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Sample records for au ag-polymetallic mineralization

  1. Au-Ag polymetallic mineralization within tectonically weak zones along the southwestern edge of the Colorado Plateau

    SciTech Connect

    Wenrich, K.J.; Silberman, M.L. )

    1993-04-01

    The Music Mountain mining district lies at the base of the Grand Wash Cliffs, a major fault-line scarp along the Grand Wash fault, which marks the SW margin of the Colorado Plateau. Nearly vertical Au-Ag polymetallic quartz veins parallel, and are in contact with, altered diabase and granite porphyry dikes that cut Proterozoic granite, schist, and gneiss. The gold-bearing veins range in thickness from an inch to several feet and contain significant amounts of sulfide minerals. Diabase dikes and quartz veins in the district and to the north consistently strike N42[degree]W to N57[degree]W, which is one of the most prevalent fracture orientation throughout NW Arizona. In the Gold Basin-Lost Basin districts to the north, the Au occurs in such pegmatite-quartz veins that strike NE. Thirty miles east along Diamond Creek, quartz veins and diabase dikes strike N45[degree]E and are associated with Au and Ag anomalies in stream-sediments and panned concentrates. To the west major Au-Ag polymetallic quartz veins of the Wallapai mining district show consistent strikes from N30[degree] to 60[degree]W. K-Ar ages of hydrothermal alterations of 4 NW oriented diabase dikes that have quartz veins along them, range from 935 [+-] 35 to 755 [+-] 21 Ma. Sericite from altered granite porphyry, adjacent to a mineralized vein, gave a K-Ar age of 72 [+-]2 Ma. All geochemical sites (within a 1,000 mi[sup 2] area) determined to be anomalous in Au lie within 2 mi of either the Grand Wash or Hurricane faults. The Hurricane and Grand Wash faults, major Precambrian fault zones that were reactivated in the Phanerozoic, appear to be good exploration targets for Au-rich quartz veins associated with pegmatite or diabase dikes, many of which may be buried beneath the thick alluvium of Hualapai Valley.

  2. Geological, fluid inclusion and isotopic studies of the Baiyangping Pb-Zn-Cu-Ag polymetallic deposit, Lanping basin, Yunnan province, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Hu; Hou, Zeng-Qian; Song, Yu-Cai; Zhang, Hong-Rui

    2015-11-01

    Baiyangping Pb-Zn-Cu-Ag deposit is located in Lanping basin, northwestern Yunnan province. The deposit is composed of a few ore veins and can be divided into several ore blocks. The ore bodies are primarily hosted in Mesozoic carbonate, sandstone and siltstone along the north-south-striking, NWW-striking and NE-SW-striking fault zones. There are breccia, massive, vein like and disseminated ores. The main ore minerals are sphalerite, galena, gratonite, jordanite, tetrahedrite series minerals, chalcocite, chalcopyrite, realgar, orpiment, bournonite, cobalt-bearing arsenopyrite, argentite, kongsbergite, cobaltine, siegenite. The sizes of fluid inclusions in Baiyangping deposit are generally less than 10 μm and have the shape of round, oval, irregular, etc. The ore-forming fluid system is Ca2+-Na+-K+-Mg2+-Cl--F--NO3- brine system. The freezing temperature of fluid inclusions in mineral deposits ranges from -26.4 to -0.2 °C, average -14.6 °C; the homogenization temperature is concentrated in 120-180 °C, and the salinity is between 0.35 and 24.73 wt% (NaCleq), average 16.9 wt% (NaCleq). δ13CPDB and δ18OSMOW values of hydrothermal calcite range from -4.16‰ to 3‰ and -2.5‰ to 20.4‰, respectively. δ34S values of sulfide minerals range from -10.2‰ to 11.2‰, average 5.6‰. The sulfide samples yield 206Pb/204Pb values of 18.609-18.818, 207Pb/204Pb of 15.548-15.842 and 208Pb/204Pb = 38.514-39.556. C-O-S-Pb isotope compositions of the Baiyangping deposit indicate a homogeneous carbon source, and the carbon in hydrothermal calcite is derived from the dissolution of carbonate rock strata, the ore-forming fluid belongs to basin brine fluid system, which is mixed with the precipitate water, sulfur in sulfides and sulfosalts is derived from thermal chemical sulfate reduction, and the thermal decomposition of sulfur-bearing organic matter. The metal mineralization material is from sedimentary strata and basement. The late Pb-Zn polymetallic mineralization event

  3. Nitrogen mineralization from 'AU Golden' sunn hemp residue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The tropical legume sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea) cultivar ‘AU Golden’ has the potential to provide substantial amounts of nitrogen (N) to subsequent crops that could reduce recommended application rates of synthetic N fertilizers. Nitrogen fertilization problems via legumes are often due to asynch...

  4. Ozone-driven photocatalyzed degradation and mineralization of pesticide, Triclopyr by Au/TiO2.

    PubMed

    Maddila, Suresh; Rana, Surjakanta; Pagadala, Ramakanth; Maddila, Surya N; Vasam, Chandrasekhar; Jonnalagadda, Sreekantha B

    2015-01-01

    Triclopyr is a widely used pesticide which is non-biodegradable and enters aquatic systems. The ozone facilitated photocatalyzed degradation and mineralization of Triclopyr using Au-loaded titania as heterogeneous catalyst is reported. The oxidative degradation activity of the hazardous pesticide was investigated at pH 7.8 under varied reaction conditions, including in presence and absence of ozone, titania alone, in presence and absence of light and with different loadings of Au on support. Photocatalysis with 2% Au/TiO2 in the presence of ozone yielded 100% degradation of Triclopyr in 2 h. The extent of degradation of pesticide and its mineralization were confirmed by GC-MS. For 10 mg/L of Triclopyr, 0.1 g/L of catalyst was found to be the optimum for mineralization. Results show that photocatalyzed ozonation with Au/TiO2 as catalyst is a very effective for its removal. No leaching of Au was observed in triplicate runs. Catalyst was fully recoverable and reusable with no loss of activity. PMID:26065517

  5. Evidence for rapid epithermal mineralization and coeval bimodal volcanism, Bruner Au-Ag property, NV USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, Dylan

    The character of Au-Ag mineralization and volcanic/hydrothermal relationships at the underexplored Miocene-age Bruner low-sulfidation epithermal Au-Ag deposit are elucidated using field and laboratory studies. Bruner is located in central Nevada within the Great Basin extensional province, near several major volcanic trends (Western Andesite, Northern Nevada Rift) associated with world-class Miocene-age epithermal Au-Ag provinces. Despite its proximity to several >1 Moz Au deposits, and newly discovered high-grade drill intercepts (to 117 ppm Au/1.5m), there is no published research on the deposit, the style of mineralization has not been systematically characterized, and vectors to mineralization remain elusive. By investigating the nature of mineralization and time-space relationships between volcanic/hydrothermal activity, the deposit has been integrated into a regional framework, and exploration targeting improved. Mineralization occurs within narrow quartz + adularia +/- pyrite veins that manifest as sheeted/stockwork zones, vein swarms, and rare 0.3-2 m wide veins hosted by two generations of Miocene high-K, high-silica rhyolite flow dome complexes overlying an andesite flow unit. The most prominent structural controls on veining are N­striking faults and syn-mineral basalt/rhyolite dikes. Productive veins have robust boiling indicators (high adularia content, bladed quartz after calcite, recrystallized colloform quartz bands), lack rhythmic banding, and contain only 1-2 stages; these veins overprint, or occur separately from another population of barren to weakly mineralized rhythmically banded quartz-only veins. Ore minerals consist of coarse Au0.5Ag 0.5 electrum, fine Au0.7Ag0.3 electrum, acanthite, uytenbogaardtite (Ag3AuS2) and minor embolite Ag(Br,Cl). Now deeply oxidized, veins typically contain <1% pyrite/goethite + Au-Ag minerals, with trace marcasite and microscopic Fe-poor sphalerite. Property-scale K-feldspar alteration related to a pre

  6. Formation of recent Pb-Ag-Au mineralization by potential sub-surface microbial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tornos, Fernando; Velasco, Francisco; Menor-Salván, César; Delgado, Antonio; Slack, John F.; Escobar, Juan Manuel

    2014-08-01

    Las Cruces is a base-metal deposit in the Iberian Pyrite Belt, one of the world’s best-known ore provinces. Here we report the occurrence of major Pb-Ag-Au mineralization resulting from recent sub-surface replacement of supergene oxyhydroxides by carbonate and sulphide minerals. This is probably the largest documented occurrence of recent microbial activity producing an ore assemblage previously unknown in supergene mineralizing environments. The presence of microbial features in the sulphides suggests that these may be the first-described natural bacteriomorphs of galena. The low δ13C values of the carbonate minerals indicate formation by deep anaerobic microbial processes. Sulphur isotope values of sulphides are interpreted here as reflecting microbial reduction in a system impoverished in sulphate. We suggest that biogenic activity has produced around 3.1 × 109 moles of reduced sulphur and 1010 moles of CO2, promoting the formation of ca. 1.19 Mt of carbonates, 114,000 t of galena, 638 t of silver sulphides and 6.5 t of gold.

  7. Formation of recent Pb-Ag-Au mineralization by potential sub-surface microbial activity.

    PubMed

    Tornos, Fernando; Velasco, Francisco; Menor-Salván, César; Delgado, Antonio; Slack, John F; Escobar, Juan Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Las Cruces is a base-metal deposit in the Iberian Pyrite Belt, one of the world's best-known ore provinces. Here we report the occurrence of major Pb-Ag-Au mineralization resulting from recent sub-surface replacement of supergene oxyhydroxides by carbonate and sulphide minerals. This is probably the largest documented occurrence of recent microbial activity producing an ore assemblage previously unknown in supergene mineralizing environments. The presence of microbial features in the sulphides suggests that these may be the first-described natural bacteriomorphs of galena. The low δ(13)C values of the carbonate minerals indicate formation by deep anaerobic microbial processes. Sulphur isotope values of sulphides are interpreted here as reflecting microbial reduction in a system impoverished in sulphate. We suggest that biogenic activity has produced around 3.1 × 10(9) moles of reduced sulphur and 10(10) moles of CO2, promoting the formation of ca. 1.19 Mt of carbonates, 114,000 t of galena, 638 t of silver sulphides and 6.5 t of gold. PMID:25098677

  8. Controls on magmatic PGE and Au mineralization in the Skaergaard Intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keays, Reid; Tegner, Christian

    2013-04-01

    The Skaergaard Intrusion of East Greenland is the host for significant magmatic PGE and Au mineralization (the Platinova Reefs). It was formed from a single batch of magma that crystallized in its entirety as a closed system. Unlike all other examples of significant magmatic PGE and Ni-Cu-PGE mineralization, the Skaergaard rocks exhibit no evidence of crustal contamination, the major factor responsible for driving magmas to sulphide saturation and ore genesis. Although the Skaergaard rocks and mineralized zones have extremely low S contents, the mineralization is believed to be the product of late stage sulphide saturation of the magma. Three factors drove the magma to sulphide saturation, viz: (1) prolonged build up of S in the residual melt of the fractionating magma; (2) crystallization of magnetite which slowed down the build up of FeO in the fractionating magma; and (3) cooling of the magma against the walls of the intrusion. High quality PGE, Au, Cu, S, Se data and other geochemical data for samples from a detailed stratigraphic section through the Skaergaard intrusion are used to model these elements throughout its crystallization history, estimate their concentrations in the Skaergaard parental magma, and to establish the timing of sulphide saturation and the causes of PGE-Au mineralization. The model indicates that the parental magma contained 4.0 ppb Au, 18.7 ppb Pd, 9.0 ppb Pt, 95 ppb Se and 240 ppm Cu. The high Pd/Pt ratio indicates that the magma had undergone a significant amount of fractionation prior to entry into the Skaergaard magma chamber, consistent with the silicate mineralogy. A sharp increase in PGE contents (but not Cu or incompatible lithophile trace elements) 300m below the Platinova Reefs coincides with the first appearance of cumulus magnetite and marks the stratigraphic position at which tiny amounts of cumulus PGE-rich sulphides segregated from the magma. Although the S contents of all rocks below the Platinova Reefs are below the

  9. Evidence for throttling as a control over localized late-stage Au/Ag mineralization in the Mineral Hill breccia pipe, Golden Sunlight mine, Jefferson County, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Coppinger, W.W.; Porter, E.

    1985-01-01

    A restricted zone of anomalous gold and silver mineralization, coupled with localized intense alteration and textural variations, documents the existence of a natural throttle which controlled Au/Ag emplacement during late-stage mineralization of the Mineral Hill breccia pipe. The zone is roughly funnel-shaped with a maximum width of 10m and a length of 30m. Mineralization and alteration are developed along the trend of a steep-dipping to vertical fracture zone and apparently pinch out at depth. Small displacement post-mineralization cross-faults offset contacts and influence grade distribution within the feature. Breccia texture, nature and intensity of alteration, and ore grade very systematically from the margin to the interior of the zone. The breccia becomes rubbly and friable, with frothy, cellular quartz comprising the matrix and as much as 50 percent of the rock in some locations. Au/Ag grades vary directly with the development of the cellular quartz and are highest in the interior, grading to local background levels in the wallrock. Barite and minor white opaline quartz occur in the matrix adjacent to contacts, diminishing in volume toward the interior. Minor primary hematite occurs in some clasts in the interior. Iron-oxides after sulfides are common throughout the zone. The feature is interpreted as late-stage localized zone of venting and pressure-release developed above a constriction in the Mineral Hill hydrothermal mineralizing system.

  10. Structural characteristics of chalcopyrite from a Cu(Au) ore deposit in the Carajás Mineral Province, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, Andreza Aparecida; Lima, Diana Quintão; Duarte, Hélio Anderson; Murad, Enver; Pereira, Márcio César; de Freitas Suita, Marcos Tadeu; Ardisson, José Domingos; Fabris, José Domingos

    2011-11-01

    Mössbauer spectra and X-ray diffraction data show a chalcopyrite from the Cristalino Cu(Au) deposit in the Carajás Mineral Province in northern Brazil to consist of a single, tetragonal phase. This is in stark contrast to a previously described chalcopyrite from the Camaquã copper mine in southern Brazil, obviously reflecting differences in mineral (and thus ore deposit) genesis.

  11. Tellurides, selenides and Bi-mineral assemblages from the Río Narcea Gold Belt, Asturias, Spain: genetic implications in Cu-Au and Au skarns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cepedal, A.; Fuertes-Fuente, M.; Martín-Izard, A.; González-Nistal, S.; Rodríguez-Pevida, L.

    2006-07-01

    Gold ores in skarns from the Río Narcea Gold Belt are associated with Bi-Te(-Se)-bearing minerals. These mineral assemblages have been used to compare two different skarns from this belt, a Cu-Au skarn (calcic and magnesian) from the El Valle deposit, and a Au-reduced calcic skarn from the Ortosa deposit. In the former, gold mineralization occurs associated with Cu-(Fe)-sulfides (chalcopyrite, bornite, chalcocite-digenite), commonly in the presence of magnetite. Gold occurs mainly as native gold and electrum. Au-tellurides (petzite, sylvanite, calaverite) are locally present; other tellurides are hessite, clausthalite and coloradoite. The Bi-bearing minerals related to gold are Bi-sulfosalts (wittichenite, emplectite, aikinite, bismuthinite), native bismuth, and Bi-tellurides and selenides (tetradymite, kawazulite, tsumoite). The speciation of Bi-tellurides with Bi/Te(Se + S) ≤ 1, the presence of magnetite and the abundance of precious metal tellurides and clausthalite indicate fO2 conditions within the magnetite stability field that locally overlap the magnetite-hematite buffer. In Ortosa deposit, gold essentially occurs as native gold and maldonite and is commonly related to pyrrhotite and to the replacement of löllingite by arsenopyrite, indicating lower fO2 conditions for gold mineralization than those for El Valle deposit. This fact is confirmed by the speciation of Bi-tellurides and selenides (hedleyite, joséite-B, joséite-A, ikunolite-laitakarite) with Bi/Te(+ Se + S) ≥ 1.

  12. The enhancing of Au-Ag-Te content in tellurium-bearing ore mineral by bio-oxidation-leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, PyeongMan; Kim, HyunSoo; Myung, EunJi; Kim, YoonJung; Lee, YongBum; Park*, CheonYoung

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to enhance the content of valuable metals such as Au-Ag-Te in tellurium-bearing minerals by bio-oxidation-leaching. It was confirmed that pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite and galena were produced together with tellurium-bearing minerals including hessite, sylvanite and tellurobismuthite from ore minerals and concentrates through microscopic observation and SEM/EDS analysis. In a bio-oxidation-leaching experiment, with regard to Au, Ag, Te, Cu and Fe, the changes in the amount of leaching and the content of leaching residues were compared and analyzed with each other depending on the adaptation of an indigenous microbe identified as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. As a result of the experiment, the Au-Ag-Te content in tellurium-bearing ore mineral was enhanced in the order of physical oxidation leaching, physical/non-adaptive bio-oxidation-leaching and physical/adaptive biological leaching. It suggests that the bio-oxidation-leaching using microbes adapted in tellurium-bearing ore mineral can be used as a pre-treatment and a main process in a recovery process of valuable metals. "This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea(NRF) funded by the Ministry of Education(NRF-2013R1A1A2004898)"

  13. Pt, Au, Pd and Ru Partitioning Between Mineral and Silicate Melts: The Role of Metal Nanonuggets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malavergne, V.; Charon, E.; Jones, J.; Agranier, A.; Campbell, A.

    2012-01-01

    The partition coefficients of Pt and other Pt Group Elements (PGE) between metal and silicate D(sub Metal-Silicate) and also between silicate minerals and silicate melts D(sub Metal-Silicate) are among the most challenging coefficients to obtain precisely. The PGE are highly siderophile elements (HSE) with D(sub Metal-Silicate) >10(exp 3) due to the fact that their concentrations in silicates are very low (ppb to ppt range). Therefore, the analytical difficulty is increased by the possible presence of HSE-rich-nuggets in reduced silicate melts during experiments). These tiny HSE nuggets complicate the interpretation of measured HSE concentrations. If the HSE micro-nuggets are just sample artifacts, then their contributions should be removed before calculations of the final concentration. On the other hand, if they are produced during the quench, then they should be included in the analysis. We still don't understand the mechanism of nugget formation well. Are they formed during the quench by precipitation from precursor species dissolved homogeneously in the melts, or are they precipitated in situ at high temperature due to oversaturation? As these elements are important tracers of early planetary processes such as core formation, it is important to take up this analytical and experimental challenge. In the case of the Earth for example, chondritic relative abundances of the HSE in some mantle xenoliths have led to the concept of the "late veneer" as a source of volatiles (such as water) and siderophiles in the silicate Earth. Silicate crystal/liquid fractionation is responsible for most, if not all, the HSE variation in the martian meteorite suites (SNC) and Pt is the element least affected by these fractionations. Therefore, in terms of reconstructing mantle HSE abundances for Mars, Pt becomes a very important player. In the present study, we have performed high temperature experiments under various redox conditions in order to determine the abundances of Pt, Au

  14. Orogenic Au-mineralization during Proterozoic transpression in SW Tanzania: insights from three-dimensional frictional reactivation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawley, Christopher; Imber, Jonathan; Selby, David

    2013-04-01

    Au-mineralization in the western Lupa goldfield, SW Tanzania was associated with transpression and reverse sinistral slip along a network of steeply south-dipping shear zones with non-Andersonian geometries. Slip, synchronous with greenschist facies retrogression, was accommodated by frictional failure and sliding during emplacement of quartz ± Au-bearing veins, and by crystal plasticity and fluid-assisted diffusive mass transfer. The Kenge ore body is situated along a NW-SE trending shear zone and is characterized by < 10 m thick, Au-bearing fault-fill veins hosted by well-developed phyllosilicate-rich mylonites. The contemporaneous Porcupine ore body is situated along an ENE-WSW to E-W trending shear zone, which is characterized by narrow, discontinuous mylonites within a silicified and non-foliated granitoid protolith. Au-mineralization at Porcupine occurs within steeply-dipping fault-fill and sub-horizontal extension/oblique-extension veins. Three-dimensional frictional reactivation theory explains the different vein styles at Kenge and Porcupine, and extends the classic fault valve model to the general case of oblique slip along multiple, arbitrarily-oriented shear zones. Frictional reactivation of the Kenge shear zone is predicted to have occurred at supra-hydrostatic, but sub-lithostatic pore fluid pressures, whilst frictional reactivation of the shear zone hosting the Porcupine deposit took place at near-lithostatic fluid pressures. Furthermore, analysis of the differential stress required for frictional reactivation suggests that the Kenge shear zone was intrinsically weaker than that hosting the Porcupine ore body, a prediction consistent with the lack of well-developed phyllosilicate-rich shear zones at Porcupine. We hypothesize that near-lithostatic pore fluid pressures at the Porcupine ore body relieved effective normal stresses at grain-grain contacts, helping to preserve intra-granular and fracture porosity associated with partially-altered feldspar

  15. Minerals

    MedlinePlus

    Minerals are important for your body to stay healthy. Your body uses minerals for many different jobs, including building bones, making ... regulating your heartbeat. There are two kinds of minerals: macrominerals and trace minerals. Macrominerals are minerals your ...

  16. Se and Te mineralization in albitites and prospects of the metasomatites for Au, Salla-Kuolajarvi belt, Northern Karelia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinin, A. A.; Savchenko, Ye. E.; Selivanova, E. A.

    2014-03-01

    On the basis of the complex of geological features, the eastern flank of the Salla-Pana-Kuolajarvi belt is a prospect structure for gold mineralization in the U-bearing albitites and related acid and mafic metasomatites. Visible tellurides and selenides, which are typical of gold deposits of the Fe-Co-Au-U group in the adjacent territory of Finland within the Salla-Pana-Kuolajarvi belt, were found in the Ozerny occurrence as a result of studies. Native gold is found in association with tellurides. Molybdenite from the occurrence has a high Re content up to 0.3%.

  17. The Woxi W-Sb-Au deposit in Hunan, South China: An example of Late Proterozoic sedimentary exhalative (SEDEX) mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, X. X.; Zhang, Y. M.; Schulz, O.; Vavtar, F.; Liu, J. M.; Zheng, M. H.; Zheng, L.

    2012-09-01

    The Woxi W-Sb-Au deposit in Hunan, South China is hosted by Proterozoic metasedimentary rocks, a turbiditic sequence of graywacke, siltstone, sandy slate and slate. The deposit has two principal styles of mineralization: stratiform and stockwork. The stratiform ores, which account for about 75% of the total proven ore reserves, are composed predominantly of interbedded, massive to laminated Au-bearing quartz, stibnite, scheelite, pyrite, and silty clays. Fine layering, at the macro- to microscale, is the most striking feature of the ores, with individual mm- to cm-scale bands traceable over distances of several meters to a few hundred meters along strike. Structures indicative of soft-sediment deformation due to slumping and synsedimentary sliding are commonly observed in the banded ores and the barren quartz-carbonate beds in the adjacent host rocks. The stockwork mineralization accounts for about 25% of the total ore reserves and is restricted to a 3-10 m-thick zone immediately beneath the stratiform ores. It is characterized by numerous quartz + pyrite ± scheelite stringer veins that are either subparallel or near perpendicular to the overlying stratiform ore layers. Alteration at Woxi occurs as semiconformable, tabular blankets asymmetrically enveloping the orebodies along their entire length, and, is dominated by a quartz + sericite + chlorite ± carbonate assemblage. The footwall alteration is generally more intense and somewhat thicker than the hanging-wall alteration. Geochemical data show that, with distance above and below the mineralized horizons, contents of W, Au, As, and Sb systematically decrease, whereas concentrations of other trace elements such as Hf, Sc, Th, Ta, Y, Zr, Nb and REEs gradually increase. This may reflect a decreasing hydrothermal input in the sediments and an increasing dominance of detrital and seawater-derived components. The chondrite-normalized REE patterns of both bulk ores and individual minerals are comparable to those of

  18. Descriptive and geoenvironmental model for Co-Cu-Au deposits in metasedimentary rocks: Chapter G in Mineral deposit models for resource assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slack, John F.; Johnson, Craig A.; Causey, J. Douglas; Lund, Karen; Schulz, Klaus J.; Gray, John E.; Eppinger, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Additional geologically and compositionally similar deposits are known, but have average Co grades less than 0.1 percent. Most of these deposits contain cobalt-rich pyrite and lack appreciable amounts of distinct Co sulfide and (or) sulfarsenide minerals. Such deposits are not discussed in detail in the following sections, but these deposits may be revelant to the descriptive and genetic models presented below. Examples include the Scadding Au-Co-Cu deposit in Ontario, Canada; the Vähäjoki Co-Cu-Au deposit in Finland; the Tuolugou Co-Au deposit in Qinghai Province, China; the Lala Co-Cu-UREE deposit in Sichuan Province, China; the Guelb Moghrein Cu-Au-Co deposit in Mauritania; and the Great Australia Co-Cu, Greenmount Cu-Au-Co, and Monakoff Cu-Au-Co-UAg deposits in Queensland, Australia. Detailed information on these deposits is presented in appendix 2.

  19. Structural control and metamorphic setting of the shear zone-related Au vein mineralization of the Adola Belt (southern Ethiopia) and its tectono-genetic development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worku, H.

    1996-10-01

    Structural study of the Adola Belt shows that most of its known and potential Au deposits occur in quartz veins which are localised within shear contacts between lithological units, and along major shear zones that divide the Adola Belt into different lithostructural domains. Analysis of the shear zone-related ore bodies and their host volcano-sedimentary succession and gneisses indicates that Au mineralization in the Adola Belt is pre-dated by two stages of deformation and a regional prograde metamorphism. The first deformation event (D 1) is a fold-and-thrust event which is characterised by low-angle thrusts, associated recumbent folds and axial planar S 1 foliation, and is related to nappe-style deformation. The second event (D 2) has folded and/or reactivated the thrust-related structures and formed upright folds and high-angle reverse shear zones and is related to the collision event. Gold mineralization occurred over a prolonged deformation history but is closely related to alteration, retrograde greenschistfacies assemblages and brittle-ductile deformation of late D 2 and D 3 transpressional shear zones that accommodate regional shortening both by crustal thickening and lateral displacement. The mineralization occurs in associated dilational jogs or bends that might have formed during the lateral or vertical expulsion. The Au-hosting shear zones are characterised by extensive development of heterogeneous mylonitic fault rocks which reveals that the accompanied deformation is characterised by processes that can increase the porosity and permeability of the rocks within the shear zones. This gave rise to further extensive dilatancy within the major dilational jogs and produced a suitable structural regime for vein-hosted Au mineralization. This implies that the Au mineralization is epigenetic in origin and that it resulted from precipitation from metamorphic hydrothermal fluids circulating through major shear zones and associated structures late during the

  20. Using the concentration-volume (C-V) fractal model in the delineation of gold mineralized zones within the Tepeoba porphyry Cu-Mo-Au, Balikesir, NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumral, Mustafa; Abdelnasser, Amr; Karaman, Muhittin; Budakoglu, Murat

    2016-04-01

    The Tepeoba porphyry Cu-Mo-Au mineralization that located at the Biga peninsula (W Turkey) developed around the Eybek pluton concentrated at its southern contact. This mineralization that hosted in the hornfels rocks of Karakaya Complex is associated with three main alteration zones; potassic, phyllic and propylitic alterations along the fault controlled margins of the Eybek pluton and quartz stockwork veining as well as brecciation zones. As well as two mineralized zones were occurred in the mine area; hypogene and oxidation/supergene zone. The hypogene zone has differentiated alteration types; high potassic and low phyllic alteration, while the oxidation/supergene zone has high phyllic and propylitic alterations. This work deals with the delineation of gold mineralized zone within this porphyry deposit using the concentration-volume (C-V) fractal model. Five zones of gold were calculated using its power-law C-V relationship that revealed that the main phase of gold mineralization stated at 5.3083 ppm Au concentration. In addition, the C-V log-log plot shows that the highly and moderately Au mineralization zone developed in western part of deposit correlated with oxidation zone related to propylitic alteration. On the other hand, its weakly mineralization zone has a widespread in the hypogene zone related to potassic alteration. This refers to the enrichment of gold and depletion of copper at the oxidation/supergene zone is due to the oxidation/supergene alteration processes that enrich the deposits by the meteoric water. Keywords: Concentration-volume (C-V) fractal model; gold mineralized zone; Tepeoba porphyry Cu-Mo-Au; Balikesir; NW Turkey.

  1. Later stages of evolution of an epithermal system: Au-Ag mineralizations at Apigania Bay, Tinos Island, Cyclades, Hellas, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tombros, S. F.; St. Seymour, K.; Williams-Jones, A. E.; Spry, P. G.

    2008-11-01

    Precious metals accompany all types of epithermal deposits. In general, the largest of these deposits occur in intrusive or extrusive rocks of alkaline or calc-alkaline affinity. The Apigania Bay vein system and Au-Ag mineralization is hosted in Mesozoic marbles and schists, and is composed primarily of five nearly parallel, high-angle quartz veins that extend for at least 200 m. Gold-silver mineralization, in association with more than thirty ore and vein minerals, is developed in three stages and occurs at the contact of marbles and schists. Zones of epidote-chlorite-calcite and sericite-albite alteration are associated with precious metal-bearing milky and clear quartz veins. Fluid inclusion studies suggest that hydrothermal mineralization was deposited under hydrostatic pressures of 100 bars, at temperature of 120-235°C, from low to moderate, calcium-bearing, saline fluids of 0.2 to 6.8 equiv. wt.% NaCl. Calculated isotope compositions (δ18O = -4.7‰ to 1.7‰ and δD = -120‰ to -80‰) for waters in equilibrium with milky and clear quartz are consistent with mixing with dilute, low temperature meteoric ore fluids. Calculated δ 13CCO2 (0.6‰ to 1.1‰) and δ 34SH2S (-7.3 to -0.3‰) compositions of the ore fluids indicate exchange, in an open system, with a metasedimentary source. Gold and silver deposition was associated with degassing of hydrogen due to intense uplift of the mineralizing area. The physicochemical conditions of mineralization stages I to III range between 200°C and 150°C, f_{{text{S}}_2 } = 10^{ - 18.1} to 10-16.8, f_{{text{O}}_2 } = 10^{ - 44.0} to 10-41.5, pH = 6.9 to7.6, f_{{text{H}}_{text{2}} {text{S}}} = 10^{ - 3.4} to 10-2.6 and a_{{text{H}}_{text{2}} {text{S}}} = 10^{ - 2.7} to 10-2.6. Apigania Bay could be possibly considered the latest evolutional phase of Tinos hydrothermal system.

  2. Miocene strike-slip and normal fault controls on Au-Ag mineralization in the Talapoosa district, Lyon County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Dilles, P.A.; Carpenter, A.S.

    1993-04-01

    Structurally controlled epithermal stockwork Au-Ag mineralization formed at the intersection of three complexly interacting fault sets in intermediate Miocene volcanic rocks at the Talapoosa District (TD) on the western margin of the Walker Lane during the mid.-late Miocene. The TD lies at the intersection of the N 75[degree] W Talapoosa-Gooseberry (T-G) lineament with the N 70[degree] E Carson River fault system. Earliest high angle faults guided the dacite intrusive and early hydrothermal fluids. In response to increasing down to the south motion on these faults, first low angle then moderate angle striking, south dipping normal faults evolved. The Hematite fault separates argillized hanging wall from stockwork mineralized footwall in the Dyke zone, but is offset by the 40--65[degree] S dipping Talapoosa Fault (TF). The TF, traceable for over 1,500 m, is the primary conduit flooring tabular south dipping stockwork mineralization in the Bear Creek, Dyke and East Hill zones. The TF has accommodated at least 150 m of dip-slip motion, as well as repeated strike-slip and rare oblique-slip motions. High angle left-lateral and normal faults horsetail and flatten to moderate southerly dips creating mineralized brecciated zones where they merge with the TF in the Dyke zone. Significant post mineral faulting occurred on all fault sets as the core of the district was subsequently uplifted as a horst. Latest left-lateral and normal motions on faults displace the TF and Lousetown Fm. The authors preliminary interpretation of structural data is that low to moderate south dipping faults evolved above the intersection of right-lateral N 20-40[degree] W strike-slip faults of the Walker Lane bent toward (older ) N 75[degree] W faults of the T-G lineament. During and after mineralization left-lateral and normal faults of the Carson River system merged into and moved in concert with the Talapoosa fault, shattering hangingwall andesites and reacting older structures.

  3. Origin of epithermal Ag-Au-Cu-Pb-Zn mineralization in Guanajuato, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mango, Helen; Arehart, Greg; Oreskes, Naomi; Zantop, Half

    2014-01-01

    The Guanajuato epithermal district is one of the largest silver producers in Mexico. Mineralization occurs along three main vein systems trending dominantly northwest-southeast: the central Veta Madre, the La Luz system to the northwest, and the Sierra system to the east. Mineralization consists dominantly of silver sulfides and sulfosalts, base metal sulfides (mostly chalcopyrite, galena, sphalerite, and pyrite), and electrum. There is a broad zonation of metal distribution, with up to 10 % Cu+Pb+Zn in the deeper mines along the northern and central portions of the Veta Madre. Ore occurs in banded veins and breccias and as stockworks, with gangue composed dominantly of quartz and calcite. Host rocks are Mesozoic sedimentary and intrusive igneous rocks and Tertiary volcanic rocks. Most fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures are between 200 and 300 °C, with salinities below 4 wt.% NaCl equivalent. Fluid temperature and salinity decreased with time, from 290 to 240 °C and from 2.5 to 1.1 wt.% NaCl equivalent. Relatively constant fluid inclusion liquid-to-vapor ratios and a trend of decreasing salinity with decreasing temperature and with increasing time suggest dilution of the hydrothermal solutions. However, evidence of boiling (such as quartz and calcite textures and the presence of adularia) is noted along the Veta Madre, particularly at higher elevations. Fluid inclusion and mineralogical evidence for boiling of metal-bearing solutions is found in gold-rich portions of the eastern Sierra system; this part of the system is interpreted as the least eroded part of the district. Oxygen, carbon, and sulfur isotope analysis of host rocks, ore, and gangue minerals and fluid inclusion contents indicate a hydrothermal fluid, with an initial magmatic component that mixed over time with infiltrating meteoric water and underwent exchange with host rocks. Mineral deposition was a result of decreasing activities of sulfur and oxygen, decreasing temperature, increasing p

  4. Cu-Mo-Au Partitioning and Ore Mineral Solubility: Constraints on the Role of Temperature, Pressure, and Volatile Fugacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tattitch, Brian; Blundy, Jon

    2014-05-01

    The complex conditions under which volatile phases are exsolved from arc magmas play a key role in the formation of Porphyry Copper Deposits (PCD). Specifically, the efficiency by which ore metals are removed from melts by these 'proto-ore fluids', metal ratios in the fluid(s), the mass of metals available for transport, and ultimately deposit grades are affected by several key intensive variables and volatile fugacitites. Previous experiments have shown that fluid salinity [1] as well as sulfur content [2] can strongly affect the ore metal partitioning. In addition, more subtle parameters such as cation ratios (e.g Na/K/H - [3]) along with melt ASI and fH2S/fSO2, may influence both Cu and Au. We present experiments designed to constrain the role of key variables (T, P, fO2, fH2S, fSO2, δΣ Clv) in influencing metal partitioning on a suite of ore metals in equilibrium. In order to simulate complex, natural proto-ore fluids, we have performed CuFeS2-MoS2 saturated, Cu-Au-Mo-Re partitioning experiments using pumice from the Cardones Ignimbrite in northern Chile. These experiments examine fluid-melt-crystal partitioning and ore mineral solubility for a magmatic system similar to those found in major PCD. Experiments were performed at 100 & 200 MPa and super-solidus conditions (810 oC) in oxidized (NNO + 2) and reduced (NNO + 0.75) environments with respect to sulphur, as well as at near-solidus conditions (740 oC and NNO + 0.75). Observed Cu concentrations are consistent with Cl-dependent partitioning, modified by the presence of sulfur. The vapour/melt partitioning of Cu is enhanced by increased fH2S at reduced conditions at 810 oC, but returns to Cl-dependence for high fSO2 at oxidized conditions (DCuv/m decreases from 40 ± 20 to 10 ± 5). In contrast, molybdenum partitioning remains constant with changing fO2 (DMov/m = 3 ± 1 and 4 ± 2 respectively). This corresponds to a change in the vapour Cu/Mo ratio from ~40:1 down to ~1:1. The decrease in DCuv/m is likely

  5. Magmatic and structural controls on porphyry-style Cu-Au-Mo mineralization at Kemess South, Toodoggone District of British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duuring, Paul; Rowins, Stephen M.; McKinley, Bradley S. M.; Dickinson, Jenni M.; Diakow, Larry J.; Kim, Young-Seog; Creaser, Robert A.

    2009-05-01

    Kemess South is the only Cu-Au-Mo mine in the Toodoggone district and a major Cu and Au producer in British Columbia. Porphyry-style Cu-Au-Mo mineralization is mainly hosted by the tabular, SW-plunging, 199.6 ± 0.6-Ma Maple Leaf granodiorite, which intrudes tightly folded, SW-dipping, Permian Asitka Group siltstone and limestone and homogeneous Triassic Takla Group basalt. Southwest-dipping 194.0 ± 0.4-Ma Toodoggone Formation conglomerate, volcaniclastic, and epiclastic rocks overlie the granodiorite and Asitka Group rocks. Minor Cu-Au-Mo mineralization is hosted by the immediate Takla Group basalt country rock, whereas low-tonnage high-grade Cu zones occur beneath a 30-m-thick leached capping in supergene-altered granodiorite and in exotic positions in overlying Toodoggone Formation conglomerate. Granodiorite has an intrusive contact with mineralized and altered Takla Group basalt but displays a sheared contact with unmineralized and less altered Asitka Group siltstone. The North Block fault is a deposit-scale, E-striking, steeply S-dipping normal fault that juxtaposes the granodiorite/basalt ore body against unmineralized Asitka Group rocks. Younger NW- and NE-striking normal-dextral faults cut all rock types, orebodies, and the North Block fault with displacements of up to 100 m and result in the graben-and-horst-style block faulting of the stratigraphy and ore body. Both basalt and granodiorite host comparable vein sequence and alteration histories, with minor variations in hydrothermal mineral assemblages caused by differing protolith chemistry. Early potassic alteration (and associated early-stage Cu ± Au ± Mo mineralization) is partly replaced by phyllic and intermediate argillic alteration associated with main-stage Cu-Au-Mo mineralization. Two main-stage veins have Re-Os molybdenite ages of 201.3 ± 1.2 and 201.1 ± 1.2 Ma. These mineralization ages overlap the 199.6 ± 0.6-Ma U-Pb zircon crystallization age for the Maple Leaf granodiorite. Late

  6. Minerals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fish require the same minerals or inorganic elements as terrestrial animals for tissue formation, osmoregulation and various metabolic functions. Those required in large quantities are termed macro- or major minerals and those required in small quantities are called micro- or trace minerals. Fish ca...

  7. Late Cretaceous (ca. 90 Ma) adakitic intrusive rocks in the Kelu area, Gangdese Belt (southern Tibet): Slab melting and implications for Cu-Au mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zi-Qi; Wang, Qiang; Li, Zheng-Xiang; Wyman, Derek A.; Tang, Gong-Jian; Jia, Xiao-Hui; Yang, Yue-Heng

    2012-07-01

    The Gangdese Belt in southern Tibet (GBST) is a major Cu-Au-Mo mineralization zone that mostly formed after the India-Asia collision in association with the small-volume, though widespread, Miocene (18-10 Ma) adakitic porphyries. Cu-Au mineralization has scarcely been found in the regional Jurassic-Early Tertiary batholiths related to subduction of the Neo-Tethyan oceanic plate. Here, we report petrological, zircon geochronological and geochemical data for Late Cretaceous (˜90 Ma) intrusive rocks that contain Cu-Au mineralization from the Kelu area in the GBST. These rocks consist of quartz monzonites and diorites. The quartz monzonites, with SiO2 of 58-59 wt.% and Na2O/K2O of 1.1-1.2, are geochemically similar to slab-derived adakites characterized by apparent depletions in heavy rare earth elements (e.g., Yb = 1.4-1.5 ppm) and Y (16-18 ppm) contents, positive Sr but negative Nb and Ti anomalies on multi-element variation diagrams. They have relatively low (87Sr/86Sr)i (0.7038-0.7039) ratios and high ɛNd(t) (+3.4 to +3.9) and in situ zircon ɛHf(t) (+9.3 to +15.8) values. The diorites exhibit high Mg-numbers (0.57-0.61) similar to those of magnesian andesites, and have (87Sr/86Sr)i (0.7040-0.7041) and ɛNd(t) (+3.0 to +4.4) values similar to those of the quartz monzonites. We suggest that the quartz monzonitic magmas were most likely generated by partial melting of the subducted Neo-Tethyan basaltic oceanic crust and minor associated oceanic sediments, with subsequent melt-mantle interaction, and the dioritic magmas were mainly derived by the interaction between slab melts and mantle wedge peridotites, with fractionation of apatite and hornblende. These slab-derived adakitic magmas have high oxygen fugacity that may have facilitated Cu-Au mineralization. The close association of the Late Cretaceous adakitic intrusive rocks and Cu-Au mineralization in the Kelu area suggests that the arc magmatic rocks in the GBST may have higher potential than previously thought

  8. Composition and source of salinity of ore-bearing fluids in Cu-Au systems of the Carajás Mineral Province, Brazil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xavier, Roberto; Rusk, Brian; Emsbo, Poul; Monteiro, Lena

    2009-01-01

    The composition and Cl/Br – NaCl ratios of highly saline aqueous inclusions from large tonnage (> 100 t) IOCG deposits (Sossego, Alvo 118, and Igarapé Bahia) and a Paleoproterozoic intrusion-related Cu-Au-(Mo-W-Bi-Sn) deposit (Breves; < 50 Mt)) in the Carajás Mineral Province have been analysed by LA-ICP-MS and ion chromatography. In both Cu-Au systems, brine inclusions are Ca-dominated (5 to 10 times more than in porphyry Cu-Au fluids), and contain percent level concentrations of Na and K. IOCG inclusion fluids, however, contain higher Sr, Ba, Pb, and Zn concentrations, but significantly less Bi, than the intrusion-related Breves inclusion fluids. Cu is consistently below detection limits in brine inclusions from the IOCG and intrusion-related systems and Fe was not detected in the latter. Cl/Br and Na/Cl ratios of the IOCG inclusion fluids range from entirely evaporative brines (bittern fluids; e.g. Igarapé Bahia and Alvo 118) to values that indicate mixing with magma-derived brines. Cl/Br and Na/Cl ratios of the Breves inclusion fluids strongly suggest the involvement of magmatic brines, but that possibly also incorporated bittern fluids. Collectively, these data demonstrate that residual evaporative and magmatic brines were important components of the fluid regime involved in the formation of Cu-Au systems in the Carajás Mineral Province.

  9. Minerals

    MedlinePlus

    ... your body needs in larger amounts. They include calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, sodium, potassium, chloride and sulfur. Your body needs just small amounts of trace minerals. These include iron, manganese, copper, iodine, zinc, cobalt, fluoride and selenium. The best way to ...

  10. Fluid processes in the Tesbihdere base-metal-Au deposit: Implications for epithermal mineralization in the Biga Peninsula, NW Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozkaya, Gulcan; Banks, David; Ozbas, Fatih; Wallington, Jon

    2014-06-01

    Tesbihdere is one of a number of spatially close epithermal Cu-Pb-Zn-Ag-Au deposits hosted by andesites and rhyolites, typical of deposits in the Biga peninsula. Microthermometry of fluid inclusions shows a wide range of temperatures, ˜360-170°C, and salinities, ˜10-0.5 wt.% NaCl, in the different deposits studied. Dilution of a moderately saline magmatic? fluid with meteoric water occurred at constant temperature indicating, the temperature of both fluids was controlled by the geological environment. Boiling was not a major factor, but did occur in very minor amounts. The large range of temperatures within individual samples can only reasonably be explained by variations from near lithostatic to hydrostatic pressure during vein and fracture opening. That this pressure decrease did not produce extensive boiling suggests that vein opening was gradual rather than aggressive, allowing the pressure and temperature decrease to follow a path close to the L-V boiling curve. P-T reconstruction places emplacement of these ore veins at between 300-500 m beneath the surface. Similarities of LA-ICPMS of fluid inclusions from Tesbihdere, Azitepe and Basmakci, supports the conclusion that they were part of the same contemporaneous mineralizing system. The fluids are dominated by Na, with the concentrations of K>Ca>Mg combined equivalent to the concentration of Na. The range of K/Na ratios is not consistent with the fluid inclusion temperatures as the calculated temperatures are significantly higher indicating the fluids were not close to equilibrium with the enclosing rocks. Elevated K concentrations are consistent with acid-sulphate waters in shallow epithermal systems. Ore metals Cu, Zn and Pb are present in significant concentrations ˜500, 300 and 200 ppm respectively and the low Fe/Mn ratios are indicative of a relatively oxidising fluid. The negative δ 34S values of sulphides are consistent with boiling and oxidising redox conditions.

  11. Carbonate-replacement Pb-Zn-Ag ± Au mineralization in the Kamariza area, Lavrion, Greece: Mineralogy and thermochemical conditions of formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voudouris, P.; Melfos, V.; Spry, P. G.; Bonsall, T. A.; Tarkian, M.; Solomos, Ch.

    2008-09-01

    Carbonate-replacement Pb-Zn-Ag ± Au deposits in the Kamariza area, Lavrion district, Attica, Greece, are genetically related to the emplacement of Miocene andesitic dikes within a rapidly extending continental back-arc basin, which formed during exhumation of the Attic-Cycladic Crystalline Belt. Replacement veins as well as chimneys and mantos of massive sulfides are the major orebody types with mantos grading into chimneys and veins. Ore minerals are similar among the various types of orebodies in the Kamariza area and consist of sulfides and sulfarsenides (pyrite, arsenopyrite, chalcopyrite, galena, sphalerite, gersdorffite, marcasite), native metals (Au and Bi), Sn-bearing phases (petrukite), sulfosalts and sulfbismuthites of Ag, Bi, Cu, Pb, As, Sb (tetrahedrite-group minerals, bournonite, boulangerite, stephanite, pyrargyrite, semseyite, enargite, bismuthinite, lillianite homologues, Cu-matildite, aikinite, Ag-aikinite, mummeite, emplectite, wittichenite). The elemental association of Bi, Au, and Ag is common. The assemblages gersdorffite-bismuthinite-native gold and native gold-native bismuth are evidence for a contribution of magmatic components to the hydrothermal system. A fluctuation in the sulfidation states of the ore fluid during the evolution of the Kamariza system is evident from the deposition of early arsenopyrite, as well as of enargite-luzonite and both low-Fe and Fe-rich sphalerite in the same samples. Microthermometry of fluid inclusion assemblages show that carbonate replacement mineralization was deposited from a warm to hot (100°C to 400°C), low to moderately saline (1.8 to 17.3 wt% NaCl equiv) fluid. Eutectic temperatures of fluid inclusions as low as -55°C suggest the presence of CaCl2 in addition to NaCl, in the ore fluid. The Kamariza deposit occurs distal to the Plaka granodiorite intrusion and the associated porphyry-Mo mineralization, but is likely to be genetically related to a granitoid buried at depth.

  12. Silver-rich telluride mineralization at Mount Charlotte and Au-Ag zonation in the giant Golden Mile deposit, Kalgoorlie, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Andreas G.; Muhling, Janet R.

    2013-03-01

    The gold deposits at Kalgoorlie in the 2.7-Ga Eastern Goldfields Province of the Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia, occur adjacent to the D2 Golden Mile Fault over a strike of 8 km within a district-scale zone marked by porphyry dykes and chloritic alteration. The late Golden Pike Fault separates the older (D2) shear zone system of the Golden Mile (1,500 t Au) in the southeast from the younger (D4) quartz vein stockworks at Mt Charlotte (126 t Au) in the northwest. Both deposits occur in the Golden Mile Dolerite sill and display inner sericite-ankerite alteration and early-stage gold-pyrite mineralization replacing the wall rocks. Late-stage tellurides account for 20 % of the total gold in the first, but for <1 % in the second deposit. In the Golden Mile, the main telluride assemblage is coloradoite + native gold (898-972 fine) + calaverite + petzite ± krennerite. Telluride-rich ore (>30 g/t Au) is characterized by Au/Ag = 2.54 and As/Sb = 2.6-30, the latter ratio caused by arsenical pyrite. Golden Mile-type D2 lodes occur northwest of the Golden Pike Fault, but the Hidden Secret orebody, the only telluride bonanza mined (10,815 t at 44 g/t Au), was unusually rich in silver (Au/Ag = 0.12-0.35) due to abundant hessite. We describe another array of silver-rich D2 shear zones which are part of the Golden Mile Fault exposed on the Mt Charlotte mine 22 level. They are filled with crack-seal and pinch-and-swell quartz-carbonate veins and are surrounded by early-stage pyrite + pyrrhotite disseminated in a sericite-ankerite zone more than 6 m wide. Gold grade (0.5-0.8 g/t) varies little across the zone, but Au/Ag (0.37-2.40) and As/Sb (1.54-13.9) increase away from the veins. Late-stage telluride mineralization (23 g/t Au) sampled in one vein has a much lower Au/Ag (0.13) and As/Sb (0.48) and comprises scheelite, pyrite, native gold (830-854 fine), hessite, and minor pyrrhotite, altaite, bournonite, and boulangerite. Assuming 250-300 °C, gold-hessite compositions

  13. Geology, mineralization, and fluid inclusion characteristics of the Kumbel oxidized W-Cu-Mo skarn and Au-W stockwork deposit in Kyrgyzstan, Tien Shan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soloviev, Serguei G.

    2015-02-01

    The Kumbel deposit is located within a metallogenic belt of W-Mo, Cu-Mo, Au-W, and Au deposits along the Late Paleozoic active continental margin of Tien Shan. The deposit is related to a Late Carboniferous multiphase pluton, with successive intrusive phases from early olivine monzogabbro through monzonite-quartz monzonite to granodiorite and granite, with the latest monzogabbro-porphyry dikes. The deposit represents an example of a complex W-Cu-Mo-Au magmatic-hydrothermal system related to magnetite-series high-K calc-alkaline to shoshonitic igneous suite. It contains large bodies of W-Cu-Mo oxidized prograde and retrograde skarns, with abundant andradite garnet, magnetite, and especially hematite, as well as K-feldspar, molybdoscheelite, chalcopyrite, and molybdenite, with transitions to zones of intense quartz-K-feldspar (with minor andradite and hematite) veining. The skarns are cut by quartz-carbonate ± adularia ± sericite veins (locally sheeted) and stockworks bearing scheelite and minor Cu, Zn, Pb sulfides, as well as Au, Bi, Te, and As mineralization. The association of these veins with the oxidized skarns and magnetite-series intrusion is consistent with the general oxidized, intrusion-related W-Mo-Cu-Au type of deposit, with an affinity to the alkalic (silica-saturated) Cu-Au ± Mo porphyry deposits. The fluid inclusion data show the predominance of magmatic-hydrothermal aqueous chloride fluid during the formation of skarns and quartz-carbonate-scheelite-sulfide veins. The high fluid pressures (˜1,750 bars), together with their high temperature (up to 600 °C) and high salinity (˜50-60 wt% NaCl-equiv.), suggest the formation of skarns and quartz-K-feldspar-andradite-hematite veins under conditions typical of magmatic-hydrothermal transition (depth of ≥4-5 km) of intrusion-related mineralized system, possibly by exsolution of the fluids from crystallizing magma. The auriferous quartz-carbonate-scheelite-sulfide veins formed from high to moderate

  14. Pb-Sr-Nd isotopes in surficial materials at the Pebble Porphyry Cu-Au-Mo Deposit, Southwestern Alaska: can the mineralizing fingerprint be detected through cover?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ayuso, Robert A.; Kelley, Karen D.; Eppinger, Robert G.; Forni, Francesca

    2013-01-01

    The Cretaceous Pebble porphyry Cu-Au-Mo deposit is covered by tundra and glacigenic sediments. Pb-Sr-Nd measurements were done on sediments and soils to establish baseline conditions prior to the onset of mining operations and contribute to the development of exploration methods for concealed base metal deposits of this type. Pebble rocks have a moderate range for 206Pb/204Pb = 18.574 to 18.874, 207Pb/204Pb = 15.484 to 15.526, and 208,Pb/204Pb = 38.053 to 38.266. Mineralized granodiorite shows a modest spread in 87Sr/86Sr (0.704354–0.707621) and 143Nd/144Nd (0.512639–0.512750). Age-corrected (89 Ma) values for the granodiorite yield relatively unradiogenic Pb (e.g., 207Pb/204Pb 87Sr/86Sr, and positive values of ɛNd (1.00–4.52) that attest to a major contribution of mantle-derived source rocks. Pond sediments and soils have similar Pb isotope signatures and 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd values that resemble the mineralized granodiorites. Glacial events have obscured the recognition of isotope signatures of mineralized rocks in the sediments and soils. Baseline radiogenic isotope compositions, prior to the onset of mining operations, reflect natural erosion, transport and deposition of heterogeneous till sheets that included debris from barren rocks, mineralized granodiorite and sulfides from the Pebble deposit, and other country rocks that pre- and postdate the mineralization events. Isotopic variations suggest that natural weathering of the deposit is generally reflected in these surficial materials. The isotope data provide geochemical constraints to glimpse through the extensive cover and together with other geochemical observations provide a vector to concealed mineralized rocks genetically linked with the Pebble deposit.

  15. A monoclinic, pseudo-orthorhombic Au-Hg mineral of potential economic significance in Pleistocene Snake River alluvial deposits of southeastern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Desborough, G.A.; Foord, E.E.

    1992-01-01

    A mineral with the approximate composition of Au94Hg6 - Au88Hg12 (atomic %) has been identified in Pleistocene Snake River alluvial deposits. The gold-mercury mineral occurs as very small grains or as polycrystalline masses composed of subhedral to nearly euhedral attached crystals. Vibratory cold-polishing techniques with 0.05-??m alumina abrasive for polished sections revealed a porous internal texture for most subhedral crystals after 48-72 hours of treatment. Thus, optical character (isotropic or anisotropic) could not be determined by reflected-light microscopy, and pore-free areas were too small for measurement of reflectance. X-ray-diffraction lines rather than individual reflections (spots), on powder camera X-ray films of unrotated spindles of single grains that morphologically appear to be single crystals, indicate that individual subhedral or euhedral crystals are composed of domains in random orientation. Thus, no material was found suitable for single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies. -from Authors

  16. Two-dimensional Mineral [Pb2BiS3 ][AuTe2 ]: High mobility Charge Carriers in Single-atom-thick Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Lei; Im, J.; Stoumpos, C.; Shi, F.; Dravid, V.; Leroux, M.; Freeman, A.; Kwok, W.-K.,; Chung, D.-Y.; Kanatzidis, M.

    2015-03-01

    We report that [Pb2BiS3][AuTe2], known as a naturally occurring mineral buckhornite, hosts 2D carriers in single-atom-thick layers. The structure is composed of stacking layers of weakly coupled [Pb2BiS3] and [AuTe2] sheets. The insulating [Pb2BiS3] sheet inhibits interlayer charge hopping and confines the carriers in the basal plane of the single-atom-thick [AuTe2] layer. Magneto-transport measurements and theoretical calculations show a property of multiband semimetal with compensated density of electrons and holes, which exhibit high hole carrier mobility of 1360 cm2/Vs. This material possesses an extremely large anisotropy 104, comparable to benchmark materials graphite. The electronic structure features linear band dispersion at the Fermi level and ultrahigh Fermi velocities of 106 m/s which are virtually identical to that of graphene. The weak interlayer coupling gives rise to the highly cleavable property of single crystal specimens, indicating a prospect for monolayer system. This research was supported by the DoE, BES, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357, and NUANCE Center at the Northwestern Univeristy.

  17. Two-dimensional mineral [Pb2BiS3][AuTe2]: high-mobility charge carriers in single-atom-thick layers.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lei; Im, Jino; Stoumpos, Constantinos C; Shi, Fengyuan; Dravid, Vinayak; Leroux, Maxime; Freeman, Arthur J; Kwok, Wai-Kwong; Chung, Duck Young; Kanatzidis, Mercouri

    2015-02-18

    Two-dimensional (2D) electronic systems are of wide interest due to their richness in chemical and physical phenomena and potential for technological applications. Here we report that [Pb2BiS3][AuTe2], known as the naturally occurring mineral buckhornite, hosts 2D carriers in single-atom-thick layers. The structure is composed of stacking layers of weakly coupled [Pb2BiS3] and [AuTe2] sheets. The insulating [Pb2BiS3] sheet inhibits interlayer charge hopping and confines the carriers in the basal plane of the single-atom-thick [AuTe2] layer. Magneto-transport measurements on synthesized samples and theoretical calculations show that [Pb2BiS3][AuTe2] is a multiband semimetal with a compensated density of electrons and holes, which exhibits a high hole carrier mobility of ∼1360 cm(2)/(V s). This material possesses an extremely large anisotropy, Γ = ρ(c)/ρ(ab) ≈ 10(4), comparable to those of the benchmark 2D materials graphite and Bi2Sr2CaCu2O(6+δ). The electronic structure features linear band dispersion at the Fermi level and ultrahigh Fermi velocities of 10(6) m/s, which are virtually identical to those of graphene. The weak interlayer coupling gives rise to the highly cleavable property of the single crystal specimens. Our results provide a novel candidate for a monolayer platform to investigate emerging electronic properties. PMID:25612093

  18. Biomimetic layer-by-layer Co-mineralization approach towards TiO2/Au nanosheets with high rate performance for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Bo; Yan, Yong; Wang, Xiaobo; Chen, Ge

    2013-10-01

    We fabricated a sandwich-like branched-polyethyleneimine (b-PEI)/TiO2/Au/graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposite through a biomimetic layer-by-layer co-mineralization approach, and the polymer b-PEI was believed to act as both an inducing agent for the hydrolysis of titanium bis(ammonium lactato)-dihydroxide (Ti-BALDH) and a reducing agent for the reduction of HAuCl4 in the synthetic procedure. Upon organic pyrolysis in air at 500 °C, a TiO2/Au nanosheet was formed; and gold nanocrystals were observed uniformly dispersed on TiO2 nanosheet. Moreover, the obtained TiO2/Au nanosheets demonstrated an enhanced lithium storage performance when they are used as anode materials for lithium ion batteries (LIBs), particularly, a high capacity of 205 mA h g-1 and 189 mA h g-1 was obtained at 5 C and 10 C rate, respectively, indicating the high rate capability of the material. The greatly improved rate performance might be attributed from both the sheet-like nanostructure and the existence of uniformly dispersed gold nanocrystals, which facilitate electron transfer and lithium ions diffusion in the material. The result suggests that the TiO2 electrode performance can be improved through a design of sheet-like nanocomposites using a bio-inspired route, which is desirable for both ``green synthesis'' and application for high power LIBs, moreover, such a benign bio-inspired route can be developed into a general pathway to synthesize many other TiO2 based nanocomposites for broad applications in the fields of batteries, photoelectrochemistry, photocatalysis and dye-sensitized solar cells.We fabricated a sandwich-like branched-polyethyleneimine (b-PEI)/TiO2/Au/graphene oxide (GO) nanocomposite through a biomimetic layer-by-layer co-mineralization approach, and the polymer b-PEI was believed to act as both an inducing agent for the hydrolysis of titanium bis(ammonium lactato)-dihydroxide (Ti-BALDH) and a reducing agent for the reduction of HAuCl4 in the synthetic procedure. Upon organic

  19. Stable isotope systematics and fluid inclusion studies in the Cu-Au Visconde deposit, Carajás Mineral Province, Brazil: implications for fluid source generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Costa Silva, Antonia Railine; Villas, Raimundo Netuno Nobre; Lafon, Jean-Michel; Craveiro, Gustavo Souza; Ferreira, Valderez Pinto

    2015-06-01

    The Cu-Au Visconde deposit is located in the Carajás Mineral Province (CMP), northern Brazil, near the contact between the ca. 2.76 Ga metavolcano-sedimentary rocks of the Itacaiunas Supergroup rocks and the ~3.0 Ga granitic-gneissic basement. It is hosted by mylonitized Archean rocks, mainly metadacites, the Serra Dourada granite, and gabbros/diorites, which have been successively altered by sodic, sodic-calcic-magnesian, potassic, and calcic-magnesian hydrothermal processes, producing diverse mineralogical associations (albite-scapolite; albite-actinolite-scapolite-epidote; K-feldspar-biotite; chlorite-actinolite-epidote-calcite, etc.). Chalcopyrite is the dominant ore mineral and occurs principally in breccias and veins/veinlets. The aqueous fluids responsible for the alteration/mineralization were initially hot (>460 °C) and very saline (up to 58 wt.% equivalent (equiv.) NaCl), but as the system evolved, they experienced successive dilution processes. Mineral oxygen and hydrogen isotope data show that 18O-rich ( to +9.4 ‰) fluids prevailed in the earlier alteration (including magnetitites) and reached temperatures as high as 410-355 °C. Metamorphic/formation waters, most likely derived from the Carajás Basin rocks, appear to have contributed a major component to the fluid composition, although some magmatic input cannot be discounted. In turn, the later alterations and the mineralization involved cooler (<230 °C), 18O-depleted ( to +3.7 ‰) and less saline (7-30 wt.% equiv. NaCl) fluids, indicating the influx of meteoric water. Fluid dilution and cooling might have caused abundant precipitation of sulfides, especially as breccia cement. Ore δ 34 S values (+0.5 to +3.4 ‰) suggest a magmatic source for sulfur (from sulfide dissolution in pre-existing igneous rocks). The chalcopyrite Pb-Pb ages (2.73 ± 0.15 and 2.74 ± 0.10 Ga) indicate that the Visconde mineralization is Neoarchean, rather than Paleoproterozoic as previously considered. If so, the

  20. Involvement of magmatic fluids at the Laloki and Federal Flag massive sulfide Cu-Zn-Au-Ag deposits, Astrolabe mineral district, Papua New Guinea: sulfur isotope evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noku, Shadrach K.; Espi, Joseph O.; Matsueda, Hiroharu

    2015-01-01

    We present the first sulfur (S) isotope data of sulfides, sulfates, pyrite in host mudstone, and bulk sulfur of gabbroic rocks from the Laloki and Federal Flag massive Cu-Zn-Au-Ag deposits in the Astrolabe mineral district, Papua New Guinea. Early-stage pyrite-marcasite, chalcopyrite, and sphalerite from Laloki display wide range of δ34S values from -4.5 to +7.0 ‰ ( n = 16). Late-stage pyrite, chalcopyrite, and sphalerite have restricted δ34S values of -1.9 to +4.7 ‰ ( n = 16). The mineralizing stage these correspond to had moderately saline (5.9-8.4 NaCl eq. wt%) mineralizing fluids of possible magmatic origin. A single analysis of late-stage barite has a value of δ34S +17.9 ‰, which is likely similar to coexisting seawater sulfate. Pyrite from the foot-wall mudstone at Laloki has very light δ34S values of -36.1 to -33.8 ‰ ( n = 2), which suggest an organic source for S. Pyrite-marcasite and chalcopyrite from Federal Flag show δ34S values of -2.4 to -1.9 ‰ ( n = 2), consistent with a magmatic origin, either leached from intrusive magmatic rocks or derived from magmatic-hydrothermal fluids. The very narrow range and near-zero δ34S values (-1.0 to +0.6 ‰) of bulk gabbroic samples is consistent with mantle-derived magmatic S. Sulfur isotope characteristics of sulfides and sulfates are, however, very similar to base metal sulfide accumulations associated with modern volcanic arcs and sedimented mid-ocean ridges. The most reasonable interpretation is that the range of the sulfide and sulfate δ34S values from both Laloki and Federal Flag massive sulfide deposits is indicative of the complex interaction of magmatic fluids, seawater, gabbroic rocks, and mudstone.

  1. New constraints on the origin of the Skaergaard intrusion Cu-Pd-Au mineralization: Insights from high-resolution X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godel, Bélinda; Rudashevsky, Nikolay S.; Nielsen, Troels F. D.; Barnes, Stephen J.; Rudashevsky, Vladimir N.

    2014-03-01

    This contribution presents the first detailed three-dimensional (3D) in situ analysis of samples from the Platinova Reef using high-resolution X-ray computed tomography (HRXCT) and 3D image processing and quantification coupled with microscopic and mineralogical investigations. Our HRXCT analyses reveal the complex textural relationships between Cu-rich sulfides (bulk composition close to bornite), skaergaardite (PdCu), Au-rich phases, silicates and Fe-Ti oxides and provide unequivocal textural evidences, not observed previously. The association in 3D between Cu-rich sulfide globules, PdCu alloy and ilmenite is inconsistent with a hydrothermal origin of the Cu-Pd mineralization. In contrast, our results combined with phase diagrams strongly support a primary magmatic origin for the Cu-Pd mineralization where Cu and Pd-rich, Fe-poor sulfide liquid represents a cumulus phase that forms by in-situ nucleation. These sulfide droplets and attached skaergaardite grains were trapped during the formation and crystallization of the Fe-Ti oxides. Subsequent, post-cumulus processes led to the partial to total dissolution of the sulfide not entirely enclosed by the Fe-Ti oxides (i.e., not protected from reaction) leading to the observed variability in Cu and Pd composition at the aggregate (sulfide + PdCu) scale and to the occurrence of free PdCu alloys. In contrast to the PdCu alloy, gold-bearing minerals are never observed entirely enclosed within the Fe-Ti oxide. Two hypotheses can be envisaged for the formation of the gold enriched layer in the upper part of the section. Gold may have either precipitated from high-temperature late magmatic Cl-rich fluids. Alternatively, gold may have been enriched during fractional crystallization after sulfide had been suppressed from the liquidus after the Pd layer crystallized and then deposited along redox barriers.

  2. Mineralogical, stable isotope, and fluid inclusion studies of spatially related porphyry Cu and epithermal Au-Te mineralization, Fakos Peninsula, Limnos Island, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornadel, Andrew P.; Voudouris, Panagiotis Ch.; Spry, Paul G.; Melfos, Vasilios

    2012-05-01

    The Fakos porphyry Cu and epithermal Au-Te deposit, Limnos Island, Greece, is hosted in a ~20 Ma quartz monzonite and shoshonitic subvolcanic rocks that intruded middle Eocene to lower Miocene sedimentary basement rocks. Metallic mineralization formed in three stages in quartz and quartz-calcite veins. Early porphyry-style (Stage 1) metallic minerals consist of pyrite, chalcopyrite, galena, bornite, sphalerite, molybdenite, and iron oxides, which are surrounded by halos of potassic and propylitic alteration. Stage 2 mineralization is composed mostly of quartz-tourmaline veins associated with sericitic alteration and disseminated pyrite and molybdenite, whereas Stage 3, epithermal-style mineralization is characterized by polymetallic veins containing pyrite, chalcopyrite, sphalerite, galena, enargite, bournonite, tetrahedrite-tennantite, hessite, petzite, altaite, an unknown cervelleite-like Ag-telluride, native Au, and Au-Ag alloy. Stage 3 veins are spatially associated with sericitic and argillic alteration. Fluid inclusions in quartz from Stage 1 (porphyry-style) mineralization contain five types of inclusions. Type I, liquid-vapor inclusions, which homogenize at temperatures ranging from 189.5°C to 403.3°C have salinities of 14.8 to 19.9 wt. % NaCl equiv. Type II, liquid-vapor-NaCl, Type III liquid-vapor-NaCl-XCl2 (where XCl is an unknown chloride phase, likely CaCl2), and Type IV, liquid-vapor-hematite ± NaCl homogenize to the liquid phase by liquid-vapor homogenization or by daughter crystal dissolution at temperatures of 209.3 to 740.5 °C, 267.6 to 780.8 °C, and 357.9 to 684.2 °C, respectively, and, Type V, vapor-rich inclusions. Stage 2 veins are devoid of interpretable fluid inclusions. Quartz from Stage 3 (epithermal-style) veins contains two types of fluid inclusions, Type I, liquid-vapor inclusions that homogenize to the liquid phase (191.6 to 310.0 °C) with salinities of 1.40 to 9.73 wt. % NaCl equiv., and Type II, vapor-rich inclusions. Mixing

  3. Cu-Mo-Au mineralization in Qarachilar area, Qaradagh batholith (NW Iran): Fluid inclusion and stable isotope studies and Re-Os dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmonds, Vartan; Moazzen, Mohssen

    2015-04-01

    The Qaradagh batholith is located in NW Iran, neighboring the Meghri-Ordubad granitoid in southern Armenia. This magmatic complex is emplaced in the northwestern part of the Urumieh-Dokhtar magmatic arc, which formed through north-eastward subduction of Neo-Tethyan oceanic crust beneath the central Iranian domain in the late-Mesozoic and early-Cenozoic and hosts most of the porphyry copper deposits and prospects in Iran, such as Sarcheshmeh and Sungun. The Qaradagh batholith is comprised of Eocene-Oligocene intrusive rocks occurring as multi-episode stocks, where the dominant rock type is granodiorite. Hydrothermal alterations have also occurred in these rocks including potassic, phyllic-sericitic, argillic and propylitic alterations and silicification. These alterations are accompanied by vein-type and disseminated Cu, Mo and Au mineralization. The Qarachilar area is located in the central part of the Qaradagh batholith, which hosts mono-mineralic and quartz-sulfide veins and veinlets (several mm to <1 m thick and 50-700 m long) and silicic zones containing Cu-Mo-Au-Ag ore minerals (mainly pyrite, chalcopyrite and molybdenite). Microthermometric studies on the fluid inclusions of quartz-sulfide veins-veinlets show that the salinity ranges between 15-70 wt% NaCl, with the highest peak between 35-40 wt% NaCl. The homogenization temperature for primary 2-phase and multi-phase inclusions ranges between 220 and 540 °C. Two-phase inclusions homogenizing by vapor disappearance have TH values between 280 and 440 °C (mainly between 300 and 360 °C). A few of them homogenize into vapor state with TH values of 440-540 °C. Multi-phase inclusions show 3 types of homogenization. Most of them homogenize by simultaneous disappearance of vapor bubble and dissolution of halite daughter crystal, for which the TH value is 240-420 °C (mostly between 260 and 340 °C). Those homogenizing by halite dissolution show TH values about 220-360 °C and a few homogenizing by vapor

  4. Selective copper diffusion into quartz-hosted vapor inclusions: Evidence from other host minerals, driving forces, and consequences for Cu-Au ore formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jung Hun; Heinrich, Christoph A.

    2013-07-01

    Recent experimental studies have raised concerns that Cu concentrations in quartz-hosted fluid inclusions from magmatic-hydrothermal ore deposits do not represent pristine concentrations in the trapped fluids, but are modified by post-entrapment diffusional exchange through the host quartz. New microanalyses of fluid inclusions hosted in topaz show significantly lower Cu concentrations in vapor inclusions, compared to otherwise identical inclusions hosted by coexisting quartz, whereas coeval brine (hypersaline liquid) inclusions are very similar independent of host mineral in one sample. Sulfur is present as a major component in all vapor inclusions, as in most porphyry-related vapor inclusions, and Cu never exceeds S, but commonly matches the S content at a molar ratio of Cu:S ⩽ 2 in vapor inclusions hosted by quartz. Univalent ions with a radius smaller than ˜1 Å are known to diffuse rapidly through the channels of the quartz structure, parallel to its crystallographic c axis. Since only Cu concentrations differ between topaz- and quartz-hosted inclusions, we hypothesize that Cu+ and H+ re-equilibrate by diffusional ion exchange through these channels, while all other element concentrations remain essentially unchanged. A thermodynamic model considering charge-balanced Cu+H+ exchange and diffusive H2 re-equilibration of an initially Cu-poor but S-rich vapor inclusion with a typical rock-buffered fluid environment outside the host crystal demonstrates a strong chemical driving force for Cu+ to migrate from the surrounding rock into the fluid inclusion during cooling of the system. The driving force for Cu diffusion, against the gradient in total Cu concentration, is the abundant H+ liberated inside the inclusion by dissociation of HCl and particularly by the precipitation of CuFeS2 by reaction with the initially trapped H2S and/or SO2. Gold is not only a much larger ion, but is subject to an opposing driving force, suggesting that high concentrations of this

  5. Cenozoic high-K alkaline magmatism and associated Cu-Mo-Au mineralization in the Jinping-Fan Si Pan region, southeastern Ailao Shan-Red River shear zone, southwestern China-northwestern Vietnam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, My Dung; Liu, Junlai; Nguyen, Quang Luat; Chen, Yue; Tang, Yuan; Song, Zhijie; Zhang, Zhaochong; Zhao, Zhidan

    2014-01-01

    The Jinping-Fan Si Pan (JFP) Cenozoic magmatic and Cu-Mo-Au metallogenic belt in the southeastern part of the Ailao Shan shear zone host the Tongchang, Chang‧an, Habo, and Chinh Sang Cu-Mo-Au deposits. These deposits form an integrated epithermal-porphyry regional mineralization system associated with 40-32 Ma high-K alkaline magmatism. The magmatic rocks in the belt have relatively low TiO2 (<0.73 wt%), P2O5 (<0.29 wt%), and FeO* (<4.99 wt%), and high Na2O (2.86-4.75 wt%) and K2O (4.01-7.98 wt%). They also have high contents of incompatible trace elements, and are enriched in LILE (Rb, Ba, K, Sr) and LREE. They have marked Nb, Ta, Ti and P depletion in primitive mantle-normalized spidergrams, and plot close to the EMII mantle field in the Sr-Nd isotopic diagram. These characteristics are similar to those of the Eocene high-K alkaline rocks along the northern Ailao Shan belt, eastern Tibet plateau. The sulfur and lead isotope analyses of sulfide minerals from both the ores and related magmatic rocks confirm the involvement of a magmatic ore fluid. The Cenozoic alkaline intrusions and Cu-Mo-Au mineralization in the JFP were formed prior to the initiation of left-lateral shearing along the Ailao Shan shear zone. The magmas appear to have been derived from enriched mantle, possibly with mixing of materials from the buried Tethyan oceanic lithosphere, and/or crust.

  6. Genesis of the Au-Bi-Cu-As, Cu-Mo ± W, and base-metal Au-Ag mineralization at the Mountain Freegold (Yukon, Canada): constraints from Ar-Ar and Re-Os geochronology and Pb and stable isotope compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bineli Betsi, Thierry; Lentz, David; Chiaradia, Massimo; Kyser, Kurt; Creaser, Robert A.

    2013-12-01

    The genesis of mineralized systems across the Mountain Freegold area, in the Dawson Range Cu-Au ± Mo Belt of the Tintina Au province was constrained using Pb and stable isotope compositions and Ar-Ar and Re-Os geochronology. Pb isotope compositions of sulfides span a wide compositional range (206Pb/204Pb, 18.669-19.861; 208Pb/204Pb, 38.400-39.238) that overlaps the compositions of the spatially associated igneous rocks, thus indicating a magmatic origin for Pb and probably the other metals. Sulfur isotopic compositions of sulfide minerals are broadly similar and their δ34S (Vienna-Canyon Diablo Troilite (V-CDT)) values range from -1.4 to 3.6 ‰ consistent with the magmatic range, with the exception of stibnite from a Au-Sb-quartz vein, which has δ34S values between -8.1 and -3.1 ‰. The δ34S values of sulfates coexisting with sulfide are between 11.2 and 14.2 ‰; whereas, those from the weathering zone range from 3.7 to 4.3 ‰, indicating supergene sulfates derived from oxidation of hypogene sulfides. The δ13C (Vienna Peedee Belemnite (VPDB)) values of carbonate range from -4.9 to 1.1 ‰ and are higher than magmatic values. The δ18O (V-SMOW) values of magmatic quartz phenocrysts and magmatic least-altered rocks vary between 6.2 and 10.1 ‰ and between 5.0 and 10.1 ‰, respectively, whereas altered magmatic rocks and hydrothermal minerals (quartz and magnetite) are relatively 18O-depleted (4.2 to 7.9 ‰ and -6.3 to 1.5 ‰, respectively). Hydrogen isotope compositions of both least-altered and altered igneous rock samples are D-depleted (from -133 to -161 ‰ Vienna-Standard Mean Ocean Water (V-SMOW)), consistent with differential magma degassing and/or post-crystallization exchange between the rocks and meteoric ground water. Zircon from a chlorite-altered dike has a U-Pb crystallization age of 108.7 ± 0.4 Ma; whereas, the same sample yielded a whole-rock Ar-Ar plateau age of 76.25 ± 0.53 Ma. Likewise, molybdenite Re-Os model ages range from 75.8 to

  7. Origin of REE mineralization in the Bastnäs-type Fe-REE-(Cu-Mo-Bi-Au) deposits, Bergslagen, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtstam, Dan; Andersson, Ulf B.; Broman, Curt; Mansfeld, Joakim

    2014-09-01

    The Bastnäs-type deposits, with mineral assemblages of Fe oxides, Ca-Mg silicates, rare earth element (REE) silicates, REE fluorocarbonates, and Cu-Fe-Mo-Bi sulfides, are associated with marble horizons in a strongly Na, K, and/or Mg altered, metavolcanic succession, over a distance of at least 80 km in a SW-NE trending zone in western Bergslagen. Two subtypes occur: (1) enriched (relative to the other type) in light REE (LREE) and Fe, exemplified by the Bastnäs and Rödbergsgruvan deposits, and (2) enriched in heavy REE (HREE), Y, Mg, Ca, and F, represented by deposits in the Norberg district. Bastnäsite hosts primary fluid H2O-CO2 inclusions with salinities of 6-29 eq. wt% CaCl2 and with total homogenization temperatures (Th tot) of ca. 300-400 °C. Subtype 2 has late-stage fluorite with fluid inclusions that show 1-16 eq. wt% NaCl and Th tot of ca. 90-150 °C. Molybdenite Re-Os ages obtained from three deposits are 1,904 ± 6, 1,863 ± 4, and 1,842 ± 4 Ma. Nd isotopic data from five different REE minerals yielded no defined isochron, but a range in ɛNd (1.88 Ga) of +0.2 to +1.6. The oxygen isotope values (δ18OSMOW) of dolomite and calcite from the associated REE-mineralized skarn and recrystallized carbonate assemblages lie in the range 6.1-8.6 ‰, overlapping with those of the host marbles. Carbon isotope values (δ13CPDB) show typical magmatic signatures of -6.7 to -4.4 ‰, while the host marbles group around ca. -2.4 ‰. The sulfur isotope (δ34SCDT) values of associated sulfides range between -10.8 and +0.2 ‰. The combined evidence suggests REE mineralization, beginning at 1.9 Ga, from mainly Svecofennian, juvenile magmatic (>400 °C) fluids carrying Si, F, Cl, S, CO2, and the REE in addition to other metals; mineralization occurred through reactions with dolomitic layers in the supracrustal units coevally with regional metasomatic alteration associated with fluid circulation through an extensive active volcano-plutonic complex.

  8. Origin of REE mineralization in the Bastnäs-type Fe-REE-(Cu-Mo-Bi-Au) deposits, Bergslagen, Sweden

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holtstam, Dan; Andersson, Ulf B.; Broman, Curt; Mansfeld, Joakim

    2014-12-01

    The Bastnäs-type deposits, with mineral assemblages of Fe oxides, Ca-Mg silicates, rare earth element (REE) silicates, REE fluorocarbonates, and Cu-Fe-Mo-Bi sulfides, are associated with marble horizons in a strongly Na, K, and/or Mg altered, metavolcanic succession, over a distance of at least 80 km in a SW-NE trending zone in western Bergslagen. Two subtypes occur: (1) enriched (relative to the other type) in light REE (LREE) and Fe, exemplified by the Bastnäs and Rödbergsgruvan deposits, and (2) enriched in heavy REE (HREE), Y, Mg, Ca, and F, represented by deposits in the Norberg district. Bastnäsite hosts primary fluid H2O-CO2 inclusions with salinities of 6-29 eq. wt% CaCl2 and with total homogenization temperatures ( Th tot) of ca. 300-400 °C. Subtype 2 has late-stage fluorite with fluid inclusions that show 1-16 eq. wt% NaCl and Th tot of ca. 90-150 °C. Molybdenite Re-Os ages obtained from three deposits are 1,904 ± 6, 1,863 ± 4, and 1,842 ± 4 Ma. Nd isotopic data from five different REE minerals yielded no defined isochron, but a range in ɛNd (1.88 Ga) of +0.2 to +1.6. The oxygen isotope values (δ18OSMOW) of dolomite and calcite from the associated REE-mineralized skarn and recrystallized carbonate assemblages lie in the range 6.1-8.6 ‰, overlapping with those of the host marbles. Carbon isotope values (δ13CPDB) show typical magmatic signatures of -6.7 to -4.4 ‰, while the host marbles group around ca. -2.4 ‰. The sulfur isotope (δ34SCDT) values of associated sulfides range between -10.8 and +0.2 ‰. The combined evidence suggests REE mineralization, beginning at 1.9 Ga, from mainly Svecofennian, juvenile magmatic (>400 °C) fluids carrying Si, F, Cl, S, CO2, and the REE in addition to other metals; mineralization occurred through reactions with dolomitic layers in the supracrustal units coevally with regional metasomatic alteration associated with fluid circulation through an extensive active volcano-plutonic complex.

  9. Geology of the Ivanhoe Hg-Au district, northern Nevada: Influence of Miocene volcanism, lakes, and active faulting on epithermal mineralization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, A.R.

    2003-01-01

    The mercury-gold deposits of the Ivanhoe mining district in northern Nevada formed when middle Miocene rhyolitic volcanism and high-angle faulting disrupted a shallow lacustrine environment. Sinter and replacement mercury deposits formed at and near the paleosurface, and disseminated gold deposits and high-grade gold-silver veins formed beneath the hot spring deposits. The lacustrine environment provided abundant meteoric water; the rhyolites heated the water; and the faults, flow units, and lakebeds provided fluid pathways for the hydrothermal fluids. A shallow lake began to develop in the Ivanhoe area about 16.5 Ma. The lake progressively expanded and covered the entire area with fine-grained lacustrine sediments. Lacustrine sedimentation continued to at least 14.4 Ma, and periodic fluctuations in the size and extent of the lake may have been responses to both climate and nearby volcanism. The eruption of rhyolite and andesite flows and domes periodically disrupted the lacustrine environment and produced interfingered flows and lake sediments. The major pulse of rhyolitic volcanism took place between 15.16 ?? 0.05 and 14.92 ?? 0.05 Ma. High-angle faulting began in the basement about 15.2 Ma, penetrated to and disrupted the paleosurface after 15.10 ?? 0.06 Ma, and largely ceased by 14.92 ?? 0.05 Ma. Ground motion related to both faulting and volcanism created debris flows and soft-sediment deformation in the lakebeds. Mercury-gold mineralization was coeval with rhyolite volcanism and high-angle faulting, and it took place about 15.2 to 14.9 Ma. At and near the paleosurface, hydrothermal fluids migrated through tuffaceous sediments above relatively impermeable volcanic and Paleozoic units, creating chalcedonic, cinnabar-bearing replacement bodies and sinters. Disseminated gold was deposited in sedimentary and volcanic rocks beneath the mercury deposits, although the hydrologic path between the two ore types is unclear. Higher-grade gold-silver deposits formed in

  10. Geochronology and Nd isotope geochemistry of the Gameleira Cu-Au deposit, Serra dos Carajás, Brazil: 1.8-1.7 Ga hydrothermal alteration and mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimentel, Márcio M.; Lindenmayer, Zara G.; Laux, Jorge H.; Armstrong, Richard; de Araújo, Janice Caldas

    2003-01-01

    The Gameleira deposit is one of several important Cu-Au deposits associated with the late Archean (ca. 2.7 Ga) volcanic rocks of the Itacaiúnas supergroup in the Carajás mineral province, southeastern Pará. It comprises mainly biotite- and sulphide-rich veins and quartz-grunerite-biotite-gold hydrothermal veins that cut andesitic rocks. It is interpreted as representative of the Fe oxide Cu-Au class of deposit. Sm-Nd isotopic data indicate an age of 2719±80 Ma (MSWD=3.0) and ɛNd( T) of -1.4 for the host meta-andesites. Metavolcanic rocks and cogenetic gabbros give an age of 2757±81 Ma (1 σ) with ɛNd( T) of -0.8. This is considered the best estimate for the crystallization age of the Gameleira volcanic and subvolcanic rocks. Negative ɛNd( T) and Archean TDM model ages (mostly between 2.8 and 3.1 Ga) suggest some contamination with older crustal material. The andesitic/gabbroic rocks are cut by two generations of granite dykes. The older has striking petrographic and geochemical similarities to the ca. 1.87 Ga alkali-rich Pojuca granite, which is exposed a few kilometers to the northwest of the deposit. The younger is a leucogranite with a U-Pb SHRIMP age of 1583+9/-7 Ma. Neodymium isotopic analyses of the two generations of granites indicate a strong crustal affinity and possible derivation from reworking of the Archean crust. The quartz-grunerite-gold hydrothermal vein yields a Sm-Nd isochron (MSWD=.83) age of 1839±15 Ma (1 σ) with ɛNd( T) of -9.2. Pervasive potassic alteration, represented by the widespread formation of biotite in the country rocks, is dated by Ar-Ar at 1734±8 Ma, and a similar age of 1700±31 Ma (1 σ) is indicated by the Sm-Nd isochron for the biotite-sulphide veins. Similar to that for the quartz-grunerite vein, the ɛNd( T) value for the sulphide-rich veins is strongly negative (-8.2), thereby suggesting that the original fluids percolated through, leached, or were derived from igneous rocks with an Archaean Nd isotopic signature

  11. Constraints on the timing of Co-Cu ± Au mineralization in the Blackbird district, Idaho, using SHRIMP U-Pb ages of monazite and xenotime plus zircon ages of related Mesoproterozoic orthogneisses and metasedimentary rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aleinikoff, John N.; Slack, John F.; Lund, Karen; Evans, Karl V.; Fanning, C. Mark; Mazdab, Frank K.; Wooden, Joseph L.; Pillers, Renee M.

    2012-01-01

    The Blackbird district, east-central Idaho, contains the largest known Co reserves in the United States. The origin of strata-hosted Co-Cu ± Au mineralization at Blackbird has been a matter of controversy for decades. In order to differentiate among possible genetic models for the deposits, including various combinations of volcanic, sedimentary, magmatic, and metamorphic processes, we used U-Pb geochronology of xenotime, monazite, and zircon to establish time constraints for ore formation. New age data reported here were obtained using sensitive high resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) microanalysis of (1) detrital zircons from a sample of Mesoproterozoic siliciclastic metasedimentary country rock in the Blackbird district, (2) igneous zircons from Mesoproterozoic intrusions, and (3) xenotime and monazite from the Merle and Sunshine prospects at Blackbird. Detrital zircon from metasandstone of the biotite phyllite-schist unit has ages mostly in the range of 1900 to 1600 Ma, plus a few Neoarchean and Paleoproterozoic grains. Age data for the six youngest grains form a coherent group at 1409 ± 10 Ma, regarded as the maximum age of deposition of metasedimentary country rocks of the central structural domain. Igneous zircons from nine samples of megacrystic granite, granite augen gneiss, and granodiorite augen gneiss that crop out north and east of the Blackbird district yield ages between 1383 ± 4 and 1359 ± 7 Ma. Emplacement of the Big Deer Creek megacrystic granite (1377 ± 4 Ma), structurally juxtaposed with host rocks in the Late Cretaceous ca. 5 km north of Blackbird, may have been involved in initial deposition of rare earth elements (REE) minerals and, possibly, sulfides. In situ SHRIMP ages of xenotime and monazite in Co-rich samples from the Merle and Sunshine prospects, plus backscattered electron imagery and SHRIMP analyses of trace elements, indicate a complex sequence of Mesoproterozoic and Cretaceous events. On the basis of textural relationships

  12. Contrasting zircon Hf-O isotopes and trace elements between ore-bearing and ore-barren adakitic rocks in central-eastern China: Implications for genetic relation to Cu-Au mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fangyue; Liu, Sheng-Ao; Li, Shuguang; He, Yongsheng

    2013-01-01

    The petrogenesis of Early Cretaceous adakitic intrusions in the Lower Yangtze River belt (LYRB), central-eastern China, and their genetic association with Cu-Au mineralization have recently been debated. This study presented integrated in-situ zircon U-Pb-Hf-O isotopic and trace elemental data for the LYRB adakites, and a comparison with ore-barren adakites from the south Tan-Lu fault (STLF) adjacent to the LYRB. Magmatic zircons from these two series of intrusions have U-Pb ages of 145-132 Ma and 136-132 Ma respectively. The STLF zircons have δ18O ranging from 5.6 to 6.7‰ and ɛHf(t) from - 28.8 to - 16.4, plotted within the range of global lower crustal metabasaltic xenoliths, consistent with low-radiogenic Pb of the host adakitic rocks. In contrast, both Hf and O isotopic compositions of zircons from the LYRB are greatly variable with heavier δ18O (4.7 to 9.6‰) and higher ɛHf(t) values (- 25.5 to + 2.0) compared with the STLF series. The co-variations of Hf-O isotopes in the LYRB series reflect source heterogeneity as a result of mixing of basaltic oceanic crust with sediments (10-20%), consistent with high-radiogenic Pb and enriched Sr-Nd isotopic compositions of the host adakites. The high La, U and low Ti concentrations in the LYRB zircons also imply a volatile (perhaps, CO32 --rich, carbonatite-like) source. Combined with whole-rock geochemical data, the new results further suggest contrasting origins of the LYRB and STLF adakites from subducted oceanic crust and foundering lower continental crust, respectively. The LYRB zircons have much higher ratios of Ce4 +/Ce3 + (avg.417) and Eu/Eu* (avg. 0.67) than the STLF zircons (avg. 84 and 0.44). This difference confirms that the ore-bearing adakitic magmas are more oxidized relative to the ore-barren ones. There is roughly a positive correlation between zircon Ce4 +/Ce3 + and δ18O in the LYRB series, probably indicating that the elevated fO2 was related to components enriched in heavy oxygen isotopes. A

  13. Mineral Chart

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Mineral Chart KidsHealth > For Teens > Mineral Chart Print A A A Text Size en ... sources of calcium. You'll also find this mineral in broccoli and dark green, leafy vegetables. Soy ...

  14. Mineral oils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furby, N. W.

    1973-01-01

    The characteristics of lubricants made from mineral oils are discussed. Types and compositions of base stocks are reviewed and the product demands and compositions of typical products are outlined. Processes for commercial production of mineral oils are examined. Tables of data are included to show examples of product types and requirements. A chemical analysis of three types of mineral oils is reported.

  15. Virus-templated Au and Au/Pt Core/shell Nanowires and Their Electrocatalytic Activitives for Fuel Cell Applications

    PubMed Central

    LEE, YOUJIN; KIM, JUNHYUNG; YUN, DONG SOO; NAM, YOON SUNG; SHAO-HORN, YANG; BELCHER, ANGELA M.

    2014-01-01

    A facile synthetic route was developed to make Au nanowires (NWs) from surfactant-mediated bio-mineralization of a genetically engineered M13 phage with specific Au binding peptides. From the selective interaction between Au binding M13 phage and Au ions in aqueous solution, Au NWs with uniform diameter were synthesized at room temperature with yields greater than 98 % without the need for size selection. The diameters of Au NWs were controlled from 10 nm to 50 nm. The Au NWs were found to be active for electrocatalytic oxidation of CO molecules for all sizes, where the activity was highly dependent on the surface facets of Au NWs. This low-temperature high yield method of preparing Au NWs was further extended to the synthesis of Au/Pt core/shell NWs with controlled coverage of Pt shell layers. Electro-catalytic studies of ethanol oxidation with different Pt loading showed enhanced activity relative to a commercial supported Pt catalyst, indicative of the dual functionality of Pt for the ethanol oxidation and Au for the anti-poisoning component of Pt. These new one-dimensional noble metal NWs with controlled compositions could facilitate the design of new alloy materials with tunable properties. PMID:24910712

  16. Industrial Minerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Lawrence L.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses trends in and factors related to the production of industrial minerals during 1982, indicating that, as 1981 marked a downturn in production of industrial minerals, 1982 continued the trend with temporary and permanent cutbacks in mine and plant production. Includes highlights of several conferences/conference papers in this field.…

  17. Ultra-relativistic Au+Au and d+Au collisions:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Hauer, M.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Seals, H.; Sedykh, I.; Skulski, W.; Smith, C. E.; Stankiewicz, M. A.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Vaurynovich, S. S.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wenger, E.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    In this talk I will review PHOBOS data on charged particle multiplicities, obtained in Au+Au and d+Au collisions at RHIC. The general features of the Au+Au pseudorapidity distributions results will be discussed and compared to those of /line{p}p collisions. The total charged particle multiplicity, scaled by the number of participant pairs, is observed to be about 40% higher in Au+Au collisions than in /line{p}p and d+Au systems, but, surprisingly at the same level of e+e- collisions. Limiting fragmentation scaling is seen to be obeyed in Au+Au collisions.

  18. Mineral Quantification.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Optimal intakes of elements, such as sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, manganese, copper, zinc and iodine, can reduce individual risk factors including those related to cardiovascular diseases among humans and animals. In order to meet the need for vitamins, major minerals, trace minerals, fatty acids and amino acids, it is necessary to include a full spectrum programme that can deliver all of the nutrients in the right ratio. Minerals are required for normal growth, activities of muscles, skeletal development (such as calcium), cellular activity, oxygen transport (copper and iron), chemical reactions in the body, intestinal absorption (magnesium), fluid balance and nerve transmission (sodium and potassium), as well as the regulation of the acid base balance (phosphorus). The chapter discusses the chemical and instrumentation techniques used for estimation of minerals such as N, P, Ca, Mg, K, Na, Fe, Cu, Zn, B and Mb. PMID:26939263

  19. Clay Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Karl T.; Sanders, Rebecca L.; Washton, Nancy M.

    2014-03-14

    Clay minerals are important components of the environment and are involved or implicated in processes such as the uptake of pollutants and the release of nutrients and as potential platforms for a number of chemical reactions. Owing to their small particle sizes (typically, on the order of microns or smaller) and mixing with a variety of other minerals and soil components, advanced characterization methods are needed to study their structures, dynamics, and reactivities. In this article, we describe the use of solid-state NMR methods to characterize the structures and chemistries of clay minerals. Early one-pulse magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR studies of 27Al and 29Si have now been enhanced and extended with new studies utilizing advanced methodologies (such as Multiple Quantum MAS) as well as studies of less-sensitive nuclei. In additional work, the issue of reactivity of clay minerals has been addressed, including studies of reactive surface area in the environment. Utilizations of NMR-sensitive nuclides within the clay minerals themselves, and in molecules that react with specific sites on the clay mineral surfaces, have aided in understanding the reactivity of these complex aluminosilicate systems.

  20. Les minéralisations Cu_(Ni_Bi_U_Au_Ag) d'Ifri (district du Haut Seksaoua, Maroc) : apport de l'étude texturale au débat syngenèse versus épigenèseThe Cu_(Ni_Bi_U_Au_Ag) mineralization of Ifri ('Haut Seksaoua' district, Morocco): contribution of a textural study to the discussion syngenetic versus epigenetic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbanson, Luc; Chauvet, Alain; Gaouzi, Aziz; Badra, Lakhifi; Mechiche, Mohamed; Touray, Jean Claude; Oukarou, Saı̈d

    2003-11-01

    The Cu ore of Ifri is a chalcopyrite stockwork hosted by Cambrian formations and was until now interpreted as a syngenetic massive sulphide deposit. Textural studies highlight two generations of pyrite early (Py I) and late (Py II) with respect to the regional deformation. The chalcopyrite stockwork overprinted Py II, outlining the epigenetic nature of the Cu mineralization. Regarding the origin of Cu-depositing fluids, the presence in the stockwork paragenesis of an U, W, Sn association and preliminary Pb/Pb dating of a brannerite belonging to this association suggest a contribution of the Tichka granite. To cite this article: L. Barbanson et al., C. R. Geoscience 335 (2003).

  1. Collective flow in Au + Au collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, H.G.; EOS Collaboration

    1994-05-01

    Based on a preliminary sample of Au + Au collisions in the EOS time projection chamber at the Bevalac, we study sideward flow as a function of bombarding energy between 0.25A GeV and 1.2A GeV. We focus on the increase in in-plane transverse momentum per nucleon with fragment mass. We also find event shapes to be close to spherical in the most central collisions, independent of bombarding energy and fragment mass up to {sup 4}He.

  2. Industrial Minerals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradbury, James C.

    1978-01-01

    The past year is seen as not particularly good for industrial minerals and for industry in general. Environmental concerns continued to trouble the industry with unacceptable asbestos concentrations and chlorofluorocarbon effects on ozone. A halting U.S. economy also affected industrial progress. (MA)

  3. A new occurrence of telluride minerals in South Carolina.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bell, H.; Larson, R.R.

    1984-01-01

    A study of drill cores from the Haile gold mine, Lancaster County, South Carolina, has revealed grains containing large amounts of Te with various combinations of Pb, Ag and Au in pyrite. These telluride minerals have so far not been identified. The nearby Brewer mine, on the basis of chemical evidence, also contains tellurides. The probable telluride localities in South Carolina are now expanded to three, significantly increasing the few reports of Te minerals from the Au deposits of the southeastern Piedmont, many of which are now considered to be volcanogenic. The occurrence of telluride minerals in gold ore from the Haile-Brewer area may help to explain the divergence in Au/Ag ratios reported in chemical analyses of drill core, ore samples and production records. Te, in addition, may be useful in geochemical exploration programmes in the SE Piedmont, including programmes using heavy mineral concentrates derived from stream alluvium. -R.S.M.

  4. Descriptive and Grade-Tonnage Models and Database for Iron Oxide Cu-Au Deposits

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cox, Dennis P.; Singer, Donald A.

    2007-01-01

    Iron oxide Cu-Au deposits are veins and breccia-hosted bodies of hematite and/or magnetite with disseminated Cu + Au ? Ag ? Pd ? Pt ? Ni ? U ? LREE minerals formed in sedimentary or volcano-sedimentary basins intruded by igneous rocks. Deposits are associated with broad redox boundaries and feature sodic alteration of source rocks and potassic alteration of host rocks.

  5. Mineral bioprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Torma, A.E.

    1993-05-01

    In the last 25 years, the introduction of biotechnological methods in hydrometallurgy has created new opportunities and challenges for the mineral processing industry. This was especially true for the production of metal values from mining wastes and low-and-complex-grade mineral resources, which were considered economically not amenable for processing by conventional extraction methods. Using bio-assisted heap, dump and in-situ leaching technologies, copper and uranium extractions gained their first industrial applications. The precious metal industries were the next to adopt the bio-preoxidation technique in the extraction of gold from refractory sulfide-bearing ores and concentrates. A variety of other bioleaching opportunities exist for nickel, cobalt, cadmium and zinc sulfide leaching. Recently developed bioremediation methods and biosorption technologies have shown a good potential for industrial applications to remove trace heavy metal and radionuclide concentrations from contaminated soils, and mining and processing effluents.

  6. Genetic Pd, Pt, Au, Ag, and Rh mineralogy in Noril'sk sulfide ores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiridonov, E. M.; Kulagov, E. A.; Serova, A. A.; Kulikova, I. M.; Korotaeva, N. N.; Sereda, E. V.; Tushentsova, I. N.; Belyakov, S. N.; Zhukov, N. N.

    2015-09-01

    The undeformed ore-bearing intrusions of the Noril'sk ore field (NOF) cut through volcanic rocks of the Late Permian-Early Triassic trap association folded in brachysynclines. Due to the nonuniform load on the roof of intrusive bodies, most sulfide melts were squeezed, up to the tops of ore-bearing intrusions; readily fusible Ni-Fe-Cu sulfide melts were almost completely squeezed. In our opinion, not only one but two stages of mineralization developed at the Noril'sk deposits: (i) syntrap magmatic and (ii) epigenetic post-trap metamorphic-hydrothermal. All platinum-group minerals (PGM) and minerals of gold are metasomatic in the Noril'sk ores. They replaced sulfide solid solutions and exsolution structures. All types of PGM and Au minerals occur in the ores, varying in composition from pyrrhotite to chalcopyrite, talnakhite, mooihoekite, and rich in galena; they are localized in the inner and outer contact zones and differ only in the quantitative proportions of ore minerals. The aureoles of PGM and Au-Ag minerals are wider than the contours of sulfide bodies and coincide with halos of fluid impact on orebodies and adjacent host rocks. The pneumatolytic PGM and Au-Ag minerals are correlated in abundance with the dimensions of sulfide bodies. Their amounts are maximal in veins of late fusible ore composed of eutectic PbS ss and iss intergrowths, as well as at their contacts. The Pd and Pt contents in eutectic sulfide ores of NOF are the world's highest. In the process of noble-metal mineral formation, the fluids supply Pd, Pt, Au, As, Sb, Sn, Bi, and a part of Te, whereas Fe, Ni, Cu, Pb, Ag, Rh, a part of Te and Pd are leached from the replaced sulfide minerals. The pneumatolytic PGM of the early stage comprises Pd and Pt intermetallic compounds enriched in Au along with Pd-Pt-Fe-Ni-Cu-Sn-Pb(As) and (Pd,Pt,Au)(Sn,Sb,Bi,Te,As) solid solutions. Pneumatolytic PGM and Au minerals of the middle stage are products of solid-phase transformation and recrystallization of

  7. The coupled geochemistry of Au and As in pyrite from hydrothermal ore deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deditius, Artur P.; Reich, Martin; Kesler, Stephen E.; Utsunomiya, Satoshi; Chryssoulis, Stephen L.; Walshe, John; Ewing, Rodney C.

    2014-09-01

    alteration by hydrothermal fluids. The second trend consists of pyrites from porphyry Cu and epithermal Au deposits, which are characterised by compositions that preserve the Au/As signature of mineralizing magmatic-hydrothermal fluids, confirming the role of this sulfide in controlling metal ratios in ore systems.

  8. Vitamins and Minerals

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Vitamins and Minerals KidsHealth > For Teens > Vitamins and Minerals Print A ... of a good thing? What Are Vitamins and Minerals? Vitamins and minerals make people's bodies work properly. ...

  9. Carlin-type Au Deposits in Nevada: Unique Hydrothermal Systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cline, J. S.

    2006-05-01

    Carlin-type gold deposits (CTGD) in Nevada have huge Au endowments that have made Nevada one of the leading Au producers in the world. Although they form one of the three most productive Au districts in the world, the deposits were not discovered until the early 1960's owing primarily to the lack of visible Au. Numerous studies have provided a detailed geologic picture of the deposits, yet a comprehensive and widely accepted genetic model remains elusive because of 1) difficulties in identifying and analyzing the fine-grained, volumetrically minor, and common ore and gangue minerals, 2) approximately contemporaneous mineralization that overprinted or was overprinted by Carlin-type mineralization, and 3) post-ore weathering and oxidation. Geologic data from all districts indicate compelling similarities, suggesting that all deposits formed in response to similar geologic processes. Yet, stable isotope studies suggest multiple sources for ore fluids and components. Because of these inconsistencies, current models relate deposits to 1) metal leaching and transport by convecting meteoric water, 2) hydrothermal fluids exsolved from epizonal intrusions, and 3) deep metamorphic and/or magmatic fluids. Proterozoic to early Paleozoic rifting produced a passive margin sequence of reactive calcareous host rocks, and NNW- and WNW-striking basement and Paleozoic normal faults that may control the trends. Following rifting, the host rocks were subjected to compressional orogenies, developing a pre-mineral architecture of steeply dipping fluid conduits and shallow dipping traps. NNW- and WNW-striking basement and Paleozoic normal faults were inverted during these compressional events and formed structural culminations including anticlines and domes that served as depositional sites for ore fluids. Au-bearing pyrite precipitated 42-36 m.y. ago as northwesterly to westerly extension reopened favorably oriented older structures. Fluid flow and mineral deposition appear to have been

  10. Magnetic susceptibilities of liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au and Fe-Au alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ohno, S.; Shimakura, H.; Tahara, S.; Okada, T.

    2015-08-17

    The magnetic susceptibility of liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au, Fe-Au and Cu-Au alloys was investigated as a function of temperature and composition. Liquid Cr{sub 1-c}Au{sub c} with 0.5 ≤ c and Mn{sub 1-c}Au{sub c} with 0.3≤c obeyed the Curie-Weiss law with regard to their dependence of χ on temperature. The magnetic susceptibilities of liquid Fe-Au alloys also exhibited Curie-Weiss behavior with a reasonable value for the effective number of Bohr magneton. On the Au-rich side, the composition dependence of χ for liquid TM-Au (TM=Cr, Mn, Fe) alloys increased rapidly with increasing TM content, respectively. Additionally, the composition dependences of χ for liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au, and Fe-Au alloys had maxima at compositions of 50 at% Cr, 70 at% Mn, and 85 at% Fe, respectively. We compared the composition dependences of χ{sub 3d} due to 3d electrons for liquid binary TM-M (M=Au, Al, Si, Sb), and investigated the relationship between χ{sub 3d} and E{sub F} in liquid binary TM-M alloys at a composition of 50 at% TM.

  11. Solid Inclusions in Au-nuggets, genesis and derivation from alkaline rocks of the Guli Massif, Northern Siberia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvorani, Sami N.

    2016-04-01

    A total of 112 Au-nuggets, collected from alluvial placer deposits of the Ingarinda River from the Guli massif, located in northem Siberia, Russia, were investigated. The Guli massif consists of a huge dunite-clinopyroxenite complex (the largest complex in the world), an alkaline to highly alkaline rock suite (melilite, nephelinite, ijolite) enveloping the dunite and carbonatite intrusions, associated with disseminated schlieren type chromitite and Au-Ag, Pt placer deposits. The nuggets are characterized by various sizes and shapes and show chemical compositions Au, Au-Ag and AuCu, typical for a derivate of carbon-atites and/or ultramafic complexes. A great variety of oxide, silicate, REE-minerals, carbonate and sulphide inclusions have been detected in the nuggets, which are identical in mineralogy and chemical composition to mineral constituents of the alkaline to highly alkaline rock suite surrounding the Guli dunite core complex thus, considered as the source for Au-nuggets.

  12. Electrochemistry of Au(II) and Au(III) pincer complexes: determination of the Au(II)-Au(II) bond energy.

    PubMed

    Dann, Thomas; Roşca, Dragoş-Adrian; Wright, Joseph A; Wildgoose, Gregory G; Bochmann, Manfred

    2013-10-01

    The bond energy of the unsupported Au-Au bond in the Au(ii) dimer [(C(∧)N(∧)C)Au]2 and the difference between Au(III)-OH and Au(III)-H bond enthalpies have been determined experimentally by electrochemical methods, with Au-OH and Au-H complexes showing unexpected differences in their reduction pathways, supported by DFT modelling. PMID:24051607

  13. Novel Sr-Au-ZnO: Synthesis, characterization and photocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senthilraja, A.; Subash, B.; Krishnakumar, B.; Swaminathan, M.; Shanthi, M.

    2014-11-01

    A simple method was adopted for the synthesis of Sr-Au-ZnO and the formed composite was characterized by different characterization technique. The initial dopant amount of Au was fixed as a constant, the other dopant amount (Sr) was varied. It is good to keep the concentration of Au in a minimum level due to its cost. The optimization of Sr amount was performed through the photocatalytic activity of the prepared catalysts using AR 18 degradation under UV-A light. The photocatalytic activity was highly influenced by Sr. The optimized Sr-Au-ZnO was found to be more efficient than single metal dopants (Sr-ZnO, Au-ZnO), commercial catalysts (ZnO and benchmark photocatalyst Degussa P25) and prepared ZnO for the mineralization of AR 18. The effects of operational parameters such as the amount of photocatalyst, dye concentration, initial pH on photo mineralization of AR 18 have been analyzed and optimized values are reported. The mineralization of AR 18 has been confirmed by COD measurements. A mechanism has been proposed for the degradation of AR 18 by Sr-Au-ZnO under UV-A light illumination. Reusability of optimized Sr-Au-ZnO, make this process to be applied for industrial effluent treatment.

  14. Rocks and Minerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Provides background information on rocks and minerals, including the unique characteristics of each. Teaching activities on rock-hunting and identification, mineral configurations, mystery minerals, and growing crystals are provided. Reproducible worksheets are included for two of the activities. (TW)

  15. New Minerals and Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birch, William D.

    1997-01-01

    Defines geodiversity, compares it to biodiversity, and discusses the mineral classification system. Charts the discovery of new minerals in Australia over time and focuses on uses of these minerals in technological advances. (DDR)

  16. Mineral spirits poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    Mineral spirits are liquid chemicals used to thin paint and as a degreaser. Mineral spirits poisoning occurs ... be found in: Mineral spirits ( Stoddard solvent ) Some paints Some floor and furniture waxes and polishes Some ...

  17. Magnetoresistance of Au films

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, D. L.; Song, X. H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    2014-12-10

    Measurement of the magnetoresistance (MR) of Au films as a function of temperature and film thickness reveals a strong dependence on grain size distribution and clear violation of the Kohler s rule. Using a model of random resistor network, we show that this result can be explained if the MR arises entirely from inhomogeneity due to grain boundary scattering and thermal activation of grain boundary atoms.

  18. Magnetoresistance of Au films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D. L.; Song, X. H.; Zhang, X; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of the magnetoresistance (MR) of Au films as a function of temperature and film thickness reveals a strong dependence on grain size distribution and clear violation of the Kohler s rule. Using a model of random resistor network, we show that this result can be explained if the MR arises entirely from inhomogeneity due to grain boundary scattering and thermal activation of grain boundary atoms.

  19. Application of Hyperspectral Methods in Hydrothermal Mineral System Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laukamp, Carsten; Cudahy, Thomas; Gessner, Klaus; Haest, Maarten; Cacetta, Mike; Rodger, Andrew; Jones, Mal; Thomas, Matilda

    2010-05-01

    Hyperspectral infrared reflectance spectra are used to identify abundances and compositional differences of mineral groups and single mineral phases. 3D mineral maps are derived from surface (airborne and satellite sensed) and sub-surface (drill core) mineralogical data and integrated with geological, geochemical and geophysical datasets, enabling a quantitative mineral systems analysis. The Western Australian Centre of Excellence for 3D Mineral Mapping is working on a variety of mineral deposits to showcase the emerging applications of hyperspectral techniques in mineral system studies. Applied remote sensing technologies comprise hyperspectral airborne surveys (HyMap) covering 126 bands in the visible and shortwave infrared, as well as satellite-based multispectral surveys (ASTER) featuring 14 bands from the visible to thermal infrared. Drill cores were scanned with CSIRO's HyLoggingTM systems, which allow a fast acquisition of mineralogical data in cm-spacing and thereby providing statistically significant datasets. Building on procedures developed for public Australian geosurvey data releases for north Queensland, Broken Hill and Kalgoorlie (http://c3dmm.csiro.au), the ultimate goal is to develop sensor-independent scalars based on the position, depth and shape of selected absorption features in the visible-near (VNIR), shortwave (SWIR) and thermal infrared (TIR), which can be applied to a wide range of mineral deposit types. In the Rocklea Dome Channel Iron Ore deposits of the Pilbara (Western Australia) for example, hyperspectral drill core data were processed into 3D mineral maps to delineate major ore zones by identifying various ore types and possible contaminants. Vitreous (silica-rich) iron ore was successfully separated from ochreous goethitic ore, with both of them requiring different metallurgical processing. The silicified vitreous iron ore as well as outlined carbonate-rich zones are presumably related to overprinting groundwater effects. The

  20. Applications of PIXE to mineral characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Graham C.; Rucklidge, John C.; Campbell, John L.; Nejedly, Zdenek; Teesdale, William J.

    2002-04-01

    This article illustrates the application of the proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) technique to detailed documentation of mineral assemblages, with emphasis on base-metal ores. Some of the investigations aided by the PIXE laboratory at Guelph since 1993 include determinations of the distribution of minor and trace elements in magmatic Ni-Cu ores, volcanogenic massive sulphide Cu-Pb-Zn-(Ag-Au) ores and lode Au-(Ag) deposits. Minor elements of importance include possible by-products or co-products of metal refining, as well as deleterious impurities in mill-feed, e.g. Cd, In, Sn, As, Se, Te, Tl and Hg. Weathering products of primary sulphide mineralization, including tropical laterites and other oxidized assemblages, have been analysed successfully and can contain a wide range of minor elements which reflect the bedrock style of mineralization. The iron oxyhydroxide goethite, α-FeO(OH), contains trace levels of many elements, and in some cases 1 wt.% or more of base metals and arsenic, elements which are invisible in reflected-light microscopy. Other metals such as Ag are of sporadic occurrence in oxidized ores: they may be found as discrete mineral species, not incorporated into the dominant oxyhydroxides. A summary of findings from three base-metal deposits in Canada, the Philippines and Portugal serves to illustrate the manner in which PIXE data benefit our knowledge of metal distributions in metallic ores. PIXE can contribute to several facets of mineral-deposit research, such as: (1) the development of ore textures, and specifically the distribution of elements within zoned crystals, or between multiple generations of a particular mineral; (2) the location of precious metals, Ag being in general the simplest case; and (3) pinpointing elements that may have implications for ore genesis, environmental quality or metal refining, such as Cr, As and Se.

  1. Sonophotocatalytic mineralization of Norflurazon in aqueous environment.

    PubMed

    Sathishkumar, Panneerselvam; Mangalaraja, Ramalinga Viswanathan; Rozas, Oscar; Vergara, Carola; Mansilla, Héctor D; Gracia-Pinilla, M A; Anandan, Sambandam

    2016-03-01

    Norflurazon (4-chloro-5-(methylamino)-2-[3-(trifluoromethyl)phenyl]pyridazin-3(2H)-one; C12H9ClF3N3O) is an excellent weed controlling agent being practiced in the agricultural lands. The excessive addition or the undissolved Norflurazon (maximum solubility 28 mg/L at 25 °C) enters into the aquatic environment and causes the adverse effects associated with its high concentration. To avoid the perilous effects, visible light assisted photocatalysis set-up coupled with the 42 kHz ultrasound producing bath type sonicator is used to completely mineralize the Norflurazon. TiO2, ZnO and gold loaded zinc oxide nanocatalysts were utilized to study the mineralization of Norflurazon. Au-ZnO shows the greater efficiency for the sonophotocatalytic removal of Norflurazon among the various nanocatalysts employed to study the mineralization. The order of Norflurazon mineralization was sonophotocatalysis > sonocatalysis > photocatalysis. The additive effect was achieved for the sonophotocatalytic degradation. The high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometric (LCMS) analyses were employed to identify the various intermediates produced during the mineralization. The identification of four pseudo molecular ions and various intermediates using the LCMS analysis evidently suggests the sonophotocatalytic degradation was preceded in various decay pathways. A suitable mechanism has been proposed for the sonophotocatalytic mineralization of Norflurazon. PMID:26735720

  2. Antibacterial Au nanostructured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Songmei; Zuber, Flavia; Brugger, Juergen; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Ren, Qun

    2016-01-01

    We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all the Au nanostructures, regardless their shapes, exhibited similar excellent antibacterial properties. A comparison of live cells attached to nanotopographic surfaces showed that the number of live S. aureus cells was <1% of that from flat and rough reference surfaces. Our micro/nanofabrication process is a scalable approach based on cost-efficient self-organization and provides potential for further developing functional surfaces to study the behavior of microbes on nanoscale topographies.We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It

  3. Surface morphology and optical properties of porphyrin/Au and Au/porphyrin/Au systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalachyova, Yevgeniya; Lyutakov, Oleksiy; Solovyev, Andrey; Slepička, Petr; Švorčík, Vaclav

    2013-12-01

    Porphyrin/Au and Au/porphyrin/Au systems were prepared by vacuum evaporation and vacuum sputtering onto glass substrate. The surface morphology of as-prepared systems and those subjected to annealing at 160°C was studied by optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Absorption and luminescence spectra of as-prepared and annealed samples were measured. Annealing leads to disintegration of the initially continuous gold layer and formation of gold nanoclusters. An amplification of Soret band magnitude was observed on the Au/meso-tetraphenyl porphyrin (TPP) system in comparison with mere TPP. Additional enhancement of luminescence was observed after the sample annealing. In the case of sandwich Au/porphyrin/Au structure, suppression of one of the two porphyrins' luminescence maxima and sufficient enhancement of the second one were observed.

  4. Antibacterial Au nanostructured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wu, Songmei; Zuber, Flavia; Brugger, Juergen; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Ren, Qun

    2016-02-01

    We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all the Au nanostructures, regardless their shapes, exhibited similar excellent antibacterial properties. A comparison of live cells attached to nanotopographic surfaces showed that the number of live S. aureus cells was <1% of that from flat and rough reference surfaces. Our micro/nanofabrication process is a scalable approach based on cost-efficient self-organization and provides potential for further developing functional surfaces to study the behavior of microbes on nanoscale topographies. PMID:26648134

  5. Bartering for Minerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Kathie

    2002-01-01

    Presents an activity in which students are assigned occupations that rely on specific minerals. To obtain the needed minerals, students learn how to trade services and commodities. Includes details on preparation, modeling behaviors, and printed materials. (DDR)

  6. Possible uranium mineralization, Mineral Mountains, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, W. Roger; McHugh, John B.; Ficklin, Walter H.

    1979-01-01

    The Mineral Mountains block in west-central Utah is a horst whose core stands structurally high relative to all nearby basin-and-range fault blocks. Rocks of the Mineral Mountains range from Precambrian to Quaternary in age, but mostly consist of Tertiary granitic rocks. The range lies with the Wah Wah-Tusher mineral belt. Lead, silver, gold, and tungsten have been mined commercially. During a geochemical survey conducted in the summer of 1978, 30 water samples and 29 stream-sediment samples were collected from the Mineral Mountains area. The interpretation of simple plots of uranium concentrations and the results of a Q-mode factor analysis indicate that potential exists for uranium mineral deposits within the Mineral Mountains. The most favorable areas are in the granitic pluton near its contacts with sedimentary and metamorphic rocks. The most likely source of the uranium anomalies is uraninite-bearing epigenic veins along faults and fractures within the pluton. Three hypothetical models are proposed to account for the uranium mineralization.

  7. Mineral particles, mineral fibers, and lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Churg, A.; Wiggs, B.

    1985-08-01

    The total fibrous and nonfibrous mineral content of the lung has been analyzed in a series of 14 men with lung cancer but no history of occupational dust exposure, and in a series of 14 control men matched for age, smoking history, and general occupational class. The lung cancer patients had an average of 525 +/- 369 X 10(6) exogenous mineral particles and 17.4 +/- 19.6 X 10(6) exogenous mineral fibers/g dry lung, while the controls had averages of 261 +/- 175 mineral particles and 4.7 +/- 3.2 X 10(6) mineral fibers/g dry lung. These differences are statistically significant for both particles and fibers. Kaolinite, talc, mica, feldspars, and crystalline silica comprised the majority of particles of both groups. Approximately 90% of the particles were smaller than 2 micron in diameter and approximately 60% smaller than 1 micron. In both groups, patients who had smoked more than 35 pack years had greater numbers of particles than patients who had smoked less than 35 pack years. It is concluded that, in this study, lungs from patients with lung cancer had statistically greater numbers of mineral particles and fibers than lungs from controls, and that smoking influences total long-term retention of particles from all sources.

  8. Geology, Geochemistry and Geophysics of Sedimentary Rock-Hosted Au Deposits in P.R. China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peters, Stephen G.

    2002-01-01

    This is the second report concerning results of a joint project between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Tianjin Geological Academy to study sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits in P.R. China. Since the 1980s, Chinese geologists have devoted a large-scale exploration and research effort to the deposits. As a result, there are more than 20 million oz of proven Au reserves in sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits in P.R. China. Additional estimated and inferred resources are present in over 160 deposits and occurrences, which are undergoing exploration. This makes China second to Nevada in contained ounces of Au in Carlin-type deposits. It is likely that many of the Carlin-type Au ore districts in China, when fully developed, could have resource potential comparable to the multi-1,000-tonne Au resource in northern Nevada. The six chapters of this report describe sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits that were visited during the project. Chapters 1 and 2 provide an overview of sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits and Carlin-type Au deposits and also provide a working classification for the sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits. Chapters 3, 4, and 5 provide descriptions that were compiled from the literature in China in three main areas: the Dian-Qian-Gui, the Qinling fold belt, and Middle-Lower Yangtze River areas. Chapter 6 contains a weights-of-evidence (WofE), GIS-based mineral assessment of sedimentary rock-hosted Au deposits in the Qinling fold belt and Dian-Qian-Gui areas. Appendices contain scanned aeromagnetic (Appendix I) and gravity (Appendix II) geophysical maps of south and central China. Data tables of the deposits (Appendix III) also are available in the first report as an interactive database at http://geopubs.wr.usgs.gov/open-file/of98-466/. Geochemical analysis of ore samples from the deposits visited are contained in Appendix IV.

  9. Au20: A Tetrahedral Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jun; Li, Xi; Zhai, Hua Jin; Wang, Lai S.

    2003-02-07

    Photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that a 20 atom gold cluster has an extremely large energy gap, which is even greater than that of C60, and an electron affinity comparable with that of C60. This observation suggests that the Au20 cluster must be extremely stable and chemically inert. Using relativistic density functional calculations, we found that Au20 possesses a remarkable tetrahedral structure, which is a fragment of the bulk face-centered cubic lattice of gold with a small structural relaxation. Au20 is thus a true cluster molecule, while at the same time it is exactly part of the bulk, but with very different properties. The tetrahedral Au20 may possess interesting catalytic properties and may be synthesized in bulk quantity or assembled on non-interacting surfaces.

  10. Intermetallic compounds, copper and palladium alloys in Au-Pd ore of the Skaergaard pluton, Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudashevsky, N. S.; Rudashevsky, V. N.; Nielsen, T. F. D.

    2015-12-01

    Copper-palladium intermetallic compounds and alloys (2314 grains) from the Au-Pd ore of the Skaergaard layered gabbroic pluton have been studied. Skaergaardite PdCu, nielsenite PdCu3, (Cu,Pd)β, (Cu,Pd)α, (Pd,Cu,Au,Pt) alloys, and native palladium have been identified as a result of 1680 microprobe analyses. The average compositions and various chemical varieties of these minerals are characterized, as well as vertical and lateral zoning in distribution of noble metals. The primary Pd-Cu alloys were formed within a wide temperature interval broadly synchronously with cooling and crystallization of host gabbro and in close association with separation of Fe-Cu sulfide liquid. In the course of crystallization of residual gabbroic melt enriched in iron, noble and heavy metals and saturated with the supercritical aqueous fluid, PGE and Au are selectively concentrated in the Fe-Cu sulfide phase as Pd-Cu and Cu-Au alloys.

  11. Reagan issues mineral policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The National Materials and Minerals Program plan and report that President Reagan sent to Congress on April 5 aims to ‘decrease America's minerals vulnerability’ while reducing future dependence on potentially unstable foreign sources of minerals. These goals would be accomplished by taking inventory of federal lands to determine mineral potential; by meeting the stockpile goals set by the Strategic and Critical Material Stockpiling Act; and by establishing a business and political climate that would encourage private-sector research and development on minerals.Now that the Administration has issued its plan, the Subcommittee on Mines and Mining of the House Committee on Interior and Insular Affairs will consider the National Minerals Security Act (NMSA), which was introduced 1 year ago by subcommittee chairman Jim Santini (D-Nev.) [Eos, May 19, 1981, p. 497]. The bill calls for establishing a three-member White-House-level council to coordinate the development of a national minerals policy; amending tax laws to assist the mining industry to make capital investments to locate and produce strategic materials; and creating a revolving fund for the sale and purchase of strategic minerals. In addition, the NMSA bill would allow the secretary of the interior to make previously withdrawn public lands available for mineral development. The subcommittee will hold a hearing on the Administration's plan on May 11. Interior Secretary James Watt has been invited to testify.

  12. Interfacial nanodroplets guided construction of hierarchical Au, Au-Pt, and Au-Pd particles as excellent catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Aijing; Xu, Jie; Zhang, Xuehua; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Dayang; Xu, Haolan

    2014-01-01

    Interfacial nanodroplets were grafted to the surfaces of self-sacrificed template particles in a galvanic reaction system to assist the construction of 3D Au porous structures. The interfacial nanodroplets were formed via direct adsorption of surfactant-free emulsions onto the particle surfaces. The interfacial nanodroplets discretely distributed at the template particle surfaces and served as soft templates to guide the formation of porous Au structures. The self-variation of footprint sizes of interfacial nanodroplets during Au growth gave rise to a hierarchical pore size distribution of the obtained Au porous particles. This strategy could be easily extended to synthesize bimetal porous particles such as Au-Pt and Au-Pd. The obtained porous Au, Au-Pt, and Au-Pd particles showed excellent catalytic activity in catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol. PMID:24797697

  13. Interfacial nanodroplets guided construction of hierarchical Au, Au-Pt, and Au-Pd particles as excellent catalysts.

    PubMed

    Ma, Aijing; Xu, Jie; Zhang, Xuehua; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Dayang; Xu, Haolan

    2014-01-01

    Interfacial nanodroplets were grafted to the surfaces of self-sacrificed template particles in a galvanic reaction system to assist the construction of 3D Au porous structures. The interfacial nanodroplets were formed via direct adsorption of surfactant-free emulsions onto the particle surfaces. The interfacial nanodroplets discretely distributed at the template particle surfaces and served as soft templates to guide the formation of porous Au structures. The self-variation of footprint sizes of interfacial nanodroplets during Au growth gave rise to a hierarchical pore size distribution of the obtained Au porous particles. This strategy could be easily extended to synthesize bimetal porous particles such as Au-Pt and Au-Pd. The obtained porous Au, Au-Pt, and Au-Pd particles showed excellent catalytic activity in catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol. PMID:24797697

  14. Mineralization by Inhibitor Exclusion

    PubMed Central

    Price, Paul A.; Toroian, Damon; Lim, Joo Eun

    2009-01-01

    One of our goals is to understand the mechanisms that deposit mineral within collagen fibrils, and as a first step we recently determined the size exclusion characteristics of the fibril. This study revealed that apatite crystals up to 12 unit cells in size can access the water within the fibril, whereas molecules larger than a 40-kDa protein are excluded. Based on these observations, we proposed a novel mechanism for fibril mineralization: that macromolecular inhibitors of apatite growth favor fibril mineralization by selectively inhibiting crystal growth in the solution outside of the fibril. To test this mechanism, we developed a system in which crystal formation is driven by homogeneous nucleation at high calcium phosphate concentration and the only macromolecule in solution is fetuin, a 48-kDa inhibitor of apatite growth. Our experiments with this system demonstrated that fetuin determines the location of mineral growth; in the presence of fetuin mineral grows exclusively within the fibril, whereas in its absence mineral grows in solution outside the fibril. Additional experiments showed that fetuin is also able to localize calcification to the interior of synthetic matrices that have size exclusion characteristics similar to those of collagen and that it does so by selectively inhibiting mineral growth outside of these matrices. We termed this new calcification mechanism “mineralization by inhibitor exclusion,” the selective mineralization of a matrix using a macromolecular inhibitor of mineral growth that is excluded from that matrix. Future studies will be needed to evaluate the possible role of this mechanism in bone mineralization. PMID:19414589

  15. Symmetry energy from elliptic flow in 197Au + 197Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russotto, P.; Wu, P. Z.; Zoric, M.; Chartier, M.; Leifels, Y.; Lemmon, R. C.; Li, Q.; Łukasik, J.; Pagano, A.; Pawłowski, P.; Trautmann, W.

    2011-03-01

    The elliptic-flow ratio of neutrons with respect to protons or light complex particles in reactions of neutron-rich systems at relativistic energies is proposed as an observable sensitive to the strength of the symmetry term in the equation of state at supra-normal densities. The results obtained from the existing FOPI/LAND data for 197Au + 197Au collisions at 400 MeV/nucleon in comparison with the UrQMD model favor a moderately soft symmetry term with a density dependence of the potential term proportional to (ρ /ρ0) γ with γ = 0.9 ± 0.4.

  16. Flow in Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belt Tonjes, Marguerite; PHOBOS Collaboration; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Holynski, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Wozniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wyslouch, B.

    2004-08-01

    The study of flow can provide information on the initial state dynamics and the degree of equilibration attained in heavy-ion collisions. This contribution presents results for both elliptic and directed flow as determined from data recorded by the PHOBOS experiment in Au+Au runs at RHIC at \\sqrt{s_{{\\rm NN}}} = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. The PHOBOS detector provides a unique coverage in pseudorapidity for measuring flow at RHIC. The systematic dependence of flow on pseudorapidity, transverse momentum, centrality and energy is discussed.

  17. Quantitative Characterization Guidelines of Erionite Series Minerals for Regulatory Agencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, A.; Dogan, M.

    2013-05-01

    erionite series minerals - the most carcinogenic minerals known - require a special attention from the mineralogical community, which is a prerequisite to establish their true carcinogenic properties. References: Dogan, A.U., Baris, Y.I., Dogan, M., Emri, S., Steel, I., Elmishad, A.G., and Carbone, M., 2006. Genetic predisposition to fiber carcinogenesis causes a mesothelioma epidemic in Turkey. Cancer Research, v. 66 (10), p. 5063-5068, this research paper is highlighted in Nature Reviews-Cancer, v. 6, p. 489. Dogan, A.U. and Dogan, M., 2008, Re-evaluation and re-classification of erionite series minerals, Environmental Geochemistry and Health, v. 30, p. 355-366. Dogan, A.U., Dogan, M., and Hoskins, J.A. 2008, Erionite series minerals: Mineralogical and carcinogenic properties, Environmental Geochemistry and Health, v. 30, p. 367-381.

  18. 36 CFR 293.14 - Mineral leases and mineral permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mineral leases and mineral... AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.14 Mineral leases and mineral permits. (a) All laws pertaining to mineral leasing shall extend to each National Forest Wilderness for the period specified in the...

  19. 36 CFR 293.14 - Mineral leases and mineral permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mineral leases and mineral... AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.14 Mineral leases and mineral permits. (a) All laws pertaining to mineral leasing shall extend to each National Forest Wilderness for the period specified in the...

  20. 36 CFR 293.14 - Mineral leases and mineral permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mineral leases and mineral... AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.14 Mineral leases and mineral permits. (a) All laws pertaining to mineral leasing shall extend to each National Forest Wilderness for the period specified in the...

  1. 36 CFR 293.14 - Mineral leases and mineral permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mineral leases and mineral... AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.14 Mineral leases and mineral permits. (a) All laws pertaining to mineral leasing shall extend to each National Forest Wilderness for the period specified in the...

  2. 36 CFR 293.14 - Mineral leases and mineral permits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mineral leases and mineral... AGRICULTURE WILDERNESS-PRIMITIVE AREAS § 293.14 Mineral leases and mineral permits. (a) All laws pertaining to mineral leasing shall extend to each National Forest Wilderness for the period specified in the...

  3. Lead isotope compositions as guides to early gold mineralization: The North Amethyst vein system, Creede district, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foley, Nora K.; Ayuso, Robert A.

    1994-01-01

    Pb isotope compositions from the late stage of the North Amethyst vein system and from the Bondholder and central and southern Creede mining districts are more radiogenic than the host volcanic rocks of the central cluster of the San Juan volcanic field. Our Pb isotope results indicate that early Au mineralization of the North Amethyst area may represent the product of an older and relatively local hydrothermal system distinct from that of the younger base metal and Ag mineralization found throughout the region. Fluids that deposited Au minerals may have derived their Pb isotope composition by a greater degree of interaction with shallow, relatively less radiogenic volcanic wall rocks. The younger, base metal and Ag-rich mineralization that overprints the Au mineralization in the North Amethyst area clearly has a more radiogenic isotopic signature, which implies that the later mineralization derived a greater component of its Pb from Proterozoic source rocks, or sediments derived from them.Paragenetically early sulfide-rich vein assemblages have the least radiogenic galenas and generally also have the highest Au contents. Thus, identification of paragenetically early vein assemblages with relatively unradiogenic Pb isotope compositions similar to those of the North Amethyst area provides an additional exploration tool for Au in the central San Juan Mountains area.

  4. The Agan epithermal gold-silver deposit and prospects for the discovery of high-sulfidation mineralization in northeast Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, A. V.; Savva, N. E.; Sidorov, A. A.; Kolova, E. E.; Chizhova, I. A.; Alekseev, V. Yu.

    2015-01-01

    The Arman volcanotectonic depression (VTD) containing the Agan deposit is distinguished as the most promising area for the discovery of high-sulfidation (HS) epithermal Au deposit during prospecting in the Central Okhotsk ore district of the Okhotsk-Chukotka volcanogenic belt (OChVB). Studies reveal that the volcanic rocks of the Agan deposit strongly differ from those of the reference HS-type epithermal deposits. It was found that quartz-alunite metasomatites in the ore field are characterized by low Au content and Sn content two orders of magnitude higher than those of Cu and Mo. The pair-correlation coefficients are K cor (Au-Sn) = 0.73 and K cor(Au-Cu) = 0.22. The ore bodies of the Agan deposit do not contain enargite and luzonite—the main indicator minerals for Au productive HS-type mineralization; porous ("vuggy") quartz is weakly manifested. In terms of the mineral complex, the epithermal mineralization revealed in the metasomatites of the deposit is close to the intermediate sulfidation type. At the same time, this mineralization, in many of its features, is similar to the mineralization developed in siliceous and quartz-alunite lithocaps, which are formed above degassing intrusions. In this setting, HS-type ore-bearing fluids either are not formed in the system or do not reach epithermal depths.

  5. Mineral Wool Insulation Binders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowatsch, Stefan

    Mineral wool is considered the best known insulation type among the wide variety of insulation materials. There are three types of mineral wool, and these consist of glass, stone (rock), and slag wool. The overall manufacturing processes, along with features such as specifications and characteristics for each of these types, as well as the role of the binder within the process are described.

  6. Digging into Minnesota Minerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Natural Resources, St. Paul.

    This publication presents students with facts about geology and several learning activities. Topics covered include rocks and minerals, volcanoes and earthquakes, fossils, exploration geology, mining in Minnesota, environmental issues related to mining, mineral uses, mining history, and the geology of Minnesota's state parks. A geologic timetable…

  7. Vitamins, Minerals, and Mood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Bonnie J.; Crawford, Susan G.; Field, Catherine J.; Simpson, J. Steven A.

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the authors explore the breadth and depth of published research linking dietary vitamins and minerals (micronutrients) to mood. Since the 1920s, there have been many studies on individual vitamins (especially B vitamins and Vitamins C, D, and E), minerals (calcium, chromium, iron, magnesium, zinc, and selenium), and vitamin-like…

  8. Mineral Fiber Toxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chemical and physical properties of different forms of mineral fibers impact biopersistence and pathology in the lung. Fiber chemistry, length, aspect ratio, surface area and dose are critical factors determining mineral fiber-associated health effects including cancer and as...

  9. The Miner's Canary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guinier, Lani

    2005-01-01

    Miners used canaries as early warning signals: when a canary gasped for breath, the miners knew there was a problem with the atmosphere in the mine. The experience of people of color in higher education can be used similarly as a diagnostic tool.

  10. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2011-01-01

    Each chapter of the 2011 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Commodity Summaries (MCS) includes information on events, trends, and issues for each mineral commodity as well as discussions and tabular presentations on domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, 5-year salient statistics, and world production and resources. The MCS is the earliest comprehensive source of 2010 mineral production data for the world. More than 90 individual minerals and materials are covered by two-page synopses. For mineral commodities for which there is a Government stockpile, detailed information concerning the stockpile status is included in the two-page synopsis. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2011 contains new chapters on iron oxide pigments, wollastonite, and zeolites. The chapters on mica (natural), scrap and flake and mica (natural), sheet have been combined into a single chapter - mica (natural). Abbreviations and units of measure, and definitions of selected terms used in the report, are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. "Appendix C - Reserves and Resources" has been divided into "Part A - Resource/Reserve Classification for Minerals" and "Part B - Sources of Reserves Data," including some information that was previously in this introduction. A directory of USGS minerals information country specialists and their responsibilities is Appendix D. The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the MCS 2011 are welcomed.

  11. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2003-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  12. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2007-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  13. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2005-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  14. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2000-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  15. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2002-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  16. Mineral Commodity Summaries 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1997-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials

  17. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2006-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  18. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2001-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  19. Mineral Commodity Summaries 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1998-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  20. Mineral Commodity Summaries 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1999-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  1. Mineral Commodity Summaries 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2004-01-01

    Published on an annual basis, this report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for over 90 individual minerals and materials.

  2. Mineral commodity summaries 2016

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ober, Joyce A.

    2016-01-01

    This report is the earliest Government publication to furnish estimates covering 2015 nonfuel mineral industry data. Data sheets contain information on the domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, and 5-year salient statistics for more than 90 individual minerals and materials

  3. Underground mineral extraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.; Stephens, J. B.

    1980-01-01

    A method was developed for extracting underground minerals such as coal, which avoids the need for sending personnel underground and which enables the mining of steeply pitched seams of the mineral. The method includes the use of a narrow vehicle which moves underground along the mineral seam and which is connected by pipes or hoses to water pumps at the surface of the Earth. The vehicle hydraulically drills pilot holes during its entrances into the seam, and then directs sideward jets at the seam during its withdrawal from each pilot hole to comminute the mineral surrounding the pilot hole and combine it with water into a slurry, so that the slurried mineral can flow to a location where a pump raises the slurry to the surface.

  4. A spectrophotometric study of aqueous Au(III) halide-hydroxide complexes at 25-80 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usher, Al; McPhail, D. C.; Brugger, Joël

    2009-06-01

    The mobility and transport of gold in low-temperature waters and brines is affected by the aqueous speciation of gold, which is sensitive in particular to pH, oxidation and halide concentrations. In this study, we use UV-Vis spectrophotometry to identify and measure the thermodynamic properties of Au(III) aqueous complexes with chloride, bromide and hydroxide. Au(III) forms stable square planar complexes with hydroxide and halide ligands. Based on systematic changes in the absorption spectra of solutions in three binary systems NaCl-NaBr, NaCl-NaOH and NaBr-NaOH at 25 °C, we derived log dissociation constants for the following mixed and end-member halide and hydroxide complexes: [AuCl 3Br] -, [AuCl 2Br 2] -, [AuBr 3Cl] - and [AuBr 4] -; [AuCl 3(OH)] -, [AuCl 2(OH) 2] -, [AuCl(OH) 3] - and [Au(OH) 4] -; and [AuBr 3(OH)] -, [AuBr 2(OH) 2] - and [AuBr(OH) 3] -. These are the first reported results for the mixed chloride-bromide complexes. Increasing temperature to 80 °C resulted in an increase in the stability of the mixed chloride-bromide complexes, relative to the end-member chloride and bromide complexes. For the [AuCl (4-n)(OH) n] - series of complexes ( n = 0-4), there is an excellent agreement between our spectrophotometric results and previous electrochemical results of Chateau et al. [Chateau et al. (1966)]. In other experiments, the iodide ion (I -) was found to be unstable in the presence of Au(III), oxidizing rapidly to I 2(g) and causing Au to precipitate. Predicted Au(III) speciation indicates that Au(III) chloride-bromide complexes can be important in transporting gold in brines with high bromide-chloride ratios (e.g., >0.05), under oxidizing (atmospheric), acidic (pH < 5) conditions. Native gold solubility under atmospheric oxygen conditions is predicted to increase with decreasing pH in acidic conditions, increasing pH in alkaline conditions, increasing chloride, especially at acid pH, and increasing bromide for bromide/chloride ratios greater than 0

  5. Why Mineral Interfaces Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putnis, Andrew; Putnis, Christine V.

    2015-04-01

    While it is obvious that reactions between a mineral and an aqueous solution take place at the mineral-fluid interface it is only relatively recently that high spatial resolution studies have demonstrated how the local structure of the mineral surface and the chemical composition of the fluid at the interface control both the short-range and the long-range consequences of mineral-fluid interaction. Long-range consequences of fluid-mineral interaction control element cycles in the earth, the formation of ore-deposits, the chemical composition of the oceans through weathering of rocks and hence climate changes. Although weathering is clearly related to mineral dissolution, to what extent do experimentally measured dissolution rates of minerals help to understand weathering, especially weathering mechanisms? This question is related to the short-range, local reactions that take place when a mineral, that is not stable in the fluid, begins to dissolve. In this case the fluid composition at the interface will become supersaturated with respect to a different phase or phases. This may be a different composition of the same mineral e.g. a Ca-rich feldspar dissolving in a Na-rich solution results in a fluid at the interface which may be supersaturated with respect to an Na-rich feldspar. Alternatively, the interfacial fluid could be supersaturated with respect to a different mineral e.g. an Na-rich zeolite, depending on the temperature. Numerous experiments have shown that the precipitation of a more stable phase at the mineral-fluid interface results in a coupling between the dissolution and the precipitation, and the replacement of one mineral by another. This process separates the short-range mechanisms which depend only on the composition of the interfacial solution, and the long-range consequences that depend on the composition of the residual fluid released from the reacting parent mineral. Typically such residual fluids may carry metal ions tens to hundreds of

  6. Mineral replacement reactions and element mobilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putnis, Christine V.; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion; King, Helen E.; Hövelmann, Jörn; Renard, François

    2016-04-01

    When a mineral is out of equilibrium with an aqueous fluid, reactions will take place in an attempt to reach a new equilibrium. Commonly in the Earth dissolution at a mineral-fluid interface initiates a coupled reaction involving dissolution and precipitation (Ruiz-Agudo et al., 2014). This is a ubiquitous reaction during such processes as metamorphism, metasomatism and weathering. When rock-forming minerals such as feldspars, olivine, pyroxenes are in contact with aqueous fluids (typically NaCl-rich) resultant new phases are formed and elements present in the parent mineral are released to the fluid and therefore mobilized for transport elsewhere. This has been shown in a number of systems such as the albitisation of feldspars (Hövelmann et al., 2010) when a Ca-bearing plagioclase is replaced by albite (NaAlSi3O8). However during this reaction not only is Ca released to the fluid but most other minor elements, such as Mg, Pb, rare earth elements amongst others, are almost totally mobilized and removed in solution. This interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation reaction has many implications for the redistributon of elements in the crust of the Earth. It is also of note that albitisation occurs often in areas of high mineralization, such as in the Curnamona Province in S. Australia (Au-Cu and Ag-Pb-Zn deposits) and the Bamble District of S. Norway. Secondly atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to image these reactions at a nanoscale, especially at the calcite-fluid interface, such as the formation of apatite from phosphate-bearing solutions, and the sequestration of toxic elements, eg., Se and As. References Ruiz-Agudo E., Putnis C.V., Putnis A. (2014) Coupled dissolution and precipitation at mineral-fluid interfaces. Chemical Geology, 383, 132-146. Putnis C.V. and Ruiz-Agudo E. (2013) The mineral-water interface: where minerals react with the environment. Elements, 9, 177-182. Hövelmann J., Putnis A., Geisler T., Schmidt B.C., Golla-Schindler U. (2009

  7. Minerals Yearbook, centennial edition 1981. Volume I. Metals and minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    This edition of the Minerals Yearbook Marks the centennial of the first annual publication of comprehensive mineral industry statistics by the Federal Government. This volume of the Minerals Yearbook, covering metals and minerals, contains 71 commodity or commodity group chapters with data on approximately 90 minerals that were obtained as a result of the mineral information gathering activities of the Bureau of Mines. In addition, the volume contains a chapter on mining and quarrying trends and a statistical summary.

  8. Minerals yearbook, 1993. Volume 1. Metals and minerals. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    This edition of the Mineral Yearbook discusses the performance of the worlwide minerals and materials industry during 1993 and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Volume 1, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters on virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. A chapter on survey methods with a statistical summary of nonfuel minerals, and a chapters on trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries are also included.

  9. Mineral facilities of Europe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Almanzar, Francisco; Baker, Michael S.; Elias, Nurudeen; Guzman, Eric

    2010-01-01

    This map displays over 1,700 records of mineral facilities within the countries of Europe and western Eurasia. Each record represents one commodity and one facility type at a single geographic location. Facility types include mines, oil and gas fields, and plants, such as refineries, smelters, and mills. Common commodities of interest include aluminum, cement, coal, copper, gold, iron and steel, lead, nickel, petroleum, salt, silver, and zinc. Records include attributes, such as commodity, country, location, company name, facility type and capacity (if applicable), and latitude and longitude geographical coordinates (in both degrees-minutes-seconds and decimal degrees). The data shown on this map and in table 1 were compiled from multiple sources, including (1) the most recently available data from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Minerals Yearbook (Europe and Central Eurasia volume), (2) mineral statistics and information from the USGS Minerals Information Web site (http://minerals.usgs.gov/minerals/pubs/country/europe.html), and (3) data collected by the USGS minerals information country specialists from sources, such as statistical publications of individual countries, annual reports and press releases of operating companies, and trade journals. Data reflect the most recently published table of industry structure for each country at the time of this publication. Additional information is available from the country specialists listed in table 2.

  10. Elastic properties of minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, K.S.; Prodaivoda, G.T.

    1993-09-01

    Investigations of the elastic properties of the main rock-forming minerals were begun by T.V. Ryzhova and K.S. Aleksandrov over 30 years ago on the initiative of B.P. Belikov. At the time, information on the elasticity of single crystals in general, and especially of minerals, was very scanty. In the surveys of that time there was information on the elasticity of 20 or 30 minerals. These, as a rule, did not include the main rock-forming minerals; silicates were represented only by garnets, quartz, topaz, tourmaline, zircon, beryl, and staurolite, which are often found in nature in the form of large and fairly high-quality crystals. Then and even much later it was still necessary to prove a supposition which now seems obvious: The elastic properties of rocks, and hence the velocities of elastic (seismic) waves in the earth`s crust, are primarily determined by the elastic characteristics of the minerals composing these rocks. Proof of this assertion, with rare exceptions of mono-mineralic rocks (marble, quartzite, etc.) cannot be obtained without information on the elasticities of a sufficiently large number of minerals, primarily framework, layer, and chain silicates which constitute the basis of most rocks. This also served as the starting point and main problem of the undertakings of Aleksandrov, Ryzhova, and Belikov - systematic investigations of the elastic properties of minerals and then of various rocks. 108 refs., 7 tabs.

  11. Definitions of Health Terms: Minerals

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/definitions/mineralsdefinitions.html Definitions of Health Terms : Minerals To use the sharing features on this page, ... National Institutes of Health, Office of Dietary Supplements Minerals Minerals are those elements on the earth and ...

  12. Solubility of Au in Cl- and S-bearing hydrous silicate melts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botcharnikov, R. E.; Linnen, R. L.; Holtz, F.

    2010-04-01

    The solubility of Au in Cl- and S-bearing hydrous rhyodacitic and andesitic melts has been experimentally investigated at 1050 °C, 200 MPa and log fO 2 close to the Ni/NiO solid oxygen buffer (NNO). The concentrations of Au in the experimental glasses have been determined using Laser Ablation ICP-MS (LA) with special efforts to avoid incorporation of Au micronuggets in the analysis. It is concluded that metal micronuggets are an experimental artefact and produced by Au partitioning into the fluids during heating with consequent precipitation on fluid dissolution in the melting glass powder. Hence, the micronuggets do not represent quench phases and must be excluded from the analysis. The micro-analytical data obtained by LA show that Au concentrations vary from ˜0.2 to ˜2.5 ppm by weight, generally consistent with the literature data for other melt compositions. The measured Au concentrations increase with increasing amounts of Cl and S dissolved in the silicate melt and show a correlation with the apparent activities of Cl and S in the system. The apparent activities of Cl and S are defined by the simplified linear relationship between volatile concentrations in the melt and activity of volatiles. The maximum activity ( a∗ = 1) is assumed to be reached at the saturation of the systems in respect of Cl-rich brine or FeS liquid for Cl and S, respectively. The dependence of Au solubility on the concentrations/activities of Cl and S at the fixed redox conditions shows that Au may form not only oxide- but also Cl- and S-bearing complexes in silicate melts. Furthermore, it indicates that exsolution of S and Cl from the melt by degassing/segregation/crystallization processes may lead to mobilization and extraction of Au into the fluid, liquid and/or mineral phase(s).

  13. Minerals Management Service: Strategic plan

    SciTech Connect

    1997-09-30

    This plan addresses the management of the mineral resources on the Outer Continental Shelf in an environmentally sound and safe manner and the timely collection, verification, and distribution of mineral revenues from Federal and Indian lands. The Minerals Management Service (MMS) manages the Nation`s natural gas, oil and other mineral resources on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS), and collects, accounts for, and disburses revenues from offshore federal mineral leases and from onshore mineral leases on Federal and Indian lands.

  14. A new type of noble metal mineralization in the Northern Caucasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogush, I. A.; Cherkashin, V. I.; Ryabov, G. V.; Abdullayev, M. Sh.

    2016-01-01

    The weathering crust of the Beden ultrabasite massif (the basin of Big Laba River) is identified and studied. Anomalously high contents of noble metals (Au, Pt, Pd) are revealed in the basal horizon of the Jurassic part of the weathering crust. For this reason we suspect an existence of a belt of noble metal miner-alization in the Paleozoic ultrabasites in the Peredovoi Range of the Northern Caucasus.

  15. Minerals and mine drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, B.M.; Turney, W.R.

    1996-11-01

    This paper provides a review of literature published in 1995 on the subject of wastewater related to minerals and mine drainage. Topics covered include: environmental regulations and impacts; and characterization, prevention, treatment and reclamation. 65 refs.

  16. Vitamins and Minerals

    MedlinePlus

    ... Also, many nutrients interact with each other. Most nutritionists believe in designing an overall program of supplements. ... SUPPLEMENTS? In addition to vitamins and minerals, some nutritionists suggest that people with HIV take supplements of ...

  17. Mineral spirits poisoning

    MedlinePlus

    ... substances may be found in: Mineral spirits ( Stoddard solvent ) Some paints Some floor and furniture waxes and ... for recovery. Swallowing such poisons can have severe effects on many parts of the body. The ultimate ...

  18. Fluorescent minerals, a review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Modreski, P.J.; Aumente-Modreski, R.

    1996-01-01

    Fluorescent minerals are more than just an attractive novelty, and collecting them is a speciality for thousands of individuals who appreciate their beauty, rarity, and scientific value. Fluorescent properties can be used as an aid to mineral identification, locality determination, and distinction between natural and synthetic gemstones. This article gives an overview of those aspects of fluorescence that are of most interest to collectors, hobbyists, and mineralogists. -from Authors

  19. Mineral commodity summaries 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2013-01-01

    Each chapter of the 2013 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Commodity Summaries (MCS) includes information on events, trends, and issues for each mineral commodity as well as discussions and tabular presentations on domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, 5-year salient statistics, and world production and resources. The MCS is the earliest comprehensive source of 2012 mineral production data for the world. More than 90 individual minerals and materials are covered by two-page synopses. For mineral commodities for which there is a Government stockpile, detailed information concerning the stockpile status is included in the two-page synopsis. Abbreviations and units of measure, and definitions of selected terms used in the report, are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. “Appendix C—Reserves and Resources” includes “Part A—Resource/Reserve Classification for Minerals” and “Part B—Sources of Reserves Data.” A directory of USGS minerals information country specialists and their responsibilities is Appendix D. The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the MCS 2013 are welcomed.

  20. Mineral commodity summaries 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2014-01-01

    Each chapter of the 2014 edition of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Mineral Commodity Summaries (MCS) includes information on events, trends, and issues for each mineral commodity as well as discussions and tabular presentations on domestic industry structure, Government programs, tariffs, 5-year salient statistics, and world production and resources. The MCS is the earliest comprehensive source of 2013 mineral production data for the world. More than 90 individual minerals and materials are covered by two-page synopses. For mineral commodities for which there is a Government stockpile, detailed information concerning the stockpile status is included in the two-page synopsis. Abbreviations and units of measure, and definitions of selected terms used in the report, are in Appendix A and Appendix B, respectively. “Appendix C—Reserves and Resources” includes “Part A—Resource/Reserve Classification for Minerals” and “Part B—Sources of Reserves Data.” A directory of USGS minerals information country specialists and their responsibilities is Appendix D. The USGS continually strives to improve the value of its publications to users. Constructive comments and suggestions by readers of the MCS 2014 are welcomed.

  1. Global polarization measurement in Au+Au collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B.I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett,J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai,Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai,X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Catu,O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen,H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cosentino, M.R.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford,H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M.M.; Dedovich, T.G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho,P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch,E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti,M.S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.S.; Gorbunov, Y.G.; Gos,H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Guo,Y.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte,B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs,P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev,V.Yu.; Kim, B.C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klein,S.R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; et al.

    2007-08-02

    The system created in non-central relativisticnucleus-nucleus collisions possesses large orbital angular momentum. Dueto spin-orbit coupling, particles produced in such a system could becomeglobally polarized along the direction of the system angular momentum. Wepresent the results of Lambda and anti-Lambda hyperon global polarizationmeasurements in Au+Au collisions at sqrt sNN=62.4 GeV and 200 GeVperformed with the STAR detector at RHIC. The observed globalpolarization of Lambda and anti-Lambda hyperons in the STAR acceptance isconsistent with zero within the precision of the measurements. Theobtained upper limit, lbar P Lambda, anti-Lambda rbar<= 0.02, iscompared to the theoretical values discussed recently in theliterature.

  2. Universality in fragment inclusive yields from Au+Au collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Insolia, A.; Tuvè, C.; Albergo, S.; Bieser, F.; Brady, F. P.; Caccia, Z.; Cebra, D.; Chacon, A. D.; Chance, J. L.; Choi, Y.; Costa, S.; Elliott, J. B.; Gilkes, M.; Hauger, J. A.; Hirsch, A. S.; Hjort, E. L.; Justice, M.; Keane, D.; Kintner, J.; Lisa, M.; Matis, H. S.; McMahan, M.; McParland, C.; Olson, D. L.; Partlan, M. D.; Porile, N. T.; Potenza, R.; Rai, G.; Rasmussen, J.; Ritter, H. G.; Romero, J. L.; Russo, G. V.; Scharenberg, R.; Scott, A.; Shao, Y.; Srivastava, B. K.; Symons, T. J. M.; Tincknell, M. L.; Wang, S.; Warren, P. G.; Wieman, H. H.; Wolf, K. L.

    2001-11-01

    The inclusive light fragment (Z⩽7) yield data in Au+Au reactions, measured by the EOS Collaboration at the LBNL Bevalac, are presented and discussed. For peripheral collisions the measured charge distributions develop progressively according to a power law which can be fitted by a single τ exponent independently of the bombarding energy in the range 250-1200 A MeV. In addition to this universal feature, we observe that the location of the maximum in the individual yields of different charged fragments shift towards lower multiplicity as the fragment charge increases from Z=3 to Z=7. This trend is common to all six measured beam energies. Moments of charge distributions and correlations among different moments are reported. Finally, the THe,DT thermometer has been constructed for central and peripheral collisions using the double yield ratios of He and D, T projectile fragments. The measured nuclear temperatures are in agreement with experimental findings in other fragmentation reactions.

  3. Nuclear Modification of Jet Fragmentation in Au+Au Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowan, Zachary; Phenix Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The characterization of energy in the quark gluon plasma is facilitated by measurements of modifications to the observed jet fragmentation. A favorable channel of study relies on direct photons created in the initial parton interactions of heavy ion collisions. Such a photon traverses the created medium unscathed and grants us a proxy for the transverse momentum of an away side jet. PHENIX Au+Au data recorded at √{sNN} = 200 GeV during RHIC run 14 benefit from the background rejection capability of the silicon vertex detector, enabling the extraction of a higher purity hadron signal. This advantage, combined with a larger integrated luminosity, allows previous PHENIX measurements of fragmentation functions to be extended to greater jet energies. In this talk, the status of the analysis of direct photon hadron correlations with the new data set will be discussed.

  4. Global polarization measurement in Au+Au collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sánchez, M. Calderón De La Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; Moura, M. M. De; Dedovich, T. G.; Dephillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gos, H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Horner, M. J.; Huang, H. Z.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E. M.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kowalik, K. L.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kumar, A.; Kurnadi, P.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; Lapointe, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C.-H.; Lehocka, S.; Levine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porile, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qattan, I. A.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Relyea, D.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Sazhin, P. S.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shen, W. Q.; Shimanskiy, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; Toledo, A. Szanto De; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Buren, G. Van; Kolk, N. Van Der; Leeuwen, M. Van; Molen, A. M. Vander; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; , C. Whitten, Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, J.; Wu, Y.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yue, Q.; Yurevich, V. I.; Zawisza, M.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, W. M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, Y.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, J.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zubarev, A. N.; Zuo, J. X.

    2007-08-01

    The system created in noncentral relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions possesses large orbital angular momentum. Because of spin-orbit coupling, particles produced in such a system could become globally polarized along the direction of the system angular momentum. We present the results of Λ and Λ¯ hyperon global polarization measurements in Au+Au collisions at sNN=62.4 and 200 GeV performed with the STAR detector at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The observed global polarization of Λ and Λ¯ hyperons in the STAR acceptance is consistent with zero within the precision of the measurements. The obtained upper limit, |PΛ,Λ¯|⩽0.02, is compared with the theoretical values discussed recently in the literature.

  5. Application of Hyperspectral Methods in Hydrothermal Mineral System Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laukamp, Carsten; Cudahy, Thomas; Gessner, Klaus; Haest, Maarten; Cacetta, Mike; Rodger, Andrew; Jones, Mal; Thomas, Matilda

    2010-05-01

    Hyperspectral infrared reflectance spectra are used to identify abundances and compositional differences of mineral groups and single mineral phases. 3D mineral maps are derived from surface (airborne and satellite sensed) and sub-surface (drill core) mineralogical data and integrated with geological, geochemical and geophysical datasets, enabling a quantitative mineral systems analysis. The Western Australian Centre of Excellence for 3D Mineral Mapping is working on a variety of mineral deposits to showcase the emerging applications of hyperspectral techniques in mineral system studies. Applied remote sensing technologies comprise hyperspectral airborne surveys (HyMap) covering 126 bands in the visible and shortwave infrared, as well as satellite-based multispectral surveys (ASTER) featuring 14 bands from the visible to thermal infrared. Drill cores were scanned with CSIRO's HyLoggingTM systems, which allow a fast acquisition of mineralogical data in cm-spacing and thereby providing statistically significant datasets. Building on procedures developed for public Australian geosurvey data releases for north Queensland, Broken Hill and Kalgoorlie (http://c3dmm.csiro.au), the ultimate goal is to develop sensor-independent scalars based on the position, depth and shape of selected absorption features in the visible-near (VNIR), shortwave (SWIR) and thermal infrared (TIR), which can be applied to a wide range of mineral deposit types. In the Rocklea Dome Channel Iron Ore deposits of the Pilbara (Western Australia) for example, hyperspectral drill core data were processed into 3D mineral maps to delineate major ore zones by identifying various ore types and possible contaminants. Vitreous (silica-rich) iron ore was successfully separated from ochreous goethitic ore, with both of them requiring different metallurgical processing. The silicified vitreous iron ore as well as outlined carbonate-rich zones are presumably related to overprinting groundwater effects. The

  6. The coupled geochemistry of Au and As in pyrite from ore deposits and geothermal fields: monitoring fluid evolution and external forcing factors in hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reich, M.; Deditius, A.; Tardani, D.; Sanchez-Alfaro, P.

    2014-12-01

    Gold and arsenic incorporation into pyrite (FeS2) is strongly coupled in different types of ore deposits, including Carlin-type Au, porphyry Cu, epithermal Au, orogenic Au, volcanogenic massive sulphide (VMS) and iron-oxide Cu-Au (IOCG), among others. Despite significant advances in the last decades, the fundamental factors controlling Au and As partition in pyrite from hydrothermal systems formed under different tectonic settings and crustal levels remain poorly known. Furthermore, the complexity of pyrite microtextures and growth features suggest multi-stage growth that may be useful to monitor changes in fluid composition related to episodic pumping of fluids. Here we report a comprehensive database of EMPA, SIMS, LA-ICP-MS and micro-PIXE Au-As analyses that cover temperature conditions of pyrite formation from ~30ºC to ~600ºC. The global pyrite Au-As data form a wedge-shaped zone in compositional space, and show that the solid solubility limit of Au in arsenian pyrite is independent of the geochemical environment of pyrite formation and rather depends on its crystal-chemical properties and post-depositional alteration. Compilation of Au-As concentrations and formation temperatures for pyrite indicates that Au and As solubility is retrograde in this mineral, as Au and As contents decrease with increasing temperature from ~200-500ºC. Based on these results, we define one Au-As trend formed by pyrites from Carlin-type and orogenic Au deposits where compositions are largely controlled by fluid-rock-interactions and can be highly perturbed by changes of temperature or subsequent alteration. The second trend consists of pyrites from porphyry Cu, epithermal Au deposits and geothermal systems, which are characterized by compositions that preserve the Au/As signature of mineralizing magmatic-hydrothermal fluids. The well-developed oscillatory zoning in pyrite detected in these systems, where Cu-rich, Au-As-depleted growth zones alternate with Cu-poor, Au

  7. Minerals yearbook, 1982. volume 1. metals and minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This volume of the Minerals Yearbook, covering metals and minerals, contains 73 commodity or commodity group chapters with data on approximately 90 minerals that were obtained as a result of the mineral information gathering activities of the Bureau of Mines. In addition, the volume contains a chapter on mining and quarrying trends and a statistical summary.

  8. Minerals yearbook, 1983. Volume 1. Metals and minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This volume of the Minerals Yearbook, covering metals and minerals, contains 73 commodity or commodity group chapters with data on approximately 90 minerals that were obtained as a result of the mineral information gathering activities of the Bureau of Mines. In addition, the volume contains a chapter on mining and quarrying trends and a statistical summary.

  9. Mathematical model for bone mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Komarova, Svetlana V.; Safranek, Lee; Gopalakrishnan, Jay; Ou, Miao-jung Yvonne; McKee, Marc D.; Murshed, Monzur; Rauch, Frank; Zuhr, Erica

    2015-01-01

    Defective bone mineralization has serious clinical manifestations, including deformities and fractures, but the regulation of this extracellular process is not fully understood. We have developed a mathematical model consisting of ordinary differential equations that describe collagen maturation, production and degradation of inhibitors, and mineral nucleation and growth. We examined the roles of individual processes in generating normal and abnormal mineralization patterns characterized using two outcome measures: mineralization lag time and degree of mineralization. Model parameters describing the formation of hydroxyapatite mineral on the nucleating centers most potently affected the degree of mineralization, while the parameters describing inhibitor homeostasis most effectively changed the mineralization lag time. Of interest, a parameter describing the rate of matrix maturation emerged as being capable of counter-intuitively increasing both the mineralization lag time and the degree of mineralization. We validated the accuracy of model predictions using known diseases of bone mineralization such as osteogenesis imperfecta and X-linked hypophosphatemia. The model successfully describes the highly nonlinear mineralization dynamics, which includes an initial lag phase when osteoid is present but no mineralization is evident, then fast primary mineralization, followed by secondary mineralization characterized by a continuous slow increase in bone mineral content. The developed model can potentially predict the function for a mutated protein based on the histology of pathologic bone samples from mineralization disorders of unknown etiology. PMID:26347868

  10. d + Au hadron correlation measurements at PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    Anne M. Sickles

    2014-05-13

    In these proceedings, we discuss recent results from d + Au collisions in PHENIX ridge related measurements and their possible hydrodynamic origin. We present the v2 at midrapidity and measurements of the pseudorapidity dependence of the ridge, distinguishing between the d-going and Au-going directions. We investigate the possible geometrical origin by comparing v2 in d + Au to that in p + Pb, Au + Au and Pb + Pb collisions. Future plans to clarify the role of geometry in small collision systems at RHIC are discussed.

  11. Minerals Yearbook, 1989. Volume i. Metals and Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The edition of the Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide mineral industry during 1989 and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters on virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. A chapter on advanced materials also has been added to the Minerals Yearbook series beginning with the 1989 volume. In addition, a chapter on survey methods used in data collection with a statistical summary of nonfuel minerals and a chapter on trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries are included.

  12. Minerals yearbook, 1993. Volume 1. Metals and minerals. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    This edition of the Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industry during 1993 and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. It contains chapters on virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. A chapter on survey methods with a statistical summary of nonfuel minerals, and a chapter on trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries are also included.

  13. Minerals yearbook, 1994. Volume 1. Metals and minerals. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-31

    The edition of the Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide minerals and materials industry during 1994 and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. The volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters on virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. The volume also contains chapters on Survey Methods, a Statistical Summary of Nonfuel Minerals, and Trends in Mining and Quarrying.

  14. The mineral economy of Brazil--Economia mineral do Brasil

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gurmendi, Alfredo C.; Barboza, Frederico Lopes; Thorman, Charles H.

    1999-01-01

    This study depicts the Brazilian government structure, mineral legislation and investment policy, taxation, foreign investment policies, environmental laws and regulations, and conditions in which the mineral industry operates. The report underlines Brazil's large and diversified mineral endowment. A total of 37 mineral commodities, or groups of closely related commodities, is discussed. An overview of the geologic setting of the major mineral deposits is presented. This report is presented in English and Portuguese in pdf format.

  15. Cometary Activity Beyond 4 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Womack, M.

    2000-10-01

    Recent observations of the distantly active comets 29 P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1, 2060 Chiron, and C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) are consistent with models that predict that the activity beyond 4 AU is dominated by outgassing of CO and CO2 molecules trapped in an amorphous water ice surface undergoing crystallization. The nominal CO production rates in Hale-Bopp, SW 1 and Chiron over the range of r = 4 to 9 AU are consistent with Q(CO) = (2.9+/-0.5)x1030r{(-2.5 +/- 0.1)}, with sporadic outbursts superimposed. The data indicate that the gas production rates in distant comets are primarily determined by the composition, and not the size, of the nucleus. The dust production rates, however, are very different among these comets and are not well-correlated with heliocentric distance. Thus, the gas and dust mixtures may not be uniform amongst these comets, nor in an individual comet. Development and sublimation of an icy grain coma at ~ 5 AU appears to be a common feature in distantly active comets. Sublimation of such icy grains is probably the main source of emission of OH, CH3OH, HCN, and H2S in comets beyond 4 AU. Studying the energetics of these phenomena provides an excellent opportunity to learn more about the composition and physical behavior of comet nuclei, as well as other icy bodies in the outer solar system, such as moons and Kuiper Belt Objects. This work was funded by the NSF CAREER Program.

  16. Geology and mineralization of the Wyoming Province

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hausel, W.D.; Edwards, B.R.; Graff, P.J.

    1991-01-01

    The Wyoming Province is an Archean craton which underlies portions of Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Utah, and much of Wyoming. The cratonic block consists of Archean age granite-gneiss with interspersed greenstone belts and related supracrustal terranes exposed in the cores of several Laramide uplifts. Resources found in the Province and in the adjacent accreted Proterozoic terrane include banded iron formation, Au, Pt, Pd, W, Sn, Cr, Ni, Zn, Cu, and diamonds. The Province shows many similarities to the mineral-rich cratons of the Canadian shield, the Rhodesian and Transvaal cratons of southern Africa, and the Pilbara and Yilgarn blocks of Western Australia, where much of the world's precious and strategic metal and gemstone resources are located.

  17. Measuring the Hardness of Minerals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bushby, Jessica

    2005-01-01

    The author discusses Moh's hardness scale, a comparative scale for minerals, whereby the softest mineral (talc) is placed at 1 and the hardest mineral (diamond) is placed at 10, with all other minerals ordered in between, according to their hardness. Development history of the scale is outlined, as well as a description of how the scale is used…

  18. Animal...Vegetable...or Mineral?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Eugene

    1973-01-01

    Outlines the problems facing the United States with mineral reserves being depleted, and the consumption of minerals outstripping production. Expresses concern about the deteriorating mineral position, and the ignorance and confusion of the public with respect to mineral production and supply, energy requirements, and environmental consequences.…

  19. American Strategic Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeYoung, John H., Jr.; Chidester, Alfred H.

    American Strategic Minerals is a collection of six papers that were presented in December 1982 at a conference organized by the Center for the Study of Marine Policy at the University of Delaware. According to editor Gerard J. Mangone, director of the center, the papers were commissioned “to investigate not only the objective resource situation, but also past United States policy on strategic minerals and future options open to Washington.” The authors and their chapter titles are John C. Kraft, University of Delaware: “Strategic minerals and world stability” V. Anthony Cammarota, Jr., U.S. Bureau of Mines: “America's dependence on strategic minerals” John D. Morgan, U.S. Bureau of Mines: “Future demands of the United States for strategic minerals” J. Robert Moore, University of Texas: “Alternative sources of strategic minerals from the seabed” Allan I. Mendelowitz and John E. Watson, U.S. General Accounting Office: “U.S. mining investments in developing countries” and James W. Curlin, Nautilus Press: “The political dimensions of strategic minerals.”

  20. [Mineralization of heart valves].

    PubMed

    Pawlikowski, M; Pfitzner, R

    1992-01-01

    Mineralization (calcification) of heart valves (mitral, aortic and aortic bioprosthesis) have been analyzed using; histology, x-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, scanning microscopy, atomic absorption and electron microprobe. Obtained results showed the presence of two type of mineralization. First type is represented by grains composed of hydroxyapatite containing admixture of carbonates. This mineralization is seen macroscopically. Second type of mineralization is possible to determine only using chemical methods. It is represented by biological structures containing amount of Ca, P and other elements higher then normal heart valves. This second type of the mineralization conducts to the changes of physical features of the tissue. Both types of calcification develops because of the defects of atomic structure of biological components of heart valves (mainly collagen). These defects show the presence of free atomic bindings i.e. electric potential. Because of this, they are able to react with surrounding free joints, starting calcification. Defects of biological structures of heart valves are the results of infections, mechanical destruction of the valves etc. Calcification may be stopped on different stages of its development: or as secret calcification or may pass to the stage seen as apatite grains. PMID:1342999

  1. Noble-metal minerals in ores of the black-shale type in the Voronezh Crystalline Massif, central Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyshov, N. M.

    2009-12-01

    High-carbonaceous stratified formations and related metasomatic rocks of global abundance are among highly promising sources of gold and platinum-group metals (PGMs) in the 21st century. The Au-PGM mineralization of the black-shale type hosted in the Early Karelian Kursk and Oskol groups in central Russia is characterized by complex multicomponent and polymineralic composition (more than 60 ore minerals, including more than 20 Au and PGM phases) and diverse speciation of noble metals in form of (1) native elements (gold, palladium, platinum, osmium, silver); (2) metallic solid solutions and intermetallic compounds (Pt-bearing palladium, Fe-bearing platinum, gold-platinum-palladium, osmiridium, rutheniridosmin, platiridosmin, platosmiridium, Hg-Te-Ag-bearing gold, gold-silver amalgam, arquerite, palladium stannide (unnamed mineral), platinum-palladium-gold-silver-tin); (3) PGM, Au, and Ag sulfoarsenides, tellurides, antimonides, selenides, and sulfosalts (sperrylite, irarsite, hessite, Pd and Pt selenide (unnamed mineral)), testibiopalladinite, Pd antimonide (unnamed mineral), etc.; and (4) impurities in ore-forming sulfides, sulfoarsenides, tellurides, antimonides, and selenides. The chemical analyses of PGM and Au minerals are presented, and their morphology and microstructure are considered.

  2. PGE mineralization of dunite-wehrlite massifs at the Gutara-Uda interfluve, Eastern Sayan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mekhonoshin, A. S.; Tolstykh, N. D.; Podlipsky, M. Yu.; Kolotilina, T. B.; Vishnevsky, A. V.; Benedyuk, Yu. P.

    2013-05-01

    The Pt-Pd and Au-Ag mineralization hosted in both wehrlite without visible links to sulfide mineralization (dispersed assemblage of the Tartai massif) and disseminated Cu-Ni sulfide ore (ore assemblage of the Ognit massif) was found in dunite-wehrlite massifs localized in the fold framework of the Siberian Craton. The Pt minerals in both assemblages comprise sperrylite (PtAs2) and secondary Pt-Fe-Ni alloys in the Ognit massif and Pt-Fe-Cu and Pt-Cu alloys in the Tartai massif. The Pd minerals are widespread in the ore assemblages as compounds with Te, Sb, and Bi, whereas in the dispersed assemblage Pd is concentrated primarily in Pd-Cu-Sb compounds. Both assemblages are characterized by similar substitution of sperrylite with orcelite (Ni5 - xAs2) and then with secondary Pt-Fe-Ni or Pt-Fe-Cu and Pt-Cu alloys; the occurrence of Au-Ag alloys with prevalence of Ag over Au; and replacement of them with auricupride (Cu3Au) at the late stage. Sperrylite in both assemblages contains Ir impurities, while the Pd minerals contain Cu and Ni admixtures, which are typical of mineral assemblages related to the ultramafic intrusions with nickel specialization. PGM were formed under a low sulfur fugacity and high As, Bi, and Sb activities. The postmagmatic fluids affected the primary mineral assemblages under reductive conditions, and this effect resulted in replacement of sperrylite with Ni arsenide (orcelite) and Pt-Fe-Ni and Pt-Fe-Cu alloys; Ni and Cu sulfides were replaced with awaruite and native copper.

  3. An XPS study of gold deposition at low temperatures on sulfide minerals: Reducing agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hyland, M.M.; Bancroft, G.M. )

    1989-02-01

    The reduction of KAuCl{sub 4} to metallic gold by pyrite, high iron content sphalerite and galena was studied using surface analytical and solution techniques, including X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and atomic absorption spectroscopy (A.A.). High resolution XPS of the reacted mineral showed that the mineral surface is the Au reducing agent. On galena and high iron sphalerite, a corroded layer forms rapidly as S{sup 2 minus} is oxidized to polysulfides, S{sup 2{minus}}{sub x}, and the metals are leached from the surface. Although Au is also reduced on pyrite, the formation of surface polysulfide is not concurrent with Au reduction. Solution analysis for the pyrite and high iron sphalerite reactions shows, however, that considerable sulfate is produced due to the oxidation of S{sup 2{minus}}, S{sup 2{minus}}{sub 2} or the intermediate polysulphide.

  4. Synthesis and optical property characterization of elongated AuPt and Pt@Au metal nanoframes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangji; Jang, Hee-Jeong; Jang, Ho Young; Hong, Soonchang; Moh, Sang Hyun; Park, Sungho

    2016-02-01

    We report a facile method to synthesize elongated nanoframes consisting of Pt and Au in solution. Pentagonal Au nanorods served as templates and successfully led to an elongated AuPt nanoframe after etching the core Au. Subsequently, the coating of Au around Pt ridges resulted in Pt@Au metal nanoframes. The resulting elongated nanostructure exhibited 5 well-defined ridges continuously connected along the long axis. During the shape evolution from pure Au nanorods to elongated Pt@Au metal nanoframes, their corresponding localized surface plasmon resonance bands were monitored. Especially, unique surface plasmon features were observed for elongated Pt@Au nanoframes where the short-axis oscillation of surface free electrons is strongly coupled but the long-axis oscillation is not coupled among the ridges.We report a facile method to synthesize elongated nanoframes consisting of Pt and Au in solution. Pentagonal Au nanorods served as templates and successfully led to an elongated AuPt nanoframe after etching the core Au. Subsequently, the coating of Au around Pt ridges resulted in Pt@Au metal nanoframes. The resulting elongated nanostructure exhibited 5 well-defined ridges continuously connected along the long axis. During the shape evolution from pure Au nanorods to elongated Pt@Au metal nanoframes, their corresponding localized surface plasmon resonance bands were monitored. Especially, unique surface plasmon features were observed for elongated Pt@Au nanoframes where the short-axis oscillation of surface free electrons is strongly coupled but the long-axis oscillation is not coupled among the ridges. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08200e

  5. The giant Pebble Cu-Au-Mo deposit and surrounding region, southwest Alaska: introduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelley, Karen D.; Lang, James R.; Eppinger, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    The Pebble deposit is located about 320 km southwest of and 27 km northwest of the village of Iliamna in Alaska (Fig. 1A). It is one of the largest porphyry deposits in terms of contained Cu (Fig. 2A) and it has the largest Au endowment of any porphyry deposit in the world (Fig. 2B). The deposit comprises the Pebble West and Pebble East zones that represent two coeval hydrothermal centers within a single system (Lang et al., 2013). Together the measured and indicated resources total 5,942 million metric tons (Mt) at 0.42% Cu, 0.35 g/t Au, and 250 ppm Mo with an inferred resource of 4,835 Mt at 0.24% Cu, 0.26 g/t Au, and 215 ppm Mo. In addition, the deposit contains significant concentrations of Ag, Pd, and Re (Northern Dynasty Minerals, 2011).

  6. Cretaceous Cu-Au, pyrite, and Fe-oxide-apatite deposits in the Ningwu basin, Lower Yangtze Area, Eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jin-Jie; Lu, Bang-Cheng; Wang, Tie-Zhu; Che, Lin-Rui

    2015-05-01

    The Cretaceous Ningwu volcanic basin of the Middle and Lower Yangtze River Valley metallogenic belt of eastern China hosts numerous Fe-oxide-apatite, Cu-Au, and pyrite deposits. The mineralization in the Ningwu basin is associated with subvolcanic rocks, consisting of gabbro-diorite porphyry and/or pyroxene diorite. However, the mineralization is associated with subvolcanic and volcanic rock suite belonging to the Niangniangshan Formation in the Tongjing Cu-Au deposit, including nosean-bearing aegirine-augite syenites, quartz syenites, and quartz monzonites. The zoning displayed by the alteration and mineralization comprises: (1) an upper light-colored zone of argillic, carbonate, and pyrite alteration and silicification that is locally associated with pyrite and gold mineralization, (2) a central dark-colored zone of diopside, fluorapatite-magnetite, phlogopite, and garnet alteration associated with fluorapatite-magnetite mineralization, and (3) a lowermost light-colored zone of extensive albite alteration. The Cu-Au and pyrite orebodies are peripheral to the Fe-oxide-apatite deposits in this area and overlie the iron orebodies, including the Meishan Cu-Au deposit in the northern Ningwu basin and the pyrite deposits in the central Ningwu basin. The δ34S values of sulfides from the Fe-oxide-apatite, Cu-Au, and pyrite deposits in the Ningwu basin show large variation, with a mixed sulfur source, including magmatic sulfur and/or a mixture of sulfur derived from a magmatic component, country rock, and thermochemical reduction of sulfate at 200-300 °C. The ore-forming fluids associated with iron mineralization were derived mainly from magmatic fluids, and the late-stage ore-forming fluids related to Cu-Au and pyrite mineralization may have formed by the introduction of cooler meteoric water to the system. The Fe-oxide-apatite, Cu-Au, and pyrite deposits of the Ningwu basin formed in an extensional environment and are associated with a large-scale magmatic

  7. Minerals Yearbook 1989: Boron

    SciTech Connect

    Lyday, P.A.

    1990-08-01

    U.S. production and sales of boron minerals and chemicals decreased during the year. Domestically, glass fiber insulation was the largest use for borates, followed by sales to distributors, textile-grade glass fibers, and borosilicate glasses. California was the only domestic source of boron minerals. The United States continued to provide essentially all of its own supply while maintaining a strong position as a source of sodium borate products and boric acid exported to foreign markets. Supplementary U.S. imports of Turkish calcium borate and calcium-sodium borate ores, borax, and boric acid, primarily for various glass uses, continued.

  8. Advancements for continuous miners

    SciTech Connect

    Fiscor, S.

    2007-06-15

    Design changes and new technology make the modern continuous miner more user friendly. Two of the major manufacturers, Joy Mining Machinery and DBT, both based near Pittsburgh, PA, USA, have recently acquired other OEMs to offer a greater product line. Joy's biggest development in terms of improving cutting time is the FACEBOSS Control System which has an operator assistance element and Joy Surface Reporting Software (JSRP). Joy's WetHead continuous miners have excellent performance. DBT is researching ways to make the machines more reliable with new drive systems. It has also been experimenting with water sprays to improve dust suppression. 4 photos.

  9. Microbially mediated mineral carbonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, I. M.; Wilson, S. A.; Dipple, G. M.; Southam, G.

    2010-12-01

    Mineral carbonation involves silicate dissolution and carbonate precipitation, which are both natural processes that microorganisms are able to mediate in near surface environments (Ferris et al., 1994; Eq. 1). (Ca,Mg)SiO3 + 2H2CO3 + H2O → (Ca,Mg)CO3 + H2O + H4SiO4 + O2 (1) Cyanobacteria are photoautotrophs with cell surface characteristics and metabolic processes involving inorganic carbon that can induce carbonate precipitation. This occurs partly by concentrating cations within their net-negative cell envelope and through the alkalinization of their microenvironment (Thompson & Ferris, 1990). Regions with mafic and ultramafic bedrock, such as near Atlin, British Columbia, Canada, represent the best potential sources of feedstocks for mineral carbonation. The hydromagnesite playas near Atlin are a natural biogeochemical model for the carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals (Power et al., 2009). Field-based studies at Atlin and corroborating laboratory experiments demonstrate the ability of a microbial consortium dominated by filamentous cyanobacteria to induce the precipitation of carbonate minerals. Phototrophic microbes, such as cyanobacteria, have been proposed as a means for producing biodiesel and other value added products because of their efficiency as solar collectors and low requirement for valuable, cultivable land in comparison to crops (Dismukes et al., 2008). Carbonate precipitation and biomass production could be facilitated using specifically designed ponds to collect waters rich in dissolved cations (e.g., Mg2+ and Ca2+), which would allow for evapoconcentration and provide an appropriate environment for growth of cyanobacteria. Microbially mediated carbonate precipitation does not require large quantities of energy or chemicals needed for industrial systems that have been proposed for rapid carbon capture and storage via mineral carbonation (e.g., Lackner et al., 1995). Therefore, this biogeochemical approach may represent a readily

  10. Continuous miner noise

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, J.

    1981-08-01

    Noise generated by continuous miners in underground coal production is an important health hazard. Laboratory tests of simulated cutting operations and in-mine noise measurements have been made. These show that coal cutting noise and conveyor noise are the dominant sources of miner operational noise. Typical noise levels for cutting and conveying operations are 97 dBA. For full operation of all machine systems, the overall sound pressure level is approximately 101 dBA. In-mine and laboratory test results show excellent agreement in both A-weighted overall levels as well as A-weighted one-third octave band spectra.

  11. Typing mineral deposits using their associated rocks, grades and tonnages using a probabilistic neural network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singer, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    A probabilistic neural network is employed to classify 1610 mineral deposits into 18 types using tonnage, average Cu, Mo, Ag, Au, Zn, and Pb grades, and six generalized rock types. The purpose is to examine whether neural networks might serve for integrating geoscience information available in large mineral databases to classify sites by deposit type. Successful classifications of 805 deposits not used in training - 87% with grouped porphyry copper deposits - and the nature of misclassifications demonstrate the power of probabilistic neural networks and the value of quantitative mineral-deposit models. The results also suggest that neural networks can classify deposits as well as experienced economic geologists. ?? International Association for Mathematical Geology 2006.

  12. Two stages of gold mineralization at Hutti mine, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, A. J.; Kolb, J.; Meyer, F. M.; Vennemann, T.

    2013-01-01

    The Hutti gold mine is located in a high-angle, NNW-SSE-trending shear zone system, which hosts nine discrete auriferous shear zones (reefs). On a clockwise, retrograde PT path two separate stages of deformation/metamorphism (D2/M2 and D3/M3) occurred synchronous with two distinct stages of gold mineralization, both of which were associated with different fluid types. Stage 1 mineralization developed during D2/M2, where the amphibolite host rocks were altered by a metamorphic fluid with a {{δ }^{{18}}}{{O}_{{{{H}_2}O}}} of 7.5-10.1 ‰, rich in K, S, As, and Au at pressure and temperature conditions of around 3 kbar and 530 + 20/-30°C, respectively. The stage 1 auriferous shear zones are enveloped by a zoned alteration consisting of a distal biotite-chlorite and proximal biotite-plagioclase assemblage. Subsequently, D2/M2 was overprinted by D3/M3 deformation and metamorphism at 300-400°C and <2 kbar that formed the stage 2 mineralization. The stage 2 mineralizing fluid which originated from outside the greenstone belt (δ18Ofluid of 3.2-6.8 ‰) was rich in Si, Au, and W. This mineralization stage is distinct by the emplacement of laminated quartz veins central to the shear zone, containing locally visible gold at concentrations of up to 1 kg Au/t. The laminated quartz veins are surrounded by a millimeter-scale chlorite2-K-feldspar alteration halo, which replaced the stage 1 biotite-plagioclase assemblage. The oxygen isotopic composition of the stage 2 fluid suggests a mixture of a magmatic fluid with an oxygen isotopic composition in the range of 6 to 10 ‰ and an isotopically light formation fluid that resulted from fluid-rock interaction in the greenstone pile. The two fluid fluxes at stages 1 and 2 both contributed to the overall gold mineralization; however, it was the second fluid pulse, which gave the Hutti mine its status as the largest gold mine in India. The metamorphic evolution was thereby important for the first stage, whereas the second stage was

  13. Clay Mineral: Radiological Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotomácio, J. G.; Silva, P. S. C.; Mazzilli, B. P.

    2008-08-01

    Since the early days, clays have been used for therapeutic purposes. Nowadays, most minerals applied as anti-inflammatory, pharmaceutics and cosmetic are the clay minerals that are used as the active ingredient or, as the excipient, in formulations. Although their large use, few information is available in literature on the content of the radionuclide concentrations of uranium and thorium natural series and 40K in these clay minerals. The objective of this work is to determine the concentrations of 238U, 232Th, 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K in commercial samples of clay minerals used for pharmaceutical or cosmetic purposes. Two kinds of clays samples were obtained in pharmacies, named green clay and white clay. Measurement for the determination of 238U and 232Th activity concentration was made by alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry was used for 226Ra, 228Ra, 210Pb and 40K determination. Some physical-chemical parameters were also determined as organic carbon and pH. The average activity concentration obtained was 906±340 Bq kg-1 for 40K, 40±9 Bq kg-1 for 226Ra, 75±9 Bq kg-1 for 228Ra, 197±38 Bq kg-1 for 210Pb, 51±26 Bq kg-1 for 238U and 55±24 Bq kg-1 for 232Th, considering both kinds of clay.

  14. Oxalate minerals on Mars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Applin, D. M.; Izawa, M. R. M.; Cloutis, E. A.; Goltz, D.; Johnson, J. R.

    2015-06-01

    Small amounts of unidentified organic compounds have only recently been inferred on Mars despite strong reasons to expect significant concentrations and decades of searching. Based on X-ray diffraction and reflectance spectroscopic analyses we show that solid oxalic acid and its most common mineral salts are stable under the pressure and ultraviolet irradiation environment of the surface of Mars, and could represent a heretofore largely overlooked reservoir of organic carbon in the martian near-surface. In addition to the delivery to Mars by carbonaceous chondrites, oxalate minerals are among the predicted breakdown products of meteoritic organic matter delivered to the martian surface, as well as any endogenic organic carbon reaching the martian surface from the interior. A reinterpretation of pyrolysis experiments from the Viking, Phoenix, and Mars Science Laboratory missions shows that all are consistent with the presence of significant concentrations of oxalate minerals. Oxalate minerals could be important in numerous martian geochemical processes, including acting as a possible nitrogen sink (as ammonium oxalate), and contributing to the formation of “organic” carbonates, methane, and hydroxyl radicals.

  15. Identification of Minerals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allison, Diane

    2005-01-01

    The lab described in this article was developed to satisfy two major goals. First, the activity is designed to show students the proper techniques used to identify the seven characteristics of all minerals. Second, the lab gives students a glimpse into the life of a professional field geologist. The author has students complete this lab at the end…

  16. Mineral mining equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Monks, H.

    1980-11-25

    A mineral mining machine hauls itself along a working face by engaging a round link chain. The links of the chain are fed sequentially from link-retaining pockets in a track component arranged around the working face, around a driven sprocket assembly on the machine and returned to the pockets.

  17. Bioleaching of Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    F. Roberto

    2002-02-01

    Bioleaching is the term used to describe the microbial dissolution of metals from minerals. The commercial bioleaching of metals, particularly those hosted in sulfide minerals, is supported by the technical disciplines of biohydrometallurgy, hydrometallurgy, pyrometallurgy, chemistry, electrochemistry, and chemical engineering. The study of the natural weathering of these same minerals, above and below ground, is also linked to the fields of geomicrobiology and biogeochemistry. Studies of abandoned and disused mines indicate that the alterations of the natural environment due to man's activities leave as remnants microbiological activity that continues the biologically mediated release of metals from the host rock (acid rock drainage; ARD). A significant fraction of the world's copper, gold and uranium is now recovered by exploiting native or introduced microbial communities. While some members of these unique communities have been extensively studied for the past 50 years, our knowledge of the composition of these communities, and the function of the individual species present remains relatively limited. Nevertheless, bioleaching represents a major strategy in mineral resource recovery whose importance will increase as ore reserves decline in quality, become more difficult to process (due to increased depth, increased need for comminution, for example), and as environmental considerations eliminate traditional physical processes such as smelting, which have served the mining industry for hundreds of years.

  18. Minerals yearbook 1977. Volume I. Metals and minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    This report contains chapters on virtually all metallic and nonmetallic mineral commodities important to the domestic economy. In addition, it includes a general review chapter on the mineral industries, a chapter on mining and quarrying trends, and a statistical summary.

  19. Wetting and energetics of solid Au and Au-Ge/SiC interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Wynblatt, P.

    1998-09-01

    A solid state wetting technique has been used to investigate the effects of alloying Au with Ge on the wetting and energetics of Au/SiC interfaces at 1123 K. Germanium was found to segregate to the Au/SiC interface, thereby lowering the contact angle of Au on SiC from 133 to 110, and doubling the work of adhesion of Au on SiC. Calculations based on a monolayer model predict a segregation of 0.89 monolayers of Ge at the Au/SiC interface for Au containing 2.3 at.% Ge. This agrees reasonably well with a coverage of 0.6 monolayers Ge at the Au/SiC interface obtained by direct measurements based on the crater edge profiling technique. The work also demonstrates that simple models of interfacial composition can be combined with the Gibbs adsorption isotherm to provide reliable estimates of interfacial composition at complex four-component interfaces.

  20. Pt{sub 3}Au and PtAu clusters: Electronic states and potential energy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, D.; Balasubramanian, K.

    1994-03-15

    We carried out complete active space multiconfiguration self-consistent-field calculations followed by multireference singles+doubles configuration interaction with the Davidson correction which included up to 3.55 million configurations employing relativistic effective core potentials on Pt{sub 3}+Au and PtAu clusters. Four low-lying electronic states were identified for Pt{sub 3}+Au. The {sup 2}{ital A}{sub 2} electronic state ({ital C}{sub 3{ital v}}) was found to be the ground state of Pt{sub 3}Au. Spin--orbit effects were found to be significant. We also computed six low-lying electronic states of PtAu and four low-lying electronic states of PtAu{sup +}. The 5/2 ({sup 2}{Delta}) and 0{sup +}({sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}) states were found to be the ground states of PtAu and PtAu{sup +}, respectively.

  1. Gold nanowired: a linear (Au25)(n) polymer from Au25 molecular clusters.

    PubMed

    De Nardi, Marco; Antonello, Sabrina; Jiang, De-en; Pan, Fangfang; Rissanen, Kari; Ruzzi, Marco; Venzo, Alfonso; Zoleo, Alfonso; Maran, Flavio

    2014-08-26

    Au25(SR)18 has provided fundamental insights into the properties of clusters protected by monolayers of thiolated ligands (SR). Because of its ultrasmall core, 1 nm, Au25(SR)18 displays molecular behavior. We prepared a Au25 cluster capped by n-butanethiolates (SBu), obtained its structure by single-crystal X-ray crystallography, and studied its properties both experimentally and theoretically. Whereas in solution Au25(SBu)18(0) is a paramagnetic molecule, in the crystal it becomes a linear polymer of Au25 clusters connected via single Au-Au bonds and stabilized by proper orientation of clusters and interdigitation of ligands. At low temperature, [Au25(SBu)18(0)]n has a nonmagnetic ground state and can be described as a one-dimensional antiferromagnetic system. These findings provide a breakthrough into the properties and possible solid-state applications of molecular gold nanowires. PMID:25088331

  2. Interplanetary dust between 1 and 5 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, J. E.; Singer, S. F.; Alvarez, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    Analyses of data from the Meteoroid Detection Experiment (MDE) and the Imaging Photopolarimeter (IPP) aboard Pioneer 10 and 11 have led to contradictory conclusions. While the MDE indicates a significant particle environment in the outer solar system (out to at least 5 AU), the IPP sees no zodiacal light (therefore implying no small particles) past 3.3 AU. These two results are reconciled by noting that the spectral index p (relating particle radius and particle concentration) is not a constant in the solar system but changes from less than 2 near 1 AU to more than 2.5 at 5 AU for particles in the range of 10 microns.

  3. Minerals yearbook, 1984. Volume 1. Metals and minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The volume of the Minerals Yearbook, covering metals and minerals, contains 72 commodity or commodity group chapters with data on approximately 90 minerals that were obtained as a result of the mineral information gathering activities of the Bureau of Mines. In addition, the volume contains a chapter on mining and quarrying trends, a chapter discussing the statistical surveying methods used by the Bureau of Mines, and a statistical summary.

  4. Minerals Yearbook, 1988. Volume 1. Metals and minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Volume I of the 1988 Minerals Yearbook, covering metals and minerals, contains 79 commodity or commodity group chapters with data on approximately 90 minerals that were obtained as a result of the mineral information gathering activities of the U.S. Bureau of Mines. In addition, the volume contains chapters on mining and quarrying trends and on the statistical surveying methods used by the Bureau of Mines and a statistical summary.

  5. Minerals yearbook, 1985. Volume 1. Metals and minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    This volume of the 1985 Minerals Yearbook, covering metals and minerals, contains 72 commodity or commodity group chapters with data on approximately 90 minerals that were obtained as a result of the mineral information gathering activities of the Bureau of Mines. In addition, the volume contains a chapter on mining and quarrying trends, a chapter discussing the statistical surveying methods used by the Bureau of Mines, and a statistical summary.

  6. Carbon Mineral Ecology: Predicting the Undiscovered Minerals of Carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazen, R. M.; Hummer, D. R.; Downs, R. T.; Hystad, G.; Golden, J.

    2015-12-01

    The diversity and distribution of Earth's minerals through deep time reflects key events in our planet's crustal evolution. Studies in mineral ecology exploit mineralogical databases to document diversity-distribution relationships of minerals, which reveal that all carbon-bearing minerals, as well as subsets containing C with O, H, Ca, or Na, conform to Large Number of Rare Events (LNRE) distributions. LNRE models facilitate prediction of total mineral diversity, and thus point to minerals that exist on Earth but have not yet been discovered and described. Our model predicts that at least 548 C minerals exist on Earth today, indicating that at least 145 carbon-bearing mineral species have yet to be discovered. Furthermore, by analyzing subsets of the most common additional elements in carbon-bearing minerals (i.e., 378 C + O species; 282 C + H species; 133 C + Ca species; and 100 C + Na species), we predict that 129 of these missing carbon minerals contain oxygen, 118 contain hydrogen, 52 contain calcium, and more than 60 contain sodium. The majority of these as yet undescribed minerals are predicted to be hydrous carbonates, many of which may have been overlooked because they are colorless, poorly crystalized, and/or water-soluble. We propose the identities of plausible as yet undescribed carbon minerals, as well as search strategies for their discovery. Some of these minerals will be natural examples of known synthetic compounds, including carbides such as calcium carbide (CaC2), crystalline hydrocarbons such as pyrene (C16H10), and numerous oxalates, anhydrous carbonates, and hydrous carbonates. Many other missing carbon minerals will be isomorphs of known carbon minerals, notably of the more than 100 different hydrous carbonate structures. An understanding of Earth's "missing" minerals provides a more complete picture of geochemical processes that influence crustal evolution.

  7. Bright, NIR-emitting Au23 from Au25: characterization and applications including biolabeling.

    PubMed

    Muhammed, Madathumpady Abubaker Habeeb; Verma, Pramod Kumar; Pal, Samir Kumar; Kumar, R C Arun; Paul, Soumya; Omkumar, Ramakrishnapillai Vyomakesannair; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2009-10-01

    A novel interfacial route has been developed for the synthesis of a bright-red-emitting new subnanocluster, Au(23), by the core etching of a widely explored and more stable cluster, Au(25)SG(18) (in which SG is glutathione thiolate). A slight modification of this procedure results in the formation of two other known subnanoclusters, Au(22) and Au(33). Whereas Au(22) and Au(23) are water soluble and brightly fluorescent with quantum yields of 2.5 and 1.3 %, respectively, Au(33) is organic soluble and less fluorescent, with a quantum yield of 0.1 %. Au(23) exhibits quenching of fluorescence selectively in the presence of Cu(2+) ions and it can therefore be used as a metal-ion sensor. Aqueous- to organic-phase transfer of Au(23) has been carried out with fluorescence enhancement. Solvent dependency on the fluorescence of Au(23) before and after phase transfer has been studied extensively and the quantum yield of the cluster varies with the solvent used. The temperature response of Au(23) emission has been demonstrated. The inherent fluorescence of Au(23) was used for imaging human hepatoma cells by employing the avidin-biotin interaction. PMID:19711391

  8. The Electronic Properties and L3 XANES of Au and Nano-Au

    SciTech Connect

    Yiu, Y.M.; Zhang, P.; Sham, T.K.

    2004-04-20

    The electronic properties of Au crystal and nano Au have been investigated by theory and experiment. Molecularly capped nano-Au was synthesized using the two-phase method. Au nano-particles have been characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). They retain the fcc crystal structure. Their sizes have been determined to be in a range from 5.5 nm to 1.7 nm. The L3 X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) of nano-Au and Au foil have been recorded using synchrotron radiation, and examined by theoretical calculation based on the first principles. Both theory and experiment show that the nano-Au particles have essentially all the Au L3 XANES features of bulk Au in the near edge region with less pronounced resonance peaks. It is also shown that nano Au exhibits lower 4f binding energy than bulk Au in good agreement with quantum confined Au systems reported previously.

  9. Mineral oil soluble borate compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Dulat, J.

    1981-09-15

    Alkali metal borates are reacted with fatty acids or oils in the presence of a low hlb value surfactant to give a stable mineral oil-soluble product. Mineral oil containing the borate can be used as a cutting fluid.

  10. International minerals: a national perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Agnew, A.F.

    1983-01-01

    Seven authors bring a variety of perspectives to the subject of minerals availability. In the domestic area, an overview of the US strategic mineral situation is followed by a discussion of changes in one state's mineral policy decisions over a 200-year period. Later chapters describe the potential of Alaska's mineral resources, with a focus on the immediate need for a thorough inventory of this vast area, and the nature and sources of mineral information available to Canadian policymakers as useful models in making inventories. In the international area, there is a discussion of the key role of South Africa in the world mineral picture and the strategic importance to the Soviet Union of the mineral wealth of Afghanistan. The volume concludes with a review of the history of US mineral policies. Separate abstracts were prepared for the seven chapters selected for the Energy Data Base (EDB) and Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA).

  11. Magnetic birefringence of minerals.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Barry R; Wilson, Stephen R; Ridler, Peter J

    2005-01-15

    The earliest reports of magnetically induced optical birefringence included data for liquids, magnetic fluids and colloidal suspensions. Recent work has shown that with relatively straightforward apparatus, when carefully designed and aligned, measurable effects can be recorded even for suspensions of relatively weak diamagnetic materials, including mineral particles. By recording the magnitude of the birefringence induced in magnetic fields of up to two Tesla, a method for the analysis of the magnetic and optical characteristics of these diamagnetic colloids is evidenced. The principles, apparatus and methodology involved are described and novel data reported for the minerals attapulgite, bentonite, hectorite, kaolinite, montmorillonite and vermiculite. Preliminary experiments using pulsed fields on vermiculite sols show that, in favourable circumstances, estimates of particle size can be made by analysing signal response rates. PMID:15571692

  12. Mineral resources of Antarctica

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, P.D.; Williams, P.L.; Pride, D.E.

    1983-01-01

    Metallic and nonmetallic mineral occurrences are abundant in Antarctica. The most significant known deposits are of iron, copper, and coal. In the Precambrian shield of East Antarctica, for example, iron is present as banded iron-formation and as magnetite in veins, pods, and schist. The largest deposits of iron are in the Prince Charles Mountains, where bodies of banded iron-formation at least as thick as 400 m extend, mostly under the ice for at least 120 km. Widely scattered morainal boulders and outcrops of iron-rich rock suggest that undiscovered iron deposits are also distributed over many other parts of East Antarctica. Gondwana reconstructions suggest that many more mineral deposits occur in Antarctica. However, ice covers nearly 98 percent of the continent, and few of the bedrock areas have even been prospected or geologically, geophysically, or geochemically mapped in detail.

  13. Minerals and mine drainage

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, H.C.; Thomson, B.M.

    2009-09-15

    A review of literature published in 2008 and early 2009 on research related to the production of acid mine drainage and/or in the dissolution of minerals as a result of mining, with special emphasis on the effects of these phenomena on the water quality in the surrounding environment, is presented. This review is divided into six sections: 1) Site Characterization and Assessment, 2) Protection, Prevention, and Restoration, 3) Toxicity Assessment, 4) Environmental Fate and Transport, 5) Biological Characterization, and 6) Treatment Technologies. Because there is much overlap in research areas associated with minerals and mine drainage, many papers presented in this review can be classified into more than one category, and the six sections should not be regarded as being mutually-exclusive, nor should they be thought of as being all-inclusive.

  14. Continuous miner noise

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, J.; Kovac, J.; Bartholomae, R.

    1981-08-01

    Noise generated by continuous miners in underground coal production is an important health hazard. Bureau of Mines contract J0387229 charters investigation and control of this noise through laboratory tests of simulated cutting operations and through in-mine noise measurements. The results of these investigations indicate that coal cutting noise and conveyor noise are dominant sources of miner operational noise. Typical noise levels for both cutting and conveying operations are approximately 97 dBA. For full operation of all machine systems, the overall sound pressure level is approximately 101 dBA. In-mine and laboratory test results show agreement in both A-weighted overall levels as well as A-weighted one-third octave band spectra. 4 refs.

  15. Au nanorod helical superstructures with designed chirality.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xiang; Lu, Xuxing; Shen, Chenqi; Ke, Yonggang; Ni, Weihai; Wang, Qiangbin

    2015-01-14

    A great challenge for nanotechnology is to controllably organize anisotropic nanomaterials into well-defined three-dimensional superstructures with customized properties. Here we successfully constructed anisotropic Au nanorod (AuNR) helical superstructures (helices) with tailored chirality in a programmable manner. By designing the 'X' pattern of the arrangement of DNA capturing strands (15nt) on both sides of a two-dimensional DNA origami template, AuNRs functionalized with the complementary DNA sequences were positioned on the origami and were assembled into AuNR helices with the origami intercalated between neighboring AuNRs. Left-handed (LH) and right-handed (RH) AuNR helices were conveniently accomplished by solely tuning the mirrored-symmetric 'X' patterns of capturing strands on the origami. The inter-rod distance was precisely defined as 14 nm and inter-rod angle as 45°, thus a full helix contains 9 AuNRs with its length up to about 220 nm. By changing the AuNR/origami molar ratio in the assembly system, the average number of AuNR in the helices was tuned from 2 to 4 and 9. Intense chiroptical activities arose from the longest AuNR helices with a maximum anisotropy factor of ∼0.02, which is highly comparable to the reported macroscopic AuNR assemblies. We expect that our strategy of origami templated assembly of anisotropic chiral superstructures would inspire the bottom-up fabrication of optically active nanostructures and shed light on a variety of applications, such as chiral fluids, chiral signal amplification, and fluorescence combined chiral spectroscopy. PMID:25516475

  16. Clay Mineral: Radiological Characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cotomacio, J. G.; Silva, P. S. C.; Mazzilli, B. P

    2008-08-07

    Since the early days, clays have been used for therapeutic purposes. Nowadays, most minerals applied as anti-inflammatory, pharmaceutics and cosmetic are the clay minerals that are used as the active ingredient or, as the excipient, in formulations. Although their large use, few information is available in literature on the content of the radionuclide concentrations of uranium and thorium natural series and {sup 40}K in these clay minerals.The objective of this work is to determine the concentrations of {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 40}K in commercial samples of clay minerals used for pharmaceutical or cosmetic purposes. Two kinds of clays samples were obtained in pharmacies, named green clay and white clay.Measurement for the determination of {sup 238}U and {sup 232}Th activity concentration was made by alpha spectrometry and gamma spectrometry was used for {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 40}K determination. Some physical-chemical parameters were also determined as organic carbon and pH. The average activity concentration obtained was 906{+-}340 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 40}K, 40{+-}9 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 226}Ra, 75{+-}9 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 228}Ra, 197{+-}38 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 210}Pb, 51{+-}26 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 238}U and 55{+-}24 Bq kg{sup -1} for {sup 232}Th, considering both kinds of clay.

  17. Reducing miner absenteeism

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, R.H.; Clingan, M.R.; Randolph, R.F.

    1989-01-01

    The U. S. Bureau of Mines has prepared this report on strategies for maintaining high job attendance among underground coal miners because high absenteeism is a threat to miners' safety and seriously hampers productivity. A substantial number of research studies on the effectiveness of various strategies for reducing absenteeism among the employees of nonmining industries have been reported in the literature. These strategies have aimed at improving job attendance through one or more of the following: (1) improving employment procedures, (2) overcoming problems that adversely affect one's ability to attend work, and (3) increasing miners' motivation to attend work. Many of these strategies appear applicable to the mining industry, and are reviewed in the first half of this report. The second half of this report describes how one could develop and implement a program for maintaining high attendance at underground coal mines. The steps include measuring and evaluating attendance levels, formulating attendance goals and an absenteeism policy, developing and implementing an attendance promotion program and periodically going through the preceding steps (known as recycling).

  18. Green Clay Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velde, B.

    2003-12-01

    Color is a problem for scientific study. One aspect is the vocabulary one used to describe color. Mint green, bottle green, and Kelly green are nice names but not of great utility in that people's physical perception of color is not always the same. In some industries, such as colored fabric manufacture, current use is to send a set of standard colors which are matched by the producer. This is similar to the use of the Munsell color charts in geology. None of these processes makes use of physical optical spectral studies. The reason is that they are difficult to obtain and interpret. For a geologist, color is very important but we rarely have the possibility to standardize the method of our color perception. One reason is that color is both a reflective and transmission phenomenon. The thickness of the sample is critical to any transmission characteristics. Hence, a field color determination is different from one made by using a petrographic microscope. Green glauconite in a hand specimen is not the same color in 30 μm thick thin section seen with a microscope using transmitted light.A second problem is that color in a spectral identification is the result of several absorption emissions,with overlapping signal, forming a complicated spectrum. Interpretation depends very greatly on the spectrum of the light source and the conditions of transmission-reflection of the sample. As a result, for this text, we will not attempt to analyze the physical aspect of green in green clays. In the discussion which follows, reference is made concerning color, to thin section microscopic perception.Very briefly, green clay minerals are green, because they contain iron. This is perhaps not a great revelation to mineralogists, but it is the key to understanding the origin and stability of green clay minerals. In fact, iron can color minerals either red or green or in various shades of orange and brown. The color most likely depends upon the relative abundance of the iron ion valence

  19. Clay Mineral Preferred Orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day-Stirrat, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    Anisotropy of the orientation of clay minerals, often referred to as texture, may be unique to sediments' deposition, composition, deformation or diagenetic history. The literature is rich with studies that include preferred orientation generation in fault gouge, low-grade metamorphic rocks, sediments with variable clay content and during the smectite-to-illite transformation. Untangling the interplay between many competing factors in any one geologic situation has proven a significant challenge over many years. Understanding how, where and when clay minerals develop a preferred orientation has significant implications for permeability anisotropy in shallow burial, the way mechanical properties are projected from shallower to deeper settings in basin modeling packages and the way velocity anisotropy is accounted for in seismic data processing. The assessment of the anisotropic properties of fine-grained siliciclastic rocks is gaining significant momentum in rock physics research. Therefore, a fundamental understanding of how clay minerals develop a preferred orientation in space and time is crucial to the understanding of anisotropy of physical properties. The current study brings together a wealth of data that may be used in a predictive sense to account for fabric anisotropy that may impact any number of rock properties.

  20. Titanium minerals for new materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotova, O.; Ozhogina, E.; Ponaryadov, A.; Golubeva, I.

    2016-04-01

    The mineral composition of titanium minerals of modern coastal-marine placer in Stradbroke Island (Australia) and Pizhma paleoplacer in Middle Timan (Russia) has been presented. The physical features of titanium minerals and their modification methods were shown. Photocatalysts on the basis of the Pizhma leucoxene were developed for water purification.

  1. Major issues in miner health.

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, S

    1998-01-01

    As recently as the last few decades, thousands of miners died in explosions, roof collapses, fires, and floods each year, and lung disease caused by inhaling mineral dusts was ubiquitous. Miners worked virtually unprotected, and were often treated as expendable bodies fulfilling critical roles in this important industry, which in the United States comprises about 5% of the gross domestic product. PMID:9799195

  2. Oxygen-assisted reduction of Au species on Au/SiO2 catalyst in room temperature CO oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zili; Zhou, Shenghu; Zhu, Haoguo; Dai, Sheng; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H

    2008-01-01

    An unexpected oxygen-assisted reduction of cationic Au species by CO was found on a Au/SiO2 catalyst at room temperature; CO oxidation activity increases simultaneously with the reduction of Au species, suggesting the key role of metallic Au played in CO oxidation on Au/SiO2.

  3. Minerals yearbook, 1991. Volume 1. Metals and minerals. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1991-12-31

    This edition of the Mineral Yearbook discusses the performance of the worlwide minerals and materials industry during 1991 and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Volume 1, Metals and Mineral, contains chapters on virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on advanced materials and nonrenewable organic materials also were added to the Minerals Yearbook series beginning with the 1989 and 1990 volumes, respectively. A new chapter on nonferrous metals recycling has been initiated in this 1991 volume. In addition, a chapter on survey methods used in data collection with a statistical summary of nonfuel minerals and a chapter on trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries are included.

  4. Minerals yearbook, 1992. Volume 1. Metals and minerals. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-01-01

    This edition of the Minerals Yearbook discusses the performance of the worldwide mineral and materials industry during 1992 and provides background information to assist in interpreting that performance. Content of the individual Yearbook volumes follows: Volume I, Metals and Minerals, contains chapters on virtually all metallic and industrial mineral commodities important to the U.S. economy. Chapters on advanced materials, nonrenewable organic materials, and nonferrous metals recycling also were added to the Minerals Yearbook series beginning with the 1989, 1990, and 1991 volumes, respectively. A new chapter on materials recycling has been initiated in this 1992 volume. In addition, a chapter on survey methods used in data collection with a statistical summary of nonfuel minerals and a chapter on trends in mining and quarrying in the metals and industrial mineral industries are included.

  5. Biosorption of Au (III) and Cu (II) from aqueous solution by a non-living Cetraria islandica (L.) Ach.

    PubMed

    Ekinci Dogan, Canan; Turhan, Kadir; Akcin, Göksel; Aslan, Ali

    2006-01-01

    Biosorption of Au(III) and Cu(II) from dilute aqueous solutions was investigated by biomass of the non-living Cetraria islandica (L.) Ach. The removal and recovery of gold and copper were studied by applying batch technique. The experimental parameters such as the pH of the solution, contact time, the amount of Cetraria islandica (L.) Ach. (dried lichen), the concentration of metals on retention and eluents kind and amount have been investigated. Au(III) and Cu(II) were adsorbed on the dried lichen at pH 3 and pH 8, respectively. Quantitative retention (> or = 90%) was obtained within 60 minutes for metals. Maximum capacity of 1.0 g of dried lichen for biosorption of Au(III) and Cu(II) were found as 7.4 mg of Au(III) and 19.2 mg of Cu(II). It was seen that the adsorption equilibrium data conformed well to the Langmuir model and Freundlich equation for Au(III) and only Freundlich equation for Cu(II). The method proposed in this study was applied to spiked mineral water analysis and metals adsorbed on the lichens were quantitatively (> or = 90%) recovered from mineral water samples by using 0.5 mol L(-1) HCl. PMID:16836256

  6. FEDERAL MINERAL LAND INFORMATION SYSTEM.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kleckner, Richard L.

    1984-01-01

    The ability of geographic information systems to combine point, line, and areal data has been widely documented, although the establishment of a particular data base presents its own unique problems. The U. S. Geological Survey is developing a geographic information system consisting of information on Federal surface ownership, Federal subsurface mineral rights, location of actual mineral occurrences and (or) known potential, and formal restrictions to mineral development. By utilizing information already compiled or soon to be collected by other agencies, the Federal Mineral Land Information System should be able to provide answers relating to mineral availability on public lands.

  7. [(CF3)4Au2(C5H5N)2]--a new alkyl gold(II) derivative with a very short Au-Au bond.

    PubMed

    Zopes, David; Hegemann, Corinna; Tyrra, Wieland; Mathur, Sanjay

    2012-09-11

    A new gold(II) species [(CF(3))(4)Au(2)(C(5)H(5)N)(2)] with a very short unsupported Au-Au bond (250.62(9) pm) was generated by photo irradiation of a silver aurate, [Ag(Py)(2)][Au(CF(3))(2)], unambiguously characterized by (19)F and (109)Ag NMR studies. PMID:22836874

  8. 43 CFR 19.8 - Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... 2 of 43 CFR, which appears in Volume II of the List of CFR Sections Affected, 1964-1972, for the... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest Wilderness. 19.8 Section 19.8 Public Lands:...

  9. 43 CFR 19.8 - Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... 2 of 43 CFR, which appears in Volume II of the List of CFR Sections Affected, 1964-1972, for the... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest Wilderness. 19.8 Section 19.8 Public Lands:...

  10. 43 CFR 19.8 - Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... 2 of 43 CFR, which appears in Volume II of the List of CFR Sections Affected, 1964-1972, for the... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest Wilderness. 19.8 Section 19.8 Public Lands:...

  11. 43 CFR 19.8 - Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... 2 of 43 CFR, which appears in Volume II of the List of CFR Sections Affected, 1964-1972, for the... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest Wilderness. 19.8 Section 19.8 Public Lands:...

  12. 43 CFR 19.8 - Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... 2 of 43 CFR, which appears in Volume II of the List of CFR Sections Affected, 1964-1972, for the... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Prospecting, mineral locations, mineral patents, and mineral leasing within National Forest Wilderness. 19.8 Section 19.8 Public Lands:...

  13. Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide is a compilation of X-ray tables and spectra recorded from various mineral matrices. Spectra were obtained using electron microprobe, equipped with LiF geared, curved crystal X-ray spectrometers, utilizing typical analytical operating conditions: 15 Kv acceleration potential, 0.02 microampere sample current as measured on a clinopyroxene standard (CP19). Tables and spectra are presented for the majority of elements, fluorine through uranium, occurring in mineral samples from lunar, meteoritic and terrestrial sources. Tables for each element contain relevant analytical information, i.e., analyzing crystal, X-ray peak, background and relative intensity information, X-ray interferences and a section containing notes on the measurement. Originally intended to cover silicates and oxide minerals the tables and spectra have been expanded to cover other mineral phases. Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide is intended as a spectral base to which additional spectra can be added as the analyst encounters new mineral matrices.

  14. The geology of aluminium phosphates and sulphates of the alunite group minerals: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dill, Harald G.

    2001-03-01

    Aluminium phosphates and sulphates of the alunite supergroup (APS minerals) occur in a wide range of environments of formation covering the metamorphic, igneous and sedimentary realms. Supergene processes, including mineral dressing and dumping when sulphide ores are mined, as well as hypogene alteration are also responsible for the precipitation of APS minerals. In these environments, complex solid solution series (s.s.s.) can form. The general formula of these alunite minerals is AB 3 (XO 4) 2(OH) 6, where A is a large cation (Na, U, K, Ag, NH 4, Pb, Ca, Ba, Sr, REE). B sites are occupied by cations of the elements Al, Fe, Cu and Zn. In nature, the anion (XO 4) x- is dominated by P and S. Mineral dressing and identification of APS minerals often needs a combination of highly sophisticated measures including Atterberg settling methods, XRD, DTA, TGA, TEM-EDX, SEM, EMPA and XRF. In sedimentary rocks APS minerals occur in various rocks and environments of deposition: calcareous, phosphorite-bearing, argillaceous-carbonaceous, arenaceous, coal-bearing environments, in soils and paleosols, in saprolite (bauxites, laterites) and in calcareous-argillaceous sequences hosting Carlin-type SHDG deposits. In igneous rocks, APS minerals may be encountered mainly in acidic through intermediate pyroclastic, volcanic and subvolcanic rocks. They occur in barren volcanic rocks and porphyry-type intrusions that have sparked epithermal Au-Ag-base metal deposits, Au-Sb mineralization, APS-bearing argillite and alunite deposits in their immediate surroundings. Granitic and pegmatitic rocks are rarely host of supergene APS mineralization. During low-grade stage regional metamorphism, peraluminous parent rocks originating from a sedimentary or igneous protolith may also give rise to APS mineralization. Peraluminous parent rocks enriched in S and/or P are a prerequisite for the formation of APS minerals that are stable up to a temperature of 400°C at moderately high fluid pressure of up

  15. Disseminated gold-sulfide mineralization at the Zhaima deposit, eastern Kazakhstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, K. R.; Kuzmina, O. N.; Dyachkov, B. A.; Vladimirov, A. G.; Kalinin, Yu. A.; Naumov, E. A.; Kirillov, M. V.; Annikova, I. Yu.

    2016-03-01

    The Zhaima gold-sulfide deposit is located in the northwestern part of the West Kalba gold belt in eastern Kazakhstan. The mineralization is hosted in Lower Carboniferous volcanic and carbonate rocks formed under conditions of marginal-sea and island-arc volcanic activity. The paper considers the mineralogy and geochemistry of primary gold-sulfide ore and Au-bearing weathering crusts. Au-bearing arsenopyrite-pyrite mineralization formed during only one productive stage. Disseminated, stringer-disseminated, and massive rocks are enriched in Ti, Cr, V, Cu, and Ni, which correspond to the mafic profile of basement. The main ores minerals are represented by finely acicular arsenopyrite containing Au (up to few tens of ppm) and cubic and pentagonal dodecahedral pyrite with sporadic submicroscopic inclusions of native gold. The sulfur isotopic composition of sulfides is close to that of the meteoritic standard (δ34S =-0.2 to +0.2). The 40Ar/39Ar age of three sericite samples from ore veinlets corresponds to the Early Permian: 279 ± 3.3, 275.6 ± 2.9, and 272.2 ± 2.9 Ma. The mantle source of sulfur, ore geochemistry, and spatial compatibility of mineralization with basic dikes allow us to speak about the existence of deep fluid-magmatic systems apparently conjugate with the Tarim plume.

  16. Hearing protection for miners

    SciTech Connect

    Schulz, T.

    2008-10-15

    A NIOSH analysis showed that at age 50 approximately 90% of coal miners have a hearing impairment, yet noise included hearing loss is 100% preventable. The article discusses requirements of the MSHA regulations, 30 CFR Part 62 - occupational noise exposure (2000) and a 2008-MSHA document describing technologically achievable and promising controls for several types of mining machinery. Hearing protection is still required for exposure to greater than 90 dBA. These are now commercially available ways to determine how much attenuation an individual gets from a given hearing protector, known as 'fit testing'. 3 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab., 1 photo.

  17. Mineral mining installation

    SciTech Connect

    Plevak, L.; Weirich, W.

    1982-04-20

    A longwall mineral mining installation has a longwall conveyor and a plurality of roof support units positioned side-by-side at the goaf side of the conveyor. The hydraulic appliances of the roof support units, such as their hydraulic props, hydraulic advance rams and hydraulic control valves, are supplied with pressurized hydraulic fluid from hydraulic supply lines which run along the goaf side of the conveyor. A plurality of flat, platelike intermediate members are provided at the goaf side of the conveyor. These intermediate members are formed with internal ducts for feeding the hydraulic fluid from the supply lines to the hydraulic appliances of the roof support units.

  18. Thermal and photoinduced reduction of ionic Au(III) to elemental Au nanoparticles by dissolved organic matter in water: possible source of naturally occurring Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yongguang; Yu, Sujuan; Liu, Jingfu; Jiang, Guibin

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been widely observed in ore deposits, coal, soil, and environmental water. Identifying the source of these naturally occurring AuNPs could be helpful for not only the discovery of Au deposits through advanced exploration methods, but also the elucidation of the biogeochemical cycle and environmental toxicity of ionic Au and engineered AuNPs. Here, we investigated the effect of natural/simulated sunlight and heating on the reduction of ionic Au by ubiquitous dissolved organic matter (DOM) in river water. The reductive process probed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that phenolic, alcoholic, and aldehyde groups in DOM act as reductive sites. Long-time exposure with thermal and photoirradiation induced the further fusion and growth of AuNPs to branched Au nanostructure as precipitation. The formation processes and kinetics of AuNPs were further investigated using humic acid (HA) as the DOM model, with comprehensive characterizing methods. We have observed that HA can reduce ionic Au(III) complex (as chloride or hydroxyl complex) to elemental Au nanoparticles under sunlight or heating. In this process, nearly all of the Au(III) could be reduced to AuNPs, in which HA serves as not only the reductive agent, but also the coating agent to stabilize and disperse AuNPs. The size and stability of AuNPs were highly dependent on the concentration ratio of Au(III) to HA. These results imply that, besides biological processes, this thermal or photochemical reduction process is another possible source of naturally occurring AuNPs in natural environments, which possibly has critical impacts on the transport and transformation of Au and engineered AuNPs. PMID:24471802

  19. Self-assembly of thiolated cyanine aggregates on Au(111) and Au nanoparticle surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menéndez, Guillermo O.; Cortés, Emiliano; Grumelli, Doris; Méndez de Leo, Lucila P.; Williams, Federico J.; Tognalli, Nicolás G.; Fainstein, Alejandro; Vela, María Elena; Jares-Erijman, Elizabeth A.; Salvarezza, Roberto C.

    2012-01-01

    Heptamethinecyanine J-aggregates display sharp, intense fluorescence emission making them attractive candidates for developing a variety of chem-bio-sensing applications. They have been immobilized on planar thiol-covered Au surfaces and thiol-capped Au nanoparticles by weak molecular interactions. In this work the self-assembly of novel thiolated cyanine (CNN) on Au(111) and citrate-capped AuNPs from solutions containing monomers and J-aggregates has been studied by using STM, XPS, PM-IRRAS, electrochemical techniques and Raman spectroscopy. Data show that CNN species adsorb on the Au surfaces by forming thiolate-Au bonds. We found that the J-aggregates are preferentially adsorbed on the Au(111) surface directly from the solution while adsorbed CNN monomers cannot organize into aggregates on the substrate surface. These results indicate that the CNN-Au interaction is not able to disorganize the large J-aggregates stabilized by π-π stacking to optimize the S-Au binding site but it is strong enough to hinder the π-π stacking when CNNs are chemisorbed as monomers. The optical properties of the J-aggregates remain active after adsorption. The possibility of covalently bonding CNN J-aggregates to Au planar surfaces and Au nanoparticles controlling the J-aggregate/Au distance opens a new path regarding their improved stability and the wide range of biological applications of both CNN and AuNP biocompatible systems.Heptamethinecyanine J-aggregates display sharp, intense fluorescence emission making them attractive candidates for developing a variety of chem-bio-sensing applications. They have been immobilized on planar thiol-covered Au surfaces and thiol-capped Au nanoparticles by weak molecular interactions. In this work the self-assembly of novel thiolated cyanine (CNN) on Au(111) and citrate-capped AuNPs from solutions containing monomers and J-aggregates has been studied by using STM, XPS, PM-IRRAS, electrochemical techniques and Raman spectroscopy. Data show

  20. Photoionization of Au+, Au2+, and Au3+ ions and developments in the synthesis of the metallofullerene Au@C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Muller, Alfred; Schippers, Stefan; Hellhund, Jonas; Borovik, Alexander; Mueller, Allison; Gross, Dylan; Johnson, Andrea; Macaluso, David; A. L. D. Kilcoyne Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    Absolute single photoionization of Au+, Au2+, and Au3+ ions was investigated via the merged-beams technique at AMO Beamline 10.0.1.2 of the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The absolute single photoionization yield was measured as a function of photon energy for each species from the metastable state ionization threshold region to well above the ground state ionization potential. Additional high-resolution measurements were performed for Au+ and Au2+ ions in the region of the ground and metastable state ionization thresholds to better resolve the detailed resonant structure found therein. This structure was used, along with the reported excited state energy levels of Au+, to preliminarily identify previously unreported excitation levels in all three ions. In addition and as a component of the same program, photoionization studies of the endohedral metallofullerene Au@C60+were performed using endohedral fullerene samples synthesized on-site at Beamline 10.0.1.2 of the ALS.

  1. Controlled Synthesis of Au@AgAu Yolk-Shell Cuboctahedra with Well-Defined Facets.

    PubMed

    Londono-Calderon, Alejandra; Bahena, Daniel; Yacaman, Miguel J

    2016-08-01

    The synthesis of Au@AgAu yolk-shell cuboctahedra nanoparticles formed by galvanic replacement in a seed-mediated method is described. Initially, single-crystal Au seeds are used for the formation of Au@Ag core-shell nanocubes, which serve as the template material for the deposition of an external Au layer. The well-controlled synthesis yields the formation of cuboctahedra nanoparticles with smooth inner and outer Au/Ag surfaces. The deposition/oxidation process is described to understand the formation of cuboctahedra and octahedra nanoparticles. The Au core maintains the initial morphology of the seed and remains static at the center of the yolk-shell because of residual Ag. Structural analysis of the shell indicates intrinsic stacking faults (SFs) near the surface. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) compositional analysis show an Au-Ag nonordered alloy forming the shell. The three-dimensional structure of the nanoparticles presented open facets on the [111] as observed by electron tomography SIRT reconstruction over a stack of high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) images. The geometrical model was validated by analyzing the direction of streaks in coherent nanobeam diffraction (NBD). The catalytic activity was evaluated using a model reaction based on the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NTP) by NaBH4 in the presence of Au@AgAu yolk-shell nanoparticles. PMID:27385583

  2. Au40: A Large Tetrahedral Magic Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Deen; Walter, Michael

    2011-01-01

    40 is a magic number for tetrahedral symmetry predicted in both nuclear physics and the electronic jellium model. We show that Au{sub 40} could be such a magic cluster from density functional theory-based basin hopping for global minimization. The putative global minimum found for Au{sub 40} has a twisted pyramid structure, reminiscent of the famous tetrahedral Au{sub 20}, and a sizable HOMO-LUMO gap of 0.69 eV, indicating its molecular nature. Analysis of the electronic states reveals that the gap is related to shell closings of the metallic electrons in a tetrahedrally distorted effective potential.

  3. Au40: A large tetrahedral magic cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, De-En; Walter, Michael

    2011-11-01

    40 is a magic number for tetrahedral symmetry predicted in both nuclear physics and the electronic jellium model. We show that Au40 could be such a a magic cluster from density functional theory-based basin hopping for global minimization. The putative global minimum found for Au40 has a twisted pyramid structure, reminiscent of the famous tetrahedral Au20, and a sizable HOMO-LUMO gap of 0.69 eV, indicating its molecular nature. Analysis of the electronic states reveals that the gap is related to shell closings of the metallic electrons in a tetrahedrally distorted effective potential.

  4. d + Au hadron correlation measurements from PHENIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sickles, Anne M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations of extended pseudorapidity correlations at the LHC in p+p and p+Pb collisions are of great interest. Here we present related results from d+Au collisions at PHENIX. We present the observed v2 and discuss the possible origin in the geometry of the collision region. We also present new measurements of the pseudorapidity dependence of the ridge in d+Au collision. Future plans to clarify the role of geometry in small collision systems using 3 He + Au collisions are discussed.

  5. New isotopic evidence bearing on bonanza (Au-Ag) epithermal ore-forming processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, James A.; Mathur, Ryan; Kamenov, George D.; Shimizu, Toru; Brueseke, Matthew E.

    2016-01-01

    New Cu, S, and Pb isotope data provide evidence for a magmatic source of metal(loid)s and sulfur in epithermal Au-Ag deposits even though their ore-forming solutions are composed primarily of heated meteoric (ground) waters. The apparent isotopic discrepancy between ore metals and ore-forming solutions, and even between the ore and associated gangue minerals, indicates two different sources of epithermal ore-forming constituents: (1) a shallow geothermal system that not only provides the bulk of water for the ore-forming solutions but also major chemical constituents leached from host rocks (silica, aluminum, potassium, sodium, calcium) to make gangue minerals and (2) metals and metalloids (As, Te, Sb, etc.) and sulfur (±Se) derived from deeper magma bodies. Isotopic data are consistent with either vapor-phase transport of metal(loids) and sulfur and their subsequent absorption by shallow geothermal waters or formation of metallic (Au, Ag, Cu phases) nanoparticles at depth from magmatic fluids prior to encountering the geothermal system. The latter is most consistent with ore textures that indicate physical transport and aggregation of nanoparticles were significant ore-forming processes. The recognition that epithermal Au-Ag ores form in tectonic settings that produce magmas capable of releasing metal-rich fluids necessary to form these deposits can refine exploration strategies that previously often have focused on locating fossil geothermal systems.

  6. Porphyry Cu-Au and associated polymetallic Fe-Cu-Au deposits in the Beiya Area, western Yunnan Province, south China

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xu, X.-W.; Cai, X.-P.; Xiao, Q.-B.; Peters, S.G.

    2007-01-01

    The Alkaline porphyries in the Beiya area are located east of the Jinshajiang suture, as part of a Cenozoic alkali-rich porphyry belt in western Yunnan. The main rock types include quartz-albite porphyry, quartz-K-feldspar porphyry and biotite-K-feldspar porphyry. These porphyries are characterised by high alkalinity [(K2O + Na2O)% > 10%], high silica (SiO2% > 65%), high Sr (> 400??ppm) and 87Sr/86Sr (> 0.706)] ratio and were intruded at 65.5??Ma, between 25.5 to 32.5??Ma, and about 3.8??Ma, respectively. There are five main types of mineral deposits in the Beiya area: (1) porphyry Cu-Au deposits, (2) magmatic Fe-Au deposits, (3) sedimentary polymetallic deposits, (4) polymetallic skarn deposits, and (5) palaeoplacers associated with karsts. The porphyry Cu-Au and polymetallic skarn deposits are associated with quartz-albite porphyry bodies. The Fe-Au and polymetallic sedimentary deposits are part of an ore-forming system that produced considerable Au in the Beiya area, and are characterised by low concentrations of La, Ti, and Co, and high concentrations of Y, Yb, and Sc. The Cenozoic porphyries in western Yunnan display increased alkalinity away from the Triassic Jinshajiang suture. Distribution of both the porphyries and sedimentary deposits in the Beiya area are interpreted to be related to partial melting in a disjointed region between upper mantle lithosphere of the Yangtze Plate and Gondwana continent, and lie within a shear zone between buried Palaeo-Tethyan oceanic lithosphere and upper mantle lithosphere, caused by the subduction and collision of India and Asia. ?? 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Mineralization (calcification) of coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Pawlikowski, M; Pfitzner, R; Wachowiak, J

    1994-01-01

    Mineralogical investigations of calcifications located in coronary vessels were performed on the material obtained from the endarterectomized arteries of 18 patients (15 M, 3 F, aged 36-65) during surgical revascularization procedures consisting in coronary artery bypass grafting. The samples were tested using scanning microscopy, X-ray diffractometry, infrared spectroscopy, atomic absorption spectroscopy, electron microprobe and neutron activation spectroscopy. The results of analyses were calculated with the use of computer programmes. Two types of mineralization were determined: 1. secret mineralization identified as higher than normal content of elements in biological tissues, not demonstrating any mineral grains, and 2. apparent mineralization, appearing micro- and macroscopically as grains composed mainly of hydroxyapatite containing admixture of carbonate groups, i.e. a mineral identical with apatite present in bones, or as calcification of other tissues (heart valves, lungs etc.). The authors suggest that the phenomenon of mineralization should be taken into consideration in the preventive treatment of coronary atheriosclerosis. PMID:7808039

  8. Au, Ge and AuGe Nanoparticles Fabricated by Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Musaev, O.R.; Sutter, E.; Wrobel, J.M.; Kruger, M.B.

    2012-02-01

    A eutectic AuGe target immersed in distilled water was ablated by pulsed ultraviolet laser light. The structure of the ablated material was investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The images show formation of nanowire structures of AuGe up to 100 nm in length, with widths of 5-10 nm. These nanostructures have Ge content significantly lower than the target material. Electron diffraction demonstrates that they crystallize in the {alpha}-AuGe structure. For comparison, laser ablation of pure Au and pure Ge targets was also performed under the same conditions. HRTEM shows that Ge forms spherical nanoparticles with a characteristic size of {approx}30 nm. Au forms spherical nanoparticles with diameters of {approx}10 nm. Similar to AuGe, it also forms chainlike structures with substantially lower aspect ratio.

  9. Charged hadron transverse momentum distributions in Au+Au collisions at S=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Christof; PHOBOS Collaboration; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Ballintijn, M.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2003-03-01

    We present transverse momentum distributions of charged hadrons produced in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV. The evolution of the spectra for transverse momenta p_T from 0.25 to 5GeV/c is studied as a function of collision centrality over a range from 65 to 344 participating nucleons. We find a significant change of the spectral shape between proton-antiproton and peripheral Au+Au collisions. Comparing peripheral to central Au+Au collisions, we find that the yields at the highest p_T exhibit approximate scaling with the number of participating nucleons, rather than scaling with the number of binary collisions.

  10. Ir-induced activation of Au towards CO adsorption: Ir films deposited on Au{111}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianfu; Driver, Stephen M.; Pratt, Stephanie J.; Jenkins, Stephen J.; King, David A.

    2016-06-01

    We have investigated the interaction of CO with Ir/Au{111} bimetallic surfaces, and the influence of morphology changes as Ir moves sub-surface into the Au bulk, using reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). The presence of Ir stabilises CO on exposed regions of the Au surface at temperatures up to around 200 K: we attribute this to low-coordinated Au sites, probably associated with lifting of the clean-surface 'herringbone' reconstruction by Ir deposition. The highest density of active Au sites is obtained after annealing the bimetallic surface to 500-600 K: we attribute this to morphology changes associated with the movement of Ir into bulk Au.

  11. [Preventing cardiovascular risk in miners].

    PubMed

    Lipatova, L V; Izmailova, O A

    2016-01-01

    The article presents results concerning usage of intravenous laser radiation of blood in miners with cardiovascular diseases. After cardiovascular state assessment, the miners at high cardiovascular risk were subjected to prophylactic procedures with traditional medical treatment added by intravenous laser therapy. Findings are anti-arrhythmic, antihypertensive, antiatherogenic and anti-aggregation effects of complex treatment with intravenous laser radiation of blood in miners at high cardiovascular risk and its subsequent decrease due to treatment. PMID:27265943

  12. Microelectrophoresis of selected mineral particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herren, B. J.; Tipps, R. W.; Alexander, K. D.

    1982-01-01

    Particle mobilities of ilmenite, labradorite plagioclase, enstatite pyroxene, and olivine were measured with a Rank microelectrophoresis system to evaluate indicated mineral separability. Sodium bicarbonate buffer suspension media with and without additives (0.0001 M DTAB and 5 percent v/v ethylene glycol) were used to determine differential adsorption by mineral particles and modification of relative mobilities. Good separability between some minerals was indicated; additives did not enhance separability.

  13. Mineral Time Capsules on Mars?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schirber, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Like dinosaur-age insects trapped in amber, biomolecules sequestered in million-year-old sulfate minerals could provide a glimpse into the past, say researchers who've recently analyzed such minerals from N orth America. The same minerals have recently been discovered on Mars , so they may be a good place to look for traces of past life on the red planet, the researchers say.

  14. Two types of noble metal mineralization in the Kaalamo massif (Karelia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashchenko, V. I.; Ruchyev, A. M.; Golubev, A. I.

    2016-05-01

    Noble metal mineralization of the syngenetic (Southern Kaalamo) and epigenetic (Surisuo) types are defined in the Kaalamo massif. The ƩPt, Pd, Au content is as high as 0.9-1.1 g/t. Syngenetic mineralization started at the late magmatic stage (at around 800°C) gradually evolving to cease during the hydrothermal-metasomatic stage (<271°C). Epigenetic mineralization was formed at temperatures ranging from 500 to <230°C in zones of intense shear deformations and low-temperature metasomatosis during the collisional stage of the Svecofennian tectono-magmatic cycle (approximately 1.85 Ga ago). Taking into consideration the geological position of the Kaalamo massif in the Raakhe-Ladoga metallogenic zone with widely developed intense shear dislocations, the epigenetic mineralization type seems to be more promising with respect to noble metals.

  15. Minerals Bill introduced in House

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    A bill that aims to strengthen a national minerals policy and to establish a three-member White-House-level council to coordinate the development of this policy was introduced in the House of Representatives on April 30 by James D. Santini (D-Nev.). Entitled the National Minerals Security Act (NMSA), the legislation, if passed, also would amend tax laws to assist the mining industry to make capital investments to locate and produce strategic minerals; it would provide the means for the Secretary of the Interior to make withdrawn public lands available for mineral development; and it would create a revolving fund for the sale and purchase of strategic minerals.Santini estimates that 4 billion tons of minerals are needed annually to sustain the nation's economy. Much of the minerals are supplied by other nations, however; Santini wants to see an end to the United States' dependence on foreign countries, especially those that seem relatively unstable politically. ‘The U.S. has placed its national security in the hands of a few foreign nations,’ Santini said in a recent press conference. ‘We are heavily dependent on the region of southern Africa for 76% of our cobalt, 93% of our platinum, 48% of our chromium, and a host of other strategic and critical minerals. Without these minerals, we cannot build jet aircraft, weapons, or other military hardware vitally important to our national security.’

  16. Minerals yearbook, 1988: Thorium

    SciTech Connect

    Hedrick, J.B.

    1988-01-01

    Mine production of monazite, the principal source of thorium, decreased slightly in 1988. Associated Minerals (USA) Inc. was the only domestic monazite producer. Monazite produced in the United States was exported, and the thorium products used domestically were derived from imported materials, existing company stocks, and thorium nitrate released from the National Defense Stockpile. Major nonenergy uses were in refractory applications, ceramics, and mantles for incandescent lanterns. The only energy use of thorium in the United States was in the high-temperature gas-cooled (HTGC) nuclear reactor at Fort St. Vrain, CO. Topics discussed in the report include domestic data coverage, legislation and government programs, domestic production, consumption and uses, stocks, prices, foreign trade, world capacity, and world review--(Australia, Brazil, Madagascar, Mozambique).

  17. The Mineral Physics Committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mineral Physics Committee members for the period July 1, 1986, to J ne 30, 1988, have been announced. They are Murli H. Manghnani (Hawaii Institute of Geophysics, Honolulu), and Orson L. Anderson (University of California, Los Angeles), Thomas J. Ahrens (California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif.), Subir K. Banerjee (University of Minnesota, Minneapolis), William A. Bassett (Cornell University, Ithaca, N.Y.), Gordon E. Brown, Jr. (Stanford University, Stanford, Calif.), Michael Brown (University of Washington, Seattle), Robert M. Hazen (Geophysical Laboratory, Washington, D.C.), Raymond F. Jeanloz (University of California, Berkeley), Robert C. Liebermann (State University of New York (SUNY),(Stony Brook), Alexandra Navrotsky (Princeton University, Princeton, N.J.), Robert N. Schock (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, Calif.), and Donald J. Weidner (SUNY Stony Brook).

  18. Computer modelling of minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catlow, C. R. A.; Parker, S. C.

    We review briefly the methodology and achievements of computer simulation techniques in modelling structural and defect properties of inorganic solids. Special attention is paid to the role of interatomic potentials in such studies. We discuss the extension of the techniques to the modelling of minerals, and describe recent results on the study of structural properties of silicates. In a paper of this length, it is not possible to give a comprehensive survey of this field. We shall concentrate on the recent work of our own group. The reader should consult Tossell (1977), Gibbs (1982), and Busing (1970) for examples of other computational studies of inorganic solids. The techniques we discuss are all based on the principle of energy minimization. Simpler, "bridge-buildingrdquo procedures, based on known bond-lengths, of which distance least squares (DLS) techniques are the best known are discussed, for example, in Dempsey and Strens (1974).

  19. Mineral mining machines

    SciTech Connect

    Higgs, R.H.; Nicholls, J.T.; Oven, T.

    1980-06-24

    A mineral mining machine incorporates a guideway defining runs for a cutter chain which carries cutter picks. The guideway is movable as a whole and is formed with runs for the chain. The runs of the guideway are of generally l-shaped cross section, although the invention is not so limited, and have relatively outer and relatively inner supporting guide surfaces for the cutter chain. The relatively inner guide surface is positioned to the rear of the drive member, E.G. A sprocket, for the chain, I.E. Behind the center line of the chain in the cutting direction. The guide surfaces are continuous around the whole of the guideway thus providing continuous support for the chain during the whole of its movement around the guideway.

  20. Mineralization by nanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajander, E. Olavi; Bjorklund, Michael; Ciftcioglu, Neva

    1998-07-01

    Nanobacteria are the smallest cell-walled bacteria, only recently discovered in human and cow blood and in commercial cell culture serum. In this study, we identified with energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis and chemical analysis that all growth phases of nanobacteria produce biogenic apatite on their cell envelope. Fourier transform IR spectroscopy revealed the mineral as carbonate apatite. Previous models for stone formation have lead to a hypothesis that an elevated pH due to urease and/or alkaline phosphatase activity are important lithogenic factors. Our results indicate that carbonate apatite can be formed without these factors at pH 7.4 at physiological phosphate and calcium concentrations. Due to their specific macromolecules, nanobacteria can produce apatite very efficiency in media mimicking tissue fluids and glomerular filtrate and rapidly mineralizing most of available calcium and phosphate. This can be also monitored by (superscript 85)Sr incorporation and provides a unique model for in vitro studies on calcification. Recently, bacteria have been implicated in the formation of carbonate (hydroxy)fluorapatite in marine sediments. Apatite grains are found so commonly in sedimentary rocks that apatite is omitted in naming the stone. To prove that apatite and other minerals are formed by bacteria would implicate that the bacteria could be observed and their actions followed in stones. We have started to approach this in two ways. Firstly, by the use of sensitive methods for detecting specific bacterial components, like antigens, muramic acid and nucleic acids, that allow for detecting the presence of bacteria and, secondly, by follow-up of volatile bacterial metabolites observed by continuous monitoring with ion mobility spectrometry, IMCELL, working like an artificial, educatable smelling nose. The latter method might allow for remote real time detection of bacterial metabolism, a signature of life, in rocks via fractures of drillholes with or without

  1. Marine Mineral Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spiess, Fren N.

    This book is the forty-first in the Elsevier Oceanography Series, and with it the series has come full circle. Its first title, published in 1964, was John Mero's landmark study The Mineral Resources of the Sea [Mero, 1964]. Looking back at that first major treatise and comparing it with this and other recent books on the topic [e.g., Teleki et al., 1987] one cannot help but be impressed with how well Mero used the sparse data and studies that had been put together by his time. Twenty-two years and many millions of dollars later a substantial mining-oriented base of knowledge has been built — we know much more about the economics and the engineering — yet the basic premises and conclusions that Mero assembled are still intact, and answers to the fundamental questions (e.g., formation processes for manganese nodules) are not in much better condition than they were then.

  2. Mineral mining installation

    SciTech Connect

    Arsuaga, Y.

    1983-07-05

    A mineral mining installation is provided for use in a steeply-inclined longwall working. The installation comprises a ladder-shaped support frame, and a plurality of roof support units. The support frame extends along the entire length of the longwall working, and has a pair of generally parallel longitudinal beams interconnected by a plurality of transverse beams. The roof support units are positioned between the longitudinal beams, and are supported on the transverse beam. Each of the longitudinal beams comprises a plurality of beam sections pivotably connected together end-to-end. The support frame comprises a plurality of detachably connected sub-frames, each of which comprises a respective transverse beam and a respective beam section of each of the longitudinal beams.

  3. Thermodynamic properties of minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robie, Richard A.

    1962-01-01

    In the ten years since the publication of the national Bureau of Standards comprehensive tables of thermochemical properties, by Rossini and other (1952), a very large body of modern calorimetric and equilibrium data has become available. Because of the complex interrelations among many thermochemical data and the necessity for internal consistency among these values, a complete revision of this standard reference is required. This is also true of the summaries of thermochemical data for the sulfides (Richardson and Jeffes 1952) and for the oxides (Coughlin 1954). The following tables present critically selected values for the heat and free energy of formation, the logarithm of the equilibrium constant of formation Log Kf, the entropy and the molar volume, at 298.15°K (25.0°C) and one atmosphere for minerals.

  4. RHIC Au beam in Run 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S. Y.

    2014-09-15

    Au beam at the RHIC ramp in run 2014 is reviewed together with the run 2011 and run 2012. Observed bunch length and longitudinal emittance are compared with the IBS simulations. The IBS growth rate of the longitudinal emittance in run 2014 is similar to run 2011, and both are larger than run 2012. This is explained by the large transverse emittance at high intensity observed in run 2012, but not in run 2014. The big improvement of the AGS ramping in run 2014 might be related to this change. The importance of the injector intensity improvement in run 2014 is emphasized, which gives rise to the initial luminosity improvement of 50% in run 2014, compared with the previous Au-Au run 2011. In addition, a modified IBS model, which is calibrated using the RHIC Au runs from 9.8 GeV/n to 100 GeV/n, is presented and used in the study.

  5. Mercury contamination in agricultural soils from abandoned metal mines classified by geology and mineralization.

    PubMed

    Kim, Han Sik; Jung, Myung Chae

    2012-01-01

    This survey aimed to compare mercury concentrations in soils related to geology and mineralization types of mines. A total of 16,386 surface soils (0~15 cm in depth) were taken from agricultural lands near 343 abandoned mines (within 2 km from each mine) and analyzed for Hg by AAS with a hydride-generation device. To meaningfully compare mercury levels in soils with geology and mineralization types, three subclassification criteria were adapted: (1) five mineralization types, (2) four valuable ore mineral types, and (3) four parent rock types. The average concentration of Hg in all soils was 0.204 mg kg(-1) with a range of 0.002-24.07 mg kg(-1). Based on the mineralization types, average Hg concentrations (mg kg(-1)) in the soils decreased in the order of pegmatite (0.250) > hydrothermal vein (0.208) > hydrothermal replacement (0.166) > skarn (0.121) > sedimentary deposits (0.045). In terms of the valuable ore mineral types, the concentrations decreased in the order of Au-Ag-base metal mines ≈ base metal mines > Au-Ag mines > Sn-W-Mo-Fe-Mn mines. For parent rock types, similar concentrations were found in the soils derived from sedimentary rocks and metamorphic rocks followed by heterogeneous rocks with igneous and metamorphic processes. Furthermore, farmland soils contained relatively higher Hg levels than paddy soils. Therefore, it can be concluded that soils in Au, Ag, and base metal mines derived from a hydrothermal vein type of metamorphic rocks and pegmatite deposits contained relatively higher concentrations of mercury in the surface environment. PMID:21814815

  6. Sclerometric study of galvanic AuNi and AuCo coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shugurov, A. R.; Panin, A. V.; Shesterikov, E. V.

    2011-03-01

    Mechanisms of wear in galvanic AuNi and AuCo coatings have been studied using the methods of sclerometry and atomic force microscopy. It is demonstrated that the scratch test at a small load can be used for a comparative analysis of the resistance of metal coatings to abrasive wear. It is established that a developed surface relief related to the formation of grain agglomerates provides for a higher wear resistance of AuCo coatings as compared to that of smooth AuNi films, which is explained by dissipation of the elastic energy of the contact interaction of the sclerometric indenter with the sample surface.

  7. Counterion-Mediated Assembly of Spherical Nucleic Acid-Au Nanoparticle Conjugates (SNA-AuNPs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kewalramani, Sumit; Moreau, Liane; Guerrero-García, Guillermo; Mirkin, Chad; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica; Bedzyk, Michael; Afosr Muri Team

    2015-03-01

    Controlled crystallization of colloids from solution has been a goal of material scientists for decades. Recently, nucleic acid functionalized spherical Au nanoparticles (SNA-AuNPs) have been programmed to assemble in a wide variety of crystal structures. In this approach, the assembly is driven by Watson-Crick hybridization between DNAs coating the AuNPs. Here, we show that counterions can induce ordered assembly of SNA-AuNPs in bulk solutions, even in the absence of base pairing interactions. The electrostatics-driven assembly of spherical nucleic acid-Au nanoparticle conjugates (SNA-AuNPs) is probed as a function of counterion concentration and counterion valency [ +1 (Na+) or +2 (Ca2+) ] by in situ solution X-ray scattering. Assemblies of AuNPs capped with single-stranded (ss-) or double-stranded (ds-) DNA are examined. SAXS reveals disordered (gas-like) --> face-centered-cubic (FCC) --> glass-like phase transitions with increasing solution ionic strength. These studies demonstrate how non-base-pairing interactions can be tuned to create crystalline assemblies of SNA-AuNPs. The dependence of the inter-SNA-AuNP interactions on counterion valency and stiffness of the DNA corona will be discussed.

  8. DFT study on cysteine adsorption mechanism on Au(111) and Au(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Buimaga-Iarinca, Luiza; Floare, Calin G.; Calborean, Adrian; Turcu, Ioan

    2013-11-13

    Periodic density functional theory calculations were used to investigate relevant aspects of adsorption mechanisms of cysteine dimers in protonated form on Au(111) and Au(110) surfaces. The projected densities of states are explicitly discussed for all main chemical groups of cysteine, i.e. the amino group (NH2), the thiol group (SH) and the carboxylic group (COOH) to identify differences in adsorption mechanism. Special emphasis is put on the analysis of changes in the electronic structure of molecules adsorbed on Au(111) and Au(110) surfaces as well as the accompanying charge transfer mechanisms at molecule-substrate interaction.

  9. Synthesis and crystal structure determination of LaAuO[sub 3

    SciTech Connect

    Ralle, M.; Jansen, M. )

    1993-08-01

    A new ternary oxide of gold and lanthanum, LaAuO[sub 3], has been prepared from Au[sub 2]O[sub 3] [center dot] 2H[sub 2]O and La(OH)[sub 3] by applying high oxygen pressure and adding aqueous KOH (55%) as a mineralizer. The bright yellow and diamagnetic LaAuO[sub 3] crystallizes in the orthorhombic crystal system, Pbcm, a = 403.35(7), b = 1307.3(2), c = 569.52(8) pm. Z = 4. The crystal structure (determined from 980 unique reflections with a final R value of 5.7% (R[sub w] = 4.7%)) consists of a grid of cubes formed by the oxygens which are either centered by lanthanum ions or face centered by gold ions. Thus, lanthanum is coordinated eightfold, and gold fourfold, by oxygen. LaAuO[sub 3] may be described as a CaF[sub 2] structure sheared within the (110) plane by half a translational period along [0 0 1].

  10. Gold enrichment and the Bi-Au association in pyrrhotite-rich massive sulfide deposits, Escanaba trough, Southern Gorda Ridge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tormanen, T.O.; Koski, R.A.

    2005-01-01

    High gold contents (to 10.1 ppm, avg 1.4 ppm, n = 34) occur in pyrrhotite-rich massive sulfide samples from the sediment-covered floor of the Escanaba trough, the slow-spreading, southernmost segment of Gorda Ridge. These concentrations reflect the presence of primary gold, formed during high-temperature hydrothermal activity in mounds and chimneys, and secondary gold deposited during sea-floor weathering of massive sulfide. Primary gold occurs as fine-grained (2 ??m) secondary gold grains have a porous, flaky morphology and occur in samples in which pyrrhotite is oxidized and replaced by Fe oxyhydroxides, Fe sulfate, and sulfur. Mounds and chimneys dominated by pyrrhotite and containing lesser amounts of isocubanite, chalcopyrite, and Fe-rich sphalerite were formed by high-temperature (estimated range 325??-275??C), reduced, low-sulfur vent fluids. The mineral and fluid compositions during this main stage of hydrothermal venting reflect subsurface interaction between circulating hydrothermal fluids and turbiditic sediment containing as much as 1.1 percent organic carbon. As the deposition of pyrrhotite, Cu-Fe sulfides, and sphalerite waned, a volumetrically minor suite of sulfarsenide, arsenide, Bi, and Au minerals was deposited from highly reduced, late main-stage fluids diffusing through mounds and chimneys. The low solubility of Au as a bisulfide complex and the absence of fluid mixing during this stage of hydrothermal activity apparently inhibited the precipitation of gold directly from solution. Instead, gold precipitation is thought to be linked to elevated concentrations of Bi in the late main-stage fluids. The textural relationships of Au and Bi minerals in pyrrhotite-rich samples, low melting point of native bismuth (271.4??C), and recent experimental results on Au and Bi in hydrothermal fluids contribute to the hypothesis that gold was effectively scavenged from the Escanaba trough vent fluids by coexisting droplets of liquid bismuth. Additional phase