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1

Atypical EEG pattern in children with absence seizures.  

PubMed

We studied four children with diagnosis of absence seizures (generalized primary epilepsy), and with a generalized delta activity on the EEG during clinical attacks provoked by hyperventilation. The lack of ictal generalized spike-and-wave discharges with a frequency of 3 Hz in our patients, makes this an atypical pattern. All children had complete control of their seizures and disappearance of the EEG changes with valproate. We concluded that generalized delta activity observed on EEG during the hyperventilation in children should not always be considered as a normal finding for age, since it could be an ictal event of an absence seizure. PMID:7487533

Silva, D F; Lima, M M; Anghinah, R; Zanoteli, E; Lima, J G

1995-06-01

2

Partial seizures and atypical absence seizures as a single ictal event in a patient with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.  

PubMed

The authors report a patient with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome who was a fraternal twin. The twins encountered myoclonic seizures at the age of 4 years, but the seizures in the other patient were controlled very quickly without intellectual development damage. With the disease evolving, other characteristic seizures of Lennox-Gastaut syndrome appeared and failed to be controlled by multiple antiepileptic drugs, so levetiracetam was added on. At this time, frequent partial seizures from the left occipital and posterior temporal regions occurred, which always intermixed with atypical absence seizures in a single ictal event. To control the status epilepticus, levetiracetam was withdrawn immediately, and clonazepam, midazolam, and corticotropin in turn were used. The partial seizures were gradually alleviated. The results obtained in this study suggest that there might be some correlative mechanisms between partial seizures and atypical absence seizures in a single event. There is a temporal relationship between the occurrence of partial seizures and the introduction of levetiracetam. PMID:18984844

Yang, Zhixian; Liu, Xiaoyan; Qin, Jiong; Zhang, Yuehua; Bao, Xinhua; Xiong, Hui

2008-11-01

3

Need for Electroencephalogram Video Confirmation of Atypical Absence Seizures in Children With Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Children with childhood epileptic encephalopathy (Lennox-Gastaut syndrome) frequently have both multiple seizure types and nonepileptic stereotyped events that are difficult to differentiate. We hypothesize that electroencephalogram (EEG) video monitoring is essential for correct identification of atypical absence seizures in this population. All video\\/EEG monitoring records on patients with confirmed Lennox-Gastaut syndrome between September 1992 and December 1996 were reviewed for

Mary A. Bare; Tracy A. Glauser; Richard H. Strawsburg

1998-01-01

4

Absence Seizure (Petit Mal Seizure)  

MedlinePLUS

... seizures: A review of recent reports with new concepts. Epilepsy & Behavior. 2009;15:404. Seizures and epilepsy: ... conditions of use policy (Updated July 13, 2013) LEGAL CONDITIONS AND TERMS OF USE APPLICABLE TO ALL ...

5

Basic mechanisms of generalized absence seizures.  

PubMed

Generalized absence seizures are neurophysiologically, pharmacologically, and developmentally unique and comprise the primary seizure type in a number of different absence epilepsy syndromes. Over the last 10 years, the availability of a number of animal models of generalized absence seizures and of sophisticated in vitro electrophysiological techniques that allow investigation of cortical and thalamic networks has begun to shed light on the pathogenesis of this disorder. The basic underlying mechanism appears to involve thalamocortical circuitry and the generation of abnormal oscillatory rhythms from that particular neuronal network. Biochemical mechanisms operative within thalamocortical circuitry during this neuronal oscillation seem to entail phase-locked gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)B-mediated inhibition alternating with glutamate-mediated excitation. The basic cellular mechanism operative within this tension between excitation and inhibition appears to involve the T-type calcium current. Local circuitry within the thalamus may influence these oscillatory rhythms by GABAA-mediated inhibition. Pharmacological factors at play external to thalamocortical circuitry include cholinergic, dopaminergic, and noradrenergic mechanisms. Pathways that utilize these various neurotransmitters project onto the thalamus and/or cortex from sites distant to those structures and may modulate the process either up or down. Perturbation of one or more of these neuronal networks may lead to abnormal neuronal oscillatory rhythms within thalamocortical circuitry, with a resultant generation of bilaterally synchronous spike wave discharges that characterize generalized absence seizures. Our increasing understanding of the basic mechanisms that underlie generalized absence seizures promises to allow, for the first time, a rational design of drug treatment for a seizure disorder based on the pathogenesis of that disorder. PMID:7847856

Snead, O C

1995-02-01

6

Vision-based absence seizure detection.  

PubMed

In order to diagnose epilepsy, neurologists rely on their experience, performing an equal assessment of the electroencephalogram and the clinical image. Since misdiagnosis reaches a rate of 30% and more than one-third of all epilepsies are poorly understood, a need for leveraging diagnostic precision is obvious. With the aim at enhancing the clinical image assessment procedure, this paper evaluates the suitability of certain facial expression features for detecting and quantifying absence seizures. These features are extracted by means of time-varying signal analysis from signals that are gained by applying computer vision techniques, such as face detection, dense optical flow computation and averaging background subtraction. For the evaluation, video sequences of four patients with absence seizures are used. The classification performance of a C4.5 decision tree shows accuracies of up to 99.96% with a worst percentage of incorrectly classified instances of 0.14%. PMID:23365833

Pediaditis, M; Tsiknakis, M; Koumakis, L; Karachaliou, M; Voutoufianakis, S; Vorgia, P

2012-01-01

7

Lateralization of cerebral blood flow in juvenile absence seizures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cerebrovascular blood flow in absence seizures and flow patterns during the ictal period have not been thoroughly investigated.\\u000a We aimed to evaluate cerebral blood flow changes in typical juvenile absence seizures during the ictal and postictal phases.\\u000a Seizures were recorded in three patients (mean age: 21 ± 1 years) with multiple daily typical absence seizures. Simultaneous\\u000a video electroencephalography and bilateral middle cerebral artery

Semai Bek; Tayfun Ka?ikçi; Gençer Genç; ?eref Demirkaya; Zeki Gökçil; Zeki Odaba?i

2010-01-01

8

Generalized absence seizures with 10–15 Hz fast discharges  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To report clinical and EEG features in 5 adults with unusual., fast rhythmic discharges accompanying absence seizures.Design and methods: The 5 patients presented with uncontrolled seizures. All had EEG-video monitoring with recorded seizures. Video seizures were reviewed and ictal as well as interictal epileptiform activity was analyzed. The patients were followed up after appropriate therapy for a minimum of

Toufic Fakhoury; Bassel Abou-Khalil

1999-01-01

9

Symptom differences in children with absence seizures versus inattention  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective. Differentiation between the diagnoses of absence seizures and Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), Predominantly Inattentive Type, is frequently confounded by similarities in symptom presentation. The purpose of the present study was to determine symptoms that would distinguish between the disorders.Methods. Prior to diagnosis, parents of children with absence seizures (n=17) or ADHD, Predominantly Inattentive Type (n=26), were administered the

Jane Williams; Gregory B Sharp; Emily DelosReyes; Stephen Bates; Tonya Phillips; Bernadette Lange; May L Griebel; Mark Edwards; Pippa Simpson

2002-01-01

10

Absence epilepsy with focal clinical and electrographic seizures.  

PubMed

Primary generalized seizures occur in half of all children with epilepsy. Correct classification carries important diagnostic, therapeutic, and prognostic information. Approximately half of all patients with generalized juvenile myoclonic epilepsy may have a partial semiology or focal electroencephalographic features although similar findings have not been described in absence epilepsy. Two examples, one with semiology characteristic of focal seizures and the other with a video-electroencephalogram documented partial seizure emanating after the completion of typical 3-Hz generalized spike-wave absence epilepsy, are discussed. PMID:20434692

Sheth, Raj D; Abram, Harry S

2010-03-01

11

Seizures  

MedlinePLUS

... Petit mal (absence) seizure Epilepsy Fever (febrile) convulsions (seizures in children with high fever) ... cause can be identified. This is called idiopathic seizures. They usually are seen in children and young adults but can occur at any ...

12

Astrocytic GABA transporter GAT-1 dysfunction in experimental absence seizures.  

PubMed

An enhanced tonic GABA(A) inhibition in the thalamus plays a crucial role in experimental absence seizures and has been attributed, on the basis of indirect evidence, to a dysfunction of the astrocytic GABA transporter-1 (GAT-1). Here, the GABA transporter current was directly investigated in thalamic astrocytes from a well-established genetic model of absence seizures, the genetic absence epilepsy rats from Strasbourg (GAERS), and its non-epileptic control (NEC) strain. We also characterized the novel form of GABAergic and glutamatergic astrocyte-to-neuron signalling by recording slow outward currents (SOCs) and slow inward currents (SICs), respectively, in thalamocortical (TC) neurons of both strains. In patch-clamped astrocytes, the GABA transporter current was abolished by combined application of the selective GAT-1 and GAT-3 blocker, NO711 (30 ?m) and SNAP5114 (60 ?m), respectively, to GAERS and NEC thalamic slices. NO711 alone significantly reduced (41%) the transporter current in NEC, but had no effect in GAERS. SNAP5114 alone reduced by half the GABA transporter current in NEC, whilst it abolished it in GAERS. SIC properties did not differ between GAERS and NEC TC neurons, whilst moderate changes in SOC amplitude and kinetics were observed. These data provide the first direct demonstration of a malfunction of the astrocytic thalamic GAT-1 transporter in absence epilepsy and support an abnormal astrocytic modulation of thalamic ambient GABA levels. Moreover, while the glutamatergic astrocyte-neuron signalling is unaltered in the GAERS thalamus, the changes in some properties of the GABAergic astrocyte-neuron signalling in this epileptic strain may contribute to the generation of absence seizures. PMID:23090943

Pirttimaki, Tiina; Parri, H Rheinallt; Crunelli, Vincenzo

2012-10-22

13

Atypical Febrile Seizures, Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy, and Dual Pathology  

PubMed Central

Febrile seizures occurring in the neonatal period, especially when prolonged, are thought to be involved in the later development of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) in children. The presence of an often undetected, underlying cortical malformation has also been reported to be implicated in the epileptogenesis process following febrile seizures. This paper highlights some of the various animal models of febrile seizures and of cortical malformation and portrays a two-hit model that efficiently mimics these two insults and leads to spontaneous recurrent seizures in adult rats. Potential mechanisms are further proposed to explain how these two insults may each, or together, contribute to network hyperexcitability and epileptogenesis. Finally the clinical relevance of the two-hit model is briefly discussed in light of a therapeutic and preventive approach to mTLE.

Sanon, Nathalie T.; Desgent, Sebastien; Carmant, Lionel

2012-01-01

14

Epilepsy with typical absence seizures with onset during the first year of life.  

PubMed

Absence epilepsy with multiple daily seizures and onset at the age of 6 and 1/2 months in a healthy female child with normal development is described. EEG-video recording revealed typical absence seizures (vacant staring and interruption of motor activity) and complex absences (as above, plus raising of the eyeballs, slight beatings of the eyebrows, and forward propulsion of head and shoulders). The absences were accompanied by bilateral symmetrical 3-Hz spike-wave discharges preceded, and at times followed, by bilateral frontoparietal theta activity coinciding with onset and termination of the absence seizures. The seizures regressed with nitrazepam therapy. At age 3-years, the child is seizure-free and shows normal neurologic development. PMID:2512115

Cavazzuti, G B; Ferrari, F; Galli, V; Benatti, A

15

Cardiovascular effects of intracerebroventricular bicuculline in rats with absence seizures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) plays an important role in both central cardiovascular homeostasis and pathogenesis of epileptic seizures. Previous studies have indicated a critical role of the amygdala in the spread of seizures from brainstem to forebrain and in the regulation of autonomic responses such as blood pressure and heart rate. The purpose of the present study was to examine blood

Ay?e Balc? Karson; Rezzan Aker; Nurbay Ate?; Filiz Onat

1999-01-01

16

Idiopathic generalised epilepsy in adults manifested by phantom absences, generalised tonic-clonic seizures, and frequent absence status  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVESTo describe the clinical and EEG features of adult patients with very mild absences, late onset generalised tonic clonic seizures, and frequent absence status.METHODSPatients were referrals to a clinic for epilepsies. They all had clinical assessment and EEG, video EEG, or both for documentation of absences.RESULTSOf 86 adults with idiopathic generalised epilepsies and EEG\\/video-EEG documented absences, 13 patients showed similar

C P Panayiotopoulos; M Koutroumanidis; S Giannakodimos; A Agathonikou

1997-01-01

17

Norovirus gastroenteritis and seizures: an atypical case with neuroradiological abnormalities.  

PubMed

We describe an 8-year-old boy admitted because of prolonged seizures during norovirus gastroenteritis without any signs of encephalopathy. Blood tests were normal and cerebrospinal fluid examination resulted negative for both bacteria and viruses. A reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction revealed norovirus RNA in a stool sample. A cerebral computed tomography turned out to be normal whereas subsequent cerebral magnetic resonance imaging showed transitory signal abnormalities consistent with vasogenic edema. The post-ictal electroencephalogram revealed normal background activity with sporadic left posterior delta waves. The child was discharged after 10 days with an unremarkable physical examination. A cerebral magnetic resonance imaging and an electroencephalogram after 1 month were both negative. We report a new case of benign infantile convulsions due to norovirus gastroenteritis with neuroradiological abnormalities to the pertinent literature in order to improve knowledge about this disorder and increase the possibility of clarifying its pathogenesis. PMID:21932182

Bartolini, L; Mardari, R; Toldo, I; Calderone, M; Battistella, P A; Laverda, A M; Sartori, S

2011-09-19

18

GABAA receptor function in the gamma-hydroxybutyrate model of generalized absence seizures.  

PubMed

gamma-Hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) produces absence-like seizures when given to animals. One of the distinguishing characteristics of experimental generalized absence seizures is that they are exacerbated by GABAA agonists. Therefore, the hypothesis that GHB-induced absence seizures result from an interaction between GHB and the GABAA receptor complex was tested. The effect of GHB on the function of various components of the GABAA receptor complex in the cortex of the rat, was determined in a series of in vitro experiments. Similar studies were carried out at various times following systemic administration of the prodrug of GHB, gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) and changes in the GABAA receptor were correlated with electrographic and behavioral changes. gamma-Hydroxybutyric acid had no effect on the binding of [3H]muscimol, [3H]flunitrazepam and [35S]t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS) or on the uptake of 36Cl- into synaptoneurosomes in the in vitro studies. Nor were changes observed after the administration of GBL before the onset of GHB-induced absence seizures. However, at the onset of GHB-induced spike wave discharge, there was a significant (P < 0.04) decrease in the binding of [35S]TBPS, associated with a significant decrease in muscimol-stimulated uptake of 36Cl- with no other biochemical change. One minute after onset of GHB-induced absence seizure, a significant (P < 0.05) increase in the binding of [3H]muscimol was noted. Ten minutes later the decrease in muscimol-stimulated uptake of 36Cl- had normalized, while the changes in binding of [3H]muscimol and [35S]TBPS persisted. Because GABAA function remained unchanged in the in vitro studies, as well as prior to the onset of GHB-induced absence seizures in the in vivo experiments, these studies do not support the hypothesis that GHB interacts directly with the GABAA receptor complex to produce absence-like seizures. PMID:8388552

Snead, O C; Liu, C C

1993-04-01

19

Typical absence seizures in adults: clinical, EEG, video-EEG findings and diagnostic\\/syndromic considerations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Eighteen women and five men had typical absences. These included 10% of a consecutive hospital series of 200 adult patients with epileptic disorders. The absences began between the ages of seven and 46 years and varied in type and severity. Twenty patients also had generalised tonic-clonic seizures, ranging in frequency from one in a lifetime to one per month. Myoclonic

C P Panayiotopoulos; E Chroni; C Daskalopoulos; A Baker; S Rowlinson; P Walsh

1992-01-01

20

Cortical and subcortical contributions to absence seizure onset examined with EEG/fMRI.  

PubMed

In patients with idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGEs), bursts of generalized spike and wave discharges (GSWDs) lasting > or =2 seconds are considered absence seizures. The location of the absence seizures generators in IGEs is thought to involve interplay between various components of thalamocortical circuits; we have recently postulated that medication resistance may, in part, be related to the location of the GSWD generators [Szaflarski JP, Lindsell CJ, Zakaria T, Banks C, Privitera MD. Epilepsy Behav. 2010;17:525-30]. In the present study we hypothesized that patients with medication-refractory IGE (R-IGE) and continued absence seizures may have GSWD generators in locations other than the thalamus, as typically seen in patients with IGE. Hence, the objective of this study was to determine the location of the GSWD generators in patients with R-IGE using EEG/fMRI. Eighty-three patients with IGE received concurrent EEG/fMRI at 4 T. Nine of them (aged 15-55) experienced absence seizures during EEG/fMRI and were included; all were diagnosed with R-IGE. Subjects participated in up to three 20-minute EEG/fMRI sessions (400 volumes, TR=3 seconds) performed at 4 T. After removal of fMRI and ballistocardiographic artifacts, 36 absence seizures were identified. Statistical parametric maps were generated for each of these sessions correlating seizures to BOLD response. Timing differences between brain regions were tested using statistical parametric maps generated by modeling seizures with onset times shifted relative to the GSWD onsets. Although thalamic BOLD responses peaked approximately 6 seconds after the onset of absence seizures, other areas including the prefrontal and dorsolateral cortices showed brief and nonsustained peaks occurring approximately 2 seconds prior to the maximum of the thalamic peak. Temporal lobe peaks occurred at the same time as the thalamic peak, with a cerebellar peak occurring approximately 1 second later. Confirmatory analysis averaging cross-correlation between cortical and thalamic regions of interest across seizures corroborated these findings. Finally, Granger causality analysis showed effective connectivity directed from frontal lobe to thalamus, supporting the notion of earlier frontal than thalamic involvement. The results of this study support our original hypothesis and indicate that in the patients with R-IGE studied, absence seizures may be initiated by widespread cortical (frontal and parietal) areas and sustained in subcortical (thalamic) regions, suggesting that the examined patients have cortical onset epilepsy with propagation to thalamus. PMID:20580319

Szaflarski, Jerzy P; DiFrancesco, Mark; Hirschauer, Thomas; Banks, Christi; Privitera, Michael D; Gotman, Jean; Holland, Scott K

2010-06-26

21

Proteomic analysis of gamma-butyrolactone-treated mouse thalamus reveals dysregulated proteins upon absence seizure.  

PubMed

Absence seizure has been of interest because the symptom is related to sensory processing. However, the mechanism that causes the disease is not understood yet. To better understand the molecular mechanism related to the disease progress at protein level, we performed proteomic studies using the thalamus of mice for which absence seizure was induced by gamma-butyrolactone (GBL). Differential proteome expression between GBL-treated mice and control mice was examined by fluorescence 2D difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE) at three different time points (5, 10, and 30 min) after GBL-administration. We identified 16 proteins differentially expressed by >1.4-fold at any of the three time points. All proteins besides the serine protease inhibitor EIA were down-regulated in absence seizure-induced mice. The down-regulated proteins can be classified into five groups by their biological functions: cytoskeleton rearrangement, neuroprotection, neurotransmitter secretion, calcium binding, and metabolism. The maximum level of change was reached by 10 min after GBL-treatment, with the expression level returning back to the original at 30 min when mice were awakened from absence seizure thereby demonstrating the proteomic response is reversible. Our results suggest that absence seizures are associated with restricted functional sets of proteins, whose down-regulation may interfere with general function of neuronal cells. PMID:17419809

Ryu, Myung-Jeom; Kim, Daesoo; Kang, Un-Beom; Kim, Joon; Shin, Hee-Sup; Lee, Cheolju; Yu, Myeong-Hee

2007-04-10

22

Polyspike and Waves Do Not Predict Generalized Tonic-Clonic Seizures in Childhood Absence Epilepsy  

PubMed Central

About 40% of children with childhood absence epilepsy develop generalized tonic-clonic seizures. It is commonly held that polyspike–wave pattern on the electroencephalogram (EEG) can predict this development of generalized tonic-clonic seizures. However, there is no firm evidence in support of this proposition. To test this assumption, we used survival analysis and compared the incidence of generalized tonic-clonic seizures in 115 patients with childhood absence epilepsy having either isolated 3-Hz spike–wave or coexisting 3 Hz and polyspike–waves and other variables. There was no evidence that polyspike–waves predicted development of generalized tonic-clonic seizures in patients with childhood absence epilepsy. Later age of onset (?8 years) and family histories of generalized tonic-clonic seizures were the only independent predictors. These results have implications for counseling and in the choice of first-line antiepileptic drugs used for childhood absence epilepsy, especially if valproate is chosen based on the observation of polyspike–waves.

Vierck, Esther; Cauley, Ryan; Kugler, Steven L.; Mandelbaum, David E.; Pal, Deb K.; Durner, Martina

2012-01-01

23

Human L-ferritin deficiency is characterized by idiopathic generalized seizures and atypical restless leg syndrome.  

PubMed

The ubiquitously expressed iron storage protein ferritin plays a central role in maintaining cellular iron homeostasis. Cytosolic ferritins are composed of heavy (H) and light (L) subunits that co-assemble into a hollow spherical shell with an internal cavity where iron is stored. The ferroxidase activity of the ferritin H chain is critical to store iron in its Fe3+ oxidation state, while the L chain shows iron nucleation properties. We describe a unique case of a 23-yr-old female patient affected by a homozygous loss of function mutation in the L-ferritin gene, idiopathic generalized seizures, and atypical restless leg syndrome (RLS). We show that L chain ferritin is undetectable in primary fibroblasts from the patient, and thus ferritin consists only of H chains. Increased iron incorporation into the FtH homopolymer leads to reduced cellular iron availability, diminished levels of cytosolic catalase, SOD1 protein levels, enhanced ROS production and higher levels of oxidized proteins. Importantly, key phenotypic features observed in fibroblasts are also mirrored in reprogrammed neurons from the patient's fibroblasts. Our results demonstrate for the first time the pathophysiological consequences of L-ferritin deficiency in a human and help to define the concept for a new disease entity hallmarked by idiopathic generalized seizure and atypical RLS. PMID:23940258

Cozzi, Anna; Santambrogio, Paolo; Privitera, Daniela; Broccoli, Vania; Rotundo, Luisa Ida; Garavaglia, Barbara; Benz, Rudolf; Altamura, Sandro; Goede, Jeroen S; Muckenthaler, Martina U; Levi, Sonia

2013-08-12

24

Seizures  

MedlinePLUS

... often with a loss or change in consciousness. Seizure Basics Most seizures are caused by abnormal electrical ... specialized treatment. Continue If Your Child Has a Seizure A child who is having a seizure should ...

25

Differential effects mediated by GABA A receptors in thalamic nuclei in lh\\/lh model of absence seizures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Absence seizures represent synchronized burst-firing of thalamocortical neurons, which are driven by tonic GABAergic output of nucleus reticularis thalami (NRT). Activation of GABAA receptors on NRT neurons reduces NRT output and retards thalamocortical burst-firing. Although this mechanism in NRT may underlie antiabsence effects of benzodiazepines, it does not explain observations that barbiturates can worsen absence seizures. In this study we

David A Hosford; Ying Wang; Zhen Cao

1997-01-01

26

Neurochemical and behavioral features in genetic absence epilepsy and in acutely induced absence seizures.  

PubMed

The absence epilepsy typical electroencephalographic pattern of sharp spikes and slow waves (SWDs) is considered to be due to an interaction of an initiation site in the cortex and a resonant circuit in the thalamus. The hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cationic I h pacemaker channels (HCN) play an important role in the enhanced cortical excitability. The role of thalamic HCN in SWD occurrence is less clear. Absence epilepsy in the WAG/Rij strain is accompanied by deficiency of the activity of dopaminergic system, which weakens the formation of an emotional positive state, causes depression-like symptoms, and counteracts learning and memory processes. It also enhances GABAA receptor activity in the striatum, globus pallidus, and reticular thalamic nucleus, causing a rise of SWD activity in the cortico-thalamo-cortical networks. One of the reasons for the occurrence of absences is that several genes coding of GABAA receptors are mutated. The question arises: what the role of DA receptors is. Two mechanisms that cause an infringement of the function of DA receptors in this genetic absence epilepsy model are proposed. PMID:23738145

Bazyan, A S; van Luijtelaar, G

2013-05-07

27

Absence seizures are reduced by the enhancement of GABA-ergic inhibition in the hippocampus in WAG\\/Rij rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

Classical theories on absence epilepsy suggest that spike-wave discharge (SWDs) represent thalamo-cortical oscillations, where an abnormally excitable cortex interacts with thalamus and brain stem reticular formation. The limbic system is generally not included in any theory about the pathogenesis of absence seizures. However, some data demonstrated that the alterations in the limbic system attribute to the expression of absence epileptic

Elena A. Tolmacheva; Gilles van Luijtelaar

2007-01-01

28

Utility of subtraction ictal SPECT when video-EEG fails to distinguish atypical psychogenic and epileptic seizures  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study was designed to evaluate the utility of subtraction ictal SPECT coregistered to MRI (SISCOM) in atypical psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES). Video-EEG monitoring (vEEG) is the gold standard for PNES diagnosis but, like any modality, has limitations. In difficult cases in which the diagnosis is suspected but remains in question after vEEG, a complementary study that could help differentiate

Eli S. Neiman; Katherine H. Noe; Joseph F. Drazkowski; Joseph I. Sirven; Michael C. Roarke

2009-01-01

29

[Seizure].  

PubMed

Seizure is defined as "a strong shrinkage state of the skeletal muscle which is involuntary, and occurs spasmodically" and it is often accompanied by disturbance of consciousness. The typical disease which causes seizure is epilepsy. But there is many conditions causing seizure. Therefore, diagnosis of epilepsy should be careful. Seizure among eldery increases in an era of an aging population in Japan. The risk of recurrence of seizure or epilepsy in elderly is higher than that in youth. In considering of the treatment of seizure among elderly, differential diagnosis from various condition must be done. PMID:23855204

Saito, Ayumi; Terayama, Yasuo

2013-06-01

30

Seizures  

MedlinePLUS

... up? Login here Please leave this field empty Seizures SHARE Share on Facebook Preview your comments Share ... Close Finish Home > Understanding Brain Tumors > Symptoms Listen Seizure is a common symptom in people with brain ...

31

Recurrent partial seizures with ictal yawning as atypical presentation of Hashimoto's encephalopathy (steroid-responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis).  

PubMed

Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE), also known as steroid-responsive encephalopathy associated with autoimmune thyroiditis (SREAT), is a rare condition whose pathogenesis is unknown, though autoimmune-mediated mechanisms are thought to be involved. The prevalent neurological manifestations of this disorder are epileptic seizures and psychocognitive disorders associated with EEG alterations. High anti-thyroid antibody titers (particularly in cerebrospinal fluid) and the effectiveness of steroid therapy are usually considered to be crucial elements in the diagnostic process. We describe a 19-year-old female patient who had been referred to the psychiatric unit because of behavioral disorders characterized predominantly by delirium with sexual content. She developed recurrent focal seizures characterized by atypical ictal semiology (repetitive forceful yawning) and a rare EEG pattern (recurrent seizures arising from the left temporal region without evident "encephalopathic" activity). The presence of anti-thyroperoxidase antibodies in her cerebrospinal fluid and a good response to steroids confirmed the diagnosis of HE. The atypical presentation in the case we describe appears to widen the electroclinical spectrum of HE and highlights its importance for differential diagnosis purposes in the neuropsychiatric setting. PMID:22030535

Casciato, S; Di Bonaventura, C; Lapenta, L; Fattouch, J; Ferrazzano, G; Fanella, M; Di Fabio, F; Pasquini, M; Amendolea, M A; Manfredi, M; Prencipe, M; Giallonardo, A T

2011-10-24

32

A gain in GABAA receptor synaptic strength in thalamus reduces oscillatory activity and absence seizures  

PubMed Central

Neural inhibition within the thalamus is integral in shaping thalamocortical oscillatory activity. Fast, synaptic inhibition is primarily mediated by activation of heteropentameric GABAA receptor complexes. Here, we examined the synaptic physiology and network properties of mice lacking GABAA receptor ?3, a subunit that in thalamus is uniquely expressed by inhibitory neurons of the reticular nucleus (nRT). Deletion of this subunit produced a powerful compensatory gain in inhibitory postsynaptic response in nRT neurons. Although, other forms of inhibitory and excitatory synaptic transmission in the circuit were unchanged, evoked thalamic oscillations were strongly dampened in ?3 knockout mice. Furthermore, pharmacologically induced thalamocortical absence seizures displayed a reduction in length and power in ?3 knockout mice. These studies highlight the role of GABAergic inhibitory strength within nRT in the maintenance of thalamic oscillations, and demonstrate that inhibitory intra-nRT synapses are a critical control point for regulating higher order thalamocortical network activity.

Schofield, Claude M.; Kleiman-Weiner, Max; Rudolph, Uwe; Huguenard, John R.

2009-01-01

33

Persistence of Cortical Sensory Processing during Absence Seizures in Human and an Animal Model: Evidence from EEG and Intracellular Recordings  

PubMed Central

Absence seizures are caused by brief periods of abnormal synchronized oscillations in the thalamocortical loops, resulting in widespread spike-and-wave discharges (SWDs) in the electroencephalogram (EEG). SWDs are concomitant with a complete or partial impairment of consciousness, notably expressed by an interruption of ongoing behaviour together with a lack of conscious perception of external stimuli. It is largely considered that the paroxysmal synchronizations during the epileptic episode transiently render the thalamocortical system incapable of transmitting primary sensory information to the cortex. Here, we examined in young patients and in the Genetic Absence Epilepsy Rats from Strasbourg (GAERS), a well-established genetic model of absence epilepsy, how sensory inputs are processed in the related cortical areas during SWDs. In epileptic patients, visual event-related potentials (ERPs) were still present in the occipital EEG when the stimuli were delivered during seizures, with a significant increase in amplitude compared to interictal periods and a decrease in latency compared to that measured from non-epileptic subjects. Using simultaneous in vivo EEG and intracellular recordings from the primary somatosensory cortex of GAERS and non-epileptic rats, we found that ERPs and firing responses of related pyramidal neurons to whisker deflection were not significantly modified during SWDs. However, the intracellular subthreshold synaptic responses in somatosensory cortical neurons during seizures had larger amplitude compared to quiescent situations. These convergent findings from human patients and a rodent genetic model show the persistence of cortical responses to sensory stimulations during SWDs, indicating that the brain can still process external stimuli during absence seizures. They also demonstrate that the disruption of conscious perception during absences is not due to an obliteration of information transfer in the thalamocortical system. The possible mechanisms rendering the cortical operation ineffective for conscious perception are discussed, but their definite elucidation will require further investigations.

Chipaux, Mathilde; Vercueil, Laurent; Kaminska, Anna

2013-01-01

34

Persistent neurological damage associated with spontaneous recurrent seizures and atypical aggressive behavior of domoic acid epileptic disease.  

PubMed

The harmful alga Pseudo-nitzschia sp. is the cause of human amnesic shellfish poisoning and the stranding of thousands of sea lions with seizures as a hallmark symptom. A human case study and epidemiological report of hundreds of stranded sea lions found individuals presenting months after recovery with a neurological disease similar to temporal lobe epilepsy. A rat model developed to establish and better predict how epileptic disease results from domoic acid poisoning demonstrated that a single episode of status epilepticus (SE), after a latent period, leads to a progressive state of spontaneous recurrent seizure (SRS) and expression of atypical aggressive behaviors. Structural damage associated with domoic acid-induced SE is prominent in olfactory pathways. Here, we examine structural damage in seven rats that progressed to epileptic disease. Diseased animals show progressive neuronal loss in the piriform cortex and degeneration of terminal fields in these layers and the posteromedial cortical amygdaloid nucleus. Animals that display aggressive behavior had additional neuronal damage to the anterior olfactory cortex. This study provides insight into the structural basis for the progression of domoic acid epileptic disease and relates to the California sea lion, where poisoned animals progress to a disease characterized by SRS and aggressive behaviors. PMID:23457124

Tiedeken, Jessica A; Ramsdell, John S

2013-03-01

35

Time lag In the recognition of absence seizures to diagnosis and treatment of childhood absence epilepsy in Singapore  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and Objective: Childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) occurs in children of school age, with strong genetic predisposition in otherwise normal children. CAE is characterized by very frequent absences i.e. abrupt impairment of consciousness, with cessation of voluntary activity. The electroencephalograph (EEG) shows bilateral, synchronous spike-waves, usually 3 Hz, on a normal background activity, which is often precipitated by hyperventilation. The

Hian-Tat ONG; Karen JL LIM; Stacey KH TAY; Poh-Chan LOW; Poh-Sim LOW

36

Social deficits in the AY-9944 mouse model of atypical absence epilepsy.  

PubMed

Atypical absence epilepsy (AAE) showing slow spike-and-wave discharges (SWD) is characterized by severely abnormal cognition and neurodevelopmental or neurological outcomes in humans. However, despite the severe behavioral outcomes in AAE, the relationship between AAE and social-behavioral dysfunctions has not defined well, either experimentally or in patients with AAE. Experimentally, AAE can be produced by administering AY-9944 (AY), a cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitor. In this study, we characterized social behavior in the AY mouse model of AAE. AAE in the mouse was induced by repeated postnatal administration of AY every 6 days from postnatal day (P) 2 to P20. AY-treated mice exhibited spontaneous, recurrent, and synchronous SWD (4-5 Hz) in electroencephalographic recordings. AY-treated mice performed tasks involving sociability/social novelty preference, social interaction with a juvenile conspecific, observational fear, and resident-intruder aggression. They showed behavioral dysfunction in social interactions with a juvenile conspecific and sociability/social novelty preference tasks. They also exhibited reduced social fear learning in observational fear conditioning. Interestingly, they showed increased levels of offensive behaviors in a resident-intruder task. However, AY-treated mice displayed normal levels of anxiety in light/dark transition and the elevated plus maze tasks, and showed slightly increased locomotor activity in an open-field task. These results demonstrate social dysfunction in the AY-induced AAE model. Our study of social behavior can also provide valuable information about Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, in which AAE is a component. Thus, our findings may help to understand behavioral pathogenesis or characteristics of patients with AAE. PMID:22944514

Jung, Seungmoon; Seo, Jin Soo; Kim, Byung Sun; Lee, Doheon; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Chu, Kon; Lee, Sang Kun; Jeon, Daejong

2012-08-24

37

PICK1 uncoupling from mGluR7a causes absence-like seizures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Absence epilepsy is a neurological disorder that causes a recurrent loss of consciousness and generalized spike-and-wave discharges on an electroencephalogram (EEG). The role of metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) and associated scaffolding proteins in absence epilepsy has been unclear to date. We investigated a possible role for these proteins in absence epilepsy, focusing on the mGluR7a receptor and its PDZ-interacting protein,

Federica Bertaso; Chuansheng Zhang; Astrid Scheschonka; Frédéric de Bock; Pierre Fontanaud; Philippe Marin; Richard L Huganir; Heinrich Betz; Laurent Fagni; Mireille Lerner-Natoli; Joël Bockaert

2008-01-01

38

Pharmacological profiles of absence seizure-induced increases in CRE- and AP-1 DNA-binding activities in gamma-butyrolactone-treated mice.  

PubMed

Absence seizures are characterised by a well-defined disturbance of thalamocortical function, and there is no spread to other systems. In this study, we continue our examination of the mechanisms underlying the increased nuclear cyclic AMP responsive element (CRE)- and activator protein 1 (AP-1) DNA-binding activities in a gamma-butyrolactone (GBL)-induced mouse model of absence seizure. The administration of GBL increased CRE- and AP-1 DNA-binding activities in the cerebral cortex and thalamus, but not in other regions such as the hippocampus, cerebellum or pons + medulla oblongata, at doses which induced absence seizures. Not only the absence-seizure behavior but also the increased CRE- and AP-1 DNA-binding activities in the thalamocortical regions were reversibly inhibited by ethosuximide, a typical anti-absence drug, and the GABAB antagonists CGP 35348 and CGP 46381. A gel-supershift assay revealed that the GBL-induced CRE-binding activity was supershifted by an anti-CRE-binding protein (CREB) antibody, and that AP-1 DNA-binding activity was blocked by anti-c-Jun and anti-c-Fos antibodies. These results suggest that increased CRE- and AP-1 DNA-binding activities in the cerebral cortex and thalamus are related to the pathogenesis of generalized absence seizures and that these increases in DNA-binding activity are related to ethosuximide- and GABAB antagonist-sensitive abnormal neuronal activity in the thalamocortical circuit. PMID:9866826

Ishige, K; Ito, Y; Fukuda, H

1998-08-01

39

Seizure-induced neuronal death is suppressed in the absence of the endogenous lectin Galectin-1.  

PubMed

Pilocarpine injection induces epileptic seizures in rodents, an experimental paradigm extensively used to model temporal lobe epilepsy in humans. It includes conspicuous neuronal death in the forebrain and previous work has demonstrated an involvement of the neurotrophin receptor p75(NTR) in this process. Following the identification of Galectin-1 (Gal-1) as a downstream effector of p75(NTR), we examine here the role of this endogenous lectin in pilocarpine-induced cell death in adult mice. We found that most somatostatin-positive neurons also express Gal-1 and that in mice lacking the corresponding gene Lgals1, pilocarpine-induced neuronal death was essentially abolished in the forebrain. We also found that the related lectin Galectin-3 (Gal-3) was strongly upregulated by pilocarpine in microglial cells. This upregulation was absent in Lgals1 mutants and our results with Lgals3-null animals show that Gal-3 is not required for neuronal death in the hippocampus. These findings provide new insights into the roles and regulation of endogenous lectins in the adult CNS and a surprisingly selective proapoptotic role of Gal-1 for a subpopulation of GABAergic interneurons. PMID:23115194

Bischoff, Vincent; Deogracias, Rubén; Poirier, Françoise; Barde, Yves-Alain

2012-10-31

40

gamma-Butyrolactone-induced absence-like seizures increase nuclear CRE- and AP-1 DNA-binding activities in mouse brain.  

PubMed

We examined the involvement of the GABAB receptor and the coordinated induction of nuclear transcriptional factors in experimental generalized absence seizures induced by gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) in mice. Although administration of GBL 50 mg/kg did not show any effects on behavior or ECoG pattern, higher doses of GBL (70 and 100 mg/kg, i.p.) induced behavioral changes associated with 3-6-Hz spike and wave discharges in the mice. CGP 35348, a GABAB receptor antagonist, suppressed both the GBL-induced absence seizures and the spike and wave discharges. The antiepileptic effects of CGP 35348 (200 mg/kg, i.p.) were stronger than those of ethosuximide (200 mg/kg, i.p.). Sodium valproate (100 mg/kg, i.p.) attenuated the early phase but not the late phase of the GBL-induced absence seizures. Gel-mobility assay demonstrated that administration of an effective dose of GBL for eliciting spike and wave discharges dose-dependently increased nuclear cyclic AMP-responsive element (CRE)- and activator protein 1 (AP-1) DNA-binding activities in mouse whole brain. The increases in nuclear CRE- and AP-1 DNA-binding were antagonized by CGP 35348 in a dose-dependent fashion. In addition, GABAB receptor binding assay revealed that GBL or antiepileptic drugs did not displace [3H]baclofen binding in cerebral cortical membranes. In contrast, gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), an active metabolite of GBL, inhibited [3H]baclofen binding in a concentration-dependent manner. These results suggest that GABAB receptor-mediated synaptic responses are involved in GBL-induced generalized absence seizures and that the increases in nuclear CRE- and AP-1 DNA-binding activities are correlated with the GBL-induced generalized absence seizures. PMID:8684596

Ishige, K; Aizawa, M; Ito, Y; Fukuda, H

1996-01-01

41

Long-term valproate treatment increases brain neuropeptide y expression and decreases seizure expression in a genetic rat model of absence epilepsy.  

PubMed

The mechanisms by which valproate, one of the most widely prescribed anti-epileptic drugs, suppresses seizures have not been fully elucidated but may involve up-regulation of neuropeptide Y (NPY). We investigated the effects of valproate treatment in Genetic Absence Epilepsy Rats from Strasbourg (GAERS) on brain NPY mRNA expression and seizure control. GAERS were administered either valproate (42 mg.kg(-1) hr(-1)) or saline continuously for 5 days. Electroencephalograms were recorded for 24 hrs on treatment days 1, 3 and 5 and the percentage of time spent in seizure activity was analysed. NPY mRNA expression was measured in different brain regions using qPCR. Valproate treatment suppressed seizures by 80% in GAERS (p<0.05) and increased NPY mRNA expression in the thalamus (p<0.05) compared to saline treatment. These results demonstrate that long-term valproate treatment results in an upregulation of thalamic expression of NPY implicating this as a potential contributor to the mechanism by which valproate suppresses absence seizures. PMID:24039965

Elms, Johanna; Powell, Kim L; van Raay, Leena; Dedeurwaerdere, Stefanie; O'Brien, Terence J; Morris, Margaret J

2013-09-09

42

A dissociation of gamma-butyrolactone-induced absence seizure and CRE- and AP-1 DNA-binding activities in the developing rat brain.  

PubMed

Generalized absence epilepsy is a neurological childhood disorder which is characterized by behavioral arrest with staring and by 3 Hz spike and wave discharges (SWDs) in the electroencephalogram (EEG). In the present study, we investigated the correlation between behavioral and EEG changes and nuclear cAMP-responsive element (CRE)- and activator protein-1 (AP-1) DNA-binding activities during gamma-butyrolactone (GBL)-induced absence seizure in the developing rat brain. In the adult postnatal day 60 (P60) rat brain, both the transcription factor activation and absence seizure in behavior and EEG were simultaneously induced 15 min after GBL injection. In the infant P20 rat or young P40 rat, a higher sensitivity to GBL induced absence epilepsy in behavior and EEG 10-15 min after injection compared with that of adult rat. By contrast, no significant increase of CRE- and AP-1 DNA-binding activities could be seen in the infant thalamus. A significant increase in CRE- and AP-1 DNA-binding activities first occurred in the P30-40 young thalamus at 30 and 90 min, respectively, after GBL injection. Such a dissociation of high inducibility of behavior and EEG changes and low inducibility of CRE- and AP-1 DNA-binding activities in the infant or young rat clearly indicates that the activation of nuclear CRE- and AP-1 DNA-binding activities is a late occurring phenomenon with a different developmental maturation of thalamocortical circuit compared with absence seizure. PMID:12657461

Takizawa, Noboru; Tanaka, Masayuki; Liu, Zhongwu; Koriyama, Yoshiki; Matsukawa, Toru; Kato, Satoru

2003-04-01

43

Absence seizures in C3H/HeJ and knockout mice caused by mutation of the AMPA receptor subunit Gria4.  

PubMed

Absence epilepsy, characterized by spike-wave discharges (SWD) in the electroencephalogram, arises from aberrations within the circuitry of the cerebral cortex and thalamus that regulates awareness. The inbred mouse strain C3H/HeJ is prone to absence seizures, with a major susceptibility locus, spkw1, accounting for most of the phenotype. Here we find that spkw1 is associated with a hypomorphic retroviral-like insertion mutation in the Gria4 gene, encoding one of the four amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) receptor subunits in the brain. Consistent with this, Gria4 knockout mice also have frequent SWD and do not complement spkw1. In contrast, null mutants for the related gene Gria3 do not have SWD, and Gria3 loss actually lowers SWD of spkw1 homozygotes. Gria3 and Gria4 encode the predominant AMPA receptor subunits in the reticular thalamus, which is thought to play a central role in seizure genesis by inhibiting thalamic relay cells and promoting rebound burst firing responses. In Gria4 mutants, synaptic excitation of inhibitory reticular thalamic neurons is enhanced, with increased duration of synaptic responses-consistent with what might be expected from reduction of the kinetically faster subunit of AMPA receptors encoded by Gria4. These results demonstrate for the first time an essential role for Gria4 in the brain, and suggest that abnormal AMPA receptor-dependent synaptic activity can be involved in the network hypersynchrony that underlies absence seizures. PMID:18316356

Beyer, Barbara; Deleuze, Charlotte; Letts, Verity A; Mahaffey, Connie L; Boumil, Rebecca M; Lew, Timothy A; Huguenard, John R; Frankel, Wayne N

2008-03-03

44

Absence of the adenosine A 2A receptor or its chronic blockade decrease ethanol withdrawal-induced seizures in mice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Considering the existing interactions between ethanol and adenosine, the influence of the genetic impairment of the adenosine A2A receptor has been examined upon the seizures occurring at the cessation of chronic ethanol intake or ‘ethanol withdrawal’ in male mice. Acute clearance of ethanol did not differ between adenosine A2A receptor knockout and wild-type mice. Mice were exposed for 10 days

M. El Yacoubi; C. Ledent; M. Parmentier; M. Daoust; J. Costentin; J.-M. Vaugeois

2001-01-01

45

A-type K+ current can act as a trigger for bursting in the absence of a slow variable  

PubMed Central

Models of bursting in single cells typically include two subsystems with different time scales. Variations in one or more slow variables switch the system between a silent and a spiking state. We have developed a model for bursting in the pituitary lactotroph that does not include any slow variable. The model incorporates fast, non-inactivating calcium and potassium currents (the spike generating mechanism) as well as the fast, inactivating A-type potassium current (IA). IA is only active briefly at the beginning of a burst, but this brief impulse of IA acts as a burst trigger, injecting the spike trajectory close to an unstable steady state. The spiraling of the trajectory away from the steady state produces a period of low amplitude spiking typical of lactotrophs. Increasing the conductance of A-type potassium current brings the trajectory closer to the unstable steady state, increasing burst duration. However, this also increases interburst interval and for larger conductance values all activity stops. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a physiologically based, single-compartmental model of bursting with no slow subsystem.

Tabak, Joel; Freeman, Marc E.; Bertram, Richard

2007-01-01

46

Potentiation of mGlu5 receptors with the novel enhancer, VU0360172, reduces spontaneous absence seizures in WAG/Rij rats  

PubMed Central

Absence epilepsy is generated by the cortico-thalamo-cortical network, which undergoes a finely tuned regulation by metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors. We have shown previously that potentiation of mGlu1 receptors reduces spontaneous occurring spike and wave discharges (SWDs) in the WAG/Rij rat model of absence epilepsy, whereas activation of mGlu2/3 and mGlu4 receptors produces the opposite effect. Here, we have extended the study to mGlu5 receptors, which are known to be highly expressed within the cortico-thalamo-cortical network. We used presymptomatic and symptomatic WAG/Rij rats and aged-matched ACI rats. WAG/Rij rats showed a reduction in the mGlu5 receptor protein levels and in the mGlu5-receptor mediated stimulation of polyphosphoinositide hydrolysis in the ventrobasal thalamus, whereas the expression of mGlu5 receptors was increased in the somatosensory cortex. Interestingly, these changes preceded the onset of the epileptic phenotype, being already visible in pre-symptomatic WAG/Rij rats. SWDs in symptomatic WAG/Rij rats were not influenced by pharmacological blockade of mGlu5 receptors with MTEP (10 or 30 mg/kg, i.p.), but were significantly decreased by mGlu5 receptor potentiation with the novel enhancer, VU0360172 (3 or 10 mg/kg, s.c.), without affecting motor behaviour. The effect of VU0360172 was prevented by co-treatment with MTEP. These findings suggest that changes in mGlu5 receptors might lie at the core of the absence-seizure prone phenotype of WAG/Rij rats, and that mGlu5 receptor enhancers are potential candidates to the treatment of absence epilepsy.

D'Amore, V.; Santolini, I.; van Rijn, C.M.; Biagioni, F.; Molinaro, G.; Prete, A.; Conn, P.J.; Lindsley, C.W.; Zhou, Y.; Vinson, P.N.; Rodriguez, A.L.; Jones, C.K.; Stauffer, S.R.; Nicoletti, F.; van Luijtelaar, G.; Ngomba, R.T.

2013-01-01

47

Potentiation of mGlu5 receptors with the novel enhancer, VU0360172, reduces spontaneous absence seizures in WAG/Rij rats.  

PubMed

Absence epilepsy is generated by the cortico-thalamo-cortical network, which undergoes a finely tuned regulation by metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors. We have shown previously that potentiation of mGlu1 receptors reduces spontaneous occurring spike and wave discharges (SWDs) in the WAG/Rij rat model of absence epilepsy, whereas activation of mGlu2/3 and mGlu4 receptors produces the opposite effect. Here, we have extended the study to mGlu5 receptors, which are known to be highly expressed within the cortico-thalamo-cortical network. We used presymptomatic and symptomatic WAG/Rij rats and aged-matched ACI rats. WAG/Rij rats showed a reduction in the mGlu5 receptor protein levels and in the mGlu5-receptor mediated stimulation of polyphosphoinositide hydrolysis in the ventrobasal thalamus, whereas the expression of mGlu5 receptors was increased in the somatosensory cortex. Interestingly, these changes preceded the onset of the epileptic phenotype, being already visible in pre-symptomatic WAG/Rij rats. SWDs in symptomatic WAG/Rij rats were not influenced by pharmacological blockade of mGlu5 receptors with MTEP (10 or 30 mg/kg, i.p.), but were significantly decreased by mGlu5 receptor potentiation with the novel enhancer, VU0360172 (3 or 10 mg/kg, s.c.), without affecting motor behaviour. The effect of VU0360172 was prevented by co-treatment with MTEP. These findings suggest that changes in mGlu5 receptors might lie at the core of the absence-seizure prone phenotype of WAG/Rij rats, and that mGlu5 receptor enhancers are potential candidates to the treatment of absence epilepsy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors'. PMID:22705340

D'Amore, V; Santolini, I; van Rijn, C M; Biagioni, F; Molinaro, G; Prete, A; Conn, P J; Lindsley, C W; Zhou, Y; Vinson, P N; Rodriguez, A L; Jones, C K; Stauffer, S R; Nicoletti, F; van Luijtelaar, G; Ngomba, R T

2012-06-15

48

Childhood absence epilepsy with tonic-clonic seizures and electroencephalogram 3-4-Hz spike and multispike-slow wave complexes: linkage to chromosome 8q24.  

PubMed Central

Childhood absence epilepsy (CAE), a common form of idiopathic generalized epilepsy, accounts for 5%-15% of childhood epilepsies. To map the chromosomal locus of persisting CAE, we studied the clinical and electroencephalographic traits of 78 members of a five-generation family from Bombay, India. The model-free affected-pedigree member method was used during initial screening with chromosome 6p, 8q, and 1p microsatellites, and only individuals with absence seizures and/or electroencephalogram 3-4-Hz spike- and multispike-slow wave complexes were considered to be affected. Significant P values of .00000-.02 for several markers on 8q were obtained. Two-point linkage analysis, assuming autosomal dominant inheritance with 50% penetrance, yielded a maximum LOD score (Zmax) of 3.6 for D8S502. No other locus in the genome achieved a significant Zmax. For five smaller multiplex families, summed Zmax was 2.4 for D8S537 and 1.7 for D8S1761. Haplotypes composed of the same 8q24 microsatellites segregated with affected members of the large family from India and with all five smaller families. Recombinations positioned the CAE gene in a 3.2-cM interval.

Fong, G C; Shah, P U; Gee, M N; Serratosa, J M; Castroviejo, I P; Khan, S; Ravat, S H; Mani, J; Huang, Y; Zhao, H Z; Medina, M T; Treiman, L J; Pineda, G; Delgado-Escueta, A V

1998-01-01

49

Partial Seizures  

MedlinePLUS

... are subdivided into simple partial seizures (in which consciousness or awareness is retained) and complex partial seizures (in which consciousness is impaired or lost). Partial seizures may spread ...

50

Seizure heralding tuberculous meningitis.  

PubMed

Seizures may frequently occur during tuberculous meningitis. We describe a patient with an apparent generalised tonic-clonic seizure, initially not associated with any magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormality, which was the presenting symptom of tuberculous meningitis. Follow-up MRI, performed after gadolinium administration, showed signs of meningeal involvement. Seizures may be the presenting symptoms of tuberculous meningitis even in the absence of evident intracerebral lesions on MRI. Therefore, contrast-enhanced brain MRI should be performed in the diagnostic workup for each first seizure, especially in patients with a clinical suspicion of CNS infectious disease. The term "heraldic seizure", indicating a subset of acute symptomatic seizures presenting at the onset of a brain/systemic injury or preceding the full clinical manifestation of a cerebral insult, may be helpful to classify these seizures retrospectively, based initially on unknown aetiology. PMID:22940820

Brigo, Francesco; Ausserer, Harald; Zuccoli, Giulio; Tezzon, Frediano; Nardone, Raffaele

2012-09-01

51

Febrile Seizures  

MedlinePLUS

NINDS Febrile Seizures Information Page Condensed from Febrile Seizures Fact Sheet Table of Contents (click to jump to sections) What are ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What are Febrile Seizures? Febrile seizures are convulsions brought on by a ...

52

Seizure Mechanisms  

MedlinePLUS

Seizure Mechanisms You are here: Home About Epilepsy What is Epilepsy The Brain Seizure Mechanisms Email Print Twitter Facebook MySpace Delicous Stumble Digg More... [ Seizure Mechanisms | Seizure Threshold | Brain Structure | Brain Hemispheres | Brain ...

53

PET in seizure disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

Epilepsy affects 0.5% to 1% of the population and can cause focal, partial, generalized, and absence seizures and several unusual types. Seizure disorders often begin in childhood and are treated with a variety of pharmacologic or surgical interventions for those refractory to medical therapy. Functional imaging, with both PET and single-photon emission CT (SPECT), has been highly useful in the

Andrew B. Newberg; Abass Alavi

54

High-resolution genomic analysis suggests the absence of recurrent genomic alterations other than SMARCB1 aberrations in atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumors.  

PubMed

Atypical teratoid/rhabdoid tumor (AT/RT) is a rare malignant pediatric brain tumor characterized by genetic alterations affecting the SMARCB1 (hSNF5/INI1) locus in chromosome band 22q11.2. To identify potential additional genetic alterations, high-resolution genome-wide analysis was performed using a molecular inversion probe single-nucleotide polymorphism (MIP SNP) assay (Affymetrix OncoScan formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded express) on DNA isolated from 18 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded archival samples. Alterations affecting the SMARCB1 locus could be demonstrated by MIP SNP in 15 out of 16 evaluable cases (94%). These comprised five tumors with homozygous deletions, six tumors with heterozygous deletions, and four tumors with copy number neutral loss of heterozygosity (LOH) involving chromosome band 22q11.2. Remarkably, MIB SNP analysis did not yield any further recurrent chromosomal gains, losses, or copy neutral LOH. On MIP SNP screening for somatic mutations, the presence of a SMARCB1 mutation (c.472C>T p.R158X) was confirmed, but no recurrent mutations of other cancer relevant genes could be identified. Results of fluorescence in situ hybridization, multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, and SMARCB1 sequencing were highly congruent with that of the MIP SNP assay. In conclusion, these data further suggest the absence of recurrent genomic alterations other than SMARCB1 in AT/RT. PMID:23074045

Hasselblatt, Martin; Isken, Sarah; Linge, Anna; Eikmeier, Kristin; Jeibmann, Astrid; Oyen, Florian; Nagel, Inga; Richter, Julia; Bartelheim, Kerstin; Kordes, Uwe; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Frühwald, Michael; Siebert, Reiner; Paulus, Werner

2012-10-17

55

Gelastic seizures in ring chromosome 20 syndrome: a case report with video illustration.  

PubMed

Although increasingly recognised, ring chromosome 20 (r[20]) syndrome is still diagnosed with delay, sometimes leading to inappropriate presurgical evaluation. The focal, presumed frontal, character of the seizures manifesting with fear and hypermotor behaviour and episodes of non-convulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) are most typical, as well as cognitive impairment with behavioural problems and, sometimes, dysmorphic signs. We present a girl diagnosed at the age of 13 years who suffered from an atypical clinical presentation, with minimal cognitive problems, absence of dysmorphic symptoms, and hypermotor/gelastic seizures. [Published with video sequences]. PMID:22591830

Dimova, Petia; Boneva, Iliyana; Todorova, Albena; Minotti, Lorella; Kahane, Philippe

2012-06-01

56

Febrile Seizures  

MedlinePLUS

... can I get more information? What are febrile seizures? Febrile seizures are convulsions brought on by a ... not triggered by fever. How common are febrile seizures? Approximately one in every 25 children will have ...

57

Prolactin and seizure activity.  

PubMed Central

Prolactin secretion after tonic-clonic seizures (10 patients), complex partial seizures (five) and non-epileptic attacks (three) was studied in a group of children aged between 0.3 and 14 years. Seven patients with other subcategories of seizure disorders were also studied. Eight children with tonic-clonic seizures exhibited post ictal concentrations of prolactin greater than 500 mU/l. One of the children, who responded on one occasion, did not do so on another. Three children with complex partial seizures had post ictal prolactin concentrations greater than 500 mU/l, while in two the increased values were more modest (390 mU/l and 420 mU/l). The timing of the peak post ictal prolactin concentration varied from less than 20 minutes to a prolonged plateau for three hours. Other seizure types--simple partial with motor signs (2), absence seizure (1), myoclonic seizure (1), minor epileptic status (3) (with one exception), and non-epileptic attacks (3) were not associated with post ictal concentrations greater than 500 mU/l.

Bye, A M; Nunn, K P; Wilson, J

1985-01-01

58

Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and epilepsy with myoclonic-astatic seizures.  

PubMed

Among nonsymptomatic epilepsies exhibiting several types of generalized seizures in children two syndromes were progressively identified: epilepsy with myoclonic-astatic seizures (MAE) and nonsymptomatic Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS). Various approaches based on etiology, electroclinical semiology, and mathematical analysis have progressively helped to distinguish these two conditions. Both conditions preferentially affect boys. The course is stereotyped in MAE, characterized by progressive worsening of epilepsy, usual pharmacoresistance at onset and tonic-clonic seizures, myoclonus and frequent episodes of myoclonic status epilepticus. EEG shows 3Hz spike wave bursts characteristic of idiopathic generalized epilepsy together with slowing of the tracing. In LGS, major seizures are mainly atypical absences and tonic seizures with 0.5-2Hz slow spike-waves and eventually focal anomalies. Prognosis in both syndromes ranges from recovery without sequelae to pharmacoresistant epilepsy that has improved over the past 2 decades with the new generation antiepileptic compounds. Iatrogenic factors may contribute to the poor prognosis, mainly in MAE. Pathophysiology remains speculative for both syndromes: although both share factors of brain maturation, MAE is probably mainly related to genetic predisposition whereas LGS results from some unidentified cortical brain malformation. In unfavorable cases, there may therefore be a continuum between both syndromes. They need to be distinguished from other epilepsy syndromes and inborn errors of metabolism that begin in the same age range: atypical idiopathic benign epilepsy, frontal lobe epilepsy with secondary bisynchrony, ring chromosome 20, ceroid lipofuscinosis, and nonsymptomatic late-onset spasms. PMID:23622212

Kaminska, Anna; Oguni, Hirokazu

2013-01-01

59

Febrile seizures.  

PubMed

Febrile seizures are the most common form of childhood seizures, occurring in 2 to 5% of children in the United States. Most febrile seizures are considered simple, although those with focal onset, prolonged duration, or that occur more than once within the same febrile illness are considered complex. Risk factors for a first febrile seizure, recurrence of febrile seizures, and development of future epilepsy are identifiable and varied. Children with febrile seizures encounter little risk of mortality and morbidity and have no association with any detectable brain damage. Recurrence is possible, but only a small minority will go on to develop epilepsy. Although antiepileptic drugs can prevent recurrent febrile seizures, they do not alter the risk of subsequent epilepsy. This has led to a changing view of how we approach the treatment of these common and largely benign seizures. This chapter will review the current understanding of the prognosis and management of febrile seizures. PMID:11918463

Shinnar, Shlomo; Glauser, Tracy A

2002-01-01

60

Atypical Fibroxanthoma  

PubMed Central

Atypical fibroxanthoma (AFX) is a nodular dermal ulcerative lesion with a favorable prognosis. AFX most commonly occurs on sun-exposed skin in elderly individuals. AFX is characterized by its association with ultraviolet radiation, not only from a clinical aspect, but also from a molecular aspect. Making a diagnosis of AFX is challenging, and it is important to differentiate it from squamous cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma. Histological features and combined immunohistochemical markers are necessary for a definitive diagnosis (i.e., an absence of immunostaining for cytokeratins, S100 and HMB45 in AFX is helpful for excluding both squamous cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma). AFX, as well as MFH (malignant fibrous histiocytoma), is a fibrohistiocytic lesion with myofibroblastic differentiation. AFX is considered to be a different lesion from MFH. AFX and MFH might share the same pathway which determines their morphology. However, they may have different pathways in development which determine their biological behavior.

Sakamoto, Akio

2008-01-01

61

Complex Partial Seizures  

MedlinePLUS

Complex Partial Seizures You are here: Home About Epilepsy Seizures Partial Seizures Complex Partial Seizures Email Print Twitter Facebook MySpace Delicous ... Complex Partial Seizures ] First Aid for Complex Partial Seizures Do not restrain the person. Remove dangerous objects ...

62

Levetiracetam in Absence Epilepsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The aim of the study was to assess the efficacy, tolerability, and safety of levetiracetam therapy in children and adolescents with absence epilepsy. Twenty-one participants (11 male, 10 female) with typical absence seizures were enrolled in this prospective study from seven centres in Italy. The mean age and age range at time of enrolment into…

Verrotti, Alberto; Cerminara, Caterina; Domizio, Sergio; Mohn, Angelika; Franzoni, Emilio; Coppola, Giangennaro; Zamponi, Nelia; Parisi, Pasquale; Iannetti, Paola; Curatolo, Paolo

2008-01-01

63

Neonatal seizures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Opinion statement  Seizures in neonates are common and often suggest a serious underlying brain injury such as hypoxia-ischemia, stroke, or hemorrhage.\\u000a There is a lack of evidence regarding optimal monitoring, evaluation, and treatment for newborns with seizures. Prolonged\\u000a video-electroencephalogram (EEG) is the gold standard for detecting seizures, whereas amplitude-integrated EEG may be a convenient\\u000a and useful screening tool. Evaluation involves a

Hannah C. Glass; Joseph E. Sullivan

2009-01-01

64

Febrile seizures  

MedlinePLUS

... minutes. The child had more than one febrile seizure in 24 hours. The child has abnormal findings when examined . ... Meningitis causes less than 0.1% of febrile seizures. It should always be considered, especially in children less than 1 year old, or those who ...

65

Non-Epileptic Seizures  

MedlinePLUS

Non-epileptic seizures You are here: Home About Epilepsy Seizures Non-epileptic seizures Email Print Twitter Facebook MySpace Delicous Stumble Digg More... Nonepileptic Seizures Non-Epileptic Seizures Live Q&A Webinar for ...

66

Atypical pneumonia  

MedlinePLUS

Walking pneumonia; Chlamydophila pneumoniae; Community-acquired pneumonia - atypical ... Thoracic Society consensus guidelines on the management of community-acquired pneumonia in adults. Clin Infect Dis . 2007; ...

67

A patient with Tramadol dependence and predictable provoked epileptic seizures.  

PubMed

Tramadol is an atypical, centrally acting synthetic analgesic with propensity for provoked seizures as well as abuse potential. The index case of Tramadol dependence discussed in this case report developed multiple epileptic seizures with high doses of Tramadol, used as a sexual enhancer by him, and later he learned to prevent the seizures by self-medicating with Alprazolam. The authors further emphasize on the regulation of Tramadol prescription. PMID:24082254

Nebhinani, Naresh; Singh, Shubh M; Gupta, Gourav

2013-07-01

68

A patient with Tramadol dependence and predictable provoked epileptic seizures  

PubMed Central

Tramadol is an atypical, centrally acting synthetic analgesic with propensity for provoked seizures as well as abuse potential. The index case of Tramadol dependence discussed in this case report developed multiple epileptic seizures with high doses of Tramadol, used as a sexual enhancer by him, and later he learned to prevent the seizures by self-medicating with Alprazolam. The authors further emphasize on the regulation of Tramadol prescription.

Nebhinani, Naresh; Singh, Shubh M.; Gupta, Gourav

2013-01-01

69

Neonatal seizures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Opinion statement  \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a – \\u000a \\u000a •Neonatal seizures are frequently manifested by subtle movements that are referable to brain stem structure, ie, nystagmus, conjugate eye movements, posturing, sucking movements, and so forth.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a – \\u000a \\u000a •Electroencephalogram (EEG) confirmation of abnormal movements is essential in diagnosing seizures in the neonate.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a – \\u000a \\u000a •Clinical seizure signs are often a clue to etiology.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a – \\u000a \\u000a •Metabolic abnormalities must always be

Michael J. Painter; John Alvin

2001-01-01

70

Epilepsy and Seizure Statistics  

MedlinePLUS

... Facebook MySpace Delicous Stumble Digg More... Epilepsy and Seizure Statistics Epilepsy and seizures affect nearly 3 million ... seizures and epilepsy in the United States: Incidence -- Seizures: 300,000 people have a first convulsion each ...

71

Atypical depression.  

PubMed

The authors conducted Pubmed searches to examine the epidemiological characteristics, symptoms, association with bipolar disorder, personality and temperament features, biology, and pharmacotherapy response of atypical depression and significance of current knowledge about this subtype of depression in treatment planning. Atypical depression has a high prevalence rate, starts early in life, tends to last longer, is more likely to occur in people with bipolar disorder, has high comorbidity of anxiety disorders, carries more risk of suicidal behavior, and has distinct personality psychopathology and biological traits. Atypical depression is an important specifier with significance in terms of predicting clinical course of depression, and hence in treatment planning and service use. PMID:21103169

Singh, Tanvir; Williams, Kristi

2006-04-01

72

Atypical Depression  

PubMed Central

The authors conducted Pubmed searches to examine the epidemiological characteristics, symptoms, association with bipolar disorder, personality and temperament features, biology, and pharmacotherapy response of atypical depression and significance of current knowledge about this subtype of depression in treatment planning. Atypical depression has a high prevalence rate, starts early in life, tends to last longer, is more likely to occur in people with bipolar disorder, has high comorbidity of anxiety disorders, carries more risk of suicidal behavior, and has distinct personality psychopathology and biological traits. Atypical depression is an important specifier with significance in terms of predicting clinical course of depression, and hence in treatment planning and service use.

Williams, Kristi

2006-01-01

73

[Atypical depression].  

PubMed

The principal atypical aspects of depressive disease are: minor and attenued aspects, monosymptomatic and atypical aspects (food disorders and sleep disorders), masqued aspects (somatoform, anxious, characterial and addict disorders), atypical aspects of child (anxious nevrotical disorder), pseudo-demented and characterial aspects of aged subjects. Facing to these aspects, the diagnosis of depression is evoqued on: the recent and fast advent of these disorders, their morning predominance, their recurrent character, the state of attenued depressive symptoms (anhedonia), the positive responsiveness to treatment. PMID:10337216

Escande, M; Boucard, J

1999-04-01

74

Controlling Seizures  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article describes how an implantable device could greatly improve the quality of life for people with epilepsy. Gabe Anderson was diagnosed with bilateral heterotopia, a congenital condition that can lead to the onset of complex partial seizures stemming from both hemispheres of the brain. In early 2004, Gabe became one of the first 35…

Henderson, Nancy

2008-01-01

75

Controlling Seizures  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article describes how an implantable device could greatly improve the quality of life for people with epilepsy. Gabe Anderson was diagnosed with bilateral heterotopia, a congenital condition that can lead to the onset of complex partial seizures stemming from both hemispheres of the brain. In early 2004, Gabe became one of the first 35…

Henderson, Nancy

2008-01-01

76

Atypical Antidepressants  

MedlinePLUS

... assessment Symptom Checker Tests and diagnosis (1) Cytochrome P450 (CYP450) tests Treatments and drugs (22) Atypical antidepressants ... May 14, 2013. Fleeman N, et al. Cytochrome P450 testing for prescribing antipsychotics in adults with schizophrenia: ...

77

Neuronal carbonic anhydrase VII provides GABAergic excitatory drive to exacerbate febrile seizures.  

PubMed

Brain carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are known to modulate neuronal signalling. Using a novel CA VII (Car7) knockout (KO) mouse as well as a CA II (Car2) KO and a CA II/VII double KO, we show that mature hippocampal pyramidal neurons are endowed with two cytosolic isoforms. CA VII is predominantly expressed by neurons starting around postnatal day 10 (P10). The ubiquitous isoform II is expressed in neurons at P20. Both isoforms enhance bicarbonate-driven GABAergic excitation during intense GABAA-receptor activation. P13-14 CA VII KO mice show behavioural manifestations atypical of experimental febrile seizures (eFS) and a complete absence of electrographic seizures. A low dose of diazepam promotes eFS in P13-P14 rat pups, whereas seizures are blocked at higher concentrations that suppress breathing. Thus, the respiratory alkalosis-dependent eFS are exacerbated by GABAergic excitation. We found that CA VII mRNA is expressed in the human cerebral cortex before the age when febrile seizures (FS) occur in children. Our data indicate that CA VII is a key molecule in age-dependent neuronal pH regulation with consequent effects on generation of FS. PMID:23881097

Ruusuvuori, Eva; Huebner, Antje K; Kirilkin, Ilya; Yukin, Alexey Y; Blaesse, Peter; Helmy, Mohamed; Kang, Hyo Jung; El Muayed, Malek; Hennings, J Christopher; Voipio, Juha; Sestan, Nenad; Hübner, Christian A; Kaila, Kai

2013-07-23

78

Neuronal carbonic anhydrase VII provides GABAergic excitatory drive to exacerbate febrile seizures  

PubMed Central

Brain carbonic anhydrases (CAs) are known to modulate neuronal signalling. Using a novel CA VII (Car7) knockout (KO) mouse as well as a CA II (Car2) KO and a CA II/VII double KO, we show that mature hippocampal pyramidal neurons are endowed with two cytosolic isoforms. CA VII is predominantly expressed by neurons starting around postnatal day 10 (P10). The ubiquitous isoform II is expressed in neurons at P20. Both isoforms enhance bicarbonate-driven GABAergic excitation during intense GABAA-receptor activation. P13–14 CA VII KO mice show behavioural manifestations atypical of experimental febrile seizures (eFS) and a complete absence of electrographic seizures. A low dose of diazepam promotes eFS in P13–P14 rat pups, whereas seizures are blocked at higher concentrations that suppress breathing. Thus, the respiratory alkalosis-dependent eFS are exacerbated by GABAergic excitation. We found that CA VII mRNA is expressed in the human cerebral cortex before the age when febrile seizures (FS) occur in children. Our data indicate that CA VII is a key molecule in age-dependent neuronal pH regulation with consequent effects on generation of FS.

Ruusuvuori, Eva; Huebner, Antje K; Kirilkin, Ilya; Yukin, Alexey Y; Blaesse, Peter; Helmy, Mohamed; Jung Kang, Hyo; El Muayed, Malek; Christopher Hennings, J; Voipio, Juha; Sestan, Nenad; Hubner, Christian A; Kaila, Kai

2013-01-01

79

Seizure Provoking Triggers  

MedlinePLUS

Seizure Provoking Triggers You are here: Home About Epilepsy Diagnosis Seizure Provoking Triggers Email Print Twitter Facebook MySpace Delicous Stumble Digg More... Seizure Triggers and Precipitants The immediate factors that provoke ...

80

Pyridoxine dependent seizures--a wider clinical spectrum.  

PubMed Central

We report 4 infants with pyridoxine dependent seizures who had clinical features that led to diagnostic uncertainty. Their clinical course was unusual in 1 or more of the following: later onset of initial seizures; a seizure free period after taking of anticonvulsants, but before taking of pyridoxine; a long remission after withdrawal of pyridoxine; and atypical seizure type. This report illustrates a broader range of clinical features and highlights the need to consider the diagnosis of pyridoxine dependent seizures in any infant with intractable epilepsy, regardless of the pattern of seizures and the response to anticonvulsant medications. In such a case, 100 mg intravenous pyridoxine should be given and, if a definite clinical response is established, oral pyridoxine should be continued indefinitely.

Bankier, A; Turner, M; Hopkins, I J

1983-01-01

81

Seizures and Teens: Stress, Sleep, & Seizures  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Most parents are used to erratic sleep patterns and mood swings in their teenagers. When these occur in an adolescent with seizures, however, the parent may wonder if sleep and mood problems are related to seizures. Sorting out the cause and effects of sleep in an adolescent with seizures can be confusing. Since stress can be a contributor to…

Shafer, Patricia Osborne

2007-01-01

82

Seizures and Teens: Stress, Sleep, & Seizures  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Most parents are used to erratic sleep patterns and mood swings in their teenagers. When these occur in an adolescent with seizures, however, the parent may wonder if sleep and mood problems are related to seizures. Sorting out the cause and effects of sleep in an adolescent with seizures can be confusing. Since stress can be a contributor to both…

Shafer, Patricia Osborne

2007-01-01

83

Generalized-onset seizures with secondary focal evolution.  

PubMed

The international seizure classification recognizes that partial-onset seizures can become secondarily generalized, but generalized-onset seizures are expected to remain generalized. We report six patients who had recorded seizures with generalized onset, but subsequent evolution into a focal discharge. The clinical seizure onset was generalized absence or myoclonic, and the most common subsequent clinical pattern was prolonged behavioral arrest with mild automatisms, and then postictal confusion. The ictal discharge started with generalized spike-and-wave activity and then acquired a focal predominance. Interictal epileptiform activity was generalized. There were no focal magnetic resonance imaging abnormalities. Four patients were misdiagnosed with complex partial seizures. All patients were initially refractory, but three became seizure-free and three improved after treatment with antiepileptic medications appropriate for absence or myoclonic seizures. Generalized-onset seizures that acquire focal features are easily misdiagnosed as complex partial. These seizures have a more favorable response to medications effective against generalized absence and myoclonic seizures. PMID:19260942

Williamson, Randy; Hanif, Samrina; Mathews, Gregory C; Lagrange, Andre H; Abou-Khalil, Bassel

2009-02-26

84

Enhanced tonic GABAA inhibition in typical absence epilepsy  

PubMed Central

The cellular mechanisms underlying typical absence seizures, which characterize various idiopathic generalized epilepsies, are not fully understood, but impaired GABAergic inhibition remains an attractive hypothesis. In contrast, we show here that extrasynaptic GABAA receptor–dependent ‘tonic’ inhibition is increased in thalamocortical neurons from diverse genetic and pharmacological models of absence seizures. Increased tonic inhibition is due to compromised GABA uptake by the GABA transporter GAT–1 in the genetic models tested, and GAT–1 is critical in governing seizure genesis. Extrasynaptic GABAA receptors are a requirement for seizures in two of the best characterized models of absence epilepsy, and the selective activation of thalamic extrasynaptic GABAA receptors is sufficient to elicit both electrographic and behavioural correlates of seizures in normal animals. These results identify an apparently common cellular pathology in typical absence seizures that may have epileptogenic significance, and highlight novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of absence epilepsy.

Cope, David W.; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; Fyson, Sarah J.; Orban, Gergely; Errington, Adam C.; Lorincz, Magor L.; Gould, Timothy M.; Carter, David A.; Crunelli, Vincenzo

2010-01-01

85

Hyperkinetic Seizures in Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to delineate the clinical and video-electroencephalographic (EEG) manifestations of children with complex partial seizures with a predominant “hyperkinetic” presentation. Certain types of partial seizures can be difficult to differentiate from nonepileptic seizures because of their intense motor presentation and, at times, lack of alteration of consciousness. Based on a published semiologic seizure classification, this

Arie Weinstock; Pierre Giglio; Susan L. Kerr; Patricia K. Duffner; Michael E. Cohen

2003-01-01

86

Atypical subacute sclerosing panencephalitis: case report.  

PubMed

Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a progressive inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system with both poor prognosis and high mortality. The disease has been related to a persistent and aberrant measles virus infection and no effective treatment has been available. We report a case of SSPE with atypical features including seizures at onset and a fulminant course in a 8 years-old boy who had been previously immunized against measles. PMID:18094871

Cruzeiro, Marcelo Maroco; Vale, Thiago Cardoso; Pires, Leopoldo Antônio; Franco, Gláucio Mendes

2007-12-01

87

Genetic Models of Absence Epilepsy: New Concepts and Insights  

Microsoft Academic Search

The discovery, development, and use of genetic rodent models of absence epilepsy have led to a new theory about the origin of absence seizures. A focal zone has been identified in the peri-oral region of the somatosensory cortex in WAG\\/Rij and GAERS – the two most commonly used models – from which the seizure quickly spreads over the cortex and

A. M. L. Coenen

2009-01-01

88

Grand Mal Seizure  

MedlinePLUS

... a tonic-clonic seizure — features a loss of consciousness and violent muscle contractions. It's the type of ... seizures have two stages. Tonic phase. Loss of consciousness occurs, and the muscles suddenly contract and cause ...

89

Seizure First Aid  

MedlinePLUS

... International Research Conference Highlights Text Size Get Involved SEIZURE FIRST AID Download a PDF of this information. There are several kinds of seizures; they all look different, and they require different ...

90

First Aid for Seizures  

MedlinePLUS

... simple. It keeps the person safe until the seizure stops naturally by itself. It is important for ... public to know how to respond to all seizures, including the most noticeable kind -- the generalized tonic ...

91

Temporal Lobe Seizure  

MedlinePLUS

... reprinted for personal, noncommercial use only. Temporal lobe seizure By Mayo Clinic staff Original Article: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/temporal-lobe-seizure/DS00266 Definition Symptoms Causes Complications Preparing for your ...

92

Seizures and syncope  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Abstract\\u000a   Although pathophysiologically distinct, syncope and seizures share clinical characteristics which may make diagnosis difficult.\\u000a Adding to diagnostic complexity are the facts that seizures and syncope may coexist in the same patient, syncope may be associated\\u000a with seizure-like motor manifestations, and seizures may be complicated by cardiac arrhythmia and syncope. Combined EEG\\/ECG\\u000a telemetry is sometimes necessary to establish the correct

Jeffrey W. Britton; Eduardo Benarroch

2006-01-01

93

Search and Seizure.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper examines the practice of search and seizure from a legal perspective. All issues concerning lawful or unlawful search and seizure, whether in a public school or otherwise, are predicated upon the Fourth Amendment to the United States Constitution. The terms "search,""seizure,""probable cause,""reasonable suspicion," and "exclusionary…

Murray, Kenneth T.

94

High-frequency oscillations and seizure generation in neocortical epilepsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Neocortical seizures are often poorly localized, explosive and widespread at onset, making them poorly amenable to epilepsy surgery in the absence of associated focal brain lesions. We describe, for the first time in an un- selected group of patients with neocortical epilepsy, the finding that high-frequency (60-100 Hz) epileptiform oscillations are highly localized in the seizure onset zone, both

Greg A. Worrell; Landi Parish; Stephen D. Cranstoun; Rachel Jonas; Gordon Baltuch; Brian Litt

2004-01-01

95

Athletes with seizure disorders.  

PubMed

Individuals with seizure disorders have long been restricted from participation in certain sporting activities. Those with seizure disorders are more likely than their peers to have a sedentary lifestyle and to develop obesity. Regular participation in physical activity can improve both physical and psychosocial outcomes for persons with seizure disorders. Seizure activity often is reduced among those patients who regularly engage in aerobic activity. Recent literature indicates that the diagnosis of seizure disorders remains highly stigmatizing in the adolescent population. Persons with seizure disorders may be more accepted by peer groups if they are allowed to participate in sports and recreational activities. Persons with seizure disorders are encouraged to participate in regular aerobic activities. They may participate in team sports and contact or collision activities provided that they utilize appropriate protective equipment. There seems to be no increased risk of injury or increasing seizure activity as the result of such participation. Persons with seizure disorders still are discouraged from participating in scuba diving and skydiving. The benefits of participation in regular sporting activity far outweigh any risk to the athlete with a seizure disorder who chooses to participate in sports. PMID:22236820

Knowles, Byron Don; Pleacher, Michael D

96

Familial Clustering of Seizure Types within the Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsies  

PubMed Central

Objective: To examine the genetic relationships among epilepsies with different seizure types --myoclonic, absence, and generalized tonic-clonic -- within the idiopathic generalized epilepsies (IGEs). Background: Careful phenotype definition in the epilepsies may allow division into groups that share susceptibility genes. Examination of seizure type, a phenotypic characteristic less complex than IGE syndrome, may help to define more homogeneous subgroups. Methods: Using the approach that found evidence for distinct genetic effects on myoclonic vs absence seizures in families from the Epilepsy Family Study of Columbia University, we examined an independent sample of families from Australia and Israel. We also examined the familial clustering of generalized tonic clonic seizures (GTCs) within the IGEs in our two combined datasets. Families were defined as concordant if all affected members had the same type of seizure or IGE syndrome, as appropriate for the analysis performed. Results: The proportion of families concordant for myoclonic vs absence seizures was greater than expected by chance in the Australian families. In addition, GTCs clustered in families with IGEs to a degree greater than expected by chance. Conclusions: These results provide additional evidence for distinct genetic effects on myoclonic vs absence seizures in an independent set of families. They also suggest that there is a genetic influence on the occurrence of GTCs within the IGEs.

Winawer, Melodie R.; Marini, Carla; Grinton, Bronwyn E; Rabinowitz, Daniel; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Ottman, Ruth

2005-01-01

97

Benzodiazepine withdrawal syndrome seizures.  

PubMed

In this study, we present five cases of seizures following withdrawal of flunitrazepam, lorazepam, or triazolam, representing 3% of a sample consisting of 153 patients dependent on benzodiazepines. Both abrupt cessation of benzodiazepine intake and high-dose use seem to be critical for the appearance of seizures. Pharmacological features, such as short elimination half-life and high potency, might explain the higher risk of seizures observed in these patients. PMID:8773293

Martínez-Cano, H; Vela-Bueno, A; de Iceta, M; Pomalima, R; Martínez-Gras, I

1995-11-01

98

Absence epilepsy and periventricular nodular heterotopia.  

PubMed

We report a case of a girl who presented with typical absence seizures at age of 4.5 years. EEG showed absence seizures of sudden onset with 3 Hz spike-and-waves that also correlated with the clinical absences. The seizure semiology included subtle deviation of the eyes which prompted MRI investigation of the brain. This showed a periventricular nodular heterotopia in the mid to anterior horn of the right lateral ventricle. Although possibly coincidental, periventricular heterotopia are considered to be epileptogenic and this association has been reported once before. Migration disorders, such as in the periventricular heterotopia of our patient, may influence the formation and excitability of the striato-thalamo-cortical network involved in the generation of 3 Hz spike-waves. PMID:20637656

de Wit, M C Y; Schippers, H M; de Coo, I F M; Arts, W F M; Lequin, M H; Brooks, A; Visser, G H; Mancini, G M S

2010-07-15

99

Epileptic Seizure Warning System.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The patent application relates to epileptic seizure warning system based on pattern recognition principles. The system is embodied in a small self-contained device which can be carried in a pocket of a person subject to grand mal seizures, to monitor the ...

S. S. Viglione V. A. Ordon W. B. Martin C. C. Kesler

1973-01-01

100

Seizures and intracranial hemorrhage.  

PubMed

Seizures and intracranial hemorrhage are possible medical diseases that any obstetrician may encounter. This article reviews the cause, treatment, and medical management in pregnancy for seizures and intracranial hemorrhage, and how the two can overlap into preeclampsia or eclampsia. This article also highlights some challenging management issues from the obstetrician's perspective. PMID:23466140

Wilson, Karen L; Alexander, James M

2013-03-01

101

Warrantless Searches and Seizures  

Microsoft Academic Search

The fourth amendment to the Constitution has two basic clauses. The first, the reasonableness clause, protects the people against unreasonable searches and seizures. The second, the warrant clause, sets forth conditions under which a warrant may issue. Searches and seizures made pursuant to a warrant are, quite obviously, governed by the commands of the warrant clause. However, the effect of

Mack Allen Player

1971-01-01

102

Genes, Seizures & Epilepsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The chance that someone will develop any disease is influenced by heredity and environment. Epilepsy is not an exception. Everybody inherits a unique degree of susceptibility to seizures. About 3 percent of the United States population is prone to seizures and will get epilepsy at some point of their lives (1). Two thirds of the people with…

Goldman, Alica M.

2006-01-01

103

Functional dentate gyrus neurogenesis in a rapid kindling seizure model.  

PubMed

Neurogenesis in the adult mammalian hippocampus resulting in long-term persistence of new neurons with features of capacity for functional activation is recognized. Many stimuli are capable of increasing the rate of neurogenesis, including seizure activity. Whether these insults result in an increased number of new functionally active neurons over and above the baseline rate of neurogenesis is not known. The rapid electrical amygdala kindling (REAK) model of seizures isolates the effects of seizures alone in the absence of neuronal death and the resulting seizures induce expression of c-Fos in the vast majority of dentate gyrus (DG) granule cells. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to REAK then injected with bromodeoxyuridine (BrDU) to label dividing cells, then re-exposed to REAK after a delay period to allow detection of functional activation in new neurons by measurement c-Fos expression in response to seizures. Adult subgranular zone cells migrated into the DG granule cell layer (GCL), assumed a neuronal phenotype and demonstrated seizure-dependent responsiveness. Larger absolute numbers of new neurons demonstrating seizure-dependent activation were found in the GCL of previously kindled mice. Seizures are capable of increasing the number of new neurons with the capacity for functional activation laid down in the postseizure period and incorporated into seizure-activated circuitry. PMID:17156380

Smith, Paul D; McLean, Karen J; Murphy, Michael A; Turnley, Ann M; Cook, Mark J

2006-12-01

104

Hyperkinetic seizures in children.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to delineate the clinical and video-electroencephalographic (EEG) manifestations of children with complex partial seizures with a predominant "hyperkinetic" presentation. Certain types of partial seizures can be difficult to differentiate from nonepileptic seizures because of their intense motor presentation and, at times, lack of alteration of consciousness. Based on a published semiologic seizure classification, this type of seizures can be described as "hyperkinetic," characterized by intense motor activity involving the extremities and trunk. We report five children diagnosed with hyperkinetic seizures by video-EEG monitoring. All patients were referred for video-EEG evaluation because of an initial suspicion of pseudoseizures. Presented in this study is a review of the patients' clinical data, including video-EEG evaluation. There were three boys and two girls; the mean age at presentation was 10 +/- 3 years. In four patients, there was a history of behavioral disorder, with two patients carrying a diagnosis of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). One girl had significant developmental delay and an abnormal neurologic examination. Brain magnetic resonance imaging was normal in three patients and abnormal in two. The semiology of the seizures consisted of stereotypic intense motor activity, mainly upper extremity flailing and kicking. Screaming and shouting were noted in three cases, and intense fear was present in two patients. The hyperkinetic ictal activity progressed to tonic-clonic seizures in two patients. Seizures occurred out of sleep or on awakening in four patients. The interictal EEG activity was normal in one patient and revealed a continuous generalized slowing and slowing of the posterior dominant rhythm in two patients. One of the latter patients had interictal epileptiform activity in the frontal and midline regions. An intermittent rhythmic slow activity of the left hemisphere with superimposed bifrontal sharp waves was noted in the fifth patient. The ictal EEG revealed profuse superimposed electromyographic (EMG) activity in all patients, making some of the EEG interpretation difficult to analyze, particularly a longitudinal bipolar montage. However, with digital manipulation of the ictal EEG data, such as changes in EEG sensitivity, application of fast frequency filters, and use of different EEG montages, it was possible to discern an ictal EEG pattern or postictal slowing following the diffuse EMG artifact in all patients. On clinical follow-up, adequate seizure control was achieved in three patients. Based on the clinical history, one patient was diagnosed with autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy. Diagnosis of hyperkinetic seizures can be difficult because of the similarity of the clinical manifestations with nonepileptic events such as certain parasomnias and pseudoseizures. Video-EEG is the most effective way of diagnosing this type of seizure. PMID:13677576

Weinstock, Arie; Giglio, Pierre; Kerr, Susan L; Duffner, Patricia K; Cohen, Michael E

2003-08-01

105

Plasticity-modulated seizure dynamics for seizure termination in realistic neuronal models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In previous studies we showed that autonomous absence seizure generation and termination can be explained by realistic neuronal models eliciting bi-stable dynamics. In these models epileptic seizures are triggered either by external stimuli (reflex epilepsies) or by internal fluctuations. This scenario predicts exponential distributions of the duration of the seizures and of the inter-ictal intervals. These predictions were validated in rat models of absence epilepsy, as well as in a few human cases. Nonetheless, deviations from the predictions with respect to seizure duration distributions remained unexplained. The objective of the present work is to implement a simple but realistic computational model of a neuronal network including synaptic plasticity and ionic current dynamics and to explore the dynamics of the model with special emphasis on the distributions of seizure and inter-ictal period durations. We use as a basis our lumped model of cortical neuronal circuits. Here we introduce 'activity dependent' parameters, namely post-synaptic voltage-dependent plasticity, as well as a voltage-dependent hyperpolarization-activated current driven by slow and fast activation conductances. We examine the distributions of the durations of the seizure-like model activity and the normal activity, described respectively by the limit cycle and the steady state in the dynamics. We use a parametric ?-distribution fit as a quantifier. Our results show that autonomous, activity-dependent membrane processes can account for experimentally obtained statistical distributions of seizure durations, which were not explainable using the previous model. The activity-dependent membrane processes that display the strongest effect in accounting for these distributions are the hyperpolarization-dependent cationic (Ih) current and the GABAa plastic dynamics. Plastic synapses (NMDA-type) in the interneuron population show only a minor effect. The inter-ictal statistics retain their consistency with the experimental data and the previous model.

Koppert, M. M. J.; Kalitzin, S.; Lopes da Silva, F. H.; Viergever, M. A.

2011-08-01

106

Do patients with absence epilepsy respond to ketogenic diets?  

PubMed

Dietary therapies are established as beneficial for symptomatic generalized epilepsies such as Lennox-Gastaut syndrome; however, the outcome for idiopathic generalized epilepsy has never been specifically reported. The efficacy of the ketogenic and modified Atkins diet for childhood and juvenile absence epilepsy was evaluated from both historical literature review and patients treated at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Upon review of 17 published studies in which absence epilepsy was included as a patient subpopulation, approximately 69% of 133 with clear outcomes patients who received the ketogenic diet had a >50% seizure reduction, and 34% of these patients became seizure free. At Johns Hopkins Hospital, the ketogenic diet (n = 8) and modified Atkins diet (n = 13) led to similar outcomes, with 18 (82%) having a >50% seizure reduction, of which 10 (48%) had a >90% seizure reduction and 4 (19%) were seizure free. Neither age at diet onset, number of anticonvulsants used previously, particular diet used, nor gender correlated with success. PMID:20647578

Groomes, Laura B; Pyzik, Paula L; Turner, Zahava; Dorward, Jennifer L; Goode, Victoria H; Kossoff, Eric H

2010-07-20

107

Endogenous neuropeptide Y prevents recurrence of experimental febrile seizures by increasing seizure threshold.  

PubMed

Febrile seizures (FSs) typically occur at the onset of fever and do not recur within the same febrile episode despite enduring or increased hyperthermia. Recurrent seizures during the same febrile episode are considered "complex," with potentially altered prognosis. A characterized immature rat model of FS was used to test the hypotheses that (1) a first FS influences the threshold temperature for subsequent ones, and (2) the underlying mechanisms involve the release and actions of the endogenous inhibitory hippocampal neuropeptide Y (NPY). Experimental FSs were induced two or three times, at 3- to 4-h intervals, and threshold temperatures measured. To determine the potential effects of seizure-induced endogenous NPY on thresholds for subsequent seizures, an antagonist of the major hippocampal NPY receptor (type 2) was infused prior to induction of the second seizure. As an indicator of NPY release, NPY expression was determined 4 and 24 h later. Threshold core and brain temperatures for hyperthermic seizures were consistent with those observed during human fever. Threshold temperatures for a second and third seizure were significantly and progressively higher than those required for the first. This "protective" effect involved induction of endogenous NPY because it was abolished by the NPY antagonist. In addition, NPY mRNA expression was increased in dentate gyrus, CA3 and CA1, after an experimental FS, consistent with peptide release. Collectively these data indicate that the absence of repetitive seizures during a febrile episode involves the inhibitory actions of endogenous NPY, suggesting that the signaling cascade triggered by this peptide might provide targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:15800380

Dubé, Céline; Brunson, Kristen L; Eghbal-Ahmadi, Mariam; Gonzalez-Vega, Rebeca; Baram, Tallie Z

2005-01-01

108

Petit mal seizure  

MedlinePLUS

Duvivier EH, Pollack Jr CV. Seizures. In: Marx, JA, ed. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Mosby Elsevier; 2009: chap 100. Kornblau DH, Conway Jr EE, ...

109

Improving Early Seizure Detection  

PubMed Central

Over the last decade, the search for a method able to reliably predict seizures hours in advance has been largely replaced by a more realistic goal of very early detection of seizure onset which would allow therapeutic or warning devices to be triggered prior to the onset of disabling clinical symptoms. We explore in this article the steps along the pathway from data acquisition to closed loop applications that can and should be considered to design the most efficient early seizure detection. Microelectrodes, high-frequency oscillations, high sampling rate, high-density arrays, and modern analysis techniques are all elements of the recording and detection process that in combination with modeling studies can provide new insights into the dynamics of seizure onsets. Each of these step needs to be considered if one wants to implement improved detection devices that will favorably impact the quality of life of patients.

Jouny, Christophe C.; Franaszczuk, Piotr J.; Bergey, Gregory K.

2011-01-01

110

Understanding Seizure Disorders.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Based on medicine for the public lecture represented in October 1990 at NIH. Discusses seizure disorders--causes, effects, treatment, and research. Includes graphic illustrations and b-roll, as well as interview with doctor.

1994-01-01

111

Genetics Home Reference: Seizures  

MedlinePLUS

... Home Conditions Genes Chromosomes Handbook Glossary Resources Conditions > Seizures Related topics on Genetics Home Reference: 15q13.3 ... syndrome aspartylglucosaminuria ataxia neuropathy spectrum benign familial ... idiopathic basal ganglia calcification fucosidosis juvenile myoclonic ...

112

[Differential diagnosis of epileptic seizures].  

PubMed

The differential diagnoses of epileptic seizures depend on the different semiologies of the respective seizures. Patient history and history of witnesses are of foremost importance in the differentiation. When seizures recur, they are more easily distinguished than single seizures. Diagnostic methods like EEG and eventually EEG video monitoring will help in the differentiation when clinical information and patient history do not allow a clear diagnosis. We present the most common differential diagnoses and their differences compared to epileptic seizures. PMID:22237650

Rémi, J; Noachtar, S

2012-02-01

113

Methylxanthines, Seizures, and Excitotoxicity  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Clinical evidence, in particular the wide use of theophylline as a bronchodilator, suggests that methylxanthines can cause\\u000a seizures in patients without known underlying epilepsy. Theophylline is also known to be an added risk factor for seizure\\u000a exacerbation in patients with epilepsy. The proconvulsant activity of methylxanthines can best be explained by their antagonizing\\u000a the brain’s own anticonvulsant adenosine. Recent evidence

Detlev Boison

114

Sound-Induced Seizures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Unilateral exposure of 21-day-old mice to doorbell sound induces unilateral seizure susceptibility to subsequent sound. However, this unilateral component of sound-induced seizures, as well as the inhibitory effect of repetitious sound, appear only in these older mice as susceptibility to audiosensitization is declining. Unilateralîty and audiosensitization have separate ontogenetic patterns, and thus involve separate mechanisms. Ether anesthesia eliminates the inhibitory

W. B. Iturrian; H. D. Johnson

1971-01-01

115

An atypical case of atypical lipomatous tumor.  

PubMed

A 56-year-old woman was referred to us with an asymptomatic nodule on the thigh. The nodule was about 11x7 cm in diameter with a well-demarcated, smooth, surface. Magnetic resonance imaging showed the intensity of the nodule to be entirely monotonous or partially heterogeneous. Histological examination revealed a proliferation of adipocytes varying considerably in size and including many mono- or multivacuolated lipoblasts. Immunohistochemically, some of the tumor cells were positive for p53 and MDM2. Histologically, the atypical lipomatous tumor, lipoblastoma, spindle cell lipoma, pleomorphic liposarcoma, and hibernoma comprised the list of possible, differential diagnoses. We considered our case to be a variant of atypical lipomatous tumor, although it did not correspond to any of the 4 atypical lipomatous tumor subgroups. There has been no recurrence to date. PMID:19033936

Miyakura, Takashi; Irisawa, Ryokichi; Miyamoto, Masamitsu; Iwaya, Keiichi; Yamamoto, Toshiyuki; Tsuboi, Ryoji

2008-12-01

116

Selective Susceptibility to Inhibitors of GABA Synthesis and Antagonists of GABA A Receptor in Rats with Genetic Absence Epilepsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Thalamocortical spike-and-wave discharges characterize the nonconvulsive absence seizures that occur spontaneously in genetic absence epilepsy rats from Strasbourg (GAERS), a selected strain of Wistar rats. GABA is crucial in the generation of absence seizures. The susceptibility to convulsions induced by threshold doses of various GABA receptor antagonists and inhibitors of GABA synthesis, kainic acid and strychnine, was compared in GAERS

Marguerite Vergnes; Any Boehrer; Sophie Reibel; Simone Simler; Christian Marescaux

2000-01-01

117

The current state of absence epilepsy: can we have your attention?  

PubMed

Absence seizures are common within many different epilepsies and span all the ages. Even though absence seizures were described more than three centuries ago advances associated with its classification, pathophysiology, genetics, treatment, prognosis, and associated co-morbidities continue to be made. PMID:23840175

Tenney, Jeffrey R; Glauser, Tracy A

2013-05-01

118

The Current State of Absence Epilepsy: Can We Have Your Attention?  

PubMed Central

Absence seizures are common within many different epilepsies and span all the ages. Even though absence seizures were described more than three centuries ago advances associated with its classification, pathophysiology, genetics, treatment, prognosis, and associated co-morbidities continue to be made.

Tenney, Jeffrey R.; Glauser, Tracy A.

2013-01-01

119

Epilepsy with myoclonic atonic seizures: an electroclinical study of 69 patients.  

PubMed

Epilepsy with myoclonic-atonic seizures is characterized by myoclonic-atonic, absence, tonic-clonic, and eventually tonic seizures, appearing in previously normal children at ages 18-60 months. We analyzed the electroclinical features, treatment, and outcome of 69 patients with myoclonic-atonic seizures; these patients were followed between 1990 and 2012 at the Juan P. Garrahan Pediatric Hospital, Buenos Aires, Argentina. No structural or metabolic etiology was identified. Based on the electroclinical features and evolution, two groups could be distinguished. The first group of 39 patients with myoclonic and myoclonic-atonic seizures with or without generalized tonic-clonic seizures and absences associated with generalized spike- and polyspike-and-wave paroxysms had excellent prognoses. The second group of 30 patients had myoclonic jerks and myoclonic-atonic seizures associated with other seizure types including tonic seizures; some had myoclonic status epilepticus and cognitive deterioration. The interictal EEG showed frequent generalized spike- and polyspike-and-wave paroxysms. In 16 patients, the seizures remitted within 3.6 years. The two groups were distinguished in retrospect, when enough time had elapsed to evaluate cognitive deterioration and different seizure types. In conclusion, epilepsy with myoclonic atonic seizures is an epileptic syndrome with a broad clinical spectrum and variable prognosis. PMID:23583052

Caraballo, Roberto H; Chamorro, Noelia; Darra, Francesca; Fortini, Sebastian; Arroyo, Hugo

2013-05-01

120

Atypical clinical and electroencephalographic pattern in a patient with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.  

PubMed

We describe an atypical clinical and electroencephalographic (EEG) pattern observed during the course of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis in a 14 year-old boy. In this patient with a two weeks history of partial complex seizures, the atypical EEG pattern was characterized by an initial left temporal focus which evolved to periodic lateralized epileptiform discharges (PLEDs) and, only during the 3rd and 4th weeks the typical bilateral and generalized periodic complexes appeared. PMID:7487538

Silva, D F; Lima, M M; Anghinah, R; Zanoteli, E; Lima, J G

1995-06-01

121

Seizures and epilepsy in children.  

PubMed

Seizures and epilepsy in children are common. They are caused by a variety of causes ranging from genetic to neuro -infections. History and actual observation or/video are very important to differentiate true seizure from non-epileptic event. A correct classification of seizure and epilepsy helps to decide need to treat, choice of anti-epileptic drugs (AED) and prognostication. Except for few seizure types, in majority of seizure types regular AED are started after second confirmed seizure. Goal of treatment is seizure control with minimal side effects and ensuring quality of life. With appropriate mono - therapy, about 70 % patients become seizure free and can be easily treated in community. An orderly approach to classify seizure type, holistic management and timely referral of intractable epilepsy will help in improving care of children with epilepsy. PMID:24048876

Sharma, Anita

2013-09-19

122

Fever, febrile seizures and epilepsy.  

PubMed

Seizures induced by fever (febrile seizures) are the most common type of pathological brain activity in infants and children. These febrile seizures and their potential contribution to the mechanisms of limbic (temporal lobe) epilepsy have been a topic of major clinical and scientific interest. Key questions include the mechanisms by which fever generates seizures, the effects of long febrile seizures on neuronal function and the potential contribution of these seizures to epilepsy. This review builds on recent advances derived from animal models and summarizes our current knowledge of the mechanisms underlying febrile seizures and of changes in neuronal gene expression and function that facilitate the enduring effects of prolonged febrile seizures on neuronal and network excitability. The review also discusses the relevance of these findings to the general mechanisms of epileptogenesis during development and points out gaps in our knowledge, including the relationship of animal models to human febrile seizures and epilepsy. PMID:17897728

Dubé, Céline M; Brewster, Amy L; Richichi, Cristina; Zha, Qinqin; Baram, Tallie Z

2007-09-25

123

Seizures and Teens: Sorting Out Seizures--Part Two  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In adolescents, diagnosing seizures can be challenging and can lead to many pitfalls. Because seizures are episodic and unpredictable events, they usually do not occur in the doctor's office. Thus, a diagnosis of epilepsy is usually based on information presented by the person with seizures and their family. Together with results of diagnostic…

Devinsky, Orrin

2006-01-01

124

Recognizing Seizures and First Aid  

MedlinePLUS

... If confusion persists, get a medical evaluation. Warning Signals Most seizures, even in elderly people with other ... more than one hour associated with seizures may signal that something is seriously wrong. If an older ...

125

Teaching about Search and Seizure.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents a six-step model to help teachers develop curriculum related to the Fourth Amendment (search and seizure). The model focuses on determining values and attitudes, defining valid and unreasonable search and seizure, recognizing a valid warrant, and using film to teach about search and seizure. Journal available from the American Bar…

Kelly, Cynthia A.

1978-01-01

126

Adaptive Epileptic Seizure Prediction System  

Microsoft Academic Search

Abstract—Current epileptic seizure “prediction” algorithms are generally based on the knowledge of seizure occurring time and analyze the electroencephalogram,(EEG) recordings retro- spectively. It is then obvious that, although these analyses provide evidence of brain activity changes prior to epileptic seizures, they cannot be applied to develop implantable devices for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. In this paper, we describe an adaptive

Leon D. Iasemidis; Deng-Shan Shiau; Wanpracha Chaovalitwongse; J. Chris Sackellares; Panos M. Pardalos; Jose C. Principe; Paul R. Carney; Awadhesh Prasad; Balaji Veeramani; Konstantinos Tsakalis

2003-01-01

127

Seizure Prediction: Methods  

PubMed Central

Epilepsy, one of the most common neurological diseases, affects over 50 million people worldwide. Epilepsy can have a broad spectrum of debilitating medical and social consequences. Although antiepileptic drugs have helped treat millions of patients, roughly a third of all patients have seizures that are refractory to pharmacological intervention. The evolution of our understanding of this dynamic disease leads to new treatment possibilities. There is great interest in the development of devices that incorporate algorithms capable of detecting early onset of seizures or even predicting them hours before they occur. The lead time provided by these new technologies will allow for new types of interventional treatment. In the near future, seizures may be detected and aborted before physical manifestations begin. In this chapter we discuss the algorithms that make these devices possible and how they have been implemented to date. We also compare and contrast these measures, and review their individual strengths and weaknesses. Finally, we illustrate how these techniques can be combined in a closed-loop seizure prevention system.

Carney, Paul R.; Myers, Stephen; Geyer, James D.

2011-01-01

128

Cannabidiol exerts anti-convulsant effects in animal models of temporal lobe and partial seizures.  

PubMed

Cannabis sativa has been associated with contradictory effects upon seizure states despite its medicinal use by numerous people with epilepsy. We have recently shown that the phytocannabinoid cannabidiol (CBD) reduces seizure severity and lethality in the well-established in vivo model of pentylenetetrazole-induced generalised seizures, suggesting that earlier, small-scale clinical trials examining CBD effects in people with epilepsy warrant renewed attention. Here, we report the effects of pure CBD (1, 10 and 100mg/kg) in two other established rodent seizure models, the acute pilocarpine model of temporal lobe seizure and the penicillin model of partial seizure. Seizure activity was video recorded and scored offline using model-specific seizure severity scales. In the pilocarpine model CBD (all doses) significantly reduced the percentage of animals experiencing the most severe seizures. In the penicillin model, CBD (? 10 mg/kg) significantly decreased the percentage mortality as a result of seizures; CBD (all doses) also decreased the percentage of animals experiencing the most severe tonic-clonic seizures. These results extend the anti-convulsant profile of CBD; when combined with a reported absence of psychoactive effects, this evidence strongly supports CBD as a therapeutic candidate for a diverse range of human epilepsies. PMID:22520455

Jones, Nicholas A; Glyn, Sarah E; Akiyama, Satoshi; Hill, Thomas D M; Hill, Andrew J; Weston, Samantha E; Burnett, Matthew D A; Yamasaki, Yuki; Stephens, Gary J; Whalley, Benjamin J; Williams, Claire M

2012-04-19

129

The outlook for adults with epileptic seizure(s) associated with cerebral cavernous malformations or arteriovenous malformations.  

PubMed

Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are common: their asymptomatic prevalence on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is 1 in 625 and 1 in 2,000, respectively. The risk of epileptic seizure(s) for people with AVMs and CCMs affects their domestic, social, and professional lives, and may influence their decisions about treatment. This article summarizes the seizure risks for people with AVMs and CCMs, gleaned from published original articles indexed in OVID Medline and Embase before 1 January 2012. In the absence of prior intracranial hemorrhage and nonhemorrhagic focal neurologic deficit, a population-based study in Scotland, United Kingdom, found that the 5-year risks of first seizure were 8% for AVM and 4% for CCM; presentation with intracranial hemorrhage or focal neurologic deficit raised this risk for AVM (23%) but not for CCM (6%). Features associated with the occurrence of epileptic seizures for CCM are lesion multiplicity and cortical CCM location, whereas for AVM the most consistently reported associations are younger age, temporal location, cortical involvement, and nidus diameter >3 cm. In the absence of prior intracranial hemorrhage and nonhemorrhagic focal neurologic deficit, the 5-year risk of developing epilepsy following a first seizure is 58% for AVM and 94% for CCM, though there is no difference in the chance of achieving 2-year seizure freedom in this time frame (45% AVM vs. 47% CCM). Observational case series describe encouraging differences in seizure frequency before and after AVM and CCM treatment, but the shortage of studies demonstrating dramatic effects in comparison to concurrent control groups justifies the need for more controlled studies, ideally with randomized treatment allocation when the benefits of AVM or CCM treatment are uncertain. PMID:22946719

Al-Shahi Salman, Rustam

2012-09-01

130

Assessment of the Attention Impairment in Absence Epilepsy: Comparison of Visual and Auditory P300  

PubMed Central

We report an investigation of P300 measures of information processing in patients with generalized epilepsy of the absence type and those with complex partial epilepsy. Studies have demonstrated that absence patients perform more poorly than complex partial patients on behavioral tests of sustained attention (the Continuous Performance Test, or CPT). Duncan (1988) reported that P300 was significantly reduced in a group of absence patients as compared with healthy controls. The present investigation was undertaken to compare the attention deficit in absence patients to that in complex partial seizure patients. Thus, ERPs were recorded while participants with absence seizure disorder, complex partial seizure disorder, and healthy controls performed auditory and visual versions of the CPT. A significant reduction in the amplitude of P300 on the visual CPT was observed in both groups of seizure patients as compared to controls. In contrast, P300 on the auditory CPT was reduced only in the group with absence seizures. These ERP data support and amplify previous behavioral findings of the impaired capacity of absence patients to mobilize and sustain attentional resources. Auditory sustained attention seems to be more affected by the pathophysiology of absence epilepsy than visual attention. Two possible factors may be involved: (a) There are separate visual and auditory attention systems in the brain, and the latter is more vulnerable than the former (Duncan et al., 2005); and (b) Auditory processing depends on intact mechanisms in the brainstem, which are dysfunctional in patients with absence seizures.

Duncan, Connie C.; Mirsky, Allan F.; Lovelace, Christopher T.; Theodore, William H.

2009-01-01

131

High-Frequency Oscillations and Seizure Generation in Neocortical Epilepsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Neocortical seizures are often poorly localized, explosive and widespread at onset, making them poorly amenable to epilepsy surgery in the absence of associated focal brain lesions. We describe, for the first time in an unselected group of patients with neocortical epilepsy, the finding that high-frequency (60--100 Hz) epileptiform oscillations…

Worrell, Greg A.; Parish, Landi; Cranstoun, Stephen D.; Jonas, Rachel; Baltuch, Gordon; Litt, Brian

2004-01-01

132

High-Frequency Oscillations and Seizure Generation in Neocortical Epilepsy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Neocortical seizures are often poorly localized, explosive and widespread at onset, making them poorly amenable to epilepsy surgery in the absence of associated focal brain lesions. We describe, for the first time in an unselected group of patients with neocortical epilepsy, the finding that high-frequency (60--100 Hz) epileptiform oscillations…

Worrell, Greg A.; Parish, Landi; Cranstoun, Stephen D.; Jonas, Rachel; Baltuch, Gordon; Litt, Brian

2004-01-01

133

Clozapine-Related EEG Changes and Seizures: Dose and Plasma-Level Relationships  

PubMed Central

Clozapine is a widely used atypical antipsychotic with a unique effectiveness in treatment-resistant schizophrenia. An important adverse effect is seizures, which have been observed at all stages of clozapine treatment. Valproate has traditionally been considered the drug of choice for the prophylaxis of clozapine seizures, however it may not be the most suitable choice for all patients. There is disagreement as to the best point to prescribe valproate or a suitable antiepileptic: as seizure prophylaxis at a certain clozapine dose or level, or only as remedial treatment. In this review, we examine the relevant literature with an aim to evaluate the following relationships: clozapine dose and electroencephalogram (EEG) abnormalities, plasma levels and EEG abnormalities, dose and occurrence of seizures and plasma levels and occurrence of seizures. Weighted linear regression models were fitted to investigate these relationships. There was a strong relationship between clozapine dose and plasma level and occurrence of clozapine-induced EEG abnormalities. However, a statistically significant relationship between dose and occurrence of seizures was not found. A relationship between clozapine plasma level and occurrence of seizures was not established because of the scarcity of useful data although our review found three case reports which suggested that there is a very substantial risk of seizures with clozapine plasma levels exceeding 1300 ?g/l. Seizures are more common during the initiation phase of clozapine treatment, suggesting a slow titration to target plasma levels is desirable. An antiepileptic drug should be considered when the clozapine plasma level exceeds 500 ?g/l, if the EEG shows clear epileptiform discharges, if seizures, myoclonic jerks or speech difficulties occur and when there is concurrent use of epileptogenic medication. The antiepileptics of choice for the treatment and prophylaxis of clozapine-induced seizures are valproate (particularly where there is mood disturbance) and lamotrigine (where there is resistance to clozapine).

Varma, Seema; Bishara, Delia; Besag, Frank M. C.; Taylor, David

2011-01-01

134

Psychiatric predictors of pseudoepileptic seizures in patients with refractory seizures.  

PubMed

This study compared psychiatric factors and diagnoses in patients with pseudoepileptic seizures and genuine seizures. A semistructured interview identified psychiatric diagnosis and the presence of psychiatric factors associated with conversion phenomena. Twenty-five subjects with medically refractory seizures were interviewed and followed prospectively until a definitive diagnosis of pseudoepileptic or genuine seizures was made by neurologists using video-EEG telemetry. Four factors help to identify patients with pseudoepileptic seizures: a psychiatric diagnosis of either somatization disorder or personality disorder, the presence of a childhood loss, or the presence of a model for seizure symptoms. These findings can aid clinicians in identifying patients who would benefit from referral to a video-EEG telemetry diagnostic unit. PMID:7950348

Eisendrath, S J; Valan, M N

1994-01-01

135

Rett syndrome: characterization of seizures versus non-seizures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Epileptic seizures are reported to occur frequently in Rett syndrome (RS). We evaluated the hypothesis that many events classified as seizures in RS represent other paroxysmal, non-epileptic events; thus, the overall incidence of seizures in RS is overestimated. We conducted video\\/polygraphic\\/EEG monitoring sessions (8–120 h duration) in 82 RS females (ages 2–30 years). Fifty-five patients (67%) had a history of

Daniel G Glaze; Rebecca J Schultz; James D Frost

1998-01-01

136

Epileptic seizures in patients with acute catatonic syndrome.  

PubMed Central

Acute catatonic syndrome is a condition that can be caused by a variety of metabolic, neurological, psychiatric, and toxic conditions, including neuroleptic malignant syndrome. Although ictal catatonia as a manifestation of non-convulsive status epilepticus has been described, reference to the occurrence of seizures in patients with acute catatonic syndrome is anecdotal. Twenty nine patients with acute catatonic syndrome were reviewed to identify patients with seizures after the onset of acute catatonic syndrome. Patients were divided into four diagnostic groups: affective (15), schizophrenic (eight), toxic (two), and organic (four). Seizures occurred in four patients (13.8%): two patients with dystonic seizures had viral encephalitis and schizophrenic disorder respectively; one patient with complex partial seizures had viral encephalitis and one patient with absence status had neuroleptic malignant syndrome. The results indicate the value of EEG in detection of epileptic activity in patients with acute catatonic syndrome, both at onset and in the course of such disturbance, particularly to provide a differential diagnosis between pseudo-seizures and neuroleptic-induced acute dystonia.

Primavera, A; Fonti, A; Novello, P; Roccatagliata, G; Cocito, L

1994-01-01

137

Pedigree analysis in families with febrile seizures  

SciTech Connect

Febrile seizures are the most common form of seizures, occurring in an estimated 2-5% of North American children. We carried out a systematic pedigree study of febrile seizure probands. Forty of 52 probands (77%) in a referral population selected for increased severity had more than one case per family: one family had 10 cases, one family had 7, 3 families had 6, 2 had 5, 3 had 4, 13 had 3, and 17 had 2 cases. Mode of inheritance in the multicase families best fit the hypothesis of autosomal dominance with reduced penetrance. Polygenic inheritance could not be excluded for some of the smaller families. There was no support for X-linked or mitochondrial inheritance. Penetrance was calculated to be 0.64. Because the cases were selected for increased severity, this represents a useful estimate of the upper limit of penetrance and is in agreement with twin studies. Simulated lod scores showed adequate power for a linkage study in the absence of heterogeneity. Individual families had simulated average lod scores as high as 2.1. However, with potential heterogeneity, assuming only 70% of families share the same disease locus, average lod scores were marginal, and a high density map of marker loci and additional families would be required to document linkage. 41 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Johnson, W.G.; Kugler, S.L.; Stenroos, E.S.; Meulener, M.C. [Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Piscataway, NJ (United States)] [and others

1996-02-02

138

[Simple febrile seizure, complex seizure, generalized epilepsy with febrile seizure plus, FIRES and new syndromes].  

PubMed

Febrile seizures are the most common seizures in childhood. They have been observed in 2-5% of children before the age of 5, but in some populations this figure may increase to 15%. It is a common cause of pediatric hospital admissions and cause of anxiety for parents. Febrile seizures could be the first manifestation of epilepsy. About 13% of epileptic patients have a history of febrile seizure, and 30% have had recurrent febrile seizures. Their phenotypic characteristics allow, in the majority of cases, a classification of the seizure, an elaboration of a prognosis and to assume a specific therapeutic attitude. It is possible to describe a spectrum according to their severity, from the benign simple seizure to the more complex, febrile seizure plus, Dravet'syndrome, and FIRES. During the past decade, molecular genetic studies have contributed to the identification of genetic factors involved in febrile seizure and related disorders, making the necessity of a careful follow up of these patients in order to detect risk factors earlier. We have reviewed the medical literature to update current knowledge of febrile seizures, their prognosis and their relation to new epileptic syndromes. PMID:24072053

Moreno de Flagge, Noris

2013-01-01

139

The new patient with a first seizure  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND First seizures are common, with one in 20 people suffering a seizure at some time in their life. OBJECTIVE This article aims to outline the assessment of patients with a first seizure, including making an accurate diagnosis of both seizure type and an epilepsy syndrome, if present. DISCUSSION Seizures are classified into generalised and partial (arising from a focal

Mark King

140

Seizure precipitants in children with intractable epilepsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To investigate the seizure precipitants in children with intractable epilepsy, and to determine any distinctive clinical features contributing to seizures in these patients. Methods: A questionnaire and seizure diary prepared by the parents of the patients. Demographic and seizure data were reviewed. Results: Of 120 patients with intractable epilepsy, 74 (62%) had one (n=43), two (n=23), or three seizure

Peng-Cheng Fang; Yung-Jung Chen; Inn-Chi Lee

2008-01-01

141

Seizures in Organ Transplant Recipients  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Seizures are a nonspecific neurological manifestation of cerebral dysfunction and not indicative of any particular disease\\u000a processes or pathology. As such, the evaluation and treatment of seizures in transplant patients generally follow the same\\u000a clinical approach as for other patients. A seizure in a transplant patient is commonly unanticipated and entirely unexplained.\\u000a The effects can be substantial with aspiration, loss

Tarek Zakaria; Eelco F. M. Wijdicks; Greg A. Worrell

142

Hypersexuality and limbic system seizures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hypersexual behavior was induced in adult male cats by repeatedly evoked limbic system seizures. Accentuation of Dopaminergic\\u000a activity with drugs was used to facilitate development of the seizure induced hypersexuality. Hypersexuality consisted of\\u000a biting knap of neck, mounting, thrusting and coital intromission. The gradual development and eventual disappearance of hypersexuality\\u000a was correlated with the progressive prolongation of the seizures in

O. J. Andy

1977-01-01

143

Symptoms of atypical depression.  

PubMed

Studies examining the demographic and clinical features of depressed patients who meet criteria for the atypical features subtype have often yielded conflicting results. The present study sought to evaluate the demographic and clinical correlates associated with each of the five symptoms (mood reactivity, hypersomnia, hyperphagia, leaden paralysis and rejection sensitivity) that constitute the DSM-IV criteria set of atypical depression. Symptom prevalence rates were determined for 661 psychiatric outpatients diagnosed with a major depressive disorder, and were analyzed as a function of age, sex, severity, and episode duration. We found that: (1) younger age was positively associated with hypersomnia and negatively associated with leaden paralysis, while middle age was positively associated with both hyperphagia and rejection sensitivity; (2) female sex was associated with all of the atypical symptoms except rejection sensitivity; (3) a greater severity of illness was positively associated with leaden paralysis and rejection sensitivity, and negatively associated with mood reactivity; and (4) a duration of illness of greater than 3 months was positively associated with hyperphagia, leaden paralysis, and rejection sensitivity. Thus, the five atypical features do not appear to be associated with the same clinical profiles. PMID:11711170

Posternak, M A; Zimmerman, M

2001-11-01

144

Seizure Prediction and its Applications  

PubMed Central

Epilepsy is characterized by intermittent, paroxysmal, hypersynchronous electrical activity, that may remain localized and/or spread and severely disrupt the brain’s normal multi-task and multi-processing function. Epileptic seizures are the hallmarks of such activity and had been considered unpredictable. It is only recently that research on the dynamics of seizure generation by analysis of the brain’s electrographic activity (EEG) has shed ample light on the predictability of seizures, and illuminated the way to automatic, prospective, long-term prediction of seizures. The ability to issue warnings in real time of impending seizures (e.g., tens of minutes prior to seizure occurrence in the case of focal epilepsy), may lead to novel diagnostic tools and treatments for epilepsy. Applications may range from a simple warning to the patient, in order to avert seizure-associated injuries, to intervention by automatic timely administration of an appropriate stimulus, for example of a chemical nature like an anti-epileptic drug (AED), electromagnetic nature like vagus nerve stimulation (VNS), deep brain stimulation (DBS), transcranial direct current (TDC) or transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), and/or of another nature (e.g., ultrasonic, cryogenic, biofeedback operant conditioning). It is thus expected that seizure prediction could readily become an integral part of the treatment of epilepsy through neuromodulation, especially in the new generation of closed-loop seizure control systems.

Iasemidis, Leon D.

2011-01-01

145

Fatal atypical reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome: a case report  

PubMed Central

Introduction Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome – a reversible subacute global encephalopathy clinically presenting with headache, altered mental status, visual symptoms such as hemianopsia or cortical blindness, motor symptoms, and focal or generalized seizures – is characterized by a subcortical vasogenic edema symmetrically affecting posterior brain regions. Complete reversibility of both clinical signs and magnetic resonance imaging lesions is regarded as a defining feature of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome is almost exclusively seen in the setting of a predisposing clinical condition, such as pre-eclampsia, systemic infections, sepsis and shock, certain autoimmune diseases, various malignancies and cytotoxic chemotherapy, transplantation and concomitant immunosuppression (especially with calcineurin inhibitors) as well as episodes of abrupt hypertension. We describe for the first time clinical, radiological and histological findings in a case of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome with an irreversible and fatal outcome occurring in the absence of any of the known predisposing clinical conditions except for a hypertensive episode. Case presentation A 58-year-old Caucasian woman presented with a two-week history of subacute and progressive occipital headache, blurred vision and imbalance of gait and with no evidence for raised arterial blood pressure during the two weeks previous to admission. Her past medical history was unremarkable except for controlled arterial hypertension. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated cortical and subcortical lesions with combined vasogenic and cytotoxic edema atypical for both venous congestion and arterial infarction. Routine laboratory and cerebrospinal fluid parameters were normal. The diagnosis of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome was established. Within hours after admission the patient showed a rapidly decreasing level of consciousness, extension and flexion synergisms, bilaterally extensor plantar responses and rapid cardiopulmonary decompensation requiring ventilatory and cardiocirculatory support. Follow-up cerebral imaging demonstrated widespread and confluent cytotoxic edematous lesions in different arterial territories, global cerebral swelling, and subsequent upper and lower brainstem herniation. Four days after admission, the patient was declared dead because of brain death. Conclusion This case demonstrates that fulminant and fatal reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome may occur spontaneously, that is, in the absence of any of the known predisposing systemic conditions.

2013-01-01

146

Circadian distribution of generalized tonic-clonic seizures associated with murine succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency, a disorder of GABA metabolism.  

PubMed

Human succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SSADH) deficiency is an autosomal recessive disorder of GABA metabolism associated with motor impairment and epileptic seizures. Similarly, mice with targeted deletion of the Aldh5a1 gene (Aldh5a1(-/-)) exhibit SSADH deficiency and seizures early in life. These seizures begin as absence seizures the second week of life, but evolve into generalized convulsive seizures that increase in severity and become lethal during the fourth postnatal week. The seizures are alleviated and survival is prolonged when the mutant animals are weaned onto a ketogenic diet (KD). The persistence of spontaneous, recurrent, generalized tonic-clonic seizures in KD-treated adult Aldh5a1(-/-) mice allowed us to quantify their daily (circadian) distribution using a novel behavioral method based on the detection of changes in movement velocity. Adult KD-treated Aldh5a1(-/-) mice exhibited a seizure phenotype characterized by fits of wild running clonus accompanied by jumping and bouncing. These hypermotor seizures were largely spontaneous and occurred daily in a nonrandom pattern. The seizure rhythm showed a peak shortly after dark phase onset (2008 hours) with near-24-hour periodicity. Age-matched wild-type littermates showed no evidence of abnormal motor behavior. These new data suggest that generalized tonic-clonic seizures in Aldh5a1(-/-) mice are more frequent during a specific time of day and will provide useful information to clinicians for the treatment of seizures associated with human SSADH deficiency. PMID:18514581

Stewart, Lee S; Nylen, Kirk J; Persinger, Michael A; Cortez, Miguel A; Gibson, K Michael; Snead, O Carter

2008-06-02

147

Pathology Case Study: Seizures  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a case study presented by the University of Pittsburgh Department of Pathology in which a 24-day-old baby is failing to thrive and experiencing seizures. Visitors are given the microscopic description, with images, the results of the postmortem examination, and are given the opportunity to diagnose the patient. This is an excellent resource for students in the health sciences to familiarize themselves with using patient history and laboratory results to diagnose disease. It is also a helpful site for educators to use to introduce or test student learning in pediatric pathology.

Lyons, Valerie; Dickman, Paul S.

2009-09-16

148

Seizures and Teens: The Practical Aspects of Managing Seizure Medications  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Medications are the primary treatment for epilepsy, yet many teens and their families have problems managing seizure medicines. Fear of side effects, difficulties remembering to take medicines and figuring out how to take them are common challenges. Unfortunately, not taking medicine as prescribed can lead to breakthrough seizures, which in turn…

Shafer, Patricia Osborne; Israel, Beth

2007-01-01

149

Seizures and Teens: Using Technology to Develop Seizure Preparedness  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Most people learn about seizures from their doctors, but others know only what they have seen on television. Unfortunately, visits to doctor's office aren't long enough to learn all that is needed, and often times, doctors and nurses aren't available to teach this information. Seizures are often represented inaccurately and too dramatically on…

Shafer, Patricia O.; Schachter, Steven C.

2007-01-01

150

Seizures and Teens: The Practical Aspects of Managing Seizure Medications  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Medications are the primary treatment for epilepsy, yet many teens and their families have problems managing seizure medicines. Fear of side effects, difficulties remembering to take medicines and figuring out how to take them are common challenges. Unfortunately, not taking medicine as prescribed can lead to breakthrough seizures, which in turn…

Shafer, Patricia Osborne; Israel, Beth

2007-01-01

151

Atypical presentation in Rasmussen encephalitis: delayed late-onset periodic epileptic spasms.  

PubMed

A five-and-a-half-year-old girl started experiencing progressive left hemiparesis at age two and a half years. At age five years and four months she started presenting clusters of asymmetric periodic epileptic spasms with no hypsarrhythmia. The ictal EEG showed periodic, constant and stereotyped complexes. Serial brain imaging revealed progressive atrophy of the right hemisphere with increased T2 signal on MRI. She underwent a right hemispherotomy, and histological examination showed signs of inflammation and features of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). She has been seizure-free for 16 months. This case is unique in the following aspects: the presence of typical Rasmussen encephalitis features of progressive unilateral brain involvement without seizures, a delay of almost three years prior to seizure onset; an atypical seizure type presentation with periodic epileptic spasms and the presence of FCD associated with inflammatory changes. [Published with video sequences]. PMID:21896424

Ferrari, Taíssa P F; Hamad, Ana P A; Caboclo, Luís Otávio S F; Centeno, Ricardo S; Zaninotto, Ana Luiza; Scattolin, Monica; Carrete Junior, Henrique; Lancellotti, Carmem L P; Yacubian, Elza Márcia T

2011-09-01

152

Hyperthermic seizure induces persistent alteration in excitability of the dentate gyrus in immature rats.  

PubMed

Febrile seizure (FS) is the most common type of seizure that occurs during early childhood. It has been proposed that atypical FS (prolonged, multiple, or lateralized) results in the development of recurrent complex partial seizures accompanied by Ammon's horn sclerosis or mesial temporal sclerosis, which is the most common of the intractable epilepsy. To elucidate the characteristics of epileptogenesis or acquired epilepsy following FS, we performed prospective long-term studies using hyperthermia-induced seizure model. Rat pups (postnatal 11 day old) were induced to hyperthermia (41-43 degrees C in core temperature) by exposure to a 175 W mercury vapor lamp. Six-nine weeks after hyperthermic seizure, the dentate gyrus showed impairments of paired-pulse inhibitions and excitability ratio. In addition, newly generated granule cells and synaptogenesis were observed in this region. Ten-twelve weeks after hyperthermic seizure, animals (approximately 68%) showed electroencephalographic seizure activity with increased VGLUT-1 immunoreactivity in the dentate gyrus. Parvalbumin immunoreactivity was markedly reduced in the hilus. These findings indicate that in this model the epileptogenic changes in the dentate gyrus may be based on the persistent alterations in excitability via neurogenesis, synaptogenesis, and impaired GABA(B) receptor-mediated inhibition. PMID:18495095

Kwak, Sung-Eun; Kim, Ji-Eun; Kim, Sung Chan; Kwon, Oh-Shin; Choi, Soo-Young; Kang, Tae-Cheon

2008-04-22

153

Seizures after Spontaneous Intracerebral Hemorrhage  

PubMed Central

Objective In patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), the risk factors for seizure and the effect of prophylactic anticonvulsants are not well known. This study aimed to determine the risk factor for seizures and the role for prophylactic anticonvulsants after spontaneous ICH. Methods Between 2005 and 2010, 263 consecutive patients with spontaneous ICH were retrospectively assessed with a mean follow-up of 19.5 months using medical records, updated clinical information and, when necessary, direct patient contact. The seizures were classified as early (within 1 week of ICH) or late (more than 1 week after ICH). The outcomes were measured with the Glasgow Outcome Scale at discharge and the modified Rankin Scale (mRS) at both 2 weeks and discharge. Results Twenty-two patients (8.4%; 9 patients with early seizures and 13 patients with late seizures) developed seizures after spontaneous ICH. Out of 263 patients, prophylactic anticonvulsants were administered in 216 patients. The prophylactic anticonvulsants were not associated with a reduced risk of early (p=0.094) or late seizures (p=0.326). Instead, the factors associated with early seizure were cortical involvement (p<0.001) and younger age (60 years or less) (p=0.046). The risk of late seizure was increased by cortical involvement (p<0.001) and communicating hydrocephalus (p=0.004). The prophylactic anticonvulsants were associated with a worse mRS at 2 weeks (p=0.024) and at last follow-up (p=0.034). Conclusion Cortical involvement may be a factor for provoked seizures. Although the incidence of early seizures tended to decrease in patients prescribed prophylactic anticonvulsants, no statistical difference was found.

Woo, Kwang-Moo; Cho, Keun-Tae

2012-01-01

154

Genetics Home Reference: Benign familial neonatal seizures  

MedlinePLUS

... OMIM Genetic disorder catalog Conditions > Benign familial neonatal seizures (often shortened to BFNS ) On this page: Description ... May 2011 What is BFNS? Benign familial neonatal seizures (BFNS) is a condition characterized by recurrent seizures ...

155

Lateralizing value of early head turning and ictal dystonia in temporal lobe seizures: a video-EEG study  

Microsoft Academic Search

To investigate early head turning, we retrospectively studied videotapes of 262 seizures from 82 patients who were seizure free after temporal lobectomy. Early head movements were arbitrarily classified into non-tonic turning, tonic turning, and absence of turning. Among the 222 seizures which showed early head turning, 168 (75.7%) had non-tonic turning and 54 (24.3%) had tonic turning. The direction of

Hsiang-Yu Yu; Chun-Hing Yiu; Der-Jen Yen; Chien Chen; Yuh-Cherng Guo; Shang-Yeong Kwan; Yung-Yang Lin; Yang-Hsin Shih

2001-01-01

156

Ameliorating effects of aripiprazole on cognitive functions and depressive-like behavior in a genetic rat model of absence epilepsy and mild-depression comorbidity.  

PubMed

Aripiprazole (APZ) is regarded as a first-line atypical antipsychotic used for the treatment of first and multiple episodes of schizophrenia to improve positive- and negative-symptoms. Its therapeutic indications were extended to acute manic and mixed episodes associated with bipolar disorder. In addition, APZ was approved as an adjunct therapy for major depressive disorder in 2007. Compared to other antipsychotic drugs, APZ has a unique pharmacological profile. It is a partial agonist at D? dopamine receptors and serotonin 5-HT(1A) and 5-HT? receptors, whereas it is an antagonist at serotonin 5-HT(2A) and 5-HT? receptors. Since epilepsy is often accompanied with neurological comorbidities such as depression, anxiety and cognitive deficits caused by both the disease and/or drug treatment, we wished to examine the effects of a sub-chronic treatment (>14 consecutive days) with APZ (0.3, 1 and 3 mg/kg; i.p.) on both absence seizures and WAG/Rij rat's behavior using different standard paradigms: Open field (OF) test, elevated plus maze (EPM) test, forced swimming (FS) test, sucrose consumption (SC) test and Morris water maze (MWM). WAG/Rij rats represent a validated genetic animal model of absence epilepsy with mild-depression comorbidity, also including other behavioral alterations. APZ treatment showed some anti-absence properties and regarding the behavioral comorbidity in this rat strain, we observed that APZ possesses clear antidepressant effects in the FS and SC tests also increasing memory/learning function in the Morris water maze test. In the two anxiety models used, APZ showed only minor effects. In conclusion, our results indicate that APZ might actually have a potential in treating absence seizures or as add-on therapy but more interestingly, these effect might be accompanied by positive modulatory actions on depression, anxiety and memory which might be also beneficial in other epileptic syndromes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Cognitive Enhancers'. PMID:22766393

Russo, Emilio; Citraro, Rita; Davoli, Alessandro; Gallelli, Luca; Di Paola, Eugenio Donato; De Sarro, Giovambattista

2012-07-02

157

Are there generalised spike waves and typical absences in benign rolandic epilepsy?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Generalised 3 Hz spike wave (SW) discharges with or without absences have been described in children with benign epilepsy with centrotemporal spikes (BECTS), leading to speculations about a continuum between childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) and BECTS. We thus decided to evaluate the prevalence of absence seizures (AS) and generalised 3 Hz SW in patients with BECTS. All patients with BECTS

Philippe Gelisse; Pierre Genton; Michelle Bureau; Charlotte Dravet; Renzo Guerrini; Danielle Viallat; Joseph Roger

1999-01-01

158

[Tramadol-induced epileptic seizures].  

PubMed

A previously non-epileptic 17-year-old patient presented with 2 generalized epileptic seizures, which occurred at 6 months of interval, following the oral intake of 200-250 mg of tramadol. Urine analysis showed only the product and its metabolites. Epileptic seizures induced by tramadol and high risk factors are described and discussed. PMID:14710027

Koussa, S; Rizk, T; Tohmé, A

2003-11-01

159

Vagal Stimulation for Intractable Seizures  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a At the present time, the conventional management of seizures includes a trial of multiple medications, followed by consideration\\u000a of surgical ablation of part of the brain. Since seizures are related to paroxysmal depolarization shifts, more specific therapies\\u000a are possible. These include the use of electrical stimulation to the brain.

Adrian Upton

160

Atypical Cogan's Syndrome  

PubMed Central

Background. Cogan's syndrome is a rare clinical entity whose etiopathology is still unknown, and the treatment strategies are not clearly defined. Case. A 23-year-old male presented with symptoms of headache, peripheral facial palsy, persistent right hearing loss and bilateral papillitis. Workup excluded all infectious, granulomatous, neoplastic, and immune causes. The diagnosis of atypical Cogan's syndrome was established, and the patient was treated with systemic corticosteroids and later on with cyclophosphamide and methotrexate. There were improvement of visual symptoms and stabilisation of left hearing. Conclusion. Cogan's syndrome is a very rare disease with no specific biological tests for the diagnosis. The diagnostic exams are mostly important to exclude other etiologies. The atypical ocular and audiovestibular manifestations make the diagnosis difficult, delaying the institution of appropriate therapy which may result in profound bilateral deafness.

Queiros, Joao; Maia, Sofia; Seca, Mariana; Friande, Antonio; Araujo, Maria; Meireles, Angelina

2013-01-01

161

Pregnancy and atypical antipsychotics.  

PubMed

Scientific research aiming at discovering new generations of effective medications is a common practice in medicine, and psychiatric research is no exception. Antipsychotics are used to treat chronic mental illnesses such as schizophrenia. The new generation of antipsychotics (atypicals) gradually reveal their advantages in comparison to the older generation of antipsychotics (conventional, typicals) and are increasingly applied to the everyday practice. Although there are no differences in the therapeutic effectiveness between the two groups mentioned, atypical antipsychotics have become the drugs of choice. A certain number of women in their reproductive age suffer from schizophrenia and other mental illnesses which demand antipsychotic treatment. Atypical antipsychotics have been available on the market since the mid 90's so the experience in the application of these medicaments in treating pregnant women is relatively modest. This study will present our own experience in the treatment of a pregnant woman suffering from schizophrenia, who was treated with ziprasidone for the duration of her pregnancy. The psychotic symptoms remained in remission throughout the whole pregnancy period, during labour and after the birth. The pregnancy course remained normal all through to the birth, which was carried out naturally and normally. A healthy baby was born within the term expected. PMID:19794358

Ruzi?, Klementina; Dadi?-Hero, Elizabeta; Knez, Rajna; Medved, Paola; Petri?, Daniela

2009-09-01

162

JAMA Patient Page: Seizures  

MedlinePLUS

... blue, and have trouble breathing. The person loses consciousness and afterward may be confused or sleepy. • Absence ( ... convulsions of the entire body and loss of consciousness. Other symptoms include briefly losing consciousness, followed by ...

163

Vaccines and febrile seizures.  

PubMed

Vaccine administration is the second leading cause of febrile seizures (FS). FS occurrence in children is a serious concern because it leads to public apprehension of vaccinations. This review discusses the clinical implications of FS, its potential link to vaccinations and its impact on official recommendations for vaccinations in children. Vaccines such as the pertussis antigen-containing vaccine, the measles-containing vaccine and the influenza vaccine have been linked to FS. However, FS events are very rare and are not usually associated with downstream complications or severe neurologic diseases. Considering their significant health benefits, vaccinations have not been restricted in the pediatric population. Nevertheless, vaccine-induced FS could be a problem, particularly in genetically predisposed children. Therefore, post-marketing surveillance studies are required to accurately assess the incidence of FS and identify individuals who are particularly susceptible to FS after vaccination. PMID:23984960

Principi, Nicola; Esposito, Susanna

2013-08-01

164

Recognition memory is impaired in children after prolonged febrile seizures  

PubMed Central

Children with a history of a prolonged febrile seizure show signs of acute hippocampal injury on magnetic resonance imaging. In addition, animal studies have shown that adult rats who suffered febrile seizures during development reveal memory impairments. Together, these lines of evidence suggest that memory impairments related to hippocampal injury may be evident in human children after prolonged febrile seizures. The current study addressed this question by investigating memory abilities in 26 children soon after a prolonged febrile seizure (median: 37.5 days) and compared their results to those of 37 normally developing children. Fifteen patients were reassessed at a mean of 12.5 months after their first assessment to determine the transiency of any observed effects. We used the visual paired comparison task to test memory abilities in our group, as this task does not depend on verbal abilities and also because successful performance on the task has been proven to depend on the presence of functional hippocampi. Our findings show that patients perform as well as controls in the absence of a delay between the learning phase and the memory test, suggesting that both groups are able to form representations of the presented stimulus. However, after a 5-min delay, patients’ recognition memory is not different from chance, and comparison of patients and controls points to an accelerated forgetting rate in the prolonged febrile seizure group. The patients’ performance was not related to the time elapsed from the acute event or the duration of the prolonged febrile seizure, suggesting that the observed effect is not a by-product of the seizure itself or a delayed effect of medication administered to terminate the seizure. By contrast, performance was related to hippocampal size; participants with the smallest mean hippocampal volumes revealed the biggest drop in performance from the immediate to the delayed paradigm. At follow-up, children were still showing deficiencies in recognizing a face after a 5-min delay. Similarly, this suggests that the observed memory impairments are not a transient effect of the prolonged febrile seizures. This is the first report of such impairments in humans, and it is clinically significant given the links between mesial temporal sclerosis and prolonged febrile seizures. The persistence of these impairments a year onwards signals the potential benefits of intervention in these children who run the risk of developing episodic memory deficits in later childhood.

Martinos, Marina M.; Yoong, Michael; Patil, Shekhar; Chin, Richard F. M.; Neville, Brian G.; de Haan, Michelle

2012-01-01

165

Bupropion seizure proportion among new-onset generalized seizures and drug related seizures presenting to an emergency department  

Microsoft Academic Search

Bupropion is a relatively new and popular medication with seizures as its major side effect. This drug can produce seizures with an overdose. The purpose of this investigation was to determine the relative importance of this medication as the etiology of new-onset seizures relative to other drugs and new-onset seizures in general. The study design was a retrospective case series.

Gene R Pesola; Jagannadha Avasarala

2002-01-01

166

Epileptogenesis provoked by prolonged experimental febrile seizures: mechanisms and biomarkers.  

PubMed

Whether long febrile seizures (FSs) can cause epilepsy in the absence of genetic or acquired predisposing factors is unclear. Having established causality between long FSs and limbic epilepsy in an animal model, we studied here if the duration of the inciting FSs influenced the probability of developing subsequent epilepsy and the severity of the spontaneous seizures. We evaluated if interictal epileptifom activity and/or elevation of hippocampal T2 signal on magnetic resonance image (MRI) provided predictive biomarkers for epileptogenesis, and if the inflammatory mediator interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta), an intrinsic element of FS generation, contributed also to subsequent epileptogenesis. We found that febrile status epilepticus, lasting an average of 64 min, increased the severity and duration of subsequent spontaneous seizures compared with FSs averaging 24 min. Interictal activity in rats sustaining febrile status epilepticus was also significantly longer and more robust, and correlated with the presence of hippocampal T2 changes in individual rats. Neither T2 changes nor interictal activity predicted epileptogenesis. Hippocampal levels of IL-1beta were significantly higher for >24 h after prolonged FSs. Chronically, IL-1beta levels were elevated only in rats developing spontaneous limbic seizures after febrile status epilepticus, consistent with a role for this inflammatory mediator in epileptogenesis. Establishing seizure duration as an important determinant in epileptogenesis and defining the predictive roles of interictal activity, MRI, and inflammatory processes are of paramount importance to the clinical understanding of the outcome of FSs, the most common neurological insult in infants and children. PMID:20519523

Dubé, Céline M; Ravizza, Teresa; Hamamura, Mark; Zha, Qinqin; Keebaugh, Andrew; Fok, Kimberly; Andres, Adrienne L; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Obenaus, Andre; Vezzani, Annamaria; Baram, Tallie Z

2010-06-01

167

Epileptogenesis provoked by prolonged experimental febrile seizures: mechanisms and biomarkers  

PubMed Central

Whether long febrile seizures (FS) can cause epilepsy in the absence of genetic or acquired predisposing factors is unclear. Having established causality between long FS and limbic epilepsy in an animal model, we studied here if the duration of the inciting FS influenced the probability of developing subsequent epilepsy and the severity of the spontaneous seizures. We evaluated if interictal epileptifom activity and/or elevation of hippocampal T2 signal on MRI provided predictive biomarkers for epileptogenesis, and if the inflammatory mediator interleukin-1? (IL-1?), an intrinsic element of FS generation, contributed also to subsequent epileptogenesis. We found that febrile status epilepticus, lasting an average of 64 minutes, increased the severity and duration of subsequent spontaneous seizures compared with FS averaging 24 minutes. Interictal activity in rats sustaining febrile status epilepticus was also significantly longer and more robust, and correlated with the presence of hippocampal T2 changes in individual rats. Neither T2 changes nor interictal activity predicted epileptogenesis. Hippocampal levels of IL-1? were significantly higher for over 24 hours after prolonged FS. Chronically, IL-1? levels were elevated only in rats developing spontaneous limbic seizures after febrile status epilepticus, consistent with a role for this inflammatory mediator in epileptogenesis. Establishing seizure duration as an important determinant in epileptogenesis, and defining the predictive roles of interictal activity, MRI, and inflammatory processes are of paramount importance to the clinical understanding of the outcome of FS, the most common neurological insult in infants and children.

Dube, Celine M.; Ravizza, Teresa; Hamamura, Mark; Zha, Qinqin; Keebaugh, Andrew; Fok, Kimberly; Andres, Adrienne M.; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Obenaus, Andre; Vezzani, Annamaria; Baram, Tallie Z.

2010-01-01

168

Antidepressant overdose-induced seizures.  

PubMed

Treating patients with psychiatric problems can present numerous challenges for clinicians. The deliberate self-ingestion of antidepressants is one such challenge frequently encountered in hospitals throughout the United States. This review focuses on 1) the classes of antidepressants, their pharmacologic properties, and some of the proposed mechanism(s) for antidepressant overdose-induced seizures; 2) the evidence for seizures caused by antidepressants in overdose; 3) management strategies for patients who have intentionally or unintentionally overdosed on an antidepressant, or who have experienced an antidepressant overdose-induced seizure. PMID:23688690

Judge, Bryan S; Rentmeester, Landen L

2013-04-11

169

Nonlinear analysis of EEG for epileptic seizures.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

We apply chaotic time series analysis (CTSA) to human electroencephalogram (EEG) data. Three epoches were examined: epileptic seizure, non-seizure, and transition from non-seizure to seizure. The CTSA tools were applied to four forms of these data: raw EE...

L. M. Hively N. E. Clapp C. S. Daw W. F. Lawkins M. L. Eisenstadt

1995-01-01

170

Seizures in Infants and Young Children.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reviews the most frequent causes of seizure disorders in young children and the classification of different seizure types. It discusses current therapies, including alternatives to medication. Emergency response to seizures is covered a well as non-epileptic episodes that may resemble seizures. Epilepsy's potential impact on the…

McBrien, Dianne M.; Bonthius, Daniel J.

2000-01-01

171

Seizure with single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation in a 35-year-old otherwise-healthy patient with bipolar disorder.  

PubMed

This case report describes a patient who developed a seizure with single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation during motor threshold estimation. The patient had no history of seizures in the past and no gross neurologic deficits. The only possible seizure-provoking factors were modest doses of lithium and chlorpromazine, which the patient was on, and family history of seizure in a brother. This report aims to highlight the fact that single-pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation may provoke a seizure even in the absence of gross neurologic abnormality. PMID:16127313

Tharayil, Biju Sunny; Gangadhar, B N; Thirthalli, Jagadisha; Anand, L

2005-09-01

172

Semiological seizure classification: before and after video-EEG monitoring of seizures.  

PubMed

The study objective was to assess the applicability and reliability of the semiological seizure classification in children with epilepsy in outpatient clinics. Ninety patients (age range, 2-16 years) who experienced clinical seizures during prolonged video-electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring were evaluated. Semiological seizure classification was performed, first based on history obtained from parents of the patient during outpatient follow-up visits and then based on video EEG-monitoring. Kappa statistics (kappa) were used to evaluate the consistency of the two rounds of semiological seizure classification. Classification based on history yielded the following distribution: simple motor seizures (66.3%), aura (28%), complex motor seizures (15.8%), special seizures (15.8%), dialeptic seizures (9.3%), and autonomic seizures (3.7%). Classification based on video EEG-monitoring yielded a different distribution: simple motor seizures (55.7%), complex motor seizures (26.9%), automotor seizures (26.9%), aura (23%), dialeptic seizures (22.1%), special seizures (9.6%), and autonomic seizures (1.9%). Negative myoclonic seizures (kappa = 1, P = 0.000) and hypermotor seizures (kappa = 0.85, P = 0.000) had excellent consistency; somatosensory aura (kappa = 0.26, P = 0.012) and automotor seizures (kappa = 0.28, P = 0.004) had the lowest consistency. The families or doctors often defined simple motor seizures (decrease of 10.6% from before to after monitoring, kappa = 0.44); the proportion of complex motor seizures changed rather from before to after monitoring (11.1%, kappa = 0.33). Generally, parents can describe seizures quite well. We suggest that semiological seizure classification is a reliable method applicable for everyday use during outpatient visits, especially if seizure semiology is evaluated individually for each component or if the semiological seizure classification is modified or refined for some seizure components (tonic, clonic, versive, conscious, automotor seizures). PMID:17437905

Hirfanoglu, Tugba; Serdaroglu, Ayse; Cansu, Ali; Bilir, Erhan; Gucuyener, Kivilcim

2007-04-01

173

Postnatal caffeine treatment affects differently two pentylenetetrazol seizure models in rats  

Microsoft Academic Search

Effects of repeated postnatal administration of caffeine (10 and 20mg\\/kg s.c. daily from P7 to P11) were studied in two models of epileptic seizures characterized by spike-and-wave EEG rhythm in 18- and 25-day-old rats. Rhythmic metrazol activity (RMA, model of human absences) was induced by low dose of pentylenetetrazol (PTZ, 20mg\\/kg or 40mg\\/kg, i.p.) and minimal clonic seizures (model of

Jana Tchekalarova; Hana Kubová; Pavel Mareš

2009-01-01

174

Febrile seizures — treatment and outcome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Assessment of treatment strategies in febrile seizures should be based on short- and long-term outcomes, with and without acute, intermittent, or chronic medical intervention, as well as short- and long-term side effects. Febrile seizures are a benign condition with a normal neurological, motor, intellectual, and cognitive long-term outcome and have a low risk of later epilepsy in most cases. Even

Finn Ursin Knudsen

1996-01-01

175

Teaching Video NeuroImages: Perioral myoclonia with absences in a 12-year-old boy.  

PubMed

A previously normal 12-year-old boy presented with 2 episodes of generalized tonic-clonic seizures in the past month. The parents also noticed brief episodes of twitching of the mouth for the last 2 years, which increased in frequency after treatment with oxcarbamazepine. Examination and neuroimaging were normal. The seizure semiology (video 1 on the Neurology® Web site at www.neurology.org) and EEG (figure) were suggestive of perioral myoclonia with absences. Brief episodes of absences (2-9 seconds) with perioral myoclonia, infrequent generalized tonic-clonic seizures, and frequent occurrence of absence status epilepticus should suggest the diagnosis.(1) The interictal EEG may reveal focal abnormalities that may lead to a misdiagnosis of a focal epilepsy. The seizures may be treatment-resistant and oxcarbamazepine must be avoided.(2.) PMID:24101753

Sharma, Suvasini; Jain, Puneet; Aneja, Satinder

2013-10-01

176

Testing atypical depression definitions.  

PubMed

The evidence supporting the DSM-IV definition of atypical depression (AD) is weak. This study aimed to test different definitions of AD. Major depressive disorder (MDD) patients (N = 254) and bipolar-II (BP-II) outpatients (N = 348) were interviewed consecutively, during major depressive episodes, with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. DSM-IV criteria for AD were followed. AD validators were female gender, young onset, BP-II, axis I comorbidity, bipolar family history. Frequency of DSM-IV AD was 43.0%. AD, versus non-AD, was significantly associated with all AD validators, apart from comorbidity when controlling for age and sex. Factor analysis of atypical symptoms found factor 1 including oversleeping, overeating and weight gain (leaden paralysis at trend correlation), and factor 2 including interpersonal sensitivity, mood reactivity, and leaden paralysis. Multiple logistic regression of factor 1 versus AD validators found significant associations with several validators (including bipolar family history), whereas factor 2 had no significant associations. Findings may support a new definition of AD based on the state-dependent features oversleeping and overeating (plus perhaps leaden paralysis) versus the current AD definition based on a combination of state and trait features. Pharmacological studies are required to support any new definition of AD, as the current concept of AD is based on different response to TCA antidepressants versus non-AD. PMID:16175877

Benazzi, Franco

2005-01-01

177

Assimilating Seizure Dynamics  

PubMed Central

Observability of a dynamical system requires an understanding of its state—the collective values of its variables. However, existing techniques are too limited to measure all but a small fraction of the physical variables and parameters of neuronal networks. We constructed models of the biophysical properties of neuronal membrane, synaptic, and microenvironment dynamics, and incorporated them into a model-based predictor-controller framework from modern control theory. We demonstrate that it is now possible to meaningfully estimate the dynamics of small neuronal networks using as few as a single measured variable. Specifically, we assimilate noisy membrane potential measurements from individual hippocampal neurons to reconstruct the dynamics of networks of these cells, their extracellular microenvironment, and the activities of different neuronal types during seizures. We use reconstruction to account for unmeasured parts of the neuronal system, relating micro-domain metabolic processes to cellular excitability, and validate the reconstruction of cellular dynamical interactions against actual measurements. Data assimilation, the fusing of measurement with computational models, has significant potential to improve the way we observe and understand brain dynamics.

Ullah, Ghanim; Schiff, Steven J.

2010-01-01

178

Atypical right atrial flutter patterns  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background—The purpose of our study was to define the incidence and mechanisms of atypical right atrial flutter. Methods and Results—A total of 28 (8%) of 372 consecutive patients with atrial flutter (AFL) had 36 episodes of sustained atypical right AFL. Among 24 (67%) of 36 episodes of lower loop reentry (LLR), 13 (54%) of 24 episodes had early breakthrough at

Yanfei Yang; Jie Cheng; Andy Bochoeyer

2001-01-01

179

Atypical depression: a comprehensive review.  

PubMed

Despite several decades of research, the characteristics distinguishing atypical depression from other depressive subtypes remain ambiguous. Multiple lines of evidence support the designation of atypical depression as a scientifically and clinically relevant subtype, including differences in hormonal responses, brain laterality, psychological profile and psychiatric co-morbidity and differential treatment response. The evolution of the diagnostic criteria for atypical depression has led to the designation of mood reactivity as the cardinal feature, and the research supporting this conclusion is reviewed. This paper also reviews the evidence for the drug treatment of atypical depression, with a particular focus on research related to the superior efficacy of monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) compared with tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs). Data relevant to the efficacy of newer antidepressants, including selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin-noradrenaline (norepinephrine) reuptake inhibitors, transdermal selegiline and other new agents for atypical depression, are discussed. In summary, the diagnostic reliability and validity of atypical depression still remain elusive and open to further evolution. Currently available findings suggest that atypical depression has preferential response to MAOIs over TCAs. More data are required to determine the efficacy of newer agents relative to MAOIs and TCAs, although limited studies have shown a non-inferior efficacy and better tolerability of newer agents such as SSRIs compared with those of MAOIs and TCAs. Finally, future directions for research include further refinement of the diagnostic criteria for atypical depression, and clarification of the role of newer antidepressants in the treatment of this subtype with evidence from randomized, controlled trials. PMID:19958040

Pae, Chi-Un; Tharwani, Haresh; Marks, David M; Masand, Prakash S; Patkar, Ashwin A

2009-12-01

180

Seizures in juvenile Huntington's disease: frequency and characterization in a multicenter cohort.  

PubMed

Little is known about the epilepsy that often occurs in the juvenile form of Huntington's disease (HD), but is absent from the adult-onset form. The primary aim of this study was to characterize the seizures in juvenile HD (JHD) subjects with regard to frequency, semiology, defining EEG characteristics, and response to antiepileptic agents. A multicenter, retrospective cohort was identified by database query and/or chart review. Data on age of HD onset, primary HD manifestations, number of CAG repeats, the presence or absence of seizures, seizure type(s), antiepileptic drugs used, subjects' response to antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), and EEG results were assembled, where available. Ninety subjects with genetically confirmed JHD were included. Seizures were present in 38% of subjects and were more likely to occur with younger ages of HD onset. Generalized tonic-clonic seizures were the most common seizure type, followed by tonic, myoclonic, and staring spells. Multiple seizure types commonly occurred within the same individual. Data on EEG findings and AED usage are presented. Seizure risk in JHD increases with younger age of HD onset. Our ability to draw firm conclusions about defining EEG characteristics and response to AEDs was limited by the retrospective nature of the study. Future prospective studies are required. PMID:23124580

Cloud, Leslie J; Rosenblatt, Adam; Margolis, Russel L; Ross, Christopher A; Pillai, Jagan A; Corey-Bloom, Jody; Tully, Hannah M; Bird, Thomas; Panegyres, Peter K; Nichter, Charles A; Higgins, Donald S; Helmers, Sandra L; Factor, Stewart A; Jones, Randi; Testa, Claudia M

2012-11-02

181

Atypical posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES): is peritoneal dialysis a risk factor?  

PubMed

A patient with diabetes mellitus who had recently been started on peritoneal dialysis presented with headaches, confusion, falling episodes, and multiple white matter abnormalities affecting the frontal, temporal, parietal, and occipital lobes on MRI of the brain. He developed stupor and frequent seizures despite control of hypertension with intravenous nicardipine. Diagnosis of atypical PRES and institution of successful empiric therapy was based on electronic searches (Google and MEDLINE) facilitated by verbal communication between and among the specialists involved in his care. PMID:23270102

Shure, David; Pusey, Frank O; Bryan, Charles S

2012-08-01

182

Massively multiplayer online role-playing game-induced seizures: a neglected health problem in Internet addiction.  

PubMed

As the Internet has become rapidly and widely integrated into society, Internet addiction has become a growing psychosocial problem. However, epileptic seizure, another out-of-the-ordinary health problem, is often neglected in this regard. Ten patients who experienced epileptic seizures while playing the newest genre of electronic games -- Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games (MMORPGs) -- were investigated. Patients were predominantly male young adults, and most of the events were generalized tonic-clonic seizures, myoclonic seizures, and absences. These patients should be categorized into idiopathic generalized epilepsies. Even though photosensitivity was an important factor, behavioral and higher mental activities also seemed to be significant seizure precipitants. Results demonstrated that MMORPG-induced seizures were not analogous to the ordinary video game-induced seizures. Significantly, an epileptic seizure warning did not always appear on the websites of MMORPGs and instructions for the software. While the prevalence of MMORPG-induced seizures remains unknown, it may exceed our expectations and impact our society. Not only for clinical neurologists but also for the primary physicians, educators, sociologists, and global online game publishers, there should be an awareness of this special form of reflex seizures in order to provide an appropriate health warning to MMORPG players. PMID:16901249

Chuang, Yao-Chung

2006-08-01

183

Epileptic seizures from abnormal networks: why some seizures defy predictability.  

PubMed

Seizure prediction has proven to be difficult in clinically realistic environments. Is it possible that fluctuations in cortical firing could influence the onset of seizures in an ictal zone? To test this, we have now used neural network simulations in a computational model of cortex having a total of 65,536 neurons with intercellular wiring patterned after histological data. A spatially distributed Poisson driven background input representing the activity of neighboring cortex affected 1% of the neurons. Gamma distributions were fit to the interbursting phase intervals, a non-parametric test for randomness was applied, and a dynamical systems analysis was performed to search for period-1 orbits in the intervals. The non-parametric analysis suggests that intervals are being drawn at random from their underlying joint distribution and the dynamical systems analysis is consistent with a nondeterministic dynamical interpretation of the generation of bursting phases. These results imply that in a region of cortex with abnormal connectivity analogous to a seizure focus, it is possible to initiate seizure activity with fluctuations of input from the surrounding cortical regions. These findings suggest one possibility for ictal generation from abnormal focal epileptic networks. This mechanism additionally could help explain the difficulty in predicting partial seizures in some patients. PMID:22169211

Anderson, William S; Azhar, Feraz; Kudela, Pawel; Bergey, Gregory K; Franaszczuk, Piotr J

2011-12-12

184

Seizures and Epilepsy in Alzheimer's Disease  

PubMed Central

Introduction Many studies have shown that patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) are at increased risk for developing seizures and epilepsy. However, reported prevalence and incidence of seizures and relationship of seizures to disease measures such as severity, outcome and progression vary widely between studies. Methods Literature review of the available clinical and epidemiological data on the topic of seizures in patients with AD. We review seizure rates and types, risk factors for seizures, electroencephalogram (EEG)studies, and treatment responses. Finally, we consider limitations and methodological issues. Results There is considerable variability in the reported prevalence and incidence of seizures in patients with AD - with reported lifetime prevalence rates of 1.5 - 64%. More recent, prospective, and larger studies in general report lower rates. Some, but not all, studies have noted increased seizure risk with increasing dementia severity or with younger age of AD onset. Generalized convulsive seizures are the most commonly reported type, but often historical information is the only basis used to determine seizure type and the manifestation of seizures may be difficult to distinguish from other behaviors common in demented patients. EEG has infrequently been performed and reported. Data on treatment of seizures in AD are extremely limited. Similarly, the relationship between seizures and cognitive impairment in AD is unclear. Conclusions The literature on seizures and epilepsy in AD, including diagnosis, risk factors, and response to treatment suffers from methodological limitations and gaps.

Friedman, Daniel; Honig, Lawrence S.; Scarmeas, Nikolaos

2013-01-01

185

[Martin Luther's seizure disorder].  

PubMed

Martin Luther's diseases are well documented, because he used to discuss them freely in his letters. There is also a wealth of evidence through reports by his friends. Most of his diseases were common and well known to the contemporary physicians, who accordingly interpreted them correctly: bladder stones, chronic constipation, hemorrhoids. Luther's death obviously was due to a coronary thrombosis. During the last 19 years of his life, in addition to these "natural diseases", Luther also suffered from recurring attacks of a peculiar symptomatology. Luther himself and his friends considered these seizures to be no "natural disease", but Satan punching his flesh, and he compared them to St. Paul's disease (2. Cor. 12). The first of these attacks occurred on July 6, 1527, when Luther was 43 years of age. It began with a roaring tinnitus in his left ear, which increased dramatically and seemed to occupy the left half of his head. Then a state of sickness and collapse followed, however, consciousness was retained throughout the whole period. After a night's rest all the symptoms had subsided, except the tinnitus, which, from that day on, continued for all the following years in varying intensity. Similar attacks with increase of the tinnitus and vertigo as the leading symptoms, seized Luther at irregular intervals and distressed him extremely. Former investigators of Luther's diseases interpreted these attacks as manifestations of a psychiatric disorder and a chronic inflammatory disease of the middle ear. The present detailed study reveals that it was a typical case of Menière's disease of the left ear manifesting itself more than 330 years before Menière's classical observation. PMID:2529669

Feldmann, H

1989-01-01

186

A typically atypical tenosynovitis.  

PubMed

A 68-year-old woman developed tenosynovitis of the right second digit without a history of injury or animal bites. Apart from high titer anti-nuclear antibodies, serological studies were unremarkable. Tuberculin test and interferon gamma release assay were both negative. Several immunosuppressive therapies led only to partial relief of symptoms. Of note, clinical symptoms worsened significantly after introduction of adalimumab therapy. Tenosynovectomy was performed revealing a granulomatous inflammatory process. Seven weeks later, Mycobacterium malmoense could be cultured from the surgical specimen. A four drug antibiotic regimen was started and immunosuppressive therapy discontinued resulting in complete clinical remission. Our case highlights non-tuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) tenosynovitis as an important differential diagnosis of atypical arthritis. A negative tuberculin skin test as well as negative Ziehl-Neelsen stain does not argue against NTM infection. In fact, mycobacterial culture for extended periods remains the gold standard for diagnosis. PMID:20582608

Sahinbegovic, Enijad; Arco, Gunther; Cavallaro, Alexander; Söder, Stephan; Schörner, Christoph; Schett, Georg; Harrer, Thomas; Zwerina, Jochen

2010-06-27

187

Bmi-1 Absence Causes Premature Brain Degeneration  

PubMed Central

Bmi-1, a polycomb transcriptional repressor, is implicated in cell cycle regulation and cell senescence. Its absence results in generalized astrogliosis and epilepsy during the postnatal development, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate the occurrence of oxidative stress in the brain of four-week-old Bmi-1 null mice. The mice showed various hallmarks of neurodegeneration including synaptic loss, axonal demyelination, reactive gliosis and brain mitochondrial damage. Moreover, astroglial glutamate transporters and glutamine synthetase decreased in the Bmi-1 null hippocampus, which might contribute to the sporadic epileptic-like seizures in these mice. These results indicate that Bmi-1 is required for maintaining endogenous antioxidant defenses in the brain, and its absence subsequently causes premature brain degeneration.

Cao, Guangliang; Gu, Minxia; Zhu, Min; Gao, Junying; Yin, Ying; Marshall, Charles; Xiao, Ming; Ding, Jiong; Miao, Dengshun

2012-01-01

188

A Smell That Causes Seizure  

PubMed Central

In mammals, odorants are detected by a large family of receptors that are each expressed in just a small subset of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). Here we describe a strain of transgenic mice engineered to express an octanal receptor in almost all OSNs. Remarkably, octanal triggered a striking and involuntary phenotype in these animals, with passive exposure regularly inducing seizures. Octanal exposure invariably resulted in widespread activation of OSNs but interestingly seizures only occurred in 30–40% of trials. We hypothesized that this reflects the need for the olfactory system to filter strong but slowly-changing backgrounds from salient signals. Therefore we used an olfactometer to control octanal delivery and demonstrated suppression of responses whenever this odorant is delivered slowly. By contrast, rapid exposure of the mice to octanal induced seizure in every trial. Our results expose new details of olfactory processing and provide a robust and non-invasive platform for studying epilepsy.

Nguyen, Minh Q.; Ryba, Nicholas J. P.

2012-01-01

189

A smell that causes seizure.  

PubMed

In mammals, odorants are detected by a large family of receptors that are each expressed in just a small subset of olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs). Here we describe a strain of transgenic mice engineered to express an octanal receptor in almost all OSNs. Remarkably, octanal triggered a striking and involuntary phenotype in these animals, with passive exposure regularly inducing seizures. Octanal exposure invariably resulted in widespread activation of OSNs but interestingly seizures only occurred in 30-40% of trials. We hypothesized that this reflects the need for the olfactory system to filter strong but slowly-changing backgrounds from salient signals. Therefore we used an olfactometer to control octanal delivery and demonstrated suppression of responses whenever this odorant is delivered slowly. By contrast, rapid exposure of the mice to octanal induced seizure in every trial. Our results expose new details of olfactory processing and provide a robust and non-invasive platform for studying epilepsy. PMID:22848650

Nguyen, Minh Q; Ryba, Nicholas J P

2012-07-27

190

Differential operator in seizure detection.  

PubMed

Differential operators can detect significant changes in signals. This has been utilized to enhance the contrast of the seizure signatures in depth EEG or ECoG. We have actually taken normalized exponential of absolute value of single or double derivative of epileptic ECoG. This in short we call differential filtering. Windowed variance operation has been performed to automatically detect seizure onset on differentially filtered signal. A novel method for determining the duration of seizure has also been proposed. Since all operations take only linear time, the whole method is extremely fast. Seven empirical parameters have been introduced whose patient specific thresholding brings down the rate of false detection to a bare minimum. Results of implementation of the methods on the ECoG data of four epileptic patients have been reported with an ROC curve analysis. High value of the area under the ROC curve indicates excellent detection performance. PMID:22104594

Majumdar, Kaushik

2011-11-20

191

SULFOLANE EFFECTS ON AUDIOGENIC, PENTYLENETETRAZOL AND AFTERDISCHARGE SEIZURE ACTIVITY  

EPA Science Inventory

Sulfolane dosages that alter seizure susceptibility were determined using audiogenic (AG), pentylenetrazol (PTZ) and hippocampal afterdischarge (AD) seizure models. The presence of AG seizures and potentiation of PTZ seizures were investigated in rats injected IP with 0, 200, 400...

192

19 CFR 162.21 - Responsibility and authority for seizures.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INSPECTION, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE Seizures § 162.21 Responsibility and authority for seizures. (a) Seizures by Customs...

2013-04-01

193

Seizure after overdose of tramadol.  

PubMed

Tramadol (Ultram) is a new analgesic agent with a dual mechanism of action that includes weak agonistic effects at the mu-opioid receptor as well as inhibition of neurotransmitter (serotonin, norepinephrine) re-uptake. Although it has proven to be a safe and effective agent for the control of pain, adverse effects can occur with its use. I report the occurrence of seizure activity after the inadvertent administration of 4 mg/kg of tramadol to a child. Previous reports of seizure activity after tramadol administration are reviewed and the treatment of this problem is discussed. PMID:9258310

Tobias, J D

1997-08-01

194

A Discriminative Approach to EEG Seizure Detection  

PubMed Central

Seizures are abnormal sudden discharges in the brain with signatures represented in electroencephalograms (EEG). The efficacy of the application of speech processing techniques to discriminate between seizure and non-seizure states in EEGs is reported. The approach accounts for the challenges of unbalanced datasets (seizure and non-seizure), while also showing a system capable of real-time seizure detection. The Minimum Classification Error (MCE) algorithm, which is a discriminative learning algorithm with wide-use in speech processing, is applied and compared with conventional classification techniques that have already been applied to the discrimination between seizure and non-seizure states in the literature. The system is evaluated on 22 pediatric patients multi-channel EEG recordings. Experimental results show that the application of speech processing techniques and MCE compare favorably with conventional classification techniques in terms of classification performance, while requiring less computational overhead. The results strongly suggests the possibility of deploying the designed system at the bedside.

Johnson, Ashley N.; Sow, Daby; Biem, Alain

2011-01-01

195

Types of Seizures Affecting Individuals with TSC  

MedlinePLUS

... below) is that there is no alteration in consciousness in individuals with Simple Partial seizures. They may ... on side to keep airway clear. Reassure when consciousness returns. Observe how long the seizure (tonic-clonic ...

196

Biotelemetry System for Epilepsy Seizure Control.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Biotelemetry System for Epilepsy Seizure Control Project developed and tested an automated telemetry system for use in an epileptic seizure prevention device that precisely controls localized brain temperature. This project was a result of a Departmen...

G. W. Bohnert L. Smith

2009-01-01

197

Febrile Seizures and Epilepsy: Possible Outcomes  

MedlinePLUS

... 79;e80-e82 Neurology Jacqueline A. French Febrile seizures: Possible outcomes This information is current as of ... 79;e80-e82 Neurology Jacqueline A. French Febrile seizures: Possible outcomes This information is current as of ...

198

Biological markers of atypical depression.  

PubMed

The atypical features subtype of major depressive disorder was introduced into DSM-IV largely on the basis of the preferential response shown by a subset of depressed patients to monoamine oxidase inhibitors. In the present report, studies evaluating the biological nature of atypical depression are reviewed to determine whether they support the existence of this subtype. Four lines of research are considered: studies involving hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity, cerebral laterality, neurochemical profiles, and sleep parameters. Taken together, the findings of these investigations do support the existence of the atypical features subtype. Furthermore, many of the features known to be associated with atypical depression, such as higher prevalence in women, higher prevalence of comorbid anxiety disorders, and younger age of onset, may be accounted for by the biological underpinnings of the disorder. PMID:12866736

Posternak, Michael A

199

Seizure-Induced Neuronal Injury: Vulnerability to Febrile Seizures in an Immature Rat Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Febrile seizures are the most common seizure type in young children. Whether they induce death of hippocampal and amyg- dala neurons and consequent limbic (temporal lobe) epilepsy has remained controversial, with conflicting data from prospec- tive and retrospective studies. Using an appropriate-age rat model of febrile seizures, we investigated the acute and chronic effects of hyperthermic seizures on neuronal integrity

Zsolt Toth; Xiao-Xin Yan; Suzie Haftoglou; Charles E. Ribak; Tallie Z. Baram

1998-01-01

200

Seizures and Epilepsy following Strokes: Recurrence Factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background and Purpose: Though there have been many reports on poststroke seizures, there is still much we do not know about them. Using a large cohort of stroke patients we analyzed the characteristics of the seizure(s) and the rate and factors involved in seizure recurrence. Methods: Out of the 3,205 patients admitted for a first-ever stroke to our department between

Sophie Berges; Thierry Moulin; Eric Berger; Laurent Tatu; Denis Sablot; Bruno Challier; Lucien Rumbach

2000-01-01

201

Survey of Washington Search and Seizure Law  

Microsoft Academic Search

This Survey is designed to assist lawyers and judges who must argue and resolve search and seizure issues in Washington State. The Survey summarizes the controlling state and federal cases on search and seizure law and uses as an additional reference W. LAFAVE, Search and Seizure: A Treatise on the Fourth Amendment (1978). Washington courts are likely to analyze future

Justice Robert F. Utter

1985-01-01

202

An Incredible Tool for Tracking Seizure Activity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Eric Schumacher knows all too well the trials and tribulations of tracking seizures and daily activities in the ongoing attempt to gain seizure control. Diagnosed with epilepsy in his teens, he is now bringing a new and innovative tool to the market that could help countless people with epilepsy gain better control over their seizures and thus…

Hollingsworth, Jan Carter

2007-01-01

203

First Aid for Non-Convulsive Seizures  

MedlinePLUS

Non-Convulsive Seizures You are here: Home About Epilepsy Non-Convulsive Seizures Email Print Twitter Facebook MySpace Delicous Stumble Digg More... First Aid for Non-Convulsive Seizures You don't have to do anything if ...

204

An Incredible Tool for Tracking Seizure Activity  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Eric Schumacher knows all too well the trials and tribulations of tracking seizures and daily activities in the ongoing attempt to gain seizure control. Diagnosed with epilepsy in his teens, he is now bringing a new and innovative tool to the market that could help countless people with epilepsy gain better control over their seizures and thus…

Hollingsworth, Jan Carter

2007-01-01

205

Vigabatrin in Partial Seizures in Children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Patients with partial seizures aged 1 week to 19 years (n = 175) were included in several prospective vigabatrin studies at the hospital Saint Vincent de Paul. A decrease in seizure frequency of over 50% was achieved in 70% of patients, with 30% becoming seizure free, and only 6% experiencing an increase. Tuberous sclerosis gave the best response (85%), tumors

Rima C. Nabbout; Catherine Chiron; John Mumford; Caroline Dumas; Olivier Dulac

1997-01-01

206

Characteristics and phenomenology of epileptic partial seizures in dogs: similarities with human seizure semiology.  

PubMed

Dogs with spontaneous occurring epilepsy with partial seizures express symptomatology resembling what is found in humans with partial epileptic seizures. Questionnaires on clinical signs from 70 dogs, with a confirmed diagnosis of epilepsy with partial seizures with or without secondary generalization, were reviewed in order to characterize and classify clinical signs of partial seizure activity in dogs and compare them to partial seizure phenomenology in humans. Signs of partial seizure activity were distributed into three categories: motor signs, autonomic signs and paroxysms of behavioral signs. Motor signs were described in 48 dogs (69%), autonomic signs in 16 dogs (23%) and paroxysms of behavioral signs in 56 dogs (80%). The majority of dogs expressed signs from more than one group. Sixty-one dogs (87%) had partial seizures with secondary generalization. Nine dogs (13%) had partial seizures without secondary generalization. The study shows a remarkable resemblance between the seizure phenomenology expressed in humans and canines with partial epileptic seizures. PMID:15451018

Berendt, M; Gredal, H; Alving, J

207

[Zolpidem dependence and withdrawal seizure].  

PubMed

Zolpidem is an imidazopiridine with hypnotic properties. Compared to benzodiazepines, zolpidem has a mechanism of action that is thought to reduce the risk of dependence or abuse. However, in the past 10 years, several cases of zolpidem abuse, dependence and withdrawal reactions have been described in the litterature. Here, we describe a case of dependence and withdrawal seizure. PMID:19777922

Pitchot, W; Ansseau, M

208

The fate of World War II veterans with posttraumatic seizures.  

PubMed

Of 244 men who, as the result of a brain wound sustained in World War II, had had one or more convulsive seizures, 101 have died. Except for men who succumbed in the first decade of complications of the wounding--infection, systemic or mental disease, status epilepticus, etc--the cause of death was similar to that of men of similar age in the general population. Of the men whose status is known, 74% have had no unconscious attacks in the past ten years or in the ten years before their death. The absence of seizures is not related to the continued ingestion of anticonvulsant medication. Approximately 25% of the men have had varying degrees of mental deterioration. The death rate of men with posttraumatic epilepsy is higher than that of normal men. Wounds of the right cerebral hemisphere seem to shorten the life span more than similar injuries of the left hemisphere. PMID:2491944

Walker, A E; Blumer, D

1989-01-01

209

Coping and sickness absence  

PubMed Central

Objectives The aim of this study is to examine the role of coping styles in sickness absence. In line with findings that contrast the reactive–passive focused strategies, problem-solving strategies are generally associated with positive results in terms of well-being and overall health outcomes; our hypothesis is that such strategies are positively related to a low frequency of sickness absence and with short lengths (total number of days absent) and durations (mean duration per spell). Methods Using a prospective design, employees’ (N = 3,628) responses on a self-report coping inventory are used to predict future registered sickness absence (i.e. frequency, length, duration, and median time before the onset of a new sick leave period). Results and conclusions In accordance with our hypothesis, and after adjustment for potential confounders, employees with an active problem-solving coping strategy are less likely to drop out because of sickness absence in terms of frequency, length (longer than 14 days), and duration (more than 7 days) of sickness absence. This positive effect is observed in the case of seeking social support only for the duration of sickness absence and in the case of palliative reaction only for the length and frequency of absence. In contrast, an avoidant coping style, representing a reactive–passive strategy, increases the likelihood of frequent absences significantly, as well as the length and duration of sickness absence. Expression of emotions, representing another reactive–passive strategy, has no effect on future sickness absenteeism. The median time before the onset of a new episode of absenteeism is significantly extended for active problem-solving and reduced for avoidance and for a palliative response. The results of the present study support the notion that problem-solving coping and reactive–passive strategies are inextricably connected to frequency, duration, length and onset of sickness absence. Especially, active problem-solving decreases the chance of future sickness absence.

Schaufeli, Wilmar B.; van Dijk, Frank J. H.; Blonk, Roland W. B.

2007-01-01

210

Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome  

PubMed Central

Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is defined by the triad of mechanical hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and renal impairment. Atypical HUS (aHUS) defines non Shiga-toxin-HUS and even if some authors include secondary aHUS due to Streptococcus pneumoniae or other causes, aHUS designates a primary disease due to a disorder in complement alternative pathway regulation. Atypical HUS represents 5 -10% of HUS in children, but the majority of HUS in adults. The incidence of complement-aHUS is not known precisely. However, more than 1000 aHUS patients investigated for complement abnormalities have been reported. Onset is from the neonatal period to the adult age. Most patients present with hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia and renal failure and 20% have extra renal manifestations. Two to 10% die and one third progress to end-stage renal failure at first episode. Half of patients have relapses. Mutations in the genes encoding complement regulatory proteins factor H, membrane cofactor protein (MCP), factor I or thrombomodulin have been demonstrated in 20-30%, 5-15%, 4-10% and 3-5% of patients respectively, and mutations in the genes of C3 convertase proteins, C3 and factor B, in 2-10% and 1-4%. In addition, 6-10% of patients have anti-factor H antibodies. Diagnosis of aHUS relies on 1) No associated disease 2) No criteria for Shigatoxin-HUS (stool culture and PCR for Shiga-toxins; serology for anti-lipopolysaccharides antibodies) 3) No criteria for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (serum ADAMTS 13 activity > 10%). Investigation of the complement system is required (C3, C4, factor H and factor I plasma concentration, MCP expression on leukocytes and anti-factor H antibodies; genetic screening to identify risk factors). The disease is familial in approximately 20% of pedigrees, with an autosomal recessive or dominant mode of transmission. As penetrance of the disease is 50%, genetic counseling is difficult. Plasmatherapy has been first line treatment until presently, without unquestionable demonstration of efficiency. There is a high risk of post-transplant recurrence, except in MCP-HUS. Case reports and two phase II trials show an impressive efficacy of the complement C5 blocker eculizumab, suggesting it will be the next standard of care. Except for patients treated by intensive plasmatherapy or eculizumab, the worst prognosis is in factor H-HUS, as mortality can reach 20% and 50% of survivors do not recover renal function. Half of factor I-HUS progress to end-stage renal failure. Conversely, most patients with MCP-HUS have preserved renal function. Anti-factor H antibodies-HUS has favourable outcome if treated early.

2011-01-01

211

Atypical Headbanging Presentation of Idiopathic Sleep Related Rhythmic Movement Disorder: Three Cases with Video-Polysomnographic Documentation  

PubMed Central

Study Objectives: To describe three cases of sleep related, idiopathic rhythmic movement disorder (RMD) with atypical headbanging, consisting of head punching and head slapping. Methods: Three consecutive patients (2 males [11 and 13 years old) and one female [22 years old]) presented with atypical headbanging of 6 years, 7 years, and 17 years duration. In 2 cases, typical rhythmic headbanging (with use of the head) shifted after 3-4 years to atypical headbanging, with frontal head punching that was quasi-rhythmic. In one case, atypical headbanging (head-slapping) was the initial and only RMD. There was no injury from the headbanging. Prenatal, perinatal, developmental, behavioral-psychological, medical-neurological, and family histories were negative. Clinical evaluations and nocturnal video-polysomnography with seizure montage were performed on all patients. Results: Atypical headbanging was documented in all 3 cases; episodes always emerged late in the sleep cycle: from N2 sleep in 11 episodes, from REM sleep in 4 episodes, and from N1 sleep in 1 episode. Epileptiform activity was not detected. Clonazepam therapy was substantially effective in 1 case but not effective in 2 cases. Conclusions: These 3 cases of idiopathic atypical headbanging expand the literature on this RMD variant, as to our knowledge only one previously documented case has been reported. Citation: Yeh SB; Schenck CH. Atypical headbanging presentation of idiopathic sleep related rhythmic movement disorder: three cases with video-polysomnographic documentation. J Clin Sleep Med 2012;8(4):403-411.

Yeh, Shih-Bin; Schenck, Carlos H.

2012-01-01

212

Localizing epileptic seizure onsets with Granger causality  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Accurate localization of the epileptic seizure onset zones (SOZs) is crucial for successful surgery, which usually depends on the information obtained from intracranial electroencephalography (IEEG) recordings. The visual criteria and univariate methods of analyzing IEEG recordings have not always produced clarity on the SOZs for resection and ultimate seizure freedom for patients. Here, to contribute to improving the localization of the SOZs and to understanding the mechanism of seizure propagation over the brain, we applied spectral interdependency methods to IEEG time series recorded from patients during seizures. We found that the high-frequency (>80 Hz) Granger causality (GC) occurs before the onset of any visible ictal activity and causal relationships involve the recording electrodes where clinically identifiable seizures later develop. These results suggest that high-frequency oscillatory network activities precede and underlie epileptic seizures, and that GC spectral measures derived from IEEG can assist in precise delineation of seizure onset times and SOZs.

Adhikari, Bhim M.; Epstein, Charles M.; Dhamala, Mukesh

2013-09-01

213

Emergence of a seizure phenotype in aged apolipoprotein epsilon 4 targeted replacement mice.  

PubMed

The apolipoprotein ?4 allele is the strongest genetic risk factor for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is associated with earlier age of onset. The incidence of spontaneous seizures has been reported to be increased in sporadic AD as well as in the early onset autosomal dominant forms of AD. We now report the emergence of a seizure phenotype in aged apolipoprotein E4 (apoE4) targeted replacement (TR) mice but not in age-matched apoE2 TR or apoE3 TR mice. Tonic-clonic seizures developed spontaneously after 5 months of age in apoE4 TR mice and are triggered by mild stress. Female mice had increased seizure penetrance compared to male mice, but had slightly reduced overall seizure severity. The majority of seizures were characterized by head and neck jerks, but 25% of aged apoE4 TR mice had more severe tonic-clonic seizures which occasionally progressed to tonic extension and death. Aged apoE4 TR mice progressed through pentylenetetrazol-induced seizure stages more rapidly than did apoE3 TR and apoE2 TR mice. Electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings revealed more frequent bursts of synchronous theta activity in the hippocampus of apoE4 TR mice than in apoE2 TR or apoE3 TR mice. Cortical EEG recordings also revealed sharp spikes and other abnormalities in apoE4 TR mice. Taken together, these findings demonstrate the emergence of an age-dependent seizure phenotype in old apoE4 TR mice in the absence of human amyloid-? peptide (A?) overexpression, suggesting increased central nervous system neural network excitability. PMID:22682924

Hunter, Jesse M; Cirrito, John R; Restivo, Jessica L; Kinley, Robert D; Sullivan, Patrick M; Holtzman, David M; Koger, Deanna; Delong, Cynthia; Lin, Suizhen; Zhao, Lingzhi; Liu, Feng; Bales, Kelly; Paul, Steven M

2012-06-05

214

Seizures during the management of high-grade gliomas: clinical relevance to disease progression.  

PubMed

This study was performed to evaluate the incidence of seizures with its implications on disease progression and the diagnostic value of post-ictal magnetic resonance images (MRI) during the management of high-grade gliomas (HGGs). A total of 406 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed HGGs were retrospectively reviewed. The incidence of seizures during the management was investigated. In patients who experienced a seizure, the causality between seizures and disease progression was assessed by pre-ictal, post-ictal (<1 month), and follow-up (<3 months) MRI. After a median follow-up of 17.4 months (range 0.1-88.3), seizures developed in 127 patients (31 %). Of the 127 patients, radiological progression at the post-ictal MRI was found in 83 patients (65 %) and the follow-up MRI confirmed progression in 79 patients (62 %). Four other patients (3 %) were shown to be progression-free. Among those without radiological progression at the post-ictal MRI, the follow-up MRI confirmed progression-free in 31 patients (24 %); however, 13 patients (10 %) revealed eventual progression. In the patients with a seizure, absence of preoperative seizures (p = 0.003), <95 % tumor resection (p = 0.001), and pre-ictal Karnofsky Performance Scale score ? 70 (p = 0.025) were significantly associated with disease progression. During the management of HGG, 31 % of patients experienced seizures; of these patients, 72 % harbored progressive disease. The post-ictal MRI is useful for detecting disease progression; however, there are pitfalls. Clinical settings should be considered together for diagnosing disease progression in patients with seizures. PMID:23459994

Kim, Young-Hoon; Park, Chul-Kee; Kim, Tae Min; Choi, Seung Hong; Kim, Yu Jung; Choi, Byung Se; Han, Jung Ho; Lee, Se-Hoon; Kim, Chae-Yong; Kim, In Ah; Heo, Dae Seog; Kim, Il Han; Kim, Dong Gyu; Jung, Hee-Won

2013-03-04

215

Atypical depression: a valid subtype?  

PubMed

The concept of atypical depression has evolved over the past several decades, yet remains inadequately defined. As currently defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR), the main criterion of atypical depression is the presence of mood reactivity in combination with at least 2 of 4 secondary criteria (hypersomnia, hyperphagia and weight gain, leaden paralysis, and oversensitivity to criticism and rejection). The focus on mood reactivity as the primary distinguishing criterion remains questionable among researchers who have been unable to verify the primacy of this symptom in relation to the other diagnostic criteria for atypical depression. A model challenging the DSM-IV-TR definition of atypical depression has been developed, redefining the disorder as a dimensional nonmelancholic syndrome in which individuals with a personality subtype of "interpersonal rejection sensitivity" have a tendency toward the onset of anxiety disorders and depression, thereby exhibiting a variety of dysregulated emotional and self-consolatory responses. This reformulated definition of atypical depression (in arguing for the primacy of a personality style or rejection sensitivity as against mood reactivity) may lead to a better understanding and recognition of the disorder and its symptoms as well as other "spectrum" disorders within the scope of major depression. PMID:17348763

Parker, Gordon B

2007-01-01

216

Vagus nerve stimulation for seizures.  

PubMed

It is agreed that 1% of the general population is afflicted with epilepsy and close to 30% of epilepsy patients are intractable to medications. In spite of a recent increase in the number of new medications that are available on the market, many patients continue to have seizures or their seizures are controlled at the expense of intolerable side effects. Resection epilepsy surgery is an alternative; however, not every intractable patient is a good candidate for this surgery. Additionally, it is only offered to a small fraction of these patients due to the lack of an adequate number of comprehensive epilepsy programs and financial support for such surgeries. Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a novel adjunctive therapy that has recently become commercially available for intractable epilepsy. It is indicated as an add-on treatment for seizures of partial onset with or without secondary generalization in patients 12 years of age or older. The VNS system is comprised of a battery generator that delivers regular intermittent electrical stimuli programmed via menu-driven software and an interrogating wand. The generator is implanted in the left upper chest and connected to the left cervical vagus nerve via a pair of semi-circular helical electrodes wound around the vagus nerve and wires tunneled under the skin. Surgery is normally completed within 2 h under general anesthesia and the patient can go home within a few hours postoperatively. Experiments in humans began in 1988 with two single-blind pilot studies that demonstrated the feasibility and safety of this unconventional therapy. Following these studies, two multicenter, active-control, parallel, double-blind protocols showed a statistically significant reduction in partial onset seizures with reasonable and well-tolerated side effects. Adverse events related to VNS included voice alteration and a tingling sensation in the throat during stimulation only and a decrease in intensity over several weeks. Coughing during stimulation occurred normally when therapy was initiated and shortness of breath occurred mainly during exertion. Long-term follow-up suggests that reduction in seizure frequency and intensity is maintained over time. VNS is a novel adjunctive anti-epilepsy therapy that offers patients a better-tolerated option than medications in general and that is less invasive and extensive than resection surgery. Its efficacy may compare to novel potent anti-epilepsy drugs; however, VNS does not replace resection epilepsy surgery in selected patients in whom chances of seizure-free results are high (70-90%). PMID:11036181

Uthman, B M

217

The early identification of anticonvulsant activity: role of the maximal electroshock and subcutaneous pentylenetetrazol seizure models  

Microsoft Academic Search

A number of widely different animal seizure models have been employed in the search for new and novel anticonvulsant drugs useful for the tratment of human epilepsy. At present, no single laboratory test will, in itself, establish the presence or absence of anticonvulsant activity or fully predict the clinical potential of a test substance. Of the many available animal models,

H. S. White; M. Johnson; H. H. Wolf; H. J. Kupferberg

1995-01-01

218

Atypical depression: a valid subtype?  

PubMed

The concept of atypical depression emerged in the 1950s to describe individuals who experienced unusual characteristics of depression and responded better to treatment with monoamine oxidase inhibitors than with tricyclic antidepressants. Over the next 50 years, research refined the criteria for atypical depression, which led to the establishment of the criteria outlined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition. These criteria, however, appear to be in need of revision. Newer research downplays the role of mood reactivity and instead emphasizes rejection sensitivity. Atypical depression appears to be a multiaxial condition that ranges across Axis I symptom states to Axis II personality styles, is a nonmelancholic spectrum disorder, and is associated with self-consolatory strategies that are homeostatic and symptomatic. PMID:17388702

Parker, Gordon B; Thase, Michael E

2007-03-01

219

Peroxisomal disorders with infantile seizures.  

PubMed

Peroxisomes are organelles responsible for multiple metabolic pathways including the biosynthesis of plasmalogens and the oxidation of branched-chain as well as very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs). Peroxisomal disorders (PDs) are heterogeneous groups of diseases and affect many organs with varying degrees of involvement. Even pathogenetically distinct PDs share some common symptoms. However, several PDs have uniquely characteristic clinical findings. The durations of survival in PDs are also variable. Infants with PDs are usually presented with developmental delay, visual and hearing impairment. Generalized hypotonia is present in severe cases. Epileptic seizures are also a common characteristic of patients with certain PDs. Nonetheless, the classification and evolution of epilepsy in PDs have not been elucidated in detail. Here, we review the relevant literatures and provide an overview of PDs with particular emphasis on the characteristics of seizures in infants. PMID:21397417

Liang, Jao-Shwann; Lu, Jyh-Feng

2011-03-11

220

Proneurotrophins, Seizures, and Neuronal Apoptosis  

PubMed Central

Neurons respond to numerous factors in their environment that influence their survival and function during development and in the mature brain. Among these factors, the neurotrophins have been shown to support neuronal survival and function, acting primarily through the Trk family of receptor tyrosine kinases. However, recent studies have established that the uncleaved neurotrophin precursors, the proneurotrophins, can be secreted and induce apoptosis via the p75 neurotrophin receptor, suggesting that the balance of secreted mature and proneurotrophins has a critical impact on neuronal survival or death. Epileptic seizures elicit increases in both proneurotrophin secretion and p75NTR expression, shifting the balance of these factors toward signaling cell death. This review will discuss the evidence that this ligand-receptor system plays an important role in neuronal loss following seizures.

Friedman, Wilma J.

2010-01-01

221

Enkephalin, PPE mRNA, and PTS-1 in alcohol withdrawal seizure-prone and -resistant mice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Inbred animal strains provide an opportunity to study genetic factors in alcoholism in the absence of environmental factors. Although the concentration of methionine enkephalin (Met-enkephalin) in whole brain has been implicated in the consumption of ethanol, it has not been studied in the brains of alcohol withdrawal seizure-prone (WSP) and withdrawal seizure-resistant (WSR) mice. We compared these concentrations with the

Scott R. Plotkin; William A. Banks; Abba J. Kastin

1998-01-01

222

Coping and sickness absence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives  The aim of this study is to examine the role of coping styles in sickness absence. In line with findings that contrast the\\u000a reactive–passive focused strategies, problem-solving strategies are generally associated with positive results in terms of\\u000a well-being and overall health outcomes; our hypothesis is that such strategies are positively related to a low frequency of\\u000a sickness absence and with

Willem van Rhenen; Wilmar B. Schaufeli; Frank J. H. van Dijk; Roland W. B. Blonk

2008-01-01

223

Atypical presentations of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis in two neurologically handicapped cases.  

PubMed

Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) is a neurodegenerative disorder caused by persistent measles infection. Here, we report two neurologically handicapped cases presenting with atypical features of SSPE. Patient 1 who had mild mental retardation manifested acute encephalopathy with partial seizures and hemiplegia, mimicking encephalitis. He showed a fulminant course without myoclonia or a periodic electroencephalogram complex. Although SSPE is usually associated with an increased diffusion pattern, diffusion-weighted imaging of our patient showed decreased diffusion in the right hippocampus. Patient 2 with infantile hemiparesis presented with secondary generalized seizures, followed by asymettrical myoclonias involving the side contralateral to the hemiparesis. A periodic electroencephalogram complex was absent on the previously damaged brain regions. Our findings show that preexisting neurological disorders may modify the clinical or electrophysiological findings of SSPE, leading to atypical presentations. SSPE should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute encephalopathy with lateralizing signs or unidentified seizures. Decreased diffusion resolution in diffusion-weighted-imaging may correlate with rapid clinical progression in SSPE. PMID:20135578

Demir, E; Ozcelik, A; Arhan, E; Serdaroglu, A; Gucuyener, K

2010-02-04

224

Mathematical modeling of encephalogram dynamics during epileptic seizure  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The problem of constructing a compact mathematical model representing various fragments of electroencephalograms (EEGs) during epileptic absence seizures is considered. Such a model would be useful for solving a number of practical tasks related to the clustering of time series, seeking for relationships between various leads, separating norm and pathology, etc. It is shown that an adequate model that takes into account the EEG structure can be constructed using nonuniform embedding. The dimensionality, degree of nonlinearity, and lags are selected based on an objective numerical criterion.

Sysoeva, M. V.; Sysoev, I. V.

2012-02-01

225

Reduction of Seizure Occurrence from Exposure to Auditory Stimulation in Individuals with Neurological Handicaps: A Randomized Controlled Trial  

PubMed Central

Background The purpose of this work was to determine in a clinical trial the efficacy of reducing or preventing seizures in patients with neurological handicaps through sustained cortical activation evoked by passive exposure to a specific auditory stimulus (particular music). The specific type of stimulation had been determined in previous studies to evoke anti-epileptiform/anti-seizure brain activity. Methods The study was conducted at the Thad E. Saleeby Center in Harstville, South Carolina, which is a permanent residence for individuals with heterogeneous neurological impairments, many with epilepsy. We investigated the ability to reduce or prevent seizures in subjects through cortical stimulation from sustained passive nightly exposure to a specific auditory stimulus (music) in a three-year randomized controlled study. In year 1, baseline seizure rates were established. In year 2, subjects were randomly assigned to treatment and control groups. Treatment group subjects were exposed during sleeping hours to specific music at regular intervals. Control subjects received no music exposure and were maintained on regular anti-seizure medication. In year 3, music treatment was terminated and seizure rates followed. We found a significant treatment effect (p?=?0.024) during the treatment phase persisting through the follow-up phase (p?=?0.002). Subjects exposed to treatment exhibited a significant 24% decrease in seizures during the treatment phase, and a 33% decrease persisting through the follow-up phase. Twenty-four percent of treatment subjects exhibited a complete absence of seizures during treatment. Conclusion/Significance Exposure to specific auditory stimuli (i.e. music) can significantly reduce seizures in subjects with a range of epilepsy and seizure types, in some cases achieving a complete cessation of seizures. These results are consistent with previous work showing reductions in epileptiform activity from particular music exposure and offers potential for achieving a non-invasive, non-pharmacologic treatment of epilepsy. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01459692

Bodner, Mark; Turner, Robert P.; Schwacke, John; Bowers, Christopher; Norment, Caroline

2012-01-01

226

Amygdala volumes in childhood absence epilepsy.  

PubMed

Abnormal amygdala volumes in pediatric mood-anxiety disorders and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), as well as high rates of these diagnoses in childhood absence epilepsy (CAE), prompted this study of amygdala volume in CAE. Twenty-six children with CAE and 23 normal children, aged 6.6-15.8 years, underwent MRI at 1.5 T. The tissue imaged with MRI was segmented, and amygdala volumes were obtained by manual tracings. There were no significant amygdala volume differences between the CAE and normal groups. Within the CAE group, however, the children with ADHD had significantly smaller amygdala volumes than the subjects with CAE with no psychopathology and those with mood/anxiety diagnoses. There was also a significant relationship between higher seizure frequency and greater amygdala asymmetry in the epilepsy group. Given ongoing development of the amygdala during late childhood and adolescence, despite the lack of significant group differences in amygdala volumes, the association of amygdala volume abnormalities with ADHD and seizure frequency implies a possible impact of the disorder on amygdala development and CAE-associated comorbidities, such as ADHD. PMID:19766541

Schreibman Cohen, Ayelet; Daley, Melita; Siddarth, Prabha; Levitt, Jennifer; Loesch, Ingrid K; Altshuler, Lori; Ly, Ronald; Shields, W Donald; Gurbani, Suresh; Caplan, Rochelle

2009-09-18

227

Family history of seizures in posttraumatic and alcohol-associated seizure disorders.  

PubMed

The potential role of genetic factors in the etiology of posttraumatic and alcohol-associated seizures was studied in 289 male patients with recurrent seizures and in 174 individuals who had never experienced a seizure. The incidence of seizures in first-degree relatives of probands was compared with that in relatives of unaffected individuals. Relatives of patients with alcohol-associated seizures had a rate ratio of 2.45 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.41-4.25], whereas no excess incidence was noted among relatives of posttraumatic epilepsy patients (rate ratio 1.20, 0.64-2.25 CI). Relatives of probands with both antecedents showed an intermediate rate ratio of 1.72 (0.92-3.20 CI). Among probands with alcohol-associated seizures, the rate ratio of 2.05 for patients with alcohol-related seizures (i.e., spontaneously occurring seizures in association with chronic alcohol abuse) was slightly higher than that of 1.85 for probands with alcohol withdrawal seizures. Trauma severity had a slight impact on the incidence of affected relatives; patients with severe head injuries had a rate ratio of 0.73 and probands with milder trauma had a rate ratio of 0.99. The results indicate a limited, if any, role of genetic predisposition in development of posttraumatic seizures. Alcohol-related seizures, however, showed familial aggregation of unprovoked seizures, suggesting an involvement of genetic factors in the origin of such seizures. PMID:8112257

Schaumann, B A; Annegers, J F; Johnson, S B; Moore, K J; Lubozynski, M F; Salinsky, M C

228

Atypical depression in children and adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Major depressive disorder (MDD) with atypical features has been described in adults. Furthermore, several studies have suggested\\u000a that tricyclic antidepressants were less effective for MDD with atypical features than for MDD without atypical features.\\u000a Thus, it may be important to determine whether atypical features are present in MDD. To date, only one study has examined\\u000a the diagnosis of depression with

Wynn Wynn Paing; Ronald A. Weller; Lauretta Brennan; Elizabeth B. Weller

2008-01-01

229

Malignant mesothelioma eight years after a diagnosis of atypical mesothelial hyperplasia.  

PubMed

The separation of mesothelial hyperplasia from early malignant mesothelioma remains one of the most difficult problems in histopathology. Inconclusive cases are termed "atypical mesothelial hyperplasia" and treated expectantly. A 49 year old male pipeline engineer was diagnosed as having atypical mesothelial hyperplasia in appendiceal serosa by the US-Canadian Mesothelioma Panel. Eight years later, he developed overtly malignant peritoneal and pleural mesothelioma. In hindsight, histological similarities between the diffuse malignant mesothelioma and the atypical mesothelial proliferation suggested malignancy from the outset. The most important of these features were the degree of mesothelial proliferation, micronodularity, architectural complexity, superficial invasion, uniform mild cytological atypia, and the absence of a clinical cause for a benign mesothelial proliferation. Ancillary investigations including immunohistochemistry were of no benefit in determining whether the atypical mesothelial hyperplasia was benign or malignant. Careful histological examination remains the mainstay of the diagnosis of early mesothelioma. PMID:10605410

Scurry, J; Duggan, M A

1999-07-01

230

Malignant mesothelioma eight years after a diagnosis of atypical mesothelial hyperplasia.  

PubMed Central

The separation of mesothelial hyperplasia from early malignant mesothelioma remains one of the most difficult problems in histopathology. Inconclusive cases are termed "atypical mesothelial hyperplasia" and treated expectantly. A 49 year old male pipeline engineer was diagnosed as having atypical mesothelial hyperplasia in appendiceal serosa by the US-Canadian Mesothelioma Panel. Eight years later, he developed overtly malignant peritoneal and pleural mesothelioma. In hindsight, histological similarities between the diffuse malignant mesothelioma and the atypical mesothelial proliferation suggested malignancy from the outset. The most important of these features were the degree of mesothelial proliferation, micronodularity, architectural complexity, superficial invasion, uniform mild cytological atypia, and the absence of a clinical cause for a benign mesothelial proliferation. Ancillary investigations including immunohistochemistry were of no benefit in determining whether the atypical mesothelial hyperplasia was benign or malignant. Careful histological examination remains the mainstay of the diagnosis of early mesothelioma. Images

Scurry, J; Duggan, M A

1999-01-01

231

Recognition and diagnosis of atypical depression.  

PubMed

The term atypical depression dates to the first wave of reports describing differential response to monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs). In contrast to more TCA-responsive depressions, patients with so-called atypical symptoms (e.g., hypersomnia, interpersonal sensitivity, leaden paralysis, increased appetite and/or weight, and phobic anxiety) were observed to be more responsive to MAOIs. After several decades of controversy and debate, the phrase "with atypical features" was added as an episode specifier in the DSM-IV in 1994. The 1-year prevalence of the defined atypical depression subtype is approximately 1% to 4%; around 15% to 29% of patients with major depressive disorder have atypical depression. Hardly "atypical" in contemporary contexts, atypical depression also is common in dysthymic bipolar II disorders and is notable for its early age at onset, more chronic course, and high rates of comorbidity with social phobia and panic disorder with agoraphobia. The requirement of preserved mood reactivity is arguably the most controversial of the DSM-IV criteria for atypical depression. When compared with melancholia, the neurobiological profiles of patients with atypical depression are relatively normal. The utility of the atypical depression subtype for differential therapeutics diminished substantially when the TCAs were supplanted as first-line antidepressants by the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Although introduction of safer MAOIs has fostered renewed interest in atypical depression, the validity and importance of the DSM-IV definition of atypical depression for the nosology of affective illness remains an open question. PMID:17640153

Thase, Michael E

2007-01-01

232

Epileptic seizure after treatment with thiocolchicoside  

PubMed Central

Background: Adverse drug reactions are important determinants of inpatient and outpatient morbidity. Thiocolchicoside is a semisynthetic derivate of naturally occurring colchicoside, which is largely used in humans as a centrally acting muscle relaxant. Epileptic seizures after thiocolchicoside intake have been reported in individuals with a history of epilepsy, acute brain injury or possible blood–brain barrier disruption. Case report: We report the case of a 66-year-old male patient presenting a sudden epileptic seizure temporally related to the intake of thiocolchicoside for muscle contracture and pain. The probably causes of the seizures were thiocolchicoside intake and cerebral microhemorrhages attributed to cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Discussion: Drugs only rarely cause focal seizures. Our case indicates that thiocolchicoside can precipitate seizures in predisposed patients, and that its use should be avoided in patients with brain diseases (and therefore lower seizure thresholds) or blood–brain barrier disruption. This information should be provided in the drug package insert.

Giavina-Bianchi, Pedro; Giavina-Bianchi, Mara; Tanno, Luciana Kase; Ensina, Luis Felipe Chiaverini; Motta, Antono Abilio; Kalil, Jorge

2009-01-01

233

[Atypical presentation of syringocystoadenoma papilliferum].  

PubMed

Syringocystoadenoma papilliferum is benign adnexal tumor derived from the sweat glands that is located in the head and neck in 70-80% of patients, and commonly presents as a papule or a solitary nodule. We report a case of syringocystoadenoma papilliferum with an atypical presentation given its location in the thigh and the peculiar histologic features, unrepresentative of this entity. PMID:17173827

Arias, D; Castellano, V M; Córdoba, S; Miñano, R; Martínez, D; Borbujo, J M

2006-12-01

234

Atypical Moles: How to Recognize  

MedlinePLUS

... to be poorly defined or have a fried-egg appearance. C – Color varies . An atypical nevus tends to have more than one visible color. D – Diameter . While melanomas are usually greater than 6 millimeters (size of a pencil eraser) in diameter when diagnosed, ...

235

Atypical Steatocystoma Multiplex with Calcification  

PubMed Central

A 60-year-old male reported to us with an atypical case of giant steatocystoma multiplex in the scrotum with calcification. There was no family history of similar lesions. Yellowish, creamy material was expressed from a nodule during punch biopsy. The diagnosis was based on clinical as well as histological findings. Successful surgical excision was done to cure the case without any complications.

Rahman, Muhammad Hasibur; Islam, Muhammad Saiful; Ansari, Nazma Parvin

2011-01-01

236

Post-ictal alpha activity in supplementary motor seizures mimics nonepileptic seizures.  

PubMed

Supplementary motor area seizures may present with bilateral tonic-clonic movements with no loss of consciousness and no postictal confusion, and patients may be erroneously thought to have psychogenic nonepileptic seizures. We describe the rapid emergence of alpha activity in the immediate postictal period in patients with supplementary motor area seizures as an additional confounding factor that may lead to the erroneous diagnosis of nonepileptic seizures in these patients. We present two cases of patients with intractable supplementary motor area seizures investigated with video/EEG monitoring. Their postictal EEG records revealed an immediate postictal recovery of alpha activity, mimicking the pattern seen with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures. Prolonged video/EEG monitoring is mandatory in establishing the diagnosis of supplementary motor area seizures and in distinguishing this condition from nonepileptic seizures. PMID:20537596

Adamolekun, Bola; Foreman, Adam

2010-07-01

237

Temporal lobe epilepsy after experimental prolonged febrile seizures: prospective analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Experimental prolonged febrile seizures (FS) lead to structural and molecular changes that promote hippocampal hyperexcitability and reduce seizure threshold to further convulsants. However, whether these seizures provoke later-onset epilepsy, as has been suspected in humans, has remained unclear. Pre- viously, intermittent EEGs with behavioural observations for motor seizures failed to demonstrate sponta- neous seizures in adult rats subjected to experimental

Celine Dube; Cristina Richichi; Roland A. Bender; Grace Chung; Brian Litt; Tallie Z. Baram

2006-01-01

238

Neonatal seizures with tonic clonic sequences and poor developmental outcome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seizures consisting of a tonic followed by a clonic phase have rarely been described in neonates and are not included in the current classifications of neonatal seizures. Our video archive of 105 neonates with seizures or suspected seizures revealed six neonates with such tonic clonic or tonic myoclonic sequences. Two of those neonates had pyridoxine dependent seizures. The other four

Bernhard Schmitt; Gabriele Wohlrab; Thomas Sander; Ortrud K. Steinlein; Beatrice Latal Hajnal

2005-01-01

239

Emergency Management of Seizures in the School Setting  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Effective seizure management in the school setting is a critical issue for students with seizures, as well as their parents, classmates, and school personnel. The unpredictable nature of seizures and the potential outcomes of experiencing a seizure in school are sources of anxiety for students with seizures. The ability to respond appropriately to…

O'Dell, Christine; O'Hara, Kathryn; Kiel, Sarah; McCullough, Kathleen

2007-01-01

240

SEIZURE PREDICTION: THE FOURTH INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP  

PubMed Central

The recently convened Fourth International Workshop on Seizure Prediction (IWSP4) brought together a diverse international group of investigators, from academia and industry, including epileptologists, neurosurgeons, neuroscientists, computer scientists, engineers, physicists, and mathematicians who are conducting interdisciplinary research on the prediction and control of seizures. IWSP4 allowed the presentation and discussion of results, an exchange of ideas, an assessment of the status of seizure prediction, control and related fields and the fostering of collaborative projects.

Zaveri, Hitten P.; Frei, Mark G.; Arthurs, Susan; Osorio, Ivan

2010-01-01

241

Assessment of febrile seizures in children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Febrile seizures are the most common form of childhood seizures, affecting 2–5% of all children and usually appearing between\\u000a 3 months and 5 years of age. Despite its predominantly benign nature, a febrile seizure (FS) is a terrifying experience for\\u000a most parents. The condition is perhaps one of the most prevalent causes of admittance to pediatric emergency wards worldwide.\\u000a FS, defined as

Arne Fetveit

2008-01-01

242

Extreme Hypertension, Eclampsia, and Critical Care Seizures  

Microsoft Academic Search

The association between seizures and blood pressure elevation remains a common medical emergency encountered in the setting\\u000a of an intensive care unit. Syndromes such as preeclampsia or eclampsia, hypertensive encephalopathy, and posterior leukoencephalopathy\\u000a commonly present with seizures. The primary treatment goal is to reduce the arterial blood pressure. In most cases, seizure\\u000a control is thus achieved, but unique medications, such

Errol Gordon; Michel T. Torbey

243

Seizure characteristics in Pallister-Killian syndrome.  

PubMed

Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) is a congenital disorder attributed to supernumerary isochromosome 12p mosaicism. Craniofacial dysmorphism, learning impairment and seizures are considered cardinal features. However, little is known regarding the seizure and epilepsy patterns in PKS. To better define the prevalence and spectrum of seizures in PKS, we studied 51 patients (39 male, 12 female; median age 4 years and 9 months; age range 7 months to 31 years) with confirmed 12p tetrasomy. Using a parent-based structured questionnaire, we collected data regarding seizure onset, frequency, timing, semiology, and medication therapy. Patients were recruited through our practice, at PKS Kids family events, and via the PKS Kids website. Epilepsy occurred in 27 (53%) with 23 (85%) of those with seizures having seizure onset prior to 3.5 years of age. Mean age at seizure onset was 2 years and 4 months. The most common seizure types were myoclonic (15/27, 56%), generalized convulsions (13/27, 48%), and clustered tonic spasms (similar to infantile spasms; 8/27, 30%). Thirteen of 27 patients with seizures (48%) had more than one seizure type with 26 out of 27 (96%) ever having taken antiepileptic medications. Nineteen of 27 (70%) continued to have seizures and 17/27 (63%) remained on antiepileptic medication. The most commonly used medications were: levetiracetam (10/27, 37%), valproic acid (10/27, 37%), and topiramate (9/27, 33%) with levetiracetam felt to be "most helpful" by parents (6/27, 22%). Further exploration of seizure timing, in-depth analysis of EEG recordings, and collection of MRI data to rule out confounding factors is warranted. PMID:23169688

Candee, Meghan S; Carey, John C; Krantz, Ian D; Filloux, Francis M

2012-11-20

244

Seizures and X-linked intellectual disability  

PubMed Central

Intellectual disability occurs as an isolated X-linked trait and as a component of recognizable X-linked syndromes in the company of somatic, metabolic, neuromuscular, or behavioral abnormalities. Seizures accompany intellectual disability in almost half of these X-linked disorders. The spectrum of seizures found in the X-linked intellectual disability syndromes is broad, varying in time of onset, type of seizure, and response to anticonvulsant therapy. The majority of the genes associated with XLID and seizures have now been identified.

Stevenson, Roger E.; Holden, Kenton R.; Rogers, R. Curtis; Schwartz, Charles E.

2012-01-01

245

Febrile seizures: mechanisms and relationship to epilepsy.  

PubMed

Studies of febrile seizures have been driven by two major enigmas: first, how these most common of human seizures are generated by fever has not been known. Second, epidemiological studies have linked prolonged febrile seizures with the development of temporal lobe epilepsy, yet whether long or recurrent febrile seizures cause temporal lobe epilepsy has remained unresolved. To investigate these questions, a model of prolonged (complex) febrile seizures was developed in immature rats and mice, permitting mechanistic examination of the potential causal relationships of fever and seizures, and of febrile seizures and limbic epilepsy. Although the model relied on hyperthermia, it was discovered that the hyperthermia-induced secretion of endogenous fever mediators including interleukin-1beta, which contributed to the generation of these 'febrile' seizures. In addition, prolonged experimental febrile seizures provoked epilepsy in a third of the animals. Investigations of the mechanisms of this epileptogenesis demonstrated that expression of specific ion (HCN) channels and of endocannabinoid signaling, may be involved. These may provide novel drug targets for intervention in the epileptogenic process. PMID:19232478

Dubé, Céline M; Brewster, Amy L; Baram, Tallie Z

2009-02-15

246

Cognitive dysfunction after experimental febrile seizures.  

PubMed

While the majority of children with febrile seizures have an excellent prognosis, a small percentage are later discovered to have cognitive impairment. Whether the febrile seizures produce the cognitive deficits or the febrile seizures are a marker or the result of underlying brain pathology is not clear from the clinical literature. We evaluated hippocampal and prefrontal cortex function in adult rats with a prior history of experimental febrile seizures as rat pups. All of the rat pups had MRI brain scans following the seizures. Rats subjected to experimental febrile seizures were found to have moderate deficits in working and reference memory and strategy shifting in the Morris water maze test. A possible basis for these hippocampal deficits involved abnormal firing rate and poor stability of hippocampal CA1 place cells, neurons involved in encoding and retrieval of spatial information. Additional derangements of interneuron firing in the CA1 hippocampal circuit suggested a complex network dysfunction in the rats. MRI T2 values in the hippocampus were significantly elevated in 50% of seizure-experiencing rats. Learning and memory functions of these T2-positive rats were significantly worse than those of T2-negative cohorts and of controls. We conclude that cognitive dysfunction involving the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex networks occur following experimental febrile seizures and that the MRI provides a potential biomarker for hippocampal deficits in a model of prolonged human febrile seizures. PMID:19000675

Dubé, Céline M; Zhou, Jun-Li; Hamamura, Mark; Zhao, Qian; Ring, Alex; Abrahams, Jennifer; McIntyre, Katherine; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Shatskih, Tatiana; Baram, Tallie Z; Holmes, Gregory L

2008-10-22

247

Flumazenil and seizures: analysis of 43 cases.  

PubMed

Flumazenil is a new drug indicated for the reversal of the sedative effects of benzodiazepines mediated at the benzodiazepine-receptor site. Worldwide sources to date have disclosed 43 cases of seizures related, at least temporally, to the intravenous administration of flumazenil. There was no apparent relationship between the dose of flumazenil and the development of seizures, which occurred at doses ranging from 0.2 to 10.0 mg. The seizures were not considered to be a toxic effect of flumazenil, but many of them probably were due to an unmasking of the anticonvulsant effect of the previously used benzodiazepine or to a severe benzodiazepine-withdrawal syndrome. Eighteen (42%) of the patients had ingested overdoses of cyclic antidepressants, which were considered responsible for the seizures. In addition to patients with concurrent cyclic antidepressant poisoning, high-risk populations include patients who have been treated with benzodiazepines for a seizure disorder or an acute convulsive episode, patients with concurrent major sedative-hypnotic drug withdrawal, patients who have recently been treated with repeated doses of parenteral benzodiazepines, and overdose patients with myoclonic jerking or seizure activity before flumazenil administration. To minimize the likelihood of a seizure, it is recommended that flumazenil not be administered to patients who have used benzodiazepines for the treatment of seizure disorders or to patients who have ingested drugs (eg, cyclic antidepressants, cocaine, lithium, methylxanthines, isoniazid, propoxyphene, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, buproprion HCl, and cyclosporine) that place them at risk for the development of seizures. PMID:1611650

Spivey, W H

248

Post-ictal alpha activity in supplementary motor seizures mimics nonepileptic seizures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Supplementary motor area seizures may present with bilateral tonic–clonic movements with no loss of consciousness and no postictal confusion, and patients may be erroneously thought to have psychogenic nonepileptic seizures. We describe the rapid emergence of alpha activity in the immediate postictal period in patients with supplementary motor area seizures as an additional confounding factor that may lead to the

Bola Adamolekun; Adam Foreman

2010-01-01

249

Persistently modified h-channels after complex febrile seizures convert the seizure-induced enhancement of inhibition to hyperexcitability  

Microsoft Academic Search

Febrile seizures are the most common type of developmental seizures, affecting up to 5% of children. Experimental complex febrile seizures involving the immature rat hippocampus led to a persistent lowering of seizure threshold despite an upregulation of inhibition. Here we provide a mechanistic resolution to this paradox by showing that, in the hippocampus of rats that had febrile seizures, the

Kang Chen; Ildiko Aradi; Niklas Thon; Mariam Eghbal-Ahmadi; Tallie Z. Baram; Ivan Soltesz

2001-01-01

250

Changes in intracellular protein expression in cortex, thalamus and hippocampus in a genetic rat model of absence epilepsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Epilepsy is a chronic disorder characterized by repeated seizures resulting from abnormal activation of neurons in the brain. Although mutations in genes related to Na+, K+, Ca2+ channels have been defined, few studies show intracellular protein changes. We have used proteomics to investigate the expression of soluble proteins in a genetic rat model of absence epilepsy “Genetic Absence Epilepsy Rats

Özkan Dan??; Serap Demir; Asl?han Günel; Rezzan Gülhan Aker; Medine Gülçebi; Filiz Onat; Ay?e Ogan

2011-01-01

251

[Lobstein's disease presenting with seizures].  

PubMed

Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a group of hereditary disorders most often due to an anomaly of collagen biosynthesis. Divers clinical manifestations are reported. Neurological manifestations are exceptional. A 40-year-old man with a history of multiple bone fractures was admitted for a generalized tonic-clonic seizure. There was no metabolic disorder, the patient however complained of bilateral shoulder pain. Standard radiography and shoulder MRI revealed bilateral humeral fractures. The electroencephalogram and the brain MRI showed no abnormalities. He was given valproate acid and eight months later was free of crises. Search for an etiological favored the diagnosis of Lobstein disease. PMID:17878811

Boughammoura-Bouatay, A; Chebel, S; Aissi, M; Koubaa, M; Frih-Ayed, M

2007-09-01

252

Chemical toxins that cause seizures.  

PubMed

Seizurogenic chemicals include a variety of toxic agents, including chemical warfare agents, toxic industrial chemicals, and natural toxins. Chemical weapons such as sarin and VX, and pesticides such as parathion and carbaryl cause hyperstimulation of cholinergic receptors and an increase in excitatory neurotransmission. Glutamatergic hyperstimulation can occur after exposure to excitatory amino acid toxins such as the marine toxin domoic acid. Other pesticides such as lindane and strychnine do not affect excitatory neurotransmission directly, but rather, they block the inhibitory regulation of neurotransmission by antagonism of inhibitory GABA and glycine synapses. In this paper, chemicals that cause seizures by a variety of molecular mechanisms and pathways are discussed. PMID:23085523

Jett, David A

2012-10-18

253

Atypical depression in children and adolescents.  

PubMed

Major depressive disorder (MDD) with atypical features has been described in adults. Furthermore, several studies have suggested that tricyclic antidepressants were less effective for MDD with atypical features than for MDD without atypical features. Thus, it may be important to determine whether atypical features are present in MDD. To date, only one study has examined the diagnosis of depression with atypical features in children and adolescents by using the DSM-IV criteria. Current knowledge suggests the DSM-IV criteria for depression with atypical features in children and adolescents may need to be reconsidered, as biological, hormonal, developmental, and psychological factors in this age group may be different from those of adults with atypical depression. PMID:18474203

Paing, Wynn Wynn; Weller, Ronald A; Brennan, Lauretta; Weller, Elizabeth B

2008-04-01

254

[Atypical Werner syndrome: Atypical progeroid syndrome: A case report].  

PubMed

Progeria is a premature ageing syndrome. Werner Syndrome (WS) is a type of progeria in the adult which includes bilateral juvenile cataracts and cutaneous sclerodermiform changes; it is caused by a mutation if the WRN gene which codes a helicase, a DNA repair enzyme. A case is presented of a patient, a 12 year old girl, with characteristics of WS but with no identifiable mutation in the WRN gene, therefore it was classified as atypical Werner Syndrome (AWS). PMID:20452840

Barrios Sanjuanelo, A; Muñoz Otero, C

2010-05-10

255

Anti-Seizure Medications: Relief from Nerve Pain  

MedlinePLUS

... be reprinted for personal, noncommercial use only. Anti-seizure medications: Relief from nerve pain By Mayo Clinic ... share your e-mail address Sign up Anti-seizure medications: Relief from nerve pain Anti-seizure drugs ...

256

50 CFR 12.5 - Seizure by other agencies.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Seizure by other agencies. 12.5 Section...AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS SEIZURE AND FORFEITURE PROCEDURES General Provisions § 12.5 Seizure by other agencies. Any...

2011-10-01

257

Seizure Anticipation Techniques: State of the Art and Future Requirements.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Recent research in seizure anticipation has shown that 'pre-seizure states' can he detected several minutes in advance from analysis of EEG time series. This time frame would allow development and testing of specific seizure prevention techniques. Thus, t...

K. Lehnertz

2001-01-01

258

50 CFR 12.5 - Seizure by other agencies.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Seizure by other agencies. 12.5 Section...AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS SEIZURE AND FORFEITURE PROCEDURES General Provisions § 12.5 Seizure by other agencies. Any...

2012-10-01

259

77 FR 25596 - Inspection Service Authority; Seizure and Forfeiture  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Part 233 Inspection Service Authority; Seizure and Forfeiture AGENCY: Postal Service...Service's rules and regulations regarding the seizure and forfeiture of property from four sections...governing practical issues regarding the seizure, custody, inventory, appraisal,...

2012-05-01

260

Lurasidone (latuda®): an atypical antipsychotic.  

PubMed

Lurasidone is a new atypical antipsychotic that has demonstrated positive effects on psychosis, mood, and cognition. This improved efficacy and safety profile for the treatment of schizophrenia. Its overall tolerability profile seems to be comparable to the other atypical antipsychotics. Perhaps its more potent blockade on the 5HT7 receptor will give it more of an advantage in treating the negative symptoms as well as improve cognitive and depressive symptoms associated with schizophrenia. Additionally, it does not appear to have any significant adverse impact on the metabolic profile, such as weight, glucose, or lipid metabolism. Lurasidone is also associated with good cardiovascular tolerability without widening of the QT interval. The use of this medication may be of particular interest in patients presenting with endocrine or cardiovascular abnormalities. The average price for a 30-day supply of lurasidone is $475.98. PMID:22545643

Nolan, Shambria F; Roman, Marian W

2012-05-01

261

Atypical measles: a diagnostic conundrum.  

PubMed

Atypical measles syndrome has been reported extensively in the pediatric medical literature. However, the clinical picture in the adult is similar to that of many other diseases, making the diagnosis elusive. The case reported here was unusually morbid. The patient, a young man, had been in excellent health until the onset of a perplexing syndrome. When seen by the author, he had been ill for 1 week with chills, pharyngitis, and vomiting; later, a nonpruritic, maculopapular rash developed. Symptoms progressed to pneumonitis and hepatitis. A rubeola titer was obtained and was found to be considerably elevated. Because of the high titer and the fact that the patient had been immunized against measles in early childhood, the diagnosis was atypical measles syndrome. Two theories are offered to explain the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:1938506

Nichols, K J

1991-07-01

262

Seizures after use and abuse of tramadol.  

PubMed

(Full text is available at http://www.manu.edu.mk/prilozi). Seizures have been reported with tramadol monotherapy in animal and human studies, both at recommended and high doses. After tramadol abuse or overdose, neurotoxicity is speculated to be related to the reuptake inhibition of serotonin and norepinephrine, rather than its opioid effects. THE AIM OF THIS STUDY is to show three unusual cases of seizures provoked by tramadol. Case reports: A 56 year-old female was hospitalized with intensive lumbosacral pain. Because the standard therapy with non steroid anti-inflammatory drugs and diazepam did not show enough pain release, Tramadol ampoules were applied. Fifteen minutes later generalized tonic clonic seizure was noticed. A 24 year-old female was admitted to the Toxicology Clinic, one hour after ingestion of 1000 mg Tramadol (20 pills of 50 mg) in a suicide attempt. Five hours later generalized tonic clonic seizure was noticed. A 27 year-old male was hospitalized for detoxification procedure with bup-renorphine. The patient was a more than four years heroin abuser, and in the last two years he mixed the heroin with high doses of tramadol. 16 hours later, after application of the first 2 mg of Buprenorphine, generalized tonic clonic seizure was noticed. Conclusion: Tramadol prescription, use and abuse are connected with the risk of developing seizures. The neurotoxicity of tramadol commonly manifests as seizures. Key words: tramadol, use/abuse, seizures. PMID:22983066

Bekjarovski, N; Chaparoska, D; Radulovikj-Bekjarovska, S

2012-07-01

263

Searches and Seizures in Public Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In "New Jersey v. T.L.O." the U.S. Supreme Court held that the prohibitions of the Fourth Amendment regarding unreasonable searches and seizures apply to student searches and seizures conducted by public school officials. However, the Court said the legality of a search should depend upon "reasonableness, under the circumstances" rather than…

Lincoln, Eugene A.

264

Search and Seizure in the Public Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This monograph attempts to provide clear understanding of the standards presented by the Supreme Court in "New Jersey v. T.L.O." relative to search and seizure in public schools, and suggests practical ways of applying search and seizure law to situations in the school setting. ("T.L.O." are the initials of the anonymous student.) After an…

Rossow, Lawrence F.

265

Substance P Causes Seizures in Neurocysticercosis  

PubMed Central

Neurocysticercosis (NCC), a helminth infection of the brain, is a major cause of seizures. The mediators responsible for seizures in NCC are unknown, and their management remains controversial. Substance P (SP) is a neuropeptide produced by neurons, endothelial cells and immunocytes. The current studies examined the hypothesis that SP mediates seizures in NCC. We demonstrated by immunostaining that 5 of 5 brain biopsies from NCC patients contained substance P (SP)-positive (+) cells adjacent to but not distant from degenerating worms; no SP+ cells were detected in uninfected brains. In a rodent model of NCC, seizures were induced after intrahippocampal injection of SP alone or after injection of extracts of cysticercosis granuloma obtained from infected wild type (WT), but not from infected SP precursor-deficient mice. Seizure activity correlated with SP levels within WT granuloma extracts and was prevented by intrahippocampal pre-injection of SP receptor antagonist. Furthermore, extracts of granulomas from WT mice caused seizures when injected into the hippocampus of WT mice, but not when injected into SP receptor (NK1R) deficient mice. These findings indicate that SP causes seizures in NCC, and, suggests that seizures in NCC in humans may be prevented and/or treated with SP-receptor antagonists.

Robinson, Prema; Garza, Armandina; Weinstock, Joel; Serpa, Jose A.; Goodman, Jerry Clay; Eckols, Kristian T.; Firozgary, Bahrom; Tweardy, David J.

2012-01-01

266

Seizure Disorders: A Review for School Psychologists.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recognizing possible seizure disorders, medication side-effects, behavioral and cognitive effects of seizures, and their treatments are important skills for school psychologists because they affect 500,000 United States school-aged children attending regular education. A knowledgeable school professional serves a critical role in integrating…

Sachs, Henry T.; Barrett, Rowland P.

1995-01-01

267

Epileptic seizures and malaria in Kenyan children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Between October 1990 and November 1991 data were collected on the frequency, causes, and nature of epileptic seizures in children admitted to the paediatric ward at Kilifi District Hospital, Kenya, from a defined study area. During this period, 1324 children were studied, of whom 15·8% had seizures as part of their illness. Malaria was by far the commonest cause of

C. M. Waruiru; C. R. J. C. Newton; D. Forster; L. New; P. Winstanley; I. Mwangi; V. Marsh; M. Winstanley; R. W. Snow; K. Marsh

1996-01-01

268

Searches and Seizures in Public Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In "New Jersey v. T.L.O." the U.S. Supreme Court held that the prohibitions of the Fourth Amendment regarding unreasonable searches and seizures apply to student searches and seizures conducted by public school officials. However, the Court said the legality of a search should depend upon "reasonableness, under the circumstances" rather than…

Lincoln, Eugene A.

269

Acute disc prolapse secondary to seizure  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 37-year-old female presented following a witnessed generalised tonic clonic seizure while washing her car. Witnesses reported the patient hit her head on the car bumper upon falling. She was investigated for a cause of a second seizure with blood tests, CT and MR brain which were normal. On day 3 of her admission she was still unable to walk

Imran Satia; Lynsey Goodwin; Salem Madi; Hisham Hamdalla

2011-01-01

270

Anticonvulsants for soman-induced seizure activity  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report describes studies of anticonvulsants for the organophosphorus (OP) nerve agent soman: a basic research effort to understand how different pharmacological classes of compounds influence the expression of seizure produced by soman in rats, and a drug screening effort to determine whether clinically useful antiepileptics can modulate soman-induced seizures in rats. Electroencephalographic (EEG) recordings were used in these studies.

Tsung-Ming Shih; John H. McDonough; Irwin Koplovitz

1999-01-01

271

Seizures and anticonvulsants after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage.  

PubMed

Seizures and seizure-like activity may occur in patients experiencing aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage. Treatment of these events with prophylactic antiepileptic drugs remains controversial. An electronic literature search was conducted for English language articles describing the incidence and treatment of seizures after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage from 1980 to October 2010. A total of 56 articles were included in this review. Seizures often occur at the time of initial presentation or aneurysmal rebleeding before aneurysm treatment. Seizures occur in about 2% of patients after invasive aneurysm treatment, with a higher incidence after surgical clipping compared with endovascular repair. Non-convulsive seizures should be considered in patients with poor neurological status or deterioration. Seizure prophylaxis with antiepileptic drugs is controversial, with limited data available for developing recommendations. While antiepileptic drug use has been linked to worse prognosis, studies have evaluated treatment with almost exclusively phenytoin. When prophylaxis is used, 3-day treatment seems to provide similar seizure prevention with better outcome compared with longer-term treatment. PMID:21751102

Lanzino, Giuseppe; D'Urso, Pietro Ivo; Suarez, Jose

2011-09-01

272

Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: review and update  

Microsoft Academic Search

The population incidence of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) may be only 4% that of epilepsy, but many patients with PNES have a tendency to seek medical attention, and PNES make up a larger share of the workload of neurologists and emergency and general physicians. Although a great number of publications describe how PNES can be distinguished from epileptic seizures, it

Markus Reuber; Christian E. Elger

2003-01-01

273

Search and Seizure in the Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Fourth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution protects the people of the United States from unreasonable searches and seizures. On first reading, these protections seem clearly defined. The amendment was meant to protect Americans from the kinds of random searches and seizures that the colonists experienced under British colonial rule. Under…

Staros, Kari; Williams, Charles F.

2007-01-01

274

43 CFR 3.16 - Seizure.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Seizure. 3.16 Section 3.16 Public Lands: Interior Office...Interior PRESERVATION OF AMERICAN ANTIQUITIES § 3.16 Seizure. Any object of antiquity taken, or collection made, on...

2012-10-01

275

43 CFR 3.16 - Seizure.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Seizure. 3.16 Section 3.16 Public Lands: Interior Office...Interior PRESERVATION OF AMERICAN ANTIQUITIES § 3.16 Seizure. Any object of antiquity taken, or collection made, on...

2011-10-01

276

Alternative therapies for seizures: promises and dangers.  

PubMed

Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) is increasingly being used for a multitude of medical problems, one of them being seizures. This article discusses the prevalence of CAM use for seizures and epilepsy. Evidence-based data regarding CAM for epilepsy are presented as well as potential safety concerns regarding ephedra and cannabis use. PMID:17701869

Sirven, Joseph I

2007-09-01

277

Lifelong history of injuries related to seizures  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is meager information in the literature regarding the characteristics and risk factors for injuries caused during epileptic seizures in adults. Previous studies focused mainly on specific types of injuries incurred, and only few explored associated risk factors. A questionnaire regarding lifetime seizures and their traumatic consequences was administered to 298 consecutive epileptic patients and their caretakers or relatives. Ninety-one

MiriamY Neufeld; Tali Vishne; Vladimir Chistik; AmosD Korczyn

1999-01-01

278

Childhood Febrile Seizures: Overview and Implications  

PubMed Central

This article provides an overview of the latest knowledge and understanding of childhood febrile seizures. This review also discusses childhood febrile seizure occurrence, health services utilization and treatment costs. Parental reactions associated with its occurrence and how healthcare providers can assist parents with dealing effectively with this potentially frightening and anxiety-producing event are also discussed.

Jones, Tonia; Jacobsen, Steven J.

2007-01-01

279

Search and Seizure in the Public Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This monograph attempts to provide clear understanding of the standards presented by the Supreme Court in "New Jersey v. T.L.O." relative to search and seizure in public schools, and suggests practical ways of applying search and seizure law to situations in the school setting. ("T.L.O." are the initials of the anonymous student.) After an…

Rossow, Lawrence F.

280

The atypical protein kinase Cs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since its discovery more than 10 years ago, the atypical PKC (aPKC) subfamily has attracted great interest. A number of reports have shown that the kinases of this subfamily play critical roles in signaling pathways that control cell growth, differentiation and survival. Recently, several investigators have identified a number of aPKC-interacting proteins whose characterization is helping to unravel the mechanisms

María T. Diaz-Meco; Jorge Moscat

2000-01-01

281

A Rare Case of Pyridoxine-dependent Seizures in Infancy.  

PubMed

Pyridoxine-dependent seizures is a rare cause of recurrent seizures in neonatal period and resistant to most of the antiepileptic medications, but respond to administration of pyridoxine. We report a male infant who had neonatal seizures which were initially responsive to anticonvulsants and later became unresponsive and presented at 45 days of life with seizures. These seizures were not responding to any anticonvulsant but responded to pyridoxine. After discharge parents inadvertently stopped pyridoxine and the infant presented with seizures once again. These seizures were promptly controlled with readministration of pyridoxine confirming the diagnosis of pyridoxine-dependant seizures. PMID:24027745

Murty, V S S Yerramilli; Kishore, M S S; Patel, Manisha R

2013-01-01

282

A Rare Case of Pyridoxine-dependent Seizures in Infancy  

PubMed Central

Pyridoxine-dependent seizures is a rare cause of recurrent seizures in neonatal period and resistant to most of the antiepileptic medications, but respond to administration of pyridoxine. We report a male infant who had neonatal seizures which were initially responsive to anticonvulsants and later became unresponsive and presented at 45 days of life with seizures. These seizures were not responding to any anticonvulsant but responded to pyridoxine. After discharge parents inadvertently stopped pyridoxine and the infant presented with seizures once again. These seizures were promptly controlled with readministration of pyridoxine confirming the diagnosis of pyridoxine-dependant seizures.

Murty, V.S.S. Yerramilli; Kishore, M.S.S.; Patel, Manisha R.

2013-01-01

283

Automated identification of multiple seizure-related and interictal epileptiform event types in the EEG of mice.  

PubMed

Visual scoring of murine EEG signals is time-consuming and subject to low inter-observer reproducibility. The Racine scale for behavioral seizure severity does not provide information about interictal or sub-clinical epileptiform activity. An automated algorithm for murine EEG analysis was developed using total signal variation and wavelet decomposition to identify spike, seizure, and other abnormal signal types in single-channel EEG collected from kainic acid-treated mice. The algorithm was validated on multi-channel EEG collected from ?-butyrolacetone-treated mice experiencing absence seizures. The algorithm identified epileptiform activity with high fidelity compared to visual scoring, correctly classifying spikes and seizures with 99% accuracy and 91% precision. The algorithm correctly identifed a spike-wave discharge focus in an absence-type seizure recorded by 36 cortical electrodes. The algorithm provides a reliable and automated method for quantification of multiple classes of epileptiform activity within the murine EEG and is tunable to a variety of event types and seizure categories. PMID:23514826

Bergstrom, Rachel A; Choi, Jee Hyun; Manduca, Armando; Shin, Hee-Sup; Worrell, Greg A; Howe, Charles L

2013-01-01

284

The risk of seizures associated with tramadol.  

PubMed

We conducted a study of the risk of idiopathic incident seizures among users of tramadol derived from data present in the General Practice Research Database based in the United Kingdom for 1994-1996. We used a nested case-control study design, comparing risks of idiopathic incident seizures during exposed and unexposed times among patients who had ever taken tramadol using a 90-day follow-up. Among the 10,916 subjects, we identified 17 cases of idiopathic seizures, 11 of which were definite and 6 possible. None of the patients was exposed to tramadol alone in the prior 90 days. Eight patients were exposed to opiates, five to both tramadol and opiates, three to other analgesics, and one to no analgesics. We found no increased risk of idiopathic incident seizures associated with exposure to tramadol alone. Thus seizures seem rarely attributable to the agent. PMID:9620111

Jick, H; Derby, L E; Vasilakis, C; Fife, D

285

Epileptic seizure induced by fennel essential oil.  

PubMed

An epileptic seizure is reported in a 38-year-old woman, known to be an epileptic patient. Although she was under antiepileptic treatment and had well-controlled epilepsy, she developed a typical generalised tonic-clonic seizure and remained unconscious for 45 minutes following ingestion of a number of cakes containing an unknown quantity of fennel essential oil. Involuntary diarrhoea accompanied her epileptic seizure. This reported case recalls the fact that fennel essential oil can induce seizures and that this oil should probably be avoided by patients with epilepsy. Labelling of products with fennel essential oil should refer to the risk of seizures, particularly for patients with epilepsy. An awareness programme should involve all stakeholders affected by this issue. PMID:21865126

Skalli, Souad; Soulaymani Bencheikh, Rachida

2011-09-01

286

Gelastic seizures misdiagnosed as gastroesophageal reflux disease.  

PubMed

Gastroesophageal reflux disease can have variable manifestations including regurgitation, irritability, arching, choking, and apnea. The disorder is also frequently mistaken for seizures (Sandifer syndrome). We report 6 patients in whom the opposite phenomenon occurred: their seizures were mistaken for gastroesophageal reflux disease. Six of 77 patients (6.8%) with gelastic seizures and epilepsy symptomatic of hypothalamic hamartomas were noted to be misdiagnosed with gastroesophageal reflux disease in infancy. As is typical in these patients, gelastic seizures were not diagnosed until months, or often years, later. Delayed diagnosis of hypothalamic hamartomas can lead to a potentially deleterious syndrome involving refractory epilepsy, developmental problems, and precocious puberty. Gelastic seizures should be considered among the conditions that can mimic reflux symptoms. PMID:17475990

Sweetman, Laura L; Ng, Yu-Tze; Kerrigan, John F

2007-05-01

287

Levetiracetam for Treatment of Neonatal Seizures  

PubMed Central

Neonatal seizures are often refractory to treatment with initial antiseizure medications. Consequently, clinicians turn to alternatives such as levetiracetam, despite the lack of published data regarding its safety, tolerability, or efficacy in the neonatal population. We report a retrospectively identified cohort of 23 neonates with electroencephalographically confirmed seizures who received levetiracetam. Levetiracetam was considered effective if administration was associated with a greater than 50% seizure reduction within 24 hours. Levetiracetam was initiated at a mean conceptional age of 41 weeks. The mean initial dose was 16 ± 6 mg/kg and the mean maximum dose was 45 ± 19 mg/kg/day. No respiratory or cardiovascular adverse effects were reported or detected. Levetiracetam was associated with a greater than 50% seizure reduction in 35% (8 of 23), including seizure termination in 7. Further study is warranted to determine optimal levetiracetam dosing in neonates and to compare efficacy with other antiseizure medications.

Abend, Nicholas S.; Gutierrez-Colina, Ana M.; Monk, Heather M.; Dlugos, Dennis J.; Clancy, Robert R.

2011-01-01

288

Role of oxidative stress in epileptic seizures  

PubMed Central

Oxidative stress resulting from excessive free-radical release is likely implicated in the initiation and progression of epilepsy. Therefore, antioxidant therapies aimed at reducing oxidative stress have received considerable attention in epilepsy treatment. However, much evidence suggests that oxidative stress does not always have the same pattern in all seizures models. Thus, this review provides an overview aimed at achieving a better understanding of this issue. We summarize work regarding seizure models (i.e., genetically epilepsy-prone rats, kainic acid, pilocarpine, pentylenetetrazol, and trimethyltin), oxidative stress as an etiologic factor in epileptic seizures (i.e., impairment of antioxidant systems, mitochondrial dysfunction, involvement of redox-active metals, arachidonic acid pathway activation, and aging), and antioxidant strategies for seizure treatment. Combined, this review highlights pharmacological mechanisms associated with oxidative stress in epileptic seizures and the potential for neuroprotection in epilepsy that targets oxidative stress and is supported by effective antioxidant treatment.

Shin, Eun-Joo; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Chung, Yoon Hee; Kim, Won-Ki; Ko, Kwang-Ho; Bach, Jae-Hyung; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Yoneda, Yukio; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

2013-01-01

289

Seizure prediction using EEG spatiotemporal correlation structure.  

PubMed

A seizure prediction algorithm is proposed that combines novel multivariate EEG features with patient-specific machine learning. The algorithm computes the eigenspectra of space-delay correlation and covariance matrices from 15-s blocks of EEG data at multiple delay scales. The principal components of these features are used to classify the patient's preictal or interictal state. This is done using a support vector machine (SVM), whose outputs are averaged using a running 15-minute window to obtain a final prediction score. The algorithm was tested on 19 of 21 patients in the Freiburg EEG data set who had three or more seizures, predicting 71 of 83 seizures, with 15 false predictions and 13.8 h in seizure warning during 448.3 h of interictal data. The proposed algorithm scales with the number of available EEG signals by discovering the variations in correlation structure among any given set of signals that correlate with seizure risk. PMID:23041171

Williamson, James R; Bliss, Daniel W; Browne, David W; Narayanan, Jaishree T

2012-10-02

290

Central apnea at complex partial seizure onset.  

PubMed

Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP) is the most common cause of epilepsy related mortality in treatment resistant epilepsy. Most SUDEPs occur after one or more seizure(s) during sleep. Nocturnal seizures may go unrecognized. Respiratory depression in the peri-ictal period is one of the primary potential causes of SUDEP. Ictal and postictal apnea is often overlooked because it is not routinely assessed, but appears common and has been a recent focus of SUDEP research. We report a 37 year-old man who had central apnea as the initial manifestation of partial complex seizures associated with oxygen desaturation. This important pathophysiological consequence of a nocturnal complex seizure was identified by respiratory monitoring during a combined video EEG and sleep study. Diagnostic and therapeutic implications are discussed. PMID:22726818

Nadkarni, Mangala A; Friedman, Daniel; Devinsky, Orrin

2012-06-21

291

Topiramate for the Treatment of Neonatal Seizures  

PubMed Central

Current therapeutic options for treatment of neonatal seizures, such as phenobarbital and phenytoin lack efficacy, and are potentially harmful to the developing brain. Topiramate appears to be effective as both an anti-seizure and neuroprotective agent in animal models of newborn brain injury. Though topiramate is commonly used as an add-on agent in newborns, its use in this population has not yet been reported. We performed a retrospective cohort study of clinical topiramate use in newborns with acute symptomatic seizures that were refractory to standard agents. In four of six identified newborns, there was apparent reduction or no further seizures, and none of the children experienced side effects that resulted in discontinuation of the drug, either during the hospital admission or after discharge home. Prospective studies evaluating the safety and efficacy of topiramate for both seizures and neuroprotection will be important to determine whether this medication deserves widespread use in clinical practice.

Glass, Hannah C.; Poulin, Chantal; Shevell, Michael I.

2011-01-01

292

Role of oxidative stress in epileptic seizures.  

PubMed

Oxidative stress resulting from excessive free-radical release is likely implicated in the initiation and progression of epilepsy. Therefore, antioxidant therapies aimed at reducing oxidative stress have received considerable attention in epilepsy treatment. However, much evidence suggests that oxidative stress does not always have the same pattern in all seizures models. Thus, this review provides an overview aimed at achieving a better understanding of this issue. We summarize work regarding seizure models (i.e., genetic rat models, kainic acid, pilocarpine, pentylenetetrazol, and trimethyltin), oxidative stress as an etiologic factor in epileptic seizures (i.e., impairment of antioxidant systems, mitochondrial dysfunction, involvement of redox-active metals, arachidonic acid pathway activation, and aging), and antioxidant strategies for seizure treatment. Combined, this review highlights pharmacological mechanisms associated with oxidative stress in epileptic seizures and the potential for neuroprotection in epilepsy that targets oxidative stress and is supported by effective antioxidant treatment. PMID:21672578

Shin, Eun-Joo; Jeong, Ji Hoon; Chung, Yoon Hee; Kim, Won-Ki; Ko, Kwang-Ho; Bach, Jae-Hyung; Hong, Jau-Shyong; Yoneda, Yukio; Kim, Hyoung-Chun

2011-06-13

293

Seizures associated with recreational drug abuse.  

PubMed

We retrospectively identified 49 cases of recreational drug-induced seizures in 47 patients seen at the San Francisco General Hospital between 1975 and 1987. Most patients experienced a single generalized tonic-clonic seizure associated with acute drug intoxication, but 7 patients had multiple seizures and 2 patients developed status epilepticus. The recreational drugs implicated were cocaine (32 cases), amphetamine (11), heroin (7), and phencyclidine (4). A combination of drugs was responsible in 11 cases. Seizures occurred independent of the route of administration, and occurred in both first-time and chronic abusers. Ten patients (21%) reported having had prior seizures, all with a close temporal association with drug abuse. Other than 1 patient who developed prolonged status epilepticus that caused a fixed neurologic deficit, most patients had no obvious short-term neurologic sequelae. PMID:2788249

Alldredge, B K; Lowenstein, D H; Simon, R P

1989-08-01

294

Voltage-gated calcium channels in the etiopathogenesis and treatment of absence epilepsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Voltage-gated calcium channels are key elements in regulating neuronal excitability and are thus of central importance in the pathogenesis of various forms of epilepsies. Among these, absence epilepsies represent about 10% of epileptic seizures in humans. They are electroencephalographically characterized by bilateral synchronous spike-wave discharge activity associated with loss or severe impairment of consciousness. Extensive studies during the last decades

Marco Weiergräber; Ulrich Stephani; Rüdiger Köhling

2010-01-01

295

Global and focal aspects of absence epilepsy: The contribution of genetic models  

Microsoft Academic Search

The cortico-reticular theory of absence epilepsy explains the origin of the bilateral generalized spike-wave discharges (SWDs) characterizing absence seizures via a subcortical pacemaker that is responsible for both normal sleep spindles and pathological SWDs. This pacemaker is the reticular thalamic nucleus (RTN); it produces spontaneous oscillations together with thalamic relay cells and the cortex in an assembled thalamo-cortico-thalamic network. Recently,

Gilles van Luijtelaar; Evgenia Sitnikova

2006-01-01

296

Unexceptional seizure potential of tramadol or its enantiomers or metabolites in mice.  

PubMed

Tramadol is one of the most widely used centrally acting analgesics worldwide. Because of its multimodal analgesic mechanism (opioid plus nonopioid), the adverse effects profile of tramadol, similar to its analgesic profile, can be atypical compared with single-mechanism opioid analgesics. The comparison is often favorable (e.g., less respiratory depression or abuse), but it is sometimes cited as unfavorable in regard to seizure potential. As part of a broader study of this analgesic, we compared seizure induction in mice produced by administration of tramadol, the enantiomers and metabolites [M1 (O-desmethyl tramadol), M2 (N-desmethyl tramadol), M3 (N,N-didesmethyl tramadol), M4 (O,N,N-tridesmethyl tramadol), and M5 (O,N-didesmethyl tramadol)] of tramadol, and opioid and nonopioid reference compounds. We found that tramadol, its enantiomers, and M1 to M5 metabolites were of intermediate potency in this endpoint (on either a milligram per kilogram or millimole per kilogram basis). The SD50 (estimated dose required to induce seizures in 50% of test group) of tramadol to antinociceptive ED50 ratio was almost identical to that of codeine. The enantiomers of tramadol were about equipotent to tramadol on this endpoint. The M1 to M5 metabolites (and M1 enantiomers) of tramadol were less potent than tramadol. The relative potency of tramadol to opioids was not altered by quinidine (an inhibitor of CYP4502D6), noxious stimulus (48 degrees C hot-plate), multiple dosing, or in reserpinized mice. Tramadol seizures were increased by naloxone, principally at high tramadol doses and due to an effect on the (-)enantiomer that overcame the opposite effect on the (+)enantiomer. No synergistic effect on seizure induction was observed between concomitant tramadol and codeine or morphine. PMID:18292293

Raffa, Robert B; Stone, Dennis J

2008-02-21

297

Electroencephalographic and seizure manifestations in two patients with folate receptor autoimmune antibody-mediated primary cerebral folate deficiency.  

PubMed

Seizure semiology and electroencephalographic (EEG) manifestations of autoimmune-mediated cerebral folate deficiency (CFD) before and after therapy have yet to be fully characterized. Here, we report these findings in two such patients. Our first patient presented with the novel manifestation of infantile spasms at the age of 3months, while the second developed the previously reported initial onset of tonic seizures with static developmental delay, but subsequently manifested the novel finding of electrical status epilepticus in sleep at the age of 15years. Awareness of these new manifestations, together with the previously reported manifestations of developmental delay, seizure onset during the first 2years of life, occurrence of tonic, myoclonic-astatic, absence, and generalized tonic-clonic seizures, with an EEG of generalized spike-slow waves and multifocal spikes, is important to increase the index of suspicion of this treatable disorder. PMID:22749608

Steele, Sonya U; Cheah, Sue Mei; Veerapandiyan, Aravindhan; Gallentine, William; Smith, Edward C; Mikati, Mohamad A

2012-06-30

298

Eyelid myoclonia with typical absences: an epilepsy syndrome.  

PubMed Central

Five unrelated patients are described with the clinical and electrical features of eyelid myoclonia with absences (EMA). In this syndrome brief, typical absences occur with rapid eyelid myoclonia associated with retropulsive movements of the eyeballs and occasionally of the head. The seizures are of shorter duration than in childhood absence epilepsy, and are accompanied by less profound impairment of consciousness. The electroencephalogram demonstrates high amplitude discharges consisting of spikes, multiple spikes and slow waves at a fluctuating frequency of 3-5 Hz and following eye closure, which disappear in darkness. Photosensitivity is also seen. Onset is in early childhood and EMA appears to persist into adult life. Treatment is sodium valproate in combination with either ethosuximide or a benzodiazepine. On the basis of the clinical features, EEG findings, and the response to treatment and prognosis, it is suggested that EMA be classified as a specific epilepsy syndrome.

Appleton, R E; Panayiotopoulos, C P; Acomb, B A; Beirne, M

1993-01-01

299

PRRT2 mutations in familial infantile seizures, paroxysmal dyskinesia, and hemiplegic migraine  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Objective: To perform a clinical and genetic study of a family with benign familial infantile seizures (BFIS) and, upon finding a PRRT2 gene mutation, to study a cohort of probands with a similar phenotype. We extended the study to all available family members to find out whether PRRT2 mutations cosegregated with additional symptoms. Methods: We carried out a clinical and genealogic study of a 3-generation family and of 32 additional probands with BFIS (11 families), infantile convulsions and paroxysmal choreoathetosis (ICCA) (9 families), BFIS/generalized epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (5 families), and sporadic benign neonatal or infantile seizures (7 probands/families). We performed a genetic study consisting of linkage analysis and PRRT2 screening of the 33 probands/families. Results: We obtained a positive linkage in the 16p11.3-q23.1 chromosomal region in the large BFIS family. Mutation analysis of PRRT2 gene revealed a c.649dupC (p.Arg217Profs*8) in all affected individuals. PRRT2 analysis of the 32 additional probands showed mutations in 10, 8 familial and 2 sporadic, probands. Overall we found PRRT2 mutations in 11 probands with a mutation rate of 11 out of 33 (33%). BFIS co-occurred with migraine and febrile seizures in 2 families, with childhood absence epilepsy in one family and with hemiplegic migraine in one family. Conclusion: Our results confirm the predominant role of PRRT2 mutations in BFIS and expand the spectrum of PRRT2-associated phenotypes to include febrile seizures, childhood absence seizures, migraine, and hemiplegic migraine.

Marini, Carla; Conti, Valerio; Mei, Davide; Battaglia, Domenica; Lettori, Donatella; Losito, Emma; Bruccini, Grazia; Tortorella, Gaetano

2012-01-01

300

Pathology Case Study: Epileptic Seizures  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is a case study presented by the University of Pittsburgh Department of Pathology which presents a 43 year old man with a "seizure" of dizziness associated with difficulty in walking and performing simple movements. Visitors are provided with patient history along with neuroimaging and microscopic description, including images, and are given the opportunity to diagnose the patient. A "Final Diagnosis" section provides a discussion of the findings as well as references. This is an excellent resource for students in the health sciences to familiarize themselves with using patient history and laboratory results to diagnose disease. It is also a helpful site for educators to use to introduce or test student learning in neuropathology.

2008-12-10

301

Repetitive convulsant-induced seizures reduce the number but not precision of hippocampal place cells.  

PubMed

Repetitive one-per-day seizures induced in otherwise normal rats by the volatile convulsant flurothyl decrease the accuracy of locating a hidden goal without changing the mean location of goal selection. We now show that an 8-d series of such seizures degrades the spatial signal carried by the firing of hippocampal pyramidal cells and specifically reduces the information conveyed by the place cell subset of pyramidal cells. This degradation and a concomitant slowing of the hippocampal theta rhythm occur over time courses parallel to the development of the behavioral deficit and plausibly account for the impairment. The details of how pyramidal cell discharge weakens are, however, unexpected. Rather than a reduction in the precision of location-specific firing distributed evenly over all place cells, the number of place cells decreases with seizure number, although the remaining place cells remain quite intact. Thus, with serial seizures there is a cell-specific conversion of robust place cells to sporadically firing (<0.1 spike/s) "low-rate" cells as opposed to gradual loss of place cell resolution. This transformation occurs in the absence of significant changes in the discharge rate of hippocampal interneurons, suggesting that the decline in the number of place cells is not a simple matter of increased inhibitory tone. The cumulative transformation of place cells to low-rate cells by repetitive seizures may reflect a homeostatic, negative-feedback process. PMID:22442080

Lin, Hai; Hangya, Balázs; Fox, Steven E; Muller, Robert U

2012-03-21

302

Repetitive Convulsant-Induced Seizures Reduce the Number But Not Precision of Hippocampal Place Cells  

PubMed Central

Repetitive one-per-day seizures induced in otherwise normal rats by the volatile convulsant flurothyl decrease the accuracy of locating a hidden goal without changing the mean location of goal selection. We now show that an 8-d series of such seizures degrades the spatial signal carried by the firing of hippocampal pyramidal cells and specifically reduces the information conveyed by the place cell subset of pyramidal cells. This degradation and a concomitant slowing of the hippocampal theta rhythm occur over time courses parallel to the development of the behavioral deficit and plausibly account for the impairment. The details of how pyramidal cell discharge weakens are, however, unexpected. Rather than a reduction in the precision of location-specific firing distributed evenly over all place cells, the number of place cells decreases with seizure number, although the remaining place cells remain quite intact. Thus, with serial seizures there is a cell-specific conversion of robust place cells to sporadically firing (<0.1 spike/s) “low-rate” cells as opposed to gradual loss of place cell resolution. This transformation occurs in the absence of significant changes in the discharge rate of hippocampal interneurons, suggesting that the decline in the number of place cells is not a simple matter of increased inhibitory tone. The cumulative transformation of place cells to low-rate cells by repetitive seizures may reflect a homeostatic, negative-feedback process.

Hangya, Balazs; Fox, Steven E.

2012-01-01

303

A prospective comparison between two seizure classifications.  

PubMed

The International Classification of Epileptic Seizures is the most widely used, but an alternative system based purely on ictal symptoms and signs has been proposed: the semiological classification. Our objective was to compare the two in a sample of patients evaluated at epilepsy centers. We collected 78 consecutive patients evaluated in outpatient epilepsy clinics who subsequently underwent noninvasive video-EEG monitoring at three centers. Patients with pseudoseizures were excluded. Seizures were first classified based on information obtained during clinic visits, and again after video-EEG monitoring. Each time, seizures were classified using both the International Classification and the semiological classification. Eventual epilepsy syndrome diagnosis was based on all the clinical data, video-EEG monitoring, and other independent tests including imaging studies. Sixty-six (87%) patients were classified as having 'complex partial seizures' in the International Classification. Using the semiological classification, these same 66 patients were classified as follows: automotor (34), dialeptic (17), hypermotor (13), hypomotor (2). Seizure classification changed between initial 'clinic-based' data and the 'monitoring-based' classification in 27 cases using the ILAE, vs. six using the semiological classification. Seizure classification tended to change significantly between pre- and post-monitoring using the ILAE but not the semiological classification. The term complex partial seizure included multiple categories of the semiological classification, and was very nonspecific. The semiological classification may be better suited for everyday clinic use, since it is based solely on clinical characteristics. PMID:11466019

Benbadis, S R; Thomas, P; Pontone, G

2001-06-01

304

Instantaneous frequency based newborn EEG seizure characterisation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The electroencephalogram (EEG), used to noninvasively monitor brain activity, remains the most reliable tool in the diagnosis of neonatal seizures. Due to their nonstationary and multi-component nature, newborn EEG seizures are better represented in the joint time-frequency domain than in either the time domain or the frequency domain. Characterising newborn EEG seizure nonstationarities helps to better understand their time-varying nature and, therefore, allow developing efficient signal processing methods for both modelling and seizure detection and classification. In this article, we used the instantaneous frequency (IF) extracted from a time-frequency distribution to characterise newborn EEG seizures. We fitted four frequency modulated (FM) models to the extracted IFs, namely a linear FM, a piecewise-linear FM, a sinusoidal FM, and a hyperbolic FM. Using a database of 30-s EEG seizure epochs acquired from 35 newborns, we were able to show that, depending on EEG channel, the sinusoidal and piecewise-linear FM models best fitted 80-98% of seizure epochs. To further characterise the EEG seizures, we calculated the mean frequency and frequency span of the extracted IFs. We showed that in the majority of the cases (>95%), the mean frequency resides in the 0.6-3 Hz band with a frequency span of 0.2-1 Hz. In terms of the frequency of occurrence of the four seizure models, the statistical analysis showed that there is no significant difference( p = 0.332) between the two hemispheres. The results also indicate that there is no significant differences between the two hemispheres in terms of the mean frequency ( p = 0.186) and the frequency span ( p = 0.302).

Mesbah, Mostefa; O'Toole, John M.; Colditz, Paul B.; Boashash, Boualem

2012-12-01

305

The Problem of Atypical Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome  

PubMed Central

Neuroleptic malignant syndrome is a serious and potentially fatal adverse effect of antipsychotic medications. Although diagnostic criteria for neuroleptic malignant syndrome have been established and are widely accepted and used, it should be recognized that atypical presentations occur, particularly during treatment with atypical antipsychotics. However, it remains unclear whether these atypical presentations represent early or impending neuroleptic malignant syndrome. Furthermore, since neuroleptic malignant syndrome is a diagnosis of exclusion, careful consideration of other neuropsychiatric conditions should occur. Relying on creatine phosphokinase elevation may result in an incorrect diagnosis of atypical neuroleptic malignant syndrome. We wish to present a case of this diagnostic dilemma in a patient with catatonia.

Surber, Susan A.

2009-01-01

306

Surgical Management and Scheimpflug Analysis of an Atypical Lens Coloboma  

PubMed Central

A lens coloboma is not a true coloboma; it is just a zonular absence that causes a defect in the lens equator and hence a more spherical lens. It can be isolated or in association with iris, choroid or retinal colobomas. Typically the defect is present at the site of the embryonic fissure, but it can be present elsewhere. This congenital defect can cause amblyopia, especially when it is associated with cataract. We describe a case of a 39-year-old male with an atypical coloboma that was managed successfully with phacoemulsification, capsular tension ring and intraocular lens implantation. Scheimpflug image analysis and full ophthalmological assessment were performed. Scheimpflug images demonstrated a notching of the lens equator and an absence of zonulae. During the surgical procedure an ophthalmic viscosurgical device was used to tamponade the vitreous, and after continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis the capsular tension ring was inserted to allow the surgeon to perform a safe phacoemulsification.

Hernadez-Camarena, Julio C.; Ayup-Arguijo, Eduardo; Chavez-Mondragon, Eduardo; Ramirez-Miranda, Arturo

2012-01-01

307

Biotelemetry system for Epilepsy Seizure Control  

SciTech Connect

The Biotelemetry System for Epilepsy Seizure Control Project developed and tested an automated telemetry system for use in an epileptic seizure prevention device that precisely controls localized brain temperature. This project was a result of a Department of Energy (DOE) Global Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (GIPP) grant to the Kansas City Plant (KCP), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to partner with Flint Hills Scientific, LLC, Lawrence, KS and Biophysical Laboratory Ltd (BIOFIL), Sarov, Russia to develop a method to help control epileptic seizures.

Smith, LaCurtise; Bohnert, George W.

2009-07-02

308

[Semiology and propagation of epileptic seizures].  

PubMed

The evaluation of episodic seizure-like symptoms is a common challenge in the neurologist's daily routine. The clinical signs (semiology) are the most important puzzle pieces to distinguish epileptic seizures from other episodic entities. Due to the often far-reaching health and social consequences of the diagnosis of epilepsy, the early and rigorous assessment of episodic symptoms by means of the patient history is important. This assessment is based on knowledge of the association of certain semiologies with epileptic syndromes and brain regions; however, certain limitations and pitfalls have to be considered. Typical propagation pathways of seizure activity determine the serial occurrence of semiological features and provide supplementary information. PMID:23756821

Gellner, A-K; Fritsch, B

2013-06-01

309

Inverse relationship of cannabimimetic (R+)WIN 55, 212 on behavior and seizure threshold during the juvenile period.  

PubMed

Cannabinoids have anti-convulsant effects in both in vivo and in vitro models of status epilepticus. Since the development of spontaneous seizures and neuronal vulnerability are age-dependent, we hypothesized that the anti-convulsant effects of cannabimimetics are also age-dependent. We administered a single injection of varied doses of (R+)WIN 55,212 (0.5, 1, 5 mg/kg) to postnatal (P) day 20 rats 90 min prior to induction of kainate (KA)-induced status epilepticus. The highest dose of (R+)WIN 55,212 (5 mg/kg) resulted in rapid onset of behavioral stupor, loss of balance, stiffening and immobility while standing on hind legs or laying flat in prone position; lower doses had minimal or no behavioral effect. After KA administration, seizure scores and electroencephalography (EEG) recordings were inversely related to (R+)WIN 55,212 dosage whereby higher doses were associated with high seizures scores and synchronous epileptiform activity and low doses with low seizure scores and diminished spiking in the EEG. Immunohistochemistry revealed a dose-dependent reduction in CB1 receptor expression with increasing concentrations of (R+)WIN 55,212 in presence or absence of KA seizures. Nissl and NeuN staining showed hippocampal injury was attenuated only when seizures were mild following low doses of WIN 55,212 (0.5, 1 mg/kg), consistent with the level of CB1 expression. Since low doses abolished seizures without psychotropic side-effects further study may facilitate a groundbreaking cannabamimetic therapeutic strategy to treat early-life seizures. Higher doses had adverse effects on behavior and failed to prevent seizures and protect CA1 neurons possibly due to inactivation or loss of CB1 receptors. PMID:22019959

Rudenko, V; Rafiuddin, A; Leheste, J R; Friedman, L K

2011-10-12

310

Developmental Milestones in Toddlers with Atypical Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The attainment of developmental milestones was examined and compared in 162 infants and toddlers with developmental disabilities, including Down Syndrome (n = 26), Cerebral Palsy (n = 19), Global Developmental Delay (n = 22), Premature birth (n = 66), and Seizure Disorder (n = 29). Toddlers in the Seizures Disorder group began crawling at a…

Horovitz, Max; Matson, Johnny L.

2011-01-01

311

Developmental Milestones in Toddlers with Atypical Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The attainment of developmental milestones was examined and compared in 162 infants and toddlers with developmental disabilities, including Down Syndrome (n = 26), Cerebral Palsy (n = 19), Global Developmental Delay (n = 22), Premature birth (n = 66), and Seizure Disorder (n = 29). Toddlers in the Seizures Disorder group began crawling at a…

Horovitz, Max; Matson, Johnny L.

2011-01-01

312

Epidemiology of seizures in children with brain tumors  

Microsoft Academic Search

We examined potential clinical and pathologic correlates of seizures among the 3,291 children in the Childhood Brain Tumor Consortium database. Fourteen percent had seizures prior to their hospitalization for a brain tumor. Among children who had a supratentorial tumor, seizures occurred in 22% of those less than 14 years of age. The prevalence of seizures increased to 68% of older

Floyd H. Gilles; Eugene Sobel; Alan Leviton; E. Tessa Hedley-Whyte; C. Jane Tavare; Lester S. Adelman; Raymond A. Sobel

1992-01-01

313

Change of seizure frequency in pregnant epileptic women  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of pregnancy on seizure frequency was monitored prospectively in 136 pregnancies of 122 epileptic women. Pregnancy did not influence the seizure frequency in 68 pregnancies (50%). In 50 pregnancies (37%) the number of seizures increased during pregnancy or puerperium. The seizure frequency decreased in 18 pregnancies (13%). In 34 out of 50 pregnancies (68%) the increase was associated

D Schmidt; R Canger; G Avanzini; D Battino; C Cusi; G Beck-Mannagetta; S Koch; D Rating; D Janz

1983-01-01

314

Seizure Semiology: An Overview of the ‘Inverse Problem’  

Microsoft Academic Search

In clinical practice, a classification of seizures based on clinical signs and symptoms leads to an improved understanding of epilepsy-related issues and therefore strongly contributes to a better patient care. The inverse problem involves inferring the anatomical brain localization of a seizure from the scalp surface EEG, a concept we apply here to correlate seizure origin with seizure semiology. The

Andrea O. Rossetti; Peter W. Kaplan

2010-01-01

315

Do seizures cause irreversible cognitive damage? Evidence from animal studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Data from experimental models provide evidence that both prolonged and brief seizures can cause irreversible impairment in spatial and emotional learning and memory. Factors related to the severity of the behavioral impairments include genetic background, age at the time of the epileptogenic insult, extent of brain lesion, location of seizure focus, seizure duration, seizure number, brain reserve, and environmental and

Katarzyna Majak; Asla Pitkänen

2004-01-01

316

Neonatal Seizures: new developments in monitoring and therapy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seizures are common in the neonatal period and represent a most distinctive signal of neurological disease. Seizures in newborns are associated with an increased risk of neurodevelopmental impairment, including cerebral palsy, mental retardation and epilepsy and mortality. Controversy still exists concerning diagnosis and treatment of neonatal seizures. Furthermore the question, regarding the potential detrimental effect of neonatal seizures on the

L. G. M. van Rooij

2009-01-01

317

Technical Report: Treatment of the Child With Simple Febrile Seizures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Overview. Simple febrile seizures that occur in children ages 6 months to 5 years are common events with few adverse outcomes. Those who advocate therapy for this disorder have been concerned that such seizures lead to additional febrile seizures, to epilepsy, and perhaps even to brain injury. Moreover, they note the potential for such seizures to cause parental anxiety. We

Robert J. Baumann

318

A seizure response dog: video recording of reacting behaviour during repetitive prolonged seizures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seizure response and alerting behaviour may spontaneously develop in dogs living with children or adults with epilepsy. Some\\u000a dogs can also be reliably trained to respond and anticipate seizures. We describe the case of a dog, not previously trained\\u000a for assistance work, showing complex seizure response behaviour. This is the first release of a home video recording of a\\u000a dog

Lidia Di Vito; Ilaria Naldi; Barbara Mostacci; Laura Licchetta; Francesca Bisulli; Paolo Tinuper

2010-01-01

319

Down-regulation of delayed rectifier K+ channels in the hippocampus of seizure sensitive gerbils.  

PubMed

In order to confirm the species-specific distribution of voltage-gated K(+) (Kv) channels and the definitive relationship between their immunoreactivities and seizure activity, we investigated Kv2.x, Kv3.x and Kv4.x channel immunoreactivities in the hippocampi of seizure-resistant (SR) and seizure-sensitive (SS) gerbils. There was no difference in Kv2.1, Kv3.4, Kv4.2 and Kv4.3 immunoreactivity in the hippocampus between SR and SS gerbils. In comparison to SR gerbils, Kv3.1b immunoreactivity in neurons was significantly lower in SS gerbils instead Kv3.1b-immunoreactive astrocytes were clearly observed in SS gerbils (p<0.05). Kv3.2 immunoreactivity was also significantly lower in neurons of SS gerbils than in those of SR gerbils (p<0.05). Considering the findings of our previous study, these findings suggest that delayed rectifier K(+) channels (Kv1.1, Kv1.2, Kv1.5, Kv1.6, Kv2.1 and Kv3.1-2), not A-type K(+) channels (Kv1.4, Kv3.4 and Kv4.x), may be down-regulated in the SS gerbil hippocampus, as compared to SR gerbils. PMID:19665528

Lee, Sang-Moo; Kim, Ji-Eun; Sohn, Jong-Hee; Choi, Hui-Chul; Lee, Ju-Sang; Kim, Sung-Hun; Kim, Min-Ju; Choi, Ihn-Geun; Kang, Tae-Cheon

2009-08-07

320

Targeting thalamic nuclei is not sufficient for the full anti-absence action of ethosuximide in a rat model of absence epilepsy.  

PubMed

Absence epilepsy is characterised by recurrent periods of physical and mental inactivity coupled to bilateral, synchronous spike and wave discharges (SWDs) on the electroencephalogram. The mechanism of action of ethosuximide (ETX), a drug specific for absence seizures, is believed to involve a reduction in the low threshold T-type Ca(2+) current in thalamocortical and nucleus reticularis thalami (NRT) neurones, although other electrophysiological data have questioned this. Here, we employed a genetic rat model of absence seizures to investigate the effects of directly administering ETX to the thalamus.SWDs were immediately and substantially reduced (approximately 90%) by systemic administration of ETX (177-709 micromol/kg), or by bilateral microinfusion into the thalamus of the GABA(B) antagonist, CGP 36742 (5-27 nmol per side). However, infusion of ETX (1-200 nmol per side) into the ventrobasal complex or the NRT resulted in a reduction of SWDs that was delayed (30-60 min) and less marked (approximately 50%). Administration of ETX (0.2 mM to 1M) to a greater volume of thalamus by reverse microdialysis also produced significant but delayed reduction of SWDs at concentrations >1mM. Only at 5mM were seizures significantly reduced (approximately 70%) within 30 min of administration. These results suggest that targeting of the thalamus alone may be insufficient for an immediate and full anti-absence action for ETX. Concomitant or exclusive actions in the cortex remain a possibility. PMID:12837561

Richards, Douglas A; Manning, Jon-Paul A; Barnes, David; Rombola, Laura; Bowery, Norman G; Caccia, Silvio; Leresche, Nathalie; Crunelli, Vincenzo

2003-05-01

321

Lamotrigine as first-line drug in childhood absence epilepsy: a clinical and neurophysiological study.  

PubMed

To investigate to which extent lamotrigine (LTG) may be effective and tolerated as a monotherapy for the treatment of newly diagnosed childhood absence seizures and, secondly, to evaluate the efficacy of this drug on the circadian interictal generalized epileptiform discharges, 20 consecutive newly diagnosed patients (five males, 15 females), aged 3-10 years (mean 6.9 years), affected by childhood absence epilepsy, were administered LTG as first-line drug at the initial dose of 0.5 mg/kg/day for 2 weeks, followed by 1.0 mg/kg/day for an additional 2 weeks. Thereafter, doses have been increased in 1-mg/kg/day increments up to 9-12 mg/kg/day in accordance with the clinical response. Each patient underwent an ambulatory (24 h) EEG monitoring before starting LTG therapy (time 0) and during the maintenance period at the end of LTG titration (time 1). After a mean follow-up period of 10.8 months (range 3-28 months), a 100% seizure control was obtained in 11 children (55.5%), a more than 75% seizure decrease was present in four (20%), and a >50% seizure decrease in five (25%), with a mean LTG dose of 6.2 mg/kg/day (range 1.2-11) in the controlled group. Adverse events were present in three patients (15%); they were generally mild and transient. Our series confirms that LTG monotherapy may control typical childhood absence seizures in about half the children as well as it may decrease interictal generalized spike and wave discharges both in seizure-free and uncontrolled patients. The slow titration phase of the drug due to the risk of the skin rash may eventually reduce compliance. PMID:14729411

Coppola, Giangennaro; Licciardi, Felicia; Sciscio, Nicola; Russo, Francesco; Carotenuto, Marco; Pascotto, Antonio

2004-01-01

322

Multiple Sclerosis: Can It Cause Seizures?  

MedlinePLUS

Multiple sclerosis Basics In-Depth Multimedia Expert Answers Resources Reprints A single copy of this article may be reprinted for personal, noncommercial use only. Multiple sclerosis: Can it cause seizures? By Mayo Clinic staff ...

323

Survey on the Management of Febrile Seizures.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A survey regarding the management of the child with febrile seizures was mailed to 10,000 child neurologists, pediatricians, family and general practitioners. The response rate varied by specialty, and overall slightly more than half the physicians respon...

D. G. Hirtz Y. J. Lee J. H. Ellenberg K. B. Nelson

1986-01-01

324

Non-traumatic fractures following seizures: two case reports  

Microsoft Academic Search

INTRODUCTION: Seizures with or without trauma may cause fractures that occur commonly in epileptic seizures. Fracture risk is less reported in non-epileptic seizures. Some metabolic conditions leading to a decrease in bone mineral density may cause fractures secondary to non-epileptic seizure. CASE PRESENTATION: We describe two cases of non-traumatic acetabular and vertebrae fractures following seizures without history of epilepsy. They

Koussay Ach; Ines Slim; Sihem Ajmi; Molka Chaieb; Amel Beizig; Larbi Chaieb

2010-01-01

325

Seizure termination by acidosis depends on ASIC1a  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most seizures stop spontaneously; however, the molecular mechanisms that terminate seizures remain unknown. Observations that seizures reduced brain pH and that acidosis inhibited seizures indicate that acidosis halts epileptic activity. Because acid-sensing ion channel 1a (ASIC1a) is exquisitely sensitive to extracellular pH and regulates neuron excitability, we hypothesized that acidosis might activate ASIC1a, which would terminate seizures. Disrupting mouse ASIC1a

Adam E Ziemann; Mikael K Schnizler; Gregory W Albert; Meryl A Severson; Matthew A Howard III; Michael J Welsh; John A Wemmie

2008-01-01

326

Management of seizures in critically ill patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

For many neurologists, seizures in critically ill patients represent a difficult problem. Etiology can be elusive because\\u000a of the complexity of the environment, and treatment decisions can be compromised by the paucity of evidence-based guidelines.\\u000a Emerging data support a higher than previously thought incidence of nonconvulsive epileptic activity in this patient population,\\u000a which is another important consideration. Although a seizure

Panayiotis N. Varelas; Marek A. Mirski

2004-01-01

327

Pediatric hypocalcemic seizures: a case of rickets.  

PubMed

Although cases of Vitamin D-deficient Rickets have declined since the Industrial Revolution, certain populations remain at risk. Risk factors for developing vitamin D-deficient Rickets include breast-feeding without formula or vitamin supplementation, very dark skin and inadequate exposure to sunlight. We describe a case of Rickets in a breastfed infant with dark skin who presented with hypocalcemic seizures. The pathophysiology of Rickets is briefly described along with the emergency management of infants presenting with hypocalcemic seizure. PMID:15707811

Bellazzini, Marc A; Howes, David S

2005-02-01

328

Seizure risk from cavernous or arteriovenous malformations  

PubMed Central

Objectives: To determine the risk of epileptic seizures due to a brain arteriovenous malformation (AVM) or cavernous malformation (CM). Methods: In a prospective population-based study of new diagnoses of AVMs (n = 229) or CMs (n = 139) in adults in Scotland in 1999–2003, we used annual medical records surveillance, general practitioner follow-up, and patient questionnaires to quantify the risk of seizures between clinical presentation and AVM/CM treatment, last follow-up, or death. Results: The 5-year risk of first-ever seizure after presentation was higher for AVMs presenting with intracranial hemorrhage or focal neurologic deficit (ICH/FND: n = 119; 23%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 9%–37%) than for incidental AVMs (n = 40; 8%, 95% CI 0%–20%), CMs presenting with ICH/FND (n = 38; 6%, 95% CI 0%–14%), or incidental CMs (n = 57; 4%, 95% CI 0%–10%). For adults who had never experienced ICH/FND, the 5-year risk of epilepsy after first-ever seizure was higher for CMs (n = 23; 94%, 95% CI 84%–100%) than AVMs (n = 37; 58%, 95% CI 40%–76%; p = 0.02). Among adults who never experienced ICH/FND and presented with or developed epilepsy, there was no difference in the proportions achieving 2-year seizure freedom over 5 years between AVMs (n = 43; 45%, 95% CI 20%–70%) and CMs (n = 35; 47%, 95% CI 27%–67%). Conclusions: AVM-related ICH confers a significantly higher risk of a first-ever seizure compared to CMs or incidental AVMs. Adults with a CM have a high risk of epilepsy after a first-ever seizure but achieve seizure freedom as frequently as those with epilepsy due to an AVM.

Josephson, C.B.; Leach, J.-P.; Duncan, R.; Roberts, R.C.; Counsell, C.E.

2011-01-01

329

New-onset afebrile seizures in infants  

PubMed Central

Objective: To investigate the presenting characteristics of new-onset afebrile seizures in infants (age 1–24 months) and the yield of neuroimaging. Methods: Prospective data were obtained from a standardized evaluation and management plan mandated by a critical care pathway. A total of 317 infants presented with new-onset afebrile seizures between 2001 and 2007. EEG was performed on 90.3%, head CT was obtained on 94%, and MRI was obtained on 57.4%. Results: We found half of the infants had partial features to their seizures, yet evidence for primary generalized seizures was rare. The majority had more than 1 seizure upon presentation. Seizures in this age group tended to be brief, with 44% lasting less than 1 minute. EEG abnormalities were found in half. One-third of CTs were abnormal, with 9% of all CTs requiring acute medical management. Over half of MRIs were abnormal, with cerebral dysgenesis being the most common abnormality (p < 0.05). One-third of normal CTs had a subsequent abnormal MRI—only 1 resulted in altered medical management. Conclusions: Infantile seizures are usually brief, but commonly recurrent, and strong consideration should be made for inpatient observation. Acute imaging with CT can alter management in a small but important number of infants. Due to the superior yield, strong consideration for MRI should be given for all infants, as primary generalized seizures are rare, and there is a high rate of cerebral dysgenesis. GLOSSARY ED = emergency department; ILAE = International League Against Epilepsy; IRB = Institutional Review Board.

Hsieh, D T.; Chang, T; Tsuchida, T N.; Vezina, L G.; Vanderver, A; Siedel, J; Brown, K; Berl, M M.; Stephens, S; Zeitchick, A; Gaillard, W D.

2010-01-01

330

Levetiracetam for seizures after liver transplantation.  

PubMed

Seizures may occur after orthotopic liver transplantation. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are used to treat these seizures, but the immunosuppressant regimen also may be altered. Levetiracetam is an attractive treatment because of its efficacy, lack of hepatic enzyme induction, and its rapid attainment of serum levels. Treatment with levetiracetam is efficacious, and levetiracetam-treated patients require significantly lower doses of immunosuppressant medications to achieve an equivalent antirejection effect. PMID:15781837

Glass, G A; Stankiewicz, J; Mithoefer, A; Freeman, R; Bergethon, P R

2005-03-22

331

Seizure-related injury and death  

Microsoft Academic Search

Epilepsy is associated with significantly increased morbidity and mortality from a variety of causes. Patients with epilepsy\\u000a have approximately two to three times the risk of death from any cause compared with persons without epilepsy. Seizures may\\u000a cause significant trauma, drowning, and accidental injury. Many of the deaths in persons with epilepsy are directly related\\u000a to seizures, accidents and injuries

Maromi Nei; Ritu Bagla

2007-01-01

332

Assessment of febrile seizures in children  

Microsoft Academic Search

Febrile seizures are the most common form of childhoodseizures,affecting2-5%of allchildrenandusually appearing between 3 months and 5 years of age. Despite its predominantly benign nature, a febrile seizure (FS) is a terrifying experience for most parents. The condition is perhaps one of the most prevalent causes of admittance to pediatric emergency wards worldwide. FS, defined as either simple or complex, may

Arne Fetveit

2008-01-01

333

PTZ-induced seizures in rats: effects of age and strain  

Microsoft Academic Search

The susceptibility to pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)-induced seizures during postnatal ontogeny [postnatal day (PN) 10–220] was investigated in two rat strains. The WAG\\/Rij strain, genetically prone for developing generalized absence epilepsy, and Wistar rats were tested and compared at PN 10, 26, 30, 70, 90, 125, and 220 on the PTZ-convulsive threshold. A subconvulsive dose of 25-mg\\/kg PTZ was administered every 15

I. A Klioueva; E. L. J. M van Luijtelaar; N. E Chepurnova; S. A Chepurnov

2001-01-01

334

Atypical spondyloarthritis in children: proposed diagnostic criteria  

Microsoft Academic Search

Clinical and laboratory findings in 26 children with atypical spondyloarthritis were compared with those of 76 children with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. The sensitivity, specificity, predictive value, and efficiency for diagnosis were calculated. The following findings (major criteria) were much more common in atypical spondyloarthritis than in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis: (1) spondyloarthritis within the family; (2) enthesopathy; (3) arthritis of digital

A. Hussein; H. Abdul-Khaliq; H. Hardt

1989-01-01

335

Atypical and Typical Antipsychotics in the Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The use of antipsychotic medications within the school-age population is rapidly increasing. Although typical antipsychotics may be used in rare cases, this influx is largely secondary to the availability of the atypical antipsychotics. Reduction of possible adverse effects and increased efficacy represent the primary basis for the atypical

Noggle, Chad A.; Dean, Raymond S.

2009-01-01

336

[Atypical Cogan's syndrome. Based on a case].  

PubMed

Cogan's syndrome is a systemic inflammatory disease that associates typical (interstitial keratitis) and atypical (such as anterior uveitis) ocular manifestations to vestibulo-auditory dysfunction. It has also a systemic vascular association of vasculitis type. We report a case of a 64 years old woman who presented an atypical form with anterior uveitis. PMID:15682920

Nandu, A; Salu, P; Caspers, L; Gordts, F; Sennesael, J

2004-01-01

337

Atypical and Typical Antipsychotics in the Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The use of antipsychotic medications within the school-age population is rapidly increasing. Although typical antipsychotics may be used in rare cases, this influx is largely secondary to the availability of the atypical antipsychotics. Reduction of possible adverse effects and increased efficacy represent the primary basis for the atypical

Noggle, Chad A.; Dean, Raymond S.

2009-01-01

338

Understanding Atypical Emotions among Children with Autism.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Twenty-three high-functioning children with autism (ages 5-11), 42 6-year-old controls, and 43 10-year-old controls were presented with six emotion-evoking stories and were asked to explain protagonists' typical and atypical emotions. In the case of atypical emotions, the children with autism performed as well as the 10-year-old controls.…

Rieffe, Carolien; Terwogt, Mark Meerum; Stockmann, Lex

2000-01-01

339

Psychogenic nonepileptic seizures: review and update.  

PubMed

The population incidence of psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES) may be only 4% that of epilepsy, but many patients with PNES have a tendency to seek medical attention, and PNES make up a larger share of the workload of neurologists and emergency and general physicians. Although a great number of publications describe how PNES can be distinguished from epileptic seizures, it usually takes several years to arrive at this diagnosis, and three-quarters of patients (with no additional epilepsy) are treated with anticonvulsants initially. However, the management of PNES as epileptic seizures can lead to significant iatrogenic harm. Moreover, the failure to recognize the psychological cause of the disorder detracts from addressing associated psychopathology and enhances secondary somatization processes. This review provides an overview of studies of the diagnosis, etiology, treatment, and prognosis of PNES. Physicians should always consider PNES in the differential diagnosis of a seizure disorder. If a diagnosis of PNES is possible, or a diagnosis of epilepsy in doubt, a clear diagnostic categorization should be sought. This should involve the assessment of the patient by a physician versed in the diagnosis of seizure disorders and, in many cases, the documentation of a typical seizure by video-EEG. Outcome may be improved if the diagnosis is more actively sought, made earlier, and communicated more convincingly. PMID:12791321

Reuber, Markus; Elger, Christian E

2003-06-01

340

Atypical presentation of atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor in a child.  

PubMed

Atypical Teratoid Rhabdoid Tumor (ATRT) is a rare malignant intracranial neoplasm more commonly diagnosed in young children. The authors report the case of an 11-year-old boy with a long standing history of slowly progressive weight loss, fatigue, and weakness over 1.5 years whose magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large heterogeneous enhancing dorsally exophytic lower brainstem mass. Examination revealed extreme cachexia, gaze-evoked nystagmus, dysphagia, dysarthria, bilateral dysmetria, and global weakness without ambulation. The protracted history and neuroimaging features were most suggestive of a low grade glioma. However, pathology revealed a hypercellular tumor with large hyperchromatic nucleoli and loss of INI-1 staining on immunohistochemistry consistent with a diagnosis of an ATRT. The child died shortly after surgery due to complications from his brainstem infiltrative disease. This case illustrates the diverse presentation of ATRT in childhood that can clinically and radiographically mimic that of low grade glioma. PMID:23781363

Udaka, Y T; Shayan, K; Chuang, N A; Crawford, J R

2013-05-27

341

The adult seizure and social outcomes of children with partial complex seizures.  

PubMed

Most intellectually normal children with focal epilepsy have partial complex or focal with secondary generalization seizures without a precise epilepsy syndrome. Their long-term outcome is largely unknown. Cases were identified from the population-based Nova Scotia Childhood Epilepsy cohort. Those eligible had seizure onset at 1 month to 16 years between 1977 and 1985, normal intelligence, ?10 years of follow-up, only focal seizures and no benign epilepsy syndromes. There were 108 patients with partial complex with or without secondary generalization as the only seizure type(s) throughout (partial complex group) and 80 with secondary generalization as the only seizure type (secondary generalization group). Average age ± standard deviation at onset was 7.3 ± 4.5 years and follow-up was 27.9 ± 5.4 years. At follow-up, 57% of the partial complex group were in remission versus 81% of the secondary generalization group (P = 0.001). The partial complex group was more likely to be intractable or have undergone epilepsy surgery (36% versus 5%, P = 0.000). In the partial complex group, 28% had <5 years seizure free versus 5% in the secondary generalized group (P = 0.000). More patients in the partial complex group had undergone mental health assessments (59% versus 32%, P = 0.000), and 33% had a psychiatric diagnosis versus 15% in the secondary generalized group (P = 0.004). More patients with partial complex seizures had specific learning disorders (63% versus 45%, P = 0.03). Seven markers of poor social outcome were more common in patients with partial complex seizures (>2 markers: 34% versus 10%, P = 0.000). During 25-30 years of follow-up, >50% of intellectually normal patients with childhood-onset partial complex seizures had difficult-to-control seizures and learning and psychiatric/social problems. Most with secondary generalized seizures only had remission and better academic and psychiatric/social outcomes. PMID:23378221

Camfield, Carol S; Camfield, Peter R

2013-01-31

342

A novel zebrafish model of hyperthermia-induced seizures reveals a role for TRPV4 channels and NMDA-type glutamate receptors  

PubMed Central

Febrile seizures are the most common seizure type in children under the age of five, but mechanisms underlying seizure generation in vivo remain unclear. Animal models to address this issue primarily focus on immature rodents heated indirectly using a controlled water bath or air blower. Here we describe an in vivo model of hyperthermia-induced seizures in larval zebrafish aged 3 to 7 days post-fertilization (dpf). Bath controlled changes in temperature are rapid and reversible in this model. Acute electrographic seizures following transient hyperthermia showed age-dependence, strain independence, and absence of mortality. Electrographic seizures recorded in the larval zebrafish forebrain were blocked by adding antagonists to the transient receptor potential vanilloid (TRPV4) channel or N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptor to the bathing medium. Application of GABA, GABA re-uptake inhibitors, or TRPV1 antagonist had no effect on hyperthermic seizures. Expression of vanilloid channel and glutamate receptor mRNA was confirmed by quantitative PCR analysis at each developmental stage in larval zebrafish. Taken together, our findings suggest a role of heat-activation of TRPV4 channels and enhanced NMDA receptor-mediated glutamatergic transmission in hyperthermia-induced seizures.

Hunt, Robert F.; Hortopan, Gabriela A.; Gillespie, Anna; Baraban, Scott C.

2012-01-01

343

Management Sanctions and Absence Control  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of deterrent measures on employee absence is a neglected topic and what little research there has been has not produced consistent findings. The present paper reports the effects of a sudden clamp-down of management sanctions on the absence behavior of a female workforce. The prediction that this action would not significantly alter the level of absence, but would

Nigel Nicholson

1976-01-01

344

Recognizing, Differentiating, and Referring Students with Absence Seizures: What Factors Affect Preservice Teachers' Decision Making?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and epilepsy are common pediatric disorders that often occur co-morbidly. Both disorders predispose children to a wide range of school-related problems, some of which are the same and others vastly different. Fortunately, with early diagnosis and comprehensive disease management, the long-term…

Nasewicz, Nicole

2009-01-01

345

Chemical profiling of different hashish seizures by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and statistical methodology: A case report.  

PubMed

Limited information is available regarding the methodology required to characterize hashish seizures for assessing the presence or the absence of a chemical link between two seizures. This casework report presents the methodology applied for assessing that two different police seizures were coming from the same block before this latter one was split. The chemical signature was extracted using GC-MS analysis and the implemented methodology consists in a study of intra- and inter-variability distributions based on the measurement of the chemical profiles similarity using a number of hashish seizures and the calculation of the Pearson correlation coefficient. Different statistical scenarios (i.e., a combination of data pretreatment techniques and selection of target compounds) were tested to find the most discriminating one. Seven compounds showing high discrimination capabilities were selected on which a specific statistical data pretreatment was applied. Based on the results, the statistical model built for comparing the hashish seizures leads to low error rates. Therefore, the implemented methodology is suitable for the chemical profiling of hashish seizures. PMID:24008198

Cadola, Liv; Broséus, Julian; Esseiva, Pierre

2013-08-19

346

Seizures and Teens: When Seizures Aren't the Only Problem  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Some teenagers with epilepsy only have to deal with seizures, which can be tough enough, but for other teens, seizures are not the only problem. Parents and caregivers often report changes in their teens' abilities to think clearly, learn in school, or remain focused in class. Mood and other behavioral problems may also be seen. It is critical…

Kanner, Andres M.; Shafer, Patricia O.

2006-01-01

347

Seizures and Teens: Surgery for Seizures--What's It All About?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Nearly 1 out of 2 children and teens with seizures may need to take medications throughout their lives. At least 25% will develop a condition called refractory epilepsy--meaning that their seizures do not respond to medical therapy. For these children and teens, non-drug therapies such as brain surgery are available that may offer a chance to…

Duchowny, Michael S.; Dean, Patricia

2006-01-01

348

Seizures and Teens: When Seizures Aren't the Only Problem  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Some teenagers with epilepsy only have to deal with seizures, which can be tough enough, but for other teens, seizures are not the only problem. Parents and caregivers often report changes in their teens' abilities to think clearly, learn in school, or remain focused in class. Mood and other behavioral problems may also be seen. It is critical…

Kanner, Andres M.; Shafer, Patricia O.

2006-01-01

349

Atypical lymphoid hyperplasia mimicking lymphoma.  

PubMed

The distinction between reactive and neoplastic lymphoid infiltrates is a common problem in clinical practice and can be problematic. The clinical implications for both the patient and the treating clinician are profound. In this article, we discuss six of the common entities that can present as atypical lymphoid hyperplasia and thus can mimic malignant lymphomas, with emphasis on morphologic features, immunophenotypic findings, and molecular correlates that help distinguish these disorders from neoplastic conditions. The six conditions to be discussed in detail include reactive follicular hyperplasia versus follicular lymphoma; progressive transformation of germinal centers versus nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma; immunoblastic proliferations versus diffuse large B-cell lymphomas; variant forms of Castleman disease that may mimic a number of lymphoid cancers; Kikuchi's disease versus large cell lymphomas; and finally, dermatopathic lymphadenopathy and its distinction from lymph nodes showing early involvement by cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (Mycosis fungoides). PMID:19577167

Good, David J; Gascoyne, Randy D

2009-08-01

350

Atypical combinations and scientific impact.  

PubMed

Novelty is an essential feature of creative ideas, yet the building blocks of new ideas are often embodied in existing knowledge. From this perspective, balancing atypical knowledge with conventional knowledge may be critical to the link between innovativeness and impact. Our analysis of 17.9 million papers spanning all scientific fields suggests that science follows a nearly universal pattern: The highest-impact science is primarily grounded in exceptionally conventional combinations of prior work yet simultaneously features an intrusion of unusual combinations. Papers of this type were twice as likely to be highly cited works. Novel combinations of prior work are rare, yet teams are 37.7% more likely than solo authors to insert novel combinations into familiar knowledge domains. PMID:24159044

Uzzi, Brian; Mukherjee, Satyam; Stringer, Michael; Jones, Ben

2013-10-25

351

STUDIES ON PRIMARY ATYPICAL PNEUMONIA  

PubMed Central

By means of fluorescein-labelled antibody, the primary atypical pneumonia virus was found to multiply exclusively in the cytoplasm of the epithelial cells lining the bronchioles and air sacs of developing chick embryos. When 13-day old embryos were inoculated intra-amniotically and incubated at 35°C. for 5 days or longer, over 90 per cent of the inoculated embryos became infected. Between 1954 and 1956, seven strains of PAP virus were isolated from sputums or nasopharyngeal washings in patients during the acute stage of the PAP infection. One strain of virus was isolated from the frozen lung of a patient who died at Boston in 1943. All eight recently isolated strains and the Mac strain isolated by Eaton et al. in California in 1944 were antigenically closely related if not identical. PAP virus is not related antigenically to agents of psittacosis, Q fever, adenovirus (Types 1 to 6), influenza A or B, or PVM.

Liu, Chien

1957-01-01

352

Epidemiology and Characterization of Seizures in a Pedigreed Baboon Colony  

PubMed Central

This study evaluated the incidence, prevalence, and clinical features of seizures in a pedigreed captive colony of baboons. The association of seizures with subspecies, age, sex, and various clinical features was assessed. Records for 1527 captive, pedigreed baboons were reviewed, and 3389 events were identified in 1098 baboons. Of these events, 1537 (45%) represented witnessed seizures, whereas the remaining 1852 presented with craniofacial trauma or episodic changes in behavior that were suggestive, but not diagnostic, of seizure activity. Seizures were generalized myoclonic or tonic–clonic, with two thirds of the events witnessed in the morning. Seizure onset occurred in adolescence (age, 5 y), with an average of 3 seizures in a lifetime. The incidence and prevalence of seizures were 2.5% and 26%, respectively, whereas the prevalence of recurrent seizures (that is, epilepsy) was 15%. Seizures were more prevalent in male baboons, which tended to present with earlier onset and more seizures over a lifetime than did female baboons. Seizures were equally distributed between the subspecies; age of onset and seizure recurrences did not differ significantly between subspecies. Clinical features including age of onset, characteristics, and diurnal presentation of seizures in baboons suggested similarities to juvenile myoclonic epilepsy in humans. Facial trauma may be useful marker for epilepsy in baboons, but its specificity should be characterized.

Szabo, C Akos; Knape, Koyle D; Leland, M Michelle; Cwikla, Daniel J; Williams-Blangero, Sarah; Williams, Jeff T

2012-01-01

353

Neuroimaging observations in a cohort of elderly manifesting with new onset seizures: Experience from a university hospital  

PubMed Central

Background: The occurrence of epilepsy is higher among elderly patients. The clinical manifestations of seizures, causes of epilepsy, and choice of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) are different in elderly people with epilepsy compared to the young. Aim: To evaluate the imaging (CT/MRI) observations in elderly patients manifesting with new-onset seizures. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and one elderly patients with new onset seizures, >60 years (age: 68.0 ± 7.5 years; M:F = 1.8:1) from Jan’ 07 to Jan’ 09, were prospectively recruited. Observations of cranial CT scan (n = 201) and MR imaging (n = 43) were analyzed. Results: The type of seizures included: Simple partial (42%), generalized tonic-clonic (30.3%), and complex partial (27.4%). The pattern of epilepsy syndromes were acute symptomatic (42.3%), remote symptomatic (18.4%), cryptogenic (37.8%), and idiopathic (1.5%). Seizures were controlled with monotherapy in 85%. The CT scan (n = 201) revealed cerebral atrophy (139), mild (79), moderate (43), and severe (18); focal lesions (98), infarcts (45), hemorrhages (18), granuloma (16), tumor (15) and gliosis (4), and hemispheric atrophy (1), white matter changes (75) and diffuse edema (21). An MRI (n = 43) showed variable degree of cerebral atrophy (31); white matter changes (20); focal cerebral lesions (24); - infarct (7); intracranial hemorrhage (6); granuloma (5); tumor (6); gliosis (1); hemispheric atrophy (1); and prominent Virchow-Robin spaces (7); and UBOs (12). Patients with focal lesions in neuroimaging more often had partial seizures, symptomatic epilepsy, past stroke, focal deficit, absence of diffuse atrophy, focal EEG slowing, abnormal CSF, seizure recurrence at follow-up (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Brain imaging observations in elderly patients with new-onset seizures revealed underlying symptomatic nature, hence the etiology and thereby assisted in deciding the specific therapy.

Sinha, Sanjib; Satishchandra, Parthasarathy; Kalband, Balaji Rameshrao; Bharath, Rose Dawn; Thennarasu, Kandavel

2012-01-01

354

Seizure Outcomes Following Use of Generic vs. Brand-Name Antiepileptic Drugs: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis  

PubMed Central

Background The automatic substitution of bioequivalent generic for brand-name antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) has been linked by anecdotal report to loss of seizure control. Objective To evaluate studies comparing brand-name and generic AEDs and determine whether evidence exists of superiority of the brand-name version in maintaining seizure control. Data Sources English-language human studies identified in searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1984 to August 2009). Study Selection Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies comparing seizure events or seizure-related outcomes between one brand-name AED and at least one alternate version produced by a distinct manufacturer. Data Extraction We identified 16 articles (9 RCTs, 1 prospective nonrandomized trial, 6 observational studies). We assessed characteristics of the studies and, for RCTs, extracted counts for patients whose seizures were characterized as “controlled” and “uncontrolled.” Data Synthesis Seven RCTs were included in the meta-analysis. The aggregate odds ratio (n=204) was 1.0 (95% confidence interval: 0.7–1.4), indicating no difference in the odds of uncontrolled seizure for patients on generic medications compared to patients on brand-name medications. In contrast, the observational studies identified trends in drug or health services utilization that the authors attributed to changes in seizure control. Conclusions Though most RCTs were short-term evaluations, the available evidence does not suggest an association between loss of seizure control and generic substitution of at least three types of AEDs. The observational study data may be explained by factors such as undue concern from patients or physicians about the effectiveness of generic AEDs after a recent switch. In the absence of better data, physicians may want to consider more intensive monitoring of high-risk patients taking AEDs when any switch occurs.

Kesselheim, Aaron S.; Stedman, Margaret R.; Bubrick, Ellen J.; Gagne, Joshua J.; Misono, Alexander S.; Lee, Joy L.; Brookhart, M. Alan; Avorn, Jerry; Shrank, William H.

2011-01-01

355

Seizure outcomes following the use of generic versus brand-name antiepileptic drugs: a systematic review and meta-analysis.  

PubMed

The automatic substitution of bioequivalent generics for brand-name antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) has been linked by anecdotal reports to loss of seizure control. To evaluate studies comparing brand-name and generic AEDs, and determine whether evidence exists of superiority of the brand-name version in maintaining seizure control. English-language human studies identified in searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts (1984 to 2009). Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies comparing seizure events or seizure-related outcomes between one brand-name AED and at least one alternative version produced by a distinct manufacturer. We identified 16 articles (9 RCTs, 1 prospective nonrandomized trial, 6 observational studies). We assessed characteristics of the studies and, for RCTs, extracted counts for patients whose seizures were characterized as 'controlled' and 'uncontrolled'. Seven RCTs were included in the meta-analysis. The aggregate odds ratio (n = 204) was 1.1 (95% CI 0.9, 1.2), indicating no difference in the odds of uncontrolled seizure for patients on generic medications compared with patients on brand-name medications. In contrast, the observational studies identified trends in drug or health services utilization that the authors attributed to changes in seizure control. Although most RCTs were short-term evaluations, the available evidence does not suggest an association between loss of seizure control and generic substitution of at least three types of AEDs. The observational study data may be explained by factors such as undue concern from patients or physicians about the effectiveness of generic AEDs after a recent switch. In the absence of better data, physicians may want to consider more intensive monitoring of high-risk patients taking AEDs when any switch occurs. PMID:20329806

Kesselheim, Aaron S; Stedman, Margaret R; Bubrick, Ellen J; Gagne, Joshua J; Misono, Alexander S; Lee, Joy L; Brookhart, M Alan; Avorn, Jerry; Shrank, William H

2010-03-26

356

Tramadol induced seizure: A 3-year study  

PubMed Central

Background: Tramadol is a synthetic analgesic. Seizures have been reported in patients receiving this drug. In this study we evaluated the correlation between tramadol consumption and seizure occurrence. Methods: Twenty-eight subjects with a history of tramadol consumption and seizure were studied. Electroencephalograms (EEG) were performed in the first 24 hours and again one week later. Subjects were followed up for a mean of 18 months after the initial attack. Results: In the 28 subjects, 26 (92.8%) were males and 2 (7.2%) were females. The mean age of the subjects was 28.4 years. Thirteen patients had abused more than 400 mg/day of tramadol. Sixteen subjects concomitantly used other drugs. The seizures occurred within the first 24 hours of tramadol intake in 25 of the subjects. The first EEG was abnormal in 12 cases, but the second EEG was abnormal in only one case. Neuroimaging of only one subject displayed patchy white matter lesions. Conclusion: In conclusion, the neurotoxicity of tramadol commonly manifests as generalized tonic clonic seizures most frequently within 24 hours after tramadol intake and was more common in subjects concomitantly consuming alcohol, illicit drugs, anti-psychotics, or anti-depressants.

Boostani, Reza; Derakhshan, Siavash

2012-01-01

357

Tramadol induced seizure: A 3-year study.  

PubMed

Background: Tramadol is a synthetic analgesic. Seizures have been reported in patients receiving this drug. In this study we evaluated the correlation between tramadol consumption and seizure occurrence. Methods: Twenty-eight subjects with a history of tramadol consumption and seizure were studied. Electroencephalograms (EEG) were performed in the first 24 hours and again one week later. Subjects were followed up for a mean of 18 months after the initial attack. Results: In the 28 subjects, 26 (92.8%) were males and 2 (7.2%) were females. The mean age of the subjects was 28.4 years. Thirteen patients had abused more than 400 mg/day of tramadol. Sixteen subjects concomitantly used other drugs. The seizures occurred within the first 24 hours of tramadol intake in 25 of the subjects. The first EEG was abnormal in 12 cases, but the second EEG was abnormal in only one case. Neuroimaging of only one subject displayed patchy white matter lesions. Conclusion: In conclusion, the neurotoxicity of tramadol commonly manifests as generalized tonic clonic seizures most frequently within 24 hours after tramadol intake and was more common in subjects concomitantly consuming alcohol, illicit drugs, anti-psychotics, or anti-depressants. PMID:24009919

Boostani, Reza; Derakhshan, Siavash

2012-01-01

358

Recurrent absence status epilepticus: clinical and EEG characteristics.  

PubMed

In order to outline the clinical and EEG characteristics of recurrent absence status epilepticus (ASE), eight cases with more than two attacks of ASE were studied. Their current ages were between 13 and 84 years, and five of the patients were women. There was a history of epilepsy in five of the patients before the first ASE episode. A varying degree of confusion was the main clinical symptom with associated mild motor signs like perioral, eyelid and generalised myoclonus, seen in one, two and four patients respectively. Two of the patients had juvenile myoclonic epilepsy. One patient had an atypical form of childhood absence epilepsy characterised by recurrent ASE attacks on awakening. There were two patients with phantom absences and late onset generalised convulsions, one patient with perioral myoclonia and absences, and finally two patients with eyelid myoclonia with absences, which are proposed syndromes. On the EEGs that revealed the diagnosis of ASE, there was a marked variability of the generalised multispike and wave discharges. The EEG findings appeared to be syndrome-related with some exceptions. IV Clonazepam lead to a dramatic improvement. Our study shows that the majority of recurrent ASE cases do not fit into the International syndrome classification. PMID:12076103

Baykan, Betül; Gökyi?it, Ay?en; Gürses, Candan; Eraksoy, Mefkure

2002-07-01

359

Atypical depression, atypical temperament and a differential antidepressant response to fluoxetine and nortriptyline.  

PubMed

We examined the personality characteristics of depressed patients with and without atypical depression. Of 195 depressed outpatients in a randomized treatment trial of fluoxetine or nortriptyline, 16 met DSM-IV criteria for atypical depression. We compared the personality traits and disorders in those with and without atypical depression. In atypical depression, fluoxetine was superior to nortriptyline. On the Temperament and Character Inventory, those with atypical depression had high attachment, low persistence, and high anticipatory anxiety. A temperament construct of these dimensions was associated with a differential antidepressant response, regardless of other atypical features. A temperament derived measure of "rejection sensitivity" defines a group of depressed patients with a differential antidepressant response, regardless of reversed vegetative symptoms. PMID:15129420

Joyce, Peter R; Mulder, Roger T; McKenzie, Janice M; Luty, Suzanne E; Cloninger, C Robert

2004-01-01

360

Atypical phenylketonuria with “ dihydrobiopterin synthetase ” deficiency: Absence of phosphate-eliminating enzyme activity demonstrated in liver  

Microsoft Academic Search

An assay for the phosphate-eliminating enzyme (PEE) activity in liver was developed which required only 5–10 mg tissue. PEE catalyses the elimination of inorganic triphosphate from dihydroneopterin triphosphate, which is the second and irreversible step in the biosynthesis of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4). In the presence of substrate, magnesium, NADPH, and a sepiapterin reductase fraction from human liver, PEE catalysed the formation

A. Niederwieser; W. Leimbacher; H. Ch. Curtius; A. Ponzone; F. Rey; D. Leupold

1985-01-01

361

Dictator Perpetuus: Julius Caesar--did he have seizures? If so, what was the etiology?  

PubMed

The "Dictator Perpetuus" of the Roman Empire, the great Julius Caesar, was not the one for whom the well-known cesarean operation was named; instead, this term is derived from a Latin word meaning "to cut." Caesar likely had epilepsy on the basis of four attacks that were probably complex partial seizures: (1) while listening to an oration by Cicero, (2) in the Senate while being offered the Emperor's Crown, and in military campaigns, (3) near Thapsus (North Africa) and (4) Corduba (Spain). Also, it is possible that he had absence attacks as a child and as a teenager. His son, Caesarion, by Queen Cleopatra, likely had seizures as a child, but the evidence is only suggestive. His great-great-great grandnephews Caligula and Britannicus also had seizures. The etiology of these seizures in this Julio-Claudian family was most likely through inheritance, with the possibility of sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) in his great grandfather and also his father. Our best evidence comes from the ancient sources of Suetonius, Plutarch, Pliny, and Appianus. PMID:15380131

Hughes, John R

2004-10-01

362

Spatiotemporal Neuronal Correlates of Seizure Generation in Focal Epilepsy  

PubMed Central

Summary Purpose Focal seizures are thought to reflect simultaneous activation of a large population of neurons within a discrete region of pathological brain. Resective surgery targeting this focus is an effective treatment in carefully selected patients, but not all. While in vivo recordings of single-neuron (i.e., “unit”) activity in patients with epilepsy have a long history, no studies have examined long–term firing rates leading into seizures and the spatial relationship of unit activity with respect to the seizure onset zone. Methods Microelectrode arrays recorded action potentials from neurons in mesial temporal structures (often including contralateral mesial temporal structures) in seven patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Key Findings Only 7.6% of microelectrode recordings showed increased firing rates prior to seizure onset and only 32.4% of microelectrodes showed any seizure-related activity changes. Surprisingly, firing rates on the majority of microelectrodes (67.6%) did not change throughout the seizure, including some microelectrodes located within the seizure onset zone. Furthermore, changes in firing rate prior to and at seizure onset were observed on microelectrodes located outside the seizure onset zone and even in contralateral mesial temporal lobe. These early changes varied from seizure to seizure, demonstrating the heterogeneity of ensemble activity underlying the generation of focal seizures. Increased neuronal synchrony was primarily observed only following seizure onset. Significance These results suggest that cellular correlates of seizure initiation and sustained ictal discharge in mesial temporal lobe epilepsy involve a small subset of the neurons within and outside the seizure onset zone. These results further suggest that the “epileptic ensemble or network” responsible for seizure generation are more complex and heterogeneous than previously thought and that future studies may find mechanistic insights and therapeutic treatments outside the clinical seizure onset zone.

Bower, Mark R.; Stead, Matt; Meyer, Fredric B.; Marsh, W. Richard; Worrell, Gregory A.

2012-01-01

363

[Classification of epileptic seizures. Comparison of two systems].  

PubMed

In spite of its universal acceptance, the international classification of epileptic seizures suffers from certain limitations. The fundamental divisions between partial and generalized seizures on the one hand, and between partial simple and complex seizures on the other, are not always practical, nor useful. The terminology is often cumbersome, and does not contain essential localizing information. Finally, the seizure classification is sometimes dependent on ancillary testing, particularly the EEG. We propose a different seizure classification, which answers the above shortcomings of the international classification, and which has been used for years in major epilepsy centers. In this system, the seizure classification is based exclusively on seizure symptomatology. The terms are generally more concise than those of the international classification, and yet convey more precise information. For example, the term left visual aura-->automotor seizure-->generalized tonic clonic seizure would be equivalent to simple partial seizure with visual symptom evolving into complex partial seizure evolving into generalized tonic clonic seizure. The international classification is longer and omits essential later-alizing information. This classification is easy to apply, and can be an extremely useful complement to the international seizure classification, especially for centers whose emphasis is on surgical treatment of epilepsy. PMID:8684356

Benbadis, S; Lüders, H

1995-01-01

364

Unusual cause of seizures in Singapore: neurocysticercosis.  

PubMed

Neurocysticercosis is the commonest cause for adult onset of seizures in developing countries, and is relatively uncommon in Singapore. However, with the influx of foreign workers from developing countries, we need to consider it as a differential diagnosis in our approach to adult-onset seizures in this group of patients. We describe a neurocysticercosis occurring in a 22-year-old Indian man who presented with a single episode of generalised tonic-clonic seizures. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed a well-defined, hypointense lesion in the cortical and subcortical regions of the left frontal lobe with adjacent vasogenic oedema. Following contrast administration, a well-defined ring enhancement was noted, with suggestion of some internal enhancement. Imaging findings were suggestive of neurocysticercosis. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging of the brain two weeks after treatment showed lesion resolution. PMID:18581006

Foo, S S; Selvan, V S; Clarke, M J; Shen, E J E

2008-06-01

365

The effect of exercise on seizure frequency.  

PubMed

The effect of exercise on seizure frequency is uncertain. While some investigators have reported an increase in the normal background frequency of EEGs after exercise, other investigators believe that exercise increases EEG epileptiform activity in the recovery period following exercise. We asked all patients over a two month period at our outpatient Epilepsy Clinic to complete a questionnaire regarding their exercise habits. Those who were not otherwise healthy, were non-compliant with their medications, or whose blood levels were not therapeutic were eliminated from the analysis. Utilizing the complex Chi-square method, it was determined that patients who participated in some form of exercise had significantly fewer seizures than those who did not exercise (p less than 0.05). Conclusions from this brief study indicate the need for a more comprehensive trial, including EEGs, biochemical studies, and fitness evaluations, to determine the effects of an exercise program on seizure frequency. PMID:2769084

Denio, L S; Drake, M E; Pakalnis, A

1989-01-01

366

Hemifacial seizures due to ganglioglioma of cerebellum.  

PubMed

We present a male infant with hemifacial seizures refractory to antiepileptic medication. Hemifacial spasms around the left eye were frequent during wakefulness and sleep since birth. He also had mild psychomotor retardation. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a large tumor in the left middle cerebellar peduncle. Ictal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and ictal (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose [(18)F-FDG] positron emission tomography (PET) revealed hyperperfusion and hyper glucose metabolism at the tumor. Total removal of the tumor resulted in complete disappearance of hemifacial seizures and improved psychomotor development, indicating that the cerebellar tumor caused hemifacial seizures. A histopathological study confirmed that the tumor was a ganglioglioma. This case and the literature on similar cases indicated that this was a new epileptic syndrome originating in the cerebellum. Early diagnosis and early complete removal of the epileptogenic lesion should be recommended for this syndrome. PMID:19628347

Hanai, Sae; Okazaki, Ken-ichi; Fujikawa, Yoshinao; Nakagawa, Eiji; Sugai, Kenji; Sasaki, Masayuki; Otsuki, Taisuke

2009-07-22

367

Management of an unusual case of atypical Mayer–Rokitansky–Kuster–Hauser syndrome, with unilateral gonadal agenesis, solitary ectopic pelvic kidney, and pelviureteric junction obstruction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Congenital absence of uterus and vagina, Mayer–Rokitansky–Kuster–Hauser (MRKH) syndrome, is mullerian agenesis and is the\\u000a second most frequent cause of primary amenorrhea. Only atypical form of MRKH (type B) is associated with renal skeletal and\\u000a ovarian abnormalities. We report the management of an unusual case of atypical MRKH, unilateral gonadal agenesis, and solitary\\u000a ectopic pelvic kidney with pelviureteric junction obstruction

Anup Kumar; Saurabh Mishra; P. N. Dogra

2007-01-01

368

Atypical Presentation of Hepatic Sarcoidosis  

PubMed Central

Introduction Sarcoidosis is a multisystem inflammatory disease characterized by noncaseating granulomas. It affects approximately 34 in 100,000 African Americans. Hepatic involvement is rare and is typically subclinical with only 0.1% to 0.9% of patients with clinically significant GI symptoms. We present a case of previously undiagnosed sarcoidosis with initial presentation of nausea, vomiting, pruritus, and severe abdominal pain with a cholestatic pattern of liver injury. Case Presentation A 42-year-old African American woman with prior cholecystectomy and a history of diabetes mellitus, type 2 was admitted with severe right upper quadrant pain, nausea, vomiting, pruritus and a 45 pound weight loss over the course of 3 months. Physical exam showed diffuse abdominal pain without peritoneal signs worse in the RUQ and epigastric region with positive Murphy's sign. Labs revealed cholestatictransaminitis with elevated direct bilirubin and dramatically elevated alkaline phosphatase. RUQ ultrasound and MRCP were normal. An infectious workup was negative and the patient was not taking any hepatotoxic drugs. Serum anti-mitochondrial antibody was negative and subsequent biopsy revealed a large number of noncaseating granulomas with notable autoimmune biliary pathology on initial pathology read. Although a chest x-ray was normal, a chest CT revealed mediastinal lymphadenopathy. A fine needle aspiration showed noncaseating granulomatous lymphadenitis. ACE level was elevated at 101 U/L. Diagnosis of multisystem sarcoidosis was made. Prednisone was started and the patient was discharged several days later with nearly complete resolution of her symptoms. Discussion Sarcoidosis is a rare inflammatory disease identified most commonly in African American patients. Hepatic involvement is typically subclinical and found on routine blood work in 10%–30% of patients with pulmonary sarcoidosis. In this atypical case the patient presented with a clinical picture mimicking acute biliary pathology and no symptoms or classic pulmonary findings of pulmonary sarcoidosis. A few rare cases of symptomatic GI sarcoidosis with a biliary obstructive picture are noted in the literature, however, these patients are exclusively males and also presented with fever and hepatosplenomegaly, so sarcoidosis was not high on the initial differential. Infectious etiologies of granulomatous hepatitis including HIV, TB and fungal infection were ruled out. She was not on any drugs reported to cause granulomatous hepatitis. Primary biliary cirrhosis became the initial working diagnosis. However, the patient's AMA negative status and a pathology addendum that noted only minimal biliary tree involvement prompted a reevaluation and workup for sarcoidosis. In this atypical case of hepatic sarcoidosis the patient presented with a clinical picture consistent with acute biliary pathology and no symptoms of sarcoidosis. However, demonstration of a granulomatous hepatitis without other apparent cause and negative AMA in a high-risk demographic patient led to a correct diagnosis.

Stitt, Rodger; Garvie, John

2013-01-01

369

Atypical "benign" partial epilepsy of childhood or pseudo-lennox syndrome. Part II: family study.  

PubMed

Atypical benign partial epilepsy of childhood (ABPE = Pseudo-Lennox syndrome) shows semiologic parallels to Lennox-Gastaut syndrome, however--besides the lack of tonic seizures--it has an entirely different etiology and prognosis. Recently Hahn et al [17] investigated the long-term evolution of 43 cases with ABPE. Symptomatology, EEG findings, and course were found to overlap with Rolandic epilepsy, Landau-Kleffner syndrome and ESES. The incidence of seizures in relatives was determined in the whole series investigated by Hahn et al [17]. Five of 56 siblings suffered from seizures (3 Rolandic seizures; one febrile convulsions; one unclassified). Three fathers reported grand mal. In 29 families of the series of Hahn et al EEG recordings were performed: 22 brothers, 19 sisters and 16 pairs of parents. In 29% of the siblings a sharp wave focus was demonstrable. The rate rose to 40% when only siblings investigated at the age of maximum expression (3 to 10 years) were considered. Sharp wave foci were mostly multifocal and indistinguishable from those observed in siblings of children with Rolandic epilepsy. Photoparoxysmal response and generalized spikes and waves during rest and hyperventilation were also found to be significantly elevated (26% and 13% respectively). We conclude that ABPE is a subgroup of idiopathic partial epilepsy of childhood (representing a less benign part of a spectrum) that has to be ranked in a continuum with Rolandic epilepsy. The different clinical phenotype might be caused by a higher expressivity of the identical genetic trait, possibly facilitated by other genetic or acquired factors. Genetic heterogeneity represents another possibility. PMID:11315204

Doose, H; Hahn, A; Neubauer, B A; Pistohl, J; Stephani, U

2001-02-01

370

Seizures after intravenous tramadol given as premedication  

PubMed Central

A 35-year-old, 50-kg female with a history of epilepsy was scheduled for elective breast surgery (fibroadenoma) under general anaesthesia. She was given glycopyrrolate 0.2 mg, ondansetron 4 mg and tramadol 100 mg i.v. as premedication. Within 5 min, she had an acute episode of generalised tonic–clonic seizure that was successfully treated with 75 mg thiopentone i.v. and after 30 min, she was given general anaesthesia with endotracheal intubation. Surgery, intra-operative period, extubation and post-operative period were uneventful. We conclude that tramadol may provoke seizures in patients with epilepsy even within the recommended dose range.

Raiger, Lalit Kumar; Naithani, Udita; Bhatia, Sonali; Chauhan, Sandeep Singh

2012-01-01

371

A gut feeling about insular seizures  

PubMed Central

A 43-year-old man presented to the Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia, after experiencing his first tonic-clonic seizure. For the previous 2 years he had undergone gastroenterological investigation of episodes of gagging associated with hypersalivation and lachrymation, occurring three or four times per week. EEG showed epileptiform discharges in the right anterior temporal region; brain MRI revealed a lesion in the right insular cortex. Video-EEG telemetry demonstrated that the episodes of gagging were focal seizures. Antiepileptic drug therapy resulted in no further episodes occurring over the next 10 months.

Dionisio, S; Koenig, A; Murray, J; Somerville, E

2011-01-01

372

Seizures and the long-QT syndrome.  

PubMed

We describe a case of idiopathic long-QT syndrome in a 4-year-old Hispanic girl. She had been seen previously at an outside hospital for possible new-onset seizure disorder but was brought to our emergency department after sustaining an unwitnessed fall. Her ECG was significant for changes consistent with long-QT syndrome. Emergency physicians should understand the necessity of electrocardiography in all pediatric patients who present with multiple spontaneous falls, episodes of dizziness, new-onset seizure activity and syncopal episodes. PMID:8909279

Bell, M R; Kozak, R J

1996-11-01

373

Neural - glial circuits : Can Interneurons stop seizures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent progress in neurobiology suggests that astrocytes - through calcium excitability - are active partners to the neurons by integrating their activity and, in turn, regulating synaptic transmission. In a similar fashion neurons and interneurons are the 'Yin and Yang' of the hippocampus. The dichotomy of excitation and inhibition between pyramidal neurons and interneurons plays a crucial role in the function of the neuronal circuit.We consider a model of a pyramidal cell in contact with one synaptic astrocytes. It has been shown that such a circuit - triggered by transient stimulation - can exhibit sustained oscillations ("seizures") for strong coupling. The question we are considering is, under what conditions synaptic inhibition can stop these seizures?

Nadkarni, Suhita; Jung, Peter

2004-03-01

374

Late-onset psychogenic nonepileptic seizures.  

PubMed

Psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) are common, but have not been well studied in older patients. We retrospectively reviewed patients with PNES who were 60 years of age and above at the time of "seizure" onset. Over a 27-month period, nine (9.6%) of 94 patients diagnosed with PNES had onset at age 60 or above. None had evidence for coexisting epilepsy. Eight were women. Characteristics of the group were comparable to younger patients with PNES. We conclude that PNES should be considered as a diagnostic possibility in older patients. PMID:16531122

Behrouz, Reza; Heriaud, Leanne; Benbadis, Selim R

2006-03-13

375

Seizures after intravenous tramadol given as premedication.  

PubMed

A 35-year-old, 50-kg female with a history of epilepsy was scheduled for elective breast surgery (fibroadenoma) under general anaesthesia. She was given glycopyrrolate 0.2 mg, ondansetron 4 mg and tramadol 100 mg i.v. as premedication. Within 5 min, she had an acute episode of generalised tonic-clonic seizure that was successfully treated with 75 mg thiopentone i.v. and after 30 min, she was given general anaesthesia with endotracheal intubation. Surgery, intra-operative period, extubation and post-operative period were uneventful. We conclude that tramadol may provoke seizures in patients with epilepsy even within the recommended dose range. PMID:22529421

Raiger, Lalit Kumar; Naithani, Udita; Bhatia, Sonali; Chauhan, Sandeep Singh

2012-01-01

376

Detection of seizure rhythmicity by recurrences  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Epileptic seizures show a certain degree of rhythmicity, a feature of heuristic and practical interest. In this paper, we introduce a simple model of this type of behavior, and suggest a measure for detecting and quantifying it. To evaluate our method, we develop a set of test segments that incorporate rhythmicity features, and present results from the application of this measure to test segments. We then analyze electrocorticogram segments containing seizures, and present two examples. Finally, we discuss the similarity of our method to techniques for detecting unstable periodic orbits in chaotic time series.

Harrison, Mary Ann F.; Frei, Mark G.; Osorio, Ivan

2008-09-01

377

Treating seizures and epilepsy with anticoagulants?  

PubMed Central

Thrombin is a serine protease playing an essential role in the blood coagulation cascade. Recent work, however, has identified a novel role for thrombin-mediated signaling pathways in the central nervous system. Binding of thrombin to protease-activated receptors (PARs) in the brain appears to have multiple actions affecting both health and disease. Specifically, thrombin has been shown to lead to the onset of seizures via PAR-1 activation. In this perspective article, we review the putative mechanisms by which thrombin causes seizures and epilepsy. We propose a potential role of PAR-1 antagonists and novel thrombin inhibitors as new, possible antiepileptic drugs.

Maggio, Nicola; Blatt, Ilan; Vlachos, Andreas; Tanne, David; Chapman, Joab; Segal, Menahem

2013-01-01

378

Canine and feline epileptic seizures and the lunar cycle: 2,507 seizures (2000-2008).  

PubMed

Epileptic seizures in 211 canine and feline patients diagnosed with idiopathic epilepsy were evaluated for temporal significance in relation to the lunar cycle. Seizure counts were compared among each of the eight individual lunar phases, among each of eight exact lunar phase dates, and by percent of lunar illumination using generalized estimating equations. No statistical significance was found in any of these comparisons excluding a relationship between the onset of epileptic seizures and the phases of the moon. Alteration in anticonvulsant treatment or monitoring of canine and feline patients with idiopathic epilepsy at large was not warranted based on the lunar cycle. PMID:21852516

Browand-Stainback, Laura; Levesque, Donald; McBee, Matthew

2011-08-18

379

Quantitative movement analysis differentiates focal seizures characterized by automatisms.  

PubMed

The analysis of epileptic seizures is typically performed by visual inspection, limited by interrater variation. Our aim was to differentiate seizures characterized by automatisms with an objective, quantitative movement analysis. In part 1 of this study we found parameters (extent and speed of movement of the wrist and trunk) separating seizures with predominant proximal (hyperkinetic, n=10) and distal (automotor, n=10) limb automatisms (P<0.002). For each movement parameter we used the lowest value recorded for a hyperkinetic seizure in part 1 as the cutoff parameter in part 2 on a consecutive sample of 100 motor seizures. As in part 1, the difference between hyperkinetic and non-hyperkinetic seizures was highly significant (<0.001). When all movement parameters were above the threshold, a hyperkinetic seizure was identified with a probability of 80.8%, but the probability for a non-hyperkinetic seizure to have all parameters above the threshold was only 0.02%. PMID:21458386

Rémi, Jan; Cunha, João P Silva; Vollmar, Christian; Topçuo?lu, Özgür Bilgin; Meier, Alexander; Ulowetz, Steffen; Beleza, Pedro; Noachtar, Soheyl

2011-03-31

380

FDA Drug Safety Communication: Anti-seizure drug Potiga ...  

Center for Drug Evaluation (CDER)

... without talking to their health care professional, as stopping anti-seizure treatment suddenly can precipitate withdrawal seizures, a serious and life ... More results from www.fda.gov/drugs/drugsafety

381

FDA Drug Safety Podcast: Anti-seizure drug Potiga ...  

Center for Drug Evaluation (CDER)

... without talking to their health care professional, as stopping anti-seizure treatment suddenly can precipitate withdrawal seizures, a serious and life ... More results from www.fda.gov/drugs/drugsafety/drugsafetypodcasts

382

The Anticonvulsant Activity of Cannabinoids in Seizure Sensitive Gerbils.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Results of the studies indicate that acute administration of Delta tetrahydrocannabinol(THC), in sufficiently high doses, will abolish spontaneous seizures in the sensitive strain of gerbils. The dose required to prevent the seizures gave rise to a marked...

B. Cox M. ten Ham W. J. Loskota P. Lomax

1975-01-01

383

Convulsive seizures in schizophrenic patients induced by zotepine administration.  

PubMed

One hundred twenty-nine schizophrenic inpatients who were administered zotepine were studied to see if they had zotepine-induced convulsive seizures. Twenty-two patients had grand mal seizures during the administration periods. The incidence of the seizure was 17.1% and was higher than that in previous reports. The average duration of zotepine administration before the seizure was 48.3 days. The incidence of the seizure was closely related to the daily dosage of zotepine, but there was no significant correlation between the daily dosage of zotepine and the duration of administration before the onset of the seizure. The patients who received a combined administration with the higher dose of zotepine and other phenothiazines were revealed to be more likely to have the seizure. In addition, young patients and patients with a past history of head injuries showed a high incidence of the seizure with the administration of zotepine. PMID:1353125

Hori, M; Suzuki, T; Sasaki, M; Shiraishi, H; Koizumi, J

1992-03-01

384

Neuro-inflammation, blood-brain barrier, seizures and autism  

PubMed Central

Many children with Autism Spectrum Diseases (ASD) present with seizure activity, but the pathogenesis is not understood. Recent evidence indicates that neuro-inflammation could contribute to seizures. We hypothesize that brain mast cell activation due to allergic, environmental and/or stress triggers could lead to focal disruption of the blood-brain barrier and neuro-inflammation, thus contributing to the development of seizures. Treating neuro-inflammation may be useful when anti-seizure medications are ineffective.

2011-01-01

385

Intranasal delivery of antiepileptic medications for treatment of seizures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary  Acute isolated seizure, repetitive or recurrent seizures, and status epilepticus are all deemed medical emergencies. Mortality\\u000a and worse neurologic outcome are directly associated with the duration of seizure activity. A number of recent reviews have\\u000a described consensus statements regarding the pharmacologic treatment protocols for seizures when patients are in pre-hospital,\\u000a institutional, and home-bound settings. Benzodiazepines, such as lorazepam, diazepam, midazolam,

Daniel P. Wermeling

2009-01-01

386

Remote effects of focal hippocampal seizures on the rat neocortex  

PubMed Central

Seizures have both local and remote effects on nervous system function. While propagated seizures are known to disrupt cerebral activity, little work has been done on remote network effects of seizures that do not propagate. Human focal temporal lobe seizures demonstrate remote changes including slow waves on electroencephalography (EEG) and decreased cerebral blood flow (CBF) in the neocortex. Ictal neocortical slow waves have been interpreted as seizure propagation, however we hypothesize that they reflect a depressed cortical state resembling sleep or coma. To investigate this hypothesis, we performed multi-modal studies of partial and secondarily-generalized limbic seizures in rats. Video/EEG monitoring of spontaneous seizures revealed slow waves in the frontal cortex during behaviorally mild partial seizures, contrasted with fast poly-spike activity during convulsive generalized seizures. Seizures induced by hippocampal stimulation produced a similar pattern, and were used to perform functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) weighted for blood oxygenation (BOLD) and blood volume (CBV), demonstrating increased signals in hippocampus, thalamus and septum, but decreases in orbitofrontal, cingulate, and retrosplenial cortex during partial seizures; and increases in all these regions during propagated seizures. Combining these results with neuronal recordings and CBF measurements, we related neocortical slow waves to reduced neuronal activity and cerebral metabolism during partial seizures, but found increased neuronal activity and metabolism during propagated seizures. These findings suggest that ictal neocortical slow waves represent an altered cortical state of depressed function, not propagated seizure activity. This remote effect of partial seizures may cause impaired cerebral functions, including loss of consciousness.

Englot, Dario J.; Mishra, Asht M.; Mansuripur, Peter K.; Herman, Peter; Hyder, Fahmeed; Blumenfeld, Hal

2008-01-01

387

Cardiac asystole during right frontal lobe seizures: a case report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The association between partial seizures and cardiac asystole has rarely been reported in the literature. This potentially\\u000a life-threatening symptom has been observed principally in left-sided epilepsies, in particular during seizures originating\\u000a in temporal lobe. We describe a case with ictal bradycardia followed by cardiac asystole during right frontal lobe seizures.\\u000a Video-EEG monitoring recorded two partial seizures with electro-clinical findings suggestive

A. Mascia; P. P. Quarato; A. Sparano; V. Esposito; F. Sebastiano; G. Occhiogrosso; G. Di Gennaro

2005-01-01

388

Lunar phases and seizure occurrence: just an ancient legend?  

PubMed

The authors retrospectively reviewed all neurologic records of an emergency unit from 1999 to 2003 to identify a potential association between lunar phases and seizure occurrence. Overall 859 patients admitted for seizure occurrence were divided into the four quarters of the synodic month according to moon phases. A significant clustering of seizures around the full moon period was observed, supporting the ancient belief of periodic increased seizure frequency during full-moon days. PMID:16682684

Polychronopoulos, P; Argyriou, A A; Sirrou, V; Huliara, V; Aplada, M; Gourzis, P; Economou, A; Terzis, E; Chroni, E

2006-05-01

389

Current management of febrile seizures in Japan: An overview  

Microsoft Academic Search

Febrile seizures (FS) require both acute and chronic management. Acute management includes the treatment and differential diagnosis of FS and depend on the presence of seizures and a patient’s level of consciousness upon arrival at hospital: a patient may be discharged after physical examination if there are no seizures and no alteration of consciousness; close observation and laboratory examinations may

Kenji Sugai

2010-01-01

390

Psychogenic seizures: Video telemetry observations in 27 patients  

Microsoft Academic Search

Psychogenic seizures are unusual during the first decade of life. To compare the clinical features of psychogenic seizures in young children with those of teenagers, the long-term electroencephalographic and video monitoring studies of all patients younger than 18 years of age with recorded episodes diagnosed as psychogenic seizures were reviewed from a single hospital during the past 7 years. The

Uri Kramer; Lionel Carmant; James J. Riviello; Amy Stauffer; Sandra L. Helmers; Mohamad A. Mikati; Gregory L. Holmes

1995-01-01

391

Are seizures harmful: what can we learn from animal models?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Epilepsy is a brain disease that requires distributed neuronal networks for its expression. Several characteristics of epilepsy, including its natural history, the latency between an initial insult and the first manifestation of seizures, the complex interaction of seizures with development as a function of developmental stage, the modulating effect of systemic physiological responses, and the fact that seizures are ultimately

Andrew J. Cole; Sookyong Koh; Yi Zheng

2002-01-01

392

Efficacy of the ketogenic diet in focal versus generalized seizures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Most reports of the ketogenic diet have focused on its efficacy for generalized seizures. Few data are available regarding its effect on focal seizures. We retrospectively studied patients (mean = 7.5 years of age) with medically intractable epilepsy treated by the ketogenic diet. The predominant seizure types in each patient were classified as generalized (100 patients) or focal (34 patients)

Bernhard V Maydell; Elaine Wyllie; Nadia Akhtar; Prakash Kotagal; Kathy Powaski; Karen Cook; Arie Weinstock; A. David Rothner

2001-01-01

393

Supplementary sensorimotor area seizures in children and adolescents  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rationale: Some types of seizures in children may be difficult to recognize; the diagnosis of seizures arising near the mesial posterior frontal supplementary sensorimotor area (SSMA) may be especially challenging. Such seizures have been well described in adults, but few pediatric cases have been reported even though onset is typically in childhood. Methods: We studied 11 children and adolescents with

Nancy Bass; Elaine Wyllie; Youssef Comair; Prakash Kotagal; Paul Ruggieri; Hans Holthausen

1995-01-01

394

Differential diagnosis of seizure disorders: A conversation analytic approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

“Taking the history” remains the most important diagnostic tool in the assessment of people who have lost consciousness. The distinction of epileptic and non-epileptic seizures (NES) is particularly difficult and relevant. Whereas epileptic seizures can usually be controlled with antiepileptic drugs, NES are considered an expression of psychosocial distress and may improve with psychotherapy. The recording of typical seizures with

Meike Schwabe; Stephen J. Howell; Markus Reuber

2007-01-01

395

EVIDENCE IMPLICATING SUBSTANTIA NIGRA IN REGULATION OF KINDLED SEIZURE THRESHOLD  

Microsoft Academic Search

We studied the effects of microinjected drugs and brainstem lesions on motor and limbic seizures in the kindling model of epilepsy. The duration of motor seizures was determined by timing the clonic and tonic movements of the extremities. The .duration of limbic seizures was determined by measuring afterdischarge recorded on the electroencephalogram. Bilateral microinjection of a y-aminobutyric acid (GABA) agonist,

MARC T. GALLOWAY; LEWIS C. RIGSBEE; CHEOLSU SHIN

1984-01-01

396

Temporal lobe epilepsy: Where do the seizures really begin?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Defining precisely the site of seizure onset has important implications for our understanding of the pathophysiology of temporal lobe epilepsy, as well as for the surgical treatment of the disorder. Removal of the limbic areas of the medial temporal lobe has led to a high rate of seizure control, but the relatively large number of patients for whom seizure control

Edward H. Bertram

2009-01-01

397

Seizure Termination by Acidosis Depends on ASIC1a  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY Most seizures stop spontaneously. However, the molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Earlier observations that seizures reduce brain pH and that acidosis inhibits seizures indicated that acidosis halts epileptic activity. Because acid–sensing ion channel–1a (ASIC1a) shows exquisite sensitivity to extracellular pH and regulates neuron excitability, we hypothesized that acidosis might activate ASIC1a to terminate seizures. Disrupting mouse ASIC1a increased the severity of chemoconvulsant–induced seizures, whereas overexpressing ASIC1a had the opposite effect. ASIC1a did not affect seizure threshold or onset, but shortened seizure duration and prevented progression. CO2 inhalation, long known to lower brain pH and inhibit seizures, also required ASIC1a to interrupt tonic–clonic seizures. Acidosis activated inhibitory interneurons through ASIC1a, suggesting that ASIC1a might limit seizures by increasing inhibitory tone. These findings identify ASIC1a as a key element in seizure termination when brain pH falls. The results suggest a molecular mechanism for how the brain stops seizures and suggest new therapeutic strategies.

Ziemann, Adam E.; Schnizler, Mikael K.; Albert, Gregory W.; Severson, Meryl A.; Howard, Matthew A.; Welsh, Michael J.; Wemmie, John A.

2008-01-01

398

Consequences of recurrent seizures during early brain development  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is well documented that prolonged seizures (status epilepticus) can cause neuronal injury and result in synaptic reorganization in certain brain regions. However, the effect of recurrent, relatively short seizures in young animals on subsequent brain development is not known. To study the consequences of recurrent seizures on the developing brain, we subjected immature rats to a total of 50

Z Liu; Y Yang; D. C Silveira; M. R Sarkisian; P Tandon; L.-T Huang; C. E Stafstrom; G. L Holmes

1999-01-01

399

Surgical Treatment of Hypothalamic Hamartoma and Refractory Seizures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Refractory gelastic seizures are often associated with hypothalamic hamartoma (HH). Presurgical evaluation in such children often points to a distinct cortical region as the source of the seizures. A case of a child with HH and refractory seizures is presented. Video-EEG monitoring revealed a well-defined epileptic focus in the left frontal region. In accordance with the current understanding of the

Uri Kramer; Sergey Spector; Walid Nasser; Vitali Siomin; Itzhak Fried; Shlomi Constantini

2001-01-01

400

Neonatal seizure classification: A fetal perspective concerning childhood epilepsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Neonatal seizures are markers for time-specific etiologies during antepartum, intrapartum and neonatal time periods. Seizures with or without encephalopathic signs can represent a continuum of maternal, placental, fetal and neonatal risk factors and disease states. A multi-dimensional classification scheme for neonatal seizures is suggested that will help strategize specific therapeutic interventions to optimize neurologic outcome and anticipate later neurological morbidities

Mark S. Scher

2006-01-01

401

77 FR 11437 - Inspection Service Authority; Seizure and Forfeiture  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Part 233 Inspection Service Authority; Seizure and Forfeiture AGENCY: Postal Service...Service's rules and regulations regarding the seizure and forfeiture of property into three...sections 233.8 and 233.9, and treats seizures involving personal use quantities of...

2012-02-27

402

Symptoms of Psychopathology in Adults with Intellectual Disability and Seizures  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Seizures are more common in individuals with intellectual disabilities than in the general population. As a result, differences in functioning for individuals with intellectual disability with and without seizures have been evaluated. Research on differences in psychopathology for individuals with intellectual disability with and without seizures

Fitzgerald, Mary E.; Matson, Johnny L.; Barker, Alyse

2011-01-01

403

27 CFR 555.186 - Seizure or forfeiture.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Seizure or forfeiture. 555.186 Section...of Plastic Explosives § 555.186 Seizure or forfeiture. Any plastic explosive...S.C. 842(l)-(n) is subject to seizure and forfeiture, and all provisions...

2011-04-01

404

50 CFR 12.11 - Notification of seizure.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...2012-10-01 false Notification of seizure. 12.11 Section 12.11 Wildlife...AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS SEIZURE AND FORFEITURE PROCEDURES Preliminary Requirements § 12.11 Notification of seizure. Except where the owner or...

2012-10-01

405

50 CFR 12.11 - Notification of seizure.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-10-01 false Notification of seizure. 12.11 Section 12.11 Wildlife...AND IMPORTATION OF WILDLIFE AND PLANTS SEIZURE AND FORFEITURE PROCEDURES Preliminary Requirements § 12.11 Notification of seizure. Except where the owner or...

2011-10-01

406

Extracranial vertebral artery dissection following tonic clonic seizure  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 34 year old woman developed cerebral infarction, following a tonic-clonic seizure. A vertebral artery dissection was demonstrated and may have been caused by arterial trauma during the seizure. This cause of morbidity following convulsive seizures may have been overlooked in the past and needs to be recognised in view of the potential benefits of anticoagulation.

C A Young; D W Chadwick; P R Humphrey

1991-01-01

407

Dental injury during seizures associated with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background:Patients can sustain injuries during seizures and the pattern and type of injury (eg, tongue biting) can be a useful silent witness in the diagnosis of seizures. In addition, the seizure type potentially influences the type of injury.Methods:Patients with dental injury were identified from the Gloucestershire Epilepsy Database (n = 1673). These patients’ notes were reviewed and the following data

R H Thomas; S Higgins; G N Fuller

2009-01-01

408

Commercialization of Seizure Prediction Technology Promises and Pitfalls of Biosignal Analysis: Seizure Prediction and Management (A case study);.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This presentation will focus on the process of commercializing technology designed to predict/detect seizures. The author will present general design criteria for an implantable device used chronically by an individual with epilepsy to manage their seizur...

M. T. Rise

2001-01-01

409

Search and Seizure in Higher Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper reviews the application of the Fourth Amendment, which protects persons against unreasonable search and seizure, as it applies to the student-college relationship. The topics discussed in terms of federal and state court decisions include warrantless searches, delegation of authority to conduct searches, notice of identity and purpose…

Mondschein, Eric S.; West, Michael A.

410

Search and Seizure in the Public Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Chapter 5 in a book on school law reviews the law governing search and seizure in the public school setting. Three types of searches illustrate problems encountered by school personnel: the search of a student's person, including the "strip search"; the search of a vehicle; and the search of a school newspaper room. Recent case law indicates that…

Brammer, J. William, Jr.

411

Search and Seizure in the Public Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Chapter 5 in a book on school law reviews the law governing search and seizure in the public school setting. Three types of searches illustrate problems encountered by school personnel: the search of a student's person, including the "strip search"; the search of a vehicle; and the search of a school newspaper room. Recent case law indicates that…

Brammer, J. William, Jr.

412

Seizure Management for School-Age Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|As many as 325,000 school-age children, ages 5-14, have epilepsy in the U.S. Thankfully, with medication, surgery, a special diet or vagus nerve stimulation, most go to school and fully participate in school activities. Children who continue to have seizures, however, may run into problems. Many of these problems can be overcome or prevented…

Frueh, Eileen

2008-01-01

413

Pyramidal cells accumulate chloride at seizure onset  

PubMed Central

Seizures are thought to originate from a failure of inhibition to quell hyperactive neural circuits, but the nature of this failure remains unknown. Here we combine high-speed two-photon imaging with electrophysiological recordings to directly evaluate the interaction between populations of interneurons and principal cells during the onset of seizure-like activity in mouse hippocampal slices. Both calcium imaging and dual patch clamp recordings reveal that in vitro seizure-like events (SLEs) are preceded by pre-ictal bursts of activity in which interneurons predominate. Corresponding changes in intracellular chloride concentration were observed in pyramidal cells using the chloride indicator Clomeleon. These changes were measurable at SLE onset and became very large during the SLE. Pharmacological manipulation of GABAergic transmission, either by blocking GABAA receptors or by hyperpolarizing the GABAA reversal potential, converted SLEs to short interictal-like bursts. Together, our results support a model in which pre-ictal GABAA receptor-mediated chloride influx shifts EGABA to produce a positive feedback loop that contributes to the initiation of seizure activity.

Lillis, Kyle P; Kramer, Mark A; Mertz, Jerome; Staley, Kevin J

2012-01-01

414

Search and Seizure in the Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Educators concerned about school safety have resorted to searching students, their lockers, and their possessions. These searches have led to litigation over whether the Fourth Amendment's prohibition of unreasonable searches and seizures applies to public schools. Although courts have upheld reasonable searches, administrators should carefully…

Russo, Charles J.; Stefkovich, Jacqueline A.

1998-01-01

415

Search and Seizure in the Public Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The protection afforded a minor student by the fourth amendment is perhaps open to some speculation due to his age and the unique situation presented by the school environment. The search and seizure issue is discussed in terms of the findings in several court cases. For journal availability see HE 508 741. (LBH)

Medlin, Kay Cowden

1976-01-01

416

Pharmacokinetics of Levetiracetam in Neonates with Seizures  

PubMed Central

The pharmacokinetics of levetiracetam were determined prospectively in 18 neonates with seizures. Neonates were found to have lower clearance, higher volume of distribution, and a longer half-life as compared with older children and adults. Mild somnolence was the only adverse effect.

Merhar, Stephanie L.; Schibler, Kurt R.; Sherwin, Catherine M.; Meinzen-Derr, Jareen; Shi, Jing; Balmakund, Tonya; Vinks, Alexander A.

2013-01-01

417

Immunological perspectives of temporal lobe seizures.  

PubMed

The temporal lobes are affected in many different neurological disorders, such as neurodegenerative diseases, viral and immunological encephalitides, and epilepsy. Both experimental and clinical evidence suggests a different inflammatory response to seizures in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) in comparison to those with extra-TLE (XTLE). Proinflammatory cytokines and several autoantibodies have been shown to be associated with TLE compared to other epilepsy types suggesting the specific role and structure of the temporal lobe. Abundant experience suggests that activation of both innate and adaptive immunity is associated with epilepsy, particularly refractory focal epilepsy. Limbic encephalitis often triggers temporal lobe seizures, and a proportion of these disorders are immune-mediated. Histological evidence shows activation of specific inflammatory pathways in resected temporal lobes of epileptic patients, and certain epileptic disorders have shown increased incidence in patients with autoimmune diseases. Rapid activation of proinflammatory cytokines is observed after single seizures, but there is also evidence of chronic overproduction of cytokines and other inflammatory mediators in patients with TLE, suggesting a neuromodulatory role of inflammation in epilepsy. In this review we summarize current data on the presence and the role of immunological factors in temporal lobe seizures, and their possible involvement in epileptogenesis. PMID:23998423

Liimatainen, Suvi; Kai, Lehtimäki; Johanna, Palmio; Tiina, Alapirtti; Jukka, Peltola

2013-08-13

418

Optimal features for online seizure detection.  

PubMed

This study identifies characteristic features in scalp EEG that simultaneously give the best discrimination between epileptic seizures and background EEG in minimally pre-processed scalp data; and have minimal computational complexity to be suitable for online, real-time analysis. The discriminative performance of 65 previously reported features has been evaluated in terms of sensitivity, specificity, area under the sensitivity-specificity curve (AUC), and relative computational complexity, on 47 seizures (split in 2,698 2 s sections) in over 172 h of scalp EEG from 24 adults. The best performing features are line length and relative power in the 12.5-25 Hz band. Relative power has a better seizure detection performance (AUC = 0.83; line length AUC = 0.77), but is calculated after the discrete wavelet transform and is thus more computationally complex. Hence, relative power achieves the best performance for offline detection, whilst line length would be preferable for online low complexity detection. These results, from the largest systematic study of seizure detection features, aid future researchers in selecting an optimal set of features when designing algorithms for both standard offline detection and new online low computational complexity detectors. PMID:22476713

Logesparan, Lojini; Casson, Alexander J; Rodriguez-Villegas, Esther

2012-04-03

419

Epileptic seizures: Quakes of the brain?  

Microsoft Academic Search

A dynamical analogy supported by five scale-free statistics (the Gutenberg-Richter distribution of event sizes, the distribution of interevent intervals, the Omori and inverse Omori laws, and the conditional waiting time until the next event) is shown to exist between two classes of seizures (``focal'' in humans and generalized in animals) and earthquakes. Increments in excitatory interneuronal coupling in animals expose

Ivan Osorio; Mark G. Frei; Didier Sornette; John Milton; Ying-Cheng Lai

2010-01-01

420

Targeting Pannexin1 Improves Seizure Outcome  

PubMed Central

Imbalance of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate and of the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA is one of several causes of seizures. ATP has also been implicated in epilepsy. However, little is known about the mechanisms involved in the release of ATP from cells and the consequences of the altered ATP signaling during seizures. Pannexin1 (Panx1) is found in astrocytes and in neurons at high levels in the embryonic and young postnatal brain, declining in adulthood. Panx1 forms large-conductance voltage sensitive plasma membrane channels permeable to ATP that are also activated by elevated extracellular K+ and following P2 receptor stimulation. Based on these properties, we hypothesized that Panx1 channels may contribute to seizures by increasing the levels of extracellular ATP. Using pharmacological tools and two transgenic mice deficient for Panx1 we show here that interference with Panx1 ameliorates the outcome and shortens the duration of kainic acid-induced status epilepticus. These data thus indicate that the activation of Panx1 in juvenile mouse hippocampi contributes to neuronal hyperactivity in seizures.

Santiago, Marcelo F.; Veliskova, Jana; Patel, Naman K.; Lutz, Sarah E.; Caille, Dorothee; Charollais, Anne; Meda, Paolo; Scemes, Eliana

2011-01-01

421

Seizure detection on prolonged-EEG videos  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper develops the fusion of audio and video features by Dempster-Shafer theory for seizure detection. In audio analysis, Mel frequency cepstral coefficient (MFCC) and zero-crossing rate (ZCR) are applied to hidden Markov model (HMM) for audio type classification and probability computation. The results are transferred to belief of evidence and combined with the results from videos. Results have been

Yu-ting Shen; Pau-choo Chung; Monnique Thonnet; Patrick Chauvel

2008-01-01

422

Seizure Management for School-Age Children  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As many as 325,000 school-age children, ages 5-14, have epilepsy in the U.S. Thankfully, with medication, surgery, a special diet or vagus nerve stimulation, most go to school and fully participate in school activities. Children who continue to have seizures, however, may run into problems. Many of these problems can be overcome or prevented…

Frueh, Eileen

2008-01-01

423

Seizures and Teens: Maximizing Health and Safety  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As parents and caregivers, their job is to help their children become happy, healthy, and productive members of society. They try to balance the desire to protect their children with their need to become independent young adults. This can be a struggle for parents of teens with seizures, since there are so many challenges they may face. Teenagers…

Sundstrom, Diane

2007-01-01

424

Neonatal seizures: soothing a burning topic.  

PubMed

Neonatal seizures are a potentially life-threatening pediatric problem with a variety of causes, such as birth trauma, asphyxia, congenital anomalies, metabolic disturbances, infections, and drug withdrawal or intoxication. Thorough and timely evaluations of such patients are necessary to identify and treat the underlying etiology, therefore reducing potential morbidity and mortality. We review neonatal seizures and hypocalcemia and present the case of a 6-day-old male infant who presented to a tertiary pediatric emergency department with seizure-like episodes. He was found to have markedly low serum calcium, magnesium, and parathyroid hormone concentrations, as well as a significantly elevated serum phosphate concentration. The etiology of these abnormalities was found to be maternal ingestion of extremely high doses of calcium carbonate during the third trimester of her pregnancy, an occurrence that has been reported only once in the literature. Education pertaining to the dangers of excessive calcium carbonate intake during pregnancy may be an important piece of anticipatory guidance for pregnant mothers with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux, and questioning the mother of a neonate presenting with seizures about such over-the-counter medications may help to elucidate the diagnosis. PMID:24084610

Thornton, Matthew D; Chen, Lei; Langhan, Melissa L

2013-10-01

425

Seizures in Children with Supratentorial Astroglial Neoplasms  

Microsoft Academic Search

We reviewed the records of 98 consecutive patients, 18 years of age or younger, with pathologically confirmed supratentorial astroglial neoplasms at the Children’s Hospital, Boston, to evaluate the importance of seizures in their presentation and natural history. Tumors were diagnosed using the WHO criteria as pilocytic astrocytomas, astrocytomas, anaplastic astrocytomas, glioblastomas, giant cell glioblastomas, oligoastrocytomas and gangliogliomas. Our results were

Joseph A. Shady; Peter Mc L. Black; William J. Kupsky; Nancy J. Tarbell; Michael Scott; Traci Leong; Gregory Holmes

1994-01-01

426

Functional implications of seizure-induced neurogenesis.  

PubMed

The neurobiological doctrine governing the concept of neurogenesis has undergone a revolution in the past few years. What was once considered dubious is now well accepted: new neurons are born in the adult brain. Science fiction is quickly becoming a reality as scientists discover ways to convert skin, bone, or blood cells into neurons. In the epilepsy arena, widespread interest has developed because of the evidence that neurogenesis increases after seizures, trauma, and other insults or injuries that alter seizure susceptibility. This review discusses some of the initial studies in this field, and their often surprising functional implications. The emphasis will be on the granule cells of hippocampus, because they are perhaps more relevant to epilepsy than other areas in which neurogenesis occurs throughout life, the olfactory bulb and subventricular zone. In particular, the following questions will be addressed: 1. Do granule cells that are born in the adult brain become functional, and what are the limits of their function? Do they behave homogeneously? Results from our own laboratory have focused on cells that become established outside the normal boundaries of the granule cell layer, forming a group of "ectopic" granule cells in the hilar region. 2. Is increased neurogenesis beneficial, or might it actually exacerbate seizures? Evidence is presented that supports the hypothesis that new granule cells may not necessarily act to ameliorate seizures, and might even contribute to them. Furthermore, cognitive deficits following seizures might in part be due to new circuits that develop between new cells and the host brain. 3. How do the new cells interact with the host brain? Several changes occur in the dentate gyrus after seizures, and increased neurogenesis is only one of many. What is the interdependence of this multitude of changes, if any? 4. Is neurogenesis increased after seizures in man? Research suggests that the data from human epileptics are actually inconsistent with the studies in animal models of epilepsy, because there is little evidence of increased neurogenesis in epileptic tissue resected from intractable epileptics. Yet neurogenesis has been shown to occur in humans throughout adult life. What might be the reasons for these seemingly disparate results? PMID:15250595

Scharfman, Helen E

2004-01-01

427

Distribution of partial seizures during the sleep-wake cycle Differences by seizure onset site  

Microsoft Academic Search

Article abstract—Objective: To evaluate the effects of sleep on partial seizures arising from various brain regions. Methods: The authors prospectively studied 133 patients with localization-related epilepsy undergoing video-EEG moni- toring over a 2-year period. Seizure type, site of onset, sleep\\/wake state at onset, duration, and epilepsy syndrome diagnosis were recorded. Periorbital, chin EMG, and scalp\\/sphenoidal electrodes were used. A subset

S. T. Herman; T. S. Walczak; C. W. Bazil

428

[Gastrointestinal histoplasmosis: an atypical presentation].  

PubMed

Histoplasmosis is a systemic mycosis caused by Histoplasma capsulatum. It is an endemic disease in the American continent. It is spread hematogenously and any organ can be affected. It is more frequent in immunodeficient patients and the most common opportunist mycosis associated with HIV Exclusive gastrointestinal involvement is rare and invariably mortal without treatment. It is considered to be impossible to diagnose the disease based on the macroscopic aspect of lesions. We report a 43-year-old male in apparent good health status who was admitted with intermittent proctorrhagia of one year of evolution associated to burning proctalgia, without any further symptoms. A videocolonoscopy (VCC) with proctologic exam was conducted The patient was warned about the potential orificial origin of the bleeding and the importance of screening for colorectal neoplasia. The proctologic exam revealed internal congestive hemorrhoids. VCC showed during the routine exploration of the terminal ileon lesions both in that level and rectum, although of a different morphology. The colon had normal endoscopic appearance. Biopsies of both lesions identified Histoplasma. Later studies diagnosed HIV/AIDS and the patient was referred to the infectology department to complete diagnostic tests and begin treatment of both diseases. In conclusion, we present an atypical case of this mycosis because of its exclusive gastrointestinal allocation, in anasymptomatic patient, in apparent good health, with unknown HIV/AIDS, who was admitted because of a proctorrhagia of orificial origin. Endoscopic biopsies of lesions of different morphologies, located in the terminal ileon and rectum, allowed the diagnosis of this disease, that had no clinical expression. This casual endoscopic diagnosis enabled to change the life expectancy of the patient. We consider that the described endoscopic lesions in rectum are of a particular morphology and can rarely be found in other pathologies. The diffusion of these images could warn other endoscopists of these phenomena. PMID:23650831

Barros, Roberto Augusto; Monteverde, María José; dElizalde, Santiago de; Barros, Augusto Sebastián; Barros, Roberto Federico

2013-03-01

429

"Simple febrile seizures plus (SFS+)": more than one febrile seizure within 24 hours is usually okay.  

PubMed

This study aimed to investigate whether children with recurrent febrile seizures within a 24-hour period need to be worked up differently from children with simple febrile seizures. Inclusion criteria included the following: (i) children with first seizure cluster between 4 months and 3 years of age, (ii) children who had more than one febrile seizure within 24 hours, and (iii) children who returned to baseline between and after each event. Thirty-two patients met the inclusion criteria over a 3-year period. All patients underwent brain CT and/or MRI and EEG. All head CTs were normal. Two children had abnormal MRI findings - both benign: one is thought to represent postictal changes, and the other one is an incidental arachnoid cyst. Of the 4 abnormal EEGs, one showed epileptiform discharges, while the others showed generalized ictal or postictal features. We propose the term "simple febrile seizures plus (SFS+)" to describe children who have more than one seizure within 24 hours but who are otherwise not different in presentation from children with SFS. PMID:23624109

Grill, Marie F; Ng, Yu-Tze

2013-04-24

430

Seizures, brain damage and brain development.  

PubMed

Recent evidence suggests that hippocampal damage can be both the result of seizure activity and the cause of further chronic epilepsy. A review of current models of status epilepticus-induced brain damage reveals that excitotoxic mechanisms probably mediate the lesions in most brain regions. NMDA receptors appear to play a dominant role, although non-NMDA glutamate receptors are important in several specific neuronal populations. In the immature brain, a number of unique metabolic features determine a different set of vulnerabilities, resulting in a brain which is more resistant than the adult's to certain mechanisms of brain damage, but quite vulnerable to others. The inhibition of growth by severe seizure activity has implications for the developing brain that have not yet been fully explored. The mechanisms by which seizure-induced hippocampal lesions cause chronic epilepsy have been explored in several recent animal models. A rearrangement of hippocampal circuits may result from death of selected populations of inhibitory neurons, or from misdirected regeneration by excitatory neurons. It could lead to chronic epilepsy through loss of normal inhibition, through sprouting of new excitatory connections, through conservation of excitatory connections which in a healthy brain would be pruned during development, or through facilitation of kindling by one of these mechanisms. These recent results are beginning to reconcile the pathology seen in human hippocampi ablated for intractable epilepsy with that observed in experimental animals, and offer the promise of even greater advances in the future. They suggest a mechanism for Gower's dictum that "seizures beget seizures" and highlight the importance of the interneurons of the dentate gyrus in epileptogenesis. PMID:7818023

Wasterlain, C G; Shirasaka, Y

431

Nerve agent-induced seizures and their pharmacological modulation  

SciTech Connect

Intoxication with nerve agents produces prolonged central nervous system seizures (status epilepticus) that can produce irreversible brain pathology (15). This report summarizes our recent findings regarding the neurotransmitter changes that occur in discrete brain regions as a function of seizure duration and the differential effectiveness of anticholinergic, benzodiazepine and excitatory amino acid (EAA) antagonist drugs in terminating soman-induced seizures when given at different times after seizure onset. These results are discussed in relation to a model we have proposed to explain the sequence of electrophysiological, biochemical and neurochemical events and mechanisms controlling nerve agent-induced seizures.

McDonough, J.H.; Shih, T.M.; Adams, N.L.; Koviak, T.A.; Cook, L.A.

1993-05-13

432

[Situation-related seizures in patients at developmental age].  

PubMed

The seizures which accompany specified situations occur in about 5% of population. They are frequent in patients at developmental age due to a different degree of brain maturity. A single, occasional seizure event which occurs in specified situations is not an epilepsy but it constitutes a significant clinical problem which requires a thorough diagnostics and procedure. We discuss situation-related seizures (also called acute symptomatic seizures) in children, excluding febrile convulsions. We bring attention to situation-related seizures characteristic only of developmental age. PMID:19172835

Szwed-Bia?ozyt, Barbara; Marsza?, Elzbieta

2008-01-01

433

Midazolam: an effective intravenous agent for seizure control.  

PubMed Central

Midazolam meleate, a water soluble 1,4 benzodiazepine, was used intravenously in 20 patients suffering seizures, of whom 12 were in status epilepticus. In all cases, midazolam in a dose of 2.5-15 mg rapidly terminated the seizure. There were no complications from the use of midazolam. The causes of the seizures were varied but alcohol-withdrawal seizures were the single largest cause. Thirteen patients were taking some form of anticonvulsant medication but only three were in the therapeutic range. Midazolam is seen to be an effective agent in the emergency treatment of seizures.

Galvin, G M; Jelinek, G A

1987-01-01

434

Neonatal Seizures: An Update on Mechanisms and Management  

PubMed Central

The lifespan risk of seizures is highest in the neonatal period. Currently used therapies have limited efficacy. Although the treatment of neonatal seizures has not significantly changed in the last several decades, there has been substantial progress in understanding developmental mechanisms that influence seizure generation and responsiveness to anticonvulsants. Here we provide an overview of current approaches to the diagnosis and treatment of neonatal seizures, identifying some of the recent insights about the pathophysiology of neonatal seizures that may provide the foundation for better treatment.

Jensen, Frances E.

2010-01-01

435

Model-based seizure detection for intracranial EEG recordings.  

PubMed

This paper presents a novel model-based patient-specific method for automatic detection of seizures in the intracranial EEG recordings. The proposed method overcomes the complexities in the practical implementation of the patient-specific approach of seizure detection. The method builds a seizure model (set of basis functions) for a priori known seizure (the template seizure pattern), and uses the statistically optimal null filters as a building block for the detection of similar seizures. The process of modeling the template seizure is fully automatic. Overall, the detection method involves the segmentation of the template seizure pattern, rejection of the redundant and noisy segments, extraction of features from the segments to generate a set of models, selection of the best seizure model, and training of the classifier. The trained classifier is used to detect similar seizures in the remaining data. The resulting seizure detection method was evaluated on a total of 304 h of single-channel depth EEG recordings from 14 patients. The system performance is further compared to the Qu-Gotman patient-specific system using the same data. A significant improvement in the proposed system, in terms of specificity, is observed over the compared method. PMID:22361656

Yadav, R; Swamy, M N S; Agarwal, R

2012-02-22

436

Seizure semiology of lesional frontal lobe epilepsies in children.  

PubMed

The aim of the study was to analyse the semiology of seizures in children with frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE) and to compare them with other paediatric cohorts described in the literature as well as with adult counterparts. We analysed 174 registered seizures of 18 cases under 12 years with lesional epilepsy whose frontal origin was defined by the concordance of neuroimaging and ictal electrographic findings, and confirmed by surgery in the six cases operated on. Seizures were generally short, with a high daily frequency and usually related to sleep. The most characteristic semiological pattern consisted of complex motor seizures, particularly hypermotor. Often seizures corresponded to a mixture of different semiological patterns (tonic, gelastic, automotor, hypermotor, versive) presenting in the same seizure, often as a unique type in the same patient. With regard to several aspects the semiology of FLE in our cohort looks like that reported in adult series, in particular as to the frequency of complex motor seizures. However, our cohort was also characterised by a more protean array of seizure semiology, stressing the occurrence of seizures typically present in adults (versive and complex motor) and of some seizure patterns more characteristic in children such as epileptic spasms; moreover, the rare occurrence of secondarily generalised tonic clonic seizures (SGTCS) was confirmed. PMID:18461504

Battaglia, D; Lettori, D; Contaldo, I; Veredice, C; Sacco, A; Vasco, J; Martinelli, D; Chieffo, D; Tartaglione, T; Colosimo, C; Di Rocco, C; Guzzetta, F

2007-12-01

437

A novel portable seizure detection alarm system: preliminary results.  

PubMed

The unpredictable and random occurrence of seizures is of the most distressful issue affecting patients and their families. Unattended seizures can have serious consequences including injury or death. The objective of this study is to develop a small, portable, wearable device capable of detecting seizures and alerting patients and families on recognition of specific seizures' motor activity. Ictal data were prospectively obtained in consecutive patients admitted to two video-EEG units. This study included patients with a history of motor seizures, clonic or tonic, or tonic-clonic seizures or patients with complex partial seizures with frequent secondary generalization. A "Motion Sensor" unit mounted on a bracelet was attached to one wrist. The "Sensor" contains a three-axis accelerometer and a transmitter. The three-axis movements' data were transmitted to a portable computer. Algorithm specially developed for this purpose analyzed the recorded data. Seizures' alerts were compared with the video-EEG data. Ictal data were acquired in 15 of the 31 recruited patients. The algorithm correctly identified 20 of 22 (91%) captured seizures and generated an alarm within a median period of 17 seconds. All events lasting >30 seconds (i.e., 19 events) were identified. The system failed to identify 2 of 22 seizures (9%). There were eight false alarms during 1,692 hours of monitoring. Preliminary data suggest that this motion detection device/alarm system can identify most motor seizures with high sensitivity and with a low false alarm rate. PMID:21221012

Kramer, Uri; Kipervasser, Svetlana; Shlitner, Arie; Kuzniecky, Ruben

2011-02-01

438

Closed-loop seizure control on epileptic rat models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper numerous alternative treatments in addition to pharmacological therapy are proposed for their use in epileptic patients. Epileptic animal models can play a crucial role in the performance evaluation of new therapeutic techniques. The objective of this research is to first develop various epileptic rat models; second, develop a portable wireless closed-loop seizure controller including on-line seizure detection and real-time electrical stimulation for seizure elimination; and third, apply the developed seizure controller to the animal models to perform on-line seizure elimination. The closed-loop seizure controller was applied to three Long-Evans rats with spontaneous spike-wave discharges (non-convulsive) and three Long-Evans rats with epileptiform activities induced by pentylenetetrazol (PTZ) injection (convulsive) for evaluation. The seizure detection accuracy is greater than 92% (up to 99%), and averaged seizure detection latency is less than 0.6 s for both spontaneous non-convulsive and PTZ-induced convulsive seizures. The average false stimulation rate is 3.1%. Near 30% of PTZ-induced convulsive seizures need more than two times of 0.5 s electrical stimulation for suppression and 90% of the non-convulsive seizures can be suppressed by only one 0.5 s electrical stimulation.

Liang, Sheng-Fu; Liao, Yi-Cheng; Shaw, Fu-Zen; Chang, Da-Wei; Young, Chung-Ping; Chiueh, Herming

2011-08-01

439

Responsive Electrical Stimulation Suppresses Epileptic Seizures in Rats  

PubMed Central

Background A responsive electrical stimulation pattern based on our recently developed novel seizure prediction method was designed to suppress the penicillin-induced epileptic seizures. Methodology Seizures were induced by Penicillin injection at rat cortex. A responsive electrical stimulation system was triggered prior to seizures predicted with phase synchronisation. Rats with induced seizures were stimulated by the electrical pulses at a responsive or 1 Hz periodic pattern of an open system. The effectiveness of stimulation on seizures suppression was assessed by measuring the average number and duration of seizures per hour. Results The prediction algorithm reliably identified seizures in real time and triggered the responsive stimulation. This type of electrical stimulation dramatically suppressed seizure activity and the performance was better than the open stimulation system with fewer and shorter seizures. Conclusions A responsive electrical stimulation system triggered by the phase synchronisation prediction is able to significantly suppress seizures. Significance Responsive electrical stimulation could achieve superior treatment performance and reduce power consumption and side effects.

Wang, Lei; Wang, Shouyan; Xu, Canhua; Fu, Feng; Jing, Xiaorong; Zhang, Hua; Dong, Xiuzhen

2012-01-01

440

Barking seizure: acute episodes of barking in a 75-year-old previously healthy man.  

PubMed

A 75-year-old right-handed man was admitted to our emergency department complaining of recurrent episodes of involuntary 'barking' within the past 12h. The episodes had occurred after an initial two-minute attack from sleep involving tonic contraction of the upper extremities and jaw locking. By the time of admission, the patient had had a total of at least 7-10 'barking' episodes, each lasting 30-45 s. Seven months prior to his current admission, the patient had had a minor ischemic stroke causing mild left paresis, which had resolved completely. His awake EEG revealed a normal background pattern interrupted by runs of two per second slow waves mixed with low-voltage spikes in the left temporal lobe with a left mid-temporal emphasis. The patient was diagnosed with recurrent simple partial seizures, and treatment with intravenous valproic acid was initiated. He was discharged four days later without having experienced any further barking episodes. Atypical presentations of the epileptic seizures have been described in the literature, but ictal barking is very rare manifestation of epilepsy. PMID:22391466

Harandi, Ali Amini; Kalanie, Hossein; Asadollahi, Marjan; Fatehi, Farzad; Pakdaman, Hossein; Gharagozli, Koroush

2012-03-04

441

Suspected exercise-induced seizures in a young dog.  

PubMed

A 12-month-old female neutered crossbreed was referred for investigation of seizure-like episodes occurring only at intense exercise. Thorough medical, neurological and cardiac investigations were performed and excluded the most commonly known causes of seizure-like activity. The dog was fitted with an ambulatory electrocardiography device and underwent another exercise-induced seizure. The electrocardiogram during the episode revealed a sinus tachycardia at approximately 300 beats/minute. A video recording of the episode revealed generalised tonic clonic limb activity with jaw chomping and frothing at the mouth typical of seizure activity. Antiepileptic medications were not prescribed and the owner was advised not to exercise the dog intensely. The dog responded well and did not seizure after 12?months of mild-moderate off-lead exercise. As all the seizures in this case were triggered by intense physical activity, it is suggested that this may be a new form of reflex seizure activity. PMID:23387942

Motta, L; Dutton, E

2013-02-07

442

Seizures and syncope: anatomic basis and diagnostic considerations.  

PubMed

Although pathophysiologically distinct, syncope and seizures share clinical characteristics which may make diagnosis difficult. Adding to diagnostic complexity are the facts that seizures and syncope may coexist in the same patient, syncope may be associated with seizure-like motor manifestations, and seizures may be complicated by cardiac arrhythmia and syncope. Combined EEG/ECG telemetry is sometimes necessary to establish the correct diagnosis. These techniques also provide an opportunity to study the role of certain cortical regions in the modulation of cardiac function. There is an increasing understanding of the central autonomic pathways involved in the genesis of the cardiovascular changes that occur during epileptic seizures. This article reviews the use of EEG/ECG telemetry in the evaluation of syncope and seizures, and the neuroanatomic circuitry involved in the production of the cardiovascular manifestations of seizures. PMID:16477491

Britton, Jeffrey W; Benarroch, Eduardo

2006-02-01

443

Jacksonian seizure as the relapse symptom of multiple sclerosis  

PubMed Central

Epilepsy is more common in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) than in the general population, occurring in 2-3% of patients. Convulsions may be either tonic–clonic in nature or partial complex. In these individuals, seizures most likely result from lesions present in the cerebral cortex and subcortical white matter. A Jacksonian seizure is a type of simple partial seizure characterized by abnormal movements that begin in one group of muscles and progress to adjacent groups of muscles. We describe a case of Jacksonian seizure as the relapse symptom of MS. Focal motor seizures of this patient have been observed before and presumably marking the clinical onset or during acute bouts of MS. In this case, Jacksonian seizures appear to be the sign of a flare of MS, while the majority of seizures had been reported occur unrelated to MS relapses.

Najafi, Mohammad Reza; Chitsaz, Ahmad; Najafi, Mohammad Amin

2013-01-01

444

Atypical meningiomas--a case series.  

PubMed

Meningiomas, in particular the Atypical (grade 2), vary greatly in their behaviour and prognosis. Over a 19 year period, we operated on 169 meningiomas (on 86 patients) and of those, 9 cases of atypical meningiomas were found which met the 2007 World Health Organization (WHO) classification. The 9 patients represented 5.3% of all meningiomas. The average presenting age was 51 years and average follow-up was 103 months with 5 patients passing away between 38 and 219 months after diagnosis. The time to first recurrence was 24 months with 1 patient suffering 12 recurrences and 2 cases having metastases. Although we had a small number of atypical meningiomas, we believe our paper highlights the unpredictable and difficult nature of these tumours. PMID:22285882

Andric, Marko; Dixit, Shreya; Dubey, Arvind; Jessup, Peter; Hunn, Andrew

2012-01-28

445

Atypical presentation of subclinical rhythmic electrographic discharge of adults (SREDA) in a patient with idiopathic generalized epilepsy.  

PubMed

Subclinical rhythmic electrographic discharge of adults (SREDA) is considered a benign EEG pattern of uncertain significance, although it may closely resemble an electrographic seizure pattern. SREDA was first described by Westmoreland and Klass in 1981 as a distinctive rhythmic and rare EEG pattern primarily seen in older subjects. The typical pattern consists of sharp contoured, non-evolving 5 to 7 Hz theta rhythm with a widespread bilaterally synchronous distribution, but maximal over the parietal and posterior temporal regions. It usually lasts for a few seconds to several minutes without clinical association. Later in 1997, several unusual variants of SREDA were reported consisting of variations infrequency, morphology, topographic distribution, duration, and stage of alertness. We report SREDA in a patient with idiopathic generalized epilepsy which shows some atypical features (such as asynchronous onset, bifid waveforms, asymmetry, and fragmentation) and mimics a secondarily generalized partial seizure. It is important to successfully identify SREDA to avoid misdiagnosis and incorrect treatment. The technologist's contribution is essential and valuable. EEG technologists and interpreters should be aware of typical and atypical features of SREDA and its wide spectrum. PMID:22558646

Poothrikovil, Rajesh P; Al Asmi, Abdullah; Gujjar, Arunodaya

2012-03-01

446

Extreme obesity in female rats following prepuberal induction of lithium-pilocarpine seizures and a single injection of acepromazine.  

PubMed

Seizures were induced in female Wistar albino rats at either 35 or 55 days of age with a single systemic injection of lithium (3 mEq/kg) and pilocarpine (30 mg/kg); the rats were then treated with the atypical neuroleptic acepromazine (25 mg/kg). These rats manifested progressive weight gain for the rest of their lives. The effect was conspicuous by casual observation 6 weeks after treatment and occurred primarily in those rats that later developed spontaneous seizures. After 1 year, the rats were obese (>1000 g). Such weight gains, associated with almost three times the serum triglyceride levels, were not observed in male rats and have not been observed in hundreds of female rats that received this treatment as adults. Single postseizure injections of ketamine rather than acepromazine did not produce this obesity; the weights of these rats were similar to those of normal littermates. These results indicate that a single injection of a neuroleptic during limbic seizures before puberty can produce neuronal alterations that contribute to a lifetime of obesity. PMID:16103018

St-Pierre, L S; Persinger, M A

2005-08-15

447

Small atypical leiomyomas: report of two cases.  

PubMed

We describe two small atypical leiomyomas. The first was a 6-mm de novo lesion in a 53-year-old woman. The second was a 3-mm focus in a 12-mm leiomyoma in a 45-year-old woman. Both lesions showed moderate atypia and a mitotic rate of six per 10 high-power fields. Coagulative necrosis was not seen. Neither patient had received exogenous oestrogen or progestogen. There was no evidence of recurrence or metastasis in either patient after 60 months of follow-up. Our report provides evidence that atypical uterine leiomyomas may arise either de novo or within a leiomyoma. PMID:11523933

Scurry, J; Kerdemelidis, P; Fortune, D

2001-08-01

448

Combined Merkel Cell Carcinoma and Atypical Fibroxanthoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Although there are reports of squamous cell carcinoma arising within and adjacent to Merkel cell carcinoma, and one report\\u000a of an atypical fibroxanthoma-like tumor arising in an irradiated recurrent Merkel cell carcinoma, there have previously been\\u000a no reports of an immunohistochemically verified atypical fibroxanthoma occurring in conjunction with a Merkel cell carcinoma.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Objective  We report on a neoplasm with distinct features

Summer R. Youker; Elizabeth M. Billingsley

2005-01-01

449

[Etiology, follow-up and therapy of seizure clusters in temporal lobe epilepsy and catamenial epileptic seizures].  

PubMed

The phenomenon of seizure clustering is still poorly understood. We therefore investigated 192 patients with temporal lobe epilepsies among whom 60 showed clustering of seizures. The percentage of women was significantly higher in the cluster than in the non-cluster group, the history of epilepsy lasted longer and the excess of complex partial seizures over tonic clonic seizures was more prominent in the cluster group. In 46 out of the 60 patients the clustering did not occur initially but developed in the course of the disease. In a particular subgroup the development initiated with isolated tonic clonic seizures, in a later phase complex partial seizures appeared and finally only complex partial seizures remained. This type of history was found significantly more frequent in the cluster than in the non-cluster group (27% versus 7%). It is conjectured that endogenous, as well as exogenous factors, both of them not completely revealed, cause the occurrence of clusters; anticonvulsant drug therapy might even enlarge this trend. Patients with seizure clustering tend to be pharmacoresistant. Chronic therapy with antiepileptic drugs besides intermittent therapy with benzodiazepines may help. A particular type of seizure clustering is observed in catamenial epilepsies where seizures appear in the perimenstrual and/or periovulatory phase of the menstrual hormonal cycle of females. This type of seizure incidence is obviously influenced by hormonal rhythms. Ten patients suffering from catamenial epileptic seizures were therefore treated with a synthetic analogue of GnRH in order to suppress the menstrual hormonal rhythm. As a result 3 patients became seizure free and in 5 patients seizure frequency decreased. PMID:1375777

Bauer, J; Ghane, Y; Flügel, D; Wildt, L; Stefan, H

1992-01-01

450

Tramadol: seizures, serotonin syndrome, and coadministered antidepressants.  

PubMed

This ongoing column is dedicated to the challenging clinical interface between psychiatry and primary care-two fields that are inexorably linked.Tramadol (Ultram(®)) is a commonly prescribed analgesic because of its relatively lower risk of addiction and better safety profile in comparison with other opiates. However, two significant adverse reactions are known to potentially occur with tramadol-seizures and serotonin syndrome. These two adverse reactions may develop during tramadol monotherapy, but appear much more likely to emerge during misuse/overdose as well as with the coadministration of other drugs, particularly antidepressants. In this article, we review the data relating to tramadol, seizures, and serotonin syndrome. This pharmacologic intersection is of clear relevance to both psychiatrists and primary care clinicians. PMID:19724727

Sansone, Randy A; Sansone, Lori A

2009-04-01

451

Epileptic seizures: Quakes of the brain?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A dynamical analogy supported by five scale-free statistics (the Gutenberg-Richter distribution of event sizes, the distribution of interevent intervals, the Omori and inverse Omori laws, and the conditional waiting time until the next event) is shown to exist between two classes of seizures (“focal” in humans and generalized in animals) and earthquakes. Increments in excitatory interneuronal coupling in animals expose the system’s dependence on this parameter and its dynamical transmutability: moderate increases lead to power-law behavior of seizure energy and interevent times, while marked ones to scale-free (power-law) coextensive with characteristic scales and events. The coextensivity of power law and characteristic size regimes is predicted by models of coupled heterogeneous threshold oscillators of relaxation and underscores the role of coupling strength in shaping the dynamics of these systems.

Osorio, Ivan; Frei, Mark G.; Sornette, Didier; Milton, John; Lai, Ying-Cheng

2010-08-01

452

Intermittent clobazam therapy in febrile seizures  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of intermittent clobazam therapy in preventing the recurrence of febrile seizures and to assess\\u000a its safety.Methods: The study was a prospective, randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial conducted in the Department of Child Health,\\u000a Christian Medical College Hospital, Vellore between July 2001 and September 2002. Neurologically normal children between 6\\u000a months and 3 years of age with

Winsley Rose; Chellam Kirubakaran; Julius Xavier Scott

2005-01-01

453

A Neurophenomenological Study of Epileptic Seizure Anticipation  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a This article sets out to retrace the course of a neurophenomenological project initiated by Francisco Varela, the purpose\\u000a of which is the anticipation of epileptic seizure, and to evaluate the relevance of the neurophenomenological approach from\\u000a the methodological, therapeutic and epistemological viewpoints. New mathematical methods for analysing the neuro-electric\\u000a activity of the brain have recently enabled researchers to detect subtle

Claire Petitmengin

454

Eslicarbazepine acetate for partial-onset seizures.  

PubMed

Eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL), a new voltage-gated sodium channel blocker that is chemically related to carbamazepine and partially metabolized to oxcarbazepine, has attracted attention as results of previous Phase II and III studies demonstrated and confirmed efficacy and tolerability of ESL 800 and 1200 mg once daily as add-on therapy for adult patients with drug-resistant partial-onset seizures. In children, efficacy data point towards a dose-dependent decrease in seizure frequency and tolerability analyses showed a low incidence of mild drug-related adverse effects at 5 and 15 mg/kg/day. The most frequently reported adverse effects were dizziness, somnolence, headache, diplopia, nausea and vomiting. The convenience of once-daily dosing and a short/simple titration regimen in combination with a comparative efficacy and tolerability profile might promote ESL as a valid alternative to the current adjunctive antiepileptic drug therapy armamentarium for drug-resistant partial seizures in adults. Since clinical trials in children and adolescents on ESL efficacy and safety are ongoing and data already published are far from conclusive, the therapeutic value of ESL in this special population has to be established in the near future. PMID:22091592

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