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Sample records for atypical absence seizures

  1. Absence seizure

    MedlinePlus

    Seizure - petit mal; Seizure - absence; Petit mal seizure; Epilepsy - absence seizure ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff RB, ... 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap ...

  2. Current and emerging treatments for absence seizures in young patients

    PubMed Central

    Vrielynck, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    In this report, we review the pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments of the different absence seizure types as recently recognized by the International League Against Epilepsy: typical absences, atypical absences, myoclonic absences, and eyelid myoclonia with absences. Overall, valproate and ethosuximide remain the principal anti-absence drugs. Typical absence seizures exhibit a specific electroclinical semiology, pathophysiology, and pharmacological response profile. A large-scale comparative study has recently confirmed the key role of ethosuximide in the treatment of childhood absence epilepsy, more than 50 years after its introduction. No new antiepileptic drug has proven major efficacy against typical absences. Of the medications under development, brivaracetam might be an efficacious anti-absence drug. Some experimental drugs also show efficacy in animal models of typical absence seizures. The treatment of other absence seizure types is not supported with a high level of evidence. Rufinamide appears to be the most promising new antiepileptic drug for atypical absences and possibly for myoclonic absences. The efficacy of vagal nerve stimulation should be further evaluated for atypical absences. Levetiracetam appears to display a particular efficacy in eyelid myoclonia with absences. Finally, it is important to remember that the majority of antiepileptic drugs, whether they be old or new, may aggravate typical and atypical absence seizures. PMID:23885176

  3. Acute and chronic pharmacological models of generalized absence seizures.

    PubMed

    Cortez, Miguel A; Kostopoulos, George K; Snead, O Carter

    2016-02-15

    This article reviews the contribution of pharmacologically induced acute and chronic animal models to our understanding of epilepsies featuring non-convulsive generalized seizures, the typical and atypical absence seizures. Typical absences comprise about 5% of all epilepsies regardless of age and the atypical ones are even more common. Although absence epilepsy was thought to be relatively benign, children with childhood epilepsy (CAE) turn out to have a high rate of pretreatment attention deficits that persist despite seizure freedom. The phenomenon of the absence seizure has long attracted research interest because of the clear temporal relationship of the conspicuous EEG rhythm of 3Hz generalized spike and wave discharges (GSWD) and the parallel transient "loss of consciousness" characterizing these seizures which is time-locked with the GSWD. Indeed, clinical epileptologists, basic scientists and neurophysiologists have long recognized in GSWD a unique electrographic and behavioral marker of the genetic predisposition to most types of epilepsy. Interestingly, the subject is still controversial since it has recently been proposed that both classification terms of CAE currently in use: idiopathic and primary generalized, be abandoned - a point of debate. Both issues - underlying mechanisms and focal origin of absence seizures - may be further enlightened by observations in valid animal models. PMID:26343323

  4. Deletion 18p11.32p11.31 in a Child with Global Developmental Delay and Atypical, Drug-Resistant Absence Seizures.

    PubMed

    Verrotti, Alberto; Palka, Chiara; Prezioso, Giovanni; Alfonsi, Melissa; Calabrese, Giuseppe; Palka, Giandomenico; Chiarelli, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    We report the first case of an 18p11.32 deletion, detected by array CGH, associated with a drug-resistant form of atypical absence epilepsy, global developmental delay and no signs of holoprosencephaly (HPE). In particular, this region encompasses 19 genes, and none of these genes have been strictly associated with epilepsy. Among these, TGIF1 is expressed in the fetal and adult nervous system, and its deletion has been related to central nervous system diseases. TGIF1 deletions have previously been reported in patients with a comparable phenotype as seen in our case and in children whose neurological signs and symptoms were considerable, but not epileptiform. Mutations and deletions involving the TGIF1 gene have been described in patients with HPE in an autosomal dominant model of inheritance. However, TGIF1 mutations have also been reported in normal individuals and in patients with mental retardation or showing a very mild phenotype, suggesting the characteristic of incomplete penetrance and variable expressivity. Therefore, a TGIF1 deletion may not be always related to HPE, and it may have a link to the development of epilepsy. PMID:26278570

  5. Consciousness and epilepsy: why are patients with absence seizures absent?

    PubMed Central

    Blumenfeld, Hal

    2011-01-01

    Epileptic seizures cause dynamic, reversible changes in brain function and are often associated with loss of consciousness. Of all seizure types, absence seizures lead to the most selective deficits in consciousness, with relatively little motor or other manifestations. Impaired consciousness in absence seizures is not monolithic, but varies in severity between patients and even between episodes in the same patient. In addition, some aspects of consciousness may be more severely involved than other aspects. The mechanisms for this variability are not known. Here we review the literature on human absence seizures and discuss a hypothesis for why effects on consciousness may be variable. Based on behavioral studies, electrophysiology, and recent neuroimaging and molecular investigations, we propose absence seizures impair focal, not generalized brain functions. Imapired consciousness in absence seizures may be caused by focal disruption of information processing in specific corticothalamic networks, while other networks are spared. Deficits in selective and varying cognitive functions may lead to impairment in different aspects of consciousness. Further investigations of the relationship between behavior and altered network function in absence seizures may improve our understanding of both normal and impaired consciousness. PMID:16186030

  6. Reducing premature KCC2 expression rescues seizure susceptibility and spine morphology in atypical febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Awad, Patricia N; Sanon, Nathalie T; Chattopadhyaya, Bidisha; Carriço, Josianne Nunes; Ouardouz, Mohamed; Gagné, Jonathan; Duss, Sandra; Wolf, Daniele; Desgent, Sébastien; Cancedda, Laura; Carmant, Lionel; Di Cristo, Graziella

    2016-07-01

    Atypical febrile seizures are considered a risk factor for epilepsy onset and cognitive impairments later in life. Patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and a history of atypical febrile seizures often carry a cortical malformation. This association has led to the hypothesis that the presence of a cortical dysplasia exacerbates febrile seizures in infancy, in turn increasing the risk for neurological sequelae. The mechanisms linking these events are currently poorly understood. Potassium-chloride cotransporter KCC2 affects several aspects of neuronal circuit development and function, by modulating GABAergic transmission and excitatory synapse formation. Recent data suggest that KCC2 downregulation contributes to seizure generation in the epileptic adult brain, but its role in the developing brain is still controversial. In a rodent model of atypical febrile seizures, combining a cortical dysplasia and hyperthermia-induced seizures (LHS rats), we found a premature and sustained increase in KCC2 protein levels, accompanied by a negative shift of the reversal potential of GABA. In parallel, we observed a significant reduction in dendritic spine size and mEPSC amplitude in CA1 pyramidal neurons, accompanied by spatial memory deficits. To investigate whether KCC2 premature overexpression plays a role in seizure susceptibility and synaptic alterations, we reduced KCC2 expression selectively in hippocampal pyramidal neurons by in utero electroporation of shRNA. Remarkably, KCC2 shRNA-electroporated LHS rats show reduced hyperthermia-induced seizure susceptibility, while dendritic spine size deficits were rescued. Our findings demonstrate that KCC2 overexpression in a compromised developing brain increases febrile seizure susceptibility and contribute to dendritic spine alterations. PMID:26875662

  7. Absence of seizures in Rasmussen encephalitis with active inflammation.

    PubMed

    Samanta, Debopam; Gokden, Murat; Albert, Gregory W

    2016-06-01

    Severe focal motor epilepsy is considered a clinical hallmark of Rasmussen encephalitis (RE). The authors report a 6-year-old girl with progressive right sided hemiparesis, loss of language skills, left sided hemispheric atrophy, and brain pathologic features characteristic for RE. The patient did not experience seizures over a 2year period after symptom onset and for several months during follow-up. This report expands the clinical spectrum of RE and suggests that seizures are not a universal symptom of RE. Our patient's quite remarkable neurologic deficits along with active inflammation in the absence of epilepsy supports that, at least in some individuals, unilateral hemispheric progressive inflammation can occur without active seizure activity. PMID:26775150

  8. Cellular and network mechanisms of genetically-determined absence seizures.

    PubMed

    Pinault, Didier; O'Brien, Terence J

    2005-01-01

    The absence epilepsies are characterized by recurrent episodes of loss of consciousness associated with generalized spike-and-wave discharges, with an abrupt onset and offset, in the thalamocortical system. In the absence of detailed neurophysiological studies in humans, many of the concepts regarding the pathophysiological basis of absence seizures are based on studies in animal models. Each of these models has its particular strengths and limitations, and the validity of findings from these models for the human condition cannot be assumed. Consequently, studies in different models have produced some conflicting findings and conclusions. A long-standing concept, based primarily from studies in vivo in cats and in vitro brain slices, is that these paroxysmal electrical events develop suddenly from sleep-related spindle oscillations. More specifically, it is proposed that the initial mechanisms that underlie absence-related spike-and-wave discharges are located in the thalamus, involving especially the thalamic reticular nucleus. By contrast, more recent studies in well-established, genetic models of absence epilepsy in rats demonstrate that spike-and-wave discharges originate in a cortical focus and develop from a wake-related natural corticothalamic sensorimotor rhythm. In this review we integrate recent findings showing that, in both the thalamus and the neocortex, genetically-determined, absence-related spike-and-wave discharges are the manifestation of hypersynchronized, cellular, rhythmic excitations and inhibitions that result from a combination of complex, intrinsic, synaptic mechanisms. Arguments are put forward supporting the hypothesis that layer VI corticothalamic neurons act as 'drivers' in the generation of spike-and-wave discharges in the somatosensory thalamocortical system that result in corticothalamic resonances particularly initially involving the thalamic reticular nucleus. However an important unresolved question is: what are the cellular and network mechanisms responsible for the switch from physiological, wake-related, natural oscillations into pathological spike-and-wave discharges? We speculate on possible answers to this, building particularly on recent findings from genetic models in rats. PMID:21909233

  9. [A case with frontal lobe epilepsy presenting with absence seizures as cardinal manifestation: ictal EEG findings].

    PubMed

    Maruyama, Koichi; Itomi, Kazuya; Ishiguro, Yoshiko; Okumura, Akihisa; Negoro, Tamiko; Watanabe, Kazuyoshi

    2002-01-01

    We report here a 9-year-old boy presenting with absence and complex partial seizures. Absence seizures occurred several times a day, with sudden arrest of speech and gesture, alteration of consciousness, myoclonus of unilateral or bilateral angles of the mouth, occasional simple automatism and brisk recovery of consciousness. Complex partial seizures occurred once to three times a month with loss of consciousness, salivation, deviation of the head and eyes toward the left, elevation of upper limbs and tonic convulsion of the left upper and lower limbs. Interictal EEG showed right frontal pole-dominant high-voltage slow waves or spike-and-waves. Ictal simultaneous video-EEG recordings of absence seizures revealed a frontal dominant 3-3.5 Hz spike-wave burst lasting several seconds. A partial seizure never preceded the absence seizure. Transverse topographical analysis revealed that the first spike component of the spike-wave burst of absence seizure always showed phase reversal on the right anterior temporal electrode. The following ones, however, showed phase reversal on the left anterior temporal electrode. Ictal EEG of the complex partial seizure could not be detected because it rarely occurred. There was no abnormal finding on brain MRI. Interictal single photon emission tomography (SPECT) indicated hypoperfusion of the dorsal and medial cortex of the right middle frontal lobe. Interictal positron emission tomography (PET) also indicated hypometabolic areas in the dorsal and medial cortex of the right frontal lobe, together with those in the right temporal and parietal cortex. EEG evolution and neuroimaging studies suggested that the epileptic focus of the absence seizure might have originated at the dorsal cortex of the right middle frontal lobe and immediately spread to the medial cortex. Both the seizures were well controlled by the combination of phenytoin and high dose sodium valproate. PMID:11808212

  10. MRI volumetry shows increased anterior thalamic volumes in patients with absence seizures.

    PubMed

    Betting, Luiz Eduardo; Mory, Susana Barreto; Lopes-Cendes, Iscia; Li, Li Min; Guerreiro, Marilisa M; Guerreiro, Carlos A M; Cendes, Fernando

    2006-05-01

    The interaction between thalamus and cortex appears to be critical to the pathophysiology of idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGEs). The objective of this study was to investigate thalamic volumes of a group of patients with IGEs using high-resolution MRI. Thalamic segmentation was performed by the same rater, who was unaware of the diagnosis. Thalamic volumes were divided into anterior half and posterior half. One hundred forty-seven patients were scanned (71 with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy, 49 with generalized tonic-clonic seizures only, and 27 with absence epilepsy). Subgroup analyses with corrections for multiple comparisons showed that, when compared with those of controls, anterior thalamic volumes were increased in patients with absence epilepsy and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy with absence seizures, but not in patients with generalized tonic-clonic seizures only and juvenile myoclonic epilepsy without absence seizures. Our results demonstrated that the anterior thalamus is structurally different in patients with IGEs and absence seizures as compared with patients with IGEs without absence seizures. PMID:16530016

  11. Disinhibition-induced transitions between absence and tonic-clonic epileptic seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Denggui; Wang, Qingyun; Perc, Matjaž

    2015-07-01

    Electrophysiological experiments have long revealed the existence of two-way transitions between absence and tonic-clonic epileptic seizures in the cerebral cortex. Based on a modified spatially-extended Taylor & Baier neural field model, we here propose a computational framework to mathematically describe the transition dynamics between these epileptic seizures. We first demonstrate the existence of various transition types that are induced by disinhibitory functions between two inhibitory variables in an isolated Taylor & Baier model. Moreover, we show that these disinhibition-induced transitions can lead to stable tonic-clonic oscillations as well as periodic spike with slow-wave discharges, which are the hallmark of absence seizures. We also observe fascinating dynamical states, such as periodic 2-spike with slow-wave discharges, tonic death, bursting oscillations, as well as saturated firing. Most importantly, we identify paths that represent physiologically plausible transitions between absence and tonic-clonic seizures in the modified spatially-extended Taylor & Baier model.

  12. The diagnostic value of the sleep EEG with and without sleep deprivation in patients with atypical absences.

    PubMed

    Degen, R; Degen, H E

    1983-10-01

    Hitherto it has not been known whether or not the sleep EEG after sleep deprivation is more effective than the simple or drug-induced sleep EEG. To investigate this, we recorded for 32 patients both sleep EEGs without sleep deprivation and, on the following day, sleep EEGs after 24 h of sleep deprivation. All the patients had atypical absences which were almost exclusively combined with generalized seizures or some other seizure types. All patients were receiving antiepileptic therapy. Sleep without sleep deprivation was induced by oral administration of 2 mg/kg body weight Protactyl (promazine hydrochloride). In patients showing no epileptic activity in the routine EEG, epileptic discharges could be provoked in 78% without sleep deprivation and in 72% after sleep deprivation. Epileptic activity was already seen in 28.1% of the cases in the awake EEG without sleep deprivation, recorded immediately before the sleep EEG, and in 50% of the cases in the awake EEG after sleep deprivation. It is unlikely that promazine hydrochloride in the dose used here has an additional inherent provocative effect. Generalized spike-and-wave complexes or sharp slow wave complexes which were combined twice with foci and runs of rapid spikes were recorded. In the sleep EEG without sleep deprivation, epileptic discharges were seen in the somewhat shallower stages (C leads to A leads to B leads to D) and, in the sleep EEG after sleep deprivation, in the somewhat deeper stages (D leads to C leads to B leads to A). Fewer epileptic discharges were elicited in patients who were older at the time of their first seizure. The illness was mild in patients whose sleep EEGs showed no epileptic activity. It is concluded that, as a rule, it is not necessary to record an EEG after sleep deprivation in patients with atypical absences whose routine EEGs show no epileptic activity; the drug-induced sleep EEG shows the same provocative effect. PMID:6413198

  13. Critical Roles of the Direct GABAergic Pallido-cortical Pathway in Controlling Absence Seizures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingming; Guo, Daqing; Li, Min; Ma, Tao; Wu, Shengdun; Ma, Jingling; Cui, Yan; Xia, Yang; Xu, Peng; Yao, Dezhong

    2015-10-01

    The basal ganglia (BG), serving as an intermediate bridge between the cerebral cortex and thalamus, are believed to play crucial roles in controlling absence seizure activities generated by the pathological corticothalamic system. Inspired by recent experiments, here we systematically investigate the contribution of a novel identified GABAergic pallido-cortical pathway, projecting from the globus pallidus externa (GPe) in the BG to the cerebral cortex, to the control of absence seizures. By computational modelling, we find that both increasing the activation of GPe neurons and enhancing the coupling strength of the inhibitory pallido-cortical pathway can suppress the bilaterally synchronous 2-4 Hz spike and wave discharges (SWDs) during absence seizures. Appropriate tuning of several GPe-related pathways may also trigger the SWD suppression, through modulating the activation level of GPe neurons. Furthermore, we show that the previously discovered bidirectional control of absence seizures due to the competition between other two BG output pathways also exists in our established model. Importantly, such bidirectional control is shaped by the coupling strength of this direct GABAergic pallido-cortical pathway. Our work suggests that the novel identified pallido-cortical pathway has a functional role in controlling absence seizures and the presented results might provide testable hypotheses for future experimental studies. PMID:26496656

  14. Critical Roles of the Direct GABAergic Pallido-cortical Pathway in Controlling Absence Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Ma, Tao; Wu, Shengdun; Ma, Jingling; Cui, Yan; Xia, Yang; Xu, Peng; Yao, Dezhong

    2015-01-01

    The basal ganglia (BG), serving as an intermediate bridge between the cerebral cortex and thalamus, are believed to play crucial roles in controlling absence seizure activities generated by the pathological corticothalamic system. Inspired by recent experiments, here we systematically investigate the contribution of a novel identified GABAergic pallido-cortical pathway, projecting from the globus pallidus externa (GPe) in the BG to the cerebral cortex, to the control of absence seizures. By computational modelling, we find that both increasing the activation of GPe neurons and enhancing the coupling strength of the inhibitory pallido-cortical pathway can suppress the bilaterally synchronous 24 Hz spike and wave discharges (SWDs) during absence seizures. Appropriate tuning of several GPe-related pathways may also trigger the SWD suppression, through modulating the activation level of GPe neurons. Furthermore, we show that the previously discovered bidirectional control of absence seizures due to the competition between other two BG output pathways also exists in our established model. Importantly, such bidirectional control is shaped by the coupling strength of this direct GABAergic pallido-cortical pathway. Our work suggests that the novel identified pallido-cortical pathway has a functional role in controlling absence seizures and the presented results might provide testable hypotheses for future experimental studies. PMID:26496656

  15. 5% CO₂ inhalation suppresses hyperventilation-induced absence seizures in children.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Fan; Shi, Xiu-Yu; Ju, Jun; Zhang, Wei-Na; Liu, Yu-Jie; Li, Xiao-Yan; Zou, Li-Ping

    2014-02-01

    Hyperventilation can cause respiratory alkalosis by exhaling CO2, and is often used to confirm diagnosis of absence epilepsy. CO2 has long been known for its anticonvulsant properties since the 1920s. In this pilot study, we aimed to determine whether inhaling medical carbogen containing 5% CO2 and 95% O2 can suppress hyperventilation-induced absence seizures and spike-and-wave discharges (SWDs). We examined 12 patients whose absence seizures were induced by hyperventilation using video electroencephalographic recording for at least 4h. The patients were asked to hyperventilate for 3 min while breathing the following gases: (1) room air (12 patients); (2) carbogen (12 patients); and (3) 100% O2 (8 patients). Eight out of twelve patients were also examined in room air through pretreatment with carbogen for 3 min before the 3 min hyperventilation. Compared with hyperventilation in room air, hyperventilation supplemented with 5% CO2 had the following effects: (a) decrease in the number and duration of seizures; (b) prolonged appearance of epileptic discharges; and (c) reduction in the number and duration of SWDs (P<0.001). However, pretreatment with 5% CO2 and 100% O2 supplement did not yield similar effects. We demonstrated that 5% CO2 could suppress hyperventilation-induced absence seizures and SWDs, supporting the claim that 5% CO2 is an effective anticonvulsant agent. Our pilot study provides clinical basis that 5% CO2 inhalation could be a therapeutic approach for hyperventilation-related seizures. PMID:24315664

  16. Childhood Absence Epilepsy: Poor Attention Is More Than Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... for treating CAE. e138 © 2013 American Academy of Neurology ª"NFSJDBO "DBEFNZ PG /FVSPMPHZ 6OBVUIPSJ[FE SFQSPEVDUJPO ... medication impact on attention in childhood absence epilepsy. Neurology 2013;81:1572 – 1580. 2. Glauser TA, Cnaan ...

  17. Human L-ferritin deficiency is characterized by idiopathic generalized seizures and atypical restless leg syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cozzi, Anna; Santambrogio, Paolo; Privitera, Daniela; Broccoli, Vania; Rotundo, Luisa Ida; Garavaglia, Barbara; Benz, Rudolf; Altamura, Sandro; Goede, Jeroen S.; Muckenthaler, Martina U.

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitously expressed iron storage protein ferritin plays a central role in maintaining cellular iron homeostasis. Cytosolic ferritins are composed of heavy (H) and light (L) subunits that co-assemble into a hollow spherical shell with an internal cavity where iron is stored. The ferroxidase activity of the ferritin H chain is critical to store iron in its Fe3+ oxidation state, while the L chain shows iron nucleation properties. We describe a unique case of a 23-yr-old female patient affected by a homozygous loss of function mutation in the L-ferritin gene, idiopathic generalized seizures, and atypical restless leg syndrome (RLS). We show that L chain ferritin is undetectable in primary fibroblasts from the patient, and thus ferritin consists only of H chains. Increased iron incorporation into the FtH homopolymer leads to reduced cellular iron availability, diminished levels of cytosolic catalase, SOD1 protein levels, enhanced ROS production and higher levels of oxidized proteins. Importantly, key phenotypic features observed in fibroblasts are also mirrored in reprogrammed neurons from the patient’s fibroblasts. Our results demonstrate for the first time the pathophysiological consequences of L-ferritin deficiency in a human and help to define the concept for a new disease entity hallmarked by idiopathic generalized seizure and atypical RLS. PMID:23940258

  18. Simultaneous EEG, fMRI, and Behavior in Typical Childhood Absence Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Rachel; Negishi, Michiro; Vestal, Matthew; Spann, Marisa; Chung, Mi Hae; Bai, Xiaoxiao; Purcaro, Michael; Motelow, Joshua E.; Danielson, Nathan; Dix-Cooper, Linda; Enev, Miro; Novotny, Edward J.; Constable, R. Todd; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Absence seizures cause transient impairment of consciousness. Typical absence seizures occur in children, and are accompanied by 3–4 Hz spike-wave discharges (SWD) on EEG. Prior EEG-fMRI studies of SWD have shown a network of cortical and subcortical changes during these electrical events. However, fMRI during typical childhood absence seizures with confirmed impaired consciousness has not been previously investigated. Methods We performed EEG-fMRI with simultaneous behavioral testing in 37 children with typical childhood absence epilepsy. Attentional vigilance was evaluated by a continuous performance task (CPT), and simpler motor performance was evaluated by a repetitive tapping task (RTT). Results SWD episodes were obtained during fMRI scanning from 9 patients among the 37 studied. fMRI signal increases during SWD were observed in the thalamus, frontal cortex, primary visual, auditory, somatosensory, and motor cortex, and fMRI decreases were seen in the lateral and medial parietal cortex, cingulate gyrus, and basal ganglia. Omission error rate (missed targets) with SWD during fMRI was 81% on CPT and 39% on RTT. For those seizure epochs during which CPT performance was impaired, fMRI changes were seen in cortical and subcortical structures typically involved in SWD, while minimal changes were observed for the few epochs during which performance was spared. Discussion These findings suggest that typical absence seizures involve a network of cortical-subcortical areas necessary for normal attention and primary information processing. Identification of this network may improve understanding of cognitive impairments in childhood absence epilepsy, and help guide development of new therapies for this disorder. PMID:20608963

  19. Atypical course in individuals from Spanish families with benign familial infantile seizures and mutations in the PRRT2 gene.

    PubMed

    Guerrero-Lpez, Rosa; Ortega-Moreno, Laura; Girldez, Beatriz G; Alarcn-Morcillo, Cristina; Snchez-Martn, Gema; Nieto-Barrera, Manuel; Gutirrez-Delicado, Eva; Gmez-Garre, Pilar; Martnez-Bermejo, Antonio; Garca-Peas, Juan J; Serratosa, Jos M

    2014-10-01

    A benign prognosis has been claimed in benign familial infantile seizures (BFIS). However, few studies have assessed the long-term evolution of these patients. The objective of this study is to describe atypical courses and presentations in BFIS families with mutations in PRRT2 gene. We studied clinically affected individuals from five BFIS Spanish families. We found mutations in PRRT2 in all 5 families. A non-BFIS phenotype or an atypical BFIS course was found in 9/25 (36%) patients harbouring a PRRT2 mutation. Atypical features included neonatal onset, mild hemiparesis, learning difficulties or mental retardation, and recurrent seizures during adulthood. We also report a novel PRRT2 mutation (c.121_122delGT). In BFIS families an atypical phenotype was present in a high percentage of the patients. These findings expand the clinical spectrum of PRRT2 mutations including non-benign epileptic phenotypes. PMID:25060993

  20. Effect of sleep deprivation on the EEG of learning-impaired children with absence seizures.

    PubMed

    Borkowski, W J; Ellington, R J; Sverdrup, E K

    1992-04-01

    Learning-impaired children can present with a clinical history suggesting additional problems, including attention deficit disorder and absence seizures. Physicians use clinical judgment in diagnosing the former, but rely heavily on the electroencephalogram (EEG) to diagnose the latter. Most clinicians are reluctant to treat patients with anticonvulsants without seeing 3 Hz spike-and-wave discharges in an EEG. We studied 21 learning-impaired and 7 control children, ages 5 through 12 years, with normal baseline EEGs. All had an additional EEG recorded after 24 hour sleep deprivation. Nine learning-impaired children had a history compatible with absence seizures; 8 of them showed spike-and-wave discharges after sleep deprivation. Of the 12 learning-impaired children with no history of absence seizures, 2 showed spike-and-wave discharges after sleep deprivation. These results are significant (p less than 0.001). Of the 7 controls, none had epileptiform activity following sleep deprivation. Our results show that routine EEGs may be falsely negative in patients with absence seizures, and that sleep deprivation is a potent activator. PMID:1582049

  1. Disinhibition-induced transitions between absence and tonic-clonic epileptic seizures

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Denggui; Wang, Qingyun; Perc, Matjaž

    2015-01-01

    Electrophysiological experiments have long revealed the existence of two-way transitions between absence and tonic-clonic epileptic seizures in the cerebral cortex. Based on a modified spatially-extended Taylor & Baier neural field model, we here propose a computational framework to mathematically describe the transition dynamics between these epileptic seizures. We first demonstrate the existence of various transition types that are induced by disinhibitory functions between two inhibitory variables in an isolated Taylor & Baier model. Moreover, we show that these disinhibition-induced transitions can lead to stable tonic-clonic oscillations as well as periodic spike with slow-wave discharges, which are the hallmark of absence seizures. We also observe fascinating dynamical states, such as periodic 2-spike with slow-wave discharges, tonic death, bursting oscillations, as well as saturated firing. Most importantly, we identify paths that represent physiologically plausible transitions between absence and tonic-clonic seizures in the modified spatially-extended Taylor & Baier model. PMID:26224066

  2. Neurochemical and Behavioral Features in Genetic Absence Epilepsy and in Acutely Induced Absence Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Bazyan, A. S.; van Luijtelaar, G.

    2013-01-01

    The absence epilepsy typical electroencephalographic pattern of sharp spikes and slow waves (SWDs) is considered to be due to an interaction of an initiation site in the cortex and a resonant circuit in the thalamus. The hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cationic Ih pacemaker channels (HCN) play an important role in the enhanced cortical excitability. The role of thalamic HCN in SWD occurrence is less clear. Absence epilepsy in the WAG/Rij strain is accompanied by deficiency of the activity of dopaminergic system, which weakens the formation of an emotional positive state, causes depression-like symptoms, and counteracts learning and memory processes. It also enhances GABAA receptor activity in the striatum, globus pallidus, and reticular thalamic nucleus, causing a rise of SWD activity in the cortico-thalamo-cortical networks. One of the reasons for the occurrence of absences is that several genes coding of GABAA receptors are mutated. The question arises: what the role of DA receptors is. Two mechanisms that cause an infringement of the function of DA receptors in this genetic absence epilepsy model are proposed. PMID:23738145

  3. A brief history on the oscillating roles of thalamus and cortex in absence seizures

    PubMed Central

    Avoli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Summary This review summarizes the findings obtained over the past 70 years on the fundamental mechanisms underlying generalized spike-wave (SW) discharges associated with absence seizures. Thalamus and cerebral cortex are the brain areas that have attracted most of the attention from both clinical and experimental researchers. However, these studies have often favored either one or the other structure in playing a major role, thus leading to conflicting interpretations. Beginning with Jasper and Penfield’s topistic view of absence seizures as the result of abnormal functions in the so-called centrencephalon, we witness the naissance of a broader concept that considered both thalamus and cortex as equal players in the process of SW discharge generation. Furthermore, we discuss how recent studies have identified fine changes in cortical and thalamic excitability that may account for the expression of absence seizures in naturally occurring genetic rodent models and knockout mice. The end of this fascinating tale is presumably far from being written. However, I can confidently conclude that in the unfolding of this “novel,” we have discovered several molecular, cellular, and pharmacologic mechanisms that govern forebrain excitability, and thus consciousness, during the awake state and sleep. PMID:22360294

  4. Closed-loop seizure control with very high frequency electrical stimulation at seizure onset in the GAERS model of absence epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Timothy S; Suhr, Courtney L; Freestone, Dean R; Lai, Alan; Halliday, Amy J; McLean, Karen J; Burkitt, Anthony N; Cook, Mark J

    2011-04-01

    A closed-loop system for the automated detection and control of epileptic seizures was created and tested in three Genetic Absence Epilepsy Rats from Strasbourg (GAERS) rats. In this preliminary study, a set of four EEG features were used to detect seizures and three different electrical stimulation strategies (standard (130 Hz), very high (500 Hz) and ultra high (1000 Hz)) were delivered to terminate seizures. Seizure durations were significantly shorter with all three stimulation strategies when compared to non-stimulated (control) seizures. We used mean seizure duration of epileptiform discharges persisting beyond the end of electrical stimulation as a measure of stimulus efficacy. When compared to the duration of seizures stimulated in the standard approach (7.0 s ± 10.1), both very high and ultra high frequency stimulation strategies were more effective at shortening seizure durations (1.3 ± 2.2 s and 3.5 ± 6.4 s respectively). Further studies are warranted to further understand the mechanisms by which this therapeutic effect may be conveyed, and which of the novel aspects of the very high and ultra high frequency stimulation strategies may have contributed to the improvement in seizure abatement performance when compared to standard electrical stimulation approaches. PMID:21442779

  5. Absence of simple partial seizure in temporal lobe epilepsy: its diagnostic and prognostic significance.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Y; Mihara, T; Matsuda, K; Tottori, T; Otsubo, T; Yagi, K

    2000-02-01

    The diagnostic and prognostic significance of the absence of simple partial seizures (SPS) immediately preceding complex partial seizures (CPS) was examined in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. The status of self-reported SPS in 193 patients with temporal lobe epilepsy who had surgical therapy more than 2 years ago was reviewed. Before surgery, 37 patients never experienced SPS before CPS (Group A), 156 patients either always or occasionally had SPS before CPS (Group B). The frequency of mesial temporal sclerosis (MTS) was lower and the age at onset of epilepsy was higher in Group A. The seizure focus was in the language-dominant temporal lobe in 73% of the cases in Group A, compared with 40% in Group B. The surgical outcome did not differ between the two groups. The findings suggest that temporal lobe seizures without preceding SPS tend to originate in the language-dominant temporal lobe that contains a pathologic etiology other than MTS, especially in the lateral temporal lobe. The surgical outcome in patients without SPS is similar to that in patients with SPS. PMID:10642041

  6. Transplantation of GABAergic Interneurons into the Neonatal Primary Visual Cortex Reduces Absence Seizures in Stargazer Mice.

    PubMed

    Hammad, Mohamed; Schmidt, Stephen L; Zhang, Xuying; Bray, Ryan; Frohlich, Flavio; Ghashghaei, H Troy

    2015-09-01

    Epilepsies are debilitating neurological disorders characterized by repeated episodes of pathological seizure activity. Absence epilepsy (AE) is a poorly understood type of seizure with an estimated 30% of affected patients failing to respond to antiepileptic drugs. Thus, novel therapies are needed for the treatment of AE. A promising cell-based therapeutic strategy is centered on transplantation of embryonic neural stem cells from the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE), which give rise to gamma-aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) interneurons during embyronic development. Here, we used the Stargazer (Stg) mouse model of AE to map affected loci using c-Fos immunohistochemistry, which revealed intense seizure-induce activity in visual and somatosensory cortices. We report that transplantation of MGE cells into the primary visual cortex (V1) of Stg mice significantly reduces AE episodes and lowers mortality. Electrophysiological analysis in acute cortical slices of visual cortex demonstrated that Stg V1 neurons exhibit more pronounced increases in activity in response to a potassium-mediated excitability challenge than wildtypes (WT). The defective network activity in V1 was significantly altered following WT MGE transplantation, associating it with behavioral rescue of seizures in Stgs. Taken together, these findings present MGE grafting in the V1 as a possible clinical approach in the treatment of AE. PMID:24812085

  7. Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Caring for Your Child All About Food Allergies First Aid: Seizures KidsHealth > For Parents > First Aid: Seizures Print ... Gently place your child on the floor or ground, and remove any nearby objects. Loosen any clothing ...

  8. Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... defects) Brain tumor (rare) Drug abuse Electric shock Epilepsy Fever (particularly in young children) Head injury Heart ... age. There may be a family history of epilepsy or seizures. If seizures continue repeatedly after the ...

  9. An autonomous real-time single-channel detection of absence seizures in WAG/Rij rats.

    PubMed

    Aghazadeh, Roghayeh; Shahabi, Parviz; Frounchi, Javad; Sadighi, Mina

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a real-time, completely automated and patient independent algorithm for detection of absence seizures in WAG/Rij rats as a valid animal model of human absence epilepsy. Single-channel EEG recordings containing totally 488 seizures from 8 WAG/Rij rats were analyzed using the real-time SWD detection algorithm. The proposed algorithms based on the variation of wavelet power to the background power in two specific frequency bands whose spectral power are highly correlated with SWDs. The wavelet powers of two specific frequency bands are calculated with a pattern-adapted mother wavelet and compared with an adaptive ratio of background power of each frequency band. The results indicate used algorithm is able to detect the whole 488 seizures within less than 1 s with sensitivity of 100%. The average precision for 1200, 1400 and 1600 point of window size was 95.2%, 98.3% and 99.17%, respectively. The present algorithm, with its high sensitivity and specificity, could be used for further studies of absence seizures in humans and rats and could be implemented as real-time system for closed loop deep brain stimulation systems. PMID:26001287

  10. A critical evaluation of the gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) model of absence seizures.

    PubMed

    Venzi, Marcello; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; Crunelli, Vincenzo

    2015-02-01

    Typical absence seizures (ASs) are nonconvulsive epileptic events which are commonly observed in pediatric and juvenile epilepsies and may be present in adults suffering from other idiopathic generalized epilepsies. Our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of ASs has been greatly advanced by the availability of genetic and pharmacological models, in particular the γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) model which, in recent years, has been extensively used in studies in transgenic mice. GHB is an endogenous brain molecule that upon administration to various species, including humans, induces not only ASs but also a state of sedation/hypnosis. Analysis of the available data clearly indicates that only in the rat does there exist a set of GHB-elicited behavioral and EEG events that can be confidently classified as ASs. Other GHB activities, particularly in mice, appear to be mostly of a sedative/hypnotic nature: thus, their relevance to ASs requires further investigation. At the molecular level, GHB acts as a weak GABA-B agonist, while the existence of a GHB receptor remains elusive. The pre- and postsynaptic actions underlying GHB-elicited ASs have been thoroughly elucidated in thalamus, but little is known about the cellular/network effects of GHB in neocortex, the other brain region involved in the generation of ASs. PMID:25403866

  11. A Critical Evaluation of the Gamma-Hydroxybutyrate (GHB) Model of Absence Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Venzi, Marcello; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; Crunelli, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Typical absence seizures (ASs) are nonconvulsive epileptic events which are commonly observed in pediatric and juvenile epilepsies and may be present in adults suffering from other idiopathic generalized epilepsies. Our understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of ASs has been greatly advanced by the availability of genetic and pharmacological models, in particular the γ-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) model which, in recent years, has been extensively used in studies in transgenic mice. GHB is an endogenous brain molecule that upon administration to various species, including humans, induces not only ASs but also a state of sedation/hypnosis. Analysis of the available data clearly indicates that only in the rat does there exist a set of GHB-elicited behavioral and EEG events that can be confidently classified as ASs. Other GHB activities, particularly in mice, appear to be mostly of a sedative/hypnotic nature: thus, their relevance to ASs requires further investigation. At the molecular level, GHB acts as a weak GABA-B agonist, while the existence of a GHB receptor remains elusive. The pre- and postsynaptic actions underlying GHB-elicited ASs have been thoroughly elucidated in thalamus, but little is known about the cellular/network effects of GHB in neocortex, the other brain region involved in the generation of ASs. PMID:25403866

  12. ?-Hydroxybutyric acid-induced electrographic seizures.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Joseph; Lucey, Brendan P; Duntley, Stephen P; Darken, Rachel S

    2014-07-15

    We describe a case of absence-like electrographic seizures during NREM sleep in a patient who was taking sodium oxybate, a sodium salt of ?-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB). An overnight full montage electroencephalography (EEG) study revealed numerous frontally predominant rhythmic 1.5-2 Hz sharp waves and spike-wave activity during stage N2 and N3 sleep at the peak dose time for sodium oxybate, resembling atypical absence-like electrographic seizures. The patient was later weaned off sodium oxybate, and a repeat study did not show any such electrographic seizures. Absence-like seizures induced by GHB had previously been described in experimental animal models. We present the first reported human case of absence-like electrographic seizure associated with sodium oxybate. PMID:25024661

  13. γ-Hydroxybutyric Acid-Induced Electrographic Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Joseph; Lucey, Brendan P.; Duntley, Stephen P.; Darken, Rachel S.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a case of absence-like electrographic seizures during NREM sleep in a patient who was taking sodium oxybate, a sodium salt of γ-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB). An overnight full montage electroencephalography (EEG) study revealed numerous frontally predominant rhythmic 1.5-2 Hz sharp waves and spike-wave activity during stage N2 and N3 sleep at the peak dose time for sodium oxybate, resembling atypical absence-like electrographic seizures. The patient was later weaned off sodium oxybate, and a repeat study did not show any such electrographic seizures. Absence-like seizures induced by GHB had previously been described in experimental animal models. We present the first reported human case of absence-like electrographic seizure associated with sodium oxybate. Citation: Cheung J, Lucey BP, Duntley SP, Darken RS. γ-hydroxybutyric acid-induced electrographic seizures. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(7):811-812. PMID:25024661

  14. Epilepsy phenotype associated with a chromosome 2q24.3 deletion involving SCN1A: Migrating partial seizures of infancy or atypical Dravet syndrome?

    PubMed

    Lim, Byung Chan; Hwang, Hee; Kim, Hunmin; Chae, Jong-Hee; Choi, Jieun; Kim, Ki Joong; Hwang, Yong Seung; Yum, Mi-Sun; Ko, Tae-Sung

    2015-01-01

    The deletion of a sodium channel gene cluster located on chromosome 2q24.3 is associated with variable epilepsy phenotypes, including Dravet syndrome and migrating partial seizures of infancy. Although SCN1A is considered as the major contributor to the epilepsy phenotype, the role of other sodium channel genes that map within this cluster has not been delineated. We presented five new cases with a chromosome 2q24.3 deletion involving SCN1A and investigated their epilepsy phenotype in relation to the extent of the deletion. Three cases with deletion of the whole sodium channel gene cluster (SCN3A, SCN2A, SCN1A, SCN9A, and SCN7A) exhibited a complex epilepsy phenotype that was atypical for Dravet syndrome and suggestive of migrating partial seizures of infancy: early seizure onset (before 2 months of age), severe developmental delay from seizure onset, multifocal interictal spikes, polymorphous focal seizures, and acquired microcephaly. Two cases with partial deletion of SCN1A and SCN9A and whole SCN1A deletion had an epilepsy phenotype of Dravet syndrome. A literature review of cases with chromosome 2q24.3 deletion revealed that, in most Dravet syndrome cases, it does not involve SCN2A and SCN3A, whereas a complex epilepsy phenotype that is shared with migrating partial seizures of infancy was associated with cases of deletion of the whole sodium channel gene cluster. PMID:25524840

  15. Absence of Nails, Deaf-mutism, Seizures, and Intellectual Disability: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Sagayaraj, Benjamin; Kumar, Radha

    2015-01-01

    Seizures coexists in children with intellectual disability and are often attributed to neural dysfunction associated with it. Often a careful clinical examination will unravel many diagnostic pointers as in this 8-year-old child with global development delay, deaf-mutism and moderate intellectual disability (mental retardation) who presented with seizures in the emergency department. General examination revealed dysmorphic features like anonychia, low set ears, long philtrum, large lower lips and abnormal dermatoglyphics with features of osteodystrophy on radiology. She was diagnosed as a case of DOORS syndrome, an extremely rare genetic condition affecting the TCA cycle, with just over 40 cases reported, worldwide till date, since its first description in 1961. Her genetic analysis did not reveal the common TBC1D24 mutation in 16p13.3 resulting often from substitutions affecting the arginine at position 242, in spite of all classical clinical features associated with it, suggesting genetic heterogeneity in DOORS syndrome. Though four year follow-up revealed changes in seizure pattern, there was no optic atrophy, change in IQ or peripheral nerve problem. This probably suggests that children with typical clinical features and TBC1D24 mutations may have more progressive deterioration than those without it and newer molecular techniques may identify unexplained phenotypic expressions. PMID:26023614

  16. Clonazepam in the treatment of epilepsy. A controlled clinical trial in simple absences, bilateral massive epileptic myoclonus, and atonic seizures.

    PubMed

    Mikkelsen, B; Birket-Smith, E; Bradt, S; Holm, P; BParm; Lung, M; Thorn, I; Vestermark, S; Olsen, P Z

    1976-05-01

    In a controlled clinical investigation based on ten patients with simple absences and ten patients with myoclonic atonic seizures, all patients who had insufficient response to conventional antiepileptic treatment received clonazepam (Rivotril [Denmark]; Clonopin, comparable US product) combined with previous antiepileptic drugs. The effects of the combined use of clonazepam and the previous antiepileptid drugs were compared with the effects of placebo combined with the same drugs. The trial was single-blind crossover with sequential analysis. In a daily dose of usually 3 to 6 mg, depending on patient age, the antiepileptic effect of clonazepam was significantly superior to placebo and was estimated as remarkably good. Side-effects of somnolence, fatigue, drowsiness, and coordination disturbances occurred in most of the patients, but subsided spontaneously or could be controlled by slow increase or slight reduction of dosage. Mental sideeffects such as agitation, confusion, and aggressiveness were more troublesome and caused discontinuation of clonazepam in two patients. PMID:817696

  17. Dynamics of networks during absence seizure's on- and offset in rodents and man

    PubMed Central

    Lüttjohann, Annika; van Luijtelaar, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Network mechanisms relevant for the generation, maintenance and termination of spike-wave discharges (SWD), the neurophysiological hallmark of absence epilepsy, are still enigmatic and widely discussed. Within the last years, however, improvements in signal analytical techniques, applied to both animal and human fMRI, EEG, MEG, and ECoG data, greatly increased our understanding and challenged several, dogmatic concepts of SWD. This review will summarize these recent data, demonstrating that SWD are not primary generalized, are not sudden and unpredictable events. It will disentangle different functional contributions of structures within the cortico-thalamo-cortical system, relevant for the generation, generalization, maintenance, and termination of SWD and will present a new “network based” scenario for these oscillations. Similarities and differences between rodent and human data are presented demonstrating that in both species a local cortical onset zone of SWD exists, although with different locations; that in both some forms of cortical and thalamic precursor activity can be found, and that SWD occur through repetitive cyclic activity between cortex and thalamus. The focal onset zone in human data could differ between patients with varying spatial and temporal dynamics; in rats the latter is still poorly investigated. PMID:25698972

  18. Neuropsychiatric consequences (atypical psychosis and complex-partial seizures) of ecstasy use: possible evidence for toxicity-vulnerability predictors and implications for preventative and clinical care.

    PubMed

    Vecellio, Marco; Schopper, Christian; Modestin, Jiri

    2003-09-01

    Two case reports of ecstasy abuse and its serious neuropsychiatric complications are presented. The first patient developed a florid paranoid psychosis resembling schizophrenia after repeated long-term recreational ecstasy abuse, and significant alterations with intermittent paroxysmal discharges were found in his electroencephalogram. The second patient showed an atypical paranoid psychosis with Fregoli syndrome and a series of complex-partial epileptic seizures with secondary generalization after a first single ecstasy dose. Both subjects presented considerable vulnerability; the first a minimal brain dysfunction after perinatal asphyxia and a persisting attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder, the second a long-lasting opioid addiction. In vulnerable individuals, dose-independent ecstasy abuse can lead to unpredictable and potentially dangerous neuropsychiatric sequelae which require proper initial assessment and adequate treatment. PMID:14513928

  19. Dopey's seizure.

    PubMed

    Dan, B; Christiaens, F

    1999-06-01

    Angelman syndrome is a neurogenetic condition namely characterized by developmental delay, virtual absence of expressive verbal language, peculiar organization of movement, seizures and happy demeanor. This syndrome has been recognized since 1965, but it seems that Walt Disney presented an original depiction of it in his first full-length animated film, including myoclonic jerks and an apparently generalized tonic-clonic seizure. PMID:10452923

  20. Corpus Callosotomy for Patients With Intractable Seizures: An Insight Into the Rapid Relapse.

    PubMed

    Liang, Chuandong; Tang, Yufei; Mu, Hua; Guo, Tao; Du, Yali; Yue, Xiangyong; Li, Wenling; Zhao, Wenqing

    2015-11-01

    It is well known that corpus callosotomy (CC) can bring a favorable seizure control outcome for disabling generalized seizures, but the complete remission rate achieved by CC is rarely reported, and the postoperative relapse pattern is still not clear. In this study, the authors reviewed patients with medically refractory epilepsy who were suffering disabling seizures, including drop attacks, generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS), tonic seizures, atonic seizures, atypical absences, and complex partial seizures. The patients underwent anterior two third or complete CC in our hospital. Seizure control outcome was evaluated postoperatively at 2 weeks, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, thereafter, at yearly intervals. Seizure-free or >90% reduction was considered to be satisfactory. There were 14 patients with mean age 11.00 ± 6.34 at surgery. Of all the patients, 6 patients underwent anterior two third CC, and the other 8 patients underwent complete CC. All the patients were postoperatively followed up for at least 1 year. Four patients (28.57%) were free of all seizure types in the first year after surgery. Among the 9 patients with follow-up longer than 3 years, 2 patients (22.22%) were free of all seizure types. In the first 3 months after surgery, more than half of the seizure free patients (55.56%) relapsed with the same seizure types as preoperatively. Although after that, there was only 1 patient relapsed. Of all the seizure types, CC achieved the most favorable seizure outcome in drop attacks. In conclusion, CC could achieve complete seizure remission in a small portion of selected candidates. Exploration of the relapse mechanism will contribute to improve the seizure outcome following CC. PMID:26595011

  1. Ethosuximide Affects Paired-Pulse Facilitation in Somatosensory Cortex of WAG\\Rij Rats as a Model of Absence Seizure

    PubMed Central

    Ghamkhari Nejad, Ghazaleh; Shahabi, Parviz; Alipoor, Mohamad Reza; Ghaderi Pakdel, Firouz; Asghari, Mohammad; Sadighi Alvandi, Mina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The interaction between somatosensory cortex and thalamus via a thalamocortical loop is a theory behind induction of absence epilepsy. Inside peri-oral somatosensory (S1po) and primary somatosensory forelimb (S1fl) regions, excitatory and inhibitory systems are not balanced and GABAergic inhibitory synapses seem to play a fundamental role in short-term plasticity alterations. Methods: We investigated the effects of Ethosuximide on presynaptic changes by utilizing paired-pulse stimulation that was recorded from somatosensory cortex in 18 WAG\\Rij rats during epileptic activity. A twisted tripolar electrode including two stimulating electrodes and one recording electrode was implanted into the S1po and S1FL according to stereotaxic landmarks. Paired-pulses (200 µs, 100-1000 µA, 0.1 Hz) were applied to somatosensory cortex at 50, 100, 400, 500 ms inter-pulse intervals for 50 min period. Results: The results showed that paired-pulse facilitation was significantly reduced at all intervals in all times, but compared to the control group of epileptic WAG/Rij rats (p<0.05), it was exceptional about the first 10 minutes after the injection. At the intervals of 50 and 100 ms, a remarkable PPD was found in second, third, fourth and fifth 10-min post injection. Conclusion: These experiments indicate that Ethosuximide has effects on presynaptic facilitation in somatosensory cortex inhibitory loops by alteration in GABA levels that leads to a markedly diminished PPF in paired-pulse stimulation. PMID:26819920

  2. Febrile seizures

    MedlinePlus

    American Academy of Pediatrics, Steering Committee on Quality Improvement and Management, Subcommittee on Febrile Seizures. Febrile seizures: clinical practice guideline for the long-term management of the child with simple febrile seizures. Pediatrics . 2008; ...

  3. CHD2 myoclonic encephalopathy is frequently associated with self-induced seizures

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Rhys H.; Zhang, Lin Mei; Carvill, Gemma L.; Archer, John S.; Heavin, Sinéad B.; Mandelstam, Simone A.; Craiu, Dana; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Gill, Deepak S.; Mefford, Heather C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To delineate the phenotype of early childhood epileptic encephalopathy due to de novo mutations of CHD2, which encodes the chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 2. Methods: We analyzed the medical history, MRI, and video-EEG recordings of 9 individuals with de novo CHD2 mutations and one with a de novo 15q26 deletion encompassing CHD2. Results: Seizures began at a mean of 26 months (12–42) with myoclonic seizures in all 10 cases. Seven exhibited exquisite clinical photosensitivity; 6 self-induced with the television. Absence seizures occurred in 9 patients including typical (4), atypical (2), and absence seizures with eyelid myoclonias (4). Generalized tonic-clonic seizures occurred in 9 of 10 cases with a mean onset of 5.8 years. Convulsive and nonconvulsive status epilepticus were later features (6/10, mean onset 9 years). Tonic (40%) and atonic (30%) seizures also occurred. In 3 cases, an unusual seizure type, the atonic-myoclonic-absence was captured on video. A phenotypic spectrum was identified with 7 cases having moderate to severe intellectual disability and refractory seizures including tonic attacks. Their mean age at onset was 23 months. Three cases had a later age at onset (34 months) with relative preservation of intellect and an initial response to antiepileptic medication. Conclusion: The phenotypic spectrum of CHD2 encephalopathy has distinctive features of myoclonic epilepsy, marked clinical photosensitivity, atonic-myoclonic-absence, and intellectual disability ranging from mild to severe. Recognition of this genetic entity will permit earlier diagnosis and enable the development of targeted therapies. PMID:25672921

  4. Levetiracetam: preliminary efficacy in generalized seizures.

    PubMed

    Kasteleijn-Nolst Trenité, Dorothée G A; Hirsch, Edouard

    2003-05-01

    Levetiracetam is a novel antiepileptic drug (AED) with proven efficacy against partial seizures, but there is limited information about its effectiveness against generalized seizures. In animal models, levetiracetam protects against seizures in audiogenic susceptible rodents, and it is effective in the Genetic Absence Epilepsy Rat from Strasbourg, a model of absence seizures. In these models, levetiracetam has a therapeutic index that is higher than those of other AEDs. A number of small open-label studies suggest that levetiracetam reduces seizure frequency in patients with generalized seizures, including primarily generalized seizures and myoclonic seizures. Case reports provide additional information regarding the potential efficacy of levetiracetam in postanoxic, post-encephalitic and progressive myoclonus. Although random-ized controlled studies of patients with generalized seizures have not yet been conducted, on the basis of available information, levetiracetam may be prom-ising in the treatment of generalized seizures. PMID:12915340

  5. Atypical preeclampsia and eclampsia: report of four cases and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Albayrak, Mustafa; Ȯzdemir, İsmail; Demiraran, Yavuz; Dikici, Süber

    2010-01-01

    Classically, most women who develop preeclampsia (hypertension and proteinuria) present some time after 20 weeks of gestation up to 48 h postpartum;and this is especially true in otherwise healthy, nulliparous pregnancies. Recent data suggest that in some women, preeclampsia and even eclampsia may develop in the absence of hypertension or proteinuria. Here, we report four atypical cases: eclampsia in the absence of hypertension and proteinuria (case 1), a partial seizure following eclampsia with antecedent proteinuria, but no hypertension (case 2), a case presenting with fetal distress, but no hypertension (case 3), and a case with unusually rapid progression and massive proteinuria that was unresponsive to therapy (case 4). Problems with atypical forms of eclampsia lie in its unpredictable onset; timely diagnosis and management are critical in avoiding complications. The purpose of this review is to increase the awareness of atypical forms of hypertensive disorders during pregnancy. PMID:24591913

  6. Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor of the brain in an adult with 22q deletion but no absence of INI1 protein: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Jin, S; Sun, C; Yu, S; Wang, Q; An, T; Wen, Y

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT) of the central nervous system (CNS) in an adult and its immunological phenotype and chromosomal DNA imbalance characteristics, as detected by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH). The immunohistochemical characteristics showed that atypical rhabdoid cells were positive for epithelial membrane antigen, vimentin, desmin, and glial fibrillary acidic protein, but there was no absence of INI1 protein. The CGH results identified the imbalances of the case to be the loss of 1p, 5q, 12q, 15q, 19q and 22q and the gain of 9q. Our discovery raises the question whether INI1 is implicated in all cases and whether its deletion is necessary in the pathogenesis of AT/RT, and also whether additional genetic pathways might exist. These data will offer useful information for further research on AT/RTs. PMID:25909878

  7. Diagnosis of Seizure Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Purves, Sherrill J.

    1990-01-01

    The author addresses the diagnosis of seizure disorders by discussing clinical features of the different types of seizures, including generalized tonic-clonic, absence, myoclonic, partial complex seizures, and non-epileptic or “pseudoseizures.” She also discusses the use of appropriate laboratory tests, electroencephalography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomographic scanning. The rationale of and approach to treatment of these conditions with some of the common anticonvulsant drugs (phenytoin, carbamazepine, valproic acid, phenobarbital, and primidone) is provided. PMID:21234044

  8. Orgasm Induced Seizures: A Rare Phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Chaukimath, SP; Patil, PS

    2015-01-01

    A variety of stimuli can cause reflex seizures, Some triggers include light, music and cognitive phenomenon. There are case reports however where the phenomenon of sexual activity has been a trigger for epileptic seizures. Most of these cases reported are in women so far, and were found to be localized to right cerebral hemisphere. We report a case of a 36-year-old male with orgasm-induced seizures, with other atypical features compared to majority of previous reports.

  9. Orgasm Induced Seizures: A Rare Phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Chaukimath, S P; Patil, P S

    2015-01-01

    A variety of stimuli can cause reflex seizures, Some triggers include light, music and cognitive phenomenon. There are case reports however where the phenomenon of sexual activity has been a trigger for epileptic seizures. Most of these cases reported are in women so far, and were found to be localized to right cerebral hemisphere. We report a case of a 36-year-old male with orgasm-induced seizures, with other atypical features compared to majority of previous reports. PMID:27057393

  10. Levetiracetam in Absence Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verrotti, Alberto; Cerminara, Caterina; Domizio, Sergio; Mohn, Angelika; Franzoni, Emilio; Coppola, Giangennaro; Zamponi, Nelia; Parisi, Pasquale; Iannetti, Paola; Curatolo, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy, tolerability, and safety of levetiracetam therapy in children and adolescents with absence epilepsy. Twenty-one participants (11 male, 10 female) with typical absence seizures were enrolled in this prospective study from seven centres in Italy. The mean age and age range at time of enrolment into…

  11. Animal models of absence epilepsies: What do they model and do sex and sex hormones matter?

    PubMed Central

    van Luijtelaar, Gilles; Onat, Filiz Yilmaz; Gallagher, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    While epidemiological data suggest a female prevalence in human childhood- and adolescence-onset typical absence epilepsy syndromes, the sex difference is less clear in adult-onset syndromes. In addition, although there are more females than males diagnosed with typical absence epilepsy syndromes, there is a paucity of studies on sex differences in seizure frequency and semiology in patients diagnosed with any absence epilepsy syndrome. Moreover, it is unknown if there are sex differences in the prevalence or expression of atypical absence epilepsy syndromes. Surprisingly, most studies of animal models of absence epilepsy either did not investigate sex differences, or failed to find sex-dependent effects. However, various rodent models for atypical syndromes such as the AY9944 model (prepubertal females show a higher incidence than prepubertal males), BN model also with a higher prevalence in males and the Gabra1 deletion mouse in the C57BL/6J strain offer unique possibilities for the investigation of the mechanisms involved in sex differences. Although the mechanistic bases for the sex differences in humans or these three models are not yet known, studies of the effects of sex hormones on seizures have offered some possibilities. The sex hormones progesterone, estradiol and testosterone exert diametrically opposite effects in genetic absence epilepsy and pharmacologically-evoked convulsive types of epilepsy models. In addition, acute pharmacological effects of progesterone on absence seizures during proestrus are opposite to those seen during pregnancy. 17?-Estradiol has anti-absence seizure effects, but it is only active in atypical absence models. It is speculated that the pro-absence action of progesterone, and perhaps also the delayed pro-absence action of testosterone, are mediated through the neurosteroid allopregnanolone and its structural and functional homolog, androstanediol. These two steroids increase extrasynaptic thalamic tonic GABAergic inhibition by selectively targeting neurosteroid-selective subunits of GABAA receptors (GABAARs). Neurosteroids also modulate the expression of GABAAR containing the ?2, ?4, and ? subunits. It is hypothesized that differences in subunit expression during pregnancy and ovarian cycle contribute to the opposite effects of progesterone in these two hormonal states. PMID:25132554

  12. Pediatric seizures.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Maneesha; Fox, Sean M

    2013-08-01

    Seizures are a commonly encountered condition within the emergency department and, because of this, can engender complacency on the part of the physicians and staff. Unfortunately, there is significant associated morbidity and mortality with seizures, and they should never be regarded as routine. This point is particularly important with respect to seizures in pediatric patients. The aim of this review is to provide a current view of the various issues that make pediatric seizures unique and to help elucidate emergent evaluation and management strategies. PMID:23915601

  13. Management of seizures in Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

    PubMed

    Crumrine, Patricia K

    2011-04-01

    Lennox-Gastaut syndrome is an epilepsy syndrome that begins in childhood (between 1 and 8 years of age), worsens during latency and persists frequently into adulthood, is refractory to antiepileptic medications, and results in cognitive decline and behavioral problems in affected individuals. Seizure types consist primarily of axial tonic, atonic, and atypical absence; nocturnal tonic seizures are the most common seizure pattern in this population, but often are not one of the initial seizure patterns. Some patients also have myoclonic seizures; this seizure pattern is less frequent than the three preceding types. Although there are some cases that are cryptogenic, most are symptomatic, arising during prenatal and perinatal periods from intrauterine infections, and vascular insults to the brain. Examples of causes of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome include migrational abnormalities of the brain, late effects of CNS infections, certain genetic disorders such as tuberous sclerosis, and inherited metabolic disorders. The difficulty early in the course of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome is distinguishing this diagnosis from severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (Dravet syndrome) or from myoclonic-astatic epilepsy (Doose syndrome), as the seizure patterns in these three syndromes may overlap at the onset. EEG is a helpful diagnostic tool in the diagnosis of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, usually demonstrating high voltage, bifrontal 1.5-2.5 Hz spike and wave complexes interictally, and attenuation with paroxysmal fast activity (10-13 Hz) during the ictal phase. Treatment options for Lennox-Gastaut syndrome have been less than optimal. In recent years, several drugs have been tested and approved for the treatment of this syndrome; these include felbamate, lamotrigine, topiramate, and rufinamide. The long-term outcome does not appear to be any better with the newer antiepileptic drugs than when using earlier prescribed antiepileptic drugs or polytherapy. Treatment options other than antiepileptic drugs include a ketogenic diet, vagus nerve stimulation, and corpus callosotomy. Long-term outcome of these patients relative to seizure control and cognition is poor. Most develop moderate intellectual disability within a few years of onset of the syndrome. Many develop behavioral problems with inattention, hyperactivity, and aggression. PMID:21351810

  14. Effectiveness of Rufinamide in the Treatment of Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy With Atypical Evolution: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Albini, Mariarita; Morano, Alessandra; Fanella, Martina; Lapenta, Leonardo; Casciato, Sara; Fattouch, Jinane; Manfredi, Mario; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Di Bonaventura, Carlo

    2016-04-01

    Rufinamide (RFD) is a novel drug that was recently approved as an adjunctive treatment for Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. Despite its reported effectiveness in generalized seizures (tonic, atonic, or tonic-clonic) in this syndrome, few data on its use in idiopathic generalized epilepsy are available. Indeed, the scientific evidence to date is limited to anecdotal cases or isolated clinical experiences. We report an uncommon, though paradigmatic, case of a woman affected by juvenile absence epilepsy (JAE) who, following a prolonged seizure-freedom period and the consequent withdrawal of valproate, presented a seizure relapse accompanied by a worsening in her electroclinical pattern. In view of this atypical evolution of JAE, characterized by drug-resistant seizures (absence and generalized tonic-clonic) and the progressive increase in electroencephalographic (EEG) abnormalities, several antiepileptic drugs were used, though to no benefit. The use of RFD instead led to a gradual control of the seizures and normalization of the EEG findings. In addition to this clinical experience, we briefly review the literature on the use of RFD in refractory generalized epilepsy. PMID:25420625

  15. Atypical Autism and Tuberous Sclerosis in a Sibling Pair.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, David A.; Bolton, Patrick

    1995-01-01

    This report describes a sibling pair (ages 21 and 18), both with tuberous sclerosis. One sibling has atypical autism (but no mental retardation or seizure disorder) and the other has a seizure disorder but no autism or mental retardation. Both siblings had multiple bilateral brain lesions. Clinical findings are discussed in relationship to the…

  16. Audiogenic reflex seizures in cats

    PubMed Central

    Lowrie, Mark; Bessant, Claire; Harvey, Robert J; Sparkes, Andrew; Garosi, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to characterise feline audiogenic reflex seizures (FARS). Methods An online questionnaire was developed to capture information from owners with cats suffering from FARS. This was collated with the medical records from the primary veterinarian. Ninety-six cats were included. Results Myoclonic seizures were one of the cardinal signs of this syndrome (90/96), frequently occurring prior to generalised tonic–clonic seizures (GTCSs) in this population. Other features include a late onset (median 15 years) and absence seizures (6/96), with most seizures triggered by high-frequency sounds amid occasional spontaneous seizures (up to 20%). Half the population (48/96) had hearing impairment or were deaf. One-third of cats (35/96) had concurrent diseases, most likely reflecting the age distribution. Birmans were strongly represented (30/96). Levetiracetam gave good seizure control. The course of the epilepsy was non-progressive in the majority (68/96), with an improvement over time in some (23/96). Only 33/96 and 11/90 owners, respectively, felt the GTCSs and myoclonic seizures affected their cat’s quality of life (QoL). Despite this, many owners (50/96) reported a slow decline in their cat’s health, becoming less responsive (43/50), not jumping (41/50), becoming uncoordinated or weak in the pelvic limbs (24/50) and exhibiting dramatic weight loss (39/50). These signs were exclusively reported in cats experiencing seizures for >2 years, with 42/50 owners stating these signs affected their cat’s QoL. Conclusions and relevance In gathering data on audiogenic seizures in cats, we have identified a new epilepsy syndrome named FARS with a geriatric onset. Further studies are warranted to investigate potential genetic predispositions to this condition. PMID:25916687

  17. Partial (focal) seizure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jacksonian seizure; Seizure - partial (focal); Temporal lobe seizure; Epilepsy - partial seizures ... Abou-Khalil BW, Gallagher MJ, Macdonald RL. Epilepsies. In: Daroff RB, ... 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2012:chap 67. ...

  18. Controlling Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how an implantable device could greatly improve the quality of life for people with epilepsy. Gabe Anderson was diagnosed with bilateral heterotopia, a congenital condition that can lead to the onset of complex partial seizures stemming from both hemispheres of the brain. In early 2004, Gabe became one of the first 35

  19. Controlling Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    This article describes how an implantable device could greatly improve the quality of life for people with epilepsy. Gabe Anderson was diagnosed with bilateral heterotopia, a congenital condition that can lead to the onset of complex partial seizures stemming from both hemispheres of the brain. In early 2004, Gabe became one of the first 35…

  20. Inflammatory markers associated with seizures.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Hong Seok; Kim, Sung Keun; Lee, Seo-Young

    2016-03-01

    Seizures can produce systemic changes, including elevated body temperature, white blood cell count, and C-reactive protein levels, which raises concern for potential infection. We describe seizure-induced inflammation-like responses and discuss how these changes may be distinguished from those associated with infection. We prospectively investigated 140 consecutive visits to the emergency room, in which patients presented with seizures. We defined elevated body temperature, white blood cell count, or C-reactive protein levels as inflammation-like responses. We investigated the occurrence of inflammation-like responses, characteristics of the seizures, neurological status at the initial visit, outcomes, and clinical findings to determine the presence of infection. We ascertained whether the patients had infection or not based on the overall information post-discharge. An inflammation-like response was observed in 56.3% of all visits and 19.3% were diagnosed with concurrent infection. Among the visits with inflammation-like response, 34.7% were shown to have an infection. Increases in body temperature and C-reactive protein levels were milder (<39C and <6mg/dl, respectively) in patients without infection compared to those with infection, whereas there was no difference in leukocytosis, with regard to the presence or absence of infection. Increased body temperature occurred only in cases of generalized tonic-clonic seizures, whereas leukocytosis and elevated C-reactive protein levels were reported in patients with any type of seizure. Body temperatures returned to normal within eight hours in uncomplicated cases. Seizures frequently induce an increase in body temperature, white blood cell count, or C-reactive protein levels, making it challenging to distinguish these changes from those associated with infection. Nonetheless, elevated body temperature in the absence of generalized tonic-clonic seizures, above 39?C, or persisting for more than eight hours after recovery of consciousness, and C-reactive protein levels above 6mg/dl warrant close observation and consideration for concurrent infection. PMID:26806580

  1. Atypical Fibroxanthoma.

    PubMed

    López, Liurka; Vélez, Román

    2016-04-01

    Atypical fibroxanthoma is a malignant skin tumor with histologic features similar to those of undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma, but lacking its more aggressive behavior. The tumor is composed of pleomorphic cells with hyperchromatic nuclei and abundant cytoplasm, commonly arranged in a spindle cell pattern. Recent genetic studies have identified similarities between atypical fibroxanthoma and undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma, such as the presence of 9p and 13q deletions in both tumors, favoring a common histogenesis. However, the lack of K-ras and H-ras mutations in atypical fibroxanthoma compared with undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma could explain the difference in aggressiveness and continued separation of these entities. Exclusion of other neoplasms by histology and immunohistochemistry followed by complete surgical removal remains the standard of care. PMID:27028396

  2. Skin Cancer: Atypical Moles

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Skin Cancer | Atypical Moles What are atypical moles? Atypical moles are skin growths that are usually bigger than ... and that can fade into the skin. Atypical moles can be more than 2 different colors (often ...

  3. Atypical Cities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiJulio, Betsy

    2011-01-01

    In this creative challenge, Surrealism and one-point perspective combine to produce images that not only go "beyond the real" but also beyond the ubiquitous "imaginary city" assignment often used to teach one-point perspective. Perhaps the difference is that in the "atypical cities challenge," an understanding of one-point perspective is a means…

  4. Seizure Disorders in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Seizures that cause a loss of consciousness and violent, jerking movements, called grand mal seizures , are especially ... of seizure that causes loss of consciousness and violent, jerking movements. Intrauterine Device: A small device that ...

  5. Seizures and Teens: Stress, Sleep, & Seizures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafer, Patricia Osborne

    2007-01-01

    Most parents are used to erratic sleep patterns and mood swings in their teenagers. When these occur in an adolescent with seizures, however, the parent may wonder if sleep and mood problems are related to seizures. Sorting out the cause and effects of sleep in an adolescent with seizures can be confusing. Since stress can be a contributor to both…

  6. Positron emission tomography in generalized seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Theodore, W.H.; Brooks, R.; Margolin, R.; Patronas, N.; Sato, S.; Porter, R.J.; Mansi, L.; Bairamian, D.; DiChiro, G.

    1985-05-01

    The authors used /sup 18/F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) to study nine patients with clinical absence or generalized seizures. One patient had only absence seizures, two had only generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and six had both seizure types. Interictal scans in eight failed to reveal focal or lateralized hypometabolism. No apparent abnormalities were noted. Two patients had PET scans after isotope injection during hyperventilation-induced generalized spike-wave discharges. Diffusely increased metabolic rates were found in one compared with an interictal scan, and in another compared with control values. Another patient had FDG injected during absence status: EEG showed generalized spike-wave discharges (during which she was unresponsive) intermixed with slow activity accompanied by confusion. Metabolic rates were decreased, compared with the interictal scan, throughout both cortical and subcortical structures. Interictal PET did not detect specific anatomic regions responsible for absence seizure onset in any patient, but the results of the ictal scans did suggest that pathophysiologic differences exist between absence status and single absence attacks.

  7. Can Seizure-Alert Dogs predict seizures?

    PubMed

    Brown, Stephen W; Goldstein, Laura H

    2011-12-01

    An index observation where a dog was trained to alert to, as well as respond to, human tonic-clonic seizures led to further research and refinement of training techniques. This was followed by anecdotal reports of pet dogs spontaneously anticipating human epileptic seizures. An industry has since developed training Seizure-Alert Dogs (SADs) to give humans warnings of their seizures. In some cases this has been accompanied by a reduction in seizure frequency. SADs may be trained along with the person with epilepsy, responding specifically to that person's seizures, or may be trained separately. Recent sceptical reports of non-epileptic seizures in some people with SADs have cast doubt on dogs' ability to anticipate true epileptic seizures. This may reflect selection criteria for training programmes as well as training methods used, but does not necessarily indicate that SADs might not be able to predict epileptic seizures. Whether the seizures are epileptic or non-epileptic, it is speculated that SADs probably alert to subtle pre-ictal human behaviour changes, but may also be sensitive to heart rate or olfactory cues. As yet, however, no rigorous data exist as to whether seizure prediction by SADS is better than chance, and what false positive and negative prediction rates might be. PMID:22050976

  8. Oxaliplatin-Induced Tonic-Clonic Seizures.

    PubMed

    Rahal, Ahmad K; Truong, Phu V; Kallail, K James

    2015-01-01

    Oxaliplatin is a common chemotherapy drug used for colon and gastric cancers. Common side effects are peripheral neuropathy, hematological toxicity, and allergic reactions. A rare side effect is seizures which are usually associated with posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome (PRES). A 50-year-old male patient presented with severe abdominal pain. CT scan of the abdomen showed acute appendicitis. Appendectomy was done and pathology showed mixed adenoneuroendocrine carcinoma. Adjuvant chemotherapy was started with Folinic acid, Fluorouracil, and Oxaliplatin (FOLFOX). During the third cycle of FOLFOX, the patient developed tonic-clonic seizures. Laboratory workup was within normal limits. EEG and MRI of the brain showed no acute abnormality. The patient was rechallenged with FOLFOX but he had tonic-clonic seizures for the second time. His chemotherapy regimen was switched to Folinic acid, Fluorouracil, and Irinotecan (FOLFIRI). After 5 cycles of FOLFIRI, the patient did not develop any seizures, making Oxaliplatin the most likely culprit for his seizures. Oxaliplatin-induced seizures rarely occur in the absence of PRES. One case report has been described in the literature. We present a rare case of tonic-clonic seizures in a patient receiving Oxaliplatin in the absence of PRES. PMID:26491586

  9. Atypical fibroxanthoma†

    PubMed Central

    Zogbi, Luciano; Juliano, Camila; Neutzling, Aluísio

    2015-01-01

    Atypical fibroxanthoma (AFX) is a rare skin neoplasm of low-grade malignancy and fibroblastic origin. AFX is a curable cutaneous disease and the diagnosis depends on knowledge of its clinical and histological features and combined immunohistochemistry markers. This study presents a case of a male patient, aged 90 years, presented with painless skin lesion in his ear. The lesion had been growing progressively for 2 months, measured ∼1.5 cm, ulcerated, fixed and firm. After a biopsy, the patient underwent a complete resection with adequate surgical margins and showed favorable evolution without complications or recurrence. The histopathological evaluation showed a poorly circumscribed ulcerated dermal nodule, mesenchymal proliferation, with pleomorphic spindle cells. There was infiltration of the deep dermis and subcutis, showing malignant features, but there was no invasion of cartilage. The immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the diagnosis of AFX. PMID:25742967

  10. [Concussive convulsions: seizure or no seizure?].

    PubMed

    Nass, R D; Elger, C E; Fink, G R; Burghaus, L

    2011-11-01

    Convulsions following traumatic brain injury (TBI) represent a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. They can be differentiated into late (> 7 days after TBI), early (1 - 7 days after TBI), immediate (within the first 24 h after TBI), and impact seizures (within seconds after TBI). Some authors suggest that most impact seizures are non-epileptic in origin and hence coined the term "concussive convulsions" for benign impact seizures. Early and late post-traumatic seizures frequently indicate structural brain damage and transition to chronic, post-traumatic epilepsy. The data for impact seizures or concussive convulsions is less clear: only a small percentage of impact seizures is associated with structural brain damage and the development of post-traumatic epilepsy, rather the majority of cases are benign and associated with an excellent prognosis. Here, we present a case report as a starting point for pathophysiological and clinical considerations regarding convulsions that start within seconds after TBI. PMID:22002819

  11. Psychogenic seizures in brain injury: diagnosis, treatment and case study.

    PubMed

    Conder, R L; Zasler, N D

    1990-01-01

    Psychogenic seizures are a functional phenomena in which a person experiences a paroxysmal event that may be interpreted as epileptiform in nature. By definition, psychogenic seizures imply a sudden episode of change in behaviour or psychic state that is not associated with an identifiable process, either vasculogenic or neurogenic, and during which there is an absence of characteristic epileptiform changes on the electroencephalogram. Prevalence rates range from 5% to 50% in outpatient populations seen in epilepsy clinics. However, approximately 20% of true seizure patients also have psychogenic seizures. As psychogenic seizures are not a pathophysiological phenomena, pharmacological interventions do not alter their aetiology and can cloud the cognitive skills necessary to ameliorate the psychogenic seizure behaviour. In non-aphasic true seizure patients, as well as psychogenic seizure patients, self-control relaxation paradigms have been successful where pharmacological intervention has failed. This case involved an aphasic brain-injured patient who had both psychogenic and true seizures. For this patient, the self-control paradigm was modified to include use of gesture and prosody to achieve similar psychotherapeutic effects. Additionally, family therapy was instituted to provide a constructive means for the patient's family to participate in the reduction of psychogenic seizures. As seizures are a common sequelae of brain injury, the differential diagnosis of seizures and knowledge of standard and alternative treatment is essential for rehabilitation professionals. PMID:1701326

  12. Atypicalseizure-like” activity in cortical reverberating networks in vitro can be caused by LPS-induced inflammation: a multi-electrode array study from a hundred neurons

    PubMed Central

    Gullo, Francesca; Amadeo, Alida; Donvito, Giulia; Lecchi, Marzia; Costa, Barbara; Constanti, Andrew; Wanke, Enzo

    2014-01-01

    We show here that a mild sterile inflammation induced by the endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), in a neuron/astrocyte/microglial cortical network, modulates neuronal excitability and can initiate long-duration burst events resembling epileptiform seizures, a recognized feature of various central nervous neurodegenerative, neurological and acute systemic diseases associated with neuroinflammation. To study this action, we simultaneously analyzed the reverberating bursting activity of a hundred neurons by using in vitro multi-electrode array methods. ∼5 h after LPS application, we observed a net increase in the average number of spikes elicited in engaged cells and within each burst, but no changes neither in spike waveforms nor in burst rate. This effect was characterized by a slow, twofold exponential increase of the burst duration and the appearance of rarely occurring long burst events that were never seen during control recordings. These changes and the time-course of microglia-released proinflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), were blocked by pre-treatment with 50 nM minocycline, an established anti-inflammatory agent which was inactive when applied alone. Assay experiments also revealed that application of 60 pM exogenous TNF-α after 12–15 h, produced non-washable changes of neuronal excitability, completely different from those induced by LPS, suggesting that TNF-α release alone was not responsible for our observed findings. Our results indicate that the link between neuroinflammation and hyperexcitability can be unveiled by studying the long-term activity of in vitro neuronal/astrocyte/microglial networks. PMID:25404893

  13. Seizure First Aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... medical I.D. bracelet or necklace that says epilepsy or seizure disorder. Some individuals wear a medical ... of knowing whether or not the person has epilepsy. The person having a seizure does not have ...

  14. Code blue: seizures.

    PubMed

    Hoerth, Matthew T; Drazkowski, Joseph F; Noe, Katherine H; Sirven, Joseph I

    2011-06-01

    Eyewitnesses frequently perceive seizures as life threatening. If an event occurs on the hospital premises, a "code blue" can be called which consumes considerable resources. The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency and characteristics of code blue calls for seizures and seizure mimickers. A retrospective review of a code blue log from 2001 through 2008 identified 50 seizure-like events, representing 5.3% of all codes. Twenty-eight (54%) occurred in inpatients; the other 22 (44%) events involved visitors or employees on the hospital premises. Eighty-six percent of the events were epileptic seizures. Seizure mimickers, particularly psychogenic nonepileptic seizures, were more common in the nonhospitalized group. Only five (17.9%) inpatients had a known diagnosis of epilepsy, compared with 17 (77.3%) of the nonhospitalized patients. This retrospective survey provides insights into how code blues are called on hospitalized versus nonhospitalized patients for seizure-like events. PMID:21546315

  15. Atypical epigenesis.

    PubMed

    Karmiloff-Smith, Annette

    2007-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that little in development is predetermined or permanently fixed. Rather, gene expression is activity dependent, and epigenesis is probabilistic. So, the study of genetic disorders needs to change from the still widely held view that developmental disorders can be accounted for in terms of intact versus impaired modules, to one which takes serious account of the fact that the infant cortex passes from an initial state of high regional interconnectivity to a subsequent state of increasing specialization and localization of function. With such early interconnectivity in mind, developmental neuroscientists must consider the possibility that an early deficit in one part of the brain may have subtle effects on other parts of the developing brain, even when scores fall 'in the normal range'. In studying developmental disorders, it is thus crucial to examine not only domains of clear-cut deficit, but also domains of behavioural proficiency. Atypical epigenesis may often involve a lack of specialization and localization of brain function over developmental time, even in cases of behavioural proficiency. PMID:17181704

  16. Optogenetic activation of superior colliculus neurons suppresses seizures originating in diverse brain networks.

    PubMed

    Soper, Colin; Wicker, Evan; Kulick, Catherine V; N'Gouemo, Prosper; Forcelli, Patrick A

    2016-03-01

    Because sites of seizure origin may be unknown or multifocal, identifying targets from which activation can suppress seizures originating in diverse networks is essential. We evaluated the ability of optogenetic activation of the deep/intermediate layers of the superior colliculus (DLSC) to fill this role. Optogenetic activation of DLSC suppressed behavioral and electrographic seizures in the pentylenetetrazole (forebrain+brainstem seizures) and Area Tempestas (forebrain/complex partial seizures) models; this effect was specific to activation of DLSC, and not neighboring structures. DLSC activation likewise attenuated seizures evoked by gamma butyrolactone (thalamocortical/absence seizures), or acoustic stimulation of genetically epilepsy prone rates (brainstem seizures). Anticonvulsant effects were seen with stimulation frequencies as low as 5 Hz. Unlike previous applications of optogenetics for the control of seizures, activation of DLSC exerted broad-spectrum anticonvulsant actions, attenuating seizures originating in diverse and distal brain networks. These data indicate that DLSC is a promising target for optogenetic control of epilepsy. PMID:26721319

  17. Search and Seizure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Kenneth T.

    This paper examines the practice of search and seizure from a legal perspective. All issues concerning lawful or unlawful search and seizure, whether in a public school or otherwise, are predicated upon the Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution. The terms "search,""seizure,""probable cause,""reasonable suspicion," and "exclusionary…

  18. [Perioral myoclonia syndrome with absences: about 2 cases].

    PubMed

    Bourcy, E; Leroy, P; Dubru, J M

    2013-10-01

    Perioral myoclonia with absences (POMA) was first described in 1994 by CP Panayotopoulos who identified 6 cases that did not fit with the classical syndrome of absence epilepsy in children and whose predominant symptom during the absence seizure was the occurrence of myoclonia of perioral muscles. The POMA belongs to the group of generalized idiopathic epilepsies. It begins in childhood and there is a female predominance. It may be accompanied by tonic-clonic generalized seizures as well as absence status epilepticus. It has the EEG characteristics of typical absence seizures and therefore remains currently considered as such. The clinical manifestations of POMA are often misdiagnosed as focal motor seizures. This syndrome can be pharmacoresistant and is not likely to regress spontaneously. We present two clinical observations of perioral myoclonia with absences. The first case illustrates the typical electro-clinical features of this syndrome while the second illustrates its pharmacoresistance. PMID:24298729

  19. Predictive factors for generalized seizures after deliberate citalopram overdose

    PubMed Central

    Waring, W Stephen; Gray, Julie A; Graham, Ann

    2008-01-01

    WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECTCitalopram is a common means of self-poisoning in young adults.Generalized seizures are a recognised complication after selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor overdose (including citalopram overdose). WHAT THIS STUDY ADDSThe minimum stated citalopram dose associated with seizures in the absence of co-ingested drugs was 400 mg.Co-ingestion of a tricyclic antidepressant or venlafaxine confers a 15-fold increased risk of seizures. AIMS Seizures are a recognized complication of citalopram overdose. The present study sought to establish risk factors for seizures in this high-risk patient group, including stated dose ingested, co-ingested drugs or ethanol, and electrolyte disturbances. METHODS A retrospective casenote review was carried out of patients who attended the Emergency Department due to citalopram overdose between January 2000 and July 2007 inclusive. Stepwise logistic regression analysis considered age, gender, stated citalopram dose, acute ethanol consumption, co-ingested drugs, administration of activated charcoal, and hyponatraemia. RESULTS There were 241 patients (177 women), and the median (interquartile range) stated citalopram dose was 300 mg (200 to 600 mg). Generalized seizures occurred in 18 patients (7.5%). Logistic regression analysis found co-ingested tricyclic antidepressants or venlafaxine predicted seizures with odds ratio = 15 (95% confidence interval 3, 75). In the absence of co-ingested drugs, the minimum citalopram dose associated with seizures was 400 mg. Odds ratio for seizures = 1.1 (95% confidence interval 1.0, 1.2) for every 100 mg increment in citalopram dose. Seizures were associated with a greater need for invasive ventilatory support, higher creatine kinase activity, and prolonged hospital stay. CONCLUSIONS Generalized seizures are an important manifestation of citalopram toxicity, and cannot be explained solely by electrolyte disturbances or co-ingestion of other drugs or ethanol. The strongest predictors of seizures in this patient series were ingestion of high citalopram dosages and co-ingestion of drugs capable of lowering seizure threshold. PMID:19032728

  20. Atypical language representation in children with intractable temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Maulisova, Alice; Korman, Brandon; Rey, Gustavo; Bernal, Byron; Duchowny, Michael; Niederlova, Marketa; Krsek, Pavel; Novak, Vilem

    2016-05-01

    This study evaluated language organization in children with intractable epilepsy caused by temporal lobe focal cortical dysplasia (FCD) alone or dual pathology (temporal lobe FCD and hippocampal sclerosis, HS). We analyzed clinical, neurological, fMRI, neuropsychological, and histopathologic data in 46 pediatric patients with temporal lobe lesions who underwent excisional epilepsy surgery. The frequency of atypical language representation was similar in both groups, but children with dual pathology were more likely to be left-handed. Atypical receptive language cortex correlated with lower intellectual capacity, verbal abstract conceptualization, receptive language abilities, verbal working memory, and a history of status epilepticus but did not correlate with higher seizure frequency or early seizure onset. Histopathologic substrate had only a minor influence on neuropsychological status. Greater verbal comprehension deficits were noted in children with atypical receptive language representation, a risk factor for cognitive morbidity. PMID:27064828

  1. Interstellar A-type methanol masers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Q.; Lou, G. F.

    1990-02-01

    The formation conditions for A-type methanol masers are discussed. The correlation between A-type masers and external radiation fields is determined, with emphasis on the energy levels of A-type methanol and brightness temperature. Radiative transfer equations and statistical equilibrium are solved using a large velocity gradient model and the escape probability model. It is demonstrated that the 9(2)-10(1)A+ emission in W3(OH) and 7(0)-6(1)A in SgrB2 are masers, as discovered previously. The formation of the first type of masers requires pumping from an external radiation field, while the second type might be excited in the absence of an external radiation field. It is also pointed out that according to calculations there are A-type maser series similar to E-type methanol maser series of J2-J1E.

  2. An atypical case of hepatic cavernous hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The case of an atypical hepatic angiocavernoma is referred. The lesion, first described as a hypoechogenic area compared to the surrounding parenchyma, with anechogenic shoots inside, suggestive for vascular structures developed one year later into a totally asonic area with frayed margins. This change is very unusual and uncommon for this kind of lesions. Case presentation The case of a 74-year old caucasian male, complaining of slight dyspeptic symptoms (post-prandial fullness and bloating) is referred. The routine blood tests were all normal. Abdominal ultrasound showed a large, roughly round-shaped lesion (diameter 14 cm) in the VIII hepatic segment diagnosed as hepatic angiocavernoma, which turned unexpectedly in a cystic like lesion one year later. Conclusion The atypical angioma's degeneration could account for one of the causes of the patient's exitus. It could be related to blood seizure by the large hepatic angioma due to the intratumoural haemorrhage. PMID:19946491

  3. [Driver's licence and seizures].

    PubMed

    Gjerstad, L; Steen, T

    1993-08-10

    The authors consider various types of seizures and their medico-legal consequences in connection with motor vehicle driving. Epilepsy, syncope, transitory ischemic attacks, migraine, electrolyte disturbances, hypoglycaemia, hypersomnia, and alcohol-induced fits are discussed in brief. The authors also discuss risk of recurrence, the seizure-free interval before driving can be resumed, and possible mitigating factors. PMID:8362397

  4. Genes, Seizures & Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Alica M.

    2006-01-01

    The chance that someone will develop any disease is influenced by heredity and environment. Epilepsy is not an exception. Everybody inherits a unique degree of susceptibility to seizures. About 3 percent of the United States population is prone to seizures and will get epilepsy at some point of their lives (1). Two thirds of the people with

  5. Genes, Seizures & Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Alica M.

    2006-01-01

    The chance that someone will develop any disease is influenced by heredity and environment. Epilepsy is not an exception. Everybody inherits a unique degree of susceptibility to seizures. About 3 percent of the United States population is prone to seizures and will get epilepsy at some point of their lives (1). Two thirds of the people with…

  6. Modeling early-onset post-ischemic seizures in aging mice

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chiping; Wang, Justin; Peng, Jessie; Patel, Nisarg; Huang, Yayi; Gao, Xiaoxing; Aljarallah, Salman; Eubanks, James H; McDonald, Robert; Zhang, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of seizures and epilepsy in the aged population, with post-stroke seizures being a poor prognostic factor. The pathological processes underlying post-stroke seizures are not well understood and studies of these seizures in aging/aged animals remain scarce. Therefore, our primary objective was to model post-stroke seizures in aging mice (C57 black strain, 16–20 month-old), with a focus on early-onset, convulsive seizures that occur within 24-hours of brain ischemia. We utilized a middle cerebral artery occlusion model and examined seizure activity and brain injury using combined behavioral and electroencephalographic monitoring and histological assessments. Aging mice exhibited vigorous convulsive seizures within hours of the middle cerebral artery occlusion. These seizures manifested with jumping, rapid running, barrel-rolling and/or falling all in the absence of hippocampal-cortical electrographic discharges. Seizure development was closely associated with severe brain injury and acute mortality. Anticonvulsive treatments after seizure occurrence offered temporary seizure control but failed to improve animal survival. A separate cohort of adult mice (6–8 months-old) exhibited analogous early-onset convulsive seizures following the middle cerebral artery occlusion but had better survival outcomes following anticonvulsive treatment. Collectively, our data suggest that early-onset convulsive seizures are a result of severe brain ischemia in aging animals. PMID:25943585

  7. Modeling early-onset post-ischemic seizures in aging mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chiping; Wang, Justin; Peng, Jessie; Patel, Nisarg; Huang, Yayi; Gao, Xiaoxing; Aljarallah, Salman; Eubanks, James H; McDonald, Robert; Zhang, Liang

    2015-09-01

    Stroke is the leading cause of seizures and epilepsy in the aged population, with post-stroke seizures being a poor prognostic factor. The pathological processes underlying post-stroke seizures are not well understood and studies of these seizures in aging/aged animals remain scarce. Therefore, our primary objective was to model post-stroke seizures in aging mice (C57 black strain, 16-20 months-old), with a focus on early-onset, convulsive seizures that occur within 24-hours of brain ischemia. We utilized a middle cerebral artery occlusion model and examined seizure activity and brain injury using combined behavioral and electroencephalographic monitoring and histological assessments. Aging mice exhibited vigorous convulsive seizures within hours of the middle cerebral artery occlusion. These seizures manifested with jumping, rapid running, barrel-rolling and/or falling all in the absence of hippocampal-cortical electrographic discharges. Seizure development was closely associated with severe brain injury and acute mortality. Anticonvulsive treatments after seizure occurrence offered temporary seizure control but failed to improve animal survival. A separate cohort of adult mice (6-8 months-old) exhibited analogous early-onset convulsive seizures following the middle cerebral artery occlusion but had better survival outcomes following anticonvulsive treatment. Collectively, our data suggest that early-onset convulsive seizures are a result of severe brain ischemia in aging animals. PMID:25943585

  8. Prediction of epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Litt, Brian; Echauz, Javier

    2002-05-01

    For almost 40 years, neuroscientists thought that epileptic seizures began abruptly, just a few seconds before clinical attacks. There is now mounting evidence that seizures develop minutes to hours before clinical onset. This change in thinking is based on quantitative studies of long digital intracranial electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings from patients being evaluated for epilepsy surgery. Evidence that seizures can be predicted is spread over diverse sources in medical, engineering, and patent publications. Techniques used to forecast seizures include frequency-based methods, statistical analysis of EEG signals, non-linear dynamics (chaos), and intelligent engineered systems. Advances in seizure prediction promise to give rise to implantable devices able to warn of impending seizures and to trigger therapy to prevent clinical epileptic attacks. Treatments such as electrical stimulation or focal drug infusion could be given on demand and might eliminate side-effects in some patients taking antiepileptic drugs long term. Whether closed-loop seizure-prediction and treatment devices will have the profound clinical effect of their cardiological predecessors will depend on our ability to perfect these techniques. Their clinical efficacy must be validated in large-scale, prospective, controlled trials. PMID:12849542

  9. [Dystrophinopathy and Seizure].

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Eri

    2016-02-01

    Dystrophinopathy is associated strongly with central nervous system manifestation. It has been reported that 4%-15% of patients with dystrophinopathy have febrile seizure, and 2%-12% have epilepsy. In our study, 8% of patients had febrile seizure, and it was more common in patients with mutations downstream of exon 45, especially exon 63. Epilepsy occurred in 5% of our patients, and the prevalence in Becker muscular dystrophy was higher than that in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Isoforms such as Dp427 and Dp71, expressed in the central nervous system. might be related to seizure, because of impairment in GABAA receptors, aquaporin 4, and K channels. PMID:26873232

  10. Plasticity-modulated seizure dynamics for seizure termination in realistic neuronal models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppert, M. M. J.; Kalitzin, S.; Lopes da Silva, F. H.; Viergever, M. A.

    2011-08-01

    In previous studies we showed that autonomous absence seizure generation and termination can be explained by realistic neuronal models eliciting bi-stable dynamics. In these models epileptic seizures are triggered either by external stimuli (reflex epilepsies) or by internal fluctuations. This scenario predicts exponential distributions of the duration of the seizures and of the inter-ictal intervals. These predictions were validated in rat models of absence epilepsy, as well as in a few human cases. Nonetheless, deviations from the predictions with respect to seizure duration distributions remained unexplained. The objective of the present work is to implement a simple but realistic computational model of a neuronal network including synaptic plasticity and ionic current dynamics and to explore the dynamics of the model with special emphasis on the distributions of seizure and inter-ictal period durations. We use as a basis our lumped model of cortical neuronal circuits. Here we introduce 'activity dependent' parameters, namely post-synaptic voltage-dependent plasticity, as well as a voltage-dependent hyperpolarization-activated current driven by slow and fast activation conductances. We examine the distributions of the durations of the seizure-like model activity and the normal activity, described respectively by the limit cycle and the steady state in the dynamics. We use a parametric γ-distribution fit as a quantifier. Our results show that autonomous, activity-dependent membrane processes can account for experimentally obtained statistical distributions of seizure durations, which were not explainable using the previous model. The activity-dependent membrane processes that display the strongest effect in accounting for these distributions are the hyperpolarization-dependent cationic (Ih) current and the GABAa plastic dynamics. Plastic synapses (NMDA-type) in the interneuron population show only a minor effect. The inter-ictal statistics retain their consistency with the experimental data and the previous model.

  11. Plasticity-modulated seizure dynamics for seizure termination in realistic neuronal models.

    PubMed

    Koppert, M M J; Kalitzin, S; Lopes da Silva, F H; Viergever, M A

    2011-08-01

    In previous studies we showed that autonomous absence seizure generation and termination can be explained by realistic neuronal models eliciting bi-stable dynamics. In these models epileptic seizures are triggered either by external stimuli (reflex epilepsies) or by internal fluctuations. This scenario predicts exponential distributions of the duration of the seizures and of the inter-ictal intervals. These predictions were validated in rat models of absence epilepsy, as well as in a few human cases. Nonetheless, deviations from the predictions with respect to seizure duration distributions remained unexplained. The objective of the present work is to implement a simple but realistic computational model of a neuronal network including synaptic plasticity and ionic current dynamics and to explore the dynamics of the model with special emphasis on the distributions of seizure and inter-ictal period durations. We use as a basis our lumped model of cortical neuronal circuits. Here we introduce 'activity dependent' parameters, namely post-synaptic voltage-dependent plasticity, as well as a voltage-dependent hyperpolarization-activated current driven by slow and fast activation conductances. We examine the distributions of the durations of the seizure-like model activity and the normal activity, described respectively by the limit cycle and the steady state in the dynamics. We use a parametric ?-distribution fit as a quantifier. Our results show that autonomous, activity-dependent membrane processes can account for experimentally obtained statistical distributions of seizure durations, which were not explainable using the previous model. The activity-dependent membrane processes that display the strongest effect in accounting for these distributions are the hyperpolarization-dependent cationic (I(h)) current and the GABAa plastic dynamics. Plastic synapses (NMDA-type) in the interneuron population show only a minor effect. The inter-ictal statistics retain their consistency with the experimental data and the previous model. PMID:21730748

  12. Atypical cellular chorangioma.

    PubMed

    Mesia, A F; Mo, P; Ylagan, L R

    1999-06-01

    We describe an unusual, large atypical cellular chorangioma with abundant mitoses and focal necrosis. Other than premature birth, the prenatal and postpartum clinical course was unremarkable for both the mother and baby. Our case and a few similar cases reported in literature suggest that atypical cellular chorangioma is a benign tumor, despite its worrisome histopathologic features. PMID:10383809

  13. Genetic background of febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Saghazadeh, Amene; Mastrangelo, Mario; Rezaei, Nima

    2014-01-01

    Febrile seizures (FSs) occur in children older than 1 month and without prior afebrile seizures in the absence of a central nervous system infection or acute electrolyte imbalance. Their pathogenesis is multifactorial. The most relevant familial studies evidence an occurrence rate ranging from 10% to 46% and median recurrence rate of 36% in children with positive familial history for FS. The main twin studies demonstrated a higher concordance rate in monozygotic twins with FS than in dizygotic ones. Linkage studies have proposed 11 chromosomal locations responsible to FS attributed to FEB1 to FEB11. Population-based association studies have shown at least one positive association for 14 of 41 investigated genes with FS. The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin 1β (IL-1β) was the most investigated and also gene associated with susceptibility to FS. A possible role in the overlapping of epilepsy and FS was found for 16 of 36 investigated genes. SCN1A, IL-1β, CHRNA4, and GABRG2 were the most commonly involved genes in this context. The genetic background of FS involves the regulation of different processes, including individual and familial susceptibility, modulation of immune response, and neuronal excitability and interactions with exogenous agents such as viruses. PMID:24399675

  14. Atypical vitamin B6 deficiency: a rare cause of unexplained neonatal and infantile epilepsies.

    PubMed

    Baumgart, Anna; Spiczak, Sarah von; Verhoeven-Duif, Nanda M; Møller, Rikke S; Boor, Rainer; Muhle, Hiltrud; Jähn, Johanna A; Klitten, Laura L; Hjalgrim, Helle; Lindhout, Dick; Stephani, Ulrich; van Kempen, Marjan J A; Helbig, Ingo

    2014-05-01

    ALDH7A1 and PNPO deficiencies are rare inborn errors of vitamin B6 metabolism causing perinatal seizure disorders. The phenotypic variability, however, is broad. To assess the frequency of these deficiencies in unexplained infantile epilepsy, we screened 113 patients for mutations in both genes. We identified 1 patient with an epilepsy phenotype resembling Dravet syndrome and likely pathogenic mutations in ALDH7A1. Presenting features were highly atypical of pyridoxine-dependent epilepsy, including febrile seizures, response to anticonvulsive drugs, and periods of seizure freedom without pyridoxine treatment. "Hidden" vitamin B6 deficiencies might be rare but treatable causes of unexplained epilepsy extending beyond the classical phenotypes. PMID:24114605

  15. Seizure-induced neglect.

    PubMed Central

    Heilman, K M; Howell, G J

    1980-01-01

    A man with intermittent right parieto-occipital seizures was monitored by electroencephalography while he received 60 trials of being touched on the right, left, or both hands. Half of the trials were given during a focal seizure, and half were given interictally. While the patient was having seizures, he appropriately responded to all 10 stimuli delivered to the right hand, but four of 10 responses were incorrect (allaesthetic) when he was stimulated on the left. With bilateral simultaneous stimulation he neglected the left hand in all 10 trials. His interictal performance was flawless. When given a line-bisection task on two occasions during a seizure, the patient attempted to make a mark to the left of the entire sheet of paper. Immediately postictally he made a mark at the right end of the line. The case illustrates that focal seizures may induce elements of the neglect syndrome and that attention (to contralateral stimuli) and intention to perform (in the contralateral hemispatial field) may be dissociable phenomena. PMID:6777464

  16. Seizures and Teens: Sorting Out Seizures--Part Two

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devinsky, Orrin

    2006-01-01

    In adolescents, diagnosing seizures can be challenging and can lead to many pitfalls. Because seizures are episodic and unpredictable events, they usually do not occur in the doctor's office. Thus, a diagnosis of epilepsy is usually based on information presented by the person with seizures and their family. Together with results of diagnostic

  17. Seizures and Teens: Sorting Out Seizures--Part Two

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devinsky, Orrin

    2006-01-01

    In adolescents, diagnosing seizures can be challenging and can lead to many pitfalls. Because seizures are episodic and unpredictable events, they usually do not occur in the doctor's office. Thus, a diagnosis of epilepsy is usually based on information presented by the person with seizures and their family. Together with results of diagnostic…

  18. Atypical autoerotic deaths

    SciTech Connect

    Gowitt, G.T.; Hanzlick, R.L. )

    1992-06-01

    So-called typical' autoerotic fatalities are the result of asphyxia due to mechanical compression of the neck, chest, or abdomen, whereas atypical' autoeroticism involves sexual self-stimulation by other means. The authors present five atypical autoerotic fatalities that involved the use of dichlorodifluoromethane, nitrous oxide, isobutyl nitrite, cocaine, or compounds containing 1-1-1-trichloroethane. Mechanisms of death are discussed in each case and the pertinent literature is reviewed.

  19. Atypical autoerotic deaths.

    PubMed

    Gowitt, G T; Hanzlick, R L

    1992-06-01

    So-called "typical" autoerotic fatalities are the result of asphyxia due to mechanical compression of the neck, chest, or abdomen, whereas "atypical" autoeroticism involves sexual self-stimulation by other means. We present five atypical autoerotic fatalities that involved the use of dichlorodifluoromethane, nitrous oxide, isobutyl nitrite, cocaine, or compounds containing 1-1-1-trichloroethane. Mechanisms of death are discussed in each case and the pertinent literature is reviewed. PMID:1510059

  20. Tuberculoma-Induced Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Salway, R. James; Sangani, Shruti; Parekh, Samira; Bhatt, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    Seizures in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients can be caused by a wide variety of opportunistic infections, and, especially in developing countries, tuberculosis (TB) should be high on the differential. In India, TB is the most common opportunistic infection in HIV and it can have several different central nervous system manifestations, including intracranial tuberculomas. In this case, an HIV patient presenting with new-onset seizure and fever was diagnosed with tuberculous meningitis and multiple intracranial tuberculomas. The patient received standard TB medications, steroids, and anticonvulsants in the emergency department and was admitted for further care. PMID:26587082

  1. Briviact Approved for Epileptic Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... seizures in people aged 16 and older with epilepsy. Partial onset seizures describe those that originate in ... the FDA said Friday in a news release. Epilepsy, a common disorder believed to affect more than ...

  2. Iopamidol Myelography-Induced Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sonal; Rajpal, Chitra; Nannapeneni, Srikanth; Venkatesh, Sundar

    2005-01-01

    Iopamidol, a water-soluble contrast agent, has been rarely associated with seizures. We describe a case of generalized tonic-clonic seizure after cervical myelography with iopamidol in a previously healthy young man. In patients presenting with seizures, a history of recent myelography should be considered as an etiology. Iopamidol myelography may be associated with a risk of seizures. Clinicians need to be aware of this complication and inform their patients about such risk. PMID:16369390

  3. Atypical presentation of atypical mycobacteria in atypical diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Sugata Narayan; Chakraborty, Partha Pratim; Satpathi, Partha Sarathi; Patra, Shinjan

    2016-01-01

    A 45-year-old, non-obese male presented with low-grade, remittent fever and a fluctuant swelling over the posterior aspect of his lower left flank. Laboratory tests revealed leukocytosis, raised ESR, hyperglycemia and raised HbA1C levels. Light microscopy of Ziehl–Neelsen-stained pus sample revealed numerous acid-fast bacilli. After 72 h of incubating aspirated pus in Löwenstein–Jensen media, non-pigmented, cream-colored colonies were observed, suggestive of rapid-growing atypical forms of mycobacteria. Polymerase chain reaction of isolated bacteria identified Mycobacterium chelonae as causative organism. Abdominal skiagram revealed extensive pancreatic intraductal calcifications suggestive of fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes and lumbar vertebral body destruction with evidence of paravertebral abscess. The patient was prescribed a split-mixed insulin regimen, clarithromycin and ciprofloxacin with complete resolution of the subcutaneous abscess at 6 months. Diabetic patients are prone to infections. Mycobacteria, especially atypical ones, involving the spine and subcutaneous tissues have rarely been reported. PMID:27127641

  4. Terminology of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Brigo, Francesco; Igwe, Stanley C; Ausserer, Harald; Nardone, Raffaele; Tezzon, Frediano; Bongiovanni, Luigi Giuseppe; Tinazzi, Michele; Trinka, Eugen

    2015-03-01

    Several different terms have been used to describe "psychogenic nonepileptic seizures" (PNES) in the literature. In this study, we evaluated the most common English terms used to describe PNES on Google and in PubMed using multiple search terms (https://www.google.com and http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed). The information prevalence of the five terms most frequently used to refer to PNES in PubMed were: psychogenic non(-)epileptic seizure(s), followed by pseudo(-)seizure(s), non(-)epileptic seizure(s), psychogenic seizure(s), and non(-)epileptic event(s). The five most frequently adopted terms to describe PNES in Google were: psychogenic non(-)epileptic seizure(s), followed by non(-)epileptic event(s), psychogenic attack(s), non(-)epileptic attack(s), and psychogenic non(-)epileptic attack(s). The broad spectrum of synonyms used to refer to PNES in the medical literature reflects a lack of internationally accepted, uniform terminology for PNES. In addition to "seizure(s)," lay people use the word "attack(s)" to describe PNES. Although considered obsolete, some terms, e.g., pseudoseizure(s), are still used in the recent medical literature. Adopting a uniform terminology to describe PNES could facilitate communication between epileptologists, physicians without specific expertise in epilepsy, and patients. PMID:25631657

  5. Seizure First Aid

    MedlinePlus

    ... Anyone who’s had a seizure while in the water should go to the emergency room for a checkup, even if he or she seems to be all right afterward. If a lot of water was swallowed, there could be damage to the ...

  6. Atypical cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Schram, Carrie A.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To review the diagnosis of patients with atypical cystic fibrosis (CF). Sources of information A comprehensive search of MEDLINE (1950 to the third week of May 2009), MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations and Cases (1950 to the third week of May 2009), and EMBASE (1980 to the fourth week of March 2009). The Cystic Fibrosis Canada website was also reviewed and the most recent patient data registry report was consulted. Main message Atypical CF is a milder form of the CF disorder, which is associated with mutations of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane receptor gene. Instead of having classic symptoms, individuals with atypical CF might only have mild dysfunction in 1 organ system and might or might not have elevated sweat chloride levels. Atypical CF is a very diverse disorder affecting different organ systems to varying degrees. The symptoms patients experience can also fluctuate over time; however, certain clinical signs and symptoms affecting the respiratory, gastrointestinal, endocrine and metabolic, and genitourinary systems should alert physicians to the possibility of CF. Patients with atypical CF often have fewer hospitalizations during childhood than those with classic CF do, and the disorder can remain undiagnosed for many years, at times into adulthood. Conclusion Although patients diagnosed with atypical CF have longer life expectancies than individuals with classic CF, the long-term expected outcome for many individuals with atypical CF is unknown. It is important to counsel patients about the possibility of future illness. Education about CF can help patients understand their symptoms, modify their lifestyles to optimize health, reduce the incidence of complications, and receive family planning counseling when appropriate. PMID:23242890

  7. Cannabidiol exerts anti-convulsant effects in animal models of temporal lobe and partial seizures.

    PubMed

    Jones, Nicholas A; Glyn, Sarah E; Akiyama, Satoshi; Hill, Thomas D M; Hill, Andrew J; Weston, Samantha E; Burnett, Matthew D A; Yamasaki, Yuki; Stephens, Gary J; Whalley, Benjamin J; Williams, Claire M

    2012-06-01

    Cannabis sativa has been associated with contradictory effects upon seizure states despite its medicinal use by numerous people with epilepsy. We have recently shown that the phytocannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) reduces seizure severity and lethality in the well-established in vivo model of pentylenetetrazole-induced generalised seizures, suggesting that earlier, small-scale clinical trials examining CBD effects in people with epilepsy warrant renewed attention. Here, we report the effects of pure CBD (1, 10 and 100mg/kg) in two other established rodent seizure models, the acute pilocarpine model of temporal lobe seizure and the penicillin model of partial seizure. Seizure activity was video recorded and scored offline using model-specific seizure severity scales. In the pilocarpine model CBD (all doses) significantly reduced the percentage of animals experiencing the most severe seizures. In the penicillin model, CBD (≥ 10 mg/kg) significantly decreased the percentage mortality as a result of seizures; CBD (all doses) also decreased the percentage of animals experiencing the most severe tonic-clonic seizures. These results extend the anti-convulsant profile of CBD; when combined with a reported absence of psychoactive effects, this evidence strongly supports CBD as a therapeutic candidate for a diverse range of human epilepsies. PMID:22520455

  8. Anoxic-epileptic seizures: observational study of epileptic seizures induced by syncopes

    PubMed Central

    Horrocks, I; Nechay, A; Stephenson, J; Zuberi, S

    2005-01-01

    Aims: To describe a large series of children with anoxic-epileptic seizures (AES)that is, epileptic seizures induced by syncopes. Methods: Retrospective case-note review in a tertiary paediatric neurology unit. For all 27 children seen with a definite diagnosis of AES between 1972 and 2002, a review of clinical histories, videotapes, and EEG/ECG studies was undertaken. Main outcome measures were: age of onset, frequency and type of syncopes; age of onset and frequency of AES; type and duration of induced epileptic seizures; effect of treatment of syncopal and epileptic components. Results: Median age of onset of syncopes was 8 months (range 0.2120), frequency 2 in total to 40/day, median total ?200. Syncopes were predominantly reflex asystolic (RAS), prolonged expiratory apnoea (cyanotic breath-holding spells), or of mixed or uncertain origin; there was one each of ear piercing and hair grooming vasovagal syncope and one of compulsive Valsalva. Median age of onset of AES was 17 months (range 7120), frequency from total 1 to 3/day, median total 3. The epileptic component was almost always bilateral clonic; three had additional epilepsy, one each with complex partial seizures, myoclonic absences, and febrile seizures plus. Median duration of epileptic component was 5 minutes (range 0.540, mean 11). Cardiac pacing prevented RAS in two patients: most other anti-syncope therapies were ineffective. Diazepam terminated the epileptic component in 6/8. Valproate or carbamazepine abolished AES in 5/7 without influencing syncope frequency. Conclusions: Although uncommon compared with simple syncopes, syncope triggered epileptic seizures (AES) are an important treatable basis of status epilepticus. PMID:16159903

  9. Distinct EEG seizure patterns reflect different seizure generation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Salami, Pariya; Lévesque, Maxime; Gotman, Jean; Avoli, Massimo

    2015-04-01

    Low-voltage fast (LVF)- and hypersynchronous (HYP)-seizure onset patterns can be recognized in the EEG of epileptic animals and patients with temporal lobe epilepsy. Ripples (80-200 Hz) and fast ripples (250-500 Hz) have been linked to each pattern, with ripples predominating during LVF seizures and fast ripples predominating during HYP seizures in the rat pilocarpine model. This evidence led us to hypothesize that these two seizure-onset patterns reflect the contribution of neural networks with distinct transmitter signaling characteristics. Here, we tested this hypothesis by analyzing the seizure activity induced with the K(+) channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4AP, 4-5 mg/kg ip), which enhances both glutamatergic and GABAergic transmission, or the GABAA receptor antagonist picrotoxin (3-5 mg/kg ip); rats were implanted with electrodes in the hippocampus, the entorhinal cortex, and the subiculum. We found that LVF onset occurred in 82% of 4AP-induced seizures whereas seizures after picrotoxin were always HYP. In addition, high-frequency oscillation analysis revealed that 4AP-induced LVF seizures were associated with higher ripple rates compared with fast ripples (P < 0.05), whereas picrotoxin-induced seizures contained higher rates of fast ripples compared with ripples (P < 0.05). These results support the hypothesis that two distinct patterns of seizure onset result from different pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:25652916

  10. Atypical Optic Neuritis.

    PubMed

    Gaier, Eric D; Boudreault, Katherine; Rizzo, Joseph F; Falardeau, Julie; Cestari, Dean M

    2015-12-01

    Classic demyelinative optic neuritis is associated with multiple sclerosis and typically carries a good prognosis for visual recovery. This disorder is well characterized with respect to its presentation and clinical features by baseline data obtained through the optic neuritis treatment trial and numerous other studies. Atypical optic neuritis entails clinical manifestations that deviate from this classic pattern of features. Clinical signs and symptoms that deviate from the typical presentation should prompt consideration of less common etiologies. Atypical features to consider include lack of pain, simultaneous or near-simultaneous onset, lack of response to or relapse upon tapering from corticosteroids, or optic nerve head or peripapillary hemorrhages. The most important alternative etiologies to consider and the steps towards their respective diagnostic evaluations are suggested for these atypical features. PMID:26467052

  11. Evaluation of Bax and Bcl-2 Proteins Expression in the Rat Hippocampus due to Childhood Febrile Seizure

    PubMed Central

    SAEEDI BORUJENI, Mohammad Javad; HAMI, Javad; HAGHIR, Hossein; RASTIN, Maryam; SAZEGAR, Ghasem

    2016-01-01

    Objective Simple Febrile Seizure (SFS) is the most common seizure disorder in childhood, and is frequently described as inoffensive disorder. Nevertheless, there is evidence suggesting the association between neonatal febrile seizures and hippocampal abnormalities in adulthood. This study was conducted at evaluating the hippocampal expression of pro-apoptotic Bax and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins following SFS induction in rat neonates. Materials & Methods Febrile seizure was modeled by hyperthermia-induced seizure in 22-dayold male rats by a hot water bath. The animals were divided into two groups based on the presence or absence of seizure behaviors: Hyperthermia without seizure (n=10) and hyperthermia with seizure (n=10). To control the effects of environmental stress a sham-control group was also added (n=10). The rats’ hippocampi were dissected 2 or 15 days after hyperthermia. The expression of Bax and Bcl-2 proteins were measured using Western Blotting technique. Results The hippocampal expression of Bcl-2 protein was significantly lower in the hyperthermia with seizure animals than that of the sham-control and hyperthermia without seizure groups. The expression of pro-apoptotic Bax protein also significantly increased in the hippocampus of hyperthermia with seizure group rats compared to the sham-control and hyperthermia without seizure animals. Conclusion The simple febrile seizure markedly disturbed the hippocampal expression of both Bcl2 and Bax proteins, resulting in apoptosis promotion in hippocampi of juvenile rats, which were measurable for at least 15 days. PMID:27057189

  12. Febrile seizures and genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+).

    PubMed

    Camfield, Peter; Camfield, Carol

    2015-06-01

    To review the literature about febrile seizures and GEFS plus with special emphasis on management and outcome. Selected literature review. Febrile seizures are the most common convulsive event in humans, occurring in 2-6% of the population. The aetiology is complex with strong evidence for a heterogeneous genetic predisposition interacting with fever of any cause, with certain viral infections having a greater effect. A large amount of literature has established that febrile seizures have no long-term consequences on cognition or behaviour. Unfortunately, about 40% of children with a first febrile seizure will have a recurrence. The strongest predictor of recurrence is age <14-16 months at the time of the first febrile seizure. Epilepsy follows febrile seizures in ∼3% cases, with the concepts of simple and complex febrile seizures providing relatively weak prediction. Very prolonged febrile seizures may lead to mesial temporal sclerosis and temporal lobe epilepsy although the degree of risk remains uncertain. Investigations beyond establishing the cause of the provoking fever are nearly always unnecessary. Treatment is mainly reassurance and there is some evidence that parents eventually "come to grips" with the fear that their children are dying during a febrile seizure. Antipyretic medications are remarkably ineffective to prevent recurrences. Daily and intermittent prophylactic medications are ineffective or have unacceptable side effects or risks. "Rescue" benzodiazepines may prevent prolonged recurrences for selected patients with a first prolonged febrile seizure although this has not been proven. Genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) is a complex autosomal dominant disorder usually caused by mutations in SCN1A (a voltage-gated sodium channel). One third of patients have febrile seizures only; two thirds have a variety of epilepsy syndromes, both focal and generalized. Febrile seizures may distress parents but rarely have any long-term consequences. Reassurance is the only treatment for the vast majority. Identifying patients with GEFS plus may lead to further investigations and counselling. PMID:25917466

  13. Atypical femur fractures.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Wakenda; Bukata, Susan; O'Keefe, Regis

    2014-05-01

    Atypical femur fractures were first reported in 2007 and are now recognized as a unique clinical entity. They occur along the shaft of the femur extending from the subtrochanteric region proximally to the distal femoral metaphysis. These fractures have an increased incidence in patients taking bisphosphonates for osteoporosis and develop as stress reactions in the lateral cortex of the femoral shaft. The fractures often have a distinct radiographic appearance with thickening or beaking of the lateral cortex. Treatment should be initiated immediately. There is a higher incidence of complications with atypical fractures. Early detection of these fractures can greatly reduce morbidity. PMID:24721373

  14. High-Frequency Oscillations and Seizure Generation in Neocortical Epilepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worrell, Greg A.; Parish, Landi; Cranstoun, Stephen D.; Jonas, Rachel; Baltuch, Gordon; Litt, Brian

    2004-01-01

    Neocortical seizures are often poorly localized, explosive and widespread at onset, making them poorly amenable to epilepsy surgery in the absence of associated focal brain lesions. We describe, for the first time in an unselected group of patients with neocortical epilepsy, the finding that high-frequency (60--100 Hz) epileptiform oscillations…

  15. Treatment of neonatal seizures

    PubMed Central

    Rennie, Janet; Boylan, Geraldine

    2007-01-01

    Newborn babies with unusual movements thought to represent seizures are usually given a loading dose of phenobarbitone without electroencephalography being performed. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are then continued, with the outcome determined by clinical observation alone. AED treatment, often involving multiple drugs for long periods, is undesirable at a time when the brain is developing rapidly and likely to be especially vulnerable to any toxic effects. Despite considerable advances in the pharmacology of AEDs, continuous EEG monitoring using compact digital systems with simultaneous videorecording allowing off?line analysis, automated seizure detection, neuroimaging, and basic science research on cellular mechanisms of brain injury, treatment of such babies has progressed little. A change in practice is long overdue to allow affected babies to benefit from the advances made. PMID:17337664

  16. Ion dynamics during seizures

    PubMed Central

    Raimondo, Joseph V.; Burman, Richard J.; Katz, Arieh A.; Akerman, Colin J.

    2015-01-01

    Changes in membrane voltage brought about by ion fluxes through voltage and transmitter-gated channels represent the basis of neural activity. As such, electrochemical gradients across the membrane determine the direction and driving force for the flow of ions and are therefore crucial in setting the properties of synaptic transmission and signal propagation. Ion concentration gradients are established by a variety of mechanisms, including specialized transporter proteins. However, transmembrane gradients can be affected by ionic fluxes through channels during periods of elevated neural activity, which in turn are predicted to influence the properties of on-going synaptic transmission. Such activity-induced changes to ion concentration gradients are a feature of both physiological and pathological neural processes. An epileptic seizure is an example of severely perturbed neural activity, which is accompanied by pronounced changes in intracellular and extracellular ion concentrations. Appreciating the factors that contribute to these ion dynamics is critical if we are to understand how a seizure event evolves and is sustained and terminated by neural tissue. Indeed, this issue is of significant clinical importance as status epilepticus—a type of seizure that does not stop of its own accord—is a life-threatening medical emergency. In this review we explore how the transmembrane concentration gradient of the six major ions (K+, Na+, Cl−, Ca2+, H+and HCO3−) is altered during an epileptic seizure. We will first examine each ion individually, before describing how multiple interacting mechanisms between ions might contribute to concentration changes and whether these act to prolong or terminate epileptic activity. In doing so, we will consider how the availability of experimental techniques has both advanced and restricted our ability to study these phenomena. PMID:26539081

  17. [Seizures and driver's licence].

    PubMed

    Barolin, G S; Haslinger, A

    1991-01-01

    Legislation leaves a wide margin of freedom of judgement to the medical expert in the forensic assessment of a person's suitability for holding a driver's license. We have to make use of this freedom very cautiously with regard to social aspects as well as to the presently accepted state of scientific knowledge. In cases of first manifestations of epilepsy we must postulate--as a rule of thumb--a seizure-free period of two years with regular medication and clinical and electro-encephalographic checkups. The (epileptic or non-epileptic) "accidental seizure" is characterized by the releasing influence of powerful external noxious factors. In these cases, the patients should be seizure-free for at least six months before driving can be resumed. In all cases, the evaluation depends on the continuous observance of the patients, taking into account any underlying primary illness (alcoholism, cerebral vascular disease, conditions following brain surgery or trauma). The organic brain syndrome is an essential additional factor, together with the feasibility of treatment and the patient's compliance. Evaluation of the clinical picture is of foremost importance, support by EEG-findings, serum levels and psychological tests. Knowledge of cumulative factors, elimination and side-effects of anticonvulsive drugs is essential. According to the present view, medication should be continued over a period of many years. Curative medicine and medical assessment are not mutually exclusive, but require a distinct differentiation in every single case. PMID:1926883

  18. Atypical gouty arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mauro, G; Rubin, R P; Kanat, I O

    1985-01-01

    The authors describe an atypical case of idiopathic gouty arthritis in a 24-year old man. Idiopathic gout is usually found in persons between the ages of 30 and 50 years, and it is unusual to find clinical and roentgenographic abnormalities in a person as young as 24 years of age. PMID:4045120

  19. Atypical adenomatous hyperplasia —

    Cancer.gov

    Focal and diffuse lesions involving alveoli and terminal bronchioles and consisting of relatively uniform atypical cuboidal to columnar cells with dense chromatin. Degrees of cellular hypertrophy and hyperchromasia are variable. Cellular and nuclear atypia are the distinctive features as compared with hyperplasia. Their relevance to human AAH and mouse adenomas remains to be determined.

  20. Atypical/Nor98 Scrapie Infectivity in Sheep Peripheral Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Andréoletti, Olivier; Orge, Leonor; Benestad, Sylvie L.; Beringue, Vincent; Litaise, Claire; Simon, Stéphanie; Le Dur, Annick; Laude, Hubert; Simmons, Hugh; Lugan, Séverine; Corbière, Fabien; Costes, Pierrette; Morel, Nathalie; Schelcher, François; Lacroux, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    Atypical/Nor98 scrapie was first identified in 1998 in Norway. It is now considered as a worldwide disease of small ruminants and currently represents a significant part of the detected transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSE) cases in Europe. Atypical/Nor98 scrapie cases were reported in ARR/ARR sheep, which are highly resistant to BSE and other small ruminants TSE agents. The biology and pathogenesis of the Atypical/Nor98 scrapie agent in its natural host is still poorly understood. However, based on the absence of detectable abnormal PrP in peripheral tissues of affected individuals, human and animal exposure risk to this specific TSE agent has been considered low. In this study we demonstrate that infectivity can accumulate, even if no abnormal PrP is detectable, in lymphoid tissues, nerves, and muscles from natural and/or experimental Atypical/Nor98 scrapie cases. Evidence is provided that, in comparison to other TSE agents, samples containing Atypical/Nor98 scrapie infectivity could remain PrPSc negative. This feature will impact detection of Atypical/Nor98 scrapie cases in the field, and highlights the need to review current evaluations of the disease prevalence and potential transmissibility. Finally, an estimate is made of the infectivity loads accumulating in peripheral tissues in both Atypical/Nor98 and classical scrapie cases that currently enter the food chain. The results obtained indicate that dietary exposure risk to small ruminants TSE agents may be higher than commonly believed. PMID:21347349

  1. Inflammatory pathways of seizure disorders

    PubMed Central

    Marchi, Nicola; Granata, Tiziana; Janigro, Damir

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy refers to a cluster of neurological disease characterized by seizures. While many forms of epilepsy have a well-defined immune etiology, in other forms of epilepsy an altered immune response is only suspected. In general, the hypothesis that inflammation contributes to seizures is supported by experimental results. Additionally, antiepileptic maneuvers may act as immunomodulators and anti-inflammatory therapies can treat seizures. Triggers of seizure include a bidirectional communication between the nervous system and organs of immunity. Thus, a crucial cellular interface protecting from immunological seizures is the blood-brain barrier. Here, we summarize recent advances in the understanding and treatment of epileptic seizures which derive from a non-neurocentric viewpoint and suggest key avenues for future research. PMID:24355813

  2. Chemoconvulsant seizures: advantages of focally-evoked seizure models.

    PubMed

    Gale, K

    1995-01-01

    Studies of short and long-term changes in regional metabolism, blood flow, gene expression (including immediate early genes and genes for neurotrophic factors), sprouting and cell death following seizures are pivotal to an understanding of the neural networks responsible for the generation of seizures. At the same time, this information forms a basis for understanding the pathophysiology associated with chronic, recurrent seizures. Systemic chemoconvulsant seizure models, produced by systemically administered chemoconvulsant agents, although convenient, are plagued with difficulties which confound the interpretation of their effects on the nervous system. These difficulties include widespread direct cellular and physiological effects of the chemoconvulsant drugs, most of which are independent of seizures. In addition, numerous physiological changes occur as a secondary consequence of, or ancillary to, seizures, and it can be especially difficult to separate these effects from the direct effects of the propagated seizure discharge itself. Some of these difficulties can be overcome by the use of focally-evoked seizure models. Such models avoid the diffuse presence of drug throughout the CNS and thereby eliminate most of the direct cellular and physiologic actions of the drug apart from seizure-induction. Large regions of the brain distant from the focal site of drug application then can be examined for molecular, structural and physiologic changes uncomplicated by the presence of drug. Moreover, different focal sites of drug application can be compared to evaluate the specificity of the molecular changes to the neural network engaged in the seizure discharge. For example, limbic seizures, evoked by chemoconvulsant application into area tempestas, can be compared with brainstem convulsions evoked by chemoconvulsant application into inferior colliculus.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7642347

  3. Seizures with neuroleptics and antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, J C; Brown, R P

    1987-03-01

    Seizures remain among the most serious side effects of psychotropic drugs. The authors review the literature associating neuroleptic and antidepressant medications with seizures, discussing the relative "seizurogenicity" of different medications, risk factors for seizures, and drugs of choice for high-risk patients. Case histories are presented. Available evidence suggests that molindone, fluphenazine, and haloperidol are among the least seizurogenic neuroleptics and that doxepin, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, or electroconvulsive therapy may be safest in treating the depressed patient at risk for seizures. PMID:2883085

  4. Seizures and Teens: Using Technology to Develop Seizure Preparedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafer, Patricia O.; Schachter, Steven C.

    2007-01-01

    Most people learn about seizures from their doctors, but others know only what they have seen on television. Unfortunately, visits to doctor's office aren't long enough to learn all that is needed, and often times, doctors and nurses aren't available to teach this information. Seizures are often represented inaccurately and too dramatically on…

  5. Seizures and Teens: The Practical Aspects of Managing Seizure Medications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafer, Patricia Osborne; Israel, Beth

    2007-01-01

    Medications are the primary treatment for epilepsy, yet many teens and their families have problems managing seizure medicines. Fear of side effects, difficulties remembering to take medicines and figuring out how to take them are common challenges. Unfortunately, not taking medicine as prescribed can lead to breakthrough seizures, which in turn…

  6. Seizures and Teens: Using Technology to Develop Seizure Preparedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shafer, Patricia O.; Schachter, Steven C.

    2007-01-01

    Most people learn about seizures from their doctors, but others know only what they have seen on television. Unfortunately, visits to doctor's office aren't long enough to learn all that is needed, and often times, doctors and nurses aren't available to teach this information. Seizures are often represented inaccurately and too dramatically on

  7. ATYPICAL MANIFESTATIONS OF HYPERTHYROIDISM.

    PubMed

    BOXALL, E A; LAUENER, R W; MCINTOSH, H W

    1964-08-01

    Patients with hyperthyroidism usually present with symptoms of hypermetabolism with or without goitre and/or eye signs. Occasionally, however, the chief complaints are not immediately suggestive of hyperthyroidism. Patients with hyperthyroidism are described who presented with such atypical manifestations as periodic muscular paralysis, myasthenia, myopathy, encephalopathy, psychosis, angina pectoris, atrial fibrillation, heart failure without underlying heart disease, skeletal demineralization, pretibial myxedema, unilateral eye signs, and pitting edema of the ankles. PMID:14178405

  8. Dexamethasone-induced withdrawal seizure

    PubMed Central

    Mahar, Santwana; Malhotra, Mahima

    2015-01-01

    Dexamethasone-induced withdrawal seizure, which is a very rare and uncommon event, occurred after discontinuation of steroid therapy that was taken to increase weight by the patient. The pathogenesis is not well understood. In this submission, we have highlighted the fact that withdrawal of steroid has a propensity to cause seizure as a rare withdrawal phenomenon. PMID:25969660

  9. Recurrent seizures after lidocaine ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Aminiahidashti, Hamed; Laali, Abolghasem; Nosrati, Nazanin; Jahani, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Lidocaine has a concentration-dependent effect on seizures. Concentrations above 15 μg/mL frequently result in seizures in laboratory animals and human. We report a case of central nervous system (CNS) lidocaine toxicity and recurrent seizure after erroneous ingestion of lidocaine solution. A 4-year-old boy presented to the Emergency Department of Imam Hospital of Sari in December 2013 due to tonic-clonic generalized seizures approximately 30 min ago. 3 h before seizure, his mother gave him 2 spoons (amount 20–25 cc) lidocaine hydrochloride 2% solution instead of pediatric gripe by mistake. Seizure with generalized tonic-clonic occurred 3 times in home. Neurological examination was essentially unremarkable except for the depressed level of consciousness. Personal and medical history was unremarkable. There was no evidence of intracranial ischemic or hemorrhagic lesions in computed tomography scan. There were no further seizures, the condition of the patient remained stable, and he was discharged 2 days after admission. The use of viscous lidocaine may result in cardiovascular and CNS toxicity, particularly in children. Conservative management is the best option for treatment of lidocaine induced seizure. PMID:25709968

  10. [Reflex seizures, cinema and television].

    PubMed

    Olivares-Romero, Jesús

    2015-12-16

    In movies and television series are few references to seizures or reflex epilepsy even though in real life are an important subgroup of total epileptic syndromes. It has performed a search on the topic, identified 25 films in which they appear reflex seizures. Most seizures observed are tonic-clonic and visual stimuli are the most numerous, corresponding all with flashing lights. The emotions are the main stimuli in higher level processes. In most cases it is not possible to know if a character suffers a reflex epilepsy or suffer reflex seizures in the context of another epileptic syndrome. The main conclusion is that, in the movies, the reflex seizures are merely a visual reinforcing and anecdotal element without significant influence on the plot. PMID:26662874

  11. Predicting Epileptic Seizures in Advance

    PubMed Central

    Moghim, Negin; Corne, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is the second most common neurological disorder, affecting 0.6–0.8% of the world's population. In this neurological disorder, abnormal activity of the brain causes seizures, the nature of which tend to be sudden. Antiepileptic Drugs (AEDs) are used as long-term therapeutic solutions that control the condition. Of those treated with AEDs, 35% become resistant to medication. The unpredictable nature of seizures poses risks for the individual with epilepsy. It is clearly desirable to find more effective ways of preventing seizures for such patients. The automatic detection of oncoming seizures, before their actual onset, can facilitate timely intervention and hence minimize these risks. In addition, advance prediction of seizures can enrich our understanding of the epileptic brain. In this study, drawing on the body of work behind automatic seizure detection and prediction from digitised Invasive Electroencephalography (EEG) data, a prediction algorithm, ASPPR (Advance Seizure Prediction via Pre-ictal Relabeling), is described. ASPPR facilitates the learning of predictive models targeted at recognizing patterns in EEG activity that are in a specific time window in advance of a seizure. It then exploits advanced machine learning coupled with the design and selection of appropriate features from EEG signals. Results, from evaluating ASPPR independently on 21 different patients, suggest that seizures for many patients can be predicted up to 20 minutes in advance of their onset. Compared to benchmark performance represented by a mean S1-Score (harmonic mean of Sensitivity and Specificity) of 90.6% for predicting seizure onset between 0 and 5 minutes in advance, ASPPR achieves mean S1-Scores of: 96.30% for prediction between 1 and 6 minutes in advance, 96.13% for prediction between 8 and 13 minutes in advance, 94.5% for prediction between 14 and 19 minutes in advance, and 94.2% for prediction between 20 and 25 minutes in advance. PMID:24911316

  12. Seizure Treatment in Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    Opinion statement Solid organ transplantation is frequently complicated by a spectrum of seizure types, including single partial-onset or generalized tonic-clonic seizures, acute repetitive seizures or status epilepticus, and sometimes the evolution of symptomatic epilepsy. There is currently no specific evidence involving the transplant patient population to guide the selection, administration, or duration of antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy, so familiarity with clinical AED pharmacology and application of sound judgment are necessary for successful patient outcomes. An initial detailed search for symptomatic seizure etiologies, including metabolic, infectious, cerebrovascular, and calcineurin inhibitor treatment-related neuro-toxic complications such as posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), is imperative, as underlying central nervous system disorders may impose additional serious risks to cerebral or general health if not promptly detected and appropriately treated. The mainstay for post-transplant seizure management is AED therapy directed toward the suspected seizure type. Unfavorable drug interactions could place the transplanted organ at risk, so choosing an AED with limited interaction potential is also crucial. When the transplanted organ is dysfunctional or vulnerable to rejection, AEDs without substantial hepatic metabolism are favored in post-liver transplant patients, whereas after renal transplantation, AEDs with predominantly renal elimination may require dosage adjustment to prevent adverse effects. Levetiracetam, gabapentin, pregabalin, and lacosamide are drugs of choice for treatment of partial-onset seizures in post-transplant patients given their efficacy spectrum, generally excellent tolerability, and lack of drug interaction potential. Levetiracetam is the drug of choice for primary generalized seizures in post-transplant patients. When intravenous drugs are necessary for acute seizure management, benzodiazepines and fosphenytoin are the traditional and best evidence-based options, although intravenous levetiracetam, valproate, and lacosamide are emerging options. Availability of several newer AEDs has greatly expanded the therapeutic armamentarium for safe and efficacious treatment of post-transplant seizures, but future prospective clinical trials and pharmacokinetic studies within this specific patient population are needed. PMID:22660960

  13. Electrographic seizures after convulsive status epilepticus in children and young adults. A retrospective multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Iván Sánchez; Abend, Nicholas S.; Arndt, Daniel H.; Carpenter, Jessica L.; Chapman, Kevin E; Cornett, Karen M.; Dlugos, Dennis J.; Gallentine, William B.; Giza, Christopher C; Goldstein, Joshua L; Hahn, Cecil D; Lerner, Jason T; Matsumoto, Joyce H; McBain, Kristin; Nash, Kendall B; Payne, Eric; Sánchez, Sarah M; Williams, Korwyn; Loddenkemper, Tobias

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To describe the prevalence, characteristics and predictors of electrographic seizures following convulsive status epilepticus (CSE). Study design Multicenter retrospective study describing clinical and electroencephalographic (EEG) features of children (1 month-21 years) with CSE who underwent continuous EEG monitoring. Results Ninety-eight children (53 males) with a median age of 5 years with CSE underwent subsequent continuous EEG monitoring after CSE. Electrographic seizures (with or without clinical correlate) were identified in 32 subjects (33%). Eleven subjects (34.4%) had electrographic-only seizures, 17 subjects (53.1%) had electro-clinical seizures, and 4 subjects (12.5%) had an unknown clinical correlate. Of the 32 subjects with electrographic seizures, 15 subjects (46.9%) had electrographic status epilepticus. Factors associated with the occurrence of electrographic seizures after CSE were a prior diagnosis of epilepsy (p= 0.029) and the presence of interictal epileptiform discharges (p< 0.0005). The median (p25–p75) duration of stay in the pediatric intensive care unit was longer for children with electrographic seizures than for children without electrographic seizures [9.5 (3–22.5) versus 2 (2–5) days, Wilcoxon test, Z=3.916, p=0.0001]. Four children (4.1%) died before leaving the hospital and we could not identify a relationship between death and the presence or absence of electrographic seizures. Conclusions Following CSE, one-third of children who underwent EEG monitoring experienced electrographic seizures, and among these, one-third experienced entirely electrographic-only seizures. A prior diagnosis of epilepsy and the presence of interictal epileptiform discharges were risk factors for electrographic seizures. PMID:24161223

  14. Reduced glucose utilization underlies seizure protection with dietary therapy in epileptic EL mice.

    PubMed

    Meidenbauer, Joshua J; Roberts, Mary F

    2014-10-01

    Dietary therapy has been used to treat many individuals with epilepsy whose seizures are refractory to antiepileptic drugs. The mechanisms for how dietary therapy confers seizure protection are currently not well understood. We evaluated the acute effects of glucose and β-hydroxybutyrate (the major circulating ketone body) in conferring seizure protection to the EL mouse, a model of multifactorial idiopathic generalized epilepsy. EL mice were fed either an unrestricted standard diet or a calorie-restricted standard diet to achieve a body weight reduction of 20-23%. D-Glucose, 2-deoxy-D-glucose, and β-hydroxybutyrate were supplemented in the drinking water of calorie-restricted mice for 2.5 h prior to seizure testing to simulate the effect of increased glucose availability, decreased glucose utilization, and increased ketone availability, respectively. Seizure susceptibility, body weight, plasma glucose, and β-hydroxybutyrate were measured over a nine-week treatment period. Additionally, excitatory and inhibitory amino acids were measured in the brains of mice using (1)H NMR. Glutamate decarboxylase activity was also measured to evaluate the connection between dietary therapy and brain metabolism. We found that lowering of glucose utilization is necessary to confer seizure protection with long-term (>4 weeks) calorie restriction, whereas increased ketone availability did not affect seizure susceptibility. In the absence of long-term calorie restriction, however, reduced glucose utilization and increased ketone availability did not affect seizure susceptibility. Brain excitatory and inhibitory amino acid content did not change with treatment, and glutamate decarboxylase activity was not associated with seizure susceptibility. We demonstrated that reduced glucose utilization is necessary to confer seizure protection under long-term calorie restriction in EL mice, while acute ketone supplementation did not confer seizure protection. Further studies are needed to uncover the mechanisms by which glucose utilization influences seizure susceptibility. PMID:25200525

  15. Hemispheric surgery for refractory epilepsy: a systematic review and meta-analysis with emphasis on seizure predictors and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wen-Han; Zhang, Chao; Zhang, Kai; Shao, Xiao-Qiu; Zhang, Jian-Guo

    2016-04-01

    OBJECT Conflicting conclusions have been reported regarding several factors that may predict seizure outcomes after hemispheric surgery for refractory epilepsy. The goal of this study was to identify the possible predictors of seizure outcome by pooling the rates of postoperative seizure freedom found in the published literature. METHODS A comprehensive literature search of PubMed, Embase, and the Cochrane Library identified English-language articles published since 1970 that describe seizure outcomes in patients who underwent hemispheric surgery for refractory epilepsy. Two reviewers independently assessed article eligibility and extracted the data. The authors pooled rates of seizure freedom from papers included in the study. Eight potential prognostic variables were identified and dichotomized for analyses. The authors also compared continuous variables within seizure-free and seizure-recurrent groups. Random- or fixed-effects models were used in the analyses depending on the presence or absence of heterogeneity. RESULTS The pooled seizure-free rate among the 1528 patients (from 56 studies) who underwent hemispheric surgery was 73%. Patients with an epilepsy etiology of developmental disorders, generalized seizures, nonlateralization on electroencephalography, and contralateral MRI abnormalities had reduced odds of being seizure-free after surgery. CONCLUSIONS Hemispheric surgery is an effective therapeutic modality for medically intractable epilepsy. This meta-analysis provides useful evidence-based information for the selection of candidates for hemispheric surgery, presurgical counseling, and explanation of seizure outcomes. PMID:26495944

  16. Recognition memory is impaired in children after prolonged febrile seizures.

    PubMed

    Martinos, Marina M; Yoong, Michael; Patil, Shekhar; Chin, Richard F M; Neville, Brian G; Scott, Rod C; de Haan, Michelle

    2012-10-01

    Children with a history of a prolonged febrile seizure show signs of acute hippocampal injury on magnetic resonance imaging. In addition, animal studies have shown that adult rats who suffered febrile seizures during development reveal memory impairments. Together, these lines of evidence suggest that memory impairments related to hippocampal injury may be evident in human children after prolonged febrile seizures. The current study addressed this question by investigating memory abilities in 26 children soon after a prolonged febrile seizure (median: 37.5 days) and compared their results to those of 37 normally developing children. Fifteen patients were reassessed at a mean of 12.5 months after their first assessment to determine the transiency of any observed effects. We used the visual paired comparison task to test memory abilities in our group, as this task does not depend on verbal abilities and also because successful performance on the task has been proven to depend on the presence of functional hippocampi. Our findings show that patients perform as well as controls in the absence of a delay between the learning phase and the memory test, suggesting that both groups are able to form representations of the presented stimulus. However, after a 5-min delay, patients' recognition memory is not different from chance, and comparison of patients and controls points to an accelerated forgetting rate in the prolonged febrile seizure group. The patients' performance was not related to the time elapsed from the acute event or the duration of the prolonged febrile seizure, suggesting that the observed effect is not a by-product of the seizure itself or a delayed effect of medication administered to terminate the seizure. By contrast, performance was related to hippocampal size; participants with the smallest mean hippocampal volumes revealed the biggest drop in performance from the immediate to the delayed paradigm. At follow-up, children were still showing deficiencies in recognizing a face after a 5-min delay. Similarly, this suggests that the observed memory impairments are not a transient effect of the prolonged febrile seizures. This is the first report of such impairments in humans, and it is clinically significant given the links between mesial temporal sclerosis and prolonged febrile seizures. The persistence of these impairments a year onwards signals the potential benefits of intervention in these children who run the risk of developing episodic memory deficits in later childhood. PMID:22945967

  17. Epileptogenesis provoked by prolonged experimental febrile seizures: mechanisms and biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Dubé, Céline M; Ravizza, Teresa; Hamamura, Mark; Zha, Qinqin; Keebaugh, Andrew; Fok, Kimberly; Andres, Adrienne L; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Obenaus, Andre; Vezzani, Annamaria; Baram, Tallie Z

    2010-06-01

    Whether long febrile seizures (FSs) can cause epilepsy in the absence of genetic or acquired predisposing factors is unclear. Having established causality between long FSs and limbic epilepsy in an animal model, we studied here if the duration of the inciting FSs influenced the probability of developing subsequent epilepsy and the severity of the spontaneous seizures. We evaluated if interictal epileptifom activity and/or elevation of hippocampal T2 signal on magnetic resonance image (MRI) provided predictive biomarkers for epileptogenesis, and if the inflammatory mediator interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), an intrinsic element of FS generation, contributed also to subsequent epileptogenesis. We found that febrile status epilepticus, lasting an average of 64 min, increased the severity and duration of subsequent spontaneous seizures compared with FSs averaging 24 min. Interictal activity in rats sustaining febrile status epilepticus was also significantly longer and more robust, and correlated with the presence of hippocampal T2 changes in individual rats. Neither T2 changes nor interictal activity predicted epileptogenesis. Hippocampal levels of IL-1beta were significantly higher for >24 h after prolonged FSs. Chronically, IL-1beta levels were elevated only in rats developing spontaneous limbic seizures after febrile status epilepticus, consistent with a role for this inflammatory mediator in epileptogenesis. Establishing seizure duration as an important determinant in epileptogenesis and defining the predictive roles of interictal activity, MRI, and inflammatory processes are of paramount importance to the clinical understanding of the outcome of FSs, the most common neurological insult in infants and children. PMID:20519523

  18. Epileptogenesis provoked by prolonged experimental febrile seizures: mechanisms and biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Dubé, Celiné M.; Ravizza, Teresa; Hamamura, Mark; Zha, Qinqin; Keebaugh, Andrew; Fok, Kimberly; Andres, Adrienne M.; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Obenaus, Andre; Vezzani, Annamaria; Baram, Tallie Z.

    2010-01-01

    Whether long febrile seizures (FS) can cause epilepsy in the absence of genetic or acquired predisposing factors is unclear. Having established causality between long FS and limbic epilepsy in an animal model, we studied here if the duration of the inciting FS influenced the probability of developing subsequent epilepsy and the severity of the spontaneous seizures. We evaluated if interictal epileptifom activity and/or elevation of hippocampal T2 signal on MRI provided predictive biomarkers for epileptogenesis, and if the inflammatory mediator interleukin-1β (IL-1β), an intrinsic element of FS generation, contributed also to subsequent epileptogenesis. We found that febrile status epilepticus, lasting an average of 64 minutes, increased the severity and duration of subsequent spontaneous seizures compared with FS averaging 24 minutes. Interictal activity in rats sustaining febrile status epilepticus was also significantly longer and more robust, and correlated with the presence of hippocampal T2 changes in individual rats. Neither T2 changes nor interictal activity predicted epileptogenesis. Hippocampal levels of IL-1β were significantly higher for over 24 hours after prolonged FS. Chronically, IL-1β levels were elevated only in rats developing spontaneous limbic seizures after febrile status epilepticus, consistent with a role for this inflammatory mediator in epileptogenesis. Establishing seizure duration as an important determinant in epileptogenesis, and defining the predictive roles of interictal activity, MRI, and inflammatory processes are of paramount importance to the clinical understanding of the outcome of FS, the most common neurological insult in infants and children. PMID:20519523

  19. Lacosamide: A Review in Focal Seizures in Patients with Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Scott, Lesley J

    2015-12-01

    Lacosamide (Vimpat(®)) is a functionalized amino acid available orally (as a solution or tablets) and as an intravenous infusion for use as monotherapy (only in the USA) or adjunctive therapy for the treatment of focal seizures in adult and adolescent (aged ≥17 years in the USA) patients with epilepsy. As adjunctive therapy to other antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), lacosamide provided effective seizure control and was generally well tolerated in adults and adolescents (aged ≥16 years) in randomized clinical trials and in the real-world setting. In clinical trials, adjunctive lacosamide provided significantly greater reductions in 28-day seizure rates than adjunctive placebo, with these benefits maintained after up to 8 years of therapy in open-label extension studies. Moreover, patients were effectively switched from oral to short-term intravenous adjunctive therapy at the same dosage, which may be particularly beneficial in situations where oral therapy is not suitable. Conversion to lacosamide monotherapy was superior to a historical-control cohort in patients with focal seizures converting from previous AED therapy. In the absence of head-to-head comparisons with other AEDs, the exact position of lacosamide relative to other AEDs remains to be fully determined. In the meantime, oral and intravenous lacosamide provides a useful option as monotherapy (only in the USA) or adjunctive therapy for the treatment of focal seizures in adult and adolescent (aged ≥17 years in the USA) patients with epilepsy. PMID:26607484

  20. Evaluation of a first seizure.

    PubMed

    Adams, Stephen M; Knowles, Paul D

    2007-05-01

    Seizure is a common presentation in the emergency care setting, and new-onset epilepsy is the most common cause of unprovoked seizures. The patient history and physical examination should direct the type and timing of laboratory and imaging studies. No single sign, symptom, or test dearly differentiates a seizure from a nonseizure event (e.g., syncope, pseudoseizure). Electroencephalography is recommended for patients presenting with a first seizure, and neuroimaging is recommended for adults. Neuroimaging also should be performed in children with risk factors such as head trauma, focal neurologic deficits, or a history of malignancy. Magnetic resonance imaging is preferred over computed tomography except when acute intracranial bleeding is suspected. The most common laboratory findings associated with a seizure are abnormal sodium and glucose levels. Patients with a normal neurologic examination, normal test results, and no structural brain disease do not require hospitalization or antiepileptic medications. Treatment with antiepileptic medications reduces the one- to two-year risk of recurrent seizures but does not reduce the long-term risk of recurrence and does not affect remission rates. Regardless of etiology, a seizure diagnosis severely limits a patient's driving privileges, although laws vary by state. PMID:17508528

  1. Atypical Manifestations of Hyperthyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Boxall, E. A.; Lauener, R. W.; McIntosh, H. W.

    1964-01-01

    Patients with hyperthyroidism usually present with symptoms of hypermetabolism with or without goitre and/or eye signs. Occasionally, however, the chief complaints are not immediately suggestive of hyperthyroidism. Patients with hyperthyroidism are described who presented with such atypical manifestations as periodic muscular paralysis, myasthenia, myopathy, encephalopathy, psychosis, angina pectoris, atrial fibrillation, heart failure without underlying heart disease, skeletal demineralization, pretibial myxedema, unilateral eye signs, and pitting edema of the ankles. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 5Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10 PMID:14178405

  2. [Atypical presentation of preeclampsia].

    PubMed

    Ditisheim, A; Boulvain, M; Irion, O; Pechère-Bertschi, A

    2015-09-01

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-related syndrome, which still represents one of the major causes of maternal-fetal mortality and morbidity. Diagnosis can be made difficult due to the complexity of the disorder and its wide spectrum of clinical manifestations. In order to provide an efficient diagnostic tool to the clinician, medical societies regularly rethink the definition criteria. However, there are still clinical presentations of preeclampsia that escape the frame of the definition. The present review will address atypical forms of preeclampsia, such as preeclampsia without proteinuria, normotensive preeclampsia, preeclampsia before 20 weeks of gestation and post-partum preeclampsia. PMID:26540995

  3. Atypical Myopathy: Pentazocine Induced

    PubMed Central

    Kolikonda, Murali K.; Cherlopalle, Suneela; Enja, Manasa

    2015-01-01

    Pentazocine is a mixed agonist/antagonist opioid analgesic agent that can induce an atypical myopathy following intramuscular injections. This iatrogenic myopathy is rare, typified by fibrosis, and should be differentiated from other myopathies. We describe a case of pentazocine-induced myopathy that caused wasting of musculature in the gluteal region bilaterally and stiffness and woody induration in the legs of 42-year-old man. Though rare, clinicians should be alerted to this potential side effect and avoid repeated administration of intramuscular pentazocine. PMID:26000202

  4. [Anticonvulsive Therapy after the First Unprovoked Seizure – Pros and Cons].

    PubMed

    Zieglgänsberger, Dominik; Tettenborn, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    A first seizure is a critical life time event with severe consequences. A very thorough work-up is needed to find out the cause of the seizure and to number the risk of recurrence. Reasons for an anticonvulsive therapy are a pathologic EEG, a pathologic neurologic examination, the proof of a structural lesion, focal seizure onset or seizure onset while sleeping or classification as an epilepsy syndrome with high recurrence risk like juvenile myoclonic epilepsy or juvenile absence epilepsy. Psychological and social aspects like the patients or relatives fear of a further seizure, the risk of injury and occupational and recreational aspects must be considered as well. Reasons against an anticonvulsive therapy are mainly related to adverse effects like gain of weight and osteoporosis. PMID:26732716

  5. Seizures in Infants and Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBrien, Dianne M.; Bonthius, Daniel J.

    2000-01-01

    This article reviews the most frequent causes of seizure disorders in young children and the classification of different seizure types. It discusses current therapies, including alternatives to medication. Emergency response to seizures is covered a well as non-epileptic episodes that may resemble seizures. Epilepsy's potential impact on the…

  6. A Child's Guide to Seizure Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epilepsy Foundation of America, Landover, MD.

    Intended for young children suffering from seizure disorders, the booklet explains what a seizure disorder is, encourages the asking of questions, provides a simple explanation of how seizures happen and what effects they have, describes various kinds of seizures, and stresses the importance of taking prescribed medication regularly. Also stressed…

  7. Testing atypical depression definitions.

    PubMed

    Benazzi, Franco

    2005-01-01

    The evidence supporting the DSM-IV definition of atypical depression (AD) is weak. This study aimed to test different definitions of AD. Major depressive disorder (MDD) patients (N = 254) and bipolar-II (BP-II) outpatients (N = 348) were interviewed consecutively, during major depressive episodes, with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. DSM-IV criteria for AD were followed. AD validators were female gender, young onset, BP-II, axis I comorbidity, bipolar family history. Frequency of DSM-IV AD was 43.0%. AD, versus non-AD, was significantly associated with all AD validators, apart from comorbidity when controlling for age and sex. Factor analysis of atypical symptoms found factor 1 including oversleeping, overeating and weight gain (leaden paralysis at trend correlation), and factor 2 including interpersonal sensitivity, mood reactivity, and leaden paralysis. Multiple logistic regression of factor 1 versus AD validators found significant associations with several validators (including bipolar family history), whereas factor 2 had no significant associations. Findings may support a new definition of AD based on the state-dependent features oversleeping and overeating (plus perhaps leaden paralysis) versus the current AD definition based on a combination of state and trait features. Pharmacological studies are required to support any new definition of AD, as the current concept of AD is based on different response to TCA antidepressants versus non-AD. PMID:16175877

  8. Recent Research on Febrile Seizures: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Syndi Seinfeld, DO; Pellock, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Febrile seizures are common and mostly benign. They are the most common cause of seizures in children less than five years of age. There are two categories of febrile seizures, simple and complex. Both the International League against Epilepsy and the National Institute of Health has published definitions on the classification of febrile seizures. Simple febrile seizures are mostly benign, but a prolonged (complex) febrile seizure can have long term consequences. Most children who have a febrile seizure have normal health and development after the event, but there is recent evidence that suggests a small subset of children that present with seizures and fever may have recurrent seizure or develop epilepsy. This review will give an overview of the definition of febrile seizures, epidemiology, evaluation, treatment, outcomes and recent research. PMID:25383238

  9. Generalized tonic-clonic seizure

    MedlinePlus

    Treatment for tonic-clonic seizures includes medications, changes in lifestyle for adults and children , such as activity and diet, and sometimes surgery. Your doctor can tell you more about these options.

  10. Ranolazine overdose-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Akil, Nour; Bottei, Edward; Kamath, Sameer

    2015-12-01

    Ranolazine is a new anti-anginal medication that was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2006 for patients with symptomatic chronic angina despite optimized therapy. This paper presents a case report of a fifteen year old male patient admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit after ranolazine overdose ingestion. He had recurrent new onset seizures that are most likely due to ranolazine overdose. Seizures have never been reported with ranolazine use or abuse. PMID:26072257

  11. Seizures, Cerebral Shutdown, and SUDEP

    PubMed Central

    Bozorgi, Alireza; Lhatoo, Samden D.

    2013-01-01

    Several potential pathophysiologic phenomena, including cerebral shutdown, are postulated to be responsible for SUDEP. Since the evidence for a seizure-related mechanism is strong, a poor understanding of the physiology of human seizure termination is a major handicap. However, rather than a failure of a single homeostatic mechanism, such as postictal arousal, it may be a perfect storm created by the lining up of a several factors that lead to death. PMID:24348118

  12. Characterizing neurodynamic changes before seizures.

    PubMed

    Le Van Quyen, M; Martinerie, J; Navarro, V; Baulac And, M; Varela, F J

    2001-05-01

    The study of dynamic changes in neural activity preceding epileptic seizure allows the characterization of a preictal state several minutes before seizure onset. This opens up new perspectives for studying the mechanisms of epileptogenesis as well as for possible therapeutic interventions, which represent a major breakthrough. In this review the authors present and discuss the results from their group in this domain using nonlinear analysis of brain signals, as well as the limitations of this topic and current questions. PMID:11528293

  13. Epileptiform seizures in domestic fowl. V. The anticonvulsant activity of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol.

    PubMed

    Johnson, D D; McNeill, J R; Crawford, R D; Wilcox, W C

    1975-12-01

    The anticonvulsant activity of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta9-THC) has been determined against seizures induced in epileptic chickens by intermittent photic stimulation (IPS) and in epileptic and nonepileptic chickens by Metrazol. Intravenous administration of the drug reduced both the severity and incidence of seizures evoked by IPS in epileptic chickens. This anticonvulsant action was accompanied by a reduction in frequency of inter-ictal slow-wave high-voltage electroencephalographic activity and by the absence of spiking during IPS. delta9-THC did not affect the incidence of Metrazol-induced seizures in epileptic or nonepileptic chickens. PMID:1222370

  14. Atypical histiocytosis in the lung

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Weijun; Zhang, Rongxuan; Zhou, Ying; Xu, Jinfu; Garfield, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To report a rare case of atypical histiocytic tumor of the lung with a review of literature. Methods The clinical materials were noted. Literature related to this condition from the past 50 years was reviewed from the group of histiocytic tumors. Results and conclusions Clinical manifestations were non-specific. The imaging characteristics of our case were infiltrative lesions with multiple cysts in both lungs. Pathology showed nodular proliferation of atypical cells. Immunohistochemistry suggested a histiocytic origin of the infiltrating atypical cells. Because the pathological findings did not fall into any particular category of typical histiocytic tumors, the final diagnosis was atypical histiocytic tumor. The presentation of atypical histiocytic tumor of the lungs, only, with infiltrative lesions and multiple air cysts seems very rare, with pathological examination being “gold standard” for the diagnosis. PMID:23991320

  15. Early seizures in acute stroke

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed, Chraa; Kissani, Najib

    2015-01-01

    Early seizures (ES) may complicate the clinical course of patients with acute stroke. The aim of this study was to assess the frequency and the predictive factors for early seizures as well the clinical outcome in patients with first-ever stroke. A total of 352 consecutive patients with first-ever stroke, admitted to our department, were included in this retrospective study. Early seizures were defined as seizures occurring within 7 days from acute stroke. Patients with history of epilepsy were excluded. About 47 patients (13%) had early seizure, and 8 had a status epilepticus. We had 28 women and 19 men. The mean age was 71.6 14.6. They were significantly more common in patients with cortical involvement, severe and large stroke, and in patient with cortical associated hemorrhage. ES were associated with an increase in adverse outcome (mortality and disability). Early seizures occured in about 13% of patients with acute stroke. In these patients hemorrhagic transformation is a predictive factor for ES. ES seem to be associated with a worse outcome after acute stroke. PMID:26097640

  16. Assimilating Seizure Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Ghanim; Schiff, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    Observability of a dynamical system requires an understanding of its state—the collective values of its variables. However, existing techniques are too limited to measure all but a small fraction of the physical variables and parameters of neuronal networks. We constructed models of the biophysical properties of neuronal membrane, synaptic, and microenvironment dynamics, and incorporated them into a model-based predictor-controller framework from modern control theory. We demonstrate that it is now possible to meaningfully estimate the dynamics of small neuronal networks using as few as a single measured variable. Specifically, we assimilate noisy membrane potential measurements from individual hippocampal neurons to reconstruct the dynamics of networks of these cells, their extracellular microenvironment, and the activities of different neuronal types during seizures. We use reconstruction to account for unmeasured parts of the neuronal system, relating micro-domain metabolic processes to cellular excitability, and validate the reconstruction of cellular dynamical interactions against actual measurements. Data assimilation, the fusing of measurement with computational models, has significant potential to improve the way we observe and understand brain dynamics. PMID:20463875

  17. Atypical causes of cholestasis

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ken D; Sundaram, Vinay; Ayoub, Walid S

    2014-01-01

    Cholestatic liver disease consists of a variety of disorders. Primary sclerosing cholangitis and primary biliary cirrhosis are the most commonly recognized cholestatic liver disease in the adult population, while biliary atresia and Alagille syndrome are commonly recognized in the pediatric population. In infants, the causes are usually congenital or inherited. Even though jaundice is a hallmark of cholestasis, it is not always seen in adult patients with chronic liver disease. Patients can have “silent” progressive cholestatic liver disease for years prior to development of symptoms such as jaundice and pruritus. In this review, we will discuss some of the atypical causes of cholestatic liver disease such as benign recurrent intrahepatic cholestasis, progressive familial intrahepatic cholestasis, Alagille Syndrome, biliary atresia, total parenteral nutrition induced cholestasis and cholestasis secondary to drug induced liver injury. PMID:25071336

  18. Dermatofibroma: Atypical Presentations

    PubMed Central

    Bandyopadhyay, Mousumi Roy; Besra, Mrinal; Dutta, Somasree; Sarkar, Somnath

    2016-01-01

    Dermatofibroma is a common benign fibrohistiocytic tumor and its diagnosis is easy when it presents classical clinicopathological features. However, a dermatofibroma may show a wide variety of clinicopathological variants and, therefore, the diagnosis may be difficult. The typical dermatofibroma generally occurs as a single or multiple firm reddish-brown nodules. We report here two atypical presentations of dermatofibroma - Atrophic dermatofibroma and keloidal presentation of dermatofibroma. Clinical dermal atrophy is a common phenomenon in dermatofibromas as demonstrated by the dimpling on lateral pressure. However, this feature is exaggerated in the atrophic variant of dermatofibroma. Atrophic dermatofibroma is defined by dermal atrophy of more than 50% of the lesion apart from the usual features of common dermatofibroma. The keloidal variant of dermatofibroma should not be overlooked as a simple keloid. The findings of keloidal change in dermatofibromas may support that trauma is a possible cause of dermatofibroma. PMID:26955137

  19. Massively multiplayer online role-playing game-induced seizures: a neglected health problem in Internet addiction.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Yao-Chung

    2006-08-01

    As the Internet has become rapidly and widely integrated into society, Internet addiction has become a growing psychosocial problem. However, epileptic seizure, another out-of-the-ordinary health problem, is often neglected in this regard. Ten patients who experienced epileptic seizures while playing the newest genre of electronic games -- Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games (MMORPGs) -- were investigated. Patients were predominantly male young adults, and most of the events were generalized tonic-clonic seizures, myoclonic seizures, and absences. These patients should be categorized into idiopathic generalized epilepsies. Even though photosensitivity was an important factor, behavioral and higher mental activities also seemed to be significant seizure precipitants. Results demonstrated that MMORPG-induced seizures were not analogous to the ordinary video game-induced seizures. Significantly, an epileptic seizure warning did not always appear on the websites of MMORPGs and instructions for the software. While the prevalence of MMORPG-induced seizures remains unknown, it may exceed our expectations and impact our society. Not only for clinical neurologists but also for the primary physicians, educators, sociologists, and global online game publishers, there should be an awareness of this special form of reflex seizures in order to provide an appropriate health warning to MMORPG players. PMID:16901249

  20. Epileptic Seizures From Abnormal Networks: Why Some Seizures Defy Predictability

    PubMed Central

    Azhar, Feraz; Kudela, Pawel; Bergey, Gregory K.; Franaszczuk, Piotr J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Seizure prediction has proven to be difficult in clinically realistic environments. Is it possible that fluctuations in cortical firing could influence the onset of seizures in an ictal zone? To test this, we have now used neural network simulations in a computational model of cortex having a total of 65,536 neurons with intercellular wiring patterned after histological data. A spatially distributed Poisson driven background input representing the activity of neighboring cortex affected 1% of the neurons. Gamma distributions were fit to the interbursting phase intervals, a non-parametric test for randomness was applied, and a dynamical systems analysis was performed to search for period-1 orbits in the intervals. The non-parametric analysis suggests that intervals are being drawn at random from their underlying joint distribution and the dynamical systems analysis is consistent with a nondeterministic dynamical interpretation of the generation of bursting phases. These results imply that in a region of cortex with abnormal connectivity analogous to a seizure focus, it is possible to initiate seizure activity with fluctuations of input from the surrounding cortical regions. These findings suggest one possibility for ictal generation from abnormal focal epileptic networks. This mechanism additionally could help explain the difficulty in predicting partial seizures in some patients. PMID:22169211

  1. Seizures and Meperidine: Overstated and Underutilized.

    PubMed

    Schlick, Konrad H; Hemmen, Thomas M; Lyden, Patrick D

    2015-12-01

    Meperidine is used for pain control and treatment of shivering. Concerns about neurotoxicity, particularly seizures, have led to efforts limiting meperidine use. We reviewed the body of evidence linking meperidine to seizures. We searched PubMed for the terms meperidine, normeperidine, pethidine, and norpethidine; each was combined with the terms: seizure, epilepsy, epileptogenic, toxicity, overdose, seizure threshold, and convulsion. Articles were assessed for relevance. Semiologies were reviewed to ascertain seizure likelihood. Our search yielded 351 articles, of which 66 were relevant. Of these, 33 had primary clinical data on meperidine-associated seizures, comprising 50 patients. Twenty events were deemed likely to be seizures, 26 indeterminate, and 4 unlikely. Most studies were case reports. Confounding comorbidities were frequent. The evidence base for meperidine-associated seizures in man is scant. Seizure risk associated with meperidine appears to be overstated. The utility of meperidine should continue to be explored, especially for therapeutic hypothermia. PMID:26087278

  2. Methods for Measuring Seizure Frequency and Severity.

    PubMed

    Aghaei-Lasboo, Anahita; Fisher, Robert S

    2016-05-01

    Counting seizures is not simple. Patients may not be aware of their seizures. Adherence to diary entry often is poor. Shake detectors pick up only seizures with rhythmic movements and suffer from false-positive results. Measurement of electrodermal response is a promising technology but sensitivity and specificity for partial seizures are uncertain. Video-electroencephalogram monitoring is accurate but of short duration and performed in an artificial and expensive environment. Invasive electroencephalogram electrodes can detect seizure-like patterns, sometimes of unknown clinical significance. Practical long-term electroencephalogram monitors are under development. Methods to rank seizure severity are subjective. New approaches and solutions are needed. PMID:27086985

  3. [Seizures revealing phosphocalcic metabolism abnormalities].

    PubMed

    Hmami, F; Chaouki, S; Benmiloud, S; Souilmi, F Z; Abourazzak, S; Idrissi, M; Atmani, S; Bouharrou, A; Hida, M

    2014-01-01

    Hypocalcemia due to hypoparathyroidism produces a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations, but overt symptoms may be sparse. One unusual presentation is onset or aggravation of epilepsy in adolescence revealing hypoparathyroidism. This situation can lead to delayed diagnosis, with inefficacity of the antiepileptic drugs. We report five cases of adolescence-onset epilepsy with unsuccessful antiepileptic therapy, even with gradually increasing dose. Physical examination revealed signs of hypocalcemia, confirmed biologically. Full testing disclosed the origin of the seizures: hypoparathyroidism in three patients and pseudohypoparathyroidism in the other two. In four of five patients, computed tomography showed calcification of the basal ganglia, defining Fahr's syndrome. The patients were treated with oral calcium and active vitamin D (1-alphahydroxy vitamin D3). Seizure frequency progressively decreased and serum calcium levels returned to normal. These cases illustrate the importance of the physical examination and of routine serum calcium assay in patients with new-onset epileptic seizures in order to detect hypocalcemia secondary to hypoparathyroidism. PMID:24726042

  4. SULFOLANE EFFECTS ON AUDIOGENIC, PENTYLENETETRAZOL AND AFTERDISCHARGE SEIZURE ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sulfolane dosages that alter seizure susceptibility were determined using audiogenic (AG), pentylenetrazol (PTZ) and hippocampal afterdischarge (AD) seizure models. The presence of AG seizures and potentiation of PTZ seizures were investigated in rats injected IP with 0, 200, 400...

  5. Atypical breasts cancers

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Lucie; Ng, Cho Ee; Fasih, Tarannum

    2016-01-01

    Introduction With increasing incidence of breast cancers there are now a larger number of cases diagnosed with rare malignancies. These can be diagnostic dilemmas and management strategy can be different by various breast multi-disciplinary teams (MDT). We aim to discuss the evidence-based approach for management of these atypical breast cancers which were identified in patients from a single breast screening unit. Method Patient with unusual breast malignancies (all types except invasive ductal and lobular) treated under the care of a single surgeon were identified during the breast multi-disciplinary discussion from 2011 to 2015. The histology and management of these cases were reviewed and literature search of electronic databases via PubMed and the search engines Google/Google Scholar was performed. Emphasis on keywords based on the histology type was used to limit search. Search was focused on the diagnosis, management and prognosis of these unusual breast cancers. Conclusion This series aims to focus on the evidence-based management of these rare breast malignancies; the diagnosis of which is crucial as it affects the overall treatment and prognosis. PMID:26812668

  6. [Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome].

    PubMed

    Blasco Pelicano, Miquel; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago; Campistol Plana, Josep M

    2015-11-20

    The hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a clinical entity characterized by thrombocytopenia, non-immune hemolytic anemia and renal impairment. Kidney pathology shows thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) with endothelial cell injury leading to thrombotic occlusion of arterioles and capillaries. Traditionally, HUS was classified in 2 forms: Typical HUS, most frequently occurring in children and caused by Shiga-toxin-producing bacteria, and atypical HUS (aHUS). aHUS is associated with mutations in complement genes in 50-60% of patients and has worse prognosis, with the majority of patients developing end stage renal disease. After kidney transplantation HUS may develop as a recurrence of aHUS or as de novo disease. Over the last years, many studies have demonstrated that complement dysregulation underlies the endothelial damage that triggers the development of TMA in most of these patients. Advances in our understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms of aHUS, together with the availability of novel therapeutic options, will enable better strategies for the early diagnosis and etiological treatment, which are changing the natural history of aHUS. This review summarizes the aHUS clinical entity and describes the role of complement dysregulation in the pathogenesis of aHUS. Finally, we review the differential diagnosis and the therapeutic options available to patients with aHUS. PMID:25433773

  7. Phenomenology of simple partial seizures.

    PubMed

    Erkwoh, R; Steinmeyer, E M

    1996-12-01

    Based on a sample of 325 inpatients we present the subjective experiences during simple partial seizures. In a majority of cases, auras comprised composed forms of different symptomatic qualities. We describe rules which seem to govern sequences of aura phenomena. Autonomous and vestibular sensations were shown to have preceding positions related to others, olfactory and gustatory sensations preferred a following position. The tentative explanation of the findings favours the idea of heterogeneity rather than the concept of a focal discharge in a simple partial seizures. PMID:8952014

  8. Autoimmunity, Seizures, and Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Rebecca; Dalmau, Josep

    2013-01-01

    Summary The recent discovery of a category of autoimmune encephalitis associated with antibodies against neuronal cell-surface and synaptic proteins has renewed interest for autoimmune causes of epilepsy. The identification of autoimmune encephalitis has changed paradigms in the diagnosis and management of several novel and treatable syndromes that occur with seizures and status epilepticus previously attributed to viral or idiopathic etiologies. This review focuses on the novel group of autoimmune encephalitis and also discusses some classical paraneoplastic syndromes that constitute another group of autoimmune disorders that may result in seizures. PMID:24001072

  9. Types of Seizures Affecting Individuals with TSC

    MedlinePlus

    ... during or just after seizures. Don’t use artificial respiration unless breathing is absent after muscle jerks ... during or just after seizures. Don’t use artificial respiration unless breathing is absent after muscle jerks ...

  10. Utility of different seizure induction protocols in psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Goyal, Gourav; Kalita, Jayantee; Misra, Usha K

    2014-08-01

    Psychogenic non epileptic seizure (PNES) can be induced by several induction tests but their relative usefulness has not been evaluated. In this study, we report the sensitivity and specificity of various induction tests in the diagnosis of PNES and assess their discomfort level. The induction tests were: (a) compression of temple region (CTR), (b) verbal suggestion (VS), (c) tuning fork application (TFA), (d) moist swab application (MSA), (e) torch light stimulation (TLS) and (f) saline injection (SI). Up to 3 trials were done for each test except for normal saline injection which was given once. For comparison of these tests, patients with epileptic seizures were included as controls. The time to precipitate PNES was recorded and patients' discomfort levels were noted on a 0-10 scale. Video EEG was recorded in the PNES patients. 140 patients with PNES and 50 controls with epileptic seizures were included. The diagnostic yield of CTR was 65.7%, TFA 61.4%, MSA 60.7%, SI 55.6%, VS 54.3% and TLS 40.7%. These tests did not induce seizures in the controls. All these tests had 100% specificity and 100% positive predictive value in the diagnosis of PNES. The maximum discomfort was reported with SI and minimum with MSA. The similarity of efficacy and discomfort with CTR and TFA appear to be the most optimal induction techniques when compared with VS, AMS, TLS, and SI. PMID:24802296

  11. Case Report: Atypical Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Leanza, Vito; Rubbino, Gabriella; Leanza, Gianluca

    2015-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) (also called Bushy Syndrome or Amsterdam dwarfism), is a genetic disorder that can lead to several alterations. This disease affects both physical and neuropsychiatric development. The various abnormalities include facial dysmorphia (arched eyebrows, synophrys, depressed nasal bridge, long philtrum, down-turned angles of the mouth), upper-extremity malformations, hirsutism, cardiac defects, and gastrointestinal alterations. The prevalence of this syndrome is approximately one per 15,000. Ultrasound is not the perfect means to diagnose CdLS, however, many abnormalities can be detected prenatally by scrupulous image observation. We report an atypical CdLS case characterized by increased nuchal translucency in the first trimester, normal karyotype, saddle nose, micrognathia with receding jaw, low set ears, facies senilis, arthrogryposis of the hands, absence of the Aranzio ductus venous, dilatation of gallbladder and bowel, a unique umbilical artery, increased volume of amniotic fluid, and intrauterine growth retardation ending with the interruption of pregnancy. PMID:26834972

  12. The language of absence.

    PubMed

    Gurevich, Hayuta

    2008-06-01

    This paper will focus on the concept of 'absence', which describes a continuum of non-responsiveness and misattunement of the environment in the stage of absolute dependence; it refers to concepts like lack, failure, non-recognition, impingement, neglect, tantalizing, ranging to mental, physical and sexual abuse. An extreme external absence causes shock and fear. The automatic survival response is an inner absence, an intrapsychic absence, a dissociation of parts of the self. The external and the inner absence are the negative image of each other. The concept of absence points to the synchronicity of outer and inner reality and portrays the non-responded-to needs of the self. This point of view of the development of psychopathology of the self on the basis of massive dissociation is inherently an intersubjective-field-theory. As the inner absence is created as a reaction to an absence of the other, in analysis - the analyst has an active role in reviving it. This paper will explore the language of absence, that is, the derivatives and consequences of these situations in the inner realm, and in the relations with the analyst. It is the author's contention that understanding and speaking this language has important clinical and technical implications. Understanding the language of absence enables the analyst to recognize its intersubjective and its intrapsychic presence, to provide an environment that allows for its revival, and to facilitate and regulate the annihilation anxiety that awakens when dissociated self-states are experienced. When the absence is present, i.e. when the traumatic experience and the dissociated reactions to it are experienced in an attuned relationship, it is rendered with meaning, symbolization, and validation, and enables the survival mode of dissociation to be relinquished. PMID:18558956

  13. Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is defined by the triad of mechanical hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and renal impairment. Atypical HUS (aHUS) defines non Shiga-toxin-HUS and even if some authors include secondary aHUS due to Streptococcus pneumoniae or other causes, aHUS designates a primary disease due to a disorder in complement alternative pathway regulation. Atypical HUS represents 5 -10% of HUS in children, but the majority of HUS in adults. The incidence of complement-aHUS is not known precisely. However, more than 1000 aHUS patients investigated for complement abnormalities have been reported. Onset is from the neonatal period to the adult age. Most patients present with hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and renal failure and 20% have extra renal manifestations. Two to 10% die and one third progress to end-stage renal failure at first episode. Half of patients have relapses. Mutations in the genes encoding complement regulatory proteins factor H, membrane cofactor protein (MCP), factor I or thrombomodulin have been demonstrated in 20-30%, 5-15%, 4-10% and 3-5% of patients respectively, and mutations in the genes of C3 convertase proteins, C3 and factor B, in 2-10% and 1-4%. In addition, 6-10% of patients have anti-factor H antibodies. Diagnosis of aHUS relies on 1) No associated disease 2) No criteria for Shigatoxin-HUS (stool culture and PCR for Shiga-toxins; serology for anti-lipopolysaccharides antibodies) 3) No criteria for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (serum ADAMTS 13 activity > 10%). Investigation of the complement system is required (C3, C4, factor H and factor I plasma concentration, MCP expression on leukocytes and anti-factor H antibodies; genetic screening to identify risk factors). The disease is familial in approximately 20% of pedigrees, with an autosomal recessive or dominant mode of transmission. As penetrance of the disease is 50%, genetic counseling is difficult. Plasmatherapy has been first line treatment until presently, without unquestionable demonstration of efficiency. There is a high risk of post-transplant recurrence, except in MCP-HUS. Case reports and two phase II trials show an impressive efficacy of the complement C5 blocker eculizumab, suggesting it will be the next standard of care. Except for patients treated by intensive plasmatherapy or eculizumab, the worst prognosis is in factor H-HUS, as mortality can reach 20% and 50% of survivors do not recover renal function. Half of factor I-HUS progress to end-stage renal failure. Conversely, most patients with MCP-HUS have preserved renal function. Anti-factor H antibodies-HUS has favourable outcome if treated early. PMID:21902819

  14. Characteristics and phenomenology of epileptic partial seizures in dogs: similarities with human seizure semiology.

    PubMed

    Berendt, M; Gredal, H; Alving, J

    2004-01-01

    Dogs with spontaneous occurring epilepsy with partial seizures express symptomatology resembling what is found in humans with partial epileptic seizures. Questionnaires on clinical signs from 70 dogs, with a confirmed diagnosis of epilepsy with partial seizures with or without secondary generalization, were reviewed in order to characterize and classify clinical signs of partial seizure activity in dogs and compare them to partial seizure phenomenology in humans. Signs of partial seizure activity were distributed into three categories: motor signs, autonomic signs and paroxysms of behavioral signs. Motor signs were described in 48 dogs (69%), autonomic signs in 16 dogs (23%) and paroxysms of behavioral signs in 56 dogs (80%). The majority of dogs expressed signs from more than one group. Sixty-one dogs (87%) had partial seizures with secondary generalization. Nine dogs (13%) had partial seizures without secondary generalization. The study shows a remarkable resemblance between the seizure phenomenology expressed in humans and canines with partial epileptic seizures. PMID:15451018

  15. 19 CFR 145.59 - Seizures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seizures. 145.59 Section 145.59 Customs Duties U.S...) MAIL IMPORTATIONS Restricted and Prohibited Merchandise § 145.59 Seizures. (a) Articles prohibited and... handled by the Postal Service as specified in §§ 145.51 and 145.52. (b) Notification of seizure...

  16. 19 CFR 145.59 - Seizures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Seizures. 145.59 Section 145.59 Customs Duties U.S...) MAIL IMPORTATIONS Restricted and Prohibited Merchandise § 145.59 Seizures. (a) Articles prohibited and... handled by the Postal Service as specified in §§ 145.51 and 145.52. (b) Notification of seizure...

  17. An Incredible Tool for Tracking Seizure Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollingsworth, Jan Carter

    2007-01-01

    Eric Schumacher knows all too well the trials and tribulations of tracking seizures and daily activities in the ongoing attempt to gain seizure control. Diagnosed with epilepsy in his teens, he is now bringing a new and innovative tool to the market that could help countless people with epilepsy gain better control over their seizures and thus…

  18. Analysis of rare copy number variation in absence epilepsies

    PubMed Central

    Rosch, Richard E.; Valentin, Antonio; Makoff, Andrew; Robinson, Robert; Everett, Kate V.; Nashef, Lina; Pal, Deb K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify shared genes and pathways between common absence epilepsy (AE) subtypes (childhood absence epilepsy [CAE], juvenile absence epilepsy [JAE], and unclassified absence epilepsy [UAE]) that may indicate common mechanisms for absence seizure generation and potentially a diagnostic continuum. Methods: We used high-density single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays to analyze genome-wide rare copy number variation (CNV) in a cohort of 144 children with AEs (95 CAE, 26 UAE, and 23 JAE). Results: We identified CNVs that are known risk factors for AE in 4 patients, including 3x 15q11.2 deletion. We also expanded the phenotype at 4 regions more commonly identified in other neurodevelopmental disorders: 1p36.33 duplication, 1q21.1 deletion, 22q11.2 duplication, and Xp22.31 deletion and duplication. Fifteen patients (10.5%) were found to carry rare CNVs that disrupt genes associated with neuronal development and function (8 CAE, 2 JAE, and 5 UAE). Four categories of protein are each disrupted by several CNVs: (1) synaptic vesicle membrane or vesicle endocytosis, (2) synaptic cell adhesion, (3) synapse organization and motility via actin, and (4) gap junctions. CNVs within these categories are shared across the AE subtypes. Conclusions: Our results have reinforced the complex and heterogeneous nature of the AEs and their potential for shared genetic mechanisms and have highlighted several pathways that may be important in epileptogenesis of absence seizures. PMID:27123475

  19. Role of the Wada test and functional magnetic resonance imaging in preoperative mapping of language and memory: two atypical cases.

    PubMed

    Połczyńska, Monika M; Benjamin, Christopher F A; Moseley, Brian D; Walshaw, Patricia; Eliashiv, Dawn; Vigil, Celia; Jones, Michael; Bookheimer, Susan Y

    2015-01-01

    The Wada test is an invasive procedure used to determine cerebral memory and language dominance as well as risk of cognitive deficits following neurosurgery. However, the potential risks of Wada testing have led some to consider foregoing Wada testing in candidates for resective epilepsy surgery with right hemispheric seizure onset. We present two atypical cases in which the Wada test showed unexpected memory and language lateralization. These cases underscore the importance of functional magnetic resonance in which imaging and Wada examination in right-handed individuals even when the lesion would not suggest atypical language representation. PMID:25372664

  20. Spatiotemporal dynamics of optogenetically induced and spontaneous seizure transitions in primary generalized epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Truccolo, Wilson; Wang, Jing; Nurmikko, Arto V.

    2014-01-01

    Transitions into primary generalized epileptic seizures occur abruptly and synchronously across the brain. Their potential triggers remain unknown. We used optogenetics to causally test the hypothesis that rhythmic population bursting of excitatory neurons in a local neocortical region can rapidly trigger absence seizures. Most previous studies have been purely correlational, and it remains unclear whether epileptiform events induced by rhythmic stimulation (e.g., sensory/electrical) mimic actual spontaneous seizures, especially regarding their spatiotemporal dynamics. In this study, we used a novel combination of intracortical optogenetic stimulation and microelectrode array recordings in freely moving WAG/Rij rats, a model of absence epilepsy with a cortical focus in the somatosensory cortex (SI). We report three main findings: 1) Brief rhythmic bursting, evoked by optical stimulation of neocortical excitatory neurons at frequencies around 10 Hz, induced seizures consisting of self-sustained spike-wave discharges (SWDs) for about 10% of stimulation trials. The probability of inducing seizures was frequency-dependent, reaching a maximum at 10 Hz. 2) Local field potential power before stimulation and response amplitudes during stimulation both predicted seizure induction, demonstrating a modulatory effect of brain states and neural excitation levels. 3) Evoked responses during stimulation propagated as cortical waves, likely reaching the cortical focus, which in turn generated self-sustained SWDs after stimulation was terminated. Importantly, SWDs during induced and spontaneous seizures propagated with the same spatiotemporal dynamics. Our findings demonstrate that local rhythmic bursting of excitatory neurons in neocortex at particular frequencies, under susceptible ongoing brain states, is sufficient to trigger primary generalized seizures with stereotypical spatiotemporal dynamics. PMID:25552645

  1. Electrographic seizures in pediatric ICU patients

    PubMed Central

    Arndt, Daniel H.; Carpenter, Jessica L.; Chapman, Kevin E.; Cornett, Karen M.; Gallentine, William B.; Giza, Christopher C.; Goldstein, Joshua L.; Hahn, Cecil D.; Lerner, Jason T.; Loddenkemper, Tobias; Matsumoto, Joyce H.; McBain, Kristin; Nash, Kendall B.; Payne, Eric; Sánchez, Sarah M.; Fernández, Iván Sánchez; Shults, Justine; Williams, Korwyn; Yang, Amy; Dlugos, Dennis J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: We aimed to determine the incidence of electrographic seizures in children in the pediatric intensive care unit who underwent EEG monitoring, risk factors for electrographic seizures, and whether electrographic seizures were associated with increased odds of mortality. Methods: Eleven sites in North America retrospectively reviewed a total of 550 consecutive children in pediatric intensive care units who underwent EEG monitoring. We collected data on demographics, diagnoses, clinical seizures, mental status at EEG onset, EEG background, interictal epileptiform discharges, electrographic seizures, intensive care unit length of stay, and in-hospital mortality. Results: Electrographic seizures occurred in 162 of 550 subjects (30%), of which 61 subjects (38%) had electrographic status epilepticus. Electrographic seizures were exclusively subclinical in 59 of 162 subjects (36%). A multivariable logistic regression model showed that independent risk factors for electrographic seizures included younger age, clinical seizures prior to EEG monitoring, an abnormal initial EEG background, interictal epileptiform discharges, and a diagnosis of epilepsy. Subjects with electrographic status epilepticus had greater odds of in-hospital death, even after adjusting for EEG background and neurologic diagnosis category. Conclusions: Electrographic seizures are common among children in the pediatric intensive care unit, particularly those with specific risk factors. Electrographic status epilepticus occurs in more than one-third of children with electrographic seizures and is associated with higher in-hospital mortality. PMID:23794680

  2. Lipopolysaccharide potentiates hyperthermia-induced seizures

    PubMed Central

    Eun, Baik-Lin; Abraham, Jayne; Mlsna, Lauren; Kim, Min Jung; Koh, Sookyong

    2015-01-01

    Background Prolonged febrile seizures (FS) have both acute and long-lasting effects on the developing brain. Because FS are often associated with peripheral infection, we aimed to develop a preclinical model of FS that simulates fever and immune activation in order to facilitate the implementation of targeted therapy after prolonged FS in young children. Methods The innate immune activator lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was administered to postnatal day 14 rat (200 μg/kg) and mouse (100 μg/kg) pups 2–2.5 h prior to hyperthermic seizures (HT) induced by hair dryer or heat lamp. To determine whether simulation of infection enhances neuronal excitability, latency to seizure onset, threshold temperature and total number of seizures were quantified. Behavioral seizures were correlated with electroencephalographic changes in rat pups. Seizure-induced proinflammatory cytokine production was assessed in blood samples at various time points after HT. Seizure-induced microglia activation in the hippocampus was quantified using Cx3cr1GFP/+ mice. Results Lipopolysaccharide priming increased susceptibility of rats and mice to hyperthemic seizures and enhanced seizure-induced proinflammatory cytokine production and microglial activation. Conclusions Peripheral inflammation appears to work synergistically with hyperthermia to potentiate seizures and to exacerbate seizure-induced immune responses. By simulating fever, a regulated increase in body temperature from an immune challenge, we developed a more clinically relevant animal model of prolonged FS. PMID:26357586

  3. Nonlinear analysis of EEG for epileptic seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Hively, L.M.; Clapp, N.E.; Daw, C.S.; Lawkins, W.F.; Eisenstadt, M.L.

    1995-04-01

    We apply chaotic time series analysis (CTSA) to human electroencephalogram (EEG) data. Three epoches were examined: epileptic seizure, non-seizure, and transition from non-seizure to seizure. The CTSA tools were applied to four forms of these data: raw EEG data (e-data), artifact data (f-data) via application of a quadratic zero-phase filter of the raw data, artifact-filtered data (g- data) and that was the residual after subtracting f-data from e-data, and a low-pass-filtered version (h-data) of g-data. Two different seizures were analyzed for the same patient. Several nonlinear measures uniquely indicate an epileptic seizure in both cases, including an abrupt decrease in the time per wave cycle in f-data, an abrupt increase in the Kolmogorov entropy and in the correlation dimension for e-h data, and an abrupt increase in the correlation dimension for e-h data. The transition from normal to seizure state also is characterized by distinctly different trends in the nonlinear measures for each seizure and may be potential seizure predictors for this patient. Surrogate analysis of e-data shows that statistically significant nonlinear structure is present during the non-seizure, transition , and seizure epoches.

  4. Localizing epileptic seizure onsets with Granger causality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Bhim M.; Epstein, Charles M.; Dhamala, Mukesh

    2013-09-01

    Accurate localization of the epileptic seizure onset zones (SOZs) is crucial for successful surgery, which usually depends on the information obtained from intracranial electroencephalography (IEEG) recordings. The visual criteria and univariate methods of analyzing IEEG recordings have not always produced clarity on the SOZs for resection and ultimate seizure freedom for patients. Here, to contribute to improving the localization of the SOZs and to understanding the mechanism of seizure propagation over the brain, we applied spectral interdependency methods to IEEG time series recorded from patients during seizures. We found that the high-frequency (>80 Hz) Granger causality (GC) occurs before the onset of any visible ictal activity and causal relationships involve the recording electrodes where clinically identifiable seizures later develop. These results suggest that high-frequency oscillatory network activities precede and underlie epileptic seizures, and that GC spectral measures derived from IEEG can assist in precise delineation of seizure onset times and SOZs.

  5. Identification of atypical flight patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statler, Irving C. (Inventor); Ferryman, Thomas A. (Inventor); Amidan, Brett G. (Inventor); Whitney, Paul D. (Inventor); White, Amanda M. (Inventor); Willse, Alan R. (Inventor); Cooley, Scott K. (Inventor); Jay, Joseph Griffith (Inventor); Lawrence, Robert E. (Inventor); Mosbrucker, Chris (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Method and system for analyzing aircraft data, including multiple selected flight parameters for a selected phase of a selected flight, and for determining when the selected phase of the selected flight is atypical, when compared with corresponding data for the same phase for other similar flights. A flight signature is computed using continuous-valued and discrete-valued flight parameters for the selected flight parameters and is optionally compared with a statistical distribution of other observed flight signatures, yielding atypicality scores for the same phase for other similar flights. A cluster analysis is optionally applied to the flight signatures to define an optimal collection of clusters. A level of atypicality for a selected flight is estimated, based upon an index associated with the cluster analysis.

  6. Seizure-induced disinhibition of the HPA axis increases seizure susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    O'Toole, Kate K.; Hooper, Andrew; Wakefield, Seth; Maguire, Jamie

    2013-01-01

    Stress is the most commonly reported precipitating factor for seizures. The proconvulsant actions of stress hormones are thought to mediate the effects of stress on seizure susceptibility. Interestingly, epileptic patients have increased basal levels of stress hormones, including corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and corticosterone, which are further increased following seizures. Given the proconvulsant actions of stress hormones, we proposed that seizure-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis may contribute to future seizure susceptibility. Consistent with this hypothesis, our data demonstrate that pharmacological induction of seizures in mice with kainic acid or pilocarpine increases circulating levels of the stress hormone, corticosterone, and exogenous corticosterone administration is sufficient to increase seizure susceptibility. However, the mechanism(s) whereby seizures activate the HPA axis remain unknown. Here we demonstrate that seizure-induced activation of the HPA axis involves compromised GABAergic control of CRH neurons, which govern HPA axis function. Following seizure activity, there is a collapse of the chloride gradient due to changes in NKCC1 and KCC2 expression, resulting in reduced amplitude of sIPSPs and even depolarizing effects of GABA on CRH neurons. Seizure-induced activation of the HPA axis results in future seizure susceptibility which can be blocked by treatment with an NKCC1 inhibitor, bumetanide, or blocking the CRH signaling with Antalarmin. These data suggest that compromised GABAergic control of CRH neurons following an initial seizure event may cause hyperexcitability of the HPA axis and increase future seizure susceptibility. PMID:24225328

  7. Do atypical antipsychotics improve cognition?

    PubMed

    Walters, Yasmin; Agius, Mark

    2014-11-01

    One of the major symptoms of schizophrenia is cognitive deficits. Despite this, these impairments still lack an effective treatment. It was hoped that atypical antipsychotics would treat these symptoms better than their first generation counterparts, but unfortunately the likes of quetiapine and clozapine did not do so. Asenapine and lurasidone, two newer atypicals, have shown promise, as have agents that interact with the glutamate system. Another approach has been to add agents such as modafinil. More research is needed to consolidate the findings of these studies. PMID:25413554

  8. Therapeutic Outcomes and Prognostic Factors in Childhood Absence Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye Ryun; Kim, Gun-Ha; Eun, So-Hee; Eun, Baik-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) is one of the most common types of pediatric epilepsy. It is generally treated with ethosuximide (ESM), valproic acid (VPA), or lamotrigine (LTG), but the efficacy and adverse effects of these drugs remain controversial. This study compared initial therapy treatment outcomes, including VPA-LTG combination, and assessed clinical factors that may predict treatment response and prognosis. Methods Sixty-seven patients with typical CAE were retrospectively enrolled at the Korea University Medical Center. We reviewed patients' clinical characteristics, including age of seizure onset, seizure-free interval, duration of seizure-free period, freedom from treatment failure, breakthrough seizures frequency, and electroencephalogram (EEG) findings. Results The age at seizure onset was 7.9±2.7 years (mean±SD), and follow-up duration was 4.4±3.7 years. Initially, 22 children were treated with ESM (32.8%), 23 with VPA (34.3%), 14 with LTG (20.9%), and 8 with VPA-LTG combination (11.9%). After 48 months of therapy, the rate of freedom from treatment failure was significantly higher for the VPA-LTG combination therapy than in the three monotherapy groups (p=0.012). The treatment dose administrated in the VPA-LTG combination group was less than that in the VPA and LTG monotherapy groups. The shorter interval to loss of 3-Hz spike-and-wave complexes and the presence of occipital intermittent rhythmic delta activity on EEG were significant factors predicting good treatment response. Conclusions This study showed that low-dose VPA-LTG combination therapy has a good efficacy and fewer side effects than other treatments, and it should thus be considered as a firstline therapy in absence epilepsy. PMID:26610892

  9. [Recurrent seizures of unknown aetiology].

    PubMed

    Krauß, Martha; Berkermann, Heiner; Ghadimi, Michael; Gaedcke, Jochen; Bürger, Tobias

    2016-04-01

    History and admission findings | A 41year old woman presented at our internistic clinic after treatment by an emergency doctor because of confusion and amnesia accompanied by a hypoglycaemic episode while driving her car. Only by giving continuous glucose intravenously a stable clinical state could be achieved. In her medical history she took Lamotrigin for 12 years since she had seizures of unknown aetiology. 16 years ago she had similar sudden attacks with confusion and hypoglycaemia. At that time thorough diagnostics at the clinic for internal medicine did not reveal any evidence for hyperinsulinaemia. While taking Lamotrigin the patient had no seizures or similar symptoms for 12 years. Treatment and course | In the present case we detected a tumor in the pancreas and a two-fold increased insulin secretion. Histopathological work-up of the removed tissue confirmed the suspected diagnosis of insulinoma. Postoperatively, Lamotrigin treatment was terminated. Since then the patient remained asymptomatic. PMID:27123728

  10. Peroxisomal disorders with infantile seizures.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jao-Shwann; Lu, Jyh-Feng

    2011-10-01

    Peroxisomes are organelles responsible for multiple metabolic pathways including the biosynthesis of plasmalogens and the oxidation of branched-chain as well as very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs). Peroxisomal disorders (PDs) are heterogeneous groups of diseases and affect many organs with varying degrees of involvement. Even pathogenetically distinct PDs share some common symptoms. However, several PDs have uniquely characteristic clinical findings. The durations of survival in PDs are also variable. Infants with PDs are usually presented with developmental delay, visual and hearing impairment. Generalized hypotonia is present in severe cases. Epileptic seizures are also a common characteristic of patients with certain PDs. Nonetheless, the classification and evolution of epilepsy in PDs have not been elucidated in detail. Here, we review the relevant literatures and provide an overview of PDs with particular emphasis on the characteristics of seizures in infants. PMID:21397417

  11. Proneurotrophins, seizures, and neuronal apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Wilma J

    2010-06-01

    Neurons respond to numerous factors in their environment that influence their survival and function during development and in the mature brain. Among these factors, the neurotrophins have been shown to support neuronal survival and function, acting primarily through the Trk family of receptor tyrosine kinases. However, recent studies have established that the uncleaved neurotrophin precursors, the proneurotrophins, can be secreted and induce apoptosis via the p75 neurotrophin receptor, suggesting that the balance of secreted mature and proneurotrophins has a critical impact on neuronal survival or death. Epileptic seizures elicit increases in both proneurotrophin secretion and p75(NTR) expression, shifting the balance of these factors toward signaling cell death. This review will discuss the evidence that this ligand-receptor system plays an important role in neuronal loss following seizures. PMID:20360602

  12. Environmental manipulations early in development alter seizure activity, Ih and HCN1 protein expression later in life.

    PubMed

    Schridde, Ulrich; Strauss, Ulf; Bräuer, Anja U; van Luijtelaar, Gilles

    2006-06-01

    Although absence epilepsy has a genetic origin, evidence from an animal model (Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rijswijk; WAG/Rij) suggests that seizures are sensitive to environmental manipulations. Here, we show that manipulations of the early rearing environment (neonatal handling, maternal deprivation) of WAG/Rij rats leads to a pronounced decrease in seizure activity later in life. Recent observations link seizure activity in WAG/Rij rats to the hyperpolarization-activated cation current (Ih) in the somatosensory cortex, the site of seizure generation. Therefore, we investigated whether the alterations in seizure activity between rats reared differently might be correlated with changes in Ih and its channel subunits hyperpolarization-activated cation channel HCN1, 2 and 4. Whole-cell recordings from layer 5 pyramidal neurons, in situ hybridization and Western blot of the somatosensory cortex revealed an increase in Ih and HCN1 in neonatal handled and maternal deprived, compared to control rats. The increase was specific to HCN1 protein expression and did not involve HCN2/4 protein expression, or mRNA expression of any of the subunits (HCN1, 2, 4). Our findings provide the first evidence that relatively mild changes in the neonatal environment have a long-term impact of absence seizures, Ih and HCN1, and suggest that an increase of Ih and HCN1 is associated with absence seizure reduction. Our findings shed new light on the role of Ih and HCN in brain functioning and development and demonstrate that genetically determined absence seizures are quite sensitive for early interventions. PMID:16820024

  13. Antipsychotic medication and seizures: a review.

    PubMed

    Hedges, Dawson; Jeppson, Kreg; Whitehead, Paul

    2003-07-01

    Both first-generation and second-generation antipsychotic medications can lower the seizure threshold, increasing the chances of seizure induction. This article reviews the published literature concerning the seizure-lowering effects of first- and second-generation antipsychotic medication. Unfortunately, rigorously controlled studies are relatively infrequent, and case reports form a large part of the available literature, limiting the confidence with which firm conclusions can be drawn. Of the first-generation antipsychotic medications, chlorpromazine appears to be associated with the greatest risk of seizure provocation, although other first-generation antipsychotics also lower seizure threshold. Conversely, molindone, haloperidol, fluphenazine, pimozide and trifluoperazine are associated with a lower risk of seizure induction. Clozapine is the second-generation antipsychotic most frequently associated with seizures, with risperidone appearing to confer a relatively low risk. Other factors such as history of seizure activity, concurrent use of other drugs that lower seizure threshold, rapid dose titration, slow drug metabolism, metabolic factors and drug-drug interactions appear to increase the chances of an antipsychotic medication inducing seizure activity. PMID:12973403

  14. Neonatal Seizures: Impact on Neurodevelopmental Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seok Kyu; Kadam, Shilpa D.

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal period is the most vulnerable time for the occurrence of seizures, and neonatal seizures often pose a clinical challenge both for their acute management and frequency of associated long-term co-morbidities. Etiologies of neonatal seizures are known to play a primary role in the anti-epileptic drug responsiveness and the long-term sequelae. Recent studies have suggested that burden of acute recurrent seizures in neonates may also impact chronic outcomes independent of the etiology. However, not many studies, either clinical or pre-clinical, have addressed the long-term outcomes of neonatal seizures in an etiology-specific manner. In this review, we briefly review the available clinical and pre-clinical research for long-term outcomes following neonatal seizures. As the most frequent cause of acquired neonatal seizures, we focus on the studies evaluating long-term effects of HIE-seizures with the goal to evaluate (1) what parameters evaluated during acute stages of neonatal seizures can reliably be used to predict long-term outcomes? and (2) what available clinical and pre-clinical data are available help determine importance of etiology vs. seizure burdens in long-term sequelae. PMID:26636052

  15. Smartphone applications for seizure management.

    PubMed

    Pandher, Puneet Singh; Bhullar, Karamdeep Kaur

    2016-06-01

    Technological advancements continue to provide innovative ways of enhancing patient care in medicine. In particular, the growing popularity of smartphone technology has seen the recent emergence of a myriad of healthcare applications (or apps) that promise to help shape the way in which health information is delivered to people worldwide. While limited research already exists on a range of such apps, our study is the first to examine the salient features of smartphone applications as they apply to the area of seizure management. For the purposes of this review, we conducted a search of the official online application stores of the five major smartphone platforms: iPhone, Android, Blackberry, Windows Mobile and Nokia-Symbian. Apps were included if they reported to contain some information or tools relating to seizure management and excluded if they were aimed exclusively at health professionals. A total of 28 applications met these criteria. Overall, we found an increasing number of epilepsy apps available on the smartphone market, but with only a minority offering comprehensive educational information alongside tools such as seizure diaries, medication tracking and/or video recording. PMID:25038202

  16. Aromatase inhibition, testosterone, and seizures.

    PubMed

    Harden, Cynthia; MacLusky, Neil J

    2004-04-01

    The effect of testosterone on brain excitability is unclear. The excitatory aspect of testosterone's action in the brain may be due to its conversion to estrogen via aromatase. We report herein a 61-year-old man with temporal lobe epilepsy and sexual dysfunction due to low testosterone levels. Use of an aromatase inhibitor, letrozole, normalized his testosterone level and improved his sexual functioning. Letrozole, in addition to standard antiseizure medication, was also associated with improved seizure control. This was sustained and, further, was associated with seizure exacerbation after withdrawing letrozole, and subsequent seizure improvement after restarting it. During the course of treatment, his serum testosterone level increased, sex hormone-binding globulin decreased (SHBG), luteinizing hormone (LH), and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels increased, while serum estradiol levels remained undetectable. Letrozole may, therefore, have produced a central alteration in the testosterone/estrogen ratio, thereby impairing estrogen-mediated feedback control of the pituitary, resulting in the observed increase in circulating LH and FSH levels. This experience suggests that aromatase inhibitors should be further investigated as a beneficial treatment modality for male patients with epilepsy. PMID:15123030

  17. Atypical cadherin negotiates a turn.

    PubMed

    Shi, Dongbo; Fujimori, Toshihiko; Uemura, Tadashi

    2013-07-15

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling is involved in many polarized cell behaviors. In this issue of Developmental Cell, Tatin et al. (2013) show that the atypical cadherin Celsr1 is transiently localized to cellular protrusions in lymphatic endothelial cells and acts to orient valve-forming cells perpendicular to the vessel axis. PMID:23867224

  18. Atypical moles: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Allen; Duffy, R Lamar

    2015-06-01

    Atypical moles are benign pigmented lesions. Although they are benign, they exhibit some of the clinical and histologic features of malignant melanoma. They are more common in fair-skinned individuals and in those with high sun exposure. Atypical moles are characterized by size of 6 mm or more at the greatest dimension, color variegation, border irregularity, and pebbled texture. They are associated with an increased risk of melanoma, warranting enhanced surveillance, especially in patients with more than 50 moles and a family history of melanoma. Because an individual lesion is unlikely to display malignant transformation, biopsy of all atypical moles is neither clinically beneficial nor cost-effective. The ABCDE (asymmetry, border irregularity, color unevenness, diameter of 6 mm or more, evolution) mnemonic is a valuable tool for clinicians and patients to identify lesions that could be melanoma. Also, according to the "ugly duckling" concept, benign moles tend to have a similar appearance, whereas an outlier with a different appearance is more likely to be undergoing malignant change. Atypical moles with changes suggestive of malignant melanoma should be biopsied, using an excisional method, if possible. PMID:26034853

  19. Mathematical modeling of encephalogram dynamics during epileptic seizure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sysoeva, M. V.; Sysoev, I. V.

    2012-02-01

    The problem of constructing a compact mathematical model representing various fragments of electroencephalograms (EEGs) during epileptic absence seizures is considered. Such a model would be useful for solving a number of practical tasks related to the clustering of time series, seeking for relationships between various leads, separating norm and pathology, etc. It is shown that an adequate model that takes into account the EEG structure can be constructed using nonuniform embedding. The dimensionality, degree of nonlinearity, and lags are selected based on an objective numerical criterion.

  20. Patterns of human local cerebral glucose metabolism during epileptic seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J. Jr.; Kuhl, D.E.; Phelps, M.E.

    1982-10-01

    Ictal patterns of local cerebral metabolic rate have been studied in epileptic patients by positron computed tomography with /sup 18/F-labeled 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose. Partial seizures were associated with activation of anatomic structures unique to each patient studied. Ictal increases and decreases in local cerebral metabolism were observed. Scans performed during generalized convulsions induced by electroshock demonstrated a diffuse ictal increase and postictal decrease in cerebral metabolism. Petit mal absences were associated with a diffuse increase in cerebral metabolic rate. The ictal fluorodeoxyglucose patterns obtained from patients do not resemble autoradiographic patterns obtained from common experimental animal models of epilepsy.

  1. Absence status associated with focal activity and polydipsia-induced hyponatremia

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Hideki; Akechi, Tatsuo; Furukawa, Toshi A

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of de novo absence status associated with focal discharge and polydipsia-induced hyponatremia. Nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) is classified as absence status or complex partial status. Absence status is characterized by bilateral synchronized spike and wave complex bursts and a variety of conscious disturbances. Possible precipitating factors for NCSE include benzodiazepine withdrawal, excessive use of psychotropic drugs, and electrolyte imbalances. Hyponatremia is a rare precipitating factor. In this case, the patient was 59 years old and had suffered from primary insomnia but had no history of epilepsy. NCSE improved by means of saline infusion. However after recovery from NCSE EEG revealed some spikes in the left frontal area. Absence seizures can also show generalized spike and slow waves, and cases of focal lesion-associated absence seizures have been reported. Although absence seizures and absence status are two distinct conditions, they should not be considered together. We assumed that hyponatremia induced by polydipsia precipitated epileptogenicity in the left frontal area, and then focal activity secondarily generalized and resulted in absence status. PMID:18728738

  2. Differential Seizure Response in Two Models of Cortical Heterotopia

    PubMed Central

    Gabel, Lisa A.; Manglani, Monica; Ibanez, Natalia; Roberts, Jessica; Ramos, Raddy; Rosen, Glenn D.

    2013-01-01

    Malformations of cortical development (MCD) are linked to epilepsy in humans. MCD encompass a broad spectrum of malformations, which occur as the principal pathology or a secondary disruption. Recently, Rosen et al. (2012) reported that BXD29-Trl4lps-2J/J mice have subcortical nodular heterotopias with partial agenesis of the corpus callosum (p-ACC). Additionally Ramos and colleagues (2008) demonstrated that C57BL/10J mice exhibit cortical heterotopias with no additional cortical abnormalities. We examined the seizure susceptibility of these mice to determine if the presence (BXD29-Trl4lps-2J/J) or absence (C57BL/10J) of p-ACC, in strains with MCD, confers a differential response to chemi-convulsive treatment. Our results indicate that C57BL/10J mice with layer I heterotopia are more susceptible, whereas BXD29-Trl4lps-2J/J mice with more severe subcortical nodular heterotopia and p-ACC are more resistant to seizure behavior induced by pentylenetetrazole. These data suggest that p-ACC may confer seizure resistance in models of MCD. PMID:23201443

  3. Doxylamine toxicity: seizure, rhabdomyolysis and false positive urine drug screen for methadone.

    PubMed

    Syed, Husnain; Som, Sumit; Khan, Nazia; Faltas, Wael

    2009-01-01

    The present report highlights the possible adverse effects of doxylamine, a common over the counter sleep aid. Doxylamine is an antihistamine that at toxic doses can cause anticholinergic effects, including seizures, rhabdomyolysis and death. The following case describes a patient with doxylamine toxicity who presented with seizure and confusion. Our patient was managed symptomatically, and remained otherwise stable throughout his hospitalisation. This case is atypical in terms of a delayed rhabdomyolysis and a false positive urine drug screen test for methadone. There is evidence that doxylamine at toxic levels can lead to false positives for methadone and phencyclidine testing using immunoassay-based urine drug screen kits. Urine drug screen testing on patients who are hospitalised is typically performed using immunoassays. However, in certain cases confirmatory secondary testing may be required. Doxylamine is prone to abuse and knowledge of the clinical presentation of its toxicity and the management of acute overdose can be life-saving. PMID:21686586

  4. Doxylamine toxicity: seizure, rhabdomyolysis and false positive urine drug screen for methadone

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Husnain; Som, Sumit; Khan, Nazia; Faltas, Wael

    2009-01-01

    The present report highlights the possible adverse effects of doxylamine, a common over the counter sleep aid. Doxylamine is an antihistamine that at toxic doses can cause anticholinergic effects, including seizures, rhabdomyolysis and death. The following case describes a patient with doxylamine toxicity who presented with seizure and confusion. Our patient was managed symptomatically, and remained otherwise stable throughout his hospitalisation. This case is atypical in terms of a delayed rhabdomyolysis and a false positive urine drug screen test for methadone. There is evidence that doxylamine at toxic levels can lead to false positives for methadone and phencyclidine testing using immunoassay-based urine drug screen kits. Urine drug screen testing on patients who are hospitalised is typically performed using immunoassays. However, in certain cases confirmatory secondary testing may be required. Doxylamine is prone to abuse and knowledge of the clinical presentation of its toxicity and the management of acute overdose can be life-saving. PMID:21686586

  5. Marked Seizure Reduction after MCT Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Azar, Nabil J.

    2013-01-01

    We report the case of a 43-year-old man with history of nonsurgical partial epilepsy who previously failed multiple trials of antiepileptic drugs. Medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) were added to his regular diet in the form of pure oil. Subsequently, his seizure frequency was markedly reduced from multiple daily seizures to one seizure every four days. His seizures recurred after transient discontinuation of MCT over a period of ten days. His seizure improvement was achieved at a dose of four tablespoons of MCT twice daily with no reported side effects. He developed significant diarrhea and flatulence at higher doses. We conclude that MCT oil supplementation to regular diet may provide better seizure control in some patients. MCT oil supplementation may be a more tolerable alternative to the standard ketogenic diet. PMID:24383019

  6. Emergency Management of Seizures in the School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Dell, Christine; O'Hara, Kathryn; Kiel, Sarah; McCullough, Kathleen

    2007-01-01

    Effective seizure management in the school setting is a critical issue for students with seizures, as well as their parents, classmates, and school personnel. The unpredictable nature of seizures and the potential outcomes of experiencing a seizure in school are sources of anxiety for students with seizures. The ability to respond appropriately to…

  7. Emergency Management of Seizures in the School Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Dell, Christine; O'Hara, Kathryn; Kiel, Sarah; McCullough, Kathleen

    2007-01-01

    Effective seizure management in the school setting is a critical issue for students with seizures, as well as their parents, classmates, and school personnel. The unpredictable nature of seizures and the potential outcomes of experiencing a seizure in school are sources of anxiety for students with seizures. The ability to respond appropriately to

  8. 19 CFR 162.22 - Seizure of conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seizure of conveyances. 162.22 Section 162.22... TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Seizures § 162.22 Seizure of conveyances. (a) General applicability. If it shall appear to any officer authorized to board conveyances and make seizures that...

  9. 19 CFR 162.21 - Responsibility and authority for seizures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Responsibility and authority for seizures. 162.21...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Seizures § 162.21 Responsibility and authority for seizures. (a) Seizures by Customs officers. Property may be seized, if available, by...

  10. 15 CFR 904.501 - Notice of seizure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Notice of seizure. 904.501 Section 904... Seizure and Forfeiture Procedures § 904.501 Notice of seizure. Within 60 days from the date of the seizure, NOAA will serve the Notice of Seizure as provided in § 904.3 to the owner or consignee, if known...

  11. 19 CFR 162.21 - Responsibility and authority for seizures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Responsibility and authority for seizures. 162.21...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Seizures § 162.21 Responsibility and authority for seizures. (a) Seizures by Customs officers. Property may be seized, if available, by...

  12. 15 CFR 904.501 - Notice of seizure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Notice of seizure. 904.501 Section 904... Seizure and Forfeiture Procedures § 904.501 Notice of seizure. Within 60 days from the date of the seizure, NOAA will serve the Notice of Seizure as provided in § 904.3 to the owner or consignee, if known...

  13. 19 CFR 162.22 - Seizure of conveyances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Seizure of conveyances. 162.22 Section 162.22... TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Seizures § 162.22 Seizure of conveyances. (a) General applicability. If it shall appear to any officer authorized to board conveyances and make seizures that...

  14. Possible causes of seizure after spine surgery

    PubMed Central

    Habibi, Zohreh; Nejat, Farideh; El Khashab, Mostafa

    2010-01-01

    Seizure after laminectomy for spinal procedure is very rare and has not been reported after lipomyelomeningocele surgery beforehand. Here, two cases of seizure following laminectomy for lipomyelomeningocele are reported. The exact etiology of the event is unknown but anesthetic material, pneumocephalus, intracranial hypotension subsequent to cerebrospinal fluid leakage after spinal procedures, spinal-induced seizure and the potential toxic effect of fat molecules could be considered. PMID:21042506

  15. An Scn1a epilepsy mutation in Scn8a alters seizure susceptibility and behavior.

    PubMed

    Makinson, Christopher D; Dutt, Karoni; Lin, Frank; Papale, Ligia A; Shankar, Anupama; Barela, Arthur J; Liu, Robert; Goldin, Alan L; Escayg, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the role of SCN8A in epilepsy and behavior is critical in light of recently identified human SCN8A epilepsy mutations. We have previously demonstrated that Scn8a(med) and Scn8a(med-jo) mice carrying mutations in the Scn8a gene display increased resistance to flurothyl and kainic acid-induced seizures; however, they also exhibit spontaneous absence seizures. To further investigate the relationship between altered SCN8A function and epilepsy, we introduced the SCN1A-R1648H mutation, identified in a family with generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+), into the corresponding position (R1627H) of the mouse Scn8a gene. Heterozygous R1627H mice exhibited increased resistance to some forms of pharmacologically and electrically induced seizures and the mutant Scn8a allele ameliorated the phenotype of Scn1a-R1648H mutants. Hippocampal slices from heterozygous R1627H mice displayed decreased bursting behavior compared to wild-type littermates. Paradoxically, at the homozygous level, R1627H mice did not display increased seizure resistance and were susceptible to audiogenic seizures. We furthermore observed increased hippocampal pyramidal cell excitability in heterozygous and homozygous Scn8a-R1627H mutants, and decreased interneuron excitability in heterozygous Scn8a-R1627H mutants. These results expand the phenotypes associated with disruption of the Scn8a gene and demonstrate that an Scn8a mutation can both confer seizure protection and increase seizure susceptibility. PMID:26410685

  16. Importance of cardiological evaluation for first seizures

    PubMed Central

    Choong, Ho; Hanna, Ibrahim; Beran, Roy

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports two cases of long QT syndrome (LQTS) which presented with seizures as their initial feature. Case 1, AB was seen in emergency department with post-partum seizure, discharged and re-presented following cardiac arrest associated with LQTS. Case 2, CD presented initially with tonic-clonic seizure and because of experience with AB, CD was assessed for LQTS which was subsequently confirmed. The legal medicine experience re Dobler v Halverson, which involved a young boy with LQTS, who suffered cardiac arrest without prior diagnosis of LQTS, has reinforced the requirement to seriously consider LQTS as an aetiological factor in first seizure presentations. PMID:25879012

  17. Seizures and X-linked intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, Roger E.; Holden, Kenton R.; Rogers, R. Curtis; Schwartz, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Intellectual disability occurs as an isolated X-linked trait and as a component of recognizable X-linked syndromes in the company of somatic, metabolic, neuromuscular, or behavioral abnormalities. Seizures accompany intellectual disability in almost half of these X-linked disorders. The spectrum of seizures found in the X-linked intellectual disability syndromes is broad, varying in time of onset, type of seizure, and response to anticonvulsant therapy. The majority of the genes associated with XLID and seizures have now been identified. PMID:22377486

  18. Reactive Astrogliosis Causes the Development of Spontaneous Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Buckingham, Susan C.; Boni, Jessica L.; Campbell, Susan L.; Danbolt, Niels C.; Riedemann, Therese; Sutor, Bernd; Sontheimer, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common chronic neurologic diseases, yet approximately one-third of affected patients do not respond to anticonvulsive drugs that target neurons or neuronal circuits. Reactive astrocytes are commonly found in putative epileptic foci and have been hypothesized to be disease contributors because they lose essential homeostatic capabilities. However, since brain pathology induces astrocytes to become reactive, it is difficult to distinguish whether astrogliosis is a cause or a consequence of epileptogenesis. We now present a mouse model of genetically induced, widespread chronic astrogliosis after conditional deletion of β1-integrin (Itgβ1). In these mice, astrogliosis occurs in the absence of other pathologies and without BBB breach or significant inflammation. Electroencephalography with simultaneous video recording revealed that these mice develop spontaneous seizures during the first six postnatal weeks of life and brain slices show neuronal hyperexcitability. This was not observed in mice with neuronal-targeted β1-integrin deletion, supporting the hypothesis that astrogliosis is sufficient to induce epileptic seizures. Whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from astrocytes further suggest that the heightened excitability was associated with impaired astrocytic glutamate uptake. Moreover, the relative expression of the cation-chloride cotransporters (CCC) NKCC1 (Slc12a2) and KCC2 (Slc12a5), which are responsible for establishing the neuronal Cl− gradient that governs GABAergic inhibition were altered and the NKCC1 inhibitor bumetanide eliminated seizures in a subgroup of mice. These data suggest that a shift in the relative expression of neuronal NKCC1 and KCC2, similar to that observed in immature neurons during development, may contribute to astrogliosis-associated seizures. PMID:25716834

  19. Seizure exacerbation in two patients with focal epilepsy following marijuana cessation.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Manu; Santos-Sanchez, Carlos; Hess, Christopher P; Kabir, Arif A; Garcia, Paul A

    2012-12-01

    While animal models of epilepsy suggest that exogenous cannabinoids may have anticonvulsant properties, scant evidence exists for these compounds' efficacy in humans. Here, we report on two patients whose focal epilepsy was nearly controlled through regular outpatient marijuana use. Both stopped marijuana upon admission to our epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU) and developed a dramatic increase in seizure frequency documented by video-EEG telemetry. These seizures occurred in the absence of other provocative procedures, including changes to anticonvulsant medications. We review these cases and discuss mechanisms for the potentially anticonvulsant properties of cannabis, based on a review of the literature. PMID:23159379

  20. Comparative proteomic approach in rat model of absence epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gürol, Gönül; Demiralp, Duygu Özel; Yılmaz, Ayça Kasapoğlu; Akman, Özlem; Ateş, Nurbay; Karson, Ayşe

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate cellular proteins in the pathogenesis of the genetic rat model of absence epilepsy. Protein spots were identified with peptide mass fingerprinting analysis using matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry. Data were gathered from the frontoparietal cortex and thalamus of Wistar Albino Glaxo/Rij (WAG/Rij) and Wistar by using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE). Six proteins (Clathrin light chain-A protein, Transmembrane EMP24 Domain-Containing Protein, Stathmin-4, Myosin Light Chain4, Rheb, phosphoserine phosphatase) were found to be differentially expressed in the frontoparietal cortex of WAG/Rij and Wistar rats in both age groups. Another set of six proteins (Protein FAM89A and Oasl1, Gemin2, NuDEL1, Pur-beta, 3-alpha HSD) were found to be differentially expressed in the thalamus of WAG/Rij and Wistar rats. Findings from the frontoparietal cortex suggest the presence of altered serine metabolism and increased vesicular trafficking in the frontoparietal cortex of WAG/Rij rats compared with Wistar rats. These differences in the protein levels might reflect the crucial role of these proteins and related pathways in the generation of absence seizures. In the thalamic specimens, age-dependent changes in protein expression were remarkable, suggesting that this phenomenon may be a precursor or a consequence of absence seizures. Our findings further highlight the potential role of the mTOR signaling pathway in absence epilepsy. PMID:25323782

  1. Optogenetic control of thalamus as a tool for interrupting penicillin induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Yechao Han; Feiqiang Ma; Hongbao Li; Yueming Wang; Kedi Xu

    2015-08-01

    Penicillin epilepsy model, whose discharge resembles that of human absence epilepsy, is one of the most useful acute experimental epilepsy models. Though closed-loop optogenetic strategy of interrupting seizures was proved sufficient to switch off epilepsy by controlling thalamus in the post-lesion partial chronic epilepsy model, doubts still exist in absence epilepsy attenuation through silencing thalamus. Here we directly arrested the thalamus to modulate penicillin-induced absence seizures through pseudorandom responsive stimulation on eNpHR-transfected rats. Our data suggested that the duration of epileptiform bursts under light conditions, compared with no light conditions, did not increase or decrease when modulated specific eNpHR-expressing neurons in thalamus. PMID:26737807

  2. Atypical Unilateral Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome Mimicking a Middle Cerebral Artery Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yang-Je; Park, Mina; Lee, Seung Koo

    2015-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is usually a reversible clinical and radiological entity associated with typical features on brain MR or CT imaging. However, the not-so-uncommon atypical radiological presentations of the condition are also present and they may go unrecognised as they are confused with other conditions. Here, we report a very rare case of atypical, unilateral PRES in a 49-year-old uremic, post-transplant female patient who presented with seizures. Initial MRI showed high-grade occlusion of the left middle cerebral artery (MCA) and lesions suggestive of subacute infarction in the ipsilateral frontotemporoparietal lobe. Patient symptoms had resolved a day after the onset without any specific treatment but early follow-up CT findings suggested hemorrhagic transformation. Follow-up MRI performed 2 years later showed complete disappearence of the lesions and persisting MCA occlusion. PMID:26356795

  3. In vivo imaging of seizure activity in a novel developmental seizure model.

    PubMed

    Hewapathirane, D Sesath; Dunfield, Derek; Yen, Wesley; Chen, Simon; Haas, Kurt

    2008-06-01

    The immature brain is exceptionally susceptible to seizures. However, it remains unclear whether seizures occurring during development affect critical processes underlying neural circuit formation, leading to long-term functional consequences. Here we characterize a novel in vivo model system of developmental seizures based on the transparent albino Xenopus laevis tadpole, which allows direct examination of seizure activity, and seizure-induced effects on neuronal development within the intact unanesthetized brain. Pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), kainic acid, bicuculline, picrotoxin, 4-aminopyridine, and pilocarpine were tested for their ability to induce behavioral seizures in freely swimming tadpoles when bath applied. All six chemoconvulsants consistently induced similar patterns of abnormal behavior in a dose-dependent manner, characterized by convulsive clonus-like motor patterns with periods of behavioral arrest. Extracellular field recordings demonstrated rhythmic synchronous epileptiform electrographic responses induced by convulsants irrespective of mechanism of action, that could be terminated by the anti-epileptic drug valproate. PTZ-induced seizures were further characterized using in vivo two-photon fluorescence imaging of neuronal calcium dynamics, in unanesthetized immobilized tadpoles. Imaging of calcium dynamics during PTZ-induced seizures revealed waves of neural activity propagating through large populations of neurons within the brain. Analysis of single-cell responses demonstrated distinct synchronized high-amplitude calcium spikes not observed under baseline conditions. Similar to other developmental seizure models, prolonged seizures failed to induce marked neuronal death within the brain, detected by cellular propidium iodide incorporation in vivo or TUNEL labeling. This novel developmental seizure model system has distinct advantages for controlled seizure induction, and direct visualization of both seizure activity and seizure-induced effects on individual developing neurons within the intact unanesthetized brain. Such a system is necessary to address important questions relating to the long-term impact of common perinatal seizures on developing neural circuits. PMID:18402939

  4. Tardive or Atypical Tourette's Disorder in a Population with Down Syndrome?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Myers, Beverly; Pueschel, Siegfried M.

    1995-01-01

    In a population of 425 individuals with Down's syndrome, 5 persons (1.2%) were identified as having Tourette's disorder. The lack of interrelationship between Down's syndrome and Tourette's disorder argues against an atypical Tourette's disorder. Diagnoses of tardive Tourette's disorder were based on absence of family history of Tourette's, late…

  5. Atypical idiopathic scoliosis in childhood.

    PubMed

    Barnes, P D

    1996-09-01

    Scoliosis, common in preadolescent females is a finding which warrants investigation in any other age group or if the clinical or neuroimaging features are atypical even in the preadolescent female. The cause of scoliosis are numerous but include several important conditions some of which are treatable and some of which are genetic. A rational approach to sequencing the neuroimaging studies to be used is based on what the clinical suspicions are and the results of the initial studies. PMID:8883160

  6. Atypical centrioles during sexual reproduction.

    PubMed

    Avidor-Reiss, Tomer; Khire, Atul; Fishman, Emily L; Jo, Kyoung H

    2015-01-01

    Centrioles are conserved, self-replicating, microtubule-based, 9-fold symmetric subcellular organelles that are essential for proper cell division and function. Most cells have two centrioles and maintaining this number of centrioles is important for animal development and physiology. However, how animals gain their first two centrioles during reproduction is only partially understood. It is well established that in most animals, the centrioles are contributed to the zygote by the sperm. However, in humans and many animals, the sperm centrioles are modified in their structure and protein composition, or they appear to be missing altogether. In these animals, the origin of the first centrioles is not clear. Here, we review various hypotheses on how centrioles are gained during reproduction and describe specialized functions of the zygotic centrioles. In particular, we discuss a new and atypical centriole found in sperm and zygote, called the proximal centriole-like structure (PCL). We also discuss another type of atypical centriole, the "zombie" centriole, which is degenerated but functional. Together, the presence of centrioles, PCL, and zombie centrioles suggests a universal mechanism of centriole inheritance among animals and new causes of infertility. Since the atypical centrioles of sperm and zygote share similar functions with typical centrioles in somatic cells, they can provide unmatched insight into centriole biology. PMID:25883936

  7. Atypical centrioles during sexual reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Avidor-Reiss, Tomer; Khire, Atul; Fishman, Emily L.; Jo, Kyoung H.

    2015-01-01

    Centrioles are conserved, self-replicating, microtubule-based, 9-fold symmetric subcellular organelles that are essential for proper cell division and function. Most cells have two centrioles and maintaining this number of centrioles is important for animal development and physiology. However, how animals gain their first two centrioles during reproduction is only partially understood. It is well established that in most animals, the centrioles are contributed to the zygote by the sperm. However, in humans and many animals, the sperm centrioles are modified in their structure and protein composition, or they appear to be missing altogether. In these animals, the origin of the first centrioles is not clear. Here, we review various hypotheses on how centrioles are gained during reproduction and describe specialized functions of the zygotic centrioles. In particular, we discuss a new and atypical centriole found in sperm and zygote, called the proximal centriole-like structure (PCL). We also discuss another type of atypical centriole, the “zombie” centriole, which is degenerated but functional. Together, the presence of centrioles, PCL, and zombie centrioles suggests a universal mechanism of centriole inheritance among animals and new causes of infertility. Since the atypical centrioles of sperm and zygote share similar functions with typical centrioles in somatic cells, they can provide unmatched insight into centriole biology. PMID:25883936

  8. Viscum Album in the Treatment of a Girl With Refractory Childhood Absence Epilepsy.

    PubMed

    von Schoen-Angerer, Tido; Madeleyn, René; Kienle, Gunver; Kiene, Helmut; Vagedes, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Viscum album (European mistletoe) extracts have known immunomodulatory effects but little data exist on anticonvulsant activity despite its usefulness having been reported for centuries. A 4½-year-old girl with childhood absence epilepsy and global developmental delay was treated with different antiepileptic drugs and ketogenic diet but failed to become seizure free over a 2-year period. She also received different herbal remedies as part of an integrative medicine approach. Initial improvement occurred on valproate-ethosuximide, a further improvement was seen after adding clobazam to valproate. Final cessation of absence activity occurred after a dose increase of V album. She was still seizure free at the 12-month follow-up. V album appears to have been a necessary adjunct treatment for this child to become seizure free. We call on physicians to report their experiences of V album in epilepsy and suggest further study. PMID:25038133

  9. Predictive value of induction of psychogenic seizures by suggestion.

    PubMed

    Lancman, M E; Asconapé, J J; Craven, W J; Howard, G; Penry, J K

    1994-03-01

    Induction by suggestion has previously been reported to be effective in the diagnosis of psychogenic seizures (PS). However, the sensitivity and specificity of this procedure has not previously been studied. Results of induction of PS by suggestion were analyzed in 93 patients with purely PS. The diagnosis of PS was based on the recording of a clinical event on video-electroencephalography, the absence of clinical or electroencephalography the absence of clinical or electroencephalographic evidence of epilepsy, and the subsequent followup and withdrawal of anticonvulsants supporting the diagnosis of PS. A control-group was composed of 20 patients with epilepsy in which induction was tried. Both groups were comparable for age, sex, and educational level. Induction was performed following a standardized protocol. The test was carried out placing a colored patch on the neck. The test was considered positive when the induced clinical events were typical, according to a witness familiar with the patient's seizures. Induction was positive in 72 of 93 cases with PS and in none with epilepsy. Sensitivity of this test for the diagnosis of PS was 77.4%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100%, and negative predictive value 48.7%. PMID:8122889

  10. Seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Looking for Health Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Zika & Pregnancy: What ... your child: has difficulty breathing turns bluish in color has had a head injury seems ill has ...

  11. Treatment of drug-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsien-Yi; Albertson, Timothy E; Olson, Kent R

    2016-03-01

    Seizures are a common complication of drug intoxication, and up to 9% of status epilepticus cases are caused by a drug or poison. While the specific drugs associated with drug-induced seizures may vary by geography and change over time, common reported causes include antidepressants, stimulants and antihistamines. Seizures occur generally as a result of inadequate inhibitory influences (e.g., gamma aminobutyric acid, GABA) or excessive excitatory stimulation (e.g. glutamate) although many other neurotransmitters play a role. Most drug-induced seizures are self-limited. However, status epilepticus occurs in up to 10% of cases. Prolonged or recurrent seizures can lead to serious complications and require vigorous supportive care and anticonvulsant drugs. Benzodiazepines are generally accepted as the first line anticonvulsant therapy for drug-induced seizures. If benzodiazepines fail to halt seizures promptly, second line drugs include barbiturates and propofol. If isoniazid poisoning is a possibility, pyridoxine is given. Continuous infusion of one or more anticonvulsants may be required in refractory status epilepticus. There is no role for phenytoin in the treatment of drug-induced seizures. The potential role of ketamine and levetiracetam is promising but not established. PMID:26174744

  12. Seizure prediction for therapeutic devices: A review.

    PubMed

    Gadhoumi, Kais; Lina, Jean-Marc; Mormann, Florian; Gotman, Jean

    2016-02-15

    Research in seizure prediction has come a long way since its debut almost 4 decades ago. Early studies suffered methodological caveats leading to overoptimistic results and lack of statistical significance. The publication of guidelines addressing mainly the question of performance evaluation and statistical validation in seizure prediction helped revising the status of the field. While many studies failed to prove that above chance prediction is possible by applying these guidelines, other studies were successful. Methods based on EEG analysis using linear and nonlinear measures were reportedly successful in detecting preictal changes and using them to predict seizures above chance. In this review, we present a selection of studies in seizure prediction published in the last decade. The studies were selected based on the validity of the methods and the statistical significance of performance results. These results varied between studies and many showed acceptable levels of sensitivity and specificity that could be appealing for therapeutic devices. The relatively large prediction horizon and early preictal changes reported in most studies suggest that seizure prediction may work better in closed loop seizure control devices rather than as seizure advisory devices. The emergence of a large database of annotated long-term EEG recordings should help prospective assessment of prediction methods. Some questions remain to be addressed before large clinical trials involving seizure prediction can be carried out. PMID:26099549

  13. Focal cooling rapidly terminates experimental neocortical seizures.

    PubMed

    Yang, X F; Rothman, S M

    2001-06-01

    The efficacy of surgical resection for epilepsy is considerably lower for neocortical epilepsy than for temporal lobe epilepsy. We have explored focal cooling with a thermoelectric (Peltier) device as a potential therapy for neocortical epilepsy. After creating a cranial window in anesthetized rats, we induced seizures by injecting artificial cerebrospinal fluid containing 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), a potassium channel blocker. Within 30 minutes of 4-AP injection, animals developed recurrent seizures (duration 85.7 +/- 26.2 seconds; n = 10 rats) that persisted for 2 hours. When a small Peltier device cooled the exposed cortical surface to 20-25 degrees C at seizure onset, the seizure duration was reduced to 8.4 +/- 5.0 seconds (n = 10 rats; p < 0.001). When the Peltier device was placed close to the cortical surface, but not allowed to make physical contact, there was no effect on seizure duration (104.3 +/- 20.7 seconds; p > 0.05 compared to control). Interestingly, the duration of uncooled seizures was reduced after we allowed the cortex to rewarm from prior cooling. Histological examination of the cortex after cooling has shown no evidence of acute or delayed neuronal injury, and blood pressure and temperature remained stable. It may be possible to use Peltier devices for cortical mapping or, when seizure detection algorithms improve, for chronic seizure control. PMID:11409423

  14. Seizure Disorders: A Review for School Psychologists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sachs, Henry T.; Barrett, Rowland P.

    1995-01-01

    Recognizing possible seizure disorders, medication side-effects, behavioral and cognitive effects of seizures, and their treatments are important skills for school psychologists because they affect 500,000 United States school-aged children attending regular education. A knowledgeable school professional serves a critical role in integrating…

  15. Search and Seizure in the Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staros, Kari; Williams, Charles F.

    2007-01-01

    The Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution protects the people of the United States from unreasonable searches and seizures. On first reading, these protections seem clearly defined. The amendment was meant to protect Americans from the kinds of random searches and seizures that the colonists experienced under British colonial rule. Under…

  16. 43 CFR 3.16 - Seizure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Seizure. 3.16 Section 3.16 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior PRESERVATION OF AMERICAN ANTIQUITIES § 3.16 Seizure. Any object of antiquity taken, or collection made, on lands owned or controlled by the United States,...

  17. 43 CFR 3.16 - Seizure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Seizure. 3.16 Section 3.16 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior PRESERVATION OF AMERICAN ANTIQUITIES § 3.16 Seizure. Any object of antiquity taken, or collection made, on lands owned or controlled by the United States,...

  18. Searches and Seizures in Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lincoln, Eugene A.

    In "New Jersey v. T.L.O." the U.S. Supreme Court held that the prohibitions of the Fourth Amendment regarding unreasonable searches and seizures apply to student searches and seizures conducted by public school officials. However, the Court said the legality of a search should depend upon "reasonableness, under the circumstances" rather than…

  19. A Discriminative Approach to EEG Seizure Detection

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ashley N.; Sow, Daby; Biem, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Seizures are abnormal sudden discharges in the brain with signatures represented in electroencephalograms (EEG). The efficacy of the application of speech processing techniques to discriminate between seizure and non-seizure states in EEGs is reported. The approach accounts for the challenges of unbalanced datasets (seizure and non-seizure), while also showing a system capable of real-time seizure detection. The Minimum Classification Error (MCE) algorithm, which is a discriminative learning algorithm with wide-use in speech processing, is applied and compared with conventional classification techniques that have already been applied to the discrimination between seizure and non-seizure states in the literature. The system is evaluated on 22 pediatric patients multi-channel EEG recordings. Experimental results show that the application of speech processing techniques and MCE compare favorably with conventional classification techniques in terms of classification performance, while requiring less computational overhead. The results strongly suggests the possibility of deploying the designed system at the bedside. PMID:22195192

  20. Seizure phenotypes, periodicity, and sleep-wake pattern of seizures in Kcna-1 null mice.

    PubMed

    Wright, Samantha; Wallace, Eli; Hwang, Youngdeok; Maganti, Rama

    2016-02-01

    This study was undertaken to describe seizure phenotypes, natural progression, sleep-wake patterns, as well as periodicity of seizures in Kcna-1 null mutant mice. These mice were implanted with epidural electroencephalography (EEG) and electromyography (EMG) electrodes, and simultaneous video-EEG recordings were obtained while animals were individually housed under either diurnal (LD) condition or constant darkness (DD) over ten days of recording. The video-EEG data were analyzed to identify electrographic and behavioral phenotypes and natural progression and to examine the periodicity of seizures. Sleep-wake patterns were analyzed to understand the distribution and onset of seizures across the sleep-wake cycle. Four electrographically and behaviorally distinct seizure types were observed. Regardless of lighting condition that animals were housed in, Kcna-1 null mice initially expressed only a few of the most severe seizure types that progressively increased in frequency and decreased in seizure severity. In addition, a circadian periodicity was noted, with seizures peaking in the first 12h of the Zeitgeber time (ZT) cycle, regardless of lighting conditions. Interestingly, seizure onset differed between lighting conditions where more seizures arose out of sleep in LD conditions, whereas under DD conditions, the majority occurred out of the wakeful state. We suggest that this model be used to understand the circadian pattern of seizures as well as the pathophysiological implications of sleep and circadian disturbances in limbic epilepsies. PMID:26724401

  1. Triheptanoin in acute mouse seizure models.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Nicola K; Willis, Sarah; Sweetman, Lawrence; Borges, Karin

    2012-05-01

    Triheptanoin, the triglyceride of heptanoate, is used to treat certain hereditary metabolic diseases in USA because of its anaplerotic potential. In two chronic mouse seizure models this clear tasteless oil was found to be reproducibly anticonvulsant. Here we investigated the effects of triheptanoin feeding in C3H and CD1 mice using standard acute seizure models. Feeding 30-40% triheptanoin (caloric intake) consistently elevated blood propionyl-carnitines, but inconsistent anticonvulsant effects were observed in the fluorothyl, pentylenetetrazole and 6Hz seizure models. A 2mA consistent increase in the maximal electroshock threshold was found after 3 weeks of 35% triheptanoin feeding (p=0.018). In summary, triheptanoin shows a unique anticonvulsant profile in seizure models, compared to other treatments that are in the clinic. Therefore, despite small and/or inconsistent effects of triheptanoin in acute seizure models, triheptanoin remains of interest as a potential add-on treatment for patients with medically refractory epilepsy. PMID:22260920

  2. Helicopter mishap attributed to single seizure.

    PubMed

    Simon, Esan; Watts, Darron; Bohnker, Bruce K

    2008-03-01

    A case report is presented of a 36-year-old U.S. Coast Guard aviator who had a single seizure while operating a helicopter on the ground. His seizure activity produced a loss of consciousness during which he pushed the cyclic to the left anterior quadrant that resulted in a ground mishap. No risk factors were identified in an extensive neurological workup. The current guidance for handling seizures in military aviation personnel is reviewed, along with considerations for treatment. Although the military aviation selection process carefully screens applicants for seizure history and potential, occasional seizures in the aviation population remain possible. Such events may result in military aircraft mishaps despite careful risk factor surveillance, as demonstrated by this case. PMID:18419038

  3. Role of oxidative stress in epileptic seizures

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Eun-Joo; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Chung, Yoon Hee; Kim, Won-Ki; Ko, Kwang-Ho; Bach, Jae-Hyung; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Yoneda, Yukio; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative stress resulting from excessive free-radical release is likely implicated in the initiation and progression of epilepsy. Therefore, antioxidant therapies aimed at reducing oxidative stress have received considerable attention in epilepsy treatment. However, much evidence suggests that oxidative stress does not always have the same pattern in all seizures models. Thus, this review provides an overview aimed at achieving a better understanding of this issue. We summarize work regarding seizure models (i.e., genetically epilepsy-prone rats, kainic acid, pilocarpine, pentylenetetrazol, and trimethyltin), oxidative stress as an etiologic factor in epileptic seizures (i.e., impairment of antioxidant systems, mitochondrial dysfunction, involvement of redox-active metals, arachidonic acid pathway activation, and aging), and antioxidant strategies for seizure treatment. Combined, this review highlights pharmacological mechanisms associated with oxidative stress in epileptic seizures and the potential for neuroprotection in epilepsy that targets oxidative stress and is supported by effective antioxidant treatment. PMID:21672578

  4. Refractory absence epilepsy and glut1 deficiency syndrome: a new case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Ragona, Francesca; Matricardi, Sara; Castellotti, Barbara; Patrini, Mara; Freri, Elena; Binelli, Simona; Granata, Tiziana

    2014-10-01

    We report a 12-year-old female patient with a mild phenotype of glucose transporter type 1 deficiency syndrome (Glut1D). The clinical picture was characterized by refractory absence epilepsy, migraine, and learning disabilities. Absence seizures appeared at the age of 4 years, and electroencephalogram (EEG) showed irregular discharges of diffuse epileptic abnormalities. During the follow-up, seizures became drug resistant, cognitive evaluation revealed learning difficulties, and the patient complained migraine episodes. The evidence of seizure worsening before meals and the drug resistance suggested a Glut1D. Molecular analysis of SLC2A1 gene showed the presence of a pathogenic de novo mutation of the gene in heterozygosity (p.Ala275Thr, c.823G > A). Our case and the review of literature data on patients with Glut1D and absences provide a combination of clinical and EEG keys that should prompt the genetic analysis. The Glut1D should be suspected when absence seizures are associated with at least one among: irregular ictal EEG discharges, mild mental retardation, migraine, microcephaly, drug resistance, and worsening during fasting. An early diagnosis allows to establish one of the available ketogenic regimens which could modify the natural history of this treatable condition. PMID:24892788

  5. Unexceptional seizure potential of tramadol or its enantiomers or metabolites in mice.

    PubMed

    Raffa, Robert B; Stone, Dennis J

    2008-05-01

    Tramadol is one of the most widely used centrally acting analgesics worldwide. Because of its multimodal analgesic mechanism (opioid plus nonopioid), the adverse effects profile of tramadol, similar to its analgesic profile, can be atypical compared with single-mechanism opioid analgesics. The comparison is often favorable (e.g., less respiratory depression or abuse), but it is sometimes cited as unfavorable in regard to seizure potential. As part of a broader study of this analgesic, we compared seizure induction in mice produced by administration of tramadol, the enantiomers and metabolites [M1 (O-desmethyl tramadol), M2 (N-desmethyl tramadol), M3 (N,N-didesmethyl tramadol), M4 (O,N,N-tridesmethyl tramadol), and M5 (O,N-didesmethyl tramadol)] of tramadol, and opioid and nonopioid reference compounds. We found that tramadol, its enantiomers, and M1 to M5 metabolites were of intermediate potency in this endpoint (on either a milligram per kilogram or millimole per kilogram basis). The SD50 (estimated dose required to induce seizures in 50% of test group) of tramadol to antinociceptive ED50 ratio was almost identical to that of codeine. The enantiomers of tramadol were about equipotent to tramadol on this endpoint. The M1 to M5 metabolites (and M1 enantiomers) of tramadol were less potent than tramadol. The relative potency of tramadol to opioids was not altered by quinidine (an inhibitor of CYP4502D6), noxious stimulus (48 degrees C hot-plate), multiple dosing, or in reserpinized mice. Tramadol seizures were increased by naloxone, principally at high tramadol doses and due to an effect on the (-)enantiomer that overcame the opposite effect on the (+)enantiomer. No synergistic effect on seizure induction was observed between concomitant tramadol and codeine or morphine. PMID:18292293

  6. Spinal abnormalities and the atypical form of the Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome.

    PubMed

    Strübbe, E H; Lemmens, J A; Thijn, C J; Willemsen, W N; van Toor, B S

    1992-01-01

    In 96 patients with congenital absence of the uterus and upper vagina, the Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome, it proved possible to distinguish between the typical and the atypical form using laparoscopy. The typical form was characterized by symmetrical nonfunctioning muscular buds (the Müllerian duct remnants) and normal fallopian tubes, and the atypical form by aplasia of one or both buds, one bud smaller than the contralateral one, with or without dysplasia of one or both fallopian tubes. The atypical form was found in 52 patients (54.2%). Radiographs of the spine showed that congenital spinal abnormalities, especially the Klippel-Feil (KF) syndrome, were seen in 14 of the 52 patients with the atypical form only. Renal agenesis or ectopia together with the MRKH and KF syndromes, known as the MURCS association (MU: Müllerian duct aplasia; R: renal agenesis/ectopia; CS: cervical somite dysplasia), was diagnosed in 10/52 patients in the atypical group. From our results we conclude that additional cervical spine films in patients with the MRKH syndrome are indicated only in the atypical form the syndrome. In those cases where the MRKH syndrome is associated with the KF syndrome, the MURCS association should be considered. PMID:1294137

  7. Evidence of Absence software

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalthorp, Daniel; Huso, Manuela M. P.; Dail, David; Kenyon, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Evidence of Absence software (EoA) is a user-friendly application used for estimating bird and bat fatalities at wind farms and designing search protocols. The software is particularly useful in addressing whether the number of fatalities has exceeded a given threshold and what search parameters are needed to give assurance that thresholds were not exceeded. The software is applicable even when zero carcasses have been found in searches. Depending on the effectiveness of the searches, such an absence of evidence of mortality may or may not be strong evidence that few fatalities occurred. Under a search protocol in which carcasses are detected with nearly 100 percent certainty, finding zero carcasses would be convincing evidence that overall mortality rate was near zero. By contrast, with a less effective search protocol with low probability of detecting a carcass, finding zero carcasses does not rule out the possibility that large numbers of animals were killed but not detected in the searches. EoA uses information about the search process and scavenging rates to estimate detection probabilities to determine a maximum credible number of fatalities, even when zero or few carcasses are observed.

  8. Information Display System for Atypical Flight Phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statler, Irving C. (Inventor); Ferryman, Thomas A. (Inventor); Amidan, Brett G. (Inventor); Whitney, Paul D. (Inventor); White, Amanda M. (Inventor); Willse, Alan R. (Inventor); Cooley, Scott K. (Inventor); Jay, Joseph Griffith (Inventor); Lawrence, Robert E. (Inventor); Mosbrucker, Chris J. (Inventor); Rosenthal, Loren J. (Inventor); Lynch, Robert E. (Inventor); Chidester, Thomas R. (Inventor); Prothero, Gary L. (Inventor); Andrei, Adi (Inventor); Romanowski, Timothy P. (Inventor); Robin, Daniel E. (Inventor); Prothero, Jason W. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and system for displaying information on one or more aircraft flights, where at least one flight is determined to have at least one atypical flight phase according to specified criteria. A flight parameter trace for an atypical phase is displayed and compared graphically with a group of traces, for the corresponding flight phase and corresponding flight parameter, for flights that do not manifest atypicality in that phase.

  9. The role of technical, biological and pharmacological factors in the laboratory evaluation of anticonvulsant drugs. VI. Seasonal influences on maximal electroshock and pentylenetetrazol seizure thresholds.

    PubMed

    Löscher, W; Fiedler, M

    1996-09-01

    There is strong evidence for circadian rhythmicity in certain seizure types, whereas only a few studies have addressed the possibility of seasonal rhythms in convulsive activity. In the present experiments, seizure thresholds to different types of seizures were determined twice per month over a period of 13 months in mice under controlled environmental conditions, i.e., constant photoperiod, temperature, humidity, and food. Each group of animals was used for only one experiment, and the age of the mice used per month was the same throughout the study. Furthermore, all experiments were done at the same time in the morning to avoid circadian variation. Thresholds for the following seizure types were determined: (1) tonic hindlimb seizures induced by electrical (transauricular) stimulation; (2) myoclonic seizures induced by intravenous (i.v.) infusion of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ); (3) generalized clonic seizures in response to i.v. PTZ; and (4) tonic forelimb seizures induced by PTZ. A significant seasonality was determined for myoclonic and clonic PTZ seizure thresholds with highest thresholds between February and April and lowest thresholds between July and September. No clear seasonality was seen for chemically or electrically induced tonic seizures. Determination of plasma corticosterone did not disclose any seasonal rhythm in adrenal corticosteroid production that resembled the circannual variation in myoclonic and clonic seizure thresholds. In conclusion, our experiments suggest the existence of seasonal rhythms in PTZ seizure thresholds in laboratory animals despite standardized environmental conditions. A possible explanation for the findings may be the known seasonal alteration of the geomagnetic field which, by its effect on the pineal production of melatonin, may act as a seasonal synchronizor ("zeitgeber") in animals in the absence of other synchronizing forces, such as seasonal changes in photoperiod and ambient temperature. PMID:8886656

  10. Is atypical odontalgia a psychological problem?

    PubMed

    Graff-Radford, S B; Solberg, W K

    1993-05-01

    Several authors have asserted that psychological factors are the underlying cause of atypical odontalgia. However, objective evidence is lacking to support this claim. In this study, the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory was used to assess psychological functioning of an atypical odontalgia population. Means of the standard scores for each Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory scale were within normal ranges. Standard scores for atypical odontalgia profiles compared with standard scores for a chronic headache group (matched for age, sex, and chronicity) were similar and scales for both groups were within normal ranges. These findings fail to support psychological dysfunction as a primary condition associated with patients suffering from atypical odontalgia. PMID:8155097

  11. Experimental models of multifactorial epilepsies: the EL mouse and mice susceptible to audiogenic seizures.

    PubMed

    Seyfried, T N; Todorova, M T; Poderycki, M J

    1999-01-01

    This chapter reviews two well-characterized mouse epilepsy models with a multifactorial etiology, the epileptic EL mouse and mice susceptible to audiogenic seizures (AGS). Multifactorial disorders are quantitative traits where the action of more than one gene together with environmental factors contributes to the disease phenotype. The EL (epilepsy) mouse has been studied extensively as a genetic model for idiopathic complex partial seizures in humans. EL seizures are associated with an intense hippocampal gliosis in the absence of obvious neuronal loss and an elevated calcium-dependent release of aspartate that is present both before and after seizure onset. The inheritance of epilepsy is complex and several seizure frequency quantitative trait loci (QTL) have been mapped. Much of this genetic complexity may arise from the influence of environmental factors, including the seizure testing procedure, seizure history, and age. AGS, which are violent sound-induced convulsions, are considered a genetic model for generalized brainstem or reflex epilepsies. AGS susceptibility can arise as an inherited trait in some mouse strains or can be induced in genetically resistant strains from environmental factors (e.g., prior acoustic stimulation). AGS susceptibility and long-term potentiation (LTP) may also share common mechanisms. Several Asp genes have been mapped that influence AGS susceptibility. The expression of one of these can be modified by genomic imprinting and another has been identified as the X-linked 5-HT2e serotonin receptor. The genetic dissection of convulsive behavior in EL and AGS susceptible mice could help identify candidate genes for human multifactorial epilepsies. PMID:10514820

  12. Genetic features of oligodendrogliomas and presence of seizures. The relationship of seizures and genetics in LGOs.

    PubMed

    Mulligan, Linda; Ryan, Elizabeth; O'Brien, Margaret; Looby, Seamus; Heffernan, Josephine; O'Sullivan, Joanne; Clarke, Mary; Buckley, Patrick; O'Brien, David; Farrell, Michael; Brett, Francesca Mary

    2014-01-01

    Low grade oligodendrogliomas (LGO) are diffusely infiltrating World Health Organization (WHO) grade II gliomas, 20 - 30% of which show contrast enhancement. Seizures are a common presenting feature. It has been suggested that 1p19q co-deletion is associated with occurrence of seizures in adults, however, to date, the relationship of tumor genetics and seizure activity has not been extensively investigated. We sought to assess the influence of 1p19q co-deletion, IDH1-R132H positivity, and radiological variables on seizure activity in LGO patients. Specifically, we examined whether these characteristics were associated with seizure at initial presentation, or if they could predict outcome in terms of seizure free survival. In 62 LGOs, neither tumor location nor tumor enhancement were associated with seizures. 1p19q co-deletion status did not predict seizures when controlled for mutant IDH1-R132H expression, tumor location, or enhancement status (odds ratio (OR) 0.9, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.1 - 4.3). This study, although of limited statistical power, did not demonstrate an association between 1p19q status and seizure occurrence in LGO's. Replication in a larger cohort would further support our hypothesis that 1p19q status alone cannot be used as a reliable predictor of seizure occurrence in LGO's. PMID:24986208

  13. Developmental Milestones in Toddlers with Atypical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horovitz, Max; Matson, Johnny L.

    2011-01-01

    The attainment of developmental milestones was examined and compared in 162 infants and toddlers with developmental disabilities, including Down Syndrome (n = 26), Cerebral Palsy (n = 19), Global Developmental Delay (n = 22), Premature birth (n = 66), and Seizure Disorder (n = 29). Toddlers in the Seizures Disorder group began crawling at a

  14. Developmental Milestones in Toddlers with Atypical Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horovitz, Max; Matson, Johnny L.

    2011-01-01

    The attainment of developmental milestones was examined and compared in 162 infants and toddlers with developmental disabilities, including Down Syndrome (n = 26), Cerebral Palsy (n = 19), Global Developmental Delay (n = 22), Premature birth (n = 66), and Seizure Disorder (n = 29). Toddlers in the Seizures Disorder group began crawling at a…

  15. Optical imaging reveals reduced seizure spread and propagation velocities in aged rat brain in vitro.

    PubMed

    Holtkamp, M; Buchheim, K; Siegmund, H; Meierkord, H

    2003-01-01

    Old age is the most common time for patients to develop epileptic seizures, and due to their frequent unusual clinical presentation the diagnosis of epilepsy is often delayed in the elderly. It is as yet unknown if pronounced alterations in the plastic properties of aging nervous tissue contribute to these phenomena. We employed a non-lesional in vitro epilepsy model to study seizure susceptibility, spread pattern, and propagation velocities in combined hippocampal-entorhinal cortex slices of aged rats and controls using electrophysiological methods and imaging of intrinsic optical signals. In aged animals we saw a less extensive spread of seizure-like events into areas adjacent to the region of onset of activity and a decreased spread velocity in various anatomical regions. In addition, both the activity-dependent shrinkage of the extracellular space (ECS)-volume and the extracellular K(+) concentration were significantly reduced compared to controls. The results of this study are consistent with the clinical observation that epileptic seizures in the elderly have a reduced tendency to spread. In addition, our data suggest that in the absence of structural lesions seizure susceptibility in the aging brain is not increased. PMID:12498969

  16. Post-seizures amygdaloallocortical microvascular lesion leading to atrophy and memory impairment.

    PubMed

    Mraovitch, Sima; Calando, Yolande; Régnier, Angélique; Lamproglou, Ioannis; Vicaut, Eric

    2005-08-01

    Although the incidence of seizures after a cerebrovascular event including intracerebral hemorrhage has been widely recognized, the present studies have demonstrated that generalized convulsive seizures can cause multifocal amygdaloallocortical hemorrhage and tissue necrosis, the origin of which remains to be established. The seizure-elicited amygdaloallocortical injured area, which we refer to as a focal injury-prone area (FIPA), was caused by cholinergic stimulation of the ventroposterolateral and thalamic reticular nuclei. The amygdaloallocortical injury was preceded by focal absence of neuronal COX-2 and presence of microvascular immunoreactivity to the pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-1beta and TNF-alpha. The microvascular inflammation was followed by edema and multifocal amygdaloallocortical microhemorrhages, leading to atrophy and cognitive impairment. On the basis of the present results, we conclude that generalized convulsive seizures may be at the origin of amygdaloallocortical microvascular injury suggesting that, in addition to anticonvulsant treatment, an appropriate clinical evaluation and therapy for seizures-associated cerebrovascular accidents should be considered. PMID:16023590

  17. Interictal paroxysmal EEG abnormalities in childhood absence epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Mariani, Emilio; Rossi, Livia N; Vajani, Stefania

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study is to analyze the graphic features and the clinical significance of the focal interictal paroxysmal abnormalities (FIPA) which can be found in the EEG of patients with typical absences, on the basis of 29 personal cases. The children (15 female; mean age at the first evaluation=8.2 years, range 4.8-14.3 years) were particularly selected, because they only showed absence seizures. In all subjects the ictal clinical and EEG features were typical for childhood absence epilepsy (CAE). The interictal EEG showed a normal background activity in all children and in 11 patients the presence of FIPA specially on frontal areas. The graphic aspects of FIPA and their spatial and temporal variability, often in the same subject, were in agreement with a functional form. Furthermore the excellent response to valproic acid and ethosuximide, with a complete seizure control also in the follow-up in 26 among 28 treated children, confirms the opinion that our cases are affected by a typical form of CAE. In conclusion FIPA probably are not uncommon in typical idiopathic CAE and their presence does not seem to change the benign prognosis. There is a relationship between our data and the experimental models proposed in the literature. PMID:21282069

  18. Metabolic brain PET pattern underlying hyperkinetic seizures.

    PubMed

    Guedj, Eric; McGonigal, Aileen; Vaugier, Lisa; Mundler, Olivier; Bartolomei, Fabrice

    2012-09-01

    This study aims to contribute to the identification of selective brain regions involved in hyperkinetic behaviors. We studied the whole-brain voxel-based interictal metabolic 18FDG-PET pattern of 23 patients with hyperkinetic seizures, in comparison with both 15 healthy subjects similar for age and gender, and 23 patients without hyperkinetic seizures. Patients were in particular similar for the localization of the epileptogenic zone, this having been defined using stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) when clinically indicated (15/23 patients with hyperkinetic seizures and 13/23 patients without hyperkinetic seizures). Using conjunction voxel-based analysis, patients with hyperkinetic seizures exhibited significant hypometabolism within bilateral midbrain and the right caudate head, in comparison both to healthy subjects (p<0.05, FDR-corrected for the voxel) and to patients without hyperkinetic seizures (p<0.0167, uncorrected for the voxel). Findings were secondarily confirmed separately in each subgroup of patients with frontal, temporal or posterior epilepsy. These findings argue for a specific subcortical metabolic impairment in patients with hyperkinetic seizures, within brain structures supposed to be involved in the generation of primitive motor programs. PMID:22551665

  19. Pediatric Stroke Presenting as a Seizure

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadzadeh, Katie L.; Bhardwaj, Vartika; Johnson, Steven A.; Kane, Kathleen E.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Childhood arterial ischemic stroke (AIS) is rare and may be difficult to diagnose. Management of acute stroke in any age group is time sensitive, so awareness of the manifestations and appropriate diagnostic procedures for pediatric AIS is vital to establishing care. We present a pediatric case of arterial ischemic stroke that presented to the emergency department (ED) after two seizures. Case Report. A five-year-old female with an existing seizure disorder presented to a pediatric ED after having two seizures. Postictal upon arrival, she underwent a computed tomography (CT) scan of her head. Family reported that she had complained of a severe headache and vomited; her seizures were described as different from those she had experienced in the past. Loss of grey white matter differentiation on the CT warranted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which demonstrated a right-sided stroke. After a complicated course in the hospital, the patient was discharged to a rehabilitation hospital. Why Should an Emergency Physician Be Aware of This? It is important that emergency physicians recognize that a seizure may be the initial symptom of a pediatric stroke regardless of an established seizure history. Pediatric seizures are relatively common; however consideration of the diagnosis of pediatric stroke may prevent unnecessary delays in treatment. PMID:25587467

  20. Seizures associated with poisoning and drug overdose.

    PubMed

    Olson, K R; Kearney, T E; Dyer, J E; Benowitz, N L; Blanc, P D

    1993-11-01

    A retrospective review of cases consulted by the San Francisco Bay Area Regional Poison Control Center during a 2-year period was performed to determine the causes and consequences of seizures associated with poisoning and drug intoxication. Of 233 charts coded as involving seizures, 191 occurred in humans and were available for analysis. The leading causes of seizures reported to the Poison Control Center were cyclic antidepressants (55 cases, 29%); cocaine and other stimulants (55 cases, 29%); diphenhydramine and other antihistamines (14 cases, 7%); theophylline (10 cases, 5%); and isoniazid (10 cases, 5%). Stimulants and diphenhydramine were more likely than other drugs to produce brief, self-limited seizures. In contrast, poisoning by cyclic antidepressants, cardiodepressant antiarrhythmic agents, or theophylline was more likely to be associated with death. Seizures in elderly patients were more likely to result in complications and death. The frequency of seizure-related cases by substance type was also compared with the results of an earlier survey performed in 1981, and found a striking increase in the proportion of seizures caused by cocaine and (23% in 1988 to 1989 compared with 4% in 1981). Poison Control Center data can provide valuable information about the causes and consequences of drug-related medical complications, as well as highlight changing trends in drug-related injury. PMID:8192750

  1. The Dynamics of Absence Behaviour: Interrelations between Absence from Class and Absence in Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jonasson, Charlotte

    2011-01-01

    Background: Studies of absence in educational settings have primarily been concerned with the causes for and results of student absence. However, recent research has argued that distinguishing between different forms of absence could be important. In consequence, studying the way in which different forms of absence are interrelated provides…

  2. Instantaneous frequency based newborn EEG seizure characterisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesbah, Mostefa; O'Toole, John M.; Colditz, Paul B.; Boashash, Boualem

    2012-12-01

    The electroencephalogram (EEG), used to noninvasively monitor brain activity, remains the most reliable tool in the diagnosis of neonatal seizures. Due to their nonstationary and multi-component nature, newborn EEG seizures are better represented in the joint time-frequency domain than in either the time domain or the frequency domain. Characterising newborn EEG seizure nonstationarities helps to better understand their time-varying nature and, therefore, allow developing efficient signal processing methods for both modelling and seizure detection and classification. In this article, we used the instantaneous frequency (IF) extracted from a time-frequency distribution to characterise newborn EEG seizures. We fitted four frequency modulated (FM) models to the extracted IFs, namely a linear FM, a piecewise-linear FM, a sinusoidal FM, and a hyperbolic FM. Using a database of 30-s EEG seizure epochs acquired from 35 newborns, we were able to show that, depending on EEG channel, the sinusoidal and piecewise-linear FM models best fitted 80-98% of seizure epochs. To further characterise the EEG seizures, we calculated the mean frequency and frequency span of the extracted IFs. We showed that in the majority of the cases (>95%), the mean frequency resides in the 0.6-3 Hz band with a frequency span of 0.2-1 Hz. In terms of the frequency of occurrence of the four seizure models, the statistical analysis showed that there is no significant difference( p = 0.332) between the two hemispheres. The results also indicate that there is no significant differences between the two hemispheres in terms of the mean frequency ( p = 0.186) and the frequency span ( p = 0.302).

  3. Efficacy of lacosamide by focal seizure subtype.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Michael R; Rosenow, Felix; Faught, Edward; Hebert, David; Doty, Pamela; Isojärvi, Jouko

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this post hoc exploratory analysis was to determine the effects of the antiepileptic drug, lacosamide, on focal (partial-onset) seizure subtypes. Patient data from the three lacosamide pivotal trials were grouped and pooled by focal seizure subtype at Baseline: simple partial seizures (SPS), complex partial seizures (CPS), and secondarily generalized partial seizures (SGPS). Both efficacy outcomes (median percent change from Baseline to Maintenance Phase in seizure frequency per 28 days and the proportion of patients experiencing at least a 50% reduction in seizures) were evaluated by lacosamide dose (200, 400, or 600 mg/day) compared to placebo for each seizure subtype. An additional analysis was performed to determine whether a shift from more severe focal seizure subtypes to less severe occurred upon treatment with lacosamide. In patients with CPS or SGPS at Baseline, lacosamide 400 mg/day (maximum recommended daily dose) and 600 mg/day reduced the frequency of CPS and SGPS compared to placebo. Likewise, a proportion of patients with CPS and SGPS at Baseline experienced at least a 50% reduction in the frequency of CPS and SGPS (≥50% responder rate) in the lacosamide 400 and 600 mg/day groups compared with placebo. For both outcomes, numerically greatest responses were observed in the lacosamide 600 mg/day group among patients with SGPS at Baseline. In patients with SPS at Baseline, no difference between placebo and lacosamide was observed for either efficacy outcome. An additional exploratory analysis suggests that in patients with SPS at Baseline, CPS and SGPS may have been shifted to less severe SPS upon treatment with lacosamide. The results of these exploratory analyses revealed reductions in CPS and SGPS frequency with adjunctive lacosamide. Reduction in CPS and SGPS may confound assessment of SPS since the CPS or SGPS may possibly change to SPS by effective treatment. PMID:25082395

  4. Biotelemetry system for Epilepsy Seizure Control

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, LaCurtise; Bohnert, George W.

    2009-07-02

    The Biotelemetry System for Epilepsy Seizure Control Project developed and tested an automated telemetry system for use in an epileptic seizure prevention device that precisely controls localized brain temperature. This project was a result of a Department of Energy (DOE) Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (GIPP) grant to the Kansas City Plant (KCP), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to partner with Flint Hills Scientific, LLC, Lawrence, KS and Biophysical Laboratory Ltd (BIOFIL), Sarov, Russia to develop a method to help control epileptic seizures.

  5. Ambroxol-induced focal epileptic seizure.

    PubMed

    Lapenta, Leonardo; Morano, Alessandra; Fattouch, Jinane; Casciato, Sara; Fanella, Martina; Giallonardo, Anna Teresa; Di Bonaventura, Carlo

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that in epileptic patients some compounds and different drugs used for the treatment of comorbidities can facilitate or provoke seizures, this evidence regarding a wide spectrum of pharmacological categories. The potential facilitating factors usually include direct toxic effects or pharmacological interactions of either active ingredients or excipients. We report the case of a patient with drug-resistant epilepsy who experienced focal epileptic seizures, easily and constantly reproducible, after each administration of a cough syrup. This is, to our knowledge, the first electroencephalogram-documented case of focal epileptic seizures induced by cough syrup containing ambroxol as active ingredient. PMID:24824664

  6. Brain Energy Metabolism During Experimental Neonatal Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Kerry W.; Suchomelova, Lucie; Niquet, Jerome

    2010-01-01

    During flurothyl seizures in 4-day-old rats, cortical concentration of ATP, phosphocreatine and glucose fell while lactate rose. Cortical energy use rate more than doubled, while glycolytic rate increased fivefold. Calculation of the cerebral metabolic balance during sustained seizures suggests that energy balance could be maintained in hyperglycemic animals, and would decline slowly in normoglycemia, but would be compromised by concurrent hypoglycemia, hyperthermia or hypoxia. These results suggest that the metabolic challenge imposed on the brain by this model of experimental neonatal seizures is milder than that seen at older ages, but can become critical when associated with other types of metabolic stress. PMID:21136154

  7. On the nature of seizure dynamics.

    PubMed

    Jirsa, Viktor K; Stacey, William C; Quilichini, Pascale P; Ivanov, Anton I; Bernard, Christophe

    2014-08-01

    Seizures can occur spontaneously and in a recurrent manner, which defines epilepsy; or they can be induced in a normal brain under a variety of conditions in most neuronal networks and species from flies to humans. Such universality raises the possibility that invariant properties exist that characterize seizures under different physiological and pathological conditions. Here, we analysed seizure dynamics mathematically and established a taxonomy of seizures based on first principles. For the predominant seizure class we developed a generic model called Epileptor. As an experimental model system, we used ictal-like discharges induced in vitro in mouse hippocampi. We show that only five state variables linked by integral-differential equations are sufficient to describe the onset, time course and offset of ictal-like discharges as well as their recurrence. Two state variables are responsible for generating rapid discharges (fast time scale), two for spike and wave events (intermediate time scale) and one for the control of time course, including the alternation between 'normal' and ictal periods (slow time scale). We propose that normal and ictal activities coexist: a separatrix acts as a barrier (or seizure threshold) between these states. Seizure onset is reached upon the collision of normal brain trajectories with the separatrix. We show theoretically and experimentally how a system can be pushed toward seizure under a wide variety of conditions. Within our experimental model, the onset and offset of ictal-like discharges are well-defined mathematical events: a saddle-node and homoclinic bifurcation, respectively. These bifurcations necessitate a baseline shift at onset and a logarithmic scaling of interspike intervals at offset. These predictions were not only confirmed in our in vitro experiments, but also for focal seizures recorded in different syndromes, brain regions and species (humans and zebrafish). Finally, we identified several possible biophysical parameters contributing to the five state variables in our model system. We show that these parameters apply to specific experimental conditions and propose that there exists a wide array of possible biophysical mechanisms for seizure genesis, while preserving central invariant properties. Epileptor and the seizure taxonomy will guide future modeling and translational research by identifying universal rules governing the initiation and termination of seizures and predicting the conditions necessary for those transitions. PMID:24919973

  8. On the nature of seizure dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, William C.; Quilichini, Pascale P.; Ivanov, Anton I.

    2014-01-01

    Seizures can occur spontaneously and in a recurrent manner, which defines epilepsy; or they can be induced in a normal brain under a variety of conditions in most neuronal networks and species from flies to humans. Such universality raises the possibility that invariant properties exist that characterize seizures under different physiological and pathological conditions. Here, we analysed seizure dynamics mathematically and established a taxonomy of seizures based on first principles. For the predominant seizure class we developed a generic model called Epileptor. As an experimental model system, we used ictal-like discharges induced in vitro in mouse hippocampi. We show that only five state variables linked by integral-differential equations are sufficient to describe the onset, time course and offset of ictal-like discharges as well as their recurrence. Two state variables are responsible for generating rapid discharges (fast time scale), two for spike and wave events (intermediate time scale) and one for the control of time course, including the alternation between ‘normal’ and ictal periods (slow time scale). We propose that normal and ictal activities coexist: a separatrix acts as a barrier (or seizure threshold) between these states. Seizure onset is reached upon the collision of normal brain trajectories with the separatrix. We show theoretically and experimentally how a system can be pushed toward seizure under a wide variety of conditions. Within our experimental model, the onset and offset of ictal-like discharges are well-defined mathematical events: a saddle-node and homoclinic bifurcation, respectively. These bifurcations necessitate a baseline shift at onset and a logarithmic scaling of interspike intervals at offset. These predictions were not only confirmed in our in vitro experiments, but also for focal seizures recorded in different syndromes, brain regions and species (humans and zebrafish). Finally, we identified several possible biophysical parameters contributing to the five state variables in our model system. We show that these parameters apply to specific experimental conditions and propose that there exists a wide array of possible biophysical mechanisms for seizure genesis, while preserving central invariant properties. Epileptor and the seizure taxonomy will guide future modeling and translational research by identifying universal rules governing the initiation and termination of seizures and predicting the conditions necessary for those transitions. PMID:24919973

  9. Risperidone versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Komossa, Katja; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Schwarz, Sandra; Schmid, Franziska; Hunger, Heike; Kissling, Werner; Leucht, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background In many countries of the industrialised world second-generation (“atypical”) antipsychotics (SGAs) have become the first line drug treatment for people with schizophrenia. The question as to whether and if so how much the effects of the various SGAs differ is a matter of debate. In this review we examined how the efficacy and tolerability of risperidone differs from that of other SGAs. Objectives To evaluate the effects of risperidone compared with other atypical antipsychotics for people with schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychosis. Search methods 1. Electronic searching We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group Trials Register (April 2007) which is based on regular searches of BIOSIS, CENTRAL, CINAHL, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO. 2. Reference searching We inspected the references of all identified studies for more trials. 3. Personal contact We contacted the first author of each included study for missing information. 4. Drug companies We contacted the manufacturers of all atypical antipsychotics included for additional data. Selection criteria We included all randomised, blinded trials comparing oral risperidone with oral forms of amisulpride, aripiprazole, clozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, sertindole, ziprasidone or zotepine in people with schizophrenia or schizophrenia-like psychosis. Data collection and analysis We extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated risk ratio (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) on an intention-to-treat basis based on a random-effects model. We calculated numbers needed to treat/harm (NNT/NNH) where appropriate. For continuous data, we calculated mean differences (MD), again based on a random-effects model. Main results The review currently includes 45 blinded RCTs with 7760 participants. The number of RCTs available for each comparison varied: four studies compared risperidone with amisulpride, two with aripiprazole, 11 with clozapine, 23 with olanzapine, eleven with quetiapine, two with sertindole, three with ziprasidone and none with zotepine. Attrition from these studies was high (46.9%), leaving the interpretation of results problematic. Furthermore, 60% were industry sponsored, which can be a source of bias. There were few significant differences in overall acceptability of treatment as measured by leaving the studies early. Risperidone was slightly less acceptable than olanzapine, and slightly more acceptable than ziprasidone in this regard. Risperidone improved the general mental state (PANSS total score) slightly less than olanzapine (15 RCTs, n = 2390, MD 1.94 CI 0.58 to 3.31), but slightly more than quetiapine (9 RCTs, n = 1953, MD −3.09 CI −5.16 to −1.01) and ziprasidone (3 RCTs, n = 1016, MD −3.91 CI −7.55 to −0.27). The comparisons with the other SGA drugs were equivocal. Risperidone was also less efficacious than olanzapine and clozapine in terms of leaving the studies early due to inefficacy, but more efficacious than ziprasidone in the same outcome. Risperidone produced somewhat more extrapyramidal side effects than a number of other SGAs (use of antiparkinson medication versus clozapine 6 RCTs, n = 304, RR 2.57 CI 1.47 to 4.48, NNH 6 CI 33 to 3; versus olanzapine 13 RCTs, n = 2599, RR 1.28 CI 1.06 to 1.55, NNH 17 CI 9 to 100; versus quetiapine 6 RCTs, n = 1715, RR 1.98 CI 1.16 to 3.39, NNH 20 CI 10 to 100; versus ziprasidone 2 RCTs, n = 822, RR 1.42 CI 1.03 to 1.96, NNH not estimable; parkinsonism versus sertindole 1 RCT, n = 321, RR 4.11 CI 1.44 to 11.73, NNH 14 CI 100 to 8). Risperidone also increased prolactin levels clearly more than all comparators, except for amisulpride and sertindole for which no data were available. Other adverse events were less consistently reported, but risperidone may well produce more weight gain and/or associated metabolic problems than amisulpride (weight gain: 3 RCTs, n = 585, MD 0.99 CI 0.37 to 1.61), aripiprazole (cholesterol increase: 1 RCT, n = 83, MD 22.30 CI 4.91 to 39.69) and ziprasidone (cholesterol increase 2 RCTs, n = 767, MD 8.58 CI 1.11 to 16.04) but less than clozapine (weight gain 3 RCTs n = 373, MD −3.30 CI −5.65 to −0.95), olanzapine (weight gain 13 RCTs, n = 2116, MD −2.61 CI −3.74 to −1.48), quetiapine (cholesterol increase: 5 RCTs, n = 1433, MD −8.49 CI −12. 23 to −4.75) and sertindole (weight gain: 2 RCTs, n = 328, MD −0.99 CI −1.86 to −0.12). It may be less sedating than clozapine and quetiapine, lengthen the QTc interval less than sertindole (QTc change: 2 RCTs, n = 495, MD −18.60 CI −22.37 to 14.83), produce fewer seizures than clozapine (2 RCTs, n = 354, RR 0.22 CI 0.07 to 0.70, NNT 14 CI 8 to 33) and less sexual dysfunction in men than sertindole (2 RCTs, n = 437, RR 0.34 CI 0.16 to 0.76, NNT 13 CI 8 to 33). Authors’ conclusions Risperidone seems to produce somewhat more extrapyramidal side effects and clearly more prolactin increase than most other SGAs. It may also differ from other compounds in efficacy and in the occurrence of other adverse effects such as weight gain, metabolic problems, cardiac effects, sedation and seizures. Nevertheless, the large proportion of participants leaving studies early and incomplete reporting of outcomes makes it difficult to draw firm conclusions. Further large trials, especially comparing risperidone with those other new drugs for which only a few RCTs are available, are needed. PMID:21249678

  10. 27 CFR 478.152 - Seizure and forfeiture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Seizure and forfeiture. 478..., Seizures, and Forfeitures § 478.152 Seizure and forfeiture. (a) Any firearm or ammunition involved in or... clear and convincing evidence, shall be subject to seizure and forfeiture, and all provisions of...

  11. 50 CFR 12.5 - Seizure by other agencies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Seizure by other agencies. 12.5 Section 12... SEIZURE AND FORFEITURE PROCEDURES General Provisions § 12.5 Seizure by other agencies. Any authorized... the laws listed in § 12.2 will, if so requested, deliver such seizure to the appropriate Special...

  12. 50 CFR 12.11 - Notification of seizure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Notification of seizure. 12.11 Section 12... SEIZURE AND FORFEITURE PROCEDURES Preliminary Requirements § 12.11 Notification of seizure. Except where the owner or consignee is personally notified or seizure is made pursuant to a search warrant,...

  13. Atypical autoerotic death: part II.

    PubMed

    Shields, Lisa B E; Hunsaker, Donna M; Hunsaker, John C; Wetli, Charles V; Hutchins, Kenneth D; Holmes, Ronald M

    2005-03-01

    Autoerotic fatalities encompass a wide array of means and mechanisms used to attain sexual gratification. The most commonly encountered autoerotic practice, specifically, autoerotic asphyxia, denotes death resulting from failure of a release mechanism of the apparatus designed to attain cerebral hypoxia for heightened arousal. Historically, the majority of victims of autoerotic death are Caucasian males under the age of 30. While autoerotic death is most often associated with a constrictive cervical ligature tied to either other parts of the victim's body or to an inanimate object such as a door, several other methods have been reported. These modalities include ligature around the thorax or abdomen, plastic bags covering the face, electrical current, inhalation of a toxic gas or chemicals, or partial or total submersion, known as aquaerotic asphyxiation. This study highlights 11 cases of atypical autoerotic death, including asphyxia with a plastic bag, electrocution, and inhalation of butane and nitrous oxide (N2O). Whereas the manner of death in the majority of autoerotic death cases is deemed accidental, we present and analyze unique and equivocal cases representing 4 different manners of death: accident, natural, suicide, and homicide. The 11 victims were all Caucasian and between the ages of 17 and 55. Ten decedents were males, 1 female. A comprehensive investigation incorporating a thorough scene analysis, gathering of the victim's history, and complete postmortem examination is necessary to elucidate both the cause and manner of death in these atypical cases. PMID:15725777

  14. Provocation of nonepileptic seizures by suggestion in a general seizure population.

    PubMed

    Bazil, C W; Kothari, M; Luciano, D; Moroney, J; Song, S; Vasquez, B; Weinreb, H J; Devinsky, O

    1994-01-01

    Nonepileptic seizures (NES) are common and are often diagnosed at epilepsy centers by video-EEG recording of both spontaneous and suggestion-induced episodes, but no study has evaluated provocative testing in a general seizure population. We studied consecutive patients with a tentative diagnosis of epilepsy using saline provocation during video-EEG recording, suggesting that this could produce a typical seizure. Of 52 patients, 40% had no response, 23% had responses unlike their seizures, and 37% had typical episodes (positive test). Patients whose usual episodes resembled complex partial seizures (CPS) were more likely to have NES than were patients with a history of generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTC). Of patients with positive provocations, the primary physician predicted NES in 68% of cases. This preliminary study suggests that NES are frequent in a general neurology setting, and that saline provocation is a sensitive method of identifying NES. PMID:8082620

  15. Association of a bovine prion gene haplotype with atypical BSE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathies (BSEs) are recently recognized prion diseases of cattle. Atypical BSEs are rare; approximately 30 cases have been identified worldwide. We tested prion gene (PRNP) haplotypes for an association with atypical BSE. Methodology/Principal Findin...

  16. Higher Education and the Black Atypical Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hull, W. Frank, IV

    The black atypical student, defined as that black student who would be excluded from most colleges and universities in America by traditional admission policy, is beginning to find entrance into institutions of higher education. There is no indication reported of these institutions admitting large numbers of black atypical students. In the…

  17. Atypical and Typical Antipsychotics in the Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noggle, Chad A.; Dean, Raymond S.

    2009-01-01

    The use of antipsychotic medications within the school-age population is rapidly increasing. Although typical antipsychotics may be used in rare cases, this influx is largely secondary to the availability of the atypical antipsychotics. Reduction of possible adverse effects and increased efficacy represent the primary basis for the atypical

  18. Influence of vigilance state on physiological consequences of seizures and seizure-induced death in mice.

    PubMed

    Hajek, Michael A; Buchanan, Gordon F

    2016-05-01

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) is the leading cause of death in patients with refractory epilepsy. SUDEP occurs more commonly during nighttime sleep. The details of why SUDEP occurs at night are not well understood. Understanding why SUDEP occurs at night during sleep might help to better understand why SUDEP occurs at all and hasten development of preventive strategies. Here we aimed to understand circumstances causing seizures that occur during sleep to result in death. Groups of 12 adult male mice were instrumented for EEG, EMG, and EKG recording and subjected to seizure induction via maximal electroshock (MES) during wakefulness, nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Seizure inductions were performed with concomitant EEG, EMG, and EKG recording and breathing assessment via whole body plethysmography. Seizures induced via MES during sleep were associated with more profound respiratory suppression and were more likely to result in death. Despite REM sleep being a time when seizures do not typically occur spontaneously, when seizures were forced to occur during REM sleep, they were invariably fatal in this model. An examination of baseline breathing revealed that mice that died following a seizure had increased baseline respiratory rate variability compared with those that did not die. These data demonstrate that sleep, especially REM sleep, can be a dangerous time for a seizure to occur. These data also demonstrate that there may be baseline respiratory abnormalities that can predict which individuals have higher risk for seizure-induced death. PMID:26888097

  19. Glut1 deficiency syndrome: Absence epilepsy and La Soupe du Jour.

    PubMed

    Thouin, Anaïs; Crompton, Douglas E

    2016-02-01

    For some time, paediatric neurologists have recognised glucose transporter type 1 (GluT1) deficiency syndrome as a cause of intractable infantile seizures, microcephaly, developmental delay and hypoglycorrhachia in the presence of a normal plasma glucose. It is caused by mutations in the SLC2A1 gene, coding for GluT1, leading to a reduction in the available glucose transporter sites; it responds to the ketogenic diet. Recently, a wider spectrum of seizure syndromes have been associated with functional impairment of glucose transport caused by SLC2A1 mutations. These syndromes include 12% of early-onset absence epilepsy and 1% of genetic generalised epilepsies, where they represent a risk allele contributing to polygenic inheritance. We describe a young man with early-onset absence seizures and paroxysmal exercise-induced dyskinesia. While this syndrome is uncommon, it is recognisable and its diagnosis allows consideration of treatment with the ketogenic diet. We discuss the role of genetic testing in early-onset absence seizures and genetic generalised epilepsy. PMID:26336901

  20. Psychogenic seizures after head injury in children.

    PubMed

    Pakalnis, A; Paolicchi, J

    2000-02-01

    A total of 148 patients with a history of probable seizure disorder were studied prospectively with long-term video electroencephalography over a 1-year period. Sixteen (11%) were identified with psychogenic seizures. Eleven (69%) of 16 were boys, with a mean age of 10.5 years. Seven (44%) of the 16 had an antecedent history of head injury prior to the development of these episodes; of these patients 85% were boys. Our results suggest that contrary to findings in the adult population, psychogenic seizures can be commonly seen in boys. The prevalence of antecedent head injury suggests that it is a notable risk factor in children as well as adults in the occurrence of psychogenic seizures. PMID:10695889

  1. Decreased subcortical cholinergic arousal in focal seizures.

    PubMed

    Motelow, Joshua E; Li, Wei; Zhan, Qiong; Mishra, Asht M; Sachdev, Robert N S; Liu, Geoffrey; Gummadavelli, Abhijeet; Zayyad, Zaina; Lee, Hyun Seung; Chu, Victoria; Andrews, John P; Englot, Dario J; Herman, Peter; Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G; Hyder, Fahmeed; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2015-02-01

    Impaired consciousness in temporal lobe seizures has a major negative impact on quality of life. The prevailing view holds that this disorder impairs consciousness by seizure spread to the bilateral temporal lobes. We propose instead that seizures invade subcortical regions and depress arousal, causing impairment through decreases rather than through increases in activity. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging in a rodent model, we found increased activity in regions known to depress cortical function, including lateral septum and anterior hypothalamus. Importantly, we found suppression of intralaminar thalamic and brainstem arousal systems and suppression of the cortex. At a cellular level, we found reduced firing of identified cholinergic neurons in the brainstem pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus and basal forebrain. Finally, we used enzyme-based amperometry to demonstrate reduced cholinergic neurotransmission in both cortex and thalamus. Decreased subcortical arousal is a critical mechanism for loss of consciousness in focal temporal lobe seizures. PMID:25654258

  2. Automatic Detection of Seizures with Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Dale E.; Harris, John C.; Cutchis, Protagoras N.; Cristion, John A.; Lesser, Ronald P.; Webber, W. Robert S.

    1993-01-01

    There are an estimated two million people with epilepsy in the United States. Many of these people do not respond to anti-epileptic drug therapy. Two devices can be developed to assist in the treatment of epilepsy. The first is a microcomputer-based system designed to process massive amounts of electroencephalogram (EEG) data collected during long-term monitoring of patients for the purpose of diagnosing seizures, assessing the effectiveness of medical therapy, or selecting patients for epilepsy surgery. Such a device would select and display important EEG events. Currently many such events are missed. A second device could be implanted and would detect seizures and initiate therapy. Both of these devices require a reliable seizure detection algorithm. A new algorithm is described. It is believed to represent an improvement over existing seizure detection algorithms because better signal features were selected and better standardization methods were used.

  3. Febrile Seizures and Epilepsy: Possible Outcomes

    MedlinePlus

    ... status epilepticus in children: The FEB- STAT Study. Neurology 2012;79:871– 877. 2. Graves RC, Oehler ... Am J Epidemiol 2007;165:911–918. e82 Neurology 79 August 28, 2012 Febrile seizures: Possible outcomes ...

  4. Decreased subcortical cholinergic arousal in focal seizures

    PubMed Central

    Motelow, Joshua E.; Li, Wei; Zhan, Qiong; Mishra, Asht M.; Sachdev, Robert N. S.; Liu, Geoffrey; Gummadavelli, Abhijeet; Zayyad, Zaina; Lee, Hyun Seung; Chu, Victoria; Andrews, John P.; Englot, Dario J.; Herman, Peter; Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G.; Hyder, Fahmeed; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Impaired consciousness in temporal lobe seizures has a major negative impact on quality of life. The prevailing view holds that this disorder impairs consciousness by seizure spread to the bilateral temporal lobes. We propose instead that seizures invade subcortical regions and depress arousal, causing impairment through decreases rather than through increases in activity. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging in a rodent model, we found increased activity in regions known to depress cortical function including lateral septum and anterior hypothalamus. Importantly, we found suppression of intralaminar thalamic and brainstem arousal systems and suppression of the cortex. At a cellular level, we found reduced firing of identified cholinergic neurons in the brainstem pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus and basal forebrain. Finally, we used enzyme-based amperometry to demonstrate reduced cholinergic neurotransmission in both cortex and thalamus. Decreased subcortical arousal is a novel mechanism for loss of consciousness in focal temporal lobe seizures. PMID:25654258

  5. Genetics Home Reference: benign familial neonatal seizures

    MedlinePlus

    ... loss of consciousness. A test called an electroencephalogram (EEG) is used to measure the electrical activity of the brain. Abnormalities on an EEG test, measured during no seizure activity, can indicate ...

  6. Analysis of Epileptic Seizures with Complex Network

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Yan; Wang, Yinghua; Yu, Tao; Li, Xiaoli

    2014-01-01

    Epilepsy is a disease of abnormal neural activities involving large area of brain networks. Until now the nature of functional brain network associated with epilepsy is still unclear. Recent researches indicate that the small world or scale-free attributes and the occurrence of highly clustered connection patterns could represent a general organizational principle in the human brain functional network. In this paper, we seek to find whether the small world or scale-free property of brain network is correlated with epilepsy seizure formation. A mass neural model was adopted to generate multiple channel EEG recordings based on regular, small world, random, and scale-free network models. Whether the connection patterns of cortical networks are directly associated with the epileptic seizures was investigated. The results showed that small world and scale-free cortical networks are highly correlated with the occurrence of epileptic seizures. In particular, the property of small world network is more significant during the epileptic seizures. PMID:25147576

  7. Focal motor seizures complicating carotid endarterectomy.

    PubMed

    Youkey, J R; Clagett, G P; Jaffin, J H; Parisi, J E; Rich, N M

    1984-09-01

    We studied four patients with focal motor seizures complicating carotid endarterectomy and compared them with 14 other cases reported previously. Seventeen of the 18 patients had high-grade carotid stenoses. A severe unilateral headache usually preceded seizure activity, which was followed by prolonged Todd's paralysis. Eight patients had histories of ipsilateral stroke. There was no association with perioperative hypertension. Two patients who were receiving heparin sodium had intracerebral hemorrhages that caused one of the two postoperative deaths. The patency of all endarterectomized carotid arteries was recorded by arteriography or noninvasive studies. These data suggest that patients who have severe unilateral headaches following ipsilateral carotid endarterectomy for high-grade stenoses are at risk for focal motor seizures. The roles of antithrombotic agents and anti-seizure medication in this setting are unclear. PMID:6433857

  8. [Postpartum seizures in 2 epileptic patients].

    PubMed

    Gredilla, E; Pérez Ferrer, A; Fornet, I; Martínez Serrano, B; López López, M A; Gilsanz, F

    2004-05-01

    We report the cases of 2 women with epilepsy who suffered generalized postpartum seizures on the first day after giving birth. The first had a history of febrile convulsions in childhood and had a seizure in the 36th week of gestation due to sleep deprivation. She had received epidural analgesia for labor pain. The second patient had had her most recent crisis at the beginning of the third trimester of pregnancy. Both patients had low serum levels of antiepileptic drugs. The pharmacokinetics of antiepileptic drugs can change during pregnancy, making seizures more difficult to control. Serum levels of these drugs should therefore be monitored more often, given that a generalized maternal seizure can have devastating consequences for the fetus. More careful planning and management of pregnancy is necessary for epileptic patients to ensure successful outcomes for both mother and fetus. PMID:15214765

  9. Absence of the Septum Pellucidum

    MedlinePlus

    ... Absence of the Septum Pellucidum? The septum pellucidum (SP) is a thin membrane located at the midline ... Page . Is there any treatment? Absence of the SP alone is not a disorder but is instead ...

  10. Clozapine versus other atypical antipsychotics for schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Asenjo Lobos, Claudia; Komossa, Katja; Rummel-Kluge, Christine; Hunger, Heike; Schmid, Franziska; Schwarz, Sandra; Leucht, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Background Clozapine is an atypical antipsychotic demonstrated to be superior in the treatment of refractory schizophrenia which causes fewer movement disorders. Clozapine, however, entails a significant risk of serious blood disorders such as agranulocytosis which could be potentially fatal. Currently there are a number of newer antipsychotics which have been developed with the purpose to find both a better tolerability profile and a superior effectiveness. Objectives To compare the clinical effects of clozapine with other atypical antipsychotics (such as amisulpride, aripiprazole, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, sertindole, ziprasidone and zotepine) in the treatment of schizophrenia and schizophrenia-like psychoses. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Groups Register (June 2007) and reference lists of all included randomised controlled trials. We also manually searched appropriate journals and conference proceedings relating to clozapine combination strategies and contacted relevant pharmaceutical companies. Selection criteria All relevant randomised, at least single-blind trials, comparing clozapine with other atypical antipsychotics, any dose and oral formulations, for people with schizophrenia or related disorders. Data collection and analysis We selected trials and extracted data independently. For dichotomous data we calculated relative risks (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) based on a random-effects model. We calculated numbers needed to treat/harm (NNT/NNH) where appropriate. For continuous data, we calculated mean differences (MD) again based on a random-effects model. Main results The review currently includes 27 blinded randomised controlled trials, which involved 3099 participants. Twelve randomised control trials compared clozapine with olanzapine, five with quetiapine, nine with risperidone, one with ziprasidone and two with zotepine. Attrition from these studies was high (overall 30.1%), leaving the interpretation of results problematic. Clozapine had a higher attrition rate due to adverse effects than olanzapine (9 RCTs, n=1674, RR 1.60 CI 1.07 to 2.40, NNT 25 CI 15 to 73) and risperidone (6 RCTs, n=627, RR 1.88 CI 1.11 to 3.21, NNT 16 CI 9 to 59). Fewer participants in the clozapine groups left the trials early due to inefficacy than risperidone (6 RCTs, n=627, RR 0.40 CI 0.23 to 0.70, NNT 11 CI 7 to 21), suggesting a certain higher efficacy of clozapine. Clozapine was more efficacious than zotepine in improving the participants general mental state (BPRS total score: 1 RCT, n=59, MD −6.00 CI −9.83 to −2.17), but not consistently more than olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone and ziprasidone. There was no significant difference between clozapine and olanzapine or risperidone in terms of positive or negative symptoms of schizophrenia. According to two studies from China quetiapine was more efficacious for negative symptoms than clozapine (2 RCTs, n=142, MD 2.23 CI 0.99 to 3.48). Clozapine produced somewhat fewer extrapyramidal side-effects than risperidone (use of antiparkinson medication: 6 RCTs, n=304, RR 0.39 CI 0.22 to 0.68, NNT 7 CI 5 to 18) and zotepine (n=59, RR 0.05 CI 0.00 to 0.86, NNT 3 CI 2 to 5). More participants in the clozapine group showed decreased white blood cells than those taking olanzapine, more hypersalivation and sedation than those on olanzapine, risperidone and quetiapine and more seizures than people on olanzapine and risperidone. Also clozapine produced an important weight gain not seen with risperidone. Other differences in adverse effects were less documented and should be replicated, for example, clozapine did not alter prolactin levels whereas olanzapine, risperidone and zotepine did; compared with quetiapine, clozapine produced a higher incidence of electrocardiogram (ECG) alterations; and compared with quetiapine and risperidone clozapine produced a higher increase of triglyceride levels. Other findings that should be replicated were: clozapine improved social functioning less than risperidone and fewer participants in the clozapine group had to be hospitalised to avoid suicide attempts compared to olanzapine. Other important outcomes such as service use, cognitive functioning, satisfaction with care or quality of life were rarely reported. Authors’ conclusions Clozapine may be a little more efficacious than zotepine and risperidone but further trials are required to confirm this finding. Clozapine differs more clearly in adverse effects from other second generation antipsychotics and the side-effect profile could be key in the selection of treatment depending on the clinical situation and a patient’s preferences. Data on other important outcomes such as cognitive functioning, quality of life, death or service use are currently largely missing, making further large and well-designed trials necessary. It is also important to take into account that the large number of people leaving the studies early limits the validity and interpretation of our findings. PMID:21069690

  11. Seizure in Iranian patients with multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Zare, Mohammad; Norouzi, Rasul; Shayegannejad, Vahid; Ashtari, Fereshteh; Ghasemi, Majid; Tavahen, Hemaseh; Masaeli, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is a broad variation in reported frequencies of seizure in multiple sclerosis (MS). In this study, the seizure and its characteristics analyzed among a large group of patients with MS. Patients and Methods: We reviewed the medical records of all definite MS patients referred to the MS Clinic of Kashani hospital, Isfahan, Iran, between 2007 and 2011. Results: Altogether, 34 cases with seizure activity identified among the 920 definite MS subjects (3.69%). Five excluded due to the other probable etiologies rather than MS. In the remained 29 patients (3.15%), the type of seizure was mostly generalized (79.3%); interictal electroencephalography showed an abnormal pattern in 84.6%, brain magnetic resonance imaging revealed subcortical white mater lesions in 84.6% of patients. The mean duration of MS onsets was 8.17 years and the mean interval between MS onset and the first seizure occurrence was 3.7 years. In general, response to antiepileptic treatment was excellent. Conclusion: Seizures can occur at any stage during the course of MS, but it is more common during the early stages. PMID:24516486

  12. Acute Symptomatic Seizures Caused by Electrolyte Disturbances

    PubMed Central

    Nardone, Raffaele; Brigo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    In this narrative review we focus on acute symptomatic seizures occurring in subjects with electrolyte disturbances. Quite surprisingly, despite its clinical relevance, this issue has received very little attention in the scientific literature. Electrolyte abnormalities are commonly encountered in clinical daily practice, and their diagnosis relies on routine laboratory findings. Acute and severe electrolyte imbalances can manifest with seizures, which may be the sole presenting symptom. Seizures are more frequently observed in patients with sodium disorders (especially hyponatremia), hypocalcemia, and hypomagnesemia. They do not entail a diagnosis of epilepsy, but are classified as acute symptomatic seizures. EEG has little specificity in differentiating between various electrolyte disturbances. The prominent EEG feature is slowing of the normal background activity, although other EEG findings, including various epileptiform abnormalities may occur. An accurate and prompt diagnosis should be established for a successful management of seizures, as rapid identification and correction of the underlying electrolyte disturbance (rather than an antiepileptic treatment) are of crucial importance in the control of seizures and prevention of permanent brain damage. PMID:26754778

  13. Cerebrospinal fluid findings after epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Chatzikonstantinou, Anastasios; Ebert, Anne D; Hennerici, Michael G

    2015-12-01

    We aimed to evaluate ictally-induced CSF parameter changes after seizures in adult patients without acute inflammatory diseases or infectious diseases associated with the central nervous system. In total, 151 patients were included in the study. All patients were admitted to our department of neurology following acute seizures and received an extensive work-up including EEG, cerebral imaging, and CSF examinations. CSF protein elevation was found in most patients (92; 60.9%) and was significantly associated with older age, male sex, and generalized seizures. Abnormal CSF-to-serum glucose ratio was found in only nine patients (5.9%) and did not show any significant associations. CSF lactate was elevated in 34 patients (22.5%) and showed a significant association with focal seizures with impaired consciousness, status epilepticus, the presence of EEG abnormalities in general and epileptiform potentials in particular, as well as epileptogenic lesions on cerebral imaging. Our results indicate that non-inflammatory CSF elevation of protein and lactate after epileptic seizures is relatively common, in contrast to changes in CSF-to-serum glucose ratio, and further suggest that these changes are caused by ictal activity and are related to seizure type and intensity. We found no indication that these changes may have further-reaching pathological implications besides their postictal character. PMID:26575850

  14. Altered Intrathalamic GABAA Neurotransmission in a Mouse Model of a Human Genetic Absence Epilepsy Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Chengwen; Ding, Li; Deel, M. Elizabeth; Ferrick, Elizabeth A.; Emeson, Ronald B.; Gallagher, Martin J.

    2014-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that heterozygous deletion of Gabra1, the mouse homolog of the human absence epilepsy gene that encodes the GABAA receptor (GABAAR) α1 subunit, causes absence seizures. We showed that cortex partially compensates for this deletion by increasing the cell surface expression of residual α1 subunit and by increasing α3 subunit expression. Absence seizures also involve two thalamic nuclei: the ventrobasal (VB) nucleus, which expresses only the α1 and α4 subtypes of GABAAR α subunits, and the reticular (nRT) nucleus, which expresses only the α3 subunit subtype. Here, we found that, unlike cortex, VB exhibited significantly reduced total and synaptic α1 subunit expression. In addition, heterozygous α1 subunit deletion substantially reduced miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current (mIPSC) peak amplitudes and frequency in VB. However, there was no change in expression of the extrasynaptic α4 or δ subunits in VB and, unlike other models of absence epilepsy, no change in tonic GABAAR currents. Although heterozygous α1 subunit knockout increased α3 subunit expression in medial thalamic nuclei, it did not alter α3 subunit expression in nRT. However, it did enlarge the presynaptic vesicular inhibitory amino acid transporter puncta and lengthen the time constant of mIPSC decay in nRT. We conclude that increased tonic GABAA currents are not necessary for absence seizures. In addition, heterozygous loss of α1 subunit disinhibits VB by substantially reducing phasic GABAergic currents and surprisingly, it also increases nRT inhibition by prolonging phasic currents. The increased inhibition in nRT likely represents a partial compensation that helps reduce absence seizures. PMID:25447232

  15. Monitor for status epilepticus seizures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Mark; Simkins, Thomas

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the sensor technology and associated electronics of a monitor designed to detect the onset of a seizure disorder called status epilepticus. It is a condition that affects approximately 3-5 percent of those individuals suffering from epilepsy. This form of epilepsy does not follow the typical cycle of start-peak-end. The convulsions continue until medically interrupted and are life threatening. The mortality rate is high without prompt medical treatment at a suitable facility. The paper describes the details of a monitor design that provides an inexpensive solution to the needs of those responsible for the care of individuals afflicted with this disorder. The monitor has been designed as a cooperative research and development effort involving the United States Army Armament Research, Development, and Engineering Center's Benet Laboratories (Benet) and the Cerebral Palsy Center for the Disabled (Center), in association with the Department of Neurology at Albany Medical College (AMC). Benet has delivered a working prototype of the device for field testing, in collaboration with Albany Medical College. The Center has identified several children in need of special monitoring and has agreed to pursue commercialization of the device.

  16. Recognizing, Differentiating, and Referring Students with Absence Seizures: What Factors Affect Preservice Teachers' Decision Making?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nasewicz, Nicole

    2009-01-01

    Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and epilepsy are common pediatric disorders that often occur co-morbidly. Both disorders predispose children to a wide range of school-related problems, some of which are the same and others vastly different. Fortunately, with early diagnosis and comprehensive disease management, the long-term…

  17. Age-dependent seizures of absence epilepsy and sleep spindles dynamics in WAG/Rij rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grubov, Vadim V.; Sitnikova, Evgenia Y.; Pavlov, Alexey N.; Khramova, Marina V.; Koronovskii, Alexey A.; Hramov, Alexander E.

    2015-03-01

    In the given paper, a relation between time-frequency characteristics of sleep spindles and the age-dependent epileptic activity in WAG/Rij rats is discussed. Analysis of sleep spindles based on the continuous wavelet transform is performed for rats of different ages. It is shown that the epileptic activity affects the time-frequency intrinsic dynamics of sleep spindles.

  18. Atypical case of Morvan's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lotan, Itay; Djaldetti, Ruth; Hellman, Mark A; Benninger, Felix

    2016-03-01

    Morvan's syndrome is a rare neurological condition characterized by the combination of neuromyotonia, autonomic instability and encephalopathy, associated with auto-antibodies against voltage-gated potassium channels. We report a patient with an initial presentation suggestive of typical Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), who later developed clinical and laboratory features compatible with Morvan's syndrome. Several months after resolution of the neurological symptoms, as well as disappearance of the characteristic anti-leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 1 (anti-LGI1) antibodies, the patient presented with episodes of fever of unknown origin, during which the antibodies became positive again, suggesting the possibility of a relapse. In this case, both the GBS-like symptoms at presentation and the isolated episodes of fever of unknown origin during follow-up are atypical, and may suggest the presence of an additional, yet unknown antibody. PMID:26549678

  19. [Atypical trajectory of gunshot injury].

    PubMed

    Aygün, Mert; Tulay, Cumhur Murat

    2014-11-01

    Gunshot injuries are common medical-legal issues. Atypical tract lines resulting from this type of injuries cause difficulties in diagnosis and treatment. In this paper, a gunshot injury on the right anterior thigh extending to the right hemithorax was presented. A 67-year-old Syrian refugee patient was brought to the emergency service due to gunshot injury. Bullet entrance hole was determined on the right anterior thigh region; however, exit side could not be seen. Bullet was determined on the right thorax at tomography and the patient was taken to operation due to diaphragm rupture and lung parenchymal injury. Other body parts must be examined radiologically for the bullet which cannot be determined at gunshot injury side. PMID:25541926

  20. Typical and atypical AIS. Pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Dudin, M; Pinchuk, D

    2012-01-01

    AIS hypothesis has the right to recognition, if it explains the transition of "healthy" vertebra column into status of "scoliotic" one. AIS is the most investigated disease in the history of orthopedics, but up the present time there is no clear explanation of some its phenomena: vertebra column mono-form deformation along with its poly etiology character, interrelation of its origin and development and child's growth process etc. The key for authors' view at AIS was scoliosis with non-standard (concave side) rotation. On the bases of its' multifunctional instrumental investigation results (Rtg, EMG, EEG, optical topography, hormonal and neuropeptides trials, thermo-vision methods and other) in comparison with typical AIS was worked out the new hypothesis, part of it is suggested for discussion. In the work under observation is the sequence of appearance of typical and atypical scoliosis symptomatology beginning from the preclinical stage. PMID:22744477

  1. Interplay between interictal spikes and behavioral seizures in young, but not aged pilocarpine-treated epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Bajorat, Rika; Goerss, Doreen; Brenndörfer, Linda; Schwabe, Lars; Köhling, Rüdiger; Kirschstein, Timo

    2016-04-01

    Interictal spike activity is commonly observed in the EEG of patients with epilepsy, but the causal interrelationship between interictal spikes and behavioral seizures is poorly understood. We performed long-term video-EEG monitoring of 16 epileptic rats after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus and five control animals. To quantify the interplay between periods of spikes and seizures, we calculated the time spent with spikes as well as the time spent with seizures for each animal. Within a given subject, we found a significant correlation between these two measures in 7/11 young epileptic rats (<400days); this correlation was positive in six cases and negative in one. By contrast, none of five aged pilocarpine-treated animals exhibited significant correlation coefficients between spike periods and seizures (>600days, P<0.05). Instead, aged epileptic rats showed a prominent predominance for either spike periods or seizures, which might explain the absence of significant correlation in this population. We found that there is a significant interplay between interictal periods of spikes and behavioral seizures in young epileptic animals, but this association is absent during aging. PMID:26926072

  2. High-Performance Seizure Detection System Using a Wavelet-Approximate Entropy-fSVM Cascade With Clinical Validation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Chia-Ping; Chen, Chih-Chuan; Hsieh, Sheau-Ling; Chen, Wei-Hsin; Chen, Jia-Ming; Chen, Chih-Min; Lai, Feipei; Chiu, Ming-Jang

    2013-10-01

    The classification of electroencephalography (EEG) signals is one of the most important methods for seizure detection. However, verification of an atypical epileptic seizure often can only be done through long-term EEG monitoring for 24 hours or longer. Hence, automatic EEG signal analysis for clinical screening is necessary for the diagnosis of epilepsy. We propose an EEG analysis system of seizure detection, based on a cascade of wavelet-approximate entropy for feature selection, Fisher scores for adaptive feature selection, and support vector machine for feature classification. Performance of the system was tested on open source data, and the overall accuracy reached 99.97%. We further tested the performance of the system on clinical EEG obtained from a clinical EEG laboratory and bedside EEG recordings. The results showed an overall accuracy of 98.73% for routine EEG, and 94.32% for bedside EEG, which verified the high performance and usefulness of such a cascade system for seizure detection. Also, the prediction model, trained by routine EEG, can be successfully generalized to bedside EEG of independent patients. PMID:23610456

  3. Effect of trained Seizure Alert Dogs on frequency of tonic-clonic seizures.

    PubMed

    Strong, Val; Brown, Stephen; Huyton, Margaret; Coyle, Helen

    2002-09-01

    We have previously reported that dogs can be trained to recognize specific changes preceding an epileptic seizure in humans. Such dogs can provide an overt signal that acts as a useful warning to the human. Early observations suggested that seizure frequency might also be reduced. We report a prospective study of 10 consecutive referrals to our Seizure Alert Dogs service of people with tonic-clonic seizures. Seizure frequency was monitored over a 48 week period including 12 weeks baseline after entry, a 12 week training period, and 24 weeks follow up. Comparing baseline seizure frequency to the last 12 weeks of follow up, there was a 43% mean reduction in seizure frequency ( P= 0.002). Nine out of /10 subjects showed a 34% or greater reduction, 4 /10 showed a 50% or greater reduction, and only one showed no improvement. Although a significant drop in seizure frequency was seen during the first 4 weeks of training ( P= 0.0078) a further drop occurred between the first and last 4 week period of training (P = 0.038) and this final improvement was maintained for the whole 24 week follow up. PMID:12160671

  4. Seizures and Teens: Surgery for Seizures--What's It All About?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duchowny, Michael S.; Dean, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    Nearly 1 out of 2 children and teens with seizures may need to take medications throughout their lives. At least 25% will develop a condition called refractory epilepsy--meaning that their seizures do not respond to medical therapy. For these children and teens, non-drug therapies such as brain surgery are available that may offer a chance to…

  5. Seizures and Teens: Surgery for Seizures--What's It All About?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duchowny, Michael S.; Dean, Patricia

    2006-01-01

    Nearly 1 out of 2 children and teens with seizures may need to take medications throughout their lives. At least 25% will develop a condition called refractory epilepsy--meaning that their seizures do not respond to medical therapy. For these children and teens, non-drug therapies such as brain surgery are available that may offer a chance to

  6. Seizures and Teens: When Seizures Aren't the Only Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanner, Andres M.; Shafer, Patricia O.

    2006-01-01

    Some teenagers with epilepsy only have to deal with seizures, which can be tough enough, but for other teens, seizures are not the only problem. Parents and caregivers often report changes in their teens' abilities to think clearly, learn in school, or remain focused in class. Mood and other behavioral problems may also be seen. It is critical…

  7. Nonconvulsive seizures and status epilepticus in pediatric head trauma: A national survey

    PubMed Central

    Joffe, Ari R; Bowman, Stephen M; Richer, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: It remains uncertain whether nonconvulsive seizures and nonconvulsive status epilepticus in pediatric traumatic brain injury are deleterious to the brain and/or impact the recovery from injury. Consequently, optimal electroencephalographic surveillance and management is unknown. We aimed to determine specialists’ opinion regarding the detection and treatment of nonconvulsive seizures or nonconvulsive status epilepticus in pediatric traumatic brain injury, regardless of their practice. Methods: In 2012, 183 surveys were sent to all 93 neurologists, 27 neurosurgeons, and 63 intensivists in the14 tertiary pediatric hospitals across Canada. The survey included an initial scenario of pediatric TBI that evolved into three further scenarios. Each scenario had required responses and an embedded branching logic algorithm ascertaining clinical management. The survey instrument assimilated data about the importance of nonconvulsive status epilepticus and nonconvulsive seizures detection and treatment, and whether they are a cause of brain injury that adversely affects neurologic outcomes. Results: Of the 79 specialists who replied (43% response rate), 68%–78% elected to order an electroencephalographic across all four scenarios, and one-third (31%–36%; scenario dependent) would request an urgent electroencephalographic (within the hour) in the comatose pediatric traumatic brain injury patient. In the absence of pharmacologic paralysis or intracranial pressure spikes, half-hour electroencephalographic (41%–55%) was preferred over ⩾24-h continuous electroencephalographic monitoring (29%–40%). Finally, nonconvulsive status epilepticus (81%–87%) and nonconvulsive seizures (61%–73%) were considered to be a cause of poor neurologic outcomes warranting aggressive pharmacologic management. Conclusion: The Canadian specialists’ opinion is that nonconvulsive seizures and nonconvulsive status epilepticus are biomarkers of brain injury and contribute to worsened outcomes. This suggests the urgency of future outcome-oriented research in the identification and management of nonconvulsive seizures or nonconvulsive status epilepticus. PMID:26770768

  8. Homozygous TREM2 mutation in a family with atypical frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Bras, José; Camuzat, Agnès; Caroppo, Paola; Lattante, Serena; Couarch, Philippe; Kabashi, Edor; Bouya-Ahmed, Kawtar; Dubois, Bruno; Brice, Alexis

    2014-01-01

    TREM2 mutations were first identified in Nasu-Hakola disease, a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by recurrent fractures because of bone cysts and presenile dementia. Recently, homozygous and compound heterozygous TREM2 mutations were identified in rare families with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) but without bone involvement. We identified a p.Thr66Met heterozygous mutation in a new consanguineous Italian family. Two sibs had early onset autosomal recessive FTLD without severe bone disorders. Atypical signs were present in this family: early parietal and hippocampus involvement, parkinsonism, epilepsy, and corpus callosum thickness on brain magnetic resonance imaging. This study further demonstrates the implication of TREM2 mutations in FTLD phenotypes. It illustrates the variability of bone phenotype and underlines the frequency of atypical signs in TREM2 carriers. This and previous studies evidence that TREM2 mutation screening should be limited to autosomal recessive FTLD with atypical phenotypes characterized by: (1) a very young age at onset (20–50 years); (2) early parietal and hippocampal deficits; (3) the presence of seizures and parkinsonism; (4) suggestive extensive white matter lesions and corpus callosum thickness on brain magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:24910390

  9. Homozygous TREM2 mutation in a family with atypical frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Le Ber, Isabelle; De Septenville, Anne; Guerreiro, Rita; Bras, José; Camuzat, Agnès; Caroppo, Paola; Lattante, Serena; Couarch, Philippe; Kabashi, Edor; Bouya-Ahmed, Kawtar; Dubois, Bruno; Brice, Alexis

    2014-10-01

    TREM2 mutations were first identified in Nasu-Hakola disease, a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by recurrent fractures because of bone cysts and presenile dementia. Recently, homozygous and compound heterozygous TREM2 mutations were identified in rare families with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD) but without bone involvement. We identified a p.Thr66Met heterozygous mutation in a new consanguineous Italian family. Two sibs had early onset autosomal recessive FTLD without severe bone disorders. Atypical signs were present in this family: early parietal and hippocampus involvement, parkinsonism, epilepsy, and corpus callosum thickness on brain magnetic resonance imaging. This study further demonstrates the implication of TREM2 mutations in FTLD phenotypes. It illustrates the variability of bone phenotype and underlines the frequency of atypical signs in TREM2 carriers. This and previous studies evidence that TREM2 mutation screening should be limited to autosomal recessive FTLD with atypical phenotypes characterized by: (1) a very young age at onset (20-50 years); (2) early parietal and hippocampal deficits; (3) the presence of seizures and parkinsonism; (4) suggestive extensive white matter lesions and corpus callosum thickness on brain magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:24910390

  10. Altered resting state functional network connectivity in children absence epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Li, Qifu; Cao, Weifang; Liao, Xiaoping; Chen, Zhibin; Yang, Tianhua; Gong, Qiyong; Zhou, Dong; Luo, Cheng; Yao, Dezhong

    2015-07-15

    Altered functional connectivity has been associated with the influence of epileptic activity. Abnormalities in connectivity, particularly in dorsal attention (DAN), salience (SN) and default mode (DMN) networks, might contribute to the loss of consciousness during seizures and cognitive deficits in patients with children absence epilepsy (CAE). The objective of the present study was to identify whether the functional network connectivity (FNC) is changed between patients with CAE and healthy controls. Using independent component analysis, twelve resting state networks (RSNs) were identified in resting state functional magnetic resonance imaging data sets in eighteen CAE patients and twenty-one healthy controls. Analyses of the group differences in FNC strength were conducted, controlling for age and gender effects. The findings showed that some functional networks were clustered into two subgroups, correlated within subgroups and antagonized with each other. Compared with the controls, patients with CAE demonstrated abnormal FNC strength among three networks: DMN, DAN and SN. In addition, the antagonism of two subgroups was altered. These results might reflect the underlying neuronal functional impairment or altered integration among these RSNs in CAE, suggesting that the abnormal functional connectivity is likely to imply the pathological mechanism associated with the accumulative influence of epileptic activity. These findings contribute to the understanding of the behavior abnormality in CAE, such as disturbed executive and attentional functions and the loss of consciousness during absence seizures. PMID:25982500

  11. A New Model to Study Sleep Deprivation-Induced Seizure

    PubMed Central

    Lucey, Brendan P.; Leahy, Averi; Rosas, Regine; Shaw, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Study Objectives: A relationship between sleep and seizures is well-described in both humans and rodent animal models; however, the mechanism underlying this relationship is unknown. Using Drosophila melanogaster mutants with seizure phenotypes, we demonstrate that seizure activity can be modified by sleep deprivation. Design: Seizure activity was evaluated in an adult bang-sensitive seizure mutant, stress sensitive B (sesB9ed4), and in an adult temperature sensitive seizure mutant seizure (seits1) under baseline and following 12 h of sleep deprivation. The long-term effect of sleep deprivation on young, immature sesB9ed4 flies was also assessed. Setting: Laboratory. Participants: Drosophila melanogaster. Interventions: Sleep deprivation. Measurements and Results: Sleep deprivation increased seizure susceptibility in adult sesB9ed4/+ and seits1 mutant flies. Sleep deprivation also increased seizure susceptibility when sesB was disrupted using RNAi. The effect of sleep deprivation on seizure activity was reduced when sesB9ed4/+ flies were given the anti-seizure drug, valproic acid. In contrast to adult flies, sleep deprivation during early fly development resulted in chronic seizure susceptibility when sesB9ed4/+ became adults. Conclusions: These findings show that Drosophila is a model organism for investigating the relationship between sleep and seizure activity. Citation: Lucey BP, Leahy A, Rosas R, Shaw PJ. A new model to study sleep deprivation-induced seizure. SLEEP 2015;38(5):777–785. PMID:25515102

  12. Febrile seizures in Kaduna, north western Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Eseigbe, E. E.; Adama, S. J.; Eseigbe, P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Febrile seizure is the most common seizure of childhood and has a good prognosis. However its presentation is fraught with poor management, with grave consequences, in our environment. Thus a review of its current status is important. Objective: To review the status of febrile seizures in Kaduna metropolis. Materials and Methods: A review of cases seen in the Department of Paediatrics, 44 Nigeria Army Reference Hospital, Kaduna between June 2008 and June 2010. Results: Out of the 635 cases admitted in the department 17 (2.7%) fulfilled the criteria for febrile seizures. There were 11 Males and 6 Females (M: F, 1.8:1). Age range was from 9 months to 5 years with a mean of 2.2 years ± 1.1 and peak age of 3 years. Twelve (70.6%) were in the upper social classes (I-III). Fever, convulsion, catarrh and cough were major presenting symptoms. Incidence of convulsion was least on the 1st day of complaint. Fourteen (82.4%) of the cases were simple febrile seizures while 3 were complex. There was a positive family history in 5 (29.4%) of the cases. Eleven (64.7%) had orthodox medication at home, before presentation, 5 (29.4%) consulted patient medicine sellers and 7 (41.7%) received traditional medication as part of home management. Malaria and acute respiratory infections were the identifiable causes. Standard anti-malaria and anti-biotic therapy were instituted, where indicated. All recovered and were discharged. Conclusion: There was a low prevalence of febrile seizures among the hospitalized children and a poor pre-hospitalization management of cases. It highlighted the need for improved community awareness on the prevention and management of febrile seizures. PMID:23293414

  13. Imaging appearances of atypical hydatid cysts

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Amita; Chandra, Ranjan; Prasad, Rajni; Khanna, Geetika; Thukral, Brij B

    2016-01-01

    Hydatid disease continues to be a significant health problem in many parts of the world. It can occur in any part of the body, but liver is the commonest site of involvement. The disease may remain asymptomatic for years. Symptoms occur due to compression of local structures or complications like rupture and infection. The diagnosis is clear when typical radiological appearance is observed at the common sites of involvement. Complications give rise to atypical appearances. These coupled with unusual localizations pose diagnostic difficulty. The aim of this pictorial essay is to demonstrate the atypical manifestations of hydatid cysts – atypical either due to complications or the unusual site. PMID:27081221

  14. Scn8a voltage-gated sodium channel mutation alters seizure and anxiety responses to acute stress

    PubMed Central

    Sawyer, Nikki T; Papale, Ligia A; Eliason, Jessica; Neigh, Gretchen N; Escayg, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Stress is known to trigger seizures in patients with epilepsy, highlighting the physiological stress response as a possible therapeutic target for epilepsy treatment. Nevertheless, little is currently known about how a genetic predisposition to epilepsy interacts with the stress response to influence seizure outcome. To address this question, we examined the effect of acute stress on seizure outcome in mice with mutations in the voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) gene Scn8a. Scn8a mutants display spontaneous spike-wave discharges (SWDs) characteristic of absence epilepsy. We saw that the baseline frequency of SWDs in Scn8a mutants correlates closely with the diurnal activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, with a peak in seizure activity occurring at around the same time as the peak in corticosterone (1700h–1900h). A 20-minute acute restraint stress administered in the morning increases the frequency of spontaneous SWDs immediately following the stressor. Seizure frequency then returns to baseline levels within three hours after stressor exposure, but the subsequent evening peak in seizure frequency is delayed and broadened, changes that persist into the next evening and are accompanied by long-lasting changes in HPA axis activity. Scn8a mutants also show increased anxiety-like behavior in mildly stressful situations. A 20-minute acute restraint stress can also increase the severity and duration of chemically induced seizures in Scn8a mutants, changes that differ from wild-type littermates. Overall, our data show that a voltage-gated sodium channel mutation can alter the behavioral response to stress and can interact with the stress response to alter seizure outcome. PMID:24138934

  15. The diagnosis of psychogenic non-epileptic seizures: a review.

    PubMed

    Kuyk, J; Leijten, F; Meinardi, H; Spinhoven; Van Dyck, R

    1997-08-01

    Diagnosing psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) is a clinical challenge. There is neither a standard in diagnosing PNES nor a comprehensive theoretical framework for this type of seizure. The diagnosis of PNES must be made by excluding epilepsy. However, epilepsy cannot always be determined and PNES and epileptic seizures may coexist. In this study, the characteristics of PNES and patients are discussed. The diagnosis of PNES and epileptic seizures was facilitated by the simultaneous recording of seizures on video tape and EEG. Seizure provoking techniques, hormonal indices, and psychological methods were also used. The benefits and limitations of these techniques are discussed and proposals are made for clinical guidelines. PMID:9304716

  16. Electrolyte Therapy Reduces Spike-and-Wave Discharges in the WAG/Rij Rat Model of Absence Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Talnov, Arkadij N.; Isaeva, Elena; Savotchenko, Alina V.; Dovgalets, Galina V.; Ochoa, Juan G.; Holmes, Gregory L.; Isaev, Dmytro

    2012-01-01

    Although antiepileptic drugs are often effective in control seizures, some patients show little or no improvement. As alternative treatment, different dietary modifications were shown to be beneficial for patients with poor tolerance for AED. Previous reports have shown that rice-based oral electrolyte hydration therapy is effective in seizure control in patients with refractory absence seizures. In the present study using an animal model of absence epilepsy we show that the occurrence of spike-and-wave discharges significantly decreases upon switching to electrolyte therapy. We also show that consumption of solution with the same osmolarity as rice-based oral electrolyte solution leads to a decrease in number of spike-and-wave discharges per hour. We suggest that the antiepileptic effect of rice-based oral electrolyte hydration therapy can be at least in part due to hyperosmolarity of the ingested solution. PMID:22749239

  17. Self-control of epileptic seizures by nonpharmacological strategies.

    PubMed

    Kotwas, Iliana; McGonigal, Aileen; Trebuchon, Agnès; Bastien-Toniazzo, Mireille; Nagai, Yoko; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Micoulaud-Franchi, Jean-Arthur

    2016-02-01

    Despite the unpredictability of epileptic seizures, many patients report that they can anticipate seizure occurrence. Using certain alert symptoms (i.e., auras, prodromes, precipitant factors), patients can adopt behaviors to avoid injury during and after the seizure or may implement spontaneous cognitive and emotional strategies to try to control the seizure itself. From the patient's view point, potential means of enhancing seizure prediction and developing seizure control supports are seen as very important issues, especially when the epilepsy is drug-resistant. In this review, we first describe how some patients anticipate their seizures and whether this is effective in terms of seizure prediction. Secondly, we examine how these anticipatory elements might help patients to prevent or control their seizures and how the patient's neuropsychological profile, specifically parameters of perceived self-control (PSC) and locus of control (LOC), might impact these strategies and quality of life (QOL). Thirdly, we review the external supports that can help patients to better predict seizures. Finally, we look at nonpharmacological means of increasing perceived self-control and achieving potential reduction of seizure frequency (i.e., stress-based and arousal-based strategies). In the past few years, various approaches for detection and control of seizures have gained greater interest, but more research is needed to confirm a positive effect on seizure frequency as well as on QOL. PMID:26780213

  18. Effects of an acute seizure on associative learning and memory.

    PubMed

    Holley, Andrew J; Lugo, Joaquin N

    2016-01-01

    Past studies have demonstrated that inducing several seizures or continuous seizures in neonatal or adult rats results in impairments in learning and memory. The impact of a single acute seizure on learning and memory has not been investigated in mice. In this study, we exposed adult 129SvEvTac mice to the inhalant flurothyl until a behavioral seizure was induced. Our study consisted of 4 experiments where we examined the effect of one seizure before or after delay fear conditioning. We also included a separate cohort of animals that was tested in the open field after a seizure to rule out changes in locomotor activity influencing the results of memory tests. Mice that had experienced a single seizure 1h, but not 6h, prior to training showed a significant impairment in associative conditioning to the conditioned stimulus when compared with controls 24h later. There were no differences in freezing one day later for animals that experienced a single seizure 1h after associative learning. We also found that an acute seizure reduced activity levels in an open-field test 2h but not 24h later. These findings suggest that an acute seizure occurring immediately before learning can have an effect on the recall of events occurring shortly after that seizure. In contrast, an acute seizure occurring shortly after learning appears to have little or no effect on long-term memory. These findings have implications for understanding the acute effects of seizures on the acquisition of new knowledge. PMID:26655449

  19. Prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation and subsequent development of seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, K.; Yoshimaru, H.; Otake, M.; Annegers, J.F.; Schull, W.J. )

    1990-01-01

    Seizures are a frequent sequela of impaired brain development and can be expected to affect more children with radiation-related brain damage than children without such damage. This report deals with the incidence and type of seizures among survivors prenatally exposed to the atomic bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and their association with specific stages of prenatal development at the time of irradiation. Fetal radiation dose was assumed to be equal to the dose to the maternal uterus. Seizures here include all references in the clinical record to seizure, epilepsy, or convulsion. Histories of seizures were obtained at biennial routine clinical examinations starting at about the age of 2 years. These clinical records were used to classify seizures as febrile or unprovoked (without precipitating cause). No seizures were ascertained among subjects exposed 0-7 weeks after fertilization at doses higher than 0.10 Gy. The incidence of seizures was highest with irradiation at the eighth through the 15th week after fertilization among subjects with doses exceeding 0.10 Gy and was linearly related to the level of fetal exposure. This obtains for all seizures without regard to the presence of fever or precipitating causes, and for unprovoked seizures. When the 22 cases of severe mental retardation were excluded, the increase in seizures was only suggestively significant and only for unprovoked seizures. After exposure at later stages of development, there was no increase in recorded seizures.

  20. CHD2 mutations are a rare cause of generalized epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures.

    PubMed

    Trivisano, Marina; Striano, Pasquale; Sartorelli, Jacopo; Giordano, Lucio; Traverso, Monica; Accorsi, Patrizia; Cappelletti, Simona; Claps, Dianela Judith; Vigevano, Federico; Zara, Federico; Specchio, Nicola

    2015-10-01

    Chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 2 (CHD2) gene mutations have been reported in patients with myoclonic-atonic epilepsy (MAE), as well as in patients with Lennox-Gastaut, Dravet, and Jeavons syndromes and other epileptic encephalopathies featuring generalized epilepsy and intellectual disability. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of CHD2 mutations in a series of patients with MAE. Twenty patients affected by MAE were included in the study. We analyzed antecedents, age at onset, seizure semiology and frequency, EEG, treatment, and neuropsychological outcome. We sequenced the CHD2 gene with Sanger technology. We identified a CHD2 frameshift mutation in one patient (c.4256del19). He was a 17-year-old boy with no familial history for epilepsy and normal development before epilepsy onset. Epilepsy onset was at 3years and 5months: he presented with myoclonic-atonic seizures, head drops, myoclonic jerks, and absences. Interictal EEGs revealed slow background activity associated with generalized epileptiform abnormalities and photoparoxysmal response. His seizures were highly responsive to valproic acid, and an attempt to withdraw it led to seizure recurrence. Neuropsychological evaluation revealed moderate intellectual disability. Chromodomain-helicase-DNA-binding protein 2 is not the major gene associated with MAE. Conversely, CHD2 could be responsible for a proper phenotype characterized by infantile-onset generalized epilepsy, intellectual disability, and photosensitivity, which might overlap with MAE, Lennox-Gastaut, Dravet, and Jeavons syndromes. PMID:26262932

  1. Dictator Perpetuus: Julius Caesar--did he have seizures? If so, what was the etiology?

    PubMed

    Hughes, John R

    2004-10-01

    The "Dictator Perpetuus" of the Roman Empire, the great Julius Caesar, was not the one for whom the well-known cesarean operation was named; instead, this term is derived from a Latin word meaning "to cut." Caesar likely had epilepsy on the basis of four attacks that were probably complex partial seizures: (1) while listening to an oration by Cicero, (2) in the Senate while being offered the Emperor's Crown, and in military campaigns, (3) near Thapsus (North Africa) and (4) Corduba (Spain). Also, it is possible that he had absence attacks as a child and as a teenager. His son, Caesarion, by Queen Cleopatra, likely had seizures as a child, but the evidence is only suggestive. His great-great-great grandnephews Caligula and Britannicus also had seizures. The etiology of these seizures in this Julio-Claudian family was most likely through inheritance, with the possibility of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) in his great grandfather and also his father. Our best evidence comes from the ancient sources of Suetonius, Plutarch, Pliny, and Appianus. PMID:15380131

  2. Interventional trials in atypical parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Eschlbck, S; Krismer, F; Wenning, G K

    2016-01-01

    Atypical parkinson disorders (APD) are rapidly progressive neurodegenerative diseases with a variable clinical presentation that may even mimic Parkinson's disease. Multiple system atrophy (MSA), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and corticobasal degeneration (CBD) are commonly summarized under this umbrella term. Significant developments in research have expanded knowledge and have broadened available symptomatic treatments, particularly for the treatment of neurogenic orthostatic hypotension. Nonetheless, symptomatic support still remains limited in all of these disorders. Currently, there exists no effective treatment to delay disease progression and disease-modifying trials have failed to provide coherent and convincing results. Recent trials of rasagiline (in MSA), rifampicin (in MSA), tideglusib (in PSP) and davunetide (in PSP) reported negative results. Nevertheless, large cohorts of patients were recruited for interventional studies in the last few years which improved our understanding of trial methodology in APDs immensely. In addition, remarkable progress in basic research has been reported recently and will provide a solid foundation for future therapeutic trials. In this review, we will summarize published randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials (RCTs) in APDs. Additionally, the design of ongoing and unpublished interventions will be presented. PMID:26421389

  3. The effect of exercise on seizure frequency.

    PubMed

    Denio, L S; Drake, M E; Pakalnis, A

    1989-01-01

    The effect of exercise on seizure frequency is uncertain. While some investigators have reported an increase in the normal background frequency of EEGs after exercise, other investigators believe that exercise increases EEG epileptiform activity in the recovery period following exercise. We asked all patients over a two month period at our outpatient Epilepsy Clinic to complete a questionnaire regarding their exercise habits. Those who were not otherwise healthy, were non-compliant with their medications, or whose blood levels were not therapeutic were eliminated from the analysis. Utilizing the complex Chi-square method, it was determined that patients who participated in some form of exercise had significantly fewer seizures than those who did not exercise (p less than 0.05). Conclusions from this brief study indicate the need for a more comprehensive trial, including EEGs, biochemical studies, and fitness evaluations, to determine the effects of an exercise program on seizure frequency. PMID:2769084

  4. Seizure Reduction with Fluoxetine in Dravet Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Meador, Kimford J

    2014-01-01

    An adult woman with Dravet syndrome (documented SCN1A mutation) experienced a marked reduction in seizures when treated with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) fluoxetine. The seizure reduction may be partly to reductions associated with aging in Dravet patients, but it appears to be due at least in part to the fluoxetine. A prior preliminary study reported that fenfluramine reduces seizures in patients with Dravet syndrome. Fenfluramine may produce this effect by increasing serotonin brain levels, and SSRIs have been found to possess antiepileptic properties in animal models of epilepsy. Given the known cardiac risks of fenfluramine, consideration of randomized clinical trials with SSRIs should be considered in Dravet syndrome and other epilepsies. PMID:24955329

  5. Febrile Seizures and Febrile Seizure Syndromes: An Updated Overview of Old and Current Knowledge

    PubMed Central

    Khair, Abdulhafeez M.; Elmagrabi, Dalal

    2015-01-01

    Febrile seizures are the most common paroxysmal episode during childhood, affecting up to one in 10 children. They are a major cause of emergency facility visits and a source of family distress and anxiety. Their etiology and pathophysiological pathways are being understood better over time; however, there is still more to learn. Genetic predisposition is thought to be a major contributor. Febrile seizures have been historically classified as benign; however, many emerging febrile seizure syndromes behave differently. The way in which human knowledge has evolved over the years in regard to febrile seizures has not been dealt with in depth in the current literature, up to our current knowledge. This review serves as a documentary of how scientists have explored febrile seizures, elaborating on the journey of knowledge as far as etiology, clinical features, approach, and treatment strategies are concerned. Although this review cannot cover all clinical aspects related to febrile seizures at the textbook level, we believe it can function as a quick summary of the past and current sources of knowledge for all varieties of febrile seizure types and syndromes. PMID:26697219

  6. Widespread EEG Changes Precede Focal Seizures

    PubMed Central

    Perucca, Piero; Dubeau, François; Gotman, Jean

    2013-01-01

    The process by which the brain transitions into an epileptic seizure is unknown. In this study, we investigated whether the transition to seizure is associated with changes in brain dynamics detectable in the wideband EEG, and whether differences exist across underlying pathologies. Depth electrode ictal EEG recordings from 40 consecutive patients with pharmacoresistant lesional focal epilepsy were low-pass filtered at 500 Hz and sampled at 2,000 Hz. Predefined EEG sections were selected immediately before (immediate preictal), and 30 seconds before the earliest EEG sign suggestive of seizure activity (baseline). Spectral analysis, visual inspection and discrete wavelet transform were used to detect standard (delta, theta, alpha, beta and gamma) and high-frequency bands (ripples and fast ripples). At the group level, each EEG frequency band activity increased significantly from baseline to the immediate preictal section, mostly in a progressive manner and independently of any modification in the state of vigilance. Preictal increases in each frequency band activity were widespread, being observed in the seizure-onset zone and lesional tissue, as well as in remote regions. These changes occurred in all the investigated pathologies (mesial temporal atrophy/sclerosis, local/regional cortical atrophy, and malformations of cortical development), but were more pronounced in mesial temporal atrophy/sclerosis. Our findings indicate that a brain state change with distinctive features, in the form of unidirectional changes across the entire EEG bandwidth, occurs immediately prior to seizure onset. We postulate that these changes might reflect a facilitating state of the brain which enables a susceptible region to generate seizures. PMID:24260523

  7. Sex dimorphism in seizure-controlling networks

    PubMed Central

    Giorgi, Fillippo Sean; Galanopoulou, Aristea S.; Moshé, Solomon L.

    2014-01-01

    Males and females show a different predisposition to certain types of seizures in clinical studies. Animal studies have provided growing evidence for sexual dimorphism of certain brain regions, including those that control seizures. Seizures are modulated by networks involving subcortical structures, including thalamus, reticular formation nuclei, and structures belonging to the basal ganglia. In animal models, the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNR) is the best studied of these areas, given its relevant role in the expression and control of seizures throughout development in the rat. Studies with bilateral infusions of the GABAA receptor agonist muscimol have identified distinct roles of the anterior or posterior rat SNR in flurothyl seizure control, that follow sex-specific maturational patterns during development. These studies indicate that (a) the regional functional compartmentalization of the SNR appears only after the third week of life, (b) only the male SNR exhibits muscimol-sensitive proconvulsant effects which, in older animals, is confined to the posterior SNR, and (c) the expression of the muscimol-sensitive anticonvulsant effects become apparent earlier in females than in males. The first three postnatal days are crucial in determining the expression of the muscimol-sensitive proconvulsant effects of the immature male SNR, depending on the gonadal hormone setting. Activation of the androgen receptors during this early period seems to be important for the formation of this proconvulsant SNR region. We describe molecular/anatomical candidates underlying these age- and sex-related differences, as derived from in vitro and in vivo experiments, as well as by [14C]2-deoxyglucose autoradiography. These involve sex-specific patterns in the developmental changes in the structure or physiology or GABAA receptors or of other subcortical structures (e.g., locus coeruleus, hippocampus) that may affect the function of seizure-controlling networks. PMID:24851800

  8. How to Treat Compensated Absences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewandowski, Raymond J.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses compensated absences such as future vacation, sick leave, and other absences that must be recognized for accounting and financial reporting purposes. Explains Governmental Accounting Standards Board distinctions between governmental and proprietary fund models. School districts and municipalities must now account for compensated…

  9. Emergence of semiology in epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Chauvel, Patrick; McGonigal, Aileen

    2014-09-01

    Semiology, the manifestation of epilepsy, is dependent upon electrical activity produced by epileptic seizures that are organized within existing neural pathways. Clinical signs evolve as the epileptic discharge spreads in both time and space. Studying the relation between these, of which the temporal component is at least as important as the spatial one, is possible using anatomo-electro-clinical correlations of stereoelectroencephalography (SEEG) data. The period of semiology production occurs with variable time lag after seizure onset and signs then emerge more or less rapidly depending on seizure type (temporal seizures generally propagating more slowly and frontal seizures more quickly). The subset of structures involved in semiological production, the "early spread network", is tightly linked to those constituting the epileptogenic zone. The level of complexity of semiological features varies according to the degree of involvement of the primary or associative cortex, with the former having a direct relation to peripheral sensory and motor systems with production of hallucinations (visual and auditory) or elementary sensorimotor signs. Depending on propagation pattern, these signs can occur in a "march" fashion as described by Jackson. On the other hand, seizures involving the associative cortex, having a less direct relation with the peripheral nervous system, and necessarily involving more widely distributed networks manifest with altered cognitive and/or behavioral signs whose neural substrate involves a network of cortical structures, as has been observed for normal cognitive processes. Other than the anatomical localization of these structures, the frequency of the discharge is a crucial determinant of semiological effect since a fast (gamma) discharge will tend to deactivate normal function, whereas a slower theta discharge can mimic physiological function. In terms of interaction between structures, the degree of synchronization plays a key role in clinical expression, as evidenced, for example, by studies of ictal fear-related behavior (decorrelation of activity between structures inducing "release" phenomena) and of déjà vu (increased synchronization). Studies of functional coupling within networks underlying complex ictal behavior indicate that the clinical semiology of a given seizure depends upon neither the anatomical origin of ictal discharge nor the target areas of its propagation alone but on the dynamic interaction between these. Careful mapping of the ictal network in its full spread offers essential information as to the localization of seizure onset, by deducing that a given network configuration could only be generated by a given area or group of areas. PMID:24424286

  10. A gut feeling about insular seizures

    PubMed Central

    Dionisio, S; Koenig, A; Murray, J; Somerville, E

    2011-01-01

    A 43-year-old man presented to the Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, after experiencing his first tonic-clonic seizure. For the previous 2 years he had undergone gastroenterological investigation of episodes of gagging associated with hypersalivation and lachrymation, occurring three or four times per week. EEG showed epileptiform discharges in the right anterior temporal region; brain MRI revealed a lesion in the right insular cortex. Video-EEG telemetry demonstrated that the episodes of gagging were focal seizures. Antiepileptic drug therapy resulted in no further episodes occurring over the next 10 months. PMID:22692493

  11. The use of seizure-alert dogs.

    PubMed

    Brown, S W; Strong, V

    2001-01-01

    We report our experience of training dogs to assist people with epilepsy by providing a useful warning of seizures. An unexpected finding has been that human subjects report an improvement in seizure rate. This may be related to increased confidence and activity levels. We have observed some hazards associated with untrained dogs, which raises questions about future experimental design. We plan further research to test our method and assess outcomes more formally. Recent changes in UK quarantine law provide an opportunity for further international collaboration. PMID:11181096

  12. Seizures due to high dose camphor ingestion

    PubMed Central

    Tekin, Hande Gazeteci; Gökben, Sarenur; Serdaroğlu, Gül

    2015-01-01

    Camphor is a cyclic ketone of the hydro aromatic terpene group. Today it is frequently used as a prescription or non-prescription topical antitussive, analgesic, anesthetic and antipruritic agent. Camphor which is considered an innocent drug by parents and physicians is a common household item which can lead to severe poisoning in children even when taken in small amounts. Neurotoxicity in the form of seizures can ocur soon after ingestion. A two-year old female patient who presented with a complaint of generalized tonic-clonic seizures after oral ingestion of camphor is presented. PMID:26884696

  13. Neural - glial circuits : Can Interneurons stop seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadkarni, Suhita; Jung, Peter

    2004-03-01

    Recent progress in neurobiology suggests that astrocytes - through calcium excitability - are active partners to the neurons by integrating their activity and, in turn, regulating synaptic transmission. In a similar fashion neurons and interneurons are the 'Yin and Yang' of the hippocampus. The dichotomy of excitation and inhibition between pyramidal neurons and interneurons plays a crucial role in the function of the neuronal circuit.We consider a model of a pyramidal cell in contact with one synaptic astrocytes. It has been shown that such a circuit - triggered by transient stimulation - can exhibit sustained oscillations ("seizures") for strong coupling. The question we are considering is, under what conditions synaptic inhibition can stop these seizures?

  14. Seizures due to high dose camphor ingestion.

    PubMed

    Tekin, Hande Gazeteci; Gökben, Sarenur; Serdaroğlu, Gül

    2015-12-01

    Camphor is a cyclic ketone of the hydro aromatic terpene group. Today it is frequently used as a prescription or non-prescription topical antitussive, analgesic, anesthetic and antipruritic agent. Camphor which is considered an innocent drug by parents and physicians is a common household item which can lead to severe poisoning in children even when taken in small amounts. Neurotoxicity in the form of seizures can ocur soon after ingestion. A two-year old female patient who presented with a complaint of generalized tonic-clonic seizures after oral ingestion of camphor is presented. PMID:26884696

  15. Letting a typical mouse judge whether mouse social interactions are atypical.

    PubMed

    Shah, Charisma R; Forsberg, Carl Gunnar; Kang, Jing-Qiong; Veenstra-VanderWeele, Jeremy

    2013-06-01

    Diagnosis of an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) requires a qualitative assessment of social aptitude: one person judging whether another person interacts in a "typical" way. We hypothesized that mice could be used to make a similar judgment if they prefer "typical" over "atypical" social interactions with mouse models relevant to ASD. We used wild-type C57BL/6 (B6) mice as "judges" and evaluated their preference for a chamber containing a "typical" (B6 or 129S6) or an "atypical" mouse. For our atypical mouse stimuli, we chose two inbred strains with well-documented social phenotypes (BTBR and BALB/c), as well a mutant line with abnormal social behavior and seizures (Gabrb3 +/-). Overall, we observed a stimulus by time interaction (P < 0.0001), with B6 mice preferring the typical mouse chamber during the last 10 min of the 30-min test. For two of the individual stimulus pairings, we observed a similar chamber by time interaction (BALB/c vs. 129S6, P = 0.0007; Gabrb3 +/- vs. 129S6, P = 0.033). For the third stimulus pairing, we found a trend for preference of the typical mouse across time (BTBR vs. B6, P = 0.051). We repeated the experiments using 129S6 mice as judges and found a significant overall interaction (P = 0.034), but only one stimulus pairing reached significance on its own (BALB/c vs. 129S6, P = 0.0021). These data suggest that a characteristic pattern of exploration in B6 mice can distinguish some socially atypical animals from controls. PMID:23436806

  16. 19 CFR 162.92 - Notice of seizure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act § 162.92 Notice of seizure. (a..., Immigration and Customs Enforcement or the Commissioner of Customs and Border Protection for cases...

  17. 19 CFR 162.92 - Notice of seizure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act § 162.92 Notice of seizure. (a..., Immigration and Customs Enforcement or the Commissioner of Customs and Border Protection for cases...

  18. 19 CFR 162.92 - Notice of seizure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act § 162.92 Notice of seizure. (a..., Immigration and Customs Enforcement or the Commissioner of Customs and Border Protection for cases...

  19. 19 CFR 162.92 - Notice of seizure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act § 162.92 Notice of seizure. (a..., Immigration and Customs Enforcement or the Commissioner of Customs and Border Protection for cases...

  20. 19 CFR 162.92 - Notice of seizure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act § 162.92 Notice of seizure. (a... or physical safety of an individual; (ii) Flight from prosecution; (iii) Destruction of or...

  1. Canine and feline epileptic seizures and the lunar cycle: 2,507 seizures (2000-2008).

    PubMed

    Browand-Stainback, Laura; Levesque, Donald; McBee, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    Epileptic seizures in 211 canine and feline patients diagnosed with idiopathic epilepsy were evaluated for temporal significance in relation to the lunar cycle. Seizure counts were compared among each of the eight individual lunar phases, among each of eight exact lunar phase dates, and by percent of lunar illumination using generalized estimating equations. No statistical significance was found in any of these comparisons excluding a relationship between the onset of epileptic seizures and the phases of the moon. Alteration in anticonvulsant treatment or monitoring of canine and feline patients with idiopathic epilepsy at large was not warranted based on the lunar cycle. PMID:21852516

  2. The atypical pneumonias: clinical diagnosis and importance.

    PubMed

    Cunha, B A

    2006-05-01

    The most common atypical pneumonias are caused by three zoonotic pathogens, Chlamydia psittaci (psittacosis), Francisella tularensis (tularemia), and Coxiella burnetii (Q fever), and three nonzoonotic pathogens, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and Legionella. These atypical agents, unlike the typical pathogens, often cause extrapulmonary manifestations. Atypical CAPs are systemic infectious diseases with a pulmonary component and may be differentiated clinically from typical CAPs by the pattern of extrapulmonary organ involvement which is characteristic for each atypical CAP. Zoonotic pneumonias may be eliminated from diagnostic consideration with a negative contact history. The commonest clinical problem is to differentiate legionnaire's disease from typical CAP as well as from C. pneumoniae or M. pneumonia infection. Legionella is the most important atypical pathogen in terms of severity. It may be clinically differentiated from typical CAP and other atypical pathogens by the use of a weighted point system of syndromic diagnosis based on the characteristic pattern of extrapulmonary features. Because legionnaire's disease often presents as severe CAP, a presumptive diagnosis of Legionella should prompt specific testing and empirical anti-Legionella therapy such as the Winthrop-University Hospital Infectious Disease Division's weighted point score system. Most atypical pathogens are difficult or dangerous to isolate and a definitive laboratory diagnosis is usually based on indirect, i.e., direct flourescent antibody (DFA), indirect flourescent antibody (IFA). Atypical CAP is virtually always monomicrobial; increased IFA IgG tests indicate past exposure and not concurrent infection. Anti-Legionella antibiotics include macrolides, doxycycline, rifampin, quinolones, and telithromycin. The drugs with the highest level of anti-Legionella activity are quinolones and telithromycin. Therapy is usually continued for 2 weeks if potent anti-Legionella drugs are used. In adults, M. pneumoniae and C. pneumoniae may exacerbate or cause asthma. The importance of the atypical pneumonias is not related to their frequency (approximately 15% of CAPs), but to difficulties in their diagnosis, and their nonresponsiveness to beta-lactam therapy. Because of the potential role of C. pneumoniae in coronary artery disease and multiple sclerosis (MS), and the role of M. pneumoniae and C. pneumoniae in causing or exacerbating asthma, atypical CAPs also have public health importance. PMID:16669925

  3. Modification of seizure disorders: the interruption of behavioral chains.

    PubMed Central

    Zlutnick, S; Mayville, W J; Moffat, S

    1975-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of interruption and differential reinforcement on seizures in children. Seizures were conceptualized as the terminal link in a behavioral chain, resulting in a strategy aimed at identifying and modifying behaviors that reliably preceded the seizure climax. Seizure frequency was reduced in four of five subjects, whereas the frequency of preseizure behavior was reduced in only three subjects. Parents and school personnel were successfully used as change agents. PMID:1141076

  4. Quadriplegia Following Epileptic Seizure : Things to Keep in Mind

    PubMed Central

    Yeşilbudak, Zülal; Şişman, Lokman; Uca, Ali Ulvi

    2016-01-01

    People with epilepsy are believed to be at a higher risk of incurring accidental injury than people who do not have seizures. The incidence of injury, either due to seizure or accident as a consequent of seizure is also high and varies from 0.03% to 3%. The most common injuries are head contusions, lacerations, burns and fractures. In this article, we present a case of quadriplegia after a generalized epileptic seizure. PMID:27226869

  5. Seizure-like activity leads to the release of BAD from 14-3-3 protein and cell death in hippocampal neurons in vitro.

    PubMed

    Meller, R; Schindler, C K; Chu, X P; Xiong, Z G; Cameron, J A; Simon, R P; Henshall, D C

    2003-05-01

    Seizure-induced neuronal death may involve engagement of the BCL-2 family of apoptosis-regulating proteins. In the present study we examined the activation of proapoptotic BAD in cultured hippocampal neurons following seizures induced by removal of chronic glutamatergic transmission blockade. Kynurenic acid withdrawal elicited an increase in seizure-like electrical activity, which was inhibited by blockers of AMPA (CNQX) and NMDA (MK801 and AP5) receptor function. However, only NMDA receptor antagonists inhibited calcium entry as assessed by fura-2, and cell death of hippocampal neurons. Seizures increased proteolysis of caspase-3 and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) of cells. Seizure-like activity induced dephosphorylation of BAD and the disruption of its constitutive interaction with 14-3-3 proteins. In turn, BAD dimerized with antiapoptotic BCL-Xl after seizures. However, the absence of neuroprotective effects of pathway intervention suggests that BAD may perform a reinforcement rather than instigator role in cell death following seizures in vitro. PMID:12728252

  6. Out-of-body experiences associated with seizures

    PubMed Central

    Greyson, Bruce; Fountain, Nathan B.; Derr, Lori L.; Broshek, Donna K.

    2014-01-01

    Alterations of consciousness are critical factors in the diagnosis of epileptic seizures. With these alterations in consciousness, some persons report sensations of separating from the physical body, experiences that may in rare cases resemble spontaneous out-of-body experiences. This study was designed to identify and characterize these out-of-body-like subjective experiences associated with seizure activity. Fifty-five percent of the patients in this study recalled some subjective experience in association with their seizures. Among our sample of 100 patients, 7 reported out-of-body experiences associated with their seizures. We found no differentiating traits that were associated with patients' reports of out-of-body experiences, in terms of either demographics; medical history, including age of onset and duration of seizure disorder, and seizure frequency; seizure characteristics, including localization, lateralization, etiology, and type of seizure, and epilepsy syndrome; or ability to recall any subjective experiences associated with their seizures. Reporting out-of-body experiences in association with seizures did not affect epilepsy-related quality of life. It should be noted that even in those patients who report out-of-body experiences, such sensations are extremely rare events that do not occur routinely with their seizures. Most patients who reported out-of-body experiences described one or two experiences that occurred an indeterminate number of years ago, which precludes the possibility of associating the experience with the particular characteristics of that one seizure or with medications taken or other conditions at the time. PMID:24592228

  7. The long-term effects of neonatal seizures.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Gregory L

    2009-12-01

    The highest incidence of seizures occurs during the first hours to days after birth. The immature brain is prone to seizures because of reduced inhibition. GABA, which is the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mature brain, is depolarizing and excitatory in the immature brain. Seizures are an ominous sign, indicating either an acquired brain insult or a genetic abnormality. While the primary outcome determinant of neonatal seizures is etiology, whether seizures can result in long-term adverse consequences independently is not clear. While the clinical data is uncertain, there is now a considerable body of evidence indicating that in animals, neonatal seizures can adversely alter the developing brain. Animal data indicates that the sequelae of seizures are strongly age dependent; seizures will affect the developing and plastic neuronal circuitry much differently than the fixed circuitry of the mature brain. Seizures at an early developmental stage can dramatically affect the construction of networks, resulting in severe and permanent handicaps in some patients. In the young brain, the long-lasting detrimental consequences of seizures are caused by an alteration of developmental programs rather than by neuronal cell loss, as occurs in adults. In animal models, neonatal seizures result in decreases in neurogenesis, sprouting of mossy fibers, and long-standing changes in signaling properties. Seizures in rat pups are also associated with abnormalities in firing patterns of single cells in the hippocampus. Furthermore, these anatomic and physiologic changes correlate well with behavioral dysfunction. PMID:19944841

  8. Out-of-body experiences associated with seizures.

    PubMed

    Greyson, Bruce; Fountain, Nathan B; Derr, Lori L; Broshek, Donna K

    2014-01-01

    Alterations of consciousness are critical factors in the diagnosis of epileptic seizures. With these alterations in consciousness, some persons report sensations of separating from the physical body, experiences that may in rare cases resemble spontaneous out-of-body experiences. This study was designed to identify and characterize these out-of-body-like subjective experiences associated with seizure activity. Fifty-five percent of the patients in this study recalled some subjective experience in association with their seizures. Among our sample of 100 patients, 7 reported out-of-body experiences associated with their seizures. We found no differentiating traits that were associated with patients' reports of out-of-body experiences, in terms of either demographics; medical history, including age of onset and duration of seizure disorder, and seizure frequency; seizure characteristics, including localization, lateralization, etiology, and type of seizure, and epilepsy syndrome; or ability to recall any subjective experiences associated with their seizures. Reporting out-of-body experiences in association with seizures did not affect epilepsy-related quality of life. It should be noted that even in those patients who report out-of-body experiences, such sensations are extremely rare events that do not occur routinely with their seizures. Most patients who reported out-of-body experiences described one or two experiences that occurred an indeterminate number of years ago, which precludes the possibility of associating the experience with the particular characteristics of that one seizure or with medications taken or other conditions at the time. PMID:24592228

  9. 28 CFR 0.86 - Seizure of gambling devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Seizure of gambling devices. 0.86 Section... Bureau of Investigation 0.86 Seizure of gambling devices. The Director, Associate Director, Assistants... General to make seizures of gambling devices (18 U.S.C. 1955(d), 15 U.S.C. 1171 et seq.) and wire or...

  10. 28 CFR 0.86 - Seizure of gambling devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Seizure of gambling devices. 0.86 Section... Bureau of Investigation 0.86 Seizure of gambling devices. The Director, Associate Director, Assistants... General to make seizures of gambling devices (18 U.S.C. 1955(d), 15 U.S.C. 1171 et seq.) and wire or...

  11. 28 CFR 0.86 - Seizure of gambling devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Seizure of gambling devices. 0.86 Section... Bureau of Investigation 0.86 Seizure of gambling devices. The Director, Associate Director, Assistants... General to make seizures of gambling devices (18 U.S.C. 1955(d), 15 U.S.C. 1171 et seq.) and wire or...

  12. Neuropsychological and event-related potential correlates of nonepileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    Drake, M E; Huber, S J; Pakalnis, A; Phillips, B B

    1993-01-01

    A retrospective study of 14 patients with epileptic seizures and 11 with nonepileptic seizures, all taking antiepileptic drugs, found epileptic patients had significantly longer P160, N200, and P300 latencies on auditory event-related potential recordings. Patients with nonepileptic seizures had generally higher IQs and significantly greater psychopathology on neuropsychological scales. PMID:8428129

  13. Seizure associated with clozapine: incidence, etiology, and management.

    PubMed

    Williams, Andrew M; Park, Susie H

    2015-02-01

    Seizures are a known adverse effect of clozapine therapy. The literature varies on incidence rates of seizures, secondary to varying time frames in which each seizure occurred. Tonic-clonic seizures comprise the majority of seizures experienced secondary to clozapine use, but it is imperative to recognize the potential variety of seizure presentation. The exact etiology of clozapine-induced seizure is unknown. Conflicting reports regarding total oral dose, serum concentration, dose titration, and concomitant medications make it difficult to identify a single cause contributing to seizure risk. Following seizure occurrence, it may be in the best interests of the patient to continue clozapine treatment. In this clinical situation, the use of an antiepileptic drug (AED) for seizure prophylaxis may be required. The AED of choice appears to be valproate, but several successful case reports also support the use of lamotrigine, gabapentin and topiramate. Well-designed clinical trials regarding clozapine seizure prophylaxis are lacking. Given clozapine's strong evidence for efficacy in the treatment of schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder, every attempt to manage side effects, including seizure, should be implemented to allow for therapeutic continuation. PMID:25537107

  14. 9 CFR 118.4 - Seizure and condemnation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seizure and condemnation. 118.4... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS DETENTION; SEIZURE AND CONDEMNATION § 118.4 Seizure and condemnation. Any biological product which is prepared, sold,...

  15. 26 CFR 301.7321-1 - Seizure of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seizure of property. 301.7321-1 Section 301... ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Other Offenses § 301.7321-1 Seizure of property. Any property subject... director or assistant regional commissioner (alcohol, tobacco, and firearms). Upon seizure of property...

  16. 27 CFR 447.63 - Seizure and forfeiture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seizure and forfeiture. 447.63 Section 447.63 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS... IMPLEMENTS OF WAR Penalties, Seizures and Forfeitures § 447.63 Seizure and forfeiture. Whoever...

  17. 19 CFR 12.101 - Seizure of prohibited switchblade knives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seizure of prohibited switchblade knives. 12.101...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Switchblade Knives § 12.101 Seizure of prohibited... accordance with § 12.100(a) shall be seized under 19 U.S.C. 1595a(c). (b) Notice of seizure. Notice...

  18. 21 CFR 1316.72 - Officers who will make seizures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Officers who will make seizures. 1316.72 Section..., PRACTICES, AND PROCEDURES Seizure, Forfeiture, and Disposition of Property § 1316.72 Officers who will make seizures. For the purpose of carrying out the provisions of the Act, all special agents of the...

  19. 27 CFR 555.166 - Seizure or forfeiture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Seizure or forfeiture. 555... EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE EXPLOSIVES COMMERCE IN EXPLOSIVES Unlawful Acts, Penalties, Seizures and Forfeitures § 555.166 Seizure or forfeiture. Any explosive materials involved or used or intended to be...

  20. 26 CFR 403.25 - Personal property subject to seizure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Personal property subject to seizure. 403.25... AND ADMINISTRATION DISPOSITION OF SEIZED PERSONAL PROPERTY Seizures and Forfeitures § 403.25 Personal property subject to seizure. Personal property may be seized by the Commissioner of Internal Revenue or...

  1. 21 CFR 1316.72 - Officers who will make seizures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Officers who will make seizures. 1316.72 Section..., PRACTICES, AND PROCEDURES Seizure, Forfeiture, and Disposition of Property § 1316.72 Officers who will make seizures. For the purpose of carrying out the provisions of the Act, all special agents of the...

  2. 9 CFR 118.4 - Seizure and condemnation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Seizure and condemnation. 118.4... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS DETENTION; SEIZURE AND CONDEMNATION § 118.4 Seizure and condemnation. Any biological product which is prepared, sold,...

  3. 26 CFR 403.25 - Personal property subject to seizure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Personal property subject to seizure. 403.25... AND ADMINISTRATION DISPOSITION OF SEIZED PERSONAL PROPERTY Seizures and Forfeitures § 403.25 Personal property subject to seizure. Personal property may be seized by the Commissioner of Internal Revenue or...

  4. 19 CFR 12.101 - Seizure of prohibited switchblade knives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Seizure of prohibited switchblade knives. 12.101...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Switchblade Knives § 12.101 Seizure of prohibited... accordance with § 12.100(a) shall be seized under 19 U.S.C. 1595a(c). (b) Notice of seizure. Notice...

  5. 27 CFR 555.166 - Seizure or forfeiture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Seizure or forfeiture. 555... EXPLOSIVES, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE EXPLOSIVES COMMERCE IN EXPLOSIVES Unlawful Acts, Penalties, Seizures and Forfeitures § 555.166 Seizure or forfeiture. Any explosive materials involved or used or intended to be...

  6. 28 CFR 0.86 - Seizure of gambling devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Seizure of gambling devices. 0.86 Section... Bureau of Investigation § 0.86 Seizure of gambling devices. The Director, Associate Director, Assistants... General to make seizures of gambling devices (18 U.S.C. 1955(d), 15 U.S.C. 1171 et seq.) and wire or...

  7. 26 CFR 301.7321-1 - Seizure of property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Seizure of property. 301.7321-1 Section 301... ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Other Offenses § 301.7321-1 Seizure of property. Any property subject... director or assistant regional commissioner (alcohol, tobacco, and firearms). Upon seizure of property...

  8. 27 CFR 555.186 - Seizure or forfeiture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Seizure or forfeiture. 555... Seizure or forfeiture. Any plastic explosive that does not contain a detection agent in violation of 18 U.S.C. 842(l)-(n) is subject to seizure and forfeiture, and all provisions of 19 U.S.C....

  9. 27 CFR 447.63 - Seizure and forfeiture.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Seizure and forfeiture. 447.63 Section 447.63 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND... WAR Penalties, Seizures and Forfeitures § 447.63 Seizure and forfeiture. Whoever knowingly...

  10. 28 CFR 0.86 - Seizure of gambling devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Seizure of gambling devices. 0.86 Section... Bureau of Investigation § 0.86 Seizure of gambling devices. The Director, Associate Director, Assistants... General to make seizures of gambling devices (18 U.S.C. 1955(d), 15 U.S.C. 1171 et seq.) and wire or...

  11. 8 CFR 1280.21 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 1280.21 Section 1280... REGULATIONS IMPOSITION AND COLLECTION OF FINES § 1280.21 Seizure of aircraft. Seizure of an aircraft under the authority of section 239 of the Act and § 1280.2 will not be made if such aircraft is damaged to an...

  12. 8 CFR 1280.21 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 1280.21 Section 1280... REGULATIONS IMPOSITION AND COLLECTION OF FINES § 1280.21 Seizure of aircraft. Link to an amendment published at 76 FR 74630, December 1, 2011. Seizure of an aircraft under the authority of section 239 of...

  13. 8 CFR 1280.21 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 1280.21 Section 1280... REGULATIONS IMPOSITION AND COLLECTION OF FINES § 1280.21 Seizure of aircraft. Seizure of an aircraft under the authority of section 239 of the Act and § 1280.2 will not be made if such aircraft is damaged to an...

  14. Seizure Management for School-Age Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frueh, Eileen

    2008-01-01

    As many as 325,000 school-age children, ages 5-14, have epilepsy in the U.S. Thankfully, with medication, surgery, a special diet or vagus nerve stimulation, most go to school and fully participate in school activities. Children who continue to have seizures, however, may run into problems. Many of these problems can be overcome or prevented…

  15. Seizures - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... XYZ List of All Topics All Seizures - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) French (français) Hindi (हिन्दी) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) ...

  16. Cardiac arrhythmias during or after epileptic seizures.

    PubMed

    van der Lende, Marije; Surges, Rainer; Sander, Josemir W; Thijs, Roland D

    2016-01-01

    Seizure-related cardiac arrhythmias are frequently reported and have been implicated as potential pathomechanisms of Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP). We attempted to identify clinical profiles associated with various (post)ictal cardiac arrhythmias. We conducted a systematic search from the first date available to July 2013 on the combination of two terms: 'cardiac arrhythmias' and 'epilepsy'. The databases searched were PubMed, Embase (OVID version), Web of Science and COCHRANE Library. We attempted to identify all case reports and case series. We identified seven distinct patterns of (post)ictal cardiac arrhythmias: ictal asystole (103 cases), postictal asystole (13 cases), ictal bradycardia (25 cases), ictal atrioventricular (AV)-conduction block (11 cases), postictal AV-conduction block (2 cases), (post)ictal atrial flutter/atrial fibrillation (14 cases) and postictal ventricular fibrillation (3 cases). Ictal asystole had a mean prevalence of 0.318% (95% CI 0.316% to 0.320%) in people with refractory epilepsy who underwent video-EEG monitoring. Ictal asystole, bradycardia and AV-conduction block were self-limiting in all but one of the cases and seen during focal dyscognitive seizures. Seizure onset was mostly temporal (91%) without consistent lateralisation. Postictal arrhythmias were mostly found following convulsive seizures and often associated with (near) SUDEP. The contrasting clinical profiles of ictal and postictal arrhythmias suggest different pathomechanisms. Postictal rather than ictal arrhythmias seem of greater importance to the pathophysiology of SUDEP. PMID:26038597

  17. Neonatal Seizures: Soothing a Burning Topic

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Matthew D.; Chen, Lei; Langhan, Melissa L.

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal seizures are a potentially life-threatening pediatric problem with a variety of causes, such as birth trauma, asphyxia, congenital anomalies, metabolic disturbances, infections, and drug withdrawal or intoxication. Thorough and timely evaluations of such patients are necessary to identify and treat the underlying etiology, therefore reducing potential morbidity and mortality. We review neonatal seizures and hypocalcemia, and present the case of a 6 day old male who presented to a tertiary pediatric emergency department with seizure-like episodes. He was found to have markedly low serum calcium, magnesium, and parathyroid hormone concentrations, as well as a significantly elevated serum phosphate concentration. The etiology of these abnormalities was found to be maternal ingestion of extremely high doses of calcium carbonate during the third trimester of her pregnancy, an occurrence that has been reported only once in the literature. Education pertaining to the dangers of excessive calcium carbonate intake during pregnancy may be an important piece of anticipatory guidance for pregnant mothers with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux, and questioning the mother of a neonate presenting with seizures about such over-the-counter medications may help to elucidate the diagnosis. PMID:24084610

  18. Propagation of seizure activity in kindled dogs.

    PubMed

    Mars, N J; Lopes da Silva, F H

    1983-08-01

    The problem of determining the location of epileptogenic foci has been studied by means of a new analysis technique, the AAMI method. This AAMI method is a generalization of the more conventional cross-correlation technique, and can be used for the determination of relationships and of time delays between simultaneously recorded EEG signals during an epileptic paroxysm. Unlike the cross-correlation function, the AAMI method is not restricted to the study of linear propagation channels. The spread of seizure activity in several seizures of 3 dogs, made epileptic by the kindling process, has been analyzed, using depth recording. The focus was located in the prepyriform cortex (PPC). The spread of activity from there to the amygdala was observed. It was found that seizures can be divided into 3 phases. In the first phase (lasting up to 5 sec after the kindling stimulus) no relationship between PPC and amygdala was found. In the second phase (5-13 sec) a strong relationship between these areas was found, with consistent delay times which decreased during this interval from 19.1 to 23.6 msec at the beginning to 11.3 to 16.0 msec at the end of the interval. In the third phase of the seizures (after about 13 sec post kindling) activity in the reported areas was found to be independent again. A possible neurophysiological interpretation of these findings is given. PMID:6191951

  19. Seizures and Teens: Maximizing Health and Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sundstrom, Diane

    2007-01-01

    As parents and caregivers, their job is to help their children become happy, healthy, and productive members of society. They try to balance the desire to protect their children with their need to become independent young adults. This can be a struggle for parents of teens with seizures, since there are so many challenges they may face. Teenagers…

  20. Cardiac arrhythmias during or after epileptic seizures

    PubMed Central

    van der Lende, Marije; Surges, Rainer; Sander, Josemir W; Thijs, Roland D

    2016-01-01

    Seizure-related cardiac arrhythmias are frequently reported and have been implicated as potential pathomechanisms of Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP). We attempted to identify clinical profiles associated with various (post)ictal cardiac arrhythmias. We conducted a systematic search from the first date available to July 2013 on the combination of two terms: ‘cardiac arrhythmias’ and ‘epilepsy’. The databases searched were PubMed, Embase (OVID version), Web of Science and COCHRANE Library. We attempted to identify all case reports and case series. We identified seven distinct patterns of (post)ictal cardiac arrhythmias: ictal asystole (103 cases), postictal asystole (13 cases), ictal bradycardia (25 cases), ictal atrioventricular (AV)-conduction block (11 cases), postictal AV-conduction block (2 cases), (post)ictal atrial flutter/atrial fibrillation (14 cases) and postictal ventricular fibrillation (3 cases). Ictal asystole had a mean prevalence of 0.318% (95% CI 0.316% to 0.320%) in people with refractory epilepsy who underwent video-EEG monitoring. Ictal asystole, bradycardia and AV-conduction block were self-limiting in all but one of the cases and seen during focal dyscognitive seizures. Seizure onset was mostly temporal (91%) without consistent lateralisation. Postictal arrhythmias were mostly found following convulsive seizures and often associated with (near) SUDEP. The contrasting clinical profiles of ictal and postictal arrhythmias suggest different pathomechanisms. Postictal rather than ictal arrhythmias seem of greater importance to the pathophysiology of SUDEP. PMID:26038597

  1. Rhythmic 3-4Hz discharge is insufficient to produce cortical BOLD fMRI decreases in generalized seizures.

    PubMed

    Youngblood, Mark W; Chen, William C; Mishra, Asht M; Enamandram, Sheila; Sanganahalli, Basavaraju G; Motelow, Joshua E; Bai, Harrison X; Frohlich, Flavio; Gribizis, Alexandra; Lighten, Alexis; Hyder, Fahmeed; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2015-04-01

    Absence seizures are transient episodes of impaired consciousness accompanied by 3-4 Hz spike-wave discharge on electroencephalography (EEG). Human functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies have demonstrated widespread cortical decreases in the blood oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) signal that may play an important role in the pathophysiology of these seizures. Animal models could provide an opportunity to investigate the fundamental mechanisms of these changes, however they have so far failed to consistently replicate the cortical fMRI decreases observed in human patients. This may be due to important differences between human seizures and animal models, including a lack of cortical development in rodents or differences in the frequencies of rodent (7-8 Hz) and human (3-4 Hz) spike-wave discharges. To examine the possible contributions of these differences, we developed a ferret model that exhibits 3-4 Hz spike-wave seizures in the presence of a sulcated cortex. Measurements of BOLD fMRI and simultaneous EEG demonstrated cortical fMRI increases during and following spike-wave seizures in ferrets. However unlike human patients, significant fMRI decreases were not observed. The lack of fMRI decreases was consistent across seizures of different durations, discharge frequencies, and anesthetic regimes, and using fMRI analysis models similar to human patients. In contrast, generalized tonic-clonic seizures under the same conditions elicited sustained postictal fMRI decreases, verifying that the lack of fMRI decreases with spike-wave was not due to technical factors. These findings demonstrate that 3-4 Hz spike-wave discharge in a sulcated animal model does not necessarily produce fMRI decreases, leaving the mechanism for this phenomenon open for further investigation. PMID:25562830

  2. Epilepsy in children with a history of febrile seizures

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hyun; Byeon, Jung Hye; Kim, Gun Ha; Eun, Baik-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Febrile seizure, the most common type of pediatric convulsive disorder, is a benign seizure syndrome distinct from epilepsy. However, as epilepsy is also common during childhood, we aimed to identify the prognostic factors that can predict epilepsy in children with febrile seizures Methods The study comprised 249 children at the Korea University Ansan Hospital who presented with febrile seizures. The relationship between the subsequent occurrence of epilepsy and clinical factors including seizure and fever-related variables were analyzed by multivariate analysis. Results Twenty-five patients (10.0%) had additional afebrile seizures later and were diagnosed with epilepsy. The subsequent occurrence of epilepsy in patients with a history of febrile seizures was associated with a seizure frequency of more than 10 times during the first 2 years after seizure onset (P<0.001). Factors that were associated with subsequent occurrence of epilepsy were developmental delay (P<0.001), preterm birth (P=0.001), multiple seizures during a febrile seizure attack (P=0.005), and epileptiform discharges on electroencephalography (EEG) (P=0.008). Other factors such as the age at onset of first seizure, seizure duration, and family history of epilepsy were not associated with subsequent occurrence of epilepsy in this study. Conclusion Febrile seizures are common and mostly benign. However, careful observation is needed, particularly for prediction of subsequent epileptic episodes in patients with frequent febrile seizures with known risk factors, such as developmental delay, history of preterm birth, several attacks during a febrile episode, and epileptiform discharges on EEG. PMID:26958066

  3. Interictal spikes and epileptic seizures: their relationship and underlying rhythmicity.

    PubMed

    Karoly, Philippa J; Freestone, Dean R; Boston, Ray; Grayden, David B; Himes, David; Leyde, Kent; Seneviratne, Udaya; Berkovic, Samuel; O'Brien, Terence; Cook, Mark J

    2016-04-01

    We report on a quantitative analysis of electrocorticography data from a study that acquired continuous ambulatory recordings in humans over extended periods of time. The objectives were to examine patterns of seizures and spontaneous interictal spikes, their relationship to each other, and the nature of periodic variation. The recorded data were originally acquired for the purpose of seizure prediction, and were subsequently analysed in further detail. A detection algorithm identified potential seizure activity and a template matched filter was used to locate spikes. Seizure events were confirmed manually and classified as either clinically correlated, electroencephalographically identical but not clinically correlated, or subclinical. We found that spike rate was significantly altered prior to seizure in 9 out of 15 subjects. Increased pre-ictal spike rate was linked to improved predictability; however, spike rate was also shown to decrease before seizure (in 6 out of the 9 subjects). The probability distribution of spikes and seizures were notably similar, i.e. at times of high seizure likelihood the probability of epileptic spiking also increased. Both spikes and seizures showed clear evidence of circadian regulation and, for some subjects, there were also longer term patterns visible over weeks to months. Patterns of spike and seizure occurrence were highly subject-specific. The pre-ictal decrease in spike rate is not consistent with spikes promoting seizures. However, the fact that spikes and seizures demonstrate similar probability distributions suggests they are not wholly independent processes. It is possible spikes actively inhibit seizures, or that a decreased spike rate is a secondary symptom of the brain approaching seizure. If spike rate is modulated by common regulatory factors as seizures then spikes may be useful biomarkers of cortical excitability.media-1vid110.1093/brain/aww019_video_abstractaww019_video_abstract. PMID:26912639

  4. NONCONVULSIVE SEIZURES AFTER SUBARACHNOID HEMORRHAGE: MULTIMODAL DETECTION AND OUTCOMES

    PubMed Central

    Claassen, Jan; Perotte, Adler; Albers, David; Kleinberg, Samantha; Schmidt, J. Michael; Tu, Bin; Badjatia, Neeraj; Lantigua, Hector; Hirsch, Lawrence J.; Mayer, Stephan A.; Connolly, E. Sander; Hripcsak, George

    2013-01-01

    Objective Seizures have been implicated as a cause of secondary brain injury, but the systemic and cerebral physiologic effects of seizures after acute brain injury are poorly understood. Methods We analyzed intracortical EEG and multimodality physiological recordings in 48 comatose subarachnoid hemorrhage patients to better characterize the physiological response to seizures after acute brain injury. Results Intracortical seizures were seen in 38% of patients and 8% had surface seizures. Intracortical seizures were accompanied by elevated heart rate (P=0.001), blood pressure (P<0.001), and respiratory rate (P<0.001). There were trends for rising cerebral perfusion pressure (P=0.03) and intracranial pressure (P =0.06) seen after seizure onset. Intracortical seizure associated increases in global brain metabolism, partial brain tissue oxygenation, and regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) did not reach significance, but a trend for a pronounced delayed rCBF rise was seen for surface seizures (P=0.08). Functional outcome was very poor for patients with severe background attenuation without seizures and best for those without severe attenuation or seizures (77% vs. 0% dead or severely disabled, respectively). Outcome was intermediate for those with seizures independent of the background EEG and worse for those with intracortical only seizures when compared to those with intracortical and scalp seizures (50% and 25% death or severe disability, respectively). Interpretation We replicated in humans complex physiologic processes associated with seizures after acute brain injury previously described in laboratory experiments and illustrated differences such as the delayed increase in regional cerebral blood flow. These real-world physiologic observations may permit more successful translation of laboratory research to the bedside. PMID:23813945

  5. Febrile temperatures unmask biophysical defects in Nav1.1 epilepsy mutations supportive of seizure initiation.

    PubMed

    Volkers, Linda; Kahlig, Kristopher M; Das, Joost H G; van Kempen, Marjan J A; Lindhout, Dick; Koeleman, Bobby P C; Rook, Martin B

    2013-12-01

    Generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+) is an early onset febrile epileptic syndrome with therapeutic responsive (a)febrile seizures continuing later in life. Dravet syndrome (DS) or severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy has a complex phenotype including febrile generalized or hemiclonic convulsions before the age of 1, followed by intractable myoclonic, complex partial, or absence seizures. Both diseases can result from mutations in the Nav1.1 sodium channel, and initially, seizures are typically triggered by fever. We previously characterized two Nav1.1 mutants-R859H (GEFS+) and R865G (DS)-at room temperature and reported a mixture of biophysical gating defects that could not easily predict the phenotype presentation as either GEFS+ or DS. In this study, we extend the characterization of Nav1.1 wild-type, R859H, and R865G channels to physiological (37°C) and febrile (40°C) temperatures. At physiological temperature, a variety of biophysical defects were detected in both mutants, including a hyperpolarized shift in the voltage dependence of activation and a delayed recovery from fast and slow inactivation. Interestingly, at 40°C we also detected additional gating defects for both R859H and R865G mutants. The GEFS+ mutant R859H showed a loss of function in the voltage dependence of inactivation and an increased channel use-dependency at 40°C with no reduction in peak current density. The DS mutant R865G exhibited reduced peak sodium currents, enhanced entry into slow inactivation, and increased use-dependency at 40°C. Our results suggest that fever-induced temperatures exacerbate the gating defects of R859H or R865G mutants and may predispose mutation carriers to febrile seizures. PMID:24277604

  6. Comparison between the effects of quercetin on seizure threshold in acute and chronic seizure models.

    PubMed

    Nassiri-Asl, Marjan; Hajiali, Farid; Taghiloo, Mina; Abbasi, Esmail; Mohseni, Fatemeh; Yousefi, Farbod

    2016-05-01

    Flavonoids are important constituents of food and beverages, and several studies have shown that they have neuroactive properties. Many of these compounds are ligands for γ-aminobutyric acid type A receptors in the central nervous system. This study aimed to investigate the anticonvulsant effects of quercetin (3,3',4',5,7-pentahydroxyflavone), which is a flavonoid found in plants, in rats treated with pentylenetetrazole in acute and chronic seizure models. Single intraperitoneal administration of quercetin did not show anticonvulsive effects against acute seizure. Similarly, multiple oral pretreatment with quercetin did not have protective effects against acute seizure. However, multiple intraperitoneal administration of quercetin (25 and 50 mg/kg) significantly increased time to death compared with the control (p < 0.001). However, quercetin pretreatment had no significant effects on the pattern of convulsion development during all periods of kindling. But on the test day, quercetin (100 mg/kg) could significantly increase generalized tonic-clonic seizure onset (GTCS) and decrease GTCS duration compared with the control (p < 0.01, p < 0.05). We conclude that quercetin has a narrow therapeutic dose range for anticonvulsant activities in vivo, and it has different effects on the seizure threshold. The different effects of quercetin on seizure threshold may occur through several mechanisms. PMID:24442347

  7. Atypical idiopathic scoliosis: MR imaging evaluation.

    PubMed

    Barnes, P D; Brody, J D; Jaramillo, D; Akbar, J U; Emans, J B

    1993-01-01

    The authors analyzed the clinical and imaging findings in 30 consecutive pediatric, adolescent, and young adult patients who underwent MR imaging because of atypical features of idiopathic scoliosis. Atypical clinical and plain radiographic features included early onset (n = 4), rapid progression (n = 19), pain (n = 17), other neurologic symptoms or signs (n = 12), associated syndromes (n = 4), a convex left thoracic or thoracolumbar curve (n = 18), a kyphotic component (n = 7), and pedicle thinning (n = 4). MR imaging demonstrated 17 abnormalities in 11 patients: lumbar disk protrusions (n = 1), patulous intradural space (dural ectasia) (n = 3), hydrosyringomyelia (n = 7), Chiari I malformation (n = 5), and cord astrocytoma (n = 1). Significant associations with abnormal MR imaging findings were shown for patients with pain, weakness, abnormal neurologic findings, and atypical curvatures. Furthermore, there was a striking association of convex left thoracic or thoracolumbar scoliosis with hydrosyringomyelia (six of seven cases). On the basis of these results, "atypical" spinal curvatures at radiography and "atypical" clinical features should prompt performance of additional diagnostic studies. PMID:8416573

  8. Behavior of atypical amphiphilic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, John

    1997-08-01

    The physical behavior of several atypical amphiphilic molecules was studied in various environments including micelles, model bilayer membranes, and emulsions. The molecules under investigation were nor-chenodeoxycholic acid (nor-CDCA), ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA), sphingosine (Sp), sphingosine hydrochloride (SpċHCl), and tetrahydrolipstatin (THL). The bile acids, nor-CDCA and UDCA, were studied using 13C-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance ([13C) -NMR) in micelles of taurocholate and in bilayers of phosphatidylcholine. The pK a values of the bile acids in each environment were determined by [13C) -NMR and are as follows: 6.08 ±.03 for nor-CDCA and 6.27 ±.01 for UDCA in micelles, and 7.04 ± 12 for nor-CDCA and 6.89 ±.05 for UDCA in vesicles. Using line shape analysis, the transbilayer movement rate at 36oC for nor-CDCA and UDCA was calculated to be 580 sec--1 and 409 sec-1, respectively. [13C) -NMR titration of Sp gave pK a values of 9.09 ±.02 in micelles and 9.69 ±.21 in bilayers. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction were used to establish the Spċwater and SpċHClċwater phase diagrams. Anhydrous and hydrated samples ranging from 5- 90% water were analyzed. The DSC thermograms traced out the transition temperatures of each molecule while the X- ray diffraction patterns revealed their chain and crystalline lattice packing structures. In general, sphingosine exists as a hydrated crystal with β packing phase below 43oC and melts into an Lα phase. Sphingosine hydrochloride, however, exists as a gel phase (L_beta or /beta/sp') below 42oC that swells to 61% hydration. At low water concentrations (0-64%), a lamellar liquid crystal phase (L_alpha) is formed above the chain melting transition of 42oC. At medium concentration (65%), a Hexagonal I phase is present, and at high water concentrations (66-90%), a micellar phase is present. THL, a specific inhibitor of lipases, was analyzed with [ 13C) -NMR to study its behavior in various environments, ranging from carbon tetrachloride to water to pure triolein. THL was also incorporated into phosphatidylcholine bilayers and into microemulsions of triolein and phosphatidylcholine. [ 13C) -NMR analysis revealed that THL gets incorporated into the surface of vesicles, and into both the surface and core of microemulsion particles.

  9. The photoreceptors in atypical achromatopsia.

    PubMed Central

    Hess, R F; Mullen, K T; Sharpe, L T; Zrenner, E

    1989-01-01

    1. The receptoral mechanisms underlying the vision of two atypical achromats of the complete variety were studied with standard psychophysical procedures. 2. Under scotopic conditions the spectral sensitivity of each achromat was well described by the CIE (Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage) scotopic sensitivity function and the recovery of sensitivity after a retinal bleach showed characteristic duplex behaviour with the time constant of recovery of the slower phase matching that of normal rod vision for both foveal and peripheral stimulation. 3. Their spectral sensitivity was measured under conditions of chromatic adaptation in order to reveal any residual middle or long wavelength cone activity. Only one photopic spectral responses was found and this was adequately described by the spectral sensitivity function of Stiles pi 3 mechanism of normal vision. 4. Increment threshold measurements as a function of background intensity revealed a double-branched function in the fovea. The lower branch was found to have the spectral sensitivity of the rods; the upper branch that of Stiles' pi 3 mechanism. Stiles-Crawford measurements of directional sensitivity confirmed that the branch with the rhodopsin action spectrum had the directional sensitivity of rods and that the branch with the action spectrum of pi 3 had the directional sensitivity of cones. 5. These was no evidence for hue discrimination under photopic conditions. Regions of apparently normal performance on hue discrimination tests on more careful examination could be explained by luminosity judgements mediated by short wavelength-absorbing receptors. 6. We reject the notion of there being rhodopsin-filled cones in the fovea of these subjects. The foveal and peripheral vision of each of these achromats can be adequately described in terms of the participation of only two types of receptor, namely normally functional rods under scotopic conditions and normally functioning short wavelength-absorbing cones under photopic conditions. They are therefore functional blue mono-cone monochromats, an explanation which was originally proposed by Blackwell & Blackwell (1957) over thirty years ago. Images Fig. 1 PMID:2621588

  10. St. Valentine--patron saint of epilepsy: illustrating the semiology of seizures over the course of six centuries.

    PubMed

    Kluger, Gerhard; Kudernatsch, Verena

    2009-01-01

    From the 15th century to the present day, Christian art has portrayed people who suffer from epilepsy as attributes in illustrations of Saint Valentine (SV). The objective of our study was to interpret the works of art from a modern epileptological perspective on the basis of a collection of portrayals of SV in Europe that was as comprehensive as possible. The people depicted as attributes were analyzed with respect to their age, gender, social status, and possible seizure semiology. Three hundred forty-one illustrations of SV from Austria, Belgium, Croatia, Czech Republic, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, Poland, Scotland, Slovakia, and Switzerland were systematically analyzed. Irrespective of the age of the work of art, among the 143 pictures of people with possible epilepsy characteristics, there were more males than females from various levels of society. As far as could be interpreted, there were 17 infants, 35 children, 7 adolescents, and 84 adults. With respect to possible seizure semiology, infantile spasms (n=10), atonic seizures (n=13), tonic seizures (n=53), absences (n=2), psychogenic seizures (n=4), and postictal or undefinable states (n=61) were differentiated in a subjective assessment. Despite the fact that from a modern perspective, the 15th to 20th centuries in Europe seemed to be dominated by a rather superstitious attitude toward epilepsy, there is striking accuracy in the detail of the semiology in many of the historic portrayals, and a well-founded knowledge of epilepsy is apparent. PMID:18935981

  11. How I treat a first single seizure in a child

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Sheffali; Kaushik, Jaya Shankar

    2016-01-01

    An epileptic seizure is defined as transient occurrence of signs and/or symptoms due to abnormal excessive or synchronous neuronal activity in brain. There are diverse etiologies for acute seizure in infants and children. The present review provides a broad approach to diagnosis and treatment plan for acute seizure in children. The approach to a child with acute seizure is discussed with special emphasis on clinical approach based on history and focused examination with judicious choice of investigation and further management plan. The review also emphasizes on recognizing common nonepileptic events that masquerade as true seizure among infants and children. PMID:27011625

  12. Risk of seizures in children with tectal gliomas.

    PubMed

    Dabscheck, Gabriel; Prabhu, Sanjay P; Manley, Peter E; Goumnerova, Liliana; Ullrich, Nicole J

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of seizures in children with tectal gliomas and to determine if there are common clinical, electroencephalography (EEG), or radiologic findings that predict risk of seizures in these patients. We conducted a retrospective review of all patients with tectal gliomas over a 22-year period at a single institution. Data extraction included sex, age at presentation of tectal glioma and age of presentation with seizures, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings, seizure frequency and semiology, and EEG findings. We identified 79 patients, 66 of whom had adequate imaging and clinical data for further analysis. Eight patients (12.1%) had a history of seizures. Three patients had a clear symptomatic cause of seizures. Three patients were diagnosed with a tectal glioma as an incidental finding after a first seizure. One patient had a history of febrile convulsions. One patient had a generalized seizure 5 years after presenting with macrocephaly. Although the risk of seizure in children with known tectal glioma was relatively high, we did not identify specific clinical, radiologic, EEG, or MRI features that are predictive of increased risk. Thus, in children with tectal gliomas who have seizures, alternative causes for the seizures must be sought. PMID:26193802

  13. Predictability of uncontrollable multifocal seizures – towards new treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Lehnertz, Klaus; Dickten, Henning; Porz, Stephan; Helmstaedter, Christoph; Elger, Christian E.

    2016-01-01

    Drug-resistant, multifocal, non-resectable epilepsies are among the most difficult epileptic disorders to manage. An approach to control previously uncontrollable seizures in epilepsy patients would consist of identifying seizure precursors in critical brain areas combined with delivering a counteracting influence to prevent seizure generation. Predictability of seizures with acceptable levels of sensitivity and specificity, even in an ambulatory setting, has been repeatedly shown, however, in patients with a single seizure focus only. We did a study to assess feasibility of state-of-the-art, electroencephalogram-based seizure-prediction techniques in patients with uncontrollable multifocal seizures. We obtained significant predictive information about upcoming seizures in more than two thirds of patients. Unexpectedly, the emergence of seizure precursors was confined to non-affected brain areas. Our findings clearly indicate that epileptic networks, spanning lobes and hemispheres, underlie generation of seizures. Our proof-of-concept study is an important milestone towards new therapeutic strategies based on seizure-prediction techniques for clinical practice. PMID:27091239

  14. Predictability of uncontrollable multifocal seizures - towards new treatment options.

    PubMed

    Lehnertz, Klaus; Dickten, Henning; Porz, Stephan; Helmstaedter, Christoph; Elger, Christian E

    2016-01-01

    Drug-resistant, multifocal, non-resectable epilepsies are among the most difficult epileptic disorders to manage. An approach to control previously uncontrollable seizures in epilepsy patients would consist of identifying seizure precursors in critical brain areas combined with delivering a counteracting influence to prevent seizure generation. Predictability of seizures with acceptable levels of sensitivity and specificity, even in an ambulatory setting, has been repeatedly shown, however, in patients with a single seizure focus only. We did a study to assess feasibility of state-of-the-art, electroencephalogram-based seizure-prediction techniques in patients with uncontrollable multifocal seizures. We obtained significant predictive information about upcoming seizures in more than two thirds of patients. Unexpectedly, the emergence of seizure precursors was confined to non-affected brain areas. Our findings clearly indicate that epileptic networks, spanning lobes and hemispheres, underlie generation of seizures. Our proof-of-concept study is an important milestone towards new therapeutic strategies based on seizure-prediction techniques for clinical practice. PMID:27091239

  15. Closed-loop seizure control on epileptic rat models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Sheng-Fu; Liao, Yi-Cheng; Shaw, Fu-Zen; Chang, Da-Wei; Young, Chung-Ping; Chiueh, Herming

    2011-08-01

    In this paper numerous alternative treatments in addition to pharmacological therapy are proposed for their use in epileptic patients. Epileptic animal models can play a crucial role in the performance evaluation of new therapeutic techniques. The objective of this research is to first develop various epileptic rat models; second, develop a portable wireless closed-loop seizure controller including on-line seizure detection and real-time electrical stimulation for seizure elimination; and third, apply the developed seizure controller to the animal models to perform on-line seizure elimination. The closed-loop seizure controller was applied to three Long-Evans rats with spontaneous spike-wave discharges (non-convulsive) and three Long-Evans rats with epileptiform activities induced by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) injection (convulsive) for evaluation. The seizure detection accuracy is greater than 92% (up to 99%), and averaged seizure detection latency is less than 0.6 s for both spontaneous non-convulsive and PTZ-induced convulsive seizures. The average false stimulation rate is 3.1%. Near 30% of PTZ-induced convulsive seizures need more than two times of 0.5 s electrical stimulation for suppression and 90% of the non-convulsive seizures can be suppressed by only one 0.5 s electrical stimulation.

  16. Atypical Spitz Tumors: A Diagnostic Challenge.

    PubMed

    Harms, Kelly L; Lowe, Lori; Fullen, Douglas R; Harms, Paul W

    2015-10-01

    Spitzoid melanocytic lesions encompass a spectrum from benign Spitz nevi to malignant spitzoid melanomas. Spitzoid melanocytic neoplasms have significant morphologic and molecular differences from conventional melanocytic lesions, and prediction of biologic behavior and metastatic risk may be difficult. Most challenging is the atypical Spitz tumor, a borderline spitzoid melanocytic lesion of uncertain malignant potential that has overlapping histologic features with conventional Spitz nevus and spitzoid melanoma. Atypical Spitz tumors involve the sentinel lymph nodes at a greater frequency than conventional melanoma and frequently harbor chromosomal copy number changes, yet most cases follow an indolent course. Herein we review the clinical, microscopic, and molecular features of atypical Spitz tumors, including recent molecular advances, including the potential prognostic significance of chromosomal abnormalities, such as homozygous CDKN2A loss. PMID:26414472

  17. Atypical measles syndrome in adults: still around.

    PubMed

    Melenotte, Cléa; Cassir, Nadim; Tessonnier, Laurent; Brouqui, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Measles, a vaccine-preventable disease, is currently responsible for worldwide outbreaks mainly due to the failure to maintain high coverage of childhood immunisation. Atypical measles syndrome was first described in the 1960s in association with the inactivated measles vaccine. We report a case of atypical measles syndrome in a 29-year-old man without previous measles immunisation. He presented with fever, shortness of breath and a purpuric rash. Radiological investigations allowed the diagnosis of severe nodular pneumonia. Positive PCR in nasal and pharyngeal samples, and positive serology for a primary infection confirmed measles diagnosis. Both clinical symptoms and pulmonary nodules regressed spontaneously, whereas mediastinal lymph nodes increased and persisted up to 3 months after the primary infection. Physicians should be aware of the atypical measles syndrome presentation in order to limit the delay of diagnosis, to avoid unnecessary investigations and to prevent the potential spread of this infectious disease. PMID:26400591

  18. Olanzapine-related repetitive focal seizures with lingual dystonia.

    PubMed

    Anzellotti, Francesca; Capasso, Margherita; Frazzini, Valerio; Onofrj, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Olanzapine-related seizures have rarely been reported despite associated proconvulsant risk factors described in the literature: myoclonic status, increased frequency of seizures, tonic-clonic seizures, as well as fatal status epilepticus. We present a psychiatric patient who developed repetitive focal motor seizures and lingual dystonia when olanzapine was added for psychomotor agitation and aggressiveness. Olanzapine was immediately suspended and the seizures progressively disappeared. A control EEG showed no paroxysmal discharges. Olanzapine shares some pharmacological similarities with clozapine, a neuroleptic with a high risk of dose-dependent seizures. This adverse effect should be taken into account, and olanzapine should be used with caution if concomitant circumstances decrease the seizure threshold. [Published with video sequence online]. PMID:26898965

  19. Lichen sclerosus: a potpourri of misdiagnosed cases based on atypical clinical presentations

    PubMed Central

    Ventolini, Gary; Patel, Ravi; Vasquez, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Objective Lichen sclerosus (LS) is a chronic progressive inflammatory autoimmune-induced disease that primarily affects the epidermis and dermis of the external genital-anal region. Intense and recalcitrant pruritus is the hallmark of LS. Physical exam reveals thinning, hyperkeratosis, and parchment-like appearance. However, the classic symptom and signs of LS may not always be present and patients may be asymptomatic for pruritus. Hence, we describe 15 misdiagnosed cases with atypical clinical presentations. We believe that the absence of pruritus contributed to their initial misdiagnosis. The purpose of this paper is to increase awareness of atypical presentations of LS. Methods Data base review of de-identified clinical case pictures was performed. All patients had histopathology-confirmed diagnoses of LS. The data base file contains 800 cases of vulvovaginal disorders. The Institutional Review Board (IRB) considered that searching a de-identified data base of pictures did not require IRB approval. Results We identified 15 different atypical clinical cases. Patient ages were 18–75 years old. These patients were asymptomatic for pruritus and were misdiagnosed before they presented to the vulvovaginal specialized clinic. Conclusion Fifteen patients asymptomatic for pruritus with histopathology-confirmed diagnosis of LS were identified. They illustrate atypical clinical presentations that LS may have. PMID:26056492

  20. Quantitative EEG analysis of the maturational changes associated with childhood absence epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosso, O. A.; Hyslop, W.; Gerlach, R.; Smith, R. L. L.; Rostas, J. A. P.; Hunter, M.

    2005-10-01

    This study aimed to examine the background electroencephalography (EEG) in children with childhood absence epilepsy, a condition whose presentation has strong developmental links. EEG hallmarks of absence seizure activity are widely accepted and there is recognition that the bulk of inter-ictal EEG in this group is normal to the naked eye. This multidisciplinary study aimed to use the normalized total wavelet entropy (NTWS) (Signal Processing 83 (2003) 1275) to examine the background EEG of those patients demonstrating absence seizure activity, and compare it with children without absence epilepsy. This calculation can be used to define the degree of order in a system, with higher levels of entropy indicating a more disordered (chaotic) system. Results were subjected to further statistical analyses of significance. Entropy values were calculated for patients versus controls. For all channels combined, patients with absence epilepsy showed (statistically significant) lower entropy values than controls. The size of the difference in entropy values was not uniform, with certain EEG electrodes consistently showing greater differences than others.

  1. Atypical arthritis revisited: Acute rheumatic fever

    PubMed Central

    Shankar, Binoy; Bhutia, Euden; Kumar, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    A 13-year-old boy presented with vague musculoskeletal pain and involvement of multiple small and large joints along with axial skeleton for the last 3 years, poorly responsive to aspirin. However, on account of presence of carditis and fulfilment of Jones criteria, a diagnosis of acute rheumatic fever (ARF) with atypical arthritis was made. We report this case to break the myth and sensitize pediatricians and rheumatologists to keep the possibility of atypical articular presentations, as in our case, in patients with ARF and prevent delayed diagnosis and treatment. PMID:27212853

  2. Root extract of Anacyclus pyrethrum ameliorates seizures, seizure-induced oxidative stress and cognitive impairment in experimental animals.

    PubMed

    Pahuja, Monika; Mehla, Jogender; Reeta, K H; Joshi, Sujata; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2012-02-01

    In Ayurveda, Anacyclus pyrethrum has been used as a brain tonic. The present study evaluates the effect of hydroalcoholic extract of A. pyrethrum (HEAP) root against seizures, seizure-induced oxidative stress and cognitive impairment in experimental models of seizures. Male Wistar rats were used in the study. HEAP was administered in doses of 50, 100, 250, 500 in pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) model and 250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg in maximal electroshock (MES) model. Myoclonic jerk latency and generalized tonic clonic seizures (GTCS) were noted in PTZ whereas occurrence of tonic hind limb extension (THLE) was observed in MES seizures. Cognitive deficit was assessed using elevated plus maze and passive avoidance tests. Whole brain reduced glutathione, malondialdehyde levels and cholinesterase activity were measured. HEAP showed 50, 66.7, 83.3 and 100% protection at 50,100, 250 and 500 mg/kg, respectively against GTCS in PTZ induced seizures. In MES induced seizures, HEAP produced 16.7, 33.3 and 50% protection against THLE at 250, 500 and 1000 mg/kg, respectively. HEAP administration significantly prevented seizure induced oxidative stress and cognitive impairment in a dose-dependent manner. HEAP also normalized the decrease in cholinesterase activity caused by seizures. Thus, HEAP showed protective effect against seizures, seizure-induced oxidative stress and cognitive impairment in rats. PMID:21993359

  3. Genetics Home Reference: atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases: Kidney Failure: Choosing a Treatment That's Right for You Educational Resources (5 links) Disease InfoSearch: Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome 1 Orphanet: Atypical hemolytic-uremic syndrome The Merck Manual ...

  4. Alterations of A-Type Potassium Channels in Hippocampal Neurons after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Zhigang; Deng, Ping; Li, Jinqing

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with cognitive deficits, memory impairment, and epilepsy. Previous studies have reported neuronal loss and neuronal hyperexcitability in the post-traumatic hippocampus. A-type K+ currents (IA) play a critical role in modulating the intrinsic membrane excitability of hippocampal neurons. The disruption of IA is reportedly linked to hippocampal dysfunction. The present study investigates the changes of IA in the hippocampus after TBI. TBI in rats was induced by controlled cortical impact. The impact induced a reproducible lesion in the cortex and an obvious neuronal death in the ipsilateral hippocampus CA3 region. At one week after TBI, immunohistochemical staining and Western blotting showed that the expression of IA channel subunit Kv4.2 was markedly decreased in the ipsilateral hippocampus, but remained unchanged in the contralateral hippocampus. Meanwhile, electrophysiological recording showed that IA currents in ipsilateral CA1 pyramidal neurons were significantly reduced, which was associated with an increased neuronal excitability. Furthermore, there was an increased sensitivity to bicuculline-induced seizures in TBI rats. At 8 weeks after TBI, immunohistochemical staining and electrophysiological recording indicated that IA returned to control levels. These findings suggest that TBI causes a transient downregulation of IA in hippocampal CA1 neurons, which might be associated with the hyperexcitability in the post-traumatic hippocampus, and in turn leads to seizures and epilepsy. PMID:21895522

  5. Epileptic seizures: Quakes of the brain?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio, Ivan; Frei, Mark G.; Sornette, Didier; Milton, John; Lai, Ying-Cheng

    2010-08-01

    A dynamical analogy supported by five scale-free statistics (the Gutenberg-Richter distribution of event sizes, the distribution of interevent intervals, the Omori and inverse Omori laws, and the conditional waiting time until the next event) is shown to exist between two classes of seizures (“focal” in humans and generalized in animals) and earthquakes. Increments in excitatory interneuronal coupling in animals expose the system’s dependence on this parameter and its dynamical transmutability: moderate increases lead to power-law behavior of seizure energy and interevent times, while marked ones to scale-free (power-law) coextensive with characteristic scales and events. The coextensivity of power law and characteristic size regimes is predicted by models of coupled heterogeneous threshold oscillators of relaxation and underscores the role of coupling strength in shaping the dynamics of these systems.

  6. Local cerebral metabolism during partial seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, J. Jr.; Kuhl, D.E.; Phelps, M.E.; Rausch, R.; Nuwer, M.

    1983-04-01

    Interictal and ictal fluorodeoxyglucose scans were obtained with positron CT from four patients with spontaneous recurrent partial seizures, one with epilepsia partialis continua, and one with a single partial seizure induced by electrical stimulation of the hippocampus. Ictal metabolic patterns were different for each patient studied. Focal and generalized increased and decreased metabolism were observed. Ictal hypermetabolism may exceed six times the interictal rate and could represent activation of excitatory or inhibitory synapses in the epileptogenic region and its projection fields. Hypometabolism seen on ictal scans most likely reflects postictal depression and may indicate projection fields of inhibited neurons. No quantitative relationship between alterations in metabolism and EEG or behavioral measurements of ictal events could be demonstrated.

  7. Herbal remedies, dietary supplements, and seizures.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Alok; Delanty, Norman

    2003-02-01

    The use of herbal remedies and dietary supplements is widespread throughout the world, and use may be increasing. These are taken for a wide range of perceived benefits, such as energy and memory enhancement and treatment of specific conditions. Individuals with and without epilepsy may use these substances and may not inform their treating physician unless specifically asked. Inquiry about herbal medicine and dietary supplement intake should now be part of routine clinical history taking. Anecdotal accounts suggest that some herbal substances may have anticonvulsant effect, but randomised double-blind controlled trails are lacking. Alternatively many herbals and dietary supplements may predispose to seizures in individuals without epilepsy and worsen seizure control in those with epilepsy. In this article, we review the potential anticonvulsant and proconvulsant effects of herbal remedies and dietary supplements and discuss the potential interaction between these herbal substances and conventional anticonvulsant medications. PMID:12558579

  8. Phenobarbitone versus phenytoin monotherapy for partial onset seizures and generalized onset tonic-clonic seizures

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Stephen; Smith, Catrin Tudur; Williamson, Paula R; Marson, Anthony G

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in Issue 4, 2001. Worldwide, phenytoin and phenobarbitone are commonly used antiepileptic drugs. They are more likely to be used in the developing world than the developed world, primarily because they are inexpensive. The aim of this review is to summarize data from existing trials comparing phenytoin and phenobarbitone. Objectives To review the effects of phenobarbitone compared to phenytoin when used as monotherapy in patients with partial onset seizures or generalized tonic-clonic seizures with or without other generalized seizure types. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Epilepsy Group trials register (20 October 2009), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library Issue 4, 2009) and MEDLINE (1950 to October week 2, 2009). In addition, we handsearched relevant journals, and contacted pharmaceutical companies and researchers in the field to seek any ongoing or unpublished studies. Selection criteria Randomized controlled trials in children or adults with partial onset seizures or generalized onset tonic-clonic seizures. Trials must have included a comparison of phenobarbitone monotherapy with phenytoin monotherapy. Data collection and analysis This was an individual patient data review. Outcomes were time to (a) withdrawal of allocated treatment, (b) 12-month remission and (c) first seizure post randomization. Data were analyzed using a stratified logrank analysis with results expressed as hazard ratios (HR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI), where a HR > 1 indicates an event is more likely to occur earlier on phenobarbitone than phenytoin. Main results To date, data have been obtained for four of ten studies meeting the inclusion criteria, amounting to 599 individuals, or approximately 65% of the potential data. The main overall results (HR) were (a) time to treatment withdrawal 1.62 (95% confidence interval 1.22 to 2.14); (b) time to 12-month remission 0.93 (95% confidence interval 0.70 to 1.23) and (c) time to first seizure 0.84 (95% confidence interval 0.68 to 1.05). These results indicate a statistically significant clinical advantage for phenytoin in terms of treatment withdrawal and a non-significant advantage in terms of 12-month remission. Results for time to first seizure suggest a non-significant clinical advantage for phenobarbitone. Authors’ conclusions The results of this review favour phenytoin over phenobarbitone, as phenobarbitone was significantly more likely to be withdrawn than phenytoin. Given that no significant differences for seizure outcomes were found, the higher withdrawal rate with phenobarbitone may be due to adverse effects. PMID:11687150

  9. Inheritance of febrile seizures in sudden unexplained death in toddlers.

    PubMed

    Holm, Ingrid A; Poduri, Annapurna; Crandall, Laura; Haas, Elisabeth; Grafe, Marjorie R; Kinney, Hannah C; Krous, Henry F

    2012-04-01

    Sudden unexplained death in toddlers has been associated with febrile seizures, family history of febrile seizures, and hippocampal anomalies. We investigated the mode of inheritance for febrile seizures in these families. A three-generation pedigree was obtained from families enrolled in the San Diego Sudden Unexplained Death in Childhood Research Project, involving toddlers with sudden unexplained death, febrile seizures, and family history of febrile seizures. In our six cases, death was unwitnessed and related to sleep. The interval from last witnessed febrile seizure to death ranged from 3 weeks to 6 months. Hippocampal abnormalities were identified in one of three cases with available autopsy sections. Autosomal dominant inheritance of febrile seizures was observed in three families. A fourth demonstrated autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance or variable expressivity. In two families, the maternal and paternal sides manifested febrile seizures. In this series, the major pattern of inheritance in toddlers with sudden unexplained death and febrile seizures was autosomal dominant. Future studies should develop markers (including genetic) to identify which patients with febrile seizures are at risk for sudden unexplained death in childhood, and to provide guidance for families and physicians. PMID:22490769

  10. Inheritance of Febrile Seizures in Sudden Unexplained Death in Toddlers

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Ingrid A.; Poduri, Annapurna; Crandall, Laura; Haas, Elisabeth; Grafe, Marjorie R.; Kinney, Hannah C.; Krous, Henry F.

    2014-01-01

    Sudden unexplained death in toddlers has been associated with febrile seizures, family history of febrile seizures, and hippocampal anomalies. We investigated the mode of inheritance for febrile seizures in these families. A three-generation pedigree was obtained from families enrolled in the San Diego Sudden Unexplained Death in Childhood Research Project, involving toddlers with sudden unexplained death, febrile seizures, and family history of febrile seizures. In our six cases, death was unwitnessed and related to sleep. The interval from last witnessed febrile seizure to death ranged from 3 weeks to 6 months. Hippocampal abnormalities were identified in one of three cases with available autopsy sections. Autosomal dominant inheritance of febrile seizures was observed in three families. A fourth demonstrated autosomal dominant inheritance with incomplete penetrance or variable expressivity. In two families, the maternal and paternal sides manifested febrile seizures. In this series, the major pattern of inheritance in toddlers with sudden unexplained death and febrile seizures was autosomal dominant. Future studies should develop markers (including genetic) to identify which patients with febrile seizures are at risk for sudden unexplained death in childhood, and to provide guidance for families and physicians. PMID:22490769

  11. Perspectives on seizure clusters: Gaps in lexicon, awareness, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Buelow, Janice M; Shafer, Patricia; Shinnar, Ruth; Austin, Joan; Dewar, Sandra; Long, Lucretia; O'Hara, Kathryn; Santilli, Nancy

    2016-04-01

    Seizure clusters in epilepsy can result in serious outcomes such as missed work or school, postictal psychosis, emergency room visits, or hospitalizations, and yet they are often not included in discussions between health-care professionals (HCPs) and their patients. The purpose of this paper was to describe and compare consumer (patient and caregivers) and professional understanding of seizure clusters and to describe how consumers and HCPs communicate regarding seizure clusters. We reviewed social media discussion sites to explore consumers' understanding of seizure clusters. We analyzed professional (medical) literature to explore the HCPs' understanding of seizure clusters. Major themes were revealed in one or both groups, including: communication about diagnosis; frequency, duration, and time frame; seizure type and pattern; severity; and self-management. When comparing discussions of professionals and consumers, both consumers and clinicians discussed the definition of seizure clusters. Discussions of HCPs were understandably clinically focused, and consumer discussions reflected the experience of seizure clusters; however, both groups struggled with a common lexicon. Seizure cluster events remain a problem associated with serious outcomes. Herein, we outline the lack of a common understanding and recommend the development of a common lexicon to improve communication regarding seizure clusters. PMID:26906403

  12. Models of hypoxia and ischemia-induced seizures.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hongyu; Juul, Halvor M; Jensen, Frances E

    2016-02-15

    Despite greater understanding and improved management, seizures continue to be a major problem in childhood. Neonatal seizures are often refractory to conventional antiepileptic drugs, and can result in later life epilepsy and cognitive deficits, conditions for which there are no specific treatments. Hypoxic and/or ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) is the most common cause for neonatal seizures, and accounts for more than two-thirds of neonatal seizure cases. A better understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms is essential for identifying new therapeutic strategies that control the neonatal seizures and its cognitive consequences. This heavily relies on animal models that play a critical role in discovering novel mechanisms underlying both epileptogenesis and associated cognitive impairments. To date, a number of animal models have provided a tremendous amount of information regarding the pathophysiology of HIE-induced neonatal seizures. This review provides an overview on the most important features of the main animal models of HIE-induced seizures. In particular, we focus on the methodology of seizure induction and the characterizations of post-HIE injury consequences. These aspects of HIE-induced seizure models are discussed in the light of the suitability of these models in studying human HIE-induced seizures. PMID:26434705

  13. SEIZURE DURATION AND RELATED ISSUES IN ECT FOR ENDOGENOUS DEPRESSION

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    1993-01-01

    SUMMARY In a study comparing sinusoidal wave and brief-pulse ECT in endogenous depression, seizure duration was monitored by the cuff method in 29 patients over 180 treatment sessions. Mean seizure duration across all treatments was 26.5 secs, and the mean for individual patients across their ECT course ranged from a minimum of 15.7 secs to maximum of38.5 secs. Regression analysis found no variable which significantly predicted mean seizure duration. Of the 22 good responders in the study, response to ECT was associated with a mean seizure duration of secs in 1 patient, ando cs in 11 patients; as just 2 of 7poor responders to ECT had a mean seizure duration of <20 secs in 1 patients, <25 secs in 11 patients, of the 22 good responders in the study; as just 2 of 7 poor responders to ECT had a mean seizure duration of <25 secs, it appears that a cuff seizure duration of over 20 secs may suffice for the seizure to be therapeutic in depression. With (constant current) brief pulse ECT, seizure threshold significantly increased with successive ECTs; thresholds did not however differ between the good and poor responders. There was a trend for seizure duration to decrease over time; again, good and poor responders did not differ. These findings provide little support for the anticonvulsant hypothesis for the antidepressant effect of ECT, but support the literature that ECT exerts an anticonvulsant effect. PMID:21776168

  14. DC potentials of temporal lobe seizures in the monkey.

    PubMed

    Mayanagi, Y; Walker, A E

    1975-07-01

    In 8 monkeys, made epileptic by alum or penicillin injection into temporal lobe structures, 40 seizures were studied by both DC cortical potential and subcortical EEG recordings. Eighteen seizures of lateral temporal origin had an abrupt negative DC potential shift of 0.5 to 2.0 mV in and around the focus. The frontal, parietal and occipital cortices did not develop DC potential changes, perhaps due to the limited propagation of the neocortical seizures. Twenty-two seizures of medial temporal origin showed a negative shift of the anterior, inferior or lateral temporal cortex in 85% of seizures. The other 15% had a positive or no shift. In hippocampal seizures, a positive displacement was sometimes seen prior to the main negative shift in the lateral temporal cortex. The remote cortex developed only a minimal positive shift in 30% of the mediotemporal seizures. A marked negative shift in the frontocentral cortex was the first sign of impending generalization, which may result from a series of chain reactions with seizure propagation, involving more and more structures of the brain. Registration of DC potentials in temporal lobe seizures may give insight into the nature of abnormal EEG activities and to some extent into the origin of seizures. PMID:51061

  15. Infant Perception of Atypical Speech Signals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vouloumanos, Athena; Gelfand, Hanna M.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to decode atypical and degraded speech signals as intelligible is a hallmark of speech perception. Human adults can perceive sounds as speech even when they are generated by a variety of nonhuman sources including computers and parrots. We examined how infants perceive the speech-like vocalizations of a parrot. Further, we examined how

  16. Atypical Ligon Lintless-2 Phenotype in Cotton

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The mutant Li2 is reported to be a dominant single gene mutation in cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L. It has normal vegetative phenotypic morphology and the phenotype of the seed cotton is reported to be fuzzy seed with short fibers. The objective of this research was to report on atypical phenotypes ob...

  17. Human Poisoning Through Atypical Routes of Exposure.

    PubMed

    Behal, Niharika; Wong, Alan; Mantara, Ruzly; Cantrell, F Lee

    2016-02-01

    There are over 2 million human exposure cases reported to United States poison centers annually. Much of the data involves exposure through ingestion, dermal contact, inhalation, ocular, or parenteral routes. There is limited data characterizing exposure via atypical routes. We conducted a retrospective review of the California Poison Control System Database for a 24-month period from January 2012 to December 2013 for poison exposure that occurred through the otic, vaginal, or rectal route. There were a total of 634 cases involving single-route and single-substance atypical poison exposure. There were 287 (45%) cases of otic exposure, 190 (30.0%) cases of vaginal exposure, and 157 (25%) cases of rectal exposure. Five hundred forty (85%) of the cases were unintentional. Gasoline exposure through the otic route occurred in 83 (13.1%) cases, followed by hydrogen peroxide (4.7%), acetaminophen (3.8%), and miconazole (2.7%). Adverse effects occurred in 336 (53%) cases. No deaths were reported. The most common treatment was observation only, occurring in 396 (62.4%) cases. The majority of the cases did not warrant hospital evaluation (73.5%). This is the first retrospective characterization study of atypical routes of poison exposure. These results may provide education to providers and the public regarding risks of exposure to substances through atypical routes. PMID:26250476

  18. Cohort study of atypical pressure ulcers development.

    PubMed

    Jaul, Efraim

    2014-12-01

    Atypical pressure ulcers (APU) are distinguished from common pressure ulcers (PU) with both unusual location and different aetiology. The occurrence and attempts to characterise APU remain unrecognised. The purpose of this cohort study was to analyse the occurrence of atypical location and the circumstances of the causation, and draw attention to the prevention and treatment by a multidisciplinary team. The cohort study spanned three and a half years totalling 174 patients. The unit incorporates two weekly combined staff meetings. One concentrates on wound assessment with treatment decisions made by the physician and nurse, and the other, a multidisciplinary team reviewing all patients and coordinating treatment. The main finding of this study identified APU occurrence rate of 21% within acquired PU over a three and a half year period. Severe spasticity constituted the largest group in this study and the most difficult to cure wounds, located in medial aspects of knees, elbows and palms. Medical devices caused the second largest occurrence of atypical wounds, located in the nape of the neck, penis and nostrils. Bony deformities were the third recognisable atypical wound group located in shoulder blades and upper spine. These three categories are definable and time observable. APU are important to be recognisable, and can be healed as well as being prevented. The prominent role of the multidisciplinary team is primary in identification, prevention and treatment. PMID:23374746

  19. Infant Perception of Atypical Speech Signals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vouloumanos, Athena; Gelfand, Hanna M.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to decode atypical and degraded speech signals as intelligible is a hallmark of speech perception. Human adults can perceive sounds as speech even when they are generated by a variety of nonhuman sources including computers and parrots. We examined how infants perceive the speech-like vocalizations of a parrot. Further, we examined how…

  20. Atypical and Typical Antipsychotics in the Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noggle, Chad A.; Dean, Raymond S.

    2009-01-01

    The use of antipsychotic medications within the school-age population is rapidly increasing. Although typical antipsychotics may be used in rare cases, this influx is largely secondary to the availability of the atypical antipsychotics. Reduction of possible adverse effects and increased efficacy represent the primary basis for the atypical…

  1. Coexistent atypical polypoid adenomyoma and endometrial adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Mittal, K R; Peng, X C; Wallach, R C; Demopoulos, R I

    1995-05-01

    Atypical polypoid adenomyoma (APA) is a rare entity that is believed to follow a benign course. We report a case of APA with coexistent endometrial adenocarcinoma. The example raises the possibility that APA may progress to endometrial adenocarcinoma in some cases. PMID:7750942

  2. An Atypical Case of Foreign Accent Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryalls, Jack; Whiteside, Janet

    2006-01-01

    A new case of Foreign Accent Syndrome is described. This American woman presented with a British- or Australian- sounding accent after stroke, which resulted in a lacunar infarct in the left internal capsule. The atypical etiology and apparent changes in lexical use are described. It is hypothesized that an abnormally tense vocal tract posture may…

  3. Atypical Alpha Asymmetry in Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, T. Sigi; Smalley, Susan L.; Hanada, Grant; Macion, James; McCracken, James T.; McGough, James J.; Loo, Sandra K.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: A growing body of literature suggests atypical cerebral asymmetry and interhemispheric interaction in ADHD. A common means of assessing lateralized brain function in clinical populations has been to examine the relative proportion of EEG alpha activity (8-12 Hz) in each hemisphere (i.e., alpha asymmetry). Increased rightward alpha…

  4. Atypical anti-glomerular basement membrane disease

    PubMed Central

    Troxell, Megan L.; Houghton, Donald C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) disease classically presents with aggressive necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis, often with pulmonary hemorrhage. The pathologic hallmark is linear staining of GBMs for deposited immunoglobulin G (IgG), usually accompanied by serum autoantibodies to the collagen IV alpha-3 constituents of GBMs. Methods Renal pathology files were searched for cases with linear anti-GBM to identify cases with atypical or indolent course. Histopathology, laboratory studies, treatment and outcome of those cases was reviewed in detail. Results Five anti-GBM cases with atypical clinicopathologic features were identified (accounting for ∼8% of anti-GBM cases in our laboratory). Kidney biopsies showed minimal glomerular changes by light microscopy; one patient had monoclonal IgG deposits in an allograft (likely recurrent). Three patients did not have detectable serum anti-GBM by conventional assays. Three patients had indolent clinical courses after immunosuppressive treatment. One patient, untreated after presenting with brief mild hematuria, re-presented after a short interval with necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis. Conclusions Thorough clinicopathologic characterization and close follow-up of patients with findings of atypical anti-GBM on renal biopsy are needed. Review of the literature reveals only rare well-documented atypical anti-GBM cases to date, only one of which progressed to end-stage kidney disease. PMID:26985371

  5. Atypical Neural Self-Representation in Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardo, Michael V.; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Bullmore, Edward T.; Sadek, Susan A.; Pasco, Greg; Wheelwright, Sally J.; Suckling, John; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2010-01-01

    The "self" is a complex multidimensional construct deeply embedded and in many ways defined by our relations with the social world. Individuals with autism are impaired in both self-referential and other-referential social cognitive processing. Atypical neural representation of the self may be a key to understanding the nature of such impairments.…

  6. Identification of atypical scrapie in Canadian sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scrapie, a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy of sheep and goats, exists in most small ruminant producing countries of the world. An atypical form of this disease, originally termed Nor98, was discovered in large abattoir surveillance of clinically normal, predominantly older sheep and rarely ...

  7. Atypical Visuomotor Performance in Children with PDD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlooz, Wim A. J. M.; Hulstijn, Wouter

    2012-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) frequently encounter difficulties in visuomotor tasks, which are possibly caused by atypical visuoperceptual processing. This was tested in children (aged 9-12 years) with pervasive developmental disorder (PDD; including PDD-NOS and Asperger syndrome), and two same-age control groups (Tourette syndrome

  8. Atypical Visuomotor Performance in Children with PDD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlooz, Wim A. J. M.; Hulstijn, Wouter

    2012-01-01

    Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) frequently encounter difficulties in visuomotor tasks, which are possibly caused by atypical visuoperceptual processing. This was tested in children (aged 9-12 years) with pervasive developmental disorder (PDD; including PDD-NOS and Asperger syndrome), and two same-age control groups (Tourette syndrome…

  9. Atypical Pyoderma Gangrenosum Mimicking an Infectious Process

    PubMed Central

    To, Derek; Wong, Aaron; Montessori, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    We present a patient with atypical pyoderma gangrenosum (APG), which involved the patient's arm and hand. Hemorrhagic bullae and progressive ulcerations were initially thought to be secondary to an infectious process, but a biopsy revealed PG. Awareness of APG by infectious disease services may prevent unnecessary use of broad-spectrum antibiotics. PMID:25024856

  10. Atypical pyoderma gangrenosum mimicking an infectious process.

    PubMed

    To, Derek; Wong, Aaron; Montessori, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    We present a patient with atypical pyoderma gangrenosum (APG), which involved the patient's arm and hand. Hemorrhagic bullae and progressive ulcerations were initially thought to be secondary to an infectious process, but a biopsy revealed PG. Awareness of APG by infectious disease services may prevent unnecessary use of broad-spectrum antibiotics. PMID:25024856

  11. Atypical Gifted Learners and Their Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diket, Read M., Ed.; Abel, Trudy, Ed.

    This collection of 12 handouts focuses on different categories of atypical gifted learners and their characteristics. The handouts are generally two pages long and present a summary of the literature on the topic, some practical teaching suggestions, and references. The handouts include: (1) "Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Gifted Students" (Pam…

  12. Epileptic Seizure Detection and Warning Device

    SciTech Connect

    Elarton, J.K.; Koepsel, K.L.

    1999-06-21

    Flint Hills Scientific, L.L.C. (FHS) has invented what is believed to be the first real-time epileptic seizure detection and short-term prediction method in the world. They have demonstrated an IBM PC prototype with a multi-channel EEG monitoring configuration. This CRADA effort applied AlliedSignal FM and T hardware design, manufacturing miniaturization, and high quality manufacturing expertise in converting the prototype into a small, portable, self-contained, multi-channel EEG epileptic seizure detection and warning device. The purpose of this project was to design and build a proof-of-concept miniaturized prototype of the FHS-developed PC-based prototype. The resultant DSP prototype, measuring 4'' x 6'' x 2'', seizure detection performance compared favorably with the FHS PC prototype, thus validating the DSP design goals. The very successful completion of this project provided valuable engineering information for FHS for future prototype commercialization as well as providing AS/FM and T engineers DSP design experience.

  13. Ictal alterations of consciousness during ecstatic seizures.

    PubMed

    Picard, Fabienne; Kurth, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Patients with ecstatic epileptic seizures report an altered consciousness, which they describe as a sense of heightened perception of themselves – they “feel very present” – and an increased vividness of sensory perceptions. Recently, the anterior insula has been proposed as the region where these seizures originate, based on the results of ictal nuclear imaging in three patients, the first induction of ecstatic auras by electrical stimulation, and the functional characteristics of the anterior insula in neuroimaging literature. Specifically, the anterior insula is thought to play a key role in integrating information from within the body, the external world, as well as the emotional states. In addition, the anterior insula is thought to convert this integrated information into successive global emotional moments, thus enabling both the construct of a sentient self as well as a mechanism for predictive coding. As part of the salience network, this region is also involved in switching from mind wandering toward attentional and executive processing. In this review, we will summarize previous patient reports and recap how insular functioning may be involved in the phenomenon of ecstatic seizures. Furthermore, we will relate these hypotheses to the results from research on meditation and effects of drug abuse. PMID:24436968

  14. Fluorocitrate-mediated astroglial dysfunction causes seizures.

    PubMed

    Willoughby, John O; Mackenzie, Lorraine; Broberg, Marita; Thoren, Anna E; Medvedev, Andrei; Sims, Neil R; Nilsson, Michael

    2003-10-01

    A role for astroglia in epileptogenesis has been hypothesised but is not established. Low doses of fluorocitrate specifically and reversibly disrupt astroglial metabolism by blocking aconitase, an enzyme integral to the tricarboxylic acid cycle. We used cerebral cortex injections of fluorocitrate, at a dose that we demonstrated to inhibit astroglial metabolism selectively, to determine whether astroglial disturbances lead to seizures. Rats were halothane-anesthetized, and 0.8 nmol of sodium fluorocitrate was injected into the cerebral cortex. Extradural electroencephalogram (EEG) electrodes were implanted, after which the anesthesia was ceased and the animals were observed. In all experiments, 14 of 15 fluorocitrate-treated animals exhibited epileptiform EEG discharges, with some animals exhibiting convulsive seizures. Discharges commenced as early as 30 min postfluorocitrate injection. Intraperitoneal octanol, but not halothane by inhalation, given to test the possible participation of gap junctions in EEG discharge generation, blocked or delayed the occurrence of discharges after fluorocitrate. These results indicate that focal cerebrocortical astroglial dysfunction leads to focal epileptiform discharges and sometimes to convulsive seizures and that the process possibly depends on effects mediated by gap junctions. PMID:13130518

  15. Translational Development Strategy for Magnetic Seizure Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Rowny, Stefan; Benzl, Karla; Lisanby, Sarah H.

    2009-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has unparalleled antidepressant efficacy, but its cognitive side effects may be persistent. Research suggests that the side effects may be at least partially dissociable from the therapeutic effects of ECT, suggesting that distinct cortical networks may underlie them and introducing a role for focal seizure induction as a means of minimizing side effects. In magnetic seizure therapy (MST), magnetic fields avoid tissue impedance and induce electrical currents confined to superficial cortex, facilitating focal seizure induction. The translational development strategy for MST has included: (1) device development, (2) feasibility in animals and initial human trials, (3) testing in nonhuman primates on safety and mechanisms of action (with neuroanatomical, neurophysiological and cognitive endpoints), (4) safety testing in patients, (5) initial efficacy testing in patients, (6) dosage optimization, and (7) randomized comparison with ECT. These stages have been iterative, with results of early clinical testing prompting device enhancements that were, in turn, tested in nonhuman primates prior to human trials. Safety testing was aided by development of a nonhuman primate model of human ECT, and the validation of a cognitive battery for the monkey that is sensitive to the range of effects of ECT on human memory. Human testing has been facilitated by the development of an international consortium of centers addressing various aspects of technique and dose/response relationships. Challenges facing MST are common to other device based therapies: characterizing dose/response relationships, optimizing efficacy, and developing efficient and reliable methods to induce lasting therapeutic change in the circuitry underlying depression. PMID:19348798

  16. Identification of a neurovascular signaling pathway regulating seizures in mice

    PubMed Central

    Fredriksson, Linda; Stevenson, Tamara K; Su, Enming J; Ragsdale, Margaret; Moore, Shannon; Craciun, Stefan; Schielke, Gerald P; Murphy, Geoffrey G; Lawrence, Daniel A

    2015-01-01

    Objective A growing body of evidence suggests that increased blood–brain barrier (BBB) permeability can contribute to the development of seizures. The protease tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) has been shown to promote BBB permeability and susceptibility to seizures. In this study, we examined the pathway regulated by tPA in seizures. Methods An experimental model of kainate-induced seizures was used in genetically modified mice, including mice deficient in tPA (tPA−/−), its inhibitor neuroserpin (Nsp−/−), or both (Nsp:tPA−/−), and in mice conditionally deficient in the platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRα). Results Compared to wild-type (WT) mice, Nsp−/− mice have significantly reduced latency to seizure onset and generalization; whereas tPA−/− mice have the opposite phenotype, as do Nsp:tPA−/− mice. Furthermore, interventions that maintain BBB integrity delay seizure propagation, whereas osmotic disruption of the BBB in seizure-resistant tPA−/− mice dramatically reduces the time to seizure onset and accelerates seizure progression. The phenotypic differences in seizure progression between WT, tPA−/−, and Nsp−/− mice are also observed in electroencephalogram recordings in vivo, but absent in ex vivo electrophysiological recordings where regulation of the BBB is no longer necessary to maintain the extracellular environment. Finally, we demonstrate that these effects on seizure progression are mediated through signaling by PDGFRα on perivascular astrocytes. Interpretation Together, these data identify a specific molecular pathway involving tPA-mediated PDGFRα signaling in perivascular astrocytes that regulates seizure progression through control of the BBB. Inhibition of PDGFRα signaling and maintenance of BBB integrity might therefore offer a novel clinical approach for managing seizures. PMID:26273685

  17. The behavioral treatment of epilepsy generation and inhibition of seizures.

    PubMed

    Fenwick, P

    1994-02-01

    These studies provide abundant evidence of the close interrelation between seizure activity and behavior. They reaffirm the point that epileptic seizures do not occur in a behavioral vacuum and strengthen the theoretical framework for behavioral treatment of epilepsy patients. As our understanding of the epileptic focus and its connections to surrounding cerebral systems increases, the concept that seizure control is significantly influenced by altering behavior of the patient becomes more comprehensible. Epileptic seizures should not be thought of as arising randomly. They occur in focal seizures when the pools of neurons surrounding the epilepsy focus are sufficiently excited for seizure activity to spread. Generalized seizures occur when the level of cortical excitability, or corticoreticular excitation, has reached a point at which thalamic recruiting volleys generalize and start to spread. In the partial epilepsies, a detailed clinical history should be taken as to the nature and characteristics of the aura and the form that seizure generalization or spread may take. Charting events surrounding the time of the seizure as described below are the engine which drives the creation of a countermeasure and its application to stopping seizures. They are the heart of a behavioral program and skill in interpreting the data will be repaid by the finding of the appropriate countermeasures for seizure reduction. This information will define those aspects of the patient's psychic life or behavior that will both trigger and inhibit seizure activity. Discussing this information with the patient will help him or her to understand that their seizures are not necessarily random events, but are intimately related to feelings, actions, and thoughts. A complete treatment of epilepsy involves not just medication, but includes teaching the patient about their brain and its functioning, and how they can use their feelings, thinking, and behavior in the control of their epilepsy. PMID:8183209

  18. Clear Cell Atypical Fibroxantoma: A Rare Variant of Atypical Fibroxanthoma and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Agirbas, Sule; Sehitoglu, Ibrahim; Yurdakul, Cüneyt; Elmas, Ömer

    2014-01-01

    Atypical fibroxanthoma (AFX) is a superficial variant of pleomorphic malignant fibrous histiocytoma. Clear cell atypical fibroxanthoma (CCAFXA) is a rare variant of atypical fibroxanthoma. A 74-year-old male patient presented with a rapidly growing nodule on the shoulder, which had appeared over a 5-months period. Lesion was excised by the plastic surgeon. Microscopic examination showed an ulcerated nodule composed of pleomorphic spindled and polygonal cells with clear or vacuolated cytoplasm. The neoplastic cells were stained positively with CD68 and CD10 and were stained negative with S-100, Melan A, muscle-specific actin, or pan-cytokeratin. Final diagnosis was clear cell atypical fibroxanthoma. CCAFXA should be differentiated from other clear-cell neoplasms of the skin. Best of our knowledge only 11 cases CCAFXA of have been reported in published studies till date. Herein, we reported 12th case in literature of CCAFXA and review of the literature. PMID:25120992

  19. Novel CDKL5 Mutations in Czech Patients with Phenotypes of Atypical Rett Syndrome and Early-Onset Epileptic Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Záhoráková, D; Langová, M; Brožová, K; Laštůvková, J; Kalina, Z; Rennerová, L; Martásek, P

    2016-01-01

    The X-linked CDKL5 gene, which encodes cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 protein, has been implicated in early-onset encephalopathy and atypical Rett syndrome with early-onset seizures. The CDKL5 protein is a kinase required for neuronal development and morphogenesis, but its precise functions are still largely unexplored. Individuals with CDKL5 mutations present with severe global developmental delay, intractable epilepsy, and Rett-like features. A clear genotype-phenotype correlation has not been established due to an insufficient number of reported cases. The aim of this study was to analyse the CDKL5 gene in Czech patients with early-onset seizures and Rett-like features. We performed mutation screening in a cohort of 83 individuals using high-resolution melting analysis, DNA sequencing and multiplex ligation- dependent probe amplification. Molecular analyses revealed heterozygous pathogenic mutations in three girls with severe intellectual disability and intractable epilepsy starting at the age of two months. All three identified mutations, c.637G>A, c.902_977+29del105, and c.1757_1758delCT, are novel, thus significantly extending the growing spectrum of known pathogenic CDKL5 sequence variants. Our results support the importance of genetic testing of the CDKL5 gene in patients with early-onset epileptic encephalopathy and Rett-like features with early-onset seizures. This is the first study referring to molecular defects of CDKL5 in Czech cases. PMID:27187038

  20. Flares in A-type stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoci, Victoria; Gade Pedersen, May

    2015-08-01

    Recent studies show evidence of flare-like features in 32 Kepler A-type stars which were interpreted to be intrinsic, contradicting theory. Flares in late type stars are generated through the reconnection of magnetic field lines in stellar atmospheres. For magnetic fields to be sufficiently strong to emerge at the surface and form flares a dynamo is required, which is operated by a convective envelope. A-type stars only possess shallow convective envelopes of the order of 1-3% of the total stellar radius and therefore are not expected to support flaring. On the other hand X-ray flares have been observed in early B-type stars. They are produced by stellar wind activity which vanish for late B-type stars.We re-investigated the light curves of 26 flaring A-type stars setting specific criteria in order to identify these features. Our preliminary results reveal significantly fewer flare candidates than those previously detected even including more data. However, the positively detected flares follow the expected correlation between flare intensity and duration. We investigated the variations in the light curves of one of the stars in detail and found that these variations could be due to spots based on the observed vsini. Currently we are following up on those results and investigating RV data for 3-4 different epochs for the 10 brightest flaring A-type stars. The actual pixel data of the entire sample of flaring A-type stars is likewise being analyzed.

  1. Familial Atypical Cold Urticaria: Description of a New Hereditary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Chhavi; Healy, Chris; Wanderer, Alan A.; Hoffman, Hal M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Acquired Cold Urticaria (ACU) is usually a self-limited, sporadic, cutaneous disease diagnosed by history and positive cold stimulation time tests (CSTT). We describe three unrelated families (A,B,C) with lifelong atypical cold urticaria, distinguished from ACU and Familial Cold Autoinflammatory Syndrome (FCAS). Objective To describe a new hereditary disease of cold urticaria and study its pathogenesis. Methods Questionnaires, interviews, physical exams, skin testing and biopsies were obtained. Absolute values, means and prevalence percentages of data are reported. Results 35 subjects are described with Familial Atypical Cold Urticaria (FACU) (A:17, B:8, C:10) displaying an autosomal dominant (AD) pattern of inheritance. All tested subjects had negative CSTT. Completed questionnaires from family A and B (35) revealed that all affected subjects had lifelong symptoms that began in early childhood with pruritis, erythema and urticaria after cold exposure. Angioedema (A:23%; B:42%), syncope and/or near-syncope (A:46%; B:86%) were also present. Triggers included cold atmosphere (100%), aquatic activities (A:92%, B:100%), handling cold objects (A:54%, B:71%) and ingestion of cold food or beverage (A:69%, B:100%). Skin biopsies demonstrated a mast cell infiltrate with the appearance of degranulation after cold challenge. Conclusions FACU is a new cold-induced inherited disease that is different than ACU in its natural history, atmospheric cold elicitation, severity of systemic reactions and CSTT results. FACU differs from FCAS in symptom-timing and the absence of fever, chills and joint pain. The etiology is suspected to be mast cell-related. Treatment of reactions is similar to ACU. Further evaluation of pathogenesis and genetics is warranted. PMID:19910034

  2. Atypical Gaze Following in Autism: A Comparison of Three Potential Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie-Lynch, K.; Elias, R.; Escudero, P.; Hutman, T.; Johnson, S. P.

    2014-01-01

    In order to evaluate the following potential mechanisms underlying atypical gaze following in autism, impaired reflexive gaze following, difficulty integrating gaze and affect, or reduced understanding of the referential significance of gaze, we administered three paradigms to young children with autism (N = 21) and chronological (N = 21) and nonverbal mental age (N = 21) matched controls. Children with autism exhibited impaired reflexive gaze following. The absence of evidence of integration of gaze and affect, regardless of diagnosis, indicates ineffective measurement of this construct. Reduced gaze following was apparent among children with autism during eye-tracking and in-person assessments. Word learning from gaze cues was better explained by developmental level than autism. Thus, gaze following may traverse an atypical, rather than just delayed, trajectory in autism. PMID:23619947

  3. Uric acid is released in the brain during seizure activity and increases severity of seizures in a mouse model for acute limbic seizures.

    PubMed

    Thyrion, Lisa; Raedt, Robrecht; Portelli, Jeanelle; Van Loo, Pieter; Wadman, Wytse J; Glorieux, Griet; Lambrecht, Bart N; Janssens, Sophie; Vonck, Kristl; Boon, Paul

    2016-03-01

    Recent evidence points at an important role of endogenous cell-damage induced pro-inflammatory molecules in the generation of epileptic seizures. Uric acid, under the form of monosodium urate crystals, has shown to have pro-inflammatory properties in the body, but less is known about its role in seizure generation. This study aimed to unravel the contribution of uric acid to seizure generation in a mouse model for acute limbic seizures. We measured extracellular levels of uric acid in the brain and modulated them using complementary pharmacological and genetic tools. Local extracellular uric acid levels increased three to four times during acute limbic seizures and peaked between 50 and 100min after kainic acid infusion. Manipulating uric acid levels through administration of allopurinol or knock-out of urate oxidase significantly altered the number of generalized seizures, decreasing and increasing them by a twofold respectively. Taken together, our results consistently show that uric acid is released during limbic seizures and suggest that uric acid facilitates seizure generalization. PMID:26774005

  4. Sensitivity testing of the Seizure Severity Questionnaire (SSQ).

    PubMed

    Borghs, Simon; de la Loge, Christine; Brabant, Yves; Cramer, Joyce

    2014-02-01

    The sensitivity of the Seizure Severity Questionnaire (SSQ) was evaluated using pooled data from open-label extensions of two clinical trials in patients with partial-onset seizures. The SSQ includes questions relating to frequency and helpfulness of warning signs as well as frequency, severity, and bothersomeness of ictal and postictal effects. Differences between mean change from baseline for each SSQ item for responders and nonresponders were described and compared between patients solely with complex partial seizures (CPSs: responders, n=166; nonresponders, n=127) and those solely with secondarily generalized partial seizures (SGPSs: responders, n=26; nonresponders, n=24) at baseline. Seizure Severity Questionnaire total score and individual SSQ items related to ictal movement, consciousness, bothersomeness of postictal effects, and frequency of postictal emotional effects showed differentiation between seizure type responders. These data provide further validation of the SSQ by demonstrating its sensitivity in describing treatment effects. PMID:24275520

  5. Seizure facilitating activity of the oral contraceptive ethinyl estradiol.

    PubMed

    Younus, Iyan; Reddy, Doodipala Samba

    2016-03-01

    Contraceptive management is critical in women with epilepsy. Although oral contraceptives (OCs) are widely used by many women with epilepsy, little is known about their impact on epileptic seizures and epileptogenesis. Ethinyl estradiol (EE) is the primary component of OC pills. In this study, we investigated the pharmacological effect of EE on epileptogenesis and kindled seizures in female mice using the hippocampus kindling model. Animals were stimulated daily with or without EE until generalized stage 5 seizures were elicited. EE treatment significantly accelerated the rate of epileptogenesis. In acute studies, EE caused a significant decrease in the afterdischarge threshold and increased the incidence and severity of seizures in fully-kindled mice. In chronic studies, EE treatment caused a greater susceptibility to kindled seizures. Collectively, these results are consistent with moderate proconvulsant-like activity of EE. Such excitatory effects may affect seizure risk in women with epilepsy taking OC pills. PMID:26874323

  6. Febrile convulsions: acute seizure characteristics and anti-convulsant therapy.

    PubMed

    Ling, S G

    2000-09-01

    A descriptive study using data from the medical records of 448 children with febrile convulsion was carried out to determine the seizure characteristics and use of anti-convulsant therapy for febrile convulsions in a Malaysian hospital. There was a higher incidence of multiple seizures and a lower incidence of focal seizures in the local population than in studies done among Western populations. The majority of initial seizures occurred within 24 h of fever onset. Transient neurological abnormalities following an acute seizure were common. A quarter of children referred by general practitioners had been given anti-convulsants prior to referral but up to 20% of general practitioners had used ineffective routes for administering diazepam. However, diazepam used in the hospital was found to be effective in controlling acute febrile seizures. PMID:11064777

  7. Tranexamic acid–associated seizures: Causes and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lecker, Irene; Wang, Dian‐Shi; Whissell, Paul D.; Avramescu, Sinziana; Mazer, C. David

    2015-01-01

    Antifibrinolytic drugs are routinely used worldwide to reduce the bleeding that results from a wide range of hemorrhagic conditions. The most commonly used antifibrinolytic drug, tranexamic acid, is associated with an increased incidence of postoperative seizures. The reported increase in the frequency of seizures is alarming, as these events are associated with adverse neurological outcomes, longer hospital stays, and increased in‐hospital mortality. However, many clinicians are unaware that tranexamic acid causes seizures. The goal of this review is to summarize the incidence, risk factors, and clinical features of these seizures. This review also highlights several clinical and preclinical studies that offer mechanistic insights into the potential causes of and treatments for tranexamic acid–associated seizures. This review will aid the medical community by increasing awareness about tranexamic acid–associated seizures and by translating scientific findings into therapeutic interventions for patients. ANN NEUROL 2016;79:18–26 PMID:26580862

  8. Extended-release bupropion induced grand mal seizures.

    PubMed

    Rissmiller, David J; Campo, Thomas

    2007-10-01

    Bupropion hydrochloride is currently available in three formulations: immediate-release, sustained-release, and extended-release (ER). Several published reports exist concerning bupropion's history of inducing seizures in both the immediate- and sustained-release formulations. Although the potential of the ER formulation for causing seizures is noted in the drug's prescribing information, there is no previously published report of bupropion ER inducing seizures. In the case reported, a 27-year-old woman who was prescribed bupropion ER as well as clonazepam and lamotrigine (anticonvulsants), hydrocodone bitartrate (for irritable bowel syndrome), and zolipidem tartrate (for depression and associated anxiety and insomnia) experienced a grand mal seizure 6 months after beginning bupropion ER therapy. The patient was taken to the emergency department, where she had a second grand mal seizure 8 hours after the first one. Extended-release bupropion was discontinued, and the patient had not had additional seizures at 8 months follow-up. PMID:17956996

  9. Dentate gyrus progenitor cell proliferation after the onset of spontaneous seizures in the tetanus toxin model of temporal lobe epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Jiruska, Premysl; Shtaya, Anan B Y; Bodansky, David M S; Chang, Wei-Chih; Gray, William P; Jefferys, John G R

    2013-06-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy alters adult neurogenesis. Existing experimental evidence is mainly from chronic models induced by an initial prolonged status epilepticus associated with substantial cell death. In these models, neurogenesis increases after status epilepticus. To test whether status epilepticus is necessary for this increase, we examined precursor cell proliferation and neurogenesis after the onset of spontaneous seizures in a model of temporal lobe epilepsy induced by unilateral intrahippocampal injection of tetanus toxin, which does not cause status or, in most cases, detectable neuronal loss. We found a 4.5 times increase in BrdU labeling (estimating precursor cells proliferating during the 2nd week after injection of toxin and surviving at least up to 7days) in dentate gyri of both injected and contralateral hippocampi of epileptic rats. Radiotelemetry revealed that the rats experienced 112±24 seizures, lasting 88±11s each, over a period of 8.6±1.3days from the first electrographic seizure. On the first day of seizures, their duration was a median of 103s, and the median interictal period was 23min, confirming the absence of experimentally defined status epilepticus. The total increase in cell proliferation/survival was due to significant population expansions of: radial glial-like precursor cells (type I; 7.2×), non-radial type II/III neural precursors in the dentate gyrus stem cell niche (5.6×), and doublecortin-expressing neuroblasts (5.1×). We conclude that repeated spontaneous brief temporal lobe seizures are sufficient to promote increased hippocampal neurogenesis in the absence of status epilepticus. PMID:23439313

  10. Forecasting Seizures in Dogs with Naturally Occurring Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Stead, S. Matt; Brinkmann, Ben; Vasoli, Vincent; Crepeau, Daniel; Vite, Charles H.; Sturges, Beverly; Ruedebusch, Vanessa; Mavoori, Jaideep; Leyde, Kent; Sheffield, W. Douglas; Litt, Brian; Worrell, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    Seizure forecasting has the potential to create new therapeutic strategies for epilepsy, such as providing patient warnings and delivering preemptive therapy. Progress on seizure forecasting, however, has been hindered by lack of sufficient data to rigorously evaluate the hypothesis that seizures are preceded by physiological changes, and are not simply random events. We investigated seizure forecasting in three dogs with naturally occurring focal epilepsy implanted with a device recording continuous intracranial EEG (iEEG). The iEEG spectral power in six frequency bands: delta (0.14 Hz), theta (48 Hz), alpha (812 Hz), beta (1230 Hz), low-gamma (3070 Hz), and high-gamma (70180 Hz), were used as features. Logistic regression classifiers were trained to discriminate labeled pre-ictal and inter-ictal data segments using combinations of the band spectral power features. Performance was assessed on separate test data sets via 10-fold cross-validation. A total of 125 spontaneous seizures were detected in continuous iEEG recordings spanning 6.5 to 15 months from 3 dogs. When considering all seizures, the seizure forecasting algorithm performed significantly better than a Poisson-model chance predictor constrained to have the same time in warning for all 3 dogs over a range of total warning times. Seizure clusters were observed in all 3 dogs, and when the effect of seizure clusters was decreased by considering the subset of seizures separated by at least 4 hours, the forecasting performance remained better than chance for a subset of algorithm parameters. These results demonstrate that seizures in canine epilepsy are not randomly occurring events, and highlight the feasibility of long-term seizure forecasting using iEEG monitoring. PMID:24416133

  11. Surface acoustic wave probe implant for predicting epileptic seizures

    DOEpatents

    Gopalsami, Nachappa; Kulikov, Stanislav; Osorio, Ivan; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    2012-04-24

    A system and method for predicting and avoiding a seizure in a patient. The system and method includes use of an implanted surface acoustic wave probe and coupled RF antenna to monitor temperature of the patient's brain, critical changes in the temperature characteristic of a precursor to the seizure. The system can activate an implanted cooling unit which can avoid or minimize a seizure in the patient.

  12. Epileptic seizure prediction by non-linear methods

    DOEpatents

    Hively, Lee M.; Clapp, Ned E.; Daw, C. Stuart; Lawkins, William F.

    1999-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for automatically predicting epileptic seizures monitor and analyze brain wave (EEG or MEG) signals. Steps include: acquiring the brain wave data from the patient; digitizing the data; obtaining nonlinear measures of the data via chaotic time series analysis tools; obtaining time serial trends in the nonlinear measures; comparison of the trend to known seizure predictors; and providing notification that a seizure is forthcoming.

  13. 8 CFR 280.21 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 280.21 Section 280.21... OF FINES § 280.21 Seizure of aircraft. Seizure of an aircraft under the authority of section 239 of the Act and § 280.2 will not be made if such aircraft is damaged to an extent that its value is...

  14. Seizure freedom with VNS monotherapy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rose, Sandra; Tao, James X

    2011-11-01

    Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is generally considered as a palliative treatment for patients with drug-resistant partial onset epilepsy. Although seizure freedom can be occasionally achieved in patients with VNS, anti-epileptic medications (AEDs) are commonly required to maintain seizure freedom. We report a case that a patient became seizure free for 5 years with VNS monotherapy. To our knowledge, a similar case has not been reported previously. PMID:21764334

  15. 8 CFR 280.21 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 280.21 Section 280.21... OF FINES § 280.21 Seizure of aircraft. Seizure of an aircraft under the authority of section 239 of the Act and § 280.2 will not be made if such aircraft is damaged to an extent that its value is...

  16. 8 CFR 280.21 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 280.21 Section 280.21... OF FINES § 280.21 Seizure of aircraft. Seizure of an aircraft under the authority of section 239 of the Act and § 280.2 will not be made if such aircraft is damaged to an extent that its value is...

  17. 8 CFR 280.21 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 280.21 Section 280.21... OF FINES § 280.21 Seizure of aircraft. Seizure of an aircraft under the authority of section 239 of the Act and § 280.2 will not be made if such aircraft is damaged to an extent that its value is...

  18. 8 CFR 280.21 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 280.21 Section 280.21... OF FINES § 280.21 Seizure of aircraft. Seizure of an aircraft under the authority of section 239 of the Act and § 280.2 will not be made if such aircraft is damaged to an extent that its value is...

  19. Epileptic seizure prediction by non-linear methods

    DOEpatents

    Hively, L.M.; Clapp, N.E.; Day, C.S.; Lawkins, W.F.

    1999-01-12

    This research discloses methods and apparatus for automatically predicting epileptic seizures monitor and analyze brain wave (EEG or MEG) signals. Steps include: acquiring the brain wave data from the patient; digitizing the data; obtaining nonlinear measures of the data via chaotic time series analysis tools; obtaining time serial trends in the nonlinear measures; comparison of the trend to known seizure predictors; and providing notification that a seizure is forthcoming. 76 figs.

  20. Effects of tianeptine on onset time of pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures in mice: possible role of adenosine A1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Uzbay, Tayfun I; Kayir, Hakan; Ceyhan, Mert

    2007-02-01

    Depression is a common psychiatric problem in epileptic patients. Thus, it is important that an antidepressant agent has anticonvulsant activity. This study was organized to investigate the effects of tianeptine, an atypical antidepressant, on pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced seizure in mice. A possible contribution of adenosine receptors was also evaluated. Adult male Swiss-Webster mice (25-35 g) were subjects. PTZ (80 mg/kg, i.p.) was injected to mice 30 min after tianeptine (2.5-80 mg/kg, i.p.) or saline administration. The onset times of 'first myoclonic jerk' (FMJ) and 'generalized clonic seizures' (GCS) were recorded. Duration of 600 s was taken as a cutoff time in calculation of the onset time of the seizures. To evaluate the contribution of adenosine receptors in the effect of tianeptine, a nonspecific adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine, a specific A1 receptor antagonist 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dipropylxanthine (DPCPX), a specific A2A receptor antagonist 8-(3-chlorostyryl) caffeine (CSC) or their vehicles were administered to the mice 15 min before tianeptine (80 mg/kg) or saline treatments. Tianeptine (40 and 80 mg/kg) pretreatment significantly delayed the onset time of FMJ and GCS. Caffeine (10-60 mg/kg, i.p.) dose-dependently blocked the retarding effect of tianeptine (80 mg/kg) on the onset times of FMJ and GCS. DPCPX (20 mg/kg) but not CSC (1-8 mg/kg) blocked the effect of tianeptine (80 mg/kg) on FMJ. Our results suggest that tianeptine delayed the onset time of PTZ-induced seizures via adenosine A1 receptors in mice. Thus, this drug may be a useful choice for epileptic patients with depression. PMID:16823386

  1. Neocortical GABA release at high intracellular sodium and low extracellular calcium: an anti-seizure mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rassner, Michael P; Moser, Andreas; Follo, Marie; Joseph, Kevin; van Velthoven-Wurster, Vera; Feuerstein, Thomas J

    2016-04-01

    In epilepsy, the GABA and glutamate balance may be disrupted and a transient decrease in extracellular calcium occurs before and during a seizure. Flow Cytometry based fluorescence activated particle sorting experiments quantified synaptosomes from human neocortical tissue, from both epileptic and non-epileptic patients (27.7% vs. 36.9% GABAergic synaptosomes, respectively). Transporter-mediated release of GABA in human and rat neocortical synaptosomes was measured using the superfusion technique for the measurement of endogenous GABA. GABA release was evoked by either a sodium channel activator or a sodium/potassium-ATPase inhibitor when exocytosis was possible or prevented, and when the sodium/calcium exchanger was active or inhibited. The transporter-mediated release of GABA is because of elevated intracellular sodium. A reduction in the extracellular calcium increased this release (in both non-epileptic and epileptic, except Rasmussen encephalitis, synaptosomes). The inverse was seen during calcium doubling. In humans, GABA release was not affected by exocytosis inhibition, that is, it was solely transporter-mediated. However, in rat synaptosomes, an increase in GABA release at zero calcium was only exhibited when the exocytosis was prevented. The absence of calcium amplified the sodium/calcium exchanger activity, leading to elevated intracellular sodium, which, together with the stimulation-evoked intracellular sodium increment, enhanced GABA transporter reversal. Sodium/calcium exchange inhibitors diminished GABA release. Thus, an important seizure-induced extracellular calcium reduction might trigger a transporter- and sodium/calcium exchanger-related anti-seizure mechanism by augmenting transporter-mediated GABA release, a mechanism absent in rats. Uniquely, the additional increase in GABA release because of calcium-withdrawal dwindled during the course of illness in Rasmussen encephalitis. Seizures cause high Na(+) influx through action potentials. A transient decrease in [Ca(2+) ]e (seizure condition) increases GABA transporter (GAT)-mediated GABA release because of elevated [Na(+) ]i . This amplifies the Sodium-Calcium-Exchanger (NCX) activity, further increasing [Na(+) ]i and GABA release. The reduction in [Ca(2+) ]e triggers a GAT-NCX related anti-seizure mechanism by augmenting GAT-mediated GABA release. This mechanism, obvious in humans, is absent in rats. PMID:26821584

  2. Using a structured questionnaire improves seizure description by medical students

    PubMed Central

    Kapadia, Saher; Shah, Hemang; McNair, Nancy; Pruitt, J. Ned; Murro, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate a structured questionnaire for improving a medical students’ ability to identify, describe and interpret a witnessed seizure. Methods Ninety two 3rd year medical students, blinded to seizure diagnosis, viewed videos of a primary generalized seizure and a complex partial seizure.  Students next completed an unstructured questionnaire that asked the students to describe the seizure video recordings. The students then completed a structured questionnaire that asked the student to respond to 17 questions regarding specific features occurring during the seizures.  We determined the number and types of correct responses for each questionnaire. Results Overall, the structured questionnaire was more effective in eliciting an average of 9.25 correct responses compared to the unstructured questionnaire eliciting an average of 5.30 correct responses (p < 0.001). Additionally, 10 of the 17 seizure features were identified more effectively with the structured questionnaire. Potentially confounding factors, prior knowledge of someone with epilepsy or a prior experience of viewing a seizure, did not predict the student’s ability to correctly identify any of the 17 features. Conclusions A structured questionnaire significantly improves a medical student’s ability to provide an accurate clinical description of primary generalized and complex partial witnessed seizures. Our analysis identified the 10 specific features improved by using the structured questionnaire. PMID:26752118

  3. Pharmacotherapy for Neonatal Seizures: Current Knowledge and Future Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Maria D; Griffin, Brendan T; Kharoshankaya, Liudmila; Cryan, John F; Boylan, Geraldine B

    2016-04-01

    Seizures are the most common neurological emergencies in the neonatal period and are associated with poor neurodevelopmental outcomes. Seizures affect up to five per 1000 term births and population-based studies suggest that they occur even more frequently in premature infants. Seizures are a sign of an underlying cerebral pathology, the most common of which is hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy in term infants. Due to a growing body of evidence that seizures exacerbate cerebral injury, effective diagnosis and treatment of neonatal seizures is of paramount importance to reduce long-term adverse outcomes. Electroencephalography is essential for the diagnosis of seizures in neonates due to their subtle clinical expression, non-specific neurological presentation and a high frequency of electro-clinical uncoupling in the neonatal period. Hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy may require neuroprotective therapeutic hypothermia, accompanying sedation with opioids, anticonvulsant drugs or a combination of all of these. The efficacy, safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of seven anticonvulsant drugs (phenobarbital, phenytoin, levetiracetam, lidocaine, midazolam, topiramate and bumetanide) are reviewed. This review is focused only on studies reporting electrographically confirmed seizures and highlights the knowledge gaps that exist in optimal treatment regimens for neonatal seizures. Randomised controlled trials are needed to establish a safe and effective treatment protocol for neonatal seizures. PMID:26943929

  4. From bench to drug: Human seizure modeling using Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Song, Juan; Tanouye, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    Studies of human seizure disorders have revealed that susceptibility to seizures is greatly influenced by genetic factors. In addition to causing epilepsy, genetic factors can suppress seizures and epileptogenesis. Examination of seizure-suppressor genes is challenging in humans. However, such genes are readily identified and analyzed in a Drosophila animal model of epilepsy. In this article, the epilepsy phenotype of Drosophila seizure-sensitive mutants is reviewed. A novel class of genes called seizure-suppressors is described. Mutations defining suppressors revert the “epilepsy” phenotype of neurological mutants. We conclude this review with particular discussion of a seizure-suppressor gene encoding DNA topoisomerase I (top1). Mutations of top1 are especially effective at reverting the seizure-sensitive phenotype of Drosophila epilepsy mutants. In addition, an unexpected class of anti-epileptic drugs has been identified. These are DNA topoisomerase I inhibitors such as camptothecin and its derivatives; several candidates are comparable or perhaps better than traditional anti-epileptic drugs such as valproate at reducing seizures in Drosophila drug-feeding experiments. PMID:18063465

  5. Urethane anesthesia blocks the development and expression of kindled seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Cain, D.P.; Raithby, A.; Corcoran, M.E.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of anesthetic and subanesthetic doses of urethane on the development of amygdala kindled seizures and on the expression of previously kindled seizures was studied in hooded rats. An anesthetic dose of urethane almost completely eliminated evoked after discharge and completely eliminated convulsive behavior in both groups. It also eliminated the seizure response to pentylenetetrazol. Subanesthetic doses of urethane strongly attenuated the expression of previously kindled seizures. These results suggest that urethane may not be an appropriate anesthetic for the study of epileptiform phenomena.

  6. Imaging the seizure during surgery with a hyperspectral camera.

    PubMed

    Noordmans, Herke Jan; Ferrier, Cyrille; de Roode, Rowland; Leijten, Frans; van Rijen, Peter; Gosselaar, Peter; Klaessens, John; Verdaasdonk, Ruud

    2013-11-01

    An epilepsy patient with recurring sensorimotor seizures involving the left hand every 10 min, was imaged with a hyperspectral camera during surgery. By calculating the changes in oxygenated, deoxygenated blood, and total blood volume in the cortex, a focal increase in oxygenated and total blood volume could be observed in the sensory cortex, corresponding to the seizure-onset zone defined by intracranial electroencephalography (EEG) findings. This probably reflects very local seizure activity. After multiple subpial transections in this motor area, clinical seizures abated. PMID:24199829

  7. Ethosuximide and Phenytoin Dose-Dependently Attenuate Acute Nonconvulsive Seizures after Traumatic Brain Injury in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shear, Deborah A.; Potter, Brittney; Marcsisin, Sean R.; Sousa, Jason; Melendez, Victor; Tortella, Frank C.; Lu, Xi-Chun M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Acute seizures frequently occur following severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) and have been associated with poor patient prognosis. Silent or nonconvulsive seizures (NCS) manifest in the absence of motor convulsion, can only be detected via continuous electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings, and are often unidentified and untreated. Identification of effective anti-epileptic drugs (AED) against post-traumatic NCS remains crucial to improve neurological outcome. Here, we assessed the anti-seizure profile of ethosuximide (ETX, 12.5–187.5 mg/kg) and phenytoin (PHT, 5–30 mg/kg) in a spontaneously occurring NCS model associated with penetrating ballistic-like brain injury (PBBI). Rats were divided between two drug cohorts, PHT or ETX, and randomly assigned to one of four doses or vehicle within each cohort. Following PBBI, NCS were detected by continuous EEG monitoring for 72 h post-injury. Drug efficacy was evaluated on NCS parameters of incidence, frequency, episode duration, total duration, and onset latency. Both PHT and ETX attenuated NCS in a dose-dependent manner. In vehicle-treated animals, 69–73% experienced NCS (averaging 9–10 episodes/rat) with average onset of NCS occurring at 30 h post-injury. Compared with control treatment, the two highest PHT and ETX doses significantly reduced NCS incidence to 13–40%, reduced NCS frequency (1.8–6.2 episodes/rat), and delayed seizure onset: <20% of treated animals exhibited NCS within the first 48 h. NCS durations were also dose-dependently mitigated. For the first time, we demonstrate that ETX and PHT are effective against spontaneously occurring NCS following PBBI, and suggest that these AEDs may be effective at treating post-traumatic NCS. PMID:23822888

  8. A microdeletion of the GABRB3 locus on 15q in a child with generalized seizures

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, B.; Krueger, L.; Nook, J.

    1994-09-01

    A 13-month-old female presented with a history of infrequent febrile tonic-clonic seizures and recent onset of daily absence and clusters of myoclonic seizures. She had minimal developmental delays, slight frontal bossing, a wide nasal bridge and macrostomia. Initial EEG was normal as were multiple metabolic and biochemical determinations. Subsequent EEGs demonstrated normal back ground activity with frequent bursts of generalized, irregular spikes and polyspikes. The child responded favorably to a course of parenteral ACTH and at 17 months, she was maintained on valproic acid, was seizure-free and had a normal EEG. Examination was notable for prominent, socially appropriate smiling, age-appropriate speech, and significant ataxia and tremor. High resolution G-banded chromosome analysis revealed a suspected deletion of 15q11.2 and part of 15q12. FISH was performed with ONCOR probes to the D15S11, SNRPN, D15S10 and GABRB3 loci. A total of 30 metaphase cells (from two separate blood samples) were examined and revealed positive hybridization on both chromosome 15 homologues for D15S11, SNRPN, and D15S10. However, the GABRB3 probe revealed positive hybridization to only one chromosome 15 homologue, thus supporting the interpretation of a deletion of this region. FISH analyses of the patient`s parents are in progress as are methylation studies. To our knowledge, these findings represent the first report of a deletion of GAMRB3 which does not extend proximally to include all of D15S10 in a patient presenting with generalizied seizures. Careful comparison of this patient`s phenotype to that of Angelman syndrome will therefore be most informative for furthering genotype-phenotype correlations within this critical region of 15q.

  9. Anticonvulsant Effect of Guaifenesin against Pentylenetetrazol-Induced Seizure in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Keshavarz, Mojtaba; Showraki, Alireza; Emamghoreishi, Masoumeh

    2013-01-01

    Background: There have been some reports about the possible N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) antagonist activity of Guaifenesin. As drugs with a similar structure to Guaifenesin (i.e. Felbamate) and those with NMDA antagonist activity have been clinically used as anticonvulsants, the aim of this study was to determine whether Guaifenesin has an anticonvulsant effect in an animal model of seizure. Methods: Anticonvulsant effect of Guaifenesin was assessed via Pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced convulsion. Male albino mice received Guaifenesin (100, 200, 300, or 400 mg/kg; n=8-10) or 0.25% Tween (vehicle) intraperitoneally 30 minutes before the injection of PTZ (95 mg/kg). Diazepam (3 mg/kg; n=8) was used as a reference drug. The latency time before the onset of myoclonic, clonic, and tonic-clonic convulsions, percentage of animals exhibiting convulsion, and percentage of mortality were recorded. In addition, the effect of Guaifenesin on neuromuscular coordination was assessed using the Rotarod. Results: Guaifenesin at all the studied doses significantly increased the latency to myoclonic and clonic convulsions in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, Guaifenesin at the dose of 300 mg/kg increased the latency to tonic-clonic seizure. The ED50s of Guaifenesin for protection against PTZ-induced clonic and tonic-clonic seizures and death were 744.88 (360-1540), 256 (178-363), and 328 (262-411) mg/kg, respectively. Guaifenesin at all the investigated doses significantly reduced neuromuscular coordination, compared to the vehicle-treated group. Conclusion: These results suggest that Guaifenesin possesses muscle relaxant and anticonvulsant properties and may have a potential clinical use in absence seizure. PMID:23825891

  10. Block term decomposition for modelling epileptic seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunyadi, Borbála; Camps, Daan; Sorber, Laurent; Paesschen, Wim Van; Vos, Maarten De; Huffel, Sabine Van; Lathauwer, Lieven De

    2014-12-01

    Recordings of neural activity, such as EEG, are an inherent mixture of different ongoing brain processes as well as artefacts and are typically characterised by low signal-to-noise ratio. Moreover, EEG datasets are often inherently multidimensional, comprising information in time, along different channels, subjects, trials, etc. Additional information may be conveyed by expanding the signal into even more dimensions, e.g. incorporating spectral features applying wavelet transform. The underlying sources might show differences in each of these modes. Therefore, tensor-based blind source separation techniques which can extract the sources of interest from such multiway arrays, simultaneously exploiting the signal characteristics in all dimensions, have gained increasing interest. Canonical polyadic decomposition (CPD) has been successfully used to extract epileptic seizure activity from wavelet-transformed EEG data (Bioinformatics 23(13):i10-i18, 2007; NeuroImage 37:844-854, 2007), where each source is described by a rank-1 tensor, i.e. by the combination of one particular temporal, spectral and spatial signature. However, in certain scenarios, where the seizure pattern is nonstationary, such a trilinear signal model is insufficient. Here, we present the application of a recently introduced technique, called block term decomposition (BTD) to separate EEG tensors into rank- ( L r , L r ,1) terms, allowing to model more variability in the data than what would be possible with CPD. In a simulation study, we investigate the robustness of BTD against noise and different choices of model parameters. Furthermore, we show various real EEG recordings where BTD outperforms CPD in capturing complex seizure characteristics.

  11. Typical and Atypical Manifestations of Intrathoracic Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyun Jin; Jung, Jung Im; Chung, Myung Hee; Song, Sun Wha; Kim, Hyo Lim; Baik, Jun Hyun; Han, Dae Hee; Lee, Kyo-Young

    2009-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic disorder of unknown cause that is characterized by the presence of noncaseating granulomas. The radiological findings associated with sarcoidosis have been well described. The findings include symmetric, bilateral hilar and paratracheal lymphadenopathy, with or without concomitant parenchymal abnormalities (multiple small nodules in a peribronchovascular distribution along with irregular thickening of the interstitium). However, in 25% to 30% of cases, the radiological findings are atypical and unfamiliar to most radiologists, which cause difficulty for making a correct diagnosis. Many atypical forms of intrathoracic sarcoidosis have been described sporadically. We have collected cases with unusual radiological findings associated with pulmonary sarcoidosis (unilateral or asymmetric lymphadenopathy, necrosis or cavitation, large opacity, ground glass opacity, an airway abnormality and pleural involvement) and describe the typical forms of the disorder as well. The understanding of a wide range of the radiological manifestations of sarcoidosis will be very helpful for making a proper diagnosis. PMID:19885319

  12. Atypical Trigeminal Neuralgia Secondary to Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Niwant, Premeshwar; Motwani, Mukta; Naik, Sushil

    2015-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a disorder of the fifth cranial nerve that causes episodes of intense, stabbing, electric shock-like pain that lasts from few seconds to few minutes in the areas of the face where the branches of the nerve are distributed. More than one nerve branch can be affected by the disorder. We report an unusual case of trigeminal neuralgia affecting right side of face presenting atypical features of neuralgia and not responding to the usual course of treatment. The magnetic resonance imaging study of brain revealed a large extra-axial mass involving right cerebellopontine angle region causing moderate pressure effect on trigeminal nerve and brain stem. The aim of this case report is to show a tumor of cerebellopontine angle, presenting clinically as atypical trigeminal neuralgia. PMID:26664753

  13. Clinical aspects of atypical mycobacterial infection.

    PubMed Central

    Kahana, L. M.; Cole, F. M.; Richardson, H.

    1975-01-01

    Summary: Atypical mycobacterial infections may give rise to various clinical difficulties. Case reports of six patients--three adult patients with pulmonary lesions, two children with cervical lymphadentis and one patient in whom the atypical mycobacterium appeared to be present as a commensal--illustrate these difficulties. Determination of the significance of the organism and differentiation of condition from tuberculosis and others requires consideration of the clinical picture, the results of skin testing, histologic features and cultural characteristics. Three patients, including the two children, were treated with a combination of surgery and chemotherapy, with satisfactory results. An elderly patient with chronic bronchitis and a pulmonary infection due to M. kansasii was treated successfully with antiuberculosis agents alone. Chemotherapy is being tried on a fifth patient with cavitary disease due to M. intracellulare, but is seems likely that an operation will also be required. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:1109749

  14. Seizures and Teens: The Impact of Seizures and Epilepsy on Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Sandra Cushner

    2007-01-01

    When a teenager or child of any age develops seizures, the impact on the family can be enormous. Worries and fears may affect everyone, and left untreated, crises can occur too easily. This article explores the way that epilepsy can affect family dynamics. Common factors that may contribute to family stress and patterns of coping will be…

  15. Effects of JIP3 on epileptic seizures: Evidence from temporal lobe epilepsy patients, kainic-induced acute seizures and pentylenetetrazole-induced kindled seizures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Chen, Y; Lü, Y; Chen, X; Cheng, L; Mi, X; Xu, X; Deng, W; Zhang, Y; Wang, N; Li, J; Li, Y; Wang, X

    2015-08-01

    JNK-interacting protein 3 (JIP3), also known as JNK stress-activated protein kinase-associated protein 1 (JSAP1), is a scaffold protein mainly involved in the regulation of the pro-apoptotic signaling cascade mediated by c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Overexpression of JIP3 in neurons in vitro has been reported to lead to accelerated activation of JNK and enhanced apoptosis response to cellular stress. However, the occurrence and the functional significance of stress-induced modulations of JIP3 levels in vivo remain elusive. In this study, we investigated the expression of JIP3 in temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) and in a kainic acid (KA)-induced mouse model of epileptic seizures, and determined whether down-regulation of JIP3 can decrease susceptibility to seizures and neuron damage induced by KA. We found that JIP3 was markedly increased in TLE patients and a mouse model of epileptic seizures; mice underexpressing JIP3 through lentivirus bearing LV-Letm1-RNAi showed decreased susceptibility, delayed first seizure and decreased seizure duration response to the epileptogenic properties of KA. Subsequently, a decreased activation of JNK following seizure induction was observed in mice underexpressing JIP3, which also exhibited less neuronal apoptosis in the CA3 region of the hippocampus, as assessed three days after KA administration. We also found that mice underexpressing JIP3 exhibited a delayed pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)-induced kindling seizure process. PMID:26002316

  16. Atypical presentations of methemoglobinemia from benzocaine spray.

    PubMed

    Tantisattamo, Ekamol; Suwantarat, Nuntra; Vierra, Joseph R; Evans, Samuel J

    2011-06-01

    Widely used for local anesthesia, especially prior to endoscopic procedures, benzocaine spray is one of the most common causes of iatrogenic methemoglobinemia. The authors report an atypical case of methemoglobinemia in a woman presenting with pale skin and severe hypoxemia, after a delayed repeat exposure to benzocaine spray. Early recognition and prompt management of methemoglobinemia is needed in order to lessen morbidity and mortality from this entity. PMID:22162610

  17. Atypical cases of Dowling–Degos disease

    PubMed Central

    Naveen, Kikkeri Narayanshetty; Athaniker, Sharatchandra B.; Hegde, Spandana P.; Shetty, Rahul; Radha, Hanumanthayya; Parinitha, Sadashivappa Sangam

    2016-01-01

    Dowling–Degos disease (DDD) is a rare autosomal dominant condition characterized by multiple, small, round pigmented macules usually arranged in reticular pattern, chiefly distributed in axillae and groins. Here we are reporting three atypical cases of DDD in a family. They had hypopigmented macules with typical features of DDD indicating generalized DDD. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis. We present these three cases to stress the existence of generalized DDD phenotype in the Indian population.

  18. Atypical ductal hyperplasia: interobserver and intraobserver variability.

    PubMed

    Jain, Rohit K; Mehta, Rutika; Dimitrov, Rosen; Larsson, Lisbeth G; Musto, Paul M; Hodges, Kurt B; Ulbright, Thomas M; Hattab, Eyas M; Agaram, Narasimhan; Idrees, Muhammad T; Badve, Sunil

    2011-07-01

    Interobserver reproducibility in the diagnosis of benign intraductal proliferative lesions has been poor. The aims of the study were to investigate the inter- and intraobserver variability and the impact of the addition of an immunostain for high- and low-molecular weight keratins on the variability. Nine pathologists reviewed 81 cases of breast proliferative lesions in three stages and assigned each of the lesions to one of the following three diagnoses: usual ductal hyperplasia, atypical ductal hyperplasia and ductal carcinoma in situ. Hematoxylin and eosin slides and corresponding slides stained with ADH-5 cocktail (cytokeratins (CK) 5, 14. 7, 18 and p63) by immunohistochemistry were evaluated. Concordance was evaluated at each stage of the study. The interobserver agreement among the nine pathologists for diagnosing the 81 proliferative breast lesions was fair (κ-value=0.34). The intraobserver κ-value ranged from 0.56 to 0.88 (moderate to strong). Complete agreement among nine pathologists was achieved in only nine (11%) cases, at least eight agreed in 20 (25%) cases and seven or more agreed in 38 (47%) cases. Following immunohistochemical stain, a significant improvement in the interobserver concordance (overall κ-value=0.50) was observed (P=0.015). There was a significant reduction in the total number of atypical ductal hyperplasia diagnosis made by nine pathologists after the use of ADH-5 immunostain. Atypical ductal hyperplasia still remains a diagnostic dilemma with wide variation in both inter- and intraobserver reproducibility among pathologists. The addition of an immunohistochemical stain led to a significant improvement in the concordance rate. More importantly, there was an 8% decrease in the number of lesions classified as atypical ductal hyperplasia in favor of usual hyperplasia; in clinical practice, this could lead to a decrease in the number of surgeries carried out for intraductal proliferative lesions. PMID:21532546

  19. Atypical Human Infections by Animal Trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Truc, Philippe; Büscher, Philippe; Cuny, Gérard; Gonzatti, Mary Isabel; Jannin, Jean; Joshi, Prashant; Juyal, Prayag; Lun, Zhao-Rong; Mattioli, Raffaele; Pays, Etienne; Simarro, Pere P.; Teixeira, Marta Maria Geraldes; Touratier, Louis; Vincendeau, Philippe; Desquesnes, Marc

    2013-01-01

    The two classical forms of human trypanosomoses are sleeping sickness due to Trypanosoma brucei gambiense or T. brucei rhodesiense, and Chagas disease due to T. cruzi. However, a number of atypical human infections caused by other T. species (or sub-species) have been reported, namely due to T. brucei brucei, T. vivax, T. congolense, T. evansi, T. lewisi, and T. lewisi-like. These cases are reviewed here. Some infections were transient in nature, while others required treatments that were successful in most cases, although two cases were fatal. A recent case of infection due to T. evansi was related to a lack of apolipoprotein L-I, but T. lewisi infections were not related to immunosuppression or specific human genetic profiles. Out of 19 patients, eight were confirmed between 1974 and 2010, thanks to improved molecular techniques. However, the number of cases of atypical human trypanosomoses might be underestimated. Thus, improvement, evaluation of new diagnostic tests, and field investigations are required for detection and confirmation of these atypical cases. PMID:24069464

  20. Perampanel for tonic-clonic seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, Gregory L.; Wechsler, Robert T.; Wang, Xue-Feng; DiVentura, Bree; Brandt, Christian; Trinka, Eugen; O'Brien, Terence J.; Laurenza, Antonio; Patten, Anna; Bibbiani, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess efficacy and safety of adjunctive perampanel in patients with drug-resistant, primary generalized tonic-clonic (PGTC) seizures in idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE). Methods: In this multicenter, double-blind study (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01393743; funded by Eisai Inc.), patients 12 years or older with PGTC seizures and IGE were randomized to placebo or perampanel during a 4-week titration period (perampanel uptitrated from 2 to 8 mg/d, or highest tolerated dose) and 13-week maintenance period. The primary endpoint was percent change in PGTC seizure frequency per 28 days (titration plus maintenance vs baseline). The key secondary endpoint (primary endpoint for European Union registration) was 50% PGTC seizure responder rate (patients achieving ≥50% reduction in PGTC seizure frequency; maintenance vs baseline). Treatment-emergent adverse events were monitored. Results: Of 164 randomized patients, 162 comprised the full analysis set (placebo, 81; perampanel, 81). Compared with placebo, perampanel conferred a greater median percent change in PGTC seizure frequency per 28 days (−38.4% vs −76.5%; p < 0.0001) and greater 50% PGTC seizure responder rate (39.5% vs 64.2%; p = 0.0019). During maintenance, 12.3% of placebo-treated patients and 30.9% of perampanel-treated patients achieved PGTC seizure freedom. For the safety analysis (placebo, 82; perampanel, 81), the most frequent treatment-emergent adverse events with perampanel were dizziness (32.1%) and fatigue (14.8%). Conclusions: Adjunctive perampanel was well tolerated and improved control of drug-resistant PGTC seizures in patients with IGE. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that adjunctive perampanel reduces PGTC seizure frequency, compared with placebo, in patients with drug-resistant PGTC seizures in IGE. PMID:26296511

  1. Seizure-like activity in a juvenile Angelman syndrome mouse model is attenuated by reducing Arc expression.

    PubMed

    Mandel-Brehm, Caleigh; Salogiannis, John; Dhamne, Sameer C; Rotenberg, Alexander; Greenberg, Michael E

    2015-04-21

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder arising from loss-of-function mutations in the maternally inherited copy of the UBE3A gene, and is characterized by an absence of speech, excessive laughter, cognitive delay, motor deficits, and seizures. Despite the fact that the symptoms of AS occur in early childhood, behavioral characterization of AS mouse models has focused primarily on adult phenotypes. In this report we describe juvenile behaviors in AS mice that are strain-independent and clinically relevant. We find that young AS mice, compared with their wild-type littermates, produce an increased number of ultrasonic vocalizations. In addition, young AS mice have defects in motor coordination, as well as abnormal brain activity that results in an enhanced seizure-like response to an audiogenic challenge. The enhanced seizure-like activity, but not the increased ultrasonic vocalizations or motor deficits, is rescued in juvenile AS mice by genetically reducing the expression level of the activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein, Arc. These findings suggest that therapeutic interventions that reduce the level of Arc expression have the potential to reverse the seizures associated with AS. In addition, the identification of aberrant behaviors in young AS mice may provide clues regarding the neural circuit defects that occur in AS and ultimately allow new approaches for treating this disorder. PMID:25848016

  2. Seizure-like activity in a juvenile Angelman syndrome mouse model is attenuated by reducing Arc expression

    PubMed Central

    Mandel-Brehm, Caleigh; Salogiannis, John; Dhamne, Sameer C.; Rotenberg, Alexander; Greenberg, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder arising from loss-of-function mutations in the maternally inherited copy of the UBE3A gene, and is characterized by an absence of speech, excessive laughter, cognitive delay, motor deficits, and seizures. Despite the fact that the symptoms of AS occur in early childhood, behavioral characterization of AS mouse models has focused primarily on adult phenotypes. In this report we describe juvenile behaviors in AS mice that are strain-independent and clinically relevant. We find that young AS mice, compared with their wild-type littermates, produce an increased number of ultrasonic vocalizations. In addition, young AS mice have defects in motor coordination, as well as abnormal brain activity that results in an enhanced seizure-like response to an audiogenic challenge. The enhanced seizure-like activity, but not the increased ultrasonic vocalizations or motor deficits, is rescued in juvenile AS mice by genetically reducing the expression level of the activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein, Arc. These findings suggest that therapeutic interventions that reduce the level of Arc expression have the potential to reverse the seizures associated with AS. In addition, the identification of aberrant behaviors in young AS mice may provide clues regarding the neural circuit defects that occur in AS and ultimately allow new approaches for treating this disorder. PMID:25848016

  3. ECT INDUCED EEG SEIZURE: VALIDITY OF DURATION ESTIMATION BY LAST SPIKE

    PubMed Central

    Gangadhar, B.N.; Rao, K.M. Jyoti; Sujatha, B.L.; Janakiramaiah, N.; Subbakrishna, D.K.

    1993-01-01

    SUMMARY The seizure EEG records of 25 depressives receiving ECT were ‘blindly’ rated by two trained raters using a uniform definition of seizure endpoint. The EEG seizure duration estimates were validated against five expected relationships. EEG seizure duration correlated with and was more than motor seizure duration, reduced over the course of ECTs, was consistent within subjects, and negatively varied with age. Within clinical constraints, the method of seizure duration estimation by the last spike is valid. PMID:21743633

  4. Chronic bilateral subthalamic stimulation after anterior callosotomy in drug-resistant epilepsy: long-term clinical and functional outcome of two cases.

    PubMed

    Capecci, Marianna; Ricciuti, Riccardo A; Ortenzi, Andrea; Paggi, Aldo; Durazzi, Vasco; Rychlicki, Franco; Provinciali, Leandro; Scerrati, Massimo; Ceravolo, Maria Gabriella

    2012-02-01

    We explored the efficacy and safety of bilateral SubThalamic Nucleus (STN) stimulation in two subjects suffering from drug-resistant epilepsy even after anterior callosotomy. Case 1 had about 65% decrease of partial motor seizures and the complete disappearance of tonic-clonic generalized attacks. Case 2, with sudden drop (atonic) attacks, partial complex seizures, atypical absences and rare tonic-clonic seizures, showed no meaningful reduction of fits and a stimulation associated atypical absence rate increase. PMID:21962765

  5. Atypical Presentation of Ewing’s Sarcoma with a Single Left Orbital Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Puglia, Marta; Acquaviva, Alessandra; Ponsiglione, Andrea; Barbuto, Luigi; Di Paolo, Nilde; De Rosa, Dario; Sicuranza, Simonetta; Maurea, Simone; Imbriaco, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background We present an uncommon case of Ewing’s sarcoma in a 16-year-old boy. Case Report This case can be considered unique because of the atypical presentation, normal laboratory tests and absence of the typical symptoms such as pain, masses or swelling, fatigue or weight loss, breathing problems linked to lung metastases or pathologic fractures. The only event that brought the patient to our attention was the sudden onset of left proptosis. Conclusions The final histopathology together with CT and PET-CT findings led to the diagnosis of a multi-metastatic Ewing’s sarcoma involving the orbit, skeleton, bone marrow and lymph nodes. PMID:26568777

  6. Seizure prediction using polynomial SVM classification.

    PubMed

    Zisheng Zhang; Parhi, Keshab K

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents a novel patient-specific algorithm for prediction of seizures in epileptic patients with low hardware complexity and low power consumption. In the proposed approach, we first compute the spectrogram of the input fragmented EEG signals from a few electrodes. Each fragmented data clip is ten minutes in duration. Band powers, relative spectral powers and ratios of spectral powers are extracted as features. The features are then subjected to electrode selection and feature selection using classification and regression tree. The baseline experiment uses all features from selected electrodes and these features are then subjected to a radial basis function kernel support vector machine (RBF-SVM) classifier. The proposed method further selects a small number features from the selected electrodes and train a polynomial support vector machine (SVM) classifier with degree of 2 on these features. Prediction performances are compared between the baseline experiment and the proposed method. The algorithm is tested using intra-cranial EEG (iEEG) from the American Epilepsy Society Seizure Prediction Challenge database. The baseline experiment using a large number of features and RBF-SVM achieves a 100% sensitivity and an average AUC of 0.9985, while the proposed algorithm using only a small number of features and polynomial SVM with degree of 2 can achieve a sensitivity of 100.0%, an average area under curve (AUC) of 0.9795. For both experiments, only 10% of the available training data are used for training. PMID:26737598

  7. Using trend templates in a neonatal seizure algorithm improves detection of short seizures in a foetal ovine model.

    PubMed

    Zwanenburg, Alex; Andriessen, Peter; Jellema, Reint K; Niemarkt, Hendrik J; Wolfs, Tim G A M; Kramer, Boris W; Delhaas, Tammo

    2015-03-01

    Seizures below one minute in duration are difficult to assess correctly using seizure detection algorithms. We aimed to improve neonatal detection algorithm performance for short seizures through the use of trend templates for seizure onset and end. Bipolar EEG were recorded within a transiently asphyxiated ovine model at 0.7 gestational age, a common experimental model for studying brain development in humans of 30-34 weeks of gestation. Transient asphyxia led to electrographic seizures within 6-8 h. A total of 3159 seizures, 2386 shorter than one minute, were annotated in 1976 h-long EEG recordings from 17 foetal lambs. To capture EEG characteristics, five features, sensitive to seizures, were calculated and used to derive trend information. Feature values and trend information were used as input for support vector machine classification and subsequently post-processed. Performance metrics, calculated after post-processing, were compared between analyses with and without employing trend information. Detector performance was assessed after five-fold cross-validation conducted ten times with random splits. The use of trend templates for seizure onset and end in a neonatal seizure detection algorithm significantly improves the correct detection of short seizures using two-channel EEG recordings from 54.3% (52.6-56.1) to 59.5% (58.5-59.9) at FDR 2.0 (median (range); p < 0.001, Wilcoxon signed rank test). Using trend templates might therefore aid in detection of short seizures by EEG monitoring at the NICU. PMID:25651839

  8. Chronic omega-3 supplementation in seizure-prone versus seizure-resistant rat strains: a cautionary tale.

    PubMed

    Gilby, K L; Jans, J; McIntyre, D C

    2009-10-20

    Several studies have shown fatty acid supplementation to be efficacious in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder/autism spectrum disorder (ADHD/ASD) and epilepsy. Interestingly, rats bred to be seizure-prone (Fast), unlike those bred for seizure-resistance (Slow), naturally exhibit behaviors and physiology reminiscent of ADHD/ASD in humans, suggesting a fundamental link between seizure disposition and these developmental disorders. To determine whether chronic omega-3 supplementation might ameliorate ADHD-like behaviors in the seizure-prone rat strain and/or alter natural predispositions for or against seizure in either strain, Fast and Slow weanlings were maintained on a control or omega-3-supplemented diet. As adults, rats were tested in paradigms known to elicit ADHD-like behaviors from Fast rats and then kindled from the amygdala to assess relative seizure disposition. While omega-3 supplementation did not significantly alter the relative hyperactivity, learning deficits or heightened seizure sensitivity naturally exhibited by Fast rats, it dramatically reduced their impulsivity to Slow-like levels. In contrast, typical behavioral patterns in Slow rats were largely unaffected by omega-3 supplementation yet their proclivity for seizure was greatly increased. This heightened vulnerability to seizure in Slow rats was paralleled by a drop in circulating plasma non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA) to match levels normally observed in Fast rats. These findings suggest a delicate balance between seizure predisposition and ADHD-like behaviors that can be influenced by omega-3 treatment. Further, a relationship between circulating NEFA levels and seizure susceptibility has surfaced that advocates caution when treating different genetic backgrounds with omega-3 fatty acids. PMID:19596053

  9. Levetiracetam in the Treatment of Epileptic Seizures After Liver Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chih-Hsiang; Chen, Chao-Long; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Chen, Nai-Ching; Tsai, Meng-Han; Chuang, Yao-Chung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract After liver transplantation, patients may develop seizures or epilepsy due to a variety of etiologies. The ideal antiepileptic drugs for these patients are those with fewer drug interactions and less hepatic toxicity. In this study, we present patients using levetiracetam to control seizures after liver transplantation. We retrospectively enrolled patients who received levetiracetam for seizure control after liver transplantation. We analyzed the etiology of liver failure that required liver transplantation, etiology of the seizures, outcomes of seizure control, and the condition of the patient after follow-up at the outpatient department. Hematological and biochemical data before and after the use of levetiracetam were also collected. Fifteen patients who received intravenous or oral levetiracetam monotherapy for seizure control after liver transplantation were enrolled into this study. All of the patients remained seizure-free during levetiracetam treatment. Two patients died during the follow-up, and the other 13 patients were alive at the end of the study period and all were seizure-free without neurological sequelae that interfered with their daily activities. No patients experienced liver failure or rejection of the donor liver due to ineffective immunosuppressant medications. The dosage of immunosuppressants did not change before and after levetiracetam treatment, and there were no changes in hematological and biochemical data before and after treatment. Levetiracetam may be a suitable antiepileptic drug for patients who undergo liver transplantation due to fewer drug interactions and a favorable safety profile. PMID:26402799

  10. Seizure Prediction and Detection via Phase and Amplitude Lock Values

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Mark H.; Padmanabha, Akshay; Hossain, Gahangir; de Jongh Curry, Amy L.; Blaha, Charles D.

    2016-01-01

    A robust seizure prediction methodology would enable a “closed-loop” system that would only activate as impending seizure activity is detected. Such a system would eliminate ongoing stimulation to the brain, thereby eliminating such side effects as coughing, hoarseness, voice alteration, and paresthesias (Murphy et al., 1998; Ben-Menachem, 2001), while preserving overall battery life of the system. The seizure prediction and detection algorithm uses Phase/Amplitude Lock Values (PLV/ALV) which calculate the difference of phase and amplitude between electroencephalogram (EEG) electrodes local and remote to the epileptic event. PLV is used as the seizure prediction marker and signifies the emergence of abnormal neuronal activations through local neuron populations. PLV/ALVs are used as seizure detection markers to demarcate the seizure event, or when the local seizure event has propagated throughout the brain turning into a grand-mal event. We verify the performance of this methodology against the “CHB-MIT Scalp EEG Database” which features seizure attributes for testing. Through this testing, we can demonstrate a high degree of sensivity and precision of our methodology between pre-ictal and ictal events. PMID:27014017

  11. Practical neurology--5: Recurrent unresponsive episodes and seizures.

    PubMed

    Degruyter, Melissa A; Cook, Mark J

    2011-11-21

    Careful history-taking is essential when evaluating patients with suspected epileptic seizures. It should focus on ascertaining whether the episodes are seizures or a seizure mimic such as syncope. Recurrent unresponsive episodes associated with seizures may indicate a diagnosis of focal epilepsy or complex partial epilepsy. Adults with a clinical diagnosis of a focal seizure disorder require investigation with electroencephalography and magnetic resonance imaging. The goal of treatment should be to achieve a life free of seizures, with minimum adverse effects from anticonvulsant medication. The choice of medication should be individualised to a patient's seizure characteristics, circumstances and preferences. Dose adjustments should be made according to clinical response (seizure frequency and adverse effects), rather than on serum drug concentrations alone. Lifestyle advice, such as advice about driving restrictions, is important for the safety of the patient and others. All anticonvulsants are potentially teratogenic. Poorly controlled epilepsy in pregnancy imparts significant risks to the mother and baby, which need to be weighed against the risks of teratogenicity. The risk of major congenital malformations is highest with valproate, particularly in high doses. PMID:22107008

  12. Effects of Early Seizures on Later Behavior and Epileptogenicity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Gregory L.

    2004-01-01

    Both clinical and laboratory studies demonstrate that seizures early in life can result in permanent behavioral abnormalities and enhance epileptogenicity. Understanding the critical periods of vulnerability of the developing nervous system to seizure-induced changes may provide insights into parallel or divergent processes in the development of…

  13. Validation of an automated seizure detection algorithm for term neonates

    PubMed Central

    Mathieson, Sean R.; Stevenson, Nathan J.; Low, Evonne; Marnane, William P.; Rennie, Janet M.; Temko, Andrey; Lightbody, Gordon; Boylan, Geraldine B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to validate the performance of a seizure detection algorithm (SDA) developed by our group, on previously unseen, prolonged, unedited EEG recordings from 70 babies from 2 centres. Methods EEGs of 70 babies (35 seizure, 35 non-seizure) were annotated for seizures by experts as the gold standard. The SDA was tested on the EEGs at a range of sensitivity settings. Annotations from the expert and SDA were compared using event and epoch based metrics. The effect of seizure duration on SDA performance was also analysed. Results Between sensitivity settings of 0.5 and 0.3, the algorithm achieved seizure detection rates of 52.6–75.0%, with false detection (FD) rates of 0.04–0.36 FD/h for event based analysis, which was deemed to be acceptable in a clinical environment. Time based comparison of expert and SDA annotations using Cohen’s Kappa Index revealed a best performing SDA threshold of 0.4 (Kappa 0.630). The SDA showed improved detection performance with longer seizures. Conclusion The SDA achieved promising performance and warrants further testing in a live clinical evaluation. Significance The SDA has the potential to improve seizure detection and provide a robust tool for comparing treatment regimens. PMID:26055336

  14. 19 CFR 162.63 - Arrests and seizures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Arrests and seizures. 162.63 Section 162.63 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Controlled Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana §...

  15. 19 CFR 162.63 - Arrests and seizures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Arrests and seizures. 162.63 Section 162.63 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Controlled Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana §...

  16. 19 CFR 162.63 - Arrests and seizures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Arrests and seizures. 162.63 Section 162.63 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Controlled Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana §...

  17. 19 CFR 162.63 - Arrests and seizures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Arrests and seizures. 162.63 Section 162.63 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Controlled Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana §...

  18. 19 CFR 162.63 - Arrests and seizures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Arrests and seizures. 162.63 Section 162.63 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Controlled Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana §...

  19. 14 CFR 13.17 - Seizure of aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Seizure of aircraft. 13.17 Section 13.17... INVESTIGATIVE AND ENFORCEMENT PROCEDURES Legal Enforcement Actions § 13.17 Seizure of aircraft. (a) Under... by the Regional Administrator of the region, or by the Chief Counsel, may summarily seize an...

  20. Multifractal detrented fluctuation analysis of tonic-clonic epileptic seizures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figliola, A.; Serrano, E.; Rosso, O. A.

    2007-04-01

    Scaling behaviour analysis of wavelet filtered EEG (without muscle activity) generalized tonic-clonic epileptic seizures are presented. In particular we show using the Multifractal Detrented Fluctuation Analysis (MF-DFA) that the epileptic recruitment rhythm observed in this kind of epileptic seizures present monofractal scaling behaviour, with lower values for the clonic than the tonic phases.