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Sample records for attitude control method

  1. Method for controlling a vehicle attitude

    SciTech Connect

    Ise, K.; Minegishi, H.; Harada, H.

    1989-02-14

    This patent describes a method for controlling a suspension characteristic of a vehicle comprising the steps of: detecting a slippage of the one drive wheel of the vehicle; determining whether or not the detected slippage is greater than a reference value; controlling a drive force of the drive wheel by means of the braking system when the slippage is determined to be greater than the reference value; and altering an original state suspension characteristic of at least the drive wheel to a harder state when the slippage is determined to be greater than the reference value.

  2. ISS Contingency Attitude Control Recovery Method for Loss of Automatic Thruster Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedrossian, Nazareth; Bhatt, Sagar; Alaniz, Abran; McCants, Edward; Nguyen, Louis; Chamitoff, Greg

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the attitude control issues associated with International Space Station (ISS) loss of automatic thruster control capability are discussed and methods for attitude control recovery are presented. This scenario was experienced recently during Shuttle mission STS-117 and ISS Stage 13A in June 2007 when the Russian GN&C computers, which command the ISS thrusters, failed. Without automatic propulsive attitude control, the ISS would not be able to regain attitude control after the Orbiter undocked. The core issues associated with recovering long-term attitude control using CMGs are described as well as the systems engineering analysis to identify recovery options. It is shown that the recovery method can be separated into a procedure for rate damping to a safe harbor gravity gradient stable orientation and a capability to maneuver the vehicle to the necessary initial conditions for long term attitude hold. A manual control option using Soyuz and Progress vehicle thrusters is investigated for rate damping and maneuvers. The issues with implementing such an option are presented and the key issue of closed-loop stability is addressed. A new non-propulsive alternative to thruster control, Zero Propellant Maneuver (ZPM) attitude control method is introduced and its rate damping and maneuver performance evaluated. It is shown that ZPM can meet the tight attitude and rate error tolerances needed for long term attitude control. A combination of manual thruster rate damping to a safe harbor attitude followed by a ZPM to Stage long term attitude control orientation was selected by the Anomaly Resolution Team as the alternate attitude control method for such a contingency.

  3. Students' Attitudes towards Control Methods in Computer-Assisted Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hintze, Hanne; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes study designed to investigate dental students' attitudes toward computer-assisted teaching as applied in programs for oral radiology in Denmark. Programs using personal computers and slide projectors with varying degrees of learner and teacher control are described, and differences in attitudes between male and female students are…

  4. Spacecraft methods and structures with enhanced attitude control that facilitates gyroscope substitutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Rongsheng (Inventor); Kurland, Jeffrey A. (Inventor); Dawson, Alec M. (Inventor); Wu, Yeong-Wei A. (Inventor); Uetrecht, David S. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Methods and structures are provided that enhance attitude control during gyroscope substitutions by insuring that a spacecraft's attitude control system does not drive its absolute-attitude sensors out of their capture ranges. In a method embodiment, an operational process-noise covariance Q of a Kalman filter is temporarily replaced with a substantially greater interim process-noise covariance Q. This replacement increases the weight given to the most recent attitude measurements and hastens the reduction of attitude errors and gyroscope bias errors. The error effect of the substituted gyroscopes is reduced and the absolute-attitude sensors are not driven out of their capture range. In another method embodiment, this replacement is preceded by the temporary replacement of an operational measurement-noise variance R with a substantially larger interim measurement-noise variance R to reduce transients during the gyroscope substitutions.

  5. Attitude Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract to ITHACO, Inc. satisfied a Goddard Space Flight Center demand for a low cost altitude control system for small spacecraft. The SBIR-sponsored work resulted in the T-Wheel, built specifically for altitude control of small and medium-sized spacecraft. Another product, the T-SCANWHEEL, reduces overall system cost, minimizes mass and power and enhances reliability with a mixture of altitude control and control capacity. Additionally, the Type E Wheel is built for use on medium to large spacecraft. Through July 1996, ITHACO had delivered or was under contract for 95 T-Wheel, T-SCANWHEEL, and Type E Wheel units.

  6. Spacecraft Attitude Determination Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This document is presentation in viewgraph form, which outlines the methods of determining spacecraft attitude. The presentation reviews several parameterizations relating to spacecraft attitude, such as Euler's Theorem, Rodriques parameters, and Euler-Rodriques parameters or Quaternion. Onboard attitude determination is the norm, using either single frame or filtering methods. The presentation reviews several mathematical representations of attitude. The mechanisms for determining attitude on board the Hubble Space Telescope, the Tropical Rainfall and Measuring Mission and the Solar Anomalous and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer are reviewed. Wahba's problem, Procrustes Problem, and some solutions are also summarized.

  7. Modular design attitude control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chichester, F. D.

    1982-01-01

    A hybrid multilevel linear quadratic regulator (ML-LQR) approach was developed and applied to the attitude control of models of the rotational dynamics of a prototype flexible spacecraft and of a typical space platform. Three axis rigid body flexible suspension models were developed for both the spacecraft and the space platform utilizing augmented body methods. Models of the spacecraft with hybrid ML-LQR attitude control and with LQR attitude control were simulated and their response with the two different types of control were compared.

  8. Attitude control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vonpragenau, G. L.; Rupp, C. C. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An attitude control system is described in which angular rate signals are generated by rate gyros mounted closely adjacent to gimbaled engines at the rear of a vehicle. Error signals representative of a commanded change in vehicle angle or attitude are obtained from a precision inertial platform located in the nose region of the vehicle. The rate gyro derived signals dominate at high frequencies where dynamic effects become significant, and platform signals dominate at low frequencies where precision signals are required for a steady vehicle attitude. The blended signals are applied in a conventional manner to control the gimbaling of vehicle engines about control axes.

  9. Spacecraft attitude control systems with dynamic methods and structures for processing star tracker signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yong (Inventor); Wu, Yeong-Wei Andy (Inventor); Li, Rongsheng (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Methods are provided for dynamically processing successively-generated star tracker data frames and associated valid flags to generate processed star tracker signals that have reduced noise and a probability greater than a selected probability P.sub.slctd of being valid. These methods maintain accurate spacecraft attitude control in the presence of spurious inputs (e.g., impinging protons) that corrupt collected charges in spacecraft star trackers. The methods of the invention enhance the probability of generating valid star tracker signals because they respond to a current frame probability P.sub.frm by dynamically selecting the largest valid frame combination whose combination probability P.sub.cmb satisfies a selected probability P.sub.slctd. Noise is thus reduced while the probability of finding a valid frame combination is enhanced. Spacecraft structures are also provided for practicing the methods of the invention.

  10. Satellite attitude control simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debra, D. B.; Powell, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    Work was conducted to develop an extremely low drift rate gyroscope and a very precise star tracker. A proposed relativity satellite will measure very accurately the theoretically predicted 'relativistic' precession of the gyroscope relative to an inertial reference frame provided by the star tracker. Aspects of precision spinning attitude control are discussed together with questions of gyro operation, and the hopping mode for lunar transportation. For the attitude control system of the lunar hopper, a number of control laws were investigated. The studies indicated that some suboptimal controls should be adequate for the system.

  11. Instrument Attitude Precision Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan

    2004-01-01

    A novel approach is presented in this paper to analyze attitude precision and control for an instrument gimbaled to a spacecraft subject to an internal disturbance caused by a moving component inside the instrument. Nonlinear differential equations of motion for some sample cases are derived and solved analytically to gain insight into the influence of the disturbance on the attitude pointing error. A simple control law is developed to eliminate the instrument pointing error caused by the internal disturbance. Several cases are presented to demonstrate and verify the concept presented in this paper.

  12. Nonlinear spacecraft`s gyromoment attitude control

    SciTech Connect

    Somov, Y.I.

    1994-12-31

    Nonlinear methods of attitude control for spacecraft`s spatial rotation maneuvers through the use of gyrodynes - single gimbal control moment gyroscopes - are developed. We present new results on optimizing and dynamic synthesis of the nonlinear gyromoment attitude control system for a fast-manoeuvring spacecraft with a minimum-excessive scheme of gyrodynes.

  13. Nonlinear Attitude Filtering Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis; Crassidis, John L.; Cheng, Yang

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides a survey of modern nonlinear filtering methods for attitude estimation. Early applications relied mostly on the extended Kalman filter for attitude estimation. Since these applications, several new approaches have been developed that have proven to be superior to the extended Kalman filter. Several of these approaches maintain the basic structure of the extended Kalman filter, but employ various modifications in order to provide better convergence or improve other performance characteristics. Examples of such approaches include: filter QUEST, extended QUEST, the super-iterated extended Kalman filter, the interlaced extended Kalman filter, and the second-order Kalman filter. Filters that propagate and update a discrete set of sigma points rather than using linearized equations for the mean and covariance are also reviewed. A two-step approach is discussed with a first-step state that linearizes the measurement model and an iterative second step to recover the desired attitude states. These approaches are all based on the Gaussian assumption that the probability density function is adequately specified by its mean and covariance. Other approaches that do not require this assumption are reviewed, including particle filters and a Bayesian filter based on a non-Gaussian, finite-parameter probability density function on SO(3). Finally, the predictive filter, nonlinear observers and adaptive approaches are shown. The strengths and weaknesses of the various approaches are discussed.

  14. The attitude control problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, John Ting-Yung; Kreutz-Delgado, Kenneth

    1991-01-01

    A general framework for the analysis of the attitude tracking control problem for a rigid body is presented. A large family of globally stable control laws is obtained by using the globally nonsingular unit quaternion representation in a Lyapunov function candidate whose form is motivated by the consideration of the total energy of the rigid body. The controllers share the common structure of a proportional-derivative feedback plus some feedforward which can be zero (the model-independent case), the Coriolis torque compensation, or an adaptive compensation. These controller structures are compared in terms of the requirement on the a priori model information, guaranteed transient performance, and robustness. The global stability of the Luh-Walker-Paul robot end-effector controller is also analyzed in this framework.

  15. Adaptive mass expulsion attitude control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodden, John J. (Inventor); Stevens, Homer D. (Inventor); Carrou, Stephane (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An attitude control system and method operative with a thruster controls the attitude of a vehicle carrying the thruster, wherein the thruster has a valve enabling the formation of pulses of expelled gas from a source of compressed gas. Data of the attitude of the vehicle is gathered, wherein the vehicle is located within a force field tending to orient the vehicle in a first attitude different from a desired attitude. The attitude data is evaluated to determine a pattern of values of attitude of the vehicle in response to the gas pulses of the thruster and in response to the force field. The system and the method maintain the attitude within a predetermined band of values of attitude which includes the desired attitude. Computation circuitry establishes an optimal duration of each of the gas pulses based on the pattern of values of attitude, the optimal duration providing for a minimal number of opening and closure operations of the valve. The thruster is operated to provide gas pulses having the optimal duration.

  16. Torque equilibrium attitude control for Skylab reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaese, J. R.; Kennel, H. F.

    1980-01-01

    The method of torque equilibrium attitude control used to control the reentry of Skylab to an altitude below 150 km without the use of thruster fuel once the attitude was established is discussed. The Skylab attitude and pointing control system, which included rate gyros, sun sensors, star tracker, the Apollo telescope mount digital computer, control moment gyros and cold-gas attitude thrusters, is presented. The 12 torque equilibrium attitudes found at which aerodynamic, gravity gradient and gyroscopic torques would balance are indicated, and the three of those at which the solar power supply would be adequate for attitude control are illustrated. The equilibrium seeking method employed is then examined, and the operation and performance of the torque equilibrium attitude control system during the three weeks prior to Skylab reentry are discussed. It is concluded that the torque equilibrium attitude control method developed for Skylab was successful in performing its assigned mission, and will be valuable for the design of future, low-altitude spacecraft or tethered vehicles.

  17. MERCATOR: Methods and Realization for Control of the Attitude and the Orbit of spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tavernier, Gilles; Campan, Genevieve

    1993-01-01

    Since 1974, CNES has been involved in geostationary positioning. Among different entities participating in operations and their preparation, the Flight Dynamics Center (FDC) is in charge of performing the following tasks: orbit determination; attitude determination; computation, monitoring, and calibration of orbit maneuvers; computation, monitoring, and calibration of attitude maneuvers; and operational predictions. In order to fulfill this mission, the FDC receives telemetry from the satellite and localization measurements from ground stations (e.g., CNES, NASA, INTELSAT). These data are processed by space dynamics programs integrated in the MERCATOR system which is run on SUN workstations (UNIX O.S.). The main features of MERCATOR are redundancy, modularity, and flexibility: efficient, flexible, and user friendly man-machine interface; and four identical SUN stations redundantly linked in an Ethernet network. Each workstation can perform all the tasks from data acquisition to computation results dissemination through a video network. A team of four engineers can handle the space mechanics aspects of a complete geostationary positioning from the injection into a transfer orbit to the final maneuvers in the station-keeping window. MERCATOR has been or is to be used for operations related to more than ten geostationary positionings. Initially developed for geostationary satellites, MERCATOR's methodology was also used for satellite control centers and can be applied to a wide range of satellites and to future manned missions.

  18. Predicted torque equilibrium attitude utilization for Space Station attitude control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Renjith R.; Heck, Michael L.; Robertson, Brent P.

    1990-01-01

    An approximate knowledge of the torque equilibrium attitude (TEA) is shown to improve the performance of a control moment gyroscope (CMG) momentum management/attitude control law for Space Station Freedom. The linearized equations of motion are used in conjunction with a state transformation to obtain a control law which uses full state feedback and the predicted TEA to minimize both attitude excursions and CMG peak and secular momentum. The TEA can be computationally determined either by observing the steady state attitude of a 'controlled' spacecraft using arbitrary initial attitude, or by simulating a fixed attitude spacecraft flying in desired orbit subject to realistic environmental disturbance models.

  19. Geometric Attitude Controls And Estimations On The Special Orthogonal Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tse-Huai

    This dissertation is concerned with spacecraft attitude control and estimation problems from the point of view of geometric mechanics. The controllers and observers are built on the special orthogonal group without any parameterizations, where the attitude dynamics is treated in a global and unique manner. The dissertation is composed of three parts. A leader-follower attitude formation control scheme is reported such that the leader spacecraft control its absolute attitude with respect to the inertial reference frame and the follower spacecraft control relative attitude with respect to other spacecraft in the formation. The unique feature is that both the absolute attitude and the relative attitude control systems are developed directly in terms of the line-of-sight observations, where attitude determination and estimation processes are not required. Second, an angular velocity observer is developed such that the estimated angular velocity is guaranteed to converge to the true angular velocity asymptotically from almost all initial estimates. Then, the presented observer is integrated with a proportional-derivative attitude tracking controller to show a separation type property for attitude tracking in the absence of angular velocity measurements. A hybrid observer for the attitude dynamics of a rigid body is proposed to guarantee global asymptotic stability. By designing a set of attitude error functions, attitude estimates are expelled from undesired equilibria to achieve global asymptotic stability. To guarantee that the estimated attitudes evolve on the special orthogonal group, a numerical algorithm based on the Lie group method is presented.

  20. Attitude control and stabilization technology discipline

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunkel, John W.

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on attitude control and stabilization technology discipline for the Space Station Freedom are presented. Topics covered include: attitude control technologies for multi-user accommodation; flexible dynamics and control; computational control techniques; and automatic proximity operations.

  1. Nonlinear fractional order proportion-integral-derivative active disturbance rejection control method design for hypersonic vehicle attitude control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jia; Wang, Lun; Cai, Guobiao; Qi, Xiaoqiang

    2015-06-01

    Near space hypersonic vehicle model is nonlinear, multivariable and couples in the reentry process, which are challenging for the controller design. In this paper, a nonlinear fractional order proportion integral derivative (NFOPIλDμ) active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) strategy based on a natural selection particle swarm (NSPSO) algorithm is proposed for the hypersonic vehicle flight control. The NFOPIλDμ ADRC method consists of a tracking-differentiator (TD), an NFOPIλDμ controller and an extended state observer (ESO). The NFOPIλDμ controller designed by combining an FOPIλDμ method and a nonlinear states error feedback control law (NLSEF) is to overcome concussion caused by the NLSEF and conversely compensate the insufficiency for relatively simple and rough signal processing caused by the FOPIλDμ method. The TD is applied to coordinate the contradiction between rapidity and overshoot. By attributing all uncertain factors to unknown disturbances, the ESO can achieve dynamic feedback compensation for these disturbances and thus reduce their effects. Simulation results show that the NFOPIλDμ ADRC method can make the hypersonic vehicle six-degree-of-freedom nonlinear model track desired nominal signals accurately and fast, has good stability, dynamic properties and strong robustness against external environmental disturbances.

  2. Attitude control system synthesis for the Hoop/Column antenna using the LQG/LTR method. [loop transfer recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundararajan, N.; Joshi, S. M.; Armstrong, E. S.

    1986-01-01

    This paper investigates the application of the linear-quadratic-Gaussian (LQG)/loop transfer recovery (LTR) method to the problem of synthesizing a fine-pointing control system for a large flexible space anenna. The study is based on an antenna, which consists of three rigid-body rotational modes and the first ten elastic modes. A robust compensator design for achieving the required pointing performance in the presence of modeling uncertainties is obtained using the LQG/LTR method. For the Hoop/Column antenna, a satisfactory controller design meeting a desired bandwidth of .1 rad/sec and ensuring stability with unmodelled high frequency modes is obtained using only a collocated pair of 3-axis attitude sensors and torque actuators. This study also indicates that to achieve the desired performance bandwidth of 0.1 rad/sec. and to ensure stability in the presence of higher frequency elastic modes, the design model should include at least the first three flexible modes together with the rigid body modes.

  3. Attitude Control Working Group report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Daniel F.; Studer, Phillip A.

    1986-01-01

    The goals were to establish the Attitude Control System (ACS) requirements, constraints, technology assessment, technology shortfalls, expected in the year 2000. These were based upon all missions, military and civil, for LEO and GEO. The critical ACS technology issues were identified and ACS programs developed to address these critical issues.

  4. Solar sail attitude dynamics and coning control: On Developing Control Methods for Solar Sail Coning at Orbit Rate to Attain Desired Orbital Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizvi, Farheen

    In this thesis, a control method is developed for the solar sail normal vector to trace a desired circular coning trajectory at orbit rate. The coning trajectory is defined in the local vertical local horizontal (LVLH) frame and the coning occurs about an LVLH equilibrium sail attitude. Past research has shown that sail attitude equilibria exist in the LVLH frame under the influence of aerodynamic, gravity gradient and solar torques. Precession of the sail normal from these equilibria causes sail normal coning about that equilibrium attitude. If the coning happens at orbit rate, wide variety of orbital effects can be induced with minimum excitation of the sailcraft structure. This results in an inexpensive spacecraft with a longer duration mission as compared to other conventional efforts. A special case of analyzing circular cones (at orbit rate coning) revealed that new Sun-synchronous orbits were created and launch injection errors were overcome by employing the sail coning method. The control method herein minimizes the angular momentum error between the sail and desired angular momentum vectors at orbit rate. Since angular momentum is a function of sail normal, angular momentum error reduction raises hope in reducing the sail normal error between the sail normal and desired sail normal vector as well. The results show that even though the control method enables the sail angular momentum to track the desired angular momentum on the coning trajectory, the sail normal tracing can only occur about certain LVLH equilibrium points, for small cones and small initial condition angular position/velocity errors. The control method is robust for tracking the desired angular momentum at orbit rate, but not always for tracking the desired sail normal. The case where the sail normal does track the desired at orbit rate corresponds to tracing a 1° circular cone about an orbit lowering LVLH equilibrium point. Even though the control torques are on the order of 10-6 Nm

  5. Noise screen for attitude control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodden, John J. (Inventor); Stevens, Homer D. (Inventor); Hong, David P. (Inventor); Hirschberg, Philip C. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    An attitude control system comprising a controller and a noise screen device coupled to the controller. The controller is adapted to control an attitude of a vehicle carrying an actuator system that is adapted to pulse in metered bursts in order to generate a control torque to control the attitude of the vehicle in response to a control pulse. The noise screen device is adapted to generate a noise screen signal in response to the control pulse that is generated when an input attitude error signal exceeds a predetermined deadband attitude level. The noise screen signal comprises a decaying offset signal that when combined with the attitude error input signal results in a net attitude error input signal away from the predetermined deadband level to reduce further control pulse generation.

  6. Attitude Dynamics and Control of Solar Sails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperber, Evan

    Solar sails are space vehicles that rely on solar radiation pressure in order to generate forces for thrust and attitude control torques. They exhibit characteristics such as large moments of inertia, fragility of various system components, and long mission durations that make attitude control a particularly difficult engineering problem. Thrust vector control (TVC) is a family of sailcraft attitude control techniques that is on a short list of strategies thought to be suitable for the primary attitude control of solar sails. Every sailcraft TVC device functions by manipulating the relative locations of the composite mass center (cm) of the sailcraft and the center of pressure (cp) of at least one of its reflectors. Relative displacement of these two points results in body torques that can be used to steer the sailcraft. This dissertation presents a strategy for the large-angle reorientation of a sailcraft using TVC. Two forms of TVC, namely the panel and ballast mass translation methods are well represented in the literature, while rigorous studies regarding a third form, gimballed mass rotation, are conspicuously absent. The gimballed mass method is physically realized by placing a ballast mass, commonly the sailcraft's scientific payload, at the tip of a gimballed boom that has its base fixed at some point on the sailcraft. A TVC algorithm will then strategically manipulate the payload boom's gimbal angles, thereby changing the projection of the sailcraft cm in the plane of the sail. This research demonstrates effective three-axis attitude control of a model sailcraft using numerical simulation of its nonlinear equations of motion. The particular TVC algorithm developed herein involves two phases---the first phase selects appropriate gimbal rates with the objective that the sailcraft be placed in the neighborhood of its target orientation. It was discovered, however that concomitantly minimizing attitude error as well as residual body rate was not possible using

  7. Attitude orientation control for a spinning satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Gerald

    The Department of the Air Force, Headquarters Space Systems Division, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are currently involved in litigation with Hughes Aircraft Company over the alledged infringement of the 'Williams patent,' which describes a method for attitude control of a spin-stabilized vehicle. Summarized here is pre-1960 RAND work on this subject and information obtained from RAND personnel knowledgeable on this subject. It was concluded that there is no RAND documentation that directly parallels the 'Williams patent' concept. Also, the TIROS II magnetic torque attitude control method is reviewed. The TIROS II meteorological satellite, launched on November 23, 1960, incorporated a magnetic actuation system for spin axis orientation control. The activation system was ground controlled to orient the satellite spin axis to obtain the desired pointing direction for optical and infrared sensor subsystems.

  8. Linearization of Attitude-Control Error Dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bach, Ralph; Paielli, Russell

    1993-01-01

    Direction cosines and quaternions are useful for representing rigid-body attitude because they exhibit no kinematic singularities. Each utilizes more variables than the minimum three degrees of freedom required to specify attitude. Therefore, application of a nonlinear inversion procedure to either formulation introduces singularities. Furthermore, in designing an attitude-control system, it is not appropriate to express attitude error as a difference of direction cosines (or quaternions). One should employ a measure of attitude error that not only is minimal but preserves orthogonal rotation properties as well. This note applies an inversion procedure to an appropriate measure of attitude error, so that the singularity occurs when the error reaches +/- 180 deg. This approach leads to the realization of a new model-follower attitude-control system that exhibits exact linear attitude-error dynamics.

  9. Skylab thruster attitude control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilmer, G. E., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Preflight activities and the Skylab mission support effort for the thruster attitude control system (TACS) are documented. The preflight activities include a description of problems and their solutions encountered in the development, qualification, and flight checkout test programs. Mission support effort is presented as it relates to system performance assessment, real-time problem solving, flight anomalies, and the daily system evaluation. Finally, the detailed flight evaluation is presented for each phase of the mission using system telemetry data. Data assert that the TACS met or exceeded design requirements and fulfilled its assigned mission objectives.

  10. Modular design attitude control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chichester, F. D.

    1984-01-01

    A sequence of single axismodels and a series of reduced state linear observers of minimum order are used to reconstruct inaccessible variables pertaining to the modular attitude control of a rigid body flexible suspension model of a flexible spacecraft. The single axis models consist of two, three, four, and five rigid bodies, each interconnected by a flexible shaft passing through the mass centers of the bodies. Modal damping is added to each model. Reduced state linear observers are developed for synthesizing the inaccessible modal state variables for each modal model.

  11. Three axis attitude control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, Philip A. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A three-axis attitude control system for an orbiting body comprised of a motor driven flywheel supported by a torque producing active magnetic bearing is described. Free rotation of the flywheel is provided about its central axis and together with limited angular torsional deflections of the flywheel about two orthogonal axes which are perpendicular to the central axis. The motor comprises an electronically commutated DC motor, while the magnetic bearing comprises a radially servoed permanent magnet biased magnetic bearing capable of producing cross-axis torques on the flywheel. Three body attitude sensors for pitch, yaw and roll generate respective command signals along three mutually orthogonal axes (x, y, z) which are coupled to circuit means for energizing a set of control coils for producing torques about two of the axes (x and y) and speed control of the flywheel about the third (z) axis. An energy recovery system, which is operative during motor deceleration, is also included which permits the use of a high-speed motor to perform effectively as a reactive wheel suspended in the magnetic bearing.

  12. Remote Spacecraft Attitude Control by Coulomb Charging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, Daan

    The possibility of inter-spacecraft collisions is a serious concern at Geosynchronous altitudes, where many high-value assets operate in proximity to countless debris objects whose orbits experience no natural means of decay. The ability to rendezvous with these derelict satellites would enable active debris removal by servicing or repositioning missions, but docking procedures are generally inhibited by the large rotational momenta of uncontrolled satellites. Therefore, a contactless means of reducing the rotation rate of objects in the space environment is desired. This dissertation investigates the viability of Coulomb charging to achieve such remote spacecraft attitude control. If a servicing craft imposes absolute electric potentials on a nearby nonspherical debris object, it will impart electrostatic torques that can be used to gradually arrest the object's rotation. In order to simulate the relative motion of charged spacecraft with complex geometries, accurate but rapid knowledge of the Coulomb interactions is required. To this end, a new electrostatic force model called the Multi-Sphere Method (MSM) is developed. All aspects of the Coulomb de-spin concept are extensively analyzed and simulated using a system with simplified geometries and one dimensional rotation. First, appropriate control algorithms are developed to ensure that the nonlinear Coulomb torques arrest the rotation with guaranteed stability. Moreover, the complex interaction of the spacecraft with the plasma environment and charge control beams is modeled to determine what hardware requirements are necessary to achieve the desired electric potential levels. Lastly, the attitude dynamics and feedback control development is validated experimentally using a scaled down terrestrial testbed. High voltage power supplies control the potential on two nearby conductors, a stationary sphere and a freely rotating cylinder. The nonlinear feedback control algorithms developed above are implemented to

  13. Seasat-A attitude control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, R.; Rodden, J. J.; Hendricks, R. J.

    1977-01-01

    The Seasat-A attitude control system controls the attitude of the satellite system during injection into final circular orbit after Atlas boost, during orbit adjust and trim phases, and throughout the 3-year mission. Ascent and injection guidance and attitude control are provided by the Agena spacecraft with a gyrocompassed mass expulsion system. On-orbit attitude control functions are performed by a system that has its functional roots in the gravity-gradient momentum bias technology. The paper discusses hardware, control laws, and simulation results.

  14. Linearizing feedforward/feedback attitude control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paielli, Russell A.; Bach, Ralph E.

    1991-01-01

    An approach to attitude control theory is introduced in which a linear form is postulated for the closed-loop rotation error dynamics, then the exact control law required to realize it is derived. The nonminimal (four-component) quaternion form is used to attitude because it is globally nonsingular, but the minimal (three-component) quaternion form is used for attitude error because it has no nonlinear constraints to prevent the rotational error dynamics from being linearized, and the definition of the attitude error is based on quaternion algebra. This approach produces an attitude control law that linearizes the closed-loop rotational error dynamics exactly, without any attitude singularities, even if the control errors become large.

  15. ISS Update: Attitude Determination and Control Officer

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Dan Huot talks with Attitude Determination and Control Officer (ADCO) flight controller Ann Esbeck in the Mission Control Center at Johnson Space Center. They discuss th...

  16. Lorentz Force Based Satellite Attitude Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Dipak Kumar; Sinha, Manoranjan

    2016-07-01

    Since the inception of attitude control of a satellite, various active and passive control strategies have been developed. These include using thrusters, momentum wheels, control moment gyros and magnetic torquers. In this present work, a new technique named Lorentz force based Coulombic actuators for the active control is proposed. This method uses electrostatic charged shells, which interact with the time varying earth's magnetic field to establish a full three axes control of the satellite. It is shown that the proposed actuation mechanism is similar to a satellite actuated by magnetic coils except that the resultant magnetic moment vanishes under two different conditions. The equation for the required charges on the the Coulomb shells attached to the satellite body axes is derived, which is in turn used to find the available control torque for actuating the satellite along the orbit. Stability of the proposed system for very high initial angular velocity and exponential stability about the origin are proved for a proportional-differential control input. Simulations are carried out to show the efficacy of the proposed system for the attitude control of the earth-pointing satellite.

  17. Space Station Freedom Attitude Determination and Control System Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penrod, Jeff

    1990-01-01

    Viewgraphs on Space Station Freedom attitude determination and control system overview are presented. Topics covered include: highly dynamic plant; SSF flight attitudes; effectors; inertial attitude sensors; control system performance requirements; control system functional requirements; and controller architecture.

  18. Adaptive spacecraft attitude control utilizing eigenaxis rotations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, J. E., Jr.; Colburn, B. K.; Speakman, N. O.

    1975-01-01

    Conventional and adaptive attitude control of spacecraft which use control moment gyros (CMG's) as torque sources are discussed. Control laws predicated on the assumption of a linear system are used since the spacecraft equations of motion are formulated in an 'eigenaxis system' so that they are essentially linear during 'slow' maneuvers even if large angles are involved. The overall control schemes are 'optimal' in several senses. Eigenaxis rotations and a weighted pseudo-inverse CMG steering law are used and, in the adaptive case, a Model Reference Adaptive System (MRAS) controller based on Liapunov's Second Method is adopted. To substantiate the theory, digital simulation results obtained using physical parameters of a Large Space Telescope type spacecraft are presented. These results indicate that an adaptive control law is often desirable.

  19. Precision attitude control for tethered satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline-Schoder, Robert J.; Powell, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    Tethered spacecraft are particularly well suited to serve as isolation platforms for space-borne observatories. It has previously been shown that, due to the relatively large tether force, conventional means of performing attitude control for tethered satellites are inefficient for any mission with pointing requirements more stringent than about 1 deg. A particularly effective method of implementing attitude control for tethered satellites is to use the tether tension force to generate control moments by moving the tether attach point relative to the subsatellite center of mass. This paper presents the development of a precision pointing control algorithm for tethered satellites and the simulation of the control system with laboratory hardware. The control algorithm consists of a linear quadratic regulator feedback law and a Kalman filter. The control algorithm has been shown to regulate the vehicle orientation to within 0.60 arcsec rms. This level of precision was achieved only after including a mass center estimator and accurately modeling the effects of the nonlinear attach point motion actuator.

  20. Attitude control with active actuator saturation prevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, James Richard

    2015-02-01

    Spacecraft attitude control in the presence of actuator saturation is considered. The attitude controller developed has two components: a proportional component and an angular velocity component. The proportional control has a special form that depends on the attitude parameterization. The angular velocity control is realized by a strictly positive real system with its own input nonlinearity. The strictly positive real system can filter noise in the angular velocity measurement. With this control architecture the torques applied to the body are guaranteed to be below a predetermined value, thus preventing saturation of the actuators. The closed-loop equilibrium point corresponding to the desired attitude is shown to be asymptotically stable. Additionally, the control law does not require specific knowledge of the body's inertia properties, and is therefore robust to such modelling errors.

  1. H∞ control option for a combined energy and attitude control system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Ying Siang; Varatharajoo, Renuganth

    2013-10-01

    A combined energy and attitude control system (CEACS) is a hybrid system that uses flywheels to store energy and provide a simultaneous attitude control in satellites. Previous work appeared in Advances in Space Research (ASR) employing the proportional-derivative (PD) control has proven that CEACS works well and achieves its mission requirement. However, the in-orbit system performance uncertainties present a challenge to the CEACS attitude pointing capability. Thus, this paper complements the previous mentioned work, and focuses on employing the H∞ optimal attitude control solution for the CEACS attitude control enhancement. The mathematical model and numerical treatments for the CEACS H∞ control architecture are presented. Numerical results show that a better attitude pointing accuracy at least up to 0.043° can be achieved with the H∞ control method.

  2. Integrated Attitude Control Based on Momentum Management for Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Li-Ni

    An integrated attitude control for attitude control, momentum management and power storage is proposed as a momentum-management-based IPACS. The integrated attitude control combines ACMM and IPACS to guarantees the momentum of CMGs and flywheels within acceptable limits as well as satisfying the requirements of attitude control and power storage. The later objective is to testify the foundation of the integrated attitude control by the fact that the momentum management of the integrated attitude control is able to keep the momentum exchange actuators including flywheels and VSCMG out of singularity. Finally, the space station attitude control task during assembly process is illustrated to testify the effectiveness of the integrated attitude control.

  3. Attitude Control Propulsion Components, Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Effort was made to include as much engineering information on each component as possible, consistent with usefulness and catalog size limitations. The contents of this catalog contain components which were qualified for use with spacecraft monopropellant hydrazine and inert gas attitude control systems. Thrust ranges up to 44.5 N (10.0 lbf) for hydrazine and inert gas sytems were considered. Additionally, some components qualified for uses other than spacecraft attitude control are included because they are suitable for use in attitude controls systems.

  4. Miniaturized attitude control system for nanosatellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candini, Gian Paolo; Piergentili, Fabrizio; Santoni, Fabio

    2012-12-01

    A miniaturized attitude control system suitable for nanosatellites, developed using only commercial off-the-shelf components, is described in the paper. It is a complete and independent system to be used on board nanosatellites, allowing automated attitude control. To integrate this system into nanosatellites such as Cubesats its size has been reduced down to a cube of side about 5 cm. The result is a low cost attitude control system built with terrestrial components, integrating three micro magnetotorquers, three micro reaction wheels, three magnetometers and redundant control electronics, capable of performing automatics operations on request from the ground. The system can operate as a real time maneuvering system, executing commands sent from the ground or as a standalone attitude control system receiving the solar array status from a hosting satellite and the satellite ephemeris transmitted from the ground station. The main characteristics of the developed system and test results are depicted in this paper.

  5. Attitude Control Propulsion Components, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Attitude control propulsion components are described, including hydrazine thrusters, hydrazine thruster and cold gas jet valves, and pressure and temperature transducers. Component-ordered data are presented in tabular form; the manufacturer and specific space program are included.

  6. New methods of determining spacecraft attitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pitts, R.; Jackson, T.; Gilmozzi, R.

    1990-01-01

    The IUE spacecraft was launched with prime and redundant mechanical Panoramic Attitude Sensors (PAS) to determine coarse spacecraft pointing. Attitude determination typically took at least 24 hours. After launch both systems failed. A new method was developed which required pointing the spacecraft at the antisolar position. After the failure of the 4th IUE gyro, it was no longer possible to point in the antisolar direction. A second method was developed which utilizes IUE's ability to track the sun with a solid state two-dimensional sun sensor. Attitude determination can now be completed in several hours. An hour is required for coarse position measurement and several more hours are needed, using a small 15 arc minute square finder camera, for final attitude confirmation. These methods should be of use for other spacecraft where weight is critical or there is a desire to avoid mechanical devices.

  7. Attitude Determination and Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starin, Scott R.; Eterno, John

    2010-01-01

    The importance of accurately pointing spacecraft to our daily lives is pervasive, yet somehow escapes the notice of most people. In this section, we will summarize the processes and technologies used in designing and operating spacecraft pointing (i.e. attitude) systems.

  8. Torque equilibrium attitude control for Skylab reentry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaese, J. R.; Kennel, H. F.

    1979-01-01

    All the available torque equilibrium attitudes (most were useless from the standpoint of lack of electrical power) and the equilibrium seeking method are presented, as well as the actual successful application during the 3 weeks prior to Skylab reentry.

  9. Solar Sail Attitude Control Performance Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bladt, Jeff J.; Lawrence, Dale A.

    2005-01-01

    Performance of two solar sail attitude control implementations is evaluated. One implementation employs four articulated reflective vanes located at the periphery of the sail assembly to generate control torque about all three axes. A second attitude control configuration uses mass on a gimbaled boom to alter the center-of-mass location relative to the center-of-pressure producing roll and pitch torque along with a pair of articulated control vanes for yaw control. Command generation algorithms employ linearized dynamics with a feedback inversion loop to map desired vehicle attitude control torque into vane and/or gimbal articulation angle commands. We investigate the impact on actuator deflection angle behavior due to variations in how the Jacobian matrix is incorporated into the feedback inversion loop. Additionally, we compare how well each implementation tracks a commanded thrust profile, which has been generated to follow an orbit trajectory from the sun-earth L1 point to a sub-L1 station.

  10. Attitude motion of a non-attitude-controlled cylindrical satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, C. K.

    1988-01-01

    In 1985, two non-attitude-controlled satellites were each placed in a low earth orbit by the Scout Launch Vehicle. The satellites were cylindrical in shape and contained reservoirs of hydrazine fuel. Three-axis magnetometer measurements, telemetered in real time, were used to derive the attitude motion of each satellite. Algorithms are generated to deduce possible orientations (and magnitudes) of each vehicle's angular momentum for each telemetry contact. To resolve ambiguities at each contact, a force model was derived to simulate the significant long-term effects of magnetic, gravity gradient, and aerodynamic torques on the angular momentum of the vehicles. The histories of the orientation and magnitude of the angular momentum are illustrated.

  11. Nonlinear feedback model attitude control using CCD in magnetic suspension system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, CHIN-E.; Hou, Ann-San

    1994-01-01

    A model attitude control system for a CCD camera magnetic suspension system is studied in this paper. In a recent work, a position and attitude sensing method was proposed. From this result, model position and attitude of a magnetic suspension system can be detected by generating digital outputs. Based on this achievement, a control system design using nonlinear feedback techniques for magnetic suspended model attitude control is proposed.

  12. Low drag attitude control for Skylab orbital lifetime extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaese, J. R.; Kennel, H. F.

    1981-01-01

    In the fall of 1977 it was determined that Skylab had started to tumble and that the original orbit lifetime predictions were much too optimistic. A decision had to be made whether to accept an early uncontrolled reentry with its inherent risks or try to attempt to control Skylab to a lower drag attitude in the hope that there was enough time to develop a Teleoperator Retrieval System, bring it up on the Space Shuttle and then decide whether to boost Skylab to a higher longer life orbit or to reenter it in a controlled fashion. The end-on-velocity (EOVV) control method is documented, which was successfully applied for about half a year to keep Skylab in a low drag attitude with the aid of the control moment gyros and a minimal expenditure of attitude control gas.

  13. Control and synchronization of Chaotic Attitude Control of Satellite with Backstepping controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemih, K.; Halimi, M.; Ghanes, M.; Fanit, H.; Salit, H.

    2014-06-01

    A backstepping control system is proposed to control and synchronize the attitude dynamics of a satellite subjected to deterministic external perturbations which induce chaotic motion when no control is affected in this paper. The proposed method is a systematic recursive design approach based on the choice of Lyapunov functions for constructing feedback control laws. The effectiveness of the proposed control scheme is verified by the simulated results.

  14. Experiment D010: Ion sensing attitude control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagalyn, R. C.; Smiddy, M.

    1971-01-01

    The feasibility of an attitude control system that uses environmental positive ions and an electrostatic detection system to measure spacecraft pitch and yaw is studied. The secondary objective was to measure the spatial and temporal variations of ambient positively charged particles along the orbital path of the Gemini 10 and 12 spacecrafts. The results proved that the use of a horizon detector in conjunction with pitch and yaw sensors would facilitate complete description of the spacecraft position and attitude. Furthermore, with the addition of a servosystem, the unit could be used as a complete automatic attitude-control system that would be applicable from the lowest satellite altitudes up to at least 10 earth radii. Also, results established that the charge density along the trajectory of the satellite could be determined by transmission of output voltages from the individual electrometers.

  15. Attitude controls for VTOL aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauli, F. A.

    1971-01-01

    Systems consist of single duct system with two sets of reaction control nozzles, one linked mechanically to pilot's controls, and other set driven by electric servomotors commanded by preselected combinations of electrical signals.

  16. Mariner Mars 1971 attitude control subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edmunds, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    The Mariner Mars 1971 attitude control subsystem (ACS) is discussed. It is comprised of a sun sensor set, a Canopus tracker, an inertial reference unit, two cold gas reaction control assemblies, two rocket engine gimbal actuators, and an attitude control electronics unit. The subsystem has the following eight operating modes: (1) launch, (2) sun acquisition, (3) roll search, (4) celestial cruise, (5) all-axes inertial, (6) roll inertial, (7) commanded turn, and (8) thrust vector control. In the celestial cruise mode, the position control is held to plus or minus 0.25 deg. Commanded turn rates are plus or minus 0.18 deg/s. The attitude control logic in conjunction with command inputs from other spacecraft subsystems establishes the ACS operating mode. The logic utilizes Sun and Canopus acquisition signals generated within the ACS to perform automatic mode switching so that dependence of ground control is minimized when operating in the sun acquisition, roll search, and celestial cruise modes. The total ACS weight is 65.7 lb, and includes 5.4 lb of nitrogen gas. Total power requirements vary from 9 W for the celestial cruise mode to 54 W for the commanded turn mode.

  17. Attitude control compensator for flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodzeit, Neil E. (Inventor); Linder, David M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    An attitude control loop for a spacecraft uses a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller for control about an axis. The spacecraft body has at least a primary mechanical resonance. The attitude sensors are collocated, or both on the rigid portion of the spacecraft. The flexure attributable to the resonance may result in instability of the system. A compensator for the control loop has an amplitude response which includes a component which rolls off beginning at frequencies below the resonance, and which also includes a component having a notch at a notch frequency somewhat below the resonant frequency. The phase response of the compensator tends toward zero at low frequencies, and tends toward -180.degree. as frequency increases toward the notch frequency. At frequencies above the notch frequency, the phase decreases from +180.degree., becoming more negative, and tending toward -90.degree. at frequencies far above the resonance frequency. Near the resonance frequency, the compensator phase is near zero.

  18. Solar sail attitude dynamics and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, G.; Marsh, E. L.; Gunter, S. M.

    1977-01-01

    This paper describes some results of an attitude dynamics and control study for a solar sailing vehicle. This type of vehicle is currently under study and evaluation at JPL and has very high potential for interplanetary missions in and beyond the 1980s. Crucial to the success of such a vehicle would be the performance of its onboard attitude control system. Because of the vehicle's large size and its flexibility, vehicle deformations may have a potential for causing a degradation in vehicle performance. It may therefore be necessary for the control system to take into account the vehicle deformations as well as its rigid-body motions. Distributed parameter system analysis techniques are used in the paper to study certain fundamental aspects of such a control system for the sail vehicle. The techniques can, however, be more generally applicable to other large flexible vehicles.

  19. Attitude Determination and Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starin, Scott R.; Eterno, John

    2011-01-01

    designing and operating spacecraft pointing (i.e. attitude) systems.

  20. Enhanced Attitude Control Experiment for SSTI Lewis Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maghami, Peoman G.

    1997-01-01

    The enhanced attitude control system experiment is a technology demonstration experiment on the NASA's small spacecraft technology initiative program's Lewis spacecraft to evaluate advanced attitude control strategies. The purpose of the enhanced attitude control system experiment is to evaluate the feasibility of designing and implementing robust multi-input/multi-output attitude control strategies for enhanced pointing performance of spacecraft to improve the quality of the measurements of the science instruments. Different control design strategies based on modern and robust control theories are being considered for the enhanced attitude control system experiment. This paper describes the experiment as well as the design and synthesis of a mixed H(sub 2)/H(sub infinity) controller for attitude control. The control synthesis uses a nonlinear programming technique to tune the controller parameters and impose robustness and performance constraints. Simulations are carried out to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed attitude control design strategy. Introduction

  1. The control of space manipulators subject to spacecraft attitude control saturation limits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubowsky, S.; Vance, E. E.; Torres, M. A.

    1989-01-01

    The motions of robotic manipulators mounted on spacecraft can disturb the spacecraft's positions and attitude. These disturbances can surpass the ability of the system's attitude control reaction jets to control them, for the disturbances increase as manipulator speeds increase. If the manipulator moves too quickly the resulting disturbances can exceed the saturation levels of the reaction jets, causing excessive spacecraft motions. A method for planning space manipulator's motions is presented, so that tasks can be performed as quickly as possible without saturating the system's attitude control jets.

  2. Inversion Of Dynamical Equations For Control Of Attitude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bach, Ralph; Paielli, Russell

    1995-01-01

    Method of inverting nonlinear equations of rotational dynamics of rigid body used to design feedback control of orientation of body. Applicable to both direction-cosine and quaternion formulations suitable for large-angle maneuvers. Exploiting some apparently little-known properties of direction cosine and quaternion formulations, method leads to equations for model-follower control system that exhibits exactly linear attitude-error dynamics. Quarternion system more robust in responding to large roll-angle commands.

  3. TRMM On Orbit Attitude Control System Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Brent; Placanica, Sam; Morgenstern, Wendy

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Attitude Control System (ACS) along with detailed in-flight performance results for each operational mode. The TRMM spacecraft is an Earth-pointed, zero momentum bias satellite launched on November 27, 1997 from Tanegashima Space Center, Japan. TRMM is a joint mission between NASA and the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan designed to monitor and study tropical rainfall and the associated release of energy. Launched to provide a validation for poorly known rainfall data sets generated by global climate models, TRMM has demonstrated its utility by reducing uncertainties in global rainfall measurements by a factor of two. The ACS is comprised of Attitude Control Electronics (ACE), an Earth Sensor Assembly (ESA), Digital Sun Sensors (DSS), Inertial Reference Units (IRU), Three Axis Magnetometers (TAM), Coarse Sun Sensors (CSS), Magnetic Torquer Bars (MTB), Reaction Wheel Assemblies (RWA), Engine Valve Drivers (EVD) and thrusters. While in Mission Mode, the ESA provides roll and pitch axis attitude error measurements and the DSS provide yaw updates twice per orbit. In addition, the TAM in combination with the IRU and DSS can be used to provide pointing in a contingency attitude determination mode which does not rely on the ESA. Although the ACS performance to date has been highly successful, lessons were learned during checkout and initial on-orbit operation. This paper describes the design, on-orbit checkout, performance and lessons learned for the TRMM ACS.

  4. Digital attitude control for NASA sounding rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Carlos

    1998-11-01

    Various configurations of Solar Pointing Control Systems have been used for NASA sounding rockets since an initial flight in December of 1967. Until now, these attitude control systems have used an analog controller. The demand for a more advanced attitude control system with better performance and flexibility leads to the testing of a digital control system. Computer aided design was used to develop the control equations and an embedded controller is used to implement these equations. The analog control system pointing performance was degraded by electrical noise and offsets getting into the sensor signals. The solution to this problem was to isolate the sun sensor from payload electrical nose and ground loops. To accomplish this the sun sensor output was digitized and the data was sent to the control system using a fiber optical cable. This control system was flown on Naval Research Laboratories rocket 36.140 and had less than 0.5 arc-second peak-to-peak jitter during the flight. With further refinements the digital system is expected to attain jitter of less than 0.2 arc- seconds peak-to-peak.

  5. Integrated Method - the Optimum Way to Improve the Quality of Frequency Response Characteristics of the Space Vehicle Attitude Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britova, Yu.; Dmitriev, V.; Kostyuchenko, T.

    2016-06-01

    The integrated method applied to the design of technical systems is a process in which various project, calculation and verification procedures are interconnected and interrelated. The results of procedures are used in a certain sequence, thus ensuring maximum reachable optimality of the system being designed.

  6. Prospects of Relative Attitude Control Using Coulomb Actuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaub, Hanspeter; Stevenson, Daan

    2013-12-01

    The relative attitude is studied between two charge controlled spacecraft being held at a fixed separation distance. While one body has a spherical shape, the 2nd body is assumed to be non-spherical and tumbling. The attitude control goal is to arrest the rotation of the 2nd body. While prior work has identified the existence of torques between charged bodies, this is the first analytical study on a charged feedback attitude control. Using the recently developed multi-sphere method to provide a simplified electrostatic force and torque model between non-spherical shapes, Lyapunov theory is used to develop a stabilizing attitude control using spacecraft potential as the control variable. Zero and non-zero equilibrium potentials are considered, with the later suitable for the electrostatic tug concept. With a pulling configuration, the cylinder will come to rest with the long axis aligned with the inter-vehicle axis in a stable configuration. For a pusher, the cylinder will settle 90 degrees rotated from this axis. Numerical simulations illustrate the control performance.

  7. Spacecraft attitude control momentum requirements analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, Brent P.; Heck, Michael L.

    1987-01-01

    The relationship between attitude and angular momentum control requirements is derived for a fixed attitude, Earth orbiting spacecraft with large area articulating appendages. Environmental effects such as gravity gradient, solar radiation pressure, and aerodynamic forces arising from a dynamic, rotating atmosphere are examined. It is shown that, in general, each environmental effect contributes to both cyclic and secular momentum requirements both within and perpendicular to the orbit plane. The gyroscopic contribution to the angular momentum control requirements resulting from a rotating, Earth oriented spacecraft is also discussed. Special conditions are described where one or more components of the angular momentum can be made to vanish, or become purely cyclical. Computer generated plots for a candidate space station configuration are presented to supplement the analytically derived results.

  8. Spacecraft Attitude and Orbit Control Systems testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnenschein, F. J.; Schoomade, M.; Zwartbol, T.

    1995-03-01

    Contemporary AOCS are equipped with local Attitude Control Computers which provide sophisticated Attitude and Orbit Control functions, automatic Failure Detection and Isolation functions and extensive Telemetry and Telecommand handling functions. Generic models of the design, development and test life cycle approaches for such intelligent AOCS are emerging. Also knowledge of the activities to be performed and the generic design, development and test environments to be used during the different phases is accumulating. Lessons learned can be used to improve AOCS development life cycle approaches and to define new development and test environments which improve the efficiency of the design, development and test life cycle and quality of the product. The SAX (Satellite per Astronomia a raggi X) satellite is equipped with a contemporary AOCS providing the above mentioned functions. In this paper the SAX AOCS software design, development and test life cycle is described as an example of AOCS software development. Lessons learned and suggestions for possible improvements are given.

  9. A novel single thruster control strategy for spacecraft attitude stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godard; Kumar, Krishna Dev; Zou, An-Min

    2013-05-01

    Feasibility of achieving three axis attitude stabilization using a single thruster is explored in this paper. Torques are generated using a thruster orientation mechanism with which the thrust vector can be tilted on a two axis gimbal. A robust nonlinear control scheme is developed based on the nonlinear kinematic and dynamic equations of motion of a rigid body spacecraft in the presence of gravity gradient torque and external disturbances. The spacecraft, controlled using the proposed concept, constitutes an underactuated system (a system with fewer independent control inputs than degrees of freedom) with nonlinear dynamics. Moreover, using thruster gimbal angles as control inputs make the system non-affine (control terms appear nonlinearly in the state equation). This necessitates the control algorithms to be developed based on nonlinear control theory since linear control methods are not directly applicable. The stability conditions for the spacecraft attitude motion for robustness against uncertainties and disturbances are derived to establish the regions of asymptotic 3-axis attitude stabilization. Several numerical simulations are presented to demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed controller and validate the theoretical results. The control algorithm is shown to compensate for time-varying external disturbances including solar radiation pressure, aerodynamic forces, and magnetic disturbances; and uncertainties in the spacecraft inertia parameters. The numerical results also establish the robustness of the proposed control scheme to negate disturbances caused by orbit eccentricity.

  10. System and method for correcting attitude estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Josselson, Robert H. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A system includes an angular rate sensor disposed in a vehicle for providing angular rates of the vehicle, and an instrument disposed in the vehicle for providing line-of-sight control with respect to a line-of-sight reference. The instrument includes an integrator which is configured to integrate the angular rates of the vehicle to form non-compensated attitudes. Also included is a compensator coupled across the integrator, in a feed-forward loop, for receiving the angular rates of the vehicle and outputting compensated angular rates of the vehicle. A summer combines the non-compensated attitudes and the compensated angular rates of the to vehicle to form estimated vehicle attitudes for controlling the instrument with respect to the line-of-sight reference. The compensator is configured to provide error compensation to the instrument free-of any feedback loop that uses an error signal. The compensator may include a transfer function providing a fixed gain to the received angular rates of the vehicle. The compensator may, alternatively, include a is transfer function providing a variable gain as a function of frequency to operate on the received angular rates of the vehicle.

  11. Low cost attitude control system scanwheel development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bialke, William; Selby, Vaughn

    1991-01-01

    In order to satisfy a growing demand for low cost attitude control systems for small spacecraft, development of low cost scanning horizon sensor coupled to a low cost/low power consumption Reaction Wheel Assembly was initiated. This report addresses the details of the versatile design resulting from this effort. Tradeoff analyses for each of the major components are included, as well as test data from an engineering prototype of the hardware.

  12. Robust nonlinear attitude control of flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Sahjendra N.

    1987-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to large-angle rotational maneuvers of a spacecraft-beam-tip body configuration based on nonlinear invertibility and linear feedback stabilization. A control law u sub d is derived for the decoupled control of attitude angles, lateral elastic deflections, slopes due to bending and angular deflection due to torsion at the tip of the beam using torquers and force actuators. For the stabilization of the elastic modes, a linear feedback control law u sub s is obtained based on a linearized model augmented with a servocompensator. Simulation results are presented to show that large slewing and elastic mode stabilization can be accomplished.

  13. Precision tethered satellite attitude control. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kline-Schoder, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    Tethered spacecraft possess unique dynamic characteristics which make them advantageous for certain classes of experiments. One use for which tethers are particularly well suited is to provide an isolated platform for spaceborne observatories. The advantages of tethering a pointing platform 1 or 2 km from a space shuttle or space station are that, compared to placing the observatory on the parent spacecraft, vibrational disturbances are attenuated and contamination is eliminated. In practice, all satellites have some requirement on the attitude control of the spacecraft, and tethered satellites are no exception. It has previously been shown that conventional means of performing attitude control for tethered satellites are insufficient for any mission with pointing requirements more stringent than about 1 deg. This is due mainly to the relatively large force applied by the tether to the spacecraft. A particularly effective method of implementing attitude control for tethered satellites is to use this tether tension force to generate control torques by moving the tether attach point relative to the subsatellite center of mass. A demonstration of this attitude control technique on an astrophysical pointing platform has been proposed for a space shuttle flight test project and is referred to as the Kinetic Isolation Tether Experiment (KITE).

  14. SSS-A attitude control prelaunch analysis and operations plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werking, R. D.; Beck, J.; Gardner, D.; Moyer, P.; Plett, M.

    1971-01-01

    A description of the attitude control support being supplied by the Mission and Data Operations Directorate is presented. Descriptions of the computer programs being used to support the mission for attitude determination, prediction, control, and definitive attitude processing are included. In addition, descriptions of the operating procedures which will be used to accomplish mission objectives are provided.

  15. Adaptive Attitude Control System For Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boussalis, Dhemetrios; Bayard, David S.; Wang, Shyh J.

    1995-01-01

    Report presents theoretical foundation for attitude control system for proposed Space Station Freedom in orbit around Earth. Intended to maintain space station in torque equilibrium with designated axes of its structure aligned with local vertical, local along-trajectory horizontal, and local across-trajectory horizontal axes, respectively. System required to provide desired combination of control performance and stability in presence of disturbances (e.g., variations in masses of payloads, movements of astronauts and equipment, atmospheric drag, gravitational anomalies, and interactions with docking spacecraft).

  16. Adaptive control applied to Space Station attitude control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Quang M.; Chipman, Richard; Hu, Tsay-Hsin G.; Holmes, Eric B.; Sunkel, John

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an adaptive control approach to enhance the performance of current attitude control system used by the Space Station Freedom. The proposed control law was developed based on the direct adaptive control or model reference adaptive control scheme. Performance comparisons, subject to inertia variation, of the adaptive controller and the fixed-gain linear quadratic regulator currently implemented for the Space Station are conducted. Both the fixed-gain and the adaptive gain controllers are able to maintain the Station stability for inertia variations of up to 35 percent. However, when a 50 percent inertia variation is applied to the Station, only the adaptive controller is able to maintain the Station attitude.

  17. Attitude Control Subsystem for the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewston, Alan W.; Mitchell, Kent A.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.

    1996-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the on-orbit operation of the Attitude Control Subsystem (ACS) for the Advanced Communications Technology Satellite (ACTS). The three ACTS control axes are defined, including the means for sensing attitude and determining the pointing errors. The desired pointing requirements for various modes of control as well as the disturbance torques that oppose the control are identified. Finally, the hardware actuators and control loops utilized to reduce the attitude error are described.

  18. MAP Attitude Control System Design and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, S. F.; Campbell, C. E.; Ericsson-Jackson, A. J.; Markley, F. L.; ODonnell, J. R., Jr.

    1997-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) is a follow-on to the Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) instrument on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) spacecraft. The MAP spacecraft will perform its mission in a Lissajous orbit around the Earth-Sun L(sub 2) Lagrange point to suppress potential instrument disturbances. To make a full-sky map of cosmic microwave background fluctuations, a combination fast spin and slow precession motion will be used. MAP requires a propulsion system to reach L(sub 2), to unload system momentum, and to perform stationkeeping maneuvers once at L(sub 2). A minimum hardware, power and thermal safe control mode must also be provided. Sufficient attitude knowledge must be provided to yield instrument pointing to a standard deviation of 1.8 arc-minutes. The short development time and tight budgets require a new way of designing, simulating, and analyzing the Attitude Control System (ACS). This paper presents the design and analysis of the control system to meet these requirements.

  19. Flexible Dynamics and Attitude Control of a Square Solar Sail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Mirue

    This thesis presents a comprehensive analysis of attitude and structural dynamics of a square solar sail. In particular, this research examines the use of corner-attached reflective vanes to control the attitude of the spacecraft. An introduction to known solar sail designs is given, then the mathematics involved in calculating solar radiation pressure forces are presented. A detailed derivation and implementation of the unconstrained nonlinear flexible structural dynamics with Finite Element Method (FEM) models are explored, with several sample simulations of published large deflection experiments used as verification measures. To simulate the inability of a thin membrane to resist compression, the sail membrane elements are augmented with a method that approximates the wrinkling and the slacking dynamics, which is followed by a simulation of another well-known experiment as a verification measure. Once the structural dynamics are established, the usage of the tip vanes is explored. Specifically, a control allocation problem formed by having two degrees of freedom for each tip vane is defined and an efficient solution to this problem is presented, allowing desired control torques to be converted to appropriate vane angles. A randomized testing mechanism is implemented to show the efficacy of this algorithm. The sail shadowing problem is explored as well, where a component of the spacecraft casts shadow upon the sail and prevents solar radiation pressure force from being produced. A method to calculate the region of shadow is presented, and two different shadowing examples are examined --- due to the spacecraft bus, and due to the sail itself. Combining all of the above, an attitude control simulation of the sail model is presented. A simple PD controller combined with the control allocation scheme is used to provide the control torque for the sail, with which the spacecraft must orient towards a number of pre-specified attitude targets. Several attitude

  20. Globally stable control laws for the attitude maneuver problem - Tracking control and adaptive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, John T.; Kreutz, Kenneth

    1988-01-01

    An approach using a globally nonsingular representation is proposed for the attitude control problem of a rigid body. The attitude dynamics are described by the nonlinear Euler equation together with the nonlinear kinematic equations which relate a representation of attitude to the angular velocity of the body. When this approach is combined with an energy-motivated Lyapunov function, a large class of globally stable attitude control laws can be derived. This class includes model-independent tracking control, model-dependent tracking control, and adaptive control, allowing tradeoffs between controller complexity, attainable performance, and available model information.

  1. Position and attitude tracking control for a quadrotor UAV.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Jing-Jing; Zheng, En-Hui

    2014-05-01

    A synthesis control method is proposed to perform the position and attitude tracking control of the dynamical model of a small quadrotor unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), where the dynamical model is underactuated, highly-coupled and nonlinear. Firstly, the dynamical model is divided into a fully actuated subsystem and an underactuated subsystem. Secondly, a controller of the fully actuated subsystem is designed through a novel robust terminal sliding mode control (TSMC) algorithm, which is utilized to guarantee all state variables converge to their desired values in short time, the convergence time is so small that the state variables are acted as time invariants in the underactuated subsystem, and, a controller of the underactuated subsystem is designed via sliding mode control (SMC), in addition, the stabilities of the subsystems are demonstrated by Lyapunov theory, respectively. Lastly, in order to demonstrate the robustness of the proposed control method, the aerodynamic forces and moments and air drag taken as external disturbances are taken into account, the obtained simulation results show that the synthesis control method has good performance in terms of position and attitude tracking when faced with external disturbances. PMID:24534327

  2. The Spartan attitude control system - Control electronics assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    The Spartan attitude control system (ACS) represents an evolutionary development of the previous STRAP-5 ACS through the use of state-of-the-art microprocessors and hardware. Despite a gyro rate signal noise problem that caused the early depletion of argon gas, the Spartan 101 experiment was able to collect several hours of data from two targets. Attention is presently given to the ACS sequencer module, sensor interface box, valve driver box, control electronics software, jam tables, and sequencer programs.

  3. Three-axis active magnetic attitude control asymptotical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, M. Yu.; Roldugin, D. S.; Penkov, V. I.

    2015-05-01

    Active magnetic attitude control system providing given inertial attitude is considered. Control algorithm is constructed on the basis of a planar motion model. It decreases attitude discrepancy. Alternative approach is based on the PD-controller design. System behavior is analyzed for specific motion cases and sometimes for specific inertia tensor (axisymmetrical satellite) using averaging technique. Overall satellite angular motion is covered. Necessary attitude is found to be accessible for some control parameters. Stability is proven and optimal algorithm parameters are obtained. Floquet-based analysis is performed to verify and broaden analytical results.

  4. Attitude and vibration control of a large flexible space-based antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, S. M.

    1982-01-01

    Control systems synthesis is considered for controlling the rigid body attitude and elastic motion of a large deployable space-based antenna. Two methods for control systems synthesis are considered. The first method utilizes the stability and robustness properties of the controller consisting of torque actuators and collocated attitude and rate sensors. The second method is based on the linear-quadratic-Gaussian control theory. A combination of the two methods, which results in a two level hierarchical control system, is also briefly discussed. The performance of the controllers is analyzed by computing the variances of pointing errors, feed misalignment errors and surface contour errors in the presence of sensor and actuator noise.

  5. SP-100 attitude control pathfinder study. Technical information report

    SciTech Connect

    Eke, F.O.; Graff, S.H.; Laskin, R.A.; Swan, P.A.

    1984-03-01

    This report delineates the scope of Jet Propulsion Laboratory`s FY`83 effort in the attitude control area in support of the SP-100 program. Dynamic modeling of the baseline beam configuration has been conducted and is presented herein. As a first cut, the beam is treated as rigid. Its inherent flexibility is then integrated via the hybrid coordinates method. Using the resulting dynamical equations, a preliminary look at attitude control is taken. Only one axis of rotational one flexible mode are included. An alternative to the beam configuration is one that envisions connecting basebody to user via a long, lightweight, flexible tether. A literature search has been conducted in this area and the resulting bibliography is presented. The tether option is not considered viable near term. However, it offers several potentially significant advantages and thus deserves serious consideration for the next generation space power system. This report also treats attitude control constraints imposed by the high temperature and radiation environment and addresses the issue of hardware requirements and availability. Recommendations for FY`84 tasks include assembling and exercising a simulation program for the beam configuration dynamic model and conducting a technology assessment in the area of tether dynamics and control.

  6. Finite-time output feedback attitude coordination control for formation flying spacecraft without unwinding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yong; Song, Shen-Min; Li, Xue-Hui

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, two finite-time attitude coordinated controllers for formation flying spacecraft are investigated based on rotation matrix. Because rotation matrix can represent the set of attitudes both globally and uniquely, the two controllers can deal with unwinding that can result in extra fuel consumption. To address the lack of angular velocity measurement, the second attitude coordinated controller is given by using a novel filter. Through homogeneous method and Lyapunov theories, it is shown that the proposed controllers can achieve the finite-time stability. Numerical simulations also demonstrate that the proposed control schemes are effective.

  7. Dynamic and attitude control characteristics of an International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sutter, Thomas R.; Cooper, Paul A.; Young, John W.; Mccutchen, Don K.

    1987-01-01

    The structural dynamic characteristics of the International Space Station (ISS), the interim reference configuration established for NASA's Space Station developmental program, are discussed, and a finite element model is described. Modes and frequencies of the station below 2.0 Hz are derived, and the dynamic response of the station is simulated for an external impulse load corresponding to a failed shuttle-docking maneuver. A three-axis attitude control system regulates the ISS orientation, with control moment gyros responding to attitude and attitude rate signals. No instabilities were found in the attitude control system.

  8. TSS subsatellite attitude dynamics and control laws verification programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venditti, Floriano

    1987-01-01

    A dynamic model of the Tethered Satellite System (TSS) and of the relevant simulation program, developed in order to provide the dynamic analysis support for the design verification of the subsatellite attitude control, is presented. Special care was spent in the satellite attitude dynamic analysis and the model was specifically conceived to this aim. The way in which the simulation results can be utilized for the verification and testing of the attitude control is also presented.

  9. Nonlinear Least Squares Method for Gyros Bias and Attitude Estimation Using Satellite Attitude and Orbit Toolbox for Matlab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, W. R.; Kuga, H. K.; Zanardi, M. C.

    2015-10-01

    The knowledge of the attitude determination is essential to the safety and control of the satellite and payload, and this involves approaches of nonlinear estimation techniques. Here one focuses on determining the attitude and the gyros drift of a real satellite CBERS-2 (China Brazil Earth Resources Satellite) using simulated measurements provided by propagator PROPAT Satellite Attitude and Orbit Toolbox for Matlab. The method used for the estimation was the Nonlinear Least Squares Estimation (NLSE). The attitude dynamical model is described by nonlinear equations involving the Euler angles. The attitude sensors available are two DSS (Digital Sun Sensor), two IRES (Infra-Red Earth Sensor), and one triad of mechanical gyros. The two IRES give direct measurements of roll and pitch angles with a certain level of error. The two DSS are nonlinear functions of roll, pitch, and yaw attitude angles. Gyros are very important sensors, as they provide direct incremental angles or angular velocities. However gyros present several sources of error of which the drift is the most troublesome. Results show that one can reach accuracies in attitude determination within the prescribed requirements, besides providing estimates of the gyro drifts which can be further used to enhance the gyro error model.

  10. Study of tethered satellite active attitude control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colombo, G.

    1982-01-01

    Existing software was adapted for the study of tethered subsatellite rotational dynamics, an analytic solution for a stable configuration of a tethered subsatellite was developed, the analytic and numerical integrator (computer) solutions for this "test case' was compared in a two mass tether model program (DUMBEL), the existing multiple mass tether model (SKYHOOK) was modified to include subsatellite rotational dynamics, the analytic "test case,' was verified, and the use of the SKYHOOK rotational dynamics capability with a computer run showing the effect of a single off axis thruster on the behavior of the subsatellite was demonstrated. Subroutines for specific attitude control systems are developed and applied to the study of the behavior of the tethered subsatellite under realistic on orbit conditions. The effect of all tether "inputs,' including pendular oscillations, air drag, and electrodynamic interactions, on the dynamic behavior of the tether are included.

  11. Attitude Control Performance of IRVE-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillman, Robert A.; Gsell, Valerie T.; Bowden, Ernest L.

    2013-01-01

    The Inflatable Reentry Vehicle Experiment 3 (IRVE-3) launched July 23, 2012, from NASA Wallops Flight Facility and successfully performed its mission, demonstrating both the survivability of a hypersonic inflatable aerodynamic decelerator in the reentry heating environment and the effect of an offset center of gravity on the aeroshell's flight L/D. The reentry vehicle separated from the launch vehicle, released and inflated its aeroshell, reoriented for atmospheric entry, and mechanically shifted its center of gravity before reaching atmospheric interface. Performance data from the entire mission was telemetered to the ground for analysis. This paper discusses the IRVE-3 mission scenario, reentry vehicle design, and as-flown performance of the attitude control system in the different phases of the mission.

  12. Operational Implementation of Mars Express Orbit and Attitude Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Companys, V.; Keil, J.; Rivero, E.; Mueller, M.; de La Fuente, S.; Perez, P.

    further orbit manoeuvres were executed to change the orbital plane and reduce the apocentre height. Operational orbit was reached on January 28th . Since then, intensive science operations are being conducted. The Mars Express Flight Dynamics command generation team has been in charge of providing command support for the Attitude and Orbit Control and Measurement Subsystem (AOCMS) of the spacecraft. This paper deals with the operational implementation of this support. Activities related to operations that required special support are highlighted. Innovative methods for the implementation of attitude control are described. The approach for delta-V manoeuvre implementation is shown.

  13. An automated method of tuning an attitude estimator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, Paul A. C.; Mook, D. Joseph

    1995-01-01

    Attitude determination is a major element of the operation and maintenance of a spacecraft. There are several existing methods of determining the attitude of a spacecraft. One of the most commonly used methods utilizes the Kalman filter to estimate the attitude of the spacecraft. Given an accurate model of a system and adequate observations, a Kalman filter can produce accurate estimates of the attitude. If the system model, filter parameters, or observations are inaccurate, the attitude estimates may be degraded. Therefore, it is advantageous to develop a method of automatically tuning the Kalman filter to produce the accurate estimates. In this paper, a three-axis attitude determination Kalman filter, which uses only magnetometer measurements, is developed and tested using real data. The appropriate filter parameters are found via the Process Noise Covariance Estimator (PNCE). The PNCE provides an optimal criterion for determining the best filter parameters.

  14. MSFC Skylab attitude and pointing control system mission evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    The results of detailed performance analyses of the attitude and pointing control system in-orbit hardware and software on Skylab are reported. Performance is compared with requirements, test results, and prelaunch predictions. A brief history of the altitude and pointing control system evolution leading to the launch configuration is presented. The report states that the attitude and pointing system satisfied all requirements.

  15. The Relationship of Pupil Control Ideology to Students' Rights Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lynn

    As a result of increased court intervention in favor of students' rights, a review of a sample of teachers concerning their attitudes about student control was examined. Taking into consideration the teachers' attitudes concerning student rights, the Pupil Control Ideology test and the Students' Rights Acceptance Scale were used as measurement…

  16. IMP-J attitude control prelaunch analysis and operations plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooper, H. L.; Mckendrew, J. B.; Repass, G. D.

    1973-01-01

    A description of the attitude control support being supplied for the Explorer 50 mission is given. Included in the document are descriptions of the computer programs being used to support attitude determination, prediction, and control for the mission and descriptions of the operating procedures that will be used to accomplish mission objectives.

  17. Application of a microprocessor to a spacecraft attitude control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, D. H.; Hermann, F. W.

    1980-01-01

    The attitude control system (ACS) microprocessor development work spanned three main design areas: hardware and instruction set, ACS firmware, and hardware firmware verification testing. The processor hardware utilizes two parallel 4 bit microprocessors. The firmware includes data processing for five sensors, four attitude control laws, and telemetry and commands.

  18. Spacecraft attitude control using neuro-fuzzy approximation of the optimal controllers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Woo; Park, Sang-Young; Park, Chandeok

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a neuro-fuzzy controller (NFC) was developed for spacecraft attitude control to mitigate large computational load of the state-dependent Riccati equation (SDRE) controller. The NFC was developed by training a neuro-fuzzy network to approximate the SDRE controller. The stability of the NFC was numerically verified using a Lyapunov-based method, and the performance of the controller was analyzed in terms of approximation ability, steady-state error, cost, and execution time. The simulations and test results indicate that the developed NFC efficiently approximates the SDRE controller, with asymptotic stability in a bounded region of angular velocity encompassing the operational range of rapid-attitude maneuvers. In addition, it was shown that an approximated optimal feedback controller can be designed successfully through neuro-fuzzy approximation of the optimal open-loop controller.

  19. New attitude penalty functions for spacecraft optimal control problems

    SciTech Connect

    Schaub, H.; Junkins, J.L.; Robinett, R.D.

    1996-03-01

    A solution of a spacecraft optimal control problem, whose cost function relies on an attitude description, usually depends on the choice of attitude coordinates used. A problem could be solved using 3-2-1 Euler angles or using classical Rodriguez parameters and yield two different ``optimal`` solutions, unless the performance index in invariant with respect to the attitude coordinate choice. Another problem arising with many attitude coordinates is that they have no sense of when a body has tumbled beyond 180{degrees} from the reference attitude. In many such cases it would be easier (i.e. cost less) to let the body complete the revolution than to force it to reverse the rotation and return to the desired attitude. This paper develops a universal attitude penalty function g() whose value is independent of the attitude coordinates chosen to represent it. Furthermore, this function will achieve its maximum value only when a principal rotation of {plus_minus}180{degrees} from the target state is performed. This will implicitly permit the g() function to sense the shortest rotational distance back to the reference state. An attitude penalty function which depends on the Modified Rodriguez Parameters (MRP) will also be presented. These recently discovered MRPs are a non-singular three-parameter set which can describe any three-attitude. This MRP penalty function is simpler than the attitude coordinate independent g() function, but retains the useful property of avoiding lengthy principal rotations of more than {plus_minus}180{degrees}.

  20. Attitude control with realization of linear error dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paielli, Russell A.; Bach, Ralph E.

    1993-01-01

    An attitude control law is derived to realize linear unforced error dynamics with the attitude error defined in terms of rotation group algebra (rather than vector algebra). Euler parameters are used in the rotational dynamics model because they are globally nonsingular, but only the minimal three Euler parameters are used in the error dynamics model because they have no nonlinear mathematical constraints to prevent the realization of linear error dynamics. The control law is singular only when the attitude error angle is exactly pi rad about any eigenaxis, and a simple intuitive modification at the singularity allows the control law to be used globally. The forced error dynamics are nonlinear but stable. Numerical simulation tests show that the control law performs robustly for both initial attitude acquisition and attitude control.

  1. Adaptive Jacobian Fuzzy Attitude Control for Flexible Spacecraft Combined Attitude and Sun Tracking System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chak, Yew-Chung; Varatharajoo, Renuganth

    2016-07-01

    Many spacecraft attitude control systems today use reaction wheels to deliver precise torques to achieve three-axis attitude stabilization. However, irrecoverable mechanical failure of reaction wheels could potentially lead to mission interruption or total loss. The electrically-powered Solar Array Drive Assemblies (SADA) are usually installed in the pitch axis which rotate the solar arrays to track the Sun, can produce torques to compensate for the pitch-axis wheel failure. In addition, the attitude control of a flexible spacecraft poses a difficult problem. These difficulties include the strong nonlinear coupled dynamics between the rigid hub and flexible solar arrays, and the imprecisely known system parameters, such as inertia matrix, damping ratios, and flexible mode frequencies. In order to overcome these drawbacks, the adaptive Jacobian tracking fuzzy control is proposed for the combined attitude and sun-tracking control problem of a flexible spacecraft during attitude maneuvers in this work. For the adaptation of kinematic and dynamic uncertainties, the proposed scheme uses an adaptive sliding vector based on estimated attitude velocity via approximate Jacobian matrix. The unknown nonlinearities are approximated by deriving the fuzzy models with a set of linguistic If-Then rules using the idea of sector nonlinearity and local approximation in fuzzy partition spaces. The uncertain parameters of the estimated nonlinearities and the Jacobian matrix are being adjusted online by an adaptive law to realize feedback control. The attitude of the spacecraft can be directly controlled with the Jacobian feedback control when the attitude pointing trajectory is designed with respect to the spacecraft coordinate frame itself. A significant feature of this work is that the proposed adaptive Jacobian tracking scheme will result in not only the convergence of angular position and angular velocity tracking errors, but also the convergence of estimated angular velocity to

  2. Fuzzy attitude control for a nanosatellite in leo orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, Daniel; Laverón-Simavilla, Ana; Lapuerta, Victoria; Aviles, Taisir

    Fuzzy logic controllers are flexible and simple, suitable for small satellites Attitude Determination and Control Subsystems (ADCS). In this work, a tailored fuzzy controller is designed for a nanosatellite and is compared with a traditional Proportional Integrative Derivative (PID) controller. Both control methodologies are compared within the same specific mission. The orbit height varies along the mission from injection at around 380 km down to a 200 km height orbit, and the mission requires pointing accuracy over the whole time. Due to both the requirements imposed by such a low orbit, and the limitations in the power available for the attitude control, a robust and efficient ADCS is required. For these reasons a fuzzy logic controller is implemented as the brain of the ADCS and its performance and efficiency are compared to a traditional PID. The fuzzy controller is designed in three separated controllers, each one acting on one of the Euler angles of the satellite in an orbital frame. The fuzzy memberships are constructed taking into account the mission requirements, the physical properties of the satellite and the expected performances. Both methodologies, fuzzy and PID, are fine-tuned using an automated procedure to grant maximum efficiency with fixed performances. Finally both methods are probed in different environments to test their characteristics. The simulations show that the fuzzy controller is much more efficient (up to 65% less power required) in single maneuvers, achieving similar, or even better, precision than the PID. The accuracy and efficiency improvement of the fuzzy controller increase with orbit height because the environmental disturbances decrease, approaching the ideal scenario. A brief mission description is depicted as well as the design process of both ADCS controllers. Finally the validation process and the results obtained during the simulations are described. Those results show that the fuzzy logic methodology is valid for small

  3. Method and apparatus for rate integration supplement for attitude referencing with quaternion differencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodden, John James (Inventor); Price, Xenophon (Inventor); Carrou, Stephane (Inventor); Stevens, Homer Darling (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A control system for providing attitude control in spacecraft. The control system comprising a primary attitude reference system, a secondary attitude reference system, and a hyper-complex number differencing system. The hyper-complex number differencing system is connectable to the primary attitude reference system and the secondary attitude reference system.

  4. RECOGNIZING FARMERS' ATTITUDES AND IMPLEMENTING NONPOINT SOURCE POLLUTION CONTROL POLICIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report examines the role of farmer attitudes and corresponding communication activities in the implementation of nonpoint source water pollution control programs. The report begins with an examination of the basis for and function of attitudes in influencing behavior. The ro...

  5. Anti-sway control of tethered satellite systems using attitude control of the main satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefian, Peyman; Salarieh, Hassan

    2015-06-01

    In this study a new method is introduced to suppress libration of a tethered satellite system (TSS). It benefits from coupling between satellites and tether libration dynamics. The control concept uses the main satellite attitude maneuvers to suppress librational motion of the tether, and the main satellite's actuators for attitude control are used as the only actuation in the system. The study considers planar motion of a two body TSS system in a circular orbit and it is assumed that the tether's motion will not change it. Governing dynamic equations of motion are derived using the extended Lagrange method. Controllability of the system around the equilibrium state is studied and a linear LQG controller is designed to regulate libration of the system. Tether tension and satellite attitude are assumed as only measurable outputs of the system. The Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) is used to estimate states of the system to be used as feedback to the controller. The designed controller and observer are implemented to the nonlinear plant and simulations demonstrate that the controller lead to reduction of the tether libration propoerly. By the way, because the controller is linear, it is applicable only at low amplitudes in the vicinity of equilibrium point. To reach global stability, a nonlinear controller is demanded.

  6. Spacecraft attitude control using a smart control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, Brian; Wheatcraft, Louis

    1992-01-01

    Traditionally, spacecraft attitude control has been implemented using control loops written in native code for a space hardened processor. The Naval Research Lab has taken this approach during the development of the Attitude Control Electronics (ACE) package. After the system was developed and delivered, NRL decided to explore alternate technologies to accomplish this same task more efficiently. The approach taken by NRL was to implement the ACE control loops using systems technologies. The purpose of this effort was to: (1) research capabilities required of an expert system in processing a classic closed-loop control algorithm; (2) research the development environment required to design and test an embedded expert systems environment; (3) research the complexity of design and development of expert systems versus a conventional approach; and (4) test the resulting systems against the flight acceptance test software for both response and accuracy. Two expert systems were selected to implement the control loops. Criteria used for the selection of the expert systems included that they had to run in both embedded systems and ground based environments. Using two different expert systems allowed a comparison of the real-time capabilities, inferencing capabilities, and the ground-based development environment. The two expert systems chosen for the evaluation were Spacecraft Command Language (SCL), and NEXTPERT Object. SCL is a smart control system produced for the NRL by Interface and Control Systems (ICS). SCL was developed to be used for real-time command, control, and monitoring of a new generation of spacecraft. NEXPERT Object is a commercially available product developed by Neuron Data. Results of the effort were evaluated using the ACE test bed. The ACE test bed had been developed and used to test the original flight hardware and software using simulators and flight-like interfaces. The test bed was used for testing the expert systems in a 'near-flight' environment

  7. Optimal periodic control for spacecraft pointing and attitude determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pittelkau, Mark E.

    1993-01-01

    A new approach to autonomous magnetic roll/yaw control of polar-orbiting, nadir-pointing momentum bias spacecraft is considered as the baseline attitude control system for the next Tiros series. It is shown that the roll/yaw dynamics with magnetic control are periodically time varying. An optimal periodic control law is then developed. The control design features a state estimator that estimates attitude, attitude rate, and environmental torque disturbances from Earth sensor and sun sensor measurements; no gyros are needed. The state estimator doubles as a dynamic attitude determination and prediction function. In addition to improved performance, the optimal controller allows a much smaller momentum bias than would otherwise be necessary. Simulation results are given.

  8. Second Language Learners' Attitudes towards the Methods of Learning Vocabulary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ali, Zuraina; Mukundan, Jayakaran; Baki, Roselan; Ayub, Ahmad Fauzi Mohd

    2012-01-01

    The paper aims at investigating students' learning attitudes after they are exposed to three vocabulary learning methods, namely Contextual Clues, Dictionary Strategy and Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL). The study involves 123 undergraduates, who were surveyed to identify the factors that affect their attitudes in learning vocabulary…

  9. Interior and exterior ballistics coupled optimization with constraints of attitude control and mechanical-thermal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xin-xin; Zhang, Nai-min; Zhang, Yan

    2016-07-01

    For solid launch vehicle performance promotion, a modeling method of interior and exterior ballistics associated optimization with constraints of attitude control and mechanical-thermal condition is proposed. Firstly, the interior and external ballistic models of the solid launch vehicle are established, and the attitude control model of the high wind area and the stage of the separation is presented, and the load calculation model of the drag reduction device is presented, and thermal condition calculation model of flight is presented. Secondly, the optimization model is established to optimize the range, which has internal and external ballistic design parameters as variables selected by sensitivity analysis, and has attitude control and mechanical-thermal conditions as constraints. Finally, the method is applied to the optimal design of a three stage solid launch vehicle simulation with differential evolution algorithm. Simulation results are shown that range capability is improved by 10.8%, and both attitude control and mechanical-thermal conditions are satisfied.

  10. Altazimuth mount based dynamic calibration method for GNSS attitude measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nan; He, Tao; Sun, Shaohua; Gu, Qing

    2015-02-01

    As the key process to ensure the test accuracy and quality, the dynamic calibration of the GNSS attitude measuring instrument is often embarrassed by the lack of the rigid enough test platform and an accurate enough calibration reference. To solve the problems, a novel dynamic calibration method for GNSS attitude measurement based on altazimuth mount is put forward in this paper. The principle and implementation of this method are presented, and then the feasibility and usability of the method are analyzed in detail involving the applicability of the mount, calibrating precision, calibrating range, base line rigidity and the satellite signal involved factors. Furthermore, to verify and test the method, a confirmatory experiment is carried out with the survey ship GPS attitude measuring instrument, and the experimental results prove that it is a feasible way to the dynamic calibration for GNSS attitude measurement.

  11. Model-reference attitude control and reaction control jet engine placement for space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boland, J. S., III

    1973-01-01

    Analytical studies on the theoretical aspects of thrust vector control of large space vehicles were conducted. A system for attitude control of the space shuttle vehicle was developed. Major accomplishments of the project are: (1) investigation of a model-reference adaptive control scheme for controlling the space shuttle attitude and (2) determination of optimum placement of reaction control jet engines on space shuttles.

  12. Periodic attitude control of a slowly spinning spacecraft.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Todosiev, E. P.

    1973-01-01

    A periodic attitude control system is presented which permits control of secular errors of a slowly spinning spacecraft operating in a high disturbance environment. Attitude errors of the spin-axis are detected by sun sensors (or rate gyros) and are controlled by a periodic control law which modulates external control torques generated by mass expulsion torquers. Attitude stability during the uncontrolled periods is obtained passively via the vehicle spin momentum. Equations of motion, a system block diagram, and design parameters are presented for a typical spacecraft application. Simulation results are included which demonstrate the feasibility of the novel control concept. Salient features of the periodic control approach are implementation simplicity, excellent response, and a propellant utilization efficiency greater than 75 percent.

  13. Satellite attitude prediction by multiple time scales method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tao, Y. C.; Ramnath, R.

    1975-01-01

    An investigation is made of the problem of predicting the attitude of satellites under the influence of external disturbing torques. The attitude dynamics are first expressed in a perturbation formulation which is then solved by the multiple scales approach. The independent variable, time, is extended into new scales, fast, slow, etc., and the integration is carried out separately in the new variables. The theory is applied to two different satellite configurations, rigid body and dual spin, each of which may have an asymmetric mass distribution. The disturbing torques considered are gravity gradient and geomagnetic. Finally, as multiple time scales approach separates slow and fast behaviors of satellite attitude motion, this property is used for the design of an attitude control device. A nutation damping control loop, using the geomagnetic torque for an earth pointing dual spin satellite, is designed in terms of the slow equation.

  14. Attitude Control Optimization for ROCSAT-2 Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chern, Jeng-Shing; Wu, A.-M.

    one revolution. The purpose of this paper is to present the attitude control design optimization such that the maximum solar energy is ingested while minimum maneuvering energy is dissipated. The strategy includes the maneuvering sequence design, the minimization of angular path, the sizing of three magnetic torquers, and the trade-off of the size, number and orientations arrangement of momentum wheels.

  15. A system for spacecraft attitude control and energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaughnessy, J. D.

    1974-01-01

    A conceptual design for a double-gimbal reaction-wheel energy-wheel device which has three-axis attitude control and electrical energy storage capability is given. A mathematical model for the three-axis gyroscope (TAG) was developed, and a system of multiple units is proposed for attitude control and energy storage for a class of spacecraft. Control laws were derived to provide the required attitude-control torques and energy transfer while minimizing functions of TAG gimbal angles, gimbal rates, reaction-wheel speeds, and energy-wheel speed differences. A control law is also presented for a magnetic torquer desaturation system. A computer simulation of a three-TAG system for an orbiting telescope was used to evaluate the concept. The results of the study indicate that all control and power requirements can be satisfied by using the TAG concept.

  16. The development and demonstration of hybrid programmable attitude control electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, L. S.; Kopf, E. H., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    In the course of extended life attitude control system (ELACS) research sponsored by NASA a hybrid programable attitude control electronics (HYPACE) concept was developed and demonstrated. The wide variety of future planetary missions demanded a new control approach to accommodate the automatic fault tolerance and long the life requirements of such missions. HYPACE provides an adaptable, analog/digital design approach that permits preflight and in-flight accommodation of mission changes, component performance variations, and spacecraft changes, through programing. This enabled broad multimission flexibility of application in a cost effective manner. Previously, flight control computers have not been not flown on planetary missions because of weight and power problems. These problems were resolved in the design of HYPACE. The HYPACE design, which was demonstrated in breadboard form on a single-axis gas-bearing spacecraft simulation, uses a single control channel to perform the attitude control functions sequentially, thus significantly reducing the number of component parts over hard-wired designs.

  17. Attitude Control System Design for the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starin, Scott R.; Bourkland, Kristin L.; Kuo-Chia, Liu; Mason, Paul A. C.; Vess, Melissa F.; Andrews, Stephen F.; Morgenstern, Wendy M.

    2005-01-01

    The Solar Dynamics Observatory mission, part of the Living With a Star program, will place a geosynchronous satellite in orbit to observe the Sun and relay data to a dedicated ground station at all times. SDO remains Sun- pointing throughout most of its mission for the instruments to take measurements of the Sun. The SDO attitude control system is a single-fault tolerant design. Its fully redundant attitude sensor complement includes 16 coarse Sun sensors, a digital Sun sensor, 3 two-axis inertial reference units, 2 star trackers, and 4 guide telescopes. Attitude actuation is performed using 4 reaction wheels and 8 thrusters, and a single main engine nominally provides velocity-change thrust. The attitude control software has five nominal control modes-3 wheel-based modes and 2 thruster-based modes. A wheel-based Safehold running in the attitude control electronics box improves the robustness of the system as a whole. All six modes are designed on the same basic proportional-integral-derivative attitude error structure, with more robust modes setting their integral gains to zero. The paper details the mode designs and their uses.

  18. Integrated Attitude Control Strategy for the Asteroid Redirect Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Pedro, Jr.; Price, Hoppy; San Martin, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    A deep-space mission has been proposed to redirect an asteroid to a distant retrograde orbit around the moon using a robotic vehicle, the Asteroid Redirect Vehicle (ARV). In this orbit, astronauts will rendezvous with the ARV using the Orion spacecraft. The integrated attitude control concept that Orion will use for approach and docking and for mated operations will be described. Details of the ARV's attitude control system and its associated constraints for redirecting the asteroid to the distant retrograde orbit around the moon will be provided. Once Orion is docked to the ARV, an overall description of the mated stack attitude during all phases of the mission will be presented using a coordinate system that was developed for this mission. Next, the thermal and power constraints of both the ARV and Orion will be discussed as well as how they are used to define the optimal integrated stack attitude. Lastly, the lighting and communications constraints necessary for the crew's extravehicular activity planned to retrieve samples from the asteroid will be examined. Similarly, the joint attitude control strategy that employs both the Orion and the ARV attitude control assets prior, during, and after each extravehicular activity will also be thoroughly discussed.

  19. Precision Integrated Power and Attitude Control System (IPACS) in the Presence of Dynamic Uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, D.; MacKunis, W.; Fitz-Coy, N.; Dixon, W. E.

    2011-01-01

    An adaptive robust integrated power and attitude control system (IPACS) is presented for a variable speed control moment gyroscope (VSCMG)-actuated satellite. The developed IPACS method is capable of achieving precision attitude control while simultaneously achieving asymptotic power tracking for a rigid-body satellite in the presence of uncertain friction in the VSCMG gimbals and wheels. In addition, the developed controller compensates for the effects of uncertain, time-varying satellite inertia properties. Some challenges encountered in the control design are that the control input is premultiplied by a nonsquare, time-varying, nonlinear, uncertain matrix and is embedded in a discontinuous nonlinear. Globally uniformly ultimately bounded attitude tracking and asymptotic power tracking results are proven via Lyapunov stability analyses, and simulation results are provided to demonstrate the performance of the controller.

  20. Three-Axis Attitude Control With a Single Wheel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Studer, P. A.

    1987-01-01

    Single-device attitude-control system provides stabilization along three axes. Flywheel connected to electronically controlled motor rotates on magnetic bearing. At high rotational speed, small angular displacements about x and y axes, in response to control signals enable storage of relatively large amounts of angular momentum. Angular momentum about z axis stored in changes in rotational speed.

  1. Evolution of spacecraft attitude control concepts before 1952

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberson, R. E.

    1977-01-01

    The control of rotational motion of a spacecraft during its free flight regime is traced from pioneer space flight to the year 1952. Essentials of attitude control systems are reviewed and spin stabilization is examined. Other topics include passive stabilization and active closed loop control.

  2. Design study for LANDSAT D attitude control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iwens, R. P.; Bernier, G. E.; Hofstadter, R. F.

    1976-01-01

    A design and performance evaluation is presented for the LANDSAT D attitude control system (ACS). Control and configuration of the gimballed Ku-band antenna system for communication with the tracking and data relay satellite (TDRS). Control of the solar array drive considered part of the ACS is also addressed.

  3. Model reference adaptive attitude control of spacecraft using reaction wheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Sahjendra N.

    1986-01-01

    A nonlinear model reference adaptive control law for large angle rotational maneuvers of spacecraft using reaction wheels in the presence of uncertainty is presented. The derivation of control law does not require any information on the values of the system parameters and the disturbance torques acting on the spacecraft. The controller includes a dynamic system in the feedback path. The control law is a nonlinear function of the attitude error, the rate of the attitude error, and the compensator state. Simulation results are prsented to show that large angle rotational maneuvers can be performed in spite of the uncertainty in the system.

  4. Propellantless Attitude Control of Solar Sail Technology Utilizing Reflective Control Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munday, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Solar sails offer an opportunity for a CubeSatscale, propellant-free spacecraft technology that enables long-term and long-distance missions not possible with traditional methods. Solar sails operate using the transfer of linear momentum from photons of sunlight reflected from the surface of the sail. To propel the spacecraft, no mechanically moving parts, thrusters, or propellant are needed. However, attitude control, or orientation, is still performed using traditional methods involving reaction wheels and propellant ejection, which severely limit mission lifetime. For example, the current state of the art solutions employed by upcoming missions couple solar sails with a state of the art propellant ejection gas system. Here, the use of the gas thruster has limited the lifetime of the mission. To solve the limited mission lifetime problem, the Propellantless Attitude Control of Solar Sail Technology Utilizing Reflective Control Devices project team is working on propellantless attitude control using thin layers of material, an optical film, electrically switchable from transparent to reflective. The technology is based on a polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (PDLC), which allows this switch upon application of a voltage. This technology removes the need for propellant, which reduces weight and cost while improving performance and lifetime.

  5. Investigation on attitude disturbance control and vibration suppression for fuel-filled flexible spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiao-Juan; Yue, Bao-Zeng; Wu, Wen-Jun

    2015-08-01

    This paper is mainly focused on the attitude dynamics and control of a fuel-filled flexible spacecraft subjected to the thermal payload during eclipse transitions. The flexible appendages are considered as Euler-Bernoulli beams, and the sloshing liquid is modeled as in two modes multi-spring-mass models; the governing equations of this coupled system are developed by using Hamilton's principle. Numerical results show that the spacecraft attitude responses consist of a quasi-static displacement and superimposed vibration. Then, we design an adaptive sliding mode and use the Lyapunov approach control law to control the attitude disturbance and suppress the thermal jitter and liquid sloshing for the fuel filled flexible spacecraft subject to the thermal payload. Numerical results are presented to verify the efficiency of the hybrid control methods. The results show that the adaptive sliding mode method might be effective to handle the steady-state errors and the Lyapunov control algorithm would suppress the residual vibration.

  6. Attitude control schemes for the first recovery mission of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, N. K.; Chinnaponnu, V.; Krishnakumar, E.; Natarajan, P.; Agrawal, V. K.; Malik, N. K.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the attitude control schemes for the various phases such as acquisition, on-orbit, orbit maneuver, de-boost maneuvers and coast phases of the India's first recovery mission Space Capsule Recovery Experiment-I (SRE-1). During the on-orbit phase, the SRE was configured to point the negative roll axis to Sun. The attitude referencing of SRE-1 was based on dry tuned gyros with updates from the attitude determined using on-board Sun sensors and magnetometer. For attitude acquisition, attitude maneuvers and for providing the velocity corrections for de-orbiting operations; a set of eight thrusters grouped in functionally redundant blocks were used. The control scheme with thrusters was based on proportional derivative controller with a modulator. In order to ensure micro-gravity environment during the on-orbit payload operations a linear quadratic regulator (LQR) based control scheme was designed to drive an orthogonal configuration of magnetic torquers which in turn produced three-axis control torque with the interaction of Earth's magnetic field. Proportional derivative control scheme with modulator was designed to track the steering commands during the velocity reduction as well as during the coasting phase of the de-orbiting operations. A novel thruster failure detection, isolation and reconfiguration scheme implemented on-board for the de-orbiting phase is also discussed in this paper.

  7. Two Axis Pointing System (TAPS) attitude acquisition, determination, and control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azzolini, John D.; Mcglew, David E.

    1990-01-01

    The Two Axis Pointing System (TAPS) is a 2 axis gimbal system designed to provide fine pointing of Space Transportation System (STS) borne instruments. It features center-of-mass instrument mounting and will accommodate instruments of up to 1134 kg (2500 pounds) which fit within a 1.0 by 1.0 by 4.2 meter (40 by 40 by 166 inch) envelope. The TAPS system is controlled by a microcomputer based Control Electronics Assembly (CEA), a Power Distribution Unit (PDU), and a Servo Control Unit (SCU). A DRIRU-II inertial reference unit is used to provide incremental angles for attitude propagation. A Ball Brothers STRAP star tracker is used for attitude acquisition and update. The theory of the TAPS attitude determination and error computation for the Broad Band X-ray Telescope (BBXRT) are described. The attitude acquisition is based upon a 2 star geometric solution. The acquisition theory and quaternion algebra are presented. The attitude control combines classical position, integral and derivative (PID) control with techniques to compensate for coulomb friction (bias torque) and the cable harness crossing the gimbals (spring torque). Also presented is a technique for an adaptive bias torque compensation which adjusts to an ever changing frictional torque environment. The control stability margins are detailed, with the predicted pointing performance, based upon simulation studies. The TAPS user interface, which provides high level operations commands to facilitate science observations, is outlined.

  8. Robustness and Actuator Bandwidth of MRP-Based Sliding Mode Control for Spacecraft Attitude Control Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keum, Jung-Hoon; Ra, Sung-Woong

    2009-12-01

    Nonlinear sliding surface design in variable structure systems for spacecraft attitude control problems is studied. A robustness analysis is performed for regular form of system, and calculation of actuator bandwidth is presented by reviewing sliding surface dynamics. To achieve non-singular attitude description and minimal parameterization, spacecraft attitude control problems are considered based on modified Rodrigues parameters (MRP). It is shown that the derived controller ensures the sliding motion in pre-determined region irrespective of unmodeled effects and disturbances.

  9. Coupled attitude-orbit dynamics and control for an electric sail in a heliocentric transfer mission.

    PubMed

    Huo, Mingying; Zhao, Jun; Xie, Shaobiao; Qi, Naiming

    2015-01-01

    The paper discusses the coupled attitude-orbit dynamics and control of an electric-sail-based spacecraft in a heliocentric transfer mission. The mathematical model characterizing the propulsive thrust is first described as a function of the orbital radius and the sail angle. Since the solar wind dynamic pressure acceleration is induced by the sail attitude, the orbital and attitude dynamics of electric sails are coupled, and are discussed together. Based on the coupled equations, the flight control is investigated, wherein the orbital control is studied in an optimal framework via a hybrid optimization method and the attitude controller is designed based on feedback linearization control. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy, a transfer problem from Earth to Mars is considered. The numerical results show that the proposed strategy can control the coupled system very well, and a small control torque can control both the attitude and orbit. The study in this paper will contribute to the theory study and application of electric sail. PMID:25950179

  10. Coupled Attitude-Orbit Dynamics and Control for an Electric Sail in a Heliocentric Transfer Mission

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Mingying; Zhao, Jun; Xie, Shaobiao; Qi, Naiming

    2015-01-01

    The paper discusses the coupled attitude-orbit dynamics and control of an electric-sail-based spacecraft in a heliocentric transfer mission. The mathematical model characterizing the propulsive thrust is first described as a function of the orbital radius and the sail angle. Since the solar wind dynamic pressure acceleration is induced by the sail attitude, the orbital and attitude dynamics of electric sails are coupled, and are discussed together. Based on the coupled equations, the flight control is investigated, wherein the orbital control is studied in an optimal framework via a hybrid optimization method and the attitude controller is designed based on feedback linearization control. To verify the effectiveness of the proposed control strategy, a transfer problem from Earth to Mars is considered. The numerical results show that the proposed strategy can control the coupled system very well, and a small control torque can control both the attitude and orbit. The study in this paper will contribute to the theory study and application of electric sail. PMID:25950179

  11. Advanced Integrated Power and Attitude Control System (IPACS) study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oglevie, R. E.; Eisenhaure, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    Integrated Power and Attitude Control System (IPACS) studies performed over a decade ago established the feasibility of simultaneously satisfying the demands of energy storage and attitude control through the use of rotating flywheels. It was demonstrated that, for a wide spectrum of applications, such a system possessed many advantages over contemporary energy storage and attitude control approaches. More recent technology advances in composite material rotors, magnetic suspension systems, and power control electronics have triggered new optimism regarding the applicability and merits of this concept. This study is undertaken to define an advanced IPACS and to evaluate its merits for a space station application. System and component designs are developed to establish the performance of this concept and system trade studies conducted to examine the viability of this approach relative to conventional candidate systems. It is clearly demonstrated that an advanced IPACS concept is not only feasible, but also offers substantial savings in mass and life-cycle cost for the space station mission.

  12. On-board attitude determination and control algorithms for SAMPEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flatley, Thomas W.; Forden, Josephine K.; Henretty, Debra A.; Lightsey, E. Glenn; Markley, F. Landis

    1990-01-01

    Algorithms for onboard attitude determination and control of the Solar, Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX) were developed. The algorithms include spacecraft ephemeris and geomagnetic field models, attitude determination with 2 degree accuracy, control of pitch axis pointing to the sun and yaw axis pointing away from the Earth to achieve control of pitch axis within 5 degrees of sunline, momentum unloading, and nutation damping. The closed loop simulations were performed on a VAX 8830 using a prototype version of the on-board software.

  13. NASA Workshop on Hybrid (Mixed-Actuator) Spacecraft Attitude Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dennehy, Cornelius J.; Kunz, Nans

    2014-01-01

    At the request of the Science Mission Directorate Chief Engineer, the NASA Technical Fellow for Guidance, Navigation & Control assembled and facilitated a workshop on Spacecraft Hybrid Attitude Control. This multi-Center, academic, and industry workshop, sponsored by the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC), was held in April 2013 to unite nationwide experts to present and discuss the various innovative solutions, techniques, and lessons learned regarding the development and implementation of the various hybrid attitude control system solutions investigated or implemented. This report attempts to document these key lessons learned with the 16 findings and 9 NESC recommendations.

  14. Applications software supporting the Spartan Attitude Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    The native software supporting a single mission for the Spartan Attitude Control System can require up to 40,000 lines of code. Most of this must be rewritten for each mission. Control system engineers use an array of Applications Software Packages residing in ground computers to write each mission's flight software. These Applications Packages are written in the 'C' programming language and run under the UNIX Operating System. This paper discusses each of the Attitude Control Applications Software Packages, and describes the purpose and design of each.

  15. Factors That Affect Patient Attitudes toward Infection Control Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Daniel J.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    A study investigated patient attitudes toward different disease control measures taken in dental school clinics (n=272 patients) and private practices (n=107 patients). Variables examined included sex, age, educational background, and knowledge of infectious diseases. Patients tended to accept the control measures being used in each context. (MSE)

  16. Weight Control: Attitudes of Dieters and Change Agents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parham, Ellen S.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Survey explores attitudes toward weight loss/weight control among 2 groups of change agents--40 dietitians and 42 fitness instructors--and among 96 people trying to lose weight. Significant differences were found in terms of importance in weight control of diet, drugs, exercise, religion, and will power; in importance of being of normal weight;…

  17. Precision Attitude Control for the BETTII Balloon-Borne Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benford, Dominic J.; Fixsen, Dale J.; Rinehart. Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII) is an 8-meter baseline far-infrared interferometer to fly on a high altitude balloon. Operating at wavelengths of 30-90 microns, BETTII will obtain spatial and spectral information on science targets at angular resolutions down to less than half an arcsecond, a capability unmatched by other far-infrared facilities. This requires attitude control at a level ofless than a tenth of an arcsecond, a great challenge for a lightweight balloon-borne system. We have designed a precision attitude determination system to provide gondola attitude knowledge at a level of 2 milliarcseconds at rates up to 100Hz, with accurate absolute attitude determination at the half arcsecond level at rates of up to 10Hz. A mUlti-stage control system involving rigid body motion and tip-tilt-piston correction provides precision pointing stability to the level required for the far-infrared instrument to perform its spatial/spectral interferometry in an open-loop control. We present key aspects of the design of the attitude determination and control and its development status.

  18. Weight Control Beliefs, Body Shape Attitudes, and Physical Activity among Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Scott B.; Rhea, Deborah J.; Greenleaf, Christy A.; Judd, Doryce E.; Chambliss, Heather O.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Relatively little is known about how perceived weight controllability influences important psychological health factors among adolescents. Thus, the purpose of this study is to explore adolescents' weight controllability beliefs and how those beliefs influence weight-related attitudes and behaviors. Methods: Adolescents (N = 369, mean…

  19. Attitude Dynamics and Control of Solar Sails with Articulated Vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mettler, Edward; Acikmese, A. Behcet; Ploen, Scott R.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we develop a robust nonlinear algorithm for the attitude control of a solar sailcraft with M single degree-of-freedom articulated control vanes. A general attitude controller that tracks an admissible trajectory while rejecting disturbances such as torques due to center-of-mass to center-of-pressure offsets is applied to this problem. We then describe a methodology based on nonlinear programming to allocate the required control torques among the control vanes. A simplified allocation strategy is then applied to a solar sail with four articulated control vanes, and simulation results are given. The performance of the control algorithm and possible limitations of vane-only control are then discussed.

  20. Precision attitude control of the Gravity Probe B satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conklin, J. W.; Adams, M.; Bencze, W. J.; DeBra, D. B.; Green, G.; Herman, L.; Holmes, T.; Muhlfelder, B.; Parkinson, B. W.; Silbergleit, A. S.; Kirschenbaum, J.

    2015-11-01

    The Gravity Probe B satellite used ultra-precise gyroscopes in low Earth orbit to compare the orientation of the local inertial reference frame with that of distant space in order to test predictions of general relativity. The experiment required that the Gravity Probe B spacecraft have milliarcsecond-level attitude knowledge for the science measurement, and milliarcsecond-level control to minimize classical torques acting on the science gyroscopes. The primary sensor was a custom Cassegrainian telescope, which measured the pitch and yaw angles of the experiment package with respect to a guide star. The spacecraft rolled uniformly about the direction to the guide star, and the roll angle was measured by star trackers. Attitude control was performed with sixteen proportional thrusters that used boil-off from the experiment’s liquid Helium cryogen as propellant. This paper summarizes the attitude control system’s design and on-orbit performance.

  1. Crew exploration vehicle (CEV) attitude control using a neural-immunology/memory network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weng, Liguo; Xia, Min; Wang, Wei; Liu, Qingshan

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of the crew exploration vehicle (CEV) attitude control. CEVs are NASA's next-generation human spaceflight vehicles, and they use reaction control system (RCS) jet engines for attitude adjustment, which calls for control algorithms for firing the small propulsion engines mounted on vehicles. In this work, the resultant CEV dynamics combines both actuation and attitude dynamics. Therefore, it is highly nonlinear and even coupled with significant uncertainties. To cope with this situation, a neural-immunology/memory network is proposed. It is inspired by the human memory and immune systems. The control network does not rely on precise system dynamics information. Furthermore, the overall control scheme has a simple structure and demands much less computation as compared with most existing methods, making it attractive for real-time implementation. The effectiveness of this approach is also verified via simulation.

  2. Attitude sensors and attitude-control concepts for next-generation spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balteas, N.; Simon, C.

    The design concept of the attitude sensor being developed for the Tubsat experimental satellite is discussed and illustrated with drawings, diagrams, and photographs. The device is based on a CCD-detector star sensor which determines the attitude angle and the angular velocity of the spacecraft on the basis of any arbitrary star configuration (rather than from the position of a particular star or the earth or sun). The components include a single-chip microcomputer, a D/A converter, the CCD, and control and readout electronics. The sensor operates either in a barbecue mode (to stabilize the rotation rate) or a sun-oriented triaxially stabilized mode (to maintain, during eclipse periods, the attitude set by an analogous sun sensor while the sun is visible). The resolution of the sensor in the latter mode is less than 0.1 deg.

  3. HEAO attitude reference design. [for satellite attitude control and determination subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, D. P.; Mcelroy, T. T.

    1978-01-01

    The paper deals with the precision onboard attitude reference implemented as part of the attitude control and determination subsystem for the three High Energy Astronomy Observatories (HEAO-A, HEAO-B, and HEAO-C) in the HEAO scientific spacecraft program. The first observatory (HEAO-A, designated HEAO-1 when in orbit) was launched successfully into near-earth orbit on August 12, 1977. The HEAO attitude reference, analysis techniques for performance prediction, and flight results from the HEAO-1 observatory during its first months of operation. The HEAO-B design is specifically described and analyzed in terms of gyro processing, kinematic integration, ground update algorithm, and star tracker update algorithm. Attitude reference performance estimates are also discussed. It is shown that the orbital performance of the attitude reference correlates very well with the developmental predictions, thereby validating the analytical techniques used during the development. This validation provides a firm basis from which to extrapolate to other applications and related design concepts.

  4. Semi-Projective Methods, Political Attitudes, and Political Reasoning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binford, Michael B.

    Semi-projective holistic methods in political science research can augment knowledge of political attitudes and political reasoning. Semi-projective methods refer to techniques which present focused or structured stimuli and allow an unrestricted range of responses. Visual stimuli include ink blots, standard drawings, political cartoons, or…

  5. The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) Attitude Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis; Andrews, Stephen F.; ODonnell, James R., Jr.; Ward, David K.; Ericsson, Aprille J.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe mission is designed to produce a map of the cosmic microwave background radiation over the entire celestial sphere by executing a fast spin and a slow precession of its spin axis about the Sun line to obtain a highly interconnected set of measurements. The spacecraft attitude is sensed and controlled using an Inertial Reference Unit, two Autonomous Star Trackers, a Digital Sun Sensor, twelve Coarse Sun Sensors, three Reaction Wheel Assemblies, and a propulsion system. This paper describes the design of the attitude control system that carries out this mission and presents some early flight experience.

  6. Application of square-root filtering for spacecraft attitude control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, J. A.; Schmidt, S. F.; Goka, T.

    1978-01-01

    Suitable digital algorithms are developed and tested for providing on-board precision attitude estimation and pointing control for potential use in the Landsat-D spacecraft. These algorithms provide pointing accuracy of better than 0.01 deg. To obtain necessary precision with efficient software, a six state-variable square-root Kalman filter combines two star tracker measurements to update attitude estimates obtained from processing three gyro outputs. The validity of the estimation and control algorithms are established, and the sensitivity of their performance to various error sources and software parameters are investigated by detailed digital simulation. Spacecraft computer memory, cycle time, and accuracy requirements are estimated.

  7. Flight performance of Skylab attitude and pointing control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, W. B.; Kennel, H. F.; Rupp, C. C.; Seltzer, S. M.

    1975-01-01

    The Skylab attitude and pointing control system (APCS) requirements are briefly reviewed and the way in which they became altered during the prelaunch phase of development is noted. The actual flight mission (including mission alterations during flight) is described. The serious hardware failures that occurred, beginning during ascent through the atmosphere, also are described. The APCS's ability to overcome these failures and meet mission changes are presented. The large around-the-clock support effort on the ground is discussed. Salient design points and software flexibility that should afford pertinent experience for future spacecraft attitude and pointing control system designs are included.

  8. Precise attitude control of the Stanford relativity satellite.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, J. S.; Debra, D. B.

    1973-01-01

    A satellite being designed by the Stanford University to measure (with extremely high precision) the effect of General Relativity is described. Specifically, the satellite will measure two relativistic precessions predicted by the theory: the geodetic effect (6.9 arcsec/yr), due solely to motion about the earth, and the motional effect (0.05 arcsec/yr), due to rotation of the earth. The gyro design requirements, including the requirement for precise attitude control and a dynamic model for attitude control synthesis, are discussed. Closed loop simulation of the satellite's natural dynamics on an analog computer is described.

  9. An investigation of nonlinear control of spacecraft attitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binette, Mark Richard

    The design of controllers subject to the nonlinear H-infinity criterion is explored. The plants to be controlled are the attitude motion of spacecraft, subject to some disturbance torque. Two cases are considered: the regulation about an inertially-fixed direction, and an Earth-pointing spacecraft in a circular orbit, subject to the gravity-gradient torque. The spacecraft attitude is described using the modified Rodrigues parameters. A series of controllers are designed using the nonlinear H-infinity control criterion, and are subsequently generated using a Taylor series expansion to approximate solutions of the relevant Hamilton-Jacobi equations. The controllers are compared, using both input-output and initial condition simulations. A proof is used to demonstrate that the linearized controller solves the H-infinity control problem for the inertial pointing problem when describing the plant using the modified Rodrigues parameters.

  10. Attitudes toward population control in Santiago, Chile.

    PubMed

    Hall, M F

    1975-01-01

    This article explores Chilean attitudes toward the national population's size and rate of growth, as indicated by a special survey conducted for this purpose. The survey sample consisted of 1,410 men 20 to 54 years of age in urban Santiago, who were separated into six categories on the basis of their education and socioeconomic status. The subjects were interviewed by 36 students from the University of Chile who utilized a prepared questionnaire including both open-ended and multiple-choice questions. The results clearly indicate that men in the lower socioeconomic categories tended to know less about the population's size and growth than their better-off counterparts. Nevertheless, they more often felt that Chile had "too many" inhabitants, that recent population growth had been rapid, and that this rate of growth should be reduced. PMID:1212535

  11. Attitude control study for a large flexible spacecraft using a Solar Electric Propulsion System (SEPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolivar, A. F.; Key, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    The attitude control performance of the solar electric propulsion system (SEPS) was evaluated. A thrust vector control system for powered flight control was examined along with a gas jet reaction control system, and a reaction wheel system, both of which have been proposed for nonpowered flight control. Comprehensive computer simulations of each control system were made and evaluated using a 30 mode spacecraft model. Results obtained indicate that thrust vector control and reaction wheel systems offer acceptable smooth proportional control. The gas jet control system is shown to be risky for a flexible structure such as SEPS, and is therefore, not recommended as a primary control method.

  12. Youth Attitudes towards Tobacco Control Laws: The Influence of Smoking Status and Grade in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Terrinieka T.; Jason, Leonard A.; Pokorny, Steven B.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined adolescent attitudes towards tobacco control laws. An exploratory factor analysis, using surveys from over 9,000 students, identified the following three factors: (1) youth attitudes towards the efficacy of tobacco control laws, (2) youth attitudes towards tobacco possession laws and (3) youth attitudes towards tobacco sales…

  13. A linear quadratic tracker for Control Moment Gyro based attitude control of the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaidy, J. T.

    1986-01-01

    The paper discusses a design for an attitude control system for the Space Station which produces fast response, with minimal overshoot and cross-coupling with the use of Control Moment Gyros (CMG). The rigid body equations of motion are linearized and discretized and a Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) design and analysis study is performed. The resulting design is then modified such that integral and differential terms are added to the state equations to enhance response characteristics. Methods for reduction of computation time through channelization are discussed as well as the reduction of initial torque requirements.

  14. Attitude control of a space structure using a 3-R rigid manipulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Ranjan; Zurowski, Mary

    The attitude control of space structures is an important problem. There has been considerable research in this area that has focussed on the use of momentum exchange devices. In this paper, we propose to control the attitude of space structures using a serial three-link PUMA-type manipulator that can be mounted on the space structure. This unconventional method of attitude control exploits the nonholonomic nature of the constraints that arise due to the conservation of angular momentum. We adopt a surface integral approach for the motion planning of the manipulator that will reorient the space structure in any desired way. The salient features of our algorithm are: (a) it is possible to mathematically prove the controllability of the system; (b) The motion of the manipulator can be planned amidst additional constraints like joint limits of the manipulator; and (c) the algorithm can be easily extended for application to flexible space structures.

  15. Design and simulation of satellite attitude control system based on Simulink and VR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Gan, Qingbo; Kang, Jingshu

    2016-01-01

    In order to research satellite attitude control system design and visual simulation, the simulation framework of satellite dynamics and attitude control using Simulink were established. The design of satellite earth-oriented control system based on quaternion feedback was completed. The 3D scene based on VR was created and models in the scene were driven by simulation data of Simulink. By coordinate transformation. successful observing the scene in inertial coordinate system, orbit coordinate system and body coordinate system. The result shows that application of simulation method of Simulink combined with VR in the design of satellite attitude control system field, has the advantages of high confidence level, hard real-time property, multi-perspective and multi-coordinate system observing the scene, and improves the comprehensibility and accuracy of the design.

  16. Dual-spin attitude control for outer planet missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, R. S.; Tauke, G. J.

    1977-01-01

    The applicability of dual-spin technology to a Jupiter orbiter with probe mission was investigated. Basic mission and system level attitude control requirements were established and preliminary mechanization and control concepts developed. A comprehensive 18-degree-of-freedom digital simulation was utilized extensively to establish control laws, study dynamic interactions, and determined key sensitivities. Fundamental system/subsystem constraints were identified, and the applicability of dual-spin technology to a Jupiter orbiter with probe mission was validated.

  17. Cassini at Saturn Proximal Orbits - Attitude Control Challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burk, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    The Cassini mission at Saturn will come to an end in the spring and summer of 2017 with a series of 22 orbits that will dip inside the rings of Saturn. These are called proximal orbits and will conclude with spacecraft disposal into the atmosphere of the ringed world on September 15, 2017. These unique orbits that cross the ring plane only a few thousand kilometers above the cloud tops of the planet present new attitude control challenges for the Cassini operations team. Crossing the ring plane so close to the inner edge of the rings means that the Cassini orientation during the crossing will be tailored to protect the sensitive electronics bus of the spacecraft. This orientation will put the sun sensors at some extra risk so this paper discusses how the team prepares for dust hazards. Periapsis is so close to the planet that spacecraft controllability with RCS thrusters needs to be evaluated because of the predicted atmospheric torque near closest approach to Saturn. Radiation during the ring plane crossings will likely trigger single event transients in some attitude control sensors. This paper discusses how the attitude control team deals with radiation hazards. The angular size and unique geometry of the rings and Saturn near periapsis means that star identification will be interrupted and this paper discusses how the safe mode attitude is selected to best deal with these large bright bodies during the proximal orbits.

  18. Low cost attitude control system reaction wheel development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bialke, William

    1991-01-01

    In order to satisfy a growing demand for low cost attitude control systems for small spacecraft, development of a low power and low cost Reaction Wheel Assembly was initiated. The details of the versatile design resulting from this effort are addressed. Tradeoff analyses for each of the major components are included, as well as test data from an engineering prototype of the hardware.

  19. Attitudes about Arms Control and Effects of "The Day After."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Linden L.; Slem, Charles M.

    An 18-item questionnaire was designed to investigate relationships between attitude towards arms control and beliefs about nuclear weapon effects, probability of war, Soviet goals, and the importance of nuclear arms superiority. Effects of the television movie, "The Day After," were also assessed by administering the questionnaire eight days…

  20. Attitudes toward Nutrition, Locus of Control and Smoking Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corfield, V. Kilian; And Others

    Research has shown that many behaviors previously thought to be purely psychological in origin do, in fact, have a physiological basis. To examine the relationship of smoking behavior to locus of control, and to attitudes toward, knowledge about, and behavior with respect to nutrition, 116 Canadian undergraduate students completed the Nutrition…

  1. Adaptive attitude controller for a satellite based on neural network in the presence of unknown external disturbances and actuator faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazlyab, Ali Reza; Fani Saberi, Farhad; Kabganian, Mansour

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, an adaptive attitude control algorithm is developed based on neural network for a satellite. The proposed attitude control is based on nonlinear modified Rodrigues parameters feedback control in the presence of unknown terms like external disturbances and actuator faults. In order to eliminate the effect of the uncertainties, a multilayer neural network with a new learning rule will be designed appropriately. In this method, asymptotic stability of the proposed algorithm has been proven in the presence of unknown terms based on Lyapunov stability theorem. Finally, the performance of the designed attitude controller is investigated by simulations.

  2. Student Attitudes to Traditional and Online Methods of Delivery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Lily; Fong, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Rapid developments in education technology have provided educators and students new options in a constantly changing, competitive teaching and learning environment. As the number of online teaching resources continue to increase, research into student attitudes toward traditional and online methods of delivery is important in order to determine…

  3. The SAS-3 attitude control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mobley, F. F.; Konigsberg, R.; Fountain, G. H.

    1975-01-01

    SAS-3 uses a reaction wheel to provide torque to control the spin rate. If the wheel speed becomes too great or too small, it must be restored to its nominal rate by momentum dumping which is done by magnetic torquing against the earth's magnetic field by the satellite's magnetic coils. A small rate-integrating gyro is used to sense the spin rate so that closed loop control of the spin rate can be achieved. These various systems are described in detail including the reaction wheel system, the gyro system, along with control modes (spin rate control and the star lock mode).

  4. Design and Stability of an On-Orbit Attitude Control System Using Reaction Control Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Robert A.; Hough, Steven; Orphee, Carolina; Clements, Keith

    2016-01-01

    NASA is providing preliminary design and requirements for the Space Launch System Exploration Upper Stage (EUS). The EUS will provide upper stage capability for vehicle ascent as well as on-orbit control capability. Requirements include performance of on-orbit burn to provide Orion vehicle with escape velocity. On-orbit attitude control is accommodated by a on-off Reaction Control System (RCS). Paper provides overview of approaches for design and stability of an attitude control system using a RCS.

  5. Observing Mode Attitude Controller for the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calhoun, Philip C.; Garrick, Joseph C.

    2007-01-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) mission is the first of a series of lunar robotic spacecraft scheduled for launch in Fall 2008. LRO will spend at least one year in a low altitude polar orbit around the Moon, collecting lunar environment science and mapping data to enable future human exploration. The LRO employs a 3-axis stabilized attitude control system (ACS) whose primary control mode, the "Observing mode", provides Lunar Nadir, off-Nadir, and Inertial fine pointing for the science data collection and instrument calibration. The controller combines the capability of fine pointing with that of on-demand large angle full-sky attitude reorientation into a single ACS mode, providing simplicity of spacecraft operation as well as maximum flexibility for science data collection. A conventional suite of ACS components is employed in this mode to meet the pointing and control objectives. This paper describes the design and analysis of the primary LRO fine pointing and attitude re-orientation controller function, known as the "Observing mode" of the ACS subsystem. The control design utilizes quaternion feedback, augmented with a unique algorithm that ensures accurate Nadir tracking during large angle yaw maneuvers in the presence of high system momentum and/or maneuver rates. Results of system stability analysis and Monte Carlo simulations demonstrate that the observing mode controller can meet fine pointing and maneuver performance requirements.

  6. Vibration suppression of flexible spacecraft during attitude control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Gangbing; Agrawal, Brij N.

    2001-07-01

    This paper presents a new approach to vibration reduction of flexible spacecraft during attitude control by using pulse width pulse frequency (PWPF) modulator for thruster firing and smart materials for active vibration suppression. The experiment was conducted on the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS)'s flexible spacecraft simulator (FSS), which consists of a central rigid body and an L-shape flexible appendage. A pair of on-off thrusters are used to re-orient the FSS. To actively suppress vibrations introduced to the flexible appendage, embedded piezoelectric ceramic patches are used as both sensors and actuators to detect and counter react to the induced vibration. For active vibration suppression using the piezoelectric ceramic patches, positive position feedback (PPF) control targeting at the first two flexible modes of the FSS system is used. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the control strategy of PWPF modulation for attitude control and PPF for active vibration suppression.

  7. Voyager Saturn encounter attitude and articulation control experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlisle, G.; Hill, M.

    1981-01-01

    The Voyager attitude and articulation control system is designed for a three-axis stabilized spacecraft; it uses a biasable sun sensor and a Canopus Star Tracker (CST) for celestial control, as well as a dry inertial reference unit, comprised of three dual-axis dry gryos, for inertial control. A series of complex maneuvers was required during the first of two Voyager spacecraft encounters with Saturn (November 13, 1980); these maneuvers involved rotating the spacecraft simultaneously about two or three axes while maintaining accurate pointing of the scan platform. Titan and Saturn earth occulation experiments and a ring scattering experiment are described. Target motion compensation and the effects of celestial sensor interference are also considered. Failure of the CST, which required an extensive reevaluation of the star reference and attitude control mode strategy, is discussed. Results analyzed thus far show that the system performed with high accuracy, gathering data deeper into Saturn's atmosphere than on any previous planetary encounter.

  8. Nonlinear attitude control of spacecraft and momentum management of control moment gyros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Hwa-Suk

    Nonlinear design procedures are presented for obtaining attitude control and momentum management laws. These are based on the Liapunov stability theorems. The Work-Energy Rate (WER) principle is extended to cover general classes of systems. It is shown that the use of the WER principle for obtaining control laws, can reduce the design efforts. The attitude control laws are designed for several types of missions, i.e., absolute attitude and relative attitude control. The momentum management as well as attitude control laws are designed for both stable and unstable spacecraft configurations which use Control Moment Gyros (CMGs) as active actuators. A large stability region is found around the local-vertical-local-horizontal (LVLH) equilibrium point, and so the designed control laws can be used even in the event of large initial attitude deviations for LVLH. In the presence of constant disturbance, the momentum is managed by seeking a Torque Equilibrium Attitude (TEA) where the disturbance torque is balanced by gravity gradient and gyroscopic torques. This is done by the use of integral feedback of the control torque, which is related to the angular momentum of the CMGs. It is shown that the unknown constant disturbance can be identified by the use of integral feedback. Cyclic disturbance rejection for the pitch axis is performed by successive stabilization and integral feedback. Theoretical results developed are verified using both experimental and numerical simulations. Experimental model of a flexible spacecraft is used to demonstrate the applicability of the WER principle and the fact that under certain conditions, a control law based on a rigid body model, can be applied to a flexible spacecraft. Using a mathematical model of the Space Station Freedom, several attitude/momentum management control laws are simulated and shown to work successfully with/without a constant disturbance torque. The control law for cyclic disturbance rejection of pitch axis attitude is

  9. Minimizing attitude control fuel in space manipulator systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubowsky, Steven; Torres, Miguel A.

    1990-01-01

    Techniques are presented for finding space manipulator motions which result in reduced spacecraft dynamic disturbances. Although a spacecraft's attitude control reaction jets can compensate for these disturbances, reaction jet fuel is a limited resource and excessive disturbances would limit the life of a space manipulator. A graphical tool called the Enhanced Disturbance Map (EDM) is presented and is demonstrated as an aid in developing planning and control algorithms to solve this complex problem.

  10. Smoking Behaviors and Attitudes During Adolescence Prospectively Predict Support for Tobacco Control Policies in Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Chassin, Laurie; Presson, Clark C.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Several cross-sectional studies have examined factors associated with support for tobacco control policies. The current study utilized a longitudinal design to test smoking status and attitude toward smoking measured in adolescence as prospective predictors of support for tobacco control policies measured in adulthood. Methods: Participants (N = 4,834) were from a longitudinal study of a Midwestern community-based sample. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses tested adolescent smoking status and attitude toward smoking as prospective predictors (after controlling for sociodemographic factors, adult smoking status, and adult attitude toward smoking) of support for regulation of smoking in public places, discussion of the dangers of smoking in public schools, prohibiting smoking in bars, eliminating smoking on television and in movies, prohibiting smoking in restaurants, and increasing taxes on cigarettes. Results: Participants who smoked during adolescence demonstrated more support for discussion of the dangers of smoking in public schools and less support for increasing taxes on cigarettes but only among those who smoked as adults. Those with more positive attitudes toward smoking during adolescence demonstrated less support as adults for prohibiting smoking in bars and eliminating smoking on television and in movies. Moreover, a significant interaction indicated that those with more positive attitudes toward smoking as adolescents demonstrated less support as adults for prohibiting smoking in restaurants, but only if they became parents as adults. Conclusions: This study’s findings suggest that interventions designed to deter adolescent smoking may have future benefits in increasing support for tobacco control policies. PMID:22193576

  11. Flexible spacecraft maneuver - Inverse attitude control and modal stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Sahjendra N.

    1988-01-01

    A control law is presented for three-axis rotational maneuvers of a spacecraft (orbiter)-beam-tip body (antenna or a reflector) configuration based on nonlinear inversion and modal velocity feedback. Using invertibility and functional reproducibility results, a decoupling attitude control law is presented such that, in the closed-loop system, the attitude angles of the spacecraft are independently controlled using the control moments acting on the space vehicle. This controller asymptotically decouples the flexible dynamics from the rigid one and also allows the decomposition of the elastic dynamics into two subsystems representing the transverse deflections of the beam in two orthogonal planes. These low-order subsystems are used for derivation of a modal velocity feedback stabilizer using the force and moment actuators at the end body. Simulation results are presented to show that, in the closed-loop system, attitude control and elastic mode stabilization are accomplished in spite of the parameter uncertainty and disturbance torque input in the system.

  12. Preliminary Attitude Control Studies for the ASTER Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Victorino Sarli, Bruno; Luís da Silva, André; Paglione, Pedro

    2013-10-01

    This work discusses an attitude control study for the ASTER mission, the first Brazilian mission to the deep space. The study is part of a larger scenario that is the development of optimal trajectories to navigate in the 2001 SN263 asteroid system, together with the generation of orbit and attitude controllers for autonomous operation. The spacecraft attitude is defined from the orientation of the body reference system to the Local Vertical Local Horizontal (LVLH) of a circular orbit around the Alpha asteroid. The rotational equations of motion involve the dynamic equations, where the three angular speeds are generated from a set of three reaction wheels and the gravitational torque. The rotational kinematics is represented in the Euler angles format. The controller is developed via the linear quadratic regulator approach with output feedback. It involves the generation of a stability augmentation (SAS) loop and a tracking outer loop, with a compensator of desired structure. It was chosen the feedback of the p, q and r angular speeds in the SAS, one for each reaction wheel. In the outer loop, it was chosen a proportional integral compensator. The parameters are tuned using a numerical minimization that represents a linear quadratic cost, with weightings in the tracking error and controls. Simulations are performed with the nonlinear model. For small angle manoeuvres, the linear results with reaction wheels or thrusters are reasonable, but, for larger manoeuvres, nonlinear control techniques shall be applied, for example, the sliding mode control.

  13. Attitude control of a spinning rocket via thrust vectoring

    SciTech Connect

    White, J.E.

    1990-12-19

    Two controllers are developed to provide attitude control of a spinning rocket that has a thrust vectoring capability. The first controller has a single-input/single-output design that ignores the gyroscopic coupling between the control channels. The second controller has a multi-input/multi-output structure that is specifically intended to account for the gyroscopic coupling effects. A performance comparison between the two approached is conducted for a range of roll rates. Each controller is tested for the ability to track step commands, and for the amount of coupling impurity. Both controllers are developed via a linear-quadratic-regulator synthesis procedure, which is motivated by the multi-input/multi-output nature of second controller. Time responses and a singular value analysis are used to evaluate controller performance. This paper describes the development and comparison of two controllers that are designed to provide attitude control of a spinning rocket that is equipped with thrust vector control. 12 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  14. The Attitude Control System for the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markley, F. Landis; Andrews, Stephen F.; ODonnell, James R., Jr.; Ward, David K.

    2003-01-01

    The Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe mission produces a map of the cosmic microwave background radiation over the entire celestial sphere by executing a fast spin and a slow precession of its spin axis about the Sun line to obtain a highly interconnected set of measurements. The spacecraft attitude is sensed and controlled using an inertial reference unit, two star trackers, a digital sun sensor, twelve coarse sun sensors, three reaction wheel assemblies, and a propulsion system. Sufficient attitude knowledge is provided to yield instrument pointing to a standard deviation (l sigma) of 1.3 arc-minutes per axis. In addition, the spacecraft acquires and holds the sunline at initial acquisition and in the event of a failure, and slews to the proper orbit adjust orientations and to the proper off-sunline attitude to start the compound spin. This paper presents an overview of the design of the attitude control system to carry out this mission and presents some early flight experience.

  15. Attitude-Control Algorithm for Minimizing Maneuver Execution Errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acikmese, Behcet

    2008-01-01

    A G-RAC attitude-control algorithm is used to minimize maneuver execution error in a spacecraft with a flexible appendage when said spacecraft must induce translational momentum by firing (in open loop) large thrusters along a desired direction for a given period of time. The controller is dynamic with two integrators and requires measurement of only the angular position and velocity of the spacecraft. The global stability of the closed-loop system is guaranteed without having access to the states describing the dynamics of the appendage and with severe saturation in the available torque. Spacecraft apply open-loop thruster firings to induce a desired translational momentum with an extended appendage. This control algorithm will assist this maneuver by stabilizing the attitude dynamics around a desired orientation, and consequently minimize the maneuver execution errors.

  16. Elizabethan birth control and Puritan attitudes.

    PubMed

    Schnucker, R V

    1975-01-01

    During the Elizabethan era there was a considerable body of knowledge concerning birth control techniques including coitus interruptus, penis ointments, pessaries, purgatives, genital baths and bloodletting. Works were available describing the symptons and causes of abortion and reporting some abortifacients. The Puritans were aware of birth control techniques, but were opposed to them for several reasons: 1) it would go against the biblical injunction to be fruitful and multiply; 2) birth control frustrated the creation of what was in the image of God; 3) fecundity was a blessing and should not be thwarted; 4) the society of the elect should be increased; and 5) through childbirth a woman could atone for Eve's original sin. Although some Puritans recognized that marriage was for comfort and solace as well as for the bearing of progeny, birth control was frowned upon, the the Puritan clergy practiced what it preached. In a random sample of Puritan clergy there was an average of 6.8 children born per family, which was higher than the average to be found among English nobility of the same period. PMID:11619425

  17. Fully magnetic sliding mode control for acquiring three-axis attitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ovchinnikov, M. Yu.; Roldugin, D. S.; Penkov, V. I.; Tkachev, S. S.; Mashtakov, Y. V.

    2016-04-01

    Satellite equipped with purely magnetic attitude control system is considered. Sliding mode control is used to achieve three-axis satellite attitude. Underactuation problem is solved for transient motion. Necessary attitude is acquired by proper sliding manifold construction. Satellite motion on the manifold is executed with magnetic control system. One manifold construction approach is proposed and discussed. Numerical examples are provided.

  18. Locus of Control and Attitude toward Eating in a Female College Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groth-Marnat, Gary; Scumaker, Jack F.

    1988-01-01

    Investigated relationship between locus of control and attitude to food intake in 101 female college students. Results indicated that locus of control was unable to predict attitudes toward eating and fear of becoming overweight. Thesis that locus of control would be related to attitude toward food intake was not supported. (Author/NB)

  19. Attitude Control System Design for Fast Rest-to-Rest Attitude Maneuver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, S.-I.; Bando, N.; Hashimoto, T.; Murata, Y.; Mochizuki, N.; Nakamura, T.; Kamiya, T.; Ogura, N.; Maeda, K.

    2009-08-01

    The VSOP-2 project is a new space VLBI (very long baseline interferometer) radio astronomy mission, proposed to inherit the fruitful success of the VSOP mission with the HALCA satellite. One of the most important advances of VSOP-2 is the use of higher observation frequency, which requires fast alternating observation of a target and calibrator in order to remove the phase changes caused by the atmosphere. Typically, both sources must be observed within 60 sec, and this switching must be carried out over many hours. ``ASTRO-G" is a satellite planned for this VSOP-2 project, and one of technical challenges is to achieve such fast rest-to-rest maneuvers, and the proper hardware must be selected to account for this fast attitude maneuver. The controlled momentum gyro (CMG) is an actuator that provides high torque with small power consumption, and the fiber optical gyro is a sensor able to measure the high angular velocity with excellent accuracy. This paper first describes these components for attitude control. Another challenge of the ASTRO-G's attitude control system is to design the switching for the flexible mode of the satellite structure, containing a large deployable reflector and a large solar panel. These produce resonances with fast switching and these must be attenuated. To achieve high agility in a flexible satellite, the controller design is crucial. One design feature is a novel robust input shaper named ``nil mode exciting profiler". Another feature is the feedback controller design. The paper describes these features and other potential problems with fast switching..

  20. Wheel configurations for combined energy storage and attitude control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oglevie, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Integrated power and attitude control system (IPACS) studies performed over a decade ago established the feasibility of simultaneously storing electrical energy in wheels and utilizing the resulting momentum for spacecraft attitude control. It was shown that such a system possessed many advantages over other contemporary energy storage and attitude control systems in many applications. More recent technology advances in composite rotors, magnetic bearings, and power control electronics have triggered new optimism regarding the feasibility and merits of such a system. This paper presents the results of a recent study whose focus was to define an advanced IPACS and to evaluate its merits for the Space Station application. Emphasis is given to the selection of the wheel configuration to perform the combined functions. A component design concept is developed to establish the system performance capability. A system-level trade study, including life-cycle costing, is performed to define the merits of the system relative to two other candidate systems. It is concluded that an advanced IPACS concept is not only feasible but offers substantial savings in mass and life-cycle cost.

  1. Triana Safehold: A New Gyroless, Sun-Pointing Attitude Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, J.; Morgenstern, Wendy; Garrick, Joseph

    2001-01-01

    Triana is a single-string spacecraft to be placed in a halo orbit about the sun-earth Ll Lagrangian point. The Attitude Control Subsystem (ACS) hardware includes four reaction wheels, ten thrusters, six coarse sun sensors, a star tracker, and a three-axis Inertial Measuring Unit (IMU). The ACS Safehold design features a gyroless sun-pointing control scheme using only sun sensors and wheels. With this minimum hardware approach, Safehold increases mission reliability in the event of a gyroscope anomaly. In place of the gyroscope rate measurements, Triana Safehold uses wheel tachometers to help provide a scaled estimation of the spacecraft body rate about the sun vector. Since Triana nominally performs momentum management every three months, its accumulated system momentum can reach a significant fraction of the wheel capacity. It is therefore a requirement for Safehold to maintain a sun-pointing attitude even when the spacecraft system momentum is reasonably large. The tachometer sun-line rate estimation enables the controller to bring the spacecraft close to its desired sun-pointing attitude even with reasonably high system momentum and wheel drags. This paper presents the design rationale behind this gyroless controller, stability analysis, and some time-domain simulation results showing performances with various initial conditions. Finally, suggestions for future improvements are briefly discussed.

  2. Attitude control/momentum management and payload pointing in advanced space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parlos, Alexander G.; Jayasuriya, Suhada

    1990-01-01

    The design and evaluation of an attitude control/momentum management system for highly asymmetric spacecraft configurations are presented. The preliminary development and application of a nonlinear control system design methodology for tracking control of uncertain systems, such as spacecraft payload pointing systems are also presented. Control issues relevant to both linear and nonlinear rigid-body spacecraft dynamics are addressed, whereas any structural flexibilities are not taken into consideration. Results from the first task indicate that certain commonly used simplifications in the equations of motions result in unstable attitude control systems, when used for highly asymmetric spacecraft configurations. An approach is suggested circumventing this problem. Additionally, even though preliminary results from the second task are encouraging, the proposed nonlinear control system design method requires further investigation prior to its application and use as an effective payload pointing system design technique.

  3. Optimal spacecraft attitude control using collocation and nonlinear programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herman, A. L.; Conway, B. A.

    1992-10-01

    Direct collocation with nonlinear programming (DCNLP) is employed to find the optimal open-loop control histories for detumbling a disabled satellite. The controls are torques and forces applied to the docking arm and joint and torques applied about the body axes of the OMV. Solutions are obtained for cases in which various constraints are placed on the controls and in which the number of controls is reduced or increased from that considered in Conway and Widhalm (1986). DCLNP works well when applied to the optimal control problem of satellite attitude control. The formulation is straightforward and produces good results in a relatively small amount of time on a Cray X/MP with no a priori information about the optimal solution. The addition of joint acceleration to the controls significantly reduces the control magnitudes and optimal cost. In all cases, the torques and acclerations are modest and the optimal cost is very modest.

  4. Attitude and Translation Control of a Solar Sail Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Gurkirpal

    2008-01-01

    A report discusses the ability to control the attitude and translation degrees-of-freedom of a solar sail vehicle by changing its center of gravity. A movement of the spacecraft s center of mass causes solar-pressure force to apply a torque to the vehicle. At the compact core of the solar-sail vehicle lies the spacecraft bus which is a large fraction of the total vehicle mass. In this concept, the bus is attached to the spacecraft by two single degree-of-freedom linear tracks. This allows relative movement of the bus in the sail plane. At the null position, the resulting solar pressure applies no torque to the vehicle. But any deviation of the bus from the null creates an offset between the spacecraft center of mass and center of solar radiation pressure, resulting in a solar-pressure torque on the vehicle which changes the vehicle attitude. Two of the three vehicle degrees of freedom can be actively controlled in this manner. The third, the roll about the sunline, requires a low-authority vane/propulsive subsystem. Translation control of the vehicle is achieved by directing the solar-pressure-induced force in the proper inertial direction. This requires attitude control. Attitude and translation degrees-of-freedom are therefore coupled. A guidance law is proposed, which allows the vehicle to stationkeep at an appropriate point on the inertially-rotating Sun-Earth line. Power requirements for moving the bus are minimal. Extensive software simulations have been performed to demonstrate the feasibility of this concept.

  5. Fault tolerant programmable digital attitude control electronics study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, A. A.

    1974-01-01

    The attitude control electronics mechanization study to develop a fault tolerant autonomous concept for a three axis system is reported. Programmable digital electronics are compared to general purpose digital computers. The requirements, constraints, and tradeoffs are discussed. It is concluded that: (1) general fault tolerance can be achieved relatively economically, (2) recovery times of less than one second can be obtained, (3) the number of faulty behavior patterns must be limited, and (4) adjoined processes are the best indicators of faulty operation.

  6. Magnetic bearing reaction wheel. [for spacecraft attitude control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabnis, A.; Schmitt, F.; Smith, L.

    1976-01-01

    The results of a program for the development, fabrication and functional test of an engineering model magnetically suspended reaction wheel are described. The reaction wheel develops an angular momentum of + or - 0.5 foot-pound-second and is intended for eventual application in the attitude control of long-life interplanetary and orbiting spacecraft. A description of the wheel design and its major performance characteristics is presented. Recommendations for flight prototype development are made.

  7. Entry Attitude Controller for the Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brugarolas, Paul B.; SanMartin, A. Miguel; Wong, Edward C.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the preliminary concept for the RCS 3-axis attitude controller for the exo-atmospheric and guided entry phases of the Mars Science Laboratory Entry, Descend and Landing. The entry controller is formulated as three independent channels in the control frame, which is nominally aligned with the stability frame. Each channel has a feedfoward and a feedback. The feedforward path enables fast response to large bank commands. The feedback path stabilizes the vehicle angle of attack and sideslip around its trim position, and tracks bank commands. The feedback path has a PD/D structure with deadbands that minimizes fuel usage. The performance of this design is demonstrated via simulation.

  8. MAP Attitude Control System Design and Flight Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, S. F.; ODonnell, J. R.; Bauer, Frank H. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) is a follow-on to the Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) instrument on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) spacecraft. To make a full-sky map of cosmic microwave background fluctuations, a combination fast spin and slow precession motion will be used that will cover the entire celestial sphere in six months. The spin rate should be an order of magnitude higher than the precession rate, and each rate should be tightly controlled. The sunline angle should be 22.5 +/- 0.25 deg. Sufficient attitude knowledge must be provided to yield instrument pointing to a standard deviation of 1.3 arc-minutes RSS three axes. In addition, the spacecraft must be able to acquire and hold the sunline at initial acquisition, and in the event of a failure. Finally. the spacecraft must be able to slew to the proper burn orientations and to the proper off-sunline attitude to start the compound spin. The design and flight performance of the Attitude Control System on MAP that meets these requirements will be discussed.

  9. Attitude Control for a Solar-Sail Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mettler, Edward; Ploen, Scott

    2004-01-01

    A report discusses the attitude-control system of a proposed spacecraft that would derive at least part of its propulsion from a solar sail. The spacecraft would include a bus module containing three or more reaction wheels, a boom attached at one end to the bus module and attached at its other end to a two-degree-of-freedom (DOF) gimbal at the nominal center of mass of a sail module. Each DOF of the gimbal could be independently locked against rotation or allowed to rotate freely. By using the reaction wheels to rotate the bus when at least one gimbal DOF was in the free state, the center of mass (CM) of the spacecraft could be shifted relative to the center of pressure (CP) on the solar sail. The resulting offset between the CM and CP would result in a solar torque, which could be used to change the attitude of the spacecraft. The report discusses numerous aspects of the dynamics and kinematics of the spacecraft, along with the relationships between these aspects and the designs of such attitude-control- system components as sensors, motors, brakes, clutches, and gimbals.

  10. Robust attitude control for Cassini spacecraft flying by Titan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, R.; Lisman, S.; Wong, E.; Enright, P.; Breckenridge, W.; Jahanshahi, M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper summarizes a few years attitude control design work on Cassini spacecraft with emphasis on the mission of Titan flyby. The study consists of modeling of the spacecraft dynamics, fuel sloshing, aerodynamic disturbance, controller design, nonlinear simulation, and establishing geometric command profiles. Both classical bang-bang control and modern robust H-infinity control have been designed and evaluated in nonlinear simulation to access the system tracking performance. Design procedures as well as their critical design issues are discussed in detail. Full model nonlinear simulations indicate that a simple 12-state H-infinity controller achieves better radar tracking performance than the classical bang-bang controller with less fuel throughout the flyby mission. Detailed robustness analysis of both designs will be published elsewhere.

  11. Spacecraft attitude maneuver using two single-gimbal control moment gyros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Shinya; Kojima, Hirohisa; Satoh, Mitsunori

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, arbitrary rest-to-rest attitude maneuver problems for a satellite using two single-gimbal control moment gyros (2SGCMGs) are considered. Although single-gimbal control moment gyros are configured in the same manner as the traditional pyramid-array CMG, only two CMGs are assumed to be available. Attitude maneuver problems are similar to problems involving two reaction wheels (RWs) from the viewpoint of the number of actuators. In other words, the problem treated herein is a kind of underactuated problem. Although 2SGCMGs can generate torques around all axes, they cannot generate torques around each axis independently. Therefore, control methods designed for a satellite using two reaction wheels cannot be applied to three-axis attitude maneuver problems for a satellite using 2SGCMGs. In this paper, for simplicity, maneuvers around the x- and z-axes are first considered, and then a maneuver around the y-axis due to the corning effect resulting from the maneuver around the x- and z-axes is considered. Since maneuvers around each axis are established by the proposed method, arbitrary attitude maneuvers can be achieved using 2SGCMGs. In addition, the maneuvering angles around the z- and x-axes, which are required in order to maneuver around the y-axis, are analytically determined, and the total time required for maneuvering around the y-axis is then analyzed numerically.

  12. Multimode attitude and orbit control for the Atmosphere Explorer spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, B.

    1975-01-01

    The orbit profile for the Atmosphere Explorer requires a velocity adjust capability of 2000 ft/sec/sec and individual maneuvers of up to 24 ft/sec in magnitude. This requirement is met by a monopropellant hydrazine propulsion subsystem which also provides, by virtue of the tank arrangement, a means of adjusting the spacecraft center of mass in orbit, thereby minimizing external disturbance torques. The attitude control subsystem is of the momentum bias type. A large internal flywheel furnishes gyroscopic stiffness and permits rapid changes in operating mode (despun to spinning mode) by controlled interchange of momentum between the flywheel and the spacecraft main body.

  13. Integrated Power and Attitude Control for a Spacecraft with Flywheels and Control Moment Gyroscopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roithmayr, Carlos M.; Karlgaard, Christopher D.; Kumar, Renjith R.; Bose, David M.

    2003-01-01

    A law is designed for simultaneous control of the orientation of an Earth-pointing spacecraft, the energy stored by counter-rotating flywheels, and the angular momentum of the flywheels and control moment gyroscopes used together as all integrated set of actuators for attitude control. General. nonlinear equations of motion are presented in vector-dyadic form, and used to obtain approximate expressions which are then linearized in preparation for design of control laws that include feedback of flywheel kinetic energy error as it means of compensating for damping exerted by rotor bearings. Two flywheel 'steering laws' are developed such that torque commanded by all attitude control law is achieved while energy is stored or discharged at the required rate. Using the International Space Station as an example, numerical simulations are performed to demonstrate control about a torque equilibrium attitude and illustrate the benefits of kinetic energy error feedback.

  14. Nonlinear attitude control of flexible spacecraft under disturbance torque

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Sahjendra N.

    1986-01-01

    A control law for large-angle single-axis rotational maneuvers of a spacecraft-beam-tip body (an antenna or a reflector) configuration is presented. It is assumed that an unknown but bounded disturbance torque is acting on the spacecraft. A model reference adaptive torque control law is derived for the slewing of the space vehicle. This controller includes a dynamic system in the feedback path and requires only attitude angle and rate of the space vehicle for feedback. For damping out the elastic motion excited by the slewing maneuver, a stabilizer is designed assuming that a torquer and a force actuator are available at the tip body. The stabilizer uses only the flexible modes for the synthesis of the control law. Simulation results are presented to show that fast, large-angle rotational maneuvers can be performed using the adaptive controller and the stabilizer in spite of the presence of continuously acting unknown torque on the spacecraft.

  15. attitude control design for the solar polar orbit radio telesope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, D.; Zheng, J.

    This paper studies the attitude dynamics and control of the Solar Polar Orbit Radio Telescope SPORT The SPORT which consists of one parent satellite and eight tethered satellites runs around the Sun in a polar orbit The parent satellite locates at the mass center of the constellation and tethered satellites which are tied with the parent satellite through a non-electric rope rotate around the parent satellite It is also supposed that the parent satellite and all tethered satellites are in a plane when the constellation works begin figure htbp centerline includegraphics width 3 85in height 2 38in 75271331 6a6eb71057 doc1 eps label fig1 end figure Fig 1 the SPORT constellation Firstly this paper gives the dynamic equations of the tethered satellite and the parent satellite From the dynamic characteristic of the tethered satellite we then find that the roll axis is coupled with the yaw axis The control torque of the roll axis can control the yaw angle But the control torque of the roll axis and pitch axis provided by the tether is very small it can not meet the accuracy requirement of the yaw angle In order to improve the attitude pointing accuracy of the tethered satellite a gradient pole is set in the negative orientation of the yaw axis The gradient pole can improve not only the attitude accuracy of roll angle and pitch angle but also that of the yaw angle indirectly As to the dynamic characteristic of the parent satellite the roll axis is coupled with the pitch axis due to the spinning angular velocity At the same

  16. Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) transfer orbit attitude control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Placanica, Samuel J.; Flatley, Thomas W.

    1986-01-01

    The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) spacecraft will be launched by the Shuttle from Vandenberg AFB into a 300 km altitude, 99 deg inclination, 6 a.m. or 6 p.m. ascending node orbit. After release from the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm, an on-board monopropellant hydrazine propulsion system will raise the orbit altitude to 900 km. The spacecraft continuously spins during transfer orbit operations with the spin axis nominally horizontal and in or near the orbit plane. The blowdown propulsion system consists of twelve 5 lb thrusters (3 'spin', 3 'despin', and 6 'axial') with the latter providing initially 30 lb of force parallel to the spin axis for orbit raising. The spin/despin jets provide a constant roll rate during the transfer orbit phase of the mission and the axials control pitch and yaw. The axial thrusters are pulsed on for attitude control during coast periods and are normally on- and off-modulated for control during orbit raising. Attitude sensors employed in the control loops include an array of two-axis digital sun sensors and three planar earth scanners for position measurements, as well as six gyroscopes for rate information. System redundancy is achieved by means of unique three-axes-in-a-plane geometry. This triaxial concept results in a fail-safe operational system with no performance degradation for many different component failure modes.

  17. Comparison of thruster configurations in attitude control systems. M.S. Thesis. Progress Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boland, J. S., III; Drinkard, D. M., Jr.; White, L. R.; Chakravarthi, K. R.

    1973-01-01

    Several aspects concerning reaction control jet systems as used to govern the attitude of a spacecraft were considered. A thruster configuration currently in use was compared to several new configurations developed in this study. The method of determining the error signals which control the firing of the thrusters was also investigated. The current error determination procedure is explained and a new method is presented. Both of these procedures are applied to each of the thruster configurations which are developed and comparisons of the two methods are made.

  18. System and method for attitude determination based on optical imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junkins, John L. (Inventor); Pollock, Thomas C. (Inventor); Mortari, Daniele (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method and apparatus is provide for receiving a first set of optical data from a first field of view and receiving a second set of optical data from a second field of view. A portion of the first set of optical data is communicated and a portion of the second set of optical data is reflected, both toward an optical combiner. The optical combiner then focuses the portions onto the image plane such that information at the image plane that is associated with the first and second fields of view is received by an optical detector and used to determine an attitude characteristic.

  19. Propulsion Options for Primary Thrust and Attitude Control of Microspacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroot, W. A.

    1998-01-01

    Order of magnitude decreases in the size of scientific satellites and spacecraft could provide concurrent decreases in mission costs because of lower launch and fabrication costs. Although many subsystems are amenable to dramatic size reductions, miniaturization of the propulsion subsystems is not straightforward. There are a range of requirements for both primary and attitude control propulsion, dictated by mission requirements, satellite size, and power restrictions. Many of the established propulsion technologies can not currently be applied to microspacecraft. Because of this, micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) fabrication technology is being explored as a path for miniaturization.

  20. Galileo attitude and articulation control subsystem closed loop testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lembeck, M. F.; Pignatano, N. D.

    1983-01-01

    In order to ensure the reliable operation of the Attitude and Articulation Control Subsystem (AACS) which will guide the Galileo spacecraft on its two and one-half year journey to Jupiter, the AACS is being rigorously tested. The primary objectives of the test program are the verification of the AACS's form, fit, and function, especially with regard to subsystem external interfaces and the functional operation of the flight software. Attention is presently given to the Galileo Closed Loop Test System, which simulates the dynamic and 'visual' flight environment for AACS components in the laboratory.

  1. Structural control interaction for an LSS attitude control system using thrusters and reaction wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Fonseca, Ijar M.; Bainum, Peter M.; da Silva, Adenilson R.

    2007-05-01

    This work provides some important information about control structure interaction (CSI) for a large space structure (LSS) attitude control subsystem (ACS) comprised of thrusters and reaction wheels. The LSS physical model is assumed as a rigid long tubular beam as the main bus with two attached long flexible solar panels. Two thrusters (one at each tip of the LSS) are used for large amplitude maneuvers and the reaction wheels for fine control. Lagrange's formulations for generalized and quasi-coordinates were used to derive the equations of motion. The gravity gradient, the solar pressure and the drag were included in the mathematical model as external perturbations. The assumed modes discretization method has been used to model the solar array elastic displacements so as to obtain a set of ordinary differential equations to describe the LSS motion. Different control strategies were implemented to analyze the CSI for two configurations, fine and coarse control. The MatLab/Simulink platform has been used for the computational simulations. The results are in agreement with the CSI theory in that thruster firings excite the solar panel vibrations and that the elastic vibration is an important issue to be taken into account for LSS ACS performance evaluation for both fine and coarse control. In spite of the CSI the maneuver objectives have been accomplished with results that meet the mission criteria.

  2. Control system design method

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, David G.; Robinett, III, Rush D.

    2012-02-21

    A control system design method and concomitant control system comprising representing a physical apparatus to be controlled as a Hamiltonian system, determining elements of the Hamiltonian system representation which are power generators, power dissipators, and power storage devices, analyzing stability and performance of the Hamiltonian system based on the results of the determining step and determining necessary and sufficient conditions for stability of the Hamiltonian system, creating a stable control system based on the results of the analyzing step, and employing the resulting control system to control the physical apparatus.

  3. An Evaluation of Attitude-Independent Magnetometer-Bias Determination Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashmall, J. A.; Deutschmann, Julie

    1996-01-01

    Although several algorithms now exist for determining three-axis magnetometer (TAM) biases without the use of attitude data, there are few studies on the effectiveness of these methods, especially in comparison with attitude dependent methods. This paper presents the results of a comparison of three attitude independent methods and an attitude dependent method for computing TAM biases. The comparisons are based on in-flight data from the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE), the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS), and the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO). The effectiveness of an algorithm is measured by the accuracy of attitudes computed using biases determined with that algorithm. The attitude accuracies are determined by comparison with known, extremely accurate, star-tracker-based attitudes. In addition, the effect of knowledge of calibration parameters other than the biases on the effectiveness of all bias determination methods is examined.

  4. Pulsed Plasma Thrusters for Small Spacecraft Attitude Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGuire, Melissa L.; Myers, Roger M.

    1996-01-01

    Pulsed plasma thrusters (PPT's) are a new option for attitude control of a small spacecraft and may result in reduced attitude control system (ACS) mass and cost. The primary purpose of an ACS is to orient the spacecraft configuration to the desired accuracy in inertial space. The ACS functions for which the PPT system will be analyzed include disturbance torque compensation and slewing maneuvers such as sun acquisition for which the small impulse bit and high specific impulse of the PPT offers unique advantages. The NASA Lewis Reserach Center (LeRC) currently has a contracted flight PPT system development program in place with Olin Aerospace and a delivery date of October 1997. The PPT system in this study are based upon the work being done under the NASA LeRC program. Analysis of the use of PPT's for ACS showed that the replacement of the standard momentum wheels and torque rods systems with a PTT system to perform the altitude control maneuvers on a small low Earth orbiting spacecraft reduced the ACS mass by 50 to 75 percent with no increase in required power level over comparable wheel-based systems.

  5. An Attitude Control of Flexible Spacecraft Using Fuzzy-PID Controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jong-Oh; Im, Young-Do

    This primary objective of this study is to demonstrate simulation and ground-based experiment for the attitude control of flexible spacecraft. A typical spacecraft structure consists of the rigid body and flexible appendages which are large flexible solar panels, parabolic antennas built from light materials in order to reduce their weight. Therefore the attitude control has a big problem because these appendages induce structural vibration under the excitation of external forces. A single-axis rotational simulator with a flexible arm is constructed with on-off air thrusters and reaction wheel as actuation. The simulator is also equipped with payload pointing capability by simultaneous thruster and DC servo motor actuation. The experiment of flexible spacecraft attitude control is performed using only the reaction wheel. Using the reaction wheel the performance of the fuzzy-PID controller is illustrated by simulation and experimental results for a single-axis rotational simulator.

  6. Measurement of Student Attitudes in First Year Engineering--A Mixed Methods Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malik, Qaiser Hameed

    2010-01-01

    This research study focused on freshman attitudes towards engineering in a newly implemented cornerstone sequence that emphasized holistic design experiences. The students' initial attitudes and changes in these attitudes were examined with the explanatory mixed methods approach that allows a sequential examination of the target population with…

  7. Attitude and translation control of a low-altitude Gravsat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, J. C.; Jenkins, R. E.; Debra, D. B.; Van Patten, R. A.; Junkins, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    Dynamic simulation of the Gravsat's attitude and translation control system is used to provide an upper bound for the fuel supply and test the feasibility of the preliminary design. A preliminary design is made for the disturbance compensation system (DISCOS) sensor, the thruster control laws, reaction wheel control laws, and the onboard state estimators. The sensor analysis and noise measurements show no problems in scaling the Triad navigation satellite sensor design up to meet the Gravsat requirements, except for proof mass center-of-mass offset. A promising technique is proposed to measure and eliminate this error. The covariance analysis confirms that a sophisticated post-flight data fit will be necessary to reconstruct a scientifically useful proof mass state. The DISCOS sensor will have to be continuously calibrated from the inflight data to achieve this reconstruction.

  8. Backup Attitude Control Algorithms for the MAP Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ODonnell, James R., Jr.; Andrews, Stephen F.; Ericsson-Jackson, Aprille J.; Flatley, Thomas W.; Ward, David K.; Bay, P. Michael

    1999-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) is a follow-on to the Differential Microwave Radiometer (DMR) instrument on the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) spacecraft. The MAP spacecraft will perform its mission, studying the early origins of the universe, in a Lissajous orbit around the Earth-Sun L(sub 2) Lagrange point. Due to limited mass, power, and financial resources, a traditional reliability concept involving fully redundant components was not feasible. This paper will discuss the redundancy philosophy used on MAP, describe the hardware redundancy selected (and why), and present backup modes and algorithms that were designed in lieu of additional attitude control hardware redundancy to improve the odds of mission success. Three of these modes have been implemented in the spacecraft flight software. The first onboard mode allows the MAP Kalman filter to be used with digital sun sensor (DSS) derived rates, in case of the failure of one of MAP's two two-axis inertial reference units. Similarly, the second onboard mode allows a star tracker only mode, using attitude and derived rate from one or both of MAP's star trackers for onboard attitude determination and control. The last backup mode onboard allows a sun-line angle offset to be commanded that will allow solar radiation pressure to be used for momentum management and orbit stationkeeping. In addition to the backup modes implemented on the spacecraft, two backup algorithms have been developed in the event of less likely contingencies. One of these is an algorithm for implementing an alternative scan pattern to MAP's nominal dual-spin science mode using only one or two reaction wheels and thrusters. Finally, an algorithm has been developed that uses thruster one shots while in science mode for momentum management. This algorithm has been developed in case system momentum builds up faster than anticipated, to allow adequate momentum management while minimizing interruptions to science. In this paper, each mode and

  9. A neural network approach to fault detection in spacecraft attitude determination and control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiner, John N.

    This thesis proposes a method of performing fault detection and isolation in spacecraft attitude determination and control systems. The proposed method works by deploying a trained neural network to analyze a set of residuals that are defined such that they encompass the attitude control, guidance, and attitude determination subsystems. Eight neural networks were trained using either the resilient backpropagation, Levenberg-Marquardt, or Levenberg-Marquardt with Bayesian regularization training algorithms. The results of each of the neural networks were analyzed to determine the accuracy of the networks with respect to isolating the faulty component or faulty subsystem within the ADCS. The performance of the proposed neural network-based fault detection and isolation method was compared and contrasted with other ADCS FDI methods. The results obtained via simulation showed that the best neural networks employing this method successfully detected the presence of a fault 79% of the time. The faulty subsystem was successfully isolated 75% of the time and the faulty components within the faulty subsystem were isolated 37% of the time.

  10. Pushing the Limits of Cubesat Attitude Control: A Ground Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Devon S.; Heater, Daniel L.; Peeples, Steven R.; Sules. James K.; Huang, Po-Hao Adam

    2013-01-01

    A cubesat attitude control system (ACS) was designed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to provide sub-degree pointing capabilities using low cost, COTS attitude sensors, COTS miniature reaction wheels, and a developmental micro-propulsion system. The ACS sensors and actuators were integrated onto a 3D-printed plastic 3U cubesat breadboard (10 cm x 10 cm x 30 cm) with a custom designed instrument board and typical cubesat COTS hardware for the electrical, power, and data handling and processing systems. In addition to the cubesat development, a low-cost air bearing was designed and 3D printed in order to float the cubesat in the test environment. Systems integration and verification were performed at the MSFC Small Projects Rapid Integration & Test Environment laboratory. Using a combination of both the miniature reaction wheels and the micro-propulsion system, the open and closed loop control capabilities of the ACS were tested in the Flight Robotics Laboratory. The testing demonstrated the desired sub-degree pointing capability of the ACS and also revealed the challenges of creating a relevant environment for development testin

  11. Controlling Attitude of a Solar-Sail Spacecraft Using Vanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mettler, Edward; Acikmese, Ahmet; Ploen, Scott

    2006-01-01

    A paper discusses a concept for controlling the attitude and thrust vector of a three-axis stabilized Solar Sail spacecraft using only four single degree-of-freedom articulated spar-tip vanes. The vanes, at the corners of the sail, would be turned to commanded angles about the diagonals of the square sail. Commands would be generated by an adaptive controller that would track a given trajectory while rejecting effects of such disturbance torques as those attributable to offsets between the center of pressure on the sail and the center of mass. The controller would include a standard proportional + derivative part, a feedforward part, and a dynamic component that would act like a generalized integrator. The controller would globally track reference signals, and in the presence of such control-actuator constraints as saturation and delay, the controller would utilize strategies to cancel or reduce their effects. The control scheme would be embodied in a robust, nonlinear algorithm that would allocate torques among the vanes, always finding a stable solution arbitrarily close to the global optimum solution of the control effort allocation problem. The solution would include an acceptably small angle, slow limit-cycle oscillation of the vanes, while providing overall thrust vector pointing stability and performance.

  12. ATS-6 engineering performance report. Volume 2: Orbit and attitude controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wales, R. O. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    Attitude control is reviewed, encompassing the attitude control subsystem, spacecraft attitude precision pointing and slewing adaptive control experiment, and RF interferometer experiment. The spacecraft propulsion system (SPS) is discussed, including subsystem, SPS design description and validation, orbital operations and performance, in-orbit anomalies and contingency operations, and the cesium bombardment ion engine experiment. Thruster failure due to plugging of the propellant feed passages, a major cause for mission termination, are considered among the critical generic failures on the satellite.

  13. Health literacy and parent attitudes about weight control for children.

    PubMed

    Liechty, Janet M; Saltzman, Jaclyn A; Musaad, Salma M

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine associations between parental health literacy and parent attitudes about weight control strategies for young children. Parental low health literacy has been associated with poor child health outcomes, yet little is known about its relationship to child weight control and weight-related health information-seeking preferences. Data were drawn from the STRONG Kids Study, a Midwest panel survey among parents of preschool aged children (n = 497). Parents endorsed an average of 4.3 (SD =2.8) weight loss strategies, 53% endorsed all three recommended weight loss strategies for children, and fewer than 1% of parents endorsed any unsafe strategies. Parents were most likely to seek child weight loss information from healthcare professionals but those with low (vs. adequate) health literacy were significantly less likely to use the Internet or books and more likely to use minister/clergy as sources. Poisson and logistic regressions showed that higher health literacy was associated with endorsement of more strategies overall, more recommended strategies, and greater odds of endorsing each specific recommended strategy for child weight control, after adjusting for parent age, education, race/ethnicity, income, marital status, weight concern, and child BMI percentile. Findings suggest that health literacy impacts parental views about child weight loss strategies and health information-seeking preferences. Pediatric weight loss advice to parents should include assessment of parent attitudes and prior knowledge about child weight control and facilitate parent access to reliable sources of evidence-informed child weight control information. PMID:25868552

  14. Methods of inventory control.

    PubMed

    Lindley, C; Mackowiak, J

    1985-01-01

    Various methods for controlling inventory are described, and the advantages and disadvantages of each are discussed. The open-to-buy (OTB) budget method limits purchases to a specific amount of funds available for purchasing pharmaceuticals during a specified period. The emphasis of the OTB method is financial control of the pharmacy inventory. Although it is useful in monitoring and adjusting the dollar value of the inventory, it should be combined with other methods for a total inventory control system. The primary emphasis of the short-list method is to provide accurate and timely inventory information to the person responsible for order placement. The short list identifies the items that are in short supply. It is the most common feedback and control mechanism in use, but it is best suited for settings where duplicate or reserve stock is maintained and monitored by more rigorous methods. The main objective of the minimum and maximum method is to determine when and how much to order of each item. It also provides limited dollar control. The major disadvantage of this method is the time it requires to establish the minimum and maximum levels and to update them regularly to reflect changes in demand. The stock record card method is used to record information on the movement of goods in and out of the storage area. Stock cards can also be used to monitor inventory levels and facilitate order initiation. It is probably the optimum method to be used alone. The most effective system of inventory control is one employing a combination of these methods tailored to meet the institution's needs and available resources. PMID:3970028

  15. Attitude control of geostationary satellites with double gimballed momentum wheels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, G.; Lange, T.

    1981-11-01

    Conventional control methods are generalized using state vector feedback design procedures. Alternatively, a decoupled control method using a nondiagonal inertia tensor was derived. These are confronted to modern control theory design method with observer, where especially the insensitivity with respect to variants of the moments of inertia was demonstrated.

  16. Gaining control over responses to implicit attitude tests: Implementation intentions engender fast responses on attitude-incongruent trials.

    PubMed

    Webb, Thomas L; Sheeran, Paschal; Pepper, John

    2012-03-01

    The present research investigated whether forming implementation intentions could promote fast responses to attitude-incongruent associations (e.g., woman-manager) and thereby modify scores on popular implicit measures of attitude. Expt 1 used the Implicit Association Test (IAT) to measure associations between gender and science versus liberal arts. Planning to associate women with science engendered fast responses to this category-attribute pairing and rendered summary scores more neutral compared to standard IAT instructions. Expt 2 demonstrated that forming egalitarian goal intentions is not sufficient to produce these effects. Expt 3 extended these findings to a different measure of implicit attitude (the Go/No-Go Association Task) and a different stereotypical association (Muslims-terrorism). In Expt 4, managers who planned to associate women with superordinate positions showed more neutral IAT scores relative to non-planners and effects were maintained 3 weeks later. In sum, implementation intentions enable people to gain control over implicit attitude responses. PMID:22435844

  17. Neural network-based distributed attitude coordination control for spacecraft formation flying with input saturation.

    PubMed

    Zou, An-Min; Kumar, Krishna Dev

    2012-07-01

    This brief considers the attitude coordination control problem for spacecraft formation flying when only a subset of the group members has access to the common reference attitude. A quaternion-based distributed attitude coordination control scheme is proposed with consideration of the input saturation and with the aid of the sliding-mode observer, separation principle theorem, Chebyshev neural networks, smooth projection algorithm, and robust control technique. Using graph theory and a Lyapunov-based approach, it is shown that the distributed controller can guarantee the attitude of all spacecraft to converge to a common time-varying reference attitude when the reference attitude is available only to a portion of the group of spacecraft. Numerical simulations are presented to demonstrate the performance of the proposed distributed controller. PMID:24807141

  18. Attitude tracking control for spacecraft formation with time-varying delays and switching topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongjiu; You, Xiu; Hua, Changchun

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates attitude dynamic tracking control for spacecraft formation in the presence of unmeasurable velocity information with time-varying delays and switching topology. Based on an extended state observer, a nonlinear attitude tracking control approach is developed for spacecraft attitude model formulated by Euler-Lagrangian equations. The attitude tracking controller allows for external disturbances and absence of angular velocity information. Both auto-stable region techniques and a Lyapunov function approach are developed to prove ultimately bounded tracking. Simulation results demonstrate effectiveness of the nonlinear control techniques proposed in this paper.

  19. Attitude control requirements for various solar sail missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Trevor

    1990-01-01

    The differences are summarized between the attitude control requirements for various types of proposed solar sail missions (Earth orbiting; heliocentric; asteroid rendezvous). In particular, it is pointed out that the most demanding type of mission is the Earth orbiting one, with the solar orbit case quite benign and asteroid station keeping only slightly more difficult. It is then shown, using numerical results derived for the British Solar Sail Group Earth orbiting design, that the disturbance torques acting on a realistic sail can completely dominate the torques required for nominal maneuvering of an 'ideal' sail. This is obviously an important consideration when sizing control actuators; not so obvious is the fact that it makes the standard rotating vane actuator unsatisfactory in practice. The reason for this is given, and a set of new actuators described which avoids the difficulty.

  20. Compressor surge control method

    SciTech Connect

    Dziubakowski, D.J.; Keys, M.A.I.V.; Shaffer, J.J.

    1990-02-13

    This patent describes a method of controlling surge in a centrifugal compressor having a predetermined surge condition line and providing a combined output with a base load means. It comprises: establishing a main surge control line offset from the centrifugal compressor surge condition line according to a function of pressure differentials across the centrifugal compressor and across an orifice in the inlet line of the centrifugal compressor; establishing a feed forward control signal which is a function of a variable associated with the base load means which may cause the surge condition in the centrifugal compressor; and establishing an anticipatory surge control line offset from the main surge control line as a function of the established main surge control line and the established feed forward control signal.

  1. Satellite attitude dynamics and estimation with the implicit midpoint method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellström, Christian; Mikkola, Seppo

    2009-07-01

    We describe the application of the implicit midpoint integrator to the problem of attitude dynamics for low-altitude satellites without the use of quaternions. Initially, we consider the satellite to rotate without external torques applied to it. We compare the numerical solution with the exact solution in terms of Jacobi's elliptic functions. Then, we include the gravity-gradient torque, where the implicit midpoint integrator proves to be a fast, simple and accurate method. Higher-order versions of the implicit midpoint scheme are compared to Gauss-Legendre Runge-Kutta methods in terms of accuracy and processing time. Finally, we investigate the performance of a parameter-adaptive Kalman filter based on the implicit midpoint integrator for the determination of the principal moments of inertia through observations.

  2. Robust attitude control design for spacecraft under assigned velocity and control constraints.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qinglei; Li, Bo; Zhang, Youmin

    2013-07-01

    A novel robust nonlinear control design under the constraints of assigned velocity and actuator torque is investigated for attitude stabilization of a rigid spacecraft. More specifically, a nonlinear feedback control is firstly developed by explicitly taking into account the constraints on individual angular velocity components as well as external disturbances. Considering further the actuator misalignments and magnitude deviation, a modified robust least-squares based control allocator is employed to deal with the problem of distributing the previously designed three-axis moments over the available actuators, in which the focus of this control allocation is to find the optimal control vector of actuators by minimizing the worst-case residual error using programming algorithms. The attitude control performance using the controller structure is evaluated through a numerical example. PMID:23618744

  3. Analysis of Pan-European attitudes to the eradication and control of bovine viral diarrhoea.

    PubMed

    Heffernan, C; Misturelli, F; Nielsen, L; Gunn, G J; Yu, J

    2009-02-01

    At present, national-level policies concerning the eradication and control of bovine viral diarrhoea (BVD) differ widely across Europe. Some Scandinavian countries have enacted strong regulatory frameworks to eradicate the disease, whereas other countries have few formal policies. To examine these differences, the attitudes of stakeholders and policy makers in 17 European countries were investigated. A web-based questionnaire was sent to policy makers, government and private sector veterinarians, and representatives of farmers' organisations. In total, 131 individuals responded to the questionnaire and their responses were analysed by applying a method used in sociolinguistics: frame analysis. The results showed that the different attitudes of countries that applied compulsory or voluntary frameworks were associated with different views about the attribution or blame for BVD and the roles ascribed to farmers and other stakeholders in its eradication and control. PMID:19202168

  4. A comparison of attitude propagation and parameterization methods for low-cost UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, Robert Taylor

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) represent an increasingly important and prolific technology in today's world, finding use in myriad applications across multiple domains, including civil, commercial, military, and research environments. Control of these aircraft requires fundamental information on the vehicle's position and orientation in space. Attitude determination algorithms calculate this spatial orientation by propagating the attitude kinematic equations that estimate the current attitude based on previous estimates along with information about the vehicle's angular velocities. Within the domain of low-cost UAVs, numerous options exist for the choice of 1) propagation algorithms, 2) attitude representation, and 3) the assumptions about the behavior of the angular velocity vector between samples within the discrete-time hardware of the embedded system typically running the estimation algorithms. This thesis examines the impact of these three variables upon propagated attitude estimates with respect to accuracy, computational efficiency, and noise response. Noise response is evaluated in terms of the algorithm's ability to track an underlying clean signal in spite of inputs corrupted by additive Gaussian noise. Various propagation methods are evaluated across four attitude representations: the direction cosine matrix, Euler angles, quaternions, and the angle-axis or eigen-axis parameterization. Lastly, the nature of angular velocity (constant, linear, and quadratic) is evaluated in terms of accuracy, computational efficiency, and noise resilience. The algorithms were tested using simulated angular velocity inputs from analytic functions as well as flight test data from low-cost, fixed wing UAVs. Implementation was done in Matlab as well as Simulink-based test modules to evaluate algorithm performance. The quaternion parameterization proved most beneficial across all three test metrics, though the DCM representation was only slightly deficient in terms of

  5. Motor Control of Two Flywheels Enabling Combined Attitude Control and Bus Regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, Barbara H.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation discussed the flywheel technology development work that is ongoing at NASA GRC with a particular emphasis on the flywheel system control. The "field orientation" motor/generator control algorithm was discussed and explained. The position-sensorless angle and speed estimation algorithm was presented. The motor current response to a step change in command at low (10 kRPM) and high (60 kRPM) was discussed. The flywheel DC bus regulation control was explained and experimental results presented. Finally, the combined attitude control and energy storage algorithm that controls two flywheels simultaneously was presented. Experimental results were shown that verified the operational capability of the algorithm. shows high speed flywheel energy storage (60,000 RPM) and the successful implementation of an algorithm to simultaneously control both energy storage and a single axis of attitude with two flywheels. Overall, the presentation demonstrated that GRC has an operational facility that

  6. Sine Rotation Vector Method for Attitude Estimation of an Underwater Robot.

    PubMed

    Ko, Nak Yong; Jeong, Seokki; Bae, Youngchul

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a method for estimating the attitude of an underwater robot. The method employs a new concept of sine rotation vector and uses both an attitude heading and reference system (AHRS) and a Doppler velocity log (DVL) for the purpose of measurement. First, the acceleration and magnetic-field measurements are transformed into sine rotation vectors and combined. The combined sine rotation vector is then transformed into the differences between the Euler angles of the measured attitude and the predicted attitude; the differences are used to correct the predicted attitude. The method was evaluated according to field-test data and simulation data and compared to existing methods that calculate angular differences directly without a preceding sine rotation vector transformation. The comparison verifies that the proposed method improves the attitude estimation performance. PMID:27490549

  7. CMC 20N thruster for hermes attitude control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, A. C.

    Ceramic Matrix Composite materials (CMC) have been developped by SEP Solid Propulsion an Composite Materials Division in Le Haillan since the seventies for solid propulsion applications. In the race to create a new generation of small high performance bipropellant engines, SEP has opted for Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) such as SEPCARBINOX (R) or CERASEP (R), as combustion chamber and nozzle material. The main advantage of these composites is enabling increase of maximum combustion temperature to 1600°C without requiring anti-oxydation coatings, and with improved resistance to thermal cycles. SEP's Defense and Space group started preliminary work on choosing the composite materials best adapted to liquid bipropellant engines in 1983. Based on some 30 5N thrust combustion chambers, about 20 different materials were evaluated during firing tests. Next, using different combustion chambers sizes, SEP implemented a program designed to demonstrate the endurance of this material, and initiated a study on producing larger size parts including large area ratio nozzles. This program comprised the production and testing of combustion chambers rated at 200N and 6000N, associated with injectors derived from other applications. Finaly, in order to simulate the operating conditions experienced by certain motors on HERMES spaceplane, tests of the 200N motor were also carried out with an external thermal protection system. As of end 1987, designers had set the thrust level required for the HERMES attitude control system at between 10 and 30N. SEP therefore decided to focus further work on 20N-thrust engines, a choice which took into consideration the potential applications of this thrust level for satellite attitude control systems. Starting in mid-1988 and continuing until fall 1990, this program is designed to validate before going into final qualification all technologies required for the two planned applications: - the HERMES spaceplane, which has several thrusters integrated

  8. Integrated Power/Attitude Control System (IPACS) technology experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keckler, C. R.

    1984-01-01

    An experiment is proposed that will perform the tasks associated with the control and energy storage/power generation functions attendant to space operations. It was shown in past studies that the integration of these functions into one system can result in significant weight, volume, and cost savings. The Integrated Power/Attitude Control System (IPACS) concept is discussed. During orbit day, power is derived from the solar cell arrays and, after appropriate conditioning, is used to operate the spacecraft subsystems, including the control system. In conventional approaches, a part of the collected solar energy is stored in a bank of batteries to permit operation of the vehicle's systems during orbit night. In the IPACS concept, the solar energy is stored in the spinning flywheels of the control system in the form of kinetic energy. During orbit night, the wheels are despun and, through the use of a wheel-shaft mounted generator, power is generated for the onboard subsystems. Operating these flywheels over a 50-percent speed variation permits the extraction of 75 percent of the stored energy while at the same time preserving 50 percent of the momentum capacity for control of the vehicle. Batteries can therefore be eliminated and significant weight and volume savings realized.

  9. The instrument pointing system: Precision attitude control in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Ralf; Woelker, Albrecht

    1990-06-01

    The Spacelab Instrument Pointing System (IPS) is a three axes gimbal system providing pointing and stabilization in the arcsec range to a variety of space experiments with a mass of up to 7000 kg. The IPS demonstrated its control performance during the maiden flight in July 1985, the Spacelab 2 mission on board the Space Shuttle Challenger. The most challenging problem for attitude control in space is the disturbance compensation in the presence of structural flexibilities. Kalman filtering based on optical sensor and gyro measurements as well as flexible mode attenuation and feedforward control were indispensable to achieve high precision. To further enhance the IPS pointing performance and versatility, a new, more autonomous computer and sensor concept has been conceived providing the capacity for a higher degree of automation as well as improved pointing and closed loop tracking control. The autonomy and control capacity of the enhanced IPS establish the basis to accommodate the IPS as long-term available tracking and pointing platform on the International Space Station Freedom (ISF).

  10. A sun gate for Galileo spacecraft attitude control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mobasser, Sohrab; Weisenberg, David

    1990-01-01

    The combination of a sun sensor called a sun gate (SG) and a digital programmable signal processor on the Galileo spacecraft attitude and articulation control subsystem (AACS) will orient the rotation axis of the spacecraft toward the sun to satisfy a new requirement imposed by the new spacecraft trajectory. The combination will continuously monitor the pointing direction of the rotation axis, and any off-sun excursions of more than a preset threshold will be detected, triggering appropriate actions by the flight software to prevent off-sun cone angles of more than 14 deg. The design of the SG is described in detail, its principle of operation is given, and the flight software processing of the SG output is discussed.

  11. Investigations of an integrated angular velocity measurement and attitude control system for spacecraft using magnetically suspended double-gimbal CMGs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Shiqiang; Han, Bangcheng

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents an integrated angular velocity measurement and attitude control system of spacecraft using magnetically suspended double-gimbal control moment gyros (MSDGCMGs). The high speed rotor of MSDGCMG is alleviated by a five-degree-of-freedom permanent magnet biased AMB control system. With this special rotor supported manner, the MSDGCMG has the function of attitude rate sensing as well as attitude control. This characteristic provides a new approach to a compact light-weight spacecraft design, which can combine these two functions into a single device. This paper discusses the principles and implementations of AMB-based angular velocity measurement. Spacecraft dynamics with DGMSCMG actuators, including the dynamics of magnetically suspended high-speed rotor, the dynamics of inner gimbal and outer gimbal, as well as the determination method of spacecraft angular velocity are modeled, respectively. The effectiveness of the proposed integrated system is also validated numerically and experimentally.

  12. Passive radiative cooling of a HTS coil for attitude orbit control in micro-spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamori, Takaya; Ozaki, Naoya; Saisutjarit, Phongsatorn; Ohsaki, Hiroyuki

    2015-02-01

    This paper proposes a novel radiative cooling system for a high temperature superconducting (HTS) coil for an attitude orbit control system in nano- and micro-spacecraft missions. These days, nano-spacecraft (1-10 kg) and micro-spacecraft (10-100 kg) provide space access to a broader range of spacecraft developers and attract interest as space development applications. In planetary and high earth orbits, most previous standard-size spacecraft used thrusters for their attitude and orbit control, which are not available for nano- and micro-spacecraft missions because of the strict power consumption, space, and weight constraints. This paper considers orbit and attitude control methods that use a superconducting coil, which interacts with on-orbit space plasmas and creates a propulsion force. Because these spacecraft cannot use an active cooling system for the superconducting coil because of their mass and power consumption constraints, this paper proposes the utilization of a passive radiative cooling system, in which the superconducting coil is thermally connected to the 3 K cosmic background radiation of deep space, insulated from the heat generation using magnetic holders, and shielded from the sun. With this proposed cooling system, the HTS coil is cooled to 60 K in interplanetary orbits. Because the system does not use refrigerators for its cooling system, the spacecraft can achieve an HTS coil with low power consumption, small mass, and low cost.

  13. Predicting healthcare employees' participation in an office redesign program: Attitudes, norms and behavioral control

    PubMed Central

    Mohr, David C; Lukas, Carol VanDeusen; Meterko, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Background The study examined the extent to which components based on a modified version of the theory of planned behavior explained employee participation in a new clinical office program designed to reduce patient waiting times in primary care clinics. Methods We regressed extent of employee participation on attitudes about the program, group norms, and perceived behavioral control along with individual and clinic characteristics using a hierarchical linear mixed model. Results Perceived group norms were one of the best predictors of employee participation. Attitudes about the program were also significant, but to a lesser degree. Behavioral control, however, was not a significant predictor. Respondents with at least one year of clinic tenure, or who were team leaders, first line supervisor, or managers had greater participation rates. Analysis at the clinic level indicated clinics with scores in the highest quartile clinic scores on group norms, attitudes, and behavioral control scores were significantly higher on levels of overall participation than clinics in the lowest quartile. Conclusion Findings suggest that establishing strong norms and values may influence employee participation in a change program in a group setting. Supervisory level was also significant with greater responsibility being associated with greater participation. PMID:18976505

  14. AE-C attitude determination and control prelaunch analysis and operations plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werking, R. D.; Headrick, R. D.; Manders, C. F.; Woolley, R. D.

    1973-01-01

    A description of attitude control support being supplied by the Mission and Data Operations Directorate is presented. Included are descriptions of the computer programs being used to support the missions for attitude determination, prediction, and control. In addition, descriptions of the operating procedures which will be used to accomplish mission objectives are provided.

  15. The Effects of Perceived Locus of Control and Social Influence Techniques on Attitude Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Steven J.

    This study deals with the interaction between social influence technique and locus of control, internal or external to oneself, on attitude change. In a persuasive communication situation, where effectiveness depends on the receiver feelings controlled and subject to influence from outside sources, externals ought to show more attitude change than…

  16. The Measurement of Nuclear War Attitudes: Methods and Concerns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayton, Daniel M., II

    Measures of adults' attitudes toward nuclear war are briefly discussed, and Mayton's Modified World Affairs Questionnaire (MWAQ) is described. The 23-item MWAQ was developed from Novak and Lerner's World Affairs Questionnaire, a nuclear war attitude measure by Mayton and Delamater, and related interview items by Jeffries. When the MWAQ was…

  17. The attitude control of fixed-wing MAVS in turbulent environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Abdulghani; Massey, Kevin; Watkins, Simon; Clothier, Reece

    2014-04-01

    The small scale and portability of fixed-wing Micro Aerial Vehicles lend them to many unique applications, however their utility is often limited by ineffective attitude control in turbulent environments. The performance of attitude control systems themselves are affected by a variety of factors. Assessment of this system’s performance needs to be viewed in relation to the MAVs’ unique constraints. Certain aspects and limitations of MAV attitude control related issues are addressed in the literature, but to fully address the degradation of utility, the entire system must be examined. These issues can only be fully addressed when considering them concurrently. There is no framework for defining the attitude control problem explicitly for MAVs. This paper attempts to (1) Define the MAV attitude control problem with respect to the unique constraints imposed by this class of Unmanned Aircraft; (2) Review current design trends of MAVs with respect to vulnerability to atmospheric turbulence.

  18. Orion Launch Abort Vehicle Attitude Control Motor Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Kelly J.; Brauckmann, Gregory J.; Paschal, Keith B.; Chan, David T.; Walker, Eric L.; Foley, Robert; Mayfield, David; Cross, Jared

    2011-01-01

    Current Orion Launch Abort Vehicle (LAV) configurations use an eight-jet, solid-fueled Attitude Control Motor (ACM) to provide required vehicle control for all proposed abort trajectories. Due to the forward position of the ACM on the LAV, it is necessary to assess the effects of jet-interactions (JI) between the various ACM nozzle plumes and the external flow along the outside surfaces of the vehicle. These JI-induced changes in flight control characteristics must be accounted for in developing ACM operations and LAV flight characteristics. A test program to generate jet interaction aerodynamic increment data for multiple LAV configurations was conducted in the NASA Ames and NASA Langley Unitary Plan Wind Tunnels from August 2007 through December 2009. Using cold air as the simulant gas, powered subscale models were used to generate interaction data at subsonic, transonic, and supersonic test conditions. This paper presents an overview of the complete ACM JI experimental test program for Orion LAV configurations, highlighting ACM system modeling, nozzle scaling assumptions, experimental test techniques, and data reduction methodologies. Lessons learned are discussed, and sample jet interaction data are shown. These data, in conjunction with computational predictions, were used to create the ACM JI increments for all relevant flight databases.

  19. A study of attitude control concepts for precision-pointing non-rigid spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Likins, P. W.

    1975-01-01

    Attitude control concepts for use onboard structurally nonrigid spacecraft that must be pointed with great precision are examined. The task of determining the eigenproperties of a system of linear time-invariant equations (in terms of hybrid coordinates) representing the attitude motion of a flexible spacecraft is discussed. Literal characteristics are developed for the associated eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the system. A method is presented for determining the poles and zeros of the transfer function describing the attitude dynamics of a flexible spacecraft characterized by hybrid coordinate equations. Alterations are made to linear regulator and observer theory to accommodate modeling errors. The results show that a model error vector, which evolves from an error system, can be added to a reduced system model, estimated by an observer, and used by the control law to render the system less sensitive to uncertain magnitudes and phase relations of truncated modes and external disturbance effects. A hybrid coordinate formulation using the provided assumed mode shapes, rather than incorporating the usual finite element approach is provided.

  20. Attitudes toward Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trials of Patients with Schizophrenia in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Norio; Ishioka, Masamichi; Tsuchimine, Shoko; Tsuruga, Koji; Sato, Yasushi; Furukori, Hanako; Kudo, Shuhei; Tomita, Tetsu; Nakagami, Taku; Yasui-Furukori, Norio

    2015-01-01

    Background Although the use of placebo in clinical trials of schizophrenia patients is controversial because of medical and ethical concerns, placebo-controlled clinical trials are commonly used in the licensing of new drugs. Aims The objective of this study was to assess the attitudes toward placebo-controlled clinical trials among patients with schizophrenia in Japan. Method Using a cross-sectional design, we recruited patients (n = 251) aged 47.7±13.2 (mean±SD) with a DSM-IV diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder who were admitted to six psychiatric hospitals from December 2013 to March 2014. We employed a 14-item questionnaire specifically developed to survey patients' attitudes toward placebo-controlled clinical trials. Results The results indicated that 33% of the patients would be willing to participate in a placebo-controlled clinical trial. Expectations for improvement of disease, a guarantee of hospital treatment continuation, and encouragement by family or friends were associated with the willingness to participate in such trials, whereas a belief of additional time required for medical examinations was associated with non-participation. Conclusions Fewer than half of the respondents stated that they would be willing to participate in placebo-controlled clinical trials. Therefore, interpreting the results from placebo-controlled clinical trials could be negatively affected by selection bias. PMID:26600382

  1. Single Axis Attitude Control and DC Bus Regulation with Two Flywheels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kascak, Peter E.; Jansen, Ralph H.; Kenny, Barbara; Dever, Timothy P.

    2002-01-01

    A computer simulation of a flywheel energy storage single axis attitude control system is described. The simulation models hardware which will be experimentally tested in the future. This hardware consists of two counter rotating flywheels mounted to an air table. The air table allows one axis of rotational motion. An inertia DC bus coordinator is set forth that allows the two control problems, bus regulation and attitude control, to be separated. Simulation results are presented with a previously derived flywheel bus regulator and a simple PID attitude controller.

  2. Integrated Orbit and Attitude Control for a Nanosatellite with Power Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naasz, Bo; Hall, Christopher; Berry, Matthew; Hy-Young, Kim

    2003-01-01

    Small satellites tend to be power-limited, so that actuators used to control the orbit and attitude must compete with each other as well as with other subsystems for limited electrical power. The Virginia Tech nanosatellite project, HokieSat, must use its limited power resources to operate pulsed-plasma thrusters for orbit control and magnetic torque coils for attitude control, while also providing power to a GPS receiver, a crosslink transceiver, and other subsystems. The orbit and attitude control strategies were developed independently. The attitude control system is based on an application of Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) to an averaged system of equations, whereas the orbit control is based on orbit element feedback. In this paper we describe the strategy for integrating these two control systems and present simulation results to verify the strategy.

  3. Decentralized sliding-mode control for spacecraft attitude synchronization under actuator failures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Baolin; Wang, Danwei; Poh, Eng Kee

    2014-12-01

    This paper examines attitude synchronization and tracking problems with model uncertainties, external disturbances, actuator failures and control torque saturation. Two decentralized sliding mode control laws are proposed and analyzed based on algebraic graph theory. Using Barbalat's Lemma, it is shown that the control laws guarantee each spacecraft approaches the desired time-varying attitude and angular velocity while maintaining attitude synchronization among the other spacecraft in the formation. The first controller is designed in the presence of model uncertainties, external disturbances, and actuator failures. The results are extended to the case with control input saturation in the second controller. Both control laws do not require online identification of failures. Numerical simulations are presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed attitude synchronization and tracking approaches.

  4. X-33 Attitude Control System Design for Ascent, Transition, and Entry Flight Regimes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Charles E.; Gallaher, Michael W.; Hendrix, Neal D.

    1998-01-01

    The Vehicle Control Systems Team at Marshall Space Flight Center, Systems Dynamics Laboratory, Guidance and Control Systems Division is designing under a cooperative agreement with Lockheed Martin Skunkworks, the Ascent, Transition, and Entry flight attitude control system for the X-33 experimental vehicle. Ascent flight control begins at liftoff and ends at linear aerospike main engine cutoff (NECO) while Transition and Entry flight control begins at MECO and concludes at the terminal area energy management (TAEM) interface. TAEM occurs at approximately Mach 3.0. This task includes not only the design of the vehicle attitude control systems but also the development of requirements for attitude control system components and subsystems. The X-33 attitude control system design is challenged by a short design cycle, the design environment (Mach 0 to about Mach 15), and the X-33 incremental test philosophy. The X-33 design-to-launch cycle of less than 3 years requires a concurrent design approach while the test philosophy requires design adaptation to vehicle variations that are a function of Mach number and mission profile. The flight attitude control system must deal with the mixing of aerosurfaces, reaction control thrusters, and linear aerospike engine control effectors and handle parasitic effects such as vehicle flexibility and propellant sloshing from the uniquely shaped propellant tanks. The attitude control system design is, as usual, closely linked to many other subsystems and must deal with constraints and requirements from these subsystems.

  5. Knowledge, Attitude, Practice, and Status of Infection Control among Iranian Dentists and Dental Students: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Moradi Khanghahi, Behnam; Jamali, Zahra; Pournaghi Azar, Fatemeh; Naghavi Behzad, Mohammad; Azami-Aghdash, Saber

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims Infection control is an important issue in dentistry, and the dentists are primarily responsible for observing the relevant procedures. Therefore, the present study evaluated knowledge, attitude, practice, and status of infection control among Iranian dentists through systematic review of published results. Materials and methods In this systematic review, the required data was collected searching for keywords including infection, infection control, behavior, performance, practice, attitude, knowledge, dent*, prevention, Iran* and their Persian equivalents in PubMed, Science Direct, Iranmedex, SID, Medlib, and Magiran databases with a time limit of 1985 to 2012. Out of 698 articles, 15 completely related articles were finally considered and the rest were excluded due to lake of relev-ance to the study goals. The required data were extracted and summarized in an Extraction Table and were analyzed ma-nually. Results Evaluating the results of studies indicated inappropriate knowledge, attitude, and practice regarding infection control among Iranian dentists and dental students. Using personal protection devices and observing measures required for infection control were not in accordance with global standards. Conclusion The knowledge, attitudes, and practice of infection control in Iranian dental settings were found to be inadequate. Therefore, dentists should be educated more on the subject and special programs should be in place to monitor the dental settings for observing infection control standards. PMID:23875081

  6. An approach to the design and implementation of spacecraft attitude control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ODonnell, James R., Jr.; Mangus, David J.

    1998-01-01

    Over 39 years and a long list of missions, the guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) groups at the Goddard Space Flight Center have gradually developed approaches to the design and implementation of successful spacecraft attitude control systems. With the recent creation of the Guidance, Navigation, and Control Center at Goddard, there is a desire to document some of these design practices to help to ensure their consistent application in the future. In this paper, we will discuss the beginnings of this effort, drawing primarily on the experience of one of the past attitude control system (ACS) groups at Goddard (what was formerly known as Code 712, the Guidance, Navigation, and Control Branch). We will discuss the analysis and design methods and criteria used, including guidelines for linear and nonlinear analysis, as well as the use of low- and high-fidelity simulation for system design and verification of performance. Descriptions of typical ACS sensor and actuator hardware will be shown, and typical sensor/actuator suites for a variety of mission types detailed. A description of the software and hardware test effort will be given, along with an attempt to make some qualitative estimates on how much effort is involved. The spacecraft and GN&C subsystem review cycles will be discussed, giving an outline of what design reviews are typically held and what information should be presented at each stage. Finally, we will point out some of the lessons learned at Goddard.

  7. An Approach to the Design and Implementation of Spacecraft Attitude Control Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ODonnell, James R., Jr.; Mangus, David J.

    1998-01-01

    Over 39 years and a long list of missions, the guidance, navigation, and control (GN&C) groups at the Goddard Space Flight Center have gradually developed approaches to the design and implementation of successful spacecraft attitude control systems. With the recent creation of the Guidance, Navigation, and Control Center at Goddard, there is a desire to document some of these design practices to help to ensure their consistent application in the future. In this paper, we will discuss the beginnings of this effort, drawing primarily on the experience of one of the past attitude control system (ACS) groups at Goddard (what was formerly known as Code 712, the Guidance, Navigation, and Control Branch). We will discuss the analysis and design methods and criteria used, including guidelines for linear and nonlinear analysis, as well as the use of low- and high-fidelity simulation for system design and verification of performance. Descriptions of typical ACS sensor and actuator hardware will be shown, and typical sensor/actuator suites for a variety of mission types detailed. A description of the software and hardware test effort will be given, along with an attempt to make some qualitative estimates on how much effort is involved. The spacecraft and GN&C subsystem review cycles will be discussed, giving an outline of what design reviews are typically held and .what information should be presented at each stage. Finally, we will point out some of the lessons learned at Goddard.

  8. Maternal and Paternal Psychological Control as Moderators of the Link between Peer Attitudes and Adolescents' Risky Sexual Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oudekerk, Barbara A.; Allen, Joseph P.; Hafen, Christopher A.; Hessel, Elenda T.; Szwedo, David E.; Spilker, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Maternal and paternal psychological control, peer attitudes, and the interaction of psychological control and peer attitudes at age 13 were examined as predictors of risky sexual behavior before age 16 in a community sample of 181 youth followed from age 13 to 16. Maternal psychological control moderated the link between peer attitudes and sexual…

  9. Flight Performance of Skylab Attitude and Pointing Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, W. B.; Kennel, H. F.; Rupp, C. C.; Seltzer, S. M.

    1975-01-01

    In 1967 a paper at the AIAA Guidance, Control and Flight Dynamics Conference in Huntsville, Ala. presented for the first time the prot)osed SKYLAB Attitude and Pointing Control System (APCS) The system requirements, Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) configuration, control philosophy, and operational modes were presented and the APCS described. The Initial mission and system design requirements changed during the period of time before the SKYLAB was launched. This paper will review the Initial and final APCS requirements and goals and their relationship. The actual flight mission (and Its alterations during the flight) and known achieved APCS performance will then be presented. SKYLAB was a tremendous success in furthering man's scientific knowledge; but perhaps SKYLAB will be remembered more for the anomalies and the efforts undertaken to solve them. On May 14, 1973, the unmanned SKYLAB Orbital Workshop (OWS) was launched from Cape Kennedy. Serious hardware failures began to occur during ascent through the atmosphere and their spectre continued to haunt both the astronauts and their ground based support team. Nor were these the only surprises affecting the design and operation of the APCS. Mission requirements for pointing to various stellar targets and to nadir for earth resources experiments were added after the hardware was designed. The chance appearance of comet Kohoutek during the SKYLAB operational life-time caused NASA to add comet observation to the mission requirements and to adjust the time when the third crew would man the SKYLAB. The development of new procedures and software for the opportunity to observe this visitor to our solar system is described.

  10. Vega roll and attitude control system algorithms trade-off study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulino, N.; Cuciniello, G.; Cruciani, I.; Corraro, F.; Spallotta, D.; Nebula, F.

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes the trade-off study for the selection of the most suitable algorithms for the Roll and Attitude Control System (RACS) within the FPS-A program, aimed at developing the new Flight Program Software of VEGA Launcher. Two algorithms were analyzed: Switching Lines (SL) and Quaternion Feedback Regulation. Using a development simulation tool that models two critical flight phases (Long Coasting Phase (LCP) and Payload Release (PLR) Phase), both algorithms were assessed with Monte Carlo batch simulations for both of the phases. The statistical outcomes of the results demonstrate a 100 percent success rate for Quaternion Feedback Regulation, and support the choice of this method.