Science.gov

Sample records for atypical mycobacterium infection

  1. Mycobacterium chelonae Is an Ubiquitous Atypical Mycobacterium

    PubMed Central

    Pinto-Gouveia, Miguel; Gameiro, Ana; Ramos, Leonor; Cardoso, José Carlos; Brites, Maria Manuel; Tellechea, Óscar; Figueiredo, Américo

    2015-01-01

    The type of cutaneous infection varies mainly according to the patient's immune status, and the disseminated form is mostly found in the context of immunosuppression. We report the case of a 62-year-old male who was under long-term systemic corticosteroid therapy and presented with a 7-month history of multiple painless cutaneous lesions at various stages of development: papules, nodules, pustules and hemorrhagic crusts, as well as small erosions and ulcers distributed over the limbs and scalp. Cutaneous biopsy showed a suppurative granulomatous infiltrate with abscess formation. Fite stain revealed numerous extracellular bacilli, suggesting mycobacterial infection, particularly by atypical mycobacteria. Culture of a skin sample revealed Mycobacterium chelonae. The patient started multidrug therapy and showed clinical improvement despite of resistance to one of the antibiotics. This striking presentation underlines the role of immunosuppression with corticotherapy as a major risk factor for these infections. Multidrug therapy is advised and antibiogram is essential in directing treatment. PMID:26351432

  2. [Cutaneous atypical mycobacteriosis due to Mycobacterium massiliense in a cat].

    PubMed

    Albini, S; Mueller, S; Bornand, V; Gutzwiller, M E Ricklin; Burnand, C; Hüssy, D; Abril, C; Reitt, K; Korczak, B M; Miserez, R

    2007-12-01

    Fast growing mycobacteria are saprophytic bacteria that prevail in water and soil. They are opportunistic pathogens and may cause various infections if gaining entry into the body through a trauma. We herein describe the clinical presentation, pathology and diagnosis of the first case of cutaneous atypical mycobacteriosis due to Mycobacterium massiliense in a cat. PMID:18225411

  3. Mycobacterium marinum infection.

    PubMed

    Cassetty, Christopher T; Sanchez, Miguel

    2004-01-01

    A 49-year-old man presented with nodules on his right hand after a history of Mycobacterium marinum infection recently treated with rifampin and clarithromycin. The patient has an aquarium with Betta fish (Siamese fighting fish). PMID:15748591

  4. A hoarse voice: atypical mycobacterial infection of the larynx.

    PubMed

    McEwan, J A; Mohsen, A H; Schmid, M L; McKendrick, M W

    2001-11-01

    Myobacterium malmoense is a non-tuberculous mycobacterium that most commonly causes pulmonary infection, particularly in patients with underlying pulmonary disease or immunodeficiency. We describe a case of Mycobacterium malmoense infection of the larynx in a previously well middle-aged woman, which has previously not been reported. The case highlights the importance of considering atypical mycobacterial infection in the differential diagnosis of laryngeal lesions. PMID:11779312

  5. Atypical presentation of infective endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Arunachalam, Karuppiah

    2016-01-01

    The HACEK group of organisms are one of the infrequent causes of infective endocarditis. Infective endocarditis should be recognized and treated promptly to prevent excessive morbidity and mortality associated with the disease. Sometimes the diagnosis is delayed due to vague and subtle presentation. Through this case report, risk factors of Cardiobacterium hominis endocarditis and its atypical presentation is illustrated to increase the recognition of infective endocarditis as one of the differential diagnosis. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2016-07.asp, free with no login]. PMID:27379355

  6. Cutaneous Mycobacterium abscessus Infection Associated with Mesotherapy Injection.

    PubMed

    Wongkitisophon, Pranee; Rattanakaemakorn, Ploysyne; Tanrattanakorn, Somsak; Vachiramon, Vasanop

    2011-01-01

    Non-tuberculous mycobacterial skin infections have an increasing incidence. In immunocompetent patients, they usually follow local trauma. We present a case of cutaneous Mycobacterium abscessus infection following mesotherapy. The lesions were successfully treated with a combination of clarithromycin, ciprofloxacin, and doxycycline. Atypical mycobacterial infection should be suspected in patients who develop late-onset skin and soft tissue infection after cutaneous injury, injection, and surgical intervention, particularly if they do not respond to conventional antibiotic treatment. PMID:21487459

  7. Treatment of Mycobacterium abscessus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Beekmann, Susan E.; Polgreen, Philip M.; Mackey, Kate; Winthrop, Kevin L.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is often resistant to multiple antimicrobial drugs, and data supporting effective drugs or dosing regimens are limited. To better identify treatment approaches and associated toxicities, we collected a series of case reports from the Emerging Infections Network. Side effects were common and often led to changing or discontinuing therapy. PMID:26890211

  8. Mycobacterium smegmatis infection of a prosthetic total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Saffo, Zaid; Ognjan, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    The most common organisms causing prosthetic knee joint infections are staphylococci. However, arthroplasty infections with atypical microbial pathogens, such as Mycobacteria can occur. Due to the rarity of mycobacterial prosthetic joint infections, diagnosis, treatment, and management of these atypical infections represent a clinical challenge. A 71-year old female post-operative day 40 after a left total knee arthroplasty was hospitalized secondary to left knee pain and suspected arthroplasty infection. She had failed outpatient oral antimicrobial treatment for superficial stitch abscess; and outpatient IV/Oral antimicrobials for a clinical postoperative septic bursitis. Ultimately, resection arthroplasty with operative tissue acid fast bacterial cultures demonstrated growth of the Mycobacterium smegmatis group. Post-operatively, she completed a combination course of oral doxycycline and levofloxacin and successfully completed a replacement arthroplasty with clinical and microbial resolution of the infection. To our knowledge, literature review demonstrates three case of knee arthroplasty infection caused by the Mycobacterium smegmatis group. Correspondingly, optimal surgical procedures and antimicrobial management including antimicrobial selection, treatment duration are not well defined. Presently, the best treatment options consists of two step surgical management including prosthesis hardware removal followed by extended antimicrobial therapy, followed by consideration for re-implantation arthroplasty. Our case illustrates importance of considering atypical mycobacterial infections in post-operative arthroplasty infections not responding to traditional surgical manipulations and antimicrobials. For an arthroplasty infection involving the atypical Mycobacterium smegmatis group, two step arthroplasty revision, including arthroplasty resection, with a combination of oral doxycycline and levofloxacin can lead to successful infection resolution, allowing for a

  9. Vaccination of mice against Mycobacterium leprae infection.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, N B; Lowe, A C; Rees, R J; Colston, M J

    1989-01-01

    Intradermal immunization with killed Mycobacterium leprae renders mice immune to infection with viable M. leprae. This protection is long lasting and systemic in that immunization in the left flank results in protection in both the left and right footpads. Immunization with Mycobacterium vaccae was ineffective in protecting mice against M. leprae infection, while Mycobacterium bovis BCG provided partial protection. Mycobacterium habana TMC 5135 (now known as Mycobacterium simiae) was found to be as effective as M. leprae in protecting mice against footpad infection. PMID:2643581

  10. The epidemiology of Mycobacterium bovis infections.

    PubMed

    Morris, R S; Pfeiffer, D U; Jackson, R

    1994-05-01

    Mycobacterium bovis has an exceptionally wide host range, but until recent years there was little concern about infection in species other than cattle and man. Diversification of farming enterprises has led to cognizance of the need for control in other domestic animals, notably deer. There has also been recognition that self-maintaining infection is present in wildlife hosts in some countries--notably the European badger in the United Kingdom and Ireland, the Australian brush-tailed possum in New Zealand, and various species of ungulates in limited areas of a number of countries. Although transmission of M. bovis can occur by a number of different routes, control measures imposed on cattle and to a lesser extent on other species have reduced a number of the routes to insignificance. Hence the vast preponderance of transmission within host species is now by the airborne route, and predominantly between species as well. Transmission of infection from badgers to cattle may be an exception, with evidence remaining equivocal about the relative importance of pasture contamination by excretion in badger urine and airborne transmission. In general, contamination of feed and pasture appears to be unimportant in transmission of the disease, because survival times of infective doses of organisms on fomites are relatively short under realistic conditions and because animals are not commonly exposed to a dose high enough to be infective by the alimentary route. Infection through the oro-pharyngeal mucous membrane may be significant, although the infective dose for this route is not known. While many species of animals can become infected with M. bovis, only a few act as maintenance hosts and the rest are spillover hosts in which infection is not self-maintaining. With the exception of cattle and deer, other species have become maintenance hosts only within part of their ecological range. For both badgers and possums, maintenance of infection within a local population is due to

  11. Cutaneous Mycobacterium fortuitum Infection: Successfully Treated with Amikacin and Ofloxacin Combination

    PubMed Central

    Sethi, Sunil; Arora, Shilpa; Gupta, Vikas; Kumar, Shiv

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous infections caused by atypical mycobacteria are uncommon and the diagnosis can be missed unless there is strong clinical suspicion supported by laboratory confirmation. We report a case of chronic discharging sinus caused by Mycobacterium fortuitum in a young healthy immunocompetent individual. The patient recovered completely following amikacin and ofloxacin therapy. PMID:25071259

  12. Osteomyelitis Infection of Mycobacterium marinum: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hao H.; Fadul, Nada; Ashraf, Muhammad S.; Siraj, Dawd S.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium marinum (M. marinum) is a ubiquitous waterborne organism that grows optimally at temperatures around 30°C. It is a nontuberculous Mycobacterium found in nonchlorinated water with worldwide prevalence. It is the most common atypical Mycobacterium that causes opportunistic infection in humans. M. marinum can cause superficial infections and localized invasive infections in humans, with the hands being the sites most frequently affected. It can cause skin lesions, which are either single, papulonodular lesions, confined to an extremity, or may resemble cutaneous sporotrichosis. This infection can also cause deeper infections including tenosynovitis, bursitis, arthritis, and osteomyelitis. Disseminated infections and visceral involvements have been reported in immunocompromised patients. We here report a case of severe deep soft tissue infection with necrotizing fasciitis and osteomyelitis of the left upper extremity (LUE) caused by M. marinum in an immunocompromised patient. PMID:25664190

  13. [Infection due to Mycobacterium bovis in common variable immunodeficiency].

    PubMed

    Herrera-Sánchez, Diana Andrea; Castilla-Rodríguez, Jaisel Luz; Castrejón-Vázquez, María Isabel; Vargas-Camaño, María Eugenia; Medina-Torres, Edgar Alejandro; Blancas-Galicia, Lizbeth; Espinosa-Padilla, Sara Elva

    2015-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is an heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by impaired antibody production. It shows a wide spectrum of manifestations including severe and recurrent respiratory infections (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus) and gastrointestinal (Campylobacter jejuni, rotavirus and Giardia lamblia). Viral infections caused by herpes zoster, cytomegalovirus (CMV) and hepatitis C are rare. The opportunistic agents such as CMV, Pneumocystis jirovecii, cryptococcus and atypical mycobacteria have been reported as isolated cases. This paper reports the case of a 38-year-old female patient, who began six years before with weight loss of 7 kg in six months, fatigue, weakness, sweating, fever and abdominal pain. Furthermore, patient had intestinal obstruction and abdominal CT showed mesenteric lymph growth. The mesenteric lymph node biopsy revealed positives Mycobacterium PCR, Ziehl-Neelsen staining and culture for M. bovis. In the laparotomy postoperative period was complicated with nosocomial pneumonia, requiring mechanical ventilation and tracheostomy. Two years later, she developed right renal abscess that required surgical drainage, once again with a positive culture for Mycobacterium bovis. She was referred to highly specialized hospital and we documented panhypogammaglobulinemia and lymphopenia. Secondary causes of hypogammaglobulinemia were ruled out and common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) was confirmed, we started IVIG replacement. Four years later she developed mixed cellularity Hodgkin's lymphoma. Until today she continues with IVIG and chemotherapy. This report of a patient with CVID and Mycobacterium bovis infection, a unusual association, shows the cellular immunity susceptibility in this immunodeficiency, additional to the humoral defect. PMID:25758115

  14. Immunopathogenesis of Mycobacterium bovis infection of cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aerosol and intratracheal inoculation routes are commonly used for experimental biology purposes to infect cattle with virulent Mycobacterium bovis, each resulting primarily in a respiratory tract infection including lungs and lung-associated lymph nodes. Disease severity is dose and time dependent...

  15. [Study of cows experimentally infected with atypical mycobacteria].

    PubMed

    Savov, N; Pavlov, N

    1975-01-01

    Cows were infected subcutaneously with Mycobacterium aquae, Mycobacterium fortuitum, Micobacterium vaccae, and Mycobacterium smegmatis. The investigations carried out on the thirtieth day following infection revealed allergic reaction in all cows with close variations when avian and bovine tuberculin were used. The complement-fixation test with blood sera pointed to the presence of specific antibodies for the Mycobacterium genus. The histopathologic reaction in the lymph nodes, established after the slaughter of the animals on the 45th day of infection, was a proliferative-infiltrative one, the epitheloid cells being located at the periphery of the trabecules. Giant cells and necroses were missing. PMID:1198916

  16. Macrophage infection models for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Benjamin K; Abramovitch, Robert B

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis colonizes, survives, and grows inside macrophages. In vitro macrophage infection models, using both primary macrophages and cell lines, enable the characterization of the pathogen response to macrophage immune pressure and intracellular environmental cues. We describe methods to propagate and infect primary murine bone marrow-derived macrophages and J774 and THP-1 macrophage-like cell lines. We also present methods on the characterization of M. tuberculosis intracellular survival and the preparation of infected macrophages for imaging. PMID:25779326

  17. Diagnosis of Mycobacterium bovis infection in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bovine tuberculosis (TB) caused by Mycobacterium bovis continues to be a major animal health problem, having adverse impacts on socioeconomic conditions, public health and trade of animals and animal products. Worldwide it has been estimated that approximately 50 million cattle are infected with M. ...

  18. Disseminated Mycobacterium abscessus Infection Following Septic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Shoichi; Sekiya, Noritaka; Takizawa, Yasunobu; Morioka, Hiroshi; Kato, Hirofumi; Aono, Akio; Chikamatsu, Kinuyo; Mitarai, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Satomi; Kamei, Satoshi; Setoguchi, Keigo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mycobacterium abscessus is a rapidly growing mycobacterium found mainly in patients with respiratory or cutaneous infections, but it rarely causes disseminated infections. Little is known about the clinical characteristics, treatment, and prognosis of disseminated M abscessus infection. A 75-year-old Japanese woman who had been treated for 17 years with a corticosteroid for antisynthetase syndrome with antithreonyl-tRNA synthetase antibody developed swelling of her right elbow. X-ray of her right elbow joint showed osteolysis, and magnetic resonance imaging revealed fluid in her right elbow joint. M abscessus grew in joint fluid and blood cultures. She was diagnosed with a disseminated M abscessus infection following septic arthritis. Antimicrobial treatment by clarithromycin, amikacin, and imipenem/cilastatin combined with surgical debridement was administered. Although blood and joint fluid cultures became negative 1 week later, the patient died at 6 weeks from starting antimicrobial treatment. We reviewed 34 cases of disseminated M abscessus infections from the literature. Most of the patients had immunosuppressive backgrounds such as transplantation, use of immunosuppressive agents, hematological malignancy, and end stage renal disease. The duration from onset of symptoms to diagnosis was over 3 months in half of the cases. All fatal cases had positive blood cultures or use of immunosuppressive agents. Clinicians should bear in mind that mycobacterial infections including M abscessus are one of the differential diagnoses in patients with subacute arthritis and soft tissue infections. PMID:26020393

  19. Case report of fatal Mycobacterium tilburgii infection.

    PubMed

    Akpinar, Timur; Bakkaloglu, Oguz K; Ince, Burak; Tufan, Fatih; Kose, Murat; Poda, Mehves; Tascioglu, Didem; Koksalan, O Kaya; Saka, Bulent; Erten, Nilgun; Buyukbabani, Nesimi; Kilicaslan, Zeki; Tascioglu, Cemil

    2015-07-01

    There are few reports concerning Mycobacterium tilburgii infection in humans because this bacterium is non-cultivatable. Herein, using new molecular techniques, we report the case of an immunocompromised patient with fatal disseminated lymphadenitis that was caused by M. tilburgii.26 years old Caucasian HIV negative female patient presented with abdominal pain. Her clinical assessment revealed disseminated lymphadenitis, that was acid fast bacilli positive. Further molecular evaluation showed the causative agent as M. tilburgii. Despite anti mycobacterial therapy and careful management of intervening complications patient died because of an intraabdominal sepsis. This is the first fatal M. tilburgii infection in the literature. This case points the importance of careful management of patient's immune status and intervening infections besides implementation of effective drug treatment. PMID:25818194

  20. Invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma mimicking organizing pneumonia associated with Mycobacterium fortuitum infection.

    PubMed

    Morichika, Daisuke; Miyahara, Nobuaki; Hotta, Katsuyuki; Okamoto, Yoshiko; Minami, Daisuke; Irie, Masahiro; Tanimoto, Yasushi; Kanehiro, Arihiko; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Kiura, Katsuyuki

    2014-01-01

    We herein report the case of a 68-year-old man diagnosed with invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma of the lungs. Chest computed tomography showed subpleural ground-glass opacity and small nodules with cavitation. A culture of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid resulted in the detection of Mycobacterium fortuitum. The patient's lung consolidation rapidly progressed; however, repeated bronchoscopy showed no atypical cells, thus suggesting a diagnosis of organizing pneumonia associated with M. fortuitum infection. However, the surgical biopsy specimen was diagnostic for adenocarcinoma, with no mycobacterial infection. Invasive mucinous adenocarcinoma should not be excluded in the differential diagnosis of patients with clinical features of organizing pneumonia and nontuberculous mycobacterium infection, even if a transbronchial biopsy confirms the absence of malignancy. PMID:25500441

  1. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jiansong; Yam, Wing-Cheong; Chen, Zhiwei

    2016-05-01

    Following HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis (TB) continues to be the second most deadly infectious disease in humans. The global TB prevalence has become worse in recent years due to the emergence of multi-drug resistant (MDR) and extensively-drug resistant (XDR) strains, as well as co-infection with HIV. Although Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine has nearly been used for a century in many countries, it does not protect adult pulmonary tuberculosis and even causes disseminated BCG disease in HIV-positive population. It is impossible to use BCG to eliminate the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection or to prevent TB onset and reactivation. Consequently, novel vaccines are urgently needed for TB prevention and immunotherapy. In this review, we discuss the TB prevalence, interaction between M. tb and host immune system, as well as recent progress of TB vaccine research and development. PMID:27156616

  2. Mycobacterium abscessus Complex Infections in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Meng-Rui; Sheng, Wang-Huei; Hung, Chien-Ching; Yu, Chong-Jen; Lee, Li-Na

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus complex comprises a group of rapidly growing, multidrug-resistant, nontuberculous mycobacteria that are responsible for a wide spectrum of skin and soft tissue diseases, central nervous system infections, bacteremia, and ocular and other infections. M. abscessus complex is differentiated into 3 subspecies: M. abscessus subsp. abscessus, M. abscessus subsp. massiliense, and M. abscessus subsp. bolletii. The 2 major subspecies, M. abscessus subsp. abscessus and M. abscessus subsp. massiliense, have different erm(41) gene patterns. This gene provides intrinsic resistance to macrolides, so the different patterns lead to different treatment outcomes. M. abscessus complex outbreaks associated with cosmetic procedures and nosocomial transmissions are not uncommon. Clarithromycin, amikacin, and cefoxitin are the current antimicrobial drugs of choice for treatment. However, new treatment regimens are urgently needed, as are rapid and inexpensive identification methods and measures to contain nosocomial transmission and outbreaks. PMID:26295364

  3. Mycobacterium marinum: a potential immunotherapy for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Wei-wei; Wang, Qian-qiu; Liu, Wei-da; Shen, Jian-ping; Wang, Hong-sheng

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the present study was to investigate the immune response induced by Mycobacterium marinum infection in vitro and the potential of M. marinum as an immunotherapy for M. tuberculosis infection. Methods The potential human immune response to certain bacillus infections was investigated in an immune cell-bacillus coculture system in vitro. As a potential novel immunotherapy, M. marinum was studied and compared with two other bacilli, Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) and live attenuated M. tuberculosis. We examined the changes in both the bacilli and immune cells, especially the time course of the viability of mycobacteria in the coculture system and host immune responses including multinuclear giant cell formation by Wright-Giemsa modified staining, macrophage polarization by cell surface antigen expression, and cytokines/chemokine production by both mRNA expression and protein secretion. Results The M. marinum stimulated coculture group showed more expression of CD209, CD68, CD80, and CD86 than the BCG and M. tuberculosis (an attenuated strain, H37Ra) groups, although the differences were not statistically significant. Moreover, the M. marinum group expressed more interleukin (IL)-1B and IL-12p40 on day 3 (IL-1B: P = 0.003 and 0.004, respectively; IL-12p40: P = 0.001 and 0.011, respectively), a higher level of CXCL10 on day 1 (P = 0.006 and 0.026, respectively), and higher levels of chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL) 8 and chemokine (C motif) ligand (XCL) 1 on day 3 (CXCL8: P = 0.012 and 0.014, respectively; XCL1: P = 0.000 and 0.000, respectively). The M. marinum stimulated coculture group also secreted more tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, IL-1β, and IL-10 on day 1 (TNF-α: P = 0.000 and 0.000, respectively; IL-1β: P = 0.000 and 0.000, respectively; IL-10: P = 0.002 and 0.019, respectively) and day 3 (TNF-α: P = 0.000 and 0.000, respectively; IL-1β: P = 0.000 and 0.001, respectively; IL-10: P = 0.000 and 0.000, respectively). In addition, the

  4. Membranous glomerulonephritis associated with Mycobacterium shimoidei pulmonary infection

    PubMed Central

    Kanaji, Nobuhiro; Kushida, Yoshio; Bandoh, Shuji; Ishii, Tomoya; Haba, Reiji; Tadokoro, Akira; Watanabe, Naoki; Takahama, Takayuki; Kita, Nobuyuki; Dobashi, Hiroaki; Matsunaga, Takuya

    2013-01-01

    Patient: Male, 83 Final Diagnosis: Membranous glomerulonephritis Symptoms: Producting cough Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Nephrology Objective: Rare disease Background: Membranous glomerulonephritis can occur secondarily from infectious diseases. There are no reports describing membranous glomerulonephritis caused by non-tuberculous mycobacterium infection. However, several cases with membranous glomerulonephritis due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis have been reported. Mycobacterium shimoidei is an uncommon pathogen, and less than 20 cases with this species have been reported. A therapeutic regimen for this infection has not been established yet. Case Report: An 83-year-old Japanese man presented with productive cough for 6 months. Computed tomography scan showed multiple cavities in the bilateral pulmonary fields. Acid-fast bacilli were evident in his sputum by Ziehl-Neelsen staining (Gaffky 3). PCR amplifications for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Mycobacterium avium, and Mycobacterium intracellulare were all negative. Finally, Mycobacterium shimoidei was identified by rpoB sequencing and 16S rRNA sequencing. Urine examination showed a sub-nephrotic range of proteinuria and histology of the kidney showed membranous glomerulonephritis. Antimycobacterial treatment with clarithromycin, rifampicin, and ethambutol dramatically improved not only the pulmonary disease, but also the proteinuria. Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, the presented case is the first report showing non-tuberculous mycobacterium-induced secondary membranous glomerulonephritis. A combination with clarithromycin, ethambutol, and rifampicin might be effective for treatment of Mycobacterium shimoidei infection. PMID:24367720

  5. Atypical growth of Renibacterium salmoninarum in subclinical infections.

    PubMed

    Hirvelä-Koski, V; Pohjanvirta, T; Koski, P; Sukura, A

    2006-01-01

    Two growth types of Renibacterium salmoninarum were isolated from subclinically infected rainbow trout, one producing the smooth colonies typical of R. salmoninarum and the other forming a thin film on the surface of the agar with no separate colonies. The atypical growth was present on kidney disease medium agar in primary cultures of the kidney but not on selective kidney disease medium (SKDM). Fluorescent antibody staining of the fresh isolate and polymerase chain reaction amplification were the most reliable techniques to identify the atypical growth of R. salmoninarum. The condition was reversible, with growth reverting from atypical to the smooth colony form in experimentally infected rainbow trout and under laboratory conditions. There was no mortality, or any clinical signs of bacterial kidney disease (BKD) in the fish challenged with the atypical growth, although small numbers of smooth colonies of R. salmoninarum were isolated from 8% of these fish. The atypical growth reported here may explain some of the failures of culture, when SKDM agar alone is used for the detection of BKD in subclinically infected fish. PMID:16351695

  6. Evaluation of the GenoType Mycobacteria Direct assay for the simultaneous detection of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and four atypical mycobacterial species in smear-positive respiratory specimens.

    PubMed

    Seagar, A-Louise; Prendergast, Carmel; Emmanuel, F Xavier; Rayner, Alan; Thomson, Susan; Laurenson, Ian F

    2008-05-01

    A novel, commercially available reverse hybridization assay [GenoType Mycobacteria Direct (GTMD), version 2.0; Hain Lifescience] was evaluated for the direct detection of five clinically relevant mycobacterial species [Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC), Mycobacterium avium, Mycobacterium malmoense, Mycobacterium kansasii and Mycobacterium intracellulare] from 54 smear-positive respiratory specimens and the findings were compared with culture results. Three approaches were used for specimen preparation using either whole or 'split' sample volumes and N-acetyl-l-cysteine/3 % NaOH or 4 % NaOH as decontamination chemicals. Forty-three out of 52 samples in which RNA amplification was successful gave GTMD results that concurred with the identification of the cultured isolate. All cases of MTBC were detected. Twenty-two samples contained M. tuberculosis complex, seven had M. kansasii, four had M. malmoense, seven contained atypical mycobacteria other than those detectable using the GTMD assay and three specimens contained no viable mycobacteria. The assay is easy to use and can be completed in one working day. Results interpretation is facilitated by the inclusion of an internal amplification control with each sample to allow identification of specimens containing amplification inhibitors. A positive GTMD result will quickly identify patients with MTBC infection or provide specific identification of four other atypical mycobacteria from the same specimen. This allows more rapid drug susceptibility testing, treatment, and public health and infection control decisions. PMID:18436594

  7. Mycobacterium bovis infection in human beings.

    PubMed

    Grange, J M

    2001-01-01

    The causative agent of bovine tuberculosis, Mycobacterium bovis, is also responsible for some cases of tuberculosis in human beings. Although recognized for over a century, this form of human tuberculosis has been a source of considerable misunderstanding and controversy. Questions still remain concerning the relative virulence of M. tuberculosis and M. bovis in human beings, the risk of human disease after infection, the immunological consequences of infection that does not proceed to disease, the occurrence of human-to-human transmission of M. bovis and the health risk of diseased human beings to cattle. The advent of the HIV/AIDS pandemic raises new questions of the epidemiological impact of immunosuppression on the transmission of M. bovis to and between human beings. Although largely eradicated in the developed nations, bovine tuberculosis still occurs in many developing nations and epidemiological data on the impact of this on human health is scanty but, in the light of the increasing incidence of tuberculosis worldwide, it is urgently needed. PMID:11463226

  8. Mycobacterium caprae Infection in Livestock and Wildlife, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Sabrina; Bezos, Javier; Romero, Beatriz; de Juan, Lucía; Álvarez, Julio; Castellanos, Elena; Moya, Nuria; Lozano, Francisco; Javed, M. Tariq; Sáez-Llorente, José L.; Liébana, Ernesto; Mateos, Ana; Domínguez, Lucas; Tuberculosis, Monitoring of Animal

    2011-01-01

    Mycobacterium caprae is a pathogen that can infect animals and humans. To better understand the epidemiology of M. caprae, we spoligotyped 791 animal isolates. Results suggest infection is widespread in Spain, affecting 6 domestic and wild animal species. The epidemiology is driven by infections in caprids, although the organism has emerged in cattle. PMID:21392452

  9. Atypical Presentations of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maskari, Nawal; Mohsin, Jalila; Al-Maani, Amal; Al-Macki, Nabil; Al-Ismaili, Suad

    2016-01-01

    The respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) usually causes a lower respiratory tract infection in affected patients. RSV has also been infrequently linked to extrapulmonary diseases in children. We report four children who had unusually severe clinical manifestations of RSV infections requiring critical care admission. These patients presented to the Royal Hospital, Muscat, Oman, in December 2013 with acute necrotising encephalopathy (ANE), acute fulminant hepatic failure with encephalopathy, pneumatoceles and croup. A unique presentation of ANE has not previously been reported in association with an RSV infection. All patients had a positive outcome and recovered fully with supportive management. PMID:26909220

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis produces pili during human infection

    PubMed Central

    Alteri, Christopher J.; Xicohténcatl-Cortes, Juan; Hess, Sonja; Caballero-Olín, Guillermo; Girón, Jorge A.; Friedman, Richard L.

    2007-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is responsible for nearly 3 million human deaths worldwide every year. Understanding the mechanisms and bacterial factors responsible for the ability of M. tuberculosis to cause disease in humans is critical for the development of improved treatment strategies. Many bacterial pathogens use pili as adherence factors to colonize the host. We discovered that M. tuberculosis produces fine (2- to 3-nm-wide), aggregative, flexible pili that are recognized by IgG antibodies contained in sera obtained from patients with active tuberculosis, indicating that the bacilli produce pili or pili-associated antigen during human infection. Purified M. tuberculosis pili (MTP) are composed of low-molecular-weight protein subunits encoded by the predicted M. tuberculosis H37Rv ORF, designated Rv3312A. MTP bind to the extracellular matrix protein laminin in vitro, suggesting that MTP possess adhesive properties. Isogenic mtp mutants lost the ability to produce Mtp in vitro and demonstrated decreased laminin-binding capabilities. MTP shares morphological, biochemical, and functional properties attributed to bacterial pili, especially with curli amyloid fibers. Thus, we propose that MTP are previously unidentified host-colonization factors of M. tuberculosis. PMID:17360408

  11. Mycobacterium microti infection in two meerkats (Suricata suricatta).

    PubMed

    Palgrave, C J; Benato, L; Eatwell, K; Laurenson, I F; Smith, N H

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium microti is a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC). M. microti is generally considered a pathogen of small rodents, although sporadic infections in a range of other mammals, including domestic animals and man, have been reported. While many human infections have been associated with immunosuppression, an increasing number of cases are being reported in immunocompetent patients. Two cases of M. microti infection in meerkats (Suricata suricatta) are reported. These are the first cases of mycobacterial disease to be described in meerkats outside Africa. PMID:21783200

  12. Mycobacterium lepromatosis Infections in Nuevo León, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Escalante-Fuentes, Wendy; Ocampo-Garza, Sonia S.; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge; Molina-Torres, Carmen A.; Avanzi, Charlotte; Benjak, Andrej; Busso, Philippe; Singh, Pushpendra; Cole, Stewart T.

    2015-01-01

    The frequency of infection caused by the recently described pathogen Mycobacterium lepromatosis is unknown. Here, we describe the demographics, clinical characteristics, and therapeutic outcomes of five lepromatous leprosy patients suffering from M. lepromatosis infection in Nuevo Léon, Mexico. Diagnosis was facilitated by a new highly specific PCR procedure. PMID:25809978

  13. Mycobacterium lepromatosis Infections in Nuevo León, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Vera-Cabrera, Lucio; Escalante-Fuentes, Wendy; Ocampo-Garza, Sonia S; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge; Molina-Torres, Carmen A; Avanzi, Charlotte; Benjak, Andrej; Busso, Philippe; Singh, Pushpendra; Cole, Stewart T

    2015-06-01

    The frequency of infection caused by the recently described pathogen Mycobacterium lepromatosis is unknown. Here, we describe the demographics, clinical characteristics, and therapeutic outcomes of five lepromatous leprosy patients suffering from M. lepromatosis infection in Nuevo Léon, Mexico. Diagnosis was facilitated by a new highly specific PCR procedure. PMID:25809978

  14. Transcriptome analysis of stimulated PBMC from Mycobacterium bovis infected cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Immunological responses of cattle to Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) infection are of interest in terms of understanding the biology of M. bovis infection and for the development of improved diagnostic techniques. Although considerable time and resources have been invested in understanding immune re...

  15. A case of Manila type Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Usami, Osamu; Nakajima, Chie; Endo, Shiro; Inomata, Shinya; Kanamori, Hajime; Hirakata, Yoichi; Uchiyama, Bine; Kaku, Mitsuo; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Hattori, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message A 76-year-old Japanese woman contracted a Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB, Manila type) infection in Japan, despite never having traveled. However, her son was treated for TB in the Philippines 3 years before he stayed at her house. Spoligotyping allows us to identify the TB genotype and identify the route of infection. PMID:26273455

  16. Fatal aortic pseudoaneurysm from disseminated Mycobacterium kansasii infection: case report.

    PubMed

    Ehsani, Laleh; Reddy, Sujan C; Mosunjac, Mario; Kraft, Colleen S; Guarner, Jeannette

    2015-03-01

    Mycobacterium kansasii is a photochromogenic, slow-growing mycobacterium species that can cause pulmonary infection in patients with predisposing lung diseases, as well as extrapulmonary or disseminated disease in immunosuppressed patients. We describe a patient with a myelodysplastic syndrome, disseminated M kansasii infection, and ruptured aortic aneurysm. He had a recent diagnosis of mycobacterium cavitary lung lesions and was transferred to our facility for possible surgical intervention of an aortic aneurysm. Few hours after admission, the patient suddenly collapsed and died despite resuscitation efforts. A complete autopsy was performed and showed ruptured ascending aortic pseudoaneurysm with hemopericardium, disseminated necrotizing and nonnecrotizing granulomas with acid-fast bacilli in the aortic wall, lungs, heart, liver, spleen, and kidneys. Further genetic studies were consistent with monocytopenia and mycobacterial infection syndrome. PMID:25537975

  17. Atypical Isolated Infections of the Infratemporal Fossa: A Diagnostic Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Sien Hui; Chong, Aun Wee; Prepageran, Narayanan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Atypical infratemporal fossa infections are rare and potentially fatal. Case Report: A case of an aspergillosis localized in the infratemporal fossa and another case of tuberculosis of the infratemporal fossa originating from the maxillary sinus, is described. The first patient was immunocompromised and showed symptoms of facial numbness; whereas the other was an immunocompetent man who complained of trigeminal neuralgia type pain. It was difficult to differentiate between infection and tumour despite the utilization of computed tomography scans and magnetic resonance imaging. Conclusion: These cases illustrate the need for a high index of suspicion; in addition to endoscopic confirmation and histopathology to establish precise diagnosis and early intervention. PMID:26568944

  18. Mycobacterium kansasii infection in a bontebok (Damaliscus pygaragus dorcas) herd: diagnostic challenges in differentiating from the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michele; Terrell, Scott; Lyashchenko, Konstantin; Greenwald, Rena; Harris, Beth; Thomsen, Bruce V; Fontenot, Deidre; Stetter, Mark; Neiffer, Don; Fleming, Greg

    2011-09-01

    Two adult female bontebok (Damaliscus pygarus dorcas) were euthanized because of signs of pneumonia and weakness (case 1), and a nonresponsive lameness with draining fistula (case 2). Necropsy findings were similar in both cases and consisted of disseminated granulomatous lesions in the liver, kidneys, spleen, lungs, pleural surfaces, and multiple lymph nodes. Mycobacterium kansasii was isolated from both cases after multiple attempts on a variety of samples by two laboratories. The remaining four animals in the herd were tested for antibody responses using the Chembio ElephantTB STAT-PAK, DPP VetTB kits, and multi-antigen print immunoassay (MAPIA), for immune reaction using the intradermal tuberculin test, and by tracheal wash cultures, and thoracic radiographs. Banked serum samples collected in 2005 and obtained from the original institution, revealed 1/9 (11.11%) seropositive animals using the three immunoassays. Retesting the current herd in 2008 showed 2/6 (33.33%) seropositive animals by the three tests, with MAPIA demonstrating antibody reactivity to MPB83 and MPB70 proteins. Inconsistent intradermal tuberculin test results, cross-reactivity in serologic assays designed for tuberculosis detection, difficulty in obtaining definitive identification by culture, and inability to identify a source of infection created challenges in distinguishing the atypical mycobacteriosis due to M. kansasii from the initially suspected tuberculous infection in this herd. Owing to regulatory considerations, differences in host-to-host transmission, and source of infection between Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and nontuberculous mycobacteria, correct diagnosis is crucial for management of these diseases in wildlife species. PMID:22950320

  19. Mycobacterium simiae and Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare mixed infection in acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Lévy-Frébault, V; Pangon, B; Buré, A; Katlama, C; Marche, C; David, H L

    1987-01-01

    Acquired immune deficiency syndrome was diagnosed in a 43-year-old man, born and living in Congo. The patient presented a disseminated infection caused by mycobacteria which were recovered from blood, jejunal fluid, and duodenal and rectal biopsies. Identification, according to conventional tests and mycolate profile determination, showed that Mycobacterium avium-M. intracellulare and M. simiae were both involved. Images PMID:3793869

  20. [The atypical course of syphilis in HIV infection].

    PubMed

    Mahrle, G; Rasokat, H; Kurz, K; Steigleder, G K

    1989-05-15

    We report on 3 HIV patients showing atypical courses of syphilis. Both the history and serology of the first patient proved a recent re-infection with T. pallidum, whereas the histopathological findings corresponded to an advanced stage of the disease (S II-III). The second patient showed the clinical picture of syphilis maligna with slowly converting and slightly positive serological reactions. The third patient had a refractory syphilis and an early relapse. Our observations suggest that syphilis might take an unusual course in HIV patients. Considering our total HIV clientèle (800 patients greater than or equal to WR 2) the frequency of these atypical cases must be rated very low (0.38%). PMID:2741530

  1. Mycobacterium abscessus skin infection after tattooing--Case report.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Pétra Pereira de; Cruz, Rossilene Conceição da Silva; Schettini, Antonio Pedro Mendes; Westphal, Danielle Cristine

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is a rapidly growing mycobacterium that has been affecting people undergoing invasive procedures, such as videosurgery and mesotherapy. This bacterium has global distribution, being found in numerous niches. The frequency of published reports of infection by rapidly growing mycobacteria associated with tattooing procedures has increased in recent years. However, in Brazil there were no case reports of M. abscessus after tattooing in the literature until now. In this paper, we describe the case of a patient with a nine-month history of lesion on a tattoo site. The diagnosis of infection with Mycobacterium abscessus was established by correlation between dermatological and histopathological aspects, culture and molecular biology techniques. The patient had significant improvement of symptoms with the use of clarithromycin monotherapy. PMID:26560222

  2. Mycobacterium abscessus skin infection after tattooing - Case report*

    PubMed Central

    de Sousa, Pétra Pereira; Cruz, Rossilene Conceição da Silva; Schettini, Antonio Pedro Mendes; Westphal, Danielle Cristine

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is a rapidly growing mycobacterium that has been affecting people undergoing invasive procedures, such as videosurgery and mesotherapy. This bacterium has global distribution, being found in numerous niches. The frequency of published reports of infection by rapidly growing mycobacteria associated with tattooing procedures has increased in recent years. However, in Brazil there were no case reports of M. abscessus after tattooing in the literature until now. In this paper, we describe the case of a patient with a nine-month history of lesion on a tattoo site. The diagnosis of infection with Mycobacterium abscessus was established by correlation between dermatological and histopathological aspects, culture and molecular biology techniques. The patient had significant improvement of symptoms with the use of clarithromycin monotherapy. PMID:26560222

  3. Atypical streptococcal infection of gingiva associated with chronic mouth breathing.

    PubMed

    Haytac, M Cenk; Oz, I Attila

    2007-01-01

    Streptococcal infections of oral tissues are mainly seen in young children who experience a variety of upper respiratory tract infections. The disease is characterized by fever, lymphadenopathy, and ulcers on the gingiva, lips, and tonsils. This case report presents an atypical streptococcal infection of the gingiva in an 18-year-old man. The patient was referred to the periodontology department complaining of a 2-month history of gingival enlargement. He had persistent fever (39.5 degrees C) and general malaise for 2 weeks. Intraoral examination revealed extremely inflamed and enlarged gingiva with spontaneous bleeding and suppuration. Based on the otolaryngologic consultation and the hematologic, immunologic, and microbiologic tests, the final diagnosis was an atypical streptococcal gingivitis with chronic adenoid-related mouth breathing and oral hygiene neglect as contributing factors. Treatment consisted of a broad-spectrum antibiotic regimen, supragingival and subgingival debridement, adenoidectomy, and scaling and root planing. A good response to nonsurgical therapy was achieved despite poor patient compliance, and no recurrence of gingival enlargement was observed after 1 year. Streptococcal gingivitis should be included in the differential diagnosis of suppurative gingival enlargements. Furthermore, chronic mouth breathing may initiate and/or contribute to this disease. PMID:18197316

  4. Cellular Interactions in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The study of host immune responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is complicated by a number of factors, including the protracted nature of the disease and the stealthy nature of the pathogen. Noted as one of the more fastidious mycobacteria, infection with MAP is often chara...

  5. Mycobacterium marinum Infection After Exposure to Coal Mine Water

    PubMed Central

    Huaman, Moises A.; Ribes, Julie A.; Lohr, Kristine M.; Evans, Martin E.

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium marinum infection has been historically associated with exposure to aquariums, swimming pools, fish, or other marine fauna. We present a case of M marinum left wrist tenosynovitis and elbow bursitis associated with a puncture injury and exposure to coal mine water in Illinois. PMID:26835478

  6. Mycobacterium marinum Infection After Exposure to Coal Mine Water.

    PubMed

    Huaman, Moises A; Ribes, Julie A; Lohr, Kristine M; Evans, Martin E

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium marinum infection has been historically associated with exposure to aquariums, swimming pools, fish, or other marine fauna. We present a case of M marinum left wrist tenosynovitis and elbow bursitis associated with a puncture injury and exposure to coal mine water in Illinois. PMID:26835478

  7. Infection with Mycobacterium microti in Animals in France

    PubMed Central

    Michelet, Lorraine; de Cruz, Krystel; Zanella, Gina; Aaziz, Rachid; Bulach, Tabatha; Karoui, Claudine; Hénault, Sylvie; Joncour, Guy

    2014-01-01

    We describe here 35 animal cases of tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium microti in France (2002–2014). Recently, molecular tools that overcome the difficulty of confirming infection by this potentially zoonotic agent have revealed an increasing number of cases, suggesting that its prevalence may have been underestimated. PMID:25540404

  8. Mycobacterium marinum Infections in Fish and Humans in Israel

    PubMed Central

    Ucko, M.; Colorni, A.

    2005-01-01

    Israeli Mycobacterium marinum isolates from humans and fish were compared by direct sequencing of the 16S rRNA and hsp65 genes, restriction mapping, and amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis. Significant molecular differences separated all clinical isolates from the piscine isolates, ruling out the local aquaculture industry as the source of human infections. PMID:15695698

  9. Infection with Mycobacterium microti in animals in France.

    PubMed

    Michelet, Lorraine; de Cruz, Krystel; Zanella, Gina; Aaziz, Rachid; Bulach, Tabatha; Karoui, Claudine; Hénault, Sylvie; Joncour, Guy; Boschiroli, Maria Laura

    2015-03-01

    We describe here 35 animal cases of tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium microti in France (2002-2014). Recently, molecular tools that overcome the difficulty of confirming infection by this potentially zoonotic agent have revealed an increasing number of cases, suggesting that its prevalence may have been underestimated. PMID:25540404

  10. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection, immunology and pathology of livestock

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection in ruminants leads to a chronic and progressive enteric disease (Johne’s disease) that results in loss of intestinal function, poor body condition, and eventual death. Transmission is primarily through a fecal-oral route in neonates but con...

  11. Pulmonary Mycobacterium avium infection demonstrating unusual lobar caseous pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Okuzumi, Shinichi; Minematsu, Naoto; Sasaki, Mamoru; Ohsawa, Kazuma; Murakami, Marohito

    2016-09-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection is a major medical concern in Japan because of its increased prevalence and associated mortality. A common radiological feature in pulmonary MAC infection is a mixture of two basic patterns: fibrocavitary and nodular bronchiectatic; however, lobar consolidation is rare. We report an 83-year-old man with lobar caseous pneumonia caused by pulmonary MAC infection. Radiological findings were predominantly composed of dense lobar consolidation and ground-glass opacity. A diagnosis was made in accordance with the clinical and microbiological criteria set by the American Thoracic Society. A histological examination of lung specimens obtained by using a bronchoscope revealed a caseous granulomatous inflammation with an appearance of Langhans cells. The patient was treated using combined mycobacterium chemotherapy with an initial positive response for 6 months; however, the disease progressed later. We suggest that an awareness of lobar pneumonic consolidation as a rare radiological finding in pulmonary MAC infection is important. PMID:27516892

  12. First Pulmonary Case Reported in Argentina of Infection with Mycobacterium szulgai, a Rare Pathogen▿

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, M.; Feola, M.; Lenge, L.; Rey, R.; Hoffman, M.

    2007-01-01

    Mycobacterium szulgai is a rare pathogen. Nontuberculous mycobacteria usually produce disease in people with some kind of immunosuppression or another predisposing condition. A case of pulmonary Mycobacterium szulgai infection is described. PMID:17596359

  13. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection of Domesticated Asian Elephants, Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Angkawanish, Taweepoke; Sirimalaisuwan, Anucha; Kaewsakhorn, Thattawan; Boonsri, Kittikorn; Rutten, Victor P.M.G.

    2010-01-01

    Four Asian elephants were confirmed to be infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis by bacterial culture, other diagnostic procedures, and sequencing of 16S–23S rDNA internal transcribed spacer region, 16S rRNA, and gyrase B gene sequences. Genotyping showed that the infectious agents originated from 4 sources in Thailand. To identify infections, a combination of diagnostic assays is essential. PMID:21122228

  14. Mycobacterium fortuitum Complex Skin Infection in a Healthy Adolescent.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Rebecca; Khatami, Ameneh

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium fortuitum complex skin infection is described in a previously healthy adolescent girl in Sydney, Australia. Mycobacterium fortuitum typically causes superficial skin infections following trauma to the skin and in our patient may have been related to prior leg "waxing". This case highlights common causes for a delay in diagnosis: lack of clinician awareness and inadequate microbiological and histopathological investigations of tissue samples. Due to the size and number of lesions, surgical excision was felt to be a less desirable therapeutic option due to the potential risk of poor cosmetic outcome for our patient. The standard chemotherapeutic approach to M. fortuitum infections involves the use of a combination of at least two antimicrobial agents to which the isolate is susceptible. Despite in vitro susceptibility testing that suggested that the isolate from our patient was resistant to most oral anti-microbial agents, our patient was treated successfully with a 10-week course of oral trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and moxifloxacin. PMID:25019232

  15. Implantable cardioverter defibrillator infection due to Mycobacterium mageritense.

    PubMed

    Fukunaga, Masato; Goya, Masahiko; Ogawa, Midori; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Taniguchi, Hatsumi; Ando, Kenji; Iwabuchi, Masashi; Miyazaki, Hiroaki

    2016-03-01

    Rapidly growing non-tuberculous mycobacteria (RGM) are usually detected in blood cultures after 4-5 days of incubation, so it is important to differentiate RGM from contamination of commensal organisms on human skin. We report an unusual case of Mycobacterium mageritense bacteremia and infection of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator originally misidentified as Corynebacterium spp. or Nocardia spp. in gram-stained smears. 16S rRNA gene sequencing had utility in the definitive identification of isolates. We should be aware that RGM infection may exist in repeated implantable device infections. PMID:26719132

  16. Mycobacterium bovis infection and control in domestic livestock.

    PubMed

    Cousins, D V

    2001-04-01

    Bovine tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium bovis, is a well-known zoonotic disease which affects cattle world-wide. The public health risk has been alleviated in many countries by the introduction of pasteurisation, but the disease continues to cause production losses when poorly controlled. The Office International des Epizooties classifies bovine tuberculosis as a List B disease, a disease which is considered to be of socio-economic or public health importance within countries and of significance to the international trade of animals and animal products. Consequently, most developed nations have embarked on campaigns to eradicate M. bovis from the cattle population or at least to control the spread of infection. The success of these eradication and control programmes has been mixed. Mycobacterium bovis infects other animal species, both domesticated and wild, and this range of hosts may complicate attempts to control or eradicate the disease in cattle. PMID:11288521

  17. Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis and Bloodstream Infection Due to Mycobacterium chimaera

    PubMed Central

    Achermann, Yvonne; Rössle, Matthias; Hoffmann, Matthias; Deggim, Vanessa; Kuster, Stefan; Zimmermann, Dieter R.; Hombach, Michael; Hasse, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Prosthetic valve endocarditis (PVE) due to fast-growing nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) has been reported anecdotally. Reports of PVE with slowly growing NTM, however, are lacking. We present here one case of PVE and one case of bloodstream infection caused by Mycobacterium chimaera. Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR indicated a relatedness of the two M. chimaera strains. Both patients had heart surgery 2 years apart from each other. A nosocomial link was not detected. PMID:23536407

  18. [Osteo-cutaneous Mycobacterium marinum infection of the elbow and reconstruction with radial collateral artery perforator-based propeller flap].

    PubMed

    Gabert, P-E; Lievain, L; Vallée, A; Joly, P; Auquit Auckbur, I

    2016-08-01

    Mycobacterium marinum is an atypical and non-tuberculosis mycobacterium that mainly leads to cutaneous infections. Infections occur through inoculation of the organism through injury to the skin in the presence of contaminated water or fish. The patient often presents with unspecific symptoms and the evolution, in the absence of adequate treatment, is characterized by an expansion of the cutaneous lesion and a spread to deep structures. Infections of tendon sheaths and joints are described, rarely osteomyelitis. Sure diagnosis is hard to obtain and is established from the medical history and microbiological examination. There are no specific therapeutic guidelines. Double or triple antibiotherapy is often effective and should be continued several months after complete resolution of clinical signs. Surgical debridement is required in cases of invasive or resistant infections. We report the case of a young immunocompetent fishmonger with a rare osteocutaneous M. marinum infection of the elbow. Treatment included large surgical excision of infected skin and bone areas and a triple antibiotics administration. Reconstruction have been ensured by a radial collateral artery perforator-based propeller flap, satisfying appropriates functional and cosmetical concerns of this anatomical region. Surgery and appropriate antibiotics treatment were effective and allowed healing of an invasive cutaneous and bone M. marinum infection. PMID:26748858

  19. Disseminated subcutaneous Mycobacterium fortuitum infection in a dog.

    PubMed

    Fox, L E; Kunkle, G A; Homer, B L; Manella, C; Thompson, J P

    1995-01-01

    A 15-month-old 27.7-kg sexually intact male Doberman Pinscher was examined because of multiple subcutaneous abscesses on the neck, trunk, and limbs that developed 2 months after a dog bite and were refractory to antibiotic treatment. Incubation of a biopsy specimen at 37 C on a Lowenstein-Jensen agar slant for 8 days yielded growth of a Runyon's Group IV mycobacterium, and disseminated subcutaneous Mycobacterium sp infection was diagnosed. The organism was identified as M fortuitum, and was susceptible to amikacin, doxycycline, cefoxitin, minocycline, trimethoprim/sulfadiazine, and sulfisoxazole. Lesions resolved after 8 months of treatment with doxycycline (5 mg/kg of body weight, PO, q 12 h). The cause of dissemination was unknown; however, delay in debridement of the bite wound and corticosteroid use in initial wound management may have potentiated dissemination. PMID:7744663

  20. Microfold Cells Actively Translocate Mycobacterium tuberculosis to Initiate Infection.

    PubMed

    Nair, Vidhya R; Franco, Luis H; Zacharia, Vineetha M; Khan, Haaris S; Stamm, Chelsea E; You, Wu; Marciano, Denise K; Yagita, Hideo; Levine, Beth; Shiloh, Michael U

    2016-08-01

    The prevailing paradigm is that tuberculosis infection is initiated when patrolling alveolar macrophages and dendritic cells within the terminal alveolus ingest inhaled Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). However, definitive data for this model are lacking. Among the epithelial cells of the upper airway, a specialized epithelial cell known as a microfold cell (M cell) overlies various components of mucosa-associated lymphatic tissue. Here, using multiple mouse models, we show that Mtb invades via M cells to initiate infection. Intranasal Mtb infection in mice lacking M cells either genetically or by antibody depletion resulted in reduced invasion and dissemination to draining lymph nodes. M cell-depleted mice infected via aerosol also had delayed dissemination to lymph nodes and reduced mortality. Translocation of Mtb across two M cell transwell models was rapid and transcellular. Thus, M cell translocation is a vital entry mechanism that contributes to the pathogenesis of Mtb. PMID:27452467

  1. Mycobacterium bovis infection in domestic pigs in Great Britain.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Suzanne S; Crawshaw, Timothy R; Smith, Noel H; Palgrave, Christopher J

    2013-11-01

    Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis (TB), infects a wide range of wild and domestic mammals. Despite a control programme spanning decades, M. bovis infection levels in cattle in Great Britain (GB) have continued to rise over recent years. As the incidence of infection in cattle and wildlife may be linked to that in swine, data relating to infection of pigs identified at slaughter were examined in this study. Between 2007 and 2011, almost all M. bovis-infected pigs originated from farms in the South-West and West-Midland regions of England. The data suggest that pigs raised outdoors or on holdings with poor biosecurity may be more vulnerable to infection with M. bovis. In the majority of cases, the same strains of M. bovis were found in pigs and cattle, despite that fact that direct contact between these species was rarely observed. Genotyping and geographical mapping data indicated that some strains found in pigs may correlate better with those present in badgers, rather than cattle. In consequence, it is proposed that pigs may represent a useful sentinel for M. bovis infection in wildlife in GB. Given the potential implications of this infection for the pig industry, and for the on-going effort to control bovine TB, the importance of understanding the epidemiology and pathogenesis of M. bovis infection, as well as monitoring its prevalence, in pigs should not be underestimated. PMID:24095608

  2. [Chemotherapy of pulmonary Mycobacterium kansasii infection].

    PubMed

    Mizutani, S

    1996-09-01

    A very favorable outcome after chemotherapy of 122 cases of M. kansasii lung disease was reported by Dr. Mizutani, who emphasized RFP as the "Key drug", and concluded that three-drug combination (not two-drug), including RFP (RFP.INH.EB or SM) for 1 year, could be a standard regimen for M. kansasii lung disease at the time of the moment. In addition, the following itemes were discussed. (1) In cases resistant to RFP, one could possibly replace RFP by TH, one of new quinolones (NQ), or the new macrolide (NM) (clarithromycin, CAM). (2) In low grade resistant cases to INH (0.1 microgram /ml) or EB (2.5 micrograms/ml), the replacement of the drugs may not be necessary, however, in higher-grade resistance to INH or EB, many cases were looked for the change of drugs according the results of the questionnaire done by the author. The present status of basic preclinical evaluations of new drugs were presented by Dr. Tomioka, who summarized in vitro and in vivo antimycobacterial activities of NMs and NQs. The most potent activity among NMs was demonstrated in CAM, which is probably the candidate for M. kansasii and possibly for M. avium complex (MAC) disease, followed by roxithromycin (RXM) and azithromycin (AZM) in sequence. NQs including the ones under development were generally potent against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, M. kansasii and M. fortuitum. NQs were not potent enough for MAC. In addition, the author discussed more suitable in vitro techniques which should reflect in vivo evaluations, and proposed the observation of in vitro bactericidal activity using both Cmax (maximal in vivo concentration) and C (0-8h) (the average concentration during 8 hours after administration) of drugs, and also the assessment of bactericidal activities of drugs in macrophages as better choices. As additional comments, the results of in vitro activities of NQs and NMs against MAC were supplemented by two authors, Dr. Tsuyuguchi and Dr. Kawahara. The assessment using 7 H 9 liquid medium by

  3. Mycobacterium peregrinum infection in a patient with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Toshihiko; Kobayashi, Chizuko; Shinohara, Masao

    2005-03-01

    The patient, a 30-year-old housewife, visited a nearby doctor in mid August 2002 because of weight loss and neck swelling. HIV tests done at the hospital were positive. She was referred to and admitted to our hospital on October 2 for detailed examination and treatment of the neck tumor. A coat of epithelial debris extended from the oral cavity to the pharynx and an abscess and a fistula were found in the left tonsil. After hospitalization, an abscess culture revealed the presence of acid-fast bacteria, which was identified as Mycobacterium peregrinum. Treatment with imipenem and clarithromycin resulted in the normalization of CRP (0.1 mg/dl), on day 5 of treatment. The patient was discharged from the hospital after treatment for 2 weeks with imipenem and clarithromycin. Thereafter, the patient received continuous treatment with faropenem and clarithromycin for 4 more weeks, and has shown no signs of recurrence for 11 months to date. Only a few cases of infection with this bacterial strain have been reported. This infection is difficult to treat because most antituberculosis agents are not effective against it and there is limited availability of effective antibiotics. Medical treatment of infection caused by Mycobacterium peregrinum may be useful in such cases. PMID:15805720

  4. Mycobacterium chelonae Facial Infections Following Injection of Dermal Filler

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Jan M.; Xie, Yingda L.; Winthrop, Kevin L.; Schafer, Sean; Sehdev, Paul; Solomon, Joel; Jensen, Bette; Toney, Nadege C.; Lewis, Paul F.

    2015-01-01

    A cluster of 3 facial Mycobacterium chelonae infections occurred after cosmetic dermal filler injections at a plastic surgery clinic. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed that M chelonae isolated from the clinic tap water were identical to the patient wound isolates. Review of injection procedures identified application of nonsterile ice to the skin prior to injection as a possible source of M chelonae. Surveys of regional laboratories and a national plastic surgery listserv identified no other cases related to the injection of this brand of dermal filler. This is the first report of cutaneous M chelonae infections following the injection of dermal fillers. It adds to a growing body of literature on postinjection M chelonae infections and reinforces the importance of optimal skin disinfection steps prior to percutaneous procedures. PMID:23335647

  5. An Elucidation of Neutrophil Functions against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Devin; Nguyen, Thien; Kim, John; Kassissa, Christine; Khurasany, Melissa; Luong, Jennifer; Kasko, Sarah; Pandya, Shalin; Chu, Michael; Chi, Po-Ting; Lagman, Minette; Venketaraman, Vishwanath

    2013-01-01

    We characterized the functions of neutrophils in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection, with particular reference to glutathione (GSH). We examined the effects of GSH in improving the ability of neutrophils to control intracellular M. tb infection. Our findings indicate that increasing the intracellular levels of GSH with a liposomal formulation of GSH (L-GSH) resulted in reduction in the levels of free radicals and increased acidification of M. tb containing phagosomes leading to the inhibition in the growth of M. tb. This inhibitory mechanism is dependent on the presence of TNF-α and IL-6. Our studies demonstrate a novel regulatory mechanism adapted by the neutrophils to control M. tb infection. PMID:24312131

  6. TIM3 Mediates T Cell Exhaustion during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Jayaraman, Pushpa; Jacques, Miye K.; Zhu, Chen; Steblenko, Katherine M.; Stowell, Britni L.; Madi, Asaf; Anderson, Ana C.; Kuchroo, Vijay K.; Behar, Samuel M.

    2016-01-01

    While T cell immunity initially limits Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, why T cell immunity fails to sterilize the infection and allows recrudescence is not clear. One hypothesis is that T cell exhaustion impairs immunity and is detrimental to the outcome of M. tuberculosis infection. Here we provide functional evidence for the development T cell exhaustion during chronic TB. Second, we evaluate the role of the inhibitory receptor T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain–containing-3 (TIM3) during chronic M. tuberculosis infection. We find that TIM3 expressing T cells accumulate during chronic infection, co-express other inhibitory receptors including PD1, produce less IL-2 and TNF but more IL-10, and are functionally exhausted. Finally, we show that TIM3 blockade restores T cell function and improves bacterial control, particularly in chronically infected susceptible mice. These data show that T cell immunity is suboptimal during chronic M. tuberculosis infection due to T cell exhaustion. Moreover, in chronically infected mice, treatment with anti-TIM3 mAb is an effective therapeutic strategy against tuberculosis. PMID:26967901

  7. Chronic Mycobacterium marinum Infection Acts as a Tumor Promoter in Japanese Medaka (Oryzias latipes)

    EPA Science Inventory

    An accumulating body of research indicates there is an increased cancer risk associated with chronic infections. The genus Mycobacterium contains a number of species, including M tuberculosis, which mount chronic infections and have been implicated in higher cancer risk. Several ...

  8. Review of Mycobacterium marinum Infection Reported From Iran and Report of Three New Cases With Sporotrichoid Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Babamahmoodi, Farhang; Babamahmoodi, Abdolreza; Nikkhahan, Babak

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Mycobacterium marinum infection is the most common nontuberculous mycobacterial skin lesions. It results from skin injury and contact with contaminated water, fish, or shellfish; its infections have low frequency, nonspecific symptoms and lack of specific identification methods that can alter correct diagnosis.This study designed about cases that reported from Iran and comparing their presentation and clinical sign and symptom and outcome. Case Presentation: We find and evaluate three cases that have been reported in indexing sites (PubMed, Google scholar and Iranian indexing databases) since 1980 till end of 2012. Using combinations of the following keywords: “Mycobacterium marinum,” “Iran”, “atypical mycobacterium”, “Sporotrichoid presentation” and “fish tank granuloma”. Three new cases also described that infected with this organism and had Sporotrichoid presentation in 2012 in a referral hospital in north of Iran. Conclusions: Totally we evaluate six patients. Source of infection in all cases were aquarium and four of six cases were male (66.6%). Occurrence to treatment interval were between one month to one year (mean 3.07 months). Infection site in all of them were hands and dominantly in right hand (66.6 % of cases ) and 83.3 % of them had Sporotrichoid presentation and all of the patients finally cured. The only cause of infection with Mycobacterium marinum in Iran is aquarium and its presence in homes and offices increased during these years. Health workers and people should be informed and warned about this disease. PMID:24719723

  9. Disseminated Mycobacterium marinum Infection With a Destructive Nasal Lesion Mimicking Extranodal NK/T Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Asakura, Takanori; Ishii, Makoto; Kikuchi, Taku; Kameyama, Kaori; Namkoong, Ho; Nakata, Noboru; Sugita, Kayoko; Tasaka, Sadatomo; Shimizu, Takayuki; Hoshino, Yoshihiko; Okamoto, Shinichiro; Betsuyaku, Tomoko; Hasegawa, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mycobacterium marinum is a ubiquitous waterborne organism that mainly causes skin infection in immunocompetent patients, and its disseminated infection is rare. Extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENKL) usually localizes at the nasal and/or paranasal area, but occasionally disseminates into the skin/soft tissue and gastrointestinal tract. Compromised immunity is a risk factor for developing nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infection and malignant lymphoma, and the 2 diseases may share similar clinical presentation; however, only a few reports have described NTM infection mimicking malignant lymphoma. A 43-year-old Japanese man presented to our hospital complaining of multiple progressive skin nodules and purulent nasal discharge for 3 weeks. He was diagnosed with Crohn disease with refractory enteropathic arthritis and has been treated with anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha agents for 25 years. Fiberoptic nasal examination revealed septal perforation with hemorrhagic mucus and purulent rhinorrhea. Histological examination of the nasal septum revealed the infiltration of atypical medium-to-large-sized cells with erosion. The cells were positive for cytoplasmic CD3, granzyme B, and Epstein–Barr virus-encoded small RNA. Histological examination of the skin nodules and auricle also showed infiltration of atypical lymphocytes. The patient was tentatively diagnosed with ENKL, and chemotherapy was considered. However, the skin lesions decreased in size after discontinuation of immunosuppressive agents and minocycline administration. Two weeks later, nasal septum and lavage fluid and left leg skin cultures were positive for M marinum, and minocycline was discontinued. The skin and the nasal lesions improved after 2 months. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of disseminated M marinum infection with a destructive nasal lesion mimicking ENKL. The differentiation between M marinum infection and ENKL is clinically important because

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection following Kidney Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Boubaker, Karima; Gargah, Tahar; Abderrahim, Ezzedine; Ben Abdallah, Taieb; Kheder, Adel

    2013-01-01

    Introduction and Aims. Post-transplant tuberculosis (TB) is a problem in successful long-term outcome of renal transplantation recipients. Our objective was to describe the pattern and risk factors of TB infection and the prognosis in our transplant recipients. Patients and Methods. This study was a retrospective review of the records of 491 renal transplant recipients in our hospital during the period from January 1986 to December 2009. The demographic data, transplant characteristics, clinical manifestations, diagnostic criteria, treatment protocol, and long-term outcome of this cohort of patients were analyzed. Results. 16 patients (3,2%) developed post-transplant TB with a mean age of 32,5 ± 12,7 (range: 13–60) years and a mean post-transplant period of 36,6months (range: 12,3 months–15,9 years). The forms of the diseases were pulmonary in 10/16 (62,6%), disseminated in 3/16 (18,7%), and extrapulmonary in 3/16 (18,7%). Graft dysfunction was observed in 7 cases (43,7%) with tissue-proof acute rejection in 3 cases and loss of the graft in 4 cases. Hepatotoxicity developed in 3 patients (18,7%) during treatment. Recurrences were observed in 4 cases after early stop of treatment. Two patients (12.5%) died. Conclusion. Extra pulmonary and disseminated tuberculosis were observed in third of our patients. More than 9months of treatment may be necessary to prevent recurrence. PMID:24222903

  11. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in women with unexplained infertility

    PubMed Central

    Eftekhar, Maryam; Pourmasumi, Soheila; Sabeti, Parvin; Aflatoonian, Abbas; Sheikhha, Mohammad Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Genital tuberculosis (GTB) is an important cause of female infertility, especially in developing countries. The positive results of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in endometrial GTB in the absence of tubal damage raise the possibility of the detection of sub-clinical or latent disease, with doubtful benefits of treatment. Objective: To evaluate the mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in endometrial biopsy samples collected from unexplained infertile women attending Yazd Research and Clinical Center for Infertility by using PCR techniques. Materials and Methods: In this cross sectional study, 144 infertile women with unexplained infertility aged 20-35 years old and normal Histro-saplango graphy findings were enrolled. Endometrial biopsy samples from each participant were tested for mycobacterium tuberculosis detecting by PCR. In 93 patients, peritoneal fluid was also taken for culture and PCR. Results: The PCR results of endometrial specimens were negative in all cases, demonstrating that there was no GTB infection among our patients. Conclusion: Our results showed that GTB could not be considered as a major problem in women with unexplained infertility. Although, studies have indicated that PCR is a useful method in diagnosing early GTB disease in infertile women with no demonstrable evidence of tubal or endometrial involvement. PMID:27141534

  12. A rabbit model for study of Mycobacterium paratuberculosis infection.

    PubMed Central

    Mokresh, A H; Czuprynski, C J; Butler, D G

    1989-01-01

    Of 21 newborn rabbits inoculated orally with Mycobacterium paratuberculosis ATCC 19698, 13 (62%) became infected, as determined by histopathology and culture. Of the 21 inoculated rabbits, 14 (67%) experienced episodes of intermittent diarrhea, sometimes as early as 5 months after inoculation. Feces varied in consistency from soft-semisolid to watery. The organism was isolated from the sacculus rotundus, vermiform appendix of the cecum, ileum, mesenteric lymph node, and feces of 9 of 21 (43%) M. paratuberculosis-inoculated rabbits 8 to 10 months after inoculation. One infected rabbit gradually became severely emaciated; advanced paratuberculosis was confirmed by culture and histopathology. Of 21 rabbits, 9 (43%) developed multifocal, well-demarcated granulomatous enteritis in the sacculus rotundus and the vermiform appendix of the cecum. There was no significant difference in the rate of infection when the organisms were administered daily for 5 or 10 days in cow milk or broth. There was no discernible effect of pregnancy, parturition, or lactation on the severity of intestinal lesions, clinical signs, or the number of rabbits infected. Complement fixation and delayed-type hypersensitivity skin tests failed to detect infection. The results of this study suggest that newborn rabbits inoculated orally with M. paratuberculosis constitute a useful animal model for the study of paratuberculosis infection. Images PMID:2807547

  13. LAG3 Expression in Active Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infections

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Bonnie L.; Mehra, Smriti; Ahsan, Muhammad H.; Selman, Moises; Khader, Shabaana A.; Kaushal, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a highly successful pathogen because of its ability to persist in human lungs for long periods of time. MTB modulates several aspects of the host immune response. Lymphocyte-activation gene 3 (LAG3) is a protein with a high affinity for the CD4 receptor and is expressed mainly by regulatory T cells with immunomodulatory functions. To understand the function of LAG3 during MTB infection, a nonhuman primate model of tuberculosis, which recapitulates key aspects of natural human infection in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), was used. We show that the expression of LAG3 is highly induced in the lungs and particularly in the granulomatous lesions of macaques experimentally infected with MTB. Furthermore, we show that LAG3 expression is not induced in the lungs and lung granulomas of animals exhibiting latent tuberculosis infection. However, simian immunodeficiency virus–induced reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection results in an increased expression of LAG3 in the lungs. This response is not observed in nonhuman primates infected with non-MTB bacterial pathogens, nor with simian immunodeficiency virus alone. Our data show that LAG3 was expressed primarily on CD4+ T cells, presumably by regulatory T cells but also by natural killer cells. The expression of LAG3 coincides with high bacterial burdens and changes in the host type 1 helper T-cell response. PMID:25549835

  14. Pathology of Mycobacterium bovis infection in wild meerkats (Suricata suricatta).

    PubMed

    Drewe, J A; Foote, A K; Sutcliffe, R L; Pearce, G P

    2009-01-01

    Pathological lesions associated with Mycobacterium bovis infection (bovine tuberculosis; bTB) in free-living meerkats (Suricata suricatta) in the Kalahari Desert of South Africa are described. The pathology of bTB in meerkats was determined through detailed post-mortem examinations of 57 animals (52 meerkats showing clinical signs of bTB, and five not showing signs of disease). Lymph nodes and tissue lesions thought to be associated with bTB were cultured for mycobacteria. All 52 bTB-infected meerkats showed gross or microscopical granulomatous lesions, but M. bovis was cultured from only 42% (22/52) of these animals. The majority (96%, 50/52) of diseased meerkats had lesions in multiple sites, the pattern of which suggested haematogenous spread of M. bovis infection in this species. The histological characteristics of the tuberculous lesions, together with the gross pathology and the wide range of body systems affected, indicate that infection in meerkats is acquired principally via the respiratory and oral routes, whereas excretion is most likely via the respiratory tract and suppurating skin wounds. Urine and faeces appear to be unlikely sources of infection. The findings of this study provide information on the transmission, pathogenesis and epidemiology of bTB in meerkats that is likely to be relevant to the understanding of M. bovis infection in other social mammal species such as the European badger (Meles meles). PMID:19070868

  15. Mixed Infections and Rifampin Heteroresistance among Mycobacterium tuberculosis Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Chao; Li, Song; Luo, Zhongyue; Pi, Rui; Sun, Honghu; He, Qingxia; Tang, Ke; Luo, Mei; Li, Yuqing; Couvin, David; Rastogi, Nalin

    2015-01-01

    Mixed infections and heteroresistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis contribute to the difficulty of diagnosis, treatment, and control of tuberculosis. However, there is still no proper solution for these issues. This study aimed to investigate the potential relationship between mixed infections and heteroresistance and to determine the high-risk groups related to these factors. A total of 499 resistant and susceptible isolates were subjected to spoligotyping and 24-locus variable-number tandem repeat methods to analyze their genotypic lineages and the occurrence of mixed infections. Two hundred ninety-two randomly selected isolates were sequenced on their rpoB gene to examine mutations and heteroresistance. The results showed that 12 patients had mixed infections, and the corresponding isolates belonged to Manu2 (n = 8), Beijing (n = 2), T (n = 1), and unknown (n = 1) lineages. Manu2 was found to be significantly associated with mixed infections (odds ratio, 47.72; confidence interval, 9.68 to 235.23; P < 0.01). Four isolates (1.37%) were confirmed to be heteroresistant, which was caused by mixed infections in three (75%) isolates; these belonged to Manu2. Additionally, 3.8% of the rifampin-resistant isolates showing no mutation in the rpoB gene were significantly associated with mixed infections (χ2, 56.78; P < 0.01). This study revealed for the first time that Manu2 was the predominant group in the cases of mixed infections, and this might be the main reason for heteroresistance and a possible mechanism for isolates without any mutation in the rpoB gene to become rifampin resistant. Further studies should focus on this lineage to clarify its relevance to mixed infections. PMID:25903578

  16. Paramecium caudatum enhances transmission and infectivity of Mycobacterium marinum and Mycobacterium chelonae in zebrafish (Danio rerio)

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Tracy S.; Ferguson, Jayde A.; Watral, Virginia G.; Mutoji, K. Nadine; Ennis, Don G.; Kent, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterial infections in laboratory zebrafish (Danio rerio) are common and widespread in research colonies. Mycobacteria within free living amoebae have been shown to be transmission vectors for mycobacteriosis. Paramecium caudatum are commonly used as a first food for zebrafish, and we investigated this ciliate’s potential to serve as a vector of Mycobacterium marinum and M. chelonae. The ability of live P. caudatum to transmit these mycobacteria to larval, juvenile and adult zebrafish was evaluated. Infections were defined by histologic observation of granulomas containing acid-fast bacteria in extraintestinal locations. In both experiments, fish fed paramecia containing mycobacteria became infected at a higher incidence than controls. Larvae (exposed at 4 days post hatch) fed paramecia with M. marinum exhibited an incidence of 30% (24/80) and juveniles (exposed at 21 days post hatch) showed 31% incidence (14/45). Adult fish fed a gelatin food matrix containing mycobacteria within paramecia or mycobacteria alone for 2 wk resulted in infections when examined 8 wk after exposure as follows: M. marinum OSU 214 47% (21/45), M. marinum CH 47% (9/19), M. chelonae 38% (5/13). In contrast, fish feed mycobacteria alone in this diet did not become infected, except for 2 fish (5%) in the M. marinum OSU 214 low dose group. These results demonstrate that Paramecium caudatum can act as a vector for mycobacteria. This provides a useful animal model for evaluation of natural mycobacterial infections and demonstrates the possibility of mycobacterial transmission in zebrafish facilities via contaminated paramecia cultures. PMID:24192000

  17. A fatal case of pulmonary infection by Mycobacterium colombiense in Para State, Amazon Region, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barretto, Adriana Rodrigues; Felício, João Soares; Sales, Lucia Helena Messias; Yamada, Elizabeth Sumi; Lopes, Maria Luiza; da Costa, Ana Roberta Fusco

    2016-07-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is a heterogeneous group of species found in several environmental sources and that exhibit variable degrees of pathogenicity. Among the MAC members, Mycobacterium colombiense has been related to pulmonary disease and disseminated infection in HIV-infected patients in Colombia. Lymphadenopathy cases have also been reported. We have described a fatal case of M. colombiense pulmonary disease in a Brazilian patient without evidence of HIV infection or other known causes of immunosuppression. PMID:27133309

  18. Virulence of two strains of Mycobacterium bovis in cattle following aerosol infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Over the past two decades, highly virulent strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis have emerged and spread rapidly in humans, suggesting a selective advantage based upon virulence. A similar scenario has not been described for Mycobacterium bovis infection in cattle (i.e., Bovine Tuberculos...

  19. In situ cytokine expression in pulmonary granulomas of cattle experimentally infected by aerosolized Mycobacterium bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium bovis is the cause of tuberculosis in most animal species, including cattle and is a serious zoonotic pathogen. In humans, M. bovis infection can result in disease clinically indistinguishable from that caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the cause of most tuberculosis in humans. Reg...

  20. Isolation of Mycobacterium kumamotonense from a patient with pulmonary infection and latent tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kontos, Fanourios; Mavromanolakis, Dimitrios Nikitas; Zande, Marina Chari; Gitti, Zoe Georgios

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium kumamotonense is a novel, slow-growing non-chromogenic nontuberculous mycobacterium, which belongs to Mycobacterium terrae complex. We report, for the first time in Greece, the isolation of M. kumamotonense from an immunocompetent patient with pulmonary infection and latent tuberculosis. M. kumamotonense was identified by sequencing analysis of 16S rDNA and 65-kDa heat shock protein genes while by commercial molecular assays it was misidentified as Mycobacterium celatum. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed by the reference broth microdilution method. The strain was susceptible to amikacin, clarithromycin, rifampin, ciprofloxacin, moxifloxacin, rifabutin, ethambutol and linezolid. PMID:27080783

  1. Laboratory Diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection and Disease in Children.

    PubMed

    Dunn, James J; Starke, Jeffrey R; Revell, Paula A

    2016-06-01

    Diagnosis of tuberculosis in children is challenging; even with advanced technologies, the diagnosis is often difficult to confirm microbiologically in part due to the paucibacillary nature of the disease. Clinical diagnosis lacks standardization, and traditional and molecular microbiologic methods lack sensitivity, particularly in children. Immunodiagnostic tests may improve sensitivity, but these tests cannot distinguish tuberculosis disease from latent infection and some lack specificity. While molecular tools like Xpert MTB/RIF have advanced our ability to detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis and to determine antimicrobial resistance, decades old technologies remain the standard in most locales. Today, the battle against this ancient disease still poses one of the primary diagnostic challenges in pediatric laboratory medicine. PMID:26984977

  2. Induction of Mycobacterium avium proteins upon infection of human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Brunori, Lara; Giannoni, Federico; Bini, Luca; Liberatori, Sabrina; Frota, Cristiane; Jenner, Peter; Thoresen, Ove Fredrik; Orefici, Graziella; Fattorini, Lanfranco

    2004-10-01

    Induction of Mycobacterium avium proteins labelled with [35S]methionine and mRNAs upon infection of the human macrophage cell line THP-1 was investigated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis-mass spectrometry and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), respectively. M. avium overexpressed proteins within the macrophages that are involved in fatty acids metabolism (FadE2, FixA), cell wall synthesis (KasA), and protein synthesis (EF-tu). The correlation of differential protein and mRNA expression varied between good and no correlation. Overall, these four proteins may be involved in the adaptation and survival of M. avium within human macrophages. PMID:15378697

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection of the 'non-classical immune cell'.

    PubMed

    Randall, Philippa J; Hsu, Nai-Jen; Quesniaux, Valerie; Ryffel, Bernhard; Jacobs, Muazzam

    2015-10-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis can infect 'non-classical immune cells', which comprise a significant constituency of cells that reside outside of those defined as 'classical immune cells' from myeloid or lymphoid origin. Here we address the influence of specific 'non-classical immune cells' in host responses and their effects in controlling mycobacterial growth or enabling an environment conducive for bacilli persistence. The interaction of M. tuberculosis with epithelial cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, adipocytes, glia and neurons and downstream cellular responses that often dictate immune regulation and disease outcome are discussed. Functional integration and synergy between 'classical' and 'non-classical immune cells' are highlighted as critical for determining optimal immune outcomes that favour the host. PMID:25801479

  4. Epidemic of Postsurgical Infections Caused by Mycobacterium massiliense▿

    PubMed Central

    Duarte, Rafael Silva; Lourenço, Maria Cristina Silva; Fonseca, Leila de Souza; Leão, Sylvia Cardoso; Amorim, Efigenia de Lourdes T.; Rocha, Ingrid L. L.; Coelho, Fabrice Santana; Viana-Niero, Cristina; Gomes, Karen Machado; da Silva, Marlei Gomes; de Oliveira Lorena, Nádia Suely; Pitombo, Marcos Bettini; Ferreira, Rosa M. C.; de Oliveira Garcia, Márcio Henrique; de Oliveira, Gisele Pinto; Lupi, Otilia; Vilaça, Bruno Rios; Serradas, Lúcia Rodrigues; Chebabo, Alberto; Marques, Elizabeth Andrade; Teixeira, Lúcia Martins; Dalcolmo, Margareth; Senna, Simone Gonçalves; Sampaio, Jorge Luiz Mello

    2009-01-01

    An epidemic of infections after video-assisted surgery (1,051 possible cases) caused by rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) and involving 63 hospitals in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, occurred between August 2006 and July 2007. One hundred ninety-seven cases were confirmed by positive acid-fast staining and/or culture techniques. Thirty-eight hospitals had cases confirmed by mycobacterial culture, with a total of 148 available isolates recovered from 146 patients. Most (n = 144; 97.2%) isolates presented a PRA-hsp65 restriction pattern suggestive of Mycobacterium bolletii or Mycobacterium massiliense. Seventy-four of these isolates were further identified by hsp65 or rpoB partial sequencing, confirming the species identification as M. massiliense. Epidemic isolates showed susceptibility to amikacin (MIC at which 90% of the tested isolates are inhibited [MIC90], 8 μg/ml) and clarithromycin (MIC90, 0.25 μg/ml) but resistance to ciprofloxacin (MIC90, ≥32 μg/ml), cefoxitin (MIC90, 128 μg/ml), and doxycycline (MIC90, ≥64 μg/ml). Representative epidemic M. massiliense isolates that were randomly selected, including at least one isolate from each hospital where confirmed cases were detected, belonged to a single clone, as indicated by the analysis of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns. They also had the same PFGE pattern as that previously observed in two outbreaks that occurred in other Brazilian cities; we designated this clone BRA100. All five BRA100 M. massiliense isolates tested presented consistent tolerance to 2% glutaraldehyde. This is the largest epidemic of postsurgical infections caused by RGM reported in the literature to date in Brazil. PMID:19403765

  5. Racial differences in susceptibility to infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Stead, W W; Senner, J W; Reddick, W T; Lofgren, J P

    1990-02-15

    The prevalence of tuberculosis among blacks is known to be about twice that among whites. When we looked at infection rates among the initially tuberculin-negative residents of 165 racially integrated nursing homes in Arkansas, we were stimulated to investigate whether this difference could be due in part to racial differences in susceptibility to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. A new infection was defined by an increase of greater than or equal to 12 mm of induration after a tuberculin skin test (5 tuberculin units) administered at least 60 days after a negative two-step test. On repeat skin testing of the 25,398 initially tuberculin-negative nursing home residents, we found that 13.8 percent of the blacks and only 7.2 percent of the whites had evidence of a new infection (relative risk, 1.9; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.7 to 2.1). Blacks were infected more frequently, regardless of the race of the source patient. In homes with a single source patient who was white, 17.4 percent of the black and 11.7 percent of the white residents became infected (relative risk, 1.5; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.2 to 1.9); in homes with a single source patient who was black, 12.4 percent of the black and 7.7 percent of the white residents became infected (relative risk, 1.6; 95 percent confidence interval, 1.2 to 2.1). However, there was no racial difference in the percentage of residents who had recently converted to positive status who, in the absence of preventive therapy, were later found to have clinical tuberculosis (blacks, 11.5 percent; whites, 10.6 percent). Data from three outbreaks of tuberculosis in two prisons also showed that blacks have about twice the relative risk of whites of becoming infected with M. tuberculosis. We conclude that blacks are more readily infected by M. tuberculosis than are whites. The data also suggest that susceptibility to M. tuberculosis infection varies independently of the factors governing the progression to clinical

  6. Palatal Actinomycosis and Kaposi Sarcoma in an HIV-Infected Subject with Disseminated Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ablanedo-Terrazas, Yuria; Ormsby, Christopher E.; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2012-01-01

    Actinomyces and Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare are facultative intracellular organisms, members of the bacterial order actinomycetales. Although Actinomyces can behave as copathogen when anatomic barriers are compromised, its coinfection with Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare has not previously been reported. We present the first reported case of palatal actinomycosis co-infection with disseminated MAC, in an HIV-infected subject with Kaposi sarcoma and diabetes. We discuss the pathogenesis of the complex condition of this subject. PMID:22481952

  7. Antibody responses in reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) infected with Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Waters, W R; Palmer, M V; Bannantine, J P; Greenwald, R; Esfandiari, J; Andersen, P; McNair, J; Pollock, J M; Lyashchenko, K P

    2005-06-01

    Despite having a very low incidence of disease, reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) are subject to tuberculosis (TB) testing requirements for interstate shipment and herd accreditation in the United States. Improved TB tests are desperately needed, as many reindeer are falsely classified as reactors by current testing procedures. Sera collected sequentially from 11 (experimentally) Mycobacterium bovis-infected reindeer and 4 noninfected reindeer were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), immunoblotting, and multiantigen print immunoassay (MAPIA) for antibody specific to M. bovis antigens. Specific antibody was detected as early as 4 weeks after challenge with M. bovis. By MAPIA, sera were tested with 12 native and recombinant antigens, which were used to coat nitrocellulose. All M. bovis-infected reindeer developed responses to MPB83 and a fusion protein, Acr1/MPB83, and 9/11 had responses to MPB70. Other antigens less commonly recognized included MPB59, ESAT-6, and CFP10. Administration of purified protein derivatives for skin testing boosted serum antibody responses, as detected by each of the assays. Of the noninfected reindeer, 2/4 had responses that were detectable immediately following skin testing, which correlated with pathological findings (i.e., presence of granulomatous lesions yet the absence of acid-fast bacteria). The levels of specific antibody produced by infected reindeer appeared to be associated with disease progression but not with cell-mediated immunity. These findings indicate that M. bovis infection of reindeer elicits an antibody response to multiple antigens that can be boosted by skin testing. Serological tests using carefully selected specific antigens have potential for early detection of infections in reindeer. PMID:15939747

  8. Source Tracking Mycobacterium ulcerans Infections in the Ashanti Region, Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Narh, Charles A.; Mosi, Lydia; Quaye, Charles; Dassi, Christelle; Konan, Daniele O.; Tay, Samuel C. K.; de Souza, Dziedzom K.; Boakye, Daniel A.; Bonfoh, Bassirou

    2015-01-01

    Although several studies have associated Mycobacterium ulcerans (MU) infection, Buruli ulcer (BU), with slow moving water bodies, there is still no definite mode of transmission. Ecological and transmission studies suggest Variable Number Tandem Repeat (VNTR) typing as a useful tool to differentiate MU strains from other Mycolactone Producing Mycobacteria (MPM). Deciphering the genetic relatedness of clinical and environmental isolates is seminal to determining reservoirs, vectors and transmission routes. In this study, we attempted to source-track MU infections to specific water bodies by matching VNTR profiles of MU in human samples to those in the environment. Environmental samples were collected from 10 water bodies in four BU endemic communities in the Ashanti region, Ghana. Four VNTR loci in MU Agy99 genome, were used to genotype environmental MU ecovars, and those from 14 confirmed BU patients within the same study area. Length polymorphism was confirmed with sequencing. MU was present in the 3 different types of water bodies, but significantly higher in biofilm samples. Four MU genotypes, designated W, X, Y and Z, were typed in both human and environmental samples. Other reported genotypes were only found in water bodies. Animal trapping identified 1 mouse with lesion characteristic of BU, which was confirmed as MU infection. Our findings suggest that patients may have been infected from community associated water bodies. Further, we present evidence that small mammals within endemic communities could be susceptible to MU infections. M. ulcerans transmission could involve several routes where humans have contact with risk environments, which may be further compounded by water bodies acting as vehicles for disseminating strains. PMID:25612300

  9. Activity of 5-chloro-pyrazinamide in mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis or Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Zahoor; Tyagi, Sandeep; Minkowski, Austin; Almeida, Deepak; Nuermberger, Eric L.; Peck, Kaitlin M.; Welch, John T.; Baughn, Anthony D.; Jacobs, Williams R.; Grosset, Jacques H.

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Pyrazinamide is an essential component of first line anti-tuberculosis regimen as well as most of the second line regimens. This drug has a unique sterilizing activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Its unique role in tuberculosis treatment has lead to the search and development of its structural analogues. One such analogue is 5-chloro-pyrazinamide (5-Cl-PZA) that has been tested under in vitro conditions against M. tuberculosis. The present study was designed with an aim to assess the activity of 5-Cl-PZA, alone and in combination with first-line drugs, against murine tuberculosis. Methods: The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 5-Cl-PZA in Middlebrook 7H9 broth (neutral pH) and the inhibitory titre of serum from mice that received a 300 mg/kg oral dose of 5-Cl-PZA 30 min before cardiac puncture were determined. To test the tolerability of orally administered 5-Cl-PZA, uninfected mice received doses up to 300 mg/kg for 2 wk. Four weeks after low-dose aerosol infection either with M. tuberculosis or M. bovis, mice were treated 5 days/wk with 5-Cl-PZA, at doses ranging from 37.5 to 150 mg/kg, either alone or in combination with isoniazid and rifampicin. Antimicrobial activity was assessed by colony-forming unit counts in lungs after 4 and 8 wk of treatment. Results: The MIC of 5-Cl-PZA against M. tuberculosis was between 12.5 and 25 μg/ml and the serum inhibitory titre was 1:4. Under the same experimental conditions, the MIC of pyrazinamide was >100 μg/ml and mouse serum had no inhibitory activity after a 300 mg/kg dose; 5-Cl-PZA was well tolerated in uninfected and infected mice up to 300 and 150 mg/kg, respectively. While PZA alone and in combination exhibited its usual antimicrobial activity in mice infected with M. tuberculosis and no activity in mice infected with M. bovis, 5-Cl-PZA exhibited antimicrobial activity neither in mice infected with M. tuberculosis nor in mice infected with M. bovis. Interpretation

  10. The first case of cutaneous infection with Mycobacterium parascrofulaceum.

    PubMed

    Zong, Wenkai; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wang, Hongsheng; Xu, Xiu Lian; Wang, Qiuling; Tian, Weiwei; Jin, Ya Li; Wu, Qinxue; Tang, Meiyu

    2012-01-01

    The authors present the first, to the best of their knowledge, reported case of cutaneous infection caused by Mycobacterium parascrofulaceum. A 42-year-old woman presented with asymptomatic reddish papules, nodules, plaques, and patches on the right side of her face and on her forehead that had persisted for 5 years, with the lesions gradually increasing in size over that time. No previous intervening medical treatment had been applied. No history or evidence of immunosuppression was found. A skin biopsy was performed for routine histological examination. Samples of lesioned skin were inoculated on Löwenstein-Jensen medium to determine the presence of acid-fast bacilli. Ziehl-Neelsen staining was used to confirm the presence of the organism. In vitro drug susceptibility testing was conducted using the microtiter plate method. Mycobacterium was identified by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and sequencing of the hsp65 and 16S rDNA genes. Cultures for aerobic and anaerobic bacteria, as well as fungus, were also conducted. Routine histopathology revealed granulomatous changes without caseation. Ziehl-Neelsen staining showed that the organisms in both the lesions and the cultures were acid-fast bacilli. The cultured colonies were grown in Löwenstein-Jensen medium and incubated at two different temperatures (32°C and 37°C) for 2-3 weeks, developing pigmentation both in the dark and in the light. In vitro drug susceptibility tests showed that the organism was sensitive to clarithromycin and moxifloxacin. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and sequencing of the hsp65 and 16S rDNA genes confirmed that the isolated organisms were M. parascrofulaceum. Fungal and other standard bacterial cultures were negative. In conclusion, identification and diagnosis of nontuberculous mycobacteria should be performed promptly to obtain better prognoses. Empirical treatments may be feasible, and drug

  11. Association between cattle herd Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection and infection of a hare population.

    PubMed

    Salgado, Miguel; Monti, Gustavo; Sevilla, Iker; Manning, Elizabeth

    2014-10-01

    Paratuberculosis has long been considered a disease of domestic and wild ruminants only. The known host range of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) was recently extended to include non-ruminant wildlife species believed to be exposed to spillover of MAP from infected domestic cattle herds. The aim of the present study was to assess the association between cattle herd MAP infection pressure level and the infection level of a hare population in two dairy farms of southern Chile. Fifty hares from a herd A and 42 hares from herd B were captured and sampled for MAP culture. The results showed a statistically significant association between the cattle herds' infection prevalence and the hare infection prevalence. PMID:25030465

  12. Development of vaccines to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Park, Hong-Tae; Yoo, Han Sang

    2016-07-01

    Johne's disease or paratuberculosis is a chronic debilitating disease in ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). The disease causes significant economic losses in livestock industries worldwide. There are no effective control measures to eradicate the disease because there are no appropriate diagnostic methods to detect subclinically infected animals. Therefore, it is very difficult to control the disease using only test and cull strategies. Vaccination against paratuberculosis has been considered as an alternative strategy to control the disease when combined with management interventions. Understanding host-pathogen interactions is extremely important to development of vaccines. It has long been known that Th1-mediated cellular immune responses are play a crucial role in protection against MAP infection. However, recent studies suggested that innate immune responses are more closely related to protective effects than adaptive immunity. Based on this understanding, several attempts have been made to develop vaccines against paratuberculosis. A variety of ideas for designing novel vaccines have emerged, and the tests of the efficacy of these vaccines are conducted constantly. However, no effective vaccines are commercially available. In this study, studies of the development of vaccines for MAP were reviewed and summarized. PMID:27489800

  13. Development of vaccines to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Johne's disease or paratuberculosis is a chronic debilitating disease in ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). The disease causes significant economic losses in livestock industries worldwide. There are no effective control measures to eradicate the disease because there are no appropriate diagnostic methods to detect subclinically infected animals. Therefore, it is very difficult to control the disease using only test and cull strategies. Vaccination against paratuberculosis has been considered as an alternative strategy to control the disease when combined with management interventions. Understanding host-pathogen interactions is extremely important to development of vaccines. It has long been known that Th1-mediated cellular immune responses are play a crucial role in protection against MAP infection. However, recent studies suggested that innate immune responses are more closely related to protective effects than adaptive immunity. Based on this understanding, several attempts have been made to develop vaccines against paratuberculosis. A variety of ideas for designing novel vaccines have emerged, and the tests of the efficacy of these vaccines are conducted constantly. However, no effective vaccines are commercially available. In this study, studies of the development of vaccines for MAP were reviewed and summarized. PMID:27489800

  14. Gamma Interferon Release Assays for Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Denkinger, Claudia M.; Kik, Sandra V.; Rangaka, Molebogeng X.; Zwerling, Alice; Oxlade, Olivia; Metcalfe, John Z.; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Dowdy, David W.; Dheda, Keertan; Banaei, Niaz

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Identification and treatment of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) can substantially reduce the risk of developing active disease. However, there is no diagnostic gold standard for LTBI. Two tests are available for identification of LTBI: the tuberculin skin test (TST) and the gamma interferon (IFN-γ) release assay (IGRA). Evidence suggests that both TST and IGRA are acceptable but imperfect tests. They represent indirect markers of Mycobacterium tuberculosis exposure and indicate a cellular immune response to M. tuberculosis. Neither test can accurately differentiate between LTBI and active TB, distinguish reactivation from reinfection, or resolve the various stages within the spectrum of M. tuberculosis infection. Both TST and IGRA have reduced sensitivity in immunocompromised patients and have low predictive value for progression to active TB. To maximize the positive predictive value of existing tests, LTBI screening should be reserved for those who are at sufficiently high risk of progressing to disease. Such high-risk individuals may be identifiable by using multivariable risk prediction models that incorporate test results with risk factors and using serial testing to resolve underlying phenotypes. In the longer term, basic research is necessary to identify highly predictive biomarkers. PMID:24396134

  15. Prime–Boost with Mycobacterium smegmatis Recombinant Vaccine Improves Protection in Mice Infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Junqueira-Kipnis, Ana Paula; de Oliveira, Fábio Muniz; Trentini, Monalisa Martins; Tiwari, Sangeeta; Chen, Bing; Resende, Danilo Pires; Silva, Bruna D. S.; Chen, Mei; Tesfa, Lydia; Jacobs, William R.; Kipnis, André

    2013-01-01

    The development of a new vaccine as a substitute for Bacillus Calmette–Guerin or to improve its efficacy is one of the many World Health Organization goals to control tuberculosis. Mycobacterial vectors have been used successfully in the development of vaccines against tuberculosis. To enhance the potential utility of Mycobacterium smegmatis as a vaccine, it was transformed with a recombinant plasmid containing the partial sequences of the genes Ag85c, MPT51, and HspX (CMX) from M. tuberculosis. The newly generated recombinant strain mc2-CMX was tested in a murine model of infection. The recombinant vaccine induced specific IgG1 or IgG2a responses to CMX. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from the lungs and spleen responded ex vivo to CMX, producing IFN-γ, IL17, TNF-α, and IL2. The vaccine thus induced a significant immune response in mice. Mice vaccinated with mc2-CMX and challenged with M. tuberculosis showed better protection than mice immunized with wild-type M. smegmatis or BCG. To increase the safety and immunogenicity of the CMX antigens, we used a recombinant strain of M. smegmatis, IKE (immune killing evasion), to express CMX. The recombinant vaccine IKE-CMX induced a better protective response than mc2-CMX. The data presented here suggest that the expression of CMX antigens improves the immune response and the protection induced in mice when M. smegmatis is used as vaccine against tuberculosis. PMID:24250805

  16. Mycobacterium bovis infection in humans and cats in same household, Texas, USA, 2012

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium bovis infection of cats is exceedingly rare in non-endemic regions for bovine tuberculosis. This case study describes the diagnosis and clinical management of pulmonary M. bovis infection in two indoor-housed cats and their association with at least one M. bovis-infected human in Texas...

  17. Mycobacterium bovis Infection in Humans and Cats in Same Household, Texas, USA, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Lyashchenko, Konstantin P.; Greenwald, Rena; Robbe-Austerman, Suelee; McManis, Cynthia; Waters, W. Ray

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium bovis infection of cats is exceedingly rare in regions where bovine tuberculosis is not endemic. We describe the diagnosis and clinical management of pulmonary M. bovis infection in 2 indoor-housed cats and their association with at least 1 M. bovis–infected human in Texas, USA, in September 2012. PMID:25695666

  18. Associations Between Cytokine Gene Expression and Pathology in Mycobacterium bovis Infected Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium bovis infection results in the development of tuberculosis in many mammalian species including humans. In the US, infected white-tailed deer (WTD) represent a reservoir of infection that threatens cattle in endemic areas. This continued threat to herd health emphasizes the need for the...

  19. Soft Tissue Infection Caused by Rapid Growing Mycobacterium following Medical Procedures: Two Case Reports and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Sen; Lee, Chin-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Non-tubecrulosis mycobacterium infections were increasingly reported either pulmonary or extrapulmonary in the past decades. In Taiwan, we noticed several reports about the soft tissue infections caused by rapid growing mycobacterium such as Mycobacterium abscessus, Mycobacterium chelonae, on newspaper, magazines, or the multimedia. Most of them occurred after a plastic surgery, and medical or non-medical procedures. Here, we reported two cases of these infections following medical procedures. We also discussed common features and the clinical course of the disease, the characteristics of the infected site, and the treatment strategy. The literatures were also reviewed, and the necessity of the treatment guidelines was discussed. PMID:24882980

  20. Isolation and characterization of an atypical Listeria monocytogenes associated with a canine urinary tract infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes, a well described neurologic, gastrointestinal, and potential abortion-causing agent in humans, is rarely associated with disease in companion animals. A case of urinary tract infection associated with an atypical, weakly hemolytic L. monocytogenes strain is described here in ...

  1. Isolation and characterization of an atypical Listeria monocytogenes associated with a canine urinary tract infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Listeria monocytogenes, a well-described cause of encephalitis and abortion in ruminants and of food-borne illness in humans, is rarely associated with disease in companion animals. A case of urinary tract infection associated with an atypical, weakly hemolytic L. monocytogenes strain is described i...

  2. Mycobacterium intracellulare infection of the shoulder and spine in a patient with steroid-treated systemic Lupus erythematosus

    SciTech Connect

    Zvetina, J.R.; Rubinstein, H.; Demos, T.C.

    1982-05-01

    Atypical mycobacterial infections of bone are rare. A patient with systemic lupus erythematosus treated with steroids developed an M. intracellulare infection of the shoulder and spine. These infections are insidious and diagnosis is difficult. Marked involvement of one joint, large effusion, or aspirated small synovial fragments suggest an atypical tuberculous joint infection.

  3. Outbreak of Mycobacterium bovis infection in a wild animal park.

    PubMed

    Schmidbauer, S-M; Wohlsein, P; Kirpal, G; Beineke, A; Müller, G; Müller, H; Moser, I; Baumgartner, W

    2007-09-01

    An outbreak of tuberculosis due to Mycobacterium bovis occurred in a wild animal park. Three pot-bellied pigs (Sus scrofa vittatus), one red deer (Cervus elaphus), one buffalo (Bison bonasus) and two European lynxes (Lynx lynx) were affected and showed clinical signs including weight loss, enlarged lymph nodes and paralysis of the hindlimbs. Postmortem examinations revealed multifocal granulomatous lesions in various organs, including the lymph nodes, lungs, intestines, kidneys and the central nervous system. Acid-fast organisms were demonstrated in various organs histologically and bacteriologically. Spoligotyping of 17 isolates from various organs of the affected animals confirmed an infection by M bovis and revealed an identical pattern indicating a common origin. The spoligotype was different from the pattern of M bovis recorded in the cattle population in Germany between 2000 and 2006. Investigations of sentinel animals such as an aged silver fox (Vulpes vulpes), a badger (Meles meles), a ferret (Mustela putorius) and rodents, and tuberculin skin tests of the animal attendants and randomly collected faecal samples from the enclosures were all negative for M bovis. PMID:17766809

  4. [Pulmonary infection caused by Mycobacterium szulgai: a case report].

    PubMed

    Ikeue, Tatsuyoshi; Watanabe, Shigeki; Sugita, Takakazu; Horikawa, Sadao; Suzuki, Yujiro; Nishiyama, Hideki; Maekawa, Nobuo

    2002-05-01

    We reported a case of pulmonary infection caused by Mycobacterium szulgai (M. szulgai) in an immunocompetent, asymptomatic 55-year-old man without underlying disease. A chest radiograph of an annual health examination revealed a right upper lobe infiltrate with thin-walled cavities, which was not present in the previous year. An acid-fast stain of bronchial washing fluid was positive, and antimycobacterial chemotherapy with isoniazid (400 mg/day), rifampin (450 mg/day), and ethambutol (750 mg/day) was initiated on presumptive diagnosis of the case as tuberculosis. DNA-DNA hybridization of sputum and bronchial washing samples identified M. szulgai as the causative organism. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing indicated that the isolate was sensitive to most common antimycobacterial drugs except capreomycin (CPM) and p-aminosalicylic acid (PAS), and was also sensitive to clarithromycin and fluoroquinolones including ofloxacin, levofloxacin, sparfloxacin, and ciprofloxacin. After 12 months of therapy, a repeat chest radiograph demonstrated improvement of the right upper lobe infiltrate. When M. szulgai is isolated, it almost always represents a true pathogen. Therefore, the detection of even a small number of M. szulgai warrants treatment based on susceptibility testing. PMID:12073621

  5. Mycobacterium ulcerans infection as a cause of chronic diarrhea in an AIDS patient: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Jin-Gook; Kim, You-Sun; Lee, Jong-Sung; Jeong, Tae-Yeob; Ryu, Soo-Hyung; Lee, Jung-Hwan; Moon, Jeong-Seop; Kang, Yun-Kyung; Shim, Myung-Shup; Oh, Myoung-Don

    2008-01-01

    Chronic diarrhea is one of the most frequent gastro-intestinal manifestations in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Protozoa and nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) are opportunistic pathogens that can easily infect these patients. Among the NTM, Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is the most frequently observed pathogen in HIV-infected patients. However, NTMs other than MAC have not been reported as a gastrointestinal pathogen as yet. We present a case of chronic diarrhea in an AIDS patient in whom Mycobacterium ulcerans and cryptosporidium co-infection is evidenced from colonic tissue. PMID:18205278

  6. Risk factors for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection among children in Greenland

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Aase Bengaard; Melbye, Mads; Wohlfahrt, Jan; Andersson, Mikael; Biggar, Robert J; Ladefoged, Karin; Thomsen, Vibeke Ostergaard; Koch, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objective To examine the risk factors for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (MTI) among Greenlandic children for the purpose of identifying those at highest risk of infection. Methods Between 2005 and 2007, 1797 Greenlandic schoolchildren in five different areas were tested for MTI with an interferon gamma release assay (IGRA) and a tuberculin skin test (TST). Parents or guardians were surveyed using a standardized self-administered questionnaire to obtain data on crowding in the household, parents’ educational level and the child’s health status. Demographic data for each child – i.e. parents’ place of birth, number of siblings, distance between siblings (next younger and next older), birth order and mother’s age when the child was born – were also extracted from a public registry. Logistic regression was used to check for associations between these variables and MTI, and all results were expressed as odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Children were considered to have MTI if they tested positive on both the IGRA assay and the TST. Findings The overall prevalence of MTI was 8.5% (152/1797). MTI was diagnosed in 26.7% of the children with a known TB contact, as opposed to 6.4% of the children without such contact. Overall, the MTI rate was higher among Inuit children (OR: 4.22; 95% CI: 1.55–11.5) and among children born less than one year after the birth of the next older sibling (OR: 2.48; 95% CI: 1.33–4.63). Self-reported TB contact modified the profile to include household crowding and low mother’s education. Children who had an older MTI-positive sibling were much more likely to test positive for MTI themselves (OR: 14.2; 95% CI: 5.75–35.0) than children without an infected older sibling. Conclusion Ethnicity, sibling relations, number of household residents and maternal level of education are factors associated with the risk of TB infection among children in Greenland. The strong household clustering of

  7. 'The worm that got away': parainfectious atypical optic neuritis associated with schistosomiasis infection.

    PubMed

    Osman, Chinar; Hannigan, Sally; Ditchfield, Adam; Harden, Stephen; Marshall, Ben; Pinto, Ashwin Arnold

    2016-06-01

    Although optic neuritis is commonly associated with multiple sclerosis, patients with atypical optic neuritis require further investigations to exclude other associated conditions. We report a woman presenting with cough, fatigue, atypical optic neuritis with chiasmitis. She responded partially to corticosteroids and we subsequently found she had a ground-glass lung nodule. Follow-up CT scan of thorax at 12 months showed new parenchymal lung lesions that suggested schistosomiasis. Further questioning by a respiratory physician identified, in retrospect, a previous exposure history; serological testing confirmed schistosoma infection. She was treated with praziquantel and slowly improved clinically, with radiological improvement in the optic chiasm, regression of the parenchymal lung lesions but with the ground glass nodule unchanged. We diagnosed parainfectious optic neuritis associated with schistosomiasis, based upon exposure history, serological confirmation and radiological features, together with the response to treatment, and having excluded other causes of an atypical optic neuritis. PMID:26888797

  8. A case of catheter-related bloodstream infection caused by Mycobacterium phocaicum.

    PubMed

    Simkins, Jacques; Rosenblatt, Joseph D

    2013-05-01

    We present a patient with double hit Burkitt's like lymphoma who developed a catheter-related bloodstream infection due to Mycobacterium phocaicum that was identified by rpoB gene sequencing. His infection resolved with 7 weeks of antibiotics and port-a-cath removal. PMID:23537787

  9. Immunologic Responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Neonatal Calves After Oral or Intraperitoneal Experimental Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection models are useful for studying host responses to infection to aid in the development of diagnostic tools and vaccines. The majority of experimental models for ruminants have utilized an oral inoculation of live Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in order to establish infecti...

  10. Identification of gene targets against dormant phase Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Dennis J; Brown, James R

    2007-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis (TB), infects approximately 2 billion people worldwide and is the leading cause of mortality due to infectious disease. Current TB therapy involves a regimen of four antibiotics taken over a six month period. Patient compliance, cost of drugs and increasing incidence of drug resistant M. tuberculosis strains have added urgency to the development of novel TB therapies. Eradication of TB is affected by the ability of the bacterium to survive up to decades in a dormant state primarily in hypoxic granulomas in the lung and to cause recurrent infections. Methods The availability of M. tuberculosis genome-wide DNA microarrays has lead to the publication of several gene expression studies under simulated dormancy conditions. However, no single model best replicates the conditions of human pathogenicity. In order to identify novel TB drug targets, we performed a meta-analysis of multiple published datasets from gene expression DNA microarray experiments that modeled infection leading to and including the dormant state, along with data from genome-wide insertional mutagenesis that examined gene essentiality. Results Based on the analysis of these data sets following normalization, several genome wide trends were identified and used to guide the selection of targets for therapeutic development. The trends included the significant up-regulation of genes controlled by devR, down-regulation of protein and ATP synthesis, and the adaptation of two-carbon metabolism to the hypoxic and nutrient limited environment of the granuloma. Promising targets for drug discovery were several regulatory elements (devR/devS, relA, mprAB), enzymes involved in redox balance and respiration, sulfur transport and fixation, pantothenate, isoprene, and NAD biosynthesis. The advantages and liabilities of each target are discussed in the context of enzymology, bacterial pathways, target tractability, and drug development

  11. Mixed Cutaneous Infection Caused by Mycobacterium szulgai and Mycobacterium intermedium in a Healthy Adult Female: A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amresh Kumar; Marak, Rungmei S. K.; Maurya, Anand Kumar; Das, Manaswini; Nag, Vijaya Lakshmi; Dhole, Tapan N.

    2015-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTMs) are ubiquitous and are being increasingly reported as human opportunistic infection. Cutaneous infection caused by mixed NTM is extremely rare. We encountered the case of a 46-year-old female, who presented with multiple discharging sinuses over the lower anterior abdominal wall (over a previous appendectomy scar) for the past 2 years. Microscopy and culture of the pus discharge were done to isolate and identify the etiological agent. Finally, GenoType Mycobacterium CM/AS assay proved it to be a mixed infection caused by Mycobacterium szulgai and M. intermedium. The patient was advised a combination of rifampicin 600 mg once daily, ethambutol 600 mg once daily, and clarithromycin 500 mg twice daily to be taken along with periodic follow-up based upon clinical response as well as microbiological response. We emphasize that infections by NTM must be considered in the etiology of nonhealing wounds or sinuses, especially at postsurgical sites. PMID:25789180

  12. Osteopontin: A Novel Cytokine Involved in the Regulation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection in Periparturient Dairy Cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Osteopontin (Opn), an important mediator of the cell-mediated immune response, enhances the host immune response against mycobacterial infections. Infections caused by the intracellular bacterium, Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), have a devastating impact on the dairy industry. ...

  13. Hyperparasitaemic human Plasmodium knowlesi infection with atypical morphology in peninsular Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodium knowlesi is a potentially life-threatening zoonotic malaria parasite due to its relatively short erythrocytic cycle. Microscopic identification of P. knowlesi is difficult, with “compacted parasite cytoplasm” being one of the important identifying keys. This report is about a case of hyperparasitaemic human P. knowlesi infection (27% parasitaemia) with atypical amoeboid morphology. A peninsular Malaysian was admitted to the hospital with malaria. He suffered anaemia and acute kidney function impairment. Microscopic examination, assisted by nested PCR and sequencing confirmed as P. knowlesi infection. With anti-malarial treatment and several medical interventions, patient survived and recovered. One-month medical follow-up was performed after recovery and no recrudescence was noted. This case report highlights the extreme hyperparasitaemic setting, the atypical morphology of P. knowlesi in the patient’s erythrocytes, as well as the medical interventions involved in this successfully treated case. PMID:23496970

  14. Necrosis of lung epithelial cells during infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis is preceded by cell permeation.

    PubMed

    Dobos, K M; Spotts, E A; Quinn, F D; King, C H

    2000-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis establishes infection, progresses towards disease, and is transmitted from the alveolus of the lung. However, the role of the alveolar epithelium in any of these pathogenic processes of tuberculosis is unclear. In this study, lung epithelial cells (A549) were used as a model in which to examine cytotoxicity during infection with either virulent or avirulent mycobacteria in order to further establish the role of the lung epithelium during tuberculosis. Infection of A549 cells with M. tuberculosis strains Erdman and CDC1551 demonstrated significant cell monolayer clearing, whereas infection with either Mycobacterium bovis BCG or Mycobacterium smegmatis LR222 did not. Clearing of M. tuberculosis-infected A549 cells correlated to necrosis, not apoptosis. Treatment of M. tuberculosis-infected A549 cells with streptomycin, but not cycloheximide, demonstrated a significant reduction in the necrosis of A549 cell monolayers. This mycobacterium-induced A549 necrosis did not correlate to higher levels of intracellular or extracellular growth by the mycobacteria during infection. Staining of infected cells with propidium iodide demonstrated that M. tuberculosis induced increased permeation of A549 cell membranes within 24 h postinfection. Quantitation of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release from infected cells further demonstrated that cell permeation was specific to M. tuberculosis infection and correlated to A549 cellular necrosis. Inactivated M. tuberculosis or its subcellular fractions did not result in A549 necrosis or LDH release. These studies demonstrate that lung epithelial cell cytotoxicity is specific to infection by virulent mycobacteria and is caused by cellular necrosis. This necrosis is not a direct correlate of mycobacterial growth or of the expression of host cell factors, but is preceded by permeation of the A549 cell membrane and requires infection with live bacilli. PMID:11035739

  15. Mycobacterium haemophilum bone and joint infection in HIV/AIDS: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Cross, Gail B; Le, Quynh; Webb, Brooke; Jenkin, Grant A; Korman, Tony M; Francis, Michelle; Woolley, Ian

    2015-11-01

    We report a case of disseminated Mycobacterium haemophilum osteomyelitis in a patient with advanced HIV infection, who later developed recurrent immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome after commencement of antiretroviral therapy. We review previous reports of M. haemophilum bone and joint infection associated with HIV infection and describe the management of M. haemophilum-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome, including the role of surgery as an adjunctive treatment modality and the potential drug interactions between antiretroviral and antimycobacterial agents. PMID:25577597

  16. Heme Catabolism by Heme Oxygenase-1 Confers Host Resistance to Mycobacterium Infection

    PubMed Central

    Silva-Gomes, Sandro; Appelberg, Rui; Larsen, Rasmus; Soares, Miguel Parreira

    2013-01-01

    Heme oxygenases (HO) catalyze the rate-limiting step of heme degradation. The cytoprotective action of the inducible HO-1 isoform, encoded by the Hmox1 gene, is required for host protection against systemic infections. Here we report that upregulation of HO-1 expression in macrophages (Mϕ) is strictly required for protection against mycobacterial infection in mice. HO-1-deficient (Hmox1−/−) mice are more susceptible to intravenous Mycobacterium avium infection, failing to mount a protective granulomatous response and developing higher pathogen loads, than infected wild-type (Hmox1+/+) controls. Furthermore, Hmox1−/− mice also develop higher pathogen loads and ultimately succumb when challenged with a low-dose aerosol infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The protective effect of HO-1 acts independently of adaptive immunity, as revealed in M. avium-infected Hmox1−/− versus Hmox1+/+ SCID mice lacking mature B and T cells. In the absence of HO-1, heme accumulation acts as a cytotoxic pro-oxidant in infected Mϕ, an effect mimicked by exogenous heme administration to M. avium-infected wild-type Mϕ in vitro or to mice in vivo. In conclusion, HO-1 prevents the cytotoxic effect of heme in Mϕ, contributing critically to host resistance to Mycobacterium infection. PMID:23630967

  17. One Episode of Self-Resolving Plasmodium yoelii Infection Transiently Exacerbates Chronic Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Blank, Jannike; Eggers, Lars; Behrends, Jochen; Jacobs, Thomas; Schneider, Bianca E.

    2016-01-01

    Malaria and tuberculosis (Tb) are two of the main causes of death from infectious diseases globally. The pathogenic agents, Plasmodium parasites and Mycobacterium tuberculosis, are co-endemic in many regions in the world, however, compared to other co-infections like HIV/Tb or helminth/Tb, malaria/Tb has been given less attention both in clinical and immunological studies. Due to the lack of sufficient human data, the impact of malaria on Tb and vice versa is difficult to estimate but co-infections are likely to occur very frequently. Due to its immunomodulatory properties malaria might be an underestimated risk factor for latent or active Tb patients particularly in high-endemic malaria settings were people experience reinfections very frequently. In the present study, we used the non-lethal strain of Plasmodium yoelii to investigate, how one episode of self-resolving malaria impact on a chronic M. tuberculosis infection. P. yoelii co-infection resulted in exacerbation of Tb disease as demonstrated by increased pathology and cellular infiltration of the lungs which coincided with elevated levels of pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators. T cell responses were not impaired in co-infected mice but enhanced and likely contributed to increased cytokine production. We found a slight but statistically significant increase in M. tuberculosis burden in co-infected animals and increased lung CFU was positively correlated with elevated levels of TNFα but not IL-10. Infection with P. yoelii induced the recruitment of a CD11c+ population into lungs and spleens of M. tuberculosis infected mice. CD11c+ cells isolated from P. yoelii infected spleens promoted survival and growth of M. tuberculosis in vitro. 170 days after P. yoelii infection changes in immunopathology and cellular immune responses were no longer apparent while M. tuberculosis numbers were still slightly higher in lungs, but not in spleens of co-infected mice. In conclusion, one episode of P. yoelii co-infection

  18. Cutaneous infection by Mycobacterium haemophilum and kansasii in an IgA-deficient man

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The prevalence of infections by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) has steadily increased over the past decades, especially in immunocompromised patients. Case presentation We present a patient with IgA-deficiency and mixed cutaneous infection by two slowly growing mycobacteria, Mycobacterium (M.) haemophilum and M. kansasii. Conclusions Cutaneous M. haemophilum infections most often result from HIV or transplantation-associated immunosuppression. Rarely, M. haemophilum may also infect healthy patients or iatrogenically immunosuppressed patients without transplantation. M. kansasii is one of the most frequent NTM and large awareness exists about its involvement in human diseases. Mycobacterial diagnosis of cutaneous infections should be considered in long-lasting skin lesions. PMID:21269422

  19. Anatomical distribution of Mycobacterium bovis genotypes in experimentally infected white-tailed deer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) causes tuberculosis in white-tailed deer (WTD). Natural infection of WTD with M. bovis is most closely mimicked by instilling inoculum into palatine tonsilar crypts. One hundred fifty days after intratonsilar inoculation, M. bovis was cultured from 30 tissues originati...

  20. Associations between Cytokine Gene Expression and Pathology in Cattle infected with Mycobacterium bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An impediment to the development of effective vaccines for bovine tuberculosis is the failure to demonstrate associations between immune function and protection. To investigate correlates of immunity, cytokine gene expression in response to Mycobacterium bovis infection (n = 10) were compared to res...

  1. Transcriptional profiling of ileocecal valve of holstein dairy cows infected with mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Johne’s disease is a chronic infection of the small intestine caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), an intracellular bacterium. The events of pathogen survival within the host cell(s), chronic inflammation and the progression from asymptomatic subclinical stage to an advan...

  2. Environmental contamination with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in endemically infected dairy herds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Environmental contamination with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is thought to be the primary source of infection for dairy cattle. The exact link between fecal shedding of MAP by individual cows and environmental contamination levels at the herd level was explored with a cross-se...

  3. Pathogenesis of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Neonatal Calves after Oral or Intraperitoneal Experimental Infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the infection process to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is tantamount to the development of effective vaccines and therapeutics for the control of this disease in the field. The current study compared the effectiveness of oral and intraperitoneal methods of experimental in...

  4. Cytokine Secretion in Periparturient dairy cows naturally infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Johne's disease, cause by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), has a devastating impact on the dairy industry. Cows typically are infected as neonates, and stressors, such as parturition, may induce the transition from the subclinical to a more clinical stage of disease. The objective ...

  5. Osteopontin Expression in Periparturient Dairy Cows Naturally Infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Johne’s disease (JD), caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), is estimated to infect more than 22% of US dairy herds. Periods of immunosuppression, typically seen at parturition, may contribute to the transition from the subclinical, or asymptomatic, to the clinical stage of inf...

  6. Clinical Impact of Mycobacterium tuberculosis W-Beijing Genotype Strain Infection on Aged Patients in Taiwan▿

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jia-Yih; Su, Wei-Juin; Tsai, Cheng-Chien; Chang, Shi-Chuan

    2008-01-01

    The impact of W-Beijing genotype Mycobacterium tuberculosis on treatment outcome was evaluated in 249 newly diagnosed tuberculosis patients. No significant difference in the treatment outcome was found between the W-Beijing and non-W-Beijing groups. However, a poor outcome was more common in the elderly patients (≥65 years) infected with the W-Beijing strain. PMID:18596137

  7. Aquarium-borne Mycobacterium marinum skin infection. Report of 15 cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bonamonte, Domenico; De Vito, Daniela; Vestita, Michelangelo; Delvecchio, Susanna; Ranieri, Luigi Davide; Santantonio, Marilina; Angelini, Gianni

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium marinum is a non-tuberculous photochromogenic mycobacterium, commonly responsible for fish and amphibious infections world-wide. Contagion in humans typically follows minor hand trauma from aquarium keeping and manifests as a granulomatous infection of the skin. Dissemination is rare and almost exclusive to immunosuppressed hosts. 15 cases of M. marinum fish tank related infection are hereby reported. The site of infection was the upper limbs in all cases. 3 patients presented a single papulo-verrucous lesion, while the remaining 12 showed a sporotrichoid clinical pattern. Diagnosis was reached by history and clinical examination and further supported by one or more of the following criteria: histology, culture, acid fast bacilli identification from histologic specimen and PCR. 2 to 3 months minocycline treatment showed efficacy in 13 individuals, another case was treated with rifampicin-isoniazid association, yet another showed spontaneous regression over a 3 month period. PMID:24002023

  8. An Atypical Splenic B Cell Progenitor Population Supports Antibody Production during Plasmodium Infection in Mice.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Debopam; Wikenheiser, Daniel J; Kennedy, Brian; McGovern, Kathryn E; Stuart, Johnasha D; Wilson, Emma H; Stumhofer, Jason S

    2016-09-01

    Hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) function to replenish the immune cell repertoire under steady-state conditions and in response to inflammation due to infection or stress. Whereas the bone marrow serves as the primary niche for hematopoiesis, extramedullary mobilization and differentiation of HSPCs occur in the spleen during acute Plasmodium infection, a critical step in the host immune response. In this study, we identified an atypical HSPC population in the spleen of C57BL/6 mice, with a lineage(-)Sca-1(+)c-Kit(-) (LSK(-)) phenotype that proliferates in response to infection with nonlethal Plasmodium yoelii 17X. Infection-derived LSK(-) cells upon transfer into naive congenic mice were found to differentiate predominantly into mature follicular B cells. However, when transferred into infection-matched hosts, infection-derived LSK(-) cells gave rise to B cells capable of entering into a germinal center reaction, and they developed into memory B cells and Ab-secreting cells that were capable of producing parasite-specific Abs. Differentiation of LSK(-) cells into B cells in vitro was enhanced in the presence of parasitized RBC lysate, suggesting that LSK(-) cells expand and differentiate in direct response to the parasite. However, the ability of LSK(-) cells to differentiate into B cells was not dependent on MyD88, as myd88(-/-) LSK(-) cell expansion and differentiation remained unaffected after Plasmodium infection. Collectively, these data identify a population of atypical lymphoid progenitors that differentiate into B lymphocytes in the spleen and are capable of contributing to the ongoing humoral immune response against Plasmodium infection. PMID:27448588

  9. Clinical experience in 52 patients with tigecycline-containing regimens for salvage treatment of Mycobacterium abscessus and Mycobacterium chelonae infections

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Richard J.; Dukart, Gary; Brown-Elliott, Barbara A.; Griffith, David E.; Scerpella, Ernesto G.; Marshall, Bonnie

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We report the largest clinical experience using tigecycline-containing regimens for salvage treatment of patients with Mycobacterium abscessus and Mycobacterium chelonae. Patients and methods Data were collected from 52 patients on emergency/compassionate use (n = 38) or two open-label studies (n = 7 patients each). Based on information that was available, 46 (88.5%) of the subjects received antibiotic therapy prior to treatment with tigecycline. Treatment groups were evaluated based on length of tigecycline therapy (<1 and ≥1 month). ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers: Study 205, NCT00600600 and Study 310, NCT00205816. Results The most commonly used concomitant antimicrobials were macrolides, amikacin and linezolid. Pulmonary disease was the most common presentation (36/52; 69.2%), and 58.3% of these patients had underlying cystic fibrosis. The majority were M. abscessus complex (n = 30) or M. chelonae/abscessus (n = 4). With therapy ≥1 month (mean, 255.0 ± 265.7 days), 10/15 patients (66.7%) with cystic fibrosis and 16/26 (61.5%) overall were considered improved. Skin/soft-tissue/bone infections were the most common extrapulmonary infections. With therapy ≥1 month (mean, 143 ± 123 days), 9/12 patients (75.0%) were considered improved. Nine of the 16 cases reported as failures regardless of site of infection occurred in patients who stopped treatment due to adverse events. There were eight deaths; none was related to tigecycline. Conclusions Tigecycline given for ≥1 month as part of a multidrug regimen resulted in improvement in >60% of patients with M. abscessus and M. chelonae infections, including those with underlying cystic fibrosis, despite failure of prior antibiotic therapy. Adverse events were reported in >90% of cases, the most common being nausea and vomiting. PMID:24633206

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in a Green-Winged Macaw (Ara chloroptera): Report with Public Health Implications

    PubMed Central

    Washko, Rita M.; Hoefer, Heidi; Kiehn, Timothy E.; Armstrong, Donald; Dorsinville, Guy; Frieden, Thomas R.

    1998-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis was isolated from the eyelid, skin, tongue, and lungs of a green-winged macaw (Ara chloroptera). Two persons living in the same household were culture positive for pulmonary tuberculosis 3 to 4 years before tuberculosis was diagnosed in the bird. Although humans have not been shown to acquire tuberculosis from birds, an infected bird may be a sentinel for human infection. PMID:9542945

  11. Case of Mycobacterium marinum infection with unusual patterns of susceptibility to commonly used antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Nicole; Luethke, Ronald; Dionne, Kim; Carroll, Karen; Riedel, Stefan

    2011-05-01

    Mycobacterium marinum, found commonly in salt water and freshwater, is the causative agent of disease in many species of fish and occasionally in humans. MICs to most antimicrobial agents are relatively low. Susceptibility testing is not routinely performed, and single-drug therapy is used for the treatment of most infections. Here, we report an infection caused by a drug-resistant M. marinum strain in an otherwise healthy patient. PMID:21430095

  12. Human infection due to Mycobacterium marinum after a dolphin bite

    PubMed Central

    Flowers, D. J.

    1970-01-01

    A young man employed at the local aquarium was bitten by a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) during a training session, receiving a slight injury which healed rapidly. Some two months later fluctuant swellings appeared in the region of the bite, which developed into indolent ulcers which have not completely healed seven months after the original bite. Cultures taken on two occasions have yielded a pure growth of Mycobacterium marinum. Images PMID:5529254

  13. Atypical presentation of atypical mycobacteria in atypical diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Sugata Narayan; Chakraborty, Partha Pratim; Satpathi, Partha Sarathi; Patra, Shinjan

    2016-01-01

    A 45-year-old, non-obese male presented with low-grade, remittent fever and a fluctuant swelling over the posterior aspect of his lower left flank. Laboratory tests revealed leukocytosis, raised ESR, hyperglycemia and raised HbA1C levels. Light microscopy of Ziehl–Neelsen-stained pus sample revealed numerous acid-fast bacilli. After 72 h of incubating aspirated pus in Löwenstein–Jensen media, non-pigmented, cream-colored colonies were observed, suggestive of rapid-growing atypical forms of mycobacteria. Polymerase chain reaction of isolated bacteria identified Mycobacterium chelonae as causative organism. Abdominal skiagram revealed extensive pancreatic intraductal calcifications suggestive of fibrocalculous pancreatic diabetes and lumbar vertebral body destruction with evidence of paravertebral abscess. The patient was prescribed a split-mixed insulin regimen, clarithromycin and ciprofloxacin with complete resolution of the subcutaneous abscess at 6 months. Diabetic patients are prone to infections. Mycobacteria, especially atypical ones, involving the spine and subcutaneous tissues have rarely been reported. PMID:27127641

  14. A Challenging Case of Multifocal Mycobacterium marinum Osteoarticular Infection in a Patient with Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Sharff, Katie; Min, Zaw; Bhanot, Nitin

    2015-01-01

    Disseminated infection due to Mycobacterium marinum is rare but has been described in immunosuppressed and transplant recipients. We describe a case of multifocal osteoarticular involvement by this pathogen in a patient with anorexia nervosa. Serial surgical debridements and a prolonged course of antimicrobial therapy including intravenous amikacin, imipenem, and oral ethambutol and azithromycin were needed to treat the infection. Cell mediated immune deficits related to the patient's anorexia nervosa predisposed her to a severe infection with M. marinum. Aggressive surgical intervention in conjunction with multiple antimicrobial agents helped cure the infection. PMID:26137337

  15. A case of extensive cutaneous Mycobacterium marinum infection in a Pacific Islander living in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Kevern, Charlotte; Tovaranonte, Pleayo; Meyer, Roland; Pithie, Alan

    2014-07-01

    Mycobacterium marinum is a rare cause of cutaneous infection. The typical clinical picture consists of one or more discrete well circumscribed lesions affecting the upper limbs. However, a more exuberant form has been described in the South Pacific, where it is sometimes entitled 'Spam disease' given the infected skin's similar appearance to the canned food. We describe a case of this more extensive infection in a South Pacific Islander who appears to have acquired the infection in New Zealand, and remained undiagnosed for many years. PMID:24997705

  16. Source-case investigation of Mycobacterium wolinskyi cardiac surgical site infection.

    PubMed

    Dupont, C; Terru, D; Aguilhon, S; Frapier, J-M; Paquis, M-P; Morquin, D; Lamy, B; Godreuil, S; Parer, S; Lotthé, A; Jumas-Bilak, E; Romano-Bertrand, S

    2016-07-01

    The non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) Mycobacterium wolinskyi caused bacteraemia and massive colonization of an aortic prosthesis in a patient 16 days after cardiac surgery, necessitating repeat surgery and targeted antimicrobial chemotherapy. The infection control team investigated the source and conditions of infection. Peri-operative management of the patient complied with recommendations. The environmental investigation showed that although M. wolinskyi was not recovered, diverse NTM species were present in water from point-of-use taps and heater-cooler units for extracorporeal circulation. This case and increasing evidence of emerging NTM infections in cardiac surgery led to the implementation of infection control procedures in cardiac surgery wards. PMID:27210271

  17. Mycobacterium genavense Infections in a Tertiary Hospital and Reviewed Cases in Non-HIV Patients

    PubMed Central

    Santos, M.; Gil-Brusola, A.; Escandell, A.; Blanes, M.; Gobernado, M.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium genavense is a relatively new species of nontuberculous mycobacterium reported to cause disseminated infections in patients with AIDS and later on in non-HIV immunosuppressed patients. We describe clinical and laboratory features and response to therapy in 7 patients, three of them with HIV infection and four non-HIV—three organ transplant recipients and one with hyper-IgE syndrome—in Valencia, Spain, in a ten years period. We then summarize the published cases of M. avium complex infection, with invasion of peripheral blood, liver, spleen, bone marrow, lymph nodes, and lungs. In clinical samples a large number of acid-fast bacilli were observed. M. genavense grew only from liquid media and after a prolonged incubation period. Its identification was accomplished through molecular methods. Patients were treated with prolonged combinations of antimicrobial agents. There was clinical favourable outcome in 4 patients. PMID:24693456

  18. Circulating Mycobacterium bovis Peptides and Host Response Proteins as Biomarkers for Unambiguous Detection of Subclinical Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lamont, Elise A.; Janagama, Harish K.; Ribeiro-Lima, Joao; Vulchanova, Lucy; Seth, Meetu; Yang, My; Kurmi, Kiran; Waters, W. Ray; Thacker, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis remains one of the most damaging diseases to agriculture, and there is also a concern for human spillover. A critical need exists for rapid, thorough, and inexpensive diagnostic methods capable of detecting and differentiating Mycobacterium bovis infection from other pathogenic and environmental mycobacteria at multiple surveillance levels. In a previous study, Seth et al. (PLoS One 4:e5478, 2009, doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0005478) identified 32 host peptides that specifically increased in the blood serum of M. bovis-infected animals). In the current study, 16 M. bovis proteins were discovered in the blood serum proteomics data sets. A large-scale validation analysis was undertaken for selected host and M. bovis proteins using a cattle serum repository containing M. bovis (n = 128), Mycobacterium kansasii (n = 10), and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (n = 10), cases exposed to M. bovis (n = 424), and negative controls (n = 38). Of the host biomarkers, vitamin D binding protein (VDBP) showed the greatest sensitivity and specificity for M. bovis detection. Circulating M. bovis proteins, specifically polyketide synthetase 5, detected M. bovis-infected cattle with little to no seroreactivity against M. kansasii- and M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-infected animals. These data indicate that host and pathogen serum proteins can serve as reliable biomarkers for tracking M. bovis infection in animal populations. PMID:24478485

  19. Osteopontin Immunoreactivity in the Ileum and Ileoceccal Lymph Node of Dairy Cows Naturally Infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Osteopontin (Opn), a highly acidic glycoprotein, promotes cellular adhesion and recruitment and has been shown to be upregulated in the granulomas of mycobacterial infections. Johne’s disease, caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), is associated with granulomatous enteritis. ...

  20. An outbreak of Mycobacterium genavense infection in a flock of captive diamond doves (Geopelia cuneata).

    PubMed

    Haridy, Mohie; Fukuta, Mayumi; Mori, Yasuyuki; Ito, Hideyuki; Kubo, Masahito; Sakai, Hiroki; Yanai, Tokuma

    2014-09-01

    Two diamond doves (Geopelia cuneata) in a flock of 23 birds housed in an aviary in a zoo in central Japan were found dead as a result of mycobacteriosis. Fecal samples of the remaining doves were positive for mycobacterial infection, and thus they were euthanatized. Clinical signs and gross pathology, including weight loss and sudden death and slight enlargement of the liver and intestine, were observed in a small number of birds (3/23). Disseminated histiocytic infiltration of either aggregates or sheets of epithelioid cells containing acid-fast bacilli, in the absence of caseous necrosis, were observed in different organs of the infected doves, especially lungs (23/23), intestines (9/23), livers (7/23), and hearts (6/23). Mycobacterium sp. was isolated from the livers of three birds (3/23). DNA extracted from frozen liver and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissues (5/23) were used for amplification of the gene encoding mycobacterial 65-kDa heat shock protein (hsp65). The causative Mycobacterium species was identified by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. Mycobacterium genavense infection was confirmed in three of the diamond doves. Moreover, partial 16S rDNA gene sequencing revealed 100% identity across the three samples tested, and 99.77% nucleotide homology of the isolate sequence to M. genavense. The main route of M. genavense infection in the diamond doves was most likely airborne, suggesting a potential zoonotic risk of airborne transmission between humans and birds. PMID:25518432

  1. Mycobacterium leprae and Mycobacterium haemophilum co-infection in an iatrogenically immunosuppressed patient.

    PubMed

    SoRelle, Jeffrey A; Beal, Stacy G; Scollard, David M; Gander, Rita M; Cohen, Jack; Nuara, Anthony; Nations, Sharon; Cavuoti, Dominick

    2014-04-01

    We present the case of a native Texan who was diagnosed with tuberculoid leprosy and later developed a cutaneous infection with M. haemophilum following iatrogenic immunosuppression. To our knowledge, there are no such reports of M. haemophilum and M. leprae infection occurring simultaneously in the same host. PMID:24439137

  2. Nonarchetypal Type II-like and atypical strains of Toxoplasma gondii infecting marsupials of Australia

    PubMed Central

    Parameswaran, N.; Thompson, R.C.A; Sundar, N.; Pan, S.; Johnson, M.; Smith, N.C.; Grigg, M.E.

    2010-01-01

    Australia is geographically isolated and possesses a remarkable diversity of wildlife species. Marsupials are highly susceptible to infection with the cosmopolitan parasite Toxoplasma gondii. Of 46 marsupials screened for T. gondii by multilocus PCR-DNA sequencing at polymorphic genes (B1, SAG3, GRA6, GRA7), 12 were PCR-positive; the majority (67%; 9/12) were infected by nonarchetypal Type II-like or atypical strains. Six novel alleles were detected at B1, indicating greater diversity of genotypes than previously envisaged. Two isolates lethal to marsupials, were avirulent to mice. The data support the conclusion that Australia’s isolation may have favoured the persistence of nonarchetypal ancestral genotypes. PMID:20346947

  3. Whole Blood Gene Expression Profiling in Preclinical and Clinical Cattle Infected with Atypical Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Xerxa, Elena; Barbisin, Maura; Chieppa, Maria Novella; Krmac, Helena; Vallino Costassa, Elena; Vatta, Paolo; Simmons, Marion; Caramelli, Maria; Casalone, Cristina; Corona, Cristiano; Legname, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Prion diseases, such as bovine spongiform encephalopathies (BSE), are transmissible neurodegenerative disorders affecting humans and a wide variety of mammals. Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), a prion disease in humans, has been linked to exposure to BSE prions. This classical BSE (cBSE) is now rapidly disappearing as a result of appropriate measures to control animal feeding. Besides cBSE, two atypical forms (named H- and L-type BSE) have recently been described in Europe, Japan, and North America. Here we describe the first wide-spectrum microarray analysis in whole blood of atypical BSE-infected cattle. Transcriptome changes in infected animals were analyzed prior to and after the onset of clinical signs. The microarray analysis revealed gene expression changes in blood prior to the appearance of the clinical signs and during the progression of the disease. A set of 32 differentially expressed genes was found to be in common between clinical and preclinical stages and showed a very similar expression pattern in the two phases. A 22-gene signature showed an oscillating pattern of expression, being differentially expressed in the preclinical stage and then going back to control levels in the symptomatic phase. One gene, SEL1L3, was downregulated during the progression of the disease. Most of the studies performed up to date utilized various tissues, which are not suitable for a rapid analysis of infected animals and patients. Our findings suggest the intriguing possibility to take advantage of whole blood RNA transcriptional profiling for the preclinical identification of prion infection. Further, this study highlighted several pathways, such as immune response and metabolism that may play an important role in peripheral prion pathogenesis. Finally, the gene expression changes identified in the present study may be further investigated as a fingerprint for monitoring the progression of disease and for developing targeted therapeutic interventions. PMID

  4. Whole Blood Gene Expression Profiling in Preclinical and Clinical Cattle Infected with Atypical Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Xerxa, Elena; Barbisin, Maura; Chieppa, Maria Novella; Krmac, Helena; Vallino Costassa, Elena; Vatta, Paolo; Simmons, Marion; Caramelli, Maria; Casalone, Cristina; Corona, Cristiano

    2016-01-01

    Prion diseases, such as bovine spongiform encephalopathies (BSE), are transmissible neurodegenerative disorders affecting humans and a wide variety of mammals. Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD), a prion disease in humans, has been linked to exposure to BSE prions. This classical BSE (cBSE) is now rapidly disappearing as a result of appropriate measures to control animal feeding. Besides cBSE, two atypical forms (named H- and L-type BSE) have recently been described in Europe, Japan, and North America. Here we describe the first wide-spectrum microarray analysis in whole blood of atypical BSE-infected cattle. Transcriptome changes in infected animals were analyzed prior to and after the onset of clinical signs. The microarray analysis revealed gene expression changes in blood prior to the appearance of the clinical signs and during the progression of the disease. A set of 32 differentially expressed genes was found to be in common between clinical and preclinical stages and showed a very similar expression pattern in the two phases. A 22-gene signature showed an oscillating pattern of expression, being differentially expressed in the preclinical stage and then going back to control levels in the symptomatic phase. One gene, SEL1L3, was downregulated during the progression of the disease. Most of the studies performed up to date utilized various tissues, which are not suitable for a rapid analysis of infected animals and patients. Our findings suggest the intriguing possibility to take advantage of whole blood RNA transcriptional profiling for the preclinical identification of prion infection. Further, this study highlighted several pathways, such as immune response and metabolism that may play an important role in peripheral prion pathogenesis. Finally, the gene expression changes identified in the present study may be further investigated as a fingerprint for monitoring the progression of disease and for developing targeted therapeutic interventions. PMID

  5. STAT3 Represses Nitric Oxide Synthesis in Human Macrophages upon Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Queval, Christophe J.; Song, Ok-Ryul; Deboosère, Nathalie; Delorme, Vincent; Debrie, Anne-Sophie; Iantomasi, Raffaella; Veyron-Churlet, Romain; Jouny, Samuel; Redhage, Keely; Deloison, Gaspard; Baulard, Alain; Chamaillard, Mathias; Locht, Camille; Brodin, Priscille

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a successful intracellular pathogen. Numerous host innate immune responses signaling pathways are induced upon mycobacterium invasion, however their impact on M. tuberculosis replication is not fully understood. Here we reinvestigate the role of STAT3 specifically inside human macrophages shortly after M. tuberculosis uptake. We first show that STAT3 activation is mediated by IL-10 and occurs in M. tuberculosis infected cells as well as in bystander non-colonized cells. STAT3 activation results in the inhibition of IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-γ and MIP-1β. We further demonstrate that STAT3 represses iNOS expression and NO synthesis. Accordingly, the inhibition of STAT3 is detrimental for M. tuberculosis intracellular replication. Our study thus points out STAT3 as a key host factor for M. tuberculosis intracellular establishment in the early stages of macrophage infection. PMID:27384401

  6. T-cell mRNA Expression in Response to Mycobacterium bovis BCG Vaccination and Mycobacterium bovis Infection of White-tailed deer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding immune responses of white-tailed deer (WTD) to infection with Mycobacterium bovis provides insight into mechanisms of pathogen control and may provide clues to development of effective vaccine strategies. WTD were vaccinated with either BCG strain Pasteur or BCG Danish. Both vaccinates...

  7. Early Immune Markers Associated with Experimental Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) Infection in a Neonatal Calf Model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to observe early markers of cell-mediated immunity in naïve calves infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) and how expression of these markers evolved over the 12-month period of infection. Methods of experimental infection included: Control (n...

  8. Neither Primary nor Memory Immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection Is Compromised in Mice with Chronic Enteric Helminth Infection

    PubMed Central

    Rafi, Wasiulla; Bhatt, Kamlesh; Gause, William C.

    2015-01-01

    Previously we had reported that Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, a helminth with a lung migratory phase, affected host resistance against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection through the induction of alternatively activated (M2) macrophages. Several helminth species do not have an obligatory lung migratory phase but establish chronic infections in the host that include potent immune downregulatory effects, in part mediated through induction of a FoxP3+ T regulatory cell (Treg) response. Treg cells exhibit duality in their functions in host defense against M. tuberculosis infection since their depletion leads to enhanced priming of T cells in the lymph nodes and attendant improved control of M. tuberculosis infection, while their presence in the lung granuloma protects against excessive inflammation. Heligmosomoides polygyrus is a strictly murine enteric nematode that induces a strong FoxP3 Treg response in the host. Therefore, in this study we investigated whether host immunity to M. tuberculosis infection would be modulated in mice with chronic H. polygyrus infection. We report that neither primary nor memory immunity conferred by Mycobacterium bovis BCG vaccination was affected in mice with chronic enteric helminth infection, despite a systemic increase in FoxP3+ T regulatory cells. The findings indicate that anti-M. tuberculosis immunity is not similarly affected by all helminth species and highlight the need to consider this inequality in human coinfection studies. PMID:25605766

  9. Pulmonary Kaposi sarcoma and disseminated Mycobacterium genavense infection in an HIV-infected patient.

    PubMed

    Tribuna, Cindy; Ângela, Cristina; Eira, Isabel; Carvalho, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of Kaposi sarcoma (KS) and disseminated infection by Mycobacterium genavense in a 40-year-old HIV-positive man with CD4+ T-cell count 5/µL. He presented with anorexia, diarrhoea, cachexia and multiple firm violaceous nodules distributed over the face, neck and upper and lower extremities. Biopsy of a skin nodule was performed, confirming KS. Immunoperoxidase staining for human herpesvirus 8 was strongly positive. Endoscopic examination revealed erosive duodenopathy. Multiple biopsy samples showed numerous acid-fast bacilli at direct microscopic examination. Real-time PCR (RT-PCR) identified M. genavense. A CT scan showed diffuse pulmonary infiltrates with a 'tree-in-bud' appearance, striking splenomegaly and abdominal lymphadenopathy. A bronchoscopy was performed, revealing typical Kaposi's lesions in the upper respiratory tract. RT-PCR of bronchial aspirate identified M. genavense and Pneumocystis jirovecii. Despite treatment with highly active antiretroviral therapy, antimycobacterial therapy and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, the outcome was fatal. PMID:26452414

  10. Experimental Reactivation of Pulmonary Mycobacterium avium Complex Infection in a Modified Cornell-Like Murine Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woo Sik; Kim, Jong-Seok; Kim, Hong Min; Kwon, Kee Woong; Cho, Sang-Nae; Shin, Sung Jae; Koh, Won-Jung

    2015-01-01

    The latency and reactivation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection has been well studied. However, there have been few studies of the latency and reactivation of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), the most common etiological non-tuberculous Mycobacterium species next to M. tuberculosis in humans worldwide. We hypothesized that latent MAC infections can be reactivated following immunosuppression after combination chemotherapy with clarithromycin and rifampicin under experimental conditions. To this end, we employed a modified Cornell-like murine model of tuberculosis and investigated six strains consisting of two type strains and four clinical isolates of M. avium and M. intracellulare. After aerosol infection of each MAC strain, five to six mice per group were euthanized at 2, 4, 10, 18, 28 and 35 weeks post-infection, and lungs were sampled to analyze bacterial burden and histopathology. One strain of each species maintained a culture-negative state for 10 weeks after completion of 6 weeks of chemotherapy, but was reactivated after 5 weeks of immunosuppression in the lungs with dexamethasone (three out of six mice in M. avium infection) or sulfasalazine (four out of six mice in both M. avium and M. intracellulare infection). The four remaining MAC strains exhibited decreased bacterial loads in response to chemotherapy; however, they remained at detectable levels and underwent regrowth after immunosuppression. In addition, the exacerbated lung pathology demonstrated a correlation with bacterial burden after reactivation. In conclusion, our results suggest the possibility of MAC reactivation in an experimental mouse model, and experimentally demonstrate that a compromised immune status can induce reactivation and/or regrowth of MAC infection. PMID:26406237

  11. Mycobacterium arupense in Cancer Patients: An Emerging Infection or a Commensal Organism.

    PubMed

    Al Hamal, Zainab; Jordan, Mary; Hachem, Ray Y; Alawami, Hussain M; Alburki, Abdussalam M; Yousif, Ammar; Deshmukh, Poonam; Jiang, Ying; Chaftari, Ann-Marie; Raad, Issam I

    2016-04-01

    Mycobacterium arupense is a slow-growing, nonchromogenic, acid-fast bacillus. Its clinical spectrum, epidemiology, and frequency of colonization versus true infection remain unknown. We evaluated the clinical significance of M arupense and positive cultures from cancer patients.We retrospectively reviewed records of all cancer patients treated at our institution between 2007 and 2014 to identify those who had positive cultures for M arupense. Mycobacterium arupense was identified by sequencing the 16S rRNA and hsp65 genes. A total of 53patients had positive cultures, 100% of which were isolated from respiratory specimens. Of these, 7 patients met the American Thoracic Society/Infectious Diseases Society of America criteria for a definitive diagnosis of M arupense infection, 14 cases were considered to be probable infections, and 29 cases were considered to be possible infections. Of the included patients, 13 received therapy for M arupense infection and 40 did not.The outcomes of treated and untreated patients did not differ significantly. No relapses of M arupense infection. In addition, there were no M arupense-related deaths in either group.In cancer patients, M arupense appears to be mostly a commensal organism rather than a pathogen. Patients who did or did not receive treatment had similar outcomes. Validation of these findings in a larger prospective trial is warranted. PMID:27057825

  12. Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium found in raptors exposed to infected domestic fowl.

    PubMed

    Kriz, Petr; Kaevska, Marija; Bartejsova, Iva; Pavlik, Ivo

    2013-09-01

    We report a case of a falcon breeding facility, where raptors (both diurnal and nocturnal) were raised in contact with domestic fowl (Gallus gallus f. domesticus) infected by Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium. Fecal and environmental samples from 20 raptors and four common ravens (Corvus corax) were collected. Mycobacterium a. avium DNA was detected in feces of four raptors (bald eagle [Haliaeetus leucocephalus], eagle owl [Bubo bubo], barn owl [Tyto alba], and little owl [Athene noctua]) using triplex quantitative real-time PCR. As both the flock of domestic fowl and one of the infected raptors had the same origin (zoological collection), they might have had a common source of colonization/infection. However, the detection of M. a. avium in feces of three other raptors may point at transmission of the agent between the birds in the facility. Contact of raptors with domestic fowl infected by M. a. avium may pose a risk for transmission of the infection for them; however, raptors from the falcon breeding facility seemed to be relatively resistant to the infection. PMID:24283140

  13. Facial skin and soft tissue infection caused by Mycobacterium wolinskyi associated with cosmetic procedures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mycobacteirum wolinskyi is a member of the Mycobacterium smegmatis group, which is less frequently found in clinical settings than other nontuberculous mycobacterium (NTM) species. However, its clinical significance has recently increased in opportunistic infections. This case is the first report of facial skin and soft tissue infection by M. wolinskyi complicating cosmetic procedures. Case presentation A 56-year-old Asian female patient with a history of receiving multiple facial cosmetic procedures over the preceding 2 years was admitted to our institution with swelling, local pain, and erythema on the right cheek. Mycobacteirum fortuitum complex isolated from a pus culture was identified as M. wolinskyi by rpoB sequencing. Metallic foreign bodies and abscess were detected by radiologic imaging. The pus was incised and drained. Treatment comprised clarithromycin (500 mg every 12 h), amikacin (200 mg every 8 h), and ciprofloxacin (400 mg every 6 h). Conclusion We report the first case of facial skin and soft tissue infection with M. wolinskyi after multiple cosmetic procedures of filler injection and laser lipolysis. Increased occurrence of NTM infection in nosocomial settings suggests the importance of appropriate treatment including culturing and rpoB gene sequencing when patients who have undergone cosmetic procedures display symptoms and signs of soft tissue infection indicative of NTM infection. PMID:24131522

  14. Mycobacterium ulcerans Fails to Infect through Skin Abrasions in a Guinea Pig Infection Model: Implications for Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Heather R.; Mosi, Lydia; Donnell, Robert; Aqqad, Maha; Merritt, Richard W.; Small, Pamela L. C.

    2014-01-01

    Transmission of M. ulcerans, the etiological agent of Buruli ulcer, from the environment to humans remains an enigma despite decades of research. Major transmission hypotheses propose 1) that M. ulcerans is acquired through an insect bite or 2) that bacteria enter an existing wound through exposure to a contaminated environment. In studies reported here, a guinea pig infection model was developed to determine whether Buruli ulcer could be produced through passive inoculation of M. ulcerans onto a superficial abrasion. The choice of an abrasion model was based on the fact that most bacterial pathogens infecting the skin are able to infect an open lesion, and that abrasions are extremely common in children. Our studies show that after a 90d infection period, an ulcer was present at intra-dermal injection sites of all seven animals infected, whereas topical application of M. ulcerans failed to establish an infection. Mycobacterium ulcerans was cultured from all injection sites whereas infected abrasion sites healed and were culture negative. A 14d experiment was conducted to determine how long organisms persisted after inoculation. Mycobacterium ulcerans was isolated from abrasions at one hour and 24 hours post infection, but cultures from later time points were negative. Abrasion sites were qPCR positive up to seven days post infection, but negative at later timepoints. In contrast, M. ulcerans DNA was detected at intra-dermal injection sites throughout the study. M. ulcerans was cultured from injection sites at each time point. These results suggest that injection of M. ulcerans into the skin greatly facilitates infection and lends support for the role of an invertebrate vector or other route of entry such as a puncture wound or deep laceration where bacteria would be contained within the lesion. Infection through passive inoculation into an existing abrasion appears a less likely route of entry. PMID:24722416

  15. Antibacterial resistance in mice infected with Mycobacterium lepraemurium.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, P J

    1981-01-01

    The differences in susceptibility among C57Bl/6, DBA/2 mice and their F1 hybrids to infections with M. lepraemurium were shown to depend upon the route of infection and size of the inoculum. A method was developed to measure the ability of lymphocytes obtained from M. lepraemurium-infected donors to effect adoptive immunization of syngeneic naive mice against infection with M. tuberculosis. This required sublethal irradiation of recipient mice prior to cell transfer and bacterial challenge. Using this method, it was found that mice infected subcutaneously generated antituberculous immune mechanisms concordantly with the development of delayed-hypersensitivity to antigens of M. lepraemurium. In contrast, intravenously infected mice demonstrated only a transient from of delayed hypersensitivity and little or no antimycobacterial immunity in that progression of infection was associated with a rapid decay of both these functions. Moreover, during the terminal stage, M. lepraemurium-infected mice lost the ability to control the growth of a sublethal intravenous inoculum of the antigenically unrelated bacterium. Listeria monocytogenes. PMID:7039875

  16. Protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection by adoptive immunotherapy. Requirement for T cell-deficient recipients

    SciTech Connect

    Orme, I.M.; Collins, F.M.

    1983-07-01

    The results of this study demonstrate that spleen cells taken from mice at the height of the primary immune response to intravenous infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis possess the capacity to transfer adoptive protection to M. tuberculosis-infected recipients, but only if these recipients are first rendered T cell-deficient, either by thymectomy and gamma irradiation, or by sublethal irradiation. A similar requirement was necessary to demonstrate the adoptive protection of the lungs after exposure to an acute aerosol-delivered M. tuberculosis infection. In both infectious models successful adoptive immunotherapy was shown to be mediated by T lymphocytes, which were acquired in the donor animals in response to the immunizing infection. It is proposed that the results of this study may serve as a basic model for the subsequent analysis of the nature of the T cell-mediated immune response to both systemic and aerogenic infections with M. tuberculosis.

  17. The Importance of First Impressions: Early Events in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection Influence Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Cadena, Anthony M.; Fortune, Sarah M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tuberculosis remains a major health threat in much of the world. New vaccines against Mycobacterium tuberculosis are essential for preventing infection, disease, and transmission. However, the host immune responses that need to be induced by an effective vaccine remain unclear. Increasingly, it has become clear that early events in infection are of major importance in the eventual outcome of the infection. Studying such events in humans is challenging, as they occur within the lung and thoracic lymph nodes, and any clinical signs of early infection are relatively nonspecific. Nonetheless, clinical studies and animal models of tuberculosis have provided new insights into the local events that occur in the first few weeks of tuberculosis. Development of an effective vaccine requires a clear understanding of the successful (and detrimental) early host responses against M. tuberculosis, with the goal to improve upon natural immune responses and prevent infection or disease. PMID:27048801

  18. Large-scale outbreak of infection with Mycobacterium chelonae subsp. abscessus after penicillin injection.

    PubMed

    Zhibang, Yang; BiXia, Zhang; Qishan, Lu; Lihao, Chen; Xiangquan, Liu; Huaping, Li

    2002-07-01

    An outbreak of infection with Mycobacterium chelonae subsp. abscessus after the injection of penicillin in 86 patients attending a factory hospital is reported. The bacterium was isolated both from lids and from the soil where the drug was stored. Molecular analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of whole-cell proteins and plasmids revealed a pattern identical to that of the strains isolated from the wounds. The source of the infections was soil contamination of the vial lids and was caused by improper use and sterilization of penicillin vials. PMID:12089291

  19. Mycobacterium marinum infection simulating interstitial granuloma annulare: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Barr, Keira L; Lowe, Lori; Su, Lyndon D

    2003-04-01

    We report two cases of Mycobacterium marinum infection that histologically simulated interstitial granuloma annulare (GA). In one case, an infectious etiology was not suspected in histologic sections, but a tissue culture performed during the patient's clinic visit identified M. marinum, and a subsequent Fite stain revealed mycobacteria. Interstitial granulomatous dermatitis is a rare presentation for cutaneous nontuberculous mycobacteria and has yet to be attributed specifically to M. marinum. In both immunocompetent and immunosuppressed patients, infection with M. marinum should be considered in lesions histologically resembling interstitial GA, particularly when there is clinical suspicion for an infectious process. PMID:12652197

  20. Clinical Features of Spontaneous Partial Healing During Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection.

    PubMed

    Marion, Estelle; Chauty, Annick; Kempf, Marie; Le Corre, Yannick; Delneste, Yves; Croue, Anne; Marsollier, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Background.  Buruli ulcer, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, is a necrotizing skin disease leading to extensive cutaneous and subcutaneous destruction and functional limitations. Spontaneous healing in the absence of medical treatment occurs in rare cases, but this has not been well described in the literature. Methods.  In a retrospective case study in an area of Benin where this disease is highly endemic, we selected 26 Buruli ulcer patients presenting features of spontaneous healing from a cohort of 545 Buruli ulcer patients treated between 2010 and 2013. Results.  The 26 patients studied had a median age of 13.5 years and were predominantly male (1.4:1). Three groups of patients were defined on the basis of their spontaneous healing characteristics. The first group (12 patients) consisted of patients with an ulcer of more than 1 year's duration showing signs of healing. The second (13 patients) group contained patients with an active Buruli ulcer lesion some distance away from a first lesion that had healed spontaneously. Finally, the third group contained a single patient displaying complete healing of lesions from a nodule, without treatment and with no relapse. Conclusions.  We defined several features of spontaneous healing in Buruli ulcer patients and highlighted the difficulties associated with diagnosis and medical management. Delays in consultation contributed to the high proportion of patients with permanent sequelae and a risk of squamous cell carcinoma. Early detection and antibiotic treatment are the best ways to reduce impairments. PMID:26925431

  1. Clinical Features of Spontaneous Partial Healing During Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Estelle; Chauty, Annick; Kempf, Marie; Le Corre, Yannick; Delneste, Yves; Croue, Anne; Marsollier, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Background. Buruli ulcer, caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, is a necrotizing skin disease leading to extensive cutaneous and subcutaneous destruction and functional limitations. Spontaneous healing in the absence of medical treatment occurs in rare cases, but this has not been well described in the literature. Methods. In a retrospective case study in an area of Benin where this disease is highly endemic, we selected 26 Buruli ulcer patients presenting features of spontaneous healing from a cohort of 545 Buruli ulcer patients treated between 2010 and 2013. Results. The 26 patients studied had a median age of 13.5 years and were predominantly male (1.4:1). Three groups of patients were defined on the basis of their spontaneous healing characteristics. The first group (12 patients) consisted of patients with an ulcer of more than 1 year′s duration showing signs of healing. The second (13 patients) group contained patients with an active Buruli ulcer lesion some distance away from a first lesion that had healed spontaneously. Finally, the third group contained a single patient displaying complete healing of lesions from a nodule, without treatment and with no relapse. Conclusions. We defined several features of spontaneous healing in Buruli ulcer patients and highlighted the difficulties associated with diagnosis and medical management. Delays in consultation contributed to the high proportion of patients with permanent sequelae and a risk of squamous cell carcinoma. Early detection and antibiotic treatment are the best ways to reduce impairments. PMID:26925431

  2. Metabolomic Profiling in Cattle Experimentally Infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    De Buck, Jeroen; Shaykhutdinov, Rustem; Barkema, Herman W.; Vogel, Hans J.

    2014-01-01

    The sensitivity of current diagnostics for Johne's disease, a slow, progressing enteritis in ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), is too low to reliably detect all infected animals in the subclinical stage. The objective was to identify individual metabolites or metabolite profiles that could be used as biomarkers of early MAP infection in ruminants. In a monthly follow-up for 17 months, calves infected at 2 weeks of age were compared with aged-matched controls. Sera from all animals were analyzed by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. Spectra were acquired, processed, and quantified for analysis. The concentration of many metabolites changed over time in all calves, but some metabolites only changed over time in either infected or non-infected groups and the change in others was impacted by the infection. Hierarchical multivariate statistical analysis achieved best separation between groups between 300 and 400 days after infection. Therefore, a cross-sectional comparison between 1-year-old calves experimentally infected at various ages with either a high- or a low-dose and age-matched non-infected controls was performed. Orthogonal Projection to Latent Structures Discriminant Analysis (OPLS DA) yielded distinct separation of non-infected from infected cattle, regardless of dose and time (3, 6, 9 or 12 months) after infection. Receiver Operating Curves demonstrated that constructed models were high quality. Increased isobutyrate in the infected cattle was the most important agreement between the longitudinal and cross-sectional analysis. In general, high- and low-dose cattle responded similarly to infection. Differences in acetone, citrate, glycerol and iso-butyrate concentrations indicated energy shortages and increased fat metabolism in infected cattle, whereas changes in urea and several amino acids (AA), including the branched chain AA, indicated increased protein turnover. In conclusion, metabolomics was a sensitive

  3. Isolation and characterization of atypical Listeria monocytogenes associated with a canine urinary tract infection.

    PubMed

    Palerme, Jean-Sébastien; Pan, Po Ching; Parsons, Cameron T; Kathariou, Sophia; Ward, Todd J; Jacob, Megan E

    2016-09-01

    Listeria monocytogenes, a well-described cause of encephalitis and abortion in ruminants and of food-borne illness in humans, is rarely associated with disease in companion animals. A case of urinary tract infection associated with an atypical, weakly hemolytic L. monocytogenes strain is described in a diabetic dog. The serotype of the L. monocytogenes isolate was determined to be 1/2a (3a), with the multilocus genotyping pattern 2.72_1/2a. A nucleotide substitution (Gly145Asp) was detected at residue 145 in the promoter prfA region. This residue is within the critical helix-turn-helix motif of PrfA. The source of the L. monocytogenes strain remains unknown, and the dog recovered after a 4-week course of cephalexin (30 mg/kg orally twice daily). PMID:27493137

  4. Orchestration of pulmonary T cell immunity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection: immunity interruptus

    PubMed Central

    Behar, Samuel M.; Carpenter, Stephen M.; Booty, Matthew G.; Barber, Daniel L.; Jayaraman, Pushpa

    2014-01-01

    Despite the introduction almost a century ago of Mycobacterium bovis BCG (BCG), an attenuated form of M. bovis that is used as a vaccine against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, tuberculosis remains a global health threat and kills more than 1.5 million people each year. This is mostly because BCG fails to prevent pulmonary disease – the contagious form of tuberculosis. Although there have been significant advances in understanding how the immune system responds to infection, the qualities that define protective immunity against M. tuberculosis remain poorly characterized. The ability to predict who will maintain control over the infection and who will succumb to clinical disease would revolutionize our approach to surveillance, control, and treatment. Here we review the current understanding of pulmonary T cell responses following M. tuberculosis infection. While infection elicits a strong immune response that contains infection, M. tuberculosis evades eradication. Traditionally, its intracellular lifestyle and alteration of macrophage function are viewed as the dominant mechanisms of evasion. Now we appreciate that chronic inflammation leads to T cell dysfunction. While this may arise as the host balances the goals of bacterial sterilization and avoidance of tissue damage, it is becoming clear that T cell dysfunction impairs host resistance. Defining the mechanisms that lead to T cell dysfunction is crucial as memory T cell responses are likely to be subject to the same subject to the same pressures. Thus, success of T cell based vaccines is predicated on memory T cells avoiding exhaustion while at the same time not promoting overt tissue damage. PMID:25311810

  5. Mycobacterium avium Complex Infection in a Patient with Sickle Cell Disease and Severe Iron Overload

    PubMed Central

    Jafferjee, Nasima; Thomas, David; Jacobs, Gretta; Meyerson, Howard J.

    2014-01-01

    A 34-year-old female with sickle cell anemia (hemoglobin SS disease) and severe iron overload presented to our institution with the subacute presentation of recurrent pain crisis, fever of unknown origin, pancytopenia, and weight loss. A CT scan demonstrated both lung and liver nodules concerning for granulomatous disease. Subsequent biopsies of the liver and bone marrow confirmed the presence of noncaseating granulomas and blood cultures isolated Mycobacterium avium complex MAC. Disseminated MAC is considered an opportunistic infection typically diagnosed in the immunocompromised and rarely in immunocompetent patients. An appreciable number of mycobacterial infection cases have been reported in sickle cell disease patients without immune dysfunction. It has been reported that iron overload is known to increase the risk for mycobacterial infection in vitro and in vivo studies. While iron overload is primarily known to cause end organ dysfunction, the clinical relationship with sickle cell disease and disseminated MAC infection has not been reported. Clinical iron overload is a common condition diagnosed in the sub-Saharan African population. High dietary iron, genetic defects in iron trafficking, as well as hemoglobinopathy are believed to be the etiologies for iron overload in this region. Patients with iron overload in this region were 17-fold more likely to die from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Both experimental and clinical evidence suggest a possible link to iron overload and mycobacterial infections; however larger observational studies are necessary to determine true causality. PMID:25544913

  6. Detailed chronological analysis of microevolution events in herds infected persistently by Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Yurena; Romero, Beatriz; Bouza, Emilio; Domínguez, Lucas; de Juan, Lucía; García-de-Viedma, Darío

    2016-02-01

    Various studies have analyzed microevolution events leading to the emergence of clonal variants in human infections by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. However, microevolution events in animal tuberculosis remain unknown. We performed a systematic analysis of microevolution events in eight herds that were chronically infected by Mycobacterium bovis for more than 12 months. We analyzed 88 animals using a systematic screening procedure based on discriminatory MIRU-VNTR genotyping at sequential time points during the infection. Microevolution was detected in half of the herds studied. Emergence of clonal variants did not require long infection periods or a high number of infected animals in the herd. Microevolution was not restricted to strains from specific spoligotypes, and the subtle variations detected involved different MIRU loci. The genetic locations of the subtle genotypic variations recorded in the clonal variants indicated potential functional significance. This finding was consistent with the dynamics of some clonal variants, which outcompeted the original strains, suggesting an advantageous phenotype. Our data constitute a first step in defining the thresholds of variability to be tolerated in molecular epidemiology studies of M. bovis. We could therefore ensure that related clonal variants emerging as a result of microevolution events are not going to be misinterpreted as unrelated isolates. PMID:26790941

  7. Atypical microbial infections of digestive tract may contribute to diarrhea in mucopolysaccharidosis patients: a MPS I case study

    PubMed Central

    Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Kurlenda, Julianna; Liberek, Anna; Tylki-Szymańska, Anna; Czartoryska, Barbara; Piotrowska, Ewa; Jakóbkiewicz-Banecka, Joanna; Węgrzyn, Alicja

    2005-01-01

    Background Mucopolysaccharidoses are heritable, metabolic diseases caused by deficiency in an activity of one of specific lysosomal enzymes involved in degradation of mucoplysaccharides (glycosaminoglycans). Among many medical problems of patients with mucopolysaccharidoses, there are frequent episodes of diarrhea of unknown etiology. Case presentation A girl, diagnosed enzymatically for mucopolysaccharidosis type I (deficiency of α-L-iduronidase) at the age of 3 years and 9 months, was investigated until the age of 5 years and 4 months. Frequent loose stools and episodes of diarrhea, often accompanied by vomiting, were encountered. Detailed microbiological analyses were performed and atypical microbial infections (most often enetropathogenic Escherichia coli, but also other species, like Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Staphylococcus aureus, as well as adenoviruses) of the digestive tract were found in most severe diarrhea episodes. Often, isolations of pathogenic bacterial strains from stools of the investigated patient suffering from diarrhea were not obvious during the first screening, and only detailed microbiological studies, including re-isolation of colonies, gave the results of isolation of particular pathogenic strains (especially in the case of enetropathogenic E. coli). Conclusion We conclude that atypical microbial infections of digestive tract may contribute significantly to diarrhea in mucopolysaccaridosis patients. Since isolated strains were not typical and their isolation was often possible only after detailed investigation (not during a standard screening), such atypical microbial infections of digestive tract of mucopolysaccharidosis patients could be usually overlooked to date. Importantly, these atypical infections could be effectively treated with antimicrobial agents. PMID:15882450

  8. Acute microbiologically negative hypoxic interstitial pneumonia on HAART: Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome unmasking Pneumocystis Jiroveci infection with an atypical presentation

    PubMed Central

    Sovaila, S; de Raigniac, A; Picard, C; Taulera, O; Lascoux-Combe, C; Sereni, D; Bourgarit, A

    2012-01-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy for AIDS sometimes engenders inflammatory manifestations resulting from an inappropriate and unbalanced immune-system restoration, called Immune Reconstitution inflammatory Syndrome, which, in turn, can unmask a subclinical infection/pathology. Despite our patient’s evident syndrome, the atypical clinical, microbiologic and radiologic feature of Pneumocystis pneumonia made its diagnosis difficult. PMID:22802889

  9. Mycobacterium chelonae infection under adalimumab therapy for spondylarthritis.

    PubMed

    Kluger, N; Cohen, P; Fallet-Bianco, C; Guillevin, L

    2010-01-01

    Tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha antagonists have been prescribed increasingly over the past few years to manage various inflammatory diseases. This widespread use was quickly followed by the heightened frequency of opportunistic mycobacterial infections including environmental non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections (ENTM). We describe a 66-year-old man taking adalimumab for spondyloarthropathy who developed an inflammatory infiltration in his right index finger. A non-necrotising granuloma with epitheloid and giant cells in the dermis and eosinophilic acid-fast bacilli, identified by using Ziehl-Neelsen staining suggested a mycobacterial infection. Cultures for mycobacteria grew positive on Loewenstein-Jensen medium and molecular identification confirmed M. chelonae infection. The outcome was favourable after five months of clarythromycin. In this context of more frequent ENTM infections, chronic non-specific cutaneous lesions of the extremities should evoke systematically cutaneous ENTM infections. Skin biopsy with histological examination and oriented microbiological cultures and molecular identification are mandatory to confirm the diagnosis. PMID:20346249

  10. Mycobacterium genavense infections: a retrospective multicenter study in France, 1996-2007.

    PubMed

    Charles, Pierre; Lortholary, Olivier; Dechartres, Agnès; Doustdar, Fahranoosh; Viard, Jean Paul; Lecuit, Marc; Gutierrez, Maria Cristina

    2011-07-01

    Mycobacterium genavense, a nontuberculous mycobacterium, led to devastating infections in patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) before highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) was available, as well as in other immunocompromised patients. We conducted the current study to describe the features of this infection in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the HAART era and in non HIV-infected patients.We conducted a retrospective cohort survey in France. All patients with M. genavense infection diagnosed from 1996 to 2007 at the National Reference Center, Institut Pasteur, Paris, were identified and their clinical, laboratory, and microbiologic data were centralized in a single database. Twenty-five cases of M. genavense infection originating from 19 centers were identified. Twenty patients had AIDS, 3 had solid organ transplantation, and 2 had sarcoidosis. Sixty-four percent (n = 16) were male, mean age was 42 years, and median CD4 count was 13/mm (range, 0-148/mm) in patients with AIDS. Twenty-four patients had disseminated infection with fever (75%, n = 18), weight loss (79%, n = 19), abdominal pain (71%, n = 17), diarrhea (62.5%, n = 15), splenomegaly (71%, n = 17), hepatomegaly (62.5%, n = 15), or abdominal adenopathy (62.5%, n = 15). M. genavense was isolated from the lymph node (n = 13), intestinal biopsy (n = 9), blood (n = 6), sputum (n = 3), stool (n = 3), and bone marrow (n = 5). Eleven patients (44%) died, 8 (32%) were considered cured with no residual symptoms, and 6 (24%) had chronic symptoms. The 1-year survival rate was 72%.The prognosis of M. genavense infection in HIV-infected patients has dramatically improved with HAART. Clinical presentations in HIV and non-HIV immunocompromised patients were similar. PMID:21694645

  11. Human multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium bovis infection in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Chacon, Carlos A; Martínez-Guarneros, Armando; Couvin, David; González-Y-Merchand, Jorge A; Rivera-Gutierrez, Sandra; Escobar-Gutierrez, Alejandro; De-la-Cruz López, Juan J; Gomez-Bustamante, Adriana; Gonzalez-Macal, Gabriela A; Gonçalves Rossi, Livia Maria; Muñiz-Salazar, Raquel; Rastogi, Nalin; Vaughan, Gilberto

    2015-12-01

    Here, we describe the molecular characterization of six human Mycobacterium bovis clinical isolates, including three multidrug resistant (MDR) strains, collected in Mexico through the National Survey on Tuberculosis Drug Resistance (ENTB-2008), a nationally representative survey conducted during 2008-2009 in nine states with a stratified cluster sampling design. The genetic background of bovine M. bovis strains identified in three different states of Mexico was studied in parallel to assess molecular relatedness of bovine and human strains. Additionally, resistance to first and second line anti-tuberculosis (TB) drugs and molecular identification of mutations conferring drug resistance was also performed. All strains were characterized by spoligotyping and 24-loci MIRU-VNTRs, and analyzed using the SITVIT2 (n = 112,000 strains) and SITVITBovis (n = 25,000 strains) proprietary databases of Institut Pasteur de la Guadeloupe. Furthermore, data from this study (n = 55 isolates), were also compared with genotypes recorded for M. bovis from USA (n = 203), Argentina (n = 726), as well as other isolates from Mexico (independent from the present study; n = 147), to determine any evidence for genetic relatedness between circulating M. bovis strains. The results showed that all human M. bovis cases were not genetically related between them or to any bovine strain. Interestingly, a high degree of genetic variability was observed among bovine strains. Several autochthonous and presumably imported strains were identified. The emergence of drug-resistant M. bovis is an important public health problem that jeopardizes the success of TB control programs in the region. PMID:26299906

  12. LL-37 immunomodulatory activity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Torres-Juarez, Flor; Cardenas-Vargas, Albertina; Montoya-Rosales, Alejandra; González-Curiel, Irma; Garcia-Hernandez, Mariana H; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A; Hancock, Robert E W; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the most important infectious diseases worldwide. The susceptibility to this disease depends to a great extent on the innate immune response against mycobacteria. Host defense peptides (HDP) are one of the first barriers to counteract infection. Cathelicidin (LL-37) is an HDP that has many immunomodulatory effects besides its weak antimicrobial activity. Despite advances in the study of the innate immune response in tuberculosis, the immunological role of LL-37 during M. tuberculosis infection has not been clarified. Monocyte-derived macrophages were infected with M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv and then treated with 1, 5, or 15 μg/ml of exogenous LL-37 for 4, 8, and 24 h. Exogenous LL-37 decreased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) while inducing anti-inflammatory IL-10 and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) production. Interestingly, the decreased production of anti-inflammatory cytokines did not reduce antimycobacterial activity. These results are consistent with the concept that LL-37 can modulate the expression of cytokines during mycobacterial infection and this activity was independent of the P2X7 receptor. Thus, LL-37 modulates the response of macrophages during infection, controlling the expression of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:26351280

  13. LL-37 Immunomodulatory Activity during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Juarez, Flor; Cardenas-Vargas, Albertina; Montoya-Rosales, Alejandra; González-Curiel, Irma; Garcia-Hernandez, Mariana H.; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A.; Hancock, Robert E. W.

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis is one of the most important infectious diseases worldwide. The susceptibility to this disease depends to a great extent on the innate immune response against mycobacteria. Host defense peptides (HDP) are one of the first barriers to counteract infection. Cathelicidin (LL-37) is an HDP that has many immunomodulatory effects besides its weak antimicrobial activity. Despite advances in the study of the innate immune response in tuberculosis, the immunological role of LL-37 during M. tuberculosis infection has not been clarified. Monocyte-derived macrophages were infected with M. tuberculosis strain H37Rv and then treated with 1, 5, or 15 μg/ml of exogenous LL-37 for 4, 8, and 24 h. Exogenous LL-37 decreased tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin-17 (IL-17) while inducing anti-inflammatory IL-10 and transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) production. Interestingly, the decreased production of anti-inflammatory cytokines did not reduce antimycobacterial activity. These results are consistent with the concept that LL-37 can modulate the expression of cytokines during mycobacterial infection and this activity was independent of the P2X7 receptor. Thus, LL-37 modulates the response of macrophages during infection, controlling the expression of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:26351280

  14. Mycobacterium tuberculosis senses host-derived carbon monoxide during macrophage infection

    PubMed Central

    Shiloh, Michael U.; Manzanillo, Paolo; Cox, Jeffery S.

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) expresses a set of genes known as the dormancy regulon in vivo. These genes are expressed in vitro in response to nitric oxide (NO) or hypoxia, conditions used to model MTB persistance in latent infection. Although NO, a macrophage product that inhibits respiration, and hypoxia are likely triggers in vivo, additional cues could activate the dormancy regulon during infection. Here, we show that MTB infection stimulates expression of heme oxygenase (HO-1) by macrophages and that the gaseous product of this enzyme, carbon monoxide (CO), activates expression of the dormancy regulon. Deletion of macrophage HO-1 reduced expression of the dormancy regulon. Furthermore, we show that the MTB DosS/DosT/DosR two-component sensory relay system is required for the response to CO. Together, these findings demonstrate that MTB senses CO during macrophage infection. CO may represent a general cue used by pathogens to sense and adapt to the host environment. PMID:18474359

  15. B cells and Antibodies in the Defense against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Achkar, Jacqueline M.; Chan, John; Casadevall, Arturo

    2015-01-01

    Summary Better understanding of the immunological components and their interactions necessary to prevent or control Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection in humans is critical for tuberculosis (TB) vaccine development strategies. While the contributory role of humoral immunity in the protection against Mtb infection and disease is less defined than the role of T cells, it has been well established for many other intracellular pathogens. Here we update and discuss the increasing evidence and the mechanisms of B cells and antibodies in the defense against Mtb infection. We posit that B cells and antibodies have a variety of potential protective roles at each stage of Mtb infection, and postulate that such roles should be considered in the development strategies for TB vaccines and other immune-based interventions. PMID:25703559

  16. NLRP3 Activation Was Regulated by DNA Methylation Modification during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Meili; Wang, Lu; Wu, Tao; Xi, Jun; Han, Yuze; Yang, Xingxiang; Zhang, Ding; Fang, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection activates the NLRP3 inflammasome in macrophages and dendritic cells. Much attention has been paid to the mechanisms for regulation of NLRP3 against Mtb. However, whether epigenetic mechanisms participated in NLRP3 activation is still little known. Here we showed that NLRP3 activation was regulated by DNA methylation modification. Mtb infection promoted NLRP3 activation and inflammatory cytokines expression. NLRP3 promoter was cloned and subsequently identified by Dual-Luciferase Reporter System. The results showed that NLRP3 promoter activity was decreased after methylation by DNA methylase Sss I in vitro. Meanwhile, DNA methyltransferases inhibitor DAC could upregulate the expression of NLRP3. Furthermore, promoter region of NLRP3 gene was demethylated after Mtb H37Rv strain infection. These data revealed that DNA methylation was involved in NLRP3 inflammasome activation during Mtb infection and provided a new insight into the relationship between host and pathogens. PMID:27366746

  17. Antineutrophil Cytoplasmic Antibody-associated Vasculitis Superimposed on Infection-related Glomerulonephritis Secondary to Pulmonary Mycobacterium avium Complex Infection.

    PubMed

    Asano, Shuichi; Mizuno, Shige; Okachi, Shotaro; Aso, Hiromichi; Wakahara, Keiko; Hashimoto, Naozumi; Ito, Satoru; Kozaki, Yohei; Katsuno, Takayuki; Maruyama, Shoichi; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2016-01-01

    A 73-year-old woman was diagnosed with pulmonary Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection and received no treatment. Disease progression was evident one year later with the development of myeloperoxidase-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA) titers and systemic symptoms of a fever, polyarthritis, purpura, and rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis. Her symptoms did not improve with antibiotic treatment. A renal biopsy revealed crescentic glomerulonephritis with immunodeposition. According to these findings, she was diagnosed with ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) superimposed on infection-related glomerulonephritis (IRGN). Although there was a risk of aggravating an underlying infection, the combination therapy of corticosteroid and antibiotics improved AAV, IRGN, and even the lung radiological findings. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of AAV and IRGN secondary to pulmonary MAC infection. PMID:27580547

  18. Establishment of a neonatal rhesus macaque model to study Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Cepeda, Magdalena; Salas, Mary; Folwarczny, Jessica; Leandro, Ana C; Hodara, Vida L; de la Garza, Melissa A; Dick, Edward J; Owston, Michael; Armitige, Lisa Y; Gauduin, Marie-Claire

    2013-12-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is the causative agent of human tuberculosis (TB) with an estimated 8.8 million new TB cases and 1.4 million deaths annually. Tuberculosis is the leading cause of death in AIDS patients worldwide but very little is known about early TB infection or TB/HIV co-infection in infants. A clinically relevant newborn animal model to study TB infection is urgently needed. We have successfully established an aerosol newborn/infant model in neonatal nonhuman primates (NHPs) that mimics clinical and bacteriological characteristics of Mtb infection as seen in human newborns/infants. Further, this model will allow the establishment of a TB coinfection model of pediatric AIDS. Aerosol versus intra broncho-alveolar Mtb infection was studied. Interestingly, 42 days post infection specific lesions were detected suggestive of the classic Ghon focus in human children. Concurrently, specific cellular immune responses developed 4-6 weeks after Mtb infection. Using the enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) assays, we found that IL-12 production correlated with early Mtb infection lesions seen by routine thoracic radiographs. Overall, this work represents the first example of early Mtb infection of newborn macaques. This study gives us a unique opportunity to further characterize immunopathogenesis and establish a TB/SIV co-infection model for pediatric AIDS. PMID:24388650

  19. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection induces non-apoptotic cell death of human dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dendritic cells (DCs) connect innate and adaptive immunity, and are necessary for an efficient CD4+ and CD8+ T cell response after infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). We previously described the macrophage cell death response to Mtb infection. To investigate the effect of Mtb infection on human DC viability, we infected these phagocytes with different strains of Mtb and assessed viability, as well as DNA fragmentation and caspase activity. In parallel studies, we assessed the impact of infection on DC maturation, cytokine production and bacillary survival. Results Infection of DCs with live Mtb (H37Ra or H37Rv) led to cell death. This cell death proceeded in a caspase-independent manner, and without nuclear fragmentation. In fact, substrate assays demonstrated that Mtb H37Ra-induced cell death progressed without the activation of the executioner caspases, 3/7. Although the death pathway was triggered after infection, the DCs successfully underwent maturation and produced a host-protective cytokine profile. Finally, dying infected DCs were permissive for Mtb H37Ra growth. Conclusions Human DCs undergo cell death after infection with live Mtb, in a manner that does not involve executioner caspases, and results in no mycobactericidal effect. Nonetheless, the DC maturation and cytokine profile observed suggests that the infected cells can still contribute to TB immunity. PMID:22024399

  20. Polyfunctional cytokine production by central memory T cells from cattle in response to Mycobacterium bovis infection and BCG vaccination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Polyfunctional T cells simultaneously produce IFN-gamma, IL-2 and TNF-alpha and play relevant roles in several chronic infections, including TB. Mycobacterium bovis infection of cattle elicits ex vivo polyfunctional T cell responses. Vaccine-elicited IFN-gamma Tcm (CD4+ CD45RO+ CCR7+) responses corr...

  1. Differences in intermittent and continuous fecal shedding patterns between natural and experimental Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infections in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this paper is to study shedding patterns of cows infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). While multiple single farm studies of MAP dynamics were reported, there is not large-scale meta-analysis of both natural and experimental infections. Large difference...

  2. Parturition invokes Changes in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Populations in Holstein Dairy Cows Naturally Infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twenty-one multiparous and two primiparous Holstein cows were grouped according to infection status with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), the causative microorganism for Johne’s disease (JD). The effect of parturition and infection on the percentages of CD4+, CD8+, and T-cells, B-...

  3. Parturition Invokes Changes in Peripheral blood Mononuclear Cell Populations in Holstein Dairy Cows Naturally Infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Johne’s disease, caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), is estimated to infect more than 22% of US dairy herds. Once infected, cows may remain in the asymptomatic subclinical state until a period of stress, such as parturition. Parturition has a major impact on the number of ...

  4. Shedding of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis into milk and colostrum of naturally infected dairy cows over complete lactation cycles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The primary mode of transmission of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is fecal-oral. However, MAP is also shed into the milk and colostrum of infected cows. The objective of this study was to identify if an association exists between stage of MAP infection and days in lactation with ...

  5. Concomitant Mycobacterium avium infection and Hodgkin's disease in a lymph node from an HIV-negative child.

    PubMed

    de Armas, Yaxsier; Capó, Virginia; González, Ida; Mederos, Lilian; Díaz, Raúl; de Waard, Jacobus H; Rodríguez, Alberto; García, Yarmila; Cabanas, Ricardo

    2011-03-01

    We report a case of an immunocompetent child with simultaneously an infection with Mycobacterium avium and Hodgkin's disease in a cervical lymph node. A positive PCR result for M. avium on a biopsy of the lymph node directed the definitive diagnosis for both etiologies and avoided a possible dissemination of this infection after chemotherapy was started. PMID:20467849

  6. Transcriptomic Characterization of an Infection of Mycobacterium smegmatis by the Cluster A4 Mycobacteriophage Kampy

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    The mycobacteriophages, phages that infect the genus Mycobacterium, display profound genetic diversity and widespread geographical distribution, and possess significant medical and ecological importance. However, most of the majority of functions of mycobacteriophage proteins and the identity of most genetic regulatory elements remain unknown. We characterized the gene expression profile of Kampy, a cluster A4 mycobacteriophage, during infection of its host, Mycobacterium smegmatis, using RNA-Seq and mass spectrometry. We show that mycobacteriophage Kampy transcription occurs in roughly two phases, an early phase consisting of genes for metabolism, DNA synthesis, and gene regulation, and a late phase consisting of structural genes and lysis genes. Additionally, we identify the earliest genes transcribed during infection, along with several other possible regulatory units not obvious from inspection of Kampy's genomic structure. The transcriptional profile of Kampy appears similar to that of mycobacteriophage TM4 but unlike that of mycobacteriophage Giles, a result which further expands our understanding of the diversity of mycobacteriophage gene expression programs during infection. PMID:26513661

  7. Evaluation of gamma interferon (IFN-gamma)-induced protein 10 (IP-10) responses for detection of cattle infected with Mycobacterium bovis: comparisons to IFN-gamma responses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gamma interferon (IFN-gamma)-induced protein 10 (IP-10) has recently shown promise as a diagnostic biomarker of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection of humans. The aim of the current study was to compare IP-10 and IFN-gamma responses upon Mycobacterium bovis infection in cattle using archived sample...

  8. Modulation of Cytokine Gene Expression and Secretion During the Periparturient Period in Dairy Cows Naturally Infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Modulation of cytokine gene expression and secretion during the periparturient period in dairy cows naturally infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Technical abstract Johne’s disease (JD), caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), is estimated to infect more t...

  9. The epidemiology of Mycobacterium bovis infections in animals and man: a review.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, L M; Daborn, C J

    1995-08-01

    Tuberculosis is primarily a respiratory disease and transmission of infection within and between species is mainly by the airborne route. Mycobacterium bovis, the cause of bovine-type tuberculosis, has an exceptionally wide host range. Susceptible species include cattle, humans, non-human primates, goats, cats dogs, pigs, buffalo, badgers, possums, deer and bison. Many susceptible species, including man, are spillover hosts in which infection is not self-maintaining. In countries where there is transmission of infection from endemically infected wildlife populations to cattle or other farmed animals, eradication is not feasible and control measures must be applied indefinitely. Possible methods of limiting spread of infection from wildlife to cattle including the use of vaccines are outlined. The usefulness of DNA fingerprinting of M. bovis strains as an epidemiological tool and of BCG vaccination of humans and cattle as a control measure are reviewed. The factors determining susceptibility to infection and clinical disease, and the infectiousness of infected hosts and transmission of infection, are detailed. Reports of the epidemiology of M. bovis infections in man and a variety of animal species are reviewed. M. bovis infection was recognised as a major public health problem when this organism was transmitted to man via milk from infected cows. The introduction of pasteurization helped eliminate this problem. Those occupational groups working with M. bovis infected cattle or deer, on the farm or in the slaughter house, are more likely to develop pulmonary disease than alimentary disease. In recent years, tuberculosis in farmed cervidae has become a disease of economic as well as public health importance in several countries. Nowadays, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is associated with a greatly increased risk of overt disease in humans infected with Myobacterium tuberculosis. It is believed this increased risk also occurs in the case of M. bovis infections

  10. Mycobacterium abscessus isolated from municipal water - a potential source of human infection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mycobacterium abscessus is a rapidly growing mycobacterium responsible for progressive pulmonary disease, soft tissue and wound infections. The incidence of disease due to M. abscessus has been increasing in Queensland. In a study of Brisbane drinking water, M. abscessus was isolated from ten different locations. The aim of this study was to compare genotypically the M. abscessus isolates obtained from water to those obtained from human clinical specimens. Methods Between 2007 and 2009, eleven isolates confirmed as M. abscessus were recovered from potable water, one strain was isolated from a rainwater tank and another from a swimming pool and two from domestic taps. Seventy-four clinical isolates referred during the same time period were available for comparison using rep-PCR strain typing (Diversilab). Results The drinking water isolates formed two clusters with ≥97% genetic similarity (Water patterns 1 and 2). The tankwater isolate (WP4), one municipal water isolate (WP3) and the pool isolate (WP5) were distinctly different. Patient isolates formed clusters with all of the water isolates except for WP3. Further patient isolates were unrelated to the water isolates. Conclusion The high degree of similarity between strains of M. abscessus from potable water and strains causing infection in humans from the same geographical area, strengthens the possibility that drinking water may be the source of infection in these patients. PMID:23705674

  11. Mycobacterium sherrisii Lung Infection in a Brazilian Patient with Silicosis and a History of Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Abrão, Carolina; de Araújo Filho, João Alves

    2015-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) diseases became relevant with the emergence and spread of HIV and are also related to lung infection in non-HIV individuals with structural lung diseases. Mycobacterium sherrisii is a NTM first characterized in 2004. Only a few cases have been reported. The aim of this case report is to describe the first detailed case of infection with M. sherrisii in a patient with silicosis and history of pulmonary tuberculosis. A 50-year-old HIV-negative white male, previous smoker, with silicosis and a history of treated pulmonary tuberculosis developed a worsening of cough and expectoration pattern, and two sputum samples were positive for acid-fast bacilli. Presumptive treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis was initiated with rifampin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide, and ethambutol, but, at month 5 of treatment, despite correct medication intake and slight improvement of symptoms, sputum bacilloscopy remained positive. Sputum cultures were positive Mycobacterium sherrisii. Treatment regimen was altered to streptomycin (for 2 months), ethambutol, clarithromycin, rifabutin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. M. sherrisii should be considered a possible etiological agent of lung infections in patients with pneumoconiosis and history of tuberculosis. PMID:26557395

  12. Successful treatment with faropenem and clarithromycin of pulmonary Mycobacterium abscessus infection.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Eisaku; Kimoto, Terumi; Tsuyuguchi, Kazunari; Suzuki, Katsuhiro; Amitani, Ryoichi

    2002-09-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus accounts for 80% of rapidly growing mycobacterial pulmonary infections and can be lethal. Treatment is difficult because of the paucity of effective drugs. We describe a patient with pulmonary M. abscessus infection who was treated with a regimen that included faropenem, a novel oral penem, and clarithromycin. He showed favorable responses to the treatment for more than 12 months. In vitro, faropenem had considerable inhibitory activities against 56 strains of rapidly growing mycobacteria, including M. peregrinum, M. chelonae, M. fortuitum, and M. abscessus (stated in order of increasing minimal inhibitory concentrations). Thus, faropenem has the potential to be used as an adjunctive drug with clarithromycin for the treatment of infection with rapidly growing mycobacteria, including M. abscessus. PMID:12373490

  13. Development of a PCR assay for rapid diagnosis of Mycobacterium ulcerans infection.

    PubMed Central

    Ross, B C; Marino, L; Oppedisano, F; Edwards, R; Robins-Browne, R M; Johnson, P D

    1997-01-01

    The diagnosis of Mycobacterium ulcerans infection is hampered by the slow growth of the bacterium in culture, resulting in a delay of several months before a specific diagnosis can be obtained. In addition, M. ulcerans cannot be isolated from water even when there is convincing epidemiological evidence implicating this as the source of infection. The aim of the present study was to develop a PCR assay to circumvent the problems of delayed diagnosis and insensitivity of standard bacterial culture for M. ulcerans. For the PCR, we isolated an M. ulcerans-specific DNA fragment, 1,109 bp long, which is repeated at least 50 times throughout the genome. Use of this sequence as a target for PCR allowed us to detect as few as 2 molecules of genomic DNA in vitro. The PCR was used to detect M. ulcerans DNA in fresh tissue and paraffin-embedded sections from all seven patients with culture-confirmed cases of infection. PMID:9196176

  14. Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Liver Transplant Recipients—Controversies in Current Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopala, Srinivas; Olithselvan, A; Varghese, Joy; Shanmugam, Naresh; Rela, Mohamed

    2011-01-01

    Liver transplantation for end-stage liver disease is increasingly being undertaken in India.1 Routine tuberculin skin testing (TST) for latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (LTBI) and isoniazid prophylaxis in TST-positive liver-transplant recipients (LTRs) is recommended2,3 but seldom implemented worldwide.4–7 The role of TST-testing and isoniazid prophylaxis in LTRs remains further undefined in high prevalence areas, including India. We describe the burden of LTBI in LTRs; the epidemiological aspects of M. tuberculosis infection in high prevalence areas; identifiable risk factors for M. tuberculosis infection; the limitations of current diagnostic techniques for LTBI in LTRs and the efficacy and toxicity of isoniazid prophylaxis in TST-positive LTRs and suggest directions for future investigations in this area. PMID:25755308

  15. Tuberculosis in Birds: Insights into the Mycobacterium avium Infections

    PubMed Central

    Dhama, Kuldeep; Mahendran, Mahesh; Tiwari, Ruchi; Dayal Singh, Shambhu; Kumar, Deepak; Singh, Shoorvir; Sawant, Pradeep Mahadev

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis, a List B disease of World Organization for Animal Health, caused by M. avium or M. genavense predominantly affects poultry and pet or captive birds. Clinical manifestations in birds include emaciation, depression and diarrhea along with marked atrophy of breast muscle. Unlike tuberculosis in animals and man, lesions in lungs are rare. Tubercular nodules can be seen in liver, spleen, intestine and bone marrow. Granulomatous lesion without calcification is a prominent feature. The disease is a rarity in organized poultry sector due to improved farm practices, but occurs in zoo aviaries. Molecular techniques like polymerase chain reaction combined with restriction fragment length polymorphism and gene probes aid in rapid identification and characterization of mycobacteria subspecies, and overcome disadvantages of conventional methods which are slow, labour intensive and may at times fail to produce precise results. M. avium subsp. avium with genotype IS901+ and IS1245+ causes infections in animals and human beings too. The bacterium causes sensitivity in cattle to the tuberculin test. The paper discusses in brief the M. avium infection in birds, its importance in a zoonotic perspective, and outlines conventional and novel strategies for its diagnosis, prevention and eradication in domestic/pet birds and humans alike. PMID:21776352

  16. Neuroinvasive West Nile Infection Elicits Elevated and Atypically Polarized T Cell Responses That Promote a Pathogenic Outcome

    PubMed Central

    James, Eddie A.; Gates, Theresa J.; LaFond, Rebecca E.; Yamamoto, Shinobu; Ni, Chester; Mai, Duy; Gersuk, Vivian H.; O’Brien, Kimberly; Nguyen, Quynh-Anh; Zeitner, Brad; Lanteri, Marion C.; Norris, Philip J.; Chaussabel, Damien; Malhotra, Uma; Kwok, William W.

    2016-01-01

    Most West Nile virus (WNV) infections are asymptomatic, but some lead to neuroinvasive disease with symptoms ranging from disorientation to paralysis and death. Evidence from animal models suggests that neuroinvasive infections may arise as a consequence of impaired immune protection. However, other data suggest that neurologic symptoms may arise as a consequence of immune mediated damage. We demonstrate that elevated immune responses are present in neuroinvasive disease by directly characterizing WNV-specific T cells in subjects with laboratory documented infections using human histocompatibility leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II tetramers. Subjects with neuroinvasive infections had higher overall numbers of WNV-specific T cells than those with asymptomatic infections. Independent of this, we also observed age related increases in WNV-specific T cell responses. Further analysis revealed that WNV-specific T cell responses included a population of atypically polarized CXCR3+CCR4+CCR6- T cells, whose presence was highly correlated with neuroinvasive disease. Moreover, a higher proportion of WNV-specific T cells in these subjects co-produced interferon-γ and interleukin 4 than those from asymptomatic subjects. More globally, subjects with neuroinvasive infections had reduced numbers of CD4+FoxP3+ Tregs that were CTLA4 positive and exhibited a distinct upregulated transcript profile that was absent in subjects with asymptomatic infections. Thus, subjects with neuroinvasive WNV infections exhibited elevated, dysregulated, and atypically polarized responses, suggesting that immune mediated damage may indeed contribute to pathogenic outcomes. PMID:26795118

  17. Post Liposuction Mycobacterium Abscessus Surgical Site Infection in a Returned Medical tourist Complicated by a Paradoxical Reaction During Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Siong H.; Noonan, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    Rapidly growing mycobacterial skin and soft tissue infections are known to complicate cosmetic surgical procedures. Treatment consists of more surgery and prolonged antibiotic therapy guided by drug susceptibility testing. Paradoxical reactions occurring during antibiotic therapy can further complicate treatment of non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections. We report a case of post liposuction Mycobacterium abscessus surgical site infection in a returned medical tourist and occurrence of paradox during treatment. PMID:26753088

  18. Serum level of C-reactive protein is not a parameter to determine the difference between viral and atypical bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Durán, Anyelo; González, Andrea; Delgado, Lineth; Mosquera, Jesús; Valero, Nereida

    2016-02-01

    C-reactive protein (CRP) is an acute-phase reactant that increases in the circulation in response to a variety of inflammatory stimuli. Elevated levels in serum during several infectious diseases have been reported. In this study, a highly sensitive CRP enzyme immunoassay was used to evaluate serum CRP values in patients with viral and atypical bacterial infections. Patients (n = 139) with different viral or atypical bacterial infections (systemic or respiratory) and healthy controls (n = 40) were tested for circulating CRP values. High levels of IgM antibodies against several viruses: Dengue virus (n = 36), Cytomegalovirus (n = 9), Epstein Barr virus (n = 17), Parvovirus B19 (n = 26), Herpes simplex 1 and 2 virus (n = 3) and Influenza A and B (n = 8) and against atypical bacteria: Legionella pneumophila (n = 15), Mycoplasma pneumoniae (n = 21) and Coxiella burnetii (n = 4) were found. High values of CRP in infected patients compared with controls (P < 0.001) were found; however, no significant differences between viral and atypical bacterial infections were found. Low levels of CRP in respiratory and Coxiella burnetii infections compared with exanthematic viral and other atypical bacterial infections were found. This study suggests that CRP values are useful to define viral and atypical bacterial infections compared with normal values, but, it is not useful to define type of infection. PMID:26241406

  19. Deep Whole-Genome Sequencing to Detect Mixed Infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Mingyu; Liu, Qingyun; Yang, Chongguang; Gao, Qian; Luo, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Mixed infection by multiple Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) strains is associated with poor treatment outcome of tuberculosis (TB). Traditional genotyping methods have been used to detect mixed infections of MTB, however, their sensitivity and resolution are limited. Deep whole-genome sequencing (WGS) has been proved highly sensitive and discriminative for studying population heterogeneity of MTB. Here, we developed a phylogenetic-based method to detect MTB mixed infections using WGS data. We collected published WGS data of 782 global MTB strains from public database. We called homogeneous and heterogeneous single nucleotide variations (SNVs) of individual strains by mapping short reads to the ancestral MTB reference genome. We constructed a phylogenomic database based on 68,639 homogeneous SNVs of 652 MTB strains. Mixed infections were determined if multiple evolutionary paths were identified by mapping the SNVs of individual samples to the phylogenomic database. By simulation, our method could specifically detect mixed infections when the sequencing depth of minor strains was as low as 1× coverage, and when the genomic distance of two mixed strains was as small as 16 SNVs. By applying our methods to all 782 samples, we detected 47 mixed infections and 45 of them were caused by locally endemic strains. The results indicate that our method is highly sensitive and discriminative for identifying mixed infections from deep WGS data of MTB isolates. PMID:27391214

  20. Overexpression of RORγt Enhances Pulmonary Inflammation after Infection with Mycobacterium Avium.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Masashi; Ishii, Yukio; Sakurai, Hirofumi; Ano, Satoshi; Morishima, Yuko; Yoh, Keigyou; Takahashi, Satoru; Ogawa, Kenji; Hizawa, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is the most common cause of nontuberculous mycobacterial disease in humans. The role of Th17 immunity in the pathogenesis of intracellular bacteria, such as MAC, is not currently understood. Transcription factor RAR-related orphan receptor gamma t (RORγt) is known as the master regulator for Th17 cell development. Here, we investigated the role of RORγt in host responses against MAC infection. Wild-type (WT) mice and RORγt-overexpressing mice were infected with MAC via intratracheal inoculation. Systemic MAC growth was not different between WT mice and RORγt-overexpressing mice. However, neutrophilic pulmonary inflammation following MAC infection was enhanced in RORγt-overexpressing mice compared with that in WT mice. The cytokine expression shifted toward a Th17 phenotype in the lungs of RORγt-overexpressing mice following MAC infection; the levels of IL-6 and IL-17 were significantly higher in the lung of these mice than in WT mice. In addition to the increase in IL-17 single-positive T cells, T cells producing both IL-17 and interferon-γ were elevated in the lung of RORγt-overexpressing mice following MAC infection. These findings suggest that RORγt overexpression-mediated Th17 bias contributes to local inflammation rather than systemic responses, by regulating neutrophil recruitment into the sites of infection during MAC infection. PMID:26784959

  1. Determination of Urinary Neopterin/Creatinine Ratio to Distinguish Active Tuberculosis from Latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Eisenhut, Michael; Hargreaves, Dougal S.; Scott, Anne; Housley, David; Walters, Andrew; Mulla, Rohinton

    2016-01-01

    Background. Biomarkers to distinguish latent from active Mycobacterium (M.) tuberculosis infection in clinical practice are lacking. The urinary neopterin/creatinine ratio can quantify the systemic interferon-gamma effect in patients with M. tuberculosis infection. Methods. In a prospective observational study, urinary neopterin levels were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay in patients with active tuberculosis, in people with latent M. tuberculosis infection, and in healthy controls and the urinary neopterin/creatinine ratio was calculated. Results. We included a total of 44 patients with M. tuberculosis infection and nine controls. 12 patients had active tuberculosis (8 of them culture-confirmed). The median age was 15 years (range 4.5 to 49). Median urinary neopterin/creatinine ratio in patients with active tuberculosis was 374.1 micromol/mol (129.0 to 1072.3), in patients with latent M. tuberculosis infection it was 142.1 (28.0 to 384.1), and in controls it was 146.0 (40.3 to 200.0), with significantly higher levels in patients with active tuberculosis (p < 0.01). The receiver operating characteristics curve had an area under the curve of 0.84 (95% CI 0.70 to 0.97) (p < 0.01). Conclusions. Urinary neopterin/creatinine ratios are significantly higher in patients with active tuberculosis compared to patients with latent infection and may be a significant predictor of active tuberculosis in patients with M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:27433370

  2. Host Transcriptional Profiles and Immunopathologic Response following Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Min-Kyoung; Park, Hongtae; Shin, Seung Won; Jung, Myunghwan; Lee, Su-Hyung; Kim, Dae-Yong; Yoo, Han Sang

    2015-01-01

    Paratuberculosis or Johne’s disease is a chronic granulomatous enteropathy in ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection. In the present study, we examined the host response to MAP infection in spleens of mice in order to investigate the host immunopathology accompanying host-pathogen interaction. Transcriptional profiles of the MAP-infected mice at 3 and 6 weeks p.i. showed severe histopathological changes, whereas those at 12 weeks p.i. displayed reduced lesion severity in the spleen and liver. MAP-infected mice at 3 and 6 weeks p.i. showed up-regulation of interferon-related genes, scavenger receptor, and complement components, suggesting an initial innate immune reaction, such as macrophage activation, bactericidal activity, and macrophage invasion of MAP. Concurrently, MAP-infected mice at 3 and 6 weeks p.i. were also suggested to express M2 macrophage phenotype with up-regulation of Mrc1, and Marco and down-regulation of MHC class II, Ccr7, and Irf5, and canonical pathways related to the T cell response including ICOS-ICOSL signaling in T helper cells, calcium-induced T lymphocyte apoptosis, and CD28 signaling in T helper cell. These results provide information which furthers the understanding of the immunopathologic response to MAP infection in mice, thereby providing insights valuable for research into the pathogenesis for MAP infection. PMID:26439498

  3. Deep Whole-Genome Sequencing to Detect Mixed Infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gan, Mingyu; Liu, Qingyun; Yang, Chongguang; Gao, Qian; Luo, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Mixed infection by multiple Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) strains is associated with poor treatment outcome of tuberculosis (TB). Traditional genotyping methods have been used to detect mixed infections of MTB, however, their sensitivity and resolution are limited. Deep whole-genome sequencing (WGS) has been proved highly sensitive and discriminative for studying population heterogeneity of MTB. Here, we developed a phylogenetic-based method to detect MTB mixed infections using WGS data. We collected published WGS data of 782 global MTB strains from public database. We called homogeneous and heterogeneous single nucleotide variations (SNVs) of individual strains by mapping short reads to the ancestral MTB reference genome. We constructed a phylogenomic database based on 68,639 homogeneous SNVs of 652 MTB strains. Mixed infections were determined if multiple evolutionary paths were identified by mapping the SNVs of individual samples to the phylogenomic database. By simulation, our method could specifically detect mixed infections when the sequencing depth of minor strains was as low as 1× coverage, and when the genomic distance of two mixed strains was as small as 16 SNVs. By applying our methods to all 782 samples, we detected 47 mixed infections and 45 of them were caused by locally endemic strains. The results indicate that our method is highly sensitive and discriminative for identifying mixed infections from deep WGS data of MTB isolates. PMID:27391214

  4. Prolonged survival of scavenger receptor class A-deficient mice from pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    PubMed Central

    Sever-Chroneos, Zvjezdana; Tvinnereim, Amy; Hunter, Robert L.; Chroneos, Zissis C.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The present study tested the hypothesis that the scavenger receptor SR-A modulates granuloma formation in response to pulmonary infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB). To test this hypothesis, we monitored survival and histopathology in WT and SR-A-deficient mice following aerosol infection with MTB Rv. SR-A-deficient (SR-A−/−) mice infected with MTB survived significantly longer than WT mice; the mean survival of SR-A−/− mice exceeded 430 days compared to 230 days for WT mice. Early granuloma formation was not impaired in SR-A−/− mice. The extended survival of SR-A−/− mice was associated with 13- and 3-fold higher number of CD4+ lymphocytes and antigen presenting cells in SR-A−/− lungs compared to WT mice 280 after infection. The histopathology of chronically infected SR-A−/− lungs, however, was marked by abundant cholesterol clefts in parenchymal lesions containing infection in multinucleated giant cells. The present study indicates SR-A as a candidate gene of the innate immune system influencing the chronic phase of M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:22088322

  5. Mycobacterium avium Subspecies paratuberculosis Infection Modifies Gut Microbiota under Different Dietary Conditions in a Rabbit Model

    PubMed Central

    Arrazuria, Rakel; Elguezabal, Natalia; Juste, Ramon A.; Derakhshani, Hooman; Khafipour, Ehsan

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) the causative agent of paratuberculosis, produces a chronic granulomatous inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract of ruminants. It has been recently suggested that MAP infection may be associated with dysbiosis of intestinal microbiota in ruminants. Since diet is one of the key factors affecting the balance of microbial populations in the digestive tract, we intended to evaluate the effect of MAP infection in a rabbit model fed a regular or high fiber diet during challenge. The composition of microbiota of the cecal content and the sacculus rotundus was studied in 20 New Zealand white female rabbits. The extracted DNA was subjected to paired-end Illumina sequencing of the V3-V4 hypervariable region of the 16S rRNA gene for microbiota analysis. Microbial richness (Chao1) in the cecal content was significantly increased by MAP infection in regular diet rabbits (p = 0.0043) and marginally increased (p = 0.0503) in the high fiber group. Analysis of beta-diversity showed that MAP infection produces deeper changes in the microbiota of sacculus rotundus than in the cecal content. A lower abundance of Proteobacteria in the cecal content of infected animals fed the high fiber diet and also lower abundance of Bacteroidetes in the sacculus rotundus of infected animals fed the regular diet were observed. Based on OPLS-DA analysis, we observed that some bacteria repeatedly appear to be positively associated with infection in different samples under different diets (families Dehalobacteriaceae, Coriobacteriaceae, and Mogibacteriaceae; genus Anaerofustis). The same phenomenon was observed with some of the bacteria negatively associated with MAP infection (genera Anaerostipes and Coprobacillus). However, other groups of bacteria (Enterobacteriaceae family and ML615J-28 order) were positively associated with infection in some circumstances and negatively associated with infection in others. Data demonstrate that MAP infection

  6. Genotype heterogeneity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis within geospatial hotspots suggests foci of imported infection in Sydney, Australia.

    PubMed

    Gurjav, Ulziijargal; Jelfs, Peter; Hill-Cawthorne, Grant A; Marais, Ben J; Sintchenko, Vitali

    2016-06-01

    In recent years the State of New South Wales (NSW), Australia, has maintained a low tuberculosis incidence rate with little evidence of local transmission. Nearly 90% of notified tuberculosis cases occurred in people born in tuberculosis-endemic countries. We analyzed geographic, epidemiological and genotypic data of all culture-confirmed tuberculosis cases to identify the bacterial and demographic determinants of tuberculosis hotspot areas in NSW. Standard 24-loci mycobacterium interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-24) typing was performed on all isolates recovered between 2009 and 2013. In total 1692/1841 (91.9%) cases with confirmed Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection had complete MIRU-24 and demographic data and were included in the study. Despite some year-to-year variability, spatio-temporal analysis identified four tuberculosis hotspots. The incidence rate and the relative risk of tuberculosis in these hotspots were 2- to 10-fold and 4- to 8-fold higher than the state average, respectively. MIRU-24 profiles of M. tuberculosis isolates associated with these hotspots revealed high levels of heterogeneity. This suggests that these spatio-temporal hotspots, within this low incidence setting, can represent areas of predominantly imported infection rather than clusters of cases due to local transmission. These findings provide important epidemiological insight and demonstrate the value of combining tuberculosis genotyping and spatiotemporal data to guide better-targeted public health interventions. PMID:26187743

  7. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Rv1265 promotes mycobacterial intracellular survival and alters cytokine profile of the infected macrophage.

    PubMed

    Luo, Hongping; Zeng, Jie; Huang, Qinqin; Liu, Minqiang; Abdalla, Abualgasim Elgaili; Xie, Longxiang; Wang, Huan; Xie, Jianping

    2016-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis cAMP and underlying regulatory network are crucial for its survival and thrive in the presence of numerous stresses mounted by the host. Our studies mainly focus on the cAMP-induced M. tuberculosis gene Rv1265, which was shown to be up-regulated under hypoxia and during macrophage infection by addition of exogenous cAMP. To explore the role of Rv1265 in host-pathogen interactions, Rv1265 was expressed in a non-pathogenic Mycobacterium smegmatis. We found that Rv1265 was associated with cell envelope and can up-regulate some cell wall fatty acid components, especially the C26:0. The survival of the recombinant Ms_Rv1265 was enhanced within macrophages and under stress conditions such as low pH and SDS. Macrophages infected with Ms_Rv1265 increased transcription of pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-12 P40 and anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 possibly through activation of NF-κB and ERK1/2 pathway. Our findings indicate that Rv1265 can enhance mycobacterial survival within macrophages, and perturb the cytokine profile of macrophage. PMID:26156642

  8. Atypical Presentation of C. Difficile Infection: Report of a Case with Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Towheed, Arooge; Tul Llah, Sibghat; Bin Abdulhak, Aref; Tilson-Mallett, Nancy R; Salkind, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) is a gram-positive, obligate, anaerobic spore-forming bacillus first reported by Hall and O'Toole in 1935. It occurs mostly after antibiotic use and invariably presents with watery diarrhea. We describe an atypical presentation of C. difficile in a 64-year-old Caucasian female who presented to the our emergency department with abdominal pain, nausea, and vomiting for one day. A complete blood count revealed leukocytosis 30 x 109/L and a subsequent computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen and the pelvis, showed fluid filled small bowel loops consistent with enteritis. Her presentation was unusual for lack of diarrhea, the hallmark of C. difficile infection. She was admitted and treated with oral vancomycin. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) value in the stool for C. difficile was positive. The patient responded very well: her abdominal pain resolved and leukocyte count normalized after a few doses of vancomycin (125 mg po qid). The patient's progress was followed in our clinic for the last three months. PMID:27190728

  9. Multisite Infection with Mycobacterium abscessus after Replacement of Breast Implants and Gluteal Lipofilling

    PubMed Central

    Rüegg, Eva; Cheretakis, Alexandre; Modarressi, Ali; Harbarth, Stephan; Pittet-Cuénod, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Medical tourism for aesthetic surgery is popular. Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) occasionally cause surgical-site infections. As NTM grow in biofilms, implantations of foreign bodies are at risk. Due to late manifestation, infections occur when patients are back home, where they must be managed properly. Case Report. A 39-year-old healthy female was referred for acute infection of the right gluteal area. Five months before, she had breast implants replacement, abdominal liposuction, and gluteal lipofilling in Mexico. Three months postoperatively, implants were removed for NTM-infection in Switzerland. Adequate antibiotic treatment was stopped after seven days for drug-related hepatitis. At entrance, gluteal puncture for bacterial analysis was performed. MRI showed large subcutaneous collection. Debridement under general anaesthesia was followed by open wound management. Total antibiotic treatment was 20 weeks. Methods. Bacterial analysis of periprosthetic and gluteal liquids included Gram-stain plus acid-fast stain, and aerobic, anaerobic and mycobacterial cultures.  Results. In periprosthetic fluid, Mycobacterium abscessus, Propionibacterium, and Staphylococcus epidermidis were identified. The same M. abscessus strain was found gluteally. The gluteal wound healed within six weeks. At ten months' follow-up, gluteal asymmetry persists for deep scarring. Conclusion. This case presents major complications of multisite aesthetic surgery. Surgical-site infections in context of medical tourism need appropriate bacteriological investigations, considering potential NTM-infections. PMID:25893122

  10. Characterization of Mouse Models of Mycobacterium avium Complex Infection and Evaluation of Drug Combinations

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Deepak V.; Tyagi, Sandeep; Converse, Paul J.; Ammerman, Nicole C.; Grosset, Jacques H.

    2015-01-01

    The Mycobacterium avium complex is the most common cause of nontuberculous mycobacterial lung disease worldwide; yet, an optimal treatment regimen for M. avium complex infection has not been established. Clarithromycin is accepted as the cornerstone drug for treatment of M. avium lung disease; however, good model systems, especially animal models, are needed to evaluate the most effective companion drugs. We performed a series of experiments to evaluate and use different mouse models (comparing BALB/c, C57BL/6, nude, and beige mice) of M. avium infection and to assess the anti-M. avium activity of single and combination drug regimens, in vitro, ex vivo, and in mice. In vitro, clarithromycin and moxifloxacin were most active against M. avium, and no antagonism was observed between these two drugs. Nude mice were more susceptible to M. avium infection than the other mouse strains tested, but the impact of treatment was most clearly seen in M. avium-infected BALB/c mice. The combination of clarithromycin-ethambutol-rifampin was more effective in all infected mice than moxifloxacin-ethambutol-rifampin; the addition of moxifloxacin to the clarithromycin-containing regimen did not increase treatment efficacy. Clarithromycin-containing regimens are the most effective for M. avium infection; substitution of moxifloxacin for clarithromycin had a negative impact on treatment efficacy. PMID:25624335

  11. The Role of Prostate Apoptosis Response-4 (Par-4) in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infected Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Han, Ji-Ye; Lim, Yun-Ji; Choi, Ji-Ae; Lee, Jung-Hwan; Jo, Sung-Hee; Oh, Sung-Man; Song, Chang-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Prostate apoptosis response-4 (Par-4) is a tumor suppressor protein that forms a complex with glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) to induce apoptosis. Previously, we reported that ER stress-induced apoptosis is a critical host defense mechanism against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). We sought to understand the role of Par-4 during ER stress-induced apoptosis in response to mycobacterial infection. Par-4 and GRP78 protein levels increased in response Mtb (strain: H37Ra) infection. Furthermore, Par-4 and GRP78 translocate to the surface of Mtb H37Ra-infected macrophages and induce apoptosis via caspase activation. NF-κB activation, Mtb-mediated ER stress, and Par-4 production were significantly diminished in macrophages with inhibited ROS production. To test Par-4 function during mycobacterial infection, we analyzed intracellular survival of Mtb H37Ra in macrophages with Par-4 overexpression or knockdown. Mtb H37Ra growth was significantly reduced in Par-4 overexpressing macrophages and increased in knockdown macrophages. We also observed increased Par-4, GRP78, and caspases activation in Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-infected prostate cancer cells. Our data demonstrate that Par-4 is associated with ER stress-induced apoptosis resulting in reduced intracellular survival of mycobacteria. BCG treatment increases Par-4-dependent caspase activation in prostate cancer cells. These results suggest ER stress-induced Par-4 acts as an important defense mechanism against mycobacterial infection and regulates cancer. PMID:27552917

  12. Heme Oxygenase-1 Regulates Inflammation and Mycobacterial Survival in Human Macrophages during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Scharn, Caitlyn R; Collins, Angela C; Nair, Vidhya R; Stamm, Chelsea E; Marciano, Denise K; Graviss, Edward A; Shiloh, Michael U

    2016-06-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, is responsible for 1.5 million deaths annually. We previously showed that M. tuberculosis infection in mice induces expression of the CO-producing enzyme heme oxygenase (HO1) and that CO is sensed by M. tuberculosis to initiate a dormancy program. Further, mice deficient in HO1 succumb to M. tuberculosis infection more readily than do wild-type mice. Although mouse macrophages control intracellular M. tuberculosis infection through several mechanisms, such as NO synthase, the respiratory burst, acidification, and autophagy, how human macrophages control M. tuberculosis infection remains less well understood. In this article, we show that M. tuberculosis induces and colocalizes with HO1 in both mouse and human tuberculosis lesions in vivo, and that M. tuberculosis induces and colocalizes with HO1 during primary human macrophage infection in vitro. Surprisingly, we find that chemical inhibition of HO1 both reduces inflammatory cytokine production by human macrophages and restricts intracellular growth of mycobacteria. Thus, induction of HO1 by M. tuberculosis infection may be a mycobacterial virulence mechanism to enhance inflammation and bacterial growth. PMID:27183573

  13. The Role of Prostate Apoptosis Response-4 (Par-4) in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infected Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ji-Ye; Lim, Yun-Ji; Choi, Ji-Ae; Lee, Jung-hwan; Jo, Sung-Hee; Oh, Sung-Man; Song, Chang-Hwa

    2016-01-01

    Prostate apoptosis response-4 (Par-4) is a tumor suppressor protein that forms a complex with glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) to induce apoptosis. Previously, we reported that ER stress-induced apoptosis is a critical host defense mechanism against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). We sought to understand the role of Par-4 during ER stress-induced apoptosis in response to mycobacterial infection. Par-4 and GRP78 protein levels increased in response Mtb (strain: H37Ra) infection. Furthermore, Par-4 and GRP78 translocate to the surface of Mtb H37Ra-infected macrophages and induce apoptosis via caspase activation. NF-κB activation, Mtb-mediated ER stress, and Par-4 production were significantly diminished in macrophages with inhibited ROS production. To test Par-4 function during mycobacterial infection, we analyzed intracellular survival of Mtb H37Ra in macrophages with Par-4 overexpression or knockdown. Mtb H37Ra growth was significantly reduced in Par-4 overexpressing macrophages and increased in knockdown macrophages. We also observed increased Par-4, GRP78, and caspases activation in Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-infected prostate cancer cells. Our data demonstrate that Par-4 is associated with ER stress-induced apoptosis resulting in reduced intracellular survival of mycobacteria. BCG treatment increases Par-4-dependent caspase activation in prostate cancer cells. These results suggest ER stress-induced Par-4 acts as an important defense mechanism against mycobacterial infection and regulates cancer. PMID:27552917

  14. Impact of the shedding level on transmission of persistent infections in Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP).

    PubMed

    Slater, Noa; Mitchell, Rebecca Mans; Whitlock, Robert H; Fyock, Terry; Pradhan, Abani Kumar; Knupfer, Elena; Schukken, Ynte Hein; Louzoun, Yoram

    2016-01-01

    Super-shedders are infectious individuals that contribute a disproportionate amount of infectious pathogen load to the environment. A super-shedder host may produce up to 10,000 times more pathogens than other infectious hosts. Super-shedders have been reported for multiple human and animal diseases. If their contribution to infection dynamics was linear to the pathogen load, they would dominate infection dynamics. We here focus on quantifying the effect of super-shedders on the spread of infection in natural environments to test if such an effect actually occurs in Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP). We study a case where the infection dynamics and the bacterial load shed by each host at every point in time are known. Using a maximum likelihood approach, we estimate the parameters of a model with multiple transmission routes, including direct contact, indirect contact and a background infection risk. We use longitudinal data from persistent infections (MAP), where infectious individuals have a wide distribution of infectious loads, ranging upward of three orders of magnitude. We show based on these parameters that the effect of super-shedders for MAP is limited and that the effect of the individual bacterial load is limited and the relationship between bacterial load and the infectiousness is highly concave. A 1000-fold increase in the bacterial contribution is equivalent to up to a 2-3 fold increase in infectiousness. PMID:26925966

  15. Phage Therapy Is Effective against Infection by Mycobacterium ulcerans in a Murine Footpad Model

    PubMed Central

    Trigo, Gabriela; Martins, Teresa G.; Fraga, Alexandra G.; Longatto-Filho, Adhemar; Castro, António G.; Azeredo, Joana; Pedrosa, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Background Buruli Ulcer (BU) is a neglected, necrotizing skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans. Currently, there is no vaccine against M. ulcerans infection. Although the World Health Organization recommends a combination of rifampicin and streptomycin for the treatment of BU, clinical management of advanced stages is still based on the surgical resection of infected skin. The use of bacteriophages for the control of bacterial infections has been considered as an alternative or to be used in association with antibiotherapy. Additionally, the mycobacteriophage D29 has previously been shown to display lytic activity against M. ulcerans isolates. Methodology/Principal findings We used the mouse footpad model of M. ulcerans infection to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy of treatment with mycobacteriophage D29. Analyses of macroscopic lesions, bacterial burdens, histology and cytokine production were performed in both M. ulcerans-infected footpads and draining lymph nodes (DLN). We have demonstrated that a single subcutaneous injection of the mycobacteriophage D29, administered 33 days after bacterial challenge, was sufficient to decrease pathology and to prevent ulceration. This protection resulted in a significant reduction of M. ulcerans numbers accompanied by an increase of cytokine levels (including IFN-γ), both in footpads and DLN. Additionally, mycobacteriophage D29 treatment induced a cellular infiltrate of a lymphocytic/macrophagic profile. Conclusions/Significance Our observations demonstrate the potential of phage therapy against M. ulcerans infection, paving the way for future studies aiming at the development of novel phage-related therapeutic approaches against BU. PMID:23638204

  16. No association between Helicobacter pylori and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections among gastrointestinal clinic attendees in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Torres, M A; Passaro, D J; Watanabe, J; Parsonnet, J; Small, P; Miyagu, J; Rodriquez, C; Astete, M; Gilman, R H

    2003-02-01

    Helicobacter pylori (HP) infection can cause hypochlorhydria, a positive risk factor for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infection. This study examined the association between HP and MTB infections among persons attending the Policlinico Peruano Japonés Gastrointestinal Clinic in Lima, Peru. From 23 June 2000 to 18 August 2000, consenting 18-55 year olds who attended the clinic for gastric biopsy gave blood for HP serologic testing, underwent tuberculin skin testing (TST) and completed a social and medical history. Of 128 participating patients, 78 (61%) were TST positive for MTB, and 107 (84%) were infected with HP by serology. Of the patients who were HP positive, 67 (63%) developed positive TST reactions compared to 11 (52%) of 21 HP-seronegative subjects (OR 1.29; 95% CI 0.54-3.11; P = 0.6). There was no association after adjusting for covariates of H. pylori infection (OR 0.78; 95% CI 0.23-2.71; P = 0.7). However, study power was limited by high prevalence of the two infections. PMID:12613749

  17. Catheter-related Mycobacterium fortuitum bloodstream infection: rapid identification using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Artacho-Reinoso, M J; Olbrich, P; Solano-Paéz, P; Ybot-Gonzalez, P; Lepe, J A; Neth, O; Aznar, J

    2014-04-01

    We present the case of a 6-year-old boy diagnosed with stage III mediastinal Non Hodgkin Lymphoblastic T cell Lymphoma who suffered from catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBI) due to Mycobacterium fortuitum whilst receiving chemotherapy. Isolation of this rare pathogen was done directly from blood culture and identification was made rapidly within 48 h using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectro-metry as well as specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-reverse hybridization method. This allowed prompt directed antibiotic therapy apart from central venous catheter removal and resulted in an excellent clinical response. This case highlights the potential benefit of using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, a fast, cost-effective and precise methodology, in the diagnosis and subsequent management of invasive bacterial infection. PMID:24554588

  18. Characteristics and specificity of acquired immunologic memory to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    SciTech Connect

    Orme, I.M.

    1988-05-15

    The results herein show that mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and then exposed to a protracted course of isoniazid chemotherapy possess a heightened state of acquired resistance to subsequent challenge with the homologous organism. Our results provide the first evidence, moreover, that this resistance is mediated by a long-lived, cyclophosphamide- and irradiation-resistant L3T4+ Lyt-2- lymphocyte capable of giving rise to an accelerated re-emergence of resistance in the animal upon rechallenge. Evidence is also provided to show that triggering of this memory-immune T cell population in the re-challenged host was associated with the rapid emergence of non-specific resistance to secondary bacterial infection; however, the accelerated emergence of this population was only observed if the challenge inoculum consisted of the living organism. The relevance of this latter finding to strategies for vaccine development is discussed.

  19. [Mycobacterium marinum. A rare cause of infection of the skin and joints].

    PubMed

    Byg, K E; Milman, N; Clausen, P P; Radulescu, B

    1997-09-01

    Mycobacterium marinum is a rare cause of disseminated infection in man. The case report describes an 80-year-old woman, who had been treated with oral corticosteroids for bronchial asthma for 40 years, and in the same period had been swimming daily in swimming pools. At the first admission, the symptoms and clinical findings were interpreted as seronegative rheumatoid arthritis. After eight years of disease with recurrent infections of the skin, periarticular tissues and joints in the hands and one elbow, a biopsy specimen from an abscess showed granulomatous inflammation and acid fast bacilli. Culture for mycobacteria grew M. marinum. There was a severe, destructive monoarthritis in the right second metacarpophalangeal joint. The patient recovered completely on treatment with clarithromycin and doxycycline. PMID:9304271

  20. Comparative Proteomics Identifies Host Immune System Proteins Affected by Infection with Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    López, Vladimir; Villar, Margarita; Queirós, João; Vicente, Joaquín; Mateos-Hernández, Lourdes; Díez-Delgado, Iratxe; Contreras, Marinela; Alves, Paulo C; Alberdi, Pilar; Gortázar, Christian; de la Fuente, José

    2016-03-01

    Mycobacteria of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) greatly impact human and animal health worldwide. The mycobacterial life cycle is complex, and the mechanisms resulting in pathogen infection and survival in host cells are not fully understood. Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa) are natural reservoir hosts for MTBC and a model for mycobacterial infection and tuberculosis (TB). In the wild boar TB model, mycobacterial infection affects the expression of innate and adaptive immune response genes in mandibular lymph nodes and oropharyngeal tonsils, and biomarkers have been proposed as correlates with resistance to natural infection. However, the mechanisms used by mycobacteria to manipulate host immune response are not fully characterized. Our hypothesis is that the immune system proteins under-represented in infected animals, when compared to uninfected controls, are used by mycobacteria to guarantee pathogen infection and transmission. To address this hypothesis, a comparative proteomics approach was used to compare host response between uninfected (TB-) and M. bovis-infected young (TB+) and adult animals with different infection status [TB lesions localized in the head (TB+) or affecting multiple organs (TB++)]. The results identified host immune system proteins that play an important role in host response to mycobacteria. Calcium binding protein A9, Heme peroxidase, Lactotransferrin, Cathelicidin and Peptidoglycan-recognition protein were under-represented in TB+ animals when compared to uninfected TB- controls, but protein levels were higher as infection progressed in TB++ animals when compared to TB- and/or TB+ adult wild boar. MHCI was the only protein over-represented in TB+ adult wild boar when compared to uninfected TB- controls. The results reported here suggest that M. bovis manipulates host immune response by reducing the production of immune system proteins. However, as infection progresses, wild boar immune response recovers to limit pathogen

  1. Comparative Proteomics Identifies Host Immune System Proteins Affected by Infection with Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    López, Vladimir; Villar, Margarita; Queirós, João; Vicente, Joaquín; Mateos-Hernández, Lourdes; Díez-Delgado, Iratxe; Contreras, Marinela; Alves, Paulo C.; Alberdi, Pilar; Gortázar, Christian; de la Fuente, José

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacteria of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) greatly impact human and animal health worldwide. The mycobacterial life cycle is complex, and the mechanisms resulting in pathogen infection and survival in host cells are not fully understood. Eurasian wild boar (Sus scrofa) are natural reservoir hosts for MTBC and a model for mycobacterial infection and tuberculosis (TB). In the wild boar TB model, mycobacterial infection affects the expression of innate and adaptive immune response genes in mandibular lymph nodes and oropharyngeal tonsils, and biomarkers have been proposed as correlates with resistance to natural infection. However, the mechanisms used by mycobacteria to manipulate host immune response are not fully characterized. Our hypothesis is that the immune system proteins under-represented in infected animals, when compared to uninfected controls, are used by mycobacteria to guarantee pathogen infection and transmission. To address this hypothesis, a comparative proteomics approach was used to compare host response between uninfected (TB-) and M. bovis-infected young (TB+) and adult animals with different infection status [TB lesions localized in the head (TB+) or affecting multiple organs (TB++)]. The results identified host immune system proteins that play an important role in host response to mycobacteria. Calcium binding protein A9, Heme peroxidase, Lactotransferrin, Cathelicidin and Peptidoglycan-recognition protein were under-represented in TB+ animals when compared to uninfected TB- controls, but protein levels were higher as infection progressed in TB++ animals when compared to TB- and/or TB+ adult wild boar. MHCI was the only protein over-represented in TB+ adult wild boar when compared to uninfected TB- controls. The results reported here suggest that M. bovis manipulates host immune response by reducing the production of immune system proteins. However, as infection progresses, wild boar immune response recovers to limit pathogen

  2. Constitutive expression of SMAR1 confers susceptibility to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in a transgenic mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Bhawna; Malonia, Sunil K.; Majumdar, Subeer S.; Gupta, Pushpa; Wadhwa, Neerja; Badhwar, Archana; Gupta, Umesh D.; Katoch, Vishwa M.; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Studies involving animal models of experimental tuberculosis have elucidated the predominant role of cytokines secreted by T cells and macrophages to be an essential component of the immune response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. The immune activities of CD4+ T cells are mediated in part by Th1 cytokine interferon gamma (IFN-γ) which is produced primarily by T cells and natural killer (NK) cells and critical for initiating the immune response against intracellular pathogen such as M. tuberculosis. Nuclear matrix protein SMAR1 plays an important role in V(D)J recombination, T helper cell differentiation and inflammatory diseases. In this study a transgenic mouse model was used to study the role of SMAR1 in M. tuberculosis infection. Methods: Wild type BALB/c, C57BL/6, BALB/c-EGFP-SMAR1 and C57BL/6-SMAR1 transgenic mice were infected with M. tuberculosis (H37Rv). A dose of 100 bacilli was used for infection via respiratory route. Bacterial load in lung and spleen of infected mice was determined at 2, 4, 6 and 8 wk post-infection. Gene expression analysis for Th1 cytokines and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) was performed in infected lung tissues by quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR. Results: SMAR1 transgenic mice from both BALB/c and C57BL/6 genetic background displayed higher bacillary load and susceptibility to M. tuberculosis infection compared to wild type mice. This susceptibility was attributed due to compromised of Th1 response exhibited by transgenic mice. Interpretation & conclusions: SMAR1 transgenic mice exhibited susceptibility to M. tuberculosis infection in vivo irrespective of genetic background. This susceptibility was attributed to downregulation of Th1 response and its hallmark cytokine IFN-γ. Hence, SMAR1 plays an important role in modulating host immune response after M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:26831422

  3. Animal-side Serologic Assay for Rapid Detection of Mycobacterium bovis Infection in Multiple Species of Free-ranging Wildlife

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous species of wild mammals are susceptible to Mycobacterium bovis, a cause of bovine tuberculosis (TB). Eurasian badgers, white-tailed deer, brushtail possums, and wild boar are implicated in the maintenance of wildlife reservoirs of M. bovis infection in different countries, fueling bovine TB...

  4. Gamma-delta T cell responses in subclinical and clinical stages of Bovine Mycobacterium Avium Paratuberculosis infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The early immune response to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in cattle is characterized by a Th1-like immune response effective in controlling bacterial proliferation during the subclinical stage of infection. In young calves nearly 60% of circulating lymphocytes are gamma delta T ...

  5. Divergent cellular responses during asymptomatic subclinical and clinical states of disease in cows naturally infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection of the host with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) results in a chronic and progressive enteritis that traverses both subclinical and clinical stages. The mechanism(s) for the shift from asymptomatic subclinical disease state to advanced clinical disease are not fully under...

  6. Longitudinal data collection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies Paratuberculosis infections in dairy herds. Collection and use of observational data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Longitudinal infection data on Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) was collected on three dairy farms in Northeastern United States during approximately 10 years. Precise data on animal characteristics and animal location within farm were collected on these farms. Cows were followe...

  7. Prevention of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection in BALB/c Mice by Feeding Lactobacillus acidophilus Strain NP-51

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The immune responses of 390 BALB/c mice fed the probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus strain NP51® and infected with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) were evaluated in a 6-month trial. Mice were randomized to nine treatment groups fed either viable- or heat-killed NP51 and inocula...

  8. Mycobacterium abscessus pulmonary infection complicated with vertebral osteomyelitis in a heart transplant recipient: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Silva, J T; López-Medrano, F; Fernández-Ruiz, M; San-Juan, R; Ruiz-Cano, M J; Delgado, J F; Aguado, J M

    2015-06-01

    Infections produced by Mycobacterium abscessus are emerging in immunosuppressed patients, such as solid organ transplant recipients. We report the first case, to our knowledge, of a vertebral osteomyelitis caused by M. abscessus in a heart transplant recipient, and review the risk factors, manifestations, and therapeutic approaches to this uncommon disease. PMID:25816889

  9. Use of the Intradermal Tuberculin Test in a Herd of Captive Elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) Naturally Infected with Mycobacterium bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tuberculosis of captive Cervidae, caused by Mycobacterium bovis, attracted attention in 1991 in the United States when investigations, prompted by the identification of a tuberculous elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) in Canada, revealed infected captive elk herds in 8 different states. Based on methods u...

  10. Bacterial Membrane Vesicles Mediate the Release of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Lipoglycans and Lipoproteins from Infected Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Athman, Jaffre J; Wang, Ying; McDonald, David J; Boom, W Henry; Harding, Clifford V; Wearsch, Pamela A

    2015-08-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an intracellular pathogen that infects lung macrophages and releases microbial factors that regulate host defense. M. tuberculosis lipoproteins and lipoglycans block phagosome maturation, inhibit class II MHC Ag presentation, and modulate TLR2-dependent cytokine production, but the mechanisms for their release during infection are poorly defined. Furthermore, these molecules are thought to be incorporated into host membranes and released from infected macrophages within exosomes, 40-150-nm extracellular vesicles that derive from multivesicular endosomes. However, our studies revealed that extracellular vesicles released from infected macrophages include two distinct, largely nonoverlapping populations: one containing host cell markers of exosomes (CD9, CD63) and the other containing M. tuberculosis molecules (lipoglycans, lipoproteins). These vesicle populations are similar in size but have distinct densities, as determined by separation on sucrose gradients. Release of lipoglycans and lipoproteins from infected macrophages was dependent on bacterial viability, implicating active bacterial mechanisms in their secretion. Consistent with recent reports of extracellular vesicle production by bacteria (including M. tuberculosis), we propose that bacterial membrane vesicles are secreted by M. tuberculosis within infected macrophages and subsequently are released into the extracellular environment. Furthermore, extracellular vesicles released from M. tuberculosis-infected cells activate TLR2 and induce cytokine responses by uninfected macrophages. We demonstrate that these activities derive from the bacterial membrane vesicles rather than exosomes. Our findings suggest that bacterial membrane vesicles are the primary means by which M. tuberculosis exports lipoglycans and lipoproteins to impair effector functions of infected macrophages and circulate bacterial components beyond the site of infection to regulate immune responses by uninfected

  11. Recognition of Stage-Specific Mycobacterial Antigens Differentiates between Acute and Latent Infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Demissie, Abebech; Leyten, Eliane M. S.; Abebe, Markos; Wassie, Liya; Aseffa, Abraham; Abate, Getahun; Fletcher, Helen; Owiafe, Patrick; Hill, Philip C.; Brookes, Roger; Rook, Graham; Zumla, Alimuddin; Arend, Sandra M.; Klein, Michel; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.; Andersen, Peter; Doherty, T. Mark

    2006-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is estimated to infect 80 to 100 million people annually, the majority of whom do not develop clinical tuberculosis (TB) but instead maintain the infection in a latent state. These individuals generally become positive in response to a tuberculin skin test and may develop clinical TB at a later date, particularly if their immune systems are compromised. Latently infected individuals are interesting for two reasons. First, they are an important reservoir of M. tuberculosis, which needs to be considered for TB control. Second, if detected prior to recrudescence of the disease, they represent a human population that is making a protective immune response to M. tuberculosis, which is very important for defining correlates of protective immunity. In this study, we show that while responsiveness to early secretory antigenic target 6 is a good marker for M. tuberculosis infection, a strong response to the 16-kDa Rv2031c antigen (HspX or α-crystallin) is largely restricted to latently infected individuals, offering the possibility of differential immunodiagnosis of, or therapeutic vaccination against, TB. PMID:16467323

  12. Trans-species communication in the Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected macrophage

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Shumin; Russell, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Much of the infection cycle of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is spent within its host cell, the macrophage. As a consequence of the chronic, enduring nature of the infection, this cell/cell interaction has become highly intimate, and the bacterium has evolved to detect, react to, and manipulate the evolving, immune-modulated phenotype of its host. In this review, we discuss the nature of the endosomal/lysosomal continuum, the characterization of the bacterium’s transcriptional responses during the infection cycle, and the dominant environmental cues that shape this response. We also discuss how the metabolism of both cells is modulated by the infection and the impact that this has on the progression of the granuloma. Finally, we detail how these transcriptional responses can be exploited to construct reporter bacterial strains to probe the temporal and spatial environmental shifts experienced by Mtb during the course of experimental infections. These reporter strains provide new insights into the fitness of Mtb under immune- and drug-mediated pressure. PMID:25703563

  13. Innate myeloid cell TNFR1 mediates first line defence against primary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed Central

    Segueni, Noria; Benmerzoug, Sulayman; Rose, Stéphanie; Gauthier, Amandine; Bourigault, Marie-Laure; Reverchon, Flora; Philippeau, Amandine; Erard, François; Le Bert, Marc; Bouscayrol, Hélène; Wachter, Thierry; Garcia, Irène; Kollias, George; Jacobs, Muazzam; Ryffel, Bernhard; Quesniaux, Valerie F.J.

    2016-01-01

    TNF is crucial for controlling Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and understanding how will help immunomodulating the host response. Here we assessed the contribution of TNFR1 pathway from innate myeloid versus T cells. We first established the prominent role of TNFR1 in haematopoietic cells for controlling M. tuberculosis in TNFR1 KO chimera mice. Further, absence of TNFR1 specifically on myeloid cells (M-TNFR1 KO) recapitulated the uncontrolled M. tuberculosis infection seen in fully TNFR1 deficient mice, with increased bacterial burden, exacerbated lung inflammation, and rapid death. Pulmonary IL-12p40 over-expression was attributed to a prominent CD11b+ Gr1high cell population in infected M-TNFR1 KO mice. By contrast, absence of TNFR1 on T-cells did not compromise the control of M. tuberculosis infection over 6-months. Thus, the protective TNF/TNFR1 pathway essential for controlling primary M. tuberculosis infection depends on innate macrophage and neutrophil myeloid cells, while TNFR1 pathway in T cells is dispensable. PMID:26931771

  14. Innate myeloid cell TNFR1 mediates first line defence against primary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Segueni, Noria; Benmerzoug, Sulayman; Rose, Stéphanie; Gauthier, Amandine; Bourigault, Marie-Laure; Reverchon, Flora; Philippeau, Amandine; Erard, François; Le Bert, Marc; Bouscayrol, Hélène; Wachter, Thierry; Garcia, Irène; Kollias, George; Jacobs, Muazzam; Ryffel, Bernhard; Quesniaux, Valerie F J

    2016-01-01

    TNF is crucial for controlling Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and understanding how will help immunomodulating the host response. Here we assessed the contribution of TNFR1 pathway from innate myeloid versus T cells. We first established the prominent role of TNFR1 in haematopoietic cells for controlling M. tuberculosis in TNFR1 KO chimera mice. Further, absence of TNFR1 specifically on myeloid cells (M-TNFR1 KO) recapitulated the uncontrolled M. tuberculosis infection seen in fully TNFR1 deficient mice, with increased bacterial burden, exacerbated lung inflammation, and rapid death. Pulmonary IL-12p40 over-expression was attributed to a prominent CD11b(+) Gr1(high) cell population in infected M-TNFR1 KO mice. By contrast, absence of TNFR1 on T-cells did not compromise the control of M. tuberculosis infection over 6-months. Thus, the protective TNF/TNFR1 pathway essential for controlling primary M. tuberculosis infection depends on innate macrophage and neutrophil myeloid cells, while TNFR1 pathway in T cells is dispensable. PMID:26931771

  15. Seroprevalence and risk factors of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infection in domestic sika deer in China.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qing-Feng; Li, Ying; Yang, Fan; Yao, Gui-Zhi; Qian, Ai-Dong; Wang, Wei-Li; Cong, Wei

    2015-06-01

    Paratuberculosis or Johne's disease (JD), caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), is a chronic infectious granulomatous enteritis of ruminants and other animals, which has a worldwide occurrence, but little is known of MAP infection in domestic sika deer in Jilin Province, China. The objective of the present investigation was to examine seroprevalence and risk factors of MAP infection in Jilin Province. Serum samples collected from 1400 sika deer from 16 sika deer herds were collected in the 4 districts of the province between May 2013 and August 2014 and were tested independently for the presence of antibodies against MAP. A total of 247 (17.64 %) sika deer tested positive for MAP antibodies using a commercially available enzyme immunoassay kit. The management level of farm and collecting region of sika deer was the main risk factor associated with MAP infection. The present study revealed the seroprevalence of MAP infection in sika deer in Jilin Province, China, which provided the baseline data for taking comprehensive countermeasures and measures in effectively preventing and controlling MAP infection in sika deer. PMID:25904509

  16. Mycobacterium avium genotype is associated with the therapeutic response to lung infection.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, T; Kobashi, Y; Hirano, T; Tode, N; Santoso, A; Tamada, T; Fujimura, S; Mitsuhashi, Y; Honda, Y; Nukiwa, T; Kaku, M; Watanabe, A; Ichinose, M

    2014-03-01

    Factors that can interfere with the successful treatment of Mycobacterium avium lung infection have been inadequately studied. To identify a potent predictor of therapeutic responses of M. avium lung infection, we analyzed variable number tandem repeats (VNTR) at 16 minisatellite loci of M. avium clinical isolates. Associations between the VNTR profiling data and a therapeutic response were evaluated in 59 subjects with M. avium lung infection. M. avium lung infection of 30 subjects in whom clarithromycin-containing regimens produced microbiological and radiographic improvement was defined as responsive disease, while that of the remaining 29 subjects was defined as refractory disease. In phylogenetic analysis using the genotypic distance aggregated from 16-dimensional VNTR data, 59 M. avium isolates were divided into three clusters, which showed a nearly significant association with therapeutic responses (p 0.06). We then subjected the raw 16-dimensional VNTR data directly to principal component analysis, and identified the genetic features that were significantly associated with the therapeutic response (p <0.05). By further analysis of logistic regression with a stepwise variable-selection, we constructed the highest likelihood multivariate model, adjusted for age, to predict a therapeutic response, using VNTR data from only four minisatellite loci. In conclusion, we identified four mycobacterial minisatellite loci that together were associated with the therapeutic response of M. avium lung infections. PMID:23829301

  17. [Mycobacterium infection in prehistoric humans: co-evolution in remote ages].

    PubMed

    Sabbatani, Sandro; Fiorini, Sirio

    2015-03-01

    The introduction of agriculture and animal husbandry at the end of the Mesolithic era, despite enabling a significant demographic growth through an increase in food storage and availability, caused new infectious noxae to enter the pathocoenosis. However in the Palaeolithic era, hunter-gatherers were already in contact with infectious diseases of animal origin, albeit episodically. Modern biomedical technologies allow us to estimate, with better approximation, how long mankind has been in contact with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Archaeological finds, including human and animal remains (especially the aurochs), are particularly studied by palaeopathologists, as mycobacteria frequently cause bone involvement and this characteristic is of particular interest for palaeopathological (even macroscopic) studies; the interest is to detect the ancient DNA of MT, which is the cause of bone tuberculosis in skeletal remains as well as in mummies. According to our present knowledge, palaeopathological findings, confirmed by molecular techniques, suggest that tuberculosis in human skeletons goes back at most to 9000 years ago, while, in a veterinary environment, the most ancient DNA of MTBC to be detected in an American bison dates back about 17,000 years. The possibility of discovering archaeological finds making even more ancient human remains available leaves opens up the possibility of dating back to previous eras the transmission of MTBC infection to mankind. Phylogenetic works examining the available materials (DNAa) suggest that Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the cause of tuberculosis infection in humans and cattle (Aurochs), would have had a co-evolutionary process. On the basis of recent phylogenetic studies, the MTBC genome would have had a wide span of time to reach a suitable adjustment, co-evolving in geographical environments both at high and low host density. It is likely that the strains that did not show this strong "flexibility" underwent extinction, in favour of

  18. Profiling Bovine Antibody Responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection by Using Protein Arrays▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Bannantine, John P.; Paustian, Michael L.; Waters, W. Ray; Stabel, Judith R.; Palmer, Mitchell V.; Li, Lingling; Kapur, Vivek

    2008-01-01

    With the genome sequence of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis determined, technologies are now being developed for construction of protein arrays to detect the presence of antibodies against M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in host serum. The power of this approach is that it enables a direct comparison of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis proteins to each other in relation to their immunostimulatory capabilities. In this study, 93 recombinant proteins, produced in Escherichia coli, were arrayed and spotted onto nitrocellulose. These proteins include unknown hypothetical proteins and cell surface proteins as well as proteins encoded by large sequence polymorphisms present uniquely in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Also included were previously reported or known M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens to serve as a frame of reference. Sera from healthy control cattle (n = 3) and cattle infected with either M. avium subsp. avium and Mycobacterium bovis were exposed to the array to identify nonspecific or cross-reactive epitopes. These data demonstrated a degree of cross-reactivity with the M. avium subsp. avium proteins that was higher than the degree of cross-reactivity with the more distantly related M. bovis proteins. Finally, sera from naturally infected cattle (n = 3) as well as cattle experimentally infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis (n = 3) were used to probe the array to identify antigens in the context of Johne's disease. Three membrane proteins were the most strongly detected in all serum samples, and they included an invasion protein, an ABC peptide transport permease, and a putative GTPase protein. This powerful combination of genomic information, molecular tools, and immunological assays has enabled the identification of previously unknown antigens of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. PMID:18039835

  19. Effects of B Cell Depletion on Early Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Cynomolgus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Phuah, Jiayao; Wong, Eileen A; Gideon, Hannah P; Maiello, Pauline; Coleman, M Teresa; Hendricks, Matthew R; Ruden, Rachel; Cirrincione, Lauren R; Chan, John; Lin, Philana Ling; Flynn, JoAnne L

    2016-05-01

    Although recent studies in mice have shown that components of B cell and humoral immunity can modulate the immune responses against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the roles of these components in human and nonhuman primate infections are unknown. The cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) model of M. tuberculosis infection closely mirrors the infection outcomes and pathology in human tuberculosis (TB). The present study used rituximab, an anti-CD20 antibody, to deplete B cells in M. tuberculosis-infected macaques to examine the contribution of B cells and humoral immunity to the control of TB in nonhuman primates during the acute phase of infection. While there was no difference in the overall pathology, disease profession, and clinical outcome between the rituximab-treated and untreated macaques in acute infection, analyzing individual granulomas revealed that B cell depletion resulted in altered local T cell and cytokine responses, increased bacterial burden, and lower levels of inflammation. There were elevated frequencies of T cells producing interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-10, and IL-17 and decreased IL-6 and IL-10 levels within granulomas from B cell-depleted animals. The effects of B cell depletion varied among granulomas in an individual animal, as well as among animals, underscoring the previously reported heterogeneity of local immunologic characteristics of tuberculous granulomas in nonhuman primates. Taken together, our data clearly showed that B cells can modulate the local granulomatous response in M. tuberculosis-infected macaques during acute infection. The impact of these alterations on disease progression and outcome in the chronic phase remains to be determined. PMID:26883591

  20. Age- and Sex-Specific Social Contact Patterns and Incidence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dodd, Peter J.; Looker, Clare; Plumb, Ian D.; Bond, Virginia; Schaap, Ab; Shanaube, Kwame; Muyoyeta, Monde; Vynnycky, Emilia; Godfrey-Faussett, Peter; Corbett, Elizabeth L.; Beyers, Nulda; Ayles, Helen; White, Richard G.

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to model the incidence of infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis among adults using data on infection incidence in children, disease prevalence in adults, and social contact patterns. We conducted a cross-sectional face-to-face survey of adults in 2011, enumerating “close” (shared conversation) and “casual” (shared indoor space) social contacts in 16 Zambian communities and 8 South African communities. We modeled the incidence of M. tuberculosis infection in all age groups using these contact patterns, as well as the observed incidence of M. tuberculosis infection in children and the prevalence of tuberculosis disease in adults. A total of 3,528 adults participated in the study. The reported rates of close and casual contact were 4.9 per adult per day (95% confidence interval: 4.6, 5.2) and 10.4 per adult per day (95% confidence interval: 9.3, 11.6), respectively. Rates of close contact were higher for adults in larger households and rural areas. There was preferential mixing of close contacts within age groups and within sexes. The estimated incidence of M. tuberculosis infection in adults was 1.5–6 times higher (2.5%–10% per year) than that in children. More than 50% of infections in men, women, and children were estimated to be due to contact with adult men. We conclude that estimates of infection incidence based on surveys in children might underestimate incidence in adults. Most infections may be due to contact with adult men. Treatment and control of tuberculosis in men is critical to protecting men, women, and children from tuberculosis. PMID:26646292

  1. Age- and Sex-Specific Social Contact Patterns and Incidence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Peter J; Looker, Clare; Plumb, Ian D; Bond, Virginia; Schaap, Ab; Shanaube, Kwame; Muyoyeta, Monde; Vynnycky, Emilia; Godfrey-Faussett, Peter; Corbett, Elizabeth L; Beyers, Nulda; Ayles, Helen; White, Richard G

    2016-01-15

    We aimed to model the incidence of infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis among adults using data on infection incidence in children, disease prevalence in adults, and social contact patterns. We conducted a cross-sectional face-to-face survey of adults in 2011, enumerating "close" (shared conversation) and "casual" (shared indoor space) social contacts in 16 Zambian communities and 8 South African communities. We modeled the incidence of M. tuberculosis infection in all age groups using these contact patterns, as well as the observed incidence of M. tuberculosis infection in children and the prevalence of tuberculosis disease in adults. A total of 3,528 adults participated in the study. The reported rates of close and casual contact were 4.9 per adult per day (95% confidence interval: 4.6, 5.2) and 10.4 per adult per day (95% confidence interval: 9.3, 11.6), respectively. Rates of close contact were higher for adults in larger households and rural areas. There was preferential mixing of close contacts within age groups and within sexes. The estimated incidence of M. tuberculosis infection in adults was 1.5-6 times higher (2.5%-10% per year) than that in children. More than 50% of infections in men, women, and children were estimated to be due to contact with adult men. We conclude that estimates of infection incidence based on surveys in children might underestimate incidence in adults. Most infections may be due to contact with adult men. Treatment and control of tuberculosis in men is critical to protecting men, women, and children from tuberculosis. PMID:26646292

  2. Early Immune Markers Associated with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection in a Neonatal Calf Model ▿

    PubMed Central

    Stabel, J. R.; Robbe-Austerman, S.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to observe early markers of cell-mediated immunity in naïve calves infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis and how expression of these markers evolved over the 12-month period of infection. Groups for experimental infection included control (noninfected), oral (infected orally with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strain K-10), oral/DXM (pretreatment with dexamethasone before oral inoculation), intraperitoneal (i.p.) inoculation, and oral/M (oral inoculation with mucosal scrapings from a cow with clinical disease) groups. One of the earliest markers to emerge was antigen-specific gamma interferon (IFN-γ). Only i.p. inoculated calves had detectable antigen-specific IFN-γ responses at 7 days, with responses of the other infection groups becoming detectable at 90 and 120 days. All infection groups maintained robust IFN-γ responses for the remainder of the study. At 1 month, calves in the oral and oral/M groups had higher antigen-stimulated interleukin-10 (IL-10) levels than calves in the other treatment groups, but IL-10 secretion declined by 12 months for all calves. T-cell activation markers such as CD25, CD26, CD45RO, and CD5 were significantly upregulated in infected calves compared to noninfected controls. Oral inoculation of calves resulted in significantly increased antigen-specific lymphocyte proliferation at 9 and 12 months, as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) secretion at 6 and 12 months. These results demonstrate that infection of naïve calves with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis invoked early immunologic responses characterized by robust antigen-specific IFN-γ responses and induction of CD25 and CD45RO expression on T-cell subsets. These were followed by antigen-specific lymphocyte proliferation, iNOS secretion, and expression of CD26 and CD5bright markers in the latter part of the 12-month study. PMID:21228140

  3. Specific recognition of mycobacterial protein and peptide antigens by gamma-delta T cell subsets following infection with virulent Mycobacterium bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Promoting effective immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex pathogens is a challenge that is of interest to the fields of human and veterinary medicine alike. We report that gamma delta T cells from virulent Mycobacterium bovis-infected cattle respond specifically and directly to complex, pro...

  4. THE ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX (MAC) RECOVERED FROM LOS ANGELES POTABLE WATER, A POSSIBLE SOURCE OF INFECTION IN AIDS PATIENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Los Angeles water was investigated as a possible source of Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection in patients with AIDS. MAC consists of M.avium (MA), M. intracellulare (MI) and Mycobacterium X (MX)(positive for MAC by DNA probe but not MA or MI). The study included 13 reser...

  5. Analysis of cytokine mRNA expression using a novel chromogenic in situ hybridization method in pulmonary granulomas of cattle experimentally infected by aerosolized Mycobacterium bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium bovis is the cause of tuberculosis in most animal species, including cattle and is a serious zoonotic pathogen. In humans, M. bovis infection can result in disease clinically indistinguishable from that caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the cause of most tuberculosis in humans. Reg...

  6. [A case of Mycobacterium abscessus pulmonary infection; effectiveness of clarithromycin, amikacin and imipenem/cilastatin].

    PubMed

    Shikama, Yusuke; Kamio, Yoshito; Kuriu, Kazuyuki; Shibuya, Yasuhiro; Kimura, Satoshi; Nakajima, Hiroaki

    2006-11-01

    A 42-year-old woman presented with persistent cough, bloody sputum and fever. Her chest X-ray film showed an infiltrative shadow with cavitation in the upper lobe of the left lung. Acid-fast-bacilli were shown by sputum smear staining. The anti-tuberculosis drugs isoniazid, refampicin, ethambutol and pyrazinamide were prescribed, but her symptoms and chest X-ray findings did not improve. Findings of MTD and MAC-PCR were negative but Mycobacterium abscessus was confirmed by sputum culture with the DNA hybridization method. Combination therapy with clarithromycin, amikacin and imipenem/cilastatin for one month improved her symptoms and chest X-ray shadow, and clarithromycin monotherapy was carried out for another ten months. Drug susceptibility tests revealed this mycobacterium was sensitive to clarithromycin and amikacin. To determine the environmental factors related to this infection, several samples were examined. Acid-fast-bacilli were present in a smear from the bath room drain. However, to confirm the infectious routes, longer observation is needed. Moreover, serum amyloid protein A and ESR were useful markers to estimate the clinical course. PMID:17144576

  7. Innate Immunity Holding the Flanks until Reinforced by Adaptive Immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Nargis; Vidyarthi, Aurobind; Javed, Shifa; Agrewala, Javed N.

    2016-01-01

    T cells play a cardinal role in imparting protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). However, ample time is required before T-cells are able to evoke efficient effector responses in the lung, where the mycobacterium inflicts disease. This delay in T cells priming, which is termed as lag phase, provides sufficient time for Mtb to replicate and establish itself within the host. In contrast, innate immunity efficiently curb the growth of Mtb during initial phase of infection through several mechanisms. Pathogen recognition by innate cells rapidly triggers a cascade of events, such as apoptosis, autophagy, inflammasome formation and nitric oxide production to kill intracellular pathogens. Furthermore, bactericidal mechanisms such as autophagy and apoptosis, augment the antigen processing and presentation, thereby contributing substantially to the induction of adaptive immunity. This manuscript highlights the role of innate immune mechanisms in restricting the survival of Mtb during lag phase. Finally, this article provides new insight for designing immuno-therapies by targeting innate immune mechanisms to achieve optimum immune response to cure TB. PMID:27014247

  8. Mycobacterium marinum infection in Japanese forest green tree frogs (Rhacophorus arboreus).

    PubMed

    Haridy, M; Tachikawa, Y; Yoshida, S; Tsuyuguchi, K; Tomita, M; Maeda, S; Wada, T; Ibi, K; Sakai, H; Yanai, T

    2014-01-01

    Four Japanese forest green tree frogs (Rhacophorus arboreus) were presented with emaciation, abdominal distention and ulcerative and nodular cutaneous lesions affecting the brisket, limbs, digits and ventral abdomen. Another three frogs had been found dead in the same tank 1 year previously. Necropsy examination of these seven frogs revealed splenomegaly and hepatomegaly, with multiple tan-yellow nodular foci present in the liver, spleen, heart, lungs, ovaries and kidneys. Microscopically, five frogs had necrosis and surrounding granulomatous inflammation in the liver, spleen, kidneys, lungs, intestine and ovaries, with numerous acid-fast bacilli in the areas of necrosis. Two frogs had granulomatous lesions in the lungs, liver, spleen, heart, coelomic membrane, stomach and intestinal wall. These lesions had no or minimal necrosis and few acid-fast bacilli. Mycobacterium spp. was cultured from three frogs and identified as Mycobacterium marinum by colony growth rate and photochromogenicity and DNA sequencing. This is the first report of M. marinum infection in Japanese forest green tree frogs. PMID:25047922

  9. Gastric lap-band infection due to Mycobacterium abscessus presenting as new-onset ascites in a cirrhotic patient.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Allon; Agrwal, Neera; Carey, Elizabeth J; Madura, James A; Hewitt, Winston R; Lambert, Karen L; Grys, Thomas E; Vikram, Holenarasipur R

    2016-08-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria are ubiquitous environmental organisms that are infrequently implicated as pathogens. Peritoneal infection with nontuberculous mycobacteria is rare and published reports are most commonly associated with peritoneal dialysis. This study describes a case of a 41-year-old woman with cirrhosis who had Mycobacterium abscessus peritonitis and an abdominal abscess resulting from infection of a remotely placed gastric band (Lap-Band; Apollo Endosurgery, Inc). PMID:27222118

  10. Genotyping of Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium isolates from naturally infected lofts of domestic pigeons in Ahvaz by IS901 RFLP

    PubMed Central

    Parvandar-Asadollahi, Kaveh; Mosavari, Nader; Mayahi, Mansoor

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Avian tuberculosis is one of the most important infections affecting most species of birds. Mycobacterium avium can not only infect all species of birds, but also infect some domesticated mammals. The most crucial aspect of control and eradication scheme is identification of infection sources and transmission routs. Molecular techniques such as restriction fragment length polymorphism and pulse field gel electrophoresis have been shown to be much more discriminatory and suitable for use in the epidemiological study. Materials and Methods: Eighty suspected pigeons to avian tuberculosis based on their clinical signs, were subjected to the study. Forty Mycobacterium avium subsp. avium isolates out of a total of 51 identified isolates were subjected to the test. Results: IS901-RFLP using Pvu II was successfully conducted and produced 7 patterns. The majority of isolates (60%) were RFLP type PI.1. This type was the most similar type to standard strain. However, all the patterns obtained in this study were different from the standard strain. Conclusion: The result of this study indicate that these isolates probably are limited to Khuzestan region. We recommend DNA fingerprinting differentiation of non tuberculous Mycobacteria particularly Mycobacterium avium complex isolated from infected birds and human to possibly find source of infections. PMID:26719782

  11. Beta2-adrenergic receptor stimulation inhibits nitric oxide generation by Mycobacterium avium infected macrophages.

    PubMed

    Boomershine, C S; Lafuse, W P; Zwilling, B S

    1999-11-01

    Catecholamine regulation of nitric oxide (NO) production by IFNgamma-primed macrophages infected with Mycobacterium avium was investigated. Epinephrine treatment of IFNgamma-primed macrophages at the time of M. avium infection inhibited the anti-mycobacterial activity of the cells. The anti-mycobacterial activity of macrophages correlated with NO production. Using specific adrenergic receptor agonists, the abrogation of mycobacterial killing and decreased NO production by catecholamines was shown to be mediated via the beta2-adrenergic receptor. Elevation of intracellular cAMP levels mimicked the catecholamine-mediated inhibition of NO in both M. avium infected and LPS stimulated macrophages. Specific inhibitors of both adenylate cyclase and protein kinase A prevented the beta2-adrenoceptor-mediated inhibition of nitric oxide production. Beta2-adrenoreceptor stimulation at the time of M. avium infection of IFNgamma-primed macrophages also inhibited expression of iNOS mRNA. These observations show that catecholamine hormones can affect the outcome of macrophage-pathogen interactions and suggest that one result of sympathetic nervous system activation is the suppression of the capacity of macrophages to produce anti-microbial effector molecules. PMID:10580815

  12. Modulation of host ubiquitin system genes in human endometrial cell line infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Meenu, S; Thiagarajan, S; Ramalingam, Sudha; Michael, A; Ramalingam, Sankaran

    2016-04-01

    Endometrium is one of the most commonly affected sites in genital tuberculosis. The understanding of its interaction with the tubercle bacilli is of paramount importance for studying the pathogenesis of this disease. The main objective of this work was to study the interplay between Mycobacterium tuberculosis and host endometrial epithelial cell lines (Ishikawa cell lines), and to identify the differentially expressed genes upon tuberculosis infection. To study this, suppression subtractive hybridization library was constructed using M. tuberculosis H37Rv-infected Ishikawa cell line harvested 24 h post-infection. The subtracted cDNA library was screened, and 105 differentially expressed genes were identified and grouped based on their functions. Since ubiquitination process has gained importance in targeting M. tuberculosis to xenophagy, ubiquitin system genes obtained in the library were selected, and time course analysis of their gene expression was performed. We observed an upregulation of mkrn1 and cops5 and downregulation of zfp91, ndfip2, ube2f, rnft1, psmb6, and psmd13 at 24 h post-infection. From the results obtained, we surmise that ubiquitination pathway genes may have roles in combating tuberculosis which are yet uncharted. PMID:26403675

  13. Antigen-Specific IP-10 Release Is a Sensitive Biomarker of Mycobacterium bovis Infection in Cattle.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Sven D C; McGill, Kevina; Doyle, Mairead B; Goosen, Wynand J; van Helden, Paul D; Gormley, Eamonn

    2016-01-01

    The most widely used ante-mortem diagnostic tests for tuberculosis in cattle are the tuberculin skin test and the interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) release assay, both of which measure cell-mediated immune responses to Mycobacterium bovis infection. However, limitations in the performance of these tests results in a failure to identify all infected animals. In attempting to increase the range of diagnostic tests for tuberculosis, measurement of the cytokine IP-10 in antigen-stimulated blood has previously been shown to improve the detection of M. tuberculosis and M. bovis infection, in humans and African buffaloes (Syncerus caffer), respectively. In the present study, 60 cattle were identified by the single intradermal comparative tuberculin test as tuberculosis reactors (n = 24) or non-reactors (n = 36) and the release of IFN-γ and IP-10 in antigen-stimulated whole blood from these animals was measured using bovine specific ELISAs. There was a strong correlation between IP-10 and IFN-γ production in these samples. Moreover, measurement of the differential release of IP-10 in response to stimulation with M. bovis purified protein derivative (PPD) and M. avium PPD distinguished between reactor and non-reactor cattle with a sensitivity of 100% (95% CI, 86%-100%) and a specificity of 97% (95% CI, 85%-100%). These results suggest that IP-10 might prove valuable as a diagnostic biomarker of M. bovis infection in cattle. PMID:27167122

  14. Antigen-Specific IP-10 Release Is a Sensitive Biomarker of Mycobacterium bovis Infection in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    McGill, Kevina; Doyle, Mairead B.; Goosen, Wynand J.; van Helden, Paul D.; Gormley, Eamonn

    2016-01-01

    The most widely used ante-mortem diagnostic tests for tuberculosis in cattle are the tuberculin skin test and the interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) release assay, both of which measure cell-mediated immune responses to Mycobacterium bovis infection. However, limitations in the performance of these tests results in a failure to identify all infected animals. In attempting to increase the range of diagnostic tests for tuberculosis, measurement of the cytokine IP-10 in antigen-stimulated blood has previously been shown to improve the detection of M. tuberculosis and M. bovis infection, in humans and African buffaloes (Syncerus caffer), respectively. In the present study, 60 cattle were identified by the single intradermal comparative tuberculin test as tuberculosis reactors (n = 24) or non-reactors (n = 36) and the release of IFN-γ and IP-10 in antigen-stimulated whole blood from these animals was measured using bovine specific ELISAs. There was a strong correlation between IP-10 and IFN-γ production in these samples. Moreover, measurement of the differential release of IP-10 in response to stimulation with M. bovis purified protein derivative (PPD) and M. avium PPD distinguished between reactor and non-reactor cattle with a sensitivity of 100% (95% CI, 86%–100%) and a specificity of 97% (95% CI, 85%–100%). These results suggest that IP-10 might prove valuable as a diagnostic biomarker of M. bovis infection in cattle. PMID:27167122

  15. A Mycobacterium tuberculosis Dormancy Antigen Differentiates Latently Infected Bacillus Calmette–Guérin-vaccinated Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Delfina; Rovetta, Ana I.; Hernández Del Pino, Rodrigo E.; Amiano, Nicolás O.; Pasquinelli, Virginia; Pellegrini, Joaquín M.; Tateosian, Nancy L.; Rolandelli, Agustín; Gutierrez, Marisa; Musella, Rosa M.; Palmero, Domingo J.; Gherardi, María M.; Iovanna, Juan; Chuluyan, H. Eduardo; García, Verónica E.

    2015-01-01

    IFN-γ release assays (IGRAs) are better indicators of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection than the tuberculin skin test (TST) in Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG)-vaccinated populations. However, IGRAs do not discriminate active and latent infections (LTBI) and no gold standard for LTBI diagnosis is available. Thus, since improved tests to diagnose M. tuberculosis infection are required, we assessed the efficacy of several M. tuberculosis latency antigens. BCG-vaccinated healthy donors (HD) and tuberculosis (TB) patients were recruited. QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube, TST and clinical data were used to differentiate LTBI. IFN-γ production against CFP-10, ESAT-6, Rv2624c, Rv2626c and Rv2628 antigens was tested in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. LTBI subjects secreted significantly higher IFN-γ levels against Rv2626c than HD. Additionally, Rv2626c peptide pools to which only LTBI responded were identified, and their cumulative IFN-γ response improved LTBI discrimination. Interestingly, whole blood stimulation with Rv2626c allowed the discrimination between active and latent infections, since TB patients did not secrete IFN-γ against Rv2626c, in contrast to CFP-10 + ESAT-6 stimulation that induced IFN-γ response from both LTBI and TB patients. ROC analysis confirmed that Rv2626c discriminated LTBI from HD and TB patients. Therefore, since only LTBI recognizes specific epitopes from Rv2626c, this antigen could improve LTBI diagnosis, even in BCG-vaccinated people. PMID:26425695

  16. A Mycobacterium tuberculosis Dormancy Antigen Differentiates Latently Infected Bacillus Calmette-Guérin-vaccinated Individuals.

    PubMed

    Peña, Delfina; Rovetta, Ana I; Hernández Del Pino, Rodrigo E; Amiano, Nicolás O; Pasquinelli, Virginia; Pellegrini, Joaquín M; Tateosian, Nancy L; Rolandelli, Agustín; Gutierrez, Marisa; Musella, Rosa M; Palmero, Domingo J; Gherardi, María M; Iovanna, Juan; Chuluyan, H Eduardo; García, Verónica E

    2015-08-01

    IFN-γ release assays (IGRAs) are better indicators of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection than the tuberculin skin test (TST) in Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-vaccinated populations. However, IGRAs do not discriminate active and latent infections (LTBI) and no gold standard for LTBI diagnosis is available. Thus, since improved tests to diagnose M. tuberculosis infection are required, we assessed the efficacy of several M. tuberculosis latency antigens. BCG-vaccinated healthy donors (HD) and tuberculosis (TB) patients were recruited. QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube, TST and clinical data were used to differentiate LTBI. IFN-γ production against CFP-10, ESAT-6, Rv2624c, Rv2626c and Rv2628 antigens was tested in peripheral blood mononuclear cells. LTBI subjects secreted significantly higher IFN-γ levels against Rv2626c than HD. Additionally, Rv2626c peptide pools to which only LTBI responded were identified, and their cumulative IFN-γ response improved LTBI discrimination. Interestingly, whole blood stimulation with Rv2626c allowed the discrimination between active and latent infections, since TB patients did not secrete IFN-γ against Rv2626c, in contrast to CFP-10 + ESAT-6 stimulation that induced IFN-γ response from both LTBI and TB patients. ROC analysis confirmed that Rv2626c discriminated LTBI from HD and TB patients. Therefore, since only LTBI recognizes specific epitopes from Rv2626c, this antigen could improve LTBI diagnosis, even in BCG-vaccinated people. PMID:26425695

  17. Mycobacterium avium serovars 2 and 8 infections elicit unique activation of the host macrophage immune responses.

    PubMed

    Cebula, B R; Rocco, J M; Maslow, J N; Irani, V R

    2012-12-01

    Mycobacterium avium is an opportunistic pathogen whose pathogenesis is attributed to its serovar-specific glycopeptidolipid (ssGPL), which varies among its 31 serovars. To determine if the presence and type of ssGPLs contribute to M. avium pathogenesis, we infected murine macrophages (mφs) with two M. avium wild type (wt) serovars (2 and 8) and their serovar-null strains. We examined the influence of ssGPL (presence and type) on cytokine production in non-activated (-IFN-γ) and activated (+IFN-γ) mφs, and the bacterial intra-mφ survival over a 6-day infection process. Serovar-2 infections activated TNF-α production that increased over the 6 day period and was capable of controlling the intra-mφ serovar-2 null strain. In contrast, the serovar-8 infection stimulated a strong pro-inflammatory response, but was incapable of removing the invading pathogen, maybe through IL-10 production. It was clear that the intracellular growth of serovar-null in contrast to the wt M. avium strains was easily controlled. Based on our findings and the undisputed fact that M. avium ssGPL is key to its pathogenesis, we conclude that it is not appropriate to dissect the pathogenesis of one M. avium serovar and apply those findings to other serovars. PMID:22991047

  18. Characterization of Dendritic Cell and Regulatory T Cell Functions against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Devin; Gonzalez, Brenda; Khurasany, Melissa; Kassissa, Christine; Luong, Jennifer; Kasko, Sarah; Pandya, Shalin; Chu, Michael; Chi, Po-Ting; Bui, Steven; Guerra, Carlos; Chan, John; Venketaraman, Vishwanath

    2013-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is a tripeptide that regulates intracellular redox and other vital aspects of cellular functions. GSH plays a major role in enhancing the immune system. Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen presenting cells that participate in both innate and acquired immune responses against microbial infections. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a significant role in immune homeostasis. In this study, we investigated the effects of GSH in enhancing the innate and adaptive immune functions of DCs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) infection. We also characterized the functions of the sub-populations of CD4+T cells such as Tregs and non-Tregs in modulating the ability of monocytes to control the intracellular M. tb infection. Our results indicate that GSH by its direct antimycobacterial activity inhibits the growth of intracellular M. tb inside DCs. GSH also increases the expressions of costimulatory molecules such as HLA-DR, CD80 and CD86 on the cell surface of DCs. Furthermore, GSH-enhanced DCs induced a higher level of T-cell proliferation. We also observed that enhancing the levels of GSH in Tregs resulted in downregulation in the levels of IL-10 and TGF-β and reduction in the fold growth of M. tb inside monocytes. Our studies demonstrate novel regulatory mechanisms that favor both innate and adaptive control of M. tb infection. PMID:23762843

  19. Suppression of Mcl-1 induces apoptosis in mouse peritoneal macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei-Yu; Wang, Xin-Min; Wang, Chan; Wang, Xiao-Fang; Zhang, Yu-Qing; Wu, Jiang-Dong; Wu, Fang; Zhang, Wan-Jiang; Zhang, Le

    2016-04-01

    The effect of myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) inhibition on apoptosis of peritoneal macrophages in mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis was investigated and the primary signaling pathway associated with the transcriptional regulation of Mcl-1 was identified. Real-time PCR and western blotting indicated that Mcl-1 transcript and protein expression are upregulated during infection with virulent M. tuberculosis H37Rv and Xinjiang strains but not with attenuated M. tuberculosis strain H37Ra or Bacillus Calmette-Guérin. Mcl-1 transcript and protein expression were downregulated by specific inhibitors of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT), mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) pathways (AG490, PD98059 and LY294002, respectively). The strongest inhibitor of Mcl-1 expression was PD98059, the MAPK inhibitor. Flow cytometry demonstrated that the rate of apoptosis in peritoneal macrophages is significantly higher in mice infected with M. tuberculosis and the rate of apoptosis is correlated with the virulence of the strain of M. tuberculosis. Apoptosis was found to be upregulated by AG490, PD98059 and LY294002, whereas inhibition of the MAPK pathway sensitized the infected macrophages to apoptosis. Taken together, these results suggest that specific downregulation of Mcl-1 significantly increases apoptosis of peritoneal macrophages and that the MAPK signaling pathway is the primary mediator of Mcl-1 expression. PMID:26876933

  20. Host gene expression for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection in human THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shin, Min-Kyoung; Shin, Seung Won; Jung, Myunghwan; Park, Hongtae; Park, Hyun-Eui; Yoo, Han Sang

    2015-07-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of Johne's disease, which causes considerable economic loss in the dairy industry and has a possible relationship to Crohn's disease (CD) in humans. As MAP has been detected in retail pasteurized milk samples, its transmission via milk is of concern. Despite its possible role in the etiology of CD, there have been few studies examining the interactions between MAP and human cells. In the current study, we applied Ingenuity Pathway Analysis to the transcription profiles generated from a murine model with MAP infection as part of a previously conducted study. Twenty-one genes were selected as potential host immune responses, compared with the transcriptional profiles in naturally MAP-infected cattle, and validated in MAP-infected human monocyte-derived macrophage THP-1 cells. Of these, the potential host responses included up-regulation of genes related to immune response (CD14, S100A8, S100A9, LTF, HP and CHCIL3), up-regulation of Th1-polarizing factor (CCL4, CCL5, CXCL9 and CXCL10), down-regulation of genes related to metabolism (ELANE, IGF1, TCF7L2 and MPO) and no significant response of other genes (GADD45a, GPNMB, HMOX1, IFNG and NQO1) in THP-1 cells infected with MAP. PMID:25877879

  1. Mycobacterium-Host Cell Relationships in Granulomatous Lesions in a Mouse Model of Latent Tuberculous Infection.

    PubMed

    Ufimtseva, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a dangerous infectious disease characterized by a tight interplay between mycobacteria and host cells in granulomatous lesions (granulomas) during the latent, asymptomatic stage of infection. Mycobacterium-host cell relationships were analyzed in granulomas obtained from various organs of BALB/c mice with chronic TB infection caused by in vivo exposure to the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) vaccine. Acid-fast BCG-mycobacteria were found to be morphologically and functionally heterogeneous (in size, shape, and replication rates in colonies) in granuloma macrophages, dendritic cells, and multinucleate Langhans giant cells. Cord formation by BCG-mycobacteria in granuloma cells has been observed. Granuloma macrophages retained their ability to ingest damaged lymphocytes and thrombocytes in the phagosomes; however, their ability to destroy BCG-mycobacteria contained in these cells was compromised. No colocalization of BCG-mycobacteria and the LysoTracker dye was observed in the mouse cells. Various relationships between granuloma cells and BCG-mycobacteria were observed in different mice belonging to the same line. Several mice totally eliminated mycobacterial infection. Granulomas in the other mice had mycobacteria actively replicating in cells of different types and forming cords, which is an indicator of mycobacterial virulence and, probably, a marker of the activation of tuberculous infection in animals. PMID:26064970

  2. Diagnosis of Mycobacterium microti Infections among Humans by Using Novel Genetic Markers

    PubMed Central

    van Soolingen, Dick; van der Zanden, Adri G. M.; de Haas, Petra E. W.; Noordhoek, Gerda T.; Kiers, Albert; Foudraine, Norbert A.; Portaels, Francoise; Kolk, Arend H. J.; Kremer, Kristin; van Embden, Jan D. A.

    1998-01-01

    As a result of DNA typing of Mycobacterium microti isolates from animals in the United Kingdom and The Netherlands, we diagnosed four human M. microti infections. These are the first M. microti infections among humans to be reported. Three of the patients were immunocompromised and suffered from generalized forms of tuberculosis. The fourth patient was a 34-year-old immunocompetent male with a persistent cough and undefined X-ray abnormalities. Two of the M. microti infections were recognized by their IS6110 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) patterns, which showed a high degree of similarity with those of M. microti strains isolated from a pig and a ferret in The Netherlands. The two other human M. microti infections were recognized by using the recently developed DNA fingerprinting method, “spoligotyping,” directly on clinical material. All M. microti isolates from the United Kingdom and The Netherlands were found to contain an exceptionally short genomic direct repeat region, resulting in identical two-spacer sequence reactions in spoligotyping. In contrast, the highly similar IS6110 RFLP patterns of the vole strains from the United Kingdom differed considerably from the RFLPs of all M. microti strains isolated in The Netherlands, suggesting that geographic isolation led to divergent strains in the United Kingdom and on the continent. PMID:9650922

  3. HIV-Mycobacterium tuberculosis co-infection: a 'danger-couple model' of disease pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Esaki M; Vignesh, Ramachandran; Ellegård, Rada; Barathan, Muttiah; Chong, Yee K; Bador, M Kahar; Rukumani, Devi V; Sabet, Negar S; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Velu, Vijayakumar; Larsson, Marie

    2014-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection interfere and impact the pathogenesis phenomena of each other. Owing to atypical clinical presentations and diagnostic complications, HIV/TB co-infection continues to be a menace for healthcare providers. Although the increased access to highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has led to a reduction in HIV-associated opportunistic infections and mortality, the concurrent management of HIV/TB co-infection remains a challenge owing to adverse effects, complex drug interactions, overlapping toxicities and tuberculosis -associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Several hypotheses have been put forward for the exacerbation of tuberculosis by HIV and vice versa supported by immunological studies. Discussion on the mechanisms produced by infectious cofactors with impact on disease pathology could shed light on how to design potential interventions that could decelerate disease progression. With no vaccine for HIV and lack of an effective vaccine for tuberculosis, it is essential to design strategies against HIV-TB co-infection. PMID:24214523

  4. Mycobacterium bovis infection in the lion (Panthera leo): Current knowledge, conundrums and research challenges.

    PubMed

    Viljoen, Ignatius M; van Helden, Paul D; Millar, Robert P

    2015-06-12

    Mycobacterium bovis has global public-health and socio-economic significance and can infect a wide range of species including the lion (Panthera leo) resulting in tuberculosis. Lions are classified as vulnerable under the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species and have experienced a 30% population decline in the past two decades. However, no attempt has been made to collate and critically evaluate the available knowledge of M. bovis infections in lions and potential effects on population. In this review we set out to redress this. Arguments suggesting that ingestion of infected prey animals are the main route of infection for lions have not been scientifically proven and research is needed into other possible sources and routes of infection. The paucity of knowledge on host susceptibility, transmission directions and therefore host status, manifestation of pathology, and epidemiology of the disease in lions also needs to be addressed. Advances have been made in diagnosing the presence of M. bovis in lions. However, these diagnostic tests are unable to differentiate between exposure, presence of infection, or stage of disease. Furthermore, there are contradictory reports on the effects of M. bovis on lion populations with more data needed on disease dynamics versus the lion population's reproductive dynamics. Knowledge on disease effects on the lion reproduction and how additional stressors such as drought or co-morbidities may interact with tuberculosis is also lacking. Filling these knowledge gaps will contribute to the understanding of mycobacterial infections and disease in captive and wild lions and assist in lion conservation endeavours. PMID:25891424

  5. Apoptosis of macrophages during pulmonary Mycobacterium bovis infection: correlation with intracellular bacillary load and cytokine levels

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Michele F; Barsante, Michele M; Alves, Caio C S; Souza, Maria A; Ferreira, Ana P; Amarante-Mendes, Gustavo P; Teixeira, Henrique C

    2009-01-01

    Apoptosis of macrophages infected with pathogenic mycobacteria is an alternative host defence capable of removing the environment supporting bacterial growth. In this work the influence of virulence and bacterial load on apoptosis of alveolar macrophages during the initial phase of infection by Mycobacterium bovis was investigated. BALB/c mice were infected intratracheally with high or low doses of the virulent (ATCC19274) or attenuated (bacillus Calmette–Guérin Moreau) strains of M. bovis. The frequency of macrophage apoptosis, the growth of mycobacteria in macrophages, and the in situ levels of the cytokines tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-10 (IL-10) and IL-12 and of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 were measured at day 3 and day 7 post-infection. An increase of macrophage apoptosis was observed after infection with both strains but the virulent strain induced less apoptosis than the attenuated strain. On the 3rd day after infection with the virulent strain macrophage apoptosis was reduced in the high-dose group, while on the 7th day post-infection macrophage apoptosis was reduced in the low-dose group. Inhibition of apoptosis was correlated with increased production of IL-10, reduced production of TNF-α and increased production of Bcl-2. In addition, the production of IL-12 was reduced at points where the lowest levels of macrophage apoptosis were observed. Our results indicate that virulent mycobacteria are able to modulate macrophage apoptosis to an extent dependent on the intracellular bacterial burden, which benefits its intracellular growth and dissemination to adjacent cells. PMID:19740330

  6. Divergent Immune Responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection Correlate with Kinome Responses at the Site of Intestinal Infection

    PubMed Central

    Määttänen, Pekka; Trost, Brett; Scruten, Erin; Potter, Andrew; Kusalik, Anthony; Griebel, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the causative agent of Johne's disease (JD) in cattle. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infects the gastrointestinal tract of calves, localizing and persisting primarily in the distal ileum. A high percentage of cattle exposed to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis do not develop JD, but the mechanisms by which they resist infection are not understood. Here, we merge an established in vivo bovine intestinal segment model for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection with bovine-specific peptide kinome arrays as a first step to understanding how infection influences host kinomic responses at the site of infection. Application of peptide arrays to in vivo tissue samples represents a critical and ambitious step in using this technology to understand host-pathogen interactions. Kinome analysis was performed on intestinal samples from 4 ileal segments subdivided into 10 separate compartments (6 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-infected compartments and 4 intra-animal controls) using bovine-specific peptide arrays. Kinome data sets clustered into two groups, suggesting unique binary responses to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Similarly, two M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific immune responses, characterized by different antibody, T cell proliferation, and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) responses, were also observed. Interestingly, the kinomic groupings segregated with the immune response groupings. Pathway and gene ontology analyses revealed that differences in innate immune and interleukin signaling and particular differences in the Wnt/β-catenin pathway distinguished the kinomic groupings. Collectively, kinome analysis of tissue samples offers insight into the complex cellular responses induced by M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in the ileum and provides a novel method to understand mechanisms that alter the balance between cell-mediated and antibody responses to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection. PMID

  7. Divergent immune responses to Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection correlate with kinome responses at the site of intestinal infection.

    PubMed

    Määttänen, Pekka; Trost, Brett; Scruten, Erin; Potter, Andrew; Kusalik, Anthony; Griebel, Philip; Napper, Scott

    2013-08-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is the causative agent of Johne's disease (JD) in cattle. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infects the gastrointestinal tract of calves, localizing and persisting primarily in the distal ileum. A high percentage of cattle exposed to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis do not develop JD, but the mechanisms by which they resist infection are not understood. Here, we merge an established in vivo bovine intestinal segment model for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection with bovine-specific peptide kinome arrays as a first step to understanding how infection influences host kinomic responses at the site of infection. Application of peptide arrays to in vivo tissue samples represents a critical and ambitious step in using this technology to understand host-pathogen interactions. Kinome analysis was performed on intestinal samples from 4 ileal segments subdivided into 10 separate compartments (6 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-infected compartments and 4 intra-animal controls) using bovine-specific peptide arrays. Kinome data sets clustered into two groups, suggesting unique binary responses to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Similarly, two M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific immune responses, characterized by different antibody, T cell proliferation, and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) responses, were also observed. Interestingly, the kinomic groupings segregated with the immune response groupings. Pathway and gene ontology analyses revealed that differences in innate immune and interleukin signaling and particular differences in the Wnt/β-catenin pathway distinguished the kinomic groupings. Collectively, kinome analysis of tissue samples offers insight into the complex cellular responses induced by M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in the ileum and provides a novel method to understand mechanisms that alter the balance between cell-mediated and antibody responses to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection. PMID

  8. Mycobacterium bovis infections in domesticated non-bovine mammalian species. Part 2: A review of diagnostic methods.

    PubMed

    Broughan, J M; Crawshaw, T R; Downs, S H; Brewer, J; Clifton-Hadley, R S

    2013-11-01

    Despite the large host range of Mycobacterium bovis, ante-mortem diagnostic tests for the infection mostly lack sensitivity/specificity and/or remain unvalidated in non-bovine species. The epidemiology and importance of M. bovis infection in these species are discussed in the first part of this two-part review. This second part focuses on the diagnostic options available to identify infected species such as sheep, goats, dogs, cats, and camelids, and highlights the significant challenges posed, both in establishing estimates of disease prevalence and in controlling infections in these species, in the absence of fully validated tests. PMID:24135547

  9. Virulence-Dependent Alterations in the Kinetics of Immune Cells during Pulmonary Infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seung Jung; Kim, HongMin; Kwon, Kee Woong; Kim, So Jeong; Eum, Seok-Yong; Cho, Sang-Nae; Shin, Sung Jae

    2015-01-01

    A better understanding of the kinetics of accumulated immune cells that are involved in pathophysiology during Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection may help to facilitate the development of vaccines and immunological interventions. However, the kinetics of innate and adaptive cells that are associated with pathogenesis during Mtb infection and their relationship to Mtb virulence are not clearly understood. In this study, we used a mouse model to compare the bacterial burden, inflammation and kinetics of immune cells during aerogenic infection in the lung between laboratory-adapted strains (Mtb H37Rv and H37Ra) and Mtb K strain, a hyper-virulent W-Beijing lineage strain. The Mtb K strain multiplied more than 10- and 3.54-fold more rapidly than H37Ra and H37Rv, respectively, during the early stage of infection (at 28 days post-infection) and resulted in exacerbated lung pathology at 56 to 112 days post-infection. Similar numbers of innate immune cells had infiltrated, regardless of the strain, by 14 days post-infection. High, time-dependent frequencies of F4/80-CD11c+CD11b-Siglec-H+PDCA-1+ plasmacytoid DCs and CD11c-CD11b+Gr-1int cells were observed in the lungs of mice that were infected with the Mtb K strain. Regarding adaptive immunity, Th1 and Th17 T cells that express T-bet and RORγt, respectively, significantly increased in the lungs that were infected with the laboratory-adapted strains, and the population of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells was remarkably increased at 112 days post-infection in the lungs of mice that were infected with the K strain. Collectively, our findings indicate that the highly virulent Mtb K strain may trigger the accumulation of pDCs and Gr1intCD11b+ cells with the concomitant down-regulation of the Th1 response and the maintenance of an up-regulated Th2 response without inducing a Th17 response during chronic infection. These results will help to determine which immune system components must be considered for the development

  10. Challenges and perspectives for improved management of HIV/Mycobacterium tuberculosis co-infection.

    PubMed

    Sester, M; Giehl, C; McNerney, R; Kampmann, B; Walzl, G; Cuchí, P; Wingfield, C; Lange, C; Migliori, G B; Kritski, A L; Meyerhans, A

    2010-12-01

    HIV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) are two widespread and highly successful microbes whose synergy in pathogenesis has created a significant threat for human health globally. In acknowledgement of this fact, the European Union (EU) has funded a multinational support action, the European Network for global cooperation in the field of AIDS and TB (EUCO-Net), that brings together experts from Europe and those regions that bear the highest burden of HIV/MTB co-infection. Here, we summarise the main outcome of the EUCO-Net project derived from an expert group meeting that took place in Stellenbosch (South Africa) (AIDS/TB Workshop on Research Challenges and Opportunities for Future Collaboration) and the subsequent discussions, and propose priority areas for research and concerted actions that will have impact on future EU calls. PMID:21119204

  11. Mycobacterium genavense infection in a patient with long-standing chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Krebs, T; Zimmerli, S; Bodmer, T; Lämmle, B

    2000-10-01

    We describe the first case of disseminated infection with Mycobacterium genavense in an HIV-seronegative patient with a chronic haematological disorder. Our patient, an 80-year-old woman, had been under long-term treatment with chlorambucil (partially in combination with prednisone) for B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL). When she developed general fatigue and progressive anaemia, as well as progressive lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly, bone marrow biopsy revealed granulomas with acid-fast bacilli, and cultures of both bone marrow and blood grew M. genavense. The patient's CD4+ cell count was approximately 100 microL(-1). Treatment with clarithromycin, ethambutol and rifabutin resulted in improvement of anaemia and general health as well as in regression of lymphadenopathy and splenomegaly. PMID:11086646

  12. Treatment and prevention of Mycobacterium ulcerans infection (Buruli ulcer) in Australia: guideline update.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Daniel P; Jenkin, Grant; Buntine, John; Steffen, Christina M; McDonald, Anthony; Horne, Simon; Friedman, N Deborah; Athan, Eugene; Hughes, Andrew; Callan, Peter P; Johnson, Paul D R

    2014-03-17

    • Guidelines reflecting contemporary clinical practice in the management of Buruli ulcer (Mycobacterium ulcerans infection) in Australia were published in 2007. • Management has continued to evolve, as new evidence has become available from randomised trials, case series and increasing clinical experience with oral antibiotic therapy. • Therefore, guidelines on the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of Buruli ulcer in Australia have been updated. They include guidance on the new role of antibiotics as first-line therapy; the shortened duration of antibiotic treatment and the use of all-oral antibiotic regimens; the continued importance, timing and role of surgery; the recognition and management of paradoxical reactions during antibiotic treatment; and updates on the prevention of disease. PMID:24641151

  13. Mycobacterium chelonae cutaneous infection in a patient with mixed connective tissue disease*

    PubMed Central

    Lage, Renan; Biccigo, Danilo Guerreiro Zeolo; Santos, Felipe Borba Calixto; Chimara, Erica; Pereira, Elisangela Samartin Pegas; da Costa, Adilson

    2015-01-01

    Around 50 mycobacteria species cause human disease. Immunosuppressive states predispose to non-tuberculous mycobaterium infection, such as Mycobacterium chelonae: AFB, non-tuberculous, fast growth of low virulence and uncommon as a human pathogen. It may compromise the skin and soft tissues, lungs, lymph nodes and there is also a disseminated presentation. The diagnosis involves AFB identification and culture on Agar and Lowenstein-Jensen medium base. A 41-year-old female with MCTD (LES predominance) is reported, presenting painless nodules in the right forearm. She denied local trauma. Immunosuppressed with prednisone and cyclophosphamide for 24 months. Lesion biopsy has demonstrated positive bacilloscopy (Ziehl-Neelsen stain) and M.chelonae in culture (Lowenstein-Jensen medium base), therefore clarithromycin treatment has been started (best therapy choice in the literature). PMID:25672306

  14. Testing chemical and genetic Modulators in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infected cells using phenotypic assays.

    PubMed

    Delorme, Vincent; Song, Ok-Ryul; Baulard, Alain; Brodin, Priscille

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is able to colonize host cells, and it is now well admitted that the intracellular stage of the bacteria contributes to tuberculosis pathogenesis as well as to making it a persistent infection. There is still limited understanding on how the tubercle bacillus colonizes the cell and what are the factors impacting on its intracellular persistence. Recent advances in imaging technique allow rapid quantification of biological objects in complex environments. Furthermore, M. tuberculosis is a microorganism that is particularly genetically tractable and that tolerates the expression of heterologous fluorescent proteins. Thus, the intracellular distribution of M. tuberculosis expressing fluorescent proteins can be easily quantified by the use of confocal microscopy. Here we describe high-content/high-throughput imaging methods that enable tracking the bacillus inside host settings, taking into account the heterogeneity of colonization. PMID:25779330

  15. Multiplex Immunoassay for Serological Diagnosis of Mycobacterium bovis Infection in Cattle▿

    PubMed Central

    Whelan, Clare; Shuralev, Eduard; O'Keeffe, Grainne; Hyland, Paula; Kwok, Hang Fai; Snoddy, Philip; O'Brien, Amanda; Connolly, Marie; Quinn, Padraig; Groll, Matt; Watterson, Todd; Call, Sara; Kenny, Kevin; Duignan, Anthony; Hamilton, Mary Jo; Buddle, Bryce M.; Johnston, James A.; Davis, William C.; Olwill, Shane A.; Clarke, John

    2008-01-01

    Efforts to develop a better diagnostic assay for bovine tuberculosis have shown that the sensitivity and specificity of an assay can be improved by the use of two or more antigens. As reported here, we developed a multiplex chemiluminescent immunoassay that can simultaneously detect antibody activity to 25 antigens in a single well in a 96-well plate array format. The chemiluminescent signal is captured with a digital imaging system and analyzed with a macro program that tracks each serum for its pattern of antibody activity for Mycobacterium bovis antigens. The comparison of sera from 522 infected and 1,489 uninfected animals showed that a sensitivity of 93.1% and a specificity of 98.4% can be achieved with a combination of antigens. The assay system is rapid and can be automated for use in a centralized laboratory. PMID:18927068

  16. Brucella melitensis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis depict overlapping gene expression patterns induced in infected THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Masoudian, M; Derakhshandeh, A; Ghahramani Seno, M M

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens infecting mammalian cells have developed various strategies to suppress and evade their hosts' defensive mechanisms. In this line, the intracellular bacteria that are able to survive and propagate within their host cells must have developed strategies to avert their host's killing attitude. Studying the interface of host-pathogen confrontation can provide valuable information for defining therapeutic approaches. Brucellosis, caused by the Brucella strains, is a zoonotic bacterial disease that affects thousands of humans and animals around the world inflicting discomfort and huge economic losses. Similar to many other intracellular dwelling bacteria, infections caused by Brucella are difficult to treat, and hence any attempt at identifying new and common therapeutic targets would prove beneficial for the purpose of curing infections caused by the intracellular bacteria. In THP-1 macrophage infected with Brucella melitensis we studied the expression levels of four host's genes, i.e. EMP2, ST8SIA4, HCP5 and FRMD5 known to be involved in pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our data showed that at this molecular level, except for FRMD5 that was downregulated, the other three genes were upregulated by B. melitensis. Brucella melitensis and M. tuberculosis go through similar intracellular processes and interestingly two of the investigated genes, i.e. EMP2 and ST4SIA8 were upregulated in THP-1 cell infected with B. melitensis similar to that reported for THP-1 cells infected with M. tuberculosis. At the host-pathogen interaction interface, this study depicts overlapping changes for different bacteria with common survival strategies; a fact that implies designing therapeutic approaches based on common targets may be possible. PMID:27175205

  17. Brucella melitensis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis depict overlapping gene expression patterns induced in infected THP-1 macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Masoudian, M; Derakhshandeh, A; Ghahramani Seno, M. M

    2015-01-01

    Pathogens infecting mammalian cells have developed various strategies to suppress and evade their hosts’ defensive mechanisms. In this line, the intracellular bacteria that are able to survive and propagate within their host cells must have developed strategies to avert their host’s killing attitude. Studying the interface of host-pathogen confrontation can provide valuable information for defining therapeutic approaches. Brucellosis, caused by the Brucella strains, is a zoonotic bacterial disease that affects thousands of humans and animals around the world inflicting discomfort and huge economic losses. Similar to many other intracellular dwelling bacteria, infections caused by Brucella are difficult to treat, and hence any attempt at identifying new and common therapeutic targets would prove beneficial for the purpose of curing infections caused by the intracellular bacteria. In THP-1 macrophage infected with Brucella melitensis we studied the expression levels of four host’s genes, i.e. EMP2, ST8SIA4, HCP5 and FRMD5 known to be involved in pathogenesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our data showed that at this molecular level, except for FRMD5 that was downregulated, the other three genes were upregulated by B. melitensis. Brucella melitensis and M. tuberculosis go through similar intracellular processes and interestingly two of the investigated genes, i.e. EMP2 and ST4SIA8 were upregulated in THP-1 cell infected with B. melitensis similar to that reported for THP-1 cells infected with M. tuberculosis. At the host-pathogen interaction interface, this study depicts overlapping changes for different bacteria with common survival strategies; a fact that implies designing therapeutic approaches based on common targets may be possible. PMID:27175205

  18. Diagnostic testing patterns of natural Mycobacterium paratuberculosis infection in pygmy goats

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Elizabeth J.B.; Steinberg, Howard; Krebs, Vernon; Collins, Michael T.

    2003-01-01

    Thirteen pygmy goats (Capra hircus) from a herd naturally infected with Mycobacterium avium ss. paratuberculosis (MPTB) were monitored with 4 diagnostic assays for 2 to 15 mo. Cellular and humoral immune responses to the infection were assessed with assays of gamma interferon (IFNγ), serum antibody [enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and agar gel diffusion (AGID)], and radiometric fecal culture. Microscopic examination and radiometric culture of tissue from 12 sites were performed at necropsy. Goats were considered infected if MPTB was isolated from any tissue sample collected at necropsy. Mycobacterial isolates were confirmed as MPTB with an IS900 polymerase chain reaction assay. Ten goats whose antemortem tests indicated infection carried heavy organism burdens at necropsy, both within and beyond the gastrointestinal system. False-negative ELISA, AGID, and/or culture results were obtained in 5 of the 10 confirmed cases during the study period. In 3 goats with sporadic fecal shedding of MPTB or detectable IFNγ response, or both, no abnormalities were detected at necropsy and no MPTB was isolated from the tissue samples; the antemortem fecal-culture and IFNγ results were thus considered false-positive. Diagnosticians should be alert to the possibility of both false-positive and false-negative test results for Johne's disease in goats. False-positive fecal-culture results may occur when a high prevalence of infection exists in the herd and the premises are likely to be heavily contaminated. The diverse antemortem testing patterns seen in these goats underscore the importance of using varied diagnostic assays serially or in parallel to increase the likelihood of identifying all infected goats. PMID:12889728

  19. Genome Sequences of Four Strains of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis, Isolated from Swine and Humans, Differing in Virulence in a Murine Intranasal Infection Model.

    PubMed

    Bruffaerts, N; Vluggen, C; Duytschaever, L; Mathys, V; Saegerman, C; Chapeira, O; Huygen, K

    2016-01-01

    This paper announces the genome sequences of four strains of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis, isolated from cases of lymphadenopathy in swine and humans, differing in virulence in a murine intranasal infection model. PMID:27313293

  20. Modulation of Cytokine Expression and Lymphocyte Subsets During the Periparturient Period in Dairy Cows Naturally Infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    On-farm observations suggest that dairy cows infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) may demonstrate increased signs of clinical disease during the weeks following parturition. To date, limited research is available characterizing host immunity in periparturient dairy cows ...

  1. Genome Sequences of Four Strains of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis, Isolated from Swine and Humans, Differing in Virulence in a Murine Intranasal Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Bruffaerts, N.; Vluggen, C.; Duytschaever, L.; Mathys, V.; Saegerman, C.; Chapeira, O.

    2016-01-01

    This paper announces the genome sequences of four strains of Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis, isolated from cases of lymphadenopathy in swine and humans, differing in virulence in a murine intranasal infection model. PMID:27313293

  2. High-Density Lipoprotein Binds to Mycobacterium avium and Affects the Infection of THP-1 Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Ichimura, Naoya; Sato, Megumi; Yoshimoto, Akira; Yano, Kouji; Ohkawa, Ryunosuke; Kasama, Takeshi; Tozuka, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is involved in innate immunity toward various infectious diseases. Concerning bacteria, HDL is known to bind to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and to neutralize its physiological activity. On the other hand, cholesterol is known to play an important role in mycobacterial entry into host cells and in survival in the intracellular environment. However, the pathogenicity of Mycobacterium avium (M. avium) infection, which tends to increase worldwide, remains poorly studied. Here we report that HDL indicated a stronger interaction with M. avium than that with other Gram-negative bacteria containing abundant LPS. A binding of apolipoprotein (apo) A-I, the main protein component of HDL, with a specific lipid of M. avium might participate in this interaction. HDL did not have a direct bactericidal activity toward M. avium but attenuated the engulfment of M. avium by THP-1 macrophages. HDL also did not affect bacterial killing after ingestion of live M. avium by THP-1 macrophage. Furthermore, HDL strongly promoted the formation of lipid droplets in M. avium-infected THP-1 macrophages. These observations provide new insights into the relationship between M. avium infection and host lipoproteins, especially HDL. Thus, HDL may help M. avium to escape from host innate immunity. PMID:27516907

  3. Lipid droplet dynamics at early stages of Mycobacterium marinum infection in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Barisch, Caroline; Paschke, Peggy; Hagedorn, Monica; Maniak, Markus; Soldati, Thierry

    2015-09-01

    Lipid droplets exist in virtually every cell type, ranging not only from mammals to plants, but also to eukaryotic and prokaryotic unicellular organisms such as Dictyostelium and bacteria. They serve among other roles as energy reservoir that cells consume in times of starvation. Mycobacteria and some other intracellular pathogens hijack these organelles as a nutrient source and to build up their own lipid inclusions. The mechanisms by which host lipid droplets are captured by the pathogenic bacteria are extremely poorly understood. Using the powerful Dictyostelium discoideum/Mycobacterium marinum infection model, we observed that, immediately after their uptake, lipid droplets translocate to the vicinity of the vacuole containing live but not dead mycobacteria. Induction of lipid droplets in Dictyostelium prior to infection resulted in a vast accumulation of neutral lipids and sterols inside the bacterium-containing compartment. Subsequently, under these conditions, mycobacteria accumulated much larger lipid inclusions. Strikingly, the Dictyostelium homologue of perilipin and the murine perilipin 2 surrounded bacteria that had escaped to the cytosol of Dictyostelium or microglial BV-2 cells respectively. Moreover, bacterial growth was inhibited in Dictyostelium plnA knockout cells. In summary, our results provide evidence that mycobacteria actively manipulate the lipid metabolism of the host from very early infection stages. PMID:25772333

  4. Suppressive role of neddylation in dendritic cells during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Chadha, Attinder; Mehto, Subhash; Selvakumar, Arti; Vashishta, Mohit; Kamble, Shashank S; Popli, Sonam; Raman, Rajagopal; Singh, Yogendra; Natarajan, Krishnamurthy

    2015-09-01

    Multiple strategies evolved by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) have contributed to its successful prevalence. We previously identified specific genes in the cysteine protease and calcium-calmodulin pathways that regulated immune responses from dendritic cells (DCs). In this study we have characterized the role of neddylation in regulating various defense responses from DCs during mycobacterial infection. Neddylation is a process that is similar to ubiquitination. It however has its own enzyme machinery. It is coupled to ubiquitination and is important for maintaining cellular homeostasis. Here we show that stimulation of DCs with M. tb antigens Rv2463 and Rv3416 as well as infection with live M. tb modulates the expression levels of key proteins in the neddylation pathway. Further, stimulation with the two antigens promoted the association of NEDD8 with its target Cullin-1. The modulation in the expression levels of NEDD8 and SENtrin specific Protein 8 (SENP8) by the two antigens was in a calcium, MAPK and TLR dependent mechanism. Further, knockdown of specific genes of neddylation promoted the generation of oxidative burst, promoted phagolysosome fusion in mycobacteria infected DCs and induced higher expression of autophagy and apoptosis associated proteins in DCs. These results point toward a unique strategy employed by mycobacteria and its antigens towards immune suppression via modulating neddylation in DCs. PMID:26096160

  5. Effect of cortisol and/or DHEA on THP1-derived macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Bongiovanni, Bettina; Mata-Espinosa, Dulce; D'Attilio, Luciano; Leon-Contreras, Juan Carlos; Marquez-Velasco, Ricardo; Bottasso, Oscar; Hernandez-Pando, Rogelio; Bay, María Luisa

    2015-09-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a major health problem requiring an appropriate cell immune response to be controlled. Macrophages play a central role in the response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Given our prior studies in which adrenal steroids were found to modify the cellular immune responses from TB patients, it was sensible to analyze the immunomodulatory capability of cortisol and DHEA on macrophages infected with Mtb. The human macrophage-like THP-1 cells were infected with the H37Rv strain of Mtb and treated with Cortisol and DHEA at different doses. We monitored phagocytosis, intracellular-bacterial growth, autophagosoma formation, as well as cytokine gene expression and production. Cultures exposed to cortisol showed a decreased production of IL-1β, TNF-α, with DHEA being unable to modify the pattern of cytokine production or to reverse the cortisol inhibitory effects. Interestingly the intra-macrophagic bacterial burden was found reduced by DHEA treatment. While this effect was not related to a different cytokine pattern, in terms their production or mRNA expression, DHEA treatment did promote autophagy in Mtb-infected macrophages, irrespective of Cortisol presence. In essence, the better control of Mtb load by DHEA-treated macrophages seems to be dependent on an autophagic mechanism. The present results are relevant for two reasons as autophagy is not only important for clearance of mycobacteria but also for the prevention of tissue damage. PMID:26099547

  6. High-Density Lipoprotein Binds to Mycobacterium avium and Affects the Infection of THP-1 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Ichimura, Naoya; Sato, Megumi; Yoshimoto, Akira; Yano, Kouji; Ohkawa, Ryunosuke; Kasama, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is involved in innate immunity toward various infectious diseases. Concerning bacteria, HDL is known to bind to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and to neutralize its physiological activity. On the other hand, cholesterol is known to play an important role in mycobacterial entry into host cells and in survival in the intracellular environment. However, the pathogenicity of Mycobacterium avium (M. avium) infection, which tends to increase worldwide, remains poorly studied. Here we report that HDL indicated a stronger interaction with M. avium than that with other Gram-negative bacteria containing abundant LPS. A binding of apolipoprotein (apo) A-I, the main protein component of HDL, with a specific lipid of M. avium might participate in this interaction. HDL did not have a direct bactericidal activity toward M. avium but attenuated the engulfment of M. avium by THP-1 macrophages. HDL also did not affect bacterial killing after ingestion of live M. avium by THP-1 macrophage. Furthermore, HDL strongly promoted the formation of lipid droplets in M. avium-infected THP-1 macrophages. These observations provide new insights into the relationship between M. avium infection and host lipoproteins, especially HDL. Thus, HDL may help M. avium to escape from host innate immunity. PMID:27516907

  7. Cystic teratoma mimicking recurrent pleural effusion, complicated by Mycobacterium abscessus infection

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Radzi, Adli Azam; Bakar, Nor Salmah; Mohd Khalid, Mohd Shukry; Ismail, Ahmad Izuanuddin; Abdul Rani, Mohamed Fauzi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Teratomas of anterior mediastinum are rare. They are often slow growing, asymptomatic, and detected incidentally on chest imaging. Mycobacterium abscessus (M. abscessus) is an acid‐fast bacillus that is classified as a pathogenic “rapid growing” non‐tuberculous mycobacteria. It is an uncommon cause of human pathology, which may cause skin and soft tissue infection after skin injury following inoculation, minor trauma, and surgery. Here, we present an unusual case of benign cystic teratoma mimicking recurrent pleural effusion, which was subsequently complicated by M. abscessus infection following thoracotomy. Cystic teratoma is rare, but it needs to be considered whenever clinical and investigative work‐up fails to provide a convincing diagnosis. A combined clinical, radiological, surgical, and histopathological assessment is important to arrive at the correct diagnosis. Rapidly growing mycobacteria needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of patients with non‐resolving infected post‐thoracotomy wound and who do not respond to broad‐spectrum antibiotics. PMID:27516884

  8. Intermittent azithromycin for treatment of Mycobacterium avium infection in beige mice.

    PubMed Central

    Klemens, S P; Cynamon, M H

    1994-01-01

    The activity of azithromycin (AZI) was evaluated in the beige mouse model of disseminated Mycobacterium avium infection. Mice were infected intravenously with approximately 10(7) viable avium ATCC 49601. AZI at 50, 100, or 200 mg/kg of body weight or clarithromycin (CLA) at 200 mg/kg was given by gavage 5 days per week for 4 weeks. Groups of treated mice were compared with untreated control animals. A dose-related reduction in cell counts in organs was observed with AZI treatment. AZI at 200 mg/kg was more active than CLA at 200 mg/kg against organisms in spleens. The activities of these two agents at 200 mg/kg were comparable against organisms in lungs. In a second study, AZI at 200 mg/kg was given daily for 5 days; this was followed by intermittent AZI treatment for the next 3 weeks. The activities of AZI given on a three-times- and five-times-per-week basis in the continuation phase were comparable. AZI given on a once-weekly basis was less active. The regimen of AZI given in combination with rifapentine on a once-weekly basis for 8 weeks showed promising activity. Clinical evaluation of AZI and rifapentine will help to define the roles of these agents in the treatment of disseminated M. avium complex infection. PMID:7986001

  9. The immunological response of llamas (Lama glama) following experimental infection with Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, J B; Thoen, C O; Rohonczy, E B; Tessaro, S; Kelly, H A; Duncan, J R

    1998-01-01

    Llamas were experimentally infected with Mycobacterium bovis in order to evaluate the axillary skin test and the ELISA as diagnostic procedures for tuberculosis in llamas (Lama glama). Six llamas were given a single intratracheal challenge with 1 of 2 doses of a recent field isolate of M. bovis and 2 llamas were left as noninfected controls. This resulted in a progressive disease in some animals with 1 mortality as early as 68 d post-infection (PI). The tuberculin skin test, at the axillary site, was positive in 4 of 5 infected llamas at 80 d PI. At 143 d PI, all 3 surviving lamas were positive, including the one which had not responded at 80 d PI. The application of skin and serological tests throughout the course of this experiment adds support for the need to further evaluate the skin test and its anamnestic effect on serodiagnosis since serological responses were generally not observed in the absence of skin testing or antibiotic treatment. The wide variation in M. bovis antigens recognized by the serological response would indicate that a diagnostic panel should include multiple antigens such as MPB70 and lipoarabinomannan (LAM). While skin testing or serology alone may be of limited value to diagnose tuberculosis in llamas, together they may offer an enhanced potential for immunodiagnosis of tuberculosis. PMID:9553708

  10. PATTERNS OF MYCOBACTERIUM LEPRAE INFECTION IN WILD NINE-BANDED ARMADILLOS (DASYPUS NOVEMCINCTUS) IN MISSISSIPPI, USA.

    PubMed

    Perez-Heydrich, Carolina; Loughry, W J; Anderson, Corey Devin; Oli, Madan K

    2016-07-01

    The nine-banded armadillo ( Dasypus novemcinctus ) is the only known nonhuman reservoir of Mycobacterium leprae , the causative agent of Hansen's disease or leprosy. We conducted a 6-yr study on a wild population of armadillos in western Mississippi that was exposed to M. leprae to evaluate the importance of demographic and spatial risk factors on individual antibody status. We found that spatially derived covariates were not predictive of antibody status. Furthermore, analyses revealed no evidence of clustering by antibody-positive individuals. Lactating females and adult males had higher odds of being antibody positive than did nonlactating females. No juveniles or yearlings were antibody positive. Results of these analyses support the hypothesis that M. leprae infection patterns are spatially homogeneous within this armadillo population. Further research related to movement patterns, contact among individuals, antibody status, and environmental factors could help address hypotheses related to the role of environmental transmission on M. leprae infection and the mechanisms underlying the differential infection patterns among demographic groups. PMID:27195687

  11. Monoclonal infection involving Mycobacterium avium presenting with three distinct colony morphotypes.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, E L; Zywno-van Ginkel, S; Rastogi, N; Barrow, W W

    1996-01-01

    Recent reports indicate that polyclonal infections may play an important role in multiple drug resistance in Mycobacterium avium infections. We report here on the isolation of a single M. avium strain that appeared to have smooth colony morphology upon initial isolation on a Lowenstein-Jensen slant. Primary subculture onto Middlebrook 7H10, however, revealed three distinct morphotypes representing smooth opaque (SmO), smooth transparent (SmT), and rough (Rg) colony morphologies. All three morphotypes were identified as M. avium by standard biochemical procedures, Genprobe analysis, and mycolic acid patterns. Subsequent restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis, using SalI- and PvuII-digested genomic DNA, revealed identical patterns for hybridization with the IS1245 probe. Thin-layer chromatographic analysis of lipids from the three morphotypes revealed that only the SmT morphotype possessed what appeared to be lipid components similar to, but unlike, previously described serovar-specific glycopeptidolipid antigens. Further analysis of internally radiolabeled deacylated lipids from the SmT morphotype, by high-performance liquid chromatography and thin-layer chromatography, disclosed that some of these components can be internally radiolabeled with [14C] phenylalanine and [14C]mannose. These results suggest that these components are structurally similar to previously described glycopeptidolipid antigens. This is apparently the first report of a monoclonal infection involving a single strain of M. avium presenting with all three colony morphotypes, SmO, SmT, and Rg. PMID:8880503

  12. Surface Proteome of “Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis” during the Early Stages of Macrophage Infection

    PubMed Central

    McNamara, Michael; Tzeng, Shin-Cheng; Maier, Claudia; Zhang, Li

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis” is a robust and pervasive environmental bacterium that can cause opportunistic infections in humans. The bacterium overcomes the host immune response and is capable of surviving and replicating within host macrophages. Little is known about the bacterial mechanisms that facilitate these processes, but it can be expected that surface-exposed proteins play an important role. In this study, the selective biotinylation of surface-exposed proteins, streptavidin affinity purification, and shotgun mass spectrometry were used to characterize the surface-exposed proteome of M. avium subsp. hominissuis. This analysis detected more than 100 proteins exposed at the bacterial surface of M. avium subsp. hominissuis. Comparisons of surface-exposed proteins between conditions simulating early infection identified several groups of proteins whose presence on the bacterial surface was either constitutive or appeared to be unique to specific culture conditions. This proteomic profile facilitates an improved understanding of M. avium subsp. hominissuis and how it establishes infection. Additionally, surface-exposed proteins are excellent targets for the host adaptive immune system, and their identification can inform the development of novel treatments, diagnostic tools, and vaccines for mycobacterial disease. PMID:22392927

  13. Identification of Immune Parameters To Differentiate Disease States among Sheep Infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Gillan, Sonia; O'Brien, Rory; Hughes, Alan D.; Griffin, J. Frank T.

    2010-01-01

    Johne's disease, a chronic enteritis of ruminants, is caused by infection with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Three distinct forms have been observed in sheep: paucibacillary disease (PB), multibacillary disease (MB), and asymptomatic infection (AS). In this study, immune parameters for animals naturally infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and identified postmortem as having PB, MB, or AS were compared to provide a further understanding of the immunological reactivity contributing to or resulting from these different disease states in sheep. PB was associated with strong ex vivo M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigen-stimulated gamma interferon responses, pronounced increases in CD25+ T-cell frequencies in circulation, antibody production, and a B-cell population that expanded significantly upon ex vivo antigenic stimulation. The MB group featured the highest antibody levels and a lack of cellular immune responsiveness to the M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigen. The AS group expressed an immunological phenotype intermediate between that for noninfected control animals and that for the PB group. The relationship between immune responses and disease severity within the PB group was investigated more closely; significant positive correlations were observed between disease severity and both the CD8+ population in the circulating blood and the expression of interleukin-4 mRNA in antigen-stimulated blood samples ex vivo. Together, these data point toward distinct immune profiles in sheep that correspond to different Johne's disease states, which can be determined from circulating blood and/or from localized intestinal tract tissue samples. PMID:19923568

  14. Autophagy protects type II alveolar epithelial cells from Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Xu-Guang; Ji, Tian-Xing; Xia, Yong; Ma, Yue-Yun

    2013-03-08

    Highlights: ► We investigated the protective effect of autophagy pathway against MTB infection. ► MTB-infected A549 cells had higher LDH release. ► Inhibition of autophagy signaling significantly enhanced the MTB-induced necrosis. ► Autophagy prevents apoptosis and promotes cell survival in infected cells. -- Abstract: This study was designed to investigate the protective effect of the autophagy signaling pathway against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in type II alveolar epithelial cells. An in vitro M. tuberculosis system was established using human A549 cells. Infection-induced changes in the expression of the autophagic marker LC3 were assessed by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blotting. Morphological changes in autophagosomes were detected by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The function of the autophagy signaling pathway during infection was assessed by measuring the level of cell death and the amount of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) released in the presence or absence of the inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3-MA). In addition, effects on LDH release were assessed after the siRNA-mediated knockdown of the essential autophagosomal structural membrane protein Atg5. LC3 mRNA expression was significantly reduced in M.tuberculosis-infected A549 cells (16888.76 ± 1576.34 vs. uninfected: 12744.29 ± 1089.37; P < 0.05). TEM revealed M.tuberculosis bacilli-containing compartments that were surrounded by double membranes characteristic of the autophagic process. M.tuberculosis-infected A549 cells released more LDH (1.45 ± 0.12 vs. uninfected: 0.45 ± 0.04; P < 0.05). The inhibition of autophagy signaling significantly enhanced M.tuberculosis-induced necrosis (3-MA: 75 ± 5% vs. untreated: 15 ± 1%; P < 0.05) and LDH release (3-MA: 2.50 ± 0.24 vs. untreated: 0.45 ± 0.04; Atg5 knockdown: 3.19 ± 0.29 vs. untreated: 1.28 ± 0.11; P < 0.05). Our results indicate that autophagy signaling pathway prevents apoptosis in type II alveolar epithelial cells

  15. Transcriptional Profiling of Ileocecal Valve of Holstein Dairy Cows Infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. Paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Hempel, Randy J.; Bannantine, John P.

    2016-01-01

    Johne’s disease is a chronic infection of the small intestine caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), an intracellular bacterium. The events of pathogen survival within the host cell(s), chronic inflammation and the progression from asymptomatic subclinical stage to an advanced clinical stage of infection, are poorly understood. This study examines gene expression in the ileocecal valve (ICV) of Holstein dairy cows at different stages of MAP infection. The ICV is known to be a primary site of MAP colonization and provides an ideal location to identify genes that are relevant to the progression of this disease. RNA was prepared from ICV tissues and RNA-Seq was used to compare gene transcription between clinical, subclinical, and uninfected control animals. Interpretation of the gene expression data was performed using pathway analysis and gene ontology categories containing multiple differentially expressed genes. Results demonstrated that many of the pathways that had strong differential gene expression between uninfected control and clinical cows were related to the immune system, such as the T- and B-cell receptor signaling, apoptosis, NOD-like receptor signaling, and leukocyte transendothelial migration pathways. In contrast, the comparison of gene transcription between control and subclinical cows identified pathways that were primarily involved in metabolism. The results from the comparison between clinical and subclinical animals indicate recruitment of neutrophils, up regulation of lysosomal peptidases, increase in immune cell transendothelial migration, and modifications of the extracelluar matrix. This study provides important insight into how cattle respond to a natural MAP infection at the gene transcription level within a key target tissue for infection. PMID:27093613

  16. Molecular epidemiology of Mycobacterium abscessus infections in a subtropical chronic ventilatory setting.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Chang; Chiou, Chien-Shun; Chen, Jiann-Hwa; Shen, Gwan-Han

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the high level of pulmonary Mycobacterium abscessus infections and implement a surveillance programme among 43 ventilator-dependent patients, 15 with pulmonary M. abscessus infections, in a hospital long-term respiratory care ward (RCW) in central Taiwan. M. abscessus isolates were obtained from 35 patients in the RCW of hospital A, 6 patients in the RCWs of another three hospitals (B, C and D), and from 4 water sources in two of the hospitals (A and B). Strains were characterized by methods including hsp65 PCR-RFLP and PFGE. The patients were followed-up by chest X-ray for 1 year. All clinical isolates were type I and II, and belonged to ten distinct clusters of PFGE patterns. Five clinical strains in two hospitals belonged to a single cluster, whilst four clinical strains in the other two hospitals belonged to a single unique cluster. The strains from hospital A fell into nine clusters and were distinct from the strains isolated from the water supply. Patients infected with type I strains showed a significantly more rapid progression of disease. The number of different strains involved suggested either that there had been a polyclonal outbreak or that a high level of endemic infections was present in the RCW of hospital A. This and the lack of homology between the clinical and environmental isolates from hospital A raised the possibility that pulmonary M. abscessus infections may have been spread by the movement of patients between RCWs, a routine practice in Taiwan's integrated delivery system. PMID:20616186

  17. Experimental Infection of Rhodnius prolixus (Hemiptera, Triatominae) with Mycobacterium leprae Indicates Potential for Leprosy Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Arthur da Silva; Dias, Felipe de Almeida; Ferreira, Jéssica da Silva; Fontes, Amanda Nogueira Brum; Rosa, Patricia Sammarco; Macedo, Rafael Enrique; Oliveira, José Henrique; Teixeira, Raquel Lima de Figueiredo; Pessolani, Maria Cristina Vidal; Moraes, Milton Ozório; Suffys, Philip Noel; Oliveira, Pedro L.; Sorgine, Marcos Henrique Ferreira; Lara, Flavio Alves

    2016-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic dermato-neurological disease caused by infection with Mycobacterium leprae. In 2013 almost 200,000 new cases of leprosy were detected around the world. Since the first symptoms take from years to decades to appear, the total number of asymptomatic patients is impossible to predict. Although leprosy is one of the oldest records of human disease, the mechanisms involved with its transmission and epidemiology are still not completely understood. In the present work, we experimentally investigated the hypothesis that the mosquitoes Aedes aegypti and Culex quinquefasciatus and the hemiptera Rhodnius prolixus act as leprosy vectors. By means of real-time PCR quantification of M. leprae 16SrRNA, we found that M. leprae remained viable inside the digestive tract of Rhodnius prolixus for 20 days after oral infection. In contrast, in the gut of both mosquito species tested, we were not able to detect M. leprae RNA after a similar period of time. Inside the kissing bug Rhodnius prolixus digestive tract, M. leprae was initially restricted to the anterior midgut, but gradually moved towards the hindgut, in a time course reminiscent of the life cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi, a well-known pathogen transmitted by this insect. The maintenance of M. leprae infectivity inside the digestive tract of this kissing bug is further supported by successful mice footpad inoculation with feces collected 20 days after infection. We conclude that Rhodnius prolixus defecate infective M. leprae, justifying the evaluation of the presence of M. leprae among sylvatic and domestic kissing bugs in countries endemic for leprosy. PMID:27203082

  18. Experimental Model of Tuberculosis in the Domestic Goat after Endobronchial Infection with Mycobacterium caprae ▿

    PubMed Central

    Pérez de Val, Bernat; López-Soria, Sergio; Nofrarías, Miquel; Martín, Maite; Vordermeier, H. Martin; Villarreal-Ramos, Bernardo; Romera, Nadine; Escobar, Manel; Solanes, David; Cardona, Pere-Joan; Domingo, Mariano

    2011-01-01

    Caprine tuberculosis (TB) has increased in recent years, highlighting the need to address the problem the infection poses in goats. Moreover, goats may represent a cheaper alternative for testing of prototype vaccines in large ruminants and humans. With this aim, a Mycobacterium caprae infection model has been developed in goats. Eleven 6-month-old goats were infected by the endobronchial route with 1.5 × 103 CFU, and two other goats were kept as noninfected controls. The animals were monitored for clinical and immunological parameters throughout the experiment. After 14 weeks, the goats were euthanized, and detailed postmortem analysis of lung lesions was performed by multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) and direct observation. The respiratory lymph nodes were also evaluated and cultured for bacteriological analysis. All infected animals were positive in a single intradermal comparative cervical tuberculin (SICCT) test at 12 weeks postinfection (p.i.). Gamma interferon (IFN-γ) antigen-specific responses were detected from 4 weeks p.i. until the end of the experiment. The humoral response to MPB83 was especially strong at 14 weeks p.i. (13 days after SICCT boost). All infected animals presented severe TB lesions in the lungs and associated lymph nodes. M. caprae was recovered from pulmonary lymph nodes in all inoculated goats. MDCT allowed a precise quantitative measure of TB lesions. Lesions in goats induced by M. caprae appeared to be more severe than those induced in cattle by M. bovis over a similar period of time. The present work proposes a reliable new experimental animal model for a better understanding of caprine tuberculosis and future development of vaccine trials in this and other species. PMID:21880849

  19. Atypicality of Atypical Antipsychotics

    PubMed Central

    Farah, Andrew

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To review the current definition of atypicality, discuss the unique features of each atypical antipsychotic, and determine whether the available drugs in this class really meet the classical definition of atypicality. Data Sources: A PubMed search was conducted to identify literature on the subject of this review, supported by additional articles based on the author's clinical knowledge and experience. Study Selection and Data Extraction: Relevant references were extracted and summarized in order to meet the objective of the article. Data Synthesis: Atypical antipsychotics are considered a major advance over conventional antipsychotics, primarily because they offer effective treatment alternatives that are relatively free of extrapyramidal symptoms. In fact, the term atypicality was originally used to describe antipsychotic agents with a minimal risk of causing extrapyramidal symptoms. However, over the years the definition has been modified such that there is currently no consensus on a true definition of atypicality for these agents. Each of the atypical antipsychotics (clozapine, risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, ziprasidone, and aripiprazole) commercially available in the United States is unique in terms of its pharmacologic profile, differing with respect to receptor-binding affinity, mechanism of action, and adverse events. Of the available atypical antipsychotics, clozapine and quetiapine have shown the lowest propensity to cause extrapyramidal symptoms. Although the risk of extra-pyramidal symptoms is lower with risperidone and olanzapine than with conventional antipsychotics, risk increases with dose escalation. Data for ziprasidone indicate that the risk of extrapyramidal symptoms may be similar to that of risperidone and olanzapine. There is a concern of akathisia with aripiprazole; however, more experience with this agent is needed before definitive conclusions are made. Conclusion: If the definition of “atypical” antipsychotic is

  20. Evidence of birth seasonality and clustering of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infection in US dairy herds.

    PubMed

    Zare, Y; Shook, G E; Collins, M T; Kirkpatrick, B W

    2013-11-01

    Paratuberculosis (Johne's disease) is a contagious intestinal infection of ruminants caused by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP). In cattle, young calves are at the highest risk for acquiring the infection which occurs mainly through ingestion of MAP from contaminated milk, colostrum and feces or environmental contacts. Data consisted of birth dates and ELISA results of 8000 mature cows from 24 Jersey herds from throughout the US and 4 Wisconsin Holstein herds. Some herds also had complete fecal culture (FC) results. The first infection (case) definition (CD1) relied on only ELISA results. A second case definition (CD2) was used in which results of both ELISA and FC tests were considered: animals testing positive to either test were considered "test-positives" and cows testing negative to ELISA or to both ELISA and FC were regarded as "test-negatives". Objective one was to assess seasonality in birth of MAP-infected animals. The effects of age, breed, herd and season of birth (expressed as the sine and cosine functions of birth days within year) were examined using logistic regression. Age was significantly associated with the MAP infection status of dairy cows for both CDs (OR=1.11; 95% CI 1.09, 1.14; P<0.0001 for CD1; OR=1.16; 95% CI 1.08, 1.24; P<0.0001 for CD2). Season of birth had a significant effect on the risk of MAP infection based on CD1 (OR=0.79; 95% CI 0.71, 0.89; P<0.001 for cosine of birth days) with a peak in summer and a trough in winter based on the fitted model. Objective two was to assess whether test-positive animals were randomly distributed or were clustered by date of birth within herds. A temporal cluster analysis approach (scan statistic) implemented in SaTScan software was used for each case definition to detect clusters of birth cohorts using birthdates. Results identified significant clustering of MAP infection cases for CD1 in multiple herds (P<0.05). These results necessitate matching cases and controls of MAP

  1. Cough Aerosols of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Predict New Infection. A Household Contact Study

    PubMed Central

    Namugga, Olive; Mumbowa, Francis; Ssebidandi, Martin; Mbabazi, Olive; Moine, Stephanie; Mboowa, Gerald; Fox, Matthew P.; Reilly, Nancy; Ayakaka, Irene; Kim, Soyeon; Okwera, Alphonse; Joloba, Moses; Fennelly, Kevin P.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Airborne transmission of Mycobacterium tuberculosis results from incompletely characterized host, bacterial, and environmental factors. Sputum smear microscopy is associated with considerable variability in transmission. Objectives: To evaluate the use of cough-generated aerosols of M. tuberculosis to predict recent transmission. Methods: Patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) underwent a standard evaluation and collection of cough aerosol cultures of M. tuberculosis. We assessed household contacts for new M. tuberculosis infection. We used multivariable logistic regression analysis with cluster adjustment to analyze predictors of new infection. Measurements and Main Results: From May 2009 to January 2011, we enrolled 96 sputum culture-positive index TB cases and their 442 contacts. Only 43 (45%) patients with TB yielded M. tuberculosis in aerosols. Contacts of patients with TB who produced high aerosols (≥10 CFU) were more likely to have a new infection compared with contacts from low-aerosol (1–9 CFU) and aerosol-negative cases (69%, 25%, and 30%, respectively; P = 0.009). A high-aerosol patient with TB was the only predictor of new M. tuberculosis infection in unadjusted (odds ratio, 5.18; 95% confidence interval, 1.52–17.61) and adjusted analyses (odds ratio, 4.81; 95% confidence interval, 1.20–19.23). Contacts of patients with TB with no aerosols versus low and high aerosols had differential tuberculin skin test and interferon-γ release assay responses. Conclusions: Cough aerosols of M. tuberculosis are produced by a minority of patients with TB but predict transmission better than sputum smear microscopy or culture. Cough aerosols may help identify the most infectious patients with TB and thus improve the cost-effectiveness of TB control programs. PMID:23306539

  2. Management of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection: WHO guidelines for low tuberculosis burden countries.

    PubMed

    Getahun, Haileyesus; Matteelli, Alberto; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Aziz, Mohamed Abdel; Baddeley, Annabel; Barreira, Draurio; Den Boon, Saskia; Borroto Gutierrez, Susana Marta; Bruchfeld, Judith; Burhan, Erlina; Cavalcante, Solange; Cedillos, Rolando; Chaisson, Richard; Chee, Cynthia Bin-Eng; Chesire, Lucy; Corbett, Elizabeth; Dara, Masoud; Denholm, Justin; de Vries, Gerard; Falzon, Dennis; Ford, Nathan; Gale-Rowe, Margaret; Gilpin, Chris; Girardi, Enrico; Go, Un-Yeong; Govindasamy, Darshini; D Grant, Alison; Grzemska, Malgorzata; Harris, Ross; Horsburgh, C Robert; Ismayilov, Asker; Jaramillo, Ernesto; Kik, Sandra; Kranzer, Katharina; Lienhardt, Christian; LoBue, Philip; Lönnroth, Knut; Marks, Guy; Menzies, Dick; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Mosca, Davide; Mukadi, Ya Diul; Mwinga, Alwyn; Nelson, Lisa; Nishikiori, Nobuyuki; Oordt-Speets, Anouk; Rangaka, Molebogeng Xheedha; Reis, Andreas; Rotz, Lisa; Sandgren, Andreas; Sañé Schepisi, Monica; Schünemann, Holger J; Sharma, Surender Kumar; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Stagg, Helen R; Sterling, Timothy R; Tayeb, Tamara; Uplekar, Mukund; van der Werf, Marieke J; Vandevelde, Wim; van Kessel, Femke; van't Hoog, Anna; Varma, Jay K; Vezhnina, Natalia; Voniatis, Constantia; Vonk Noordegraaf-Schouten, Marije; Weil, Diana; Weyer, Karin; Wilkinson, Robert John; Yoshiyama, Takashi; Zellweger, Jean Pierre; Raviglione, Mario

    2015-12-01

    Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is characterised by the presence of immune responses to previously acquired Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection without clinical evidence of active tuberculosis (TB). Here we report evidence-based guidelines from the World Health Organization for a public health approach to the management of LTBI in high risk individuals in countries with high or middle upper income and TB incidence of <100 per 100 000 per year. The guidelines strongly recommend systematic testing and treatment of LTBI in people living with HIV, adult and child contacts of pulmonary TB cases, patients initiating anti-tumour necrosis factor treatment, patients receiving dialysis, patients preparing for organ or haematological transplantation, and patients with silicosis. In prisoners, healthcare workers, immigrants from high TB burden countries, homeless persons and illicit drug users, systematic testing and treatment of LTBI is conditionally recommended, according to TB epidemiology and resource availability. Either commercial interferon-gamma release assays or Mantoux tuberculin skin testing could be used to test for LTBI. Chest radiography should be performed before LTBI treatment to rule out active TB disease. Recommended treatment regimens for LTBI include: 6 or 9 month isoniazid; 12 week rifapentine plus isoniazid; 3-4 month isoniazid plus rifampicin; or 3-4 month rifampicin alone. PMID:26405286

  3. Management of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection: WHO guidelines for low tuberculosis burden countries

    PubMed Central

    Matteelli, Alberto; Abubakar, Ibrahim; Aziz, Mohamed Abdel; Baddeley, Annabel; Barreira, Draurio; Den Boon, Saskia; Borroto Gutierrez, Susana Marta; Bruchfeld, Judith; Burhan, Erlina; Cavalcante, Solange; Cedillos, Rolando; Chaisson, Richard; Chee, Cynthia Bin-Eng; Chesire, Lucy; Corbett, Elizabeth; Dara, Masoud; Denholm, Justin; de Vries, Gerard; Falzon, Dennis; Ford, Nathan; Gale-Rowe, Margaret; Gilpin, Chris; Girardi, Enrico; Go, Un-Yeong; Govindasamy, Darshini; D. Grant, Alison; Grzemska, Malgorzata; Harris, Ross; Horsburgh Jr, C. Robert; Ismayilov, Asker; Jaramillo, Ernesto; Kik, Sandra; Kranzer, Katharina; Lienhardt, Christian; LoBue, Philip; Lönnroth, Knut; Marks, Guy; Menzies, Dick; Migliori, Giovanni Battista; Mosca, Davide; Mukadi, Ya Diul; Mwinga, Alwyn; Nelson, Lisa; Nishikiori, Nobuyuki; Oordt-Speets, Anouk; Rangaka, Molebogeng Xheedha; Reis, Andreas; Rotz, Lisa; Sandgren, Andreas; Sañé Schepisi, Monica; Schünemann, Holger J.; Sharma, Surender Kumar; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Stagg, Helen R.; Sterling, Timothy R.; Tayeb, Tamara; Uplekar, Mukund; van der Werf, Marieke J.; Vandevelde, Wim; van Kessel, Femke; van't Hoog, Anna; Varma, Jay K.; Vezhnina, Natalia; Voniatis, Constantia; Vonk Noordegraaf-Schouten, Marije; Weil, Diana; Weyer, Karin; Wilkinson, Robert John; Yoshiyama, Takashi; Zellweger, Jean Pierre; Raviglione, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) is characterised by the presence of immune responses to previously acquired Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection without clinical evidence of active tuberculosis (TB). Here we report evidence-based guidelines from the World Health Organization for a public health approach to the management of LTBI in high risk individuals in countries with high or middle upper income and TB incidence of <100 per 100 000 per year. The guidelines strongly recommend systematic testing and treatment of LTBI in people living with HIV, adult and child contacts of pulmonary TB cases, patients initiating anti-tumour necrosis factor treatment, patients receiving dialysis, patients preparing for organ or haematological transplantation, and patients with silicosis. In prisoners, healthcare workers, immigrants from high TB burden countries, homeless persons and illicit drug users, systematic testing and treatment of LTBI is conditionally recommended, according to TB epidemiology and resource availability. Either commercial interferon-gamma release assays or Mantoux tuberculin skin testing could be used to test for LTBI. Chest radiography should be performed before LTBI treatment to rule out active TB disease. Recommended treatment regimens for LTBI include: 6 or 9 month isoniazid; 12 week rifapentine plus isoniazid; 3–4 month isoniazid plus rifampicin; or 3–4 month rifampicin alone. PMID:26405286

  4. Expression library immunization confers protection against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Huntley, J F; Stabel, J R; Paustian, M L; Reinhardt, T A; Bannantine, J P

    2005-10-01

    Currently, paratuberculosis vaccines are comprised of crude whole-cell preparations of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Although effective in reducing clinical disease and fecal shedding, these vaccines have severe disadvantages as well, including seroconversion of vaccinated animals and granulomatous lesions at the site of vaccination. DNA vaccines can offer an alternative approach that may be safer and elicit more protective responses. In an effort to identify protective M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis sequences, a genomic DNA expression library was generated and subdivided into pools of clones (approximately 1,500 clones/pool). The clone pools were evaluated to determine DNA vaccine efficacy by immunizing mice via gene gun delivery and challenging them with live, virulent M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Four clone pools resulted in a significant reduction in the amount of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis recovered from mouse tissues compared to mice immunized with other clone pools and nonvaccinated, infected control mice. One of the protective clone pools was further partitioned into 10 clone arrays of 108 clones each, and four clone arrays provided significant protection from both spleen and mesenteric lymph node colonization by M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. The nucleotide sequence of each clone present in the protective pools was determined, and coding region functions were predicted by computer analysis. Comparison of the protective clone array sequences implicated 26 antigens that may be responsible for protection in mice. This study is the first study to demonstrate protection against M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection with expression library immunization. PMID:16177367

  5. Evaluation of a domestic interferon-gamma release assay for detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yongliang; Ou, Mingzhan; He, Shuizhen; Li, Xiaofei; Lin, Yanyan; Xiong, Junhui; Zhang, Jun; Ge, Shengxiang

    2015-07-01

    Interferon-gamma release assays (IGRAs) have been demonstrated to be useful in the diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infection. However, IGRAs have not been recommended for clinical usage in most low-income countries due to the shortage of clinical data available resulting from their high test cost. Recently, a cheaper domestic TB-IGRA was approved in China. In this study, we compared TB-IGRA with QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) for MTB infection diagnosis in 253 active TB patients, 48 non-TB lung disease patients, 115 healthcare workers and 216 healthy individuals. The proportion of positive TB-IGRA results in active TB patients, patients with non-TB lung disease, healthcare workers and healthy individuals was 88.3%, 27.1%, 40.9% and 17.6%, respectively, which was similar to the results of QFT-GIT, with an overall agreement of 95% (κ = 0.89) and a high correlation between their responses (r = 0.85, p < 0.001) being observed. In conclusion, the TB-IGRA has comparable clinical performance with QFT-GIT. PMID:26055815

  6. Granzyme A as a potential biomarker of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and disease.

    PubMed

    Guggino, Giuliana; Orlando, Valentina; Cutrera, Stella; La Manna, Marco P; Di Liberto, Diana; Vanini, Valentina; Petruccioli, Elisa; Dieli, Francesco; Goletti, Delia; Caccamo, Nadia

    2015-08-01

    Cytotoxic molecules such as granulysin, perforin and granzymes produced by cytolytic T cells directly contribute to immune defense against tuberculosis (TB). In search for novel TB biomarkers, we have evaluated the levels of granzyme A in plasma obtained from QuantiFERON-TB Gold In tube (QFT-IT) assays from patients with active TB disease and subjects with latent TB infection (LTBI). Granzyme A serum levels in TB patients were significantly lower than values found in LTBI subjects even after subtraction of the unstimulated levels from the antigen-stimulated responses. The receiver operator characteristics (ROC) curve analysis comparing TB patients and LTBI groups, showed that at a cut-off value of granzyme A of <3.425pg/ml, the sensitivity and the specificity of the assay were 29.41% and 94.74%, respectively. Our results suggest that granzyme A could be considered another biomarker of TB, that can be used, other than IFN-γ, to discriminate between patients with active TB and LTBI subjects in a well characterized cohort of confirmed Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected individuals. PMID:26051682

  7. Understanding PGE2, LXA4 and LTB4 balance during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection through mathematical model.

    PubMed

    Pedruzzi, Gabriele; Das, Phonindra Nath; Rao, Kanury Vs; Chatterjee, Samrat

    2016-01-21

    Infection of humans with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) results in diverse outcomes that range from acute disease to establishment of persistence and to even clearance of the pathogen. These different outcomes represent the combined result of host heterogeneity on the one hand, and virulence properties of the infecting strain of pathogen on the other. From the standpoint of the host, the balance between PGE2, LXA4 and LTB4 represents at least one of the factors that dictates the eventual pathophysiology. We therefore built an ODE model to describe the host-pathogen interaction and studied the local stability properties of the system, to obtain the parametric conditions that lead to different disease outcomes. We then modulated levels of the pro- and anti-inflammatory lipid mediators to better understand the convergence between host phenotype and factors that relate to virulence properties of the pathogen. Global sensitivity analysis, using the variance-based method of extended Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test (eFAST), revealed that disease severity was indeed defined by combined effects of phenotypic variability at the level of both host and pathogen. Interestingly here, [PGE2] was found to act as a switch between bacterial clearance and acute disease. Our mathematical model suggests that development of more effective treatments for tuberculosis will be contingent upon a better understanding of how the intrinsic variability at the level of both host and pathogen contribute to influence the nature of interactions between these two entities. PMID:26551160

  8. The emergence of latent infection in the early evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, Rebecca H; Tanaka, Mark M

    2016-05-25

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis has an unusual natural history in that the vast majority of its human hosts enter a latent state that is both non-infectious and devoid of any symptoms of disease. From the pathogen perspective, it seems counterproductive to relinquish reproductive opportunities to achieve a détente with the host immune response. However, a small fraction of latent infections reactivate to the disease state. Thus, latency has been argued to provide a safe harbour for future infections which optimizes the persistence of M. tuberculosis in human populations. Yet, if a pathogen begins interactions with humans as an active disease without latency, how could it begin to evolve latency properties without incurring an immediate reproductive disadvantage? We address this question with a mathematical model. Results suggest that the emergence of tuberculosis latency may have been enabled by a mechanism akin to cryptic genetic variation in that detrimental latency properties were hidden from natural selection until their expression became evolutionarily favoured. PMID:27194699

  9. In vitro gene expression profile of bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells in early Mycobacterium bovis infection

    PubMed Central

    CHENG, YAFEN; CHOU, CHUNG-HSI; TSAI, HSIANG-JUNG

    2015-01-01

    The intracellular parasite Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) causes tuberculosis in cattle and humans. Understanding the interactions between M. bovis and host cells is essential in developing tools for the prevention, detection, and treatment of M. bovis infection. Gene expression profiles provide a large amount of information regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying these interactions. The present study analyzed changes in gene expression in bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) at 0, 4 and 24 h following exposure to M. bovis. Using bovine whole-genome microarrays, a total of 420 genes were identified that exhibited significant alterations in expression (≥2-fold). Significantly enriched genes were identified using the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes database, of which the highest differentially expressed genes were associated with the immune system, signal transduction, endocytosis, cellular transport, inflammation, and apoptosis. Of the genes associated with the immune system, 84.85% displayed downregulation. These findings support the view that M. bovis inhibits signaling pathways of antimycobacterial host defense in bovine PBMCs. These in vitro data demonstrated that molecular alterations underlying the pathogenesis of tuberculosis begin early, during the initial 24 h following M. bovis infection. PMID:26668602

  10. Nonpathogenic SIV and Pathogenic HIV Infections Associate with Disparate Innate Cytokine Signatures in Response to Mycobacterium bovis BCG

    PubMed Central

    Gasper, Melanie A.; Biswas, Shameek P.; Fisher, Bridget S.; Ehnert, Stephanie C.; Sherman, David R.; Sodora, Donald L.

    2016-01-01

    Infections with mycobacteria, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) and Mycobacterium bovis (M. bovis) BCG, are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality for HIV-infected persons. In contrast to HIV, nonpathogenic SIV infections of sooty mangabeys are characterized by a lack of clinical disease including an absence of opportunistic infections. The goal of this study was to identify innate immune responses to M. bovis BCG maintained during nonpathogenic lentiviral infections through a comparison of functional responses during pathogenic HIV or nonpathogenic SIV infections. Monocytes were evaluated for their ability to express key anti-mycobacterial cytokines TNF-α and IL-12 following a six-hour ex vivo BCG exposure. While HIV-infection was associated with a decreased percentage of IL-12-producing monocytes, nonpathogenic SIV-infection was associated with an increased percentage of monocytes producing both cytokines. Gene expression analysis of PBMC following ex vivo BCG exposure identified differential expression of NK cell-related genes and several cytokines, including IFN-γ and IL-23, between HIV-infected and control subjects. In contrast, SIV-infected and uninfected-control mangabeys exhibited no significant differences in gene expression after BCG exposure. Finally, differential gene expression patterns were identified between species, with mangabeys exhibiting lower IL-6 and higher IL-17 in response to BCG when compared to humans. Overall, this comparison of immune responses to M. bovis BCG identified unique immune signatures (involving cytokines IL-12, TNF-α, IL-23, IL-17, and IL-6) that are altered during HIV, but maintained or increased during nonpathogenic SIV infections. These unique cytokine and transcriptome signatures provide insight into the differential immune responses to Mycobacteria during pathogenic HIV-infection that may be associated with an increased incidence of mycobacterial co-infections. PMID:27505158

  11. Tuberculosis patients co-infected with Mycobacterium bovis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in an urban area of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Marcio Roberto; Rocha, Adalgiza da Silva; da Costa, Ronaldo Rodrigues; de Alencar, Andrea Padilha; de Oliveira, Vania Maria; Fonseca, Antônio Augusto; Sales, Mariana Lázaro; Issa, Marina de Azevedo; Soares, Paulo Martins; Pereira, Omara Tereza Vianello; dos Santos, Eduardo Calazans; Mendes, Rejane Silva; Ferreira, Ângela Maria de Jesus; Mota, Pedro Moacyr Pinto Coelho; Suffys, Philip Noel; Guimarães, Mark Drew Crosland

    2013-01-01

    In this cross-sectional study, mycobacteria specimens from 189 tuberculosis (TB) patients living in an urban area in Brazil were characterised from 2008-2010 using phenotypic and molecular speciation methods (pncA gene and oxyR pseudogene analysis). Of these samples, 174 isolates simultaneously grew on Löwenstein-Jensen (LJ) and Stonebrink (SB)-containing media and presented phenotypic and molecular profiles of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, whereas 12 had molecular profiles of M. tuberculosis based on the DNA analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin wax-embedded tissue samples (paraffin blocks). One patient produced two sputum isolates, the first of which simultaneously grew on LJ and SB media and presented phenotypic and molecular profiles of M. tuberculosis, and the second of which only grew on SB media and presented phenotypic profiles of Mycobacterium bovis. One patient provided a bronchial lavage isolate, which simultaneously grew on LJ and SB media and presented phenotypic and molecular profiles of M. tuberculosis, but had molecular profiles of M. bovis from paraffin block DNA analysis, and one sample had molecular profiles of M. tuberculosis and M. bovis identified from two distinct paraffin blocks. Moreover, we found a low prevalence (1.6%) of M. bovis among these isolates, which suggests that local health service procedures likely underestimate its real frequency and that it deserves more attention from public health officials. PMID:23778657

  12. Source investigation of two outbreaks of skin and soft tissue infection by Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Torres-Coy, J A; Rodríguez-Castillo, B A; Pérez-Alfonzo, R; DE Waard, J H

    2016-04-01

    Outbreaks of soft tissue or skin infection due to non-tuberculous mycobacteria are reported frequently in scientific journals but in general the infection source in these outbreaks remains unknown. In Venezuela, in two distinct outbreaks, one after breast augmentation surgery and another after hydrolipoclasy therapy, 16 patients contracted a soft tissue infection due to Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. abscessus. Searching for the possible environmental infection sources in these outbreaks, initially the tap water (in the hydrolipoclasy therapy outbreak) and a surgical skin marker (in the breast implant surgery outbreak), were identified as the infection sources. Molecular typing of the strains with a variable number tandem repeat typing assay confirmed the tap water as the infection source but the molecular typing technique excluded the skin marker. We discuss the results and make a call for the implementation of stringent hygiene and disinfection guidelines for cosmetic procedures in Venezuela. PMID:26441024

  13. Infection of J774A.1 with different Mycobacterium species induces differential immune and miRNA-related responses.

    PubMed

    Elizabeth, Mendoza-Coronel; Hernández de la Cruz, Olga Nohemí; Mauricio, Castañón-Arreola

    2016-05-01

    Macrophages act as a reservoir for Mycobacterium tuberculosis, producing latent infection in approximately 90% of infected people. In this study, J774A.1 mouse macrophage cell line response and microRNA (miRNA) expression during infection with the most relevant mycobacterial strains for humans (M. tuberculosis, M. bovis and M. bovis BCG) was explored. No significant differences in bacillary loads were observed between activate and naive macrophages infected with M. tuberculosis and M. bovis. Nitrite production inhibition and infection control were in accordance with the virulence of the strain. Expression of let-7e, miR-21, miR-155, miR-210 and miR-223 was opposite in the two species and miR-146b* and miR-1224 expression seemed to be part of the general response to infection. PMID:27041510

  14. The effect of low-power GaAlAs laser radiation on Mycobacterium bovis infection in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathi, Yashar; Golmaii, Poone; Rabiee, Atoosa; Samadpoor, Ali; Shahverdi, Nooshin; Nikbin, Behrooz

    2003-12-01

    The effects of laser on the immune system have not been extensively characterized. Low power laser sources, such as GaAlAs laser have been found to produce photo biological effects with evidence of interference with immunological functions. We have investigated the effects of GaAlAs laser irradiation on the immune response due to Mycobacterium bovis BCG infection in mice. BALB/C mice were exposed on the abdomen skin to GaAlAs laser radiation (810 nm) for 3 consequent days (Days = -2, -1, 0) before infection with 1 x 106 live units of Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) in the footpad. 21 days later groups of mice were tested for a delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to the purified protein derivative (PPD) of tubercle bacilli and the course of infection was monitored by measuring the size of the infected footpad. In the mice treated by laser, the DTH response to PPD was significantly suppressed (P-value<0.045) compared to unirradiated mice, when tested 21 days after BCG infection. When laser irradiated 13 days after BCG infection (Days: +13, +14, +15) BALB/C mice did not show a significant decrease in their DTH response to PPD indicating that the laser-induced suppression of BCG occurs only at the induction stage of the immune response. Thus mice exposed to the laser radiation before BCG infection showed an impaired DTH response to Mycobacterium, whereas mice exposed to the laser irradiation after BCG did not. These studies demonstrate that a systemic effect of laser irradiation can suppress the development and expression of immunity to pathogenic bacteria in mice. This suppression could be at the induction stage of the immune response (DTH) but not the elicitation stage. Also it seems that laser radiation, potentially, could have side effects for the immune system, on the basis of suppression effects it has shown on DTH response.

  15. [Strategies for Mycobacterium avium complex infection control in Japan: how do they improve the present situation?].

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kenji; Sano, Chiaki

    2013-03-01

    Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) were the most frequently isolated (about 80%) and most common cause of lung nontuberculosis. Its rate of infection is globally increasing, especially in Japan. In this situation, it is urgently needed to provide scientific evidences and develop therapeutic interventions in MAC infections. Recently, more and more patients are elderly women with no history of smoking, and they have reticulonodular infiltrates and patchy bilateral bronchiectasis. However the prognostic and intractable factors of MAC infections are poorly known. In this symposium, we address five novel strategies for MAC infection, concerning the more accurate incidence and prevalence rates compared with other countries, host defense associated with Th1/Th17 balance, route of MAC infection related soil exposure, MAC IgA antibody as a diagnosis maker, and improved chemotherapy including aminoglycoside or new quinolone. Appropriate clinical intervention may help to reduce the prolongation of MAC infection or enhance the activity of chemotherapy for the improved control of MAC. Below are the abstracts for each of the five speakers. 1. Review of current epidemiological study of pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial disease in Japan and the rest of the world: Kozo MORIMOTO (Respiratory Center, Fukujuji Hospital, Japan Anti-Tuberculosis Association) The studies on pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) disease prevalence were started in early 1970s in Japan by the Mycobacteriosis Research Group of National Chest Hospitals. They were followed by a questionnaire survey in 1990s, by the National Tuberculosis and NTM Survey in late 1990s, and recently by the questionnaire surveys conducted by the NTM Disease Research Committee. The latest data in Japan (from 2007) indicated a morbidity rate of 5.7 per 100,000 population. Deaths from NTM disease were reported for the first time in 1970 and showed a marked, steady increase until 2007, with 912 deaths in that year. We

  16. Atypical presentation of exophytic herpes simplex virus type 2 with concurrent cytomegalovirus infection: a significant pitfall in diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Garib, George; Hughey, Lauren C; Elmets, Craig A; Cafardi, Jennifer A; Andea, Aleodor A

    2013-05-01

    We report 3 unusual cases of atypical exophytic cutaneous herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 2 with concurrent cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in immunosuppressed patients and raise awareness to the significant clinical and pathologic challenges in establishing the correct diagnosis. In all the 3 cases, the lesions presented as fungating plaques and nodules with areas of superficial erosion. Initial clinical differential included genital warts, syphilis, versus cutaneous malignancy. All the 3 patients were referred to the dermatology clinic where a combination of cutaneous biopsies, viral cultures of the lesions, polymerase chain reaction, CMV antigenemia, and immunoperoxidase stains for CMV and HSV confirmed the diagnosis of HSV type 2 with concurrent CMV infection. All the 3 patients were treated with oral valganciclovir with significant improvement noted at the follow-up visit. In addition, we review the previously reported HSV/CMV cutaneous coinfection cases. PMID:22534637

  17. Masking of two in vitro immunological assays for Mycobacterium bovis (BCG) in calves acutely infected with non-cytopathic bovine viral diarrhoea virus.

    PubMed

    Charleston, B; Hope, J C; Carr, B V; Howard, C J

    2001-10-20

    Acute infection of calves, previously vaccinated with bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG), with non-cytopathic viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) resulted in the temporary suppression of two in vitro assays used to monitor Mycobacterium bovis infection. Lymphocyte proliferation and interferon-gamma production by whole blood cultures containing purified protein derivatives prepared from Mycobacterium avium (PPD-A) and M bovis (PPD-B) were markedly suppressed. The implication is that acute infections of cattle with non-cytopathic BVDV may temporarily compromise diagnostic tests for M. bovis infections and result in a failure to identify cattle with tuberculosis. PMID:11700926

  18. Effect of interaction of vitamin C on macrophage immune response to infection with Mycobacterium bovis.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Zhou, X; Zhang, Z; Xu, L; Yin, X; Yang, L; Zhao, D

    2012-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium bovis affecting humans and livestock. Like Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb), M. bovis can persist in cattle without causing overt symptoms after entering a non-replicating persistent (NRP) state. Given that M.tb enters NRP under stress conditions, we sought to find the effects of vitamin C (VC) on M. bovis in vitro and in vivo (VC could mimic stresses like hypoxia by O2 scavenging and acidic conditions in phagosome). M. bovis was cultured in a medium with VC for 48 h. The differential expression of five genes (dosR, dosS, dosT, icl, and hspX of M. bovis) implicated in the M. bovis NRP state was measured with real-time quantitative PCR. Expression of all five genes was increased by VC. Relative to the control, VC-exposed bacteria appeared smaller and more rounded in shape with a much thicker inner envelope. A lower number of viable bacteria were found in comparison with those of the control. We infected macrophage cell line ANA-1 with M. bovis and cultured it in VC-added medium (MC group) for 24h and 48 h. Expression of il-10, il-6, tnf-α, and il-β was examined and compared with expression by cells infected by M. bovis only without VC treatment (MB group), uninfected cells in the medium treated with VC (VC group), and cells in the medium only without VC. Il-1β, tnf-α, and il-6 transcription were up-regulated significantly in MC group. IL-10 gene expression in MB and MC groups was less than in the control at 24h, but that of MC group increased more than the MB group at 48 h. The numbers of intracellular M. bovis in the MC group were lower than that in the other groups. Slower growth was found in VC-treated M. bovis, and macrophages were more bactericidal for intracellular VC-stimulated M. bovis than for M. bovis with no VC treatment. PMID:22762523

  19. A probabilistic transmission model to assess infection risk from Mycobacterium tuberculosis in commercial passenger trains.

    PubMed

    Chen, Szu-Chieh; Liao, Chung-Min; Li, Sih-syuan; You, Shu-Han

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this article is to characterize the risk of infection from airborne Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacilli exposure in commercial passenger trains based on a risk-based probabilistic transmission modeling. We investigated the tuberculosis (TB) infection risks among commercial passengers by inhaled aerosol M. tuberculosis bacilli and quantify the patterns of TB transmission in Taiwan High Speed Rail (THSR). A deterministic Wells-Riley mathematical model was used to account for the probability of infection risk from M. tuberculosis bacilli by linking the cough-generated aerosol M. tuberculosis bacilli concentration and particle size distribution. We found that (i) the quantum generation rate of TB was estimated with a lognormal distribution of geometric mean (GM) of 54.29 and geometric standard deviation (GSD) of 3.05 quantum/h at particle size ≤ 5 μm and (ii) the basic reproduction numbers (R(0) ) were estimated to be 0.69 (0.06-6.79), 2.82 (0.32-20.97), and 2.31 (0.25-17.69) for business, standard, and nonreserved cabins, respectively. The results indicate that commercial passengers taking standard and nonreserved cabins had higher transmission risk than those in business cabins based on conservatism. Our results also reveal that even a brief exposure, as in the bronchoscopy cases, can also result in a transmission when the quantum generation rate is high. This study could contribute to a better understanding of the dynamics of TB transmission in commercial passenger trains by assessing the relationship between TB infectiousness, passenger mobility, and key model parameters such as seat occupancy, ventilation rate, and exposure duration. PMID:21175727

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection Induces HDAC1-Mediated Suppression of IL-12B Gene Expression in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Aneesh; Antony, Cecil; Jose, Leny; Mundayoor, Sathish; Natarajan, Krishnamurthy; Kumar, R Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Downregulation of host gene expression is one of the many strategies employed by intracellular pathogens such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) to survive inside the macrophages and cause disease. The underlying molecular mechanism behind the downregulation of host defense gene expression is largely unknown. In this study we explored the role of histone deacetylation in macrophages in response to infection by virulent MTB H37Rv in manipulating host gene expression. We show a significant increase in the levels of HDAC1 with a concomitant and marked reduction in the levels of histone H3-acetylation in macrophages containing live, but not killed, virulent MTB. Additionally, we show that HDAC1 is recruited to the promoter of IL-12B in macrophages infected with live, virulent MTB, and the subsequent hypoacetylation of histone H3 suppresses the expression of this gene which plays a key role in initiating Th1 responses. By inhibiting immunologically relevant kinases, and by knockdown of crucial transcriptional regulators, we demonstrate that protein kinase-A (PKA), CREB, and c-Jun play an important role in regulating HDAC1 level in live MTB-infected macrophages. By chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis, we prove that HDAC1 expression is positively regulated by the recruitment of c-Jun to its promoter. Knockdown of HDAC1 in macrophages significantly reduced the survival of intracellular MTB. These observations indicate a novel HDAC1-mediated epigenetic modification induced by live, virulent MTB to subvert the immune system to survive and replicate in the host. PMID:26697414

  1. Dysbiosis of the Fecal Microbiota in Cattle Infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Vecchiarelli, Bonnie; Indugu, Nagaraju; Kumar, Sanjay; Gallagher, Susan C.; Fyock, Terry L.; Sweeney, Raymond W.

    2016-01-01

    Johne's disease (JD) is a chronic, intestinal infection of cattle, caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). It results in granulomatous inflammation of the intestinal lining, leading to malabsorption, diarrhea, and weight loss. Crohn’s disease (CD), a chronic, inflammatory gastrointestinal disease of humans, has many clinical and pathologic similarities to JD. Dysbiosis of the enteric microbiota has been demonstrated in CD patients. It is speculated that this dysbiosis may contribute to the intestinal inflammation observed in those patients. The purpose of this study was to investigate the diversity patterns of fecal bacterial populations in cattle infected with MAP, compared to those of uninfected control cattle, using phylogenomic analysis. Fecal samples were selected to include samples from 20 MAP-positive cows; 25 MAP-negative herdmates; and 25 MAP-negative cows from a MAP-free herd. The genomic DNA was extracted; PCR amplified sequenced on a 454 Roche platform, and analyzed using QIIME. Approximately 199,077 reads were analyzed from 70 bacterial communities (average of 2,843 reads/sample). The composition of bacterial communities differed between the 3 treatment groups (P < 0.001; Permanova test). Taxonomic assignment of the operational taxonomic units (OTUs) identified 17 bacterial phyla across all samples. Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes constituted more than 95% of the bacterial population in the negative and exposed groups. In the positive group, lineages of Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria increased and those of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes decreased (P < 0.001). Actinobacteria was highly abundant (30% of the total bacteria) in the positive group compared to exposed and negative groups (0.1–0.2%). Notably, the genus Arthrobacter was found to predominate Actinobacteria in the positive group. This study indicates that MAP-infected cattle have a different composition of their fecal microbiota than MAP-negative cattle. PMID:27494144

  2. Influence of phthiocerol dimycocerosate on CD4(+) T cell priming and persistence during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Rachel; Nambiar, Jonathan K; Leotta, Lisa; Counoupas, Claudio; Britton, Warwick J; Triccas, James A

    2016-07-01

    The characterisation of mycobacterial factors that influence or modulate the host immune response may aid the development of more efficacious TB vaccines. We have previously reported that Mycobacterium tuberculosis deficient in export of Phthiocerol Dimycocerosates (DIM) (MT103(ΔdrrC)) is more attenuated than wild type M. tuberculosis and provides sustained protective immunity compared to the existing BCG vaccine. Here we sought to define the correlates of immunity associated with DIM deficiency by assessing the impact of MT103(ΔdrrC) delivery on antigen presenting cell (APC) function and the generation of CD4(+) T cell antigen-specific immunity. MT103(ΔdrrC) was a potent activator of bone marrow derived dendritic cells, inducing significantly greater expression of CD86 and IL-12p40 compared to BCG or the MT103 parental strain. This translated to an increased ability to initiate early in vivo priming of antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells compared to BCG with enhanced release of IFN-γ and TNF upon antigen-restimulation. The heightened immunity induced by MT103(ΔdrrC) correlated with greater persistence within the spleen compared to BCG, however both MT103(ΔdrrC) and BCG were undetectable in the lung at 70 days post-vaccination. In immunodeficient RAG (-/-) mice, MT103(ΔdrrC) was less virulent than the parental MT103 strain, yet MT103(ΔdrrC) infected mice succumbed more rapidly compared to BCG-infected animals. These results suggest that DIM translocation plays a role in APC stimulation and CD4(+) T cell activation during M. tuberculosis infection and highlights the potential of DIM-deficient strains as novel TB vaccine candidates. PMID:27450001

  3. Intestinal infection following aerosol challenge of calves with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A challenge experiment was performed to investigate whether administration of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) via the respiratory route leads to MAP infection in calves. Eighteen calves from test negative dams were randomly allocated to four groups. Six calves were challenged with MAP nasally and six calves were challenged by transtracheal injection; three orally challenged calves served as positive controls, and three non challenged calves as negative controls. The challenge was performed as a nine-fold trickle dose, 107 CFU in total. Blood and faecal samples were collected frequently. Calves were euthanized three months post-challenge and extensively sampled. Blood samples were tested for the presence of antibodies and interferon gamma producing cells by ELISA. Faecal and tissue samples were cultured in a liquid culture system and the presence of MAP was confirmed by IS900 realtime PCR. Fourteen out of fifteen calves had no MAP antibody response. The negative controls remained negative; all positive controls became infected. Two nasally challenged calves showed a Purified Protein Derivative Avian (PPDA) specific interferon gamma response. In all nasally challenged calves, MAP positive intestinal samples were detected. In three calves of the nasal group MAP positive retropharyngeal lymph nodes or tonsils were detected. In all calves of the transtracheal group MAP positive intestinal tissues were detected as well and three had a MAP positive tracheobronchial lymph node. These findings indicate that inhalation of MAP aerosols can result in infection. These experimental results may be relevant for transmission under field conditions since viable MAP has been detected in dust on commercial dairy farms. PMID:22136728

  4. Lactase persistence, NOD2 status and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection associations to Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), which includes both Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC), is caused by a complex interplay involving genetic predisposition, environmental factors and an infectious agent. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is a promising pathogen candidate since it produces a chronic intestinal inflammatory disease in ruminants that resembles CD in humans. MAP is a ubiquitous microorganism, although its presence in the food chain, especially in milk from infected animals, is what made us think that there could be an association between lactase persistence (LP) and IBD. The LCT mutation has brought adaptation to dairy farming which in turn would have increased exposure of the population to infection by MAP. NOD2 gene mutations are highly associated to CD. Methods In our study, CD and UC patients and controls from the North of Spain were genotyped for the lactase gene (LCT) and for three NOD-2 variants, R702W, G908R and Cins1007fs. MAP PCR was carried out in order to assess MAP infection status and these results were correlated with LCT and NOD2 genotypes. Results As for LP, no association was found with IBD, although UC patients were less likely to present the T/T−13910 variant compared to controls, showing a higher C-allele frequency and a tendency to lactase non-persistence (LNP). NOD2 mutations were associated to CD being the per-allele risk higher for the Cins1007fs variant. MAP infection was more extended among the healthy controls (45.2%) compared to CD patients (21.38%) and UC patients (19.04%) and this was attributed to therapy. The Asturian CD cohort presented higher levels of MAP prevalence (38.6%) compared to the Basque CD cohort (15.5%), differences also attributed to therapy. No interaction was found between MAP infection and LCT or NOD2 status. Conclusions We conclude that LP is not significantly associated with IBD, but that MAP infection and NOD2 do show not mutually interacting associations

  5. Brown-Pigmented Mycobacterium mageritense as a Cause of Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis and Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    McMullen, Allison R.; Mattar, Caline; Kirmani, Nigar

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium spp. are a rare cause of endocarditis. Herein, we describe a case of Mycobacterium mageritense prosthetic valve endocarditis. This organism produced an unusual brown pigment on solid media. Cultures of valve tissue for acid-fast bacilli might be considered in some cases of apparently culture-negative prosthetic valve endocarditis. PMID:26063854

  6. Probable disseminated Mycobacterium abscessus subspecies bolletii infection in a patient with idiopathic CD4+ T lymphocytopenia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Rapidly growing mycobacteria are opportunistic pathogens in patients with underlying risk factors. Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii is a newly recognized member of rapidly growing mycobacteria, isolated from respiratory tract and cutaneous infections. Case presentation We describe a case of chronic disseminated infection caused by M. abscessus subsp. bolletii in a 38-year-old Sri Lankan man with idiopathic CD4+ T lymphocytopenia. Idiopathic CD4+ T lymphocytopenia is a rare cause of immunodysfunction that, similar to human immunodeficiency virus infection, causes a depletion of CD4+ T lymphocytes. M. abscessus subsp. bolletii infection was diagnosed by culture isolation from two sputum samples. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge this is the first report of M. abscessus subsp. bolletii disseminated infection in a patient affected by idiopathic CD4+ T lymphocytopenia. In contrast to previous reports, the isolate of M. abscessus subsp. bolletii presented intermediate resistance to clarithromycin and was susceptible to cefoxitin and imipenem. PMID:22947084

  7. Notes from the Field: Mycobacterium abscessus Infections Among Patients of a Pediatric Dentistry Practice--Georgia, 2015.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Gianna; Tobin-D'Angelo, Melissa; Parham, Angie; Edison, Laura; Lorentzson, Lauren; Smith, Carol; Drenzek, Cherie

    2016-04-01

    On September 13, 2015, the Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH) was notified by hospital A of a cluster of pediatric Mycobacterium abscessus odontogenic infections. Hospital A had provided care for nine children who developed presumptive or confirmed M. abscessus infection after having a pulpotomy at pediatric dentistry practice A (dates of onset: July 23, 2014-September 4, 2015). During a pulpotomy procedure, decay and the diseased pulp are removed to preserve a deciduous tooth. DPH initiated an investigation to identify the outbreak source and recommend prevention and control measures. PMID:27054966

  8. [A Case of Disseminated Cutaneous Mycobacterium chelonae Infection Successfully Improved with Thermal Therapy].

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Akira; Nakamura-Uchiyama, Fukumi; Sato, Masatoshi; Fukumori, Tatsuya; Yamada, Yutaka; Hishiya, Naokuni; Shiraishi, Naotaka; Ogawa, Taku; Uno, Kenji; Kasahara, Kei; Maeda, Koichi; Konishi, Mitsuru; Yoshikawa, Masahide; Mikasa, Keiichi

    2015-05-01

    A 54-year-old female with dermatomyositis treated with cyclosporine and methylprednisolone presented with multiple subcutaneous nodules on her upper and lower extremities on December 2011. The number of lesions gradually increased. She had a history of surgical intervention such as debridement, skin graft of right lower leg due to trauma and subsequent bacterial infection on August 2011. Culture from a skin lesion on June 2012 confirmed Mycobacterium chelonae, which was susceptible to clarithromycin (CAM). We started treatment with CAM, imipenem/cilastatin (IPM/CS) and tobramycin (TOB) for 2 weeks. Then CAM monotherapy was continued, however CAM was discontinued because of liver dysfunction. In September 2012 new nodular lesions were observed on the left arm and right leg. We administrated azithromycin, IPM/CS and TOB. Subcutaneous nodules were partially improved, but new lesions appeared on her right leg. A culture of skin lesion yielded M. chelonae, which was highly resistant to CAM and IPM/CS. Based on the sensitivity test, moxifloxacin was used. However, there was no significant improvement in her skin lesions, so we started thermal therapy on day 57 after admission. She showed an excellent response to thermal therapy, and there has been no recurrence. PMID:26552135

  9. Mycobacterium bovis infection in goats from the Northeast region of Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Higino, Severino Silvano dos Santos; Pinheiro, Sônia Regina; de Souza, Gisele Oliveira; Dib, Cristina Corsi; do Rosário, Tatiana Reis; Melville, Priscilla Anne; Alves, Clebert José; de Azevedo, Sérgio Santos

    2011-01-01

    A total of 8,058 male and female mixed-breed goats and 1–4 years of age were slaughtered over a period of 7 months at the public slaughterhouse of Patos city, Paraíba state, in the Northeast region of Brazil; 822 animals were inspected for gross lesions of tuberculosis, and 12 (1.46%) had lesions suggestive of tuberculosis in the mammary gland, lungs, liver and mediastinal, mesenteric, submandibular, parotid and prescapular lymph nodes. Presence of granulomatous lesions was confirmed in the submandibular lymph node of one (8.3%) goat at the histopathological examination and at the mycobacterium culture the same sample was confirmed positive. Isolate was confirmed as belonging to the M. tuberculosis complex by PCR restriction enzyme analysis (PRA). Spoligotyping identified the isolate into spoligotype SB0295 on the M. bovis Spoligotype Database website (www.mbovis.org), and it was classified as M. bovis. The occurrence of M. bovis in goats in this study suggests that this species may be a potential source of infection for humans and should be regarded as a possible problem in the advancement of control and eradication program for bovine tuberculosis in Brazil. PMID:24031775

  10. Report of Two Fatal Cases of Mycobacterium mucogenicum Central Nervous System Infection in Immunocompetent Patients

    PubMed Central

    Adékambi, Toïdi; Foucault, Cedric; La Scola, Bernard; Drancourt, Michel

    2006-01-01

    Neurological infections due to rapidly growing mycobacteria (RGM) have rarely been reported. We recently investigated two unrelated immunocompetent patients, one with community-acquired lymphocytic meningitis and the other with cerebral thrombophlebitis. Mycobacterium mucogenicum was isolated in pure culture and detected by PCR sequencing of cerebrospinal fluid samples. Both patients eventually died. The two isolates exhibited an overlapping antimicrobial susceptibility pattern. They were susceptible in vitro to tetracyclines, macrolides, quinolones, amikacin, imipenem, cefoxitin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole and resistant to ceftriaxone. They shared 100% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity with M. mucogenicum ATCC 49650T over 1,482 bp. Their partial rpoB sequences shared 97.8% and 98.1% similarity with M. mucogenicum ATCC 49650T, suggesting that the two isolates were representative of two sequevars of M. mucogenicum species. This case report should make clinicians aware that M. mucogenicum, an RGM frequently isolated from tap water or from respiratory specimens and mostly without clinical significance, can even be encountered in the central nervous system of immunocompetent patients. PMID:16517863

  11. Exploitation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Reporter Strains to Probe the Impact of Vaccination at Sites of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Aldridge, Bree B.; Russell, David G.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) remains a major public health problem, with an effective vaccine continuing to prove elusive. Progress in vaccination strategies has been hampered by a lack of appreciation of the bacterium's response to dynamic changes in the host immune environment. Here, we utilize reporter Mtb strains that respond to specific host immune stresses such as hypoxia and nitric oxide (hspX′::GFP), and phagosomal maturation (rv2390c′::GFP), to investigate vaccine-induced alterations in the environmental niche during experimental murine infections. While vaccination undoubtedly decreased bacterial burden, we found that it also appeared to accelerate Mtb's adoption of a phenotype better equipped to survive in its host. We subsequently utilized a novel replication reporter strain of Mtb to demonstrate that, in addition to these alterations in host stress response, there is a decreased percentage of actively replicating Mtb in vaccinated hosts. This observation was supported by the differential sensitivity of recovered bacteria to the front-line drug isoniazid. Our study documents the natural history of the impact that vaccination has on Mtb's physiology and replication and highlights the value of reporter Mtb strains for probing heterogeneous Mtb populations in the context of a complex, whole animal model. PMID:25233380

  12. Aptamer Against Mannose-capped Lipoarabinomannan Inhibits Virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Mice and Rhesus Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Qin; Wang, Qilong; Sun, Xiaoming; Xia, Xianru; Wu, Shimin; Luo, Fengling; Zhang, Xiao-Lian

    2014-01-01

    The major surface lipoglycan of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb), mannose-capped lipoarabinomannan (ManLAM), is an immunosuppressive epitope of M. tb. We used systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) to generate an aptamer (ZXL1) that specifically bound to ManLAM from the virulent M. tb strain H37Rv. Aptamer ZXL1 had the highest binding affinity, with an equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) of 436.3 ± 37.84 nmol/l, and competed with the mannose receptor for binding to ManLAM and M. tb H37Rv. ZXL1 significantly inhibited the ManLAM-induced immunosuppression of CD11c+ dendritic cells (DCs) and enhanced the M. tb antigen–presenting activity of DCs for naive CD4+ Th1 cell activation. More importantly, we demonstrated that injection of aptamer ZXL1 significantly reduced the progression of M. tb H37Rv infections and bacterial loads in lungs of mice and rhesus monkeys. These results suggest that the aptamer ZXL1 is a new potential antimycobacterial agent and tuberculosis vaccine immune adjuvant. PMID:24572295

  13. Activities of TMC207, Rifampin, and Pyrazinamide against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Guinea Pigs▿

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Shaobin; Shanley, Crystal A.; Caraway, Megan L.; Orme, Eileen A.; Henao-Tamayo, Marcela; Hascall-Dove, Laurel; Ackart, David; Lenaerts, Anne J.; Basaraba, Randall J.; Orme, Ian M.; Ordway, Diane J.

    2011-01-01

    The experimental compound TMC207 is showing promise against infections caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis both in a variety of animal studies and in the field. In this study, we used the guinea pig model, a species that shows several similarities to human tuberculosis, including the hallmark of primary granuloma necrosis, to determine the efficacy of a combination regimen combining TMC207 with rifampin and pyrazinamide. This drug regimen rapidly reduced the bacterial load in the lungs to undetectable levels by 8 weeks of treatment. This reduction was associated with a substantial improvement in lung pathology, but despite this effect areas of residual necrosis still remained. In the draining lymph nodes, however, tissue damage was rapid and not significantly reversed by the drug treatment. Approximately 10 to 11 months after the treatment had ended, the animals began to trigger a Karnovsky scale indicating bacterial regrowth and potential relapse, an event confirmed by the new development of both pulmonary and extrapulmonary granulomatous lesions. Interestingly, a similar rate of relapse was also seen in animals receiving 24 weeks of rifampin, pyrazinamide, and isoniazid standard chemotherapy. These data indicate that TMC207 could be a useful addition to current treatment regimens for tuberculosis. PMID:20937788

  14. A 38-kD Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen associated with infection. Its isolation and serologic evaluation.

    PubMed Central

    Espitia, C; Cervera, I; González, R; Mancilla, R

    1989-01-01

    To identify antigens that could be specifically associated with tuberculosis infection, the antibody response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and of healthy individuals were compared by immunoblot. In healthy individuals, serum antibodies were found in the majority of cases. Bands of 60 and 32-31 kilodaltons (kD) were the antigens more frequently recognized by antibodies of normal sera (55.8 and 64.7%, respectively). In patients with pulmonary tuberculosis, the number and intensity of the developed antigen bands were much higher than in normal individuals. Antigens reacting preferentially with tuberculosis sera were also identified. Furthermore, a unique disease-associated protein antigen of 38 kD was found to react with 57% of patients' sera but with none of the controls. This antigen was isolated by elution from nitrocellulose membranes and tested as an ELISA reagent in the serodiagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis. A specificity of 0.96 and sensitivity of 0.68 were obtained. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:2478322

  15. Co-infection of Scedosporium apiospermum and Mycobacterium chelonae in an immunocompetent host.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji Seok; Choi, Misoo; Nam, Chan Hee; Kim, Jee Young; Hong, Seung Phil; Kim, Myung Hwa; Park, Byung Cheol

    2014-10-01

    A 75-year-old man presented with multiple, scaly, erythematous, grouped papules, nodules and plaques with tenderness ranging from the right forearm to hand dorsum and the right lower leg for 2-3 months. Five months prior to presentation, the patient had received an antibiotic skin test on his right forearm. Lesions appeared approximately 2-3 months after the antibiotic skin test, slowly progressing without clinical improvement. Culture for fungus on the right forearm revealed growth of Scedosporium apiospermum. The tissue acid-fast bacilli (AFB) culture for the right forearm and right leg revealed growth of non-tuberculous mycobacteria which was Mycobacterium chelonae, and subsequent tissue polymerase chain reaction of both sites reported positive signs of M. chelonae. On diastase periodic acid-Schiff stain of the biopsy specimen of the right forearm, fungal hyphae were found while rod-shaped bacilli could be seen in AFB stain for the biopsy specimen of the right leg. The patient was treated with oral clarithromycin and ciprofloxacin along with an oral antifungal agent for 13 weeks. After the treatment, the lesions subsided and left a scar. We report a rare case of co-infection of S. apiospermum and M. chelonae in an immunocompetent host. PMID:25228156

  16. Regulation of Ergothioneine Biosynthesis and Its Effect on Mycobacterium tuberculosis Growth and Infectivity.

    PubMed

    Richard-Greenblatt, Melissa; Bach, Horacio; Adamson, John; Peña-Diaz, Sandra; Li, Wu; Steyn, Adrie J C; Av-Gay, Yossef

    2015-09-18

    Ergothioneine (EGT) is synthesized in mycobacteria, but limited knowledge exists regarding its synthesis, physiological role, and regulation. We have identified Rv3701c from Mycobacterium tuberculosis to encode for EgtD, a required histidine methyltransferase that catalyzes first biosynthesis step in EGT biosynthesis. EgtD was found to be phosphorylated by the serine/threonine protein kinase PknD. PknD phosphorylates EgtD both in vitro and in a cell-based system on Thr(213). The phosphomimetic (T213E) but not the phosphoablative (T213A) mutant of EgtD failed to restore EGT synthesis in a ΔegtD mutant. The findings together with observed elevated levels of EGT in a pknD transposon mutant during in vitro growth suggests that EgtD phosphorylation by PknD negatively regulates EGT biosynthesis. We further showed that EGT is required in a nutrient-starved model of persistence and is needed for long term infection of murine macrophages. PMID:26229105

  17. Generation of transgenic cattle expressing human β-defensin 3 as an approach to reducing susceptibility to Mycobacterium bovis infection.

    PubMed

    Su, Feng; Wang, Yongsheng; Liu, Guanghui; Ru, Kun; Liu, Xin; Yu, Yuan; Liu, Jun; Wu, Yongyan; Quan, Fusheng; Guo, Zekun; Zhang, Yong

    2016-03-01

    Bovine tuberculosis results from infection with Mycobacterium bovis, a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis family. Worldwide, M. bovis infections result in economic losses in the livestock industry; cattle production is especially hard-hit by this disease. Generating M. bovis-resistant cattle may potentially mitigate the impact of this disease by reducing M. bovis infections. In this study, we used transgenic somatic cell nuclear transfer to generate cattle expressing the gene encoding human β-defensin 3 (HBD3), which confers resistance to mycobacteria in vitro. We first generated alveolar epithelial cells expressing HBD3 under the control of the bovine MUC1 promoter, and confirmed that these cells secreted HBD3 and possessed anti-mycobacterial capacity. We then generated and identified transgenic cattle by somatic cell nuclear transfer. The cleavage and blastocyst formation rates of genetically modified embryos provided evidence that monoclonal transgenic bovine fetal fibroblast cells have an integral reprogramming ability that is similar to that of normal cells. Five genetically modified cows were generated, and their anti-mycobacterial capacities were evaluated. Alveolar epithelial cells and macrophages from these cattle expressed higher levels of HBD3 protein compared with non-transgenic cells and possessed effective anti-mycobacterial capacity. These results suggest that the overall risk of M. bovis infection in transgenic cattle is efficiently reduced, and support the development of genetically modified animals as an effective tool to reduce M. bovis infection. PMID:26782926

  18. Autophagy induction targeting mTORC1 enhances Mycobacterium tuberculosis replication in HIV co-infected human macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Anna-Maria; Andersson, Blanka; Lorell, Christoffer; Raffetseder, Johanna; Larsson, Marie; Blomgran, Robert

    2016-01-01

    To survive and replicate in macrophages Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) has developed strategies to subvert host defence mechanisms, including autophagy. Autophagy induction has the potential to clear Mtb, but little is known about its effect during controlled tuberculosis and HIV co-infection. Mammalian target of rapamycin complex1 (mTORC1) inhibitors were used to induce autophagy in human macrophages pre-infected with HIV-1BaL and infected with a low dose of Mtb (co-infected), or single Mtb infected (single infected). The controlled Mtb infection was disrupted upon mTOR inhibition resulting in increased Mtb replication in a dose-dependent manner which was more pronounced during co-infection. The increased Mtb replication could be explained by the marked reduction in phagosome acidification upon mTOR inhibition. Autophagy stimulation targeting mTORC1 clearly induced a basal autophagy with flux that was unlinked to the subcellular environment of the Mtb vacuoles, which showed a concurrent suppression in acidification and maturation/flux. Overall our findings indicate that mTOR inhibition during Mtb or HIV/Mtb co-infection interferes with phagosomal maturation, thereby supporting mycobacterial growth during low-dose and controlled infection. Therefore pharmacological induction of autophagy through targeting of the canonical mTORC1-pathway should be handled with caution during controlled tuberculosis, since this could have serious consequences for patients with HIV/Mtb co-infection. PMID:27302320

  19. Infected Aortic Aneurysm caused by Mycobacterium bovis after Intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin Treatment for Bladder Cancer.

    PubMed

    Nam, Eun Young; Na, Sun Hee; Kim, Se Yong; Yoon, Doran; Kim, Chung-Jong; Park, Kyoung Un; Min, Seung-Kee; Lee, Sang Eun; Choe, Pyoeng Gyun

    2015-12-01

    A 70-year-old man presented with lower back pain and cyanotic changes in his left lower extremity. He was diagnosed with infected aortic aneurysm and infectious spondylitis. He had received intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) therapy up to 1 month before the onset of symptoms. The aneurysm was excised and an aorto-biiliac interposition graft was performed. Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex was cultured in the surgical specimens. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the senX3-regX3 region, and multiplex PCR using dual-priming oligonucleotide primers targeting the RD1 gene, revealed that the organism isolated was Mycobacterium bovis BCG. The patient took anti-tuberculosis medication for 1 year, and there was no evidence of recurrence at 18 months follow-up. PMID:26788410

  20. Infected Aortic Aneurysm caused by Mycobacterium bovis after Intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin Treatment for Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Na, Sun Hee; Kim, Se Yong; Yoon, Doran; Kim, Chung-Jong; Park, Kyoung Un; Min, Seung-Kee; Lee, Sang Eun

    2015-01-01

    A 70-year-old man presented with lower back pain and cyanotic changes in his left lower extremity. He was diagnosed with infected aortic aneurysm and infectious spondylitis. He had received intravesical Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) therapy up to 1 month before the onset of symptoms. The aneurysm was excised and an aorto-biiliac interposition graft was performed. Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex was cultured in the surgical specimens. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the senX3-regX3 region, and multiplex PCR using dual-priming oligonucleotide primers targeting the RD1 gene, revealed that the organism isolated was Mycobacterium bovis BCG. The patient took anti-tuberculosis medication for 1 year, and there was no evidence of recurrence at 18 months follow-up. PMID:26788410

  1. Multiple Cavitary Pulmonary Nodules Caused by Mycobacterium intracellulare

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Sang Hoon; Kim, Seo Ree; Choi, Joon Young; Choi, Jae Woo; Ko, Yu Mi; Jang, Sun Hee; Park, Jun Kyu; Sung, Ye Gyu; Park, Yun Jung; Oh, Su Yun; Bahk, Se Young; Lee, Ju Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have been increasingly recognized as an important cause of chronic pulmonary infections. The Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), which is composed of two species, Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracelluare, is the most commonly encountered pathogen associated with NTM lung disease. MAC pulmonary infection typically presents in a fibrocavitary form or a nodular bronchiectatic form. However, there have been atypical presentations of MAC pulmonary infections, including solitary pulmonary nodules (SPN). There have been several previous reports of SPN due to MAC infection in the United States, Japan, and Korea. In 2009, Sekine and colleagues reported a case of MAC pulmonary infection presenting with multiple nodules. To date, however, there have been no cases of NTM lung infection with multiple cavitary pulmonary nodules, and neither a fibrotic change nor nodular bronchiectasis. The present case showed a multiple cavitating nodular lung infection due to MAC, which is very rare and different from the typical presentation of MAC pulmonary infections. We also showed that percutaneous transthoracic needle aspiration can be a useful diagnostic tool to evaluate a case of multiple cavitary nodules. PMID:27468344

  2. Multiple Cavitary Pulmonary Nodules Caused by Mycobacterium intracellulare.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Sang Hoon; Kim, Seo Ree; Choi, Joon Young; Choi, Jae Woo; Ko, Yu Mi; Jang, Sun Hee; Park, Jun Kyu; Sung, Ye Gyu; Park, Yun Jung; Oh, Su Yun; Bahk, Se Young; Lee, Ju Hyun; Kim, Myung Sook

    2016-07-01

    Nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have been increasingly recognized as an important cause of chronic pulmonary infections. The Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC), which is composed of two species, Mycobacterium avium and Mycobacterium intracelluare, is the most commonly encountered pathogen associated with NTM lung disease. MAC pulmonary infection typically presents in a fibrocavitary form or a nodular bronchiectatic form. However, there have been atypical presentations of MAC pulmonary infections, including solitary pulmonary nodules (SPN). There have been several previous reports of SPN due to MAC infection in the United States, Japan, and Korea. In 2009, Sekine and colleagues reported a case of MAC pulmonary infection presenting with multiple nodules. To date, however, there have been no cases of NTM lung infection with multiple cavitary pulmonary nodules, and neither a fibrotic change nor nodular bronchiectasis. The present case showed a multiple cavitating nodular lung infection due to MAC, which is very rare and different from the typical presentation of MAC pulmonary infections. We also showed that percutaneous transthoracic needle aspiration can be a useful diagnostic tool to evaluate a case of multiple cavitary nodules. PMID:27468344

  3. Multiscale Model of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection Maps Metabolite and Gene Perturbations to Granuloma Sterilization Predictions.

    PubMed

    Pienaar, Elsje; Matern, William M; Linderman, Jennifer J; Bader, Joel S; Kirschner, Denise E

    2016-05-01

    Granulomas are a hallmark of tuberculosis. Inside granulomas, the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis may enter a metabolically inactive state that is less susceptible to antibiotics. Understanding M. tuberculosis metabolism within granulomas could contribute to reducing the lengthy treatment required for tuberculosis and provide additional targets for new drugs. Two key adaptations of M. tuberculosis are a nonreplicating phenotype and accumulation of lipid inclusions in response to hypoxic conditions. To explore how these adaptations influence granuloma-scale outcomes in vivo, we present a multiscale in silico model of granuloma formation in tuberculosis. The model comprises host immunity, M. tuberculosis metabolism, M. tuberculosis growth adaptation to hypoxia, and nutrient diffusion. We calibrated our model to in vivo data from nonhuman primates and rabbits and apply the model to predict M. tuberculosis population dynamics and heterogeneity within granulomas. We found that bacterial populations are highly dynamic throughout infection in response to changing oxygen levels and host immunity pressures. Our results indicate that a nonreplicating phenotype, but not lipid inclusion formation, is important for long-term M. tuberculosis survival in granulomas. We used virtual M. tuberculosis knockouts to predict the impact of both metabolic enzyme inhibitors and metabolic pathways exploited to overcome inhibition. Results indicate that knockouts whose growth rates are below ∼66% of the wild-type growth rate in a culture medium featuring lipid as the only carbon source are unable to sustain infections in granulomas. By mapping metabolite- and gene-scale perturbations to granuloma-scale outcomes and predicting mechanisms of sterilization, our method provides a powerful tool for hypothesis testing and guiding experimental searches for novel antituberculosis interventions. PMID:26975995

  4. Keap1 regulates inflammatory signaling in Mycobacterium avium-infected human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Awuh, Jane Atesoh; Haug, Markus; Mildenberger, Jennifer; Marstad, Anne; Do, Chau Phuc Ngoc; Louet, Claire; Stenvik, Jørgen; Steigedal, Magnus; Damås, Jan Kristian; Halaas, Øyvind; Flo, Trude Helen

    2015-08-01

    Several mechanisms are involved in controlling intracellular survival of pathogenic mycobacteria in host macrophages, but how these mechanisms are regulated remains poorly understood. We report a role for Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1), an oxidative stress sensor, in regulating inflammation induced by infection with Mycobacterium avium in human primary macrophages. By using confocal microscopy, we found that Keap1 associated with mycobacterial phagosomes in a time-dependent manner, whereas siRNA-mediated knockdown of Keap1 increased M. avium-induced expression of inflammatory cytokines and type I interferons (IFNs). We show evidence of a mechanism whereby Keap1, as part of an E3 ubiquitin ligase complex with Cul3 and Rbx1, facilitates ubiquitination and degradation of IκB kinase (IKK)-β thus terminating IKK activity. Keap1 knockdown led to increased nuclear translocation of transcription factors NF-κB, IFN regulatory factor (IRF) 1, and IRF5 driving the expression of inflammatory cytokines and IFN-β. Furthermore, knockdown of other members of the Cul3 ubiquitin ligase complex also led to increased cytokine expression, further implicating this ligase complex in the regulation of the IKK family. Finally, increased inflammatory responses in Keap1-silenced cells contributed to decreased intracellular growth of M. avium in primary human macrophages that was reconstituted with inhibitors of IKKβ or TANK-binding kinase 1 (TBK1). Taken together, we propose that Keap1 acts as a negative regulator for the control of inflammatory signaling in M. avium-infected human primary macrophages. Although this might be important to avoid sustained or overwhelming inflammation, our data suggest that a negative consequence could be facilitated growth of pathogens like M. avium inside macrophages. PMID:26195781

  5. Mechanisms of T-lymphocyte accumulation during experimental pleural infection induced by Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed

    Souza, Mariana C; Penido, Carmen; Costa, Maria F S; Henriques, Maria Graças

    2008-12-01

    Tuberculous pleurisy is a frequent extrapulmonary manifestation characterized by accumulation of fluid and inflammatory cells in the pleural space. Here, we investigated the mechanisms of T-lymphocyte accumulation in the pleural space by using a murine model of pleurisy induced by Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Intrathoracic (i.t.) injection of BCG (4.5 x 10(5) bacteria/cavity) induced accumulation of T lymphocytes in the pleural cavities of C57BL/6 mice. We observed the presence of CFU in pleural washes conducted 1, 2, 3, 7, and 15 days after pleurisy induction. Pretreatment with fucoidan inhibited T-lymphocyte accumulation at 1 day, but not at 15 days, after BCG-induced pleurisy. Accordingly, adoptive transfer of fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled blood mononuclear cells to infected mice showed that T lymphocytes migrated into the pleural cavity 1 day (but not 15 days) after BCG injection. Cell-free pleural wash fluids recovered from mice 1 day after BCG i.t. stimulation (day 1 BCG-PW), but not day 7 or day 15 BCG-PW, induced in vitro T-cell transmigration, which was dependent on L-, P-, and E-selectins. In contrast, day 7 BCG-PW (but not day 1 BCG-PW) induced in vitro T-lymphocyte proliferation via interleukin-2 (IL-2) and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma). Accordingly, in vivo IL-2 or IFN-gamma neutralization abolished T-lymphocyte accumulation 7 days after pleurisy induction. Our results demonstrate that pleural infection induced by BCG leads to T-lymphocyte accumulation in two waves. The acute phase depends on selectin-mediated migration, while the second wave of T-lymphocyte accumulation seems to depend on a local proliferation induced by cytokines produced in situ. PMID:18809659

  6. Transcranial Doppler Sonography: Atypical Dicrotic Pulse Waveforms in a Man with HIV Infection and Severe Cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Suwatcharangkoon, Sureerat; Meads, Dana B; Tegeler, Charles H; Reynolds, Patrick S

    2015-01-01

    A 27-year-old human immunodeficiency virus--positive man presented with abdominal pain. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed large right pleural effusion, pericardial effusion and marked ascites with diffuse intra- and extraperitoneal lymphadenopathy. Echocardiography showed severely reduced left ventricular systolic function. After drainage of pleural and pericardial fluid, the patient developed severe hypotension and hypoxic respiratory failure. Extra- and intracranial neurovascular sonography demonstrated low carotid artery flow volume and dicrotic pulse waveforms in all vessels insonated bilaterally. This case report demonstrates an atypical dicrotic waveform pattern of transcranial Doppler in advanced ventricular dysfunction with shock. PMID:25289479

  7. Tim-3 blocking rescue macrophage and T cell function against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in HIV+ patients

    PubMed Central

    Sada-Ovalle, Isabel; Ocaña-Guzman, Ranferi; Pérez-Patrigeón, Santiago; Chávez-Galán, Leslie; Sierra-Madero, Juan; Torre-Bouscoulet, Luis; Addo, Marylyn M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain (Tim) 3 and programmed death 1 (PD-1) are co-inhibitory receptors involved in the so-called T cell exhaustion, and in vivo blockade of these molecules restores T cell dysfunction. High expression of Tim-3 and PD-1 is induced after chronic antigen-specific stimulation of T cells during HIV infection. We have previously demonstrated that the interaction of Tim-3 with its ligand galectin-9 induces macrophage activation and killing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Our aim in this study was to analyze the Tim-3 expression profile before and after six months of antiretroviral therapy and the impact of Tim-3 and PD-1 blocking on immunity against M. tuberculosis. Materials and methods HIV+ patients naïve to anti-retroviral therapy (ART) were followed up for six months. Peripheral immune-cell phenotype (CD38/HLA-DR/galectin-9/Tim-3 and PD-1) was assessed by flow cytometry. Supernatants were analyzed with a multiplex cytokine detection system (human Th1/Th2 cytokine Cytometric Bead Array) by flow cytometry. Control of bacterial growth was evaluated by using an in vitro experimental model in which virulent M. tuberculosis-infected macrophages were cultured with T cells in the presence or absence of Tim-3 and PD-1 blocking antibodies. Interleukin-1 beta treatment of infected macrophages was evaluated by enumerating colony-forming units. Results We showed that HIV+ patients had an increased expression of Tim-3 in T cells and were able to control bacterial growth before ART administration. By blocking Tim-3 and PD-1, macrophages and T cells recovered their functionality and had a higher ability to control bacterial growth; this result was partially dependent on the restitution of cytokine production. Conclusions In this study, we demonstrated that increased Tim-3 expression can limit the ability of the immune system to control the infection of intracellular bacteria such as M. tuberculosis. The use of ART and the in vitro

  8. The phosphorylation of HIV-1 Gag by atypical protein kinase C facilitates viral infectivity by promoting Vpr incorporation into virions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag is the main structural protein that mediates the assembly and release of virus-like particles (VLPs) from an infected cell membrane. The Gag C-terminal p6 domain contains short sequence motifs that facilitate virus release from the plasma membrane and mediate incorporation of the viral Vpr protein. Gag p6 has also been found to be phosphorylated during HIV-1 infection and this event may affect virus replication. However, the kinase that directs the phosphorylation of Gag p6 toward virus replication remains to be identified. In our present study, we identified this kinase using a proteomic approach and further delineate its role in HIV-1 replication. Results A proteomic approach was designed to systematically identify human protein kinases that potently interact with HIV-1 Gag and successfully identified 22 candidates. Among this panel, atypical protein kinase C (aPKC) was found to phosphorylate HIV-1 Gag p6. Subsequent LC-MS/MS and immunoblotting analysis with a phospho-specific antibody confirmed both in vitro and in vivo that aPKC phosphorylates HIV-1 Gag at Ser487. Computer-assisted structural modeling and a subsequent cell-based assay revealed that this phosphorylation event is necessary for the interaction between Gag and Vpr and results in the incorporation of Vpr into virions. Moreover, the inhibition of aPKC activity reduced the Vpr levels in virions and impaired HIV-1 infectivity of human primary macrophages. Conclusion Our current results indicate for the first time that HIV-1 Gag phosphorylation on Ser487 is mediated by aPKC and that this kinase may regulate the incorporation of Vpr into HIV-1 virions and thereby supports virus infectivity. Furthermore, aPKC inhibition efficiently suppresses HIV-1 infectivity in macrophages. aPKC may therefore be an intriguing therapeutic target for HIV-1 infection. PMID:24447338

  9. Modulation of Cytokine Gene Expression and Secretion during the Periparturient Period in Dairy cows Naturally Infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twenty multiparous and two primiparous Holstein cows were grouped according to infection status with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), the causative microorganism for Johne’s disease. The effect of parturition and infection on the progression of Johne’s disease was monitored by det...

  10. Fatal Case of Polymicrobial Meningitis Caused by Cryptococcus liquefaciens and Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex in a Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patient

    PubMed Central

    Rodas-Rodríguez, Lia; Díaz-Paz, Manuel; Palacios-Rivera, Hilda; Firacative, Carolina; Meyer, Wieland; Alcázar-Castillo, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    We describe a fatal case of polymicrobial meningitis in a human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient from Guatemala caused by Cryptococcus liquefaciens and Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. Central nervous system infections caused concurrently by these species are extremely rare. This is also the first report of disseminated disease caused by C. liquefaciens. PMID:26019205

  11. Specific recognition of mycobacterial protein and peptide antigens by gamma-delta T cell subsets following infection with virulent Mycobacterium bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Promoting effective immunity to Mycobacterium bovis infection is a challenge that is of interest to the fields of human and animal medicine alike. We report that 'd T cells from virulent M. bovis infected cattle respond specifically and directly to complex, protein and non-protein mycobacterial anti...

  12. Modulation of Cytokine Expression and Lymphocyte Subsets during the Periparturient Period in Dairy Cows Naturally Infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate cytokine gene expression and populations of lymphocyte subsets in periparturient dairy cows naturally infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). Blood was collected from noninfected, subclinical, and clinical MAP-infected dairy cows ...

  13. Polyclonal Mycobacterium avium infections in patients with AIDS: variations in antimicrobial susceptibilities of different strains of M. avium isolated from the same patient.

    PubMed Central

    von Reyn, C F; Jacobs, N J; Arbeit, R D; Maslow, J N; Niemczyk, S

    1995-01-01

    Broth microdilution MICs were determined for pairs of strains isolated from five AIDS patients with polyclonal Mycobacterium avium infection. Four (80%) of the five patients were infected simultaneously with strains having different antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. These findings have implications for the interpretation of susceptibility data in M. avium prophylaxis and treatment trials. PMID:7790424

  14. Computational and Empirical Studies Predict Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Specific T Cells as a Biomarker for Infection Outcome.

    PubMed

    Marino, Simeone; Gideon, Hannah P; Gong, Chang; Mankad, Shawn; McCrone, John T; Lin, Philana Ling; Linderman, Jennifer J; Flynn, JoAnne L; Kirschner, Denise E

    2016-04-01

    Identifying biomarkers for tuberculosis (TB) is an ongoing challenge in developing immunological correlates of infection outcome and protection. Biomarker discovery is also necessary for aiding design and testing of new treatments and vaccines. To effectively predict biomarkers for infection progression in any disease, including TB, large amounts of experimental data are required to reach statistical power and make accurate predictions. We took a two-pronged approach using both experimental and computational modeling to address this problem. We first collected 200 blood samples over a 2- year period from 28 non-human primates (NHP) infected with a low dose of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We identified T cells and the cytokines that they were producing (single and multiple) from each sample along with monkey status and infection progression data. Machine learning techniques were used to interrogate the experimental NHP datasets without identifying any potential TB biomarker. In parallel, we used our extensive novel NHP datasets to build and calibrate a multi-organ computational model that combines what is occurring at the site of infection (e.g., lung) at a single granuloma scale with blood level readouts that can be tracked in monkeys and humans. We then generated a large in silico repository of in silico granulomas coupled to lymph node and blood dynamics and developed an in silico tool to scale granuloma level results to a full host scale to identify what best predicts Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection outcomes. The analysis of in silico blood measures identifies Mtb-specific frequencies of effector T cell phenotypes at various time points post infection as promising indicators of infection outcome. We emphasize that pairing wetlab and computational approaches holds great promise to accelerate TB biomarker discovery. PMID:27065304

  15. Flow Cytometric Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis-Specific Antibodies in Experimentally Infected and Naturally Exposed Calves

    PubMed Central

    Bridger, P. S.; Bulun, H.; Fischer, M.; Akineden, Ö.; Seeger, T.; Barth, S.; Henrich, M.; Doll, K.; Bülte, M.; Menge, C.; Bauerfeind, R.

    2013-01-01

    A desirable test to diagnose infections with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis facilitates identification of infected cattle prior to the state of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis shedding. This study aimed at adjusting a flow cytometry (FC)-based assay, using intact M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis bacteria as the antigen, for diagnosis of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infections in calves. Serum samples were collected from experimentally infected (n = 12) and naturally exposed (n = 32) calves. Samples from five calves from positive dams were analyzed to determine the dynamics of maternal antibodies. Samples from adult cattle with defined infection status served as the standard (18 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis shedders, 22 M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis free). After preadsorption with Mycobacterium phlei, sera were incubated with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and M. avium subsp. avium bacterial suspensions, respectively, followed by the separate detection of bovine IgG, IgG1, IgG2, and IgM attached to the bacterial surface. M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific sample/positive (S/P) ratios were compared to enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) S/P ratios. In adult cattle, the FC assay for IgG1 had a sensitivity of 78% at a specificity of 100%. Maternally acquired antibodies could be detected in calves up to 121 days of life. While all but two sera taken at day 100 ± 10 postnatum from naturally exposed calves tested negative, elevated S/P ratios (IgG and IgG1) became detectable from 44 and 46 weeks postinoculation onwards in two calves infected experimentally. Even with the optimized FC assay, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific antibodies can only occasionally be detected in infected calves less than 12 months of age. The failure to detect such antibodies apparently reflects the distinct immunobiology of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infections rather than methodological constraints. PMID:23885032

  16. Computational and empirical studies predict Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific T cells as a biomarker for infection outcome

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Marino, Simeone; Gideon, Hannah P.; Gong, Chang; Mankad, Shawn; McCrone, John T.; Lin, Philana Ling; Linderman, Jennifer J.; Flynn, JoAnne L.; Kirschner, Denise E.

    2016-04-11

    Identifying biomarkers for tuberculosis (TB) is an ongoing challenge in developing immunological correlates of infection outcome and protection. Biomarker discovery is also necessary for aiding design and testing of new treatments and vaccines. To effectively predict biomarkers for infection progression in any disease, including TB, large amounts of experimental data are required to reach statistical power and make accurate predictions. We took a two-pronged approach using both experimental and computational modeling to address this problem. We first collected 200 blood samples over a 2-year period from 28 non-human primates (NHP) infected with a low dose of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We identifiedmore » T cells and the cytokines that they were producing (single and multiple) from each sample along with monkey status and infection progression data. Machine learning techniques were used to interrogate the experimental NHP datasets without identifying any potential TB biomarker. In parallel, we used our extensive novel NHP datasets to build and calibrate a multi-organ computational model that combines what is occurring at the site of infection (e.g., lung) at a single granuloma scale with blood level readouts that can be tracked in monkeys and humans. We then generated a large in silico repository of in silico granulomas coupled to lymph node and blood dynamics and developed an in silico tool to scale granuloma level results to a full host scale to identify what best predicts Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection outcomes. The analysis of in silico blood measures identifies Mtb-specific frequencies of effector T cell phenotypes at various time points post infection as promising indicators of infection outcome. As a result, we emphasize that pairing wetlab and computational approaches holds great promise to accelerate TB biomarker discovery.« less

  17. Computational and Empirical Studies Predict Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Specific T Cells as a Biomarker for Infection Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Chang; Mankad, Shawn; McCrone, John T.; Lin, Philana Ling; Linderman, Jennifer J.; Flynn, JoAnne L.; Kirschner, Denise E.

    2016-01-01

    Identifying biomarkers for tuberculosis (TB) is an ongoing challenge in developing immunological correlates of infection outcome and protection. Biomarker discovery is also necessary for aiding design and testing of new treatments and vaccines. To effectively predict biomarkers for infection progression in any disease, including TB, large amounts of experimental data are required to reach statistical power and make accurate predictions. We took a two-pronged approach using both experimental and computational modeling to address this problem. We first collected 200 blood samples over a 2- year period from 28 non-human primates (NHP) infected with a low dose of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. We identified T cells and the cytokines that they were producing (single and multiple) from each sample along with monkey status and infection progression data. Machine learning techniques were used to interrogate the experimental NHP datasets without identifying any potential TB biomarker. In parallel, we used our extensive novel NHP datasets to build and calibrate a multi-organ computational model that combines what is occurring at the site of infection (e.g., lung) at a single granuloma scale with blood level readouts that can be tracked in monkeys and humans. We then generated a large in silico repository of in silico granulomas coupled to lymph node and blood dynamics and developed an in silico tool to scale granuloma level results to a full host scale to identify what best predicts Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection outcomes. The analysis of in silico blood measures identifies Mtb-specific frequencies of effector T cell phenotypes at various time points post infection as promising indicators of infection outcome. We emphasize that pairing wetlab and computational approaches holds great promise to accelerate TB biomarker discovery. PMID:27065304

  18. An in vitro model of granuloma-like cell aggregates substantiates early host immune responses against Mycobacterium massiliense infection

    PubMed Central

    Je, Sungmo; Quan, Hailian; Na, Yirang; Cho, Sang-Nae; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterium massiliense (M. mass), belonging to the M. abscessus complex, is a rapidly growing mycobacterium that is known to cause tuberculous-like lesions in humans. To better understand the interaction between host cells and M. mass, we used a recently developed in vitro model of early granuloma-like cell aggregates composed of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). PBMCs formed granuloma-like, small and rounded cell aggregates when infected by live M. mass. Microscopic examination showed monocytes and macrophages surrounded by lymphocytes, which resembled cell aggregation induced by M. tuberculosis (M. tb). M. mass-infected PBMCs exhibited higher expression levels of HLA-DR, CD86 and CD80 on macrophages, and a significant decrease in the populations of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Interestingly, low doses of M. mass were sufficient to infect PBMCs, while active host cell death was gradually induced with highly increased bacterial loads, reflecting host destruction and dissemination of virulent rapid-growing mycobacteria (RGM). Collectively, this in vitro model of M. mass infection improves our understanding of the interplay of host immune cells with mycobacteria, and may be useful for developing therapeutics to control bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:27489303

  19. An in vitro model of granuloma-like cell aggregates substantiates early host immune responses against Mycobacterium massiliense infection.

    PubMed

    Je, Sungmo; Quan, Hailian; Na, Yirang; Cho, Sang-Nae; Kim, Bum-Joon; Seok, Seung Hyeok

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium massiliense (M. mass), belonging to the M. abscessus complex, is a rapidly growing mycobacterium that is known to cause tuberculous-like lesions in humans. To better understand the interaction between host cells and M. mass, we used a recently developed in vitro model of early granuloma-like cell aggregates composed of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). PBMCs formed granuloma-like, small and rounded cell aggregates when infected by live M. mass Microscopic examination showed monocytes and macrophages surrounded by lymphocytes, which resembled cell aggregation induced by M. tuberculosis (M. tb). M. mass-infected PBMCs exhibited higher expression levels of HLA-DR, CD86 and CD80 on macrophages, and a significant decrease in the populations of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Interestingly, low doses of M. mass were sufficient to infect PBMCs, while active host cell death was gradually induced with highly increased bacterial loads, reflecting host destruction and dissemination of virulent rapid-growing mycobacteria (RGM). Collectively, this in vitro model of M. mass infection improves our understanding of the interplay of host immune cells with mycobacteria, and may be useful for developing therapeutics to control bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:27489303

  20. Isolation of Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis (Map) from feral cats on a dairy farm with Map-infected cattle.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Mitchell V; Stoffregen, William C; Carpenter, Jeremy G; Stabel, Judith R

    2005-07-01

    Paratuberculosis is an economically important disease of dairy cattle caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map). The role of nonruminant, nondomestic animals in the epidemiology of paratuberculosis in cattle is unclear. To examine nonruminant, nondomestic animals for the presence of Map, 25 feral cats, nine mice (species unknown), eight rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus), six raccoons (Procyon lotor), and three opossums (Didelphis virginiana) were collected from a mid-western dairy with known Map-infected cattle. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis was isolated from the mesenteric lymph node from seven of 25 (28%) feral cats. Ileum was culture-positive for three of these seven cats, and an isolation of Map was also made from the ileum of one of nine (11%) mice. Tissue samples from other species were negative as determined by Map culture; microscopic lesions consistent with paratuberculosis were not seen in any animal. Restriction fragment polymorphism analysis of isolates from cats and dairy cattle suggest interspecies transmission. The means by which interspecies transmission occurred may be through ingestion of Map-contaminated feces or waste milk or through ingestion of Map-infected prey. Shedding of Map from infected cats was not evaluated. The epidemiologic role of Map-infected feral cats on dairy farms requires further investigation. PMID:16244077

  1. Intranasal Administration of Mycobacterium bovis BCG Induces Superior Protection against Aerosol Infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kolibab, Kristopher; Yang, Amy; Morris, Sheldon L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of Mycobacterium bovis BCG, the only licensed vaccine against tuberculosis (TB), TB remains a global epidemic. To assess whether more direct targeting of the lung mucosa by respiratory immunization would enhance the potency and longevity of BCG-induced anti-TB protective immunity, the long-term impact of intranasal (i.n.) BCG vaccination was compared to conventional subcutaneous (s.c.) immunization by using a mouse model of pulmonary tuberculosis. Although significantly improved protection in the lung was seen at early time points (2 and 4 months postvaccination) in i.n. BCG-immunized mice, no differences in pulmonary protection were seen 8 and 10 months postvaccination. In contrast, in all of the study periods, i.n. BCG vaccination induced significantly elevated protective splenic responses relative to s.c. immunization. At five of nine time points, we observed a splenic protective response exceeding 1.9 log10 protection relative to the s.c. route. Furthermore, higher frequencies of CD4 T cells expressing gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and IFN-γ/tumor necrosis factor alpha, as well as CD8 T cells expressing IFN-γ, were detected in the spleens of i.n. vaccinated mice. Using PCR arrays, significantly elevated levels of IFN-γ, interleukin-9 (IL-9), IL-11, and IL-21 expression were also seen in the spleen at 8 months after respiratory BCG immunization. Overall, while i.n. BCG vaccination provided short-term enhancement of protection in the lung relative to s.c. immunization, potent and extremely persistent splenic protective responses were seen for at least 10 months following respiratory immunization. PMID:25143340

  2. Mycobacterium asiaticum infection in a red-handed tamarin (Saguinus midas).

    PubMed

    Siegal-Willott, Jessica; Isaza, Ramiro; Fiorello, Christine; Reinhard, Mary

    2006-09-01

    A 4-yr-old, intact male red-handed tamarin (Saguinus midas) was evaluated because of a 6-mo history of an enlarging axillary mass. Diagnostic findings included a positive intradermal tuberculin test, persistent severe leukocytosis, and hyperglobulinemia. A nontuberculous mycobacterium species isolated from the mass was identified as Mycobacterium asiaticum using 16s ribosomal DNA sequencing and high-performance liquid chromatography. PMID:17319146

  3. Functional polymorphisms of the TLR7 and TLR8 genes contribute to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yung-Fa; Lin, Tsun-Mei; Wang, Chiou-Huey; Su, Pei-Yi; Wu, Jiun-Ting; Lin, Meng-Chih; Eng, Hock-Liew

    2016-05-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) has recently re-emerged as a major global public health threat and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a highly successful pathogen that evolved remarkable strategies to establish persistent infection. There is strong evidence that host genetic factors influence individual susceptibility to TB. In this study, we evaluated the associations between the TLR7 and TLR8 genetic polymorphisms and TB susceptibility in Chinese individuals. The results demonstrated that the frequency of the TLR8-129C allele was higher in male patients with pulmonary TB than in healthy controls (22.9% vs. 6.8%, p < 0.001). Based on haplotype analysis, the frequency of the TLR7 IVS2-151A/TLR8 -129C haplotype increased the risk for TB infection compared to the wild-type allele (TLR7 IVS2-151A/TLR8 -129G), with OR = 3.23 (95% CI = 1.58-6.61; p = 0.001). An ex vivo phagocytosis assay that examined the functional effects of these polymorphisms on the defense against MTB revealed higher phagocytosis in monocytes from males with the TLR7 IVS2-151A/TLR8 -129C genotype than in those with the wild-type allele (73.0 ± 20.3% versus 34.6 ± 8.1%; p = 0.03). In addition, mRNA expression and cytokine production were analyzed in the whole blood of male healthy volunteers stimulated with inactivated MTB ex vivo. TNFα production was lower in TLR7 IVS2-151A/TLR8 -129C subjects than in those with the wild-type allele (578.4 ± 90.3 pg/ml versus 1043 ± 136 pg/ml; p = 0.03), and the expression of TLR7 was significantly impaired (0.8 ± 0.1 folds, p = 0.05) after MTB stimulation. In conclusion, these findings provide evidence that TLR7 and TLR8 genetic polymorphisms are associated with susceptibility to MTB infection, and the link is shaped by less effective MTB phagocytosis and impaired TLR signaling. PMID:27156628

  4. Diagnostic Value of Animal-Side Antibody Assays for Rapid Detection of Mycobacterium bovis or Mycobacterium microti Infection in South American Camelids▿

    PubMed Central

    Lyashchenko, Konstantin P.; Greenwald, Rena; Esfandiari, Javan; Rhodes, Shelley; Dean, Gillian; de la Rua-Domenech, Ricardo; Meylan, Mireille; Vordermeier, HMartin; Zanolari, Patrik

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) in South American camelids (SAC) is caused by Mycobacterium bovis or Mycobacterium microti. Two serological methods, rapid testing (RT) and the dual-path platform (DPP) assay, were evaluated using naturally infected SAC. The study population included 156 alpacas and 175 llamas in Great Britain, Switzerland, and the United States. TB due to M. bovis (n = 44) or M. microti (n = 8) in 35 alpacas and 17 llamas was diagnosed by gross pathology examination and culture. Control animals were from herds with no TB history. The RT and the DPP assay showed sensitivities of 71% and 74%, respectively, for alpacas, while the sensitivity for llamas was 77% for both assays. The specificity of the DPP assay (98%) was higher than that of RT (94%) for llamas; the specificities of the two assays were identical (98%) for alpacas. When the two antibody tests were combined, the parallel-testing interpretation (applied when either assay produced a positive result) enhanced the sensitivities of antibody detection to 89% for alpacas and 88% for llamas but at the cost of lower specificities (97% and 93%, respectively), whereas the serial-testing interpretation (applied when both assays produced a positive result) maximized the specificity to 100% for both SAC species, although the sensitivities were 57% for alpacas and 65% for llamas. Over 95% of the animals with evidence of TB failed to produce skin test reactions, thus confirming concerns about the validity of this method for testing SAC. The findings suggest that serological assays may offer a more accurate and practical alternative for antemortem detection of camelid TB. PMID:22012976

  5. Evolution of the Bovine TLR Gene Family and Member Associations with Mycobacterium avium Subspecies paratuberculosis Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Colleen A.; Bhattarai, Eric K.; Osterstock, Jason B.; Dowd, Scot E.; Seabury, Paul M.; Vikram, Meenu; Whitlock, Robert H.; Schukken, Ynte H.; Schnabel, Robert D.; Taylor, Jeremy F.; Womack, James E.; Seabury, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    Members of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) gene family occupy key roles in the mammalian innate immune system by functioning as sentries for the detection of invading pathogens, thereafter provoking host innate immune responses. We utilized a custom next-generation sequencing approach and allele-specific genotyping assays to detect and validate 280 biallelic variants across all 10 bovine TLR genes, including 71 nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and one putative nonsense SNP. Bayesian haplotype reconstructions and median joining networks revealed haplotype sharing between Bos taurus taurus and Bos taurus indicus breeds at every locus, and specialized beef and dairy breeds could not be differentiated despite an average polymorphism density of 1 marker/158 bp. Collectively, 160 tagSNPs and two tag insertion-deletion mutations (indels) were sufficient to predict 100% of the variation at 280 variable sites for both Bos subspecies and their hybrids, whereas 118 tagSNPs and 1 tagIndel predictively captured 100% of the variation at 235 variable sites for B. t. taurus. Polyphen and SIFT analyses of amino acid (AA) replacements encoded by bovine TLR SNPs indicated that up to 32% of the AA substitutions were expected to impact protein function. Classical and newly developed tests of diversity provide strong support for balancing selection operating on TLR3 and TLR8, and purifying selection acting on TLR10. An investigation of the persistence and continuity of linkage disequilibrium (r2≥0.50) between adjacent variable sites also supported the presence of selection acting on TLR3 and TLR8. A case-control study employing validated variants from bovine TLR genes recognizing bacterial ligands revealed six SNPs potentially eliciting small effects on susceptibility to Mycobacterium avium spp paratuberculosis infection in dairy cattle. The results of this study will broadly impact domestic cattle research by providing the necessary foundation to explore several

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing Genotype Is Associated with HIV Infection in Mozambique

    PubMed Central

    Viegas, Sofia O.; Machado, Adelina; Groenheit, Ramona; Ghebremichael, Solomon; Pennhag, Alexandra; Gudo, Paula S.; Cuna, Zaina; Langa, Egídio; Miotto, Paolo; Cirillo, Daniela M.; Rastogi, Nalin; Warren, Rob M.; van Helden, Paul D.; Koivula, Tuija; Källenius, Gunilla

    2013-01-01

    The Beijing genotype is a lineage of Mycobacterium tuberculosis that is distributed worldwide and responsible for large epidemics, associated with multidrug-resistance. However, its distribution in Africa is less understood due to the lack of data. Our aim was to investigate the prevalence and possible transmission of Beijing strains in Mozambique by a multivariate analysis of genotypic, geographic and demographic data. A total of 543 M. tuberculosis isolates from Mozambique were spoligotyped. Of these, 33 were of the Beijing lineage. The genetic relationship between the Beijing isolates were studied by identification of genomic deletions within some Regions of Difference (RD), Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) and Mycobacterial Interspersed Repetivie Unit – variable number tandem repeat (MIRU-VNTR). Beijing strains from South Africa, representing different sublineages were included as reference strains. The association between Beijing genotype, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) serology and baseline demographic data was investigated. HIV positive serostatus was significantly (p=0.023) more common in patients with Beijing strains than in patients with non-Beijing strains in a multivariable analysis adjusted for age, sex and province (14 (10.9%) of the 129 HIV positive patients had Beijing strains while 6/141 (4.3%) of HIV negative patients had Beijing strains). The majority of Beijing strains were found in the Southern region of Mozambique, particularly in Maputo City (17%). Only one Beijing strain was drug resistant (multi-drug resistant). By combined use of RD and spoligotyping, three genetic sublineages could be tentatively identified where a distinct group of four isolates had deletion of RD150, a signature of the “sublineage 7” recently emerging in South Africa. The same group was very similar to South African “sublineage 7” by RFLP and MIRU-VNTR, suggesting that this sublineage could have been recently introduced in Mozambique from

  7. Immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in the parietal pleura of patients with tuberculous pleurisy.

    PubMed

    Caramori, Gaetano; Lasagna, Lisa; Casalini, Angelo G; Adcock, Ian M; Casolari, Paolo; Contoli, Marco; Tafuro, Federica; Padovani, Anna; Chung, Kian Fan; Barnes, Peter J; Papi, Alberto; Rindi, Guido; Bertorelli, Giuseppina

    2011-01-01

    The T lymphocyte-mediated immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in the parietal pleura of patients with tuberculous pleurisy is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the immune response in the parietal pleura of tuberculous pleurisy compared with nonspecific pleuritis. We have measured the numbers of inflammatory cells particularly T-cell subsets (Th1/Th2/Th17/Treg cells) in biopsies of parietal pleura obtained from 14 subjects with proven tuberculous pleurisy compared with a control group of 12 subjects with nonspecific pleuritis. The number of CD3+, CD4+ and CCR4+ cells and the expression of RORC2 mRNA were significantly increased in the tuberculous pleurisy patients compared with the nonspecific pleuritis subjects. The number of toluidine blue+ cells, tryptase+ cells and GATA-3+ cells was significantly decreased in the parietal pleura of patients with tuberculous pleurisy compared with the control group of nonspecific pleuritis subjects. Logistic regression with receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis for the three single markers was performed and showed a better performance for GATA-3 with a sensitivity of 75%, a specificity of 100% and an AUC of 0.88. There was no significant difference between the two groups of subjects in the number of CD8, CD68, neutrophil elastase, interferon (IFN)-γ, STAT4, T-bet, CCR5, CXCR3, CRTH2, STAT6 and FOXP3 positive cells. Elevated CD3, CD4, CCR4 and Th17 cells and decreased mast cells and GATA-3+ cells in the parietal pleura distinguish patients with untreated tuberculous pleurisy from those with nonspecific pleuritis. PMID:21829471

  8. Revealing hidden clonal complexity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection by qualitative and quantitative improvement of sampling.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Lago, L; Palacios, J J; Herranz, M; Ruiz Serrano, M J; Bouza, E; García-de-Viedma, D

    2015-02-01

    The analysis of microevolution events, its functional relevance and impact on molecular epidemiology strategies, constitutes one of the most challenging aspects of the study of clonal complexity in infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In this study, we retrospectively evaluated whether two improved sampling schemes could provide access to the clonal complexity that is undetected by the current standards (analysis of one isolate from one sputum). We evaluated in 48 patients the analysis by mycobacterial interspersed repetitive unit-variable number tandem repeat of M. tuberculosis isolates cultured from bronchial aspirate (BAS) or bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) and, in another 16 cases, the analysis of a higher number of isolates from independent sputum samples. Analysis of the isolates from BAS/BAL specimens revealed clonal complexity in a very high proportion of cases (5/48); in most of these cases, complexity was not detected when the isolates from sputum samples were analysed. Systematic analysis of isolates from multiple sputum samples also improved the detection of clonal complexity. We found coexisting clonal variants in two of 16 cases that would have gone undetected in the analysis of the isolate from a single sputum specimen. Our results suggest that analysis of isolates from BAS/BAL specimens is highly efficient for recording the true clonal composition of M. tuberculosis in the lungs. When these samples are not available, we recommend increasing the number of isolates from independent sputum specimens, because they might not harbour the same pool of bacteria. Our data suggest that the degree of clonal complexity in tuberculosis has been underestimated because of the deficiencies inherent in a simplified procedure. PMID:25658553

  9. Comparative Sigma Factor-mRNA Levels in Mycobacterium marinum under Stress Conditions and during Host Infection.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, B M Fredrik; Das, Sarbashis; Behra, Phani Rama Krishna; Jordan, Heather R; Ramesh, Malavika; Mallick, Amrita; Root, Kate M; Cheramie, Martin N; de la Cruz Melara, Irma; Small, Pamela L C; Dasgupta, Santanu; Ennis, Don G; Kirsebom, Leif A

    2015-01-01

    We have used RNASeq and qRT-PCR to study mRNA levels for all σ-factors in different Mycobacterium marinum strains under various growth and stress conditions. We also studied their levels in M. marinum from infected fish and mosquito larvae. The annotated σ-factors were expressed and transcripts varied in relation to growth and stress conditions. Some were highly abundant such as sigA, sigB, sigC, sigD, sigE and sigH while others were not. The σ-factor mRNA profiles were similar after heat stress, during infection of fish and mosquito larvae. The similarity also applies to some of the known heat shock genes such as the α-crystallin gene. Therefore, it seems probable that the physiological state of M. marinum is similar when exposed to these different conditions. Moreover, the mosquito larvae data suggest that this is the state that the fish encounter when infected, at least with respect to σ-factor mRNA levels. Comparative genomic analysis of σ-factor gene localizations in three M. marinum strains and Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv revealed chromosomal rearrangements that changed the localization of especially sigA, sigB, sigD, sigE, sigF and sigJ after the divergence of these two species. This may explain the variation in species-specific expression upon exposure to different growth conditions. PMID:26445268

  10. Comparative Sigma Factor-mRNA Levels in Mycobacterium marinum under Stress Conditions and during Host Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pettersson, B. M. Fredrik; Das, Sarbashis; Behra, Phani Rama Krishna; Jordan, Heather R.; Ramesh, Malavika; Mallick, Amrita; Root, Kate M.; Cheramie, Martin N.; de la Cruz Melara, Irma; Small, Pamela L. C.; Dasgupta, Santanu; Ennis, Don G.; Kirsebom, Leif A.

    2015-01-01

    We have used RNASeq and qRT-PCR to study mRNA levels for all σ-factors in different Mycobacterium marinum strains under various growth and stress conditions. We also studied their levels in M. marinum from infected fish and mosquito larvae. The annotated σ-factors were expressed and transcripts varied in relation to growth and stress conditions. Some were highly abundant such as sigA, sigB, sigC, sigD, sigE and sigH while others were not. The σ-factor mRNA profiles were similar after heat stress, during infection of fish and mosquito larvae. The similarity also applies to some of the known heat shock genes such as the α-crystallin gene. Therefore, it seems probable that the physiological state of M. marinum is similar when exposed to these different conditions. Moreover, the mosquito larvae data suggest that this is the state that the fish encounter when infected, at least with respect to σ-factor mRNA levels. Comparative genomic analysis of σ-factor gene localizations in three M. marinum strains and Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv revealed chromosomal rearrangements that changed the localization of especially sigA, sigB, sigD, sigE, sigF and sigJ after the divergence of these two species. This may explain the variation in species-specific expression upon exposure to different growth conditions. PMID:26445268

  11. Mycobacterium chelonae infection presenting as recurrent cutaneous and subcutaneous nodules--a presentation previously diagnosed as Weber Christian disease.

    PubMed

    Maverakis, Emanual; He, Yong; Patel, Forum B; Fitzmaurice, Sarah; Fung, Maxwell A

    2014-06-01

    Although the dermatologic community rarely uses "Weber-Christian Disease" as a diagnosis, it still appears in the internal medicine literature. Herein we present a patient with recurrent cutaneous and subcutaneous nodules who was initially treated with aggressive immunosupression for a presumptive diagnosis of Weber-Christian Disease. After more than a decade the patient was diagnosed with cutaneous Mycobacterium chelonea. This case is an excellent example of the difficulty in diagnosing mycobacterial infections and underscores the importance of having a high suspicion for infectious etiologies for unresponsive cutaneous eruptions in patients on immunosuppressive medications. PMID:24945648

  12. Non-tuberculous mycobacterium skin infections after tattooing in healthy individuals: A systematic review of case reports.

    PubMed

    Mudedla, Sreenuvasu; Avendano, Esther E; Raman, Gowri

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, several case reports and outbreaks reported occurrence of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) infections within 6 months after receiving a tattoo in healthy individuals. NTM species (e.g., Chelonae, Fortuitum, Hemophillum, and Abscessus) are widespread in the environment and it is often suspected that contamination may occur through unsterile instrumentation or unsterile water used for diluting tattoo ink to dilute color. In reported cases, lesions were mainly restricted to a single color 'gray' part of the tattoo. Mycobacterium Chelonae was the most common cause of tattoo associated NTM infections. Less than 50% of the case reports tested tattoo ink for acid fast bacilli stains and cultures. Subjects required treatment with either clarithromycin alone or in combination with quinolones for 6 to 9 months. An increase in NTM skin infections in healthy individuals after tattooing indicates the need for sterile standards during tattooing and improved local and regional regulatory oversight. PMID:26158355

  13. TLR2-Modulating Lipoproteins of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Enhance the HIV Infectivity of CD4+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Skerry, Ciaran; Klinkenberg, Lee G; Page, Kathleen R; Karakousis, Petros C

    2016-01-01

    Co-infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis accelerates progression from HIV to AIDS. Our previous studies showed that M. tuberculosis complex, unlike M. smegmatis, enhances TLR2-dependent susceptibility of CD4+ T cells to HIV. The M. tuberculosis complex produces multiple TLR2-stimulating lipoproteins, which are absent in M. smegmatis. M. tuberculosis production of mature lipoproteins and TLR2 stimulation is dependent on cleavage by lipoprotein signal peptidase A (LspA). In order to determine the role of potential TLR2-stimulating lipoproteins on mycobacterial-mediated HIV infectivity of CD4+ T cells, we generated M. smegmatis recombinant strains overexpressing genes encoding various M. bovis BCG lipoproteins, as well as a Mycobacterium bovis BCG strain deficient in LspA (ΔlspA). Exposure of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to M. smegmatis strains overexpressing the BCG lipoproteins, LprF (p<0.01), LprH (p<0.05), LprI (p<0.05), LprP (p<0.001), LprQ (p<0.005), MPT83 (p<0.005), or PhoS1 (p<0.05), resulted in increased HIV infectivity of CD4+ T cells isolated from these PBMC. Conversely, infection of PBMC with ΔlspA reduced HIV infectivity of CD4+ T cells by 40% relative to BCG-infected cells (p<0.05). These results may have important implications for TB vaccination programs in areas with high mother-to-child HIV transmission. PMID:26807859

  14. TLR2-Modulating Lipoproteins of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex Enhance the HIV Infectivity of CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Skerry, Ciaran; Klinkenberg, Lee G.; Page, Kathleen R.; Karakousis, Petros C.

    2016-01-01

    Co-infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis accelerates progression from HIV to AIDS. Our previous studies showed that M. tuberculosis complex, unlike M. smegmatis, enhances TLR2-dependent susceptibility of CD4+ T cells to HIV. The M. tuberculosis complex produces multiple TLR2-stimulating lipoproteins, which are absent in M. smegmatis. M. tuberculosis production of mature lipoproteins and TLR2 stimulation is dependent on cleavage by lipoprotein signal peptidase A (LspA). In order to determine the role of potential TLR2-stimulating lipoproteins on mycobacterial-mediated HIV infectivity of CD4+ T cells, we generated M. smegmatis recombinant strains overexpressing genes encoding various M. bovis BCG lipoproteins, as well as a Mycobacterium bovis BCG strain deficient in LspA (ΔlspA). Exposure of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to M. smegmatis strains overexpressing the BCG lipoproteins, LprF (p<0.01), LprH (p<0.05), LprI (p<0.05), LprP (p<0.001), LprQ (p<0.005), MPT83 (p<0.005), or PhoS1 (p<0.05), resulted in increased HIV infectivity of CD4+ T cells isolated from these PBMC. Conversely, infection of PBMC with ΔlspA reduced HIV infectivity of CD4+ T cells by 40% relative to BCG-infected cells (p<0.05). These results may have important implications for TB vaccination programs in areas with high mother-to-child HIV transmission. PMID:26807859

  15. Age at occurrence of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in naturally infected dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, S S; Ersbøll, A K

    2006-12-01

    Paratuberculosis is a chronic infection of ruminants and other species caused by Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (Map). Establishing test strategies for paratuberculosis will require insight into the temporal aspects of certainty with a given test. In this study, the age at which cows tested positive by ELISA and fecal culture (FC) was investigated by use of time-to-event analyses. The effects of herd, parity, and shedding group were evaluated at the age of test-positive ELISA and FC, respectively. Finally, the test frequency was investigated for the probability of cows being tested ELISA-positive. Milk and fecal samples were collected repeatedly over a 3-yr period from 1,776 Danish dairy cows from 8 herds. The milk samples were tested for the presence of antibodies by using an ELISA, and an FC test was used for detection of Map. Repeated ELISA testing detected 98 and 95% of cows classified as high and low shedders, respectively, suggesting that most infected cows develop antibodies. Among the high shedders, 50% were positive before 4.3 yr of age (quartiles 1 to 3: 3.4 to 5.7 yr of age). Repeated FC detected only 72% of the cows that were ELISA-positive, and 50% of the ELISA-positive cows were detected by FC at 7.6 yr of age. The age with the highest probability of testing positive was determined as the interval with the steepest slope in the survival probability plots. The highest probability of testing positive by ELISA was from 2.5 to 4.5 yr of age. The highest probability of testing positive by FC was from 2.5 to 5.5 yr of age. For both ELISA and FC, testing positive was highest in the first 300 d in milk. For cows younger than 4 yr of age, monthly testing with ELISA, compared with testing every 2 yr, could increase the probability of detecting cows with antibodies by 19%. In older cows, there were no apparent differences in the probability of testing positive by monthly sampling compared with sampling every second year. Therefore, for older animals

  16. Atypical pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... that cause typical pneumonia. These include Legionella pneumophila , Mycoplasma pneumoniae , and Chlamydophila pneumoniae . Atypical pneumonia also tends to have milder symptoms than typical pneumonia. Causes Mycoplasma pneumonia is a type of atypical pneumonia. It ...

  17. Mycobacterium avium infection in HIV-1-infected subjects increases monokine secretion and is associated with enhanced viral load and diminished immune response to viral antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Denis, M; Ghadirian, E

    1994-01-01

    The complex interaction between HIV-1 infection and Mycobacterium avium was studied. Viral burden was assessed, as well as immune response to HIV-1 in the context of Myco. avium infections. We also examined serum cytokine levels and cytokine release by blood mononuclear cells in HIV-1-infected subjects, infected or not with Myco. avium. Undetectable serum levels of IL-1, tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and IL-6 were found in normal controls and in groups I, II and III of HIV-1-infected subjects. Moderate levels of TNF-alpha, IL-1 and IL-6 were found in the sera of group IV patients. When group IV was subdivided into subjects with and without Myco. avium infections, subjects with Myco, avium infections were shown to have higher serum levels of TNF-alpha, IL-1 beta and IL-6 than those with other infections. Blood mononuclear cells from controls and HIV subjects were stimulated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide, and cytokine levels assessed. Cells from group II patients were shown to secrete normal levels of TNF-alpha and IL-6, and lower levels of IL-1 beta; group III subjects released higher levels of IL-6. Patients in group IV had blood cells that released elevated levels of IL-6 and TNF-alpha, and lower levels of IL-1 beta. Group IV subjects with Myco. avium infections had blood cells that released higher levels of TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-1 than group IV subjects with other infections. Assessment of viral burden in cells of HIV-1-infected subjects revealed that Myco. avium-infected subjects had a higher level of virus burden and a lower level of lymphoproliferative response to an inactivated gp120-depleted HIV-1 antigen than AIDS subjects with other infections. These data suggest that Myco. avium infections in HIV-1-infected subjects hasten the progression of viral disease, enhance cytokine release and contribute to the anergy to viral antigens. PMID:8033423

  18. Lower numbers of natural killer T cells in HIV-1 and Mycobacterium leprae co-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Karina I; Bruno, Fernanda R; Snyder-Cappione, Jennifer E; Maeda, Solange M; Tomimori, Jane; Xavier, Marilia B; Haslett, Patrick A; Nixon, Douglas F; Kallas, Esper G

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells are a heterogeneous population of lymphocytes that recognize antigens presented by CD1d and have attracted attention because of their potential role linking innate and adaptive immune responses. Peripheral NKT cells display a memory-activated phenotype and can rapidly secrete large amounts of pro-inflammatory cytokines upon antigenic activation. In this study, we evaluated NKT cells in the context of patients co-infected with HIV-1 and Mycobacterium leprae. The volunteers were enrolled into four groups: 22 healthy controls, 23 HIV-1-infected patients, 20 patients with leprosy and 17 patients with leprosy and HIV-1-infection. Flow cytometry and ELISPOT assays were performed on peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We demonstrated that patients co-infected with HIV-1 and M. leprae have significantly lower NKT cell frequencies [median 0.022%, interquartile range (IQR): 0.007–0.051] in the peripheral blood when compared with healthy subjects (median 0.077%, IQR: 0.032–0.405, P < 0.01) or HIV-1 mono-infected patients (median 0.072%, IQR: 0.030–0.160, P < 0.05). Also, more NKT cells from co-infected patients secreted interferon-γ after stimulation with DimerX, when compared with leprosy mono-infected patients (P = 0.05). These results suggest that NKT cells are decreased in frequency in HIV-1 and M. leprae co-infected patients compared with HIV-1 mono-infected patients alone, but are at a more activated state. Innate immunity in human subjects is strongly influenced by their spectrum of chronic infections, and in HIV-1-infected subjects, a concurrent mycobacterial infection probably hyper-activates and lowers circulating NKT cell numbers. PMID:22269018

  19. Atypical myxomatosis--virus isolation, experimental infection of rabbits and restriction endonuclease analysis of the isolate.

    PubMed

    Psikal, I; Smíd, B; Rodák, L; Valícek, L; Bendová, J

    2003-08-01

    Atypical form of myxomatosis, which caused non-lethal and clinically mild disease in domestic rabbits 1 month after immunization with a commercially available vaccine MXT, is described. The isolated myxoma virus designated as Litovel 2 (Li-2) did not induce systemic disease following subcutaneous and intradermal applications in susceptible experimental rabbits but led to the immune response demonstrated by ELISA. No severe disease was induced in those Li-2 inoculated rabbits by challenge with the virulent strains Lausanne (Lu) or Sanar (SA), while the control animals showed nodular form of myxomatosis with lethal course of the illness. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of genomic DNA with KpnI and BamHI endonucleases was used for genetic characterization of the Li-2 isolate, the vaccine strain MXT and both virulent strains Lu and SA, respectively. In general, RFLP analysis has shown to be informative for inferring genetic relatedness between myxoma viruses. Based on restriction endonuclease DNA fragment size distribution, it was evident that the pathogenic strain SA is genetically related to the reference strain Lu and the isolate Li-2 is more related, but not identical, to the vaccination strain MXT. PMID:14628995

  20. Risk factors for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in 2–4 year olds in a rural HIV-prevalent setting

    PubMed Central

    Glynn, J. R.; Fielding, K. L.; Mzembe, T.; Mulawa, D.; Chiumya, R.; Fine, P. E. M.; Koole, O.; Kranzer, K.; Crampin, A. C.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY BACKGROUND: Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in children acts as a sentinel for infectious tuberculosis. OBJECTIVE: To assess risk factors associated with tuberculous infection in pre-school children. METHOD: We conducted a population-wide tuberculin skin test (TST) survey from January to December 2012 in Malawi. All children aged 2–4 years residing in a demographic surveillance area were eligible. Detailed demographic data, including adult human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) status, and clinical and sociodemographic data on all diagnosed tuberculosis (TB) patients were available. RESULTS: The prevalence of M. tuberculosis infection was 1.1% using a TST induration cut-off of 15 mm (estimated annual risk of infection of 0.3%). The main identifiable risk factors were maternal HIV infection at birth (adjusted OR [aOR] 3.6, 95%CI 1.1–12.2), having three or more adult members in the household over a lifetime (aOR 2.4, 95%CI 1.2–4.8) and living in close proximity to a known case of infectious TB (aOR 1.6, 95%CI 1.1–2.4), modelled as a linear variable across categories (>200 m, 100–200 m, <100 m, within household). Less than 20% of the infected children lived within 200 m of a known diagnosed case. CONCLUSION: Household and community risk factors identified do not explain the majority of M. tuberculosis infections in children in our setting. PMID:27046715

  1. Fasciola hepatica infection reduces Mycobacterium bovis burden and mycobacterial uptake and suppresses the pro-inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Garza-Cuartero, L; O'Sullivan, J; Blanco, A; McNair, J; Welsh, M; Flynn, R J; Williams, D; Diggle, P; Cassidy, J; Mulcahy, G

    2016-07-01

    Bovine tuberculosis (BTB), caused by Mycobacterium bovis, has an annual incidence in cattle of 0.5% in the Republic of Ireland and 4.7% in the UK, despite long-standing eradication programmes being in place. Failure to achieve complete eradication is multifactorial, but the limitations of diagnostic tests are significant complicating factors. Previously, we have demonstrated that Fasciola hepatica infection, highly prevalent in these areas, induced reduced sensitivity of the standard diagnostic tests for BTB in animals co-infected with F. hepatica and M. bovis. This was accompanied by a reduced M. bovis-specific Th1 immune response. We hypothesized that these changes in co-infected animals would be accompanied by enhanced growth of M. bovis. However, we show here that mycobacterial burden in cattle is reduced in animals co-infected with F. hepatica. Furthermore, we demonstrate a lower mycobacterial recovery and uptake in blood monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) from F. hepatica-infected cattle which is associated with suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and a switch to alternative activation of macrophages. However, the cell surface expression of TLR2 and CD14 in MDM from F. hepatica-infected cattle is increased. These findings reflecting the bystander effect of helminth-induced downregulation of pro-inflammatory responses provide insights to understand host-pathogen interactions in co-infection. PMID:27108767

  2. Clinical, Microbiological and Pathological Findings of Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection in Three Australian Possum Species

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Carolyn R.; Handasyde, Kathrine A.; Hibble, Jennifer; Lavender, Caroline J.; Legione, Alistair R.; McCowan, Christina; Globan, Maria; Mitchell, Anthony T.; McCracken, Helen E.; Johnson, Paul D. R.; Fyfe, Janet A. M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU) is a skin disease caused by Mycobacterium ulcerans, with endemicity predominantly in sub-Saharan Africa and south-eastern Australia. The mode of transmission and the environmental reservoir(s) of the bacterium and remain elusive. Real-time PCR investigations have detected M. ulcerans DNA in a variety of Australian environmental samples, including the faeces of native possums with and without clinical evidence of infection. This report seeks to expand on previously published findings by the authors' investigative group with regards to clinical and subclinical disease in selected wild possum species in BU-endemic areas of Victoria, Australia. Methodology/Principal Findings Twenty-seven clinical cases of M. ulcerans infection in free-ranging possums from southeastern Australia were identified retrospectively and prospectively between 1998–2011. Common ringtail possums (Pseudocheirus peregrinus), a common brushtail possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) and a mountain brushtail possum (Trichosurus cunninghami) were included in the clinically affected cohort. Most clinically apparent cases were adults with solitary or multiple ulcerative cutaneous lesions, generally confined to the face, limbs and/or tail. The disease was minor and self-limiting in the case of both Trichosurus spp. possums. In contrast, many of the common ringtail possums had cutaneous disease involving disparate anatomical sites, and in four cases there was evidence of systemic disease at post mortem examination. Where tested using real-time PCR targeted at IS2404, animals typically had significant levels of M. ulcerans DNA throughout the gut and/or faeces. A further 12 possums without cutaneous lesions were found to have PCR-positive gut contents and/or faeces (subclinical cases), and in one of these the organism was cultured from liver tissue. Comparisons were made between clinically and subclinically affected possums, and 61 PCR-negative, non-affected individuals, with regards

  3. Transient immunosuppression: a bridge between infection and the atypical autoimmunity of Guillain–Barré syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Steiner, I; Rosenberg, G; Wirguin, I

    2010-01-01

    Guillain–Barré syndrome (GBS) is an acute, usually monophasic, disorder of the peripheral nervous system that is assumed to be of immune-mediated pathogenesis. However, several clinical features and experimental findings of GBS are uncharacteristic for an immune-mediated disorder and set this condition apart from other disorders with a putative immune-mediated pathogenesis. These features include, among others, the monophasic nature of GBS, the lack of response to immunosuppressive (unlike immunomodulatory) therapy, the absence of a typical association with immunogenetic background and the inability to establish a valid and relevant animal model. We suggest a comprehensive hypothesis for the pathogenesis of GBS that is based on the assumption that the condition is due to a transient (or occasionally chronic) immune deficiency, as in most cases GBS follows an infection with pathogens known to induce immunosuppression. Such infections may be followed by breakdown of immune tolerance and induction of an immune attack on peripheral nerves. Mounting of the immune-mediated assault might be triggered either by the same infective pathogen or by secondary infection. Clearance of the infection and resumption of a normal immune response and tolerance eventually terminate the immune-mediated damage to the peripheral nerves and enable recovery. This hypothesis assumes that the entire sequence of events that culminates in GBS is due to transient exogenous factors and excludes a significant role for inherent host susceptibility, which explains the monophasic nature of the disorder. PMID:20735441

  4. ClassTR: Classifying Within-Host Heterogeneity Based on Tandem Repeats with Application to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infections.

    PubMed

    Chindelevitch, Leonid; Colijn, Caroline; Moodley, Prashini; Wilson, Douglas; Cohen, Ted

    2016-02-01

    Genomic tools have revealed genetically diverse pathogens within some hosts. Within-host pathogen diversity, which we refer to as "complex infection", is increasingly recognized as a determinant of treatment outcome for infections like tuberculosis. Complex infection arises through two mechanisms: within-host mutation (which results in clonal heterogeneity) and reinfection (which results in mixed infections). Estimates of the frequency of within-host mutation and reinfection in populations are critical for understanding the natural history of disease. These estimates influence projections of disease trends and effects of interventions. The genotyping technique MLVA (multiple loci variable-number tandem repeats analysis) can identify complex infections, but the current method to distinguish clonal heterogeneity from mixed infections is based on a rather simple rule. Here we describe ClassTR, a method which leverages MLVA information from isolates collected in a population to distinguish mixed infections from clonal heterogeneity. We formulate the resolution of complex infections into their constituent strains as an optimization problem, and show its NP-completeness. We solve it efficiently by using mixed integer linear programming and graph decomposition. Once the complex infections are resolved into their constituent strains, ClassTR probabilistically classifies isolates as clonally heterogeneous or mixed by using a model of tandem repeat evolution. We first compare ClassTR with the standard rule-based classification on 100 simulated datasets. ClassTR outperforms the standard method, improving classification accuracy from 48% to 80%. We then apply ClassTR to a sample of 436 strains collected from tuberculosis patients in a South African community, of which 92 had complex infections. We find that ClassTR assigns an alternate classification to 18 of the 92 complex infections, suggesting important differences in practice. By explicitly modeling tandem repeat evolution

  5. Mycobacterium marinum infection in a blue-fronted Amazon parrot (Amazona aestiva).

    PubMed

    Hannon, David E; Bemis, David A; Garner, Michael M

    2012-12-01

    A blue-fronted Amazon parrot (Amazona aestiva) was presented with a granuloma involving the proximal rhinotheca and extending into the rostral sinuses. Mycobacterium marinum was diagnosed based on results of biopsy and culture. Treatment was initiated with clarithromycin, rifampin, and ethambutol, but the bird died 4 months after the onset of antimicrobial therapy. Additional granulomas were found in the left lung and liver on postmortem examination. Mycobacterial isolation on postmortem samples was unsuccessful. This is the first report of Mycobacterium marinum in a bird. PMID:23409436

  6. Ecto-5′-Nucleotidase (CD73) Deficiency in Mycobacterium tuberculosis-Infected Mice Enhances Neutrophil Recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Petit-Jentreau, Laetitia; Jouvion, Grégory; Charles, Patricia; Majlessi, Laleh; Gicquel, Brigitte

    2015-01-01

    The immune system needs safeguards that prevent collateral tissue damage mediated by the immune system while enabling an effective response against a pathogen. The purinergic pathway is one such mechanism and finely modulates inflammation by sensing nucleotides in the environment. Extracellular ATP is considered to be a danger signal leading to a proinflammatory response, whereas adenosine is immunosuppressive. CD73, also called ecto-5′-nucleotidase, occupies a strategic position in this pathway, as it is the main enzyme responsible for the generation of adenosine from ATP. Here, we explore the role of CD73 during tuberculosis, a disease characterized by an immune response that is harmful to the host and unable to eradicate Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Using CD73 knockout (KO) mice, we found that CD73 regulates the response to M. tuberculosis infection in vitro and in vivo. Mycobacterium-infected murine macrophages derived from CD73 KO mice secrete more keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) and release less vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) upon ATP stimulation than do those derived from wild-type (WT) mice. In vivo, CD73 limits the early influx of neutrophils to the lungs without affecting bacterial growth and dissemination. Collectively, our results support the view that CD73 fine-tunes antimycobacterial immune responses. PMID:26150535

  7. An atypical case of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis associated with cytomegalovirus infection.

    PubMed

    De Fino, Chiara; Nociti, Viviana; Modoni, Anna; Bizzarro, Alessandra; Mirabella, Massimiliano

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a young man admitted to our hospital for persistent headache associated with fever, retrorbitary pain and vomiting, who rapidly developed encephalopathy with drowsiness, paraplegia, hypoesthesia with a D6 sensory level and urinary retention. Brain and spinal cord MRI revealed findings compatible with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) and microbiological tests documented a cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection. CMV infection is extraordinarily associated with ADEM, but must be included in microbiological tests, because early diagnosis and treatment ameliorate the neurological outcome. PMID:26856946

  8. A murine oral model for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection and immunomodulation with Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334.

    PubMed

    Cooney, Meagan A; Steele, James L; Steinberg, Howard; Talaat, Adel M

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) the causative agent of Johne's disease, is one of the most serious infectious diseases in dairy cattle worldwide. Due to the chronic nature of this disease and no feasible control strategy, it is essential to have an efficient animal model which is representative of the natural route of infection as well as a viable treatment option. In this report, we evaluated the effect of different doses of M. paratuberculosis in their ability to colonize murine tissues following oral delivery and the ability of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334, a nascent probiotic, to combat paratuberculosis. Oral inoculation of mice was able to establish paratuberculosis in a dose-dependent manner. Two consecutive doses of approximately 10(9) CFU per mouse resulted in a disseminated infection, whereas lower doses were not efficient to establish infection. All inoculated mice were colonized with M. paratuberculosis, maintained infection for up to 24 weeks post infection and generated immune responses that reflect M. paratuberculosis infection in cattle. Notably, oral administration of L. casei ATCC 334 did not reduce the level of M. paratuberculosis colonization in treated animals. Interestingly, cytokine responses and histology indicated a trend for the immunomodulation and reduction of pathology in animals receiving L. casei ATCC 334 treatment. Overall, a reproducible oral model of paratuberculosis in mice was established that could be used for future vaccine experiments. Although the L. casei ATCC 334 was not a promising candidate for controlling paratuberculosis, we established a protocol to screen other probiotic candidates. PMID:24551602

  9. A murine oral model for Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection and immunomodulation with Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334

    PubMed Central

    Cooney, Meagan A.; Steele, James L.; Steinberg, Howard; Talaat, Adel M.

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (M. paratuberculosis) the causative agent of Johne's disease, is one of the most serious infectious diseases in dairy cattle worldwide. Due to the chronic nature of this disease and no feasible control strategy, it is essential to have an efficient animal model which is representative of the natural route of infection as well as a viable treatment option. In this report, we evaluated the effect of different doses of M. paratuberculosis in their ability to colonize murine tissues following oral delivery and the ability of Lactobacillus casei ATCC 334, a nascent probiotic, to combat paratuberculosis. Oral inoculation of mice was able to establish paratuberculosis in a dose-dependent manner. Two consecutive doses of approximately 109 CFU per mouse resulted in a disseminated infection, whereas lower doses were not efficient to establish infection. All inoculated mice were colonized with M. paratuberculosis, maintained infection for up to 24 weeks post infection and generated immune responses that reflect M. paratuberculosis infection in cattle. Notably, oral administration of L. casei ATCC 334 did not reduce the level of M. paratuberculosis colonization in treated animals. Interestingly, cytokine responses and histology indicated a trend for the immunomodulation and reduction of pathology in animals receiving L. casei ATCC 334 treatment. Overall, a reproducible oral model of paratuberculosis in mice was established that could be used for future vaccine experiments. Although the L. casei ATCC 334 was not a promising candidate for controlling paratuberculosis, we established a protocol to screen other probiotic candidates. PMID:24551602

  10. Ulcers as a Sign of Skin Infection with Mycobacterium wolinskyi: Report of a Case and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Bossart, Simon; Schnell, Barbara; Kerl, Katrin; Urosevic-Maiwald, Mirjana

    2016-01-01

    Infection with Mycobacterium wolinskyi, if not detected, may cause severe skin and soft tissue infection with prolonged healing process and is therefore associated with high morbidity. Only about 20 cases of M. wolinskyi infections in humans have been described in the literature until now, none of them in Switzerland. We report a case of an infection in a 72-year-old male patient with recurrent subcutaneous abdominal wall abscesses and ulcer formation after insulin injection in the underbelly. A culture of skin biopsy tissue showed rapid growth of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), which were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing as M. wolinskyi. Surgical excision and primary closure of all abdominal ulcers in combination with antibiotic therapy, based on the antimicrobiotic susceptibility test results, were performed and resulted in complete resolution of the clinical symptoms and no recurrence of infection at a 6-month follow-up. The present case emphasizes the importance of accurate diagnosis and treatment of chronic infection with ulcer formation. In such cases, it is crucial to consider the presence of NTM, such as M. wolinskyi, in order to obtain rapid diagnosis, specific treatment and improved patient care. PMID:27462223

  11. Ulcers as a Sign of Skin Infection with Mycobacterium wolinskyi: Report of a Case and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Bossart, Simon; Schnell, Barbara; Kerl, Katrin; Urosevic-Maiwald, Mirjana

    2016-01-01

    Infection with Mycobacterium wolinskyi, if not detected, may cause severe skin and soft tissue infection with prolonged healing process and is therefore associated with high morbidity. Only about 20 cases of M. wolinskyi infections in humans have been described in the literature until now, none of them in Switzerland. We report a case of an infection in a 72-year-old male patient with recurrent subcutaneous abdominal wall abscesses and ulcer formation after insulin injection in the underbelly. A culture of skin biopsy tissue showed rapid growth of non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), which were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing as M. wolinskyi. Surgical excision and primary closure of all abdominal ulcers in combination with antibiotic therapy, based on the antimicrobiotic susceptibility test results, were performed and resulted in complete resolution of the clinical symptoms and no recurrence of infection at a 6-month follow-up. The present case emphasizes the importance of accurate diagnosis and treatment of chronic infection with ulcer formation. In such cases, it is crucial to consider the presence of NTM, such as M. wolinskyi, in order to obtain rapid diagnosis, specific treatment and improved patient care. PMID:27462223

  12. Interferon-γ Is a Crucial Activator of Early Host Immune Defense against Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bieri, Raphael; Bolz, Miriam; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Pluschke, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    Buruli ulcer (BU), caused by infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans, is a chronic necrotizing human skin disease associated with the production of the cytotoxic macrolide exotoxin mycolactone. Despite extensive research, the type of immune responses elicited against this pathogen and the effector functions conferring protection against BU are not yet fully understood. While histopathological analyses of advanced BU lesions have demonstrated a mainly extracellular localization of the toxin producing acid fast bacilli, there is growing evidence for an early intra-macrophage growth phase of M. ulcerans. This has led us to investigate whether interferon-γ might play an important role in containing M. ulcerans infections. In an experimental Buruli ulcer mouse model we found that interferon-γ is indeed a critical regulator of early host immune defense against M. ulcerans infections. Interferon-γ knockout mice displayed a faster progression of the infection compared to wild-type mice. This accelerated progression was reflected in faster and more extensive tissue necrosis and oedema formation, as well as in a significantly higher bacterial burden after five weeks of infection, indicating that mice lacking interferon-γ have a reduced capacity to kill intracellular bacilli during the early intra-macrophage growth phase of M. ulcerans. This data demonstrates a prominent role of interferon-γ in early defense against M. ulcerans infection and supports the view that concepts for vaccine development against tuberculosis may also be valid for BU. PMID:26863011

  13. Local Cellular Immune Responses and Pathogenesis of Buruli Ulcer Lesions in the Experimental Mycobacterium Ulcerans Pig Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Bolz, Miriam; Ruggli, Nicolas; Borel, Nicole; Pluschke, Gerd; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse

    2016-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer is a neglected tropical disease of the skin that is caused by infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans. We recently established an experimental pig (Sus scrofa) infection model for Buruli ulcer to investigate host-pathogen interactions, the efficacy of candidate vaccines and of new treatment options. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we have used the model to study pathogenesis and early host-pathogen interactions in the affected porcine skin upon infection with mycolactone-producing and non-producing M. ulcerans strains. Histopathological analyses of nodular lesions in the porcine skin revealed that six weeks after infection with wild-type M. ulcerans bacteria extracellular acid fast bacilli were surrounded by distinct layers of neutrophils, macrophages and lymphocytes. Upon ulceration, the necrotic tissue containing the major bacterial burden was sloughing off, leading to the loss of most of the mycobacteria. Compared to wild-type M. ulcerans bacteria, toxin-deficient mutants caused an increased granulomatous cellular infiltration without massive tissue necrosis, and only smaller clusters of acid fast bacilli. Conclusions/Significance In summary, the present study shows that the pathogenesis and early immune response to M. ulcerans infection in the pig is very well reflecting BU disease in humans, making the pig infection model an excellent tool for the profiling of new therapeutic and prophylactic interventions. PMID:27128097

  14. Atypical presentation of human bocavirus: Severe respiratory tract infection complicated with encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Akturk, Hacer; Sık, Guntulu; Salman, Nuran; Sutcu, Murat; Tatli, Burak; Ciblak, Meral Akcay; Erol, Oguz Bulent; Torun, Selda Hancerli; Citak, Agop; Somer, Ayper

    2015-11-01

    Human bocavirus (HBOV) has been reported as a worldwide distributed respiratory pathogen. It has also been associated with encephalitis recently by detection of the virus in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of patients presented with encephalitis. This retrospective study aimed to present clinical features of HBOV infections in children with respiratory symptoms and describe unexplained encephalopathy in a subgroup of these patients. Results of 1,143 pediatric nasal samples from mid-December 2013 to July 2014 were reviewed for detection of HBOV. A multiplex real time polymerase chain reaction assay was used for viral detection. Medical records of the patients were retrospectively analyzed. HBOV was detected in 30 patients (2.6%). Median age was 14 months (5-80). Clinical diagnoses were upper respiratory tract infection (n = 10), bronchopneumonia (n = 9), acute bronchiolitis (n = 5), pneumonia (n = 4), acute bronchitis (n = 1), and asthma execarbation (n = 1). Hospitalization was required in 16 (53.3%) patients and 10 (62.5%) of them admitted to pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Noninvasive mechanical ventilation modalities was applied to four patients and mechanical ventilation to four patients. Intractable seizures developed in four patients while mechanically ventilated on the 2nd-3rd days of PICU admission. No specific reason for encephalopathy was found after a thorough investigation. No mortality was observed, but two patients were discharged with neurological sequela. HBOV may lead to respiratory infections in a wide spectrum of severity. This report indicates its potential to cause severe respiratory infections requiring PICU admission and highlights possible clinical association of HBOV and encephalopathy, which developed during severe respiratory infection. PMID:25966820

  15. Within-Host Heterogeneity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection Is Associated With Poor Early Treatment Response: A Prospective Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ted; Chindelevitch, Leonid; Misra, Reshma; Kempner, Maria E; Galea, Jerome; Moodley, Prashini; Wilson, Douglas

    2016-06-01

    The clinical management of tuberculosis is a major challenge in southern Africa. The prevalence of within-host genetically heterogeneous Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and its effect on treatment response are not well understood. We enrolled 500 patients with tuberculosis in KwaZulu-Natal and followed them through 2 months of treatment. Using mycobacterial interspersed repetitive units-variable number of tandem repeats genotyping to identify mycobacterial heterogeneity, we report the prevalence and evaluate the association of heterogeneity with treatment response. Upon initiation of treatment, 21.1% of participants harbored a heterogeneous M. tuberculosis infection; such heterogeneity was independently associated with a nearly 2-fold higher odds of persistent culture positivity after 2 months of treatment (adjusted odds ratio, 1.90; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-3.50). PMID:26768249

  16. [A CASE OF PULMONARY MYCOBACTERIUM ABSCESSUS INFECTION THAT DEVELOPED DURING IMMUNOSUPPRESSIVE THERAPY FOR MYASTHENIA GRAVIS WITH RECURRENT THYMOMA].

    PubMed

    Matsuse, Hiroto; Oshio, Takeshi; Kishimoto, Kumiko; Nakayama, Haruo

    2016-02-01

    A 58-year-old man developed cough, sputum, and low-grade fever during immunosuppressive treatment with corticosteroids and cyclosporine for myasthenia gravis with recurrent thymoma. Since chest CT revealed diffuse nodular opacities in both lung fields, he was referred to our department. Mycobacterium abscessus was repeatedly cultured from his sputum, and he was diagnosed with pulmonary M. abscessus infection. Although both chest radiological findings and clinical symptoms were mild, he required treatment with immunosuppressive agents and systemic anesthesia for resection of the recurrent thymoma. Based on complications and according to the patient's preference, oral treatment with clarithromycin 600 mg/day, levofloxacin 500 mg/day, and faropenem 600 mg/day was initiated on an outpatient basis. Following these treatments, his chest CT findings and clinical symptoms subsided, and the thymoma was successfully resected. Our experience with the present case suggests a possible treatment strategy for M. abscessus infection in immunocompromised and complicated cases. PMID:27263226

  17. Expression of major histocompatibility complex class I and class II antigens in human Schwann cell cultures and effects of infection with Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Samuel, N M; Mirsky, R; Grange, J M; Jessen, K R

    1987-06-01

    Recent experiments on rats have raised the possibility that Schwann cells can present antigens to T lymphocytes. We have investigated whether this mechanism might be relevant in leprosy by determining under what conditions human Schwann cells express class I and class II antigens, and whether infection with Mycobacterium leprae affects this expression. The distribution of these antigens was examined on human Schwann cells in dissociated cell cultures derived from human fetal peripheral nerves. We find that both Schwann cells and fibroblastic cells in these cultures normally express class I antigens but not class II antigens. When Schwann cells are infected with live Mycobacterium leprae for 48 h, 73% of Schwann cells phagocytose the bacteria. Mycobacterium leprae prevents 3H-thymidine incorporation into cultured human Schwann cells, but does not affect class I expression in these cells. Treatment of normal and Mycobacterium leprae infected cultures with gamma-interferon for 72 h induces class II expression on most Schwann cells but not on the majority of fibroblastic cells. The fact that human Schwann cells infected with Mycobacterium leprae can be induced by gamma-interferon to express class II antigens suggests that they may be able to present Mycobacterium leprae antigens to T lymphocytes and thus initiate immune responses against the bacteria. We suggest that a failure of this response, such as that seen within nerve trunks in lepromatous leprosy, is caused by deficient class II expression on Schwann cells. This deficiency in class II expression, in turn, may be caused by the reduced gamma-interferon production characteristic of lepromatous leprosy. PMID:3115648

  18. ClassTR: Classifying Within-Host Heterogeneity Based on Tandem Repeats with Application to Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infections

    PubMed Central

    Chindelevitch, Leonid; Colijn, Caroline; Moodley, Prashini; Wilson, Douglas; Cohen, Ted

    2016-01-01

    Genomic tools have revealed genetically diverse pathogens within some hosts. Within-host pathogen diversity, which we refer to as “complex infection”, is increasingly recognized as a determinant of treatment outcome for infections like tuberculosis. Complex infection arises through two mechanisms: within-host mutation (which results in clonal heterogeneity) and reinfection (which results in mixed infections). Estimates of the frequency of within-host mutation and reinfection in populations are critical for understanding the natural history of disease. These estimates influence projections of disease trends and effects of interventions. The genotyping technique MLVA (multiple loci variable-number tandem repeats analysis) can identify complex infections, but the current method to distinguish clonal heterogeneity from mixed infections is based on a rather simple rule. Here we describe ClassTR, a method which leverages MLVA information from isolates collected in a population to distinguish mixed infections from clonal heterogeneity. We formulate the resolution of complex infections into their constituent strains as an optimization problem, and show its NP-completeness. We solve it efficiently by using mixed integer linear programming and graph decomposition. Once the complex infections are resolved into their constituent strains, ClassTR probabilistically classifies isolates as clonally heterogeneous or mixed by using a model of tandem repeat evolution. We first compare ClassTR with the standard rule-based classification on 100 simulated datasets. ClassTR outperforms the standard method, improving classification accuracy from 48% to 80%. We then apply ClassTR to a sample of 436 strains collected from tuberculosis patients in a South African community, of which 92 had complex infections. We find that ClassTR assigns an alternate classification to 18 of the 92 complex infections, suggesting important differences in practice. By explicitly modeling tandem repeat

  19. Increased susceptibility to Strongyloides venezuelensis in mice due to Mycobacterium bovis co-infection which modulates production of Th2 cytokines.

    PubMed

    Carmo, A M; Vicentini, M A; Dias, A T; Alves, L L; Alves, C C S; Brandi, J S; De Paula, M L; Fernandes, A; Barsante, M M; Souza, M A; Teixeira, H C; Negrão-Corrêa, D; Ferreira, A P

    2009-09-01

    An estimated quarter of the world's population possesses an infection caused by gastrointestinal nematodes, which induce a Th2 type immune response. Concomitant infection of nematodes with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which induces a predominantly Th1 type response, is very frequent in tropical and subtropical regions. This study examined immune responses of BALB/c mice infected with Strongyloides venezuelensis and then co-infected with Mycobacterium bovis. The number of worms in the intestine, eggs in feces, cytokine production in lungs and intestine and the expression of CD80, CD86, CTLA-4 and CD28 cell markers on pulmonary cells were analysed. Our results indicate that co-infected mice had an increased parasite burden, which correlates with elevated IFN-gamma and IL-10 cytokine production and decreased IL-4 and IL-13. Moreover, decreased expression of CD80 and increased expression of CTLA-4 were observed in co-infected mice. Our data point out that susceptibility to Strongyloides venezuelensis infection is increased by Mycobacterium bovis co-infection, resulting in higher parasite survival. PMID:19660155

  20. Outbreak of Mycobacterium haemophilum infections after permanent makeup of the eyebrows.

    PubMed

    Giulieri, Stefano; Morisod, Benoit; Edney, Timothy; Odman, Micaela; Genné, Daniel; Malinverni, Raffaele; Hammann, Catherine; Musumeci, Enrico; Voide, Cathy; Greub, Gilbert; Masserey, Eric; Bille, Jacques; Cavassini, Matthias; Jaton, Katia

    2011-02-15

    We report a Mycobacterium haemophilum outbreak after permanent make-up of the eyebrows performed by the same freelance artist. Twelve patients presented an eyebrow lesion and cervical lymphadenitis. All were treated with antibiotics. Surgery was required in 10 cases. M. haemophilum DNA was identified in the make-up ink. PMID:21258102

  1. Hemolysin as a Virulence Factor for Systemic Infection with Isolates of Mycobacterium avium Complex

    PubMed Central

    Maslow, Joel N.; Dawson, David; Carlin, Elizabeth A.; Holland, Steven M.

    1999-01-01

    Isolates of the Mycobacterium avium complex were examined for hemolysin expression. Only invasive isolates of M. avium were observed to be hemolytic (P < 0.001), with activity the greatest for isolates of serovars 4 and 8. Thus, M. avium hemolysin appears to represent a virulence factor necessary for invasive disease. PMID:9889239

  2. Lesion Development and Immunohistochemical Changes in Granulomas from Cattle Experimentally Infected with Mycobacterium bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis is known to persist within granulomas. To examine temporal changes in granulomas, 32 cattle were inoculated with M. bovis. Tissues from four calves each were examined at various time-points after inoculation. Granulomas in the retrophar...

  3. Mycobacteriosis associated with Mycobacterium peregrinum infection in Red-crowned Cranes (Grus japonensis) in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huimin; Yan, Jing; Luo, Jing; Yan, Ruoqian; Chen, Hao; Cheng, Hai; Liu, Dawei; He, Hongxuan

    2014-07-01

    We describe mycobacteriosis caused by Mycobacterium peregrinum in Red-crowned Cranes (Grus japonensis) in China. Isolates were identified by bacteriology, molecular identification methods, and phylogenetic analysis. This study shows that M. peregrinum is an important pathogen for mycobacteriosis and could represent a threat to conservation efforts of endangered species. PMID:24807357

  4. Added value of use of a purified protein derivative-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot assay for patients with Mycobacterium bovis BCG infection after intravesical BCG instillations.

    PubMed

    Heemstra, Karen A; Bossink, Ailko W J; Spermon, Roan; Bouwman, John J M; van der Kieft, Robert; Thijsen, Steven F T

    2012-06-01

    In this case series, we describe four cases in which the use of gamma interferon release assays with purified protein derivative (PPD) as a stimulating antigen was able to demonstrate PPD-specific immune activation. This may help to improve the adequate diagnosis of (systemic) Mycobacterium bovis BCG infections after intravesical BCG instillations for bladder carcinoma. PMID:22461529

  5. Added Value of Use of a Purified Protein Derivative-Based Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Spot Assay for Patients with Mycobacterium bovis BCG Infection after Intravesical BCG Instillations

    PubMed Central

    Bossink, Ailko W. J.; Spermon, Roan; Bouwman, John J. M.; van der Kieft, Robert; Thijsen, Steven F. T.

    2012-01-01

    In this case series, we describe four cases in which the use of gamma interferon release assays with purified protein derivative (PPD) as a stimulating antigen was able to demonstrate PPD-specific immune activation. This may help to improve the adequate diagnosis of (systemic) Mycobacterium bovis BCG infections after intravesical BCG instillations for bladder carcinoma. PMID:22461529

  6. Predicting the role of IL-10 in the regulation of the adaptive immune responses in Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infections using mathematical models

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that causes Johne’s disease in cattle and other animals. Infection follows ingestion of the bacteria primarily through the fecal oral route and results in the colonization of the intestine and a granulomatous en...

  7. A whole genome association analysis identified loci associated with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection status in U.S. Holstein cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to identify loci associated with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (Map) infection status in US Holsteins using the Illumina BovineSNP50 BeadChip whole genome SNP assay. Two hundred forty-five cows from dairies in New York, Pennsylvania and Vermont were fo...

  8. Optimization of methods for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in milk and colostrum of naturally infected dairy cows with Johne's Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of Johne’s Disease (JD), a chronic enteritis that occurs in dairy cattle and other ruminants. A 2007 NAHMS Dairy Study demonstrated that over 68% of dairy herds are infected with JD so the risk of exposure within a herd is high...

  9. Osteopontin Immunoreactivity in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells, Ileum, and Ileocecal Lymph Node of Dairy Cows Naturally Infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Osteopontin (Opn), a highly acidic glycoprotein, plays an early role in initiating the innate immune response to mycobacterial infections by promoting cellular adhesion and recruitment of inflammatory cells from the peripheral blood. The formation of granulomas at the site of Mycobacterium avium s...

  10. Experimental Infection of the Pig with Mycobacterium ulcerans: A Novel Model for Studying the Pathogenesis of Buruli Ulcer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bolz, Miriam; Ruggli, Nicolas; Ruf, Marie-Thérèse; Ricklin, Meret E.; Zimmer, Gert; Pluschke, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    Background Buruli ulcer (BU) is a slowly progressing, necrotising disease of the skin caused by infection with Mycobacterium ulcerans. Non-ulcerative manifestations are nodules, plaques and oedema, which may progress to ulceration of large parts of the skin. Histopathologically, BU is characterized by coagulative necrosis, fat cell ghosts, epidermal hyperplasia, clusters of extracellular acid fast bacilli (AFB) in the subcutaneous tissue and lack of major inflammatory infiltration. The mode of transmission of BU is not clear and there is only limited information on the early pathogenesis of the disease available. Methodology/Principal Findings For evaluating the potential of the pig as experimental infection model for BU, we infected pigs subcutaneously with different doses of M. ulcerans. The infected skin sites were excised 2.5 or 6.5 weeks after infection and processed for histopathological analysis. With doses of 2×107 and 2×106 colony forming units (CFU) we observed the development of nodular lesions that subsequently progressed to ulcerative or plaque-like lesions. At lower inoculation doses signs of infection found after 2.5 weeks had spontaneously resolved at 6.5 weeks. The observed macroscopic and histopathological changes closely resembled those found in M. ulcerans disease in humans. Conclusion/Significance Our results demonstrate that the pig can be infected with M. ulcerans. Productive infection leads to the development of lesions that closely resemble human BU lesions. The pig infection model therefore has great potential for studying the early pathogenesis of BU and for the development of new therapeutic and prophylactic interventions. PMID:25010421

  11. Experimental infection of lambs with C and S-type strains of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis: immunological and pathological findings

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The two main genotypes of recognized isolates of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (Map) are cattle (C) and sheep (S) strains. An experimental infection was conducted to establish the effect of Map strain on the pathogenesis of ovine paratuberculosis. Twenty-four out of thirty 1.5-month-old Assaf lambs were divided into 4 groups of 6 and infected orally with three low passage field isolates, two of S- (22G and the pigmented Ovicap49) and one of C– (764) type, and the reference K-10 strain (C type). The remaining six animals were unchallenged controls. Animals were euthanized at 150 and 390 days post-infection (dpi). Throughout the experiment, the peripheral immune response was assessed and histological and molecular (PCR) studies were conducted on samples of intestine and related lymphoid tissue. Specific antibody and IFN-γ production was significantly higher in animals infected with the C strains, while no consistent IFN- γ responses were observed in the S-type strain infected groups. A positive intradermal skin test response was detected in all infected groups. Lambs infected with S-type strains had granulomatous lesions restricted to the lymphoid tissue with no differences in the lesion intensity over time. In both C–type strain groups, lesions were more severe at 150 dpi while at 390 dpi lesions, characterized by well-demarcated granulomas with fibrosis, decreased in severity. Only infected lambs were positive to PCR. These results suggest that the strain of Map has a strong influence over the immune and pathological responses developed by the host. Lesions induced by C–type strains in lambs show a regressive character and tend to decrease as the infection progresses. PMID:24428881

  12. EFFECT OF ENVIRONMENTAL TEMPERATURES ON INFECTION WITH MYCOBACTERIUM MARINUM (BALNEI) OF MICE AND A NUMBER OF POIKILOTHERMIC SPECIES

    PubMed Central

    Clark, H Fred; Shepard, Charles C.

    1963-01-01

    Clark, H Fred (Communicable Disease Center, Atlanta, Ga.), and Charles C. Shepard. Effect of environmental temperatures on infection with Mycobacterium marinum (Balnei) of mice and a number of poikilothermic species. J. Bacteriol. 86:1057–1069. 1963.—An exploration was made of the effect of environmental temperature on infections with Mycobacterium marinum of mice, young opossums, and bats, and of 50 species of poikilothermic animals. In artificial medium (7H9 broth) M. marinum grew most rapidly from 25 to 35 C, with generation times of 4 to 6 hr. At 37 C, the generation time was 14 hr; at 20 C, 20 hr; and, at 15 C and lower, little growth was observed. In mice, deep body temperatures were found to be 36.5 to 37.3 C at environmental temperatures of 4 to 30 C. At an environmental temperature of 34 C, they averaged 39.1 C; at 37 C they averaged 40.2 C. Foot-pad temperatures were within a few degrees of ambient temperatures from 10 to 34 C. In mouse foot-pad infections, the optimal environmental temperature for infection was 20 C, and the generation time of the infecting bacilli at this environmental temperature was about 15 hr. Intravenously inoculated mice developed peripheral infections of nose, feet, and tail at environmental temperatures of 4 to 30 C. At these temperatures, they had severe pneumonic involvement, and the mice at lower temperatures tended to succumb most rapidly to systemic infection. At 34 C, the intravenously infected mice did not develop peripheral infections and there was no pulmonary involvement. Young opossums, whose deep body temperatures are only 34 to 36 C, were inoculated in the foot-pad and intravenously. Foot-pad infection developed without systemic involvement. Bats, which assume environmental temperature when at rest, were inoculated in the foot-pad. Foot-pad infections were observed but no systemic disease. The bats could be maintained for only short periods, however. Poikilothermic animals were studied. Deep body temperatures

  13. Fish, flesh and a good red herring: a case of ascending upper limb infection in a renal transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Lovric, S; Becker, J U; Kayser, D; Wagner, A; Haubitz, M; Kielstein, J T

    2009-11-01

    While newly developed potent immunosuppressive agents have dramatically reduced the incidence of rejection of transplanted organs, they have increased the patients' susceptibility to opportunistic infections and cancer. Here we report a rare skin infection caused by atypical mycobacterium marinum in a 50-year-old female renal transplant recipient. The patient presented with localized skin lesion on the dorsum of her hand, which was misdiagnosed as gout. Only after the lesions spread in a sporotrichoid pattern, a cutaneous infection with atypical mycobacteria was suspected. The diagnosis was based on histopathological analysis as well as mycobacterial culture, both showing infection with atypical mycobacterium. Three months of antimycobacterial treatment led to a marked regression of the lesions. Sporotrichoid lesions in renal transplant patients are rare and a diagnostic challenge for the physician. A thorough history and a low threshold for skin biopsies could prevent painful and unnecessary surgical interventions. PMID:19863885

  14. Early Induction of Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses during Experimental Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Infection of Calves

    PubMed Central

    Waters, W. R.; Miller, J. M.; Palmer, M. V.; Stabel, J. R.; Jones, D. E.; Koistinen, K. A.; Steadham, E. M.; Hamilton, M. J.; Davis, W. C.; Bannantine, J. P.

    2003-01-01

    Johne's disease (paratuberculosis) of cattle is widespread and causes significant economic losses for producers due to decreased production and poor health of affected animals. The chronic nature of the disease and the lack of a reproducible model of infection hinder research efforts. In the present study, instillation of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis into the tonsillar crypts of neonatal calves resulted in peripheral colonization as detected by antemortem culture of feces and postmortem (320 days postchallenge) culture of intestinal tissues. Antigen-specific blastogenic, gamma interferon (IFN-γ), and nitric oxide responses by blood mononuclear cells from infected calves exceeded prechallenge responses beginning 194 days postchallenge. Upon in vitro stimulation with paratuberculosis antigens, CD4+ cells from infected calves proliferated, produced IFN-γ, and increased expression of CD26 and CD45RO (indicative of an activated memory phenotype). Utilizing a lipoarabinomannan-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, specific serum immunoglobulin was detected as early as 134 days postchallenge and generally increased after this time point. Two antigens of ∼50 and ∼60 kDa were particularly immunodominant early in infection, as shown by immunoblot with serum collected within 2 weeks postchallenge. Findings indicate that the intratonsillar inoculation route will prove useful as an experimental model for paratuberculosis infection. Additionally, this study confirms that mycobacteria-specific antibody is detectable early in the course of experimental Johne's disease, even preceding the development of specific cell-mediated responses. PMID:12933856

  15. Infectivity in skeletal muscle of cattle with atypical bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Suardi, Silvia; Vimercati, Chiara; Casalone, Cristina; Gelmetti, Daniela; Corona, Cristiano; Iulini, Barbara; Mazza, Maria; Lombardi, Guerino; Moda, Fabio; Ruggerone, Margherita; Campagnani, Ilaria; Piccoli, Elena; Catania, Marcella; Groschup, Martin H; Balkema-Buschmann, Anne; Caramelli, Maria; Monaco, Salvatore; Zanusso, Gianluigi; Tagliavini, Fabrizio

    2012-01-01

    The amyloidotic form of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) termed BASE is caused by a prion strain whose biological properties differ from those of typical BSE, resulting in a clinically and pathologically distinct phenotype. Whether peripheral tissues of BASE-affected cattle contain infectivity is unknown. This is a critical issue since the BASE prion is readily transmissible to a variety of hosts including primates, suggesting that humans may be susceptible. We carried out bioassays in transgenic mice overexpressing bovine PrP (Tgbov XV) and found infectivity in a variety of skeletal muscles from cattle with natural and experimental BASE. Noteworthy, all BASE muscles used for inoculation transmitted disease, although the attack rate differed between experimental and natural cases (∼70% versus ∼10%, respectively). This difference was likely related to different prion titers, possibly due to different stages of disease in the two conditions, i.e. terminal stage in experimental BASE and pre-symptomatic stage in natural BASE. The neuropathological phenotype and PrP(res) type were consistent in all affected mice and matched those of Tgbov XV mice infected with brain homogenate from natural BASE. The immunohistochemical analysis of skeletal muscles from cattle with natural and experimental BASE showed the presence of abnormal prion protein deposits within muscle fibers. Conversely, Tgbov XV mice challenged with lymphoid tissue and kidney from natural and experimental BASE did not develop disease. The novel information on the neuromuscular tropism of the BASE strain, efficiently overcoming species barriers, underlines the relevance of maintaining an active surveillance. PMID:22363650

  16. Diagnostic implications of antigen-induced gamma interferon production by blood leukocytes from Mycobacterium bovis-infected reindeer (Rangifer tarandus).

    PubMed

    Waters, W R; Palmer, M V; Slaughter, R E; Jones, S L; Pitzer, J E; Minion, F C

    2006-01-01

    The only approved method of tuberculosis (TB) surveillance of reindeer within the United States is tuberculin skin testing; however, skin testing has an apparent lack of specificity, since numerous reindeer are classified as reactors, yet Mycobacterium bovis is not isolated from tissues upon necropsy. The objective of this study was to evaluate the ability of an in vitro assay (the Cervigam assay) to detect gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) produced by blood leukocytes in response to mycobacterial antigens from M. bovis-infected reindeer. Thirteen male reindeer approximately 9 months of age were inoculated with 10(5) CFU M. bovis in their tonsillar crypts. Stimulation of whole-blood cultures with a mitogen resulted in significant production of IFN-gamma compared to that by nonstimulated samples. Responses by infected reindeer to M. bovis purified protein derivative (PPD) were as much as 3.5-fold higher than those by noninfected reindeer (n = 4). Despite differences in responses to PPD by the two groups, reindeer within the noninfected group had responses of >0.1 change in optical density (DeltaOD) (a level generally considered positive) to PPD. Mean responses by infected reindeer to a rESAT-6-CFP-10 fusion protein (Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex specific) were as much as 20-fold higher than respective responses by noninfected reindeer at all time points. Additionally, responses by 3/4 noninfected reindeer were <0.1 DeltaOD (considered negative) at each time point. To further evaluate the specificity of the assay, samples were collected from reindeer in a TB-free herd. All reindeer had responses to mitogen; however, only 1 of 38 had a response to PPD, and none of the reindeer responded to rESAT-6-CFP-10. Together, these findings indicate that IFN-gamma-based tests may prove useful for TB surveillance of reindeer. PMID:16425998

  17. Indoleamine 2,3-Dioxygenase, Tryptophan Catabolism, and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis: a Model for Chronic Mycobacterial Infections ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Plain, Karren M.; de Silva, Kumudika; Earl, John; Begg, Douglas J.; Purdie, Auriol C.; Whittington, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    Virulent mycobacterial infections progress slowly, with a latent period that leads to clinical disease in a proportion of cases. Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis is an intracellular pathogen that causes paratuberculosis or Johne's disease (JD), a chronic intestinal disease of ruminants. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO), an enzyme that regulates tryptophan metabolism, was originally reported to have a role in intracellular pathogen killing and has since been shown to have an important immunoregulatory role in chronic immune diseases. Here we demonstrate an association between increased IDO levels and progression to clinical mycobacterial disease in a natural host, characterizing gene expression, protein localization, and functional effects. IDO mRNA levels were significantly increased in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-infected monocytic cells. Levels of both IDO gene and protein expression were significantly upregulated within the affected tissues of sheep with JD, particularly at the site of primary infection, the ileum, of animals with severe multibacillary disease. Lesion severity was correlated with the level of IDO gene expression. IDO gene expression was also increased in the peripheral blood cells of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-exposed sheep and cattle. IDO breaks down tryptophan, and systemic increases were functional, as shown by decreased plasma tryptophan levels, which correlated with the onset of clinical signs, a stage well known to be associated with Th1 immunosuppression. IDO may be involved in downregulating immune responses to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis and other virulent mycobacteria, which may be an example of the pathogen harnessing host immunoregulatory pathways to aid survival. These findings raise new questions about the host-mycobacterium interactions in the progression from latent to clinical disease. PMID:21730087

  18. Distinctive western blot antibody patterns induced by infection of mice with individual strains of the Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed Central

    Elsaghier, A; Nolan, A; Allen, B; Ivanyi, J

    1992-01-01

    Systemic infection of mice with organisms of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) induced antibody responses, characteristic for each of the three tested individual strains. The influence of host genetic factors was reflected up to 3 months after infection by the finding of generally oligobanded and multibanded Western blot patterns in C57B1/6 and BALB/c mice, respectively. Nevertheless, more bands developed at 6 months in C57BL/6 mice. The response to three antigens of 18,000, 38,000 and 24,000 MW was analysed in greater detail. Antibodies to a protease-resistant 18,000 MW band produced only by BALB/c mice were either strain specific, following infection with M. avium, strain Maa-B2, or cross-reactive within MAC, following infection with M. avium strain Maa-A6 and M. paratuberculosis, strain Map-203. Another protease-resistant antigen of 38,000 MW was immunogenic only in Maa-B2 infected mice. This constituent was found to be related to the protease-sensitive antigen of corresponding molecular weight from M. tuberculosis. Two 24,000 MW proteins of M. paratuberculosis were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis: antibodies to the anodic band were induced by Map-203 infection, whilst the cathodic band was revealed by heteroclitic antibodies from Maa-B2-infected mice. The latter antigen is apparently expressed during in vivo replication, but not during in vitro culture of Maa-B2 bacteria. We generally conclude, that the selective antibody patterns after live infection, could be attributed to differences in the release of native antigens within mycobacterial lesions. In view of a high degree of species specificity, some of the immunogenic constituents identified may also be useful for serodiagnostic application. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:1526646

  19. [Two cases of pulmonary infection by Mycobacterium abscessus in which drug susceptibility testing results conflicted with clinical courses].

    PubMed

    Nishizawa, Yoriko; Fujimura, Masaki; Tagami, Atsurou; Abo, Miki; Honjyo, Chihiro; Yasui, Masahide; Nakao, Shinji

    2005-04-01

    We encountered two cases of pulmonary infection by Mycobacterium abscessus (M. abscessus). [Case 1] A 66-year-old man who had been treated for non-tuberculous mycobacterium in the past was admitted because of productive cough. His chest X-ray film showed cavitation and direct microscopy of sputum revealed positive acid-fast bacilli (AFB). He was given rifampicin (RFP), ethambutol (EB), and clarythromycin (CAM), and then his symptoms and radiographic findings improved. [Case 2] A 74-year-old man with multiple myeloma as an underlying disease was admitted because of a cavitation found on chest radiography and a positive result for AFB in his sputum. Standard antituberculous drug therapy with isoniazid (INH), RFP, EB, and pyradinamide (PZA) was initiated and then the chest radiographic findings improved. As M. abscessus was isolated two weeks after the induction of therapy, the therapeutic regimen was changed to another combination therapy consisting of EB, clarithromycin (CAM) and ciprofloxacin (CPFX), and then his symptoms and radiographic findings were further improved. In both cases, the bacilli found in their sputum were identified as M. abscessus by DNA hybridization. They were completely resistant to all anti-tuberculosis agents and many antibiotics with a high value of MIC. However, their symptoms, radiographic abnormalities and the results of sputum examination improved following chemotherapy. The results obtained by MIC measurement were inconsistent with the clinical outcomes. The measurement of the MIC value of antibiotics do not necessarily predict its therapeutic effect. PMID:15966372

  20. Human Exposure following Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection of Multiple Animal Species in a Metropolitan Zoo

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Peter; Granich, Reuben; Scott, Jim; Sun, Ben; Joseph, Michael; Stringfield, Cynthia; Thisdell, Susan; Staley, Jothan; Workman-Malcolm, Donna; Borenstein, Lee; Lehnkering, Eleanor; Ryan, Patrick; Soukup, Jeanne; Nitta, Annette

    2002-01-01

    From 1997 to 2000, Mycobacterium tuberculosis was diagnosed in two Asian elephants (Elephas maximus), three Rocky Mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus), and one black rhinoceros (Diceros bicornis) in the Los Angeles Zoo. DNA fingerprint patterns suggested recent transmission. An investigation found no active cases of tuberculosis in humans; however, tuberculin skin-test conversions in humans were associated with training elephants and attending an elephant necropsy. PMID:12453358

  1. Induction of Unconventional T Cells by a Mutant Mycobacterium bovis BCG Strain Formulated in Cationic Liposomes Correlates with Protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infections of Immunocompromised Mice.

    PubMed

    Derrick, Steven C; Yabe, Idalia; Morris, Sheldon; Cowley, Siobhan

    2016-07-01

    Earlier studies aimed at defining protective immunity induced by Mycobacterium bovis BCG immunization have largely focused on the induction of antituberculosis CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses. Here we describe a vaccine consisting of a BCGΔmmaA4 deletion mutant formulated in dimethyl dioctadecyl-ammonium bromide (DDA) with d-(+)-trehalose 6,6'-dibehenate (TDB) (DDA/TDB) adjuvant (A4/Adj) that protected TCRδ(-/-) mice depleted of CD4(+), CD8(+), and NK1.1(+) T cells against an aerosol challenge with M. tuberculosis These mice were significantly protected relative to mice immunized with a nonadjuvanted BCGΔmmaA4 (BCG-A4) mutant and nonvaccinated controls at 2 months and 9 months postvaccination. In the absence of all T cells following treatment with anti-Thy1.2 antibody, the immunized mice lost the ability to control the infection. These results indicate that an unconventional T cell population was mediating protection in the absence of CD4(+), CD8(+), NK1.1(+), and TCRγδ T cells and could exhibit memory. Focusing on CD4(-) CD8(-) double-negative (DN) T cells, we found that these cells accumulated in the lungs postchallenge significantly more in A4/Adj-immunized mice and induced significantly greater frequencies of pulmonary gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing cells than were seen in the nonvaccinated or nonadjuvanted BCG control groups. Moreover, pulmonary DN T cells from the A4/Adj group exhibited significantly higher IFN-γ integrated median fluorescence intensity (iMFI) values than were seen in the control groups. We also showed that enriched DN T cells from mice immunized with A4/Adj could control mycobacterial growth in vitro significantly better than naive whole-spleen cells. These results suggest that formulating BCG in DDA/TDB adjuvant confers superior protection in immunocompromised mice and likely involves the induction of long-lived memory DN T cells. PMID:27226281

  2. Phospholipase activity of Mycobacterium leprae harvested from experimentally infected armadillo tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, P R; Ratledge, C

    1991-01-01

    Three types of phospholipase activity--phospholipase A1, A2, and lysophospholipase--were detected in Mycobacterium leprae harvested from armadillo tissue at about 25% of the specific activity found in a slowly growing mycobacterium, Mycobacterium microti, which was grown in medium to optimize its phospholipase activity. The highest activity found was lysophospholipase, which released fatty acid from 2-lyso-phosphatidylcholine. Phospholipase activity was detected by using phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. Differences in relative activities with these three types of substrate distinguished phospholipase activity in M. leprae extracts from armadillo liver extracts. Furthermore, retention of activity in M. leprae after NaOH treatment showed that the activity associated with M. leprae was not host derived. The specific activity of phospholipase was 20 times higher in extracts of M. leprae than in intact M. leprae organisms. Diazotization, a treatment which abolishes activities of surface enzymes exposed to the environment by the formation of covalent azide bonds with exposed amino groups, did not affect M. leprae's phospholipase activity, with one exception: release of arachidonic acid from phosphatidylcholine, which was partially inhibited. Phenolic glycolipid I, the major excreted amphipathic lipid of M. leprae, inhibited phospholipase activity, including release of arachidonic acid, for both M. leprae- and armadillo-derived activity. PMID:1855994

  3. Seeing a Mycobacterium-Infected Cell in Nanoscale 3D: Correlative Imaging by Light Microscopy and FIB/SEM Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Beckwith, Marianne Sandvold; Beckwith, Kai Sandvold; Sikorski, Pawel; Skogaker, Nan Tostrup

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacteria pose a threat to the world health today, with pathogenic and opportunistic bacteria causing tuberculosis and non-tuberculous disease in large parts of the population. Much is still unknown about the interplay between bacteria and host during infection and disease, and more research is needed to meet the challenge of drug resistance and inefficient vaccines. This work establishes a reliable and reproducible method for performing correlative imaging of human macrophages infected with mycobacteria at an ultra-high resolution and in 3D. Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy (FIB/SEM) tomography is applied, together with confocal fluorescence microscopy for localization of appropriately infected cells. The method is based on an Aclar poly(chloro-tri-fluoro)ethylene substrate, micropatterned into an advantageous geometry by a simple thermomoulding process. The platform increases the throughput and quality of FIB/SEM tomography analyses, and was successfully applied to detail the intracellular environment of a whole mycobacterium-infected macrophage in 3D. PMID:26406896

  4. Induction of in vivo resistance to Mycobacterium avium infection by intramuscular injection with DNA encoding interleukin-18

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S H; Cho, D; Kim, T S

    2001-01-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is closely associated with the generation of cell-mediated immunity and resistance to intracellular parasites. Interleukin-18 (IL-18) was known to strongly induce IFN-γ production by T cells and natural killer (NK) cells. In order to determine whether injection with DNA encoding IL-18 can stimulate the resistance to Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) infection, the mature IL-18 cDNA with κ leader sequence was cloned under control of the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter (TcCMVIL-18) and its effect on MAC infection was investigated in genetically susceptible BALB/c mice. Injection with the TcCMVIL-18 DNA during intranasal infection with MAC resulted in a significant decrease in bacterial load of lung during the entire 8-week observation period, while injection with the TcCMV control DNA did not. Lung cells in mice injected with the TcCMVIL-18 DNA showed persistent production of IFN-γ throughout the 8-week period. Furthermore, immunization with the TcCMVIL-18 DNA induced and maintained significantly higher levels of cytotoxic activity and nitric oxide production by lung cells than immunization with the TcCMV control vector. This work suggests that IL-18 DNA vaccination may be useful in the immunotherapeutic or immunoprotection approaches of infections by intracellular parasites such as mycobacteria. PMID:11260329

  5. Seeing a Mycobacterium-Infected Cell in Nanoscale 3D: Correlative Imaging by Light Microscopy and FIB/SEM Tomography.

    PubMed

    Beckwith, Marianne Sandvold; Beckwith, Kai Sandvold; Sikorski, Pawel; Skogaker, Nan Tostrup; Flo, Trude Helen; Halaas, Øyvind

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacteria pose a threat to the world health today, with pathogenic and opportunistic bacteria causing tuberculosis and non-tuberculous disease in large parts of the population. Much is still unknown about the interplay between bacteria and host during infection and disease, and more research is needed to meet the challenge of drug resistance and inefficient vaccines. This work establishes a reliable and reproducible method for performing correlative imaging of human macrophages infected with mycobacteria at an ultra-high resolution and in 3D. Focused Ion Beam/Scanning Electron Microscopy (FIB/SEM) tomography is applied, together with confocal fluorescence microscopy for localization of appropriately infected cells. The method is based on an Aclar poly(chloro-tri-fluoro)ethylene substrate, micropatterned into an advantageous geometry by a simple thermomoulding process. The platform increases the throughput and quality of FIB/SEM tomography analyses, and was successfully applied to detail the intracellular environment of a whole mycobacterium-infected macrophage in 3D. PMID:26406896

  6. Mycobacterium simiae infection in two unrelated patients with different forms of inherited IFN-γR2 deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Barricarte, Rubén; Megged, Orli; Stepensky, Polina; Casimir, Pierre; Moncada-Velez, Marcela; Averbuch, Diana; Assous, Marc Victor; Abuzaitoun, Omar; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Pedergnana, Vincent; Deswarte, Caroline; Migaud, Mélanie; Rose-John, Stefan; Itan, Yuval; Boisson, Bertrand; Belkadi, Aziz; Conti, Francesca; Abel, Laurent; Vogt, Guillaume; Boisson-Dupuis, Stephanie; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Bustamante, Jacinta

    2014-01-01

    Interferon-γ receptor 2 (IFN-γR2) deficiency is a rare primary immunodeficiency characterized by predisposition to infections with weakly virulent mycobacteria, such as environmental mycobacteria and BCG vaccines. We describe here two children with IFN-γR2 deficiency, from unrelated, consanguineous kindreds of Arab and Israeli descent. The first patient was a boy who died at the age of 4.5 years, from recurrent, disseminated disease caused by Mycobacterium simiae. His IFN-γR2 defect was autosomal recessive and complete. The second patient was a girl with multiple disseminated mycobacterial infections, including infection with M. simiae. She died at the age of five years, a short time after the transplantation of umbilical cord blood cells from an unrelated donor. Her IFN-γR2 defect was autosomal recessive and partial. Autosomal recessive IFN-γR2 deficiency is life-threatening, even in its partial form, and genetic diagnosis and familial counseling are therefore particularly important for this condition. These two cases are the first of IFN-γR2 deficiency associated with M simiae infection to be described. PMID:25135595

  7. Mycobacterium simiae infection in two unrelated patients with different forms of inherited IFN-γR2 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Barricarte, Rubén; Megged, Orli; Stepensky, Polina; Casimir, Pierre; Moncada-Velez, Marcela; Averbuch, Diana; Assous, Marc Victor; Abuzaitoun, Omar; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Pedergnana, Vincent; Deswarte, Caroline; Migaud, Mélanie; Rose-John, Stefan; Itan, Yuval; Boisson, Bertrand; Belkadi, Aziz; Conti, Francesca; Abel, Laurent; Vogt, Guillaume; Boisson-Dupuis, Stephanie; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Bustamante, Jacinta

    2014-11-01

    Interferon-γ receptor 2 (IFN-γR2) deficiency is a rare primary immunodeficiency characterized by predisposition to infections with weakly virulent mycobacteria, such as environmental mycobacteria and BCG vaccines. We describe here two children with IFN-γR2 deficiency, from unrelated, consanguineous kindreds of Arab and Israeli descent. The first patient was a boy who died at the age of 4.5 years, from recurrent, disseminated disease caused by Mycobacterium simiae. His IFN-γR2 defect was autosomal recessive and complete. The second patient was a girl with multiple disseminated mycobacterial infections, including infection with M. simiae. She died at the age of 5 years, a short time after the transplantation of umbilical cord blood cells from an unrelated donor. Her IFN-γR2 defect was autosomal recessive and partial. Autosomal recessive IFN-γR2 deficiency is life-threatening, even in its partial form, and genetic diagnosis and familial counseling are therefore particularly important for this condition. These two cases are the first of IFN-γR2 deficiency associated with M. simiae infection to be described. PMID:25135595

  8. A Pilot Study Exploring the Use of Breath Analysis to Differentiate Healthy Cattle from Cattle Experimentally Infected with Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Christine K.; Stahl, Randal S.; Nol, Pauline; Waters, W. Ray; Palmer, Mitchell V.; Rhyan, Jack C.; VerCauteren, Kurt C.; McCollum, Matthew; Salman, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    Bovine tuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium bovis, is a zoonotic disease of international public health importance. Ante-mortem surveillance is essential for control; however, current surveillance tests are hampered by limitations affecting ease of use or quality of results. There is an emerging interest in human and veterinary medicine in diagnosing disease via identification of volatile organic compounds produced by pathogens and host-pathogen interactions. The objective of this pilot study was to explore application of existing human breath collection and analysis methodologies to cattle as a means to identify M. bovis infection through detection of unique volatile organic compounds or changes in the volatile organic compound profiles present in breath. Breath samples from 23 male Holstein calves (7 non-infected and 16 M. bovis-infected) were collected onto commercially available sorbent cartridges using a mask system at 90 days post-inoculation with M. bovis. Samples were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and chromatographic data were analyzed using standard analytical chemical and metabolomic analyses, principle components analysis, and a linear discriminant algorithm. The findings provide proof of concept that breath-derived volatile organic compound analysis can be used to differentiate between healthy and M. bovis-infected cattle. PMID:24586655

  9. A patient with fulminant influenza-related bacterial pneumonia due to Streptococcus pneumoniae followed by Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Seki, Masafumi; Suyama, Naofumi; Hashiguchi, Kohji; Hara, Atsuko; Kosai, Kosuke; Kurihara, Shintaro; Nakamura, Shigeki; Yamamoto, Kazuko; Imamura, Yoshifumi; Izumikawa, Koichi; Kakaya, Hiroshi; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Mukae, Hiroshi; Tashiro, Takayoshi; Kohno, Shigeru

    2008-01-01

    A 74-year-old man with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus was admitted to our hospital because of severe respiratory disturbance, fever, and sputum. We found massive consolidation of the right lung and nodular shadows on the left lung on chest X-ray, and detected influenza virus and Streptococcus pneumoniae antigen from a nasopharyngeal swab and urine sample, respectively. Co-infection with influenza virus and bacteria was suspected, and oseltamivir and biapenem were prescribed. Laboratory data improved after the addition of sivelestat sodium hydrate, an inhibitor of neutrophil-derived elastase; however, chest X-ray findings became worse on Day 8, and we administered 1 g methylprednisolone intravenously for two days. On Day 12, we detected Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the sputum, even though we did not previously detect any acid-fast bacilli, and started anti-tuberculosis drugs, such as isoniazid, rifampicin, ethambutol hydrochloride, and pyrazinamide; however, the patient died 12 days later. Severe influenza-related bacterial pneumonia with Streptococcus pneumoniae and subsequently secondary tuberculosis infection were finally suspected in this case. This was a very rare case in which additional tuberculosis infection was found in a patient with fulminant pneumonia due to co-infection of influenza virus and bacteria. It is necessary to observe patients with influenza carefully, especially when steroids are used, even if antibiotics are also administered. PMID:19043258

  10. Influence of H-2 genes on growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the lungs of chronically infected mice.

    PubMed Central

    Brett, S; Orrell, J M; Swanson Beck, J; Ivanyi, J

    1992-01-01

    Mice infected by intraperitoneal injection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis were studied over a 23-week period. They showed progressive infection in the lung (with increasing microbial count and granuloma size) whereas viable bacillary counts remained largely stationary in the spleen and in the liver. The influence of H-2 genes on the progression of the lung infection was studied in four congenic strains of animals with B10 and three congenic strains of animals with BALB backgrounds. H-2k mice had significantly higher bacterial counts in the lung than H-2b mice on both B10 and BALB backgrounds, BALB. K (H-2k) mice were also more susceptible than BALB/c (H-2d) mice. Results with recombinant strains showed that bacillary counts and granulomatous infiltration were lower in the B10 (KbAbE-Db) compared with B10.A(3R) (KbAbEbDd) strain and in B10.A(4R) (KkAkE-Db) compared with B10.BR (KkAkEkDk) mice. This resistance to the late expansion of tuberculous infection in the lungs may be associated with the lack of an expressed I-E molecular or with the expression of the Db molecule. PMID:1628890

  11. Can Immune Response Mechanisms Explain the Fecal Shedding Patterns of Cattle Infected with Mycobacterium avium Subspecies paratuberculosis?

    PubMed Central

    Magombedze, Gesham; Eda, Shigetoshi; Koets, Ad

    2016-01-01

    Johne’s disease (JD) is a chronic disease in ruminants and is caused by infection with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP). At late stages of the disease, MAP bacilli are shed via feces excretion and in turn create the potential for oral-fecal transmission. The role of the host immune response in MAP bacteria shedding patterns at different stages of JD is still unclear. We employed mathematical modeling to predict if the variation in MAP shedding could be correlated to the immune response in infected animals. We used a novel inverse modeling approach that assumed biological interactions among the antigen-specific lymphocyte proliferation response (cell-mediated response), antibody/humoral immune responses, and MAP bacteria. The modeling framework was used to predict and test possible biological interactions between the measured variables and returns only the essential interactions that are relevant in explaining the observed cattle MAP experimental infection data. Through confronting the models with data, we predicted observed effects (enhancement or suppression) and extents of interactions among the three variables. This analysis enabled classification of the infected cattle into three different groups that correspond to the unique predicted immune responses that are essential to explain the data from cattle within these groups. Our analysis highlights the strong and weak points of the modeling approach, as well as the key immune mechanisms predicted to be expressed in all animals and those that were different between animals, hence giving insight into how animals exhibit different disease dynamics and bacteria shedding patterns. PMID:26808389

  12. A small hairpin RNA targeting myeloid cell leukemia-1 enhances apoptosis in host macrophages infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei-yu; Zhang, Yu-qing; Wang, Xin-min; Wang, Chan; Wang, Xiao-fang; Wu, Jiang-dong; Wu, Fang; Zhang, Wan-jiang; Zhang, Le

    2016-04-01

    Myeloid cell leukemia-1 (Mcl-1) plays an important role in various cell survival pathways. Some studies indicated that the expression of Mcl-1 was upregulated in host cells during infection with the virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain, H37Rv. The present study was designed to investigate the effect of inhibiting Mcl-1 expression both in vivo and in vitro on apoptosis of host macrophages infected with M. tuberculosis using a small hairpin (sh)RNA. Mcl-1 expression was detected by the real time-polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, and immunohistochemistry. Flow cytometry and transmission electron microscopy were used to measure host macrophage apoptosis. We found elevated Mcl-1 levels in host macrophages infected with M. tuberculosis H37Rv. The expression of Mcl-1 was downregulated efficiently in H37Rv-infected host macrophages using shRNA. Knockdown of Mcl-1 enhanced the extent of apoptosis in H37Rv-infected host macrophages significantly. The increased apoptosis correlated with a decrease in M. tuberculosis colony forming units recovered from H37Rv-infected cells that were treated with Mcl-1-shRNA. Reducing Mcl-1 accumulation by shRNA also reduced accumulation of the anti-apoptotic gene, Bcl-2, and increased expression of the pro-apoptotic gene, Bax, in H37Rv-infected host macrophages. Our results showed that specific knockdown of Mcl-1 expression increased apoptosis of host macrophages significantly and decreased the intracellular survival of a virulent strain of M. tuberculosis. These data indicate that interference with Mcl-1 expression may provide a new avenue for tuberculosis therapy. PMID:27033209

  13. [Commemorative lecture of receiving Imamura Memorial Prize. Characterization of immunosuppressive macrophages induced in mice infected with Mycobacterium intracellulare].

    PubMed

    Tomioka, H

    1993-12-01

    Functional changes in T lymphocytes and macrophages (M phi s) in host mice during the course of Mycobacterium intracellulare infection were studied. In both strains of mice, BALB/c or C57BL/6 (susceptible to M. avium complex) and CBA/JN or C3H/He (resistant to M. avium complex), the smooth, opaque and dome-shaped colonial (SmD) variants of M. intracellulare were easily eliminated from the sites after week 2 of infection. In contrast, the smooth, transparent and irregularly shaped colonial (SmT) variants showed steady growth in the former strains of mice and persisted for long time even in the latter strains of mice. No difference was found between persistence of the organisms in euthymic (+/+) and athymic (nu/nu) BALB/c mice during the first 4 weeks after infection. Thereafter, more rapid growth was seen in the spleens and lungs of nu/nu mice. Thus, matured T cells may be important for the prevention of the progression of M. intracellulare infection to the terminal state. Next, the profiles of generation and characteristics of splenic M phi s which suppress the Con A mitogenic response of splenic T cells in host CBA/JN or BALB/c mice during the course of M. intracellulare infection were investigated. In M. intracellulare--infected mice, reduction in some cellular functions of host splenic T cells, such as the Con A mitogenic response and mixed leucocyte reaction, were seen around 2 weeks after infection, and this was accompanied by appearance of immunosuppressive M phi s in spleen cells (SPCs).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8301920

  14. Managing atypical and typical herpetic central nervous system infections: results of a multinational study.

    PubMed

    Cag, Y; Erdem, H; Leib, S; Defres, S; Kaya, S; Larsen, L; Poljak, M; Ozturk-Engin, D; Barsic, B; Argemi, X; Sørensen, S M; Bohr, A L; Tattevin, P; Gunst, J D; Baštáková, L; Jereb, M; Johansen, I S; Karabay, O; Pekok, A U; Sipahi, O R; Chehri, M; Beraud, G; Shehata, G; Fontana, R; Maresca, M; Karsen, H; Sengoz, G; Sunbul, M; Yilmaz, G; Yilmaz, H; Sharif-Yakan, A; Kanj, S; Parlak, E; Pehlivanoglu, F; Korkmaz, F; Komur, S; Kose, S; Ulug, M; Bolukcu, S; Coskuner, S A; Stahl, J P; Ince, N; Akkoyunlu, Y; Halac, G; Sahin-Horasan, E; Tireli, H; Kilicoglu, G; Al-Mahdawi, A; Nemli, S A; Inan, A; Senbayrak, S; Vahaboglu, H; Elaldi, N

    2016-06-01

    There have been many studies pertaining to the management of herpetic meningoencephalitis (HME), but the majority of them have focussed on virologically unconfirmed cases or included only small sample sizes. We have conducted a multicentre study aimed at providing management strategies for HME. Overall, 501 adult patients with PCR-proven HME were included retrospectively from 35 referral centres in 10 countries; 496 patients were found to be eligible for the analysis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis using a PCR assay yielded herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 DNA in 351 patients (70.8%), HSV-2 DNA in 83 patients (16.7%) and undefined HSV DNA type in 62 patients (12.5%). A total of 379 patients (76.4%) had at least one of the specified characteristics of encephalitis, and we placed these patients into the encephalitis presentation group. The remaining 117 patients (23.6%) had none of these findings, and these patients were placed in the nonencephalitis presentation group. Abnormalities suggestive of encephalitis were detected in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 83.9% of the patients and in electroencephalography (EEG) in 91.0% of patients in the encephalitis presentation group. In the nonencephalitis presentation group, MRI and EEG data were suggestive of encephalitis in 33.3 and 61.9% of patients, respectively. However, the concomitant use of MRI and EEG indicated encephalitis in 96.3 and 87.5% of the cases with and without encephalitic clinical presentation, respectively. Considering the subtle nature of HME, CSF HSV PCR, EEG and MRI data should be collected for all patients with a central nervous system infection. PMID:27085724

  15. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex and HIV Co-Infection among Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis Suspected Cases at the University of Gondar Hospital, Northwestern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Fanosie, Alemu; Gelaw, Baye; Tessema, Belay; Tesfay, Wogahta; Admasu, Aschalew; Yitayew, Gashaw

    2016-01-01

    Background Extrapulmonary Tuberculosis (EPTB) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection are interrelated as a result of immune depression. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex isolates and the burden of HIV co-infection among EPTB suspected patients. Method An institution based cross-sectional study was conducted among EPTB suspected patients at the University of Gondar Hospital. Socio-demographic characteristics and other clinical data were collected using a pretested questionnaire. GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay was performed to diagnosis Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and Rifampicin resistance. All samples were also investigated by cytology and culture. The HIV statuses of all patients were screened initially by KHB, and all positive cases were further re-tested by STAT-pack. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 20 computer software and a P-value of < 0.05 was taken as statistically significant. Results A total of 141 extrapulmonary suspected patients were enrolled in this study. The overall prevalence of culture confirmed extrapulmonary tuberculosis infection was 29.8%, but the GeneXpert result showed a 26.2% prevalence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex infection. The 78.4% prevalence of extrapulmonary tuberculosis infection was found to be higher among the adult population. The prevalence of HIV infection among EPTB suspected patients was 14.1%, while it was 32.4% among GeneXpert-confirmed extrapulmonary TB cases (12/37). Tuberculosis lymphadenitis was the predominant (78.4%) type of EPTB infection followed by tuberculosis cold abscess (10.7%). Adult hood, previous history of contact with known pulmonary tuberculosis patients, and HIV co-infection showed a statistically significant association with extrapulmonary tuberculosis infection (P<0.013). Conclusion The prevalence of culture confirmed-EPTB infection was high, and a higher EPTB-HIV co-infection was also observed. PMID:26950547

  16. Differences between Mycobacterium-Host Cell Relationships in Latent Tuberculous Infection of Mice Ex Vivo and Mycobacterial Infection of Mouse Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ufimtseva, Elena

    2016-01-01

    The search for factors that account for the reproduction and survival of mycobacteria, including vaccine strains, in host cells is the priority for studies on tuberculosis. A comparison of BCG-mycobacterial loads in granuloma cells obtained from bone marrow and spleens of mice with latent tuberculous infection and cells from mouse bone marrow and peritoneal macrophage cultures infected with the BCG vaccine in vitro has demonstrated that granuloma macrophages each normally contained a single BCG-Mycobacterium, while those acutely infected in vitro had increased mycobacterial loads and death rates. Mouse granuloma cells were observed to produce the IFNγ, IL-1α, GM-CSF, CD1d, CD25, CD31, СD35, and S100 proteins. None of these activation markers were found in mouse cell cultures infected in vitro or in intact macrophages. Lack of colocalization of lipoarabinomannan-labeled BCG-mycobacteria with the lysosomotropic LysoTracker dye in activated granuloma macrophages suggests that these macrophages were unable to destroy BCG-mycobacteria. However, activated mouse granuloma macrophages could control mycobacterial reproduction in cells both in vivo and in ex vivo culture. By contrast, a considerable increase in the number of BCG-mycobacteria was observed in mouse bone marrow and peritoneal macrophages after BCG infection in vitro, when no expression of the activation-related molecules was detected in these cells. PMID:27066505

  17. Productive HIV-1 infection is enriched in CD4(-)CD8(-) double negative (DN) T cells at pleural sites of dual infection with HIV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qinglai; Canaday, David H; McDonald, David J; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Baseke, Joy; Toossi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    A higher human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) viral load at pleural sites infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) than in peripheral blood has been documented. However, the cellular source of productive HIV infection in HIV-1/MTB-coinfected pleural fluid mononuclear cells (PFMCs) remains unclear. In this study, we observed significant quantities of HIV-1 p24(+) lymphocytes in PFMCs, but not in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). HIV-1 p24(+) lymphocytes were mostly enriched in DN T cells. Intracellular CD4 expression was detectable in HIV-1 p24(+) DN T cells. HIV-1 p24(+) DN T cells showed lower surface expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-ABC and tetherin than did HIV-1 p24(+) CD4 T cells. Upon in vitro infection of PFMC CD4 T cells from TB mono-infected subjects, Nef- and/or Vpu-deleted HIV mutants showed lower generation of HIV-1 p24(+) DN T cells than the wild-type virus. These data indicate that productively HIV-1-infected DN T cells, generated through down-modulation of surface CD4, likely by HIV-1 Nef and Vpu, are the predominant source of HIV-1 at pleural sites of HIV/MTB coinfection. PMID:26497177

  18. The seal tuberculosis agent, Mycobacterium pinnipedii, infects domestic cattle in New Zealand: epidemiologic factors and DNA strain typing.

    PubMed

    Loeffler, Scott H; de Lisle, Geoffrey W; Neill, Mark A; Collins, Desmond M; Price-Carter, Marian; Paterson, Brent; Crews, Kevin B

    2014-04-01

    The fur seal (Arctocephalus forsteri), which is abundant in coastal areas of New Zealand, harbors several zoonotic pathogens, including Mycobacterium pinnipedii, a member of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex. We describe the microbiology and epidemiology of seven cases of M. pinnipedii infection in beef cattle (Bos primigenius) in coastal areas of New Zealand in 1991-2011. Epidemiologic factors were analyzed on six case farms and a telephone survey of 55 neighboring farms. A DNA-strain typing, using analysis of variable number tandem repeats and the direct repeats (VNTR/DR) of those isolates, was used to compare them to M. bovis isolates commonly found in New Zealand cattle and wildlife. In all cases of M. pinnipedii in cattle, only one animal in the herd was found to be infected. In six of seven cases, the lesions were in the thoracic lymph nodes, indicating a likely aerosol pathway. The lack of multiple cases within a herd suggests that cow-to-cow transmission is uncommon, if it occurs at all. There was no significant difference between case and control farms in distance to sea, herd size, herd type, or farming practice. The odds ratio for access to the beach for cattle on the Chatham Islands was significantly higher than it was for farms on the mainland coastal areas (odds ratio [OR] = 3.6, 95% CI = 1.1-11.4) Likewise, the odds ratio for acquiring tuberculosis was increased when farmers had seen seals on the property (OR =  9, 95% CI = 1.4-56.1 ). In all case farms, cattle had access to seals by beach grazing areas or waterways connecting directly with the ocean. The VNTR/DR typing of the isolates showed some variation in the M. pinnipedii isolates, with only two being identical; all isolates were easily distinguishable from M. bovis isolates. PMID:24484478

  19. Analysis of HLA association among North Indian HIV-positive individuals co-infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Saikia, Biman; Wanchu, Ajay; Mahakur, Sobhana; Bind, Mahendra; Sarkar, Krishnakali; Minz, Ranjana W

    2015-01-01

    Background: Genetic variation in HLA genes influence the immune response and may thus contribute to differential development of tuberculosis (TB) in HIV-infected individuals. The study was designed to determine whether HLA polymorphisms influence the development of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in HIV-infected individuals. Materials and Methods: Fifty HIV-positive individuals without TB (HIV+TB−), 50 HIV patients co-infected with TB (HIV+TB+) and 50 control subjects (HIV-TB-) were analyzed for HLA Class I and II polymorphisms. Results: In HLA Class II, frequency of occurrence of DRB1*13 (OR 3.165, CI 1.176–8.518, P value 0.019), DRB5 (OR 2.253, CI 1.011–5.019, P value 0.045) and DQB1*06 (OR 2.705, CI 1.197–6.113, P value 0.016) were increased in HIV+TB+compared to HIV+TB−. HLA DQB1*02 (OR 0.436, CI 0.185–1.029, P value 0.05) on the other hand conferred a protective role. In HLA Class I, frequency of B*15 (OR 2.705, CI 1.040–7.036, P value 0.038) was increased, whereas B*51 (OR 0.148, CI 0.031–0.706, P value 0.007) was decreased in HIV+TB+group compared to HIV+TB−. These differences however were not significant when compared with healthy controls. Conclusion: HLA polymorphisms independently did not account for the susceptibility to either of the disease mostly, although they seem to play a role once the infection(s) has established in a particular individual. Further studies are needed on a larger sample size to confirm these observations. PMID:26628757

  20. Tumour necrosis factor receptors and apoptosis of alveolar macrophages during early infection with attenuated and virulent Mycobacterium bovis

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Michele F; Alves, Caio C S; Figueiredo, Bárbara B M; Rezende, Alice B; Wohlres-Viana, Sabine; da Silva, Vânia Lúcia; Machado, Marco Antônio; Teixeira, Henrique C

    2013-01-01

    Apoptosis of macrophages has been reported as an effective host strategy to control the growth of intracellular pathogens, including pathogenic mycobacteria. Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) plays an important role in the modulation of apoptosis of infected macrophages. It exerts its biological activities via two distinct cell surface receptors, TNFR1 and TNFR2, whose extracellular domain can be released by proteolysis forming soluble TNF receptors (sTNFR1 and sTNFR2). The signalling through TNFR1 initiates the majority of the biological functions of TNF-α, leading to either cell death or survival whereas TNFR2 mediates primarily survival signals. Here, the expression of TNF-α receptors and the apoptosis of alveolar macrophages were investigated during the early phase of infection with attenuated and virulent mycobacteria in mice. A significant increase of apoptosis and high expression of TNFR1 were observed in alveolar macrophages at 3 and 7 days after infection with attenuated Mycobacterium bovis but only on day 7 in infection with the virulent M. bovis. Low surface expression of TNFR1 and increased levels of sTNFR1 on day 3 after infection by the virulent strain were associated with reduced rates of apoptotic macrophages. In addition, a significant reduction in apoptosis of alveolar macrophages was observed in TNFR1−/− mice at day 3 after bacillus Calmette–Guérin infection. These results suggest a potential role for TNFR1 in mycobacteria-induced alveolar macrophage apoptosis in vivo. In this scenario, shedding of TNFR1 seems to contribute to the modulation of macrophage apoptosis in a strain-dependent manner. PMID:23489296

  1. Genome-wide analysis of the emerging infection with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in the Arabian camels (Camelus dromedarius).

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Pallab; Hsu, Chungyi; Alyamani, Essam J; Shehata, Maher M; Al-Dubaib, Musaad A; Al-Naeem, Abdulmohsen; Hashad, Mahmoud; Mahmoud, Osama M; Alharbi, Khalid B J; Al-Busadah, Khalid; Al-Swailem, Abdulaziz M; Talaat, Adel M

    2012-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (M. ap) is the causative agent of paratuberculosis or Johne's disease (JD) in herbivores with potential involvement in cases of Crohn's disease in humans. JD is spread worldwide and is economically important for both beef and dairy industries. Generally, pathogenic ovine strains (M. ap-S) are mainly found in sheep while bovine strains (M. ap-C) infect other ruminants (e.g. cattle, goat, deer), as well as sheep. In an effort to characterize this emerging infection in dromedary/Arabian camels, we successfully cultured M. ap from several samples collected from infected camels suffering from chronic, intermittent diarrhea suggestive of JD. Gene-based typing of isolates indicated that all isolates belong to sheep lineage of strains of M. ap (M. ap-S), suggesting a putative transmission from infected sheep herds. Screening sheep and goat herds associated with camels identified the circulation of this type in sheep but not goats. The current genome-wide analysis recognizes these camel isolates as a sub-lineage of the sheep strain with a significant number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) between sheep and camel isolates (∼1000 SNPs). Such polymorphism could represent geographical differences among isolates or host adaptation of M. ap during camel infection. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to examine the genomic basis of this emerging infection in camels with implications on the evolution of this important pathogen. The sequenced genomes of M. ap isolates from camels will further assist our efforts to understand JD pathogenesis and the dynamic of disease transmission across animal species. PMID:22393374

  2. Response to stimulation with recombinant cytokines and synthesis of cytokines by murine intestinal macrophages infected with the Mycobacterium avium complex.

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, N; Young, L S; Bermudez, L E

    1995-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that the gut is the chief portal of entry for organisms of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) in AIDS patients. Bacterial invasion of intestinal mucosa presumably occurs through epithelial cells, and M cells in the Peyer's patches, where the bacteria have contact with immunocompetent cells such as macrophages and T and B lymphocytes. As mucosal macrophages are probably the first line of defense against MAC, we examined their ability to inhibit intracellular growth of MAC when properly stimulated. Mouse intestinal macrophages were purified, infected with MAC 101, serovar 1, and MAC 86-2686, serovar 16, and subsequently stimulated with recombinant tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha), gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), or macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). Viable intracellular bacteria were quantitated at 24 h after infection and again after 4 days of infection. Stimulation with TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, and GM-CSF, but not M-CSF, was associated with mycobacteriostatic and/or mycobactericidal activity in macrophages. Treatment with 10(3) U of TNF-alpha, GM-CSF, and IFN-gamma per ml at 24 h prior to infection with MAC resulted in a significant enhancement in killing of MAC at 4 days after infection, compared with that observed for macrophages exposed to cytokines after infection. When stimulated with lipopolysaccharide or live MAC, intestinal macrophages had produced significantly less TNF-alpha and transforming growth factor beta than had splenic and peritoneal macrophages, although the levels of production of interleukin 6 and interleukin 10 among the three populations of cells were similar. Intestinal macrophages can be stimulated with cytokines to inhibit the intracellular growth of MAC, but they have differentiated abilities to produce cytokines which can modulate the anti-MAC immune response. PMID:7822018

  3. Mycobacterium leprae-Infected Macrophages Preferentially Primed Regulatory T Cell Responses and Was Associated with Lepromatous Leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Jake W.; Gilson, Danny J.; Song, Zhengyu; Chen, Jia; Shi, Chao; Zhu, Jianyu; Yang, Jun; Jing, Zhichun

    2016-01-01

    Background The persistence of Mycobacterium leprae (M. leprae) infection is largely dependent on the types of host immune responses being induced. Macrophage, a crucial modulator of innate and adaptive immune responses, could be directly infected by M. leprae. We therefore postulated that M. leprae-infected macrophages might have altered immune functions. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we treated monocyte-derived macrophages with live or killed M. leprae, and examined their activation status and antigen presentation. We found that macrophages treated with live M. leprae showed committed M2-like function, with decreased interleukin 1 beta (IL-1beta), IL-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and MHC class II molecule expression and elevated IL-10 and CD163 expression. When incubating with naive T cells, macrophages treated with live M. leprae preferentially primed regulatory T (Treg) cell responses with elevated FoxP3 and IL-10 expression, while interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) expression and CD8+ T cell cytotoxicity were reduced. Chromium release assay also found that live M. leprae-treated macrophages were more resistant to CD8+ T cell-mediated cytotoxicity than sonicated M. leprae-treated monocytes. Ex vivo studies showed that the phenotype and function of monocytes and macrophages had clear differences between L-lep and T-lep patients, consistent with the in vitro findings. Conclusions/Significance Together, our data demonstrate that M. leprae could utilize infected macrophages by two mechanisms: firstly, M. leprae-infected macrophages preferentially primed Treg but not Th1 or cytotoxic T cell responses; secondly, M. leprae-infected macrophages were more effective at evading CD8+ T cell-mediated cytotoxicity. PMID:26751388

  4. Microarray analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis-infected monocytes reveals IL26 as a new candidate gene for tuberculosis susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Guerra-Laso, José M; Raposo-García, Sara; García-García, Silvia; Diez-Tascón, Cristina; Rivero-Lezcano, Octavio M

    2015-01-01

    Differences in the activity of monocytes/macrophages, important target cells of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, might influence tuberculosis progression. With the purpose of identifying candidate genes for tuberculosis susceptibility we infected monocytes from both healthy elderly individuals (a tuberculosis susceptibility group) and elderly tuberculosis patients with M. tuberculosis, and performed a microarray experiment. We detected 78 differentially expressed transcripts and confirmed these results by quantitative PCR of selected genes. We found that monocytes from tuberculosis patients showed similar expression patterns for these genes, regardless of whether they were obtained from younger or older patients. Only one of the detected genes corresponded to a cytokine: IL26, a member of the interleukin-10 (IL-10) cytokine family which we found to be down-regulated in infected monocytes from tuberculosis patients. Non-infected monocytes secreted IL-26 constitutively but they reacted strongly to M. tuberculosis infection by decreasing IL-26 production. Furthermore, IL-26 serum concentrations appeared to be lower in the tuberculosis patients. When whole blood was infected, IL-26 inhibited the observed pathogen-killing capability. Although lymphocytes expressed IL26R, the receptor mRNA was not detected in either monocytes or neutrophils, suggesting that the inhibition of anti-mycobacterial activity may be mediated by lymphocytes. Additionally, IL-2 concentrations in infected blood were lower in the presence of IL-26. The negative influence of IL-26 on the anti-mycobacterial activity and its constitutive presence in both serum and monocyte supernatants prompt us to propose IL26 as a candidate gene for tuberculosis susceptibility. PMID:25157980

  5. Virulence and Immune Response Induced by Mycobacterium avium Complex Strains in a Model of Progressive Pulmonary Tuberculosis and Subcutaneous Infection in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    González-Pérez, Mónica; Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo; Parra-López, Carlos Alberto; Murcia, Martha Isabel; Marquina, Brenda; Mata-Espinoza, Dulce; Rodriguez-Míguez, Yadira; Baay-Guzman, Guillermina J.; Huerta-Yepez, Sara

    2013-01-01

    The genus Mycobacterium comprises more than 150 species, including important pathogens for humans which cause major public health problems. The vast majority of efforts to understand the genus have been addressed in studies with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The biological differentiation between M. tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is important because there are distinctions in the sources of infection, treatments, and the course of disease. Likewise, the importance of studying NTM is not only due to its clinical significance but also due to the mechanisms by which some species are pathogenic while others are not. Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC) is the most important group of NTM opportunistic pathogens, since it is the second largest medical complex in the genus after the M. tuberculosis complex. Here, we evaluated the virulence and immune response of M. avium subsp. avium and Mycobacterium colombiense, using experimental models of progressive pulmonary tuberculosis and subcutaneous infection in BALB/c mice. Mice infected intratracheally with a high dose of MAC strains showed high expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and inducible nitric oxide synthase with rapid bacillus elimination and numerous granulomas, but without lung consolidation during late infection in coexistence with high expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines. In contrast, subcutaneous infection showed high production of the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α and gamma interferon with relatively low production of anti-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-10 (IL-10) or IL-4, which efficiently eliminate the bacilli but maintain extensive inflammation and fibrosis. Thus, MAC infection evokes different immune and inflammatory responses depending on the MAC species and affected tissue. PMID:23959717

  6. Expression of Nucleotide-oligomerization Domain (NOD) and Related Genes in Mouse Tissues Infected with Mycobacterium leprae

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Chae, Gue-Tae

    2015-01-01

    The nucleotide-oligomerization domain (NOD) is an important molecule involved in host defense against bacterial infection. To study the role of NODs in the host response to Mycobacterium leprae, we measured the mRNA levels of NODs and related genes in infected mouse tissues. The mRNA expression of NOD1, NOD2, caspase-1 and ASC was increased in mouse footpads. Whereas NOD2 expression in macrophages was increased at 2 and 24 h post-infection with M. leprae, there was no expression of NOD1 at these time points. An increase in caspase-1 expression was observed at 2 h and continued at 24 h. However, the expression of ASC was increased only at the early time point. The expression of caspase-1 is regulated by NOD2-dependent pathway in established HEK 293. Our results suggest NOD2, rather than NOD1, may be associated with the host response to M. leprae and that caspase-1 activation is essential for the host response. PMID:26770186

  7. Expression of Nucleotide-oligomerization Domain (NOD) and Related Genes in Mouse Tissues Infected with Mycobacterium leprae.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Hoon; Chae, Gue-Tae; Kang, Tae Jin

    2015-12-01

    The nucleotide-oligomerization domain (NOD) is an important molecule involved in host defense against bacterial infection. To study the role of NODs in the host response to Mycobacterium leprae, we measured the mRNA levels of NODs and related genes in infected mouse tissues. The mRNA expression of NOD1, NOD2, caspase-1 and ASC was increased in mouse footpads. Whereas NOD2 expression in macrophages was increased at 2 and 24 h post-infection with M. leprae, there was no expression of NOD1 at these time points. An increase in caspase-1 expression was observed at 2 h and continued at 24 h. However, the expression of ASC was increased only at the early time point. The expression of caspase-1 is regulated by NOD2-dependent pathway in established HEK 293. Our results suggest NOD2, rather than NOD1, may be associated with the host response to M. leprae and that caspase-1 activation is essential for the host response. PMID:26770186

  8. The effects of progressing and non-progressing Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection on milk production in dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Rebecca L.; Gröhn, Y. T.; Pradhan, A.K.; Whitlock, R. H.; Van Kessel, J. S.; Smith, J. M.; Wolfgang, D.R.; Schukken, Y. H.

    2016-01-01

    Longitudinal data from 3 commercial dairy herds in the northeast United States, collected from 2004 to 2011, were analyzed to determine the effect of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) infection status and progression path on milk production. Disease status, as indicated by MAP test results, was determined through quarterly ELISA serum testing, biannual fecal culture, and culture of tissues and feces at slaughter. Milk production data were collected from the Dairy Herd Information Association. Animals with positive MAP test results were categorized, based on test results over the full course of the study, as high path (at least one high-positive culture) or low path (at least one positive culture or ELISA). The cumulative number of positive ELISA and culture results were recorded. The effects of both MAP infection path, status, and number of positive tests on milk production were analyzed using a mixed linear model with an autocorrelation random effect structure. Low and high path animals produced more milk prior to their first positive test than always-negative animals, especially high path animals. While mean production decreased after a first positive test, low path animals were shown to recover some productivity. High path animals continued to exhibit a decrease in milk production, especially after their first high-positive fecal culture. These results show that not all animals that test positive for MAP will have long-term production losses. Milk production decreased significantly with each additional positive test. Ultimately, production loss appeared to be a function of MAP infection progression. PMID:26686721

  9. Transcription of genes involved in sulfolipid and polyacyltrehalose biosynthesis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in experimental latent tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Jimmy E; Ramírez, Ana S; Salas, Laura P; Helguera-Repetto, Cecilia; Gonzalez-y-Merchand, Jorge; Soto, Carlos Y; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio

    2013-01-01

    The Influence of trehalose-based glycolipids in the virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is recognised; however, the actual role of these cell-wall glycolipids in latent infection is unknown. As an initial approach, we determined by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography the sulfolipid (SL) and diacyltrehalose/polyacyltrehalose (DAT/PAT) profile of the cell wall of hypoxic Mtb. Then, qRT-PCR was extensively conducted to determine the transcription profile of genes involved in the biosynthesis of these glycolipids in non-replicating persistent 1 (NRP1) and anaerobiosis (NRP2) models of hypoxia (Wayne model), and murine models of chronic and progressive pulmonary tuberculosis. A diminished content of SL and increased amounts of glycolipids with chromatographic profile similar to DAT were detected in Mtb grown in the NRP2 stage. A striking decrease in the transcription of mmpL8 and mmpL10 transporter genes and increased transcription of the pks (polyketidesynthase) genes involved in SL and DAT biosynthesis were detected in both the NRP2 stage and the murine model of chronic infection. All genes were found to be up-regulated in the progressive disease. These results suggest that SL production is diminished during latent infection and the DAT/PAT precursors can be accumulated inside tubercle bacilli and are possibly used in reactivation processes. PMID:23472191

  10. Recent advances: role of mycolactone in the pathogenesis and monitoring of Mycobacterium ulcerans infection/Buruli ulcer disease

    PubMed Central

    Sarfo, Fred Stephen; Phillips, Richard; Wansbrough‐Jones, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Summary Infection of subcutaneous tissue with Mycobacterium ulcerans can lead to chronic skin ulceration known as Buruli ulcer. The pathogenesis of this neglected tropical disease is dependent on a lipid‐like toxin, mycolactone, which diffuses through tissue away from the infecting organisms. Since its identification in 1999, this molecule has been intensely studied to elucidate its cytotoxic and immunosuppressive properties. Two recent major advances identifying the underlying molecular targets for mycolactone have been described. First, it can target scaffolding proteins (such as Wiskott Aldrich Syndrome Protein), which control actin dynamics in adherent cells and therefore lead to detachment and cell death by anoikis. Second, it prevents the co‐translational translocation (and therefore production) of many proteins that pass through the endoplasmic reticulum for secretion or placement in cell membranes. These pleiotropic effects underpin the range of cell‐specific functional defects in immune and other cells that contact mycolactone during infection. The dose and duration of mycolactone exposure for these different cells explains tissue necrosis and the paucity of immune cells in the ulcers. This review discusses recent advances in the field, revisits older findings in this context and highlights current developments in structure‐function studies as well as methodology that make mycolactone a promising diagnostic biomarker. PMID:26572803

  11. Syndrome of selective IgM deficiency with severe T cell deficiency associated with disseminated cutaneous mycobacterium avium intracellulaire infection

    PubMed Central

    Gharib, Asal; Louis, Ankmalika Gupta; Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Gupta, Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous non-disseminated, non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections have been reported in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised subjects. Systemic Mycobacterium avium intracellulaire (MAI) have been reported in non-HIV patients with Idiopathic CD4 lymphocytopenia. We report a comprehensive immunological analysis in syndrome of selective IgM deficiency and T lymphocytopenia (both CD4+ and CD8+) with disseminated cutaneous MAI infection. Naïve (TN) and Central memory (TCM) subsets of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were decreased, whereas terminally differentiated effector memory (TEMRA) subset of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were markedly increased. IFN-γ producing T cells were markedly decreased. Although CD14highCD16- proinflammatory monocytes were modestly increased, IFN-γR+ monocytes were markedly decreased. The expression of TLR3, TLR5, TLR7, and TLR9 on monocytes was decreased. Germinal center B cells (CD19+IgD-CD38+CD27lo) and B1 cells (CD20+CD27+CD43+CD70-) were markedly decreased. A role of immune alterations, including B cells and antibodies in disseminated cutaneous MAI infection is discussed. PMID:26550546

  12. Syndrome of selective IgM deficiency with severe T cell deficiency associated with disseminated cutaneous mycobacterium avium intracellulaire infection.

    PubMed

    Gharib, Asal; Louis, Ankmalika Gupta; Agrawal, Sudhanshu; Gupta, Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous non-disseminated, non-tuberculous mycobacterial infections have been reported in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised subjects. Systemic Mycobacterium avium intracellulaire (MAI) have been reported in non-HIV patients with Idiopathic CD4 lymphocytopenia. We report a comprehensive immunological analysis in syndrome of selective IgM deficiency and T lymphocytopenia (both CD4+ and CD8+) with disseminated cutaneous MAI infection. Naïve (TN) and Central memory (TCM) subsets of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were decreased, whereas terminally differentiated effector memory (TEMRA) subset of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were markedly increased. IFN-γ producing T cells were markedly decreased. Although CD14(high)CD16- proinflammatory monocytes were modestly increased, IFN-γR+ monocytes were markedly decreased. The expression of TLR3, TLR5, TLR7, and TLR9 on monocytes was decreased. Germinal center B cells (CD19+IgD-CD38+CD27(lo)) and B1 cells (CD20+CD27+CD43+CD70-) were markedly decreased. A role of immune alterations, including B cells and antibodies in disseminated cutaneous MAI infection is discussed. PMID:26550546

  13. Granzyme A Is Expressed in Mouse Lungs during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection but Does Not Contribute to Protection In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Uranga, Santiago; Marinova, Dessislava; Martin, Carlos; Pardo, Julián; Aguilo, Nacho

    2016-01-01

    Granzyme A, a serine protease expressed in the granules of cytotoxic T and Natural Killer cells, is involved in the generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines by macrophages. Granzyme A has been described to induce in macrophages in vitro the activation of pro-inflammatory pathways that impair intracellular mycobacterial replication. In the present study, we explored the physiological relevance of Granzyme A in the control of pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in vivo. Our results show that, even though Granzyme A is expressed by cytotoxic cells from mouse lungs during pulmonary infection, its deficiency in knockout mice does not have an effect in the control of M. tuberculosis infection. In addition our findings indicate that absence of Granzyme A does not affect the protection conferred by the live-attenuated M. tuberculosis vaccine MTBVAC. Altogether, our findings are in apparent contradiction with previously published in vitro results and suggest that Granzyme A does not have a crucial role in vivo in the protective response to tuberculosis. PMID:27055232

  14. Granzyme A Is Expressed in Mouse Lungs during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection but Does Not Contribute to Protection In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Uranga, Santiago; Marinova, Dessislava; Martin, Carlos; Pardo, Julián; Aguilo, Nacho

    2016-01-01

    Granzyme A, a serine protease expressed in the granules of cytotoxic T and Natural Killer cells, is involved in the generation of pro-inflammatory cytokines by macrophages. Granzyme A has been described to induce in macrophages in vitro the activation of pro-inflammatory pathways that impair intracellular mycobacterial replication. In the present study, we explored the physiological relevance of Granzyme A in the control of pulmonary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in vivo. Our results show that, even though Granzyme A is expressed by cytotoxic cells from mouse lungs during pulmonary infection, its deficiency in knockout mice does not have an effect in the control of M. tuberculosis infection. In addition our findings indicate that absence of Granzyme A does not affect the protection conferred by the live-attenuated M. tuberculosis vaccine MTBVAC. Altogether, our findings are in apparent contradiction with previously published in vitro results and suggest that Granzyme A does not have a crucial role in vivo in the protective response to tuberculosis. PMID:27055232

  15. Disseminated Mycobacterium bovis Infection Complicating Intravesical BCG Instillation for the Treatment of Superficial Transitional Cell Carcinoma of the Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Elzein, Fatehi; Albogami, Nada; Saad, Mustafa; El Tayeb, Nazik; Alghamdi, Abdullah; Elyamany, Ghaleb

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Intravesical instillation of Bacillus Calmette–Guérin (BCG) remains a first-line treatment for superficial transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Although its use is relatively safe, severe complications such as granulomatous hepatitis, osteomyelitis, pneumonitis, and sepsis occur in few patients. Complications of intravesical instillation of BCG can be local or systemic, with early or late presentation. CASE PRESENTATION Here, we report an 88-year-old man who developed fever, rigors, and episodes of syncope following fourth intravesical BCG instillation for the treatment of superficial transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder. Pancytopenia, disseminated intravascular coagulation, ground glass appearance on computerized tomography of the chest scan in addition to multiple bone marrow granulomas, suggested the diagnosis of disseminated BCG infection. All these features recovered on antituberculosis treatment. CONCLUSION Our case study highlights the importance of early recognition and prompt treatment of patients with disseminated BCG infection following intravesical instillation. Although isolation of mycobacterium is desirable to make the diagnosis, it is not unusual to have negative smears and cultures and this should not be used to dismiss the possibility of BCG infection. PMID:27559301

  16. Concurrent infection with Mycobacterium avium subsp. hominissuis and Giardia duodenalis in a chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera f. dom.).

    PubMed

    Barthel, Yvonne; Drews, Sandra; Fehr, Michael; Moser, Irmgard; Matz-Rensing, Kerstin; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Wohlsein, Peter

    2016-01-01

    A 3-year-old, female chinchilla (Chinchilla lanigera f. dom.) suffered from prolonged vaginal discharge. Sonographically, multiple nodules were detected in the uterus, and the lung showed a diffuse radiodensity. Ovario-hysterectomy was performed and histology of the uterus revealed a severe multifocal pyogranulomatous metritis with myriads of acid-fast rod-shaped bacilli. Microbiological culture of formalin-fixed uterine tissue and a native vaginal swab resulted in the growth of mycobacteria that were identified as Mycobacterium (M.) avium subsp. hominissuis. The animal was euthanized and pathomorphological examination revealed severe multifocal granulomatous inflammation of lung, mediastinal and mesenteric lymph nodes, intestine, pancreas and kidneys. In addition, an infection of the small intestine with Giardia duodenalis was confirmed immunohistochemically. This is the first report describing a concurrent infection with M. avium subsp. hominissuis and Giardia duodenalis in a chinchilla. Both pathogens represent a potential health risk especially for young or immunosuppressed persons, in particular if infected animals show unspecific clinical symptoms. PMID:27344917

  17. Investigation of the cause of geographic disparities in IDEXX ELISA sensitivity in serum samples from Mycobacterium bovis-infected cattle

    PubMed Central

    Trost, Brett; Stuber, Tod; Surujballi, Om; Nelson, Jeffrey; Robbe-Austerman, Suelee; Smith, Noel H.; Desautels, Louis; Tikoo, Suresh K.; Griebel, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Accurately identifying Mycobacterium bovis-infected cattle is critical for bovine tuberculosis prevention and control. One method for identifying infected cattle is an ELISA developed by IDEXX laboratories, which detects antibodies to two M. bovis proteins, MPB70 and MPB83. The assay’s sensitivity varies by geographic region, with sensitivities of 77%, 45%, and 9% in bovine serum samples from the United Kingdom (n = 126), the United States (n = 146), and Mexico (n = 128), respectively. We hypothesized that geographically-biased sequence variation in mpb70 and mpb83, or in the genes that regulate their expression (sigK and rskA), may explain these differing sensitivities. This hypothesis was tested by comparing the sequences of these four genes in 455 M. bovis strains isolated from cattle in the aforementioned countries. For each gene, a single, common sequence was identified in most genomes of the M. bovis strains collected in all three countries. Twelve of the 455 strains were isolated from infected cattle for which the IDEXX ELISA was also performed. Five of the seven ELISA-positive genomes and three of the five ELISA-negative genomes contained the most common sequence of all four genes. Thus, sequence variation in mpb70, mpb83, sigK, and rskA does not explain the geographic disparities in IDEXX ELISA sensitivity. PMID:26949166

  18. Recombinant BCG prime and PPE protein boost provides potent protection against acute Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Enzhuo; Gu, Jin; Wang, Feifei; Wang, Honghai; Shen, Hongbo; Chen, Zheng W

    2016-04-01

    Since BCG, the only vaccine widely used against tuberculosis (TB) in the world, provides varied protective efficacy and may not be effective for inducing long-term cellular immunity, it is in an urgent need to develop more effective vaccines and more potent immune strategies against TB. Prime-boost is proven to be a good strategy by inducing long-term protection. In this study, we tested the protective effect against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) challenge of prime-boost strategy by recombinant BCG (rBCG) expressing PPE protein Rv3425 fused with Ag85B and Rv3425. Results showed that the prime-boost strategy could significantly increase the protective efficiency against Mtb infection, characterized by reduction of bacterial load in lung and spleen, attenuation of tuberculosis lesions in lung tissues. Importantly, we found that Rv3425 boost, superior to Ag85B boost, provided better protection against Mtb infection. Further research proved that rBCG prime-Rv3425 boost could obviously increase the expansion of lymphocytes, significantly induce IL-2 production by lymphocytes upon PPD stimulation, and inhibit IL-6 production at an early stage. It implied that rBCG prime-Rv3425 boost opted to induce Th1 immune response and provided a long-term protection against TB. These results implicated that rBCG prime-Rv3425 boost is a potent and promising strategy to prevent acute Mtb infection. PMID:26792673

  19. To Achieve an Earlier IFN-γ Response Is Not Sufficient to Control Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Marzo, Elena; Barril, Carles; Vegué, Marina; Diaz, Jorge; Valls, Joaquim; López, Daniel; Cardona, Pere-Joan

    2014-01-01

    The temporo-spatial relationship between the three organs (lung, spleen and lymph node) involved during the initial stages of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection has been poorly studied. As such, we performed an experimental study to evaluate the bacillary load in each organ after aerosol or intravenous infection and developed a mathematical approach using the data obtained in order to extract conclusions. The results showed that higher bacillary doses result in an earlier IFN-γ response, that a certain bacillary load (BL) needs to be reached to trigger the IFN-γ response, and that control of the BL is not immediate after onset of the IFN-γ response, which might be a consequence of the spatial dimension. This study may have an important impact when it comes to designing new vaccine candidates as it suggests that triggering an earlier IFN-γ response might not guarantee good infection control, and therefore that additional properties should be considered for these candidates. PMID:24959669

  20. Recent advances: role of mycolactone in the pathogenesis and monitoring of Mycobacterium ulcerans infection/Buruli ulcer disease.

    PubMed

    Sarfo, Fred Stephen; Phillips, Richard; Wansbrough-Jones, Mark; Simmonds, Rachel E

    2016-01-01

    Infection of subcutaneous tissue with Mycobacterium ulcerans can lead to chronic skin ulceration known as Buruli ulcer. The pathogenesis of this neglected tropical disease is dependent on a lipid-like toxin, mycolactone, which diffuses through tissue away from the infecting organisms. Since its identification in 1999, this molecule has been intensely studied to elucidate its cytotoxic and immunosuppressive properties. Two recent major advances identifying the underlying molecular targets for mycolactone have been described. First, it can target scaffolding proteins (such as Wiskott Aldrich Syndrome Protein), which control actin dynamics in adherent cells and therefore lead to detachment and cell death by anoikis. Second, it prevents the co-translational translocation (and therefore production) of many proteins that pass through the endoplasmic reticulum for secretion or placement in cell membranes. These pleiotropic effects underpin the range of cell-specific functional defects in immune and other cells that contact mycolactone during infection. The dose and duration of mycolactone exposure for these different cells explains tissue necrosis and the paucity of immune cells in the ulcers. This review discusses recent advances in the field, revisits older findings in this context and highlights current developments in structure-function studies as well as methodology that make mycolactone a promising diagnostic biomarker. PMID:26572803

  1. Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection as a zoonotic disease: transmission between humans and elephants.

    PubMed Central

    Michalak, K.; Austin, C.; Diesel, S.; Bacon, M. J.; Zimmerman, P.; Maslow, J. N.

    1998-01-01

    Between 1994 and 1996, three elephants from an exotic animal farm in Illinois died of pulmonary disease due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In October 1996, a fourth living elephant was culture-positive for M. tuberculosis. Twenty-two handlers at the farm were screened for tuberculosis (TB); eleven had positive reactions to intradermal injection with purified protein derivative. One had smear-negative, culture-positive active TB. DNA fingerprint comparison by IS6110 and TBN12 typing showed that the isolates from the four elephants and the handler with active TB were the same strain. This investigation indicates transmission of M. tuberculosis between humans and elephants. PMID:9621200

  2. Systemic infection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies hominissuis and fungus in a pet dog

    PubMed Central

    KIM, Myung-Chul; KIM, JaeMyung; KANG, WoonKi; JANG, Yunho; KIM, Yongbaek

    2015-01-01

    A 3-year-old neutered female poodle with a long history of dermatophytic skin disease was presented with lethargy, anorexia and progressive weight loss. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed markedly enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes and multiple hypoechoic foci in the spleen. Cytology of the mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen showed granulomatous inflammation with fungal organisms and negatively stained intracytoplasmic bacterial rods consistent with Mycobacteria spp. Based on culture, multiplex polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis, the bacterium was identified as Mycobacterium avium subspecies hominissuis. Despite treatment with antibiotics, the dog’s condition deteriorated, and it died approximately 3 weeks after first presentation. PMID:26412202

  3. Systemic infection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies hominissuis and fungus in a pet dog.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myung-Chul; Kim, JaeMyung; Kang, WoonKi; Jang, Yunho; Kim, Yongbaek

    2016-02-01

    A 3-year-old neutered female poodle with a long history of dermatophytic skin disease was presented with lethargy, anorexia and progressive weight loss. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed markedly enlarged mesenteric lymph nodes and multiple hypoechoic foci in the spleen. Cytology of the mesenteric lymph nodes and spleen showed granulomatous inflammation with fungal organisms and negatively stained intracytoplasmic bacterial rods consistent with Mycobacteria spp. Based on culture, multiplex polymerase chain reaction and sequence analysis, the bacterium was identified as Mycobacterium avium subspecies hominissuis. Despite treatment with antibiotics, the dog's condition deteriorated, and it died approximately 3 weeks after first presentation. PMID:26412202

  4. Infection of African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) by oryx bacillus, a rare member of the antelope clade of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex.

    PubMed

    Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas C; Perrett, Keith D; Michel, Anita L; Keet, Dewald F; Hlokwe, Tiny; Streicher, Elizabeth M; Warren, Robin M; van Helden, Paul D

    2012-10-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex species cause tuberculosis disease in animals and humans. Although they share 99.9% similarity at the nucleotide level, several host-adapted ecotypes of the tubercule bacilli have been identified. In the wildlife setting, probably the most well-known member of this complex is Mycobacterium bovis, the causative agent of bovine tuberculosis. The recently described oryx bacillus is an extremely rare slow-growing member of the antelope clade of the M. tuberculosis complex and is closely related to the dassie bacillus, Mycobacterium africanum and Mycobacterium microti. The antelope clade is a group of strains apparently host adapted to antelopes, as most described infections were associated with deer and antelope, most specifically the Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx). In this study, oryx bacillus was isolated from a free-ranging adult female African buffalo (Syncerus caffer), in good physical condition, which tested strongly positive on three consecutive comparative intradermal tuberculin tests. Upon necropsy, a single pulmonary granuloma and an active retropharyngeal lymph node was found. Comprehensive molecular genetic assays were performed, which confirmed that the causative microorganism was not M. bovis but oryx bacillus. Oryx bacillus has never been reported in Southern Africa and has never been found to infect African buffalo. The identification of this microorganism in buffalo is an important observation in view of the large and ever-increasing epidemic of the closely related M. tuberculosis complex species M. bovis in some African buffalo populations in South Africa. PMID:23060486

  5. Mycobacterium lentiflavum, a recently identified slow-growing mycobacterial species: clinical significance in immunosuppressed cancer patients and summary of reported cases of infection.

    PubMed

    Safdar, A; Han, X Y

    2005-08-01

    The clinical significance of Mycobacterium lentiflavum, a recently identified nontuberculous mycobacterium, remains uncertain, especially in immunosuppressed cancer patients. The records of all patients in whom M. lentiflavum was identified using a gene sequencing technique between January 2001 and December 2003 were reviewed. The mean age among 12 patients was 51+/-20 years, and 11 (92%) patients had a hematologic malignancy. Six of seven (86%) hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients had received allogeneic donor grafts. Nine (75%) patients had predisposing risk factors for infection, seven (58%) had severe lymphocytopenia (<400 cells/microl), five (42%) were receiving systemic corticosteroid therapy, and three (25%) had acute graft-versus-host disease. Only 1 of the 12 (8%) patients had evidence of probable pulmonary M. lentiflavum infection. Six M. lentiflavum strains were initially misidentified as Mycobacterium simiae and Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex using traditional biochemical tests. Four M. lentiflavum isolates were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility; they were susceptible to isoniazid, ethambutol, clarithromycin, and amikacin, and resistant to rifampin. M. lentiflavum was not clinically significant, even in these severely immunosuppressed cancer patients. PMID:16133412

  6. Filarial infection modulates the immune response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis through expansion of CD4+ IL-4 memory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Soumya; Clark, Carolyn E.; Lugli, Enrico; Roederer, Mario; Nutman, Thomas B.

    2015-01-01

    Exaggerated CD4+T helper 2-specific cytokine producing memory T cell responses developing concomitantly with a T helper1 response might have a detrimental role in immunity to infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). To assess the dynamics of antigen (Ag)-specific memory T cell compartments in the context of filarial infection we used multiparameter flow cytometry on PBMCs from 25 microfilaremic filarial -infected (Inf) and 14 filarial-uninfected (Uninf) subjects following stimulation with filarial (BmA) or with the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-specific Ag CFP10. Our data demonstrated that the Inf group not only had a marked increase in BmA-specific CD4+IL-4+ cells (Median net frequency compared to baseline (Fo)=0.09% vs. 0.01%, p=0.038) but also to CFP10 (Fo =0.16% vs. 0.007%, p=0.04) and Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B (SEB) (Fo =0.49% vs. 0.26%, p=0.04). The Inf subjects showed a BmA-specific expansion of CD4+CD45RO+IL-4+ producing central memory (TCM, CD45RO+CCR7+CD27+) (Fo =1.1% vs. 0.5%, p=0.04) as well as effector memory (TEM CD45RO+CCR7-CD27-) (Fo =1.5% vs. 0.2%, p=0.03) with a similar but non-significant response to CFP10. In addition, there was expansion of CD4+ IL-4+ CD45RA+ CCR7+CD27+ (naïve-like) in Inf individuals compared to Uninf subjects. Among Inf subjects with definitive latent tuberculosis , there were no differences in frequencies of IL-4 producing cells within any of the memory compartments compared to the Uninf group. Our data suggest that filarial infection induces antigen-specific, exaggerated IL-4 responses in distinct T cell memory compartments to Mtb-specific antigens, which are attenuated in subjects who are able to mount a delayed type hypersensitivity reaction to Mtb. PMID:25667413

  7. ZAP-70, CTLA-4 and proximal T cell receptor signaling in cows infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Leite, Fernando L; Eslabão, Livia B; Pesch, Bruce; Bannantine, John P; Reinhardt, Timothy A; Stabel, Judith R

    2015-09-15

    Paratuberculosis is a chronic intestinal disease of ruminant animals caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP). A hallmark of paratuberculosis is a transition from a cell-mediated Th1 type response to a humoral Th2 response with the progression of disease from a subclinical to clinical state. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression of two crucial molecules in T cell function, ZAP-70 (zeta-chain-associated protein of 70 kDa) and CTLA-4 (cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4), in cows naturally infected with MAP. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from control non-infected cows (n=5), and cows in subclinical (n=6) and clinical stages of paratuberculosis (n=6) were cultured alone (medium only), and with concanavalin A, and a whole cell sonicate of MAP for 24, 72 and 144 h to measure the dynamic changes of ZAP-70 and CTLA-4 expression on CD4, CD8, and gamma delta (γδ) T cells. Flow cytometry was also performed to measure ZAP-70 phosphorylation to examine proximal T cell receptor signaling in animals of different disease status. The surface expression of CTLA-4 was increased in animals in subclinical stage of infection while levels of ZAP-70 were decreased in CD4+ T cells of both subclinical and clinical animals, indicating a change in T cell phenotype with disease state. Interestingly, proximal T cell receptor signaling was not altered in infected animals. This study demonstrated changes in crucial signaling molecules in animals infected with MAP, thereby elucidating T cell alterations associated with disease progression. PMID:26163934

  8. In vivo short-term exposure to residual oil fly ash impairs pulmonary innate immune response against environmental mycobacterium infection.

    PubMed

    Delfosse, Verónica C; Tasat, Deborah R; Gioffré, Andrea K

    2015-05-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that pollution derived from industrial and vehicular transportation induces adverse health effects causing broad ambient respiratory diseases. Therefore, air pollution should be taken into account when microbial diseases are evaluated. Environmental mycobacteria (EM) are opportunist pathogens that can affect a variety of immune compromised patients, which impacts significantly on human morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of residual oil fly ash (ROFA) pre-exposure on the pulmonary response after challenge with opportunistic mycobacteria by means of an acute short-term in vivo experimental animal model. We exposed BALB/c mice to ROFA and observed a significant reduction on bacterial clearance at 24 h post infection. To study the basis of this impaired response four groups of animals were instilled with (a) saline solution (Control), (b) ROFA (1 mg kg(-1) BW), (c) ROFA and EM-infected (Mycobacterium phlei, 8 × 10(6) CFU), and (d) EM-infected. Animals were sacrificed 24 h postinfection and biomarkers of lung injury and proinflammatory madiators were examined in the bronchoalveolar lavage. Our results indicate that ROFA was able to produce an acute pulmonary injury characterized by an increase in bronchoalveolar polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells influx and a rise in O2 (-) generation. Exposure to ROFA before M. phlei infection reduced total cell number and caused a significant decline in PMN cells recruitment (p < 0.05), O2 (-) generation, TNFα (p < 0.001), and IL-6 (p < 0.001) levels. Hence, our results suggest that, in this animal model, the acute short-term pre-exposure to ROFA reduces early lung response to EM infection. PMID:25915594

  9. Induction of B Cell Responses upon Experimental Infection of Neonatal Calves with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis ▿

    PubMed Central

    Stabel, J. R.; Bannantine, J. P.; Eda, Shigetoshi; Robbe-Austerman, S.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if experimental infection of neonatal calves with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis would invoke changes in the percentages of total B cells in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell population and of subpopulations of B cells as determined by CD5, CD25, and CD45RO markers during a 12-month period. Experimental infection groups included control (noninfected), oral (infected with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis strain K-10), oral/DXM (pretreatment with dexamethasone before oral inoculation), i.p. (intraperitoneal inoculation), and oral/M (oral inoculation with mucosal scrapings from a cow with clinical disease) groups. Over the course of the study, the percentages of total B cells in nonstimulated and antigen-stimulated cell cultures increased for oral and i.p. group calves, with the highest percentages noted at 3 and 6 months. Oral/M group calves had increased percentages of activated B cells, as determined by CD5dim and CD5bright markers, at 9 and 12 months. Experimental infection by all methods resulted in increased expression of CD25+ and CD45RO+ B cells early in the study, but the most significant results were observed at 12 months for oral/DXM and oral/M group calves. Immunoblot analyses with a whole-cell sonicate of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis demonstrated the most reactivity with sera from i.p. group calves and the least reactivity with sera from oral group calves. Further evidence of M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-specific antibody responses in the i.p. group calves was demonstrated using the ethanol vortex enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (EvELISA) method. In summary, an induction of B cell responses was noted after experimental infection with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis, with differences in responses noted according to the method of experimental inoculation. PMID:21543587

  10. Humoral response to HspX and GlcB to previous and recent infection by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Rabahi, Marcelo Fouad; Junqueira-Kipnis, Ana Paula; dos Reis, Michelle Cristina Guerreiro; Oelemann, Walter; Conde, Marcus Barreto

    2007-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major world health problem. Around 2 billions of people are infected by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causal agent of this disease. This fact accounts for a third of the total world population and it is expected that 9 million people will become infected each year. Only approximately 10% of the infected people will develop disease. However, health care workers (HCW) are continually exposed to the bacilli at endemic sites presenting increased chance of becoming sick. The objective of this work was to identify LTBI (latent tuberculosis infection) among all asymptomatic HCW of a Brazilian Central Hospital, in a three year follow up, and evaluate the humoral response among HCW with previous and recent LTBI to recombinant HspX and GlcB from M. tuberculosis. Methods Four hundred and thirty seven HCW were screened and classified into three different groups according to tuberculin skin test (TST) status: uninfected, previous LTBI and recent LTBI. ELISA test were performed to determine the humoral immune response to HspX and GlcB. Results The levels of IgG and IgM against the HspX and GlcB antigens were the same among HCW with recent and previous LTBI, as well as among non infected HCW. However, the IgM levels to HspX was significantly higher among HCW with recent LTBI (OD = 1.52 ± 0.40) than among the uninfected (OD = 1.09 ± 0.50) or subjects with previous LTBI (OD = 0.96 ± 0.51) (p < 0.001). Conclusion IgG and IgM humoral responses to GlcB antigens were similar amongst all studied groups; nevertheless IgM levels against HspX were higher among the recent LTBI/HCW. PMID:18166139

  11. Detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Infected Tissues by New Species-Specific Immunohistological Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Coetsier, Christophe; Havaux, Xavier; Mattelard, Francois; Sadatte, Sanaa; Cormont, Francoise; Buergelt, Klaus; Limbourg, Bernard; Latinne, Dominique; Bazin, Herve; Denef, Jean-Francois; Cocito, Carlo

    1998-01-01

    We have previously described the cloning and sequencing of a gene portion coding for the terminal part of a 34-kDa protein of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis, the etiological agent of Johne’s disease (P. Gilot, M. De Kesel, L. Machtelinckx, M. Coene, and C. Cocito, J. Bacteriol. 175:4930–4935, 1993). The recombinant polypeptide (a362) carries species-specific B-cell epitopes which do not cross-react with other mycobacterial pathogens (M. De Kesel, P. Gilot, M.-C. Misonne, M. Coene, and C. Cocito, J. Clin. Microbiol. 31:947–954, 1993). The present work describes the preparation of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies directed against a362 and the use of these immunoglobulins for histopathological diagnosis of Johne’s disease. The new immunohistological procedures herewith detailed proved to be able to identify M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis antigens in the intestinal tissues and lymph nodes of cattle affected by either the paucibacillary or pluribacillary form of the disease. They yielded negative responses not only with healthy animals but also with those affected by tuberculosis (Mycobacterium bovis). Both immunohistological procedures proved to be as sensitive as or more sensitive than Ziehl-Neelsen staining and, in addition, to be endowed with species specificity. PMID:9665946

  12. Mycobacterium bovis Infection of Cattle and White-Tailed Deer: Translational Research of Relevance to Human Tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Waters, W Ray; Palmer, Mitchell V

    2015-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a premier example of a disease complex with pathogens primarily affecting humans (i.e., Mycobacterium tuberculosis) or livestock and wildlife (i.e., Mycobacterium bovis) and with a long history of inclusive collaborations between physicians and veterinarians. Advances in the study of bovine TB have been applied to human TB, and vice versa. For instance, landmark discoveries on the use of Koch's tuberculin and interferon-γ release assays for diagnostic purposes, as well as Calmette and Guérin's attenuated M. bovis strain as a vaccine, were first evaluated in cattle for control of bovine TB prior to wide-scale use in humans. Likewise, recent discoveries on the role of effector/memory T cell subsets and polyfunctional T cells in the immune response to human TB, particularly as related to vaccine efficacy, have paved the way for similar studies in cattle. Over the past 15 years, substantial funding for development of human TB vaccines has led to the emergence of multiple promising candidates now in human clinical trials. Several of these vaccines are being tested for immunogenicity and efficacy in cattle. Also, the development of population-based vaccination strategies for control of M. bovis infection in wildlife reservoirs will undoubtedly have an impact on our understanding of herd immunity with relevance to the control of both bovine and human TB in regions of the world with high prevalence of TB. Thus, the one-health approach to research on TB is mutually beneficial for our understanding and control of TB in humans, livestock, and wildlife. PMID:25991696

  13. Infection of SCID mice with Mycobacterium leprae and control with antigen-activated "immune" human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed Central

    Converse, P J; Haines, V L; Wondimu, A; Craig, L E; Meyers, W M

    1995-01-01

    The SCID (severe combined immunodeficient) mouse lacks both B and T cells and tolerates injected mononuclear cells from humans, the principal hosts of Mycobacterium leprae. A SCID mouse model of leprosy could be useful to investigate potential vaccine strategies using human cells in a context in which the growth of the organism is monitored. Initial experiments determined that SCID mice are more susceptible than normal mice to infection and dissemination of M. leprae. Cells from humans, either BCG vaccinated or from countries where leprosy is endemic, were stimulated in vitro with a number of mycobacterial antigens--whole M. leprae, M. leprae cell walls, purified protein derivative of M. tuberculosis, and Mycobacterium bovis BCG--and tested for proliferation and production of interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and gamma interferon. Cell walls were the most efficient and consistent in inducing all of these activities. In vitro-activated human cells retain function better after injection into SCID mice than nonactivated cells. To test the ability of cells to affect the growth of M. leprae in the footpads of SCID mice, cells from a known responder to mycobacterial antigens and from a nonresponder were activated by M. leprae cell wall antigens. The cells were harvested and coinjected with fresh M. leprae into the right hind footpads of SCID mice. After 3 months, there was no growth of M. leprae in the footpads of mice coinjected with cells from the mycobacterial antigen responder, while growth was uninhibited in mice receiving cells from the nonresponder. Future experiments will determine requirements for antigen specificity in inhibiting M. leprae multiplication. PMID:7868226

  14. Infection of SCID mice with Mycobacterium leprae and control with antigen-activated "immune" human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Converse, P J; Haines, V L; Wondimu, A; Craig, L E; Meyers, W M

    1995-03-01

    The SCID (severe combined immunodeficient) mouse lacks both B and T cells and tolerates injected mononuclear cells from humans, the principal hosts of Mycobacterium leprae. A SCID mouse model of leprosy could be useful to investigate potential vaccine strategies using human cells in a context in which the growth of the organism is monitored. Initial experiments determined that SCID mice are more susceptible than normal mice to infection and dissemination of M. leprae. Cells from humans, either BCG vaccinated or from countries where leprosy is endemic, were stimulated in vitro with a number of mycobacterial antigens--whole M. leprae, M. leprae cell walls, purified protein derivative of M. tuberculosis, and Mycobacterium bovis BCG--and tested for proliferation and production of interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and gamma interferon. Cell walls were the most efficient and consistent in inducing all of these activities. In vitro-activated human cells retain function better after injection into SCID mice than nonactivated cells. To test the ability of cells to affect the growth of M. leprae in the footpads of SCID mice, cells from a known responder to mycobacterial antigens and from a nonresponder were activated by M. leprae cell wall antigens. The cells were harvested and coinjected with fresh M. leprae into the right hind footpads of SCID mice. After 3 months, there was no growth of M. leprae in the footpads of mice coinjected with cells from the mycobacterial antigen responder, while growth was uninhibited in mice receiving cells from the nonresponder. Future experiments will determine requirements for antigen specificity in inhibiting M. leprae multiplication. PMID:7868226

  15. Evaluation of testing strategies to identify infected animals at a single round of testing within dairy herds known to be infected with Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    More, S J; Cameron, A R; Strain, S; Cashman, W; Ezanno, P; Kenny, K; Fourichon, C; Graham, D

    2015-08-01

    As part of a broader control strategy within herds known to be infected with Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP), individual animal testing is generally conducted to identify infected animals for action, usually culling. Opportunities are now available to quantitatively compare different testing strategies (combinations of tests) in known infected herds. This study evaluates the effectiveness, cost, and cost-effectiveness of different testing strategies to identify infected animals at a single round of testing within dairy herds known to be MAP infected. A model was developed, taking account of both within-herd infection dynamics and test performance, to simulate the use of different tests at a single round of testing in a known infected herd. Model inputs included the number of animals at different stages of infection, the sensitivity and specificity of each test, and the costs of testing and culling. Testing strategies included either milk or serum ELISA alone or with fecal culture in series. Model outputs included effectiveness (detection fraction, the proportion of truly infected animals in the herd that are successfully detected by the testing strategy), cost, and cost-effectiveness (testing cost per true positive detected, total cost per true positive detected). Several assumptions were made: MAP was introduced with a single animal and no management interventions were implemented to limit within-herd transmission of MAP before this test. In medium herds, between 7 and 26% of infected animals are detected at a single round of testing, the former using the milk ELISA and fecal culture in series 5 yr after MAP introduction and the latter using fecal culture alone 15 yr after MAP introduction. The combined costs of testing and culling at a single round of testing increases with time since introduction of MAP infection, with culling costs being much greater than testing costs. The cost-effectiveness of testing varied by testing strategy. It was also

  16. Added Value of Long-Term Cytokine Release Assays to Detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in HIV-Infected Subjects in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Dirix, Violette; Schepers, Kinda; Massinga-Loembe, Marguerite; Worodria, William; Colebunders, Robert; Singh, Mahavir; Locht, Camille; Kestens, Luc

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate whether mycobacterial antigen–induced cytokine secretions are helpful in detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection in a cohort of HIV-infected patients living in a country with a high burden of Mtb and HIV infections, and to determine their predictive value for the development of tuberculosis (TB)-associated immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Design: A total of 352 HIV-infected patients (186 with active TB) were prospectively enrolled when initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART). Sequential blood samples were collected during the first 6 months of ART. Eighty-three HIV-uninfected subjects (39 with active TB) were enrolled as controls. Methods: The concentrations of 13 cytokines were measured in supernatants from blood mononuclear cells in vitro stimulated with purified protein derivative (PPD), heparin-binding hemagglutinin (HBHA) or early secreted antigen-6 (ESAT-6) and culture filtrate protein-10 (CFP-10), and results were compared with those of tuberculin skin tests (TST). Results: The best detection of Mtb infection was achieved by ESAT-6/CFP-10–induced interferon-γ concentrations, but results were often negative for patients with CD4+ T-cell counts <50 per cubic millimeters. Patients with active TB were identified by high ESAT-6/CFP-10–induced interleukin-6. Conversions of interferon-γ-release assays (IGRA) and TST occurred under ART, and combined TB and antiretroviral treatments of coinfected patients resulted in a decrease of ESAT-6/CFP-10–induced and an increase of HBHA-induced interferon-γ responses. No Mtb antigen–induced cytokines allowed us to predict TB–immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome or ART-associated TB. Conclusions: In Uganda, ESAT-6/CFP-10–IGRA is better in detecting Mtb infection than TST and, when combined with an HBHA–IGRA, could help to evaluate anti-TB treatment success. PMID:27306506

  17. Evidence for a Novel Gene Expression Program in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells from Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis-Infected Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Coussens, Paul M.; Colvin, Christopher J.; Rosa, Guilherme J. M.; Perez Laspiur, Juliana; Elftman, Michael D.

    2003-01-01

    A bovine-specific cDNA microarray system was used to compare gene expression profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from control uninfected (n = 4) and Johne's disease-positive (n = 6) Holstein cows. Microarray experiments were designed so that for each animal, a direct comparison was made between PBMCs stimulated in vitro with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis and PBMCs stimulated with phosphate-buffered saline (nil-stimulated PBMCs). As expected, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis stimulation of infected cow PBMCs enhanced expression of gamma interferon transcripts. In addition, expression of 15 other genes was significantly affected (>1.25-fold change; P < 0.05) by in vitro stimulation with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Similar treatment of control cow PBMCs with M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis resulted in significant changes in expression of 13 genes, only 2 of which were also affected in PBMCs from the infected cow PBMCs. To compare gene expression patterns in the two cow infection groups (infected cows and uninfected cows), a mixed-model analysis was performed with the microarray data. This analysis indicated that there were major differences in the gene expression patterns between cells isolated from the two groups of cows, regardless of in vitro stimulation. A total of 86 genes were significantly differentially expressed (P < 0.01) in M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis-stimulated PBMCs from infected cows compared to expression in similarly treated PBMCs from control cows. Surprisingly, a larger number of genes (110 genes) were also found to be significantly differentially expressed (P < 0.01) in nil-stimulated cells from the two infection groups. The expression patterns of selected genes were substantiated by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR. Flow cytometric analysis indicated that there were no gross differences in the relative populations of major immune cell types in PBMCs from infected and control cows. Thus

  18. Effect of a single exposure to ultraviolet radiation on Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guerin infection in mice.

    PubMed

    Jeevan, A; Kripke, M L

    1989-11-01

    BALB/c and C3H mice were exposed on the dorsal skin to 45 kJ/m2 of UVB radiation from FS-40 sunlamps 3 days before infection with 1 x 10(6) live units of Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) (Tice strain) in the footpad. At regular intervals, groups of mice were tested for a delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to the purified protein derivative (PPD) of tubercle bacilli, and the course of infection was monitored by measuring the size of the infected footpad, enlargement of the draining lymph node, and the number of bacteria in the spleen and lymph node. In both strains the DTH response to PPD was significantly delayed in UV-treated mice compared to unirradiated mice, when tested 21 and 42 days after BCG infection. By day 50, no significant difference was detected in the DTH response between irradiated and unirradiated mice. UV treatment reduced the size of the lymph node draining the site of BCG infection in both strains of mice and the size of the infected footpad in C3H mice but not in BALB/c mice. In both strains of mice the total number of bacteria in the spleen and the draining lymph node increased after UV irradiation. When irradiated 3, 5, 18, or 21 days after BCG infection, BALB/c mice also showed a significant decrease in their DTH response to PPD, indicating that the UV-induced suppression of BCG occurs both at the induction and the elicitation stages of the immune response. Thus, mice exposed to a single dose of UV radiation either before or after BCG infection showed an impaired DTH response to mycobacteria, which was accompanied by an increase in the multiplication of bacteria in the tissues, even though the organisms were introduced at an unirradiated site. These studies demonstrate that a systemic effect of UV irradiation can interfere with the development and expression of immunity to pathogenic bacteria in mice. PMID:2681417

  19. In vivo gammadelta T cell priming to mycobacterial antigens by primary Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and exposure to nonpeptidic ligands.

    PubMed Central

    Poccia, F.; Malkovsky, M.; Pollak, A.; Colizzi, V.; Sireci, G.; Salerno, A.; Dieli, F.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The recognition of phosphorylated nonpeptidic microbial metabolites by Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells does not appear to require the presence of MHC molecules or antigen processing, permitting rapid responses against microbial pathogens. These may constitute an important area of natural anti-infectious immunity. To provide evidence of their involvement in immune reactivities against mycobacteria, we measured the responsiveness of peripheral blood Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells in children with primary Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infections. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 22 children with MTB infections and 16 positivity of tuberculin (PPD)-negative healthy children were exposed to nonpeptidic antigens in vitro and the reactivity of the Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cell subset with these antigens was determined using proliferation and cytokine assays. Also, responses of gammadelta T cells from rhesus monkeys stimulated with phosphoantigens in vivo were measured. RESULTS: The Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cell responses were highly increased in infected children in comparison with age-matched controls. This augmented Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cell reactivity subsided after successful antibiotic chemotherapy, suggesting that persistent exposure to mycobacterial antigens is required for the maintenance of gammadelta T cell activation in vivo. The in vivo reactivity of Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells to phosphoantigens was also analyzed in a rhesus monkey model system. Intravenous injections of phosphoantigens induced an activated state of simian Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells which decreased after 2 months, i.e., with a time course similar to that seen in MTB-infected children. CONCLUSIONS: The increased reactivity of Vgamma9Vdelta2 T cells to phosphoantigens appears to be dependent on constant antigenic exposure. Consequently, the assessment of Vgamma9Vdelta2 responses may be useful for monitoring the efficacy of antimycobacterial therapies. PMID:10449808

  20. Cytokine expression profiles of bovine lymph nodes: effects of Mycobacterium bovis infection and bacille Calmette-Guérin vaccination.

    PubMed

    Widdison, S; Schreuder, L J; Villarreal-Ramos, B; Howard, C J; Watson, M; Coffey, T J

    2006-05-01

    Cytokine expression in lymph nodes from cattle inoculated intranasally with Mycobacterium bovis was compared to that of non-infected animals using real-time polymerase chain reaction. The effect of M. bovis infection, 4 months post-challenge, was to suppress the expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-10 as well as the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and IL-6. Expression of interferon (IFN)-gamma and IL-12 was maintained. Animals vaccinated with bacille Calmette-Guérin responded differently to challenge with M. bovis. In particular, no decrease in expression of IL-4 or IL-6 was observed following challenge of vaccinated animals and decreased IFN-gamma was detected. Also, vaccinated animals had higher levels of IL-4 and IL-10 transcripts compared to unvaccinated animals following challenge. These changes in cytokine expression levels led to a significant shift in the IFN-gamma/IL-4 or IFN-gamma/IL-10 ratio within the lymph node following challenge. Challenged animals generally showed a strong Th1 bias that was not seen in animals vaccinated prior to challenge. An inverse correlation between the level of pathology and bacterial load within the lymph node and the expression of IL-4, IL-10 and TNF was also observed. These results suggest that in the lymph nodes of cattle with established tuberculosis and a persisting bacterial infection, maintenance of the pro-inflammatory response in combination with a suppressed anti-inflammatory response may control the infection but contribute to host-induced tissue damage. Vaccination, which reduces the bacterial load and consequently the IFN-gamma response, may result in less suppression of anti-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:16634802

  1. Genome-wide association study of susceptibility to infection by Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis in Holstein cattle.

    PubMed

    Alpay, Fazli; Zare, Yalda; Kamalludin, Mamat H; Huang, Xixia; Shi, Xianwei; Shook, George E; Collins, Michael T; Kirkpatrick, Brian W

    2014-01-01

    Paratuberculosis, or Johne's disease, is a chronic, granulomatous, gastrointestinal tract disease of cattle and other ruminants caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium avium, subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP). Control of Johne's disease is based on programs of testing and culling animals positive for infection with MAP while concurrently modifying management to reduce the likelihood of infection. The current study is motivated by the hypothesis that genetic variation in host susceptibility to MAP infection can be dissected and quantifiable associations with genetic markers identified. For this purpose, a case-control, genome-wide association study was conducted using US Holstein cattle phenotyped for MAP infection using a serum ELISA and/or fecal culture test. Cases included cows positive for either serum ELISA, fecal culture or both. Controls consisted of animals negative for the serum ELISA test or both serum ELISA and fecal culture when both were available. Controls were matched by herd and proximal birth date with cases. A total of 856 cows (451 cases and 405 controls) were used in initial discovery analyses, and an additional 263 cows (159 cases and 104 controls) from the same herds were used as a validation data set. Data were analyzed in a single marker analysis controlling for relatedness of individuals (GRAMMAR-GC) and also in a Bayesian analysis in which multiple marker effects were estimated simultaneously (GenSel). For the latter, effects of non-overlapping 1 Mb marker windows across the genome were estimated. Results from the two discovery analyses were generally concordant; however, discovery results were generally not well supported in analysis of the validation data set. A combined analysis of discovery and validation data sets provided strongest support for SNPs and 1 Mb windows on chromosomes 1, 2, 6, 7, 17 and 29. PMID:25473852

  2. Accuracy of three diagnostic tests for determining Mycobacterium bovis infection status in live-sampled wild meerkats (Suricata suricatta).

    PubMed

    Drewe, Julian A; Dean, Gillian S; Michel, Anita L; Lyashchenko, Konstantin P; Greenwald, Rena; Pearce, Gareth P

    2009-01-01

    Accurate diagnosis of Mycobacterium bovis infection (bovine tuberculosis [bTB]) in live animals is notoriously problematic. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the diagnostic potential of 2 new serologic tests (multiantigen print immunoassay [MAPIA] and lateral flow immunoassay rapid test [RT]) in comparison with mycobacterial culture of tracheal washes for determining M. bovis infection status in a free-ranging population of wild meerkats (Suricata suricatta). During a longitudinal study lasting 2.5 years, 240 individually identifiable meerkats were each sampled up to 8 times under anesthesia every 3 months. Diagnostic accuracy was determined through Bayesian and maximum likelihood estimations of sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratios for each diagnostic test when used independently and in parallel to classify the disease status of individual meerkats in the absence of a gold standard. Culture of tracheal washes was highly specific (0.99; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.77, 1.00) but of low sensitivity (0.36; 95% CI = 0.24, 0.50) for diagnosing M. bovis-infected individuals. The longitudinal nature of the study with repeated sampling of the same individual animals served simultaneously to improve chances of detecting infection and increase confidence in a negative result in individual animals repeatedly testing negative. Although MAPIA and RT were individually of limited diagnostic use, interpreting the results of these 2 tests in parallel produced estimates of sensitivity (0.83; 95% CI = 0.67, 0.93) and specificity (0.73; 95% CI = 0.62, 0.82) high enough to usefully inform decision making when determining exposure to bTB in wild meerkats and potentially other species in which bTB poses a diagnostic challenge. PMID:19139498

  3. Whole genome sequencing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis reveals slow growth and low mutation rates during latent infections in humans.

    PubMed

    Colangeli, Roberto; Arcus, Vic L; Cursons, Ray T; Ruthe, Ali; Karalus, Noel; Coley, Kathy; Manning, Shannon D; Kim, Soyeon; Marchiano, Emily; Alland, David

    2014-01-01

    Very little is known about the growth and mutation rates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during latent infection in humans. However, studies in rhesus macaques have suggested that latent infections have mutation rates that are higher than that observed during active tuberculosis disease. Elevated mutation rates are presumed risk factors for the development of drug resistance. Therefore, the investigation of mutation rates during human latency is of high importance. We performed whole genome mutation analysis of M. tuberculosis isolates from a multi-decade tuberculosis outbreak of the New Zealand Rangipo strain. We used epidemiological and phylogenetic analysis to identify four cases of tuberculosis acquired from the same index case. Two of the tuberculosis cases occurred within two years of exposure and were classified as recently transmitted tuberculosis. Two other cases occurred more than 20 years after exposure and were classified as reactivation of latent M. tuberculosis infections. Mutation rates were compared between the two recently transmitted pairs versus the two latent pairs. Mean mutation rates assuming 20 hour generation times were 5.5 X 10(-10) mutations/bp/generation for recently transmitted tuberculosis and 7.3 X 10(-11) mutations/bp/generation for latent tuberculosis. Generation time versus mutation rate curves were also significantly higher for recently transmitted tuberculosis across all replication rates (p = 0.006). Assuming identical replication and mutation rates among all isolates in the final two years before disease reactivation, the u 20 hr mutation rate attributable to the remaining latent period was 1.6 × 10(-11) mutations/bp/generation, or approximately 30 fold less than that calculated during the two years immediately before disease. Mutations attributable to oxidative stress as might be caused by bacterial exposure to the host immune system were not increased in latent infections. In conclusion, we did not find any evidence to suggest

  4. Whole Genome Sequencing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Reveals Slow Growth and Low Mutation Rates during Latent Infections in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Colangeli, Roberto; Arcus, Vic L.; Cursons, Ray T.; Ruthe, Ali; Karalus, Noel; Coley, Kathy; Manning, Shannon D.; Kim, Soyeon; Marchiano, Emily; Alland, David

    2014-01-01

    Very little is known about the growth and mutation rates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis during latent infection in humans. However, studies in rhesus macaques have suggested that latent infections have mutation rates that are higher than that observed during active tuberculosis disease. Elevated mutation rates are presumed risk factors for the development of drug resistance. Therefore, the investigation of mutation rates during human latency is of high importance. We performed whole genome mutation analysis of M. tuberculosis isolates from a multi-decade tuberculosis outbreak of the New Zealand Rangipo strain. We used epidemiological and phylogenetic analysis to identify four cases of tuberculosis acquired from the same index case. Two of the tuberculosis cases occurred within two years of exposure and were classified as recently transmitted tuberculosis. Two other cases occurred more than 20 years after exposure and were classified as reactivation of latent M. tuberculosis infections. Mutation rates were compared between the two recently transmitted pairs versus the two latent pairs. Mean mutation rates assuming 20 hour generation times were 5.5X10−10 mutations/bp/generation for recently transmitted tuberculosis and 7.3X10−11 mutations/bp/generation for latent tuberculosis. Generation time versus mutation rate curves were also significantly higher for recently transmitted tuberculosis across all replication rates (p = 0.006). Assuming identical replication and mutation rates among all isolates in the final two years before disease reactivation, the u20hr mutation rate attributable to the remaining latent period was 1.6×10−11 mutations/bp/generation, or approximately 30 fold less than that calculated during the two years immediately before disease. Mutations attributable to oxidative stress as might be caused by bacterial exposure to the host immune system were not increased in latent infections. In conclusion, we did not find any evidence to suggest

  5. Genome-Wide Association Study of Susceptibility to Infection by Mycobacterium avium Subspecies paratuberculosis in Holstein Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Alpay, Fazli; Zare, Yalda; Kamalludin, Mamat H.; Huang, Xixia; Shi, Xianwei; Shook, George E.; Collins, Michael T.; Kirkpatrick, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Paratuberculosis, or Johne's disease, is a chronic, granulomatous, gastrointestinal tract disease of cattle and other ruminants caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium avium, subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP). Control of Johne's disease is based on programs of testing and culling animals positive for infection with MAP while concurrently modifying management to reduce the likelihood of infection. The current study is motivated by the hypothesis that genetic variation in host susceptibility to MAP infection can be dissected and quantifiable associations with genetic markers identified. For this purpose, a case-control, genome-wide association study was conducted using US Holstein cattle phenotyped for MAP infection using a serum ELISA and/or fecal culture test. Cases included cows positive for either serum ELISA, fecal culture or both. Controls consisted of animals negative for the serum ELISA test or both serum ELISA and fecal culture when both were available. Controls were matched by herd and proximal birth date with cases. A total of 856 cows (451 cases and 405 controls) were used in initial discovery analyses, and an additional 263 cows (159 cases and 104 controls) from the same herds were used as a validation data set. Data were analyzed in a single marker analysis controlling for relatedness of individuals (GRAMMAR-GC) and also in a Bayesian analysis in which multiple marker effects were estimated simultaneously (GenSel). For the latter, effects of non-overlapping 1 Mb marker windows across the genome were estimated. Results from the two discovery analyses were generally concordant; however, discovery results were generally not well supported in analysis of the validation data set. A combined analysis of discovery and validation data sets provided strongest support for SNPs and 1 Mb windows on chromosomes 1, 2, 6, 7, 17 and 29. PMID:25473852

  6. Infection with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Results in Rapid Interleukin-1β Release and Macrophage Transepithelial Migration

    PubMed Central

    Lamont, Elise A.; O'Grady, Scott M.; Davis, William C.; Eckstein, Torsten

    2012-01-01

    Pathogen processing by the intestinal epithelium involves a dynamic innate immune response initiated by pathogen-epithelial cell cross talk. Interactions between epithelium and Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis have not been intensively studied, and it is currently unknown how the bacterium-epithelial cell cross talk contributes to the course of infection. We hypothesized that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis harnesses host responses to recruit macrophages to the site of infection to ensure its survival and dissemination. We investigated macrophage recruitment in response to M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis using a MAC-T bovine macrophage coculture system. We show that M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis infection led to phagosome acidification within bovine epithelial (MAC-T) cells as early as 10 min, which resulted in upregulation of interleukin-1β (IL-1β) at transcript and protein levels. Within 10 min of infection, macrophages were recruited to the apical side of MAC-T cells. Inhibition of phagosome acidification or IL-1β abrogated this response, while MCP-1/CCL-2 blocking had no effect. IL-1β processing was dependent upon Ca2+ uptake from the extracellular medium and intracellular Ca2+ oscillations, as determined by EGTA and BAPTA-AM [1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy) ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid tetrakis (acetoxymethyl ester)] treatments. Thus, M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis is an opportunist that takes advantage of extracellular Ca2+-dependent phagosome acidification and IL-1β processing in order to efficiently transverse the epithelium and enter its niche—the macrophage. PMID:22778093

  7. Detection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infection in two different camel species by conventional and molecular techniques

    PubMed Central

    Haghkhah, Masoud; Derakhshandeh, Abdollah; Jamshidi, Reza; Moghiseh, Asghar; Karimaghaei, Negar; Ayaseh, Mohammad; Mostafaei, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Paratuberculosis (John’s disease) is infectious and chronically progressive granulomatous disease which affects domestic and wild ruminants. The causative agent is Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis (MAP), a slow growing mycobactin dependent acid-fast bacillus. We investigated the detection and frequency of MAP in apparently healthy dromedary and Bactrian camels by insertion sequence 900 (IS900) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and acid fast staining of fecal samples in Iran. Acid fast staining results showed that 6/50 (12.0%) samples of dromedary camels and 4/26 (15.3%) samples of Bactrian camels were suspected to MAP. Although the percentage of positivity for PCR assay of fecal dromedary camel was 8.0%, no bands corresponding to MAP detect in all samples of Bactrian camels. In conclusion, Although the incidence of MAP infection was low, further studies should be conducted to get more information on MAP infection in camel population, especially in areas where camels are close to other ruminants such as dairy cow, sheep and goat. PMID:26973771

  8. The within host dynamics of Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis infection in cattle: where time and place matter.

    PubMed

    Koets, Ad P; Eda, Shigetoshi; Sreevatsan, Srinand

    2015-01-01

    Johne's disease or paratuberculosis, caused by Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP), occurs in domestic and wild animals worldwide, causing a significant economic loss to livestock industries. After a prolonged incubation time, infected cattle shed MAP bacilli into feces and spread the disease to an uninfected animal population. It is largely unknown how (or whether) the interplay between the pathogen and the host immunity determines timing of shedding after the long incubation time. Such information would provide an understanding of pathogenesis in individual animals and the epidemiology of MAP infection in animal populations. In this review, we summarize current knowledge of bovine Johne's disease pathology, pathogenesis, immunology and genetics. We discuss knowledge gaps that direly need to be addressed to provide a science-based approach to diagnostics and (immuno)prophylaxis. These knowledge gaps are related to anatomical/clinical manifestation of MAP invasion, interaction of bacteria with phagocytes, granuloma formation, shedding, establishment and kinetics of adaptive immune responses in the pathogenesis of the disease. These topics are discussed at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels with special attention to the within host dynamics including the temporal and the spatial context relevant for the various host-pathogen interactions. PMID:26092382

  9. Detection of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis infection in two different camel species by conventional and molecular techniques.

    PubMed

    Haghkhah, Masoud; Derakhshandeh, Abdollah; Jamshidi, Reza; Moghiseh, Asghar; Karimaghaei, Negar; Ayaseh, Mohammad; Mostafaei, Mohsen

    2015-01-01

    Paratuberculosis (John's disease) is infectious and chronically progressive granulomatous disease which affects domestic and wild ruminants. The causative agent is Mycobacterium avium paratuberculosis (MAP), a slow growing mycobactin dependent acid-fast bacillus. We investigated the detection and frequency of MAP in apparently healthy dromedary and Bactrian camels by insertion sequence 900 (IS900) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and acid fast staining of fecal samples in Iran. Acid fast staining results showed that 6/50 (12.0%) samples of dromedary camels and 4/26 (15.3%) samples of Bactrian camels were suspected to MAP. Although the percentage of positivity for PCR assay of fecal dromedary camel was 8.0%, no bands corresponding to MAP detect in all samples of Bactrian camels. In conclusion, Although the incidence of MAP infection was low, further studies should be conducted to get more information on MAP infection in camel population, especially in areas where camels are close to other ruminants such as dairy cow, sheep and goat. PMID:26973771

  10. Treatment of latent tuberculosis infection induces changes in multifunctional Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Sauzullo, Ilaria; Mengoni, Fabio; Mascia, Claudia; Rossi, Raffaella; Lichtner, Miriam; Vullo, Vincenzo; Mastroianni, Claudio M

    2016-02-01

    To ascertain whether multiparametric flow cytometry assessment of multifunctional Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells can distinguish between untreated and treated patients with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI), we enrolled 14 LTBI subjects treated with isoniazid (INH) therapy, 16 untreated LTBI patients, and 25 healthy controls. The analysis of mono-functional CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells producing single cytokines showed significant differences only between uninfected and infected LTBI subjects (both treated and untreated). Conversely, the analysis of multifunctional CD4(+) T cells revealed a significant reduction in the frequency of two CD4(+) T cells subsets, those producing IFN-γ, IL-2, and TNF-α simultaneously (triple positive; p = 0.005) and those producing IL-2 alone (p = 0.0359), as well as a shift towards T cells producing only one cytokine in treated as compared to untreated LTBI subjects. Assigning a triple-positive CD4(+) T cells a cut-off >0.082 %, 94 % of untreated LTBI patients were scored as positive, as compared to only 28 % of treated LTBI patients and none of the healthy controls. No significant differences between untreated and treated LTBI subjects in terms of Mtb-specific CD8(+) T cell cytokine profiles (p > 0.05) were identified. The significant changes in the cytokine profiles of Mtb-specific T cells after INH therapy suggest that analysis of multifunctional T cells may be a promising means for the monitoring of LTBI treatment success. PMID:26108901

  11. Non-Replicating Mycobacterium tuberculosis Elicits a Reduced Infectivity Profile with Corresponding Modifications to the Cell Wall and Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Bacon, Joanna; Alderwick, Luke J.; Allnutt, Jon A.; Gabasova, Evelina; Watson, Robert; Hatch, Kim A.; Clark, Simon O.; Jeeves, Rose E.; Marriott, Alice; Rayner, Emma; Tolley, Howard; Pearson, Geoff; Hall, Graham; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Wernisch, Lorenz; Williams, Ann; Marsh, Philip D.

    2014-01-01

    A key feature of Mycobacterium tuberculosis is its ability to become dormant in the host. Little is known of the mechanisms by which these bacilli are able to persist in this state. Therefore, the focus of this study was to emulate environmental conditions encountered by M. tuberculosis in the granuloma, and determine the effect of such conditions on the physiology and infectivity of the organism. Non-replicating persistent (NRP) M. tuberculosis was established by the gradual depletion of nutrients in an oxygen-replete and controlled environment. In contrast to rapidly dividing bacilli, NRP bacteria exhibited a distinct phenotype by accumulating an extracellular matrix rich in free mycolate and lipoglycans, with increased arabinosylation. Microarray studies demonstrated a substantial down-regulation of genes involved in energy metabolism in NRP bacteria. Despite this reduction in metabolic activity, cells were still able to infect guinea pigs, but with a delay in the development of disease when compared to exponential phase bacilli. Using these approaches to investigate the interplay between the changing environment of the host and altered physiology of NRP bacteria, this study sheds new light on the conditions that are pertinent to M. tuberculosis dormancy and how this organism could be establishing latent disease. PMID:24516549

  12. Immunogenicity of Eight Dormancy Regulon-Encoded Proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in DNA-Vaccinated and Tuberculosis-Infected Mice▿

    PubMed Central

    Roupie, Virginie; Romano, Marta; Zhang, Lei; Korf, Hannelie; Lin, May Young; Franken, Kees L. M. C.; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.; Klein, Michèl R.; Huygen, Kris

    2007-01-01

    Hypoxia and low concentrations of nitric oxide have been rep