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Sample records for atomic vapour laser

  1. A eutectic gold vapour laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tou, T. Y.; Cheak, K. E.; Low, K. S.

    This paper presents a eutectic gold vapour laser (EGVL) which uses the eutectic alloy of gold and silicon, Au/3.15Si, as the lasant. It was observed that, at low input power operation, the presence of the silicon vapour could increase the output of the 627.8 nm laser line by (50-60)% when compared with a gold vapour laser (GVL) which uses pure gold as the lasant. The improved laser output for the EGVL may be explained by an increased electron density, as a result of Penning ionization of silicon atoms. However, for higher input power operation, the EGVL showed a slower rate of increase in its laser output power and was overtaken by GVLs at a tube operating temperature of around 1650°C. This may be explained by a lowering of the electron temperature owing to increasing inelastic collisions between the electrons and silicon atoms which, although excited, may not produce additional electrons.

  2. Light propagation through atomic vapours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddons, Paul

    2014-05-01

    This tutorial presents the theory necessary to model the propagation of light through an atomic vapour. The history of atom-light interaction theories is reviewed, and examples of resulting applications are provided. A numerical model is developed and results presented. Analytic solutions to the theory are found, based on approximations to the numerical work. These solutions are found to be in excellent agreement with experimental measurements.

  3. Metal Vapour Lasers: Physics, Engineering and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Little, Christopher E.

    1999-03-01

    Metal Vapour Lasers Christopher E. Little University of St Andrews, St Andrews, Scotland Since the first successful demonstration of a metal vapour laser (MVL) in 1962, this class of laser has become widely used in a broad range of fields including precision materials processing, isotope separation and medicine. The MVLs that are used today have a range of impressive characteristics that are not readily available using other technologies. In particular, the combination of high average output powers, pulse recurrence frequencies and beam quality available from green/yellow Cu vapour lasers (CVLs) and Cu bromide lasers, coupled with the high-quality, multiwatt ultraviolet (265-289 nm) radiation that can be produced using simple nonlinear optical techniques, means that Cu lasers will continue to be important for many years. Metal Vapour Lasers covers all the most commercially important and scientifically interesting pulsed and continuous wave (CW) gas-discharge MVLs, and includes device histories, operating characteristics, engineering, kinetics, commercial exploitation and applications. Short descriptions of gas discharges and excitation techniques make this volume self-consistent. A comprehensive bibliography is also provided. The greater part of this book is devoted to CVLs and their variants, including new sealed-off, high-power 'kinetically enhanced' CVLs and Cu bromide lasers. However, many other self-terminating MVLs are also discussed, including the red AuVL, green/infrared MnVL and infrared BaVL. Pulsed, high-gain, high average power lasers in the UV/violet (373.7, 430.5 nm) spectral regions are represented by Sr¯+ and Ca¯+ discharge-afterglow recombination lasers. The most commercially successful of the MVLs - the CW, UV/blue cataphoretic He-Cd¯+ ion laser - is described. Hollow cathode lasers are represented in two guises: 'white light' (blue/green/red) He-Cd¯+ ion lasers and UV/infrared Ne/He-Cu¯+ ion lasers. This unique volume is an

  4. Collisional thulium vapour gas-discharge laser

    SciTech Connect

    Gerasimov, V A; Pavlinskii, A V

    2004-01-31

    A collisional laser on a system of atomic levels based on the principle proposed by Gould is built for the first time. The population of the upper laser level and relaxation of the lower level occur upon inelastic collisions of excited thulium atoms with helium atoms. The lower-level relaxation occurs in a reaction with an energy defect of > 13000 cm{sup -1}. (active media. lasers)

  5. Resonance laser-induced ionisation of sodium vapour taking radiative transfer into account

    SciTech Connect

    Kosarev, N I; Shaparev, N Ya

    2006-04-30

    The problem of ionisation of atomic sodium in the field of resonance laser radiation is numerically solved taking radiative transfer into account. Seed electrons are produced due to the mechanism of associative ionisation, then they gain energy in superelastic processes (collisions of the second kind) and initiate the avalanche ionisation of the medium by electron impact. We studied the effect of secondary radiation on the laser pulse propagation upon competition between the ionising and quenching electron collisions with excited atoms, on the kinetics of ionisation-induced vapour bleaching, and the plasma channel expansion in the form of a halo. (interaction of laser radiation with matter)

  6. Infrared Laser Optoacoustic Detection Of Gases And Vapours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, S. A.; Cummins, P. G.; Bone, S. A.; Davies, P. B.

    1988-10-01

    Mid-infrared laser optoacoustic spectroscopy has been used to detect a variety of gases and vapours. Performance was calibrated using the signal from a known concentration of ethene, and then the method applied to the perfume alcohol geraniol. Detection limits were found to be 1 ppb for ethene and 70 ppb for geraniol on their strongest absorption lines for a few seconds measurement time.

  7. Optimal repetition rates of excitation pulses in a Tm-vapour laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerasimov, V. A.; Gerasimov, V. V.; Pavlinskii, A. V.

    2011-01-01

    The optimal excitation pulse repetition rates (PRRs) for a gas-discharge Tm-vapour laser with indirect population of upper laser levels are determined. It is shown that, under the same excitation conditions, the optimal PRRs increase with a decrease in the energy defect between the upper laser acceptor level and the nearest resonant donor level. The reasons for the limitation of the optimal PRRs in Tm-vapour laser are discussed. It is shown that the maximum average power of Tm-vapour laser radiation may exceed several times the Cu-vapour laser power under the same excitation conditions and in identical gas-discharge tubes.

  8. The Development Of Gold And Copper Vapour Lasers For Medical Applications In Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanco, Alex

    1987-04-01

    The first fully automated mobile copper and gold vapour lasers for medical applications were developed in Australia. The history of this development program is presented in this paper. These lasers have been tested in several clinical programs and success with the gold vapour laser in cancer phototherapy using HpD has been achieved in various types of tumours. Trials have commenced on the use of the 578 nm yellow line of the copper vapour laser for dermatology and plastic surgery.

  9. Experimental study of multipass copper vapour laser amplifiers

    SciTech Connect

    Karpukhin, Vyacheslav T; Malikov, Mikhail M

    2008-12-31

    Repetitively pulsed multipass copper vapour amplifiers are studied experimentally. A considerable increase in the peak power of laser pulses was achieved by using a special scheme of the amplifier. It is found that the main reasons preventing an increase in the peak power during many passages of the beam are the competitive development of lasing from spontaneous seeds in a parasitic resonator formed by the fold mirrors of a multipass amplifier, a decrease in the amplification during the last passages, and an increase in the pulse width at the amplifier output. (lasers. amplifiers)

  10. Laser-Atomic Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jau, Yuan-Yu; Happer, William

    2008-05-01

    We report a newly developed technique, laser-atomic oscillator, for simultaneously generating stable optical and electrical modulations with a very few components. It requires only a semiconductor laser, a vapor cell, and a few optical components. No photodetector and electronic feedback are needed. In this new system, the ground-state hyperfine coherence of alkali-metal atoms is spontaneously generated. The modulated laser light with a spectrum of a small optical comb is automatically produced, and the spacing between the comb peaks is photonically locked to the hyperfine frequency. The charge carriers in the semiconductor laser are also modulated at the hyperfine frequency. Laser-atomic oscillator is purely optical. Its simple structure allows the system to be very compact. We believe this new technique will bring some advantages in the applications of atomic chronometry, atomic magnetometry, and generation of multi-coherent light.

  11. Metal atom oxidation laser

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-10-28

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides.

  12. Metal atom oxidation laser

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, R.J.; Rice, W.W.; Beattie, W.H.

    1975-10-28

    A chemical laser which operates by formation of metal or carbon atoms and reaction of such atoms with a gaseous oxidizer in an optical resonant cavity is described. The lasing species are diatomic or polyatomic in nature and are readily produced by exchange or other abstraction reactions between the metal or carbon atoms and the oxidizer. The lasing molecules may be metal or carbon monohalides or monoxides. (auth)

  13. High-power metal halide vapour lasers oscillating in deep ultraviolet, visible and middle infrared spectral ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temelkov, K. A.; Slaveeva, S. I.; Kirilov, V. I.; Kostadinov, I. K.; Vuchkov, N. K.

    2012-05-01

    Middle infrared and deep ultraviolet high-power high-beam-quality stable-operating He-SrBr2 and Cu+ Ne-CuBr lasers excited in nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge are developed, patented and studied. Optimal discharge conditions, such as active zone diameter, vapour pressure, buffer-gas pressure, electrical excitation scheme parameters, average input power and pulse repetition frequency, are found. The highest output laser parameters are obtained for the Sr atom and Cu+ lasers, respectively. These lasers equipped with optical systems for the control of laser radiation parameters are used in a large variety of applications, such as precise material microprocessing, including biological tissues, determination of linear optical properties of different newly developed materials, laser-induced modification of conductive polymers and laser-induced fluorescence in wide-gap semiconductors, instead of free electron and excimer lasers, respectively. A master oscillator-power amplifier system, which is based on a high-beam-quality high-power CuBr vapour laser and is equipped with an optic system for laser beam control and with the X-Y stage controlled by adequate software as well, is developed and used in high-precision micromachining of samples made of nickel and tool steel.

  14. Pulsed atomic soliton laser

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, L.D.; Brand, J.

    2004-09-01

    It is shown that simultaneously changing the scattering length of an elongated, harmonically trapped Bose-Einstein condensate from positive to negative and inverting the axial portion of the trap, so that it becomes expulsive, results in a train of self-coherent solitonic pulses. Each pulse is itself a nondispersive attractive Bose-Einstein condensate that rapidly self-cools. The axial trap functions as a waveguide. The solitons can be made robustly stable with the right choice of trap geometry, number of atoms, and interaction strength. Theoretical and numerical evidence suggests that such a pulsed atomic soliton laser can be made in present experiments.

  15. Application of copper vapour lasers for controlling activity of uranium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Barmina, E V; Sukhov, I A; Lepekhin, N M; Priseko, Yu S; Filippov, V G; Simakin, Aleksandr V; Shafeev, Georgii A

    2013-06-30

    Beryllium nanoparticles are generated upon ablation of a beryllium target in water by a copper vapour laser. The average size of single crystalline nanoparticles is 12 nm. Ablation of a beryllium target in aqueous solutions of uranyl chloride leads to a significant (up to 50 %) decrease in the gamma activity of radionuclides of the uranium-238 and uranium-235 series. Data on the recovery of the gamma activity of these nuclides to new steady-state values after laser irradiation are obtained. The possibility of application of copper vapour lasers for radioactive waste deactivation is discussed. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  16. Application of copper vapour lasers for controlling activity of uranium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmina, E. V.; Sukhov, I. A.; Lepekhin, N. M.; Priseko, Yu S.; Filippov, V. G.; Simakin, Aleksandr V.; Shafeev, Georgii A.

    2013-06-01

    Beryllium nanoparticles are generated upon ablation of a beryllium target in water by a copper vapour laser. The average size of single crystalline nanoparticles is 12 nm. Ablation of a beryllium target in aqueous solutions of uranyl chloride leads to a significant (up to 50 %) decrease in the gamma activity of radionuclides of the uranium-238 and uranium-235 series. Data on the recovery of the gamma activity of these nuclides to new steady-state values after laser irradiation are obtained. The possibility of application of copper vapour lasers for radioactive waste deactivation is discussed.

  17. Lasers, Understanding the Atom Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hellman, Hal

    This booklet is one of the booklets in the "Understanding the Atom Series" published by the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission for high school science teachers and their students. Basic information for understanding the laser is provided including discussion of the electromagnetic spectrum, radio waves, light and the atom, coherent light, controlled…

  18. Atomic-scale Studies of Uranium Oxidation and Corrosion by Water Vapour

    PubMed Central

    Martin, T. L.; Coe, C.; Bagot, P. A. J.; Morrall, P.; Smith, G. D. W; Scott, T.; Moody, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the corrosion of uranium is important for its safe, long-term storage. Uranium metal corrodes rapidly in air, but the exact mechanism remains subject to debate. Atom Probe Tomography was used to investigate the surface microstructure of metallic depleted uranium specimens following polishing and exposure to moist air. A complex, corrugated metal-oxide interface was observed, with approximately 60 at.% oxygen content within the oxide. Interestingly, a very thin (~5 nm) interfacial layer of uranium hydride was observed at the oxide-metal interface. Exposure to deuterated water vapour produced an equivalent deuteride signal at the metal-oxide interface, confirming the hydride as originating via the water vapour oxidation mechanism. Hydroxide ions were detected uniformly throughout the oxide, yet showed reduced prominence at the metal interface. These results support a proposed mechanism for the oxidation of uranium in water vapour environments where the transport of hydroxyl species and the formation of hydride are key to understanding the observed behaviour. PMID:27403638

  19. Atomic-scale Studies of Uranium Oxidation and Corrosion by Water Vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, T. L.; Coe, C.; Bagot, P. A. J.; Morrall, P.; Smith, G. D. W.; Scott, T.; Moody, M. P.

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the corrosion of uranium is important for its safe, long-term storage. Uranium metal corrodes rapidly in air, but the exact mechanism remains subject to debate. Atom Probe Tomography was used to investigate the surface microstructure of metallic depleted uranium specimens following polishing and exposure to moist air. A complex, corrugated metal-oxide interface was observed, with approximately 60 at.% oxygen content within the oxide. Interestingly, a very thin (~5 nm) interfacial layer of uranium hydride was observed at the oxide-metal interface. Exposure to deuterated water vapour produced an equivalent deuteride signal at the metal-oxide interface, confirming the hydride as originating via the water vapour oxidation mechanism. Hydroxide ions were detected uniformly throughout the oxide, yet showed reduced prominence at the metal interface. These results support a proposed mechanism for the oxidation of uranium in water vapour environments where the transport of hydroxyl species and the formation of hydride are key to understanding the observed behaviour.

  20. Atomic-scale Studies of Uranium Oxidation and Corrosion by Water Vapour.

    PubMed

    Martin, T L; Coe, C; Bagot, P A J; Morrall, P; Smith, G D W; Scott, T; Moody, M P

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the corrosion of uranium is important for its safe, long-term storage. Uranium metal corrodes rapidly in air, but the exact mechanism remains subject to debate. Atom Probe Tomography was used to investigate the surface microstructure of metallic depleted uranium specimens following polishing and exposure to moist air. A complex, corrugated metal-oxide interface was observed, with approximately 60 at.% oxygen content within the oxide. Interestingly, a very thin (~5 nm) interfacial layer of uranium hydride was observed at the oxide-metal interface. Exposure to deuterated water vapour produced an equivalent deuteride signal at the metal-oxide interface, confirming the hydride as originating via the water vapour oxidation mechanism. Hydroxide ions were detected uniformly throughout the oxide, yet showed reduced prominence at the metal interface. These results support a proposed mechanism for the oxidation of uranium in water vapour environments where the transport of hydroxyl species and the formation of hydride are key to understanding the observed behaviour. PMID:27403638

  1. A simple method for experimental determination of electron temperature and electron density in a nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge used for excitation of high-power atomic and ionic metal and metal halide vapour lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temelkov, K. A.; Vuchkov, N. K.

    2016-05-01

    A simple method based on the time-resolved measurement of electrical discharge parameters, such as tube voltage and discharge current, is developed and applied for determination of electron temperature and electron density in the discharge period of a nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge, exciting high-power DUV Cu+ Ne-CuBr, He-Hg+ and He-Sr+ lasers.

  2. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation process

    DOEpatents

    Wyeth, R.W.; Paisner, J.A.; Story, T.

    1990-08-21

    A laser spectroscopy system is utilized in an atomic vapor laser isotope separation process. The system determines spectral components of an atomic vapor utilizing a laser heterodyne technique. 23 figs.

  3. Comparative laser performances of pyrromethene 567 and rhodamine 6G dyes in copper vapour laser pumped dye lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, A. K.; Kundu, S.; Sasikumar, S.; Rao, C. S.; Mula, S.; Sinha, S.; Dasgupta, K.

    2007-05-01

    Narrowband laser performances and photochemical stability of alcoholic solutions of pyrromethene 567 and rhodamine 6G dyes, under high-repetition rate copper vapour laser (at 510 nm), as well as, high-peak intensity Nd:YAG laser (at 532 nm) excitation have been investigated. We have observed that pyrromethene 567 dye solutions offer higher efficiency, wider tuning range, but lower photochemical stability and higher lasing threshold than that of rhodamine 6G dye solutions. An addition of about 100 mM DABCO, as a singlet oxygen quencher, in pyrromethene 567 dye solutions improved its photochemical stability close to that of rhodamine 6G. The observation of higher slope efficiency, in spite of higher threshold pump energy for pyrromethene 567 dye than that of rhodamine 6G dye solutions, was explained by a predictive model on gain characteristics of both dye solutions as a function of pump energy.

  4. Compact atomic clocks and stabilised laser for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mileti, Gaetano; Affolderbach, Christoph; Matthey-de-l'Endroit, Renaud

    2016-07-01

    We present our developments towards next generation compact vapour-cell based atomic frequency standards using a tunable laser diode instead of a traditional discharge lamp. The realisation of two types of Rubidium clocks addressing specific applications is in progress: high performance frequency standards for demanding applications such as satellite navigation, and chip-scale atomic clocks, allowing further miniaturisation of the system. The stabilised laser source constitutes the main technological novelty of these new standards, allowing a more efficient preparation and interrogation of the atoms and hence an improvement of the clock performances. However, before this key component may be employed in a commercial and ultimately in a space-qualified instrument, further studies are necessary to demonstrate their suitability, in particular concerning their reliability and long-term operation. The talk will present our preliminary investigations on this subject. The stabilised laser diode technology developed for our atomic clocks has several other applications on ground and in space. We will conclude our talk by illustrating this for the example of a recently completed ESA project on a 1.6 microns wavelength reference for a future space-borne Lidar. This source is based on a Rubidium vapour cell providing the necessary stability and accuracy, while a second harmonic generator and a compact optical comb generated from an electro-optic modulator allow to transfer these properties from the Rubidium wavelength (780nm) to the desired spectral range.

  5. Investigation of the vapour-plasma plume in the welding of titanium by high-power ytterbium fibre laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bykovskiy, D. P.; Petrovskii, V. N.; Uspenskiy, S. A.

    2015-03-01

    The vapour-plasma plume produced in the welding of 6-mm thick VT-23 titanium alloy plates by ytterbium fibre laser radiation of up to 10 kW power is studied in the protective Ar gas medium. High-speed video filming of the vapour-plasma plume is used to visualise the processes occurring during laser welding. The coefficient of inverse bremsstrahlung by the welding plasma plume is calculated from the data of the spectrometric study.

  6. Detection of metal vapour in the high-current phase of a pseudospark switch by resonance absorption of laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lins, Günter; Verleger, Jobst

    1996-03-01

    The electron emission mechanism which is active at the cathode of a pseudospark switch leads to thermal overloading of emission sites followed by the evaporation of cathode material. As a consequence, metal vapour should be present very shortly after the beginning of current flow. However, it has never been possible to observe metal vapour by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) prior to the cessation of current. In the present work resonance absorption of laser light was used to detect molybdenum vapour from the cathode during the high-current phase of a pseudospark switch. To observe the narrow-band absorption the laser light which had passed the switch was introduced into a molybdenum hollow cathode lamp where it caused fluorescence from molybdenum vapour. The intensity of the fluorescence light from the hollow cathode lamp was proportional to the intensity of the laser light left after the absorption process in the pseudospark. For a current amplitude of 12 kA and a pulse duration of 0022-3727/29/3/040/img1, it is shown that molybdenum vapour is definitely present shortly after the current maximum, well before the current stops flowing. The neutral vapour density in the high-current phase is estimated to amount to at least 0022-3727/29/3/040/img2. It is concluded that LIF fails to detect metal vapour prior to the cessation of current, mainly because the fluorescence process is severely disturbed by electronic collisions which deplete the upper fluorescence level.

  7. Thin film semiconductor nanomaterials and nanostructures prepared by physical vapour deposition: An atomic force microscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesheva, D.; Petrova, A.; Stavrev, S.; Levi, Z.; Aneva, Z.

    2007-05-01

    Amorphous/nanocrystalline SiOx/CdSe, GeS2/CdSe, SiOx/ZnSe and Se/CdSe amorphous multilayers (MLs) were grown by consecutive physical vapour deposition of the constituent materials at room substrate temperature. A step-by-step manner of deposition was applied for the preparation of each layer (2 10nm thick) of MLs. Surface morphology has been investigated by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in order to get information about ML interfaces. For a scanned area of 3.4×4μmSiOx/CdSe and GeS2/CdSe MLs showed surface roughness which is around three times greater than the roughness of SiOx/ZnSe MLs. This observation has been connected with effects of both film composition and deposition rate. For a scanned area of 250×250nm the roughness determined in all MLs displayed close values and a similar increase with the ML period. The latter has been related to the flexible structure of amorphous materials. The AFM results, in good agreement with previous X-ray diffraction and high resolution electron microscopy data, indicate that the application of step-by-step physical vapour deposition makes possible fabrication of various amorphous/nanocrystalline MLs with smooth interfaces and good artificial periodicity at low substrate temperatures.

  8. Legal requirements and guidelines for the control of harmful laser generated particles, vapours and gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsey, John

    2015-07-01

    This paper is a review of the Health and Safety laws and guidelines relating to laser generated emissions into the workplace and outside environment with emphasis on the differences between legal requirements and guideline advice. The types and nature of contaminants released by various laser processes (i.e. cutting, coding, engraving, marking etc) are discussed, together with the best methods for controlling them to within legal exposure limits. A brief description of the main extract air filtration techniques, including the principles of particulate removal and the action of activated carbon for gas/vapour/odour filtration, is given.

  9. Laser spectroscopy of sputtered atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gruen, D.M.; Pellin, M.J.; Young, C.E.; Calaway, W.F.

    1985-01-01

    The use of laser radiation to study the sputtering process is of relatively recent origin. Much has been learned from this work about the basic physics of the sputtering process itself through measurements of velocity and excited state distributions of sputtered atoms and the effects of adsorbates on substrate sputtering yields. Furthermore, the identification, characterization, and sensitive detection of sputtered atoms by laser spectroscopy has led to the development of in situ diagnostics for impurity fluxes in the plasma edge regions of tokamaks and of ultrasensitive methods (ppB Fe in Si) for surface analysis with ultralow (picocoulomb) ion fluences. The techniques involved in this work, laser fluorescence and multiphoton resonance ionization spectroscopy, will be described and illustrations given of results achieved up to now. 55 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Laser trapping of radioactive atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Freedman, S.J.

    1995-04-01

    The capability of manipulating neutral atoms with the force of resonant scattered laser light is being exploited in several different areas of research. The author discusses applications in particle and nuclear physics by expediting some measurements of the subtle effects of the fundamental weak interaction in atoms and nuclei. It was shown in two recent experiments that it is possible to efficiently cool accelerator produced short-lived isotopes and load them into magneto-optic traps. These demonstrations open up new possibilities for obtaining the required precision in experiments involving rare radioactive isotopes.

  11. Wavelength-tunable sources of entangled photons interfaced with atomic vapours

    PubMed Central

    Trotta, Rinaldo; Martín-Sánchez, Javier; Wildmann, Johannes S.; Piredda, Giovanni; Reindl, Marcus; Schimpf, Christian; Zallo, Eugenio; Stroj, Sandra; Edlinger, Johannes; Rastelli, Armando

    2016-01-01

    The prospect of using the quantum nature of light for secure communication keeps spurring the search and investigation of suitable sources of entangled photons. A single semiconductor quantum dot is one of the most attractive, as it can generate indistinguishable entangled photons deterministically and is compatible with current photonic-integration technologies. However, the lack of control over the energy of the entangled photons is hampering the exploitation of dissimilar quantum dots in protocols requiring the teleportation of quantum entanglement over remote locations. Here we introduce quantum dot-based sources of polarization-entangled photons whose energy can be tuned via three-directional strain engineering without degrading the degree of entanglement of the photon pairs. As a test-bench for quantum communication, we interface quantum dots with clouds of atomic vapours, and we demonstrate slow-entangled photons from a single quantum emitter. These results pave the way towards the implementation of hybrid quantum networks where entanglement is distributed among distant parties using optoelectronic devices. PMID:26815609

  12. Wavelength-tunable sources of entangled photons interfaced with atomic vapours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trotta, Rinaldo; Martín-Sánchez, Javier; Wildmann, Johannes S.; Piredda, Giovanni; Reindl, Marcus; Schimpf, Christian; Zallo, Eugenio; Stroj, Sandra; Edlinger, Johannes; Rastelli, Armando

    2016-01-01

    The prospect of using the quantum nature of light for secure communication keeps spurring the search and investigation of suitable sources of entangled photons. A single semiconductor quantum dot is one of the most attractive, as it can generate indistinguishable entangled photons deterministically and is compatible with current photonic-integration technologies. However, the lack of control over the energy of the entangled photons is hampering the exploitation of dissimilar quantum dots in protocols requiring the teleportation of quantum entanglement over remote locations. Here we introduce quantum dot-based sources of polarization-entangled photons whose energy can be tuned via three-directional strain engineering without degrading the degree of entanglement of the photon pairs. As a test-bench for quantum communication, we interface quantum dots with clouds of atomic vapours, and we demonstrate slow-entangled photons from a single quantum emitter. These results pave the way towards the implementation of hybrid quantum networks where entanglement is distributed among distant parties using optoelectronic devices.

  13. Wavelength-tunable sources of entangled photons interfaced with atomic vapours.

    PubMed

    Trotta, Rinaldo; Martín-Sánchez, Javier; Wildmann, Johannes S; Piredda, Giovanni; Reindl, Marcus; Schimpf, Christian; Zallo, Eugenio; Stroj, Sandra; Edlinger, Johannes; Rastelli, Armando

    2016-01-01

    The prospect of using the quantum nature of light for secure communication keeps spurring the search and investigation of suitable sources of entangled photons. A single semiconductor quantum dot is one of the most attractive, as it can generate indistinguishable entangled photons deterministically and is compatible with current photonic-integration technologies. However, the lack of control over the energy of the entangled photons is hampering the exploitation of dissimilar quantum dots in protocols requiring the teleportation of quantum entanglement over remote locations. Here we introduce quantum dot-based sources of polarization-entangled photons whose energy can be tuned via three-directional strain engineering without degrading the degree of entanglement of the photon pairs. As a test-bench for quantum communication, we interface quantum dots with clouds of atomic vapours, and we demonstrate slow-entangled photons from a single quantum emitter. These results pave the way towards the implementation of hybrid quantum networks where entanglement is distributed among distant parties using optoelectronic devices. PMID:26815609

  14. Atom Skimmers and Atom Lasers Utilizing Them

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hulet, Randall; Tollett, Jeff; Franke, Kurt; Moss, Steve; Sackett, Charles; Gerton, Jordan; Ghaffari, Bita; McAlexander, W.; Strecker, K.; Homan, D.

    2005-01-01

    Atom skimmers are devices that act as low-pass velocity filters for atoms in thermal atomic beams. An atom skimmer operating in conjunction with a suitable thermal atomic-beam source (e.g., an oven in which cesium is heated) can serve as a source of slow atoms for a magneto-optical trap or other apparatus in an atomic-physics experiment. Phenomena that are studied in such apparatuses include Bose-Einstein condensation of atomic gases, spectra of trapped atoms, and collisions of slowly moving atoms. An atom skimmer includes a curved, low-thermal-conduction tube that leads from the outlet of a thermal atomic-beam source to the inlet of a magneto-optical trap or other device in which the selected low-velocity atoms are to be used. Permanent rare-earth magnets are placed around the tube in a yoke of high-magnetic-permeability material to establish a quadrupole or octupole magnetic field leading from the source to the trap. The atoms are attracted to the locus of minimum magnetic-field intensity in the middle of the tube, and the gradient of the magnetic field provides centripetal force that guides the atoms around the curve along the axis of the tube. The threshold velocity for guiding is dictated by the gradient of the magnetic field and the radius of curvature of the tube. Atoms moving at lesser velocities are successfully guided; faster atoms strike the tube wall and are lost from the beam.

  15. Comparison of laser-ablation and hot-wall chemical vapour deposition techniques for nanowire fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, E.; Cheng, G.; Guthrie, S.; Turner-Evans, D.; Broomfield, E.; Lei, B.; Li, C.; Zhang, D.; Zhou, C.; Reed, M. A.

    2006-06-01

    A comparison of the transport properties of populations of single-crystal, In2O3 nanowires (NWs) grown by unassisted hot-wall chemical vapour deposition (CVD) versus NWs grown by laser-ablation-assisted chemical vapour deposition (LA-CVD) is presented. For nominally identical growth conditions across the two systems, NWs fabricated at 850 °C with laser-ablation had significantly higher average mobilities at the 99.9% confidence level, 53.3 ± 5.8 cm2 V-1 s-1 versus 10.2 ± 1.9 cm2 V-1 s-1. It is also observed that increasing growth temperature decreases mobility for LA-CVD NWs. Transmission electron microscopy studies of CVD-fabricated samples indicate the presence of an amorphous In2O3 region surrounding the single-crystal core. Further, low-temperature measurements verify the presence of ionized impurity scattering in low-mobility CVD-grown NWs.

  16. A simple laser system for atom interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merlet, S.; Volodimer, L.; Lours, M.; Pereira Dos Santos, F.

    2014-07-01

    We present here a simple laser system for a laser-cooled atom interferometer, where all functions (laser cooling, interferometry and detection) are realized using only two extended cavity laser diodes, amplified by a common tapered amplifier. One laser is locked by frequency modulation transfer spectroscopy, the other being phase locked with an offset frequency determined by an field-programmable gate array-controlled direct digital synthesizer, which allows for efficient and versatile tuning of the laser frequency. Raman lasers are obtained with a double pass acoustooptic modulator. We demonstrate a gravimeter using this laser system, with performances close to the state of the art.

  17. Beam Quality of a Nonideal Atom Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Riou, J.-F.; Guerin, W.; Le Coq, Y.; Fauquembergue, M.; Josse, V.; Bouyer, P.; Aspect, A.

    2006-02-24

    We study the propagation of a noninteracting atom laser distorted by the strong lensing effect of the Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) from which it is outcoupled. We observe a transverse structure containing caustics that vary with the density within the residing BEC. Using the WKB approximation, Fresnel-Kirchhoff integral formalism, and ABCD matrices, we are able to describe analytically the atom-laser propagation. This allows us to characterize the quality of the nonideal atom-laser beam by a generalized M{sup 2} factor defined in analogy to photon lasers. Finally we measure this quality factor for different lensing effects.

  18. Push-Pull Laser-Atomic Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jau, Y.-Y.; Happer, W.

    2007-11-01

    A vapor of alkali-metal atoms in the external cavity of a semiconductor laser, pumped with a time-independent injection current, can cause the laser to self-modulate at the “field-independent 0-0 frequency” of the atoms. Push-pull optical pumping by the modulated light drives most of the atoms into a coherent superposition of the two atomic sublevels with an azimuthal quantum number m=0. The atoms modulate the optical loss of the cavity at the sharply defined 0-0 hyperfine frequency. As in a maser, the system is not driven by an external source of microwaves, but a very stable microwave signal can be recovered from the modulated light or from the modulated voltage drop across the laser diode. Potential applications for this new phenomenon include atomic clocks, the production of long-lived coherent atomic states, and the generation of coherent optical combs.

  19. Push-Pull Laser-Atomic Oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Jau, Y.-Y.; Happer, W.

    2007-11-30

    A vapor of alkali-metal atoms in the external cavity of a semiconductor laser, pumped with a time-independent injection current, can cause the laser to self-modulate at the 'field-independent 0-0 frequency' of the atoms. Push-pull optical pumping by the modulated light drives most of the atoms into a coherent superposition of the two atomic sublevels with an azimuthal quantum number m=0. The atoms modulate the optical loss of the cavity at the sharply defined 0-0 hyperfine frequency. As in a maser, the system is not driven by an external source of microwaves, but a very stable microwave signal can be recovered from the modulated light or from the modulated voltage drop across the laser diode. Potential applications for this new phenomenon include atomic clocks, the production of long-lived coherent atomic states, and the generation of coherent optical combs.

  20. REVIEW ARTICLE: Optical pumping-induced spatio-temporal modifications to propagation, polarization and intensity of laser beams in sodium vapour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzner, R.; Dangel, S.

    1998-02-01

    Circularly polarized laser beams propagating through sodium vapour and tuned to the buffer-gas-broadened atomic 1355-5111/10/1/003/img1 transition can optically pump sodium atoms into a non-absorbing ground state. This causes an intensity-dependent refractive index gradient along as well as transverse to the laser beam propagation direction, giving rise to a number of nonlinear spatio-temporal intensity and polarization pattern creating processes. In the case of a single circularly polarized laser beam we have observed self-focusing and defocusing, the transformation of the incident Gaussian beam intensity profiles into ring profiles, a large shift of about 5 GHz of the maximum of the absorption profile when suitable magnetic fields are applied and the deflection of a beam by the inhomogeneous transverse magnetic field of a current-carrying wire. When two beams of opposite circular polarization are superimposed, astonishing effects such as the mutual deflection of both beams (beam bouncing), the mutual extinction of both beams (beam switching), the separation of initially overlapping beams (beam splitting) and the mutual attraction of both beams (beam attraction) can be observed. While most of the effects can be well described for the stationary state by a 1355-5111/10/1/003/img2 to 1355-5111/10/1/003/img3 atomic transition model, the correct description of the dynamics requires the consideration of all hyperfine states.

  1. Laser Spectroscopy of Atoms and Molecules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schawlow, Arthur L.

    1978-01-01

    Surveys new laser techniques and a variety of spectroscopic experiments that can be used to detect, measure and study very small numbers of atoms on molecules. The range of applicability of these techniques is also included. (HM)

  2. Laser Cooled Atomic Clocks in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, R. J.; Kohel, J.; Klipstein, W. M.; Seidel, D. J.; Maleki, L.

    2000-01-01

    The goals of the Glovebox Laser-cooled Atomic Clock Experiment (GLACE) are: (1) first utilization of tunable, frequency-stabilized lasers in space, (2) demonstrate laser cooling and trapping in microgravity, (3) demonstrate longest 'perturbation-free' interaction time for a precision measurement on neutral atoms, (4) Resolve Ramsey fringes 2-10 times narrower than achievable on Earth. The approach taken is: the use of COTS components, and the utilization of prototype hardware from LCAP flight definition experiments. The launch date is scheduled for Oct. 2002. The Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) specifications are reviewed, and a picture of the MSG is shown.

  3. Determination of total mercury in environmental and biological samples by flow injection cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, James; Jones, Phil; Hill, Steve J.

    1996-12-01

    A simple and accurate method has been developed for the determination of total mercury in environmental and biological samples. The method utilises an off-line microwave digestion stage followed by analysis using a flow injection system with detection by cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry. The method has been validated using two certified reference materials (DORM-1 dogfish and MESS-2 estuarine sediment) and the results agreed well with the certified values. A detection limit of 0.2 ng g -1 Hg was obtained and no significant interference was observed. The method was finally applied to the determination of mercury in river sediments and canned tuna fish, and gave results in the range 0.1-3.0 mg kg -1.

  4. Influence of the voltage pulse front shortening on the pulse repetition rate in a copper vapour laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bokhan, P A; Gugin, P P; Zakrevskii, D E; Lavrukhin, M A; Kazaryan, M A; Lyabin, N A

    2013-08-31

    The lasing characteristics of a copper vapour laser are investigated in the regime of a pulse train excited in the internalheating tube with the diameter of 2 cm and length of 48 cm. Two power supply schemes are compared: a conventional scheme with a storage capacitor discharged through a thyratron connected to a peaking capacitor and the scheme in which the peaking capacitor is connected to the laser active element through a kivotron – a fast switch based on the 'open discharge' with a turn-on time of less than 1 ns. It is shown that in the considered range of the pulse repetition rates f = 2 – 16 kHz in the first case we deal with a typical energy dependence on frequency having a maximum near 4 – 5 kHz. In the second case, the lasing energy is frequency-independent; hence, the average power in this range is proportional to f. The results obtained are explained by the neutralised influence of the initial electron concentration on energy characteristics of the copper vapour laser. (control of laser radiation parameters)

  5. Ramsey interferometry with an atom laser.

    PubMed

    Döring, D; Debs, J E; Robins, N P; Figl, C; Altin, P A; Close, J D

    2009-11-01

    We present results on a free-space atom interferometer operating on the first order magnetically insensitive |F = 1,mF = 0) --> |F = 2,mF = 0) ground state transition of Bose-condensed (87)Rb atoms. A pulsed atom laser is output-coupled from a Bose-Einstein condensate and propagates through a sequence of two internal state beam splitters, realized via coherent Raman transitions between the two interfering states. We observe Ramsey fringes with a visibility close to 100% and determine the current and the potentially achievable interferometric phase sensitivity. This system is well suited to testing recent proposals for generating and detecting squeezed atomic states. PMID:19997295

  6. Alkali--rare gas photodissociation lasers: Applications to laser physics and atom-atom interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitt, John Darby

    This dissertation describes several experiments in which alkali--rare gas laser systems are utilized as a simple platform with which to isolate and study atom-atom interactions and fundamental physical processes that are ill-understood or have never been investigated previously. Specifically, the minimum allowable energy separation between levels 2 and 3 in a three-level laser system has been investigated experimentally, as have two-photon absorption processes in atomic Rb and Cs.

  7. Conservation laws and laser cooling of atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliani, Giuseppe

    2015-11-01

    The straightforward application of energy and linear momentum conservation to the absorption/emission of photons by atoms allows us to establish the essential features of laser cooling of two level atoms at low laser intensities. The lowest attainable average kinetic energy of the atoms depends on the ratio {{Γ }}/{E}{{R}} between the natural linewidth and the recoil energy and tends to ER as {{Γ }}/{E}{{R}} tends to zero (in one dimension). This treatment, like the quantum mechanical ones, is valid for any value of the ratio {{Γ }}/{E}{{R}} and contains the semiclassical theory of laser cooling as the limiting case in which {E}{{R}}\\ll {{Γ }}.

  8. Laser trapping of {sup 21}Na atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Zheng-Tian

    1994-09-01

    This thesis describes an experiment in which about four thousand radioactive {sup 21}Na (t{sub l/2} = 22 sec) atoms were trapped in a magneto-optical trap with laser beams. Trapped {sup 21}Na atoms can be used as a beta source in a precision measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter of the decay of {sup 21}Na {yields} {sup 21}Ne + {Beta}{sup +} + v{sub e}, which is a promising way to search for an anomalous right-handed current coupling in charged weak interactions. Although the number o trapped atoms that we have achieved is still about two orders of magnitude lower than what is needed to conduct a measurement of the beta-asymmetry parameter at 1% of precision level, the result of this experiment proved the feasibility of trapping short-lived radioactive atoms. In this experiment, {sup 21}Na atoms were produced by bombarding {sup 24}Mg with protons of 25 MeV at the 88 in. Cyclotron of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. A few recently developed techniques of laser manipulation of neutral atoms were applied in this experiment. The {sup 21}Na atoms emerging from a heated oven were first transversely cooled. As a result, the on-axis atomic beam intensity was increased by a factor of 16. The atoms in the beam were then slowed down from thermal speed by applying Zeeman-tuned slowing technique, and subsequently loaded into a magneto-optical trap at the end of the slowing path. The last two chapters of this thesis present two studies on the magneto-optical trap of sodium atoms. In particular, the mechanisms of magneto-optical traps at various laser frequencies and the collisional loss mechanisms of these traps were examined.

  9. Prospects of laser cooling in atomic thallium

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Isaac; Chen, Tzu-Ling; Liu, Yu-Sheng; Lien, Yu-Hung; Liu, Yi-Wei; Shy, Jow-Tsong

    2011-10-15

    One of the most precisely determined upper limits for the electron electric dipole moment (EDM) is set by the thallium (Tl) atomic beam experiment. One way to enhance the sensitivity of the atomic beam setup is to laser cool the Tl atoms to reduce the EDM-like phase caused by the Exv effect. In this report, a cooling scheme based on the 6P{sub 3/2}(F=2){r_reversible}6D{sub 5/2}(F{sup '}=3) transition in Tl is proposed. The absolute frequency measurement of this nearly closed-cycle transition was performed in an atomic beam apparatus. Two Ti:sapphire lasers were frequency-doubled using enhancement cavities in X-type configurations to provide the needed 377- and 352-nm light sources for the optical pumping and cooling transitions, respectively. The absolute frequency of this cooling transition is determined to be 851 634 646(56) MHz.

  10. Stabilization of a laser on a large-detuned atomic-reference frequency by resonant interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barboza, Priscila M. T.; Nascimento, Guilherme G.; Araújo, Michelle O.; da Silva, Cícero M.; Cavalcante, Hugo L. D. de S.; Oriá, Marcos; Chevrollier, Martine; Passerat de Silans, Thierry

    2016-04-01

    We report a simple technique for stabilization of a laser frequency at the wings of an atomic resonance. The reference signal used for stabilization issues from interference effects obtained in a low-quality cavity filled with a resonant atomic vapour. For a frequency detuned 2.6 GHz from the 133Cs D2 6S{}1/2 F = 4 to 6P{}3/2 F’ = 5 transition, the fractional frequency Allan deviation is 10-8 for averaging times of 300 s, corresponding to a frequency deviation of 4 MHz. Adequate choice of the atomic density and of the cell thickness allows locking the laser at detunings larger than 10 GHz. Such a simple technique does not require magnetic fields or signal modulation.

  11. LASER COOLING: Pulsed filling of a dark magnetooptical trap for rubidium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapovskii, Pavel L.

    2006-03-01

    The parameters of a dark magnetooptical trap for rubidium atoms are measured. The rubidium atoms captured and cooled in the trap occupy a hyperfine level of the ground electronic state, which does not interact with cooling laser radiation. The pulsed filling of the trap is produced due to desorption of rubidium caused by irradiation by a short (1 ms) light pulse. The trap captures and cools 2.5×108 rubidium atoms approximately for 0.2 s. The absorption spectra of a weak probe field by cold atoms are obtained, which demonstrate a good spectral resolution of the hyperfine structure in the excited state. This structure is completely hidden by the Doppler broadening in rubidium vapours at room temperature.

  12. Detecting individual atoms and molecules with lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Letokhov, V.S.

    1988-09-01

    Resonance-ionization spectroscopy was developed by the author and his colleagues at the U.S.S.R. Academy of Sciences and, independently, by G. Samuel Husrst and his colleagues at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Resonance-ionization spectroscopy relies on lasers. Lasers having a set of chosen wavelengths can be exploited to detect a desired atom or molecule in a mixture. The wavelengths can be tuned to resonate with a set of characteristic wavelengths of the atom or molecule in such a way that the light ionized the atom or the molecule. Once ionized the atom or the molecular fragments will have a net electric charge and can be separated from the mixture by applying an electric field. The sensitivity of the technique suggests an entire range of applications. Investigators might explore the properties of short-lived radioactive nuclei. Or they could detect trace levels of impurities in otherwise pure elements. In practice a solitary rare atom in a sample containing as many as 10 to the 20th atoms of other elements has been registered. 8 figs.

  13. Atoms and Molecules in Strong Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullrich, Carsten A.; Bandrauk, André D.

    The interactions of superstrong and ultrashort laser pulses with atoms and molecules have been a subject of great interest over the past two decades, as reflected in many books and review articles. The beginning of the twenty-first century is witnessing the development of several large- and medium-scale experimental facilities dedicated to the generation of laser light with unprecedented capabilities. The frequency spectrum covered by these new light sources ranges from the infrared up to the extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray (produced in the FLASH free-electron laser facility at DESY). This calls for the development of new theoretical and computational tools to simulate laser-matter interactions at extreme conditions.

  14. Stable 85Rb micro vapour cells: fabrication based on anodic bonding and application in chip-scale atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Juan; Deng, Ke; Guo, Deng-Zhu; Wang, Zhong; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Geng-Min; Chen, Xu-Zong

    2010-11-01

    We describe the microfabrication of 85Rb vapour cells using a glass-silicon anodic bonding technique and in situ chemical reaction between rubidium chloride and barium azide to produce Rb. Under controlled conditions, the pure metallic Rb drops and buffer gases were obtained in the cells with a few mm3 internal volumes during the cell sealing process. At an ambient temperature of 90 °C the optical absorption resonance of 85Rb D1 transition with proper broadening and the corresponding coherent population trapping (CPT) resonance, with a signal contrast of 1.5% and linewidth of about 1.7 kHz, have been detected. The sealing quality and the stability of the cells have also been demonstrated experimentally by using the helium leaking detection and the after-9-month optoelectronics measurement which shows a similar CPT signal as its original status. In addition, the physics package of chip-scale atomic clock (CSAC) based on the cell was realized. The measured frequency stability of the physics package can reach to 2.1 × 10-10 at one second when the cell was heated to 100 °C which proved that the cell has the quality to be used in portable and battery-operated devices.

  15. Laser cooling and trapping of atomic mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Justin; Lytle, Christian; Jones, Jason

    2011-10-01

    The level structure of the Hg atom is similar to other alkaline earth-like atoms, offering the possibility to realize an extremely high quality resonance factor (Q) on the ``clock'' transition (^1S0- ^3P0) when confined in an optical lattice at the Stark-shift free wavelength. A key feature of the Hg system is the reduced uncertainty due to black-body induced Stark shifts, making it an interesting candidate as an optical frequency standard. For cooling on the ^1S0- ^3P1 transition at 253.7 nm, we employ an optically pumped semiconductor laser (OPSEL) operating at 1015 nm. The OPSEL frequency is quadrupled, generating over 120 mW at 253.7 nm. With this laser source we have trapped Hg^199 from a background vapor in a standard MOT. We trap up to 2 x 10^6 atoms with a 1/e^2 radius of our MOT of ˜310 microns, corresponding to a density of 1.28 x10^11 atoms/cm^3. Using the time- of-flight method, we have measured a doppler-limited temperature of 46μK for the MOT. We have also generated 10 mW at the 266 nm clock transition using a frequency-quadrupled fiber laser. This light will be referenced to an iodine standard for assisting in high-precision spectroscopy of the ^1S0- ^3P0 transition. We present updated results on the MOT and the probe laser system.

  16. Secondary laser cooling of strontium-88 atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Strelkin, S. A.; Khabarova, K. Yu. Galyshev, A. A.; Berdasov, O. I.; Gribov, A. Yu.; Kolachevsky, N. N.; Slyusarev, S. N.

    2015-07-15

    The secondary laser cooling of a cloud of strontium-88 atoms on the {sup 1}S{sub 0}–{sup 3}P{sub 1} (689 nm) intercombination transition captured into a magneto-optical trap has been demonstrated. We describe in detail the recapture of atoms from the primary trap operating on the strong {sup 1}S{sub 0}–{sup 1}P{sub 1} (461 nm) transition and determine the recapture coefficient κ, the number of atoms, and their temperature in the secondary trap as a function of experimental parameters. A temperature of 2 µK has been reached in the secondary trap at the recapture coefficient κ = 6%, which confirms the secondary cooling efficiency and is sufficient to perform metrological measurements of the {sup 1}S{sub 0}–{sup 3}P{sub 1} (698 nm) clock transition in an optical lattice.

  17. Design for a compact CW atom laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, Erik; Raithel, Georg

    2011-05-01

    We present a design for a compact continuous-wave atom laser on a chip. A 2D spiral-shaped quadrupole guide is formed by two 0.5 mm × 0.5 mm wires carrying 5 A each embedded in a Si wafer; a 1.5 mm × 0.5 mm wire on the bottom layer carries -10 A, producing a horizontal B-field that pushes the guiding channel center above the chip surface. The center-to-center separation between the top wires is varied from 1.6 mm at the start of the guide to 1 mm at the end, decreasing the guide height from ~ 500 μm to ~ 25 μm above the surface as the atoms travel the 70 cm-long guide. The magnetic gradient of the guiding channel gradually increases from ~ 100 G /cm to ~ 930 G /cm . These features result in continuous surface adsorption evaporative cooling and progressive magnetic compression. Spin flip losses are mitigated by a solenoid sewn around the guide to produce a longitudinal B-field. 87Rb atoms are gravitationally loaded into the guide. A far off-resonant light shift barrier at the end of the guide traps the atoms and allows formation of a BEC. Tuning the barrier height to create a non-zero tunneling rate equal to the loading rate completes the implementation of a CW atom laser. Two options for atom interferometry are implemented on the first-generation chip (matter-wave Fabry-Perot interferometer and guide-based Mach-Zehnder interferometer). Current construction status and challenges will be discussed, along with preliminary results.

  18. Method validation for the determination of total mercury in fish muscle by cold vapour atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nascimento Neto, A P; Costa, L C S Magalhães; Kikuchi, A N S; Furtado, D M S; Araujo, M Q; Melo, M C C

    2012-01-01

    A method was validated for the determination of total Hg in fish muscle using continuous flow cold vapour atomic absorption (CVAAS) after microwave digestion in closed vessels. The method was validated according to European Union Regulations 333/2007 and 657/2002, considering the maximum level for the metal in fish, established by European Union regulation 1881/2006. The procedure for determining linear range, selectivity, recovery, precision, trueness, decision limit (CCα), detection capability (CCβ), measurement uncertainty and robustness of the method is reported. The results of the validation process demonstrate the method fulfils the provisions of the Commission Regulation. The selectivity study indicated that there was no matrix effect on the calibration curve between the concentration range of 1.0 and 30.0 µg Hg l(-1). The mean recovery calculated at six levels of fortification was in the range of 94-104%. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) values were 4.90 and 15.7 µg kg(-1), while the CCα and CCβ values were 0.517 and 0.533 mg kg(-1), respectively, for the maximum contaminant level of 0.500 mg kg(-1). The relative expanded measurement uncertainty of the method was 0.055 mg kg(-1). The method was not affected by slight variations of some critical factors (ruggedness minor changes) as sample mass and volume of the HNO(3) and H(2)O(2) used in the digestion step. The method allowed accurate confirmation analyses of the CRM DORM 3. In fact, the Z-scores attained in a proficiency test round were well below the reference value of 2.0, proving the excellent performance of the laboratory. PMID:22250927

  19. Laser-induced etching of few-layer graphene synthesized by Rapid-Chemical Vapour Deposition on Cu thin films.

    PubMed

    Piazzi, Marco; Croin, Luca; Vittone, Ettore; Amato, Giampiero

    2012-12-01

    The outstanding electrical and mechanical properties of graphene make it very attractive for several applications, Nanoelectronics above all. However a reproducible and non destructive way to produce high quality, large-scale area, single layer graphene sheets is still lacking. Chemical Vapour Deposition of graphene on Cu catalytic thin films represents a promising method to reach this goal, because of the low temperatures (T < 950°C-1000°C) involved during the process and of the theoretically expected monolayer self-limiting growth. On the contrary such self-limiting growth is not commonly observed in experiments, thus making the development of techniques allowing for a better control of graphene growth highly desirable. Here we report about the local ablation effect, arising in Raman analysis, due to the heat transfer induced by the laser incident beam onto the graphene sample. PMID:23503582

  20. Gravitational Wave Detection with Single-Laser Atom Interferometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Nan; Tinto, Massimo

    2011-01-01

    A new design for a broadband detector of gravitational radiation relies on two atom interferometers separated by a distance L. In this scheme, only one arm and one laser are used for operating the two atom interferometers. The innovation here involves the fact that the atoms in the atom interferometers are not only considered as perfect test masses, but also as highly stable clocks. Atomic coherence is intrinsically stable, and can be many orders of magnitude more stable than a laser.

  1. Laser selective excitation of a three-level atom - Barium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlsten, J. L.

    1974-01-01

    Development of a theory describing the selective excitation of a three-level atom with a tunable laser. The effects of number density, line widths, and laser parameters on the final populations of the levels are discussed. An experiment is described in which a tunable dye laser is used to pump large numbers of barium atoms into a definite excited state.

  2. Dual-Beam Atom Laser Driven by Spinor Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Robert; Lundblad, Nathan; Maleki, Lute; Aveline, David

    2007-01-01

    An atom laser now undergoing development simultaneously generates two pulsed beams of correlated Rb-87 atoms. (An atom laser is a source of atoms in beams characterized by coherent matter waves, analogous to a conventional laser, which is a source of coherent light waves.) The pumping mechanism of this atom laser is based on spinor dynamics in a Bose-Einstein condensate. By virtue of the angular-momentum conserving collisions that generate the two beams, the number of atoms in one beam is correlated with the number of atoms in the other beam. Such correlations are intimately linked to entanglement and squeezing in atomic ensembles, and atom lasers like this one could be used in exploring related aspects of Bose-Einstein condensates, and as components of future sensors relying on atom interferometry. In this atom-laser apparatus, a Bose-Einstein condensate of about 2 x 10(exp 6) Rb-87 atoms at a temperature of about 120 micro-K is first formed through all-optical means in a relatively weak singlebeam running-wave dipole trap that has been formed by focusing of a CO2-laser beam. By a technique that is established in the art, the trap is loaded from an ultrahigh-vacuum magnetooptical trap that is, itself, loaded via a cold atomic beam from an upstream two-dimensional magneto-optical trap that resides in a rubidium-vapor cell that is differentially pumped from an adjoining vacuum chamber, wherein are performed scientific observations of the beams ultimately generated by the atom laser.

  3. A compact laser system for the cold atom gravimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiyu; Wang, Zhaoying; Fu, Zhijie; Liu, Weiyong; Lin, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    With the rapid development of the technologies in the field of laser cooling atoms, a portable and stable laser system is urgently required for the wide applications based on the cold atoms. In this paper, we report a modular laser system for a gravimeter based on atom interferometry, which enable us to realize high-precision gravity measurements outside of laboratory. The system is based on two distributed feedback (DFB) laser diodes of 1560 nm, which are used as the master laser and the reference laser respectively. The frequency of the reference laser is locked on a rubidium transition, the master laser is frequency locked on the reference one by the method of beat locking. The master laser is power amplified firstly by the erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA), and then frequency doubled by using a periodically poled lithium niobate (PPLN) crystal to obtain 1 W laser output at 780 nm. The repumping and Raman lasers are generated by adding an electro-optic modulation on the master laser, featuring extremely low phase noise. With this laser system, we obtain a cloud of 87Rb atoms with a temperature of 5 μKin a magneto-optical trapping. And a gravity resolution of 1.0 ×10-8 g within 200 s integration time is reached.

  4. Development of laser excited atomic fluorescence and ionization methods

    SciTech Connect

    Winefordner, J.D.

    1991-01-01

    Progress report: May 1, 1988 to December 31, 1991. The research supported by DE-FG05-88ER13881 during the past (nearly) 3 years can be divided into the following four categories: (1) theoretical considerations of the ultimate detection powers of laser fluorescence and laser ionization methods; (2) experimental evaluation of laser excited atomic fluorescence; (3) fundamental studies of atomic and molecular parameters in flames and plasmas; (4) other studies.

  5. Laser techniques for spectroscopy of core-excited atomic levels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, S. E.; Young, J. F.; Falcone, R. W.; Rothenberg, J. E.; Willison, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    We discuss three techniques which allow the use of tunable lasers for high resolution and picosecond time scale spectroscopy of core-excited atomic levels. These are: anti-Stokes absorption spectroscopy, laser induced emission from metastable levels, and laser designation of selected core-excited levels.

  6. Laser Methods in the Study of Nuclei, Atoms and Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamura, Takashi T.

    2005-01-01

    The VIth International Workshop on Application of Lasers in Atomic Nuclei Research was held at Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznan in Poland from May 24 to 27, 2004. Its title this year was "Laser methods in the study of nuclei, atoms and molecules". Some topics are reviewed from a viewpoint of the atomic physics contribution to nuclear physics and its applications. It is suggested how this meeting should be organized in the future by taking the new geopolitics into account.

  7. Pulsed laser measurements of particle and vapour concentrations in a turbulent jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, I. M.

    1989-10-01

    A turbulent jet of air has been seeded with both particles and a vapor. An excimer pumped dye laser excited visible fluorescence from the biacetyl vapor and Mie scattering from the micron-size particles. It was possible to measure the simultaneous scatteirng from both phases by using interference filters to separate the signals. It has been found that the biacetyl vapor provides an adequate tracer for measurements of the concentration field in a turbulent flow. Furthermore, the feasibility of making simultaneous concentration measurements of two phases in a turbulent flow has been demonstrated.

  8. Miniature, atomically referenced offset phase-locked laser for cold-atom sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pino, Juan; Luey, Ben; Bickman, Sarah; Anderson, Mike

    2012-06-01

    As ultracold atom sensors begin to see their way to the field, there is a growing need for small, accurate, and robust laser systems to cool and manipulate atoms for sensing applications such as magnetometers, gravimeters, atomic clocks and inertial sensing. In this poster we present an ultracompact, frequency agile laser source, referenced to a hyperfine transition of ^87Rb. The laser system is housed in a package roughly the size of a stack of business cards, is hermetically sealed, and contains no moving parts -- ideal for field deployment. The laser system includes two lasers with independent temperature control, a Rb-filled vapor cell, a high-speed photodetector for monitoring the offset frequency between the lasers, as well the necessary optical isolation. We will present designs of the ultracompact laser system, as well as quantitative results including size, weight, expected power consumption, frequency agility, and frequency stability.

  9. Investigations of laser pumped gas cell atomic frequency standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volk, C. H.; Camparo, J. C.; Fueholz, R. P.

    1982-01-01

    The performance characteristics of a rubidium gas cell atomic frequency standard might be improved by replacing the standard rubidium discharge lamp with a single mode laser diode. Aspects of the laser pumped gas cell atomic clock studied include effects due to laser intensity, laser detuning, and the choice of the particular atomic absorption line. Results indicate that the performance of the gas cell clock may be improved by judicious choice of the operating parameters of the laser diode. The laser diode also proved to be a valuable tool in investigating the operation of the conventional gas cell clock. Results concerning linewidths, the light shift effect and the effect of isotopic spin exchange in the conventional gas cell clock are reported.

  10. Recent progress of laser cooling for neutral mercury atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Kang-Kang; Zhao, Ru-Chen; Fu, Xiao-Hu; Hu, Jin-Meng; Feng, Yan; Xu, Zhen; Wang, Yu-Zhu

    2014-11-01

    Mercury is the heaviest stable atom that could be laser cooled, and have a large nuclear charge number. So it has a distinct advantage in quantum precision measurement such as fine-structure constant α and permanent electric dipole moment. Due to its insensitivity of black body radiation, atomic mercury is a good candidate of optical clock. Here we report our recent development of laser cooling of neutral mercury atom. By cooling the mercury source to about -70°C, an ultra-high vacuum system was realized to produce ultracold mercury atoms. The commercial frequency quadrupled semiconductor laser is locked on the cooling transition (1S0-3P1 transition, wavelength of 253.7 nm) by sub-Doppler frequency modulation spectroscopy. By the modification with feed-forward method, the UV laser becomes faster tunable and more stable. A folded beam configuration was used to realize the magneto-optical trap (MOT) because of the shortage of cooling laser power, and the ultracold mercury atoms were observed by fluorescence detection. All of six rich abundant isotopes have been observed, and the atom number is about 1.5×106 with density of 3.5×109 /cm3 for 202Hg. With optical shutter and the programmable system to control the time sequence, the temperature of ultracold atoms can be measured by time of flight method. To enhance the laser power, a 1014.8 nm fiber laser amplifier was developed, which can work at room temperature. After two stages of frequency doubling, about 75 mW of 253.7 nm UV laser were generated, and the saturated absorption spectroscopy of mercury atom was also observed. More power of UV laser could help to trap more atoms in the future. These works laid a good foundation to realize the mercury lattice clock.

  11. Infiltrating a thin or single-layer opal with an atomic vapour: Sub-Doppler signals and crystal optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moufarej, Elias; Maurin, Isabelle; Zabkov, Ilya; Laliotis, Athanasios; Ballin, Philippe; Klimov, Vasily; Bloch, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    Artificial thin glass opals can be infiltrated with a resonant alkali-metal vapour, providing novel types of hybrid systems. The reflection at the interface between the substrate and the opal yields a resonant signal, which exhibits sub-Doppler structures in linear spectroscopy for a range of oblique incidences. This result is suspected to originate in an effect of the three-dimensional confinement of the vapour in the opal interstices. It is here extended to a situation where the opal is limited to a few- or even a single-layer opal film, which is a kind of bidimensional grating. We have developed a flexible one-dimensional layered optical model, well suited for a Langmuir-Blodgett opal. Once extended to the case of a resonant infiltration, the model reproduces quick variations of the lineshape with incidence angle or polarization. Alternately, for an opal limited to a single layer of identical spheres, a three-dimensional numerical calculation was developed. It predicts crystalline anisotropy, which is demonstrated through diffraction on an empty opal made of a single layer of polystyrene spheres.

  12. Search for a permanent EDM using laser cooled radioactive atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Hirokazu; Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Arikawa, H.; Ezure, S.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Inoue, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kato, K.; Kato, T.; Nataraj, H. S.; Sato, T.; Uchiyama, A.; Aoki, T.; Furukawa, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Imai, K.; Murakami, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Wakasa, T.; Yoshida, H. P.; Sakemi, Y.

    2014-03-01

    The search for the electric-dipole moment (EDM) of laser-cooled francium (Fr) atoms could lead to a measurement for the electron EDM. It is predicted that the electron EDM would be enhanced by approximately three orders of magnitude in heavy atoms such as Fr. Laser-cooling and trapping techniques are expected to suppress statistical and systematic errors in precision measurements. The magneto-optical trap was achieved using stable rubidium in a developing factory of laser-cooled radioactive atoms. In light of the results from the rubidium experiments, we found that an upgrade of each apparatus is preferred for Fr trapping.

  13. Ferric ion induced enhancement of ultraviolet vapour generation coupled with atomic fluorescence spectrometry for the determination of ultratrace inorganic arsenic in surface water.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuelong; Lin, Lingling; Liu, Jixin; Mao, Xuefei; Wang, Jianhua; Qin, Deyuan

    2016-02-21

    A novel method of ultraviolet vapour generation (UVG) coupled with atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) was developed for the determination of ultratrace inorganic arsenic (iAs) in surface water. In this work, different ferric species were utilised for the first time as an enhancement reagent for the ultraviolet vapour generation of As(III), and their UVG efficiencies for volatile species of arsenic were investigated. 15 mg L(-1) of ferric chloride provided the greatest enhancement of approximately 10-fold, using 20% acetic acid combined with 4% formic acid with 30 s ultraviolet irradiation at 200 mL min(-1) Ar/H2 flow rate. Under the optimised conditions, the linear range was 1.0 μg L(-1)-100.0 μg L(-1), and the spiked recoveries were 92%-98%. The limit of detection was 0.05 μg L(-1) for iAs, and the relative standard deviation (RSD) value of the repeated measurements was 2.0% (n = 11). This method was successfully applied to the determination of ultratrace iAs in tap water, river water, and lake water samples using 0.2% H2SO4 (v : v) as the sample preserver. The obtained values for the water samples of certified reference materials (CRMs) including GSB-Z50004-200431, GBW08605 and GBW(E)080390 were all within the certified ranges. PMID:26765360

  14. Measuring variations of δ18O and δ2H in atmospheric water vapour using laser spectroscopy: an instrument characterisation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aemisegger, F.; Sturm, P.; Graf, P.; Sodemann, H.; Pfahl, S.; Knohl, A.; Wernli, H.

    2012-02-01

    Variations of stable water isotopes in water vapour have become measurable at a measurement frequency of about 1 Hz in recent years using novel laser spectroscopic techniques. This enables us to perform continuous measurements for process-based investigations of the atmospheric water cycle at the time scales relevant for synoptic meteorology. An important prerequisite for the interpretation of data from automated field measurements lasting for several weeks or months is a detailed knowledge about instrument properties and the sources of measurement uncertainty. We present here a comprehensive characterisation and comparison study of two commercial laser spectroscopic systems based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (Picarro) and off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (Los Gatos Research). The uncertainty components of the measurements were first assessed in laboratory experiments, focussing on the effects of (i) water vapour mixing ratio, (ii) measurement stability, (iii) uncertainties due to calibration and (iv) response times of the isotope measurements due to adsorption-desorption processes on the tubing and measurement cavity walls. Based on the experience from our laboratory experiments we set up a one-week field campaign for comparing measurements of the ambient isotope signals of the two laser spectroscopic systems. The optimal calibration strategy determined for both instruments was applied as well as the correction functions for water vapour mixing ratio effects. The root mean square difference between the isotope signals from the two instruments during the field deployment was 2.3‰ for δ2H, 0.5‰ for δ18O and 3.1‰ for deuterium excess. These uncertainty estimates from field measurements compare well to those found in the laboratory experiments. The present quality of measurements from laser spectroscopic instruments combined with a calibration system opens new possibilities for investigating the atmospheric water cycle and the land

  15. Measuring variations of δ18O and δ2H in atmospheric water vapour using two commercial laser-based spectrometers: an instrument characterisation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aemisegger, F.; Sturm, P.; Graf, P.; Sodemann, H.; Pfahl, S.; Knohl, A.; Wernli, H.

    2012-07-01

    Variations of stable water isotopes in water vapour have become measurable at a measurement frequency of about 1 Hz in recent years using novel laser spectroscopic techniques. This enables us to perform continuous measurements for process-based investigations of the atmospheric water cycle at the time scales relevant for synoptic and mesoscale meteorology. An important prerequisite for the interpretation of data from automated field measurements lasting for several weeks or months is a detailed knowledge about instrument properties and the sources of measurement uncertainty. We present here a comprehensive characterisation and comparison study of two commercial laser spectroscopic systems based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (Picarro) and off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (Los Gatos Research). The uncertainty components of the measurements were first assessed in laboratory experiments, focussing on the effects of (i) water vapour mixing ratio, (ii) measurement stability, (iii) uncertainties due to calibration and (iv) response times of the isotope measurements due to adsorption-desorption processes on the tubing and measurement cavity walls. Based on the experience from our laboratory experiments, we set up a one-week field campaign for comparing measurements of the ambient isotope signals from the two laser spectroscopic systems. The optimal calibration strategy determined for both instruments was applied as well as the correction functions for water vapour mixing ratio effects. The root mean square difference between the isotope signals from the two instruments during the field deployment was 2.3‰ for δ2H, 0.5‰ for δ18O and 3.1‰ for deuterium excess. These uncertainty estimates from field measurements compare well to those found in the laboratory experiments. The present quality of measurements from laser spectroscopic instruments combined with a calibration system opens new possibilities for investigating the atmospheric water cycle and

  16. EFFECT OF LASER LIGHT ON MATTER. LASER PLASMAS: Evaporation-capillary instability in a deep vapour-gas cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzoev, F. Kh

    1994-02-01

    A theoretical investigation is made of an instability of a molten metal surface on the walls of a deep vapour—gas cavity or crater when this surface absorbs a uniform flux of the energy of laser radiation. The instability is due to the growth of perturbations on the free surface of the melt. This growth is maintained by an associated space—time modulation of the evaporation pressure. The dispersion equation for weak hydrodynamic perturbations is derived and investigated. This equation allows for the dependence of the instability increment on the laser radiation and phase transition parameters, and also on the material constants of the medium. Quantitative estimates are obtained of the conditions for the realisation of the investigated instability mechanism.

  17. Automated continuous monitoring of inorganic and total mercury in wastewater and other waters by flow-injection analysis and cold-vapour atomic absorption spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Birnie, S. E.

    1988-01-01

    An automated continuous monitoring system for the determination of inorganic and total mercury by flow-injection analysis followed by cold-vapour atomic absorption spectrometry is described. The method uses a typical flow-injection manifold where digestion and reduction of the injected sample takes place. Mercury is removed by aeration from the flowing stream in a specially designed air-liquid separator and swept into a silica cell for absorption measurement at a wavelength of 253.7 nm. A calibration curve up to 10 μg Hg ml-1 using three different path length cells is obtained with a detection limit of 0.02 μg Hg ml-1. The sampling rate of an injection every 3 min produces 20 results per hour from a flowing stream. PMID:18925201

  18. Vacuum ultraviolet laser induced fluorescence on a Si atomic beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brian, T. R.; Lawler, J. E.

    1991-01-01

    A broadly applicable vacuum ultraviolet experiment is described for measuring radiative lifetimes of neutral and singly-ionized atoms in a beam environment to 5-percent accuracy using laser induced fluorescence. First results for neutral Si are reported.

  19. Laser-induced resonant structure in electron-atom scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flegel, A. V.; Frolov, M. V.; Manakov, N. L.; Starace, Anthony F.

    2009-11-01

    Orders of magnitude increases are predicted in the cross sections for electron-atom scattering accompanied by absorption or emission of n laser photons for incident electron energies at which the electron, by emitting μ laser photons, can be captured by the atom to form a negative ion. Resonance enhancements are most significant in the plateau region (n gg μ) of the scattered electron spectrum, whose shape is predicted to replicate that of the ion's (n + μ)-photon detachment spectrum.

  20. Measurement of the absorption line profiles of water vapour isotopomers at 1.39 {mu}m using the methods of diode laser spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuz'michev, A S; Nadezhdinskii, Aleksandr I; Ponurovskii, Ya Ya

    2011-07-31

    The issues related to high-precision measurement of the absorption line profiles of water vapour and its isotopomers using the methods of diode laser spectroscopy in the near IR range aimed at the analysis and detection of greenhouse gases are considered. The absorption line shape of H{sub 2}{sup 16}O is investigated as a function of pressure of different buffer gases. The influence of the instrument function of the diode laser (DL) on the precision of measuring the line profile is studied. From fitting the profile of Doppler-broadened H{sub 2}{sup 16}O absorption line to a model profile the lasing line width of the DL with a fibre pigtail is determined. The frequencies and intensities of absorption lines of water isotopomers H{sub 2}{sup 16}O, H{sub 2}{sup 17}O, H{sub 2}{sup 18}O, and HDO are measured in the range of DL oscillation. Analytical spectral regions are chosen for distant probing of water vapour using an airborne lab. (laser spectroscopy)

  1. Strongly driven one-atom laser and decoherence monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Lougovski, P.; Casagrande, F.; Lulli, A.; Solano, E.

    2007-09-15

    We propose the implementation of a strongly driven one-atom laser, based on the off-resonant interaction of a three-level atom in {lambda} configuration with a single cavity mode and three laser fields. We show that the system can be described equivalently by a two-level atom resonantly coupled to the cavity and driven by a strong effective coherent field. The effective dynamics can be solved exactly, including a thermal field bath, allowing an analytical description of field statistics and entanglement properties. We also show the possible generation of quantum superposition (Schroedinger cat) states for the whole atom-field system and for the field alone after atomic measurement. We propose a way to monitor the system decoherence by measuring atomic populations. Finally, we confirm the validity of our model through numerical solutions.

  2. Blue-green atomic mercury photodissociation laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fill, E.; Gerck, E.

    The accomplishment of a blue-green Hg laser after dissociating HgI2 with a KrF laser is reported. The iodide was contained in a cell with an aluminum mirror, and heating with the KrF laser caused green laser emission at 180 C and a blue line above 210 C, with total emission increasing up to 260 C and then tailing off. The emitted wavelengths were measured at 435-8 and 546.1 nm, with the pulse shape having a duration of 1 ns with peak power of 3 kW for the blue and an order of magnitude less for the green. The KrF laser was tuned to emit at 248 nm, and no decrease in the resulting emissions were detected after 10,000 pulses in the iodide laser.

  3. Four-level atom interferometer with trichromatic laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Honda, Kazuhito; Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki; Morinaga, Atsuo

    2007-02-15

    A four-level atom interferometer comprised of three excited states and one ground state with trichromatic fields coupled between them is investigated using Zeeman sublevels of {sup 3}P{sub 1} and {sup 1}S{sub 0} states of a calcium atom. A theoretical description of the interaction of four-level atoms with trichromatic laser fields is presented and compared with the experimental results of the interference fringes which are generated by the three excited states.

  4. Laser stripping of hydrogen atoms by direct ionization

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brunetti, E.; Becker, W.; Bryant, H. C.; Jaroszynski, D. A.; Chou, W.

    2015-05-08

    Direct ionization of hydrogen atoms by laser irradiation is investigated as a potential new scheme to generate proton beams without stripping foils. The time-dependent Schrödinger equation describing the atom-radiation interaction is numerically solved obtaining accurate ionization cross-sections for a broad range of laser wavelengths, durations and energies. Parameters are identified where the Doppler frequency up-shift of radiation colliding with relativistic particles can lead to efficient ionization over large volumes and broad bandwidths using currently available lasers.

  5. Laser cooling atoms to indistinguishability: Atomic Hong-Ou-Mandel interference and entanglement through spin exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Adam

    2016-05-01

    Motional control of neutral atoms has a rich history and increasingly interest has turned to single-atom control. In my thesis work, we created a platform to individually prepare single bosonic atoms in highly pure quantum states, by developing methods to laser cool single atoms to the vibrational ground state of optical tweezer traps. Applying this toolset, we observe the atomic Hong-Ou-Mandel effect when we arrange for atom tunneling to play the role of a balanced beam splitter between two optical tweezers. In another experiment, we utilize spin exchange to create entanglement, which we then verify after spatially separating the atoms to observe their non-local correlations. Merging these results with our recent demonstration of deterministic loading of atomic arrays, our results establish the concept of quantum gas assembly, which could be applied to a variety of systems ranging from the production of single dipolar molecules to the assembly of low-entropy arrays of atoms.

  6. Method for laser spectroscopy of metastable pionic helium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, M.; Sótér, A.; Aghai-Khozani, H.; Barna, D.; Dax, A.; Hayano, R. S.; Murakami, Y.; Yamada, H.

    2015-08-01

    The PiHe collaboration is currently attempting to carry out laser spectroscopy of metastable pionic helium atoms using the high-intensity π - beam of the ring cyclotron facility of the Paul Scherrer Institute. These atoms are heretofore hypothetical three-body Coulomb systems each composed of a helium nucleus, a π - occupying a Rydberg state, and an electron occupying the 1s ground state. We briefly review the proposed method by which we intend to detect the laser spectroscopic signal. This complements our experiments on metastable antiprotonic helium atoms at CERN.

  7. Solar-simulator-pumped atomic iodine laser kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, H. W.; Raju, S.; Shiu, Y. J.

    1983-01-01

    The literature contains broad ranges of disagreement in kinetic data for the atomic iodine laser. A kinetic model of a solar-simulator-pumped iodine laser is used to select those kinetic data consistent with recent laser experiments at the Langley Research Center. Analysis of the solar-simulator-pumped laser experiments resulted in the following estimates of rate coefficients: for alkyl radical (n-C3F7) and atomic iodine (I) recombination, 4.3 x 10 to the 11th power (1.9) + or - cu cm/s; for n-C3F7I stabilized atomic iodine recombination (I + I) 3.7 x 10 to the -32nd power (2.3) + or -1 cm to the 6th power/s; and for molecular iodine (I2) quenching, 3.1 x 10 to the -11th power (1.6) + or - 1 cu cm/s. These rates are consistent with the recent measurements.

  8. Sudden perturbation of hydrogen atoms by intense ultrashort laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Lugovskoy, A. V.; Bray, I.

    2005-12-15

    We study theoretically how hydrogen atoms respond to intense ultrashort laser pulses of duration {tau} shorter than the inverse of the initial-state energy {epsilon}{sub i}{sup -1}. An analytical expression for the evolution operator S is derived up to the first order of the sudden perturbation approximation. This approximation treats the laser-atom interaction beyond the dipole approximation and yields S as a series in the small parameter {epsilon}{sub i}{tau}. It is shown that the effect of realistic laser pulses on atoms begins at the first order of {epsilon}{sub i}{tau}. Transitions between atomic (nlm) states of different m become possible due to the action of the pulse's magnetic field. Transitions between states of same m and arbitrary l become possible if the static Coulomb potential is taken into account during the pulse.

  9. LASER COOLING: Cold atomic beams of high brightness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozhdestvensky, Yu V.

    2004-11-01

    The possibility is studied for obtaining intense cold atomic beams by using the Renyi entropy to optimise the laser cooling process. It is shown in the case of a Gaussian velocity distribution of atoms, the Renyi entropy coincides with the density of particles in the phase space. The optimisation procedure for cooling atoms by resonance optical radiation is described, which is based on the thermodynamic law of increasing the Renyi entropy in time. Our method is compared with the known methods for increasing the laser cooling efficiency such as the tuning of a laser frequency in time and a change of the atomic transition frequency in an inhomogeneous transverse field of a magnetic solenoid.

  10. Possibilities of using pulsed lasers and copper-vapour laser system (CVL and CVLS) in modern technological equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labin, N. A.; Bulychev, N. A.; Kazaryan, M. A.; Grigoryants, A. G.; Shiganov, I. N.; Krasovskii, V. I.; Sachkov, V. I.; Plyaka, P. S.; Feofanov, I. N.

    2015-12-01

    Research on CVL installations with an average power of 20-25 W of cutting and drilling has shown wide range of applications of these lasers for micromachining of metals and a wide range of non-metallic materials up to 1-2 mm. From the analysis indicated that peak power density in the focused light spot of 10-30 μm diameter must be 109 -1012 W/cm2 the productivity and quality micromachining, when the treatment material is preferably in the evaporative mode micro explosions, followed by the expansion of the superheated vapor and the liquid. To achieve such levels of power density, a minimum heat affected zone (5- 10 μm) and a minimum surface roughness of the cut (1-2 μm), the quality of the output beam of radiation should be as high. Ideally, to ensure the quality of the radiation, the structure of CVL output beam must be single-beam, diffraction divergence and have at duration pulses τi = 20-40 ns. The pulse energy should have low values of 0.1-1 mJ at pulse repetition rates of 10-20 kHz. Axis of the radiation beam instability of the pattern to be three orders of magnitude smaller than the diffraction limit of the divergence. The spot of the focused radiation beam must have a circular shape with clear boundary, and a Gaussian intensity distribution.

  11. LASERS: Low-threshold short-cavity diode laser for a miniature atomic clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargapol'tsev, Sergei V.; Velichansky, Vladimir L.; Vasil'ev, V. V.; Kobyakova, M. Sh; Morozyuk, A. V.; Shiryaeva, N. V.; Konyaev, V. P.

    2009-06-01

    Short-cavity diode lasers (SCDLs) emitting at the 894-nm D1 line of caesium are developed. Low threshold currents and power consumption will make it possible to use these lasers in chip-size atomic clocks (CSACs) and magnetometers. The SCDL parameters are comparable with the parameters of surface-emitting lasers.

  12. Laser Assisted Free-Free Transition in Electron - Atom Collision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, C.; Bhatia, A. K.

    2011-01-01

    Free-free transition is studied for electron-Hydrogen atom system in ground state at very low incident energies in presence of an external homogeneous, monochromatic and linearly polarized laser field. The incident electron is considered to be dressed by the laser in a non perturbative manner by choosing the Volkov solutions in both the channels. The space part of the scattering wave function for the electron is solved numerically by taking into account the effect of electron exchange, short range as well as of the long range interactions. Laser assisted differential as well as elastic total cross sections are calculated for single photon absorption/emission in the soft photon limit, the laser intensity being much less than the atomic field intensity. A strong suppression is noted in the laser assisted cross sections as compared to the field free situations. Significant difference is noted in the singlet and the triplet cross sections.

  13. Recirculation of Laser Power in an Atomic Fountain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Enzer, Daphna G.; Klipstein, WIlliam M.; Moore, James D.

    2007-01-01

    A new technique for laser-cooling atoms in a cesium atomic fountain frequency standard relies on recirculation of laser light through the atom-collection region of the fountain. The recirculation, accomplished by means of reflections from multiple fixed beam-splitter cubes, is such that each of two laser beams makes three passes. As described below, this recirculation scheme offers several advantages over prior designs, including simplification of the laser system, greater optical power throughput, fewer optical and electrical connections, and simplification of beam power balancing. A typical laser-cooled cesium fountain requires the use of six laser beams arranged as three orthogonal pairs of counter-propagating beams to decelerate the atoms and hold them in a three-dimensional optical trap in vacuum. Typically, these trapping/cooling beams are linearly polarized and are positioned and oriented so that (1) counter-propagating beams in each pair have opposite linear polarizations and (2) three of the six orthogonal beams have the sum of their propagation directions pointing up, while the other three have the sum of their propagation directions pointing down. In a typical prior design, two lasers are used - one to generate the three "up" beams, the other to generate the three "down" beams. For this purpose, the output of each laser is split three ways, then the resulting six beams are delivered to the vacuum system, independently of each other, via optical fibers. The present recirculating design also requires two lasers, but the beams are not split before delivery. Instead, only one "up" beam and one oppositely polarized "down" beam are delivered to the vacuum system, and each of these beams is sent through the collection region three times. The polarization of each beam on each pass through the collection region is set up to yield the same combination of polarization and propagation directions as described above. In comparison with the prior design, the present

  14. Atoms, molecules and clusters in intense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, Zachary B.

    Recent advances in the technology of intense, short laser pulses have opened the possibility of investigating processes in atoms, molecules and clusters in which the normal intramolecular forces between electrons and nuclei, and between different electrons, are rivaled in strength by interactions with the driving laser, or with a cluster plasma. Experiments using rescattered electrons offer a means of probing atomic and molecular processes on ultrafast timescales. This thesis extends techniques and concepts of atomic and molecular physics to describe physics in the strong field regime. This involves investigating how electron scattering from atoms and molecules is affected by the intense and time-varying electric field of the laser, the effect of such scattering on experimental observables, and the role of intramolecular structure on strong field processes. Also investigated is the evolution of van derWaals atomic clusters when subject to intense laser pulses in the VUV regime. Here processes such as photoionization, inverse bremsstrahlung heating, and collisional ionization and recombination are affected both by the non-hydrogenic nature of the relevant atomic potentials but also by the screening of these potentials by the cluster plasma.

  15. Continuous beam of laser-cooled Yb atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathod, K. D.; Singh, Alok K.; Natarajan, Vasant

    2013-05-01

    We demonstrate the launching of laser-cooled Yb atoms in a continuous atomic beam. The continuous cold beam has significant advantages over the more-common pulsed fountain, which was also demonstrated by us recently. The cold beam is formed in the following steps: i) atoms from a thermal beam are first Zeeman-slowed to a small final velocity; ii) the slowed atoms are captured in a two-dimensional magneto-optic trap (2D-MOT); and iii) atoms are launched continuously in the vertical direction using two sets of moving-molasses beams, inclined at ±15° to the vertical. The cooling transition used is the strongly allowed {^1S}_0 \\rightarrow {^1P}_1 transition at 399 nm. We capture about 7 × 106 atoms in the 2D-MOT, and then launch them with a vertical velocity of 13 m/s at a longitudinal temperature of 125(6) mK.

  16. Dual-wavelength laser source for onboard atom interferometry.

    PubMed

    Ménoret, V; Geiger, R; Stern, G; Zahzam, N; Battelier, B; Bresson, A; Landragin, A; Bouyer, P

    2011-11-01

    We present a compact and stable dual-wavelength laser source for onboard atom interferometry with two different atomic species. It is based on frequency-doubled telecom lasers locked on a femtosecond optical frequency comb. We take advantage of the maturity of fiber telecom technology to reduce the number of free-space optical components, which are intrinsically less stable, and to make the setup immune to vibrations and thermal fluctuations. The source provides the frequency agility and phase stability required for atom interferometry and can easily be adapted to other cold atom experiments. We have shown its robustness by achieving the first dual-species K-Rb magneto-optical trap in microgravity during parabolic flights. PMID:22048340

  17. Search for electron EDM with laser cooled radioactive atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, T.; Arikawa, H.; Ezure, S.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kato, T.; Kawamura, H.; Nataraj, H. S.; Sato, T.; Aoki, T.; Furukawa, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Imai, K.; Murakami, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Wakasa, T.; Yoshida, H. P.; Sakemi, Y.

    2013-05-01

    The permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of the elementary particle has the sensitivity to the CP violation in the theories beyond the standard model (SM). The search for the EDM constitutes the stringent test to discriminate between the SM and beyond it. We plan to perform the electron EDM search by using the laser cooled francium (Fr) atom which has the largest enhancement factor of the electron EDM in the alkali atoms. In this paper, the present status of the laser cooled Fr factory that is being constructed at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University are reported.

  18. A Theory of Laser Induced Nuclear Reaction in Single Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Faisal, F. H. M.; Donner, C.

    2010-02-02

    An 'electron-bridge' mechanism of nuclear reaction in an atom or ion by ultra-intense laser fields is presented. A preliminary estimate of the intensity dependence of the rate of disintegration reaction of deuteron nucleus in deuterium atom is made for 800 nm laser fields. For intensities below 5x10{sup 21} W/cm{sup 2}, the rate of disintegration by the 'electron-bridge' mechanism is found to be small, but it rises sharply and becomes large already for {approx_equal}10{sup 22} W/cm{sup 2}.

  19. Cold-atom dynamics in crossed-laser-beam waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Torrontegui, E.; Muga, J. G.; Echanobe, J.; Ruschhaupt, A.; Guery-Odelin, D.

    2010-10-15

    We study the dynamics of neutral cold atoms in an L-shaped crossed-beam optical waveguide formed by two perpendicular red-detuned lasers of different intensities and a blue-detuned laser at the corner. The motion in one sense is optimized, and the motion in the other sense may be suppressed even if it is energetically allowed. Quantum and classical simulations are performed and give similar results. Complemented with a vibrational cooling process we find a range of parameters for which this setting works as a one-way device or 'atom diode'.

  20. Laser sources for precision spectroscopy on atomic strontium.

    PubMed

    Poli, N; Ferrari, G; Prevedelli, M; Sorrentino, F; Drullinger, R E; Tino, G M

    2006-04-01

    We present a new laser setup designed for high-precision spectroscopy on laser cooled atomic strontium. The system, which is entirely based on semiconductor laser sources, delivers 200 mW at 461 nm for cooling and trapping atomic strontium from a thermal source, 4 mW at 497 nm for optical pumping from the metastable P23 state, 12 mW at 689 nm on linewidth less than 1 kHz for second-stage cooling of the atomic sample down to the recoil limit, 1.2 W at 922 nm for optical trapping close to the "magic wavelength" for the 0-1 intercombination line at 689 nm. The 689 nm laser was already employed to perform a frequency measurement of the 0-1 intercombination line with a relative accuracy of 2.3 x 10(-11), and the ensemble of laser sources allowed the loading in a conservative dipole trap of multi-isotopes strontium mixtures. The simple and compact setup developed represents one of the first steps towards the realization of a transportable optical standards referenced to atomic strontium. PMID:16527534

  1. Interferometric Laser Cooling of Atomic Rubidium.

    PubMed

    Dunning, Alexander; Gregory, Rachel; Bateman, James; Himsworth, Matthew; Freegarde, Tim

    2015-08-14

    We report the 1D cooling of ^{85}Rb atoms using a velocity-dependent optical force based upon Ramsey matter-wave interferometry. Using stimulated Raman transitions between ground hyperfine states, 12 cycles of the interferometer sequence cool a freely moving atom cloud from 21 to 3 μK. This pulsed analog of continuous-wave Doppler cooling is effective at temperatures down to the recoil limit; with augmentation pulses to increase the interferometer area, it should cool more quickly than conventional methods and be more suitable for species that lack a closed radiative transition. PMID:26317719

  2. Interferometric Laser Cooling of Atomic Rubidium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunning, Alexander; Gregory, Rachel; Bateman, James; Himsworth, Matthew; Freegarde, Tim

    2015-08-01

    We report the 1D cooling of 85Rb atoms using a velocity-dependent optical force based upon Ramsey matter-wave interferometry. Using stimulated Raman transitions between ground hyperfine states, 12 cycles of the interferometer sequence cool a freely moving atom cloud from 21 to 3 μ K . This pulsed analog of continuous-wave Doppler cooling is effective at temperatures down to the recoil limit; with augmentation pulses to increase the interferometer area, it should cool more quickly than conventional methods and be more suitable for species that lack a closed radiative transition.

  3. Long Range Interactions With Laser Cooled Neutral Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Gattobigio, Giovanni Luca; Michaud, Franck; Labeyrie, Guillaume; Kaiser, Robin; Loureiro, Jorge; Mendonca, Jose Tito; Tercas, Hugo; Pohl, Thomas

    2008-09-07

    Multiple scattering of light in a trap of laser cooled neutral atoms leads to repulsion forces between the atoms. The corresponding interactions have long range behavior in 1/r{sup 2} and are thus similar to Coulomb interaction in an one component confined plasma. Consequences of these interactions will be described in this paper, including the limitation of the spatial density one can obtain in such systems and self-sustained oscillations of the cloud.

  4. LASER COOLING: 'Microwave' technique for atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivlin, Lev A.

    2008-12-01

    The mechanisms of the transport of cold atomic ensembles and transformation of their parameters in potential channels and wells treated by analogy of electromagnetic microwave waveguides and hollow resonators are considered. The possibility of performing various manipulations with such ensembles, in particular, the isothermal phase transition to a Bose—Einstein condensate is pointed out.

  5. Bowls made of Laser Light to Corral Ultracold Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, John

    2010-10-01

    Using stable lasers, it is now possible to create nearly perfect bowls made of pure light, which are smaller than a piece of lint and store atoms for several minutes in an ultrahigh vacuum environment. These almost frictionless bowls are ideal for cooling atoms by evaporation, the same way that alcohol cools the skin. In just a few seconds, atoms trapped in the bowl are cooled to temperatures of ten of billionths of a degree above absolute zero, where the de Broglie wavelength is several microns. These ultracold atoms occupy the quantum energy levels of the bowl, producing a giant quantum system that can be directly observed using laser flash photography. I will describe our laser trapping methods and show how they can be use to study a unique quantum gas of spin-up and spin-down ^6Li atoms, which are fermions that obey the Pauli exclusion principle. I will describe how this ultracold atomic gas now tests predictions in nearly all fields of physics, from high temperature superconductors to neutron stars, the quark-gluon plasma of the Big Bang, and even string theory.

  6. On-line separation for the speciation of mercury in natural waters by flow injection-cold vapour-atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sanz, Jon; Raposo, Juan Carlos; Larreta, Joana; Martinez-Arkarazo, Irantzu; de Diego, Alberto; Madariaga, Juan Manuel

    2004-10-01

    Inorganic mercury and methylmercury are determined in natural waters by injecting the filtered samples onto a low cost commercial flow injection system in which an anion exchange microcolumn is inserted after the injection loop (FIA-IE). If hydrochloric acid is used as the carrier solution, the HgCl4(2-) species (inorganic mercury) will be retained by the anion exchanger while the CH3HgCI species (methylmercury) will flow through the resin with negligible retention. Four anion exchangers and seven elution agents were checked, in a batch mode, to search for the best conditions for optimal separation and elution of both species. Dowex M-41 and L-cysteine were finally selected. Mercury detection was performed by cold vapour-electrothermal atomic adsorption spectrometry (HG-ETAAS). Both systems were coupled to perform the continuous on-line separation/detection of both inorganic mercury and methylmercury species. Separation and detection conditions were optimized by two chemometric approaches: full factorial design and central composite design. A limit of detection of 0.4 microg L(-1) was obtained for both mercury species (RSD < 3.0% for 20 microg L(-1) inorganic and methylmercury solutions). The method was applied to mercury speciation in natural waters of the Nerbioi-lbaizabal estuary (Bilbao, North of Spain) and recoveries of more than 95% were obtained. PMID:15537077

  7. Sub-Doppler laser cooling of potassium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Landini, M.; Roy, S.; Carcagni, L.; Trypogeorgos, D.; Fattori, M.; Inguscio, M.; Modugno, G.

    2011-10-15

    We investigate the sub-Doppler laser cooling of bosonic potassium isotopes, whose small hyperfine splitting has so far prevented cooling below the Doppler temperature. We find instead that the combination of a dark optical molasses scheme that naturally arises in this kind of system and an adiabatic ramping of the laser parameters allows us to reach sub-Doppler temperatures for small laser detunings. We demonstrate temperatures as low as 25{+-}3 {mu}K and 47{+-}5 {mu}K in high-density samples of the two isotopes {sup 39}K and {sup 41}K, respectively. Our findings should find application to other atomic systems.

  8. Sub-Doppler laser cooling of potassium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landini, M.; Roy, S.; Carcagní, L.; Trypogeorgos, D.; Fattori, M.; Inguscio, M.; Modugno, G.

    2011-10-01

    We investigate the sub-Doppler laser cooling of bosonic potassium isotopes, whose small hyperfine splitting has so far prevented cooling below the Doppler temperature. We find instead that the combination of a dark optical molasses scheme that naturally arises in this kind of system and an adiabatic ramping of the laser parameters allows us to reach sub-Doppler temperatures for small laser detunings. We demonstrate temperatures as low as 25±3 μK and 47±5 μK in high-density samples of the two isotopes 39K and 41K, respectively. Our findings should find application to other atomic systems.

  9. LASER COOLING OF ATOMS: Study of transitions in thulium atoms in the 410-420-nm range for laser cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akimov, A. V.; Chebakov, K. Yu; Tolstikhina, I. Yu; Sokolov, A. V.; Rodionov, P. B.; Kanorsky, S. I.; Sorokin, V. N.; Kolachevsky, N. N.

    2008-10-01

    The possibility of laser cooling of thulium atoms is considered. The hyperfine structure of almost cyclic 4f136s2 (Jg = 7/2) <--> 4f125d3/26s2 (Je = 9/2) and 4f136s2 (Jg = 7/2) <--> 4f125d5/26s2 (Je = 9/2) transitions at 410.6 and 420.4 nm, respectively, is studied by the method of sub-Doppler saturation spectroscopy in counterpropagating laser beams. The hyperfine splitting of excited levels involved in these transitions is measured and the natural linewidths of these transitions are determined. The structure of the neighbouring 4f136s6p (Je = 5/2) and 4f125d5/26s2 (Je = 7/2) levels is studied for the first time by this method. The decay probabilities of the Je = 9/2 levels via channels removing atoms from the cooling cycle are calculated. It is found that the branching ratio for the strong transition at 410.6 nm (A = 6×107 s-1) is smaller than 2×10-5, which makes this transition most promising for laser cooling. The laser cooling of atoms in a Zeeman cooler at this transition is simulated. The possibility of using a laser-cooled cloud of thulium atoms to study the metrological transition at 1.14 μm is discussed.

  10. Search for a permanent EDM with laser cooled radioactive atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakemi, Yasuhiro

    2014-09-01

    To explore the mechanism for the generation of the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe, the study on fundamental symmetry violation using the trapped radioactive atoms with laser cooling techniques is being promoted. An Electric Dipole Moment (EDM) of the elementary particle is a good prove to observe the phenomena beyond the Standard Model. A finite value of EDM means the violation of the time reversal symmetry, and the CP violation under the CPT invariance. In paramagnetic atoms, an electron EDM results in an atomic EDM enhanced by the factor of the 3rd power of the charge of the nucleus due the relativistic effects. A heaviest alkali element francium (Fr), which is the radioactive atom, has the largest enhancement factor K ~ 895 in atomic system. Then, we are developing a high intensity laser cooled Fr factory at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University to search for the EDM of Fr with the accuracy of 10-29 e cm. To overcome the current accuracy limit of the EDM, it is necessary to realize the high intensity Fr source and to reduce the systematic error due to the motional magnetic field and inhomogeneous applied field. To reduce the dominant component of the systematic errors mentioned above, we will confine the Fr atoms in the small region with the Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT) and optical lattice using the laser cooling and trapping techniques. The construction of the experimental apparatus is making progress, and the new thermal ionizer already produces the Fr of ~ 10 6 ions/s with the primary beam intensity 200 nA. The extracted Fr ion beam is transported to the neutralizer, which is located 10 m downstream, and the produced neutral Fr atoms are introduced into the MOT to load the next trapping system such as the optical dipole force trap and optical lattice. The coherence time will be increased in the laser trapping system, and the present status of the experiment will be reported.

  11. Guiding cold atoms in a hollow laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xinye; Minogin, V. G.; Lee, Kwanil; Wang, Yuzhu; Jhe, Wonho

    1999-12-01

    The theory of atom guiding in a far blue-detuned hollow laser beam (HLB) is developed for the dipole interaction scheme described by a three-level Λ model. The complete kinetic description of atomic motion based on the Fokker-Planck equation for the atomic distribution function is presented. The dipole gradient force, radiation pressure force, and momentum diffusion tensor are then derived. It is found that even for a far-detuned laser beam, the optical potential for a three-level Λ atom is not generally reduced to a sum of two independent potentials associated with the two two-level interactions in the Λ scheme. The theory developed here is also compared with the experimental guiding of cold 85Rb atoms in the HLB. The experimental results are found to be in good agreement with the Monte Carlo simulations based on the three-level Λ model. We observe that the guiding efficiency depends strongly on the intensity and the detuning of the HLB and the initial temperature of atoms. In particular, the experimental results show that, at small detunings, the guiding efficiency is deteriorated strongly by the radiation pressure force. The Monte Carlo simulations also indicate that the efficiency of guiding versus detuning depends strongly on the direction of the HLB propagation with respect to that of atomic motion. Under optimal conditions, the guiding efficiency was found to be about 20%.

  12. Equilibrium temperature of laser cooled atoms in squeezed vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shevy, Y.

    1992-01-01

    It is shown that by squeezing the vacuum fluctuations of the electromagnetic field the quantum fluctuations of the optical forces exerted on laser cooled two-level atoms, can be dramatically modified. Under certain conditions, this modification in concert with the enhanced average forces can lead to equilibrium temperatures below those attained under normal vacuum fluctuations.

  13. Strong-Field Ionization of Laser Cooled Li Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sachin; Romans, Kevin; Fischer, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Recently, our understanding of few-body effects has been substantially boosted by the development of intense femto- and attosecond laser sources. Observing the momenta of the fragments of atoms and molecules ionized in these strong fields provided new and before inconceivable insights in molecular and electronic dynamics. Here, we report on a new experiment, where the target atoms (6 Li) are laser cooled and trapped using a magneto optical trap (MOT). Momentum vectors of the target fragments will be measured using a reaction microscope (ReMi). The exclusivity of this setup is a combination of MOT and ReMi, thus dubbed as MOTReMi. Here, the advantages over standard COLTRIMS systems are multifold: Firstly, an unprecedented recoil ion momentum resolution can be achieved, as the target can be prepared at significantly lower temperatures. Second, the atoms can be optically prepared in the ground or in polarized excited states. In a first experimental campaign, studies on single ionization of laser excited and polarized Lithium atoms will be performed with circularly polarized light. This experiment can provide insight into the helicity-dependence of the ionization dynamics as the differences among co- and counter rotating electron and laser field, if any, can be investigated.

  14. Laser and Optical Subsystem for NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohel, James; Kellogg, James; Elliott, Ethan; Krutzik, Markus; Aveline, David; Thompson, Robert

    2016-05-01

    We describe the design and validation of the laser and optics subsystem for NASA's Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL), a multi-user facility being developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory for studies of ultra-cold quantum gases in the microgravity environment of the International Space Station. Ultra-cold atoms will be generated in CAL by employing a combination of laser cooling techniques and evaporative cooling in a microchip-based magnetic trap. Laser cooling and absorption imaging detection of bosonic mixtures of 87 Rb and 39 K or 41 K will be accomplished using a high-power (up to 500 mW ex-fiber), frequency-agile dual wavelength (767 nm and 780 nm) laser and optical subsystem. The CAL laser and optical subsystem also includes the capability to generate high-power multi-frequency optical pulses at 784.87 nm to realize a dual-species Bragg atom interferometer. Currently at Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin.

  15. Rate-equation approach to atomic-laser light statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Chusseau, Laurent; Arnaud, Jacques; Philippe, Fabrice

    2002-11-01

    We consider three- and four-level atomic lasers that are either incoherently (unidirectionally) or coherently (bidirectionally) pumped, the single-mode cavity being resonant with the laser transition. The intracavity Fano factor and the photocurrent spectral density are evaluated on the basis of rate equations. According to that approach, fluctuations are caused by jumps in active and detecting atoms. The algebra is simple. Whenever a comparison is made, the expressions obtained coincide with the previous results. The conditions under which the output light exhibits sub-Poissonian statistics are considered in detail. Analytical results, based on linearization, are verified by comparison with Monte Carlo simulations. An essentially exhaustive investigation of sub-Poissonian light generation by three- and four-level lasers has been performed. Only special forms were reported earlier.

  16. Ion microscopy based on laser-cooled cesium atoms.

    PubMed

    Viteau, M; Reveillard, M; Kime, L; Rasser, B; Sudraud, P; Bruneau, Y; Khalili, G; Pillet, P; Comparat, D; Guerri, I; Fioretti, A; Ciampini, D; Allegrini, M; Fuso, F

    2016-05-01

    We demonstrate a prototype of a Focused Ion Beam machine based on the ionization of a laser-cooled cesium beam and adapted for imaging and modifying different surfaces in the few-tens nanometer range. Efficient atomic ionization is obtained by laser promoting ground-state atoms into a target excited Rydberg state, then field-ionizing them in an electric field gradient. The method allows obtaining ion currents up to 130pA. Comparison with the standard direct photo-ionization of the atomic beam shows, in our conditions, a 40-times larger ion yield. Preliminary imaging results at ion energies in the 1-5keV range are obtained with a resolution around 40nm, in the present version of the prototype. Our ion beam is expected to be extremely monochromatic, with an energy spread of the order of the eV, offering great prospects for lithography, imaging and surface analysis. PMID:26876642

  17. Searching for Dark Matter with Atomic Clocks and Laser Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stadnik, Yevgeny; Flambaum, Victor

    2016-05-01

    We propose new schemes for the direct detection of low-mass bosonic dark matter, which forms a coherently oscillating classical field and resides in the observed galactic dark matter haloes, using atomic clock, atomic spectroscopy and laser interferometry measurements in the laboratory. We have recently shown that such dark matter can produce both a `slow' cosmological evolution and oscillating variations in the fundamental constants. Using recent atomic dysprosium spectroscopy measurements in, we have derived limits on the quadratic interactions of scalar dark matter with ordinary matter that improve on existing constraints by up to 15 orders of magnitude. We have also proposed the use of laser and maser interferometry as novel high-precision platforms to search for dark matter, with effects due to the variation of the electromagnetic fine-structure constant on alterations in the accumulated phase enhanced by up to 14 orders of magnitude. Other possibilities include the use of highly-charged ions, molecules and nuclear clocks.

  18. Direct observation of electron emission from the grain boundaries of chemical vapour deposition diamond films by tunneling atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chatterjee, Vijay; Harniman, Robert; May, Paul W.; Barhai, P. K.

    2014-04-28

    The emission of electrons from diamond in vacuum occurs readily as a result of the negative electron affinity of the hydrogenated surface due to features with nanoscale dimensions, which can concentrate electric fields high enough to induce electron emission from them. Electrons can be emitted as a result of an applied electric field (field emission) with possible uses in displays or cold-cathode devices. Alternatively, electrons can be emitted simply by heating the diamond in vacuum to temperatures as low as 350 °C (thermionic emission), and this may find applications in solar energy generation or energy harvesting devices. Electron emission studies usually use doped polycrystalline diamond films deposited onto Si or metallic substrates by chemical vapor deposition, and these films have a rough, faceted morphology on the micron or nanometer scale. Electron emission is often improved by patterning the diamond surface into sharp points or needles, the idea being that the field lines concentrate at the points lowering the barrier for electron emission. However, there is little direct evidence that electrons are emitted from these sharp tips. The few reports in the literature that have studied the emission sites suggested that emission came from the grain boundaries and not the protruding regions. We now present direct observation of the emission sites over a large area of polycrystalline diamond using tunneling atomic force microscopy. We confirm that the emission current comes mostly from the grain boundaries, which is consistent with a model for emission in which the non-diamond phase is the source of electrons with a threshold that is determined by the surrounding hydrogenated diamond surface.

  19. Ultrafast laser time-of-flight mass analysis of laser-desorbed atoms and molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankin, S. M.; Robson, L.; Tasker, A. D.; Ledingham, K. W. D.; McCanny, T.; Singhal, R. P.; Kosmidis, C.; Tzallas, P.; Langley, A. J.; Taday, P. F.; Divall, E. J.

    2001-08-01

    Femtosecond time-of-fight mass spectra of laser-desorbed gallium arsenide (GaAs) and trinitrobenzene (TNT) reveal the characteristic features and differences of femtosecond atomic and molecular ionization. Significant yields of multiply-charged atomic fragments, parent molecular ions and structure-specific fragment ions of labile molecules have been obtained. An optimum desorption laser intensity for the transfer of neutral intact parent molecules in to the gas phase has been observed to be molecule-dependent. This work demonstrates the potential of ultrafast laser ionization and has significant implications for analytical and environmental studies of solid materials.

  20. Rb atomic magnetometer toward EDM experiment with laser cooled francium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Takeshi; Ando, Shun; Aoki, Takahiro; Arikawa, Hiroshi; Harada, Ken-Ichi; Hayamizu, Tomohiro; Ishikawa, Taisuke; Itoh, Masatoshi; Kato, Ko; Kawamura, Hirokazu; Sakamoto, Kosuke; Uchiyama, Aiko; Asahi, Koichiro; Yoshimi, Akihiro; Sakemi, Yasuhiro

    2014-09-01

    A permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of a particle or an atom is a suited observable to test the physics beyond the standard model. We plan to search for the electron EDM by using the laser cooled francium (Fr) atom, since the Fr atom has a large enhancement factor of the electron EDM and the laser cooling techniques can suppress both statistical and systematic errors. In the EDM experiment, a fluctuation of the magnetic field is a main source of the errors. In order to achieve the high precision magnetometry, a magnetometer based on the nonlinear magneto-optical rotation effect of the Rb atom is under development. A long coherence time of Rb atom is the key issue for the highly sensitive detection of the field fluctuations. The coherence time is limited due both to collisions with an inner surface of a cell contained the Rb atom and to residual field in a magnetic shield. We prepared the cell coated with an anti-relaxation material and measured the relaxation time. A degauss of the shield was performed to eliminate the residual field. We will report the present status of the magnetometer. A permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of a particle or an atom is a suited observable to test the physics beyond the standard model. We plan to search for the electron EDM by using the laser cooled francium (Fr) atom, since the Fr atom has a large enhancement factor of the electron EDM and the laser cooling techniques can suppress both statistical and systematic errors. In the EDM experiment, a fluctuation of the magnetic field is a main source of the errors. In order to achieve the high precision magnetometry, a magnetometer based on the nonlinear magneto-optical rotation effect of the Rb atom is under development. A long coherence time of Rb atom is the key issue for the highly sensitive detection of the field fluctuations. The coherence time is limited due both to collisions with an inner surface of a cell contained the Rb atom and to residual field in a magnetic shield

  1. Atomic electron correlations in intense laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    DiMauro, L.F.; Sheehy, B.; Walker, B.; Agostini, P.A.; Kulander, K.C.

    1998-11-01

    This talk examines two distinct cases in strong optical fields where electron correlation plays an important role in the dynamics. In the first example, strong coupling in a two-electron-like system is manifested as an intensity-dependent splitting in the ionized electron energy distribution. This two-electron phenomenon (dubbed continuum-continuum Autler-Townes effect) is analogous to a strongly coupled two-level, one-electron atom but raises some intriguing questions regarding the exact nature of electron-electron correlation. The second case examines the evidence for two-electron ionization in the strong-field tunneling limit. Although their ability to describe the one-electron dynamics has obtained a quantitative level of understanding, a description of the two (multiple) electron ionization remains unclear.

  2. Atomic electron correlations in intense laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    DiMauro, L.F.; Sheehy, B.; Walker, B. Agostini, P.A. Kulander, K.C.

    1999-06-01

    This talk examines two distinct cases in strong optical fields where electron correlation plays an important role in the dynamics. In the first example, strong coupling in a two-electron-like system is manifested as an intensity-dependent splitting in the ionized electron energy distribution. This two-electron phenomenon (dubbed continuum-continuum Autler-Townes effect) is analogous to a strongly coupled two-level, one-electron atom but raises some intriguing questions regarding the exact nature of electron-electron correlation. The second case examines the evidence for two-electron ionization in the strong-field tunneling limit. Although our ability to describe the one-electron dynamics has obtained a quantitative level of understanding, a description of the two (multiple) electron ionization remains unclear. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Atomic electron correlations in intense laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    DiMauro, L. F.; Sheehy, B.; Walker, B.; Agostini, P. A.; Kulander, K. C.

    1999-06-11

    This talk examines two distinct cases in strong optical fields where electron correlation plays an important role in the dynamics. In the first example, strong coupling in a two-electron-like system is manifested as an intensity-dependent splitting in the ionized electron energy distribution. This two-electron phenomenon (dubbed continuum-continuum Autler-Townes effect) is analogous to a strongly coupled two-level, one-electron atom but raises some intriguing questions regarding the exact nature of electron-electron correlation. The second case examines the evidence for two-electron ionization in the strong-field tunneling limit. Although our ability to describe the one-electron dynamics has obtained a quantitative level of understanding, a description of the two (multiple) electron ionization remains unclear.

  4. Atomic electron correlations in intense laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Agostini, P A; DiMauro, L F; Kulander, K; Sheehy, B; Walker, B

    1998-09-03

    Abstract. This talk examines two distinct cases in strong opbical fields where electron correlation plays an important role in the dynamic.s. In the first. example, strong coupling in a two-electron-like system is manifested as an intensity-dependent splitting in the ionized electron energy distribution. This two-electron phenomenon (dubbed continuum-continuum Autler-Townes effect) is analogous to a strongly coupled two- level, one-electron atom but raises some intriguing questions regarding the exact nature of electron-electron correlation. The second case examines the evidence for two-electron ionization in the strong-field tunneling limit. Although our ability to describe the one- electron dynamics has obtained a quantitative level of understanding, a description of the two (multiple) electron ionization remains unc

  5. Injection locking of a high power ultraviolet laser diode for laser cooling of ytterbium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Hosoya, Toshiyuki; Miranda, Martin; Inoue, Ryotaro; Kozuma, Mikio

    2015-07-15

    We developed a high-power laser system at a wavelength of 399 nm for laser cooling of ytterbium atoms with ultraviolet laser diodes. The system is composed of an external cavity laser diode providing frequency stabilized output at a power of 40 mW and another laser diode for amplifying the laser power up to 220 mW by injection locking. The systematic method for optimization of our injection locking can also be applied to high power light sources at any other wavelengths. Our system does not depend on complex nonlinear frequency-doubling and can be made compact, which will be useful for providing light sources for laser cooling experiments including transportable optical lattice clocks.

  6. Development of a chemical oxygen - iodine laser with production of atomic iodine in a chemical reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Censky, M; Spalek, O; Jirasek, V; Kodymova, J; Jakubec, I

    2009-11-30

    The alternative method of atomic iodine generation for a chemical oxygen - iodine laser (COIL) in chemical reactions with gaseous reactants is investigated experimentally. The influence of the configuration of iodine atom injection into the laser cavity on the efficiency of the atomic iodine generation and small-signal gain is studied. (lasers)

  7. Velocity measurements by laser resonance fluorescence. [single atom diffusional motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    She, C. Y.; Fairbank, W. M., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The photonburst correlation method was used to detect single atoms in a buffer gas. Real time flow velocity measurements with laser induced resonance fluorescence from single or multiple atoms was demonstrated and this method was investigated as a tool for wind tunnel flow measurement. Investigations show that single atoms and their real time diffusional motion on a buffer gas can be measured by resonance fluorescence. By averaging over many atoms, flow velocities up to 88 m/s were measured in a time of 0.5 sec. It is expected that higher flow speeds can be measured and that the measurement time can be reduced by a factor of 10 or more by careful experimental design. The method is clearly not ready for incorporation in high speed wind tunnels because it is not yet known whether the stray light level will be higher or lower, and it is not known what detection efficiency can be obtained in a wind tunnel situation.

  8. Research Toward Laser Spectroscopy of Trapped Atomic Hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandberg, Jon Carl

    An apparatus has been designed and constructed to perform laser spectroscopy on magnetically trapped atomic hydrogen. Earlier experiments demonstrated the feasibility of magnetic trapping and evaporative cooling of atomic hydrogen. The current apparatus has been designed to explore two areas of research: high resolution laser spectroscopy of hydrogen, and the possible production and detection of Bose condensation. The 1S{-}2S two-photon transition was chosen for study because of its extremely narrow natural linewidth. The techniques developed here should ultimately permit laser spectroscopy with a resolution approaching 1 part in 10^{15 } and should be well suited to the detection of Bose condensation. The apparatus consists of two subsystems: a cryogenic apparatus for magnetically trapping hydrogen, and a laser source for producing the ultraviolet light necessary to excite the 1S{-}2S transition. The two subsystems have independently demonstrated exceptional performance. The magnetic trap has produced gas densities approaching 10^{14} cm ^{-3} at temperatures as low as 100 muK, the closest approach to Bose condensation achieved to date with atomic hydrogen. The continuous wave laser source has produced 20 mW of 243 nm light with an estimated spectral linewidth of 2 kHz. The optimum experimental conditions for excitation and detection of the 1S{-}2S transition in trapped hydrogen have been identified. Initial trials with the apparatus revealed an unexpected operational problem, however several strategies have been proposed that should allow observation of the transition. The expected features of the 1S{-}2S transition lineshape with magnetically trapped hydrogen have been calculated. The possibilities for future research with laser spectroscopy of magnetically trapped hydrogen are described, and a promising strategy for the detection of Bose condensation is proposed. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551 Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617

  9. Atomic vapor laser isotope separation using resonance ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Comaskey, B.; Crane, J.; Erbert, G.; Haynam, C.; Johnson, M.; Morris, J.; Paisner, J.; Solarz, R.; Worden, E.

    1986-09-01

    Atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) is a general and powerful technique. A major present application to the enrichment of uranium for light-water power-reactor fuel has been under development for over 10 years. In June 1985, the Department of Energy announced the selection of AVLIS as the technology to meet the nation's future need for enriched uranium. Resonance photoionization is the heart of the AVLIS process. We discuss those fundamental atomic parameters that are necessary for describing isotope-selective resonant multistep photoionization along with the measurement techniques that we use. We illustrate the methodology adopted with examples of other elements that are under study in our program.

  10. Transverse laser cooled Lithium atomic beam for plasma edge diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthwal, S.; Ajmathulla; Mahender, N.; Vudayagiri, A.; Kumar, A.

    2016-05-01

    We have built a set up to achieve a collimated atomic Lithium beam to be used for plasma edge diagnostics. The collimation is achieved by two-dimensional laser cooling, and such a beam could be very useful to obtain electron density at the edge of a plasma with very high spatial resolution. We present in this manuscript the details of this setup, including details of the oven we designed for the Lithium source. We present the metrics of the beam, including the transverse velocity profile of the atomic beam.

  11. Effect of Laser Power on Atom Probe Tomography of Silicates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parman, S. W.; Gorman, B.; Jackson, C.; Cooper, R. F.; Diercks, D.

    2011-12-01

    Atom probe tomography (APT) is an emerging analytical method that has the potential to produce nm-scale spatial resolution of atom positions with ppm-level detection limits. Until recently, APT has been limited to analysis of conducting samples due to the high pulsed electrical fields previously required. The recent development of laser-assisted APT now allows much lower laser powers to be used, opening the door to analysis of geologic minerals. The potential applications are many, ranging from diffusion profiles to the distribution of nano-phases to grain boundary chemical properties. We reported the first analysis of natural olivine using APT last year (Parman et al, 2010). While the spatial resolution was good (nm-scale), the accuracy of the compositional analysis was not. Two of the primary barriers to accurate ion identification in APT are: 1) Specimen overheating - This is caused by the interaction of the laser with the low thermal conductivity insulating specimens. Ions are assumed to have left the surface of the sample at the time the laser is pulsed during the analysis (laser pulse width = 12 ps). If the laser power is too high, the surface remains heated for an appreciable time (greater than 5 ns in some cases) after the laser pulse, causing atoms to field evaporate from the surface well after the laser pulse. Since they hit the detector later than the atoms that were released during the pulse, they are interpreted to be higher mass. Thus overheating appears in the analysis as a smearing of mass/charge peaks to higher mass/charge ratios (thermal tails). For well separated peaks, this is not a substantial problem, but for closely spaced peaks, overheating causes artificial mass interferences. 2) Molecular evaporation or clustering - This is also caused by overheating by the laser. Ideally, atoms are field evaporated individually from the surface of the cylindrical specimen. However, if the absorbed energy is high enough, clusters of atoms will be formed

  12. Ionization of cluster atoms in a strong laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, M.B.; Krainov, V.P.

    2004-04-01

    Inner and outer multiple ionization of clusters by a superintense ultrashort laser pulse is studied. The barrier-suppression mechanism governs inner field ionization in this case, while impact ionization can be neglected. Outer ionization produces a static Coulomb field inside the ionized cluster. This field increases the charge multiplicity of the atomic ions produced inside the cluster approximately by a factor of 1.5. Various models are suggested for the charge distribution inside the cluster.

  13. Laser-excited fluorescence spectra of atomic uranium

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Songyue; Jin Changtai; Shen Mingtao; Wang Xiulan

    1987-05-01

    Using a dc-supply hollow-cathode lamp as a source of uranium vapor and a rhodamine 6G dye laser to excite the vapor optically, it was simple and convenient to detect fluorescence from uranium atoms at 753.393, 763.175, and 763.954 nm. We give a detailed discussion of how we eliminated the intense background emissions, which were principally due to the lamp.

  14. Design of laser system for absolute gravimeter based on 87Rb atom interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Wang, Shaokai; Zhuang, Wei; Fang, Fang; Li, Tianchu

    2015-08-01

    We present a laser system design for an absolute gravimeter based on 87Rb atom interferometer. By skillful design, lasers with 9 different frequencies are based on two diode lasers including tapered amplifier. Two electrical feedback systems are used for laser frequency stabilization and the Raman lasers generation respectively. All other lasers are based on two Raman lasers and realized with frequency shift by acoustic optical modulators. This laser system not only has the compact and simple construction, but meets all requirements for laser power and frequency controlling for the atom interferometer. It has the characteristic of reliability and integrity.

  15. Cold electron sources using laser-cooled atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCulloch, Andrew J.; Sparkes, Ben M.; Scholten, Robert E.

    2016-08-01

    Since the first observation of electron diffraction in 1927, electrons have been used to probe the structure of matter. High-brightness sources of thermal electrons have recently emerged that are capable of simultaneously providing high spatial resolving power along with ultrafast temporal resolution, however they are yet to demonstrate the holy grail of single-shot diffraction of non-crystalline objects. The development of the cold atom electron source, based around the ionisation of laser cooled atoms, has the potential to contribute to this goal. Electron generation from laser cooled atoms is in its infancy, but in just ten years has moved from a proposal to a source capable of performing single-shot diffraction imaging of crystalline structures. The high brightness, high transverse coherence length, and small energy spread of cold electron sources are also potentially advantageous for applications ranging from seeding of x-ray free-electron lasers and synchrotrons to coherent diffractive imaging and microscopy. In this review we discuss the context which motivates the development of these sources, the operating principles of the source, and recent experimental results. The achievements demonstrated thus far combined with theoretical proposals to alleviate current bottlenecks in development promise a bright future for these sources.

  16. Energy level offset analysis of lead atom in laser plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, X. M.; Chen, C. S.; Man, B. Y.; Guo, J.; Wang, J.

    2009-08-01

    The optical emission spectra of the plasma generated by a 1064 nm laser irradiation of lead target in air were recorded and analyzed. Temporal evolvement trait of spectral lines was investigated. The Stark width and line shift were measured at different delay time and laser energies. The electron densities were determined using Stark-broadening parameters of spectral lines. The atomic energy level offset in plasma surroundings was explored by analyzing the line shift. The experimental data of Stark widths and line shifts were analyzed using the regularity of the Stark parameters’ dependence on effective ionization potential. However an inverse experimental result was found compared with the theoretical calculation. In addition, the change of the Stark widths and line shifts with the delay time and laser energies was discussed.

  17. Homonuclear ionizing collisions of laser-cooled metastable helium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Stas, R. J. W.; McNamara, J. M.; Hogervorst, W.; Vassen, W.

    2006-03-15

    We present a theoretical and experimental investigation of homonuclear ionizing collisions of laser-cooled metastable (2 {sup 3}S{sub 1}) helium atoms, considering both the fermionic {sup 3}He and bosonic {sup 4}He isotopes. The theoretical description combines quantum threshold behavior, Wigner's spin-conservation rule, and quantum-statistical symmetry requirements in a single-channel model, complementing a more complete close-coupling theory that has been reported for collisions of metastable {sup 4}He atoms. The model is supported with measurements (in the absence of light fields) of ionization rates in magneto-optically trapped samples that contain about 3x10{sup 8} atoms of a single isotope. The ionization rates are determined from measurements of trap loss due to light-assisted collisions combined with comparative measurements of the ion production rate in the absence and presence of trapping light. Theory and experiment show good agreement.

  18. Laser-cooled atomic ions as probes of molecular ions

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Kenneth R.; Viteri, C. Ricardo; Clark, Craig R.; Goeders, James E.; Khanyile, Ncamiso B.; Vittorini, Grahame D.

    2015-01-22

    Trapped laser-cooled atomic ions are a new tool for understanding cold molecular ions. The atomic ions not only sympathetically cool the molecular ions to millikelvin temperatures, but the bright atomic ion fluorescence can also serve as a detector of both molecular reactions and molecular spectra. We are working towards the detection of single molecular ion spectra by sympathetic heating spectroscopy. Sympathetic heating spectroscopy uses the coupled motion of two trapped ions to measure the spectra of one ion by observing changes in the fluorescence of the other ion. Sympathetic heating spectroscopy is a generalization of quantum logic spectroscopy, but does not require ions in the motional ground state or coherent control of the ion internal states. We have recently demonstrated this technique using two isotopes of Ca{sup +} [Phys. Rev. A, 81, 043428 (2010)]. Limits of the method and potential applications for molecular spectroscopy are discussed.

  19. Parcs:. a Laser-Cooled Atomic Clock in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heavner, T. P.; Hollberg, L. W.; Jefferts, S. R.; Robinson, H. G.; Sullivan, D. B.; Walls, F. L.; Ashby, N.; Klipstein, W. M.; Maleki, L.; Seidel, D. J.; Thompson, R. J.; Wu, S.; Young, L.; Mattison, E. M.; Vessot, R. F. C.; Demarchi, A.

    2002-04-01

    This paper describes progress toward the development of a Primary Atomic Reference Clock in Space (PARCS) and reviews the scientific and technical objectives of the PARCS mission. PARCS is a collaborative effort involving the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the University of Colorado, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), the Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (SAO) and the Politecnico di Torino. Space systems for this experiment include a laser-cooled cesium atomic clock and a GPS frequency-comparison and orbit determination system, along with a hydrogen maser that serves as both a local oscillator for the cesium clock and a reference against which certain tests of gravitational theory can be made. In the microgravity environment of the International Space Station (ISS), cesium atoms can be launched more slowly through the clock's microwave cavity, thus significantly reducing a number of troubling effects (including several critical systematic effects), so clock performance can be substantially improved beyond that achieved on earth.

  20. A heated vapor cell unit for dichroic atomic vapor laser lock in atomic rubidium.

    PubMed

    McCarron, Daniel J; Hughes, Ifan G; Tierney, Patrick; Cornish, Simon L

    2007-09-01

    The design and performance of a compact heated vapor cell unit for realizing a dichroic atomic vapor laser lock (DAVLL) for the D(2) transitions in atomic rubidium is described. A 5 cm long vapor cell is placed in a double-solenoid arrangement to produce the required magnetic field; the heat from the solenoid is used to increase the vapor pressure and correspondingly the DAVLL signal. We have characterized experimentally the dependence of important features of the DAVLL signal on magnetic field and cell temperature. For the weaker transitions both the amplitude and gradient of the signal are increased by an order of magnitude. PMID:17902946

  1. Search for a permanent EDM using laser cooled radioactive atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakemi, Y.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Itoh, M.; Kawamura, H.; Liu, S.; Nataraj, H. S.; Oikawa, A.; Saito, M.; Sato, T.; Yoshida, H. P.; Aoki, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Murakami, T.; Imai, K.; Hatanaka, K.; Wakasa, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Uchida, M.

    2011-07-01

    An Electric Dipole Moment (EDM) of the elementary particle is a good prove to observe the phenomena beyond the Standard Model. A non-zero EDM shows the violation of the time reversal symmetry, and under the CPT invariance it means the CP violation. In paramagnetic atoms, an electron EDM results in an atomic EDM enhanced by the factor of the 3rd power of the charge of the nucleus due the relativistic effects. A heaviest alkali element francium (Fr), which is the radioactive atom, has the largest enhancement factor K ~ 895. Then, we are developing a high intensity laser cooled Fr factory at Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University to perform the search for the EDM of Fr with the accuracy of 10-29 e · cm. The important points to overcome the current accuracy limit of the EDM are to realize the high intensity Fr source and to reduce the systematic error due to the motional magnetic field and inhomogeneous applied field. To reduce the dominant component of the systematic errors mentioned above, we will confine the Fr atoms in the small region with the Magneto-Optical Trap and optical lattice using the laser cooling and trapping techniques. The construction of the experimental apparatus is making progress, and the new thermal ionizer already produces the Fr of ~106 ions/s with the primary beam intensity 200 nA. The developments of the laser system and optical equipments are in progress, and the present status and future plan of the experimental project is reported.

  2. Nuclear-driven flashlamp pumping of the atomic iodine laser

    SciTech Connect

    Miley, G.H.

    1992-03-01

    This report is a study of the atomic iodine laser pumped with nuclear- excited XeBr fluorescence. Preliminary experiments, conducted in the TRIGA reactor investigated the fluorescence of the excimer XeBr under nuclear pumping with {sup 10}B and {sup 3}He, for use as a flashlamp gas to stimulate the laser. These measurements included a determination of the fluorescence efficiency (light emitted in the wavelength region of interest, divided by energy deposited in the gas) of XeBr under nuclear pumping, with varying excimer mixtures. Maximum fluorescence efficiencies were approximately 1%. In order to better understand XeBr under nuclear excitation, a kinetics model of the system was prepared. The model generated the time-dependant concentrations of 20 reaction species for three pulse sizes, a TRIGA pulse, a fast burst reactor pulse, and an e-beam pulse. The modeling results predicted fluorescence efficiencies significantly higher (peak efficiencies of approximately 10%) than recorded in the fluorescence experiments. The cause of this discrepancy was not fully determined. A ray tracing computer model was also prepared to evaluate the efficiency with which nuclear-induced fluorescence generated in one cavity of a laser could be coupled into another cavity containing an iodine lasant. Finally, an experimental laser cell was constructed to verify that nuclear-induced XeBr fluorescence could be used to stimulate a laser. Lasing was achieved at 1.31 micron in the TRIGA using C{sub 3}F{sub 7}I, a common iodine lasant. Peak laser powers were approximately 20 mW. Measured flashlamp pump powers at threshold agreed well with literature values, as did lasant pressure dependency on laser operation.

  3. Key technologies and applications of laser cooling and trapping 87Rb atomic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ru, Ning; Zhang, Li; Wang, Yu; Fan, Shangchun

    2016-06-01

    Atom Interferometry is proved to be a potential method for measuring the acceleration of atoms due to Gravity, we are now building a feasible system of cold atom gravimeter. In this paper development and the important applications of laser cooling and trapping atoms are introduced, some key techniques which are used to obtain 87Rb cold atoms in our experiments are also discussed.

  4. Atomic mass dependent electrostatic diagnostics of colliding laser plasma plumes

    SciTech Connect

    Yeates, P.; Fallon, C.; Kennedy, E. T.; Costello, J. T.; School of Physical Sciences, Dublin City University , Dublin 7

    2013-09-15

    The behaviours of colliding laser plasma plumes (C{sub p}) compared with single plasma plumes (S{sub p}) are investigated for 14 different atomic mass targets. A Faraday cup, situated at the end of a drift tube (L = 0.99 m), is employed to record the time-of-flight (TOF) current traces for all elements and both plume configurations, for a fixed laser intensity of I{sub p} = 4.2 × 10{sup 10} W cm{sup −2} (F = 0.25 kJ cm{sup −2}). The ratio of the peak current from the C{sub p} relative to twice that from the S{sub p} is designated as the peak current ratio while the ratio of the integrated charge yield from the C{sub p} relative to twice that from the S{sub p} is designated as the charge yield ratio. Variation of the position of the Faraday cup within the drift tube (L = 0.33, 0.55, and 0.99 m) in conjunction with a lower laser fluence (F = 0.14 kJ cm{sup −2}) facilitated direct comparison of the changing TOF traces from both plasma configurations for the five lightest elements studied (C, Al, Si, Ti, and Mn). The results are discussed in the frame of laser plasma hydrodynamic modelling to approximate the critical recombination distance L{sub CR}. The dynamics of colliding laser plasma plumes and the atomic mass dependence trends observed are presented and discussed.

  5. Secondary laser cooling and capturing of thulium atoms in traps

    SciTech Connect

    Sukachev, D D; Kalganova, E S; Sokolov, A V; Fedorov, S A; Vishnyakova, G A; Akimov, A V; Kolachevsky, N N; Sorokin, V N

    2014-06-30

    Secondary laser cooling has been realised on the weak dipole transition 4f{sup 13}({sup 2}F{sup o})6s{sup 2}, J = 7/2, F=4 → 4f{sup 12}({sup 3}H{sub 6}) 5d{sub 5/2}6s{sup 2}, J' = 9/2, F' = 5 with the wavelength of 530.7 nm and natural width of 350 kHz. The temperature of the atomic cloud in a magnetooptical trap (MOT) was 30 μK at the lifetime of 2 s and the number of atoms 10{sup 5}. Approximately 1% of atoms from the MOT have been reloaded to an optical dipole trap and to one-dimensional optical lattice at the wavelength of 532 nm. The atom lifetime in the optical lattice was 320 ms. We propose to employ thulium atoms captured in an optical lattice as an optical frequency reference. (extreme light fields and their applications)

  6. Laser cooling, trapping, and Rydberg spectroscopy of neutral holmium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hostetter, James Allen

    This thesis focuses on progress towards using ensembles of neutral holmium for use in quantum computing operations. We are particularly interested in using a switchable interaction between neutral atoms, the Rydberg blockade, to implement a universal set of quantum gates in a collective encoding scheme that presents many benefits over quantum computing schemes which rely on physically distinct qubits. We show that holmium is uniquely suited for operations in a collective encoding basis because it has 128 ground hyperfine states, the largest number of any stable, neutral atom. Holmium is a rare earth atom that is very poorly described for our purposes as it has never been cooled and trapped, its spectrum is largely unknown, and it presents several unique experimental challenges related to its complicated atomic structure and short wavelength transitions. We demonstrate important progress towards overcoming these challenges. We produce the first laser cooling and trapping of holmium into a MOT. Because we use a broad cooling transition, our cooling technique does not require the use of a Zeeman slower. Using MOT depletion spectroscopy, we provide precise measurements of holmium's Rydberg states and its ionization potential. Our work continues towards cooling holmium into a dipole trap by calculating holmium's AC polarizability and demonstrating the results of early attempts at an optical dipole trap. We provide details of future upgrades to the experimental apparatus and discuss interesting potential for using holmium in quantum computing using single atoms in a magnetically trapped lattice. This thesis shows several promising indicators for continued work in this field.

  7. Single- and multiphoton infrared laser spectroscopy of atomic negative ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheer, Michael

    A pulsed, tunable infrared laser source (0.6-5.2 μm) has been developed on the basis of a commercial dye laser and non-linear optical conversion techniques. This laser source was combined with a keV negative ion beam apparatus in a crossed-beam geometry, with the aim to systematically study several atomic negative ions through a variety of single- and multiphoton detachment experiments. Photodetachment threshold spectra of 21 ionic species (B- , C-, O-, Al- , Si-, Cr-, Co- , Ni-, Cu-, Ge- , Mo-, Rh-, Pd- , Ag-, Sn-, Sb- , Te-, Cs-, Ir- , Pt-, and Bi-) have been recorded, in most cases resulting in very accurate determinations of ionic binding energies, marking substantial improvements over previous experimental values. In fact, several ionic states investigated here had not been observed previously. Different schemes for resonant multiphoton detachment of atomic negative ions were demonstrated for the first time. These studies were conducted with several anions (Si-, Sri- , Sb-, Te-, Ir- , and Pt-) providing highly accurate ionic energy level splittings and clearly demonstrating that multiphoton probes are generally applicable to negative ion structure.

  8. The Effect of Intense Laser Radiation on Atomic Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Stephen Michael Radley

    1991-02-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. We have carried out theoretical and experimental studies into the effect of intense laser radiation on atomic collisions. The first experiment used neon. Excitation by electron impact in a gas discharge demanded a pressure of at least 0.075 Torr. Measurement of the intensity of 3^1S_0to 3^1P_1 fluorescence has been made for the case where high intensity ASE wings in the laser profile and background laser scatter are unimportant, with the laser tuned to resonance. The field intensity required to produce strong field fluorescence (exemplified by the Mollow triplet) was found to give rise to complications capable of screening the effects sought. Our theoretical model has suggested that at finite detunings, line-centre fluorescence will dominate Rayleigh scatter and omega_3 fluorescence. Our measurements provide information on the saturation of neon fluorescence but not of the variation of the intense field collision rate. Absorption of weak field 253.7 nm laser photons by ground state mercury atoms yielded a high 6 ^3P_1 population at a lower pressure of 0.02 Torr. The Mollow triplet has been observed in the self-broadened mercury system. Dressing of the upper transition (6^3P_1rightarrow 7^3S_1) by an intense laser close to 435.8 nm yielded the strong field signal. Polarisation studies were made possible by the 3-level mercury system (radiation trapping in a 2-level system would depolarise fluorescence) perturbed by argon. The studies yielded results that were explainable in terms of the selective population of Stark shifted dressed states by a detuned, weak probe field. Use has been made of the electric-dipole radiation selection rule m_{J}=0 rightarrow m_{J^' } = 0 unless J=J^' to devise a 'Stark shift collision switch'. The competition between collision and radiation induced transitions within the mercury atom has then been studied. The resonant, strong lambda 435.8 nm field was used

  9. Laser cooling and trapping of atomic particles. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning theory and experiments on laser cooling and laser trapping of neutral atoms and atomic ions. Atoms and ions are cooled by laser radiation pressure to very low Kelvin temperatures and confined in electromagnetic traps of very high density. Atomic particles cover sodium atoms, mercury ions, beryllium ions, magnesium ions, and hydrogen. Citations discuss applications in high performance spectroscopy, atomic clocks, microwave and optical frequency standards, relativistic neutral particle beam weapons, exotic fuels, cooling of electron beams, and space propulsion. (Contains a minimum of 204 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  10. Laser cooling and trapping of atomic particles. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1994-02-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning theory and experiments on laser cooling and laser trapping of neutral atoms and atomic ions. Atoms and ions are cooled by laser radiation pressure to very low Kelvin temperatures and confined in electromagnetic traps of very high density. Atomic particles cover sodium atoms, mercury ions, beryllium ions, magnesium ions, and hydrogen. Citations discuss applications in high performance spectroscopy, atomic clocks, microwave and optical frequency standards, relativistic neutral particle beam weapons, exotic fuels, cooling of electron beams, and space propulsion. (Contains a minimum of 185 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  11. Laser cooling and trapping of atomic particles. (Latest citations from the NTIS data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning theory and experiments on laser cooling and laser trapping of neutral atoms and atomic ions. Atoms and ions are cooled by laser radiation pressure to very low Kelvin temperatures and confined in electromagnetic traps of very high density. Atomic particles discussed include sodium atoms, mercury ions, beryllium ions, magnesium ions, and hydrogen. Applications for high performance spectroscopy, atomic clocks, microwave and optical frequency standards, relativistic neutral particle beam weapons, exotic fuels, cooling of electron beams, and space propulsion are examined. (Contains a minimum of 151 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  12. Production of pulsed atomic oxygen beams via laser vaporization methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinza, David E.; Coulter, Daniel R.; Liang, Ranty H.; Gupta, Amitava

    1986-01-01

    The generation of energetic pulsed atomic oxygen beams by laser-driven evaporation of cryogenically frozen ozone/oxygen films and thin indium-tin oxide (ITO) films is reported. Mass spectroscopy is used in the mass and energy characterization of beams from the ozone/oxygen films, and a peak flux of 3 x 10 to the 20th/sq m per sec at 10 eV is found. Analysis of the time-of-flight data suggests that several processes contribute to the formation of the oxygen beam. Results show the absence of metastable states such as the 2p(3)3s(1)(5S) level of atomic oxygen blown-off from the ITO films. The present process has application to the study of the oxygen degradation problem of LEO materials.

  13. Enabling Nanotechnology with Focused Ion Beams from Laser Cooled Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steele, A. V.; Knuffman, B.; Orloff, J.; Maazouz, M.; McClelland, J. J.

    2011-05-01

    The Magneto-Optical Trap Ion Source (MOTIS) being developed at NIST has the potential to enable numerous advances in nanoscale science. In a MOTIS, atoms are captured into a MOT, photoionized, and accelerated to an energy of a few hundred eV to a few tens of kV. A beam formed in this way can be brought to a tight focus, competitive with the commercial focused ion beam machines deployed widely today. Additionally, the unique characteristics of this source, coupled with the user's choice of ion from the long and growing list of laser-coolable atomic species suggest that the MOTIS has the potential to advance the state of the art in applications such as imaging, nanofabrication, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and others. I will present high-resolution images from our lithium and chromium MOTIS-based focused ion beams and discuss applications which we will pursue with these new tools.

  14. Designing Frustrated Quantum Magnets with Laser-Dressed Rydberg Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaetzle, Alexander W.; Dalmonte, Marcello; Nath, Rejish; Gross, Christian; Bloch, Immanuel; Zoller, Peter

    2015-05-01

    We show how a broad class of lattice spin-1 /2 models with angular- and distance-dependent couplings can be realized with cold alkali atoms stored in optical or magnetic trap arrays. The effective spin-1 /2 is represented by a pair of atomic ground states, and spin-spin interactions are obtained by admixing van der Waals interactions between fine-structure split Rydberg states with laser light. The strengths of the diagonal spin interactions as well as the "flip-flop," and "flip-flip" and "flop-flop" interactions can be tuned by exploiting quantum interference, thus realizing different spin symmetries. The resulting energy scales of interactions compare well with typical temperatures and decoherence time scales, making the exploration of exotic forms of quantum magnetism, including emergent gauge theories and compass models, accessible within state-of-the-art experiments.

  15. Designing frustrated quantum magnets with laser-dressed Rydberg atoms.

    PubMed

    Glaetzle, Alexander W; Dalmonte, Marcello; Nath, Rejish; Gross, Christian; Bloch, Immanuel; Zoller, Peter

    2015-05-01

    We show how a broad class of lattice spin-1/2 models with angular- and distance-dependent couplings can be realized with cold alkali atoms stored in optical or magnetic trap arrays. The effective spin-1/2 is represented by a pair of atomic ground states, and spin-spin interactions are obtained by admixing van der Waals interactions between fine-structure split Rydberg states with laser light. The strengths of the diagonal spin interactions as well as the "flip-flop," and "flip-flip" and "flop-flop" interactions can be tuned by exploiting quantum interference, thus realizing different spin symmetries. The resulting energy scales of interactions compare well with typical temperatures and decoherence time scales, making the exploration of exotic forms of quantum magnetism, including emergent gauge theories and compass models, accessible within state-of-the-art experiments. PMID:25978228

  16. Characterization of Vapour Plume Species and Deposition Residues Resulting from Pulsed Laser Ablation of a Graphite/Epoxy Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roybal, R. E.; Miglionico, C. J.; Stein, C.; Murr, L. E.; Lincoln, K. A.

    1995-01-01

    A modified time-of-flight mass spectrometer fitted with a special collection stage for carbon-coated transmission electron microscope specimen grids is used to monitor laser-pulse ablation products from graphite/epoxy composite targets. Scanning electron microscopy observations show ablation damage to consist of matrix pyrolysis, fibre fracture and spallation of fragments which include elemental hydrogen, carbon epoxide and acetylene groups. Transmission electron microscope examination of specimen grids showed a variety of crystals and polycrystalline hexagonal graphites having a wide range of shapes including spheres and faceted polyhedra and platelets, textured flake structures, microrosettes. These observations lend some credibility to a model for laser-shock and pyrolysis effects which create molecular plume fragments and deposition fragments of hexagonal graphite.

  17. Search for permanent EDM using laser cooled Fr atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, Hirokazu; Aoki, T.; Arikawa, H.; Ezure, S.; Furukawa, T.; Harada, K.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Imai, K.; Inoue, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kato, T.; Murakami, T.; Nataraj, H. S.; Sato, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Wakasa, T.; Yoshida, H. P.; Sakemi, Y.

    2013-03-01

    The existence of a non-zero electric dipole moment (EDM) implies the violation of time reversal symmetry. As the time-reversal symmetry violation predicted by the Standard Model (SM) for the electron EDM is too small to be observed with current experimental techniques and any a non-zero EDM would indicate new physics beyond the SM. The tiny signal from the electron EDM is enhanced in the heavy atoms such as francium (Fr). We are constructing the laser-cooled Fr factory to search for the electron EDM.

  18. Electron scattering by laser-excited barium atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Register, D. F.; Trajmar, S.; Jensen, S. W.; Poe, R. T.

    1978-01-01

    Inelastic and superelastic scattering of 30- and 100-eV electrons by laser-excited 6s 6p 1P and subsequent cascade-populated 6s 6p 3P, 6s 5d 1D, and 6s 5d 3D Ba atoms have been observed. Absolute differential cross sections for the singlet and relative scattering intensities for the triplet species have been determined in the 5 to 20 deg angular region. Under the present conditions excitations dominate over deexcitations.

  19. Atomic fountain of laser-cooled Yb atoms for precision measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Kanhaiya; Rathod, K. D.; Singh, Alok K.; Natarajan, Vasant

    2010-10-15

    We demonstrate launching of laser-cooled Yb atoms in a cold atomic fountain. Atoms in a collimated thermal beam are first cooled and captured in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) operating on the strongly allowed {sup 1}S{sub 0}{yields}{sup 1}P{sub 1} transition at 399 nm (blue line). They are then transferred to a MOT on the weakly allowed {sup 1}S{sub 0}{yields}{sup 3}P{sub 1} transition at 556 nm (green line). Cold atoms from the green MOT are launched against gravity at a velocity of around 2.5 m/s using a pair of green beams. We trap more than 10{sup 7} atoms in the blue MOT and transfer up to 70% into the green MOT. The temperature for the odd isotope {sup 171}Yb is {approx}1 mK in the blue MOT, and reduces by a factor of 40 in the green MOT.

  20. Production of pulsed atomic oxygen beams via laser vaporization methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinza, David E.; Coulter, Daniel R.; Liang, Ranty H.; Gupta, Amitava

    1987-01-01

    Energetic pulsed atomic oxygen beams were generated by laser-driven evaporation of cryogenically frozen ozone/oxygen films and thin films of indium-tin oxide (ITO). Mass and energy characterization of beams from the ozone/oxygen films were carried out by mass spectrometry. The peak flux, found to occur at 10 eV, is estimated from this data to be 3 x 10(20) m(-2) s(-1). Analysis of the time-of-flight data indicates a number of processes contribute to the formation of the atomic oxygen beam. The absence of metastable states such as the 2p(3) 3s(1) (5S) level of atomic oxygen blown off from ITO films is supported by the failure to observe emission at 777.3 nm from the 2p(3) 3p(1) (5P sub J) levels. Reactive scattering experiments with polymer film targets for atomic oxygen bombardment are planned using a universal crossed molecular beam apparatus.

  1. Concentration effects on laser-based δ18 O and δ2 H measurements and implications for the calibration of vapour measurements with liquid standards.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Markus; Maseyk, Kadmiel; Lett, Céline; Biron, Philippe; Richard, Patricia; Bariac, Thierry; Seibt, Ulli

    2010-12-30

    Recently available isotope ratio infrared spectroscopy can directly measure the isotopic composition of atmospheric water vapour (δ(18) O, δ(2) H), overcoming one of the main limitations of isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) methods. Calibrating these gas-phase instruments requires the vapourisation of liquid standards since primary standards in principle are liquids. Here we test the viability of calibrating a wavelength-scanned cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) instrument with vapourised liquid standards. We also quantify the dependency of the measured isotope values on the water concentration for a range of isotopic compositions. In both liquid and vapour samples, we found an increase in δ(18) O and δ(2) H with water vapour concentration. For δ(18) O, the slope of this increase was similar for liquid and vapour, with a slight positive relationship with sample δ-value. For δ(2) H, we found diverging patterns for liquid and vapour samples, with no dependence on δ-value for vapour, but a decreasing slope for liquid samples. We also quantified tubing memory effects to step changes in isotopic composition, avoiding concurrent changes in the water vapour concentration. Dekabon tubing exhibited much stronger, concentration-dependent, memory effects for δ(2) H than stainless steel or perfluoroalkoxy (PFA) tubing. Direct vapour measurements with CRDS in a controlled experimental chamber agreed well with results obtained from vapour simultaneously collected in cold traps analysed by CRDS and IRMS. We conclude that vapour measurements can be calibrated reliably with liquid standards. We demonstrate how to take the concentration dependencies of the δ-values into account. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:21080508

  2. Low-threshold short-cavity diode laser for a miniature atomic clock

    SciTech Connect

    Kargapol'tsev, Sergei V; Velichansky, Vladimir L; Vasil'ev, V V; Kobyakova, M Sh; Morozyuk, A V; Shiryaeva, N V; Konyaev, V P

    2009-06-30

    Short-cavity diode lasers (SCDLs) emitting at the 894-nm D{sub 1} line of caesium are developed. Low threshold currents and power consumption will make it possible to use these lasers in chip-size atomic clocks (CSACs) and magnetometers. The SCDL parameters are comparable with the parameters of surface-emitting lasers. (lasers)

  3. Effects of strong laser fields on hadronic helium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Han-Chieh; Jiang, Tsin-Fu

    2015-12-01

    The metastable hadronic helium atoms in microseconds lifetime are available in laboratory, and two-photon spectroscopy was reported recently. This exotic helium atom has an electron in the ground state and a negative hadron rotating around the helium nucleus. We theoretically study the excitation on hadronic helium by femtosecond pulse and elucidate the influence of moleculelike structure and rotation behavior on the photoelectron spectra and high-order harmonic generation. Because of the moleculelike structure, the electronic ground state consists of several angular orbitals. These angular orbitals can enhance photoelectron spectra at high energies, and also influence the harmonic generation spectra considerably. In particular, the harmonic spectra can occur at even harmonic orders because of the transition between these angular orbitals and continuum states. On the other side, the rotation behavior of hadron can induce a frequency shift in the harmonic spectra. The magnitude of the frequency shift depends on the orbiting speed of the hadron, which is considerable because the rotation period is in a few femtoseconds, a time scale that is comparable to that of infrared laser and is feasible in current laser experiments.

  4. Experimental comparison of Raman and rf outcouplers for high-flux atom lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Debs, J. E.; Doering, D.; Altin, P. A.; Figl, C.; Dugue, J.; Jeppesen, M.; Schultz, J. T.; Robins, N. P.; Close, J. D.

    2010-01-15

    We study the properties of an atom laser beam derived from a Bose-Einstein condensate using three different outcouplers, one based on multistate radio-frequency transitions and two others based on Raman transitions capable of imparting momentum to the beam. We first summarize the differences that arise in such systems, and how they may impact on the use of an atom laser in interferometry. Experimentally, we examine the formation of a bound state in all three outcouplers, a phenomenon which limits the atom laser flux, and find that a two-state Raman outcoupler is the preferred option for high-flux, low-divergence atom laser beams.

  5. Ultra-violet and resonant laser ablation coupled with microwave induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry and determination of tin in nickel based alloys by electrothermal atomizer atomic absorption and laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaodong

    Chapter 1 reviews laser ablation in analytical atomic spectrometry. Laser ablation is categorized into two functions: one is used as a sample introduction method, the other function is used as a microprobe analysis method. Both fundamental and applicational aspects are reviewed with the citations of related papers. This chapter also serves as an introduction to the work which is described in chapter 2 and chapter 3 as laser ablation is a relatively new research area for the research group. In chapter 2, instrumentation for excimer (308nm) laser ablation of samples was coupled with a microwave induced plasma (MLP), and evaluated for its potential as an approach to solid sampling for atomic emission spectrometry. Operating parameters were optimized, and the effects of laser repetition rate and number of laser shots on the emission signal were investigated. The UV excimer laser removed more material than would be expected of an infrared laser of similar energy. The chromium detection limit in the solid steel sample was estimated to be about 500 mug/g. In chapter 3, a wavelength tunable optical parametric oscillator (OPO) laser was used to ablate a steel sample into the same apparatus described in chapter 2. The emission signal for the elements was selectively enhanced when the ablation wavelength was tuned to be in resonance with any atomic transition of that element. This was the first report of the observation of resonant ablation by use of optical detection, as prior reports of resonant ablation have used mass spectrometric detectors. Chapter 4 reviews the publications in laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry in recent eight years. The focus of the review is on recent development on new instruments and applications of this technique. Chapter 5 studies the determination of tin in nickel-based alloys with laser excited atomic fluorescence in a graphite furnace. Zeeman electrothermal atomizer atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass

  6. Theory and computation of atoms in intense laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, Edward Stuart

    This thesis has involved performing various modifications to the HELIUM program and using the HELIUM program to study the dynamics of laser-atom interactions. The HELIUM program is a portable code for the numerical solution of the full 5-dimensional time-dependent Schrödinger Equation for 2 electron atoms in a very intense, linearly polarized, laser pulse. A finite-difference grid is used to model the two radial co-ordinates and a basis set of coupled spherical harmonics handles the three angular variables of the system. The HELIUM program was modified to incorporate a new propagator based on Krylov-subspace techniques, thus allowing a substantial increase in performance. A modular structure was implemented within the HELIUM program, separating the source code into 5 layers. This allows the program to be optimized for particular computer architectures while remaining portable across a wide variety of massively-parallel and vector supercomputers. It also greatly aids the task of program testing and verification. The breadth of output from the code was greatly extended. Numerous runs were performed for a wide variety of laser pulse parameters, enabling various observables such as ionization rates and harmonic generation to be studied. Comparisons with the results of other models have been performed and a new single active electron model has been developed. The full five-dimensional wavefunction can now be output to disk using an efficient parallel I/O strategy for subsequent analysis using the latest graphical visualization techniques. The study of magnesium, a quasi two electron system, was started using a time-independent screening potential to model the effect of the inner closed electron shells.

  7. Laser spectroscopy of atoms in superfluid helium for the measurement of nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments of radioactive atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, T.; Furukawa, T.; Imamura, K.; Yang, X. F.; Hatakeyama, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Ueno, H.; Asahi, K.; Shimoda, T.; Matsuo, Y.

    2015-11-01

    A new laser spectroscopic method named "OROCHI (Optical RI-atom Observation in Condensed Helium as Ion catcher)" has been developed for deriving the nuclear spins and electromagnetic moments of low-yield exotic nuclei. In this method, we observe atomic Zeeman and hyperfine structures using laser-radio-frequency/microwave double-resonance spectroscopy. In our previous works, double-resonance spectroscopy was performed successfully with laser-sputtered stable atoms including non-alkali Au atoms as well as alkali Rb and Cs atoms. Following these works, measurements with 84-87Rb energetic ion beams were carried out in the RIKEN projectile fragment separator (RIPS). In this paper, we report the present status of OROCHI and discuss its feasibility, especially for low-yield nuclei such as unstable Au isotopes.

  8. Cooling of cesium atomic beam with light from spectrally broadened diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Yat; Bhaskar, Natarajan D.

    1995-12-01

    We have used spectrally broadened counterpropagating radiation from tunable diode lasers to cool an atomic beam of cesium. This produces a continuous beam of cold atoms. The injection current to the single-mode diode laser is modulated at 10 MHz, resulting in spectrally broadened light for atomic cooling and optical pumping. The atomic beam is probed with a weak single-mode laser. This is a simple and relatively inexpensive method for producing a continuous supply of cold atoms. Copyright (c) 1995 Optical Society of America

  9. Selective reabsorption leading to multiple oscillations in the 8446-A atomic-oxygen laser.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feld, M. S.; Feldman, B. J.; Javan, A.; Domash, L. H.

    1973-01-01

    Laser oscillation of atomic oxygen at 8446 A occurs in four closely spaced lines with peculiar intensity ratios, all detuned from the atomic center frequencies of the three fine-structure transitions. These anomalies are caused by the selective reabsorption of resonance radiation from the lower laser level by ground-state oxygen atoms. The selectivity results from the fact that the velocity distribution of the laser levels is considerably wider than that of the ground state, because of the dissociative mode of production of excited oxygen atoms. Possible extension of this mechanism to the atomic-hydrogen system is discussed.

  10. Design, fabrication and characterization of tunable external cavity diode laser and atom trapping chips for atomic physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Ho-Chiao

    External cavity diode laser systems (ECDLs) have been well documented for their suitability in the fields of laser cooling and atom trapping, and are now widely used in optical and atomic physics. A particularly simple implementation of this idea uses feedback from a diffraction grating mounted in the Littrow configuration and the typical size of this laser is quite large (120mmx90mmx90mm). For atom optics, the current atom trapping chips are not in a feedthrough configuration, which makes the chips to glass cell assembly process complicated and the wires and solder areas vulnerable, resulting in an unreliable vacuum seal. Recent experimental realizations of atom optical devices such as atomic waveguides, beam splitters, and on-chip Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC) sources have opened a new field for the development of more complex devices such as, e.g., BEC-based atom transistor. This work focuses on micro/nano fabrication techniques to build three different devices for the miniature BEC system. The research work focuses on the development of new ECDLs, a novel fabrication process of feedthrough atom trapping chips for atomic optics and a fabrication process for atom transistor chips. In the ECDLs part, we describe a new method for constructing a smaller external-cavity diode laser by use of a micromachined silicon flexure and a VHG (Volume Holographic Grating). It is much smaller, inexpensive and easy to build because it is based on simple modifications of a few commercial optical and mechanical components but with a specific silicon flexure design enabled by micro-fabrication technology for the laser frequency tuning. In the feedthrough chips part, we present a novel fabrication process for feedthrough atom trapping chips in atomic condensate optics cells using the copper electroplating to seal the vias. The advantages of using feedthrough atom trapping chips are the simple microfabrication process and reduction of the overall chip area bonded on the glass atom

  11. Observation of superfluorescent emissions from laser-cooled atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paradis, E.; Barrett, B.; Kumarakrishnan, A.; Zhang, R.; Raithel, G.

    2008-04-01

    We study superfluorescence (SF) from spherical and cigar-shaped clouds of laser-cooled Rubidium atoms from the 5D5/2 level through the 6P3/2 level to the 5S1/2 ground level. The atomic system is initially excited to the 5D5/2 level from the ground state via two-photon excitation through the intermediate 5P3/2 level. The fluorescence on the 6P-5S transition at 420 nm is recorded using time-resolved measurements. The time delays of the observed SF emission peaks typically scale as ˜N-1 , where N is the atom number, and are much smaller than the time delay expected for uncorrelated cascade fluorescence. Since N is significantly smaller than the threshold number for SF on the 420 nm transition, and larger than the threshold number for the 5D-6P transition at 5.2μm , our observations suggest that the 420 nm SF emission is triggered by rapid deexcitation of the 5D to the 6P level via SF at 5.2μm . The observed SF time delays for 420 nm emission agree with SF time-delay estimates for the 5.2μm transition. For spherical clouds, the SF is isotropic. For cigar-shaped clouds, the SF is highly anisotropic. Along the long axis of cigar-shaped atom clouds, SF and incoherent cascade fluorescence produce temporally well-resolved peaks in the detected signal. In this case, the SF component of the signal is highly concentrated along a direction in between the directions of the two almost parallel excitation beams. The observed SF intensities scale as N , suggesting that the 5D level is regeneratively pumped during the SF decay.

  12. Superelastic electron scattering from laser-excited cesium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Slaughter, D. S.; Karaganov, V.; Brunger, M. J.; Teubner, P. J. O.; Bray, I.; Bartschat, K.

    2007-06-15

    We present results from a joint experimental and theoretical investigation of superelastic electron scattering from laser-excited Cs atoms in the (6p){sup 2}P{sub 3/2} state. Comparison of the measured pseudo-Stokes parameters P{sub 1}, P{sub 2}, and P{sub 3} and the total degree of polarization P{sup +} for incident energies of 5.5 eV and 13.5 eV, respectively, with theoretical predictions based upon a nonrelativistic convergent close-coupling method and a 24-state semirelativistic Breit-Pauli R-matrix approach indicates that driving channel coupling to convergence for these observables is more important than accounting for relativistic effects.

  13. Request for Support for the Conference on Super Intense Laser Atom Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Todd Ditmire

    2004-10-21

    The Conference on Super Intense Laser Atom Physics (SILAP) was held in November 2003 in Dallas, Texas. The venue for the meeting was South Fork Ranch in the outskirts of Dallas. The topics of the meeting included high harmonic generation and attosecond pulse generation, strong field interactions with molecules and clusters, particle acceleration, and relativistic laser atom interactions.

  14. QED Energy Approach to Atoms and Nuclei in a Strong Laser Field: Radiation Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Glushkov, A. V.

    2010-10-29

    The consistent approach to the 'atom, nucleus - realistic laser field' interaction is presented and based on the QED and Gell-Mann and Low S-matrix formalism. The method is applied to studying the multi-photon resonance width and shift in the atom of H in a laser pulse.

  15. Neutral atomic jet generation by laser ablation of copper targets

    SciTech Connect

    Matos, J. B. de; Rodrigues, N. A. S.

    2014-08-15

    This work aimed the obtainment of a neutral atomic jet departing from a plume generated by laser ablation of copper targets. A pair of electrodes together with a transducer pressure sensor was used to study the ablated plume charge composition and also to measure the ion extraction from the plasma plume. The neutral beam was produced with this setup and the relative abundance of neutrals in the plasma was measured, it decreases from 30% to 8% when the laser fluence is varied from 20 J/cm{sup 2} to 32 J/cm{sup 2}. The necessary voltage to completely remove the ions from the plume varied from 10 V to 230 V in the same fluence range. TOF analysis resulted in center of mass velocities between 3.4 and 4.6 km/s, longitudinal temperature in the range from 1 × 10{sup 4} K to 2.4 × 10{sup 4} K and a Mach number of M = 2.36, calculated using purely hydrodynamic expansion approximation.

  16. Ionization of the hydrogen atom by intense ultrashort laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borbély, S.; Tőkési, K.; Nagy, L.

    2008-03-01

    The ionization of atomic hydrogen in intense laser fields is studied theoretically by both quantum-mechanical and classical approaches. In the quantum-mechanical treatment we apply a momentum-space strong-field approximation (MSSFA) and the Coulomb potential is taken into account as a perturbation. The classical calculations are performed within the framework of the classical trajectory Monte Carlo method. The energy and angular distributions of the ionization probabilities of the photoelectrons are presented for different laser pulses. While for the case of low electron energies larger discrepancies can be observed between the theories in the double-differential ionization probabilities, at high electron energies the agreement is excellent. This indicates that the generation of low-energy electrons is of quantum type and it is strongly influenced by the Coulomb potential, while the production of high-energy electrons is of classical type and it is less influenced by the Coulomb interaction. Our MSSFA results are in good agreement with the most reliable calculations based on a numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for high momentum transfers.

  17. Transient absorption spectra of the laser-dressed hydrogen atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Mitsuko; Chu, Shih-I.

    2013-10-01

    We present a theoretical study of transient absorption spectra of laser-dressed hydrogen atoms, based on numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The timing of absorption is controlled by the delay between an extreme ultra violet (XUV) pulse and an infrared (IR) laser field. The XUV pulse is isolated and several hundred attoseconds in duration, which acts as a pump to drive the ground-state electron to excited p states. The subsequent interaction with the IR field produces dressed states, which manifest as sidebands between the 1s-np absorption spectra separated by one IR-photon energy. We demonstrate that the population of dressed states is maximized when the timing of the XUV pulse coincides with the zero crossing of the IR field, and that their energies can be manipulated in a subcycle time scale by adding a chirp to the IR field. An alternative perspective to the problem is to think of the XUV pulse as a probe to detect the dynamical ac Stark shifts. Our results indicate that the accidental degeneracy of the hydrogen excited states is removed while they are dressed by the IR field, leading to large ac Stark shifts. Furthermore, we observe the Autler-Townes doublets for the n=2 and 3 levels using the 656 nm dressing field, but their separation does not agree with the prediction by the conventional three-level model that neglects the dynamical ac Stark shifts.

  18. Quantum Control of Atomic Hydrogen Using Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xingjun; Red, Eddie; Wynn, Albert, III; Weatherford, Charles

    2007-06-01

    A method for the ab initio simulation of STIRAP (stimulated Raman adiabatic passage) [1,2] laser quantum control of the energy level poulations of atomic ions will be described. The method employs a new algorithm for the solution of the time- dependent Schr"odinger equation which avoids the time-propagator and uses spectral elements in time with a spectral spatial basis.[3] This results in a set of coupled simultaneous equations and is thus an implicit stable procedure. In order to treat the continuum problem (ionization), a complex absorbing potential is used. The spectral spatial basis used is the Coulomb Sturmians.[4] As an initial application, the control of the levels of atomic hydrogen will be presented. [1] S.A. Rice and M. Zhao, Optical Control of Molecular Dynamics, Wiley, New York, 2000. [2] M. Shapiro and P. Brumer, Principles of the Quantum Control of Molecular Processes, Wiley, New York, 2003. [3] C.A. Weatherford, E. Red, and A. Wynn III, J. Mol. Structure (Theochem) 592, 47 (2002). [4] J. Avery, Hyperspherical Harmonics and Generalized Sturmians, Kluwer, Dordrecht, 2000.

  19. Ordered many-electron motions in atoms and x-ray lasers. [Subpicosecond ultraviolet laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, C.K.

    1986-01-01

    Subpicosecond ultraviolet laser technology is enabling the exploration of nonlinear atomic interactions with electric field strengths considerably in excess of an atomic unit. As this regime is approached, experiments studying multiple ionization, photoelectron energy spectra, and harmonically produced radiation all exhibit strong nonlinear coupling. Peak total energy transfer rates on the order of approx.2 x 10/sup -4/ W/atom have been observed at an intensity of approx.10/sup 16/ W/cm/sup 2/, and it is expected that energy transfer rates approaching approx.0.1 to 1 W/atom will occur under more extreme conditions for which the ultraviolet electric field E is significantly greater than e/a/sub 0//sup 2/. In this high intensity regime, a wide range of new nonlinear phenomena will be open to study. These will include the possibility of ordered driven motions in atoms, molecules, and plasmas, mechanisms involving collisions, and relativistic processes such as electron-positron pair production. An understanding of these physical interactions may provide a basis for the generation of stimulated emission in the x-ray range. 100 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Clock Technology Development for the Laser Cooling and Atomic Physics (LCAP) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klipstein, W. M.; Thompson, R. J.; Seidel, D. J.; Kohel, J.; Maleki, L.

    1998-01-01

    The Time and Frequency Sciences and Technology Group at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has developed a laser cooling capability for flight and has been selected by NASA to support the Laser-Cooling and Atomic Physics (LCAP) program. Current work in the group includes design and development for tee two laser-cooled atomic clock experiments which have been selected for flight on the International Space Station.

  1. Laser sculpting of atomic sp, sp(2) , and sp(3) hybrid orbitals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunmei; Manz, Jörn; Yang, Yonggang

    2015-01-12

    Atomic sp, sp(2) , and sp(3) hybrid orbitals were introduced by Linus Pauling to explain the nature of the chemical bond. Quantum dynamics simulations show that they can be sculpted by means of a selective series of coherent laser pulses, starting from the 1s orbital of the hydrogen atom. Laser hybridization generates atoms with state-selective electric dipoles, opening up new possibilities for the study of chemical reaction dynamics and heterogeneous catalysis. PMID:25257703

  2. Element selective detection of molecular species applying chromatographic techniques and diode laser atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kunze, K; Zybin, A; Koch, J; Franzke, J; Miclea, M; Niemax, K

    2004-12-01

    Tunable diode laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (DLAAS) combined with separation techniques and atomization in plasmas and flames is presented as a powerful method for analysis of molecular species. The analytical figures of merit of the technique are demonstrated by the measurement of Cr(VI) and Mn compounds, as well as molecular species including halogen atoms, hydrogen, carbon and sulfur. PMID:15561625

  3. Determining the stable isotope composition of pore water from saturated and unsaturated zone core: improvements to the direct vapour equilibration laser spectrometry method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendry, M. J.; Schmeling, E.; Wassenaar, L. I.; Barbour, S. L.; Pratt, D.

    2015-11-01

    A method to measure the δ2H and δ18O composition of pore waters in saturated and unsaturated geologic core samples using direct vapour equilibration and laser spectrometry (DVE-LS) was first described in 2008, and has since been rapidly adopted. Here, we describe a number of important methodological improvements and limitations encountered in routine application of DVE-LS over several years. Generally, good comparative agreement, as well as accuracy, is obtained between core pore water isotopic data obtained using DVE-LS and that measured on water squeezed from the same core. In complex hydrogeologic settings, high-resolution DVE-LS depth profiles provide greater spatial resolution of isotopic profiles compared to long-screened or nested piezometers. When fluid is used during drilling and coring (e.g. water rotary or wet sonic drill methods), spiking the drill fluid with 2H can be conducted to identify core contamination. DVE-LS analyses yield accurate formational isotopic data for fine-textured core (e.g. clay, shale) samples, but are less effective for cores obtained from saturated permeable (e.g. sand, gravels) geologic media or on chip samples that are easily contaminated by wet rotary drilling fluid. Data obtained from DVE-LS analyses of core samples collected using wet (contamination by drill water) and dry sonic (water loss by heating) methods were also problematic. Accurate DVE-LS results can be obtained on core samples with gravimetric water contents > 5 % by increasing the sample size tested. Inexpensive Ziploc™ gas-sampling bags were determined to be as good as, if not better than, other, more expensive specialty bags. Sample storage in sample bags provides acceptable results for up to 10 days of storage; however, measurable water loss, as well as evaporitic isotopic enrichment, occurs for samples stored for up to 6 months. With appropriate care taken during sample collection and storage, the DVE-LS approach for obtaining high-resolution pore water

  4. Investigation of laser-fired point contacts on KOH structured laser-crystallized silicon by conductive atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gref, Orman; Weizman, Moshe; Rhein, Holger; Gabriel, Onno; Gernert, Ulrich; Schlatmann, Rutger; Boit, Christian; Friedrich, Felice

    2016-06-01

    A conductive atomic force microscope is used to study the local topography and conductivity of laser-fired aluminum contacts on KOH-structured multicrystalline silicon surfaces. A significant increase in conductivity is observed in the laser-affected area. The area size and spatial uniformity of this enhanced conductivity depends on the laser energy fluence. The laser-affected area shows three ring-shaped regimes of different conductance depending on the local aluminum and oxygen concentration. Finally, it was found that the topographic surface structure determined by the silicon grain orientation does not significantly affect the laser-firing process.

  5. Electron-impact excitation of holmium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, Yu M

    2000-06-30

    The electron-impact excitation of holmium atoms was studied by the method of extended crossing beams. The cross sections and the optical excitation functions were obtained for odd levels of Ho I, including the 22014 cm{sup -1} laser level. Over 99% of the atoms were shown to reside in the ground level prior to collisions with electrons. Also measured were the excitation cross sections for six even levels, which presumably participate in the formation of inversion population in a gas-discharge holmium vapour laser. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  6. Laser-induced fluorescence detection strategies for sodium atoms and compounds in high-pressure combustors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiland, Karen J. R.; Wise, Michael L.; Smith, Gregory P.

    1993-01-01

    A variety of laser-induced fluorescence schemes were examined experimentally in atmospheric pressure flames to determine their use for sodium atom and salt detection in high-pressure, optically thick environments. Collisional energy transfer plays a large role in fluorescence detection. Optimum sensitivity, at the parts in 10 exp 9 level for a single laser pulse, was obtained with the excitation of the 4p-3s transition at 330 nm and the detection of the 3d-3p fluorescence at 818 nm. Fluorescence loss processes, such as ionization and amplified spontaneous emission, were examined. A new laser-induced atomization/laser-induced fluorescence detection technique was demonstrated for NaOH and NaCl. A 248-nm excimer laser photodissociates the salt molecules present in the seeded flames prior to atom detection by laser-induced fluorescence.

  7. Development of Laser Light Sources for Trapping Radioactive Francium Atoms Toward Tests of Fundamental Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Ken-ichi; Ezure, Saki; Hayamizu, Tomohiro; Kato, Ko; Kawamura, Hirokazu; Inoue, Takeshi; Arikawa, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Taisuke; Aoki, Takahiro; Uchiyama, Aiko; Itoh, Masatoshi; Ando, Shun; Aoki, Takatoshi; Hatakeyama, Atsushi; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Imai, Kenichi; Murakami, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Sato, Tomoya; Wakasa, Tomotsugu; Yoshida, Hidetomo P.; Sakemi, Yasuhiro

    We have developed laser light sources and a magneto-optical trap system for cooling and trapping radioactive francium (Fr) atoms. Because Fr is the heaviest alkali element, a Fr atom exhibits high sensitivity to symmetry violation effects such as atomic parity nonconservation (APNC) and the electron electric dipole moment (eEDM). A laser cooling and trapping technique reduces the systematic errors due to the Doppler effect and the motion-induced magnetic field effect caused by the velocity of atoms. Thus, optically cooled and trapped Fr atoms are among a few promising candidates considered for APNC and eEDM measurements. Frequency stabilization of laser light is required for any stable measurement involving trapped radioactive atoms, including Fr. Since the hyperfine splitting in iodine molecules (127I2) is close to the resonance frequency of the Fr D2 line, we performed frequency modulation spectroscopy of hyperfine structures of I2.

  8. Process of stopping atoms with the Zeeman tuning technique with a single laser

    SciTech Connect

    Firmino, M.E.; Faria Leite, C.A.; Zilio, S.C.; Bagnato, V.S. )

    1990-04-01

    We report an observation of atoms stopped by laser light in an experiment using the Zeeman tuning technique. In contrast to previous experiments using the same technique, we are able to stop the atoms outside the slower solenoid using a single laser. The deceleration process is monitored through the measurement of the fluorescence along the deceleration path in such a way that the slower laser is also used for diagnosis. This technique also permits the realization of a few interesting observations on the process such as the position where the atoms stop scattering photons.

  9. Single and Multiphoton Infrared Laser Sectroscopy of Atomic Negative Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilodeau, René C.; Scheer, Michael; Brodie, Cicely A.; Haugen, Harold K.

    1998-05-01

    We have investigated several atomic negative ion species with the aid of a pulsed, tunable infrared laser source (M. Scheer, H.K. Haugen, and D.R. Beck, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79), 4104 (1997); M. Scheer et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 80, 684 (1998).. In a comprehensive study of the carbon group negative ions (C^-, Si^-, Ge^-, Sn^-, Pb^-) a combination of single and multiphoton techniques was utilized to determine the bound terms and fine structure levels of the p^3 (ground state) configuration. The results comprise accurate electron affinities and the first experimental data on the fine structure of the ^2DJ terms in Si^-, Ge^-, and Sn^-. In addition, photodetachment threshold spectroscopy provided significantly impoved electron affinities for B, Cr, Mo, Ru, Rh, W, and Bi. The detachment cross section of B^-(^3P_J) appeared as a sequence of closely spaced thresholds which enabled the first experimental determination of the ionic fine structure. The detachment cross section of W^- indicates the presence of unexpected and previously unobserved resonances just below the W(5d^56s ^7S_3) threshold.

  10. A self-injected, diode-pumped, solid-state ring laser for laser cooling of Li atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Miake, Yudai; Mukaiyama, Takashi; O’Hara, Kenneth M.; Gensemer, Stephen

    2015-04-15

    We have constructed a solid-state light source for experiments with laser cooled lithium atoms based on a Nd:Y V O{sub 4} ring laser with second-harmonic generation. Unidirectional lasing, an improved mode selection, and a high output power of the ring laser were achieved by weak coupling to an external cavity which contained the lossy elements required for single frequency operation. Continuous frequency tuning is accomplished by controlling two piezoelectric transducers (PZTs) in the internal and the external cavities simultaneously. The light source has been utilized to trap and cool fermionic lithium atoms into the quantum degenerate regime.

  11. A self-injected, diode-pumped, solid-state ring laser for laser cooling of Li atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miake, Yudai; Mukaiyama, Takashi; O'Hara, Kenneth M.; Gensemer, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    We have constructed a solid-state light source for experiments with laser cooled lithium atoms based on a Nd:Y V O4 ring laser with second-harmonic generation. Unidirectional lasing, an improved mode selection, and a high output power of the ring laser were achieved by weak coupling to an external cavity which contained the lossy elements required for single frequency operation. Continuous frequency tuning is accomplished by controlling two piezoelectric transducers (PZTs) in the internal and the external cavities simultaneously. The light source has been utilized to trap and cool fermionic lithium atoms into the quantum degenerate regime.

  12. A self-injected, diode-pumped, solid-state ring laser for laser cooling of Li atoms.

    PubMed

    Miake, Yudai; Mukaiyama, Takashi; O'Hara, Kenneth M; Gensemer, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    We have constructed a solid-state light source for experiments with laser cooled lithium atoms based on a Nd:YVO4 ring laser with second-harmonic generation. Unidirectional lasing, an improved mode selection, and a high output power of the ring laser were achieved by weak coupling to an external cavity which contained the lossy elements required for single frequency operation. Continuous frequency tuning is accomplished by controlling two piezoelectric transducers (PZTs) in the internal and the external cavities simultaneously. The light source has been utilized to trap and cool fermionic lithium atoms into the quantum degenerate regime. PMID:25933847

  13. The ionization potentials of atomic ions in laser-irradiated Ar, Kr and Xe clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gets, A. V.; Krainov, V. P.

    2006-04-01

    The ionization potentials of atomic ions in laser-irradiated Ar, Kr and Xe clusters are derived as functions of electron temperature. These potentials decrease significantly compared to the case of the isolated atomic ions because of the screening effect by the atomic ions and electrons inside the cluster. The results can be used for derivations of inner ionization by impact collisions of hot electrons with atomic ions and by the static Coulomb field of the ionized cluster. The broadening of atomic states by the quasistatic Holtsmark field of atomic ions is also considered.

  14. Construction and Characterization of External Cavity Diode Lasers for Atomic Physics

    PubMed Central

    Hardman, Kyle S.; Bennetts, Shayne; Debs, John E.; Kuhn, Carlos C. N.; McDonald, Gordon D.; Robins, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Since their development in the late 1980s, cheap, reliable external cavity diode lasers (ECDLs) have replaced complex and expensive traditional dye and Titanium Sapphire lasers as the workhorse laser of atomic physics labs1,2. Their versatility and prolific use throughout atomic physics in applications such as absorption spectroscopy and laser cooling1,2 makes it imperative for incoming students to gain a firm practical understanding of these lasers. This publication builds upon the seminal work by Wieman3, updating components, and providing a video tutorial. The setup, frequency locking and performance characterization of an ECDL will be described. Discussion of component selection and proper mounting of both diodes and gratings, the factors affecting mode selection within the cavity, proper alignment for optimal external feedback, optics setup for coarse and fine frequency sensitive measurements, a brief overview of laser locking techniques, and laser linewidth measurements are included. PMID:24796259

  15. Construction and characterization of external cavity diode lasers for atomic physics.

    PubMed

    Hardman, Kyle S; Bennetts, Shayne; Debs, John E; Kuhn, Carlos C N; McDonald, Gordon D; Robins, Nick

    2014-01-01

    Since their development in the late 1980s, cheap, reliable external cavity diode lasers (ECDLs) have replaced complex and expensive traditional dye and Titanium Sapphire lasers as the workhorse laser of atomic physics labs. Their versatility and prolific use throughout atomic physics in applications such as absorption spectroscopy and laser cooling makes it imperative for incoming students to gain a firm practical understanding of these lasers. This publication builds upon the seminal work by Wieman, updating components, and providing a video tutorial. The setup, frequency locking and performance characterization of an ECDL will be described. Discussion of component selection and proper mounting of both diodes and gratings, the factors affecting mode selection within the cavity, proper alignment for optimal external feedback, optics setup for coarse and fine frequency sensitive measurements, a brief overview of laser locking techniques, and laser linewidth measurements are included. PMID:24796259

  16. Laser cooling of an indium atomic beam enabled by magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klöter, B.; Weber, C.; Haubrich, D.; Meschede, D.; Metcalf, H.

    2008-03-01

    We demonstrate magnetic field enabled optical forces on a neutral indium atomic beam in a light field consisting of five frequencies. The role of dark magnetic ground state sublevels is studied and enables us to cool the atomic beam transversely to near the Doppler limit with laser frequencies tuned above the atomic resonance. The effect of laser cooling can be explained with transient effects in the light potential created by the standing wave light field where the atoms are optically pumped into the dark states and recycled by Larmor precession.

  17. Novel laser atomic fluorescence spectrometer for environmental and biomedical analyses of heavy metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dergachev, Alex Y.; Mirov, Sergey B.; Pitt, Robert E.; Parmer, Keith D.

    1997-05-01

    We report on the development of a novel experimental set-up using laser atomic fluorescence for detection and concentration measurements of heavy metal atoms for environmental and biomedical analyses. This spectrometer is based on the application of tunable LiF:F2+** and LiF:F2- color center and alexandrite lasers with nonlinear converters for narrowband excitation of atomic fluorescence and the use of gated multichannel CCD detectors for fluorescence measurements. A standard graphite furnace module was used for sample atomization. The laser sources used provide narrowband selective laser excitation continuously tunable in the 200 - 400 nm range and are therefore suitable for resonant excitation of atomic transitions in practically all known heavy metal atoms. In the first experiments, water samples containing Cu, Pb and Fe impurities were studied and detection levels of less than 1 ppb were observed. Comparison of the results of atomic laser fluorescence analysis and traditional atomic absorption spectrometry showed good qualitative agreement between these two methods. It is projected that full optimization of our experimental set up will allow for improved detection levels of several orders of magnitude. Possible optimization and simplification of the spectrometer are discussed in the context of developing a portable instrument for field use.

  18. Testing Lorentz Invariance with Laser-Cooled Cesium Atomic Frequency Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klipstein, William M.

    2004-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Lorentz invariance testing during the proposed PARCS experiment. It includes information on the primary atomic reference clock in space (PARCS), cesium, laser cooling, and the vision for the future.

  19. Alumina vapour condensation on Mo( 1 1 0 ) surface and adsorption of copper and gold atoms on the formed oxide layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magkoev, T. T.; Christmann, K.; Moutinho, A. M. C.; Murata, Y.

    2002-09-01

    Aluminium oxide vapour condensation on Mo(1 1 0) surface and subsequent adsorption of Cu and Au submonolayer films on the formed ultrathin oxide layer has been studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy. AES and XPS data suggest that the oxide films formed in this way exhibit the properties characteristic for the bulk alumina, although the intramolecular bond weakening (up to 30%) compared to bulk oxide occurs at the submonolayer coverage. Both Cu and Au form 3D clusters on the surface of the oxide film regardless of its thickness (2-5 ML). At a very low coverage (<0.4 ML) Cu deposited on the oxide strongly interacts with the surface oxygen forming the species resembling the copper oxide(s). At a higher coverage the Cu deposits have metallic character. Unlike Cu, the latter, however, is the case for gold particles regardless of the coverage: No evidence of forming of the Au-O bonds was found at room temperature. Annealing of Au and Cu deposits on Al 2O 3 film results in metal/oxide intermixing and chemical reaction. The properties of the metals deposited on 2 and 5 ML thick oxide films are essentially the same at all coverages studied. The only observed difference is that the gold deposited on a thinner oxide film is characterised by a smaller average sizes of islands compared to Au deposited on a thicker oxide film. We tend to attribute this difference to higher defect density in thinner oxide film compared to thicker film, rather than to the influence of the underlying Mo(1 1 0) support.

  20. Plateau Structure in Resonant Laser-Assisted Electron-Atom Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flegel, A. V.; Frolov, M. V.; Manakov, N. L.; Starace, Anthony F.

    2009-03-01

    Orders of magnitude increases are predicted in the cross sections for electron-atom scattering accompanied by absorption or emission of n laser photons for incident electron energies at which the electron, by emitting μ laser photons, can be captured by the atom to form a negative ion. Enhancements are most significant in the plateau region (n≫μ) of the scattered electron spectrum, whose shape is predicted to replicate that of the ion’s (n+μ)-photon detachment spectrum.

  1. Making custom fiber lasers for use in an atomic physics experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khademian, Ali; Cameron, Garnet; Nault, Kyla; Shiner, David

    2016-05-01

    Fiber lasers can be a reasonable choice for a laser source in atomic physics. Our particular applications involve the optical pumping and in some applications cooling of various transitions in atomic helium. Doped fiber with emission at the required wavelengths is necessary. Readily available fiber and approximate wavelength emission ranges include Yb (990 - 1150 nm), Er/Yb (1530 - 1625 nm) and Th (1900 -2100 nm). High efficiency conversion of pump photons into stable single frequency laser emission at the required wavelength is the function of the fiber laser. A simple fiber laser cavity uses a short (~ few mm) fiber grating high reflector mirror, a doped fiber section for the laser cavity, and a long (~ few cm) fiber grating output coupler. To ensure reliable single frequency operation, the laser cavity length should be within 2-3 times the output grating length. However the cavity length must be long enough for round trip gains to compensate for the output mirror transmission loss. Efficiency can be maximized by avoiding fiber splices in the fiber laser cavity. This requires that the gratings be written into the doped fiber directly. In our previous designs, back coupling of the fiber laser into the pump laser contributes to instability and sometimes caused catastrophic pump failure. Current designs use a fiber based wavelength splitter (WDM) to study and circumvent this problem. Data will be presented on the fiber lasers at 1083 nm. Work on a Thulium 2057 nm fiber laser will also be discussed. This work is supported by NSF Grant # 1404498.

  2. High-order harmonic generation on atoms and ions with laser fields of relativistic intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Avetissian, H. K.; Markossian, A. G.; Mkrtchian, G. F.

    2011-07-15

    High-order harmonic generation (HHG) by hydrogenlike atoms or ions in the field of counterpropagating laser beams of standing-wave configuration, with linear polarizations and relativistic intensities, is studied. The relativistic quantum theory of HHG in such field configurations (homogeneous), at which the impeding factor of relativistic magnetic drift of superstrong laser fields can be eliminated, is presented.

  3. Mapping of laser diode radiation intensity by atomic-force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekseev, P. A.; Dunaevskii, M. S.; Slipchenko, S. O.; Podoskin, A. A.; Tarasov, I. S.

    2015-09-01

    The distribution of the intensity of laser diode radiation has been studied using an original method based on atomic-force microscopy (AFM). It is shown that the laser radiation intensity in both the near field and transition zone of a high-power semiconductor laser under room-temperature conditions can be mapped by AFM at a subwavelength resolution. The obtained patterns of radiation intensity distribution agree with the data of modeling and the results of near-field optical microscopy measurements.

  4. High-precision laser and rf spectroscopy of atomic, molecular, and slow ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, W.J.; Goodman, L.S.; Sen, A.

    1987-01-01

    Interesting new results were obtained in 1986 in high-precision Laser-rf studies of neutral atoms, neutral molecules, and atomic ions. Because of their novelty, the ionic results are discussed at some length and then summarize briefly results in the other two areas.

  5. Enhancement of Efficiency of XUV Generation in Atomic Gases Irradiated by Intense Laser Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreev, A. V.; Stremoukhov, S. Y.; Shoutova, O. A.

    We present the results of the theoretical study of the high-order harmonic generation (HHG) in atomic gases. It is shown that the photoemission spectra exhibit unusual behavior when the laser field strength approaches near-atomic values. In subatomic field strength the cut-off frequency increases linearly with laser pulse intensity. However, when the field strength approaches near-atomic region firstly cut-off frequency slows down and then saturates. To interpret such kind of photoemission spectrum behavior we have proposed the light-atom interaction theory based on the use of eigenfunctions of boundary value problem for "an atom in the external field" instead of the traditional basis of the "free atom" eigenfunctions.

  6. Laser-Induced Particle Adsorption on Atomically Thin MoS2.

    PubMed

    Tran Khac, Bien Cuong; Jeon, Ki-Joon; Choi, Seung Tae; Kim, Yong Soo; DelRio, Frank W; Chung, Koo-Hyun

    2016-02-10

    Atomically thin molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) shows great potential for use in nanodevices because of its remarkable electronic, optoelectronic, and mechanical properties. These material properties are often dependent on the thickness or the number of layers, and hence Raman spectroscopy is widely used to characterize the thickness of atomically thin MoS2 due to the sensitivity of the vibrational spectrum to thickness. However, the lasers used in Raman spectroscopy can increase the local surface temperature and eventually damage the upper layers of the MoS2, thereby changing the aforementioned material properties. In this work, the effects of lasers on the topography and material properties of atomically thin MoS2 were systematically investigated using Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. In detail, friction force microscopy was used to study the friction characteristics of atomically thin MoS2 as a function of laser powers from 0.5 to 20 mW and number of layers from 1 to 3. It was found that particles formed on the top surface of the atomically thin MoS2 due to laser-induced thermal effects. The degree of particle formation increased as the laser power increased, prior to the thinning of the atomically thin MoS2. In addition, the degree of particle formation increased as the number of MoS2 layers increased, which suggests that the thermal behavior of the supported MoS2 may differ depending on the number of layers. The particles likely originated from the atmosphere due to laser-induced heating, but could be eliminated via appropriate laser powers and exposure times, which were determined experimentally. The outcomes of this work indicate that thermal management is crucial in the design of reliable nanoscale devices based on atomically thin MoS2. PMID:26795729

  7. Time-Resolved Spectroscopy With A Narrow-Band Pulsed Dye Laser At High Irradiances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bergen, A. R.; Hollander, Tj.; Alkemade, C. T.

    1985-03-01

    We measured the fluorescence spectrum of the Na-D lines in a sodium vapour cell filled with Ar gas, excited by an intense, nearly monochromatic laser near resonance. In this case the theory (dressed-atom model) predicts a line splitting dependent on the laser intensity.

  8. Laser diagnostics of the energy spectrum of Rydberg states of the lithium-7 atom

    SciTech Connect

    Zelener, B. B. Saakyan, S. A.; Sautenkov, V. A.; Manykin, E. A.; Zelener, B. V.; Fortov, V. E.

    2015-12-15

    The spectra of excited lithium-7 atoms prepared in a magneto-optical trap are studied using a UV laser. The laser diagnostics of the energy of Rydberg atoms is developed based on measurements of the change in resonance fluorescence intensity of ultracold atoms as the exciting UV radiation frequency passes through the Rydberg transition frequency. The energies of various nS configurations are obtained in a broad range of the principal quantum number n from 38 to 165. The values of the quantum defect and ionization energy obtained in experiments and predicted theoretically are discussed.

  9. Laser diagnostics of the energy spectrum of Rydberg states of the lithium-7 atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelener, B. B.; Saakyan, S. A.; Sautenkov, V. A.; Manykin, E. A.; Zelener, B. V.; Fortov, V. E.

    2015-12-01

    The spectra of excited lithium-7 atoms prepared in a magneto-optical trap are studied using a UV laser. The laser diagnostics of the energy of Rydberg atoms is developed based on measurements of the change in resonance fluorescence intensity of ultracold atoms as the exciting UV radiation frequency passes through the Rydberg transition frequency. The energies of various nS configurations are obtained in a broad range of the principal quantum number n from 38 to 165. The values of the quantum defect and ionization energy obtained in experiments and predicted theoretically are discussed.

  10. Effects of laser radiation field on energies of hydrogen atom in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahar, M. K.

    2015-09-01

    In this study, for the first time, the Schrödinger equation with more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb (MGECSC) potential is solved numerically in the presence of laser radiation field within the Ehlotzky approximation using the asymptotic iteration method. The MGECSC potential includes four different potential forms in consideration of different sets of the parameters in the potential. By applying laser field, the total interaction potential of hydrogen atom embedded in plasmas converts to double well-type potential. The plasma screening effects under the influence of laser field as well as confinement effects of laser field on hydrogen atom in Debye and quantum plasmas are investigated by solving the Schrödinger equation with the laser-dressed MGECSC potential. It is resulted that since applying a monochromatic laser field on hydrogen atom embedded in a Debye and quantum plasma causes to shift in the profile of the total interaction potential, the confinement effects of laser field on hydrogen atom in plasmas modeled by the MGECSC potential change localizations of energy states.

  11. Effects of laser radiation field on energies of hydrogen atom in plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bahar, M. K.

    2015-09-15

    In this study, for the first time, the Schrödinger equation with more general exponential cosine screened Coulomb (MGECSC) potential is solved numerically in the presence of laser radiation field within the Ehlotzky approximation using the asymptotic iteration method. The MGECSC potential includes four different potential forms in consideration of different sets of the parameters in the potential. By applying laser field, the total interaction potential of hydrogen atom embedded in plasmas converts to double well-type potential. The plasma screening effects under the influence of laser field as well as confinement effects of laser field on hydrogen atom in Debye and quantum plasmas are investigated by solving the Schrödinger equation with the laser-dressed MGECSC potential. It is resulted that since applying a monochromatic laser field on hydrogen atom embedded in a Debye and quantum plasma causes to shift in the profile of the total interaction potential, the confinement effects of laser field on hydrogen atom in plasmas modeled by the MGECSC potential change localizations of energy states.

  12. The Microlaser: Study of Laser Oscillation with One Atom in AN Optical Resonator.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Kyungwon

    1995-01-01

    This thesis describes the first realization of one-atom laser, a laser oscillator with only one atom in an optical resonator. In our experiment a beam of ^{138}Ba atoms traverses a high -Q optical cavity with a finesse of 8times10 ^5. The atoms are excited from the ^1S_0 ground state to the ^3P_1 (m = 0) excited state by a pi-pulse before they enter the cavity. Laser oscillation at 791 nm (^3P_1--> ^1S_0 ) has been observed with the mean number of atoms inside the cavity mode varied between 0.1 and 1.0, resulting in the mean number of photons inside the cavity changing from 0.14 to 11. To understand the data quantitatively, two different theoretical approaches were taken. First a pendulum equation based on the Maxwell-Schrodinger equation provides physical insights on the evolution of the one -atom laser with limited success in predicting correct signal size. Second approach is based on a fully-quantized one -atom theory. In this approach, a new photon recursion relation for the field density matrix was derived. Combined with a simple modification needed for the standing wave nature of the cavity mode, the quantum theory is in good agreement with the experiment. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617 -253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.).

  13. Laser-excitation atomic fluorescence spectroscopy in a helium microwave-induced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Timothy S.

    The focus of this dissertation is to report the first documented coupling of helium microwave induced plasmas (MIPs) to laser excitation atomic fluorescence spectroscopy. The ability to effectively produce intense atomic emission from both metal and nonmetal analytes gives helium microwave induced plasmas a greater flexibility than the more commonly utilized argon inductively coupled plasma (ICP). Originally designed as an element selective detector for non-aqueous chromatography applications at low applied powers (<100W), the helium microwave plasma has been applied to aqueous sample determinations at higher applied powers (>500 W). The helium MIP has been shown to be a very powerful analytical atomic spectroscopy tool. The development of the pulsed dye laser offered an improved method of excitation in the field of atomic fluorescence. The use of laser excitation for atomic fluorescence was a logical successor to the conventional excitation methods involving hollow cathode lamps and continuum sources. The highly intense, directional, and monochromatic nature of laser radiation results in an increased population of atomic species in excited electronic states where atomic fluorescence can occur. The application of laser excitation atomic fluorescence to the analysis of metals in a helium microwave induced plasma with ultrasonic sample nebulization was the initial focus of this work. Experimental conditions and results are included for the aqueous characterization of manganese, lead, thallium, and iron in the helium MIP- LEAFS system. These results are compared to previous laser excitation atomic fluorescence experimentation. The effect of matrix interferences on the analytical fluorescence signal was also investigated for each element. The advantage of helium MIPs over argon ICPs in the determination of nonmetals in solution indicates that the helium MIP is an excellent candidate for laser excitation atomic fluorescence experiments involving nonmetals such as

  14. Pulsed-laser atom probe studies of a precipitation hardened maraging TRIP steel.

    PubMed

    Dmitrieva, O; Choi, P; Gerstl, S S A; Ponge, D; Raabe, D

    2011-05-01

    A precipitation hardened maraging TRIP steel was analyzed using a pulsed laser atom probe. The laser pulse energy was varied from 0.3 to 1.9 nJ to study its effect on the measured chemical compositions and spatial resolution. Compositional analyses using proximity histograms did not show any significant variations in the average matrix and precipitate compositions. The only remarkable change in the atom probe data was a decrease in the ++/+ charge state ratios of the elements. The values of the evaporation field used for the reconstructions exhibit a linear dependence on the laser pulse energy. The adjustment of the evaporation fields used in the reconstructions for different laser pulse energies was based on the correlation of the obtained cluster shapes to the TEM observations. No influence of laser pulse energy on chemical composition of the precipitates and on the chemical sharpness of their interfaces was detected. PMID:21215524

  15. A phase-modulated laser system of ultra-low phase noise for compact atom interferometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ki-Se; Kim, Jaewan; Lee, Sang-Bum; Park, Sang Eon; Kwon, Taek Yong

    2015-07-01

    A compact and robust laser system is essential for mobile atom interferometers. Phase modulation can provide the two necessary phase-coherent frequencies without sophisticated phase-locking between two different lasers. However, the additional laser frequencies generated can perturb the atom interferometer. In this article, we report on a novel method to produce a single high-power laser beam composed of two phase-coherent sidebands without the perturbing carrier mode. Light from a diode laser is phase-modulated by using a fiber-coupled electro-optic modulator driven at 3.4 GHz and passes through a Fabry-Perot cavity with a 6.8 GHz free spectral range. The cavity filters the carrier mode to leave the two first-order sidebands for the two-photon Raman transition between the two hyperfine ground states of 87Rb. The laser beam is then fed to a single tapered amplifier, and the two sidebands are both amplified without mode competition. The phase noise is lower than that of a state-of-the-art optically phase-locked external-cavity diode laser (-135 dBrad2/Hz at 10 kHz) at frequencies above 10 Hz. This technique can be used in all-fiber-based laser systems for future mobile atom interferometers.

  16. Liquid atomization induced by pulse laser reflection at and beneath the liquid surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsunomiya, Y.; Kajiwara, T.; Nishiyama, T.; Nagayama, K.; Kubota, S.; Nakahara, M.

    2008-11-01

    In this paper, precision high speed imaging of the pulse laser ablation of liquid surface has been described. This study is based on our previous findings that appreciable reduction of pulse laser ablation threshold of transparent material in case the pulse laser beam is incident from the water side on the interface of the transparent material and air or water. We have performed a series of experiments to observe the ablation process for laser incidence on the interface of water and air. Whole processes were observed by shadowgraphy optics by using a ns pulse laser and a high-resolution film. Within the tested experimental conditions, minimum laser fluence for laser ablation at water-air interface is shown to be around 12-16 J/cm2. We have confirmed that laser ablation phenomena will take place only when laser beam is incident on the water-air interface from inside the water medium. Many slender liquid ligaments extend like milk crown and seem to be atomized at the tip of them. Jet tip is moving at supersonic velocity but is decelerated very rapidly. By changing the laser energy with keeping laser fluence at the interface, temporal evolution changes appreciably at least in the early stage of the process. These detailed structures can be resolved only by pulse laser photography by using high-resolution film.

  17. Diode-Pumped Alkali Atom Lasers 03-LW-024 Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Page, R H; Beach, R J

    2005-02-16

    The recent work at LLNL on alkali-atom lasers has been remarkably successful and productive. Three main phases (so far) can be identified. First, the concept and demonstration of red lasers using (Ti:sapphire pumping) took place; during this time, Rubidium and Cesium resonance-line lasers were tested, and theoretical models were developed and shown to describe experimental results very reliably. Work done during this first phase has been well documented, and the models from that period are still in use for their predictions and for designing power-scaled lasers. [1 - 3] Second, attempts were made to produce a blue alkali-vapor laser using sequentially-resonant two-step pumping (again, using Ti:sapphire lasers.) Although a blue laser did not result, the physical limitations of our approach are now better-defined. Third, diode-pumped operation of a red laser (Rubidium) was attempted, and we eventually succeeded in demonstrating the world's first diode-pumped gas laser. [4] Because we have a defensible concept for producing an efficient, compact, lightweight, power-scaled laser (tens of kW,) we are in a position to secure outside funding, and would like to find a sponsor. For descriptions of work done during the ''first phase,'' see References [1 - 3] ''Phase two'' work is briefly described in the section ''Blue laser,'' and ''phase three'' work is presented in the section entitled ''Diode-pumped red laser.''

  18. Narrow spectral width laser diode for metastable argon atoms pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Jun; Li, Bin; Wang, Xinbing; Zuo, Duluo

    2016-03-01

    Diode laser pump source with narrow emitting spectrum for optically pumped metastable rare gas laser (OPRGL) of argon was achieved by employing a complex external cavity coupled with volume Bragg grating (VBG). A commercially available c-mount laser diode with rated power of 6 W was used and studied in both the free running mode and VBG external cavity. The maximum output power of 3.9 W with FWHM less than 25 pm and peak wavelength locked around 811.53 nm was obtained from the VBG external cavity laser diode. Precise control of VBG temperature enabled fine tuning of the emission wavelength over a range of 450 pm. Future researches on OPRGL of argon will benefit from it.

  19. High-order-harmonic generation from Rydberg atoms driven by plasmon-enhanced laser fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tikman, Y.; Yavuz, I.; Ciappina, M. F.; Chacón, A.; Altun, Z.; Lewenstein, M.

    2016-02-01

    We theoretically investigate high-order-harmonic generation (HHG) in Rydberg atoms driven by spatially inhomogeneous laser fields, induced, for instance, by plasmonic enhancement. It is well known that the laser intensity should exceed a certain threshold in order to stimulate HHG when noble gas atoms in their ground state are used as an active medium. One way to enhance the coherent light coming from a conventional laser oscillator is to take advantage of the amplification obtained by the so-called surface plasmon polaritons, created when a low-intensity laser field is focused onto a metallic nanostructure. The main limitation of this scheme is the low damage threshold of the materials employed in the nanostructure engineering. In this work we propose the use of Rydberg atoms, driven by spatially inhomogeneous, plasmon-enhanced laser fields, for HHG. We exhaustively discuss the behavior and efficiency of these systems in the generation of coherent harmonic emission. Toward this aim we numerically solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for an atom, with an electron initially in a highly excited n th Rydberg state, located in the vicinity of a metallic nanostructure. In this zone the electric field changes spatially on scales relevant for the dynamics of the laser-ionized electron. We first use a one-dimensional model to investigate systematically the phenomena. We then employ a more realistic situation, in which the interaction of a plasmon-enhanced laser field with a three-dimensional hydrogen atom is modeled. We discuss the scaling of the relevant input parameters with the principal quantum number n of the Rydberg state in question and demonstrate that harmonic emission can be achieved from Rydberg atoms well below the damage threshold, thus without deterioration of the geometry and properties of the metallic nanostructure.

  20. Laser-cooled atoms inside a hollow-core photonic-crystal fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Bajcsy, M.; Hofferberth, S.; Balic, V.; Zibrov, A. S.; Lukin, M. D.; Peyronel, T.; Liang, Q.; Vuletic, V.

    2011-06-15

    We describe the loading of laser-cooled rubidium atoms into a single-mode hollow-core photonic-crystal fiber. Inside the fiber, the atoms are confined by a far-detuned optical trap and probed by a weak resonant beam. We describe different loading methods and compare their trade-offs in terms of implementation complexity and atom-loading efficiency. The most efficient procedure results in loading of {approx}30,000 rubidium atoms, which creates a medium with an optical depth of {approx}180 inside the fiber. Compared to our earlier study this represents a sixfold increase in the maximum achieved optical depth in this system.

  1. Transverse laser cooling of a thermal atomic beam of dysprosium

    SciTech Connect

    Leefer, N.; Cingoez, A.; Gerber-Siff, B.; Sharma, Arijit; Torgerson, J. R.; Budker, D.

    2010-04-15

    A thermal atomic beam of dysprosium atoms is cooled using the 4f{sup 10}6s{sup 2}(J=8){yields}4f{sup 10}6s6p(J=9) transition at 421 nm. The cooling is done via a standing light wave orthogonal to the atomic beam. Efficient transverse cooling to the Doppler limit is demonstrated for all observable isotopes of dysprosium. Branching ratios to metastable states are demonstrated to be <5x10{sup -4}. A scheme for enhancement of the nonzero-nuclear-spin-isotope cooling and a method for direct identification of possible trap states are proposed.

  2. Atomic diffusion in laser surface modified AISI H13 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aqida, S. N.; Brabazon, D.; Naher, S.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a laser surface modification process of AISI H13 steel using 0.09 and 0.4 mm of laser spot sizes with an aim to increase surface hardness and investigate elements diffusion in laser modified surface. A Rofin DC-015 diffusion-cooled CO2 slab laser was used to process AISI H13 steel samples. Samples of 10 mm diameter were sectioned to 100 mm length in order to process a predefined circumferential area. The parameters selected for examination were laser peak power, pulse repetition frequency (PRF), and overlap percentage. The hardness properties were tested at 981 mN force. Metallographic study and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDXS) were performed to observe presence of elements and their distribution in the sample surface. Maximum hardness achieved in the modified surface was 1017 HV0.1. Change of elements composition in the modified layer region was detected in the laser modified samples. Diffusion possibly occurred for C, Cr, Cu, Ni, and S elements. The potential found for increase in surface hardness represents an important method to sustain tooling life. The EDXS findings signify understanding of processing parameters effect on the modified surface composition.

  3. Laser-induced photofragmentation of triethylaluminum: Modeling H-atom production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brum, Jeffrey L.; Deshmukh, Subhash; Koplitz, Brent

    1990-12-01

    A rate-equation approach is presented that models H-atom formation during the pulsed laser photolysis of a triethyl metal compound, the specific case being triethylaluminum excited at 193 nm. An excimer laser initiates the chemistry under collisionless conditions, and H atoms are produced that are detected using two-photon (121.6+364.7 nm) ionization. Experimentally, the H-atom intensity is monitored as a function of photolysis laser power. Mechanistically, the primary photodissociation step is postulated to involve cleavage of the metal-carbon bond, thereby producing an ethyl radical. This species can then either: (1) form C2H4 and H directly; or (2) absorb an additional photon and produce an H-atom photofragment. The rate equations and their solutions allow one to calculate how H-atom production should vary as a function of photolysis laser power, and the interplay between the two H-atom production channels is calculated for various absorption cross sections and dissociation rates. A comparison with experimental power dependence data suggests that an overall one-photon dissociation process predominates under the experimental conditions actually used.

  4. Helium in chirped laser fields as a time-asymmetric atomic switch

    SciTech Connect

    Kaprálová-Žďánská, Petra Ruth; Moiseyev, Nimrod

    2014-07-07

    Tuning the laser parameters exceptional points in the spectrum of the dressed laser helium atom are obtained. The weak linearly polarized laser couples the ground state and the doubly excited P-states of helium. We show here that for specific chirped laser pulses that encircle an exceptional point one can get the time-asymmetric phenomenon, where for a negative chirped laser pulse the ground state is transformed into the doubly excited auto-ionization state, while for a positive chirped laser pulse the resonance state is not populated and the neutral helium atoms remains in the ground state as the laser pulse is turned off. Moreover, we show that the results are very sensitive to the closed contour we choose. This time-asymmetric state exchange phenomenon can be considered as a time-asymmetric atomic switch. The optimal time-asymmetric switch is obtained when the closed loop that encircles the exceptional point is large, while for the smallest loops, the time-asymmetric phenomenon does not take place. A systematic way for studying the effect of the chosen closed contour that encircles the exceptional point on the time-asymmetric phenomenon is proposed.

  5. High atomic diffusivity during pulsed laser irradiation of TiON quasi-amorphous films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodorescu, V. S.; Maraloiu, A. V.; Negrea, R. F.; Ghica, D.; Scarisoreanu, N. D.; Dinescu, M.; Gartner, M.; Blanchin, M.-G.

    2016-06-01

    Quasi-amorphous titanium oxynitride (TiON) films were obtained by annealing sol-gel anatase TiO2 films in NH3 atmosphere at 600 °C. These films were irradiated with 50 laser pulses using the fourth harmonic (266 nm) radiation of the Nd-YAG laser, with an average fluence of 20 mJ/cm2. HRTEM observations of the pulsed laser irradiated films evidenced the rutile TiO2 nanocrystallites formation. The rutile structure was not present either in the TiON films before the laser irradiation, or in the initial sol-gel anatase TiO2 films. During the laser irradiation, the film structure remains in the solid state phase, as it results from the temperature estimation and microscopic observations. For the rutile nanocrystals formation, the atomic diffusion length of the oxygen and titanium atoms should be in the nanometric range during the laser pulse action, which implies a diffusivity close to the values observed in the liquid phase. We consider that the rutile phase formation is a proof of the fast atomic diffusion in the solid amorphous matrix, during the laser irradiation.

  6. Tunable spectral singularities: coherent perfect absorber and laser in an atomic medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hang, Chao; Huang, Guoxiang; Konotop, Vladimir V.

    2016-08-01

    We propose a scheme for a coherent perfect absorber (CPA) and a laser in an atomic medium with gain and loss, obeying simultaneously a spectral singularity and a time-reversed spectral singularity, both occurring at different wavevectors (or frequencies). We term this system a CPA-and-laser and investigate its features allowing to obtain asymmetric lasing and absorbing properties, switches, etc. We show that the CPA-and-laser can be obtained by modifying characteristics of a CPA-laser of an initial {\\boldsymbol{ Q }}{\\boldsymbol{ T }}-symmetric configuration, provided there are at least three tunable parameters. The physical mechanism of emergence of a CPA-and-laser in this way, is based on splitting of a self-dual spectral singularity of the {\\boldsymbol{ Q }}{\\boldsymbol{ T }}-symmetric CPA-laser into the spectral singularity and time-reversed spectral singularity. After the discussion of a particular example of a bilayer consisting of one active and one passive slabs, we suggest a realistic physical system for implementing a CPA-and-laser. It consists of two adjacent atomic cells filled with isotopes of Λ-type three-level rubidium atoms interacting with probe and control fields, allowing for the required number of tunable parameters.

  7. Laser Cooling and Trapping of Neutral Mercury Atoms Using an Optically-Pumped External-Cavity Semiconductor Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Justin; Lytle, Christian; Jones, R. Jason

    2011-05-01

    The level structure of the Hg atom is similar to other alkaline earth-like atoms, offering the possibility to realize an extremely high quality resonance factor (Q) on the ``clock'' transition (1S0- 3P0) when confined in an optical lattice at the Stark-shift free wavelength. A key feature of the Hg system is the reduced uncertainty due to black-body induced Stark shifts, making it an interesting candidate as an optical frequency standard. One challenge to laser-cooling neutral Hg atoms is finding a reliable source for cooling on the 1S0-3 P1 transition at 253.7 nm. We employ an optically pumped semiconductor laser (OPSEL) operating at 1015 nm, whose frequency is quadrupled in two external-cavity doubling stages to generate over 120 mW at 253.7 nm. With this new laser source we have trapped Hg199 from a background vapor in a standard MOT. We trap up to 2 × 106 atoms with a 1/e2 radius of our MOT of ~310 microns, corresponding to a density of 1.28 × 1010 atoms/cm3. We report on the progress of our Hg system and plans for precision lattice-based spectroscopy of the clock transition. Support for this work is supported through the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) through grant no. FA9550-09-1-0563.

  8. Quantum treatment of two-stage sub-Doppler laser cooling of magnesium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prudnikov, O. N.; Brazhnikov, D. V.; Taichenachev, A. V.; Yudin, V. I.; Bonert, A. E.; Il'enkov, R. Ya.; Goncharov, A. N.

    2015-12-01

    Deep laser cooling of 24Mg atoms has been theoretically studied. We propose a two-stage sub-Doppler cooling strategy using electrodipole transition 3 3P2→3 3D3 (λ =383.8 nm). The first stage implies exploiting magneto-optical trap with σ+ and σ- light beams, while at the second stage lin ⊥ lin molasses is used. We focus on achieving a large number of ultracold atoms (Teff<10 μ K ) in a cold-atomic cloud. The calculations have been based on quantum treatment, taking into full account the recoil effect and beyond many widely used approximations. Steady-state values of average kinetic energy and linear momentum distributions of cold atoms have been analyzed for various light-field intensities and frequency detunings. The results of conducted quantum analysis have been significantly different from the results achieved under a semiclassical approximation based on the Fokker-Planck equation. The second cooling stage allows achieving sufficiently lower kinetic energies of the atomic cloud as well as increased fraction of ultracold atoms at certain conditions compared to the first one. We hope that the obtained results can help in overcoming current experimental problems in deep cooling of 24Mg atoms by means of laser field. Cold magnesium atoms cooled in a large amount to several μ K are of huge interest to, for example, quantum metrology and to other many-body cold-atoms physics.

  9. Light emission induced by an XUV laser pulse interacting resonantly with atomic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qingyi; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Yunfeng; Li, Suyu; Guo, Fuming; Yang, Yujun

    2016-01-01

    The resonant interaction between XUV ultra-short laser pulses and atomic hydrogen is systematically studied by numerically solving the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in this paper. Triple-peak structures are found to appear in the harmonics emitted provided that the incident laser is resonant with the 1 s-2p transition of the hydrogen atom. Moreover, the energy difference between neighboring peaks is the same and turns out to be proportional to the peak field strength E 0. Based on the theory of strong field approximation, and taking the interactions of the 1 s-2p bound energy levels into consideration, theoretical interpretations of the phenomena mentioned are successfully presented. This work provides a possible approach for generating XUV radiation with a tunable frequency via the interaction between atoms and XUV laser pulses.

  10. Effects of laser energy and wavelength on the analysis of LiFePO₄ using laser assisted atom probe tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Santhanagopalan, Dhamodaran; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Perea, Daniel E.; Martens, Richard L.; Janssen, Yuri; Khalifah, Peter; Meng, Ying Shirley

    2014-09-21

    The effects of laser wavelength (355 nm and 532 nm) and laser pulse energy on the quantitative analysis of LiFePO₄ by atom probe tomography are considered. A systematic investigation of ultraviolet (UV, 355 nm) and green (532 nm) laser assisted field evaporation has revealed distinctly different behaviors. With the use of a UV laser, the major issue was identified as the preferential loss of oxygen (up to 10 at%) while other elements (Li, Fe and P) were observed to be close to nominal ratios. Lowering the laser energy per pulse to 1 pJ/pulse from 50 pJ/pulse increased the observed oxygen concentration to nearer its correct stoichiometry, which was also well correlated with systematically higher concentrations of ¹⁶O₂⁺ ions. Green laser assisted field evaporation led to the selective loss of Li (33% deficiency) and a relatively minor O deficiency. The loss of Li is likely a result of selective dc evaporation of Li between or after laser pulses. Comparison of the UV and green laser data suggests that the green wavelength energy was absorbed less efficiently than the UV wavelength because of differences in absorption at 355 and 532 nm for LiFePO₄. Plotting of multihit events on Saxey plots also revealed a strong neutral O₂ loss from molecular dissociation, but quantification of this loss was insufficient to account for the observed oxygen deficiency.

  11. Effects of laser energy and wavelength on the analysis of LiFePO₄ using laser assisted atom probe tomography

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Santhanagopalan, Dhamodaran; Schreiber, Daniel K.; Perea, Daniel E.; Martens, Richard L.; Janssen, Yuri; Khalifah, Peter; Meng, Ying Shirley

    2014-09-21

    The effects of laser wavelength (355 nm and 532 nm) and laser pulse energy on the quantitative analysis of LiFePO₄ by atom probe tomography are considered. A systematic investigation of ultraviolet (UV, 355 nm) and green (532 nm) laser assisted field evaporation has revealed distinctly different behaviors. With the use of a UV laser, the major issue was identified as the preferential loss of oxygen (up to 10 at%) while other elements (Li, Fe and P) were observed to be close to nominal ratios. Lowering the laser energy per pulse to 1 pJ/pulse from 50 pJ/pulse increased the observed oxygenmore » concentration to nearer its correct stoichiometry, which was also well correlated with systematically higher concentrations of ¹⁶O₂⁺ ions. Green laser assisted field evaporation led to the selective loss of Li (33% deficiency) and a relatively minor O deficiency. The loss of Li is likely a result of selective dc evaporation of Li between or after laser pulses. Comparison of the UV and green laser data suggests that the green wavelength energy was absorbed less efficiently than the UV wavelength because of differences in absorption at 355 and 532 nm for LiFePO₄. Plotting of multihit events on Saxey plots also revealed a strong neutral O₂ loss from molecular dissociation, but quantification of this loss was insufficient to account for the observed oxygen deficiency.« less

  12. Inelastic scattering of electrons by metastable hydrogen atoms in a laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buica, Gabriela

    2015-09-01

    The inelastic scattering of fast electrons by metastable hydrogen atoms in the presence of a linearly polarized laser field is theoretically studied in the domain of field intensities below 1010 W/cm2. The interaction of the hydrogen atom with the laser field is described by first-order time-dependent perturbation theory, while the projectile electrons interacting with the laser field are described by the Gordon-Volkov wave functions. An analytic expression is obtained for the differential scattering cross section in the first-order Born approximation for laser-assisted inelastic e--H (2 s ) scattering for the 2 s →n l excitation. Detailed analytical and numerical results are presented for inelastic scattering accompanied by one-photon absorption, and the angular dependence and resonance structure of the differential cross sections are discussed for the 2 s →4 l excitation of metastable hydrogen.

  13. A compact laser head with high-frequency stability for Rb atomic clocks and optical instrumentation

    SciTech Connect

    Affolderbach, Christoph; Mileti, Gaetano

    2005-07-15

    We present a compact and frequency-stabilized laser head based on an extended-cavity diode laser. The laser head occupies a volume of 200 cm{sup 3} and includes frequency stabilization to Doppler-free saturated absorption resonances on the hyperfine components of the {sup 87}Rb D{sub 2} lines at 780 nm, obtained from a simple and compact spectroscopic setup using a 2 cm{sup 3} vapor cell. The measured frequency stability is {<=}2x10{sup -12} over integration times from 1 s to 1 day and shows the potential to reach 2x10{sup -13} over 10{sup 2}-10{sup 5} s. Compact laser sources with these performances are of great interest for applications in gas-cell atomic frequency standards, atomic magnetometers, interferometers and other instruments requiring stable and narrow-band optical sources.

  14. Search for laser-induced formation of antihydrogen atoms.

    PubMed

    Amoretti, M; Amsler, C; Bonomi, G; Bowe, P D; Canali, C; Carraro, C; Cesar, C L; Charlton, M; Ejsing, A M; Fontana, A; Fujiwara, M C; Funakoshi, R; Genova, P; Hangst, J S; Hayano, R S; Jørgensen, L V; Kellerbauer, A; Lagomarsino, V; Lodi Rizzini, E; Macrì, M; Madsen, N; Manuzio, G; Mitchard, D; Montagna, P; Posada, L G C; Pruys, H; Regenfus, C; Rotondi, A; Telle, H H; Testera, G; Van der Werf, D P; Variola, A; Venturelli, L; Yamazaki, Y; Zurlo, N

    2006-11-24

    Antihydrogen can be synthesized by mixing antiprotons and positrons in a Penning trap environment. Here an experiment to stimulate the formation of antihydrogen in the n = 11 quantum state by the introduction of light from a CO2 continuous wave laser is described. An overall upper limit of 0.8% with 90% C.L. on the laser-induced enhancement of the recombination has been found. This result strongly suggests that radiative recombination contributes negligibly to the antihydrogen formed in the experimental conditions used by the ATHENA Collaboration. PMID:17155742

  15. Influence of atomic modeling on integrated simulations of laser-produced Au plasmas.

    PubMed

    Frank, Yechiel; Raicher, Erez; Ehrlich, Yosi; Hurvitz, Gilad; Shpilman, Zeev; Fraenkel, Moshe; Zigler, Arie; Henis, Zohar

    2015-11-01

    Time-integrated x-ray emission spectra of laser-irradiated Au disks were recorded using transmission grating spectrometry, at laser intensities of 10(13) to 10(14) W/cm(2). Radiation-hydrodynamics and atomic physics calculations were used to simulate the emitted spectra. Three major plasma regions can be recognized: the heat wave, the corona, and an intermediate region connecting them. An analysis of the spectral contribution of these three plasma regions to the integrated recorded spectrum is presented. The importance of accurate atomic modeling of the intermediate plasma region, between the corona and the heat wave, is highlighted. The influence of several aspects of the atomic modeling is demonstrated, in particular multiply-excited atomic configurations and departure from local thermal equilibrium. PMID:26651806

  16. Evolution of dark state of an open atomic system in constant intensity laser field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krmpot, A. J.; Radonjić, M.; Ćuk, S. M.; Nikolić, S. N.; Grujić, Z. D.; Jelenković, B. M.

    2011-10-01

    We studied experimentally and theoretically the evolution of open atomic systems in the constant intensity laser field. The study is performed by analyzing the line shapes of Hanle electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) obtained in different segments of a laser beam cross section of constant intensity, i.e., a Π-shaped laser beam. Such Hanle EIT resonances were measured using a small movable aperture placed just in front of the photodetector, i.e., after the entire laser beam had passed through the vacuum Rb cell. The laser was locked to the open transition Fg=2→Fe=1 at the D1 line of 87Rb with laser intensities between 0.5 and 4 mW/cm2. This study shows that the profile of the laser beam determines the processes governing the development of atomic states during the interaction. The resonances obtained near the beam center are narrower than those obtained near the beam edge, but the significant changes of the linewidths occur only near the beam edge, i.e., right after the atom enters the beam. The Hanle EIT resonances obtained near the beam center exhibit two pronounced minima next to the central maximum. The theoretical model reveals that the occurrence of these transmission minima is a joint effect of the preparation of atoms into the dark state and the optical pumping into the uncoupled ground level Fg=1. The appearance of the transmission minima, although similar to that observed in the wings of a Gaussian beam [A. J. Krmpot , Opt. ExpressOPEXFF1094-408710.1364/OE.17.022491 17, 22491 (2009)], is of an entirely different nature for the Π-shaped laser beam.

  17. Experimental search for the electron electric dipole moment with laser cooled francium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, T.; Ando, S.; Aoki, T.; Arikawa, H.; Ezure, S.; Harada, K.; Hayamizu, T.; Ishikawa, T.; Itoh, M.; Kato, K.; Kawamura, H.; Uchiyama, A.; Aoki, T.; Asahi, K.; Furukawa, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Hatanaka, K.; Imai, K.; Murakami, T.; Nataraj, H. S.; Sato, T.; Shimizu, Y.; Wakasa, T.; Yoshida, H. P.; Yoshimi, A.; Sakemi, Y.

    2015-04-01

    A laser cooled heavy atom is one of the candidates to search for the permanent electric dipole moment (EDM) of the electron due to the enhancement mechanism and its long coherence time. The laser cooled francium (Fr) factory has been constructed to perform the electron EDM search at the Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center, Tohoku University. The present status of Fr production and the EDM measurement system is presented.

  18. A compact, high-performance all optical atomic clock based on telecom lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, John H.; Lemke, Nathan D.; Phelps, Gretchen R.; Martin, Kyle W.

    2016-03-01

    We discuss an optical atomic clock based on a two-photon transition at 778 nm in rubidium. In particular, we discuss the fundamental limitations to the short-term stability of a system based on a commercial C-band telecom laser as opposed to a near infrared laser. We show that this system is fundamentally capable of besting a hydrogen MASER in frequency stability and size.

  19. Clock Technology Development in the Laser Cooling and Atomic Physics (LCAP) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, Dave; Thompson, R. J.; Klipstein, W. M.; Kohel, J.; Maleki, L.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the Laser Cooling and Atomic Physics (LCAP) program. It focuses on clock technology development. The topics include: 1) Overview of LCAP Flight Projects; 2) Space Clock 101; 3) Physics with Clocks in microgravity; 4) Space Clock Challenges; 5) LCAP Timeline; 6) International Space Station (ISS) Science Platforms; 7) ISS Express Rack; 8) Space Qualification of Components; 9) Laser Configuration; 10) Clock Rate Comparisons: GPS Carrier Phase Frequency Transfer; and 11) ISS Model Views. This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  20. Evolution of dark state of an open atomic system in constant intensity laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Krmpot, A. J.; Radonjic, M.; Cuk, S. M.; Nikolic, S. N.; Grujic, Z. D.; Jelenkovic, B. M.

    2011-10-15

    We studied experimentally and theoretically the evolution of open atomic systems in the constant intensity laser field. The study is performed by analyzing the line shapes of Hanle electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) obtained in different segments of a laser beam cross section of constant intensity, i.e., a {Pi}-shaped laser beam. Such Hanle EIT resonances were measured using a small movable aperture placed just in front of the photodetector, i.e., after the entire laser beam had passed through the vacuum Rb cell. The laser was locked to the open transition F{sub g}=2{yields}F{sub e}=1 at the D{sub 1} line of {sup 87}Rb with laser intensities between 0.5 and 4 mW/cm{sup 2}. This study shows that the profile of the laser beam determines the processes governing the development of atomic states during the interaction. The resonances obtained near the beam center are narrower than those obtained near the beam edge, but the significant changes of the linewidths occur only near the beam edge, i.e., right after the atom enters the beam. The Hanle EIT resonances obtained near the beam center exhibit two pronounced minima next to the central maximum. The theoretical model reveals that the occurrence of these transmission minima is a joint effect of the preparation of atoms into the dark state and the optical pumping into the uncoupled ground level F{sub g}=1. The appearance of the transmission minima, although similar to that observed in the wings of a Gaussian beam [A. J. Krmpot et al., Opt. Express 17, 22491 (2009)], is of an entirely different nature for the {Pi}-shaped laser beam.

  1. (2+1) laser-induced fluorescence of spin-polarized hydrogen atoms.

    PubMed

    Bougas, Lykourgos; Sofikitis, Dimitris; Everest, Michael A; Alexander, Andrew J; Rakitzis, T Peter

    2010-11-01

    We report the measurement of the spin polarization of hydrogen (SPH) atoms by (2+1) laser-induced fluorescence, produced via the photodissociation of thermal HBr molecules with circularly polarized 193 nm light. This scheme, which involves two-photon laser excitation at 205 nm and fluorescence at 656 nm, offers an experimentally simpler polarization-detection method than the previously reported vacuum ultraviolet detection scheme, allowing the detection of SPH atoms to be performed more straightforwardly, from the photodissociation of a wide range of molecules and from a variety of collision experiments. PMID:21054033

  2. Laser spectroscopy of atoms guided by evanescent waves in micron-sized hollow optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, H.; Nakata, T.; Sakaki, K.; Ohtsu, M.; Lee, K.I.; Jhe, W.

    1996-06-01

    We report the first laser spectroscopic experiments on the Rb beam guided by blue-detuned evanescent waves in micron-sized hollow fibers. The two-step photoionization spectra show the long-range dispersive properties of dipole interaction between guided atoms and evanescent waves. A large enhancement factor of 20in in the transmitted atomic flux is obtained at optimal conditions and the total guidance efficiency is estimated to be above 40{percent}. The state- and species-selective guide with proper frequency detunings of the guide laser realizes in-line spatial separation of two stable Rb isotopes. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  3. Laser assisted atom probe analysis of thin film on insulating substrate.

    PubMed

    Kodzuka, M; Ohkubo, T; Hono, K

    2011-05-01

    We demonstrate that the atom probe analyses of metallic thin films on insulating substrates are possible using laser assisted field evaporation. The tips with metallic thin film and insulating substrate (0.6-3 μm in thickness) were prepared by the lift-out and annular ion beam milling techniques on tungsten supports. In spite of the existence of thick insulating layer between the metallic film and the tungsten support, atom probe tomography with practical mass resolution, signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution was found to be possible using laser assisted field evaporation. PMID:21172729

  4. Theoretical study on isotope separation of an ytterbium atomic beam by laser deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Min; Xu, Xin-Ye

    2014-01-01

    Isotope separation by laser deflecting an atomic beam is analyzed theoretically. Interacting with a tilted one-dimensional optical molasses, an ytterbium atomic beam is split into multi-beams with different isotopes like 172Yb,173Yb, and 174Yb. By using the numerical calculation, the dependences of the splitting angle on the molasses laser intensity and detuning are studied, and the optimal parameters for the isotope separation are also investigated. Furthermore, the isotope separation efficiency and purity are estimated. Finally a new scheme for the efficient isotope separation is proposed. These findings will give a guideline for simply obtaining pure isotopes of various elements.

  5. Design of a laser-assisted tomographic atom probe at Muenster University

    SciTech Connect

    Schlesiger, Ralf; Oberdorfer, Christian; Greiwe, Gerd; Stender, Patrick; Artmeier, Michael; Pelka, Patrick; Spaleck, Frank; Schmitz, Guido; Wuerz, Roland

    2010-04-15

    To benefit from the latest technical improvements in atom probe analysis, a new tomographic atom probe has been built at the University of Muenster, Germany. The instrument utilizes a femtosecond laser system with a high repetition rate combined with the ability of using a micrometer-sized extraction electrode and a wide angle configuration. Since field evaporation is triggered by laser pulses instead of high-voltage pulses, the instrument offers the ability to expand the range of analyzed materials to poorly conducting or insulating materials such as oxides, glasses, ceramics, and polymeric materials. The article describes the design of the instrument and presents characterizing measurements on metals, semiconductors, and oxide ceramic.

  6. Laser based analysis using a passively Q-switched laser employing analysis electronics and a means for detecting atomic optical emission of the laser media

    DOEpatents

    Woodruff, Steven D.; Mcintyre, Dustin L.

    2016-03-29

    A device for Laser based Analysis using a Passively Q-Switched Laser comprising an optical pumping source optically connected to a laser media. The laser media and a Q-switch are positioned between and optically connected to a high reflectivity mirror (HR) and an output coupler (OC) along an optical axis. The output coupler (OC) is optically connected to the output lens along the optical axis. A means for detecting atomic optical emission comprises a filter and a light detector. The optical filter is optically connected to the laser media and the optical detector. A control system is connected to the optical detector and the analysis electronics. The analysis electronics are optically connected to the output lens. The detection of the large scale laser output production triggers the control system to initiate the precise timing and data collection from the detector and analysis.

  7. Theory of x-ray absorption by laser-dressed atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Buth, Christian; Santra, Robin

    2007-03-15

    An ab initio theory is devised for the x-ray photoabsorption cross section of atoms in the field of a moderately intense optical laser (800 nm, 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2}). The laser dresses the core-excited atomic states, which introduces a dependence of the cross section on the angle between the polarization vectors of the two linearly polarized radiation sources. We use the Hartree-Fock-Slater approximation to describe the atomic many-particle problem in conjunction with a nonrelativistic quantum-electrodynamic approach to treat the photon-electron interaction. The continuum wave functions of ejected electrons are treated with a complex absorbing potential that is derived from smooth exterior complex scaling. The solution to the two-color (x-ray plus laser) problem is discussed in terms of a direct diagonalization of the complex symmetric matrix representation of the Hamiltonian. Alternative treatments with time-independent and time-dependent non-Hermitian perturbation theories are presented that exploit the weak interaction strength between x rays and atoms. We apply the theory to study the photoabsorption cross section of krypton atoms near the K edge. A pronounced modification of the cross section is found in the presence of the optical laser.

  8. Nonsequential Double Ionization of Atoms in Strong Laser Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prauzner-Bechcicki, J. S.; Sacha, K.; Eckhardt, B.; Zakrzewski, J.

    2007-10-01

    It is now possible to produce laser pulses with reproducible pulse shape and controlled carrier envelope phase. It is discussed how that can be explored in double ionisation studies. To this end we solve numerically the Schrödinger equation for a limited dimensionality model which nevertheless treats electron repulsion qualitatively correctly and allows to study correlation effects due to the Coulomb repulsion.

  9. Atom laser based on four-wave mixing with Bose-Einstein condensates in nonlinear lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasak, T.; Konotop, V. V.; Trippenbach, M.

    2013-12-01

    Optical lattices are typically used to modify the dispersion relation of the matter wave, in particular, to ensure resonant conditions for multiwave interactions. Here we propose an alternative mechanism of wave interactions. It can be implemented using a nonlinear lattice and modifies the momentum conservation law of the interacting atoms, leaving the energy conservation unchanged. We propose to apply this phenomenon to construct an atom laser via a resonant four-wave mixing process.

  10. A compact and robust diode laser system for atom interferometry on a sounding rocket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schkolnik, V.; Hellmig, O.; Wenzlawski, A.; Grosse, J.; Kohfeldt, A.; Döringshoff, K.; Wicht, A.; Windpassinger, P.; Sengstock, K.; Braxmaier, C.; Krutzik, M.; Peters, A.

    2016-08-01

    We present a diode laser system optimized for laser cooling and atom interferometry with ultra-cold rubidium atoms aboard sounding rockets as an important milestone toward space-borne quantum sensors. Design, assembly and qualification of the system, combing micro-integrated distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser modules and free space optical bench technology, is presented in the context of the MAIUS (Matter-wave Interferometry in Microgravity) mission. This laser system, with a volume of 21 l and total mass of 27 kg, passed all qualification tests for operation on sounding rockets and is currently used in the integrated MAIUS flight system producing Bose-Einstein condensates and performing atom interferometry based on Bragg diffraction. The MAIUS payload is being prepared for launch in fall 2016. We further report on a reference laser system, comprising a rubidium stabilized DFB laser, which was operated successfully on the TEXUS 51 mission in April 2015. The system demonstrated a high level of technological maturity by remaining frequency stabilized throughout the mission including the rocket's boost phase.