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Sample records for atr wg-mox fuel

  1. AFC-1 Fuel Rodlet Fission Power Deposition Validation in ATR

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Chang; M. A. Lillo; D. J. Utterbeck

    2008-11-01

    One of the viable options of long-term geological disposal of the nuclear power reactors generated spent fuel is to extract plutonium, the minor actinides (MA) and potentially long-lived fission products from the spent fuel and transmute them into short-lived or stable radionuclides in an appropriate reactor for the reduction of the radiological toxicity of the nuclear waste stream. An important component of that technology will be a non-fertile / low-fertile actinide transmutation fuel form containing the plutonium, neptunium, americium (and possibly curium) isotopes to be transmuted. Such advanced fuel forms, especially ones enriched in the long-life minor actinide (LLMA) elements (i.e., Np, Am, Cm), have minimal irradiation performance data available from which to establish a transmutation fuel form design. Recognizing these needs, an Advanced Fuel Cycle test series-1 (AFC-1) irradiation test on a variety of candidate fuel forms is now being conducted in Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The first advanced fuel experiment (AFC-1) has been finalized and the test assembly analyzed for insertion and irradiation in ATR. The ATR core consists of a serpentine and rotationally symmetric fuel assembly about the z-axis of the core center. The plan view of the ATR core configuration is shown in Fig. 5, in Ref. 1. A cadmium filter with a 0.178 cm (0.045") thickness and 121.5 cm (48") in length, is currently used in the actinide-fuel capsule design for the East Flux Trap (EFT) position in ATR, to depress the linear heat generation rate (LHGR) lower than the project’s 330 W/cm limit for the experimental fuel rodlets. The LHGR is proportional to the fission power deposited in the fuel rodlets from the neutron fissions. The fraction of the fission power generated from the neutron fission reactions deposited in the fuel rodlet is an important parameter for test assembly thermal analysis, which will be validated in this summary.

  2. Weapons-Grade MOX Fuel Burnup Characteristics in Advanced Test Reactor Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Chang

    2006-07-01

    Mixed oxide (MOX) test capsules prepared with weapons-derived plutonium have been irradiated to a burnup of 50 GWd/t. The MOX fuel was fabricated at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) by a master-mix process and has been irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Previous withdrawals of the same fuel have occurred at 9, 21, 30, 40, and 50 GWd/t. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) manages this test series for the Department of Energy’s Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP). A UNIX BASH (Bourne Again SHell) script CMO has been written and validated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to couple the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP with the depletion and buildup code ORIGEN-2 (CMO). The new Monte Carlo burnup analysis methodology in this paper consists of MCNP coupling through CMO with ORIGEN-2(MCWO). MCWO is a fully automated tool that links the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP with the radioactive decay and burnup code ORIGEN-2. The fuel burnup analyses presented in this study were performed using MCWO. MCWO analysis yields time-dependent and neutron-spectrum-dependent minor actinide and Pu concentrations for the ATR small I-irradiation test position. The purpose of this report is to validate both the Weapons-Grade Mixed Oxide (WG-MOX) test assembly model and the new fuel burnup analysis methodology by comparing the computed results against the neutron monitor measurements and the irradiated WG-MOX post irradiation examination (PIE) data.

  3. Comparison of HEU and LEU Fuel Neutron Spectrum for ATR Fuel Element and ATR Flux-Trap Positions

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Chang

    2008-10-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power and high neutron flux research reactor operating in the United States. Powered with highly enriched uranium (HEU), the ATR has a maximum thermal power rating of 250 MWth. Because of the high total core power and high neutron flux, the ATR is an ideal candidate for assessing the feasibility of converting an HEU driven reactor to a low-enriched core. An optimized low-enriched uranium (LEU) (U-10Mo) core conversion case, which can meet the project requirements, has been selected. However, LEU contains a significant quantity of high density U-238 (80.3 wt.%), which will harden the neutron spectrum in the core region. Based on the reference ATR HEU and the optimized LEU full core plate-by-plate (PBP) models, the present work investigates and compares the neutron spectra differences in the fuel element (FE), Northeast flux trap (NEFT), Southeast flux trap (SEFT), and East flux trap (EFT) positions. A detailed PBP MCNP ATR core model was developed and validated for fuel cycle burnup comparison analysis. The current ATR core with HEU U 235 enrichment of 93.0wt.% was used as the reference model. Each HEU fuel element contains 19 fuel plates with a fuel meat thickness of 0.508 mm (20 mil). In this work, an optimized LEU (U-10Mo) core conversion case with a nominal fuel meat thickness of 0.330 mm (13 mil) and the U-235 enrichment of 19.7 wt.% was used to calculate the impact of the neutron spectrum in FE and FT positions. MCNP-calculated results show that the neutron spectrum in the LEU FE is slightly harder than in the HEU FE, as expected. However, when neutrons transport through water coolant and beryllium (Be), the neutrons are thermalized to an equilibrium neutron spectrum as a function of water volume fraction in the investigated FT positions. As a result, the neutron spectrum differences of the HEU and LEU in the NEFT, SEFT, and EFT are negligible. To demonstrate that the LEU core fuel cycle performance can meet the

  4. Analysis of the ATR fuel element swaging process

    SciTech Connect

    Richins, W.D.; Miller, G.K.

    1995-12-01

    This report documents a detailed evaluation of the swaging process used to connect fuel plates to side plates in Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuel elements. The swaging is a mechanical process that begins with fitting a fuel plate into grooves in the side plates. Once a fuel plate is positioned, a lip on each of two side plate grooves is pressed into the fuel plate using swaging wheels to form the joints. Each connection must have a specified strength (measured in terms, of a pullout force capacity) to assure that these joints do not fail during reactor operation. The purpose of this study is to analyze the swaging process and associated procedural controls, and to provide recommendations to assure that the manufacturing process produces swaged connections that meet the minimum strength requirement. The current fuel element manufacturer, Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) of Lynchburg, Virginia, follows established procedures that include quality inspections and process controls in swaging these connections. The procedures have been approved by Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies and are designed to assure repeatability of the process and structural integrity of each joint. Prior to July 1994, ATR fuel elements were placed in the Hydraulic Test Facility (HTF) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (AGNAIL), Test Reactor Area (TRA) for application of Boehmite (an aluminum oxide) film and for checking structural integrity before placement of the elements into the ATR. The results presented in this report demonstrate that the pullout strength of the swaged connections is assured by the current manufacturing process (with several recommended enhancements) without the need for- testing each element in the HTF.

  5. Methodology for the Weapons-Grade MOX Fuel Burnup Analysis in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Chang

    2005-08-01

    A UNIX BASH (Bourne Again SHell) script CMO has been written and validated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to couple the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP with the depletion and buildup code ORIGEN-2 (CMO). The new Monte Carlo burnup analysis methodology in this paper consists of MCNP coupling through CMO with ORIGEN-2, and is therefore called the MCWO. MCWO is a fully automated tool that links the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP with the radioactive decay and burnup code ORIGEN-2. MCWO is capable of handling a large number of fuel burnup and material loading specifications, Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) lobe powers, and irradiation time intervals. MCWO processes user input that specifies the system geometry, initial material compositions, feed/removal specifications, and other code-specific parameters. Calculated results from MCNP, ORIGEN-2, and data process module calculations are output in succession as MCWO executes. The principal function of MCWO is to transfer one-group cross-section and flux values from MCNP to ORIGEN-2, and then transfer the resulting material compositions (after irradiation and/or decay) from ORIGEN-2 back to MCNP in a repeated, cyclic fashion. The basic requirements of MCWO are a working MCNP input file and some additional input parameters; all interaction with ORIGEN-2 as well as other calculations are performed by CMO. This paper presents the MCWO-calculated results for the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) experiments RERTR-1 and RERTR-2 as well as the Weapons-Grade Mixed Oxide (WG-MOX) fuel testing in ATR. Calculations performed for the WG-MOX test irradiation, which is managed by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), supports the DOE Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP). The MCWO-calculated results are compared with measured data.

  6. Irradiaton of Metallic and Oxide Fuels for Actinide Transmutation in the ATR

    SciTech Connect

    Heather J. MacLean; Steven L. Hayes

    2007-09-01

    Metallic fuels containing minor actinides and rare earth additions have been fabricated and are prepared for irradiation in the ATR, scheduled to begin during the summer of 2007. Oxide fuels containing minor actinides are being fabricated and will be ready for irradiation in ATR, scheduled to begin during the summer of 2008. Fabrication and irradiation of these fuels will provide detailed studies of actinide transmutation in support of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership. These fuel irradiations include new fuel compositions that have never before been tested. Results from these tests will provide fundamental data on fuel irradiation performance and will advance the state of knowledge for transmutation fuels.

  7. MCWO - Linking MCNP And ORIGEN2 For Fuel Burnup Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gray S Chang

    2005-04-01

    The UNIX BASH (Bourne Again Shell) script MCWO has been developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environment Laboratory (INEEL) to couple the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP with the depletion and buildup code ORIGEN2. MCWO is a fully automated tool that links the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP with the radioactive decay and burnup code ORIGEN2. MCWO can handle a large number of fuel burnup and material loading specifications, Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) powers, and irradiation time intervals. The program processes input from the user that specifies the system geometry, initial material compositions, feed/removal specifications, and other code-specific parameters. Calculated results from MCNP, ORIGEN2, and data process module calculations are then output successively as the code runs. The principal function of MCWO is to transfer one-group cross-section and flux values from MCNP to ORIGEN2, and then transfer the resulting material compositions (after irradiation and/or decay) from ORIGEN2 back to MCNP in a repeated, cyclic fashion. The basic requirement of the code is that the user have a working MCNP input file and other input parameters; all interaction with ORIGEN2 and other calculations are performed by UNIX BASH script MCWO. This paper presents the MCWO-calculated results of the RERTR-1 and -2 , and the Weapons-Grade Mixed Oxiide fuel (Wg-MOX) fuel experiments in ATR and compares the MCWO-calculated results with the measured data.

  8. ATR LEU Fuel and Burnable Absorber Neutronics Performance Optimization by Fuel Meat Thickness Variation

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Chang

    2007-09-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power density and high neutron flux research reactor operating in the United States. Powered with highly enriched uranium (HEU), the ATR has a maximum thermal power rating of 250 MWth. Because of the large test volumes located in high flux areas, the ATR is an ideal candidate for assessing the feasibility of converting an HEU driven reactor to a low-enriched core. The present work investigates the necessary modifications and evaluates the subsequent operating effects of this conversion. A detailed plate-by-plate MCNP ATR 1/8th core model was developed and validated for a fuel cycle burnup comparison analysis. Using the current HEU U 235 enrichment of 93.0 % as a baseline, an analysis can be performed to determine the low-enriched uranium (LEU) density and U-235 enrichment required in the fuel meat to yield an equivalent K-eff between the HEU core and the LEU core versus effective full power days (EFPD). The MCNP ATR 1/8th core model will be used to optimize the U-235 loading in the LEU core, such that the differences in K-eff and heat flux profile between the HEU and LEU core can be minimized. The depletion methodology MCWO was used to calculate K-eff versus EFPDs in this paper. The MCWO-calculated results for the LEU cases with foil (U-10Mo) types demonstrated adequate excess reactivity such that the K-eff versus EFPDs plot is similar to the reference ATR HEU case. Each HEU fuel element contains 19 fuel plates with a fuel meat thickness of 0.508 mm. In this work, the proposed LEU (U-10Mo) core conversion case with a nominal fuel meat thickness of 0.508 mm and the same U-235 enrichment (15.5 wt%) can be used to optimize the radial heat flux profile by varying the fuel plate thickness from 0.254 to 0.457 mm at the inner 4 fuel plates (1-4) and outer 4 fuel plates (16-19). In addition, a 0.7g of burnable absorber Boron-10 was added in the inner and outer plates to reduce the initial excess reactivity, and the inner/outer heat

  9. ATR LEU fuel and burnable absorber neutronics performance optimization by fuel meat thickness variation

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, G.S.

    2008-07-15

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power density and high neutron flux research reactor operating in the United States. Powered with highly enriched uranium (HEU), the ATR has a maximum thermal power rating of 250 MWth. Because of the large test volumes located in high flux areas, the ATR is an ideal candidate for assessing the feasibility of converting an HEU driven reactor to a low-enriched core. The present work investigates the necessary modifications and evaluates the subsequent operating effects of this conversion. A detailed plate-by-plate MCNP ATR 1/8th core model was developed and validated for a fuel cycle burnup comparison analysis. Using the current HEU U-235 enrichment of 93.0 % as a baseline, an analysis can be performed to determine the low-enriched uranium (LEU) density and U-235 enrichment required in the fuel meat to yield an equivalent K-eff between the HEU core th and the LEU core versus effective full power days (EFPD). The MCNP ATR 1/8th core model will be used to optimize the U-235 loading in the LEU core, such that the differences in K-eff and heat flux profile between the HEU and LEU core can be minimized. The depletion methodology MCWO was used to calculate K-eff versus EFPDs in this paper. The MCWO-calculated results for the LEU cases with foil (U-10Mo) types demonstrated adequate excess reactivity such that the K-eff versus EFPDs plot is similar to the reference ATR HEU case. Each HEU fuel element contains 19 fuel plates with a fuel meat thickness of 0.508 mm. In this work, the proposed LEU (U-10Mo) core conversion case with a nominal fuel meat thickness of 0.381 mm and the same U-235 enrichment (19.7 wt%) can be used to optimize the radial heat flux profile by varying the fuel meat thickness from 0.191 mm (7.5 mil) to 0.343 mm (13.5 mil) at the inner 4 fuel plates (1-4) and outer 4 fuel plates (16-19). In addition, 0.8g of a burnable absorber, Boron-10, was added in the inner and outer plates to reduce the initial excess

  10. Diesel fuel processor for PEM fuel cells: Two possible alternatives (ATR versus SR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutillo, A.; Specchia, S.; Antonini, M.; Saracco, G.; Specchia, V.

    There are large efforts in exploring the on-board reforming technologies, which would avoid the actual lack of hydrogen infrastructure and related safety issues. From this view point, the present work deals with the comparison between two different 10 kW e fuel processors (FP) systems for the production of hydrogen-rich fuel gas starting from diesel oil, based respectively on autothermal (ATR) and steam-reforming (SR) process and related CO clean-up technologies; the obtained hydrogen rich gas is fed to the PEMFC stack of an auxiliary power unit (APU). Based on a series of simulations with Matlab/Simulink, the two systems were compared in terms of FP and APU efficiency, hydrogen concentration fed to the FC, water balance and process scheme complexity. Notwithstanding a slightly higher process scheme complexity and a slightly more difficult water recovery, the FP based on the SR scheme, as compared to the ATR one, shows higher efficiency and larger hydrogen concentration for the stream fed to the PEMFC anode, which represent key issues for auxiliary power generation based on FCs as compared, e.g. to alternators.

  11. ATR LEU Monolithic Foil-Type Fuel with Integral Cladding Burnable Absorber – Neutronics Performance Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Gray Chang

    2012-03-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), currently operating in the United States, is used for material testing at very high neutron fluxes. Powered with highly enriched uranium (HEU), the ATR has a maximum thermal power rating of 250 MWth. Because of the large test volumes located in high flux areas, the ATR is an ideal candidate for assessing the feasibility of converting HEU driven reactor cores to low-enriched uranium (LEU) cores. The burnable absorber - 10B, was added in the inner and outer plates to reduce the initial excess reactivity, and to improve the peak ratio of the inner/outer heat flux. The present work investigates the LEU Monolithic foil-type fuel with 10B Integral Cladding Burnable Absorber (ICBA) design and evaluates the subsequent neutronics operating effects of this proposed fuel designs. The proposed LEU fuel specification in this work is directly related to both the RERTR LEU Development Program and the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) LEU Conversion Project at Idaho National Laboratory (INL).

  12. Validation of ATR Fission Power Deposition Fraction in HEU and LEU Fuel Plates

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Chang

    2008-09-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a high power (250 MW), high neutron flux research reactor operating in the United States. Powered with highly enriched uranium (HEU), the ATR has a maximum unperturbed thermal neutron flux rating of 1.0 x 1015 n/cm2–s. Because of its high power and large test volumes located in high flux areas, the ATR is an ideal candidate for assessing the feasibility of converting an HEU driven reactor to a low-enriched core. A detailed plate-by-plate MCNP ATR full core model has been developed and validated for the low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel conversion feasibility study. Using this model, an analysis has been performed to determine the LEU density and U-235 enrichment required in the fuel meat to yield equivalent K-eff versus effective full power days (EFPDs) between the HEU and LEU cores. This model has also been used to optimize U-235 content of the LEU core, minimizing the differences in K-eff and heat flux profile between the HEU and LEU cores at 115 MW total core power for 125 EFPDs. The LEU core conversion feasibility study evaluated foil type (U-10Mo) fuel with the LEU reference design of 19.7 wt% U-235 enrichment. The LEU reference design has a fixed fuel meat thickness of 0.330 mm and can sustain the same operating cycle length as the HEU fuel. Heat flux and fission power density are parameters that are proportional to the fraction of fission power deposited in fuel. Thus, the accurate determination of the fraction of fission power deposited in the fuel is important to ATR nuclear safety. In this work, a new approach was developed and validated, the Tally Fuel Cells Only (TFCO) method. This method calculates and compares the fission power deposition fraction between HEU and LEU fuel plates. Due to the high density of the U-10Mo LEU fuel, the fission ?-energy deposition fraction is 37.12%, which is larger than the HEU’s ?-energy deposition fraction of 19.7%. As a result, the fuel decay heat cooling will need to be improved

  13. Cadmium Depletion Impacts on Hardening Neutron6 Spectrum for Advanced Fuel Testing in ATR

    SciTech Connect

    Gray S. Chang

    2011-05-01

    For transmuting long-lived isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter-lived fission products effectively is in a fast neutron spectrum reactor. In the absence of a fast spectrum test reactor in the United States of America (USA), initial irradiation testing of candidate fuels can be performed in a thermal test reactor that has been modified to produce a test region with a hardened neutron spectrum. A test region is achieved with a Cadmium (Cd) filter which can harden the neutron spectrum to a spectrum similar (although still somewhat softer) to that of the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR). A fuel test loop with a Cd-filter has been installed within the East Flux Trap (EFT) of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A detailed comparison analyses between the cadmium (Cd) filter hardened neutron spectrum in the ATR and the LMFBR fast neutron spectrum have been performed using MCWO. MCWO is a set of scripting tools that are used to couple the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP with the isotope depletion and buildup code ORIGEN-2.2. The MCWO-calculated results indicate that the Cd-filter can effectively flatten the Rim-Effect and reduce the linear heat rate (LHGR) to meet the advanced fuel testing project requirements at the beginning of irradiation (BOI). However, the filtering characteristics of Cd as a strong absorber quickly depletes over time, and the Cd-filter must be replaced for every two typical operating cycles within the EFT of the ATR. The designed Cd-filter can effectively depress the LHGR in experimental fuels and harden the neutron spectrum enough to adequately flatten the Rim Effect in the test region.

  14. Status Report on the Fabrication of Fuel Cladding Chemical Interaction Test Articles for ATR Irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Field, Kevin G.; Howard, Richard H.

    2015-09-28

    FeCrAl alloys are a promising new class of alloys for light water reactor (LWR) applications due to their superior oxidation and corrosion resistance in high temperature environments. The current R&D efforts have focused on the alloy composition and processing routes to generate nuclear grade FeCrAl alloys with optimized properties for enhanced accident tolerance while maintaining properties needed for normal operation conditions. Therefore, the composition and processing routes must be optimized to maintain the high temperature steam oxidation (typically achieved by increasing the Cr and Al content) while still exhibiting properties conducive to normal operation in a LWR (such as radiation tolerance where reducing Cr content is favorable). Within this balancing act is the addition of understanding the influence on composition and processing routes on the FeCrAl alloys for fuel-cladding chemical interactions (FCCI). Currently, limited knowledge exists on FCCI for the FeCrAl-UO2 clad-fuel system. To overcome the knowledge gaps on the FCCI for the FeCrAl-UO2 clad-fuel system a series of fueled irradiation tests have been developed for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) housed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The first series of tests has already been reported. These tests used miniaturized 17x17 PWR fuel geometry rodlets of second-generation FeCrAl alloys fueled with industrial Westinghouse UO2 fuel. These rodlets were encapsulated within a stainless steel housing.To provide high fidelity experiments and more robust testing, a new series of rodlets have been developed deemed the Accident Tolerant Fuel Experiment #1 Oak Ridge National Laboratory FCCI test (ATF-1 ORNL FCCI). The main driving factor, which is discussed in detail, was to provide a radiation environment where prototypical fuel-clad interface temperatures are met while still maintaining constant contact between industrial fuel and the candidate cladding alloys

  15. Gamma-Ray Simulated Spectrum Deconvolution of a LaBr₃ 1-in. x 1-in. Scintillator for Nondestructive ATR Fuel Burnup On-Site Predictions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Navarro, Jorge; Ring, Terry A.; Nigg, David W.

    2015-03-01

    A deconvolution method for a LaBr₃ 1"x1" detector for nondestructive Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuel burnup applications was developed. The method consisted of obtaining the detector response function, applying a deconvolution algorithm to 1”x1” LaBr₃ simulated, data along with evaluating the effects that deconvolution have on nondestructively determining ATR fuel burnup. The simulated response function of the detector was obtained using MCNPX as well with experimental data. The Maximum-Likelihood Expectation Maximization (MLEM) deconvolution algorithm was selected to enhance one-isotope source-simulated and fuel- simulated spectra. The final evaluation of the study consisted of measuring the performance of the fuel burnup calibrationmore » curve for the convoluted and deconvoluted cases. The methodology was developed in order to help design a reliable, high resolution, rugged and robust detection system for the ATR fuel canal capable of collecting high performance data for model validation, along with a system that can calculate burnup and using experimental scintillator detector data.« less

  16. Gamma-Ray Simulated Spectrum Deconvolution of a LaBr₃ 1-in. x 1-in. Scintillator for Nondestructive ATR Fuel Burnup On-Site Predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, Jorge; Ring, Terry A.; Nigg, David W.

    2015-03-01

    A deconvolution method for a LaBr₃ 1"x1" detector for nondestructive Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuel burnup applications was developed. The method consisted of obtaining the detector response function, applying a deconvolution algorithm to 1”x1” LaBr₃ simulated, data along with evaluating the effects that deconvolution have on nondestructively determining ATR fuel burnup. The simulated response function of the detector was obtained using MCNPX as well with experimental data. The Maximum-Likelihood Expectation Maximization (MLEM) deconvolution algorithm was selected to enhance one-isotope source-simulated and fuel- simulated spectra. The final evaluation of the study consisted of measuring the performance of the fuel burnup calibration curve for the convoluted and deconvoluted cases. The methodology was developed in order to help design a reliable, high resolution, rugged and robust detection system for the ATR fuel canal capable of collecting high performance data for model validation, along with a system that can calculate burnup and using experimental scintillator detector data.

  17. A Feasibility Study to Determine Cooling Time and Burnup of ATR Fuel Using a Nondestructive Technique and Three Types of Gamma-ray Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Jorge Navarro; Rahmat Aryaeinejad,; David W. Nigg

    2011-05-01

    A Feasibility Study to Determine Cooling Time and Burnup of ATR Fuel Using a Nondestructive Technique1 Rahmat Aryaeinejad, Jorge Navarro, and David W Nigg Idaho National Laboratory Abstract Effective and efficient Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuel management require state of the art core modeling tools. These new tools will need isotopic and burnup validation data before they are put into production. To create isotopic, burn up validation libraries and to determine the setup for permanent fuel scanner system a feasibility study was perform. The study consisted in measuring short and long cooling time fuel elements at the ATR canal. Three gamma spectroscopy detectors (HPGe, LaBr3, and HPXe) and two system configurations (above and under water) were used in the feasibility study. The first stage of the study was to investigate which detector and system configuration would be better suited for different scenarios. The second stage of the feasibility study was to create burnup and cooling time calibrations using experimental isotopic data collected and ORIGEN 2.2 burnup data. The results of the study establish that a better spectra resolution is achieve with an above the water configuration and that three detectors can be used in the permanent fuel scanner system for different situations. In addition it was conclude that a number of isotopic ratios and absolute measurements could be used to predict ATR fuel burnup and cooling times. 1This work was supported by the U.S. Depart¬ment of Energy (DOE) under Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC Contract No. DE-AC07-05ID14517.

  18. Fabrication, Inspection, and Test Plan for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) High-Power Mixed-Oxide (MOX) Fuel Irradiation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Wachs, G. W.

    1998-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Disposition Program (FMDP) has announced that reactor irradiation of Mixed-Oxide (MOX) fuel is one of the preferred alternatives for disposal of surplus weapons-usable plutonium (Pu). MOX fuel has been utilized domestically in test reactors and on an experimental basis in a number of Commercial Light Water Reactors (CLWRs). Most of this experience has been with Pu derived from spent low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, known as reactor grade (RG) Pu. The High-Power MOX fuel test will be irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to provide preliminary data to demonstrate that the unique properties of surplus weapons-derived or weapons-grade (WG) plutonium (Pu) do not compromise the applicability of this MOX experience base. The purpose of the high-power experiment, in conjunction with the currently ongoing average-power experiment at the ATR, is to contribute new information concerning the response of WG plutonium under more severe irradiation conditions typical of the peak power locations in commercial reactors. In addition, the high-power test will contribute experience with irradiation of gallium-containing fuel to the database required for resolution of generic CLWR fuel design issues. The distinction between "high-power" and "average-power" relates to the position within the nominal CLWR core. The high-power test project is subject to a number of requirements, as discussed in the Fissile Materials Disposition Program Light Water Reactor Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation High-Power Test Project Plan (ORNL/MD/LTR-125).

  19. Safety Assurance for ATR Irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover

    2006-10-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is the world’s premiere test reactor for performing high fluence, large volume, irradiation test programs. The ATR has many capabilities and a wide variety of tests are performed in this truly one of a kind reactor, including isotope production, simple self-contained static capsule experiments, instrumented/controlled experiments, and loop testing under pressurized water conditions. Along with the five pressurized water loops, ATR may also have gas (temperature controlled) lead experiments, fuel boosted fast flux experiments, and static sealed capsules all in the core at the same time. In addition, any or all of these tests may contain fuel or moderating materials that can affect reactivity levels in the ATR core. Therefore the safety analyses required to ensure safe operation of each experiment as well as the reactor itself are complex. Each test has to be evaluated against stringent reactor control safety criteria, as well as the effects it could have on adjacent tests and the reactor as well as the consequences of those effects. The safety analyses of each experiment are summarized in a document entitled the Experiment Safety Assurance Package (ESAP). The ESAP references and employs the results of the reactor physics, thermal, hydraulic, stress, seismic, vibration, and all other analyses necessary to ensure the experiment can be irradiated safely in the ATR. The requirements for reactivity worth, chemistry compatibilities, pressure limitations, material issues, etc. are all specified in the Technical Safety Requirements and the Upgraded Final Safety Analysis Report (UFSAR) for the ATR. This paper discusses the ESAP process, types of analyses, types of safety requirements and the approvals necessary to ensure an experiment can be safely irradiated in the ATR.

  20. A feasibility study to determine cooling time and burnup of ATR fuel using a nondestructive technique and three types of gamma-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, J.; Aryaeinejad, R.; Nigg, D.W.

    2011-07-01

    The goal of this work was to perform a feasibility study and establish measurement techniques to determine the burnup of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) fuels at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Three different detectors of high purity germanium (HPGe), lanthanum bromide (LaBr{sub 3}), and high pressure xenon (HPXe) in two detection system configurations of below and above the water pool were used in this study. The last two detectors were used for the first time in fuel burnup measurements. The results showed that a better quality spectra can be achieved with the above the water pool configuration. Both short and long cooling time fuels were investigated in order to determine which measurement technique, absolute or fission product ratio, is better suited in each scenario and also to establish what type of detector should be used in each case for the best burnup measurement. The burnup and cooling time calibrations were established using experimental absolute activities or isotopic ratios and ORIGEN burnup calculations. A method was developed to do burnup and cooling time calibrations using fission isotopes activities without the need to know the exact geometry. (authors)

  1. Irradiation Planning for Fully-Ceramic Micro-encsapsulated fuel in ATR at LWR-relevant conditions: year-end report on FY-2011

    SciTech Connect

    Abderrafi M. Ougouag; R. Sonat Sen; Michael A. Pope; Brian Boer

    2011-09-01

    This report presents the estimation of required ATR irradiation levels for the DB-FCM fuel design (fueled with Pu and MAs). The fuel and assembly designs are those considered in a companion report [R. S. Sen et al., FCR&D-2011- 00037 or INL/EXT-11-23269]. These results, pertaining to the DB-FCM fuel, are definitive in as much as the design of said fuel is definitive. In addition to the work performed, as required, for DB-FCM fuel, work has started in a preliminary fashion on single-cell UO2 and UN fuels. These latter activities go beyond the original charter of this project and although the corresponding work is incomplete, significant progress has been achieved. However, in this context, all that has been achieved is only preliminary because the corresponding fuel designs are neither finalized nor optimized. In particular, the UO2 case is unlikely to result in a viable fuel design if limited to enrichment at or under 20 weight % in U-235. The UN fuel allows reasonable length cycles and is likely to make an optimal design possible. Despite being limited to preliminary designs and offering only preliminary conclusions, the irradiation planning tasks for UO2 and UN fuels that are summarized in this report are useful to the overall goal of devising and deploying FCM-LWR fuel since the methods acquired and tested in this project and the overall procedure for planning will be available for planning tests for the finalized fuel design. Indeed, once the fuel design is finalized and the expected burnup level is determined, the methodology that has been assembled will allow the prompt finalization of the neutronic planning of the irradiation experiment and would provide guidance on the expected experimental performance of the fuel. Deviations from the expected behavior will then have to be analyzed and the outcome of the analysis may be corrections or modifications for the assessment models as well as, possibly, fuel design modifications, and perhaps even variation of

  2. ATR neutron spectral characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.W.; Anderl, R.A.

    1995-11-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at INEL provides intense neutron fields for irradiation-effects testing of reactor material samples, for production of radionuclides used in industrial and medical applications, and for scientific research. Characterization of the neutron environments in the irradiation locations of the ATR has been done by means of neutronics calculations and by means of neutron dosimetry based on the use of neutron activation monitors that are placed in the various irradiation locations. The primary purpose of this report is to present the results of an extensive characterization of several ATR irradiation locations based on neutron dosimetry measurements and on least-squares-adjustment analyses that utilize both neutron dosimetry measurements and neutronics calculations. This report builds upon the previous publications, especially the reference 4 paper. Section 2 provides a brief description of the ATR and it tabulates neutron spectral information for typical irradiation locations, as derived from the more historical neutron dosimetry measurements. Relevant details that pertain to the multigroup neutron spectral characterization are covered in section 3. This discussion includes a presentation on the dosimeter irradiation and analyses and a development of the least-squares adjustment methodology, along with a summary of the results of these analyses. Spectrum-averaged cross sections for neutron monitoring and for displacement-damage prediction in Fe, Cr, and Ni are given in section 4. In addition, section4 includes estimates of damage generation rates for these materials in selected ATR irradiation locations. In section 5, the authors present a brief discussion of the most significant conclusions of this work and comment on its relevance to the present ATR core configuration. Finally, detailed numerical and graphical results for the spectrum-characterization analyses in each irradiation location are provided in the Appendix.

  3. PUREX new substation ATR

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.E.

    1997-05-12

    This document is the acceptance test report (ATR) for the New PUREX Main and Minisubstations. It covers the factory and vendor acceptance and commissioning test reports. Reports are presented for the Main 5 kV substation building, the building fire system, switchgear, and vacuum breaker; the minisubstation control building and switch gear; commissioning test; electrical system and loads inspection; electrical utilities transformer and cable; and relay setting changes based on operational experience.

  4. 78 FR 65183 - Airworthiness Directives; ATR-GIE Avions de Transport Régional Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ...We are adopting a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain ATR--GIE Avions de Transport R[eacute]gional Model ATR72-101, -201, - 102, -202, -211, -212, and -212A airplanes. This AD was prompted by reports of airplane incidents and accidents that have occurred because of low-level fuel tank situations and fuel starvation that resulted in engine flameouts. This AD requires installing a fuel......

  5. HEATR project: ATR algorithm parallelization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deardorf, Catherine E.

    1998-09-01

    High Performance Computing (HPC) Embedded Application for Target Recognition (HEATR) is a project funded by the High Performance Computing Modernization Office through the Common HPC Software Support Initiative (CHSSI). The goal of CHSSI is to produce portable, parallel, multi-purpose, freely distributable, support software to exploit emerging parallel computing technologies and enable application of scalable HPC's for various critical DoD applications. Specifically, the CHSSI goal for HEATR is to provide portable, parallel versions of several existing ATR detection and classification algorithms to the ATR-user community to achieve near real-time capability. The HEATR project will create parallel versions of existing automatic target recognition (ATR) detection and classification algorithms and generate reusable code that will support porting and software development process for ATR HPC software. The HEATR Team has selected detection/classification algorithms from both the model- based and training-based (template-based) arena in order to consider the parallelization requirements for detection/classification algorithms across ATR technology. This would allow the Team to assess the impact that parallelization would have on detection/classification performance across ATR technology. A field demo is included in this project. Finally, any parallel tools produced to support the project will be refined and returned to the ATR user community along with the parallel ATR algorithms. This paper will review: (1) HPCMP structure as it relates to HEATR, (2) Overall structure of the HEATR project, (3) Preliminary results for the first algorithm Alpha Test, (4) CHSSI requirements for HEATR, and (5) Project management issues and lessons learned.

  6. Multiple Irradiation Capsule Experiment (MICE)-3B Irradiation Test of Space Fuel Specimens in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) - Close Out Documentation for Naval Reactors (NR) Information

    SciTech Connect

    M. Chen; CM Regan; D. Noe

    2006-01-09

    Few data exist for UO{sub 2} or UN within the notional design space for the Prometheus-1 reactor (low fission rate, high temperature, long duration). As such, basic testing is required to validate predictions (and in some cases determine) performance aspects of these fuels. Therefore, the MICE-3B test of UO{sub 2} pellets was designed to provide data on gas release, unrestrained swelling, and restrained swelling at the upper range of fission rates expected for a space reactor. These data would be compared with model predictions and used to determine adequacy of a space reactor design basis relative to fission gas release and swelling of UO{sub 2} fuel and to assess potential pellet-clad interactions. A primary goal of an irradiation test for UN fuel was to assess performance issues currently associated with this fuel type such as gas release, swelling and transient performance. Information learned from this effort may have enabled use of UN fuel for future applications.

  7. 78 FR 42898 - Airworthiness Directives; ATR-GIE Avions de Transport Régional Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-18

    ...We propose to adopt a new airworthiness directive (AD) for certain ATR-GIE Avions de Transport R[eacute]gional Model ATR72-101, - 201, -102, -202, -211, -212, and -212A airplanes. This proposed AD was prompted by reports of airplane incidents and accidents that have occurred because of low-level fuel tank situations and fuel starvation that resulted in engine flameouts. This proposed AD would......

  8. LWRS ATR Irradiation Testing Readiness Status

    SciTech Connect

    Kristine Barrett

    2012-09-01

    The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program was established by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors. The LWRS Program is divided into four R&D Pathways: (1) Materials Aging and Degradation; (2) Advanced Light Water Reactor Nuclear Fuels; (3) Advanced Instrumentation, Information and Control Systems; and (4) Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization. This report describes an irradiation testing readiness analysis in preparation of LWRS experiments for irradiation testing at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) under Pathway (2). The focus of the Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuels Pathway is to improve the scientific knowledge basis for understanding and predicting fundamental performance of advanced nuclear fuel and cladding in nuclear power plants during both nominal and off-nominal conditions. This information will be applied in the design and development of high-performance, high burn-up fuels with improved safety, cladding integrity, and improved nuclear fuel cycle economics

  9. Safety significance of ATR (Advanced Test Reactor) passive safety response attributes

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory was designed with some passive safety response attributes which contribute to the safety posture of the facility. The three passive safety attributes being evaluated in the paper are: (1) In-core and in-vessel natural convection cooling, (2) a passive heat sink capability of the ATR primary coolant system (PCS) for the transfer of decay power from the uninsulated piping to the confinement, and (3) gravity feed of emergency coolant makeup. The safety significance of the ATR passive safety response attributes is that the reactor can passively respond for most transients, given a reactor scram, to provide adequate decay power removal and a significant time for operator action should the normal active heat removal systems and their backup systems both fail. The ATR Interim Level 1 Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) model ands results were used to evaluate the significance to ATR fuel damage frequency (or probability) of the above three passive response attributes. The results of the evaluation indicate that the first attribute is a major safety characteristic of the ATR. The second attribute has a noticeable but only minor safety significance. The third attribute has no significant influence on the ATR Level 1 PRA because of the diversity and redundancy of the ATR firewater injection system (emergency coolant system). 8 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Fabrication Report for the AFC-2A and AFC-2B Capsule Irradiations in the ATR

    SciTech Connect

    Timothy A. Hyde

    2007-10-01

    This document provides a general narrative description of the AFC-2A and 2B fuel fabrication processes for the AFC 2A and AFC 2B fuel irradiation experiments fabricated at the Idaho National Laboratory’s Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR).

  11. An informative confidence metric for ATR.

    SciTech Connect

    Bow, Wallace Johnston Jr.; Richards, John Alfred; Bray, Brian Kenworthy

    2003-03-01

    Automatic or assisted target recognition (ATR) is an important application of synthetic aperture radar (SAR). Most ATR researchers have focused on the core problem of declaration-that is, detection and identification of targets of interest within a SAR image. For ATR declarations to be of maximum value to an image analyst, however, it is essential that each declaration be accompanied by a reliability estimate or confidence metric. Unfortunately, the need for a clear and informative confidence metric for ATR has generally been overlooked or ignored. We propose a framework and methodology for evaluating the confidence in an ATR system's declarations and competing target hypotheses. Our proposed confidence metric is intuitive, informative, and applicable to a broad class of ATRs. We demonstrate that seemingly similar ATRs may differ fundamentally in the ability-or inability-to identify targets with high confidence.

  12. Validation of HELIOS for ATR Core Follow Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Bays, Samuel E.; Swain, Emily T.; Crawford, Douglas S.; Nigg, David W.

    2015-03-01

    This work summarizes the validation analyses for the HELIOS code to support core design and safety assurance calculations of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). Past and current core safety assurance is performed by the PDQ-7 diffusion code; a state of the art reactor physics simulation tool from the nuclear industry’s earlier days. Over the past twenty years, improvements in computational speed have enabled the use of modern neutron transport methodologies to replace the role of diffusion theory for simulation of complex systems, such as the ATR. More exact methodologies have enabled a paradigm-shift away from highly tuned codes that force compliance with a bounding safety envelope, and towards codes regularly validated against routine measurements. To validate HELIOS, the 16 ATR operational cycles from late-2009 to present were modeled. The computed power distribution was compared against data collected by the ATR’s on-line power surveillance system. It was found that the ATR’s lobe-powers could be determined with ±10% accuracy. Also, the ATR’s cold startup shim configuration for each of these 16 cycles was estimated and compared against the reported critical position from the reactor log-book. HELIOS successfully predicted criticality within the tolerance set by the ATR startup procedure for 13 out of the 16 cycles. This is compared to 12 times for PDQ (without empirical adjustment). These findings, as well as other insights discussed in this report, suggest that HELIOS is highly suited for replacing PDQ for core safety assurance of the ATR. Furthermore, a modern verification and validation framework has been established that allows reactor and fuel performance data to be computed with a known degree of accuracy and stated uncertainty.

  13. Molecular Pathways: Targeting ATR in Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Karnitz, Larry M; Zou, Lee

    2015-11-01

    The human ATR gene encodes a kinase that is activated by DNA damage and replication stress as a central transducer of a checkpoint signaling pathway. Once activated, ATR phosphorylates multiple substrates, including the kinase Chk1, to regulate cell-cycle progression, replication fork stability, and DNA repair. These events promote cell survival during replication stress and in cells with DNA damage. Accordingly, there has been the tantalizing possibility that ATR inhibitors would be therapeutically useful, especially if they were more effective in tumor versus normal cells. Indeed, multiple studies have demonstrated that alterations that promote tumorigenesis, such as defects in the ATM-p53 pathway, constitutive oncogene activation, and acquisition of the alternative lengthening of telomeres pathway, render tumor cells sensitive to ATR inhibitor monotherapy and/or increase the synergy between ATR inhibitors and genotoxic chemotherapies. Now, nearly two decades after the discovery of ATR, two highly selective and potent ATR inhibitors, AZD6738 and VX-970, are in early-phase clinical trials either as monotherapies or paired with a variety of genotoxic chemotherapies. These trials will generate important insights into the effects of ATR inhibition in humans and the potential role of inhibiting this kinase in the treatment of human malignancies. PMID:26362996

  14. EVALUATION OF LVDTS FOR USE IN ATR IRRADIATION EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    D. L. Knudson; J. L. Rempe

    2009-04-01

    New materials are being considered for fuel, cladding, and structures in next generation and existing nuclear reactors. Such materials can experience significant dimensional changes during high temperature irradiation. Currently, these changes are determined by repeatedly irradiating a specimen for a defined period of time in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and then removing it from the reactor for evaluation. The time and labor to remove, examine, and return irradiated samples for each measurement makes this approach very expensive. In addition, such techniques provide limited data and may disturb the phenomena of interest. To address these issues, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) recently initiated efforts to evaluate candidate linear variable differential transducers (LVDTs) for use during high temperature irradiation experiments in typical ATR test locations. Two nuclear grade LVDTs are under consideration – a smaller diameter design qualified for temperatures up to 350 °C and a larger design with capabilities to 500 °C. Calibration and long duration performance evaluations are underway for temperatures up to 600 ºC. This paper presents results from these evaluations, which will ultimately lead to recommendations for an improved design for use in the ATR.

  15. AGR-2 Data Qualification Report for ATR Cycle 154B

    SciTech Connect

    Binh Pham; Jeff Einerson

    2014-01-01

    This report provides the data qualification status of Advanced Gas Reactor-2 (AGR-2) fuel irradiation experimental data from Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Cycle 154B as recorded in the Nuclear Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS). This is the last cycle of AGR-2 irradiation, as the test train was pulled from the ATR core during the outage portion of ATR Cycle 155A. The AGR-2 data streams addressed in this report include thermocouple (TC) temperatures, sweep gas data (flow rates including new Fission Product Monitoring (FPM) downstream flows from Fission Product Monitoring System (FPMS) detectors, pressure, and moisture content), and FPMS data (release rates and release-to-birth rate ratios [R/Bs]) for each of the six capsules in the AGR-2 experiment. The final data qualification status for these data streams is determined by a Data Review Committee (DRC) comprised of AGR technical leads, Sitewide Quality Assurance (QA), and NDMAS analysts. The Data Review Committee reviewed the data acquisition process, considered whether the data met the requirements for data collection as specified in QA-approved Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) data collection plans, examined the results of NDMAS data testing and statistical analyses, and confirmed the qualification status of the data as given in this report.

  16. 76 FR 47520 - Airworthiness Directives; ATR-GIE Avions de Transport Régional Model ATR42 and ATR72 Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-05

    ... continued.airworthiness@atr.fr ; Internet http://www.aerochain.com . You may review copies of the referenced... 12866; 2. Is not a ``significant rule'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034... Transport R gional Model ATR42 and ATR72 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA),...

  17. Cascaded automatic target recognition (Cascaded ATR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walls, Bradley

    2010-04-01

    The global war on terror has plunged US and coalition forces into a battle space requiring the continuous adaptation of tactics and technologies to cope with an elusive enemy. As a result, technologies that enhance the intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) mission making the warfighter more effective are experiencing increased interest. In this paper we show how a new generation of smart cameras built around foveated sensing makes possible a powerful ISR technique termed Cascaded ATR. Foveated sensing is an innovative optical concept in which a single aperture captures two distinct fields of view. In Cascaded ATR, foveated sensing is used to provide a coarse resolution, persistent surveillance, wide field of view (WFOV) detector to accomplish detection level perception. At the same time, within the foveated sensor, these detection locations are passed as a cue to a steerable, high fidelity, narrow field of view (NFOV) detector to perform recognition level perception. Two new ISR mission scenarios, utilizing Cascaded ATR, are proposed.

  18. Vanadium irradiation at ATR - neutronics aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, I.C.; Smith, D.L.

    1995-04-01

    Calculations were performed to estimate damage and transmutation rates in vanadium irradiated in the ATR (Advanced Test Reactor) located in Idaho. The main focuses of the study are to evaluate the transmutation of vanadium to chromium and to explore ways to design the irradiation experiment to avoid excessive transmutation. It was found that the A-hole of ATR produces damage rate of {approximately} 0.2%/dpa of vanadium to chromium. A thermal neutron filter can be incorporated into the design to reduce the vanadium-to-chromium transmutation rate to low levels. A filter 1-2 mm thick of gadolinium or hafnium can be used.

  19. Neutron spectrum studies in the ATR (Advanced Test Reactor)

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, J.W.; Anderl, R.A.; Putnam, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has been and currently is used to provide irradiation fields to study the effects of intense radiation on samples of reactor materials. These samples include fuel, cladding, control and structural materials. The ATR is also used to irradiate target materials for the production of radionuclides used in industrial and medical applications as well as for scientific research. Routine monitoring of the thermal'' and fast'' neutron levels have been conducted during every operational cycle since its startup in 1970. The routine neutron dosimetry has been primarily accomplished using the {sup 59}Co(n,{gamma}){sup 60}Co reaction for thermal'' neutrons and the {sup 58}Ni(n,p) {sup 58}Co reaction for fast'' neutrons as described in ASTM standard methods E261, E262, and E264. Neutron spectrum studies have now been conducted in the epithermal and fast neutron energy ranges for the various capsule irradiation test facilities and the routine neutron monitoring locations. 7 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Focusing and matching properties of the ATR transfer line

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas, N.; Fischer, W.; Kewisch, J.; MacKay, W.W.; Peggs, S.; Pilat, F.; Tepikian, S.; Wei, J.

    1997-07-01

    The AGS to RHIC (AtR) beam transfer line has been constructed and will be used to transfer beam bunches from the AGS machine into the RHIC machine which is presently under construction at BNL. The original design of the AtR line has been modified. This article will present the optics of the various sections of the existing AtR beam line, as well as the matching capabilities of the AtR line to the RHIC machine.

  1. Overview of the ATR Power Supplies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruno, D.; Soukas, A.; Toldo, F.; Lambiase, B.

    1997-05-01

    The AGS to RHIC transfer Line (ATR) transports a variety of beams from the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) which gets its input from the Booster Synchrotron. In turn, the Booster receives input beams from either a Tandem Van de Graaff (heavy ions) or a Linac(protons). The AGS extracts beam bunches, up to a rate of 30 Hertz, to the ATR which will eventually feed the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) starting with the sextant test in January of 1996. The ATR is made up of the upgraded U line and the new W, X and Y lines. A test in 1995 transported beam to the end of the W line. During normal operation, a pulsed switching magnet at the end of the W line will bend the beam into the X line or the Y line so that the two rings in RHIC are filled with counter rotating beams. The ATR line is comprised of 80 power supplies (PS's), 17 of which are upgraded AGS PS's. The remaining 63 PS's were newly purchased. These PS's range from bipolar 600 watt linear type trim magnet PS's to 1 Megawatt, thyristor, dipole PS's. Results of the commissioning runs will be presented, as well as descriptions of regulation, filtering, and analog and digital controls.

  2. Overview of the ATR power supplies

    SciTech Connect

    Bruno, D.; Soukas, A.; Toldo, F.; Lambiase, R.F.

    1997-07-01

    The AGS to RHIC transfer line (ATR) transports a variety of beams from the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) which gets its input from the Booster Synchrotron. In turn, the Booster receives input beams from either a Tandem Van de Graaff (heavy ions) or a Linac (protons). The AGS extracts beam bunches, up to a rate of 30 Hertz, to the ATR which feeds the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) starting with the sextant test in January of 1997. The ATR is made up of the upgraded U line and the new W, X, and Y lines. A test in 1995 transported beam to the end of the W line. During normal operation, a pulsed switching magnet at the end of the W line will bend the beam into the X line or the Y line so that the two storage rings in RHIC are filled with counter rotating beams. The ATR line is comprised of 80 power supplies (PS`s), 17 of which are upgraded AGS PS`s. The remaining 63 PS`s were newly purchased. These PS`s range from bipolar 600 watt linear type trim magnet PS`s to 1 Megawatt, thyristor, dipole PS`s. Results of the commissioning runs will be presented, as well as descriptions of regulation, filtering, and analog and digital controls.

  3. MIR-ATR sensor for process monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geörg, Daniel; Schalk, Robert; Methner, Frank-Jürgen; Beuermann, Thomas

    2015-06-01

    A mid-infrared attenuated total reflectance (MIR-ATR) sensor has been developed for chemical reaction monitoring. The optical setup of the compact and low-priced sensor consists of an IR emitter as light source, a zinc selenide (ZnSe) ATR prism as boundary to the process, and four thermopile detectors, each equipped with an optical bandpass filter. The practical applicability was tested during esterification of ethanol and formic acid to ethyl formate and water as a model reaction with subsequent distillation. For reference analysis, a Fourier transform mid-infrared (FT-MIR) spectrometer with diamond ATR module was applied. On-line measurements using the MIR-ATR sensor and the FT-MIR spectrometer were performed in a bypass loop. The sensor was calibrated by multiple linear regression in order to link the measured absorbance in the four optical channels to the analyte concentrations. The analytical potential of the MIR-ATR sensor was demonstrated by simultaneous real-time monitoring of all four chemical substances involved in the esterification and distillation process. The temporal courses of the sensor signals are in accordance with the concentration values achieved by the commercial FT-MIR spectrometer. The standard error of prediction for ethanol, formic acid, ethyl formate, and water were 0.38 mol L  -  1, 0.48 mol L  -  1, 0.38 mol L  -  1, and 1.12 mol L  -  1, respectively. A procedure based on MIR spectra is presented to simulate the response characteristics of the sensor if the transmission ranges of the filters are varied. Using this tool analyte specific bandpass filters for a particular chemical reaction can be identified. By exchanging the optical filters, the sensor can be adapted to a wide range of processes in the chemical, pharmaceutical, and beverage industries.

  4. The distribution of atrazine (ATR) and ATR metabolites in the Wistar rat following gestational/lactational exposures

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gestational/lactational exposure to ATR is reported to alter reproductive/developmental function, yet our understanding of the transfer of ATR and/or its metabolites from the dam to the fetus/offspring is limited. Previously we examined the lactational transfer of CI4-ATR, but sp...

  5. ATR LEU Monothlic and Dispersed with 10B Loading Minimization Design – Neutronics Performance Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Chang

    2001-10-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), currently operating in the United States, is used for material testing at very high neutron fluxes. Powered with highly enriched uranium (HEU), the ATR has a maximum thermal power rating of 250 MWth. Because of the large test volumes located in high flux areas, the ATR is an ideal candidate for assessing the feasibility of converting HEU driven reactor cores to low-enriched uranium (LEU) cores. The present work investigates the optimized LEU Monolithic and Dispersed fuel with 10B loading minimization design and evaluates the subsequent neutronics operating effects of these optimized fuel designs. The MCNP ATR 1/8th core model was used to optimize the 235U and minimize the 10B loading in the LEU core, such that the differences in K-eff and heat flux profiles between the HEU and LEU cores were minimized. The fuel depletion methodology MCWO was used to calculate K eff versus effective full power days (EFPD) in this paper. The MCWO-calculated results for the optimized LEU Monolithic and Dispersed fuel cases demonstrated adequate excess reactivity such that the K-eff versus EFPD plot is similar to the ATR reference HEU case study. Each HEU fuel element contains 19 fuel plates with a fuel meat thickness of 0.508 mm (20 mil). In this work, the proposed LEU Monolithic (U-10Mo) core conversion case with nominal fuel meat thickness of 0.330 mm (13 mil) and 235U enrichment of 19.7 wt% is used to optimize the radial heat flux profile by varying the fuel meat thickness. The proposed LEU fuel meat varies from 0.203 mm (8.0 mil) to 0.254 mm (10.0 mil) at the inner four fuel plates (1-4) and outer four fuel plates (16-19). In addition, an optimized LEU dispersed (U7Mo) case with all the fuel meat thickness of 0.635 mm (25 mil) was also proposed. Then, for both Monolithic and dispersed cases, a burnable absorber – 10B, was added in the inner and outer plates to reduce the initial excess reactivity, and the higher to average ratio of the inner

  6. Function of the ATR N-terminal domain revealed by an ATM/ATR chimera

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xinping; Zhao Runxiang; Glick, Gloria G.; Cortez, David . E-mail: david.cortez@vanderbilt.edu

    2007-05-01

    The ATM and ATR kinases function at the apex of checkpoint signaling pathways. These kinases share significant sequence similarity, phosphorylate many of the same substrates, and have overlapping roles in initiating cell cycle checkpoints. However, they sense DNA damage through distinct mechanisms. ATR primarily senses single stranded DNA (ssDNA) through its interaction with ATRIP, and ATM senses double strand breaks through its interaction with Nbs1. We determined that the N-terminus of ATR contains a domain that binds ATRIP. Attaching this domain to ATM allowed the fusion protein (ATM*) to bind ATRIP and associate with RPA-coated ssDNA. ATM* also gained the ability to localize efficiently to stalled replication forks as well as double strand breaks. Despite having normal kinase activity when tested in vitro and being phosphorylated on S1981 in vivo, ATM* is defective in checkpoint signaling and does not complement cellular deficiencies in either ATM or ATR. These data indicate that the N-terminus of ATR is sufficient to bind ATRIP and to promote localization to sites of replication stress.

  7. ATR promotes cilia signalling: links to developmental impacts.

    PubMed

    Stiff, Tom; Casar Tena, Teresa; O'Driscoll, Mark; Jeggo, Penny A; Philipp, Melanie

    2016-04-15

    Mutations in ATR(ataxia telangiectasia and RAD3-related) cause Seckel syndrome (ATR-SS), a microcephalic primordial dwarfism disorder. Hitherto, the clinical manifestation of ATR deficiency has been attributed to its canonical role in DNA damage response signalling following replication fork stalling/collapse. Here, we show that ATR regulates cilia-dependent signalling in a manner that can be uncoupled from its function during replication. ATR-depleted or patient-derived ATR-SS cells form cilia of slightly reduced length but are dramatically impaired in cilia-dependent signalling functions, including growth factor and Sonic hedgehog signalling. To better understand the developmental impact of ATR loss of function, we also used zebrafish as a model. Zebrafish embryos depleted of Atr resembled ATR-SS morphology, showed a modest but statistically significant reduction in cilia length and other morphological features indicative of cilia dysfunction. Additionally, they displayed defects in left-right asymmetry including ambiguous expression of southpaw, incorrectly looped hearts and randomized localization of internal organs including the pancreas, features typically conferred by cilia dysfunction. Our findings reveal a novel role for ATR in cilia signalling distinct from its canonical function during replication and strengthen emerging links between cilia function and development. PMID:26908596

  8. ATR promotes cilia signalling: links to developmental impacts

    PubMed Central

    Stiff, Tom; Casar Tena, Teresa; O'Driscoll, Mark; Jeggo, Penny A.; Philipp, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in ATR (ataxia telangiectasia and RAD3-related) cause Seckel syndrome (ATR-SS), a microcephalic primordial dwarfism disorder. Hitherto, the clinical manifestation of ATR deficiency has been attributed to its canonical role in DNA damage response signalling following replication fork stalling/collapse. Here, we show that ATR regulates cilia-dependent signalling in a manner that can be uncoupled from its function during replication. ATR-depleted or patient-derived ATR-SS cells form cilia of slightly reduced length but are dramatically impaired in cilia-dependent signalling functions, including growth factor and Sonic hedgehog signalling. To better understand the developmental impact of ATR loss of function, we also used zebrafish as a model. Zebrafish embryos depleted of Atr resembled ATR-SS morphology, showed a modest but statistically significant reduction in cilia length and other morphological features indicative of cilia dysfunction. Additionally, they displayed defects in left-right asymmetry including ambiguous expression of southpaw, incorrectly looped hearts and randomized localization of internal organs including the pancreas, features typically conferred by cilia dysfunction. Our findings reveal a novel role for ATR in cilia signalling distinct from its canonical function during replication and strengthen emerging links between cilia function and development. PMID:26908596

  9. 75 FR 8476 - Airworthiness Directives; ATR-GIE Avions de Transport Régional Model ATR42 and ATR72 Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ..., amendment 39-16159 (75 FR 221, January 5, 2010), on December 28, 2009. That AD applies to certain portable...'' under the DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); and 3. Will not have... Transport R gional Model ATR42 and ATR72 Airplanes AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA),...

  10. Independent Review of AFC 2A, 2B, and 2E ATR Irradiation Tests

    SciTech Connect

    M. Cappiello; R. Hobbins; K. Penny; L. Walters

    2014-01-01

    As part of the Department of Energy Advanced Fuel Cycle program, a series of fuels development irradiation tests have been performed in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory. These tests are providing excellent data for advanced fuels development. The program is focused on the transmutation of higher actinides which best can be accomplished in a sodium-cooled fast reactor. Because a fast test reactor is no longer available in the US, a special test vehicle is used to achieve near-prototypic fast reactor conditions (neutron spectra and temperature) for use in ATR (a water-cooled thermal reactor). As part of the testing program, there were many successful tests of advanced fuels including metals and ceramics. Recently however, there have been three experimental campaigns using metal fuels that experienced failure during irradiation. At the request of the program, an independent review committee was convened to review the post-test analyses performed by the fuels development team, to assess the conclusions of the team for the cause of the failures, to assess the adequacy and completeness of the analyses, to identify issues that were missed, and to make recommendations for improvements in the design and operation of future tests. Although there is some difference of opinion, the review committee largely agreed with the conclusions of the fuel development team regarding the cause of the failures. For the most part, the analyses that support the conclusions are sufficient.

  11. AGR-3/4 Final Data Qualification Report for ATR Cycles 151A through 155B-1

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, Binh T.

    2015-03-01

    This report provides the qualification status of experimental data for the entire Advanced Gas Reactor 3/4 (AGR 3/4) fuel irradiation. AGR-3/4 is the third in a series of planned irradiation experiments conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) for the AGR Fuel Development and Qualification Program, which supports development of the advanced reactor technology under the INL ART Technology Development Office (TDO). The main objective of AGR-3/4 irradiation is to provide a known source of fission products for subsequent transport through compact matrix and structural graphite materials due to the presence of designed-to-fail fuel particles. Full power irradiation of the AGR 3/4 test began on December 14, 2011 (ATR Cycle 151A), and was completed on April 12, 2014 (end of ATR Cycle 155B) after 369.1 effective full power days of irradiation. The AGR-3/4 test was in the reactor core for eight of the ten ATR cycles between 151A and 155B. During the unplanned outage cycle, 153A, the experiment was removed from the ATR northeast flux trap (NEFT) location and stored in the ATR canal. This was to prevent overheating of fuel compacts due to higher than normal ATR power during the subsequent Powered Axial Locator Mechanism cycle, 153B. The AGR 3/4 test was inserted back into the ATR NEFT location during the outage of ATR Cycle 154A on April 26, 2013. Therefore, the AGR-3/4 irradiation data received during these 2 cycles (153A and 153B) are irrelevant and their qualification status isnot included in this report. Additionally, during ATR Cycle 152A the ATR core ran at low power for a short enough duration that the irradiation data are not used for physics and thermal calculations. However, the qualification status of irradiation data for this cycle is still covered in this report. As a result, this report includes data from 8 ATR Cycles: 151A, 151B, 152A, 152B, 154A, 154B, 155A, and 155B, as recorded in the Nuclear Data Management and

  12. Utilizing feedback in adaptive SAR ATR systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horsfield, Owen; Blacknell, David

    2009-05-01

    Existing SAR ATR systems are usually trained off-line with samples of target imagery or CAD models, prior to conducting a mission. If the training data is not representative of mission conditions, then poor performance may result. In addition, it is difficult to acquire suitable training data for the many target types of interest. The Adaptive SAR ATR Problem Set (AdaptSAPS) program provides a MATLAB framework and image database for developing systems that adapt to mission conditions, meaning less reliance on accurate training data. A key function of an adaptive system is the ability to utilise truth feedback to improve performance, and it is this feature which AdaptSAPS is intended to exploit. This paper presents a new method for SAR ATR that does not use training data, based on supervised learning. This is achieved by using feature-based classification, and several new shadow features have been developed for this purpose. These features allow discrimination of vehicles from clutter, and classification of vehicles into two classes: targets, comprising military combat types, and non-targets, comprising bulldozers and trucks. The performance of the system is assessed using three baseline missions provided with AdaptSAPS, as well as three additional missions. All performance metrics indicate a distinct learning trend over the course of a mission, with most third and fourth quartile performance levels exceeding 85% correct classification. It has been demonstrated that these performance levels can be maintained even when truth feedback rates are reduced by up to 55% over the course of a mission.

  13. Advanced miniature processing handware for ATR applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Tien-Hsin (Inventor); Daud, Taher (Inventor); Thakoor, Anikumar (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A Hybrid Optoelectronic Neural Object Recognition System (HONORS), is disclosed, comprising two major building blocks: (1) an advanced grayscale optical correlator (OC) and (2) a massively parallel three-dimensional neural-processor. The optical correlator, with its inherent advantages in parallel processing and shift invariance, is used for target of interest (TOI) detection and segmentation. The three-dimensional neural-processor, with its robust neural learning capability, is used for target classification and identification. The hybrid optoelectronic neural object recognition system, with its powerful combination of optical processing and neural networks, enables real-time, large frame, automatic target recognition (ATR).

  14. MOX and MOX with 237Np/241Am Inert Fission Gas Generation Comparison in ATR

    SciTech Connect

    G. S. Chang; M. Robel; W. J. Carmack; D. J. Utterbeck

    2006-06-01

    The treatment of spent fuel produced in nuclear power generation is one of the most important issues to both the nuclear community and the general public. One of the viable options to long-term geological disposal of spent fuel is to extract plutonium, minor actinides (MA), and potentially long-lived fission products from the spent fuel and transmute them into short-lived or stable radionuclides in currently operating light-water reactors (LWR), thus reducing the radiological toxicity of the nuclear waste stream. One of the challenges is to demonstrate that the burnup-dependent characteristic differences between Reactor-Grade Mixed Oxide (RG-MOX) fuel and RG-MOX fuel with MA Np-237 and Am 241 are minimal, particularly, the inert gas generation rate, such that the commercial MOX fuel experience base is applicable. Under the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), developmental fuel specimens in experimental assembly LWR-2 are being tested in the northwest (NW) I-24 irradiation position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The experiment uses MOX fuel test hardware, and contains capsules with MOX fuel consisting of mixed oxide manufactured fuel using reactor grade plutonium (RG-Pu) and mixed oxide manufactured fuel using RG-Pu with added Np/Am. This study will compare the fuel neutronics depletion characteristics of Case-1 RG-MOX and Case-2 RG-MOX with Np/Am.

  15. Fuel processing device

    DOEpatents

    Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.; Ahmed, Shabbir; Lee, Sheldon H. D.

    2011-08-02

    An improved fuel processor for fuel cells is provided whereby the startup time of the processor is less than sixty seconds and can be as low as 30 seconds, if not less. A rapid startup time is achieved by either igniting or allowing a small mixture of air and fuel to react over and warm up the catalyst of an autothermal reformer (ATR). The ATR then produces combustible gases to be subsequently oxidized on and simultaneously warm up water-gas shift zone catalysts. After normal operating temperature has been achieved, the proportion of air included with the fuel is greatly diminished.

  16. Towards universal enrichment nanocoating for IR-ATR waveguides.

    PubMed

    Giammarco, James; Zdyrko, Bogdan; Petit, Laeticia; Musgraves, J David; Hu, Juejun; Agarwal, Anu; Kimerling, Lionel; Richardson, Kathleen; Luzinov, Igor

    2011-08-28

    Polymer multilayered nanocoating capable of concentrating various chemical substances at IR-ATR waveguide surfaces is described. The coating affinity to an analyte played a pivotal role in sensitivity enhancement of the IR-ATR measurements, since the unmodified waveguide did not show any analyte detection. PMID:21734984

  17. ATR FTIR Mapping of Leather Fiber Panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tondi, G.; Grünewald, T.; Petutschnigg, A.; Schnabel, T.

    2015-01-01

    Leather fiber panels are very promising materials for many applications, not only for the easy availability of the constituents but also for their outstanding fi re-retardant properties. These innovative composite panels can be an excellent material for building insulation, and in recent times, the interest of industries in this composite board has considerably arisen. For this reason the discrimination of the components in the leather fiber panels is becoming fundamental in order to ensure their homogeneous properties. A method to characterize the surface of these materials is then required. An ATR FTIR mapping system for the leather fiber panels has been performed with a Perkin-Elmer microscope coupled with a Frontier FTIR spectrometer. The system has successfully allowed transforming the optical image to a chemical one. This technique can be considered as a right tool for routine controls of the surface quality, especially when the leather shavings cannot be optically distinguished.

  18. ATR task and training requirements analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gertman, D.I.; Blackman, H.S.; Gilmore, W.E. II; French, D.L.

    1983-05-01

    Task analysis techniques were used to assist in identifying improvements needed in the training curriculum for selected positions at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). Six positions were examined - Experiment Power Reactor Operator, Experiment (EPRO-Ex); Experiment Power Reactor Operator, Console (EPRO-Co); Senior Reactor Engineer (SRE); Assistant Shift Supervisor (AS); Shift Supervisor (SS); and Process Control Operator (PCO). A complete position task listing and a core of tasks defined in terms of (a) level of difficulty to perform, (b) severity of consequence if performed improperly, and (c) associated error probability were identified for each position. The systems, academic, and administrative knowledge needed by job incumbents to perform each task was noted. Strategies for teaching the knowledge associated with these tasks are presented.

  19. ATR inhibition rewires cellular signaling networks induced by replication stress.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Sebastian A; Oehler, Hannah; Voigt, Andrea; Dalic, Denis; Freiwald, Anja; Serve, Hubert; Beli, Petra

    2016-02-01

    The slowing down or stalling of replication forks is commonly known as replication stress and arises from multiple causes such as DNA lesions, nucleotide depletion, RNA-DNA hybrids, and oncogene activation. The ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related kinase (ATR) plays an essential role in the cellular response to replication stress and inhibition of ATR has emerged as therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancers that exhibit high levels of replication stress. However, the cellular signaling induced by replication stress and the substrate spectrum of ATR has not been systematically investigated. In this study, we employed quantitative MS-based proteomics to define the cellular signaling after nucleotide depletion-induced replication stress and replication fork collapse following ATR inhibition. We demonstrate that replication stress results in increased phosphorylation of a subset of proteins, many of which are involved in RNA splicing and transcription and have previously not been associated with the cellular replication stress response. Furthermore, our data reveal the ATR-dependent phosphorylation following replication stress and discover novel putative ATR target sites on MCM6, TOPBP1, RAD51AP1, and PSMD4. We establish that ATR inhibition rewires cellular signaling networks induced by replication stress and leads to the activation of the ATM-driven double-strand break repair signaling. PMID:26572502

  20. ATR-mediated regulation of nuclear and cellular plasticity.

    PubMed

    Kidiyoor, Gururaj Rao; Kumar, Amit; Foiani, Marco

    2016-08-01

    ATR (Ataxia Telangiectasia and Rad3-related) is a member of the Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinases (PIKKs) family, amongst six other vertebrate proteins known so far. ATR is indispensable for cell survival and its essential role is in sensing DNA damage and initiating appropriate repair responses. In this review we highlight emerging and recent observations connecting ATR to alternative roles in controlling the nuclear envelope, nucleolus, centrosome and other organelles in response to both internal and external stress conditions. We propose that ATR functions control cell plasticity by sensing structural deformations of different cellular components, including DNA and initiating appropriate repair responses, most of which are yet to be understood completely. PMID:27283761

  1. Infrared ATR: a probe for cellular activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timlin, Jerilyn A.; Martin, Laura E.; Alam, M. Kathleen; Haaland, David M.; Garrison, Kristen; Lyons, C. Richard; Hjelle, Brian

    2002-02-01

    We employ infrared spectroscopy (IR) with attenuated total reflectance (ATR) as a sampling technique to monitor live and dried RAW cells (a murine macrophage cell line) during activation with g-interferon and lipopolysaccharide. By comparing the spectra of activated cells at various time points to the spectra of healthy control cells, we identify spectral bands associated with nucleic acids that are markers for the cell activation process. These spectral changes are slight and can be complicated with the normal metabolic changes that occur within cells. We will discuss the use of data pretreatment strategies to accurately correct for the contribution of the buffer to the live cell spectra. We find the standard background correction method inadequate for concentrated solutions of cells. Data presented shows the severe effect incorrect background subtraction has on the cell spectra. We report a more accurate correction for phosphate buffer spectral contribution using an interactive subtraction of the buffer spectrum. We will show classification of dried control and activated macrophage cell spectra using partial-least squares analysis with multiplicative scatter correction.

  2. ATR-IR spectroscopy as applied to nucleic acid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanyugin, Andriy V.; Samijlenko, Svitlana P.; Martynenko, Olena I.; Hovorun, Dmytro M.

    2005-07-01

    For the first time the ATR technique was applied to obtain IR absorption spectra of DNA and RNA dry films. There was worked out procedure of the nucleic acid removal from germanium plate, which obviously was a main obstacle to application of ATR-IR spectroscopy to nucleic acids. This technique of IR spectroscopy was applied to confirmation of RNA tropism of aurin tricarboxylic acid observed by molecular biological methods.

  3. ATR National Scientific User Facility 2009 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect

    Todd R. Allen; Mitchell K. Meyer; Frances Marshall; Mary Catherine Thelen; Jeff Benson

    2010-11-01

    This report describes activities of the ATR NSUF from FY-2008 through FY-2009 and includes information on partner facilities, calls for proposals, users week and education programs. The report also contains project information on university research projects that were awarded by ATR NSUF in the fiscal years 2008 & 2009. This research is university-proposed researcher under a user facility agreement. All intellectual property from these experiments belongs to the university per the user agreement.

  4. Recent applications of ATR FTIR spectroscopy and imaging to proteins.

    PubMed

    Glassford, Stefanie E; Byrne, Bernadette; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2013-12-01

    Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy is a label-free, non-destructive analytical technique that can be used extensively to study a wide variety of different molecules in a range of different conditions. The aim of this review is to discuss and highlight the recent advances in the applications of ATR FTIR spectroscopic imaging to proteins. It briefly covers the basic principles of ATR FTIR spectroscopy and ATR FTIR spectroscopic imaging as well as their advantages to the study of proteins compared to other techniques and other forms of FTIR spectroscopy. It will then go on to examine the advances that have been made within the field over the last several years, particularly the use of ATR FTIR spectroscopy for the understanding and development of protein interaction with surfaces. Additionally, the growing potential of Surface Enhanced Infrared Spectroscopy (SEIRAS) within this area of applications will be discussed. The review includes the applications of ATR FTIR imaging to protein crystallisation and for high-throughput studies, highlighting the future potential of the technology within the field of protein structural studies and beyond. PMID:23928299

  5. Assessment of COTS IR image simulation tools for ATR development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Heiko; Stahl, Christoph; Bjerkeli, Frode; Skaaren-Fystro, Paal

    2005-05-01

    Following the tendency of increased use of imaging sensors in military aircraft, future fighter pilots will need onboard artificial intelligence e.g. ATR for aiding them in image interpretation and target designation. The European Aeronautic Defence and Space Company (EADS) in Germany has developed an advanced method for automatic target recognition (ATR) which is based on adaptive neural networks. This ATR method can assist the crew of military aircraft like the Eurofighter in sensor image monitoring and thereby reduce the workload in the cockpit and increase the mission efficiency. The EADS ATR approach can be adapted for imagery of visual, infrared and SAR sensors because of the training-based classifiers of the ATR method. For the optimal adaptation of these classifiers they have to be trained with appropriate and sufficient image data. The training images must show the target objects from different aspect angles, ranges, environmental conditions, etc. Incomplete training sets lead to a degradation of classifier performance. Additionally, ground truth information i.e. scenario conditions like class type and position of targets is necessary for the optimal adaptation of the ATR method. In Summer 2003, EADS started a cooperation with Kongsberg Defence & Aerospace (KDA) from Norway. The EADS/KDA approach is to provide additional image data sets for training-based ATR through IR image simulation. The joint study aims to investigate the benefits of enhancing incomplete training sets for classifier adaptation by simulated synthetic imagery. EADS/KDA identified the requirements of a commercial-off-the-shelf IR simulation tool capable of delivering appropriate synthetic imagery for ATR development. A market study of available IR simulation tools and suppliers was performed. After that the most promising tool was benchmarked according to several criteria e.g. thermal emission model, sensor model, targets model, non-radiometric image features etc., resulting in a

  6. FLUX SENSOR EVALUATIONS AT THE ATR CRITICAL FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Troy Unruh; Joy Rempe; David Nigg; George Imel; Jason Harris; Eric Bonebrake

    2010-11-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and the ATR Critical (ATRC) facilities lack real-time methods for detecting thermal neutron flux and fission reaction rates for irradiation capsules. Direct measurements of the actual power deposited into a test are now possible without resorting to complicated correction factors. In addition, it is possible to directly measure minor actinide fission reaction rates and to provide time-dependent monitoring of the fission reaction rate or fast/thermal flux during transient testing. A joint Idaho State University /Idaho National Laboratory ATR National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) project was recently initiated to evaluate new real-time state-of-the-art in-pile flux detection sensors. Initially, the project is comparing the accuracy, response time, and long duration performance of French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA)-developed miniature fission chambers, specialized self-powered neutron detectors (SPNDs) by the Argentinean National Energy Commission (CNEA), specially developed commercial SPNDs, and back-to-back fission (BTB) chambers developed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). As discussed in this paper, specialized fixturing and software was developed by INL to facilitate these joint ISU/INL evaluations. Calculations were performed by ISU to assess the performance of and reduce uncertainties in flux detection sensors and compare data obtained from these sensors with existing integral methods employed at the ATRC. Ultimately, project results will be used to select the detector that can provide the best online regional ATRC power measurement. It is anticipated that project results may offer the potential to increase the ATRC’s current power limit and its ability to perform low-level irradiation experiments. In addition, results from this effort will provide insights about the viability of using these detectors in the ATR. Hence, this effort complements current activities to improve ATR software tools, computational

  7. Homeostatic regulation of meiotic DSB formation by ATM/ATR

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Tim J.; Wardell, Kayleigh; Garcia, Valerie; Neale, Matthew J.

    2014-11-15

    Ataxia–telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and RAD3-related (ATR) are widely known as being central players in the mitotic DNA damage response (DDR), mounting responses to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) respectively. The DDR signalling cascade couples cell cycle control to damage-sensing and repair processes in order to prevent untimely cell cycle progression while damage still persists [1]. Both ATM/ATR are, however, also emerging as essential factors in the process of meiosis; a specialised cell cycle programme responsible for the formation of haploid gametes via two sequential nuclear divisions. Central to achieving accurate meiotic chromosome segregation is the introduction of numerous DSBs spread across the genome by the evolutionarily conserved enzyme, Spo11. This review seeks to explore and address how cells utilise ATM/ATR pathways to regulate Spo11-DSB formation, establish DSB homeostasis and ensure meiosis is completed unperturbed.

  8. ATR NATIONAL SCIENTIFIC USER FACILITY INSTRUMENTATION ENHANCEMENT EFFORTS

    SciTech Connect

    Joy L. Rempe; Mitchell K. Meyer

    2009-04-01

    A key component of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) effort is to enhance instrumentation techniques available to users conducting irradiation tests in this unique facility. In particular, development of sensors capable of providing ‘real-time’ measurements of key irradiation parameters is emphasized because of their potential to offer increased fidelity data and reduced post-test examination costs. This paper describes the strategy for identifying new instrumentation needed for ATR irradiations and the program underway to develop and evaluate new sensors to address these needs. Accomplishments from this program are illustrated by describing several new sensors now available to users of the ATR NSUF. In addition, progress is reported on current research efforts to provide users improved in-pile instrumentation.

  9. Robust SAR ATR via set-valued classifiers: new results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, John R.; Mahler, Ronald P. S.; Ravichandran, Ravi B.; Mehra, Raman K.; Musick, Stanton H.

    2003-08-01

    "Robust identification" in SAR ATR refers to the problem of determining target identity despite the confounding effects of "extended operating conditions" (EOCs). EOC"s are statistically uncharacterizable SAR intensity-signature variations caused by mud, dents, turret articulations, etc. This paper describes a robust ATR approach based on the idea of (1) hedging against EOCs by attaching "random error bars" (random intervals) to each value of the image likelihood function; (2) constructing a "generalized likelihood function" from them; and (3) using a set-valued, MLE-like approach to robustly estimate target type. We compare three such classifiers, showing that they outperform conventional approaches under EOC conditions.

  10. Design and implementation of an embedded software system for ATR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuehuan; Li, Shiyong

    2011-11-01

    This paper has designed and realized a coarse-grained, unbalanced, modularized parallel embedded software system for ATR. According to the characteristics of ATR algorithms, some control modules such as system monitoring, task assignment and hierarchical algorithm modules are realized in our system. There are different design principles for different modules. The task assignment module combines different modules into clusters based on mutually exclusive modules, and assigns them to different processors. The principle of combination is the minimum variance of load on different processors. The system satisfies the requirement of real-time performance due to this reasonable strategy for task assignment, with the flexibility and scalability significantly improved.

  11. ATR spectra on boundary with mixture containing organic substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schelokov, R. V.; Yatsishen, V. V.

    2005-02-01

    The problem of not destroying diagnostics and dosing of radiation at laser therapy is one of important in medicine. Therefore the purpose of our work is development of method ATR for diagnostics and researches in biomedicine. In this work as objects of consideration were: a mixture of nicotine with water, a mixture of an ascorbic acid with water and surface lesions of an eye cornea by a herpes virus. Results of our consideration are the ATR spectra defined at different concentration of organic substances and virions.

  12. ATR mediates a checkpoint at the nuclear envelope in response to mechanical stress.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Amit; Mazzanti, Michele; Mistrik, Martin; Kosar, Martin; Beznoussenko, Galina V; Mironov, Alexandre A; Garrè, Massimiliano; Parazzoli, Dario; Shivashankar, G V; Scita, Giorgio; Bartek, Jiri; Foiani, Marco

    2014-07-31

    ATR controls chromosome integrity and chromatin dynamics. We have previously shown that yeast Mec1/ATR promotes chromatin detachment from the nuclear envelope to counteract aberrant topological transitions during DNA replication. Here, we provide evidence that ATR activity at the nuclear envelope responds to mechanical stress. Human ATR associates with the nuclear envelope during S phase and prophase, and both osmotic stress and mechanical stretching relocalize ATR to nuclear membranes throughout the cell cycle. The ATR-mediated mechanical response occurs within the range of physiological forces, is reversible, and is independent of DNA damage signaling. ATR-defective cells exhibit aberrant chromatin condensation and nuclear envelope breakdown. We propose that mechanical forces derived from chromosome dynamics and torsional stress on nuclear membranes activate ATR to modulate nuclear envelope plasticity and chromatin association to the nuclear envelope, thus enabling cells to cope with the mechanical strain imposed by these molecular processes. PMID:25083873

  13. Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) Recently Installed in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR)

    SciTech Connect

    A. Joseph Palmer; Gerry L. McCormick; Shannon J. Corrigan

    2010-06-01

    a Readiness Assessment in November 2009. The HSIS is a key component of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) operated by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC and is available to a wide variety of university researchers for nuclear fuels and materials experiments as well as medical isotope research and production.

  14. USE OF SILICON CARBIDE MONITORS IN ATR IRRADIATION TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    K. L. Davis; B. Chase; T. Unruh; D. Knudson; J. L. Rempe

    2012-07-01

    In April 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to advance US leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry, the ATR will support basic and applied nuclear research and development and help address the nation's energy security needs. In support of this new program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed in-house capabilities to fabricate, test, and qualify new and enhanced temperature sensors for irradiation testing. Although most efforts emphasize sensors capable of providing real-time data, selected tasks have been completed to enhance sensors provided in irradiation locations where instrumentation leads cannot be included, such as drop-in capsule and Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) or 'rabbit' locations. For example, silicon carbide (SiC) monitors are now available to detect peak irradiation temperatures between 200°C and 800°C. Using a resistance measurement approach, specialized equipment installed at INL's High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL) and specialized procedures were developed to ensure that accurate peak irradiation temperature measurements are inferred from SiC monitors irradiated at the ATR. Comparison examinations were completed by INL to demonstrate this capability, and several programs currently rely on SiC monitors for peak temperature detection. This paper discusses the use of SiC monitors at the ATR, the process used to evaluate them at the HTTL, and presents representative measurements taken using SiC monitors.

  15. ATR inhibition preferentially targets homologous recombination-deficient tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Krajewska, M; Fehrmann, R S N; Schoonen, P M; Labib, S; de Vries, E G E; Franke, L; van Vugt, M A T M

    2015-06-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is required for faithful repair of double-strand DNA breaks. Defects in HR repair cause severe genomic instability and challenge cellular viability. Paradoxically, various cancers are HR defective and have apparently acquired characteristics to survive genomic instability. We aimed to identify these characteristics to uncover therapeutic targets for HR-deficient cancers. Cytogenetic analysis of 1143 ovarian cancers showed that the degree of genomic instability was correlated to amplification of replication checkpoint genes ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related kinase (ATR) and CHEK1. To test whether genomic instability leads to increased reliance on replication checkpoint signaling, we inactivated Rad51 to model HR-related genomic instability. Rad51 inactivation caused defective HR repair and induced aberrant replication dynamics. Notably, inhibition of Rad51 led to increased ATR/checkpoint kinase-1 (Chk1)-mediated replication stress signaling. Importantly, inhibition of ATR or Chk1 preferentially killed HR-deficient cancer cells. Combined, our data show that defective HR caused by Rad51 inhibition results in differential sensitivity for ATR and Chk1 inhibitors, implicating replication checkpoint kinases as potential drug targets for HR-defective cancers. PMID:25174396

  16. 30 CFR 75.209 - Automated Temporary Roof Support (ATRS) systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Automated Temporary Roof Support (ATRS) systems... Automated Temporary Roof Support (ATRS) systems. (a) Except in anthracite mines and as specified in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, an ATRS system shall be used with roof bolting machines...

  17. 30 CFR 75.209 - Automated Temporary Roof Support (ATRS) systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Automated Temporary Roof Support (ATRS) systems... Automated Temporary Roof Support (ATRS) systems. (a) Except in anthracite mines and as specified in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, an ATRS system shall be used with roof bolting machines...

  18. 30 CFR 75.209 - Automated Temporary Roof Support (ATRS) systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Automated Temporary Roof Support (ATRS) systems... Automated Temporary Roof Support (ATRS) systems. (a) Except in anthracite mines and as specified in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, an ATRS system shall be used with roof bolting machines...

  19. 30 CFR 75.209 - Automated Temporary Roof Support (ATRS) systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Automated Temporary Roof Support (ATRS) systems... Automated Temporary Roof Support (ATRS) systems. (a) Except in anthracite mines and as specified in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, an ATRS system shall be used with roof bolting machines...

  20. 30 CFR 75.209 - Automated Temporary Roof Support (ATRS) systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Automated Temporary Roof Support (ATRS) systems... Automated Temporary Roof Support (ATRS) systems. (a) Except in anthracite mines and as specified in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, an ATRS system shall be used with roof bolting machines...

  1. Integrate knowledge acquisition with target recognition through closed-loop ATR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Ssu-Hsin; McLaughlin, Pat; Zatezalo, Aleksandar; Hsiao, Kai-yuh; Boskovic, Jovan

    2015-05-01

    Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) algorithm performance is highly dependent on the sensing conditions under which the input data is collected. Open-loop fly-bys often produce poor results due to less than ideal measurement conditions. In addition, ATR algorithms must be extremely complicated to handle the diverse range of inputs with a resulting reduction in overall performance and increase in complexity. Our approach, closed-loop ATR (CL-ATR), focuses on improving the quality of information input to the ATR algorithms by optimizing motion, sensor settings and team (vehicle-vehicle-human) collaboration to dramatically improve classification accuracy. By managing the data collection guided by predicted ATR performance gain, we increase the information content of the data and thus dramatically improve ATR performance with existing ATR algorithms. CL-ATR has two major functions; first, an ATR utility function, which represents the performance sensitivity of ATR produced classification labels as a function of parameters that correlate to vehicle/sensor states. This utility function is developed off-line and is often available from the original ATR study as a confusion matrix, or it can be derived through simulation without direct access to the inner working of the ATR algorithm. The utility function is inserted into our CLATR framework to autonomously control the vehicle/sensor. Second, an on-board planner maps the utility function into vehicle position and sensor collection plans. Because we only require the utility function on-board, we can activate any ATR algorithm onto a unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) platform no matter how complex. This pairing of ATR performance profiles with vehicle/sensor controls creates a unique and powerful active perception behavior.

  2. The SUMO (Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier) Ligase PIAS3 Primes ATR for Checkpoint Activation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ching-Shyi; Zou, Lee

    2016-01-01

    The maintenance of genomic stability relies on the concerted action of DNA repair and DNA damage signaling pathways. The PIAS (protein inhibitor of activated STAT) family of SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) ligases has been implicated in DNA repair, but whether it plays a role in DNA damage signaling is still unclear. Here, we show that the PIAS3 SUMO ligase is important for activation of the ATR (ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3 related)-regulated DNA damage signaling pathway. PIAS3 is the only member of the PIAS family that is indispensable for ATR activation. In response to different types of DNA damage and replication stress, PIAS3 plays multiple roles in ATR activation. In cells treated with camptothecin (CPT), PIAS3 contributes to formation of DNA double-stranded breaks. In UV (ultraviolet light)- or HU (hydroxyurea)-treated cells, PIAS3 is required for efficient ATR autophosphorylation, one of the earliest events during ATR activation. Although PIAS3 is dispensable for ATRIP (ATR-interacting protein) SUMOylation and the ATR-ATRIP interaction, it is required for maintaining the basal kinase activity of ATR prior to DNA damage. In the absence of PIAS3, ATR fails to display normal kinase activity after DNA damage, which accompanies with reduced phosphorylation of ATR substrates. Together, these results suggest that PIAS3 primes ATR for checkpoint activation by sustaining its basal kinase activity, revealing a new function of the PIAS family in DNA damage signaling. PMID:26565033

  3. Analyzing the ATR-mediated checkpoint using Xenopus egg extracts

    PubMed Central

    Lupardus, Patrick J.; Van, Christopher; Cimprich, Karlene A.

    2009-01-01

    Our knowledge of cell cycle events such as DNA replication and mitosis has been advanced significantly through the use of Xenopus egg extracts as a model system. More recently, Xenopus extracts have been used to investigate the cellular mechanisms that ensure accurate and complete duplication of the genome, processes otherwise known as the DNA damage and replication checkpoints. Here we describe several Xenopus extract methods that have advanced the study of the ATR-mediated checkpoints. These include a protocol for the preparation of nucleoplasmic extract (NPE), which is a soluble extract system useful for studying nuclear events such as DNA replication and checkpoints. In addition, we describe several key assays for studying checkpoint activation as well as methods for using small DNA structures to activate ATR. PMID:17189864

  4. A SAR ATR algorithm based on coherent change detection

    SciTech Connect

    Harmony, D.W.

    2000-12-01

    This report discusses an automatic target recognition (ATR) algorithm for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery that is based on coherent change detection techniques. The algorithm relies on templates created from training data to identify targets. Objects are identified or rejected as targets by comparing their SAR signatures with templates using the same complex correlation scheme developed for coherent change detection. Preliminary results are presented in addition to future recommendations.

  5. Recent ATR and fusion algorithm improvements for multiband sonar imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aridgides, Tom; Fernández, Manuel

    2009-05-01

    An improved automatic target recognition processing string has been developed. The overall processing string consists of pre-processing, subimage adaptive clutter filtering, normalization, detection, data regularization, feature extraction, optimal subset feature selection, feature orthogonalization and classification processing blocks. The objects that are classified by the 3 distinct ATR strings are fused using the classification confidence values and their expansions as features, and using "summing" or log-likelihood-ratio-test (LLRT) based fusion rules. The utility of the overall processing strings and their fusion was demonstrated with new high-resolution three-frequency band sonar imagery. The ATR processing strings were individually tuned to the corresponding three-frequency band data, making use of the new processing improvement, data regularization; this improvement entails computing the input data mean, clipping the data to a multiple of its mean and scaling it, prior to feature extraction and resulted in a 3:1 reduction in false alarms. Two significant fusion algorithm improvements were made. First, a nonlinear exponential Box-Cox expansion (consisting of raising data to a to-be-determined power) feature LLRT fusion algorithm was developed. Second, a repeated application of a subset Box-Cox feature selection / feature orthogonalization / LLRT fusion block was utilized. It was shown that cascaded Box-Cox feature LLRT fusion of the ATR processing strings outperforms baseline "summing" and single-stage Box-Cox feature LLRT algorithms, yielding significant improvements over the best single ATR processing string results, and providing the capability to correctly call the majority of targets while maintaining a very low false alarm rate.

  6. Neutronics analysis of the DHCE experiment in ATR-ITV

    SciTech Connect

    Gomes, I.C.; Smith, D.L.; Tsai, H.

    1997-08-01

    The preliminary analysis of the DHCE experiments in the ITV and ATR was performed and its was concluded that such a vehicle is suitable for this kind of experiment. It is recommended to place an extra filter material in the thermocouple sleeve (such as B-10), to improve the helium to dpa ratio profile during irradiation. Also, it was concluded that a preliminary estimation of period of time for replacement of the external filter would be around 5 dps`s.

  7. Clamping the Mec1/ATR checkpoint kinase into action.

    PubMed

    Majka, Jerzy; Burgers, Peter M J

    2007-05-15

    The yeast checkpoint protein kinase Mec1, the ortholog of human ATR, is the essential upstream regulator of the cell cycle checkpoint in response to DNA damage and to stalling of DNA replication forks. The activity of Mec1/ATR is not directly regulated by the DNA substrates that signal checkpoint activation. Rather the signal appears to be transduced to Mec1 by factors that interact with the signaling DNA substrates. One of these factors, the DNA damage checkpoint clamp Rad17-Mec3-Ddc1 (human 9-1-1) is loaded onto gapped DNA resulting from the partial repair of DNA damage, and the Ddc1 subunit of this complex activates Mec1. In vertebrate cells, the TopBP1 protein (Cut5 in S. pombe and Dpb11 in S. cervisiae) that is also required for establishment of the replication fork, functions during replication fork dysfunction to activate ATR. Both mechanisms of activation generally upregulate the kinase activity towards all downstream targets. PMID:17495536

  8. Clipping service: ATR-based SAR image compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodkey, David L.; Welby, Stephen P.; Hostetler, Larry D.

    1996-06-01

    Future wide area surveillance systems such as the Tier II+ and Tier III- unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) will be gathering cast amounts of high resolution SAR data for transmission to ground stations and subsequent analysis by image interpreters to provide critical and timely information to field commanders. This extremely high data rate presents two problems. First, wide bandwidth data link channels which would be needed to transmit this high data rate presents two problems. First, wide bandwidth data link channels which would be needed to transmit this imagery to a ground station are both expensive and difficult to obtain. Second, the volume of data which is generated by the system will quickly saturate any human-based analysis system without some degree of computer assistance. The ARPA sponsored clipping service program seeks to apply automatic target recognition (ATR) technology to perform 'intelligent' data compression on this imagery in a way which will provide a product on the ground that preserves essential information for further processing either by the military analyst or by a ground-based ATR system. An ATR system on board the UAV would examine the imagery data stream in real time determining regions of interest. Imagery from those regions would be transmitted to the ground in a manner which preserved most or all of the information contained in the original image. The remainder of the imagery would be transmitted to the ground with lesser fidelity. This paper presents system analysis deriving the operational requirements for the clipping service system and examines candidate architectures.

  9. Simulator of IRST system with ATR embedded functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sozzi, B.; Fossati, E.; Barani, G.; Santini, N.; Ondini, A.; Colombi, G.; Quaranta, C.

    2010-04-01

    This paper presents a soft-real time simulator for IRST (InfraRed Search and Track) systems with ATR (Automatic Target Recognition) embedded functions to test airborne applications performance. The IR camera model includes detector, optics, available Field-of-Regard, etc., and it is integrated with the motion platform local stabilization system to consider all factors impacting IR images. The atmosphere contributions are taken into account by means of a link to ModTran computer program. Sensor simulation allows derivation and assessment of IR Figures of Merit (NEI, NETD, SNR...). IR signatures of targets derive both from data collected in specific trial campaigns and from laboratory built models. The simulation of the scan procedure takes into account different policies (ground points paths or defined angular volume) and different platform motion strategies (continuous or step steering scan). The scan process includes Kalman technique to face unexpected variations of aircraft motion. Track and ATR processors are simulated and run consistently on the output of the sensor model. The simulator functions are developed in MatLab and SIMULINK and then exported in C code to be integrated in soft real-time environment. The use of this simulator supports the definition and design of the IRST systems especially for the evaluation of the most demanding operative requirements. An application of this simulator is for the NEURON UCAV (Unmanned Combat Air Vehicle) technological demonstrator, which accommodates on board both IRST and ATR tasks.

  10. ATR pathway inhibition is synthetically lethal in cancer cells with ERCC1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Mohni, Kareem N; Kavanaugh, Gina M; Cortez, David

    2014-05-15

    The DNA damage response kinase ATR and its effector kinase CHEK1 are required for cancer cells to survive oncogene-induced replication stress. ATR inhibitors exhibit synthetic lethal interactions, with deficiencies in the DNA damage response enzymes ATM and XRCC1 and with overexpression of the cell cycle kinase cyclin E. Here, we report a systematic screen to identify synthetic lethal interactions with ATR pathway-targeted drugs, rationalized by their predicted therapeutic utility in the oncology clinic. We found that reduced function in the ATR pathway itself provided the strongest synthetic lethal interaction. In addition, we found that loss of the structure-specific endonuclease ERCC1-XPF (ERCC4) is synthetic lethal with ATR pathway inhibitors. ERCC1-deficient cells exhibited elevated levels of DNA damage, which was increased further by ATR inhibition. When treated with ATR or CHEK1 inhibitors, ERCC1-deficient cells were arrested in S-phase and failed to complete cell-cycle transit even after drug removal. Notably, triple-negative breast cancer cells and non-small cell lung cancer cells depleted of ERCC1 exhibited increased sensitivity to ATR pathway-targeted drugs. Overall, we concluded that ATR pathway-targeted drugs may offer particular utility in cancers with reduced ATR pathway function or reduced levels of ERCC4 activity. PMID:24662920

  11. ATR-101 disrupts mitochondrial functions in adrenocortical carcinoma cells and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yunhui; Kerppola, Raili Emilia; Kerppola, Tom Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) generally has poor prognosis. Existing treatments provide limited benefit for most patients with locally advanced or metastatic tumors. We investigated the mechanisms for the cytotoxicity, xenograft suppression, and adrenalytic activity of ATR-101 (PD132301-02), a prospective agent for ACC treatment. Oral administration of ATR-101 inhibited the establishment and impeded the growth of ACC-derived H295R cell xenografts in mice. ATR-101 induced H295R cell apoptosis in culture and in xenografts. ATR-101 caused mitochondrial hyperpolarization, reactive oxygen release, and ATP depletion within hours after exposure, followed by cytochrome c release, caspase-3/7 activation, and membrane permeabilization. The increase in mitochondrial membrane potential occurred concurrently with the decrease in cellular ATP levels. When combined with ATR-101, lipophilic free radical scavengers suppressed the reactive oxygen release, and glycolytic precursors prevented the ATP depletion, abrogating ATR-101 cytotoxicity. ATR-101 directly inhibited F1F0-ATPase activity and suppressed ATP synthesis in mitochondrial fractions. ATR-101 administration to guinea pigs caused oxidized lipofuscin accumulation in thezona fasciculatalayer of the adrenal cortex, implicating reactive oxygen release in the adrenalytic effect of ATR-101. These results support the development of ATR-101 and other adrenalytic compounds for the treatment of ACC. PMID:26843528

  12. ATR pathway inhibition is synthetically lethal in cancer cells with ERCC1 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mohni, Kareem N.; Kavanaugh, Gina M.; Cortez, David

    2014-01-01

    The DNA damage response kinase ATR and its effector kinase CHEK1 are required for cancer cells to survive oncogene-induced replication stress. ATR inhibitors exhibit synthetic lethal interactions with deficiencies in the DNA damage response enzymes ATM and XRCC1 and with overexpression of the cell cycle kinase Cyclin E. Here we report a systematic screen to identify synthetic lethal interactions with ATR-pathway targeted drugs, rationalized by their predicted therapeutic utility in the oncology clinic. We found that reduced function in the ATR pathway itself provided the strongest synthetic lethal interaction. In addition, we found that loss of the structure specific-endonuclease ERCC1-XPF (ERCC4) is synthetic lethal with ATR pathway inhibitors. ERCC1-deficient cells exhibited elevated levels of DNA damage, which was increased further by ATR inhibition. When treated with ATR or CHEK1 inhibitors, ERCC1-deficient cells arrested in S phase and failed to complete cell cycle transit even after drug removal. Notably, triple-negative breast cancer cells and non-small cell lung cancer cells depleted of ERCC1 exhibited increased sensitivity to ATR-pathway targeted drugs. Overall, we concluded that ATR pathway-targeted drugs may offer particular utility in cancers with reduced ATR pathway function or reduced levels of ERCC4 activity. PMID:24662920

  13. Problem set guidelines to facilitate ATR research, development, and performance assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westerkamp, Lori A.; Wild, Thomas J.; Meredith, Donna; Morrison, S. A.; Mossing, John C.; Avent, Randy K.; Bergman, Annette; Bruckheim, Arthur; Castanon, David A.; Corbett, Francis J.; Hugo, Douglas; Hummel, Robert A.; Irvine, John M.; Merle, Bruce; Otto, Louis; Reynolds, Robert; Sadowski, Charles; Schachter, Bruce J.; Simonson, Katherine M.; Smit, Gene; Walters, Clarence P.

    2002-07-01

    In November of 2000, the Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Science and Technology Sensor Systems (DUSD (S&T/SS)) chartered the ATR Working Group (ATRWG) to develop guidelines for sanctioned Problem Sets. Such Problem Sets are intended for development and test of ATR algorithms and contain comprehensive documentation of the data in them. A problem set provides a consistent basis to examine ATR performance and growth. Problem Sets will, in general, serve multiple purposes. First, they will enable informed decisions by government agencies sponsoring ATR development and transition. Problem Sets standardize the testing and evaluation process, resulting in consistent assessment of ATR performance. Second, they will measure and guide ATR development progress within this standardized framework. Finally, they quantify the state of the art for the community. Problem Sets provide clearly defined operating condition coverage. This encourages ATR developers to consider these critical challenges and allows evaluators to assess over them. Thus the widely distributed development and self-test portions, along with a disciplined methodology documented within the Problem Set, permit ATR developers to address critical issues and describe their accomplishments, while the sequestered portion permits government assessment of state-of-the-art and of transition readiness. This paper discusses the elements of an ATR problem set as a package of data and information that presents a standardized ATR challenge relevant to one or more scenarios. The package includes training and test data containing targets and clutter, truth information, required experiments, and a standardized analytical methodology to assess performance.

  14. Drugging ATR: progress in the development of specific inhibitors for the treatment of cancer.

    PubMed

    Foote, Kevin M; Lau, Alan; Nissink, J Willem M

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we review the ATR inhibitor field from initial pharmacological tools to first-generation clinical candidates with the potential to bring benefit to cancer patients. ATR is a critical part of the cell DNA-damage response. Over the past decade or more, compounds with weak ATR potency and low specificity have been used as tools in early studies to elucidate ATR pharmacology. More recently highly potent, selective and in vivo active ATR inhibitors have been developed enabling detailed preclinical in vitro and in vivo target assessment to be made. The published studies reveal the potential of ATR inhibitors for use as monotherapy or in combination with DNA-damaging agents. To date, VX-970 and AZD6738, have entered clinical assessment. PMID:26061106

  15. Requirement of ATR for maintenance of intestinal stem cells in aging Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Pyo, Jung-Hoon; Jeon, Ho-Jun; Kim, Young-Shin; Yoo, Mi-Ae

    2015-01-01

    The stem cell genomic stability forms the basis for robust tissue homeostasis, particularly in high-turnover tissues. For the genomic stability, DNA damage response (DDR) is essential. This study was focused on the role of two major DDR-related factors, ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and ATM- and RAD3-related (ATR) kinases, in the maintenance of intestinal stem cells (ISCs) in the adult Drosophila midgut. We explored the role of ATM and ATR, utilizing immunostaining with an anti-pS/TQ antibody as an indicator of ATM/ATR activation, γ-irradiation as a DNA damage inducer, and the UAS/GAL4 system for cell type-specific knockdown of ATM, ATR, or both during adulthood. The results showed that the pS/TQ signals got stronger with age and after oxidative stress. The pS/TQ signals were found to be more dependent on ATR rather than on ATM in ISCs/enteroblasts (EBs). Furthermore, an ISC/EB-specific knockdown of ATR, ATM, or both decreased the number of ISCs and oxidative stress-induced ISC proliferation. The phenotypic changes that were caused by the ATR knockdown were more pronounced than those caused by the ATM knockdown; however, our data indicate that ATR and ATM are both needed for ISC maintenance and proliferation; ATR seems to play a bigger role than does ATM. PMID:26000719

  16. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report October 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Ogden

    2014-10-01

    Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report October 2014 Highlights • Rory Kennedy, Dan Ogden and Brenden Heidrich traveled to Germantown October 6-7, for a review of the Infrastructure Management mission with Shane Johnson, Mike Worley, Bradley Williams and Alison Hahn from NE-4 and Mary McCune from NE-3. Heidrich briefed the group on the project progress from July to October 2014 as well as the planned path forward for FY15. • Jim Cole gave two invited university seminars at Ohio State University and University of Florida, providing an overview of NSUF including available capabilities and the process for accessing facilities through the peer reviewed proposal process. • Jim Cole and Rory Kennedy co-chaired the NuMat meeting with Todd Allen. The meeting, sponsored by Elsevier publishing, was held in Clearwater, Florida, and is considered one of the premier nuclear fuels and materials conferences. Over 340 delegates attended with 160 oral and over 200 posters presented over 4 days. • Thirty-one pre-applications were submitted for NSUF access through the NE-4 Combined Innovative Nuclear Research Funding Opportunity Announcement. • Fourteen proposals were received for the NSUF Rapid Turnaround Experiment Summer 2014 call. Proposal evaluations are underway. • John Jackson and Rory Kennedy attended the Nuclear Fuels Industry Research meeting. Jackson presented an overview of ongoing NSUF industry research.

  17. Open source tools for ATR development and performance evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, James M.; Dilsavor, Ronald L.; Stubbles, James; Mossing, John C.

    2002-07-01

    Early in almost every engineering project, a decision must be made about tools; should I buy off-the-shelf tools or should I develop my own. Either choice can involve significant cost and risk. Off-the-shelf tools may be readily available, but they can be expensive to purchase and to maintain licenses, and may not be flexible enough to satisfy all project requirements. On the other hand, developing new tools permits great flexibility, but it can be time- (and budget-) consuming, and the end product still may not work as intended. Open source software has the advantages of both approaches without many of the pitfalls. This paper examines the concept of open source software, including its history, unique culture, and informal yet closely followed conventions. These characteristics influence the quality and quantity of software available, and ultimately its suitability for serious ATR development work. We give an example where Python, an open source scripting language, and OpenEV, a viewing and analysis tool for geospatial data, have been incorporated into ATR performance evaluation projects. While this case highlights the successful use of open source tools, we also offer important insight into risks associated with this approach.

  18. Fuel cell technology for prototype logistic fuel cell mobile systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sederquist, R.A.; Garow, J.

    1995-08-01

    Under the aegis of the Advanced Research Project Agency`s family of programs to develop advanced technology for dual use applications, International Fuel Cells Corporation (IFC) is conducting a 39 month program to develop an innovative system concept for DoD Mobile Electric Power (MEP) applications. The concept is to integrate two technologies, the phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) with an auto-thermal reformer (ATR), into an efficient fuel cell power plant of nominally 100-kilowatt rating which operates on logistic fuels (JP-8). The ATR fuel processor is the key to meeting requirements for MEP (including weight, volume, reliability, maintainability, efficiency, and especially operation on logistic fuels); most of the effort is devoted to ATR development. An integrated demonstration test unit culminates the program and displays the benefits of the fuel cell system, relative to the standard 100-kilowatt MEP diesel engine generator set. A successful test provides the basis for proceeding toward deployment. This paper describes the results of the first twelve months of activity during which specific program aims have remained firm.

  19. Corrosion of spent Advanced Test Reactor fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, L.B.; Croson, M.L.

    1994-11-01

    The results of a study of the condition of spent nuclear fuel elements from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) currently being stored underwater at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are presented. This study was motivated by a need to estimate the corrosion behavior of dried, spent ATR fuel elements during dry storage for periods up to 50 years. The study indicated that the condition of spent ATR fuel elements currently stored underwater at the INEL is not very well known. Based on the limited data and observed corrosion behavior in the reactor and in underwater storage, it was concluded that many of the fuel elements currently stored under water in the facility called ICPP-603 FSF are in a degraded condition, and it is probable that many have breached cladding. The anticipated dehydration behavior of corroded spent ATR fuel elements was also studied, and a list of issues to be addressed by fuel element characterization before and after forced drying of the fuel elements and during dry storage is presented.

  20. Method for fast start of a fuel processor

    DOEpatents

    Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.; Ahmed, Shabbir; Lee, Sheldon H. D.

    2008-01-29

    An improved fuel processor for fuel cells is provided whereby the startup time of the processor is less than sixty seconds and can be as low as 30 seconds, if not less. A rapid startup time is achieved by either igniting or allowing a small mixture of air and fuel to react over and warm up the catalyst of an autothermal reformer (ATR). The ATR then produces combustible gases to be subsequently oxidized on and simultaneously warm up water-gas shift zone catalysts. After normal operating temperature has been achieved, the proportion of air included with the fuel is greatly diminished.

  1. ATR CONTRIBUTES TO CELL CYCLE ARREST AND SURVIVAL AFTER CISPLATIN BUT NOT OXALIPLATIN1

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Kriste A.; Lilly, Kia K.; Reynolds, Evelyn A.; Sullivan, William P.; Kaufmann, Scott H.; Cliby, William A.

    2009-01-01

    The DNA cross-linking agents cisplatin and oxaliplatin are widely used in the treatment of human cancer. Lesions produced by these agents are widely known to activate the G1 and G2 cell cycle checkpoints. Less is known about the role of the intra-S phase checkpoint in the response to these agents. In the present study, two different cell lines expressing a dominant negative kinase-dead (kd) version of the ATR (ataxia telangiectasia and rad3-related) kinase in an inducible fashion were examined for their responses to these two platinating agents and a variety of other DNA cross-linking drugs. Expression of the kdATR allele markedly sensitized the cells to cisplatin, but not oxaliplatin, as assessed by inhibition of colony formation, induction of apoptosis, and cell cycle analysis. Similar differences in survival were noted for melphalan (ATR-dependent) and 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide (4HC) (ATR-independent). Further experiments demonstrated that ATR function is not necessary for removal of Pt-DNA adducts. The predominant difference between the responses to the two platinum drugs was presence of a drug-specific ATR-dependent S phase arrest after cisplatin but not oxaliplatin. These results indicate that involvement of ATR in the response to DNA cross-linking agents is lesion specific. This observation might need to be taken into account in the development and use of ATR or Chk1 inhibitors. PMID:19372558

  2. 78 FR 58967 - Airworthiness Directives; ATR-GIE Avions de Transport Régional Airplanes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... 21 62 21; fax +33 (0) 5 62 21 67 18; email continued.airworthiness@atr.fr ; Internet http://www... Procedures (44 FR 11034, February 26, 1979); 3. Will not affect intrastate aviation in Alaska; and 4. Will...)5 62 21 69 41; email: techdesk@atr.fr . ] (1) If the inspection was done on or after the...

  3. ATR-FTIR Spectroscopy in the Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory: Part I--Fundamentals and Examples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuttlefield, Jennifer D.; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2008-01-01

    Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy is a useful technique for measuring the infrared spectra of solids and liquids as well as probing adsorption on particle surfaces. Several examples of the use of FTIR-ATR spectroscopy in different undergraduate chemistry laboratory courses are presented here. These…

  4. Drosophila ATM and ATR checkpoint kinases control partially redundant pathways for telomere maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Xiaolin; Srikanta, Deepa; Fanti, Laura; Pimpinelli, Sergio; Badugu, RamaKrishna; Kellum, Rebecca; Rong, Yikang S.

    2005-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and ATM and Rad3-related (ATR) checkpoint kinases play distinct, but partially overlapping, roles in DNA damage response. Yet their interrelated function has not been defined for telomere maintenance. We discover in Drosophila that the two proteins control partially redundant pathways for telomere protection: the loss of ATM leads to the fusion of some telomeres, whereas the loss of both ATM and ATR renders all telomeres susceptible to fusion. The ATM-controlled pathway includes the Mre11 and Nijmegen breakage syndrome complex but not the Chk2 kinase, whereas the ATR-regulated pathway includes its partner ATR-interacting protein but not the Chk1 kinase. This finding suggests that ATM and ATR regulate different molecular events at the telomeres compared with the sites of DNA damage. This compensatory relationship between ATM and ATR is remarkably similar to that observed in yeast despite the fact that the biochemistry of telomere elongation is completely different in the two model systems. We provide evidence suggesting that both the loading of telomere capping proteins and normal telomeric silencing requires ATM and ATR in Drosophila and propose that ATM and ATR protect telomere integrity by safeguarding chromatin architecture that favors the loading of telomere-elongating, capping, and silencing proteins. PMID:16203987

  5. Primary microcephaly, impaired DNA replication, and genomic instability caused by compound heterozygous ATR mutations.

    PubMed

    Mokrani-Benhelli, Houda; Gaillard, Laetitia; Biasutto, Patricia; Le Guen, Tangui; Touzot, Fabien; Vasquez, Nadia; Komatsu, Jun; Conseiller, Emmanuel; Pïcard, Capucine; Gluckman, Eliane; Francannet, Christine; Fischer, Alain; Durandy, Anne; Soulier, Jean; de Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Revy, Patrick

    2013-02-01

    Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) kinases are two key regulators of DNA-damage responses (DDR) that are mainly activated in response to DNA double-strand breaks and single-stranded DNA damages, respectively. Seckel syndrome, a rare genetic disorder characterized by a microcephaly and a markedly reduced body size, has been associated with defective ATR-dependent DNA damage signaling. However, the only human genetic ATR defect reported so far is a hypomorphic splicing mutation identified in five related individuals with Seckel syndrome. Here, we report the first case of primary microcephaly with compound heterozygous mutations in ATR: a 540 kb genomic deletion on one allele and a missense mutation leading to splice dysregulation on the other, which ultimately lead to a sharp decrease in ATR expression. DNA combing technology revealed a profound spontaneous alteration of several DNA replication parameters in patient's cells and FISH analyses highlighted the genomic instability caused by ATR deficiency. Collectively, our results emphasize the crucial role for ATR in the control of DNA replication, and reinforce the complementary and nonredundant contributions of ATM and ATR in human cells to face DNA damages and warrant genome integrity. PMID:23111928

  6. ARF and ATM/ATR cooperate in p53-mediated apoptosis upon oncogenic stress

    SciTech Connect

    Pauklin, Siim . E-mail: spauklin@ut.ee; Kristjuhan, Arnold; Maimets, Toivo; Jaks, Viljar

    2005-08-26

    Induction of apoptosis is pivotal for eliminating cells with damaged DNA or deregulated proliferation. We show that tumor suppressor ARF and ATM/ATR kinase pathways cooperate in the induction of apoptosis in response to elevated expression of c-myc, {beta}-catenin or human papilloma virus E7 oncogenes. Overexpression of oncogenes leads to the formation of phosphorylated H2AX foci, induction of Rad51 protein levels and ATM/ATR-dependent phosphorylation of p53. Inhibition of ATM/ATR kinases abolishes both induction of Rad51 and phosphorylation of p53, and remarkably reduces the level of apoptosis induced by co-expression of oncogenes and ARF. However, the induction of apoptosis is downregulated in p53-/- cells and does not depend on activities of ATM/ATR kinases, indicating that efficient induction of apoptosis by oncogene activation depends on coordinated action of ARF and ATM/ATR pathways in the regulation of p53.

  7. Project Description Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative AFC-2A and AFC-2B Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    AFCI AFC-2A and AFC-2B Experiments Project Executi

    2007-03-01

    The proposed AFC-2A and AFC-2B irradiation experiments are a continuation of the AFC-1 fuel test series currently in progress in the ATR. This document discusses the experiments and the planned activities that will take place.

  8. Corrosion inhibitor film formation studied by ATR-FTIR

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, S.; Jovancicevic, V.

    1999-11-01

    The development of an inhibitor film is essential for the effective performance of a corrosion inhibitor. The use of attenuated total reflection fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) allows the development of inhibitor films on iron oxides to be monitored. For two distinct corrosion inhibitor chemistries, oleic imidazoline and phosphate ester, the film formation and corrosion processes are monitored on Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} in a powdered form (a model surface). Additional data following on the physical and chemical properties are obtained using XPS and SEM techniques, which allows for a more complete characterization of the model inhibitor/oxide system. By the proper choice of system and measurement techniques, the complex phenomenon of corrosion inhibition may be analyzed directly.

  9. Thermal Analysis of Irradiation Experiments in the ATR

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Murray

    2012-09-01

    Reactor material testing in the INL's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) involves modeling and simulation of each experiment to accurately determine the irradiation temperature. This paper describes thermal analysis of capsule experiments using gas gap temperature control and provides data on recent material tests that validate the modeling results. Static capsule experiments and lead-out capsule experiments are discussed. The source of temperature variation in capsule experiments and ways to mitigate these variations are also explained. Two examples of instrumented lead-out capsule experiments, TMIST-1 and UCSB-2, are presented. A comparison of measured and calculated temperatures is used to validate the thermal models and to ascertain the accuracy of the calculated temperature.

  10. Deep convolutional neural networks for ATR from SAR imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, David A. E.

    2015-05-01

    Deep architectures for classification and representation learning have recently attracted significant attention within academia and industry, with many impressive results across a diverse collection of problem sets. In this work we consider the specific application of Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data from the MSTAR public release data set. The classification performance achieved using a Deep Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) on this data set was found to be competitive with existing methods considered to be state-of-the-art. Unlike most existing algorithms, this approach can learn discriminative feature sets directly from training data instead of requiring pre-specification or pre-selection by a human designer. We show how this property can be exploited to efficiently adapt an existing classifier to recognise a previously unseen target and discuss potential practical applications.

  11. Wurfelspiel-based training data methods for ATR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, James K.

    2004-09-01

    A data object is constructed from a P by M Wurfelspiel matrix W by choosing an entry from each column to construct a sequence A0A1"AM-1. Each of the PM possibilities are designed to correspond to the same category according to some chosen measure. This matrix could encode many types of data. (1) Musical fragments, all of which evoke sadness; each column entry is a 4 beat sequence with a chosen A0A1A2 thus 16 beats long (W is P by 3). (2) Paintings, all of which evoke happiness; each column entry is a layer and a given A0A1A2 is a painting constructed using these layers (W is P by 3). (3) abstract feature vectors corresponding to action potentials evoked from a biological cell's exposure to a toxin. The action potential is divided into four relevant regions and each column entry represents the feature vector of a region. A given A0A1A2 is then an abstraction of the excitable cell's output (W is P by 4). (4) abstract feature vectors corresponding to an object such as a face or vehicle. The object is divided into four categories each assigned an abstract feature vector with the resulting concatenation an abstract representation of the object (W is P by 4). All of the examples above correspond to one particular measure (sad music, happy paintings, an introduced toxin, an object to recognize)and hence, when a Wurfelspiel matrix is constructed, relevant training information for recognition is encoded that can be used in many algorithms. The focus of this paper is on the application of these ideas to automatic target recognition (ATR). In addition, we discuss a larger biologically based model of temporal cortex polymodal sensor fusion which can use the feature vectors extracted from the ATR Wurfelspiel data.

  12. AGR-3/4 Data Qualification Report for ATR Cycles 151A, 151B, 152A, 152B, 154A, and 154B

    SciTech Connect

    Binh T. Pham

    2014-02-01

    This data report provides the qualification status of Advanced Gas Reactor-3/4 (AGR-3/4) fuel irradiation experimental data from Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Cycles 151A, 151B, 152A, 152B, 154A, and 154B, as recorded in the Nuclear Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS). Of these cycles, ATR Cycle 152A is a low power cycle that occurred when the ATR core was briefly at low power. The irradiation data are not used for physics and thermal calculation, but the qualification status of these cycle data is still covered in this report. On the other hand, during ATR Cycles 153A (unplanned Outage cycle) and 153B (Power Axial Locator Mechanism [PALM] cycle), the AGR-3/4 was pulled out from the ATR core and stored in the canal to avoid being overheated. Therefore, qualification of the AGR-3/4 irradiation data from these 2 cycles was excluded in this report. By the end of ATR Cycle 154B, AGR-3/4 was irradiated for a total of 264.1 effective full power days. The AGR-3/4 data streams addressed in this report include thermocouple (TC) temperatures, sweep gas data (flow rates, pressure, and moisture content), and Fission Product Monitoring System (FPMS) data (release rates and release-to-birth rate ratios [R/Bs]) for each of the twelve capsules in the AGR-3/4 experiment. The final data qualification status for these data streams is determined by a Data Review Committee (DRC) composed of AGR technical leads, Sitewide Quality Assurance (QA), and NDMAS analysts. The DRC convened on February 12, 2014, reviewed the data acquisition process, and considered whether the data met the requirements for data collection as specified in QA-approved Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) data collection plans. The DRC also examined the results of NDMAS data testing and statistical analyses, and confirmed the qualification status of the data as given in this report.

  13. Quantitative monitoring of membrane permeation via in-situ ATR FT-IR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckingham, Bryan; Miller, Daniel

    Ion conducting membranes are of interest for various energy applications including fuel cells and artificial photosynthesis systems. Within the context of artificial photosynthesis, membranes are desired that facilitate the ion transport necessary to feed the electrochemical reactions while meeting various additional selectivity and permeability demands depending on the CO2 reduction products. Herein, we demonstrate the use of in-situ ATR FT-IR spectroscopy to quantitatively resolve the concentration of single and multicomponent mixtures of various CO2 reduction products including methanol, formate and acetate. We then apply this methodology to the in-situ monitoring of the permeation of single and multicomponent mixtures across commercially available membranes. Membrane permeabilities and selectivities calculated from the single component time-resolved concentration curves are compared to the multicomponent permeation experiments. This material is based upon work performed at the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis, a DOE Energy Innovation Hub, supported through the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy under Award Number DE-SC000493.

  14. Cancer-Specific Synthetic Lethality between ATR and CHK1 Kinase Activities.

    PubMed

    Sanjiv, Kumar; Hagenkort, Anna; Calderón-Montaño, José Manuel; Koolmeister, Tobias; Reaper, Philip M; Mortusewicz, Oliver; Jacques, Sylvain A; Kuiper, Raoul V; Schultz, Niklas; Scobie, Martin; Charlton, Peter A; Pollard, John R; Berglund, Ulrika Warpman; Altun, Mikael; Helleday, Thomas

    2016-01-12

    ATR and CHK1 maintain cancer cell survival under replication stress and inhibitors of both kinases are currently undergoing clinical trials. As ATR activity is increased after CHK1 inhibition, we hypothesized that this may indicate an increased reliance on ATR for survival. Indeed, we observe that replication stress induced by the CHK1 inhibitor AZD7762 results in replication catastrophe and apoptosis, when combined with the ATR inhibitor VE-821 specifically in cancer cells. Combined treatment with ATR and CHK1 inhibitors leads to replication fork arrest, ssDNA accumulation, replication collapse, and synergistic cell death in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of CDK reversed replication stress and synthetic lethality, demonstrating that regulation of origin firing by ATR and CHK1 explains the synthetic lethality. In conclusion, this study exemplifies cancer-specific synthetic lethality between two proteins in the same pathway and raises the prospect of combining ATR and CHK1 inhibitors as promising cancer therapy. PMID:26748709

  15. RNF4 and PLK1 are required for replication fork collapse in ATR-deficient cells.

    PubMed

    Ragland, Ryan L; Patel, Sima; Rivard, Rebecca S; Smith, Kevin; Peters, Ashley A; Bielinsky, Anja-Katrin; Brown, Eric J

    2013-10-15

    The ATR-CHK1 axis stabilizes stalled replication forks and prevents their collapse into DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Here, we show that fork collapse in Atr-deleted cells is mediated through the combined effects the sumo targeted E3-ubiquitin ligase RNF4 and activation of the AURKA-PLK1 pathway. As indicated previously, Atr-deleted cells exhibited a decreased ability to restart DNA replication following fork stalling in comparison with control cells. However, suppression of RNF4, AURKA, or PLK1 returned the reinitiation of replication in Atr-deleted cells to near wild-type levels. In RNF4-depleted cells, this rescue directly correlated with the persistence of sumoylation of chromatin-bound factors. Notably, RNF4 repression substantially suppressed the accumulation of DSBs in ATR-deficient cells, and this decrease in breaks was enhanced by concomitant inhibition of PLK1. DSBs resulting from ATR inhibition were also observed to be dependent on the endonuclease scaffold protein SLX4, suggesting that RNF4 and PLK1 either help activate the SLX4 complex or make DNA replication fork structures accessible for subsequent SLX4-dependent cleavage. Thus, replication fork collapse following ATR inhibition is a multistep process that disrupts replisome function and permits cleavage of the replication fork. PMID:24142876

  16. Status of ATR-A1 irradiation experiment on vanadium alloys and low-activation steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Strain, R.V.; Gomes, I.; Chung, H.; Smith, D.L.

    1997-04-01

    The ATR-A1 irradiation experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was a collaborative U.S./Japan effort to study at low temperatures the effects of neutron damage on vanadium alloys. The experiment also contained a limited quantity of low-activation ferritic steel specimens from Japan as part of the collaboration agreement. The irradiation was completed on May 5, 1996, as planned, after achieving an estimated neutron damage of 4.7 dpa in vanadium. The capsule has since been kept in the ATR water canal for the required radioactivity cool-down. Planning is underway for disassembly of the capsule and test specimen retrieval.

  17. Fabrication Control Plan for ORNL RH-LOCA ATF Test Specimens to be Irradiated in the ATR

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin G. Field; Richard Howard; Michael Teague

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this fabrication plan is (1) to summarize the design of a set of rodlets that will be fabricated and then irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and (2) provide requirements for fabrication and acceptance criteria for inspections of the Light Water Reactor (LWR) – Accident Tolerant Fuels (ATF) rodlet components. The functional and operational (F&OR) requirements for the ATF program are identified in the ATF Test Plan. The scope of this document only covers fabrication and inspections of rodlet components detailed in drawings 604496 and 604497. It does not cover the assembly of these items to form a completed test irradiation assembly or the inspection of the final assembly, which will be included in a separate INL final test assembly specification/inspection document. The controls support the requirements that the test irradiations must be performed safely and that subsequent examinations must provide valid results.

  18. Adaptive SAR ATR problem set (AdaptSAPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wise, Angela R.; Fitzgerald, Donna; Ross, Timothy D.

    2004-09-01

    A strong and growing interest in systems that adapt to changing circumstances was evident in panel discussions at the "Algorithms for SAR Imagery" Conference of the AeroSense Symposium in April 2003, with DARPA, Air Force, industry and academia participation. As a result, Conference Co-Chair Mr. Ed Zelnio suggested producing a dynamic model to create problem sets suitable for adaptive system research and development. Such a problem set provides a framework for the overall problem, including organization of operating conditions, performance measures and specific test cases. It is hoped that this AdaptSAPS framework will help provide the community with a more concrete base for discussing adaptation in SAR imagery exploitation. AdaptSAPS Version 1.0 was produced by the AFRL COMPASE and SDMS organizations and posted on 5 August 2003. AdaptSAPS consists of over a dozen MatLab programs that allow the user to create "missions" with SAR data of varying complexities and then present that test data one image at a time, first as unexploited imagery and then later with the exploitation results that an ATR could use for adaptation in an operational environment. AdaptSAPS keeps track of performance results and reports performance measures. This paper describes AdaptSAPS - its application process and possible improvements as a problem set.

  19. 3D ladar ATR based on recognition by parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobel, Erik; Douglas, Joel; Ettinger, Gil

    2003-09-01

    LADAR imaging is unique in its potential to accurately measure the 3D surface geometry of targets. We exploit this 3D geometry to perform automatic target recognition on targets in the domain of military and civilian ground vehicles. Here we present a robust model based 3D LADAR ATR system which efficiently searches through target hypothesis space by reasoning hierarchically from vehicle parts up to identification of a whole vehicle with specific pose and articulation state. The LADAR data consists of one or more 3D point clouds generated by laser returns from ground vehicles viewed from multiple sensor locations. The key to this approach is an automated 3D registration process to precisely align and match multiple data views to model based predictions of observed LADAR data. We accomplish this registration using robust 3D surface alignment techniques which we have also used successfully in 3D medical image analysis applications. The registration routine seeks to minimize a robust 3D surface distance metric to recover the best six-degree-of-freedom pose and fit. We process the observed LADAR data by first extracting salient parts, matching these parts to model based predictions and hierarchically constructing and testing increasingly detailed hypotheses about the identity of the observed target. This cycle of prediction, extraction, and matching efficiently partitions the target hypothesis space based on the distinctive anatomy of the target models and achieves effective recognition by progressing logically from a target's constituent parts up to its complete pose and articulation state.

  20. Hydrogen-Deuterium exchange monitored by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poe, Brent; Del Vecchio, Alessandro; Cestelli Guidi, Mariangela

    2016-04-01

    Measuring the extent of isotopic exchange is a common means for the determination of self-diffusion coefficients in any type of medium (gas, liquid, amorphous solid, crystalline solid). For rapidly diffusing species such as hydrogen in condensed phases, real time methods involving vibrational spectroscopy can be used by taking advantage of the large relative mass difference between 1H and 2H, resulting in large differences in the band positions of their vibrational modes. We demonstrate rapid isotopic exchange between D2O liquid and H2O vapor using ATR (attenuated total reflectance) in a FTIR spectrometer. Over the course of a few minutes several spectra were acquired of a D2O droplet mounted on a diamond crystal. The progressive exchange reaction between the liquid phase and H2O from the atmosphere was monitored by measuring the decreasing absorbance of the D-O-D bending and O-D stretching bands and the increasing absorbance of the D-O-H and H-O-H bending and O-H stretching bands as functions of time. Our results offer some intriguing insights into the structural characteristics of water as inferred by this exchange process.

  1. Neutron dosimetry and damage calculations for the ATR-A1 irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, L.R.; Ratner, R.T.

    1998-09-01

    Neutron fluence measurements and radiation damage calculations are reported for the collaborative US/Japan ATR-A1 irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The maximum total neutron fluence at midplane was 9.4 {times} 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} (5.5 {times} 10{sup 21} n/cm{sup 2} above 0.1 MeV), resulting in about 4.6 dpa in vanadium.

  2. Gas Test Loop Booster Fuel Hydraulic Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Gas Test Loop Hydraulic Testing Staff

    2006-09-01

    The Gas Test Loop (GTL) project is for the design of an adaptation to the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to create a fast-flux test space where fuels and materials for advanced reactor concepts can undergo irradiation testing. Incident to that design, it was found necessary to make use of special booster fuel to enhance the neutron flux in the reactor lobe in which the Gas Test Loop will be installed. Because the booster fuel is of a different composition and configuration from standard ATR fuel, it is necessary to qualify the booster fuel for use in the ATR. Part of that qualification is the determination that required thermal hydraulic criteria will be met under routine operation and under selected accident scenarios. The Hydraulic Testing task in the GTL project facilitates that determination by measuring flow coefficients (pressure drops) over various regions of the booster fuel over a range of primary coolant flow rates. A high-fidelity model of the NW lobe of the ATR with associated flow baffle, in-pile-tube, and below-core flow channels was designed, constructed and located in the Idaho State University Thermal Fluids Laboratory. A circulation loop was designed and constructed by the university to provide reactor-relevant water flow rates to the test system. Models of the four booster fuel elements required for GTL operation were fabricated from aluminum (no uranium or means of heating) and placed in the flow channel. One of these was instrumented with Pitot tubes to measure flow velocities in the channels between the three booster fuel plates and between the innermost and outermost plates and the side walls of the flow annulus. Flow coefficients in the range of 4 to 6.5 were determined from the measurements made for the upper and middle parts of the booster fuel elements. The flow coefficient for the lower end of the booster fuel and the sub-core flow channel was lower at 2.3.

  3. Roles of ATR1 paralogs YMR279c and YOR378w in boron stress tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Bozdag, Gonensin Ozan; Uluisik, Irem; Gulculer, Gulce Sila; Karakaya, Huseyin C.; Koc, Ahmet

    2011-06-17

    Highlights: {yields} ATR1 paralog YMR279c plays role in boron detoxification. {yields} YMR279c overexpression lowers cytoplasmic boron levels. {yields} ATR1 paralog YOR378w has no roles in boron stress response. -- Abstract: Boron is a necessary nutrient for plants and animals, however excess of it causes toxicity. Previously, Atr1 and Arabidopsis Bor1 homolog were identified as the boron efflux pump in yeast, which lower the cytosolic boron concentration and help cells to survive in the presence of toxic amount of boron. In this study, we analyzed ATR1 paralogs, YMR279c and YOR378w, to understand whether they participate in boron stress tolerance in yeast. Even though these genes share homology with ATR1, neither their deletion rendered cells boron sensitive nor their expression was significantly upregulated by boron treatment. However, expression of YMR279, but not YOR378w, from the constitutive GAPDH promoter on a high copy plasmid provided remarkable boron resistance by decreasing intracellular boron levels. Thus our results suggest the presence of a third boron exporter, YMR279c, which functions similar to ATR1 and provides boron resistance in yeast.

  4. Coordinated regulation of XPA stability by ATR and HERC2 during nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Lee, T-H; Park, J-M; Leem, S-H; Kang, T-H

    2014-01-01

    ATR (ATM and Rad3-related) is an essential regulator of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) mechanism. For NER activation, ATR phosphorylates XPA, the rate-limiting factor in the NER pathway. However, the role of XPA phosphorylation at serine 196 by ATR has been elusive. Here we show that ATR-mediated XPA phosphorylation enhances XPA stability by inhibiting HERC2-mediated ubiquitination and subsequent degradation. We analyzed stabilization of XPA with substitutions of Ser 196 either to aspartate (S196D), a phosphomimetic mutation, or to alanine (S196A), a phosphodeficient mutation. Upon ultraviolet damage, ATR facilitated HERC2 dissociation from the XPA complex to induce XPA stabilization. However, this regulation was abrogated in S196A-complemented XPA-deficient cells due to persistent association of HERC2 with this XPA complex, resulting in enhanced ubiquitination of S196A. Conversely, the S196D substitution showed delayed degradation kinetics compared with the wild-type and less binding with HERC2, resulting in reduced ubiquitination of S196D. We also found that XPA phosphorylation enhanced the chromatin retention of XPA, the interaction with its binding partners following DNA damage. Taken together, our study presents a novel control mechanism in the NER pathway by regulating the steady-state level of XPA through posttranslational modifications by which ATR-mediated phosphorylation induces XPA stabilization by antagonizing HERC2-catalyzed XPA ubiquitination. PMID:23178497

  5. Cancer-Specific Synthetic Lethality between ATR and CHK1 Kinase Activities

    PubMed Central

    Sanjiv, Kumar; Hagenkort, Anna; Calderón-Montaño, José Manuel; Koolmeister, Tobias; Reaper, Philip M.; Mortusewicz, Oliver; Jacques, Sylvain A.; Kuiper, Raoul V.; Schultz, Niklas; Scobie, Martin; Charlton, Peter A.; Pollard, John R.; Berglund, Ulrika Warpman; Altun, Mikael; Helleday, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Summary ATR and CHK1 maintain cancer cell survival under replication stress and inhibitors of both kinases are currently undergoing clinical trials. As ATR activity is increased after CHK1 inhibition, we hypothesized that this may indicate an increased reliance on ATR for survival. Indeed, we observe that replication stress induced by the CHK1 inhibitor AZD7762 results in replication catastrophe and apoptosis, when combined with the ATR inhibitor VE-821 specifically in cancer cells. Combined treatment with ATR and CHK1 inhibitors leads to replication fork arrest, ssDNA accumulation, replication collapse, and synergistic cell death in cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Inhibition of CDK reversed replication stress and synthetic lethality, demonstrating that regulation of origin firing by ATR and CHK1 explains the synthetic lethality. In conclusion, this study exemplifies cancer-specific synthetic lethality between two proteins in the same pathway and raises the prospect of combining ATR and CHK1 inhibitors as promising cancer therapy. PMID:26748709

  6. Achilles Tendon Reflex (ATR) in response to short exposures of microgravity and hypergravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fujii, M.; Jaweed, M.

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies indicate that latency and amplitude of the Achilles tendon reflex (ATR) are reduced after exposure to microgravity for 28 days. The objective of this study was to quantitatively measure the latency of ATR during brief (20 sec) exposure to microgravity in KC-135 parabolic flights. Methods: The ATR was elicited in ten men during parabolic flight with the ankle held neutrally, planarflexed, and dorsiflexed. During flight, the ATR was elicited during the zero G and 1.8 G phases. Postflight testing was performed flying back to the airfield. Latencies to onset of the ATR were calculated and analyses of variance were performed to determine the effect of gravity and ankle position on latency. Result: The mean latencies for zero-G, 1.8-G and postflight with the ankle in the neutral position were 32.7 plus or minus 0.5 ms, and 33.1 plus or minus 0.7 ms respectively, which were not significantly different. There was a trend toward prolongation of latencies postflight. The mean latency for those who were motion sick was 32.1 plus or minus 0.1 ms compared to 34.0 plus or minus 0.3 ms for those who were not sick. Conclusions: These studies indicate that neither the level of gravity nor ankle position significantly affected the latency of the ATR.

  7. AGR-2 Data Qualification Report for ATR Cycles 147A, 148A, 148B, and 149A

    SciTech Connect

    Michael L. Abbott; Keith A. Daum

    2011-08-01

    This report presents the data qualification status of fuel irradiation data from the first four reactor cycles (147A, 148A, 148B, and 149A) of the on-going second Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR-2) experiment as recorded in the NGNP Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS). This includes data received by NDMAS from the period June 22, 2010 through May 21, 2011. AGR-2 is the second in a series of eight planned irradiation experiments for the AGR Fuel Development and Qualification Program, which supports development of the very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) under the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. Irradiation of the AGR-2 test train is being performed at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and is planned for 600 effective full power days (approximately 2.75 calendar years) (PLN-3798). The experiment is intended to demonstrate the performance of UCO (uranium oxycarbide) and UO2 (uranium dioxide) fuel produced in a large coater. Data qualification status of the AGR-1 experiment was reported in INL/EXT-10-17943 (Abbott et al. 2010).

  8. Untangling the ATR-CHEK1 network for prognostication, prediction and therapeutic target validation in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Fatah, Tarek M A; Middleton, Fiona K; Arora, Arvind; Agarwal, Devika; Chen, Tao; Moseley, Paul M; Perry, Christina; Doherty, Rachel; Chan, Stephen; Green, Andrew R; Rakha, Emad; Ball, Graham; Ellis, Ian O; Curtin, Nicola J; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2015-03-01

    ATR-CHEK1 signalling is critical for genomic stability. ATR-CHEK1 signalling may be deregulated in breast cancer and have prognostic, predictive and therapeutic significance. We investigated ATR, CHEK1 and phosphorylated CHEK1 (Ser345) protein (pCHEK1) levels in 1712 breast cancers. ATR and CHEK1 mRNA expression was evaluated in 1950 breast cancers. Pre-clinically, biological consequences of ATR gene knock down or ATR inhibition by the small molecule inhibitor (VE-821) were investigated in MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines and in non-tumorigenic breast epithelial cells (MCF10A). High ATR and high cytoplasmic pCHEK1 levels were significantly associated with higher tumour stage, higher mitotic index, pleomorphism and lymphovascular invasion. In univariate analyses, high ATR and high cytoplasmic pCHEK1 levels were associated with poor breast cancer specific survival (BCSS). In multivariate analysis, high ATR level remains an independent predictor of adverse outcome. At the mRNA level, high CHEK1 remains associated with aggressive phenotypes including lymph node positivity, high grade, Her-2 overexpression, triple negative, aggressive molecular phenotypes and adverse BCSS. Pre-clinically, CHEK1 phosphorylation at serine(345) following replication stress was impaired in ATR knock down and in VE-821 treated breast cancer cells. Doxycycline inducible knockdown of ATR suppressed growth, which was restored when ATR was re-expressed. Similarly, VE-821 treatment resulted in a dose dependent suppression of cancer cell growth and survival (MCF7 and MDA-MB-231) but was less toxic in non-tumorigenic breast epithelial cells (MCF10A). We provide evidence that ATR and CHEK1 are promising biomarkers and rational drug targets for personalized therapy in breast cancer. PMID:25468710

  9. 10 CFR 830 Major Modification Determination for Advanced Test Reactor LEU Fuel Conversion

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd D. Christensen; Michael A. Lehto; Noel R. Duckwitz

    2012-05-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located in the ATR Complex of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), was constructed in the 1960s for the purpose of irradiating reactor fuels and materials. Other irradiation services, such as radioisotope production, are also performed at ATR. The ATR is fueled with high-enriched uranium (HEU) matrix (UAlx) in an aluminum sandwich plate cladding. The National Nuclear Security Administration Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) strategic mission includes efforts to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological material at civilian sites around the world. Converting research reactors from using HEU to low-enriched uranium (LEU) was originally started in 1978 as the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science. Within this strategic mission, GTRI has three goals that provide a comprehensive approach to achieving this mission: The first goal, the driver for the modification that is the subject of this determination, is to convert research reactors from using HEU to LEU. Thus the mission of the ATR LEU Fuel Conversion Project is to convert the ATR and Advanced Test Reactor Critical facility (ATRC) (two of the six U.S. High-Performance Research Reactors [HPRR]) to LEU fuel by 2017. The major modification criteria evaluation of the project pre-conceptual design identified several issues that lead to the conclusion that the project is a major modification.

  10. A cell-based screen identifies ATR inhibitors with synthetic lethal properties for cancer-associated mutations

    PubMed Central

    Toledo, Luis I.; Murga, Matilde; Zur, Rafal; Soria, Rebeca; Rodriguez, Antonio; Martinez, Sonia; Oyarzabal, Julen; Pastor, Joaquin; Bischoff, James R.; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Oncogene activation has been shown to generate replication-born DNA damage, also known as replicative stress (RS). Notably, the ATR kinase –and not ATM- is the primary responder to RS. One limitation for the study of ATR is the lack of potent inhibitors. We here describe a cell-based screening strategy that has allowed us to identify compounds with ATR inhibitory activity in the nanomolar range. Pharmacological inhibition of ATR generates RS, leading to chromosomal breakage in the presence of conditions that stall replication forks. Moreover, ATR inhibition is particularly toxic for p53 deficient cells, this toxicity being exacerbated by RS-generating conditions such as the overexpression of cyclin E. Importantly, one of the compounds is NVP-BEZ235, a dual PI3K/mTOR inhibitor that is currently being tested for cancer chemotherapy, but which we now show is also very potent against ATM, ATR and DNA-PKcs. PMID:21552262

  11. EVALUATION OF CORE PHYSICS ANALYSIS METHODS FOR CONVERSION OF THE INL ADVANCED TEST REACTOR TO LOW-ENRICHMENT FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Mark DeHart; Gray S. Chang

    2012-04-01

    Computational neutronics studies to support the possible conversion of the ATR to LEU are underway. Simultaneously, INL is engaged in a physics methods upgrade project to put into place modern computational neutronics tools for future support of ATR fuel cycle and experiment analysis. A number of experimental measurements have been performed in the ATRC in support of the methods upgrade project, and are being used to validate the new core physics methods. The current computational neutronics work is focused on performance of scoping calculations for the ATR core loaded with a candidate LEU fuel design. This will serve as independent confirmation of analyses that have been performed previously, and will evaluate some of the new computational methods for analysis of a candidate LEU fuel for ATR.

  12. Attila{sup R} Modeling with Comparisons to Data, MCNP and MCNPX for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR)

    SciTech Connect

    Lucas, D. Scott; LaPorta, Anthony; Hounshel, Derek A.

    2006-07-01

    The 3D neutron transport code Attila{sup R} has been used in a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The purpose is to examine the feasibility of replacing the current diffusion based Core Safety Analysis Methods with a neutron transport code. This is a discussion of the development of the Attila models, and their comparison to models from other codes and historical data from the ATR. Additional comparisons have been made to the ATR Critical Facility (ATRC), the low power version of ATR, used for physics testing. (authors)

  13. Evaluation of shooting distance by AFM and FTIR/ATR analysis of GSR.

    PubMed

    Mou, Yongyan; Lakadwar, Jyoti; Rabalais, J Wayne

    2008-11-01

    The techniques of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflectance (FTIR/ATR) spectroscopy are applied to the analysis of gun-shot residue (GSR) to test their ability to determine shooting distance and discrimination of the powder manufacturers. AFM is a nondestructive technique that is capable of characterizing the shapes and size distributions of GSR particles with resolution down to less than a nanometer. This may be useful for estimation of the shooting distance. Our AFM images of GSR show that the size distribution of the particles is inversely proportional to the shooting distance. Discrimination of powder manufacturers is tested by FTIR/ATR investigation of GSR. Identifying the specific compounds in the GSR by FTIR/ATR was not possible because it is a mixture of the debris of several compounds that compose the residue. However, it is shown that the GSR from different cartridges has characteristic FTIR/ATR bands that may be useful in differentiating the powder manufacturers. It appears promising that the development of AFM and FTIR/ATR databases for various powder manufacturers may be useful in analysis and identification of GSR. PMID:18761553

  14. HORMAD2 is essential for synapsis surveillance during meiotic prophase via the recruitment of ATR activity.

    PubMed

    Kogo, Hiroshi; Tsutsumi, Makiko; Inagaki, Hidehito; Ohye, Tamae; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Kurahashi, Hiroki

    2012-11-01

    Meiotic chromosome segregation requires homologous pairing, synapsis and crossover recombination during meiotic prophase. The checkpoint kinase ATR has been proposed to be involved in the quality surveillance of these processes, although the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. In our present study, we generated mice lacking HORMAD2, a protein that localizes to unsynapsed meiotic chromosomes. We show that this Hormad2 deficiency hampers the proper recruitment of ATR activity to unsynapsed chromosomes. Male Hormad2-deficient mice are infertile due to spermatocyte loss as a result of characteristic impairment of sex body formation; an ATR- and γH2AX-enriched repressive chromatin domain is formed, but is partially dissociated from the elongated sex chromosome axes. In contrast to males, Hormad2-deficient females are fertile. However, our analysis of Hormad2/Spo11 double-mutant females shows that the oocyte number is negatively correlated with the frequency of pseudo-sex body formation in a Hormad2 gene dosage-dependent manner. This result suggests that the elimination of Spo11-deficient asynaptic oocytes is associated with the HORMAD2-dependent pseudo-sex body formation that is likely initiated by local concentration of ATR activity in the absence of double-strand breaks. Our results thus show a HORMAD2-dependent quality control mechanism that recognizes unsynapsis and recruits ATR activity during mammalian meiosis. PMID:23039116

  15. Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Facility 10CFR830 Safety Basis Related to Facility Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tomberlin, Terry Alan

    2002-06-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), a DOE Category A reactor, was designed to provide an irradiation test environment for conducting a variety of experiments. The ATR Safety Analysis Report, determined by DOE to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 830, Subpart B, provides versatility in types of experiments that may be conducted. This paper addresses two general types of experiments in the ATR facility and how safety analyses for experiments are related to the ATR safety basis. One type of experiment is more routine and generally represents greater risks; therefore this type of experiment is addressed with more detail in the safety basis. This allows individual safety analyses for these experiments to be more routine and repetitive. The second type of experiment is less defined and is permitted under more general controls. Therefore, individual safety analyses for the second type of experiment tend to be more unique from experiment to experiment. Experiments are also discussed relative to "major modifications" and DOE-STD-1027-92. Application of the USQ process to ATR experiments is also discussed.

  16. Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Facility 10CFR830 Safety Basis Related to Facility Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Tomberlin, T.A.

    2002-06-19

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), a DOE Category A reactor, was designed to provide an irradiation test environment for conducting a variety of experiments. The ATR Safety Analysis Report, determined by DOE to meet the requirements of 10 CFR 830, Subpart B, provides versatility in types of experiments that may be conducted. This paper addresses two general types of experiments in the ATR facility and how safety analyses for experiments are related to the ATR safety basis. One type of experiment is more routine and generally represents greater risks; therefore this type of experiment is addressed with more detail in the safety basis. This allows individual safety analyses for these experiments to be more routine and repetitive. The second type of experiment is less defined and is permitted under more general controls. Therefore, individual safety analyses for the second type of experiment tend to be more unique from experiment to experiment. Experiments are also discussed relative to ''major modifications'' and DOE-STD-1027-92. Application of the USQ process to ATR experiments is also discussed.

  17. Structural elucidation and functional characterization of the Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis effector protein ATR13.

    PubMed

    Leonelli, Lauriebeth; Pelton, Jeffery; Schoeffler, Allyn; Dahlbeck, Douglas; Berger, James; Wemmer, David E; Staskawicz, Brian

    2011-12-01

    The oomycete Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis (Hpa) is the causal agent of downy mildew on the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and has been adapted as a model system to investigate pathogen virulence strategies and plant disease resistance mechanisms. Recognition of Hpa infection occurs when plant resistance proteins (R-genes) detect the presence or activity of pathogen-derived protein effectors delivered to the plant host. This study examines the Hpa effector ATR13 Emco5 and its recognition by RPP13-Nd, the cognate R-gene that triggers programmed cell death (HR) in the presence of recognized ATR13 variants. Herein, we use NMR to solve the backbone structure of ATR13 Emco5, revealing both a helical domain and a disordered internal loop. Additionally, we use site-directed and random mutagenesis to identify several amino acid residues involved in the recognition response conferred by RPP13-Nd. Using our structure as a scaffold, we map these residues to one of two surface-exposed patches of residues under diversifying selection. Exploring possible roles of the disordered region within the ATR13 structure, we perform domain swapping experiments and identify a peptide sequence involved in nucleolar localization. We conclude that ATR13 is a highly dynamic protein with no clear structural homologues that contains two surface-exposed patches of polymorphism, only one of which is involved in RPP13-Nd recognition specificity. PMID:22194684

  18. Interplay between ATM and ATR in the regulation of common fragile site stability.

    PubMed

    Ozeri-Galai, E; Schwartz, M; Rahat, A; Kerem, B

    2008-04-01

    Common fragile sites are specific genomic loci that form constrictions and gaps on metaphase chromosomes under conditions that slow, but do not arrest, DNA replication. These sites have been shown to have a role in various chromosomal rearrangements in tumors. Different DNA damage response proteins were shown to regulate fragile site stability, including ataxia-telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) and its effector Chk1. Here, we investigated the role of ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), the main transducer of DNA double-strand break (DSB) signal, in this regulation. We demonstrate that replication stress conditions, which induce fragile site expression, lead to DNA fragmentation and recruitment of phosphorylated ATM to nuclear foci at DSBs. We further show that ATM plays a role in maintaining fragile site stability, which is revealed only in the absence of ATR. However, the activation of ATM under these replication stress conditions is ATR independent. Following conditions that induce fragile site expression both ATR and ATM phosphorylate Chk1, suggesting that both proteins regulate fragile site expression probably via their effect on Chk1 activation. Our findings provide new insights into the interplay between ATR and ATM pathways in response to partial replication inhibition and in the regulation of fragile site stability. PMID:17934520

  19. Drosophila ATM and ATR have distinct activities in the regulation of meiotic DNA damage and repair.

    PubMed

    Joyce, Eric F; Pedersen, Michael; Tiong, Stanley; White-Brown, Sanese K; Paul, Anshu; Campbell, Shelagh D; McKim, Kim S

    2011-10-31

    Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and ataxia telangiectasia-related (ATR) kinases are conserved regulators of cellular responses to double strand breaks (DSBs). During meiosis, however, the functions of these kinases in DSB repair and the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage checkpoint are unclear. In this paper, we show that ATM and ATR have unique roles in the repair of meiotic DSBs in Drosophila melanogaster. ATR mutant analysis indicated that it is required for checkpoint activity, whereas ATM may not be. Both kinases phosphorylate H2AV (γ-H2AV), and, using this as a reporter for ATM/ATR activity, we found that the DSB repair response is surprisingly dynamic at the site of DNA damage. γ-H2AV is continuously exchanged, requiring new phosphorylation at the break site until repair is completed. However, most surprising is that the number of γ-H2AV foci is dramatically increased in the absence of ATM, but not ATR, suggesting that the number of DSBs is increased. Thus, we conclude that ATM is primarily required for the meiotic DSB repair response, which includes functions in DNA damage repair and negative feedback control over the level of programmed DSBs during meiosis. PMID:22024169

  20. ATR suppresses endogenous DNA damage and allows completion of homologous recombination repair.

    PubMed

    Brown, Adam D; Sager, Brian W; Gorthi, Aparna; Tonapi, Sonal S; Brown, Eric J; Bishop, Alexander J R

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication fork stalling or collapse that arises from endogenous damage poses a serious threat to genome stability, but cells invoke an intricate signaling cascade referred to as the DNA damage response (DDR) to prevent such damage. The gene product ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) responds primarily to replication stress by regulating cell cycle checkpoint control, yet it's role in DNA repair, particularly homologous recombination (HR), remains unclear. This is of particular interest since HR is one way in which replication restart can occur in the presence of a stalled or collapsed fork. Hypomorphic mutations in human ATR cause the rare autosomal-recessive disease Seckel syndrome, and complete loss of Atr in mice leads to embryonic lethality. We recently adapted the in vivo murine pink-eyed unstable (pun) assay for measuring HR frequency to be able to investigate the role of essential genes on HR using a conditional Cre/loxP system. Our system allows for the unique opportunity to test the effect of ATR loss on HR in somatic cells under physiological conditions. Using this system, we provide evidence that retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells lacking ATR have decreased density with abnormal morphology, a decreased frequency of HR and an increased level of chromosomal damage. PMID:24675793

  1. AGR-2 Final Data Qualification Report for U.S. Capsules - ATR Cycles 147A Through 154B

    SciTech Connect

    Pham, Binh T; Einerson, Jeffrey J

    2014-07-01

    This report provides the data qualification status of AGR-2 fuel irradiation experimental data in four U.S. capsules from all 15 Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Cycles 147A, 148A, 148B, 149A, 149B, 150A, 150B, 151A, 151B, 152A, 152B, 153A, 153B, 154A, and 154B, as recorded in the Nuclear Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS). Thus, this report covers data qualification status for the entire AGR-2 irradiation and will replace four previously issued AGR-2 data qualification reports (e.g., INL/EXT-11-22798, INL/EXT-12-26184, INL/EXT-13-29701, and INL/EXT-13-30750). During AGR-2 irradiation, two cycles, 152A and 153A, occurred when the ATR core was briefly at low power, so AGR-2 irradiation data are not used for physics and thermal calculations. Also, two cycles, 150A and 153B, are Power Axial Locator Mechanism (PALM) cycles when the ATR power is higher than during normal cycles. During the first PALM cycle, 150A, the experiment was temporarily moved from the B-12 location to the ATR water canal and during the second PALM cycle, 153B, the experiment was temporarily moved from the B-12 location to the I-24 location to avoid being overheated. During the “Outage” cycle, 153A, seven flow meters were installed downstream from seven Fission Product Monitoring System (FPMS) monitors to measure flows from the monitors and these data are included in the NDMAS database. The AGR-2 data streams addressed in this report include thermocouple (TC) temperatures, sweep gas data (flow rates including new FPM downstream flows, pressure, and moisture content), and FPMS data (release rates and release-to-birth rate ratios [R/Bs]) for each of the four U.S. capsules in the AGR-2 experiment (Capsules 2, 3, 5, and 6). The final data qualification status for these data streams is determined by a Data Review Committee comprised of AGR technical leads, Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Program Quality Assurance (QA), and NDMAS analysts. The Data Review Committee, which convened just

  2. Development of an LS-DYNA Model of an ATR42-300 Aircraft for Crash Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Karen E.; Fasanella, Edwin L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an LS-DYNA simulation of a vertical drop test of an ATR42-300 twin-turboprop high-wing commuter-class airplane. A 30-ft/s drop test of this aircraft was performed onto a concrete impact surface at the FAA Technical Center on July 30, 2003. The purpose of the test was to evaluate the structural response of a commuter-class aircraft when subjected to a severe, but survivable, impact. The aircraft was configured with crew and passenger seats, anthropomorphic test dummies, forward and aft luggage, instrumentation, and onboard data acquisition systems. The wings were filled with approximately 8,700 lb. of water to represent the fuel and the aircraft weighed a total of 33,200 lb. The model, which consisted of 57,643 nodes and 62,979 elements, was developed from direct measurements of the airframe geometry, over a period of approximately 8 months. The seats, dummies, luggage, fuel, and other ballast were represented using concentrated masses. Comparisons were made of the structural deformation and failure behavior of the airframe, as well as selected acceleration time history responses.

  3. Esophago-gastric motility and nutritional management in a child with ATR-X syndrome.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Toshihiko; Arai, Katsuhiro; Takahashi, Masataka; Ohno, Michinobu; Sato, Kaori; Fuchimoto, Yasushi; Wada, Takahiko; Ida, Shinobu; Kawahara, Hisayoshi; Kanamori, Yutaka

    2014-08-01

    X-linked alpha thalassemia mental retardation (ATR-X) syndrome is an X-linked recessive disorder that often involves gastrointestinal symptoms. Aspiration pneumonia related to gastroesophageal reflux has been reported as the major cause of death, but gastrointestinal function has not been well investigated. The present report describes a child with ATR-X syndrome who suffered from periodical episodes of refractory vomiting. We investigated the function of upper alimentary tract and found that esophago-gastric dysmotility and severe gastric volvulus were the major causes of gastrointestinal symptoms. This child was surgically treated with anterior gastropexy and jejunal alimentation through gastrostomy, and the symptoms were relieved with good weight gain. This report may provide insight into the gastrointestinal function and nutritional management in children with ATR-X syndrome. PMID:25252072

  4. 10 CFR 830 Major Modification Determination for Replacement of ATR Primary Coolant Pumps and Motors

    SciTech Connect

    Noel Duckwitz

    2011-05-01

    The continued safe and reliable operation of the ATR is critical to the Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) mission. While ATR is safely fulfilling current mission requirements, a variety of aging and obsolescence issues challenge ATR engineering and maintenance personnel’s capability to sustain ATR over the long term. First documented in a series of independent assessments, beginning with an OA Environmental Safety and Health Assessment conducted in 2003, the issues were validated in a detailed Material Condition Assessment (MCA) conducted as a part of the ATR Life Extension Program in 2007.Accordingly, near term replacement of aging and obsolescent original ATR equipment has become important to ensure ATR capability in support of NE’s long term national missions. To that end, a mission needs statement has been prepared for a non-major system acquisition which is comprised of three interdependent subprojects. The first project will replace the existent diesel-electrical bus (E-3), switchgear, and the 50-year-old obsolescent marine diesels with commercial power that is backed with safety related emergency diesel generators, switchgear, and uninterruptible power supply (UPS). The second project, the subject of this major modification determination, will replace the four, obsolete, original primary coolant pumps (PCPs) and motors. Completion of this and the two other age-related projects (replacement of the ATR diesel bus [E-3] and switchgear and replacement of the existent emergency firewater injection system) will resolve major age-related operational issues plus make a significant contribution in sustaining the ATR safety and reliability profile. The major modification criteria evaluation of the project pre-conceptual design identified several issues that lead to the conclusion that the project is a major modification: 1. Evaluation Criteria #3 (Change of existing process). The proposed strategy for equipping the replacement PCPs with VFDs

  5. Attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) imaging of tissues and live cells.

    PubMed

    Andrew Chan, K L; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2016-03-29

    FTIR spectroscopic imaging is a label-free, non-destructive and chemically specific technique that can be utilised to study a wide range of biomedical applications such as imaging of biopsy tissues, fixed cells and live cells, including cancer cells. In particular, the use of FTIR imaging in attenuated total reflection (ATR) mode has attracted much attention because of the small, but well controlled, depth of penetration and corresponding path length of infrared light into the sample. This has enabled the study of samples containing large amounts of water, as well as achieving an increased spatial resolution provided by the high refractive index of the micro-ATR element. This review is focused on discussing the recent developments in FTIR spectroscopic imaging, particularly in ATR sampling mode, and its applications in the biomedical science field as well as discussing the future opportunities possible as the imaging technology continues to advance. PMID:26488803

  6. Status of ATR-A1 irradiation experiment on vanadium alloys and low-activation steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Strain, R.V.; Gomes, I.; Smith, D.L.; Matsui, H.

    1996-10-01

    The ATR-A1 irradiation experiment was a collaborative U.S./Japan effort to study at low temperature the effects of neutron damage on vanadium alloys. The experiment also contained a limited quantity of low-activation ferritic steel specimens from Japan as part of the collaboration agreement. The irradiation started in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) on November 30, 1995, and ended as planned on May 5, 1996. Total exposure was 132.9 effective full power days (EFPDs) and estimated neutron damage in the vanadium was 4.7 dpa. The vehicle has been discharged from the ATR core and is scheduled to be disassembled in the next reporting period.

  7. Modeling the attenuated total reflectance infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectrum of apatite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aufort, Julie; Ségalen, Loïc; Gervais, Christel; Brouder, Christian; Balan, Etienne

    2016-06-01

    Attenuated total reflectance (ATR) infrared spectra were measured on a synthetic and a natural fluorapatite sample. A modeling approach based on the computation of the Fresnel reflection coefficient between the ATR crystal and the powder sample was used to analyze the line shape of the spectra. The dielectric properties of the samples were related to those of pure fluorapatite using an effective medium approach, based on Maxwell-Garnett and Bruggeman models. The Bruggeman effective medium model leads to a very good agreement with the experimental data recorded on the synthetic fluorapatite sample. The poorer agreement observed on the natural sample suggests a more significant heterogeneity of the sample at a characteristic length scale larger than the mid-infrared characteristic wavelength, i.e., about 10 micrometers. The results demonstrate the prominent role of macroscopic electrostatic effects over fine details of the microscopic structure in determining the line shape of strong ATR bands.

  8. Depletion of ATR selectively sensitizes ATM-deficient human mammary epithelial cells to ionizing radiation and DNA-damaging agents

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yuxia; Palii, Stela S; Innes, Cynthia L; Paules, Richard S

    2014-01-01

    DNA damage response (DDR) to double strand breaks is coordinated by 3 phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinase (PIKK) family members: the ataxia-telangiectasia mutated kinase (ATM), the ATM and Rad3-related (ATR) kinase and the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs). ATM and ATR are central players in activating cell cycle checkpoints and function as an active barrier against genome instability and tumorigenesis in replicating cells. Loss of ATM function is frequently reported in various types of tumors, thus placing more reliance on ATR for checkpoint arrest and cell survival following DNA damage. To investigate the role of ATR in the G2/M checkpoint regulation in response to ionizing radiation (IR), particularly when ATM is deficient, cell lines deficient of ATM, ATR, or both were generated using a doxycycline-inducible lentiviral system. Our data suggests that while depletion of ATR or ATM alone in wild-type human mammary epithelial cell cultures (HME-CCs) has little effect on radiosensitivity or IR-induced G2/M checkpoint arrest, depletion of ATR in ATM-deficient cells causes synthetic lethality following IR, which correlates with severe G2/M checkpoint attenuation. ATR depletion also inhibits IR-induced autophagy, regardless of the ATM status, and enhances IR-induced apoptosis particularly when ATM is deficient. Collectively, our results clearly demonstrate that ATR function is required for the IR-induced G2/M checkpoint activation and subsequent survival of cells with ATM deficiency. The synthetic lethal interaction between ATM and ATR in response to IR supports ATR as a therapeutic target for improved anti-cancer regimens, especially in tumors with a dysfunctional ATM pathway. PMID:25483091

  9. ATR and transmission analysis of pigments by means of far infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kendix, Elsebeth L; Prati, Silvia; Joseph, Edith; Sciutto, Giorgia; Mazzeo, Rocco

    2009-06-01

    In the field of FTIR spectroscopy, the far infrared (FIR) spectral region has been so far less investigated than the mid-infrared (MIR), even though it presents great advantages in the characterization of those inorganic compounds, which are inactive in the MIR, such as some art pigments, corrosion products, etc. Furthermore, FIR spectroscopy is complementary to Raman spectroscopy if the fluorescence effects caused by the latter analytical technique are considered. In this paper, ATR in the FIR region is proposed as an alternative method to transmission for the analyses of pigments. This methodology was selected in order to reduce the sample amount needed for analysis, which is a must when examining cultural heritage materials. A selection of pigments have been analyzed in both ATR and transmission mode, and the resulting spectra were compared with each other. To better perform this comparison, an evaluation of the possible effect induced by the thermal treatment needed for the preparation of the polyethylene pellets on the transmission spectra of the samples has been carried out. Therefore, pigments have been analyzed in ATR mode before and after heating them at the same temperature employed for the polyethylene pellet preparation. The results showed that while the heating treatment causes only small changes in the intensity of some bands, the ATR spectra were characterized by differences in both intensity and band shifts towards lower frequencies if compared with those recorded in transmission mode. All pigments' transmission and ATR spectra are presented and discussed, and the ATR method was validated on a real case study. PMID:19266186

  10. UPDATE ON MONOLITHIC FUEL FABRICATION METHODS

    SciTech Connect

    C. R. Clark; J. F. Jue; G. A. Moore; N. P. Hallinan; B. H. Park; D. E. Burkes

    2006-10-01

    Efforts to develop a viable monolithic research reactor fuel plate have continued at Idaho National Laboratory. These efforts have concentrated on both fabrication process refinement and scale-up to produce full sized fuel plates. Progress at INL has led to fabrication of hot isostatic pressed uranium-molybdenum bearing monolithic fuel plates. These miniplates are part of the RERTR-8 miniplate irradiation test. Further progress has also been made on friction stir weld processing which has been used to fabricate full size fuel plates which will be irradiated in the ATR and OSIRIS reactors.

  11. Increased Rrm2 gene dosage reduces fragile site breakage and prolongs survival of ATR mutant mice

    PubMed Central

    Specks, Julia; Barlow, Jacqueline H.; Ambrogio, Chiara; Desler, Claus; Vikingsson, Svante; Rodrigo-Perez, Sara; Green, Henrik; Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Murga, Matilde; Nussenzweig, André

    2015-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, absence of the checkpoint kinase Mec1 (ATR) is viable upon mutations that increase the activity of the ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) complex. Whether this pathway is conserved in mammals remains unknown. Here we show that cells from mice carrying extra alleles of the RNR regulatory subunit RRM2 (Rrm2TG) present supraphysiological RNR activity and reduced chromosomal breakage at fragile sites. Moreover, increased Rrm2 gene dosage significantly extends the life span of ATR mutant mice. Our study reveals the first genetic condition in mammals that reduces fragile site expression and alleviates the severity of a progeroid disease by increasing RNR activity. PMID:25838540

  12. 10 CFR 830 Major Modification Determination for the ATR Diesel Bus (E-3) and Switchgear Replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Noel Duckwtiz

    2011-05-01

    Near term replacement of aging and obsolescent original ATR equipment has become important to ensure ATR capability in support of NE’s long term national missions. To that end, a mission needs statement has been prepared for a non-major system acquisition which is comprised of three interdependent subprojects. The first project, subject of this determination, will replace the existent diesel-electrical bus (E-3) and associated switchgear. More specifically, INL proposes transitioning ATR to 100% commercial power with appropriate emergency backup to include: • Provide commercial power as the normal source of power to the ATR loads currently supplied by diesel-electric power. • Provide backup power to the critical ATR loads in the event of a loss of commercial power. • Replace obsolescent critical ATR power distribution equipment, e.g., switchgear, transformers, motor control centers, distribution panels. Completion of this and two other age-related projects (primary coolant pump and motor replacement and emergency firewater injection system replacement) will resolve major age related operational issues plus make a significant contribution in sustaining the ATR safety and reliability profile. The major modification criteria evaluation of the project pre-conceptual design identified several issues make the project a major modification: 1. Evaluation Criteria #2 (Footprint change). The addition of a new PC-4 structure to the ATR Facility to house safety-related SSCs requires careful attention to maintaining adherence to applicable engineering and nuclear safety design criteria (e.g., structural qualification, fire suppression) to ensure no adverse impacts to the safety-related functions of the housed equipment. 2. Evaluation Criteria #3 (Change of existing process). The change to the strategy for providing continuous reliable power to the safety-related emergency coolant pumps requires careful attention and analysis to ensure it meets a project primary object

  13. EFFECTS OF ATRAZINE (ATR), DEISOPROPYLATRAZINE (DIA), AND DIAMINOCHLOROTRIAZINE (DACT) ON THE HYPOTHALAMIC-PITUITARY-ADRENAL (HPA) AXIS IN FEMALE RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previously we reported that a single dose of ATR herbicide stimulated HPA axis activation in the male rat while its primary metabolite, DACT, did so to a lesser extent. In this study, we evaluated the effects of ATR, DACT, and an intermediate metabolite, DIA, on adrenocorticotrop...

  14. Effects of atrazine (ATR), deisopropylatrazine (DIA), Diaminochlorotriazine (DACT) on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in female rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    We previously reported that a single dose of the herbicide ATR stimulated the HPA axis in the male rat while equimolar doses of its primary metabolite, DACT, had a minimal effect. In this study, we evaluated the effects of one or four daily doses of ATR, DACT, and an intermediat...

  15. ATR-FTIR Spectroscopy in the Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory: Part II--A Physical Chemistry Laboratory Experiment on Surface Adsorption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuttlefield, Jennifer D.; Larsen, Sarah C.; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2008-01-01

    Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy is a useful technique for measuring the infrared spectra of solids and liquids as well as probing adsorption on particle surfaces. The use of FTIR-ATR spectroscopy in organic and inorganic chemistry laboratory courses as well as in undergraduate research was presented…

  16. A synthetic lethal screen identifies ATR-inhibition as a novel therapeutic approach for POLD1-deficient cancers

    PubMed Central

    Hocke, Sandra; Guo, Yang; Job, Albert; Orth, Michael; Ziesch, Andreas; Lauber, Kirsten; De Toni, Enrico N; Gress, Thomas M.; Herbst, Andreas; Göke, Burkhard; Gallmeier, Eike

    2016-01-01

    The phosphoinositide 3-kinase-related kinase ATR represents a central checkpoint regulator and mediator of DNA-repair. Its inhibition selectively eliminates certain subsets of cancer cells in various tumor types, but the underlying genetic determinants remain enigmatic. Here, we applied a synthetic lethal screen directed against 288 DNA-repair genes using the well-defined ATR knock-in model of DLD1 colorectal cancer cells to identify potential DNA-repair defects mediating these effects. We identified a set of DNA-repair proteins, whose knockdown selectively killed ATR-deficient cancer cells. From this set, we further investigated the profound synthetic lethal interaction between ATR and POLD1. ATR-dependent POLD1 knockdown-induced cell killing was reproducible pharmacologically in POLD1-depleted DLD1 cells and a panel of other colorectal cancer cell lines by using chemical inhibitors of ATR or its major effector kinase CHK1. Mechanistically, POLD1 depletion in ATR-deficient cells caused caspase-dependent apoptosis without preceding cell cycle arrest and increased DNA-damage along with impaired DNA-repair. Our data could have clinical implications regarding tumor genotype-based cancer therapy, as inactivating POLD1 mutations have recently been identified in small subsets of colorectal and endometrial cancers. POLD1 deficiency might thus represent a predictive marker for treatment response towards ATR- or CHK1-inhibitors that are currently tested in clinical trials. PMID:26755646

  17. Assessment of Nuclear Fuels using Radiographic Thickness Measurement Method

    SciTech Connect

    Muhammad Abir; Fahima Islam; Hyoung Koo Lee; Daniel Wachs

    2014-11-01

    The Convert branch of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) focuses on the development of high uranium density fuels for research and test reactors for nonproliferation. This fuel is aimed to convert low density high enriched uranium (HEU) based fuel to high density low enriched uranium (LEU) based fuel for high performance research reactors (HPRR). There are five U.S. reactors that fall under the HPRR category, including: the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor (MITR), the National Bureau of Standards Reactor (NBSR), the Missouri University Research Reactor (UMRR), the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). U-Mo alloy fuel phase in the form of either monolithic or dispersion foil type fuels, such as ATR Full-size In center flux trap Position (AFIP) and Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR), are being designed for this purpose. The fabrication process1 of RERTR is susceptible to introducing a variety of fuel defects. A dependable quality control method is required during fabrication of RERTR miniplates to maintain the allowable design tolerances, therefore evaluating and analytically verifying the fabricated miniplates for maintaining quality standards as well as safety. The purpose of this work is to analyze the thickness of the fabricated RERTR-12 miniplates using non-destructive technique to meet the fuel plate specification for RERTR fuel to be used in the ATR.

  18. Distillate fuel-oil processing for phosphoric acid fuel-cell power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ushiba, K. K.

    1980-02-01

    The current efforts to develop distillate oil-steam reforming processes are reviewed, and the applicability of these processes for integration with the fuel cell are discussed. The development efforts can be grouped into the following processing approaches: high-temperature steam reforming (HTSR); autothermal reforming (ATR); autothermal gasification (AG); and ultra desulfurization followed by steam reforming. Sulfur in the feed is a key problem in the process development. A majority of the developers consider sulfur as an unavoidable contaminant of distillate fuel and are aiming to cope with it by making the process sulfur-tolerant. In the HTSR development, the calcium aluminate catalyst developed by Toyo Engineering represents the state of the art. United Technology (UTC), Engelhard, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) are also involved in the HTSR research. The ATR of distillate fuel is investigated by UTC and JPL. The autothermal gasification (AG) of distillate fuel is being investigated by Engelhard and Siemens AG. As in the ATR, the fuel is catalytically gasified utilizing the heat generated by in situ partial combustion of feed, however, the goal of the AG is to accomplish the initial breakdown of the feed into light gases and not to achieve complete conversion to CO and H/sub 2/. For the fuel-cell integration, a secondary reforming of the light gases from the AG step is required. Engelhard is currently testing a system in which the effluent from the AG section enters the steam-reforming section, all housed in a single vessel. (WHK)

  19. Multivariate analysis of ATR-FTIR spectra for assessment of oil shale organic geochemical properties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Washburn, Kathryn E.; Birdwell, Justin E.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, attenuated total reflectance (ATR) Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) was coupled with partial least squares regression (PLSR) analysis to relate spectral data to parameters from total organic carbon (TOC) analysis and programmed pyrolysis to assess the feasibility of developing predictive models to estimate important organic geochemical parameters. The advantage of ATR-FTIR over traditional analytical methods is that source rocks can be analyzed in the laboratory or field in seconds, facilitating more rapid and thorough screening than would be possible using other tools. ATR-FTIR spectra, TOC concentrations and Rock–Eval parameters were measured for a set of oil shales from deposits around the world and several pyrolyzed oil shale samples. PLSR models were developed to predict the measured geochemical parameters from infrared spectra. Application of the resulting models to a set of test spectra excluded from the training set generated accurate predictions of TOC and most Rock–Eval parameters. The critical region of the infrared spectrum for assessing S1, S2, Hydrogen Index and TOC consisted of aliphatic organic moieties (2800–3000 cm−1) and the models generated a better correlation with measured values of TOC and S2 than did integrated aliphatic peak areas. The results suggest that combining ATR-FTIR with PLSR is a reliable approach for estimating useful geochemical parameters of oil shales that is faster and requires less sample preparation than current screening methods.

  20. U-shaped fiber-optic ATR sensor enhanced by silver nanoparticles for continuous glucose monitoring.

    PubMed

    Li, Dachao; Yu, Songlin; Sun, Changyue; Zou, Chongwei; Yu, Haixia; Xu, Kexin

    2015-10-15

    An implantable U-shaped fiber ATR sensor enhanced by silver nanoparticles on cylindrical surface was presented for continuous glucose monitoring to overcome the drawbacks of traditional glucose sensing technique based on enzyme electrodes. A U-shaped structure was addressed to increase effective optical length at limited implantable space to enhance the sensitivity of fiber ATR sensor. A novel method to fabricate silver nanoparticles on cylindrical surface of U-shaped fiber ATR sensor based on chemical reduction of its silver halide material directly without any preliminary nanoparticles synthesis and following covalent bond or self-assembly was proposed. Five glucose absorption wavelengths in the mid-infrared band were employed for specific glucose monitoring. The experimental results indicate that the sensitivity and resolution of the silver-nanoparticle-enhanced U-shaped fiber-optic ATR sensor are approximately three times those of a conventional one. The high sensitivity and low-noise performance makes it promising for in vivo glucose monitoring in the future clinical applications. PMID:26022782

  1. Potentiation of tumor responses to DNA damaging therapy by the selective ATR inhibitor VX-970.

    PubMed

    Hall, Amy B; Newsome, Dave; Wang, Yuxin; Boucher, Diane M; Eustace, Brenda; Gu, Yong; Hare, Brian; Johnson, Mac A; Milton, Sean; Murphy, Cheryl E; Takemoto, Darin; Tolman, Crystal; Wood, Mark; Charlton, Peter; Charrier, Jean-Damien; Furey, Brinley; Golec, Julian; Reaper, Philip M; Pollard, John R

    2014-07-30

    Platinum-based DNA-damaging chemotherapy is standard-of-care for most patients with lung cancer but outcomes remain poor. This has been attributed, in part, to the highly effective repair network known as the DNA-damage response (DDR). ATR kinase is a critical regulator of this pathway, and its inhibition has been shown to sensitize some cancer, but not normal, cells in vitro to DNA damaging agents. However, there are limited in vivo proof-of-concept data for ATR inhibition. To address this we profiled VX-970, the first clinical ATR inhibitor, in a series of in vitro and in vivo lung cancer models and compared it with an inhibitor of the downstream kinase Chk1. VX-970 markedly sensitized a large proportion of a lung cancer cell line and primary tumor panel in vitro to multiple DNA damaging drugs with clear differences to Chk1 inhibition observed. In vivo VX-970 blocked ATR activity in tumors and dramatically enhanced the efficacy of cisplatin across a panel of patient derived primary lung xenografts. The combination led to complete tumor growth inhibition in three cisplatin-insensitive models and durable tumor regression in a cisplatin-sensitive model. These data provide a strong rationale for the clinical evaluation of VX-970 in lung cancer patients. PMID:25010037

  2. Potentiation of tumor responses to DNA damaging therapy by the selective ATR inhibitor VX-970

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Diane M.; Eustace, Brenda; Gu, Yong; Hare, Brian; Johnson, Mac A.; Milton, Sean; Murphy, Cheryl E.; Takemoto, Darin; Tolman, Crystal; Wood, Mark; Charlton, Peter; Charrier, Jean-Damien; Furey, Brinley; Golec, Julian; Reaper, Philip M.; Pollard, John R.

    2014-01-01

    Platinum-based DNA-damaging chemotherapy is standard-of-care for most patients with lung cancer but outcomes remain poor. This has been attributed, in part, to the highly effective repair network known as the DNA-damage response (DDR). ATR kinase is a critical regulator of this pathway, and its inhibition has been shown to sensitize some cancer, but not normal, cells in vitro to DNA damaging agents. However, there are limited in vivo proof-of-concept data for ATR inhibition. To address this we profiled VX-970, the first clinical ATR inhibitor, in a series of in vitro and in vivo lung cancer models and compared it with an inhibitor of the downstream kinase Chk1. VX-970 markedly sensitized a large proportion of a lung cancer cell line and primary tumor panel in vitro to multiple DNA damaging drugs with clear differences to Chk1 inhibition observed. In vivo VX-970 blocked ATR activity in tumors and dramatically enhanced the efficacy of cisplatin across a panel of patient derived primary lung xenografts. The combination led to complete tumor growth inhibition in three cisplatin-insensitive models and durable tumor regression in a cisplatin-sensitive model. These data provide a strong rationale for the clinical evaluation of VX-970 in lung cancer patients. PMID:25010037

  3. Structural investigations of oriented membrane assemblies by FTIR-ATR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fringeli, Urs Peter; Goette, Jeannette; Reiter, Gerald; Siam, Monira; Baurecht, Dieter

    1998-06-01

    In situ attenuated total reflection (ATR) Fourier transform (FT) spectroscopy is presented as an adequate tool for studying molecular structure and function of biomembranes. In this article emphasis was directed to the production of suitable model bilayer membranes for optimum mimicking of natural biomembranes, and to special FTIR ATR techniques to achieve enhanced selectivity as well as time resolved information on complex membrane assemblies. In this context, the preparation of supported bilayers according to the LB/vesicle method is presented and the use of such model membranes to build more complex assemblies, e.g. with creatine kinase, a surface bound enzyme, and alkaline phosphatase, a membrane anchored enzyme. A comprehensive summary of equations used for quantitative ATR spectroscopy is given and applied to determine the surface concentration and orientation of membrane bound molecules. The use of supported bilayers for drug membrane interaction studies is demonstrated by the local anesthetic dibucaine. Besides of structural information's, such studies result also thermodynamic date, such as adsorption isotherm and partition coefficient. A special ATR set-up for more precise background compensation is presented enabling the conversion of a single beam spectrometer into a pseudo double beam spectrometer. This optical component may be placed in the sample compartment of the spectrometer, and is referred to as single-beam-sample-reference (SBSR) attachment. Finally, a short theoretical introduction into time resolved modulation spectroscopy is given. Temperature modulated excitation of reversible conformational changes in the polypeptide poly-L-lysine and the enzyme RNase are shown as examples.

  4. Wee1 is required to sustain ATR/Chk1 signaling upon replicative stress

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Priyanka; Li, Yizhu; Dobbelstein, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of nucleoside analogues, e.g. gemcitabine, against cancer cells can be augmented by inhibitors of checkpoint kinases, including Wee1, ATR, and Chk1. We have compared the chemosensitizing effect of these inhibitors in cells derived from pancreatic cancer, a tumor entity where gemcitabine is part of the first-line therapeutic regimens, and in osteosarcoma-derived cells. As expected, all three inhibitors rendered cancer cells more sensitive to gemcitabine, but Wee1 inhibition proved to be particularly efficient in this context. Investigating the reasons for this potent sensitizing effect, we found that Wee1 inhibition or knockdown not only blocked Wee1 activity, but also reduced the activation of ATR/Chk1 in gemcitabine-treated cells. Combination of several inhibitors revealed that Wee1 inhibition requires Cyclin-dependent kinases 1 and 2 (Cdk1/2) and Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) to reduce ATR/Chk1 activity. Through activation of Cdks and Plk1, Wee1 inhibition reduces Claspin and CtIP levels, explaining the impairment in ATR/Chk1 activity. Taken together, these results confer a consistent signaling pathway reaching from Wee1 inhibition to impaired Chk1 activity, mechanistically dissecting how Wee1 inhibitors not only dysregulate cell cycle progression, but also enhance replicative stress and chemosensitivity towards nucleoside analogues. PMID:25965828

  5. Dynamic generation of artificial HRSAR imagery for ATR development and cockpit simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Heiko; Stahl, Christoph; Knappe, Peter; Hurst, Peter

    2004-09-01

    Following the tendency of increasingly using imaging sensors in military aircraft, future combat airplane pilots will need onboard artificial intelligence for aiding them in image interpretation and target designation. This document presents a system which is able to simulate high-resolution artificial SAR imagery and thereby facilitates automatic target recognition (ATR) algorithm development. The system provides a comprehensive interface that allows dynamically requesting imagery depending on the location and heading of a simulated carrier platform. Landscapes, structures and target signatures are generated based on digital terrain data and target models. An assessment of dissimilar database preparations for sensor simulation was done with respect to the different properties of SAR imaging compared to optical imaging. The document presents selected results for specific landscape elements. Post-processing algorithms for overcoming weaknesses of digital terrain databases and improving image realism are presented. Simulated sensor imagery is useful in a wide range of applications, two of which are training of ATR algorithms and sensor simulation in flight simulation environments. Using an existing ATR method as an example, the applicability and the influences of synthetic imagery on ATR training are shown and first approaches on how to validate the correctness of the imagery are explained. The integration of the system into a flight simulator in the context of interfacing and control topics serves as a concluding example.

  6. MATERNAL ATRAZINE (ATR) ALTERS HYPOTHALAMIC DOPAMINE (HYP-DA) AND SERUM PROLACTIN (SPRL) IN MALE PUPS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Maternal Atrazine (ATR) alters hypothalamic dopamine (HYP-DA) and serum prolactin (sPRL) in male pups. 1Christopher Langdale, 2Tammy Stoker and 2Ralph Cooper. 1 Dept. of Cell Biology, North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine, Raleigh, NC. 2 Endocrinology ...

  7. ATM/ATR-mediated phosphorylation of PALB2 promotes RAD51 function.

    PubMed

    Ahlskog, Johanna K; Larsen, Brian D; Achanta, Kavya; Sørensen, Claus S

    2016-05-01

    DNA damage activates the ATM and ATR kinases that coordinate checkpoint and DNA repair pathways. An essential step in homology-directed repair (HDR) of DNA breaks is the formation of RAD51 nucleofilaments mediated by PALB2-BRCA2; however, roles of ATM and ATR in this critical step of HDR are poorly understood. Here, we show that PALB2 is markedly phosphorylated in response to genotoxic stresses such as ionizing radiation and hydroxyurea. This response is mediated by the ATM and ATR kinases through three N-terminal S/Q-sites in PALB2, the consensus target sites for ATM and ATR Importantly, a phospho-deficient PALB2 mutant is unable to support proper RAD51 foci formation, a key PALB2 regulated repair event, whereas a phospho-mimicking PALB2 version supports RAD51 foci formation. Moreover, phospho-deficient PALB2 is less potent in HDR than wild-type PALB2. Further, this mutation reveals a separation in PALB2 function, as the PALB2-dependent checkpoint response is normal in cells expressing the phospho-deficient PALB2 mutant. Collectively, our findings highlight a critical importance of PALB2 phosphorylation as a novel regulatory step in genome maintenance after genotoxic stress. PMID:27113759

  8. Linear deconvolution of ATR-IR spectra of mineral mixtures for planetary surface studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemtob, S. M.; Glotch, T. D.; Rossman, G. R.

    2007-12-01

    Attenuated total reflectance (ATR) is an infrared spectroscopic method useful for compositional analysis of powdered samples. ATR-IR is frequently used for chemical phase ID, but is seldom used in geological studies. Because it is effective with small grain sizes, ATR-IR could be a powerful tool for in situ mineral identification on future planetary lander missions, especially for the analysis of fine-grained regoliths, atmospheric dust, and outcrop grindings. Here we test the ability of the ATR-IR technique to quantitatively determine the modal mineralogy of powdered mineral mixtures. Mixtures were prepared from four mineral endmembers - olivine (Fo90), plagioclase (An60), calcite and gypsum - in known volumetric proportions and in a variety of grain sizes. ATR spectra of mineral mixtures and endmembers were collected in the range 400-4000 cm-1. Spectra of mixtures were modeled using the deconvolution method of Rogers et al. (2006), modified so that a measured grain-size distribution (GSD) could be included as a weighted factor in the fit. The signal-to-noise ratio increased for each mineral with decreasing grain size. This is expected because finer grain sizes have a better contact with the ATR crystal. For mixtures of a single grain size, the deconvolution-modeled proportions generally matched actual proportions within 10-20%. Occasionally, the deconvolution model produced poor matches to actual mineralogy and observed spectral shape. To assess the effect of clinging fines, fine-grained (<10 μm) calcite and gypsum were added in increments from 0 to 30% to a mixture of coarsely particulate (74- 147 μm) olivine and plagioclase. The fine-grained components of these mixtures were strongly overrepresented in the model - possibly the result of non-ideal mixing and surface area dominating over volume in linear spectral addition. Increasing the weight of the GSD in the deconvolution model mitigated the overestimation of fines, but increased the RMS error of the

  9. ATR-Fourier-transform mid-infrared spectroscopy for determination of trans fatty acids in ground cereal products without oil extraction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ATR-FTIR spectroscopy was investigated as a method for analysis of trans fatty acids (FA) in cereal products without oil extraction. Spectra were obtained with an ATR-FTIR spectrometer using ground samples pressed onto the diamond ATR surface and trans FA measured by a modification of AOAC Method 9...

  10. Self-sustained operation of a kW e-class kerosene-reforming processor for solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Sangho; Bae, Joongmyeon; Kim, Sunyoung; Yoo, Young-Sung

    In this paper, fuel-processing technologies are developed for application in residential power generation (RPG) in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Kerosene is selected as the fuel because of its high hydrogen density and because of the established infrastructure that already exists in South Korea. A kerosene fuel processor with two different reaction stages, autothermal reforming (ATR) and adsorptive desulfurization reactions, is developed for SOFC operations. ATR is suited to the reforming of liquid hydrocarbon fuels because oxygen-aided reactions can break the aromatics in the fuel and steam can suppress carbon deposition during the reforming reaction. ATR can also be implemented as a self-sustaining reactor due to the exothermicity of the reaction. The kW e self-sustained kerosene fuel processor, including the desulfurizer, operates for about 250 h in this study. This fuel processor does not require a heat exchanger between the ATR reactor and the desulfurizer or electric equipment for heat supply and fuel or water vaporization because a suitable temperature of the ATR reformate is reached for H 2S adsorption on the ZnO catalyst beds in desulfurizer. Although the CH 4 concentration in the reformate gas of the fuel processor is higher due to the lower temperature of ATR tail gas, SOFCs can directly use CH 4 as a fuel with the addition of sufficient steam feeds (H 2O/CH 4 ≥ 1.5), in contrast to low-temperature fuel cells. The reforming efficiency of the fuel processor is about 60%, and the desulfurizer removed H 2S to a sufficient level to allow for the operation of SOFCs.

  11. Protein phosphatase 5 is necessary for ATR-mediated DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Yoonsung; Cheong, Hyang-Min; Lee, Jung-Hee; Song, Peter I.; Lee, Kwang-Ho; Kim, Sang-Yong; Jun, Jae Yeoul; You, Ho Jin

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Serine/threonine protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) has been shown to participate in ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM)- and ATR (ATM- and Rad3-related)-mediated checkpoint pathways, which plays an important role in the DNA damage response and maintenance of genomic stability. {yields} However, it is not clear exactly how PP5 participates in this process. {yields} Our results indicate that PP5 is more closely related with ATR-mediated pathway than ATM-mediated pathway in DNA damage repair. -- Abstract: Several recent studies have shown that protein phosphatase 5 (PP5) participates in cell cycle arrest after DNA damage, but its roles in DNA repair have not yet been fully characterized. We investigated the roles of PP5 in the repair of ultraviolet (UV)- and neocarzinostatin (NCS)-induced DNA damage. The results of comet assays revealed different repair patterns in UV- and NCS-exposed U2OS-PS cells. PP5 is only essential for Rad3-related (ATR)-mediated DNA repair. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of 53BP1 and BRCA1, important mediators of DNA damage repair, and substrates of ATR and ATM decreased in U2OS-PS cells exposed to UV radiation. In contrast, the cell cycle arrest proteins p53, CHK1, and CHK2 were normally phosphorylated in U2OS and U2OS-PS cells exposed to UV radiation or treated with NCS. In view of these results, we suggest that PP5 plays a crucial role in ATR-mediated repair of UV-induced DNA damage.

  12. Acute Transfusion Reactions (ATRs) in Intensive Care Unit (ICU): A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rajesh; Gupta, Manvi; Gupta, Varun; Kaur, Amarjit; Gupta, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Blood transfusion is a frequent and integral part of critical care. Although life saving, it can occasionally be unsafe and result in a spectrum of adverse events. Acute transfusion reactions (ATRs) are probably under diagnosed in critically ill patients due to confusion of the symptoms with the underlying disease. Aim: To analyze the incidence and spectrum of ATRs occuring in critically ill patients. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective review conducted from 1st April 2011 till 31st March 2013. The ATRs related to the administration of blood components in the patients admitted in various Intensive Care Units (ICUs) were recorded, analyzed and classified on the basis of their clinical features and laboratory tests. Results: During the study period 98651 blood components were issued. Out of these 21971 were issued to various ICUs. A total of 225 transfusion reactions were reported from the various critical care departments during this period. The most frequent were Febrile Non Hemolytic Transfusion Reactions (FNHTR) 136 (60.4%), allergic reactions 70 (31.2%), hemolytic reactions 1(0.4%) and non specific reactions 18 (8%). The incidence of ATRs in our study was found to be 1.09% in adult ICUs and 0.36% in pediatric ICUs. Conclusions: Blood transfusion is a vital therapeutic procedure with a potential risk to already critical patients. So a strict vigilance has to be kept and each transfusion has to be monitored carefully with prompt recognition and treatment of ATRs. A rational use of these products considering their deleterious effects can decrease transfusion related morbidity and mortality in the critically ill patients. PMID:24701502

  13. Extended life aluminide fuel. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, L.G.; Beeston, J.M.

    1986-06-01

    As the price of fuel fabrication, shipment of both new and spent fuel, and fuel reprocessing continue to rise at a rapid rate, researchers look for alternate methods to keep reactor fuel costs within their limited funding. Extended fuel element lifetimes, without jeopardizing reactor safety, can reduce fuel costs by up to a factor of two. The Extended Life Aluminide (ELAF) program was started at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) as a joint project of the United States Department of Energy (DOE), the University of Missouri, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology research reactors. Fuel plates of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) type construction were fabricated at Atomics International and irradiated in the ATR at the INEL. Four fuel matrix compositions were tested (i.e., 50 vol% UAl/sub x/ cores for reference, and 40, 45 and 50 vol% UAl/sub 2/ cores). The 50 vol% UAl/sub 2/ cores contained up to 3 grams U-235 per cm/sup 3/ of core. Three plates of each composition were irradiated to peak burnup levels of 3 x 10/sup 21/ fission/cm/sup 3/ of core. The only observed damage was due to external corrosion at similar rates experienced by UAl/sub x/ fuel elements in test reactors.

  14. Conceptual design and selection of a biodiesel fuel processor for a vehicle fuel cell auxiliary power unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Specchia, S.; Tillemans, F. W. A.; van den Oosterkamp, P. F.; Saracco, G.

    Within the European project BIOFEAT (biodiesel fuel processor for a fuel cell auxiliary power unit for a vehicle), a complete modular 10 kW e biodiesel fuel processor capable of feeding a PEMFC will be developed, built and tested to generate electricity for a vehicle auxiliary power unit (APU). Tail pipe emissions reduction, increased use of renewable fuels, increase of hydrogen-fuel economy and efficient supply of present and future APU for road vehicles are the main project goals. Biodiesel is the chosen feedstock because it is a completely natural and thus renewable fuel. Three fuel processing options were taken into account at a conceptual design level and compared for hydrogen production: (i) autothermal reformer (ATR) with high and low temperature shift (HTS/LTS) reactors; (ii) autothermal reformer (ATR) with a single medium temperature shift (MTS) reactor; (iii) thermal cracker (TC) with high and low temperature shift (HTS/LTS) reactors. Based on a number of simulations (with the AspenPlus® software), the best operating conditions were determined (steam-to-carbon and O 2/C ratios, operating temperatures and pressures) for each process alternative. The selection of the preferential fuel processing option was consequently carried out, based on a number of criteria (efficiency, complexity, compactness, safety, controllability, emissions, etc.); the ATR with both HTS and LTS reactors shows the most promising results, with a net electrical efficiency of 29% (LHV).

  15. A Synthetic Lethal Screen Identifies DNA Repair Pathways that Sensitize Cancer Cells to Combined ATR Inhibition and Cisplatin Treatments

    PubMed Central

    Mohni, Kareem N.; Thompson, Petria S.; Luzwick, Jessica W.; Glick, Gloria G.; Pendleton, Christopher S.; Lehmann, Brian D.; Pietenpol, Jennifer A.; Cortez, David

    2015-01-01

    The DNA damage response kinase ATR may be a useful cancer therapeutic target. ATR inhibition synergizes with loss of ERCC1, ATM, XRCC1 and DNA damaging chemotherapy agents. Clinical trials have begun using ATR inhibitors in combination with cisplatin. Here we report the first synthetic lethality screen with a combination treatment of an ATR inhibitor (ATRi) and cisplatin. Combination treatment with ATRi/cisplatin is synthetically lethal with loss of the TLS polymerase ζ and 53BP1. Other DNA repair pathways including homologous recombination and mismatch repair do not exhibit synthetic lethal interactions with ATRi/cisplatin, even though loss of some of these repair pathways sensitizes cells to cisplatin as a single-agent. We also report that ATRi strongly synergizes with PARP inhibition, even in homologous recombination-proficient backgrounds. Lastly, ATR inhibitors were able to resensitize cisplatin-resistant cell lines to cisplatin. These data provide a comprehensive analysis of DNA repair pathways that exhibit synthetic lethality with ATR inhibitors when combined with cisplatin chemotherapy, and will help guide patient selection strategies as ATR inhibitors progress into the cancer clinic. PMID:25965342

  16. Decarbamoyl mitomycin C (DMC) activates p53-independent ataxia telangiectasia and rad3 related protein (ATR) chromatin eviction

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Gu; Kue, Pao; Bhosle, Rahul; Bargonetti, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Interstrand crosslinks induce DNA replication fork stalling that in turn activates the ATR-dependent checkpoint and DNA repair on nuclear chromatin. Mitomycin C (MC) and Decarbamoyl Mitomycin C (DMC) induce different types of DNA crosslinks with DMC being a more cytotoxic agent. We previously reported that the novel DMC induced β–interstrand DNA crosslinks induce a p53-independent form of cell death. The p53-independent DMC cytotoxicity associates with the activation, and subsequent depletion, of Chk1. In this study we further dissect the novel DMC signal transduction pathway and asked how it influences chromatin-associated proteins. We found that treatment with DMC, but not MC, stimulated the disassociation of ATR from chromatin and re-localization of ATR to the cytoplasm. The chromatin eviction of ATR was coupled with the formation of nuclear Rad51 foci and the phosphorylation of Chk1. Furthermore, DMC but not MC, activated expression of gadd45α mRNA. Importantly, knocking down p53 via shRNA did not inhibit the DMC-induced disassociation of ATR from chromatin or reduce the activation of transcription of gadd45α. Our results suggest that DMC induces a p53-independent disassociation of ATR from chromatin that facilitates Chk1 checkpoint activation and Rad51 chromatin recruitment. Our findings provide evidence that ATR chromatin eviction in breast cancer cells is an area of study that should be focused on for inducing p53-independent cell death. PMID:25565400

  17. IRRADIATION TESTING OF THE RERTR FUEL MINIPLATES WITH BURNABLE ABSORBERS IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    I. Glagolenko; D. Wachs; N. Woolstenhulme; G. Chang; B. Rabin; C. Clark; T. Wiencek

    2010-10-01

    Based on the results of the reactor physics assessment, conversion of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) can be potentially accomplished in two ways, by either using U-10Mo monolithic or U-7Mo dispersion type plates in the ATR fuel element. Both designs, however, would require incorporation of the burnable absorber in several plates of the fuel element to compensate for the excess reactivity and to flatten the radial power profile. Several different types of burnable absorbers were considered initially, but only borated compounds, such as B4C, ZrB2 and Al-B alloys, were selected for testing primarily due to the length of the ATR fuel cycle and fuel manufacturing constraints. To assess and compare irradiation performance of the U-Mo fuels with different burnable absorbers we have designed and manufactured 28 RERTR miniplates (20 fueled and 8 non-fueled) containing fore-mentioned borated compounds. These miniplates will be tested in the ATR as part of the RERTR-13 experiment, which is described in this paper. Detailed plate design, compositions and irradiations conditions are discussed.

  18. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report November 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Soelberg, Renae

    2014-11-01

    Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report November 2014 Highlights Rory Kennedy and Sarah Robertson attended the American Nuclear Society Winter Meeting and Nuclear Technology Expo in Anaheim, California, Nov. 10-13. ATR NSUF exhibited at the technology expo where hundreds of meeting participants had an opportunity to learn more about ATR NSUF. Dr. Kennedy briefed the Nuclear Engineering Department Heads Organization (NEDHO) on the workings of the ATR NSUF. • Rory Kennedy, James Cole and Dan Ogden participated in a reactor instrumentation discussion with Jean-Francois Villard and Christopher Destouches of CEA and several members of the INL staff. • ATR NSUF received approval from the NE-20 office to start planning the annual Users Meeting. The meeting will be held at INL, June 22-25. • Mike Worley, director of the Office of Innovative Nuclear Research (NE-42), visited INL Nov. 4-5. Milestones Completed • Recommendations for the Summer Rapid Turnaround Experiment awards were submitted to DOE-HQ Nov. 12 (Level 2 milestone due Nov. 30). Major Accomplishments/Activities • The University of California, Santa Barbara 2 experiment was unloaded from the GE-2000 at HFEF. The experiment specimen packs will be removed and shipped to ORNL for PIE. • The Terrani experiment, one of three FY 2014 new awards, was completed utilizing the Advanced Photon Source MRCAT beamline. The experiment investigated the chemical state of Ag and Pd in SiC shell of irradiated TRISO particles via X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. Upcoming Meetings/Events • The ATR NSUF program review meeting will be held Dec. 9-10 at L’Enfant Plaza. In addition to NSUF staff and users, NE-4, NE-5 and NE-7 representatives will attend the meeting. Awarded Research Projects Boise State University Rapid Turnaround Experiments (14-485 and 14-486) Nanoindentation and TEM work on the T91, HT9, HCM12A and 9Cr ODS specimens has been completed at

  19. Enhanced Accident Tolerant LWR Fuels: Metrics Development

    SciTech Connect

    Shannon Bragg-Sitton; Lori Braase; Rose Montgomery; Chris Stanek; Robert Montgomery; Lance Snead; Larry Ott; Mike Billone

    2013-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) Advanced Fuels Campaign (AFC) is conducting research and development on enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuels (ATF) for light water reactors (LWRs). This mission emphasizes the development of novel fuel and cladding concepts to replace the current zirconium alloy-uranium dioxide (UO2) fuel system. The overall mission of the ATF research is to develop advanced fuels/cladding with improved performance, reliability and safety characteristics during normal operations and accident conditions, while minimizing waste generation. The initial effort will focus on implementation in operating reactors or reactors with design certifications. To initiate the development of quantitative metrics for ATR, a LWR Enhanced Accident Tolerant Fuels Metrics Development Workshop was held in October 2012 in Germantown, MD. This paper summarizes the outcome of that workshop and the current status of metrics development for LWR ATF.

  20. Structure-Based Drug Design of Novel, Potent, and Selective Azabenzimidazoles (ABI) as ATR Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Compound 13 was discovered through morphing of the ATR biochemical HTS hit 1. The ABI series was potent and selective for ATR. Incorporation of a 6-azaindole afforded a marked increase in cellular potency but was associated with poor PK and hERG ion channel inhibition. DMPK experiments established that CYP P450 and AO metabolism in conjunction with Pgp and BCRP efflux were major causative mechanisms for the observed PK. The series also harbored the CYP3A4 TDI liability driven by the presence of both a morpholine and an indole moiety. Incorporation of an adjacent fluorine or nitrogen into the 6-azaindole addressed many of the various medicinal chemistry issues encountered. PMID:25589928

  1. Optimization of a Multi-Stage ATR System for Small Target Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Tsung-Han; Lu, Thomas; Braun, Henry; Edens, Western; Zhang, Yuhan; Chao, Tien- Hsin; Assad, Christopher; Huntsberger, Terrance

    2010-01-01

    An Automated Target Recognition system (ATR) was developed to locate and target small object in images and videos. The data is preprocessed and sent to a grayscale optical correlator (GOC) filter to identify possible regionsof- interest (ROIs). Next, features are extracted from ROIs based on Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and sent to neural network (NN) to be classified. The features are analyzed by the NN classifier indicating if each ROI contains the desired target or not. The ATR system was found useful in identifying small boats in open sea. However, due to "noisy background," such as weather conditions, background buildings, or water wakes, some false targets are mis-classified. Feedforward backpropagation and Radial Basis neural networks are optimized for generalization of representative features to reduce false-alarm rate. The neural networks are compared for their performance in classification accuracy, classifying time, and training time.

  2. Simultaneous quantification of verbenalin and verbascoside in Verbena officinalis by ATR-IR and NIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Schönbichler, S A; Bittner, L K H; Pallua, J D; Popp, M; Abel, G; Bonn, G K; Huck, C W

    2013-10-01

    Attenuated-total-reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR) and near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (NIR) in hyphenation with multivariate analysis was utilized to quantify verbenalin and verbascoside in Verbena officinalis. A new high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method as a reference was established and validated. For both vibrational spectroscopic methods test-set and cross validation were performed. Different data-pre-treatments like SNV, 1st and 2nd derivative were applied to remove systematic errors and were evaluated. Quality parameters obtained for the test-set validation revealed that ATR-IR (verbenalin: R(2)=0.94, RPD=4.23; verbascoside: R(2)=0.93, RPD=3.63) has advantages over NIR (verbenalin: R(2)=0.91, RPD=3.75; verbascoside: R(2)=0.80, RPD=2.35) in the given application. PMID:23810849

  3. Optimization of Adaboost Algorithm for Sonar Target Detection in a Multi-Stage ATR System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Tsung Han (Hank)

    2011-01-01

    JPL has developed a multi-stage Automated Target Recognition (ATR) system to locate objects in images. First, input images are preprocessed and sent to a Grayscale Optical Correlator (GOC) filter to identify possible regions-of-interest (ROIs). Second, feature extraction operations are performed using Texton filters and Principal Component Analysis (PCA). Finally, the features are fed to a classifier, to identify ROIs that contain the targets. Previous work used the Feed-forward Back-propagation Neural Network for classification. In this project we investigate a version of Adaboost as a classifier for comparison. The version we used is known as GentleBoost. We used the boosted decision tree as the weak classifier. We have tested our ATR system against real-world sonar images using the Adaboost approach. Results indicate an improvement in performance over a single Neural Network design.

  4. Phylogeny of cultivated and wild wheat species using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Pinar; Onde, Sertac; Severcan, Feride

    2015-01-01

    Within the last decade, an increasing amount of genetic data has been used to clarify the problems inherent in wheat taxonomy. The techniques for obtaining and analyzing these data are not only cumbersome, but also expensive and technically demanding. In the present study, we introduce infrared spectroscopy as a method for a sensitive, rapid and low cost phylogenetic analysis tool for wheat seed samples. For this purpose, 12 Triticum and Aegilops species were studied by Attenuated Total Reflection-Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. Hierarchical cluster analysis and principal component analysis clearly revealed that the lignin band (1525-1505 cm-1) discriminated the species at the genus level. However, the species were clustered according to their genome commonalities when the whole spectra were used (4000-650 cm-1). The successful differentiation of Triticum and its closely related genus Aegilops clearly demonstrated the power of ATR-FTIR spectroscopy as a suitable tool for phylogenetic research.

  5. Alternative lengthening of telomeres renders cancer cells hypersensitive to ATR inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Rachel Litman; Cox, Kelli E; Jeitany, Maya; Wakimoto, Hiroaki; Bryll, Alysia R; Ganem, Neil J; Bersani, Francesca; Pineda, Jose R; Suvà, Mario L; Benes, Cyril H; Haber, Daniel A; Boussin, Francois D; Zou, Lee

    2015-01-16

    Cancer cells rely on telomerase or the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway to overcome replicative mortality. ALT is mediated by recombination and is prevalent in a subset of human cancers, yet whether it can be exploited therapeutically remains unknown. Loss of the chromatin-remodeling protein ATRX associates with ALT in cancers. Here, we show that ATRX loss compromises cell-cycle regulation of the telomeric noncoding RNA TERRA and leads to persistent association of replication protein A (RPA) with telomeres after DNA replication, creating a recombinogenic nucleoprotein structure. Inhibition of the protein kinase ATR, a critical regulator of recombination recruited by RPA, disrupts ALT and triggers chromosome fragmentation and apoptosis in ALT cells. The cell death induced by ATR inhibitors is highly selective for cancer cells that rely on ALT, suggesting that such inhibitors may be useful for treatment of ALT-positive cancers. PMID:25593184

  6. An ATR-FTIR study of different phosphonic acids adsorbed onto boehmite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenobi, María C.; Luengo, Carina V.; Avena, Marcelo J.; Rueda, Elsa H.

    2010-04-01

    An ATR-FTIR study of the vibrational spectra of N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl) aminomethylphosphonic acid (BHAMP), 1-hydroxyethane-1,1'-diphosphonic acid (HEDP) and nitrilotris(methylenephosphonic acid) (NTMP) adsorbed onto boehmite is presented. The study was performed in the pH range from 5 to 9, and bands assignments are given in the 1200-900 cm -1 wavenumber range, where the bands associated with various P-O(H) vibrations can be found. The three phosphonic acids adsorb onto boehmite by forming inner-sphere surface complexes. ATR-FTIR data indicates the presence of both protonated and deprotonated mononuclear surface species. In all cases, the surface-bound ions undergo protonation reactions as pH is decreased. The results are in good agreement with previously proposed surface complexation models.

  7. An ATR-FTIR study of different phosphonic acids adsorbed onto boehmite.

    PubMed

    Zenobi, María C; Luengo, Carina V; Avena, Marcelo J; Rueda, Elsa H

    2010-04-01

    An ATR-FTIR study of the vibrational spectra of N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl) aminomethylphosphonic acid (BHAMP), 1-hydroxyethane-1,1'-diphosphonic acid (HEDP) and nitrilotris(methylenephosphonic acid) (NTMP) adsorbed onto boehmite is presented. The study was performed in the pH range from 5 to 9, and bands assignments are given in the 1200-900 cm(-1) wavenumber range, where the bands associated with various P-O(H) vibrations can be found. The three phosphonic acids adsorb onto boehmite by forming inner-sphere surface complexes. ATR-FTIR data indicates the presence of both protonated and deprotonated mononuclear surface species. In all cases, the surface-bound ions undergo protonation reactions as pH is decreased. The results are in good agreement with previously proposed surface complexation models. PMID:20129815

  8. ATR-A1 irradiation experiment on vanadium alloys and low activation steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tasi, H.; Strain, R.V.; Gomes, I.; Hins, A.G.; Smith, D.L.

    1996-04-01

    To study the mechanical properties of vanadium alloys under neutron irradiation at low temperatures, an experiment was designed and constructed for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The experiment contained Charpy, tensile, compact tension, TEM, and creep specimens of vanadium alloys. It also contained limited low-activation ferritic steel specimens as part of the collaborative agreement with Monbusho of Japan. The design irradiation temperatures for the vanadium alloy specimens in the experiment are {approx}200 and 300{degrees}C, achieved with passive gap-gap sizing and fill gas blending. To mitigate vanadium-to-chromium transmutation from the thermal neutron flux, the test specimens are contained inside gadolinium flux filters. All specimens are lithium-bonded. The irradiation started in Cycle 108A (December 3, 1995) and is expected to have a duration of three ATR cycles and a peak influence of 4.4 dpa.

  9. Achieving safety/risk goals for less ATR backup power upgrades

    SciTech Connect

    Atkinson, S.A.

    1995-10-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor probabilistic risk assessment for internal fire and flood events defined a relatively high risk for a total loss of electric power possibly leading to core damage. Backup power sources were disabled due to fire and flooding in the diesel generator area with propagation of the flooding to a common switchgear room. The ATR risk assessment was employed to define options for relocation of backup power system components to achieve needed risk reduction while minimizing costs. The risk evaluations were performed using sensitivity studies and importance measures. The risk-based evaluations of relocation options for backup power systems saved over $3 million from what might have been otherwise considered {open_quotes}necessary{close_quotes} for safety/risk improvement. The ATR experience shows that the advantages of a good risk assessment are to define risk significance, risk specifics, and risk solutions which enable risk goals to be achieved at the lowest cost.

  10. The life and death of ATR/sensor fusion and the hope for resurrection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Steven K.; Sadowski, Charles; Bauer, Kenneth W.; Oxley, Mark E.; Kabrisky, Matthew; Rogers, Adam; Mott, Stephen D.

    2008-04-01

    For over half a century, scientists and engineers have worked diligently to advance computational intelligence. One application of interest is how computational intelligence can bring value to our war fighters. Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) and sensor fusion efforts have fallen far short of the desired capabilities. In this article we review the capabilities requested by war fighters. When compared to our current capabilities, it is easy to conclude current Combat Identification (CID) as a Family of Systems (FoS) does a lousy job. The war fighter needed capable, operationalized ATR and sensor fusion systems ten years ago but it did not happen. The article reviews the war fighter needs and the current state of the art. The article then concludes by looking forward to where we are headed to provide the capabilities required.

  11. Coupling of phonon-polariton modes at dielectric-dielectric interfaces by the ATR technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocoletzi, G. H.; Olvera Hernández, J.; Martínez Montes, G.

    1989-08-01

    We report the calculated ATR dispersion relation of the interface phonon-polariton modes in the prism-dielectric-dielectric configuration. Comparison of electromagnetic dispersion relations (EMDR) with the ATR dispersion relations are presented for three different interfaces: I) GaAs/GaP, II) CdF2/CaF2 and III) CaF2/GaP in two propagation windows, using the Otto and Kretschmann geometries for p-polarized light. We have studied the three cases using angle and frequency scans for each window and geometry. The results indicate that it is possible to excite and detect phonon-polariton modes at the dielectric-dielectric interface.

  12. Multi-fuel reformers for fuel cells used in transportation. Phase 1: Multi-fuel reformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1994-05-01

    DOE has established the goal, through the Fuel Cells in Transportation Program, of fostering the rapid development and commercialization of fuel cells as economic competitors for the internal combustion engine. Central to this goal is a safe feasible means of supplying hydrogen of the required purity to the vehicular fuel cell system. Two basic strategies are being considered: (1) on-board fuel processing whereby alternative fuels such as methanol, ethanol or natural gas stored on the vehicle undergo reformation and subsequent processing to produce hydrogen, and (2) on-board storage of pure hydrogen provided by stationary fuel processing plants. This report analyzes fuel processor technologies, types of fuel and fuel cell options for on-board reformation. As the Phase 1 of a multi-phased program to develop a prototype multi-fuel reformer system for a fuel cell powered vehicle, the objective of this program was to evaluate the feasibility of a multi-fuel reformer concept and to select a reforming technology for further development in the Phase 2 program, with the ultimate goal of integration with a DOE-designated fuel cell and vehicle configuration. The basic reformer processes examined in this study included catalytic steam reforming (SR), non-catalytic partial oxidation (POX) and catalytic partial oxidation (also known as Autothermal Reforming, or ATR). Fuels under consideration in this study included methanol, ethanol, and natural gas. A systematic evaluation of reforming technologies, fuels, and transportation fuel cell applications was conducted for the purpose of selecting a suitable multi-fuel processor for further development and demonstration in a transportation application.

  13. ATR, BRCA1 and gammaH2AX localize to unsynapsed chromosomes at the pachytene stage in human oocytes.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Cruz, R; Roig, I; Robles, P; Scherthan, H; Garcia Caldés, M

    2009-01-01

    Asynapsis of homologous chromosomes at the pachytene stage has been associated with gametogenic failure and infertility, but the cellular mechanisms involved are currently unknown in human meiocytes. In mice, the protein encoded by the breast-cancer susceptibility gene Brca1 has been described to direct kinase ATR (ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3 related) to any unpaired DNA at the pachytene stage, where ATR triggers H2AX phosphorylation, resulting in the silencing of those chromosomes. In this study, the distribution of ATR, BRCA1 and the phosphorylated histone gammaH2AX is assessed by immunofluorescence in human oocytes and it is found that they localize at unpaired chromosomes at the pachytene stage. Evidence is shown to propose that BRCA1, ATR and gammaH2AX in the human may be part of a system such as the one previously described in mouse, which signals unsynapsed chromosomes at pachytene and may lead to their silencing. PMID:19146767

  14. The Conference Proceedings of the 2003 Air Transport Research Society (ATRS) World Conference, Volume 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, Brent (Editor); Gudmundsson, Sveinn (Editor); Oum, Tae (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    Volume 3 of the 2003 Air Transport Reserch Society (ATRS) World Conference includes papers on topics relevant to airline operations worldwide. Specific topics include: European Union and civil aviation regimens;simulating decision making in airline operations, passenger points of view on convenient airports; route monopolies and nonlinear pricing; cooperation among airports in Europe; fleet modernizaiton in Brazil;the effects of deregulation on the growth of air transportation in Europe and the United States.

  15. Enhanced ATR algorithm for high resolution multi-band sonar imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aridgides, Tom; Fernández, Manuel

    2008-04-01

    An improved automatic target recognition (ATR) processing string has been developed. The overall processing string consists of pre-processing, subimage adaptive clutter filtering (SACF), normalization, detection, data regularization, feature extraction, optimal subset feature selection, feature orthogonalization and classification processing blocks. A new improvement was made to the processing string, data regularization, which entails computing the input data mean, clipping the data to a multiple of its mean and scaling it, prior to feature extraction. The classified objects of 3 distinct strings are fused using the classification confidence values and their expansions as features, and using "summing" or log-likelihood-ratio-test (LLRT) based fusion rules. The utility of the overall processing strings and their fusion was demonstrated with new high-resolution three-frequency band sonar imagery. The ATR processing strings were individually tuned to the corresponding three-frequency band data, making use of the new processing improvement, data regularization, which resulted in a 3:1 reduction in false alarms. Two significant fusion algorithm improvements were made. First, a nonlinear 2nd order (Volterra) feature LLRT fusion algorithm was developed. Second, a repeated application of a subset Volterra feature selection / feature orthogonalization / LLRT fusion block was utilized. It was shown that cascaded Volterra feature LLRT fusion of the ATR processing strings outperforms baseline summing and single-stage Volterra feature LLRT algorithms, yielding significant improvements over the best single ATR processing string results, and providing the capability to correctly call the majority of targets while maintaining a very low false alarm rate.

  16. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and chemometrics: An interesting tool to discriminate and characterize counterfeit medicines.

    PubMed

    Custers, D; Cauwenbergh, T; Bothy, J L; Courselle, P; De Beer, J O; Apers, S; Deconinck, E

    2015-08-10

    Counterfeit medicines pose a huge threat to public health worldwide. High amounts of counterfeit pharmaceuticals enter the European market and therefore detection of these products is essential. Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier-Transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) might be useful for the screening of counterfeit medicines since it is easy to use and little sample preparation is required. Furthermore, this approach might be helpful to customs to obtain a first evaluation of suspected samples. This study proposes a combination of ATR-FTIR and chemometrics to discriminate and classify counterfeit medicines. A sample set, containing 209 samples in total, was analyzed using ATR-FTIR and the obtained spectra were used as fingerprints in the chemometric data-analysis which included Principal Component Analysis (PCA), k-Nearest Neighbours (k-NN), Classification and Regression Trees (CART) and Soft Independent Modelling of Class Analogy (SIMCA). First it was verified whether the mentioned techniques are capable to distinguish samples containing different active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs). PCA showed a clear tendency of discrimination based on the API present; k-NN, CART and SIMCA were capable to create suitable prediction models based on the presence of different APIs. However k-NN performs the least while SIMCA performs the best. Secondly, it was tested whether these three models could be expanded to discriminate between genuine and counterfeit samples as well. k-NN was not able to make the desired discrimination and therefore it was not useful. CART performed better but also this model was less suited. SIMCA, on the other hand, resulted in a model with a 100% correct discrimination between genuine and counterfeit drugs. This study shows that chemometric analysis of ATR-FTIR fingerprints is a valuable tool to discriminate genuine from counterfeit samples and to classify counterfeit medicines. PMID:25476739

  17. Information theoretic bounds of ATR algorithm performance for sidescan sonar target classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Vincent L.; Pinto, Marc A.

    2005-05-01

    With research on autonomous underwater vehicles for minehunting beginning to focus on cooperative and adaptive behaviours, some effort is being spent on developing automatic target recognition (ATR) algorithms that are able to operate with high reliability under a wide range of scenarios, particularly in areas of high clutter density, and without human supervision. Because of the great diversity of pattern recognition methods and continuously improving sensor technology, there is an acute requirement for objective performance measures that are independent of any particular sensor, algorithm or target definitions. This paper approaches the ATR problem from the point of view of information theory in an attempt to place bounds on the performance of target classification algorithms that are based on the acoustic shadow of proud targets. Performance is bounded by analysing the simplest of shape classification tasks, that of differentiating between a circular and square shadow, thus allowing us to isolate system design criteria and assess their effect on the overall probability of classification. The information that can be used for target recognition in sidescan sonar imagery is examined and common information theory relationships are used to derive properties of the ATR problem. Some common bounds with analytical solutions are also derived.

  18. MELT WIRE SENSORS AVAILABLE TO DETERMINE PEAK TEMPERATURES IN ATR IRRADIATION TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    K. L. Davis; D. Knudson; J. Daw; J. Palmer; J. L. Rempe

    2012-07-01

    In April 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to advance US leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry, the ATR will support basic and applied nuclear research and development and help address the nation's energy security needs. In support of this new program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed in-house capabilities to fabricate, test, and qualify new and enhanced temperature sensors for irradiation testing. Although most efforts emphasize sensors capable of providing real-time data, selected tasks have been completed to enhance sensors provided in irradiation locations where instrumentation leads cannot be included, such as drop-in capsule and Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) or 'rabbit' locations. To meet the need for these locations, the INL has developed melt wire temperature sensors for use in ATR irradiation testing. Differential scanning calorimetry and environmental testing of prototypical sensors was used to develop a library of 28 melt wire materials, capable of detecting peak irradiation temperatures ranging from 85 to 1500°C. This paper will discuss the development work and present test results.

  19. Cancer Cells with Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres Do Not Display a General Hypersensitivity to ATR Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Deeg, Katharina I; Chung, Inn; Bauer, Caroline; Rippe, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Telomere maintenance is a hallmark of cancer as it provides cancer cells with cellular immortality. A significant fraction of tumors uses the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway to elongate their telomeres and to gain an unlimited proliferation potential. Since the ALT pathway is unique to cancer cells, it represents a potentially valuable, currently unexploited target for anti-cancer therapies. Recently, it was proposed that ALT renders cells hypersensitive to ataxia telangiectasia- and RAD3-related (ATR) protein inhibitors (Flynn et al., Science 347, 273). Here, we measured the response of various ALT- or telomerase-positive cell lines to the ATR inhibitor VE-821. In addition, we compared the effect of the inhibitor on cell viability in isogenic cell lines, in which ALT was active or suppressed. In these experiments, a general ATR inhibitor sensitivity of cells with ALT could not be confirmed. We rather propose that the observed variations in sensitivity reflect differences between cell lines that are unrelated to ALT. PMID:27602331

  20. Phenotypic analysis of separation-of-function alleles of MEI-41, Drosophila ATM/ATR.

    PubMed Central

    Laurençon, Anne; Purdy, Amanda; Sekelsky, Jeff; Hawley, R Scott; Su, Tin Tin

    2003-01-01

    ATM/ATR kinases act as signal transducers in eukaryotic DNA damage and replication checkpoints. Mutations in ATM/ATR homologs have pleiotropic effects that range from sterility to increased killing by genotoxins in humans, mice, and Drosophila. Here we report the generation of a null allele of mei-41, Drosophila ATM/ATR homolog, and the use of it to document a semidominant effect on a larval mitotic checkpoint and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) sensitivity. We also tested the role of mei-41 in a recently characterized checkpoint that delays metaphase/anaphase transition after DNA damage in cellular embryos. We then compare five existing mei-41 alleles to the null with respect to known phenotypes (female sterility, cell cycle checkpoints, and MMS resistance). We find that not all phenotypes are affected equally by each allele, i.e., the functions of MEI-41 in ensuring fertility, cell cycle regulation, and resistance to genotoxins are genetically separable. We propose that MEI-41 acts not in a single rigid signal transduction pathway, but in multiple molecular contexts to carry out its many functions. Sequence analysis identified mutations, which, for most alleles, fall in the poorly characterized region outside the kinase domain; this allowed us to tentatively identify additional functional domains of MEI-41 that could be subjected to future structure-function studies of this key molecule. PMID:12807779

  1. ATR-IR Investigation of Solvent Interactions with Surface-Bound Polymers

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Solvent interactions with bulk and surface-bound polymer brushes are crucial for functionalities such as controlled friction and thermoresponsive adhesion. To study such interactions, the temperature-induced solvent-quality changes and the effect of surface tethering on the mechanical and tribological properties of poly(dodecyl methacrylate) (P12MA) brushes have been investigated by means of attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR), as well as atomic force microscopy (AFM) and lateral force microscopy (LFM). These results have been compared with temperature-dependent UV–visible spectrophotometry (UV–vis) data for the corresponding bulk polymer solutions. The ATR-IR results clearly show that increasing temperature enhances ethanol uptake in P12MA, which results in film swelling. This is accompanied by a marked increase in both adhesion and friction. We have also shown that a combination of solvents, such as toluene and ethanol, can lead to a temperature-dependent solvent partitioning within the polymer brush. To our knowledge this is the first time preferential solvent uptake in a grafted-from brush has been monitored via in situ ATR-IR. Moreover, we have observed remarkably different behavior for polymer chains in solution compared to the behavior of similar chains bound to a surface. The presented findings on the temperature-dependent solvent interactions of surface-grafted P12MA reveal previously unknown solvation phenomena and open up a range of possible applications in the area of stimuli-responsive materials. PMID:27397856

  2. Cyclohexene Photo-oxidation over Vanadia Catalyst Analyzed by Time Resolved ATR-FT-IR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Frei, Heinz; Mul, Guido; Wasylenko, Walter; Hamdy, M. Sameh; Frei, Heinz

    2008-06-04

    Vanadia was incorporated in the 3-dimensional mesoporous material TUD-1 with a loading of 2percent w/w vanadia. The performance in the selective photo-oxidation of liquid cyclohexene was investigated using ATR-FT-IR spectroscopy. Under continuous illumination at 458 nm a significant amount of product, i.e. cyclohexenone, was identified. This demonstrates for the first time that hydroxylated vanadia centers in mesoporous materials can be activated by visible light to induce oxidation reactions. Using the rapid scan method, a strong perturbation of the vanadyl environment could be observed in the selective oxidation process induced by a 458 nm laser pulse of 480 ms duration. This is proposed to be caused by interaction of the catalytic centre with a cyclohexenyl hydroperoxide intermediate. The restoration of the vanadyl environment could be kinetically correlated to the rate of formation of cyclohexenone, and is explained by molecular rearrangement and dissociation of the peroxide to ketone and water. The ketone diffuses away from the active center and ATR infrared probing zone, resulting in a decreasing ketone signal on the tens of seconds time scale after initiation of the photoreaction. This study demonstrates the high potential of time resolved ATR FT-IR spectroscopy for mechanistic studies of liquid phase reactions by monitoring not only intermediates and products, but by correlating the temporal behavior of these species to molecular changes of the vanadyl catalytic site.

  3. ATR-IR Investigation of Solvent Interactions with Surface-Bound Polymers.

    PubMed

    Mathis, Christian H; Divandari, Mohammad; Simic, Rok; Naik, Vikrant V; Benetti, Edmondo M; Isa, Lucio; Spencer, Nicholas D

    2016-08-01

    Solvent interactions with bulk and surface-bound polymer brushes are crucial for functionalities such as controlled friction and thermoresponsive adhesion. To study such interactions, the temperature-induced solvent-quality changes and the effect of surface tethering on the mechanical and tribological properties of poly(dodecyl methacrylate) (P12MA) brushes have been investigated by means of attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR), as well as atomic force microscopy (AFM) and lateral force microscopy (LFM). These results have been compared with temperature-dependent UV-visible spectrophotometry (UV-vis) data for the corresponding bulk polymer solutions. The ATR-IR results clearly show that increasing temperature enhances ethanol uptake in P12MA, which results in film swelling. This is accompanied by a marked increase in both adhesion and friction. We have also shown that a combination of solvents, such as toluene and ethanol, can lead to a temperature-dependent solvent partitioning within the polymer brush. To our knowledge this is the first time preferential solvent uptake in a grafted-from brush has been monitored via in situ ATR-IR. Moreover, we have observed remarkably different behavior for polymer chains in solution compared to the behavior of similar chains bound to a surface. The presented findings on the temperature-dependent solvent interactions of surface-grafted P12MA reveal previously unknown solvation phenomena and open up a range of possible applications in the area of stimuli-responsive materials. PMID:27397856

  4. Cancer Cells with Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres Do Not Display a General Hypersensitivity to ATR Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Deeg, Katharina I.; Chung, Inn; Bauer, Caroline; Rippe, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Telomere maintenance is a hallmark of cancer as it provides cancer cells with cellular immortality. A significant fraction of tumors uses the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway to elongate their telomeres and to gain an unlimited proliferation potential. Since the ALT pathway is unique to cancer cells, it represents a potentially valuable, currently unexploited target for anti-cancer therapies. Recently, it was proposed that ALT renders cells hypersensitive to ataxia telangiectasia- and RAD3-related (ATR) protein inhibitors (Flynn et al., Science 347, 273). Here, we measured the response of various ALT- or telomerase-positive cell lines to the ATR inhibitor VE-821. In addition, we compared the effect of the inhibitor on cell viability in isogenic cell lines, in which ALT was active or suppressed. In these experiments, a general ATR inhibitor sensitivity of cells with ALT could not be confirmed. We rather propose that the observed variations in sensitivity reflect differences between cell lines that are unrelated to ALT. PMID:27602331

  5. FTIR-ATR spectroscopy applied to quality control of grape-derived spirits.

    PubMed

    Anjos, Ofélia; Santos, António J A; Estevinho, Letícia M; Caldeira, Ilda

    2016-08-15

    The Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic method with attenuated total reflectance (ATR) was used for predicting the alcoholic strength, the methanol, acetaldehyde and fusel alcohols content of grape-derived spirits. FTIR-ATR spectrum in the mid-IR region (4000-400 cm(-1)) was used for the quantitative estimation by applying partial least square (PLS) regression models and the results were correlated with those obtained from reference methods. In the developed method, a cross-validation with 50% of the samples was used for PLS analysis along with a validation test set with 50% of the remaining samples. Good correlation models with a great accuracy were obtained for methanol (r(2)=99.4; RPD=12.8), alcoholic strength (r(2)=97.2; RPD=6.0), acetaldehyde (r(2)=98.2; RPD=7.5) and fusel alcohols (r(2) from 97.4 to 94.1; RPD from 6.2 to 4.1). These results corroborate the hypothesis that FTIR-ATR is a useful technique for the quality control of grape-derived spirits, whose practical application may improve the efficiency and quickness of the current laboratory analysis. PMID:27006210

  6. The MRE11 GAR motif regulates DNA double-strand break processing and ATR activation

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhenbao; Vogel, Gillian; Coulombe, Yan; Dubeau, Danielle; Spehalski, Elizabeth; Hébert, Josée; Ferguson, David O; Masson, Jean Yves; Richard, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    The MRE11/RAD50/NBS1 complex is the primary sensor rapidly recruited to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). MRE11 is known to be arginine methylated by PRMT1 within its glycine-arginine-rich (GAR) motif. In this study, we report a mouse knock-in allele of Mre11 that substitutes the arginines with lysines in the GAR motif and generates the MRE11RK protein devoid of methylated arginines. The Mre11RK/RK mice were hypersensitive to γ-irradiation (IR) and the cells from these mice displayed cell cycle checkpoint defects and chromosome instability. Moreover, the Mre11RK/RK MEFs exhibited ATR/CHK1 signaling defects and impairment in the recruitment of RPA and RAD51 to the damaged sites. The MRKRN complex formed and localized to the sites of DNA damage and normally activated the ATM pathway in response to IR. The MRKRN complex exhibited exonuclease and DNA-binding defects in vitro responsible for the impaired DNA end resection and ATR activation observed in vivo in response to IR. Our findings provide genetic evidence for the critical role of the MRE11 GAR motif in DSB repair, and demonstrate a mechanistic link between post-translational modifications at the MRE11 GAR motif and DSB processing, as well as the ATR/CHK1 checkpoint signaling. PMID:21826105

  7. Mismatch repair enhances convergent transcription-induced cell death at trinucleotide repeats by activating ATR.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Nimrat; Lin, Yunfu; Wilson, John H

    2016-06-01

    Trinucleotide repeat (TNR) expansion beyond a certain threshold results in some 20 incurable neurodegenerative disorders where disease anticipation positively correlates with repeat length. Long TNRs typically display a bias toward further expansion during germinal transmission from parents to offspring, and then are highly unstable in somatic tissues of affected individuals. Understanding mechanisms of TNR instability will provide insights into disease pathogenesis. Previously, we showed that enhanced convergent transcription at long CAG repeat tracks induces TNR instability and cell death via ATR activation. Components of TC-NER (transcription-coupled nucleotide excision repair) and RNaseH enzymes that resolve RNA/DNA hybrids oppose cell death, whereas the MSH2 component of MMR (mismatch repair) enhances cell death. The exact role of the MMR pathway during convergent transcription-induced cell death at CAG repeats is not well understood. In this study, we show that siRNA knockdowns of MMR components-MSH2, MSH3, MLHI, PMS2, and PCNA-reduce DNA toxicity. Furthermore, knockdown of MSH2, MLH1, and PMS2 significantly reduces the frequency of ATR foci formation. These observations suggest that MMR proteins activate DNA toxicity by modulating ATR foci formation during convergent transcription. PMID:27131875

  8. Caenorhabditis elegans ATR checkpoint kinase ATL-1 influences life span through mitochondrial maintenance.

    PubMed

    Suetomi, Kazuhiro; Mereiter, Stefan; Mori, Chihiro; Takanami, Takako; Higashitani, Atsushi

    2013-11-01

    ATR is highly conserved in all eukaryotes and functions as a cell-cycle nuclear checkpoint kinase. In mammals, ATR is essential whose complete absence results in early embryonic lethality and its hypomorphic mutation causes a complex disease known as Seckel syndrome. However, molecular mechanisms that cause a wide variety of symptoms including accelerated aging have remained unclear. Similarly, in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, a deletion mutant of ATR ortholog atl-1 appears to develop into normal adults, but their eggs do not hatch and die at early embryogenesis. Here we show that the parental worms of atl-1 defective mutant achieved longevity. Transcription levels of certain superoxide dismutase genes, sod-3 and -5 and enzymatic activity of superoxide dismutases significantly increased in the mutant. Furthermore, lipid peroxidation such as a formation of malondialdehyde was attenuated. Expressions of other genes regulated by DAF-16/FOXO transcription factor were also altered. In contrast, the mutant became hypersensitive to rotenone and ethidium bromide. Compared with the wild type the mitochondrial DNA copy number in the mutant was lesser and its proliferation is more severely inhibited in the presence of rotenone. These results suggest that C. elegans ATL-1 is involved not only in the nuclear checkpoint control but also in the mitochondrial maintenance, and its dysfunction activates mild oxidative stress response, resulting in an alteration of life span. PMID:23434802

  9. Identification and evaluation of a potent novel ATR inhibitor, NU6027, in breast and ovarian cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Peasland, A; Wang, L-Z; Rowling, E; Kyle, S; Chen, T; Hopkins, A; Cliby, W A; Sarkaria, J; Beale, G; Edmondson, R J; Curtin, N J

    2011-01-01

    Background: The ataxia telangiectasia mutated and Rad3-related kinase (ATR) has a key role in the signalling of stalled replication forks and DNA damage to cell cycle checkpoints and DNA repair. It has long been recognised as an important target for cancer therapy but inhibitors have proved elusive. As NU6027, originally developed as a CDK2 inhibitor, potentiated cisplatin in a CDK2-independent manner we postulated that it may inhibit ATR. Methods: Cellular ATR kinase activity was determined by CHK1 phosphorylation in human fibroblasts with inducible dominant-negative ATR-kinase dead expression and human breast cancer MCF7 cells. Cell cycle effects and chemo- and radiopotentiation by NU6027 were determined in MCF7 cells and the role of mismatch repair and p53 was determined in isogenically matched ovarian cancer A2780 cells. Results: NU6027 is a potent inhibitor of cellular ATR activity (IC50=6.7 μ) and enhanced hydroxyurea and cisplatin cytotoxicity in an ATR-dependent manner. NU6027 attenuated G2/M arrest following DNA damage, inhibited RAD51 focus formation and increased the cytotoxicity of the major classes of DNA-damaging anticancer cytotoxic therapy but not the antimitotic, paclitaxel. In A2780 cells sensitisation to cisplatin was greatest in cells with functional p53 and mismatch repair (MMR) and sensitisation to temozolomide was greatest in p53 mutant cells with functional MMR. Importantly, NU6027 was synthetically lethal when DNA single-strand break repair is impaired either through poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibition or defects in XRCC1. Conclusion: NU6027 inhibits ATR, impairing G2/M arrest and homologous recombination thus increasing sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents and PARP inhibitors. It provides proof of concept data for clinical development of ATR inhibitors. PMID:21730979

  10. ATR-Chk1 signaling inhibition as a therapeutic strategy to enhance cisplatin chemosensitivity in urothelial bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Mei-Chin; Lee, Chia-Lin; Peng, Chieh-Yu; Hsu, Wei-Yu; Dai, Yun-Hao; Chang, Fang-Rong; Zhang, Da-Yong; Wu, Wen-Jeng; Wu, Yang-Chang

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage responses contribute to cisplatin resistance; however, therapeutic strategies to overcome cisplatin resistance have not yet been established. Here, we demonstrate that inhibition of ATR-Chk1 pathway with the potent inhibitor WYC0209 sensitizes bladder cancer cells to cisplatin. In the clinical microarray profile, high ATR expression is associated with poor prognosis in bladder cancer patients who receive chemotherapy. We show that pharmacological and genetic suppressing of ATR sensitized cells to cisplatin. Treatment with WYC0209 or siATR increased levels of cisplatin-DNA adducts, concomitant with decreased levels of p-glycoprotein expression. Additionally, Combinations of cisplatin and WYC0209 show synergistic activity against bladder cancer. Ultimately, WYC0209 enhanced the anti-tumor effects of cisplatin and suppressed p-glycoprotein expression in bladder cancer xenografts. These results indicate that inhibiting ATR-Chk1 activation with WYC0209 suppresses p-glycoprotein expression and increases cisplatin activity in bladder cancer. Our findings collectively suggest that ATR-Chk1 is a target for improving the efficacy of cisplatin in bladder cancer. PMID:26657501

  11. A Genome-wide CRISPR Screen Identifies CDC25A as a Determinant of Sensitivity to ATR Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Sergio; Mayor-Ruiz, Cristina; Lafarga, Vanesa; Murga, Matilde; Vega-Sendino, Maria; Ortega, Sagrario; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar

    2016-04-21

    One recurring theme in drug development is to exploit synthetic lethal properties as means to preferentially damage the DNA of cancer cells. We and others have previously developed inhibitors of the ATR kinase, shown to be particularly genotoxic for cells expressing certain oncogenes. In contrast, the mechanisms of resistance to ATR inhibitors remain unexplored. We report here on a genome-wide CRISPR-Cas9 screen that identified CDC25A as a major determinant of sensitivity to ATR inhibition. CDC25A-deficient cells resist high doses of ATR inhibitors, which we show is due to their failure to prematurely enter mitosis in response to the drugs. Forcing mitotic entry with WEE1 inhibitors restores the toxicity of ATR inhibitors in CDC25A-deficient cells. With ATR inhibitors now entering the clinic, our work provides a better understanding of the mechanisms by which these compounds kill cells and reveals genetic interactions that could be used for their rational use. PMID:27067599

  12. Opportunities for mixed oxide fuel testing in the advanced test reactor to support plutonium disposition

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, W.K.; Ryskamp, J.M.; Sterbentz, J.W.

    1995-08-01

    Numerous technical issues must be resolved before LWR operating licenses can be amended to allow the use of MOX fuel. These issues include the following: (1) MOX fuel fabrication process verification; (2) Whether and how to use burnable poisons to depress MOX fuel initial reactivity, which is higher than that of urania; (3) The effects of WGPu isotopic composition; (4) The feasibility of loading MOX fuel with plutonia content up to 7% by weight; (5) The effects of americium and gallium in WGPu; (6) Fission gas release from MOX fuel pellets made from WGPu; (7) Fuel/cladding gap closure; (8) The effects of power cycling and off-normal events on fuel integrity; (9) Development of radial distributions of burnup and fission products; (10) Power spiking near the interfaces of MOX and urania fuel assemblies; and (11) Fuel performance code validation. The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory possesses many advantages for performing tests to resolve most of the issues identified above. We have performed calculations to show that the use of hafnium shrouds can produce spectrum adjustments that will bring the flux spectrum in ATR test loops into a good approximation to the spectrum anticipated in a commercial LWR containing MOX fuel while allowing operation of the test fuel assemblies near their optimum values of linear heat generation rate. The ATR would be a nearly ideal test bed for developing data needed to support applications to license LWRs for operation with MOX fuel made from weapons-grade plutonium. The requirements for planning and implementing a test program in the ATR have been identified. The facilities at Argonne National Laboratory-West can meet all potential needs for pre- and post-irradiation examination that might arise in a MOX fuel qualification program.

  13. A feasibility and optimization study to determine cooling time and burnup of advanced test reactor fuels using a nondestructive technique

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro, Jorge

    2013-12-01

    The goal of this study presented is to determine the best available non-destructive technique necessary to collect validation data as well as to determine burn-up and cooling time of the fuel elements onsite at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) canal. This study makes a recommendation of the viability of implementing a permanent fuel scanning system at the ATR canal and leads3 to the full design of a permanent fuel scan system. The study consisted at first in determining if it was possible and which equipment was necessary to collect useful spectra from ATR fuel elements at the canal adjacent to the reactor. Once it was establish that useful spectra can be obtained at the ATR canal the next step was to determine which detector and which configuration was better suited to predict burnup and cooling time of fuel elements non-destructively. Three different detectors of High Purity Germanium (HPGe), Lanthanum Bromide (LaBr3), and High Pressure Xenon (HPXe) in two system configurations of above and below the water pool were used during the study. The data collected and analyzed was used to create burnup and cooling time calibration prediction curves for ATR fuel. The next stage of the study was to determine which of the three detectors tested was better suited for the permanent system. From spectra taken and the calibration curves obtained, it was determined that although the HPGe detector yielded better results, a detector that could better withstand the harsh environment of the ATR canal was needed. The in-situ nature of the measurements required a rugged fuel scanning system, low in maintenance and easy to control system. Based on the ATR canal feasibility measurements and calibration results it was determined that the LaBr3 detector was the best alternative for canal in-situ measurements; however in order to enhance the quality of the spectra collected using this scintillator a deconvolution method was developed. Following the development of the deconvolution method

  14. Modeling a 5 kWe planar solid oxide fuel cell based system operating on JP-8 fuel and a comparison with tubular cell based system for auxiliary and mobile power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanim, Tanvir; Bayless, David J.; Trembly, Jason P.

    2014-01-01

    A steady state planar solid oxide fuel cell (P-SOFC) based system operating on desulfurized JP-8 fuel was modeled using Aspen Plus simulation software for auxiliary and mobile power applications. An onboard autothermal reformer (ATR) employed to reform the desulfurized JP-8 fuel was coupled with the P-SOFC stack to provide for H2 and CO as fuel, minimizing the cost and complexity associated with hydrogen storage. Characterization of the ATR reformer was conducted by varying the steam to carbon ratio (H2O/C) from 0.1 to 1.0 at different ATR operating temperatures (700-800 °C) while maintaining the P-SOFC stack temperature at 850 °C. A fraction of the anode recycle was used as the steam and heat source for autothermal reforming of the JP-8 fuel, intending to make the system lighter and compact for mobile applications. System modeling revealed a maximum net AC efficiency of 37.1% at 700 °C and 29.2% at 800 °C ATR operating temperatures, respectively. Parametric analyses with respect to fuel utilization factor (Uf) and current density (j) were conducted to determine optimum operating conditions. Finally, the P-SOFC based system was compared with a previously published [1] tubular solid oxide fuel cell based (T-SOFC) system to identify the relative advantages over one another.

  15. AGR-2 Data Qualification Report for ATR Cycles 149B, 150A, 150B, 151A, and 151B

    SciTech Connect

    Michael L. Abbott; Binh T. Pham

    2012-06-01

    This report provides the data qualification status of AGR-2 fuel irradiation experimental data from Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) cycles 149B, 150A, 150B, 151A, and 151B), as recorded in the Nuclear Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS). The AGR-2 data streams addressed include thermocouple temperatures, sweep gas data (flow rate, pressure, and moisture content), and fission product monitoring system (FPMS) data for each of the six capsules in the experiment. A total of 3,307,500 5-minute thermocouple and sweep gas data records were received and processed by NDMAS for this period. There are no AGR-2 data for cycle 150A because the experiment was removed from the reactor. Of these data, 82.2% were determined to be Qualified based on NDMAS accuracy testing and data validity assessment. There were 450,557 Failed temperature records due to thermocouple failures, and 138,528 Failed gas flow records due to gas flow cross-talk and leakage problems that occurred in the capsules after cycle 150A. For FPMS data, NDMAS received and processed preliminary release rate and release-to-birth rate ratio (R/B) data for the first three reactor cycles (cycles 149B, 150B, and 151B). This data consists of 45,983 release rate records and 45,235 R/B records for the 12 radionuclides reported. The qualification status of these FPMS data has been set to In Process until receipt of QA-approved data generator reports. All of the above data have been processed and tested using a SAS®-based enterprise application software system, stored in a secure Structured Query Language database, and made available on the NDMAS Web portal (http://ndmas.inl.gov) for both internal and external VHTR project participants.

  16. Molecular cloning of AtRS4, a seed specific multifunctional RFO synthase/galactosylhydrolase in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Gangl, Roman; Behmüller, Robert; Tenhaken, Raimund

    2015-01-01

    Stachyose is among the raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFOs) one of the major water-soluble carbohydrates next to sucrose in seeds of a number of plant species. Especially in leguminous seeds, e.g. chickpea, stachyose is reported as the major component. In contrast to their ambiguous potential as essential source of carbon for germination, RFOs are indigestible for humans and can contribute to diverse abdominal disorders. In the genome of Arabidopsis thaliana, six putative raffinose synthase genes are reported, whereas little is known about these putative raffinose synthases and their biochemical characteristics or their contribution to the RFO physiology in A. thaliana. In this paper, we report on the molecular cloning, functional expression in Escherichia coli and purification of recombinant AtRS4 from A. thaliana and the biochemical characterisation of the putative stachyose synthase (AtSTS, At4g01970) as a raffinose and high affinity stachyose synthase (Km for raffinose 259.2 ± 21.15 μM) as well as stachyose and galactinol specific galactosylhydrolase. A T-DNA insertional mutant in the AtRS4 gene was isolated. Only semi-quantitative PCR from WT siliques showed a specific transcriptional AtRS4 PCR product. Metabolite measurements in seeds of ΔAtRS4 mutant plants revealed a total loss of stachyose in ΔAtRS4 mutant seeds. We conclude that AtRS4 is the only stachyose synthase in the genome of A. thaliana that AtRS4 represents a key regulation mechanism in the RFO physiology of A. thaliana due to its multifunctional enzyme activity and that AtRS4 is possibly the second seed specific raffinose synthase beside AtRS5, which is responsible for Raf accumulation under abiotic stress. PMID:26483807

  17. Molecular cloning of AtRS4, a seed specific multifunctional RFO synthase/galactosylhydrolase in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Gangl, Roman; Behmüller, Robert; Tenhaken, Raimund

    2015-01-01

    Stachyose is among the raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFOs) one of the major water-soluble carbohydrates next to sucrose in seeds of a number of plant species. Especially in leguminous seeds, e.g. chickpea, stachyose is reported as the major component. In contrast to their ambiguous potential as essential source of carbon for germination, RFOs are indigestible for humans and can contribute to diverse abdominal disorders. In the genome of Arabidopsis thaliana, six putative raffinose synthase genes are reported, whereas little is known about these putative raffinose synthases and their biochemical characteristics or their contribution to the RFO physiology in A. thaliana. In this paper, we report on the molecular cloning, functional expression in Escherichia coli and purification of recombinant AtRS4 from A. thaliana and the biochemical characterisation of the putative stachyose synthase (AtSTS, At4g01970) as a raffinose and high affinity stachyose synthase (Km for raffinose 259.2 ± 21.15 μM) as well as stachyose and galactinol specific galactosylhydrolase. A T-DNA insertional mutant in the AtRS4 gene was isolated. Only semi-quantitative PCR from WT siliques showed a specific transcriptional AtRS4 PCR product. Metabolite measurements in seeds of ΔAtRS4 mutant plants revealed a total loss of stachyose in ΔAtRS4 mutant seeds. We conclude that AtRS4 is the only stachyose synthase in the genome of A. thaliana that AtRS4 represents a key regulation mechanism in the RFO physiology of A. thaliana due to its multifunctional enzyme activity and that AtRS4 is possibly the second seed specific raffinose synthase beside AtRS5, which is responsible for Raf accumulation under abiotic stress. PMID:26483807

  18. ATR- and ATM-Mediated DNA Damage Response Is Dependent on Excision Repair Assembly during G1 but Not in S Phase of Cell Cycle.

    PubMed

    Ray, Alo; Blevins, Chessica; Wani, Gulzar; Wani, Altaf A

    2016-01-01

    Cell cycle checkpoint is mediated by ATR and ATM kinases, as a prompt early response to a variety of DNA insults, and culminates in a highly orchestrated signal transduction cascade. Previously, we defined the regulatory role of nucleotide excision repair (NER) factors, DDB2 and XPC, in checkpoint and ATR/ATM-dependent repair pathway via ATR and ATM phosphorylation and recruitment to ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced damage sites. Here, we have dissected the molecular mechanisms of DDB2- and XPC- mediated regulation of ATR and ATM recruitment and activation upon UVR exposures. We show that the ATR and ATM activation and accumulation to UVR-induced damage not only depends on DDB2 and XPC, but also on the NER protein XPA, suggesting that the assembly of an active NER complex is essential for ATR and ATM recruitment. ATR and ATM localization and H2AX phosphorylation at the lesion sites occur as early as ten minutes in asynchronous as well as G1 arrested cells, showing that repair and checkpoint-mediated by ATR and ATM starts early upon UV irradiation. Moreover, our results demonstrated that ATR and ATM recruitment and H2AX phosphorylation are dependent on NER proteins in G1 phase, but not in S phase. We reasoned that in G1 the UVR-induced ssDNA gaps or processed ssDNA, and the bound NER complex promote ATR and ATM recruitment. In S phase, when the UV lesions result in stalled replication forks with long single-stranded DNA, ATR and ATM recruitment to these sites is regulated by different sets of proteins. Taken together, these results provide evidence that UVR-induced ATR and ATM recruitment and activation differ in G1 and S phases due to the existence of distinct types of DNA lesions, which promote assembly of different proteins involved in the process of DNA repair and checkpoint activation. PMID:27442013

  19. ATR- and ATM-Mediated DNA Damage Response Is Dependent on Excision Repair Assembly during G1 but Not in S Phase of Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Alo; Blevins, Chessica; Wani, Gulzar; Wani, Altaf A.

    2016-01-01

    Cell cycle checkpoint is mediated by ATR and ATM kinases, as a prompt early response to a variety of DNA insults, and culminates in a highly orchestrated signal transduction cascade. Previously, we defined the regulatory role of nucleotide excision repair (NER) factors, DDB2 and XPC, in checkpoint and ATR/ATM-dependent repair pathway via ATR and ATM phosphorylation and recruitment to ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced damage sites. Here, we have dissected the molecular mechanisms of DDB2- and XPC- mediated regulation of ATR and ATM recruitment and activation upon UVR exposures. We show that the ATR and ATM activation and accumulation to UVR-induced damage not only depends on DDB2 and XPC, but also on the NER protein XPA, suggesting that the assembly of an active NER complex is essential for ATR and ATM recruitment. ATR and ATM localization and H2AX phosphorylation at the lesion sites occur as early as ten minutes in asynchronous as well as G1 arrested cells, showing that repair and checkpoint-mediated by ATR and ATM starts early upon UV irradiation. Moreover, our results demonstrated that ATR and ATM recruitment and H2AX phosphorylation are dependent on NER proteins in G1 phase, but not in S phase. We reasoned that in G1 the UVR-induced ssDNA gaps or processed ssDNA, and the bound NER complex promote ATR and ATM recruitment. In S phase, when the UV lesions result in stalled replication forks with long single-stranded DNA, ATR and ATM recruitment to these sites is regulated by different sets of proteins. Taken together, these results provide evidence that UVR-induced ATR and ATM recruitment and activation differ in G1 and S phases due to the existence of distinct types of DNA lesions, which promote assembly of different proteins involved in the process of DNA repair and checkpoint activation. PMID:27442013

  20. Radiosensitization of Human Leukemic HL-60 Cells by ATR Kinase Inhibitor (VE-821): Phosphoproteomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Šalovská, Barbora; Fabrik, Ivo; Ďurišová, Kamila; Link, Marek; Vávrová, Jiřina; Řezáčová, Martina; Tichý, Aleš

    2014-01-01

    DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiation or chemotherapy are frequently used in oncology. DNA damage response (DDR)—triggered by radiation-induced double strand breaks—is orchestrated mainly by three Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinases (PIKKs): Ataxia teleangiectasia mutated (ATM), DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and ATM and Rad3-related kinase (ATR). Their activation promotes cell-cycle arrest and facilitates DNA damage repair, resulting in radioresistance. Recently developed specific ATR inhibitor, VE-821 (3-amino-6-(4-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl)-N-phenylpyrazine-2-carboxamide), has been reported to have a significant radio- and chemo-sensitizing effect delimited to cancer cells (largely p53-deficient) without affecting normal cells. In this study, we employed SILAC-based quantitative phosphoproteomics to describe the mechanism of the radiosensitizing effect of VE-821 in human promyelocytic leukemic cells HL-60 (p53-negative). Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC)-prefractionation with TiO2-enrichment and nano-liquid chromatography—tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis revealed 9834 phosphorylation sites. Proteins with differentially up-/down-regulated phosphorylation were mostly localized in the nucleus and were involved in cellular processes such as DDR, all phases of the cell cycle, and cell division. Moreover, sequence motif analysis revealed significant changes in the activities of kinases involved in these processes. Taken together, our data indicates that ATR kinase has multiple roles in response to DNA damage throughout the cell cycle and that its inhibitor VE-821 is a potent radiosensitizing agent for p53-negative HL-60 cells. PMID:25003641

  1. Root discrimination of closely related crop and weed species using FT MIR-ATR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Meinen, Catharina; Rauber, Rolf

    2015-01-01

    Root discrimination of species is a pre-condition for studying belowground competition processes between crop and weed species. In this experiment, we tested Fourier transform mid-infrared (FT MIR)-attenuated total reflection (ATR) spectroscopy to discriminate roots of closely related crop and weed species grown in the greenhouse: maize/barnyard grass, barley/wild oat, wheat/blackgrass (Poaceae), and sugar beet/common lambsquarters (Chenopodiaceae). Fresh (moist) and dried root segments as well as ground roots were analyzed by FT MIR-ATR spectroscopy. Root absorption spectra showed species specific peak distribution and peak height. A clear separation according to species was not possible with fresh root segments. Dried root segments (including root basis, middle section, and root tip) of maize/barnyard grass and sugar beet/common lambsquarters formed completely separated species clusters. Wheat and blackgrass separated in species specific clusters when root tips were removed from cluster analysis. A clear separation of dried root segments according to species was not possible in the case of barley and wild oat. Cluster analyses of ground roots revealed a 100% separation of all tested crop and weed species combinations. Spectra grouped in Poaceae and Chenopodiaceae clusters. Within the Poaceae cluster, C3 and C4 species differed significantly in heterogeneity. Thus, root spectra reflected the degree of kinship. To quantify species proportion in root mixtures, a two- and a three-species model for species quantification in root mixtures of maize, barnyard grass, and wild oat was calculated. The models showed low standard errors of prediction (RMSEP) and high residual predictive deviation values in an external test set validation. Hence, FT MIR-ATR spectroscopy seems to be a promising tool for root research even between closely related plant species. PMID:26483799

  2. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy: a chemometric approach for studying the lipid organisation of the stratum corneum.

    PubMed

    Laugel, C; Yagoubi, N; Baillet, A

    2005-05-01

    The barrier function of skin resides in the lipid components of the stratum corneum, particularly their spatial organisation. FTIR spectroscopy has already been used as a relevant tool to study this lipid organisation: IR vibration band shifts have been attributed to the variations in lipid organisation induced by temperature. Our study included a stratum corneum model, composed of the three main lipids: palmitic acid as an example of fatty acids, cholesterol and ceramide III as an example of ceramide. Different films with various ratios of these lipids were studied. In our analytical strategy, the interest of using a chemometric analysis of global data obtained from ATR-FTIR spectra to highlight the main interactions involved in the molecular organisation of lipids has been demonstrated. Two kinds of interaction between the three main lipids have been shown: a non polar interaction between the long hydrocarbon chains and a polar interaction as the hydrogen bonding between polar functional groups. By varying the lipid ratio, we have shown first that the relative importance of each interaction was modified, second, that the induced modification of organisation can be detected by chemometric analysis of the ATR-FTIR spectra. The role of each kind of lipid in the organisation has been discussed. In conclusion, associating the ATR-FTIR with chemometric treatment is a promising tool: firstly, to understand the consequence of lipid relative compositions on the structural organisation of the stratum corneum, secondly, to show the relationship between lipid organisation and percutaneous penetration data. Indeed, this methodology will be transposed to in vivo studies with IR measurements through a probe. PMID:15854625

  3. Competitive sorption of carbonate and arsenic to hematite: combined ATR-FTIR and batch experiments.

    PubMed

    Brechbühl, Yves; Christl, Iso; Elzinga, Evert J; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2012-07-01

    The competitive sorption of carbonate and arsenic to hematite was investigated in closed-system batch experiments. The experimental conditions covered a pH range of 3-7, arsenate concentrations of 3-300 μM, and arsenite concentrations of 3-200 μM. Dissolved carbonate concentrations were varied by fixing the CO(2) partial pressure at 0.39 (atmospheric), 10, or 100 hPa. Sorption data were modeled with a one-site three plane model considering carbonate and arsenate surface complexes derived from ATR-FTIR spectroscopy analyses. Macroscopic sorption data revealed that in the pH range 3-7, carbonate was a weak competitor for both arsenite and arsenate. The competitive effect of carbonate increased with increasing CO(2) partial pressure and decreasing arsenic concentrations. For arsenate, sorption was reduced by carbonate only at slightly acidic to neutral pH values, whereas arsenite sorption was decreased across the entire pH range. ATR-FTIR spectra indicated the predominant formation of bidentate binuclear inner-sphere surface complexes for both sorbed arsenate and sorbed carbonate. Surface complexation modeling based on the dominant arsenate and carbonate surface complexes indicated by ATR-FTIR and assuming inner-sphere complexation of arsenite successfully described the macroscopic sorption data. Our results imply that in natural arsenic-contaminated systems where iron oxide minerals are important sorbents, dissolved carbonate may increase aqueous arsenite concentrations, but will affect dissolved arsenate concentrations only at neutral to alkaline pH and at very high CO(2) partial pressures. PMID:22494686

  4. Cleaning-in-place of immunoaffinity resins monitored by in situ ATR-FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Boulet-Audet, Maxime; Byrne, Bernadette; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2015-09-01

    In the next 10 years, the pharmaceutical industry anticipates that revenue from biotherapeutics will overtake those generated from small drug molecules. Despite effectively treating a range of chronic and life-threatening diseases, the high cost of biotherapeutics limits their use. For biotherapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), an important production cost is the affinity resin used for protein capture. Cleaning-in-place (CIP) protocols aim to optimise the lifespan of the resin by slowing binding capacity decay. Binding assays can determine resin capacity from the mobile phase, but do not reveal the underlying causes of Protein A ligand degradation. The focus needs to be on the stationary phase to examine the effect of CIP on the resin. To directly determine both the local Protein A ligand concentration and conformation on two Protein A resins, we developed a method based on attenuated total reflection (ATR) Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. ATR-FTIR spectroscopic imaging revealed that applying a carefully controlled load to agarose beads produces an even and reproducible contact with the internal reflection element. This allowed detection and quantification of the binding capacity of the stationary phase. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy also showed that Protein A proteolysis does not seem to occur under typical CIP conditions (below 1 M NaOH). However, our data revealed that concentrations of NaOH above 0.1 M cause significant changes in Protein A conformation. The addition of >0.4 M trehalose during CIP significantly reduced NaOH-induced ligand unfolding observed for one of the two Protein A resins tested. Such insights could help to optimise CIP protocols in order to extend resin lifetime and reduce mAb production costs. PMID:26159572

  5. Fuel flexible fuel injector

    SciTech Connect

    Tuthill, Richard S; Davis, Dustin W; Dai, Zhongtao

    2015-02-03

    A disclosed fuel injector provides mixing of fuel with airflow by surrounding a swirled fuel flow with first and second swirled airflows that ensures mixing prior to or upon entering the combustion chamber. Fuel tubes produce a central fuel flow along with a central airflow through a plurality of openings to generate the high velocity fuel/air mixture along the axis of the fuel injector in addition to the swirled fuel/air mixture.

  6. Identification of herbarium whole-leaf samples of Epilobium species by ATR-IR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Strgulc Krajsek, Simona; Buh, Primoz; Zega, Anamarija; Kreft, Samo

    2008-02-01

    A simple, high-accuracy FT-IR method based on attenuated total reflection (ATR) was developed for the rapid determination of leaf samples of Epilobium species. The method is superior to other analytical techniques, since there is no need of laborious sample preparation such as grinding or extraction and solvent removal. A total of 70 herbarium specimens, belonging to all 13 Epilobium and to 2 Chamerion species growing in Slovenia, were analyzed. With the 100 most-informative wavenumbers in the range 700-1800 cm(-1), we obtained over 90% accuracy of species identification, with discriminant multivariate statistical analysis on the measurements made on whole dried leaves. PMID:18293444

  7. Unified generalized Bayesian accrual of evidence for robust ATR: new results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, John R.; Mahler, Ronald P. S.; Prasanth, Ravi; Huff, Melvyn; Ravichandran, Ravi B.; Mehra, Raman K.; Musick, Stanton

    2001-08-01

    We describe ongoing work in applying Finite Set Statistics (FISST) techniques to a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) problem. It summarizes recent results in an ongoing project in which we are applying FISST filtering approaches to the problem of identifying ground targets from Synthetic Aperture Radar. The signatures for these targets are ambiguous because of extended operating conditions, that is the images have uncharacterizeable noise introduced in the form of mud, dents, etc. We propose a number of mechanisms for compensating for this noise.

  8. Characterisation Of Polysacharides And Lipids From Selected Green Algae Species By FTIR-ATR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartošová, Alica; Blinová, Lenka; Gerulová, Kristína

    2015-06-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy was used in this study to identify and determine spectral features of Chromochloris zofingiensis (Dönz) Fucíková et L.A. Lewis (SAG 211-14, Gottingen, Germany), Acutodesmus obliguus (Turpin) Hegewald (SAG 276-1, Gottingen, Germany) and Chlorella sorokiniana (K. Brandt) Pröschold et Darienko (SAG 211-40c, Gottingen, Germany). Polysaccharides and lipids from these three algae species were determined using Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) with ATR accessory with diamante crystal in spectral range from 400 - 4000 cm-1 and resolution 4.

  9. Rapid monitoring of grapevine reserves using ATR-FT-IR and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Schmidtke, Leigh M; Smith, Jason P; Müller, Markus C; Holzapfel, Bruno P

    2012-06-30

    Predictions of grapevine yield and the management of sugar accumulation and secondary metabolite production during berry ripening may be improved by monitoring nitrogen and starch reserves in the perennial parts of the vine. The standard method for determining nitrogen concentration in plant tissue is by combustion analysis, while enzymatic hydrolysis followed by glucose quantification is commonly used for starch. Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FT-IR) combined with chemometric modelling offers a rapid means for the determination of a range of analytes in powdered or ground samples. ATR-FT-IR offers significant advantages over combustion or enzymatic analysis of samples due to the simplicity of instrument operation, reproducibility and speed of data collection. In the present investigation, 1880 root and wood samples were collected from Shiraz, Semillon and Riesling vineyards in Australia and Germany. Nitrogen and starch concentrations were determined using standard analytical methods, and ATR-FT-IR spectra collected for each sample using a Bruker Alpha instrument. Samples were randomly assigned to either calibration or test data sets representing two thirds and one third of the samples respectively. Signal preprocessing included extended multiplicative scatter correction for water and carbon dioxide vapour, standard normal variate scaling with second derivative and variable selection prior to regression. Excellent predictive models for percent dry weight (DW) of nitrogen (range: 0.10-2.65% DW, median: 0.45% DW) and starch (range: 0.25-42.82% DW, median: 7.77% DW) using partial least squares (PLS) or support vector machine (SVM) analysis for linear and nonlinear regression respectively, were constructed and cross validated with low root mean square errors of prediction (RMSEP). Calibrations employing SVM-regression provided the optimum predictive models for nitrogen (R(2)=0.98 and RMSEP=0.07% DW) compared to PLS regression

  10. Structure-Activity Relations In Enzymes: An Application Of IR-ATR Modulation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fringeli, Urs P.; Ahlstrom, Peter; Vincenz, Claudius; Fringeli, Marianna

    1985-12-01

    Relations between structure and specific activity in immobilized acetylcholinesterase (ACNE) have been studied by means of pH- and Ca++-modulation technique combined with attenuated total reflection (ATR) infrared (IR) spectroscopy and enzyme activity measurement. Periodic modulation of pH and Ca++-concentration enabled a periodic on-off switching of about 40% of the total enzyme activity. It was found that about 0.5 to 1% of the amino acids were involved in this process. These 15 to 30 amino acids assumed antiparallel pleated sheet structure in the inhibited state and random and/or helical structure in the activated state.

  11. Registration of heavy metal ions and pesticides with ATR planar waveguide enzyme sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabok, Alexei; Haron, Saharudin; Ray, Asim

    2004-11-01

    The proposed novel type of enzyme optical sensors is based on a combination of SiO2/Si3N4/SiO2 planar waveguide ATR (attenuated total reflection) transducer, fabricated by standard silicon planar technology, with the composite polyelectrolyte self-assembled coating containing both organic chromophores and enzyme molecules. Such devices were deployed to monitor typical industrial and agricultural water pollutants, such as heavy metal ions and pesticides, acting as inhibitors of enzyme reactions. The sensitivity of registration of these pollutants in the range of 1 ppb was achieved. The use of different enzymes in the sensitive membrane provides a background for pattern recognition of the above pollutants.

  12. Distinct but Concerted Roles of ATR, DNA-PK, and Chk1 in Countering Replication Stress during S Phase.

    PubMed

    Buisson, Rémi; Boisvert, Jessica L; Benes, Cyril H; Zou, Lee

    2015-09-17

    The ATR-Chk1 pathway is critical for DNA damage responses and cell-cycle progression. Chk1 inhibition is more deleterious to cycling cells than ATR inhibition, raising questions about ATR and Chk1 functions in the absence of extrinsic replication stress. Here we show that a key role of ATR in S phase is to coordinate RRM2 accumulation and origin firing. ATR inhibitor (ATRi) induces massive ssDNA accumulation and replication catastrophe in a fraction of early S-phase cells. In other S-phase cells, however, ATRi induces moderate ssDNA and triggers a DNA-PK and Chk1-mediated backup pathway to suppress origin firing. The backup pathway creates a threshold such that ATRi selectively kills cells under high replication stress, whereas Chk1 inhibitor induces cell death at a lower threshold. The levels of ATRi-induced ssDNA correlate with ATRi sensitivity in a panel of cell lines, suggesting that ATRi-induced ssDNA could be predictive of ATRi sensitivity in cancer cells. PMID:26365377

  13. Targeting ATR in vivo using the novel inhibitor VE-822 results in selective sensitization of pancreatic tumors to radiation

    PubMed Central

    Fokas, E; Prevo, R; Pollard, J R; Reaper, P M; Charlton, P A; Cornelissen, B; Vallis, K A; Hammond, E M; Olcina, M M; Gillies McKenna, W; Muschel, R J; Brunner, T B

    2012-01-01

    Combined radiochemotherapy is the currently used therapy for locally advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), but normal tissue toxicity limits its application. Here we test the hypothesis that inhibition of ATR (ATM-Rad3-related) could increase the sensitivity of the cancer cells to radiation or chemotherapy without affecting normal cells. We tested VE-822, an ATR inhibitor, for in vitro and in vivo radiosensitization. Chk1 phosphorylation was used to indicate ATR activity, γH2AX and 53BP1 foci as evidence of DNA damage and Rad51 foci for homologous recombination activity. Sensitivity to radiation (XRT) and gemcitabine was measured with clonogenic assays in vitro and tumor growth delay in vivo. Murine intestinal damage was evaluated after abdominal XRT. VE-822 inhibited ATR in vitro and in vivo. VE-822 decreased maintenance of cell-cycle checkpoints, increased persistent DNA damage and decreased homologous recombination in irradiated cancer cells. VE-822 decreased survival of pancreatic cancer cells but not normal cells in response to XRT or gemcitabine. VE-822 markedly prolonged growth delay of pancreatic cancer xenografts after XRT and gemcitabine-based chemoradiation without augmenting normal cell or tissue toxicity. These findings support ATR inhibition as a promising new approach to improve the therapeutic ration of radiochemotherapy for patients with PDAC. PMID:23222511

  14. Targeting ATR in vivo using the novel inhibitor VE-822 results in selective sensitization of pancreatic tumors to radiation.

    PubMed

    Fokas, E; Prevo, R; Pollard, J R; Reaper, P M; Charlton, P A; Cornelissen, B; Vallis, K A; Hammond, E M; Olcina, M M; Gillies McKenna, W; Muschel, R J; Brunner, T B

    2012-01-01

    Combined radiochemotherapy is the currently used therapy for locally advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), but normal tissue toxicity limits its application. Here we test the hypothesis that inhibition of ATR (ATM-Rad3-related) could increase the sensitivity of the cancer cells to radiation or chemotherapy without affecting normal cells. We tested VE-822, an ATR inhibitor, for in vitro and in vivo radiosensitization. Chk1 phosphorylation was used to indicate ATR activity, γH2AX and 53BP1 foci as evidence of DNA damage and Rad51 foci for homologous recombination activity. Sensitivity to radiation (XRT) and gemcitabine was measured with clonogenic assays in vitro and tumor growth delay in vivo. Murine intestinal damage was evaluated after abdominal XRT. VE-822 inhibited ATR in vitro and in vivo. VE-822 decreased maintenance of cell-cycle checkpoints, increased persistent DNA damage and decreased homologous recombination in irradiated cancer cells. VE-822 decreased survival of pancreatic cancer cells but not normal cells in response to XRT or gemcitabine. VE-822 markedly prolonged growth delay of pancreatic cancer xenografts after XRT and gemcitabine-based chemoradiation without augmenting normal cell or tissue toxicity. These findings support ATR inhibition as a promising new approach to improve the therapeutic ration of radiochemotherapy for patients with PDAC. PMID:23222511

  15. Pharmacological targeting the ATR-CHK1-WEE1 axis involves balancing cell growth stimulation and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Mak, Joyce P Y; Man, Wing Yu; Ma, Hoi Tang; Poon, Randy Y C

    2014-11-15

    The ATR-CHK1-WEE1 kinase cascade's functions in the DNA damage checkpoints are well established. Moreover, its roles in the unperturbed cell cycle are also increasingly being recognized. In this connection, a number of small-molecule inhibitors of ATR, CHK1, and WEE1 are being evaluated in clinical trials. Understanding precisely how cells respond to different concentrations of inhibitors is therefore of paramount importance and has broad clinical implications. Here we present evidence that in the absence of DNA damage, pharmacological inactivation of ATR was less effective in inducing mitotic catastrophe than inhibition of WEE1 and CHK1. Small-molecule inhibitors of CHK1 (AZD7762) or WEE1 (MK-1775) induced mitotic catastrophe, as characterized by dephosphorylation of CDK1(Tyr15), phosphorylation of histone H39(Ser10), and apoptosis. Unexpectedly, partial inhibition of WEE1 and CHK1 had the opposite effect of accelerating the cell cycle without inducing apoptosis, thereby increasing the overall cell proliferation. This was also corroborated by the finding that cell proliferation was enhanced by kinase-inactive versions of WEE1. We demonstrated that these potential limitations of the inhibitors could be overcome by targeting more than one components of the ATR-CHK1-WEE1 simultaneously. These observations reveal insights into the complex responses to pharmacological inactivation of the ATR-CHK1-WEE1 axis. PMID:25301733

  16. Fuel plate and fusion insulator irradiation test program

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, L.G.; Beeston, J.M.

    1980-11-01

    As the prices of fuel fabricating, shipping, and reprocessing continue to rise at rapid rates, research people look for alternate methods to keep their reactor fuel costs within limited funds. Extending fuel element lifetimes without jeopardizing reactor safety can reduce fuel costs by up to a factor of two. But to gain this factor, some fuel plate tests must be performed to the higher burnup to verify burnup fuel plate performance. In this proposed test, fuel plates will be constructed to a maximum fuel loading which can be produced on a commercial basis, contain a maximum boron content as used in ATR to reduce initial reactor reactivity, and will be loaded with UAl/sub 2/ to obtain higher uranium content and better operating performance over UAl/sub 3/.

  17. Investigation on the adsorption characteristics of sodium benzoate and taurine on gold nanoparticle film by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Naveen; Thomas, S.; Tokas, R. B.; Kshirsagar, R. J.

    2014-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopic studies of sodium benzoate and taurine adsorbed on gold nanoparticle (AuNp) film on silanised glass slides have been studied by attenuated total reflection technique (ATR). The surface morphology of the AuNp films has been measured by Atomic Force Microscopy. The ATR spectra of sodium benzoate and taurine deposited on AuNp film are compared with ATR spectra of their powdered bulk samples. A new red-shifted band appeared along with the symmetric and asymmetric stretches of carboxylate group of sodium benzoate leading to a broadening of the above peaks. Similar behavior is also seen in the case of symmetric and asymmetric stretches of sulphonate group of taurine. The results indicate presence of both chemisorbed and physisorbed layers of both sodium benzoate and taurine on the AuNp film with bottom layer chemically bound to AuNp through carboxylate and sulphonate groups respectively.

  18. Focusing, imaging, and ATR for the Gotcha 2008 wide angle SAR collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianelli, Christopher D.; Xu, Luzhou

    2013-05-01

    The following work discusses IAA's approach to tackling the wide angle, circular spotlight, synthetic aperture radar (SAR) problem from the 2008 Gotcha wide angle SAR data set, which is publicly released, with unlimited distribution. This data set comes with a MATLAB image formation routine and attendant graphical user inter- face (GUI). We begin by introducing a simple approach to focusing the collected phase history data that utilizes point targets (quadrahedral targets) present in the scene. Two SAR imaging algorithms are then presented, namely, the data-independent backprojection (BP) algorithm and the data-adaptive sparse learning via itera- tive minimization (SLIM) algorithm. These imaging approaches are compared using the 2008 Gotcha wide angle SAR data to perform both a clutter discrimination experiment, as well as an automatic target recognition (ATR) experiment. The ATR system is composed of a target pose and target center estimation preprocessing system, and includes a novel target feature for the final classification stage. Empirical results obtained by applying the focusing approach and imaging algorithms to the 2008 Gotcha wide angle SAR data set are presented and described. The results presented highlight the benefit of applying the SLIM algorithm over its data-independent counterpart, as well as the utility of the novel target feature.

  19. Rapid detection of melamine adulteration in dairy milk by SB-ATR-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jawaid, Sana; Talpur, Farah N; Sherazi, S T H; Nizamani, Shafi M; Khaskheli, Abid A

    2013-12-01

    Melamine is a nitrogenous chemical substance used principally as a starting material for the manufacture of synthetic resins. Due to its very high proportion of nitrogen melamine has been added illegitimately to foods and feeds to increase the measured protein content, which determines the value of the product. These issues prompted private as well as governmental laboratories to develop methods for the analysis of melamine in a wide variety of food products and ingredients. Owing to this fact present study is aimed to use single bounce attenuated total reflectance (SB-ATR) Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) method as an effective rapid tool for the detection and quantification of melamine in milk (liquid and powder). Partial least-squares (PLS) models were established for correlating spectral data to melamine concentration with R(2)>0.99, and RMSEC 0.370. Linear calibration curves were obtained over the calibration range of 25-0.0625%. The LOD and LOQ of the method was 0.00025% (2.5 ppm) and 0.0015% (15 ppm) respectively. Proposed SB-ATR-FTIR method requires little or no sample preparation with an assay time of 1-2 min. PMID:23871060

  20. Control of HIPK2 stability by ubiquitin ligase Siah-1 and checkpoint kinases ATM and ATR.

    PubMed

    Winter, Melanie; Sombroek, Dirk; Dauth, Ilka; Moehlenbrink, Jutta; Scheuermann, Karin; Crone, Johanna; Hofmann, Thomas G

    2008-07-01

    The tumour suppressor HIPK2 is an important regulator of cell death induced by DNA damage, but how its activity is regulated remains largely unclear. Here we demonstrate that HIPK2 is an unstable protein that colocalizes and interacts with the E3 ubiquitin ligase Siah-1 in unstressed cells. Siah-1 knockdown increases HIPK2 stability and steady-state levels, whereas Siah-1 expression facilitates HIPK2 polyubiquitination, degradation and thereby inactivation. During recovery from sublethal DNA damage, HIPK2, which is stabilized on DNA damage, is degraded through a Siah-1-dependent, p53-controlled pathway. Downregulation of Siah-1 inhibits HIPK2 degradation and recovery from damage, driving the cells into apoptosis. We have also demonstrated that DNA damage triggers disruption of the HIPK2-Siah-1 complex, resulting in HIPK2 stabilization and activation. Disruption of the HIPK2-Siah-1 complex is mediated by the ATM/ATR pathway and involves ATM/ATR-dependent phosphorylation of Siah-1 at Ser 19. Our results provide a molecular framework for HIPK2 regulation in unstressed and damaged cells. PMID:18536714

  1. New automated terrain and feature extraction approach for the Predator UAV TESAR ATR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosario, Dalton S.

    1999-08-01

    This paper describes a technique recently developed for target detection and false alarm reduction for the Predator unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) tactical endurance synthetic aperture radar (TESAR) automatic target recognition (ATR) system. The approach does not attempt to label various objects in the SAR image (i.e., buildings, trees, roads); instead, it finds target-like characteristics in the image and compares their statistical/spatial relationship to larger structures in the scene. To do this, the approach merges the output of multiple CFAR (constant false alarm ratio) surfaces through a sequence of mathematical morphology tests. The output is further tested by a 'smart' clustering procedure, which performs an object- size test. With the use of these CFAR surfaces, a methodical sequence of morphological tests will find and retain large structures in the scene and eliminate cues that fall within these structures. The presence of supporting shadow downrange from the sensor is also used to eliminate objects with heights not typical to those of targets. Finally, a fast procedure performs a size test on elongated streaks. This procedure allows long objects to be smartly clustered as a single object while ensuring target proximity scenarios have no performance degradation. Application of this false alarm mitigator/detector to the Predator's SAR ATR algorithm suite produced a stunning reduction of one order of magnitude in the number of cues yielded by its baseline detector. This performance was consistent in scenes having natural and/or cultural clutter.

  2. Mebendazole crystal forms in tablet formulations. An ATR-FTIR/chemometrics approach to polymorph assignment.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Natalia L; Kaufman, Teodoro S; Maggio, Rubén M

    2016-04-15

    Structural polymorphism of active pharmaceutical ingredients (API) is a relevant concern for the modern pharmaceutical industry, since different polymorphic forms may display dissimilar properties, critically affecting the performance of the corresponding drug products. Mebendazole (MEB) is a widely used broad spectrum anthelmintic drug of the benzimidazole class, which exhibits structural polymorphism (Forms A-C). Form C, which displays the best pharmaceutical profile, is the recommended one for clinical use. The polymorphs of MEB were prepared and characterized by spectroscopic, calorimetric and microscopic means. The polymorphs were employed to develop a suitable chemometrics-assisted sample display model based on the first two principal components of their ATR-FTIR spectra in the 4000-600 cm(-1) region. The model was internally and externally validated employing the leave-one-out procedure and an external validation set, respectively. Its suitability for revealing the polymorphic identity of MEB in tablets was successfully assessed analyzing commercial tablets under different physical forms (whole, powdered, dried, sieved and aged). It was concluded that the ATR-FTIR/PCA (principal component analysis) association is a fast, efficient and non-destructive technique for assigning the solid-state forms of MEB in its drug products, with minimum sample pre-treatment. PMID:26874854

  3. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopic analysis of regenerated bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benetti, Carolina; Kazarain, Sergei G.; Alves, Marco A. V.; Blay, Alberto; Correa, Luciana; Zezell, Denise M.

    2014-03-01

    The cutting of bone is routinely required in medical procedures, especially in dental applications. In such cases, bone regeneration and new bone quality can determine the success of the treatment. This study investigated the main spectral differences of undamaged and healed bone using the ATR-FTIR spectroscopy technique. Three rabbits were submitted to a surgical procedure; a small piece of bone (3x3 mm2) was removed from both sides of their jaws using a high speed drill. After 15 days, the rabbits were euthanized and the jaws were removed. A bone slice was cut from each side of the jaw containing regions of undamaged and newly formed bone, resulting in six samples which were polished for spectroscopic comparison. The samples were analyzed by FTIR spectroscopy using a diamond ATR accessory. Spectral characteristics were compared and particular attention was paid to the proportion of phosphate to amide I bands and the width of the phosphate band. The results show that the ratio of phosphate to amide I is smaller in new bone tissue than in the undamaged bone, indicating a higher organic content in the newly formed bone. The analysis of the width of the phosphate band suggests a crystallinity difference between both tissues, since the width was higher in the new bone than in the natural bone. These results suggest that the differences observed in bone aging processes by FTIR spectroscopic can be applied to the study of healing processes.

  4. Characterization of Printing Inks Using DART-Q-TOF-MS and Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR) FTIR.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Rhett; Raeva, Anna; Almirall, Jose R

    2016-05-01

    The rise in improved and widely accessible printing technology has resulted in an interest to develop rapid and minimally destructive chemical analytical techniques that can characterize printing inks for forensic document analysis. Chemical characterization of printing inks allows for both discrimination of inks originating from different sources and the association of inks originating from the same source. Direct analysis in real-time mass spectrometry (DART-MS) and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) were used in tandem to analyze four different classes of printing inks: inkjets, toners, offset, and intaglio. A total of 319 samples or ~ 80 samples from each class were analyzed directly on a paper substrate using the two methods. DART-MS was found to characterize the semi-volatile polymeric vehicle components, while ATR-FTIR provided chemical information associated with the bulk components of these inks. Complimentary data results in improved discrimination when both techniques are used in succession resulting in >96% discrimination for all toners, 95% for all inkjets, >92% for all offset, and >54% for all intaglio inks. PMID:27122410

  5. Modulation of ATR-mediated DNA damage checkpoint response by cryptochrome 1

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Tae-Hong; Leem, Sun-Hee

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian cryptochromes (Crys) are essential circadian clock factors implicated in diverse clock-independent physiological functions, including DNA damage responses. Here we show that Cry1 modulates the ATR-mediated DNA damage checkpoint (DDC) response by interacting with Timeless (Tim) in a time-of-day-dependent manner. The DDC capacity in response to UV irradiation showed a circadian rhythm. Interestingly, clock-deficient Cry1 and Cry2 double knockout (CryDKO) cells retained substantial DDC capacity compared with clock-proficient wild-type cells, although the Cry1-modulated oscillation of the DDC capacity was abolished in CryDKO cells. We found temporal interaction of Cry1 and Tim in the nucleus. When Cry1 was expressed in the nucleus, it was critical for circadian ATR activity. We regenerated rhythmic DDC responses by ectopically expressing Cry1 in CryDKO cells. In addition, we also investigated the DDC capacity in the liver of mice that were intraperitoneally injected with cisplatin at different circadian times (CT). When mice were injected at CT20, about 2-fold higher expression of phosphorylated minichromosome maintenance protein 2 (p-MCM2) was detected compared with mice injected at CT08, which consequently affected the removal rate of cisplatin-DNA adducts from genomic DNA. Taken together, our data demonstrate the intimate interaction between the circadian clock and the DDC system during genotoxic stress in clock-ticking cells. PMID:24489120

  6. Kinetics of phosphate adsorption on goethite: comparing batch adsorption and ATR-IR measurements.

    PubMed

    Luengo, Carina; Brigante, Maximiliano; Antelo, Juan; Avena, Marcelo

    2006-08-15

    The adsorption kinetics of phosphate on goethite has been studied by batch adsorption experiments and by in situ ATR-IR spectroscopy at different pH, initial phosphate concentrations and stirring rates. Batch adsorption results are very similar to those reported by several authors, and show a rather fast initial adsorption taking place in a few minutes followed by a slower process taking place in days or weeks. The adsorption kinetics could be also monitored by integrating the phosphate signals obtained in ATR-IR experiments, and a very good agreement between both techniques was found. At pH 4.5 two surface complexes, the bidentate nonprotonated (FeO)(2)PO(2) and the bidentate protonated (FeO)(2)(OH)PO complexes, are formed at the surface. There are small changes in the relative concentrations of these species as the reaction proceeds, and they seem to evolve in time rather independently. At pH 7.5 and 9 the dominating surface species is (FeO)(2)PO(2), which is accompanied by an extra unidentified species at low concentration. They also seem to evolve independently as the reaction proceeds. The results are consistent with a mechanism that involve a fast adsorption followed by a slow diffusion into pores, and are not consistent with surface precipitation of iron phosphate. PMID:16643942

  7. In-column ATR-FTIR spectroscopy to monitor affinity chromatography purification of monoclonal antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulet-Audet, Maxime; Kazarian, Sergei G.; Byrne, Bernadette

    2016-07-01

    In recent years many monoclonal antibodies (mAb) have entered the biotherapeutics market, offering new treatments for chronic and life-threatening diseases. Protein A resin captures monoclonal antibody (mAb) effectively, but the binding capacity decays over repeated purification cycles. On an industrial scale, replacing fouled Protein A affinity chromatography resin accounts for a large proportion of the raw material cost. Cleaning-in-place (CIP) procedures were developed to extend Protein A resin lifespan, but chromatograms cannot reliably quantify any remaining contaminants over repeated cycles. To study resin fouling in situ, we coupled affinity chromatography and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy for the first time, by embedding an attenuated total reflection (ATR) sensor inside a micro-scale column while measuring the UV 280 nm and conductivity. Our approach quantified the in-column protein concentration in the resin bed and determined protein conformation. Our results show that Protein A ligand leached during CIP. We also found that host cell proteins bound to the Protein A resin even more strongly than mAbs and that typical CIP conditions do not remove all fouling contaminants. The insights derived from in-column ATR-FTIR spectroscopic monitoring could contribute to mAb purification quality assurance as well as guide the development of more effective CIP conditions to optimise resin lifespan.

  8. ATR-FTIR microscopy in mapping mode for the study of verdigris and its secondary products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prati, S.; Bonacini, I.; Sciutto, G.; Genty-Vincent, A.; Cotte, M.; Eveno, M.; Menu, M.; Mazzeo, R.

    2016-01-01

    To study degradation processes occurring on painting materials, the use of high-resolution micro-analytical techniques is highly requested since it provides a detailed identification and localisation of both the original and deteriorated ingredients. Among the various pigments recently studied, the characterisation of verdigris has received a major interest. This pigment has not a unique chemical formula, but its composition depends on the recipe employed for its manufacturing. Moreover, verdigris paints are not stable and are subject to a colour change from blue-green to green, which occurs in the first few months after the application. In this paper, we focused our attention on the use of ATR-FTIR mapping as a useful method to identify verdigris secondary products and pathways. Several mock-ups and real samples have been analysed, and the correlation among the detected compounds and their spatial location, obtained by the application of ATR-FTIR microscopy in mapping mode, allowed formulating some hypotheses on the degradation pattern of verdigris, which may feed the discussion on the transformation and stability of this pigment. From an analytical point of view, we showed how FTIR mapping approaches may be extremely useful both for the identification of compounds in complex matrix in which single spectra may limit the exhaustive characterisations due to bands overlapping and for the study of degradation pathways by taking into consideration the relative distribution of degradation products.

  9. TPP1 Blocks an ATR-Mediated Resection Mechanism at Telomeres.

    PubMed

    Kibe, Tatsuya; Zimmermann, Michal; de Lange, Titia

    2016-01-21

    The regulation of 5' end resection at DSBs and telomeres prevents genome instability. DSB resection is positively and negatively regulated by ATM signaling through CtIP/MRN and 53BP1-bound Rif1, respectively. Similarly, telomeres lacking TRF2 undergo ATM-controlled CtIP-dependent hyper-resection when the repression by 53BP1/Rif1 is alleviated. However, telomere resection in the absence of 53BP1/Rif1 is more extensive upon complete removal of shelterin, indicating additional protection against resection by shelterin. Here we show that TPP1 and POT1a/b in shelterin block a resection pathway distinct from that repressed by TRF2. This second pathway is regulated by ATR signaling, involves Exo1 and BLM, and is inhibited by 53BP1/Rif1. Thus, mammalian cells have two distinct 5' end-resection pathways that are regulated by DNA damage signaling, in part through Rif1-mediated inhibition. The data show that telomeres are protected from hyper-resection through the repression of the ATM and ATR kinases by TRF2 and TPP1-bound POT1a/b, respectively. PMID:26778124

  10. 53BP1 deficiency combined with telomere dysfunction activates ATR-dependent DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Paula; Flores, Juana M; Blasco, Maria A

    2012-04-16

    TRF1 protects mammalian telomeres from fusion and fragility. Depletion of TRF1 leads to telomere fusions as well as accumulation of γ-H2AX foci and activation of both the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)- and the ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3 related (ATR)-mediated deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage response (DDR) pathways. 53BP1, which is also present at dysfunctional telomeres, is a target of ATM that accumulates at DNA double-strand breaks and favors nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair over ATM-dependent resection and homology-directed repair (homologous recombination [HR]). To address the role of 53BP1 at dysfunctional telomeres, we generated mice lacking TRF1 and 53BP1. 53BP1 deficiency significantly rescued telomere fusions in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) lacking TRF1, but they showed evidence of a switch from the NHEJ- to HR-mediated repair of uncapped telomeres. Concomitantly, double-mutant MEFs showed evidence of hyperactivation of the ATR-dependent DDR. In intact mice, combined 53BP1/TRF1 deficiency in stratified epithelia resulted in earlier onset of DNA damage and increased CHK1 phosphorylation during embryonic development, leading to aggravation of skin phenotypes. PMID:22508511

  11. In-column ATR-FTIR spectroscopy to monitor affinity chromatography purification of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Boulet-Audet, Maxime; Kazarian, Sergei G.; Byrne, Bernadette

    2016-01-01

    In recent years many monoclonal antibodies (mAb) have entered the biotherapeutics market, offering new treatments for chronic and life-threatening diseases. Protein A resin captures monoclonal antibody (mAb) effectively, but the binding capacity decays over repeated purification cycles. On an industrial scale, replacing fouled Protein A affinity chromatography resin accounts for a large proportion of the raw material cost. Cleaning-in-place (CIP) procedures were developed to extend Protein A resin lifespan, but chromatograms cannot reliably quantify any remaining contaminants over repeated cycles. To study resin fouling in situ, we coupled affinity chromatography and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy for the first time, by embedding an attenuated total reflection (ATR) sensor inside a micro-scale column while measuring the UV 280 nm and conductivity. Our approach quantified the in-column protein concentration in the resin bed and determined protein conformation. Our results show that Protein A ligand leached during CIP. We also found that host cell proteins bound to the Protein A resin even more strongly than mAbs and that typical CIP conditions do not remove all fouling contaminants. The insights derived from in-column ATR-FTIR spectroscopic monitoring could contribute to mAb purification quality assurance as well as guide the development of more effective CIP conditions to optimise resin lifespan. PMID:27470880

  12. In vivo interstitial glucose characterization and monitoring in the skin by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrebova Eikje, Natalja

    2011-03-01

    Successful development of real-time non-invasive glucose monitoring would represent a major advancement not only in the treatment and management of patients with diabetes mellitus and carbohydrate metabolism disorders, but also for understanding in those biochemical, metabolic and (patho-)physiological processes of glucose at the molecular level in vivo. Here, ATR-FTIR spectroscopy technique has been challenged not only for in vivo measurement of interstitial glucose levels, but also for their non-invasive molecular qualitative and quantitative comparative characterization in the skin tissue. The results, based on calculated mean values of determined 5 glucose-specific peaks in the glucose-related 1000-1160 cm-1 region, showed intra- and inter-subject differences in interstitial glucose activity levels with their changes at different times and doses of OGTT, while raising questions about the relationships between interstitial and blood glucose levels. In conclusion, the introduction of ATR-FTIR spectroscopy technique has opened up an access to the interstitial fluid space in the skin tissue for interstitial glucose characterization and monitoring in vivo. Though interstitial versus blood glucose monitoring has different characteristics, it can be argued that accurate and precise measurements of interstitial glucose levels may be more important clinically.

  13. In-column ATR-FTIR spectroscopy to monitor affinity chromatography purification of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Boulet-Audet, Maxime; Kazarian, Sergei G; Byrne, Bernadette

    2016-01-01

    In recent years many monoclonal antibodies (mAb) have entered the biotherapeutics market, offering new treatments for chronic and life-threatening diseases. Protein A resin captures monoclonal antibody (mAb) effectively, but the binding capacity decays over repeated purification cycles. On an industrial scale, replacing fouled Protein A affinity chromatography resin accounts for a large proportion of the raw material cost. Cleaning-in-place (CIP) procedures were developed to extend Protein A resin lifespan, but chromatograms cannot reliably quantify any remaining contaminants over repeated cycles. To study resin fouling in situ, we coupled affinity chromatography and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy for the first time, by embedding an attenuated total reflection (ATR) sensor inside a micro-scale column while measuring the UV 280 nm and conductivity. Our approach quantified the in-column protein concentration in the resin bed and determined protein conformation. Our results show that Protein A ligand leached during CIP. We also found that host cell proteins bound to the Protein A resin even more strongly than mAbs and that typical CIP conditions do not remove all fouling contaminants. The insights derived from in-column ATR-FTIR spectroscopic monitoring could contribute to mAb purification quality assurance as well as guide the development of more effective CIP conditions to optimise resin lifespan. PMID:27470880

  14. ATR inhibition induces synthetic lethality and overcomes chemoresistance in TP53- or ATM-defective chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Kwok, Marwan; Davies, Nicholas; Agathanggelou, Angelo; Smith, Edward; Oldreive, Ceri; Petermann, Eva; Stewart, Grant; Brown, Jeff; Lau, Alan; Pratt, Guy; Parry, Helen; Taylor, Malcolm; Moss, Paul; Hillmen, Peter; Stankovic, Tatjana

    2016-02-01

    TP53 and ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) defects are associated with genomic instability, clonal evolution, and chemoresistance in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Currently, therapies capable of providing durable remissions in relapsed/refractory TP53- or ATM-defective CLL are lacking. Ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related (ATR) mediates response to replication stress, the absence of which leads to collapse of stalled replication forks into chromatid fragments that require resolution through the ATM/p53 pathway. Here, using AZD6738, a novel ATR kinase inhibitor, we investigated ATR inhibition as a synthetically lethal strategy to target CLL cells with TP53 or ATM defects. Irrespective of TP53 or ATM status, induction of CLL cell proliferation upregulated ATR protein, which then became activated in response to replication stress. In TP53- or ATM-defective CLL cells, inhibition of ATR signaling by AZD6738 led to an accumulation of unrepaired DNA damage, which was carried through into mitosis because of defective cell cycle checkpoints, resulting in cell death by mitotic catastrophe. Consequently, AZD6738 was selectively cytotoxic to both TP53- and ATM-defective CLL cell lines and primary cells. This was confirmed in vivo using primary xenograft models of TP53- or ATM-defective CLL, where treatment with AZD6738 resulted in decreased tumor load and reduction in the proportion of CLL cells with such defects. Moreover, AZD6738 sensitized TP53- or ATM-defective primary CLL cells to chemotherapy and ibrutinib. Our findings suggest that ATR is a promising therapeutic target for TP53- or ATM-defective CLL that warrants clinical investigation. PMID:26563132

  15. Structure-Based Drug Design of Novel Potent and Selective Tetrahydropyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrazines as ATR Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A saturation strategy focused on improving the selectivity and physicochemical properties of ATR inhibitor HTS hit 1 led to a novel series of highly potent and selective tetrahydropyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrazines. Use of PI3Kα mutants as ATR crystal structure surrogates was instrumental in providing cocrystal structures to guide the medicinal chemistry designs. Detailed DMPK studies involving cyanide and GSH as trapping agents during microsomal incubations, in addition to deuterium-labeled compounds as mechanistic probes uncovered the molecular basis for the observed CYP3A4 TDI in the series. PMID:25589927

  16. LIGHT WATER REACTOR ACCIDENT TOLERANT FUELS IRRADIATION TESTING

    SciTech Connect

    Carmack, William Jonathan; Barrett, Kristine Eloise; Chichester, Heather Jean MacLean

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of Accident Tolerant Fuels (ATF) experiments is to test novel fuel and cladding concepts designed to replace the current zirconium alloy uranium dioxide (UO2) fuel system. The objective of this Research and Development (R&D) is to develop novel ATF concepts that will be able to withstand loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period than the current fuel system while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations, operational transients, design basis, and beyond design basis events. It was necessary to design, analyze, and fabricate drop-in capsules to meet the requirements for testing under prototypic LWR temperatures in Idaho National Laboratory's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). Three industry led teams and one DOE team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory provided fuel rodlet samples for their new concepts for ATR insertion in 2015. As-built projected temperature calculations were performed on the ATF capsules using the BISON fuel performance code. BISON is an application of INL’s Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE), which is a massively parallel finite element based framework used to solve systems of fully coupled nonlinear partial differential equations. Both 2D and 3D models were set up to examine cladding and fuel performance.

  17. Multi-fuel reformers for fuel cells used in transportation. Multi-fuel reformers: Phase 1 -- Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    DOE has established the goal, through the Fuel Cells in Transportation Program, of fostering the rapid development and commercialization of fuel cells as economic competitors for the internal combustion engine. Central to this goal is a safe feasible means of supplying hydrogen of the required purity to the vehicular fuel cell system. Two basic strategies are being considered: (1) on-board fuel processing whereby alternative fuels such as methanol, ethanol or natural gas stored on the vehicle undergo reformation and subsequent processing to produce hydrogen, and (2) on-board storage of pure hydrogen provided by stationary fuel processing plants. This report analyzes fuel processor technologies, types of fuel and fuel cell options for on-board reformation. As the Phase 1 of a multi-phased program to develop a prototype multi-fuel reformer system for a fuel cell powered vehicle, the objective of this program was to evaluate the feasibility of a multi-fuel reformer concept and to select a reforming technology for further development in the Phase 2 program, with the ultimate goal of integration with a DOE-designated fuel cell and vehicle configuration. The basic reformer processes examined in this study included catalytic steam reforming (SR), non-catalytic partial oxidation (POX) and catalytic partial oxidation (also known as Autothermal Reforming, or ATR). Fuels under consideration in this study included methanol, ethanol, and natural gas. A systematic evaluation of reforming technologies, fuels, and transportation fuel cell applications was conducted for the purpose of selecting a suitable multi-fuel processor for further development and demonstration in a transportation application.

  18. Mixed oxide fuels testing in the advanced test reactor to support plutonium disposition

    SciTech Connect

    Ryskamp, J.M.; Sterbentz, J.W.; Chang, G.S.

    1995-09-01

    An intense worldwide effort is now under way to find means of reducing the stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium. One of the most attractive solutions would be to use WGPu as fuel in existing light water reactors (LWRs) in the form of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel - i.e., plutonia (PUO{sub 2}) mixed with urania (UO{sub 2}). Before U.S. reactors could be used for this purpose, their operating licenses would have to be amended. Numerous technical issues must be resolved before LWR operating licenses can be amended to allow the use of MOX fuel. These issues include the following: (1) MOX fuel fabrication process verification, (2) Whether and how to use burnable poisons to depress MOX fuel initial reactivity, which is higher than that of urania, (3) The effects of WGPu isotopic composition, (4) The feasibility of loading MOX fuel with plutonia content up to 7% by weight, (5) The effects of americium and gallium in WGPu, (6) Fission gas release from MOX fuel pellets made from WGPu, (7) Fuel/cladding gap closure, (8) The effects of power cycling and off-normal events on fuel integrity, (9) Development of radial distributions of burnup and fission products, (10) Power spiking near the interfaces of MOX and urania fuel assemblies, and (11) Fuel performance code validation. We have performed calculations to show that the use of hafnium shrouds can produce spectrum adjustments that will bring the flux spectrum in ATR test loops into a good approximation to the spectrum anticipated in a commercial LWR containing MOX fuel while allowing operation of the test fuel assemblies near their optimum values of linear heat generation rate. The ATR would be a nearly ideal test bed for developing data needed to support applications to license LWRs for operation with MOX fuel made from weapons-grade plutonium. The requirements for planning and implementing a test program in the ATR have been identified.

  19. Assessment of XM-19 as a Substitute for AISI 348 in ATR Service

    SciTech Connect

    F. A. Garner; L. R. Greenwood; R. E. Mizia; C. R. Tyler

    2007-11-01

    It has been proposed that XM-19 alloy be considered as a possible replacement steel for AISI 348 in the construction of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) capsules. AISI 348 works well, but is currently very difficult to obtain commercially. The superior and desirable mechanical properties of XM-19 alloy have been proven in non-nuclear applications, but no data are available regarding its use in radiation environments. While most 300 series alloys will meet the conditions required in ATR , it cannot be confidently assumed that XM-19 can be substituted without prior qualification in a radiation test. Compared to AISI 348, XM-19 will have an enhanced tendency for phase instabilities due to its higher levels of Ni and, especially, Si. However, transmutation of important elemental components in the highly thermalized ATR spectrum may have a very pronounced effect on its performance during irradiation. Not only will strong transmutation of Mn to Fe reduce the ductility and strength advantages provided by the higher initial Mn content of XM-19, but the extensive loss of Mn will also release from solution much of the N upon which the higher strength of XM-19 depends. In addition, the combined influence of transmutation and Inverse Kirkendall processes may lead to gas-bubble-covered grain boundaries, producing a very fragile alloy after significant irradiation has accumulated. At present, there are no radiation data available to substantiate this possible scenario. An alternate proposal is therefore advanced. Since the response of AISI 348 and 347 to radiation are expected to be relatively indistinguishable, the AISI 347 might serve as an acceptable replacement. While AISI 348 is usually chosen for nuclear service in order to reduce the overall radioactivity arising from relatively small amounts of highly transmutable elements such as cobalt, these elements have very little effect on the radiation performance of the steel. In the proposed application, however, the activity

  20. Experience in the reprocessing of mixed-oxide fuels at PNC (Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation)

    SciTech Connect

    Komatsu, Hisato; Onishi, Moichi; Araya, Sadao; Fukushima, Misao

    1989-01-01

    The Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation (PNC) in Japan has experience in reprocessing mixed-oxide (MOX) fuels for the advanced thermal reactor (ATR) Fugen at the Tokai Reprocessing Plant (TRP) and for fast breeder reactors (FBRs) at the Chemical Processing Facility (CPF). The TRP was originally designed and constructed as the first reprocessing plant for light water reactor fuels in Japan. It has processed {approximately}400 t of spent fuels since 1977. To utilize recovered plutonium, PNC has developed the prototype ATR Fugen. This reactor has been operated using MOX fuel since 1978. In parallel, utilities are promoting a plutonium thermal project. Several MOX assemblies have already been loaded in a boiling water and a pressurized water reactor. To facilitate the operation of Fugen and promote research and development for the reprocessing of MOX fuels in Japan, PNC obtained a license for reprocessing fuels for Fugen at TRP in 1985. PNC has designed and constructed the CPF at Tokai Works to conduct basic research on the reprocessing of FBR fuels. The Recycle Equipment Test Facility, an engineering scale hot facility, is now being designed for further R and D in this field. It will start hot operation in the mid-1990s.

  1. Inactivation of ATM/ATR DNA Damage Checkpoint Promotes Androgen Induced Chromosomal Instability in Prostate Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Yung-Tuen; Liu, Ji; Tang, Kaidun; Wong, Yong-Chuan; Khanna, Kum Kum; Ling, Ming-Tat

    2012-01-01

    The ATM/ATR DNA damage checkpoint functions in the maintenance of genetic stability and some missense variants of the ATM gene have been shown to confer a moderate increased risk of prostate cancer. However, whether inactivation of this checkpoint contributes directly to prostate specific cancer predisposition is still unknown. Here, we show that exposure of non-malignant prostate epithelial cells (HPr-1AR) to androgen led to activation of the ATM/ATR DNA damage response and induction of cellular senescence. Notably, knockdown of the ATM gene expression in HPr-1AR cells can promote androgen-induced TMPRSS2: ERG rearrangement, a prostate-specific chromosome translocation frequently found in prostate cancer cells. Intriguingly, unlike the non-malignant prostate epithelial cells, the ATM/ATR DNA damage checkpoint appears to be defective in prostate cancer cells, since androgen treatment only induced a partial activation of the DNA damage response. This mechanism appears to preserve androgen induced autophosphorylation of ATM and phosphorylation of H2AX, lesion processing and repair pathway yet restrain ATM/CHK1/CHK2 and p53 signaling pathway. Our findings demonstrate that ATM/ATR inactivation is a crucial step in promoting androgen-induced genomic instability and prostate carcinogenesis. PMID:23272087

  2. Synergistic potentiation of (-)-lomaiviticin A cytotoxicity by the ATR inhibitor VE-821.

    PubMed

    Colis, Laureen C; Herzon, Seth B

    2016-07-01

    (-)-Lomaiviticin A (1) is a cytotoxic bacterial metabolite that induces double-strand breaks in DNA. Here we show that the cytotoxicity of (-)-lomaiviticin A (1) is synergistically potentiated in the presence of VE-821 (7), an inhibitor of ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related protein (ATR). While 0.5nM 1 or 10μM 7 alone are non-lethal to K562 cells, co-incubation of the two leads to high levels of cell kill (81% and 94% after 24 and 48h, respectively). Mechanistic data indicate that cells treated with 1 and 7 suffer extensive DNA double-strand breaks and apoptosis. These data suggest combinations of 1 and 7 may be a valuable chemotherapeutic strategy. PMID:27177826

  3. Direct interaction between cholesterol and phosphatidylcholines in hydrated membranes revealed by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Arsov, Zoran; Quaroni, Luca

    2007-11-01

    By using attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and curve fitting we have examined temperature dependence and composition dependence of the shape of the carbonyl band in phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol model membranes. Membranes were hydrated either in excess water or in excess deuterated water. The studied binary mixtures exhibit different lipid phases at appropriate temperature and amount of cholesterol, among them also the so-called liquid-ordered phase. The results confirm that cholesterol has a significant indirect influence on the carbonyl band through conformational and hydration effects. This influence was interpreted in view of the known temperature composition phase diagrams for inspected binary mixtures. In addition, direct interaction was observed, which could point to the presence of hydrogen bond between cholesterol and carbonyl group. This direct interaction, though weak, might play at least a partial role in the stabilization of cholesterol-rich lipid domains in model and biological membranes. PMID:17662974

  4. ATR and a Chk1-Aurora B pathway coordinate postmitotic genome surveillance with cytokinetic abscission

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, Douglas R.; Ullman, Katharine S.

    2015-01-01

    Aurora B regulates cytokinesis timing and plays a central role in the abscission checkpoint. Cellular events monitored by this checkpoint are beginning to be elucidated, yet signaling pathways upstream of Aurora B in this context remain poorly understood. Here we reveal a new connection between postmitotic genome surveillance and cytokinetic abscission. Underreplicated DNA lesions are known to be transmitted through mitosis and protected in newly formed nuclei by recruitment of 53BP1 and other proteins until repair takes place. We find that this genome surveillance initiates before completion of cytokinesis. Elevating replication stress increases this postmitotic process and delays cytokinetic abscission by keeping the abscission checkpoint active. We further find that ATR activity in midbody-stage cells links postmitotic genome surveillance to abscission timing and that Chk1 integrates this and other signals upstream of Aurora B to regulate when the final step in the physical separation of daughter cells occurs. PMID:25904336

  5. Unidirectional Excitation of Graphene Plasmon in Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Wei; Wu, Yue-Chao; Liu, Fang-Li

    2016-04-01

    Graphene plasmon has been attracting interests from both theoretical and experimental research due to its gate tunability and potential applications in the terahertz frequency range. Here, we propose an effective scheme to unidirectionally excite the graphene plasmon by exploiting magneto-optical materials in the famous attenuated total reflection (ATR) configuration. We show that the graphene plasmon dispersion relation in such a device is asymmetric in different exciting directions, thus making it possible to couple the incident light unidirectionally to the propagating plasmon. The split of absorption spectrum of graphene clearly indicates that under a magnetic field for one single frequency, graphene plasmon can only be excited in one direction. The possible gate tunablity of excitation direction and the further application of the proposed scheme, such as optical isolator, also are discussed.

  6. Mobility and surfactant migration in EA/MAA latex films; ATR FT-IR spectroscopic study

    SciTech Connect

    Thorstenson, T.A.; Tebelius, L.K.; Urban, M.W.

    1993-12-31

    Although numerous factors such as compatibility, mechanical deformation, and the nature of the substrate have been addressed with respect to surfactant migration and distribution within latex films, latex suspension stability and the effects of particle flocculation are also key issues. In this paper, surfactant behavior in an ethyl acrylate/methacrylic acid/sodium dioctyl sulfosuccinate (EA/MAA/SDOSS) latex system is monitored as a function of stability of the liquid latex suspensions. Particle size data obtained using light scattering reveals an appreciable degree of flocculation over the period of study. It is found that flocculation is paralleled by a significantly increased degree of interfacial surfactant enrichment, a monitored by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR FT-IR). It is concluded that the enhanced surfactant exudation observed for flocculated latexes is due to displacement of adsorbed surfactant during the course of flocculation.

  7. ATR and a Chk1-Aurora B pathway coordinate postmitotic genome surveillance with cytokinetic abscission.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Douglas R; Ullman, Katharine S

    2015-06-15

    Aurora B regulates cytokinesis timing and plays a central role in the abscission checkpoint. Cellular events monitored by this checkpoint are beginning to be elucidated, yet signaling pathways upstream of Aurora B in this context remain poorly understood. Here we reveal a new connection between postmitotic genome surveillance and cytokinetic abscission. Underreplicated DNA lesions are known to be transmitted through mitosis and protected in newly formed nuclei by recruitment of 53BP1 and other proteins until repair takes place. We find that this genome surveillance initiates before completion of cytokinesis. Elevating replication stress increases this postmitotic process and delays cytokinetic abscission by keeping the abscission checkpoint active. We further find that ATR activity in midbody-stage cells links postmitotic genome surveillance to abscission timing and that Chk1 integrates this and other signals upstream of Aurora B to regulate when the final step in the physical separation of daughter cells occurs. PMID:25904336

  8. Testing of Gas Reactor Materials and Fuel in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover

    2004-10-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has long been involved in testing gas reactor materials, and has developed facilities well suited for providing the right conditions and environment for gas reactor tests. This paper discusses the different types of irradiation hardware that have been utilized in past ATR irradiation tests of gas reactor materials. The new Gas Test Loop facility currently being developed for the ATR is discussed and the different approaches being considered in the design of the facility. The different options for an irradiation experiment such as active versus passive temperature control, neutron spectrum tailoring, and different types of lead experiment sweep gas monitors are also discussed. The paper is then concluded with examples of different past and present gas reactor material and fuel irradiations.

  9. TESTING OF GAS REACTOR MATERIALS AND FUEL IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Grover, S.B.

    2004-10-06

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has long been involved in testing gas reactor materials, and has developed facilities well suited for providing the right conditions and environment for gas reactor tests. This paper discusses the different types of irradiation hardware that have been utilized in past ATR irradiation tests of gas reactor materials. The new Gas Test Loop facility currently being developed for the ATR is discussed and the different approaches being considered in the design of the facility. The different options for an irradiation experiment such as active versus passive temperature control, neutron spectrum tailoring, and different types of lead experiment sweep gas monitors are also discussed. The paper is then concluded with examples of different past and present gas reactor material and fuel irradiations.

  10. Prevalence and functional analysis of sequence variants in the ATR checkpoint mediator Claspin (CLSPN)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianmin; Song, Young-Han; Brannigan, Brian W.; Wahrer, Doke C. R.; Schiripo, Taryn A.; Harris, Patricia L.; Haserlat, Sara M.; Ulkus, Lindsey E.; Shannon, Kristen M.; Garber, Judy E.; Freedman, Matthew L.; Henderson, Brian E.; Zou, Lee; Sgroi, Dennis C.; Haber, Daniel A.; Bell, Daphne W.

    2009-01-01

    Mutational inactivation of genes controlling the DNA damage response contributes to cancer susceptibility within families and within the general population as well as to sporadic tumorigenesis. Claspin (CLSPN) encodes a recently recognized mediator protein essential for the ATR and CHK1-dependent checkpoint elicited by replicative stress or the presence of single-stranded DNA. Here we describe a study to determine whether mutational disruption of CLSPN contributes to cancer susceptibility and sporadic tumorigenesis. We resequenced CLSPN from the germline of selected cancer families with a history of breast cancer (n=25) or a multicancer phenotype (n=46) as well as from a panel of sporadic cancer cell-lines (n=52) derived from a variety of tumor types. Eight nonsynonymous variants, including a recurrent mutation, were identified from the germline of two cancer-prone individuals and five cancer cell-lines of breast, ovarian and hematopoietic origin. None of the variants was present within population controls. In contrast, mutations were rare within genes encoding the CLSPN-interacting protein ATR and its binding partner ATRIP. One variant of CLSPN, encoding the I783S missense mutation, was defective in its ability to mediate CHK1 phosphorylation following DNA damage and was unable to rescue sensitivity to replicative stress in CLSPN-depleted cells. Taken together, these observations raise the possibility that CLSPN may encode a component of the DNA damage response pathway that is targeted by mutations in human cancers, suggesting the need for larger population-based studies to investigate whether CLSPN variants contribute to cancer susceptibility. PMID:19737971

  11. Rapid detection of NBOME's and other NPS on blotter papers by direct ATR-FTIR spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Coelho Neto, José

    2015-07-01

    Blotter paper is among the most common forms of consumption of new psychotropic substances (NPS), formerly referred as designer drugs. In many cases, users are misled to believe they are taking LSD when, in fact, they are taking newer and less known drugs like the NBOMEs or other substituted phenethylamines. We report our findings in quick testing of blotter papers for illicit substances like NBOMEs and other NPS by taking ATR-FTIR spectra directly from blotters seized on the streets, without any sample preparation. Both sides (front and back) of each blotter were tested. Collected data were analyzed by single- and multi-component spectral matching and submitted to chemometric discriminant analysis. Our results showed that, on 66.7% of the cases analyzed, seized blotters contained one or more types of NBOMEs, confirming the growing presence of this novel substances on the market. Matching IR signals were detected on both or just one side of the blotters and showed variable strength. Although no quantitative analysis was made, detection of these substances by the proposed approach serves as indication of variable and possibly higher dosages per blotter when compared to LSD, which showed to be below the detection limit of the applied method. Blotters containing a mescaline-like compound, later confirmed by GC-MS and LC-MS to be MAL (methallylescaline), a substance very similar to mescaline, were detected among the samples tested. Validity of direct ATR-FTIR testing was confirmed by checking the obtained results against independent GC-MS or LC-MS results for the same cases/samples. PMID:25965305

  12. Cutaneous approach towards clinical and pathophysiological aspects of hyperglycemia by ATR FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eikje, Natalja Skrebova; Sota, Takayuki; Aizawa, Katsuo

    2007-07-01

    Attempts were made to non-invasively detect glucose-specific spectral signals in the skin by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. In vivo spectra were collected from the inner wrists of healthy, prediabetes and diabetes subjects in the 750-4000 cm -1 region, with a closer assessment of the glucose-related region between 1000 and 1180 cm -1. Spectra in vivo showed glucose-specific peaks at 1030, 1080, 1118 and 1151 cm -1, as a variety of glucose solutions are found in vitro. Based on the differences of intensities at 1030 and 1118 cm -1 two spectral patterns were seen: I 1118 > I 1030 for a diabetes and I 1030> I 1118 for non-diabetes subjects. The peak at 1030 cm -1 was used to assess glucose concentrations in the skin due to its good correlation with glucose concentrations in vitro. Calculated mean values of the peak at 1030 cm -1 showed evidence of correlation with blood glucose levels when grouped as <= 140, 140-200 and >= 200 mg/dL, though there was no constant correlation between them when compared before/after OGTT or at the fasting/postprandial states. Absorbances at 1030 cm -1 were not only increased in a dose-dependent manner in a diabetes patient, but were also generally higher than in non-diabetes subjects at 30 min OGTT assessment. Also we could monitor absorbances at 1030 cm -1 and determine their changes in the skin tissue at different times of OGTT. We assume that our approach to in vivo measurement and monitoring of glucose concentrations at 1030 cm -1 may be one of the indicators to assess glucose activity level and its changes in the skin tissue, and has further implications in the study of clinical and pathophysiological aspects of hyperglycemia in diabetes and non-diabetes subjects by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy.

  13. Study of consumer fireworks post-blast residues by ATR-FTIR.

    PubMed

    Martín-Alberca, Carlos; Zapata, Félix; Carrascosa, Héctor; Ortega-Ojeda, Fernando E; García-Ruiz, Carmen

    2016-03-01

    Specific analytical procedures are requested for the forensic analysis of pre- and post-blast consumer firework samples, which present significant challenges. Up to date, vibrational spectroscopic techniques such as Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) have not been tested for the analysis of post-blast residues in spite of their interesting strengths for the forensic field. Therefore, this work proposes a simple and fast procedure for the sampling and analysis of consumer firework post-blast residues by a portable FTIR instrument with an Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) accessory. In addition, the post-blast residues spectra of several consumer fireworks were studied in order to achieve the identification of their original chemical compositions. Hence, this work analysed 22 standard reagents usually employed to make consumer fireworks, or because they are related to their combustion products. Then, 5 different consumer fireworks were exploded, and their residues were sampled with dry cotton swabs and directly analysed by ATR-FTIR. In addition, their pre-blast fuses and charges were also analysed in order to stablish a proper comparison. As a result, the identification of the original chemical compositions of the post-blast samples was obtained. Some of the compounds found were potassium chlorate, barium nitrate, potassium nitrate, potassium perchlorate or charcoal. An additional study involving chemometric tools found that the results might greatly depend on the swab head type used for the sampling, and its sampling efficiency. The proposed procedure could be used as a complementary technique for the analysis of consumer fireworks post-blast residues. PMID:26717839

  14. Analysis of H2O in silicate glass using attenuated total reflectance (ATR) micro-FTIR spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Pitcher, Bradley W.

    2013-01-01

    We present a calibration for attenuated total reflectance (ATR) micro-FTIR for analysis of H2O in hydrous glass. A Ge ATR accessory was used to measure evanescent wave absorption by H2O within hydrous rhyolite and other standards. Absorbance at 3450 cm−1 (representing total H2O or H2Ot) and 1630 cm−1 (molecular H2O or H2Om) showed high correlation with measured H2O in the glasses as determined by transmission FTIR spectroscopy and manometry. For rhyolite, wt%H2O=245(±9)×A3450-0.22(±0.03) and wt%H2Om=235(±11)×A1630-0.20(±0.03) where A3450 and A1630 represent the ATR absorption at the relevant infrared wavelengths. The calibration permits determination of volatiles in singly polished glass samples with spot size down to ~5 μm (for H2O-rich samples) and detection limits of ~0.1 wt% H2O. Basaltic, basaltic andesite and dacitic glasses of known H2O concentrations fall along a density-adjusted calibration, indicating that ATR is relatively insensitive to glass composition, at least for calc-alkaline glasses. The following equation allows quantification of H2O in silicate glasses that range in composition from basalt to rhyolite: wt%H2O=(ω×A3450/ρ)+b where ω = 550 ± 21, b = −0.19 ± 0.03, ρ = density, in g/cm3, and A3450 is the ATR absorbance at 3450 cm−1. The ATR micro-FTIR technique is less sensitive than transmission FTIR, but requires only a singly polished sample for quantitative results, thus minimizing time for sample preparation. Compared with specular reflectance, it is more sensitive and better suited for imaging of H2O variations in heterogeneous samples such as melt inclusions. One drawback is that the technique can damage fragile samples and we therefore recommend mounting of unknowns in epoxy prior to polishing. Our calibration should hold for any Ge ATR crystals with the same incident angle (31°). Use of a different crystal type or geometry would require measurement of several H2O-bearing standards to provide a crystal

  15. STAT3 regulated ATR via microRNA-383 to control DNA damage to affect apoptosis in A431 cells.

    PubMed

    Liao, Xing-Hua; Zheng, Li; He, Hong-Peng; Zheng, De-Liang; Wei, Zhao-Qiang; Wang, Nan; Dong, Jian; Ma, Wen-Jian; Zhang, Tong-Cun

    2015-11-01

    Skin cancer is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Mounting evidence shows that exposure of the skin to solar UV radiation results in inflammation, oxidative stress, DNA damage, dysregulation of cellular signaling pathways and immunosuppression thereby resulting in skin cancer. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is well known to function as an anti-apoptotic factor, especially in numerous malignancies, but the relationship between STAT3 activation and DNA damage response in skin cancer is still not fully understood. We now report that STAT3 inhibited DNA damage induced by UV and STAT3 mediated upregulation of GADD45γ and MDC-1 and the phosphorylation of H2AX in UV induced DNA damage. Notably, STAT3 can increase the expression of ATR in A431 cells. Luciferase assay shows that STAT3 activates the transcription of ATR promoter. More importantly, microRNA-383 suppressed ATR expression by targeting 3' (untranslated regions)UTR of ATR in A431 cells, and STAT3 down-regulates the transcription of miR-383 promoter. Thus, these results reveal the new insight that ATR is down-regulated by STAT3-regulated microRNA-383 in A431 cells. Moreover, overexpression of STAT3 enhanced expression of antiapoptosis genes BCL-1 and MCL-1, and depletion of STAT3 sensitized A431 cells to apoptotic cell death following UV. Collectively, these studies suggest that STAT3 may be a potential target for both the prevention and treatment of human skin cancer. PMID:26261078

  16. A testbed for architecture and fidelity trade studies in the Bayesian decision-level fusion of ATR products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Kyle J.; Ross, Timothy D.

    2007-04-01

    Decision-level fusion is an appealing extension to automatic/assisted target recognition (ATR) as it is a low-bandwidth technique bolstered by a strong theoretical foundation that requires no modification of the source algorithms. Despite the relative simplicity of decision-level fusion, there are many options for fusion application and fusion algorithm specifications. This paper describes a tool that allows trade studies and optimizations across these many options, by feeding an actual fusion algorithm via models of the system environment. Models and fusion algorithms can be specified and then exercised many times, with accumulated results used to compute performance metrics such as probability of correct identification. Performance differences between the best of the contributing sources and the fused result constitute examples of "gain." The tool, constructed as part of the Fusion for Identifying Targets Experiment (FITE) within the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Sensors Directorate ATR Thrust, finds its main use in examining the relationships among conditions affecting the target, prior information, fusion algorithm complexity, and fusion gain. ATR as an unsolved problem provides the main challenges to fusion in its high cost and relative scarcity of training data, its variability in application, the inability to produce truly random samples, and its sensitivity to context. This paper summarizes the mathematics underlying decision-level fusion in the ATR domain and describes a MATLAB-based architecture for exploring the trade space thus defined. Specific dimensions within this trade space are delineated, providing the raw material necessary to define experiments suitable for multi-look and multi-sensor ATR systems.

  17. In-Situ ATR-FTIR and Surface Complexation Modeling Study of the Adsorption of Dimethylarsenic Acid and p-Arsanilic Acid on Iron Oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, S. R.; Al-Abadleh, H.; Mitchell, W.

    2010-12-01

    Arsenic is an element that exists naturally in many rocks and minerals around the world, accumulates in petroleum, shale, and coal deposits as a result of biogeochemical processes, and is found in fly ash from fuel combustion. Arsenic compounds in their organic and inorganic forms pose both health and environmental risks. The environmental fate of arsenic compounds is controlled to a large extent by their surface interactions with inorganic and organic surfaces. We report results from applying the triple layer surface complexation model to adsorption isotherm and pH-envelope experimental data of dimethylarsenic acid, DMA, and p-arsanilic acid, p-AsA on the iron oxides, hematite and goethite. Ligand exchange reactions were based on the interpretation of ATR-FTIR spectra of DMA and p-AsA surface complexes. Surface coverage of the organoarsenicals was quantified in-situ from the spectral component at 840 cm-1. The best model fit to the DMA adsorption data was obtained using an outer-sphere complex, whereas for p-AsA, best model fit was obtained using two monodentate inner-sphere surface complexes. The significance of the results is discussed in relation to improving modeling tools used by environmental regulators. Accurate predictive modeling tools are needed for effective design of arsenic removal technologies using iron oxide minerals.

  18. Quantitative Analysis of the Relative Transcript Levels of ABC Transporter Atr Genes in Aspergillus nidulans by Real-Time Reverse Transcription-PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Pizeta Semighini, Camile; Marins, Mozart; Goldman, Maria Helena S.; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique

    2002-01-01

    The development of assays for quantitative analysis of the relative transcript levels of ABC transporter genes by real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) might provide important information about multidrug resistance in filamentous fungi. Here, we evaluate the potential of real-time RT-PCR to quantify the relative transcript levels of ABC transporter Atr genes from Aspergillus nidulans. The AtrA to AtrD genes showed different and higher levels in the presence of structurally unrelated drugs, such as camptothecin, imazalil, itraconazole, hygromycin, and 4-nitroquinoline oxide. We also verified the relative transcript levels of the Atr genes in the A. nidulans imazalil-resistant mutants. These genes displayed a very complex pattern in different ima genetic backgrounds. The imaB mutant has higher basal transcript levels of AtrB and -D than those of the wild-type strain. The levels of these two genes are comparable when the imaB mutant is grown in the presence and absence of imazalil. The imaC, -D, and -H mutants have higher basal levels of AtrA than that of the wild type. The same behavior is observed for the relative transcript levels of AtrB in the imaG mutant background. PMID:11872487

  19. Defining the contribution of MC1R physiological ligands to ATR phosphorylation at Ser435, a predictor of DNA repair in melanocytes

    PubMed Central

    Jarrett, Stuart G.; Wolf Horrell, Erin M.; Boulanger, Mary C.; D’Orazio, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), a GS-coupled receptor that signals through cAMP and PKA, regulates pigmentation, adaptive tanning, and melanoma resistance. MC1R-cAMP signaling promotes PKA-mediated phosphorylation of ataxia telangiectasia and rad3-related (ATR) at Ser435 (ATR-pS435), a modification that enhances nucleotide excision repair (NER) by facilitating recruitment of the XPA protein to sites of UV-induced DNA damage. High-throughput methods were developed to quantify ATR-pS435, measure XPA-photodamage interactions and assess NER function. We report that melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) or adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) induce ATR-pS435, enhance XPA’s association with UV-damaged DNA and optimize melanocytic NER. In contrast, MC1R antagonists agouti signaling protein (ASIP) or human β-defensin 3 (HBD3) interfere with ATR-pS435 generation, impair the XPA-DNA interaction and reduce DNA repair. Although ASIP and HBD3 each blocked α-MSH-mediated induction of the signaling pathway, only ASIP depleted basal ATR-pS435. Our findings confirm that ASIP diminishes agonist-independent MC1R basal signaling whereas HBD3 is a neutral MC1R antagonist that blocks activation by melanocortins. Furthermore, our data suggest that ATR-pS435 may be a useful biomarker for the DNA repair-deficient MC1R phenotype. PMID:26168232

  20. Defining the Contribution of MC1R Physiological Ligands to ATR Phosphorylation at Ser435, a Predictor of DNA Repair in Melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, Stuart G; Wolf Horrell, Erin M; Boulanger, Mary C; D'Orazio, John A

    2015-12-01

    The melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), a GS-coupled receptor that signals through cAMP and protein kinase A (PKA), regulates pigmentation, adaptive tanning, and melanoma resistance. MC1R-cAMP signaling promotes PKA-mediated phosphorylation of ataxia telangiectasia and rad3-related (ATR) at Ser435 (ATR-pS435), a modification that enhances nucleotide excision repair (NER) by facilitating recruitment of the XPA protein to sites of UV-induced DNA damage. High-throughput methods were developed to quantify ATR-pS435, measure XPA-photodamage interactions, and assess NER function. We report that melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH) or ACTH induce ATR-pS435, enhance XPA's association with UV-damaged DNA and optimize melanocytic NER. In contrast, MC1R antagonists agouti signaling protein (ASIP) or human β-defensin 3 (HBD3) interfere with ATR-pS435 generation, impair the XPA-DNA interaction, and reduce DNA repair. Although ASIP and HBD3 each blocked α-MSH-mediated induction of the signaling pathway, only ASIP depleted basal ATR-pS435. Our findings confirm that ASIP diminishes agonist-independent MC1R basal signaling whereas HBD3 is a neutral MC1R antagonist that blocks activation by melanocortins. Furthermore, our data suggest that ATR-pS435 may be a useful biomarker for the DNA repair-deficient MC1R phenotype. PMID:26168232

  1. Differential Processing of Low and High LET Radiation Induced DNA Damage: Investigation of Switch from ATM to ATR Signaling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Janapriya; Wang, Minli; Hada, Megumi; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2011-01-01

    The members of the phosphatidylinositol kinase-like kinase family of proteins namely ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR) are directly responsible for the maintenance of genomic integrity by mounting DDR through signaling and facilitating the recruitment of repair factors at the sites of DNA damage along with coordinating the deployment of cell cycle checkpoints to permit repair by phosphorylating Checkpoint kinase Chk1, Chk2 and p53. High LET radiation from GCR (Galactic Cosmic Rays) consisting mainly of protons and high energy and charged (HZE) particles from SPE (Solar Particle Event) pose a major health risk for astronauts on their space flight missions. The determination of these risks and the design of potential safeguards require sound knowledge of the biological consequences of lesion induction and the capability of the cells to counter them. We here strive to determine the coordination of ATM and ATR kinases at the break sites directly affecting checkpoint signaling and DNA repair and whether differential processing of breaks induced by low and high LET radiation leads to possible augmentation of swap of these damage sensors at the sites of DNA damage. Exposure of cells to IR triggers rapid autophosphorylation of serine-1981 that causes dimer dissociation and initiates monomer formation of ATM. ATM kinase activity depends on the disruption of the dimer, which allows access and phosphorylation of downstream ATM substrates like Chk2. Evidence suggests that ATM is activated by the alterations in higher-order chromatin structure although direct binding of ATM to DSB ends may be a crucial step in its activation. On the other hand, in case of ATR, RPA (replication protein A)-coated ssDNA (single-stranded DNA) generated as a result of stalled DNA replication or during processing of chromosomal lesions is crucial for the localization of ATR to sites of DNA damage in association with ATR-interacting protein (ATRIP). Although the

  2. Corrosion Evaluation of RERTR Uranium Molybdenum Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    A K Wertsching

    2012-09-01

    As part of the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) mandate to replace the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel for low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, research into the development of LEU fuel for research reactors has been active since the late 1970’s. Originally referred to as the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program the new effort named Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) is nearing the goal of replacing the standard aluminum clad dispersion highly enriched uranium aluminide fuel with a new LEU fuel. The five domestic high performance research reactors undergoing this conversion are High Flux Isotope reactor (HFIR), Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Reactor, Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Reactor II (MITR-II). The design of these reactors requires a higher neutron flux than other international research reactors, which to this point has posed unique challenges in the design and development of the new mandated LEU fuel. The new design utilizes a monolithic fuel configuration in order to obtain sufficient 235U within the LEU stoichoimetry to maintain the fission reaction within the domestic test reactors. The change from uranium aluminide dispersion fuel type to uranium molybdenum (UMo) monolithic configuration requires examination of possible corrosion issues associated with the new fuel meat. A focused analysis of the UMo fuel under potential corrosion conditions, within the ATR and under aqueous storage indicates a slow and predictable corrosion rate. Additional corrosion testing is recommended for the highest burn-up fuels to confirm observed corrosion rate trends. This corrosion analysis will focus only on the UMo fuel and will address corrosion of ancillary components such as cladding only in terms of how it affects the fuel. The calculations and corrosion scenarios are weighted with a conservative bias to

  3. RERTR Fuel Developmemt and Qualification Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Wachs

    2007-01-01

    In late 2003 it became evident that U-Mo aluminum fuels under development exhibited significant fuel performance problems under the irradiation conditions required for conversion of most high-powered research reactors. Solutions to the fuel performance issue have been proposed and show promise in early testing. Based on these results, a Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program strategy has been mapped to allow generic fuel qualification to occur prior to the end of FY10 and reactor conversion to occur prior to the end of FY14. This strategy utilizes a diversity of technologies, test conditions, and test types. Scoping studies using miniature fuel plates will be completed in the time frame of 2006-2008. Irradiation of larger specimens will occur in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in the United States, the Belgian Reactor-2 (BR2) reactor in Belgium, and in the OSIRIS reactor in France in 2006-2009. These scoping irradiation tests provide a large amount of data on the performance of advanced fuel types under irradiation and allow the down selection of technology for larger scale testing during the final stages of fuel qualification. In conjunction with irradiation testing, fabrication processes must be developed and made available to commercial fabricators. The commercial fabrication infrastructure must also be upgraded to ensure a reliable low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel supply. Final qualification of fuels will occur in two phases. Phase I will obtain generic approval for use of dispersion fuels with density less than 8.5 g-U/cm3. In order to obtain this approval, a larger scale demonstration of fuel performance and fabrication technology will be necessary. Several Materials Test Reactor (MTR) plate-type fuel assemblies will be irradiated in both the High Flux Reactor (HFR) and the ATR (other options include the BR2 and Russian Research Reactor, Dmitrovgrad, Russia [MIR] reactors) in 2008-2009. Following postirradiation examination, a report

  4. Activity and structure of perovskites as diesel reforming catalysts for solid oxide fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, D.-J.; Krumpelt, M.; Chemical Engineering

    2005-01-01

    Recent progress in developing perovskite materials as more cost-effective catalysts in autothermal reforming (ATR) of diesel fuel to hydrogen-rich reformate for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) application is reported. Perovskite-type metal oxides with B sites partially exchanged by ruthenium were prepared and evaluated under ATR reaction conditions. The hydrogen yield, reforming efficiency, and CO{sub x} selectivity of these catalysts were investigated using diesel surrogate fuel with 50 ppm sulfur. The catalyst performances have approached or exceeded a benchmark, high-cost rhodium-based material. In parallel with the reactivity study, we also investigated the physical properties of B-site doped perovskites and their impact on the reforming performance using various characterization techniques such as BET, X-ray powder diffraction, temperature programmable reduction, scanning electron microscopy, and synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We found that ruthenium is highly dispersed into perovskite lattice and its redox behavior is directly associated with reforming activity.

  5. On0Line Fuel Failure Monitor for Fuel Testing and Monitoring of Gas Cooled Very High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ayman I. Hawari; Mohamed A. Bourham

    2010-04-22

    IVery High Temperature Reactors (VHTR) utilize the TRISO microsphere as the fundamental fuel unit in the core. The TRISO microsphere (~ 1- mm diameter) is composed of a UO2 kernel surrounded by a porous pyrolytic graphite buffer, an inner pyrolytic graphite layer, a silicon carbide (SiC) coating, and an outer pyrolytic graphite layer. The U-235 enrichment of the fuel is expected to range from 4% – 10% (higher enrichments are also being considered). The layer/coating system that surrounds the UO2 kernel acts as the containment and main barrier against the environmental release of radioactivity. To understand better the behavior of this fuel under in-core conditions (e.g., high temperature, intense fast neutron flux, etc.), the US Department of Energy (DOE) is launching a fuel testing program that will take place at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). During this project North Carolina State University (NCSU) researchers will collaborate with INL staff for establishing an optimized system for fuel monitoring for the ATR tests. In addition, it is expected that the developed system and methods will be of general use for fuel failure monitoring in gas cooled VHTRs.

  6. ATR-FT-IR spectroscopy in the region of 500-230 cm -1 for identification of inorganic red pigments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vahur, Signe; Knuutinen, Ulla; Leito, Ivo

    2009-08-01

    It is demonstrated that micro-ATR-FT-IR in the low wave number range (500-230 cm -1) can be well used for identification of pigments in paint samples thereby markedly extending the possibilities of pigment identification by ATR-IR spectroscopy into the realm of pigments having no absorptions in the mid-IR region. Reference spectra of pigments can be conveniently obtained by mixing them with linseed oil in approximately 1:1 mass ratio. Vermilion (or cinnabar), read lead, different red iron oxide pigments and cadmium red can be identified. In some cases the method can be used alone for pigment identification and in many cases it provides useful additional evidence for pigment identification using other instrumental techniques (electron microprobe analysis, XRF, optical microscopy).

  7. Blood glucose measurement in vivo using hollow-fiber based, mid-infrared ATR probe with multi-reflection prism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kino, Saiko; Omori, Suguru; Matsuura, Yuji

    2016-03-01

    An attenuated-total-reflection (ATR), mid-infrared spectroscopy system that consists of hollow optical fibers, a trapezoidal multi-reflection ATR prism, and a conventional FT-IR spectrometer has been developed to measure blood glucose levels. Owing to the low transmission loss and high flexibility of the hollow-optical fiber, the system can measure any sites of the human body where blood capillaries are close to the surface of mucosa, such as inner lips. Using a multi-reflection prism brought about higher sensitivity, and the flat and wide contact surface of the prism resulted in higher measurement reproducibility. The results of in-vivo measurement of human inner lips showed the feasibility of the proposed system, and the measurement errors were within 20%.

  8. Two-dimensional ATR-FTIR Spectroscopic Study on the Water Diffusion Behavior in Polyimide/Silica Nanocomposite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yi; Wang, Hai-tao; Zhong, Wei; Wu, Pei-yi

    2006-12-01

    To consider the reliability and performance of electronic devices based on polyimide derivatives, dynamic water sorption and diffusion behavior in a polyimide derivative: poly(4'4-oxydiphenylene pyromellitimide) (PMDA-ODA)/silica nanocomposite was investigated by two-dimensional ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, by which three states of water molecules owning different H-bonding strength were distinguished. The amounts and strength of H-bonding also played a significant role in determining the diffusion rate of the different states of water molecules. The type of aggregated water molecules which also formed H-bonding with silicic acid (residues) or polyimide system was the last one diffusing to the polymer side in contact with the ATR crystal element because the polymeric matrix blocked their diffusion to a great extent. The diffusion coefficient was also estimated to gain the information of the dynamic diffusion behavior.

  9. Determination of drug content in semisolid formulations by non-invasive spectroscopic methods: FTIR - ATR, - PAS, - Raman and PDS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotter, B.; Faubel, W.; Heißler, St.; Hein, J.; Neubert, R. H. H.

    2010-03-01

    This study elucidates the potential use of photothermal deflection spectroscopy (PDS), FTIR photoacoustic (FTIR-PAS), FT Raman, and FTIR-attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy as analytical tools for investigating the drug content in semisolid formulations. Regarding the analytical parameters, this study demonstrates the photothermal beam deflection to be definitely comparable to well established spectroscopic methods for this purpose. The correlation coefficients range from 0.990 to 0.999. Likewise, repeatability and limit of detection are comparable.

  10. Azide functional monolayers grafted to a germanium surface: model substrates for ATR-IR studies of interfacial click reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuo; Koberstein, Jeffrey T

    2012-01-10

    High-quality azide-functional substrates are prepared by a low temperature reaction of 11-bromoundecyltrichlorosilane with UV-ozone-treated germanium ATR-IR plates followed by nucleophilic substitution of the terminal bromine by addition of sodium azide. The resulting monolayer films are characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), contact angle analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR), and ellipsometry. XPS and ellipsometric thickness data correspond well to the results of molecular model calculations confirming the formation of a densely packed azide-functional monolayer. These azide-functional substrates enable interfacial "click" reactions with complementary alkyne-functional molecules to be studied in situ by ATR-IR. To illustrate their potential utility for kinetic studies we show that, in the presence of copper(I) catalyst, the azide-modified surfaces react rapidly and quantitatively with 5-chloro-pentyne to form triazoles via a 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction. Time-resolved ATR-IR measurements indicate that the interfacial click reaction is initially first order in azide concentration as expected from the reaction mechanism, with a rate constant of 0.034 min(-1), and then transitions to apparent second order dependence, with a rate constant of 0.017 min(-1)/(chains/nm(2)), when the surface azide and triazole concentrations become similar, as predicted by Oyama et al. The reaction achieves an ultimate conversion of 50% consistent with the limit expected due to steric hindrance of the 5-chloro-pentyne reactant at the surface. PMID:22081885

  11. Induction of ATM/ATR pathway combined with Vγ2Vδ2 T cells enhance cytotoxicity of ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jingwei; Das, Manjusri; Kanji, Suman; Aggarwal, Reeva; Joseph, Matthew; Ray, Alo; Shapiro, Charles L.; Pompili, Vincent J.; Das, Hiranmoy

    2014-01-01

    Summary Many ovarian cancer cells express stress-related molecule MICA/B on their surface that is recognized by Vγ2Vδ2 T cells through their NKG2D receptor, which is transmitted to downstream stress-signaling pathway. However, it is yet to be established how Vγ2Vδ2 T cells-mediated recognition of MICA/B signal is transmitted to downstream stress-related molecules. Identifying targeted molecules would be critical to develop a better therapy for ovarian cancer cells. It is well established that ATM/ATR signal transduction pathways, which is modulated by DNA damage, replication stress, and oxidative stress play central role in stress signaling pathway regulating cell cycle checkpoint and apoptosis. We investigated whether ATM/ATR and its down stream molecules affect Vγ2Vδ2 T cells-mediated cytotoxicity. Herein, we show that ATM/ATR pathway is modulated in ovarian cancer cells in presence of Vγ2Vδ2 T cells. Furthermore, downregulation of ATM pathway resulted downregulation of MICA, and reduced Vγ2Vδ2 T cells-mediated cytotoxicity. Alternately, stimulating ATM pathway enhanced expression of MICA, and sensitized ovarian cancer cells for cytotoxic lysis by Vγ2Vδ2 T cells. We further show that combining currently approved chemotherapeutic drugs, which induced ATM signal transduction, along with Vγ2Vδ2 T cells enhanced cytotoxicity of resistant ovarian cancer cells. These findings indicate that ATM/ATR pathway plays an important role in tumor recognition, and drugs promoting ATM signaling pathway might be considered as a combination therapy together with Vγ2Vδ2 T cells for effectively treating resistant ovarian cancer cells. PMID:24726882

  12. FTIR-ATR analysis of brewed coffee: effect of roasting conditions.

    PubMed

    Lyman, Donald J; Benck, Robert; Dell, Stacy; Merle, Scott; Murray-Wijelath, Jacqueline

    2003-05-21

    FTIR-ATR was used to study the effect of roasting conditions on the flavor of brewed coffee using Guatemala Antigua coffee beans. The 1800-1680 cm(-1) carbonyl region for vinyl esters/lactones, esters, aldehydes, ketones, and acids was found to provide a flavor-print of the brewed coffee. A study of light, medium, and dark roasts indicated that when the rate of heating to the onset of the first and second cracks was kept constant, the types of carbonyl compounds formed were similar, varying only in their concentration. This difference in concentration is apparently due to the additional heating of the coffee bean beyond the second crack. When the heating rate to the onset of the first and second crack was varied, both the types and concentration of the carbonyl compounds formed during roasting were affected. Thus, heating rates of green coffee beans to the onset of the first and second cracks are important determinants of the basic taste and aroma of brewed coffee. PMID:12744653

  13. Forensic Hair Differentiation Using Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR FT-IR) Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Manheim, Jeremy; Doty, Kyle C; McLaughlin, Gregory; Lednev, Igor K

    2016-07-01

    Hair and fibers are common forms of trace evidence found at crime scenes. The current methodology of microscopic examination of potential hair evidence is absent of statistical measures of performance, and examiner results for identification can be subjective. Here, attenuated total reflection (ATR) Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy was used to analyze synthetic fibers and natural hairs of human, cat, and dog origin. Chemometric analysis was used to differentiate hair spectra from the three different species, and to predict unknown hairs to their proper species class, with a high degree of certainty. A species-specific partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLSDA) model was constructed to discriminate human hair from cat and dog hairs. This model was successful in distinguishing between the three classes and, more importantly, all human samples were correctly predicted as human. An external validation resulted in zero false positive and false negative assignments for the human class. From a forensic perspective, this technique would be complementary to microscopic hair examination, and in no way replace it. As such, this methodology is able to provide a statistical measure of confidence to the identification of a sample of human, cat, and dog hair, which was called for in the 2009 National Academy of Sciences report. More importantly, this approach is non-destructive, rapid, can provide reliable results, and requires no sample preparation, making it of ample importance to the field of forensic science. PMID:27412186

  14. Mechanical behavior and microstructural evolution of vanadium alloys irradiated in ATR-A1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukumoto, K.-i.; Matsui, H.; Tsai, H.; Smith, D. L.

    2000-12-01

    An irradiation experiment has been done in the ATR-A1 to investigate irradiation behavior of vanadium alloys in the low temperature regime from 200°C to 300°C with damage levels of 3 to 4 dpa. In creep measurements, creep tubes of V-3Fe-4Ti-0.1Si with inner pressures up to 165 MPa did not rupture during irradiation. The effective strain rate of creep was below 0.2% dpa-1 and it showed the same tendency as V-4Cr-4Ti alloys. In Charpy impact tests, all specimens of V-4Cr-4Ti-0.1Si and V-3Fe-4Ti-0.1Si showed brittle behavior at room temperature and the DBTT increased to 60-150°C. The fracture surface showed cleavage. Tensile tests conducted both at room temperature and at the irradiation temperature showed significant irradiation hardening and brittle responses. TEM showed that high densities of tiny defect clusters were formed in V-Cr-Ti and V-Fe-Ti alloys. Precipitates could not be seen in specimens irradiated below 300°C, however, fine defect clusters are considered to be the origin of brittle behavior in V-Cr-Ti alloys irradiated at low temperatures.

  15. Long-Range Lipid-Water Interaction as Observed by ATR-FTIR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Arsov, Zoran

    2015-01-01

    It is commonly assumed that the structure of water at a lipid-water interface is influenced mostly in the first hydration layer. However, recent results from different experimental methods show that perturbation extends through several hydration layers. Due to its low light penetration depth, attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy is specifically suited to study interlamellar water structure in multibilayers. Results obtained by this technique confirm the long-range water structure disturbance. Consequently, in confined membrane environments nearly all water molecules can be perturbed. It is important to note that the behavior of confined water molecules differs significantly in samples prepared in excess water and in partially hydrated samples. We show in what manner the interlamellar water perturbation is influenced by the hydration level and how it is sequentially modified with a step-by-step dehydration of samples either by water evaporation or by osmotic pressure. Our results also indicate that besides different levels of hydration the lipid-water interaction is modulated by different lipid headgroups and different lipid phases as well. Therefore, modification of interlamellar water properties may clarify the role of water-mediated effects in biological processes. PMID:26438264

  16. Irradiation Test Plan for the ATR National Scientific User Facility - University of Wisconsin Pilot Project

    SciTech Connect

    Heather J. MacLean; Kumar Sridharan; Timothy A. Hyde

    2008-06-01

    The performance of advanced nuclear systems critically relies on the performance of the materials used for cladding, duct, and other structural components. In many proposed advanced systems, the reactor design pushes the temperature and the total radiation dose higher than typically seen in a light water reactor. Understanding the stability of these materials under radiation is critical. There are a large number of materials or material systems that have been developed for greater high temperature or high dose performance for which little or no information on radiation response exists. The goal of this experiment is to provide initial data on the radiation response of these materials. The objective of the UW experiment is to irradiate materials of interest for advanced reactor applications at a variety of temperatures (nominally 300°C, 400°C, 500°C, and 700°C) and total dose accumulations (nominally 3 dpa and 6 dpa). Insertion of this irradiation test is proposed for September 2008 (ATR Cycle 143A).

  17. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and quantitative multivariate analysis of paints and coating materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, Philippa Alice; Vahur, Signe; Leito, Ivo

    2014-12-01

    The applicability of ATR-FTIR spectroscopy with partial least squares (PLS) data analysis was evaluated for quantifying the components of mixtures of paint binding media and pigments, and alkyd resins. PLS methods were created using a number of standard mixtures. Validation and measurement uncertainty estimation was carried out. Binary, ternary and quaternary mixtures of several common binding media and pigments were quantified, with standard measurement uncertainties in most cases below 3 g/100 g. Classes of components - aromatic anhydrides and alcohols - used in alkyd resin synthesis were also successfully quantified, with standard uncertainties in the range of 2-3 g/100 g. This is a more demanding application because in alkyd resins aromatic anhydrides and alcohols have reacted to form a polyester, and are not present in their original forms. Once a PLS method has been calibrated, analysis time and cost are significantly reduced from typical quantitative methods such as GC/MS. This is beneficial in the case of routine analysis where the components are known.

  18. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and quantitative multivariate analysis of paints and coating materials.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Philippa Alice; Vahur, Signe; Leito, Ivo

    2014-12-10

    The applicability of ATR-FTIR spectroscopy with partial least squares (PLS) data analysis was evaluated for quantifying the components of mixtures of paint binding media and pigments, and alkyd resins. PLS methods were created using a number of standard mixtures. Validation and measurement uncertainty estimation was carried out. Binary, ternary and quaternary mixtures of several common binding media and pigments were quantified, with standard measurement uncertainties in most cases below 3g/100g. Classes of components - aromatic anhydrides and alcohols - used in alkyd resin synthesis were also successfully quantified, with standard uncertainties in the range of 2-3g/100g. This is a more demanding application because in alkyd resins aromatic anhydrides and alcohols have reacted to form a polyester, and are not present in their original forms. Once a PLS method has been calibrated, analysis time and cost are significantly reduced from typical quantitative methods such as GC/MS. This is beneficial in the case of routine analysis where the components are known. PMID:24945861

  19. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly ReportJanuary 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Soelberg, Renae

    2015-01-01

    Highlights; Mike Worley and Shane Johnson visited INL Jan. 22 for an NSUF strategy discussion; Rory Kennedy attended a NSLS-2 Beamline Advisory Team meeting at Brookhaven; Provided a final cost estimate to the NSUF Program Office in support of the NEET/NSUF proposal, “Metal-ceramic and metal-metal composites for extreme radiation and temperature environment: An in situ interface stability and mechanical behavior study by high energy x-ray diffraction with a synchrotron probe.”; Assisted in the development of conceptual designs and performed a preliminary thermal hydraulic analysis for two NEET/NSUF proposals. The challenge for both experiments is to provide high (>1000 C and up to 1600 C)) specimen temperatures in a small space (0.5" diameter ATR Outboard A-position) without overheating the coolant. Several designs were analyzed and found to be feasible, although detailed design and analysis will be required after the projects are awarded; and A single USU TEM specimen is packaged and awaiting shipment from MFC to CAES. Once at CAES, SEM, TEM and LEAP analysis will be performed. Professor Ban has requested additional sub-samples to be made to take back to his laboratory at USU for thermal diffusivity studies.

  20. Rapid approach to analyze biochemical variation in rat organs by ATR FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staniszewska, Emilia; Malek, Kamilla; Baranska, Malgorzata

    2014-01-01

    ATR FTIR spectra were collected from rat tissue homogenates (myocardium, brain, liver, lung, intestine, and kidney) to analyze their biochemical content. Based on the second derivative of an average spectral profile it was possible to assign bands e.g. to triglycerides and cholesterol esters, proteins, phosphate macromolecules (DNA, RNA, phospholipids, phosphorylated proteins) and others (glycogen, lactate). Peaks in the region of 1600-1700 cm-1 related to amide I mode revealed the secondary structure of proteins. The collected spectra do not characterize morphological structure of the investigated tissues but show their different composition. The comparison of spectral information gathered from FTIR spectra of the homogenates and those obtained previously from FTIR imaging of the tissue sections implicates that the presented here approach can be successfully employed in the investigations of biochemical variation in animal tissues. Moreover, it can be used in the pharmacological and pharmacokinetic studies to correlate the overall biochemical status of the tissue with the pathological changes it has undergone.

  1. ATR-SEIRAs characterization of surface redox processes in G. sulfurreducens.

    PubMed

    Busalmen, Juan Pablo; Esteve-Nuñez, Abraham; Berná, Antonio; Feliu, Juan Miguel

    2010-04-01

    In this work we report on the occurrence of at least two different redox pairs on the cell surface of the electrogenic bacteria Geobacter sulfurreducens adsorbed on gold that are expressed in response to the polarization potential. As previously reported on graphite (Environ. Sci. Technol. 42 (2008) 2445) a typical low potential redox pair is found centered at around -0.06 V when cells are polarized for a few hours at 0.2 V, while a new pair centered at around 0.38 V is expressed upon polarization at 0.6 V. Reversible changes in the IR band pattern of whole cells where obtained by Attenuated Total Reflection-Surface Enhanced Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy (ATR-SEIRAS) upon potential cycling around both redox pairs. Changes clearly resemble the electrochemical turnover of oxidized/reduced states in c-type cytochromes, thus evidencing the nature of the involved molecules. The expression of external cytochromes in response to the potential of the electron acceptor suggests the existence of alternative pathways of electron transport with different energy yield, though it remains to be demonstrated. PMID:19482561

  2. The degradation potential of PET bottles in the marine environment: An ATR-FTIR based approach

    PubMed Central

    Ioakeimidis, C.; Fotopoulou, K. N.; Karapanagioti, H. K.; Geraga, M.; Zeri, C.; Papathanassiou, E.; Galgani, F.; Papatheodorou, G.

    2016-01-01

    The dominance and persistence of plastic debris in the marine environment are well documented. No information exists in respect to their lifespan in the marine environment. Nevertheless, the degradation potential of plastic litter items remains a critical issue for marine litter research. In the present study, polyethylene terephthalate bottles (PETs) collected from the submarine environment were characterized using ATR-FTIR in respect to their degradation potential attributed to environmental conditions. A temporal indication was used as indicative to the years of presence of the PETs in the environment as debris. PETs seem to remain robust for approximately fifteen years. Afterwards, a significant decrease of the native functional groups was recorded; some even disappear; or new-not typical for PETs-are created. At a later stage, using the PET time series collected from the Saronikos Gulf (Aegean Sea–E. Mediterranean), it was possible to date bottles that were collected from the bottom of the Ionian Sea (W. Greece). It is the first time that such a study has been conducted with samples that were actually degraded in the marine environment. PMID:27000994

  3. An ATR-FTIR study of different phosphonic acids in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Zenobi, María C; Luengo, Carina V; Avena, Marcelo J; Rueda, Elsa H

    2008-07-01

    An ATR-FIR study of the vibrational spectra of 1-hydroxyethane-1,1'-diphosphonic acid (HEDP), nitrilotris(methylenephosphonic acid) (NTMP) and N,N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)aminomethylphosphonic acid (BHAMP) in aqueous solution is presented. The study was performed in the range of pH from 5 to 9, and bands assignments are given in the 2000-890 cm(-1) range. However, as phosphonates display bands due to the PO stretching vibration mainly in the 900-1200 cm(-1) range, the study is focused in this midinfrared region, which shows important changes as the pH changes, specially the nu(POH) at approximately 925 cm(-1) and nu(PO(3)(2-)) at approximately 970 cm(-1) vibrations. IR analyses give also evidences for the zwitterionic nature of BHAMP and NTMP in solution with a strong indication that the zwitterion in both compounds remains intact throughout the pH range investigated. The successive protonation steps with the decrease of pH were evidenced in the IR spectra of the three studied phosphonates. PMID:17826311

  4. An ATR-FTIR study of different phosphonic acids in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenobi, María C.; Luengo, Carina V.; Avena, Marcelo J.; Rueda, Elsa H.

    2008-07-01

    An ATR-FIR study of the vibrational spectra of 1-hydroxyethane-1,1'-diphosphonic acid (HEDP), nitrilotris(methylenephosphonic acid) (NTMP) and N, N-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)aminomethylphosphonic acid (BHAMP) in aqueous solution is presented. The study was performed in the range of pH from 5 to 9, and bands assignments are given in the 2000-890 cm -1 range. However, as phosphonates display bands due to the P sbnd O stretching vibration mainly in the 900-1200 cm -1 range, the study is focused in this midinfrared region, which shows important changes as the pH changes, specially the ν(P sbnd OH) at ˜925 cm -1 and ν(PO 32-) at ˜970 cm -1 vibrations. IR analyses give also evidences for the zwitterionic nature of BHAMP and NTMP in solution with a strong indication that the zwitterion in both compounds remains intact throughout the pH range investigated. The successive protonation steps with the decrease of pH were evidenced in the IR spectra of the three studied phosphonates.

  5. ATR-FTIR spectroscopic characterization of coexisting carbonate surface complexes on hematite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bargar, J.R.; Kubicki, J.D.; Reitmeyer, R.; Davis, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    The speciation of carbonate adsorbed to hematite in air-equilibrated aqueous solutions has been studied using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Samples were measured over a range of pH conditions, at 0.1 M NaCl and at low ionic strength, and in H2O and D2O solutions to permit a multispecies analysis of the data. Second-derivative analyses and fits to the spectra indicate the presence of two major and two minor surface-bound carbonate species. The two major complexes coexist at near-neutral pH and low ionic strength. One of these two complexes is relatively sensitive to ionic strength, being displaced at 0.1 M NaCl, whereas the other is not. Comparison of experimental to DFT/MO-calculated frequencies suggest these two major species to be (a) a monodentate binuclear inner-sphere carbonate surface complex, and (b) a fully or partially solvated carbonate (CO32-) species that is symmetry broken and appears to reside in the structured vicinal water layers at the hematite-water interface, retained by hydrogen bonding and/or other forces. Minor carbonate complexes include diffuse layer CO32- and an unidentified inner-sphere species. Both of the dominant species observed here are likely to be significant controls of the surface charge and sorptive properties of Fe-oxides. Copyright ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd.

  6. ATR-FTIR spectroscopic studies of boric acid adsorption on hydrous ferric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peak, Derek; Luther, George W.; Sparks, Donald L.

    2003-07-01

    Boron is an important micronutrient for plants, but high B levels in soils are often responsible for toxicity effects in plants. It is therefore important to understand reactions that may affect B availability in soils. In this study, Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy was employed to investigate mechanisms of boric acid (B(OH) 3) and borate (B(OH) 4-) adsorption on hydrous ferric oxide (HFO). On the HFO surface, boric acid adsorbs via both physical adsorption (outer-sphere) and ligand exchange (inner-sphere) reactions. Both trigonal (boric acid) and tetrahedral (borate) boron are complexed on the HFO surface, and a mechanism where trigonal boric acid in solution reacts to form either trigonal or tetrahedral surface complexes is proposed based upon the spectroscopic results. The presence of outer-sphere boric acid complexes can be explained based on the Lewis acidity of the B metal center, and this complex has important implications for boron transport and availability. Outer-sphere boric acid is more likely to leach downward in soils in response to water flow. Outer-sphere boron would also be expected to be more available for plant uptake than more strongly bound boron complexes, and may more readily return to the soil solution when solution concentrations decrease.

  7. The degradation potential of PET bottles in the marine environment: An ATR-FTIR based approach.

    PubMed

    Ioakeimidis, C; Fotopoulou, K N; Karapanagioti, H K; Geraga, M; Zeri, C; Papathanassiou, E; Galgani, F; Papatheodorou, G

    2016-01-01

    The dominance and persistence of plastic debris in the marine environment are well documented. No information exists in respect to their lifespan in the marine environment. Nevertheless, the degradation potential of plastic litter items remains a critical issue for marine litter research. In the present study, polyethylene terephthalate bottles (PETs) collected from the submarine environment were characterized using ATR-FTIR in respect to their degradation potential attributed to environmental conditions. A temporal indication was used as indicative to the years of presence of the PETs in the environment as debris. PETs seem to remain robust for approximately fifteen years. Afterwards, a significant decrease of the native functional groups was recorded; some even disappear; or new-not typical for PETs-are created. At a later stage, using the PET time series collected from the Saronikos Gulf (Aegean Sea-E. Mediterranean), it was possible to date bottles that were collected from the bottom of the Ionian Sea (W. Greece). It is the first time that such a study has been conducted with samples that were actually degraded in the marine environment. PMID:27000994

  8. The degradation potential of PET bottles in the marine environment: An ATR-FTIR based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioakeimidis, C.; Fotopoulou, K. N.; Karapanagioti, H. K.; Geraga, M.; Zeri, C.; Papathanassiou, E.; Galgani, F.; Papatheodorou, G.

    2016-03-01

    The dominance and persistence of plastic debris in the marine environment are well documented. No information exists in respect to their lifespan in the marine environment. Nevertheless, the degradation potential of plastic litter items remains a critical issue for marine litter research. In the present study, polyethylene terephthalate bottles (PETs) collected from the submarine environment were characterized using ATR-FTIR in respect to their degradation potential attributed to environmental conditions. A temporal indication was used as indicative to the years of presence of the PETs in the environment as debris. PETs seem to remain robust for approximately fifteen years. Afterwards, a significant decrease of the native functional groups was recorded; some even disappear; or new-not typical for PETs-are created. At a later stage, using the PET time series collected from the Saronikos Gulf (Aegean Sea–E. Mediterranean), it was possible to date bottles that were collected from the bottom of the Ionian Sea (W. Greece). It is the first time that such a study has been conducted with samples that were actually degraded in the marine environment.

  9. In situ ATR-FTIR study of the early stages of fly ash geopolymer gel formation.

    PubMed

    Rees, Catherine A; Provis, John L; Lukey, Grant C; van Deventer, Jannie S J

    2007-08-14

    The kinetics of geopolymer formation are monitored using a novel in situ attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopic technique. Reaction rates are determined from the intensity variation of the bands related to the geopolymer gel network and the unreacted fly ash particles. Comparison with deuterated geopolymer samples provides critical information regarding peak assignments. An initial induction (lag) period is observed to occur for hydroxide-activated geopolymers, followed by gel evolution according to an approximately linear reaction profile. The length of the lag period is reduced by increasing the concentration of NaOH. An increase in the rate of network formation also occurs with increasing NaOH concentration up to a maximum point, beyond which an increased NaOH concentration leads to a reduced rate of network formation. This trend is attributed to the competing effects of increased alkalinity and stronger ion pairing with an increase in NaOH concentration. In situ analysis also shows that the rate of fly ash dissolution is similar for all moderate- to high-alkali geopolymer slurries, which is attributed to the very highly water-deficient nature of these systems and is contrary to predictions from classical glass dissolution chemistry. This provides for the first time detailed kinetic information describing fly ash geopolymer formation kinetics. PMID:17658864

  10. ATR-mediated phosphorylation of FANCI regulates dormant origin firing in response to replication stress

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Hung; Jones, Mathew J. K.; Yin, Yandong; Crist, Sarah B.; Colnaghi, Luca; Sims, Robert J.; Rothenberg, Eli; Jallepalli, Prasad V.; Huang, Tony T.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Excess dormant origins bound by the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) replicative helicase complex play a critical role in preventing replication stress, chromosome instability and tumorigenesis. In response to DNA damage, replicating cells must coordinate DNA repair and dormant origin firing to ensure complete and timely replication of the genome; how cells regulate this process remains elusive. Herein, we identify a member of the Fanconi Anemia (FA) DNA repair pathway, FANCI, as a key effector of dormant origin firing in response to replication stress. Cells lacking FANCI have reduced number of origins, increased inter-origin distances and slowed proliferation rates. Intriguingly, ATR-mediated FANCI phosphorylation inhibits dormant origin firing while promoting replication fork restart/DNA repair. Using super-resolution microscopy, we show that FANCI co-localizes with MCM-bound chromatin in response to replication stress. These data reveal a unique role for FANCI as a modulator of dormant origin firing and links timely genome replication to DNA repair. PMID:25843623

  11. The Conference Proceedings of the 2003 Air Transport Research Society (ATRS) World Conference, Volume 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, Brent (Editor); Gudmundsson, Sveinn (Editor); Oum, Tae (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The UNO Aviation Institute Monograph Series began in 1994 as a key component of the education outreach and information transfer missions of the Aviation Institute and the NASA Nebraska Space Grant & EPSCoR Programs. The series is an outlet for aviation materials to be indexed and disseminated through an efficient medium. Publications are welcome in all aspects of aviation. Publication formats may include, but are not limited to, conference proceedings, bibliographies, research reports, manuals, technical reports, and other documents that should be archived and indexed for future reference by the aviation and world wide communities. The Conference proceedings of the 2003 Air Transport Research Society (ATRS) world conference, volume 5 is presented. The topics include: 1) The Temporal Configuration of Airline Networks in Europe; 2) Determination and Applications of Environmental Costs at Different Sized Airports-Aircraft Noise and Engine Emissions; 3) Cost Effective Measures to Reduce CO2 Emissions in the Air Freight Sector; 4) An Assessment of the Sustainability of Air Transport System: Quantification of Indicators; 5) Regulation, Competition and Network Evolution in Aviation; 6) Regulation in the Air: Price and Frequency Cap; 7) Industry Consolidation and Future Airline Network Structures in Europe; 8) Application of Core Theory to the U.S. Airline Industry; 9) Air Freight Transshipment Route Choice Analysis; 10) A Fuzzy Approach of the Competition on Air Transport Market; and 11) Developing Passenger Demand Models for International Aviation from/to Egypt: A Case Study of Cairo Airport and Egyptair.

  12. Targeting the kinase activities of ATR and ATM exhibits antitumoral activity in mouse models of MLL-rearranged AML.

    PubMed

    Morgado-Palacin, Isabel; Day, Amanda; Murga, Matilde; Lafarga, Vanesa; Anton, Marta Elena; Tubbs, Anthony; Chen, Hua-Tang; Ergan, Aysegul; Anderson, Rhonda; Bhandoola, Avinash; Pike, Kurt G; Barlaam, Bernard; Cadogan, Elaine; Wang, Xi; Pierce, Andrew J; Hubbard, Chad; Armstrong, Scott A; Nussenzweig, André; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Among the various subtypes of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), those with chromosomal rearrangements of the MLL oncogene (AML-MLL) have a poor prognosis. AML-MLL tumor cells are resistant to current genotoxic therapies because of an attenuated response by p53, a protein that induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in response to DNA damage. In addition to chemicals that damage DNA, efforts have focused on targeting DNA repair enzymes as a general chemotherapeutic approach to cancer treatment. Here, we found that inhibition of the kinase ATR, which is the primary sensor of DNA replication stress, induced chromosomal breakage and death of mouse AML(MLL) cells (with an MLL-ENL fusion and a constitutively active N-RAS independently of p53. Moreover, ATR inhibition as a single agent exhibited antitumoral activity, both reducing tumor burden after establishment and preventing tumors from growing, in an immunocompetent allograft mouse model of AML(MLL) and in xenografts of a human AML-MLL cell line. We also found that inhibition of ATM, a kinase that senses DNA double-strand breaks, also promoted the survival of the AML(MLL) mice. Collectively, these data indicated that ATR or ATM inhibition represent potential therapeutic strategies for the treatment of AML, especially MLL-driven leukemias. PMID:27625305

  13. Common cancer-associated imbalances in the DNA damage response confer sensitivity to single agent ATR inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Fiona K.; Patterson, Miranda J.; Elstob, Claire J.; Fordham, Sarah; Herriott, Ashleigh; Wade, Mark A.; McCormick, Aiste; Edmondson, Richard; May, Felicity E.B.; Allan, James M.; Pollard, John R.; Curtin, Nicola J.

    2015-01-01

    ATRis an attractive target in cancer therapy because it signals replication stress and DNA lesions for repair and to S/G2 checkpoints. Cancer-specific defects in the DNA damage response (DDR) may render cancer cells vulnerable to ATR inhibition alone. We determined the cytotoxicity of the ATR inhibitor VE-821 in isogenically matched cells with DDR imbalance. Cell cycle arrest, DNA damage accumulation and repair were determined following VE-821 exposure. Defectsin homologous recombination repair (HRR: ATM, BRCA2 and XRCC3) and baseexcision repair (BER: XRCC1) conferred sensitivity to VE-821. Surprisingly, the loss of different components of the trimeric non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) protein DNA-PK had opposing effects. Loss of the DNA-binding component, Ku80, caused hypersensitivity to VE-821, but loss of its partner catalytic subunit, DNA-PKcs, did not. Unexpectedly, VE-821 was particularly cytotoxic to human and hamster cells expressing high levels of DNA-PKcs. High DNA-PKcs was associated with replicative stress and activation of the DDR. VE-821 suppressed HRR, determined by RAD51 focus formation, to a greater extent in cells with high DNA-PKcs. Defects in HRR and BER and high DNA-PKcs expression, that are common in cancer, confer sensitivity to ATR inhibitor monotherapy and may be developed as predictive biomarkers for personalised medicine. PMID:26486089

  14. Application of FTIR-ATR Spectroscopy to Determine the Extent of Lipid Peroxidation in Plasma during Haemodialysis

    PubMed Central

    Oleszko, Adam; Olsztyńska-Janus, Sylwia; Grzeszczuk-Kuć, Karolina; Bujok, Jolanta; Gałecka, Katarzyna; Czerski, Albert; Witkiewicz, Wojciech; Komorowska, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    During a haemodialysis (HD), because of the contact of blood with the surface of the dialyser, the immune system becomes activated and reactive oxygen species (ROS) are released into plasma. Particularly exposed to the ROS are lipids and proteins contained in plasma, which undergo peroxidation. The main breakdown product of oxidized lipids is the malondialdehyde (MDA). A common method for measuring the concentration of MDA is a thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) method. Despite the formation of MDA in plasma during HD, its concentration decreases because it is removed from the blood in the dialyser. Therefore, this research proposes the Fourier Transform Infrared Attenuated Total Reflectance (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy, which enables determination of primary peroxidation products. We examined the influence of the amount of hydrogen peroxide added to lipid suspension that was earlier extracted from plasma specimen on lipid peroxidation with use of TBARS and FTIR-ATR methods. Linear correlation between these methods was shown. The proposed method was effective during the evaluation of changes in the extent of lipid peroxidation in plasma during a haemodialysis in sheep. A measurement using the FTIR-ATR showed an increase in plasma lipid peroxidation after 15 and 240 minutes of treatment, while the TBARS concentration was respectively lower. PMID:25961007

  15. Tel2 structure and function in the Hsp90-dependent maturation of mTOR and ATR complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Takai, Hiroyuki; Xie, Yihu; de Lange, Titia; Pavletich, Nikola P.

    2010-09-20

    We reported previously that the stability of all mammalian phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related protein kinases (PIKKs) depends on their interaction with Tel2, the ortholog of yeast Tel2 and Caenorhabditis elegans Clk-2. Here we provide evidence that Tel2 acts with Hsp90 in the maturation of PIKK complexes. Quantitative immunoblotting showed that the abundance of Tel2 is low compared with the PIKKs, and Tel2 preferentially bound newly synthesized ATM, ATR, mTOR, and DNA-PKcs. Tel2 complexes contained, in addition to Tti1-Tti2, the Hsp90 chaperone, and inhibition of Hsp90 interfered with the interaction of Tel2 with the PIKKs. Analysis of in vivo labeled nascent protein complexes showed that Tel2 and Hsp90 mediate the formation of the mTOR TORC1 and TORC2 complexes and the association of ATR with ATRIP. The structure of yeast Tel2, reported here, shows that Tel2 consists of HEAT-like helical repeats that assemble into two separate {alpha}-solenoids. Through mutagenesis, we identify a surface patch of conserved residues involved in binding to the Tti1-Tti2 complex in vitro. In vivo, mutation of this conserved patch affects cell growth, levels of PIKKs, and ATM/ATR-mediated checkpoint signaling, highlighting the importance of Tti1-Tti2 binding to the function of Tel2. Taken together, our data suggest that the Tel2-Tti1-Tti2 complex is a PIKK-specific cochaperone for Hsp90.

  16. ATR-FTIR Spectroscopy Highlights the Problem of Distinguishing Between Exophiala dermatitidis and E. phaeomuriformis Using MALDI-TOF MS.

    PubMed

    Ergin, Çağrı; Gök, Yaşar; Bayğu, Yasemin; Gümral, Ramazan; Özhak-Baysan, Betil; Döğen, Aylin; Öğünç, Dilara; Ilkit, Macit; Seyedmousavi, Seyedmojtaba

    2016-02-01

    The present study compared two chemical-based methods, namely, matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, to understand the misidentification of Exophiala dermatitidis and Exophiala phaeomuriformis. The study utilized 44 E. dermatitidis and 26 E. phaeomuriformis strains, which were partially treated with strong acids and bases for further evaluation. MALDI-TOF MS and ATR-FTIR spectroscopy data of the two Exophiala species were compared. Data groupings were observed for the chromic acid- and nitric acid-treated species when the black yeast sources were categorized as creosoted-oak sleepers, concrete sleepers, or dishwasher isolates. The MALDI-TOF MS data for the metalloenzyme-containing regions were consistent with the ATR-FTIR spectroscopy data. These results indicated that environmental isolates might contain metals not found in human isolates and might interfere with chemical-based identification methods. Therefore, MALDI-TOF MS reference libraries should be created for clinical strains and should exclude petroleum-associated environmental isolates. PMID:26373644

  17. Src Family Kinases Promote Silencing of ATR-Chk1 Signaling in Termination of DNA Damage Checkpoint*

    PubMed Central

    Fukumoto, Yasunori; Morii, Mariko; Miura, Takahito; Kubota, Sho; Ishibashi, Kenichi; Honda, Takuya; Okamoto, Aya; Yamaguchi, Noritaka; Iwama, Atsushi; Nakayama, Yuji; Yamaguchi, Naoto

    2014-01-01

    The DNA damage checkpoint arrests cell cycle progression to allow time for repair. Once DNA repair is completed, checkpoint signaling is terminated. Currently little is known about the mechanism by which checkpoint signaling is terminated, and the disappearance of DNA lesions is considered to induce the end of checkpoint signaling; however, here we show that the termination of checkpoint signaling is an active process promoted by Src family tyrosine kinases. Inhibition of Src activity delays recovery from the G2 phase DNA damage checkpoint following DNA repair. Src activity is required for the termination of checkpoint signaling, and inhibition of Src activity induces persistent activation of ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM)- and Rad3-related (ATR) and Chk1 kinases. Src-dependent nuclear protein tyrosine phosphorylation and v-Src expression suppress the ATR-mediated Chk1 and Rad17 phosphorylation induced by DNA double strand breaks or DNA replication stress. Thus, Src family kinases promote checkpoint recovery through termination of ATR- and Chk1-dependent G2 DNA damage checkpoint. These results suggest a model according to which Src family kinases send a termination signal between the completion of DNA repair and the initiation of checkpoint termination. PMID:24634213

  18. Image-based ATR utilizing adaptive clutter filter detection, LLRT classification, and Volterra fusion with application to side-looking sonar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aridgides, Tom; Fernández, Manuel

    2010-04-01

    An improved automatic target recognition (ATR) processing string has been developed. The overall processing string consists of pre-processing, subimage adaptive clutter filtering, detection, feature extraction, optimal subset feature selection, feature orthogonalization and classification processing blocks. The objects that are classified by three distinct ATR strings are fused using the classification confidence values and their expansions as features, and using "summing" or log-likelihood-ratio-test (LLRT) based fusion rules. These three ATR processing strings were individually developed and tuned by researchers from different companies. The utility of the overall processing strings and their fusion was demonstrated with an extensive side-looking sonar dataset. In this paper we describe a new processing improvement: six additional classification features are extracted, using primarily target shadow information and a feature extraction window whose length is now made variable as a function of range. This new ATR processing improvement resulted in a 3:1 reduction in false alarms. Two advanced fusion algorithms are subsequently applied: First, a nonlinear Volterra expansion (2nd order) feature-LLRT fusion algorithm is employed. Second, a repeated application of a subset Volterra feature selection / feature orthogonalization / LLRT fusion block is utilized. It is shown that cascaded Volterra feature- LLRT fusion of the ATR processing strings outperforms baseline "summing" and single-stage Volterra feature-LLRT fusion algorithms, yielding significant improvements over the best single ATR processing string results, and providing the capability to correctly call the majority of targets while maintaining a very low false alarm rate.

  19. R_transport_matrices of the Fast Extraction Beam (FEB) of the AGS, and Beam Parameters at the Starting point of the AtR Line

    SciTech Connect

    Tsoupas,N.; MacKay, W.W.; Satogata, T.; Glenn, W.; Ahrens, L.; Brown, K.; Gardner, C.; Tanaka, S.

    2008-01-01

    As part of the task to improve and further automate the 'AtR BPM Application' we provide the theoretically calculated R-transport-matrices for the following beam line sections, which are shown schematically in Figure 1: (a) the Fast Extraction Beam section (FEB) of the AGS synchrotron. The FEB section starts at the middle of the GlO-kicker and ends at the middle of the H1 0{_}septum. (b) the Drift Extraction Channel (DEC) section of the AGS synchrotron. The DEC section starts at the middle of the H10{_}septum, continues along the fringe field region of the H11,H12, and H13 AGS main magnets, and ends at the starting point of the AtR line. The knowledge of these R-transport-matrices are needed in order to calculate the beam parameters at the beginning of the AtR line, which in turn, are required to calculate the magnet settings of the U{_}line, that match the U{_}line into the W{_}line. Also by incorporating these R{_}matrices into the model of the AtR line, the G10 kicker and the H10 septum are included in the AtR model therefore one can investigate any 'jitter' of either the GlO{_}kicker or HlO{_}septum by looking at the trajectory of the beam in the AtR line.

  20. INITIAL IRRADIATION OF THE FIRST ADVANCED GAS REACTOR FUEL DEVELOPMENT AND QUALIFICATION EXPERIMENT IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti

    2007-09-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control for each capsule. The swept gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation.

  1. BIOFEAT: Biodiesel fuel processor for a vehicle fuel cell auxiliary power unit. Study of the feed system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgroi, M.; Bollito, G.; Saracco, G.; Specchia, S.

    An integrated auxiliary power unit (APU) based on a 10 kW e integrated biodiesel fuel processor has been designed and is being developed. Auto-thermal reforming (ATR) and thermal cracking (TC) were considered for converting the fuel into a hydrogen-rich gas suitable for PEM fuel cells. The fuel processor includes also a gas clean-up system that will reduce the carbon monoxide in the primary processor exit gas to below 10 ppm via a new heat-integrated CO clean-up unit, based on the assembly of catalytic heat exchange plates, so as to meet the operational requirements of a PEMFC stack. This article is devoted to the study and selection of the proper feed strategy for the primary fuel processor. Different pre-treatment and feed alternatives (e.g. based on nozzles or simple coils) were devised and tested for the ATR processors, which turned out to be the preferred primary processing route. A nozzle-based strategy was finally selected along with special recommendations about the constituent materials and the operating procedures to be adopted to avoid coking and nozzle corrosion as well as to allow a wide turn down ratio.

  2. Simultaneous inhibition of ATR and PARP sensitizes colon cancer cell lines to irinotecan

    PubMed Central

    Abu-Sanad, Atlal; Wang, Yunzhe; Hasheminasab, Fatemeh; Panasci, Justin; Noë, Alycia; Rosca, Lorena; Davidson, David; Amrein, Lilian; Sharif-Askari, Bahram; Aloyz, Raquel; Panasci, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Enhanced DNA damage repair is one mechanism involved in colon cancer drug resistance. Thus, targeting molecular components of repair pathways with specific small molecule inhibitors may improve the efficacy of chemotherapy. ABT-888 and VE-821, inhibitors of poly-ADP-ribose-polymerase (PARP) and the serine/threonine-kinase Ataxia telangiectasia related (ATR), respectively, were used to treat colon cancer cell lines in combination with the topoisomerase-I inhibitor irinotecan (SN38). Our findings show that each of these DNA repair inhibitors utilized alone at nontoxic single agent concentrations resulted in sensitization to SN38 producing a 1.4–3 fold reduction in the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of SN38 in three colon cancer cell lines. When combined together, nontoxic concentrations of ABT-888 and VE-821 produced a 4.5–27 fold reduction in the IC50 of SN38 with the HCT-116 colon cancer cells demonstrating the highest sensitization as compared to LoVo and HT-29 colon cancer cells. Furthermore, the combination of all three agents was associated with maximal G2 −M arrest and enhanced DNA-damage (γH2AX) in all three colon cancer cell lines. The mechanism of this enhanced sensitization was associated with: (a) maximal suppression of SN38 induced PARP activity in the presence of both inhibitors and (b) ABT-888 producing partial abrogation of the VE-821 enhancement of SN38 induced DNA-PK phosphorylation, resulting in more unrepaired DNA damage; these alterations were only present in the HCT-116 cells which have reduced levels of ATM. This novel combination of DNA repair inhibitors may be useful to enhance the activity of DNA damaging chemotherapies such as irinotecan and help produce sensitization to this drug in colon cancer. PMID:26257651

  3. The structural evolution of magnesium acetate complex in aerosols by FTIR-ATR spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Shu-Feng; Wu, Chang-Qin; Zhang, Qing-Nuan; Zhang, Yun-Hong

    2015-05-01

    The structural evolution of magnesium acetate complex in aerosols with the relative humidity (RH) has been studied by ATR-FTIR technique. When the RH is higher than 66%, the ν4 band lies at 929 cm-1 meaning the free CH3COO- ions in Mg(CH3COO)2 droplets. At the 66% RH, ν4 band positioned at 939 cm-1, accompanying the ν8 band shift to 1554 cm-1, which indicats that the free CH3COO- ions are bounded to Mg2+ ions to form [Mg(H2O)5(CH3COO)]+ species. At the 57.7% RH, the ν8-COO band shifts to 1556 cm-1 accompanying the ν3 band at 1421 cm-1 and the appearance of shoulder at 1452 cm-1, which suggests the formation of chain-structure connected by the bridging bidentate of Mg2(CH3COO)4(H2O)2. In the region of 57.7-18.7% RH, the shoulder at 1452 cm-1 increases with the decrease in RH, showing the increase of Mg2(CH3COO)4(H2O)2. From the water-content, the water-transfer from and to the surface of the aerosols became limited, showing the aerosols enter the gel state. Below 18.7%RH, water-loss becomes rapid and the ν8 band performs blue-shift. At 3.8%RH, the ν8 band positioned at 1581 cm-1, showing the anhydrous Mg(CH3COO)2 solid, which can be reflected by the ν4 band at 947 cm-1. During the humidification process, the reverse structural evolution can be found.

  4. Characterization of Torin2, an ATP-competitive inhibitor of mTOR, ATM and ATR

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingsong; Xu, Chunxiao; Kirubakaran, Sivapriya; Zhang, Xin; Hur, Wooyoung; Liu, Yan; Kwiatkowski, Nicholas P.; Wang, Jinhua; Westover, Kenneth D.; Gao, Peng; Ercan, Dalia; Niepel, Mario; Thoreen, Carson C.; Kang, Seong A.; Patricelli, Matthew P.; Wang, Yuchuan; Tupper, Tanya; Altabef, Abigail; Kawamura, Hidemasa; Held, Kathryn D.; Chou, Danny M.; Elledge, Stephen J.; Janne, Pasi A.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Sabatini, David M.; Gray, Nathanael S.

    2013-01-01

    mTOR is a highly conserved serine/threonine protein kinase that serves as a central regulator of cell growth, survival and autophagy. Deregulation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway occurs commonly in cancer and numerous inhibitors targeting the ATP-binding site of these kinases are currently undergoing clinical evaluation. Here we report the characterization of Torin2, a second generation ATP-competitive inhibitor that is potent and selective for mTOR with a superior pharmacokinetic profile to previous inhibitors. Torin2 inhibited mTORC1-dependent T389 phosphorylation on S6K (RPS6KB1) with an EC50 of 250 pM with approximately 800-fold selectivity for cellular mTOR versus PI3K. Torin2 also exhibited potent biochemical and cellular activity against PIKK family kinases including ATM (EC50 28 nM), ATR (EC50 35 nM) and DNA-PK (EC50 118 nM) (PRKDC), the inhibition of which sensitized cells to Irradiation. Similar to the earlier generation compound Torin1 and in contrast to other reported mTOR inhibitors, Torin2 inhibited mTOR kinase and mTORC1 signaling activities in a sustained manner suggestive of a slow dissociation from the kinase. Cancer cell treatment with Torin2 for 24 hours resulted in a prolonged block in negative feedback and consequent T308 phosphorylation on Akt. These effects were associated with strong growth inhibition in vitro. Single agent treatment with Torin2 in vivo did not yield significant efficacy against KRAS-driven lung tumors, but the combination of Torin2 with MEK inhibitor AZD6244 yielded a significant growth inhibition. Taken together, our findings establish Torin2 as a strong candidate for clinical evaluation in a broad number of oncological settings where mTOR signaling has a pathogenic role. PMID:23436801

  5. ATR-FTIR characterization of transport properties of benzoic acid ion-pairs in silicone membranes.

    PubMed

    Tantishaiyakul, Vimon; Phadoongsombut, Narubodee; Wongpuwarak, Wibul; Thungtiwachgul, Jatupit; Faroongsarng, Damrongsak; Wiwattanawongsa, Kamonthip; Rojanasakul, Yon

    2004-09-28

    A novel technique based on Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy was used to study the transport of benzoic acid ion-pairs/salts in silicone membranes. The benzoic acid ion-pairs were prepared using various counter-ions with different degrees of lipophilicity, e.g. triethylamine (TA), diethylamine (DE), tert-butylamine (t-BA), 2-amino-2-methyl-propanol (AMP), and 2-amino-2-methyl-propanediol (AMPD). Silicone membrane, treated or untreated with propylene glycol (PG), was placed on the surface of a ZnSe crystal and the transport solution was applied to the upper surface of the membrane. A mathematical model, based on Fick's second law describing the build up of permeant concentration at the membrane/crystal interface with time was applied to determine diffusion coefficients. Absorption due to the acid (1700 cm(-1)) or benzoate anion (1555 cm(-1)) was observed at different regions without the interference from PG or silicone membrane. Benzoate anion, a charged species, was observed to permeate the membrane. The permeation of benzoate anion from sodium benzoate and polar ion-pairs of AMP and AMPD was very low in contrast to their high-saturated concentrations in PG as compared to the t-BA ion-pair. This indicated that benzoate anion preferentially permeates the membrane as an ion-pair rather than a single anion; otherwise its permeation should correspond to its concentration in PG instead of the lipophilicity of the ion-pairs. Additionally, the diffusion coefficient values of benzoic acid and benzoate anions through the treated and untreated membranes were not statistically different. PMID:15363507

  6. Fossil fuels -- future fuels

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    Fossil fuels -- coal, oil, and natural gas -- built America`s historic economic strength. Today, coal supplies more than 55% of the electricity, oil more than 97% of the transportation needs, and natural gas 24% of the primary energy used in the US. Even taking into account increased use of renewable fuels and vastly improved powerplant efficiencies, 90% of national energy needs will still be met by fossil fuels in 2020. If advanced technologies that boost efficiency and environmental performance can be successfully developed and deployed, the US can continue to depend upon its rich resources of fossil fuels.

  7. Optimized data analysis algorithm for on-site chemical identification using a hand-held attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Ron, Izhar; Zaltsman, Amalia; Kendler, Shai

    2013-12-01

    On-site identification of organic compounds in the presence of interfering materials using a field-portable attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR FT-IR) spectrometer is presented. Identification is based on an algorithm that compares the analyte's infrared absorption spectrum with the reference spectra. The comparison is performed at several predetermined frequencies, and a similarity value (distance) between the measured and the reference spectra is calculated either at each frequency individually, or, alternatively, the average distance for all frequencies is calculated. The examined frequencies are selected to give the best contrast between the target materials of interest. In this study, the algorithm was optimized to identify three common chemical warfare agents (CWAs): O-ethyl S-[2-(diisopropylamino)ethyl] methylphosphonothioic acid (VX), sarin (GB), and sulfur mustard (bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide) (HD), in the presence of field-related interfering materials (fuels, water, and dust). Receiver operating characteristics analysis was performed in order to determine the probabilities for detection (PD) and for false alerts (PF). Challenging the algorithm with a set of data that contains mixtures of CWAs and interfering materials resulted in PD of 90% and PF of 0%, 0%, and 1% for VX, GB, and HD, respectively, using the average distance approach, which was found to be much more effective than analyzing each frequency individually. This finding was validated for all possible combinations of 2-7 peaks per material. It is suggested that this algorithm provides a reliable mean for the identification of a predetermined set of target analytes and interfering materials. PMID:24359653

  8. ATR controls the UV-related upregulation of the CDKN1A mRNA in a Cdk1/HuR-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Al-Khalaf, Huda H; Aboussekhra, Abdelilah

    2014-12-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light is a carcinogenic agent that upregulates the expression of several genes involved in various cellular processes, including cell cycle checkpoints and apoptosis. The universal cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(WAF1/Cip1) plays major roles in these processes, and the level of its corresponding message increases several times in response to UV-induced DNA damage. This upregulation is mainly posttranscriptional owing to HuR-dependent mRNA stabilization. Since the protein kinase Atr plays major roles during the cellular response to UV damage, we sought to investigate its possible implication in the stabilization of the p21(WAF1/Cip1) coding mRNA. We have shown that the UV-dependent accumulation of the CDKN1A mRNA is indeed under the control of the Atr protein kinase. Upon UV damage, Atr allows nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling of the HuR protein, which binds the CDKN1A mRNA and reduces its turnover. This ATR-dependent effect is mediated through UV-related phosphorylation/inactivation of the Cdk1 protein kinase by Atr, which leads to the dissociation of HuR from Cdk1. Indeed, inhibition or shRNA specific knockdown of CDK1 in ATR-deficient cells enhanced the cytoplasmic level of HuR and restored the CDKN1A mRNA upregulation in response to UV damage. These results show that ATR stabilizes the CDKN1A message in response to UV damage through Cdk1-related cytoplasmic accumulation of HuR. PMID:23813879

  9. Opportunity fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Lutwen, R.C.

    1994-12-31

    Opportunity fuels - fuels that can be converted to other forms of energy at lower cost than standard fossil fuels - are discussed in outline form. The type and source of fuels, types of fuels, combustability, methods of combustion, refinery wastes, petroleum coke, garbage fuels, wood wastes, tires, and economics are discussed.

  10. Design and development of a diesel and JP-8 logistic fuel processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychoudhury, Subir; Lyubovsky, Maxim; Walsh, D.; Chu, Deryn; Kallio, Erik

    The paper describes the design and performance of a breadboard prototype for a 5 kW fuel-processor for powering a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack. The system was based on a small, modular catalytic Microlith auto-thermal (ATR) reactor with the versatility of operating on diesel, Jet-A or JP-8 fuels. The reforming reactor utilized Microlith substrates and catalyst technology (patented and trademarked). These reactors have demonstrated the capability of efficiently reforming liquid and gaseous hydrocarbon fuels at exceptionally high power densities. The performance characteristics of the auto-thermal reactor (ATR) have been presented along with durability data. The fuel processor integrates fuel preparation, steam generation, sulfur removal, pumps, blowers and controls. The system design was developed via ASPEN ® Engineering Suite process simulation software and was analyzed with reference to system balance requirements. Since the fuel processor has not been integrated with a fuel cell, aspects of thermal integration with the stack have not been specifically addressed.

  11. ATR-101, a Selective and Potent Inhibitor of Acyl-CoA Acyltransferase 1, Induces Apoptosis in H295R Adrenocortical Cells and in the Adrenal Cortex of Dogs.

    PubMed

    LaPensee, Christopher R; Mann, Jacqueline E; Rainey, William E; Crudo, Valentina; Hunt, Stephen W; Hammer, Gary D

    2016-05-01

    ATR-101 is a novel, oral drug candidate currently in development for the treatment of adrenocortical cancer. ATR-101 is a selective and potent inhibitor of acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol O-acyltransferase 1 (ACAT1), an enzyme located in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane that catalyzes esterification of intracellular free cholesterol (FC). We aimed to identify mechanisms by which ATR-101 induces adrenocortical cell death. In H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cells, ATR-101 decreases the formation of cholesteryl esters and increases FC levels, demonstrating potent inhibition of ACAT1 activity. Caspase-3/7 levels and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase 2'-deoxyuridine 5'-triphosphate nick end labeled-positive cells are increased by ATR-101 treatment, indicating activation of apoptosis. Exogenous cholesterol markedly potentiates the activity of ATR-101, suggesting that excess FC that cannot be adequately esterified increases caspase-3/7 activation and subsequent cell death. Inhibition of calcium release from the ER or the subsequent uptake of calcium by mitochondria reverses apoptosis induced by ATR-101. ATR-101 also activates multiple components of the unfolded protein response, an indicator of ER stress. Targeted knockdown of ACAT1 in an adrenocortical cell line mimicked the effects of ATR-101, suggesting that ACAT1 mediates the cytotoxic effects of ATR-101. Finally, in vivo treatment of dogs with ATR-101 decreased adrenocortical steroid production and induced cellular apoptosis that was restricted to the adrenal cortex. Together, these studies demonstrate that inhibition of ACAT1 by ATR-101 increases FC, resulting in dysregulation of ER calcium stores that result in ER stress, the unfolded protein response, and ultimately apoptosis. PMID:26986192

  12. In situ-ATR-FTIR analysis on the uptake and release of streptomycin from polyelectrolyte complex layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torger, B.; Müller, M.

    2013-03-01

    In-situ ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and line shape analysis of the diagnostic spectral region was used to quantify the bound amount and release of the antibiotic streptomycin (STRP) at polyelectrolyte (PEL) multilayers (PEM) of poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) or PEI and sodium alginate (ALG). Unlike common concepts based on the drug enrichment of the release medium, this analytical concept allowed to measure quantitatively the drug depletion in the delivery matrix. The measured kinetic in situ ATR-FTIR data were analysed by a modified Korsmeyer-Peppas equation based on two characteristic release parameters k and n. As main experimental parameters the number of PEL layers (adsorption steps) z and the STRP/PEL ratio were varied. For z = 8 the STRP/PEL ratio showed the most significant influence on release kinetics, whereby for STRP/PEL = 1:25 slowest (n = 0.77) and lowest (k = 21.4%) and for STRP/PEL = 1:5 most rapid (n = 0.30) and highest (k = 58.6%) drug releases were found. PEM-PEI/ALG-8 (STRP/PEL = 1:5) revealed slower release rates (n = 0.58) and lower released STRP amounts (k = 17.1%) compared to PEI/PAA. UV-VIS data on time dependent STRP enrichment of the release medium showed a similar trend compared to respective ATR-FTIR data on STRP depletion in PEM. Released amounts of around 1-2 mg from the herein introduced PEM films could be determined. The introduced analytical concept will be used as screening tool for other drugs, drug eluting films and bone substituting materials.

  13. A quantitative study for determination of sugar concentration using attenuated total reflectance terahertz (ATR-THz) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhandy, Diding; Suzuki, Tetsuhito; Ogawa, Yuichi; Kondo, Naoshi; Ishihara, Takeshi; Takemoto, Yuichiro

    2011-06-01

    The objective of our research was to use ATR-THz spectroscopy together with chemometric for quantitative study in food analysis. Glucose, fructose and sucrose are main component of sugar both in fresh and processed fruits. The use of spectroscopic-based method for sugar determination is well reported especially using visible, near infrared (NIR) and middle infrared (MIR) spectroscopy. However, the use of terahertz spectroscopy for sugar determination in fruits has not yet been reported. In this work, a quantitative study for sugars determination using attenuated total reflectance terahertz (ATR-THz) spectroscopy was conducted. Each samples of glucose, fructose and sucrose solution with different concentrations were prepared respectively and their absorbance spectra between wavenumber 20 and 450 cm-1 (between 0.6 THz and 13.5 THz) were acquired using a terahertz-based Fourier Transform spectrometer (FARIS-1S, JASCO Co., Japan). This spectrometer was equipped with a high pressure of mercury lamp as light source and a pyroelectric sensor made from deuterated L-alanine triglycine sulfate (DLTGS) as detector. Each spectrum was acquired using 16 cm-1 of resolution and 200 scans for averaging. The spectra of water and sugar solutions were compared and discussed. The results showed that increasing sugar concentration caused decreasing absorbance. The correlation between sugar concentration and its spectra was investigated using multivariate analysis. Calibration models for glucose, fructose and sucrose determination were developed using partial least squares (PLS) regression. The calibration model was evaluated using some parameters such as coefficient of determination (R2), standard error of calibration (SEC), standard error of prediction (SEP), bias between actual and predicted sugar concentration value and ratio prediction to deviation (RPD) parameter. The cross validation method was used to validate each calibration model. It is showed that the use of ATR

  14. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy coupled with chemometric analysis discriminates normal, borderline and malignant ovarian tissue: classifying subtypes of human cancer.

    PubMed

    Theophilou, Georgios; Lima, Kássio M G; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L; Stringfellow, Helen F; Martin, Francis L

    2016-01-21

    Surgical management of ovarian tumours largely depends on their histo-pathological diagnosis. Currently, screening for ovarian malignancy with tumour markers in conjunction with radiological investigations has a low specificity for discriminating benign from malignant tumours. Also, pre-operative biopsy of ovarian masses increases the risk of intra-peritoneal dissemination of malignancy. Intra-operative frozen section, although sufficiently accurate in differentiating tumours according to their histological type, increases operation times. This results in increased surgery-related risks to the patient and additional burden to resource allocation. We set out to determine whether attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, combined with chemometric analysis can be applied to discriminate between normal, borderline and malignant ovarian tumours and classify ovarian carcinoma subtypes according to the unique spectral signatures of their molecular composition. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded ovarian tissue blocks were de-waxed, mounted on Low-E slides and desiccated before being analysed using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Chemometric analysis in the form of principal component analysis (PCA), successive projection algorithm (SPA) and genetic algorithm (GA), followed by linear discriminant analysis (LDA) of the obtained spectra revealed clear segregation between benign versus borderline versus malignant tumours as well as segregation between different histological tumour subtypes, when these approaches are used in combination. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy coupled with chemometric analysis has the potential to provide a novel diagnostic approach in the accurate diagnosis of ovarian tumours assisting surgical decision making to avoid under-treatment or over-treatment, with minimal impact to the patient. PMID:26090781

  15. Investigation of switch from ATM to ATR signaling at the sites of DNA damage induced by low and high LET radiation.

    PubMed

    Saha, Janapriya; Wang, Minli; Cucinotta, Francis A

    2013-12-01

    Upon induction of DNA damage by ionizing radiation (IR), members of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-like kinase family of proteins namely ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM), DNA-PKcs, and ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR) maintain genomic integrity by mounting DNA damage response (DDR). Recent reports suggest that activation of ATM and ATR are oppositely regulated by the length of single stranded overhangs generated during end processing by nucleases at the break sites. These stretches of single stranded overhangs hold the clue for the transition from ATM to ATR signaling at broken DNA ends. We investigated whether differential processing of breaks induced by low and high LET radiation augments the phenomenon of switching from ATM to ATR kinase and hence a concomitant NHEJ to HR transition at the sites of DNA damage. 82-6 human fibroblasts were irradiated with 1 or 2Gy of γ-rays and particle radiation of increasing LET in order to increase the complexity and variability of DNA double strand breaks (DSB) structures. The activation kinetics of ATM and ATR kinases along with their downstream substrates were determined utilizing Western blotting and immunofluorescence techniques. Our data provide evidence of a potential switch from ATM to ATR kinase signaling in cells treated with γ-rays at approximately 2h post irradiation, with induction and completion of resection denoted by Rad51 foci resolution kinetics and observed with a significant decline of phosphorylated ATR kinase 8h after IR. On the other hand, irradiation with high LET 600MeV/u (56)Fe (180keV/μm) and 170MeV/u (28)Si (99keV/μm) particles show a similar Rad51 foci decay kinetics, however, exhibiting prolonged resection, evident by the persistent phosphorylated ATM and ATR kinase until 24h post irradiation. This residual effect, however, was significantly reduced for 250MeV/u (16)O particles of moderate LET (25keV/μm) and absent for γ-rays. Hence, our results support the hypothesis that the transition

  16. Nuclear Fuels & Materials Spotlight Volume 4

    SciTech Connect

    I. J. van Rooyen,; T. M. Lillo; Y. Q. WU; P.A. Demkowicz; L. Scott; D.M. Scates; E. L. Reber; J. H. Jackson; J. A. Smith; D.L. Cottle; B.H. Rabin; M.R. Tonks; S.B. Biner; Y. Zhang; R.L. Williamson; S.R. Novascone; B.W. Spencer; J.D. Hales; D.R. Gaston; C.J. Permann; D. Anders; S.L. Hayes; P.C. Millett; D. Andersson; C. Stanek; R. Ali; S.L. Garrett; J.E. Daw; J.L. Rempe; J. Palmer; B. Tittmann; B. Reinhardt; G. Kohse; P. Ramuhali; H.T. Chien; T. Unruh; B.M. Chase; D.W. Nigg; G. Imel; J. T. Harris

    2014-04-01

    As the nation's nuclear energy laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory brings together talented people and specialized nuclear research capability to accomplish our mission. This edition of the Nuclear Fuels and Materials Division Spotlight provides an overview of some of our recent accomplishments in research and capability development. These accomplishments include: • The first identification of silver and palladium migrating through the SiC layer in TRISO fuel • A description of irradiation assisted stress corrosion testing capabilities that support commercial light water reactor life extension • Results of high-temperature safety testing on coated particle fuels irradiated in the ATR • New methods for testing the integrity of irradiated plate-type reactor fuel • Description of a 'Smart Fuel' concept that wirelessly provides real time information about changes in nuclear fuel properties and operating conditions • Development and testing of ultrasonic transducers and real-time flux sensors for use inside reactor cores, and • An example of a capsule irradiation test. Throughout Spotlight, you'll find examples of productive partnerships with academia, industry, and government agencies that deliver high-impact outcomes. The work conducted at Idaho National Laboratory helps to spur innovation in nuclear energy applications that drive economic growth and energy security. We appreciate your interest in our work here at INL, and hope that you find this issue informative.

  17. A Study of Electrochemical Reduction of Ethylene and PropyleneCarbonate Electrolytes on Graphite Using ATR-FTIR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhuang, Guorong V.; Yang, Hui; Blizanac, Berislav; Ross Jr.,Philip N.

    2005-05-12

    We present results testing the hypothesis that there is a different reaction pathway for the electrochemical reduction of PC versus EC-based electrolytes at graphite electrodes with LiPF6 as the salt in common. We examined the reduction products formed using ex-situ Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy in attenuated total reflection (ATR) geometry. The results show the pathway for reduction of PC leads nearly entirely to lithium carbonate as the solid product (and presumably ethylene gas as the co-product) while EC follows a path producing a mixture of organic and inorganic compounds. Possible explanations for the difference in reaction pathway are discussed.

  18. Effect of Low Temperature Irradiation in ATR On The Mechanical Properties of Ternary V-Cr-Ti Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Margaret L.; Toloczko, Mychailo B.; Oliver, Brian M.; Garner, Francis A.

    2000-09-01

    Tensile tests and shear punch teats were performed on a variety of vanadium alloys that were irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at temperatures between 200 and 300 degrees C to doses between 3 and 5 dpa. Tests were performed at room temperature and the irradiation temperature. The results of both the tensile tests and the shear punch tests show that following low temperature irradiation, the yield strength increased by a factor of 3-4 while the ultimate strength increased by a factor of approximately 3.

  19. Microstructural examination of V-(3-6%)Cr-(3-5%)Ti irradiated in the ATR-A1 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Gelles, D.S.

    1998-09-01

    Microstructural examination results are reported for four heats of V-(3-6%)Cr-(3-5%)Ti irradiated in the ATR-A1 experiment to {approximately}4 dpa at {approximately}200 and 300 C to provide an understanding of the microstructural evolution that may be associated with degradation of mechanical properties. Fine precipitates were observed in high density intermixed with small defect clusters for all conditions examined following the irradiation. The irradiation-induced precipitation does not appear to be affected by preirradiation heat treatment or composition.

  20. Pharmacologic inhibition of ATR and ATM offers clinically important distinctions to enhancing platinum or radiation response in ovarian, endometrial, and cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Pang-ning; Bateman, Nicholas W.; Darcy, Kathleen M.; Hamilton, Chad A.; Maxwell, George Larry; Bakkenist, Christopher J.; Conrads, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Significant reductions in gynecologic (GYN) cancer mortality and morbidity require treatments that prevent and reverse resistance to chemotherapy and radiation. The objective of this study was to determine if pharmacologic inhibition of key DNA damage response kinases in GYN cancers would enhance cell killing by platinum-based chemotherapy and radiation. Methods A panel of human ovarian, endometrial and cervical cancer cell lines were treated with platinum drugs or ionizing radiation (IR) along with small molecule pharmacological kinase inhibitors of Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and ATM and Rad-3-related (ATR). Results Pharmacologic inhibition of ATR significantly enhanced platinum drug response in all GYN cancer cell lines tested, whereas inhibition of ATM did not enhance the response to platinum drugs. Co-inhibition of ATM and ATR did not enhance platinum kill beyond that observed by inhibition of ATR alone. By contrast, inhibiting either ATR or ATM enhanced the response to IR in all GYN cancer cells, with further enhancement achieved with co-inhibition. Conclusions These studies highlight actionable mechanisms operative in GYN cancer cells with potential to maximize response of platinum agents and radiation in newly diagnosed as well as recurrent gynecologic cancers. PMID:25560806

  1. Aluminum-Dependent Terminal Differentiation of the Arabidopsis Root Tip Is Mediated through an ATR-, ALT2-, and SOG1-Regulated Transcriptional Response[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sjogren, Caroline A.; Bolaris, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    By screening for suppressors of the aluminum (Al) hypersensitive Arabidopsis thaliana mutant als3-1, it was found that mutational loss of the Arabidopsis DNA damage response transcription factor SUPPRESSOR OF GAMMA RESPONSE1 (SOG1) confers increased Al tolerance similar to the loss-of-function mutants for the cell cycle checkpoint genes ATAXIA TELANGIECTASIA AND RAD3 RELATED (ATR) and ALUMINUM TOLERANT2 (ALT2). This suggests that Al-dependent terminal differentiation of the root tip is an active process resulting from activation of the DNA damage checkpoint by an ATR-regulated pathway, which functions at least in part through SOG1. Consistent with this, ATR can phosphorylate SOG1 in vitro. Analysis of SOG1’s role in Al-dependent root growth inhibition shows that sog1-7 prevents Al-dependent quiescent center differentiation and endoreduplication in the primary root tip. Following Al exposure, SOG1 increases expression of several genes previously associated with DNA damage, including BRCA1 and PARP2, with gel-shift analysis showing that SOG1 can physically associate with the BRCA1 promoter in vitro. Al-responsive expression of these SOG1-regulated genes requires ATR and ALT2, but not ATAXIA TELANGIECTASIA MUTATED, thus demonstrating that in response to chronic Al exposure, ATR, ALT2, and SOG1 function together to halt root growth and promote terminal differentiation at least in part in a transcription-dependent manner. PMID:26320227

  2. Direct Binding to Replication Protein A (RPA)-coated Single-stranded DNA Allows Recruitment of the ATR Activator TopBP1 to Sites of DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Acevedo, Julyana; Yan, Shan; Michael, W Matthew

    2016-06-17

    A critical event for the ability of cells to tolerate DNA damage and replication stress is activation of the ATR kinase. ATR activation is dependent on the BRCT (BRCA1 C terminus) repeat-containing protein TopBP1. Previous work has shown that recruitment of TopBP1 to sites of DNA damage and stalled replication forks is necessary for downstream events in ATR activation; however, the mechanism for this recruitment was not known. Here, we use protein binding assays and functional studies in Xenopus egg extracts to show that TopBP1 makes a direct interaction, via its BRCT2 domain, with RPA-coated single-stranded DNA. We identify a point mutant that abrogates this interaction and show that this mutant fails to accumulate at sites of DNA damage and that the mutant cannot activate ATR. These data thus supply a mechanism for how the critical ATR activator, TopBP1, senses DNA damage and stalled replication forks to initiate assembly of checkpoint signaling complexes. PMID:27129245

  3. Tip-enhanced near-field optical microscope with side-on and ATR-mode sample excitation for super-resolution Raman imaging of surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heilman, A. L.; Gordon, M. J.

    2016-06-01

    A tip-enhanced near-field optical microscope with side-on and attenuated total reflectance (ATR) excitation and collection is described and used to demonstrate sub-diffraction-limited (super-resolution) optical and chemical characterization of surfaces. ATR illumination is combined with an Au optical antenna tip to show that (i) the tip can quantitatively transduce the optical near-field (evanescent waves) above the surface by scattering photons into the far-field, (ii) the ATR geometry enables excitation and characterization of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), whose associated optical fields are shown to enhance Raman scattering from a thin layer of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc), and (iii) SPPs can be used to plasmonically excite the tip for super-resolution chemical imaging of patterned CuPc via tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS). ATR-illumination TERS is also quantitatively compared with the more conventional side-on illumination scheme. In both cases, spatial resolution was better than 40 nm and tip on/tip off Raman enhancement factors were >6500. Furthermore, ATR illumination was shown to provide similar Raman signal levels at lower "effective" pump powers due to additional optical energy delivered by SPPs to the active region in the tip-surface gap.

  4. Diesel fuel to dc power: Navy & Marine Corps Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomfield, D.P.

    1996-12-31

    During the past year Analytic Power has tested fuel cell stacks and diesel fuel processors for US Navy and Marine Corps applications. The units are 10 kW demonstration power plants. The USN power plant was built to demonstrate the feasibility of diesel fueled PEM fuel cell power plants for 250 kW and 2.5 MW shipboard power systems. We designed and tested a ten cell, 1 kW USMC substack and fuel processor. The complete 10 kW prototype power plant, which has application to both power and hydrogen generation, is now under construction. The USN and USMC fuel cell stacks have been tested on both actual and simulated reformate. Analytic Power has accumulated operating experience with autothermal reforming based fuel processors operating on sulfur bearing diesel fuel, jet fuel, propane and natural gas. We have also completed the design and fabrication of an advanced regenerative ATR for the USMC. One of the significant problems with small fuel processors is heat loss which limits its ability to operate with the high steam to carbon ratios required for coke free high efficiency operation. The new USMC unit specifically addresses these heat transfer issues. The advances in the mill programs have been incorporated into Analytic Power`s commercial units which are now under test.

  5. Completing the Design of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Experiments for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover

    2006-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide (UCO) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the newly formed Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control for each capsule. The swept gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation.

  6. Validation of the Physics Analysis used to Characterize the AGR-1 TRISO Fuel Irradiation Test

    SciTech Connect

    Sterbentz, James W.; Harp, Jason M.; Demkowicz, Paul A.; Hawkes, Grant L.; Chang, Gray S.

    2015-05-01

    The results of a detailed physics depletion calculation used to characterize the AGR-1 TRISO-coated particle fuel test irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory are compared to measured data for the purpose of validation. The particle fuel was irradiated for 13 ATR power cycles over three calendar years. The physics analysis predicts compact burnups ranging from 11.30-19.56% FIMA and cumulative neutron fast fluence from 2.21?4.39E+25 n/m2 under simulated high-temperature gas-cooled reactor conditions in the ATR. The physics depletion calculation can provide a full characterization of all 72 irradiated TRISO-coated particle compacts during and post-irradiation, so validation of this physics calculation was a top priority. The validation of the physics analysis was done through comparisons with available measured experimental data which included: 1) high-resolution gamma scans for compact activity and burnup, 2) mass spectrometry for compact burnup, 3) flux wires for cumulative fast fluence, and 4) mass spectrometry for individual actinide and fission product concentrations. The measured data are generally in very good agreement with the calculated results, and therefore provide an adequate validation of the physics analysis and the results used to characterize the irradiated AGR-1 TRISO fuel.

  7. Analysis and optimization of solid oxide fuel cell-based auxiliary power units using a generic zero-dimensional fuel cell model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göll, S.; Samsun, R. C.; Peters, R.

    Fuel-cell-based auxiliary power units can help to reduce fuel consumption and emissions in transportation. For this application, the combination of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) with upstream fuel processing by autothermal reforming (ATR) is seen as a highly favorable configuration. Notwithstanding the necessity to improve each single component, an optimized architecture of the fuel cell system as a whole must be achieved. To enable model-based analyses, a system-level approach is proposed in which the fuel cell system is modeled as a multi-stage thermo-chemical process using the "flowsheeting" environment PRO/II™. Therein, the SOFC stack and the ATR are characterized entirely by corresponding thermodynamic processes together with global performance parameters. The developed model is then used to achieve an optimal system layout by comparing different system architectures. A system with anode and cathode off-gas recycling was identified to have the highest electric system efficiency. Taking this system as a basis, the potential for further performance enhancement was evaluated by varying four parameters characterizing different system components. Using methods from the design and analysis of experiments, the effects of these parameters and of their interactions were quantified, leading to an overall optimized system with encouraging performance data.

  8. Development and design of experiments optimization of a high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell auxiliary power unit with onboard fuel processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karstedt, Jörg; Ogrzewalla, Jürgen; Severin, Christopher; Pischinger, Stefan

    In this work, the concept development, system layout, component simulation and the overall DOE system optimization of a HT-PEM fuel cell APU with a net electric power output of 4.5 kW and an onboard methane fuel processor are presented. A highly integrated system layout has been developed that enables fast startup within 7.5 min, a closed system water balance and high fuel processor efficiencies of up to 85% due to the recuperation of the anode offgas burner heat. The integration of the system battery into the load management enhances the transient electric performance and the maximum electric power output of the APU system. Simulation models of the carbon monoxide influence on HT-PEM cell voltage, the concentration and temperature profiles within the autothermal reformer (ATR) and the CO conversion rates within the watergas shift stages (WGSs) have been developed. They enable the optimization of the CO concentration in the anode gas of the fuel cell in order to achieve maximum system efficiencies and an optimized dimensioning of the ATR and WGS reactors. Furthermore a DOE optimization of the global system parameters cathode stoichiometry, anode stoichiometry, air/fuel ratio and steam/carbon ratio of the fuel processing system has been performed in order to achieve maximum system efficiencies for all system operating points under given boundary conditions.

  9. [A case of X-linked alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation (ATR-X) syndrome with repeated apnea attacks due to laryngomalacia].

    PubMed

    Ebishima, Yuko; Misaki, Takako; Owa, Kenji; Okuno, Takehiko; Wada, Takahito; Suehiro, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of X-linked alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome (ATR-X) with repeated apnea attacks dating from the patient's 12th year. We initially diagnosed them as obstructive apnea due to upper pharyngeal stenosis and laryngomalacia by polysomnography and laryngo-fiberscopy. However, reevaluation after one and a half years revealed that the boy had central and mixed apnea, as well as obstructive apnea. To date, few reports have been published on the causes of apnea attacks in ATR-X patients. We clinicians should therefore consider laryngomalacia as one cause of apnea attacks in ATR-X patients, and choose the appropriate therapy for a pattern of apnea that can change during its clinical course. PMID:23593745

  10. FTIR-ATR determination of solid non fat (SNF) in raw milk using PLS and SVM chemometric methods.

    PubMed

    Bassbasi, M; Platikanov, S; Tauler, R; Oussama, A

    2014-03-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) attenuated total reflectance (ATR) spectroscopy, coupled with chemometrics methods have been applied to the fast and non-destructive quantitative determination of solid non fat (SNF) content in raw milk. Partial least squares regression (PLS) and support vector machine (SVM) regression methods were used to model and predict SNF contents in raw milk based on FTIR spectral transmission measurements. Both methods, PLS and SVM, showed good performances in SNF prediction with relative prediction errors in the external validation of between 0.2% and 0.3% depending on the spectral range and regression method. Coefficient of determination of the global fit was always above 0.99. Since, the relative prediction errors were low, it can be concluded that FTIR-ATR with chemometrics can be used for accurate quantitative determinations of SNF contents in raw milk within the investigated calibration range of 79-100g/L. The proposed procedure is fast, non-destructive, simple and easy to implement. PMID:24176339

  11. Mec1/ATR regulates the generation of single-stranded DNA that attenuates Tel1/ATM signaling at DNA ends

    PubMed Central

    Clerici, Michela; Trovesi, Camilla; Galbiati, Alessandro; Lucchini, Giovanna; Longhese, Maria Pia

    2014-01-01

    Tel1/ATM and Mec1/ATR checkpoint kinases are activated by DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Mec1/ATR recruitment to DSBs requires the formation of RPA-coated single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), which arises from 5′–3′ nucleolytic degradation (resection) of DNA ends. Here, we show that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mec1 regulates resection of the DSB ends. The lack of Mec1 accelerates resection and reduces the loading to DSBs of the checkpoint protein Rad9, which is known to inhibit ssDNA generation. Extensive resection is instead inhibited by the Mec1-ad mutant variant that increases the recruitment near the DSB of Rad9, which in turn blocks DSB resection by both Rad53-dependent and Rad53-independent mechanisms. The mec1-ad resection defect leads to prolonged persistence at DSBs of the MRX complex that causes unscheduled Tel1 activation, which in turn impairs checkpoint switch off. Thus, Mec1 regulates the generation of ssDNA at DSBs, and this control is important to coordinate Mec1 and Tel1 signaling activities at these breaks. PMID:24357557

  12. In Situ ATR FTIR Spectroscopic Study of the Formation and Hydration of a Fucoidan/Chitosan Polyelectrolyte Multilayer.

    PubMed

    Ho, Tracey T M; Bremmell, Kristen E; Krasowska, Marta; MacWilliams, Stephanie V; Richard, Céline J E; Stringer, Damien N; Beattie, David A

    2015-10-20

    The formation of fucoidan/chitosan-based polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) has been studied with in situ Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Attenuated total reflectance (ATR) FTIR spectroscopy has been used to follow the sequential build-up of the multilayer, with peaks characteristic of each polymer being seen to increase in intensity with each respective adsorption stage. In addition, spectral processing has allowed for the extraction of spectra from individual adsorbed layers, which have been used to provide unambiguous determination of the adsorbed mass of the PEM at each stage of formation. The PEM was seen to undergo a transition in growth regimes during build-up: from supra-linear to linear. In addition, the wettability of the PEM has been probed at each stage of the build-up, using the captive bubble contact angle technique. The contact angles were uniformly low, but showed variation in value depending on the nature of the outer polymer layer, and this variation correlated with the overall percentage hydration of the PEM (determined from FTIR and quartz crystal microbalance data). The nature of the hydration water within the polyelectrolyte multilayer has also been studied with FTIR spectroscopy, specifically in situ synchrotron ATR FTIR microscopy of the multilayer confined between two solid surfaces. The acquired spectra have enabled the hydrogen bonding environment of the PEM hydration water to be determined. The PEM hydration water is seen to have an environment in which it is subject to fewer hydrogen bonding interactions than in bulk electrolyte solution. PMID:26421938

  13. Cell cycle-dependent DNA damage signaling induced by ICRF-193 involves ATM, ATR, CHK2, and BRCA1

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Iha; Avraham, Hava Karsenty . E-mail: havraham@bidmc.harvard.edu

    2006-07-01

    Topoisomerase II is essential for cell proliferation and survival and has been a target of various anticancer drugs. ICRF-193 has long been used as a catalytic inhibitor to study the function of topoisomerase II. Here, we show that ICRF-193 treatment induces DNA damage signaling. Treatment with ICRF-193 induced G2 arrest and DNA damage signaling involving {gamma}-H2AX foci formation and CHK2 phosphorylation. DNA damage by ICRF-193 was further demonstrated by formation of the nuclear foci of 53BP1, NBS1, BRCA1, MDC1, and FANCD2 and increased comet tail moment. The DNA damage signaling induced by ICRF-193 was mediated by ATM and ATR and was restricted to cells in specific cell cycle stages such as S, G2, and mitosis including late and early G1 phases. Downstream signaling of ATM and ATR involved the phosphorylation of CHK2 and BRCA1. Altogether, our results demonstrate that ICRF-193 induces DNA damage signaling in a cell cycle-dependent manner and suggest that topoisomerase II might be essential for the progression of the cell cycle at several stages including DNA decondensation.

  14. Galiellalactone induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis through the ATM/ATR pathway in prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    García, Víctor; Lara-Chica, Maribel; Cantarero, Irene; Sterner, Olov; Calzado, Marco A.; Muñoz, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Galiellalactone (GL) is a fungal metabolite that presents antitumor activities on prostate cancer in vitro and in vivo. In this study we show that GL induced cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase, caspase-dependent apoptosis and also affected the microtubule organization and migration ability in DU145 cells. GL did not induce double strand DNA break but activated the ATR and ATM-mediated DNA damage response (DDR) inducing CHK1, H2AX phosphorylation (fH2AX) and CDC25C downregulation. Inhibition of the ATM/ATR activation with caffeine reverted GL-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and DNA damage measured by fH2AX. In contrast, UCN-01, a CHK1 inhibitor, prevented GL-induced cell cycle arrest but enhanced apoptosis in DU145 cells. Furthermore, we found that GL did not increase the levels of intracellular ROS, but the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) completely prevented the effects of GL on fH2AX, G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In contrast to NAC, other antioxidants such as ambroxol and EGCG did not interfere with the activity of GL on cell cycle. GL significantly suppressed DU145 xenograft growth in vivo and induced the expression of fH2AX in the tumors. These findings identify for the first time that GL activates DDR in prostate cancer. PMID:26683224

  15. Splicing mutation in the ATR-X gene can lead to a dysmorphic mental retardation phenotype without {alpha}-thalassemia

    SciTech Connect

    Villard, L.; Lossi, A.M.; Fontes, M.

    1996-03-01

    We have previously reported the isolation of a gene from Xq13 that codes for a putative regulator of transcription (XNP) and has now been shown to be the gene involved in the X-linked {alpha}-thalassemia with mental retardation (ATR-X) syndrome. The widespread expression and numerous domains present in the putative protein suggest that this gene could be involved in other phenotypes. The predominant expression of the gene in the developing brain, as well as its association with neuron differentiation, indicates that mutations of this gene might result in a mental retardation (MR) phenotype. In this paper we present a family with a splice junction mutation in XNP that results in the skipping of an exon and in the introduction of a stop codon in the middle of the XNP-coding sequence. Only the abnormal transcript is expressed in two first cousins presenting the classic ATR-X phenotype (with {alpha}-thalassemia and HbH inclusions). In a distant cousin presenting a similar dysmorphic MR phenotype but not having thalassemia, {approximately}30% of the XNP transcripts are normal. These data demonstrate that the mode of action of the XNP gene product on globin expression is distinct from its mode of action in brain development and facial morphogenesis and suggest that other dysmorphic mental retardation phenotypes, such as Juberg-Marsidi or some sporadic cases of Coffin-Lowry, could be due to mutations in XNP. 20 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) onto lecithin studied by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Tantipolphan, R; Rades, T; McQuillan, A J; Medlicott, N J

    2007-06-01

    The adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA) to lecithin was investigated by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. Lecithin films were prepared by casting aliquots of 3.2 microg lecithin in methanol onto ZnSe ATR prisms. Surface morphology and the thickness of the films were investigated by laser scanning confocal electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy and the thickness of the films used for adsorption studies was estimated to be 40 A. The dependency of the CO peak area on the lecithin mass in the calibration curve confirms that the thickness of the film is below the penetration depth of the infrared evanescent wave. Size exclusion HPLC and fluorescence spectroscopy show that BSA conformation in up to 1M NaCl and CaCl(2) solutions is similar to that in water with no aggregation or changes in protein conformation seen over 4h. The kinetics of BSA adsorption on the lecithin film from water, NaCl and CaCl(2) solutions demonstrates that ions promote the protein adsorption. BSA bound more in the presence of NaCl compared to CaCl(2) at equivalent concentrations. The adsorption appeared greatest at a 0.1M concentration for both NaCl and CaCl(2). The results are explained in terms of absorptive reactivity of BSA and lecithin surfaces upon salt addition. PMID:17240095

  17. An overactivated ATR/CHK1 pathway is responsible for the prolonged G2 accumulation in irradiated AT cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xiang; Khadpe, Jay; Hu, Baocheng; Iliakis, George; Wang, Ya

    2003-01-01

    Induction of checkpoint responses in G1, S, and G2 phases of the cell cycle after exposure of cells to ionizing radiation (IR) is essential for maintaining genomic integrity. Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) plays a key role in initiating this response in all three phases of the cell cycle. However, cells lacking functional ATM exhibit a prolonged G2 arrest after IR, suggesting regulation by an ATM-independent checkpoint response. The mechanism for this ataxia telangiectasia (AT)-independent G2-checkpoint response remains unknown. We report here that the G2 checkpoint in irradiated human AT cells derives from an overactivation of the ATR/CHK1 pathway. Chk1 small interfering RNA abolishes the IR-induced prolonged G2 checkpoint and radiosensitizes AT cells to killing. These results link the activation of ATR/CHK1 with the prolonged G2 arrest in AT cells and show that activation of this G2 checkpoint contributes to the survival of AT cells.

  18. Investigation on the conformations of AOT in water-in-oil microemulsions using 2D-ATR-FTIR correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zuliang; Wu, Peiyi

    2008-07-01

    The carbonyl groups of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) sulfosuccinate (AOT) in the water-in-oil (W/O) microemulsions of AOT/tetrachloromethane/water were investigated by using two-dimensional attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (2D-ATR-FTIR) correlation spectroscopy under a perturbation of temperature. The results of a traditional curve fitting method were compared with the 2D correlation spectra results. The peaks at 1718 and 1736 cm -1 were assigned to different carbonyl groups in trans conformation and gauche conformation of AOT molecules, respectively. With the increase of temperature, the trans conformation increased quickly at the lower temperature below 35 °C and decreased slowly at the higher temperature. The special phenomenon owed to the composition and decomposition of the hydrogen bonding between water of the inner polar core and carbonyl groups of AOT molecules. Two new peaks at 1707 and 1747 cm -1 in the 2D correlation spectra implied the process of the transition of AOT molecule conformation and the deviation of correlation coefficients of curve fitting method. 2D-ATR-FTIR correlation spectroscopy exhibited the superiority over the traditional curve fitting method.

  19. In-situ monitoring of blood glucose level for dialysis machine by AAA-battery-size ATR Fourier spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosono, Satsuki; Sato, Shun; Ishida, Akane; Suzuki, Yo; Inohara, Daichi; Nogo, Kosuke; Abeygunawardhana, Pradeep K.; Suzuki, Satoru; Nishiyama, Akira; Wada, Kenji; Ishimaru, Ichiro

    2015-07-01

    For blood glucose level measurement of dialysis machines, we proposed AAA-battery-size ATR (Attenuated total reflection) Fourier spectroscopy in middle infrared light region. The proposed one-shot Fourier spectroscopic imaging is a near-common path and spatial phase-shift interferometer with high time resolution. Because numerous number of spectral data that is 60 (= camera frame rare e.g. 60[Hz]) multiplied by pixel number could be obtained in 1[sec.], statistical-averaging improvement realize high-accurate spectral measurement. We evaluated the quantitative accuracy of our proposed method for measuring glucose concentration in near-infrared light region with liquid cells. We confirmed that absorbance at 1600[nm] had high correlations with glucose concentrations (correlation coefficient: 0.92). But to measure whole-blood, complex light phenomenon caused from red blood cells, that is scattering and multiple reflection or so, deteriorate spectral data. Thus, we also proposed the ultrasound-assisted spectroscopic imaging that traps particles at standing-wave node. Thus, if ATR prism is oscillated mechanically, anti-node area is generated around evanescent light field on prism surface. By elimination complex light phenomenon of red blood cells, glucose concentration in whole-blood will be quantify with high accuracy. In this report, we successfully trapped red blood cells in normal saline solution with ultrasonic standing wave (frequency: 2[MHz]).

  20. Targeted Inhibition of ATR or CHEK1 Reverses Radioresistance in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells with Distal Chromosome Arm 11q Loss

    PubMed Central

    Sankunny, Madhav; Parikh, Rahul A.; Lewis, Dale W.; Gooding, William E.; Saunders, William S.; Gollin, Susanne M.

    2014-01-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC), a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), is the eighth most common cancer in the U.S.. Amplification of chromosomal band 11q13 and its association with poor prognosis has been well established in OSCC. The first step in the breakage-fusion-bridge (BFB) cycle leading to 11q13 amplification involves breakage and loss of distal 11q. Distal 11q loss marked by copy number loss of the ATM gene is observed in 25% of all Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) tumors, including 48% of HNSCC. We showed previously that copy number loss of distal 11q is associated with decreased sensitivity (increased resistance) to ionizing radiation (IR) in OSCC cell lines. We hypothesized that this radioresistance phenotype associated with ATM copy number loss results from upregulation of the compensatory ATR-CHEK1 pathway, and that knocking down the ATR-CHEK1 pathway increases the sensitivity to IR of OSCC cells with distal 11q loss. Clonogenic survival assays confirmed the association between reduced sensitivity to IR in OSCC cell lines and distal 11q loss. Gene and protein expression studies revealed upregulation of the ATR-CHEK1 pathway and flow cytometry showed G2-M checkpoint arrest after IR treatment of cell lines with distal 11q loss. Targeted knockdown of the ATR-CHEK1 pathway using CHEK1 or ATR siRNA or a CHEK1 small molecule inhibitor (SMI, PF-00477736) resulted in increased sensitivity of the tumor cells to IR. Our results suggest that distal 11q loss is a useful biomarker in OSCC for radioresistance that can be reversed by ATR-CHEK1 pathway inhibition. PMID:24327542

  1. TEM CHARACTERIZATION OF IRRADIATED U3SI2/AL DISPERSION FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    J. Gan; B. Miller; D. Keiser; A. Robinson; P. Medvedev; D. Wachs

    2010-10-01

    The silicide dispersion fuel of U3Si2/Al has been recognized as a reasonably good performance fuel for nuclear research and test reactors except that it requires the use of high enrichment uranium. An irradiated U3Si2/Al dispersion fuel (~75% enrichment) from the high flux side of a RERTR-8 (U0R040) plate was characterized using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The fuel plate was irradiated in the advanced test reactor (ATR) for 105 days. The average irradiation temperature and fission density of the fuel particles for the TEM sample are estimated to be approximately ~110 degrees C and 5.4 x 10-21 f/cm3. The characterization was performed using a 200KV TEM with a LaB6 filament. Detailed microstructural information along with composition analysis is obtained. The results and their implication on the performance of this silicide fuel are discussed.

  2. Modelling an experimental methane fuel processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Shi-Tin; Chen, Yih-Hang; Yu, Cheng-Ching; Liu, Yen-Chun; Lee, Chiou-Hwang

    Steady-state models are developed to describe an experimental methane fuel processor that is intended to provide hydrogen for a fuel cell system for power generation (2-3 kW). First-principle reactor models are constructed to describe a series of reactions, i.e., steam and autothermal reforming (SR/ATR), high- and low-temperature water-gas shift (HTS/LTS) reactions and preferential oxidation (PROX) reactions, at different sectors of the reactor system for methane reforming as well as gas cleaning. The pre-exponential factors of the rate constants are adjusted to fit the experimental data and the resultant reactor model provides a reasonably good description of steady-state behaviour. Next, sensitivity analyses are performed to locate the optimum operating point of the fuel processor. The objective function of the optimization is fuel processor efficiency. The dominating optimization variables include: the ratios of water and oxygen to the hydrocarbon feed to the autothermal reforming reactor and the inlet temperature of the reactor. The results indicate that further improvement in fuel processor efficiency can be made with a reliable process model.

  3. Fuel pin

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, D.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Leggett, R.D.; Baker, R.B.

    1987-11-24

    A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

  4. Using ATR-FT/IR to detect carbohydrate-related molecular structure features of carinata meal and their in situ residues of ruminal fermentation in comparison with canola meal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Hangshu; Yu, Peiqiang

    2013-10-01

    There is no information on the co-products from carinata bio-fuel and bio-oil processing (carinata meal) in molecular structural profiles mainly related to carbohydrate biopolymers in relation to ruminant nutrition. Molecular analyses with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT/IR) technique with attenuated total reflectance (ATR) and chemometrics enable to detect structural features on a molecular basis. The objectives of this study were to: (1) determine carbohydrate conformation spectral features in original carinata meal, co-products from bio-fuel/bio-oil processing; and (2) investigate differences in carbohydrate molecular composition and functional group spectral intensities after in situ ruminal fermentation at 0, 12, 24 and 48 h compared to canola meal as a reference. The molecular spectroscopic parameters of carbohydrate profiles detected were structural carbohydrates (STCHO, mainly associated with hemi-cellulosic and cellulosic compounds; region and baseline ca. 1483-1184 cm-1), cellulosic compounds (CELC, region and baseline ca. 1304-1184 cm-1), total carbohydrates (CHO, region and baseline ca. 1193-889 cm-1) as well as the spectral ratios calculated based on respective spectral intensity data. The results showed that the spectral profiles of carinata meal were significantly different from that of canola meal in CHO 2nd peak area (center at ca. 1091 cm-1, region: 1102-1083 cm-1) and functional group peak intensity ratios such as STCHO 1st peak (ca. 1415 cm-1) to 2nd peak (ca. 1374 cm-1) height ratio, CHO 1st peak (ca. 1149 cm-1) to 3rd peak (ca. 1032 cm-1) height ratio, CELC to total CHO area ratio and STCHO to CELC area ratio, indicating that carinata meal may not in full accord with canola meal in carbohydrate utilization and availability in ruminants. Carbohydrate conformation and spectral features were changed by significant interaction of meal type and incubation time and almost all the spectral parameters were significantly decreased (P < 0

  5. Operando fuel cell spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendrick, Ian Michael

    The active state of a catalyst only exists during catalysis (1) provided the motivation for developing operando spectroscopic techniques. A polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was designed to interface with commercially available instruments for acquisition of infrared spectra of the catalytic surface of the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) during normal operation. This technique has provided insight of the complex processes occurring at the electrode surface. Nafion, the solid electrolyte used in most modern-day polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), serves many purposes in fuel cell operation. However, there is little known of the interface between Nafion and the electrode surface. Previous studies of complex Stark tuning curves of carbon monoxide on the surface of a platinum electrode were attributed the co-adsorption of bisulfite ions originating from the 0.5M H2SO4 electrolyte used in the study(2). Similar tuning curves obtained on a fuel cell MEA despite the absence of supplemental electrolytes suggest the adsorption of Nafion onto platinum (3). The correlation of spectra obtained using attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy (ATR) and polarization modulated IR reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) to a theoretical spectrum generated using density functional theory (DFT) lead to development of a model of Nafion and platinum interaction which identified participation of the SO3- and CF3 groups in Nafion adsorption. The use of ethanol as a fuel stream in proton exchange membrane fuel cells provides a promising alternative to methanol. Relative to methanol, ethanol has a greater energy density, lower toxicity and can be made from the fermentation of biomass(4). Operando IR spectroscopy was used to study the oxidation pathway of ethanol and Stark tuning behavior of carbon monoxide on Pt, Ru, and PtRu electrodes. Potential dependent products such as acetaldehyde, acetic acid and carbon monoxide are identified as well as previously

  6. Reactor Physics Scoping and Characterization Study on Implementation of TRIGA Fuel in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Jennifer Lyons; Wade R. Marcum; Mark D. DeHart; Sean R. Morrell

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), under the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program and the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), is conducting feasibility studies for the conversion of its fuel from a highly enriched uranium (HEU) composition to a low enriched uranium (LEU) composition. These studies have considered a wide variety of LEU plate-type fuels to replace the current HEU fuel. Continuing to investigate potential alternatives to the present HEU fuel form, this study presents a preliminary analysis of TRIGA® fuel within the current ATR fuel envelopes and compares it to the functional requirements delineated by the Naval Reactors Program, which includes: greater than 4.8E+14 fissions/s/g of 235U, a fast to thermal neutron flux ratio that is less than 5% deviation of its current value, a constant cycle power within the corner lobes, and an operational cycle length of 56 days at 120 MW. Other parameters outside those put forth by the Naval Reactors Program which are investigated herein include axial and radial power profiles, effective delayed neutron fraction, and mean neutron generation time.

  7. Laccase/AuAg Hybrid Glucose Microfludic Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-González, B.; Cuevas-Muñiz, F. M.; Guerra-Balcázar, M.; Déctor, A.; Arjona, N.; Ledesma-García, J.; Arriaga, L. G.

    2013-12-01

    In this work a hybrid microfluidic fuel cell was fabricated and evaluated with a AuAg/C bimetallic material for the anode and an enzymatic cathode. The cathodic catalyst was prepared adsorbing laccase and ABTS on Vulcan carbon (Lac-ABTS/C). This material was characterized by FTIR-ATR, the results shows the presence of absorption bands corresponding to the amide bounds. The electrochemical evaluation for the materials consisted in cyclic voltammetry (CV). The glucose electrooxidation reaction in AuAg/C occurs around - 0.3 V vs. NHE. Both electrocatalytic materials were placed in a microfluidic fuel cell. The fuel cell was fed with PBS pH 5 oxygen saturated solution in the cathodic compartment and 5 mM glucose + 0.3 M KOH in the anodic side. Several polarization curves were performed and the maximum power density obtained was 0.3 mWcm-2 .

  8. Potential effects of gallium on cladding materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.F.; Beahm, E.C.; Besmann, T.M.; DeVan, J.H.; DiStefano, J.R.; Gat, U.; Greene, S.R.; Rittenhouse, P.L.; Worley, B.A.

    1997-10-01

    This paper identifies and examines issues concerning the incorporation of gallium in weapons derived plutonium in light water reactor (LWR) MOX fuels. Particular attention is given to the more likely effects of the gallium on the behavior of the cladding material. The chemistry of weapons grade (WG) MOX, including possible consequences of gallium within plutonium agglomerates, was assessed. Based on the calculated oxidation potentials of MOX fuel, the effect that gallium may have on reactions involving fission products and possible impact on cladding performance were postulated. Gallium transport mechanisms are discussed. With an understanding of oxidation potentials and assumptions of mechanisms for gallium transport, possible effects of gallium on corrosion of cladding were evaluated. Potential and unresolved issues and suggested research and development (R and D) required to provide missing information are presented.

  9. AGR-2 Data Qualification Report for ATR Cycles 151B-2, 152A, 152B, 153A, 153B and 154A

    SciTech Connect

    Binh T. Pham; Jeffrey J. Einerson

    2013-09-01

    This report documents the data qualification status of AGR-2 fuel irradiation experimental data from Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Cycles 152A, 152B, 153A, 153B, and 154A, as recorded in the Nuclear Data Management and Analysis System (NDMAS). The AGR-2 data streams addressed include thermocouple (TC) temperatures, sweep gas data (flow rate, pressure, and moisture content), and fission product monitoring system (FPMS) data for each of the six capsules in the experiment. A total of 13,400,520 every minute instantaneous TC and sweep gas data records were received and processed by NDMAS for this period. Of these data, 8,911,791 records (66.5% of the total) were determined to be Qualified based on NDMAS accuracy testing and data validity assessment. For temperature, there were 4,266,081 records (74% of the total TC data) that were Failed due to TC instrument failures. For sweep gas flows, there were 222,648 gas flow records (2.91% of the flow data) that were Failed. The inlet gas flow failures due to gas flow cross-talk and leakage problems that occurred after Cycle 150A were corrected by using the same gas mixture in all six capsules and the Leadout. For FPMS data, NDMAS received and processed preliminary release rate and release-to-birth rate ratio (R/B) data for three reactor cycles (Cycles 149B, 150B, and 151A) . This data consists of 45,983 release rate records and 45,235 R/B records for the 12 radionuclides reported. The qualification status of these FPMS data has been set to In Process until receipt of Quality Assurance-approved data generator reports. All of the above data have been processed and tested using a SAS®-based enterprise application software system, stored in a secure Structured Query Language database, made available on the NDMAS Web portal (http://ndmas.inl.gov), and approved by the INL STIM for release to both internal and appropriate external Very High Temperature Reactor Program participants.

  10. Fabrication of Uranium Oxycarbide Kernels for HTR Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Charles Barnes; CLay Richardson; Scott Nagley; John Hunn; Eric Shaber

    2010-10-01

    Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) has been producing high quality uranium oxycarbide (UCO) kernels for Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel tests at the Idaho National Laboratory. In 2005, 350-µm, 19.7% 235U-enriched UCO kernels were produced for the AGR-1 test fuel. Following coating of these kernels and forming the coated-particles into compacts, this fuel was irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) from December 2006 until November 2009. B&W produced 425-µm, 14% enriched UCO kernels in 2008, and these kernels were used to produce fuel for the AGR-2 experiment that was inserted in ATR in 2010. B&W also produced 500-µm, 9.6% enriched UO2 kernels for the AGR-2 experiments. Kernels of the same size and enrichment as AGR-1 were also produced for the AGR-3/4 experiment. In addition to fabricating enriched UCO and UO2 kernels, B&W has produced more than 100 kg of natural uranium UCO kernels which are being used in coating development tests. Successive lots of kernels have demonstrated consistent high quality and also allowed for fabrication process improvements. Improvements in kernel forming were made subsequent to AGR-1 kernel production. Following fabrication of AGR-2 kernels, incremental increases in sintering furnace charge size have been demonstrated. Recently small scale sintering tests using a small development furnace equipped with a residual gas analyzer (RGA) has increased understanding of how kernel sintering parameters affect sintered kernel properties. The steps taken to increase throughput and process knowledge have reduced kernel production costs. Studies have been performed of additional modifications toward the goal of increasing capacity of the current fabrication line to use for production of first core fuel for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) and providing a basis for the design of a full scale fuel fabrication facility.

  11. Xenopus Cds1 Is Regulated by DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase and ATR during the Cell Cycle Checkpoint Response to Double-Stranded DNA Ends

    PubMed Central

    McSherry, Troy D.; Mueller, Paul R.

    2004-01-01

    The checkpoint kinase Cds1 (Chk2) plays a key role in cell cycle checkpoint responses with functions in cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, and induction of apoptosis. Proper regulation of Cds1 is essential for appropriate cellular responses to checkpoint-inducing insults. While the kinase ATM has been shown to be important in the regulation of human Cds1 (hCds1), here we report that the kinases ATR and DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) play more significant roles in the regulation of Xenopus Cds1 (XCds1). Under normal cell cycle conditions, nonactivated XCds1 constitutively associates with a Xenopus ATR complex. The association of XCds1 with this complex does not require a functional forkhead activation domain but does require a putative SH3 binding region that is found in XCds1. In response to double-stranded DNA ends, the amino terminus of XCds1 is rapidly phosphorylated in a sequential pattern. First DNA-PK phosphorylates serine 39, a site not previously recognized as important in Cds1 regulation. Xenopus ATM, ATR, and/or DNA-PK then phosphorylate three consensus serine/glutamine sites. Together, these phosphorylations have the dual function of inducing dissociation from the ATR complex and independently promoting the full activation of XCds1. Thus, the checkpoint-mediated activation of XCds1 requires phosphorylation by multiple phosphoinositide 3-kinase-related kinases, protein-protein dissociation, and autophosphorylation. PMID:15509799

  12. Measuring Heterogeneous Reaction Rates with ATR-FTIR Spectroscopy to Evaluate Chemical Fates in an Atmospheric Environment: A Physical Chemistry and Environmental Chemistry Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Jason E.; Zeng, Guang; Maron, Marta K.; Mach, Mindy; Dwebi, Iman; Liu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports an undergraduate laboratory experiment to measure heterogeneous liquid/gas reaction kinetics (ozone-oleic acid and ozone-phenothrin) using a flow reactor coupled to an attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectrometer. The experiment is specially designed for an upper-level undergraduate Physical…

  13. Development of Simple Algorithms in Direct, Non-destructive, and Rapid Determination of Cotton Fiber Maturity from FT-IR/ATR Spectroscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    FT-IR/ATR spectra of seed and lint cottons were collected to explore the potential for the discrimination of immature cottons from mature ones and also for the determination of actual cotton maturity. Spectral features of immature and mature cottons revealed large differences in the 1200-900 cm-1 re...

  14. X-linked [alpha]-thalassemia/mental retardation (ATR-X) syndrome: Localization to Xq12-q21. 31 by X inactivation and linkage analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, R.J.; Buckle, V.J.; Higgs, D.R.; Suthers, G.K. ); Wilkie, A.O.M. )

    1992-11-01

    The authors have examined seven pedigrees that include individuals with a recently described X-linked form of severe mental retardation associated with [alpha]-thalassemia (ATR-X syndrome). Using hematologic and molecular approaches, they have shown that intellectually normal female carriers of this syndrome may be identified by the presence of rare cells containing HbH (hemoglobin H) inclusions in their peripheral blood and by an extremely skewed pattern of X inactivation seen in cells from a variety of tissues. Linkage analysis has localized the ATR-X locus to an interval of approximately 11 cM between the loci DXS106 and DXYS1X (Xq12-q21.31), with a peak LOD score of 5.4 (recombination fraction of 0) at DCS72. These findings provide the basis for genetic counseling, assessment of carrier risk, and prenatal diagnosis of the ATR-X syndrome. Furthermore, they represent an important step in developing strategies to understand how the mutant ATR-X allele causes mental handicap, dysmorphism, and down-regulation of the [alpha]-globin genes. 54 refs., 6 figs., 4 tabs.

  15. Cellulose acetate-lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide solid polymer electrolyte: ATR-FTIR and ionic conductivity behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohd Razalli, Siti Masyitah; Sheikh Mohd Saaid, Siti Irma Yuana; Marwan Ali, Ab Malik; Hassan, Oskar Hasdinor; Yahya, Muhd Zu Azhan

    2015-05-01

    Solid polymer electrolytes (SPEs) based on cellulose acetate (CA) doped with lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) salt are prepared by solution cast technique. Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy of the polymer salt complexes are recorded in the frequency range between 400 cm-1 and 4000 cm-1. The shifting of carbonyl band (C=O) at 1737 cm-1 to a lower wavenumber confirms the occurrence of complexation between the polymer and the salt. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) analysis discovered that the film with 25 wt.% of salt shows the highest ionic conductivity at room temperature. The change in real dielectric permittivity (ɛr) as a function of frequency at different salt concentrations which exhibits a dispersive behavior at low frequencies and decays at higher frequencies, shows the electrode polarization and space charge effect. The real modulus formalism (Mr) analysis shows that the polymer electrolytes in this work are ionic conductors.

  16. The Conference Proceedings of the 2001 Air Transport Research Society (ATRS) of the WCTR Society. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Yeong-Heok (Editor); Bowen, Brent D. (Editor); Tarry, Scott E. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    The ATRS held its Annual conference at Jeju Island, Korea in July 2001. The conference was a success with nearly 140 participants including 70 presenters. This report contains presentations from Volume 1 on the following: Airline and Travel Agent Relationships in Asia;Benchmarking Aviation Safety in the Commercial Airline Industry;Impact of Frequent Flyer Program on the Demand for Air Travel; Application of Genetic Algorithm on Airline Schedule;The Effects of Dual Carrier Designation and Partial Liberalization: The Case of Canada;Defense of Air Carriers and Air Agencies in FAA Enforcement proceedin gs - Damage Control Before the Case Arises; Cost Incentives for Airline Mergers? - An examination on the cost impact of U.S. airline mergers and acquisitions;Airport Regulation, Airline Competition and Canada's Airport System; Airline Competition: The Case of Israel's Domestic Doupoly; Non-Financial Indicators of Airline Distress: A Conceptual Approach;and Airport Privatization: An Empirical Analysis of Financial and Operational Efficiency.

  17. ATR-FTIR Spectroscopy for the Assessment of Biochemical Changes in Skin Due to Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Cássio A.; Goulart, Viviane P.; Côrrea, Luciana; Pereira, Thiago M.; Zezell, Denise M.

    2015-01-01

    Nonmelanoma skin cancers represent 95% of cutaneous neoplasms. Among them, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the more aggressive form and shows a pattern of possible metastatic profile. In this work, we used Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectroscopy to assess the biochemical changes in normal skin caused by squamous cell carcinoma induced by multi-stage chemical carcinogenesis in mice. Changes in the absorption intensities and shifts were observed in the vibrational modes associated to proteins, indicating changes in secondary conformation in the neoplastic tissue. Hierarchical cluster analysis was performed to evaluate the potential of the technique to differentiate the spectra of neoplastic and normal skin tissue, so that the accuracy obtained for this classification was 86.4%. In this sense, attenuated total reflection (ATR)-FTIR spectroscopy provides a useful tool to complement histopathological analysis in the clinical routine for the diagnosis of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:25811925

  18. Tensile and impact properties of vanadium-base alloys irradiated at low temperatures in the ATR-A1 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Nowicki, L.J.; Billone, M.C.; Chung, H.M.; Smith, D.L.

    1998-03-01

    Subsize tensile and Charpy specimens made from several V-(4-5)Cr-(4-5)Ti alloys were irradiated in the ATR-A1 experiment to study the effects of low-temperature irradiation on mechanical properties. These specimens were contained in lithium-bonded subcapsules and irradiated at temperatures between {approx}200 and 300 C. Peak neutron damage was {approx}4.7 dpa. Postirradiation testing of these specimens has begun. Preliminary results from a limited number of specimens indicate a significant loss of work-hardening capability and dynamic toughness due to the irradiation. These results are consistent with data from previous low-temperature neutron irradiation experiments on these alloys.

  19. Monitoring the distribution of surfactants in the stratum corneum by combined ATR-FTIR and tape-stripping experiments.

    PubMed

    Hoppel, Magdalena; Holper, Evelyn; Baurecht, Dieter; Valenta, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Combined ATR-FTIR (attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared) spectroscopy and tape-stripping experiments in vitro on porcine ear skin were used to investigate the spatial distribution of different surfactants in the stratum corneum (SC). To reveal a possible connection between the size of the formed micelles and skin penetration, dynamic light-scattering measurements of the aqueous surfactant solutions were also taken. Compared to an alkyl polyglycoside and sucrose laurate, a deeper skin penetration of the anionic surfactants sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) und sodium lauryl ether sulfate (SLES) could be related to a smaller size of the formed micelles. Beside the differences in spatial distribution, a link between the physical presence of anionic surfactants in the SC and a decrease of skin hydration was found. Furthermore, the incorporation of SDS and SLES into the SC, even after a brief, consumer-orientated washing procedure with commercially available hair shampoos, was confirmed. PMID:25612540

  20. Rapid evaluation and quantitative analysis of thyme, origano and chamomile essential oils by ATR-IR and NIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Hartwig; Quilitzsch, Rolf; Krüger, Hans

    2003-12-01

    The essential oils obtained from various chemotypes of thyme, origano and chamomile species were studied by ATR/FT-IR as well as NIR spectroscopy. Application of multivariate statistics (PCA, PLS) in conjunction with analytical reference data leads to very good IR and NIR calibration results. For the main essential oil components (e.g. carvacrol, thymol, γ-terpinene, α-bisabolol and β-farnesene) standard errors are in the range of the applied GC reference method. In most cases the multiple coefficients of determination ( R2) are >0.97. Using the IR fingerprint region (900-1400 cm -1) a qualitative discrimination of the individual chemotypes is possible already by visual judgement without to apply any chemometric algorithms.The described rapid and non-destructive methods can be applied in industry to control very easily purifying, blending and redistillation processes of the mentioned essential oils.

  1. Bridging the gap between in vitro and in vivo: Dose and schedule predictions for the ATR inhibitor AZD6738.

    PubMed

    Checkley, Stephen; MacCallum, Linda; Yates, James; Jasper, Paul; Luo, Haobin; Tolsma, John; Bendtsen, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the therapeutic effect of drug dose and scheduling is critical to inform the design and implementation of clinical trials. The increasing complexity of both mono, and particularly combination therapies presents a substantial challenge in the clinical stages of drug development for oncology. Using a systems pharmacology approach, we have extended an existing PK-PD model of tumor growth with a mechanistic model of the cell cycle, enabling simulation of mono and combination treatment with the ATR inhibitor AZD6738 and ionizing radiation. Using AZD6738, we have developed multi-parametric cell based assays measuring DNA damage and cell cycle transition, providing quantitative data suitable for model calibration. Our in vitro calibrated cell cycle model is predictive of tumor growth observed in in vivo mouse xenograft studies. The model is being used for phase I clinical trial designs for AZD6738, with the aim of improving patient care through quantitative dose and scheduling prediction. PMID:26310312

  2. Bridging the gap between in vitro and in vivo: Dose and schedule predictions for the ATR inhibitor AZD6738

    PubMed Central

    Checkley, Stephen; MacCallum, Linda; Yates, James; Jasper, Paul; Luo, Haobin; Tolsma, John; Bendtsen, Claus

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the therapeutic effect of drug dose and scheduling is critical to inform the design and implementation of clinical trials. The increasing complexity of both mono, and particularly combination therapies presents a substantial challenge in the clinical stages of drug development for oncology. Using a systems pharmacology approach, we have extended an existing PK-PD model of tumor growth with a mechanistic model of the cell cycle, enabling simulation of mono and combination treatment with the ATR inhibitor AZD6738 and ionizing radiation. Using AZD6738, we have developed multi-parametric cell based assays measuring DNA damage and cell cycle transition, providing quantitative data suitable for model calibration. Our in vitro calibrated cell cycle model is predictive of tumor growth observed in in vivo mouse xenograft studies. The model is being used for phase I clinical trial designs for AZD6738, with the aim of improving patient care through quantitative dose and scheduling prediction. PMID:26310312

  3. Crystallization kinetics from mixture Na2SO4/glycerol droplets of Na2SO4 by FTIR-ATR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Dan-Ting; Cai, Chen; Zhang, Yun; Wang, Na; Pang, Shu-Feng; Zhang, Yun-Hong

    2016-08-01

    The efflorescence of mixed Na2SO4/glycerol aerosols on the ZnSe substrate with various mole ratios (Na2SO4/glycerol = 1:1, 1:2, 1:4) has been studied in the relative humidity (RH) linearly decline process, using a situ Fourier transform infrared attenuated total reflection (FTIR-ATR) technique. The crystal ratio at a given RH can be gained by the absorbance of the band at 1132 cm-1, which shows the incomplete nucleation for mixed Na2SO4/glycerol aerosols and the decreased amount of the droplets crystallized at the lowest RH with the glycerol increase. Using the volume fraction of droplets that have yet to crystallize, the heterogeneous nucleation kinetics has been gained. By the Extended Aerosol Inorganics Model (E-AIM), the nucleation rate as the function of solute saturation degree has been gained for various mixed Na2SO4/glycerol aerosols.

  4. Formulation and drug-content assay of microencapsulated antisense oligonucleotide to NF-κB using ATR-FTIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siwale, Rodney; Meadows, Fred; Mody, Vicky V.; Shah, Samit

    2013-09-01

    Antisense oligonucleotide to NF-κB sequence: 5‧-GGA AAC ACA TCC TCC ATG-3‧, was microencapsulated in an albumin matrix by the method of spray dryingTM. Spectral analysis was performed on varying drug loading formulations of both drugs by mid-IR attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). An out of plane O-H bending vibration at 948 cm-1, unique to both the native and microencapsulated drugs was identified. The calculated peak areas corresponded to the drug loadings in the microsphere formulations. A standard curve could then be used to determine the drug content of an unknown microsphere formulation. Accuracy and precision were determined to be comparable to other analytical techniques such as HPLC.

  5. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative - Projected Linear Heat Generation Rate and Burnup Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Richard G. Ambrosek; Gray S. Chang; Debbie J. Utterbeck

    2005-02-01

    This report provides documentation of the physics analysis performed to determine the linear heat generation rate (LHGR) and burnup calculations for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) tests, AFC-1D, AFC-1H, and AFC-1G. The AFC-1D and AFC-1H tests consists of low-fertile metallic fuel compositions and the AFC-1G test consists of non-fertile and low-fertile nitride compositions. These tests will be irradiated in the East Flux Trap (EFT) positions E1, E2, and E3, respectively, during Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Cycle 135B.

  6. Improving the AGR Fuel Testing Power Density Profile Versus Irradiation-Time in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Gray S. Chang; David A. Petti; John T. Maki; Misti A. Lillo

    2009-05-01

    The Very High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor (VHTR), which is currently being developed, achieves simplification of safety through reliance on ceramic-coated fuel particles. Each TRISO-coated fuel particle has its own containment which serves as the principal barrier against radionuclide release under normal operating and accident conditions. These fuel particles, in the form of graphite fuel compacts, are currently undergoing a series of irradiation tests in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to support the Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (AGR) fuel qualification program. A representive coated fuel particle with an 235U enrichment of 19.8 wt% was used in this analysis. The fuel burnup analysis tool used to perform the neutronics study reported herein, couples the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP, with the radioactive decay and burnup code ORIGEN2. The fuel burnup methodology known as Monte-Carlo with ORIGEN2 (MCWO) was used to evaluate the AGR experiment assembly and demonstrate compliance with ATR safety requirements. For the AGR graphite fuel compacts, the MCWO-calculated fission power density (FPD) due to neutron fission in 235U is an important design parameter. One of the more important AGR fuel testing requirements is to maintain the peak fuel compact temperature close to 1250°C throughout the proposed irradiation campaign of 550 effective full power days (EFPDs). Based on the MCWO-calculated FPD, a fixed gas gap size was designed to allow regulation of the fuel compact temperatures throughout the entire fuel irradiation campaign by filling the gap with a mixture of helium and neon gases. The chosen fixed gas gap can only regulate the peak fuel compact temperature in the desired range during the irradiation test if the ratio of the peak power density to the time-dependent low power density (P/T) at 550 EFPDs is less than 2.5. However, given the near constant neutron flux within the ATR driver core and the depletion of 235U in

  7. Specific interactions between alkali metal cations and the KcsA channel studied using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Furutani, Yuji; Shimizu, Hirofumi; Asai, Yusuke; Oiki, Shigetoshi; Kandori, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    The X-ray structure of KcsA, a eubacterial potassium channel, displays a selectivity filter composed of four parallel peptide strands. The backbone carbonyl oxygen atoms of these strands solvate multiple K+ ions. KcsA structures show different distributions of ions within the selectivity filter in solutions containing different cations. To assess the interactions of cations with the selectivity filter, we used attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. Ion-exchange-induced ATR-FTIR difference spectra were obtained by subtracting the spectrum of KcsA soaked in K+ solution from that obtained in Li+, Na+, Rb+, and Cs+ solutions. Large spectral changes in the amide-I and -II regions were observed upon replacing K+ with smaller-sized cations Li+ and Na+ but not with larger-sized cations Rb+ and Cs+. These results strongly suggest that the selectivity filter carbonyls coordinating Rb+ or Cs+ adopt a conformation similar to those coordinating K+ (cage configuration), but those coordinating Li+ or Na+ adopt a conformation (plane configuration) considerably different from those coordinating K+. We have identified a cation-type sensitive amide-I band at 1681 cm−1 and an insensitive amide-I band at 1659 cm−1. The bands at 1650, 1639, and 1627 cm−1 observed for Na+-coordinating carbonyls were almost identical to those observed in Li+ solution, suggesting that KcsA forms a similar filter structure in Li+ and Na+ solutions. Thus, we conclude that the filter structure adopts a collapsed conformation in Li+ solution that is similar to that in Na+ solution but is in clear contrast to the X-ray crystal structure of KcsA with Li+. PMID:27493853

  8. Classification of agents using Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cell transformation assay (CTA) with ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and multivariate analysis.

    PubMed

    Ahmadzai, Abdullah A; Trevisan, Júlio; Pang, Weiyi; Riding, Matthew J; Strong, Rebecca J; Llabjani, Valon; Pant, Kamala; Carmichael, Paul L; Scott, Andrew D; Martin, Francis L

    2015-09-01

    The Syrian hamster embryo (SHE) cell transformation assay (pH 6.7) has a reported sensitivity of 87% and specificity of 83%, and an overall concordance of 85% with in vivo rodent bioassay data. To date, the SHE assay is the only in vitro assay that exhibits multistage carcinogenicity. The assay uses morphological transformation, the first stage towards neoplasm, as an endpoint to predict the carcinogenic potential of a test agent. However, scoring of morphologically transformed SHE cells is subjective. We treated SHE cells grown on low-E reflective slides with 2,6-diaminotoluene, N-nitroso-N-ethylnitroguanidine, N-nitroso-N-methylurea, N-nitroso-N-ethylurea, EDTA, dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO; vehicle control), methyl methanesulfonate, benzo[e]pyrene, mitomycin C, ethyl methanesulfonate, ampicillin or five different concentrations of benzo[a]pyrene. Macroscopically visible SHE colonies were located on the slides and interrogated using attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy acquiring five spectra per colony. The acquired IR data were analysed using Fisher's linear discriminant analysis (LDA) followed by principal component analysis (PCA)-LDA cluster vectors to extract major and minor discriminating wavenumbers for each treatment class. Each test agent vs. DMSO and treatment-induced transformed cells vs. corresponding non-transformed were classified by a unique combination of major and minor discriminating wavenumbers. Alterations associated with Amide I, Amide II, lipids and nucleic acids appear to be important in segregation of classes. Our findings suggest that a biophysical approach of ATR-FTIR spectroscopy with multivariate analysis could facilitate a more objective interrogation of SHE cells towards scoring for transformation and ultimately employing the assay for risk assessment of test agents. PMID:25925069

  9. Low-temperature, low-cost growth of robust ATR GeO2 hollow fibers based on copper capillary tubes for transmission of CO2 laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Chengbin; Bai, Wei; Hu, Zhigao; Yang, Pingxiong; Liu, Aiyun; Lin, Fangtin; Shi, Yiwei; Chu, Junhao

    2014-02-01

    Attenuated total reflectance (ATR) infrared hollow waveguide attracts particular interest since it has both advantages of a hollow fiber and a light guiding mechanism similar to that of solid-core fibers. Presently, ATR hollow waveguides are mainly structured with single-crystal sapphire or glassy materials. These waveguides are somewhat brittle. More robust ATR hollow fibers are required in many military and domestic applications. In this work, ATR GeO2 hollow waveguides were prepared based on a copper capillary tube for transmitting CO2 laser light. The inner wall of the copper structural tube was polished using a high-pressure pulsed nanofluid technique. A hexagonal crystalline GeO2 reflective layer with sufficient thickness (>4 μm) was grown on the inner tube wall via a simple liquid phase deposition process at room temperature. The GeO2 coated copper hollow fiber exhibits a low-loss band within 10-11.5 μm. It can still be bent since the hollow-core size (1.4 mm) and the wall thickness (50 μm) are not too large. The transmissions of CO2 laser light are 91% and 43% under a straight condition and a 90° bend with a 30-cm radius condition, respectively. The waveguide displays high heat-resisting properties due to high thermal conductivity of the copper substrate tube and a high melting point (1115°C) of the GeO2 reflective layer. This work opens a door for low-temperature, low-cost growth of long ATR GeO2 infrared hollow fibers based on various substrate tubes, even including plastic capillary tubes.

  10. ATR inhibitors VE-821 and VX-970 sensitize cancer cells to topoisomerase i inhibitors by disabling DNA replication initiation and fork elongation responses.

    PubMed

    Jossé, Rozenn; Martin, Scott E; Guha, Rajarshi; Ormanoglu, Pinar; Pfister, Thomas D; Reaper, Philip M; Barnes, Christopher S; Jones, Julie; Charlton, Peter; Pollard, John R; Morris, Joel; Doroshow, James H; Pommier, Yves

    2014-12-01

    Camptothecin and its derivatives, topotecan and irinotecan, are specific topoisomerase I (Top1) inhibitors and potent anticancer drugs killing cancer cells by producing replication-associated DNA double-strand breaks, and the indenoisoquinoline LMP-400 (indotecan) is a novel Top1 inhibitor in clinical trial. To develop novel drug combinations, we conducted a synthetic lethal siRNA screen using a library that targets nearly 7,000 human genes. Depletion of ATR, the main transducer of replication stress, came as a top candidate gene for camptothecin synthetic lethality. Validation studies using ATR siRNA and the ATR inhibitor VE-821 confirmed marked antiproliferative synergy with camptothecin and even greater synergy with LMP-400. Single-cell analyses and DNA fiber combing assays showed that VE-821 abrogates the S-phase replication elongation checkpoint and the replication origin-firing checkpoint induced by camptothecin and LMP-400. As expected, the combination of Top1 inhibitors with VE-821 inhibited the phosphorylation of ATR and Chk1; however, it strongly induced γH2AX. In cells treated with the combination, the γH2AX pattern changed over time from the well-defined Top1-induced damage foci to an intense peripheral and diffuse nuclear staining, which could be used as response biomarker. Finally, the clinical derivative of VE-821, VX-970, enhanced the in vivo tumor response to irinotecan without additional toxicity. A key implication of our work is the mechanistic rationale and proof of principle it provides to evaluate the combination of Top1 inhibitors with ATR inhibitors in clinical trials. PMID:25269479

  11. ATR inhibitors VE-821 and VX-970 sensitize cancer cells to topoisomerase I inhibitors by disabling DNA replication initiation and fork elongation responses

    PubMed Central

    Jossé, Rozenn; Martin, Scott E.; Guha, Rajarshi; Ormanoglu, Pinar; Pfister, Thomas D.; Reaper, Philip M.; Barnes, Christopher S.; Jones, Julie; Charlton, Peter; Pollard, John R.; Morris, Joel; Doroshow, James H.; Pommier, Yves

    2014-01-01

    Camptothecin and its derivatives, topotecan and irinotecan are specific topoisomerase I (Top1) inhibitors and potent anticancer drugs killing cancer cells by producing replication-associated DNA double-strand breaks, and the indenoisoquinoline LMP-400 (indotecan) is a novel Top1 inhibitor in clinical trial. To develop novel drug combinations, we conducted a synthetic lethal siRNA screen using a library that targets nearly 7,000 human genes. Depletion of ATR, the main transducer of replication stress came as a top candidate gene for camptothecin synthetic lethality. Validation studies using ATR siRNA and the ATR inhibitor VE-821, confirmed marked antiproliferative synergy with camptothecin, and even greater synergy with LMP-400. Single cell analyses and DNA fiber combing assays showed that VE-821 abrogates the S-phase replication elongation checkpoint and the replication origin-firing check point induced by camptothecin and LMP-400. As expected, the combination ofTop1 inhibitors with VE-821 inhibited the phosphorylation of ATR and Chk1; however, it strongly induced γH2AX. In cells treated with the combination, the γH2AX pattern changed overtime from the well-defined Top1-induced damage foci to an intense peripheral and diffuse nuclear staining, which could be used as response biomarker. Finally, the clinical derivative of VE-821, VX-970 enhanced the in vivo tumor response to irinotecan without additional toxicity. Akey implication of our work is the mechanistic rationale and proof-of-principle it provides to evaluate the combination of Top1 inhibitors with ATR inhibitors in clinical trials. PMID:25269479

  12. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report December 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Renae Soelberg

    2014-12-01

    • PNNL has completed sectioning of the U.C. Berkeley hydride fuel rodlet 1 (highest burn-up) and is currently polishing samples in preparation for optical metallography. • A disk was successfully sectioned from rodlet 1 at the location of the internal thermocouple tip as desired. The transition from annular pellet to solid pellet is verified by the eutectic-filled inner cavity located on the back face of this disk (top left) and the solid front face (bottom left). Preliminary low-resolution images indicate interesting sample characteristics in the eutectic surrounding the rodlet at the location of the outer thermocouple tip (right). This sample has been potted and is currently being polished for high-resolution optical microscopy and subsequent SEM analysis. (See images.)

  13. Perovskite catalysts for the auto-reforming of sulfur containing fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinka, Peter; Mukasyan, Alexander S.

    The ideal fuel for PEMs and SOFC fuel cells is pure hydrogen, which is not available in nature and thus needs to be produced from other resources. It is a special task to make hydrogen from JP-8 (kerosene-based jet propulsion fuel), which consists of high hydrocarbon and aromatic compounds, as well as contains a significant amount of sulfur (up to 3000 ppm). The auto-thermal reforming (ATR) process is externally energy-intensive and cost-effective method for hydrogen generation. However, it is critical to develop highly efficient, low-cost catalyst. This paper presents a detailed description of a novel combustion approach for synthesis of complex LaFeO 3-based catalysts. The activities of these catalysts for ATR of JP-8 fuel were also tested in unique Micro-Scale Bench-Top Reactor System. Several non-noble (Me = K, Na, Li, Cs, Co, Mo) and noble metals additives (Me = Pt, Pd, Ru, Re) were tested as B-site substitution in La 0.6Ce 0.4Fe 0.8- ZNi 0.2Me ZO 3- δ perovskite to find the compositions that possess stable and effective performance under severe sulfur containing environment. It was shown that small amounts of potassium (2 wt.%) or ruthenium (1 wt.%) doped to above perovskite structure significantly increase catalysts activity and lead to their stable performance during reforming of JP-8 fuel with up to 220 ppm of sulfur.

  14. Bench-Scale Monolith Autothermal Reformer Catalyst Screening Evaluations in a Micro-Reactor With Jet-A Fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomsik, Thomas M.; Yen, Judy C.H.; Budge, John R.

    2006-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cell systems used in the aerospace or commercial aviation environment require a compact, light-weight and highly durable catalytic fuel processor. The fuel processing method considered here is an autothermal reforming (ATR) step. The ATR converts Jet-A fuel by a reaction with steam and air forming hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO) to be used for production of electrical power in the fuel cell. This paper addresses the first phase of an experimental catalyst screening study, looking at the relative effectiveness of several monolith catalyst types when operating with untreated Jet-A fuel. Six monolith catalyst materials were selected for preliminary evaluation and experimental bench-scale screening in a small 0.05 kWe micro-reactor test apparatus. These tests were conducted to assess relative catalyst performance under atmospheric pressure ATR conditions and processing Jet-A fuel at a steam-to-carbon ratio of 3.5, a value higher than anticipated to be run in an optimized system. The average reformer efficiencies for the six catalysts tested ranged from 75 to 83 percent at a constant gas-hourly space velocity of 12,000 hr 1. The corresponding hydrocarbon conversion efficiency varied from 86 to 95 percent during experiments run at reaction temperatures between 750 to 830 C. Based on the results of the short-duration 100 hr tests reported herein, two of the highest performing catalysts were selected for further evaluation in a follow-on 1000 hr life durability study in Phase II.

  15. Irradiation of the First Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti

    2008-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control for each capsule. The swept gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The design of the first experiment (designated AGR-1) was completed in 2005, and the fabrication and assembly of the test train as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that monitor and control the experiment during irradiation were completed in September 2006. The experiment was inserted in the ATR in December 2006, and is serving as a shakedown test of the multi-capsule experiment design that will be used in the subsequent irradiations as well as a test of the early variants of the fuel produced under this program. The experiment test train as well as the monitoring, control, and data collection systems are discussed and the status of the experiment is provided.

  16. Synthetic fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Sammons, V.O.

    1980-01-01

    This guide is designed for those who wish to learn more about the science and technology of synthetic fuels by reviewing materials in the collections of the Library of Congress. This is not a comprehensive bibliography, it is designed to put the reader on target. Subject headings used by the Library of Congress under which books on synthetic fuels can be located are: oil-shale industry; oil-shales; shale oils; synthetic fuels; synthetic fuels industry; coal gasification; coal liquefaction; fossil fuels; hydrogen as fuel; oil sands; petroleum, synthesis gas; biomass energy; pyrolysis; and thermal oil recovery. Basic texts, handbooks, government publications, journals, etc. were included. (DP)

  17. Opportunity fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Lutwen, R.C.

    1996-12-31

    The paper consists of viewgraphs from a conference presentation. A comparison is made of opportunity fuels, defined as fuels that can be converted to other forms of energy at lower cost than standard fossil fuels. Types of fuels for which some limited technical data is provided include petroleum coke, garbage, wood waste, and tires. Power plant economics and pollution concerns are listed for each fuel, and compared to coal and natural gas power plant costs. A detailed cost breakdown for different plant types is provided for use in base fuel pricing.

  18. The orally active and bioavailable ATR kinase inhibitor AZD6738 potentiates the anti-tumor effects of cisplatin to resolve ATM-deficient non-small cell lung cancer in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Vendetti, Frank P.; Lau, Alan; Schamus, Sandra; Conrads, Thomas P.; O'Connor, Mark J.; Bakkenist, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    ATR and ATM are DNA damage signaling kinases that phosphorylate several thousand substrates. ATR kinase activity is increased at damaged replication forks and resected DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). ATM kinase activity is increased at DSBs. ATM has been widely studied since ataxia telangiectasia individuals who express no ATM protein are the most radiosensitive patients identified. Since ATM is not an essential protein, it is widely believed that ATM kinase inhibitors will be well-tolerated in the clinic. ATR has been widely studied, but advances have been complicated by the finding that ATR is an essential protein and it is widely believed that ATR kinase inhibitors will be toxic in the clinic. We describe AZD6738, an orally active and bioavailable ATR kinase inhibitor. AZD6738 induces cell death and senescence in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. AZD6738 potentiates the cytotoxicity of cisplatin and gemcitabine in NSCLC cell lines with intact ATM kinase signaling, and potently synergizes with cisplatin in ATM-deficient NSCLC cells. In contrast to expectations, daily administration of AZD6738 and ATR kinase inhibition for 14 consecutive days is tolerated in mice and enhances the therapeutic efficacy of cisplatin in xenograft models. Remarkably, the combination of cisplatin and AZD6738 resolves ATM-deficient lung cancer xenografts. PMID:26517239

  19. Synthetic Fuel

    ScienceCinema

    Idaho National Laboratory - Steve Herring, Jim O'Brien, Carl Stoots

    2010-01-08

    Two global energy priorities today are finding environmentally friendly alternatives to fossil fuels, and reducing greenhouse gass Two global energy priorities today are finding environmentally friendly alternatives to fossil fuels, and reducing greenhous

  20. Synthetic Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Idaho National Laboratory - Steve Herring, Jim O'Brien, Carl Stoots

    2008-03-26

    Two global energy priorities today are finding environmentally friendly alternatives to fossil fuels, and reducing greenhouse gass Two global energy priorities today are finding environmentally friendly alternatives to fossil fuels, and reducing greenhous

  1. Alternate fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, T.W.; Worthen, R.P.

    1981-02-01

    The escalating oil prices and shortages of petroleum based fuels for transportation have made research work on various fuel alternatives, especially for transportation engines, a priority of both the private and public sectors. This book contains 18 papers on this subject. The range of options from the development of completely non-petroleum-based fuels and engines to the use of various non-petroleum gasoline and diesel fuel extenders and improvers are discussed.

  2. Graphite Materials Testing in the ATR for Lifetime Management of Magnox Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Grover, S.B.; Metcalfe, M.P.

    2002-03-14

    A major feature of the Magnox gas cooled reactor design is the graphite core, which acts as the moderator but also provides the physical structure for fuel, control rods, instrumentation and coolant gas channels. The lifetime of a graphite core is dependent upon two principal aging processes: irradiation damage and radiolytic oxidation. Irradiation damage from fast neutrons creates lattice defects leading to changes in physical and mechanical properties and the accumulation of stresses. Radiolytic oxidation is caused by the reaction of oxidizing species from the carbon dioxide coolant gas with the graphite, these species being produced by gamma radiation. Radiolytic oxidation reduces the density and hence the moderating capability of the graphite, but also reduces strength affecting the integrity of core components. In order to manage continued operation over the planned lifetimes of their power stations, BNFL needed to extend their database of the effects of these two phenomena on the ir graphite cores through an irradiation experiment. This paper will discuss the background, purpose, and the processes taken and planned (i.e. post irradiation examination) to ensure meaningful data on the graphite core material is obtained from the irradiation experiment.

  3. Graphite Materials Testing in the ATR for Lifetime Management of Magnox Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Grover, Stanley Blaine; Metcalfe, M. P.

    2002-04-01

    A major feature of the Magnox gas cooled reactor design is the graphite core, which acts as the moderator but also provides the physical structure for fuel, control rods, instrumentation and coolant gas channels. The lifetime of a graphite core is dependent upon two principal aging processes: irradiation damage and radiolytic oxidation. Irradiation damage from fast neutrons creates lattice defects leading to changes in physical and mechanical properties and the accumulation of stresses. Radiolytic oxidation is caused by the reaction of oxidizing species from the carbon dioxide coolant gas with the graphite, these species being produced by gamma radiation. Radiolytic oxidation reduces the density and hence the moderating capability of the graphite, but also reduces strength affecting the integrity of core components. In order to manage continued operation over the planned lifetimes of their power stations, BNFL needed to extend their database of the effects of these two phenomena on their graphite cores through an irradiation experiment. This paper will discuss the background, purpose, and the processes taken and planned (i.e. post irradiation examination) to ensure meaningful data on the graphite core material is obtained from the irradiation experiment.

  4. Fossil Fuels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with fossil fuels. Some topics covered are historic facts, development of fuels, history of oil production, current and future trends of the oil industry, refining fossil fuels, and environmental problems. Material in each unit may…

  5. Fission Product Monitoring of TRISO Coated Fuel For The Advanced Gas Reactor -1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn M. Scates; John K Hartwell; John B. Walter

    2008-09-01

    The US Department of Energy has embarked on a series of tests of TRISO-coated particle reactor fuel intended for use in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) as part of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program. The AGR-1 TRISO fuel experiment, currently underway, is the first in a series of eight fuel tests planned for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The AGR-1 experiment reached a peak compact averaged burn up of 9% FIMA with no known TRISO fuel particle failures in March 2008. The burnup goal for the majority of the fuel compacts is to have a compact averaged burnup greater than 18% FIMA and a minimum compact averaged burnup of 14% FIMA. At the INL the TRISO fuel in the AGR-1 experiment is closely monitored while it is being irradiated in the ATR. The effluent monitoring system used for the AGR-1 fuel is the Fission Product Monitoring System (FPMS). The FPMS is a valuable tool that provides near real-time data indicative of the AGR-1 test fuel performance and incorporates both high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometers and sodium iodide [NaI(Tl)] scintillation detector-based gross radiation monitors. To quantify the fuel performance, release-to-birth ratios (R/B’s) of radioactive fission gases are computed. The gamma-ray spectra acquired by the AGR-1 FPMS are analyzed and used to determine the released activities of specific fission gases, while a dedicated detector provides near-real time count rate information. Isotopic build up and depletion calculations provide the associated isotopic birth rates. This paper highlights the features of the FPMS, encompassing the equipment, methods and measures that enable the calculation of the release-to-birth ratios. Some preliminary results from the AGR-1 experiment are also presented.

  6. Fission Product Monitoring of TRISO Coated Fuel For The Advanced Gas Reactor -1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn M. Scates; John K. Hartwell; John b. Walter

    2010-10-01

    The US Department of Energy has embarked on a series of tests of TRISO-coated particle reactor fuel intended for use in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) as part of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program. The AGR-1 TRISO fuel experiment, currently underway, is the first in a series of eight fuel tests planned for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The AGR-1 experiment reached a peak compact averaged burn up of 9% FIMA with no known TRISO fuel particle failures in March 2008. The burnup goal for the majority of the fuel compacts is to have a compact averaged burnup greater than 18% FIMA and a minimum compact averaged burnup of 14% FIMA. At the INL the TRISO fuel in the AGR-1 experiment is closely monitored while it is being irradiated in the ATR. The effluent monitoring system used for the AGR-1 fuel is the Fission Product Monitoring System (FPMS). The FPMS is a valuable tool that provides near real-time data indicative of the AGR-1 test fuel performance and incorporates both high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometers and sodium iodide [NaI(Tl)] scintillation detector-based gross radiation monitors. To quantify the fuel performance, release-to-birth ratios (R/B’s) of radioactive fission gases are computed. The gamma-ray spectra acquired by the AGR-1 FPMS are analyzed and used to determine the released activities of specific fission gases, while a dedicated detector provides near-real time count rate information. Isotopic build up and depletion calculations provide the associated isotopic birth rates. This paper highlights the features of the FPMS, encompassing the equipment, methods and measures that enable the calculation of the release-to-birth ratios. Some preliminary results from the AGR-1 experiment are also presented.

  7. Investigation of aged Asian dust particles by the combined use of quantitative ED-EPMA and ATR-FTIR imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Y.-C.; Eom, H.-J.; Jung, H.-J.; Malek, M. A.; Kim, H. K.; Geng, H.; Ro, C.-U.

    2013-03-01

    In our previous works, it was demonstrated that the combined use of quantitative energy-dispersive electron probe X-ray microanalysis (ED-EPMA), which is also known as low-Z particle EPMA, and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) imaging has great potential for a detailed characterization of individual aerosol particles. In this study, extensively chemically modified (aged) individual Asian dust particles collected during an Asian dust storm event on 11 November 2002 in Korea were characterized by the combined use of low-Z particle EPMA and ATR-FTIR imaging. Overall, 109 individual particles were classified into four particle types based on their morphology, elemental concentrations, and molecular species and/or functional groups of individual particles available from the two analytical techniques: Ca-containing (38%), NaNO3-containing (30%), silicate (22%), and miscellaneous particles (10%). Among the 41 Ca-containing particles, 10, 8, and 14 particles contained nitrate, sulfate, and both, respectively, whereas only two particles contained unreacted CaCO3. Airborne amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) particles were observed in this Asian dust sample for the first time, where their IR peaks for the insufficient symmetric environment of CO32- ions of ACC were clearly differentiated from those of crystalline CaCO3. This paper also reports the first inland field observation of CaCl2 particles probably converted from CaCO3 through the reaction with HCl(g). HCl(g) was likely released from the reaction of sea salt with NOx/HNO3, as all 33 particles of marine origin contained NaNO3 (no genuine sea salt particle was encountered). Some silicate particles with minor amounts of calcium were observed to be mixed with nitrate, sulfate, and water. Among 24 silicate particles, 10 particles are mixed with water, the presence of which could facilitate atmospheric heterogeneous reactions of silicate particles including swelling minerals, such

  8. Interactions of ciprofloxacin with DPPC and DPPG: fluorescence anisotropy, ATR-FTIR and 31P NMR spectroscopies and conformational analysis.

    PubMed

    Bensikaddour, Hayet; Snoussi, Karim; Lins, Laurence; Van Bambeke, Françoise; Tulkens, Paul M; Brasseur, Robert; Goormaghtigh, Erik; Mingeot-Leclercq, Marie-Paule

    2008-11-01

    The interactions between a drug and lipids may be critical for the pharmacological activity. We previously showed that the ability of a fluoroquinolone antibiotic, ciprofloxacin, to induce disorder and modify the orientation of the acyl chains is related to its propensity to be expelled from a monolayer upon compression [1]. Here, we compared the binding of ciprofloxacin on DPPC and DPPG liposomes (or mixtures of phospholipids [DOPC:DPPC], and [DOPC:DPPG]) using quasi-elastic light scattering and steady-state fluorescence anisotropy. We also investigated ciprofloxacin effects on the transition temperature (T(m)) of lipids and on the mobility of phosphate head groups using Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared-Red Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and (31)P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) respectively. In the presence of ciprofloxacin we observed a dose-dependent increase of the size of the DPPG liposomes whereas no effect was evidenced for DPPC liposomes. The binding constants K(app) were in the order of 10(5) M(-1) and the affinity appeared dependent on the negative charge of liposomes: DPPG>DOPC:DPPG (1:1; M:M)>DPPC>DOPC:DPPC (1:1; M:M). As compared to the control samples, the chemical shift anisotropy (Deltasigma) values determined by (31)P NMR showed an increase of 5 and 9 ppm for DPPC:CIP (1:1; M:M) and DPPG:CIP (1:1; M:M) respectively. ATR-FTIR experiments showed that ciprofloxacin had no effect on the T(m) of DPPC but increased the order of the acyl chains both below and above this temperature. In contrast, with DPPG, ciprofloxacin induced a marked broadening effect on the transition with a decrease of the acyl chain order below its T(m) and an increase above this temperature. Altogether with the results from the conformational analysis, these data demonstrated that the interactions of ciprofloxacin with lipids depend markedly on the nature of their phosphate head groups and that ciprofloxacin interacts preferentially with anionic lipid compounds

  9. Alternative fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J. S.; Butze, H. F.; Friedman, R.; Antoine, A. C.; Reynolds, T. W.

    1977-01-01

    Potential problems related to the use of alternative aviation turbine fuels are discussed and both ongoing and required research into these fuels is described. This discussion is limited to aviation turbine fuels composed of liquid hydrocarbons. The advantages and disadvantages of the various solutions to the problems are summarized. The first solution is to continue to develop the necessary technology at the refinery to produce specification jet fuels regardless of the crude source. The second solution is to minimize energy consumption at the refinery and keep fuel costs down by relaxing specifications.

  10. Dual Layer Monolith ATR of Pyrolysis Oil for Distributed Synthesis Gas Production

    SciTech Connect

    Lawal, Adeniyi

    2012-09-29

    We have successfully demonstrated a novel reactor technology, based on BASF dual layer monolith catalyst, for miniaturizing the autothermal reforming of pyrolysis oil to syngas, the second and most critical of the three steps for thermochemically converting biomass waste to liquid transportation fuel. The technology was applied to aged as well as fresh samples of pyrolysis oil derived from five different biomass feedstocks, namely switch-grass, sawdust, hardwood/softwood, golden rod and maple. Optimization of process conditions in conjunction with innovative reactor system design enabled the minimization of carbon deposit and control of the H2/CO ratio of the product gas. A comprehensive techno-economic analysis of the integrated process using in part, experimental data from the project, indicates (1) net energy recovery of 49% accounting for all losses and external energy input, (2) weight of diesel oil produced as a percent of the biomass to be ~14%, and (3) for a demonstration size biomass to Fischer-Tropsch liquid plant of ~ 2000 daily barrels of diesel, the price of the diesel produced is ~$3.30 per gallon, ex. tax. However, the extension of catalyst life is critical to the realization of the projected economics. Catalyst deactivation was observed and the modes of deactivation, both reversible and irreversible were identified. An effective catalyst regeneration strategy was successfully demonstrated for reversible catalyst deactivation while a catalyst preservation strategy was proposed for preventing irreversible catalyst deactivation. Future work should therefore be focused on extending the catalyst life, and a successful demonstration of an extended (> 500 on-stream hours) catalyst life would affirm the commercial viability of the process.

  11. Minimum criticality dose evaluation for the Irradiated Fuel Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.S.

    1999-09-01

    The Irradiated Fuel Storage Facility (IFSF) is a government-owned, contractor-operated facility located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory within the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. The mission of the facility is to provide safe dry storage for various types of irradiated fuels. Included are fuel elements such as irradiated ATR, EBR, MTR, Fort St. Vrain, TRIGA, and ROVER Parka fuels. Fuels requiring dry storage are received at the IFSF in fuel-shipping casks. At the facility receiving dock, the casks are removed from the transport vehicle, positioned in a cask transport car, and moved into the fuel-handling cave. Several functions are performed in the fuel-handling cave, including transferring fuel from shipping casks to storage canisters, preparing fuel elements for storage and processing. The minimum postulated criticality dose calculations were performed for the cask-receiving and fuel-handling areas to place criticality alarm system (CAS) detectors. The number of fissions for the minimum accident of concern is based on a dose of 20-rad air at 2 m in 1 min. The eigenvalue calculations were first performed to determine the size of the critical source. Then, two sets of fixed-source calculations were followed to calculate contributions from neutron and capture gamma rays and from prompt gamma rays. Two sets of MCNP calculations involved point and spherical critical sources. Validity of the Monte Carlo results was tested against ANISN deterministic calculations. The flux-to-dose conversion factors are based on ANSI/ANS-6.1.1-1977. All of the MCNP runs used continuous-energy ENDF/B-V cross sections. The BUGLE-80 cross-section library was used for the ANISN calculations.

  12. Potential-modulated attenuated total reflectance (PM-ATR) characterization of charge injection processes in monolayer-tethered CdSe nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Araci, Zeynep Ozkan; Shallcross, Clayton R.; Armstrong, Neal R.; Saavedra, S. Scott

    2010-01-01

    Reversible electron injection into pyridine-capped CdSe nanocrystals (pyr-CdSe NCs), tethered to indium-tin oxide (ITO) substrates using mercaptoalkylcarboxylic acids, is characterized using attenuated total reflectance (ATR) spectroelectrochemistry on a planar waveguide. The sensitivity of this technique provides for characterization of redox processes in submonolayer films of pyr-CdSe NCs. Optically determined onset potentials for electron injection, measured as bleaching/recovery of the exciton absorption band, provide estimates for the conduction band edge (ECB). Potential-modulated attenuated total reflectance (PM-ATR), in which the in-phase and out-of-phase reflectance response is measured as a function of modulation frequency, provides estimates for rates of electron injection. These apparent rate constants are found to be nearly independent of tether chain length, suggesting that communication between tethered NCs and electrochemically less active (i.e., less conductive) regions on the ITO surface is rate-limiting.

  13. In situ ATR-FTIR study of H2O and D2O adsorption on TiO2 under UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Belhadj, Hamza; Hakki, Amer; Robertson, Peter K J; Bahnemann, Detlef W

    2015-09-21

    The adsorption of water and deuterium oxide on TiO2 surfaces was investigated in the dark as well as under UV(A) irradiation using in situ ATR-FTIR spectroscopy under oxygen and oxygen free conditions. Adsorption of H2O-D2O mixtures revealed an isotopic exchange reaction occurring onto the surface of TiO2 in the dark. Under UV(A) irradiation, the amount of both OH and OD groups was found to be increased by the presence of molecular oxygen. Furthermore, the photocatalytic formation of hydroperoxide under oxygenated condition has been recorded utilizing Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transformed Infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy which appeared as new band at 3483 cm(-1). Different possible mechanisms are discussed in terms of the source of hydroxyl groups formed and/or hydration water on the TiO2 surface for the photocatalytic reaction and photoinduced hydrophilicity. PMID:26266701

  14. Characterization of LWRS Hybrid SiC-CMC-Zircaloy-4 Fuel Cladding after Gamma Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Isabella J van Rooyen

    2012-09-01

    The purpose of the gamma irradiation tests conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was to obtain a better understanding of chemical interactions and potential changes in microstructural properties of a mock-up hybrid nuclear fuel cladding rodlet design (unfueled) in a simulated PWR water environment under irradiation conditions. The hybrid fuel rodlet design is being investigated under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) program for further development and testing of one of the possible advanced LWR nuclear fuel cladding designs. The gamma irradiation tests were performed in preparation for neutron irradiation tests planned for a silicon carbide (SiC) ceramic matrix composite (CMC) zircaloy-4 (Zr-4) hybrid fuel rodlet that may be tested in the INL Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) if the design is selected for further development and testing

  15. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics of the Ataxia Telangiectasia-Mutated (ATM) and Ataxia Telangiectasia-Mutated and Rad3-related (ATR) Dependent DNA Damage Response in Arabidopsis thaliana*

    PubMed Central

    Roitinger, Elisabeth; Hofer, Manuel; Köcher, Thomas; Pichler, Peter; Novatchkova, Maria; Yang, Jianhua; Schlögelhofer, Peter; Mechtler, Karl

    2015-01-01

    The reversible phosphorylation of proteins on serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues is an important biological regulatory mechanism. In the context of genome integrity, signaling cascades driven by phosphorylation are crucial for the coordination and regulation of DNA repair. The two serine/threonine protein kinases ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated and Rad3-related (ATR) are key factors in this process, each specific for different kinds of DNA lesions. They are conserved across eukaryotes, mediating the activation of cell-cycle checkpoints, chromatin modifications, and regulation of DNA repair proteins. We designed a novel mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics approach to study DNA damage repair in Arabidopsis thaliana. The protocol combines filter aided sample preparation, immobilized metal affinity chromatography, metal oxide affinity chromatography, and strong cation exchange chromatography for phosphopeptide generation, enrichment, and separation. Isobaric labeling employing iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation) was used for profiling the phosphoproteome of atm atr double mutants and wild type plants under either regular growth conditions or challenged by irradiation. A total of 10,831 proteins were identified and 15,445 unique phosphopeptides were quantified, containing 134 up- and 38 down-regulated ATM/ATR dependent phosphopeptides. We identified known and novel ATM/ATR targets such as LIG4 and MRE11 (needed for resistance against ionizing radiation), PIE1 and SDG26 (implicated in chromatin remodeling), PCNA1, WAPL, and PDS5 (implicated in DNA replication), and ASK1 and HTA10 (involved in meiosis). PMID:25561503

  16. Intra-operative on-line discrimination of kidney cancer from normal tissue by IR ATR spectroscopy of extracellular fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urboniene, V.; Velicka, M.; Ceponkus, J.; Pucetaite, M.; Jankevicius, F.; Sablinskas, V.; Steiner, G.

    2016-03-01

    Determination of cancerous and normal kidney tissues during partial, simple or radical nephrectomy surgery was performed by using differences in the IR absorption spectra of extracellular fluid taken from the corresponding tissue areas. The samples were prepared by stamping of the kidney tissue on ATR diamond crystal. The spectral measurements were performed directly in the OR during surgery for 58 patients. It was found that intensities of characteristic spectral bands of glycogen (880-1200 cm-1) in extracellular fluid are sensitive to the type of the tissue and can be used as spectral markers of tumours. Characteristic spectral band of lactic acid (1730 cm-1) - product of the anaerobic glycolysis, taking place in the cancer cells is not suitable for use as a spectral marker of cancerous tissue, since it overlaps with the band of carbonyl stretch in phospholipids and fatty acids. Results of hierarchical cluster analysis of the spectra show that the spectra of healthy and tumour tissue films can be reliably separated into two groups. On the other hand, possibility to differentiate between tumours of different types and grades remains in question. While the fluid from highly malignant G3 tumour tissue contains highly pronounced glycogen spectral bands and can be well separated from benign and G1 tumours by principal component analysis, the variations between spectra from sample to sample prevent from obtaining conclusive results about the grouping between different tumour types and grades. The proposed method is instant and can be used in situ and even in vivo.

  17. The Dimeric Architecture of Checkpoint Kinases Mec1ATR and Tel1ATM Reveal a Common Structural Organization.

    PubMed

    Sawicka, Marta; Wanrooij, Paulina H; Darbari, Vidya C; Tannous, Elias; Hailemariam, Sarem; Bose, Daniel; Makarova, Alena V; Burgers, Peter M; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2016-06-24

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related protein kinases are key regulators controlling a wide range of cellular events. The yeast Tel1 and Mec1·Ddc2 complex (ATM and ATR-ATRIP in humans) play pivotal roles in DNA replication, DNA damage signaling, and repair. Here, we present the first structural insight for dimers of Mec1·Ddc2 and Tel1 using single-particle electron microscopy. Both kinases reveal a head to head dimer with one major dimeric interface through the N-terminal HEAT (named after Huntingtin, elongation factor 3, protein phosphatase 2A, and yeast kinase TOR1) repeat. Their dimeric interface is significantly distinct from the interface of mTOR complex 1 dimer, which oligomerizes through two spatially separate interfaces. We also observe different structural organizations of kinase domains of Mec1 and Tel1. The kinase domains in the Mec1·Ddc2 dimer are located in close proximity to each other. However, in the Tel1 dimer they are fully separated, providing potential access of substrates to this kinase, even in its dimeric form. PMID:27129217

  18. Association atrésie de l'oesophage type 3 - microcéphalie: Un syndrome de Feingold incomplet?

    PubMed Central

    Shongo, Mick Yapongombo; Lubala, Toni Kasole; Mbuyi, Sébastien Musanzayi; Makinko, Paul Ilunga; Ngwej, Dieudonné Tshikwej; Kabange, Felix Numbi

    2012-01-01

    L'atrésie de l'oesophage est une des malformations digestive les plus fréquentes en néonatologie. Il existe 5 types anatomiques, selon la présence et le siège de la fistule oeso-trachéale. Le diagnostic anténatal est difficile. A la naissance, le diagnostic est suspecté en salle de travail, devant l’échec du passage systématique d'une sonde digestive jusque dans l'estomac. Des trouble de la déglutition, une hyper sialorrhée, une détresse respiratoire sont ensuite retrouvés. Une fistule oeso-trachéale peut être isolée et suspectée devant des épisodes de cyanose et de dyspnée lors des tétées ou en cas de survenue d'une pneumopathie d'inhalation. Dans notre cas, nous avons observé une microcéphalie primaire. Une association microcéphalie et malformation digestive et des membres a été décrite sous le nom de syndrome de Feingold. Chez notre patient, aucune malformation des membres n'a été observée. PMID:23396887

  19. Characterization of nasal paraffinoma following septorhinoplasty by attenuated total reflection--fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR).

    PubMed

    Gil-Carcedo, Luis M; Martín-Gil, Jesús; Gil-Carcedo, Elisa S; Vallejo, Luis A; Martín-Gil, Francisco J

    2006-06-01

    Vaseline and paraffin have been injected into various parts of the body. Vaselinoma and paraffinoma are well-described complications, despite which nasal packing with Vaseline gauze is still common in the management of epistaxis, after rhinoplasty, endonasal surgery, to control bleeding and prevent synechiae or restenosis. Our aim is to highlight this complication, propose a safe method for its diagnosis and establish guidelines for its prevention. We report two cases of paraffinoma occurring after rhinoplasty and discuss prevention of this rare but serious complication, and suggest an alternative dressing. Attenuated total reflection (ATR) FI7R spectra have proven to be a definitive characterising tool for surgical extracts, guaranteeing detection of mineral products that histology does not offer. For these lesions we propose the name "petroleum oilomas" which we feel to be more appropriate than the more commonly used paraffinomas. Relevance of the work: a description of an innovative and safe method of diagnosis, and proposal of a procedure for postrhinoplasty packing (without mineral oils) to avoid this complication. PMID:16792177

  20. Detection of lipid phase coexistence and lipid interactions in sphingomyelin/cholesterol membranes by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Arsov, Zoran; Quaroni, Luca

    2008-04-01

    The phase behavior of binary mixtures of egg sphingomyelin and cholesterol has been inspected by attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy in the amide I' band region of the spectrum. Because cholesterol does not have any major absorption bands in this region, effects seen in the spectra of mixtures of sphingomyelin and cholesterol can be attributed to the change in the lipid phase and to the interaction with cholesterol. It is shown that the temperature dependence of the overall bandwidth of the amide I' band displays a phase-specific behavior. In addition, it is observed that the amide I' band for a sample exhibiting phase coexistence can be described by a linear combination of the spectra of the individual lipid phases. Description of changes in the amide I' band shape and by that the study of possible hydrogen bonding interactions of sphingomyelin with cholesterol was assisted by the use of curve fitting. It turns out that the presence of hydrogen bonding between hydroxyl group of cholesterol and carbonyl group of sphingomyelin is obscured by the complexity of different possible hydrogen bonding and coupling between the N-H (N-D) and the CO group vibrations. PMID:18191633

  1. The effect of solvent on permeant diffusion through membranes studied using ATR-FTIR and chemometric data analysis.

    PubMed

    Dias, M; Hadgraft, J; Raghavan, S L; Tetteh, J

    2004-01-01

    One method of improving the bioavailability of a topical formulation is to add an appropriate solvent that will act as a solubilizer for the permeant and, at the same time, modify the barrier properties of the stratum corneum. It has proved very difficult to determine the precise mechanisms of action involved; this is complicated by the concurrent diffusion of the solvent and the permeant into the skin. Under these circumstances the barrier function may well be changing as a function of time as the solvent disrupts it. We have observed this phenomenon in a model silicone membrane system that we have chosen to study initially to avoid the complexity of the heterogeneous nature of skin and its inherent biological variability. Diffusion experiments were conducted using an established ATR-FTIR approach but the data interpreted using sophisticated chemometric approaches that allowed us to deconvolve the IR signals from the permeant, the solvent, and the membrane. Data are presented that show the concurrent diffusion of benzoic acid (permeant), octanol (solvent), and how the octanol modifies the characteristics of the silicone membrane. Initial data are then presented using human skin to show the power of the diffusion approach coupled to the data deconvolution technique. PMID:14648648

  2. Perfluoroalkylated Substance Effects in Xenopus laevis A6 Kidney Epithelial Cells Determined by ATR-FTIR Spectroscopy and Chemometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The effects of four perfluoroalkylated substances (PFASs), namely, perfluorobutanesulfonate (PFBS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS), and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) were assessed in Xenopus laevis A6 kidney epithelial cells by attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and chemometric analysis. Principal component analysis–linear discriminant analysis (PCA-LDA) was used to visualize wavenumber-related alterations and ANOVA-simultaneous component analysis (ASCA) allowed data processing considering the underlying experimental design. Both analyses evidenced a higher impact of low-dose PFAS-treatments (10–9 M) on A6 cells forming monolayers, while there was a larger influence of high-dose PFAS-treatments (10–5 M) on A6 cells differentiated into dome structures. The observed dose–response PFAS-induced effects were to some extent related to their cytotoxicity: the EC50-values of most influential PFAS-treatments increased (PFOS < PFNA < PFOA ≪ PFBS), and higher-doses of these chemicals induced a larger impact. Major spectral alterations were mainly attributed to DNA/RNA, secondary protein structure, lipids, and fatty acids. Finally, PFOS and PFOA caused a decrease in A6 cell numbers compared to controls, whereas PFBS and PFNA did not significantly change cell population levels. Overall, this work highlights the ability of PFASs to alter A6 cells, whether forming monolayers or differentiated into dome structures, and the potential of PFOS and PFOA to induce cell death. PMID:27078751

  3. Application of FTIR-ATR to Moscatel dessert wines for prediction of total phenolic and flavonoid contents and antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Silva, Sandra D; Feliciano, Rodrigo P; Boas, Luís V; Bronze, Maria R

    2014-05-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) attenuated total reflectance (ATR) was applied for the determination of total phenolic and flavonoid contents and antioxidant capacity (DPPH and FRAP assays) in Moscatel dessert wines (n=56). Prediction models were developed for the referred parameters using Partial Least Squares (PLS) considering the spectral region 1800-900cm(-1). The determination coefficients (r(2)) values in the calibration models ranged from 0.670 to 0.870. Cross validation (leave-one-out technique) was applied to the data. Root mean square errors of calibration (RMSEC) and cross validation (RMSECV) as well as the relative errors of prediction (REP) were calculated. Minimum errors of prediction were obtained for total flavonoid content (0.2%) and maximum values (22%) for antioxidant capacity measured by FRAP. The proposed method may be used for rapid screening of total phenolic and flavonoid contents in Moscatel dessert wines. The implemented methodologies may also be used to get rough estimates for DPPH and FRAP antioxidant capacities. PMID:24360480

  4. Adsorption of Lysine on Na-Montmorillonite and Competition with Ca(2+): A Combined XRD and ATR-FTIR Study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanli; Wang, Shengrui; Liu, Jingyang; Xu, Yisheng; Zhou, Xiaoyun

    2016-05-17

    Lysine adsorption at clay/aqueous interfaces plays an important role in the mobility, bioavailability, and degradation of amino acids in the environment. Knowledge of these interfacial interactions facilitates our full understanding of the fate and transport of amino acids. Here, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and attenuated total reflectance Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) measurements were used to explore the dynamic process of lysine adsorption on montmorillonite and the competition with Ca(2+) at the molecular level. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were employed to determine the peak assignments of dissolved lysine in the solution phase. Three surface complexes, including dicationic, cationic, and zwitterionic structures, were observed to attach to the clay edge sites and penetrate the interlayer space. The increased surface coverage and Ca(2+) competition did not affect the interfacial lysine structures at a certain pH, whereas an elevated lysine concentration contributed to zwitterionic-type coordination at pH 10. Moreover, clay dissolution at pH 4 could be inhibited at a higher surface coverage with 5 and 10 mM lysine, whereas the inhibition effect was inconspicuous or undetected at pH 7 and 10. The presence of Ca(2+) not only could remove a part of the adsorbed lysine but also could facilitate the readsorption of dissolved Si(4+) and Al(3+) and surface protonation. Our results provide new insights into the process of lysine adsorption and its effects on montmorillonite surface sites. PMID:27118104

  5. Evaluating drug delivery with salt formation: Drug disproportionation studied in situ by ATR-FTIR imaging and Raman mapping.

    PubMed

    Ewing, Andrew V; Wray, Patrick S; Clarke, Graham S; Kazarian, Sergei G

    2015-01-01

    Two different vibrational spectroscopic approaches, ATR-FTIR spectroscopic imaging and Raman mapping, were used to investigate the components within a tablet containing an ionised drug during dissolution experiments. Delivering certain drugs in their salt form is a method that can be used to improve the bioavailability and dissolution of the poorly aqueous soluble materials. However, these ionised species have a propensity to covert back to their thermodynamically favourable free acid or base forms. Dissolution experiments of the ionised drug in different aqueous media resulted in conversion to the more poorly soluble free acid form, which is detrimental for controlled drug release. This study investigates the chemical changes occurring to formulations containing a development ionised drug (37% by weight), in different aqueous pH environments. Firstly, dissolution in a neutral medium was studied, showing that there was clear release of ionised monosodium form of the drug from the tablet as it swelled in the aqueous medium. There was no presence of any drug in the monohydrate free acid form detected in these experiments. Dissolution in an acidic (0.1M HCl) solution showed disproportionation forming the free acid form. Disproportionation occurred rapidly upon contact with the acidic solution, initially resulting in a shell of the monohydrate free acid form around the tablet edges. This slowed ingress of the solution into the tablet before full conversion of the ionised form to the free acid form was characterised in the spectroscopic data. PMID:25910459

  6. Colloidal carriers of isotretinoin for topical acne treatment: skin uptake, ATR-FTIR and in vitro cytotoxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Gürbüz, Aslı; Özhan, Gül; Güngör, Sevgi; Erdal, M Sedef

    2015-09-01

    Acne vulgaris is the chronical, multifactorial and complex disease of the pilosebaceous unit in the skin. The main goal of the topical therapy in acne is to target the drug to epidermal and deep dermal regions by minimizing systemic absorption . Isotretinoin, a retinoic acid derivative, is the most effective drug in acne pathogenesis. Because systemic treatment may cause many side effects, topical isotretinoin treatment is an option in the management of acne. However, due to its high lipophilic character, isotretinoin tends to accumulate in the upper stratum corneum, thus its penetration into the lower layers is limited, which restricts the efficiency of topical treatment. Microemulsions are fluid, isotropic, colloidal drug carriers that have been widely studied as drug delivery systems. The percutaneous transport of active agents can be enhanced by microemulsions when compared with their conventional formulations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate microemulsions as alternative topical carriers for isotretinoin with an objective to improve its skin uptake. After in vitro permeation studies, the dermal penetration of isotretinoin from microemulsions was investigated by tape stripping procedure. Confocal laser scanning microscopy provided insight about the localization of the drug in the skin. The interaction between the microemulsion components and stratum corneum lipids is studied by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy. The relative safety of the microemulsions was assessed in mouse embryonic fibroblasts using MTT viability test. The results indicate that microemulsion-based novel colloidal carriers have a potential for enhanced skin delivery and localization of isotretinoin. PMID:25903443

  7. Attenuated total reflection (ATR) Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy of oxidized polymer-modified bitumens.

    PubMed

    Yut, Iliya; Zofka, Adam

    2011-07-01

    Oxidative age hardening of bitumen results in increasing fatigue susceptibility of bituminous mixtures, thus reducing the service life of asphalt pavements. Polymer additives to bitumen have been shown to improve its viscoelastic properties and, in some cases, reduce the level of bitumen hardening. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy enables evaluation of oxidation levels in bitumen by measuring the concentration of oxygen-containing chemical functionalities. This paper summarizes the results of the investigation of oxidative age hardening of polymer-modified bitumens (PMB) caused by accelerated aging in laboratory conditions. The PMB samples are prepared with different concentrations of styrene-butadiene-based co-polymers. Next, the PMB samples are aged using standard procedures that employ air blowing at 163 °C for 85 min followed by conditioning the samples at 100 °C and 2.1 MPa pressure for 20 to 48 hours. The resultant changes in their chemical composition are evaluated by portable attenuated total reflection (ATR) spectrometer. Measurements of ketone, sulfoxide, and hydroxyl content in PMB samples indicated similar oxidation pathways to those of non-modified bitumens. In addition, no evidence of polymer degradation due to accelerated aging of PMB was found in this study. PMID:21740638

  8. Validation of the combined ATR-FTIR/tape stripping technique for monitoring the distribution of surfactants in the stratum corneum.

    PubMed

    Hoppel, Magdalena; Baurecht, Dieter; Holper, Evelyn; Mahrhauser, Denise; Valenta, Claudia

    2014-09-10

    The physical presence of surfactants in the skin is linked to their skin irritation potential. Combined ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and tape stripping experiments in vitro on porcine ear skin were used to investigate the spatial distribution of sodium lauryl ether sulfate (SLES) in the stratum corneum and to assess its effects on conformational order of stratum corneum intercellular lipids, secondary structure of keratin and skin hydration. It was possible to monitor the spatial distribution of SLES in the stratum corneum for the first time by subtracting spectra of untreated from treated skin samples and without the need of a perdeuterated form. This method of analysis was evaluated by addressing potential error sources such as differences in removed amounts of corneocytes and intra-individual changes in stratum corneum composition as a function of depth. The obtained results indicate a penetration of SLES into deep layers of the stratum corneum. Furthermore, SLES treatment led to significantly decreased skin hydration levels, whereas the secondary structure of keratin remained nearly unaffected. The reliability of this semi-quantitative method of analysis was confirmed by receiving a coefficient of determination of 0.9963 after making a correlation of deep depended absorbances of two different characteristic bands with different absorption coefficients. PMID:24928132

  9. Improving batch cooling seeded crystallization of an organic weed-killer using on-line ATR FTIR measurement of supersaturation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewiner, F.; Févotte, G.; Klein, J. P.; Puel, F.

    2001-06-01

    In previous papers, a method for the calibration of ATR FTIR measurement of dissolved solid concentration during cooling crystallizations was presented, and efficient basic procedures for the determination of solubility and metastability curves were described. The present paper reports new experimental results. The crystallization of an organic product is studied thanks to on-line FTIR measurements of supersaturation and off-line crystal size distribution (CSD) determinations. The obtained information is shown to potentially allow a deeper examination of major industrial issues such as the reduction of batch-to-batch variations and the improvement of the CSD of the final particles. A particular attention is focused on the determination of appropriate seeding parameters such as the cooling rate of seeded slurries, the temperature of introduction and the amount of seed. The results obtained demonstrate that, although any modelling approach is outside the scope of this paper, the analysis of the measured supersaturation profiles allows some interpretation of mechanisms governing the final CSD, and consequently, the proposal of improved operating parameters.

  10. Evidence of acid-base interactions between amines and model indoor surfaces by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Destaillats, Hugo; Singer, Brett C.; Gundel, Lara A.

    Molecular associations of pyridine with cellulose and gypsum, surrogates for common indoor surface materials, were studied using an attenuated total reflection (ATR)-Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrophotometric method. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the molecular interactions of amines with well-characterized materials that affect their partitioning between indoor air and surfaces. The experimental results suggest the presence of at least two sorptive states for volatile and semivolatile amines, attributed to the chemisorbed species and to a more labile surface state (i.e., physisorbed pyridine). Both exhibited spectroscopic signatures corresponding to aromatic C-H stretching modes (2950-3100 cm -1) in the studied spectral region. Chemisorbed pyridine could be identified by the presence of additional IR signals in the N-H and O-H stretching region of the spectrum (2900-3600 cm -1). During desorption under a stream of N 2, surface enrichment in the chemisorbed species was evidenced by a slower reduction of the absorbance of the broad band at 2900-3600 cm -1 in relation to the total pyridine absorbance change. This spectroscopic evidence for acid-base interactions between amines and surfaces is consistent with the desorption behavior observed in previous work for nicotine from model surfaces.

  11. NEK8 links the ATR-regulated replication stress response and S phase CDK activity to renal ciliopathies.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyo Jei Claudia; Lin, Jia-Ren; Vannier, Jean-Baptiste; Slaats, Gisela G; Kile, Andrew C; Paulsen, Renee D; Manning, Danielle K; Beier, David R; Giles, Rachel H; Boulton, Simon J; Cimprich, Karlene A

    2013-08-22

    Renal ciliopathies are a leading cause of kidney failure, but their exact etiology is poorly understood. NEK8/NPHP9 is a ciliary kinase associated with two renal ciliopathies in humans and mice, nephronophthisis (NPHP) and polycystic kidney disease. Here, we identify NEK8 as a key effector of the ATR-mediated replication stress response. Cells lacking NEK8 form spontaneous DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that further accumulate when replication forks stall, and they exhibit reduced fork rates, unscheduled origin firing, and increased replication fork collapse. NEK8 suppresses DSB formation by limiting cyclin A-associated CDK activity. Strikingly, a mutation in NEK8 that is associated with renal ciliopathies affects its genome maintenance functions. Moreover, kidneys of NEK8 mutant mice accumulate DNA damage, and loss of NEK8 or replication stress similarly disrupts renal cell architecture in a 3D-culture system. Thus, NEK8 is a critical component of the DNA damage response that links replication stress with cystic kidney disorders. PMID:23973373

  12. The Dimeric Architecture of Checkpoint Kinases Mec1ATR and Tel1ATM Reveal a Common Structural Organization*

    PubMed Central

    Sawicka, Marta; Wanrooij, Paulina H.; Darbari, Vidya C.; Tannous, Elias; Hailemariam, Sarem; Bose, Daniel; Makarova, Alena V.; Burgers, Peter M.; Zhang, Xiaodong

    2016-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related protein kinases are key regulators controlling a wide range of cellular events. The yeast Tel1 and Mec1·Ddc2 complex (ATM and ATR-ATRIP in humans) play pivotal roles in DNA replication, DNA damage signaling, and repair. Here, we present the first structural insight for dimers of Mec1·Ddc2 and Tel1 using single-particle electron microscopy. Both kinases reveal a head to head dimer with one major dimeric interface through the N-terminal HEAT (named after Huntingtin, elongation factor 3, protein phosphatase 2A, and yeast kinase TOR1) repeat. Their dimeric interface is significantly distinct from the interface of mTOR complex 1 dimer, which oligomerizes through two spatially separate interfaces. We also observe different structural organizations of kinase domains of Mec1 and Tel1. The kinase domains in the Mec1·Ddc2 dimer are located in close proximity to each other. However, in the Tel1 dimer they are fully separated, providing potential access of substrates to this kinase, even in its dimeric form. PMID:27129217

  13. Three-dimensional analysis of moving target radar signals: methods and implications for ATR and feature-aided tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuff, Mark A.

    1999-08-01

    Like the hypothetical shadow watchers of Plato's cave, ATR researchers have spent years in the study of one and two- dimensional signals, collected from three dimensional targets. Three-dimensional geometric invariance theory of radar returns from moving targets gives us a new opportunity to escape the study of two-dimensional information which is present, with probability one, in the signals from any randomly moving target. Target recognition for moving targets is fundamentally harder than for stationary targets, if one remains in a two- dimensional paradigm. Viewing geometry calculations based on sensor flight lines become false, due to uncontrolled target rotations. Three-dimensional analysis shows that even the most optimal purely two-dimensional approach will generically construct false target measurements and distorted target images. But the geometric facts also show that all types of three-dimensional Euclidean invariants, such as true (not projected) lengths, surface areas, angles, and volumes of target components can be extracted from moving target data. These facts have profound implications for target recognition, and for the dynamic tracking of target movements, allowing target signals to be correlated by comparing fundamental three-dimensional invariants, which are not confounded by changing illumination directions.

  14. Perfluoroalkylated Substance Effects in Xenopus laevis A6 Kidney Epithelial Cells Determined by ATR-FTIR Spectroscopy and Chemometric Analysis.

    PubMed

    Gorrochategui, Eva; Lacorte, Sílvia; Tauler, Romà; Martin, Francis L

    2016-05-16

    The effects of four perfluoroalkylated substances (PFASs), namely, perfluorobutanesulfonate (PFBS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS), and perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA) were assessed in Xenopus laevis A6 kidney epithelial cells by attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and chemometric analysis. Principal component analysis-linear discriminant analysis (PCA-LDA) was used to visualize wavenumber-related alterations and ANOVA-simultaneous component analysis (ASCA) allowed data processing considering the underlying experimental design. Both analyses evidenced a higher impact of low-dose PFAS-treatments (10(-9) M) on A6 cells forming monolayers, while there was a larger influence of high-dose PFAS-treatments (10(-5) M) on A6 cells differentiated into dome structures. The observed dose-response PFAS-induced effects were to some extent related to their cytotoxicity: the EC50-values of most influential PFAS-treatments increased (PFOS < PFNA < PFOA ≪ PFBS), and higher-doses of these chemicals induced a larger impact. Major spectral alterations were mainly attributed to DNA/RNA, secondary protein structure, lipids, and fatty acids. Finally, PFOS and PFOA caused a decrease in A6 cell numbers compared to controls, whereas PFBS and PFNA did not significantly change cell population levels. Overall, this work highlights the ability of PFASs to alter A6 cells, whether forming monolayers or differentiated into dome structures, and the potential of PFOS and PFOA to induce cell death. PMID:27078751

  15. The Conference Proceedings of the 2001 Air Transport Research Society (ATRS) of the WCTR Society. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Yeong-Heok (Editor); Bowen, Brent D. (Editor); Tarry, Scott E. (Editor)

    2001-01-01

    The ATRS held its 5th Annual conference at the City University of Hong Kong Campus in July 2001. The conference was a success with nearly 140 participants including 70 presenters. Titles that comprise Volume 2 include: Intelligent Airport Gate Assignment System; A Study on the Effects of the Personality Compatibility to the Job Performance; ITS/CVO Application for Air cargo Transportation in Korea; An Airport as a Logistics and Economic Hub: The Case of Incheon International Airport; The Impact Of Aviation Safety over the Consumer's Behavior; The Integration of China and Taiwan Air Networks for Direct Air Cargo Services; Quality perception and carrier choice in Civil Aviation; Future Trends in Business Travel Decision Making; Cooperation Among German Airports in Europe; Inbound and Outbound Air Passenger Traffic Forecasting between the United States and Selected Asian countries; An Evaluation of Alternative Facilities for Airport Redevelopment using Fuzzy Linguistic Approach; Economic Analysis of Airline Alliances; The Aviation Cooperation between the two Koreas Preparing for the Reunification of the Peninsula; and A Study on the Air Transport Cooperation in Northeast Asia between China, Japan and Korea.

  16. Design of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Experiments for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover

    2005-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight particle fuel tests in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the newly formed Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to support development of the next generation Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The experiments will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature monitoring and control combined with on-line fission product monitoring of the sweep gas. The final design phase has just been completed on the first experiment (AGR-1) in this series and the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation. This paper discusses the development of the experimental hardware and support system designs and the status of the experiment.

  17. Mismatch repair-dependent G2 checkpoint induced by low doses of SN1 type methylating agents requires the ATR kinase.

    PubMed

    Stojic, Lovorka; Mojas, Nina; Cejka, Petr; Di Pietro, Massimiliano; Ferrari, Stefano; Marra, Giancarlo; Jiricny, Josef

    2004-06-01

    S(N)1-type alkylating agents represent an important class of chemotherapeutics, but the molecular mechanisms underlying their cytotoxicity are unknown. Thus, although these substances modify predominantly purine nitrogen atoms, their toxicity appears to result from the processing of O(6)-methylguanine ((6Me)G)-containing mispairs by the mismatch repair (MMR) system, because cells with defective MMR are highly resistant to killing by these agents. In an attempt to understand the role of the MMR system in the molecular transactions underlying the toxicity of alkylating agents, we studied the response of human MMR-proficient and MMR-deficient cells to low concentrations of the prototypic methylating agent N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). We now show that MNNG treatment induced a cell cycle arrest that was absolutely dependent on functional MMR. Unusually, the cells arrested only in the second G(2) phase after treatment. Downstream targets of both ATM (Ataxia telangiectasia mutated) and ATR (ATM and Rad3-related) kinases were modified, but only the ablation of ATR, or the inhibition of CHK1, attenuated the arrest. The checkpoint activation was accompanied by the formation of nuclear foci containing the signaling and repair proteins ATR, the S(*)/T(*)Q substrate, gamma-H2AX, and replication protein A (RPA). The persistence of these foci implied that they may represent sites of irreparable damage. PMID:15175264

  18. Selective detection of the structural changes upon photoreactions of several redox cofactors in photosystem II by means of light-induced ATR-FTIR difference spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, Tatsunori; Noguchi, Takumi

    2007-04-01

    Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy was applied for the first time to detect the structural changes upon photoreactions of redox cofactors in photosystem II (PSII). The PSII-enriched membranes from spinach were adsorbed on the surface of a silicon prism, and FTIR measurements of various redox cofactors were performed for the same sample but under different conditions by exchanging buffers in a flow cell. Light-induced FTIR difference spectra upon redox reactions of the oxygen-evolving Mn cluster, the primary quinone electron acceptor Q A, the redox-active tyrosine Y D, the primary electron acceptor pheophytin, and the primary electron donor chlorophyll P680 were successively recorded in buffers including different redox reagents and inhibitors. All of these cofactors remained active in the PSII membranes on the silicon surface, and the resultant spectra were basically identical to those previously recorded by the conventional transmission method. These ATR-FTIR measurements enable accurate comparison between reactions of different active sites in a single PSII sample. The present results demonstrated that the ATR-FTIR spectroscopy is a useful technique for investigation of the reaction mechanism of PSII.

  19. Final Assembly and Initial Irradiation of the First Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. B. Grover

    2007-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide (UCO) tri-isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing.1,2 The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The final design phase for the first experiment was completed in 2005, and the fabrication and assembly of the first experiment test train (designated AGR-1) as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment

  20. Hydrogen loops in existing reactors for testing fuel elements for nuclear propulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Charles S.; Welland, Henry; Abraschoff, James; Thoms, Kenneth

    1993-01-01

    The Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) has revitalized interest in adapting nuclear energy for power and propulsion. Prior to the selection of a nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) system, extensive testing of the various proposed concepts will be required. In today's environmental, safety and health culture, full size rocket engine tests as were done under the Rover/NERVA program will be extremely difficult and expensive to perform and meet NASA's schedules. A different test strategy uses a hydrogen loop in an existing reactor to test a wide variety of single elements or clusters of elements for fuel qualification. This approach is expected to reduce operating and capital costs and expedite the testing schedule. This paper examines the potential of performing subscale tests in a hydrogen loop in an existing reactor such as the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory or the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The HFIR is expected to achieve power densities comparable to those achieved in ATR because of the 85 MWt power level and the high thermal and fast flux levels. The available length and diameter of the test region of FHIR are 60 cm and 10 cm whereas the available length and diameter of the test region of ATR are 120 cm and 12 cm respectively.

  1. Hydrogen loops in existing reactors for testing fuel elements for nuclear propulsion

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, C.S.; Welland, H.; Abraschoff, J. ); Thoms, K. )

    1993-01-15

    The Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) has revitalized interest in adapting nuclear energy for power and propulsion. Prior to the selection of a nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) system, extensive testing of the various proposed concepts will be required. In today's environmental, safety and health culture, full size rocket engine tests as were done under the Rover/NERVA program will be extremely difficult and expensive to perform and meet NASA's schedules. A different test strategy uses a hydrogen loop in an existing reactor to test a wide variety of single elements or clusters of elements for fuel qualification. This approach is expected to reduce operating and capital costs and expedite the testing schedule. This paper examines the potential of performing subscale tests in a hydrogen loop in an existing reactor such as the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory or the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The HFIR is expected to achieve power densities comparable to those achieved in ATR because of the 85 MWt power level and the high thermal and fast flux levels. The available length and diameter of the test region of FHIR are 60 cm and 10 cm whereas the available length and diameter of the test region of ATR are 120 cm and 12 cm respectively.

  2. An FTIR method for the analysis of crude and heavy fuel oil asphaltenes to assist in oil fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Riley, Brenden J; Lennard, Chris; Fuller, Stephen; Spikmans, Val

    2016-09-01

    A proof-of-concept spectroscopic method for crude and heavy fuel oil asphaltenes was developed to complement existing methods for source determination of oil spills. Current methods rely on the analysis of the volatile fraction of oils by Gas Chromatography (GC), whilst the non-volatile fraction, including asphaltenes, is discarded. By discarding the non-volatile fraction, important oil fingerprinting information is potentially lost. Ten oil samples representing various geographical regions were used in this study. The asphaltene fraction was precipitated from the oils using excess n-pentane, and analysed by Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR). Based on visual interpretation of FTIR spectra along with peak height ratio comparisons, all ten oil samples could be differentiated from one another. Furthermore, ATR-FTIR was not able to differentiate a weathered crude oil sample from its source sample, demonstrating significant potential for the application of asphaltenes in oil fingerprinting. PMID:27518037

  3. Fuel cells 101

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschenhofer, J.H.

    1999-07-01

    This paper discusses the various types of fuel cells, the importance of cell voltage, fuel processing for natural gas, cell stacking, fuel cell plant description, advantages and disadvantages of the types of fuel cells, and applications. The types covered include: polymer electrolyte fuel cell, alkaline fuel cell, phosphoric acid fuel cell; molten carbonate fuel cell, and solid oxide fuel cell.

  4. Analysis of the Reactor Physics of Low-Enrichment Fuel for the INL Advanced Test Reactor in support of RERTR

    SciTech Connect

    Mark DeHart; William Skerjanc; Sean Morrell

    2012-06-01

    Analysis of the performance of the ATR with a LEU fuel design shows promise in terms of a core design that will yield the same neutron sources in target locations. A proposed integral cladding burnable absorber design appears to meet power profile requirements that will satisfy power distributions for safety limits. Performance of this fuel design is ongoing; the current work is the initial evaluation of the core performance of this fuel design with increasing burnup. Results show that LEU fuel may have a longer lifetime that HEU fuel however, such limits may be set by mechanical performance of the fuel rather that available reactivity. Changes seen in the radial fuel power distribution with burnup in LEU fuel will require further study to ascertain the impact on neutron fluxes in target locations. Source terms for discharged fuel have also been studied. By its very nature, LEU fuel produces much more plutonium than is present in HEU fuel at discharge. However, the effect of the plutonium inventory appears to have little affect on radiotoxicity or decay heat in the fuel.

  5. Kinetics study of heterogeneous reactions of ozone with erucic acid using an ATR-IR flow reactor.

    PubMed

    Leng, Chunbo; Hiltner, Joseph; Pham, Hai; Kelley, Judas; Mach, Mindy; Zhang, Yunhong; Liu, Yong

    2014-03-01

    The ozone initiated heterogeneous oxidation of erucic acid (EA) thin film was investigated using a flow system combined with attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR) over wide ranges of ozone concentrations (0.25-60 ppm), thin film thickness (0.1-1.0 μm), temperatures (263-298 K), and relative humidities (0-80% RH) for the first time. Pseudo-first-order rate constants, kapp, and overall reactive uptake coefficients, γ, were obtained through changes in the absorbance of C[double bond, length as m-dash]O stretching bands at 1695 cm(-1), which is assigned to the carbonyl group in carboxylic acid. Results showed that the reaction followed the Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism and kapp was largely dominated by surface reaction over bulk phase reaction. In addition, both the kapp and the γ values showed very strong temperature dependences (∼two orders of magnitude) over the temperature range; in contrast, they only slightly increased with increasing RH values from 0-80%. According to the kapp values as a function of temperature, the activation energy for the heterogeneous reaction was estimated to be 80.6 kJ mol(-1). Our results have suggested that heterogeneous reactions between ozone and unsaturated solid surfaces likely have a substantially greater temperature dependence than liquid ones. Moreover, the hygroscopic properties of EA thin films before and after exposure to ozone were also studied by measurement of water uptake. Based on the hygroscopicity data, the insignificant RH effect on reaction kinetics was probably due to the relatively weak water uptake by the unreacted and reacted EA thin films. PMID:24457621

  6. Sorption of phosphate onto mesoporous γ-alumina studied with in-situ ATR-FTIR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Due to the extensive use of phosphates in industry, agriculture and households, the phosphate - γ-alumina interactions are important for understanding its detrimental contribution to eutrophication in lakes and rivers. In situ Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy can provide more detailed information on the adsorbate-adsorbent interaction and the formation of hydrogen bonds. Results In situ ATR-FTIR spectroscopy was used to identify phosphate complexes adsorbed within the three-dimensional network of mesoporous γ-alumina at pH 4.1 and 9.0. The integrated intensity between 850 cm-1 and 1250 cm-1 was used as a relative measure of the amount of adsorbed phosphate. The integrated intensity proved to be about 3 times higher at pH 4.1 as compared with the corresponding intensity at pH 9.0. The adsorption of phosphate at the two pH conditions could be well described by the Langmuir adsorption isotherm at low concentrations and the empirical Freundlich adsorption isotherm for the whole concentration range, viz. 5 – 2000 μM. Conclusions From the band shape of infrared spectra at pH 4.1 and pH 9.0, it was proposed that the symmetry of the inner-sphere surface complex formed between phosphate and γ-alumina was C1 at the lower pH value, whilst the higher value (9.0) implied a surface complex with C2v or C1 symmetry. The difference in adsorbed amount of phosphate at the two pH values was ascribed to the reduced fraction of ≡ AlOH2+ surface sites and the increased fraction of ≡ AlO- sites upon increasing pH from 4 to 9. PMID:22472205

  7. Reactor Physics Methods and Preconceptual Core Design Analyses for Conversion of the Advanced Test Reactor to Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2012

    SciTech Connect

    David W. Nigg; Sean R. Morrell

    2012-09-01

    Under the current long-term DOE policy and planning scenario, both the ATR and the ATRC will be reconfigured at an appropriate time within the next several years to operate with low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This will be accomplished under the auspices of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, administered by the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). At a minimum, the internal design and composition of the fuel element plates and support structure will change, to accommodate the need for low enrichment in a manner that maintains total core excess reactivity at a suitable level for anticipated operational needs throughout each cycle while respecting all control and shutdown margin requirements and power distribution limits. The complete engineering design and optimization of LEU cores for the ATR and the ATRC will require significant multi-year efforts in the areas of fuel design, development and testing, as well as a complete re-analysis of the relevant reactor physics parameters for a core composed of LEU fuel, with possible control system modifications. Ultimately, revalidation of the computational physics parameters per applicable national and international standards against data from experimental measurements for prototypes of the new ATR and ATRC core designs will also be required for Safety Analysis Report (SAR) changes to support routine operations with LEU. This report is focused on reactor physics analyses conducted during Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 to support the initial development of several potential preconceptual fuel element designs that are suitable candidates for further study and refinement during FY-2013 and beyond. In a separate, but related, effort in the general area of computational support for ATR operations, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is conducting a focused multiyear effort to introduce modern high-fidelity computational reactor physics software and associated validation protocols to replace

  8. Fuel injector

    DOEpatents

    Lambeth, Malcolm David Dick

    2001-02-27

    A fuel injector comprises first and second housing parts, the first housing part being located within a bore or recess formed in the second housing part, the housing parts defining therebetween an inlet chamber, a delivery chamber axially spaced from the inlet chamber, and a filtration flow path interconnecting the inlet and delivery chambers to remove particulate contaminants from the flow of fuel therebetween.

  9. Installation and Final Testing of an On-Line, Multi-Spectrometer Fission Product Monitoring System (FPMS) to Support Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Testing and Qualification in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    J. K. Hartwell; D. M. Scates; M. W. Drigert; J. B. Walter

    2006-10-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is initiating tests of reactor fuel for use in an Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR). The AGR will use helium coolant, a low-power-density ceramic core, and coated-particle fuel. A series of eight (8) fuel irradiation tests are planned for the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL’s) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). One important measure of fuel performance in these tests is quantification of the fission gas releases over the nominal 2-year duration of each irradiation experiment. This test objective will be met using the AGR Fission Product Monitoring System (FPMS) which includes seven (7) on-line detection stations viewing each of the six test capsule effluent lines (plus one spare). Each station incorporates both a heavily-shielded high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometer for quantification of the isotopic releases, and a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector to monitor the total count rate and identify the timing of the releases. The AGR-1 experiment will begin irradiation after October 1, 2006. To support this experiment, the FPMS has been completely assembled, tested, and calibrated in a laboratory at the INL, and then reassembled and tested in its final location in the ATR reactor basement. This paper presents the details of the equipment performance, the control and acquisition software, the test plan for the irradiation monitoring, and the installation in the ATR basement. Preliminary on-line data may be available by the Conference date.

  10. Effects of thermal treatment on the co-rolled U-Mo fuel foils

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis D. Keiser, Jr.; Tammy L. Trowbridge; Cynthia R. Breckenridge; Brady L. Mackowiak; Glenn A. Moore; Barry H. Rabin; Mitchell K. Meyer

    2014-11-01

    A monolithic fuel type is being developed to convert US high performance research and test reactors such as Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU). The interaction between the cladding and the U-Mo fuel meat during fuel fabrication and irradiation is known to have negative impacts on fuel performance, such as mechanical integrity and dimensional stability. In order to eliminate/minimize the direct interaction between cladding and fuel meat, a thin zirconium diffusion barrier was introduced between the cladding and U-Mo fuel meat through a co-rolling process. A complex interface between the zirconium and U-Mo was developed during the co-rolling process. A predictable interface between zirconium and U-Mo is critical to achieve good fuel performance since the interfaces can be the weakest link in the monolithic fuel system. A post co-rolling annealing treatment is expected to create a well-controlled interface between zirconium and U-Mo. A systematic study utilizing post co-rolling annealing treatment has been carried out. Based on microscopy results, the impacts of the annealing treatment on the interface between zirconium and U-Mo will be presented and an optima annealing treatment schedule will be suggested. The effects of the annealing treatment on the fuel performance will also be discussed.

  11. Testing of Gas Reactor Fuel and Materials in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover

    2006-10-01

    The recent growth in interest for high temperature gas reactors has resulted in an increased need for materials and fuel testing for this type of reactor. The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at the US Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory, has long been involved in testing gas reactor fuel and materials, and has facilities and capabilities to provide the right environment for gas reactor irradiation experiments. These capabilities include both passive sealed capsule experiments, and instrumented/actively controlled experiments. The instrumented/actively controlled experiments typically contain thermocouples and control the irradiation temperature, but on-line measurements and controls for pressure and gas environment have also been performed in past irradiations. The ATR has an existing automated gas temperature control system that can maintain temperature in an irradiation experiment within very tight bounds, and has developed an on-line fission product monitoring system that is especially well suited for testing gas reactor particle fuel. The ATR’s control system, which consists primarily of vertical cylinders used to rotate neutron poisons/reflectors toward or away from the reactor core, provides a constant vertical flux profile over the duration of each operating cycle. This constant chopped cosine shaped axial flux profile, with a relatively flat peak at the vertical centre of the core, is more desirable for experiments than a constantly moving axial flux peak resulting from a control system of axially positioned control components which are vertically withdrawn from the core.

  12. Fuel cell-fuel cell hybrid system

    DOEpatents

    Geisbrecht, Rodney A.; Williams, Mark C.

    2003-09-23

    A device for converting chemical energy to electricity is provided, the device comprising a high temperature fuel cell with the ability for partially oxidizing and completely reforming fuel, and a low temperature fuel cell juxtaposed to said high temperature fuel cell so as to utilize remaining reformed fuel from the high temperature fuel cell. Also provided is a method for producing electricity comprising directing fuel to a first fuel cell, completely oxidizing a first portion of the fuel and partially oxidizing a second portion of the fuel, directing the second fuel portion to a second fuel cell, allowing the first fuel cell to utilize the first portion of the fuel to produce electricity; and allowing the second fuel cell to utilize the second portion of the fuel to produce electricity.

  13. Fuel ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-02-01

    This report discusses the Omnibus Trade and Competitiveness Act of 1988 which requires GAO to examine fuel ethanol imports from Central America and the Caribbean and their impact on the U.S. fuel ethanol industry. Ethanol is the alcohol in beverages, such as beer, wine, and whiskey. It can also be used as a fuel by blending with gasoline. It can be made from renewable resources, such as corn, wheat, grapes, and sugarcane, through a process of fermentation. This report finds that, given current sugar and gasoline prices, it is not economically feasible for Caribbean ethanol producers to meet the current local feedstock requirement.

  14. FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Bean, R.W.

    1963-11-19

    A ceramic fuel element for a nuclear reactor that has improved structural stability as well as improved cooling and fission product retention characteristics is presented. The fuel element includes a plurality of stacked hollow ceramic moderator blocks arranged along a tubular raetallic shroud that encloses a series of axially apertured moderator cylinders spaced inwardly of the shroud. A plurality of ceramic nuclear fuel rods are arranged in the annular space between the shroud and cylinders of moderator and appropriate support means and means for directing gas coolant through the annular space are also provided. (AEC)

  15. Initial assessment of radiation behavior of very-high-density low-enriched-uranium fuels.

    SciTech Connect

    Hofman, G. L.; Meyer, M. L.; Snelgrove, J. L.; Dietz, M. L.; Strain, R. V.; Kim, K. H.

    1999-10-01

    Results from the postirradiation examinations of microplates irradiated in the RERTR-1 and -2 experiments in the ATR have shown several binary and ternary U-Mo alloys to be promising candidates for use in aluminum-based dispersion fuels with uranium densities up to 8 to 9 g/cm{sup 3}. Ternary alloys of uranium, niobium, and zirconium performed poorly, however, both in terms of fuel/matrix reaction and fission-gas-bubble behavior, and have been dropped from further study. Since irradiation temperatures achieved in the present experiments (approximately 70 C)are considerably lower than might be experienced in a high-performance reactor, a new experiment is being planned with beginning-of-cycle temperatures greater than 200 C in 8-g U/cm{sup 3} fuel.

  16. ATR-FTIR spectroscopy detects alterations induced by organotin(IV) carboxylates in MCF-7 cells at sub-cytotoxic/-genotoxic concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Muhammad S; Mirza, Bushra; Hussain, Mukhtiar; Hanif, Muhammad; Ali, Saqib; Walsh, Michael J; Martin, Francis L

    2008-01-01

    The environmental impact of metal complexes such as organotin(IV) compounds is of increasing concern. Genotoxic effects of organotin(IV) compounds (0.01 μg/ml, 0.1 μg/ml or 1.0 μg/ml) were measured using the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet) assay to measure DNA single-strand breaks (SSBs) and the cytokinesis-block micronucleus (CBMN) assay to determine micronucleus formation. Biochemical-cell signatures were also ascertained using attenuated total reflection Fourier-transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. In the comet assay, organotin(IV) carboxylates induced significantly-elevated levels of DNA SSBs. Elevated micronucleus-forming activities were also observed. Following interrogation using ATR-FTIR spectroscopy, infrared spectra in the biomolecular range (900 cm-1 – 1800 cm-1) derived from organotin-treated MCF-7 cells exhibited clear alterations in their biochemical-cell fingerprint compared to control-cell populations following exposures as low as 0.0001 μg/ml. Mono-, di- or tri-organotin(IV) carboxylates (0.1 μg/ml, 1.0 μg/ml or 10.0 μg/ml) were markedly cytotoxic as determined by the clonogenic assay following treatment of MCF-7 cells with ≥ 1.0 μg/ml. Our results demonstrate that ATR-FTIR spectroscopy can be applied to detect molecular alterations induced by organotin(IV) compounds at sub-cytotoxic and sub-genotoxic concentrations. This biophysical approach points to a novel means of assessing risk associated with environmental contaminants. PACS codes: 87.15.-v, 87.17.-d, 87.18.-h PMID:19351425

  17. Loss of INPP4B causes a DNA repair defect through loss of BRCA1, ATM and ATR and can be targeted with PARP inhibitor treatment.

    PubMed

    Ip, Laura R H; Poulogiannis, George; Viciano, Felipe Cia; Sasaki, Junko; Kofuji, Satoshi; Spanswick, Victoria J; Hochhauser, Daniel; Hartley, John A; Sasaki, Takehiko; Gewinner, Christina A

    2015-04-30

    Treatment options for ovarian cancer patients remain limited and overall survival is less than 50% despite recent clinical advances. The lipid phosphatase inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatase type II (INPP4B) has been described as a tumor suppressor in the PI3K/Akt pathway with loss of expression found most pronounced in breast, ovarian cancer and melanoma. Using microarray technology we identified a DNA repair defect in INPP4B-deficient cells, which we further characterized by comet assays and quantification of γH2AX, RAD51 and 53BP1 foci formation. INPP4B loss resulted in significantly increased sensitivity towards PARP inhibition, comparable to loss of BRCA1 in two- and three-dimensional in vitro models, as well as in in vivo xenograft models. Mechanistically, we discovered that INPP4B forms a protein complex with the key players of DNA repair, ATR and BRCA1, in GST pulldown and 293T overexpression assays, and INPP4B loss affects BRCA1, ATM and ATR protein stability resulting in the observed DNA repair defect. Given that INPP4B loss has been found in 40% of ovarian cancer patients, this study provides the rationale for establishing INPP4B as a biomarker of PARP inhibitor response, and consequently offers novel therapeutic options for a significant subset of patients. Loss of the tumor suppressor inositol polyphosphate 4-phosphatase type II (INPP4B) results in a DNA repair defect due to concomitant loss of BRCA1, ATR and ATM and can be therapeutically targeted with PARP inhibitors. PMID:25868852

  18. Completion of the first NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiment, AGR-1, in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Blaine Grover; John Maki; David Petti

    2010-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and completed a very successful irradiation in early November 2009. The design of AGR-1 test train and support systems used to monitor and control the experiment during

  19. Fuel composition

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, T.H.

    1990-06-26

    This patent describes a motor fuel composition. It comprises: a mixture of hydrocarbons in the gasoline boiling range containing a deposit preventing or reducing effective amount of poly(olefin)-N-substituted- carbamate.

  20. Formation of Assemblies Comprising Ru–Polypyridine Complexes and CdSe Nanocrystals Studied by ATR-FTIR Spectroscopy and DFT Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Koposov, Alexey Y.; Cardolaccia, Thomas; Albert, Victor; Badaeva, Ekaterina; Kilina, Svetlana; Meyer, Thomas J.; Tretiak, Sergei; Sykora, Milan

    2011-07-05

    The interaction between CdSe nanocrystals (NCs) passivated with trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO) ligands and a series of Ru–polypyridine complexes was studied by attenuated total reflectance FTIR (ATR-FTIR) and modeled using density functional theory (DFT). The results of DFT modeling are consistent with the experiment, showing that for the deprotonated carboxylic acid group the coupling to two Cd atoms via a bridging mode is the energetically most favorable mode of attachment for all nonequivalent NC surface sites and that the attachment of the protonated carboxylic acid is thermodynamically significantly less favorable.

  1. ATR-FTIR and Raman spectroscopic investigation of the electroporation-mediated transdermal delivery of a nanocarrier system containing an antitumour drug.

    PubMed

    Balázs, Boglárka; Sipos, Péter; Danciu, Corina; Avram, Stefana; Soica, Codruta; Dehelean, Cristina; Varju, Gábor; Erős, Gábor; Budai-Szűcs, Mária; Berkó, Szilvia; Csányi, Erzsébet

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present work was the optimization of the transdermal delivery of a lyotropic liquid crystal genistein-based formulation (LLC-GEN). LLC was chosen as medium in view of the poor solubility of GEN in water. Membrane diffusion and penetration studies were carried out with a Franz diffusion cell, through a synthetic membrane in vitro, a chick chorioallantoic membrane ex ovo, and ex vivo excised human epidermis. Thereafter, LLC-GEN was combined with electroporation (EP) to enhance the transdermal drug delivery. The synergistic effect of EP was verified by in vivo ATR-FTIR and ex vivo Raman spectroscopy on hairless mouse skin. PMID:26819818

  2. ATR-FTIR and Raman spectroscopic investigation of the electroporation-mediated transdermal delivery of a nanocarrier system containing an antitumour drug

    PubMed Central

    Balázs, Boglárka; Sipos, Péter; Danciu, Corina; Avram, Stefana; Soica, Codruta; Dehelean, Cristina; Varju, Gábor; Erős, Gábor; Budai-Szűcs, Mária; Berkó, Szilvia; Csányi, Erzsébet

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present work was the optimization of the transdermal delivery of a lyotropic liquid crystal genistein-based formulation (LLC-GEN). LLC was chosen as medium in view of the poor solubility of GEN in water. Membrane diffusion and penetration studies were carried out with a Franz diffusion cell, through a synthetic membrane in vitro, a chick chorioallantoic membrane ex ovo, and ex vivo excised human epidermis. Thereafter, LLC-GEN was combined with electroporation (EP) to enhance the transdermal drug delivery. The synergistic effect of EP was verified by in vivo ATR-FTIR and ex vivo Raman spectroscopy on hairless mouse skin. PMID:26819818

  3. Spectral features of guanidinium-carboxylate salt bridges. The combined ATR-IR and theoretical studies of aqueous solution of guanidinium acetate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levina, Elena O.; Lokshin, Boris V.; Mai, Bich D.; Vener, Mikhail V.

    2016-08-01

    The spectrum of guanidinium acetate in aqueous solution has been recorded by attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR). Assignments of the bands have been done using the polarizable continuum model (PCM). Three IR intensive bands at 1670, 1550, and 1410 cm-1 are associated with stretching and bending vibrations of the groups forming a ring of six heavy atoms of the bidentate configuration of guanidinium acetate. The relatively weak broad band near 2200 cm-1 is tentatively assigned to the stretching vibration of the Nsbnd H⋯O fragment of the hydrogen-bonded ion pairs.

  4. Kinetic and Conformational Insights of Protein Adsorption onto Montmorillonite Revealed Using in Situ ATR-FTIR/2D-COS.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Michael P; Martínez, Carmen Enid

    2016-08-01

    Protein adsorption onto clay minerals is a process with wide-ranging impacts on the environmental cycling of nutrients and contaminants. This process is influenced by kinetic and conformational factors that are often challenging to probe in situ. This study represents an in situ attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopic investigation of the adsorption of a model protein (bovine serum albumin (BSA)) onto a clay mineral (montmorillonite) at four concentrations (1.50, 3.75, 7.50, and 15.0 μM) under environmentally relevant conditions. At all concentrations probed, FTIR spectra show that BSA readily adsorbs onto montmorillonite. Adsorption kinetics follow an Elovich model, suggesting that primary limitations on adsorption rates are surface-related heterogeneous energetic restrictions associated with protein rearrangement and lateral protein-protein interaction. BSA adsorption onto montmorillonite fits the Langmuir model, yielding K = 5.97 × 10(5) M(-1). Deconvolution and curve fitting of the amide I band at the end of the adsorption process (∼120 min) shows a large extent of BSA unfolding upon adsorption at 1.50 μM, with extended chains and turns increasing at the expense of α-helices. At higher concentrations/surface coverages, BSA unfolding is less pronounced and a more compact structure is assumed. Two-dimensional correlation spectroscopic (2D-COS) analysis reveals three different pathways corresponding to adsorbed conformations. At 1.50 μM, adsorption increases extended chains, followed by a loss in α-helices and a subsequent increase in turns. At 3.75 μM, extended chains decrease and then aggregated strands increase and side chains decrease, followed by a decrease in turns. With 7.50 and 15.0 μM BSA, the loss of side-chain vibrations is followed by an increase in aggregated strands and a subsequent decrease in turns and extended chains. Overall, the BSA concentration and resultant surface coverage have a profound

  5. Unconventional fuel: Tire derived fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Hope, M.W.

    1995-09-01

    Material recovery of scrap tires for their fuel value has moved from a pioneering concept in the early 1980`s to a proven and continuous use in the United States` pulp and paper, utility, industrial, and cement industry. Pulp and paper`s use of tire derived fuel (TDF) is currently consuming tires at the rate of 35 million passenger tire equivalents (PTEs) per year. Twenty mills are known to be burning TDF on a continuous basis. The utility industry is currently consuming tires at the rate of 48 million PTEs per year. Thirteen utilities are known to be burning TDF on a continuous basis. The cement industry is currently consuming tires at the rate of 28 million PTEs per year. Twenty two cement plants are known to be burning TDF on a continuous basis. Other industrial boilers are currently consuming tires at the rate of 6.5 million PTEs per year. Four industrial boilers are known to be burning TDF on a continuous basis. In total, 59 facilities are currently burning over 117 million PTEs per year. Although 93% of these facilities were not engineered to burn TDF, it has become clear that TDF has found acceptance as a supplemental fuel when blending with conventional fuels in existing combustion devices designed for normal operating conditions. The issues of TDF as a supplemental fuel and its proper specifications are critical to the successful development of this fuel alternative. This paper will focus primarily on TDF`s use in a boiler type unit.

  6. Reactor Physics Characterization of the HTR Module with UCO Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Gerhard Strydom

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT The HTR Module [1] is a graphite-moderated, helium cooled pebble bed High Temperature Reactor (HTR) design that has been extensively used as a reference template for the former South African and current Chinese HTR [2] programs. This design utilized spherical fuel elements packed into a dynamic pebble bed, consisting of TRISO coated uranium oxide (UO2) fuel kernels with a U-235 enrichment of 7.8% and a Heavy Metal loading of 7 grams per pebble. The main objective of this study is to compare several important reactor physics and core design parameters for the HTR Module and an identical design utilizing UCO fuel kernels. Fuel kernels of this type are currently being tested in the Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as part of the larger Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. The PEBBED-THERMIX [3] code, which was developed specifically for the analysis of pebble bed HTRs, was used to compare the coupled neutronic and thermal fluid performance of the two designs.

  7. TRF1 negotiates TTAGGG repeat-associated replication problems by recruiting the BLM helicase and the TPP1/POT1 repressor of ATR signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zimmermann, Michal; Kibe, Tatsuya; Kabir, Shaheen

    2014-01-01

    The semiconservative replication of telomeres is facilitated by the shelterin component TRF1. Without TRF1, replication forks stall in the telomeric repeats, leading to ATR kinase signaling upon S-phase progression, fragile metaphase telomeres that resemble the common fragile sites (CFSs), and the association of sister telomeres. In contrast, TRF1 does not contribute significantly to the end protection functions of shelterin. We addressed the mechanism of TRF1 action using mouse conditional knockouts of BLM, TRF1, TPP1, and Rap1 in combination with expression of TRF1 and TIN2 mutants. The data establish that TRF1 binds BLM to facilitate lagging but not leading strand telomeric DNA synthesis. As the template for lagging strand telomeric DNA synthesis is the TTAGGG repeat strand, TRF1-bound BLM is likely required to remove secondary structures formed by these sequences. In addition, the data establish that TRF1 deploys TIN2 and the TPP1/POT1 heterodimers in shelterin to prevent ATR during telomere replication and repress the accompanying sister telomere associations. Thus, TRF1 uses two distinct mechanisms to promote replication of telomeric DNA and circumvent the consequences of replication stress. These data are relevant to the expression of CFSs and provide insights into TIN2, which is compromised in dyskeratosis congenita (DC) and related disorders. PMID:25344324

  8. Repair of a minimal DNA double-strand break by NHEJ requires DNA-PKcs and is controlled by the ATM/ATR checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Kühne, Christian; Tjörnhammar, Marie-Louise; Pongor, Sándor; Banks, Lawrence; Simoncsits, András

    2003-01-01

    Mammalian cells primarily rejoin DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by the non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway. The joining of the broken DNA ends appears directly without template and accuracy is ensured by the NHEJ factors that are under ATM/ATR regulated checkpoint control. In the current study we report the engineering of a mono-specific DNA damaging agent. This was used to study the molecular requirements for the repair of the least complex DSB in vivo. Single-chain PvuII restriction enzymes fused to protein delivery sequences transduce cells efficiently and induce blunt end DSBs in vivo. We demonstrate that beside XRCC4/LigaseIV and KU, the DNA-PK catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) is also essential for the joining of this low complex DSB in vivo. The appearance of blunt end 3′-hydroxyl and 5′-phosphate DNA DSBs induces a significantly higher frequency of anaphase bridges in cells that do not contain functional DNA-PKcs, suggesting an absolute requirement for DNA-PKcs in the control of chromosomal stability during end joining. Moreover, these minimal blunt end DSBs are sufficient to induce a p53 and ATM/ATR checkpoint function. PMID:14654698

  9. Evaluation of metformin hydrochloride in Wistar rats by FTIR-ATR spectroscopy: A convenient tool in the clinical study of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Ramalingam, P.; Reddy, Y. Padmanabha; Kumar, K. Vinod; Chandu, Babu Rao; Rajendran, K.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The IR absorption patterns (in cm−1) provide the basis to distinguish among the constituents and to separately quantify as well as qualify them and they possess many advantages such as very small sample volume requirement, good precision over entire physiological range, avoid of costly disposables, wealth of information from a single spectral measurement. The efficacy of anti-diabetic drug metformin hydrochloride as used to treat diabetic-induced Wistar rats and their sera were analyzed by FT-IR (ATR) in absorption mode. Materials and Methods: The present work was attempted in the study of normal and antidiabetic regimen-treated rat blood samples using FTIR spectroscopy by the attenuated total reflectance (ATR) sampling technique. The biomolecule characteristics were measured as intensity ratio parameter (IRP) values and interpreted. Results: To quantify the results three IRPs such as R1, R2 and R3 were calculated, respectively, for lipid, protein, and glucose. The glucose IRP value R3 showed, 0.3802, 0.3304, and 0.2847, respectively, for diseased, metformin-treated, and normal rats. Conclusion: The IRP values for glucose are compared to the glucose level obtained by using a glucometer. This study can be conveniently used in diagnostic procedures, patient compliance assessment, and efficacy evaluation of metformin hydrochlorides. PMID:25097400

  10. Genome Protection by the 9-1-1 Complex Subunit HUS1 Requires Clamp Formation, DNA Contacts, and ATR Signaling-independent Effector Functions.

    PubMed

    Lim, Pei Xin; Patel, Darshil R; Poisson, Kelsey E; Basuita, Manpreet; Tsai, Charlton; Lyndaker, Amy M; Hwang, Bor-Jang; Lu, A-Lien; Weiss, Robert S

    2015-06-12

    The RAD9A-HUS1-RAD1 (9-1-1) complex is a heterotrimeric clamp that promotes checkpoint signaling and repair at DNA damage sites. In this study, we elucidated HUS1 functional residues that drive clamp assembly, DNA interactions, and downstream effector functions. First, we mapped a HUS1-RAD9A interface residue that was critical for 9-1-1 assembly and DNA loading. Next, we identified multiple positively charged residues in the inner ring of HUS1 that were crucial for genotoxin-induced 9-1-1 chromatin localization and ATR signaling. Finally, we found two hydrophobic pockets on the HUS1 outer surface that were important for cell survival after DNA damage. Interestingly, these pockets were not required for 9-1-1 chromatin localization or ATR-mediated CHK1 activation but were necessary for interactions between HUS1 and its binding partner MYH, suggesting that they serve as interaction domains for the recruitment and coordination of downstream effectors at damage sites. Together, these results indicate that, once properly loaded onto damaged DNA, the 9-1-1 complex executes multiple, separable functions that promote genome maintenance. PMID:25911100

  11. Detection and quantification of soymilk in cow-buffalo milk using Attenuated Total Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR).

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Pranita; Jha, Shyam Narayan; Borah, Anjan; Gautam, Anuj; Grewal, Manpreet Kaur; Jindal, Gaurav

    2015-02-01

    Milk consumption is steadily increasing, especially in India and China, due to rising income. To bridge the gap between supply and demand, unscrupulous milk vendors add milk-like products from vegetable sources (soymilk) to milk without declaration. A rapid detection technique is required to enforce the safety norms of food regulatory authorities. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has demonstrated potential as a rapid quality monitoring method and was therefore explored for detection of soymilk in milk. In the present work, spectra of milk, soymilk (SM), and milk adulterated with known quantity of SM were acquired in the wave number range of 4000-500cm(-1) using Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR)-FTIR. The acquired spectra revealed differences amongst milk, SM and adulterated milk (AM) samples in the wave number range of 1680-1058cm(-1). This region encompasses the absorption frequency of amide-I, amide-II, amide-III, beta-sheet protein, α-tocopherol and Soybean Kunitz Trypsin Inhibitor. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed clustering of samples based on SM concentration at 5% level of significance and thus SM could be detected in milk using ATR-FTIR. The SM was best predicted in the range of 1472-1241cm(-1) using multiple linear regression with coefficient of determination (R(2)) of 0.99 and 0.92 for calibration and validation, respectively. PMID:25172681

  12. Sensing cocaine in saliva with attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy combined with a one-step extraction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hans, Kerstin M.-C.; Gianella, Michele; Sigrist, Markus W.

    2012-03-01

    On-site drug tests have gained importance, e.g., for protecting the society from impaired drivers. Since today's drug tests are majorly only positive/negative, there is a great need for a reliable, portable and preferentially quantitative drug test. In the project IrSens we aim to bridge this gap with the development of an optical sensor platform based on infrared spectroscopy and focus on cocaine detection in saliva. We combine a one-step extraction method, a sample drying technique and infrared attenuated total reflection (ATR) spectroscopy. As a first step we have developed an extraction technique that allows us to extract cocaine from saliva to an almost infrared-transparent solvent and to record ATR spectra with a commercially available Fourier Transform-infrared spectrometer. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time that such a simple and easy-to-use one-step extraction method is used to transfer cocaine from saliva into an organic solvent and detect it quantitatively. With this new method we are able to reach a current limit of detection around 10 μg/ml. This new extraction method could also be applied to waste water monitoring and controlling caffeine content in beverages.

  13. Genome Protection by the 9-1-1 Complex Subunit HUS1 Requires Clamp Formation, DNA Contacts, and ATR Signaling-independent Effector Functions*

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Pei Xin; Patel, Darshil R.; Poisson, Kelsey E.; Basuita, Manpreet; Tsai, Charlton; Lyndaker, Amy M.; Hwang, Bor-Jang; Lu, A-Lien; Weiss, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The RAD9A-HUS1-RAD1 (9-1-1) complex is a heterotrimeric clamp that promotes checkpoint signaling and repair at DNA damage sites. In this study, we elucidated HUS1 functional residues that drive clamp assembly, DNA interactions, and downstream effector functions. First, we mapped a HUS1-RAD9A interface residue that was critical for 9-1-1 assembly and DNA loading. Next, we identified multiple positively charged residues in the inner ring of HUS1 that were crucial for genotoxin-induced 9-1-1 chromatin localization and ATR signaling. Finally, we found two hydrophobic pockets on the HUS1 outer surface that were important for cell survival after DNA damage. Interestingly, these pockets were not required for 9-1-1 chromatin localization or ATR-mediated CHK1 activation but were necessary for interactions between HUS1 and its binding partner MYH, suggesting that they serve as interaction domains for the recruitment and coordination of downstream effectors at damage sites. Together, these results indicate that, once properly loaded onto damaged DNA, the 9-1-1 complex executes multiple, separable functions that promote genome maintenance. PMID:25911100

  14. De novo truncation of chromosome 16p and healing with (TTAGGG)[sub n] in the [alpha]-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome (ATR-16)

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, J.; Harris, P.C.; Wood, W.G.; Higgs, D.R. ); Wilkie, A.O.M. ); Dauwerse, J.G. )

    1993-04-01

    The authors have previously described a series of patients in whom the deletion of 1--2 megabases (Mb) of DNA from the tip of the short arm of chromosome 16 (band 16p13.3) is associated with [alpha]-thalassemia/mental retardation syndrome (ATR-16). They now show that one of these patients has a de novo truncation of the terminal 2 Mb of chromosome 16p and that telomeric sequence (TTAGGG)[sub n] has been added at the site of breakage. This suggests that the chromosomal break, which is paternal in origin and which probably arose at meiosis, has been stabilized in vivo by the direct addition of the telomeric sequence. Sequence comparisons of this breakpoint with that of a previously described chromosomal truncation ([alpha][alpha][sup TI]) do not reveal extensive sequence homology. However, both breakpoints show minimal complementarity (3--4 bp) to the proposed RNA template of human telomerase at the site at which telomere repeats have been added. Unlike previously characterized individuals with ATR-16, the clinical features of this patient appear to be solely due to monosomy for the terminal portion of 16p13.3. The identification of further patients with [open quotes]pure[close quotes] monosomy for the tip of chromosome 16p will be important for defining the loci contributing to the phenotype of this syndrome. 33 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Targeting Poly (ADP-Ribose) Polymerase and the c-Myb-TopBP1-ATR-Chk1 Signaling Pathway in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Likun; Chang, Wenjun; Yang, Guang; Ren, Chengzhen; Park, Sanghee; Karantanos, Theodoros; Karanika, Styliani; Wang, Jianxiang; Yin, Jianhua; Shah, Parantu K.; Takahiro, Hirayama; Dobashi, Masato; Zhang, Wenling; Efstathiou, Eleni; Maity, Sankar N.; Aparicio, Ana M.; Tapia, Elsa M Li Ning; Troncoso, Patricia; Broom, Bradley; Xiao, Lianchun; Lee, Hyun-Sung; Lee, Ju-Seog; Corn, Paul G.; Navone, Nora; Thompson, Timothy C.

    2014-01-01

    Androgen deprivation is the standard systemic treatment for advanced prostate cancer (PCa), but most patients ultimately develop castration-resistance. We show here that MYB is transcriptionally activated by androgen deprivation or impairment of androgen receptor (AR) signaling. MYB gene silencing significantly inhibited PCa growth in vitro and in vivo. Microarray data revealed that c-Myb shares a substantial subset of DNA damage response (DDR) target genes with AR, suggesting that c-Myb may replace AR for the dominant role in the regulation of their common DDR target genes in AR inhibition-resistant or AR-negative PCa. Gene signatures comprising AR, MYB, and their common DDR target genes are significantly correlated with metastasis, castration-resistance, recurrence, and shorter overall survival in PCa patients. We demonstrated in vitro that silencing of MYB, BRCA1 or TOPBP1 synergized with poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor olaparib (OLA) to increase cytotoxicity to PCa cells. We further demonstrated that targeting the c-Myb-TopBP1-ATR-Chk1 pathway by using the Chk1 inhibitor AZD7762 synergizes with OLA to increase PCa cytotoxicity. Our results reveal new mechanism-based therapeutic approaches for PCa by targeting PARP and the c-Myb-TopBP1-ATR-Chk1 pathway. PMID:24847116

  16. Development of a rapid Buffer-exchange system for time-resolved ATR-FTIR spectroscopy with the step-scan mode

    PubMed Central

    Furutani, Yuji; Kimura, Tetsunari; Okamoto, Kido

    2013-01-01

    Attenuated total reflectance (ATR)-FTIR spectroscopy has been widely used to probe protein structural changes under various stimuli, such as light absorption, voltage change, and ligand binding, in aqueous conditions. Time-resolved measurements require a trigger, which can be controlled electronically; therefore, light and voltage changes are suitable. Here we developed a novel, rapid buffer-exchange system for time-resolved ATR-FTIR spectroscopy to monitor the ligand- or ion-binding re-action of a protein. By using the step-scan mode (time resolution; 2.5 ms), we confirmed the completion of the buffer-exchange reaction within ∼25 ms; the process was monitored by the infrared absorption change of a nitrate band at 1,350 cm−1. We also demonstrated the anion-binding reaction of a membrane protein, Natronomonas pharaonis halorhodopsin (pHR), which binds a chloride ion in the initial anion-binding site near the retinal chromophore. The formation of chloride- or nitrate-bound pHR was confirmed by an increase of the retinal absorption band at 1,528 cm−1. It also should be noted that low sample consumption (∼1 µg of protein) makes this new method a powerful technique to understand ligand–protein and ion–protein interactions, particularly for membrane proteins. PMID:27493550

  17. Preliminary Results of an On-Line, Multi-Spectrometer Fission Product Monitoring System to Support Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Testing and Qualification in the Advanced Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn M. Scates; John K. Hartwell; John B. Walter; Mark W. Drigert

    2007-10-01

    The Advanced Gas Reactor -1 (AGR-1) experiment is the first experiment in a series of eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide (UCO) tri-isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments scheduled for placement in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The experiment began irradiation in the ATR with a cycle that reached full power on December 26, 2006 and will continue irradiation for about 2.5 years. During this time six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The goals of the irradiation experiment is to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. This paper presents the preliminary test details of the fuel performance, as measured by the control and acquisition software.

  18. Alternative jet aircraft fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J.

    1979-01-01

    Potential changes in jet aircraft fuel specifications due to shifts in supply and quality of refinery feedstocks are discussed with emphasis on the effects these changes would have on the performance and durability of aircraft engines and fuel systems. Combustion characteristics, fuel thermal stability, and fuel pumpability at low temperature are among the factors considered. Combustor and fuel system technology needs for broad specification fuels are reviewed including prevention of fuel system fouling and fuel system technology for fuels with higher freezing points.

  19. Microstructural Characterization of the U-9.1Mo Fuel/AA6061 Cladding Interface in Friction-Bonded Monolithic Fuel Plates Irradiated in the RERTR-6 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Keiser, Dennis D.; Jue, Jan-Fong; Miller, Brandon; Gan, Jian; Robinson, Adam; Medvedev, Pavel; Madden, James; Wachs, Dan; Clark, Curtis; Meyer, Mitch

    2015-09-01

    Low-enrichment (U-235 < 20%) U-Mo monolithic fuel is being developed for use in research and test reactors. The earliest design for this fuel that was investigated via reactor testing was comprised of a nominally U-10Mo fuel foil encased in AA6061 (Al-6061) cladding. For a fuel design to be deemed adequate for final use in a reactor, it must maintain dimensional stability and retain fission products throughout irradiation, which means that there must be good integrity at the fuel foil/cladding interface. To investigate the nature of the fuel/cladding interface for this fuel type after irradiation, fuel plates that were tested in INL's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) were subsequently characterized using optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Results of this characterization showed that the fuel/cladding interaction layers present at the U-Mo fuel/AA6061 cladding interface after fabrication became amorphous during irradiation. Up to two main interaction layers, based on composition, could be found at the fuel/cladding interface, depending on location. After irradiation, an Al-rich layer contained very few fission gas bubbles, but did exhibit Xe enrichment near the AA6061 cladding interface. Another layer, which contained more Si, had more observable fission gas bubbles. Adjacent to the AA6061 cladding were Mg-rich precipitates, which was in close proximity to the region where Xe is observed to be enriched. In samples produced using a focused ion beam at the interaction zone/AA6061 cladding interface were possible indications of porosity/debonding, which suggested that the interface in this location is relatively weak.

  20. Microstructural Characterization of the U-9.1Mo Fuel/AA6061 Cladding Interface in Friction-Bonded Monolithic Fuel Plates Irradiated in the RERTR-6 Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiser, Dennis D.; Jue, Jan-Fong; Miller, Brandon; Gan, Jian; Robinson, Adam; Medvedev, Pavel; Madden, James; Wachs, Dan; Clark, Curtis; Meyer, Mitch

    2015-09-01

    Low-enrichment (235U < 20 pct) U-Mo monolithic fuel is being developed for use in research and test reactors. The earliest design for this fuel that was investigated via reactor testing consisted of a nominally U-10Mo fuel foil encased in AA6061 (Al-6061) cladding. For a fuel design to be deemed adequate for final use in a reactor, it must maintain dimensional stability and retain fission products throughout irradiation, which means that there must be good integrity at the fuel foil/cladding interface. To investigate the nature of the fuel/cladding interface for this fuel type after irradiation, fuel plates were fabricated using a friction bonding process, tested in INL's advanced test reactor (ATR), and then subsequently characterized using optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Results of this characterization showed that the fuel/cladding interaction layers present at the U-Mo fuel/AA6061 cladding interface after fabrication became amorphous during irradiation. Up to two main interaction layers, based on composition, could be found at the fuel/cladding interface, depending on location. After irradiation, an Al-rich layer contained very few fission gas bubbles, but did exhibit Xe enrichment near the AA6061 cladding interface. Another layer, which contained more Si, had more observable fission gas bubbles. In the samples produced using a focused ion beam at the interaction zone/AA6061 cladding interface, possible indications of porosity/debonding were found, which suggested that the interface in this location is relatively weak.

  1. FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Fortescue, P.; Zumwalt, L.R.

    1961-11-28

    A fuel element was developed for a gas cooled nuclear reactor. The element is constructed in the form of a compacted fuel slug including carbides of fissionable material in some cases with a breeder material carbide and a moderator which slug is disposed in a canning jacket of relatively impermeable moderator material. Such canned fuel slugs are disposed in an elongated shell of moderator having greater gas permeability than the canning material wherefore application of reduced pressure to the space therebetween causes gas diffusing through the exterior shell to sweep fission products from the system. Integral fission product traps and/or exterior traps as well as a fission product monitoring system may be employed therewith. (AEC)

  2. Fuel compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Zaweski, E.F.; Niebylski, L.M.

    1986-09-23

    This patent describes a distillate fuel for indirect injection compression ignition engines containing at least the combination of (i) organic nitrate ignition accelerator, and (ii) an additive selected from the group consisting of alkenyl substituted succinimide, alkenyl substituted succinamide and mixtures thereof. The alkenyl substituent contains about 12-36 carbon atoms, the additive being made by the process comprising (a) isomerizing the double bond of an ..cap alpha..-olefin containing about 12-36 carbon atoms to obtain a mixture of internal olefins, (b) reacting the mixture of internal olefins with maleic acid, anhydride or ester to obtain an intermediate alkenyl substituted succinic acid, anhydride or ester, and (c) reacting the intermediate with ammonia to form a succinimide, succinamide or mixture thereof. The combination is present in an amount sufficient to minimize the coking characteristics of such fuel, especially throttling nozzle coking in the prechambers or swirl chambers of indirect injection compression ignition engines operated on such fuel.

  3. Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Grimble, R.E.

    1988-03-08

    Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream 1 and spent fuel stream 2. Spent fuel stream 1 is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream 1 and exhaust stream 2, and exhaust stream 1 is vented. Exhaust stream 2 is mixed with spent fuel stream 2 to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells. 1 fig.

  4. Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Grimble, Ralph E.

    1988-01-01

    Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream I and spent fuel stream II. Spent fuel stream I is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream I and exhaust stream II, and exhaust stream I is vented. Exhaust stream II is mixed with spent fuel stream II to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells.

  5. FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Howard, R.C.; Bokros, J.C.

    1962-03-01

    A fueled matrlx eontnwinlng uncomblned carbon is deslgned for use in graphlte-moderated gas-cooled reactors designed for operatlon at temperatures (about 1500 deg F) at which conventional metallic cladding would ordlnarily undergo undesired carburization or physical degeneratlon. - The invention comprlses, broadly a fuel body containlng uncombined earbon, clad with a nickel alloy contalning over about 28 percent by' weight copper in the preferred embodlment. Thls element ls supporirted in the passageways in close tolerance with the walls of unclad graphite moderator materlal. (AEC)

  6. Preliminary Assessment of ATR-C Capabilities to Provide Integral Benchmark Data for Key Structural/Matrix Materials that May be Used for Nuclear Data Testing and Analytical Methods Validation

    SciTech Connect

    John D. Bess

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to identify some suggested types of experiments that can be performed in the Advanced Test Reactor Critical (ATR-C) facility. A fundamental computational investigation is provided to demonstrate possible integration of experimental activities in the ATR-C with the development of benchmark experiments. Criticality benchmarks performed in the ATR-C could provide integral data for key matrix and structural materials used in nuclear systems. Results would then be utilized in the improvement of nuclear data libraries and as a means for analytical methods validation. It is proposed that experiments consisting of well-characterized quantities of materials be placed in the Northwest flux trap position of the ATR-C. The reactivity worth of the material could be determined and computationally analyzed through comprehensive benchmark activities including uncertainty analyses. Experiments were modeled in the available benchmark model of the ATR using MCNP5 with the ENDF/B-VII.0 cross section library. A single bar (9.5 cm long, 0.5 cm wide, and 121.92 cm high) of each material could provide sufficient reactivity difference in the core geometry for computational modeling and analysis. However, to provide increased opportunity for the validation of computational models, additional bars of material placed in the flux trap would increase the effective reactivity up to a limit of 1$ insertion. For simplicity in assembly manufacture, approximately four bars of material could provide a means for additional experimental benchmark configurations, except in the case of strong neutron absorbers and many materials providing positive reactivity. Future tasks include the cost analysis and development of the experimental assemblies, including means for the characterization of the neutron flux and spectral indices. Oscillation techniques may also serve to provide additional means for experimentation and validation of computational methods and acquisition of

  7. As-Run Thermal Analysis of the GTL-1 Experiment Irradiated in the ATR South Flux Trap

    SciTech Connect

    Donna P. Guillen

    2011-05-01

    The GTL-1 experiment was conducted to assess corrosion the performance of the proposed Boosted Fast Flux Loop booster fuel at heat flux levels {approx}30% above the design operating condition. Sixteen miniplates fabricated from 25% enriched, high-density U3Si2/Al dispersion fuel with 6061 aluminum cladding were subjected to peak beginning of cycle (BOC) heat fluxes ranging from 411 W/cm2 to 593 W/cm2. Miniplates fabricated with three different fuel variations (without fines, annealed, and with standard powder) performed equally well, with negligible irradiation-induced swelling and a normal fission density gradient. Both the standard and the modified prefilm procedures produced hydroxide films that adequately protected the miniplates from failure. A detailed finite element model was constructed to calculate temperatures and heat flux for an as-run cycle average effective south lobe power of 25.4 MW(t). Results of the thermal analysis are given at four times during the cycle: BOC at 0 effective full power days (EFPD), middle of cycle (MOC) at 18 EFPD, MOC at 36 EFPD, and end of cycle at 48.9 EFPD. The highest temperatures and heat fluxes occur at the BOC and decrease in a linear manner throughout the cycle. Miniplate heat flux levels and fuel, cladding, hydroxide, and coolant-hydroxide interface temperatures were calculated using the average measured hydroxide thickness on each miniplate. The hydroxide layers are the largest on miniplates nearest to the core midplane, where heat flux and temperature are highest. The hydroxide layer thickness averages 20.4 {mu}m on the six hottest miniplates (B3, B4, C1, C2, C3, and C4). This tends to exacerbate the heating of these miniplates, since a thicker hydroxide layer reduces the heat transfer from the fuel to the coolant. These six hottest miniplates have the following thermal characteristics at BOC: (1) Peak fuel centerline temperature >300 C; (2) Peak cladding temperature >200 C; (3) Peak hydroxide temperature >190 C; (4

  8. Microlith catalytic reactors for reforming iso-octane-based fuels into hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roychoudhury, Subir; Castaldi, Marco; Lyubovsky, Maxim; LaPierre, Rene; Ahmed, Shabbir

    Recent advances in the development of short contact time (SCT) reactor design approaches allow reformers capable of overcoming current barriers of cost, size, weight, complexity and efficiency associated with conventional reactor design approaches. PCI has developed an SCT based approach using a patented substrate (trademarked Microlith ®) and proprietary coating technology [1]. The high heat and mass transport properties of the substrate have been shown to significantly reduce reactor size while improving performance. Resistance to coking, especially at low H 2O:C ratios, has also been observed with these reactors. This paper summarizes the results of auto thermal reforming (ATR) of an iso-octane-based liquid fuel. In addition Microlith-based water gas shift (WGS) and preferential CO oxidation (PROX) reactors were also examined for fuel processing applications. Surprisingly, selectivity advantages for these kinetically controlled reactions were observed [2]. Examples described here include low methanation selectivity in WGS applications and large operating windows for PROX at very high space velocities. A complete reformer system with Microlith ATR, WGS and PROX reactors has been identified. Sensitivity of system size with regard to steam:carbon ratios, and the resulting implications for reactor/heat exchanger sizes were documented and a compact system identified.

  9. Enhanced Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Element for the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, M. A.; DeHart, M. D.; Morrell, S. R.; Jamison, R. K.; Nef, E. C.; Nigg, D. W.

    2015-03-01

    Under the current US Department of Energy (DOE) policy and planning scenario, the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and its associated critical facility (ATRC) will be reconfigured to operate on low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This effort has produced a conceptual design for an Enhanced LEU Fuel (ELF) element. This fuel features monolithic U-10Mo fuel foils and aluminum cladding separated by a thin zirconium barrier. As with previous iterations of the ELF design, radial power peaking is managed using different U-10Mo foil thicknesses in different plates of the element. The lead fuel element design, ELF Mk1A, features only three fuel meat thicknesses, a reduction from the previous iterations meant to simplify manufacturing. Evaluation of the ELF Mk1A fuel design against reactor performance requirements is ongoing, as are investigations of the impact of manufacturing uncertainty on safety margins. The element design has been evaluated in what are expected to be the most demanding design basis accident scenarios and has met all initial thermal-hydraulic criteria.

  10. Compaction Scale Up and Optimization of Cylindrical Fuel Compacts for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey J. Einerson; Jeffrey A. Phillips; Eric L. Shaber; Scott E. Niedzialek; W. Clay Richardson; Scott G. Nagley

    2012-10-01

    Multiple process approaches have been used historically to manufacture cylindrical nuclear fuel compacts. Scale-up of fuel compacting was required for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project to achieve an economically viable automated production process capable of providing a minimum of 10 compacts/minute with high production yields. In addition, the scale-up effort was required to achieve matrix density equivalent to baseline historical production processes, and allow compacting at fuel packing fractions up to 46% by volume. The scale-up approach of jet milling, fluid-bed overcoating, and hot-press compacting adopted in the U.S. Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development Program involves significant paradigm shifts to capitalize on distinct advantages in simplicity, yield, and elimination of mixed waste. A series of designed experiments have been completed to optimize compaction conditions of time, temperature, and forming pressure using natural uranium oxycarbide (NUCO) fuel. Results from these experiments are included. The scale-up effort is nearing completion with the process installed and operational using nuclear fuel materials. The process is being certified for manufacture of qualification test fuel compacts for the AGR-5/6/7 experiment at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL).

  11. Fuels characterization studies. [jet fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seng, G. T.; Antoine, A. C.; Flores, F. J.

    1980-01-01

    Current analytical techniques used in the characterization of broadened properties fuels are briefly described. Included are liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. High performance liquid chromatographic ground-type methods development is being approached from several directions, including aromatic fraction standards development and the elimination of standards through removal or partial removal of the alkene and aromatic fractions or through the use of whole fuel refractive index values. More sensitive methods for alkene determinations using an ultraviolet-visible detector are also being pursued. Some of the more successful gas chromatographic physical property determinations for petroleum derived fuels are the distillation curve (simulated distillation), heat of combustion, hydrogen content, API gravity, viscosity, flash point, and (to a lesser extent) freezing point.

  12. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant/Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    S. Blaine Grover

    2009-09-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006, and the second experiment (AGR-2) is currently in the design phase. The design of test trains, as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation will be discussed. In

  13. Nuclear Fuels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, J. Thomas

    1983-01-01

    Trends in and factors related to the nuclear industry and nuclear fuel production are discussed. Topics addressed include nuclear reactors, survival of the U.S. uranium industry, production costs, budget cuts by the Department of Energy and U.S. Geological survey for resource studies, mining, and research/development activities. (JN)

  14. Future Fuel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stover, Del

    1991-01-01

    Tough new environmental laws, coupled with fluctuating oil prices, are likely to prompt hundreds of school systems to examine alternative fuels. Literature reviews and interviews with 45 government, education, and industry officials provided data for a comparative analysis of gasoline, diesel, natural gas, methanol, and propane. (MLF)

  15. Alcohol fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    The API publication 4312 reports a detailed study carried out by Battelle on the energy balances for five alcohol-fuel-producing technologies. The results indicate that processes for producing ethanol from corn are net consumers of energy while ethanol from sugar cane and methanol from wood are net energy producers.

  16. Fuel Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, M. D.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the theories, construction, operation, types, and advantages of fuel cells developed by the American space programs. Indicates that the cell is an ideal small-scale power source characterized by its compactness, high efficiency, reliability, and freedom from polluting fumes. (CC)

  17. Electrochemical and spectroscopic studies of fuel cell reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Minhua

    Fuel cells, especially proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are expected soon to become a major source of clean energy. However, the sluggish kinetics of the fuel cell reactions, i.e., the fuel oxidation and oxygen reduction, hinders the wide-spread application of PEMFCs. These problems prompted our studies to focus on elucidating the nature of the reaction intermediates during the oxidation of fuels and the reduction of oxygen on electrocatalysts, and understanding the mechanisms of these reactions. The results from these studies will provide basic information for designing new electrocatalysts. In this dissertation, the oxidation reactions of ethanol and dimethyl ether (DME) on Pt were investigated by the surface enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy with an attenuated total reflection configuration (ATR-SEIRAS). Various reaction intermediates were detected and their electrochemical behaviors were studied. We also benefited from advantages of the ATR-SEIRAS technique and observed superoxide anion (O2-) and hydrogen peroxide anion (H2-) as the intermediates in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on Pt and Au electrodes for the first time. The other main goal of this study is design of new electrocatalysts for ORR with low cost and high activity. Two novel electrocatalysts were developed. One is Pt monolayer electrocatalysts consisting of a Pt monolayer formed by a red-ox replacement of the Cu monolayer by Pt atoms on non-noble metal-noble metal core-shell nanoparticles. In such catalyst, the total noble mass activity of the catalyst was 2--6 times larger that of commercial Pt catalyst. Another way of lowering the cost of catalysts and enhancing the ORR activity involves alloying less expensive noble metals with other non-noble elements. In this dissertation, the nano-structured Pd based alloy electrocatalysts have been explored. The results showed that their ORR activities surpass that of commercial Pt. The density functional theory (DFT) calculations

  18. Fuel issues for fuel cell vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Borroni-Bird, C.E.

    1995-12-31

    In the near-term, infrastructure and energy density concerns dictate that the most appropriate fuel for a light-duty fuel cell vehicle is probably not hydrogen; there are also several concerns with using methanol, the generally accepted most convenient fuel. In order to accelerate fuel cell commercialization it may be necessary to use petroleum-based fuels and on-board fuel processors. In the near-term, this approach may reduce fuel cell system efficiency to a level comparable with advanced diesel engines but in the long-term fuel cells powered by hydrogen should be the most efficient and cleanest of all automotive powertrains.

  19. Fuel cells: A handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, K.; McLarnon, F. R.; Cairns, E. J.

    1988-05-01

    The purpose of this handbook is to present information describing fuel cells that is helpful to scientists, engineers, and technical managers who are not experienced in this technology, as well as to provide an update on the current technical status of the various types of fuel cells. Following the introduction, contents of this handbook are: fuel cell performance variables; phosphoric acid fuel cell; molten carbonate fuel cell; solid oxide fuel cell; alternative fuel cell technologies; fuel cell systems; and concluding remarks.

  20. Supplemental fuel vapor system

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, P.M.

    1991-01-08

    This patent describes a supplemental fuel system utilizing fuel vapor. It comprises: an internal combustion engine including a carburetor and an intake manifold; a fuel tank provided with air vents; a fuel conduit having a first end connected to the fuel tank and in communication with liquid fuel in the tank and a second end connected to the carburetor; the fuel conduit delivering the liquid fuel to the carburetor from the fuel tank; a fuel vapor conduit having a first end connected to the fuel tank at a location displaced from contact with the liquid fuel and a second end connected to a carbon canister; a PCV conduit having a first end connected to a pollution control valve and a second end connected to the intake manifold; and, an intermediate fuel vapor conduit having a first end connected to the fuel vapor conduit and a second end connected to the PCV conduit; wherein the air vents continuously provide air to the tank to mix with the liquid fuel and form fuel vapor. The fuel vapor drawn from the fuel tank by vacuum developed in the intake manifold and flows through the fuel vapor conduit. The intermediate fuel vapor conduit and the intake manifold to combustion chambers of the internal combustion engine so as to supplement fuel delivered to the engine by the fuel conduit. The liquid fuel and the fuel vapor constantly delivered to the engine during normal operation.