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Sample records for atomic emission spectroscopy

  1. Atomic emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrew, K. H.

    1975-01-01

    The relationship between the Slater-Condon theory and the conditions within the atom as revealed by experimental data was investigated. The first spectrum of Si, Rb, Cl, Br, I, Ne, Ar, and Xe-136 and the second spectrum of As, Cu, and P were determined. Methods for assessing the phase stability of fringe counting interferometers and the design of an autoranging scanning system for digitizing the output of an infrared spectrometer and recording it on magnetic tape are described.

  2. [Determination of potassium in sodium by flame atomic emission spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Xie, C; Wen, X; Jia, Y; Sun, S

    2001-06-01

    Sodium is used as a coolant in China experiment fast reactor (CEFR). Potassium in sodium has an influence on heat property of reactor. A analytical method has been developed to determinate potassium in sodium by flame atomic emission spectroscopy. Sodium sample is dissolved by ultrasonic humidifier. The working conditions of the instrument and inTerferences from matrix sodium, acid effect and concomitant elements have been studied. Standard addition experiments are carried out with potassium chloride. The percentage recoveries are 94.7%-109.8%. The relative standard deviation is 4.2%. The analytical range accords with sodium quality control standard of CFFR. The precision corresponds to the international analytical method in sodium coolant reactor. PMID:12947670

  3. Atomic Oscillator Strengths by Emission Spectroscopy and Lifetime Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiese, W. L.; Griesmann, U.; Kling, R.; Musielok, J.

    2002-11-01

    Over the last seven years, we have carried out numerous oscillator strength measurements for some light and medium heavy elements (Musielok et al. 1995, 1996, 1997, 1999, 2000; Veres & Wiese 1996; Griesmann et al. 1997; Bridges & Wiese 1998; Kling et al. 2001; Kling & Gries- mann 2000; Bridges & Wiese to be published). Most recently we have determined numerous transitions of Mu II (Kling et al. 2001; Kling & Griesmann 2000) and are now working on Cl I (Bridges & Wiese to be published). See the summary statement at the end of the text. For the emission measurements, we have applied either a high-current wall-stabilized arc (described for example, in Musielok et al. (1999)), or a high-current hollow cathode, or a Penning discharge. The latter two sources were used for branching ratio measurements from common upper 1ev- els, while the wall-stabilized arc was operated at atmospheric pressure under the condition of partial local thermodynamic equilibrium, which allows the measurement of relative transition probabilities. Absolute data were obtained by combining the emission results with lifetime data measured by other research groups, especially the University of Hannover, with which we have closely collaborated. This group uses the laser induced fluorescence (LIF) technique. Our emission spectra were recorded for the light elements with a 2 m grating spectrometer, or, for Mu II, with an FT 700 vacuum ultraviolet Fourier transform spectrometer. The radiometric calibration was carried out with a tungsten strip lamp for the visible part of the spectrum and with a deuterium lamp for the ultraviolet. All measurements were made under optically thin conditions, which was checked by doubling the path length with a focusing mirror setup. Typical uncertainties of the measured oscillator strengths are estimated to be in the range 15%-20% (one-standard deviation). However, discrepancies with advanced atomic structure theories are sometimes much larger. In Tables 1-3 and Fig. 1, we

  4. Ion bombardment glow-discharge furnaces for atomic emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tanguay, S.L.

    1990-01-01

    Two glow discharge plasma devices for the atomic emission analysis of aqueous samples were investigated. The devices use thermal vaporization of samples from a graphite cathode coupled with glow-discharge excitation. Furnace heating of the cathode is accomplished by the positive ion bombardment of the cathode during plasma operation. The dc plasma operates in Ar at 0.5-5.0 torr, with currents up to 250 mA. A cw, axial magnetic field of up to 1.25 kG is applied to the cylindrical-post cathode system to reduce electron losses, thereby increasing plasma excitation and ionization efficiency. At higher currents, the cathodes heat to temperatures as high as 2,500{degree}C in the case of the cylindrical-post cathode. Hollow-cathode heating temperatures are lower under comparable conditions, due to the larger cathode surface area, greater cathode mass, and lower power dissipation. The peak furnace temperature using this configuration is approximately 2100{degree}C. The role of the emission of thermionic electrons from the hot cathodes in limiting the cathode heating and in regulating the cathode temperature are considered. Sample residues of up to 50 ng of the analyte are vaporized from the cylindrical-post cathode within a few seconds of the initiation of the discharge, resulting in a transient emission intensity profile. With the hollow-cathode furnace, vaporization may take several seconds. Although a lower rate of cathode heating and a lower sample vapor residence time results in limits of detection which are one to two orders of magnitude lower than those achieved using the cylindrical-post cathode system. For the hollow cathode, limits of detection are on the order of 10 pg to 1 ng.

  5. Ability to Control a Titanium-Alloy Structure by Atomic-Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molchan, N. V.; Polkin, I. S.; Fertikov, V. I.

    2014-05-01

    The effect of material structure on the analytical signal was studied using atomic emission spectroscopy with spark excitation of solids. A method for assessing the structure of the titanium alloy was proposed. It consisted of repeated analysis of a series of samples before and after heat treatment with excitation and recording of the spectrum under identical conditions followed by statistical processing of the results. The effects on the alloy structure of two heattreatment regimes, quenching and annealing, were studied. Atomic-emission spectroscopy with inductively coupled plasma was used to control the homogeneity of the chemical composition in the test samples.

  6. INTERLABORATORY STUDY OF INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY METHOD 6010 AND DIGESTION METHOD 3050

    EPA Science Inventory

    The design, execution, and results of an interlaboratory study of Method 6010, 'Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy,' are described. The study examined the application of the method to the analysis of solid-waste materials for 23 elements. Part of the interlab...

  7. Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy: The determination of trace impurities in uranium hexafluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floyd, M. A.; Morrow, R. W.; Farrar, R. B.

    An analytical method has been developed for the determination of trace impurities in high-purity uranium hexafluoride using liquid-liquid extraction of the uranium from the trace impurities followed by analysis with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. Detection limits, accuracy, and precision data are presented.

  8. Revisiting the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of magnesium with online inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shkirskiy, Viacheslav; King, Andrew D; Gharbi, Oumaïma; Volovitch, Polina; Scully, John R; Ogle, Kevin; Birbilis, Nick

    2015-02-23

    The electrochemical impedance of reactive metals such as magnesium is often complicated by an obvious inductive loop with decreasing frequency of the AC polarising signal. The characterisation and ensuing explanation of this phenomenon has been lacking in the literature to date, being either ignored or speculated. Herein, we couple electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) with online atomic emission spectroelectrochemistry (AESEC) to simultaneously measure Mg-ion concentration and electrochemical impedance spectra during Mg corrosion, in real time. It is revealed that Mg dissolution occurs via Mg(2+) , and that corrosion is activated, as measured by AC frequencies less than approximately 1 Hz approaching DC conditions. The result of this is a higher rate of Mg(2+) dissolution, as the voltage excitation becomes slow enough to enable all Mg(2+) -enabling processes to adjust in real time. The manifestation of this in EIS data is an inductive loop. The rationalisation of such EIS behaviour, as it relates to Mg, is revealed for the first time by using concurrent AESEC. PMID:25425247

  9. Determination of heavy metals in solid emission and immission samples using atomic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Fara, M.; Novak, F.

    1995-12-01

    Both flame and electrothermal methods of atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) have been applied to the determination of Al, As, Be, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, TI, Se, V and Zn in emission and emission (deposition) samples decomposed in open PTFE test-tubes by individual fuming-off hydrofluoric, perchloroic and nitric acid. An alternative hydride technique was also used for As and Se determination and Hg was determined using a self-contained AAS analyzer. A graphite platform proved good to overcome non-spectral interferences in AAS-ETA. Methods developed were verified by reference materials (inc. NBS 1633a).

  10. Determination of titanium atom and ion densities in sputter deposition plasmas by optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vašina, P.; Fekete, M.; Hnilica, J.; Klein, P.; Dosoudilová, L.; Dvořák, P.; Navrátil, Z.

    2015-12-01

    The thorough characterizations of deposition plasma lead to important achievements in the fundamental understanding of the deposition process, with a clear impact on the development of technology. Measurement of the spatial and, in the case of pulse excited plasma, also temporal evolution, of the concentrations of sputtered atoms and ions is a primary task in the diagnostics of any sputter deposition plasma. However, it is difficult to estimate absolute number densities of the sputtered species (atoms and ions) in ground states directly from optical emission spectroscopy, because the species in the ground levels do not produce any optical signal. A method using effective branching fractions enables us to determine the density of non-radiating species from the intensities of self-absorbed spectral lines. The branching fractions method described in the first part of this paper was applied to determine the ground state densities of the sputtered titanium atoms and ions. The method is based on fitting the theoretically calculated branching fractions to experimentally measured ratios of the relative intensities of carefully selected resonant titanium atomic and ionic lines. The sputtered species density is determined in our experimental setup with a relative uncertainty of less than 5% for the dc driven magnetron and typically 15% for time-resolved measurements of high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge. In the second part of the paper, the method was applied to determine the evolution of titanium atom and ion densities in three typical cases ranging from the dc driven sputter process to HiPIMS.

  11. Atom-specific look at the surface chemical bond using x-ray emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, A.; Wassdahl, N.; Weinelt, M.

    1997-04-01

    CO and N{sub 2} adsorbed on the late transition metals have become prototype systems regarding the general understanding of molecular adsorption. It is in general assumed that the bonding of molecules to transition metals can be explained in terms of the interaction of the frontier HOMO and LUMO molecular orbitals with the d-orbitals. In such a picture the other molecular orbitals should remain essentially the same as in the free molecule. For the adsorption of the isoelectronic molecules CO and N{sub 2} this has led to the so called Blyholder model i.e., a synergetic {sigma} (HOMO) donor and {pi} (LUMO) backdonation bond. The authors results at the ALS show that such a picture is oversimplified. The direct observation and identification of the states related to the surface chemical bond is an experimental challenge. For noble and transition metal surfaces, the adsorption induced states overlap with the metal d valence band. Their signature is therefore often obscured by bulk substrate states. This complication has made it difficult for techniques such as photoemission and inverse photoemission to provide reliable information on the energy of chemisorption induced states and has left questions unanswered regarding the validity of the frontier orbitals concept. Here the authors show how x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), in spite of its inherent bulk sensitivity, can be used to investigate adsorbed molecules. Due to the localization of the core-excited intermediate state, XE spectroscopy allows an atomic specific separation of the valence electronic states. Thus the molecular contributions to the surface measurements make it possible to determine the symmetry of the molecular states, i.e., the separation of {pi} and {sigma} type states. In all the authors can obtain an atomic view of the electronic states involved in the formation of the chemical bond to the surface.

  12. Chemical Analysis of Impurity Boron Atoms in Diamond Using Soft X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Muramatsu, Yasuji; Iihara, Junji; Takebe, Toshihiko; Denlinger, Jonathan D.

    2008-03-29

    To analyze the local structure and/or chemical states of boron atoms in boron-doped diamond, which can be synthesized by the microwave plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition method (CVD-B-diamond) and the temperature gradient method at high pressure and high temperature (HPT-B-diamond), we measured the soft X-ray emission spectra in the CK and BK regions of B-diamonds using synchrotron radiation at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). X-ray spectral analyses using the fingerprint method and molecular orbital calculations confirm that boron atoms in CVD-B-diamond substitute for carbon atoms in the diamond lattice to form covalent B-C bonds, while boron atoms in HPT-B-diamond react with the impurity nitrogen atoms to form hexagonal boron nitride. This suggests that the high purity diamond without nitrogen impurities is necessary to synthesize p-type B-diamond semiconductors.

  13. Determination of Sulfur in High-Level Waste Sludge by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy and Ion Chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    COLEMAN, CJ

    2004-04-22

    Significant differences (approximately 30 percent) have been observed in the sulfur measurements in high-level waste sludge by the Analytical Development Section (ADS) using the inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) method compared with the ADS ion chromatography (IC) method. Since the measured concentrations of sulfur in the sludge approached the maximum concentration that can be processed in the DWPF, experiments were performed to determine the source of the differences and assess the true accuracy of sulfur measurements.

  14. In situ calibration of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission and mass spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Braymen, Steven D.

    1996-06-11

    A method and apparatus for in situ addition calibration of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer or mass spectrometer using a precision gas metering valve to introduce a volatile calibration gas of an element of interest directly into an aerosol particle stream. The present situ calibration technique is suitable for various remote, on-site sampling systems such as laser ablation or nebulization.

  15. Inductively coupled plasma -- Atomic emission spectroscopy glove box assembly system at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Marlow, J.H.; McCarthy, K.M.; Tamul, N.R.

    1999-12-17

    The inductively coupled plasma/atomic emission spectroscopy [ICP/AES (ICP)] system for elemental analyses in support of vitrification processing was first installed in 1986. The initial instrument was a Jobin Yvon (JY) Model JY-70 ICP that consisted of sequential and simultaneous spectrometers for analysis of nonradioactive samples as radioactive surrogates. The JY-70 ICP continued supporting nonradioactive testing during the Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS) using the full-scale melter with ``cold'' (nonradioactive) testing campaigns. As a result, the need for another system was identified to allow for the analysis of radioactive samples. The Mass Spec (Spectrometry) Lab was established for the installation of the modified ICP system for handling radioactive samples. The conceptual setup of another ICP was predicated on the use of a hood to allow ease of accessibility of the torch, nebulizer, and spray chamber, and the minimization of air flow paths. However, reconsideration of the radioactive sample dose rate and contamination levels led to the configuration of the glovebox system with a common transfer interface box for the ICP and the inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometer (ICP-MS) glovebox assemblies. As a result, a simultaneous Model JY-50P ICP with glovebox was installed in 1990 as a first generation ICP glovebox system. This was one of the first ICP glovebox assemblies connected with an ICP-MS glovebox system. Since the economics of processing high-level radioactive waste (HLW) required the availability of an instrument to operate 24 hours a day throughout the year without any downtime, a second generation ICP glovebox assembly was designed, manufactured, and installed in 1995 using a Model JY-46P ICP. These two ICP glovebox systems continue to support vitrification of the HLW into canisters for storage. The ICP systems have been instrumental in monitoring vitrification batch processing. To date, remote sample preparation and

  16. In situ calibration of inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission and mass spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Braymen, S.D.

    1996-06-11

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for in situ addition calibration of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer or mass spectrometer using a precision gas metering valve to introduce a volatile calibration gas of an element of interest directly into an aerosol particle stream. The present in situ calibration technique is suitable for various remote, on-site sampling systems such as laser ablation or nebulization. 5 figs.

  17. Atom probe and field emission electron spectroscopy studies of semiconductor films on metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashino, Makoto; Tomitori, Masahiko; Nishikawa, Osamu

    1995-03-01

    The surface morphology and the electronic states of Ge overlayers deposited on Ir-and Mo-tips were investigated by a combined instrument of an atom probe (AP) and a field emission electron spectroscope (FEES). The overlayers were deposited on the tips while observing field emission microscope (FEM) images of the surfaces. The FEM images of thin Ge overlayers on the Ir-tips show layer-like structures. In field emission electron distribution (FEED) of a Ge overlayer on the Ir-tip, about 5 ML thick, an energy gap near the Fermi level was clearly widened by low temperature annealing. After the thickness was reduced to 3 ML by field evaporation, the energy gap still remained wide. The FEEDs of the Ge overlayers on the Mo-tips exhibit several peaks distinct from those on the Ir-tip. This may be attributed to the local strong electric field surrounding the Ge clusters formed on the Mo-tips.

  18. Transition rates and transition rate diagrams in atomic emission spectroscopy: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Zdeněk; Steers, Edward B. M.; Pickering, Juliet C.

    2015-08-01

    In low pressure plasmas with low electron densities, such as glow discharges, radiative de-excitation is a major de-excitation process of most excited states. Their relative de-excitation rates can be determined by emission spectroscopy, making it possible to study excitation processes in these discharges. This is in contrast to denser plasmas, in which such considerations are usually based on relative populations of excited states and concepts related to thermodynamic equilibrium. In the approach using reaction rates rather than populations, a convenient tool is the recently introduced formalism of transition rate diagrams. This formalism is reviewed, its relevance to different plasmas is discussed and some recent results on glow discharge excitation of manganese, copper and iron ions are presented. The prospects for the use of this formalism for the comparison of rate constants and cross sections for charge transfer reactions with argon ions of elements of interest in analytical glow discharge spectroscopy are discussed.

  19. Methyl oleate as matrix simulacrum for the simultaneous determination of metals in biodiesel samples by flame atomic emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Conny Cerai; Costa, Letícia Malta; Barbeira, Paulo Jorge Sanches

    2015-06-01

    A measurement procedure for direct and simultaneous quantification of Na, K and Ca in biodiesel by flame atomic emission spectroscopy (FAES) was developed. A lab-made device was constructed by coupling a nebulizer/combustion system from a commercial photometer to a continuous emission detector in a spectral range of 255 to 862 nm. Instrumental optimizations were carried out evaluating the most important variables, such as gas flow rates and sample introduction temperature, indicating that a temperature of 50°C enhances the analytical signals and assures good precision. The direct analysis method was properly validated and presented limits of quantification of 0.09, 0.07 and 0.43 μg kg(-1) for Na, K and Ca, respectively. Accuracy of the proposed procedure was checked by comparing the results with those obtained by the standard procedure described in ABNT NBR 15556 and the standard addition method. PMID:25863364

  20. Development of Desolvation System for Single-cell Analysis Using Droplet Injection Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Yukiko; Aida, Mari; Nomura, Akito; Miyahara, Hidekazu; Hokura, Akiko; Okino, Akitoshi

    2015-01-01

    With a view to enhance the sensitivity of analytical instruments used in the measurement of trace elements contained in a single cell, we have now equipped the previously reported micro-droplet injection system (M-DIS) with a desolvation system. This modified M-DIS was coupled to inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) and evaluated for its ability to measure trace elements. A flow rate of 100 mL/min for the additional gas and a measurement point -7.5 mm above the load coil (ALC) have been determined to be the optimal parameters for recording the emission intensity of the Ca(II) spectral lines. To evaluate the influence of the desolvation system, we recorded the emission intensities of the Ca(I), Ca(II), and H-β spectral lines with and without inclusion of the desolvation system. The emission intensity of the H-β spectral line reduces and the magnitude of the Ca(II)/Ca(I) emission intensity ratio increases four-fold with inclusion of the desolvation system. Finally, the elements Ca, Mg, and Fe present in a single cell of Pseudococcomyxa simplex are simultaneously determined by coupling the M-DIS equipped with the desolvation system to ICP-AES. PMID:26256601

  1. Research as a guide for curriculum development: An example from introductory spectroscopy. I. Identifying student difficulties with atomic emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanjek, L.; Shaffer, P. S.; McDermott, L. C.; Planinic, M.; Veza, D.

    2015-01-01

    This is the first of two closely related articles (Paper I and Paper II) that together illustrate how research in physics education has helped guide the design of instruction that has proved effective in improving student understanding of atomic spectroscopy. Most of the more than 1000 students who participated in this four-year investigation were science majors enrolled in the introductory calculus-based physics course at the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle, WA, USA. The others included graduate and undergraduate teaching assistants at UW and physics majors in introductory and advanced physics courses at the University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia. About half of the latter group were preservice high school physics teachers. This article (Paper I) describes how several serious conceptual and reasoning difficulties were identified among students as they tried to relate a discrete line spectrum to the energy levels of atoms in a light source. Paper II illustrates how findings from this research informed the development of a tutorial that led to significant improvement in student understanding of atomic emission spectra.

  2. Research as a guide for curriculum development: An example from introductory spectroscopy. II. Addressing student difficulties with atomic emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanjek, L.; Shaffer, P. S.; McDermott, L. C.; Planinic, M.; Veza, D.

    2015-02-01

    This is the second of two closely related articles (Paper I and Paper II) that together illustrate how research in physics education has helped guide the design of instruction that has proved effective in improving student understanding of atomic spectroscopy. Most of the more than 1000 students who participated in this four-year investigation were science majors enrolled in the introductory calculus-based physics course at the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle, WA, USA. The others included graduate and undergraduate teaching assistants at UW and physics majors in introductory and advanced physics courses at the University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia. About half of the latter group were preservice high school physics teachers. Paper I describes how several conceptual and reasoning difficulties were identified among university students as they tried to relate a discrete line spectrum to the energy levels of atoms in a light source. This second article (Paper II) illustrates how findings from this research informed the development of a tutorial that led to improvement in student understanding of atomic emission spectra.

  3. X-ray emission spectroscopy applied to glycine adsorbed on Cu(110): An atom and symmetry projected view

    SciTech Connect

    Hasselstroem, J.; Karis, O.; Weinelt, M.

    1997-04-01

    When a molecule is adsorbed on a metal surface by chemical bonding new electronic states are formed. For noble and transition metals these adsorption-induced states overlap with the much more intense metal d-valence band, making them difficult to probe by for instance direct photoemission. However, it has recently been shown that X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) can be applied to adsorbate systems. Since the intermediate state involves a core hole, this technique has the power to project out the partial density of states around each atomic site. Both the excitation and deexcitation processes are in general governed by the dipole selection rules. For oriented system, it is hence possible to obtain a complete separation into 2p{sub x}, 2p{sub y} and 2p{sub z} contributions using angular resolved measurements. The authors have applied XES together with other core level spectroscopies to glycine adsorption on Cu(110). Glycine (NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}COOH) is the smallest amino acid and very suitable to study by core level spectroscopy since it has several functional groups, all well separated in energy by chemical shifts. Its properties are futhermore of biological interest. In summary, the authors have shown that it is possible to apply XES to more complicated molecular adsorbates. The assignment of different electronic states is however not as straight forward as for simple diatomic molecules. For a complete understanding of the redistribution and formation of new electronic states associated with the surface chemical bond, experimental data must be compared to theoretical calculations.

  4. THE EVOLUTION OF ATOMIC SPECTROSCOPY IN MEASURING TOXIC CONTAMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three decades of study of environmental conditions necessary for the protection of freshwater
    aquatic life have been limited by the development and application of analytical methodology utilizing atomic adsorption, atomic fluorescence, and atomic emission spectroscopy.
    The...

  5. Elemental analysis of biological samples by graphite furnace, inductively coupled plasma - atomic emission spectroscopy (GF-ICP-AES)

    SciTech Connect

    Winge, R.K.; Fassel, V.A.; Grabau, F.; Zu-cheng, J.

    1984-08-01

    The large number of analyses required for monitoring environmental pollution and its ecological impacts suggests that an analytical screening method would be very useful if it could rapidly distinguish those samples containing environmentally significant concentrations of pollutants from those that do not. In the trace elemental analysis of solids the most time consuming step is often the conversion of the sample into a suitable analytical form, usually a digestion and dissolution process. We have addressed these problems by combining a graphite furnace with inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy. With this system solid samples of plant and animal tissue, as well as solutions, can be vaporized and introduced directly into the inductively coupled plasma. A simple standard additions technique was developed for solid samples that yielded acceptable results for a number of elements in biological samples. Powers of detection were not satisfactory for the lowest concentrations of several elements in the NBS biological SRMs and analytical uncertainties were relatively high for quantitative analyses but were generally satisfactory for screening methods. The design of the interface between the graphite furnace and the inductively coupled plasma and the pulse effect caused by the vaporization of the sample are critical factors in the GF-ICP-AES method. 31 references, 21 figures, 4 tables.

  6. High-resolution Inductively Coupled Plasma--Atomic Emission Spectroscopy applied to problems in Nuclear Waste Management

    SciTech Connect

    Edelson, M.C.; Winge, R.K.; Eckels, D.E. ); Douglas, J.G. )

    1990-01-01

    High-resolution Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) is a variant of the more conventional ICP-AES that is widely used for environmental monitoring. The relevance of high-resolution capabilities of three such analytical problems are discussed herein. (1) Pu in very complex, radioactive matrices can be determined with good accuracy without the need for prior chemical separations. Isotopically resolved spectra from actinides in fuel dissolver solutions can be obtained after a simple ion-exchange step. (2) High-resolution methods permit the simultaneous determination of fission products and actinides in simulated high-level nuclear waste solutions. Such measurements can be useful for both safeguards and waste processing. (3) The ICP-AES technique, with a photodiode array detector, can be used to determine the composition of nuclear waste glasses. Such measurements can assist the glass producer as well as providing predictors of nuclear waste form performance in a repository. 16 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Current Trends in Atomic Spectroscopy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wynne, James J.

    1983-01-01

    Atomic spectroscopy is the study of atoms/ions through their interaction with electromagnetic radiation, in particular, interactions in which radiation is absorbed or emitted with an internal rearrangement of the atom's electrons. Discusses nature of this field, its status and future, and how it is applied to other areas of physics. (JN)

  8. [Study of characteristics of excited O atom generated in multi-needle-to-plate corona discharge by emission spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Ge, Hui; Yan, Ling; Mi, Dong; Zhu, Yi-min; Zhang, Lu

    2012-04-01

    The emission spectra of O(3p 5 P --> 3s 5 S2(0) 777.4 nm) produced by multi-needle-to-plate negative corona discharge and positive streamer discharge in air were successfully recorded at one atmosphere. The influences of discharge power, electrode gap, content of N2 and relative humidity on the excited O atom production were investigated in negative corona discharge. Meanwhile, the distribution of relative density of excited O atom in discharge space was also studied in positive streamer discharge. The results indicate that, for negative corona discharge, the amount of O active atom increases with the increase in power, decreases with increased discharge gap. And with the increase in relative humidity and N2 content, its amount firstly increases and then decreases; whereas for positive corona discharge, the relative density of O active atom from needlepoint to plate firstly increases and then decreases. PMID:22715745

  9. Conditional ramsey spectroscopy with synchronized atoms.

    PubMed

    Xu, Minghui; Holland, M J

    2015-03-13

    We investigate Ramsey spectroscopy performed on a synchronized ensemble of two-level atoms. The synchronization is induced by the collective coupling of the atoms to a heavily damped mode of an optical cavity. We show that, in principle, with this synchronized system it is possible to observe Ramsey fringes indefinitely, even in the presence of spontaneous emission and other sources of individual-atom dephasing. This could have important consequences for atomic clocks and a wide range of precision metrology applications. PMID:25815931

  10. Ultraviolet atomic emission detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, W.; Peterson, N. C.; Bass, A. M.; Kurylo, M. J., III (Inventor)

    1972-01-01

    A device and method are provided for performing qualitative and quantitative elemental analysis through the utilization of a vacuum UV chromatographic detector. The method involves the use of a carrier gas at low pressure. The gas carries a sample to a gas chromatograph column; the column output is directed to a microwave cavity. In this cavity, a low pressure microwave discharge produces fragmentation of the compounds present and generates intense atomic emissions in the vacuum ultraviolet. These emissions are isolated by a monochromator and measured by photometer to establish absolute concentration for the elements.

  11. Solar Spectroscopy: Atomic Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, H.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    A Greek philosopher called DEMOCRITUS (c. 460-370 BC) first introduced the concept of atoms (which means indivisible). His atoms do not precisely correspond to our atoms of today, which are not indivisible, but made up of a nucleus (protons with positive charge and neutrons which have no charge) and orbiting electrons (with negative charge). Indeed, in the solar atmosphere, the temperature is suc...

  12. Spectroscopy, Understanding the Atom Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellman, Hal

    This booklet is one of the "Understanding the Atom" Series. The science of spectroscopy is presented by a number of topics dealing with (1) the uses of spectroscopy, (2) its origin and background, (3) the basic optical systems of spectroscopes, spectrometers, and spectrophotometers, (4) the characteristics of wave motion, (5) the electromagnetic…

  13. Identification of a Single Light Atom within a Multinuclear Metal Cluster using Valence-to-Core X-Ray Emission Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Jaime, Mario Ulises; Dible, Benjamin R.; Chiang, Karen P.; Brennessel, William W.; Bergmann, Uwe; Holland, Patrick L.

    2011-01-01

    Iron valence-to-core Fe Kβ x-ray emission spectroscopy (V2C XES) is established as a means to identify light atoms (C. N, O) within complex multimetallic frameworks. The ability to distinguish light atoms, particularly in the presence of heavier atoms, is a well-known limitation of both crystallography and EXAFS. Using the sensitivity of V2C XES to the ionization potential of the bound ligand energetic shifts of ~10 eV in the ligand 2s ionization energies of bound C, N and O may be observed. As V2C XES is a high-energy X-ray method, it is readily applicable to samples in any physical form. This method thus has great potential for application to multimetallic inorganic frameworks involved in both small molecule storage and activation. PMID:21954894

  14. LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    LOCKREM LL; OWENS JW; SEIDEL CM

    2009-03-26

    This report describes the installation, testing and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste samples in a hot cell environment. The 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method.

  15. LASER ABLATION-INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY STUDY AT THE 222-S LABORATORY USING HOT-CELL GLOVE BOX PROTOTYPE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    SEIDEL CM; JAIN J; OWENS JW

    2009-02-23

    This report describes the installation, testing, and acceptance of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) procured laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (LA-ICP-AES) system for remotely analyzing high-level waste (HLW) samples in a hot cell environment. The work was completed by the Analytical Process Development (APD) group in accordance with Task Order 2005-003; ATS MP 1027, Management Plan for Waste Treatment Plant Project Work Performed by Analytical Technical Services. The APD group at the 222-S Laboratory demonstrated acceptable turnaround time (TAT) and provide sufficient data to assess sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the LA-ICP-AES method.

  16. Transient infrared emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, R.W.; McClelland, J.F.

    1989-04-01

    Transient infrared emission spectroscopy (TIRES) is a new method that produces analytically useful emission spectra from optically thick, solid samples by greatly reducing self-absorption of emitted radiation. The method reduces self-absorption by creating a thin, short-lived, heated layer at the sample surface and collecting the transient emission from this layer. The technique requires no sample preparation and may be applied to both moving and stationary samples. The single-ended, noncontact TIRES measurement geometry is ideal for on-line and other remote-sensing applications. TIRES spectra acquired via a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer on moving samples of coal, plastic, and paint are presented and compared to photoacoustic absorption spectra of these materials. The TIRES and photoacoustic results are in close agreement as predicted by Kirchhoff's law.

  17. Quantitative Determination of Density of Ground State Atomic Oxygen from Both TALIF and Emission Spectroscopy in Hot Air Plasma Generated by Microwave Resonant Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchal, F.; Yousfi, M.; Merbahi, N.; Wattieaux, G.; Piquemal, A.

    2016-03-01

    Two experimental techniques have been used to quantify the atomic oxygen density in the case of hot air plasma generated by a microwave (MW) resonant cavity. The latter operates at a frequency of 2.45 GHz inside a cell of gas conditioning at a pressure of 600 mbar, an injected air flow of 12 L/min and an input MW power of 1 kW. The first technique is based on the standard two photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF) using xenon for calibration but applied for the first time in the present post discharge hot air plasma column having a temperature of about 4500 K near the axis of the nozzle. The second diagnostic technique is an actinometry method based on optical emission spectroscopy (OES). In this case, we compared the spectra intensities of a specific atomic oxygen line (844 nm) and the closest wavelength xenon line (823 nm). The two lines need to be collected under absolutely the same spectroscopic parameters. The xenon emission is due to the addition of a small proportion of xenon (1% Xe) of this chemically inert gas inside the air while a further small quantity of H2 (2%) is also added in the mixture in order to collect OH(A-X) and NH(A-X) spectra without noise. The latter molecular spectra are required to estimate gas and excitation temperatures. Optical emission spectroscopy measurements, at for instance the position z=12 mm on the axis plasma column that leads to a gas measured temperature equal to 3500 K, an excitation temperature of about 9500 K and an atomic oxygen density 2.09×1017±0.2×1017 cm-3. This is in very good agreement with the TALIF measurement, which is equal to 2.0×1017 cm-3.

  18. Direct detection of vacuum ultraviolet radiation through an optical sampling orifice: determination of nonmetals in gaseous samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, B.R.; Houk, R.S.; Wiederin, D.R.; Fassel, V.A.

    1988-01-01

    A copper cone with a sampling orifice is attached to the entrance slit chamber or a monochromator and inserted directly into an inductively couples plasma (ICP) to sample vacuum ultraviolet (vacuum UV) radiation emitted by the plasma. A unique interface with low dead volume (<40 ..mu..L) is used for introduction of gaseous samples directly into the axial channel of the ICP. Injection of a gaseous mixture of compounds containing the elements Br, C, Cl, and S results in detection limits of 50, 30, 80 and 20 pg, respectively. These detection limits are by far the best obtained for these elements by ICP atomic emission spectroscopy (AES) and are comparable to those obtained by AES with He plasmas. Precision of the analyte emission intensities is 2% relative standard deviation or better.

  19. Determination of metal concentrations in lichen samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy technique after applying different digestion procedures.

    PubMed

    Tuncel, S G; Yenisoy-Karakas, S; Dogangün, A

    2004-05-28

    Three digestion procedures have been tested on lichen samples for application in the determination of major, minor and trace elements (Al, Ca, Cd, Cr, Cu, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, Ni, Pb, V and Zn) in lichen samples collected in Aegean Region of Turkey by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES). The acid mixture of concentrated HNO(3), H(2)O(2) and HF were used. The instrument was optimized using lichen matrix considering RF power, nebulizer pressure, auxiliary flow rate and pump rate. The accuracy of the overall analyses was first estimated by analysis of two certified reference materials. Good agreement between measured and reference values were found for almost all elements. As the second way of determining the accuracy, results obtained from independent analytical techniques (ICP-AES and instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA)) were compared for all elements by analyzing real samples. Correlation coefficients of two techniques for the elements ranged between 0.70 (Mg) and 0.96 (Fe). Among the three digestion systems, namely microwave, open vessel and acid bomb, microwave digestion system gave the best recovery results. The method detection limit (MDL) was computed using reagent blanks of microwave digestion system since it provides cleaner sample preparation. Detection limit is adequate for all elements to determine the elements in lichen samples. The precision was assessed from the replicate analyses of reagent blanks of microwave digestion system and was found to be less than 1.5% relative standard deviation (R.S.D.). PMID:18969428

  20. Optical emission spectroscopy of metal-halide lamps: Radially resolved atomic state distribution functions of Dy and Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Nimalasuriya, T.; Flikweert, A.J.; Stoffels, W.W.; Haverlag, M.; Mullen, J.J.A.M. van der; Pupat, N.B.M.

    2006-03-01

    Absolute line intensity measurements are performed on a metal-halide lamp. Several transitions of atomic and ionic Dy and atomic Hg are measured at different radial positions from which we obtain absolute atomic and ionic Dy intensity profiles. From these profiles we construct the radially resolved atomic state distribution function (ASDF) of the atomic and ionic Dy and the atomic Hg. From these ASDFs several quantities are determined as functions of radial position, such as the (excitation) temperature, the ion ratio Hg{sup +}/Dy{sup +}, the electron density, the ground state, and the total density of Dy atoms and ions. Moreover, these ASDFs give us insight about the departure from equilibrium. The measurements show a hollow density profile for the atoms and the ionization of atoms in the center. In the outer parts of the lamp molecules dominate.

  1. Optical emission spectroscopy of metal-halide lamps: Radially resolved atomic state distribution functions of Dy and Hg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimalasuriya, T.; Flikweert, A. J.; Stoffels, W. W.; Haverlag, M.; van der Mullen, J. J. A. M.; Pupat, N. B. M.

    2006-03-01

    Absolute line intensity measurements are performed on a metal-halide lamp. Several transitions of atomic and ionic Dy and atomic Hg are measured at different radial positions from which we obtain absolute atomic and ionic Dy intensity profiles. From these profiles we construct the radially resolved atomic state distribution function (ASDF) of the atomic and ionic Dy and the atomic Hg. From these ASDFs several quantities are determined as functions of radial position, such as the (excitation) temperature, the ion ratio Hg+/Dy+, the electron density, the ground state, and the total density of Dy atoms and ions. Moreover, these ASDFs give us insight about the departure from equilibrium. The measurements show a hollow density profile for the atoms and the ionization of atoms in the center. In the outer parts of the lamp molecules dominate.

  2. Laser spectroscopy of sputtered atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gruen, D.M.; Pellin, M.J.; Young, C.E.; Calaway, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    The use of laser radiation to study the sputtering process is of relatively recent origin. Much has been learned from this work about the basic physics of the sputtering process itself through measurements of velocity and excited state distributions of sputtered atoms and the effects of adsorbates on substrate sputtering yields. Furthermore, the identification, characterization, and sensitive detection of sputtered atoms by laser spectroscopy has led to the development of in situ diagnostics for impurity fluxes in the plasma edge regions of tokamaks and of ultrasensitive methods (ppB Fe in Si) for surface analysis with ultralow (picocoulomb) ion fluences. The techniques involved in this work, laser fluorescence and multiphoton resonance ionization spectroscopy, will be described and illustrations given of results achieved up to now. 55 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Atomic squeezing under collective emission

    SciTech Connect

    Yukalov, V.I.; Yukalova, E.P.

    2004-11-01

    Atomic squeezing is studied for the case of large systems of radiating atoms, when collective effects are well developed. All temporal stages are analyzed, starting with the quantum stage of spontaneous emission, passing through the coherent stage of superradiant emission, and going to the relaxation stage ending with stationary solutions. A method of governing the temporal behavior of the squeezing factor is suggested. The influence of a squeezed effective vacuum on the characteristics of collective emission is also investigated.

  4. Precision Spectroscopy of Atomic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, A.; Parthey, Ch G.; Kolachevsky, N.; Alnis, J.; Khabarova, K.; Pohl, R.; Peters, E.; Yost, D. C.; Matveev, A.; Predehl, K.; Droste, S.; Wilken, T.; Holzwarth, R.; Hänsch, T. W.; Abgrall, M.; Rovera, D.; Salomon, Ch; Laurent, Ph; Udem, Th

    2013-12-01

    Precise determinations of transition frequencies of simple atomic systems are required for a number of fundamental applications such as tests of quantum electrodynamics (QED), the determination of fundamental constants and nuclear charge radii. The sharpest transition in atomic hydrogen occurs between the metastable 2S state and the 1S ground state. Its transition frequency has now been measured with almost 15 digits accuracy using an optical frequency comb and a cesium atomic clock as a reference [1]. A recent measurement of the 2S - 2P3/2 transition frequency in muonic hydrogen is in significant contradiction to the hydrogen data if QED calculations are assumed to be correct [2, 3]. We hope to contribute to this so-called "proton size puzzle" by providing additional experimental input from hydrogen spectroscopy.

  5. Laser techniques for spectroscopy of core-excited atomic levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, S. E.; Young, J. F.; Falcone, R. W.; Rothenberg, J. E.; Willison, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    We discuss three techniques which allow the use of tunable lasers for high resolution and picosecond time scale spectroscopy of core-excited atomic levels. These are: anti-Stokes absorption spectroscopy, laser induced emission from metastable levels, and laser designation of selected core-excited levels.

  6. Measurement of Trace Metals in Tobacco and Cigarette Ash by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2003-01-01

    The ICP AES experiment reported here is suitable for use in a junior- or senior-level undergraduate instrumental analysis laboratory. The objective of this experiment is to analyze trace metals present in cigarette tobacco, the cigarette filter, and the ash obtained when the cigarette is burned. Two different brands of cigarettes, one with and one without a filter, were used. The filter was analyzed before and after smoke was drawn through it. The trace metals were extracted using concentrated nitric acid at room temperature and at 100 °C respectively, to test the extraction efficiency. Some tobacco samples were spiked with ZnCl2 and FeCl3 to assess the efficiency of the recovery. Zinc and iron are shown to be present in tobacco, filter, and ash, while chromium was above the detection limit only in the ash. These metals are concentrated in the ash compared to the tobacco by factors of ˜4 (Zn), 12 17 (Fe), and ≥ 2 (Cr). If sufficient laboratory time is available, this experiment could be paired with one using atomic absorption (AA) to demonstrate the advantages and disadvantages of ICP when compared to AA.

  7. Atom-probe and field emission electron spectroscopy studies of ordered structures and electronic properties of Ge overlayers on Ir-tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashino, Makoto; Tomitori, Masahiko; Nishikawa, Osamu

    1994-03-01

    The combined instrument of an atom probe (AP) and a field emission electron spectroscope (FEES) was employed to investigate the crystallinity and the surface electronic state of Ge overlayers deposited on Ir tips. The crystallinity of Ge overlayers deposited at 300 and 420 K, and those annealed after the deposition, is better than that of the overlayers deposited at 50 K. The surface electronic state of the well-crystallized Ge overlayer is semiconductive at the thickness of ≈4 ML. When the degree of crystallinity is rather low or Ir atoms exist in the Ge overlayer, even a thick overlayer exhibits metallic surface electronic states. When an Ir atom exists on the overlayer surface, a small peak appears at ≈ 0.3 eV below the Fermi level in the field emission electron distribution (FEED), indicating a local state of the Ir atom.

  8. Solving a Mock Arsenic-Poisoning Case Using Atomic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarr, Matthew A.

    2001-01-01

    A new upper-level undergraduate atomic spectroscopy laboratory procedure has been developed that presents a realistic problem to students and asks them to assist in solving it. Students are given arsenic-laced soda samples from a mock crime scene. From these samples, they are to gather evidence to help prosecute a murder suspect. The samples are analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy or by atomic absorbance spectroscopy to determine the content of specific metal impurities. By statistical comparison of the samples' composition, the students determine if the soda samples can be linked to arsenic found in the suspect's home. As much as possible, the procedures and interpretations are developed by the students. Particular emphasis is placed on evaluating the limitations and capabilities of the analytical method with respect to the demands of the problem.

  9. Relativistic atomic beam spectroscopy II

    SciTech Connect

    1989-12-31

    The negative ion of H is one of the simplest 3-body atomic systems. The techniques we have developed for experimental study of atoms moving near speed of light have been productive. This proposal request continuing support for experimental studies of the H{sup -} system, principally at the 800 MeV linear accelerator (LAMPF) at Los Alamos. Four experiments are currently planned: photodetachment of H{sup -} near threshold in electric field, interaction of relativistic H{sup -} ions with matter, high excitations and double charge escape in H{sup -}, and multiphoton detachment of electrons from H{sup -}.

  10. Atomic vapor spectroscopy in integrated photonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfau, Tilman; Löw, Robert; Ritter, Ralf; Kübler, Harald; Gruhler, Nico; Pernice, Wolfram

    2016-05-01

    We investigate an integrated optical chip immersed in atomic vapor providing several waveguide geometries for spectroscopy applications. This includes integrated ring resonators, Mach Zehnder interferometers, slot waveguides and counterpropagating coupling schemes. The narrow-band transmission through a silicon nitride waveguide and interferometer is altered when the guided light is coupled to a vapor of rubidium atoms via the evanescent tail of the waveguide mode. We use grating couplers to couple between the waveguide mode and the radiating wave, which allow for addressing arbitrary coupling positions on the chip surface. The evanescent atom-light interaction can be numerically simulated and shows excellent agreement with our experimental data. This work demonstrates a next step towards miniaturization and integration of alkali atom spectroscopy and provides a platform for further fundamental studies of strong atom light coupling. Cooperativities on the order of 1 are within reach.

  11. Atomic vapor spectroscopy in integrated photonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritter, Ralf; Gruhler, Nico; Pernice, Wolfram; Kübler, Harald; Pfau, Tilman; Löw, Robert

    2015-07-01

    We investigate an integrated optical chip immersed in atomic vapor providing several waveguide geometries for spectroscopy applications. The narrow-band transmission through a silicon nitride waveguide and interferometer is altered when the guided light is coupled to a vapor of rubidium atoms via the evanescent tail of the waveguide mode. We use grating couplers to couple between the waveguide mode and the radiating wave, which allow for addressing arbitrary coupling positions on the chip surface. The evanescent atom-light interaction can be numerically simulated and shows excellent agreement with our experimental data. This work demonstrates a next step towards miniaturization and integration of alkali atom spectroscopy and provides a platform for further fundamental studies of complex waveguide structures.

  12. Atomic vapor spectroscopy in integrated photonic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, Ralf; Kübler, Harald; Pfau, Tilman; Löw, Robert; Gruhler, Nico; Pernice, Wolfram

    2015-07-27

    We investigate an integrated optical chip immersed in atomic vapor providing several waveguide geometries for spectroscopy applications. The narrow-band transmission through a silicon nitride waveguide and interferometer is altered when the guided light is coupled to a vapor of rubidium atoms via the evanescent tail of the waveguide mode. We use grating couplers to couple between the waveguide mode and the radiating wave, which allow for addressing arbitrary coupling positions on the chip surface. The evanescent atom-light interaction can be numerically simulated and shows excellent agreement with our experimental data. This work demonstrates a next step towards miniaturization and integration of alkali atom spectroscopy and provides a platform for further fundamental studies of complex waveguide structures.

  13. Signals for Lorentz violation in atomic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas, Arnaldo J.; Kostelecký, V. Alan

    2015-05-01

    A breakdown of Lorentz and CPT symmetry has been proposed as a possible signal in several candidate theories of quantum gravity. This talk discusses the prospects for detecting Lorentz and CPT violation via atomic spectroscopy, using the effective field theory known as the Standard-Model Extension and including operators of both renormalizable and nonrenormalizable mass dimensions. The discussion targets commonly measured atomic transitions in experiments with conventional matter and with more exotic atoms such as antihydrogen, muonium, and muonic hydrogen. Potential signals are identified and constraints from existing data are obtained.

  14. Building and analyzing models from data by stirred tank experiments for investigation of matrix effects caused by inorganic matrices and selection of internal standards in Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grotti, Marco; Paredes, Eduardo; Maestre, Salvador; Todolí, José Luis

    2008-05-01

    Interfering effects caused by inorganic matrices (inorganic acids as well as easily ionized elements) in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy have been modeled by regression analysis of experimental data obtained using the "stirred tank method". The main components of the experimental set-up were a magnetically-stirred container and two peristaltic pumps. In this way the matrix composition was gradually and automatically varied, while the analyte concentration remained unchanged throughout the experiment. An inductively coupled plasma spectrometer with multichannel detection based on coupled charge device was used to simultaneously measure the emission signal at several wavelengths when the matrix concentration was modified. Up to 50 different concentrations were evaluated in a period of time of 10 min. Both single interfering species (nitric, hydrochloric and sulphuric acids, sodium and calcium) and different mixtures (aqua regia, sulfonitric mixture, sodium-calcium mixture and sodium-nitric acid mixture) were investigated. The dependence of the emission signal on acid concentration was well-fitted by logarithmic models. Conversely, for the easily ionized elements, 3-order polynomial models were more suitable to describe the trends. Then, the coefficients of these models were used as "signatures" of the matrix-related signal variations and analyzed by principal component analysis. Similarities and differences among the emission lines were highlighted and discussed, providing a new insight into the interference phenomena, mainly with regards to the combined effect of concomitants. The combination of the huge amount of data obtained by the stirred tank method in a short period of time and the speed of analysis of principal component analysis provided a judicious means for the selection of the optimal internal standard in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy.

  15. Development of novel and sensitive methods for the determination of sulfide in aqueous samples by hydrogen sulfide generation-inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Colon, M; Todolí, J L; Hidalgo, M; Iglesias, M

    2008-02-25

    Two new, simple and accurate methods for the determination of sulfide (S(2-)) at low levels (microgL(-1)) in aqueous samples were developed. The generation of hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) took place in a coil where sulfide reacted with hydrochloric acid. The resulting H(2)S was then introduced as a vapor into an inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES) and sulfur emission intensity was measured at 180.669nm. In comparison to when aqueous sulfide was introduced, the introduction of sulfur as H(2)S enhanced the sulfur signal emission. By setting a gas separator at the end of the reaction coil, reduced sulfur species in the form of H(2)S were removed from the water matrix, thus, interferences could be avoided. Alternatively, the gas separator was replaced by a nebulizer/spray chamber combination to introduce the sample matrix and reagents into the plasma. This methodology allowed the determination of both sulfide and sulfate in aqueous samples. For both methods the linear response was found to range from 5microgL(-1) to 25mgL(-1) of sulfide. Detection limits of 5microgL(-1) and 6microgL(-1) were obtained with and without the gas separator, respectively. These new methods were evaluated by comparison to the standard potentiometric method and were successfully applied to the analysis of reduced sulfur species in environmental waters. PMID:18261510

  16. Mid infrared emission spectroscopy of carbon plasma.

    PubMed

    Nemes, Laszlo; Brown, Ei Ei; S-C Yang, Clayton; Hommerich, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    Mid infrared time-resolved emission spectra were recorded from laser-induced carbon plasma. These spectra constitute the first study of carbon materials LIB spectroscopy in the mid infrared range. The carbon plasma was induced using a Q-switched Nd: YAG laser. The laser beam was focused to high purity graphite pellets mounted on a translation stage. Mid infrared emission from the plasma in an atmospheric pressure background gas was detected by a cooled HgCdTe detector in the range 4.4-11.6μm, using long-pass filters. LIB spectra were taken in argon, helium and also in air. Despite a gate delay of 10μs was used there were strong backgrounds in the spectra. Superimposed on this background broad and noisy emission bands were observed, the form and position of which depended somewhat on the ambient gas. The spectra were digitally smoothed and background corrected. In argon, for instance, strong bands were observed around 4.8, 6.0 and 7.5μm. Using atomic spectral data by NIST it could be concluded that carbon, argon, helium and nitrogen lines from neutral and ionized atoms are very weak in this spectral region. The width of the infrared bands supports molecular origin. The infrared emission bands were thus compared to vibrational features of carbon molecules (excluding C2) of various sizes on the basis of previous carbon cluster infrared absorption and emission spectroscopic analyses in the literature and quantum chemical calculations. Some general considerations are given about the present results. PMID:27428600

  17. Atomic and electronic structure peculiarities of silicon wires formed on substrates with varied resistivity according to ultrasoft X-ray emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turishchev, S. Yu.; Terekhov, V. A.; Nesterov, D. N.; Koltygina, K. G.; Sivakov, V. A.; Domashevskaya, E. P.

    2015-04-01

    Silicon wires arrays have been produced by metal-assisted wet chemical etching with the use of crystalline silicon substrates. The arrays and individual nanowires have been studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The electronic structure and phase composition of the surface and near-surface layers of the arrays have been studied by ultrasoft X-ray emission spectroscopy. It is shown that the morphologically more developed sample formed on a substrate with low resistivity is considerably more strongly subject to oxidation with noticeable formation of phases of intermediate silicon oxides. The array of nanowires formed on a substrate with high resistivity also undergoes natural oxidation, but does so to a substantially lesser extent and, with increasing depth of analysis, mostly contains the phase of crystalline silicon constituting the bulk of the nanowires being formed.

  18. A Simple LIBS (Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) Laboratory Experiment to Introduce Undergraduates to Calibration Functions and Atomic Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinni, Rosemarie C.

    2012-01-01

    This laboratory experiment introduces students to a different type of atomic spectroscopy: laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS). LIBS uses a laser-generated spark to excite the sample; once excited, the elemental emission is spectrally resolved and detected. The students use LIBS to analyze a series of standard synthetic silicate samples…

  19. Scanning Josephson spectroscopy on the atomic scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randeria, Mallika T.; Feldman, Benjamin E.; Drozdov, Ilya K.; Yazdani, Ali

    2016-04-01

    The Josephson effect provides a direct method to probe the strength of the pairing interaction in superconductors. By measuring the phase fluctuating Josephson current between a superconducting tip of a scanning tunneling microscope and a BCS superconductor with isolated magnetic adatoms on its surface, we demonstrate that the spatial variation of the pairing order parameter can be characterized on the atomic scale. This system provides an example where the local pairing potential suppression is not directly reflected in the spectra measured via quasiparticle tunneling. Spectroscopy with such superconducting tips also shows signatures of previously unexplored Andreev processes through individual impurity-bound Shiba states. The atomic resolution achieved here establishes scanning Josephson spectroscopy as a promising technique for the study of novel superconducting phases.

  20. Atomic Force Microscope for Imaging and Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pike, W. T.; Hecht, M. H.; Anderson, M. S.; Akiyama, T.; Gautsch, S.; deRooij, N. F.; Staufer, U.; Niedermann, Ph.; Howald, L.; Mueller, D.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed, built, and tested an atomic force microscope (AFM) for extraterrestrial applications incorporating a micromachined tip array to allow for probe replacement. It is part of a microscopy station originally intended for NASA's 2001 Mars lander to identify the size, distribution, and shape of Martian dust and soil particles. As well as imaging topographically down to nanometer resolution, this instrument can be used to reveal chemical information and perform infrared and Raman spectroscopy at unprecedented resolution.

  1. Atomic absorption spectroscopy with high temperature flames.

    PubMed

    Willis, J B

    1968-07-01

    An account is given of the history of the development of high temperature flames for the atomic absorption measurement of metals forming refractory oxides. The principles governing the design of premix burners for such flames, and the relative merits of different types of nebulizer burner systems are described. After a brief account of the structure and emission characteristics of the premixed oxygen-acetylene and nitrous oxide-acetylene flames, the scope and limitations of the latter flame in chemical analysis are discussed. PMID:20068790

  2. Quantitative atomic spectroscopy for primary thermometry

    SciTech Connect

    Truong, Gar-Wing; Luiten, Andre N.; May, Eric F.; Stace, Thomas M.

    2011-03-15

    Quantitative spectroscopy has been used to measure accurately the Doppler broadening of atomic transitions in {sup 85}Rb vapor. By using a conventional platinum resistance thermometer and the Doppler thermometry technique, we were able to determine k{sub B} with a relative uncertainty of 4.1x10{sup -4} and with a deviation of 2.7x10{sup -4} from the expected value. Our experiment, using an effusive vapor, departs significantly from other Doppler-broadened thermometry (DBT) techniques, which rely on weakly absorbing molecules in a diffusive regime. In these circumstances, very different systematic effects such as magnetic sensitivity and optical pumping are dominant. Using the model developed recently by Stace and Luiten, we estimate the perturbation due to optical pumping of the measured k{sub B} value was less than 4x10{sup -6}. The effects of optical pumping on atomic and molecular DBT experiments is mapped over a wide range of beam size and saturation intensity, indicating possible avenues for improvement. We also compare the line-broadening mechanisms, windows of operation and detection limits of some recent DBT experiments.

  3. Towards Atomic Column-by-Column Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, S.J.; Rafferty, B.

    1998-09-06

    The optical arrangement of the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is ideally suited for performing analysis of individual atomic columns in materials. Using the incoherent Z-contrast image as a reference, and arranging incoherent conditions also for the spectroscopy, a precise correspondence is ensured between features in the inelastic image and elastic signals. In this way the exact probe position needed to maximise the inelastic signal from a selected column can be located and monitored during the analysis using the much higher intensity elastic signal. Although object functions for EELS are typically less than 1 {Angstrom} full width at half maximum, this is still an order of magnitude larger than the corresponding object functions for elastic (or diffuse) scattering used to form the Z-contrast image. Therefore the analysis is performed with an effective probe that is significantly broader than that used for the reference Z-contrast image. For a 2.2 {Angstrom} probe the effective probe is of the order of 2.5 {Angstrom}, while for a 1.3 {Angstrom} probe the effective probe is 1.6 {Angstrom}. Such increases in effective probe size can significantly reduce or even eliminate contrast between atomic columns that are visible in the image. However, this is only true if we consider circular collector apertures. Calculations based upon the theory of Maslen and Rossouw (Maslen and Rossouw 1984; Rossouw and Maslen 1984) show that employing an annular aperture can reduce the FWHM of the inelastic object function down to values close 0.1 {Angstrom}. With practical aperture sizes it should be possible to achieve this increased spatial resolution without loosing too much signal.

  4. Fourier transform stimulated emission pumping spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felker, P. M.; Henson, B. F.; Corcoran, T. C.; Connell, L. L.; Hartland, G. V.

    1987-12-01

    Theoretical and experimental results that demonstrate a new technique of non-linear interferometry based on stimulated emission pumping spectroscopy (SEPS) are presented. It is shown that splittings between the initial and final states in SEP processes can be measured by the method. Advantages and disadvantages of the technique relative to spectral domain SEPS are discussed.

  5. Improvement of AOAC Official Method 984.27 for the determination of nine nutritional elements in food products by Inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy after microwave digestion: single-laboratory validation and ring trial.

    PubMed

    Poitevin, Eric; Nicolas, Marine; Graveleau, Laetitia; Richoz, Janique; Andrey, Daniel; Monard, Florence

    2009-01-01

    A single-laboratory validation (SLV) and a ring trial (RT) were undertaken to determine nine nutritional elements in food products by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy in order to improve and update AOAC Official Method 984.27. The improvements involved optimized microwave digestion, selected analytical lines, internal standardization, and ion buffering. Simultaneous determination of nine elements (calcium, copper, iron, potassium, magnesium, manganese, sodium, phosphorus, and zinc) was made in food products. Sample digestion was performed through wet digestion of food samples by microwave technology with either closed or open vessel systems. Validation was performed to characterize the method for selectivity, sensitivity, linearity, accuracy, precision, recovery, ruggedness, and uncertainty. The robustness and efficiency of this method was proved through a successful internal RT using experienced food industry laboratories. Performance characteristics are reported for 13 certified and in-house reference materials, populating the AOAC triangle food sectors, which fulfilled AOAC criteria and recommendations for accuracy (trueness, recovery, and z-scores) and precision (repeatability and reproducibility RSD and HorRat values) regarding SLV and RT. This multielemental method is cost-efficient, time-saving, accurate, and fit-for-purpose according to ISO 17025 Norm and AOAC acceptability criteria, and is proposed as an improved version of AOAC Official Method 984.27 for fortified food products, including infant formula. PMID:19916387

  6. Mid-infrared emission from laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Clayton S-C; Brown, Ei E; Hommerich, Uwe H; Trivedi, Sudhir B; Samuels, Alan C; Snyder, A Peter

    2007-03-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a powerful analytical technique for detecting and identifying trace elemental contaminants by monitoring the visible atomic emission from small plasmas. However, mid-infrared (MIR), generally referring to the wavelength range between 2.5 to 25 microm, molecular vibrational and rotational emissions generated by a sample during a LIBS event has not been reported. The LIBS investigations reported in the literature largely involve spectral analysis in the ultraviolet-visible-near-infrared (UV-VIS-NIR) region (less than 1 microm) to probe elemental composition and profiles. Measurements were made to probe the MIR emission from a LIBS event between 3 and 5.75 microm. Oxidation of the sputtered carbon atoms and/or carbon-containing fragments from the sample and atmospheric oxygen produced CO(2) and CO vibrational emission features from 4.2 to 4.8 microm. The LIBS MIR emission has the potential to augment the conventional UV-VIS electronic emission information with that in the MIR region. PMID:17389073

  7. Optical Frequency Comb Spectroscopy of Rare Earth Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swiatlowski, Jerlyn; Palm, Christopher; Joshi, Trinity; Montcrieffe, Caitlin; Jackson Kimball, Derek

    2013-05-01

    We discuss progress in our experimental program to employ optical-frequency-comb-based spectroscopy to understand the complex spectra of rare-earth atoms. We plan to carry out systematic measurements of atomic transitions in rare-earth atoms to elucidate the energy level structure and term assignment and determine presently unknown atomic state parameters. This spectroscopic information is important in view of the increasing interest in rare-earth atoms for atomic frequency standards, in astrophysical investigations of chemically peculiar stars, and in tests of fundamental physics (tests of parity and time-reversal invariance, searches for time variation of fundamental constants, etc.). We are presently studying the use of hollow cathode lamps as atomic sources for two-photon frequency comb spectroscopy. Supported by the National Science Foundation under grant PHY-0958749.

  8. Theoretical Calculations of Atomic Data for Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bautista, Manuel A.

    2000-01-01

    Several different approximations and techniques have been developed for the calculation of atomic structure, ionization, and excitation of atoms and ions. These techniques have been used to compute large amounts of spectroscopic data of various levels of accuracy. This paper presents a review of these theoretical methods to help non-experts in atomic physics to better understand the qualities and limitations of various data sources and assess how reliable are spectral models based on those data.

  9. Visualizing the Solute Vaporization Interference in Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dockery, Christopher R.; Blew, Michael J.; Goode, Scott R.

    2008-01-01

    Every day, tens of thousands of chemists use analytical atomic spectroscopy in their work, often without knowledge of possible interferences. We present a unique approach to study these interferences by using modern response surface methods to visualize an interference in which aluminum depresses the calcium atomic absorption signal. Calcium…

  10. Laser Spectroscopy of Atoms and Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schawlow, Arthur L.

    1978-01-01

    Surveys new laser techniques and a variety of spectroscopic experiments that can be used to detect, measure and study very small numbers of atoms on molecules. The range of applicability of these techniques is also included. (HM)

  11. Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1993-03-30

    Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using a metal hydride.

  12. Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1991-05-08

    Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using, a metal hydride.

  13. Atomic line emission analyzer for hydrogen isotopes

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1993-01-01

    Apparatus for isotopic analysis of hydrogen comprises a low pressure chamber into which a sample of hydrogen is introduced and then exposed to an electrical discharge to excite the electrons of the hydrogen atoms to higher energy states and thereby cause the emission of light on the return to lower energy states, a Fresnel prism made at least in part of a material anomalously dispersive to the wavelengths of interest for dispersing the emitted light, and a photodiode array for receiving the dispersed light. The light emitted by the sample is filtered to pass only the desired wavelengths, such as one of the lines of the Balmer series for hydrogen, the wavelengths of which differ slightly from one isotope to another. The output of the photodiode array is processed to determine the relative amounts of each isotope present in the sample. Additionally, the sample itself may be recovered using a metal hydride.

  14. Experimental estimation of oxidation-induced Si atoms emission on Si(001) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Shuichi Tang, Jiayi; Takakuwa, Yuji

    2015-08-15

    Kinetics of Si atoms emission during the oxidation of Si(001) surfaces have been investigated using reflection high energy electron diffraction combined with Auger electron spectroscopy. The area ratio of the 1 × 2 and the 2 × 1 domains on a clean Si(001) surface changed with the oxidation of the surface by Langmuir-type adsorption. This change in the domain ratio is attributed to the emission of Si atoms. We can describe the changes in the domain ratio using the Si emission kinetics model, which states that (1) the emission rate is proportional to the oxide coverage, and (2) the emitted Si atoms migrate on the surface and are trapped at S{sub B} steps. Based on our model, we find experimentally that up to 0.4 ML of Si atoms are emitted during the oxidation of a Si(001) surface at 576 °C.

  15. Atomic Absorption, Atomic Fluorescence, and Flame Emission Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horlick, Gary

    1984-01-01

    This review is presented in six sections. Sections focus on literature related to: (1) developments in instrumentation, measurement techniques, and procedures; (2) performance studies of flames and electrothermal atomizers; (3) applications of atomic absorption spectrometry; (4) analytical comparisons; (5) atomic fluorescence spectrometry; and (6)…

  16. Speciation of mercury compounds by differential atomization - atomic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, J.W.; Skelly, E.M.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the dual stage atomization technique which allows speciation of several mercury-containing compounds in aqueous solution and in biological fluids. The technique holds great promise for further speciation studies. Accurate temperature control, expecially at temperatures less than 200/sup 0/C, is needed to separate the extremely volatile mercury halides and simple organomercurials from each other. Studies with mercury salts and EDTA, L-cysteine and dithioxamide demonstrate that this technique may be used to study the extent of complex formation. Investigations of biological fluids indicate that there is a single predominant form of mercury in sweat and a single predominant form of mercury in urine. The mercury compound in urine is more volatile than that in sweat. Both quantitative and qualitative analyses are possible with this technique.

  17. Single-atom electron energy loss spectroscopy of light elements

    PubMed Central

    Senga, Ryosuke; Suenaga, Kazu

    2015-01-01

    Light elements such as alkali metal (lithium, sodium) or halogen (fluorine, chlorine) are present in various substances and indeed play significant roles in our life. Although atomic behaviours of these elements are often a key to resolve chemical or biological activities, they are hardly visible in transmission electron microscope because of their smaller scattering power and higher knock-on probability. Here we propose a concept for detecting light atoms encaged in a nanospace by means of electron energy loss spectroscopy using inelastically scattered electrons. In this method, we demonstrate the single-atom detection of lithium, fluorine, sodium and chlorine with near-atomic precision, which is limited by the incident probe size, signal delocalization and atomic movement in nanospace. Moreover, chemical shifts of lithium K-edge have been successfully identified with various atomic configurations in one-dimensional lithium compounds. PMID:26228378

  18. Decoherence Spectroscopy Theory and Application with an Atom Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trubko, Raisa; Cronin, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    We developed decoherence spectroscopy as a method to improve the accuracy of a tune-out wavelength (λzero) measurement made with atom interferometry. Specifically, we used atom interference fringe contrast loss as a function of laser frequency in order to monitor Doppler shifts. This was particularly helpful since we used a multi-pass cavity to recycle laser light in this experiment. The resulting decoherence spectra have non-intuitive features. Therefore we present a theoretical model for decoherence spectroscopy and compare this model to several empirical examples.

  19. Method for laser spectroscopy of metastable pionic helium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, M.; Sótér, A.; Aghai-Khozani, H.; Barna, D.; Dax, A.; Hayano, R. S.; Murakami, Y.; Yamada, H.

    2015-08-01

    The PiHe collaboration is currently attempting to carry out laser spectroscopy of metastable pionic helium atoms using the high-intensity π - beam of the ring cyclotron facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute. These atoms are heretofore hypothetical three-body Coulomb systems each composed of a helium nucleus, a π - occupying a Rydberg state, and an electron occupying the 1s ground state. We briefly review the proposed method by which we intend to detect the laser spectroscopic signal. This complements our experiments on metastable antiprotonic helium atoms at CERN.

  20. Secondary Electron Emission Spectroscopy of Diamond Surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, Isay L.; Asnin, Vladimir M.; Petukhov, Andre G.

    1999-01-01

    This report presents the results of the secondary electron emission spectroscopy study of hydrogenated diamond surfaces for single crystals and chemical vapor-deposited polycrystalline films. One-electron calculations of Auger spectra of diamond surfaces having various hydrogen coverages are presented, the major features of the experimental spectra are explained, and a theoretical model for Auger spectra of hydrogenated diamond surfaces is proposed. An energy shift and a change in the line shape of the carbon core-valence-valence (KVV) Auger spectra were observed for diamond surfaces after exposure to an electron beam or by annealing at temperatures higher than 950 C. This change is related to the redistribution of the valence-band local density of states caused by hydrogen desorption from the surface. A strong negative electron affinity (NEA) effect, which appeared as a large, narrow peak in the low-energy portion of the spectrum of the secondary electron energy distribution, was also observed on the diamond surfaces. A fine structure in this peak, which was found for the first time, reflected the energy structure of the bottom of the conduction band. Further, the breakup of the bulk excitons at the surface during secondary electron emission was attributed to one of the features of this structure. The study demonstrated that the NEA type depends on the extent of hydrogen coverage of the diamond surface, changing from the true type for the completely hydrogenated surface to the effective type for the partially hydrogenated surface.

  1. Optical Emission Spectroscopy in an Unmagnetized Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milhone, Jason; Cooper, Christopher; Desangles, Victor; Nornberg, Mark; Seidlitz, Blair; Forest, Cary; WiPAL Team

    2015-11-01

    An optical emission spectroscopic analysis has been developed to measure electron temperature, neutral burnout, and Zeff in Ar and He plasmas in the Wisconsin plasma astrophysics laboratory (WiPAL). The WiPAL vacuum chamber is a 3 meter diameter spherical vessel lined with 3000 SmCo permanent magnets (B > 3 kG) that create an axisymmetric multi-cusp ring for confining the plasma. WiPAL is designed to study unmagnetized plasmas that are hot (Te > 10 eV), dense (ne >1018), and with high ionization fraction. Electron temperature and density can be measured via Langmuir probes. However, probes can disturb the plasma, be difficult to interpret, and become damaged by large heat loads from the plasma. A low cost non-invasive spectroscopy system capable of scanning the plasma via a linear stage has been installed to study plasma properties. From the neutral particle emission, the neutral burnout and estimated neutral temperature can be inferred. A modified coronal model with metastable states is being implemented to determine Te for Ar plasmas.

  2. Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy. The Present and the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slavin, Walter

    1982-01-01

    The status of current techniques and methods of atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy (flame, hybrid, and furnace AA) is discussed, including limitations. Technological opportunities and how they may be used in AA are also discussed, focusing on automation, microprocessors, continuum AA, hybrid analyses, and others. (Author/JN)

  3. SPECTRW: A software package for nuclear and atomic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalfas, C. A.; Axiotis, M.; Tsabaris, C.

    2016-09-01

    A software package to be used in nuclear and atomic spectroscopy is presented. Apart from analyzing γ and X-ray spectra, it offers many additional features such as de-convolution of multiple photopeaks, sample analysis and activity determination, detection system evaluation and an embedded code for spectra simulation.

  4. Single atom identification by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lovejoy, T. C.; Dellby, N.; Krivanek, O. L.; Ramasse, Q. M.; Falke, M.; Kaeppel, A.; Terborg, R.; Zan, R.

    2012-04-09

    Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, single, isolated impurity atoms of silicon and platinum in monolayer and multilayer graphene are identified. Simultaneously acquired electron energy loss spectra confirm the elemental identification. Contamination difficulties are overcome by employing near-UHV sample conditions. Signal intensities agree within a factor of two with standardless estimates.

  5. Developing a Transdisciplinary Teaching Implement for Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drew, John

    2008-01-01

    In this article I explain why I wrote the set of teaching notes on Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS) and why they look the way they do. The notes were intended as a student reference to question, highlight and write over as much as they wish during an initial practical demonstration of the threshold concept being introduced, in this case…

  6. Current Status of Atomic Spectroscopy Databases at NIST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramida, Alexander; Ralchenko, Yuri; Reader, Joseph

    2016-05-01

    NIST's Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center maintains several online databases on atomic spectroscopy. These databases can be accessed via the http://physics.nist.gov/PhysRefData web page. Our main database, Atomic Spectra Database (ASD), recently upgraded to v. 5.3, now contains critically evaluated data for about 250,000 spectral lines and 109,000 energy levels of almost all elements in the periodic table. This new version has added several thousand spectral lines and energy levels of Sn II, Mo V, W VIII, and Th I-III. Most of these additions contain critically evaluated transition probabilities important for astrophysics, technology, and fusion research. A new feature of ASD is providing line-ratio data for diagnostics of electron temperature and density in plasmas. Saha-Boltzmann plots have been modified by adding an experimental feature allowing the user to specify a multi-element mixture. We continue regularly updating our bibliography databases, ensuring comprehensive coverage of current literature on atomic spectra for energy levels, spectral lines, transition rates, hyperfine structure, isotope shifts, Zeeman and Stark effects. Our other popular databases, such as the Handbook of Basic Atomic Spectroscopy Data, searchable atlases of spectra of Pt-Ne and Th-Ne lamps, and non-LTE plasma-kinetics code comparisons, continue to be maintained.

  7. Spectroscopy and Dynamics of K Atoms on Argon Clusters.

    PubMed

    Douady, J; Awali, S; Poisson, L; Soep, B; Mestdagh, J M; Gervais, B

    2015-06-11

    We present a combined experimental and simulation study of the 4s → 4p photoexcitation of the K atom trapped at the surface of ArN clusters made of a few hundred Ar atoms. Our experimental method based on photoelectron spectroscopy allows us to firmly establish that one single K atom is trapped at the surface of the cluster. The absorption spectrum is characterized by the splitting of the atomic absorption line into two broad bands, a Π band associated with p orbitals parallel to the cluster surface and a Σ band associated with the perpendicular orientation. The spectrum is consistent with observations reported for K atoms trapped on lighter inert gas clusters, but the splitting between the Π and Σ bands is significantly larger. We show that a large amount of K atoms are transiently stuck and eventually lost by the Ar cluster, in contrast with previous observations reported for alkaline earth metal systems. The excitation in the Σ band leads systematically to the ejection of the K atom from the Ar cluster. On the contrary, excitation in the Π band leads to the formation of a bound state. In this case, the analysis of the experimental photoelectron spectrum by means of nonadiabatic molecular dynamics simulation shows that the relaxation drives the system toward a basin where the coordination of the K atom is 2.2 Ar atoms on the average, in a poorly structured surface. PMID:25854161

  8. Photoionization of Endohedral Atoms: Collective, Reflective and Collateral Emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Himadri S.; McCune, Matthew A.; Hopper, Dale E.; Madjet, Mohamed E.; Manson, Steven T.

    2009-12-03

    The photoionization properties of a fullerene-confined atom differ dramatically from that of an isolated atom. In the low energy region, where the fullerene plasmons are active, the electrons of the confined atom emerge through a collective channel carrying a significant chunk of plasmon with it. The photoelectron angular distribution of the confined atom however shows far lesser impact of the effect. At higher energies, the interference between two single-electron ionization channels, one directly from the atom and another reflected off the fullerene cage, producuces oscillatory cross sections. But for the outermost atomic level, which transfers some electrons to the cage, oscillations are further modulated by the collateral emission from the part of the atomic charge density transferred to the cage. These various modes of emissions are studied for the photoionization of Ar endohedrally confined in C{sub 60}.

  9. Atom-wall interactions and their role in the spectroscopy of spatially constrained atomic vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartanyan, T. A.; Khromov, V. V.; Przhibelskii, S. G.; Pazgalev, A. S.

    2013-03-01

    Atom-wall interactions play an unexpectedly important role in the atomic spectroscopy. J.L. Cojan was the first who observed and then interpreted the effects of the atom-wall interactions on the reflection spectra in the vicinity of the atomic spectral line. His observation was made on the mercury vapors of such a low concentration that the Doppler width was much larger than the homogeneous width of the atomic transition. Surprisingly, the width of the spectral line he observed in reflection was much smaller than the Doppler width. He pointed out that the atoms those leave the window posses a transient rather than the stationary polarization. This is the reason why their contribution to the reflected field differs from what was expected. M. Ducloy employed the tiny distortions of these narrow resonances in reflection spectra to measure for the first time the van der Waals constants in the excited atomic states. In our work we considered reflection from a narrow slice of atomic vapors and found a manifold of spectral line shapes depending on the width of the vapor slice that have nothing in common with the Fabri-Perot resonances. It was not until the invention of an Extremely Thin Cell (ETC) by D. Sarkisyan that the observation of these effects becomes possible in the optical domain. In the subsequent years ETC proved to be a very powerful tool of modern spectroscopy.

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATION OF GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY/ATOMIC EMISSION DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A gas chromatography/atomic emission detector (GC/AED) system has been evaluated for its applicability to environmental analysis. Detection limits, elemental response factors, and regression analysis data were determined for 58 semivolatile environmental contaminants. Detection l...

  11. Vacuum ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy of atoms and molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samson, J. A. R.

    1978-01-01

    For a complete study of the photoionization of atoms and molecules it is essential to make use of the technique of Photoelectron Spectroscopy and the continuum characteristics of synchrotron radiation. A brief review is given of the application of the above techniques in measuring partial photoionization cross sections and the angular distribution assymetry parameter beta. Selected results are given, which are compared to theoretical values.

  12. Atomic photoelectron-spectroscopy studies using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kobrin, P.H.

    1983-02-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy combined with tunable synchrotron radiation has been used to study the photoionization process in several atomic systems. The time structure of the synchrotron radiation source at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) was used to record time-of-flight (TOF) photoelectron spectra of gaseous Cd, Hg, Ne, Ar, Ba, and Mn. The use of two TOF analyzers made possible the measurement of photoelectron angular distributions as well as branching ratios and partial cross sections.

  13. Cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of Yb atoms with a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus.

    PubMed

    Song, Minsoo; Yoon, Tai Hyun

    2013-02-01

    We present a transportable effusive atomic beam apparatus for cascaded two-photon spectroscopy of the dipole-forbidden transition (6s(2)(1)S0↔ 6s7s (1)S0) of Yb atoms. An ohmic-heating effusive oven is designed to have a reservoir volume of 1.6 cm(3) and a high degree of atomic beam collimation angle of 30 mrad. The new atomic beam apparatus allows us to detect the spontaneously cascaded two-photons from the 6s7s(1)S0 state via the intercombination 6s6p(3)P1 state with a high signal-to-noise ratio even at the temperature of 340 °C. This is made possible in our apparatus because of the enhanced atomic beam flux and superior detection solid angle. PMID:23464193

  14. Spreadsheet-Based Program for Simulating Atomic Emission Spectra

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flannigan, David J.

    2014-01-01

    A simple Excel spreadsheet-based program for simulating atomic emission spectra from the properties of neutral atoms (e.g., energies and statistical weights of the electronic states, electronic partition functions, transition probabilities, etc.) is described. The contents of the spreadsheet (i.e., input parameters, formulas for calculating…

  15. Spectroscopy of Rb atoms in hollow-core fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Slepkov, Aaron D.; Bhagwat, Amar R.; Venkataraman, Vivek; Londero, Pablo; Gaeta, Alexander L.

    2010-05-15

    Recent demonstrations of light-matter interactions with atoms and molecules confined to hollow waveguides offer great promise for ultralow-light-level applications. The use of waveguides allows for tight optical confinement over interaction lengths much greater than what could be achieved in bulk geometries. However, the combination of strong atom-photon interactions and nonuniformity of guided light modes gives rise to spectroscopic features that must be understood in order to take full advantage of the properties of such systems. We use light-induced atomic desorption to generate an optically dense Rb vapor at room temperature inside a hollow-core photonic band-gap fiber. Saturable-absorption spectroscopy and passive slow-light experiments reveal large ac Stark shifts, power broadening, and transit-time broadening, that are present in this system even at nanowatt powers.

  16. Spectroscopy of lithium atoms using an optical frequency comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stalnaker, Jason; Almaguer, Jose; Sherry, Leanne

    2011-05-01

    The atomic structure of lithium (Li) has aroused a significant amount theoretical and experimental interest as a system in which precision atomic calculations and spectroscopic measurements can be united to yield scientifically significant results. While there have been many experimental investigations of Li spectroscopy, particularly of the isotope shifts and hyperfine structure on the 22S1 / 2 --> 22P1 / 2 , 3 / 2 (D 1 , D 2) transitions, they suffer from significant disagreements and systematic effects. By utilizing the optical-to-microwave frequency conversion made possible by a stabilized optical frequency comb, we will be able to resolve the discrepancies and measure the optical frequencies of the D 1 and D 2 transitions to an accuracy of 5 kHz. We present preliminary data from an atomic beam source and discuss future plans to develop a laser-cooled and trapped source. Supported by NIST Precision Measurements Grant.

  17. Atomic jet with ionization detection for laser spectroscopy of Rydberg atoms under collisions and fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, G.

    2008-03-01

    An efficient atomic jet setup offering many unprecedented advantages over a conventional heat pipe setup used in multi-photon spectroscopy, mainly of alkaline-earth metals, has been constructed by a scheme in which the sample material is encapsulated in a disposable cartridge oven located inside a thermally stabilised heat-pipe and is made to effuse in to a row of atomic beams merging to form a jet target. This novel scheme combines the advantages of both high density atomic beam with convenient geometry for orthogonal excitation and high sensitive ionisation detection capabilities of thermionic diodes, besides eliminating several problems inherent in the usual heat-pipe operation. Out of various designs, typical results are presented for a linear heat-pipe with vertical atomic jet used in two-photon spectroscopy of highly excited states of Sr I. Controlled excitations of both Rydberg and non-Rydberg states, which cannot otherwise be accessed from the ground state due to parity and spectroscopic selection rules, have been achieved by employing a weak electric field complimented by collisions. The atomic jet setup is also found very useful for the study of collisional broadening and shift of excited states and time evolution of Rydberg atoms.

  18. Research Toward Laser Spectroscopy of Trapped Atomic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg, Jon Carl

    An apparatus has been designed and constructed to perform laser spectroscopy on magnetically trapped atomic hydrogen. Earlier experiments demonstrated the feasibility of magnetic trapping and evaporative cooling of atomic hydrogen. The current apparatus has been designed to explore two areas of research: high resolution laser spectroscopy of hydrogen, and the possible production and detection of Bose condensation. The 1S{-}2S two-photon transition was chosen for study because of its extremely narrow natural linewidth. The techniques developed here should ultimately permit laser spectroscopy with a resolution approaching 1 part in 10^{15 } and should be well suited to the detection of Bose condensation. The apparatus consists of two subsystems: a cryogenic apparatus for magnetically trapping hydrogen, and a laser source for producing the ultraviolet light necessary to excite the 1S{-}2S transition. The two subsystems have independently demonstrated exceptional performance. The magnetic trap has produced gas densities approaching 10^{14} cm ^{-3} at temperatures as low as 100 muK, the closest approach to Bose condensation achieved to date with atomic hydrogen. The continuous wave laser source has produced 20 mW of 243 nm light with an estimated spectral linewidth of 2 kHz. The optimum experimental conditions for excitation and detection of the 1S{-}2S transition in trapped hydrogen have been identified. Initial trials with the apparatus revealed an unexpected operational problem, however several strategies have been proposed that should allow observation of the transition. The expected features of the 1S{-}2S transition lineshape with magnetically trapped hydrogen have been calculated. The possibilities for future research with laser spectroscopy of magnetically trapped hydrogen are described, and a promising strategy for the detection of Bose condensation is proposed. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551 Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617

  19. A CAVITY RINGDOWN SPECTROSCOPY MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher C. Carter, Ph.D.

    2002-01-01

    The first quarter of this project to develop a Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy mercury continuous emission monitor involved acquisition and verification of the laser system to be used, initial cavity design, and initial software development for signal processing and data acquisition.

  20. Laser cooling, trapping, and Rydberg spectroscopy of neutral holmium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hostetter, James Allen

    This thesis focuses on progress towards using ensembles of neutral holmium for use in quantum computing operations. We are particularly interested in using a switchable interaction between neutral atoms, the Rydberg blockade, to implement a universal set of quantum gates in a collective encoding scheme that presents many benefits over quantum computing schemes which rely on physically distinct qubits. We show that holmium is uniquely suited for operations in a collective encoding basis because it has 128 ground hyperfine states, the largest number of any stable, neutral atom. Holmium is a rare earth atom that is very poorly described for our purposes as it has never been cooled and trapped, its spectrum is largely unknown, and it presents several unique experimental challenges related to its complicated atomic structure and short wavelength transitions. We demonstrate important progress towards overcoming these challenges. We produce the first laser cooling and trapping of holmium into a MOT. Because we use a broad cooling transition, our cooling technique does not require the use of a Zeeman slower. Using MOT depletion spectroscopy, we provide precise measurements of holmium's Rydberg states and its ionization potential. Our work continues towards cooling holmium into a dipole trap by calculating holmium's AC polarizability and demonstrating the results of early attempts at an optical dipole trap. We provide details of future upgrades to the experimental apparatus and discuss interesting potential for using holmium in quantum computing using single atoms in a magnetically trapped lattice. This thesis shows several promising indicators for continued work in this field.

  1. Atomic and molecular data for optical stellar spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiter, U.; Lind, K.; Asplund, M.; Barklem, P. S.; Bergemann, M.; Magrini, L.; Masseron, T.; Mikolaitis, Š.; Pickering, J. C.; Ruffoni, M. P.

    2015-05-01

    High-precision spectroscopy of large stellar samples plays a crucial role for several topical issues in astrophysics. Examples include studying the chemical structure and evolution of the Milky Way Galaxy, tracing the origin of chemical elements, and characterizing planetary host stars. Data are accumulating from instruments that obtain high-quality spectra of stars in the ultraviolet, optical and infrared wavelength regions on a routine basis. These instruments are located at ground-based 2-10 m class telescopes around the world, in addition to the spectrographs with unique capabilities available at the Hubble Space Telescope. The interpretation of these spectra requires high-quality transition data for numerous species, in particular neutral and singly ionized atoms, and di- or triatomic molecules. We rely heavily on the continuous efforts of laboratory astrophysics groups that produce and improve the relevant experimental and theoretical atomic and molecular data. The compilation of the best available data is facilitated by databases and electronic infrastructures such as the NIST Atomic Spectra Database, the VALD database, or the Virtual Atomic and Molecular Data Centre. We illustrate the current status of atomic data for optical stellar spectra with the example of the Gaia-ESO Public Spectroscopic Survey. Data sources for 35 chemical elements were reviewed in an effort to construct a line list for a homogeneous abundance analysis of up to 105 stars.

  2. Atomic Multiplets in X-ray Spectroscopies of Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delley, Bernard; Uldry, Anne-Christine

    2013-03-01

    The electronic structures of compounds involving open d- and f- shell are studied frequently by X-ray and electron spectroscopies. For a better understanding of the multiplets arising in spectra involving one or more open shells, we have developed recently an easy to use program multiX,[2] which is available to download.[3] This first step allows the inclusion of the crystal environment as a crystal field entered simply as positions and charges of a cluster of atoms around the core hole site. This often gives valuable insights in the case of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and resonant inelastic x-ray spectroscopy (RIXS) measurements. However, in many cases it is desirable to allow for hybridization of the open shell electrons with the orbitals of neighbor atoms. This requires dealing with a significantly larger active Hilbert space. This is addressed with our recent Lanczos-based procedure to calculate spectra. First results will be discussed. Swiss SNF grant 200021-129970 is gratefully acknowledged.

  3. Search for Ultralight Scalar Dark Matter with Atomic Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Van Tilburg, Ken; Leefer, Nathan; Bougas, Lykourgos; Budker, Dmitry

    2015-07-01

    We report new limits on ultralight scalar dark matter (DM) with dilatonlike couplings to photons that can induce oscillations in the fine-structure constant α. Atomic dysprosium exhibits an electronic structure with two nearly degenerate levels whose energy splitting is sensitive to changes in α. Spectroscopy data for two isotopes of dysprosium over a two-year span are analyzed for coherent oscillations with angular frequencies below 1  rad s-1. No signal consistent with a DM coupling is identified, leading to new constraints on dilatonlike photon couplings over a wide mass range. Under the assumption that the scalar field comprises all of the DM, our limits on the coupling exceed those from equivalence-principle tests by up to 4 orders of magnitude for masses below 3×10(-18)  eV. Excess oscillatory power, inconsistent with fine-structure variation, is detected in a control channel, and is likely due to a systematic effect. Our atomic spectroscopy limits on DM are the first of their kind, and leave substantial room for improvement with state-of-the-art atomic clocks. PMID:26182090

  4. Search for Ultralight Scalar Dark Matter with Atomic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Tilburg, Ken; Leefer, Nathan; Bougas, Lykourgos; Budker, Dmitry

    2015-07-01

    We report new limits on ultralight scalar dark matter (DM) with dilatonlike couplings to photons that can induce oscillations in the fine-structure constant α . Atomic dysprosium exhibits an electronic structure with two nearly degenerate levels whose energy splitting is sensitive to changes in α . Spectroscopy data for two isotopes of dysprosium over a two-year span are analyzed for coherent oscillations with angular frequencies below 1 rad s-1 . No signal consistent with a DM coupling is identified, leading to new constraints on dilatonlike photon couplings over a wide mass range. Under the assumption that the scalar field comprises all of the DM, our limits on the coupling exceed those from equivalence-principle tests by up to 4 orders of magnitude for masses below 3 ×10-18 eV . Excess oscillatory power, inconsistent with fine-structure variation, is detected in a control channel, and is likely due to a systematic effect. Our atomic spectroscopy limits on DM are the first of their kind, and leave substantial room for improvement with state-of-the-art atomic clocks.

  5. Atomic-Scale Imaging and Spectroscopy Using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Youngquist, Michael George

    Advances in scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) instrumentation and applications are presented. An ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) scanning tunneling microscope incorporating computer-controlled two-dimensional sample translation and in vacuo tip and sample transfer was developed. Its performance is documented through large-area and atomic -resolution imaging of highly stepped Si(111) 7 x 7 reconstructed surfaces and physisorbed clusters on graphite. An STM with automated approach and intra-Dewar spring suspension was developed for operation in cryogenic liquids. A high performance digital signal processor (DSP) based control system was constructed, and software with advanced spectroscopic imaging and data processing capabilities was developed. The feasibility of individual-molecule vibrational spectroscopy via STM-detected inelastic electron tunneling is assessed. In preliminary experiments, a low-temperature STM was used for energy gap and phonon spectroscopy of superconducting Pb films. The first STM observation of phonon density of states effects in a superconductor is reported. A systematic UHV STM imaging and spectroscopy study of 2H-MoS_2 was conducted. Atom -resolved images from three distinct imaging modes are presented. Occasional appearance of negative differential resistance (NDR) in I vs. V measurements is traced to changing tip electronic structure rather than localized surface states. Other potential NDR mechanisms are discussed including electron trap charging and resonant tunneling through a double-barrier quantum well structure arising from layer separation in the MoS_2 crystal. DNA was imaged at atomic resolution with a UHV STM. Images show double-helical structure, base pairs, and atomic-scale substructure. Experimental STM profiles have atom-for-atom correlation with the A-DNA van der Waals surface. This work demonstrates the potential of the STM for characterization of large biomolecular structures. Impurity-pinned steps on silicon and gold surfaces

  6. Angular distribution and atomic effects in condensed phase photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, R.F.

    1981-11-01

    A general concept of condensed phase photoelectron spectroscopy is that angular distribution and atomic effects in the photoemission intensity are determined by different mechanisms, the former being determined largely by ordering phenomena such as crystal momentum conservation and photoelectron diffraction while the latter are manifested in the total (angle-integrated) cross section. In this work, the physics of the photoemission process is investigated in several very different experiments to elucidate the mechanisms of, and correlation between, atomic and angular distribution effects. Theoretical models are discussed and the connection betweeen the two effects is clearly established. The remainder of this thesis, which describes experiments utilizing both angle-resolved and angle-integrated photoemission in conjunction with synchrotron radiation in the energy range 6 eV less than or equal to h ..nu.. less than or equal to 360 eV and laboratory sources, is divided into three parts.

  7. Results from Point Contact Tunnelling Spectroscopy and Atomic Layer Deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Proslier, Th.; Zasadzinski, J.; Ciovati, Gianluigi; Kneisel, Peter K.; Elam, J. W.; Norem, J.; Pellin, M. J.

    2009-11-01

    We have shown previously that magnetic niobium oxides can influence the superconducting density of states at the surface of cavity-grade niobium coupons. We will present recent results obtained by Point Contact Tunneling spectroscopy (PCT) on coupons removed from hot and cold spots in a niobium cavity, as well as a comparative study of magnetic oxides on mild baked/unbaked electropolished coupons. We will also describe recent results obtained from coated cavities, ALD films properties and new materials using Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD).

  8. Resonantly enhanced Bragg-scattering spectroscopy of an atomic transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xudong; Qiao, Cuifang; Li, Chuanliang; Chen, Fenghua

    2016-07-01

    A novel resonantly enhanced Bragg-scattering (REBS) spectroscopy from a population difference grating (PDG) is reported. The PDG is formed by a standing-wave (SW) pump field, which periodically modulates the space population distributions of two levels in the 87Rb D1 line. Then, a probe beam, having identical frequency and orthogonal polarization with the SW pump field, is Bragg-scattered by the PDG. The research achievement shows that the Bragg-scattered light is strongest at an atomic transition, and forms an REBS spectrum with a high signal-to-noise ratio and sub-natural linewidth. The observed REBS can be applied in precise frequency measurements.

  9. Two-atom spontaneous emission in a planar microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Ujihara, Kikuo; Dung, Ho Trung

    2002-11-01

    Spontaneous emission in a planar microcavity by two identical and spatially separated two-level atoms, both of them initially excited, is considered under fourth-order perturbation approximation in atom-field coupling constants. A delay-differential equation with proper retardation times for the probability of both atoms in the upper state is derived and expressions for the emitted-light intensity and spectrum are given. It is numerically shown that, while two-atom cooperation is enhanced for small interatomic distances, the two-atom vacuum Rabi oscillation is somewhat suppressed compared to the single-atom oscillation level when the interatomic separation is close to the cavity transverse coherence length.

  10. Atomic emission in the ultraviolet nightglow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, W. E.; Siskind, D. E.

    1989-01-01

    An observation of the ultraviolet nightglow between 2670 A and 3040 A was conducted over White Sands Missile Range on October 22, 1984, at 0020 hours LST during the Orionids meteor shower. A 1/4-meter UV spectrometer operating at 3.5 A resolution viewed the earth's limb at tangent heights between 90 km and 110 km for 120 seconds. By inverting the observed limb intensities, a total zenith intensity of 1.4 kR is inferred for the Herzberg I system. Excess emission above the Herzberg I (7,3) band at 2852 A is identified as the Mg I resonance line. The intensity ratio of the Herzberg I band system to the 2972 A line from O(1S) was less than that predicted from the accepted O(1S) branching ratio and acceptable ratios of Herzberg I to 5577 A emissions. Arguments supporting the identification of the Herzberg III band system are also advanced.

  11. Laser sources for precision spectroscopy on atomic strontium.

    PubMed

    Poli, N; Ferrari, G; Prevedelli, M; Sorrentino, F; Drullinger, R E; Tino, G M

    2006-04-01

    We present a new laser setup designed for high-precision spectroscopy on laser cooled atomic strontium. The system, which is entirely based on semiconductor laser sources, delivers 200 mW at 461 nm for cooling and trapping atomic strontium from a thermal source, 4 mW at 497 nm for optical pumping from the metastable P23 state, 12 mW at 689 nm on linewidth less than 1 kHz for second-stage cooling of the atomic sample down to the recoil limit, 1.2 W at 922 nm for optical trapping close to the "magic wavelength" for the 0-1 intercombination line at 689 nm. The 689 nm laser was already employed to perform a frequency measurement of the 0-1 intercombination line with a relative accuracy of 2.3 x 10(-11), and the ensemble of laser sources allowed the loading in a conservative dipole trap of multi-isotopes strontium mixtures. The simple and compact setup developed represents one of the first steps towards the realization of a transportable optical standards referenced to atomic strontium. PMID:16527534

  12. The determination of aluminum, copper, iron, and lead in glycol formulations by atomic absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Initial screening tests and the results obtained in developing procedures to determine Al, Cu, Fe, and Pb in glycol formulations are described. Atomic absorption completion was selected for Cu, Fe and Pb, and after comparison with emission spectroscopy, was selected for Al also. Before completion, carbon, iron, and lead are extracted with diethyl dithio carbamate (DDC) into methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). Aluminum was also extracted into MIBK using 8-hydroxyquinoline as a chelating agent. As little as 0.02 mg/l carbon and 0.06 mg/l lead or iron may be determined in glycol formulations. As little as 0.3 mg/l aluminum may be determined.

  13. Rotational spectra of N2 + : An advanced undergraduate laboratory in atomic and molecular spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayram, S. B.; Arndt, P. T.; Freamat, M. V.

    2015-10-01

    We describe an inexpensive instructional experiment that demonstrates the rotational energy levels of diatomic nitrogen, using the emission band spectrum of molecular nitrogen ionized by various processes in a commercial ac capillary discharge tube. The simple setup and analytical procedure is introduced as part of a sequence of educational experiments employed by a course of advanced atomic and molecular spectroscopy, where the study of rotational spectra is combined with the analysis of vibrational characteristics for a multifaceted picture of the quantum states of diatomic molecules.

  14. Atomic emission in the ultraviolet nightglow

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, W.E.; Siskind, D.E. )

    1989-12-01

    An observation of the ultraviolet nightglow between 2,670 {angstrom} and 3,040 {angstrom} was conducted over White Sands Missile Range on October 22, 1984, at 0020 hours LST during the Orionids meteor shower. A 1/4-meter uv spectrometer operating at 3.5 {angstrom} resolution viewed the Earth's limb at tangent heights between 90 km and 110 km for 120 seconds. By inverting the observed limb intensities, a total zenith intensity of 1.4 kR is inferred for the Herzberg I system. Excess emission above the Herzberg I (7,3) band at 2,852 {angstrom} is identified as the Mg I resonance line. The intensity ratio of the Herzberg I band system to the 2,972 {angstrom} line from O({sup 1}S) was less than that predicted from the accepted O({sup 1}S) branching ratio and acceptable ratios of Herzberg I to 5,577 {angstrom} emissions. Arguments supporting the identification of the Herzberg III band system are also advanced.

  15. Induced Emission of Cold Atoms Passing Through a Micromaser Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Aty, Mahmoud; Obada, Abdel-Shafy F.

    The emission probability of a cold atom in a microcavity when its center-of-mass motion is described quantum mechanically is presented, but is distinguished from other treatments by the inclusion of the spatial variation along the cavity axis. In particular, the mesa mode cavity profile is considered. The quantum theory of the one-photon mazer is constructed in the framework of the dressed-state coordinate formalism. Simple expressions for the atomic populations, the cavity photon statistics, and the reflection and transmission probabilities are given for any initial state of the atom-field system. The general conclusions reached are illustrated by numerical results.

  16. Laser-excitation atomic fluorescence spectroscopy in a helium microwave-induced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Timothy S.

    The focus of this dissertation is to report the first documented coupling of helium microwave induced plasmas (MIPs) to laser excitation atomic fluorescence spectroscopy. The ability to effectively produce intense atomic emission from both metal and nonmetal analytes gives helium microwave induced plasmas a greater flexibility than the more commonly utilized argon inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Originally designed as an element selective detector for non-aqueous chromatography applications at low applied powers (<100W), the helium microwave plasma has been applied to aqueous sample determinations at higher applied powers (>500 W). The helium MIP has been shown to be a very powerful analytical atomic spectroscopy tool. The development of the pulsed dye laser offered an improved method of excitation in the field of atomic fluorescence. The use of laser excitation for atomic fluorescence was a logical successor to the conventional excitation methods involving hollow cathode lamps and continuum sources. The highly intense, directional, and monochromatic nature of laser radiation results in an increased population of atomic species in excited electronic states where atomic fluorescence can occur. The application of laser excitation atomic fluorescence to the analysis of metals in a helium microwave induced plasma with ultrasonic sample nebulization was the initial focus of this work. Experimental conditions and results are included for the aqueous characterization of manganese, lead, thallium, and iron in the helium MIP- LEAFS system. These results are compared to previous laser excitation atomic fluorescence experimentation. The effect of matrix interferences on the analytical fluorescence signal was also investigated for each element. The advantage of helium MIPs over argon ICPs in the determination of nonmetals in solution indicates that the helium MIP is an excellent candidate for laser excitation atomic fluorescence experiments involving nonmetals such as

  17. Plasma emission spectroscopy method of tumor therapy

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, Kevin J.

    1997-01-01

    Disclosed are a method and apparatus for performing photon diagnostics using a portable and durable apparatus which incorporates the use of a remote sensing probe in fiberoptic communication with an interferometer or spectrometer. Also disclosed are applications for the apparatus including optically measuring high velocities and analyzing plasma/emission spectral characteristics.

  18. Plasma emission spectroscopy method of tumor therapy

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, K.J.

    1997-03-11

    Disclosed are a method and apparatus for performing photon diagnostics using a portable and durable apparatus which incorporates the use of a remote sensing probe in fiberoptic communication with an interferometer or spectrometer. Also disclosed are applications for the apparatus including optically measuring high velocities and analyzing plasma/emission spectral characteristics. 6 figs.

  19. Mid-infrared Molecular Emission Studies from Energetic Materials using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Ei; Hommerich, Uwe; Yang, Clayton; Trivedi, Sudhir; Samuels, Alan; Snyder, Peter

    2011-10-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is a powerful diagnostic tool for detection of trace elements by monitoring the atomic and ionic emission from laser-induced plasmas. The laser-induced plasma was produced by focusing a 30 mJ pulsed Nd:YAG laser (1064 nm) to dissociate, atomize, and ionize target molecules. In this work, LIBS emissions in the mid-infrared (MIR) region were studied for potential applications in chemical, biological, and explosives (CBE) sensing. We report on the observation of MIR emissions from energetic materials (e.g. ammonium compounds) due to laser-induced breakdown processes. All samples showed LIBS-triggered oxygenated breakdown products as well as partially dissociated and recombination molecular species. More detailed results of the performed MIR LIBS studies on the energetic materials will be discussed at the conference.

  20. NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Databases in Support of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reader, Joseph; Kramida, A.; Ralchenko, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Joseph Reader1, Alexander Kramida1, Yuri Ralchenko1 1National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland. The NIST Atomic Spectroscopy Data Center maintains a number of online databases supporting astronomical observations of atomic spectra. The available numerical and bibliographic databases can be accessed from the NIST Physical Measurement Laboratory website www.nist.gov/pml/data/atomspec.cfm. The largest one, the Atomic Spectra Database (ASD), contains wavelength and energy level data for nearly 180,000 spectral lines including 73,400 oscillator strengths. ASD also includes 92,500 energy levels for various ions of 89 elements. In addition to tabular data, ASD can generate dynamic Grotrian diagrams and Saha/LTE spectra, which can be tailored to the user's needs. We continue to systematically expand this database according to needs of the astrophysics and fusion energy science communities. Our bibliographic databases for atomic spectra are updated about every two weeks; they serve as a valuable resource in searching for the latest data. We also provide online non-LTE codes for plasma modeling. Our compilations of spectral data are largely oriented to the needs of astronomers. Recently completed are extensive compilations for Ar, Cr, Ti, and Ni, and a new compilation for Ca is in progress. Recent updates of line lists and transition probabilities include data for H, He, Li, Be, B, C, N, F, Ne, Na, Mg Al, Cl, Sr, Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Te, I, Cs, and Ba. We welcome suggestions from astronomers regarding spectra to be compiled and added to the online databases. Spectral atlases of Pt/Ne and Th/Ar hollow cathode lamps for wavelength calibration of astronomical spectrometers can also be found at his website. Our Data Center is supported by NASA (agreement NNH09AL771) and by the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences of the U. S. Department of Energy.

  1. EQUIB: Atomic level populations and line emissivities calculator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howarth, I. D.; Adams, S.; Clegg, R. E. S.; Ruffle, D. P.; Liu, X.-W.; Pritchet, C. J.; Ercolano, B.

    2016-03-01

    The Fortran program EQUIB solves the statistical equilibrium equation for each ion and yields atomic level populations and line emissivities for given physical conditions, namely electron temperature and electron density, appropriate to the zones in an ionized nebula where the ions are expected to exist.

  2. Emission spectroscopy analysis during Nopal cladodes dethorning by laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña-Díaz, M.; Ponce, L.; Arronte, M.; Flores, T.

    2007-04-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy of the pulsed laser ablation of spines and glochids from Opuntia (Nopal) cladodes was performed. Nopal cladodes were irradiated with Nd:YAG free-running laser pulses on their body, glochids and spines. Emission spectroscopy analyses in the 350-1000 nm region of the laser induced plasma were made. Plasma plume evolution characterization, theoretical calculations of plasma plume temperature and experiments varying the processing atmosphere showed that the process is dominated by a thermally activated combustion reaction which increases the dethorning process efficiency. Therefore, appropriate laser pulse energy for minimal damage of cladodes body and in the area beneath glochids and spines can be obtained.

  3. Data processing for atomic resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cueva, Paul; Hovden, Robert; Mundy, Julia A; Xin, Huolin L; Muller, David A

    2012-08-01

    The high beam current and subangstrom resolution of aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopes has enabled electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) mapping with atomic resolution. These spectral maps are often dose limited and spatially oversampled, leading to low counts/channel and are thus highly sensitive to errors in background estimation. However, by taking advantage of redundancy in the dataset map, one can improve background estimation and increase chemical sensitivity. We consider two such approaches--linear combination of power laws and local background averaging--that reduce background error and improve signal extraction. Principal component analysis (PCA) can also be used to analyze spectrum images, but the poor peak-to-background ratio in EELS can lead to serious artifacts if raw EELS data are PCA filtered. We identify common artifacts and discuss alternative approaches. These algorithms are implemented within the Cornell Spectrum Imager, an open source software package for spectroscopic analysis. PMID:22697429

  4. The determination of vanadium in brines by atomic absorption spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crump-Wiesner, Hans J.; Feltz, H.R.; Purdy, W.C.

    1971-01-01

    A standard addition method is described for the determination of vanadium in brines by atomic absorption spectroscopy with a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame. Sample pH is adjusted to 1.0 with concentrated hydrochloric acid and the vanadium is directly extracted with 5% cupferron in methyl isobutyl ketone (MIBK). The ketone layer is then aspirated into the flame and the recorded absorption values are plotted as a function of the concentration of the added metal. As little as 2.5 ??g l-1 of vanadium can be detected under the conditions of the procedure. Tungsten and tin interfere when present in excess of 5 and 10 ??g ml-1, respectively. The concentrations of the two interfering ions normally found in brines are well below interference levels. ?? 1971.

  5. Towards an improved measurement of the proton size from precision spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maisenbacher, Lothar; Beyer, Axel; Khabarova, Ksenia; Matveev, Arthur; Pohl, Randolf; Udem, Thomas; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Kolachevsky, Nikolai

    2015-05-01

    Precision spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen has long been successfully used to provide stringent tests on fundamental theories and precisely determine physical constants. The current limit originates from the uncertainty in the value of the proton r.m.s.charge radius rp. Moreover, the value of rp extracted from laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen is ten times more accurate than any other determination, but disagrees by 7 σ with the recommended CODATA 2010 value. Here, we report on our progress towards an improved absolute frequency measurement of the 2S-4P (one-photon) transition in atomic hydrogen, which combined with the much more precisely known 1S-2S transition frequency allows a more precise extraction of rp from electronic hydrogen. To suppress the first order Doppler shift, we use a cryogenic beam of atoms optically excited to the 2S state and actively stabilized counter-propagating laser beams. Interference effects due to spontaneous emission were studied and we show how to experimentally suppress the corresponding line center shifts.

  6. Etalon-induced baseline drift and correction in atom flux sensors based on atomic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yingge; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-10-20

    Atom flux sensors based on atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy are of significant interest in thin film growth as they can provide unobtrusive, element specific real-time flux sensing and control. The ultimate sensitivity and performance of these sensors are strongly affected by baseline drift. Here we demonstrate that an etalon effect resulting from temperature changes in optical viewport housings is a major source of signal instability, which has not been previously considered, and cannot be corrected using existing methods. We show that small temperature variations in the fused silica viewports can introduce intensity modulations of up to 1.5% which in turn significantly deteriorate AA sensor performance. This undesirable effect can be at least partially eliminated by reducing the size of the beam and tilting the incident light beam off the viewport normal.

  7. Etalon-induced Baseline Drift And Correction In Atom Flux Sensors Based On Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yingge; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-10-20

    Atom flux sensors based on atomic absorption (AA) spectroscopy are of significant interest in thin film growth as they can provide unobtrusive, element specific, real-time flux sensing and control. The ultimate sensitivity and performance of the sensors are strongly affected by the long-term and short term baseline drift. Here we demonstrate that an etalon effect resulting from temperature changes in optical viewport housings is a major source of signal instability which has not been previously considered or corrected by existing methods. We show that small temperature variations in the fused silica viewports can introduce intensity modulations of up to 1.5%, which in turn significantly deteriorate AA sensor performance. This undesirable effect can be at least partially eliminated by reducing the size of the beam and tilting the incident light beam off the viewport normal.

  8. Magnetic-field-assisted atomic polarization spectroscopy of 4 He

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sheng; Wang, Haidong; Wu, Teng; Peng, Xiang; Guo, Hong; Cream Team

    2016-05-01

    Atomic polarization spectroscopy (PS) is a high resolution sub-Doppler atomic spectroscopic technique with free modulation. It is always desirable to obtain a PS signal with zero background as it can provide a more preferable laser frequency stabilization performance. There are many factors that can affect the PS signal background, i.e., the laser power, the laser polarization and the magnetic field. Here, we demonstrate a method for observing and analyzing the effects on the PS signal of 4 He under different magnetic fields. At the beginning, under nearly zero magnetic field, the large asymmetrical PS signal background has been observed and cannot be eliminated by only optically adjusting. Then, we find that the PS signal profile can be changed and controlled by varying the magnetic field with transverse or longitudinal direction and different intensity. The optimized PS signal with symmetrical dispersive profile and zero background is obtained when the magnetic field is chosen and controlled in the transverse direction and more than 20000nT intensity. Similar phenomenon cannot be observed under the longitudinal magnetic field. A theoretical model is also presented, which explains and agrees well with our experimental results.

  9. Atomic Physics with Accelerators: Projectile Electron Spectroscopy (APAPES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madesis, I.; Dimitriou, A.; Laoutaris, A.; Lagoyannis, A.; Axiotis, M.; Mertzimekis, T.; Andrianis, M.; Harissopulos, S.; Benis, E. P.; Sulik, B.; Valastyán, I.; Zouros, T. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    The new research initiative APAPES (http://apapes.physics.uoc.gr/) has already established a new experimental station with a beam line dedicated for atomic collisions physics research, at the 5 MV TANDEM accelerator of the National Research Centre "Demokritos" in Athens, Greece. A complete zero-degree Auger projectile spectroscopy (ZAPS) apparatus has been put together to perform high resolution studies of electrons emitted in ion-atom collisions. A single stage hemispherical spectrometer with a 2-dimensional Position Sensitive Detector (PSD) combined with a doubly-differentially pumped gas target will be used to perform a systematic isoelectronic investigation of K-Auger spectra emitted from collisions of preexcited and ground state He-like ions with gas targets using novel techniques. Our intention is to provide a more thorough understanding of cascade feeding of the 1s2s2p 4P metastable states produced by electron capture in collisions of He-like ions with gas targets and further elucidate their role in the non-statistical production of excited three-electron 1s2s2p states by electron capture, recently a field of conflicting interpretations awaiting further resolution. At the moment, the apparatus is being completed and the spectrometer will soon be fully operational. Here we present the project progress and the recent high resolution spectrum obtained in collisions of 12 MeV C4+ on a Neon gas target.

  10. Experimental Atomic Spectroscopy At NIST In Support Of Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, Gillian; Sansonetti, C. J.; Redman, S. L.

    2012-01-01

    The Atomic Spectroscopy Group at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has equipment to measure atomic wavelengths and oscillator strengths of astrophysical interest over a wide spectral range. Our 2-m Fourier transform (FT) spectrometer covers wavelengths from 230 nm to 5500 nm at a resolving power of over a million. It has been used to measure calibration data for ground-based astronomical spectrographs, including infrared atlases of Th/Ar and U/Ne hollow cathode lamps and measurements of iodine absorption cells that calibrate many of the spectrographs used for exoplanet searches. Our ultraviolet FT spectrometer covers the range from 140 nm to 900 nm with a resolving power of over a million at 200 nm. Below 140 nm, our 10.7 m normal incidence vacuum spectrograph has been used to provide calibration data for three spectrographs on the Hubble Space Telescope (GHRS, STIS and COS). Although originally designed for use with photographic plates, we have begun using this instrument with phosphor image plates as detectors. These provide a linear intensity response throughout the vacuum ultraviolet, enabling us to measure branching ratios in Fe II and the change in spectral line intensities of Pt/Ne hollow cathode lamps as they age. Data from all three instruments are currently being analyzed to obtain comprehensive descriptions of the spectra of Fe II and Cr II covering wavelengths from 90 nm to 5500 nm. Much of this work has been partly funded by NASA, most recently under agreement NNH11AQ551 to analyze spectra of iron-group elements. Such support is crucial to the continuation of this work at NIST, much of which is of little interest in basic atomic physics but is vital for the interpretation of astrophysical spectra. We are seeking collaborations with astronomers who can assist us in determining future research directions.

  11. Thermal emission spectroscopy of the middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunde, V. G.; Brasunas, J. C.; Conrath, B. J.; Herman, J. R.; Maguire, W. C.; Massie, S. T.; Abbas, Mian M.

    1990-01-01

    The general objective of this research is to obtain, via remote sensing, simultaneous measurements of the vertical distributions of stratospheric temperature, ozone, and trace constituents that participate in the catalytic destruction of ozone (NO(sub y): NO, NO2, NO3, HNO3, ClONO2, N2O5, HNO4; Cl(sub x): HOCl), and the source gases for the catalytic cycles (H2O, CH4, N2O, CF2Cl2, CFCl3, CCl4, CH3Cl, CHF2Cl, etc.). Data are collected during a complete diurnal cycle in order to test our present understanding of ozone chemistry and its associate catalytic cycles. The instrumentation employed is an emission-mode, balloon-borne, liquid-nitrogen-cooled Michelson interferometer-spectrometer (SIRIS), covering the mid-infrared range with a spectral resolution of 0.020 cm(exp -1). Cryogenic cooling combined with the use of extrinsic silicon photoconductor detectors allows the detection of weak emission features of stratospheric gaseous species. Vertical distributions of these species are inferred from scans of the thermal emission of the limb in a sequence of elevation angles. The fourth SIRIS balloon flight was carried out from Palestine, Texas on September 15-16, 1986 with 9 hours of nighttime data (40 km). High quality data with spectral resolution 0.022 cm(exp -1), were obtained for numerous limb sequences. Fifteen stratospheric species have been identified to date from this flight: five species from the NO(sub y) family (HNO3, NO2, NO, ClONO2, N2O5), plus CO2, O3, H2O, N2O, CH4, CCl3F, CCl2F2, CHF2Cl, CF4, and CCl4. The nighttime values of N2O5, ClONO2, and total odd nitrogen have been measured for the first time, and compared to model results. Analysis of the diurnal variation of N2O5 within the 1984 and 1986 data sets, and of the 1984 ClONO2 measurements, were presented in the literature. The demonstrated ability of SIRIS to measure all the major NO(sub y) species, and therefore to determine the partitioning of the nitrogen family over a continuous diurnal cycle, is

  12. Linear radiation model for phase of thermal emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Ted D.; Yu, Fengling

    2005-11-01

    A linear radiation model is developed that overcomes the analytical complexity in phase of thermal emission spectroscopy. It is shown that the linear radiation model can result in a simple algebraic relation between the phase of thermal emission and four coating properties, enabling these properties to be determined by nonlinear regression analysis of experimental measurements. Suitability of the linear radiation model to various measurement conditions is explored, and the model is applied to the phase of thermal emission measurements performed on a thermal barrier coating.

  13. Electron-Impact-Induced Emission Cross Sections of Atomic Oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noren, C.; Kanik, I.; James, G. K.; Ajello, J. M.; Khakoo, M. A.

    1998-05-01

    One cannot overstate the importance of ultraviolet (UV) lines of neutral atomic oxygen. For example, the atomic oxygen resonance transition at 130.4 nm is a prominent emission feature in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectrum of the Earth's aurora and dayglow as well as the atmospheres of Venus and Mars. In this poster, we present our measurements of the electron-impact emission cross sections of the 130.4 nm atomic oxygen feature from threshold to 100 eV impact energy. A high-density atomic oxygen beam, created by a microwave discharge source, was intersected at a right angle by a magnetically focused electron beam. A 0.2m UV spectrometer system was used in the present measurements. It consists of an electron-impact collision chamber in tandem with an UV spectrometer equipped with a CsI coated channel electron multiplier detector. Emitted photons corresponding to radiative decay of collisionally excited state of the 130.4 nm atomic oxygen feature were detected.

  14. Absorption and Emission Spectroscopy of a Lasing Material: Ruby

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esposti, C. Degli; Bizzocchi, L.

    2007-01-01

    Ruby is a crystalline material, which comes very expensive and is of great significance, as it helped in the creation of first laser. An experiment to determine the absorption and emission spectroscopy, in addition to the determination of the room-temperature lifetime of the substance is being described.

  15. Theory of single molecule emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bel, Golan; Brown, Frank L. H.

    2015-05-01

    A general theory and calculation framework for the prediction of frequency-resolved single molecule photon counting statistics is presented. Expressions for the generating function of photon counts are derived, both for the case of naive "detection" based solely on photon emission from the molecule and also for experimentally realizable detection of emitted photons, and are used to explicitly calculate low-order photon-counting moments. The two cases of naive detection versus physical detection are compared to one another and it is demonstrated that the physical detection scheme resolves certain inconsistencies predicted via the naive detection approach. Applications to two different models for molecular dynamics are considered: a simple two-level system and a two-level absorber subject to spectral diffusion.

  16. Diamond Analyzed by Secondary Electron Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainsky, Isay L.

    1998-01-01

    Diamond is a promising semiconductor material for novel electronic applications because of its chemical stability and inertness, heat conduction properties, and so-called negative electron affinity (NEA). When a surface has NEA, electrons generated inside the bulk of the material are able to come out into the vacuum without any potential barrier (work function). Such a material would have an extremely high secondary electron emission coefficient o, very high photoelectron (quantum) yield, and would probably be an efficient field emitter. Chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) polycrystalline diamond films have even more advantages than diamond single crystals. Their fabrication is relatively easy and inexpensive, and they can be grown with high levels of doping--consequently, they can have relatively high conductivity. Because of these properties, diamond can be used for cold cathodes and photocathodes in high-power electronics and in high-frequency and high-temperature semiconductor devices.

  17. Theory of single molecule emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bel, Golan; Brown, Frank L. H.

    2015-05-07

    A general theory and calculation framework for the prediction of frequency-resolved single molecule photon counting statistics is presented. Expressions for the generating function of photon counts are derived, both for the case of naive “detection” based solely on photon emission from the molecule and also for experimentally realizable detection of emitted photons, and are used to explicitly calculate low-order photon-counting moments. The two cases of naive detection versus physical detection are compared to one another and it is demonstrated that the physical detection scheme resolves certain inconsistencies predicted via the naive detection approach. Applications to two different models for molecular dynamics are considered: a simple two-level system and a two-level absorber subject to spectral diffusion.

  18. Mars exploration via thermal emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schueler, Carl F.; Blasius, Karl R.; Christensen, Philip; Silverman, Steven; Ruff, Steven; Wyatt, Michael; Mehall, Greg; Peralta, Richard J.; Bates, Duane

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the Arizona State University (ASU), and Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems (SAS) Santa Barbara Remote Sensing (SBRS) have executed a series of successful Mars exploration missions. These have recently been publicized on television and the internet with the early 2004 Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission geological robots that have revolutionized our detailed knowledge of the planet's geology and atmosphere. This latest mission success has its foundation in missions dating back to 1969. Over the past thirty-five years NASA has demonstrated a long-term commitment to planetary science and solar system exploration that continues with a commitment recently expressed by President Bush and codified in a reorganization of the NASA space sciences mission directorate. This paper reports on a small but exciting aspect of this sweeping NASA program, and illustrates the benefits and efficiency with which planetary and solar system exploration can be accomplished. Key in the success is the vision not only of NASA in general, but of the mission Principal Investigator, in particular. The specific series of missions leading to MER contains an underlying vision of carefully planned geological investigations using remote sensing instrumentation, starting with broad survey, leading to more finely resolved global imaging, and finally to landing instrumentation capable of detailed rock and soil analyses. The mission started with broad and relatively coarse spatial resolution orbital surveys with fine spectral capability focused on identifying the overall geological and atmospheric character of the planet accomplished from 1996 to the present conducted by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES). This led to the more detailed global imaging at finer spatial resolution offered by the Mars 2001 Odyssey Mission Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) which identified specific

  19. Atomic Auger Doppler effects upon emission of fast photoelectrons.

    PubMed

    Simon, Marc; Püttner, Ralph; Marchenko, Tatiana; Guillemin, Renaud; Kushawaha, Rajesh K; Journel, Loïc; Goldsztejn, Gildas; Piancastelli, Maria Novella; Ablett, James M; Rueff, Jean-Pascal; Céolin, Denis

    2014-01-01

    Studies of photoemission processes induced by hard X-rays including production of energetic electrons have become feasible due to recent substantial improvement of instrumentation. Novel dynamical phenomena have become possible to investigate in this new regime. Here we show a significant change in Auger emission following 1s photoionization of neon, which we attribute to the recoil of the Ne ion induced by the emission of a fast photoelectron. Because of the preferential motion of the ionized Ne atoms along two opposite directions, an Auger Doppler shift is revealed, which manifests itself as a gradual broadening and doubling of the Auger spectral features. This Auger Doppler effect should be a general phenomenon in high-energy photoemission of both isolated atoms and molecules, which will have to be taken into account in studies of other recoil effects such as vibrational or rotational recoil in molecules, and may also have consequences in measurements in solids. PMID:24906107

  20. Lamb-Dicke spectroscopy of atoms in a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okaba, Shoichi; Takano, Tetsushi; Benabid, Fetah; Bradley, Tom; Vincetti, Luca; Maizelis, Zakhar; Yampol'Skii, Valery; Nori, Franco; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2014-06-01

    Unlike photons, which are conveniently handled by mirrors and optical fibres without loss of coherence, atoms lose their coherence via atom-atom and atom-wall interactions. This decoherence of atoms deteriorates the performance of atomic clocks and magnetometers, and also hinders their miniaturization. Here we report a novel platform for precision spectroscopy. Ultracold strontium atoms inside a kagome-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibre are transversely confined by an optical lattice to prevent atoms from interacting with the fibre wall. By confining at most one atom in each lattice site, to avoid atom-atom interactions and Doppler effect, a 7.8-kHz-wide spectrum is observed for the 1S0-3P1(m=0) transition. Atoms singly trapped in a magic lattice in hollow-core photonic crystal fibres improve the optical depth while preserving atomic coherence time.

  1. Lamb-Dicke spectroscopy of atoms in a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre.

    PubMed

    Okaba, Shoichi; Takano, Tetsushi; Benabid, Fetah; Bradley, Tom; Vincetti, Luca; Maizelis, Zakhar; Yampol'skii, Valery; Nori, Franco; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-01

    Unlike photons, which are conveniently handled by mirrors and optical fibres without loss of coherence, atoms lose their coherence via atom-atom and atom-wall interactions. This decoherence of atoms deteriorates the performance of atomic clocks and magnetometers, and also hinders their miniaturization. Here we report a novel platform for precision spectroscopy. Ultracold strontium atoms inside a kagome-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibre are transversely confined by an optical lattice to prevent atoms from interacting with the fibre wall. By confining at most one atom in each lattice site, to avoid atom-atom interactions and Doppler effect, a 7.8-kHz-wide spectrum is observed for the (1)S0-(3)P1(m=0) transition. Atoms singly trapped in a magic lattice in hollow-core photonic crystal fibres improve the optical depth while preserving atomic coherence time. PMID:24934478

  2. Atomic Number Dependence of Ion-Induced Electron Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arrale, Abdikarim Mohamed

    Knowledge of the atomic number (Z_1 ) dependence of ion-induced electron emission yields (gamma) can be the basis for a general understanding of ion-atom interaction phenomena and, in particular, for the design of Z_1 -sensitive detectors that could be useful, for example, in the separation of isobars in accelerator mass spectrometry. The Z_1 dependence of ion-induced electron emission yields has been investigated using heavy ions of identical velocity (v = 2 v_0, with v_0 as the Bohr velocity) incident in a normal direction on sputter-cleaned carbon foils. Yields measured in this work plotted as a function of the ion's atomic number reveal an oscillatory behavior with pronounced maxima and minima. This nonmonotonic dependence of the yield on Z_1 will be discussed in the light of existing theories. Ion-induced electron emission yields from contaminated surfaces are well known to be enhanced relative to the yields from atomically clean surfaces. Under the bombardment of energetic ions, the surfaces become sputter-cleaned with time, and the yields from the samples are reduced accordingly. The time dependent reduction of yields observed are shown to be due to various effects such as the desorption of contaminant atoms and molecules by incident ions and the adsorption of residual gas onto previously clean sites. Experimental results obtained in the present work show the lower, saturated yield (gamma_{rm s} ) to be a function of residual gas pressure (P) and the fluence (phi_{rm i}) of the ion. We present a dynamic equilibrium model which explains the increase in yields for surface gas contamination, the decrease in yields for contaminant desorption, and the pressure/fluence dependence of the time required to reach gamma_{ rm s}. The predictions of the model agree well with the observations of gamma _{rm s} as a function of the ratio of gas flux to ion flux, and the electron yields of clean and gas covered surfaces.

  3. Emission Spectroscopy Following the Multiphoton Photolysis of Halomethanes at Near-Ultraviolet Wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chen-Nan; Liao, Hsiang-Fu; Hou, Guang-Yi; Yang, Shi-Xing; Chang, Bor-Chen

    2010-06-01

    Emission spectroscopy including nascent emission and laser-induced dispersed fluorescence was adopted to investigate the multiphoton photolysis mechanism of halomethanes at near-ultraviolet wavelengths in a slow flow system. In the 266 nm photolysis of the interested halomethanes (CHBr_3, CHBr_2Cl, CHBrCl_2, CH_2Br_2, CHI_3, CH_2I_2, and CH_3I), several excited species such as CH (A^2Δ, B^2Σ^-, and C^2Σ^+), atomic Br or I, and C_2 (d^3Π_g) were observed in the nascent emission spectra. Halomethylenes (CHX, X= Br, Cl, I), the reactive intermediates, were not observed in nascent emission spectra, but they can be found using laser-induced dispersed fluorescence spectroscopy following excitation of their ~A1A' '(0,v_2,0)←~X1A^'(0,0,0) transitions. Interestingly, CHBr was seen only in the photolysis of CHBr_3, whereas CHCl was only discovered when the precursor is CHBr_2Cl or CHBrCl_2. The photolysis laser power dependence and emission waveform measurements were also conducted. In addition, nascent emission spectra following the photolysis at longer near-ultraviolet wavelengths (280 nm and 355 nm) were acquired. The results show the distinctive differences between the photolysis of bromomethanes (CHBr_3, CHBr_2Cl, CHBrCl_2, and CH_2Br_2) and that of iodomethanes (CHI_3, CH_2I_2, and CH_3I). Our recent progress will be presented.

  4. Time-resolved spectroscopy measurements of hydrogen-alpha, -beta, and -gamma emissions

    SciTech Connect

    Parigger, Christian G.; Dackman, Matthew; Hornkohl, James O

    2008-11-01

    Hydrogen emission spectroscopy results are reported following laser-induced optical breakdown with infrared Nd:YAG laser radiation focused into a pulsed methane flow. Measurements of Stark-broadened atomic hydrogen-alpha, -beta, and -gamma lines show electron number densities of 0.3 to 4x10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} for time delays of 2.1 to 0.4 {mu}s after laser-induced optical breakdown. In methane flow, recombination molecular spectra of the {delta}{nu}=+2 progression of the C2 Swan system are discernable in the H{beta} and H{gamma} plasma emissions within the first few microseconds. The recorded atomic spectra indicate the occurrence of hydrogen self-absorption for pulsed CH4 flow pressures of 2.7x10{sup 5} Pa (25 psig) and 6.5x10{sup 5} Pa (80 psig)

  5. Time-resolved spectroscopy measurements of hydrogen-alpha, -beta, and -gamma emissions.

    PubMed

    Parigger, Christian G; Dackman, Matthew; Hornkohl, James O

    2008-11-01

    Hydrogen emission spectroscopy results are reported following laser-induced optical breakdown with infrared Nd:YAG laser radiation focused into a pulsed methane flow. Measurements of Stark-broadened atomic hydrogen-alpha, -beta, and -gamma lines show electron number densities of 0.3 to 4x10(17) cm(-3) for time delays of 2.1 to 0.4 micros after laser-induced optical breakdown. In methane flow, recombination molecular spectra of the Delta nu = +2 progression of the C(2) Swan system are discernable in the H(beta) and H(gamma) plasma emissions within the first few microseconds. The recorded atomic spectra indicate the occurrence of hydrogen self-absorption for pulsed CH(4) flow pressures of 2.7x10(5) Pa (25 psig) and 6.5x10(5) Pa (80 psig). PMID:19122690

  6. Infrared [Fe II] Emission Lines from Radiative Atomic Shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koo, Bon-Chul; Raymond, John C.; Kim, Hyun-Jeong

    2016-06-01

    [Fe II] emission lines are prominent in the infrared (IR) and important as diagnostic tools for radiative atomic shocks. We investigate the emission characteristics of [Fe II] lines using a shock code developed by te{raymond1979} with updated atomic parameters. We first review general characteristics of the IR [Fe II] emission lines from shocked gas, and derive their fluxes as a function of shock speed and ambient density. We have compiled available IR [Fe II] line observations of interstellar shocks and compare them to the ratios predicted from our model. The sample includes both young and old supernova remnants in the Galaxy and the Large Magellanic Cloud and several Herbig-Haro objects. We find that the observed ratios of the IR [Fe II] lines generally fall on our grid of shock models, but the ratios of some mid-IR lines, e.g., fethreefive/fetwofive, fefive/fetwofive, and fefive/feoneseven, are significantly offset from our model grid. We discuss possible explanations and conclude that while uncertainties in the shock modeling and the observations certainly exist, the uncertainty in atomic rates appears to be the major source of discrepancy.

  7. Optical emission spectroscopy characterization of oxygen plasma during degradation of Escherichia coli

    SciTech Connect

    Vujosevic, D.; Mozetic, M.; Cvelbar, U.; Krstulovic, N.; Milosevic, S.

    2007-05-15

    Optical emission spectroscopy was applied for plasma characterization during sterilization of substrates contaminated with bacteria. The amount of 10{sup 10}/ml cells of Escherichia coli was carefully applied to glass substrates and exposed to oxygen plasma glow discharge at different pressures between 30 and 200 Pa. Plasma was created in a glass discharge tube by an inductively coupled rf generator at the frequency of 27.12 MHz and output power of about 250 W. The electron temperature and plasma density were estimated with a double Langmuir probe. They were between 3 and 5 eV and 2 and 35x10{sup 15} m{sup -3}. Density of neutral oxygen atoms was measured with a catalytic probe, and was between 2 and 6x10{sup 21} m{sup -3}. Optical emission spectroscopy was performed with a low resolution spectrometer. The emission from carbon monoxide and nitrogen molecules was used to monitor the evolution of bacteria degradation. Both signals expressed a well defined maximum corresponding to peak erosion of bacteria by plasma radicals. As the sterilization was accomplished, both CO and N{sub 2} lines fell below the detection limit of the spectrometer. The bacteria degradation was also monitored by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and culturing. The SEM images corresponded well with the evolution of CO and N{sub 2} lines so the optical emission spectroscopy found a reliable tool for monitoring the sterilization process.

  8. Optical emission spectroscopy characterization of oxygen plasma during degradation of Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vujošević, D.; Mozetič, M.; Cvelbar, U.; Krstulović, N.; Milošević, S.

    2007-05-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy was applied for plasma characterization during sterilization of substrates contaminated with bacteria. The amount of 1010/ml cells of Escherichia coli was carefully applied to glass substrates and exposed to oxygen plasma glow discharge at different pressures between 30 and 200Pa. Plasma was created in a glass discharge tube by an inductively coupled rf generator at the frequency of 27.12MHz and output power of about 250W. The electron temperature and plasma density were estimated with a double Langmuir probe. They were between 3 and 5eV and 2 and 35×1015m-3. Density of neutral oxygen atoms was measured with a catalytic probe, and was between 2 and 6×1021m-3. Optical emission spectroscopy was performed with a low resolution spectrometer. The emission from carbon monoxide and nitrogen molecules was used to monitor the evolution of bacteria degradation. Both signals expressed a well defined maximum corresponding to peak erosion of bacteria by plasma radicals. As the sterilization was accomplished, both CO and N2 lines fell below the detection limit of the spectrometer. The bacteria degradation was also monitored by scanning electron microscope (SEM) and culturing. The SEM images corresponded well with the evolution of CO and N2 lines so the optical emission spectroscopy found a reliable tool for monitoring the sterilization process.

  9. Emission spectroscopy study of CF{sub 4} decomposition in an Ar-H{sub 2} inductive plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Ricard, A.; Al Ayoubi, S.; Cavvadias, S.; Amouroux, J.

    1995-12-31

    Radiative species in Ar RF plasma torch with addition of H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and CF{sub 4} polluting gases have been analyzed by emission spectroscopy. An efficient etching by F atoms of reactor quartz tube is detected from Si atom emission when a few 10{sup {minus}3} CF{sub 4} is introduced into the Ar plasma. The Si emission disappeared with H{sub 2} introduction into the Ar-CF{sub 4} gas mixture which has been correlated with HF formation. From C atomic emission, it is deduced that CF{sub 4} as CH{sub 4} polluting gases are largely dissociated into the Ar plasma torch.

  10. Investigating single molecule adhesion by atomic force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stetter, Frank W S; Kienle, Sandra; Krysiak, Stefanie; Hugel, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force spectroscopy is an ideal tool to study molecules at surfaces and interfaces. An experimental protocol to couple a large variety of single molecules covalently onto an AFM tip is presented. At the same time the AFM tip is passivated to prevent unspecific interactions between the tip and the substrate, which is a prerequisite to study single molecules attached to the AFM tip. Analyses to determine the adhesion force, the adhesion length, and the free energy of these molecules on solid surfaces and bio-interfaces are shortly presented and external references for further reading are provided. Example molecules are the poly(amino acid) polytyrosine, the graft polymer PI-g-PS and the phospholipid POPE (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine). These molecules are desorbed from different surfaces like CH3-SAMs, hydrogen terminated diamond and supported lipid bilayers under various solvent conditions. Finally, the advantages of force spectroscopic single molecule experiments are discussed including means to decide if truly a single molecule has been studied in the experiment. PMID:25867282

  11. Quantitative Cherenkov emission spectroscopy for tissue oxygenation assessment

    PubMed Central

    Axelsson, Johan; Glaser, Adam K.; Gladstone, David J.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2012-01-01

    Measurements of Cherenkov emission in tissue during radiation therapy are shown to enable estimation of hemoglobin oxygen saturation non-invasively, through spectral fitting of the spontaneous emissions from the treated tissue. Tissue oxygenation plays a critical role in the efficacy of radiation therapy to kill tumor tissue. Yet in-vivo measurement of this has remained elusive in routine use because of the complexity of oxygen measurement techniques. There is a spectrally broad emission of Cherenkov light that is induced during the time of irradiation, and as this travels through tissue from the point of the radiation deposition, the tissue absorption and scatter impart spectral changes. These changes can be quantified by diffuse spectral fitting of the signal. Thus Cherenkov emission spectroscopy is demonstrated for the first time quantitatively in vitro and qualitatively in vivo, and has potential for real-time online tracking of tissue oxygen during radiation therapy when fully characterized and developed. PMID:22418319

  12. Spontaneous emission from an excited atom in the presence of N atoms and M modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, F. W.

    1985-05-01

    The spontaneous emission of an excited two-level atom into a system of N nonexcited atoms of the same type (with N much greater than 1) in the presence of M electromagnetic-field modes is investigated analytically, applying the Hamiltonian formulation of Dicke (1954) studied by Jaynes and Cummings (1963), Tavis and Cummings (1968), and Buley and Cummings (1964). It is shown that the trapping of radiation in the system seen when one EM mode is present does not persist as M approaches N. The feasibility of an experimental verification of these phenomena is discussed.

  13. Observation of superfluorescent emissions from laser-cooled atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradis, E.; Barrett, B.; Kumarakrishnan, A.; Zhang, R.; Raithel, G.

    2008-04-01

    We study superfluorescence (SF) from spherical and cigar-shaped clouds of laser-cooled Rubidium atoms from the 5D5/2 level through the 6P3/2 level to the 5S1/2 ground level. The atomic system is initially excited to the 5D5/2 level from the ground state via two-photon excitation through the intermediate 5P3/2 level. The fluorescence on the 6P-5S transition at 420 nm is recorded using time-resolved measurements. The time delays of the observed SF emission peaks typically scale as ˜N-1 , where N is the atom number, and are much smaller than the time delay expected for uncorrelated cascade fluorescence. Since N is significantly smaller than the threshold number for SF on the 420 nm transition, and larger than the threshold number for the 5D-6P transition at 5.2μm , our observations suggest that the 420 nm SF emission is triggered by rapid deexcitation of the 5D to the 6P level via SF at 5.2μm . The observed SF time delays for 420 nm emission agree with SF time-delay estimates for the 5.2μm transition. For spherical clouds, the SF is isotropic. For cigar-shaped clouds, the SF is highly anisotropic. Along the long axis of cigar-shaped atom clouds, SF and incoherent cascade fluorescence produce temporally well-resolved peaks in the detected signal. In this case, the SF component of the signal is highly concentrated along a direction in between the directions of the two almost parallel excitation beams. The observed SF intensities scale as N , suggesting that the 5D level is regeneratively pumped during the SF decay.

  14. Infrared laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy emissions from energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Clayton S.; Brown, E.; Hommerich, Uwe; Trivedi, Sudhir B.; Samuels, Alan C.; Snyder, A. Peter

    2011-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has shown great promise for applications in chemical, biological, and explosives (CBE) sensing and has significant potential for real time standoff detection and analysis. We have studied LIBS emissions in the mid-infrared (MIR) spectral region for potential applications in CBE sensing. Detailed MIR-LIBS studies were performed for several energetic materials for the first time. In this study, the IR signature spectral region between 4 - 12 um was mined for the appearance of MIR-LIBS emissions that are directly indicative of oxygenated breakdown products as well as partially dissociated and recombination molecular species.

  15. Digital imaging technique for optical emission spectroscopy of a hydrogen arcjet plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litchford, Ron J.; Ruyten, Wim M.

    1995-07-01

    A digital imaging technique has been developed for optical emission spectroscopy measurements of a 1.6-kW hydrogen arcjet plume. Emissions from the Balmer alpha and beta transitions of excited atomic hydrogen were measured with a computer-controlled red-green-blue color CCD detector with and without line-centered bandpass interference filters. A method for extending the effective dynamic range of the detector was developed, whereby images obtained with a wide range of exposure times are combined to form a single composite nonsaturated map of the plume emission structure. The line-of-sight measurements were deconvoluted to obtain the true radial intensity distribution with an inverse Abel transformation. Analysis of the inverted measurements indicates that the upper levels of the Balmer alpha and beta transitions are not thermalized with the electrons in the plasma. The local thermodynamic equilibrium assumption fails for this plasma, and the electron temperature is not equivalent to the apparent excitation

  16. Laser spectroscopy of atoms in superfluid helium for the measurement of nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments of radioactive atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, T.; Furukawa, T.; Imamura, K.; Yang, X. F.; Hatakeyama, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Ueno, H.; Asahi, K.; Shimoda, T.; Matsuo, Y.

    2015-11-01

    A new laser spectroscopic method named "OROCHI (Optical RI-atom Observation in Condensed Helium as Ion catcher)" has been developed for deriving the nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments of low-yield exotic nuclei. In this method, we observe atomic Zeeman and hyperfine structures using laser-radio-frequency/microwave double-resonance spectroscopy. In our previous works, double-resonance spectroscopy was performed successfully with laser-sputtered stable atoms including non-alkali Au atoms as well as alkali Rb and Cs atoms. Following these works, measurements with 84-87Rb energetic ion beams were carried out in the RIKEN projectile fragment separator (RIPS). In this paper, we report the present status of OROCHI and discuss its feasibility, especially for low-yield nuclei such as unstable Au isotopes.

  17. Supplemental Report: Application of Emission Spectroscopy to Monitoring Technetium

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, W.A.

    2000-07-27

    This report provides supplemental information to an earlier report BNF-98-003-0199, ''Evaluation of Emission Spectroscopy for the On-Line Analysis of Technetium''. In this report data is included from real Hanford samples as well as for solutions spiked with technetium. This supplemental work confirms the ability of ICP-ES to monitor technetium as it breaks through an ion exchange process.

  18. Studies in atomic-fluorescence spectroscopy-V The fluorescence characteristics and determination of antimony.

    PubMed

    Dagnall, R M; Thompson, K C; West, T S

    1967-10-01

    Atomic-fluorescence of antimony may be generated in an air-propane flame by nebulizing aqueous solutions of antimony salts whilst irradiating the flame by means of a microwave-excited electrode-less discharge tube operating at 30 W. The strongest fluorescence is exhibited by the (4)S(11 2 ) --> (4)P(1 3 ) 2311 A resonance line and weaker signals are observed at the 2068 and 2176 A resonance lines and at four intercombination lines, at 2598, 2671, 2770 and 2878 A. A process of thermally assisted direct-line fluorescence is postulated to account for the otherwise inexplicable intensity of the 2598 A line emission. Atomic-fluorescence spectroscopy at 2176 A permits the determination of antimony in the range 0.1-120 ppm with a detection limit of 0.05 ppm. With the same equipment and source, the range of measurement for atomic-absorption was 6-120 ppm and the detection limit was 1 ppm. No interferences were observed from 100-fold molar amounts of Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Hg, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, NH(4), Pb and Zn or from arsenate, chloride, nitrate, phosphate and sulphate. PMID:18960212

  19. Magnetic-sublevel atomic kinetics modeling for line polarization spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hakel, P.; Mancini, R. C.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss the mechanism of polarized X-ray line emission in plasmas, its connection to plasma anisotropy, and introduce an atomic kinetics model and code (POLAR) based on the population kinetics of magnetic sublevels. POLAR represents a multi-level, multi-process approach to the problem of polarized spectra in plasmas, and hence it is well suited for plasma applications where cascade effects and alignment transfer can become important. Polarization degrees of X-ray spectral lines computed with POLAR were successfully benchmarked against calculations done with other formalisms, and experimental results obtained at the EBIT facility of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. We also investigated the polarization of He-like Si X-ray satellite lines as spectral signatures of anisotropy in the electron distribution function. A comprehensive modeling study was performed taking into account hydrodynamics and electron kinetics. We find that two satellite lines connecting singlet states develop a noticeable polarization while the triplet lines remain unpolarized. These results suggest a scenario where triplet lines could be used as a reference while the singlets could be used as polarized markers of plasma anisotropy.

  20. Spectral shaping of cascade emissions from multiplexed cold atomic ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, H. H.; Chen, Y.-C.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the spectral properties of the biphoton state from the cascade emissions of cold atomic ensembles, which are composed of a telecommunication photon (signal) followed by an infrared one (idler) via four-wave mixing. With adiabatic conditions for Gaussian driving pulses of width τ , the spectrum of the biphoton state has the form of a Gaussian that conserves signal and idler photon energies within ℏ /τ modulated by a Lorentzian with a superradiant linewidth. Multiplexing the atomic ensembles with frequency-shifted cascade emissions, we may manipulate and shape the spectrum of the biphoton state. The entropy of entanglement is derived from Schmidt decomposition, which can be larger if we multiplex the atomic ensembles in a way that conserves signal and idler photon central energies. The eigenvalues in Schmidt bases are degenerate in pairs for symmetric spectral shaping in which the mode probability densities show interference patterns. We also demonstrate the excess entropy of entanglement that comes from continuous frequency space, which scales up the total entropy. The scheme of the multiplexed cascade-emitted biphoton state provides multimode structures that are useful in long-distance quantum communication and multimode quantum information processing.

  1. Dynamics of femto- and nanosecond laser ablation plumes investigated using optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Verhoff, B.; Harilal, S. S.; Freeman, J. R.; Diwakar, P. K.; Hassanein, A.

    2012-11-01

    We investigated the spatial and temporal evolution of temperature and electron density associated with femto- and nanosecond laser-produced plasmas (LPP) from brass under similar laser fluence conditions. For producing plasmas, brass targets were ablated in vacuum employing pulses either from a Ti:Sapphire ultrafast laser (40 fs, 800 nm) or from a Nd:YAG laser (6 ns, 1064 nm). Optical emission spectroscopy is used to infer the density and temperature of the plasmas. The electron density (n{sub e}) was estimated using Stark broadened profiles of isolated lines while the excitation temperature (T{sub exc}) was estimated using the Boltzmann plot method. At similar fluence levels, continuum and ion emission are dominant in ns LPP at early times (<50 ns) followed by atomic emission, while the fs LPP provided an atomic plume throughout its visible emission lifetime. Though both ns and fs laser-plasmas showed similar temperatures ({approx}1 eV), the fs LPP is found to be significantly denser at shorter distances from the target surface as well as at early phases of its evolution compared to ns LPP. Moreover, the spatial extension of the plume emission in the visible region along the target normal is larger for fs LPP in comparison with ns LPP.

  2. Electron impact induced light emission from zinc atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvejanovic, Danica

    2009-10-01

    Experimental studies of electron impact excitation of zinc atom are rare, primarily due to experimental difficulties. However, zinc is an interesting target because of possible applications in light sources. Also, due to its position in periodic table, zinc is an interesting case for the fundamental understanding of momentum couplings and the role of electron correlations in complex metal atoms. Recent experimental investigations have indicated the existence of highly correlated scattering mechanisms via formation of negative ion resonances and Post Collision Interaction (PCI) in the decay of autoionizing states. These can significantly modify energy dependence of the emission cross sections at low impact energies and the studies of photon emission offer a sensitive way to investigate electron correlations. Specifically, in the lowest autoionizing region of zinc, i.e. between 10 and 15 eV, both the cross sections and polarization of emitted light are affected by the formation of short lived negative ions and PCI effects. These are associated with excitation of one of the sub-valence 3d electrons and complex correlations between inner 3d and outer excited electrons in the target and also with the slow electron released into continuum, need to be included in modeling. Also the scattering of the spin polarized electrons has shown significant spin effects when excitation proceeds via negative ion resonances. Emission cross sections and comparison with theory would be discussed at the conference.

  3. Phase-resolved optical emission spectroscopy for an electron cyclotron resonance etcher

    SciTech Connect

    Milosavljevic, Vladimir; MacGearailt, Niall; Daniels, Stephen; Turner, Miles M.; Cullen, P. J.

    2013-04-28

    Phase-resolved optical emission spectroscopy (PROES) is used for the measurement of plasma products in a typical industrial electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma etcher. In this paper, the PROES of oxygen and argon atoms spectral lines are investigated over a wide range of process parameters. The PROES shows a discrimination between the plasma species from gas phase and those which come from the solid phase due to surface etching. The relationship between the micro-wave and radio-frequency generators for plasma creation in the ECR can be better understood by the use of PROES.

  4. Spatial Resolution of Combined Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy with Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy for Atomic Oxygen Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsui, Makoto; Nakajima, Daisuke

    2015-09-01

    For developments of thermal protection system, atomic oxygen plays important role. However, its measurement method has not been established because the pressure in front of TPS test materials is as high as a few kPa. Our group proposed combined wavelength modulation and integrated output spectroscopies based on the forbidden transition at OI 636 nm to measure the ground-state number densities. In this study, WM-ICOS system is developed and applied to a microwave oxygen plasma to evaluate measurable region. As a result, the estimated number density by ICOS could be measured as low as 1021 m21. For the condition, WM-ICOS was applied. The signal to noise ratio of the 2f signal was 40.4. Then, the sensitivity was improved about 26. This result corresponding to the measurement limit of the partial atomic oxygen pressure of 250 Pa. The sensitivity of WM-ICOS was found to enough to diagnose the shock layer in high enthalpy flows. However, the spatial resolution was as large as 8 mm. The size of the beam pattern depends on the cavity length, robust ness of the cavity and accuracy of the cavity alignment. In this presentation, the relationship among these parameters will be discussed.

  5. Symposium on atomic spectroscopy (SAS-83): abstracts and program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-09-01

    Abstracts of papers given at the symposium are presented. Session topics include: Rydbergs, optical radiators, and planetary atoms; highly ionized atoms; ultraviolet radiation; theory, ion traps, and laser cooling; beam foil; and astronomy. (GHT)

  6. Optical Emission Spectroscopy of Microplasma Discharge in Sea Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamaleev, Vladislav; Hatta, Akimitsu; Furuta, Hiroshi; Oh, Jun-Seok; Okamura, Yo; Kitamura, Kensuke; Hashimoto, Yusuke

    2015-09-01

    We have been investigating microplasma discharge in sea water for optical emission spectroscopy. Microplasma discharge in artificial sea water (10ASW) was carried using needle-to-plane platinum electrode system. The gap, between electrodes, was ranged from 10 to 60 microns. The electricity source was impulse generatorwith MOSFET switch and variable capacitance and inductance. The maximum voltage and current for this scheme were respectively 1 kV and 10 A, pulse width 10 μs. It has been confirmed that, using the micro-gap configuration, spark discharges were ignited at the conventional breakdown voltages below 1kV, even in the conductive sea water. Was noted formation of small bubbles before of the plasma ignition process. The mechanism of formation of these bubbles is mostly Joule heating because of high currents. It has been speculated that plasma discharge initiates in bubbles. Optical emission spectroscopy of microplasma in sea water was carried. In the spectra, emission peaks for H, O, Na, Mg, Ca, Cl and Pt were clearly detected. Besides the main components of 10ASW, contaminants from the electrodes appeared in the spectra. The characteristics of microplasma discharge in sea water and analysis of the optical emission spectra will be presented. This work was supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26600129. The ASW was provided from Prof. Kei Okamura of Kochi University.

  7. Comparison of Optical Emission Spectroscopy and Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy in Large-Scaled Negative-Ion Source

    SciTech Connect

    Ikeda, K.; Nakano, H.; Tsumori, K.; Kaneko, O.; Kisaki, M.; Nagaoka, K.; Osakabe, M.; Takeiri, Y.; Fantz, U.

    2011-09-26

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) systems are installed in a 1/3-scaled negative hydrogen-ion source at the National Institute for Fusion Science testbed to investigate the dynamics of H{sup -} ions in the extraction region near the plasma grid. The signal form of the H{sup -} ion density rapidly drops after beam extraction on applying a low-bias voltage. A similar signal drop appears in the intensity of the hydrogen Balmer-line emission measured by OES and is caused by decreasing atomic hydrogen produced by mutual neutralization effects between H{sup -} and H{sup +}. Shot trend of the beam currents are similar to the H{sup -} density and H{sub {alpha}}/H{sub {beta}} in the extraction region, which increases twice as large immediately after Cs seeding. We observe a linear correlation between the H{sup -} density and the inclination of H{sub {alpha}}/H{sub {beta}} which allows for experimentally benchmarking the OES measurement with that of CRDS. Thus, this approach is used for estimating the H{sup -} density by OES in negative-ion sources for high-energy neutral beam injector.

  8. High-voltage spark atomic emission detector for gas chromatography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calkin, C. L.; Koeplin, S. M.; Crouch, S. R.

    1982-01-01

    A dc-powered, double-gap, miniature nanosecond spark source for emission spectrochemical analysis of gas chromatographic effluents is described. The spark is formed between two thoriated tungsten electrodes by the discharge of a coaxial capacitor. The spark detector is coupled to the gas chromatograph by a heated transfer line. The gas chromatographic effluent is introduced into the heated spark chamber where atomization and excitation of the effluent occurs upon breakdown of the analytical gap. A microcomputer-controlled data acquisition system allows the implementation of time-resolution techniques to distinguish between the analyte emission and the background continuum produced by the spark discharge. Multiple sparks are computer averaged to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. The application of the spark detector for element-selective detection of metals and nonmetals is reported.

  9. On emission from a hydrogen-like atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skobelev, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    A solution of the Dirac equation for an electron in the field of a point nucleus ( Ze) has been obtained as an eigenfunction of the Schrödinger Hamiltonian and the spin projection operator Σ3. With the use of this solution, the probability W (ν) of the emission of a neutrino per unit time from a hydrogen-like atom, (Ze)* to (Ze) + ν bar ν, has been calculated for the first time in the first order of the parameter Ze ≪ 1. The probability W (ν) appears to be rather small, and the corresponding lifetime τ(ν) = [ W (ν)]-1 is much larger than the age of the Universe; correspondingly, this process cannot affect the balance of low-energy neutrinos. The smallness of W (ν) is due not only to the presence of the obvious "weak" factor ( Gm p 2 )2( m/ mp)4 in the expression for W (ν), but also primarily to the "electromagnetic" factor ( Zα)12, which can be revealed only in a particular calculation. It has been argued within quantum electrodynamics with the mentioned wavefunctions that photon emission, ( Ze)* → ( Ze) + γ, can be absent (analysis of photon emission requires the further development of the method), whereas axion emission, ( Ze)* → ( Ze) + a, can occur, although the last two effects have not been considered in detail.

  10. Lamb-Dicke spectroscopy of atoms in a hollow-core photonic crystal fibre

    PubMed Central

    Okaba, Shoichi; Takano, Tetsushi; Benabid, Fetah; Bradley, Tom; Vincetti, Luca; Maizelis, Zakhar; Yampol'skii, Valery; Nori, Franco; Katori, Hidetoshi

    2014-01-01

    Unlike photons, which are conveniently handled by mirrors and optical fibres without loss of coherence, atoms lose their coherence via atom–atom and atom–wall interactions. This decoherence of atoms deteriorates the performance of atomic clocks and magnetometers, and also hinders their miniaturization. Here we report a novel platform for precision spectroscopy. Ultracold strontium atoms inside a kagome-lattice hollow-core photonic crystal fibre are transversely confined by an optical lattice to prevent atoms from interacting with the fibre wall. By confining at most one atom in each lattice site, to avoid atom–atom interactions and Doppler effect, a 7.8-kHz-wide spectrum is observed for the 1S0−3P1(m=0) transition. Atoms singly trapped in a magic lattice in hollow-core photonic crystal fibres improve the optical depth while preserving atomic coherence time. PMID:24934478

  11. Ultrathin atomic vapor film transmission spectroscopy: analysis of Dicke narrowing structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yanpeng; Gan, Chenli

    2005-11-01

    Transmission sub-Doppler spectroscopy with confined atomic vapor film between two dielectric walls is theoretically studied. Because of atoms flying from wall to wall, where they get de-excited, the atom-field interaction time is anisotropic so that the contribution of slow atoms is enhanced, a sub-Doppler transmission spectroscopy (Dicke narrowing effect) can be obtained when the thickness of the film is much small or comparable with the wavelength even at small angle oblique incidence. It is feasible to get a sub-Doppler structure in a new region (L < ?/4) in experiments.

  12. Vibrational structure in atomic emission spectra: Hg atoms in molecular matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crépin, C.; Tramer, A.

    1997-08-01

    Mercury atoms excited to the 3P1 state in rare gas and molecular (CH4, CD4, CF4, and SF6) matrices relax by a direct 3P1→1S0 fluorescence with a ca. 60 ns lifetime or by the 3P1⇝3P0 radiationless transition followed by the 3P0→1S0 long-lived (τ in the 10 to 500 ms range) emission. The main difference between atomic and molecular hosts is the appearance, in the latter case, of a well resolved vibrational structure in the spectrum of the 3P0→1S0 transition involving the frequencies of nontotally symmetric modes of the host molecules. This structure, related to a shortening of the lifetime of the 3P0→1S0 emission is explained by the intensity borrowing from the allowed 3P1→1S0 transition, i.e., by the 3P1↔3P0 mixing induced by nontotally symmetric vibrations of neighbor molecules (analog of the Herzberg-Teller effect). Relative intensities of bands corresponding to different vibrational modes may be deduced from estimation of electric fields induced in the Hg atom by displacements of electric charges of the vibrating molecule

  13. Eye-safe infrared laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) emissions from energetic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Ei E.; Hömmerich, Uwe; Yang, Clayton C.; Jin, Feng; Trivedi, Sudhir B.; Samuels, Alan C.

    2016-05-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is a powerful diagnostic tool for detection of trace elements by monitoring the atomic and ionic emission from laser-induced plasmas. Besides elemental emissions from conventional UV-Vis LIBS, molecular LIBS emission signatures of the target compounds were observed in the long-wave infrared (LWIR) region in recent studies. Most current LIBS studies employ the fundamental Nd:YAG laser output at 1.064 μm, which has extremely low eye-damage threshold. In this work, comparative LWIR-LIBS emissions studies using traditional 1.064 μm pumping and eye-safe laser wavelength at 1.574 μm were performed on several energetic materials for applications in chemical, biological, and explosive (CBE) sensing. A Q-switched Nd: YAG laser operating at 1.064 μm and the 1.574 μm output of a pulsed Nd:YAG pumped Optical Parametric Oscillator were employed as the excitation sources. The investigated energetic materials were studied for the appearance of LWIR-LIBS emissions (4-12 μm) that are directly indicative of oxygenated breakdown products as well as partially dissociated and recombination molecular species. The observed molecular IR LIBS emission bands showed strong correlation with FTIR absorption spectra of the studied materials for 1.064 μm and 1.574 μm pump wavelengths.

  14. Resonance ionization spectroscopy: counting noble-gas atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Hurst, G.S.; Payne, M.G.; Chen, C.H.; Willis, R.D.; Lehmann, B.E.; Kramer, S.D.

    1981-06-01

    New work on the counting of noble gas atoms, using lasers for the selective ionization and detectors for counting individual particles (electrons or positive ions) is reported. When positive ions are counted, various kinds of mass analyzers (magnetic, quadrupole, or time-of-flight) can be incorporated to provide A selectivity. It is shown that a variety of interesting and important applications can be made with atom-counting techniques which are both atomic number (Z) and mass number (A) selective.

  15. Fluorescence-excitation and Emission Spectroscopy on Single FMO Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Löhner, Alexander; Ashraf , Khuram; Cogdell, Richard J.; Köhler, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    In green-sulfur bacteria sunlight is absorbed by antenna structures termed chlorosomes, and transferred to the RC via the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex. FMO consists of three monomers arranged in C3 symmetry where each monomer accommodates eight Bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) molecules. It was the first pigment-protein complex for which the structure has been determined with high resolution and since then this complex has been the subject of numerous studies both experimentally and theoretically. Here we report about fluorescence-excitation spectroscopy as well as emission spectroscopy from individual FMO complexes at low temperatures. The individual FMO complexes are subjected to very fast spectral fluctuations smearing out any possible different information from the ensemble data that were recorded under the same experimental conditions. In other words, on the time scales that are experimentally accessible by single-molecule techniques, the FMO complex exhibits ergodic behaviour. PMID:27545197

  16. Fluorescence-excitation and Emission Spectroscopy on Single FMO Complexes.

    PubMed

    Löhner, Alexander; Ashraf, Khuram; Cogdell, Richard J; Köhler, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    In green-sulfur bacteria sunlight is absorbed by antenna structures termed chlorosomes, and transferred to the RC via the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex. FMO consists of three monomers arranged in C3 symmetry where each monomer accommodates eight Bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) molecules. It was the first pigment-protein complex for which the structure has been determined with high resolution and since then this complex has been the subject of numerous studies both experimentally and theoretically. Here we report about fluorescence-excitation spectroscopy as well as emission spectroscopy from individual FMO complexes at low temperatures. The individual FMO complexes are subjected to very fast spectral fluctuations smearing out any possible different information from the ensemble data that were recorded under the same experimental conditions. In other words, on the time scales that are experimentally accessible by single-molecule techniques, the FMO complex exhibits ergodic behaviour. PMID:27545197

  17. Electron impact spectroscopy. [for atom and molecule quantum state investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trajmar, S.

    1980-01-01

    The concepts of electron impact spectroscopy are discussed, comparing the electron spectroscopy techniques with those of the optical spectroscopy. The main advantage of the electron spectroscopy is to be found in the elimination of optical selection rules in excitation processes and the ability to scan the spectrum from the infrared to the X-ray region. The range of the method is indicated through a review of several examples, including electron impact excitation of Ba and rotational excitation of H2. The sensitivity of the method is demonstrated by vibrational excitation spectrum of N2. It is shown that the application of the method to the inner-shell excitation allows to obtain information about molecular species which are not commonly available, while spectroscopy of negative ions yields information about their energy and symmetry properties. However, the techniques are still under development and more data are expected to become available in the coming years.

  18. Diagnostics of a see-through hollow cathode discharge by emission, absorption, and fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Nicholas

    Atomic line filters have been suggested to be attractive in areas of Doppler velocimetry, resonance fluorescence detection, and resonance ionization detection. They are based on the resonant absorption of photons by an atomic vapor, and allow all other radiation to pass. This allows the detection of very low levels of light superimposed on a large optical background. Several elements have been studied for use as atomic line filters, such as the alkali metals, alkaline earths, and thallium. As previously recognized, thallium is especially attractive since the 535.046 nm metastable transition overlaps with the second harmonic output of an Nd:La2Be2O 5 (BEL) laser (1070 nm). This makes thallium ideal for certain applications as an atomic line filter. Recently a see-through hollow cathode lamp, or galvatron (Hamamatsu), was made commercially available. The galvatron geometry is unique compared to traditional hollow cathode lamps since the cathode and cell are oriented in a T-shape, with the cathode bored completely through to allow the propagation of a light source through the cathode. This allows multi-step excitation of the atomic vapor, not easily accomplished with a traditional hollow cathode lamp. The advantages that a galvatron offers over conventional atomic reservoirs make it an attractive candidate for the application as an atomic line filter; however, little spectroscopic data have been found in the literature. For this reason, Doppler temperatures, number densities, quantum efficiencies, and lifetimes have been determined in order to characterize this atomic reservoir as a potential atomic line filter. These parameters are determined by use of various spectroscopic techniques which include emission, absorption, time-resolved fluorescence, and time-resolved laser-induced saturated fluorescence spectroscopy. From these measurements, it has been demonstrated that a galvatron is an attractive atomic reservoir for applications as an atomic line filter. The

  19. Gas emission analysis based on Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Xiaowen; Zhang, Xiaofu; Lian, Xu; Jin, Hui

    2014-12-01

    Solar occultation flux (SOF), a new optical technology to detect the gas based on the traditional Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) developed quickly recently. In this paper, the system and the data analysis is investigated. First a multilayer transmission model of solar radiation is simulated. Then the retrieval process is illustrated. In the proceeding of the data analysis, the Levenberg-Marquardt non-linear square fitting is used to obtain the gas column concentration and the related emission ratio. After the theory certification, the built up system is conducted in a fertilizer plant in Hefei city .The results show SOF is available in the practice and the retrieved gas column concentration can give important information about the pollution emission and dispersion

  20. Applications of AFM for atomic manipulation and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Custance, Oscar

    2009-03-01

    Since the first demonstration of atom-by-atom assembly [1], atomic manipulation with scanning tunneling microscopy has yielded stunning realizations in nanoscience. A new exciting panorama has been recently opened with the possibility of manipulating atoms at surfaces using atomic force microscopy (AFM) [2-5]. In this talk, we will present two different approaches that enable patterning structures at semiconductor surfaces by manipulating individual atoms with AFM and at room temperature [2, 3]. We will discuss the physics behind each protocol through the analysis of the measured forces associated with these manipulations [3-5]. Another challenging issue in scanning probe microscopy is the ability to disclose the local chemical composition of a multi-element system at atomic level. Here, we will introduce a single-atom chemical identification method, which is based on detecting the forces between the outermost atom of the AFM tip and the atoms at a surface [6]. We demonstrate this identification procedure on a particularly challenging system, where any discrimination attempt based solely on topographic measurements would be impossible to achieve. [4pt] References: [0pt] [1] D. M. Eigler and E. K. Schweizer, Nature 344, 524 (1990); [0pt] [2] Y. Sugimoto, M. Abe, S. Hirayama, N. Oyabu, O. Custance and S. Morita, Nature Materials 4, 156 (2005); [0pt] [3] Y. Sugimoto, P. Pou, O. Custance, P. Jelinek, M. Abe, R. Perez and S. Morita, Science 322, 413 (2008); [0pt] [4] Y. Sugimoto, P. Jelinek, P. Pou, M. Abe, S. Morita, R. Perez and O. Custance, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 106104 (2007); [0pt] [5] M. Ternes, C. P. Lutz, C. F. Hirjibehedin, F. J. Giessibl and A. J. Heinrich, Science 319, 1066 (2008); [0pt] [6] Y. Sugimoto, P. Pou, M. Abe, P. Jelinek, R. Perez, S. Morita, and O. Custance, Nature 446, 64 (2007)

  1. Single-molecule force spectroscopy: optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Keir C.; Nagy, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy has emerged as a powerful tool to investigate the forces and motions associated with biological molecules and enzymatic activity. The most common force spectroscopy techniques are optical tweezers, magnetic tweezers and atomic force microscopy. These techniques are described and illustrated with examples highlighting current capabilities and limitations. PMID:18511917

  2. Faraday rotation spectroscopy in multi-pass atomic vapor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuguang; Vachaspati, Pranjal; Dural, Nezih; Romalis, Michael

    2011-05-01

    Many important applications of atomic vapors, such as quantum measurements, light storage experiments, and atomic magnetometers benefit from large optical depth of the atomic ensemble. We explore multi-pass cells using cylindrical mirrors with a hole for the entrance and exit of the laser beam to achieve very high optical depth while sampling a large number of atoms. Such cells are much less sensitive to mirror quality and alignment compared to optical cavities and do not require laser frequency locking, mode matching or power coupling matching. Cells with more than 100 passes have been fabricated using internal high-reflectivity mirrors. We have performed paramagnetic Faraday rotation measurements on Rb vapor and have observed atomic rotation angles in excess of 60 radians. Quantum spin noise from unpolarized atomic vapor has also been observed with a high signal-to-noise ratio. This system also exhibits non-linear spin relaxation due to spin-exchange collisions, opening the possibility of using spin-squeezing techniques to improve long-term sensitivity of frequency measurements. We will report on the development of a scalar atomic magnetometer using such spin-squeezing techniques.

  3. INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROSCOPY: PROMINENT LINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nearly every phase of environmental protection depends on a capability to identify and measure specific pollutants in the environment. As part of the research on the occurrence, movement, transformation, impact, and control of environmental contaminants, new techniques for identi...

  4. Atomic structure of machined semiconducting chips: An x-ray absorption spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Paesler, M.; Sayers, D.

    1988-12-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to examine the atomic structure of chips of germanium that were produced by single point diamond machining. It is demonstrated that although the local (nearest neighbor) atomic structure is experimentally quite similar to that of single crystal specimens information from more distant atoms indicates the presence of considerable stress. An outline of the technique is given and the strength of XAS in studying the machining process is demonstrated.

  5. Continuous Liquid-Sample Introduction for Bunsen Burner Atomic Emission Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gregory D.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes a laboratory-constructed atomic emission spectrometer with modular instrumentation components and a simple Bunsen burner atomizer with continuous sample introduction. A schematic diagram and sample data are provided. (DDR)

  6. Spectroscopy, Manipulation and Trapping of Neutral Atoms, Molecules, and Other Particles Using Optical Nanofibers: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Morrissey, Michael J.; Deasy, Kieran; Frawley, Mary; Kumar, Ravi; Prel, Eugen; Russell, Laura; Truong, Viet Giang; Chormaic, Síle Nic

    2013-01-01

    The use of tapered optical fibers, i.e., optical nanofibers, for spectroscopy and the detection of small numbers of particles, such as neutral atoms or molecules, has been gaining interest in recent years. In this review, we briefly introduce the optical nanofiber, its fabrication, and optical mode propagation within. We discuss recent progress on the integration of optical nanofibers into laser-cooled atom and vapor systems, paying particular attention to spectroscopy, cold atom cloud characterization, and optical trapping schemes. Next, a natural extension of this work to molecules is introduced. Finally, we consider several alternatives to optical nanofibers that display some advantages for specific applications. PMID:23945738

  7. Digital imaging technique for optical emission spectroscopy of a hydrogen arcjet plume.

    PubMed

    Litchford, R J; Ruyten, W M

    1995-07-20

    A digital imaging technique has been developed for optical emission spectroscopy measurements of a 1.6-kW hydrogen arcjet plume. Emissions from the Balmer α and β transitions of excited atomic hydrogen were measured with a computer-controlled red-green-blue color CCD detector with and without line-centered bandpass interference filters. A method for extending the effective dynamic range of the detector was developed, whereby images obtained with a wide range of exposure times are combined to form a single composite nonsaturated map of the plume emission structure. The line-of-sight measurements were deconvoluted to obtain the true radial intensity distribution with an inverse Abel transformation. Analysis of the inverted measurements indicates that the upper levels of the Balmer α and β transitions are not thermalized with the electrons in the plasma. The local thermodynamic equilibrium assumption fails for this plasma, and the electron temperature is not equivalent to the apparent excitation temperature obtained when a Boltzmann energy distribution is assumed for the atomic hydrogen excited states. PMID:21052286

  8. Emission Spectroscopy and Radiometric Measurements in the NASA Ames IHF Arc Jet Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Michael W.; Raiche, George A.; Prabhu, Dinesh K.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma diagnostic measurement campaigns in the NASA Ames Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) have been conducted over the last several years with a view towards characterizing the flow in the arc jet facility by providing data necessary for modeling and simulation. Optical emission spectroscopy has been used in the plenum and in the free jet of the nozzle. Radiation incident over a probe surface has also been measured using radiometry. Plenum measurements have shown distinct radial profiles of temperature over a range of operating conditions. For cases where large amounts of cold air are added radially to the main arc-heated stream, the temperature profiles are higher by as much as 1500 K than the profiles assumed in flow simulations. Optical measurements perpendicular to the flow direction in the free jet showed significant contributions to the molecule emission through inverse pre-dissociation, thus allowing determination of atom number densities from molecular emission. This has been preliminarily demonstrated with the N2 1st Positive System. Despite the use of older rate coefficients, the resulting atom densities are reasonable and surprisingly close to flow predictions.

  9. Spectroscopy of Molecular Hydrogen Emission from KH 15D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deming, Drake; Charbonneau, David; Harrington, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    We report infrared spectroscopy of the unusual eclipsing pre-main-sequence object KH 15D, obtained using NIRSPEC on Keck II. During eclipse, observations using low spectral resolution (λ/δλ~1000) reveal the presence of prominent molecular hydrogen emission in five lines near 2 μm. The relative line strengths are consistent with thermal excitation at T~2800+/-300 K. Observations out of eclipse, at both low and high spectral resolution (λ/δλ~2×104), show reduced contrast with the stellar continuum. The change in contrast for the strongest line, 1-0 S(1), is consistent with an approximately constant emission line superposed on a variable stellar continuum. Emission in the 1-0 S(1) line is observed to extend by >~4" both east and west of the stellar point-spread function (PSF; >~3000 AU). Observed at high spectral resolution, the velocity and the intensity structure of the 1-0 S(1) profile are both asymmetric. East of the stellar PSF (by 1.1"-2.3") the emission is blueshifted (-63 km s-1) and has significantly greater intensity than the marginally redshifted component (+2 km s-1, approximately consistent with zero) that dominates west of the stellar PSF. The spatial extent of the emission and the excitation temperature suggest shock excitation of ambient gas by a bipolar outflow from the star and/or the disk. However, it is difficult to account for the observed radial velocity unless the outflow axis is inclined significantly to the plane of the sky. Data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  10. Studying Simple Molecular Ionization using Radiation Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Christopher; Lemmer, Kristina; Western Michigan University Aerospace LaboratoryPlasma Experiments Team

    2015-11-01

    This study focuses on radiation emission from the formation of simple molecular plasma using a DC glow discharge. The purpose is to measure the emission from argon and molecular nitrogen gas as a function of time with an optical emission spectroscopy system operating in kinetic mode as the gases go from their neutral state to ionized state. The end goal of the research is to develop a diagnostic tool that will be used to study the formation of plasma discharges from complex molecules. The kinetic mode of the CCD camera allows for fast data acquisition so that the species present and their relative concentrations as a function of time can be measured as the plasma is forming. The primary difficulty in the development of this diagnostic tool is designing a device and data analysis technique to allow for kinetic mode operation of the CCD camera. Experimental devices have been designed and built to enable the CCD to operate in kinetic mode, including a fiber optic adapter, camera mount, and twin razor blade system. The twin blades allow for the reduction of exposed pixels on the CCD camera and thereby allow the camera to store data on rows of pixels, rather than imaging the entire camera, allowing for faster data transfer. PhD in Aerospace Engineering.

  11. Development of the charge exchange recombination spectroscopy and the beam emission spectroscopy on the EAST tokamak.

    PubMed

    Li, Y Y; Fu, J; Lyu, B; Du, X W; Li, C Y; Zhang, Y; Yin, X H; Yu, Y; Wang, Q P; von Hellermann, M; Shi, Y J; Ye, M Y; Wan, B N

    2014-11-01

    Charge eXchange Recombination Spectroscopy (CXRS) and Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES) diagnostics based on a heating neutral beam have recently been installed on EAST to provide local measurements of ion temperature, velocity, and density. The system design features common light collection optics for CXRS and BES, background channels for the toroidal views, multi-chord viewing sightlines, and high throughput lens-based spectrometers with good signal to noise ratio for high time resolution measurements. Additionally, two spectrometers each has a tunable grating to observe any wavelength of interest are used for the CXRS and one utilizes a fixed-wavelength grating to achieve higher diffraction efficiency for the BES system. A real-time wavelength correction is implemented to achieve a high-accuracy wavelength calibration. Alignment and calibration are performed. Initial performance test results are presented. PMID:25430335

  12. Precision Spectroscopy of Atomic Hydrogen and the Proton Size Puzzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udem, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Precise determination of transition frequencies of simple atomic systems are required for a number of fundamental applications such as tests of quantum electrodynamics (QED), the determination of fundamental constants and nuclear charge radii. The sharpest transition in atomic hydrogen occurs between the metastable 2S state and the 1S ground state. Its transition frequency has now been measured with almost 15 digits accuracy using an optical frequency comb and a cesium atomic clock as a reference. A recent measurement of the Lamb shift in muonic hydrogen is in significant contradiction to the hydrogen data if QED calculations are assumed to be correct. We hope to contribute to the resolution of this so called `proton size puzzle' by providing additional experimental input from the hydrogen side.

  13. Advances in fast-atom-bombardment mass spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hemling, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    A comparison of fast atom bombardment and field desorption mass spectrometry was made to determine relative sensitivity and applicability. A series of glycosphingolipids and a series of protected oligonucleotides of known structure were analyzed to ascertain the potential utility of fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry in the structural elucidation of novel compounds in these classes. Negative ion mass markers were also developed. Fast atom bombardment was found to be one-to-two orders of magnitude more sensitive than field desorption based on the analysis of a limited number of compounds from several classes. Superior sensitivity was not universal and field desorption was clearly better in certain cases. In the negative ion mode in particular, fast atom bombardment was found to be a useful tool for the determination of the primary structure of glycosphingolipids and oligonucleotides. Carbohydrate sequence and branching information, and a fatty acid and lipid base composition were readily obtained from the mass spectra of glycosphingolipids while bidirectional nucleotide sequence, nucleotide base, and protecting group assignments were obtained for oligonucleotides. Based on this knowledge, a tentative structure of a human peripheral nervous system glycosphingolipid implicated in certain cases of disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Lou Gehrig's Disease, was proposed. Suitable negative ion mass markers were found in dispersions of poly(ethylene) and poly(propylene)glycols in a triethylenetetramine matrix, a matrix which also proved useful in the analysis of glycosphingolipids. These polyglycol dispersions provided ions for calibration to 2300 daltons.

  14. Two-photon-excited fluorescence spectroscopy of atomic fluorine at 170 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, G. C.; Dyer, Mark J.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Bischel, William K.

    1988-01-01

    Two-photon-excited fluorescence spectroscopy of atomic fluorine is reported. A doubled dye laser at 286-nm is Raman shifted in H2 to 170 nm (sixth anti-Stokes order) to excite ground-state 2P(0)J fluorine atoms to the 2D(0)J level. The fluorine atoms are detected by one of two methods: observing the fluorescence decay to the 2PJ level or observing F(+) production through the absorption of an additional photon by the excited atoms. Relative two-photon absorption cross sections to and the radiative lifetimes of the 2D(0)J states are measured.

  15. Asphaltene Erosion Process in Air Plasma: Emission Spectroscopy and Surface Analysis for Air-Plasma Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, H.; Flores, O.; C. Poveda, J.; Campillo, B.

    2012-04-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) was applied for plasma characterization during the erosion of asphaltene substrates. An amount of 100 mg of asphaltene was carefully applied to an electrode and exposed to air-plasma glow discharge at a pressure of 1.0 Torr. The plasma was generated in a stainless steel discharge chamber by an ac generator at a frequency of 60 Hz, output power of 50 W and a gas flow rate of 1.8 L/min. The electron temperature and ion density were estimated to be 2.15±0.11 eV and (1.24±0.05) × 1016 m-3, respectively, using a double Langmuir probe. OES was employed to observe the emission from the asphaltene exposed to air plasma. Both molecular band emission from N2, N+2, OH, CH, NH, O2 as well as CN, and atomic light emission from V and Hγ were observed and used to monitor the evolution of asphaltene erosion. The asphaltene erosion was analyzed with the aid of a scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) detector. The EDX analysis showed that the time evolution of elements C, O, S and V were similar; and the chemical composition of the exposed asphaltenes remained constant. Particle size evolution was measured, showing a maximum size of 2307 μm after 60 min. This behavior is most likely related to particle agglomeration as a function of time.

  16. Diagnostics of nitrogen plasma by trace rare-gas-optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Qayyum, A.; Zeb, Shaista; Naveed, M.A.; Ghauri, S.A.; Zakaullah, M.; Waheed, A.

    2005-11-15

    Trace rare-gas-optical emission spectroscopy is carried out to characterize the nitrogen plasma as a function of discharge parameters. The functional dependence of N{sub 2}(C {sup 3}{pi}{sub u}) and N{sub 2}{sup +}(B {sup 2}{sigma}{sub u}{sup +}) excited states is monitored by measuring the emission intensities of the bandheads of second positive and first negative systems. The excited-state population density of N atoms and N{sub 2} molecules, extracted from their optical emission, is related to the ground-state population density after normalizing the changes for excitation cross section and electron energy distribution function by optical actinometry. The electron temperature is determined from the plasma-induced optical emission of trace rare gas by the line-to-line method. The obtained data may help us to adjust the optimum discharge conditions for the production of active species, which are considered to be important for the desired treatment of the samples.

  17. Nuclear spectroscopy with Geant4: Proton and neutron emission & radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarmiento, L. G.; Rudolph, D.

    2016-07-01

    With the aid of a novel combination of existing equipment - JYFLTRAP and the TASISpec decay station - it is possible to perform very clean quantum-state selective, high-resolution particle-γ decay spectroscopy. We intend to study the determination of the branching ratio of the ℓ = 9 proton emission from the Iπ = 19/2-, 3174-keV isomer in the N = Z - 1 nucleus 53Co. The study aims to initiate a series of similar experiments along the proton dripline, thereby providing unique insights into "open quantum systems". The technique has been pioneered in case studies using SHIPTRAP and TASISpec at GSI. Newly available radioactive decay modes in Geant4 simulations are going to corroborate the anticipated experimental results.

  18. Optical emission spectroscopy of carbon arc for nanomaterial synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vekselman, Vladislav; Stratton, Brentley; Raitses, Yevgeny

    2015-11-01

    Arc plasma assisted synthesis of carbon nanostructures is one of the most efficient and simple production methods. In spite of a long time use of this method in materials science research and industrial applications, the role of the plasma in nucleation and growth of nanostructures is not well understood. This is due to complexity of physico-chemical processes governing the plasma nanosynthesis. The objective of this work is to characterize the atmospheric pressure arc plasma used for synthesis of various carbon nanostructures. Optical emission spectroscopy was carried out to determine the distribution of temperature and density of carbon plasma in the synthesis zone as a function of arc discharge parameters. Accurate and detailed mapping of plasma parameters elucidate the general trend governing the formation of carbon nanostructures. This work was supported by DOE contract DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  19. GABI: a compact detector for GRB prompt emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natalucci, L.; Ubertini, P.; Bazzano, A.; Federici, M.; Fiocchi, M. T.; Lotti, S.; Grindlay, J. E.; Gehrels, N.; Uslenghi, M.; Fiorini, M.; Perotti, F.

    Triggering on sky transient events can be efficiently accomplished by coded mask instruments, which can also provide positions with arcmin or sub-arcmin accuracy, but at the expense of weight and power. On the other hand good broadband spectroscopy is possible using much lighter systems, that could also provide a coarse positioning capability (˜ degrees). We present the concept of a compact, light detector based on NaI(Tl) scintillator, that can be used to complement other soft X-ray or IR/optical telescopes in detecting transients and characterizing them. The Gamma-Ray Burst Imager (GABI) will operate in the energy range 8-1000 keV that is optimal for the detection of the prompt emission of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRB). GABI is being proposed for accomodation on board Lobster, a candidate mission of the NASA Explorer Program.

  20. Density fluctuation measurements using beam emission spectroscopy on Heliotron J

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, S.; Ohshima, S.; Yamamoto, S.; Mizuuchi, T.; Nagasaki, K.; Okada, H.; Minami, T.; Konoshima, S.; Toushi, K.; Sano, F.; Kado, S.; Oishi, T.; Kagawa, T.; Nagae, Y.; Lee, H. Y.; Minami, T.; Harada, T.; Nakamura, Y.; Estrada, T.; Murakami, S.

    2012-10-15

    This paper describes the measurement of the density fluctuation using beam emission spectroscopy in Heliotron J, having the non-symmetrical helical-magnetic-axis configuration. In order to optimize the sightlines, the numerical calculations are carried out to estimate the spatial resolution and the observation location. When a tangential neutral beam is used as diagnostic one, suitable sightlines from the newly installed diagnostic port are selected whose spatial resolution {Delta}{rho} is less than {+-}0.07 over the entire plasma region. Modification of the interference filter and the detection systems enables us to measure the radial profile of the density fluctuation. Each of the three coherent modes due to the fast-ion-driven magnetohydrodynamic instabilities has different radial structure of the density fluctuation.

  1. Project 8: Towards cyclotron radiation emission spectroscopy on tritium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fertl, Martin; Project 8 Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Project 8 aims to determine the neutrino mass by making a precise measurement of the β--decay of molecular tritium (Q = 18.6 keV) using the recently demonstrated the technique of cyclotron radiation emission spectroscopy (CRES). Here we discuss the production of a gas cell that fulfills the stringent requirements for cryogenic operation, safe tritium handling, a non-magnetic design, and a good microwave guide performance. The phased program that allows Project 8 to probe the neutrino mass range accessible using molecular tritium is described. Major financial support by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics to the University of Washington under Award Number DE-FG02-97ER41020 is acknowledged.

  2. Hot exhaust gases with passive FTIR emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heland, Joerg; Schaefer, Klaus; Haus, Rainer

    1998-12-01

    Passive FTIR emission spectroscopy using a commercial medium resolution instrument with a telescope has been applied to analyze the hot exhaust gases of various combustion sources, such as industrial and building smoke stacks, aircraft engines, flares, and forest fires. To interpret the remotely measured spectra a multi-layer, line-by-line spectra retrieval software using the molecular spectral databases HITRAN and HITEMP has been developed, validated and successfully used to determine the exhaust gas temperatures and the concentrations of CO2, H2O, CO, N2O, CH4, NO, NO2, SO2, and HCl for different combustion conditions of the sources. In this paper the feasibility and the setup of passive IR measurements, the basic theory of radiative transfer and special features of the commercially available spectra analysis code are described. In addition, the results of the different measurement applications are summarized.

  3. X-ray spectroscopy of kaonic atoms at SIDDHARTA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cargnelli, M.; Bazzi, M.; Beer, G.; Berucci, C.; Bragadireanu, A. M.; Curceanu, C.; d'Uffizi, A.; Fiorini, C.; Ghio, F.; Guaraldo, C.; Hayano, R.; Iliescu, M.; Ishiwatari, T.; Iwasaki, M.; Levi Sandri, P.; Marton, J.; Okada, S.; Pietreanu, D.; Ponta, T.; Quaglia, R.; Romero Vidal, A.; Sbardella, E.; Scordo, A.; Shi, H.; Sirghi, D. L.; Sirghi, F.; Tatsuno, H.; Vazquez Doce, O.; Widmann, E.; Wünschek, B.; Zmeskal, J.

    2014-06-01

    The X-ray measurements of kaonic atoms play an important role for understanding the low-energy QCD in the strangeness sector. The SIDDHARTA experiment studied the X-ray transitions of 4 light kaonic atoms (H, D, 3He, and 4He) using the DAFNE electron-positron collider at LNF (Italy). Most precise values of the shift and width of the kaonic hydrogen 1s state were determined, which have been now used as fundamental information for the low-energy K-p interaction in theoretical studies. An upper limit of the X-ray yield of kaonic deuterium was derived, important for future K-d experiments. The shifts and widths of the kaonic 3He and 4He 2p states were obtained, confirming the end of the "kaonic helium puzzle". In this contribution also the plans for new experiments of kaonic deuterium are being presented.

  4. Spectroscopy of Mn atoms isolated in solid {sup 4}He

    SciTech Connect

    Moroshkin, P. Lebedev, V.; Weis, A.

    2014-06-07

    We present an experimental study of the laser-induced luminescence spectra of Mn atoms in solid helium matrices. We observe transitions of the valence electron and of inner-shell electrons. We find that the Mn-He interaction perturbs the inner-shell transitions to a lesser extent than the valence-electron transitions. The observed lineshapes of the inner-shell transitions of Mn are similar to those of an inner-shell transition in Ba studied earlier. At the same time, they are more strongly perturbed than the corresponding transitions in Au and Cu under the same conditions. We suggest a qualitative explanation of these observations based on the atomic bubble model. Our results also suggest that the inner-shell transitions of Mn in solid He are more strongly perturbed than the same lines of Mn isolated in solid Ar or Kr matrices.

  5. [Preliminary study of atomic emission spectrometry of Ti (H) plasma produced by vacuum arc ion source].

    PubMed

    Deng, Chun-Feng; Wu, Chun-Lei; Wang, Yi-Fu; Lu, Biao; Wen, Zhong-Wei

    2014-03-01

    In order to study the discharge process of vacuum arc ion source, make a detail description of the discharge plasma, and lay the foundation for further research on ion source, atomic emission spectrometry was used to diagnose the parameters of plasma produced by vaccum arc ion source. In the present paper, two kinds of analysis method for the emission spectra data collected by a spectrometer were developed. Those were based in the stark broadening of spectral lines and Saba-Boltzmann equation. Using those two methods, the electron temperature, electron number density and the ion temperature of the plasma can be determined. The emission spectroscopy data used in this paper was collected from the plasma produced by a vacuum are ion source whose cathode was made by Ti material (which adsorbed hydrogen during storage procedure). Both of the two methods were used to diagnose the plasma parameters and judge the thermal motion state of the plasma. Otherwise, the validity of the diagnostic results by the two methods were analyzed and compared. In addition, the affection from laboratory background radiation during the spectral acquisition process was discussed. PMID:25208416

  6. High-precision three-dimensional atom localization via spontaneous emission in a four-level atomic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiping; Yu, Benli

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the three-dimensional atom localization via spontaneous emission in a four-level atomic system. It is found that the detecting probability and precision of atom localization can be significantly improved due to the interference effects induced by the vacuum radiation field and the two laser fields. More importantly, the almost 100% probability of finding an atom within a certain range can be reached when corresponding conditions are satisfied. As a result, our scheme may be helpful in a spatially selective single-qubit phase gate, entangling gates, and quantum error correction for quantum information processing.

  7. Optical Emission Spectroscopy in an Unmagnetized Flowing Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidlitz, Blair; Collins, Cami; Nornberg, Mark; Boffard, John; Forest, Cary

    2013-10-01

    Recently, a new technique has been developed to create a large, weakly magnetized, fast flowing, and hot plasma in the laboratory. These unique conditions make it possible to study a wide variety of phenomena in plasma astrophysics which is the goal of the Plasma Couette Experiment. Accurate measurements of plasma properties such as density and temperature have been challenging with Langmuir probes due to contamination, their perturbative nature, and the flowing plasma. To achieve a non-invasive measurement of relevant parameters, Optical Emission Spectroscopy techniques have been implemented using a low resolution (~1.5 nm) fiber-coupled broad wavelength spectrograph. Argon line ratios were used to determine the metastable ArI densities through radiation trapping and electron temperature was deduced from the energy dependence of many optical emission cross sections. Time resolved measurements and radial profiles of temperature have been produced and have shown good agreement with triple probe results in the 2-6 eV range. We are expanding these techniques to measurements of the electron density (using quenching of certain transitions), multispecies ion densities and further exploration of higher temperature regions all utilizing spectra from the above mentioned spectrograph, fully exploiting its wide wavelength range. Supported by NSF and DoE.

  8. Characterization and Infrared Emission Spectroscopy of Ball Plasmoid Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubowsky, Scott E.; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2015-06-01

    Plasmas at atmospheric pressure serve many purposes, from ionization sources for ambient mass spectrometry (AMS) to plasma-assisted wound healing. Of the many naturally occurring ambient plasmas, ball lightning is one of the least understood; there is currently no solid explanation in the literature for the formation and lifetime of natural ball lightning. With the first measurements of naturally occurring ball lightning being reported last year, we have worked to replicate the natural phenomenon in order to elucidate the physical and chemical processes by which the plasma is sustained at ambient conditions. We are able to generate ball-shaped plasmoids (self-sustaining plasmas) that are analogous to natural ball lightning using a high-voltage, high-current, pulsed DC system. Improvements to the discharge electronics used in our laboratory and characterization of the plasmoids that are generated from this system will be described. Infrared emission spectroscopy of these plasmoids reveals emission from water and hydroxyl radical -- fitting methods for these molecular species in the complex experimental spectra will be presented. Rotational temperatures for the stretching and bending modes of H2O along with that of OH will be presented, and the non-equilibrium nature of the plasmoid will be discussed in this context. Cen, J.; Yuan, P,; Xue, S. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2014, 112, 035001. Dubowsky, S.E.; Friday, D.M.; Peters, K.C.; Zhao, Z.; Perry, R.H.; McCall, B.J. Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 2015, 376, 39-45.

  9. NIR spectroscopy of Palomar emission-line galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Rachel; Alonso-Herrero, Almudena; Bluck, Asa; Colina, Luis; Diaz, Ruben; Diaz-Santos, Tanio; Flohic, Helene; Gomez, Percy; Gonzalez-Martin, Omaira; Ho, Luis; Jorgensen, Inger; Lemoine-Busserolle, Marie; Levenson, Nancy; Lira, Paulina; McDermid, Richard; Perlman, Eric; Rodriguez-Ardila, Alberto; Riffel, Rogerio; Schiavon, Ricardo; Ramos Almeida, Cristina; Thanjavur, Karun; Winge, Claudia

    2012-02-01

    We propose GNIRS cross-dispersed spectroscopy of 60 Seyferts and LINERs from the Palomar galaxy sample. The spectra will advance our knowledge of AGN physics and lifecycles by demonstrating whether the accretion disk and nuclear dust properties change as a function of accretion rate, as predicted by theoretical models. They will be used to investigate the contribution of evolved stars to the line emission in LINERs, with implications for AGN demographics, and to make new stellar kinematic measurements for black hole mass estimates. The number and variety of spectral features that will appear in the data are expected to enable a wide range of science besides that highlighted in this proposal. For this reason, we plan a reduced proprietary period and to make the reduced spectra available to the community. We anticipate applying for time to observe the remaining emission-line galaxies in the (near-complete) Palomar sample over the next few semesters. The targets are distributed throughout the northern sky, making Gemini's queue mode ideal for this work. The fairly short observations are easily scheduled and can be carried out in suboptimal observing conditions.

  10. X-ray emission and photoluminescence spectroscopy of nanostructured silica with implanted copper ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatsepin, D. A.; Kortov, V. S.; Kurmaev, É. Z.; Gavrilov, N. V.; Wilks, R. G.; Moewes, A.

    2008-12-01

    Quartz glass samples and compacted SiO2 nanopowders have been studied by x-ray emission (Cu L 2, 3 transition 3 d4 s → 2 p 1/2, 3/2) and photoluminescence spectroscopy following pulsed Cu+ ion implantation (energy, 30 keV; pulse current up to 0.5 A; pulse duration, 400 μs; irradiation doses, 1015, 1016, and 2 × 1017 cm-2). It has been established that ion irradiation gives rise to the formation of glassy and compacted SiO2 samples of nanosized metallic and oxide phases in the structure. An analysis of Cu L x-ray emission spectra has shown that copper nanoparticles are thermodynamically metastable and chemically active because ion beam bombardment transfers them readily to the oxide form. This results from the radiation-stimulated fracture of regular Si-O-Si bonds in amorphous SiO2 and the formation of defective Si-Si bonds, followed by capture of oxygen by copper atoms. The enhanced degree of oxidation of copper ions in SiO2 nanostructured pellets can be reduced by coimplantation and thermal annealing. Optical spectroscopy studies suggest that, in glasses and SiO2 nanostructured pellets, there exist metallic Cu{/n 0} nanoclusters, which at low temperatures exhibit quantum-confined photoluminescence with a characteristic stepped excitation spectrum.

  11. A heated chamber burner for atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Venghiattis, A A

    1968-07-01

    A new heated chamber burner is described. The burner is of the premixed type, and burner heads of the types conventionally used in atomic absorption may be readily adapted to it. This new sampling system has been tested for Ag, Al, Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni, Pb, Si, Ti, and Zn in aqueous solutions. An improvement of the order of ten times has been obtained in sensitivity, and in detection limits as well, for the elements determined. Interferences controllable are somewhat more severe than in conventional burners but are controllable. PMID:20068792

  12. Exact solution for spontaneous emission in the presence of N atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, F. W.; Dorri, Ali

    1983-10-01

    N two-level "atoms" are considered in interaction with a single-mode resonant electromagnetic field. The exact solution is given nonrelativistically for all times for the case of spontaneous emission, when only one atom is initially excited. The solution is given for the general case of the N atoms in inequivalent mode positions.

  13. Diagnostic performance of the beam emission spectroscopy system on the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D. R.; Fonck, R. J.; McKee, G. R.; Thompson, D. S.

    2012-10-15

    The beam emission spectroscopy system on the National Spherical Torus Experiment measures localized density fluctuations on the ion gyroscale. Optical sightlines provide core to edge radial coverage, and the sightlines are aligned to typical pitch angles to maximize cross-field spatial resolution. Sightline images are 2-3 cm, and point spread function calculations indicate image distortion from pitch angle misalignment and atomic state finite lifetimes is minor with a 15% increase in the image size. New generation photodetectors achieve photon noise limited measurements at frequencies up to 400 kHz with refrigerant cooling at -20 Degree-Sign C. Measurements near the pedestal show broadband turbulence up to 100 kHz, and poloidal correlation lengths are about 10 cm. Plasma turbulence signals can be 2-3 orders of magnitude above photon noise and amplifier thermal noise.

  14. Diagnostic performance of the beam emission spectroscopy system on the National Spherical Torus Experiment.

    PubMed

    Smith, D R; Fonck, R J; McKee, G R; Thompson, D S

    2012-10-01

    The beam emission spectroscopy system on the National Spherical Torus Experiment measures localized density fluctuations on the ion gyroscale. Optical sightlines provide core to edge radial coverage, and the sightlines are aligned to typical pitch angles to maximize cross-field spatial resolution. Sightline images are 2-3 cm, and point spread function calculations indicate image distortion from pitch angle misalignment and atomic state finite lifetimes is minor with a 15% increase in the image size. New generation photodetectors achieve photon noise limited measurements at frequencies up to 400 kHz with refrigerant cooling at -20 °C. Measurements near the pedestal show broadband turbulence up to 100 kHz, and poloidal correlation lengths are about 10 cm. Plasma turbulence signals can be 2-3 orders of magnitude above photon noise and amplifier thermal noise. PMID:23126846

  15. Three-dimensional modeling of beam emission spectroscopy measurements in fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Guszejnov, D.; Pokol, G. I.; Pusztai, I.; Refy, D.; Zoletnik, S.; Lampert, M.; Nam, Y. U.

    2012-11-15

    One of the main diagnostic tools for measuring electron density profiles and the characteristics of long wavelength turbulent wave structures in fusion plasmas is beam emission spectroscopy (BES). The increasing number of BES systems necessitated an accurate and comprehensive simulation of BES diagnostics, which in turn motivated the development of the Rate Equations for Neutral Alkali-beam TEchnique (RENATE) simulation code that is the topic of this paper. RENATE is a modular, fully three-dimensional code incorporating all key features of BES systems from the atomic physics to the observation, including an advanced modeling of the optics. Thus RENATE can be used both in the interpretation of measured signals and the development of new BES systems. The most important components of the code have been successfully benchmarked against other simulation codes. The primary results have been validated against experimental data from the KSTAR tokamak.

  16. Comparative study of bandwidths in copper delafossites from x-ray emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, D.; Foord, J. S.; Payne, D. J.; Arnold, T.; Aston, D. J.; Egdell, R. G.; Godinho, K. G.; Scanlon, D. O.; Morgan, B. J.; Watson, G. W.; Mugnier, E.; Yaicle, C.; Rougier, A.; Colakerol, L.; Glans, P. A.; Piper, L. F. J.; Smith, K. E.

    2009-12-01

    The widths of the valence bands in the copper (I) delafossites CuGaO2 , CuInO2 , and CuScO2 have been measured by OK -shell x-ray emission spectroscopy and are compared with previous experimental work on CuAlO2 and CuCrO2 . In agreement with recent density-functional theory calculations it is found that the bandwidth decreases in the series CuAlO2>CuGaO2>CuInO2>CuScO2 . It is shown that states at the top of the valence band are of dominant Cu3dz2 atomic character but with significant mixing with O2p states.

  17. Atomic data for stellar spectroscopy: recent successes and remaining needs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sneden, Christopher; Lawler, James E.; Wood, Michael P.; Den Hartog, Elizabeth A.; Cowan, John J.

    2014-11-01

    Stellar chemical composition analyses provide vital insights into galactic nucleosynthesis. Atomic line data are critical inputs to stellar abundance computations. Recent lab studies have made significant progress in refining and extending knowledge of transition probabilities, isotopic wavelength shifts, and hyperfine substructure patterns for the absorption lines that are of most interest to stellar spectroscopists. The observable neutron-capture (n-capture) element species (Z \\gt 30) have been scrutinized in lab studies by several groups. For many species the uncertainties in experimental oscillator strengths are ≤slant 10%, which permits detailed assessment of rapid and slow n-capture nucleosynthesis contributions. In this review, extreme examples of r-process-enriched stars in the galactic halo will be shown, which suggest that the description of observable n-capture abundances in these stars is nearly complete. Unfortunately, there are serious remaining concerns about the reliability of observed abundances of lighter elements. In particular, it is not clear that line formation in real stellar atmospheres is being modeled correctly. But for many elements with Z \\lt 30 the atomic transition data are not yet settled. Highlights will be given of some recent large improvements, with suggestions for the most important needs for the near future.

  18. Single- and multiphoton infrared laser spectroscopy of atomic negative ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheer, Michael

    A pulsed, tunable infrared laser source (0.6-5.2 μm) has been developed on the basis of a commercial dye laser and non-linear optical conversion techniques. This laser source was combined with a keV negative ion beam apparatus in a crossed-beam geometry, with the aim to systematically study several atomic negative ions through a variety of single- and multiphoton detachment experiments. Photodetachment threshold spectra of 21 ionic species (B- , C-, O-, Al- , Si-, Cr-, Co- , Ni-, Cu-, Ge- , Mo-, Rh-, Pd- , Ag-, Sn-, Sb- , Te-, Cs-, Ir- , Pt-, and Bi-) have been recorded, in most cases resulting in very accurate determinations of ionic binding energies, marking substantial improvements over previous experimental values. In fact, several ionic states investigated here had not been observed previously. Different schemes for resonant multiphoton detachment of atomic negative ions were demonstrated for the first time. These studies were conducted with several anions (Si-, Sri- , Sb-, Te-, Ir- , and Pt-) providing highly accurate ionic energy level splittings and clearly demonstrating that multiphoton probes are generally applicable to negative ion structure.

  19. Use of multiwavelength emission from hollow cathode lamp for measurement of state resolved atom density of metal vapor produced by electron beam evaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Majumder, A.; Dikshit, B.; Bhatia, M. S.; Mago, V. K.

    2008-09-15

    State resolved atom population of metal vapor having low-lying metastable states departs from equilibrium value. It needs to be experimentally investigated. This paper reports the use of hollow cathode lamp based atomic absorption spectroscopy technique to measure online the state resolved atom density (ground and metastable) of metal vapor in an atomic beam produced by a high power electron gun. In particular, the advantage of availability of multiwavelength emission in hollow cathode lamp is used to determine the atom density in different states. Here, several transitions pertaining to a given state have also been invoked to obtain the mean value of atom density thereby providing an opportunity for in situ averaging. It is observed that at higher source temperatures the atoms from metastable state relax to the ground state. This is ascribed to competing processes of atom-atom and electron-atom collisions. The formation of collision induced virtual source is inferred from measurement of atom density distribution profile along the width of the atomic beam. The total line-of-sight average atom density measured by absorption technique using hollow cathode lamp is compared to that measured by atomic vapor deposition method. The presence of collisions is further supported by determination of beaming exponent by numerically fitting the data.

  20. Use of multiwavelength emission from hollow cathode lamp for measurement of state resolved atom density of metal vapor produced by electron beam evaporation.

    PubMed

    Majumder, A; Dikshit, B; Bhatia, M S; Mago, V K

    2008-09-01

    State resolved atom population of metal vapor having low-lying metastable states departs from equilibrium value. It needs to be experimentally investigated. This paper reports the use of hollow cathode lamp based atomic absorption spectroscopy technique to measure online the state resolved atom density (ground and metastable) of metal vapor in an atomic beam produced by a high power electron gun. In particular, the advantage of availability of multiwavelength emission in hollow cathode lamp is used to determine the atom density in different states. Here, several transitions pertaining to a given state have also been invoked to obtain the mean value of atom density thereby providing an opportunity for in situ averaging. It is observed that at higher source temperatures the atoms from metastable state relax to the ground state. This is ascribed to competing processes of atom-atom and electron-atom collisions. The formation of collision induced virtual source is inferred from measurement of atom density distribution profile along the width of the atomic beam. The total line-of-sight average atom density measured by absorption technique using hollow cathode lamp is compared to that measured by atomic vapor deposition method. The presence of collisions is further supported by determination of beaming exponent by numerically fitting the data. PMID:19044405

  1. Resonant three-photon ionization spectroscopy of atomic Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Gottwald, T.; Havener, C. C.; Mattolat, C.; Vane, C. R.; Wendt, K.

    2013-12-01

    Laser spectroscopic investigations on high-lying states around the ionization potential (IP) in the atomic spectrum of Fe have been carried out for the development of a practical three-step resonance ionization scheme accessible by Ti: sapphire lasers. A hot cavity laser ion source, typically used at on-line radioactive ion beam production facilities, was employed in this work. Ionization schemes employing high-lying Rydberg and autoionizing states populated by three-photon excitations were established. Five new Rydberg and autoionizing Rydberg series converging to the ground and to the first four excited states of Fe II are reported. Analyses of the Rydberg series yield the value 63 737.686 ± 0.068 cm-1 for the ionization potential of iron.

  2. Resonant three-Photon Ionization Spectroscopy of Atomic Fe

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuan; Gottwald, T.; Havener, Charles C; Mattolat, C.; Vane, C Randy; Wendt, K.

    2013-01-01

    Laser spectroscopic investigations on high-lying states around the ionization potential in the atomic spectrum of Fe have been carried out for development of a practical three-step resonance ionization scheme accessible by Ti:Sapphire lasers. A hot cavity laser ion source typically used at on-line radioactive ion beam production facilities was employed in this work. Ionization schemes employing high-lying Rydberg and autoionizing states populated by three-photon excitations were established. Five new Rydberg and autoionizing Rydberg series converging to the ground and to the first four excited states of Fe II are reported. Analyses of the Rydberg series yield the value 63737.686 0.068 cm-1 for the ionization potential of iron.

  3. Spectroscopy of nonspherical atomic bubbles in solid helium.

    PubMed

    Lebedev, V; Moroshkin, P; Weis, A

    2011-06-30

    We analyze the effect of the host crystal symmetry on the optical spectra of the 6P(1/2)-6S(1/2) and 6P(3/2)-6S(1/2) transitions of atomic Cs in solid (4)He matrices. In particular, we address the deformation of the bubble structures formed by Cs in such quantum crystals. We show that the anisotropy of the stiffness tensor leads to static quadrupolar bubble shape deformations in hexagonally close-packed (hcp) crystals, while the corresponding deformations in the body-centered cubic (bcc) phase of the matrix have a hexadecupolar symmetry. A comparison of the measured excitation spectra with our model calculations allow us to infer quantitative values of the deformation parameters. PMID:21462948

  4. Kilohertz-Resolution Spectroscopy of Cold Atoms with an Optical Frequency Comb

    SciTech Connect

    Fortier, T. M.; Le Coq, Y.; Stalnaker, J. E.; Diddams, S. A.; Oates, C. W.; Hollberg, L.; Ortega, D.

    2006-10-20

    We have performed sub-Doppler spectroscopy on the narrow intercombination line of cold calcium atoms using the amplified output of a femtosecond laser frequency comb. Injection locking of a 657-nm diode laser with a femtosecond comb allows for two regimes of amplification, one in which many lines of the comb are amplified, and one where a single line is predominantly amplified. The output of the laser in both regimes was used to perform kilohertz-level spectroscopy. This experiment demonstrates the potential for high-resolution absolute-frequency spectroscopy over the entire spectrum of the frequency comb output using a single high-finesse optical reference cavity.

  5. Kilohertz-resolution spectroscopy of cold atoms with an optical frequency comb.

    PubMed

    Fortier, T M; Coq, Y Le; Stalnaker, J E; Ortega, D; Diddams, S A; Oates, C W; Hollberg, L

    2006-10-20

    We have performed sub-Doppler spectroscopy on the narrow intercombination line of cold calcium atoms using the amplified output of a femtosecond laser frequency comb. Injection locking of a 657-nm diode laser with a femtosecond comb allows for two regimes of amplification, one in which many lines of the comb are amplified, and one where a single line is predominantly amplified. The output of the laser in both regimes was used to perform kilohertz-level spectroscopy. This experiment demonstrates the potential for high-resolution absolute-frequency spectroscopy over the entire spectrum of the frequency comb output using a single high-finesse optical reference cavity. PMID:17155398

  6. Frequency-modulation spectroscopy of rubidium atoms with an AlGaAs diode laser

    SciTech Connect

    Nakanishi, S.; Ariki, H.; Itoh, H.; Kondo, K.

    1987-11-01

    Frequency-modulation (FM) spectroscopy has been performed on the D/sub 2/ transitions of rubidium atoms with an AlGaAs diode laser at 780 nm. Doppler-broadened hyperfine-structure transitions of /sup 85/Rb and /sup 87/Rb were resolved with no residual amplitude-modulation-induced background signal by modulating the injection current of the laser diode at a low frequency (20--50 MHz) compared with the Doppler width. To obtain Doppler-free spectra, we combined FM spectroscopy with saturation spectroscopy. The results show that the FM spectroscopy technique is sensitive and should be useful for high-resolution spectroscopy, although the resolution was instrument limited and unusual double peaks were observed.

  7. The emission of atoms and molecules accompanying fracture of single-crystal MgO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickinson, J. T.; Jensen, L. C.; Mckay, M. R.; Freund, F.

    1986-01-01

    The emission of particles due to deformation and fracture of materials has been investigated. The emission of electrons (exoelectron emission), ions, neutral species, photons (triboluminescence), as well as long wavelength electromagnetic radiation was observed; collectively these emissions are referred to as fractoemission. This paper describes measurements of the neutral emission accompanying the fracture of single-crystal MgO. Masses detected are tentatively assigned to the emission of H2, CH4, H2O, CO, O2, CO2, and atomic Mg. Other hydrocarbons are also observed. The time dependencies of some of these emissions relative to fracture are presented for two different loading conditions.

  8. Low-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy: An atomic-resolution complement to optical spectroscopies and application to graphene

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kapetanakis, Myron; Zhou, Wu; Oxley, Mark P.; Lee, Jaekwang; Prange, Micah P.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Idrobo Tapia, Juan Carlos; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2015-09-25

    Photon-based spectroscopies have played a central role in exploring the electronic properties of crystalline solids and thin films. They are a powerful tool for probing the electronic properties of nanostructures, but they are limited by lack of spatial resolution. On the other hand, electron-based spectroscopies, e.g., electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), are now capable of subangstrom spatial resolution. Core-loss EELS, a spatially resolved analog of x-ray absorption, has been used extensively in the study of inhomogeneous complex systems. In this paper, we demonstrate that low-loss EELS in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope, which probes low-energy excitations, combined with amore » theoretical framework for simulating and analyzing the spectra, is a powerful tool to probe low-energy electron excitations with atomic-scale resolution. The theoretical component of the method combines density functional theory–based calculations of the excitations with dynamical scattering theory for the electron beam. We apply the method to monolayer graphene in order to demonstrate that atomic-scale contrast is inherent in low-loss EELS even in a perfectly periodic structure. The method is a complement to optical spectroscopy as it probes transitions entailing momentum transfer. The theoretical analysis identifies the spatial and orbital origins of excitations, holding the promise of ultimately becoming a powerful probe of the structure and electronic properties of individual point and extended defects in both crystals and inhomogeneous complex nanostructures. The method can be extended to probe magnetic and vibrational properties with atomic resolution.« less

  9. Low-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy: An atomic-resolution complement to optical spectroscopies and application to graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Kapetanakis, Myron; Zhou, Wu; Oxley, Mark P.; Lee, Jaekwang; Prange, Micah P.; Pennycook, Stephen J.; Idrobo Tapia, Juan Carlos; Pantelides, Sokrates T.

    2015-09-25

    Photon-based spectroscopies have played a central role in exploring the electronic properties of crystalline solids and thin films. They are a powerful tool for probing the electronic properties of nanostructures, but they are limited by lack of spatial resolution. On the other hand, electron-based spectroscopies, e.g., electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS), are now capable of subangstrom spatial resolution. Core-loss EELS, a spatially resolved analog of x-ray absorption, has been used extensively in the study of inhomogeneous complex systems. In this paper, we demonstrate that low-loss EELS in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope, which probes low-energy excitations, combined with a theoretical framework for simulating and analyzing the spectra, is a powerful tool to probe low-energy electron excitations with atomic-scale resolution. The theoretical component of the method combines density functional theory–based calculations of the excitations with dynamical scattering theory for the electron beam. We apply the method to monolayer graphene in order to demonstrate that atomic-scale contrast is inherent in low-loss EELS even in a perfectly periodic structure. The method is a complement to optical spectroscopy as it probes transitions entailing momentum transfer. The theoretical analysis identifies the spatial and orbital origins of excitations, holding the promise of ultimately becoming a powerful probe of the structure and electronic properties of individual point and extended defects in both crystals and inhomogeneous complex nanostructures. The method can be extended to probe magnetic and vibrational properties with atomic resolution.

  10. Spatially Resolved Atomic and Molecular Spectroscopy in Microelectronics Processing Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hebner, G.A.

    1998-10-14

    Plasma processing of microelectronic materials is strongly dependent on the generation and control of neutral radial and ion species generated in a plasma. For example, process uniformity across a #er is drken by a combination of plasma charged particle and neutral uniformity. Due to extensive rexarch and engineering the current generation of commercial plasma reactors can generate very radially uniform ion distributions, usually better than ~ 2 perwnt as determined by ion saturation measurements. Due in part to the difficulty associated with determining the neutral radial distributions, control of the neutral radical uniformity is less well developed. This abstract will review our recent measurements of the spatial distribution of severaI important atomic and molecukw species in inductively coupled plasmas through C12 / BCIJ / Ar containing gas mixtures. Measured species include the ground state Cl and BC1 densities as well as the metastable argon density. The fbeus of this review will be on the experimental techniques and results. In addition to assisting in the development of a fbndarnental understanding of the important pkunna physics, these measurements have been used to benchmark multi dimensional plasma discharge codes.

  11. Detection of viruses: atomic force microscopy and surface enhanced raman spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper demonstrated the capability of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) to function effectively as ultra-sensitive readout tools for chip-scale platforms designed for pathogen detection in complex biological media. AFM allows direct (i.e. label-free) vi...

  12. Circuit Board Analysis for Lead by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy in a Course for Nonscience Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weidenhammer, Jeffrey D.

    2007-01-01

    A circuit board analysis of the atomic absorption spectroscopy, which is used to measure lead content in a course for nonscience majors, is being presented. The experiment can also be used to explain the potential environmental hazards of unsafe disposal of various used electronic equipments.

  13. DETERMINING BERYLLIUM IN DRINKING WATER BY GRAPHITE FURNACE ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A direct graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy method for the analysis of beryllium in drinking water has been derived from a method for determining beryllium in urine. Ammonium phosphomolybdate and ascorbic acid were employed as matrix modifiers. The matrix modifiers s...

  14. Some historic and current aspects of plasma diagnostics using atomic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutton, Roger; Zou, Yaming; Andersson, Martin; Brage, Tomas; Martinson, Indrek

    2010-07-01

    In this paper we give a short introduction to the use of atomic spectroscopy in plasma diagnostics. Both older works and exciting new branches of atomic physics, which have relevance to diagnostics, are discussed. In particular we focus on forbidden lines in Be-like ions, lines sensitive to magnetic fields and levels which have a lifetime dependence on the nuclear spin of the ion, i.e. f-dependent lifetimes. Finally we mention a few examples of where tokamaks, instead of needing atomic data, actually provide new data and lead to developments in atomic structure studies. This paper is dedicated to the memory of Nicol J Peacock (1931-2008), a distinguished plasma scientist who contributed much to the field of spectroscopy applied to plasma, and in particular, fusion plasma diagnostics. During the final stages of the preparation of this paper Professor Indrek Martinson passed away peacefully in his sleep on 14 November 2009. Indrek will be greatly missed by many people, both for his contributions to atomic spectroscopy and for his great kindness and friendliness, which many of us experienced.

  15. Spectroscopy for cold atom gases in periodically modulated optical lattice potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokuno, Akiyuki; Giamarchi, Thierry

    2011-03-01

    Cold atoms in optical lattices are vigorously studied experimentally and theoretically as one of the candidates for a quantum simulator. At the same time, further development of probes to microscopic structure of systems is needed. We propose a novel spectroscopy in cold atom experiments by use of periodic phase-modulation of optical lattice potentials. Corresponding to the statistics of atoms, we formulate the different observables: The energy absorption rate for bosonic atom gases, and the doublon production rate for fermionic atom gases. These observables are formulated within the linear response theory. Interestingly they are given by the imaginary part of the retarded current-current correlation function which is familiar as a quantity corresponding to an optical conductivity. As an example, we discuss one-dimensional Mott insulating state, and also compare our spectroscopy with another known spectroscopy by amplitude-modulation of an optical lattice. This work was supported in part by the Swiss SNF under MaNEP and division II.

  16. Optical emission spectroscopy of argon and hydrogen-containing plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siepa, Sarah; Danko, Stephan; Tsankov, Tsanko V.; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Czarnetzki, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) on neutral argon is applied to investigate argon, hydrogen and hydrogen-silane plasmas. The spectra are analyzed using an extensive collisional-radiative model (CRM), from which the electron density and the electron temperature (or mean energy) can be calculated. The CRM also yields insight into the importance of different excited species and kinetic processes. The OES measurements are performed on pure argon plasmas at intermediate pressure. Besides, hydrogen and hydrogen-silane plasmas are investigated using argon as a trace gas. Especially for the gas mixture discharges, CRMs for low and high pressure differ substantially. The commonly used line-ratio technique is found to lose its sensitivity for gas mixture discharges at higher pressure. A solution using absolutely calibrated line intensities is proposed. The effect of radiation trapping and the shape of the electron energy distribution function on the results are discussed in detail, as they have been found to significantly influence the results. This work was supported by the Ruhr University Research School PLUS, funded by Germany's Excellence Initiative [DFG GSC 98/3].

  17. Avalanche photodiode based detector for beam emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dunai, D.; Zoletnik, S.; Sarkoezi, J.; Field, A. R.

    2010-10-15

    An avalanche photodiode based (APD) detector for the visible wavelength range was developed for low light level, high frequency beam emission spectroscopy (BES) experiments in fusion plasmas. This solid state detector has higher quantum efficiency than photomultiplier tubes, and unlike normal photodiodes, it has internal gain. This paper describes the developed detector as well as the noise model of the electronic circuit. By understanding the noise sources and the amplification process, the optimal amplifier and APD reverse voltage setting can be determined, where the signal-to-noise ratio is the highest for a given photon flux. The calculations are compared to the absolute calibration results of the implemented circuit. It was found that for a certain photon flux range, relevant for BES measurements ({approx_equal}10{sup 8}-10{sup 10} photons/s), the new detector is superior to both photomultipliers and photodiodes, although it does not require cryogenic cooling of any component. The position of this photon flux window sensitively depends on the parameters of the actual experimental implementation (desired bandwidth, detector size, etc.) Several detector units based on these developments have been built and installed in various tokamaks. Some illustrative results are presented from the 8-channel trial BES system installed at Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) and the 16-channel BES system installed at the Torus Experiment for Technology Oriented Research (TEXTOR).

  18. Rapid evaluation of ion thruster lifetime using optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, B. A.; Mantenieks, M. A.; Parsons, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    A major life-limiting phenomenon of electric thrusters is the sputter erosion of discharge chamber components. Thrusters for space propulsion are required to operate for extended periods of time, usually in excess of 10,000 hr. Lengthy and very costly life-tests in high-vacuum facilities have been required in the past to determine the erosion rates of thruster components. Alternative methods for determining erosion rates which can be performed in relatively short periods of time at considerably lower costs are studied. An attempt to relate optical emission intensity from an ion bombarded surface (screen grid) to the sputtering rate of that surface is made. The model used a kinetic steady-state (KSS) approach, balancing the rates of population and depopulation of ten low-lying excited states of the sputtered molybdenum atom (MoI) with those of the ground state to relate the spectral intensities of the various transitions of the MoI to the population densities. Once this is accomplished, the population density can be related to the sputtering rate of the target. Radiative and collisional modes of excitation and decay are considered. Since actual data has not been published for MoI excitation rate and decay constants, semiempirical equations are used. The calculated sputtering rate and intensity is compared to the measured intensity and sputtering rates of the 8 and 30 cm ion thrusters.

  19. Rapid evaluation of ion thruster lifetime using optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rock, B. A.; Parsons, M. L.; Mantenieks, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    A major life-limiting phenomenon of electric thrusters is the sputter erosion of discharge chamber components. Thrusters for space propulsion are required to operate for extended periods of time, usually in excess of 10,000 hr. Lengthy and very costly life-tests in high-vacuum facilities have been required in the past to determine the erosion rates of thruster components. Alternative methods for determining erosion rates which can be performed in relatively short periods of time at considerably lower costs are studied. An attempt to relate optical emission intensity from an ion bombarded surface (screen grid) to the sputtering rate of that surface is made. The model used a kinetic steady-state (KSS) approach, balancing the rates of population and depopulation of ten low-lying excited states of the sputtered molybdenum atom (MoI) with those of the ground state to relate the spectral intensities of the various transitions of the MoI to the population densities. Once this is accomplished, the population density can be related to the sputting rate of the target. Radiative and collisional modes of excitation and decay are considered. Since actual data has not been published for MoI excitation rate and decay constants, semiempirical equations are used. The calculated sputtering rate and intensity is compared to the measured intensity and sputtering rates of the 8 and 30 cm ion thrusters.

  20. Innovations in X-ray-induced electron emission spectroscopy (XIEES)

    SciTech Connect

    Pogrebitsky, K. Ju. Sharkov, M. D.

    2010-06-15

    Currently, a pressing need has arisen for controlling the local atomic and electron structure of materials irrespective of their aggregate state. Efficient approaches to the studies of short-range order are based on phenomena accompanied by interference of secondary electrons excited by primary X-ray radiation. The set of such approaches are commonly referred to as the X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) methods. In reality, the XAFS methods are based on the use of synchrotron radiation and applied to structural studies in two modes of measurements, transmission analysis and recording of secondary effects. Only two such effects-specifically, the X-ray fluorescence an d X-ray-induced electron emission effect-are commonly discussed. Access to synchrotron accelerators is problematic for most researchers, so a demand is created for designing laboratory systems that make direct access possible. Since the power of laboratory systems is much lower than that of synchrotrons, it is essential to use much more efficient detectors of secondary electrons. In addition, it is of interest to analyze energy characteristics with a high spatial resolution. Channel multipliers and multichannel boards are incapable of providing such a possibility. For this reason, an improved electron detector has been developed to analyze the photoemission effect in an accelerating field.

  1. Determination of Calcium in Cereal with Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy: An Experiment for a Quantitative Methods of Analysis Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bazzi, Ali; Kreuz, Bette; Fischer, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    An experiment for determination of calcium in cereal using two-increment standard addition method in conjunction with flame atomic absorption spectroscopy (FAAS) is demonstrated. The experiment is intended to introduce students to the principles of atomic absorption spectroscopy giving them hands on experience using quantitative methods of…

  2. Fluorescence spectroscopy in the nanosecond range for matrix-isolated Cu atoms and dimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiggenhauser, H.; Kolb, D. M.; Rotermund, H. H.; Schrittenlacher, W.; Schroeder, W.

    1985-11-01

    Synchrotron radiation in the single-bunch mode was employed to study time-resolved emission from Cu atoms and dimers isolated in a Ne matrix. The decay time of the matrix-related emission at 3.5 eV for Cu in Ne after excitation of the 4s → 4p resonance transition was determined as 6.9±0.3 ns, while excitation into higher-lying 3d → 4p transitions resulted in a much slower decay of the 3.5 eV emission. From analysis of rise and decay times, a detailed diagram for energy dissipation in matrix-isolated Cu atoms has been derived. The B → X (Σ u → Σ g) emission of Cu 2 in Ne has a first-order decay time of about 10 ns.

  3. Self-corrected Sensors Based On Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy For Atom Flux Measurements In Molecular Beam Epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Yingge; Droubay, Timothy C.; Liyu, Andrey V.; Li, Guosheng; Chambers, Scott A.

    2014-04-24

    A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device (CCD) detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ a non-resonant line or a resonant line with lower absorbance from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  4. Self-corrected sensors based on atomic absorption spectroscopy for atom flux measurements in molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Du, Y. E-mail: scott.chambers@pnnl.gov; Liyu, A. V.; Droubay, T. C.; Chambers, S. A. E-mail: scott.chambers@pnnl.gov; Li, G.

    2014-04-21

    A high sensitivity atom flux sensor based on atomic absorption spectroscopy has been designed and implemented to control electron beam evaporators and effusion cells in a molecular beam epitaxy system. Using a high-resolution spectrometer and a two-dimensional charge coupled device detector in a double-beam configuration, we employ either a non-resonant line or a resonant line with low cross section from the same hollow cathode lamp as the reference for nearly perfect background correction and baseline drift removal. This setup also significantly shortens the warm-up time needed compared to other sensor technologies and drastically reduces the noise coming from the surrounding environment. In addition, the high-resolution spectrometer allows the most sensitive resonant line to be isolated and used to provide excellent signal-to-noise ratio.

  5. Combined low-temperature scanning tunneling/atomic force microscope for atomic resolution imaging and site-specific force spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Udo; Albers, Boris J.; Liebmann, Marcus; Schwendemann, Todd C.; Baykara, Mehmet Z.; Heyde, Markus; Salmeron, Miquel; Altman, Eric I.; Schwarz, Udo D.

    2008-02-27

    The authors present the design and first results of a low-temperature, ultrahigh vacuum scanning probe microscope enabling atomic resolution imaging in both scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM) modes. A tuning-fork-based sensor provides flexibility in selecting probe tip materials, which can be either metallic or nonmetallic. When choosing a conducting tip and sample, simultaneous STM/NC-AFM data acquisition is possible. Noticeable characteristics that distinguish this setup from similar systems providing simultaneous STM/NC-AFM capabilities are its combination of relative compactness (on-top bath cryostat needs no pit), in situ exchange of tip and sample at low temperatures, short turnaround times, modest helium consumption, and unrestricted access from dedicated flanges. The latter permits not only the optical surveillance of the tip during approach but also the direct deposition of molecules or atoms on either tip or sample while they remain cold. Atomic corrugations as low as 1 pm could successfully be resolved. In addition, lateral drifts rates of below 15 pm/h allow long-term data acquisition series and the recording of site-specific spectroscopy maps. Results obtained on Cu(111) and graphite illustrate the microscope's performance.

  6. Atomic resolution imaging and spectroscopy of barium atoms and functional groups on graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Boothroyd, C B; Moreno, M S; Duchamp, M; Kovács, A; Monge, N; Morales, G M; Barbero, C A; Dunin-Borkowski, R E

    2014-10-01

    We present an atomic resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning TEM (STEM) study of the local structure and composition of graphene oxide modified with Ba(2+). In our experiments, which are carried out at 80kV, the acquisition of contamination-free high-resolution STEM images is only possible while heating the sample above 400°C using a highly stable heating holder. Ba atoms are identified spectroscopically in electron energy-loss spectrum images taken at 800°C and are associated with bright contrast in high-angle annular dark-field STEM images. The spectrum images also show that Ca and O occur together and that Ba is not associated with a significant concentration of O. The electron dose used for spectrum imaging results in beam damage to the specimen, even at elevated temperature. It is also possible to identify Ba atoms in high-resolution TEM images acquired using shorter exposure times at room temperature, thereby allowing the structure of graphene oxide to be studied using complementary TEM and STEM techniques over a wide range of temperatures. PMID:24726278

  7. Characterization of an atmospheric helium plasma jet by relative and absolute optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Qing; Nikiforov, Anton Yu; González, Manuel Á.; Leys, Christophe; Pei Lu, Xin

    2013-02-01

    The characteristics of plasma temperatures (gas temperature and electron excitation temperature) and electron density in a pulsed-dc excited atmospheric helium plasma jet are studied by relative and absolute optical emission spectroscopy (OES). High-resolution OES is performed for the helium and hydrogen lines for the determination of electron density through the Stark broadening mechanism. A superposition fitting method composed of two component profiles corresponding to two different electron densities is developed to fit the investigated lines. Electron densities of the orders of magnitude of 1021 and 1020 m-3 are characterized for the center and edge regions in the jet discharge when the applied voltage is higher than 13.0 kV. The atomic state distribution function (ASDF) of helium demonstrates that the discharge deviates from the Boltzmann-Saha equilibrium state, especially for the helium lower levels, which are significantly overpopulated. Local electron excitation temperatures T13 and Tspec corresponding to the lower and upper parts of the helium ASDF are defined and found to range from 1.2 eV to 1.4 eV and 0.2 eV to 0.3 eV, respectively. A comparative analysis shows that the Saha balance is valid in the discharge for helium atoms at high excited states.

  8. Emission spectroscopy of a microhollow cathode discharge plasma in helium-water gas mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Namba, S.; Yamasaki, T.; Hane, Y.; Fukuhara, D.; Kozue, K.; Takiyama, K.

    2011-10-01

    A dc microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) plasma was generated inflowing helium gas containing water vapor. The cathode hole diameters were 0.3, 0.7, 1.0, and 2.0 mm, each with a length of 2.0 mm. Emission spectroscopy was carried out to investigate the discharge mode and to determine the plasma parameters. For the 0.3-mm cathode, stable MHCDs in an abnormal glow mode existed at pressures up to 100 kPa, whereas for larger diameters, a plasma was not generated at atmospheric pressure. An analysis of the lineshapes relevant to He at 667.8 nm and to H{alpha} at 656.3 nm implied an electron density and gas temperature of 2 x 10{sup 14} cm{sup -3} and 1100 K, respectively, for a 100-kPa discharge in the negative glow region. The dependence of the OH band, and H{alpha} intensities on the discharge current exhibited different behaviors. Specifically, the OH spectrum had a maximum intensity at a certain current, while the H atom intensity kept increasing with the discharge current. This observation implies that a high concentration of OH radicals results in quenching, leading to the production of H atoms via the reaction OH + e{sup -}{yields} O + H + e{sup -}.

  9. Monte Carlo simulation of the atomic master equation for spontaneous emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dum, R.; Zoller, P.; Ritsch, H.

    1992-04-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of the atomic master equation for spontaneous emission in terms of atomic wave functions is developed. Realizations of the time evolution of atomic wave functions are constructed that correspond to an ensemble of atoms driven by laser light undergoing a sequence of spontaneous emissions. The atomic decay times are drawn according to the photon count distribution of the driven atom. Each quantum jump of the atomic electron projects the atomic wave function to the ground state of the atom. Our theory is based on a stochastic interpretation and generalization of Mollow's pure-state analysis of resonant light scattering, and the Srinivas-Davies theory of continuous measurements in photodetection. An extension of the theory to include mechanical light effects and a generalization to atomic systems with Zeeman substructure are given. We illustrate the method by simulating the solutions of the optical Bloch equations for two-level systems, and laser cooling of a two-level atom in an ion trap where the center-of-mass motion of the atom is described quantum mechanically.

  10. Temperature measurement of wood flame based on the double line method of atomic emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Xiaojian; Liu, Zhenhua; Sang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Aimed at the testing requirement of the transient high temperature in explosion field and the bore of barrel weapon, the temperature measurement system of double line of atomic emission spectrum was designed, the method of flame spectrum testing system were used for experimental analysis. The experimental study of wood burning spectra was done with flame spectrum testing system. The measured spectra contained atomic emission spectra of the elements K, Na, and the excitation ease of two kinds atomic emission spectra was analyzed. The temperature was calculated with two spectral lines of K I 766.5nm and 769.9nm. The results show that, compared with Na, the excitation temperature of K atomic emission spectra is lower. By double line method, the temperature of wood burning is 1040K, and error is 3.7%.

  11. Contribution of nitrogen atoms and ions to the luminescence emission during femotosecond filamentation in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Su-Yu; Li, Shu-Chang; Sui, Lai-Zhi; Jiang, Yuan-Fei; Chen, An-Min; Jin, Ming-Xing

    2016-01-01

    During femtosecond filamentation in air, nitrogen molecules and corresponding molecular ions undergo dissociation due to the high intensity of laser pulses, generating nitrogen atoms and atomic ions. The generated atoms and atomic ions emit luminescence in the UV range, which superposes on those emissions for the neutral and ionic nitrogen molecules. Here we report on a significant difference between the emission behavior of the 391-nm line and the other spectral lines under different pump laser polarizations. We attribute this difference to the contribution of the atomic ions to the luminescence emission around 391 nm. The difference becomes more evident in tightly focusing cases, providing an indirect but effective evidence for the dissociation of nitrogen molecular ions.

  12. Precision spectroscopy of light kaonic atom X-rays in the SIDDHARTA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cargnelli, M.; Bazzi, M.; Beer, G.; Bombelli, L.; Bragadireanu, A. M.; Curceanu, C.; Fiorini, C.; Frizzi, T.; Ghio, F.; Girolami, B.; Guaraldo, C.; Hayano, R.; Iliescu, M.; Ishiwatari, T.; Iwasaki, M.; Kienle, P.; Lechner, P.; Sandri, P. Levi; Longoni, A.; Lucherini, V.; Marton, J.; Okada, S.; Pietreanu, D.; Ponta, T.; Vidal, A. Romero; Scordo, A.; Shi, H.-X.; Sirghi, D. L.; Sirghi, F.; Soltau, H.; Strüder, L.; Tatsuno, H.; Doce, O. Vazquez; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.

    2011-10-01

    The KN system at rest makes a sensitive testing ground for low energy QCD. At the DAΦNE electron-positron collider of Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati we study kaonic atoms, taking advantage of the low-energy kaons from Φ-mesons decaying nearly at rest. The DEAR (DAΦNE Exotic Atom Research) experiment at LNF delivered the most precise data on kaonic hydrogen up to now. DEAR and its follow-up experiment SIDDHARTA (Silicon Drift Detector for Hadronic Atom Research by Timing Application) are using X-ray spectroscopy of kaonic atoms to measure the strong interaction induced shift and width of the ground state. SIDDHARTA is the first experiment on kaonic helium-3 and deuterium ever, and kaonic hydrogen was remeasured with improved precision.

  13. Precision spectroscopy of light kaonic atom X-rays in the SIDDHARTA experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Cargnelli, M.; Ishiwatari, T.; Marton, J.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.; Bazzi, M.; Bragadireanu, A. M.; Curceanu, C.; Guaraldo, C.; Iliescu, M.; Sandri, P. Levi; Lucherini, V.; Okada, S.; Pietreanu, D.; Vidal, A. Romero; Scordo, A.; Sirghi, D. L.; Sirghi, F; Doce, O. Vazquez; Beer, G.

    2011-10-24

    The KN system at rest makes a sensitive testing ground for low energy QCD. At the DA{Phi}NE electron-positron collider of Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati we study kaonic atoms, taking advantage of the low-energy kaons from {Phi}-mesons decaying nearly at rest. The DEAR (DA{Phi}NE Exotic Atom Research) experiment at LNF delivered the most precise data on kaonic hydrogen up to now. DEAR and its follow-up experiment SIDDHARTA (Silicon Drift Detector for Hadronic Atom Research by Timing Application) are using X-ray spectroscopy of kaonic atoms to measure the strong interaction induced shift and width of the ground state. SIDDHARTA is the first experiment on kaonic helium-3 and deuterium ever, and kaonic hydrogen was remeasured with improved precision.

  14. BATMAN beam properties characterization by the beam emission spectroscopy diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Bonomo, F.; Ruf, B.; Schiesko, L.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Riedl, R.; Wünderlich, D.; Barbisan, M.; Pasqualotto, R.; Serianni, G.; Cristofaro, S.

    2015-04-08

    The ITER neutral beam heating systems are based on the production and acceleration of negative ions (H/D) up to 1 MV. The requirements for the beam properties are strict: a low core beam divergence (< 0.4 °) together with a low source pressure (≤ 0.3 Pa) would permit to reduce the ion losses along the beamline, keeping the stripping particle losses below 30%. However, the attainment of such beam properties is not straightforward. At IPP, the negative ion source testbed BATMAN (BAvarian Test MAchine for Negative ions) allows for deepening the knowledge of the determination of the beam properties. One of the diagnostics routinely used to this purpose is the Beam Emission Spectroscopy (BES): the H{sub α} light emitted in the beam is detected and the corresponding spectra are evaluated to estimate the beam divergence and the stripping losses. The BES number of lines of sight in BATMAN has been recently increased: five horizontal lines of sight providing a vertical profile of the beam permit to characterize the negative ion beam properties in relation to the source parameters. Different methods of H{sub α} spectra analysis are here taken into account and compared for the estimation of the beam divergence and the amount of stripping. In particular, to thoroughly study the effect of the space charge compensation on the beam divergence, an additional hydrogen injection line has been added in the tank, which allows for setting different background pressure values (one order of magnitude, from about 0.04 Pa up to the source pressure) in the beam drift region.

  15. [Influence of Flame Emission Spectroscopy on K measurement Using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-hao; Song, Qiang; Alwahabi, Zeyad T; Yao, Qiang

    2015-04-01

    During the combustion of coal or biomass, the inherent alkali metals in the fuel will be released to the gas phase. The released alkali species condensed during the cooling of the flue gas, which may subsequently cause problems with ash deposition and corrosion in thermal fuel conversion systems. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is an effective technique to measure the alkali species in the plume of burning coal or biomass. In this study, an LIBS experimental system with a flat flame burner was set up, and the Flame Emission Spectroscopy (FES) and LIBS of K in the flat flame environment were measured using different ICCD gate-width times. The experimental results revealed that with the same ICCD gate-width time, the LIBS intensity of K was higher than the FES intensity of K in the flat flame. With the increase of the ICCD gate-width time, both intensities increased, but their increase rates were different: the increase rate of the LIBS intensity of K was firstly fast then became slow, but the increase rate of the FES intensity of K was constant. Furthermore, the intensity ratio of LIBS to FES of K increased monotonically with the ICCD gate-width time in the range of 0-8 µs, until reaching approximately 4. Then, further increasing the ICCD gate-width time, such ratio decreased slowly with an asymptote value of 1. After analyzing the influences of the FES on the LIBS measurement of K in a flame condition, it is proposed that to minimize such influence, the optimization of the ICCD gate-width time was necessary, which maximized the intensity ratio of LIBS to FES-of K and facilitated the measurement accuracy of K in the flame environment using LIBS. PMID:26197597

  16. High-pressure combustor exhaust emissions with improved air-atomizing and conventional pressure-atomizing fuel nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.; Norgren, C. T.

    1973-01-01

    A high-pressure combustor segment 0.456 meter (18 in.) long with a maximum cross section of 0.153 by 0.305 meter (6 by 12 in.) was tested with specially designed air-atomizing and conventional pressure-atomizing fuel nozzles at inlet-air temperatures of 340 to 755 k (610 deg to 1360 R), reference velocities of 12.4 to 26.1 meters per second (41 to 86 ft/sec), and fuel-air ratios of 0.008 to 0.020. Increasing inlet-air pressure from 4 to 20 atmospheres generally increased smoke number and nitric oxide, but decreased carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbon concentrations with air-atomizing and pressure-atomizing nozzles. Emission indexes for carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbons were lower at 4, 10, and 20 atmospheres, and nitric oxide emission indexes were lower at 10 and 20 atmospheres with air-atomizing than with pressure-atomizing nozzles.

  17. A CAVITY RING-DOWN SPECTROSCOPY MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher C. Carter, Ph.D.

    2003-04-01

    Accurate reporting of mercury concentration requires a detailed model that includes experimental parameters that vary, such as: pressure, temperature, concentration, absorption cross-section, and isotopic structure etc. During this quarter a theoretical model has been developed to model the 253.7 nm mercury transition. In addition, while testing the interferent species SO{sub 2}, SRD was able to determine the absorption cross-section experimentally and add this to the theoretical model. Assuming that the baseline losses are due to the mirror reflectivity and SO{sub 2}, SRD can now determine the concentrations of both mercury and SO{sub 2} from the data taken. For the CRD instrument to perform as a continuous emission monitor it will be required to monitor mercury concentrations over extended periods of time. The stability of monitoring mercury concentrations over time with the CRD apparatus was tested during the past quarter. During a test which monitored the mercury concentration every 2 seconds it was found that the standard deviation, of a signal from about 1.25 ppb Hg, was only 30 ppt. SRD continued interferent gas testing during this past quarter. This included creating a simulated flue gas composed of the gases tested individually by SRD. The detection limits for mercury, although dependent on the concentration of SO{sub 2} in the simulated gas matrix, remained well below the ppb range. It was determined that for the gases tested the only measurable changes in the baseline level occurred for SO{sub 2} and mercury. Speciation studies continued with mercury chloride (HgCl{sub 2}). This included checking for spectral speciation with both Hg and HgCl{sub 2} present in the CRD cavity. There was no observable spectral shift. Also a pyrolysis oven was incorporated into the gas delivery system both for tests with HgCl{sub 2} as well as atomization of the entire gas stream. The pyrolysis tests conducted have been inconclusive thus far.

  18. Optical emission spectroscopy of oxygen plasma induced by IR CO2 pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, J. J.; Santos, M.; Díaz, L.; Poyato, J. M. L.

    2008-11-01

    Laser-induced breakdown (LIB) spectroscopy in oxygen at room temperature and pressures ranging from 4.6 to 75 kPa was studied using a high-power transverse excitation atmospheric CO2 laser (λ = 9.621 and 10.591 µm τFWHM = 64 ns; power densities ranging from 0.87 to 6.31 GW cm-2). The spectrum of the generated plasma is dominated by emission of strong O, O+ and weak O2+ atomic lines. Excitation temperatures of 31 500 ± 1600 K and 23 000 ± 3000 K were estimated by means of O2+ and O+ ionic lines, respectively. Electron number densities of the order of (3.5-16.5) × 1016 cm-3 were deduced from the Stark broadening of several ionic O+ lines. The characteristics of the spectral emission intensities from different species have been investigated as functions of the oxygen pressure and laser irradiance. Optical breakdown threshold intensities in O2 at 10.591 µm have been determined. The physical processes leading to LIB of oxygen have been analysed.

  19. Time-resolved emission spectroscopy of gadolinium vanadate ceramics (GdVO4:Bi3+)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leppert, J.; Peudenier, S.; Bayer, E.; Grabmaier, B. C.; Blasse, G.

    1994-07-01

    The preparation of GdVO4:Bi3+ ceramics is indicated. Bismuth shows a strong tendency to evaporate during the sintering process. Time-resolved emission spectroscopy shows for sufficiently low Bi3+ concentrations subsequently: blue VO{4/3-}emission with a decay time corresponding to the transfer rate (106 s-1), yellow VO{4/3-}-Bi3+ emission, rare-earth impurity emission and VO{4/3-}-Bi3+ afterglow.

  20. High-power Ti:sapphire lasers for spectroscopy of antiprotonic atoms and radioactive ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, M.; Dax, A.; Soter, A.

    The ASACUSA collaboration has developed injection-seeded Ti:sapphire lasers of linewidth Γpl ˜ 6 MHz, pulse energy 50-100 mJ, and output wavelength λ = 726-941 nm. They are being used in two-photon spectroscopy experiments of antiprotonic helium atoms at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) of CERN. Ti:sapphire lasers of larger linewidth Γpl ˜ 100 MHz but more robust design will also be used in collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy (CRIS) experiments of neutron-deficient francium ions at the ISOLDE facility.

  1. High-power Ti:sapphire lasers for spectroscopy of antiprotonic atoms and radioactive ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, M.; Dax, A.; Soter, A.

    2012-12-01

    The ASACUSA collaboration has developed injection-seeded Ti:sapphire lasers of linewidth Γpl ˜ 6 MHz, pulse energy 50-100 mJ, and output wavelength λ = 726-941 nm. They are being used in two-photon spectroscopy experiments of antiprotonic helium atoms at the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) of CERN. Ti:sapphire lasers of larger linewidth Γpl ˜ 100 MHz but more robust design will also be used in collinear resonance ionization spectroscopy (CRIS) experiments of neutron-deficient francium ions at the ISOLDE facility.

  2. Determination of trace elements in soil, leaves and fruits of Quercus brantii grown in southwestern Iran by atomic spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammadzadeh, A.; Samadi-Maybodi, A.; Khodadoust, S.

    2013-09-01

    Quercus brantii acorn is rich of some useful mineral elements such as K, Fe and Zn. The content of these mineral elements in Quercus are dependent on their region and environmental conditions. Q. brantii grown naturally in different regions of Iran especially in Kohgiloye va Boyer Ahmad province (southwestern of Iran). In this study total concentration of Fe, Zn and K elements were determined using atomic absorption and emission spectroscopy in fruits, leaves of Q. brantii and also in the soils where this plant was grown. Statistical evaluation (ANOVA test) was employed for all measurements. Results confirmed that the concentration of elements in fruit and leave depended on area which the plant is growth. The transport factor of elements was also considered.

  3. Work on an Atomic Beam Apparatus for Precision Laser Spectroscopy of Tritium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNeil, David; Khademian, Ali; Shiner, David

    2004-05-01

    An apparatus for precision spectroscopy of tritium is being constructed. One goal is to measure the nuclear size of tritium using the 1S to 2S transition. The apparatus is designed to reduce the amount of radioactive atoms required and minimize hydrogen background. Storing and releasing tritium in an active getter will help to reuse tritium atoms while minimizing contamination. We have investigated the use of several materials such as uranium, titanium and palladium for storing hydrogen isotopes. Preliminary results for tritium storage and hydrogen outgassing in the vacuum chamber will be presented.

  4. Role of transient processes in resonance line spectroscopy of caesium atoms in cells with antirelaxation coating

    SciTech Connect

    Sevost'yanov, D I; Yakovlev, V P; Kozlov, A N; Vasil'ev, V V; Zibrov, S A; Velichansky, Vladimir L

    2013-07-31

    We study the peculiarities of the absorption spectra in D{sub 1,2}-lines of Cs, caused by optical pumping in cells with antirelaxation coating. In these cells the internal state of the atom, which arose under optical pumping by a monochromatic laser field, is preserved with a high probability in a collision with the wall. As a result, the optical pumping action extends to the entire volume of the cell and to all the velocities of the atoms. This leads to the speed-dependent scanning distortions of the absorption line profile. The detected features should be considered when using laserpumped quantum magnetometers with antirelaxation-coated cells. (laser spectroscopy)

  5. Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy of Metastable Atoms in Dusty Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang Tung Do; Hippler, Rainer

    2008-09-07

    Spatial density profile of neon metastable produced in dusty plasma was investigated by means of tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. The line averaged measured density drops about 30% with the presence of dust particles. The observations provide evidence for a significant interaction between atoms and powder particles which are important for energy transfer from plasma to particles. The power per unit area absorbed by dust particles due to the collision of metastable atoms with dust particle surface is about some tens of mW/m{sup 2}.

  6. [Laser resonance ionization spectroscopy of even-parity autoionization states of cerium atom].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-ming; Zhu, Feng-rong; Zhang, Zi-bin; Ren, Xiang-jun; Deng, Hu; Zhai, Li-hua; Zhang, Li-xing

    2004-12-01

    This paper describes the investigation of even-parity autoionization states of cerium atoms by three-step three-color resonance ionization spectroscopy (RIS). Twenty-seven odd-parity highly excited levels, whose transition probability is high, were used in this research. One hundred and forty-one autoionization states were found by these channels with the third-step laser scanning in the wavelength range of 634-670 nm. The ionization probabilities of different channels, which had higher cross sections, were compared. On the basis of this, eight optimal photoionization schemes of cerium atom have been given. PMID:15828309

  7. Two-dimensional B- B NMR spectroscopy: coupling through bridging hydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gaines, D.F.; Edvenson, G.M.; Hill, T.G.; Adams, B.R.

    1987-06-03

    Application of B- B two-dimensional correlated spectroscopy (COSY) to a variety of boranes and substituted boranes has shown coupling between B nuclei linked by bridging hydrogen atoms to be more common than previously observed. Coupling between the hydrogen-bridged boron nuclei in decaborane(14), 2-(CH3)B5H8, B4H10, (Me2N)2B4H8, ( -Me2NCH2)B5H8, and ( -Me3CCH=N)B5H8 are reported. The factors that contribute to the detection of coupling between hydrogen-bridged boron atoms are discussed.

  8. Transport spectroscopy of a graphene quantum dot fabricated by atomic force microscope nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puddy, R. K.; Chua, C. J.; Buitelaar, M. R.

    2013-10-01

    We report low-temperature transport spectroscopy of a graphene quantum dot fabricated by atomic force microscope nanolithography. The excellent spatial resolution of the atomic force microscope allows us to reliably fabricate quantum dots with short constrictions of less than 15 nm in length. Transport measurements demonstrate that the device is dominated by a single quantum dot over a wide gate range. The electron spin system of the quantum dot is investigated by applying an in-plane magnetic field. The results are consistent with a Landé g-factor ˜2 but no regular spin filling sequence is observed, most likely due to disorder.

  9. High-resolution X-ray emission spectroscopy with transition-edge sensors: present performance and future potential.

    PubMed

    Uhlig, J; Doriese, W B; Fowler, J W; Swetz, D S; Jaye, C; Fischer, D A; Reintsema, C D; Bennett, D A; Vale, L R; Mandal, U; O'Neil, G C; Miaja-Avila, L; Joe, Y I; El Nahhas, A; Fullagar, W; Gustafsson, F Parnefjord; Sundström, V; Kurunthu, D; Hilton, G C; Schmidt, D R; Ullom, J N

    2015-05-01

    X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) is a powerful element-selective tool to analyze the oxidation states of atoms in complex compounds, determine their electronic configuration, and identify unknown compounds in challenging environments. Until now the low efficiency of wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectrometer technology has limited the use of XES, especially in combination with weaker laboratory X-ray sources. More efficient energy-dispersive detectors have either insufficient energy resolution because of the statistical limits described by Fano or too low counting rates to be of practical use. This paper updates an approach to high-resolution X-ray emission spectroscopy that uses a microcalorimeter detector array of superconducting transition-edge sensors (TESs). TES arrays are discussed and compared with conventional methods, and shown under which circumstances they are superior. It is also shown that a TES array can be integrated into a table-top time-resolved X-ray source and a soft X-ray synchrotron beamline to perform emission spectroscopy with good chemical sensitivity over a very wide range of energies. PMID:25931095

  10. Diffusive and inelastic scattering in ballistic-electron-emission spectroscopy and ballistic-electron-emission microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, E.Y.; Turner, B.R.; Schowalter, L.J.

    1993-07-01

    Ballistic-electron-emission microscopy (BEEM) of Au/Si(001) n type was done to study whether elastic scattering in the Au overlayer is dominant. It was found that there is no dependence of the BEEM current on the relative gradient of the Au surface with respect to the Si interface, and this demonstrates that significant elastic scattering must occur in the Au overlayer. Ballistic-electron-emission spectroscopy (BEES) was also done, and, rather than using the conventional direct-current BEES, alternating-current (ac) BEES was done on Au/Si and also on Au/PtSi/Si(001) n type. The technique of ac BEES was found to give linear threshold for the Schottky barrier, and it also clearly showed the onset of electron-hole pair creation and other inelastic scattering events. The study of device quality PtSi in Au/PtSi/Si(001) yielded an attenuation length of 4 nm for electrons of energy 1 eV above the PtSi Fermi energy. 20 refs., 5 figs.

  11. Bayesian modelling of the emission spectrum of the Joint European Torus Lithium Beam Emission Spectroscopy system.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Sehyun; Svensson, J; Brix, M; Ghim, Y-C

    2016-02-01

    A Bayesian model of the emission spectrum of the JET lithium beam has been developed to infer the intensity of the Li I (2p-2s) line radiation and associated uncertainties. The detected spectrum for each channel of the lithium beam emission spectroscopy system is here modelled by a single Li line modified by an instrumental function, Bremsstrahlung background, instrumental offset, and interference filter curve. Both the instrumental function and the interference filter curve are modelled with non-parametric Gaussian processes. All free parameters of the model, the intensities of the Li line, Bremsstrahlung background, and instrumental offset, are inferred using Bayesian probability theory with a Gaussian likelihood for photon statistics and electronic background noise. The prior distributions of the free parameters are chosen as Gaussians. Given these assumptions, the intensity of the Li line and corresponding uncertainties are analytically available using a Bayesian linear inversion technique. The proposed approach makes it possible to extract the intensity of Li line without doing a separate background subtraction through modulation of the Li beam. PMID:26931843

  12. Comparing Compositions of Modern Cast Bronze Sculptures: Optical Emission Spectroscopy Versus x-Ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, M. L.; Dunand, D. C.

    2015-07-01

    Bulk elemental compositions of 74 modern cast bronze sculptures from the collection at the Art Institute of Chicago, the Philadelphia Museum of Art, and the Rodin Museum (Philadelphia, PA) were determined using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and a handheld x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometer. The elemental compositions of the cast sculptures as measured previously by ICP-OES and presently by XRF are compared: A good match is found between the two methods for the base metal (Cu) and the two majority alloying elements (Zn and Sn). For both ICP-OES and XRF data, when the Zn composition is plotted versus the Sn composition, three discernable clusters are found that are related to the artist, foundry, casting date, and casting method; they consist of (A) high-zinc brass, (B) low-zinc, low-tin brass, and (C) low-zinc, tin bronze. Thus, our study confirms that the relatively fast, nondestructive XRF spectrometry can be used effectively over slower and invasive, but more accurate, ICP-OES to help determine a sculpture's artist, foundry, date of creation, date of casting, and casting method.

  13. Workshop on Thermal Emission Spectroscopy and Analysis of Dust, Disk, and Regoliths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprague, Ann L. (Editor); Lynch, David K. (Editor); Sitko, Michael (Editor)

    1999-01-01

    This volume contains abstracts that have been accepted for presentation at the workshop on Thermal Emission Spectroscopy and analysis of Dust, Disks and Regoliths, held April 28-30, 1999, in Houston Texas.

  14. MEASUREMENT OF AMMONIA EMISSIONS FROM MECHANICALLY VENTILATED POULTRY HOUSES USING MULTIPATH TUNABLE DIODE LASER SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ammonia emissions from mechanically ventilated poultry operations are an important environmental concern. Open Path Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy has emerged as a robust real-time method for gas phase measurement of ammonia concentrations in agricultural settings. ...

  15. Spectroscopy of Z-pinch plasmas: how atomic and plasma physics merge and unfold new applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronova, Alla

    2012-06-01

    Recent advances in theoretical and experimental work on plasma spectroscopy of Z-pinches are presented. We have shown that the University-scale Z-pinch generators are able to produce plasmas within a broad range of temperatures, densities, opacity, and radiative properties depending on the type, geometry, size, and mass of wire array loads and wire material. The full x-ray and EUV diagnostic set for detailed spatial and temporal monitoring of such a plasma together with relativistic atomic and non-LTE kinetic codes create a very useful and productive environment for the study of atomic and plasma spectroscopy features and development of their applications. A variety of examples of K-shell low-Z (such as Mg and Al), L-shell mid-Z (such as Ni, Cu, and Ag), and M- and L-shell high-Z (W) will be considered and their specific features and applications to fusion and astrophysics will be highlighted.

  16. Spontaneous emission from a single two-level atom in the presence of N initially unexcited identical atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, F. W.

    1986-03-01

    The quantum-electrodynamical problem of N identical two-level atoms interacting with M field modes is considered, and an exact solution for the case of spontaneous emission from a single atom is obtained. The behavior of this system is shown to be quite different from the exponential decay of a single excited atom radiating into free space. A 'ringing' behavior at the enigmatic frequency of approximately the square root of N, which occurs when only one mode is accessible to the field, persists when many modes are present. When a continuum of modes is accessible, the long-time limit shows that the energy of the originally excited atom is equally likely to be shared by the N-1 originally unexcited atoms and the electromagnetic field when M/N approaches 1. 'Radiation suppression' occurs whenever N is much greater than 1 and M is much less than N, when the originally excited atom does not emit its energy. When M = N much greater than 1, the single atom decays monotonically to zero (and approximately exponentially), but with a decay rate that is the square root of N times the Rabi frequency. Such unexpected affects are presently within experimental range.

  17. X-ray emission from charge exchange of highly-charged ions in atoms and molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenwood, J. B.; Williams, I. D.; Smith, S. J.; Chutjian, A.

    2000-01-01

    Charge exchange followed by radiative stabilization are the main processes responsible for the recent observations of X-ray emission from comets in their approach to the Sun. A new apparatus was constructed to measure, in collisions of HCIs with atoms and molecules, (a) absolute cross sections for single and multiple charge exchange, and (b) normalized X-ray emission cross sections.

  18. The metamorphosis in the emission angular profile from an inverted two-level atoms system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedberg, Richard; Manassah, Jamal T.

    2009-08-01

    A rich variety of angular distributions in the cooperative emission from a sphere of inverted N two-level atoms are shown to result from the eigenstructure of the complex kernel of scalar photon theory exp( ik0R)/( ik0R). This angular distribution is sensitive both to the size of the sphere and to the instant of observation of the emission.

  19. Optical emission generated by collisions of 5 eV O(3P) atoms with surface-absorbed hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orient, O. J.; Martus, K. E.; Chutjian, A.; Murad, E.

    1992-01-01

    Optical emission has been observed corresponding to vibrational bands in the NH (A 3Pi - X 3Sigma(-)) electronic transition during collisions of 5 eV, ground-state oxygen O(3P) atoms with MgF2 and Ni surfaces continuously exposed to a beam of hydrazine (N2H4). The NH emission intensity is observed to be about five times greater for MgF2 than for Ni. No dependence on temperature was observed for either surface in the range 240 - 340 K, implying that the NH-producing intermediate species is tightly bound. The half-lifetime for desorption of hydrazine from each surface was measured. This was found to be 120 min for the MgF2 surface at 240 K, and less than 20 min for Ni. After exposure, the surface composition was measured using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy on the exposed and unexposed areas of both targets.

  20. Forbidden line emission from highly ionized atoms in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, U.; Doschek, G. A.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1982-01-01

    Considerable interest in the observation of forbidden spectral lines from highly ionized atoms in tokamak plasmas is related to the significance of such observations for plasma diagnostic applications. Atomic data for the elements Ti Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, and Kr have been published by Feldman et al. (1980) and Bhatia et al. (1980). The present investigation is concerned with collisional excitation rate coefficients and radiative decay rates, which are interpolated for ions of elements between calcium, and krypton and for levels of the 2s2 2pk, 2s 2p(k+1), and 2p(k+2) configurations, and for the O I, N I, C I, B I, and Be I isoelectronic sequences. The provided interpolated atomic data can be employed to calculate level populations and relative line intensities for ions of the considered sequences, taking into account levels of the stated configurations. Important plasma diagnostic information provided by the forbidden lines includes the ion temperature

  1. New Atomic Data for Doubly Ionized Iron Group Atoms by High Resolution UV Fourier Transform Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Peter L.; Pickering, Juliet C.; Thorne, A. P.

    2002-01-01

    Currently available laboratory spectroscopic data of doubly ionized iron-group element were obtained about 50 years ago using spectrographs of modest dispersion, photographic plates, and eye estimates of intensities. The accuracy of the older wavelength data is about 10 mAngstroms at best, whereas wavelengths are now needed to an accuracy of 1 part in 10(exp 6) to 10(exp 7) (0.2 to 2 mAngstroms at 2000 Angstroms). The Fourier transform (FT) spectroscopy group at Imperial College, London, and collaborators at the Harvard College Observatory have used a unique VUV FT spectrometer in a program focussed on improving knowledge of spectra of many neutral and singly and doubly ionized, astrophysically important, iron group elements. Spectra of Fe II and Fe III have been recorded at UV and VUV wavelengths with signal-to-noise ratios of several hundred for the stronger lines. Wavelengths and energy levels for Fe III are an order of magnitude more accurate than previous work; analysis is close to completion. f-values for Fe II have been published.

  2. Absorption and emission spectroscopy of individual semiconductor nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Matthew P.

    The advent of controllable synthetic methods for the production of semiconductor nanostructures has led to their use in a host of applications, including light-emitting diodes, field effect transistors, sensors, and even television displays. This is, in part, due to the size, shape, and morphologically dependent optical and electrical properties that make this class of materials extremely customizable; wire-, rod- and sphere-shaped nanocrystals are readily synthesized through common wet chemical methods. Most notably, confining the physical dimension of the nanostructure to a size below its Bohr radius (aB) results in quantum confinement effects that increase its optical energy gap. Not only the size, but the shape of a particle can be exploited to tailor its optical and electrical properties. For example, confined CdSe quantum dots (QDs) and nanowires (NWs) of equivalent diameter possess significantly different optical gaps. This phenomenon has been ascribed to electrostatic contributions arising from dielectric screening effects that are more pronounced in an elongated (wire-like) morphology. Semiconducting nanostructures have thus received significant attention over the past two decades. However, surprisingly little work has been done to elucidate their basic photophysics on a single particle basis. What has been done has generally been accomplished through emission-based measurements, and thus does not fully capture the full breadth of these intriguing systems. What is therefore needed then are absorption-based studies that probe the size and shape dependent evolution of nanostructure photophysics. This thesis summarizes the single particle absorption spectroscopy that we have carried out to fill this knowledge gap. Specifically, the diameter-dependent progression of one-dimensional (1D) excitonic states in CdSe NWs has been revealed. This is followed by a study that focuses on the polarization selection rules of 1D excitons within single CdSe NWs. Finally

  3. Nonlinear spectroscopy of Sr atoms in an optical cavity for laser stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, Bjarke T. R.; Henriksen, Martin R.; Schäffer, Stefan A.; Westergaard, Philip G.; Tieri, David; Ye, Jun; Holland, Murray J.; Thomsen, Jan W.

    2015-11-01

    We study the nonlinear interaction of a cold sample of 88Sr atoms coupled to a single mode of a low finesse optical cavity in the so-called bad cavity limit, and we investigate the implications for applications to laser stabilization. The atoms are probed on the weak intercombination line |5 s21S0>-|5 s 5 p 3P1> at 689 nm in a strongly saturated regime. Our measured observables include the atomic induced phase shift and absorption of the light field transmitted through the cavity represented by the complex cavity transmission coefficient. We demonstrate high signal-to-noise-ratio measurements of both quadratures—the cavity transmitted phase and absorption—by employing frequency modulation (FM) spectroscopy (noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical-heterodyne molecular spectroscopy). We also show that when FM spectroscopy is employed in connection with a cavity locked to the probe light, observables are substantially modified compared to the free-space situation in which no cavity is present. Furthermore, the nonlinear dynamics of the phase dispersion slope is experimentally investigated, and the optimal conditions for laser stabilization are established. Our experimental results are compared to state-of-the-art cavity QED theoretical calculations.

  4. Electronic Structure of In2O3 from Resonant X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Piper, L.; DeMasi, A; Cho, S; Smith, K; Fuchs, F; Bechstedt, F; Korber, C; Klein, A; Payne, D; Egdell, R

    2009-01-01

    The valence and conduction band structures of In2O3 have been measured using a combination of valence band x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, O K-edge resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy, and O K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Excellent agreement is noted between the experimental spectra and O 2p partial density of states calculated within hybrid density functional theory. Our data are consistent with a direct band gap for In2O3.

  5. A Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy Mercury Continuous Emission Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher C. Carter

    2004-12-15

    The Sensor Research & Development Corporation (SRD) has undertaken the development of a Continuous Emissions Monitor (CEM) for mercury based on the technique of Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRD). The project involved building an instrument for the detection of trace levels of mercury in the flue gas emissions from coal-fired power plants. The project has occurred over two phases. The first phase concentrated on the development of the ringdown cavity and the actual detection of mercury. The second phase dealt with the construction and integration of the sampling system, used to carry the sample from the flue stack to the CRD cavity, into the overall CRD instrument. The project incorporated a Pulsed Alexandrite Laser (PAL) system from Light Age Incorporated as the source to produce the desired narrow band 254 nm ultra-violet (UV) radiation. This laser system was seeded with a diode laser to bring the linewidth of the output beam from about 150 GHz to less than 60 MHz for the fundamental beam. Through a variety of non-linear optics the 761 nm fundamental beam is converted into the 254 nm beam needed for mercury detection. Detection of the mercury transition was verified by the identification of the characteristic natural isotopic structure observed at lower cavity pressures. The five characteristic peaks, due to both natural isotopic abundance and hyperfine splitting, provided a unique identifier for mercury. SRD scientists were able to detect mercury in air down below 10 parts-per-trillion by volume (pptr). This value is dependent on the pressure and temperature within the CRD cavity at the time of detection. Sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) absorbs UV radiation in the same spectral region as mercury, which is a significant problem for most mercury detection equipment. However, SRD has not only been able to determine accurate mercury concentrations in the presence of SO{sub 2}, but the CRD instrument can in fact determine the SO{sub 2} concentration as well. Detection of

  6. Revisiting the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy of single hydrogen atom adsorbed on the Cu(100) surface

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Zhuoling; Wang, Hao; Sanvito, Stefano; Hou, Shimin

    2015-12-21

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) of a single hydrogen atom on the Cu(100) surface in a scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) configuration has been investigated by employing the non-equilibrium Green’s function formalism combined with density functional theory. The electron-vibration interaction is treated at the level of lowest order expansion. Our calculations show that the single peak observed in the previous STM-IETS experiments is dominated by the perpendicular mode of the adsorbed H atom, while the parallel one only makes a negligible contribution even when the STM tip is laterally displaced from the top position of the H atom. This propensity of the IETS is deeply rooted in the symmetry of the vibrational modes and the characteristics of the conduction channel of the Cu-H-Cu tunneling junction, which is mainly composed of the 4s and 4p{sub z} atomic orbitals of the Cu apex atom and the 1s orbital of the adsorbed H atom. These findings are helpful for deepening our understanding of the propensity rules for IETS and promoting IETS as a more popular spectroscopic tool for molecular devices.

  7. Revisiting the inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy of single hydrogen atom adsorbed on the Cu(100) surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhuoling; Wang, Hao; Sanvito, Stefano; Hou, Shimin

    2015-12-01

    Inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) of a single hydrogen atom on the Cu(100) surface in a scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) configuration has been investigated by employing the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism combined with density functional theory. The electron-vibration interaction is treated at the level of lowest order expansion. Our calculations show that the single peak observed in the previous STM-IETS experiments is dominated by the perpendicular mode of the adsorbed H atom, while the parallel one only makes a negligible contribution even when the STM tip is laterally displaced from the top position of the H atom. This propensity of the IETS is deeply rooted in the symmetry of the vibrational modes and the characteristics of the conduction channel of the Cu-H-Cu tunneling junction, which is mainly composed of the 4s and 4pz atomic orbitals of the Cu apex atom and the 1s orbital of the adsorbed H atom. These findings are helpful for deepening our understanding of the propensity rules for IETS and promoting IETS as a more popular spectroscopic tool for molecular devices.

  8. Theoretical analysis of the spectroscopy of atomic Bose-Hubbard systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inaba, Kensuke; Yamashita, Makoto

    2016-04-01

    We provide a numerical method to calculate comprehensively the microwave and the laser spectra of ultracold bosonic atoms in optical lattices at finite temperatures. Our formulation is built up with the sum rules, up to the second order, derived from the general principle of spectroscopy. The sum rule approach allows us to discuss the physical origins of a spectral peak shift and also a peak broadening. We find that a spectral broadening of superfluid atoms can be determined from number fluctuations of atoms, while that of normal-state atoms is mainly attributed to quantum fluctuations resulting from hopping of atoms. To calculate spectra at finite temperatures, based on the sum rule approach, we provide a two-mode approximation assuming that spectra of the superfluid and normal state atoms can be calculated separately. Our method can properly deal with multipeak structures of spectra resulting from thermal fluctuations and also coexisting of the superfluid and the normal states. By combining the two-mode approximation with a finite temperature Gutzwiller approximation, we calculate spectra at finite temperatures by considering realistic systems, and the calculated spectra show nice agreements with those in experiments.

  9. Laser spectroscopy of radioactive atoms using the photon-burst technique

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, A.G.; Dutta, S.B.; Rogers, W.F.; Clark, D.L.

    1987-03-01

    The photon-burst technique has been used to perform laser spectroscopy on small samples of accelerator-produced radioactive isotopes. Measurements have been made of the isotope shifts in the resonance transitions of /sup 128/Ba (tau/sub 1/2/ = 2.4 days), /sup 126/Ba (tau/sub 1/2/ = 100 min), and /sup 82/Sr (tau/sub 1/2/ = 24 days). The technique has permitted high-resolution measurements to be performed in a few minutes on atomic beams of --100 atoms/sec of these elements. The laser-spectroscopy measurements of /sup 126/Ba are, to our knowledge, on the smallest samples of radioactive atoms (--10/sup 9/ atoms) used for high-resolution isotope-shift measurements performed to date. A technique is also demonstrated that, by producing a laser beam of spatially varying polarization, reduces optical pumping effects, allowing the photon-burst technique to be extended for use with odd isotopes as well as even.

  10. Composite pulses in Hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy for the next generation of atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanon-Willette, T.; Minissale, M.; Yudin, V. I.; Taichenachev, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    The next generation of atomic frequency standards based on an ensemble of neutral atoms or a single-ion will provide very stringent tests in metrology, applied and fundamental physics requiring a new step in very precise control of external systematic corrections. In the proceedings of the 8th Symposium on Frequency Standards and Metrology, we present a generalization of the recent Hyper-Ramsey spectroscopy with separated oscillating fields using composites pulses in order to suppress field frequency shifts induced by the interrogation laser itself. Sequences of laser pulses including specific selection of phases, frequency detunings and durations are elaborated to generate spectroscopic signals with a strong reduction of the light-shift perturbation by off resonant states. New optical clocks based on weakly allowed or completely forbidden transitions in atoms, ions, molecules and nuclei will benefit from these generalized Ramsey schemes to reach relative accuracies well below the 10-18 level.

  11. Precision spectroscopy of Mg atoms in a magneto-optical trap

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharov, A N; Brazhnikov, D V; Shilov, A M; Bagayev, S N; Bonert, A E

    2014-06-30

    We report the results of experimental investigations aimed at creation of the optical frequency standard based on magnesium atoms cooled and localised in a magneto-optical trap (MOT). An experimentally realised MOT for magnesium made it possible to obtain a cloud comprising ∼10{sup 6} – 10{sup 7} atoms at a temperature of 3 – 5 mK. The results of ultra-high resolution spectroscopy of intercombination {sup 1}S{sub 0} – {sup 3}P{sub 1} transition for Mg atom are presented, the resonances in time-domain separated optical fields with the half-width of Γ = 500 Hz are recorded, which corresponds to the Q-factor of the reference line Q = ν/Δν ∼ 1.3 × 10{sup 12}. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  12. Auroral excitation of optical emissions of atomic and molecular oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, P. D.

    1978-01-01

    The O I 'green line' (1S-1D) at 5577 A and the O2 (0,0) atmosphere band at 7620 A were measured in a steady IBC II(plus) aurora simultaneously with N2 emissions and the auroral electron flux. An empirical model based on these rocket measurements shows that the principal excitation source of O2(b 1 Sigma g plus) is energy transfer from O(1D), with direct electron impact of O2 contributing less than 5 percent. While the altitude profile of the green line emission resembles that which would be produced by electron impact excitation of O2, a dissociative excitation cross section of 10 to the minus 16th power is required for this interpretation. None of the other known O(1S) excitation mechanisms are thought capable of producing the observed emission rate.

  13. Laser spectroscopy of thulium atoms implanted in liquid and solid {sup 4}He

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, K.; Hatakeyama, A.; Gosyono-o, K.; Wada, S.; Takahashi, Y.; Yabuzaki, T.

    1997-07-01

    The excitation, emission spectra, and decay curves of the emission intensity of thulium atoms implanted in liquid and solid helium were observed in the presence and absence of an external magnetic field. The observed narrow line (width {approximately}0.1 nm) of the excitation spectrum at 590.60 nm is assigned as a zero-phonon transition from the electronic ground state 4f{sup 13}({sup 2}F{sub 7/2}{sup o})6s{sup 2}, which indicates that the transition between the inner shells is weakly perturbed by surrounding helium atoms. The pressure dependence of the emission wavelength suggests that the symmetry of helium atoms distributed around a thulium atom in the solid phase is similar to that in the liquid phase. The emission intensity was stable and large in the solid phase since thulium atoms were trapped at a density of 10{sup 10}{endash}10{sup 11} atoms/cm{sup 3}. The lifetime of the excited state was measured to be 7.09{plus_minus}0.04 {mu}s, which was longer than that of the 4f{sup 12}({sup 3}H{sub 6})5d{sub 5/2}6s{sup 2} (6,5/2){sub 7/2} state of free thulium atoms. The excited state is expected to be a mixed state of the 4f{sup 12}5d6s{sup 2} and 4f{sup 13}6s6p configurations. The metastable state 4f{sup 13}({sup 2}F{sub 5/2}{sup o})6s{sup 2} is populated by a radiative transition from this excited state and relaxes to the ground state through a magnetic dipole transition. The lifetime of the metastable state of a neutral thulium atom was measured to be 75{plus_minus}3 ms. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  14. Time evolution, Lamb shift, and emission spectra of spontaneous emission of two identical atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Dawei; Li Zhenghong; Zheng Hang; Zhu Shiyao

    2010-04-15

    A unitary transformation method is used to investigate the dynamic evolution of two multilevel atoms, in the basis of symmetric and antisymmetric states, with one atom being initially prepared in the first excited state and the other in the ground state. The unitary transformation guarantees that our calculations are based on the ground state of the atom-field system and the self-energy is subtracted at the beginning. The total Lamb shifts of the symmetric and antisymmetric states are divided into transformed shift and dynamic shift. The transformed shift is due to emitting and reabsorbing of virtual photons, by a single atom (nondynamic single atomic shift) and between the two atoms (quasi-static shift). The dynamic shift is due to the emitting and reabsorbing of real photons, by a single atom (dynamic single atomic shift) and between the two atoms (dynamic interatomic shift). The emitting and reabsorbing of virtual and real photons between the two atoms result in the interatomic shift, which does not exist for the one-atom case. The spectra at the long-time limit are calculated. If the distance between the two atoms is shorter than or comparable to the wavelength, the strong coupling between the two atoms splits the spectrum into two peaks, one from the symmetric state and the other from the antisymmetric state. The origin of the red or blue shifts for the symmetric and antisymmetric states mainly lies in the negative or positive interaction energy between the two atoms. In the investigation of the short time evolution, we find the modification of the effective density of states by the interaction between two atoms can modulate the quantum Zeno and quantum anti-Zeno effects in the decays of the symmetric and antisymmetric states.

  15. Thermal Emission Spectroscopy of 1 Ceres: Evidence for Olivine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witteborn, Fred. C.; Roush, Ted L.; Cohen, Martin

    1999-01-01

    Thermal emission spectra of the largest asteroid, 1 Ceres, obtained from the Kuiper Airborne Observatory display features that may provide information about its surface mineralogy. The emissivity, obtained by dividing the spectra by a standard thermal model, is compared with emissivity spectra of olivines and phyllosilicates deduced via Kirchoff's law from reflectivity measurements. The spectra provide a fairly good match to fine grained olivines (0 to 5 micrometer size range). The smoothness of the spectrum beyond 18 micrometers is an indication of particles smaller than 50 micrometers. While the abrupt rise in emissivity near 8 micrometers matches many silicates, the distinct emissivity minimum centered near 12.8 micrometers is consistant with iron-poor olivines, but not with phyllosilicates. It suggests the presence of opaques and does not exclude a mixture with organics and fine-grained phyllosilicates.

  16. PREFACE: Heavy-Ion Spectroscopy and QED Effects in Atomic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindgren, Ingvar; Martinson, Indrek; Schuch, Reinhold

    1993-01-01

    now essentially solved. The experimental accuracy is already so high that also higher-order QED effects become observable, and several groups are now active in trying to evaluate such effects from first principles. Another related field where substantial progress has recently been made involves precision measurements of X-ray transitions. This has created an interest in the study of deep inner holes in heavy atoms, where large relativistic and QED effects appear. These effects are as large as in corresponding highly charged ions, but the interpretation requires that the many-body effects from the surrounding electrons are accurately extracted. This is a big challenge at present. Atomic collision physics with highly charged ions has been dominated in recent years by the search for a possibility to describe electron-electron interaction within the dynamics of collisions. The experiments on multielectron transfer reactions with highly charged ions posed in this respect quite a challenge to the theory. The models developed to meet this were often based on methods and terminologies developed for describing the inter-electronic interactions in atomic structure. This caused many controversial discussions, also during this symposium. A new and fast rising field is the interaction of highly charged ions with solid surfaces. This may become an important link between atomic physics and condensed-matter physics, stimulated by the opportunity to study effects in coupled many-body systems present in the case when a large amount of electrons is transferred from the solid to each single ion. Furtheron, collision experiments with cooled ion beams in ion storage rings open new dimensions also for atomic spectroscopy. It appears possible that transition and binding energies can be measured in recombination of very heavy ions with a better quality than by conventional Auger electron or X-ray spectroscopy. Obviously, it is not possible to cover all the fields mentioned here in a single

  17. Dielectric barrier discharge carbon atomic emission spectrometer: universal GC detector for volatile carbon-containing compounds.

    PubMed

    Han, Bingjun; Jiang, Xiaoming; Hou, Xiandeng; Zheng, Chengbin

    2014-01-01

    It was found that carbon atomic emission can be excited in low temperature dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), and an atmospheric pressure, low power consumption, and compact microplasma carbon atomic emission spectrometer (AES) was constructed and used as a universal and sensitive gas chromatographic (GC) detector for detection of volatile carbon-containing compounds. A concentric DBD device was housed in a heating box to increase the plasma operation temperature to 300 °C to intensify carbon atomic emission at 193.0 nm. Carbon-containing compounds directly injected or eluted from GC can be decomposed, atomized, and excited in this heated DBD for carbon atomic emission. The performance of this new optical detector was first evaluated by determination of a series of volatile carbon-containing compounds including formaldehyde, ethyl acetate, methanol, ethanol, 1-propanol, 1-butanol, and 1-pentanol, and absolute limits of detection (LODs) were found at a range of 0.12-0.28 ng under the optimized conditions. Preliminary experimental results showed that it provided slightly higher LODs than those obtained by GC with a flame ionization detector (FID). Furthermore, it is a new universal GC detector for volatile carbon-containing compounds that even includes those compounds which are difficult to detect by FID, such as HCHO, CO, and CO2. Meanwhile, hydrogen gas used in conventional techniques was eliminated; and molecular optical emission detection can also be performed with this GC detector for multichannel analysis to improve resolution of overlapped chromatographic peaks of complex mixtures. PMID:24328147

  18. Characteristics of Spontaneous Emission of Polarized Atoms in Metal Dielectric Multiple Layer Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Li-Ming; Gu, Ben-Yuan; Zhou, Yun-Song

    2007-11-01

    The spontaneous emission (SE) progress of polarized atoms in a stratified structure of air-dielectric(D0)-metal(M)-dielectric(D1)-air can be controlled effectively by changing the thickness of the D1 layer and rotating the polarized direction of atoms. It is found that the normalized SE rate of atoms located inside the D0 layer crucially depends on the atomic position and the thickness of the D1 layer. When the atom is located near the D0-M interface, the normalized atomic SE rate as a function of the atomic position is abruptly onset for the thin D1 layer. However, with the increasing thickness of the D1 layer, the corresponding curve profile exhibits plateau and stays nearly unchanged. The substantial change of the SE rate stems from the excitation of the surface plasmon polaritons in metal-dielectric interface, and the feature crucially depends on the thickness of D1 layer. If atoms are positioned near the D0-air interface, the substantial variation of the normalized SE rate appears when rotating the polarized direction of atoms. These findings manifest that the atomic SE processes can be flexibly controlled by altering the thickness of the dielectric layer D1 or rotating the orientation of the polarization of atoms.

  19. Effect of discharge parameters on emission yields in a radio-frequency glow-discharge atomic-emission source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Mark; Hartenstein, Matthew L.; Marcus, R. Kenneth

    1997-05-01

    A study is performed on a radio-frequency glow-discharge atomic-emission (rf-GD-AES) source to determine the factors effecting the emission yields for both metallic and nonconductive sample types. Specifically, these studies focus on determining how the operating parameters (power and pressure) influence emission yields. The results follow predicted patterns as determined by Langmuir probe diagnostic studies of a similar source. In particular, discharge gas pressure is the key operating parameter as slight changes in pressure may significantly affect the emission yield of the analyte species. RF power is less important and is shown to produce only relatively small changes in the emission yield over the ranges typically used in rf-GD analyses. These studies indicate that the quantitative analysis of layered materials, depth-profiling, may be adversely affected if the data collection scheme, i.e. the quantitative algorithm, requires changing the pressure during an analysis to keep the operating current and voltage constant. A direct relationship is shown to exist between the Ar (discharge gas) emission intensity and that of sputtered species for nonconductors. This observance is used to compensate for differences in emission intensities observed in the analysis of various thickness nonconductive samples. The sputtered element emission signals are corrected based on the emission intensity of an Ar (1) transition, implying that quantitative analysis of nonconductive samples is not severely limited by the availability of matrix matched standards.

  20. Hydrogen transport diagnostics by atomic and molecular emission line profiles simultaneously measured for large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, K.; Shikama, T.; Hasuo, M.; Goto, M.; Morita, S.

    2013-01-15

    We observe the Balmer-{alpha}, -{beta}, and -{gamma} lines of hydrogen atoms and Q branches of the Fulcher-{alpha} band of hydrogen molecules simultaneously with their polarization resolved for large helical device. From the fit including the line splits and the polarization dependences by the Zeeman effect, the emission locations, intensities, and the temperatures of the atoms and molecules are determined. The emission locations of the hydrogen atoms are determined outside but close to the last closed flux surface (LCFS). The results are consistent with a previous work (Phys. Plasmas 12, 042501 (2005)). On the other hand, the emission locations of the molecules are determined to be in the divertor legs, which is farer from those of the atoms. The kinetic energy of the atoms is 1 {approx} 20 eV, while the rotational temperature of molecules is {approx}0.04 eV. Additionally, substantial wings, which originate from high velocity atoms and are not reproduced by the conventional spectral analysis, are observed in the Balmer line profiles. We develop a one-dimensional model to simulate the transport of the atoms and molecules. The model reproduces the differences of the emission locations of the atoms and molecules when their initial temperatures are assumed to be 3 eV and 0.04 eV, respectively. From the model, the wings of the Balmer-{alpha} line is attributed to the high velocity atoms exist deep inside the LCFS, which are generated by the charge exchange collisions with hot protons there.

  1. Protecting remote atomic entanglement against spontaneous emission by separated photonic pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zong, Xiao-Lan; Du, Chao-Qun; Yang, Ming; Zhang, Gang; Yang, Qing; Cao, Zhuo-Liang

    2015-07-01

    We study the entanglement dynamics between two spatially separated atoms trapped in two separate optical cavities. Based on cavity-assisted interactions between the atoms and separated photonic pulses, we propose a scheme for the implemention of a controlled-phase-flip gate (CPF gate) between each of the atoms and the photonic pulse to protect the remote atomic quantum entanglement against the decaying caused by spontaneous emission. What we need to do is to shoot the horizontally polarized photons onto the cavity mirror successively, plus a train of Hadamard operations on the atoms, and no measurement is needed here. It is shown that the quantum entanglement of the two remote atoms can be protected effectively in this way. We also extend our scheme to the case of weak coupling and low Q cavity cases. The simplicity of the current scheme may warrant its experimental realization.

  2. Luminescence spectroscopy of matrix-isolated z 6P state atomic manganese.

    PubMed

    Collier, Martin A; McCaffrey, John G

    2005-05-01

    The relaxation of electronically excited atomic manganese isolated in solid rare gas matrices is observed from recorded emission spectra, to be strongly site specific. z 6P state excitation of Mn atoms isolated in the red absorption site in Ar and Kr produces narrow a 4D and a 6D state emissions while blue-site excitation produces z 6P state fluorescence and broadened a 4D and a 6D emissions. MnXe exhibits only a single thermally stable site whose emission at 620 nm is similar to the broad a 6D bands produced with blue-site excitation in Ar and Kr. Thus in Ar(Kr), excitation of the red site at 393 (400) nm produces narrow line emissions at 427.5 (427.8) and 590 (585.7) nm. From their spectral positions, linewidths, and long decay times, these emission bands are assigned to the a 4D72 and a 6D92 states, respectively. Excitation of the blue site at 380 (385.5) nm produces broad emission at 413 (416) nm which, because of its nanosecond radiative lifetime, is assigned to resonance z 6P --> a 6S fluorescence. Emission bands at 438 (440) and 625 (626.8) nm, also produced with blue-site excitation, are broader than their red-site equivalents at 427.5 and 590 nm (427.8 and 585.7 nm in Kr) but from their millisecond and microsecond decay times are assigned to the a 4D and a 6D states. The line features observed in high resolution scans of the red-site emission at 427.5 and 427.8 nm in MnAr and MnKr, respectively, have been analyzed with the W(p) optical line shape function and identified as resolved phonon structure originating from very weak (S=0.4) electron-phonon coupling. The presence of considerable hot-phonon emission (even in 12 K spectra) and the existence of crystal field splittings of 35 and 45 cm(-1) on the excited a 4D72 level in Ar and Kr matrices have been identified in W(p) line shape fits. The measured matrix lifetimes for the narrow red-site a 6D state emissions (0.29 and 0.65 ms) in Ar and Kr are much shorter than the calculated (3 s) gas phase value. With

  3. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and Spectroscopy: I. Semimetals and Semiconductors. I. Atom-Resolved Imaging of DNA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Robert James

    1993-01-01

    The topographic and electronic structure of semimetal and semiconductor surfaces were investigated using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), respectively. The long-range morphology and atomic -scale characteristics of cleaved materials, including highly oriented pyrolitic graphite (HOPG), boronated pyrolitic graphite (BPG), titanium disulfide, and gallium arsenide (GaAs), were revealed by STM performed in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV). Atom-resolved constant current topographs and current -imaging data, as well as barrier height information, are presented. Both point and line defects were observed on these surfaces. Visual evidence of coulombic screening caused by adsorption of charged species on n-GaAs(110) is provided. On BPG samples, containing up to 0.5% boron, boron substituent atoms appeared as protrusions approximately 3 A in diameter, with a density consistent with the known concentration. The BPG surface contained numerous line defects, including large-angle grain boundaries, and monolayer -deep etch pits. The effects of stress on the morphology of an annealed vicinal Si(111) wafer were explored. The height and orientation of step bunches, as well as terrace widths, on the (7 x 7) surface were determined. Line fault defects at step kinks were observed; theories for the origin and structure of these features based on stress relief are proposed. Current imaging tunneling spectroscopy (CITS) revealed differences between the adatom sites of the (7 x 7) surface. Atom-resolved barrier height images were also obtained. The measured barrier height was seen to depend strongly on the "cleanliness" of the STM tip. In addition, atom-resolved STM images of duplex DNA supported on a HOPG surface were obtained in UHV. These images revealed double-helical structure, major and minor groove alternation, base pairs, and atomic-scale substructure. The DNA dimensions derived from the STM data were in agreement with dimensions from x

  4. Mössbauer spectroscopy and the structure of interfaces on the atomic scale in metallic nanosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uzdin, V. M.

    2007-10-01

    A microscopic model of the formation of an alloy on the interface has been constructed, which takes into account the exchange of atoms with the substrate atoms and the “floating up” of the latter into the upper layers in the process of epitaxial growth. The self-consistent calculations of atomic magnetic moments of spatially inhomogeneous structures obtained in this case are used for the interpretation of data of Mössbauer spectroscopy. The proposed scenario of mixing leads to the appearance of a preferred direction in the sample and the asymmetry of interfaces in the direction of epitaxial growth. In the multilayer M 1/ M 2 ( M 1,2 = Fe, Cr, V, Sn, or Ag) systems, this asymmetry makes it possible to understand the difference in the magnetic behavior of M 1-on M 2 and M 2-on- M 1 interfaces which has been observed experimentally. The correlation between the calculated distributions of magnetic moments and the measured distributions of hyperfine fields at iron atoms confirms the assumption about their proportionality for a broad class of metallic multilayer systems. However, a linear decrease of hyperfine fields at the 57Fe nuclei with increasing number of impurity atoms among the nearest and next-nearest neighbors is not confirmed for Fe/Cr systems, although is correct in Fe/V superlattices. In the Fe/Cr multilayer systems, the experimentally measured value of magnetoresistance grows with increasing fraction of the “floated up” atoms of 57Fe. Thus, it is the bulk scattering by impurity atoms that gives the basic contribution to the effect of giant magnetoresistance. The problem of the influence of mixing and adsorption of hydrogen in the vanadium layers on the state of the spin-density wave in V/Cr superlattices has been considered.

  5. Multiple stimulated emission fluorescence photoacoustic sensing and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Gaoming; Gao, Fei; Qiu, Yishen; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2016-07-01

    Multiple stimulated emission fluorescence photoacoustic (MSEF-PA) phenomenon is demonstrated in this letter. Under simultaneous illumination of pumping light and stimulated emission light, the fluorescence emission process is speeded up by the stimulated emission effect. This leads to nonlinear enhancement of photoacoustic signal while the quantity of absorbed photons is more than that of fluorescent molecules illuminated by pumping light. The electronic states' specificity of fluorescent molecular can also be labelled by the MSEF-PA signals, which can potentially be used to obtain fluorescence excitation spectrum in deep scattering tissue with nonlinearly enhanced photoacoustic detection. In this preliminary study, the fluorescence excitation spectrum is reconstructed by MSEF-PA signals through sweeping the wavelength of exciting light, which confirms the theoretical derivation well.

  6. Taking nanomedicine teaching into practice with atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Filomena A; Freitas, Teresa; Santos, Nuno C

    2015-12-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a useful and powerful tool to study molecular interactions applied to nanomedicine. The aim of the present study was to implement a hands-on atomic AFM course for graduated biosciences and medical students. The course comprises two distinct practical sessions, where students get in touch with the use of an atomic force microscope by performing AFM scanning images of human blood cells and force spectroscopy measurements of the fibrinogen-platelet interaction. Since the beginning of this course, in 2008, the overall rating by the students was 4.7 (out of 5), meaning a good to excellent evaluation. Students were very enthusiastic and produced high-quality AFM images and force spectroscopy data. The implementation of the hands-on AFM course was a success, giving to the students the opportunity of contact with a technique that has a wide variety of applications on the nanomedicine field. In the near future, nanomedicine will have remarkable implications in medicine regarding the definition, diagnosis, and treatment of different diseases. AFM enables students to observe single molecule interactions, enabling the understanding of molecular mechanisms of different physiological and pathological processes at the nanoscale level. Therefore, the introduction of nanomedicine courses in bioscience and medical school curricula is essential. PMID:26628660

  7. Thermal Emissivity-Based Chemical Spectroscopy through Evanescent Tunneling.

    PubMed

    Poole, Zsolt L; Ohodnicki, Paul R

    2016-04-01

    A new spectroscopic technique is presented, with which environmentalchemistry-induced thermal emissivity changes of thin films are extracted with high isolation through evanescent tunneling. With this method the hydrogen-induced emissivity changes of films of TiO2 , Pd-TiO2 , and Au-TiO2 , with properties of high conductivity, hydrogen chemisorption, and plasmonic activity, are characterized in the UV-vis and NIR wavelength ranges, at 1073 K. PMID:26901747

  8. Emission spectroscopy for coal-fired cyclone furnace diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Wehrmeyer, Joseph A; Boll, David E; Smith, Richard

    2003-08-01

    Using a spectrograph and charge-coupled device (CCD) camera, ultraviolet and visible light emission spectra were obtained from a coal-burning electric utility's cyclone furnaces operating at either fuel-rich or fuel-lean conditions. The aim of this effort is to identify light emission signals that can be related to a cyclone furnace's operating condition in order to adjust its air/fuel ratio to minimize pollutant production. Emission spectra at the burner and outlet ends of cyclone furnaces were obtained. Spectra from all cyclone burners show emission lines for the trace elements Li, Na, K, and Rb, as well as the molecular species OH and CaOH. The Ca emission line is detected at the burner end of both the fuel-rich and fuel-lean cyclone furnaces but is not detected at the outlet ends of either furnace type. Along with the disappearance of Ca is a concomitant increase in the CaOH signal at the outlet end of both types of furnaces. The OH signal strength is in general stronger when viewing at the burner end rather than the exhaust end of both the fuel-rich and fuel-lean cyclone furnaces, probably due to high, non-equilibrium amounts of OH present inside the furnace. Only one molecular species was detected that could be used as a measure of air/fuel ratio: MgOH. It was detected at the burner end of fuel-rich cyclone furnaces but not detected in fuel-lean cyclone furnaces. More direct markers of air/fuel ratio, such as CO and O2 emission, were not detected, probably due to the generally weak nature of molecular emission relative to ambient blackbody emission present in the cyclone furnaces, even at ultraviolet wavelengths. PMID:14661846

  9. Note: Spectrometer with multichannel photon-counting detector for beam emission spectroscopy in magnetic fusion devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizunov, A.; Khilchenko, A.; Khilchenko, V.; Kvashnin, A.; Zubarev, P.

    2015-12-01

    A spectrometer based on a linear array photomultiplier tube (PMT) has been developed and calibrated. A 0.635 m focal length Czerny-Turner monochromator combined with a coupling optics provides an image of a narrow 0.5 nm spectral range with a resolution of 0.015 nm/channel on a 32-anode PMT. The system aims at spectroscopy of Dα or Hα lines emitted by a diagnostic atomic beam in a plasma (primarily a motional Stark effect diagnostics). To record a low photon flux of ˜106 s-1 per channel with the time resolution of 100 μs, a pulse counting approach has been used. Wideband amplifiers scale single-electron pulses and transmit them to a digital data processing core hardwired in a programmable logic matrix. Calibrations have shown that the aberration-limited instrument function fits to a single detector channel of 1 mm width. Pilot results of passive measurements of Dα light emission from the plasma confined in a magnetic trap are presented.

  10. Note: Spectrometer with multichannel photon-counting detector for beam emission spectroscopy in magnetic fusion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Lizunov, A.; Khilchenko, A.; Khilchenko, V.; Kvashnin, A.; Zubarev, P.

    2015-12-15

    A spectrometer based on a linear array photomultiplier tube (PMT) has been developed and calibrated. A 0.635 m focal length Czerny-Turner monochromator combined with a coupling optics provides an image of a narrow 0.5 nm spectral range with a resolution of 0.015 nm/channel on a 32-anode PMT. The system aims at spectroscopy of D{sub α} or H{sub α} lines emitted by a diagnostic atomic beam in a plasma (primarily a motional Stark effect diagnostics). To record a low photon flux of ∼10{sup 6} s{sup −1} per channel with the time resolution of 100 μs, a pulse counting approach has been used. Wideband amplifiers scale single-electron pulses and transmit them to a digital data processing core hardwired in a programmable logic matrix. Calibrations have shown that the aberration-limited instrument function fits to a single detector channel of 1 mm width. Pilot results of passive measurements of D{sub α} light emission from the plasma confined in a magnetic trap are presented.

  11. Heuristic modeling of spectral plasma emission for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, Rolf; Noll, Reinhard

    2009-12-15

    A heuristic model was developed to describe the spectral emission of laser-induced plasmas generated for laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy under the assumption that the composition of the plasma and the plasma state is known. The plasma is described by a stationary spherical shell model surrounded by an ambient gas, which partially absorbs the emitted radiation. The radiation transport equation is used to calculate the spectrum emitted by the plasma. Simulations of a multiline iron spectrum and a self-reversed Al line are compared with experimental spectra. For the iron spectrum, the degree of congruence is moderate to good, which may be attributed to a lack of precise atomic and Stark broadening data as well as a simplified plasma model. The line profile of the Al resonance line with self reversal can be simulated with a high degree of agreement. Simulated spectra of a steel sample in the vacuum ultraviolet spectral range demonstrate the strong influence of the ambient atmosphere in the spectral range between 178 and 194 nm. The number of free parameters of the plasma model of 8 can be further reduced down to 3, taking into account the integral parameters of the plasma that are accessible experimentally.

  12. Note: Spectrometer with multichannel photon-counting detector for beam emission spectroscopy in magnetic fusion devices.

    PubMed

    Lizunov, A; Khilchenko, A; Khilchenko, V; Kvashnin, A; Zubarev, P

    2015-12-01

    A spectrometer based on a linear array photomultiplier tube (PMT) has been developed and calibrated. A 0.635 m focal length Czerny-Turner monochromator combined with a coupling optics provides an image of a narrow 0.5 nm spectral range with a resolution of 0.015 nm/channel on a 32-anode PMT. The system aims at spectroscopy of D(α) or H(α) lines emitted by a diagnostic atomic beam in a plasma (primarily a motional Stark effect diagnostics). To record a low photon flux of ∼10(6) s(-1) per channel with the time resolution of 100 μs, a pulse counting approach has been used. Wideband amplifiers scale single-electron pulses and transmit them to a digital data processing core hardwired in a programmable logic matrix. Calibrations have shown that the aberration-limited instrument function fits to a single detector channel of 1 mm width. Pilot results of passive measurements of D(α) light emission from the plasma confined in a magnetic trap are presented. PMID:26724090

  13. Two-temperature modelling and optical emission spectroscopy of a constant current plasma arc welding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boselli, M.; Colombo, V.; Ghedini, E.; Gherardi, M.; Sanibondi, P.

    2013-06-01

    In this work, a plasma arc welding process with constant current in the range 25-70 A operating in pure Ar is characterized by means of both thermo-fluid-dynamic modelling under the assumption of local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and two-temperature thermal non-equilibrium modelling (2T), allowing a comparison of the LTE temperature fields with electron and heavy particle temperature fields: thermal non-equilibrium is strongest in the fringes of the arc and upstream the plasma flow even though a temperature difference between electrons and heavy particles is also found in the arc core in the nozzle orifice, due to the high velocity of the gas. Also, excitation temperature of Ar atoms is obtained from optical emission spectroscopy measurements using a new method (called hybrid method) that extends the usability of the Boltzmann plot method to spatial regions where the signal-to-noise ratio of the spectral lines adopted in the calculation is poor. Good agreement is obtained between the modelling predicted electron temperature and the measured excitation temperature in the whole investigated spatial region.

  14. Use of LEED, Auger emission spectroscopy and field ion microscopy in microstructural studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Buckley, D. H.; Pepper, S. V.; Brainard, W. A.

    1972-01-01

    Surface research tools such as LEED, Auger emission spectroscopy analysis, and field ion microscopy are discussed. Examples of their use in studying adhesion, friction, wear, and lubrication presented. These tools have provided considerable insight into the basic nature of solid surface interactions. The transfer of metals from one surface to another at the atomic level has been observed and studied with each of these devices. The field ion microscope has been used to study polymer-metal interactions and Auger analysis to study the mechanism of polymer adhesion to metals. LEED and Auger analysis have identified surface segregation of alloying elements and indicated the influence of these elements in metallic adhesion. LEED and Auger analysis have assisted in adsorption studies in determining the structural arrangement and quantity of adsorbed species present in making an understanding of the influence of these species on adhesion possible. These devices are assisting in the furtherance of understanding of the fundamental mechanism involved in the adhesion, friction, wear, and lubrication processes.

  15. Imaging molecular adsorption and desorption dynamics on graphene using terahertz emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sano, Y; Kawayama, I; Tabata, M; Salek, K A; Murakami, H; Wang, M; Vajtai, R; Ajayan, P M; Kono, J; Tonouchi, M

    2014-01-01

    Being an atomically thin material, graphene is known to be extremely susceptible to its environment, including defects and phonons in the substrate on which it is placed as well as gas molecules that surround it. Thus, any device design using graphene has to take into consideration all surrounding components, and device performance needs to be evaluated in terms of environmental influence. However, no methods have been established to date to readily measure the density and distribution of external perturbations in a quantitative and non-destructive manner. Here, we present a rapid and non-contact method for visualizing the distribution of molecular adsorbates on graphene semi-quantitatively using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy and imaging. We found that the waveform of terahertz bursts emitted from graphene-coated InP sensitively changes with the type of atmospheric gas, laser irradiation time, and ultraviolet light illumination. The terahertz waveform change is explained through band structure modifications in the InP surface depletion layer due to the presence of localized electric dipoles induced by adsorbed oxygen. These results demonstrate that terahertz emission serves as a local probe for monitoring adsorption and desorption processes on graphene films and devices, suggesting a novel two-dimensional sensor for detecting local chemical reactions. PMID:25116593

  16. Application of emission ( 57Co) Mössbauer spectroscopy in bioscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamnev, Alexander A.

    2005-06-01

    Cobalt is an essential trace element with a broad range of physiological and biochemical functions. However, biochemical speciation of cobalt and structural investigations of cobalt-containing complexes with biomacromolecules are challenging, as the participation of cobalt in physiological processes is limited by its very low concentrations. Emission Mössbauer spectroscopy (EMS), with the radioactive 57Co isotope as the most widely used nuclide, is several orders of magnitude more sensitive than its 57Fe absorption variant which has had a rich history of applications in bioscience. Nevertheless, owing to specific difficulties related to the necessity of using radioactive 57Co in samples under study, applications of EMS in biological fields have so far been sparse. In this communication, the EMS applicability to studying biological objects as well as some specific aspects of the EMS methodology are considered in order to draw attention to the unique structural information which can be obtained non-destructively in situ. Chemical consequences (after-effects) of the nuclear transition ( 57Co→ 57Fe), which provide additional information on the electron acceptor properties of the proximate chemical microenvironment of the metal ions, are also considered. The data presented demonstrate that EMS is a sensitive tool for monitoring the chemical state and coordination of cobalt species in biological matter and in biomacromolecular complexes (metalloenzymes), providing valuable structural information at the atomic level.

  17. Coherent x-ray emission from hollow Xe atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, G. M.; Davis, J.; Kepple, P.; Dasgupta, A.; Clark, R.; Velikovich, A.; Borisov, A. B.; Rhodes, C. K.

    2004-11-01

    We investigated small Xe clusters subject to intense ultrashort laser radiation. The dynamics and evolution of the cluster plasma is described by a relativistic time-dependent 3-D molecular dynamics model and a detailed atomic physics model describing the formation of hollow Xe atoms. At a peak laser intensity of (1-5)x10^20 W/cm^2 the model predicts inversions in a number of states distributed in several ionization stages in agreement with experimental observations [1,2]. The particle simulation model suggests that at laser intensities below 10^20 W/cm^2 the outer electrons form a low-density uniform plasma, while at higher intensities the electrons may behave collectively in a manner similar to that described by the "collective oscillation model" [1,2]. [1] W. A. Schroeder, F. G. Omenetto, A. B. Borisov, J. W. Longworth, A. McPherson, C. Jordan, K. Boyer, K. Kondo, and C. K. Rhodes, J. Phys. B 31, 5031 (1998) [2] W. A. Schroeder, T. R. Nelson, A. B. Borisov, J. W. Longworth, K. Boyer, and C. K. Rhodes, J. Phys. B 34, 297 (2001)

  18. Optical emission spectroscopy study in the VUV-VIS regimes of a developing low-temperature plasma in nitrogen gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fierro, A.; Laity, G.; Neuber, A.

    2012-12-01

    The mechanisms leading to the development of an atmospheric low temperature plasma along a surface under pulsed conditions is of current interest. In the early plasma phase, high energy photons are a contributing factor to the process of generating electron avalanches resulting in surface flashover. Since only photons in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) regime are energetic enough to cause step-ionization or direct ionization of atmospheric gases, an experiment has been set up to enable observations of photons with wavelengths shorter than 200 nm while still allowing observation up to 800 nm. A spectrum simulation software package has been developed to allow for temperature analysis on the developing plasma in the VUV region. Observations below 200 nm revealed a Boltzmann distributed excited state population corresponding to a temperature of 3.1 eV. Time-resolved emission spectroscopy measurements of the entire electrode region during the streamer phase of breakdown demonstrate the presence of molecular nitrogen emission lines from the second positive system. Further photomultiplier tube measurements of the spark phase showed a rapid decrease in intensity of the second positive system compared to that of a representative atomic emission line in the VUV regime. This emission dominates the ultraviolet-visible (UV-VIS) spectrum during the initial phases of breakdown with little detection of other sources of emission during this phase.

  19. Emission spectrum of holmium atoms excited during ionic sputtering of a surface

    SciTech Connect

    Pop, S. S.; Braslavets, V. V.; Evdokimov, S. A.

    1988-08-01

    The article shows the fundamental possibility of using the bombardment of the surface of solids by kilo V ions for exciting the emission spectrum of particles of the target material and for obtaining spectroscopic data. The method is tested by studying the emission spectra of holmium as an example. It is shown that the sensitivity of the method can be substantially increased by using the so-called chemical effect, i.e., the effect of strengthening the spectral lines of sputtered excited metal atoms during bombardment of the target in the presence of oxygen. It is proposed that the chemical effect, which takes place only for atomic lines, in contrast to ionic ones, can also be used for simplifying the identification of atomic lines. It is noted that the proposed method is suitable for studying the atomic spectra of any solids, including refractory and chemically reactive substances.

  20. Directional spontaneous emission and lateral Casimir-Polder force on an atom close to a nanofiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheel, Stefan; Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi; Clausen, Christoph; Schneeweiss, Philipp

    2015-10-01

    We study the spontaneous emission of an excited atom close to an optical nanofiber and the resulting scattering forces. For a suitably chosen orientation of the atomic dipole, the spontaneous emission pattern becomes asymmetric and a resonant Casimir-Polder force parallel to the fiber axis arises. For a simple model case, we show that such a lateral force is due to the interaction of the circularly oscillating atomic dipole moment with its image inside the material. With the Casimir-Polder energy being constant in the lateral direction, the predicted lateral force does not derive from a potential in the usual way. Our results have implications for optical force measurements on a substrate as well as for laser cooling of atoms in nanophotonic traps.

  1. Real-time atomic absorption mercury continuous emission monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamzow, Daniel S.; Bajic, Stanley J.; Eckels, David E.; Baldwin, David P.; Winterrowd, Chris; Keeney, Robert

    2003-08-01

    A continuous emission monitor (CEM) for mercury (Hg) in combustor flue gas streams has been designed and tested for the detection of Hg by optical absorption. A sampling system that allows continuous introduction of stack gas is incorporated into the CEM, for the sequential analysis of elemental and total Hg. A heated pyrolysis tube is used in the system to convert oxidized Hg compounds to elemental Hg for analysis of total Hg; the pyrolysis tube is bypassed to determine the elemental Hg concentration in the gas stream. A key component of the CEM is a laboratory-designed and -assembled echelle spectrometer that provides simultaneous detection of all of the emission lines from a Hg pen lamp, which is used as the light source for the optical absorption measurement. This feature allows for on-line spectroscopic correction for interferent gases such as sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide, typically present in combustion stack gas streams, that also absorb at the Hg detection wavelength (253.65 nm). This article provides a detailed description of the CEM system, the characteristics and performance of the CEM, and the results of field tests performed at the Environmental Protection Agency-Rotary Kiln at Research Triangle Park, NC.

  2. Near-ionization-threshold emission in atomic gases driven by intense sub-cycle pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Wei-Chun; Travers, John C.; Russell, Philip St. J.

    2016-02-01

    We study theoretically the dipole radiation of a hydrogen atom driven by an intense sub-cycle pulse. The time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the system is solved by ab initio calculation to obtain the dipole response. Remarkably, a narrowband emission lasting longer than the driving pulse appears at a frequency just above the ionization threshold. An additional calculation using the strong field approximation also recovers this emission, which suggests that it corresponds to the oscillation of nearly bound electrons that behave similarly to Rydberg electrons. The predicted phenomenon is unique to ultrashort driving pulses but not specific to any particular atomic structure.

  3. Spectroscopy and atomic physics of highly ionized Cr, Fe, and Ni for tokamak plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, U.; Doschek, G. A.; Cheng, C.-C.; Bhatia, A. K.

    1980-01-01

    The paper considers the spectroscopy and atomic physics for some highly ionized Cr, Fe, and Ni ions produced in tokamak plasmas. Forbidden and intersystem wavelengths for Cr and Ni ions are extrapolated and interpolated using the known wavelengths for Fe lines identified in solar-flare plasmas. Tables of transition probabilities for the B I, C I, N I, O I, and F I isoelectronic sequences are presented, and collision strengths and transition probabilities for Cr, Fe, and Ni ions of the Be I sequence are given. Similarities of tokamak and solar spectra are discussed, and it is shown how the atomic data presented may be used to determine ion abundances and electron densities in low-density plasmas.

  4. Resonant two-photon ionization spectroscopy of Al atoms and dimers solvated in helium nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnokutski, Serge A.; Huisken, Friedrich

    2015-02-28

    Resonant two-photon ionization (R2PI) spectroscopy has been applied to investigate the solvation of Al atoms in helium droplets. The R2PI spectra reveal vibrational progressions that can be attributed to Al–He{sub n} vibrations. It is found that small helium droplets have very little chance to pick up an aluminum atom after collision. However, the pick-up probability increases with the size of the helium droplets. The absorption band that is measured by monitoring the ions on the mass of the Al dimer is found to be very little shifted with respect to the Al monomer band (∼400 cm{sup −1}). However, using the same laser wavelength, we were unable to detect any Al{sub n} photoion with n larger than two.

  5. Note: In situ measurement of vacuum window birefringence by atomic spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Steffen, Andreas; Alt, Wolfgang; Genske, Maximilian; Meschede, Dieter; Robens, Carsten; Alberti, Andrea

    2013-12-01

    We present an in situ method to measure the birefringence of a single vacuum window by means of microwave spectroscopy on an ensemble of cold atoms. Stress-induced birefringence can cause an ellipticity in the polarization of an initially linearly polarized laser beam. The amount of ellipticity can be reconstructed by measuring the differential vector light shift of an atomic hyperfine transition. Measuring the ellipticity as a function of the linear polarization angle allows us to infer the amount of birefringence Δn at the level of 10(-8) and identify the orientation of the optical axes. The key benefit of this method is the ability to separately characterize each vacuum window, allowing the birefringence to be precisely compensated in existing vacuum apparatuses. PMID:24387479

  6. Note: In situ measurement of vacuum window birefringence by atomic spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen, Andreas; Alt, Wolfgang; Genske, Maximilian; Meschede, Dieter; Robens, Carsten; Alberti, Andrea

    2013-12-15

    We present an in situ method to measure the birefringence of a single vacuum window by means of microwave spectroscopy on an ensemble of cold atoms. Stress-induced birefringence can cause an ellipticity in the polarization of an initially linearly polarized laser beam. The amount of ellipticity can be reconstructed by measuring the differential vector light shift of an atomic hyperfine transition. Measuring the ellipticity as a function of the linear polarization angle allows us to infer the amount of birefringence Δn at the level of 10{sup −8} and identify the orientation of the optical axes. The key benefit of this method is the ability to separately characterize each vacuum window, allowing the birefringence to be precisely compensated in existing vacuum apparatuses.

  7. PREFACE: The 23rd EGAS Conference of the European Group for Atomic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Łęgowski, S.

    1992-01-01

    The 23rd conference of the European Group for Atomic Physics took place in Toruń, Poland and was hosted by the Nicholas Copernicus University, from July 9-12th, 1991. Originally the conference was planned to be held in Vilnius, Lithuania but at the end of February the Board of EGAS decided to transfer the Conference to Poland. So the town Toruń where the famous astronomer Nicholas Copernicus was born became the host for the 23rd EGAS Conference. About 168 physicists from 16 countries all over the world met to discuss problems of pure and applied atomic and molecular spectroscopy and related topics. Ten of the invited lectures have been prepared for publication by the authors and are presented in this issue of Physica Scripta.

  8. Energetics of endohedral atoms in type-I clathrates observed by soft x-ray spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jun; Rachi, Takeshi; Kumashiro, Ryotaro; Avila, Marcos A.; Suekuni, Kouichirou; Takabatake, Toshiro; Guo, Fangzhun; Kobayashi, Keisuke; Akai, Koji; Tanigaki, Katsumi

    2008-08-01

    We present an extensive soft x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study on the core levels of the endohedral atoms of Ba8Ga16Ge30 (BGG), Sr8Ga16Ge30 (SGG), Eu8Ga16Ge30 (EGG), and Sr8Ga16Si30 (SGS) single crystals, performed at a high-energy facility. Unexpected features evidencing the different shift for the 2a and 6d sites between Ba4d and Sr3d are observed for BGG and SGG. The detailed analyses including theoretical support by first-principles band-structure calculations lead to the surprising conclusion that the component distributions of the larger tetrakaidecahedral cage are different depending on the endohedral atoms, which is in contrast to the past consensus that BGG and SGG have the same framework structure. The differences are further supported by analysis of the Ga3d core levels. This may suggest thorough reconsiderations on earlier interpretations of experimental data.

  9. Improved limits on interactions of low-mass spin-0 dark matter from atomic clock spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadnik, Y. V.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    Low-mass (sub-eV) spin-0 dark matter particles, which form a coherently oscillating classical field ϕ =ϕ0cos(mϕt ) , can induce oscillating variations in the fundamental constants through their interactions with the standard model sector. We calculate the effects of such possible interactions, which may include the linear interaction of ϕ with the Higgs boson, on atomic and molecular transitions. Using recent atomic clock spectroscopy measurements, we derive limits on the linear interaction of ϕ with the Higgs boson, as well as its quadratic interactions with the photon and light quarks. For the linear interaction of ϕ with the Higgs boson, our derived limits improve on existing constraints by up to 2-3 orders of magnitude.

  10. Oxidation of diamond films by atomic oxygen: High resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shpilman, Z.; Gouzman, I.; Grossman, E.; Akhvlediani, R.; Hoffman, A.

    2007-12-01

    Diamond surface oxidation by atomic oxygen, annealing up to ˜700°C, and in situ exposure to thermally activated hydrogen were studied by high resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS). After atomic oxygen (AO) exposure, HREELS revealed peaks associated with CHx groups, carbonyl, ether, and peroxide-type species and strong quenching of the diamond optical phonon and its overtones. Upon annealing of the oxidized surfaces, the diamond optical phonon overtones at 300 and 450meV emerge and carbonyl and peroxide species gradually desorb. The diamond surface was not completely regenerated after annealing to ˜700°C and in situ exposure to thermally activated hydrogen, probably due to the irreversible deterioration of the surface by AO.

  11. Perforated hollow-core optical waveguides for on-chip atomic spectroscopy and gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraud-Carrier, M.; Hill, C.; Decker, T.; Black, J. A.; Schmidt, H.; Hawkins, A.

    2016-03-01

    A hollow-core waveguide structure for on-chip atomic spectroscopy is presented. The devices are based on Anti-Resonant Reflecting Optical Waveguides and may be used for a wide variety of applications which rely on the interaction of light with gases and vapors. The designs presented here feature short delivery paths of the atomic vapor into the hollow waveguide. They also have excellent environmental stability by incorporating buried solid-core waveguides to deliver light to the hollow cores. Completed chips were packaged with an Rb source and the F = 3 ≥ F' = 2, 3, 4 transitions of the D2 line in 85Rb were monitored for optical absorption. Maximum absorption peak depths of 9% were measured.

  12. Optical emission spectroscopy observations of fast pulsed capillary discharge plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avaria, G.; Ruiz, M.; Guzmán, F.; Favre, M.; Wyndham, E. S.; Chuaqui, H.; Bhuyan, H.

    2014-05-01

    We present time resolved optical emission spectroscopic (OES) observations of a low energy, pulsed capillary discharage (PCD). The optical emission from the capillary plasma and plasma jets emitted from the capillary volume was recorded with with a SpectraPro 275 spectrograph, fitted with a MCP gated OMA system, with 15 ns time resolution. The discharge was operated with different gases, including argon, nitrogen, hydrogen and methane, in a repetitive pulsed discharge mode at 10-50 Hz, with, 10-12 kV pulses applied at the cathode side. The time evolution of the electron density was measured using Stark broadening of the Hβ line. Several features of the capillary plasma dynamics, such as ionization growth, wall effects and plasma jet evolution, are inferred from the time evolution of the optical emission.

  13. Spectroscopy of antiprotonic helium atoms and its contribution to the fundamental physical constants

    PubMed Central

    Hayano, Ryugo S.

    2010-01-01

    Antiprotonic helium atom, a metastable neutral system consisting of an antiproton, an electron and a helium nucleus, was serendipitously discovered, and has been studied at CERN’s antiproton decelerator facility. Its transition frequencies have recently been measured to nine digits of precision by laser spectroscopy. By comparing these experimental results with three-body QED calculations, the antiproton-to-electron massratio was determined as 1836.152674(5). This result contributed to the CODATA recommended values of the fundamental physical constants. PMID:20075605

  14. High-Resolution Kaonic-Atom X-ray Spectroscopy with Transition-Edge-Sensor Microcalorimeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, S.; Bennett, D. A.; Doriese, W. B.; Fowler, J. W.; Irwin, K. D.; Ishimoto, S.; Sato, M.; Schmidt, D. R.; Swetz, D. S.; Tatsuno, H.; Ullom, J. N.; Yamada, S.

    2014-09-01

    We are preparing for an ultra-high resolution X-ray spectroscopy of kaonic atoms using an X-ray spectrometer based on an array of superconducting transition-edge-sensor microcalorimeters developed by NIST. The instrument has excellent energy resolutions of 2-3 eV (FWHM) at 6 keV and a large collecting area of about 20 mm. This will open new door to investigate kaon-nucleus strong interaction and provide new accurate charged-kaon mass value.

  15. Remote sensing of the troposphere by infrared emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beer, Reinhard; Glavich, Thomas A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the concept of a cryogenic IR imaging Fourier transform spectrometer, called the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), designed for observations of the troposphere and lower stratosphere from a near-earth orbit, using natural thermal emission and reflected sunlight. The principal molecular species to be measured by TES are O3, CO, CO2, N2O, H2O, H2O2, NO, NO2, HNO3, NH3, CH4, C2H6, C2H2, SO2, COS, CFCl3, and CF2Cl2. The TES is scheduled for a launch on the second polar platform of the Earth Observing System in 1998.

  16. Method for reducing emissions utilizing pre-atomized fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, M.E.; Hrebenar, K.R.; Deal, J.F. III; Bolden, P.L. Jr.

    1987-05-19

    A method is described for reducing particulate emissions during combustion of a hydrocarbon with API gravity of about 20/sup 0/ API or less, viscosity of about 40,000 centipoise at 122/sup 0/F, paraffin content of about 50% by weight or less, aromatic content of about 15% by weight or greater, and asphaltene content of about 50% by weight or greater. The method comprises: emulsifying such hydrocarbon to form a hydrocarbon-in-water emulsion having a hydrocarbon water ratio from about 60:40 to about 90:10 by volume and in which emulsion the hydrocarbon has a particle size predominantly of about 50 microns in diameter or less; preheating such hydrocarbon-in-water emulsion prior to combustion; and burning such hydrocarbon-in-water emulsion.

  17. X-ray spectroscopy of light kaonic atoms - new results and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marton, J.; Bazzi, M.; Beer, G.; Berucci, C.; Bombelli, L.; Bragadireanu, A. M.; Cargnelli, M.; Curceanu (Petrascu), C.; d'Uffizi, A.; Fiorini, C.; Frizzi, T.; Ghio, F.; Guaraldo, C.; Hayano, R.; Iliescu, M.; Ishiwatari, T.; Iwasaki, M.; Kienle, P.; Levi Sandri, P.; Longoni, A.; Okada, S.; Pietreanu, D.; Ponta, T.; Rizzo, A.; Romero Vidal, A.; Sbardella, E.; Scordo, A.; Shi, H.; Sirghi, D. L.; Sirghi, F.; Tatsuno, H.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Vazquez Doce, O.; Wünschek, B.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.

    2012-12-01

    The antikaon interaction on nucleons and nuclei in the low-energy regime is neither simple nor well understood. Rather direct access to this field is provided by x-ray spectroscopy of light kaonic atoms like kaonic hydrogen, deuterium and helium isotopes. A series of precision measurements on kaonic atoms was performed very successfully by the SIDDHARTA Collaboration at the DAΦNE electron-positron collider at LNF-INFN (Frascati, Italy). Consequently, new precision data on the strong interaction observables (i.e. energy shift and broadening of low-lying atomic states) were delivered having an important impact on the theory of low-energy QCD with strangeness. Presently, the follow-up experiment, SIDDHARTA-2, is in preparation, aiming at a determination of the strong interaction observables in kaonic deuterium as the highest priority; other type of measurements (light and heavier kaonic atoms) are as well foreseen. With the kaonic deuterium data the antikaon-nucleon isospin-resolved scattering lengths can be extracted for the first time. An overview of the progress and present status of experimental studies and an outlook to future perspectives in this fascinating research field is given.

  18. Light-induced atom desorption from glass surfaces characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, Ryo; Hatakeyama, Atsushi

    2016-07-01

    We analyzed the surfaces of vitreous silica (quartz) and borosilicate glass (Pyrex) substrates exposed to rubidium (Rb) vapor by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to understand the surface conditions of alkali metal vapor cells. XPS spectra indicated that Rb atoms adopted different bonding states in quartz and Pyrex. Furthermore, Rb atoms in quartz remained in the near-surface region, while they diffused into the bulk in Pyrex. For these characterized surfaces, we measured light-induced atom desorption (LIAD) of Rb atoms. Clear differences in time evolution, photon energy dependence, and substrate temperature dependence were found; the decay of LIAD by continuous ultraviolet irradiation for quartz was faster than that for Pyrex, a monotonic increase in LIAD with increasing photon energy from 1.8 to 4.3 eV was more prominent for quartz, and LIAD from quartz was more efficient at higher temperatures in the range from 300 to 580 K, while that from Pyrex was almost independent of temperature.

  19. Spectroscopy with Laser-cooled Francium and Progress on Atomic Parity Non-conservation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiehang

    Francium, the heaviest alkali, possesses a unique combination of structural simplicity and great sensitivity to effects such as atomic parity non-conservation (APNC). We report in this thesis our progress towards measuring weak-interaction physics in a low energy system: the francium atom. We have built a new generation of high-efficiency laser cooling and trapping facility at TRIUMF national laboratory in Canada. We constructed a precision science chamber and demonstrate francium atom transfer into the precision trap, where the electromagnetic field environments can be exquisitely controlled such that weak-interaction studies via optical and microwave excitations can take place. We perform laser spectroscopy measurements of the hyperfine structure and isotope shifts in a chain of francium isotopes near the neutron closed shell (N = 126), including both ground and isomeric nuclear states. These measurements provide a basis for benchmarking state of the art atomic theory, as well as future nuclear structure calculations in Fr, necessary for interpreting the weak-interaction studies. These developments lay important foundations for precision parity non-conservation measurements with francium.

  20. Cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc determination in precipitation: A comparison of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry and graphite furnace atomization atomic absorption spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.; Benefiel, M.A.; Claassen, H.C.

    1987-01-01

    Selected trace element analysis for cadmium, copper, lead, and zinc in precipitation samples by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission Spectrometry (ICP) and by atomic absorption spectrometry with graphite furnace atomization (AAGF) have been evaluated. This task was conducted in conjunction with a longterm study of precipitation chemistry at high altitude sites located in remote areas of the southwestern United States. Coefficients of variation and recovery values were determined for a standard reference water sample for all metals examined for both techniques. At concentration levels less than 10 micrograms per liter AAGF analyses exhibited better precision and accuracy than ICP. Both methods appear to offer the potential for cost-effective analysis of trace metal ions in precipitation. ?? 1987 Springer-Verlag.

  1. Atomic carbon emission from photodissociation of CO2. [planetary atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. Y. R.; Phillips, E.; Lee, L. C.; Judge, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    Atomic carbon fluorescence, C I 1561, 1657, and 1931 A, has been observed from photodissociation of CO2, and the production cross sections have been measured. A line emission source provided the primary photons at wavelengths from threshold to 420 A. The present results suggest that the excited carbon atoms are produced by total dissociation of CO2 into three atoms. The cross sections for producing the O I 1304-A fluorescence through photodissociation of CO2 are found to be less than 0.01 Mb in the wavelength region from 420 to 835 A. The present data have implications with respect to photochemical processes in the atmospheres of Mars and Venus.

  2. Ultrafast spectroscopy of stimulated emission in single ZnO tetrapod nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djurisic, A. B.; Kwok, W. M.; Leung, Y. H.; Chan, W. K.; Phillips, D. L.; Lin, M. S.; Gwo, S.

    2006-01-01

    Stimulated emission from single ZnO tetrapod nanowires was studied by time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) spectroscopy. The samples were excited by a 300 fs pulse and the emission spectra collected as a function of time. The spectra exhibit a change in the position and the shape of the emission peak with time. The time evolution of the emission spectra was studied for different pump excitation fluences. The spectra exhibited a blue shift with increasing pump fluence, while for all pump fluences a red shift of the peaks with time was obtained. Possible reasons for the observed behaviour are discussed.

  3. [Study of emission spectra of N atom generated in multi-needle-to-plate corona discharge].

    PubMed

    Ge, Hui; Yu, Ran; Zhang, Lu; Mi, Dong; Zhu, Yi-Min

    2012-06-01

    The emission spectra of nitrogen (N) atom produced by multi-needle-to-plate negative corona discharge in air were detected successfully at one atmosphere, and the excited transition spectral line at 674.5 nm with maximum value of relative intensity was selected to investigate the influences of air and electrical parameters on N atom relative density. The results indicate that N atom relative density in ionization region increases with the increase in power; decreases with increasing discharge gap and relative humidity; and with the increase in N2 content, the relative density of N active atom firstly increases and then decreases. Under present experimental conditions, the maximum value of N atom relative density appears at the axial distance from needle point r = 1 mm. PMID:22870624

  4. Hybrid interferometric/dispersive atomic spectroscopy of laser-induced uranium plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Phyllis K.; Scott, Jill R.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2016-02-01

    An established optical emission spectroscopy technique, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), holds promise for detection and rapid analysis of elements relevant for nuclear safeguards, nonproliferation, and nuclear power, including the measurement of isotope ratios. One such important application of LIBS is the measurement of uranium enrichment (235U/238U), which requires high spectral resolution (e.g., 25 pm for the 424.4 nm U II line). High-resolution dispersive spectrometers necessary for such measurements are typically bulky and expensive. We demonstrate the use of an alternative measurement approach, which is based on an inexpensive and compact Fabry-Perot etalon integrated with a low to moderate resolution Czerny-Turner spectrometer, to achieve the resolution needed for isotope selectivity of LIBS of uranium in ambient air. Spectral line widths of ~ 10 pm have been measured at a center wavelength 424.437 nm, clearly discriminating the natural from the highly enriched uranium.

  5. DESIGN NOTE: A modified Nanosurf scanning tunnelling microscope for ballistic electron emission microscopy and spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelbaum, Ian; Thompson, Pete; van Schendel, P. J. A.

    2006-04-01

    We describe the design and implementation of modifications to an ambient STM with a slip stick approach mechanism to create a system capable of ballistic electron emission microscopy (BEEM) and spectroscopy (BEES). These modifications require building a custom sample holder which operates as a high gain transimpedance preamplifier. Results of microscopy and spectroscopy using a Au/n-GaAs Schottky device demonstrate the effectiveness of our design.

  6. Characterization of helium/argon working gas systems in a radiofrequency glow discharge atomic emission source. Part I: Optical emission, sputtering and electrical characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christopher, Steven J.; Hartenstein, Matthew L.; Marcus, R. Kenneth; Belkin, Mikhail; Caruso, Joseph A.

    1998-08-01

    Studies are performed to determine the influence of discharge gas composition (helium/argon working gas mixtures) on the analyte emission signal intensities, sputtering rates, and DC-bias characteristics of an analytical radiofrequency glow discharge atomic emission spectroscopy (RF-GD-AES) source. As the partial pressure of He is increased from 0 to 15 torr, increased emission intensity is observed for a range of bulk and trace elements in NIST 1250 SRM (low alloy steel), regardless of the base pressure of Ar in the source (5 and 9 torr). In contrast to increases in analyte emission intensity of up to 300%, counterindicative decreases in the sputtering rates on the order of about 30-50% are observed. The magnitude of these effects depends on both the partial pressure of helium introduced to the source and the total pressure of the He and Ar gases. Use of relative emission yield (REY) to normalize changes in emission intensity to sputtering rates indicates that excitation efficiencies increase under these conditions. Increases in average electron energy and temperature appear to control this response. Decreases in both analyte emission intensities and sputter rates occur with increasing He partial pressure when the total pressure in the cell remains fixed (11 torr in these studies). Emission yields for the fixed pressure, mixed gas plasmas decrease as the partial pressure of He (He/Ar ratio) in the RF-GD source increases. In this case, decreases in electron number densities appear to dictate the lower REYs. Measurement of DC-bias values at the sample surface provide understanding with respect to the observed changes in sputtering rates as well as suggest the origins of changes in plasma electron energetics. Use of a diamond stylus profilometer provides both the quantitative sputter rate information as well as qualitative insights into the use of mixed gas plasmas for enhanced depth profiling capabilities. The analyte emission characteristics of these mixed gas

  7. Atomic Data and Emission Line Intensities for CA VII

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landi, E.; Bhatia, A. K.

    2003-01-01

    In the present work we calculate energy levels, transition probabilities and electron-ion collisional excitation rates for the 3s(sup 2)3p(sup 2), 3s3p(sup 3) and 3s(sup 2)3p3d configurations of the silicon-like ion Ca VII. The total number of intermediate coupling levels considered is 27. Collision strengths are calculated at seven incident electron energies: 8, 10, 15, 20, 30,40 and 60 Ry, using the Distorted Wave approximation and a 5-configuration model. Excitation rate coefficients are calculated by assuming a Maxwellian distribution of velocities and are used to calculate level populations and line emissivities under the assumption of statistical equilibrium. Line intensity ratios are calculated and compared with observed values measured from SERTS and SOHO/CDS spectra. The diagnostic potential of Ca VII is demonstrated, with particular emphasis on the possibility to measure the Ne/Ca relative abundance through simultaneous observations of Ca VII and N VI lines. Ca VII proves to be an excellent tool for the study of the FIP effect in the solar transition region.

  8. Sampling and excitation of refractory solids with a theta pinch designed as an atomic emission source

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.S.; Scheeline, A.

    1987-01-15

    Work with a theta pinch designed as an atomic emission source for solids analysis is reported. Argon at 3.5 torr provided the most intense analyte emission compared to several other gases. A study of the effects of sample positioning provides further understanding of the plasma motion and plasma/sample interactions. Application of the new sample positioning knowledge has resulted in significant increases in analyte emission, as is demonstrated by use of samples of tungsten powder, boron nitride, and aluminum oxide ceramics.

  9. Analysis of Aluminum Dust Cloud Combustion Using Flame Emission Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sanghyup; Noh, Kwanyoung; Yoon, Woongsup

    2015-09-01

    In this study, aluminum flame analysis was researched in order to develop a measurement method for high-energy-density metal aluminum dust cloud combustion, and the flame temperature and UV-VIS-IR emission spectra were precisely measured using a spectrometer. Because the micron-sized aluminum flame temperature was higher than 2400 K, Flame temperature was measured by a non-contact optical technique, namely, a modified two-color method using 520 and 640 nm light, as well as by a polychromatic fitting method. These methods were applied experimentally after accurate calibration. The flame temperature was identified to be higher than 2400 K using both methods. By analyzing the emission spectra, we could identify AlO radicals, which occur dominantly in aluminum combustion. This study paves the way for realization of a measurement technique for aluminum dust cloud combustion flames, and it will be applied in the aluminum combustors that are in development for military purposes. PMID:26669143

  10. Atomic-Scale Imaging and Spectroscopy for In Situ Liquid Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Jungjohann, K. L.; Evans, James E.; Aguiar, Jeff; Arslan, Ilke; Browning, Nigel D.

    2012-06-04

    Observation of growth, synthesis, dynamics and electrochemical reactions in the liquid state is an important yet largely unstudied aspect of nanotechnology. The only techniques that can potentially provide the insights necessary to advance our understanding of these mechanisms is simultaneous atomic-scale imaging and quantitative chemical analysis (through spectroscopy) under environmental conditions in the transmission electron microscope (TEM). In this study we describe the experimental and technical conditions necessary to obtain electron energy loss (EEL) spectra from a nanoparticle in colloidal suspension using aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) combined with the environmental liquid stage. At a fluid path length below 400 nm, atomic resolution images can be obtained and simultaneous compositional analysis can be achieved. We show that EEL spectroscopy can be used to quantify the total fluid path length around the nanoparticle, and demonstrate characteristic core-loss signals from the suspended nanoparticles can be resolved and analyzed to provide information on the local interfacial chemistry with the surrounding environment. The combined approach using aberration corrected STEM and EEL spectra with the in situ fluid stage demonstrates a plenary platform for detailed investigations of solution based catalysis and biological research.

  11. Atomic force spectroscopy and density-functional study of graphene corrugation on Ru(0001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voloshina, Elena; Dedkov, Yuriy

    2016-06-01

    Graphene, the thinnest material in the world, can form moiré structures on different substrates, including graphite, h -BN, or metal surfaces. In such systems, the structure of graphene, i.e., its corrugation, as well as its electronic and elastic properties, are defined by the combination of the system geometry and local interaction strength at the interface. The corrugation in such structures on metals is heavily extracted from diffraction or local probe microscopy experiments, and it can be obtained only via comparison with theoretical data, which usually simulate the experimental findings. Here we show that graphene corrugation on metals can be measured directly employing atomic force spectroscopy, and the obtained value coincides with state-of-the-art theoretical results. The presented results demonstrate an unexpected space selectivity for the Δ f (z ) signal in the atomic force spectroscopy in the moiré graphene lattice on Ru(0001), which is explained by the different response of the graphene layer on the indentation process. We also address the elastic reaction of the formed graphene nanodoms on the indentation process by the scanning tip that is important for the modeling and fabrication of graphene-based nanoresonators on the nanoscale.

  12. Open-path tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy for acquisition of fugitive emission flux data.

    PubMed

    Thoma, Eben D; Shores, Richard C; Thompson, Edgar L; Harris, D Bruce; Thorneloe, Susan A; Varma, Ravi M; Hashmonay, Ram A; Modrak, Mark T; Natschke, David F; Gamble, Heather A

    2005-05-01

    Air pollutant emission from unconfined sources is an increasingly important environmental issue. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed a ground-based optical remote-sensing method that enables direct measurement of fugitive emission flux from large area sources. Open-path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (OP-FTIR) has been the primary technique for acquisition of pollutant concentration data used in this emission measurement method. For a number of environmentally important compounds, such as ammonia and methane, open-path tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (OP-TDLAS) is shown to be a viable alternative to Fourier transform spectroscopy for pollutant concentration measurements. Near-IR diode laser spectroscopy systems offer significant operational and cost advantages over Fourier transform instruments enabling more efficient implementation of the measurement strategy. This article reviews the EPA's fugitive emission measurement method and describes its multipath tunable diode laser instrument. Validation testing of the system is discussed. OP-TDLAS versus OP-FTIR correlation testing results for ammonia (R2 = 0.980) and methane (R2 = 0.991) are reported. Two example applications of tunable diode laser-based fugitive emission measurements are presented. PMID:15991674

  13. Determination of microelements in uncontaminated natural water from the Baikal region by atomic emission spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsova, A.I.; Chumakova, N.L.

    1995-10-01

    In this study, concentration by evaporation was used to determine 17 microelements (B, Al, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr, Mo, Ag, Sn, Ba, and Pb) in water from Lake Baikal and its tributaries by atomic-emission spectrometry with the arc excitation of spectra.

  14. INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA-ATOMIC EMISSION SPECTROMETRIC ANALYSIS OF ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES USING ULTRASONIC NEBULIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ultrasonic and pneumatic nebulizers used in inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) are compared in the analysis of standard materials and environmental samples. Results verify that ICP-AES with ultrasonic nebulization is capable of lower detection limit...

  15. Atomic emission lines in the near ultraviolet; hydrogen through krypton, section 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    A compilation of spectra from the first 36 elements was prepared from published literature available through October 1977. In most cases, only those lines which were actually observed in emission or absorption are listed. The wavelengths included range from 2000 Angstroms to 3200 Angstroms with some additional lines up to 3500 Angstroms. Only lines of stripped atoms are reported; no molecular bands are included.

  16. Atomic emission lines in the near ultraviolet; hydrogen through krypton, section 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    A compilation of spectra from the first 36 elements was prepared from published literature available through October 1977. In most cases, only those lines which were actually observed in emission or absorption are listed. The wavelengths included range from 2000 Angstroms to 3200 Angstroms with some additional lines up to 3500 Angstroms. Only lines of stripped atoms are reported; no molecular bands are included.

  17. Atomic emission line wavelength calculations below 2000 angstroms for Lithium II through Cobalt XXVI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. D.

    1971-01-01

    Atomic-emission-line wavelengths are presented which were calculated from wavelengths of previously identified transition sequences using second-degree polynomials fitted to known wave numbers by the least squares method. Wavelengths less than 2000 angstroms are included for ions from Li II to Co XXVI. The computer program written in FORTRAN 4 is also included.

  18. Atomic Oxygen Emission Cross Sections resulting from Electron Impact in the FUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noren, C.; Kanik, I.; James, G. K.; Khakoo, M. A.

    1998-10-01

    The atomic oxygen emissions from astronomical sources provide valuable (perhaps unique) information on densities, gas dynamics, etc. of the atmospheres of the planets and their satellites. For example, the atomic oxygen resonance transition at 130.4 nm is a prominent emission feature in the vacuum ultraviolet spectrum of the Earth's aurora and day glow as well as the atmospheres of Europa, Ganymede, Mars and Venus. In this poster we present our measurements of the electron impact emission cross sections of the 130.4 nm atomic oxygen feature from threshold to 1000 eV impact energy. A high density atomic oxygen beam, created by a microwave discharge source, was intersected at right angles by a magnetically focused electron beam. The experimental apparatus consists of an electron impact collision chamber in tandem with a 0.2m UV spectrometer equipped with a CsI coated channel electron multiplier detector. Emitted photons corresponding to radiative decay of collisionally excited state of the 130.4 nm atomic oxygen feature were detected.

  19. LZIFU: IDL emission line fitting pipeline for integral field spectroscopy data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, I.-Ting

    2016-07-01

    LZIFU (LaZy-IFU) is an emission line fitting pipeline for integral field spectroscopy (IFS) data. Written in IDL, the pipeline turns IFS data to 2D emission line flux and kinematic maps for further analysis. LZIFU has been applied and tested extensively to various IFS data, including the SAMI Galaxy Survey, the Wide-Field Spectrograph (WiFeS), the CALIFA survey, the S7 survey and the MUSE instrument on the VLT.

  20. Emission of energetic neutral atoms from water ice under Ganymede surface-like conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieser, Martin; Futaana, Yoshifumi; Barabash, Stas; Wurz, Peter

    2016-05-01

    The co-rotating plasma around Jupiter precipitates on the surfaces of the jovian moons, where it is not hindered by a local magnetic field. Precipitating ions lead to the emission of energetic neutral atoms, which are produced via backscattering and sputtering processes, from the surface. The European Space Agency's JUICE mission to Jupiter carries as part of the Particle Environment Package experiment an imaging energetic neutral atom spectrometer called the jovian Neutrals Analyzer (JNA). When it is in orbit around Ganymede, JNA will measure the energetic neutral atom flux emitted from the surface of Ganymede in the energy range from 10 eV to 3300 eV. The surface of Ganymede consists of a large fraction of water ice. To characterize the expected energetic neutral atom fluxes from water ice due to precipitating jovian plasma, we impacted protons and singly charged oxygen ions with energies up to 33 keV on a salty water ice target kept at Ganymede surface conditions. Emitted energetic atoms were measured energy- and mass-resolved using the JNA prototype instrument. The data show high yields for energetic neutral atoms per incident ion in the JNA energy range. For incident protons, energetic neutral atom yields between 0.28 at 1 keV and ∼40 at 33 keV were observed. For incident singly charged oxygen ions, the observed energetic neutral atom yield ranged from 0.8 for at 3 keV to ∼170 at 23 keV.

  1. Infrared Spectroscopy of Pa(Beta) and [Fe II] Emission in NGC 4151

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knop, R. A.; Armus, L.; Larkin, J. E.; Mathews, K.; Shupe, D. L.; Soifer, B. T.

    1996-07-01

    We present spatially resolved 1.24-1.30 micron spectroscopy with a resolution of 240 km/s of the Seyfert 1.5 galaxy NGC 4151. Broad Paβ, narrow Paβ, and narrow [Fe II] (λ = 1.2567 microns) emission lines are identified in the spectrum. Additionally, a spatially unresolved narrow component probably due to [S IX] = (λ = 1.25235 microns) is observed on the nucleus. The narrow Paβ and [Fe II] lines are observed to be extended over a scale of 5". The spatial variation of the velocity centers of the Paβ and [Fe II] lines show remarkable similarity, and additionally show similarities to the velocity structure previously observed in ground based spectroscopy of [O III] emission in NGC 4151. This leads to the conclusion that the [Fe II] emission arises in clouds in the Seyfert narrow line region that are physically correlated with those narrow line clouds responsible for the optical emission. The [Fe II] emission line, however, is significantly wider than the Paβ emission line along the full spatial extent of the observed emission. This result suggests that despite the correlation between the bulk kinematics of Paβ and [Fe II], there is an additional process, perhaps fast shocks from a wind in the Seyfert nucleus, contributing to the [Fe II] emission.

  2. Infrared Spectroscopy of Pa-beta and [Fe II] Emission in NGC 4151

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knop, R. A.; Armus, L.; Larkin, J. E.; Matthews, K.; Shupe, D. L.; Soifer, B. T.

    1996-01-01

    We present spatially resolved 1.24-1.30 micron spectroscopy with a resolution of 240 km/s of the Seyfert 1.5 galaxy NGC 4151. Broad Pa-beta, narrow Pa-beta, and narrow [Fe II] (lambda = 1.2567 micron) emission lines are identified in the spectrum. Additionally, a spatially unresolved narrow component probably due to [S ix] (lambda = 1.25235 micron) is observed on the nucleus. The narrow Pa-beta and [Fe II] lines are observed to be extended over a scale of 5 sec. The spatial variation of the velocity centers of the Pa-beta and [Fe II] lines show remarkable similarity, and additionally show similarities to the velocity structure previously observed in ground based spectroscopy of [O III] emission in NGC 4151. This leads to the conclusion that the [Fe II] emission arises in clouds in the Seyfert narrow line region that are physically correlated with those narrow line clouds responsible for the optical emission. The [Fe II] emission line, however, is significantly wider than the Pa-beta emission line along the full spatial extent of the observed emission. This result suggests that despite the correlation between the bulk kinematics of Pa-beta and [Fe II], there is an additional process, perhaps fast shocks from a wind in the Seyfert nucleus, contributing to the [Fe II] emission.

  3. Determination of Elemental Ratio in an Atomic Column by Electron Energy Loss Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Haruta, Mitsutaka; Hosaka, Yoshiteru; Ichikawa, Noriya; Saito, Takashi; Shimakawa, Yuichi; Kurata, Hiroki

    2016-07-26

    Atomic-resolution quantification of the elemental ratio of Fe to Mn at the octahedral and tetrahedral sites in brownmillerite Ca2Fe1.07Mn0.93O5 was determined using electron energy-loss spectroscopy combined with aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. The combined techniques revealed that oversampling of the spectral imaging data yielded a spatially resolved area that very nearly reflects atomic resolution (∼1.2 Å radius). The average experimental ratios of Fe to Mn within this region were 17.5:82.5 for the octahedral sites and 81.6:18.4 for the tetrahedral sites. The elemental ratio in an octahedral atomic column was successfully extracted by estimating the mixing of signals from nearest neighbor columns. The results indicated that the ratio of Fe to Mn was 13:87 at the octahedral site, which is in good agreement with the results of neutron diffraction analysis. In addition, the uncertainty of experimental results obtained by using an average 1.2 Å radius was less than 10% at octahedral sites, depending on the sample thickness. In contrast, the experimental error due to dechanneling of incident electrons was larger at the tetrahedral sites. This experimental procedure has wide application for determining the spatially resolved composition ratio of elements in perovskite-like compounds. PMID:27341006

  4. Tunable Diode Laser Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy for Detection of Potassium under Optically Thick Conditions.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhechao; Steinvall, Erik; Ghorbani, Ramin; Schmidt, Florian M

    2016-04-01

    Potassium (K) is an important element related to ash and fine-particle formation in biomass combustion processes. In situ measurements of gaseous atomic potassium, K(g), using robust optical absorption techniques can provide valuable insight into the K chemistry. However, for typical parts per billion K(g) concentrations in biomass flames and reactor gases, the product of atomic line strength and absorption path length can give rise to such high absorbance that the sample becomes opaque around the transition line center. We present a tunable diode laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (TDLAAS) methodology that enables accurate, calibration-free species quantification even under optically thick conditions, given that Beer-Lambert's law is valid. Analyte concentration and collisional line shape broadening are simultaneously determined by a least-squares fit of simulated to measured absorption profiles. Method validation measurements of K(g) concentrations in saturated potassium hydroxide vapor in the temperature range 950-1200 K showed excellent agreement with equilibrium calculations, and a dynamic range from 40 pptv cm to 40 ppmv cm. The applicability of the compact TDLAAS sensor is demonstrated by real-time detection of K(g) concentrations close to biomass pellets during atmospheric combustion in a laboratory reactor. PMID:26938713

  5. Glow discharge lamp: A light source for optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishwanathan, K. S.; Srinivasan, V.; Nalini, S.; Mahalingam, T. R.

    A glow discharge lamp based on a modified version of the Grimm design has been fabricated. Its utility as a radiation source for optical emission spectrography by standardizing a method for the analysis of low alloy steels using a set of certified standards from DMRL, Hyderabad, has been demonstrated. A model has been proposed where the sputtering rates of different metals have been correlated with their heats of sublimation, metallic radii, and densities. Sputtering rates of ten different metals obtained from literature have been used to test this model, and the correlation appears to be excellent.

  6. A GAS TEMPERATURE PROFILE BY INFRARED EMISSION-ABSORPTION SPECTROSCOPY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchele, D. R.

    1994-01-01

    This computer program calculates the temperature profile of a flame or hot gas. Emphasis is on profiles found in jet engine or rocket engine exhaust streams containing water vapor or carbon dioxide as radiating gases. The temperature profile is assumed to be axisymmetric with a functional form controlled by two variable parameters. The parameters are calculated using measurements of gas radiation at two wavelengths in the infrared spectrum. Infrared emission and absorption measurements at two or more wavelengths provide a method of determining a gas temperature profile along a path through the gas by using a radiation source and receiver located outside the gas stream being measured. This permits simplified spectral scanning of a jet or rocket engine exhaust stream with the instrumentation outside the exhaust gas stream. This program provides an iterative-cyclic computation in which an initial assumed temperature profile is altered in shape until the computed emission and absorption agree, within specified limits, with the actual instrument measurements of emission and absorption. Temperature determination by experimental measurements of emission and absorption at two or more wavelengths is also provided by this program. Additionally, the program provides a technique for selecting the wavelengths to be used for determining the temperature profiles prior to the beginning of the experiment. By using this program feature, the experimenter has a higher probability of selecting wavelengths which will result in accurate temperature profile measurements. This program provides the user with a technique for determining whether this program will be sufficiently accurate for his particular application, as well as providing a means of finding the solution. The input to the program consists of four types of data: (1) computer program control constants, (2) measurements of gas radiance and transmittance at selected wavelengths, (3) tabulations from the literature of gas

  7. Imaging spectroscopy of solar microwave radiation. 1: Flaring emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, Jeremy; Gary, Dale E.; Hurford, Gordon J.; Lemen, James R.

    1994-01-01

    We present observations of an impulsive microwave burst on the Sun with both high spatial and spectral resolution, made with the Solar Array at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO). We used the measured brightness temperature spectrum to infer the emission process responsible for each microwave source, and to derive physical conditions in the source region. We confimed our predictions using soft X-ray measurements from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), soft X-ray images from Yohkoh, and H-alpha flare images together with sunspots and magnetogram images from the Big Bear Solar Observatory.

  8. Stimulated emission pumping spectroscopy of jet-cooled C3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohlfing, Eric A.; Goldsmith, J. E. M.

    1989-06-01

    We report a dispersed fluorescence spectrum obtained for excitation of a ∑+u-∑+g vibronic band of C3 at 33 588 cm-1, part of a newly discovered electronic system. Rotationally resolved stimulated-emission-pumping spectra of jet-cooled C3 using this ∑+u intermediate state are presented for dumping to the 0v121 (1≤v2≤13) and 6v121 (1≤v2≤5) levels in the 1Σ+g ground state. Vibrational term energies, rotational constants, and l-type doubling parameters are determined for each level.

  9. Infrared emission spectroscopy of atmospheric-pressure ball plasmoids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubowsky, Scott E.; Deutsch, Bradley; Bhargava, Rohit; McCall, Benjamin J.

    2016-04-01

    We report the first (to our knowledge) infrared emission spectra collected from water-based laboratory ball plasmoid discharges. A "ball plasmoid" results from a unique type of pulsed DC plasma discharge in which a sphere of plasma is seen to grow and eventually separate from a central electrode and last for a few hundred milliseconds without an external power source before dissipating. Typical recombination rates for plasmas at ambient conditions are on the order of a millisecond or less, however ball plasmoids have been observed to last a few hundred milliseconds, and there is no explanation in the literature that fully accounts for this large discrepancy in lifetime. The spectra are dominated by emission from water and from hydroxyl radical; PGOPHER was used to fit the experimental spectra to extract rotational temperatures for these molecules. The temperatures of the bending and stretching modes of H2O were determined to be 1900 ± 300 K and 2400 ± 400 K, respectively and the rotational temperature of OH was found to be 9200 ± 1500 K.

  10. A CAVITY RINGDOWN SPECTROSCOPY MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher C. Carter, Ph.D.

    2002-10-01

    Work on the Cavity Ring-Down (CRD) mercury spectrometer this past quarter concentrated on the actual detection of mercury and the beginning of flue gas interference testing. After obtaining the initial mercury signal detection was done at various pressures and concentrations. The Alexandrite laser system used for the CRD spectrometer has a narrow enough linewidth to spectrally resolve the isotopic structure of mercury. This includes both isotopic frequency shifts as well as hyperfine splittings due to a couple of the odd isotopes of mercury. Initial flue gas inteferent testing concentrated on SO{sub 2}, which is expected to cause the greatest interference with mercury detection due to its absorption of ultra-violet light in the same region as that of the mercury atomic line.

  11. Time-resolved characterization of a filamentary argon discharge at atmospheric pressure in a capillary using emission and absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröter, Sandra; Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Awakowicz, Peter; Bibinov, Nikita; Böke, Marc; Niermann, Benedikt; Winter, Jörg

    2013-11-01

    An argon/nitrogen (0.999/0.001) filamentary pulsed discharge operated at atmospheric pressure in a quartz tube is characterized using voltage-current measurements, microphotography, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and absorption spectroscopy. Nitrogen is applied as a sensor gas for the purpose of OES diagnostic. The density of argon metastable atoms Ar(3P2) is determined using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). Using a plasma chemical model the measured OES data are applied for the characterization of the plasma conditions. Between intense positive pulses the discharge current oscillates with a damped amplitude. It is established that an electric current flows in this discharge not only through a thin plasma filament that is observed in the discharge image but also through the whole cross section of the quartz tube. A diffuse plasma fills the quartz tube during a time between intense current pulses. Ionization waves are propagating in this plasma between the spike and the grounded area of the tube producing thin plasma channels. The diameter of these channels increases during the pause between the propagation of ionization waves probably because of thermal expansion and diffusion. Inside the channels electron densities of ˜2 × 1013 cm-3, argon metastable densities ˜1014 cm-3 and a reduced electric field about 10 Td are determined.

  12. Analytical control of wollastonite for biomedical applications by use of atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry.

    PubMed

    De Aza, P N; Guitián, F; De Aza, S; Valle, F J

    1998-04-01

    Preliminary in vitro experiments revealed that wollastonite (CaSiO3) is a potentially highly bioactive material that forms a hyroxyapatite (HA) surface layer on exposure to simulated body fluid with an ion concentration, pH and temperature virtually identical with those of human blood plasma. The formation of the HA layer is an essential requirement for an artificial material to be used as bioactive bone substitute. This finding opens up a wide field for biomedical applications of wollastonite. Biomaterials used as implants in the human body require strict control of trace elements and of the toxic species specified in American Society for Testing and Materials F-1185-88 (As, Cd, Hg and Pb) in ceramic hydroxyapatite for surgical implantation. In this work, two types of pseudowollastonite, the high temperature form of wollastonite, were analysed by using cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry and hydride generation atomic absorption spectrometry, in order to determine the elements stated in the above-mentioned norm, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry to establish the SiO2/CaO ratio of the two materials and analyse for all other impurities introduced by the raw materials and by the processes of synthesis, sintering and grinding. Barium and Mg were especially prominent in raw materials, and Zr, Y, Mg, W, Co and Ni come mainly from the processing. PMID:9684401

  13. Quantitative compositional analysis of sedimentary materials using thermal emission spectroscopy: 1. Application to sedimentary rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, Michael T.; Rogers, A. Deanne; Bristow, Thomas F.; Pan, Cong

    2015-11-01

    Thermal emission spectroscopy is used to determine the mineralogy of sandstone and mudstone rocks as part of an investigation of linear spectral mixing between sedimentary constituent phases. With widespread occurrences of sedimentary rocks on the surface of Mars, critical examination of the accuracy associated with quantitative models of mineral abundances derived from thermal emission spectra of sedimentary materials is necessary. Although thermal emission spectroscopy has been previously proven to be a viable technique to obtain quantitative mineralogy from igneous and metamorphic materials, sedimentary rocks, with natural variation of composition, compaction, and grain size, have yet to be examined. In this work, we present an analysis of the thermal emission spectral (~270-1650 cm-1) characteristics of a suite of 13 sandstones and 14 mudstones. X-ray diffraction and traditional point counting procedures were all evaluated in comparison with thermal emission spectroscopy. Results from this work are consistent with previous thermal emission spectroscopy studies and indicate that bulk rock mineral abundances can be estimated within 11.2% for detrital grains (i.e., quartz and feldspars) and 14.8% for all other mineral phases present in both sandstones and mudstones, in comparison to common in situ techniques used for determining bulk rock composition. Clay-sized to fine silt-sized grained phase identification is less accurate, with differences from the known ranging from ~5 to 24% on average. Nevertheless, linear least squares modeling of thermal emission spectra is an advantageous technique for determining abundances of detrital grains and sedimentary matrix and for providing a rapid classification of clastic rocks.

  14. Evaluation of infrared emission spectroscopy for mapping the Moon's surface composition from lunar orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, Douglas B.; Salisbury, John W.; Conel, James E.; Lucey, Paul G.; Christensen, Philip R.

    1993-01-01

    Infrared thermal emission spectroscopy is evaluated for its possible application to compositional mapping of the Moon's surface from lunar orbit. Principles of the mid-IR (approximately 4-25 microns) technique, previous lunar ground-based observations, and laboratory studies of Moon samples are reviewed and summarized. A lunar thermal emission spectrometer experiment is described, patterned after a similar instrument on the Mars Observer spacecraft. Thermal emission spectrometry from a polar-orbiting lunar spacecraft could provide a valuable mapping tool to aid in exploration for lunar resources and help provide understanding of the origin of the Moon and history of lunar surface processes.

  15. On-line emissions monitoring of chlorobenzene incineration using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Zhuoxiong; McIntosh, M.J.; Demirgian, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    Incineration of chlorobenzene in a small laboratory incinerator was monitored by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) coupled with a heated long-path cell (LPC) to analyze and quantify flue gas emissions in near real time. The effects of operating conditions under stable and decreasing incineration temperatures on the destruction of chlorobenzene were studied. The results from the decreasing temperature experiments were found to be consistent with those from experiments at stable temperatures. This finding demonstrates that the FTIR/LPC, as a continuous emissions monitor, can effectively detect dynamic changes in the incinerator emissions and can contribute significantly to the safety of incinerators.

  16. On-line emissions monitoring of chlorobenzene incineration using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Zhuoxiong; McIntosh, M.J.; Demirgian, J.C.

    1992-06-01

    Incineration of chlorobenzene in a small laboratory incinerator was monitored by using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) coupled with a heated long-path cell (LPC) to analyze and quantify flue gas emissions in near real time. The effects of operating conditions under stable and decreasing incineration temperatures on the destruction of chlorobenzene were studied. The results from the decreasing temperature experiments were found to be consistent with those from experiments at stable temperatures. This finding demonstrates that the FTIR/LPC, as a continuous emissions monitor, can effectively detect dynamic changes in the incinerator emissions and can contribute significantly to the safety of incinerators.

  17. APPLYING OPEN-PATH OPTICAL SPECTROSCOPY TO HEAVY-DUTY DIESEL EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Non-dispersive infrared absorption has been used to measure gaseous emissions for both stationary and mobile sources. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy has been used for stationary sources as both extractive and open-path methods. We have applied the open-path method for bo...

  18. Thermal infrared reflectance and emission spectroscopy of quartzofeldspathic glasses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byrnes, J.M.; Ramsey, M.S.; King, P.L.; Lee, R.J.

    2007-01-01

    This investigation seeks to better understand the thermal infrared (TIR) spectral characteristics of naturally-occurring amorphous materials through laboratory synthesis and analysis of glasses. Because spectra of glass phases differ markedly from their mineral counterparts, examination of glasses is important to accurately determine the composition of amorphous surface materials using remote sensing datasets. Quantitatively characterizing TIR (5-25 ??m) spectral changes that accompany structural changes between glasses and mineral crystals provides the means to understand natural glasses on Earth and Mars. A suite of glasses with compositions analogous to common terrestrial volcanic glasses was created and analyzed using TIR reflectance and emission techniques. Documented spectral characteristics provide a basis for comparison with TIR spectra of other amorphous materials (glasses, clays, etc.). Our results provide the means to better detect and characterize glasses associated with terrestrial volcanoes, as well as contribute toward understanding the nature of amorphous silicates detected on Mars. Copyright 2007 by the American Geophysical Union.

  19. Precision spectroscopy of the 2S-4P transition in atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maisenbacher, Lothar; Beyer, Axel; Khabarova, Ksenia; Matveev, Arthur; Pohl, Randolf; Udem, Thomas; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Kolachevsky, Nikolai

    2015-05-01

    A precision measurement of the 2S-4P transition in atomic hydrogen, when combined with the precisely known 1S-2S transition frequency, can be used to determine the value of the r.m.s.proton charge radius rp. We report on our progress towards an absolute frequency measurement, using a cryogenic beam of atoms optically excited to the metastable 2S state. This strongly suppresses the first order Doppler shift, which is further reduced using actively stabilized counter-propagating laser beams for the 2S-4P (one-photon) excitation. We experimentally verify this suppression using time-of-flight resolved detection. We present a theoretical and experimental study of interference effects due to spontaneous emission and the corresponding line center shifts, using a segmented detector to spatially resolved the emission pattern. An experimental scheme to suppress this systematic shift and extract the unperturbed transition frequency is shown and future measurements of transitions to higher nL states are discussed.

  20. Experimental detection of iron overload in liver through neutron stimulated emission spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kapadia, A J; Tourassi, G D; Sharma, A C; Crowell, A S; Kiser, M R; Howell, C R

    2008-05-21

    Iron overload disorders have been the focus of several quantification studies involving non-invasive imaging modalities. Neutron spectroscopic techniques have demonstrated great potential in detecting iron concentrations within biological tissue. We are developing a neutron spectroscopic technique called neutron stimulated emission computed tomography (NSECT), which has the potential to diagnose iron overload in the liver at clinically acceptable patient dose levels through a non-invasive scan. The technique uses inelastic scatter interactions between atomic nuclei in the sample and incoming fast neutrons to non-invasively determine the concentration of elements in the sample. This paper discusses a non-tomographic application of NSECT investigating the feasibility of detecting elevated iron concentrations in the liver. A model of iron overload in the human body was created using bovine liver tissue housed inside a human torso phantom and was scanned with a 5 MeV pulsed beam using single-position spectroscopy. Spectra were reconstructed and analyzed with algorithms designed specifically for NSECT. Results from spectroscopic quantification indicate that NSECT can currently detect liver iron concentrations of 6 mg g(-1) or higher and has the potential to detect lower concentrations by optimizing the acquisition geometry to scan a larger volume of tissue. The experiment described in this paper has two important outcomes: (i) it demonstrates that NSECT has the potential to detect clinically relevant concentrations of iron in the human body through a non-invasive scan and (ii) it provides a comparative standard to guide the design of iron overload phantoms for future NSECT liver iron quantification studies. PMID:18443387

  1. Charge transfer satellite in Pr@C82 metallofullerene observed using resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaoka, H.; Sugiyama, H.; Kubozono, Y.; Kotani, A.; Nouchi, R.; Vlaicu, A. M.; Oohashi, H.; Tochio, T.; Ito, Y.; Yoshikawa, H.

    2009-11-01

    Resonant x-ray emission spectroscopy (RXES) was performed on the metallofullerene Pr@C82 at the PrL3 absorption edge. We verify not only nearly three-electron charge transfers from the metal to the cage but also back-electron transfer observed as a charge transfer satellite. The results are compared to theoretical calculations with a single-impurity Anderson model. Theory shows that the electronic structure of endohedral atom in the cage is atomiclike. The satellite structure originates from the charge transfer, i.e., dynamical screening effect, induced by the core-hole potential in the final state rather than from the valence fluctuation of the rare-earth metal in the ground state. We also performed the RXES measurement of Pr2O3 for comparison.

  2. Feasibility of Valence-to-Core X-ray Emission Spectroscopy for Tracking Transient Species

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    X-ray spectroscopies, when combined in laser-pump, X-ray-probe measurement schemes, can be powerful tools for tracking the electronic and geometric structural changes that occur during the course of a photoinitiated chemical reaction. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is considered an established technique for such measurements, and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) of the strongest core-to-core emission lines (Kα and Kβ) is now being utilized. Flux demanding valence-to-core XES promises to be an important addition to the time-resolved spectroscopic toolkit. In this paper we present measurements and density functional theory calculations on laser-excited, solution-phase ferrocyanide that demonstrate the feasibility of valence-to-core XES for time-resolved experiments. We discuss technical improvements that will make valence-to-core XES a practical pump–probe technique. PMID:26568779

  3. A CAVITY RING-DOWN SPECTROSCOPY MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher C. Carter

    2002-12-31

    SRD tested a number of different length cavities during this past quarter. Continuous transmission was observed with cavity lengths from 65 to 12 cm. The 65 cm cavity was replaced with a 39 cm cavity for work performed during this quarter. Flue gas components were tested for background absorptions and any interference with the determination of accurate mercury concentrations. Sulfur dioxide was found to absorb fairly strongly in the region of the mercury transition, but the Cavity Ring-Down (CRD) instrument was still able to detect mercury at subparts-per-billion by volume (ppb) levels. Additional flue gases tested included H{sub 2}O, CO, CO{sub 2}, NO, NO{sub 2}. None of these flue gas constituents showed any observable absorption in the ultraviolet region near the atomic mercury transition. Work was also initiated in speciation studies. In particular mercury chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) was tested. A mercury signal was detected from a gas stream containing HgCl{sub 2}. SRD was not able to determine definitively if there exists a spectral shift great enough to separate HgCl{sub 2} from elemental mercury in these initial tests.

  4. Single photon infrared emission spectroscopy: a study of IR emission from UV laser excited PAHs between 3 and 15 micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, D. J.; Schlemmer, S.; Balucani, N.; Wagner, D. R.; Harrison, J. A.; Steiner, B.; Saykally, R. J.

    1998-01-01

    Single-photon infrared emission spectroscopy (SPIRES) has been used to measure emission spectra from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A supersonic free-jet expansion has been used to provide emission spectra of rotationally cold and vibrationally excited naphthalene and benzene. Under these conditions, the observed width of the 3.3-micrometers (C-H stretch) band resembles the bandwidths observed in experiments in which emission is observed from naphthalene with higher rotational energy. To obtain complete coverage of IR wavelengths relevant to the unidentified infrared bands (UIRs), UV laser-induced desorption was used to generate gas-phase highly excited PAHs. Lorentzian band shapes were convoluted with the monochromator-slit function in order to determine the widths of PAH emission bands under astrophysically relevant conditions. Bandwidths were also extracted from bands consisting of multiple normal modes blended together. These parameters are grouped according to the functional groups mostly involved in the vibration, and mean bandwidths are obtained. These bandwidths are larger than the widths of the corresponding UIR bands. However, when the comparison is limited to the largest PAHs studied, the bandwidths are slightly smaller than the corresponding UIR bands. These parameters can be used to model emission spectra from PAH cations and cations of larger PAHs, which are better candidate carriers of the UIRs.

  5. Matrix-Assisted Plasma Atomization Emission Spectrometry for Surface Sampling Elemental Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xin; Zhan, Xuefang; Li, Xuemei; Zhao, Zhongjun; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-01-01

    An innovative technology has been developed involving a simple and sensitive optical spectrometric method termed matrix-assisted plasma atomization emission spectrometry (MAPAES) for surface sampling elemental analysis using a piece of filter paper (FP) for sample introduction. MAPAES was carried out by direct interaction of the plasma tail plume with the matrix surface. The FP absorbs energy from the plasma source and releases combustion heating to the analytes originally present on its surface, thus to promote the atomization and excitation process. The matrix-assisted plasma atomization excitation phenomenon was observed for multiple elements. The FP matrix served as the partial energy producer and also the sample substrate to adsorb sample solution. Qualitative and quantitative determinations of metal ions were achieved by atomic emission measurements for elements Ba, Cu, Eu, In, Mn, Ni, Rh and Y. The detection limits were down to pg level with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.99. The proposed MAPAES provides a new way for atomic spectrometry which offers advantages of fast analysis speed, little sample consumption, less sample pretreatment, small size, and cost-effective. PMID:26762972

  6. Superradiant cascade emissions in an atomic ensemble via four-wave mixing

    SciTech Connect

    Jen, H.H.

    2015-09-15

    We investigate superradiant cascade emissions from an atomic ensemble driven by two-color classical fields. The correlated pair of photons (signal and idler) is generated by adiabatically driving the system with large-detuned light fields via four-wave mixing. The signal photon from the upper transition of the diamond-type atomic levels is followed by the idler one which can be superradiant due to light-induced dipole–dipole interactions. We then calculate the cooperative Lamb shift (CLS) of the idler photon, which is a cumulative effect of interaction energy. We study its dependence on a cylindrical geometry, a conventional setup in cold atom experiments, and estimate the maximum CLS which can be significant and observable. Manipulating the CLS of cascade emissions enables frequency qubits that provide alternative robust elements in quantum network. - Highlights: • Superradiance from a cascade atomic transition. • Correlated photon pair generation via four-wave mixing. • Dynamical light–matter couplings in a phased symmetrical state. • Cooperative Lamb shift in a cylindrical atomic ensemble.

  7. Matrix-Assisted Plasma Atomization Emission Spectrometry for Surface Sampling Elemental Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xin; Zhan, Xuefang; Li, Xuemei; Zhao, Zhongjun; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-01-01

    An innovative technology has been developed involving a simple and sensitive optical spectrometric method termed matrix-assisted plasma atomization emission spectrometry (MAPAES) for surface sampling elemental analysis using a piece of filter paper (FP) for sample introduction. MAPAES was carried out by direct interaction of the plasma tail plume with the matrix surface. The FP absorbs energy from the plasma source and releases combustion heating to the analytes originally present on its surface, thus to promote the atomization and excitation process. The matrix-assisted plasma atomization excitation phenomenon was observed for multiple elements. The FP matrix served as the partial energy producer and also the sample substrate to adsorb sample solution. Qualitative and quantitative determinations of metal ions were achieved by atomic emission measurements for elements Ba, Cu, Eu, In, Mn, Ni, Rh and Y. The detection limits were down to pg level with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.99. The proposed MAPAES provides a new way for atomic spectrometry which offers advantages of fast analysis speed, little sample consumption, less sample pretreatment, small size, and cost-effective.

  8. Matrix-Assisted Plasma Atomization Emission Spectrometry for Surface Sampling Elemental Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xin; Zhan, Xuefang; Li, Xuemei; Zhao, Zhongjun; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-01-01

    An innovative technology has been developed involving a simple and sensitive optical spectrometric method termed matrix-assisted plasma atomization emission spectrometry (MAPAES) for surface sampling elemental analysis using a piece of filter paper (FP) for sample introduction. MAPAES was carried out by direct interaction of the plasma tail plume with the matrix surface. The FP absorbs energy from the plasma source and releases combustion heating to the analytes originally present on its surface, thus to promote the atomization and excitation process. The matrix-assisted plasma atomization excitation phenomenon was observed for multiple elements. The FP matrix served as the partial energy producer and also the sample substrate to adsorb sample solution. Qualitative and quantitative determinations of metal ions were achieved by atomic emission measurements for elements Ba, Cu, Eu, In, Mn, Ni, Rh and Y. The detection limits were down to pg level with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.99. The proposed MAPAES provides a new way for atomic spectrometry which offers advantages of fast analysis speed, little sample consumption, less sample pretreatment, small size, and cost-effective. PMID:26762972

  9. Time-resolved spectroscopy of spin-current emission from a magnetic insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tateno, Yuma; Fukami, Masaya; Tashiro, Takaharu; Ando, Kazuya

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate time-resolved spectroscopy of spin-current emission from a magnetic insulator using the inverse spin Hall effect (ISHE). We measured magnetic field dependence of the spin-current emission in the time domain and found that the spectral shape of the ISHE voltage changes with time. The change in the spectral shape is due to field and power dependent temporal oscillation of the spin pumping driven by parametric magnons. The observed oscillating spin-current emission driven by dipole-exchange magnons is well reproduced by a model calculation based on the S theory. In contrast, the spin-current emission driven by short-wavelength exchange magnons cannot be reproduced with this model, illustrating an important role of higher-order nonlinear effects in the spin-current emission.

  10. Anisotropy resolved multidimensional emission spectroscopy (ARMES): A new tool for protein analysis.

    PubMed

    Groza, Radu Constantin; Li, Boyan; Ryder, Alan G

    2015-07-30

    Structural analysis of proteins using the emission of intrinsic fluorophores is complicated by spectral overlap. Anisotropy resolved multidimensional emission spectroscopy (ARMES) overcame the overlap problem by the use of anisotropy, with chemometric analysis, to better resolve emission from different fluorophores. Total synchronous fluorescence scan (TSFS) provided information about all the fluorophores that contributed to emission while anisotropy provided information about the environment of each fluorophore. Here the utility of ARMES was demonstrated via study of the chemical and thermal denaturation of human serum albumin (HSA). Multivariate curve resolution (MCR) analysis of the constituent polarized emission ARMES data resolved contributions from four emitters: fluorescence from tryptophan (Trp), solvent exposed tyrosine (Tyr), Tyr in a hydrophobic environment, and room temperature phosphorescence (RTP) from Trp. The MCR scores, anisotropy, and literature validated these assignments and showed all the expected transitions during HSA unfolding. This new methodology for comprehensive intrinsic fluorescence analysis of proteins is applicable to any protein containing multiple fluorophores. PMID:26320645

  11. Predicting Reactor Antineutrino Emissions Using New Precision Beta Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Asner, David M.; Burns, Kimberly A.; Greenfield, Bryce A.; Kos, Marek S.; Orrell, John L.; Schram, Malachi; VanDevender, Brent A.; Wootan, David W.

    2013-05-01

    Neutrino experiments at nuclear reactors are currently vital to the study of neutrino oscillations. The observed antineutrino rates at reactors are typically lower than model expectations. This observed deficit is called the “reactor neutrino anomaly”. A new understanding of neutrino physics may be required to explain this deficit, though model estimation uncertainties may also play a role in the apparent discrepancy. PNNL is currently investigating an experimental technique that promises reduced uncertainties for measured data to support these hypotheses and interpret reactor antineutrino measurements. The experimental approach is to 1) direct a proton accelerator beam on a metal target to produce a source of neutrons, 2) use spectral tailoring to modify the neutron spectrum to closely simulate the energy distribution of a power reactor neutron spectrum, 3) irradiate isotopic fission foils (235U, 238U, 239Pu, 241Pu) in this neutron spectrum so that fissions occur at energies representative of a reactor, 4) transport the beta particles released by the fission products in the foils to a beta spectrometer, 5) measure the beta energy spectrum, and 6) invert the measured beta energy spectrum to an antineutrino energy spectrum. A similar technique using a beta spectrometer and isotopic fission foils was pioneered in the 1980’s at the ILL thermal reactor. Those measurements have been the basis for interpreting all subsequent antineutrino measurements at reactors. A basic constraint in efforts to reduce uncertainties in predicting the antineutrino emission from reactor cores is any underlying limitation of the original measurements. This may include beta spectrum energy resolution, the absolute normalization of beta emission to number of fission, statistical counting uncertainties, lack of 238U data, the purely thermal nature of the IIL reactor neutrons used, etc. An accelerator-based neutron source that can be tailored to match various reactor neutron spectra

  12. Noninvasive, real-time measurements of plasma parameters via optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Shicong; Wendt, Amy E.; Boffard, John B.; Lin, Chun C.; Radovanov, Svetlana; Persing, Harold

    2013-03-15

    Plasma process control applications require acquisition of diagnostic data at a rate faster than the characteristic timescale of perturbations to the plasma. Diagnostics based on optical emission spectroscopy of intense emission lines permit rapid noninvasive measurements with low-resolution ({approx}1 nm), fiber-coupled spectrographs, which are included on many plasma process tools for semiconductor processing. Here the authors report on rapid analysis of Ar emissions with such a system to obtain electron temperatures, electron densities, and metastable densities in argon and argon/mixed-gas (Ar/N{sub 2}, Ar/O{sub 2}, Ar/H{sub 2}) inductively coupled plasmas. Accuracy of the results (compared to measurements made by Langmuir probe and white-light absorption spectroscopy) are typically better than {+-}15% with a time resolution of 0.1 s, which is more than sufficient to capture the transient behavior of many processes, limited only by the time response of the spectrograph used.

  13. Surface and waveguide collection of Raman emission in waveguide-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zilong; Zervas, Michalis N; Bartlett, Philip N; Wilkinson, James S

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate Raman spectroscopy on a high index thin film tantalum pentoxide waveguide and compare collection of Raman emission from the waveguide end with that from the waveguide surface. Toluene was used as a convenient model analyte, and a 40-fold greater signal was collected from the waveguide end. Simulations of angular and spatial Raman emission distributions showed good agreement with experiments, with the enhancement resulting from efficient collection of power from dipoles near the surface into the high-index waveguide film and substrate, combined with long interaction length. The waveguide employed was optimized at the excitation wavelength but not at emission wavelengths, and full optimization is expected to lead to enhancements comparable to surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy in robust low-cost metal-free and nanostructure-free chips. PMID:27607994

  14. Electron ionization of metastable nitrogen and oxygen atoms in relation to the auroral emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Siddharth; Joshipura, K. N.

    Atomic and molecular excited metastable states (EMS) are exotic systems due to their special properties like long radiative life-time, large size (average radius) and large polarizability along with relatively smaller first ionization energy compared to their respective ground states (GS). The present work includes our theoretical calculations on electron impact ionization of metastable atomic states N( (2) P), N( (2) D) of nitrogen and O( (1) S), O( (1) D) of oxygen. The targets of our present interest, are found to be present in our Earth's ionosphere and they play an important role in auroral emissions observed in Earth’s auroral regions [1] as also in the emissions observed from cometary coma [2, 3] and airglow emissions. In particular, atomic oxygen in EMS can radiate, the visible O( (1) D -> (3) P) doublet 6300 - 6364 Å red doublet, the O( (1) S -> (1) D) 5577 Å green line, and the ultraviolet O( (1) S -> (3) P) 2972 Å line. For metastable atomic nitrogen one observes the similar emissions, in different wavelengths, from (2) D and (2) P states. At the Earth's auroral altitudes, from where these emissions take place in the ionosphere, energetic electrons are also present. In particular, if the metastable N as well as O atoms are ionized by the impact of electrons then these species are no longer available for emissions. This is a possible loss mechanism, and hence it is necessary to analyze the importance of electron ionization of the EMS of atomic O and N, by calculating the relevant cross sections. In the present paper we investigate electron ionization of the said metastable species by calculating relevant total cross sections. Our quantum mechanical calculations are based on projected approximate ionization contribution in the total inelastic cross sections [4]. Detailed results and discussion along with the significance of these calculations will be presented during the COSPAR-2014. References [1] A.Bhardwaj, and G. R. Gladstone, Rev. Geophys., 38

  15. An Atomically Precise Au10 Ag2 Nanocluster with Red-Near-IR Dual Emission.

    PubMed

    Lei, Zhen; Guan, Zong-Jie; Pei, Xiao-Li; Yuan, Shang-Fu; Wan, Xian-Kai; Zhang, Jin-Yuan; Wang, Quan-Ming

    2016-08-01

    A red-near-IR dual-emissive nanocluster with the composition [Au10 Ag2 (2-py-C≡C)3 (dppy)6 ](BF4 )5 (1; 2-py-C≡C is 2-pyridylethynyl, dppy=2-pyridyldiphenylphosphine) has been synthesized. Single-crystal X-ray structural analysis reveals that 1 has a trigonal bipyramidal Au10 Ag2 core that contains a planar Au4 (2-py-C≡C)3 unit sandwiched by two Au3 Ag(dppy)3 motifs. Cluster 1 shows intense red-NIR dual emission in solution. The visible emission originates from metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) from silver atoms to phosphine ligands in the Au3 Ag(dppy)3 motifs, and the intense NIR emission is associated with the participation of 2-pyridylethynyl in the frontier orbitals of the cluster, which is confirmed by a time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculation. PMID:27305386

  16. Electron emission in H sup 0 --atom collisions: A coincidence study of the angular dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Heil, O.; Maier, R.; Kuzel, M.; Groeneveld, K.O. . Inst. fuer Kernphysik); DuBois, R.D. )

    1990-10-01

    Differential electron emission occurring as the result of fast hydrogen atom impact on helium and argon targets has been studied using standard non-coincidence and emitted electron-ionized projectile coincidence techniques. Impact energies were 0.5 and 1 MeV; electron emission was measured between approximately 20 and 2000 eV for selected laboratory emission angles ranging from 0{degree} to 180{degree}. These data demonstrate the importance of simultaneous target-projectile ionization as was previously observed for energetic He{sup +} impact. The experimental data for the helium target, when compared to PWBA calculations using hydrogenic wave functions, indicate good agreement with theory for projectile ionization and, indirectly, reasonably good agreement for target ionization. Simultaneous target-projectile ionization events were not included in the model. The argon data are compared with more sophisticated calculations for electron loss. These comparisons indicate the importance of second order effects at large emission angles.

  17. Statistical evaluation of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometric method for routine water quality testing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garbarino, J.R.; Jones, B.E.; Stein, G.P.

    1985-01-01

    In an interlaboratory test, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) was compared with flame atomic absorption spectrometry and molecular absorption spectrophotometry for the determination of 17 major and trace elements in 100 filtered natural water samples. No unacceptable biases were detected. The analysis precision of ICP-AES was found to be equal to or better than alternative methods. Known-addition recovery experiments demonstrated that the ICP-AES determinations are accurate to between plus or minus 2 and plus or minus 10 percent; four-fifths of the tests yielded average recoveries of 95-105 percent, with an average relative standard deviation of about 5 percent.

  18. New high temperature plasmas and sample introduction systems for analytical atomic emission and mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Montaser, A.

    1992-01-01

    New high temperature plasmas and new sample introduction systems are explored for rapid elemental and isotopic analysis of gases, solutions, and solids using mass spectrometry and atomic emission spectrometry. Emphasis was placed on atmospheric pressure He inductively coupled plasmas (ICP) suitable for atomization, excitation, and ionization of elements; simulation and computer modeling of plasma sources with potential for use in spectrochemical analysis; spectroscopic imaging and diagnostic studies of high temperature plasmas, particularly He ICP discharges; and development of new, low-cost sample introduction systems, and examination of techniques for probing the aerosols over a wide range. Refs., 14 figs. (DLC)

  19. Atomic Force Microscopy Imaging and Force Spectroscopy of Supported Lipid Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Unsay, Joseph D; Cosentino, Katia; García-Sáez, Ana J

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a versatile, high-resolution imaging technique that allows visualization of biological membranes. It has sufficient magnification to examine membrane substructures and even individual molecules. AFM can act as a force probe to measure interactions and mechanical properties of membranes. Supported lipid bilayers are conventionally used as membrane models in AFM studies. In this protocol, we demonstrate how to prepare supported bilayers and characterize their structure and mechanical properties using AFM. These include bilayer thickness and breakthrough force. The information provided by AFM imaging and force spectroscopy help define mechanical and chemical properties of membranes. These properties play an important role in cellular processes such as maintaining cell hemostasis from environmental stress, bringing membrane proteins together, and stabilizing protein complexes. PMID:26273958

  20. QED, Nuclear Size, and the Cosmos: Applications of High Precision Atomic Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillaspy, John

    2013-04-01

    I will survey some recent results from the Atomic Spectroscopy Group at NIST, focusing on topics that are most relevant to this Meeting, including evidence for a discrepancy between experiment and calculation based on three-body quantum electrodynamics (QED) [PRL, 109, 153001 (2012)], testing a method for determining nuclear sizes at the sub-attometer scale [PRL, 107, 023001 (2011)], and determining x-ray line ratios for astrophysical plasma diagnostics [ApJ, 728, 132 (2011)]. A common theme underlying these studies is to establish a basis for understanding discrepancies between prior results from various groups. This work was done in collaboration with S. Brewer, N. Brickhouse, R. Brown, C. Chantler, G.-X. Chen, A. Henins, L. Hudson, J. Kimpton, M. Kinnane, J. Laming, T. Lin, K. Makonyi, A. Payne, J. Pomeroy, J. Porto, C. Sansonetti, E. Silver, C. Simien, L. Smale, E. Takacs, J. Tan, L. Tedesco, and S. Wu.

  1. X-ray fluorescence/Auger-electron coincidence spectroscopy of vacancy cascades in atomic argon

    SciTech Connect

    Arp, U.; LeBrun, T.; Southworth, S.H.; Jung, M.; MacDonald, M.A.

    1996-12-01

    Argon L{sub 2.3}-M{sub 2.3}M{sub 2.3} Auger-electron spectra were measured in coincidence with K{alpha} fluorescent x-rays in studies of Ar K-shell vacancy decays at several photon energies above the K-threshold and on the 1s-4p resonance in atomic argon. The complex spectra recorded by conventional electron spectroscopy are greatly simplified when recorded in coincidence with fluorescent x-rays, allowing a more detailed analysis of the vacancy cascade process. The resulting coincidence spectra are compared with Hartree-Fock calculations which include shake-up transitions in the resonant case. Small energy shifts of the coincidence electron spectra are attributed to post-collision interaction with 1s photoelectrons.

  2. Development of laser optogalvanic spectroscopy as a probe of alkali atoms in an MHD environment

    SciTech Connect

    Monts, D.L.; Qian, S.; Cook, R.L.; Shepard, W.S.

    1995-02-01

    Application of Laser Optogalvanic Spectroscopy (LOGS) to MHD combustion systems requires selection of an appropriate alkali atom electronic transition to monitor. These studies suggest that in MHD combustion systems, it is desirable to use cesium, which occurs as an impurity in potassium compounds, as a surrogate for potassium rather than to directly monitor potassium in order to obtain reliable determinations of seed concentration. Studies were also performed to investigate the effect of electrode corrosion on the normalized LOGS signal intensity at a fixed wavelength (578.238 nm). During six-hour experiments in a near-stoichiometric flame, the normalized LOGS signal intensity decreased by 40-50% for a -960 V rod electrode and by 10-20% for a -500 V rod electrode. These changes are attributed to buildup of an oxide coating on the electrode, reducing the collection efficiency of the electrode.

  3. Small cantilevers for atomic force microscopy and force spectroscopy of biological molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viani, M. B.; Schaffer, T. E.; Chand, A.; Smith, B. L.; Hansma, P. K.; Wendman, M.

    1998-03-01

    Small cantilevers offer new possibilities for high speed/low noise atomic force microscopy of soft, biological samples. We have used a novel process to fabricate metallic cantilevers that should maximize reflectivity and minimize thermal bending. We have fabricated and measured the properties of aluminum, nickel, silver, and 14-karat gold cantilevers that are 3-12 um long, 1-4 um wide, and 60-300 nm thick and have resonant frequencies of 0.5-2 MHz and spring constants of 0.1-3 N/m. We also have fabricated small cantilevers with ultra-low spring constants (1-10 mN/m) out of silicon nitride and used them for force spectroscopy of DNA. This work was supported by grant numbers NSF-DMR9622169 and NSF-DMR9632716 from the Materials Research Division of the National Science Foundation and by grant number DAAH04-96-1-004 from the Army Research Office.

  4. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy of lead sulfide quantum wells fabricated by atomic layer deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W. J.; Dasgupta, N. P.; Jung, H. J.; Lee, J. R.; Sinclair, R.; Prinz, F. B.

    2010-11-10

    We report the use of scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) to investigate one-dimensional quantum confinement effects in lead sulfide (PbS) thin films. Specifically, quantum confinement effects on the band gap of PbS quantum wells were explored by controlling the PbS film thickness and potential barrier height. PbS quantum well structures with a thickness range of 1–20 nm were fabricated by atomic layer deposition (ALD). Two barrier materials were selected based on barrier height: aluminum oxide as a high barrier material and zinc oxide as a low barrier material. Band gap measurements were carried out by STS, and an effective mass theory was developed to compare the experimental results. Our results show that the band gap of PbS thin films increased as the film thickness decreased, and the barrier height increased from 0.45 to 2.19 eV.

  5. Lattice-Assisted Spectroscopy: A Generalized Scanning Tunneling Microscope for Ultracold Atoms.

    PubMed

    Kantian, A; Schollwöck, U; Giamarchi, T

    2015-10-16

    We propose a scheme to measure the frequency-resolved local particle and hole spectra of any optical lattice-confined system of correlated ultracold atoms that offers single-site addressing and imaging, which is now an experimental reality. Combining perturbation theory and time-dependent density matrix renormalization group simulations, we quantitatively test and validate this approach of lattice-assisted spectroscopy on several one-dimensional example systems, such as the superfluid and Mott insulator, with and without a parabolic trap, and finally on edge states of the bosonic Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model. We highlight extensions of our basic scheme to obtain an even wider variety of interesting and important frequency resolved spectra. PMID:26550881

  6. Ablation-initiated Isotope-selective Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy of Lanthanide Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Miyabe, M.; Oba, M.; Iimura, H.; Akaoka, K.; Maruyama, Y.; Wakaida, I.; Watanabe, K.

    2009-03-17

    For remote isotope analysis of low-decontaminated trans-uranium (TRU) fuel, absorption spectroscopy has been applied to a laser-ablated plume of lanthanide elements. To improve isotopic selectivity and detection sensitivity of the ablated species, various experimental conditions were optimized. Isotope-selective absorption spectra were measured by observing the slow component of the plume produced under low-pressure rare-gas ambient. The measured minimum line width of about 0.9 GHz was close to the Doppler width of the Gd atomic transition at room temperature. The relaxation rate of high-lying metastable state was found to be higher than that of the ground state, which suggests that higher analytical sensitivity can be obtained using low-lying state transition. Under helium gas environment, Doppler splitting was caused from particle motion. This effect was considered for optimization for isotope selection and analysis. Some analytical performances of this method were determined under optimum conditions and were discussed.

  7. Compact solid-state laser source for 1S-2S spectroscopy in atomic hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Kolachevsky, N.; Alnis, J.; Bergeson, S. D.; Haensch, T. W.

    2006-02-15

    We demonstrate a compact solid-state laser source for high-resolution two-photon spectroscopy of the 1S-2S transition in atomic hydrogen. The source emits up to 20 mW at 243 nm and consists of a 972 nm diode laser, a tapered amplifier, and two doubling stages. The diode laser is actively stabilized to a high-finesse cavity. We compare the new source to the stable 486 nm dye laser used in previous experiments and record 1S-2S spectra using both systems. With the solid-state laser system, we demonstrate a resolution of the hydrogen spectrometer of 6x10{sup 11}, which is promising for a number of high-precision measurements in hydrogenlike systems.

  8. Laser absorption spectroscopy diagnostics of helium metastable atoms generated in dielectric barrier discharge cryoplasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urabe, Keiichiro; Muneoka, Hitoshi; Stauss, Sven; Sakai, Osamu; Terashima, Kazuo

    2015-10-01

    Cryoplasmas, which are plasmas whose gas temperatures are below room temperature (RT), have shown dynamic changes in their physical and chemical characteristics when the gas temperature in the plasmas (Tgp) was decreased from RT. In this study, we measured the temporal behavior of helium metastable (Hem) atoms generated in a parallel-plate dielectric barrier discharge at ambient gas temperatures (Tga) of 300, 100, and 14 K and with a gas density similar to atmospheric conditions by laser absorption spectroscopy. The increments of Tgp to Tga were less than 20 K. We found from the results that the Hem lifetime and maximum density become longer and larger over one order of magnitude for lower Tga. The reasons for the long Hem lifetime at low Tga are decreases in the rate coefficients of three-body Hem quenching reactions and in the amounts of molecular impurities with boiling points higher than that of He.

  9. Quantitative atomic resolution elemental mapping via absolute-scale energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Z; Weyland, M; Sang, X; Xu, W; Dycus, J H; LeBeau, J M; D'Alfonso, A J; Allen, L J; Findlay, S D

    2016-09-01

    Quantitative agreement on an absolute scale is demonstrated between experiment and simulation for two-dimensional, atomic-resolution elemental mapping via energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. This requires all experimental parameters to be carefully characterized. The agreement is good, but some discrepancies remain. The most likely contributing factors are identified and discussed. Previous predictions that increasing the probe forming aperture helps to suppress the channelling enhancement in the average signal are confirmed experimentally. It is emphasized that simple column-by-column analysis requires a choice of sample thickness that compromises between being thick enough to yield a good signal-to-noise ratio while being thin enough that the overwhelming majority of the EDX signal derives from the column on which the probe is placed, despite strong electron scattering effects. PMID:27258645

  10. Direct Detection of Oxygen Ligation to the Mn4Ca Cluster of Photosystem II by X-ray Emission Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pushkar, Yulia; Long, Xi; Glatzel, Pieter; Brudvig, Gary W.; Dismukes, G. Charles; Collins, Terrence J.; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko; Bergmann, Uwe

    2009-06-16

    Ligands play critical roles during the catalytic reactions in metalloproteins through bond formation/breaking, protonation/deprotonation, and electron/spin delocalization. While there are well-defined element-specific spectroscopic handles, such as X-ray spectroscopy and EPR, to follow the chemistry of metal catalytic sites in a large protein matrix, directly probing particular ligand atoms like C, N, and O is challenging due to their abundance in the protein. FTIR/Raman and ligand-sensitive EPR techniques such as ENDOR and ESEEM have been applied to study metal-ligand interactions. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) can also indirectly probe the ligand environment; its element-specificity allows us to focus only on the catalytic metal site, and EXAFS and XANES provide metal-ligand distances, coordination numbers, and symmetry of ligand environments. However, the information is limited, since one cannot distinguish among ligand elements with similar atomic number (i.e. C, N. and O). As an alternative and a more direct method to probe the specific metal-ligand chemistry in the protein matrix, we investigated the application of X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES). Using this technique we have identified the oxo-bridging ligands of the Mn{sub 4}Ca complex of photosystem II (PS II), a multisubunit membrane protein, that catalyzes the water oxidizing reaction. The catalytic mechanism has been studied intensively by Mn XAS. The fundamental question of this reaction, however, is how the water molecules are ligated to the Mn{sub 4}Ca cluster and how the O-O bond formation occurs before the evolution of O{sub 2}. This implies that it is necessary to follow the chemistry of the oxygen ligands in order to understand the mechanism.

  11. Determination of minor elements in water by emission spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnett, Paul R.; Mallory, E.C.

    1971-01-01

    With the emission spectrograph, the analyst is able to determine many minor elements simultaneously in water samples. Spectrographic methods differ chiefly in techniques of preconcentrating the elements. For waters with dissolved solids of less than 1,000 milligrams per liter, the method of evaporating to dryness and determining the elements in the dried residue is sensitive, precise, and reasonably accurate. The lower limits of detection vary with the quantity of dissolved solids. Twenty-four elements are determined by this method. For waters with more than 1,000 milligrams per liter of dissolved solids, it is necessary to separate the minor elements from the major constituents before spectrographically determining the former, in order to achieve adequate lower limits of detection. Such procedures generally require more time than the residue method. In the first of two such procedures given, 21 of the metallic elements are precipitated with thioacetamide prior to spectrographic determination. In an alternate procedure, 18 elements are precipitated quantitatively with complexing reagents 8-hydroxyquinoline, tannic acid, and thioanlide. This method is faster than the thioacetamide method, but at the sacrifice of some elements. A Fortran IV computer program for processing densitometric data is given in the section 'Computer Program.'

  12. Ir Emission Spectroscopy of Ammonia: Linelists and Assignments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargreaves, R.; Bernath, P. F.; Zobov, N. F.; Shirin, S. V.; Ovsyannikov, R. I.; Polyansky, O. L.; Yurchenko, S. N.; Barber, R. J.; Tennyson, J.

    2011-06-01

    We present high resolution intensity-calibrated linelists of ammonia (NH_3) at high temperatures obtained from Fourier transform emission spectra recorded using a tube furnace. Individual calibrated linelists are presented for 12 temperatures (300-1300°C in 100°C intervals and 1370°C). Each linelist covers the 800--2200 cm-1 range and includes the majority of the ν_2 bending mode and the complete ν_4 mode regions. We also demonstrate the useful technique of obtaining empirical lower state energies from spectra at different temperatures. We expect our hot NH_3 linelists to find direct application in modeling of the spectra of extrasolar planets and brown dwarfs. Quantum number assignments in the experimental linelists are difficult because of extensive perturbations and the poor convergence of traditional Hamiltonians based on perturbation theory. A new theoretical linelist, known as BYTe, was computed variationally to assign and model spectra with ammonia temperatures up to 1500 K. It was computed using the NH3-2010 spectroscopically-determined potential energy surface and the TROVE rovibrational computer program. Intensities were calculated using an ab initio dipole moment surface. BYTe comprises more than 1.1 billion transitions in the wavenumber range from 0 to 12 000 Cm-1, constructed from 1.3 million energy levels lying below 18 000 Cm-1. Given an accurate potential energy surface, variational calculations are able to account automatically for perturbations.

  13. New method for estimating greenhouse gas emissions from livestock buildings using open-path FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briz, Susana; Barrancos, José; Nolasco, Dácil; Melián, Gladys; Padrón, Eleazar; Pérez, Nemesio

    2009-09-01

    It is widely known that methane, together with carbon dioxide, is one of the most effective greenhouse gases contributing to climate global change. According to EMEP/CORINAIR Emission Inventory Guidebook1, around 25% of global CH4 emissions originate from animal husbandry, especially from enteric fermentation. However, uncertainties in the CH4 emission factors provided by EMEP/CORINAIR are around 30%. For this reason, works addressed to calculate emissions experimentally are so important to improve the estimations of emissions due to livestock and to calculate emission factors not included in this inventory. FTIR spectroscopy has been frequently used in different methodologies to measure emission rates in many environmental problems. Some of these methods are based on dispersion modelling techniques, wind data, micrometeorological measurements or the release of a tracer gas. In this work, a new method for calculating emission rates from livestock buildings applying Open-Path FTIR spectroscopy is proposed. This method is inspired by the accumulation chamber method used for CO2 flux measurements in volcanic areas or CH4 flux in wetlands and aquatic ecosystems. The process is the following: livestock is outside the building, which is ventilated in order to reduce concentrations to ambient level. Once the livestock has been put inside, the building is completely closed and the concentrations of gases emitted by livestock begin to increase. The Open-Path system measures the concentration evolution of gases such as CO2, CH4, NH3 and H2O. The slope of the concentration evolution function, dC/dt, at initial time is directly proportional to the flux of the corresponding gas. This method has been applied in a cow shed in the surroundings of La Laguna, Tenerife Island, Spain). As expected, evolutions of gas concentrations reveal that the livestock building behaves like an accumulation chamber. Preliminary results show that the CH4 emission factor is lower than the proposed by

  14. A CAVITY RING-DOWN SPECTROSCOPY MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher C. Carter

    2003-09-30

    The work performed during this quarter by SRD scientists and engineers focused on a number of tasks. The initial acquisition of some hardware needed and the actual construction of the sampling system have begun. This sampling system will contain the pyrolysis oven to atomize the sample gas stream needed for total gaseous mercury measurements, the CRD cavity to acquire the ring-down signal needed to obtain the mercury concentration, various tubing, and temperature and pressure measurement equipment. The amount of tubing and valves have been cut to a minimum to try and reduce the resident time the sample flue gas stream is in the sampling system and minimize the possibility that the gases in the sample gas stream will react with the elements of the sampling system and change the component mixture contained in the flue gas. In an effort to minimize the equipment that needs to be close to the actual sampling port, SRD scientists decided to fiber optically couple the laser to the CRD cavity. However, the ultra-violet (UV) light needed for the mercury transition presents a problem as fiber optics can be solarized by the UV radiation thereby changing the transmission characteristics. SRD has obtained a solarization-resistant fiber. SRD scientists were then able to couple the UV laser light into the fiber and inject the output of the fiber into the CRD cavity and obtain a ring-down signal. Long-term effects of the UV radiation on the fiber optic are being monitored to detect any change in the transmission of the laser light to the cavity. Additional requirements of the mercury CRD monitor will be to not only monitor the mercury concentration continuously but also perform the measurements over extended periods of time. SRD has extended some previously performed shorter-term studies to longer time intervals. The results of these initial long-term studies are very promising.

  15. Atomic scattering spectroscopy for determination of the polarity of semipolar AlN grown on ZnO

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Atsushi; Ohta, Jitsuo; Ueno, Kohei; Oshima, Masaharu; Fujioka, Hiroshi

    2013-11-04

    Determination of the polarity of insulating semipolar AlN layers was achieved via atomic scattering spectroscopy. The back scattering of neutralized He atoms on AlN surfaces revealed the atomic alignment of the topmost layers of semipolar AlN and the ZnO substrate. Pole figures of the scattering intensity were used to readily determine the polarity of these wurtzite-type semipolar materials. In addition, we found that +R-plane AlN epitaxially grows on −R-plane ZnO, indicating that the polarity flips at the semipolar AlN/ZnO interface. This polarity flipping is possibly explained by the appearance of −c and m-faces on the −R ZnO surfaces, which was also revealed by atomic scattering spectroscopy.

  16. Study of the welding gas influence on a controlled short-arc GMAW process by optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelm, G.; Gött, G.; Schöpp, H.; Uhrlandt, D.

    2010-11-01

    The controlled short-arc processes, variants of the gas metal arc welding (GMAW) process, which have recently been developed, are used to reduce the heat input into the workpiece. Such a process with a wire feeding speed which varies periodically, using a steel wire and a steel workpiece to produce bead-on-plate welds has been investigated. As welding gases CO2 and a mixture of Ar and O2 have been used. Depending on the gas, the properties of the plasma change, and as a consequence the weldseams themselves also differ distinctly. Optical emission spectroscopy has been applied to analyse the plasma. The radial profiles of the emission coefficients of an iron line and an argon line or an atomic oxygen line, respectively, have been determined. These profiles indicate the establishment of a metal vapour arc core which has a broader profile under CO2 but is more focused in the centre for argon. The measured iron line emission was near to its norm maximum in the case of CO2. From this fact, temperatures around 8000 K and a metal vapour molar fraction above 75% in the arc centre could be roughly estimated for this case. Estimations of the electrical conductivity and the arc field indicate that the current path must include not only the metal vapour arc core but also outer hot regions dominated by welding gas properties in the case of argon.

  17. Enhanced emission from an ensemble of inverted atoms in the presence of another isotopic species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manassah, Jamal T.

    2016-04-01

    The emission flux from a slab of two homogeneously-broadened isotope species ensembles is analyzed. Initially one of the species is coherently nearly all inverted, the atoms of the other species are in the ground state. The slab thickness is less than the wavelength of the resonant transition radiation. In particular, in a narrow band of the slab thickness centered at 237λ/500, the emission flux from the species mixture for different detunings between the two species resonance frequencies is shown to be greatly enhanced over its value where only a single species is present.

  18. High-resolution atomic force microscopy and spectroscopy of native membrane proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bippes, Christian A.; Muller, Daniel J.

    2011-08-01

    Membranes confining cells and cellular compartments are essential for life. Membrane proteins are molecular machines that equip cell membranes with highly sophisticated functionality. Examples of such functions are signaling, ion pumping, energy conversion, molecular transport, specific ligand binding, cell adhesion and protein trafficking. However, it is not well understood how most membrane proteins work and how the living cell regulates their function. We review how atomic force microscopy (AFM) can be applied for structural and functional investigations of native membrane proteins. High-resolution time-lapse AFM imaging records membrane proteins at work, their oligomeric state and their dynamic assembly. The AFM stylus resembles a multifunctional toolbox that allows the measurement of several chemical and physical parameters at the nanoscale. In the single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) mode, AFM quantifies and localizes interactions in membrane proteins that stabilize their folding and modulate their functional state. Dynamic SMFS discloses fascinating insights into the free energy landscape of membrane proteins. Single-cell force spectroscopy quantifies the interactions of live cells with their environment to single-receptor resolution. In the future, technological progress in AFM-based approaches will enable us to study the physical nature of biological interactions in more detail and decipher how cells control basic processes.

  19. Atomic-Scale Spectroscopy of Gated Monolayer MoS2.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaodong; Kang, Kibum; Xie, Saien; Dadgar, Ali; Monahan, Nicholas R; Zhu, X-Y; Park, Jiwoong; Pasupathy, Abhay N

    2016-05-11

    The electronic properties of semiconducting monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides can be tuned by electrostatic gate potentials. Here we report gate-tunable imaging and spectroscopy of monolayer MoS2 by atomic-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS). Our measurements are performed on large-area samples grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) techniques on a silicon oxide substrate. Topographic measurements of defect density indicate a sample quality comparable to single-crystal MoS2. From gate voltage dependent spectroscopic measurements, we determine that in-gap states exist in or near the MoS2 film at a density of 1.3 × 10(12) eV(-1) cm(-2). By combining the single-particle band gap measured by STS with optical measurements, we estimate an exciton binding energy of 230 meV on this substrate, in qualitative agreement with numerical simulation. Grain boundaries are observed in these polycrystalline samples, which are seen to not have strong electronic signatures in STM imaging. PMID:27064662

  20. A portable optical emission spectroscopy-cavity ringdown spectroscopy dual-mode plasma spectrometer for measurements of environmentally important trace heavy metals: Initial test with elemental Hg

    SciTech Connect

    Sahay, Peeyush; Scherrer, Susan T.; Wang Chuji

    2012-09-15

    A portable optical emission spectroscopy-cavity ringdown spectroscopy (OES-CRDS) dual-mode plasma spectrometer is described. A compact, low-power, atmospheric argon microwave plasma torch (MPT) is utilized as the emission source when the spectrometer is operating in the OES mode. The same MPT serves as the atomization source for ringdown measurements in the CRDS mode. Initial demonstration of the instrument is carried out by observing OES of multiple elements including mercury (Hg) in the OES mode and by measuring absolute concentrations of Hg in the metastable state 6s6p {sup 3}P{sub 0} in the CRDS mode, in which a palm-size diode laser operating at a single wavelength 405 nm is incorporated in the spectrometer as the light source. In the OES mode, the detection limit for Hg is determined to be 44 parts per 10{sup 9} (ppb). A strong radiation trapping effect on emission measurements of Hg at 254 nm is observed when the Hg solution concentration is higher than 50 parts per 10{sup 6} (ppm). The radiation trapping effect suggests that two different transition lines of Hg at 253.65 nm and 365.01 nm be selected for emission measurements in lower (<50 ppm) and higher concentration ranges (>50 ppm), respectively. In the CRDS mode, the detection limit of Hg in the metastable state 6s6p {sup 3}P{sub 0} is achieved to be 2.24 parts per 10{sup 12} (ppt) when the plasma is operating at 150 W with sample gas flow rate of 480 mL min{sup -1}; the detection limit corresponds to 50 ppm in Hg sample solution. Advantage of this novel spectrometer has two-fold, it has a large measurement dynamic range, from a few ppt to hundreds ppm and the CRDS mode can serve as calibration for the OES mode as well as high sensitivity measurements. Measurements of seven other elements, As, Cd, Mn, Ni, P, Pb, and Sr, using the OES mode are also carried out with detection limits of 1100, 33, 30, 144, 576, 94, and 2 ppb, respectively. Matrix effect in the presence of other elements on Hg measurements

  1. Correlation between Soft X-ray Absorption and Emission Spectra of the Nitrogen Atoms within Imidazolium-Based Ionic Liquids.

    PubMed

    Horikawa, Yuka; Tokushima, Takashi; Takahashi, Osamu; Hoke, Hiroshi; Takamuku, Toshiyuki

    2016-08-01

    Soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been performed on the N K-edge of two imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs), 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)amide ([C2mim][TFSA]) and 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bromide ([C2mim][Br]), to clarify the electronic structures of the ILs. Soft X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) has also been applied to the ILs by excitation at various X-ray energies according to the XAS spectra. It was possible to fully associate the XAS peaks with the XES peaks. Additionally, both XAS and XES spectra of the ILs were well reproduced by the theoretical spectra for a single-molecule model on [C2mim](+) and [TFSA](-) using density functional theory. The assignments for the XAS and XES peaks of the ILs were accomplished from both experimental and theoretical approaches. The theoretical XAS and XES spectra of [C2mim](+) and [TFSA](-) did not significantly depend on the conformations of the ions. The reproducibility of the theoretical spectra for the single-molecule model suggested that the interactions between the cations and anions are very weak in the ILs, thus scarcely influencing the electronic structures of the nitrogen atoms. PMID:27388151

  2. Microplasmas as vacuum ultraviolet source for Cl-atom density measurements by resonance absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Virginie; Bauville, Gérard; Sadeghi, Nader; Puech, Vincent

    2011-11-01

    A micro-hollow cathode discharge was used to generate radiation on the chlorine atom resonance lines. Such radiation could be used to measure, by resonance absorption spectroscopy, the density of chlorine atoms in either ground state (3p5 2P3/2) or in the fine structure metastable state (3p5 2P1/2), which is located at 882.35 cm-1. Among the nine analysed lines in the 132-142 nm spectral region, only those at 137.953 and 139.653 nm, which are strong enough and are not affected by the self-absorption, can be used for the resonance absorption diagnostic of the ground state and the metastable state, respectively. The best operating conditions of the lamp source are 0.5% of Cl2 in argon at 150 mbar and 4 mA discharge current. The measured 800 ± 30 K gas temperature of the microplasma, indicates that under these specific conditions, these two lines are dominantly Doppler broadened. So their profile is Gaussian shaped with full widths at half maximum of (4.7 ± 0.1) × 10-4 nm.

  3. Atomic and Molecular Photoelectron and Auger Electron SpectroscopyStudies Using Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Southworth, Stephen H.

    1982-01-01

    Electron spectroscopy, combined with synchrotron radiation, was used to measure the angular distributions of photoelectrons and Auger electrons from atoms and molecules as functions of photon energy. The branching ratios and partial cross sections were a 130 measured in certain cases. By comparison with theoretical calculations, the experimental results are interpreted in terms of the characteristic electronic structure and ionization dynamics of the atomic or molecular sample. The time structure of the synchrotron radiation source was used to record time-of-flight (TOF) spectra o f the ejected electrons. The ''a double-angle-TOF'' method for the measurement of photoelectron angular distributions is discussed. This technique offers the advantages of increased electron collect ion efficiency and the elimination of certain systematic errors. Several results were obtained for Xe using photon energies in the range hv {approx_equal} 60-190 eV, where excitation and ionization of the inner-subshell 4d electrons dominates. The 4d asymmetry parameter {beta} exhibits strong oscillations with energy, in agreement with several theoretical calculations. As predicted, the 5p asymmetry parameter was observed to deviate strongly from that calculated using the independent-electron model, due to intershell correlation with the 4d electrons.

  4. Spontaneous emission of a photon: Wave-packet structures and atom-photon entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    Fedorov, M.V.; Efremov, M.A.; Kazakov, A.E.; Chan, K.W.; Eberly, J.H.; Law, C.K.

    2005-09-15

    Spontaneous emission of a photon by an atom is described theoretically in three dimensions with the initial wave function of a finite-mass atom taken in the form of a finite-size wave packet. Recoil and wave-packet spreading are taken into account. The total atom-photon wave function is found in the momentum and coordinate representations as the solution of an initial-value problem. The atom-photon entanglement arising in such a process is shown to be closely related to the structure of atom and photon wave packets which can be measured in the coincidence and single-particle schemes of measurements. Two predicted effects, arising under the conditions of high entanglement, are anomalous narrowing of the coincidence wave packets and, under different conditions, anomalous broadening of the single-particle wave packets. Fundamental symmetry relations between the photon and atom single-particle and coincidence wave-packet widths are established. The relationship with the famous scenario of Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen is discussed.

  5. Effect of target composition on the emission enhancement observed in Double-Pulse Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristo Foretti, G.; Legnaioli, S.; Palleschi, V.; Salvetti, A.; Tognoni, E.

    2008-02-01

    The effect of the matrix composition on the emission enhancement observed in Double-Pulse (DP) Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) was studied for several pure metal targets (Al, Au, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Pt, Si and W). The measurements were performed in air by using a dual-pulse Nd:YAG ns laser emitting 60mJ pulses at 1064nm wavelength. The measurement of the emission enhancement for neutral and ionic lines of all the samples showed a wide range of results. Very low enhancement was observed in Pb, Ni and Mn while the highest values of enhancement were obtained in Cu, Al and Au. The space-averaged thermodynamic parameters of the induced plasmas in DP and in SP LIBS were calculated and the enhancement of ablated atomized mass in DP case was spectroscopically estimated in all the targets. A correlation seems to exist between the ablated atomized mass enhancement and the plasma temperature increase in the DP configuration. An attempt was made to correlate the increase of these two quantities with the melting point and heat, boiling point and heat, reflectivity and ionization energy of the metal. No evident correlation was found. At the opposite, a correlation was observed between the ablated atomized mass enhancement and the thermal diffusivity of the metal. A simple picture is proposed to explain the experimental findings. It is hypothesized that different mass ablation mechanisms prevail depending on the experimental configuration. It may be expected that in the SP case mass ablation is dominated by vaporization, while in the DP case it is dominated by phase explosion and/or melt expulsion.

  6. A CAVITY RING-DOWN SPECTROSCOPY MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher C. Carter

    2004-03-31

    The construction of the sampling system was completed during the past quarter. The sampling system has been built on a 3 feet x 4 feet x 2 inch breadboard table. The laser system, all the associated optics, and the mounts and hardware needed to couple the UV light into the fiber optic have also been condensed and placed on an identical 3 feet x 4 feet x 2 inch breadboard table. This reduces the footprint of each system for ease of operation at a field test facility. The two systems are only connected with a fiber optic, to bring the UV light to the CRD cavity, and a single coaxial cable used to apply a voltage to the diode seed laser to scan the frequency over the desired mercury transition. SRD software engineers applied a couple of software fixes to correct the problems of the diode seed laser drifting or mode hopping. Upon successful completion of the software fixes another long-term test was conducted. A nearly 3 day long, 24 hours/day, test was run to test out the new subroutines. Everything appeared to work as it should and the mercury concentrations were accurately reported for the entire test, with the exception of a small interval of time when the intensity of the UV light dropped low enough that the program was no longer triggering properly. After adjusting the power of the laser the program returned to proper operation. With the successful completion of a relatively long test SRD software engineer incorporated the new subroutine into an entirely new program. This program operates the CRD instrument automatically as a continuous emissions monitor for mercury. In addition the program also reports the concentration of SO{sub 2} determined in the sample flue gas stream. Various functions, operation of, and a description of the new program have been included with this report. This report concludes the technical work associated with Phase II of the Cavity Ring-Down project for the continuous detection of trace levels of mercury. The project is presently

  7. A CAVITY RING-DOWN SPECTROSCOPY MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITOR

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher C. Carter, Ph.D.

    2003-06-30

    Previous work on the detection of mercury using the cavity ring-down (CRD) technique has concentrated on the detection and characterization of the desired mercury transition. Interferent species present in flue gas emissions have been tested as well as a simulated flue gas stream. Additionally, work has been done on different mercury species such as the elemental and oxidized forms. The next phase of the effort deals with the actual sampling system. This sampling system will be responsible for acquiring a sample stream from the flue gas stack, taking it to the CRD cavity where it will be analyzed and returning the gas stream to the stack. In the process of transporting the sample gas stream every effort must be taken to minimize any losses of mercury to the walls of the sampling system as well as maintaining the mercury in its specific state (i.e. elemental, oxidized, or other mercury compounds). SRD first evaluated a number of commercially available sampling systems. These systems ranged from a complete sampling system to a number of individual components for specific tasks. SRD engineers used some commercially available components and designed a sampling system suited to the needs of the CRD instrument. This included components such as a pyrolysis oven to convert all forms of mercury to elemental mercury, a calibration air source to ensure mirror alignment and quality of the mirror surfaces, and a pumping system to maintain the CRD cavity pressure from atmospheric pressure (760 torr) down to about 50 torr. SRD also began evaluating methods for the CRD instrument to automatically find the center of a mercury transition. This procedure is necessary as the instrument must periodically measure the baseline losses of the cavity off of the mercury resonance and then return to the center of the transition to accurately measure the mercury concentration. This procedure is somewhat complicated due to the isotopic structure of the 254 nm mercury transition. As a result of

  8. Laser sampling system for an inductively-coupled atomic emission spectrometer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-02-15

    A laser sampling system was attached to a Perkin Elmer Optima 3000 inductively-coupled plasma, atomic emission spectrometer that was already installed and operating in the Chemistry and Geochemistry Department at the Colorado School of Mines. The use of the spectrometer has been highly successful. Graduate students and faculty from at least four different departments across the CSM campus have used the instrument. The final report to NSF is appended to this final report. Appendices are included which summarize several projects utilizing this instrument: acquisition of an inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer for the geochemistry program; hydrogen damage susceptibility assessment for high strength steel weldments through advanced hydrogen content analysis, 1996 and 1997 annual reports; and methods for determination of hydrogen distribution in high strength steel welds.

  9. Expressing self-absorption in the analytical function of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kántor, Tibor; Bartha, András

    2015-11-01

    The self-absorption of spectral lines was studied with up to date multi-element inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) instrumentation using radial and axial viewing of the plasma, as well, performing line peak height and line peak area measurements. Two resonance atomic and ionic lines of Cd and Mg were studied, the concentration range was extended up to 2000 mg/L. At the varying analyte concentration, constant matrix concentration of 10,000 mg/L Ca was ensured in the pneumatically nebulized solutions. The physical and the phenomenological formulation of the emission analytical function is overviewed and as the continuity of the earlier results the following equation is offered:

  10. X-ray photo-emission and energy dispersive spectroscopy of HA coated titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Drummond, J.L.; Steinberg, A.D.; Krauss, A.R.

    1997-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the chemical composition changes of hydroxyapatite (HA) coated titanium using surface analysis (x-ray photo-emission) and bulk analysis (energy dispersive spectroscopy). The specimens examined were controls, 30 minutes and 3 hours aged specimens in distilled water or 0.2M sodium phosphate buffer (pH 7.2) at room temperature. Each x-ray photo-emission cycle consisted of 3 scans followed by argon sputtering for 10 minutes for a total of usually 20 cycles, corresponding to a sampling depth of {approximately} 1500 {angstrom}. The energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis was on a 110 by 90 {mu}m area for 500 sec. Scanning electron microscopy examination showed crystal formation (3P{sub 2}O{sub 5}*2CAO*?H{sub 2}O by energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis) on the HA coating for the specimens aged in sodium phosphate buffer. The x-ray photo-emission results indicated the oxidation effect of water on the titanium (as TiO{sub 2}) and the effect of the buffer to increase the surface concentration of phosphorous. No differences in the chemical composition were observed by energy dispersive spectroscopy analysis. The crystal growth was only observed for the sodium phosphate buffer specimens and only on the HA surface.

  11. Liquid sample introduction in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission and mass spectrometry - Critical review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bings, N. H.; Orlandini von Niessen, J. O.; Schaper, J. N.

    2014-10-01

    Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) can be considered as the most important tools in inorganic analytical chemistry. Huge progress has been made since the first analytical applications of the ICP. More stable RF generators, improved spectrometers and detection systems were designed along with the achievements gained from advanced microelectronics, leading to overall greatly improved analytical performance of such instruments. In contrast, for the vast majority of cases liquid sample introduction is still based on the pneumatic principle as described in the late 19th century. High flow pneumatic nebulizers typically demand the use of spray chambers as “aerosol filters” in order to match the prerequisites of an ICP. By this, only a small fraction of the nebulized sample actually contributes to the measured signal. Hence, the development of micronebulizers was brought forward. Those systems produce fine aerosols at low sample uptake rates, but they are even more prone for blocking or clogging than conventional systems in the case of solutions containing a significant amount of total dissolved solids (TDS). Despite the high number of publications devoted to liquid sample introduction, it is still considered the Achilles' heel of atomic spectrometry and it is well accepted, that the technology used for liquid sample introduction is still far from ideal, even when applying state-of-the-art systems. Therefore, this review is devoted to offer an update on developments in the field liquid sample introduction that had been reported until the year 2013. The most recent and noteworthy contributions to this field are discussed, trends are highlighted and future directions are outlined. The first part of this review provides a brief overview on theoretical considerations regarding conventional pneumatic nebulization, the fundamentals on aerosol generation and discusses characteristics of aerosols ideally suited

  12. Interlayer Potassium And Its Neighboring Atoms in Micas: Crystal-Chemical Modeling And Xanes Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Brigatti, M.F.; Malferrari, D.; Poppi, M.; Mottana, A.; Cibin, G.; Marcelli, A.; Cinque, G.

    2009-05-12

    A detailed description of the interlayer site in trioctahedral true micas is presented based on a statistical appraisal of crystal-chemical, structural, and spectroscopic data determined on two sets of trioctahedral micas extensively studied by both X-ray diffraction refinement on single crystals (SC-XRD) and X-ray absorption fine spectroscopy (XAFS) at the potassium K-edge. Spectroscopy was carried out on both random powders and oriented cleavage flakes, the latter setting taking advantage of the polarized character of synchrotron radiation. Such an approach (AXANES) is shown to be complementary to crystal-chemical investigation based on SC-XRD refinement. However, the results are not definitive as they focus on few samples having extreme features only (e.g., end-members, unusual compositions, and samples with extreme and well-identified substitution mechanisms). The experimental absorption K-edge (XANES) for potassium was decomposed by calculation and extrapolated into a full in-plane absorption component ({sigma}{parallel}) and a full out-of-plane absorption component ({sigma}{perpendicular}). These two patterns reflect different structural features: {sigma}{parallel}represents the arrangement of the atoms located in the mica interlayer space and facing tetrahedral sheets; {sigma}{perpendicular} is associated with multiple-scattering interactions entering deep into the mica structure, thus also reflecting interactions with the heavy atoms (essentially Fe) located in the octahedral sheet. The out-of-plane patterns also provide insights into the electronic properties of the octahedral cations, such as their oxidation states (e.g., Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+}) and their ordering (e.g., trans- vs. cis-setting). It is also possible to distinguish between F- and OH-rich micas due to peculiar absorption features originating from the F vs. OH occupancy of the O4 octahedral site. Thus, combining crystal-chemical, structural, and spectroscopic information is shown to be a

  13. Europa - Ultraviolet emissions and the possibility of atomic oxygen and hydrogen clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, F.-M.; Judge, D. L.; Carlson, R. W.

    1978-01-01

    Emission signals from Europa with wavelength below 800 A were detected by the Pioneer 10 ultraviolet photometer. In the present paper, improved procedures for data reduction are used to determine the spatial region as well as the intensity of the suggested emission sources. The observations indicate a cloud with a radius of about 1.5 Jupiter radii and an apparent brightness of approximately 10 rayleighs for a wavelength of 500 A. It is argued that neutral oxygen atoms, along with neutral hydrogen, are produced through dissociation of water ice on the surface of Europa by particle impact. Electron impact ionization excitation of oxygen atoms in the resulting cloud then gives rise to the observed emission. The present source brightness and cloud radius results are used to estimate an oxygen column density of the order of 10 trillion per sq cm, while the density of atomic hydrogen is at most 100 billion per sq cm and 1 trillion per sq cm for molecular hydrogen.

  14. Hybrid interferometric/dispersive atomic spectroscopy of laser-induced uranium plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Phyllis K.; Scott, Jill R.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2015-12-19

    An established optical emission spectroscopy technique, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), holds promise for detection and rapid analysis of elements relevant for nuclear safeguards, nonproliferation, and nuclear power, including the measurement of isotope ratios. One such important application of LIBS is the measurement of uranium enrichment (235U/238U), which requires high spectral resolution (e.g., 25 pm for the 424.4 nm U II line). High-resolution dispersive spectrometers necessary for such measurements are typically bulky and expensive. We demonstrate the use of an alternative measurement approach, which is based on an inexpensive and compact Fabry–Perot etalon integrated with a low to moderate resolution Czerny–Turner spectrometer, to achieve the resolution needed for isotope selectivity of LIBS of uranium in ambient air. Furthermore, spectral line widths of ~ 10 pm have been measured at a center wavelength 424.437 nm, clearly discriminating the natural from the highly enriched uranium.

  15. Hybrid interferometric/dispersive atomic spectroscopy of laser-induced uranium plasma

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Morgan, Phyllis K.; Scott, Jill R.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2015-12-19

    An established optical emission spectroscopy technique, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS), holds promise for detection and rapid analysis of elements relevant for nuclear safeguards, nonproliferation, and nuclear power, including the measurement of isotope ratios. One such important application of LIBS is the measurement of uranium enrichment (235U/238U), which requires high spectral resolution (e.g., 25 pm for the 424.4 nm U II line). High-resolution dispersive spectrometers necessary for such measurements are typically bulky and expensive. We demonstrate the use of an alternative measurement approach, which is based on an inexpensive and compact Fabry–Perot etalon integrated with a low to moderate resolution Czerny–Turnermore » spectrometer, to achieve the resolution needed for isotope selectivity of LIBS of uranium in ambient air. Furthermore, spectral line widths of ~ 10 pm have been measured at a center wavelength 424.437 nm, clearly discriminating the natural from the highly enriched uranium.« less

  16. Photon emission from translational energy in atomic collisions: A dynamic Casimir-Polder effect

    SciTech Connect

    Westlund, Per-Olof; Wennerstroem, H.

    2005-06-15

    It is demonstrated, using a Liouville formalism, that the relative motion of two atoms can result in the emission of photons and conversely that photons can be absorbed to excite the relative translational motion. The mechanism responsible for the energy transfer between the radiation field and the translational motion of the atoms is a dynamic version of the long-range Casimir-Polder interaction between two fixed atoms. The phenomenon is analogous to the dynamic Casimir effect discussed for moving macro- (or meso)scopic objects and we term it the dynamic Casimir-Polder effect. The absorption or emission is a two-photon process and we find that the transition probability is proportional to the spectral density of a correlation function involving the relative translational motion of two atoms. An energy transfer only occurs for photons with energies smaller than or of the same magnitude as the thermal energy. The effect provides a microscopic mechanism for establishing thermal equilibrium between the radiation field and a gas. A sufficiently large volume of gas would be perceived as a black-body radiator. Applications of the dynamic Casimir-Polder effect might be found in the microscopic description of the cosmic low-temperature black-body radiation.

  17. Proposed method for laser spectroscopy of pionic helium atoms to determine the charged-pion mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Masaki; Sótér, Anna; Korobov, Vladimir I.

    2014-04-01

    Metastable pionic helium (πHe+) is a three-body atom composed of a helium nucleus, an electron occupying the 1s ground state, and a negatively charged pion π- in a Rydberg state with principal and orbital angular momentum quantum numbers of n ˜ℓ+1˜16. We calculate the spin-independent energies of the π3He+ and π4He+ isotopes in the region n =15-19. These include relativistic and quantum electrodynamics corrections of orders R∞α2 and R∞α3 in atomic units, where R∞ and α denote the Rydberg and fine structure constants. The fine-structure splitting due to the coupling between the electron spin and the orbital angular momentum of the π- and the radiative and Auger decay rates of the states are also calculated. Some states (n,ℓ)=(16,15) and (17,16) retain nanosecond-scale lifetimes against π- absorption into the helium nucleus. We propose the use of laser pulses to induce π- transitions from these metastable states to states with large (˜1011 s-1) Auger rates. The πHe2+ ion that remains after Auger emission of the 1s electron undergoes Stark mixing with the s, p, and d states during collisions with the helium atoms in the experimental target. This leads to immediate nuclear absorption of the π -. The resonance condition between the laser beam and the atom is thus revealed as a sharp spike in the rates of neutrons, protons, deuterons, and tritons that emerge. A resonance curve is obtained from which the πHe+ transition frequency can in principle be determined with a fractional precision of 10-8-10-6 provided the systematic uncertainties can be controlled. By comparing the measured πHe+ frequencies with the calculated values, the π- mass may be determined with a similar precision. The πHe+ will be synthesized by allowing a high-intensity (>108 s-1) beam of π-produced by a cyclotron to come to rest in a helium target. The precise time structure of the π- beam is used to ensure a sufficient rate of coincidence between the resonant laser pulses

  18. Visible emission spectroscopy of highly charged tungsten ions in LHD: II. Evaluation of tungsten ion temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, K.; Takahashi, Y.; Nakai, Y.; Kato, D.; Goto, M.; Morita, S.; Hasuo, M.; Experiment Group2, LHD

    2015-12-01

    We demonstrated a polarization-resolved high resolution spectroscopy of a visible emission line of highly charged tungsten ions (λ0 = 668.899 nm, Shinohara et al Phys. Scr. 90 125402) for the large helical device (LHD) plasma, where the tungsten ions were introduced by a pellet injection. Its spectral profile shows broadening and polarization dependence, which are attributed to the Doppler and Zeeman effects, respectively. The tungsten ion temperature was evaluated for the first time from the broadening of visible the emission line, with its emission location determined by the Abel inversion of the chord-integrated emission intensities observed with multiple chords. The tungsten ion temperature was found to be close to the helium-like argon ion temperature, which is used as an ion temperature monitor in LHD.

  19. The interaction of 193-nm excimer laser irradiation with single-crystal zinc oxide: Neutral atomic zinc and oxygen emission

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, E. H.; Langford, S. C.; Dickinson, J. T.; Boatner, Lynn A

    2013-01-01

    We report mass-resolved time-of-flight measurements of neutral particles from the surface of single-crystal ZnO during pulsed 193-nm irradiation at laser fluences below the threshold for avalanche breakdown. The major species emitted are atomic Zn and O. We examine the emissions of atomic Zn as a function of laser fluence and laser exposure. Defects at the ZnO surface appear necessary for the detection of these emissions. Our results suggest that the production of defects is necessary to explain intense sustained emissions at higher fluence. Rapid, clean surface etching and high atomic zinc kinetic energies seen at higher laser fluences are also discussed.

  20. Hydrogen atom temperature measured with wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, H. Goto, M.; Tsumori, K.; Kisaki, M.; Ikeda, K.; Nagaoka, K.; Osakabe, M.; Takeiri, Y.; Kaneko, O.; Nishiyama, S.; Sasaki, K.

    2015-04-08

    The velocity distribution function of hydrogen atoms is one of the useful parameters to understand particle dynamics from negative hydrogen production to extraction in a negative hydrogen ion source. Hydrogen atom temperature is one of the indicators of the velocity distribution function. To find a feasibility of hydrogen atom temperature measurement in large scale filament arc negative hydrogen ion source for fusion, a model calculation of wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy of the hydrogen Balmer alpha line was performed. By utilizing a wide range tunable diode laser, we successfully obtained the hydrogen atom temperature of ∼3000 K in the vicinity of the plasma grid electrode. The hydrogen atom temperature increases as well as the arc power, and becomes constant after decreasing with the filling of hydrogen gas pressure.

  1. Investigation of an alternating current plasma as an element selective atomic emission detector for high-resolution capillary gas chromatography and as a source for atomic absorption and atomic emission spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ombaba, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    This thesis deals with the construction and evaluation of an alternating current plasma (ACP) as an element-selective detector for high resolution capillary gas chromatography (GC) and as an excitation source for atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and atomic emission spectrometry (AES). The plasma, constrained in a quartz discharge tube at atmospheric pressure, is generated between two copper electrodes and utilizes helium as the plasma supporting gas. The alternating current plasma power source consists of a step-up transformer with a secondary output voltage of 14,000 V at a current of 23 mA. The chromatographic applications studied included the following: (1) the separation and selective detection of the organotin species, tributyltin chloride (TBT) and tetrabutyltin (TEBT), in environmental matrices including mussels (mytilus edullus) and sediment from Boston Harbor, industrial waste water and industrial sludge, and (2) the detection of methylcyclopentadienylmanganesetricarbonyl (MMT) and similar compounds used as gasoline additives. An ultrasonic nebulizer was utilized as a sample introduction device for aqueous solutions when the ACP was employed as an atomization source for atomic absorption spectrometry and as an excitation source for atomic emission spectrometry. Plasma diagnostic parameters studied include spatial electron number density across the discharge tube, electronic, excitation and ionization temperatures. Interference studies both in absorption and emission modes were considered. The evaluation of a computer-aided optimization program, Drylab GC, using spearmint oil and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standard mixture as probes is discussed. The program is used for separation optimization and prediction of gas chromatographic parameters. The program produces a relative resolution map (RRM) which guides the analyst in selecting the most favorable temperature programming rate for the separation.

  2. A Simplified Digestion Protocol for the Analysis of Hg in Fish by Cold Vapor Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kristian, Kathleen E.; Friedbauer, Scott; Kabashi, Donika; Ferencz, Kristen M.; Barajas, Jennifer C.; O'Brien, Kelly

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of mercury in fish is an interesting problem with the potential to motivate students in chemistry laboratory courses. The recommended method for mercury analysis in fish is cold vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy (CVAAS), which requires homogeneous analyte solutions, typically prepared by acid digestion. Previously published digestion…

  3. [The Emission Spectroscopy of Nitrogen Discharge under Low Voltage at Room Temperature].

    PubMed

    Shen, Li-hua; Yu, Chun-xia; Yan, Bei; Zhang, Cheng-xiao

    2015-03-01

    A set of direct current (DC) discharge device of N2 plasma was developed, carbon nanotubes (CNT) modified ITO electrode was used as anode, aluminum plate as cathode, with -80 μm separation between them. Nitrogen emission spectra was observed at room temperature and low DC voltage (less than 150 V), and the emission spectrometry was used to diagnose the active species of the process of nitrogen discharge. Under DC discharge, the strongest energy band N2 (C3π(u)), the weak Gaydon's Green system N2 (H3 -Φ(u)-G3 Δ(g)) and the emission line of nitrogen atoms (4 p-4 p0) at 820 nm were observed. Found that metastable state of nitrogen molecules were the main factors leading to a series of excited state nitrogen atoms and nitrogen ionization. Compared the emission spectra under DC with that under alternating current (AC) (1.1 kV), and it can be seen that under DC the spectra band of nitrogen atoms can be obviously observed, and there was a molecular band in the range of 500 - 800 nm. The effect of oxygen and hydrogen on the emission spectra of nitrogen was investigated. The results showed that the oxygen inhibited the luminescence intensity of nitrogen, but the shape of spectra unchanged. All of the second positive system, Gaydon's Green system and atomic lines of nitrogen can be observed. The second positive system and Gaydon's Green system of nitrogen will be greatly affected when the volume ratio of nitrogen and hydrogen greatly affected is 1 : 1, which was due to the hydrogen. The hydrogen can depresse nitrogen plasma activation, and make the Gaydon's Green System disappeared. CNT modified ITO electrode can reduce the breakdown voltage, and the optical signal generated by the weakly ionized gas can be observed by the photo-multiplier tube at low voltage of 10 V. PMID:26117899

  4. Two-photon-induced x-ray emission in neon atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Yuping; Wang Chuankui; Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; Gel'mukhanov, Faris; Carniato, Stephane; Simon, Marc; Taieeb, Richard

    2010-10-15

    We investigated the resonant x-ray emission from a neon atom induced by the two-photon population of a double-core-hole excited state. Two qualitatively different schemes of this process are studied: The first one involves an off-resonant intermediate single-core-hole state; the second scheme passes through a resonant core-ionized intermediate state. The numerical simulations of the resonant x-ray emission performed for different peak intensities and pulse durations show significant population of the double-core-hole final states. Therefore, rather strong two-photon absorption-induced x-ray emission is predicted for both studied schemes. Thus, high counting rates in experimental measurements are expected.

  5. Relativistic theory for radiative forward electron emission in heavy ion-atom encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubaßa-Amundsen, Doris; Müller, Robert; Surzhykov, Andrey; Yerokhin, Vladimir

    2014-12-01

    The forward electron emission with simultaneous photon production during the scattering of relativistic, highly stripped projectiles from light target atoms is calculated within the Dirac theory. The method of calculation is a simplification of the impulse approximation and is based on the relation of the cross section for radiative capture to continuum of loosely bound electrons to the frame-transformed electron bremsstrahlung cross section. It is demonstrated that such an approximation is well justified in a large region of energies and photon emission angles, with the exception of the extreme forward and backward emission and the soft-photon energy limit. The cusp spectrum and the corresponding angular distribution are compared to recent experimental data for the collision system 90.38 MeV/amu U88+ + N2.

  6. Investigation of microplasma discharge in sea water for optical emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamaleev, Vladislav; Okamura, Yo; Kitamura, Kensuke; Hashimoto, Yusuke; Oh, Jun-Seok; Furuta, Hiroshi; Hatta, Akimitsu

    2016-07-01

    Microplasma discharge in sea water for optical emission spectroscopy was investigated using a needle-to-plane electrode system. The electrodes of a Pd needle and a Pt plate were placed with a gap of 25 µm in typical artificial sea water or locally sampled natural deep sea water. A pulse current source, consisting of a MOSFET switch, a capacitor, an inductor and the resistance of the sea water between the electrodes, was used. The circuit parameters were optimized to decrease the breakdown voltage and the spark duration to suppress erosion of the electrodes. Using a microgap configuration, spark discharges were reproducibly ignited in the highly conductive sea water at low breakdown voltages. The ignition of spark discharges required not only a critical voltage sufficient for breakdown, but also a critical energy for preheating of the sea water, sufficient for bubble formation. The possibility of using optical emission spectroscopy of microplasma in water is shown for identifying elemental composition of sea water.

  7. Electrochemical flowcell for in-situ investigations by soft x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schwanke, C.; Lange, K. M.; Golnak, R.; Xiao, J.

    2014-10-15

    A new liquid flow-cell designed for electronic structure investigations at the liquid-solid interface by soft X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy is presented. A thin membrane serves simultaneously as a substrate for the working electrode and solid state samples as well as for separating the liquid from the surrounding vacuum conditions. In combination with counter and reference electrodes this approach allows in-situ studies of electrochemical deposition processes and catalytic reactions at the liquid-solid interface in combination with potentiostatic measurements. As model system in-situ monitoring of the deposition process of Co metal from a 10 mM CoCl{sub 2} aqueous solution by X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy is presented.

  8. Development of two-color laser system for high-resolution polarization spectroscopy measurements of atomic hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Bhuiyan, A H; Satija, A; Naik, S V; Lucht, R P

    2012-09-01

    We have developed a high-spectral-resolution laser system for two-photon pump, polarization spectroscopy probe (TPP-PSP) measurements of atomic hydrogen in flames. In the TPP-PSP technique, a 243-nm laser beam excites the two-photon 1S-2S transition, and excited n=2 atoms are then detected by polarization spectroscopy of the n=2 to n=3 transition using 656-nm laser radiation. The single-frequency-mode 243 and 656-nm beams are produced using injection-seeded optical parametric generators coupled with pulsed dye amplifiers. The use of single-mode lasers allows accurate measurement of signal line shapes and intensities even with significant pulse-to-pulse fluctuations in pulse energies. Use of single-mode lasers and introduction of a scheme to select nearly constant laser energies enable repeatable extraction of important spectral features in atomic hydrogen transitions. PMID:22940950

  9. Validating optical emission spectroscopy as a diagnostic of microwave activated CH{sub 4}/Ar/H{sub 2} plasmas used for diamond chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Jie; Ashfold, Michael N. R.; Mankelevich, Yuri A.

    2009-02-15

    Spatially resolved optical emission spectroscopy (OES) has been used to investigate the gas phase chemistry and composition in a microwave activated CH{sub 4}/Ar/H{sub 2} plasma operating at moderate power densities ({approx}30 W cm{sup -3}) and pressures ({<=}175 Torr) during chemical vapor deposition of polycrystalline diamond. Several tracer species are monitored in order to gain information about the plasma. Relative concentrations of ground state H (n=1) atoms have been determined by actinometry, and the validity of this method have been demonstrated for the present experimental conditions. Electronically excited H (n=3 and 4) atoms, Ar (4p) atoms, and C{sub 2} and CH radicals have been studied also, by monitoring their emissions as functions of process parameters (Ar and CH{sub 4} flow rates, input power, and pressure) and of distance above the substrate. These various species exhibit distinctive behaviors, reflecting their different formation mechanisms. Relative trends identified by OES are found to be in very good agreement with those revealed by complementary absolute absorption measurements (using cavity ring down spectroscopy) and with the results of complementary two-dimensional modeling of the plasma chemistry prevailing within this reactor.

  10. Picosecond and steady state, variable intensity and variable temperature emission spectroscopy of bacteriorhodopsin.

    PubMed Central

    Shapiro, S L; Campillo, A J; Lewis, A; Perreault, G J; Spoonhower, J P; Clayton, R K; Stoeckenius, W

    1978-01-01

    The bacteriorhodopsin emission lifetime at 77 degrees K has been obtained for different regions of the emission spectrum with single-pulse excitation. The data under all conditions yield a lifetime of 60 +/- 15 ps. Intensity effects on this lifetime have been ruled out by studying the relative emission amplitude as a function of the excitation pulse energy. We relate our lifetime to previously reported values at other temperatures by studying the relative emission quantum efficiency as a function of temperature. These variable temperature studies have indicated that an excited state with an emission maximum at 670 nm begins to contribute to the spectrum as the temperature is lowered. Within our experimental error the picosecond data seem to suggest that this new emission may arise from a minimum of the same electronic state responsible for the 77 degrees K emission at 720 nm. A correlation is noted between a 1.0-ps formation time observed in absorption by Ippen et al. (Ippen, E.P., C.V. Shank, A. Lewis, and M.A. Marcus. 1978. Subpicosecond spectroscopy of bacteriorhodopsin. Science [wash. D.C.]. 200:1279-1281 and a time extrapolated from relative quantum efficiency measurements and the 77 degrees K fluorescence lifetime that we report. Images FIGURE 3 PMID:698343

  11. Metallic transfer between metals in sliding contact examined by auger emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, S. V.

    1972-01-01

    Metallic transfer between polycrystalline metals in sliding contact was examined. Hemispherical riders of iron, nickel, and cobalt were slid on tungsten, tantalum, niobium, and molybdenum disks in ultrahigh vacuum. Auger emission spectroscopy was used to monitor the elemental composition of the disk surfaces. Iron, nickel, and cobalt transferred to tungsten, whereas only cobalt transferred to tantalum, niobium, and molybdenum. The results of this investigation are discussed in terms of the cohesive energy and strain hardening characteristics of the specimen materials.

  12. Approach to SSME health monitoring. III - Exhaust plume emission spectroscopy: Recent results and detailed analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejwani, Gopal D.; van Dyke, David B.; Bircher, Felix E.

    1993-06-01

    Spectral data for two recent A-1 test firings, 901-717 and 901-718, obtained from an Optical Multichannel Analyzer and an Optical Plume Anomaly Detector, are presented. The spectral data encompasses the database of SSME critical components and materials and the spectral database for the SSME related elements and materials. Relatively strong and continuous emissions from Cr and Fe atomic transitions were observed starting at engine start plus 494 s and persisting until the engine shut off at engine start plus 520 s. These emissions are considered to be emanated from the SSME material AISI 440C, which is traced to high pressure turbopump bearings.

  13. Approach to SSME health monitoring. III - Exhaust plume emission spectroscopy: Recent results and detailed analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tejwani, Gopal D.; Van Dyke, David B.; Bircher, Felix E.

    1993-01-01

    Spectral data for two recent A-1 test firings, 901-717 and 901-718, obtained from an Optical Multichannel Analyzer and an Optical Plume Anomaly Detector, are presented. The spectral data encompasses the database of SSME critical components and materials and the spectral database for the SSME related elements and materials. Relatively strong and continuous emissions from Cr and Fe atomic transitions were observed starting at engine start plus 494 s and persisting until the engine shut off at engine start plus 520 s. These emissions are considered to be emanated from the SSME material AISI 440C, which is traced to high pressure turbopump bearings.

  14. Electronic structure investigation of atomic layer deposition ruthenium(oxide) thin films using photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Michael; Schlaf, Rudy

    2015-08-01

    Analyzing and manipulating the electronic band line-up of interfaces in novel micro- and nanoelectronic devices is important to achieve further advancement in this field. Such band alignment modifications can be achieved by introducing thin conformal interfacial dipole layers. Atomic layer deposition (ALD), enabling angstrom-precise control over thin film thickness, is an ideal technique for this challenge. Ruthenium (Ru0) and its oxide (RuO2) have gained interest in the past decade as interfacial dipole layers because of their favorable properties like metal-equivalent work functions, conductivity, etc. In this study, initial results of the electronic structure investigation of ALD Ru0 and RuO2 films via photoemission spectroscopy are presented. These experiments give insight into the band alignment, growth behavior, surface structure termination, and dipole formation. The experiments were performed in an integrated vacuum system attached to a home-built, stop-flow type ALD reactor without exposing the samples to the ambient in between deposition and analysis. Bis(ethylcyclopentadienyl)ruthenium(II) was used as precursor and oxygen as reactant. The analysis chamber was outfitted with X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (LIXPS, XPS). The determined growth modes are consistent with a strong growth inhibition situation with a maximum average growth rate of 0.21 Å/cycle for RuO2 and 0.04 Å/cycle for Ru.0 An interface dipole of up to -0.93 eV was observed, supporting the assumption of a strongly physisorbed interface. A separate experiment where the surface of a RuO film was sputtered suggests that the surface is terminated by an intermediate, stable, non-stoichiometric RuO2/OH compound whose surface is saturated with hydroxyl groups.

  15. Electronic structure investigation of atomic layer deposition ruthenium(oxide) thin films using photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, Michael E-mail: schlaf@mail.usf.edu; Schlaf, Rudy E-mail: schlaf@mail.usf.edu

    2015-08-14

    Analyzing and manipulating the electronic band line-up of interfaces in novel micro- and nanoelectronic devices is important to achieve further advancement in this field. Such band alignment modifications can be achieved by introducing thin conformal interfacial dipole layers. Atomic layer deposition (ALD), enabling angstrom-precise control over thin film thickness, is an ideal technique for this challenge. Ruthenium (Ru{sup 0}) and its oxide (RuO{sub 2}) have gained interest in the past decade as interfacial dipole layers because of their favorable properties like metal-equivalent work functions, conductivity, etc. In this study, initial results of the electronic structure investigation of ALD Ru{sup 0} and RuO{sub 2} films via photoemission spectroscopy are presented. These experiments give insight into the band alignment, growth behavior, surface structure termination, and dipole formation. The experiments were performed in an integrated vacuum system attached to a home-built, stop-flow type ALD reactor without exposing the samples to the ambient in between deposition and analysis. Bis(ethylcyclopentadienyl)ruthenium(II) was used as precursor and oxygen as reactant. The analysis chamber was outfitted with X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (LIXPS, XPS). The determined growth modes are consistent with a strong growth inhibition situation with a maximum average growth rate of 0.21 Å/cycle for RuO{sub 2} and 0.04 Å/cycle for Ru.{sup 0} An interface dipole of up to −0.93 eV was observed, supporting the assumption of a strongly physisorbed interface. A separate experiment where the surface of a RuO film was sputtered suggests that the surface is terminated by an intermediate, stable, non-stoichiometric RuO{sub 2}/OH compound whose surface is saturated with hydroxyl groups.

  16. Probing buried interfaces with standing-wave excited photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sell, Brian C.

    The experiments presented in this thesis are based on a few rather simple ideas that, when put together, can yield impressive amounts of information of relevance to nanoscience and nanotechnology. It is with this philosophy in mind that we will work our way through the generation of x-rays to their excitation of photoelectrons and x-rays to their final use to yield information about buried interfaces in a non-destructive manner. As a first idea, a strong soft x-ray standing wave can be created by irradiating a synthetic multilayer with a monochromatized synchrotron radiation beam at its first-order Bragg angle. The standing wave causes a strong modulation of the magnitude of the electric field inside and above the multilayer. This modulation in turn results in a modulation of the intensity of both photoelectrons and secondary x-rays emitted from the sample as a function of the depth of the emitting atoms below the surface. By growing one layer of the sample as a wedge on top of the multilayer and the other uniform-thickness layers of the sample on top of that, we can by translating the focused x-ray beam across the thickness of the wedge probe the stoichiometric and magnetic properties of the overlayers and their respective interfaces. These measured intensities can then be compared to theoretical calculations which include all x-ray optical effects. This standing wave/wedge approach, which we shall also term the "swedge" method, shows considerable promise for studying a variety of nanostructured materials and devices.

  17. Low-energy electro- and photo-emission spectroscopy of GaN materials and devices

    SciTech Connect

    Piccardo, Marco; Weisbuch, Claude; Iveland, Justin; Nakamura, Shuji; Speck, James S.; Martinelli, Lucio Peretti, Jacques; Choi, Joo Won

    2015-03-21

    In hot-electron semiconductor devices, carrier transport extends over a wide range of conduction states, which often includes multiple satellite valleys. Electrical measurements can hardly give access to the transport processes over such a wide range without resorting to models and simulations. An alternative experimental approach however exists which is based on low-energy electron spectroscopy and provides, in a number of cases, very direct and selective information on hot-electron transport mechanisms. Recent results obtained in GaN crystals and devices by electron emission spectroscopy are discussed. Using near-band-gap photoemission, the energy position of the first satellite valley in wurtzite GaN is directly determined. By electro-emission spectroscopy, we show that the measurement of the electron spectrum emitted from a GaN p-n junction and InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) under electrical injection of carriers provides a direct observation of transport processes in these devices. In particular, at high injected current density, high-energy features appear in the electro-emission spectrum of the LEDs showing that Auger electrons are being generated in the active region. These measurements allow us identifying the microscopic mechanism responsible for droop which represents a major hurdle for widespread adoption of solid-state lighting.

  18. PREFACE: International Conference on Many Particle Spectroscopy of Atoms, Molecules, Clusters and Surfaces (MPS2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancarani, Lorenzo Ugo

    2015-04-01

    This volume contains a collection of contributions from the invited speakers at the 2014 edition of the International Conference on Many Particle Spectroscopy of Atoms, Molecules, Clusters and Surfaces held in Metz, France, from 15th to 18th July 2014. This biennial conference alternates with the ICPEAC satellite International Symposium on (e,2e), Double Photoionization and Related Topics, and is concerned with experimental and theoretical studies of radiation interactions with matter. These include many-body and electron-electron correlation effects in excitation, and in single and multiple ionization of atoms, molecules, clusters and surfaces with various projectiles: electrons, photons and ions. More than 80 scientists, from 19 different countries around the world, came together to discuss the most recent progress on these topics. The scientific programme included 28 invited talks and a poster session extending over the three days of the meeting. Amongst the 51 posters, 11 have been selected and were advertised through short talks. Besides, Professor Nora Berrah gave a talk in memory of Professor Uwe Becker who sadly passed away shortly after co-chairing the previous edition of this conference. Financial support from the Institut Jean Barriol, Laboratoire SRSMC, Groupement de Recherche THEMS (CNRS), Ville de Metz, Metz Métropole, Conseil Général de la Moselle and Région Lorraine is gratefully acknowledged. Finally, I would like to thank the members of the local committee and the staff of the Université de Lorraine for making the conference run smoothly, the International Advisory Board for building up the scientific programme, the sessions chairpersons, those who gave their valuable time in carefully refereeing the articles of this volume and last, but not least, all participants for contributing to lively and fruitful discussions throughout the meeting.

  19. Absorption spectroscopy characterization measurements of a laser-produced Na atomic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, C.H.; Bailey, J.E.; Lake, P.W.; Filuk, A.B.; Adams, R.G.; McKenney, J.

    1996-06-01

    This work describes a pulsed Na atomic beam source developed for spectroscopic diagnosis of a high-power ion diode on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II. The goal is to produce a {approximately} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3}-density Na atomic beam that can be injected into the diode acceleration gap to measure electric and magnetic fields from the Stark and Zeeman effects through laser-induced-fluorescence or absorption spectroscopy. A {approximately} 10 ns fwhm, 1.06 {micro}m, 0.6 J/cm{sup 2} laser incident through a glass slide heats a Na-bearing thin film, creating a plasma that generates a sodium vapor plume. A {approximately} 1 {micro}sec fwhm dye laser beam tuned to 5,890 {angstrom} is used for absorption measurement of the Na I resonant doublet by viewing parallel to the film surface. The dye laser light is coupled through a fiber to a spectrograph with a time-integrated CCD camera. A two-dimensional mapping of the Na vapor density is obtained through absorption measurements at different spatial locations. Time-of-flight and Doppler broadening of the absorption with {approximately} 0.1 {angstrom} spectral resolution indicate that the Na neutral vapor temperature is about 0.5 to 2 eV. Laser-induced-fluorescence from {approximately} 1 {times} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3} Na I 3s-3p lines observed with a streaked spectrograph provides a signal level sufficient for {approximately} 0.06 {angstrom} wavelength shift measurements in a mock-up of an ion diode experiment.

  20. VLT integral field spectroscopy of embedded protostars: using near-infrared emission lines as tracers of accretion and outflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, C. J.; Cervantes, B.; Nisini, B.; Giannini, T.; Takami, M.; Whelan, E.; Smith, M. D.; Ray, T. P.; Chrysostomou, A.; Pyo, T. S.

    2011-04-01

    Aims: We present near-infrared spectroscopy of the forbidden emission line (FEL) and molecular hydrogen emission line (MHEL) regions at the bases of Herbig-Haro (HH) jets from seven embedded protostars: SVS 13 (the HH 7-11 progenitor), HH 26-IRS, HH 34-IRS, HH 72-IRS, HH 83-IRS, HH 300-IRS (IRAS 04239+2436) and HH 999-IRS (IRAS 06047-1117) Methods: The integral field spectrograph, SINFONI, on the European Southern Observatory's Very Large Telescope (VLT) was used to characterise jet parameters in these formative regions, where the jets are collimated and accelerated. Results: We find considerable differences in the spectra of HH 83-IRS when compared to the other six sources; CO bandhead and atomic permitted lines from Ca i, Na i, Mg i and Al i are observed in emission in all but HH 83-IRS, where they are detected in absorption. It is likely that this source is more evolved than the others (or at the very least considerably less active). Strong CO bandhead emission is also detected in emission in the other six sources, while extended H2 ro-vibrational and [Fe ii] forbidden emission lines trace the outflows (only the HH jet from HH 83-IRS is undetected). CO bandhead and Brγ emission peaks are in most cases coincident with the jet source continuum position, consistent with excitation in an accretion disk or accretion flow. However, in the closest source, HH 300-IRS, we do find evidence for excitation in the outflow: here the emission peak is offset by 3.6(±0.7) AU along the flow axis. We also note a correlation between CO and Mg i, Na i and Ca i intensities, which supports the idea that these atomic permitted lines are associated with accretion disks. From H2 and [Fe ii] images we measure jet widths and derive upper limits to flow component opening angles. Although we do not find that the ionised [Fe ii] component is consistently narrower than the H2 flow component, we do find that narrower H2 and/or [Fe ii] flow components are associated with higher radial

  1. First hydrogen operation of NIO1: Characterization of the source plasma by means of an optical emission spectroscopy diagnostic.

    PubMed

    Barbisan, M; Baltador, C; Zaniol, B; Cavenago, M; Fantz, U; Pasqualotto, R; Serianni, G; Vialetto, L; Wünderlich, D

    2016-02-01

    NIO1 (Negative Ion Optimization 1) is a compact and flexible radio frequency H(-) ion source, developed by Consorzio RFX and INFN-LNL. The aim of the experimentation on NIO1 is the optimization of both the production of negative ions and their extraction and beam optics. In the initial phase of its commissioning, NIO1 was operated with nitrogen, but now the source is regularly operated also with hydrogen. To evaluate the source performances, an optical emission spectroscopy diagnostic was installed. The system includes a low resolution spectrometer in the spectral range of 300-850 nm and a high resolution (50 pm) one, to study, respectively, the atomic and the molecular emissions in the visible range. The spectroscopic data have been interpreted also by means of a collisional-radiative model developed at IPP Garching. Besides the diagnostic hardware and the data analysis methods, the paper presents the first plasma measurements across a transition to the full H mode, in a hydrogen discharge. The characteristic signatures of this transition in the plasma parameters are described, in particular, the sudden increase of the light emitted from the plasma above a certain power threshold. PMID:26932047

  2. Real-time emission spectrum from a hybrid atom-optomechanical cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirza, Imran

    Hybrid quantum systems are promising candidates for opening new avenues for quantum technologies [G. Kurizki et. al, PNAS, 112 (13), 3866-3873 (2015)]. Hybrid atom-optomechanical (HAOM) systems set an intriguing example in this context. From the perspective of practical utilizations of these HAOM systems in future quantum devices, it is crucial to fully understand the excitation dynamics as well as the spectral features of these systems. In this poster, I'll present my calculations of single-photon time-dependent (TD) spectrum emitted by such a HAOM system in a strong atom-cavity as well as strong cavity-mechanics (strong-strong) coupling regime [``Real-time emission spectrum from a hybrid atom-optomechanical cavity'', Imran M. Mirza, J. Opt. Soc. Am. B, 32 (8), 1604-1614 (2015)]. In order to make the system more realistic the effects of dissipation through the mechanical oscillator, optical cavity and spontaneous emission from the two-level emitter are also incorporated. The TD spectrum reveals some novel features that are not possible to observe otherwise. For instance, time order in which different side bands appears which explains different photon-phonon interactions responsible for the production of distinct spectral resonances. .

  3. Influence of atomic tip structure on the intensity of inelastic tunneling spectroscopy data analyzed by combined scanning tunneling spectroscopy, force microscopy, and density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabayashi, Norio; Gustafsson, Alexander; Peronio, Angelo; Paulsson, Magnus; Arai, Toyoko; Giessibl, Franz J.

    2016-04-01

    Achieving a high intensity in inelastic scanning tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) is important for precise measurements. The intensity of the IETS signal can vary by up to a factor of 3 for various tips without an apparent reason accessible by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) alone. Here, we show that combining STM and IETS with atomic force microscopy enables carbon monoxide front-atom identification, revealing that high IETS intensities for CO/Cu(111) are obtained for single-atom tips, while the intensity drops sharply for multiatom tips. Adsorption of the CO molecule on a Cu adatom [CO/Cu/Cu(111)] such that the molecule is elevated over the substrate strongly diminishes the tip dependence of IETS intensity, showing that an elevated position channels most of the tunneling current through the CO molecule even for multiatom tips, while a large fraction of the tunneling current bypasses the CO molecule in the case of CO/Cu(111).

  4. Plasma emission spectroscopy for operating and developing the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) H- ion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Baoxi; Welton, Robert F; Murray Jr, S N; Pennisi, Terry R; Santana, Manuel; Stockli, Martin P

    2014-01-01

    An RF-driven, Cs-enhanced H- ion source feeds the SNS accelerator with a high current (typically >50 mA), ~1.0 ms pulsed beam at 60 Hz. To achieve the persistent high current beam for several weeks long service cycles, each newly installed ion source undergoes a rigorous conditioning and cesiation processes. Plasma conditioning outgases the system and sputter-cleans the ion conversion surfaces. A cesiation process immediately following the plasma conditioning releases Cs to provide coverage on the ion conversion surfaces. The effectiveness of the ion source conditioning and cesiation is monitored with plasma emission spectroscopy using a high-sensitivity optical spectrometer. Plasma emission spectroscopy is also used to provide a mean for diagnosing and confirming a failure of the insulating coating of the ion source RF antenna which is immersed in the plasma. Emissions of composition elements of the antenna coating material, Na emission being the most significant, drastically elevate to signal a failure when it happens. Plasma spectra of the developmental ion source with an AlN chamber and an external RF antenna are also briefly discussed.

  5. Plasma emission spectroscopy for operating and developing the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) H(-) ion sources.

    PubMed

    Han, B X; Welton, R F; Murray, S N; Pennisi, T R; Santana, M; Stockli, M P

    2014-02-01

    A RF-driven, Cs-enhanced H(-) ion source feeds the SNS accelerator with a high current (typically >50 mA), ∼1.0 ms pulsed beam at 60 Hz. To achieve the persistent high current beam for several weeks long service cycles, each newly installed ion source undergoes a rigorous conditioning and cesiation processes. Plasma conditioning outgases the system and sputter-cleans the ion conversion surfaces. A cesiation process immediately following the plasma conditioning releases Cs to provide coverage on the ion conversion surfaces. The effectiveness of the ion source conditioning and cesiation is monitored with plasma emission spectroscopy using a high-sensitivity optical spectrometer. Plasma emission spectroscopy is also used to provide a means for diagnosing and confirming a failure of the insulating coating of the ion source RF antenna which is immersed in the plasma. Emissions of composition elements of the antenna coating material, Na emission being the most significant, drastically elevate to signal a failure when it happens. Plasma spectra of the developmental ion source with an AlN (aluminum nitrite) chamber and an external RF antenna are also briefly discussed. PMID:24593570

  6. The Kalman filter approach to inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Veen, E. H.; Bosch, S.; De Loos-Vollebregt, M. T. C.

    1994-07-01

    This article is an electronic publication in Spectrochimica Acta Electronica (SAE), the electronic section of Spectrochimica Acta Part B (SAB). The hardcopy text, comprising the main article and two appendices, is accompanied by a disk containing the compiled program, a reference manual and data files. The work deals with data handling in inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES). With this technique, the analyte signal is superimposed on a background signal. When separating the signals by manual or automated three-point background correction, there are many instances in which the data reduction fails. Based on scans recorded in a fast-scanning mode and on a library of pure-component scans, the Kaiman filter approach models the emission in the spectral window (about 100 pm) of the analyte and mathematically solves the problem of background correction. By using a criterion-based algorithm to correct for optical instability, the uncertainty in the determination of the interferent line signal is eliminated. Therefore, the present filter implementation yields more accurate and precise results, especially in the case of line overlap. The Kalman filter Approach to Atomic Spectrometry (KAAS) software automatically processes Perkin-Elmer Plasma 1000/2000 text files, but can also handle ASCII data files. Practical and comprehensive examples are given to evoke the "Kalman filter feeling" in the crucial step of creating the emission model.

  7. Accurate force spectroscopy in tapping mode atomic force microscopy in liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xin; Melcher, John; Raman, Arvind

    2010-01-01

    Existing force spectroscopy methods in tapping mode atomic force microscopy (AFM) such as higher harmonic inversion [M. Stark, R. W. Stark, W. M. Heckl, and R. Guckenberger, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 8473 (2002)] or scanning probe acceleration microscopy [J. Legleiter, M. Park, B. Cusick, and T. Kowalewski, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 103, 4813 (2006)] or integral relations [M. Lee and W. Jhe, Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 036104 (2006); S. Hu and A. Raman, Nanotechnology 19, 375704 (2008); H. Hölscher, Appl. Phys. Lett. 89, 123109 (2006); A. J. Katan, Nanotechnology 20, 165703 (2009)] require and assume as an observable the tip dynamics in a single eigenmode of the oscillating microcantilever. We demonstrate that this assumption can distort significantly the extracted tip-sample interaction forces when applied to tapping mode AFM with soft cantilevers in liquid environments. This exception is due to the fact that under these conditions the second eigenmode is momentarily excited and the observed tip dynamics clearly contains contributions from the fundamental and second eigenmodes. To alleviate this problem, a simple experimental method is proposed to screen the second eigenmode contributions in the observed tip deflection signal to allow accurate tip-sample force reconstruction in liquids. The method is implemented experimentally to reconstruct interaction forces on polymer, bacteriorhodopsin membrane, and mica samples in buffer solutions.

  8. Cadmium accumulation in the crayfish, Procambarus clarkii, using graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Mayans, J.; Hernandez, F.; Medina, J.; Del Ramo, J.; Torreblanca, A.

    1986-11-01

    Lake Albufera and the surrounding rice-field waters are being subject to very heavy loads of sewage and toxic industrial residues (including heavy metals and pesticides) from the many urban and wastewaters in this area. The American red crayfish Procambarus clarkii is native to the Louisiana marshes (USA). In 1978, the crayfish appeared in Lake Albufera near Valencia (Spain), and presently, without adequate sanitary controls, the crayfish is being fished commercially for human consumption. In view of this interest, it is important to have accurate information on concentrations of cadmium in natural waters and cadmium levels of tissues of freshwaters animals used as human food, as well as the accumulation rates of this metal in this animal. In the present study, the authors investigated the accumulation of cadmium in several tissues of the red crayfish, P clarkii (Girard) from Lake Albufera following cadmium exposure. Determinations of cadmium were made by flameless atomic absorption spectroscopy and the standard additions method. Digestion of samples was made by wet ashing in open flasks with concentrated HNO/sub 3/ at 80-90/sup 0/C.

  9. Valley polarization and coherence in atomically thin tungsten disulfide via optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Bairen; Zeng, Hualing; Dai, Junfeng; Gong, Zhirui; Cui, Xiaodong

    Atomically thin group-VI transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDC) has been emerging as a family of intrinsic 2-dimensional crystals with a sizeable bandgap, opening a potential avenue for ultimate electronics and optoelectronics. Besides, the characteristic structural inversion symmetry breaking in monolayers leads to non-zero but contrasting Berry curvatures and orbital magnetic moments at K/K' valleys. These features provide an opportunity to manipulate electrons' additional internal degrees of freedom, namely the valley degree of freedom, making monolayer TMDC a promising candidate for the conceptual valleytronics. Here, our experimental approach on valley dependent circular dichroism in monolayer and bilayer WS2 via optical spectroscopy are elaborated. Consequently, the polarization of photoluminescence inherits that of excitations, circularly and linearly polarized, confirming the valley dependent selectivity rule. However, the valley polarization and valley coherence in bilayer WS2 owing to the coupling of spin, valley and layer degrees of freedom, are anomalously robust compared with monolayer WS2. We propose potential mechanisms of the anomalous behavior in WS2 bilayers.

  10. MDM2-MDM4 molecular interaction investigated by atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Moscetti, Ilaria; Teveroni, Emanuela; Moretti, Fabiola; Bizzarri, Anna Rita; Cannistraro, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Murine double minute 2 (MDM2) and 4 (MDM4) are known as the main negative regulators of p53, a tumor suppressor. They are able to form heterodimers that are much more effective in the downregulation of p53. Therefore, the MDM2-MDM4 complex could be a target for promising therapeutic restoration of p53 function. To this aim, a deeper understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlining the heterodimerization is needed. The kinetic and thermodynamic characterization of the MDM2-MDM4 complex was performed with two complementary approaches: atomic force spectroscopy and surface plasmon resonance. Both techniques revealed an equilibrium dissociation constant (KD ) in the micromolar range for the MDM2-MDM4 heterodimer, similar to related complexes involved in the p53 network. Furthermore, the MDM2-MDM4 complex is characterized by a relatively high free energy, through a single energy barrier, and by a lifetime in the order of tens of seconds. New insights into the MDM2-MDM4 interaction could be highly important for developing innovative anticancer drugs focused on p53 reactivation. PMID:27621617

  11. Investigating the mechanical properties of zona pellucida of whole human oocytes by atomic force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Andolfi, Laura; Masiero, Elena; Giolo, Elena; Martinelli, Monica; Luppi, Stefania; Dal Zilio, Simone; Delfino, Ines; Bortul, Roberta; Zweyer, Marina; Ricci, Giuseppe; Lazzarino, Marco

    2016-08-01

    The role of mechanics in numerous biological processes is nowadays recognized, while in others, such as the fertilization process, it is still neglected. In the case of oocytes the description of their mechanical properties could improve the comprehension of the oocyte-spermatozoon interaction and be helpful for application in in vitro fertilization (IVF) clinics. Herein the mechanical properties of whole human oocytes (HOs) immediately after retrieval are investigated by indentation measurements with atomic force spectroscopy under physiological conditions. Measurements are performed on immature (metaphase I - MI) and mature (metaphase II - MII) HOs. According to their morphological characteristics MII-HOs are classified as "suitable" and "rejected"; these latter would be usually rejected for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). For all maturation stages we observe that the elastic response of the zona pellucida (ZP) outer layer was different and distinguishable from the rest of the ZP-HO. The elasticity of this ZP outer layer varies with maturation and quality: stiffness decreases from immature MI to good quality MII, up to poor-quality rejected MII. An indirect analysis with IVF outcome indicates that the ZP outer layer of analysed HOs donated by women who achieved pregnancy is stiffer than that of HOs from women with negative outcome. Our findings suggest that mechanical properties can represent important oocyte quality indicators that may be exploited for the design of innovative ICSI dedicated cell sorters. PMID:27476747

  12. Atomic Structure of Pt3Ni Nanoframe Electrocatalysts by in Situ X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Becknell, Nigel; Kang, Yijin; Chen, Chen; Resasco, Joaquin; Kornienko, Nikolay; Guo, Jinghua; Markovic, Nenad M; Somorjai, Gabor A; Stamenkovic, Vojislav R; Yang, Peidong

    2015-12-23

    Understanding the atomic structure of a catalyst is crucial to exposing the source of its performance characteristics. It is highly unlikely that a catalyst remains the same under reaction conditions when compared to as-synthesized. Hence, the ideal experiment to study the catalyst structure should be performed in situ. Here, we use X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) as an in situ technique to study Pt3Ni nanoframe particles which have been proven to be an excellent electrocatalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The surface characteristics of the nanoframes were probed through electrochemical hydrogen underpotential deposition and carbon monoxide electrooxidation, which showed that nanoframe surfaces with different structure exhibit varying levels of binding strength to adsorbate molecules. It is well-known that Pt-skin formation on Pt-Ni catalysts will enhance ORR activity by weakening the binding energy between the surface and adsorbates. Ex situ and in situ XAS results reveal that nanoframes which bind adsorbates more strongly have a rougher Pt surface caused by insufficient segregation of Pt to the surface and consequent Ni dissolution. In contrast, nanoframes which exhibit extremely high ORR activity simultaneously demonstrate more significant segregation of Pt over Ni-rich subsurface layers, allowing better formation of the critical Pt-skin. This work demonstrates that the high ORR activity of the Pt3Ni hollow nanoframes depends on successful formation of the Pt-skin surface structure. PMID:26652294

  13. Detection of Glucose with Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy by Using Oligonucleotide Functionalized Gold Nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Yan, Honglian; Ling, Liansheng

    2016-06-01

    A novel method for the detection of glucose was established with atomic absorption spectroscopy by using the label of gold nanoparticle (AuNP). Silver-coated glass assembled with oligonucleotide 5'-SH-T12-AGA CAA GAG AGG-3' (Oligo 1) was acted as separation probe, oligonucleotide 5'-CAA CAG AGA ACG-T12-SH-3' modified gold nanoparticle (AuNP-Oligo 2) was acted as signal-reporting probe. Oligonucleotide 5'-CGT TCT CTG TTG CCT CTC TTG TCT-3' (Oligo 3) could hybridize with Oligo 1 on the surface of silver-coated glass and AuNP-Oligo 2, and free AuNP-Oligo 2 could be removed by rinsing with buffer. Hence the concentration of Oligo 3 was transformed into the concentration of gold element. In addition, Oligo 3 could be cleaved into DNA fragments by glucose, glucose oxidase and Fe(2+)-EDTA through Fenton reaction. Thereby the concentration of glucose could be transformed to the absorbance of gold element. Under the optimum conditions, the integrated absorbance decreased proportionally to the concentration of glucose over the range from 50.0 μM to 1.0 mM with a detection limit of 40.0 μM. Moreover, satisfactory result was obtained when the assay was used to determinate glucose in human serum. PMID:27427698

  14. Ultra-violet and resonant laser ablation coupled with microwave induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry and determination of tin in nickel based alloys by electrothermal atomizer atomic absorption and laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaodong

    Chapter 1 reviews laser ablation in analytical atomic spectrometry. Laser ablation is categorized into two functions: one is used as a sample introduction method, the other function is used as a microprobe analysis method. Both fundamental and applicational aspects are reviewed with the citations of related papers. This chapter also serves as an introduction to the work which is described in chapter 2 and chapter 3 as laser ablation is a relatively new research area for the research group. In chapter 2, instrumentation for excimer (308nm) laser ablation of samples was coupled with a microwave induced plasma (MLP), and evaluated for its potential as an approach to solid sampling for atomic emission spectrometry. Operating parameters were optimized, and the effects of laser repetition rate and number of laser shots on the emission signal were investigated. The UV excimer laser removed more material than would be expected of an infrared laser of similar energy. The chromium detection limit in the solid steel sample was estimated to be about 500 mug/g. In chapter 3, a wavelength tunable optical parametric oscillator (OPO) laser was used to ablate a steel sample into the same apparatus described in chapter 2. The emission signal for the elements was selectively enhanced when the ablation wavelength was tuned to be in resonance with any atomic transition of that element. This was the first report of the observation of resonant ablation by use of optical detection, as prior reports of resonant ablation have used mass spectrometric detectors. Chapter 4 reviews the publications in laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry in recent eight years. The focus of the review is on recent development on new instruments and applications of this technique. Chapter 5 studies the determination of tin in nickel-based alloys with laser excited atomic fluorescence in a graphite furnace. Zeeman electrothermal atomizer atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass

  15. Deconvolution-based correction of alkali beam emission spectroscopy density profile measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Pusztai, I.; Pokol, G.; Refy, D.; Por, G.; Dunai, D.; Anda, G.; Zoletnik, S.; Schweinzer, J.

    2009-08-15

    A deconvolution-based correction method of the beam emission spectroscopy (BES) density profile measurement is demonstrated by its application to simulated measurements of the COMPASS and TEXTOR tokamaks. If the line of sight is far from tangential to the flux surfaces, and the beam width is comparable to the scale length on which the light profile varies, the observation may cause an undesired smoothing of the light profile, resulting in a non-negligible underestimation of the calculated density profile. This effect can be reduced significantly by the emission reconstruction method, which gives an estimate of the emissivity along the beam axis from the measured light profile, taking the finite beam width and the properties of the measurement into account in terms of the transfer function of the observation. Characteristics and magnitude of the mentioned systematic error and its reduction by the introduced method are studied by means of the comprehensive alkali BES simulation code RENATE.

  16. United States Environmental Protection Agency Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy test program for emissions measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Lay, L.T.

    1994-12-31

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published amendments to the Clean Air Act (CAA) November 15, 1990. Title 3 of the CAA amendments included a list of 189 hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) for which emission test procedures must be established. An extractive emission test method, using Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, is being developed for measuring HAP compounds. The FTIR procedure has the potential to detect over 100 of the listed compounds plus additional compounds such as criteria pollutants. This procedure has the ability to detect multiple compounds simultaneously and will provide near real-time data. Since the development of the extractive FTIR procedure, many source categories have been screened for HAP emissions using this technique. Modifications to the procedure have been made and validation testing has been performed. Currently, this technique is being used to collect data for maximum achievable control technology (MACT) standard development.

  17. Structural conformation in a poly (ethylene oxide) film obta inedfrom X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES)

    SciTech Connect

    Kashtanov, S.; Zhuang, G.V.; Augustsson, A.; Guo, J.-H.; Nordgren, J.; Luo, Y.; Ross, P.N.

    2007-03-16

    The electronic structure of poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) in a thin (< 1 {micro}) film sample was experimentally probed by X-ray emission spectroscopy. The emission spectra from this film were much sharper with more resolved fine structure than the spectra from the bulk polymer from which it was cast. Both non-resonant and resonant X-ray emission spectra were simulated using density functional theory (DFT) applied to four different models representing different conformations in the polymer. Calculated spectra were compared with experimental results for the PEO film. It was found that the best fit was obtained with the polymer conformation in PEO electrolytes from which the salt (LiMF6, M=P, As, or Sb) had been removed. This conformation is different from that in the crystalline bulk polymer and implies that film casting, commonly used to form electrolytes for Li polymer batteries, induces the same conformation in the polymer with or without the salt present.

  18. Spectroscopy of optically selected BL Lac objects and their γ-ray emission

    SciTech Connect

    Sandrinelli, A.; Treves, A.; Farina, E. P.; Landoni, M.; Falomo, R.; Foschini, L.; Sbarufatti, B.

    2013-12-01

    We present Very Large Telescope optical spectroscopy of nine BL Lac objects of unknown redshift belonging to the list of optically selected radio-loud BL Lac candidates. We explore their spectroscopic properties and possible link with gamma-ray emission. From the new observations we determine the redshifts of four objects from faint emission lines or from absorption features of their host galaxies. In three cases we find narrow intervening absorptions from which a lower limit to the redshift is inferred. For the remaining two featureless sources, lower limits to the redshift are deduced from the absence of spectral lines. A search for γ counterpart emission shows that six out of the nine candidates are Fermi γ-ray emitters and we find two new detections. Our analysis suggests that most of the BL Lac objects still lacking redshift information are most likely located at high redshifts.

  19. Comparison endpoint study of process plasma and secondary electron beam exciter optical emission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Stephan Thamban, P. L.; Yun, Stuart; Padron-Wells, Gabriel; Hosch, Jimmy W.; Goeckner, Matthew J.

    2012-11-15

    Traditionally process plasmas are often studied and monitored by optical emission spectroscopy. Here, the authors compare experimental measurements from a secondary electron beam excitation and direct process plasma excitation to discuss and illustrate its distinctiveness in the study of process plasmas. They present results that show excitations of etch process effluents in a SF{sub 6} discharge and endpoint detection capabilities in dark plasma process conditions. In SF{sub 6} discharges, a band around 300 nm, not visible in process emission, is observed and it can serve as a good indicator of etch product emission during polysilicon etches. Based on prior work reported in literature the authors believe this band is due to SiF{sub 4} gas phase species.

  20. Diagnostics of Argon Inductively Coupled Plasma and Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma by Optical Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jia-liang; Yu, Shi-ji; Ma, Teng-cai; Deng, Xin-lu

    2001-08-01

    An experimental setup was built up to carry out radio frequency (RF) inductively coupled plasma (ICP) and dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), and to depict the optical emission spectra (OES) of the discharges. OES from argon ICP and DBD plasmas in visible and near ultraviolet region were measured. For argon ICP, the higher RF power input (higher than 500 W for our machine), the higher degree of argon plasma ionization. But that doesn't mean a higher mean electron energy. With the increase in the power input, the mean electron energy increases slightly, whereas the density of electron increases apparently. Or, the contrary, argon DBD discharge behaves in the manner of a pulsed DC discharge on optical emission spectroscopy and V-I characteristics. DBD current is composed of a series of pulses equally spaced in temporal domain. The kinetics of DBD emission strength is mainly governed by the frequency of the current pulse.

  1. A study of carbonates, sulfates, and phosphates using thermal emission spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenrich, M. L.; Christensen, P. R.

    1993-01-01

    Thermal emission spectroscopy is useful for identifying mineralogies including carbonates, sulfates, and phosphates. Each of these groups of minerals has a distinct emissivity profile that allows for general identification (e.g., carbonate). Laboratory data are being collected that suggest the potential for determining specific composition of these minerals (e.g., calcite, magnesite). Previous studies of Mars suggest that the above groups of minerals should be present. On Mars fine-grained mineralogies are likely to be intimately mixed due to aeolian activity. Mixtures of calcite with palagonite will be studied to determine the volume percent requirement for salt identification and to understand the complexities of fine-grained mixtures observed by thermal emission. Further work with mixtures will include sulfate and phosphate mineralogies.

  2. Nonthermal Optical Emission Spectrometry: Direct Atomization and Excitation of Cadmium for Highly Sensitive Determination.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yi; Zhang, Ya-Jie; Wu, De-Fu; Yu, Yong-Liang; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2016-04-19

    The low atomization and excitation capability of nonthermal microplasma, e.g., dielectric barrier discharge (DBD), has greatly hampered its potential applications for the determination of metals in solution. In the present work, an inspiring development is reported for direct atomization and excitation of cadmium in aqueous solution by DBD and facilitates highly sensitive determination. A DBD microplasma is generated on the nozzle of a pneumatic micronebulizer to focus the DBD energy on a confined space and atomize/excite metals in the spray. Meanwhile, an appropriate sample matrix and nebulization in helium further improves the atomization and excitation capability of DBD. With cadmium as a model, its emission is recorded by a CCD spectrometer at 228.8 nm. By using an 80 μL sample solution nebulized at 3 μL s(-1), a linear range of 5-1000 μg L(-1) along with a detection limit of 1.5 μg L(-1) is achieved, which is comparable to those obtained by commercial bulky inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-based instrumentations. PMID:27030025

  3. Ozone-stimulated emission due to atomic oxygen population inversions in an argon microwave plasma torch

    SciTech Connect

    Lukina, N. A.; Sergeichev, K. F.

    2008-06-15

    It is shown that, in a microwave torch discharge in an argon jet injected into an oxygen atmosphere at normal pressure, quasi-resonant energy transfer from metastable argon atoms to molecules of oxygen and ozone generated in the torch shell and, then, to oxygen atoms produced via the dissociation of molecular oxygen and ozone leads to the inverse population of metastable levels of atomic oxygen. As a result, the excited atomic oxygen with population inversions becomes a gain medium for lasing at wavelengths of 844.6 and 777.3 nm (the 3{sup 3}P-3{sup 3}S and 3{sup 5}P-3{sup 5}S transitions). It is shown that an increase in the ozone density is accompanied by an increase in both the lasing efficiency at these wavelength and the emission intensity of the plasma-forming argon at a wavelength of 811.15 nm (the {sup 2}P{sup 0}4s-{sup 2}P{sup 0}4p transition). When the torch operates unstably, the production of singlet oxygen suppresses ozone generation; as a result, the lasing effect at these wavelengths disappears.

  4. Corona discharge radical emission spectroscopy: a multi-channel detector with nose-type function for discrimination analysis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yunfei; Wu, Peng; Wu, Xi; Jiang, Xiaoming; Xu, Kailai; Hou, Xiandeng

    2013-04-21

    A simple and economical multi-channel optical sensor using corona discharge radical emission spectroscopy is developed and explored as an optical nose for discrimination analysis of volatile organic compounds, wines, and even isomers. PMID:23471437

  5. CHIANTI-AN ATOMIC DATABASE FOR EMISSION LINES. XII. VERSION 7 OF THE DATABASE

    SciTech Connect

    Landi, E.; Del Zanna, G.; Mason, H. E.; Young, P. R.; Dere, K. P.

    2012-01-10

    The CHIANTI spectral code consists of an atomic database and a suite of computer programs to calculate the optically thin spectrum of astrophysical objects and carry out spectroscopic plasma diagnostics. The database includes atomic energy levels, wavelengths, radiative transition probabilities, collision excitation rate coefficients, and ionization and recombination rate coefficients, as well as data to calculate free-free, free-bound, and two-photon continuum emission. Version 7 has been released, which includes several new ions, significant updates to existing ions, as well as Chianti-Py, the implementation of CHIANTI software in the Python programming language. All data and programs are freely available at http://www.chiantidatabase.org, while the Python interface to CHIANTI can be found at http://chiantipy.sourceforge.net.

  6. A Complete Model Helium Atom: Theoretical Emissivities, the Case B Approximation, and the Primordial Helium Abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, R. L.; Bauman, R. P.; MacAdam, K. B.; Ferland, G. J.

    2004-12-01

    We have completed the development of a new model helium atom for the spectra simulation code Cloudy. All relevant astrophysically significant processes are included, and the spectrum is solved self-consistently with the thermal and ionization structure of the simulated system. We present here an overview of the differences that distinguish our model from those by previous authors. We also compare predicted case B emissivities with those from previous works. The differences will have significant consequences for the interpretation of spectra of a wide variety of systems. We also explore deviations from the case B approximation and present an estimate of the primordial helium abundance.

  7. Measurement of visible and UV emission from Energetic Neutral Atom Precipitation (ENAP), on Spacelab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinsley, B. A.

    1980-10-01

    The charge exchange of plasmaspheric ions and exospheric H and O and of solar wind ions with exospheric and interplanetary H are sources of precipitating neutrals whose faint emission may be observed by the imaging spectrometric observatory during dark periods of the SL-1 orbit. Measurements of the interactions of these precipitating atoms with the thermosphere are needed to evaluate the heating and ionization effects on the atmosphere as well as the selective loss of i energetic ions from the sources (predominantly the ring current).

  8. Measurement of visible and UV emission from Energetic Neutral Atom Precipitation (ENAP), on Spacelab

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinsley, B. A.

    1980-01-01

    The charge exchange of plasmaspheric ions and exospheric H and O and of solar wind ions with exospheric and interplanetary H are sources of precipitating neutrals whose faint emission may be observed by the imaging spectrometric observatory during dark periods of the SL-1 orbit. Measurements of the interactions of these precipitating atoms with the thermosphere are needed to evaluate the heating and ionization effects on the atmosphere as well as the selective loss of i energetic ions from the sources (predominantly the ring current).

  9. Energetic Neutral Atom Emissions From Venus: VEX Observations and Theoretical Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fok, M.-C.; Galli, A.; Tanaka, T.; Moore, T. E.; Wurz, P.; Holmstrom, M.

    2007-01-01

    Venus has almost no intrinsic magnetic field to shield itself from its surrounding environment. The solar wind thus directly interacts with the planetary ionosphere and atmosphere. One of the by-products of this close encounter is the production of energetic neutral atom (ENA) emissions. Theoretical studies have shown that significant amount of ENAs are emanated from the planet. The launch of the Venus Express (VEX) in 2005 provided the first light ever of the Venus ENA emissions. The observed ENA flux level and structure are in pretty good agreement with the theoretical studies. In this paper, we present VEX ENA data and the comparison with numerical simulations. We seek to understand the solar wind interaction with the planet and the impacts on its atmospheres.

  10. Thermal infrared emission spectroscopy of natural surfaces: Application to desert varnish coatings on rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Philip R.; Harrison Thliveris, Stephanie

    1993-01-01

    Thermal infrared spectroscopy has become an increasingly important tool for remote compositional analysis and geologic mapping. Most published laboratory measurements have been obtained in bidirectional reflection or transmission, whereas remotely sensed thermal infrared data are obtained by measuring the emitted energy. Section 2 of this paper describes a laboratory technique for determining calibrated emissivities of natural surfaces. Equations are developed to account for the energy reflected from the environment and to determine directly the sample temperature from measurements of hot and cold blackbody targets. Two methods for determining emissivity are developed: one in which only a hot sample measurement is made and the reflected background energy is removed by modeling, and a second in which the sample is cooled and the reflected energy is measured directly. Relative emissivity can be obtained to approximately 1% and absolute emissivities can be obtained to 2-15%, depending on the validity of the assumption that the emissivity of the sample is unity at some wavelength. The emission data agree well within the hemispherically integrated reflection data but point out probelms associated with bidirectional reflectance measurements. Section 3 applies emissivity measurements to the study of layered surfaces consisting of desert varnish coatings on granite and granodiorite rock suites. Two linear models are developed: the first assumes linear mixing of independent emission from the substrate and varnish (checkerboard model); the second models tansmission through an absorbing/emitting medium. Regardless of whether the varnish is or is not relatively transparant and strongly absorptive, the spectral effect of varnish increases linearly with varnish thickness, indicating that thick patches of varnish dominate the spectral properties. As a result, medium varnish thickness can be determined from spectral measurements. In addition, the composition of a substrate can be

  11. Precision spectroscopy of 2S-nP transitions in atomic hydrogen for a new determination of the Rydberg constant and the proton charge radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, Axel; Maisenbacher, Lothar; Khabarova, Ksenia; Matveev, Arthur; Pohl, Randolf; Udem, Thomas; Hänsch, Theodor W.; Kolachevsky, Nikolai

    2015-10-01

    Precision measurements of transition frequencies in atomic hydrogen provide important input for a number of fundamental applications, such as stringent tests of QED and the extraction of fundamental constants. Here we report on precision spectroscopy of the 2S-4P transition in atomic hydrogen with a reproducibility of a few parts in 1012. Utilizing a cryogenic beam of hydrogen atoms in the metastable 2S state reduces leading order systematic effects of previous experiments of this kind. A number of different systematic effects, especially line shape modifications due to quantum interference in spontaneous emission, are currently under investigation. Once fully characterized, our measurement procedure can be applied to higher lying 2S-nP transitions (n=6,8,9,10) and we hope to contribute to an improved determination of the Rydberg constant and the proton root mean square charge radius by this series of experiments. Ultimately, this improved determination will give deeper insight into ‘the proton size puzzle’ from the electronic hydrogen side.

  12. Time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy of matrix-isolated silver atoms after pulsed excitation of inner-shell transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebert, T.; Wiggenhauser, H.; Schriever, U.; Kolb, D. M.

    1990-02-01

    The energy dissipation in matrix-isolated silver atoms after pulsed vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) excitation of 4d-5p transitions has been studied by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The decay behavior of the various fluorescence bands has been analyzed and a model for the relaxation process proposed within the framework of a two-dimensional configuration-coordinate diagram. If minute quantities of Ag2 are present in the matrix, the analysis requires consideration of energy transfer between silver atoms and dimers.

  13. Characterization of aging in organic materials on atomic-, meso- and macro-length scales by {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Assink, R.A.; Jamison, G.M.; Alam, T.M.; Gillen, K.T.

    1997-10-01

    A fundamental understanding of aging in an organic material requires that one understand how aging affects the chemical structure of a material, and how these chemical changes are related to the material`s macroscopic properties. This level of understanding is usually achieved by examining the material on a variety of length scales ranging from atomic to meso-scale to macroscopic. The authors are developing and applying several {sup 13}C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy experiments to characterize the aging process of organic materials over a broad range of length scales. Examples of studies which range from atomic to macroscopic will be presented.

  14. An atomic beam of 6Li — 7Li for high resolution spectroscopy from matrix isolation sublimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, A. N.; Sacramento, R. L.; Silva, B. A.; Uhlmann, F. O.; Wolff, W.; Cesar, C. L.

    2016-07-01

    We propose the Matrix Isolation Sublimation (MlSu) technique for generating cold lithium atoms for the measurement of the 6Li - 7Li isotope shift in D1 and D2 transitions. The technique is capable of generating cold 6Li and 7Li beams at 4 K with forward velocity of 125 m/s. Using this beam we offer a distinguished source of lithium atoms for transitions measurements, adding a new possibility to make high resolution spectroscopy towards improving the experimental checks of the theory.

  15. Single- and double-core-hole ion emission spectroscopy of transient neon plasmas produced by ultraintense x-ray laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Cheng; Zeng, Jiaolong; Yuan, Jianmin

    2016-02-01

    Single-core-hole (SCH) and double-core-hole (DCH) spectroscopy is investigated systematically for neon gas in the interaction with ultraintense x-ray pulses with photon energy from 937 eV to 2000 eV. A time-dependent rate equation, implemented in detailed level accounting approximation, is utilized to study the dynamical evolution of the level population and emission properties of the laser-produced highly transient plasmas. The plasma-density effects on level populations and charge-state distribution are demonstrated with an x-ray photon energy of 2000 eV. It is shown that atomic number density of relevant experiment is about 1 × 1018 cm-3, which is comparable to a recent experiment. At this density, we systematically investigate the emissivity of the transient neon plasmas. For laser photon energy in the range 937-1360 eV, resonant absorptions (RA) of 1s\\to {np} (n≥slant 2) transitions play important roles in time evolution of the population and DCH emission spectroscopy. The RA effects are illustrated in detail for an x-ray pulse of 944 eV photon energy, which creates the 1s\\to 2p RA from the SCH states (1s2{s}22{p}4, 1s2s2p5, and 1s2p6) of Ne3+. After averaging over the space and time distribution of x-ray pulse, DCH emission spectroscopy is studied at x-ray photon energies of 937, 944, 955, 968, 980, and 990 eV, where there exist 1s\\to 2p resonances from SCH states of Ne2+-Ne7+. The processes with producing DCH states are discussed. For x-ray photon energy larger than 1360 eV, no RA exist and transient plasmas show different features in the DCH spectroscopy.

  16. Terahertz Spectroscopy of Low-Dimensional Nanomaterials: Nonlinear Emission and Ultrafast Electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Liang; Wang, Jigang

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear and non-equilibrium properties of low-dimensional quantum materials are fundamental in nanoscale science yet transformative in nonlinear imaging/photonic technology today. These have been poorly addressed in many nano-materials despite of their well-established equilibrium optical and transport properties. The development of ultrafast terahertz (THz) sources and nonlinear spectroscopy tools facilitates understanding these issues and reveals a wide range of novel nonlinear and quantum phenomena that are not expected in bulk solids or atoms. In this paper, we discuss our recent discoveries in two model photonic and electronic nanostructures to solve two outstanding questions: (1) how to create nonlinear broadband terahertz emitters using deeply subwavelength nanoscale meta-atom resonators? (2) How to access one-dimensional (1D) dark excitons and their non-equilibrium correlated states in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWMTs)?

  17. Terahertz Spectroscopy of Low-Dimensional Nanomaterials: Nonlinear Emission and Ultrafast Electrodynamics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Luo, Liang; Wang, Jigang

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinear and non-equilibrium properties of low-dimensional quantum materials are fundamental in nanoscale science yet transformative in nonlinear imaging/photonic technology today. These have been poorly addressed in many nano-materials despite of their well-established equilibrium optical and transport properties. The development of ultrafast terahertz (THz) sources and nonlinear spectroscopy tools facilitates understanding these issues and reveals a wide range of novel nonlinear and quantum phenomena that are not expected in bulk solids or atoms. In this paper, we discuss our recent discoveries in two model photonic and electronic nanostructures to solve two outstanding questions: (1) how to create nonlinear broadband terahertz emittersmore » using deeply subwavelength nanoscale meta-atom resonators? (2) How to access one-dimensional (1D) dark excitons and their non-equilibrium correlated states in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWMTs)?« less

  18. Terahertz spectroscopy of low-dimensional nanomaterials: nonlinear emission and ultrafast electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Liang; Wang, Jigang

    2015-08-01

    Nonlinear and non-equilibrium properties of low-dimensional quantum materials are fundamental in nanoscale science yet transformative in nonlinear imaging/photonic technology today. These have been poorly addressed in many nano-materials despite of their well-established equilibrium optical and transport properties. The development of ultrafast terahertz (THz) sources and nonlinear spectroscopy tools facilitates understanding these issues and reveals a wide range of novel nonlinear and quantum phenomena that are not expected in bulk solids or atoms. In this paper, we discuss our recent discoveries in two model photonic and electronic nanostructures to solve two outstanding questions: (1) how to create nonlinear broadband terahertz emitters using deeply subwavelength nanoscale meta-atom resonators? (2) How to access one-dimensional (1D) dark excitons and their non-equilibrium correlated states in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWMTs)?

  19. Synthesis, structure, and emission spectroscopy of luminescent Pt(COD)(dithiolate) complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Bevilacqua, J.M.; Zuleta, J.A.; Eisenberg, R.

    1993-08-18

    The synthesis, characterization, X-ray structure determination and emission spectroscopy of two Pt(COD)(S-S) complexes are reported where COD = 1,5-cycloctadiene (COD) and S-S is maleonitriledithiolate (mnt) for complex 1 and 1-(ethoxycarbonyl)-1-cyanoethylene-2,2-dithiolate (ecda) for complex 2. Both complexes are isolated in high yield from the reaction of Pt(COD)Cl{sub 2} and the corresponding dianionic dithiolate salt. Orange crystals of 1 (C{sub 12}H{sub 12}N{sub 2}PtS{sub 2}) are monoclinic, space group P2{sub 1}/n (No. 14). Each complex possess a square planar structure with chelating diolefin and dithiolate ligands. Proton NMR spectroscopy shows that the solid-state structures are maintained in solution. The complexes are luminescent at low temperature in the solid state and in frozen glasses. In the solid state at 77 K, Pt(COD)(mnt) exhibits a highly structured emission ({lambda}{sub max} = 560 nm, 17.9 kcm{sup {minus}1}) with a vibronic progression of {approximately}1400 cm{sup {minus}1}, whereas for Pt(COD)(ecda), the emission is broad and featureless ({lambda}{sub max} = 525 nm, 19.0 kcm{sup {minus}1}). The emissive state for both complexes is assigned as a metal-to-dithiolate charge transfer with differences in the structure and energy of the emissions resulting from differences in the {pi}*{sub dithiolate} orbital of the mnt and ecda ligands.

  20. [Photodissociation of Acetylene and Acetone using Step-Scan Time-Resolved FTIR Emission Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLaren, Ian A.; Wrobel, Jacek D.

    1997-01-01

    The photodissociation of acetylene and acetone was investigated as a function of added quenching gas pressures using step-scan time-resolved FTIR emission spectroscopy. Its main components consist of Bruker IFS88, step-scan Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer coupled to a flow cell equipped with Welsh collection optics. Vibrationally excited C2H radicals were produced from the photodissociation of acetylene in the unfocused experiments. The infrared (IR) emission from these excited C2H radicals was investigated as a function of added argon pressure. Argon quenching rate constants for all C2H emission bands are of the order of 10(exp -13)cc/molecule.sec. Quenching of these radicals by acetylene is efficient, with a rate constant in the range of 10(exp -11) cc/molecule.sec. The relative intensity of the different C2H emission bands did not change with the increasing argon or acetylene pressure. However, the overall IR emission intensity decreased, for example, by more than 50% when the argon partial pressure was raised from 0.2 to 2 Torr at fixed precursor pressure of 160mTorr. These observations provide evidence for the formation of a metastable C2H2 species, which are collisionally quenched by argon or acetylene. Problems encountered in the course of the experimental work are also described.