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Sample records for atypical absence seizures

  1. Absence seizure

    MedlinePLUS

    Seizure - petit mal; Seizure - absence; Petit mal seizure; Epilepsy - absence seizure ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff RB, ... 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap ...

  2. Deletion 18p11.32p11.31 in a Child with Global Developmental Delay and Atypical, Drug-Resistant Absence Seizures.

    PubMed

    Verrotti, Alberto; Palka, Chiara; Prezioso, Giovanni; Alfonsi, Melissa; Calabrese, Giuseppe; Palka, Giandomenico; Chiarelli, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    We report the first case of an 18p11.32 deletion, detected by array CGH, associated with a drug-resistant form of atypical absence epilepsy, global developmental delay and no signs of holoprosencephaly (HPE). In particular, this region encompasses 19 genes, and none of these genes have been strictly associated with epilepsy. Among these, TGIF1 is expressed in the fetal and adult nervous system, and its deletion has been related to central nervous system diseases. TGIF1 deletions have previously been reported in patients with a comparable phenotype as seen in our case and in children whose neurological signs and symptoms were considerable, but not epileptiform. Mutations and deletions involving the TGIF1 gene have been described in patients with HPE in an autosomal dominant model of inheritance. However, TGIF1 mutations have also been reported in normal individuals and in patients with mental retardation or showing a very mild phenotype, suggesting the characteristic of incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity. Therefore, a TGIF1 deletion may not be always related to HPE, and it may have a link to the development of epilepsy. PMID:26278570

  3. Childhood Absence Epilepsy: Poor Attention Is More Than Seizures

    MedlinePLUS

    ... C. Spencer, MD Steven Karceski, MD Childhood absence epilepsy Poor attention is more than seizures Liu Lin ... Masur and colleagues 1 from the Childhood Absence Epilepsy Study Group tried to answer a few important ...

  4. Absence seizures in succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficient mice: a model of juvenile absence epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Cortez, M A; Wu, Y; Gibson, K M; Snead, O C

    2004-11-01

    The succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) null mouse represents a viable animal model for human SSADH deficiency and is characterized by markedly elevated levels of both gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in brain, blood, and urine. GHB is known to induce absence-like seizures and absence seizures have been reported to occur in children with SSADH deficiency. We tested the hypothesis that the phenotype of the SSADH(-/-) mouse shows absence-like seizures because of the inordinately high levels of GHB in the brain of this mutant animal. Sequential electrocorticographic (ECoG) and prolonged video ECoG recordings from chronically implanted electrodes were done on SSADH(-/-), SSADH(+/-), and SSADH(+/+) mice from postnatal day (P) 10 to (P) 21. Spontaneous, recurrent absence-like seizures appeared in the SSADH(-/-) during the second week of life and evolved into generalized convulsive seizures late in the third week of life that were associated with an explosive onset of status epilepticus which was lethal. The seizures in SSADH null mice were consistent with typical absence seizures in rodent with 7 Hz spike-and-wave discharge (SWD) recorded from thalamocortical circuitry, the onset/offset of which was time-locked with ictal behavior characterized by facial myoclonus, vibrissal twitching and frozen immobility. The absence seizures became progressively more severe from P14 to 18 at which time they evolved into myoclonic and generalized convulsive seizures that progressed into a lethal status epilepticus. The absence seizures in SSADH(-/-) were abolished by ethosuximide (ETX) and the GABA(B)R antagonist CGP 35348. The seizure phenotype in the SSADH(-/-) recapitulates that observed in human SSADH deficiency. Hence, SSADH(-/-) may be used to investigate the molecular mechanisms that underpin the pathogenesis of absence and generalized tonic-clonic seizures associated with SSADH deficiency. As well, the SSADH(-/-) may represent a unique animal model of the transition from absence to myoclonic and generalized convulsive seizures that is observed in up to 80% of patients with juvenile absence epilepsy. PMID:15582027

  5. Cellular and network mechanisms of genetically-determined absence seizures.

    PubMed

    Pinault, Didier; O'Brien, Terence J

    2005-01-01

    The absence epilepsies are characterized by recurrent episodes of loss of consciousness associated with generalized spike-and-wave discharges, with an abrupt onset and offset, in the thalamocortical system. In the absence of detailed neurophysiological studies in humans, many of the concepts regarding the pathophysiological basis of absence seizures are based on studies in animal models. Each of these models has its particular strengths and limitations, and the validity of findings from these models for the human condition cannot be assumed. Consequently, studies in different models have produced some conflicting findings and conclusions. A long-standing concept, based primarily from studies in vivo in cats and in vitro brain slices, is that these paroxysmal electrical events develop suddenly from sleep-related spindle oscillations. More specifically, it is proposed that the initial mechanisms that underlie absence-related spike-and-wave discharges are located in the thalamus, involving especially the thalamic reticular nucleus. By contrast, more recent studies in well-established, genetic models of absence epilepsy in rats demonstrate that spike-and-wave discharges originate in a cortical focus and develop from a wake-related natural corticothalamic sensorimotor rhythm. In this review we integrate recent findings showing that, in both the thalamus and the neocortex, genetically-determined, absence-related spike-and-wave discharges are the manifestation of hypersynchronized, cellular, rhythmic excitations and inhibitions that result from a combination of complex, intrinsic, synaptic mechanisms. Arguments are put forward supporting the hypothesis that layer VI corticothalamic neurons act as 'drivers' in the generation of spike-and-wave discharges in the somatosensory thalamocortical system that result in corticothalamic resonances particularly initially involving the thalamic reticular nucleus. However an important unresolved question is: what are the cellular and network mechanisms responsible for the switch from physiological, wake-related, natural oscillations into pathological spike-and-wave discharges? We speculate on possible answers to this, building particularly on recent findings from genetic models in rats. PMID:21909233

  6. Critical Roles of the Direct GABAergic Pallido-cortical Pathway in Controlling Absence Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Ma, Tao; Wu, Shengdun; Ma, Jingling; Cui, Yan; Xia, Yang; Xu, Peng; Yao, Dezhong

    2015-01-01

    The basal ganglia (BG), serving as an intermediate bridge between the cerebral cortex and thalamus, are believed to play crucial roles in controlling absence seizure activities generated by the pathological corticothalamic system. Inspired by recent experiments, here we systematically investigate the contribution of a novel identified GABAergic pallido-cortical pathway, projecting from the globus pallidus externa (GPe) in the BG to the cerebral cortex, to the control of absence seizures. By computational modelling, we find that both increasing the activation of GPe neurons and enhancing the coupling strength of the inhibitory pallido-cortical pathway can suppress the bilaterally synchronous 2–4 Hz spike and wave discharges (SWDs) during absence seizures. Appropriate tuning of several GPe-related pathways may also trigger the SWD suppression, through modulating the activation level of GPe neurons. Furthermore, we show that the previously discovered bidirectional control of absence seizures due to the competition between other two BG output pathways also exists in our established model. Importantly, such bidirectional control is shaped by the coupling strength of this direct GABAergic pallido-cortical pathway. Our work suggests that the novel identified pallido-cortical pathway has a functional role in controlling absence seizures and the presented results might provide testable hypotheses for future experimental studies. PMID:26496656

  7. Cardiorespiratory Analysis on Children Suffering from Absence and Complex Partial Seizures

    E-print Network

    change on the cardio-respiratory control of the autonomic nervous system[1]. As mentioned above episodes, while absence seizures do not seem to alter the cardio-respiratory control in any signif- icant, these effects are studied and the cardio-respiratory control of children suf- fering from complex

  8. Application of approximate entropy on dynamic characteristics of epileptic absence seizure.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yi; Huang, Ruimei; Chen, Ziyi; Chang, Xin; Chen, Jialong; Xie, Lingli

    2012-03-15

    Electroencephalogram signals are time-varying complex electrophysiological signals. Existing studies show that approximate entropy, which is a nonlinear dynamics index, is not an ideal method for electroencephalogram analysis. Clinical electroencephalogram measurements usually contain electrical interference signals, creating additional challenges in terms of maintaining robustness of the analytic methods. There is an urgent need for a novel method of nonlinear dynamical analysis of the electroencephalogram that can characterize seizure-related changes in cerebral dynamics. The aim of this paper was to study the fluctuations of approximate entropy in preictal, ictal, and postictal electroencephalogram signals from a patient with absence seizures, and to improve the algorithm used to calculate the approximate entropy. The approximate entropy algorithm, especially our modified version, could accurately describe the dynamical changes of the brain during absence seizures. We could also demonstrate that the complexity of the brain was greater in the normal state than in the ictal state. The fluctuations of the approximate entropy before epileptic seizures observed in this study can form a good basis for further study on the prediction of seizures with nonlinear dynamics. PMID:25745446

  9. Seizures

    MedlinePLUS

    ... defects) Brain tumor (rare) Drug abuse Electric shock Epilepsy Fever (particularly in young children) Head injury Heart ... age. There may be a family history of epilepsy or seizures. If seizures continue repeatedly after the ...

  10. Neurochemical and Behavioral Features in Genetic Absence Epilepsy and in Acutely Induced Absence Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Bazyan, A. S.; van Luijtelaar, G.

    2013-01-01

    The absence epilepsy typical electroencephalographic pattern of sharp spikes and slow waves (SWDs) is considered to be due to an interaction of an initiation site in the cortex and a resonant circuit in the thalamus. The hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cationic Ih pacemaker channels (HCN) play an important role in the enhanced cortical excitability. The role of thalamic HCN in SWD occurrence is less clear. Absence epilepsy in the WAG/Rij strain is accompanied by deficiency of the activity of dopaminergic system, which weakens the formation of an emotional positive state, causes depression-like symptoms, and counteracts learning and memory processes. It also enhances GABAA receptor activity in the striatum, globus pallidus, and reticular thalamic nucleus, causing a rise of SWD activity in the cortico-thalamo-cortical networks. One of the reasons for the occurrence of absences is that several genes coding of GABAA receptors are mutated. The question arises: what the role of DA receptors is. Two mechanisms that cause an infringement of the function of DA receptors in this genetic absence epilepsy model are proposed. PMID:23738145

  11. ?-Hydroxybutyric Acid-Induced Electrographic Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Joseph; Lucey, Brendan P.; Duntley, Stephen P.; Darken, Rachel S.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of absence-like electrographic seizures during NREM sleep in a patient who was taking sodium oxybate, a sodium salt of ?-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB). An overnight full montage electroencephalography (EEG) study revealed numerous frontally predominant rhythmic 1.5-2 Hz sharp waves and spike-wave activity during stage N2 and N3 sleep at the peak dose time for sodium oxybate, resembling atypical absence-like electrographic seizures. The patient was later weaned off sodium oxybate, and a repeat study did not show any such electrographic seizures. Absence-like seizures induced by GHB had previously been described in experimental animal models. We present the first reported human case of absence-like electrographic seizure associated with sodium oxybate. Citation: Cheung J, Lucey BP, Duntley SP, Darken RS. ?-hydroxybutyric acid-induced electrographic seizures. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(7):811-812. PMID:25024661

  12. A Critical Evaluation of the Gamma-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB) Model of Absence Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Venzi, Marcello; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; Crunelli, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Typical absence seizures (ASs) are nonconvulsive epileptic events which are commonly observed in pediatric and juvenile epilepsies and may be present in adults suffering from other idiopathic generalized epilepsies. Our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of ASs has been greatly advanced by the availability of genetic and pharmacological models, in particular the ?-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) model which, in recent years, has been extensively used in studies in transgenic mice. GHB is an endogenous brain molecule that upon administration to various species, including humans, induces not only ASs but also a state of sedation/hypnosis. Analysis of the available data clearly indicates that only in the rat does there exist a set of GHB-elicited behavioral and EEG events that can be confidently classified as ASs. Other GHB activities, particularly in mice, appear to be mostly of a sedative/hypnotic nature: thus, their relevance to ASs requires further investigation. At the molecular level, GHB acts as a weak GABA-B agonist, while the existence of a GHB receptor remains elusive. The pre- and postsynaptic actions underlying GHB-elicited ASs have been thoroughly elucidated in thalamus, but little is known about the cellular/network effects of GHB in neocortex, the other brain region involved in the generation of ASs. PMID:25403866

  13. GABAB receptors as a common target for hypothermia and spike and wave seizures: intersecting mechanisms of thermoregulation and absence epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Ostoji?, Z S; Ili?, T V; Veskovi?, S M; Andjus, P R

    2013-05-15

    In the current study the link among the ?-hydroxybutyrate (GHB)/pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced absence-like seizures and concomitant decreases in the core temperature, as well as electroencephalographic (EEG) activity during rewarming from deep hypothermia produced by a drug-free protocol were investigated. During the rewarming period after deep cooling, most Wistar rats suffered from bilaterally synchronous spike and waves with no or mild behavioral correlates. Spike and wave seizures were temperature-dependent and were initially registered when body temperature (Tb) reached 25-27°C, but mostly during the mild hypothermia of 0.3-1.3°C (Tb of 36.3-37.3°C). In chemical absence models, spike and wave discharges were also closely accompanied by mild systemic hypothermia, as both PTZ- and GHB-induced temperature decreases ranged from about 1-1.4°C respectively, together with EEG markers of absence activity. Thus, throughout the different experimental designs, the occurrence of spike and wave discharges was always related to a mild (0.3-1.4°C) decrease of Tb. Benzodiazepine diazepam as the GABAA-positive allosteric modulator and CGP 62349 as the selective antagonist of GABAB receptors were used to determine if their well-known anticonvulsant properties also affect hypothermia elicited by these drugs. Finally, during the course of spontaneous rewarming from deep hypothermia, another selective GABAB-blocking agent, CGP 35348, was used to elucidate if GABAB inhibitory system could be critically implicated in the generation of hypothermia-dependent spike and waves. Diazepam prevented both the PTZ-induced hypothermia and electrographic absence seizures, but these two beneficial effects did not occur in the GHB model. Even though diazepam delayed GHB-induced maximal temperature decrease, the GHB effects remained highly significant. The GABAB antagonist CGP 62349 completely prevented hypothermia as well as absence seizures in both chemical models. Likewise, spike and wave discharges, registered during the spontaneous rewarming from deep hypothermia, were completely prevented by CGP 35348. These findings show that systemic hypothermia should definitely be regarded as a marker of GABAB receptor activation. Moreover, the results of this study clearly show that initial mild temperature decrease should be considered as strong absence-provoking factor. Hypothermia-induced nonconvulsive seizures also highlight the importance of continuous EEG monitoring in children undergoing therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest. Since every change in peripheral or systemic temperature ultimately must be perceived by preoptic region of the anterior hypothalamus as the primary thermoregulatory and sleep-inducing center, the preoptic thermosensitive neurons in general and warm-sensitive neurons in particular, simply have to be regarded as the most probable candidate for connected thermoregulatory and absence generating mechanisms. Therefore, additional studies are needed to confirm their potential role in the generation and propagation of absence seizures. PMID:23415784

  14. Absence of Nails, Deaf-mutism, Seizures, and Intellectual Disability: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sagayaraj, Benjamin; Kumar, Radha

    2015-01-01

    Seizures coexists in children with intellectual disability and are often attributed to neural dysfunction associated with it. Often a careful clinical examination will unravel many diagnostic pointers as in this 8-year-old child with global development delay, deaf-mutism and moderate intellectual disability (mental retardation) who presented with seizures in the emergency department. General examination revealed dysmorphic features like anonychia, low set ears, long philtrum, large lower lips and abnormal dermatoglyphics with features of osteodystrophy on radiology. She was diagnosed as a case of DOORS syndrome, an extremely rare genetic condition affecting the TCA cycle, with just over 40 cases reported, worldwide till date, since its first description in 1961. Her genetic analysis did not reveal the common TBC1D24 mutation in 16p13.3 resulting often from substitutions affecting the arginine at position 242, in spite of all classical clinical features associated with it, suggesting genetic heterogeneity in DOORS syndrome. Though four year follow-up revealed changes in seizure pattern, there was no optic atrophy, change in IQ or peripheral nerve problem. This probably suggests that children with typical clinical features and TBC1D24 mutations may have more progressive deterioration than those without it and newer molecular techniques may identify unexplained phenotypic expressions. PMID:26023614

  15. Absence of Nails, Deaf-mutism, Seizures, and Intellectual Disability: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Nair, Lal Devayanivasudevan; Sagayaraj, Benjamin; Kumar, Radha

    2015-04-01

    Seizures coexists in children with intellectual disability and are often attributed to neural dysfunction associated with it. Often a careful clinical examination will unravel many diagnostic pointers as in this 8-year-old child with global development delay, deaf-mutism and moderate intellectual disability (mental retardation) who presented with seizures in the emergency department. General examination revealed dysmorphic features like anonychia, low set ears, long philtrum, large lower lips and abnormal dermatoglyphics with features of osteodystrophy on radiology. She was diagnosed as a case of DOORS syndrome, an extremely rare genetic condition affecting the TCA cycle, with just over 40 cases reported, worldwide till date, since its first description in 1961. Her genetic analysis did not reveal the common TBC1D24 mutation in 16p13.3 resulting often from substitutions affecting the arginine at position 242, in spite of all classical clinical features associated with it, suggesting genetic heterogeneity in DOORS syndrome. Though four year follow-up revealed changes in seizure pattern, there was no optic atrophy, change in IQ or peripheral nerve problem. This probably suggests that children with typical clinical features and TBC1D24 mutations may have more progressive deterioration than those without it and newer molecular techniques may identify unexplained phenotypic expressions. PMID:26023614

  16. Seizures with an atypical aetiology in an elderly patient: Eagle's syndrome-how does one treat it?

    PubMed

    Malik, Yasir; Dar, Javeed Ahmed; Almadani, Abubaker Abdul Rahman

    2015-01-01

    Onset of epilepsy can occur at any age, but it is relatively rare in the elderly. Late onset epilepsy is usually secondary to stroke, tumour, trauma or neurodegenerative disorders. A 62-year-old Indian woman presented with frequent drop attacks sometimes leading to unconsciousness and, rarely, associated with seizure. Her epilepsy work up was unremarkable. As the disease progressed, she was diagnosed as having idiopathic epilepsy, syncope or pseudo-seizure, on different occasions, and was treated at length with no response. Finally, detailed history-taking revealed her as having glossopharyngeal neuralgia leading to syncope and seizures. She subsequently improved. In clinical practice, such rare entities should also be considered for proper management of patients' ailments. PMID:26604239

  17. Dynamics of networks during absence seizure's on- and offset in rodents and man

    PubMed Central

    Lüttjohann, Annika; van Luijtelaar, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Network mechanisms relevant for the generation, maintenance and termination of spike-wave discharges (SWD), the neurophysiological hallmark of absence epilepsy, are still enigmatic and widely discussed. Within the last years, however, improvements in signal analytical techniques, applied to both animal and human fMRI, EEG, MEG, and ECoG data, greatly increased our understanding and challenged several, dogmatic concepts of SWD. This review will summarize these recent data, demonstrating that SWD are not primary generalized, are not sudden and unpredictable events. It will disentangle different functional contributions of structures within the cortico-thalamo-cortical system, relevant for the generation, generalization, maintenance, and termination of SWD and will present a new “network based” scenario for these oscillations. Similarities and differences between rodent and human data are presented demonstrating that in both species a local cortical onset zone of SWD exists, although with different locations; that in both some forms of cortical and thalamic precursor activity can be found, and that SWD occur through repetitive cyclic activity between cortex and thalamus. The focal onset zone in human data could differ between patients with varying spatial and temporal dynamics; in rats the latter is still poorly investigated. PMID:25698972

  18. Febrile Seizures

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or prolonged seizures are a risk factor for epilepsy but most children who experience febrile seizures do ... develop the reoccurring seizures that re characteristic of epilepsy. Certain children who have febrile seizures face an ...

  19. Febrile Seizures

    MedlinePLUS

    ... febrile seizure does not mean a child has epilepsy, since that disorder is characterized by reoccurring seizures ... outcome but carry an increased risk of developing epilepsy. How common are febrile seizures? Febrile seizures are ...

  20. Atypical central pain processing in sensory modulation disorder: absence of temporal summation and higher after-sensation.

    PubMed

    Bar-Shalita, T; Vatine, J-J; Yarnitsky, D; Parush, S; Weissman-Fogel, I

    2014-02-01

    Sensory over-responsivity (SOR), a subtype of the proposed sensory modulation disorder (SMD), is characterized by over-responsiveness to stimuli in several sensory modalities. SMD individuals demonstrate abnormal responses to naturally occurring stimuli in a manner that interferes with daily life participation. Previous psychophysical testing of the somatosensory system revealed that SOR individuals rated pain sensations higher than controls, demonstrating hyperalgesia that can be centrally mediated. Temporal summation (TS) of second pain and after-sensation are manifestations of central sensitization; therefore, this study explored these measures for better characterization of central pain processing in SOR. Twelve SOR adults and 12 healthy controls participated. TS was produced by a train of fifteen repetitive heat pulses, 0.7 s duration each, and 2 s of inter-stimulus interval, applied to the thenar-eminence, while four pain ratings were obtained. An after-sensation was then measured for 5 min, obtaining six pain ratings. No TS of pain was indicated in the SOR group (SOR: p = 0.36; control: p < 0.001). Further, while controls reported a gradual disappearance of pain after-sensation, individuals with SOR continued to report pain for the duration of the 5 min measured (p = 0.002). These results demonstrate an atypical response pattern, suggesting alteration in pain processing and/or modulation at a central level in individuals with SOR. These possible neural changes may manifest themselves as interference with daily functioning as well as shed light on some of the between-subject variability seen in psychophysical testing in non-painful subjects. PMID:24247592

  1. Modulation of pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures and oxidative stress parameters by sodium valproate in the absence and presence of N-acetylcysteine.

    PubMed

    Uma Devi, P; Pillai, K Kolappa; Vohora, Divya

    2006-06-01

    In view of a role of oxidative stress in epilepsy and the evidence for the involvement of peroxidative injury in sodium valproate (SVP)-induced adverse effects on liver and kidneys, we investigated whether the combination of SVP with N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an antioxidant, may help us to achieve maximal efficacy in terms of seizure control, with minimal toxicity on liver and kidneys. Pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures were used to evaluate the anticonvulsant effect of drugs. Biochemical estimations included the determination of oxidative stress markers like thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances in brain tissue and glutathione (GSH) levels in liver and kidney tissues. Aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase concentrations in the serum were also determined to assess liver function. In our study, NAC exhibited a nondose-dependent anticonvulsant effect. The concurrent administration of NAC with SVP significantly prolonged the latency to jerks, myoclonus and clonic generalized seizures. No significant oxidative stress was evident in brain tissue following PTZ-induced seizures, though an elevation of serum transaminase enzymes was seen. SVP at the dose studied did not produce any significant oxidative stress on the liver and kidneys, while treatment with NAC elevated liver and kidney GSH levels. The concurrent administration of NAC with SVP had beneficial effects on liver and kidney cells. PMID:16671959

  2. Febrile seizures

    MedlinePLUS

    ... does not have a history of seizure disorders (epilepsy). A grand mal seizure involves the entire body. ... no evidence that they cause death, brain damage, epilepsy, a decrease in IQ, or learning problems. Most ...

  3. Absence of multiple atypical chemokine binders (ACBs) and the presence of VEGF and MMP-9 predict axillary lymph node metastasis in early breast carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiao-Hua; Ou, Zhou-Luo; Yu, Ke-Da; Feng, Lan-Yun; Yin, Wen-Jing; Li, Jing; Shen, Zhen-Zhou; Shao, Zhi-Min

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of axillary lymph node (ALN) metastasis of early breast cancers by evaluating the status of DARC, D6 and CCX-CKR and the levels of VEGF and MMP-9. The status of DARC, D6 and CCX-CKR and the levels VEGF and MMP-9 were evaluated in ALN- (n = 130) and ALN + (n = 88) patients with T1 breast cancer by immunohistochemical staining. For ALN, likelihood ratio ? (2)-tests were used for univariate analysis and logistic regression for multivariate analysis. Univariate analysis identified the nuclear grade, VEGF and MMP-9 expression and absence of DARC, D6 and CCX-CKR as predictors of ALN involvement. When combining the three receptors (DARC, D6 and CCX-CKR) together, tumors with multiple absence (multi-absence, any two or three loss) had a higher likelihood of being ALN positive than non-multi-absence (coexpression of any two or three) tumors (56.2 vs. 27.9 %, P < 0.001). The final multivariate logistic regression revealed nuclear grade, VEGF, MMP-9 and non-multi-absence versus multi-absence to be independent predictors of ALN involvement; the odds ratio (OR) and 95 % CI for non-multi-absence tumors versus multi-absence were 0.469 (0.233-0.943). Multi-absence was also associated with the involvement of four or more lymph nodes among ALN + tumors. Moreover, tumors with multi-absence had higher VEGF (78.1 vs. 50.0 %, P < 0.001) and MMP-9 (81.3 vs. 36.1 %, P < 0.001) expression than non-multi-absence tumors. Our data highlight that the absence of DARC, D6 and CCX-CKR in combination, which is associated with higher VEGF and MMP-9 expression, predicts the presence and extent of ALN metastasis in breast cancer. PMID:25097078

  4. Febrile seizures

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Simple febrile seizures are generalised in onset, last <15 minutes, and do not occur more than once in 24 hours. Complex febrile seizures are longer lasting, have focal symptoms, and can recur within 24 hours. This review only deals with simple febrile seizures. About 2% to 5% of children in the USA and Western Europe, and 6% to 9% of infants and children in Japan will have experienced at least one febrile seizure by the age of 5 years. Simple febrile seizures may slightly increase the risk of developing epilepsy, but have no known adverse effects on behaviour, scholastic performance, or neurocognition. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments given during episodes of fever in children with one or more previous simple febrile seizures? What are the effects of long-term (daily, for >1 month) anticonvulsant treatment in children with a history of simple febrile seizures? What are the effects of treatments on reducing the risk of subsequent epilepsy in children with a history of simple febrile seizures? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to March 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 18 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: anticonvulsants (intermittent or continuous) and antipyretic treatments (physical antipyretic measures, paracetamol, ibuprofen). PMID:21406130

  5. Febrile seizures

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Simple febrile seizures are generalised in onset, last less than 15 minutes, and do not occur more than once in 24 hours. Complex seizures are longer lasting, have focal symptoms, and can recur within 24 hours. This review only deals with simple febrile seizures. About 2-5% of children in the USA and Western Europe, and 6-9% of infants and children in Japan, will have experienced at least one febrile seizure by the age of 5 years. Simple febrile seizures may slightly increase the risk of developing epilepsy, but have no known adverse effects on behaviour, scholastic performance, or neurocognition. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of treatments given during episodes of fever in children with one or more previous simple febrile seizures? What are the effects of long-term (daily, for more than 1 month) anticonvulsant treatment in children with a history of simple febrile seizures? What are the effects of treatments on reducing the risk of subsequent epilepsy in children with a history of simple febrile seizures? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library and other important databases up to August 2007 (BMJ Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 19 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: anticonvulsants (intermittent or continuous), and antipyretic treatments (physical antipyretic measures, paracetamol, ibuprofen). PMID:19450310

  6. Partial (focal) seizure

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Jacksonian seizure; Seizure - partial (focal); Temporal lobe seizure; Epilepsy - partial seizures ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff RB, ... 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 67. ...

  7. Atypical craniocerebral eumycetoma: A case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Kommu Venkateswara; Praveen, Ankathi; Megha, Santhavir; Sundaram, Challa; Purohith, Anirudh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Craniocerebral eumycetomas are rare. They usually present with scalp swelling and discharging sinuses. Radiologically, they present as space-occupying lesions. We report a case of eumycetoma involving the left parietal cortex, bone, and subcutaneous tissue in a young male, farm laborer, who presented with seizures and blurring of vision. Imaging showed a dural based lesions enhancing moderately on contrast. To the best of our knowledge and belief, ours is the first published case in the English Literature where a eumycetoma has presented as a mass lesion without discharging sinuses. It is imperative to keep such atypical features of an infective etiology in mind because they may be one of differentials of “dural” based lesions where only a biopsy may suffice in the absence of significant mass effect to prove the diagnosis. PMID:25767591

  8. Controlling Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how an implantable device could greatly improve the quality of life for people with epilepsy. Gabe Anderson was diagnosed with bilateral heterotopia, a congenital condition that can lead to the onset of complex partial seizures stemming from both hemispheres of the brain. In early 2004, Gabe became one of the first 35…

  9. Febrile seizures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Febrile seizure (FS) is the most common seizure disorder of childhood, and occurs in an age-related manner. FS are classified into simple and complex. FS has a multifactorial inheritance, suggesting that both genetic and environmental factors are causative. Various animal models have elucidated the pathophysiological mechanisms of FS. Risk factors for a first FS are a family history of the disorder and a developmental delay. Risk factors for recurrent FS are a family history, age below 18 months at seizure onset, maximum temperature, and duration of fever. Risk factors for subsequent development of epilepsy are neurodevelopmental abnormality and complex FS. Clinicians evaluating children after a simple FS should concentrate on identifying the cause of the child's fever. Meningitis should be considered in the differential diagnosis for any febrile child. A simple FS does not usually require further evaluation such as ordering electroencephalography, neuroimaging, or other studies. Treatment is acute rescue therapy for prolonged FS. Antipyretics are not proven to reduce the recurrence risk for FS. Some evidence shows that both intermittent therapy with oral/rectal diazepam and continuous prophylaxis with oral phenobarbital or valproate are effective in reducing the risk of recurrence, but there is no evidence that these medications reduce the risk of subsequent epilepsy. Vaccine-induced FS is a rare event that does not lead to deleterious outcomes, but could affect patient and physician attitudes toward the safety of vaccination. PMID:25324864

  10. Seizure Disorders in Pregnancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... in Pregnancy • What is a seizure? • What is epilepsy? • Can seizures be controlled? • If I have a ... in mood, emotions, consciousness, or movement. What is epilepsy? Epilepsy is one kind of seizure disorder. It ...

  11. Atypical Cities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiJulio, Betsy

    2011-01-01

    In this creative challenge, Surrealism and one-point perspective combine to produce images that not only go "beyond the real" but also beyond the ubiquitous "imaginary city" assignment often used to teach one-point perspective. Perhaps the difference is that in the "atypical cities challenge," an understanding of one-point perspective is a means…

  12. Positron emission tomography in generalized seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Theodore, W.H.; Brooks, R.; Margolin, R.; Patronas, N.; Sato, S.; Porter, R.J.; Mansi, L.; Bairamian, D.; DiChiro, G.

    1985-05-01

    The authors used /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to study nine patients with clinical absence or generalized seizures. One patient had only absence seizures, two had only generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and six had both seizure types. Interictal scans in eight failed to reveal focal or lateralized hypometabolism. No apparent abnormalities were noted. Two patients had PET scans after isotope injection during hyperventilation-induced generalized spike-wave discharges. Diffusely increased metabolic rates were found in one compared with an interictal scan, and in another compared with control values. Another patient had FDG injected during absence status: EEG showed generalized spike-wave discharges (during which she was unresponsive) intermixed with slow activity accompanied by confusion. Metabolic rates were decreased, compared with the interictal scan, throughout both cortical and subcortical structures. Interictal PET did not detect specific anatomic regions responsible for absence seizure onset in any patient, but the results of the ictal scans did suggest that pathophysiologic differences exist between absence status and single absence attacks.

  13. Seizures and Teens: Stress, Sleep, & Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafer, Patricia Osborne

    2007-01-01

    Most parents are used to erratic sleep patterns and mood swings in their teenagers. When these occur in an adolescent with seizures, however, the parent may wonder if sleep and mood problems are related to seizures. Sorting out the cause and effects of sleep in an adolescent with seizures can be confusing. Since stress can be a contributor to both…

  14. Oxaliplatin-Induced Tonic-Clonic Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Rahal, Ahmad K.; Truong, Phu V.; Kallail, K. James

    2015-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is a common chemotherapy drug used for colon and gastric cancers. Common side effects are peripheral neuropathy, hematological toxicity, and allergic reactions. A rare side effect is seizures which are usually associated with posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome (PRES). A 50-year-old male patient presented with severe abdominal pain. CT scan of the abdomen showed acute appendicitis. Appendectomy was done and pathology showed mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma. Adjuvant chemotherapy was started with Folinic acid, Fluorouracil, and Oxaliplatin (FOLFOX). During the third cycle of FOLFOX, the patient developed tonic-clonic seizures. Laboratory workup was within normal limits. EEG and MRI of the brain showed no acute abnormality. The patient was rechallenged with FOLFOX but he had tonic-clonic seizures for the second time. His chemotherapy regimen was switched to Folinic acid, Fluorouracil, and Irinotecan (FOLFIRI). After 5 cycles of FOLFIRI, the patient did not develop any seizures, making Oxaliplatin the most likely culprit for his seizures. Oxaliplatin-induced seizures rarely occur in the absence of PRES. One case report has been described in the literature. We present a rare case of tonic-clonic seizures in a patient receiving Oxaliplatin in the absence of PRES. PMID:26491586

  15. Seizure First Aid

    MedlinePLUS

    ... medical I.D. bracelet or necklace that says “epilepsy” or “seizure disorder.” Some individuals wear a medical ... of knowing whether or not the person has epilepsy. The person having a seizure does not have ...

  16. How do seizures stop?

    PubMed Central

    Lado, Fred A.; Moshé, Solomon L.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Although often overshadowed by factors influencing seizure initiation, seizure termination is a critical step in the return to the interictal state. Understanding the mechanisms contributing to seizure termination could potentially identify novel targets for anticonvulsant drug development and may also highlight the pathophysiological processes contributing to seizure initiation. In this article, we review known physiological mechanisms contributing to seizure termination and discuss additional mechanisms that are likely to be relevant even though specific data are not yet available. This review is organized according to successively increasing “size scales”—from membranes to synapses to networks to circuits. We first discuss mechanisms of seizure termination acting at the shortest distances and affecting the excitable membranes of neurons in the seizure onset zone. Next we consider the contributions of ensembles of neurons and glia interacting at intermediate distances within the region of the seizure onset zone. Lastly, we consider the contribution of brain nuclei, such as the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNR), that are capable of modulating seizures and exert their influence over the seizure onset zone (and neighboring areas) from a relatively great—in neuroanatomical terms—distance. It is our hope that the attention to the mechanisms contributing to seizure termination will stimulate novel avenues of epilepsy research and will contribute to improved patient care. PMID:18503563

  17. Athletes with seizure disorders.

    PubMed

    Knowles, Byron Don; Pleacher, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    Individuals with seizure disorders have long been restricted from participation in certain sporting activities. Those with seizure disorders are more likely than their peers to have a sedentary lifestyle and to develop obesity. Regular participation in physical activity can improve both physical and psychosocial outcomes for persons with seizure disorders. Seizure activity often is reduced among those patients who regularly engage in aerobic activity. Recent literature indicates that the diagnosis of seizure disorders remains highly stigmatizing in the adolescent population. Persons with seizure disorders may be more accepted by peer groups if they are allowed to participate in sports and recreational activities. Persons with seizure disorders are encouraged to participate in regular aerobic activities. They may participate in team sports and contact or collision activities provided that they utilize appropriate protective equipment. There seems to be no increased risk of injury or increasing seizure activity as the result of such participation. Persons with seizure disorders still are discouraged from participating in scuba diving and skydiving. The benefits of participation in regular sporting activity far outweigh any risk to the athlete with a seizure disorder who chooses to participate in sports. PMID:22236820

  18. Seizure disorders in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Hanly, John G.; Urowitz, Murray B.; Su, Li; Gordon, Caroline; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Sanchez-Guerrero, Jorge; Romero-Diaz, Juanita; Wallace, Daniel J; Clarke, Ann E.; Ginzler, E.M.; Merrill, Joan T.; Isenberg, David A.; Rahman, Anisur; Petri, M.; Fortin, Paul R.; Gladman, D. D.; Bruce, Ian N.; Steinsson, Kristjan; Dooley, M.A.; Khamashta, Munther A.; Alarcón, Graciela S.; Fessler, Barri J.; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Manzi, Susan; Zoma, Asad A.; Sturfelt, Gunnar K.; Nived, Ola; Aranow, Cynthia; Mackay, Meggan; Ramos-Casals, Manuel; van Vollenhoven, R.F.; Kalunian, Kenneth C.; Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo; Lim, Sam; Kamen, Diane L.; Peschken, Christine A.; Inanc, Murat; Theriault, Chris; Thompson, Kara; Farewell, Vernon

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the frequency, attribution, outcome and predictors of seizures in SLE Methods The Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics (SLICC) performed a prospective inception cohort study. Demographic variables, global SLE disease activity (SLEDAI-2K), cumulative organ damage (SLICC/ACR Damage Index (SDI)) and neuropsychiatric events were recorded at enrollment and annually. Lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin, anti-?2 glycoprotein-I, anti-ribosomal P and anti-NR2 glutamate receptor antibodies were measured at enrollment. Physician outcomes of seizures were recorded. Patient outcomes were derived from the SF-36 mental (MCS) and physical (PCS) component summary scores. Statistical analyses included Cox and linear regressions. Results The cohort was 89.4% female with a mean follow up of 3.5±2.9 years. 75/1631 (4.6%) had ?1 seizure, the majority around the time of SLE diagnosis. Multivariate analysis indicated a higher risk of seizures with African race/ethnicity (HR(CI):1.97 (1.07–3.63); p=0.03) and lower education status (1.97 (1.21–3.19); p<0.01). Higher damage scores (without NP variables) were associated with an increased risk of subsequent seizures (SDI=1:3.93 (1.46–10.55)); SDI=2 or 3:1.57 (0.32–7.65); SDI?4:7.86 (0.89–69.06); p=0.03). There was an association with disease activity but not with autoantibodies. Seizures attributed to SLE frequently resolved (59/78(76%)) in the absence of anti-seizure drugs. There was no significant impact on the MCS or PCS scores. Anti-malarial drugs in absence of immunosuppressive agents were associated with reduced seizure risk (0.07(0.01–0.66); p=0.03). Conclusion Seizures occurred close to SLE diagnosis, in patients with African race/ethnicity, lower educational status and cumulative organ damage. Most seizures resolved without a negative impact on health-related quality of life. Anti-malarial drugs were associated with a protective effect. PMID:22492779

  19. Interstellar A-type methanol masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Q.; Lou, G. F.

    1990-02-01

    The formation conditions for A-type methanol masers are discussed. The correlation between A-type masers and external radiation fields is determined, with emphasis on the energy levels of A-type methanol and brightness temperature. Radiative transfer equations and statistical equilibrium are solved using a large velocity gradient model and the escape probability model. It is demonstrated that the 9(2)-10(1)A+ emission in W3(OH) and 7(0)-6(1)A in SgrB2 are masers, as discovered previously. The formation of the first type of masers requires pumping from an external radiation field, while the second type might be excited in the absence of an external radiation field. It is also pointed out that according to calculations there are A-type maser series similar to E-type methanol maser series of J2-J1E.

  20. Generalized tonic-clonic seizure

    MedlinePLUS

    ... grand mal seizure. The terms seizure , convulsion, or epilepsy are most often associated with generalized tonic-clonic ... occur as part of a repeated, chronic illness (epilepsy). Some seizures are due to psychological problems (psychogenic).

  1. Modeling early-onset post-ischemic seizures in aging mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chiping; Wang, Justin; Peng, Jessie; Patel, Nisarg; Huang, Yayi; Gao, Xiaoxing; Aljarallah, Salman; Eubanks, James H; McDonald, Robert; Zhang, Liang

    2015-09-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of seizures and epilepsy in the aged population, with post-stroke seizures being a poor prognostic factor. The pathological processes underlying post-stroke seizures are not well understood and studies of these seizures in aging/aged animals remain scarce. Therefore, our primary objective was to model post-stroke seizures in aging mice (C57 black strain, 16-20 months-old), with a focus on early-onset, convulsive seizures that occur within 24-hours of brain ischemia. We utilized a middle cerebral artery occlusion model and examined seizure activity and brain injury using combined behavioral and electroencephalographic monitoring and histological assessments. Aging mice exhibited vigorous convulsive seizures within hours of the middle cerebral artery occlusion. These seizures manifested with jumping, rapid running, barrel-rolling and/or falling all in the absence of hippocampal-cortical electrographic discharges. Seizure development was closely associated with severe brain injury and acute mortality. Anticonvulsive treatments after seizure occurrence offered temporary seizure control but failed to improve animal survival. A separate cohort of adult mice (6-8 months-old) exhibited analogous early-onset convulsive seizures following the middle cerebral artery occlusion but had better survival outcomes following anticonvulsive treatment. Collectively, our data suggest that early-onset convulsive seizures are a result of severe brain ischemia in aging animals. PMID:25943585

  2. Genes, Seizures & Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Alica M.

    2006-01-01

    The chance that someone will develop any disease is influenced by heredity and environment. Epilepsy is not an exception. Everybody inherits a unique degree of susceptibility to seizures. About 3 percent of the United States population is prone to seizures and will get epilepsy at some point of their lives (1). Two thirds of the people with…

  3. Plasticity-modulated seizure dynamics for seizure termination in realistic neuronal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppert, M. M. J.; Kalitzin, S.; Lopes da Silva, F. H.; Viergever, M. A.

    2011-08-01

    In previous studies we showed that autonomous absence seizure generation and termination can be explained by realistic neuronal models eliciting bi-stable dynamics. In these models epileptic seizures are triggered either by external stimuli (reflex epilepsies) or by internal fluctuations. This scenario predicts exponential distributions of the duration of the seizures and of the inter-ictal intervals. These predictions were validated in rat models of absence epilepsy, as well as in a few human cases. Nonetheless, deviations from the predictions with respect to seizure duration distributions remained unexplained. The objective of the present work is to implement a simple but realistic computational model of a neuronal network including synaptic plasticity and ionic current dynamics and to explore the dynamics of the model with special emphasis on the distributions of seizure and inter-ictal period durations. We use as a basis our lumped model of cortical neuronal circuits. Here we introduce 'activity dependent' parameters, namely post-synaptic voltage-dependent plasticity, as well as a voltage-dependent hyperpolarization-activated current driven by slow and fast activation conductances. We examine the distributions of the durations of the seizure-like model activity and the normal activity, described respectively by the limit cycle and the steady state in the dynamics. We use a parametric ?-distribution fit as a quantifier. Our results show that autonomous, activity-dependent membrane processes can account for experimentally obtained statistical distributions of seizure durations, which were not explainable using the previous model. The activity-dependent membrane processes that display the strongest effect in accounting for these distributions are the hyperpolarization-dependent cationic (Ih) current and the GABAa plastic dynamics. Plastic synapses (NMDA-type) in the interneuron population show only a minor effect. The inter-ictal statistics retain their consistency with the experimental data and the previous model.

  4. Epidemiology of pyridoxine dependent and pyridoxine responsive seizures in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, P.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To study the epidemiology of pyridoxine dependent seizures and other forms of pyridoxine responsive seizures.?DESIGN—Monthly notifications to the British Paediatric Surveillance Unit over two years. Questionnaire follow up.?SETTING—UK and the Republic of Ireland.?PATIENTS—Children aged 15 years or younger whose seizures respond to pyridoxine.?INTERVENTIONS—None.?MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—Numbers of children with definite, probable, and possible pyridoxine dependent seizures or other seizures responsive to pyridoxine.?RESULTS—Point prevalence and birth incidence: 1/687 000 and 1/783 000, respectively (definite and probable cases); 1/317 000 and 1/157 000, respectively (all types of pyridoxine responsiveness).?NOTIFICATIONS—Pyridoxine dependency: 14 definite, 9 probable, and 10 possible cases; neonatal seizures not meeting case definitions: 7; infantile spasms: 5. Eight of 18 families of definite/probable cases had 2 affected siblings. Just over a third had atypical presentations and just under a third had features and/or initial diagnoses of birth asphyxia and neonatal hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy.?CONCLUSIONS—Pyridoxine dependency is rare. Atypical presentations are relatively frequent. A trial of pyridoxine is justified in all cases of early onset intractable seizures or status epilepticus, whatever the suspected cause.? PMID:10519720

  5. Seizures and Teens: Sorting Out Seizures--Part Two

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devinsky, Orrin

    2006-01-01

    In adolescents, diagnosing seizures can be challenging and can lead to many pitfalls. Because seizures are episodic and unpredictable events, they usually do not occur in the doctor's office. Thus, a diagnosis of epilepsy is usually based on information presented by the person with seizures and their family. Together with results of diagnostic…

  6. Atypical spinal tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pande, Ketan C; Babhulkar, Sudhir S

    2002-05-01

    Typical spinal tuberculosis is readily diagnosed and treated. Certain atypical clinical and radiologic presentations of spinal tuberculosis are described. Failure to recognize these presentations may lead to delay in diagnosis and initiation of treatment. In some atypical forms of the disease, this may have disastrous consequences. The current authors present a new classification for atypical spinal tuberculosis and describe the various presentations. The role of advanced imaging studies such as computed tomography scanning and magnetic resonance imaging and imaging-guided aspiration cytology is discussed. PMID:11964633

  7. Tuberculoma-Induced Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Salway, R. James; Sangani, Shruti; Parekh, Samira; Bhatt, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Seizures in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients can be caused by a wide variety of opportunistic infections, and, especially in developing countries, tuberculosis (TB) should be high on the differential. In India, TB is the most common opportunistic infection in HIV and it can have several different central nervous system manifestations, including intracranial tuberculomas. In this case, an HIV patient presenting with new-onset seizure and fever was diagnosed with tuberculous meningitis and multiple intracranial tuberculomas. The patient received standard TB medications, steroids, and anticonvulsants in the emergency department and was admitted for further care. PMID:26587082

  8. Iopamidol Myelography-Induced Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sonal; Rajpal, Chitra; Nannapeneni, Srikanth; Venkatesh, Sundar

    2005-01-01

    Iopamidol, a water-soluble contrast agent, has been rarely associated with seizures. We describe a case of generalized tonic-clonic seizure after cervical myelography with iopamidol in a previously healthy young man. In patients presenting with seizures, a history of recent myelography should be considered as an etiology. Iopamidol myelography may be associated with a risk of seizures. Clinicians need to be aware of this complication and inform their patients about such risk. PMID:16369390

  9. Reflex seizures in Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Roche Martínez, Ana; Alonso Colmenero, M Itziar; Gomes Pereira, Andreia; Sanmartí Vilaplana, Francesc X; Armstrong Morón, Judith; Pineda Marfa, Mercé

    2011-12-01

    Reflex seizures are a rare phenomenon among epileptic patients, in which an epileptic discharge is triggered by various kinds of stimuli (visual, auditory, tactile or gustatory). Epilepsy is common in Rett syndrome patients (up to 70%), but to the authors' knowledge, no pressure or eating-triggered seizures have yet been reported in Rett children. We describe three epileptic Rett patients with reflex seizures, triggered by food intake or proprioception. One patient with congenital Rett Sd. developed infantile epileptic spasms at around seven months and two patients with classic Rett Sd. presented with generalised tonic-clonic seizures at around five years. Reflex seizures appeared when the patients were teenagers. The congenital-Rett patient presented eating-triggered seizures at the beginning of almost every meal, demonstrated by EEG recording. Both classic Rett patients showed self-provoked pressure -triggered attacks, influenced by stress or excitement. Non-triggered seizures were controlled with carbamazepine or valproate, but reflex seizures did not respond to antiepileptic drugs. Risperidone partially improved self-provoked seizures. When reflex seizures are suspected, reproducing the trigger during EEG recording is fundamental; however, self-provoked seizures depend largely on the patient's will. Optimal therapy (though not always possible) consists of avoiding the trigger. Stress modifiers such as risperidone may help control self-provoked seizures. PMID:22258043

  10. Terminology of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Brigo, Francesco; Igwe, Stanley C; Ausserer, Harald; Nardone, Raffaele; Tezzon, Frediano; Bongiovanni, Luigi Giuseppe; Tinazzi, Michele; Trinka, Eugen

    2015-03-01

    Several different terms have been used to describe "psychogenic nonepileptic seizures" (PNES) in the literature. In this study, we evaluated the most common English terms used to describe PNES on Google and in PubMed using multiple search terms (https://www.google.com and http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed). The information prevalence of the five terms most frequently used to refer to PNES in PubMed were: psychogenic non(-)epileptic seizure(s), followed by pseudo(-)seizure(s), non(-)epileptic seizure(s), psychogenic seizure(s), and non(-)epileptic event(s). The five most frequently adopted terms to describe PNES in Google were: psychogenic non(-)epileptic seizure(s), followed by non(-)epileptic event(s), psychogenic attack(s), non(-)epileptic attack(s), and psychogenic non(-)epileptic attack(s). The broad spectrum of synonyms used to refer to PNES in the medical literature reflects a lack of internationally accepted, uniform terminology for PNES. In addition to "seizure(s)," lay people use the word "attack(s)" to describe PNES. Although considered obsolete, some terms, e.g., pseudoseizure(s), are still used in the recent medical literature. Adopting a uniform terminology to describe PNES could facilitate communication between epileptologists, physicians without specific expertise in epilepsy, and patients. PMID:25631657

  11. Atypical autoerotic deaths

    SciTech Connect

    Gowitt, G.T.; Hanzlick, R.L. )

    1992-06-01

    So-called typical' autoerotic fatalities are the result of asphyxia due to mechanical compression of the neck, chest, or abdomen, whereas atypical' autoeroticism involves sexual self-stimulation by other means. The authors present five atypical autoerotic fatalities that involved the use of dichlorodifluoromethane, nitrous oxide, isobutyl nitrite, cocaine, or compounds containing 1-1-1-trichloroethane. Mechanisms of death are discussed in each case and the pertinent literature is reviewed.

  12. Atypical Optic Neuritis.

    PubMed

    Gaier, Eric D; Boudreault, Katherine; Rizzo, Joseph F; Falardeau, Julie; Cestari, Dean M

    2015-12-01

    Classic demyelinative optic neuritis is associated with multiple sclerosis and typically carries a good prognosis for visual recovery. This disorder is well characterized with respect to its presentation and clinical features by baseline data obtained through the optic neuritis treatment trial and numerous other studies. Atypical optic neuritis entails clinical manifestations that deviate from this classic pattern of features. Clinical signs and symptoms that deviate from the typical presentation should prompt consideration of less common etiologies. Atypical features to consider include lack of pain, simultaneous or near-simultaneous onset, lack of response to or relapse upon tapering from corticosteroids, or optic nerve head or peripapillary hemorrhages. The most important alternative etiologies to consider and the steps towards their respective diagnostic evaluations are suggested for these atypical features. PMID:26467052

  13. Ion dynamics during seizures

    PubMed Central

    Raimondo, Joseph V.; Burman, Richard J.; Katz, Arieh A.; Akerman, Colin J.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in membrane voltage brought about by ion fluxes through voltage and transmitter-gated channels represent the basis of neural activity. As such, electrochemical gradients across the membrane determine the direction and driving force for the flow of ions and are therefore crucial in setting the properties of synaptic transmission and signal propagation. Ion concentration gradients are established by a variety of mechanisms, including specialized transporter proteins. However, transmembrane gradients can be affected by ionic fluxes through channels during periods of elevated neural activity, which in turn are predicted to influence the properties of on-going synaptic transmission. Such activity-induced changes to ion concentration gradients are a feature of both physiological and pathological neural processes. An epileptic seizure is an example of severely perturbed neural activity, which is accompanied by pronounced changes in intracellular and extracellular ion concentrations. Appreciating the factors that contribute to these ion dynamics is critical if we are to understand how a seizure event evolves and is sustained and terminated by neural tissue. Indeed, this issue is of significant clinical importance as status epilepticus—a type of seizure that does not stop of its own accord—is a life-threatening medical emergency. In this review we explore how the transmembrane concentration gradient of the six major ions (K+, Na+, Cl?, Ca2+, H+and HCO3?) is altered during an epileptic seizure. We will first examine each ion individually, before describing how multiple interacting mechanisms between ions might contribute to concentration changes and whether these act to prolong or terminate epileptic activity. In doing so, we will consider how the availability of experimental techniques has both advanced and restricted our ability to study these phenomena. PMID:26539081

  14. Seizures in oligodendroglial tumors.

    PubMed

    Kerkhof, Melissa; Benit, Christa; Duran-Pena, Alberto; Vecht, Charles J

    2015-10-01

    Epilepsy develops in more than 70-90% of oligodendroglial tumors and represents a favorable indicator for long-term survival if present as the first clinical sign. Presence of IDH1 mutation is frequently associated with seizures in oligodendrogliomas, next to alterations of glutamate and GABA metabolism in the origin of glioma-associated epilepsy. Treatment by surgery or radiotherapy results in seizure freedom in about two-thirds of patients, and chemotherapy to a seizure reduction in about 50%. Symptomatic anticonvulsive therapy with levetiracetam and valproic acid as monotherapy are both evidence-based drugs for the partial epilepsies, and their effective use in brain tumors is supported by a large amount of additional data. Pharmacoresistance against anticonvulsants is more prevalent among oligodendrogliomas, occurring in about 40% despite polytherapy with two anticonvulsants or more. Toxic signs of anticonvulsants in brain tumors involve cognition, bone marrow and skin. Previous neurosurgery, radiation therapy or chemotherapy add to the risks of cognitive dysfunction. PMID:26478444

  15. Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kavanagh, David; Goodship, Tim H.; Richards, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Summary Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a triad of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure. The atypical form of HUS is a disease characterized by complement overactivation. Inherited defects in complement genes and acquired autoantibodies against complement regulatory proteins have been described. Incomplete penetrance of mutations in all predisposing genes is reported, suggesting that a precipitating event or trigger is required to unmask the complement regulatory deficiency. The underlying genetic defect predicts the prognosis both in native kidneys and after renal transplantation. The successful trials of the complement inhibitor eculizumab in the treatment of atypical HUS will revolutionize disease management. PMID:24161037

  16. Inflammatory pathways of seizure disorders

    PubMed Central

    Marchi, Nicola; Granata, Tiziana; Janigro, Damir

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy refers to a cluster of neurological disease characterized by seizures. While many forms of epilepsy have a well-defined immune etiology, in other forms of epilepsy an altered immune response is only suspected. In general, the hypothesis that inflammation contributes to seizures is supported by experimental results. Additionally, antiepileptic maneuvers may act as immunomodulators and anti-inflammatory therapies can treat seizures. Triggers of seizure include a bidirectional communication between the nervous system and organs of immunity. Thus, a crucial cellular interface protecting from immunological seizures is the blood-brain barrier. Here, we summarize recent advances in the understanding and treatment of epileptic seizures which derive from a non-neurocentric viewpoint and suggest key avenues for future research. PMID:24355813

  17. Atypical/Nor98 Scrapie Infectivity in Sheep Peripheral Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Andréoletti, Olivier; Orge, Leonor; Benestad, Sylvie L.; Beringue, Vincent; Litaise, Claire; Simon, Stéphanie; Le Dur, Annick; Laude, Hubert; Simmons, Hugh; Lugan, Séverine; Corbière, Fabien; Costes, Pierrette; Morel, Nathalie; Schelcher, François; Lacroux, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    Atypical/Nor98 scrapie was first identified in 1998 in Norway. It is now considered as a worldwide disease of small ruminants and currently represents a significant part of the detected transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) cases in Europe. Atypical/Nor98 scrapie cases were reported in ARR/ARR sheep, which are highly resistant to BSE and other small ruminants TSE agents. The biology and pathogenesis of the Atypical/Nor98 scrapie agent in its natural host is still poorly understood. However, based on the absence of detectable abnormal PrP in peripheral tissues of affected individuals, human and animal exposure risk to this specific TSE agent has been considered low. In this study we demonstrate that infectivity can accumulate, even if no abnormal PrP is detectable, in lymphoid tissues, nerves, and muscles from natural and/or experimental Atypical/Nor98 scrapie cases. Evidence is provided that, in comparison to other TSE agents, samples containing Atypical/Nor98 scrapie infectivity could remain PrPSc negative. This feature will impact detection of Atypical/Nor98 scrapie cases in the field, and highlights the need to review current evaluations of the disease prevalence and potential transmissibility. Finally, an estimate is made of the infectivity loads accumulating in peripheral tissues in both Atypical/Nor98 and classical scrapie cases that currently enter the food chain. The results obtained indicate that dietary exposure risk to small ruminants TSE agents may be higher than commonly believed. PMID:21347349

  18. Seizure Prediction and its Applications

    PubMed Central

    Iasemidis, Leon D.

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy is characterized by intermittent, paroxysmal, hypersynchronous electrical activity, that may remain localized and/or spread and severely disrupt the brain’s normal multi-task and multi-processing function. Epileptic seizures are the hallmarks of such activity and had been considered unpredictable. It is only recently that research on the dynamics of seizure generation by analysis of the brain’s electrographic activity (EEG) has shed ample light on the predictability of seizures, and illuminated the way to automatic, prospective, long-term prediction of seizures. The ability to issue warnings in real time of impending seizures (e.g., tens of minutes prior to seizure occurrence in the case of focal epilepsy), may lead to novel diagnostic tools and treatments for epilepsy. Applications may range from a simple warning to the patient, in order to avert seizure-associated injuries, to intervention by automatic timely administration of an appropriate stimulus, for example of a chemical nature like an anti-epileptic drug (AED), electromagnetic nature like vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), deep brain stimulation (DBS), transcranial direct current (TDC) or transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), and/or of another nature (e.g., ultrasonic, cryogenic, biofeedback operant conditioning). It is thus expected that seizure prediction could readily become an integral part of the treatment of epilepsy through neuromodulation, especially in the new generation of closed-loop seizure control systems. PMID:21939848

  19. Analyzing autonomic activity in neonatal seizures

    E-print Network

    Ramaswamy, Priya, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that seizures in the newborn occur more often than previously appreciated. The effect of neonatal seizures remain unclear, however. Do seizures in the newborn cause brain injury, are they a consequence ...

  20. Seizures and Teens: The Practical Aspects of Managing Seizure Medications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafer, Patricia Osborne; Israel, Beth

    2007-01-01

    Medications are the primary treatment for epilepsy, yet many teens and their families have problems managing seizure medicines. Fear of side effects, difficulties remembering to take medicines and figuring out how to take them are common challenges. Unfortunately, not taking medicine as prescribed can lead to breakthrough seizures, which in turn…

  1. Hypocalcemia-Induced Seizure

    PubMed Central

    Trinidad, Bradley J.; Shi, Jiong

    2015-01-01

    Calcium is essential for both neurotransmitter release and muscle contraction. Given these important physiological processes, it seems reasonable to assume that hypocalcemia may lead to reduced neuromuscular excitability. Counterintuitively, however, clinical observation has frequently documented hypocalcemia’s role in induction of seizures and general excitability processes such as tetany, Chvostek’s sign, and bronchospasm. The mechanism of this calcium paradox remains elusive, and very few pathophysiological studies have addressed this conundrum. Nevertheless, several studies primarily addressing other biophysical issues have provided some clues. In this review, we analyze the data of these studies and propose an integrative model to explain this hypocalcemic paradox. PMID:25810356

  2. Dexamethasone-induced withdrawal seizure.

    PubMed

    Mahar, Santwana; Malhotra, Mahima

    2015-01-01

    Dexamethasone-induced withdrawal seizure, which is a very rare and uncommon event, occurred after discontinuation of steroid therapy that was taken to increase weight by the patient. The pathogenesis is not well understood. In this submission, we have highlighted the fact that withdrawal of steroid has a propensity to cause seizure as a rare withdrawal phenomenon. PMID:25969660

  3. Recurrent seizures after lidocaine ingestion.

    PubMed

    Aminiahidashti, Hamed; Laali, Abolghasem; Nosrati, Nazanin; Jahani, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Lidocaine has a concentration-dependent effect on seizures. Concentrations above 15 ?g/mL frequently result in seizures in laboratory animals and human. We report a case of central nervous system (CNS) lidocaine toxicity and recurrent seizure after erroneous ingestion of lidocaine solution. A 4-year-old boy presented to the Emergency Department of Imam Hospital of Sari in December 2013 due to tonic-clonic generalized seizures approximately 30 min ago. 3 h before seizure, his mother gave him 2 spoons (amount 20-25 cc) lidocaine hydrochloride 2% solution instead of pediatric gripe by mistake. Seizure with generalized tonic-clonic occurred 3 times in home. Neurological examination was essentially unremarkable except for the depressed level of consciousness. Personal and medical history was unremarkable. There was no evidence of intracranial ischemic or hemorrhagic lesions in computed tomography scan. There were no further seizures, the condition of the patient remained stable, and he was discharged 2 days after admission. The use of viscous lidocaine may result in cardiovascular and CNS toxicity, particularly in children. Conservative management is the best option for treatment of lidocaine induced seizure. PMID:25709968

  4. Recurrent seizures after lidocaine ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Aminiahidashti, Hamed; Laali, Abolghasem; Nosrati, Nazanin; Jahani, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Lidocaine has a concentration-dependent effect on seizures. Concentrations above 15 ?g/mL frequently result in seizures in laboratory animals and human. We report a case of central nervous system (CNS) lidocaine toxicity and recurrent seizure after erroneous ingestion of lidocaine solution. A 4-year-old boy presented to the Emergency Department of Imam Hospital of Sari in December 2013 due to tonic-clonic generalized seizures approximately 30 min ago. 3 h before seizure, his mother gave him 2 spoons (amount 20–25 cc) lidocaine hydrochloride 2% solution instead of pediatric gripe by mistake. Seizure with generalized tonic-clonic occurred 3 times in home. Neurological examination was essentially unremarkable except for the depressed level of consciousness. Personal and medical history was unremarkable. There was no evidence of intracranial ischemic or hemorrhagic lesions in computed tomography scan. There were no further seizures, the condition of the patient remained stable, and he was discharged 2 days after admission. The use of viscous lidocaine may result in cardiovascular and CNS toxicity, particularly in children. Conservative management is the best option for treatment of lidocaine induced seizure. PMID:25709968

  5. [Reflex seizures, cinema and television].

    PubMed

    Olivares-Romero, J

    2015-12-16

    In movies and television series are few references to seizures or reflex epilepsy even though in real life are an important subgroup of total epileptic syndromes. It has performed a search on the topic, identified 25 films in which they appear reflex seizures. Most seizures observed are tonic-clonic and visual stimuli are the most numerous, corresponding all with flashing lights. The emotions are the main stimuli in higher level processes. In most cases it is not possible to know if a character suffers a reflex epilepsy or suffer reflex seizures in the context of another epileptic syndrome. The main conclusion is that, in the movies, the reflex seizures are merely a visual reinforcing and anecdotal element without significant influence on the plot. PMID:26662874

  6. Atypical hidradenitis suppurativa.

    PubMed

    Naasan, H; Affleck, A

    2015-12-01

    Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory disease resulting in subcutaneous abscesses, sinus tracts and scarring, arising predominantly in apocrine gland-bearing skin. The sites affected, in order of frequency, are the axillae, groins, perianal and perineal region, mammary and submammary skin, buttocks, and pubic region. Other sites that may be affected more rarely include the chest, eyelids, scalp, retroauricular and preauricular skin, thighs, and abdomen. Research has suggested that mechanical friction and follicular occlusion is the primary cause of HS. HS is one of the conditions of the 'follicular occlusion tetrad', which share a similar pathogenesis. HS at atypical sites may mimic other conditions both clinically and pathologically, so misdiagnosis is possible. We present a case series that illustrates a range of atypical sites affected. Our patients all had severe disease. Satisfactory control has not been achieved despite years of medical and surgical interventions. PMID:25917371

  7. First seizure: EEG and neuroimaging following an epileptic seizure.

    PubMed

    Pohlmann-Eden, Bernd; Newton, Mark

    2008-01-01

    An early EEG (within 48 h) and high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (hr_MRI) are the methods of choice for an accurate diagnosis after a first seizure presentation. Together with a careful history and examination, they will allow definition of the epilepsy syndrome in two-thirds of patients and help assess the individual risk for seizure recurrence, which is determined by the specific syndrome and is highest with focal epileptiform activity on EEG. Despite the heterogeneity of first seizure studies, EEG and etiology are consistently found to be the best predictors for seizure recurrence and prognosis. The additional yield of sleep-deprived EEG and sleep EEG is uncertain; yet MRI is essential for detecting brain tumors and other structural bases for new epilepsy. The rate occurrence of remote symptomatic seizures increases significantly with age and the most common etiology in the elderly with a first seizure is stroke; however, its exact relevance to epileptogenicity is yet to be defined. There is a striking lack of systematic studies using early EEG and hr_MRI in order to better characterize epileptogenic areas and elucidate the mechanisms of seizure provocation. PMID:18184150

  8. Lacosamide: A Review in Focal Seizures in Patients with Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Scott, Lesley J

    2015-12-01

    Lacosamide (Vimpat(®)) is a functionalized amino acid available orally (as a solution or tablets) and as an intravenous infusion for use as monotherapy (only in the USA) or adjunctive therapy for the treatment of focal seizures in adult and adolescent (aged ?17 years in the USA) patients with epilepsy. As adjunctive therapy to other antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), lacosamide provided effective seizure control and was generally well tolerated in adults and adolescents (aged ?16 years) in randomized clinical trials and in the real-world setting. In clinical trials, adjunctive lacosamide provided significantly greater reductions in 28-day seizure rates than adjunctive placebo, with these benefits maintained after up to 8 years of therapy in open-label extension studies. Moreover, patients were effectively switched from oral to short-term intravenous adjunctive therapy at the same dosage, which may be particularly beneficial in situations where oral therapy is not suitable. Conversion to lacosamide monotherapy was superior to a historical-control cohort in patients with focal seizures converting from previous AED therapy. In the absence of head-to-head comparisons with other AEDs, the exact position of lacosamide relative to other AEDs remains to be fully determined. In the meantime, oral and intravenous lacosamide provides a useful option as monotherapy (only in the USA) or adjunctive therapy for the treatment of focal seizures in adult and adolescent (aged ?17 years in the USA) patients with epilepsy. PMID:26607484

  9. Seizures in Infants and Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBrien, Dianne M.; Bonthius, Daniel J.

    2000-01-01

    This article reviews the most frequent causes of seizure disorders in young children and the classification of different seizure types. It discusses current therapies, including alternatives to medication. Emergency response to seizures is covered a well as non-epileptic episodes that may resemble seizures. Epilepsy's potential impact on the…

  10. Anterior plagiocephaly in an atypical case of apert syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Madhumita; Pai, Ashwin Alke; Bhattacharya, Abhimanyu; Ramachandra, Ravi; Sawarappa, Raghavendra; Mohapatra, Subhakanta; Kanoi, Aditya

    2013-06-01

    Apert syndrome is a congenital craniosynostosis syndrome comprising of bilateral coronal synostosis , symmetric syndactyly of hands and feet and midface hypoplasia. We present an atypical phenotype of this syndrome with right sided unilateral coronal synostosis. However, type I apert hand and other clinical and radiological features suggestthe diagnosis. Genetic analysis revealed an absence of the specific missense mutations in the FGFR 2 gene that is found in patients with this syndrome. We conclude that this patient represented a rare atypical variant of Apert syndrome. Further analysis is required to map the associated genotype. PMID:25489515

  11. Complexity of Multi-Channel Electroencephalogram Signal Analysis in Childhood Absence Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Weng, Wen-Chin; Jiang, George J A; Chang, Chi-Feng; Lu, Wen-Yu; Lin, Chun-Yen; Lee, Wang-Tso; Shieh, Jiann-Shing

    2015-01-01

    Absence epilepsy is an important epileptic syndrome in children. Multiscale entropy (MSE), an entropy-based method to measure dynamic complexity at multiple temporal scales, is helpful to disclose the information of brain connectivity. This study investigated the complexity of electroencephalogram (EEG) signals using MSE in children with absence epilepsy. In this research, EEG signals from 19 channels of the entire brain in 21 children aged 5-12 years with absence epilepsy were analyzed. The EEG signals of pre-ictal (before seizure) and ictal states (during seizure) were analyzed by sample entropy (SamEn) and MSE methods. Variations of complexity index (CI), which was calculated from MSE, from the pre-ictal to the ictal states were also analyzed. The entropy values in the pre-ictal state were significantly higher than those in the ictal state. The MSE revealed more differences in analysis compared to the SamEn. The occurrence of absence seizures decreased the CI in all channels. Changes in CI were also significantly greater in the frontal and central parts of the brain, indicating fronto-central cortical involvement of "cortico-thalamo-cortical network" in the occurrence of generalized spike and wave discharges during absence seizures. Moreover, higher sampling frequency was more sensitive in detecting functional changes in the ictal state. There was significantly higher correlation in ictal states in the same patient in different seizures but there were great differences in CI among different patients, indicating that CI changes were consistent in different absence seizures in the same patient but not from patient to patient. This implies that the brain stays in a homogeneous activation state during the absence seizures. In conclusion, MSE analysis is better than SamEn analysis to analyze complexity of EEG, and CI can be used to investigate the functional brain changes during absence seizures. PMID:26244497

  12. Complexity of Multi-Channel Electroencephalogram Signal Analysis in Childhood Absence Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chi-Feng; Lu, Wen-Yu; Lin, Chun-Yen; Lee, Wang-Tso; Shieh, Jiann-Shing

    2015-01-01

    Absence epilepsy is an important epileptic syndrome in children. Multiscale entropy (MSE), an entropy-based method to measure dynamic complexity at multiple temporal scales, is helpful to disclose the information of brain connectivity. This study investigated the complexity of electroencephalogram (EEG) signals using MSE in children with absence epilepsy. In this research, EEG signals from 19 channels of the entire brain in 21 children aged 5-12 years with absence epilepsy were analyzed. The EEG signals of pre-ictal (before seizure) and ictal states (during seizure) were analyzed by sample entropy (SamEn) and MSE methods. Variations of complexity index (CI), which was calculated from MSE, from the pre-ictal to the ictal states were also analyzed. The entropy values in the pre-ictal state were significantly higher than those in the ictal state. The MSE revealed more differences in analysis compared to the SamEn. The occurrence of absence seizures decreased the CI in all channels. Changes in CI were also significantly greater in the frontal and central parts of the brain, indicating fronto-central cortical involvement of “cortico-thalamo-cortical network” in the occurrence of generalized spike and wave discharges during absence seizures. Moreover, higher sampling frequency was more sensitive in detecting functional changes in the ictal state. There was significantly higher correlation in ictal states in the same patient in different seizures but there were great differences in CI among different patients, indicating that CI changes were consistent in different absence seizures in the same patient but not from patient to patient. This implies that the brain stays in a homogeneous activation state during the absence seizures. In conclusion, MSE analysis is better than SamEn analysis to analyze complexity of EEG, and CI can be used to investigate the functional brain changes during absence seizures. PMID:26244497

  13. Psychological correlates of psychogenic seizures.

    PubMed

    Binder, L M; Salinsky, M C; Smith, S P

    1994-08-01

    Psychological correlates of psychogenic seizures were studied. The MMPI, Portland Digit Recognition Test (PDRT; a forced choice measure of motivation), disability status, Face-Hand Test, and Finger Agnosia were compared in 53 patients with medically intractable seizure disorders who underwent intensive EEG monitoring. Using conventional neurologic criteria, 64% had diagnoses of epileptic seizures (ES) and 36% had psychogenic seizures (PS). PS patients were significantly higher in number of somatoform MMPI profiles and likelihood of applying for financial benefits, and significantly lower on the PDRT. PS patients made more Finger Agnosia errors. Differences on the Face-Hand Test were of borderline significance. The results support the existence of multiple psychometric correlates of PS. PMID:7962356

  14. Understanding the TXA seizure connection

    E-print Network

    Schwinn, Debra A.

    Transexamic acid (TXA) is an antifibrinolytic that has been used successfully to prevent blood loss during major surgery. However, as its usage has increased, there have been growing reports of postsurgical seizure events ...

  15. Seizure and Psychosocial Outcomes of Childhood and Juvenile Onset Generalized Epilepsies: Wolf in Sheep's Clothing, or Well-Dressed Wolf?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Studies of generalized electroclinical syndromes can provide guidance regarding long-term seizure, cognitive, and psychosocial outcomes. Childhood absence epilepsy, juvenile absence epilepsy, juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, and idiopathic generalized epilepsy with generalized tonic–clonic seizures alone are electroclinical syndromes typically associated with normal intellect and good response to antiseizure medications. However, studies have demonstrated significantly poorer psychosocial outcomes than expected for these syndromes, regardless of seizure control. Potential causes for this include underlying abnormalities in social skills, social stigma, and underlying abnormalities in brain development and maturation. PMID:26316843

  16. Massively multiplayer online role-playing game-induced seizures: a neglected health problem in Internet addiction.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yao-Chung

    2006-08-01

    As the Internet has become rapidly and widely integrated into society, Internet addiction has become a growing psychosocial problem. However, epileptic seizure, another out-of-the-ordinary health problem, is often neglected in this regard. Ten patients who experienced epileptic seizures while playing the newest genre of electronic games -- Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games (MMORPGs) -- were investigated. Patients were predominantly male young adults, and most of the events were generalized tonic-clonic seizures, myoclonic seizures, and absences. These patients should be categorized into idiopathic generalized epilepsies. Even though photosensitivity was an important factor, behavioral and higher mental activities also seemed to be significant seizure precipitants. Results demonstrated that MMORPG-induced seizures were not analogous to the ordinary video game-induced seizures. Significantly, an epileptic seizure warning did not always appear on the websites of MMORPGs and instructions for the software. While the prevalence of MMORPG-induced seizures remains unknown, it may exceed our expectations and impact our society. Not only for clinical neurologists but also for the primary physicians, educators, sociologists, and global online game publishers, there should be an awareness of this special form of reflex seizures in order to provide an appropriate health warning to MMORPG players. PMID:16901249

  17. Assimilating Seizure Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Ghanim; Schiff, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    Observability of a dynamical system requires an understanding of its state—the collective values of its variables. However, existing techniques are too limited to measure all but a small fraction of the physical variables and parameters of neuronal networks. We constructed models of the biophysical properties of neuronal membrane, synaptic, and microenvironment dynamics, and incorporated them into a model-based predictor-controller framework from modern control theory. We demonstrate that it is now possible to meaningfully estimate the dynamics of small neuronal networks using as few as a single measured variable. Specifically, we assimilate noisy membrane potential measurements from individual hippocampal neurons to reconstruct the dynamics of networks of these cells, their extracellular microenvironment, and the activities of different neuronal types during seizures. We use reconstruction to account for unmeasured parts of the neuronal system, relating micro-domain metabolic processes to cellular excitability, and validate the reconstruction of cellular dynamical interactions against actual measurements. Data assimilation, the fusing of measurement with computational models, has significant potential to improve the way we observe and understand brain dynamics. PMID:20463875

  18. Atypical causes of cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ken D; Sundaram, Vinay; Ayoub, Walid S

    2014-01-01

    Cholestatic liver disease consists of a variety of disorders. Primary sclerosing cholangitis and primary biliary cirrhosis are the most commonly recognized cholestatic liver disease in the adult population, while biliary atresia and Alagille syndrome are commonly recognized in the pediatric population. In infants, the causes are usually congenital or inherited. Even though jaundice is a hallmark of cholestasis, it is not always seen in adult patients with chronic liver disease. Patients can have “silent” progressive cholestatic liver disease for years prior to development of symptoms such as jaundice and pruritus. In this review, we will discuss some of the atypical causes of cholestatic liver disease such as benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis, progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis, Alagille Syndrome, biliary atresia, total parenteral nutrition induced cholestasis and cholestasis secondary to drug induced liver injury. PMID:25071336

  19. [Martin Luther's seizure disorder].

    PubMed

    Feldmann, H

    1989-01-01

    Martin Luther's diseases are well documented, because he used to discuss them freely in his letters. There is also a wealth of evidence through reports by his friends. Most of his diseases were common and well known to the contemporary physicians, who accordingly interpreted them correctly: bladder stones, chronic constipation, hemorrhoids. Luther's death obviously was due to a coronary thrombosis. During the last 19 years of his life, in addition to these "natural diseases", Luther also suffered from recurring attacks of a peculiar symptomatology. Luther himself and his friends considered these seizures to be no "natural disease", but Satan punching his flesh, and he compared them to St. Paul's disease (2. Cor. 12). The first of these attacks occurred on July 6, 1527, when Luther was 43 years of age. It began with a roaring tinnitus in his left ear, which increased dramatically and seemed to occupy the left half of his head. Then a state of sickness and collapse followed, however, consciousness was retained throughout the whole period. After a night's rest all the symptoms had subsided, except the tinnitus, which, from that day on, continued for all the following years in varying intensity. Similar attacks with increase of the tinnitus and vertigo as the leading symptoms, seized Luther at irregular intervals and distressed him extremely. Former investigators of Luther's diseases interpreted these attacks as manifestations of a psychiatric disorder and a chronic inflammatory disease of the middle ear. The present detailed study reveals that it was a typical case of Menière's disease of the left ear manifesting itself more than 330 years before Menière's classical observation. PMID:2529669

  20. SULFOLANE EFFECTS ON AUDIOGENIC, PENTYLENETETRAZOL AND AFTERDISCHARGE SEIZURE ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfolane dosages that alter seizure susceptibility were determined using audiogenic (AG), pentylenetrazol (PTZ) and hippocampal afterdischarge (AD) seizure models. The presence of AG seizures and potentiation of PTZ seizures were investigated in rats injected IP with 0, 200, 400...

  1. Febrile Seizures and Epilepsy: Possible Outcomes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... whether they could increase the risk of developing epilepsy later. Febrile seizures are defined as seizures that ... brains of patients who underwent surgery for severe epilepsy. 3 The children with FSE were com- pared ...

  2. Early Posttraumatic Seizures in the Pediatric Population.

    PubMed

    Arndt, Daniel H; Goodkin, Howard P; Giza, Christopher C

    2016-01-01

    Early posttraumatic seizure is a paramount clinical issue in pediatric traumatic brain injury patients as it is a common occurrence, yet an understudied entity at present. Recent literature recognizes several posttraumatic seizure subtypes based on time of presentation and the underlying pathophysiology: impact, immediate, delayed early, and late/posttraumatic epilepsy. Appropriate classification of pediatric posttraumatic seizure subtypes can be helpful for appropriate management and prognosis. This review will focus on early posttraumatic seizures, and the subtypes of early posttraumatic seizure. Incidence, risk factors, diagnosis, seizure semiology, status epilepticus, management, risk of recurrence, and prognosis were reviewed. The integration of continuous electroencephalographic (EEG) monitoring into pediatric traumatic brain injury management may hold the key to better characterizing and understanding pediatric early posttraumatic seizures. Topics for future research pertaining to pediatric early posttraumatic seizure are identified. PMID:25564481

  3. Atypical Odontalgia (Phantom Tooth Pain)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... and is found most often in the middle-aged to older age group. Some studies have found an association between atypical odontalgia and depression and anxiety, however, the significance of this association is unclear. ...

  4. Utility of different seizure induction protocols in psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Gourav; Kalita, Jayantee; Misra, Usha K

    2014-08-01

    Psychogenic non epileptic seizure (PNES) can be induced by several induction tests but their relative usefulness has not been evaluated. In this study, we report the sensitivity and specificity of various induction tests in the diagnosis of PNES and assess their discomfort level. The induction tests were: (a) compression of temple region (CTR), (b) verbal suggestion (VS), (c) tuning fork application (TFA), (d) moist swab application (MSA), (e) torch light stimulation (TLS) and (f) saline injection (SI). Up to 3 trials were done for each test except for normal saline injection which was given once. For comparison of these tests, patients with epileptic seizures were included as controls. The time to precipitate PNES was recorded and patients' discomfort levels were noted on a 0-10 scale. Video EEG was recorded in the PNES patients. 140 patients with PNES and 50 controls with epileptic seizures were included. The diagnostic yield of CTR was 65.7%, TFA 61.4%, MSA 60.7%, SI 55.6%, VS 54.3% and TLS 40.7%. These tests did not induce seizures in the controls. All these tests had 100% specificity and 100% positive predictive value in the diagnosis of PNES. The maximum discomfort was reported with SI and minimum with MSA. The similarity of efficacy and discomfort with CTR and TFA appear to be the most optimal induction techniques when compared with VS, AMS, TLS, and SI. PMID:24802296

  5. Atypical myeloproliferative disorders in adults.

    PubMed

    Zachée, Pierre

    2011-04-01

    The definition of 'atypical MPDs' includes all chronic myeloid disorders that defy classification as either MDS or classic MPDs. These can be both molecularly defined or clinicopathologically assigned: chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia, chronic neutrophilic leukemia, chronic basophilic leukemia, chronic eosinophilic leukemia, idiopathic eosinophilia including hypereosinophilic syndrome, systemic mastocytosis, unclassified MPD, and eosinophilic/mast cell disorders associated with mutations of PDGFR, FGFR1, and KIT all fall under the category of atypical MPDs. PMID:21402312

  6. [Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Blasco Pelicano, Miquel; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Campistol Plana, Josep M

    2015-11-20

    The hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a clinical entity characterized by thrombocytopenia, non-immune hemolytic anemia and renal impairment. Kidney pathology shows thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) with endothelial cell injury leading to thrombotic occlusion of arterioles and capillaries. Traditionally, HUS was classified in 2 forms: Typical HUS, most frequently occurring in children and caused by Shiga-toxin-producing bacteria, and atypical HUS (aHUS). aHUS is associated with mutations in complement genes in 50-60% of patients and has worse prognosis, with the majority of patients developing end stage renal disease. After kidney transplantation HUS may develop as a recurrence of aHUS or as de novo disease. Over the last years, many studies have demonstrated that complement dysregulation underlies the endothelial damage that triggers the development of TMA in most of these patients. Advances in our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of aHUS, together with the availability of novel therapeutic options, will enable better strategies for the early diagnosis and etiological treatment, which are changing the natural history of aHUS. This review summarizes the aHUS clinical entity and describes the role of complement dysregulation in the pathogenesis of aHUS. Finally, we review the differential diagnosis and the therapeutic options available to patients with aHUS. PMID:25433773

  7. Role of the Wada test and functional magnetic resonance imaging in preoperative mapping of language and memory: two atypical cases.

    PubMed

    Po?czy?ska, Monika M; Benjamin, Christopher F A; Moseley, Brian D; Walshaw, Patricia; Eliashiv, Dawn; Vigil, Celia; Jones, Michael; Bookheimer, Susan Y

    2015-01-01

    The Wada test is an invasive procedure used to determine cerebral memory and language dominance as well as risk of cognitive deficits following neurosurgery. However, the potential risks of Wada testing have led some to consider foregoing Wada testing in candidates for resective epilepsy surgery with right hemispheric seizure onset. We present two atypical cases in which the Wada test showed unexpected memory and language lateralization. These cases underscore the importance of functional magnetic resonance in which imaging and Wada examination in right-handed individuals even when the lesion would not suggest atypical language representation. PMID:25372664

  8. Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is defined by the triad of mechanical hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and renal impairment. Atypical HUS (aHUS) defines non Shiga-toxin-HUS and even if some authors include secondary aHUS due to Streptococcus pneumoniae or other causes, aHUS designates a primary disease due to a disorder in complement alternative pathway regulation. Atypical HUS represents 5 -10% of HUS in children, but the majority of HUS in adults. The incidence of complement-aHUS is not known precisely. However, more than 1000 aHUS patients investigated for complement abnormalities have been reported. Onset is from the neonatal period to the adult age. Most patients present with hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and renal failure and 20% have extra renal manifestations. Two to 10% die and one third progress to end-stage renal failure at first episode. Half of patients have relapses. Mutations in the genes encoding complement regulatory proteins factor H, membrane cofactor protein (MCP), factor I or thrombomodulin have been demonstrated in 20-30%, 5-15%, 4-10% and 3-5% of patients respectively, and mutations in the genes of C3 convertase proteins, C3 and factor B, in 2-10% and 1-4%. In addition, 6-10% of patients have anti-factor H antibodies. Diagnosis of aHUS relies on 1) No associated disease 2) No criteria for Shigatoxin-HUS (stool culture and PCR for Shiga-toxins; serology for anti-lipopolysaccharides antibodies) 3) No criteria for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (serum ADAMTS 13 activity > 10%). Investigation of the complement system is required (C3, C4, factor H and factor I plasma concentration, MCP expression on leukocytes and anti-factor H antibodies; genetic screening to identify risk factors). The disease is familial in approximately 20% of pedigrees, with an autosomal recessive or dominant mode of transmission. As penetrance of the disease is 50%, genetic counseling is difficult. Plasmatherapy has been first line treatment until presently, without unquestionable demonstration of efficiency. There is a high risk of post-transplant recurrence, except in MCP-HUS. Case reports and two phase II trials show an impressive efficacy of the complement C5 blocker eculizumab, suggesting it will be the next standard of care. Except for patients treated by intensive plasmatherapy or eculizumab, the worst prognosis is in factor H-HUS, as mortality can reach 20% and 50% of survivors do not recover renal function. Half of factor I-HUS progress to end-stage renal failure. Conversely, most patients with MCP-HUS have preserved renal function. Anti-factor H antibodies-HUS has favourable outcome if treated early. PMID:21902819

  9. Neonatal Seizures: Advances in Mechanisms and Management

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Hannah C.

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis Seizures occur in approximately 1–5 per 1,000 live births, and are among the most common neurologic conditions managed by a neonatal neurocritical care service. There are several, age-specific factors that are particular to the developing brain, which influence excitability and seizure generation, response to medications, and impact of seizures on brain structure and function. Neonatal seizures are often associated with serious underlying brain injury such as hypoxia-ischemia, stroke or hemorrhage. Conventional, prolonged, continuous video-electroencephalogram (cEEG) is the gold standard for detecting seizures, whereas amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG) is a convenient and useful bedside tool. Evaluation of neonatal seizures involves a thorough search for the etiology of the seizures, and includes detailed clinical history, routine chemistries, neuroimaging (and preferably magnetic resonance imaging, MRI), and specialized testing such as screening for inborn errors of metabolism if no structural cause is identified and seizures persist after correction of transient metabolic deficits. Expert opinion supports rapid medical treatment to abolish electrographic seizures, however the relative risk versus benefit for aggressive medical treatment of neonatal seizures is not known. While there is increasing evidence to support a harmful effect of seizures on the developing brain, there is also evidence that commonly used medications are potentially neurotoxic in animal models. Newer agents appear less harmful, but data are lacking regarding optimal dosing and efficacy. PMID:24524454

  10. Nonlinear analysis of EEG for epileptic seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Hively, L.M.; Clapp, N.E.; Daw, C.S.; Lawkins, W.F.; Eisenstadt, M.L.

    1995-04-01

    We apply chaotic time series analysis (CTSA) to human electroencephalogram (EEG) data. Three epoches were examined: epileptic seizure, non-seizure, and transition from non-seizure to seizure. The CTSA tools were applied to four forms of these data: raw EEG data (e-data), artifact data (f-data) via application of a quadratic zero-phase filter of the raw data, artifact-filtered data (g- data) and that was the residual after subtracting f-data from e-data, and a low-pass-filtered version (h-data) of g-data. Two different seizures were analyzed for the same patient. Several nonlinear measures uniquely indicate an epileptic seizure in both cases, including an abrupt decrease in the time per wave cycle in f-data, an abrupt increase in the Kolmogorov entropy and in the correlation dimension for e-h data, and an abrupt increase in the correlation dimension for e-h data. The transition from normal to seizure state also is characterized by distinctly different trends in the nonlinear measures for each seizure and may be potential seizure predictors for this patient. Surrogate analysis of e-data shows that statistically significant nonlinear structure is present during the non-seizure, transition , and seizure epoches.

  11. Localizing epileptic seizure onsets with Granger causality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Bhim M.; Epstein, Charles M.; Dhamala, Mukesh

    2013-09-01

    Accurate localization of the epileptic seizure onset zones (SOZs) is crucial for successful surgery, which usually depends on the information obtained from intracranial electroencephalography (IEEG) recordings. The visual criteria and univariate methods of analyzing IEEG recordings have not always produced clarity on the SOZs for resection and ultimate seizure freedom for patients. Here, to contribute to improving the localization of the SOZs and to understanding the mechanism of seizure propagation over the brain, we applied spectral interdependency methods to IEEG time series recorded from patients during seizures. We found that the high-frequency (>80 Hz) Granger causality (GC) occurs before the onset of any visible ictal activity and causal relationships involve the recording electrodes where clinically identifiable seizures later develop. These results suggest that high-frequency oscillatory network activities precede and underlie epileptic seizures, and that GC spectral measures derived from IEEG can assist in precise delineation of seizure onset times and SOZs.

  12. Overdose of atypical antipsychotics: clinical presentation, mechanisms of toxicity and management.

    PubMed

    Levine, Michael; Ruha, Anne-Michelle

    2012-07-01

    Historically, treatment for schizophrenia focused on sedation. The advent of the typical antipsychotics resulted in treatment aimed specifically at the underlying disease, but these agents were associated with numerous adverse effects, and were not particularly effective at treatment of the negative symptoms of schizophrenia. As a result, numerous atypical agents have been developed over the past 2 decades, including several agents within the past 5 years. Overdose of antipsychotics remains quite common in Western society. In 2010, poison control centres in the US received nearly 43,000 calls related to atypical antipsychotics alone. Due to underreporting, the true incidence of overdose with atypical antipsychotics is likely much greater. Following overdose of an atypical antipsychotic, the clinical effects observed, such as CNS depression, tachycardia and orthostasis are largely predictable based on the unique receptor binding profile of the agent. This article, which focuses on the atypical antipsychotics commonly used in the treatment of schizophrenia, discusses the features commonly encountered in overdose. Specifically, agents that result in QT prolongation and the corresponding potential for torsades de pointes, as well as unique features encountered with the various medications are discussed. The diagnosis of this overdose is largely based on history. Routine use of drug screens is unlikely to be beneficial. The primary goal of management is aggressive supportive care. Patients with significant CNS depression with associated loss of airway reflexes and respiratory failure need advanced airway management. Hypotension should be treated first with intravenous fluids, with the use of direct acting vasopressors reserved for persistent hypotension. Benzodiazepines should be used for seizures, with barbiturates used for refractory seizures. Intravenous magnesium can be administered for patients with a corrected QT interval exceeding 500 milliseconds. PMID:22668123

  13. Benign meningiomas (WHO Grade I) with atypical histological features: correlation of histopathological features with clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Marciscano, Ariel E; Stemmer-Rachamimov, Anat O; Niemierko, Andrzej; Larvie, Mykol; Curry, William T; Barker, Fred G; Martuza, Robert L; McGuone, Declan; Oh, Kevin S; Loeffler, Jay S; Shih, Helen A

    2016-01-01

    OBJECT World Health Organization (WHO) Grade I (benign) meningiomas with atypical features may behave more aggressively than similarly graded tumors without atypical features. Here, the prognostic significance of atypical features in benign meningiomas was determined. METHODS Data from patients diagnosed with WHO Grade I benign meningiomas per the 2007 WHO criteria and who underwent surgery between 2002 and 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients were stratified by the absence or presence of 1 to 2 atypical features with review of the clinical and histological factors. RESULTS A total of 148 patients met the inclusion criteria (n = 77 with atypia; n = 71 without atypia). The median follow-up duration after pathological diagnosis was 37.5 months. Thirty patients had progression/recurrence (P/R) after initial treatment, and 22 (73%) of 30 patients with P/R had 1-2 atypical features. The presence of atypical features was significantly associated with P/R (p = 0.03) and independent of the MIB-1 labeling index. The 1-year and 5-year actuarial rates of P/R were 9.6% versus 1.4% and 30.8% versus 13.8% fortumors with and without atypical features, respectively. Higher Simpson grade resection (II-IV vs I) was associated with the increased risk of P/R (p < 0.001). Stratification of patients into low-risk (Simpson Grade I), intermediate-risk (Simpson Grade II-IV with no atypical features), and high-risk groups (Simpson Grade II-IV with atypical features) was significantly correlated with increased risk of P/R (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Patients with benign meningiomas with atypical features and those undergoing Simpson Grade II-IV resection are at significantly increased risk of P/R. Patients with these features may benefit from the consideration of additional surgery and/or radiation therapy. PMID:26274991

  14. Neonatal Seizures: Impact on Neurodevelopmental Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seok Kyu; Kadam, Shilpa D.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal period is the most vulnerable time for the occurrence of seizures, and neonatal seizures often pose a clinical challenge both for their acute management and frequency of associated long-term co-morbidities. Etiologies of neonatal seizures are known to play a primary role in the anti-epileptic drug responsiveness and the long-term sequelae. Recent studies have suggested that burden of acute recurrent seizures in neonates may also impact chronic outcomes independent of the etiology. However, not many studies, either clinical or pre-clinical, have addressed the long-term outcomes of neonatal seizures in an etiology-specific manner. In this review, we briefly review the available clinical and pre-clinical research for long-term outcomes following neonatal seizures. As the most frequent cause of acquired neonatal seizures, we focus on the studies evaluating long-term effects of HIE-seizures with the goal to evaluate (1) what parameters evaluated during acute stages of neonatal seizures can reliably be used to predict long-term outcomes? and (2) what available clinical and pre-clinical data are available help determine importance of etiology vs. seizure burdens in long-term sequelae. PMID:26636052

  15. Proneurotrophins, Seizures, and Neuronal Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Wilma J.

    2010-01-01

    Neurons respond to numerous factors in their environment that influence their survival and function during development and in the mature brain. Among these factors, the neurotrophins have been shown to support neuronal survival and function, acting primarily through the Trk family of receptor tyrosine kinases. However, recent studies have established that the uncleaved neurotrophin precursors, the proneurotrophins, can be secreted and induce apoptosis via the p75 neurotrophin receptor, suggesting that the balance of secreted mature and proneurotrophins has a critical impact on neuronal survival or death. Epileptic seizures elicit increases in both proneurotrophin secretion and p75NTR expression, shifting the balance of these factors toward signaling cell death. This review will discuss the evidence that this ligand-receptor system plays an important role in neuronal loss following seizures. PMID:20360602

  16. Patterns of human local cerebral glucose metabolism during epileptic seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J. Jr.; Kuhl, D.E.; Phelps, M.E.

    1982-10-01

    Ictal patterns of local cerebral metabolic rate have been studied in epileptic patients by positron computed tomography with /sup 18/F-labeled 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Partial seizures were associated with activation of anatomic structures unique to each patient studied. Ictal increases and decreases in local cerebral metabolism were observed. Scans performed during generalized convulsions induced by electroshock demonstrated a diffuse ictal increase and postictal decrease in cerebral metabolism. Petit mal absences were associated with a diffuse increase in cerebral metabolic rate. The ictal fluorodeoxyglucose patterns obtained from patients do not resemble autoradiographic patterns obtained from common experimental animal models of epilepsy.

  17. Smartphone applications for seizure management.

    PubMed

    Pandher, Puneet Singh; Bhullar, Karamdeep Kaur

    2014-07-18

    Technological advancements continue to provide innovative ways of enhancing patient care in medicine. In particular, the growing popularity of smartphone technology has seen the recent emergence of a myriad of healthcare applications (or apps) that promise to help shape the way in which health information is delivered to people worldwide. While limited research already exists on a range of such apps, our study is the first to examine the salient features of smartphone applications as they apply to the area of seizure management. For the purposes of this review, we conducted a search of the official online application stores of the five major smartphone platforms: iPhone, Android, Blackberry, Windows Mobile and Nokia-Symbian. Apps were included if they reported to contain some information or tools relating to seizure management and excluded if they were aimed exclusively at health professionals. A total of 28 applications met these criteria. Overall, we found an increasing number of epilepsy apps available on the smartphone market, but with only a minority offering comprehensive educational information alongside tools such as seizure diaries, medication tracking and/or video recording. PMID:25038202

  18. Resetting of brain dynamics: epileptic versus psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Balu; Faith, Aaron; Vlachos, Ioannis; Roth, Austin; Williams, Korwyn; Noe, Katie; Drazkowski, Joe; Tapsell, Lisa; Sirven, Joseph; Iasemidis, Leon

    2011-12-01

    We investigated the possibility of differential diagnosis of patients with epileptic seizures (ES) and patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) through an advanced analysis of the dynamics of the patients' scalp EEGs. The underlying principle was the presence of resetting of brain's preictal spatiotemporal entrainment following onset of ES and the absence of resetting following PNES. Long-term (days) scalp EEGs recorded from five patients with ES and six patients with PNES were analyzed. It was found that: (1) Preictal entrainment of brain sites was reset at ES (P<0.05) in four of the five patients with ES, and not reset (P=0.28) in the fifth patient. (2) Resetting did not occur (p>0.1) in any of the six patients with PNES. These preliminary results in patients with ES are in agreement with our previous findings from intracranial EEG recordings on resetting of brain dynamics by ES and are expected to constitute the basis for the development of a reliable and supporting tool in the differential diagnosis between ES and PNES. Finally, we believe that these results shed light on the electrophysiology of PNES by showing that occurrence of PNES does not assist patients in overcoming a pathological entrainment of brain dynamics. This article is part of a Supplemental Special Issue entitled The Future of Automated Seizure Detection and Prediction. PMID:22078523

  19. Emergency Management of Seizures in the School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Dell, Christine; O'Hara, Kathryn; Kiel, Sarah; McCullough, Kathleen

    2007-01-01

    Effective seizure management in the school setting is a critical issue for students with seizures, as well as their parents, classmates, and school personnel. The unpredictable nature of seizures and the potential outcomes of experiencing a seizure in school are sources of anxiety for students with seizures. The ability to respond appropriately to…

  20. Clozapine versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Asenjo Lobos, Claudia; Komossa, Katja; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Hunger, Heike; Schmid, Franziska; Schwarz, Sandra; Leucht, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background Clozapine is an atypical antipsychotic demonstrated to be superior in the treatment of refractory schizophrenia which causes fewer movement disorders. Clozapine, however, entails a significant risk of serious blood disorders such as agranulocytosis which could be potentially fatal. Currently there are a number of newer antipsychotics which have been developed with the purpose to find both a better tolerability profile and a superior effectiveness. Objectives To compare the clinical effects of clozapine with other atypical antipsychotics (such as amisulpride, aripiprazole, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, sertindole, ziprasidone and zotepine) in the treatment of schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychoses. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Groups Register (June 2007) and reference lists of all included randomised controlled trials. We also manually searched appropriate journals and conference proceedings relating to clozapine combination strategies and contacted relevant pharmaceutical companies. Selection criteria All relevant randomised, at least single-blind trials, comparing clozapine with other atypical antipsychotics, any dose and oral formulations, for people with schizophrenia or related disorders. Data collection and analysis We selected trials and extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated relative risks (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) based on a random-effects model. We calculated numbers needed to treat/harm (NNT/NNH) where appropriate. For continuous data, we calculated mean differences (MD) again based on a random-effects model. Main results The review currently includes 27 blinded randomised controlled trials, which involved 3099 participants. Twelve randomised control trials compared clozapine with olanzapine, five with quetiapine, nine with risperidone, one with ziprasidone and two with zotepine. Attrition from these studies was high (overall 30.1%), leaving the interpretation of results problematic. Clozapine had a higher attrition rate due to adverse effects than olanzapine (9 RCTs, n=1674, RR 1.60 CI 1.07 to 2.40, NNT 25 CI 15 to 73) and risperidone (6 RCTs, n=627, RR 1.88 CI 1.11 to 3.21, NNT 16 CI 9 to 59). Fewer participants in the clozapine groups left the trials early due to inefficacy than risperidone (6 RCTs, n=627, RR 0.40 CI 0.23 to 0.70, NNT 11 CI 7 to 21), suggesting a certain higher efficacy of clozapine. Clozapine was more efficacious than zotepine in improving the participants general mental state (BPRS total score: 1 RCT, n=59, MD ?6.00 CI ?9.83 to ?2.17), but not consistently more than olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone and ziprasidone. There was no significant difference between clozapine and olanzapine or risperidone in terms of positive or negative symptoms of schizophrenia. According to two studies from China quetiapine was more efficacious for negative symptoms than clozapine (2 RCTs, n=142, MD 2.23 CI 0.99 to 3.48). Clozapine produced somewhat fewer extrapyramidal side-effects than risperidone (use of antiparkinson medication: 6 RCTs, n=304, RR 0.39 CI 0.22 to 0.68, NNT 7 CI 5 to 18) and zotepine (n=59, RR 0.05 CI 0.00 to 0.86, NNT 3 CI 2 to 5). More participants in the clozapine group showed decreased white blood cells than those taking olanzapine, more hypersalivation and sedation than those on olanzapine, risperidone and quetiapine and more seizures than people on olanzapine and risperidone. Also clozapine produced an important weight gain not seen with risperidone. Other differences in adverse effects were less documented and should be replicated, for example, clozapine did not alter prolactin levels whereas olanzapine, risperidone and zotepine did; compared with quetiapine, clozapine produced a higher incidence of electrocardiogram (ECG) alterations; and compared with quetiapine and risperidone clozapine produced a higher increase of triglyceride levels. Other findings that should be replicated were: clozapine improved social functioning less than risperidone and fewer participants

  1. Neurologic outcome after electroencephalographically proven neonatal seizures.

    PubMed

    Legido, A; Clancy, R R; Berman, P H

    1991-09-01

    Infants in whom neonatal seizures were confirmed by randomly recorded ictal electroencephalographic (EEG) tracings were retrospectively examined to determine their global neurologic outcome and the specific frequency of epilepsy, development delay, and cerebral palsy. Perinatal and postnatal clinical and EEG variables were also examined for their relevance to the neurologic outcome. Forty infants with EEG documented seizures of diverse etiologies were studied. The 27 survivors were followed up at a mean of 31 months. The outcome was unfavorable in 70%. The rate of epilepsy was 56%, of developmental delay 67%, and of cerebral palsy 63%. The etiology of seizures was an important factor influencing the outcome. Other clinical factors that showed a significant relationship with global or specific aspects of the neurologic outcome included the age at the onset of seizures, birth weight, and neurologic examination results. The EEG parameters that significantly predicted the neurologic outcome were interictal EEG background, increased seizure frequency, and decreased seizure duration. PMID:1881741

  2. An Scn1a epilepsy mutation in Scn8a alters seizure susceptibility and behavior.

    PubMed

    Makinson, Christopher D; Dutt, Karoni; Lin, Frank; Papale, Ligia A; Shankar, Anupama; Barela, Arthur J; Liu, Robert; Goldin, Alan L; Escayg, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the role of SCN8A in epilepsy and behavior is critical in light of recently identified human SCN8A epilepsy mutations. We have previously demonstrated that Scn8a(med) and Scn8a(med-jo) mice carrying mutations in the Scn8a gene display increased resistance to flurothyl and kainic acid-induced seizures; however, they also exhibit spontaneous absence seizures. To further investigate the relationship between altered SCN8A function and epilepsy, we introduced the SCN1A-R1648H mutation, identified in a family with generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+), into the corresponding position (R1627H) of the mouse Scn8a gene. Heterozygous R1627H mice exhibited increased resistance to some forms of pharmacologically and electrically induced seizures and the mutant Scn8a allele ameliorated the phenotype of Scn1a-R1648H mutants. Hippocampal slices from heterozygous R1627H mice displayed decreased bursting behavior compared to wild-type littermates. Paradoxically, at the homozygous level, R1627H mice did not display increased seizure resistance and were susceptible to audiogenic seizures. We furthermore observed increased hippocampal pyramidal cell excitability in heterozygous and homozygous Scn8a-R1627H mutants, and decreased interneuron excitability in heterozygous Scn8a-R1627H mutants. These results expand the phenotypes associated with disruption of the Scn8a gene and demonstrate that an Scn8a mutation can both confer seizure protection and increase seizure susceptibility. PMID:26410685

  3. Breakthrough seizures after starting vilazodone for depression.

    PubMed

    McKean, James; Watts, Hannah; Mokszycki, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Vilazodone is a new selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) and serotonin 5-HT1a partial agonist that is approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration to treat major depression. SSRI-induced seizures are rare and are more likely to be associated with larger doses and severe symptoms such as those present in serotonin syndrome. Several case reports have implicated SSRIs, buspirone, or the combination of these agents as the cause of seizures, but these reports were confounded with either coingestions or doses that exceeded FDA recommendations. We describe a 22-year-old woman with a history of seizure disorder who had been seizure free for the previous 8 years and experienced two breakthrough seizures shortly after starting vilazodone. Her dose of vilazodone had recently been titrated to 40 mg/day when she experienced the first seizure. She was instructed to taper vilazodone over the next several days, then discontinue the drug, and then follow up with her neurologist. Based on the patient's history, physical examination, and recent dose increase, it was plausible that vilazodone was the cause of the seizures. Use of the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale indicated a possible relationship (score of 4) between her development of seizures and vilazodone therapy. The pharmacodynamics of this particular class of SSRI has both proconvulsive and anticonvulsive mechanisms. This is of particular concern in patients with a history of seizure disorder who are starting antidepressive therapy. In persons with epilepsy who are taking vilazodone and experience breakthrough seizures, practitioners should consider this drug as a potential cause of these seizures. Thus, until future research and experience with vilazodone can provide a definitive answer, clinicians should be cautious when prescribing this medication to treat depression in patients with a history of seizure disorder. PMID:25809181

  4. Possible causes of seizure after spine surgery

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Zohreh; Nejat, Farideh; El Khashab, Mostafa

    2010-01-01

    Seizure after laminectomy for spinal procedure is very rare and has not been reported after lipomyelomeningocele surgery beforehand. Here, two cases of seizure following laminectomy for lipomyelomeningocele are reported. The exact etiology of the event is unknown but anesthetic material, pneumocephalus, intracranial hypotension subsequent to cerebrospinal fluid leakage after spinal procedures, spinal-induced seizure and the potential toxic effect of fat molecules could be considered. PMID:21042506

  5. SEIZURE PREDICTION: THE FOURTH INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP

    PubMed Central

    Zaveri, Hitten P.; Frei, Mark G.; Arthurs, Susan; Osorio, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    The recently convened Fourth International Workshop on Seizure Prediction (IWSP4) brought together a diverse international group of investigators, from academia and industry, including epileptologists, neurosurgeons, neuroscientists, computer scientists, engineers, physicists, and mathematicians who are conducting interdisciplinary research on the prediction and control of seizures. IWSP4 allowed the presentation and discussion of results, an exchange of ideas, an assessment of the status of seizure prediction, control and related fields and the fostering of collaborative projects. PMID:20674508

  6. Neonatal seizures-part 2: Aetiology of acute symptomatic seizures, treatments and the neonatal epilepsy syndromes.

    PubMed

    Hart, Anthony R; Pilling, Elizabeth L; Alix, James J P

    2015-10-01

    Most neonatal epileptic seizures are provoked by an underlying condition or problem-'acute symptomatic seizures'. However, a few neonatal epilepsy syndromes exist, and these are defined by the constellation of seizure types, EEG findings and family history seen. Making an accurate diagnosis of an epilepsy syndrome can help direct investigations, treatment options and provide prognostic information. This article discusses the investigative approach and treatments for neonatal epileptic seizures, including the neonatal epilepsy syndromes. PMID:25824891

  7. Reduction of thalamic and cortical Ih by deletion of TRIP8b produces a mouse model of human absence epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Heuermann, Robert J; Jaramillo, Thomas C; Ying, Shui-Wang; Suter, Benjamin A; Lyman, Kyle A; Han, Ye; Lewis, Alan S; Hampton, Thomas G; Shepherd, Gordon M G; Goldstein, Peter A; Chetkovich, Dane M

    2016-01-01

    Absence seizures occur in several types of human epilepsy and result from widespread, synchronous feedback between the cortex and thalamus that produces brief episodes of loss of consciousness. Genetic rodent models have been invaluable for investigating the pathophysiological basis of these seizures. Here, we identify tetratricopeptide-containing Rab8b-interacting protein (TRIP8b) knockout mice as a new model of absence epilepsy, featuring spontaneous spike-wave discharges on electroencephalography (EEG) that are the electrographic hallmark of absence seizures. TRIP8b is an auxiliary subunit of the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic-nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels, which have previously been implicated in the pathogenesis of absence seizures. In contrast to mice lacking the pore-forming HCN channel subunit HCN2, TRIP8b knockout mice exhibited normal cardiac and motor function and a less severe seizure phenotype. Evaluating the circuit that underlies absence seizures, we found that TRIP8b knockout mice had significantly reduced HCN channel expression and function in thalamic-projecting cortical layer 5b neurons and thalamic relay neurons, but preserved function in inhibitory neurons of the reticular thalamic nucleus. Our results expand the known roles of TRIP8b and provide new insight into the region-specific functions of TRIP8b and HCN channels in constraining cortico-thalamo-cortical excitability. PMID:26459112

  8. Reactive Astrogliosis Causes the Development of Spontaneous Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Buckingham, Susan C.; Boni, Jessica L.; Campbell, Susan L.; Danbolt, Niels C.; Riedemann, Therese; Sutor, Bernd; Sontheimer, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic neurologic diseases, yet approximately one-third of affected patients do not respond to anticonvulsive drugs that target neurons or neuronal circuits. Reactive astrocytes are commonly found in putative epileptic foci and have been hypothesized to be disease contributors because they lose essential homeostatic capabilities. However, since brain pathology induces astrocytes to become reactive, it is difficult to distinguish whether astrogliosis is a cause or a consequence of epileptogenesis. We now present a mouse model of genetically induced, widespread chronic astrogliosis after conditional deletion of ?1-integrin (Itg?1). In these mice, astrogliosis occurs in the absence of other pathologies and without BBB breach or significant inflammation. Electroencephalography with simultaneous video recording revealed that these mice develop spontaneous seizures during the first six postnatal weeks of life and brain slices show neuronal hyperexcitability. This was not observed in mice with neuronal-targeted ?1-integrin deletion, supporting the hypothesis that astrogliosis is sufficient to induce epileptic seizures. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from astrocytes further suggest that the heightened excitability was associated with impaired astrocytic glutamate uptake. Moreover, the relative expression of the cation-chloride cotransporters (CCC) NKCC1 (Slc12a2) and KCC2 (Slc12a5), which are responsible for establishing the neuronal Cl? gradient that governs GABAergic inhibition were altered and the NKCC1 inhibitor bumetanide eliminated seizures in a subgroup of mice. These data suggest that a shift in the relative expression of neuronal NKCC1 and KCC2, similar to that observed in immature neurons during development, may contribute to astrogliosis-associated seizures. PMID:25716834

  9. Infantile hypophosphatasia without bone deformities presenting with severe pyridoxine-resistant seizures.

    PubMed

    de Roo, Marieke G A; Abeling, Nico G G M; Majoie, Charles B; Bosch, Annet M; Koelman, Johannes H T M; Cobben, Jan M; Duran, Marinus; Poll-The, Bwee Tien

    2014-03-01

    An infant carrying a heterozygous c.43_46delACTA and a heterozygous c.668 G>A mutation in the ALPL gene with hypophosphatasia in the absence of bone deformities presented with therapy-resistant seizures. Pyridoxal phosphate was extremely high in CSF and plasma. Pyridoxine treatment had only a transient effect and the severe encephalopathy was fatal. Repeated brain MRIs showed progressive cerebral damage. The precise metabolic cause of the seizures remains unknown and pyridoxine treatment apparently does not cure the epilepsy. PMID:24100244

  10. Local disruption of glial adenosine homeostasis in mice associates with focal electrographic seizures: a first step in epileptogenesis?

    PubMed

    Li, Tianfu; Lytle, Nikki; Lan, Jing-Quan; Sandau, Ursula S; Boison, Detlev

    2012-01-01

    Astrogliosis and associated dysfunction of adenosine homeostasis are pathological hallmarks of the epileptic brain and thought to contribute to seizure generation in epilepsy. The authors hypothesized that astrogliosis-an early component of the epileptogenic cascade-might be linked to focal seizure onset. To isolate the contribution of astrogliosis to ictogenesis from other pathological events involved in epilepsy, the authors used a minimalistic model of epileptogenesis in mice, based on a focal onset status epilepticus triggered by intra-amygdaloid injection of kainic acid. The authors demonstrate acute neuronal cell loss restricted to the injected amygdala and ipsilateral CA3, followed 3 weeks later by focal astrogliosis and overexpression of the adenosine-metabolizing enzyme adenosine kinase (ADK). Using synchronous electroencephalographic recordings from multiple depth electrodes, the authors identify the KA-injected amygdala and ipsilateral CA3 as two independent foci for the initiation of non-synchronized electrographic subclinical seizures. Importantly, seizures remained focal and restricted to areas of ADK overexpression. However, after systemic application of a non-convulsive dose of an adenosine A(1) -receptor antagonist, seizures in amygdala and CA3 immediately synchronized and spread throughout the cortex, leading to convulsive seizures. This focal seizure phenotype remained stable over at least several weeks. We conclude that astrogliosis via disruption of adenosine homeostasis per se and in the absence of any other overt pathology, is associated with the emergence of spontaneous recurrent subclinical seizures, which remain stable over space and time. A secondary event, here mimicked by brain-wide disruption of adenosine signaling, is likely required to turn pre-existing subclinical seizures into a clinical seizure phenotype. PMID:21964979

  11. 19 CFR 162.63 - Arrests and seizures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Controlled Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana § 162.63 Arrests and seizures. Arrests and seizures under the Controlled Substances Act (84...

  12. 19 CFR 162.63 - Arrests and seizures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Controlled Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana § 162.63 Arrests and seizures. Arrests and seizures under the Controlled Substances Act (84...

  13. Atypical Unilateral Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome Mimicking a Middle Cerebral Artery Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yang-Je; Park, Mina; Lee, Seung Koo

    2015-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is usually a reversible clinical and radiological entity associated with typical features on brain MR or CT imaging. However, the not-so-uncommon atypical radiological presentations of the condition are also present and they may go unrecognised as they are confused with other conditions. Here, we report a very rare case of atypical, unilateral PRES in a 49-year-old uremic, post-transplant female patient who presented with seizures. Initial MRI showed high-grade occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery (MCA) and lesions suggestive of subacute infarction in the ipsilateral frontotemporoparietal lobe. Patient symptoms had resolved a day after the onset without any specific treatment but early follow-up CT findings suggested hemorrhagic transformation. Follow-up MRI performed 2 years later showed complete disappearence of the lesions and persisting MCA occlusion. PMID:26356795

  14. Nonepileptic seizures treatment workshop summary.

    PubMed

    LaFrance, W Curt; Alper, Kenneth; Babcock, Debra; Barry, John J; Benbadis, Selim; Caplan, Rochelle; Gates, John; Jacobs, Margaret; Kanner, Andres; Martin, Roy; Rundhaugen, Lynn; Stewart, Randy; Vert, Christina

    2006-05-01

    In May 2005, an international, interdisciplinary group of researchers gathered in Bethesda, MD, USA, for a workshop to discuss the development of treatments for patients with nonepileptic seizures (NES). Specific subgroup topics that were covered included: pediatric NES; presenting the diagnosis of NES, outcome measures for NES trials; classification of NES subtypes; and pharmacological treatment approaches and psychotherapies. The intent was to develop specific research strategies that can be expanded to involve a large segment of the epilepsy and psychiatric treatment communities. Various projects have resulted from the workshop, including the initial development of a prospective randomized clinical trial for NES. PMID:16540377

  15. Predictors of seizures during pregnancy in women with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Sanjeev V; Syam, Unnikrishnan; Devi, J Sucharitha

    2012-05-01

    We aimed to characterize the seizure pattern during pregnancy in a large cohort of women with epilepsy (WWE) and identify possible predictors of seizure relapse during pregnancy. We recorded the antiepileptic drug (AED) use and seizure frequency for WWE during the prepregnancy month and pregnancy. The seizure profile was correlated with the clinical details and seizure type as abstracted from the clinical records maintained in the registry. Of the 1,297 pregnancies in WWE with complete seizure data, 47.8% were seizure-free during pregnancy. Seizure relapse was highest during the three peripartum days. Women with partial seizures-had higher risk of relapse (odds ratio [OR] 1.6, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.2-2.0) than those with generalized seizures. They had two peaks of seizure relapse (second to third month and sixth month). Those with generalized seizures had one peak at first trimester. Those who were on polytherapy had increased risk of seizures (OR 2.98, 95% CI 2.3-3.9) when compared to those on monotherapy. Those who had seizures in the prepregnancy month had higher risk (OR 15, 95% CI 9-25.1) of seizures during pregnancy when compared to those who were seizure-free during that period. On multiple logistic regression, prepregnancy seizure was the most important predictor of seizures during pregnancy. PMID:22429269

  16. A Rare Case of Pyridoxine-dependent Seizures in Infancy

    PubMed Central

    Murty, V.S.S. Yerramilli; Kishore, M.S.S.; Patel, Manisha R.

    2013-01-01

    Pyridoxine-dependent seizures is a rare cause of recurrent seizures in neonatal period and resistant to most of the antiepileptic medications, but respond to administration of pyridoxine. We report a male infant who had neonatal seizures which were initially responsive to anticonvulsants and later became unresponsive and presented at 45 days of life with seizures. These seizures were not responding to any anticonvulsant but responded to pyridoxine. After discharge parents inadvertently stopped pyridoxine and the infant presented with seizures once again. These seizures were promptly controlled with readministration of pyridoxine confirming the diagnosis of pyridoxine-dependant seizures. PMID:24027745

  17. The long-term effects of febrile seizures on the hippocampal neuronal plasticity - clinical and experimental evidence.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao-Ching; Chang, Ying-Chao

    2009-05-01

    Febrile seizures are the most common seizure disorder in childhood, but their long-term effects on the developing brains especially neuronal injury and neurocognitive function remain unresolved. Recent epidemiological studies reassure that most febrile seizures do not adversely affect global intelligence and hippocampal function, such as memory. However, there are concerns regarding those children who experience febrile seizures during the first postnatal year, having prior developmental delay and pre- or peri-natal events. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies confirmed that prolonged and focal FS can occasionally produce acute hippocampal injury that evolves into atrophy. Animal studies have revealed that the exposure of hippocampal neurons to experimental febrile seizures early in life, particularly prolonged or frequently repetitive FS, or together with brain malformation, may lead to sustained dysfunction of these cells, in spite of the absence of neuronal damage. Genetic studies suggest that the relationship between febrile seizures and subsequent epilepsy and neurocognitive dysfunction is sometimes genetic, but there are complex interactions with genetic or environmental modifiers. Therefore, there is a small group of children in whom febrile seizures-induced hippocampal injury might occur. Identification of the target population for subsequent mesial temporal sclerosis is important for prevention and early intervention. PMID:19131199

  18. VLSI Multivariate Phase Synchronization Epileptic Seizure Detector

    E-print Network

    Genov, Roman

    VLSI Multivariate Phase Synchronization Epileptic Seizure Detector Karim Abdelhalim, Vadim-- A low-power VLSI seizure detector is presented. It combines a 256-channel analog neural recording chip with in vitro epilepsy models, a low-cost technique to implement on-chip gold microelectrodes was utilized

  19. Search and Seizure in the Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staros, Kari; Williams, Charles F.

    2007-01-01

    The Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution protects the people of the United States from unreasonable searches and seizures. On first reading, these protections seem clearly defined. The amendment was meant to protect Americans from the kinds of random searches and seizures that the colonists experienced under British colonial rule. Under…

  20. A Discriminative Approach to EEG Seizure Detection

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ashley N.; Sow, Daby; Biem, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Seizures are abnormal sudden discharges in the brain with signatures represented in electroencephalograms (EEG). The efficacy of the application of speech processing techniques to discriminate between seizure and non-seizure states in EEGs is reported. The approach accounts for the challenges of unbalanced datasets (seizure and non-seizure), while also showing a system capable of real-time seizure detection. The Minimum Classification Error (MCE) algorithm, which is a discriminative learning algorithm with wide-use in speech processing, is applied and compared with conventional classification techniques that have already been applied to the discrimination between seizure and non-seizure states in the literature. The system is evaluated on 22 pediatric patients multi-channel EEG recordings. Experimental results show that the application of speech processing techniques and MCE compare favorably with conventional classification techniques in terms of classification performance, while requiring less computational overhead. The results strongly suggests the possibility of deploying the designed system at the bedside. PMID:22195192

  1. CONSERVATION Genetic assignment of large seizures

    E-print Network

    Napp, Nils

    CONSERVATION Genetic assignment of large seizures of elephant ivory reveals Africa's major poaching recovery of elephant populations. We genetically assign origin to 28 large ivory seizures (0.5 metric tons crime, and African elephant ivory is a major part of that trade (1). An esti- mated 40,000 African

  2. Oxygen and seizure dynamics: II. Computational modeling.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yina; Ullah, Ghanim; Ingram, Justin; Schiff, Steven J

    2014-07-15

    Electrophysiological recordings show intense neuronal firing during epileptic seizures leading to enhanced energy consumption. However, the relationship between oxygen metabolism and seizure patterns has not been well studied. Recent studies have developed fast and quantitative techniques to measure oxygen microdomain concentration during seizure events. In this article, we develop a biophysical model that accounts for these experimental observations. The model is an extension of the Hodgkin-Huxley formalism and includes the neuronal microenvironment dynamics of sodium, potassium, and oxygen concentrations. Our model accounts for metabolic energy consumption during and following seizure events. We can further account for the experimental observation that hypoxia can induce seizures, with seizures occurring only within a narrow range of tissue oxygen pressure. We also reproduce the interplay between excitatory and inhibitory neurons seen in experiments, accounting for the different oxygen levels observed during seizures in excitatory vs. inhibitory cell layers. Our findings offer a more comprehensive understanding of the complex interrelationship among seizures, ion dynamics, and energy metabolism. PMID:24671540

  3. Role of oxidative stress in epileptic seizures

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eun-Joo; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Chung, Yoon Hee; Kim, Won-Ki; Ko, Kwang-Ho; Bach, Jae-Hyung; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Yoneda, Yukio; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress resulting from excessive free-radical release is likely implicated in the initiation and progression of epilepsy. Therefore, antioxidant therapies aimed at reducing oxidative stress have received considerable attention in epilepsy treatment. However, much evidence suggests that oxidative stress does not always have the same pattern in all seizures models. Thus, this review provides an overview aimed at achieving a better understanding of this issue. We summarize work regarding seizure models (i.e., genetically epilepsy-prone rats, kainic acid, pilocarpine, pentylenetetrazol, and trimethyltin), oxidative stress as an etiologic factor in epileptic seizures (i.e., impairment of antioxidant systems, mitochondrial dysfunction, involvement of redox-active metals, arachidonic acid pathway activation, and aging), and antioxidant strategies for seizure treatment. Combined, this review highlights pharmacological mechanisms associated with oxidative stress in epileptic seizures and the potential for neuroprotection in epilepsy that targets oxidative stress and is supported by effective antioxidant treatment. PMID:21672578

  4. Helicopter mishap attributed to single seizure.

    PubMed

    Simon, Esan; Watts, Darron; Bohnker, Bruce K

    2008-03-01

    A case report is presented of a 36-year-old U.S. Coast Guard aviator who had a single seizure while operating a helicopter on the ground. His seizure activity produced a loss of consciousness during which he pushed the cyclic to the left anterior quadrant that resulted in a ground mishap. No risk factors were identified in an extensive neurological workup. The current guidance for handling seizures in military aviation personnel is reviewed, along with considerations for treatment. Although the military aviation selection process carefully screens applicants for seizure history and potential, occasional seizures in the aviation population remain possible. Such events may result in military aircraft mishaps despite careful risk factor surveillance, as demonstrated by this case. PMID:18419038

  5. Seizures

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & ... color on the lips, tongue, or face remains unconscious for more than a few minutes after a ...

  6. Seizures

    MedlinePLUS

    ... over and over might indicate the ongoing condition epilepsy . Some kids under 5 years old have febrile ... times. Fortunately, fainting is rarely a sign of epilepsy. Most kids recover very quickly (seconds to minutes) ...

  7. Atypical centrioles during sexual reproduction.

    PubMed

    Avidor-Reiss, Tomer; Khire, Atul; Fishman, Emily L; Jo, Kyoung H

    2015-01-01

    Centrioles are conserved, self-replicating, microtubule-based, 9-fold symmetric subcellular organelles that are essential for proper cell division and function. Most cells have two centrioles and maintaining this number of centrioles is important for animal development and physiology. However, how animals gain their first two centrioles during reproduction is only partially understood. It is well established that in most animals, the centrioles are contributed to the zygote by the sperm. However, in humans and many animals, the sperm centrioles are modified in their structure and protein composition, or they appear to be missing altogether. In these animals, the origin of the first centrioles is not clear. Here, we review various hypotheses on how centrioles are gained during reproduction and describe specialized functions of the zygotic centrioles. In particular, we discuss a new and atypical centriole found in sperm and zygote, called the proximal centriole-like structure (PCL). We also discuss another type of atypical centriole, the "zombie" centriole, which is degenerated but functional. Together, the presence of centrioles, PCL, and zombie centrioles suggests a universal mechanism of centriole inheritance among animals and new causes of infertility. Since the atypical centrioles of sperm and zygote share similar functions with typical centrioles in somatic cells, they can provide unmatched insight into centriole biology. PMID:25883936

  8. Atypical centrioles during sexual reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Avidor-Reiss, Tomer; Khire, Atul; Fishman, Emily L.; Jo, Kyoung H.

    2015-01-01

    Centrioles are conserved, self-replicating, microtubule-based, 9-fold symmetric subcellular organelles that are essential for proper cell division and function. Most cells have two centrioles and maintaining this number of centrioles is important for animal development and physiology. However, how animals gain their first two centrioles during reproduction is only partially understood. It is well established that in most animals, the centrioles are contributed to the zygote by the sperm. However, in humans and many animals, the sperm centrioles are modified in their structure and protein composition, or they appear to be missing altogether. In these animals, the origin of the first centrioles is not clear. Here, we review various hypotheses on how centrioles are gained during reproduction and describe specialized functions of the zygotic centrioles. In particular, we discuss a new and atypical centriole found in sperm and zygote, called the proximal centriole-like structure (PCL). We also discuss another type of atypical centriole, the “zombie” centriole, which is degenerated but functional. Together, the presence of centrioles, PCL, and zombie centrioles suggests a universal mechanism of centriole inheritance among animals and new causes of infertility. Since the atypical centrioles of sperm and zygote share similar functions with typical centrioles in somatic cells, they can provide unmatched insight into centriole biology. PMID:25883936

  9. Information Display System for Atypical Flight Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statler, Irving C. (Inventor); Ferryman, Thomas A. (Inventor); Amidan, Brett G. (Inventor); Whitney, Paul D. (Inventor); White, Amanda M. (Inventor); Willse, Alan R. (Inventor); Cooley, Scott K. (Inventor); Jay, Joseph Griffith (Inventor); Lawrence, Robert E. (Inventor); Mosbrucker, Chris J. (Inventor); Rosenthal, Loren J. (Inventor); Lynch, Robert E. (Inventor); Chidester, Thomas R. (Inventor); Prothero, Gary L. (Inventor); Andrei, Adi (Inventor); Romanowski, Timothy P. (Inventor); Robin, Daniel E. (Inventor); Prothero, Jason W. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and system for displaying information on one or more aircraft flights, where at least one flight is determined to have at least one atypical flight phase according to specified criteria. A flight parameter trace for an atypical phase is displayed and compared graphically with a group of traces, for the corresponding flight phase and corresponding flight parameter, for flights that do not manifest atypicality in that phase.

  10. Advances in Management of Neonatal Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Vesoulis, Zachary A.; Mathur, Amit M.

    2015-01-01

    Seizures are more common in the neonatal period than any other time in the human lifespan. A high index of suspicion for seizures should be maintained for infants who present with encephalopathy soon after birth, have had a stroke, central nervous system (CNS) infection or intracranial hemorrhage or have a genetic or metabolic condition associated with CNS malformations. Complicating the matter, most neonatal seizures lack a clinical correlate with only subtle autonomic changes and often no clinical indication at all. Over the last three decades, several tools have been developed to enhance the detection and treatment of neonatal seizures. The use of electroencephalography (EEG) and the later development of amplitude-integrated EEG (aEEG), allows for Neurologists and non-Neurologists alike, to significantly increase the sensitivity of seizure detection. When applied to the appropriate clinical setting, time to diagnosis and start of therapy is greatly reduced. Phenobarbital maintains the status of first-line therapy in worldwide use. However, newer anti-epileptic agents such as, levetiracetam, bumetanide, and topiramate are increasingly being applied to the neonatal population, offering the potential for seizure treatment with a significantly better side-effect profile. Seizures in premature infants continue to confound clinicians and researchers alike. Though the apparent seizure burden is significant and there is an association between seizures and adverse outcomes, the two are not cleanly correlated. Compounding the issue, GABA-ergic anti-epileptic drugs are not only less effective in this age group due to reversed neuronal ion gradients but may also cause harm. Selecting an appropriate treatment group remains a challenge. PMID:24796413

  11. Instantaneous frequency based newborn EEG seizure characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesbah, Mostefa; O'Toole, John M.; Colditz, Paul B.; Boashash, Boualem

    2012-12-01

    The electroencephalogram (EEG), used to noninvasively monitor brain activity, remains the most reliable tool in the diagnosis of neonatal seizures. Due to their nonstationary and multi-component nature, newborn EEG seizures are better represented in the joint time-frequency domain than in either the time domain or the frequency domain. Characterising newborn EEG seizure nonstationarities helps to better understand their time-varying nature and, therefore, allow developing efficient signal processing methods for both modelling and seizure detection and classification. In this article, we used the instantaneous frequency (IF) extracted from a time-frequency distribution to characterise newborn EEG seizures. We fitted four frequency modulated (FM) models to the extracted IFs, namely a linear FM, a piecewise-linear FM, a sinusoidal FM, and a hyperbolic FM. Using a database of 30-s EEG seizure epochs acquired from 35 newborns, we were able to show that, depending on EEG channel, the sinusoidal and piecewise-linear FM models best fitted 80-98% of seizure epochs. To further characterise the EEG seizures, we calculated the mean frequency and frequency span of the extracted IFs. We showed that in the majority of the cases (>95%), the mean frequency resides in the 0.6-3 Hz band with a frequency span of 0.2-1 Hz. In terms of the frequency of occurrence of the four seizure models, the statistical analysis showed that there is no significant difference( p = 0.332) between the two hemispheres. The results also indicate that there is no significant differences between the two hemispheres in terms of the mean frequency ( p = 0.186) and the frequency span ( p = 0.302).

  12. Developmental Milestones in Toddlers with Atypical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horovitz, Max; Matson, Johnny L.

    2011-01-01

    The attainment of developmental milestones was examined and compared in 162 infants and toddlers with developmental disabilities, including Down Syndrome (n = 26), Cerebral Palsy (n = 19), Global Developmental Delay (n = 22), Premature birth (n = 66), and Seizure Disorder (n = 29). Toddlers in the Seizures Disorder group began crawling at a…

  13. On the nature of seizure dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, William C.; Quilichini, Pascale P.; Ivanov, Anton I.

    2014-01-01

    Seizures can occur spontaneously and in a recurrent manner, which defines epilepsy; or they can be induced in a normal brain under a variety of conditions in most neuronal networks and species from flies to humans. Such universality raises the possibility that invariant properties exist that characterize seizures under different physiological and pathological conditions. Here, we analysed seizure dynamics mathematically and established a taxonomy of seizures based on first principles. For the predominant seizure class we developed a generic model called Epileptor. As an experimental model system, we used ictal-like discharges induced in vitro in mouse hippocampi. We show that only five state variables linked by integral-differential equations are sufficient to describe the onset, time course and offset of ictal-like discharges as well as their recurrence. Two state variables are responsible for generating rapid discharges (fast time scale), two for spike and wave events (intermediate time scale) and one for the control of time course, including the alternation between ‘normal’ and ictal periods (slow time scale). We propose that normal and ictal activities coexist: a separatrix acts as a barrier (or seizure threshold) between these states. Seizure onset is reached upon the collision of normal brain trajectories with the separatrix. We show theoretically and experimentally how a system can be pushed toward seizure under a wide variety of conditions. Within our experimental model, the onset and offset of ictal-like discharges are well-defined mathematical events: a saddle-node and homoclinic bifurcation, respectively. These bifurcations necessitate a baseline shift at onset and a logarithmic scaling of interspike intervals at offset. These predictions were not only confirmed in our in vitro experiments, but also for focal seizures recorded in different syndromes, brain regions and species (humans and zebrafish). Finally, we identified several possible biophysical parameters contributing to the five state variables in our model system. We show that these parameters apply to specific experimental conditions and propose that there exists a wide array of possible biophysical mechanisms for seizure genesis, while preserving central invariant properties. Epileptor and the seizure taxonomy will guide future modeling and translational research by identifying universal rules governing the initiation and termination of seizures and predicting the conditions necessary for those transitions. PMID:24919973

  14. On the nature of seizure dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jirsa, Viktor K; Stacey, William C; Quilichini, Pascale P; Ivanov, Anton I; Bernard, Christophe

    2014-08-01

    Seizures can occur spontaneously and in a recurrent manner, which defines epilepsy; or they can be induced in a normal brain under a variety of conditions in most neuronal networks and species from flies to humans. Such universality raises the possibility that invariant properties exist that characterize seizures under different physiological and pathological conditions. Here, we analysed seizure dynamics mathematically and established a taxonomy of seizures based on first principles. For the predominant seizure class we developed a generic model called Epileptor. As an experimental model system, we used ictal-like discharges induced in vitro in mouse hippocampi. We show that only five state variables linked by integral-differential equations are sufficient to describe the onset, time course and offset of ictal-like discharges as well as their recurrence. Two state variables are responsible for generating rapid discharges (fast time scale), two for spike and wave events (intermediate time scale) and one for the control of time course, including the alternation between 'normal' and ictal periods (slow time scale). We propose that normal and ictal activities coexist: a separatrix acts as a barrier (or seizure threshold) between these states. Seizure onset is reached upon the collision of normal brain trajectories with the separatrix. We show theoretically and experimentally how a system can be pushed toward seizure under a wide variety of conditions. Within our experimental model, the onset and offset of ictal-like discharges are well-defined mathematical events: a saddle-node and homoclinic bifurcation, respectively. These bifurcations necessitate a baseline shift at onset and a logarithmic scaling of interspike intervals at offset. These predictions were not only confirmed in our in vitro experiments, but also for focal seizures recorded in different syndromes, brain regions and species (humans and zebrafish). Finally, we identified several possible biophysical parameters contributing to the five state variables in our model system. We show that these parameters apply to specific experimental conditions and propose that there exists a wide array of possible biophysical mechanisms for seizure genesis, while preserving central invariant properties. Epileptor and the seizure taxonomy will guide future modeling and translational research by identifying universal rules governing the initiation and termination of seizures and predicting the conditions necessary for those transitions. PMID:24919973

  15. Biotelemetry system for Epilepsy Seizure Control

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, LaCurtise; Bohnert, George W.

    2009-07-02

    The Biotelemetry System for Epilepsy Seizure Control Project developed and tested an automated telemetry system for use in an epileptic seizure prevention device that precisely controls localized brain temperature. This project was a result of a Department of Energy (DOE) Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (GIPP) grant to the Kansas City Plant (KCP), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to partner with Flint Hills Scientific, LLC, Lawrence, KS and Biophysical Laboratory Ltd (BIOFIL), Sarov, Russia to develop a method to help control epileptic seizures.

  16. Viscum Album in the Treatment of a Girl With Refractory Childhood Absence Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    von Schoen-Angerer, Tido; Madeleyn, René; Kienle, Gunver; Kiene, Helmut; Vagedes, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Viscum album (European mistletoe) extracts have known immunomodulatory effects but little data exist on anticonvulsant activity despite its usefulness having been reported for centuries. A 4½-year-old girl with childhood absence epilepsy and global developmental delay was treated with different antiepileptic drugs and ketogenic diet but failed to become seizure free over a 2-year period. She also received different herbal remedies as part of an integrative medicine approach. Initial improvement occurred on valproate-ethosuximide, a further improvement was seen after adding clobazam to valproate. Final cessation of absence activity occurred after a dose increase of V album. She was still seizure free at the 12-month follow-up. V album appears to have been a necessary adjunct treatment for this child to become seizure free. We call on physicians to report their experiences of V album in epilepsy and suggest further study. PMID:25038133

  17. Atypical Presentation for Friedreich Ataxia in a Child.

    PubMed

    Caron, Elena; Burns, Dennis; Castro, Diana; Iannaccone, Susan T

    2015-09-01

    The classic phenotype of Friedreich ataxia is characterized by dysarthria, progressive limb and trunk ataxia, loss of reflexes, and gait disturbance with the onset of disease before the second decade. Homozygous trinucleotide repeat expansion of GAA in the FXN gene is found in 98% of patients. Two-5% of all patients have a repeat expansion on one allele and a point mutation on the other allele. Atypical phenotype is found in 25% of patients. A 10-year-old boy presented with congenital biliary atresia and progressive gait abnormality. His examination was significant for spastic gait, hyperreflexia, and sensory neuropathy. Genetic testing revealed a compound heterozygous mutation in the FXN gene. The absence of dysarthria and ataxia, retention of reflexes, absence of diabetes, and variable development of cardiomyopathy support a slow progression of disease with compound heterozygous mutation at G130V. Missense mutations are rare causes of Friedreich ataxia that can only be detected by sequencing of the FXN gene. Sequencing of the FXN gene is essential to make an early diagnosis when there is an atypical phenotype. PMID:26301374

  18. Seizures in Adults (Beyond the Basics)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... UpToDate, Inc. References Top Kwan P, Brodie MJ. Effectiveness of first antiepileptic drug. Epilepsia 2001; 42:1255. ... evidence-based analysis of antiepileptic drug efficacy and effectiveness as initial monotherapy for epileptic seizures and syndromes. ...

  19. Seizures - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePLUS

    ... XYZ List of All Topics All Seizures - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Chinese - Simplified (????) French (français) Hindi (??????) Japanese (???) Korean (???) Russian (???????) Somali (af Soomaali) Spanish (español) ...

  20. Patient-specific seizure onset detection

    E-print Network

    Shoeb, Ali Hossam, 1981-

    2003-01-01

    Approximately one percent of the world's population exhibits symptoms of epilepsy, a serious disorder of the central nervous system that predisposes those affected to experiencing recurrent seizures. The risk of injury ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Benign familial neonatal seizures

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 15 percent of people with BFNS, recurrent seizures (epilepsy) will come back later in life after the ... with BFNS have gone away. The age that epilepsy begins is variable. How common is BFNS? Benign ...

  2. Automatic Detection of Seizures with Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Dale E.; Harris, John C.; Cutchis, Protagoras N.; Cristion, John A.; Lesser, Ronald P.; Webber, W. Robert S.

    1993-01-01

    There are an estimated two million people with epilepsy in the United States. Many of these people do not respond to anti-epileptic drug therapy. Two devices can be developed to assist in the treatment of epilepsy. The first is a microcomputer-based system designed to process massive amounts of electroencephalogram (EEG) data collected during long-term monitoring of patients for the purpose of diagnosing seizures, assessing the effectiveness of medical therapy, or selecting patients for epilepsy surgery. Such a device would select and display important EEG events. Currently many such events are missed. A second device could be implanted and would detect seizures and initiate therapy. Both of these devices require a reliable seizure detection algorithm. A new algorithm is described. It is believed to represent an improvement over existing seizure detection algorithms because better signal features were selected and better standardization methods were used.

  3. Refractory absence epilepsy and glut1 deficiency syndrome: a new case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Ragona, Francesca; Matricardi, Sara; Castellotti, Barbara; Patrini, Mara; Freri, Elena; Binelli, Simona; Granata, Tiziana

    2014-10-01

    We report a 12-year-old female patient with a mild phenotype of glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (Glut1D). The clinical picture was characterized by refractory absence epilepsy, migraine, and learning disabilities. Absence seizures appeared at the age of 4 years, and electroencephalogram (EEG) showed irregular discharges of diffuse epileptic abnormalities. During the follow-up, seizures became drug resistant, cognitive evaluation revealed learning difficulties, and the patient complained migraine episodes. The evidence of seizure worsening before meals and the drug resistance suggested a Glut1D. Molecular analysis of SLC2A1 gene showed the presence of a pathogenic de novo mutation of the gene in heterozygosity (p.Ala275Thr, c.823G?>?A). Our case and the review of literature data on patients with Glut1D and absences provide a combination of clinical and EEG keys that should prompt the genetic analysis. The Glut1D should be suspected when absence seizures are associated with at least one among: irregular ictal EEG discharges, mild mental retardation, migraine, microcephaly, drug resistance, and worsening during fasting. An early diagnosis allows to establish one of the available ketogenic regimens which could modify the natural history of this treatable condition. PMID:24892788

  4. Infantile Spasms: Little Seizures, BIG Consequences

    PubMed Central

    Shields, W Donald

    2006-01-01

    Infantile spasms is one of the “catastrophic childhood epilepsies” because of the difficulty in controlling seizures and the association with mental retardation. However, early recognition, a careful diagnostic evaluation, and proper treatment may allow some children to attain seizure control and to achieve a normal, or at least much improved, level of development. Thus, there is the opportunity to have an important impact in the lives of these unfortunate children and their families. PMID:16761063

  5. Do atypical antipsychotics cause stroke?

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Nathan; Lanctôt, Krista L

    2005-01-01

    Post hoc analyses of pooled results from 11 randomised controlled trials of risperidone and olanzapine in elderly dementia subjects revealed an increased incidence of cerebrovascular adverse events compared with placebo. Reanalysis of the risperidone trials suggests that some of the increased incidence may be accounted for by nonspecific events that were not strokes. Large observational administrative health database studies appear to confirm that risperidone and olanzapine are not associated with an increased risk of stroke in elderly patients compared with typical antipsychotics or untreated dementia patients. A larger number of subjects with vascular and mixed dementias were included in the risperidone studies compared with the olanzapine studies, which likely accounts for the increased incidence of cerebrovascular adverse events in the risperidone trials compared with the olanzapine studies. Potential mechanisms proposed to explain an association between atypical antipsychotics and cerebrovascular adverse events include thromboembolic effects, cardiovascular effects (e.g. orthostatic hypotension, arrhythmias), excessive sedation resulting in dehydration and haemoconcentration, and hyperprolactinaemia. However, there is little evidence to support these hypothesised mechanisms at present. The association between atypical antipsychotics and cerebrovascular adverse events requires further clarification. At the present time, this association is another factor that clinicians should consider when weighing the risks and benefits of treating behavioural and psychological disturbances in elderly dementia patients. PMID:15697324

  6. Atypical and Typical Antipsychotics in the Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noggle, Chad A.; Dean, Raymond S.

    2009-01-01

    The use of antipsychotic medications within the school-age population is rapidly increasing. Although typical antipsychotics may be used in rare cases, this influx is largely secondary to the availability of the atypical antipsychotics. Reduction of possible adverse effects and increased efficacy represent the primary basis for the atypical

  7. Understanding Atypical Emotions among Children with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieffe, Carolien; Terwogt, Mark Meerum; Stockmann, Lex

    2000-01-01

    Twenty-three high-functioning children with autism (ages 5-11), 42 6-year-old controls, and 43 10-year-old controls were presented with six emotion-evoking stories and were asked to explain protagonists' typical and atypical emotions. In the case of atypical emotions, the children with autism performed as well as the 10-year-old controls.…

  8. Monitor for status epilepticus seizures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Mark; Simkins, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the sensor technology and associated electronics of a monitor designed to detect the onset of a seizure disorder called status epilepticus. It is a condition that affects approximately 3-5 percent of those individuals suffering from epilepsy. This form of epilepsy does not follow the typical cycle of start-peak-end. The convulsions continue until medically interrupted and are life threatening. The mortality rate is high without prompt medical treatment at a suitable facility. The paper describes the details of a monitor design that provides an inexpensive solution to the needs of those responsible for the care of individuals afflicted with this disorder. The monitor has been designed as a cooperative research and development effort involving the United States Army Armament Research, Development, and Engineering Center's Benet Laboratories (Benet) and the Cerebral Palsy Center for the Disabled (Center), in association with the Department of Neurology at Albany Medical College (AMC). Benet has delivered a working prototype of the device for field testing, in collaboration with Albany Medical College. The Center has identified several children in need of special monitoring and has agreed to pursue commercialization of the device.

  9. Seizure Outcomes Following Use of Generic vs. Brand-Name Antiepileptic Drugs: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kesselheim, Aaron S.; Stedman, Margaret R.; Bubrick, Ellen J.; Gagne, Joshua J.; Misono, Alexander S.; Lee, Joy L.; Brookhart, M. Alan; Avorn, Jerry; Shrank, William H.

    2011-01-01

    Background The automatic substitution of bioequivalent generic for brand-name antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) has been linked by anecdotal report to loss of seizure control. Objective To evaluate studies comparing brand-name and generic AEDs and determine whether evidence exists of superiority of the brand-name version in maintaining seizure control. Data Sources English-language human studies identified in searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1984 to August 2009). Study Selection Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies comparing seizure events or seizure-related outcomes between one brand-name AED and at least one alternate version produced by a distinct manufacturer. Data Extraction We identified 16 articles (9 RCTs, 1 prospective nonrandomized trial, 6 observational studies). We assessed characteristics of the studies and, for RCTs, extracted counts for patients whose seizures were characterized as “controlled” and “uncontrolled.” Data Synthesis Seven RCTs were included in the meta-analysis. The aggregate odds ratio (n=204) was 1.0 (95% confidence interval: 0.7–1.4), indicating no difference in the odds of uncontrolled seizure for patients on generic medications compared to patients on brand-name medications. In contrast, the observational studies identified trends in drug or health services utilization that the authors attributed to changes in seizure control. Conclusions Though most RCTs were short-term evaluations, the available evidence does not suggest an association between loss of seizure control and generic substitution of at least three types of AEDs. The observational study data may be explained by factors such as undue concern from patients or physicians about the effectiveness of generic AEDs after a recent switch. In the absence of better data, physicians may want to consider more intensive monitoring of high-risk patients taking AEDs when any switch occurs. PMID:20329806

  10. Seizures and Teens: Surgery for Seizures--What's It All About?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duchowny, Michael S.; Dean, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    Nearly 1 out of 2 children and teens with seizures may need to take medications throughout their lives. At least 25% will develop a condition called refractory epilepsy--meaning that their seizures do not respond to medical therapy. For these children and teens, non-drug therapies such as brain surgery are available that may offer a chance to…

  11. Seizures and Teens: When Seizures Aren't the Only Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanner, Andres M.; Shafer, Patricia O.

    2006-01-01

    Some teenagers with epilepsy only have to deal with seizures, which can be tough enough, but for other teens, seizures are not the only problem. Parents and caregivers often report changes in their teens' abilities to think clearly, learn in school, or remain focused in class. Mood and other behavioral problems may also be seen. It is critical…

  12. A New Model to Study Sleep Deprivation-Induced Seizure

    PubMed Central

    Lucey, Brendan P.; Leahy, Averi; Rosas, Regine; Shaw, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Study Objectives: A relationship between sleep and seizures is well-described in both humans and rodent animal models; however, the mechanism underlying this relationship is unknown. Using Drosophila melanogaster mutants with seizure phenotypes, we demonstrate that seizure activity can be modified by sleep deprivation. Design: Seizure activity was evaluated in an adult bang-sensitive seizure mutant, stress sensitive B (sesB9ed4), and in an adult temperature sensitive seizure mutant seizure (seits1) under baseline and following 12 h of sleep deprivation. The long-term effect of sleep deprivation on young, immature sesB9ed4 flies was also assessed. Setting: Laboratory. Participants: Drosophila melanogaster. Interventions: Sleep deprivation. Measurements and Results: Sleep deprivation increased seizure susceptibility in adult sesB9ed4/+ and seits1 mutant flies. Sleep deprivation also increased seizure susceptibility when sesB was disrupted using RNAi. The effect of sleep deprivation on seizure activity was reduced when sesB9ed4/+ flies were given the anti-seizure drug, valproic acid. In contrast to adult flies, sleep deprivation during early fly development resulted in chronic seizure susceptibility when sesB9ed4/+ became adults. Conclusions: These findings show that Drosophila is a model organism for investigating the relationship between sleep and seizure activity. Citation: Lucey BP, Leahy A, Rosas R, Shaw PJ. A new model to study sleep deprivation-induced seizure. SLEEP 2015;38(5):777–785. PMID:25515102

  13. Atypical parasitic ischiopagus conjoined twins.

    PubMed

    Corona-Rivera, J Román; Corona-Rivera, Enrique; Franco-Topete, Ramón; Acosta-León, Jorge; Aguila-Dueñas, Virginia; Corona-Rivera, Alfredo

    2003-02-01

    Occurrence of asymmetrical or parasitic conjoined twins (CT) is rare, and currently they are classified analogically to the common unions of symmetrical CT. The authors report on an infant with a parasitic third limb attached to the left lateral aspect of the autosite trunk, in whom male gonadal tissue was found histologically. Parasite parts included complete left lower limb, hemipelvis, lumbosacral vertebral column, spinal cord, and one kidney with ureter and adrenal gland. Autosite anomalies comprised a small left diaphragmatic defect, omphalocele, exstrophy of cloaca, and lumbar meningomyelocele. The authors considered this case to be a rare atypical parasitic ischiopagus CT. The differential diagnosis of the type of twining and other entities with caudal duplications is analyzed briefly. PMID:12596123

  14. CHD2 mutations are a rare cause of generalized epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures.

    PubMed

    Trivisano, Marina; Striano, Pasquale; Sartorelli, Jacopo; Giordano, Lucio; Traverso, Monica; Accorsi, Patrizia; Cappelletti, Simona; Claps, Dianela Judith; Vigevano, Federico; Zara, Federico; Specchio, Nicola

    2015-10-01

    Chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 2 (CHD2) gene mutations have been reported in patients with myoclonic-atonic epilepsy (MAE), as well as in patients with Lennox-Gastaut, Dravet, and Jeavons syndromes and other epileptic encephalopathies featuring generalized epilepsy and intellectual disability. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of CHD2 mutations in a series of patients with MAE. Twenty patients affected by MAE were included in the study. We analyzed antecedents, age at onset, seizure semiology and frequency, EEG, treatment, and neuropsychological outcome. We sequenced the CHD2 gene with Sanger technology. We identified a CHD2 frameshift mutation in one patient (c.4256del19). He was a 17-year-old boy with no familial history for epilepsy and normal development before epilepsy onset. Epilepsy onset was at 3years and 5months: he presented with myoclonic-atonic seizures, head drops, myoclonic jerks, and absences. Interictal EEGs revealed slow background activity associated with generalized epileptiform abnormalities and photoparoxysmal response. His seizures were highly responsive to valproic acid, and an attempt to withdraw it led to seizure recurrence. Neuropsychological evaluation revealed moderate intellectual disability. Chromodomain-helicase-DNA-binding protein 2 is not the major gene associated with MAE. Conversely, CHD2 could be responsible for a proper phenotype characterized by infantile-onset generalized epilepsy, intellectual disability, and photosensitivity, which might overlap with MAE, Lennox-Gastaut, Dravet, and Jeavons syndromes. PMID:26262932

  15. Dictator Perpetuus: Julius Caesar--did he have seizures? If so, what was the etiology?

    PubMed

    Hughes, John R

    2004-10-01

    The "Dictator Perpetuus" of the Roman Empire, the great Julius Caesar, was not the one for whom the well-known cesarean operation was named; instead, this term is derived from a Latin word meaning "to cut." Caesar likely had epilepsy on the basis of four attacks that were probably complex partial seizures: (1) while listening to an oration by Cicero, (2) in the Senate while being offered the Emperor's Crown, and in military campaigns, (3) near Thapsus (North Africa) and (4) Corduba (Spain). Also, it is possible that he had absence attacks as a child and as a teenager. His son, Caesarion, by Queen Cleopatra, likely had seizures as a child, but the evidence is only suggestive. His great-great-great grandnephews Caligula and Britannicus also had seizures. The etiology of these seizures in this Julio-Claudian family was most likely through inheritance, with the possibility of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) in his great grandfather and also his father. Our best evidence comes from the ancient sources of Suetonius, Plutarch, Pliny, and Appianus. PMID:15380131

  16. Prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation and subsequent development of seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, K.; Yoshimaru, H.; Otake, M.; Annegers, J.F.; Schull, W.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Seizures are a frequent sequela of impaired brain development and can be expected to affect more children with radiation-related brain damage than children without such damage. This report deals with the incidence and type of seizures among survivors prenatally exposed to the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and their association with specific stages of prenatal development at the time of irradiation. Fetal radiation dose was assumed to be equal to the dose to the maternal uterus. Seizures here include all references in the clinical record to seizure, epilepsy, or convulsion. Histories of seizures were obtained at biennial routine clinical examinations starting at about the age of 2 years. These clinical records were used to classify seizures as febrile or unprovoked (without precipitating cause). No seizures were ascertained among subjects exposed 0-7 weeks after fertilization at doses higher than 0.10 Gy. The incidence of seizures was highest with irradiation at the eighth through the 15th week after fertilization among subjects with doses exceeding 0.10 Gy and was linearly related to the level of fetal exposure. This obtains for all seizures without regard to the presence of fever or precipitating causes, and for unprovoked seizures. When the 22 cases of severe mental retardation were excluded, the increase in seizures was only suggestively significant and only for unprovoked seizures. After exposure at later stages of development, there was no increase in recorded seizures.

  17. Febrile Seizures and Febrile Seizure Syndromes: An Updated Overview of Old and Current Knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Khair, Abdulhafeez M.; Elmagrabi, Dalal

    2015-01-01

    Febrile seizures are the most common paroxysmal episode during childhood, affecting up to one in 10 children. They are a major cause of emergency facility visits and a source of family distress and anxiety. Their etiology and pathophysiological pathways are being understood better over time; however, there is still more to learn. Genetic predisposition is thought to be a major contributor. Febrile seizures have been historically classified as benign; however, many emerging febrile seizure syndromes behave differently. The way in which human knowledge has evolved over the years in regard to febrile seizures has not been dealt with in depth in the current literature, up to our current knowledge. This review serves as a documentary of how scientists have explored febrile seizures, elaborating on the journey of knowledge as far as etiology, clinical features, approach, and treatment strategies are concerned. Although this review cannot cover all clinical aspects related to febrile seizures at the textbook level, we believe it can function as a quick summary of the past and current sources of knowledge for all varieties of febrile seizure types and syndromes. PMID:26697219

  18. [Panic attacks simulated by occipital lobe seizures].

    PubMed

    Stolle, Martin; Sieben, Claudia; Püst, Burkhard

    2009-05-01

    Eleven-year-old Stephanie was admitted to a child and adolescent psychiatry day hospital with symptoms of an anxiety and panic disorder, and compulsive and self-harmful behavior. The patient described detailed threatening scenic sequences that caused her to feel panicky. They symptoms could be classified as epilepsy with visually dominated seizures of the occipital lobe. In addition to pharmacological treatment with oxcabazepine, extensive multimodal interventions as part of the child and adolescent psychiatric day hospital treatment program helped all family members to understand and handle the seizures. Eight weeks after initiation of treatment, Stephanie was seizure-free. Complex partial epilepsy can be mistaken for primary child-psychiatric disorder. PMID:19415605

  19. Continuous assessment of epileptic seizures with wrist-worn biosensors

    E-print Network

    Poh, Ming-Zher

    2011-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder characterized predominantly by an enduring predisposition to generate epileptic seizures. The apprehension about injury, or even death, resulting from a seizure often overshadows the ...

  20. Ictal asystole mimicking seizure deterioration in temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Guldiken, Baburhan; Hartl, Elisabeth; Rémi, Jan; Noachtar, Soheyl

    2015-09-01

    We report on a patient with temporal lobe epilepsy, secondary to a left lateral temporal cavernoma, in whom the change in seizure semiology suggested recurrence of secondary generalized seizures. Anticonvulsive medication previously controlled secondary generalized seizures over a period of years but focal seizures continued at a lower rate. Continuous video-EEG monitoring revealed ictal asystole associated with myoclonic syncope and falls during focal seizures arising from the left temporal lobe. After implantation of a cardiac pacemaker, no more falls occurred during the focal seizures. In conclusion, recurrence of seizure-associated falls is typically attributed to recurrence of secondary generalized seizures, however, ictal asystole should be considered in selected epilepsy patients as a differential diagnosis of falls. [Published with video sequence]. PMID:26235365

  1. Seizure-like activity leads to the release of BAD from 14-3-3 protein and cell death in hippocampal neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Meller, R; Schindler, C K; Chu, X P; Xiong, Z G; Cameron, J A; Simon, R P; Henshall, D C

    2003-05-01

    Seizure-induced neuronal death may involve engagement of the BCL-2 family of apoptosis-regulating proteins. In the present study we examined the activation of proapoptotic BAD in cultured hippocampal neurons following seizures induced by removal of chronic glutamatergic transmission blockade. Kynurenic acid withdrawal elicited an increase in seizure-like electrical activity, which was inhibited by blockers of AMPA (CNQX) and NMDA (MK801 and AP5) receptor function. However, only NMDA receptor antagonists inhibited calcium entry as assessed by fura-2, and cell death of hippocampal neurons. Seizures increased proteolysis of caspase-3 and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) of cells. Seizure-like activity induced dephosphorylation of BAD and the disruption of its constitutive interaction with 14-3-3 proteins. In turn, BAD dimerized with antiapoptotic BCL-Xl after seizures. However, the absence of neuroprotective effects of pathway intervention suggests that BAD may perform a reinforcement rather than instigator role in cell death following seizures in vitro. PMID:12728252

  2. Altered Intrathalamic GABAA Neurotransmission in a Mouse Model of a Human Genetic Absence Epilepsy Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chengwen; Ding, Li; Deel, M. Elizabeth; Ferrick, Elizabeth A.; Emeson, Ronald B.; Gallagher, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that heterozygous deletion of Gabra1, the mouse homolog of the human absence epilepsy gene that encodes the GABAA receptor (GABAAR) ?1 subunit, causes absence seizures. We showed that cortex partially compensates for this deletion by increasing the cell surface expression of residual ?1 subunit and by increasing ?3 subunit expression. Absence seizures also involve two thalamic nuclei: the ventrobasal (VB) nucleus, which expresses only the ?1 and ?4 subtypes of GABAAR ? subunits, and the reticular (nRT) nucleus, which expresses only the ?3 subunit subtype. Here, we found that, unlike cortex, VB exhibited significantly reduced total and synaptic ?1 subunit expression. In addition, heterozygous ?1 subunit deletion substantially reduced miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current (mIPSC) peak amplitudes and frequency in VB. However, there was no change in expression of the extrasynaptic ?4 or ? subunits in VB and, unlike other models of absence epilepsy, no change in tonic GABAAR currents. Although heterozygous ?1 subunit knockout increased ?3 subunit expression in medial thalamic nuclei, it did not alter ?3 subunit expression in nRT. However, it did enlarge the presynaptic vesicular inhibitory amino acid transporter puncta and lengthen the time constant of mIPSC decay in nRT. We conclude that increased tonic GABAA currents are not necessary for absence seizures. In addition, heterozygous loss of ?1 subunit disinhibits VB by substantially reducing phasic GABAergic currents and surprisingly, it also increases nRT inhibition by prolonging phasic currents. The increased inhibition in nRT likely represents a partial compensation that helps reduce absence seizures. PMID:25447232

  3. [Epileptic seizure-induced vertebral body fractures].

    PubMed

    Ladurner, A; Forster, T; Külling, F A

    2015-12-01

    In the literature epilepsy is described as the most common cause of generalized seizures. Vertebral body fractures are a rare complication of epileptic convulsions, occurring with an incidence of 3?%. We present the case of a 37-year-old healthy patient, who sustained contiguous fractures of the thoracic and lumbar spine during the first manifestation of epilepsy with primary localized and then secondary generalized epileptic seizures. A complication-free outcome was achieved with a combination of conservative and operative therapies. PMID:26160128

  4. Neural - glial circuits : Can Interneurons stop seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadkarni, Suhita; Jung, Peter

    2004-03-01

    Recent progress in neurobiology suggests that astrocytes - through calcium excitability - are active partners to the neurons by integrating their activity and, in turn, regulating synaptic transmission. In a similar fashion neurons and interneurons are the 'Yin and Yang' of the hippocampus. The dichotomy of excitation and inhibition between pyramidal neurons and interneurons plays a crucial role in the function of the neuronal circuit.We consider a model of a pyramidal cell in contact with one synaptic astrocytes. It has been shown that such a circuit - triggered by transient stimulation - can exhibit sustained oscillations ("seizures") for strong coupling. The question we are considering is, under what conditions synaptic inhibition can stop these seizures?

  5. Modification of seizure disorders: the interruption of behavioral chains.

    PubMed Central

    Zlutnick, S; Mayville, W J; Moffat, S

    1975-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of interruption and differential reinforcement on seizures in children. Seizures were conceptualized as the terminal link in a behavioral chain, resulting in a strategy aimed at identifying and modifying behaviors that reliably preceded the seizure climax. Seizure frequency was reduced in four of five subjects, whereas the frequency of preseizure behavior was reduced in only three subjects. Parents and school personnel were successfully used as change agents. PMID:1141076

  6. Remote effects of focal hippocampal seizures on the rat neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Englot, Dario J.; Mishra, Asht M.; Mansuripur, Peter K.; Herman, Peter; Hyder, Fahmeed; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2008-01-01

    Seizures have both local and remote effects on nervous system function. While propagated seizures are known to disrupt cerebral activity, little work has been done on remote network effects of seizures that do not propagate. Human focal temporal lobe seizures demonstrate remote changes including slow waves on electroencephalography (EEG) and decreased cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the neocortex. Ictal neocortical slow waves have been interpreted as seizure propagation, however we hypothesize that they reflect a depressed cortical state resembling sleep or coma. To investigate this hypothesis, we performed multi-modal studies of partial and secondarily-generalized limbic seizures in rats. Video/EEG monitoring of spontaneous seizures revealed slow waves in the frontal cortex during behaviorally mild partial seizures, contrasted with fast poly-spike activity during convulsive generalized seizures. Seizures induced by hippocampal stimulation produced a similar pattern, and were used to perform functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) weighted for blood oxygenation (BOLD) and blood volume (CBV), demonstrating increased signals in hippocampus, thalamus and septum, but decreases in orbitofrontal, cingulate, and retrosplenial cortex during partial seizures; and increases in all these regions during propagated seizures. Combining these results with neuronal recordings and CBF measurements, we related neocortical slow waves to reduced neuronal activity and cerebral metabolism during partial seizures, but found increased neuronal activity and metabolism during propagated seizures. These findings suggest that ictal neocortical slow waves represent an altered cortical state of depressed function, not propagated seizure activity. This remote effect of partial seizures may cause impaired cerebral functions, including loss of consciousness. PMID:18768701

  7. Interventional trials in atypical parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Eschlböck, S; Krismer, F; Wenning, G K

    2016-01-01

    Atypical parkinson disorders (APD) are rapidly progressive neurodegenerative diseases with a variable clinical presentation that may even mimic Parkinson's disease. Multiple system atrophy (MSA), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and corticobasal degeneration (CBD) are commonly summarized under this umbrella term. Significant developments in research have expanded knowledge and have broadened available symptomatic treatments, particularly for the treatment of neurogenic orthostatic hypotension. Nonetheless, symptomatic support still remains limited in all of these disorders. Currently, there exists no effective treatment to delay disease progression and disease-modifying trials have failed to provide coherent and convincing results. Recent trials of rasagiline (in MSA), rifampicin (in MSA), tideglusib (in PSP) and davunetide (in PSP) reported negative results. Nevertheless, large cohorts of patients were recruited for interventional studies in the last few years which improved our understanding of trial methodology in APDs immensely. In addition, remarkable progress in basic research has been reported recently and will provide a solid foundation for future therapeutic trials. In this review, we will summarize published randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials (RCTs) in APDs. Additionally, the design of ongoing and unpublished interventions will be presented. PMID:26421389

  8. 28 CFR 0.86 - Seizure of gambling devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 2012-07-01 false Seizure of gambling devices. 0.86 Section 0.86...Investigation § 0.86 Seizure of gambling devices. The Director, Associate...the Attorney General to make seizures of gambling devices (18 U.S.C....

  9. 28 CFR 0.86 - Seizure of gambling devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 2014-07-01 false Seizure of gambling devices. 0.86 Section 0.86...Investigation § 0.86 Seizure of gambling devices. The Director, Associate...the Attorney General to make seizures of gambling devices (18 U.S.C....

  10. 28 CFR 0.86 - Seizure of gambling devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 2010-07-01 false Seizure of gambling devices. 0.86 Section 0.86...Investigation § 0.86 Seizure of gambling devices. The Director, Associate...the Attorney General to make seizures of gambling devices (18 U.S.C....

  11. 28 CFR 0.86 - Seizure of gambling devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 2013-07-01 false Seizure of gambling devices. 0.86 Section 0.86...Investigation § 0.86 Seizure of gambling devices. The Director, Associate...the Attorney General to make seizures of gambling devices (18 U.S.C....

  12. 28 CFR 0.86 - Seizure of gambling devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 2011-07-01 false Seizure of gambling devices. 0.86 Section 0.86...Investigation § 0.86 Seizure of gambling devices. The Director, Associate...the Attorney General to make seizures of gambling devices (18 U.S.C....

  13. 8 CFR 1280.21 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 1280.21 Section 1280... REGULATIONS IMPOSITION AND COLLECTION OF FINES § 1280.21 Seizure of aircraft. Seizure of an aircraft under the authority of section 239 of the Act and § 1280.2 will not be made if such aircraft is damaged to an...

  14. 8 CFR 1280.21 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 1280.21 Section 1280... REGULATIONS IMPOSITION AND COLLECTION OF FINES § 1280.21 Seizure of aircraft. Link to an amendment published at 76 FR 74630, December 1, 2011. Seizure of an aircraft under the authority of section 239 of...

  15. 8 CFR 1280.21 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 1280.21 Section 1280... REGULATIONS IMPOSITION AND COLLECTION OF FINES § 1280.21 Seizure of aircraft. Seizure of an aircraft under the authority of section 239 of the Act and § 1280.2 will not be made if such aircraft is damaged to an...

  16. Rapidly Learned Identification of Epileptic Seizures from Sonified EEG

    PubMed Central

    Loui, Psyche; Koplin-Green, Matan; Frick, Mark; Massone, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Sonification refers to a process by which data are converted into sound, providing an auditory alternative to visual display. Currently, the prevalent method for diagnosing seizures in epilepsy is by visually reading a patient’s electroencephalogram (EEG). However, sonification of the EEG data provides certain advantages due to the nature of human auditory perception. We hypothesized that human listeners will be able to identify seizures from EEGs using the auditory modality alone, and that accuracy of seizure identification will increase after a short training session. Here, we describe an algorithm that we have used to sonify EEGs of both seizure and non-seizure activity, followed by a training study in which subjects listened to short clips of sonified EEGs and determined whether each clip was of seizure or normal activity, both before and after a short training session. Results show that before training subjects performed at chance level in differentiating seizures from non-seizures, but there was a significant improvement of accuracy after the training session. After training, subjects successfully distinguished seizures from non-seizures using the auditory modality alone. Further analyses using signal detection theory demonstrated improvement in sensitivity and reduction in response bias as a result of training. This study demonstrates the potential of sonified EEGs to be used for the detection of seizures. Future studies will attempt to increase accuracy using novel training and sonification modifications, with the goals of managing, predicting, and ultimately controlling seizures using sonification as a possible biofeedback-based intervention for epilepsy. PMID:25352802

  17. 19 CFR 162.92 - Notice of seizure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Notice of seizure. 162.92 Section 162.92 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act § 162.92 Notice of seizure....

  18. 19 CFR 162.92 - Notice of seizure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Notice of seizure. 162.92 Section 162.92 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act § 162.92 Notice of seizure....

  19. Automatic Seizure Detection in Rats Using Laplacian EEG and Verification with Human Seizure Signals

    PubMed Central

    Feltane, Amal; Boudreaux-Bartels, G. Faye; Besio, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Automated detection of seizures is still a challenging problem. This study presents an approach to detect seizure segments in Laplacian electroencephalography (tEEG) recorded from rats using the tripolar concentric ring electrode (TCRE) configuration. Three features, namely, median absolute deviation, approximate entropy, and maximum singular value were calculated and used as inputs into two different classifiers: support vector machines and adaptive boosting. The relative performance of the extracted features on TCRE tEEG was examined. Results are obtained with an overall accuracy between 84.81 and 96.51%. In addition to using TCRE tEEG data, the seizure detection algorithm was also applied to the recorded EEG signals from Andrzejak et al. database to show the efficiency of the proposed method for seizure detection. PMID:23073989

  20. Age-dependent seizures of absence epilepsy and sleep spindles dynamics in WAG/Rij rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubov, Vadim V.; Sitnikova, Evgenia Y.; Pavlov, Alexey N.; Khramova, Marina V.; Koronovskii, Alexey A.; Hramov, Alexander E.

    2015-03-01

    In the given paper, a relation between time-frequency characteristics of sleep spindles and the age-dependent epileptic activity in WAG/Rij rats is discussed. Analysis of sleep spindles based on the continuous wavelet transform is performed for rats of different ages. It is shown that the epileptic activity affects the time-frequency intrinsic dynamics of sleep spindles.

  1. Phenotyping seizures (epilepsy)Phenotyping seizures (epilepsy) 1st ISBS Summer School1st ISBS Summer School

    E-print Network

    Kalueff, Allan V.

    Phenotyping seizures (epilepsy)Phenotyping seizures (epilepsy) 1st ISBS Summer School1st ISBS;Epilepsy · A group of CNS disorders · Associated with sudden transient seizure episodes - Abnormal motor, sensory, autonomic, and psychic activity · EEG usually normal · Different types of epilepsy - Secondary

  2. Seizure Management for School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frueh, Eileen

    2008-01-01

    As many as 325,000 school-age children, ages 5-14, have epilepsy in the U.S. Thankfully, with medication, surgery, a special diet or vagus nerve stimulation, most go to school and fully participate in school activities. Children who continue to have seizures, however, may run into problems. Many of these problems can be overcome or prevented…

  3. Seizures and Teens: Maximizing Health and Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundstrom, Diane

    2007-01-01

    As parents and caregivers, their job is to help their children become happy, healthy, and productive members of society. They try to balance the desire to protect their children with their need to become independent young adults. This can be a struggle for parents of teens with seizures, since there are so many challenges they may face. Teenagers…

  4. Cardiac arrhythmias during or after epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    van der Lende, Marije; Surges, Rainer; Sander, Josemir W; Thijs, Roland D

    2016-01-01

    Seizure-related cardiac arrhythmias are frequently reported and have been implicated as potential pathomechanisms of Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP). We attempted to identify clinical profiles associated with various (post)ictal cardiac arrhythmias. We conducted a systematic search from the first date available to July 2013 on the combination of two terms: 'cardiac arrhythmias' and 'epilepsy'. The databases searched were PubMed, Embase (OVID version), Web of Science and COCHRANE Library. We attempted to identify all case reports and case series. We identified seven distinct patterns of (post)ictal cardiac arrhythmias: ictal asystole (103 cases), postictal asystole (13 cases), ictal bradycardia (25 cases), ictal atrioventricular (AV)-conduction block (11 cases), postictal AV-conduction block (2 cases), (post)ictal atrial flutter/atrial fibrillation (14 cases) and postictal ventricular fibrillation (3 cases). Ictal asystole had a mean prevalence of 0.318% (95% CI 0.316% to 0.320%) in people with refractory epilepsy who underwent video-EEG monitoring. Ictal asystole, bradycardia and AV-conduction block were self-limiting in all but one of the cases and seen during focal dyscognitive seizures. Seizure onset was mostly temporal (91%) without consistent lateralisation. Postictal arrhythmias were mostly found following convulsive seizures and often associated with (near) SUDEP. The contrasting clinical profiles of ictal and postictal arrhythmias suggest different pathomechanisms. Postictal rather than ictal arrhythmias seem of greater importance to the pathophysiology of SUDEP. PMID:26038597

  5. Functional implications of seizure-induced neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Scharfman, Helen E

    2004-01-01

    The neurobiological doctrine governing the concept of neurogenesis has undergone a revolution in the past few years. What was once considered dubious is now well accepted: new neurons are born in the adult brain. Science fiction is quickly becoming a reality as scientists discover ways to convert skin, bone, or blood cells into neurons. In the epilepsy arena, widespread interest has developed because of the evidence that neurogenesis increases after seizures, trauma, and other insults or injuries that alter seizure susceptibility. This review discusses some of the initial studies in this field, and their often surprising functional implications. The emphasis will be on the granule cells of hippocampus, because they are perhaps more relevant to epilepsy than other areas in which neurogenesis occurs throughout life, the olfactory bulb and subventricular zone. In particular, the following questions will be addressed: 1. Do granule cells that are born in the adult brain become functional, and what are the limits of their function? Do they behave homogeneously? Results from our own laboratory have focused on cells that become established outside the normal boundaries of the granule cell layer, forming a group of "ectopic" granule cells in the hilar region. 2. Is increased neurogenesis beneficial, or might it actually exacerbate seizures? Evidence is presented that supports the hypothesis that new granule cells may not necessarily act to ameliorate seizures, and might even contribute to them. Furthermore, cognitive deficits following seizures might in part be due to new circuits that develop between new cells and the host brain. 3. How do the new cells interact with the host brain? Several changes occur in the dentate gyrus after seizures, and increased neurogenesis is only one of many. What is the interdependence of this multitude of changes, if any? 4. Is neurogenesis increased after seizures in man? Research suggests that the data from human epileptics are actually inconsistent with the studies in animal models of epilepsy, because there is little evidence of increased neurogenesis in epileptic tissue resected from intractable epileptics. Yet neurogenesis has been shown to occur in humans throughout adult life. What might be the reasons for these seemingly disparate results? PMID:15250595

  6. How do you approach seizures in the high altitude traveler?

    PubMed

    Maa, Edward H

    2011-01-01

    Counseling patients who suffer first-time or break- through seizures can be difficult, particularly when controllable external factors may be contributing to the lowering of their seizure threshold. High altitude as a potential trigger for seizures is a common question in our epilepsy clinics in Colorado, and this article reviews the existing anecdotal literature, presents our local experience with high altitude seizures (HAS), offers possible mechanisms to explain how high altitude may trigger seizures, and suggests an initial work-up and prophylactic strategies for future high altitude exposures. PMID:21452959

  7. Evidence of Absence software

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalthorp, Daniel; Huso, Manuela M. P.; Dail, David; Kenyon, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Evidence of Absence software (EoA) is a user-friendly application used for estimating bird and bat fatalities at wind farms and designing search protocols. The software is particularly useful in addressing whether the number of fatalities has exceeded a given threshold and what search parameters are needed to give assurance that thresholds were not exceeded. The software is applicable even when zero carcasses have been found in searches. Depending on the effectiveness of the searches, such an absence of evidence of mortality may or may not be strong evidence that few fatalities occurred. Under a search protocol in which carcasses are detected with nearly 100 percent certainty, finding zero carcasses would be convincing evidence that overall mortality rate was near zero. By contrast, with a less effective search protocol with low probability of detecting a carcass, finding zero carcasses does not rule out the possibility that large numbers of animals were killed but not detected in the searches. EoA uses information about the search process and scavenging rates to estimate detection probabilities to determine a maximum credible number of fatalities, even when zero or few carcasses are observed.

  8. Recurrent and atypical posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in a child with hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Komur, Mustafa; Delibas, Ali; Arslankoylu, Ali Ertug; Okuyaz, Cetin; Kara, Engin

    2012-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinical and radiologic entity with typical symptoms including headache, seizures, visual disturbance, altered mental status, vomiting, nausea and focal neurologic signs. In this article, we report recurrent and atypical PRES in a child with hypertension due to end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who was on a peritoneal dialysis program for 6 months. After the second hypertension attack, PRES findings did not recover and persisted as encephalomalacia. As far as we know, this case is the first child with ESRD who developed encephalomalacia after recurrent episodes of PRES. When a patient with a history of PRES presented with new clinical and neuroradiological findings, recurrent PRES should be considered. PMID:22919196

  9. Lichen sclerosus: a potpourri of misdiagnosed cases based on atypical clinical presentations

    PubMed Central

    Ventolini, Gary; Patel, Ravi; Vasquez, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objective Lichen sclerosus (LS) is a chronic progressive inflammatory autoimmune-induced disease that primarily affects the epidermis and dermis of the external genital-anal region. Intense and recalcitrant pruritus is the hallmark of LS. Physical exam reveals thinning, hyperkeratosis, and parchment-like appearance. However, the classic symptom and signs of LS may not always be present and patients may be asymptomatic for pruritus. Hence, we describe 15 misdiagnosed cases with atypical clinical presentations. We believe that the absence of pruritus contributed to their initial misdiagnosis. The purpose of this paper is to increase awareness of atypical presentations of LS. Methods Data base review of de-identified clinical case pictures was performed. All patients had histopathology-confirmed diagnoses of LS. The data base file contains 800 cases of vulvovaginal disorders. The Institutional Review Board (IRB) considered that searching a de-identified data base of pictures did not require IRB approval. Results We identified 15 different atypical clinical cases. Patient ages were 18–75 years old. These patients were asymptomatic for pruritus and were misdiagnosed before they presented to the vulvovaginal specialized clinic. Conclusion Fifteen patients asymptomatic for pruritus with histopathology-confirmed diagnosis of LS were identified. They illustrate atypical clinical presentations that LS may have. PMID:26056492

  10. The return of dissociation as absence within absence.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, Hayuta

    2014-12-01

    My aim is to translate Ferenczi's central concepts of the intrapsychic impact and imprint of early developmental trauma into both revived and contemporary conceptualizations. The concept of dissociation was renounced by Freud, yet it is returning as a cornerstone of recent trauma theories. Ferenczi used the concept of "repression," but used it in the sense of an intrapsychic imprint of early external trauma that fragments consciousness, that is, as dissociation. Furthermore, early trauma is double: an absence of protection that threatens existence of the self, combined with an absence of attachment and of recognition of this threat and terror; thus it is an absence-within-absence. This contemporary conceptualization entails a widening of the intrapsychic realm to include an intersubjective one, and regards dissociation as a unique and complex intrapsychic absence, which is a negative of the external absence-within-absence in the early environment. PMID:25434884

  11. Pediatric Melanoma and Atypical Melanocytic Neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Sreeraman Kumar, Radhika; Messina, Jane L; Reed, Damon; Navid, Fariba; Sondak, Vernon K

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is uncommon in the pediatric age range, but is increasing in frequency and often presents with atypical features compared to the classic ABCDE criteria common to adult melanoma cases. Moreover, many melanocytic neoplasms in childhood pose diagnostic challenges to the pathologist, and sometimes cannot be unequivocally classified as benign nevi or melanoma. This chapter addresses the evaluation and management of pediatric patients with melanoma and atypical melanocytic neoplasms, including the roles of and unresolved questions surrounding sentinel lymph node biopsy, completion lymphadenectomy, adjuvant therapy, and treatment of advanced disease. PMID:26601871

  12. Inheritance of Febrile Seizures in Sudden Unexplained Death in Toddlers

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Ingrid A.; Poduri, Annapurna; Crandall, Laura; Haas, Elisabeth; Grafe, Marjorie R.; Kinney, Hannah C.; Krous, Henry F.

    2014-01-01

    Sudden unexplained death in toddlers has been associated with febrile seizures, family history of febrile seizures, and hippocampal anomalies. We investigated the mode of inheritance for febrile seizures in these families. A three-generation pedigree was obtained from families enrolled in the San Diego Sudden Unexplained Death in Childhood Research Project, involving toddlers with sudden unexplained death, febrile seizures, and family history of febrile seizures. In our six cases, death was unwitnessed and related to sleep. The interval from last witnessed febrile seizure to death ranged from 3 weeks to 6 months. Hippocampal abnormalities were identified in one of three cases with available autopsy sections. Autosomal dominant inheritance of febrile seizures was observed in three families. A fourth demonstrated autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance or variable expressivity. In two families, the maternal and paternal sides manifested febrile seizures. In this series, the major pattern of inheritance in toddlers with sudden unexplained death and febrile seizures was autosomal dominant. Future studies should develop markers (including genetic) to identify which patients with febrile seizures are at risk for sudden unexplained death in childhood, and to provide guidance for families and physicians. PMID:22490769

  13. Epileptic seizures: Quakes of the brain?

    PubMed

    Osorio, Ivan; Frei, Mark G; Sornette, Didier; Milton, John; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2010-08-01

    A dynamical analogy supported by five scale-free statistics (the Gutenberg-Richter distribution of event sizes, the distribution of interevent intervals, the Omori and inverse Omori laws, and the conditional waiting time until the next event) is shown to exist between two classes of seizures ("focal" in humans and generalized in animals) and earthquakes. Increments in excitatory interneuronal coupling in animals expose the system's dependence on this parameter and its dynamical transmutability: moderate increases lead to power-law behavior of seizure energy and interevent times, while marked ones to scale-free (power-law) coextensive with characteristic scales and events. The coextensivity of power law and characteristic size regimes is predicted by models of coupled heterogeneous threshold oscillators of relaxation and underscores the role of coupling strength in shaping the dynamics of these systems. PMID:20866849

  14. Local cerebral metabolism during partial seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J. Jr.; Kuhl, D.E.; Phelps, M.E.; Rausch, R.; Nuwer, M.

    1983-04-01

    Interictal and ictal fluorodeoxyglucose scans were obtained with positron CT from four patients with spontaneous recurrent partial seizures, one with epilepsia partialis continua, and one with a single partial seizure induced by electrical stimulation of the hippocampus. Ictal metabolic patterns were different for each patient studied. Focal and generalized increased and decreased metabolism were observed. Ictal hypermetabolism may exceed six times the interictal rate and could represent activation of excitatory or inhibitory synapses in the epileptogenic region and its projection fields. Hypometabolism seen on ictal scans most likely reflects postictal depression and may indicate projection fields of inhibited neurons. No quantitative relationship between alterations in metabolism and EEG or behavioral measurements of ictal events could be demonstrated.

  15. Identification of a neurovascular signaling pathway regulating seizures in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fredriksson, Linda; Stevenson, Tamara K; Su, Enming J; Ragsdale, Margaret; Moore, Shannon; Craciun, Stefan; Schielke, Gerald P; Murphy, Geoffrey G; Lawrence, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    Objective A growing body of evidence suggests that increased blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability can contribute to the development of seizures. The protease tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) has been shown to promote BBB permeability and susceptibility to seizures. In this study, we examined the pathway regulated by tPA in seizures. Methods An experimental model of kainate-induced seizures was used in genetically modified mice, including mice deficient in tPA (tPA?/?), its inhibitor neuroserpin (Nsp?/?), or both (Nsp:tPA?/?), and in mice conditionally deficient in the platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFR?). Results Compared to wild-type (WT) mice, Nsp?/? mice have significantly reduced latency to seizure onset and generalization; whereas tPA?/? mice have the opposite phenotype, as do Nsp:tPA?/? mice. Furthermore, interventions that maintain BBB integrity delay seizure propagation, whereas osmotic disruption of the BBB in seizure-resistant tPA?/? mice dramatically reduces the time to seizure onset and accelerates seizure progression. The phenotypic differences in seizure progression between WT, tPA?/?, and Nsp?/? mice are also observed in electroencephalogram recordings in vivo, but absent in ex vivo electrophysiological recordings where regulation of the BBB is no longer necessary to maintain the extracellular environment. Finally, we demonstrate that these effects on seizure progression are mediated through signaling by PDGFR? on perivascular astrocytes. Interpretation Together, these data identify a specific molecular pathway involving tPA-mediated PDGFR? signaling in perivascular astrocytes that regulates seizure progression through control of the BBB. Inhibition of PDGFR? signaling and maintenance of BBB integrity might therefore offer a novel clinical approach for managing seizures. PMID:26273685

  16. Electroencephalography of Seizure-Like Movements During General Anesthesia with Propofol: Seizures or Nonepileptic Events?

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Flood, Pamela; Cornes, Susannah

    2015-12-01

    Seizure-like behavior is an uncommon yet worrisome phenomenon during anesthesia with propofol. The current case report describes a 23-year-old man admitted for elective surgery who experienced several seizure-like episodes after induction with propofol and during a desflurane-based general anesthetic that were so severe it was not possible to complete the procedure. A second surgery was rescheduled 2 days later with simultaneous scalp electroencephalographic (EEG) recording and general anesthesia with propofol and fentanyl. During the second operation, he again experienced numerous episodes of generalized shaking movements. Simultaneous intraoperative EEG recording showed a background of diffuse beta and alpha frequencies interspersed with periods of pseudoperiodic delta activity; electrographic seizures were not apparent. With this information, muscle relaxants were given and the procedure was performed without difficulty. This is the first report of apparent seizure-like activity during anesthesia with propofol of an otherwise relatively healthy adult, in which concurrent EEG recording demonstrates the nonepileptic nature. The current case demonstrates that, at least in some instances, these concerning movements are not seizure related. Concurrent EEG monitoring may be helpful to evaluate the nature of the episodes in select cases. PMID:26588032

  17. Evaluation of links in heroin seizures.

    PubMed

    Dujourdy, L; Barbati, G; Taroni, F; Guéniat, O; Esseiva, P; Anglada, F; Margot, P

    2003-01-28

    The evaluation of a link between two heroin seizures using a descriptive method is presented. It is based on the measure of the angles between two chromatograms assimilated to vectors, and interpreted using a continuous approach based on the likelihood ratio of Bayes' theorem. A complete evaluation model thus avoids the drawbacks of decision thresholds used until now to establish a link. Validation is obtained through tests and simulation methods. PMID:12590057

  18. Disseminated nocardiosis masking an atypical zygomycosis presentation in a kidney transplant recipient.

    PubMed

    Colón-Santos, E; González-Ramos, M; Bertrán-Pasarell, J; Rodríguez-Vega, G; Almira-Suarez, M; Vélez-Rosario, R

    2011-08-01

    Immunosuppressive agents increase the vulnerability of solid organ transplant patients to opportunistic infections. An atypical clinical presentation of a bacterial and fungal co-infection makes diagnosis and treatment even more challenging in this population. A 54-year-old hypertensive woman underwent a cadaveric kidney transplant after years on hemodialysis. Her treatment included mycophenolate, tacrolimus, and prednisone. By post-transplant week 8, she had pneumonia followed by progressive visual changes and seizures. Diagnostic work-up, consisting of magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and chest x-ray, showed several cerebral ring-enhancing lesions, and a pulmonary cavitary lesion. Disseminated nocardiosis was suspected and therapy was started. Skin biopsy was taken from a nodular lesion and culture confirmed Nocardia species infection. During hospitalization, neurological deficit persisted with worsening of brain lesions. She underwent excision of a brain abscess and the final pathologic report showed mucormycosis, revealing the patient's co-infection by 2 different pathogens. After therapy with liposomal amphotericin B and posaconazole, she has remained stable for more than 1 year. Disseminated nocardiosis masked and delayed the diagnosis and treatment of a more aggressive and worrisome organism. Mucormycosis, as a non-fatal isolated brain abscess without rhinal involvement, is an atypical presentation, and only a few cases have been reported. PMID:21309966

  19. Seizure classification key to epilepsy management.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Louise; Derry, Chris

    2015-09-01

    The diagnosis of epilepsy carries significant implications for physical, psychosocial and financial wellbeing as well as a small but significant increased risk of mortality. The diagnosis is often incorrect, potentially in up to 20% of cases, so should be revisited if seizures are not responding to treatment. Evidence indicates that misdiagnosis is significantly more common among nonspecialists. SIGN recommends that the diagnosis of epilepsy should be made by an epilepsy specialist, ideally in the setting of a dedicated first seizure or epilepsy clinic. An incorrect diagnosis of epilepsy can be harmful. There is an exhaustive list of epilepsy mimics that can result in misdiagnosis and expose patients to unnecessary treatment with antiepileptic drugs. Diagnosis relies primarily on the history. Investigations can support the diagnosis but cannot make it in isolation, and negative investigation findings are common in epilepsy. Brain imaging will be undertaken in most patients with epilepsy, but is not routinely required in those with a definite diagnosis of genetic generalised epilepsy. The EEG has limitations and can sometimes cloud rather than clarify the diagnostic picture. Distinguishing between a genetic generalised epilepsy and a focal epilepsy is vital as this influences investigation, treatment and prognosis. Generally medication should not be started following a single seizure except in specific circumstances or in cases where the risk of recurrence is high. PMID:26591652

  20. Epileptic Seizure Detection and Warning Device

    SciTech Connect

    Elarton, J.K.; Koepsel, K.L.

    1999-06-21

    Flint Hills Scientific, L.L.C. (FHS) has invented what is believed to be the first real-time epileptic seizure detection and short-term prediction method in the world. They have demonstrated an IBM PC prototype with a multi-channel EEG monitoring configuration. This CRADA effort applied AlliedSignal FM and T hardware design, manufacturing miniaturization, and high quality manufacturing expertise in converting the prototype into a small, portable, self-contained, multi-channel EEG epileptic seizure detection and warning device. The purpose of this project was to design and build a proof-of-concept miniaturized prototype of the FHS-developed PC-based prototype. The resultant DSP prototype, measuring 4'' x 6'' x 2'', seizure detection performance compared favorably with the FHS PC prototype, thus validating the DSP design goals. The very successful completion of this project provided valuable engineering information for FHS for future prototype commercialization as well as providing AS/FM and T engineers DSP design experience.

  1. Parvalbumin deficiency affects network properties resulting in increased susceptibility to epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Schwaller, B; Tetko, I V; Tandon, P; Silveira, D C; Vreugdenhil, M; Henzi, T; Potier, M-C; Celio, M R; Villa, A E P

    2004-04-01

    Networks of GABAergic interneurons are of utmost importance in generating and promoting synchronous activity and are involved in producing coherent oscillations. These neurons are characterized by their fast-spiking rate and by the expression of the Ca(2+)-binding protein parvalbumin (PV). Alteration of their inhibitory activity has been proposed as a major mechanism leading to epileptic seizures and thus the role of PV in maintaining the stability of neuronal networks was assessed in knockout (PV-/-) mice. Pentylenetetrazole induced generalized tonic-clonic seizures in all genotypes, but the severity of seizures was significantly greater in PV-/- than in PV+/+ animals. Extracellular single-unit activity recorded from over 1000 neurons in vivo in the temporal cortex revealed an increase of units firing regularly and a decrease of cells firing in bursts. In the hippocampus, PV deficiency facilitated the GABA(A)ergic current reversal induced by high-frequency stimulation, a mechanism implied in the generation of epileptic activity. We postulate that PV plays a key role in the regulation of local inhibitory effects exerted by GABAergic interneurons on pyramidal neurons. Through an increase in inhibition, the absence of PV facilitates synchronous activity in the cortex and facilitates hypersynchrony through the depolarizing action of GABA in the hippocampus. PMID:15080894

  2. A unifying explanation of primary generalized seizures through nonlinear brain modeling and bifurcation analysis.

    PubMed

    Breakspear, M; Roberts, J A; Terry, J R; Rodrigues, S; Mahant, N; Robinson, P A

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this paper is to explain critical features of the human primary generalized epilepsies by investigating the dynamical bifurcations of a nonlinear model of the brain's mean field dynamics. The model treats the cortex as a medium for the propagation of waves of electrical activity, incorporating key physiological processes such as propagation delays, membrane physiology, and corticothalamic feedback. Previous analyses have demonstrated its descriptive validity in a wide range of healthy states and yielded specific predictions with regards to seizure phenomena. We show that mapping the structure of the nonlinear bifurcation set predicts a number of crucial dynamic processes, including the onset of periodic and chaotic dynamics as well as multistability. Quantitative study of electrophysiological data supports the validity of these predictions. Hence, we argue that the core electrophysiological and cognitive differences between tonic-clonic and absence seizures are predicted and interrelated by the global bifurcation diagram of the model's dynamics. The present study is the first to present a unifying explanation of these generalized seizures using the bifurcation analysis of a dynamical model of the brain. PMID:16280462

  3. Adding Insult to Injury: Nonconvulsive Seizures in Abusive Head Trauma.

    PubMed

    Greiner, Mary V; Greiner, Hansel M; Caré, Marguerite M; Owens, Deanna; Shapiro, Robert; Holland, Katherine

    2015-11-01

    The primary objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of nonconvulsive seizures and nonconvulsive status epilepticus in patients with abusive head trauma who underwent electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring and to describe predictive factors for this population. Children with a diagnosis of abusive head trauma were studied retrospectively to determine the rate of EEG monitoring, the rate of nonconvulsive seizures and nonconvulsive status epilepticus, and the associated neuroimaging findings. Over 11 years, 73 of 199 (36.8%) children with abusive head trauma had electroencephalography monitoring performed. Of these, 20 (27.4%) had nonconvulsive seizures and 3 (4.1%) had nonconvulsive status epilepticus. The presence of subarachnoid hemorrhage and cortical T2 / fluid-attenuated inversion recovery signal abnormalities were both significantly associated with the presence of nonconvulsive seizures / nonconvulsive status epilepticus. Nonconvulsive seizures are relatively common in abusive head trauma and may go unrecognized. Specific neuroimaging characteristics increase the likelihood of nonconvulsive seizures on EEG. PMID:25900138

  4. Drosophila sodium channel mutations: Contributions to seizure-susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Jason R; Saras, Arunesh; Tanouye, Mark A

    2015-12-01

    This paper reviews Drosophila voltage-gated Na(+) channel mutations encoded by the para (paralytic) gene and their contributions to seizure disorders in the fly. Numerous mutations cause seizure-sensitivity, for example, para(bss1), with phenotypes that resemble human intractable epilepsy in some aspects. Seizure phenotypes are also seen with human GEFS+ spectrum mutations that have been knocked into the Drosophila para gene, para(GEFS+) and para(DS) alleles. Other para mutations, para(ST76) and para(JS) act as seizure-suppressor mutations reverting seizure phenotypes in other mutants. Seizure-like phenotypes are observed from mutations and other conditions that cause a persistent Na(+) current through either changes in mRNA splicing or protein structure. PMID:26093037

  5. Observing Behavior and Atypically Restricted Stimulus Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dube, William V.; Dickson, Chata A.; Balsamo, Lyn M.; O'Donnell, Kristin Lombard; Tomanari, Gerson Y.; Farren, Kevin M.; Wheeler, Emily E.; McIlvane, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Restricted stimulus control refers to discrimination learning with atypical limitations in the range of controlling stimuli or stimulus features. In the study reported here, 4 normally capable individuals and 10 individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) performed two-sample delayed matching to sample. Sample-stimulus observing was recorded…

  6. Atypical Alpha Asymmetry in Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, T. Sigi; Smalley, Susan L.; Hanada, Grant; Macion, James; McCracken, James T.; McGough, James J.; Loo, Sandra K.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: A growing body of literature suggests atypical cerebral asymmetry and interhemispheric interaction in ADHD. A common means of assessing lateralized brain function in clinical populations has been to examine the relative proportion of EEG alpha activity (8-12 Hz) in each hemisphere (i.e., alpha asymmetry). Increased rightward alpha…

  7. Atypical hypoadrenocorticism in a Birman cat

    PubMed Central

    Hock, Colleen E.

    2011-01-01

    A 1-year-old female spayed Birman cat was presented with a history of inappropriate urination and defecation, lethargy, anorexia, and weight loss. After intermittent responses to non-specific therapy she was diagnosed with atypical hypoadrenocorticism from the results of an adrenocorticotropic hormone stimulation test. PMID:22294798

  8. Identification of atypical scrapie in Canadian sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scrapie, a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of sheep and goats, exists in most small ruminant producing countries of the world. An atypical form of this disease, originally termed Nor98, was discovered in large abattoir surveillance of clinically normal, predominantly older sheep and rarely ...

  9. Atypical Gifted Learners and Their Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diket, Read M., Ed.; Abel, Trudy, Ed.

    This collection of 12 handouts focuses on different categories of atypical gifted learners and their characteristics. The handouts are generally two pages long and present a summary of the literature on the topic, some practical teaching suggestions, and references. The handouts include: (1) "Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Gifted Students" (Pam…

  10. Atypical Neural Self-Representation in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardo, Michael V.; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Bullmore, Edward T.; Sadek, Susan A.; Pasco, Greg; Wheelwright, Sally J.; Suckling, John; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2010-01-01

    The "self" is a complex multidimensional construct deeply embedded and in many ways defined by our relations with the social world. Individuals with autism are impaired in both self-referential and other-referential social cognitive processing. Atypical neural representation of the self may be a key to understanding the nature of such impairments.…

  11. Atypical Visuomotor Performance in Children with PDD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlooz, Wim A. J. M.; Hulstijn, Wouter

    2012-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) frequently encounter difficulties in visuomotor tasks, which are possibly caused by atypical visuoperceptual processing. This was tested in children (aged 9-12 years) with pervasive developmental disorder (PDD; including PDD-NOS and Asperger syndrome), and two same-age control groups (Tourette syndrome…

  12. Cardiac tamponade: atypical presentations after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Kirti, Ravi; Karadi, Rangaprasad

    2012-01-01

    We present two cases of cardiac tamponade presenting in the aftermath of cardiac surgery. We have briefly discussed the aetiology, presentation, diagnosis and management of the condition with emphasis on its atypical presentation in postoperative patients. A high index of suspicion and early access to echocardiography is necessary for prompt recognition and treatment of this life threatening emergency. PMID:22860267

  13. Cohort study of atypical pressure ulcers development.

    PubMed

    Jaul, Efraim

    2014-12-01

    Atypical pressure ulcers (APU) are distinguished from common pressure ulcers (PU) with both unusual location and different aetiology. The occurrence and attempts to characterise APU remain unrecognised. The purpose of this cohort study was to analyse the occurrence of atypical location and the circumstances of the causation, and draw attention to the prevention and treatment by a multidisciplinary team. The cohort study spanned three and a half years totalling 174 patients. The unit incorporates two weekly combined staff meetings. One concentrates on wound assessment with treatment decisions made by the physician and nurse, and the other, a multidisciplinary team reviewing all patients and coordinating treatment. The main finding of this study identified APU occurrence rate of 21% within acquired PU over a three and a half year period. Severe spasticity constituted the largest group in this study and the most difficult to cure wounds, located in medial aspects of knees, elbows and palms. Medical devices caused the second largest occurrence of atypical wounds, located in the nape of the neck, penis and nostrils. Bony deformities were the third recognisable atypical wound group located in shoulder blades and upper spine. These three categories are definable and time observable. APU are important to be recognisable, and can be healed as well as being prevented. The prominent role of the multidisciplinary team is primary in identification, prevention and treatment. PMID:23374746

  14. Infant Perception of Atypical Speech Signals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vouloumanos, Athena; Gelfand, Hanna M.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to decode atypical and degraded speech signals as intelligible is a hallmark of speech perception. Human adults can perceive sounds as speech even when they are generated by a variety of nonhuman sources including computers and parrots. We examined how infants perceive the speech-like vocalizations of a parrot. Further, we examined how…

  15. 8 CFR 280.21 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 280.21 Section 280.21... OF FINES § 280.21 Seizure of aircraft. Seizure of an aircraft under the authority of section 239 of the Act and § 280.2 will not be made if such aircraft is damaged to an extent that its value is...

  16. 8 CFR 280.21 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 280.21 Section 280.21... OF FINES § 280.21 Seizure of aircraft. Seizure of an aircraft under the authority of section 239 of the Act and § 280.2 will not be made if such aircraft is damaged to an extent that its value is...

  17. 8 CFR 280.21 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 280.21 Section 280.21... OF FINES § 280.21 Seizure of aircraft. Seizure of an aircraft under the authority of section 239 of the Act and § 280.2 will not be made if such aircraft is damaged to an extent that its value is...

  18. 8 CFR 280.21 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 280.21 Section 280.21... OF FINES § 280.21 Seizure of aircraft. Seizure of an aircraft under the authority of section 239 of the Act and § 280.2 will not be made if such aircraft is damaged to an extent that its value is...

  19. 8 CFR 280.21 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 280.21 Section 280.21... OF FINES § 280.21 Seizure of aircraft. Seizure of an aircraft under the authority of section 239 of the Act and § 280.2 will not be made if such aircraft is damaged to an extent that its value is...

  20. Epileptic seizure prediction by non-linear methods

    DOEpatents

    Hively, L.M.; Clapp, N.E.; Day, C.S.; Lawkins, W.F.

    1999-01-12

    This research discloses methods and apparatus for automatically predicting epileptic seizures monitor and analyze brain wave (EEG or MEG) signals. Steps include: acquiring the brain wave data from the patient; digitizing the data; obtaining nonlinear measures of the data via chaotic time series analysis tools; obtaining time serial trends in the nonlinear measures; comparison of the trend to known seizure predictors; and providing notification that a seizure is forthcoming. 76 figs.

  1. Surface acoustic wave probe implant for predicting epileptic seizures

    DOEpatents

    Gopalsami, Nachappa (Naperville, IL); Kulikov, Stanislav (Sarov, RU); Osorio, Ivan (Leawood, KS); Raptis, Apostolos C. (Downers Grove, IL)

    2012-04-24

    A system and method for predicting and avoiding a seizure in a patient. The system and method includes use of an implanted surface acoustic wave probe and coupled RF antenna to monitor temperature of the patient's brain, critical changes in the temperature characteristic of a precursor to the seizure. The system can activate an implanted cooling unit which can avoid or minimize a seizure in the patient.

  2. Camphor poisoning: An unusual cause of seizure in children

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Chaitali; Sarkar, Shatanik; Dasgupta, Malay Kumar; Das, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Camphor is a pleasant-smelling cyclic ketone with propensity to cause neurologic side-effect, especially seizures. We report a case of 1½-year-old child who after inadvertent consumption of camphor, experienced an episode of generalized tonic clonic seizure. This case highlights the importance of enquiring any intake of material (medicinal or otherwise) in every patient presenting with seizure and notifying presence of typical smell, if any. PMID:25878755

  3. Epileptic seizure prediction by non-linear methods

    DOEpatents

    Hively, Lee M. (Knoxville, TN); Clapp, Ned E. (Knoxville, TN); Daw, C. Stuart (Knoxville, TN); Lawkins, William F. (Knoxville, TN)

    1999-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for automatically predicting epileptic seizures monitor and analyze brain wave (EEG or MEG) signals. Steps include: acquiring the brain wave data from the patient; digitizing the data; obtaining nonlinear measures of the data via chaotic time series analysis tools; obtaining time serial trends in the nonlinear measures; comparison of the trend to known seizure predictors; and providing notification that a seizure is forthcoming.

  4. Flares in A-type stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoci, Victoria; Gade Pedersen, May

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies show evidence of flare-like features in 32 Kepler A-type stars which were interpreted to be intrinsic, contradicting theory. Flares in late type stars are generated through the reconnection of magnetic field lines in stellar atmospheres. For magnetic fields to be sufficiently strong to emerge at the surface and form flares a dynamo is required, which is operated by a convective envelope. A-type stars only possess shallow convective envelopes of the order of 1-3% of the total stellar radius and therefore are not expected to support flaring. On the other hand X-ray flares have been observed in early B-type stars. They are produced by stellar wind activity which vanish for late B-type stars.We re-investigated the light curves of 26 flaring A-type stars setting specific criteria in order to identify these features. Our preliminary results reveal significantly fewer flare candidates than those previously detected even including more data. However, the positively detected flares follow the expected correlation between flare intensity and duration. We investigated the variations in the light curves of one of the stars in detail and found that these variations could be due to spots based on the observed vsini. Currently we are following up on those results and investigating RV data for 3-4 different epochs for the 10 brightest flaring A-type stars. The actual pixel data of the entire sample of flaring A-type stars is likewise being analyzed.

  5. Stereo-Encephalography Versus Subdural Electrodes for Seizure Localization.

    PubMed

    Podkorytova, Irina; Hoes, Kathryn; Lega, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    In today's practice, epileptologists and neurosurgeons have several options for seizure localization with intracranial electrodes during phase II evaluations. Traditionally, centers in North America have used subdural electrode grids (SDE or SDG) for intracranial seizure localization. However, improvements in technology led to the popularization of stereo-encephalography (SEEG) using depth electrodes. Epilepsy surgery centers highest in volume now offer both SDE and SEEG for seizure localization. This article provides a general guide for considering SEEG versus SDE for intracranial seizure localization based on our experience with both. Several paradigmatic cases are used illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of the different approaches. PMID:26615112

  6. Urethane anesthesia blocks the development and expression of kindled seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Cain, D.P.; Raithby, A.; Corcoran, M.E.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of anesthetic and subanesthetic doses of urethane on the development of amygdala kindled seizures and on the expression of previously kindled seizures was studied in hooded rats. An anesthetic dose of urethane almost completely eliminated evoked after discharge and completely eliminated convulsive behavior in both groups. It also eliminated the seizure response to pentylenetetrazol. Subanesthetic doses of urethane strongly attenuated the expression of previously kindled seizures. These results suggest that urethane may not be an appropriate anesthetic for the study of epileptiform phenomena.

  7. Persisting atypical and cystic forms of Borrelia burgdorferi and local inflammation in Lyme neuroborreliosis

    PubMed Central

    Miklossy, Judith; Kasas, Sandor; Zurn, Anne D; McCall, Sherman; Yu, Sheng; McGeer, Patrick L

    2008-01-01

    Background The long latent stage seen in syphilis, followed by chronic central nervous system infection and inflammation, can be explained by the persistence of atypical cystic and granular forms of Treponema pallidum. We investigated whether a similar situation may occur in Lyme neuroborreliosis. Method Atypical forms of Borrelia burgdorferi spirochetes were induced exposing cultures of Borrelia burgdorferi (strains B31 and ADB1) to such unfavorable conditions as osmotic and heat shock, and exposure to the binding agents Thioflavin S and Congo red. We also analyzed whether these forms may be induced in vitro, following infection of primary chicken and rat neurons, as well as rat and human astrocytes. We further analyzed whether atypical forms similar to those induced in vitro may also occur in vivo, in brains of three patients with Lyme neuroborreliosis. We used immunohistochemical methods to detect evidence of neuroinflammation in the form of reactive microglia and astrocytes. Results Under these conditions we observed atypical cystic, rolled and granular forms of these spirochetes. We characterized these abnormal forms by histochemical, immunohistochemical, dark field and atomic force microscopy (AFM) methods. The atypical and cystic forms found in the brains of three patients with neuropathologically confirmed Lyme neuroborreliosis were identical to those induced in vitro. We also observed nuclear fragmentation of the infected astrocytes using the TUNEL method. Abundant HLA-DR positive microglia and GFAP positive reactive astrocytes were present in the cerebral cortex. Conclusion The results indicate that atypical extra- and intracellular pleomorphic and cystic forms of Borrelia burgdorferi and local neuroinflammation occur in the brain in chronic Lyme neuroborreliosis. The persistence of these more resistant spirochete forms, and their intracellular location in neurons and glial cells, may explain the long latent stage and persistence of Borrelia infection. The results also suggest that Borrelia burgdorferi may induce cellular dysfunction and apoptosis. The detection and recognition of atypical, cystic and granular forms in infected tissues is essential for the diagnosis and the treatment as they can occur in the absence of the typical spiral Borrelia form. PMID:18817547

  8. Seizure-like activity in a juvenile Angelman syndrome mouse model is attenuated by reducing Arc expression

    PubMed Central

    Mandel-Brehm, Caleigh; Salogiannis, John; Dhamne, Sameer C.; Rotenberg, Alexander; Greenberg, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder arising from loss-of-function mutations in the maternally inherited copy of the UBE3A gene, and is characterized by an absence of speech, excessive laughter, cognitive delay, motor deficits, and seizures. Despite the fact that the symptoms of AS occur in early childhood, behavioral characterization of AS mouse models has focused primarily on adult phenotypes. In this report we describe juvenile behaviors in AS mice that are strain-independent and clinically relevant. We find that young AS mice, compared with their wild-type littermates, produce an increased number of ultrasonic vocalizations. In addition, young AS mice have defects in motor coordination, as well as abnormal brain activity that results in an enhanced seizure-like response to an audiogenic challenge. The enhanced seizure-like activity, but not the increased ultrasonic vocalizations or motor deficits, is rescued in juvenile AS mice by genetically reducing the expression level of the activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein, Arc. These findings suggest that therapeutic interventions that reduce the level of Arc expression have the potential to reverse the seizures associated with AS. In addition, the identification of aberrant behaviors in young AS mice may provide clues regarding the neural circuit defects that occur in AS and ultimately allow new approaches for treating this disorder. PMID:25848016

  9. Seizure-like activity in a juvenile Angelman syndrome mouse model is attenuated by reducing Arc expression.

    PubMed

    Mandel-Brehm, Caleigh; Salogiannis, John; Dhamne, Sameer C; Rotenberg, Alexander; Greenberg, Michael E

    2015-04-21

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder arising from loss-of-function mutations in the maternally inherited copy of the UBE3A gene, and is characterized by an absence of speech, excessive laughter, cognitive delay, motor deficits, and seizures. Despite the fact that the symptoms of AS occur in early childhood, behavioral characterization of AS mouse models has focused primarily on adult phenotypes. In this report we describe juvenile behaviors in AS mice that are strain-independent and clinically relevant. We find that young AS mice, compared with their wild-type littermates, produce an increased number of ultrasonic vocalizations. In addition, young AS mice have defects in motor coordination, as well as abnormal brain activity that results in an enhanced seizure-like response to an audiogenic challenge. The enhanced seizure-like activity, but not the increased ultrasonic vocalizations or motor deficits, is rescued in juvenile AS mice by genetically reducing the expression level of the activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein, Arc. These findings suggest that therapeutic interventions that reduce the level of Arc expression have the potential to reverse the seizures associated with AS. In addition, the identification of aberrant behaviors in young AS mice may provide clues regarding the neural circuit defects that occur in AS and ultimately allow new approaches for treating this disorder. PMID:25848016

  10. Synchronous inhibitory potentials precede seizure-like events in acute models of focal limbic seizures.

    PubMed

    Uva, Laura; Breschi, Gian Luca; Gnatkovsky, Vadym; Taverna, Stefano; de Curtis, Marco

    2015-02-18

    Interictal spikes in models of focal seizures and epilepsies are sustained by the synchronous activation of glutamatergic and GABAergic networks. The nature of population spikes associated with seizure initiation (pre-ictal spikes; PSs) is still undetermined. We analyzed the networks involved in the generation of both interictal and PSs in acute models of limbic cortex ictogenesis induced by pharmacological manipulations. Simultaneous extracellular and intracellular recordings from both principal cells and interneurons were performed in the medial entorhinal cortex of the in vitro isolated guinea pig brain during focal interictal and ictal discharges induced in the limbic network by intracortical and brief arterial infusions of either bicuculline methiodide (BMI) or 4-aminopyridine (4AP). Local application of BMI in the entorhinal cortex did not induce seizure-like events (SLEs), but did generate periodic interictal spikes sensitive to the glutamatergic non-NMDA receptor antagonist DNQX. Unlike local applications, arterial perfusion of either BMI or 4AP induced focal limbic SLEs. PSs just ahead of SLE were associated with hyperpolarizing potentials coupled with a complete blockade of firing in principal cells and burst discharges in putative interneurons. Interictal population spikes recorded from principal neurons between two SLEs correlated with a depolarizing potential. We demonstrate in two models of acute limbic SLE that PS events are different from interictal spikes and are sustained by synchronous activation of inhibitory networks. Our findings support a prominent role of synchronous network inhibition in the initiation of a focal seizure. PMID:25698742

  11. Seizure Clustering during Drug Treatment Affects Seizure Outcome and Mortality of Childhood-Onset Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sillanpaa, Matti; Schmidt, Dieter

    2008-01-01

    To provide evidence of whether seizure clustering is associated with drug resistance and increased mortality in childhood-onset epilepsy, a prospective, long-term population-based study was performed. One hundred and twenty patients who had been followed since disease onset (average age 37.0 years, SD 7.1, median 40.0, range 11-42; incident cases)…

  12. Block term decomposition for modelling epileptic seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunyadi, Borbála; Camps, Daan; Sorber, Laurent; Paesschen, Wim Van; Vos, Maarten De; Huffel, Sabine Van; Lathauwer, Lieven De

    2014-12-01

    Recordings of neural activity, such as EEG, are an inherent mixture of different ongoing brain processes as well as artefacts and are typically characterised by low signal-to-noise ratio. Moreover, EEG datasets are often inherently multidimensional, comprising information in time, along different channels, subjects, trials, etc. Additional information may be conveyed by expanding the signal into even more dimensions, e.g. incorporating spectral features applying wavelet transform. The underlying sources might show differences in each of these modes. Therefore, tensor-based blind source separation techniques which can extract the sources of interest from such multiway arrays, simultaneously exploiting the signal characteristics in all dimensions, have gained increasing interest. Canonical polyadic decomposition (CPD) has been successfully used to extract epileptic seizure activity from wavelet-transformed EEG data (Bioinformatics 23(13):i10-i18, 2007; NeuroImage 37:844-854, 2007), where each source is described by a rank-1 tensor, i.e. by the combination of one particular temporal, spectral and spatial signature. However, in certain scenarios, where the seizure pattern is nonstationary, such a trilinear signal model is insufficient. Here, we present the application of a recently introduced technique, called block term decomposition (BTD) to separate EEG tensors into rank- ( L r , L r ,1) terms, allowing to model more variability in the data than what would be possible with CPD. In a simulation study, we investigate the robustness of BTD against noise and different choices of model parameters. Furthermore, we show various real EEG recordings where BTD outperforms CPD in capturing complex seizure characteristics.

  13. Perampanel for tonic-clonic seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, Gregory L.; Wechsler, Robert T.; Wang, Xue-Feng; DiVentura, Bree; Brandt, Christian; Trinka, Eugen; O'Brien, Terence J.; Laurenza, Antonio; Patten, Anna; Bibbiani, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess efficacy and safety of adjunctive perampanel in patients with drug-resistant, primary generalized tonic-clonic (PGTC) seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). Methods: In this multicenter, double-blind study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01393743; funded by Eisai Inc.), patients 12 years or older with PGTC seizures and IGE were randomized to placebo or perampanel during a 4-week titration period (perampanel uptitrated from 2 to 8 mg/d, or highest tolerated dose) and 13-week maintenance period. The primary endpoint was percent change in PGTC seizure frequency per 28 days (titration plus maintenance vs baseline). The key secondary endpoint (primary endpoint for European Union registration) was 50% PGTC seizure responder rate (patients achieving ?50% reduction in PGTC seizure frequency; maintenance vs baseline). Treatment-emergent adverse events were monitored. Results: Of 164 randomized patients, 162 comprised the full analysis set (placebo, 81; perampanel, 81). Compared with placebo, perampanel conferred a greater median percent change in PGTC seizure frequency per 28 days (?38.4% vs ?76.5%; p < 0.0001) and greater 50% PGTC seizure responder rate (39.5% vs 64.2%; p = 0.0019). During maintenance, 12.3% of placebo-treated patients and 30.9% of perampanel-treated patients achieved PGTC seizure freedom. For the safety analysis (placebo, 82; perampanel, 81), the most frequent treatment-emergent adverse events with perampanel were dizziness (32.1%) and fatigue (14.8%). Conclusions: Adjunctive perampanel was well tolerated and improved control of drug-resistant PGTC seizures in patients with IGE. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that adjunctive perampanel reduces PGTC seizure frequency, compared with placebo, in patients with drug-resistant PGTC seizures in IGE. PMID:26296511

  14. Emotions and personality in complex partial seizures.

    PubMed

    Perini, G I

    1986-01-01

    Using the emotion profile index (EPI) and the Bear and Fedio personality inventory (PI), we investigated the influence of hemispheric localization of epileptic foci on emotions and personality in 24 patients with complex partial seizure. On the EPI, left patients showed a paranoid and depressed personality and gave a negative image of themselves, whereas right patients rated themselves in a positive way. On the PI, left and right patients showed an epileptic behavioral syndrome. Left patients were more depressed, guilt-ridden and aggressive than right patients. PMID:3823358

  15. Splenic cystic lymphangioma with atypical ultrasound findings.

    PubMed

    Roman, Andrei; Iancu, Cornel; Andreica, Vasile; Socaciu, Mihai; Anton, Ofelia; Sechel, Roxana; Badea, Radu

    2016-01-01

    Splenic lymphangiomas are rare benign tumors occurring more frequently in children. Because of their asymptomatic growth, splenic lymphangiomas are usually suspected based on incidental findings, the diagnosis relying on different imaging techniques and requiring histological confirmation. The rarity of the disease and its atypical imaging findings make the diagnosis of splenic lymphangiomas challenging. We describe the case of an isolated splenic cystic lymphangioma affecting an elderly female patient. The patient was asymptomatic and the blood tests were normal. The tumor appeared on gray-scale ultrasound as an inhomogeneous, mostly hyperechoic septated mass, which is atypical for a cystic lymphangioma. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound and contrast-enhanced computed tomography suggested the benign nature of the tumor and narrowed the diagnosis. The tumor received histopathological confirmation after splenectomy. Various CT and MRI findings in splenic lymphangiomas have been described, but very few reports regarding CEUS exist to this point. PMID:26703174

  16. Atypical Trigeminal Neuralgia Secondary to Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Niwant, Premeshwar; Motwani, Mukta; Naik, Sushil

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a disorder of the fifth cranial nerve that causes episodes of intense, stabbing, electric shock-like pain that lasts from few seconds to few minutes in the areas of the face where the branches of the nerve are distributed. More than one nerve branch can be affected by the disorder. We report an unusual case of trigeminal neuralgia affecting right side of face presenting atypical features of neuralgia and not responding to the usual course of treatment. The magnetic resonance imaging study of brain revealed a large extra-axial mass involving right cerebellopontine angle region causing moderate pressure effect on trigeminal nerve and brain stem. The aim of this case report is to show a tumor of cerebellopontine angle, presenting clinically as atypical trigeminal neuralgia. PMID:26664753

  17. Clinical aspects of atypical mycobacterial infection.

    PubMed Central

    Kahana, L. M.; Cole, F. M.; Richardson, H.

    1975-01-01

    Summary: Atypical mycobacterial infections may give rise to various clinical difficulties. Case reports of six patients--three adult patients with pulmonary lesions, two children with cervical lymphadentis and one patient in whom the atypical mycobacterium appeared to be present as a commensal--illustrate these difficulties. Determination of the significance of the organism and differentiation of condition from tuberculosis and others requires consideration of the clinical picture, the results of skin testing, histologic features and cultural characteristics. Three patients, including the two children, were treated with a combination of surgery and chemotherapy, with satisfactory results. An elderly patient with chronic bronchitis and a pulmonary infection due to M. kansasii was treated successfully with antiuberculosis agents alone. Chemotherapy is being tried on a fifth patient with cavitary disease due to M. intracellulare, but is seems likely that an operation will also be required. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:1109749

  18. ?-Spinasterol, a TRPV1 receptor antagonist, elevates the seizure threshold in three acute seizure tests in mice.

    PubMed

    Soca?a, Katarzyna; Nieoczym, Dorota; Pieróg, Mateusz; Wla?, Piotr

    2015-09-01

    ?-Spinasterol is a plant-derived compound which was reported to act as a selective antagonist for the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) receptor. Several studies revealed that the TRPV1 receptors might modulate seizure activity in animal models of seizures and epilepsy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of ?-spinasterol on the seizure threshold in three acute models of seizures, i.e., in the intravenous (i.v.) pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) seizure test, in the maximal electroshock seizure threshold (MEST) test and in the model of psychomotor seizures induced by 6 Hz stimulation in mice. Our results revealed significant anticonvulsant effect of ?-spinasterol in all the used seizure tests. In the i.v. PTZ test, statistically significant elevation was noted in case of the threshold for myoclonic twitches (doses of 0.1-1 mg/kg) and generalized clonus seizures (doses of 0.5 and 1 mg/kg) but not for tonic seizures. The studied TRPV1 antagonist also increased the threshold for tonic hindlimb extension in the MEST (doses of 0.5 and 1 mg/kg) and 6 Hz psychomotor seizure (doses of 0.1 and 0.5 mg/kg) tests in mice. Furthermore, ?-spinasterol did not produce any significant impairment of motor coordination (assessed in the chimney test) and muscular strength (investigated in the grip-strength test) and it did not provoke significant changes in body temperature in mice. Based on the results of our study and the fact that ?-spinasterol is characterized by good blood-brain permeability, we postulate further investigation of this compound to precisely evaluate mechanism of its anticonvulsant action and opportunity of its usage in clinical practice. PMID:25764210

  19. Electrically Induced Limbic Seizures: Preliminary Findings in a Rodent Model

    PubMed Central

    Kowski, Alexander B; Holtkamp, Martin

    2015-01-01

    In epilepsy, novel pharmacological and nonpharmacological treatment approaches are commonly assessed in model systems of acute motor and often generalized seizures. We developed a rodent model with short-term electrical stimulation of the perforant path resulting in stereotyped limbic seizures. Limbic structures play a major role in human intractable epilepsy. In 10 rats, single electrical 5-second and 20-Hz stimuli to the perforant path reliably produced limbic seizures characterized by resting behavior and subtle motor signs. Electrophysiological recordings from the dentate gyrus demonstrated a seizure pattern with 4-Hz to 5-Hz discharges. Multiple inductions of seizures within 72 hours did not alter behavioral and electrophysiological seizure characteristics. Electrophysiological excitatory and inhibitory parameters assessed by evoked single and paired pulses did not change with increasing number of seizures. We present preliminary findings on a new model of electrically induced limbic seizures of mesiotemporal origin. This model may represent a reliable screening tool for new treatment approaches such as deep brain stimulation. PMID:25861223

  20. Levetiracetam in the Treatment of Epileptic Seizures After Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chih-Hsiang; Chen, Chao-Long; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Chen, Nai-Ching; Tsai, Meng-Han; Chuang, Yao-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract After liver transplantation, patients may develop seizures or epilepsy due to a variety of etiologies. The ideal antiepileptic drugs for these patients are those with fewer drug interactions and less hepatic toxicity. In this study, we present patients using levetiracetam to control seizures after liver transplantation. We retrospectively enrolled patients who received levetiracetam for seizure control after liver transplantation. We analyzed the etiology of liver failure that required liver transplantation, etiology of the seizures, outcomes of seizure control, and the condition of the patient after follow-up at the outpatient department. Hematological and biochemical data before and after the use of levetiracetam were also collected. Fifteen patients who received intravenous or oral levetiracetam monotherapy for seizure control after liver transplantation were enrolled into this study. All of the patients remained seizure-free during levetiracetam treatment. Two patients died during the follow-up, and the other 13 patients were alive at the end of the study period and all were seizure-free without neurological sequelae that interfered with their daily activities. No patients experienced liver failure or rejection of the donor liver due to ineffective immunosuppressant medications. The dosage of immunosuppressants did not change before and after levetiracetam treatment, and there were no changes in hematological and biochemical data before and after treatment. Levetiracetam may be a suitable antiepileptic drug for patients who undergo liver transplantation due to fewer drug interactions and a favorable safety profile. PMID:26402799

  1. 77 FR 56093 - Consolidation of Seizure and Forfeiture Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-12

    ...Consistent with Executive Order 13563, by this rule the Department of Justice (the Department) revises, consolidates, and updates its regulations regarding the seizure, forfeiture, and remission of assets. The rule recognizes that as of 2002 the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (ATF) is now part of the Department, and consolidates the regulations governing the seizure and......

  2. 50 CFR 12.11 - Notification of seizure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Notification of seizure. 12.11 Section 12.11 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TAKING, POSSESSION, TRANSPORTATION, SALE, PURCHASE, BARTER, EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS SEIZURE AND FORFEITURE...

  3. 50 CFR 12.5 - Seizure by other agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Seizure by other agencies. 12.5 Section 12.5 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR TAKING, POSSESSION, TRANSPORTATION, SALE, PURCHASE, BARTER, EXPORTATION, AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS SEIZURE AND FORFEITURE PROCEDURES...

  4. Providing Services for Adolescents Who Live with Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millspaugh, Delight; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Discusses the work of a team of medical professionals and social workers who help New York City adolescents cope with the social and emotional aspects of major epileptic seizures. In addition to medical attempts to control seizures, support is achieved through contact with schools, parents, and vocational counselors. (HS)

  5. 14 CFR 13.17 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 13.17 Section 13.17... INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Legal Enforcement Actions § 13.17 Seizure of aircraft. (a) Under... by the Regional Administrator of the region, or by the Chief Counsel, may summarily seize an...

  6. 14 CFR 13.17 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 13.17 Section 13.17... INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Legal Enforcement Actions § 13.17 Seizure of aircraft. (a) Under... by the Regional Administrator of the region, or by the Chief Counsel, may summarily seize an...

  7. 14 CFR 13.17 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 13.17 Section 13.17... INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Legal Enforcement Actions § 13.17 Seizure of aircraft. (a) Under... by the Regional Administrator of the region, or by the Chief Counsel, may summarily seize an...

  8. 14 CFR 13.17 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 13.17 Section 13.17... INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Legal Enforcement Actions § 13.17 Seizure of aircraft. (a) Under... by the Regional Administrator of the region, or by the Chief Counsel, may summarily seize an...

  9. 14 CFR 13.17 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 13.17 Section 13.17... INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Legal Enforcement Actions § 13.17 Seizure of aircraft. (a) Under... by the Regional Administrator of the region, or by the Chief Counsel, may summarily seize an...

  10. Seizures in Fragile X Syndrome: Characteristics and Comorbid Diagnoses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry-Kravis, Elizabeth; Raspa, Melissa; Loggin-Hester, Lisa; Bishop, Ellen; Holiday, David; Bailey, Donald B., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    A national survey of caregivers of individuals with fragile X syndrome addressed characteristics of epilepsy and co-occurring conditions. Of the 1,394 individuals (1,090 males and 304 females) with the full mutation, 14% of males and 6% of females reported seizures. Seizures were more often partial, began between ages 4 and 10 years, and were…

  11. Effects of Early Seizures on Later Behavior and Epileptogenicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Gregory L.

    2004-01-01

    Both clinical and laboratory studies demonstrate that seizures early in life can result in permanent behavioral abnormalities and enhance epileptogenicity. Understanding the critical periods of vulnerability of the developing nervous system to seizure-induced changes may provide insights into parallel or divergent processes in the development of…

  12. Chronic focal seizure disorder as a manifestation of intracranial iophendylate.

    PubMed

    Pascuzzi, R M; Roos, K L; Scott, J A

    1988-01-01

    A 46-year-old woman developed focal seizures 10-15 years following iophendylate myelography. Focal epileptogenic abnormalities on electroencephalogram corresponded to the localization of residual iophendylate in the right sylvian fissure. Intracranial iophendylate may have produced chronic meningeal reaction leading to cortical irritation and a chronic seizure disorder. PMID:3131136

  13. 19 CFR 162.63 - Arrests and seizures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Arrests and seizures. 162.63 Section 162.63 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Controlled Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana §...

  14. 19 CFR 162.63 - Arrests and seizures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arrests and seizures. 162.63 Section 162.63 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Controlled Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana §...

  15. 19 CFR 162.63 - Arrests and seizures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Arrests and seizures. 162.63 Section 162.63 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Controlled Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana §...

  16. 19 CFR 162.63 - Arrests and seizures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Arrests and seizures. 162.63 Section 162.63 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Controlled Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana §...

  17. 19 CFR 162.63 - Arrests and seizures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Arrests and seizures. 162.63 Section 162.63 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Controlled Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana §...

  18. Recognition Memory Is Impaired in Children after Prolonged Febrile Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinos, Marina M.; Yoong, Michael; Patil, Shekhar; Chin, Richard F. M.; Neville, Brian G.; Scott, Rod C.; de Haan, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Children with a history of a prolonged febrile seizure show signs of acute hippocampal injury on magnetic resonance imaging. In addition, animal studies have shown that adult rats who suffered febrile seizures during development reveal memory impairments. Together, these lines of evidence suggest that memory impairments related to hippocampal…

  19. Seizures and Epilepsy and Their Relationship to Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matson, Johnny L.; Neal, Daniene

    2009-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are serious neurodevelopmental disorders which often co-occur with intellectual disabilities. A disorder which is strongly correlated with both of these disabilities are seizures and epilepsy. The purpose of this review was to provide an overview of available research on seizures and epilepsy in the ASD population…

  20. Another Tool in the Fight against Epilepsy: Seizure Response Dogs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollingsworth, Jan Carter

    2007-01-01

    Epilepsy, a chronic neurological seizure disorder, affects 2.7 million Americans, half of them children, and worldwide, it is the most common brain disorder. While there is not a cure for epilepsy, the goal of treatment is to achieve the greatest freedom from seizures that can be attained with the minimal amount of side effects. These days…

  1. Detection of early seizures by diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Hajihashemi, M. Reza; Zhou, Junli; Carney, Paul R.; Jiang, Huabei

    2015-03-01

    In epilepsy it has been challenging to detect early changes in brain activity that occurs prior to seizure onset and to map their origin and evolution for possible intervention. Besides, preclinical seizure experiments need to be conducted in awake animals with images reconstructed and displayed in real-time. We demonstrate using a rat model of generalized epilepsy that diffuse optical tomography (DOT) provides a unique functional neuroimaging modality for noninvasively and continuously tracking brain activities with high spatiotemporal resolution. We developed methods to conduct seizure experiments in fully awake rats using a subject-specific helmet and a restraining mechanism. For the first time, we detected early hemodynamic responses with heterogeneous patterns several minutes preceding the electroencephalographic seizure onset, supporting the presence of a "pre-seizure" state both in anesthetized and awake rats. Using a novel time-series analysis of scattering images, we show that the analysis of scattered diffuse light is a sensitive and reliable modality for detecting changes in neural activity associated with generalized seizure. We found widespread hemodynamic changes evolving from local regions of the bilateral cortex and thalamus to the entire brain, indicating that the onset of generalized seizures may originate locally rather than diffusely. Together, these findings suggest DOT represents a powerful tool for mapping early seizure onset and propagation pathways.

  2. Increasing Epilepsy Awareness in Schools: A Seizure Smart Schools Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brook, Heather A.; Hiltz, Cynthia M.; Kopplin, Vicki L.; Lindeke, Linda L.

    2015-01-01

    A high prevalence of epilepsy diagnoses and seizure events among students was identified at a large Midwestern school district. In partnership with the Epilepsy Foundation of Minnesota (EFMN), a quality improvement project was conducted to provide education and resources to staff caring for school children with seizures. School nurses (N = 26)…

  3. Atypical Presentation of Ewing’s Sarcoma with a Single Left Orbital Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Puglia, Marta; Acquaviva, Alessandra; Ponsiglione, Andrea; Barbuto, Luigi; Di Paolo, Nilde; De Rosa, Dario; Sicuranza, Simonetta; Maurea, Simone; Imbriaco, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background We present an uncommon case of Ewing’s sarcoma in a 16-year-old boy. Case Report This case can be considered unique because of the atypical presentation, normal laboratory tests and absence of the typical symptoms such as pain, masses or swelling, fatigue or weight loss, breathing problems linked to lung metastases or pathologic fractures. The only event that brought the patient to our attention was the sudden onset of left proptosis. Conclusions The final histopathology together with CT and PET-CT findings led to the diagnosis of a multi-metastatic Ewing’s sarcoma involving the orbit, skeleton, bone marrow and lymph nodes. PMID:26568777

  4. Cerebral hemodynamic responses to seizure in the mouse brain: simultaneous near-infrared spectroscopy-electroencephalography study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seungduk; Lee, Mina; Koh, Dalkwon; Kim, Beop-Min; Choi, Jee Hyun

    2010-05-01

    We applied near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) and electroencephalography (EEG) simultaneously on the mouse brain and investigated the hemodynamic response to epileptic episodes under pharmacologically driven seizure. ?-butyrolactone (GBL) and 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) were applied to induce absence and tonic-clonic seizures, respectively. The epileptic episodes were identified from the single-channel EEG, and the corresponding hemodynamic changes in different regions of the brain were characterized by multichannel frequency-domain NIRS. Our results are the following: (i) the oxyhemoglobin level increases in the case of GBL-treated mice but not 4-AP-treated mice compared to the predrug state; (ii) the dominant response to each absence seizure is a decrease in deoxyhemolobin; (iii) the phase shift between oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin reduces in GBL-treated mice but no 4-AP-treated mice; and (iv) the spatial correlation of hemodynamics increased significantly in 4-AP-treated mice but not in GBL-treated mice. Our results shows that spatiotemporal tracking of cerebral hemodynamics using NIRS can be successfully applied to the mouse brain in conjunction with electrophysiological recording, which will support the study of molecular, cellular, and network origin of neurovascular coupling in vivo.

  5. Visuospatial functions in atypical parkinsonian syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Bak, T H; Caine, D; Hearn, V C; Hodges, J R

    2006-01-01

    Objectives Visuospatial deficits have been occasionally reported but never systematically studied in atypical parkinsonian syndromes. The interpretation of existing studies is complicated by the possible influence of motor and frontal executive deficits. Moreover, no attempt has been made to distinguish visuoperceptual from visuospatial tasks. The aim of the present study was to assess visuoperceptual and visuospatial abilities in three atypical parkinsonian syndromes while minimising the influence of confounding variables. Methods Twenty patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA), 43 with progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and 25 with corticobasal degeneration (CBD) as well as 30 healthy age matched controls were examined with the Visual Object and Space Perception Battery (VOSP). Results Visuospatial functions were intact in MSA patients. PSP patients showed mild deficits related to general cognitive decline and the severity of oculomotor symptoms. The CBD group showed the most pronounced deficits, with spatial tasks more impaired than object based tasks. Performance on object based, but not spatial, tasks was related to general cognitive status. The extent of the visuospatial impairment could not be predicted from disease duration or severity. Conclusion Visuospatial functions are not consistently impaired in atypical parkinsonian syndromes. The degree and pattern of impairment varies across the diseases, suggesting that the observed deficits could have a different neural basis in each condition. The distinction between the object based (“ventral stream”) and the space oriented (“dorsal stream”) processing might be useful in the interpretation of visuospatial deficits in parkinsonian syndromes, especially in CBD. PMID:16543521

  6. Management of reflex anoxic seizures in children.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Anand; Appleton, Richard

    2013-09-01

    Reflex anoxic seizures (RAS) are important in the differential diagnosis of non-epileptic paroxysmal events in infants and preschool-aged children. They are classically provoked by a sudden distressing stimulus, which causes loss of consciousness followed by stiffening and brief clonic movements affecting some or all limbs, often misinterpreted as an epileptic seizure. The underlying pathophysiology is a vagal-induced brief cardiac asystole with resultant transient cerebral hypoperfusion. Parents and carers who witness the event are understandably anxious, and the mainstay of management are ensuring the appropriate timely diagnosis of RAS and excluding cardiac arrhythmia. A detailed history from a witness is all that is needed to diagnose this condition and investigations like EEG or neuroimaging should be avoided. Education and reassurance remain the mainstay in the management. Some children benefit from medical treatment with atropine or fluoxetine; however, there is a lack of evidence for pharmacological treatment. Cardiac pacing is the only definitive treatment, and is reserved for frequent, severe cases in joint consultation with the cardiologist. PMID:23814085

  7. Photosensitivity, visually sensitive seizures and epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Trenité, Dorothée G A Kasteleijn-Nolst

    2006-08-01

    Although many observations in patients with this intriguing type of epilepsy have been described and detailed studies have been performed, only a few meet the current criteria of class 1 or 2 evidence-based studies. In general, the selection bias is due to studying a referral population instead of the general population, and to different age and sex distributions of the subjects under study. Comparing the various studies is often difficult, because of differences in the populations studied (single seizures, epilepsy centre population, etc.), but also because of different methods (photic stimulator, flash frequencies, eye conditions, etc.) and the terminology used. Finally, and most crucial, in many studies there is often no information on how the data were actually obtained (EEG or clinical data or both?). The popular term "photosensitive" is used widely and applied to patients with a history of visually induced seizures, with and without a photoparoxysmal response (PPR), and to those with only a PPR. An overview of the "hard" data is given with future needs for a better understanding of this type of epilepsy and for improving the endophenotype for genetic research. It is important to standardise the studies as much as possible and describe in detail the methodology of the study, taking at least the above variables into account. PMID:16814522

  8. Seizure activity and unresponsiveness after hydroxycut ingestion.

    PubMed

    Kockler, D R; McCarthy, M W; Lawson, C L

    2001-05-01

    A 22-year-old man was hospitalized after unexplained seizure-like activity and unresponsiveness. A urine toxicology screen was negative for salicylates, acetaminophen, alcohol, and drugs of abuse. Medical history was insignificant with the exception of recent (within 2 wks) ingestion of Hydroxycut is a dietary supplement purported to be energy enhancing, muscle building, and fat burning. The agent contains ephedra alkaloids and caffeine, which are both central nervous system stimulants; the etiology of seizure was attributed to their consumption. Due to a significant number of reported adverse events, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) proposed regulations for dietary supplements containing ephedra alkaloids and requested an independent review of case reports linked to these products. Because herbal products are not subject to the same rigorous FDA regulations required for prescription and over-the-counter products, consumers unknowingly risk adverse effects when taking these products. Questioning patients about consumption of herbal products should be part of routine medical visits. PMID:11349754

  9. The piriform, perirhinal, and entorhinal cortex in seizure generation

    PubMed Central

    Vismer, Marta S.; Forcelli, Patrick A.; Skopin, Mark D.; Gale, Karen; Koubeissi, Mohamad Z.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding neural network behavior is essential to shed light on epileptogenesis and seizure propagation. The interconnectivity and plasticity of mammalian limbic and neocortical brain regions provide the substrate for the hypersynchrony and hyperexcitability associated with seizure activity. Recurrent unprovoked seizures are the hallmark of epilepsy, and limbic epilepsy is the most common type of medically-intractable focal epilepsy in adolescents and adults that necessitates surgical evaluation. In this review, we describe the role and relationships among the piriform (PIRC), perirhinal (PRC), and entorhinal cortex (ERC) in seizure-generation and epilepsy. The inherent function, anatomy, and histological composition of these cortical regions are discussed. In addition, the neurotransmitters, intrinsic and extrinsic connections, and the interaction of these regions are described. Furthermore, we provide evidence based on clinical research and animal models that suggest that these cortical regions may act as key seizure-trigger zones and, even, epileptogenesis. PMID:26074779

  10. Seizure in Pregnancy Following Cerebral Venous Sinus Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Farzi, Farnoush; Abdollahzadeh, Mehrsima; Faraji, Roya; Chavoushi, Tahereh

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Seizure involves less than 1% of pregnancies; however it is associated with increased maternal and fetal complications. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a rare, but potentially life-threatening cause of seizure during pregnancy, presenting primarily as seizure in 12% - 31.9% of cases. Pregnancy and puerperium are known as the risk factors of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Case Presentation: Here is presented a case of seizure after delivery by cesarean section in an otherwise healthy woman. The final diagnosis was cerebral venous sinus thrombosis probably due to hypercoagulable state in pregnancy. Conclusions: If seizure occurs during the peripartum period, along with providing complete cardiovascular and respiratory support, advanced diagnostic measures are needed and cerebral venous sinus thrombosis should be considered as a possible diagnosis. PMID:26161329

  11. Unilateral opercular lesion and eating-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Manyam, Siresha Chaluvadi; Kung, Doris H; Rhodes, Lisa B; Newmark, Michael E; Friedman, David E

    2010-12-01

    Eating-induced seizures are an uncommon presentation of reflex epilepsy, a condition characterized by seizures provoked by specific stimuli. Most reports have identified aetiology associated with malformations of cortical developmental, hypoxic brain injury, previous meningoencephalitis or static encephalopathy. We present a patient with eating-induced reflex seizures, which began several years after treatment for an opercular primitive neuroectodermal tumour (PNET), and who subsequently underwent in-depth clinical and video-EEG analysis for her seizures. This patient noted rapid improvement with decreased frequency of seizure activity after treatment with valproic acid. We discuss the aetiology of reflex epilepsy, the anatomical basis of eating-induced epilepsy, and review the current literature. PMID:21112825

  12. Sleep Related Hypermotor Seizures with a Right Parietal Onset.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Steve A; Figorilli, Michela; Casaceli, Giuseppe; Proserpio, Paola; Nobili, Lino

    2015-08-01

    Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (NFLE) is a syndrome characterized by the occurrence of sleep related seizures of variable complexity and duration. Hypermotor seizures (HMS) represent a classic manifestation of this syndrome, associated with a perturbation of the ventromesial frontal cortex and anterior cingulate gyrus regions. Nevertheless, in recent years, reports have showed that the seizure onset zone (SOZ) need not be of frontal origin to generate HMS. Here we report an unusual case of a patient presenting with a seven-year history of drug-resistant sleep related HMS arising from the mesial parietal region. The presence of an infrequent feeling of levitation before the HMS was key to suspecting a subtle focal cortical dysplasia in the right precuneus region. A stereo-EEG investigation confirmed the extra-frontal seizure onset of the HMS and highlighted the interrelationship between unstable sleep and seizure precipitation. PMID:25902821

  13. Assortative mixing in functional brain networks during epileptic seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bialonski, Stephan; Lehnertz, Klaus

    2013-09-01

    We investigate assortativity of functional brain networks before, during, and after one-hundred epileptic seizures with different anatomical onset locations. We construct binary functional networks from multi-channel electroencephalographic data recorded from 60 epilepsy patients; and from time-resolved estimates of the assortativity coefficient, we conclude that positive degree-degree correlations are inherent to seizure dynamics. While seizures evolve, an increasing assortativity indicates a segregation of the underlying functional network into groups of brain regions that are only sparsely interconnected, if at all. Interestingly, assortativity decreases already prior to seizure end. Together with previous observations of characteristic temporal evolutions of global statistical properties and synchronizability of epileptic brain networks, our findings may help to gain deeper insights into the complicated dynamics underlying generation, propagation, and termination of seizures.

  14. Pre-seizure state identified by diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Zhou, Junli; Jiang, Ruixin; Yang, Hao; Carney, Paul R.; Jiang, Huabei

    2014-01-01

    In epilepsy it has been challenging to detect early changes in brain activity that occurs prior to seizure onset and to map their origin and evolution for possible intervention. Here we demonstrate using a rat model of generalized epilepsy that diffuse optical tomography (DOT) provides a unique functional neuroimaging modality for noninvasively and continuously tracking such brain activities with high spatiotemporal resolution. We detected early hemodynamic responses with heterogeneous patterns, along with intracranial electroencephalogram gamma power changes, several minutes preceding the electroencephalographic seizure onset, supporting the presence of a ``pre-seizure'' state. We also observed the decoupling between local hemodynamic and neural activities. We found widespread hemodynamic changes evolving from local regions of the bilateral cortex and thalamus to the entire brain, indicating that the onset of generalized seizures may originate locally rather than diffusely. Together, these findings suggest DOT represents a powerful tool for mapping early seizure onset and propagation pathways.

  15. Policy on Leaves of Absence Policy on Leaves of Absence

    E-print Network

    Resources Management Keywords: leaves of absence; maternity leave; adoption; FMLA, military leave #12;Policy their required contributions. Life insurance and long term disability insurance may remain in effect during

  16. Increased Cortical Extracellular Adenosine Correlates with Seizure Termination

    PubMed Central

    Van Gompel, Jamie J.; Bower, Mark R.; Worrell, Gregory A.; Stead, Matt; Chang, Su-Youne; Goerss, Stephan J.; Kim, Inyong; Bennet, Kevin E.; Meyer, Fredric B.; Marsh, W. Richard; Blaha, Charles D.; Lee, Kendall H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Seizures are currently defined by their electrographic features. However, neuronal networks are intrinsically dependent upon neurotransmitters of which little is known regarding their peri-ictal dynamics. Evidence supports adenosine as having a prominent role in seizure termination, as its administration can terminate and reduce seizures in animal models. Further, microdialysis studies in humans suggest adenosine is elevated peri-ictally, but the relationship to the seizure is obscured by its temporal measurement limitations. Because electrochemical techniques can provide vastly superior temporal resolution, we test the hypothesis that extracellular adenosine concentrations rise during seizure termination in an animal model and humans using electrochemistry. Methods White farm swine (n=45) were used in an acute cortical model of epilepsy and 10 human epilepsy patients were studied during intraoperative electrocorticography (Ecog). Wireless Instantaneous Neurotransmitter Concentration Sensor (WINCS) based fast scan cyclic voltametry (FSCV) and fixed potential amperometry were obtained utilizing an adenosine specific triangular waveform or biosensors respectively. Results Simultaneous Ecog and electrochemistry demonstrated an average adenosine rise of 260% compared to baseline at 7.5 ± 16.9 seconds with amperometry (n=75 events) and 2.6 ± 11.2 seconds with FSCV (n=15 events) prior to electrographic seizure termination. In agreement with these animal data, adenosine elevation prior to seizure termination in a human patient utilizing FSCV was also seen. Significance Simultaneous Ecog and electrochemical recording supports the hypothesis that adenosine rises prior to seizure termination, suggesting that adenosine itself may be responsible for seizure termination. Future work using intraoperative WINCS based FSCV recording may help to elucidate the precise relationship between adenosine and seizure termination. PMID:24483230

  17. From seizures to epilepsy and its substrates: neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Gagandeep; Burneo, Jorge G; Sander, Josemir W

    2013-05-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is the main risk factor for late-onset seizures in many Taenia solium endemic countries and is also increasingly recognized in high income countries, where it was once thought to have been eliminated. The course and outcome of NCC-associated seizures and epilepsy are poorly understood. Substrates underlying NCC-associated seizures and epilepsy are unknown. Another unknown is if there is an association between NCC and hippocampal sclerosis (HS) and if it leads to intractable epilepsy. We review evidence regarding the structural basis of seizures and epilepsy in NCC and its association with HS. There are only a limited number of prospective studies of NCC-associated seizures and epilepsy. From these, it can be inferred that the risk of seizure recurrence is high following a first seizure, even though seizures are well-controlled with antiepileptic drugs. The single most important risk factor for ongoing or recurrent seizures is the persistence of either degenerating or residual calcified cysticercus cysts in the brain parenchyma on follow-up imaging studies. Medically intractable epilepsy requiring surgical treatment appears to be rare in people with NCC. In few cases that have been operated, gliosis around the cysticerci is the principal pathologic finding. Reports of the association between NCC and HS might be categorized into those in which the calcified cysticercus is located within the hippocampus and those in which the calcified cysticercus is located remote from the hippocampus. The former are convincing cases of medically intractable epilepsy with good seizure control following hippocampal resection. In the remaining, it is unclear whether a dual pathology relationship exists between HS and the calcified cysticercus. Carefully planned, follow-up studies incorporating high-resolution and quantitative imaging are desirable in order to clarify the outcome, the structural basis of NCC-associated epilepsy, and also its association with HS. PMID:23621876

  18. Seizure, Fit or Attack? The Use of Diagnostic Labels by Patients with Epileptic or Non-Epileptic Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plug, Leendert; Sharrack, Basil; Reuber, Markus

    2010-01-01

    We present an analysis of the use of diagnostic labels such as "seizure", "attack", "fit", and "blackout" by patients who experience seizures. While previous research on patients' preferences for diagnostic terminology has relied on questionnaires, we assess patients' own preferences and their responses to a doctor's use of different labels…

  19. Why Are Seizures Rare in Rapid Eye Movement Sleep? Review of the Frequency of Seizures in Different Sleep Stages

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Since the formal characterization of sleep stages, there have been reports that seizures may preferentially occur in certain phases of sleep. Through ascending cholinergic connections from the brainstem, rapid eye movement (REM) sleep is physiologically characterized by low voltage fast activity on the electroencephalogram, REMs, and muscle atonia. Multiple independent studies confirm that, in REM sleep, there is a strikingly low proportion of seizures (~1% or less). We review a total of 42 distinct conventional and intracranial studies in the literature which comprised a net of 1458 patients. Indexed to duration, we found that REM sleep was the most protective stage of sleep against focal seizures, generalized seizures, focal interictal discharges, and two particular epilepsy syndromes. REM sleep had an additional protective effect compared to wakefulness with an average 7.83 times fewer focal seizures, 3.25 times fewer generalized seizures, and 1.11 times fewer focal interictal discharges. In further studies REM sleep has also demonstrated utility in localizing epileptogenic foci with potential translation into postsurgical seizure freedom. Based on emerging connectivity data in sleep, we hypothesize that the influence of REM sleep on seizures is due to a desynchronized EEG pattern which reflects important connectivity differences unique to this sleep stage. PMID:23853720

  20. Acute and Chronic Effects of N-acetylcysteine on Pentylenetetrazole-induced Seizure and Neuromuscular Coordination in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zaeri, Sasan; Emamghoreishi, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    Background N-acetylcysteine (NAC) has been indicated against experimental seizures, but with relatively inconclusive results. This study was undertaken to evaluate whether NAC exerts a dose-dependent anticonvulsant effect and to determine NAC safe therapeutic dose range and its muscle-relaxant activity in both acute and chronic uses. Methods Following intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of N-acetylcysteine acutely (50-300 mg/kg) or chronically for 8 days (25-300 mg/kg), mice were injected with PTZ (90 mg/kg, i.p.) and latency times to the onset of myoclonic and clonic seizures and protection against death were recorded. Changes in body weight and mortality rate were considered as parameters for drug safety. The muscle-relaxant activity of NAC was assessed by rotarod test. Results Acute and chronic treatment with NAC delayed latency times to myoclonic and clonic seizures in a dose-dependent manner, but with no significant prevention against PTZ-induced death. Chronic administration of 300 mg/kg NAC was fully lethal while lower doses (100 and 150 mg/kg) resulted in a significant weight loss and decreased stay time on rotarod. Acute treatment with NAC had no significant effect on stay time on rotarod at all studied doses. Conclusion NAC exerts a dose-dependent anticonvulsant effect in acute and chronic uses, with no muscle relaxant activity. NAC has higher efficacy in preventing seizure in chronic than acute treatment, but its chronic use at higher doses of 75 mg/kg may be associated with side effects and/or toxicity. These findings suggest that low doses of NAC may have a potential use as a prophylactic treatment for absence seizure in human. PMID:25821291

  1. Microscale spatiotemporal dynamics during neocortical propagation of human focal seizures.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Fabien B; Eskandar, Emad N; Cosgrove, G Rees; Madsen, Joseph R; Blum, Andrew S; Potter, N Stevenson; Hochberg, Leigh R; Cash, Sydney S; Truccolo, Wilson

    2015-11-15

    Some of the most clinically consequential aspects of focal epilepsy, e.g. loss of consciousness, arise from the generalization or propagation of seizures through local and large-scale neocortical networks. Yet, the dynamics of such neocortical propagation remain poorly understood. Here, we studied the microdynamics of focal seizure propagation in neocortical patches (4×4mm) recorded via high-density microelectrode arrays (MEAs) implanted in people with pharmacologically resistant epilepsy. Our main findings are threefold: (1) a newly developed stage segmentation method, applied to local field potentials (LFPs) and multiunit activity (MUA), revealed a succession of discrete seizure stages, each lasting several seconds. These different stages showed characteristic evolutions in overall activity and spatial patterns, which were relatively consistent across seizures within each of the 5 patients studied. Interestingly, segmented seizure stages based on LFPs or MUA showed a dissociation of their spatiotemporal dynamics, likely reflecting different contributions of non-local synaptic inputs and local network activity. (2) As previously reported, some of the seizures showed a peak in MUA that happened several seconds after local seizure onset and slowly propagated across the MEA. However, other seizures had a more complex structure characterized by, for example, several MUA peaks, more consistent with the succession of discrete stages than the slow propagation of a simple wavefront of increased MUA. In both cases, nevertheless, seizures characterized by spike-wave discharges (SWDs, ~2-3Hz) eventually evolved into patterns of phase-locked MUA and LFPs. (3) Individual SWDs or gamma oscillation cycles (25-60Hz), characteristic of two different types of recorded seizures, tended to propagate with varying degrees of directionality, directions of propagation and speeds, depending on the identified seizure stage. However, no clear relationship was observed between the MUA peak onset time (in seizures where such peak onset occurred) and changes in MUA or LFP propagation patterns. Overall, our findings indicate that the recruitment of neocortical territories into ictal activity undergoes complex spatiotemporal dynamics evolving in slow discrete states, which are consistent across seizures within each patient. Furthermore, ictal states at finer spatiotemporal scales (individual SWDs or gamma oscillations) are organized by slower time scale network dynamics evolving through these discrete stages. PMID:26279211

  2. Resected Brain Tissue, Seizure Onset Zone and Quantitative EEG Measures: Towards Prediction of Post-Surgical Seizure Control

    PubMed Central

    Andrzejak, Ralph G.; Hauf, Martinus; Pollo, Claudio; Müller, Markus; Weisstanner, Christian; Wiest, Roland; Schindler, Kaspar

    2015-01-01

    Background Epilepsy surgery is a potentially curative treatment option for pharmacoresistent patients. If non-invasive methods alone do not allow to delineate the epileptogenic brain areas the surgical candidates undergo long-term monitoring with intracranial EEG. Visual EEG analysis is then used to identify the seizure onset zone for targeted resection as a standard procedure. Methods Despite of its great potential to assess the epileptogenicty of brain tissue, quantitative EEG analysis has not yet found its way into routine clinical practice. To demonstrate that quantitative EEG may yield clinically highly relevant information we retrospectively investigated how post-operative seizure control is associated with four selected EEG measures evaluated in the resected brain tissue and the seizure onset zone. Importantly, the exact spatial location of the intracranial electrodes was determined by coregistration of pre-operative MRI and post-implantation CT and coregistration with post-resection MRI was used to delineate the extent of tissue resection. Using data-driven thresholding, quantitative EEG results were separated into normally contributing and salient channels. Results In patients with favorable post-surgical seizure control a significantly larger fraction of salient channels in three of the four quantitative EEG measures was resected than in patients with unfavorable outcome in terms of seizure control (median over the whole peri-ictal recordings). The same statistics revealed no association with post-operative seizure control when EEG channels contributing to the seizure onset zone were studied. Conclusions We conclude that quantitative EEG measures provide clinically relevant and objective markers of target tissue, which may be used to optimize epilepsy surgery. The finding that differentiation between favorable and unfavorable outcome was better for the fraction of salient values in the resected brain tissue than in the seizure onset zone is consistent with growing evidence that spatially extended networks might be more relevant for seizure generation, evolution and termination than a single highly localized brain region (i.e. a “focus”) where seizures start. PMID:26513359

  3. Fifteen-minute consultation: when is a seizure not a seizure? Part 2, the older child.

    PubMed

    Babiker, Mohamed Oe; Prasad, Manish

    2015-12-01

    Paroxysmal non-epileptic events (PNEs) refer to episodic changes in behaviour, sensation or consciousness that lead to unusual movements, which may resemble epileptic seizures, but are not, due to excessive neuronal firing in the cerebral cortex. A significant proportion of patients seen in epilepsy clinics do not actually have epilepsy. Therefore, it is paramount for clinicians to be able to recognise these transient non-epileptic events in order to avoid unnecessary antiepileptic treatments and to provide appropriate management as required. These PNEs can be observed within the context of a neurological disorder such as migraine or with no direct neurological basis such as simple tics. In this review, we have described common PNEs presenting in school-age children and adolescents alongside the clinical approach to differentiate them from epileptic seizures. PNEs occurring in infancy and younger children have been covered in our first review of this series. PMID:26135356

  4. A Novel Dynamic Update Framework for Epileptic Seizure Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Minghui; Hong, Xiaojun; Han, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Epileptic seizure prediction is a difficult problem in clinical applications, and it has the potential to significantly improve the patients' daily lives whose seizures cannot be controlled by either drugs or surgery. However, most current studies of epileptic seizure prediction focus on high sensitivity and low false-positive rate only and lack the flexibility for a variety of epileptic seizures and patients' physical conditions. Therefore, a novel dynamic update framework for epileptic seizure prediction is proposed in this paper. In this framework, two basic sample pools are constructed and updated dynamically. Furthermore, the prediction model can be updated to be the most appropriate one for the prediction of seizures' arrival. Mahalanobis distance is introduced in this part to solve the problem of side information, measuring the distance between two data sets. In addition, a multichannel feature extraction method based on Hilbert-Huang transform and extreme learning machine is utilized to extract the features of a patient's preseizure state against the normal state. At last, a dynamic update epileptic seizure prediction system is built up. Simulations on Freiburg database show that the proposed system has a better performance than the one without update. The research of this paper is significantly helpful for clinical applications, especially for the exploitation of online portable devices. PMID:25050381

  5. Optimal control based seizure abatement using patient derived connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Peter N.; Thomas, Jijju; Sinha, Nishant; Dauwels, Justin; Kaiser, Marcus; Thesen, Thomas; Ruths, Justin

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder in which patients have recurrent seizures. Seizures occur in conjunction with abnormal electrical brain activity which can be recorded by the electroencephalogram (EEG). Often, this abnormal brain activity consists of high amplitude regular spike-wave oscillations as opposed to low amplitude irregular oscillations in the non-seizure state. Active brain stimulation has been proposed as a method to terminate seizures prematurely, however, a general and widely-applicable approach to optimal stimulation protocols is still lacking. In this study we use a computational model of epileptic spike-wave dynamics to evaluate the effectiveness of a pseudospectral method to simulated seizure abatement. We incorporate brain connectivity derived from magnetic resonance imaging of a subject with idiopathic generalized epilepsy. We find that the pseudospectral method can successfully generate time-varying stimuli that abate simulated seizures, even when including heterogeneous patient specific brain connectivity. The strength of the stimulus required varies in different brain areas. Our results suggest that seizure abatement, modeled as an optimal control problem and solved with the pseudospectral method, offers an attractive approach to treatment for in vivo stimulation techniques. Further, if optimal brain stimulation protocols are to be experimentally successful, then the heterogeneity of cortical connectivity should be accounted for in the development of those protocols and thus more spatially localized solutions may be preferable. PMID:26089775

  6. Stability of Synchronization Clusters and Seizurability in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Palmigiano, Agostina; Pastor, Jesús; García de Sola, Rafael; Ortega, Guillermo J.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Identification of critical areas in presurgical evaluations of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy is the most important step prior to resection. According to the “epileptic focus model”, localization of seizure onset zones is the main task to be accomplished. Nevertheless, a significant minority of epileptic patients continue to experience seizures after surgery (even when the focus is correctly located), an observation that is difficult to explain under this approach. However, if attention is shifted from a specific cortical location toward the network properties themselves, then the epileptic network model does allow us to explain unsuccessful surgical outcomes. Methods The intraoperative electrocorticography records of 20 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy were analyzed in search of interictal synchronization clusters. Synchronization was analyzed, and the stability of highly synchronized areas was quantified. Surrogate data were constructed and used to statistically validate the results. Our results show the existence of highly localized and stable synchronization areas in both the lateral and the mesial areas of the temporal lobe ipsilateral to the clinical seizures. Synchronization areas seem to play a central role in the capacity of the epileptic network to generate clinical seizures. Resection of stable synchronization areas is associated with elimination of seizures; nonresection of synchronization clusters is associated with the persistence of seizures after surgery. Discussion We suggest that synchronization clusters and their stability play a central role in the epileptic network, favoring seizure onset and propagation. We further speculate that the stability distribution of these synchronization areas would differentiate normal from pathologic cases. PMID:22844524

  7. Mortality in late post-traumatic seizures.

    PubMed

    Englander, Jeffrey; Bushnik, Tamara; Wright, Jerry M; Jamison, Laura; Duong, Thao T

    2009-09-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the mortality rates in individuals with traumatic brain injury (TBI) who were classified as having experienced late post-traumatic seizures (LPTS) in the first 2 years post-TBI compared to those who were seizure-free (non-LPTS). Participants were a pooled sample (n = 508) from two studies which enrolled individuals with TBI who were injured between March 31, 1992 and December 20, 1999. The first sample was made up of individuals enrolled in a study of risk factors for LPTS development; the second sample was composed of individuals enrolled in the TBI National Database from a single rehabilitation center. Seventy-one (14%) participants had LPTS, of which 27% had died at 8-15 years post-injury, as compared to 10% of non-LPTS participants. Individuals with LPTS died at a younger age (54.1 versus 67.7 years; p = 0.01), but there were no statistically significant differences in either time from date of injury to death or highest GCS score in the first 24 h. Causes of death were variable and not specifically related to epilepsy. Of those with LPTS, risk factors for death include advanced age at time of injury and presence of subdural hematoma. The higher mortality rate and death at younger age with variable causes in TBI individuals with LPTS warrant close medical evaluation and monitoring of these individuals, particularly accessibility and compliance with ongoing general medical care, and education of primary care colleagues of the unique needs of this at-risk population. PMID:19508123

  8. Lipoma in the Corpus Callosum Presenting with Epileptic Seizures Associated with Expanding Perifocal Edema: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Fuga, Michiyasu; Yamamoto, Yohei; Hasegawa, Yuzuru; Murayama, Yuichi; Takahashi-Fujigasaki, Junko

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a rare case of a patient with lipoma presenting with epileptic seizures associated with expanding perifocal edema. The patient was a 48-year-old man who presented with loss of consciousness and convulsions. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a calcified mass in the corpus callosum with perifocal edema causing mass effect. An interhemispheric approach was used to biopsy the mass lesion. Histological examination revealed typical adipose cells, along with hamartomatous components. These components contained neurofilament and S-100-positive structures showing marked calcification. Fibrous cells immunoreactive for ?-smooth muscle actin and epithelial membrane antigen proliferated with focal granulomatous inflammatory changes. MIB-1 index was approximately 5% in immature cells observed in granulomatous areas. We thus suspected a coexisting neoplastic component. The residual lesion persisted in a dormant state for 2 years following biopsy. Surgical resection of a lipoma is extremely difficult and potentially dangerous. However, in the present case, the lesion was accompanied by atypical, expanding, and perifocal edema. Surgical treatment was inevitable for the purpose of histological confirmation, considering differential diagnoses such as dermoid, epidermoid, and glioma. In the end, anticonvulsant therapy proved effective for controlling epileptic seizures. PMID:26078892

  9. Seizures Related to Vitamin B6 Deficiency in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Gun; Lee, Yeonkyung; Shin, Hyeeun; Kang, Kyusik; Park, Jong-Moo; Kim, Byung-Kun; Kwon, Ohyun; Lee, Jung-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin B6 is closely associated with functions of the nervous, immune, and endocrine systems. Its deficiency may result in neurological disorders including convulsions and epileptic encephalopathy. Until today, this has only been reported in infants, children, and critically ill adult patients. We report a case of a 36year-old man with chronic alcoholism who presented with seizures after gastrointestinal disturbance. His seizures persisted even after treatment with antiepileptic drugs, but eventually disappeared after administration of pyridoxine. Hence, vitamin B6 deficiency may cause seizures in adult patients with chronic alcoholism. PMID:26157671

  10. Clinical decision making in seizures and status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Teran, Felipe; Harper-Kirksey, Katrina; Jagoda, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Seizures and status epilepticus are frequent neurologic emergencies in the emergency department, accounting for 1% of all emergency department visits. The management of this time-sensitive and potentially life-threatening condition is challenging for both prehospital providers and emergency clinicians. The approach to seizing patients begins with differentiating seizure activity from mimics and follows with identifying potential secondary etiologies, such as alcohol-related seizures. The approach to the patient in status epilepticus and the patient with nonconvulsive status epilepticus constitutes a special clinical challenge. This review summarizes the best available evidence and recommendations regarding diagnosis and resuscitation of the seizing patient in the emergency setting. PMID:25902572

  11. Abusive suffocation presenting as new-onset seizure.

    PubMed

    Oral, Resmiye; Koc, Feyza; Smith, Jacob; Sato, Yutaka

    2011-11-01

    Child abuse can often be very difficult to identify. This is especially true in cases of abuse by suffocation. Suffocation often leaves no external physical marks and presents with vague, nonspecific symptoms. Infants who have been suffocated usually present unexplained apnea, cyanosis, or seizure. Moreover, new-onset seizures can be mistaken for an organic seizure disorder. This case report reviews a case of abuse by suffocation, which presented as new-onset status epilepticus. This case illustrates that suffocation can be difficult to diagnose despite the recognition of red flags that should prompt an investigation for abuse. PMID:22068072

  12. Increased Seizure Latency and Decreased Severity of Pentylenetetrazol-Induced Seizures in Mice after Essential Oil Administration

    PubMed Central

    Koutroumanidou, Eleni; Kimbaris, Athanasios; Kortsaris, Alexandros; Bezirtzoglou, Eugenia; Polissiou, Moschos; Charalabopoulos, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    The effect of pretreatment with essential oils (EOs) from eight aromatic plants on the seizure latency and severity of pentylenetetrazol- (PTZ-) induced seizures in mice was evaluated. Weight-dependent doses of Rosmarinus officinalis, Ocimum basilicum, Mentha spicata, Mentha pulegium, Lavandula angustifolia, Mentha piperita, Origanum dictamnus, and Origanum vulgare, isolated from the respective aromatic plants from NE Greece, were administered 60 minutes prior to intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of a lethal dose of PTZ to eight respective groups of Balb-c mice. Control group received only one i.p. PTZ injection. Motor and behavioral activity of the animals after EOs administration, development of tonic-clonic seizures, seizure latency and severity, and percentage of survival after PTZ administration were determined for each group. All groups of mice treated with the EOs showed reduced activity and stability after the administration of the oil, except for those treated with O. vulgare (100% mortality after the administration of the oil). After PTZ administration, mice from the different groups showed increased latency and reduced severity of seizures (ranging from simple twitches to complete seizures). Mice who had received M. piperita demonstrated no seizures and 100% survival. The different drastic component and its concentration could account for the diversity of anticonvulsant effects. PMID:23819045

  13. Increased seizure latency and decreased severity of pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures in mice after essential oil administration.

    PubMed

    Koutroumanidou, Eleni; Kimbaris, Athanasios; Kortsaris, Alexandros; Bezirtzoglou, Eugenia; Polissiou, Moschos; Charalabopoulos, Konstantinos; Pagonopoulou, Olga

    2013-01-01

    The effect of pretreatment with essential oils (EOs) from eight aromatic plants on the seizure latency and severity of pentylenetetrazol- (PTZ-) induced seizures in mice was evaluated. Weight-dependent doses of Rosmarinus officinalis, Ocimum basilicum, Mentha spicata, Mentha pulegium, Lavandula angustifolia, Mentha piperita, Origanum dictamnus, and Origanum vulgare, isolated from the respective aromatic plants from NE Greece, were administered 60 minutes prior to intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of a lethal dose of PTZ to eight respective groups of Balb-c mice. Control group received only one i.p. PTZ injection. Motor and behavioral activity of the animals after EOs administration, development of tonic-clonic seizures, seizure latency and severity, and percentage of survival after PTZ administration were determined for each group. All groups of mice treated with the EOs showed reduced activity and stability after the administration of the oil, except for those treated with O. vulgare (100% mortality after the administration of the oil). After PTZ administration, mice from the different groups showed increased latency and reduced severity of seizures (ranging from simple twitches to complete seizures). Mice who had received M. piperita demonstrated no seizures and 100% survival. The different drastic component and its concentration could account for the diversity of anticonvulsant effects. PMID:23819045

  14. Blockade of T-type calcium channels prevents tonic-clonic seizures in a maximal electroshock seizure model.

    PubMed

    Sakkaki, Sophie; Gangarossa, Giuseppe; Lerat, Benoit; Françon, Dominique; Forichon, Luc; Chemin, Jean; Valjent, Emmanuel; Lerner-Natoli, Mireille; Lory, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    T-type (Cav3) calcium channels play important roles in neuronal excitability, both in normal and pathological activities of the brain. In particular, they contribute to hyper-excitability disorders such as epilepsy. Here we have characterized the anticonvulsant properties of TTA-A2, a selective T-type channel blocker, in mouse. Using the maximal electroshock seizure (MES) as a model of tonic-clonic generalized seizures, we report that mice treated with TTA-A2 (0.3 mg/kg and higher doses) were significantly protected against tonic seizures. Although no major change in Local Field Potential (LFP) pattern was observed during the MES seizure, analysis of the late post-ictal period revealed a significant increase in the delta frequency power in animals treated with TTA-A2. Similar results were obtained for Cav3.1-/- mice, which were less prone to develop tonic seizures in the MES test, but not for Cav3.2-/- mice. Analysis of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK) phosphorylation and c-Fos expression revealed a rapid and elevated neuronal activation in the hippocampus following MES clonic seizures, which was unchanged in TTA-A2 treated animals. Overall, our data indicate that TTA-A2 is a potent anticonvulsant and that the Cav3.1 isoform plays a prominent role in mediating TTA-A2 tonic seizure protection. PMID:26456350

  15. Pontine Infarct Presenting with Atypical Dental Pain: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Rajat; Kumar, Sanjeev; Panwar, Ajay; Singh, Abhishek B

    2015-01-01

    Orofacial pain’ most commonly occurs due to dental causes like caries, gingivitis or periodontitis. Other common causes of ‘orofacial pain’ are sinusitis, temporomandibular joint(TMJ) dysfunction, otitis externa, tension headache and migraine. In some patients, the etiology of ‘orofacial pain’ remains undetected despite optimal evaluation. A few patients in the practice of clinical dentistry presents with dental pain without any identifiable dental etiology. Such patients are classified under the category of ‘atypical odontalgia’. ‘Atypical odontalgia’ is reported to be prevalent in 2.1% of the individuals. ‘Atypical orofacial pain’ and ‘atypical odontalgia’ can result from the neurological diseases like multiple sclerosis, trigeminal neuralgia and herpes infection. Trigeminal neuralgia has been frequently documented as a cause of ‘atypical orofacial pain’ and ‘atypical odontalgia’. There are a few isolated case reports of acute pontine stroke resulting in ‘atypical orofacial pain’ and ‘atypical odontalgia’. However, pontine stroke as a cause of atypical odontalgia is limited to only a few cases, hence prevalence is not established. This case is one, where a patient presented with acute onset atypical dental pain with no identifiable dental etiology, further diagnosed as an acute pontine infarct on neuroimaging. A 40 years old male presented with acute onset, diffuse teeth pain on right side. Dental examination was normal. Magnetic resonance imaging(MRI) of the brain had an acute infarct in right pons near the trigeminal root entry zone(REZ). Pontine infarct presenting with dental pain as a manifestation of trigeminal neuropathy, has rarely been reported previously. This stresses on the importance of neuroradiology in evaluation of atypical cases of dental pain. PMID:26464604

  16. A study of the dynamics of seizure propagation across micro domains in the vicinity of the seizure onset zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Ishita; Kudela, Pawel; Korzeniewska, Anna; Franaszczuk, Piotr J.; Anderson, William S.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. The use of micro-electrode arrays to measure electrical activity from the surface of the brain is increasingly being investigated as a means to improve seizure onset zone (SOZ) localization. In this work, we used a multivariate autoregressive model to determine the evolution of seizure dynamics in the 70-110 Hz high frequency band across micro-domains sampled by such micro-electrode arrays. We showed that a directed transfer function (DTF) can be used to estimate the flow of seizure activity in a set of simulated micro-electrode data with known propagation pattern. Approach. We used seven complex partial seizures recorded from four patients undergoing intracranial monitoring for surgical evaluation to reconstruct the seizure propagation pattern over sliding windows using a DTF measure. Main results. We showed that a DTF can be used to estimate the flow of seizure activity in a set of simulated micro-electrode data with a known propagation pattern. In general, depending on the location of the micro-electrode grid with respect to the clinical SOZ and the time from seizure onset, ictal propagation changed in directional characteristics over a 2-10 s time scale, with gross directionality limited to spatial dimensions of approximately 9 m{{m}2}. It was also seen that the strongest seizure patterns in the high frequency band and their sources over such micro-domains are more stable over time and across seizures bordering the clinically determined SOZ than inside. Significance. This type of propagation analysis might in future provide an additional tool to epileptologists for characterizing epileptogenic tissue. This will potentially help narrowing down resection zones without compromising essential brain functions as well as provide important information about targeting anti-epileptic stimulation devices.

  17. External Validation of a Prognostic Model for Seizure Recurrence Following a First Unprovoked Seizure and Implications for Driving

    PubMed Central

    Bonnett, Laura Jayne; Marson, Anthony G.; Johnson, Anthony; Kim, Lois; Sander, Josemir W.; Lawn, Nicholas; Beghi, Ettore; Leone, Maurizio; Smith, Catrin Tudur

    2014-01-01

    Objective In the United Kingdom and other European Union countries guidelines for driving following a first unprovoked seizure require the risk of another seizure in the next year to be less than 20%. Using data from one clinical trial, we previously developed a prognostic model to inform driving guidelines. The objective of this work is to externally validate our published model and demonstrate its generalisability. Methods A cohort of 620 people with a first unprovoked seizure was used to develop the original model which included variables for aetiology, first degree relative with epilepsy, seizures only while asleep, electroencephalogram, computed tomography or magnetic resonance scan result, and treatment policy. The validation cohorts consisted of 274 (United Kingdom), 305 (Italy), and 847 (Australia) people. The model was evaluated using discrimination and calibration methods. A covariate, missing from the Italian dataset, was handled via five imputation methods. Following external validation, the model was fitted to a pooled population comprising all validation datasets and the development dataset. The model was stratified by dataset. Results The model generalised relatively well. All methods of imputation performed fairly similarly. At six months, the risk of a seizure recurrence following a first ever seizure, based on the pooled datasets, is 15% (95% CI: (12% to 18%)) for patients who are treated immediately and 18% (95% CI: (15 to 21%)) otherwise. Individuals can be reliably stratified into risk groups according to the clinical factors included in the model. Significance Our prognostic model, used to inform driving regulations, has been validated and consequently has been proven as a valuable tool for predicting risk of seizure recurrence following a first seizure in people with various combinations of risk factors. Additionally, there is evidence to support one worldwide overall prognostic model for risk of second seizure following a first. PMID:24919184

  18. Long-term neuroplasticity effects of febrile seizures in the developing brain.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ying-Chao; Huang, Chao-Ching; Huang, Song-Chei

    2008-01-01

    Febrile seizures (FS) are the most common seizure disorder in childhood, occurring in 2%-5% of children. Regarding the large number of children with FS, it is important to delineate whether early-life FS alters long-term neuroplasticity, especially the neurocognitive function and subsequent temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Recent epidemiological studies reassure that most FS do not adversely affect global intelligence and hippocampal function, such as memory. However, there are concerns regarding those children who experience FS during the first postnatal year, having prior developmental delay and pre- or peri-natal events. The epidemiological data do not support a causal relationship between FS and TLE. However, magnetic resonance imaging studies confirmed that prolonged and focal FS can occasionally produce acute hippocampal injury that evolves into atrophy. Moreover, the common coexistence of hippocampal sclerosis and asymmetric cortical dysgenesis in TLE patients argues for a 'double-hit' theory for TLE. Animal studies have revealed that the exposure of hippocampal neurons to FS early in life, particularly prolonged or frequently repetitive FS, or together with brain malformation, may lead to sustained dysfunction of these cells including long-term memory impairment or epileptogenesis, in spite of the absence of neuronal damage. Recent clinical and molecular genetic studies suggest that the relationship between FS and later epilepsy is frequently genetic, and there are a number of syndrome-specific genes for FS. However, these channelopathies account for a small proportion of FS cases. The clinical management, therefore, is based mainly on the phenotypic features of FS and the subsequent seizures. PMID:18567412

  19. Mozart K.448 listening decreased seizure recurrence and epileptiform discharges in children with first unprovoked seizures: a randomized controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Increasing numbers of reports show the beneficial effects of listening to Mozart music in decreasing epileptiform discharges as well as seizure frequency in epileptic children. There has been no effective method to reduce seizure recurrence after the first unprovoked seizure until now. In this study, we investigated the effect of listening to Mozart K.448 in reducing the seizure recurrence rate in children with first unprovoked seizures. Methods Forty-eight children who experienced their first unprovoked seizure with epileptiform discharges were included in the study. They were randomly placed into treatment (n?=?24) and control (n?=?24) groups. Children in the treatment group listened to Mozart K.448 daily before bedtime for at least six months. Two patients in the treatment group were excluded from analysis due to discontinuation intervention. Finally, forty-six patients were analyzed. Most of these patients (89.1%) were idiopathic in etiology. Seizure recurrence rates and reduction of epileptiform discharges were compared. Results The average follow-up durations in the treatment and control groups were 18.6?±?6.6 and 20.1?±?5.1 months, respectively. The seizure recurrence rate was estimated to be significantly lower in the treatment group than the control group over 24 months (37.2% vs. 76.8%, p?=?0.0109). Significant decreases in epileptiform discharges were also observed after 1, 2, and 6 months of listening to Mozart K.448 when compared with EEGs before listening to music. There were no significant differences in gender, mentality, seizure type, and etiology between the recurrence and non-recurrence groups. Conclusions Although the case number was limited and control music was not performed in this study, the study revealed that listening to Mozart K.448 reduced the seizure recurrence rate and epileptiform discharges in children with first unprovoked seizures, especially of idiopathic etiology. We believe that Mozart K.448 could be a promising alternative treatment in patients with first unprovoked seizures and abnormal EEGs. Further large-scaled study should be conducted to confirm the effect. Trial registration NCT01892605, date: June-19-2013 PMID:24410973

  20. Moonstruck? The effect of the lunar cycle on seizures.

    PubMed

    Baxendale, Sallie; Fisher, Jennifer

    2008-10-01

    Recent reports on the effects of the lunar cycle on seizure occurrence have yielded mixed results. If the moon phase is influential, we hypothesized that this would be due to the moon's contribution to nocturnal illumination, rather than its waxing or waning state, and that significant correlations would not be apparent if local cloud cover were controlled for. We found a significant negative correlation between the mean number of seizures and the fraction of the moon illuminated by the sun (rho=-0.09, P<0.05) in 1571 seizures recorded in a dedicated epilepsy inpatient unit over 341 days. This correlation disappeared when we controlled for the local clarity of the night sky, suggesting that it is the brightness of the night and the contribution the moon phase makes to nocturnal luminance, rather than the moon phase per se, that may influence the occurrence of epileptic seizures. PMID:18602495

  1. Effect of Contraceptive Estradiol on Hippocampus Kindling Seizure Activity 

    E-print Network

    Younus, Iyan

    2014-09-15

    by several million women worldwide. The present study was undertaken to investigate the potential adverse effect of EE on epileptogenesis and seizure activity using the hippocampus kindling model in female mice. Animals were stimulated daily without...

  2. Focal inhibitory seizures: a cause of recurrent transient weakness.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Fahmida A; Connor, Steve; Ferner, Rosalie; Leschziner, Guy

    2015-12-01

    Focal seizures are usually manifest with stereotyped positive phenomena. However, seizures may also give negative phenomena, such as paralysis, speech arrest, neglect, atonia and numbness. We report a 39-year-old man with neurofibromatosis 2 who had recurrent stereotyped episodes of weakness affecting his right leg and right arm. His MR scan of brain showed numerous meningiomas, the largest of which was near the vertex, adjacent to the left side of the falx. Interictal electroencephalogram, MR cerebral angiogram and Doppler carotid artery ultrasound scan were normal. He was diagnosed with epilepsy and started on levetiracetam, with no subsequent attacks. We postulate his negative motor seizures related to a meningioma overlying the supplementary negative motor area in the mesial superior frontal gyrus, and discuss diagnostic criteria for inhibitory seizures. PMID:26245512

  3. Respiratory motor nerve activities during experimental seizures in cats.

    PubMed

    Terndrup, T E; Knuth, S L; Gdovin, M J; Darnall, R; Bartlett, D

    1996-03-01

    We evaluated respiratory motor nerve activities during experimental seizures induced with subcortical penicillin. The activities of the phrenic (PH), nasolabial (NL), and hypoglossal (HG) nerves and the recurrent laryngeal motor branches to the thyroarytenoid (TA) and posterior cricoarytenoid (PCA) muscles were analyzed in 13 anesthetized, vagotomized, paralyzed, and ventilated cats. During ictal and interictal phases of seizures, nerve activities became irregular and peak integrated nerve activities increased, particularly in the case of the PH nerve. The ictal phase of seizures was associated with increased tonic activity and decreased phasic respiratory discharges, particularly in the cases of the HG, NL, and PCA nerves. During some prolonged ictal discharges, entrainment of nerve activities by cortical spiking was associated with irregular uncoordinated activation, particularly in the TA nerve. These studies help explain respiratory impairment during seizures by providing evidence of impaired coordination between activation of muscles that regulate upper airway patency and activation of the diaphragm. PMID:8964758

  4. Pyridoxine-dependent seizures: magnetic resonance spectroscopy findings.

    PubMed

    Alkan, Alpay; Kutlu, Ramazan; Aslan, Mehmet; Sigirci, Ahmet; Orkan, Ismet; Yakinci, Cengiz

    2004-01-01

    Pyridoxine-dependent seizures are an extremely rare genetic disorder. Early diagnosis and treatment are important for the prevention of permanent brain damage. Elevated levels of glutamate and decreased levels of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the frontal and parietal cortices are among the characteristic features of this disorder. These metabolic abnormalities eventually lead to seizures and neuronal loss. In this case report, we present magnetic resonance spectroscopy findings of a 9-year-old girl with pyridoxine-dependent seizures with mental retardation. The N-acetylaspartate-to-creatine ratio was found to be decreased in the frontal and parieto-occipital cortices, which could indicate neuronal loss. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy could be a useful tool in the neuroimaging evaluation for assessment of parenchymal changes despite a normal-appearing brain magnetic resonance image in patients with pyridoxine-dependent seizures. PMID:15032392

  5. Nitric Oxide Regulates Neurogenesis in the Hippocampus following Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Carreira, Bruno P.; Santos, Daniela F.; Santos, Ana I.; Carvalho, Caetana M.; Araújo, Inês M.

    2015-01-01

    Hippocampal neurogenesis is changed by brain injury. When neuroinflammation accompanies injury, activation of resident microglial cells promotes the release of inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen/nitrogen species like nitric oxide (NO). In these conditions, NO promotes proliferation of neural stem cells (NSC) in the hippocampus. However, little is known about the role of NO in the survival and differentiation of newborn cells in the injured dentate gyrus. Here we investigated the role of NO following seizures in the regulation of proliferation, migration, differentiation, and survival of NSC in the hippocampus using the kainic acid (KA) induced seizure mouse model. We show that NO increased the proliferation of NSC and the number of neuroblasts following seizures but was detrimental to the survival of newborn neurons. NO was also required for the maintenance of long-term neuroinflammation. Taken together, our data show that NO positively contributes to the initial stages of neurogenesis following seizures but compromises survival of newborn neurons. PMID:26587180

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Malignant migrating partial seizures of infancy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of infancy (MMPSI) is a severe form of epilepsy that begins very early in life. Recurrent seizures ... Health National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: Epilepsy Educational resources - Information pages (6 links) Patient support - ...

  7. Ontology and Knowledge Management System on Epilepsy and Epileptic Seizures

    E-print Network

    Almeida, Pedro; Sales, Francisco; Nogueira, Ana; Dourado, António

    2010-01-01

    A Knowledge Management System developed for supporting creation, capture, storage and dissemination of information about Epilepsy and Epileptic Seizures is presented. We present an Ontology on Epilepsy and a Web-based prototype that together create the KMS.

  8. UNCONTROLLED SEIZURES AND BONE HEALTH AMONG ADULT EPILEPSY PATIENTS

    E-print Network

    Yamada, Mikiko

    2013-12-31

    PURPOSE: Uncontrolled seizures negatively impact the quality of life of epilepsy patients, and bone health represents one of the more serious adverse outcomes of epilepsy and its treatment. The objectives of this study were to determine...

  9. Investigation of cardiac dysfunction and hypoxaemia during epileptic seizures 

    E-print Network

    Brotherstone, Ruth Elizabeth

    2012-06-30

    Epileptic seizures are often un-witnessed and can result in hypoxic brain damage or can be fatal due to injuries, status epilepticus or sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP). The first aim of this thesis was ...

  10. 27 CFR 555.186 - Seizure or forfeiture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... COMMERCE IN EXPLOSIVES Marking of Plastic Explosives § 555.186 Seizure or forfeiture. Any plastic explosive that does not contain...regulations on summary destruction of plastic explosives that do not contain a...

  11. 27 CFR 555.186 - Seizure or forfeiture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... COMMERCE IN EXPLOSIVES Marking of Plastic Explosives § 555.186 Seizure or forfeiture. Any plastic explosive that does not contain...regulations on summary destruction of plastic explosives that do not contain a...

  12. 27 CFR 555.186 - Seizure or forfeiture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... COMMERCE IN EXPLOSIVES Marking of Plastic Explosives § 555.186 Seizure or forfeiture. Any plastic explosive that does not contain...regulations on summary destruction of plastic explosives that do not contain a...

  13. 27 CFR 555.186 - Seizure or forfeiture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... COMMERCE IN EXPLOSIVES Marking of Plastic Explosives § 555.186 Seizure or forfeiture. Any plastic explosive that does not contain...regulations on summary destruction of plastic explosives that do not contain a...

  14. 27 CFR 555.186 - Seizure or forfeiture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... COMMERCE IN EXPLOSIVES Marking of Plastic Explosives § 555.186 Seizure or forfeiture. Any plastic explosive that does not contain...regulations on summary destruction of plastic explosives that do not contain a...

  15. Typical and Atypical Dementia Family Caregivers: Systematic and Objective Comparisons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nichols, Linda O.; Martindale-Adams, Jennifer; Burns, Robert; Graney, Marshall J.; Zuber, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    This systematic, objective comparison of typical (spouse, children) and atypical (in-law, sibling, nephew/niece, grandchild) dementia family caregivers examined demographic, caregiving and clinical variables. Analysis was of 1,476 caregivers, of whom 125 were atypical, from the Resources for Enhancing Alzheimer's Caregivers Health (REACH I and II)…

  16. Association of a bovine prion gene haplotype with atypical BSE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), also known as prion diseases, are a class of fatal neurodegenerative disorders that occur in humans, ruminants, cats, and mink. Three distinct TSEs afflict cattle: classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE), atypical H-type BSE, and atypical ...

  17. Placental ischemia increases seizure susceptibility and cerebrospinal fluid cytokines.

    PubMed

    Warrington, Junie P

    2015-11-01

    Eclampsia is diagnosed in preeclamptic patients who develop unexplained seizures and/or coma during pregnancy or postpartum. Eclampsia is one of the leading causes of maternal and infant morbidity and mortality, accounting for ~13% of maternal deaths worldwide. Little is known about the mechanisms contributing to the pathophysiology of eclampsia, partly due to the lack of suitable animal models. This study tested the hypothesis that placental ischemia, induced by reducing utero-placental perfusion, increases susceptibility to seizures, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) inflammation, and neurokinin B (NKB) expression in brain and plasma. Pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), a pro-convulsive drug, was injected into pregnant and placental ischemic rats (40 mg/kg, i.p.) on gestational day 19 followed by video monitoring for 30 min. Seizure scoring was blindly conducted. Placental ischemia hastened the onset of seizures compared to pregnant controls but had no effect on seizure duration. Placental ischemia increased CSF levels of IL-2, IL-17, IL-18 and eotaxin (CCL11), had no effect on plasma NKB; however, PTZ increased plasma NKB in both pregnant and placental ischemic rats. NKB was strongly correlated with latency to seizure in normal pregnant rats (R(2) = 0.88 vs. 0.02 in placental ischemic rats). Lastly, NKB decreased in the anterior cerebrum in response to placental ischemia and PTZ treatment but was unchanged in the posterior cerebrum. These data demonstrate that placental ischemia is associated with increased susceptibility to seizures and CSF inflammation; thus provides an excellent model for elucidating mechanisms of eclampsia-like symptoms. Further studies are required to determine the role of CSF cytokines/chemokines in mediating increased seizure susceptibility. PMID:26603461

  18. Placental ischemia increases seizure susceptibility and cerebrospinal fluid cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Warrington, Junie P

    2015-01-01

    Eclampsia is diagnosed in preeclamptic patients who develop unexplained seizures and/or coma during pregnancy or postpartum. Eclampsia is one of the leading causes of maternal and infant morbidity and mortality, accounting for ?13% of maternal deaths worldwide. Little is known about the mechanisms contributing to the pathophysiology of eclampsia, partly due to the lack of suitable animal models. This study tested the hypothesis that placental ischemia, induced by reducing utero-placental perfusion, increases susceptibility to seizures, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) inflammation, and neurokinin B (NKB) expression in brain and plasma. Pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), a pro-convulsive drug, was injected into pregnant and placental ischemic rats (40 mg/kg, i.p.) on gestational day 19 followed by video monitoring for 30 min. Seizure scoring was blindly conducted. Placental ischemia hastened the onset of seizures compared to pregnant controls but had no effect on seizure duration. Placental ischemia increased CSF levels of IL-2, IL-17, IL-18 and eotaxin (CCL11), had no effect on plasma NKB; however, PTZ increased plasma NKB in both pregnant and placental ischemic rats. NKB was strongly correlated with latency to seizure in normal pregnant rats (R2 = 0.88 vs. 0.02 in placental ischemic rats). Lastly, NKB decreased in the anterior cerebrum in response to placental ischemia and PTZ treatment but was unchanged in the posterior cerebrum. These data demonstrate that placental ischemia is associated with increased susceptibility to seizures and CSF inflammation; thus provides an excellent model for elucidating mechanisms of eclampsia-like symptoms. Further studies are required to determine the role of CSF cytokines/chemokines in mediating increased seizure susceptibility. PMID:26603461

  19. Detection of Epileptic Seizure Using Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Borujeny, Golshan Taheri; Yazdi, Mehran; Keshavarz-Haddad, Alireza; Borujeny, Arash Rafie

    2013-01-01

    The monitoring of epileptic seizures is mainly done by means of electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring. Although this method is accurate, it is not comfortable for the patient as the EEG-electrodes have to be attached to the scalp which hampers the patient's movement. This makes long-term home monitoring not feasible. In this paper, the aim is to propose a seizure detection system based on accelerometry for the detection of epileptic seizure. The used sensors are wireless, which can improve quality of life for the patients. In this system, three 2D accelerometer sensors are positioned on the right arm, left arm, and left thigh of an epileptic patient. Datasets from three patients suffering from severe epilepsy are used in this paper for the development of an automatic detection algorithm. This monitoring system is based on Wireless Sensor Networks and can determine the location of the patient when a seizure is detected and then send an alarm to hospital staff or the patient's relatives. Our wireless sensor nodes are MICAz Motes developed by Crossbow Technology. The proposed system can be used for patients living in a clinical environment or at their home, where they do only their daily routines. The analysis of the recorded data is done by an Artificial Neural Network and K Nearest-Neighbor to recognize seizure movements from normal movements. The results show that K Nearest Neighbor performs better than Artificial Neural Network for detecting these seizures. The results also show that if at least 50% of the signal consists of seizure samples, we can detect the seizure accurately. In addition, there is no need for training the algorithm for each new patient. PMID:24098859

  20. Reflex seizures, traits, and epilepsies: from physiology to pathology.

    PubMed

    Koepp, Matthias J; Caciagli, Lorenzo; Pressler, Ronit M; Lehnertz, Klaus; Beniczky, Sándor

    2016-01-01

    Epileptic seizures are generally unpredictable and arise spontaneously. Patients often report non-specific triggers such as stress or sleep deprivation, but only rarely do seizures occur as a reflex event, in which they are objectively and consistently modulated, precipitated, or inhibited by external sensory stimuli or specific cognitive processes. The seizures triggered by such stimuli and processes in susceptible individuals can have different latencies. Once seizure-suppressing mechanisms fail and a critical mass (the so-called tipping point) of cortical activation is reached, reflex seizures stereotypically manifest with common motor features independent of the physiological network involved. The complexity of stimuli increases from simple sensory to complex cognitive-emotional with increasing age of onset. The topography of physiological networks involved follows the posterior-to-anterior trajectory of brain development, reflecting age-related changes in brain excitability. Reflex seizures and traits probably represent the extremes of a continuum, and understanding of their underlying mechanisms might help to elucidate the transition of normal physiological function to paroxysmal epileptic activity. PMID:26627365

  1. Decursin attenuates kainic acid-induced seizures in mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Keun; Jeong, Ji Woon; Jang, Taeik; Lee, Go-Woon; Han, Hogyu; Kang, Jae-Seon; Kim, Ik-Hwan

    2014-11-12

    Epilepsy is a neurological disorder with recurrent unprovoked seizures as the main symptom. Of the coumarin derivatives in Angelica gigas, decursin, a major coumarin component, was reported to exhibit significant protective activity against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity when added to primary cultures of rat cortical cells. This study served to investigate the effects of decursin on a kainic acid (KA)-induced status epilepticus model. Thirty minutes after intraperitoneal injections of decursin (20?mg/kg) in male 7-week-old C57BL/6 mice, the animals were treated with KA (30?mg/kg, intraperitoneally) and then examined for behavioral seizure score, electroencephalogram, seizure-related expressed protein levels, neuronal cell loss, neurodegeneration, and astrogliosis. KA injections significantly enhanced neurodegenerative conditions but treatment with decursin 30?min before KA injection reduced the detrimental effects of KA in mice. The decursin-treated KA-injected group showed significantly decreased behavioral seizure activity and remarkably attenuated intense and high-frequency seizure discharges in the parietal cortex for 2?h compared with the group treated only with KA. Furthermore, in-vivo results indicated that decursin strongly inhibits selective neuronal death, astrogliosis, and oxidative stress induced by KA administration. Therefore decursin is able to attenuate KA-induced seizures and could have potential as an antiepileptic drug. PMID:25171200

  2. Seizure Prediction: Science Fiction or Soon to Become Reality?

    PubMed

    Freestone, Dean R; Karoly, Philippa J; Peterson, Andre D H; Kuhlmann, Levin; Lai, Alan; Goodarzy, Farhad; Cook, Mark J

    2015-11-01

    This review highlights recent developments in the field of epileptic seizure prediction. We argue that seizure prediction is possible; however, most previous attempts have used data with an insufficient amount of information to solve the problem. The review discusses four methods for gaining more information above standard clinical electrophysiological recordings. We first discuss developments in obtaining long-term data that enables better characterisation of signal features and trends. Then, we discuss the usage of electrical stimulation to probe neural circuits to obtain robust information regarding excitability. Following this, we present a review of developments in high-resolution micro-electrode technologies that enable neuroimaging across spatial scales. Finally, we present recent results from data-driven model-based analyses, which enable imaging of seizure generating mechanisms from clinical electrophysiological measurements. It is foreseeable that the field of seizure prediction will shift focus to a more probabilistic forecasting approach leading to improvements in the quality of life for the millions of people who suffer uncontrolled seizures. However, a missing piece of the puzzle is devices to acquire long-term high-quality data. When this void is filled, seizure prediction will become a reality. PMID:26404726

  3. A Physiology-Based Seizure Detection System for Multichannel EEG

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Chia-Ping; Liu, Shih-Ting; Zhou, Wei-Zhi; Lin, Feng-Seng; Lam, Andy Yan-Yu; Sung, Hsiao-Ya; Chen, Wei; Lin, Jeng-Wei; Chiu, Ming-Jang; Pan, Ming-Kai; Kao, Jui-Hung; Wu, Jin-Ming; Lai, Feipei

    2013-01-01

    Background Epilepsy is a common chronic neurological disorder characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures. Electroencephalogram (EEG) signals play a critical role in the diagnosis of epilepsy. Multichannel EEGs contain more information than do single-channel EEGs. Automatic detection algorithms for spikes or seizures have traditionally been implemented on single-channel EEG, and algorithms for multichannel EEG are unavailable. Methodology This study proposes a physiology-based detection system for epileptic seizures that uses multichannel EEG signals. The proposed technique was tested on two EEG data sets acquired from 18 patients. Both unipolar and bipolar EEG signals were analyzed. We employed sample entropy (SampEn), statistical values, and concepts used in clinical neurophysiology (e.g., phase reversals and potential fields of a bipolar EEG) to extract the features. We further tested the performance of a genetic algorithm cascaded with a support vector machine and post-classification spike matching. Principal Findings We obtained 86.69% spike detection and 99.77% seizure detection for Data Set I. The detection system was further validated using the model trained by Data Set I on Data Set II. The system again showed high performance, with 91.18% detection of spikes and 99.22% seizure detection. Conclusion We report a de novo EEG classification system for seizure and spike detection on multichannel EEG that includes physiology-based knowledge to enhance the performance of this type of system. PMID:23799053

  4. Antisense Reduction of Tau in Adult Mice Protects against Seizures

    PubMed Central

    DeVos, Sarah L.; Goncharoff, Dustin K.; Chen, Guo; Kebodeaux, Carey S.; Yamada, Kaoru; Stewart, Floy R.; Schuler, Dorothy R.; Maloney, Susan E.; Wozniak, David F.; Rigo, Frank; Bennett, C. Frank; Cirrito, John R.; Holtzman, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Tau, a microtubule-associated protein, is implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) in regard to both neurofibrillary tangle formation and neuronal network hyperexcitability. The genetic ablation of tau substantially reduces hyperexcitability in AD mouse lines, induced seizure models, and genetic in vivo models of epilepsy. These data demonstrate that tau is an important regulator of network excitability. However, developmental compensation in the genetic tau knock-out line may account for the protective effect against seizures. To test the efficacy of a tau reducing therapy for disorders with a detrimental hyperexcitability profile in adult animals, we identified antisense oligonucleotides that selectively decrease endogenous tau expression throughout the entire mouse CNS—brain and spinal cord tissue, interstitial fluid, and CSF—while having no effect on baseline motor or cognitive behavior. In two chemically induced seizure models, mice with reduced tau protein had less severe seizures than control mice. Total tau protein levels and seizure severity were highly correlated, such that those mice with the most severe seizures also had the highest levels of tau. Our results demonstrate that endogenous tau is integral for regulating neuronal hyperexcitability in adult animals and suggest that an antisense oligonucleotide reduction of tau could benefit those with epilepsy and perhaps other disorders associated with tau-mediated neuronal hyperexcitability. PMID:23904623

  5. Cannabidiol Rescues Acute Hepatic Toxicity and Seizure Induced by Cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Vilela, Luciano Rezende; Gomides, Lindisley Ferreira; David, Bruna Araújo; Antunes, Maísa Mota; Diniz, Ariane Barros; Moreira, Fabrício de Araújo; Menezes, Gustavo Batista

    2015-01-01

    Cocaine is a commonly abused illicit drug that causes significant morbidity and mortality. The most severe and common complications are seizures, ischemic strokes, myocardial infarction, and acute liver injury. Here, we demonstrated that acute cocaine intoxication promoted seizure along with acute liver damage in mice, with intense inflammatory infiltrate. Considering the protective role of the endocannabinoid system against cell toxicity, we hypothesized that treatment with an anandamide hydrolysis inhibitor, URB597, or with a phytocannabinoid, cannabidiol (CBD), protects against cocaine toxicity. URB597 (1.0?mg/kg) abolished cocaine-induced seizure, yet it did not protect against acute liver injury. Using confocal liver intravital microscopy, we observed that CBD (30?mg/kg) reduced acute liver inflammation and damage induced by cocaine and prevented associated seizure. Additionally, we showed that previous liver damage induced by another hepatotoxic drug (acetaminophen) increased seizure and lethality induced by cocaine intoxication, linking hepatotoxicity to seizure dynamics. These findings suggest that activation of cannabinoid system may have protective actions on both liver and brain induced by cocaine, minimizing inflammatory injury promoted by cocaine, supporting its further clinical application in the treatment of cocaine abuse. PMID:25999668

  6. 38 CFR 21.350 - Unauthorized absences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Vocational Rehabilitation and Employment Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 31 Leaves of Absence § 21.350 Unauthorized absences. A veteran who is unable to obtain an authorized leave of absence in...

  7. Seizure Outcomes and Predictors of Recurrent Post-Stroke Seizure: A Retrospective Observational Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Motoyama, Rie; Fukuma, Kazuki; Miyagi, Tetsuya; Nishimura, Kazutaka; Toyoda, Kazunori; Nagatsuka, Kazuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Background Seizure is a common complication after stroke (termed “post-stroke seizure,” PSS). Although many studies have assessed outcomes and risk factors of PSS, no reliable predictors are currently available to determine PSS recurrence. We compared baseline clinical characteristics and post-stroke treatment regimens between recurrent and non-recurrent PSS patients to identify factors predictive of recurrence. Methods Consecutive PSS patients admitted to our stroke center between January 2011 and July 2013 were monitored until February 2014 (median 357 days; IQR, 160–552) and retrospectively evaluated for baseline clinical characteristics and PSS recurrence. Cumulative recurrence rates at 90, 180, and 360 days post-stroke were estimated by Kaplan—Meier analysis. Independent predictors of recurrent PSS were identified by Cox proportional-hazards analysis. Results A total of 104 patients (71 men; mean age, 72.1 ± 11.2 years) were analyzed. PSS recurred in 31 patients (30%) during the follow-up. Factors significantly associated with PSS recurrence by log-rank analysis included previous PSS, valproic acid (VPA) monotherapy, polytherapy with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), frontal cortical lesion, and higher modified Rankin Scale score at discharge (all p < 0.05). Independent predictors of recurrent PSS were age <74 years (HR 2.38, 95% CI 1.02–5.90), VPA monotherapy (HR 3.86, 95% CI 1.30–12.62), and convulsions on admission (HR 3.87, 95% CI 1.35–12.76). Conclusions Approximately one-third of PSS patients experienced seizure recurrence within one year. The predictors of recurrent PSS were younger age, presence of convulsions and VPA monotherapy. Our findings should be interpreted cautiously in countries where monotherapy with second-generation AEDs has been approved because this study was conducted while second-generation AEDs had not been officially approved for monotherapy in Japan. PMID:26309124

  8. Nucleus basalis lesions suppress spike and wave discharges in rats with spontaneous absence-epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Danober, L; Vergnes, M; Depaulis, A; Marescaux, C

    1994-04-01

    Cholinergic drugs were shown to affect spike and wave discharges in a selected strain of Wistar rats with generalized non-convulsive absence epilepsy, named GAERS (Genetic Absence Epilepsy Rats from Strasbourg). The involvement of cholinergic transmission from the nucleus basalis in the control of absence seizures in GAERS was investigated in the present study, by examining the effects of unilateral excitotoxic lesions of this nucleus on the occurrence of spike-wave discharges. Ibotenate (0.01 M) and quisqualate (0.03 and 0.06 M)-induced lesions of the nucleus basalis suppressed spike-wave discharges in the cortex ipsilateral to the lesion. The suppression was associated with a disappearance of both acetylcholinesterase-fibres in the cerebral cortex and choline acetyltransferase immunopositive neurons within the nucleus basalis. Concomitantly, the background electroencephalographic activity was slowed. These results suggest that cholinergic innervation of the cerebral cortex by the nucleus basalis is involved in the occurrence of generalized non-convulsive seizures, in relation to the control of cortical activation. PMID:8008207

  9. Long-term safety of perampanel and seizure outcomes in refractory partial-onset seizures and secondarily generalized seizures: Results from phase III extension study 307

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, Gregory L; Perucca, Emilio; Ben-Menachem, Elinor; Kwan, Patrick; Shih, Jerry J; Clément, Jean-François; Wang, Xuefeng; Bagul, Makarand; Gee, Michelle; Zhu, Jin; Squillacote, David

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate safety, tolerability, seizure frequency, and regional variations in treatment responses with the AMPA antagonist, perampanel, in a large extension study during up to 3 years of treatment. Methods Patients ?12 years old with partial-onset seizures despite treatment with 1–3 antiepileptic drugs at baseline completed a perampanel phase III trial and entered extension study 307 (NCT00735397). Patients were titrated to 12 mg/day (or their individual maximum tolerated dose) during the blinded conversion period, followed by open-label maintenance. Exposure, safety (adverse events [AEs], vital signs, weight, electrocardiography [ECG], laboratory values) and seizure outcomes were analyzed; key measures were assessed by geographic regions. Results Among 1,216 patients, median exposure was 1.5 years (range 1 week to 3.3 years), with >300 patients treated for >2 years. Treatment retention was 58.5% at cutoff. AEs reported in ?10% of patients were dizziness, somnolence, headache, fatigue, irritability, and weight increase. Only dizziness and irritability caused discontinuation in >1% of patients (3.9% and 1.3%, respectively). The only serious AEs reported in >1% of patients were epilepsy-related (convulsion, 3.0%; status epilepticus, 1.1%). No clinically relevant changes in vital signs, ECG or laboratory parameters were seen. After titration/conversion, responder rate and median percentage change from baseline in seizure frequency were stable: 46% for both measures at 9 months (in 980 patients with ?9 months' exposure) and 58% and 60%, respectively, at 2 years (in the 337 patients with 2 years' exposure). Median percentage reduction in frequency of secondarily generalized (SG) seizures ranged from 77% at 9 months (N = 422) to 90% at 2 years (N = 141). Among the 694 patients with maintenance data ?1 year, 5.3% were seizure-free for the entire year. Significance No new safety signals emerged during up to 3 years of perampanel exposure in 39 countries. Seizure responses remained stable, with marked reductions, particularly in SG seizures. PMID:24867391

  10. Effect of electroconvulsive seizures on pattern separation.

    PubMed

    Svensson, Maria; Grahm, Matilda; Ekstrand, Joakim; Movahed-Rad, Pouya; Johansson, Mikael; Tingström, Anders

    2015-11-01

    Strategies employing different techniques to inhibit or stimulate neurogenesis have implicated a role for adult-born neurons in the therapeutic effect of antidepressant drugs, as well as a role in memory formation. Electroconvulsive seizures (ECS), an animal model of electroconvulsive therapy, robustly stimulate hippocampal neurogenesis, but it is not known how this relates to either therapeutic efficacy or unwanted cognitive side effects. We hypothesized that the ECS-derived increase in adult-born neurons would manifest in improved pattern separation ability, a memory function that is believed to be both hippocampus-dependent and coupled to neurogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we stimulated neurogenesis in adult rats by treating them with a series of ECS and compared their performances in a trial-unique delayed nonmatching-to-location task (TUNL) to a control group. TUNL performance was analyzed over a 12-week period, during which newly formed neurons differentiate and become functionally integrated in the hippocampal neurocircuitry. Task difficulty was manipulated by modifying the delay between sample and choice, and by varying the spatial similarity between target and distracter location. Although animals learned the task and improved the number of correct responses over time, ECS did not influence spatial pattern separation ability. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25850383

  11. COGNITIVE FUNCTIONING IN PATIENTS WITH COMPLEX ABSENCE FOLLOWING TREATMENT WITH SODIUM VALPROATE

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Shobini L.; Satischandra, P.; Devi, M. Gourie

    1993-01-01

    SUMMARY The association of sodium valproate with cognitive functions was studied in 29 patients with complex absence seizures. Seventeen patients were on monotherapy and twelve on polypharmacy with sodium valproate. Cognitive functions assessed were attention, speech, visuo-speciat perception, memory and intelligence. Behavioral disturbances were also assessed. Two assessments were made six months apart; in the first assessment, attention and speech were adequate, while memory, visuo-spatial perception, and behavioral functioning were impaired. Intelligence was lower in the polypharmacy group, while other functions were similar. In the second assessment, intelligence and visual memory improved in the monotherapy group, while no changes were present in the polypharmacy group. PMID:21776171

  12. Recurrence of atypical fibroxanthoma. Diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mattiola, Leandro Ricardo; Mattiola, Lyzandro; Mattiola, Giovani; Mattiola, Sandra Zucchi de Moraes; Moura, Carlos Eduardo; Kirschnick, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    Summary Introduction:?The soft tissue sarcomas (SPM) accounts for only 1% of malignant tumors of the adult population. The SPM is the most frequent malignant fibrous histiocytoma (MFH) that exhibits behavior characterized by the tendency to invasion of adjacent tissue and metastatic spread early. One of its variants is the atypical fibroxanthoma (FA). Objective:?To describe a case of probable recurrence of AF underwent surgical treatment and presentation of a literature review. Case report:?Patient female, 63 years, presenting with a mass in the face about four inches and a history of prior resection of the lesion in the same topography. The patient underwent surgical resection with a diagnosis of AF. Conclusion:?The FA is a rare tumor histological diagnosis difficult. The correct histological diagnosis and patient follow-up are essential. PMID:25991985

  13. Vestibular Schwannoma Atypically Invading Temporal Bone

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soo Jeong; Yang, Na-Rae

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular schwannoma (VS) usually present the widening of internal auditory canal (IAC), and these bony changes are typically limited to IAC, not extend to temporal bone. Temporal bone invasion by VS is extremely rare. We report 51-year-old man who revealed temporal bone destruction beyond IAC by unilateral VS. The bony destruction extended anteriorly to the carotid canal and inferiorly to the jugular foramen. On histopathologic examination, the tumor showed typical benign schwannoma and did not show any unusual vascularity or malignant feature. Facial nerve was severely compressed and distorted by tumor, which unevenly eroded temporal bone in surgical field. Vestibular schwannoma with atypical invasion of temporal bone can be successfully treated with combined translabyrinthine and lateral suboccipiral approach without facial nerve dysfunction. Early detection and careful dissection of facial nerve with intraoperative monitoring should be considered during operation due to severe adhesion and distortion of facial nerve by tumor and eroded temporal bone. PMID:25932298

  14. Thymic carcinoma presenting as atypical chest pain.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Sadiq; Connelly, Tara; Keita, Luther; Blazkova, Sylvie; Veerasingam, Dave

    2015-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman with a 2-month history of atypical chest pain was referred to the chest pain clinic by the general practitioner. Exercise stress test was positive and subsequent coronary angiogram revealed significant triple vessel disease with left ventricular impairment requiring a coronary artery bypass graft (CABG). The patient had a chest X-ray as part of the preoperative work up. Chest X-ray revealed a large anterior mediastinal mass. Subsequent thorax CT revealed a 7.2??cm anterior mediastinal mass. CT-guided biopsy of the mass revealed the diagnosis of a poorly differentiated thymic basaloid carcinoma. The patient was successfully treated with concomitant surgery involving complete resection of the mass and a CABG procedure. PMID:26607199

  15. [Treatment of atypical and neurotic depression].

    PubMed

    Leitner, P; Umann, E; Kulawik, H

    1986-10-01

    Hitherto it has not been usual to talk in the German language about the therapy-oriented concept of two forms of the progress of atypical depression (Type A and Type V). The characteristic symptom of Type A is angst, together with phobias, physical complaints, etc. In Type V there are vegetative symptoms, often towards evening (Hypersomnia, difficulty in getting to sleep, increased appetite, increased weight, increased libido), accompanied by hysterical extrovert personality traits, and of intermittent occurrence. These clinical pictures are amenable to psychopharmalogical therapy. In conformity with the assumption of "somatic accommodation" treatment with antidepressives is recommended in the case neurotic depression, too, at least in the initial stages of treatment. PMID:3809300

  16. Mycobacterium chelonae Is an Ubiquitous Atypical Mycobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Pinto-Gouveia, Miguel; Gameiro, Ana; Ramos, Leonor; Cardoso, José Carlos; Brites, Maria Manuel; Tellechea, Óscar; Figueiredo, Américo

    2015-01-01

    The type of cutaneous infection varies mainly according to the patient's immune status, and the disseminated form is mostly found in the context of immunosuppression. We report the case of a 62-year-old male who was under long-term systemic corticosteroid therapy and presented with a 7-month history of multiple painless cutaneous lesions at various stages of development: papules, nodules, pustules and hemorrhagic crusts, as well as small erosions and ulcers distributed over the limbs and scalp. Cutaneous biopsy showed a suppurative granulomatous infiltrate with abscess formation. Fite stain revealed numerous extracellular bacilli, suggesting mycobacterial infection, particularly by atypical mycobacteria. Culture of a skin sample revealed Mycobacterium chelonae. The patient started multidrug therapy and showed clinical improvement despite of resistance to one of the antibiotics. This striking presentation underlines the role of immunosuppression with corticotherapy as a major risk factor for these infections. Multidrug therapy is advised and antibiogram is essential in directing treatment. PMID:26351432

  17. Familial cavernous hemangioma with atypical neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Passarin, M G; Salviati, A; Gambina, G; Tezzon, F; Tomelleri, G; Deotto, L; Zanoni, T; Bovi, P; Gerosa, M; Nicolato, A; Mazza, C; Iuzzolino, P; Ghimenton, C; Ferrari, G

    1996-08-01

    Three members of the same family were studied, all of whom had multiple intracerebral cavernous angiomas for which a dominant autosomal inheritance was hypothesised. The proband suffered from headaches, and physical examination revealed evident right hemiparesis. The second case started with a hemorrhagic cerebral stroke and the third was asymptomatic on neurological examination. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), performed in two of the three cases, showed lesions whose number and extent were not radiologically characteristic of cavernous angioma. A cerebral biopsy of the proband enabled the diagnosis to be made. Despite the recent introduction of NMR, the nosological classification of familial forms can be difficult when the radiological lesions are atypical. In such cases, cerebral biopsy is not only a valid diagnostic aid, but is also indispensable for obtaining adequate genetic information. PMID:8915762

  18. Muscarinic M1 receptor and cannabinoid CB1 receptor do not modulate paraoxon-induced seizures

    PubMed Central

    Kow, Rebecca L; Cheng, Eugene M; Jiang, Kelly; Le, Joshua H; Stella, Nephi; Nathanson, Neil M

    2015-01-01

    One of the major signs of severe organophosphate poisoning is seizures. Previous studies have shown that both muscarinic agonist- and organophosphate-induced seizures require activation of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors in the central nervous system. Seizures induced by the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine require the M1 receptor and are modulated by cannabinoid CB1 receptors. In this study, we determined whether M1 and CB1 receptors also regulated seizures induced by the organophosphate paraoxon. We found no differences in seizures induced by paraoxon in wild-type (WT) and M1 knockout (KO) mice, indicating that in contrast to pilocarpine seizures, M1 receptors are not required for paraoxon seizures. Furthermore, we found that pilocarpine administration resulted in seizure-independent activation of ERK in the hippocampus in a M1 receptor-dependent manner, while paraoxon did not induce seizure-independent activation of ERK in the mouse hippocampus. This shows that pilocarpine and paraoxon activated M1 receptors in the hippocampus to different extents. There were no differences in seizures induced by paraoxon in WT and CB1 KO mice, and neither CB1 agonist nor antagonist administration had significant effects on paraoxon seizures, indicating that, in contrast to pilocarpine seizures, paraoxon seizures are not modulated by CB1 receptors. These results demonstrate that there are fundamental molecular differences in the regulation of seizures induced by pilocarpine and paraoxon. PMID:25692018

  19. Atypical clinical and pathological findings in a patient with isolated cortical vein thrombosis?

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yan; Fredrickson, Vance; Lin, Yicong; Piao, Yueshan; Wang, Xiangbo; Lu, Dehong; Li, Cunjiang

    2012-01-01

    Isolated cortical vein thrombosis often produces a focal lesion. Because of the rapid development of collateral circulation, increased intracranial pressure has never been reported in a patient with isolated cortical vein thrombosis. The diagnosis of isolated cortical vein thrombosis is based mainly on MRI, catheter digital subtraction angiography, and histological findings, but may be challenging. We report a patient who presented with intermittent seizures and left-sided limb weakness. Her symptoms gradually progressed, and she eventually developed signs of increased intracranial pressure. Imaging studies showed a space-occupying lesion in the right frontal lobe of the brain. As we could not diagnose isolated cortical vein thrombosis based on the preoperative findings, surgical excision of the lesion was performed under general anesthesia. Histological examination showed destruction of the brain parenchyma with infiltration of macrophages, proliferation of reactive astrocytes and small vessels, and foci of hemorrhage. Further examination found that a number of small vessels in both the subarachnoid space and brain parenchyma were filled with thrombus, some of which was organized. Elastic fiber staining showed that the obstructed vessels were veins. We diagnosed isolated cortical vein thrombosis with atypical clinical features. PMID:25337098

  20. Atypical presentation of cerebral schistosomiasis four years after exposure to Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Rose, Matthew F; Zimmerman, Eli E; Hsu, Liangge; Golby, Alexandra J; Saleh, Emam; Folkerth, Rebecca D; Santagata, Sandro S; Milner, Danny A; Ramkissoon, Shakti H

    2014-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is the second most socioeconomically devastating parasitic disease worldwide, affecting over 240 million people in 77 countries on 5 continents and killing 300,000 people annually in sub-Saharan Africa alone. Neuroschistosomiasis is caused by granuloma formation around eggs that lodge in the CNS, with Schistosoma mansoni and Schistosoma haematobium usually affecting the spinal cord and Schistosoma japonicum causing most reported cerebral disease. We report a case of a previously healthy 25-year-old woman native to the United States who presented with a single generalized tonic-clonic seizure without other neurologic symptoms four years after spending a semester in Ghana where she went swimming once in a river. Brain MRI showed areas of signal abnormality and mottled nodular linear enhancement in the left temporal and right posterior temporal/parietal lobes and right cerebellum without mass effect. A biopsy of the left temporal lesion showed prominent granulomas with dense mixed inflammatory infiltrates composed of eosinophils, plasma cells, and lymphocytes surrounding refractile egg shells containing characteristic embryonal cells and von Lichtenberg's envelope and displaying the pathognomonic spine shape of S. mansoni. Serum ELISA and antibody immunoblots confirmed exposure to S. mansoni. In summary, we describe the atypical combination of cerebral schistosomiasis due to S. mansoni, after a prolonged interval of four years, from a single known exposure. PMID:25667876

  1. A case of atypical progressive supranuclear palsy

    PubMed Central

    Spaccavento, Simona; Del Prete, Marina; Craca, Angela; Loverre, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Background Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) is a neurodegenerative extrapyramidal syndrome. Studies have demonstrated that PSP can present clinically as an atypical dementing syndrome dominated by a progressive apraxia of speech (AOS) and aphasia. Aim We aimed to investigate the clinical presentation of PSP, using a comprehensive multidimensional evaluation, and the disease response to various pharmacological treatments. Methods A 72-year-old right-handed male, with 17 years education, who first presented with aphasia, AOS, depression, apathy, and postural instability at 69 years; a complete neuropsychological evaluation, tapping the different cognitive domains, was performed. Results Testing revealed a moderate global cognitive deficit (Mini-Mental State Examination test score =20), low memory test scores (story recall, Rey’s 15-word Immediate and Delayed Recall), and poor phonemic and semantic fluency. The patient’s language was characterized by AOS, with slow speech rate, prolonged intervals between syllables and words, decreased articulatory accuracy, sound distortions, and anomia. Behavioral changes, such as depression, anxiety, apathy, and irritability, were reported. The neurological examination revealed supranuclear vertical gaze palsy, poor face miming, and a mild balance deficit. Magnetic resonance imaging showed only widespread cortical atrophy. Single photon emission computed tomography demonstrated left > right frontotemporal cortical abnormalities. After 6 months, a further neuropsychological assessment showed a progression in cognitive deficits, with additional attention deficits. The patient reported frequent falls, but the neurological deficits remained unchanged. Neuroimaging tests showed the same brain involvement. Conclusion Our case highlights the heterogeneity of the clinical features in this syndrome, demonstrating that atypical PSP can present as AOS and aphasia, without the classical features or involvement of the subcortical gray and brainstem region, commonly affected in typical PSP. PMID:24368882

  2. Atypical lung carcinoid with GFAP immunoreactive cells.

    PubMed

    Doglioni, C; Barbareschi, M; Balercia, G; Bontempini, L; Iuzzolino, P

    1993-02-01

    A case of atypical carcinoid with peculiar histological and ultrastructural pattern and immunohistochemical phenotype is presented. The neoplasm is composed of three types of cells. Type 1 cells are small to medium sized, fusiform, with scarce cytoplasm and are arranged in fascicles. Type 2 cells are cuboidal and line acinar structures. Type 3 cells have more abundant eosinophilic cytoplasm, larger nuclei and are arranged in fascicles intersecting with fascicles of type 1 cells, and sometimes surround acinar structures. The three cell types are present both in the primary lesion and in its lymph node metastases. Immunohistochemistry demonstrates immunoreactivity of all cell types for general neuroendocrine markers. Cytokeratin immunoreactivity is more prominent in type 1 and 2 cells, and is only focally expressed in type 3 cells. Type 3 cells are also immunoreactive for glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), alpha-actin, S-100 protein, vimentin. Electron microscopic examination confirms the neuroendocrine nature of the cells, and show that type 3 cells have prominent bundles of intermediate filaments, electron-dense granules and junctional complexes. To our knowledge, this is the first case of atypical lung carcinoid with GFAP immunoreactivity. The nature of type 3 GFAP positive cells is unclear. There are some clues pointing to their sustentacular nature, and other ones pointing to a myoepithelial origin, but the data are inconclusive. Type 3 cells may be the malignant counterpart of sustentacular cells seen in typical carcinoids, but their GFAP positivity and the presence of electron-dense granules are very unique features, which differentiates them from sustentacular cells. Alternatively, their unusual GFAP + immunohistochemical phenotype may be due to aberrant expression of cytoskeletal proteins. PMID:8516220

  3. Parenthood, gender and sickness absence.

    PubMed

    Mastekaasa, A

    2000-06-01

    It is well documented that women have generally higher morbidity rates than men. In line with this women are also more absent from work due to sickness. This paper considers one popular explanation of the morbidity difference in general and of the difference in sickness absence in particular, viz. that women to a greater extent than men are exposed to the 'double burden' of combining paid work with family obligations. We discuss theories of role overload and role conflict, which both assume that the combination of multiple roles may have negative health effects, as well theories of role enhancement, which assume positive health effects of multiple roles. Using two large Norwegian data sets, the relationship between the number of and the age of children on the one hand and sickness absence on the other is examined separately for men and women and for a number of theoretically interesting subpopulations of women defined in terms of marital status (also taking account of unmarried cohabitation), level of education, and working hours. Generally speaking the association between children and sickness absence is weak, particularly for married people of both genders. To the extent that married persons with children are more absent than married persons without children, this is largely due to respiratory conditions. The relationship between children and sickness absence is somewhat stronger for single, never married mothers, but not for single mothers who have been previously married or for women living in unmarried cohabitation. The findings thus provide little support for either role overload/conflict or role enhancement theories. The possibility that these effects are both present and counterbalancing each other or that they are confounded with uncontrolled selection effects can not, however, be ruled out. PMID:10798335

  4. The use of atypical antipsychotics in Bipolar Spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    Grünze, H.; Möller, H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Viewed in the context of ever-expanding conceptual boundaries for the diagnosis of bipolar disorder including the spectrum concept of DSM-IV, or even beyond (Akiskal and Pinto, 1999), it becomes obvious that lithium is the treatment of choice in a minority? of patients only (Bowden et al, 2000). This article reviews what additional benefit atypical antipsychotics may provide in patients with bipolar disorder. Due both to tradition and to the regulatory requirements in the USA (FDA) and European Union (EMEA), the main target of clinical trials with atypical antipsychotics has been typical manic disorder. More recently, a significant subgroup of atypical patients, e.g., with mixed states, marked psychosis, or rapid cycling, have participated in these studies to allow an estimation of the value of atypical antipsychotics in these conditions. For the purposes of filing applications for registration with the regulatory agencies, the existing evidence is probably weak, however; from a clinical perspective, it is important that most atypical antipsychotics have also been tested in combination treatments. Finally, first data are now available on long-term prophylactic efficacy of atypical antipsychotics. These combined efficacy data definitely support the use of atypical antipsychotics in bipolar disorder, and it is now the time to collect more experience with these substances in severely ill patients in clinical settings. PMID:21206806

  5. Synaptic changes in GABAA receptor expression in the thalamus of the stargazer mouse model of absence epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Seo, S; Leitch, B

    2015-10-15

    Absence seizures are known to result from disturbances within the cortico-thalamocortical network, which remains partially synchronous under normal conditions but switches to a state of hypersynchronicity and hyperexcitability during absence seizures. There is evidence to suggest that impaired GABAergic inhibitory function within the thalamus could contribute to the generation of hypersynchronous oscillations in some animal models of absence epilepsy. Recently, we demonstrated region-specific alterations in the tissue expression level of GABAA receptors (GABA(A)Rs) ?1 and ?2 subunits within the thalamus of the stargazer mouse model of absence epilepsy. In the present study we investigated whether changes in these subunits also occur at synapses in the ventral posterior (VP) complex where they are components of phasic GABA(A)R receptors. Postembedding immunogold cytochemistry and electron microscopy were used to analyze the relative synaptic expression of ?1 and ?2 subunits in the VP thalamic region in epileptic stargazer mice compared to their non-epileptic littermates. We show that there is a significant increase in expression of ?1 and ?2 subunits (53.6% and 45.8%, respectively) at synapses in the VP region of stargazers, indicative of an increase in phasic GABA(A)Rs at thalamocortical (TC) relay neurons. Furthermore, we investigated whether tissue expression of GABA(A)R subunits ?4 and ?, which constitute part of tonic GABA(A)Rs in the VP region, is altered in the stargazer mouse. Semi-quantitative Western blotting showed a significant increase in GABA(A)R ?4 and ? subunits in the VP region of stargazer thalamus, which would indicate an increase in tonic GABA(A)R expression. Our findings show that there are changes in the levels of both phasic and tonic GABA(A)Rs in the VP thalamus; altered GABAergic inhibition within the VP could be one of many mechanisms contributing to the generation of absence seizures in this model. PMID:26297893

  6. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for psychogenic nonepileptic seizures

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, L.H.; Chalder, T.; Chigwedere, C.; Khondoker, M.R.; Moriarty, J.; Toone, B.K.; Mellers, J.D.C.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To compare cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) and standard medical care (SMC) as treatments for psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES). Methods: Our randomized controlled trial (RCT) compared CBT with SMC in an outpatient neuropsychiatric setting. Sixty-six PNES patients were randomized to either CBT (plus SMC) or SMC alone, scheduled to occur over 4 months. PNES diagnosis was established by video-EEG telemetry for most patients. Exclusion criteria included comorbid history of epilepsy, <2 PNES/month, and IQ <70. The primary outcome was seizure frequency at end of treatment and at 6-month follow-up. Secondary outcomes included 3 months of seizure freedom at 6-month follow-up, measures of psychosocial functioning, health service use, and employment. Results: In an intention-to-treat analysis, seizure reduction following CBT was superior at treatment end (group × time interaction p < 0.0001; large to medium effect sizes). At follow-up, the CBT group tended to be more likely to have experienced 3 months of seizure freedom (odds ratio 3.125, p = 0.086). Both groups improved in some health service use measures and on the Work and Social Adjustment Scale. Mood and employment status showed no change. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that cognitive-behavioral therapy is more effective than standard medical care alone in reducing seizure frequency in PNES patients. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that CBT in addition to SMC, as compared to SMC alone, significantly reduces seizure frequency in patients with PNES (change in median monthly seizure frequency: baseline to 6 months follow-up, CBT group, 12 to 1.5; SMC alone group, 8 to 5). GLOSSARY AED = antiepileptic drug; CBT = cognitive-behavioral therapy; CI = confidence interval; DSM-IV = Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th edition; HADS = Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale; IQR = interquartile range; ITT = intention-to-treat; OR = odds ratio; PNES = psychogenic nonepileptic seizures; RCT = randomized controlled trial; SMC = standard medical care; WASAS = Work and Social Adjustment Scale. PMID:20548043

  7. Metformin Hydrochloride in Patients With Atypical Hyperplasia or In Situ Breast Cancer to Placebo in Decreasing Atypical Cells in Patients With Atypical Hyperplasia or in Situ Breast Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This randomized phase III trial studies metformin hydrochloride to see how well it works compared to placebo in decreasing atypical cells in patients with atypical hyperplasia or in situ breast cancer.

  8. Citation/Reference Carolina Varon, Jansen K., Lagae L., and Van Huffel S. (2015), Can ECG monitoring identify seizures?

    E-print Network

    2015-01-01

    seizures is improved after including respiratory information. Significance These findings could improve monitoring systems in epilepsy, and closed-loop techniques that aim to stop seizures. #12;Highlights: Cardiac and respiratory changes during epileptic seizures Cardiorespiratory interactions derived solely

  9. Risk factors for EEG seizures in neonates treated with hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Wusthoff, Courtney J.; Shellhaas, Renée A.; Tsuchida, Tammy N.; Bonifacio, Sonia Lomeli; Cordeiro, Malaika; Sullivan, Joseph; Abend, Nicholas S.; Chang, Taeun

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess the risk factors for electrographic seizures among neonates treated with therapeutic hypothermia for hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). Methods: Three-center observational cohort study of 90 term neonates treated with hypothermia, monitored with continuous video-EEG (cEEG) within the first day of life (median age at onset of recording 9.5 hours, interquartile range 6.3–14.5), and continued for >24 hours (total recording 93.3 hours, interquartile range 80.1–112.8 among survivors). A pediatric electroencephalographer at each site reviewed cEEGs for electrographic seizures and initial EEG background category. Results: A total of 43 (48%) had electrographic seizures, including 9 (10%) with electrographic status epilepticus. Abnormal initial EEG background classification (excessively discontinuous, depressed and undifferentiated, burst suppression, or extremely low voltage), but not clinical variables (including pH <6.8, base excess ??20, or 10-minute Apgar ?3), was strongly associated with seizures. Conclusions: Electrographic seizures are common among neonates with HIE undergoing hypothermia and are difficult to predict based on clinical features. These results justify the recommendation for cEEG monitoring in neonates treated with hypothermia. PMID:24610326

  10. Clinical implementation of a neonatal seizure detection algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Temko, Andriy; Marnane, William; Boylan, Geraldine; Lightbody, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Technologies for automated detection of neonatal seizures are gradually moving towards cot-side implementation. The aim of this paper is to present different ways to visualize the output of a neonatal seizure detection system and analyse their influence on performance in a clinical environment. Three different ways to visualize the detector output are considered: a binary output, a probabilistic trace, and a spatio-temporal colormap of seizure observability. As an alternative to visual aids, audified neonatal EEG is also considered. Additionally, a survey on the usefulness and accuracy of the presented methods has been performed among clinical personnel. The main advantages and disadvantages of the presented methods are discussed. The connection between information visualization and different methods to compute conventional metrics is established. The results of the visualization methods along with the system validation results indicate that the developed neonatal seizure detector with its current level of performance would unambiguously be of benefit to clinicians as a decision support system. The results of the survey suggest that a suitable way to visualize the output of neonatal seizure detection systems in a clinical environment is a combination of a binary output and a probabilistic trace. The main healthcare benefits of the tool are outlined. The decision support system with the chosen visualization interface is currently undergoing pre-market European multi-centre clinical investigation to support its regulatory approval and clinical adoption. PMID:25892834

  11. The effects of inferior olive lesion on strychnine seizure

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, M.C.; Chung, E.Y.; Van Woert, M.H. )

    1990-10-01

    Bilateral inferior olive lesions, produced by systemic administration of the neurotoxin 3-acetylpyridine (3AP) produce a proconvulsant state specific for strychnine-induced seizures and myoclonus. We have proposed that these phenomena are mediated through increased excitation of cerebellar Purkinje cells, through activation of glutamate receptors, in response to climbing fiber deafferentation. An increase in quisqualic acid (QA)-displaceable ({sup 3}H)AMPA ((RS)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-propionic acid) binding in cerebella from inferior olive-lesioned rats was observed, but no difference in ({sup 3}H)AMPA binding displaced by glutamate, kainic acid (KA) or glutamate diethylester (GDEE) was seen. The excitatory amino acid antagonists GDEE and MK-801 ((+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo(a,d)cyclo-hepten-5,10 imine) were tested as anticonvulsants for strychnine-induced seizures in 3AP inferior olive-lesioned and control rats. Neither drug effected seizures in control rats, however, both GDEE and MK-801 produced a leftward shift in the strychnine-seizure dose-response curve in 3AP inferior olive-lesioned rats. GDEE also inhibited strychnine-induced myoclonus in the lesioned group, while MK-801 had no effect on myoclonus. The decreased threshold for strychnine-induced seizures and myoclonus in the 3AP-inferior olive-lesioned rats may be due to an increase in glutamate receptors as suggested by the ({sup 3}H)AMPA binding data.

  12. Brain regional glucose use during Soman-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    McDonough, J H; Hackley, B E; Cross, R; Samson, F; Nelson, S

    1983-01-01

    The (14C)-2-deoxyglucose procedure was used to determine the effects of the potent acetylcholinesterase inhibitor Soman on regional metabolism in the brain. Groups of rats were given 112 micrograms/kg Soman, 84 micrograms/kg Soman, or saline i.m., and 15 min later the (14C)-2-deoxyglucose mapping procedure was initiated. All animals given 112 micrograms/kg Soman and 2 of 6 given 84 micrograms/kg Soman developed seizures that continued throughout the mapping procedure. Very high rates of glucose use occurred in most of the brain regions studied during seizures. The most striking increases occurred in substantia nigra, septum, outer layer of dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, hippocampal body, frontal cortex, caudate, ventral thalamus, parietal cortex, medial geniculate and interpeduncular nucleus. Only the inferior colliculus, superior olivary nucleus and lateral habenula were unaffected by the seizures. The mid layers of cerebral cortex rostral to superior colliculus showed marked reductions in glucose use which may represent inhibition of neuronal activity or functional failure from depleted energy reserves. The animals given 84 micrograms/kg i.m. that did not have seizures had regional glucose use patterns similar to the controls. The results indicate that the brain damage observed by others in Soman treated rats may be in part due to the excessive neuronal stimulation that occurs during the prolonged Soman-induced seizure. PMID:6685261

  13. The effects of inferior olive lesion on strychnine seizure.

    PubMed

    Anderson, M C; Chung, E Y; Van Woert, M H

    1990-10-01

    Bilateral inferior olive lesions, produced by systemic administration of the neurotoxin 3-acetylpyridine (3AP) produce a proconvulsant state specific for strychnine-induced seizures and myoclonus. We have proposed that these phenomena are mediated through increased excitation of cerebellar Purkinje cells, through activation of glutamate receptors, in response to climbing fiber deafferentation. An increase in quisqualic acid (QA)-displaceable [3H]AMPA [(RS)-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-isoxazole-4-propionic acid] binding in cerebella from inferior olive-lesioned rats was observed, but no difference in [3H]AMPA binding displaced by glutamate, kainic acid (KA) or glutamate diethylester (GDEE) was seen. The excitatory amino acid antagonists GDEE and MK-801 [(+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo[a,d]cyclo-hepten-5,10 imine] were tested as anticonvulsants for strychnine-induced seizures in 3AP inferior olive-lesioned and control rats. Neither drug effected seizures in control rats, however, both GDEE and MK-801 produced a leftward shift in the strychnine-seizure dose-response curve in 3AP inferior olive-lesioned rats. GDEE also inhibited strychnine-induced myoclonus in the lesioned group, while MK-801 had no effect on myoclonus. The decreased threshold for strychnine-induced seizures and myoclonus in the 3AP-inferior olive-lesioned rats may be due to an increase in glutamate receptors as suggested by the [3H]AMPA binding data. PMID:2125520

  14. Sydenham's chorea and seizures. Clinical and electroencephalographic studies.

    PubMed

    Ch'ien, L T; Economides, A N; Lemmi, H

    1978-06-01

    The hospital records of 28 children (mean age, 9.4 years) with typical Sydenham's chorea were reviewed. Nineteen of 28 patients had antistreptolysin O titers of greater than or equal to 200 Todd units. Other causes of chorea were excluded by appropriate laboratory and clinical follow-up studies. At the onset of the movement disorder, 17 of 28 patients had abnormal EEGs consisting of irregular posterior slowing in 15, sharp epileptic spikes in 5, and high-voltage sharp waves in 2. Two patients with spikes predominantly in the temporal lobe regions developed complex partial seizures. On follow-up evaluation, the EEGs returned to normal within one to four weeks. Seizures did not recur after therapy with anticonvulsants. Seizures have been reported only rarely in association with Sydenham's chorea. Our observation suggests that seizures may occur during chorea but may often be masked by frequent choreic movements and thus not recognized. The EEG changes and seizures were transient in our patients studied so far. PMID:655913

  15. EEG seizure detection and prediction algorithms: a survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alotaiby, Turkey N.; Alshebeili, Saleh A.; Alshawi, Tariq; Ahmad, Ishtiaq; Abd El-Samie, Fathi E.

    2014-12-01

    Epilepsy patients experience challenges in daily life due to precautions they have to take in order to cope with this condition. When a seizure occurs, it might cause injuries or endanger the life of the patients or others, especially when they are using heavy machinery, e.g., deriving cars. Studies of epilepsy often rely on electroencephalogram (EEG) signals in order to analyze the behavior of the brain during seizures. Locating the seizure period in EEG recordings manually is difficult and time consuming; one often needs to skim through tens or even hundreds of hours of EEG recordings. Therefore, automatic detection of such an activity is of great importance. Another potential usage of EEG signal analysis is in the prediction of epileptic activities before they occur, as this will enable the patients (and caregivers) to take appropriate precautions. In this paper, we first present an overview of seizure detection and prediction problem and provide insights on the challenges in this area. Second, we cover some of the state-of-the-art seizure detection and prediction algorithms and provide comparison between these algorithms. Finally, we conclude with future research directions and open problems in this topic.

  16. Proposed pathogenesis for atypical femoral fractures: Lessons from materials research

    E-print Network

    Ritchie, Robert

    Bone turnover Aging Bone quality Bone biomechanics Atypical femoral fractures (AFFs) have been well by exposure to potent anti-remodeling agents, most notably the bisphosphonates (BPs). Suppressed bone turnover

  17. Delayed Recurrence of Atypical Pulmonary Carcinoid Cluster: A Rare Occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Surani, Saherish S.; Varon, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Carcinoid is one of the most common tumors of the gastrointestinal tract followed by the tracheobronchial tree. Bronchial carcinoid compromises 20% of total carcinoid and accounts for 1–5% of pulmonary malignancies. Carcinoid can be typical or atypical, with atypical carcinoid compromises 10% of the carcinoid tumors. Carcinoid usually presents as peripheral lung lesion or solitary endobronchial abnormality. Rarely it can present as multiple endobronchial lesion. We hereby present a rare case of an elderly gentleman who had undergone resection of right middle and lower lobe of lung for atypical carcinoid. Seven years later he presented with cough. CT scan of chest revealed right hilar mass. Flexible bronchoscopy revealed numerous endobronchial polypoid lesions in the tracheobronchial tree. Recurrent atypical carcinoid was then confirmed on biopsy. PMID:25506019

  18. The atypical hyperosmotic stress response of Campylobacter jejuni

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Atypical Hyperosmotic Stress Response of Campylobacter jejuni Background. Campylobacter species are unusually sensitive to hyperosmotic stress conditions imposed in the laboratory and encode no characterized osmoprotectant systems. Despite these limitations, the Gram-negative Campylobacter jeju...

  19. The Use of Electroconvulsive Therapy in Atypical Psychotic Presentations

    PubMed Central

    Vasu, Devi

    2007-01-01

    Convulsive therapy and its progeny, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), were originally used for the treatment of catatonic schizophrenia, and there is little doubt that ECT remains an effective intervention for the treatment of schizophrenia. However, current practice tends to favor the use of ECT in severe or treatment refractory affective disorders, and its use in schizophrenia and other nonaffective (atypical) psychotic disorders has become controversial. Case reports have suggested a role for ECT in two specific atypical psychotic disorders: Cotard's syndrome and cycloid psychosis. In this article, we review the atypical psychotic disorders and report a series of five case examples that signify the role of ECT in atypical psychotic presentations, particularly when the symptoms resemble those found in Cotard's syndrome and cycloid psychosis. PMID:20428309

  20. EFFECTIVE SAMPLING TECHNIQUES FOR PARTICULATE EMISSIONS FROM ATYPICAL STATIONARY SOURCES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sampling techniques for measuring particulate emissions from four 'atypical' stationary source categories were developed and evaluated. The categories include low effluent velocity streams, extended dimensions, partially or totally unconfined flow, and saturated gas streams or ga...

  1. Panchagavya Ghrita, an Ayurvedic formulation attenuates seizures, cognitive impairment and oxidative stress in pentylenetetrazole induced seizures in rats.

    PubMed

    Joshi, R; Reeta, K H; Sharma, S K; Tripathi, M; Gupta, Y K

    2015-07-01

    Panchagavya Ghrita (PG), according to Ayurvedic formulary of India (AFI), is used to treat epilepsy (apasmara), fever (jvara), mania (unmade) and jaundice (kamala). In the present study, we examined its effect on convulsions, oxidative stress and cognitive impairment in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) induced seizures in rats. PG @ 250, 500, 1000, 2000 and 4000 mg/kg was administered orally for 7 days to male Wistar rats. On day 7, PTZ (60 mg/kg) was injected intraperitoneally 2 h after the last dose of PG. Sodium valproate (300 mg/kg) was used as positive control. Latency to myoclonic jerks, clonus and generalized tonic clonic seizures (GTCS) were recorded for seizure severity. Cognitive impairment was assessed using elevated plus maze and passive avoidance tests. Malondialdehyde and reduced glutathione levels were measured in rat brain. The results have shown that pretreatment with PG @ 500, 1000, 2000 and 4000 mg/kg exhibited 16.6, 33.3, 50 and 100% protection against occurrence of GTCS. The pretreatment with PG has significantly improved cognitive functions and the oxidative stress induced by seizures demonstrating its protective effect against PTZ induced seizures, and further, use of PG as an anticonvulsant in Ayurvedic system of medicine. PMID:26245029

  2. Excitant amino acids and audiogenic seizures in the genetically epilepsy-prone rat. I. Afferent seizure initiation pathway.

    PubMed

    Faingold, C L; Millan, M H; Boersma, C A; Meldrum, B S

    1988-03-01

    The afferent pathway involved in initiation of audiogenic seizures in the genetically epilepsy-prone rat was investigated by bilateral microinfusion of the excitant amino acid antagonist 2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoate into the major brain stem and subcortical nuclei of the auditory system. This antagonist has been shown to possess anticonvulsant properties in other seizure models, and an excitant amino acid has been implicated as a putative neurotransmitter in several of these nuclei. Seizure severity was significantly reduced following infusion of this agent into the cochlear nucleus, superior olivary complex, inferior colliculus, and medial geniculate body. Many of these animals exhibited a complete blockade of seizures. The smallest effective dose in the cochlear nucleus and the medial geniculate body was 5 nmol per side. The smallest effective dose in the olive was 1 nmol, and in the inferior colliculus 0.1 nmol per side was protective. The onset of anticonvulsant effectiveness was earliest in the inferior colliculus. These findings showed that the inferior colliculus was the most sensitive auditory center to the anticonvulsant action of 2-amino-7-phosphonoheptanoate and that imbalance between inhibitory and excitatory transmission within this brain structure may be crucial in the initiation of audiogenic seizures in the genetically epilepsy-prone rat. PMID:3342850

  3. Issues related to development of new anti-seizure treatments

    PubMed Central

    Wilcox, Karen S.; Dixon-Salazar, Tracy; Sills, Graeme J.; Ben-Menachem, Elinor; White, H. Steve; Porter, Roger J.; Dichter, Marc A.; Moshé, Solomon L.; Noebels, Jeffery L.; Privitera, Michael D.; Rogawski, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary This report represents a summary of the discussions led by the anti-seizure treatment working group of the ILAE/AES Working Groups joint meeting in London (London Meeting). We review here what is currently known about the pharmacological characteristics of current models of refractory seizures, both for adult and pediatric epilepsy. In addition, we address how the NINDS-funded Anticonvulsant Screening Program (ASP) is evolving to incorporate appropriate animal models in the search for molecules that might be sufficiently novel to warrant further pharmacological development. We also briefly address what we believe is necessary, going forward, to achieve the goal of stopping seizures in all patients, with a call to arms for funding agencies, the pharmaceutical industry, and basic researchers. PMID:23909851

  4. Unification of Neuronal Spikes, Seizures, and Spreading Depression

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yina; Ullah, Ghanim

    2014-01-01

    The pathological phenomena of seizures and spreading depression have long been considered separate physiological events in the brain. By incorporating conservation of particles and charge, and accounting for the energy required to restore ionic gradients, we extend the classic Hodgkin–Huxley formalism to uncover a unification of neuronal membrane dynamics. By examining the dynamics as a function of potassium and oxygen, we now account for a wide range of neuronal activities, from spikes to seizures, spreading depression (whether high potassium or hypoxia induced), mixed seizure and spreading depression states, and the terminal anoxic “wave of death.” Such a unified framework demonstrates that all of these dynamics lie along a continuum of the repertoire of the neuron membrane. Our results demonstrate that unified frameworks for neuronal dynamics are feasible, can be achieved using existing biological structures and universal physical conservation principles, and may be of substantial importance in enabling our understanding of brain activity and in the control of pathological states. PMID:25164668

  5. Blast TBI Models, Neuropathology, and Implications for Seizure Risk

    PubMed Central

    Kovacs, S. Krisztian; Leonessa, Fabio; Ling, Geoffrey S. F.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) due to explosive blast exposure is a leading combat casualty. It is also implicated as a key contributor to war related mental health diseases. A clinically important consequence of all types of TBI is a high risk for development of seizures and epilepsy. Seizures have been reported in patients who have suffered blast injuries in the Global War on Terror but the exact prevalence is unknown. The occurrence of seizures supports the contention that explosive blast leads to both cellular and structural brain pathology. Unfortunately, the exact mechanism by which explosions cause brain injury is unclear, which complicates development of meaningful therapies and mitigation strategies. To help improve understanding, detailed neuropathological analysis is needed. For this, histopathological techniques are extremely valuable and indispensable. In the following we will review the pathological results, including those from immunohistochemical and special staining approaches, from recent preclinical explosive blast studies. PMID:24782820

  6. Stimulus driver for epilepsy seizure suppression with adaptive loading impedance.

    PubMed

    Ker, Ming-Dou; Lin, Chun-Yu; Chen, Wei-Ling

    2011-12-01

    A stimulus driver circuit for a micro-stimulator used in an implantable device is presented in this paper. For epileptic seizure control, the target of the driver was to output 30 µA stimulus currents when the electrode impedance varied between 20 and 200 k?. The driver, which consisted of the output stage, control block and adaptor, was integrated in a single chip. The averaged power consumption of the stimulus driver was 0.24-0.56 mW at 800 Hz stimulation rate. Fabricated in a 0.35 µm 3.3 V/24 V CMOS process and applied to a closed-loop epileptic seizure monitoring and controlling system, the proposed design has been successfully verified in the experimental results of Long-Evans rats with epileptic seizures. PMID:22027449

  7. Childhood epilepsy and school absence.

    PubMed

    Ibekwe, Roland C; Ojinnaka, Ngozi C

    2008-10-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common diseases encountered among school children. Its effect on school attendance and academic performance is a major cause of concern to both parents and clinicians. In this communication, the absence rate and academic performance of 50 school children with epilepsy attending normal schools was compared with that of their age- and sex-matched classmates using the class attendance register and overall score of the 2001/2002 academic year. The mean and standard deviation of the number of days an epileptic child was absent in the 2001/2002 session was 15.3 + 13.8 days while that of the controls was 9.4 + 9.6 days (x2 = 3.4,df = 49, p < 0.001). There was no significant relationship between the rate of absenteeism and overall score among both epileptic children (x2 = 6.34, df = 2, p = 0.18) and the controls (x2 = 1.43, df = 2, p = 0.49). School absenteeism was therefore more common among epileptic children, though there was no observed negative effect of this increased absence on academic performance. PMID:18820208

  8. Potent anti-seizure effects of D-leucine.

    PubMed

    Hartman, Adam L; Santos, Polan; O'Riordan, Kenneth J; Stafstrom, Carl E; Marie Hardwick, J

    2015-10-01

    There are no effective treatments for millions of patients with intractable epilepsy. High-fat ketogenic diets may provide significant clinical benefit but are challenging to implement. Low carbohydrate levels appear to be essential for the ketogenic diet to work, but the active ingredients in dietary interventions remain elusive, and a role for ketogenesis has been challenged. A potential antiseizure role of dietary protein or of individual amino acids in the ketogenic diet is understudied. We investigated the two exclusively ketogenic amino acids, L-leucine and L-lysine, and found that only L-leucine potently protects mice when administered prior to the onset of seizures induced by kainic acid injection, but not by inducing ketosis. Unexpectedly, the D-enantiomer of leucine, which is found in trace amounts in the brain, worked as well or better than L-leucine against both kainic acid and 6Hz electroshock-induced seizures. However, unlike L-leucine, D-leucine potently terminated seizures even after the onset of seizure activity. Furthermore, D-leucine, but not L-leucine, reduced long-term potentiation but had no effect on basal synaptic transmission in vitro. In a screen of candidate neuronal receptors, D-leucine failed to compete for binding by cognate ligands, potentially suggesting a novel target. Even at low doses, D-leucine suppressed ongoing seizures at least as effectively as diazepam but without sedative effects. These studies raise the possibility that D-leucine may represent a new class of anti-seizure agents, and that D-leucine may have a previously unknown function in eukaryotes. PMID:26054437

  9. Electroacupuncture Reduces Cocaine-Induced Seizures and Mortality in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Hung; Chuang, Chieh-Min; Lu, Dah-Yuu; Lin, Jaung-Geng

    2013-01-01

    The aims of this study were to characterize the protective profile of electroacupuncture (EA) on cocaine-induced seizures and mortality in mice. Mice were treated with EA (2?Hz, 50?Hz, and 100?Hz), or they underwent needle insertion without anesthesia at the Dazhui (GV14) and Baihui (GV20) acupoints before cocaine administration. EA at 50 Hz applied to GV14 and GV20 significantly reduced the seizure severity induced by a single dose of cocaine (75?mg/kg; i.p.). Furthermore, needle insertion into GV14 and GV20 and EA at 2 Hz and 50 Hz at both acupoints significantly reduced the mortality rate induced by a single lethal dose of cocaine (125?mg/kg; i.p.). In the sham control group, EA at 50?Hz applied to bilateral Tianzong (SI11) acupoints had no protective effects against cocaine. In addition, EA at 50?Hz applied to GV14 and GV20 failed to reduce the incidence of seizures and mortality induced by the local anesthetic procaine. In an immunohistochemistry study, EA (50 Hz) pretreatment at GV14 and GV20 decreased cocaine (75?mg/kg; i.p.)-induced c-Fos expression in the paraventricular thalamus. While the dopamine D3 receptor antagonist, SB-277011-A (30?mg/kg; s.c), did not by itself affect cocaine-induced seizure severity, it prevented the effects of EA on cocaine-induced seizures. These results suggest that EA alleviates cocaine-induced seizures and mortality and that the dopamine D3 receptor is involved, at least in part, in the anticonvulsant effects of EA in mice. PMID:23690833

  10. 28 CFR 8.2 - Designation of officials having seizure authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...Designation of officials having seizure authority. 8.2 Section 8.2 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FBI FORFEITURE AUTHORITY FOR CERTAIN STATUTES § 8.2 Designation of officials having seizure authority. The Director,...

  11. Application of machine learning to epileptic seizure onset detection and treatment

    E-print Network

    Shoeb, Ali Hossam, 1981-

    2009-01-01

    Epilepsy is a chronic disorder of the central nervous system that predisposes individuals to experiencing recurrent seizures. It affects 3 million Americans and 50 million people world-wide. A seizure is a transient ...

  12. Disruption of Endocytosis with the Dynamin Mutant shibirets1 Suppresses Seizures in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kroll, Jason R; Wong, Karen G; Siddiqui, Faria M; Tanouye, Mark A

    2015-11-01

    One challenge in modern medicine is to control epilepsies that do not respond to currently available medications. Since seizures consist of coordinated and high-frequency neural activity, our goal was to disrupt neurotransmission with a synaptic transmission mutant and evaluate its ability to suppress seizures. We found that the mutant shibire, encoding dynamin, suppresses seizure-like activity in multiple seizure-sensitive Drosophila genotypes, one of which resembles human intractable epilepsy in several aspects. Because of the requirement of dynamin in endocytosis, increased temperature in the shi(ts1) mutant causes impairment of synaptic vesicle recycling and is associated with suppression of the seizure-like activity. Additionally, we identified the giant fiber neuron as critical in the seizure circuit and sufficient to suppress seizures. Overall, our results implicate mutant dynamin as an effective seizure suppressor, suggesting that targeting or limiting the availability of synaptic vesicles could be an effective and general method of controlling epilepsy disorders. PMID:26341658

  13. 28 CFR 8.2 - Designation of officials having seizure authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...Designation of officials having seizure authority. 8.2 Section 8.2 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FBI FORFEITURE AUTHORITY FOR CERTAIN STATUTES § 8.2 Designation of officials having seizure authority. The Director,...

  14. 28 CFR 8.2 - Designation of officials having seizure authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...Designation of officials having seizure authority. 8.2 Section 8.2 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FBI FORFEITURE AUTHORITY FOR CERTAIN STATUTES § 8.2 Designation of officials having seizure authority. The Director,...

  15. Dynamic Network Drivers of Seizure Generation, Propagation and Termination in Human Neocortical Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Khambhati, Ankit N; Davis, Kathryn A; Oommen, Brian S; Chen, Stephanie H; Lucas, Timothy H; Litt, Brian; Bassett, Danielle S

    2015-12-01

    The epileptic network is characterized by pathologic, seizure-generating 'foci' embedded in a web of structural and functional connections. Clinically, seizure foci are considered optimal targets for surgery. However, poor surgical outcome suggests a complex relationship between foci and the surrounding network that drives seizure dynamics. We developed a novel technique to objectively track seizure states from dynamic functional networks constructed from intracranial recordings. Each dynamical state captures unique patterns of network connections that indicate synchronized and desynchronized hubs of neural populations. Our approach suggests that seizures are generated when synchronous relationships near foci work in tandem with rapidly changing desynchronous relationships from the surrounding epileptic network. As seizures progress, topographical and geometrical changes in network connectivity strengthen and tighten synchronous connectivity near foci-a mechanism that may aid seizure termination. Collectively, our observations implicate distributed cortical structures in seizure generation, propagation and termination, and may have practical significance in determining which circuits to modulate with implantable devices. PMID:26680762

  16. Dynamic Network Drivers of Seizure Generation, Propagation and Termination in Human Neocortical Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Khambhati, Ankit N.; Davis, Kathryn A.; Oommen, Brian S.; Chen, Stephanie H.; Lucas, Timothy H.; Litt, Brian; Bassett, Danielle S.

    2015-01-01

    The epileptic network is characterized by pathologic, seizure-generating ‘foci’ embedded in a web of structural and functional connections. Clinically, seizure foci are considered optimal targets for surgery. However, poor surgical outcome suggests a complex relationship between foci and the surrounding network that drives seizure dynamics. We developed a novel technique to objectively track seizure states from dynamic functional networks constructed from intracranial recordings. Each dynamical state captures unique patterns of network connections that indicate synchronized and desynchronized hubs of neural populations. Our approach suggests that seizures are generated when synchronous relationships near foci work in tandem with rapidly changing desynchronous relationships from the surrounding epileptic network. As seizures progress, topographical and geometrical changes in network connectivity strengthen and tighten synchronous connectivity near foci—a mechanism that may aid seizure termination. Collectively, our observations implicate distributed cortical structures in seizure generation, propagation and termination, and may have practical significance in determining which circuits to modulate with implantable devices. PMID:26680762

  17. Blood magnesium levels in a mentally retarded/developmentally disabled seizure population.

    PubMed

    Vacanti, M P; Merveille, O C; Smart, J R; Sone, S O

    1991-12-01

    Blood magnesium levels from a mentally retarded/developmentally disabled population with difficult to control seizure disorders were presented. The role of low blood magnesium with regard to seizure activity and its causes was discussed. PMID:1775078

  18. Treatment of Acute Seizures: Is Intranasal Midazolam a Viable Option?

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Lesley K.; Eiland, Lea S.

    2013-01-01

    Seizures in the pediatric population commonly occur, and when proper rescue medication is not administered quickly, the risk of neurologic compromise emerges. For many years, rectal diazepam has been the standard of care, but recent interest in a more cost-effective, safe alternative has led to the investigation of intranasal midazolam for this indication. Although midazolam and diazepam are both members of the benzodiazepine class, the kinetic properties of these 2 anticonvulsants vary. This paper will review available data pertaining to the efficacy, safety, cost, and pharmacokinetics of intranasal midazolam versus rectal diazepam as treatment for acute seizures for children in the prehospital, home, and emergency department settings. PMID:23798902

  19. Lumbar spinal atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Dhir, Aditi; Tekautz, Tanya; Recinos, Violette; Murphy, Erin; Prayson, Richard A; Ruggieri, Paul; Wolff, Johannes

    2015-12-01

    We describe a pediatric patient with an atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT) exclusively of the lumbar spine, with a different presentation from the two previously reported pediatric lumbar AT/RT. AT/RT are rare pediatric tumors of the central nervous system, with a dismal prognosis. Although there is sufficient literature on brain AT/RT, spinal AT/RT continues to be a rare entity, with a lumbar location even less frequently reported. A 30-month-old African American boy with multiple comorbidities presented with the inability to ambulate, encopresis and urinary dribbling. The MRI showed an intradural extramedullary mass extending downwards from the L3-4 level. He underwent an L3-S2 laminoplasty. The surgically resected mass was marked by sheets of cells with large nuclei and prominent nucleoli. The tumor cells stained with antibodies to synaptophysin and CAM5.2, and showed no immunoreactivity to INI-1 antibody. He was diagnosed with a World Health Organization Grade IV AT/RT. There was no mutation detected in the SMARCB1 gene on a comprehensive analysis of his blood. The boy is currently being treated according to the Medical University of Vienna AT/RT protocol, with no evidence of tumor recurrence 8months after surgery. To our knowledge, this is the only report of a lumbar AT/RT in an African American child. PMID:26234633

  20. Vilazodone: another novel atypical antidepressant drug.

    PubMed

    Howland, Robert H

    2011-03-01

    This article reviews the novel atypical antidepressant drug vilazodone (Viibryd(™)), which was approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in January 2011 for the treatment of major depression. Vilazodone is a dual-acting antidepressant drug, with a primary mechanism of action of blocking the serotonin reuptake transporter together with acting as a 5-HT1A receptor partial agonist. The antidepressant efficacy of vilazodone was established in two 8-week placebo-controlled studies. One long-term (52-week) open-label study has been conducted. The most common side effects are diarrhea, nausea, and headache. The drug has not been studied in pediatric patients or well studied in patients older than 65. Vilazodone is efficacious, safe, and well tolerated, but does not appear to have major efficacy advantages compared with other antidepressant drugs. However, because of its unique pharmacology and relatively benign tolerability profile, it may be a more effective alternative for patients who do not respond to or cannot tolerate currently available antidepressant drugs. PMID:21323263

  1. Observing Behavior and Atypically Restricted Stimulus Control

    PubMed Central

    Dube, William V; Dickson, Chata A; Balsamo, Lyn M; O'Donnell, Kristin Lombard; Tomanari, Gerson Y; Farren, Kevin M; Wheeler, Emily E; McIlvane, William J

    2010-01-01

    Restricted stimulus control refers to discrimination learning with atypical limitations in the range of controlling stimuli or stimulus features. In the study reported here, 4 normally capable individuals and 10 individuals with intellectual disabilities (ID) performed two-sample delayed matching to sample. Sample-stimulus observing was recorded with an eye-tracking apparatus. High accuracy scores indicated stimulus control by both sample stimuli for the 4 nondisabled participants and 4 participants with ID, and eye tracking data showed reliable observing of all stimuli. Intermediate accuracy scores indicated restricted stimulus control for the remaining 6 participants. Their eye-tracking data showed that errors were related to failures to observe sample stimuli and relatively brief observing durations. Five of these participants were then given interventions designed to improve observing behavior. For 4 participants, the interventions resulted initially in elimination of observing failures, increased observing durations, and increased accuracy. For 2 of these participants, contingencies sufficient to maintain adequate observing were not always sufficient to maintain high accuracy; subsequent procedure modifications restored it, however. For the 5th participant, initial improvements in observing were not accompanied by improved accuracy, an apparent instance of observing without attending; accuracy improved only after an additional intervention that imposed contingencies on observing behavior. Thus, interventions that control observing behavior seem necessary but may not always be sufficient for the remediation of restricted stimulus control. PMID:21541173

  2. Echovirus 22 is an atypical enterovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Coller, B A; Chapman, N M; Beck, M A; Pallansch, M A; Gauntt, C J; Tracy, S M

    1990-01-01

    Although echovirus 22 (EV22) is classified as an enterovirus in the family Picornaviridae, it is atypical of the enterovirus paradigm, typified by the polioviruses and the coxsackie B viruses. cDNA reverse transcribed from coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) RNA does not hybridize to genomic RNA of EV22, and conversely, cDNA made to EV22 does not hybridize to CVB3 genomic RNA or to molecular clones of CVB3 or poliovirus type 1. EV22 cDNA does not hybridize to viral RNA of encephalomyocarditis virus or to a molecular clone of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus, members of the cardiovirus genus. The genomic RNA of EV22 cannot be detected by the polymerase chain reaction using generic enteroviral primers. EV22 does not shut off host cell protein synthesis, and the RNA of EV22 is efficiently translated in vitro in rabbit reticulocyte lysates. Murine enterovirus-immune T cells recognize and proliferate against EV22 as an antigen in vitro, demonstrating that EV22 shares an epitope(s) common to enteroviruses but not found among other picornaviruses. Images PMID:2159539

  3. Atypical Bilateral Fuchs Uveitis: Diagnostic Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Couto, Cristóbal; Hurtado, Erika; Faingold, Dana; Demetrio, Carmen; Schlaen, Ariel; Zas, Marcelo; Zarate, Jorge; Rosetti, Silvia; de Lima, Andrea Paes; Croxatto, Juan Oscar; Chiaradía, Pablo; Burnier, Miguel N.

    2015-01-01

    Bilateral Fuchs uveitis associated with vitreous infiltration and posterior segment involvement requires a thorough diagnostic evaluation. The lack of well-defined diagnostic criteria makes identification of this entity difficult. The aim of this case report was to present the characteristics of a patient with atypical Fuchs uveitis and the procedures needed to rule out the differential diagnosis with specific attention to the utility of in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM). Case Report One case of chronic bilateral uveitis with severe vitreous opacities is presented. After extensive systemic workup, including vitrectomy, the case had no identifiable systemic etiology. IVCM of the cornea revealed the presence of dendritiform keratic precipitates. Conclusion The diagnosis of Fuchs uveitis is based on clinical findings as no confirmatory laboratory tests are available. A high index of suspicion is key to an early diagnosis, especially in the cases with vitreous opacities and posterior segment manifestations. Auxiliary tests such as IVCM may aid the clinician in the diagnosis of Fuchs uveitis. PMID:26483668

  4. Clinical pharmacology of atypical antipsychotics: an update

    PubMed Central

    Mauri, M.C.; Paletta, S.; Maffini, M.; Colasanti, A.; Dragogna, F.; Di Pace, C.; Altamura, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    This review will concentrate on the clinical pharmacology, in particular pharmacodynamic data, related to atypical antipsychotics, clozapine, risperidone, paliperidone, olanzapine, que¬tiapine, amisulpride, ziprasidone, aripiprazole, asenapine, iloperidone, lurasidone and cariprazine. A summary of their acute pharmacokinetics properties are also reported. Four new second-generation antipsychotics are available: iloperidone, asenapine, lurasidone and in the next future cariprazine. Similar to ziprasidone and aripiprazole, these new agents are advisable for the lower propensity to give weight gain and metabolic abnormalities in comparison with older second-generation antipsychotics such as olanzapine or clozapine. Actually lurasidone seems to be best in terms of minimizing unwanted alterations in body weight and metabolic variables. Therapeutic drug monitoring is not strictly necessary for all of the new antipsychotic drugs because there are no unequivocal data supporting a relationship between plasma drug levels and clinical outcomes or side effects. The exception can be represented by clozapine for which plasma levels of 350-420 ng/ml are reported to be associated with an increased probability of a good clinical response. Also for olanzapine an established therapeutic range (20-50 ng/ml) is proposed to yield an optimal response and minimize side effects. PMID:26417330

  5. The Neurogenetics of Atypical Parkinsonian Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fogel, Brent L.; Clark, Mary C.; Geschwind, Daniel H.

    2015-01-01

    Although classic Parkinson disease is the disorder most commonly associated with the clinical feature of parkinsonism, there is in fact a broader spectrum of disease represented by a collection of phenotypically similar neurodegenerative conditions which mimic many of its core features. These atypical parkinsonian disorders most commonly include progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration, disorders both associated with frontotemporal dementia, as well as multiple system atrophy, and dementia with Lewy bodies. While clinical distinction of these disorders still remains a challenge to physicians, recent advances in genetics are poised to tease apart the differences. Insights into the molecular etiologies underlying these conditions will improve diagnosis, yield better understanding of the underlying disease pathology, and ultimately lend stimulation to the development of potential treatments. At the same time, the wide range of phenotypes observed from mutations in a single gene warrants broad testing facilitated by advances in DNA sequencing. These expanding genomic approaches, ranging from the use of next-generation sequencing to identify causative or risk-associated gene variations to the study of epigenetic modification linking human genetics to environmental factors, are poised to lead the field into a new age of discovery. PMID:24963681

  6. Atypical alpha asymmetry in adults with ADHD*

    PubMed Central

    Hale, T. Sigi; Smalley, Susan L.; Hanada, Grant; Macion, James; McCracken, James T.; McGough, James J.; Loo, Sandra K.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction A growing body of literature suggests atypical cerebral asymmetry and interhemispheric interaction in ADHD. A common means of assessing lateralized brain function in clinical populations has been to examine the relative proportion of EEG alpha activity (8– 12 Hz) in each hemisphere (i.e., alpha asymmetry). Increased rightward alpha asymmetry has been associated with ADHD-like traits such as reduced reward responsiveness, a lack of inhibition toward aversive experience, and increased approach behaviors, and previous work has indicated increased rightward alpha asymmetry in children with ADHD. The current study explores whether increased rightward alpha asymmetry is also evident in adults with ADHD. Method We assessed low (8– 10 Hz) and high (10– 12 Hz) alpha asymmetry in adults with ADHD (n = 29) versus controls (n = 62) during baseline and cognitive activation conditions for nine homologous electrode pairs along the anterior–posterior axis. Result Seven results emerged (p < .05) showing increased rightward alpha asymmetry in adults with ADHD. This occurred in three specific electrode pairs across two testing conditions, and five of six results occurred in the lower alpha band. Finally, post hoc analysis indicated that increased rightward alpha asymmetry was generally associated with greater numbers of ADHD symptoms—with a possible parietal association for inattentive and a fronto-temporal association for hyperactivity symptoms. Conclusions Increased rightward alpha asymmetry previously observed in children with ADHD appears to be a developmentally persistent feature of ADHD. PMID:19467358

  7. Atypical mitochondrial inheritance patterns in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Breton, Sophie; Stewart, Donald T

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is predominantly maternally inherited in eukaryotes. Diverse molecular mechanisms underlying the phenomenon of strict maternal inheritance (SMI) of mtDNA have been described, but the evolutionary forces responsible for its predominance in eukaryotes remain to be elucidated. Exceptions to SMI have been reported in diverse eukaryotic taxa, leading to the prediction that several distinct molecular mechanisms controlling mtDNA transmission are present among the eukaryotes. We propose that these mechanisms will be better understood by studying the deviations from the predominating pattern of SMI. This minireview summarizes studies on eukaryote species with unusual or rare mitochondrial inheritance patterns, i.e., other than the predominant SMI pattern, such as maternal inheritance of stable heteroplasmy, paternal leakage of mtDNA, biparental and strictly paternal inheritance, and doubly uniparental inheritance of mtDNA. The potential genes and mechanisms involved in controlling mitochondrial inheritance in these organisms are discussed. The linkage between mitochondrial inheritance and sex determination is also discussed, given that the atypical systems of mtDNA inheritance examined in this minireview are frequently found in organisms with uncommon sexual systems such as gynodioecy, monoecy, or andromonoecy. The potential of deviations from SMI for facilitating a better understanding of a number of fundamental questions in biology, such as the evolution of mtDNA inheritance, the coevolution of nuclear and mitochondrial genomes, and, perhaps, the role of mitochondria in sex determination, is considerable. PMID:26501689

  8. TABLE OF CONTENTS Poster n1 -ARAKAKI Takafumi -Persistence and termination of absence epileptic seizures: the role

    E-print Network

    ............................................................................................................................1 Poster n°2 - BERCIER Valérie - Dynactin mutations associated with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

  9. Effects of hypoxia-induced neonatal seizures on acute hippocampal injury and later-life seizure susceptibility and anxiety-related behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Alvarez, Natalia; Jimenez-Mateos, Eva M; Dunleavy, Mark; Waddington, John L; Boylan, Geraldine B; Henshall, David C

    2015-11-01

    Seizures are common during the neonatal period, often due to hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and may contribute to acute brain injury and the subsequent development of cognitive deficits and childhood epilepsy. Here we explored short- and long-term consequences of neonatal hypoxia-induced seizures in 7day old C57BL/6J mice. Seizure activity, molecular markers of hypoxia and histological injury were investigated acutely after hypoxia and response to chemoconvulsants and animal behaviour was explored at adulthood. Hypoxia was induced by exposing pups to 5% oxygen for 15min (global hypoxia). Electrographically defined seizures with behavioral correlates occurred in 95% of these animals and seizures persisted for many minutes after restitution of normoxia. There was minimal morbidity or mortality. Pre- or post-hypoxia injection of phenobarbital (50mg/kg) had limited efficacy at suppressing seizures. The hippocampus from neonatal hypoxia-seizure mice displayed increased expression of vascular endothelial growth factor and the immediate early gene c-fos, minimal histological evidence of cell injury and activation of caspase-3 in scattered neurons. Behavioral analysis of mice five weeks after hypoxia-induced seizures detected novel anxiety-related and other behaviors, while performance in a spatial memory test was similar to controls. Seizure threshold tests with kainic acid at six weeks revealed that mice previously subject to neonatal hypoxia-induced seizures developed earlier, more frequent and longer-duration seizures. This study defines a set of electro-clinical, molecular, pharmacological and behavioral consequences of hypoxia-induced seizures that indicate short- and long-term deleterious outcomes and may be a useful model to investigate the pathophysiology and treatment of neonatal seizures in humans. PMID:26341542

  10. Faciobrachial dystonic seizures: the influence of immunotherapy on seizure control and prevention of cognitive impairment in a broadening phenotype.

    PubMed

    Irani, Sarosh R; Stagg, Charlotte J; Schott, Jonathan M; Rosenthal, Clive R; Schneider, Susanne A; Pettingill, Philippa; Pettingill, Rosemary; Waters, Patrick; Thomas, Adam; Voets, Natalie L; Cardoso, Manuel J; Cash, David M; Manning, Emily N; Lang, Bethan; Smith, Shelagh J M; Vincent, Angela; Johnson, Michael R

    2013-10-01

    Voltage-gated potassium channel complex antibodies, particularly those directed against leucine-rich glioma inactivated 1, are associated with a common form of limbic encephalitis that presents with cognitive impairment and seizures. Faciobrachial dystonic seizures have recently been reported as immunotherapy-responsive, brief, frequent events that often predate the cognitive impairment associated with this limbic encephalitis. However, these observations were made from a retrospective study without serial cognitive assessments. Here, we undertook the first prospective study of faciobrachial dystonic seizures with serial assessments of seizure frequencies, cognition and antibodies in 10 cases identified over 20 months. We hypothesized that (i) faciobrachial dystonic seizures would show a differential response to anti-epileptic drugs and immunotherapy; and that (ii) effective treatment of faciobrachial dystonic seizures would accelerate recovery and prevent the development of cognitive impairment. The 10 cases expand both the known age at onset (28 to 92 years, median 68) and clinical features, with events of longer duration, simultaneously bilateral events, prominent automatisms, sensory aura, and post-ictal fear and speech arrest. Ictal epileptiform electroencephalographic changes were present in three cases. All 10 cases were positive for voltage-gated potassium channel-complex antibodies (346-4515 pM): nine showed specificity for leucine-rich glioma inactivated 1. Seven cases had normal clinical magnetic resonance imaging, and the cerebrospinal fluid examination was unremarkable in all seven tested. Faciobrachial dystonic seizures were controlled more effectively with immunotherapy than anti-epileptic drugs (P = 0.006). Strikingly, in the nine cases who remained anti-epileptic drug refractory for a median of 30 days (range 11-200), the addition of corticosteroids was associated with cessation of faciobrachial dystonic seizures within 1 week in three and within 2 months in six cases. Voltage-gated potassium channel-complex antibodies persisted in the four cases with relapses of faciobrachial dystonic seizures during corticosteroid withdrawal. Time to recovery of baseline function was positively correlated with time to immunotherapy (r = 0.74; P = 0.03) but not time to anti-epileptic drug administration (r = 0.55; P = 0.10). Of 10 cases, the eight cases who received anti-epileptic drugs (n = 3) or no treatment (n = 5) all developed cognitive impairment. By contrast, the two who did not develop cognitive impairment received immunotherapy to treat their faciobrachial dystonic seizures (P = 0.02). In eight cases without clinical magnetic resonance imaging evidence of hippocampal signal change, cross-sectional volumetric magnetic resonance imaging post-recovery, after accounting for age and head size, revealed cases (n = 8) had smaller brain volumes than healthy controls (n = 13) (P < 0.001). In conclusion, faciobrachial dystonic seizures can be prospectively identified as a form of epilepsy with an expanding phenotype. Immunotherapy is associated with excellent control of the frequently anti-epileptic drug refractory seizures, hastens time to recovery, and may prevent the subsequent development of cognitive impairment observed in this study. PMID:24014519

  11. Clinical and neuroradiological approach to fucosidosis in a child with atypical presentation

    PubMed Central

    Zubarioglu, Tanyel; Kiykim, Ertugrul; Zeybek, Cigdem Aktuglu; Cansever, Mehmet Serif; Benbir, Gulcin; Aydin, Ahmet; Yalcinkaya, Cengiz

    2015-01-01

    Fucosidosis is a rare lysosomal storage disease with clinical presentation of developmental retardation, coarse facial features, hepatosplenomegaly, dysostosis multiplex, and angiokeratomas. Here, a 7-year-old female patient with progressive dystonic movement disorder and loss of acquired motor skills is presented. Coarse facial feature and abnormal globuspallidus signaling in brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) led the patient to be investigated in terms of fucosidosis despite absence of hepatosplenomegaly, dysostosis multiplex, and angiokeratomas. Markedly decreased enzyme activity of alpha-fucosidosis led to the correct diagnosis. Conclusion: Various neurological findings have recently been reported in fucosidosis. However, neuroimaging findings have not been studied in detail except a few studies. It is critically important to discuss the wide neuroradiological spectrum of the disease and to highlight fucosidosis in differential diagnosis of bilateral pallidalhypointensity on T2-weighted images in brain MRI. In addition, description of atypical clinical findings of fucosidosis should avoid clinicians from diagnostic delay. PMID:26713028

  12. The new ILAE report on terminology and concepts for organization of epileptic seizures: a clinician's critical view and contribution.

    PubMed

    Panayiotopoulos, Chrysostomos P

    2011-12-01

    The International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) standardized classification and terminology for "epileptic seizures" of 1981 and "epilepsies and epileptic syndromes" of 1989 provide a fundamental framework for organizing and differentiating the epilepsies. However, a revision of these classifications is mandated by recent major technologic and scientific advances. Since 1997, the relevant ILAE Commissions have made significant efforts to achieve better and internationally uniform classifications as reflected in their reports of 2001, 2006, and 2010. Their initial aim to construct a "new scientific classification from application of methods used in biology that determines separate species and natural classes" proved elusive and, therefore, the last Commission in their report of 2010 confined their revisions to "new terminology and concepts" instead of "proposing a new classification (in the sense of organization) of epilepsies." It is unfortunate that most of the proposals in this report are modified interpretations and nomenclature of previous ILAE classifications; new terms are not better than the old ones, and recent advances have not been incorporated. Hence, the new ILAE report met with considerable protest from several expert epileptologists. This critical review refers mainly to the epileptic seizures, the classification of which may be an easier and less controversial task in the ILAE revisions. A revised classification should incorporate advanced knowledge of seizure pathophysiology, and clinical, interictal, and ictal manifestations. Such an attempt was made and detailed in the 2006 report of the ILAE Classification Core Group. However, these changes were largely discarded in the new ILAE report of 2010, without justification. This is inexplicable considering that the scientific advances that were available to the two Commissions were the same or had improved between 2006 and 2010. Of major concern is that "No specific classification is recommended for focal seizures which should be described according to their manifestations." Such a proposition defies the essence and the principle of any classification that requires an organization and a common language for communication. Free text descriptions are fine in a manual of differential diagnosis but not as a classification system. Another striking weakness is that even the accepted types of epileptic seizure are listed by name only, without defining them. The result is avoidable confusion. Furthermore, the report fails to consider reflex epileptic seizures. Status epilepticus is the most conspicuous omission despite immense advances of our understanding of it and its relevance on the classification. It appears that the new ILAE report does not fulfill its intent to improve the previous classifications and it may be premature to submit anything similar to this for approval by the ILAE General Assembly. The ILAE Commission could benefit by asking experts in basic and clinical science to provide a concise statement in their field of expertise as, for example, what are focal, myoclonic, or absence seizures, and their subtypes, their manifestations, and their possible pathophysiology. Areas of certainties and uncertainties, agreements and disagreements should be identified and stated clearly, with documentation of the reasons for it. Probably this is the only way forward for a truly scientific, sound, and clinically meaningful organizational system for the epileptic seizures and the epilepsies. PMID:22004554

  13. 19 CFR 12.150 - Merchandise prohibited by economic sanctions; detention; seizure or other disposition; blocked...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Assets Control (OFAC) (31 CFR Chapter V). (b) Seizure. When an unlicensed importation of merchandise...; detention; seizure or other disposition; blocked property. 12.150 Section 12.150 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS...; detention; seizure or other disposition; blocked property. (a) Generally. Merchandise from certain...

  14. Case Report Shared vulnerability between seizures and psychosis in cocaine addiction?

    E-print Network

    Hayar, Abdallah

    Case Report Shared vulnerability between seizures and psychosis in cocaine addiction? Benjamin Available online 15 September 2011 Keywords: Cocaine Seizures Psychosis N-methyl-D-aspartate Dopamine Kindling effect Cocaine-induced seizures (CIS) and cocaine-induced psychosis (CIP) may be complications

  15. Functional, metabolic, and synaptic changes after seizures as potential targets for antiepileptic therapy.

    PubMed

    Löscher, Wolfgang; Köhling, Rüdiger

    2010-10-01

    Little is known about how the brain limits seizure duration and terminates seizures. Depending on severity and duration, a single seizure is followed by various functional, metabolic, and synaptic changes that may form targets for novel therapeutic strategies. It is long known that most seizures are followed by a period of postictal refractoriness during which the threshold for induction of additional seizures is increased. The endogenous anticonvulsant mechanisms involved in this phenomenon may be relevant for both spontaneous seizure arrest and increase of seizure threshold after seizure arrest. Postictal refractoriness has been extensively studied in various seizure and epilepsy models, including electrically and chemically induced seizures, kindling, and genetic animal models of epilepsy. During kindling development, two antagonistic processes occur simultaneously, one responsible for kindling-like events and the other for terminating ictus and postictal refractoriness. Frequently occurring seizures may lead to an accumulation of postictal refractoriness that may last weeks. The mechanisms involved in seizure termination and postictal refractoriness include changes in ionic microenvironment, in pH, and in various endogenous neuromodulators such as adenosine and neuropeptides. In animal models, the anticonvulsant efficacy of several antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is increased during postictal refractoriness, which is a logical consequence of the interaction between endogenous anticonvulsant processes and the mechanism of AEDs. As discussed in this review, enhanced understanding of these endogenous processes may lead to novel targets for AED development. PMID:20705520

  16. The Effects of Seizures on the Connectivity and Circuitry of the Developing Brain

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swann, John W.

    2004-01-01

    Recurring seizures in infants and children are often associated with cognitive deficits, but the reason for the learning difficulties is unclear. Recent studies in several animal models suggest that seizures themselves may contribute in important ways to these deficits. Other studies in animals have shown that recurring seizures result in…

  17. Synergistic GABA-Enhancing Therapy against Seizures in a Mouse Model of Dravet Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Oakley, John C.; Cho, Alvin R.; Cheah, Christine S.; Scheuer, Todd

    2013-01-01

    Seizures remain uncontrolled in 30% of patients with epilepsy, even with concurrent use of multiple drugs, and uncontrolled seizures result in increased morbidity and mortality. An extreme example is Dravet syndrome (DS), an infantile-onset severe epilepsy caused by heterozygous loss of function mutations in SCN1A, the gene encoding the brain type-I voltage-gated sodium channel NaV1.1. Studies in Scn1a heterozygous knockout mice demonstrate reduced excitability of GABAergic interneurons, suggesting that enhancement of GABA signaling may improve seizure control and comorbidities. We studied the efficacy of two GABA-enhancing drugs, clonazepam and tiagabine, alone and in combination, against thermally evoked myoclonic and generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Clonazepam, a positive allosteric modulator of GABA-A receptors, protected against myoclonic and generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Tiagabine, a presynaptic GABA reuptake inhibitor, was protective against generalized tonic-clonic seizures but only minimally protective against myoclonic seizures and enhanced myoclonic seizure susceptibility at high doses. Combined therapy with clonazepam and tiagabine was synergistic against generalized tonic-clonic seizures but was additive against myoclonic seizures. Toxicity determined by rotorod testing was additive for combination therapy. The synergistic actions of clonazepam and tiagabine gave enhanced seizure protection and reduced toxicity, suggesting that combination therapy may be well tolerated and effective for seizures in DS. PMID:23424217

  18. Feasibility Study of a Caregiver Seizure Alert System in Canine Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Coles, Lisa D; Patterson, Edward E; Sheffield, Warren D; Mavoori, Jaideep; Higgins, Jason; Bland, Mike; Leyde, Kent; Cloyd, James C; Litt, Brian; Vite, Charles; Worrell, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Summary A device capable of detecting seizures and alerting caregivers would be a major advance for epilepsy management, and could be used to guide early intervention and prevent seizure-related injuries. The objective of this work was to evaluate a seizure advisory system (SAS) that alerts caregivers of seizures in canines with naturally occurring epilepsy. Four dogs with epilepsy were implanted with a SAS that wirelessly transmits continuous intracranial EEG (iEEG) to an external device embedded with a seizure detection algorithm and the capability to alert caregivers. In this study a veterinarian was alerted by automated text message if prolonged or repetitive seizures occurred, and a rescue therapy protocol was implemented. The performance of the SAS caregiver alert was evaluated over the course of 8 weeks. Following discontinuation of antiepileptic drugs, the dogs experienced spontaneous unprovoked partial seizures that secondarily generalized. Three prolonged or repetitive seizure episodes occurred in 2 of the dogs. On each occasion, the SAS caregiver alert successfully alerted an on call veterinarian who confirmed the seizure activity via remote video-monitoring. A rescue medication was then administered and the seizures were aborted. This study demonstrates the feasibility of a SAS caregiver alert for prolonged or repetitive seizures, and enabling rescue medications to be delivered in a timely manner. The SAS may improve the management of human epilepsy by alerting caregivers of seizures, enabling early interventions, and potentially improving outcomes and quality of life of patients and caregivers. PMID:23962794

  19. Epilepsy Research 72 (2006) 8081 Comment on: "Performance of a seizure warning

    E-print Network

    Timmer, Jens

    2006-01-01

    Epilepsy Research 72 (2006) 80­81 Discussion Comment on: "Performance of a seizure warning Epilepsy Center, University Hospital of Freiburg, Germany Accepted 26 June 2006 Available online 21 August device for epilepsy patients based on an in-time seizure warning. However, seizure pre- diction suffers

  20. Febrile Seizures and Behavioural and Cognitive Outcomes in Preschool Children: An Old Issue Revisited

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deonna, Thierry

    2012-01-01

    The possible deleterious role of febrile seizures on development is an old issue. It took a long time to realize that impaired development or occurrence of chronic epilepsy affected a very small minority of children with febrile seizures. These children either had pre-existing brain damage, specific genetic epileptic conditions, or seizure-induced…

  1. Phylogenetic and genetic linkage between novel atypical dual-specificity phosphatases from non-metazoan organisms.

    PubMed

    Romá-Mateo, Carlos; Sacristán-Reviriego, Almudena; Beresford, Nicola J; Caparrós-Martín, José Antonio; Culiáñez-Macià, Francisco A; Martín, Humberto; Molina, María; Tabernero, Lydia; Pulido, Rafael

    2011-04-01

    Dual-specificity phosphatases (DSPs) constitute a large protein tyrosine phosphatase (PTP) family, with examples in distant evolutive phyla. PFA-DSPs (Plant and Fungi Atypical DSPs) are a group of atypical DSPs present in plants, fungi, kinetoplastids, and slime molds, the members of which share structural similarity with atypical- and lipid phosphatase DSPs from mammals. The analysis of the PFA-DSPs from the plant Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPFA-DSPs) showed differential tissue mRNA expression, substrate specificity, and catalytic activity for these proteins, suggesting different functional roles among plant PFA-DSPs. Bioinformatic analysis revealed the existence of novel PFA-DSP-related proteins in fungi (Oca1, Oca2, Oca4 and Oca6 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and protozoa, which were segregated from plant PFA-DSPs. The closest yeast homolog for these proteins was the PFA-DSP from S. cerevisiae ScPFA-DSP1/Siw14/Oca3. Oca1, Oca2, Siw14/Oca3, Oca4, and Oca6 were involved in the yeast response to caffeine and rapamycin stresses. Siw14/Oca3 was an active phosphatase in vitro, whereas no phosphatase activity could be detected for Oca1. Remarkably, overexpression of Siw14/Oca3 suppressed the caffeine sensitivity of oca1, oca2, oca4, and oca6 deleted strains, indicating a genetic linkage and suggesting a functional relationship for these proteins. Functional studies on mutations targeting putative catalytic residues from the A. thaliana AtPFA-DSP1/At1g05000 protein indicated the absence of canonical amino acids acting as the general acid/base in the phosphor-ester hydrolysis, which suggests a specific mechanism of reaction for PFA-DSPs and related enzymes. Our studies demonstrate the existence of novel phosphatase protein families in fungi and protozoa, with active and inactive enzymes linked in common signaling pathways. This illustrates the catalytic and functional complexity of the expanding family of atypical dual-specificity phosphatases in non-metazoans, including parasite organisms responsible for infectious human diseases. PMID:21409566

  2. The use of atypical antipsychotics in the management of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, M; Young, P I; Bateman, D N; Smith, J M; Thomas, S H L

    1999-01-01

    Long-term drug treatment of schizophrenia with conventional antipsychotics has limitations: an estimated quarter to one third of patients are treatment-resistant; conventional antipsychotics have only a modest impact upon negative symptoms (poverty of thought, social withdrawal and loss of affect); and adverse effects, particularly extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS). Newer, so-called atypical, antipsychotics such as olanzapine, risperidone, sertindole and clozapine (an old drug which was re-introduced in 1990) are claimed to address these limitations. Atypical agents are, at a minimum, at least as effective as conventional drugs such as haloperidol. They also cause substantially fewer extrapyramidal symptoms. However, some other adverse effects are more common than with conventional drugs. For example, clozapine carries a significant risk of serious blood disorders, for which special monitoring is mandatory; it also causes troublesome drowsiness and increased salivation more often than conventional agents. Some atypical agents cause more weight gain or QT prolongation than older agents. The choice of therapy is, therefore, not straightforward. At present, atypical agents represent an advance for patients with severe or intolerable EPS. Most published evidence exists to support the use of clozapine, which has also been shown to be effective in schizophrenia refractory to conventional agents. However, the need for compliance with blood count monitoring and its sedative properties make careful patient selection important. The extent of any additional direct benefit offered by atypical agents on negative symptoms is not yet clear. The lack of a depot formulation for atypical drugs may pose a significant practical problem. To date, only two double-blind studies in which atypical agents were compared directly have been published. Neither provides compelling evidence for the choice of one agent over another. Atypical agents are many times more expensive than conventional drugs. Although drug treatment constitutes only a small proportion of the costs of managing schizophrenia, the additional annual cost of the use of atypical agents in, say, a quarter of the likely U.K. schizophrenic population would be about £56 M. There is only limited evidence of cost-effectiveness. Atypical antipsychotics are not currently licensed for other conditions where conventional antipsychotics are commonly used, such as behaviour disturbance or dementia in the elderly. Their dose, and place in treatment in such cases have yet to be determined. PMID:10073734

  3. First Japanese case of atypical progeroid syndrome/atypical Werner syndrome with heterozygous LMNA mutation.

    PubMed

    Motegi, Sei-ichiro; Yokoyama, Yoko; Uchiyama, Akihiko; Ogino, Sachiko; Takeuchi, Yuko; Yamada, Kazuya; Hattori, Tomoyasu; Hashizume, Hiroaki; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Goto, Makoto; Ishikawa, Osamu

    2014-12-01

    Atypical progeroid syndrome (APS), including atypical Werner syndrome (AWS), is a progeroid syndrome involving heterozygous mutations in the LMNA gene encoding the nuclear protein lamin A/C. We report the first Japanese case of APS/AWS with a LMNA mutation (p.D300N). A 53-year-old Japanese man had a history of recurrent severe cardiovascular diseases as well as brain infarction and hemorrhages. Although our APS/AWS patient had overlapping features with Werner syndrome (WS), such as high-pitched voice, scleroderma, lipoatrophy and atherosclerosis, several cardinal features of WS, including short stature, premature graying/alopecia, cataract, bird-like face, flat feet, hyperkeratosis on the soles and diabetes mellitus, were absent. In immunofluorescence staining and electron microscopic analyses of the patient's cultured fibroblasts, abnormal nuclear morphology, an increase in small aggregation of heterochromatin and a decrease in interchromatin granules in nuclei of fibroblasts were observed, suggesting that abnormal nuclear morphology and chromatin disorganization may be associated with the pathogenesis of APS/AWS. PMID:25327215

  4. Abnormal cortical thickness connectivity persists in childhood absence epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Curwood, Evan K; Pedersen, Mangor; Carney, Patrick W; Berg, Anne T; Abbott, David F; Jackson, Graeme D

    2015-01-01

    Objective Childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) is a childhood-onset generalized epilepsy. Recent fMRI studies have suggested that frontal cortex activity occurs before thalamic involvement in epileptic discharges suggesting that frontal cortex may play an important role in childhood absence seizures. Neurocognitive deficits can persist after resolution of the epilepsy. We investigate whether structural connectivity changes are present in the brains of CAE patients in young adulthood. Methods Cortical thickness measurements were obtained for 30 subjects with CAE (mean age 21 ± 2 years) and 56 healthy controls (mean age 24 ± 4) and regressed for age, sex, and total intracranial volume (TIV). Structural connectivity was evaluated by measuring the correlation between average cortical thicknesses in 915 regions over the brain. Maps of connectivity strength were then obtained for both groups. Results When compared to controls, the CAE group shows overall increased “connectivity” with focal increased connection strength in anterior regions including; the anterior cingulate and the insula and superior temporal gyrus bilaterally; the right orbito-frontal and supramarginal regions; and the left entorhinal cortex. Decreased connection strength in the CAE group was found in the left occipital lobe, with a similar trend in right occipital lobe. Interpretation Brains in young adults whose CAE was resolved had abnormal structural connectivity. Our findings suggest that frontal regions correlate most with cortical thickness throughout the brain in CAE patients, whereas occipital regions correlate most in well matched normal controls. We interpret this as evidence of a developmental difference in CAE that emphasizes these frontal lobe regions, perhaps driven by frontal lobe epileptiform activity. PMID:26000319

  5. Clinical impact of atypical endoscopic features in rectal neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Jong Hee; Lee, Seong Dae; Youk, Eui Gon; Lee, Jae Bum; Lee, Enu-Jung; Chang, Hee Jin; Sohn, Dae Kyung

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To validate the association between atypical endoscopic features and lymph node metastasis (LNM). METHODS: A total of 247 patients with rectal neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) were analyzed. Endoscopic images were reviewed independently by two endoscopists, each of whom classified tumors by sized and endoscopic features, such as shape, color, and surface change (kappa coefficient 0.76 for inter-observer agreement). All of patients underwent computed tomography scans of abdomen and pelvis for evaluation of LNM. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify the factors associated with LNM. Additionally, the association between endoscopic atypical features and immunohistochemical staining of tumors was analyzed. RESULTS: Of 247 patients, 156 (63.2%) were male and 15 (6.1%) were showed positive for LNM. On univariate analysis, tumor size (P < 0.001), shape (P < 0.001), color (P < 0.001) and surface changes (P < 0.001) were significantly associated with LNM. On multivariate analysis, tumor size (OR = 11.53, 95%CI: 2.51-52.93, P = 0.002) and atypical surface (OR = 27.44, 95%CI: 5.96-126.34, P < 0.001) changes were independent risk factors for LNM. The likelihood of atypical endoscopic features increased as tumor size increased. Atypical endoscopic features were associated with LNM in rectal NETs < 10 mm (P = 0.005) and 10-19 mm (P = 0.041) in diameter. Immunohistochemical staining showed that the rate of atypical endoscopic features was higher in non L-cell tumors. CONCLUSION: Atypical endoscopic features as well as tumor size are predictive factors of LNM in patients with rectal NETs. PMID:26715813

  6. Childhood Learning Disabilities and Atypical Dementia: A Retrospective Chart Review

    PubMed Central

    Seifan, Alon

    2015-01-01

    Objective To further our understanding of the association between self-reported childhood learning disabilities (LDs) and atypical dementia phenotypes (Atypical Dementia), including logopenic primary progressive aphasia (L-PPA), Posterior Cortical Atrophy (PCA), and Dysexecutive-type Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). Methods This retrospective case series analysis of 678 comprehensive neuropsychological assessments compared rates of self-reported LD between dementia patients diagnosed with Typical AD and those diagnosed with Atypical Dementia. 105 cases with neuroimaging or CSF data available and at least one neurology follow-up were identified as having been diagnosed by the neuropsychologist with any form of neurodegenerative dementia. These cases were subject to a consensus diagnostic process among three dementia experts using validated clinical criteria for AD and PPA. LD was considered Probable if two or more statements consistent with prior LD were documented within the Social & Developmental History of the initial neuropsychological evaluation. Results 85 subjects (Typical AD n=68, Atypical AD n=17) were included in the final analysis. In logistic regression models adjusted for age, gender, handedness, education and symptom duration, patients with Probable LD, compared to patients without Probable LD, were significantly more likely to be diagnosed with Atypical Dementia vs. Typical AD (OR 13.1, 95% CI 1.3-128.4). All three of the L-PPA cases reporting a childhood LD endorsed childhood difficulty with language. By contrast, both PCA cases reporting Probable childhood LD endorsed difficulty with attention and/or math. Conclusions In people who develop dementia, childhood LD may predispose to atypical phenotypes. Future studies are required to confirm whether atypical neurodevelopment predisposes to regional-specific neuropathology in AD and other dementias. PMID:26106899

  7. Amygdala Volume and Psychopathology in Childhood Complex Partial Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Daley, Melita; Siddarth, Prabha; Levitt, Jennifer; Gurbani, Suresh; Shields, W. Donald; Sankar, Raman; Toga, Arthur; Caplan, Rochelle

    2008-01-01

    Purpose This study compared amygdala volume in children with cryptogenic epilepsy, who had complex partial seizures (CPS), with age and gender matched normal children. It also examined the relationship of amygdala volumes with seizure variables and the presence of psychopathology in the patients. Methods 28 children with cryptogenic epilepsy, all of whom had CPS, and gender matched normal children, aged 6–16 years had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at 1.5 Tesla. Tissue was segmented and total brain volume and amygdala volumes obtained from manual tracings were computed. Results There were no significant differences in the amygdala volume of the CPS and normal groups. Within the CPS group, the children with an affective/anxiety disorder had significantly larger left amygdala volumes compared to those with no psychopathology as well as greater amygdala asymmetry. Exploring the association of seizure variables to amygdala volumes yielded no significant predictors. Conclusions In pediatric CPS left amygdala involvement might reflect effects of the neuropathology underlying comorbid affective or anxiety disorders on amygdala development rather than effects of on-going seizures. PMID:18359276

  8. 27 CFR 555.186 - Seizure or forfeiture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE EXPLOSIVES COMMERCE IN EXPLOSIVES Marking of Plastic Explosives § 555.186 Seizure or forfeiture. Any plastic explosive that does not contain a detection agent in violation of 18 U... of this chapter for regulations on summary destruction of plastic explosives that do not contain...

  9. 27 CFR 555.186 - Seizure or forfeiture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE EXPLOSIVES COMMERCE IN EXPLOSIVES Marking of Plastic Explosives § 555.186 Seizure or forfeiture. Any plastic explosive that does not contain a detection agent in violation of 18 U... of this chapter for regulations on summary destruction of plastic explosives that do not contain...

  10. Cardiac asystole associated with seizures of right hemispheric onset.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jennifer; Majmudar, Shirine; Chen, David K

    2014-01-01

    Ictal asystole is frequently underrecognized despite being a potentially lethal condition. We report two cases of ictal asystole with right hemispheric onset. These cases are unique since previous literature reports that seizures associated with bradyarrhythmias typically arise from left hemispheric foci. These cases further underscore the importance of clinical vigilance and the need of an enhanced diagnostic biomarker. PMID:25667889

  11. Cardiac asystole associated with seizures of right hemispheric onset

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jennifer; Majmudar, Shirine; Chen, David K.

    2014-01-01

    Ictal asystole is frequently underrecognized despite being a potentially lethal condition. We report two cases of ictal asystole with right hemispheric onset. These cases are unique since previous literature reports that seizures associated with bradyarrhythmias typically arise from left hemispheric foci. These cases further underscore the importance of clinical vigilance and the need of an enhanced diagnostic biomarker. PMID:25667889

  12. [Dissociative seizures: a manual for neurologists for communicating the diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Fritzsche, K; Baumann, K; Schulze-Bonhage, A

    2013-01-01

    The great physical resemblance between epileptic and dissociative seizures and a diagnosis of epilepsy that had been made years ago and usually had been treated unsuccessfully makes it difficult for both physician and patient to communicate the diagnosis of dissociative seizures. A direct referral to psychotherapy treatment is rarely accepted by patients. Intermediate steps, which are based on cooperation between neurologists and psychotherapists, are necessary. The approach that we use to communicate diagnosis and motivation for psychotherapeutic treatment includes eight steps: 1. Welcome and introduction; 2. Jointly watching a video of documented seizures; 3. The message that the seizures are not of epileptic origin, 4. Development of an alternative disease concept; 5. Motivation for a conversation with a representative from psychosomatics; 6. Responding to the fear of "going crazy"; 7. If necessary, briefly touching on the subject of sexual violence; 8. More recommendations and conclusion of the conversation. The manual was discussed and practiced with the attending neurologist in two sessions and is now being regularly used by two neurologists with concomitant supervision. PMID:22328103

  13. [FOCAL MOTOR SEIZURES AND STATUS EPILEPTICUS PROVOKED BY MIRTAZAPINE].

    PubMed

    Dömötör, Johanna; Clemens, Béla

    2015-07-30

    The seizure-provoking effect of the tetracyclic antidepressant mirtazapine is not a well-known adverse effect of the drug. The authors report on a 39-year-old non-epileptic patient who had been treated for depression with the usual daily dose of mirtazapine. Having increased the daily dose of the drug from 30 to 45 milligrams he experienced a few clonic seizures of the right lower limb. This symptom and insomnia erroneously intended the patient to further increase the daily dose of mirtazapine, which immediately resulted in the evolution of focal clonic status epilepticus in the same limb. After admission, this condition was recorded by video-EEG and abolished by intravenous administration of levetiracetam after the intravenous clonazepam had been ineffective. Discontinuation of mirtazapine and administration of carbamazepine resulted in completely seizure-free state that persisted even after carbamazepine treatment was terminated. The clinical and laboratory data indicate the seizure-provoking effect of mirtazapine in the reported case. PMID:26380424

  14. 76 FR 26660 - Consolidation of Seizure and Forfeiture Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-09

    ...The Department of Justice (the Department) proposes to revise, consolidate, and update its seizure and forfeiture regulations, to conform those regulations to the Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act (CAFRA) of 2000 to reflect organizational changes that have occurred within the Department, and to make other...

  15. A Unifying Explanation of Primary Generalized Seizures Through Nonlinear

    E-print Network

    Breakspear, Michael

    A Unifying Explanation of Primary Generalized Seizures Through Nonlinear Brain Modeling. A. Robinson1,2 1 School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006, Australia, 2 Brain Dynamics the dynamical bifur- cations of a nonlinear model of the brain's mean field dynamics. The model treats

  16. Seizure detection method based on fractal dimension and gradient boosting.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanli; Zhou, Weidong; Yuan, Shasha; Yuan, Qi

    2015-02-01

    Automatic seizure detection technology is necessary and crucial for the long-term electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring of patients with epilepsy. This article presents a patient-specific method for the detection of epileptic seizures. The fractal dimensions of preprocessed multichannel EEG were firstly estimated using a k-nearest neighbor algorithm. Then, the feature vector constructed for each epoch was fed into a trained gradient boosting classifier. After a series of postprocessing, including smoothing, threshold processing, collar operation, and union of seizure detections in a short time interval, a binary decision was made to determine whether the epoch belonged to seizure status or not. Both the epoch-based and event-based assessments were used for the performance evaluation of this method on the EEG data of 21 patients from the Freiburg dataset. An average epoch-based sensitivity of 91.01% and a specificity of 95.77% were achieved. For the event-based assessment, this method obtained an average sensitivity of 94.05%, with a false detection rate of 0.27/h. PMID:25549952

  17. Induction of Glycerol Phosphate Dehydrogenase Gene Expression During Seizure

    E-print Network

    Kuhl, Dietmar

    Induction of Glycerol Phosphate Dehydrogenase Gene Expression During Seizure and Analgesia Wolfgang display, we found that the gene for NAD -dependent glycerol phosphate dehy- drogenase (GPDH; EC 1 as it is mimicked by exogenously applied analgesic drugs. Key Words: Glycerol phosphate dehydrogenase

  18. 19 CFR 12.109 - Seizure and forfeiture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...Pre-Columbian Monumental and Architectural Sculpture and Murals § 12.109 Seizure and...pre-Columbian monumental or architectural sculpture or mural listed in § 12.105 is...the time provided in § 12.108, the sculpture or mural shall be seized and...

  19. 19 CFR 12.109 - Seizure and forfeiture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...Pre-Columbian Monumental and Architectural Sculpture and Murals § 12.109 Seizure and...pre-Columbian monumental or architectural sculpture or mural listed in § 12.105 is...the time provided in § 12.108, the sculpture or mural shall be seized and...

  20. 19 CFR 12.109 - Seizure and forfeiture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...Pre-Columbian Monumental and Architectural Sculpture and Murals § 12.109 Seizure and...pre-Columbian monumental or architectural sculpture or mural listed in § 12.105 is...the time provided in § 12.108, the sculpture or mural shall be seized and...

  1. 19 CFR 12.109 - Seizure and forfeiture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...Pre-Columbian Monumental and Architectural Sculpture and Murals § 12.109 Seizure and...pre-Columbian monumental or architectural sculpture or mural listed in § 12.105 is...the time provided in § 12.108, the sculpture or mural shall be seized and...

  2. 19 CFR 12.109 - Seizure and forfeiture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...Pre-Columbian Monumental and Architectural Sculpture and Murals § 12.109 Seizure and...pre-Columbian monumental or architectural sculpture or mural listed in § 12.105 is...the time provided in § 12.108, the sculpture or mural shall be seized and...

  3. Characterization of Dopamine Release in a Penicillin Model of Seizure

    E-print Network

    Collins, Gary S.

    Characterization of Dopamine Release in a Penicillin Model of Seizure Taylor C. Hood, James O References Adiguzel, Esat, Ilgaz Akdogan, S. Ender Duzcan, and A. Cevik Tufan. "Effect of Penicillin Induced Analysis of Penicillin-induced Epileptiform Activity in Anesthetized Rats." Epilepsy Research 82.1 (2008

  4. Strychnine seizure potentiation by azaspirodecanedione anxiolytics in rats.

    PubMed

    Anderson, M C; Chung, E; Van Woert, M H

    1988-10-18

    Buspirone, gepirone and ipsaperone administered intraperitoneally (40 mg/kg) to naive rats were found to be proconvulsive for strychnine-induced seizures. The dose of strychnine required to induce seizures in 50% of test animals (CD50) was 2.18 mg/kg in naive rats, while CD50s for rats treated with the azaspirodecanediones ipsaperone, gepirone and buspirone were 1.65, 0.97 and 0.70 mg/kg respectively. Azaspirodecanediones have high affinity for the 5-HT1A serotonin receptor, however, the specific 5-HT1A agonist, 8-hydroxy-2-(di-n-propyl-amino)-tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) had no effect on strychnine seizure in naive rats (CD50 = 2.0 mg/kg). The strychnine specific proconvulsive effects of inferior olive lesions and buspirone were additive, resulting in a CD50 of 0.1 mg/kg. This observation indicates that the buspirone-induced decrease in strychnine seizure threshold does not require intact inferior olive-climbing fiber pathways. Cerebellar sites for possible azaspirodecanedione action are discussed. PMID:2906877

  5. 19 CFR 12.104e - Seizure and forfeiture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Cultural Property § 12.104e Seizure and... (b) Whenever any stolen article of cultural property is imported into the U.S. in violation of 19 U.S.C. 2607, such cultural property shall be seized and...

  6. 19 CFR 12.104e - Seizure and forfeiture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Cultural Property § 12.104e Seizure and... (b) Whenever any stolen article of cultural property is imported into the U.S. in violation of 19 U.S.C. 2607, such cultural property shall be seized and...

  7. 19 CFR 12.104e - Seizure and forfeiture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Cultural Property § 12.104e Seizure and... (b) Whenever any stolen article of cultural property is imported into the U.S. in violation of 19 U.S.C. 2607, such cultural property shall be seized and...

  8. 19 CFR 12.104e - Seizure and forfeiture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Cultural Property § 12.104e Seizure and... (b) Whenever any stolen article of cultural property is imported into the U.S. in violation of 19 U.S.C. 2607, such cultural property shall be seized and...

  9. 19 CFR 12.104e - Seizure and forfeiture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Cultural Property § 12.104e Seizure and... (b) Whenever any stolen article of cultural property is imported into the U.S. in violation of 19 U.S.C. 2607, such cultural property shall be seized and...

  10. Long-range prediction of epileptic seizures with nonlinear dynamics.

    PubMed

    Guastello, Stephen J; Boeh, Henry; Lynn, Mark

    2011-07-01

    Patients with uncontrolled epilepsy have some significant problems with planning life routines, and thus one goal of the present study was to explore the viability of predicting seizures in time intervals of one week. The second goal was to utilize the principle of dynamic diseases and to assess the viability of a cusp catastrophe model for seizure onset that was proposed by Cerf (2006). A seizure history of 124 weeks from one adult male patient fit both the cusp and fold catastrophe models (R2 = .92 and .88 respectively) reasonably well using the pdf method and more accurately than counterpart linear models. Prediction of future states was possible, but somewhat compromised because of the nonstationary nature of the data and uncertainties regarding the control variables in the catastrophe models. Analyses of lag functions, however, revealed some surprising elements, suggesting that the precursory conditions for a seizure could be building up over a period of several weeks and that a self-correcting effect within the nervous system could have been occurring. PMID:21645436

  11. Serum Zinc Level in Children Presenting with Febrile Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Waqar Rabbani, Muhammad; Ali, Ibad; Zahid Latif, Hafiz; Basit, Abdul; Rabbani, Muhammad Ali

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of low serum zinc level in children presenting with febrile seizures at The Children’s Hospital and the Institute of Child Health (CH/ICH) Multan. Methods: This is an observational cross sectional study conducted at the Department of Pediatric Medicine, The Children’s Hospital and the Institute of Child Health, Multan from September 2010 to March 2011. Children (6 months to 6 years of age) presenting with febrile seizures who satisfied inclusion and exclusion criteria were enrolled for the study. Cause of fever was determined after detailed history, physical examination and relevant investigations. Four milliliters centrifuged blood sample was preserved in acid washed test tube. Separated serum was used to measure serum zinc level by employing Randox kit on auto-analyzer in all cases. The outcome variable (serum zinc level) was recorded on a predesigned proforma. Results: Out of 100 enrolled children, there were 66 (66%) male with male to female ratio of 1:0.52. Mean age of the children was 23.97±14.45 months. Upper respiratory tract infection was the most frequent cause of fever apparent in 24 children (24%) followed by tonsillitis 17 (17%), pneumonia 16 (16%), urinary tract infection 16 (16%), otitis media 15 (15%), and bronchiolitis 12 (12%). Frequency of low serum zinc level was 26% in children with febrile seizures. Conclusion: Zinc deficiency could be a potential risk factor for febrile seizure in children. PMID:24353677

  12. Epileptic Seizure Detection by Means of Genetically Programmed Artificial Features

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Thomas

    by recurrent seizures. It affects up to one percent of the population of the world or sixty million people, features are calculated using conventional techniques and methodologies that are time-consuming, trial-and-error on knowledge of a feature formula or algorithm that may have been obtained from intuition, tradition

  13. Pharmacotherapeutic targeting of cation-chloride cotransporters in neonatal seizures

    PubMed Central

    Puskarjov, Martin; Kahle, Kristopher T; Ruusuvuori, Eva; Kaila, Kai

    2014-01-01

    Seizures are a common manifestation of acute neurologic insults in neonates and are often resistant to the standard antiepileptic drugs that are efficacious in children and adults. The paucity of evidence-based treatment guidelines, coupled with a rudimentary understanding of disease pathogenesis, has made the current treatment of neonatal seizures empiric and often ineffective, highlighting the need for novel therapies. Key developmental differences in ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA)ergic neurotransmission between the immature and mature brain, and trauma-induced alterations in the function of the cation-chloride cotransporters (CCCs) NKCC1 and KCC2, probably contribute to the poor efficacy of standard antiepileptic drugs used in the treatment of neonatal seizures. Although CCCs are attractive drug targets, bumetanide and other existing CCC inhibitors are suboptimal because of pharmacokinetic constraints and lack of target specificity. Newer approaches including isoform-specific NKCC1 inhibitors with increased central nervous system penetration, and direct and indirect strategies to enhance KCC2-mediated neuronal chloride extrusion, might allow therapeutic modulation of the GABAergic system for neonatal seizure treatment. PMID:24802699

  14. Seizure Recognition on Epilepsy Feature Tensor , Canan Aykut Bingol

    E-print Network

    Bystroff, Chris

    Seizure Recognition on Epilepsy Feature Tensor Evrim Acar , Canan Aykut Bingol , Haluk Bingol are threefold. First, we rearrange multi-channel EEG signals as a third-order tensor called an Epilepsy Feature Tensor with modes: time epochs, features and electrodes. Second, we model the Epilepsy Feature Tensor

  15. Two patients with atypical low triiodothyronine syndrome: primary deiodinase abnormalities?

    PubMed Central

    Tevaarwerk, Gerald J M

    2014-01-01

    Summary Low triiodothyronine (T3) concentrations in the presence of normal thyroxine (T4) and TSH levels, referred to as the low T3 syndrome (LT3S), are common. LT3S may be caused by starvation, various non-thyroidal illnesses (NTIs) and some medications. Reverse T3 (rT3) concentrations are elevated in the more severely ill, and they characteristically fail to respond to exogenous levothyroxine (l-T4) therapy. The biochemical abnormalities have been explained on the basis of altered peripheral deiodinase activities. Herein, we report on two patients with hypothyroid symptoms who on testing were found to have LT3S. They were atypical clinically in not having LT3S due to any of the usual causes, had no increased rT3 concentrations, and had a normal negative TSH feedback response to l-T4. One (patient 1) had previously been diagnosed with Hashimoto's autoimmune primary hypothyroidism and was on l-T4 therapy. Both had T4 concentrations in the reference range. TSH levels were elevated in patient 1 and in the reference range in patient 2. Starting or increasing l-T4 doses resulted in no clinical improvement and no increase in T3 levels in spite of a marked increase in T4 levels. It is suggested that in the absence of the usual causes, lack of elevated rT3 levels, response to treatment and intact negative TSH feedback these two patients differ from the usual secondary causes of decreases in deiodinase activity. It is speculated that they may represent primary alterations in deiodinase enzymes possibly due to genetic variations in the deiodinase-encoding genes. Learning points LT3S is commonly found secondary to starvation, NTIs and use of some medications.Low T3 levels are the result of alterations in the activity of deiodinase enzymes.LT3S without the usual causes may represent a primary disturbance in deiodinase activity. PMID:24683478

  16. Does the Thalamo-Cortical Synchrony Play a Role in Seizure Termination?

    PubMed Central

    Evangelista, Elisa; Bénar, Christian; Bonini, Francesca; Carron, Romain; Colombet, Bruno; Régis, Jean; Bartolomei, Fabrice

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying seizure termination are still unclear despite their therapeutic importance. We studied thalamo-cortical connectivity and synchrony in human mesial temporal lobe seizures in order to analyze their role in seizure termination. Twenty-two seizures from 10 patients with drug-resistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy undergoing pre-surgical evaluation were analyzed using intracerebral recordings [stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG)]. We performed a measure of SEEG signal interdependencies (non-linear correlation), to estimate the functional connectivity between thalamus and cortical regions. Then, we derived synchronization indices, namely global, thalamic, mesio-temporal, and thalamo-mesio temporal index at the onset and the end of seizures. In addition, an estimation of thalamic “outputs and inputs” connectivity was proposed. Thalamus was consistently involved in the last phase of all analyzed seizures and thalamic synchronization index was significantly more elevated at the end of seizure than at the onset. The global synchronization index at the end of seizure negatively correlated with seizure duration (p?=?0.045) and in the same way the thalamic synchronization index showed an inverse tendency with seizure duration. Six seizures out of twenty-two displayed a particular thalamo-cortical spike-and-wave pattern at the end. They were associated to higher values of all synchronization indices and outputs from thalamus (p?=?0.0079). SWP seizures displayed a higher and sustained increase of cortical and thalamo-cortical synchronization with a stronger participation of thalamic outputs. We suggest that thalamo-cortical oscillations might contribute to seizure termination via modulation of cortical synchronization. In the subgroup of SWP seizures, thalamus may exert a control on temporal lobe structures by inducing a stable hypersynchronization that ultimately leads to seizure termination. PMID:26388834

  17. CFTR gene variant for patients with congenital absence of vas deferens

    SciTech Connect

    Zielenski, J.; Markiewicz, D.; Corey, M.

    1995-10-01

    Obstructive azoospermia due to congenital absence of vas deferens is a prominent clinical feature among male patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). A similar autosomal recessive condition with no other CF manifestations is classified as congenital bilateral absence of vas deferens (CBAVD). Since 50%-64% of CBAVD patients have been found to be positive for at least one known CFTR mutation, it is believed that at least part of the CBAVD population represents an atypical form of CF affecting only the male reproductive system. This explanation is not completely satisfactory, however, because only {approximately}10% of CBAVD patients are found to carry known CF mutations on both chromosomes, even after exhaustive screening of the entire CFTR coding region. Here we present data to show that a previously known sequence variant in intron 8 of the CFTR gene is a specific and frequent mutation associated with CBAVD. 20 refs., 1 tab.

  18. Why do seizures occur when they do? Situations perceived to be associated with increased or decreased seizure likelihood in people withepilepsy and intellectual disability

    E-print Network

    Illingworth, Josephine L.; Watson, Peter; Ring, Howard

    2014-09-16

    to have neurological deficits, with 84% of those with severe ID having precipitants reported [39]. These investigations present conflict- ingfindings on the effect of ID on precipitant prevalence, and further re- search comparing those with ID and those... . Self-perception of seizure precipitants and their relation to anxiety level, depression, and health locus of control in epilepsy. Seizure 2008;17:302–7. [9] Balamurugan E, Aggarwal M, Lamba A, Dang N, Tripathi M. Perceived trigger factors of seizures...

  19. Thioperamide, a selective histamine H3 receptor antagonist, protects against PTZ-induced seizures in mice.

    PubMed

    Vohora, D; Pal, S N; Pillai, K K

    2000-04-21

    The effect of selective histamine H3-receptor antagonist thioperamide was studied on PTZ-induced seizures in mice. Thioperamide significantly protected clonic seizures induced by PTZ in a dose-dependent manner. The effect of thioperamide was completely countered by pretreatment with R (alpha)-methylhistamine (RAMH), a selective H3-receptor agonist suggesting that the observed effect of thioperamide was elicited by histamine H3-receptors. RAMH alone did not significantly modify PTZ seizures. The findings are consistent with a role for the histaminergic neuronal system in seizures and suggest that H3-receptors may play an important role in modulating clonic seizures induced by PTZ in mice. PMID:10834305

  20. Acute seizure suppression by transcranial direct current stimulation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Dhamne, Sameer C; Ekstein, Dana; Zhuo, Zhihong; Gersner, Roman; Zurakowski, David; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Jensen, Frances E; Rotenberg, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cathodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a focal neuromodulation technique that suppresses cortical excitability by low-amplitude constant electrical current, and may have an antiepileptic effect. Yet, tDCS has not been tested in status epilepticus (SE). Furthermore, a combined tDCS and pharmacotherapy antiseizure approach is unexplored. We therefore examined in the rat pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) SE model whether cathodal tDCS (1) suppresses seizures, (2) augments lorazepam (LZP) efficacy, and (3) enhances GABAergic cortical inhibition. Methods Experiment 1 aimed to identify an effective cathodal tDCS intensity. Rats received intraperitoneal PTZ followed by tDCS (sham, cathodal 1 mA, or cathodal 0.1 mA; for 20 min), and then a second PTZ challenge. In Experiment 2, two additional animal groups received a subtherapeutic LZP dose after PTZ, and then verum or sham tDCS. Clinical and electroencephalography (EEG) epileptic activity were compared between all groups. In Experiment 3, we measured GABA-mediated paired-pulse inhibition of the motor evoked potential by paired-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (ppTMS) in rats that received PTZ or saline, and either verum or sham tDCS. Results Cathodal 1 mA tDCS (1) reduced EEG spike bursts, and suppressed clinical seizures after the second PTZ challenge, (2) in combination with LZP was more effective in seizure suppression and improved the clinical seizure outcomes compared to either tDCS or LZP alone, and (3) prevented the loss of ppTMS motor cortex inhibition that accompanied PTZ injection. Interpretation These results suggest that cathodal 1 mA tDCS alone and in combination with LZP can suppress seizures by augmenting GABAergic cortical inhibition. PMID:26339678

  1. Montelukast Inhibits Pentylenetetrazol-Induced Seizures in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Cevik, Betul; Solmaz, Volkan; Aksoy, Durdane; Erbas, Oytun

    2015-01-01

    Background Montelukast is an antiinflammatory drug with an antioxidant property. In this study, we aimed to reveal whether montelukast has a preventive effect against seizures and post-seizure oxidative stress in pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures in rats. Material/Methods Of the 48 male Sprague-Dawley rats used in the study, 24 were assigned to EEG recordings (group A) and 24 were assigned to behavioral studies (group B). In group A, the electrodes were implanted on dura over the left frontal cortex for EEG recording. After 10 days, in group A, i.p. saline, 25, 50, or 100 mg/kg montelukast+35 mg/kg PTZ was administered to the rats. EEG was recorded and spike percentage was evaluated. In group B, i.p. saline, 25, 50, or 100 mg/kg montelukast+70 mg/kg PTZ was administered to the rats. Racine’s Convulsion Scale (RCS) and onset times of first myoclonic jerk (FMJ) was used to evaluate the seizures. Malondialdehyde (MDA) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) levels were determined in the brain tissue of animals. Results Animals treated with 50 or 100 mg/kg montelukast had significantly lower RCS and significantly increased FMJ onset time compared to the saline-treated animals. Moreover, groups given 25, 50, or 100 mg/kg montelukast had significantly lower MDA and higher SOD levels compared to the saline-treated group. The differences were more pronounced in the 100 mg/kg montelukast-pretreated group (p<0.001). Conclusions Montelukast showed anticonvulsant action and led to amelioration of oxidative stress markers in PTZ-induced seizures in rats. PMID:25803241

  2. Dissociated multimodal hubs and seizures in temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Douw, Linda; DeSalvo, Matthew N; Tanaka, Naoaki; Cole, Andrew J; Liu, Hesheng; Reinsberger, Claus; Stufflebeam, Steven M

    2015-01-01

    Objective Brain connectivity at rest is altered in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), particularly in “hub” areas such as the posterior default mode network (DMN). Although both functional and anatomical connectivity are disturbed in TLE, the relationships between measures as well as to seizure frequency remain unclear. We aim to clarify these associations using connectivity measures specifically sensitive to hubs. Methods Connectivity between 1000 cortical surface parcels was determined in 49 TLE patients and 23 controls with diffusion and resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging. Two types of hub connectivity were investigated across multiple brain modules (the DMN, motor system, etcetera): (1) within-module connectivity (a measure of local importance that assesses a parcel's communication level within its own subnetwork) and (2) between-module connectivity (a measure that assesses connections across multiple modules). Results In TLE patients, there was lower overall functional integrity of the DMN as well as an increase in posterior hub connections with other modules. Anatomical between-module connectivity was globally decreased. Higher DMN disintegration (DD) coincided with higher anatomical between-module connectivity, whereas both were associated with increased seizure frequency. DD related to seizure frequency through mediating effects of anatomical connectivity, but seizure frequency also correlated with anatomical connectivity through DD, indicating a complex interaction between multimodal networks and symptoms. Interpretation We provide evidence for dissociated anatomical and functional hub connectivity in TLE. Moreover, shifts in functional hub connections from within to outside the DMN, an overall loss of integrative anatomical communication, and the interaction between the two increase seizure frequency. PMID:25909080

  3. Symptomatic atypical femoral fractures are related to underlying hip geometry.

    PubMed

    Taormina, David P; Marcano, Alejandro I; Karia, Raj; Egol, Kenneth A; Tejwani, Nirmal C

    2014-06-01

    The benefits of bisphosphonates are well documented, but prolonged use has been associated with atypical femur fractures. Radiographic markers for fracture predisposition could potentially aid in safer medication use. In this case-control designed study, we compared hip radiographic parameters and the demographic characteristics of chronic bisphosphonate users who sustained an atypical femoral fracture with a group of chronic bisphosphonate users who did not sustain an atypical femur fracture and also a group who sustained an intertrochanteric hip fracture. Radiographic parameters included were neck-shaft angle (NSA), hip-axis length (HAL) and center-edge angle (CE). Multivariate regression was used to evaluate the relationship between radiographic measures and femur fracture. Receiver-operating characteristic analysis determined cut-off points for neck-shaft angle and risk of atypical femur fracture. Ultimately, pre-fracture radiographs of 53 bisphosphonate users who developed atypical fracture were compared with 43 asymptomatic chronic bisphosphonate users and 64 intertrochanteric fracture patients. Duration of bisphosphonate use did not statistically differ between users sustaining atypical fracture and those without fracture (7.9 [±3.5] vs. 7.7 [±3.3] years, p=0.7). Bisphosphonate users who fractured had acute/varus pre-fracture neck-shaft angles (p<0.001), shorter hip-axis length (p<0.01), and narrower center-edge angles (p<0.01). Regression analysis revealed associations between neck-shaft angle (OR=0.89 [95% CI=0.81-0.97; p=0.01), center edge angle (OR=0.89 [95% CI=0.80-0.99]; p=0.03), and BMI (OR=1.15 [95% CI=1.02-1.31; p=0.03) with fracture development. ROC curve analysis (AUC=0.67 [95% CI=0.56-0.79]) determined that a cut-off point for neck-shaft angle <128.3° yielded 69% sensitivity and 63% specificity for development of atypical femoral fracture. Ultimately, an acute/varus angle of the femoral neck, high BMI, and narrow center-edge angle were associated with development of atypical femur fracture in long-term bisphosphonate users. Patients on long-term bisphosphonates should be regularly radiographically evaluated in order to assess for potential risk of atypical fracture. PMID:24565751

  4. Nurturing the genome: A-type lamins preserve genomic stability.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Suarez, Ignacio; Gonzalo, Susana

    2010-01-01

    A-type lamins provide a scaffold for tethering chromatin and protein complexes regulating nuclear structure and function. Interest in lamins increased after mutations in the LMNA gene were found to be associated with a variety of human disorders termed laminopathies. These include muscular dystrophy, cardiomyopathy, lipodystrophy, peripheral neuropathy and premature aging syndromes such as progeria. In addition, altered expression of A-type lamins is emerging as a contributing factor to tumorigenesis. How different alterations in a gene that is ubiquitously expressed can cause such an array of systemic as well as tissue specific diseases remains an enigma. Several lines of evidence indicate that mutant forms of A-type lamins impact on genome function and integrity. A current model suggests that genomic instability plays a major part in the pathophysiology of some lamin-related diseases. However, this model remains to be fully investigated. Here we discuss recent studies revealing novel functions for A-type lamins in the maintenance of telomeres and in the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway. These findings have shed some light onto the putative molecular mechanisms by which alterations in A-type lamins induce genomic instability and contribute to disease. PMID:21326943

  5. Flupirtine effectively prevents development of acute neonatal seizures in an animal model of global hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Sampath, Dayalan; Shmueli, Doron; White, Andrew M; Raol, Yogendra H

    2015-10-21

    Current first-line drugs for the treatment of neonatal seizures have limited efficacy and are associated with side effects. Uncontrolled seizures may exacerbate brain injury and contribute to later-life neurological disability. Therefore, it is critical to develop a treatment for neonatal seizures that is effective and safe. In early-life, when the ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) inhibitory system is not fully developed, potassium channels play an important role in controlling excitability. An earlier study demonstrated that flupirtine, a KCNQ potassium channel opener, is more efficacious than diazepam and phenobarbital for the treatment of chemoconvulsant-induced neonatal seizures. In newborns, seizures are most commonly associated with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). Thus, in the present study, we examined the efficacy of flupirtine to treat neonatal seizures in an animal model of global hypoxia. Our results showed that flupirtine dose dependently blocks the occurrence of behavioral seizures in pups during hypoxia. Additionally, flupirtine inhibits the development of hypoxia-induced clinical seizures and associated epileptiform discharges, as well as purely electrographic (subclinical) seizures. These results suggest that flupirtine is an effective anti-seizure drug, and that further studies should be conducted to determine the time window within which it's administration can effectively treat neonatal seizures. PMID:26365409

  6. Oxygen desaturations triggered by partial seizures: implications for cardiopulmonary instability in epilepsy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blum, A. S.; Ives, J. R.; Goldberger, A. L.; Al-Aweel, I. C.; Krishnamurthy, K. B.; Drislane, F. W.; Schomer, D. L.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: The occurrence of hypoxemia in adults with partial seizures has not been systematically explored. Our aim was to study in detail the temporal dynamics of this specific type of ictal-associated hypoxemia. METHODS: During long-term video/EEG monitoring (LTM), patients underwent monitoring of oxygen saturation using a digital Spo2 (pulse oximeter) transducer. Six patients (nine seizures) were identified with oxygen desaturations after the onset of partial seizure activity. RESULTS: Complex partial seizures originated from both left and right temporal lobes. Mean seizure duration (+/-SD) was 73 +/- 18 s. Mean Spo2 desaturation duration was 76 +/- 19 s. The onset of oxygen desaturation followed seizure onset with a mean delay of 43 +/- 16 s. Mean (+/-SD) Spo2 nadir was 83 +/- 5% (range, 77-91%), occurring an average of 35 +/- 12 s after the onset of the desaturation. One seizure was associated with prolonged and recurrent Spo2 desaturations. CONCLUSIONS: Partial seizures may be associated with prominent oxygen desaturations. The comparable duration of each seizure and its subsequent desaturation suggests a close mechanistic (possibly causal) relation. Spo2 monitoring provides an added means for seizure detection that may increase LTM yield. These observations also raise the possibility that ictal ventilatory dysfunction could play a role in certain cases of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy in adults with partial seizures.

  7. Effect of inferior olive lesion on seizure threshold in the rat.

    PubMed

    Anderson, M C; Chung, E Y; Van Woert, M H

    1987-06-15

    Cerebellar stimulation has been associated with anticonvulsant activity in several experimental seizure models. We examined the effect of destruction of cerebellar climbing fibers, by systemic administration of 3-acetylpyridine (3AP) or electrothermic lesion of the inferior olive, on seizures produced by various chemical convulsants in rats. We found that inferior olive lesioned rats had lower threshold to seizures induced by strychnine and brucine, both glycine antagonists. The dose response curve for strychnine seizure was shifted 2.5 times to the left in 3AP lesioned rats. No difference in seizure threshold was seen when picrotoxin, bicuculline or pentylenetetrazole PTZ) were used to produce seizures. Abnormal motor behavior (AMB) including myoclonus, backward movement and hyperextension, produced by all of the convulsants tested, was significantly aggravated in 3AP pretreated rats. The inferior olive-climbing fiber projection to the cerebellum appears to modulate seizures induced by inhibition of glycinergic neurotransmission. PMID:2884546

  8. Seizures caused by pyridoxine (vitamin B6) deficiency in adults: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yisha

    2014-05-01

    Pyridoxine (vitamin B6) deficiency is a recognised cause of intractable seizures in neonates. However, pyridoxine deficiency related seizures in adults were rarely reported. This article reports a case of a 79 year old lady who suffered from new-onset seizures and was successfully treated with vitamin B6. The patient had chronic renal disease and weight loss due to anepithymia following a pelvic fracture. This article also reviews literatures of seizures caused by pyridoxine deficiency in adults. Seizures caused by vitamin B6 deficiency in adults may result from dietary deficiency, liver disease, pregnancy and certain medications and can be easily treated by vitamin B6 with excellent outcome. Clinicians should consider vitamin B6 deficiency as a potential aetiology of seizures, even in patients who suffer from other underlying diseases which can cause seizures. PMID:25343127

  9. Seizures caused by pyridoxine (vitamin B6) deficiency in adults: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Yisha

    2014-01-01

    Summary Pyridoxine (vitamin B6) deficiency is a recognised cause of intractable seizures in neonates. However, pyridoxine deficiency related seizures in adults were rarely reported. This article reports a case of a 79 year old lady who suffered from new-onset seizures and was successfully treated with vitamin B6. The patient had chronic renal disease and weight loss due to anepithymia following a pelvic fracture. This article also reviews literatures of seizures caused by pyridoxine deficiency in adults. Seizures caused by vitamin B6 deficiency in adults may result from dietary deficiency, liver disease, pregnancy and certain medications and can be easily treated by vitamin B6 with excellent outcome. Clinicians should consider vitamin B6 deficiency as a potential aetiology of seizures, even in patients who suffer from other underlying diseases which can cause seizures. PMID:25343127

  10. Epileptic Seizure Prediction by Exploiting Spatiotemporal Relationship of EEG Signals Using Phase Correlation.

    PubMed

    Parvez, Mohammad Zavid; Paul, Manoranjan

    2016-01-01

    Automated seizure prediction has a potential in epilepsy monitoring, diagnosis, and rehabilitation. Electroencephalogram (EEG) is widely used for seizure detection and prediction. This paper proposes a new seizure prediction approach based on spatiotemporal relationship of EEG signals using phase correlation. This measures the relative change between current and reference vectors of EEG signals which can be used to identify preictal/ictal (before the actual seizure onset/ actual seizure period) and interictal (period between adjacent seizures) EEG signals to predict the seizure. The experiments show that the proposed method is less sensitive to artifacts and provides higher prediction accuracy (i.e., 91.95%) and lower number of false alarms compared to the state-of-the-art methods using intracranial EEG signals in different brain locations of 21 patients from a benchmark data set. PMID:26208360

  11. Atypical biological motion kinematics are represented by complementary lower-level and top-down processes during imitation learning.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Spencer J; Dutoy, Chris A; Elliott, Digby; Gowen, Emma; Bennett, Simon J

    2016-01-01

    Learning a novel movement requires a new set of kinematics to be represented by the sensorimotor system. This is often accomplished through imitation learning where lower-level sensorimotor processes are suggested to represent the biological motion kinematics associated with an observed movement. Top-down factors have the potential to influence this process based on the social context, attention and salience, and the goal of the movement. In order to further examine the potential interaction between lower-level and top-down processes in imitation learning, the aim of this study was to systematically control the mediating effects during an imitation of biological motion protocol. In this protocol, we used non-human agent models that displayed different novel atypical biological motion kinematics, as well as a control model that displayed constant velocity. Importantly the three models had the same movement amplitude and movement time. Also, the motion kinematics were displayed in the presence, or absence, of end-state-targets. Kinematic analyses showed atypical biological motion kinematics were imitated, and that this performance was different from the constant velocity control condition. Although the imitation of atypical biological motion kinematics was not modulated by the end-state-targets, movement time was more accurate in the absence, compared to the presence, of an end-state-target. The fact that end-state targets modulated movement time accuracy, but not biological motion kinematics, indicates imitation learning involves top-down attentional, and lower-level sensorimotor systems, which operate as complementary processes mediated by the environmental context. PMID:26587962

  12. Activation of the caspase 8 pathway mediates seizure-induced cell death in cultured hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Meller, R; Clayton, C; Torrey, D J; Schindler, C K; Lan, J Q; Cameron, J A; Chu, X P; Xiong, Z G; Simon, R P; Henshall, D C

    2006-07-01

    In response to harmful stresses, cells induce programmed cell death (PCD) or apoptosis. Seizures can induce neural damage and activate biochemical pathways associated with PCD. Since seizures trigger intracellular calcium overload, it has been presumed that the intrinsic cell death pathway mediated by mitochondrial dysfunction would modulate cell death following seizures. However, previous work suggests that the extrinsic cell death pathway may initiate the damage program. Here we investigate intrinsic versus extrinsic cell death pathway activation using caspase cleavage as a marker for activation of these pathways in a rat in vitro model of seizures. Hippocampal cells, chronically treated with kynurenic acid, had kynurenic acid withdrawn to induce seizure-like activity for 40 min. Subjecting rat hippocampal cultures to seizures increased cell death and apoptosis-like DNA fragmentation using TUNEL staining. Seizure-induced cell death was blocked by both MK801 (10 microM) and CNQX (40 microM), which suggests multiple glutamate receptors regulate seizure-induced cell death. Cleavage of the initiator caspases, caspase 8 and 12 were increased 4h following seizure, and cleavage of the quintessential executioner caspase, caspase 3 was increased 4h following seizure. In contrast, caspase 9 cleavage only increased 24h following seizure. Using an affinity labeling approach to trap activated caspases in situ, we show that caspase 8 is the apical caspase activated following seizures. Finally, we show that the caspase 8 inhibitor Ac-IETD-CHO was more effective at blocking seizure-induced cell death than the caspase 9 inhibitor Ac-LEHD-CHO. Taken together, our data suggests the extrinsic cell death pathway-associated caspase 8 is activated following seizures in vitro. PMID:16542823

  13. Activation Of The Caspase 8 Pathway Mediates Seizure-Induced Cell Death In Cultured Hippocampal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Meller, R; Clayton, C.; Torrey, DJ; Schindler, CK; Lan, JQ; Cameron, JA; Chu, XP.; Xiong, ZG; Simon, RP; Henshall, DC

    2006-01-01

    In response to harmful stresses, cells induce programmed cell death (PCD) or apoptosis. Seizures can induce neural damage and activate biochemical pathways associated with PCD. Since seizures trigger intracellular calcium overload, it has been presumed that the intrinsic cell death pathway mediated by mitochondrial dysfunction would modulate cell death following seizures. However, previous work suggests that the extrinsic cell death pathway may initiate the damage program. Here we investigate intrinsic vs. extrinsic cell death pathway activation using caspase cleavage as a marker for activation of these pathways in a rat in vitro model of seizures. Hippocampal cells, chronically treated with kynurenic acid, had kynurenic acid withdrawn to induce seizure-like activity for 40 minutes. Subjecting rat hippocampal cultures to seizures increased cell death and apoptosis-like DNA fragmentation using TUNEL staining. Seizure-induced cell death was blocked by both MK801 (10 ?M) and CNQX (40 ?M), which suggests multiple glutamate receptors regulate seizure-induced cell death. Cleavage of the initiator caspases, caspase 8 and 12 were increased 4 hours following seizure, and cleavage of the quintessential executioner caspase, caspase 3 was increased 4 hours following seizure. In contrast, caspase 9 cleavage only increased 24 hours following seizure. Using an affinity labeling approach to trap activated caspases in situ, we show that caspase 8 is the apical caspase activated following seizures. Finally, we show that the caspase 8 inhibitor Ac-IETD-CHO was more effective at blocking seizure-induced cell death than the caspase 9 inhibitor Ac-LEHD-CHO. Taken together, our data suggests the extrinsic cell death pathway-associated caspase 8 is activated following seizures in vitro. PMID:16542823

  14. B-cell lymphoma with plasmacytoid differentiation, atypical cytoplasmic inclusions, and secondary leukemia in a dog.

    PubMed

    Kol, A; Christopher, M M; Skorupski, K A; Tokarz, D; Vernau, W

    2013-03-01

    A 7-year-old male castrated Jack Russell Terrier was presented to the oncology service at the University of California-Davis Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital for evaluation of suspected lymphoma. The dog had several enlarged lymph nodes and moderate lymphocytosis. Aspirates of an enlarged inguinal lymph node contained a bimorphic population of large immature lymphocytes and smaller cells with plasmacytoid features. Both cell types often contained a single large cytoplasmic inclusion that varied from clear to pale pink to sky blue. Cytologic changes were interpreted as most consistent with lymphoid neoplasia. Based on the predominantly mature cell morphology and some morphologic heterogeneity, the peripheral lymphocytosis was interpreted as most likely reactive in nature. However, the immunophenotype of the cells (CD20+, CD21+, CD79a+, MUM-1+, and MHCII+) and clonality assays showed that tissue and blood lymphocytes were neoplastic B cells with clonal identity despite their different morphologic appearances. The cytoplasmic inclusions were positive with periodic acid-Schiff and were immunoreactive for IgM and IgG. By transmission electron microscopy, inclusions consisted of aberrant rough endoplasmic reticulum; a few small Russell bodies were also noted. A final diagnosis of high-grade B-cell lymphoma with plasmacytoid differentiation, atypical cytoplasmic inclusions, and secondary leukemia was made. Chemotherapy was initiated, but the dog was euthanized due to severe and uncontrolled seizures 9 months after the initial diagnosis. This case extends the morphologic repertoire of canine plasmacytoid neoplasms and emphasizes their continuum with multicentric lymphoma. This case also demonstrates the need for advanced diagnostic techniques in establishing blood involvement in lymphoma in some instances. PMID:23205858

  15. Genetics Underlying Atypical Parkinsonism and Related Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Sonja W.; Bras, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Atypical parkinsonism syndromes, such as dementia with Lewy bodies, multiple system atrophy, progressive supranuclear palsy and corticobasal degeneration, are neurodegenerative diseases with complex clinical and pathological features. Heterogeneity in clinical presentations, possible secondary determinants as well as mimic syndromes pose a major challenge to accurately diagnose patients suffering from these devastating conditions. Over the last two decades, significant advancements in genomic technologies have provided us with increasing insights into the molecular pathogenesis of atypical parkinsonism and their intriguing relationships to related neurodegenerative diseases, fueling new hopes to incorporate molecular knowledge into our diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic approaches towards managing these conditions. In this review article, we summarize the current understanding of genetic mechanisms implicated in atypical parkinsonism syndromes. We further highlight mimic syndromes relevant to differential considerations and possible future directions. PMID:26501269

  16. Novel antipsychotics: issues and controversies. Typicality of atypical antipsychotics.

    PubMed Central

    Stip, E

    2000-01-01

    The typicality of atypical antipsychotic drugs remains debatable. Preclinical studies and findings from randomized, controlled and open trials of clozapine, olanzapine, risperidone, quetiapine, sertindole, ziprasidone and a substituted benzamide were examined. A MEDLINE search was conducted using key words, including "extrapyramidal side effects," "cognition," "schizophrenia" and the generic drug names. Over 140 articles from peer-reviewed journals were reviewed, some of which were based on a meta-analysis. New-generation neuroleptic agents were found to have greater efficacy on the negative symptoms of schizophrenia and to cause fewer unwanted extrapyramidal side effects (EPS) than the traditional antipsychotic drugs. On one hand, atypical neuroleptic agents could be strictly defined as any neuroleptic agent with antipsychotic effects at a dosage that does not cause extrapyramidal side effects. Thus, clozapine is regarded as the "standard" atypical antipsychotic drug. On the other hand, typicality is about dimension rather than category, and we suggest the use of the term "spectrum of atypicality." For example, an emphasis is placed on quetiapine to illustrate where a new compound fits in this spectrum. Although dose-related, atypicality may be more a question of prescription attitude than of a specific characteristic of a compound. The degree to which a new compound is clinically superior to another atypical antipsychotic drug, in terms of improving positive, negative or affective symptoms, cognitive function and long-term outcome, will require further a priori hypotheses based on conceptual frameworks that are clinically meaningful. In addition, the results from industry-sponsored trials should be more comparable to those obtained from investigator-leading trials. Finally, the patient characteristics that define a patient's response to a specific antipsychotic drug are unknown. PMID:10740987

  17. Atypical Kawasaki disease with remarkable paucity of signs and symptoms.

    PubMed

    Thapa, Rajoo; Chakrabartty, Subroto

    2009-07-01

    We report on a 7-month-old infant with Kawasaki disease (KD) whose only manifestations were high-grade fever of 7 days duration, "non-toxic look" and "extreme irritability", thereby not meeting the criteria for the classical or the atypical form of the disease. The diagnosis was confirmed by the demonstration of a solitary aneurysm in the proximal left anterior descending coronary artery. The present case raises the concern that the presently laid guidelines for the diagnosis of atypical KD may not be adequate. PMID:19381640

  18. Slow Spatial Recruitment of Neocortex during Secondarily Generalized Seizures and Its Relation to Surgical Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Martinet, Louis-Emmanuel; Ahmed, Omar J.; Lepage, Kyle Q.; Cash, Sydney S.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the spatiotemporal dynamics of brain activity is crucial for inferring the underlying synaptic and nonsynaptic mechanisms of brain dysfunction. Focal seizures with secondary generalization are traditionally considered to begin in a limited spatial region and spread to connected areas, which can include both pathological and normal brain tissue. The mechanisms underlying this spread are important to our understanding of seizures and to improve therapies for surgical intervention. Here we study the properties of seizure recruitment—how electrical brain activity transitions to large voltage fluctuations characteristic of spike-and-wave seizures. We do so using invasive subdural electrode arrays from a population of 16 patients with pharmacoresistant epilepsy. We find an average delay of ?30 s for a broad area of cortex (8 × 8 cm) to be recruited into the seizure, at an estimated speed of ?4 mm/s. The spatiotemporal characteristics of recruitment reveal two categories of patients: one in which seizure recruitment of neighboring cortical regions follows a spatially organized pattern consistent from seizure to seizure, and a second group without consistent spatial organization of activity during recruitment. The consistent, organized recruitment correlates with a more regular, compared with small-world, connectivity pattern in simulation and successful surgical treatment of epilepsy. We propose that an improved understanding of how the seizure recruits brain regions into large amplitude voltage fluctuations provides novel information to improve surgical treatment of epilepsy and highlights the slow spread of massive local activity across a vast extent of cortex during seizure. PMID:26109670

  19. Seizures and Epilepsy following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage : Incidence and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyu-Sun; Chun, Hyoung-Joon; Ko, Yong; Kim, Young-Soo; Kim, Jae-Min

    2009-01-01

    Objective Although prophylactic antiepileptic drug (AED) use in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) is a common practice, lack of uniform definitions and guidelines for seizures and AEDs rendered this prescription more habitual instead of evidence-based manner. We herein evaluated the incidence and predictive factors of seizure and complications about AED use. Methods From July 1999 to June 2007, data of a total of 547 patients with aneurysmal SAH who underwent operative treatments were reviewed. For these, the incidence and risk factors of seizures and epilepsy were assessed, in addition to complications of AEDs. Results Eighty-three patients (15.2%) had at least one seizure following SAH. Forty-three patients (7.9%) had onset seizures, 34 (6.2%) had perioperative seizures, and 17 (3.1%) had late epilepsy. Younger age (< 40 years), poor clinical grade, thick hemorrhage, acute hydrocephalus, and rebleeding were related to the occurrence of onset seizures. Cortical infarction and thick hemorrhage were independent risk factors for the occurrence of late epilepsy. Onset seizures were not predictive of late epilepsy. Moreover, adverse drug effects were identified in 128 patients (23.4%) with AEDs. Conclusion Perioperative seizures are not significant predictors for late epilepsy. Instead, initial amount of SAH and surgery-induced cortical damage should be seriously considered as risk factors for late epilepsy. Because AEDs can not prevent early postoperative seizures (< 1 week) and potentially cause unexpected side effects, long-term use should be readjusted in high-risk patients. PMID:19763209

  20. Quantitative and trajectory analysis of movement trajectories in supplementary motor area seizures of frontal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei; Yang, Xuhong; Liu, Yonghong; Zeng, Dong; Tang, Yufeng; Yan, Bo; Lin, Xu; Liu, Ling; Xu, Hongru; Zhou, Dong

    2009-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to quantitatively analyze the movement trajectories of four types of supplementary motor area (SMA) seizures (hyperkinetic, tonic posturing, fencing posture, tonic head turning), and to compare the movement trajectories of SMA seizures with those of temporal lobe seizures and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures. Ten video/EEG recordings of each type of seizure were obtained. Imaging data collected by video/EEG monitoring were transformed into a digital matrix with image processing software and then transformed into a movement trajectory curve with MATLAB 6.5 software. From these movement trajectories, amplitude, frequency, proximal/distal limb amplitude ratios, and shoulder/abdominal amplitude ratios measurements were calculated. One-way ANOVA revealed statistically significant differences in average amplitude, as well as proximal/distal limb amplitude ratios, in SMA seizures when compared with those of temporal lobe seizures and psychogenic nonepileptic seizures. This study proved the feasibility of quantitative analysis of SMA seizures and suggests it should be further evaluated for its capability to distinguish different seizure semiologies for the diagnosis of epilepsy. PMID:19100340

  1. Possessed by evil spirits: a history of seizures in infancy.

    PubMed

    Obladen, Michael

    2014-07-01

    For 4 millennia, seizures in infancy were believed to be of supranatural origin and were dealt with by incantations, exorcising rituals, and protective amulets. Instead of pursuing scientific research into their causes, gods, devils, mothers, wet nurses, midwives, or obstetricians were blamed. Help from protective gods and patron saints was sought, and amulets against the "evil eye" were recommended by physicians, mostly in the form of necklaces. Infants were despised and hidden away from the community. Among the medical conditions associated with seizures, those most prominent were dentition, gastrointestinal irritation, and "bad" mother's milk. Medical treatment consisted of cutting or rubbing the gums with a hare's brain during dentition, and applying peony or theriac. Even during the 20th century, when laboratory methods, electroencephalography, brain imaging, and powerful pharmaceutical techniques were available, effective treatment evolved empirically rather than systematically. PMID:23670245

  2. Seizure onset detection based on one sEMG channel.

    PubMed

    Conradsen, Isa; Beniczky, Sándor; Hoppe, Karsten; Wolf, Peter; Sams, Thomas; Sorensen, Helge B D

    2011-01-01

    We present a new method to detect seizure onsets of tonic-clonic epileptic seizures based on surface electromyography (sEMG) data. The proposed method is generic and based on a single channel making it ideal for a small detection or monitoring device. The sEMG signal is high-pass filtered with a Butterworth filter with a cut-off frequency of 150 Hz. The number of zero-crossings with a hysteresis of ± 50 ?V is the only feature extracted. The number of counts in a window of 1 second and the number of windows to make a detection is tested with a leave-one-out method. On 6 patients the method performs with a sensitivity of 100%, a median latency of 7.6 seconds and a median false detection rate of 0.04/h. PMID:22256126

  3. Palmitoylethanolamide attenuates PTZ-induced seizures through CB1 and CB2 receptors.

    PubMed

    Aghaei, Iraj; Rostampour, Mohammad; Shabani, Mohammad; Naderi, Nima; Motamedi, Fereshteh; Babaei, Parvin; Khakpour-Taleghani, Behrooz

    2015-11-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurologic disorders. Though there are effective medications available to reduce the symptoms of the disease, their side effects have limited their usage. Palmitoylethanolamide (PEA) has been shown to attenuate seizure in different animal models. The objective of the current study was to evaluate the role of CB1 and CB2 receptors in this attenuation. Male wistar rats were used for the current experiment. PTZ was injected to induce chemical kindling in animals. After verification of kindling in animals, treatment was performed with PEA, AM251 and AM630 in different groups. Latency to induce seizure, seizure stages and latency and duration of fifth stage of seizure was recorded for each animal. Injection of PTZ led to seizure in the animals. Pretreatment with PEA increased the latency to initiate seizures and reduced the duration of seizure. Pretreatment with different dosages of AM251 had contrary effects so that at lower doses they increased the seizure in animals but at higher doses led to the attenuation of seizure. AM630 increased seizures in a dose dependent manner. Combination of the antagonists increased the seizure parameters and attenuated the effect of PEA on seizure. PEA attenuated the PTZ-induced seizures and pretreatment with CB1 and CB2 antagonists diminished this effect of PEA, but still PEA was effective, which might be attributed to the contribution of other receptors in PEA anti-epileptic properties. Findings of the current study implied that endocannabinoid signaling pathway might have an important role in the effects of PEA. PMID:26370914

  4. Quantification of Interictal Neuromagnetic Activity in Absence Epilepsy with Accumulated Source Imaging.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jing; Tenney, Jeffrey R; Korman, Abraham M; Leiken, Kimberly; Rose, Douglas F; Harris, Elana; Yuan, Weihong; Horn, Paul S; Holland, Katherine; Loring, David W; Glauser, Tracy A

    2015-11-01

    Aberrant brain activity in childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) during seizures has been well recognized as synchronous 3 Hz spike-and-wave discharges on electroencephalography. However, brain activity from low- to very high-frequency ranges in subjects with CAE between seizures (interictal) has rarely been studied. Using a high-sampling rate magnetoencephalography (MEG) system, we studied ten subjects with clinically diagnosed but untreated CAE in comparison with age- and gender-matched controls. MEG data were recorded from all subjects during the resting state. MEG sources were assessed with accumulated source imaging, a new method optimized for localizing and quantifying spontaneous brain activity. MEG data were analyzed in nine frequency bands: delta (1-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz), beta (12-30 Hz), low-gamma (30-55 Hz), high-gamma (65-90 Hz), ripple (90-200 Hz), high-frequency oscillation (HFO, 200-1,000 Hz), and very high-frequency oscillation (VHFO, 1,000-2,000 Hz). MEG source imaging revealed that subjects with CAE had higher odds of interictal brain activity in 200-1,000 and 1,000-2,000 Hz in the parieto-occipito-temporal junction and the medial frontal cortices as compared with controls. The strength of the interictal brain activity in these regions was significantly elevated in the frequency bands of 90-200, 200-1,000 and 1,000-2,000 Hz for subjects with CAE as compared with controls. The results indicate that CAE has significantly aberrant brain activity between seizures that can be noninvasively detected. The measurements of high-frequency neuromagnetic oscillations may open a new window for investigating the cerebral mechanisms of interictal abnormalities in CAE. PMID:25359158

  5. Seizure disorders and anemia associated with chronic borax intoxication.

    PubMed

    Gordon, A S; Prichard, J S; Freedman, M H

    1973-03-17

    During the course of investigation of two infants with seizure disorders it was discovered that both had been given large amounts of a preparation of borax and honey which resulted in chronic borate intoxication. In one child a profound anemia developed as well. The symptoms of chronic borate intoxication are different from those of the acute poisoning with which we are more familiar. The borax and honey preparations are highly dangerous and should no longer be manufactured or distributed for sale. PMID:4691106

  6. Cerebellar stimulation for cerebral palsy spasticity, function, and seizures.

    PubMed

    Davis, R

    2000-01-01

    Chronic cerebellar stimulation (CCS) applied to the superio-medial cortex reduces generalized cerebral spasticity, athetoid movements, and seizures. Eighteen clinics have reported on 600 cerebral palsy (CP) patients who comprise 90% of those treated with CCS. CP patients have varying degrees of limited abilities interfered with by spasticity (primitive reflexes, increased muscle tone, co-contractions, and spasms) and by athetoid movements in two-thirds of the patients. With CCS, spasticity reduction occurred in 85% (marked 25%, moderate 34%, mild 27%) and resulted in improvements in patient drooling, speech, respiration, posture, motor performance, gait, joint range of motion, and mood states. Radiofrequency (RF)-linked stimulators were used initially with serious equipment and calibration problems; 68% of 422 patients improved. When totally implantable controlled-currrent stimulators were used, 86% of 178 patients improved. Our double-blind study of 20 CP patients using this implantable stimulator showed 12 (60%) improved in motor performance, joint range of motion, and profile of mood states when the stimulator was ON. When abilities are graded (1: poor to 9: best), the seven patients with the higher functioning grades (5-8) all improved (99% confidence level). Intractable seizures occurred in 27 (8%) of our CP patients. At a 17-year follow-up, 19 patients contacted were using or had used CCS with 10 (53%) seizure-free and 6 (32%) with reduced seizures. CCS should be given by a totally implanted controlled-current stimulator (1-4 microCoulombs/sq. cm. /phase, 150-200 Hz) applied intermittently to the superio-medial cerebellar cortex for safe, effective, and continuous results. PMID:11036180

  7. Hyponatraemia and Moduretic-grand mal seizures: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, C; Webb, L; Daley, J; Spathis, G S

    1989-01-01

    Three cases are presented which emphasize the importance of hyponatraemia as a cause of grand mal seizures. The combination of hydrochlorothiazide and amiloride appears to increase the risk of hyponatraemia. We discuss the aetiology and treatment of hyponatraemia and review the necessity for such combination therapy. We recommend caution in prescribing diuretics and preparations such as Moduretic should be used only in those few patients shown to need potassium supplementation. PMID:2506346

  8. Seizures and reproductive function: insights from female rats with epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Scharfman, Helen E.; Kim, Michelle; Hintz, Tana M.; MacLusky, Neil J.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Chronic seizures in women can have adverse effects on reproductive function, such as polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), but it has been difficult to dissociate the effects of epilepsy per se from the role of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). To distinguish the effects of chronic seizures from AEDs, we used the laboratory rat, where an epileptic condition can be induced without concomitant AED treatment. METHODS Adult female rats were administered the chemoconvulsant pilocarpine to initiate status epilepticus (SE), which was decreased in severity by the anticonvulsant diazepam. These rats developed spontaneous seizures in the ensuing weeks, and are therefore termed “epileptic.” Controls were saline-treated rats, or animals that were injected with pilocarpine but did not develop SE. Ovarian cyclicity and weight gain were evaluated for 2-3 months. Serum hormone levels were assayed from trunk blood, collected at the time of death. Paraformaldehyde-fixed ovaries were evaluated quantitatively. RESULTS Rats that had pilocarpine-induced seizures had an increased incidence of acyclicity by the end of the study, even if SE did not occur. Ovarian cysts and weight gain were significantly greater in epileptic rats than controls, whether rats maintained cyclicity or not. Serum testosterone was elevated in epileptic rats, but estradiol, progesterone and prolactin were not. INTERPRETATIONS The results suggest that an epileptic condition in the rat leads to increased body weight, cystic ovaries and elevated testosterone levels. Although caution is required when comparing female rats to women, the data suggest that epilepsy per se may be sufficient to induce abnormalities in the control of the ovary. PMID:19107990

  9. Mitochondrial dysfunction and seizures: the neuronal energy crisis.

    PubMed

    Zsurka, Gábor; Kunz, Wolfram S

    2015-09-01

    Seizures are often the key manifestation of neurological diseases caused by pathogenic mutations in 169 of the genes that have so far been identified to affect mitochondrial function. Mitochondria are the main producers of ATP needed for normal electrical activities of neurons and synaptic transmission. Additionally, they have a central role in neurotransmitter synthesis, calcium homoeostasis, redox signalling, production and modulation of reactive oxygen species, and neuronal death. Hypotheses link mitochondrial failure to seizure generation through changes in calcium homoeostasis, oxidation of ion channels and neurotransmitter transporters by reactive oxygen species, a decrease in neuronal plasma membrane potential, and reduced network inhibition due to interneuronal dysfunction. Seizures, irrespective of their origin, represent an excessive acute energy demand in the brain. Accordingly, secondary mitochondrial dysfunction has been described in various epileptic disorders, including disorders that are mainly of non-mitochondrial origin. An understanding of the reciprocal relation between mitochondrial dysfunction and epilepsy is crucial to select appropriate anticonvulsant treatment and has the potential to open up new therapeutic approaches in the subset of epileptic disorders caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID:26293567

  10. Seizure-Induced Oxidative Stress in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    An insult to the brain (such as the first seizure) causes excitotoxicity, neuroinflammation, and production of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS). ROS and RNS produced during status epilepticus (SE) overwhelm the mitochondrial natural antioxidant defense mechanism. This leads to mitochondrial dysfunction and damage to the mitochondrial DNA. This in turn affects synthesis of various enzyme complexes that are involved in electron transport chain. Resultant effects that occur during epileptogenesis include lipid peroxidation, reactive gliosis, hippocampal neurodegeneration, reorganization of neural networks, and hypersynchronicity. These factors predispose the brain to spontaneous recurrent seizures (SRS), which ultimately establish into temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). This review discusses some of these issues. Though antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are beneficial to control/suppress seizures, their long term usage has been shown to increase ROS/RNS in animal models and human patients. In established TLE, ROS/RNS are shown to be harmful as they can increase the susceptibility to SRS. Further, in this paper, we review briefly the data from animal models and human TLE patients on the adverse effects of antiepileptic medications and the plausible ameliorating effects of antioxidants as an adjunct therapy. PMID:25650148

  11. Integrating electrodermal biofeedback into pharmacologic treatment of grand mal seizures

    PubMed Central

    Scrimali, Tullio; Tomasello, Damiana; Sciuto, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Electrodermal activity (EDA) and electrodermal biofeedback, when integrated with pharmacologic treatments, indicate promising methods for the treatment of grand mal seizures. They can be used to monitor patient arousal and help patients learn new strategies to better cope with stress and anxiety. Our proposed method can possibly reduce the number of crises for patients who are dependent on pharmacologic therapy and can improve their quality of life. This article describes the scientific background of electrodermal monitoring and electrodermal biofeedback for patients affected by grand mal seizures. In this study, we have reported a clinical case study. The patient was treated for 2 years with electrodermal biofeedback to augment pharmacologic treatments. The trial has been designed in accordance with “n = 1 case study research”. Our results have shown that our methods could achieve a significant reduction in grand mal seizures and sympathetic arousal when applied. The patient under consideration was also relaxed and exhibited greater competency to cope with stress. Additionally, the patient’s sense of mastery and self-efficacy was enhanced. PMID:26029078

  12. Epidemiology of pyridoxine dependent seizures in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Been, J; Bok, L; Andriessen, P; Renier, W

    2005-01-01

    Background: Pyridoxine dependent epilepsy is a rare cause of seizures in childhood. The diagnosis is made on clinical criteria, that in many cases are never met. Therefore, epidemiological data on pyridoxine dependency are scarce. Aims: To study the epidemiology of pyridoxine dependent epilepsy in the Netherlands, and to determine whether the diagnosis is based on the appropriate criteria. Methods: Nationwide all departments of paediatrics (n = 113) and of paediatric or neonatal neurology (n = 17) were asked to report cases of pyridoxine dependent seizures. Birth incidences were calculated using national data on live births from 1991 to 2003. Results: Response was received from 67% of paediatric departments, including all university hospitals and 94% of child neurology departments. Thirteen patients were reported. Four definite (31%), three probable (23%), and four possible cases (31%) were identified. Two cases (15%) did not meet criteria for either of these groups. The birth incidence was 1:396 000 for definite and probable cases and 1:252 000 when possible cases are included. Conclusions: Thus far, epidemiological data on pyridoxine dependent seizures were only available from the UK and Ireland. A higher incidence was found in the Netherlands, in accordance with earlier suggestions of a regional difference. The study shows that the diagnosis is often made without performance of a formal trial of withdrawal. The importance of confirming the diagnosis, concerning the consequences as for individual prognosis, the potential side effects of prolonged pyridoxine substitution, and the possibility of treating the mother in case of future pregnancies are emphasised. PMID:16159904

  13. Sulfur Dioxide and Emergency Department Visits for Stroke and Seizure

    PubMed Central

    Szyszkowicz, Mieczys?aw; Porada, Eugeniusz; Tremblay, Neil; Grafstein, Eric

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess an association between ambient sulfur dioxide and the number of emergency department (ED) visits for ischemic stroke and seizure. The study used data collected in a Vancouver (Canada) hospital in the years 1999–2003. Daily ED visits diagnosed as ministroke, stroke, or seizure were investigated using the case-crossover technique. Conditional logistic regression models were applied to estimate the odds ratios (ORs) and their respective 95% confidence intervals (CIs). The models included temperature and relative humidity in the form of natural splines. The results were reported for an increase in interquartile range ((IQR), IQR = 1.9 ppb for SO2). Positive and statistically significant associations were obtained for SO2 and ischemic stroke for all patients (OR = 1.12; CI 1.02, 1.23; lag 3) and for female patients (OR = 1.17; CI 1.01, 1.33; lag 0). In the case of ED visits for seizure, for female patients the results were also statistically significant (OR = 1.15; CI 1.02, 1.28; lag 1 and OR = 1.18; CI 1.05, 1.32; lag 2). These findings suggest that cases of ischemic cerebrovascular accidents are associated with acute exposure to ambient sulfur dioxide. PMID:22577602

  14. The treatment of neonatal seizures: focus on Levetiracetam.

    PubMed

    Loiacono, Giulia; Masci, Marco; Zaccara, Gaetano; Verrotti, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Neonatal crises are a common problem in the first month, where phenobarbital and phenytoin are still the most frequently used medication in treatment. Whereas, Levetiracetam (LEV) is an antiepileptic drug (AED) with an innovative action. Our present review is updated on the current literature regarding the use of LEV in neonatal seizures treatment. The available data is analyzed to assess LEV pharmacokinetics, efficacy and tolerability in neonatal crises treatment. Several clinical trials, prospective and retrospective, comparative and pharmacokinetic studies were evaluated in LEV pharmacokinetics, efficacy, dosage, route of administration and side effects. Many cases were reported on neonatal seizures control in using LEV in certain clinical conditions. In spite of the limitations in current studies available, which have evaluated LEV efficacy and safety in neonatal crises treatment, the authors still believe that LEV seems to be a promising and useful AED in the treatment for neonatal seizures, but likewise further studies are required to better define LEV efficacy and tolerability in term and preterm neonates. PMID:25385270

  15. [The changes of bone architecture in atypical femoral fracture].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Noriaki; Shimakura, Taketoshi; Takahash, Hideaki

    2013-07-01

    The feature of atypical femoral fracture is stress induced cortical bone reaction. It was considered to be the accumulation of microdamage which come from increasing of mechanical stress by femoral lateral bowing, and the decreased of ability of microdamage repair system. PMID:23811584

  16. [An atypical form of Aujezky's disease after vaccination (author's transl].

    PubMed

    Willemse, A; Rondhuis, P R; Goedegebuure, S A; Maas, J H

    1977-03-15

    Four atypical case of Aujezky's disease in dogs are described. Two weeks before the outbreak of the disease, the dogs had been vaccinated with a live tissue culture vaccin, based on the Bartha strain. By culturevirus (cytopathogenic effect) the Bartha vaccin was identified and a vaccination reaction was proved. Vaccination with this must be discouraged. PMID:191953

  17. Absence epileptic activity changing effects of non-adenosine nucleoside inosine, guanosine and uridine in Wistar Albino Glaxo Rijswijk rats.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Z; Kékesi, K A; Dobolyi, Á; Lakatos, R; Juhász, G

    2015-08-01

    Adenosine (Ado) and non-adenosine (non-Ado) nucleosides such as inosine (Ino), guanosine (Guo) and uridine (Urd) may have regionally different roles in the regulation of physiological and pathophysiological processes in the central nervous system (CNS) such as epilepsy. It was demonstrated previously that Ino and Guo decreased quinolinic acid (QA)-induced seizures and Urd reduced penicillin-, bicuculline- and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizures. It has also been demonstrated that Ino and Urd may exert their effects through GABAergic system by altering the function of GABA(A) type of gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors (GABAA receptors) whereas Guo decreases glutamate-induced excitability through glutamatergic system, which systems (GABAergic and glutamatergic) are involved in pathomechanisms of absence epilepsy. Thus, we hypothesized that Ino and Guo, similarly to the previously described effect of Urd, might also decrease absence epileptic activity. We investigated in the present study whether intraperitoneal (i.p.) application of Ino (500 and 1000mg/kg), Guo (20 and 50mg/kg), Urd (500 and 1000mg/kg), GABA(A) receptor agonist muscimol (1 and 3mg/kg), GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline (2 and 4mg/kg), non-selective Ado receptor antagonist theophylline (5 and 10mg/kg) and non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist (+)-5-methyl-10,11-dihydro-5H-dibenzo (a,d) cyclohepten-5,10-imine maleate (MK-801, 0.0625 and 0.1250mg/kg) alone and in combination have modulatory effects on absence epileptic activity in Wistar Albino Glaxo Rijswijk (WAG/Rij) rats. We found that Guo decreased the number of spike-wave discharges (SWDs) whereas Ino increased it dose-dependently. We strengthened that Urd can decrease absence epileptic activity. Our results suggest that Guo, Urd and their analogs could be potentially effective drugs for treatment of human absence epilepsy. PMID:26037802

  18. Relation between stress-precipitated seizures and the stress response in childhood epilepsy.

    PubMed

    van Campen, Jolien S; Jansen, Floor E; Pet, Milou A; Otte, Willem M; Hillegers, Manon H J; Joels, Marian; Braun, Kees P J

    2015-08-01

    The majority of patients with epilepsy report that seizures are sometimes triggered or provoked. Stress is the most frequently self-reported seizure-precipitant. The mechanisms underlying stress-sensitivity of seizures are currently unresolved. We hypothesized that stress-sensitivity of seizures relates to alteration of the stress response, which could affect neuronal excitability and hence trigger seizures. To study this, children with epilepsy between 6 and 17 years of age and healthy controls, with similar age, sex and intelligence, were exposed to a standardized acute psychosocial stressor (the Trier Social Stress Test for Children), during which salivary cortisol and sympathetic parameters were measured. Beforehand, the relation between stress and seizures in children with epilepsy was assessed by (i) a retrospective questionnaire; and (ii) a prospective 6-week diary on stress and seizure occurrence. Sixty-four children with epilepsy and 40 control subjects were included in the study. Of all children with epilepsy, 49% reported that seizures were precipitated by acute stress. Diary analysis showed a positive association between acute stress and seizures in 62% of children who experienced at least one seizure during the diary period. The acute social stress test was completed by 56 children with epilepsy and 37 control subjects. Children with sensitivity of seizures for acute stress, either determined by the questionnaire or by the prospective diary, showed a blunted cortisol response to stress compared with patients without acute stress-precipitated seizures and healthy controls (questionnaire-based F = 2.74, P = 0.018; diary-based F = 4.40, P = 0.007). No baseline differences in cortisol were observed, nor differences in sympathetic stress response. The relation between acute stress-sensitivity of seizures and the cortisol response to stress remained significant in multivariable analysis (? = -0.30, P = 0.03). Other variables associated with the acute stress response were the number of anti-epileptic drugs (? = -0.27, P = 0.05) and sleep quality (? = 0.30, P = 0.03). In conclusion, we show that children with acute stress-sensitive seizures have a decreased cortisol response to stress. These results support our hypothesis that stress-sensitivity of seizures is associated with alterations of the stress response, thereby providing a first step in unravelling the mechanisms behind the seizure-precipitating effects of stress. Increased knowledge of the relation between stress and seizures in childhood epilepsy might benefit our understanding of the fundamental processes underlying epilepsy and ictogenesis in general, and provide valuable clues to direct the development of new therapeutic strategies for epilepsy. PMID:26049086

  19. Congenital hypoparathyroidism, seizure, extreme growth failure with developmental delay and dysmorphic features--another case of this new syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kalam, M A; Hafeez, W

    1992-09-01

    A 4-year-old Saudi female child with extreme failure to thrive, striking dysmorphic features, developmental delay, congenital hypoparathyroidism, UTI, seizures, chronic otitis media, chronic non-specific gastroenteritis and repeated life-threatening infections was followed from birth. She was the product of first-cousin consanguineous marriage. She had striking facies with frontal prominence, deep-set eyes, depressed nasal bridge, beaked nose, long philtrum with thin upper lip, micrognathia, large floppy ears, bifid uvula, and growth retardation with SD score less than -2 for height, weight and head circumference. We believe these features which include congenital hypoparathyroidism, severe growth failure and developmental delay in the absence of chromosomal abnormality represent a newly described genetically determined syndrome. PMID:1395080

  20. Absences of chair and declaration of interests

    E-print Network

    Abrahams, I. David

    Absences of chair and declaration of interests 1. In the event of the absence and/or declared in relation to the assessment of a submission from that institution takes place. The formal note, and these will be noted and the member's involvement in assessing a submission may be restricted. UOA descriptor 4

  1. Absences of chair and declaration of interests

    E-print Network

    Abrahams, I. David

    Absences of chair and declaration of interests 1. In the event of the absence or declared interest to the assessment of a submission from that institution takes place. The formal note of the discussion provided, and these will be noted and the member's involvement in assessing a submission may be restricted. UOA descriptor 4

  2. Absences of chair and declaration of interests

    E-print Network

    Abrahams, I. David

    Absences of chair and declaration of interests 1. In the event of absence or declared interest to the assessment of a submission from that institution takes place. The formal note of the discussion provided, and these will be noted and the member's involvement in assessing a submission may be restricted. UOA descriptor 4

  3. 47 CFR 32.24 - Compensated absences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Compensated absences. 32.24 Section 32.24 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES General Instructions § 32.24 Compensated absences. (a)...

  4. 47 CFR 32.24 - Compensated absences.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Compensated absences. 32.24 Section 32.24 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES General Instructions § 32.24 Compensated absences. (a)...

  5. Developments in Educational Leave of Absence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, Paris (France). Centre for Educational Research and Innovation.

    The document evaluates present international developments in the area of leave of absence during working hours for educational purposes. Part 1, Educational Leave of Absence: A Comparative Analysis, contains five chapters: (1) Towards a New Right to Education, discussing recurrent education, the world of work, the International Labor Organization,…

  6. Failure of antiepileptic drugs in controlling seizures in epilepsy: What do we do next?

    PubMed Central

    Galindo-Mendez, Brahyan; Mayor, Luis C.; Velandia-Hurtado, Fernando; Calderon-Ospina, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Medically intractable epilepsy is a clinical condition of concern that arises when a patient with epilepsy suffers seizures, despite a trial of two or more antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) suitable for the type of epilepsy that are prescribed at maximum tolerated doses, does not achieve control of seizures. This diagnosis could be related to cortical dysplasias. We report the case of a 5-year-old girl with a previous normal neurological development and no family history of epilepsy who presented with focal-type seizures at age 4. She started treatment by taking different AEDs for seizure control. She continued having frequent seizures that sometimes progressed to generalized seizures and status epilepticus. After a focal cortical resection performed in the area where interictal spikes were detected, the pathology confirmed a type IIb cortical dysplasia as the cause of the epilepsy. This article discusses cortical dysplasias as a cause of pharmacoresistant epilepsy and its treatment. PMID:26101746

  7. Optogenetic stimulation of cholinergic brainstem neurons during focal limbic seizures: Effects on cortical physiology.

    PubMed

    Furman, Moran; Zhan, Qiong; McCafferty, Cian; Lerner, Benjamin A; Motelow, Joshua E; Meng, Jin; Ma, Chanthia; Buchanan, Gordon F; Witten, Ilana B; Deisseroth, Karl; Cardin, Jessica A; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2015-12-01

    Focal temporal lobe seizures often cause impaired cortical function and loss of consciousness. Recent work suggests that the mechanism for depressed cortical function during focal seizures may depend on decreased subcortical cholinergic arousal, which leads to a sleep-like state of cortical slow-wave activity. To test this hypothesis, we sought to directly activate subcortical cholinergic neurons during focal limbic seizures to determine the effects on cortical function. Here we used an optogenetic approach to selectively stimulate cholinergic brainstem neurons in the pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus during focal limbic seizures induced in a lightly anesthetized rat model. We found an increase in cortical gamma activity and a decrease in delta activity in response to cholinergic stimulation. These findings support the mechanistic role of reduced subcortical cholinergic arousal in causing cortical dysfunction during seizures. Through further work, electrical or optogenetic stimulation of subcortical arousal networks may ultimately lead to new treatments aimed at preventing cortical dysfunction during seizures. PMID:26530287

  8. Human seizures self-terminate across spatial scales via a critical transition

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Mark A.; Truccolo, Wilson; Eden, Uri T.; Lepage, Kyle Q.; Hochberg, Leigh R.; Eskandar, Emad N.; Madsen, Joseph R.; Lee, Jong W.; Maheshwari, Atul; Halgren, Eric; Chu, Catherine J.; Cash, Sydney S.

    2012-01-01

    Why seizures spontaneously terminate remains an unanswered fundamental question of epileptology. Here we present evidence that seizures self-terminate via a discontinuous critical transition or bifurcation. We show that human brain electrical activity at various spatial scales exhibits common dynamical signatures of an impending critical transition—slowing, increased correlation, and flickering—in the approach to seizure termination. In contrast, prolonged seizures (status epilepticus) repeatedly approach, but do not cross, the critical transition. To support these results, we implement a computational model that demonstrates that alternative stable attractors, representing the ictal and postictal states, emulate the observed dynamics. These results suggest that self-terminating seizures end through a common dynamical mechanism. This description constrains the specific biophysical mechanisms underlying seizure termination, suggests a dynamical understanding of status epilepticus, and demonstrates an accessible system for studying critical transitions in nature. PMID:23213262

  9. [Case of frontal lobe epilepsy with gelastic seizures induced by emotion].

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yasuhiro; Sudo, Akira; Ito, Tomoshiro; Sano, Hitomi; Fukushima, Naoki

    2009-08-01

    Gelastic seizures without hypothalamic hamartoma is a rare forms of epilepsy. Here, we report the case of 4-year-old girl with gelastic seizures. There was no delay in mental or motor development of the patient. The patient exhibited a peculiar seizure pattern that suddenly clung to her mother stiffening her body and an outburst of laughter with no apparent cause. The frequency of the seizures increased over a period of 1 month. Although the brain MRI and interictal EEG showed no abnormality, ictal EEG showed a 14 Hz wave discharge and subsequent slow-wave activity and suppression in bilateral frontal areas. The seizures responded favorably to oral administration of carbamazepine. The induction of the seizures could be related to theophylline administration and emotional excitation. PMID:19697890

  10. Seizures induced by direct electrical cortical stimulation - Mechanisms and clinical considerations.

    PubMed

    Kovac, Stjepana; Kahane, Philippe; Diehl, Beate

    2016-01-01

    Direct electrical cortical stimulation (CS) is widely used to map eloquent cortex. It can be applied extraoperatively in patients undergoing intracranial EEG recordings using chronically implanted electrodes (subdural, depth or a combination), or it can be used intraoperatively. Seizures can be induced by CS but there is controversy regarding the utility of CS induced seizures in defining the epileptogenic zone and hence practice varies considerably between centres. Some centres use seizures induced by direct CS routinely to aid in defining the epileptogenic zone. In contrast, others do not rely on such information and explicitly avoid stimulating seizures during cortical mapping. Intra- and extraoperative techniques have been used to stimulate seizures with varying results, which may in part reflect these methodological differences. We here aim to review current views, definitions and studies on seizures induced by direct electrical CS. In addition we discuss mechanisms and methodological considerations of this procedure. PMID:25613034

  11. Apparatus and method for epileptic seizure detection using non-linear techniques

    DOEpatents

    Hively, Lee M. (Knoxville, TN); Clapp, Ned E. (Knoxville, TN); Daw, C. Stuart (Knoxville, TN); Lawkins, William F. (Knoxville, TN)

    1998-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for automatically detecting epileptic seizures by monitoring and analyzing brain wave (EEG or MEG) signals. Steps include: acquiring the brain wave data from the patient; digitizing the data; obtaining nonlinear measures of the data via chaotic time series analysis; obtaining time serial trends in the nonlinear measures; determining that one or more trends in the nonlinear measures indicate a seizure, and providing notification of seizure occurrence.

  12. Failure to kindle seizures after repeated intracerebral administration of arginine vasopressin.

    PubMed

    Cain, D P; Plant, J; Rouleau, S; Corcoran, M E

    1986-03-17

    In an attempt to kindle seizures with arginine-vasopressin (AVP), we injected AVP into the amygdala or hippocampus of rats. Although behavioral and electrographic alterations were sometimes observed, seizures failed to develop, even in rats that had previously been kindled with electrical stimulation. This and previous failures to kindle seizures by intraventricular injections of AVP call into question the possibility of AVP kindling. PMID:3951322

  13. Apparatus and method for epileptic seizure detection using non-linear techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Hively, L.M.; Clapp, N.E.; Daw, C.S.; Lawkins, W.F.

    1998-04-28

    Methods and apparatus are disclosed for automatically detecting epileptic seizures by monitoring and analyzing brain wave (EEG or MEG) signals. Steps include: acquiring the brain wave data from the patient; digitizing the data; obtaining nonlinear measures of the data via chaotic time series analysis; obtaining time serial trends in the nonlinear measures; determining that one or more trends in the nonlinear measures indicate a seizure, and providing notification of seizure occurrence. 76 figs.

  14. 14 Department of Geology and Geophysics University of Wisconsin-Madison Atypical "Noise" for an Atypical Badger Football Saturday

    E-print Network

    Johnson, Clark M.

    " for an Atypical Badger Football Saturday by John Naranjo -- President Wisconsin-Madison Student Geophysical Society This is not your typical Badger football tailgate party. On the morning of Nov. 18, 2006 Badger football home game, the entire student section (seated Sec. J-P) turns its attention

  15. Mechanisms by which a CACNA1H mutation in epilepsy patients increases seizure susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Eckle, Veit-Simon; Shcheglovitov, Aleksandr; Vitko, Iuliia; Dey, Deblina; Yap, Chan Choo; Winckler, Bettina; Perez-Reyes, Edward

    2014-01-01

    T-type calcium channels play essential roles in regulating neuronal excitability and network oscillations in the brain. Mutations in the gene encoding Cav3.2 T-type Ca2+ channels, CACNA1H, have been found in association with various forms of idiopathic generalized epilepsy. We and others have found that these mutations may influence neuronal excitability either by altering the biophysical properties of the channels or by increasing their surface expression. The goals of the present study were to investigate the excitability of neurons expressing Cav3.2 with the epilepsy mutation, C456S, and to elucidate the mechanisms by which it influences neuronal properties. We found that expression of the recombinant C456S channels substantially increased the excitability of cultured neurons by increasing the spontaneous firing rate and reducing the threshold for rebound burst firing. Additionally, we found that molecular determinants in the I–II loop (the region in which most childhood absence epilepsy-associated mutations are found) substantially increase the surface expression of T-channels but do not alter the relative distribution of channels into dendrites of cultured hippocampal neurons. Finally, we discovered that expression of C456S channels promoted dendritic growth and arborization. These effects were reversed to normal by either the absence epilepsy drug ethosuximide or a novel T-channel blocker, TTA-P2. As Ca2+-regulated transcription factors also increase dendritic development, we tested a transactivator trap assay and found that the C456S variant can induce changes in gene transcription. Taken together, our findings suggest that gain-of-function mutations in Cav3.2 T-type Ca2+ channels increase seizure susceptibility by directly altering neuronal electrical properties and indirectly by changing gene expression. PMID:24277868

  16. Synchronization analysis of voltage-sensitive dye imaging during focal seizures in the rat neocortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeshita, Daisuke; Bahar, Sonya

    2011-12-01

    Seizures are often assumed to result from an excess of synchronized neural activity. However, various recent studies have suggested that this is not necessarily the case. We investigate synchronization during focal neocortical seizures induced by injection of 4-aminopyridine (4AP) in the rat neocortex in vivo. Neocortical activity is monitored by field potential recording and by the fluorescence of the voltage-sensitive dye RH-1691. After removal of artifacts, the voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) signal is analyzed using the nonlinear dynamics-based technique of stochastic phase synchronization in order to determine the degree of synchronization within the neocortex during the development and spread of each seizure event. Results show a large, statistically significant increase in synchronization during seizure activity. Synchrony is typically greater between closer pixel pairs during a seizure event; the entire seizure region is synchronized almost exactly in phase. This study represents, to our knowledge, the first application of synchronization analysis methods to mammalian VSD imaging in vivo. Our observations indicate a clear increase in synchronization in this model of focal neocortical seizures across a large area of the neocortex; a sharp increase in synchronization during seizure events was observed in all 37 seizures imaged. The results are consistent with a recent computational study which simulates the effect of 4AP in a neocortical neuron model.

  17. Assessing Systems of Care for US Children with Epilepsy/Seizure Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, Mary Kay; Mann, Marie

    2013-01-01

    Background. The proportion of US children with special health care needs (CSHCN) with epilepsy/seizure disorder who receive care in high-quality health service systems was examined. Methodology. We analyzed data for 40,242 CSHCN from the 2009-2010 National Survey of CSHCN and compared CSHCN with epilepsy/seizure disorder to CSHCN without epilepsy/seizure disorder. Measures included attainment rates for 6 federal quality indicators with comparisons conducted using chi square and logistic regression methods. In addition, CSHCN with epilepsy/seizure disorder were compared to CSHCN without epilepsy/seizure disorder on the basis of 14 unmet health care needs. Results. Lower attainment rates for receiving comprehensive care in a medical home and easily accessible community-based services were found for CSHCN with epilepsy/seizure disorder versus CSHCN without epilepsy/seizure disorder (medical home: 32% versus 43%; accessible community-based services: 50% versus 66%, resp.) in unadjusted analyses. Lower adjusted odds for these indicators as well as greater unmet need for specialists, dentistry, prescriptions, therapies, and mental health care were also found for CSHCN with epilepsy/seizure disorder. Conclusions. Further efforts are needed to improve attainment of high-quality health care services for CSHCN with epilepsy/seizure disorders. PMID:24228175

  18. Ictal dystonia and secondary generalization in temporal lobe seizures: a video-EEG study.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Ljubica; Vojvodic, Nikola; Ristic, Aleksandar J; Bascarevic, Vladimir; Sokic, Dragoslav; Kostic, Vladimir S

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the occurrence of unilateral ictal limb dystonia (ID) during complex partial seizures (CPS) reduces the possibility of contralateral propagation (CP) and secondary generalization (SG) in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). We assessed 216 seizures recorded in 33 patients with pharmacoresistant TLE. All patients underwent video-EEG telemetry prior to surgical treatment with good postoperative outcomes (Engel I). Ictal limb dystonia was observed in 16 of the 33 patients (48%) and 58 of the 216 seizures (26.8%). We found highly significant differences in the frequency of SG between seizures with ID and seizures without ID (2/58 vs. 41/158; 3.45% vs. 25.95%; p<0.001). Contralateral propagation was seen in 13 of the 57 analyzed seizures with ID compared to 85 of the 158 seizures without ID (22.8% vs. 53.8%; p<0.001). Among the CPS without SG, we found that the mean duration of seizures with ID was significantly longer than the duration of seizures without ID (81.66±40.10 vs. 68.88±25.01 s; p=0.011). Our findings that CP and SG occur less often in patients with ID, yet the duration of CPS without SG is longer in patients with ID, suggest that the basal ganglia might inhibit propagation to the contralateral hemisphere but not ictal activity within the unilateral epileptic network. PMID:23153714

  19. Heart rate changes in partial seizures: analysis of influencing factors among refractory patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We analyzed the frequency of heart rate (HR) changes related to seizures, and we sought to identify the influencing factors of these changes during partial seizures, to summarize the regularity of the HR changes and gain some insight into the mechanisms involved in the neuronal regulation of cardiovascular function. To date, detailed information on influencing factors of HR changes related to seizures by multiple linear regression analysis remains scarce. Methods Using video-electroencephalograph (EEG)-electrocardiograph (ECG) recordings, we retrospectively assessed the changes in the HR of 81 patients during a total of 181 seizures, including 27 simple partial seizures (SPS), 110 complex partial seizures (CPS) and 44 complex partial seizures secondarily generalized (CPS-G). The epileptogenic focus and the seizure type, age, gender, and sleep/wakefulness state of each patient were evaluated during and after the seizure onset. The HR changes were evaluated in the stage of epilepsy as time varies. Results Of the 181 seizures from 81 patients with ictal ECGs, 152 seizures (83.98%) from 74 patients were accompanied by ictal tachycardia (IT). And only 1 patient was accompanied by ictal bradycardia (IB). A patient has both IT and IB. We observed that HR difference was independently correlated with side, type and sleep/wakefulness state. In this analysis, the HR changes were related to the side, gender, seizure type, and sleep/wakefulness state. Right focus, male, sleep, and CPS-G showed more significant increases than that were observed in left, female, wakefulness, SPS and CPS. HR increases rapidly within 10 seconds before seizure onset and ictus, and typically slows to normal with seizure offset. Conclusion CPS-G, sleep and right focus led to higher ictal HR. The HR in the stage of epilepsy has regularly been observed to change to become time-varying. The risk factors of ictal HR need to be controlled along with sleep, CPS-G and right focus. Our study first explains that the HR in seizures has a regular evolution varying with time. Our study might help to further clarify the basic mechanisms of interactions between heart and brain, making seizure detection and closed-loop systems a possible therapeutic alternative in refractory patients. PMID:24950859

  20. Effect of Antiepileptic Drugs for Acute and Chronic Seizures in Children with Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kuang-Lin; Lin, Jainn-Jim; Hsia, Shao-Hsuan; Chou, Min-Liang; Hung, Po-Cheng; Wang, Huei-Shyong

    2015-01-01

    Background Encephalitis presents with seizures in the acute phase and increases the risk of late unprovoked seizures and epilepsy. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of antiepileptic drugs in pediatric patients with acute seizures due to encephalitis and epilepsy. Patients and Methods Cases of acute pediatric encephalitis between January 2000 and December 2010 were reviewed. Clinical data, including onset at age, seizure type, seizure frequency, effects of antiepileptic drugs, and prognosis were analyzed. Results During the study period, 1038 patients (450 girls, 588 boys) were enrolled. Among them, 44.6% (463) had seizures in the acute phase, 33% had status epilepticus, and 26% (251) developed postencephalitic epilepsy. At one year of follow-up, 205 of the 251 patients with postencephalitic epilepsy were receiving antiepileptic drugs while 18% were seizure free even after discontinuing the antiepileptic drugs. Among those with postencephalitic epilepsy, 67% had favorable outcomes and were using <2 anti-epileptic drugs while 15% had intractable seizures and were using ? 2 antiepileptic drugs. After benzodiazepines, intravenous phenobarbital was preferred over phenytoin as treatment of postencephalitic seizures in the acute phase. For refractory status epilepticus, high-dose topiramate combined with intravenous high-dose phenobarbital or high-dose lidocaine had less side effects. Conclusions Children with encephalitis have a high rate of postencephalitic epilepsy. Phenobarbital and clonazepam are the most common drugs used, alone or in combination, for postencephalitic epilepsy. PMID:26444013