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Sample records for au sahara premiere

  1. The Sahara's Diverse Landscape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Vast stretches of uninterrupted sand are only one kind of Saharan landscape. This true-color MODIS image from November 9, 2001, reveals a diversity of land surface features, including ancient lava flows and volcanoes. Beginning at upper left and moving clockwise are the countries of Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, Chad, and Niger. Evidence of previous volcanic activity in the Sahara can be found in northeastern Chad, in particular, in a region known as Tibesti. Reaching up out of the surrounding desert, the dark rock of the Tibesti Plateau stands out in dark brown against the sand. Scattered throughout the region are the circular cones and calderas of several volcanoes. The dark remains of a lava flow mark the location of the Tousside volcano. North of Tibesti, in Libya, more dark-colored lava beds leave their mark on the landscape. Variety exists in Algeria, where the Grand Erg Oriental desert (far upper left) is hemmed in to the south by the Tinrhert Plateau. South of the Plateau, desert resumes briefly, only to give way to a mountainous region traced with impermanent rivers. In northern Niger, a sinuous gray-green line marks the edge of an escarpment that separates the Mangueni Plateau to the north from the rock deserts to the south. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

  2. [Malaria in Algerian Sahara].

    PubMed

    Hammadi, D; Boubidi, S C; Chaib, S E; Saber, A; Khechache, Y; Gasmi, M; Harrat, Z

    2009-08-01

    Thanks to the malaria eradication campaign launched in Algeria in 1968, the number of malaria cases fell down significantly from 95,424 cases in 1960 to 30 cases in 1978. At that time the northern part of the country was declared free of Plasmodium falciparum. Only few cases belonging to P. vivax persisted in residual foci in the middle part of the country. In the beginning of the eighties, the south of the country was marked by an increase of imported malaria cases. The resurgence of the disease in the oases coincided with the opening of the Trans-Saharan road and the booming trade with the neighbouring southern countries. Several authors insisted on the risk of introduction of malaria or its exotic potential vectors in Algeria via this new road. Now, the totality of malaria autochthonous cases in Algeria are located in the south of the country where 300 cases were declared during the period (1980-2007). The recent outbreak recorded in 2007 at the borders with Mall and the introduction of Anopheles gambiae into the Algerian territory show the vulnerability of this area to malaria which is probably emphasized by the local environmental changes. The authors assess the evolution of malaria in the Sahara region and draw up the distribution of the anopheles in this area. PMID:19739417

  3. Le diagnostic anténatal de la trisomie 21 par l'hybridation in situ en fluorescence (FISH): à propos des premiers tests réalisés au Maroc

    PubMed Central

    Lamzouri, Afaf; Natiq, Abdelhafid; Tajir, Mariam; Sendid, Mohamed; Sefiani, Abdelaziz

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Le but de cette étude était de présenter les premiers résultats de diagnostic anténatal de la trisomie 21 par la technique d'hybridation in situ en fluorescence (FISH) au Maroc et discuter son intérêt dans le diagnostic rapide de cette aneuploïdie. Méthodes Ce travail a été réalisé chez 23 femmes avec des grossesses à haut risque de trisomie 21. La moyenne d’âge des gestantes étaient de 37,43 ans avec des extrêmes de 21 et 43 ans. Toutes étaient musulmanes mariées, mariage légitimé par la Charia, dont trois mariages consanguins, sauf une originaire de la République Démocratique du Congo qui était chrétienne et concubine. La majorité des femmes étaient fonctionnaires et avaient un niveau de scolarisation moyen à élevé. Toutes les patientes ont bénéficié d'une consultation de génétique médicale au cours de laquelle il leur a été donné des informations sur la technique, son intérêt et ses limites. Il s'agit de femmes enceintes qui avaient soit un âge maternel élevé ou des signes d'appel échographiques et/ ou biochimiques. Une des patientes était porteuse d'une translocation robertsonienne t(14;21) équilibrée. Une amniocentèse a été réalisée chez toutes les gestantes et aucun avortement n'a était induit par ce geste invasif. L’âge gestationnel moyen à la première consultation était de 14 semaines d'aménorrhée (SA) et à l'amniocentèse était de 16 SA et 5 jours. L'analyse FISH a été réalisée, après consentement des couples, sur des cellules non cultivées à partir des échantillons de liquides amniotiques, en utilisant des sondes spécifiques du chromosome 21. Résultats Parmi les 23 patientes qui ont bénéficiées d'un diagnostic anténatal de la trisomie 21 par la technique FISH, nous avons pu rassurer 21 d'entre elles, et nous avons détecté deux cas de trisomie 21 fœtal. Conclusion La technique FISH permet un diagnostic anténatal rapide, en moins de 48h, de la trisomie 21 sur

  4. PREMIER's imaging IR limb sounder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraft, Stefan; Caron, Jerome; Bézy, Jean-Loup; Meynart, Roland; Langen, Jörg; Carnicero Dominguez, Bernardo; Bensi, Paolo; Silvestrin, Pierluigi

    2011-11-01

    The Imaging IR Limb Sounder (IRLS) is one of the two instruments planned on board of the candidate Earth Explorer Core Mission PREMIER. PREMIER stands for PRocess Exploration through Measurements of Infrared and Millimetrewave Emitted Radiation and is presently under feasibility study by ESA. Emerging from recent enhanced detector and processing technologies IRLS shall, next to a millimetre-wave limb sounder, explore the benefits of three-dimensional limb sounding with embedded cloud imaging capability. Such 3d imaging technology is expected to open a new era of limb sounding that will allow detailed studies of the link between atmospheric composition and climate, since it will map simultaneously fields of temperature and many trace gases in the mid/upper troposphere and stratosphere across a large vertical and horizontal field of view and with relatively high vertical and horizontal resolution. PREMIER shall fly in tandem formation looking backwards to METOP's swath and thereby explore the benefit of 3-dimensional information for meteorological/environmental analyses and climate forcing investigations. As currently planned and if implemented, IRLS will cover a total horizontal field of about 360 km and observe the limb at altitudes between 4 and 52 km. The vertical spatial sampling distance (SSD) will be well below 1 km. It will be run in two different exclusive modes to address scientific questions about atmospheric dynamics and chemistry at spectral samplings of ~1.2 cm-1 and ~0.2 cm-1, respectively. In such configuration IRLS will be composed of an imaging array with about 1800 macro pixels or sub-samples, thereby allowing cloud imaging and rejection at sufficient spatial resolution. We will present an overview of the instrument requirements as derived from the scientific requirements, the present status of the mission, and we will give an overview of the currently identified technology needs and instrument predevelopments.

  5. Precision Cleaning - Path to Premier

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackler, Scott E.

    2008-01-01

    ITT Space Systems Division s new Precision Cleaning facility provides critical cleaning and packaging of aerospace flight hardware and optical payloads to meet customer performance requirements. The Precision Cleaning Path to Premier Project was a 2007 capital project and is a key element in the approved Premier Resource Management - Integrated Supply Chain Footprint Optimization Project. Formerly precision cleaning was located offsite in a leased building. A new facility equipped with modern precision cleaning equipment including advanced process analytical technology and improved capabilities was designed and built after outsourcing solutions were investigated and found lacking in ability to meet quality specifications and schedule needs. SSD cleans parts that can range in size from a single threaded fastener all the way up to large composite structures. Materials that can be processed include optics, composites, metals and various high performance coatings. We are required to provide verification to our customers that we have met their particulate and molecular cleanliness requirements and we have that analytical capability in this new facility. The new facility footprint is approximately half the size of the former leased operation and provides double the amount of throughput. Process improvements and new cleaning equipment are projected to increase 1st pass yield from 78% to 98% avoiding $300K+/yr in rework costs. Cost avoidance of $350K/yr will result from elimination of rent, IT services, transportation, and decreased utility costs. Savings due to reduced staff expected to net $4-500K/yr.

  6. Cenozoic stratigraphy of the Sahara, Northern Africa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swezey, Christopher S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Cenozoic stratigraphic record in the Sahara, and shows that the strata display some remarkably similar characteristics across much of the region. In fact, some lithologies of certain ages are exceptionally widespread and persistent, and many of the changes from one lithology to another appear to have been relatively synchronous across the Sahara. The general stratigraphic succession is that of a transition from early Cenozoic carbonate strata to late Cenozoic siliciclastic strata. This transition in lithology coincides with a long-term eustatic fall in sea level since the middle Cretaceous and with a global climate transition from a Late Cretaceous–Early Eocene “warm mode” to a Late Eocene–Quaternary “cool mode”. Much of the shorter-term stratigraphic variability in the Sahara (and even the regional unconformities) also can be correlated with specific changes in sea level, climate, and tectonic activity during the Cenozoic. Specifically, Paleocene and Eocene carbonate strata and phosphate are suggestive of a warm and humid climate, whereas latest Eocene evaporitic strata (and an end-Eocene regional unconformity) are correlated with a eustatic fall in sea level, the build-up of ice in Antarctica, and the appearance of relatively arid climates in the Sahara. The absence of Oligocene strata throughout much of the Sahara is attributed to the effects of generally low eustatic sea level during the Oligocene and tectonic uplift in certain areas during the Late Eocene and Oligocene. Miocene sandstone and conglomerate are attributed to the effects of continued tectonic uplift around the Sahara, generally low eustatic sea level, and enough rainfall to support the development of extensive fluvial systems. Middle–Upper Miocene carbonate strata accumulated in northern Libya in response to a eustatic rise in sea level, whereas Upper Miocene mudstone accumulated along the south side of the Atlas Mountains because uplift of the

  7. An Open Letter to Premier Wen Jiabao

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinese Education and Society, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This article is an open letter of a group of early childhood education (ECE) practitioners to Premier Wen Jiabao. This open letter was written with one goal in mind: to ask Premier Wen's government to take measures to protect young children and support early childhood education. These practitioners have become worried about the many accidents that…

  8. Scottish Premier League Reading Stars Evaluation Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Literacy Trust, 2009

    2009-01-01

    Scottish Premier League (SPL) Reading Stars uses the motivational power of football to attract families who need support with literacy into a positive and friendly learning environment. It ran for the first time between March and August 2009 and attracted 225 children and 190 adults to take part in a series of inspirational learning sessions in 23…

  9. Premier League Reading Stars. Annual Review 2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Literacy Trust, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Premier League Reading Stars (PLRS) is an educational project that harnesses the motivational power of football to encourage families to enjoy reading. It targets those hard to reach groups in society who may not have shown an interest in reading, but who do have a passion for football. PLRS has been running since 2003 following the creation of a…

  10. New data on the unresolved paradox of the Tibesti crater paleolakes (Central Sahara, North Chad)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroepelin, S.; Darius, F.; Deschamps, P.; Dinies, M.; Hoelzmann, P.; Kuper, J.; Oppenheimer, C.; Soulié-Märsche, I.; Sylvestre, F.

    2015-12-01

    Recent field work in the volcanic Tibesti Mountains opens a new chapter in the reconstruction of the last climatic cycles in the central Sahara and their lacustrine environments. For the first time, complete lacustrine sections were sampled in the 900 m deep crater of Trou au Natron at Pic Toussidé (3,315 m a.s.l.), and in 800 m deep Era Kohor, the major sub-caldera of Emi Koussi, the Sahara's 3,445 m high peak (photo). The probed diatomites are located 360 and 125 m above the present-day bottom of the calderas. Studies in the 1960s suggested that lake levels in the Trou au Natron were 300-500 m high at 12,400-14,970 uncal. yrs BP. Such lake depths and resulting water volumes, however, are hardly conceivable in view of the limited intake area and precipitation-evaporation ratios which would have required local rainfall by far surpassing estimates for latitudes 19-21°N from the full-Holocene record of Lake Yoa situated 460 or 220 km southeast, and 1,550 or 2,450 m lower. The presentation will examine whether differences in altitude may explain unparalleled lake depths and postglacial humid conditions 4,000-7,000 years earlier than in the surrounding lowlands, and present alternative hypotheses of lake formation in this Saharan key region.

  11. Evening Pass Over the Sahara Desert and the Middle East

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video over the Sahara Desert and the Middle East was taken by the crew of Expedition 29 aboard the International Space Station. This sequence of shots was taken on Oct. 6, 2011, from 19:46:23 ...

  12. Africa South of the Sahara: A Guide to Reference Sources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Mary, Comp.

    This annotated bibliography has been compiled as an introduction to reference resources for college-level African studies and to suggest useful tools for literature searches. It is a guide to materials in the library of McGill University. Call numbers are included. The titles cited refer to Africa South of the Sahara as a whole or to large…

  13. Drought in the Sahara - A biogeophysical feedback mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charney, J.; Stone, P. H.; Quirk, W. J.

    1975-01-01

    Two integrations of a global general circulation model, differing only in the prescribed surface albedo in the Sahara, show that an increase in albedo resulting from a decrease in plant cover causes a decrease in rainfall. Thus any tendency for plant cover to decrease would be reinforced by a decrease in rainfall, and could initiate or perpetuate a drought.

  14. Cultural Astronomy in Africa South of the Sahara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbrook, Jarita

    This chapter examines two foci of cultural astronomy found in Africa south of the Sahara: creation myths and celestial art. The examples highlighted are from the Akan, the Bahima, the Boshongo, the Fon, the Igbo, the Mambila, the Yoruba, and the Zulu people.

  15. The qanat of Algerian Sahara: an evolutionary hydraulic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Remini, Boualem; Achour, Bachir; Albergel, Jean

    2015-12-01

    This article discusses for the first time a study on the connection and interconnection of qanats located in the Algerian Sahara. During the missions in the oases of Touat and Gourara in 2009, 2010 and 2011, we have been impressed by the complexity of the network of water distribution. The seguias of differents sections take all the senses. Connections are made between qanats to ensure water supply to each owner. In this study, we identified nine models for connecting qanats.

  16. Fennec dust forecast intercomparison over the Sahara in June 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Flamant, Cyrille; Dauhut, Thibaut; Kocha, Cécile; Lafore, Jean-Philippe; Lavaysse, Chistophe; Marnas, Fabien; Mokhtari, Mohamed; Pelon, Jacques; Reinares Martínez, Irene; Schepanski, Kerstin; Tulet, Pierre

    2016-06-01

    In the framework of the Fennec international programme, a field campaign was conducted in June 2011 over the western Sahara. It led to the first observational data set ever obtained that documents the dynamics, thermodynamics and composition of the Saharan atmospheric boundary layer (SABL) under the influence of the heat low. In support to the aircraft operation, four dust forecasts were run daily at low and high resolutions with convection-parameterizing and convection-permitting models, respectively. The unique airborne and ground-based data sets allowed the first ever intercomparison of dust forecasts over the western Sahara. At monthly scale, large aerosol optical depths (AODs) were forecast over the Sahara, a feature observed by satellite retrievals but with different magnitudes. The AOD intensity was correctly predicted by the high-resolution models, while it was underestimated by the low-resolution models. This was partly because of the generation of strong near-surface wind associated with thunderstorm-related density currents that could only be reproduced by models representing convection explicitly. Such models yield emissions mainly in the afternoon that dominate the total emission over the western fringes of the Adrar des Iforas and the Aïr Mountains in the high-resolution forecasts. Over the western Sahara, where the harmattan contributes up to 80 % of dust emission, all the models were successful in forecasting the deep well-mixed SABL. Some of them, however, missed the large near-surface dust concentration generated by density currents and low-level winds. This feature, observed repeatedly by the airborne lidar, was partly forecast by one high-resolution model only.

  17. The Green Sahara: Climate Change, Hydrologic History and Human Occupation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blom, Ronald G.; Farr, Tom G.; Feynmann, Joan; Ruzmaikin, Alexander; Paillou, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Archaeology can provide insight into interactions of climate change and human activities in sensitive areas such as the Sahara, to the benefit of both disciplines. Such analyses can help set bounds on climate change projections, perhaps identify elements of tipping points, and provide constraints on models. The opportunity exists to more precisely constrain the relationship of natural solar and climate interactions, improving understanding of present and future anthropogenic forcing. We are beginning to explore the relationship of human occupation of the Sahara and long-term solar irradiance variations synergetic with changes in atmospheric-ocean circulation patterns. Archaeological and climate records for the last 12 K years are gaining adequate precision to make such comparisons possible. We employ a range of climate records taken over the globe (e.g. Antarctica, Greenland, Cariaco Basin, West African Ocean cores, records from caves) to identify the timing and spatial patterns affecting Saharan climate to compare with archaeological records. We see correlation in changing ocean temperature patterns approx. contemporaneous with drying of the Sahara approx. 6K years BP. The role of radar images and other remote sensing in this work includes providing a geographically comprehensive geomorphic overview of this key area. Such coverage is becoming available from the Japanese PALSAR radar system, which can guide field work to collect archaeological and climatic data to further constrain the climate change chronology and link to models. Our initial remote sensing efforts concentrate on the Gilf Kebir area of Egypt.

  18. Satellite measurement of mass of Sahara dust in the atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, R. S.

    1976-01-01

    Landsat 1 measurements of nadir radiance are used to obtain the mass of particulates in a vertical column of dust from the Sahara Desert. A radiative transfer model, constructed with knowledge of a few values of optical parameters measured from a ship, is developed to account for the measured radiance values. Measurement and model accuracies are discussed. It is found that the mass of particulates with smaller than a 10 micron radius in a vertical column is 1.6 g/sq m.

  19. Premier League Reading STARS 2013/14. Evaluation Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pabion, Clémence

    2015-01-01

    The National Literacy Trust's Premier League Reading Stars programme (PLRS) is a reading intervention for children aged 8 to 13 that captures the motivational power of football to inspire children and young people to read more and to improve their literacy skills. PLRS is delivered by teachers and librarians. The programme delivers statutory…

  20. Open Access Publishing in Indian Premier Research Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhat, Mohammad Hanief

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Publishing research findings in open access journals is a means of enhancing visibility and consequently increasing the impact of publications. This study provides an overview of open access publishing in premier research institutes of India. Method: The publication output of each institution from 2003 to 2007 was ascertained through…

  1. Library Media Specialists: Premier Information Specialists for the Information Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuman, Delia

    2011-01-01

    The information age has given library media specialists an unprecedented opportunity to play a leading role in helping teachers, administrators, and especially students access and use information intelligently. As the school's premier information specialist; the library media specialist has a unique role to play in helping everyone in the school…

  2. Crater palaeolakes in the Tibesti mountains (Central Sahara, North Chad) - New insights into past Saharan climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kröpelin, Stefan; Dinies, Michèle; Sylvestre, Florence; Hoelzmann, Philipp

    2016-04-01

    For the first time continuous lacustrine sections were sampled from the volcanic Tibesti Mountains (Chad): In the 900 m deep crater of Trou au Natron at Pic Toussidé (3,315 m a.s.l.) and from the 800 m deep Era Kohor, the major sub-caldera of Emi Koussi (3,445 m a.s.l.). The remnant diatomites on their slopes are located 360 m (Trou au Natron) and 125 m (Era Kohor) above the present day bottom of the calderas. These sediments from highly continental positions in the central Sahara are keys for the reconstruction of the last climatic cycles (Kröpelin et al. 2015). We report first results from sedimentary-geochemical (total organic and total inorganic carbon contents; total nitrogen; major elements; mineralogy) and palynological analyses for palaeo-environmental interpretations. The diatomites from the Trou au Natron comprise 330 cm of mostly calcitic sediments with relatively low organic carbon (<2.5 %) and strongly varying aragonite and gypsum contents. Major elements (Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Na, P, S, Sr), elemental ratios (Sr/Ca, Mg/Ca, Fe/Mn) and the mineralogy are used to interpret the lake's salinity, productivity and ecological conditions. Trilete spores are preserved throughout the sequence, probably reflecting local moss/fern stands. Regional pollen rain-e.g. grasses and wormwood-is scarcely represented. Golden algae dominate in the lower section. The results of the first palynological samples suggest a small sedimentation basin. Two 14C-dated charcoals out of the upper part of the section indicate mid-Holocene ages and a linear extrapolation based on a sediment accumulation rate of 1.4mma-1 would lead to tentative dates of ~8650 cal a BP for basal lacustrine sediments and ~4450 cal a BP for the cessation of this lacustrine sequence. The diatomites from the Era Kohor reflect a suite of sections that in total sum up to 145 cm of mostly silica-based sediments with very low carbon contents (< 2% TC). Calcite dominated sediments are only present in the topmost 15

  3. Eastern Sahara Geology from Orbital Radar: Potential Analog to Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, T. G.; Paillou, P.; Heggy, E.

    2004-01-01

    Much of the surface of Mars has been intensely reworked by aeolian processes and key evidence about the history of the Martian environment seems to be hidden beneath a widespread layer of debris (paleo lakes and rivers, faults, impact craters). In the same way, the recent geological and hydrological history of the eastern Sahara is still mainly hidden under large regions of wind-blown sand which represent a possible terrestrial analog to Mars. The subsurface geology there is generally invisible to optical remote sensing techniques, but radar images obtained from the Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR) missions were able to penetrate the superficial sand layer to reveal parts of paleohydrological networks in southern Egypt.

  4. The megageomorphology of the radar rivers of the eastern Sahara

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccauley, John F.; Breed, Carol S.; Schaber, Gerald G.

    1986-01-01

    The Eastern Sahara is devoid of surface drainage; this unusual characteristic distinguishes its morphology from that of most other desert regions where running water dominates landscape development. A map derived from SIR-A/B and LANDSAT images and the literature, shows the major presently known paleodrainages in the Eastern Sahara. This compilation permits consideration of the key questions: Where did the radar rivers come from and where did they go? Analysis of SIR-A data led McCauley et al. to suggest that the radar rivers, because of their southwestward trends, once flowed into the Chad basin. This key North African feature is a regional structural low formed in the Early Cretaceous in response to initial opening of the South Atlantic. The problem of the origin of headwaters for the radar rivers was less tractable. The idea that the source areas of the radar rivers might originally have been the same as those later captured by the Nile was proposed tentatively. A more extensive review of the Cenozoic tectonic history of North Africa reveals no reason now to suppose that the Central African tributaries of the present Nile were ever connected to the large alluvial valleys in southwestern Egypt and northwestern Sudan. formed in the Early Cretaceous in response to initial opening of the South Atlantic. The problem of the origin of headwaters for the radar rivers was less tractable. The idea that the source areas of the radar rivers might originally have been the same as those (The Ethiopian Highlands) later captured by the Nile was proposed tentatively. A more extensive review of the Cenozoic tectonic history of North Africa reveals no reason now to support that the Central African tributaries of the present Nile were ever connected to the large alluvial valleys in southwestern Egypt and northwestern Sudan.

  5. Alternate non-stop migration strategies of pied flycatchers to cross the Sahara desert.

    PubMed

    Ouwehand, Janne; Both, Christiaan

    2016-04-01

    Each year more than two billion songbirds cross the Sahara, but how they perform this formidable task is largely unknown. Using geolocation tracks from 27 pied flycatchers, a nocturnally migrating passerine, we show that most birds made diurnal flights in both autumn and spring. These diurnal flights were estimated to be part of non-stop flights of mostly 40-60 h. In spring, birds flew across the Sahara, while autumn migration probably circumpassed part of the desert, through a long oversea flight. Our data contradict claims that passerines cross the Sahara by intermittent flight and daytime resting. The frequent occurrence of long non-stop flights to cross the desert shows migrants' physiological abilities and poses the question why this would not be the general migration strategy to cross the Sahara. PMID:27072404

  6. Lessons premier hospitals learned about implementing electronic health records.

    PubMed

    DeVore, Susan D; Figlioli, Keith

    2010-04-01

    Implementing health information technology (IT) is a major strategic objective for providers. To pinpoint considerations that tie to success, the Premier health care alliance surveyed hospitals to develop an electronic health record best-practices library. Compiled from diverse health care organizations, the library outlines considerations to support "meaningful use" in the areas of computerized physician order entry, medication management, clinical documentation, reporting of measures, privacy, information exchange, management of populations' health, and personal health records. Best practices also uncovered strategies for securing executive leadership, culture change, communication, and support for clinicians. This paper summarizes lessons from the library, providing recommendations to speed up health IT implementation. PMID:20368596

  7. Paired Renazzo-type (CR) carbonaceous chondrites from the Sahara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bischoff, A.; Palme, H.; Ash, R. D.; Clayton, R. N.; Schultz, L.; Herpers, U.; Stoffler, D.; Grady, M. M.; Pillinger, C. T.; Spettel, B.; Weber, H.; Grund, T.; Endress, M.; Weber, D.

    1993-04-01

    Data on the chemical composition, mineralogy, abundance, and isotopic composition of recently found Sahara meteorites are presented. The nine Acfer samples and the El Djouf 001 meteorite are considered to belong to the same parent meteoroid and are classified as a CR chondrite. The Acfer-El Djouf meteorite has a CI-chondritic composition of nonvolatile elements, in particular CI ratios of refractory elements to Mg. The presence of metal with chondritic Fe/Ni ratios, olivine with relatively low FeO contents and with high Cr is attributed to the primitive, unequilibrated nature of Acfer-El Djouf and other CR chondrites. The carbon and nitrogen stable isotropic composition of the Acfer-El Djouf chondrite lies within the range of other members of the CR group. Rare gases of the Acfer-El Djouf meteorite contain a comparatively large solar wind component, in excess of that in Renazzo. The cosmic-ray exposure age of the Acfer-El Djouf meteorite is about 6 million years.

  8. The demographic response to Holocene climate change in the Sahara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Katie; Timpson, Adrian

    2014-10-01

    The timing and development of Holocene human occupation in the now hyperarid Sahara has major implications for understanding links between climate change, demography and cultural adaptation. Here we use summed probability distributions from 3287 calibrated 14C dates from 1011 archaeological sites to demonstrate a major and rapid demographic shift between 10,500 and 5500 years BP. This event corresponds with the African Humid Period (AHP) and is sub-continental in scale, indicating climate as the prime factor driving broad-scale population dynamics in northern Africa. Furthermore, by providing a high temporal resolution proxy for effective carrying capacity our population curve offers an independent estimate of environmental change in northern Africa, indicating a temporal delay in the terrestrial response to atmospheric climate change. These results highlight the degree to which human demography is a function of environment at the appropriate scale of observation in both time and space and sheds important new light on the social response to global environmental change.

  9. Measuring cardiac waste: the premier cardiac waste measures.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Timothy J; Partovian, Chohreh; Kroch, Eugene; Martin, John; Bankowitz, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The authors developed 8 measures of waste associated with cardiac procedures to assist hospitals in comparing their performance with peer facilities. Measure selection was based on review of the research literature, clinical guidelines, and consultation with key stakeholders. Development and validation used the data from 261 hospitals in a split-sample design. Measures were risk adjusted using Premier's CareScience methodologies or mean peer value based on Medicare Severity Diagnosis-Related Group assignment. High variability was found in resource utilization across facilities. Validation of the measures using item-to-total correlations (range = 0.27-0.78), Cronbach α (.88), and Spearman rank correlation (0.92) showed high reliability and discriminatory power. Because of the level of variability observed among hospitals, this study suggests that there is opportunity for facilities to design successful waste reduction programs targeting cardiac-device procedures. PMID:23719033

  10. African humid periods triggered the reactivation of a large river system in Western Sahara.

    PubMed

    Skonieczny, C; Paillou, P; Bory, A; Bayon, G; Biscara, L; Crosta, X; Eynaud, F; Malaizé, B; Revel, M; Aleman, N; Barusseau, J-P; Vernet, R; Lopez, S; Grousset, F

    2015-01-01

    The Sahara experienced several humid episodes during the late Quaternary, associated with the development of vast fluvial networks and enhanced freshwater delivery to the surrounding ocean margins. In particular, marine sediment records off Western Sahara indicate deposition of river-borne material at those times, implying sustained fluvial discharges along the West African margin. Today, however, no major river exists in this area; therefore, the origin of these sediments remains unclear. Here, using orbital radar satellite imagery, we present geomorphological data that reveal the existence of a large buried paleodrainage network on the Mauritanian coast. On the basis of evidence from the literature, we propose that reactivation of this major paleoriver during past humid periods contributed to the delivery of sediments to the Tropical Atlantic margin. This finding provides new insights for the interpretation of terrigenous sediment records off Western Africa, with important implications for our understanding of the paleohydrological history of the Sahara. PMID:26556052

  11. Active sand dunes are largest dust source in the Sahara Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Atreyee

    2012-09-01

    Dried up lakebeds and playas in the Sahara Desert of North Africa are large sources of dust in the atmosphere. The Bodélé Depression at the southern edge of the Sahara Desert, for example, is the single largest source of dust in the world; on average, 100 dust storms a year originate from the Bodélé Depression. A new study by Crouvi et al., however, finds that active sand dunes could be even bigger sources of desert dust in the atmosphere. Atmospheric dust plays active roles in climate and biological processes in the ocean: It regulates heating at the surface of the Earth; modifies cloud properties that affect rainfall; and acts as the only source of iron, a critical nutrient for microorganisms in the ocean. Little is known about types of dust sources in the Sahara Desert, which alone accounts for more than 50% of the dust in the atmosphere.

  12. African humid periods triggered the reactivation of a large river system in Western Sahara

    PubMed Central

    Skonieczny, C.; Paillou, P.; Bory, A.; Bayon, G.; Biscara, L.; Crosta, X.; Eynaud, F.; Malaizé, B.; Revel, M.; Aleman, N.; Barusseau, J. -P.; Vernet, R.; Lopez, S.; Grousset, F.

    2015-01-01

    The Sahara experienced several humid episodes during the late Quaternary, associated with the development of vast fluvial networks and enhanced freshwater delivery to the surrounding ocean margins. In particular, marine sediment records off Western Sahara indicate deposition of river-borne material at those times, implying sustained fluvial discharges along the West African margin. Today, however, no major river exists in this area; therefore, the origin of these sediments remains unclear. Here, using orbital radar satellite imagery, we present geomorphological data that reveal the existence of a large buried paleodrainage network on the Mauritanian coast. On the basis of evidence from the literature, we propose that reactivation of this major paleoriver during past humid periods contributed to the delivery of sediments to the Tropical Atlantic margin. This finding provides new insights for the interpretation of terrigenous sediment records off Western Africa, with important implications for our understanding of the paleohydrological history of the Sahara. PMID:26556052

  13. Ancient watercourses and biogeography of the Sahara explain the peopling of the desert

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Nick A.; Blench, Roger M.; Armitage, Simon J.; Bristow, Charlie S.; White, Kevin H.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence increasingly suggests that sub-Saharan Africa is at the center of human evolution and understanding routes of dispersal “out of Africa” is thus becoming increasingly important. The Sahara Desert is considered by many to be an obstacle to these dispersals and a Nile corridor route has been proposed to cross it. Here we provide evidence that the Sahara was not an effective barrier and indicate how both animals and humans populated it during past humid phases. Analysis of the zoogeography of the Sahara shows that more animals crossed via this route than used the Nile corridor. Furthermore, many of these species are aquatic. This dispersal was possible because during the Holocene humid period the region contained a series of linked lakes, rivers, and inland deltas comprising a large interlinked waterway, channeling water and animals into and across the Sahara, thus facilitating these dispersals. This system was last active in the early Holocene when many species appear to have occupied the entire Sahara. However, species that require deep water did not reach northern regions because of weak hydrological connections. Human dispersals were influenced by this distribution; Nilo-Saharan speakers hunting aquatic fauna with barbed bone points occupied the southern Sahara, while people hunting Savannah fauna with the bow and arrow spread southward. The dating of lacustrine sediments show that the “green Sahara” also existed during the last interglacial (∼125 ka) and provided green corridors that could have formed dispersal routes at a likely time for the migration of modern humans out of Africa. PMID:21187416

  14. Teaching About Africa South of the Sahara; A Guide and Resource Packet for Ninth Grade Social Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coburn, Barbara; And Others

    This guide provides a sampling of reference materials which are pertinent for two ninth grade units: Africa South of the Sahara: Land and People, and Africa South of the Sahara: Historic Trends. The effect of urbanization upon traditional tribalistic cultures is the focus. A case study is used to encourage an inductive approach to the learning…

  15. Expansion and contraction of the sahara desert from 1980 to 1990.

    PubMed

    Tucker, C J; Dregne, H E; Newcomb, W W

    1991-07-19

    Data from polar-orbiting meteorological satellites have been used to determine the extent of the Sahara Desert and to document its interannual variation from 1980 to 1990. The Sahara Desert ranged from 8,633,000 square kilometers in 1980 to 9,982,000 square kilometers in 1984. The greatest annual north-south latitudinal movement of the southern Saharan boundary was 110 kilometers from 1984 to 1985 and resulted in a decrease in desert area of 724,000 square kilometers. PMID:17794695

  16. Preliminary Examination of Sahara 99555: Mineralogy and Experimental Studies of a New Angrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikouchi, T.; McKay, G.; Le, L.; Mittlefehldt, D. W.

    2000-01-01

    A 2710 g meteorite, Sahara 99555 (Sah99), was recently recovered from the Sahara and reported to be the 5th angrite. It is the largest angrite ever found and may offer useful information to better understand the unusual petrogeneses of this rare achondrite group. It may also allow us to examine the chronological record of igneous activity in the very early solar system. We obtained a 2.6 g chip of Sah99 and here present a preliminary report of its petrology and mineralogy in conjunction with a crystallization experiment on an analogue composition.

  17. Investigating the role of the land surface in explaining the interannual variation of the net radiation balance over the Western Sahara and sub-Sahara

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Nicholson, Sharon

    1987-01-01

    The status of the data sets is discussed. Progress was made in both data analysis and modeling areas. The atmospheric and land surface contributions to the net radiation budget over the Sahara-Sahel region is being decoupled. The interannual variability of these two processes was investigated and this variability related to seasonal rainfall fluctuations. A modified Barnes objective analysis scheme was developed which uses an eliptic scan pattern and a 3-pass iteration of the difference fields.

  18. The Sahara Troposphere - Simultaneous Aircraft Observations from Fennec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelstaedter, Sebastian; Washington, Richard; Flamant, Cyrille; Allen, Chris J. T.

    2013-04-01

    The Saharan heat low (SHL) that develops over western Africa in Boreal summer has been recognised for its important role in the regional and continental scale climate system. It is co-located with the highest atmospheric dust loading and the deepest dry convective boundary layer in the world. As part of the Fennec 2011 Intensive Observation Period, two aircraft surveyed the SHL region in the morning and afternoon on 22 June 2011 along different tracks employing LIDAR instruments and dropsondes allowing the first characterisation of the structure and daytime evolution of atmospheric features in the central western Sahara including the SHL, the Saharan atmospheric boundary layer (SABL), the monsoon and atmospheric dust distributions within the system. The observations show a system that is more complex than previously thought. Characteristics include a) a NE-SW orientated SHL, b) a monsoon re-circulation around the SHL associated with dampened Convective Boundary Layer (CBL) growth and Saharan Residual Layer (SRL) top minimum, c) Harmattan winds associated with increased near-surface temperatures and enhanced CBL growth rate and CBL depth, d) near-surface inversions limiting CBL growth and vertical mixing of emitted dust, e) above SRL inversion strength linked to SRL top altitude, f) an aged dust layer close to the SABL top that shows a complex wave-like structure, and g) a potential tropospheric ventilation reducing SRL height and reducing dust concentration. The NE-SW elongated SHL is located over northern Mauritania close to the Mali border in the morning and moves west by about 0.5 to 1.0° in the afternoon corresponding well with the ERA-Interim reanalysis. The CBL depth ranges from 0.45 to 2.01 km above mean sea level (aMSL) in the morning and from 1.75 to 6.02 km in the afternoon. Low-level inversions in the morning between 0.5 and 0.9 km aMSL are strongest (up to 0.83°C) where the CBL is most shallow and weakening with increasing CBL depth. Above SRL

  19. Sahara: Barrier or corridor? Nonmetric cranial traits and biological affinities of North African late Holocene populations.

    PubMed

    Nikita, Efthymia; Mattingly, David; Lahr, Marta Mirazón

    2012-02-01

    The Garamantes flourished in southwestern Libya, in the core of the Sahara Desert ~3,000 years ago and largely controlled trans-Saharan trade. Their biological affinities to other North African populations, including the Egyptian, Algerian, Tunisian and Sudanese, roughly contemporary to them, are examined by means of cranial nonmetric traits using the Mean Measure of Divergence and Mahalanobis D(2) distance. The aim is to shed light on the extent to which the Sahara Desert inhibited extensive population movements and gene flow. Our results show that the Garamantes possess distant affinities to their neighbors. This relationship may be due to the Central Sahara forming a barrier among groups, despite the archaeological evidence for extended networks of contact. The role of the Sahara as a barrier is further corroborated by the significant correlation between the Mahalanobis D(2) distance and geographic distance between the Garamantes and the other populations under study. In contrast, no clear pattern was observed when all North African populations were examined, indicating that there was no uniform gene flow in the region. PMID:22183688

  20. Songbird migration across the Sahara: the non-stop hypothesis rejected!

    PubMed

    Schmaljohann, Heiko; Liechti, Felix; Bruderer, Bruno

    2007-03-01

    Billions of songbirds breeding in the Western Palaearctic cross the largest desert of the world, the Sahara, twice a year. While crossing Europe, the vast majority use an intermittent flight strategy, i.e. fly at night and rest or feed during the day. However, it was long assumed that they overcome the Sahara in a 40 h non-stop flight. In this study, we observed bird migration with radar in the plain sand desert of the Western Sahara (Mauritania) during autumn and spring migration and revealed a clear prevalence of intermittent migration. Massive departures of songbirds just after sunset independent of site and season suggests strongly that songbirds spent the day in the plain desert. Thus, most songbirds cross the Sahara predominantely by the intermittent flight strategy. Autumn migration took place mainly at low altitudes with high temperatures, its density decreased abruptly before sunrise, followed by very little daytime migration. Migration was highly restricted to night-time and matched perfectly the intermittent flight strategy. However, in spring, when migratory flights occurred at much higher altitudes than in autumn, in cool air, about 17% of the songbird migration occurred during the day. This suggests that flying in high temperatures and turbulent air, as is the case in autumn, may lead to an increase in water and/or energy loss and may prevent songbirds from prolonged flights into the day. PMID:17254999

  1. Hibiscus plant named `Sahara Sunset` U.S. Plant Patent 21,765

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    'Sahara Sunset' is a new and distinct cultivar of Hibiscus, botanically known as Hibiscus acetosella. The new Hibiscus was originated in Poplarville, Miss. and is a product of a mutation induction program. The parent of the present new cultivar is an unknown Hibiscus acetosella Wels. Ex Hiern seedli...

  2. Lakeside Cemeteries in the Sahara: 5000 Years of Holocene Population and Environmental Change

    PubMed Central

    Sereno, Paul C.; Garcea, Elena A. A.; Jousse, Hélène; Stojanowski, Christopher M.; Saliège, Jean-François; Maga, Abdoulaye; Ide, Oumarou A.; Knudson, Kelly J.; Mercuri, Anna Maria; Stafford, Thomas W.; Kaye, Thomas G.; Giraudi, Carlo; N'siala, Isabella Massamba; Cocca, Enzo; Moots, Hannah M.; Dutheil, Didier B.; Stivers, Jeffrey P.

    2008-01-01

    Background Approximately two hundred human burials were discovered on the edge of a paleolake in Niger that provide a uniquely preserved record of human occupation in the Sahara during the Holocene (∼8000 B.C.E. to the present). Called Gobero, this suite of closely spaced sites chronicles the rapid pace of biosocial change in the southern Sahara in response to severe climatic fluctuation. Methodology/Principal Findings Two main occupational phases are identified that correspond with humid intervals in the early and mid-Holocene, based on 78 direct AMS radiocarbon dates on human remains, fauna and artifacts, as well as 9 OSL dates on paleodune sand. The older occupants have craniofacial dimensions that demonstrate similarities with mid-Holocene occupants of the southern Sahara and Late Pleistocene to early Holocene inhabitants of the Maghreb. Their hyperflexed burials compose the earliest cemetery in the Sahara dating to ∼7500 B.C.E. These early occupants abandon the area under arid conditions and, when humid conditions return ∼4600 B.C.E., are replaced by a more gracile people with elaborated grave goods including animal bone and ivory ornaments. Conclusions/Significance The principal significance of Gobero lies in its extraordinary human, faunal, and archaeological record, from which we conclude the following: The early Holocene occupants at Gobero (7700–6200 B.C.E.) were largely sedentary hunter-fisher-gatherers with lakeside funerary sites that include the earliest recorded cemetery in the Sahara.Principal components analysis of craniometric variables closely allies the early Holocene occupants at Gobero with a skeletally robust, trans-Saharan assemblage of Late Pleistocene to mid-Holocene human populations from the Maghreb and southern Sahara.Gobero was abandoned during a period of severe aridification possibly as long as one millennium (6200–5200 B.C.E).More gracile humans arrived in the mid-Holocene (5200–2500 B.C.E.) employing a diversified

  3. Unravelling biodiversity, evolution and threats to conservation in the Sahara-Sahel.

    PubMed

    Brito, José C; Godinho, Raquel; Martínez-Freiría, Fernando; Pleguezuelos, Juan M; Rebelo, Hugo; Santos, Xavier; Vale, Cândida G; Velo-Antón, Guillermo; Boratyński, Zbyszek; Carvalho, Sílvia B; Ferreira, Sónia; Gonçalves, Duarte V; Silva, Teresa L; Tarroso, Pedro; Campos, João C; Leite, João V; Nogueira, Joana; Alvares, Francisco; Sillero, Neftalí; Sow, Andack S; Fahd, Soumia; Crochet, Pierre-André; Carranza, Salvador

    2014-02-01

    Deserts and arid regions are generally perceived as bare and rather homogeneous areas of low diversity. The Sahara is the largest warm desert in the world and together with the arid Sahel displays high topographical and climatic heterogeneity, and has experienced recent and strong climatic oscillations that have greatly shifted biodiversity distribution and community composition. The large size, remoteness and long-term political instability of the Sahara-Sahel, have limited knowledge on its biodiversity. However, over the last decade, there have been an increasing number of published scientific studies based on modern geomatic and molecular tools, and broad sampling of taxa of these regions. This review tracks trends in knowledge about biodiversity patterns, processes and threats across the Sahara-Sahel, and anticipates needs for biodiversity research and conservation. Recent studies are changing completely the perception of regional biodiversity patterns. Instead of relatively low species diversity with distribution covering most of the region, studies now suggest a high rate of endemism and larger number of species, with much narrower and fragmented ranges, frequently limited to micro-hotspots of biodiversity. Molecular-based studies are also unravelling cryptic diversity associated with mountains, which together with recent distribution atlases, allows identifying integrative biogeographic patterns in biodiversity distribution. Mapping of multivariate environmental variation (at 1 km × 1 km resolution) of the region illustrates main biogeographical features of the Sahara-Sahel and supports recently hypothesised dispersal corridors and refugia. Micro-scale water-features present mostly in mountains have been associated with local biodiversity hotspots. However, the distribution of available data on vertebrates highlights current knowledge gaps that still apply to a large proportion of the Sahara-Sahel. Current research is providing insights into key

  4. Behavioral transitions and weight change patterns within the PREMIER trial.

    PubMed

    Bartfield, Jessica K; Stevens, Victor J; Jerome, Gerald J; Batch, Bryan C; Kennedy, Betty M; Vollmer, William M; Harsha, David; Appel, Lawrence J; Desmond, Renee; Ard, Jamy D

    2011-08-01

    Little is known about the transition in behaviors from short-term weight loss to maintenance of weight loss. We wanted to determine how short-term and long-term weight loss and patterns of weight change were associated with intervention behavioral targets. This analysis includes overweight/obese participants in active treatment (n = 507) from the previously published PREMIER trial, an 18-month, multicomponent lifestyle intervention for blood pressure reduction, including 33 intervention sessions and recommendations to self-monitor food intake and physical activity daily. Associations between behaviors (attendance, recorded days/week of physical activity, food records/week) and weight loss of ≥5% at 6 and 18 months were examined using logistic regression. We characterized the sample using 5 weight change categories (weight gained, weight stable, weight loss then relapse, late weight loss, and weight loss then maintenance) and analyzed adherence to the behaviors for each category, comparing means with ANOVA. Participants lost an average of 5.3 ± 5.6 kg at 6 months and 4.0 ± 6.7 kg (4.96% of body weight) by 18 months. Higher levels of attendance, food record completion, and recorded days/week of physical activity were associated with increasing odds of achieving 5% weight loss. All weight change groups had declines in the behaviors over time; however, compared to the other four groups, the weight loss/maintenance group (n = 154) had statistically less significant decline in number of food records/week (48%), recorded days/week of physical activity (41.7%), and intervention sessions attended (12.8%) through 18 months. Behaviors associated with short-term weight loss continue to be associated with long-term weight loss, albeit at lower frequencies. Minimizing the decline in these behaviors may be important in achieving long-term weight loss. PMID:21455122

  5. Transforming KSC to be the World's Premier 21st Century Launch Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engler, Tom

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the work being done to transform the Kennedy Space Center into what is hoped to be the world's premier launch complex, capable of launching commercial and government satellites and manned spacecraft.

  6. Health News You Can Use …from the world's premier research institute

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Health News You Can Use …from the world's premier research institute Past Issues / Summer 2007 Table ... medical experts who work for you at the world's leading medical and health research organization, the National ...

  7. Mineralogy of Carbonaceous Chondrites and ACFER 217 from the Sahara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, T.; Bischoff, A.

    1992-07-01

    Among the approximately 400 meteorites recovered in the past three years in the Sahara at least 19 carbonaceous chondrites exist. Ten paired samples belong to the CR- chondrite Acfer 059/El Djouf 001 which has been recently described (Bischoff et al., 1992a). Three samples (Acfer 182, 207, 214) represent a unique (carbonaceous) chondrite (Bischoff et al., 1992b) that has similarities to ALH 85085 (e.g. Scott, 1988). Here, we describe six unpaired carbonaceous chondrites and Acfer 217, an unusual chondritic breccia. Three chondrites probably belong to the CV- chondrites (Acfer 082, 086, 272) and two to the CO- chondrites (Acfer 202, 243). Acfer 094 has trace element characteristics of a CM-chondrite, but has oxygen isotope ratios different from CM-chondrites (Bischoff et al., 1991). CV-chondrites: Based on the petrography and mineral chemistry Acfer 082 and 086 are typical CV3 chondrites. Large coarse-grained CAIs (especially in Acfer 082), fine- grained spinel-rich and large olivine-rich aggregates, chondrules and fragments are embedded in a fine-grained groundmass mainly consisting of small Fe-rich olivine laths. In Acfer 082 and Acfer 086 the average compositions of matrix olivine are Fa 55 and Fa 40, respectively. Acfer 082 is quite fresh concerning the degree of weathering, whereas Acfer 086 is severely weathered as indicated by the occurrence of abundant calcite filling fractures and pores between the olivine laths of the matrix. Acfer 272 has a mineral chemistry similar to Acfer 082, but is in texture, trace element chemistry (Spettel et al., 1992), and oxygen isotopes (Mayeda and Clayton, pers. communication) different to Acfer 082. Acfer 272 has a densely compacted matrix without individual euhedral to subhedral olivine laths. CO-chondrites: Acfer 202 and 243 consist of abundant porphyritic chondrules, CAIs, olivine-rich inclusions, and fragments embedded in abundant fine-grained matrix. The main component of the matrix is Fe-rich olivine. Matrix olivines

  8. Modeling mineral dust emissions from the Sahara desert using new surface properties and soil database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, B.; Marticorena, B.; Bergametti, G.; LéOn, J. F.; Mahowald, N. M.

    2008-07-01

    The present study investigates the mineral dust emissions and the occurrence of dust emission events over the Sahara desert from 1996 to 2001. Mineral dust emissions are simulated over a region extending from 16°N to 38°N and from 19°W to 40°E with a ?° × ?° spatial resolution. The input parameters required by the dust emission model are surface features data (aerodynamic roughness length, dry soil size distribution and texture for erodible soils), and meteorological surface data (mainly surface wind velocity and soil moisture). A map of the aerodynamic roughness lengths is established based on a composition of protrusion coefficients derived from the POLDER-1 surface products. Soil dry size distribution and texture are derived from measurements performed on soil samples from desert areas, and from a soil map derived from a geomorphologic analysis of desert landscapes. Surface re-analyzed meteorological databases (ERA-40) of the European Centre for Medium range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) are used. The influence of soil moisture on simulated dust emissions is quantified. The main Saharan dust sources identified during the 6-year simulated period are in agreement with the previous studies based on in situ or satellite observations. The relevance of the simulated large dust sources and point sources ("hot spots") is tested using aerosol indexes derived from satellite observations (TOMS Absorbing Aerosol Index and Infrared Dust Difference Index Meteosat). The Saharan dust emissions simulated from 1996 to 2001 range from 585 to 759 Tg a-1. The simulations show marked seasonal cycles with a maximum in summer for the western Sahara and in spring for the eastern Sahara. The interannual variability of dust emissions is pronounced in the eastern part of the Sahara while the emissions from the western Sahara are more regular over the studied period. The soil moisture does not noticeably affect the Saharan dust emissions, their seasonal cycle or their interannual

  9. Were Rivers Flowing across the Sahara During the Last Interglacial? Implications for Human Migration through Africa

    PubMed Central

    Coulthard, Tom J.; Ramirez, Jorge A.; Barton, Nick; Rogerson, Mike; Brücher, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Human migration north through Africa is contentious. This paper uses a novel palaeohydrological and hydraulic modelling approach to test the hypothesis that under wetter climates c.100,000 years ago major river systems ran north across the Sahara to the Mediterranean, creating viable migration routes. We confirm that three of these now buried palaeo river systems could have been active at the key time of human migration across the Sahara. Unexpectedly, it is the most western of these three rivers, the Irharhar river, that represents the most likely route for human migration. The Irharhar river flows directly south to north, uniquely linking the mountain areas experiencing monsoon climates at these times to temperate Mediterranean environments where food and resources would have been abundant. The findings have major implications for our understanding of how humans migrated north through Africa, for the first time providing a quantitative perspective on the probabilities that these routes were viable for human habitation at these times. PMID:24040347

  10. Multiple dust sources in the Sahara Desert: The importance of sand dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouvi, Onn; Schepanski, Kerstin; Amit, Rivka; Gillespie, Alan R.; Enzel, Yehouda

    2012-07-01

    We determine the current sources of dust in the Sahara Desert using quantitative correlation between the number of days with dust storms (NDS), derived from remote-sensing data of high temporal resolution, with the distribution of the soil types and geomorphic units. During 2006-8 the source of over 90% of the NDS was found to be sand dunes, leptosols, calcisols, arenosols, and rock debris. In contrast to previous studies, only few dust storms originated from playas and dry lake beds. Land erodibility was estimated by regressing the NDS to the number of days with high-speed wind events, and was found to be high for sand dunes. Clay and fine-silt grains and aggregates are scarce in sand dunes, which most likely produce dust particles through aeolian abrasion of sand grains. Thus, saltating sand grains impacting clay aggregates on playa surfaces cannot be the sole process for generating dust in the Sahara.

  11. Resource Geopolitics: Cold War Technologies, Global Fertilizers, and the Fate of Western Sahara.

    PubMed

    Camprubí, Lino

    2015-07-01

    When, after years of geological and geophysical exploration, a phosphate mine was discovered at Bu-Craa in 1964, Western Sahara received renewed geopolitical attention. Several countries competing for the control of the world fertilizer market, including Morocco, Spain, France, and the United States, developed diverging strategies to gain control of the mineral. After intense negotiations revolving around the materiality of mining technologies and involving reserve estimations, sabotage, and flexing of diplomatic muscles, Morocco took over the Spanish colony in 1975. While this secured Morocco's place in the world market, it condemned the local population to exile and domination. This article explores three technological stages of the exploitation of phosphate in Western Sahara that underpin the geopolitical history. This perspective yields new visions of cold war technology and postcolonial markets. PMID:26387526

  12. Pre-Islamic Dry-Stone Monuments of the Central and Western Sahara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauthier, Yves

    Saharan dry-stone monuments are important cultural markers: not only do they highlight the boundaries of the areas occupied by different prehistoric populations, but they also reveal information about the rites and beliefs of Holocene Saharan populations. As climate deteriorated in the Middle Holocene, ways of life changed, with indirect impacts on the architecture of the monuments and on the way they were oriented. Tens of thousands of recorded monuments, of various types, allow us to understand what the orientation rules were and how they changed with location. Data compiled for the eleven types of monuments reveal that many monuments of the central Sahara and Tibesti were probably aligned toward the rising sun or moon, that three types of the Atlantic Sahara show instead a random distribution, and that monuments with a pan-Saharan distribution have a complex orientation pattern. A correlation or orientation with key landscape features is likely for three monument types, coexisting with criteria based on lunisolar alignment.

  13. Palaeohydrology of the Fazzan Basin, Libyan Sahara: Evidence for multiple phases of North African humidity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armitage, S. J.; White, K.; Drake, N.

    2008-12-01

    The Fazzan is a large closed basin with an area of 450,000 km2, located in south-western Libya. The present-day climate is hyper-arid. Modern human occupation is restricted to oases, notably at the foot of the Messak Sattafat, a Nubian Sandstone escarpment which divides the Fazzan into two sub-basins. However widespread lithic scatters with varying inferred ages, and numerous Holocene hearth fields, indicate that the Fazzan has a long history of human occupation. In addition, regionally extensive lake deposits attest to the presence of a large palaeolake, here termed Lake Mega-Fazzan, at various periods in the past. Although the Sahara contains evidence for several other large palaeolakes, Lake Mega-Fazzan is the only one fed exclusively by rivers draining the Sahara proper. Thus, the Lake Mega-Fazzan sediments and archaeological remains provide an important resource for advancing our understanding of climate change in this part of the Sahara. Optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating techniques have been applied to a range of lacustrine deposits, and more experimentally to the Holocene hearth fields, to provide an internally consistent chronology for the Fazzan record. Results indicate that sediments within the Fazzan Basin record a very long history of palaeohydrological change. The oldest lacustrine sediments are beyond the range of conventional OSL dating techniques, but younger humid periods during oxygen isotope stages 11, 5 and 1 are recognised. Initial results from one hearth field also indicate that OSL has the potential to reveal human responses to changes in hydrology during the Holocene. These results, when compared with similar studies of adjacent closed basins, indicate that the Sahara may not always have provided as formidable a barrier to faunal migration as it does at present. The implications of this finding for our understanding of North African palaeoclimate and biogeography will be discussed.

  14. Aridification of the Sahara desert caused by Tethys Sea shrinkage during the Late Miocene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhongshi; Ramstein, Gilles; Schuster, Mathieu; Li, Camille; Contoux, Camille; Yan, Qing

    2014-09-18

    It is widely believed that the Sahara desert is no more than ∼2-3 million years (Myr) old, with geological evidence showing a remarkable aridification of north Africa at the onset of the Quaternary ice ages. Before that time, north African aridity was mainly controlled by the African summer monsoon (ASM), which oscillated with Earth's orbital precession cycles. Afterwards, the Northern Hemisphere glaciation added an ice volume forcing on the ASM, which additionally oscillated with glacial-interglacial cycles. These findings led to the idea that the Sahara desert came into existence when the Northern Hemisphere glaciated ∼2-3 Myr ago. The later discovery, however, of aeolian dune deposits ∼7 Myr old suggested a much older age, although this interpretation is hotly challenged and there is no clear mechanism for aridification around this time. Here we use climate model simulations to identify the Tortonian stage (∼7-11 Myr ago) of the Late Miocene epoch as the pivotal period for triggering north African aridity and creating the Sahara desert. Through a set of experiments with the Norwegian Earth System Model and the Community Atmosphere Model, we demonstrate that the African summer monsoon was drastically weakened by the Tethys Sea shrinkage during the Tortonian, allowing arid, desert conditions to expand across north Africa. Not only did the Tethys shrinkage alter the mean climate of the region, it also enhanced the sensitivity of the African monsoon to orbital forcing, which subsequently became the major driver of Sahara extent fluctuations. These important climatic changes probably caused the shifts in Asian and African flora and fauna observed during the same period, with possible links to the emergence of early hominins in north Africa. PMID:25230661

  15. Wet phases in the Sahara/Sahel region and human migration patterns in North Africa

    PubMed Central

    Castañeda, Isla S.; Mulitza, Stefan; Schefuß, Enno; Lopes dos Santos, Raquel A.; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S.; Schouten, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of individual plant leaf waxes (a proxy for C3 vs. C4 vegetation) in a marine sediment core collected from beneath the plume of Sahara-derived dust in northwest Africa reveals three periods during the past 192,000 years when the central Sahara/Sahel contained C3 plants (likely trees), indicating substantially wetter conditions than at present. Our data suggest that variability in the strength of Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) is a main control on vegetation distribution in central North Africa, and we note expansions of C3 vegetation during the African Humid Period (early Holocene) and within Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 3 (≈50–45 ka) and MIS 5 (≈120–110 ka). The wet periods within MIS 3 and 5 coincide with major human migration events out of sub-Saharan Africa. Our results thus suggest that changes in AMOC influenced North African climate and, at times, contributed to amenable conditions in the central Sahara/Sahel, allowing humans to cross this otherwise inhospitable region. PMID:19910531

  16. Western Sahara Atlas of Algeria: Salt diapirism, orogenic folding and hydrocarbon potential

    SciTech Connect

    Roeder, D. )

    1991-08-01

    The Sahara Atlas has been the Algerian part of the surface trace of the Europe/Africa convergent plate boundary since the early Oligocene. In its western segment, the structure of this detached fold belt is evident in surface mapping, in reflection seismic data, and in a finite plate-tectonic convergence of about 300 km. The northward slope at the Saharan foreland flexure of 5-8{degree} is consistent with northward thinning crust. Very large detached folds with minor thrusts are consistent with an 8 km thick, Triassic to Eocene, marine and nonmarine, polyphase rifted, passive-margin series. The bulk strain in the fold carpet is only 30-40 km, but large folds near the foreland support the theoretical detachment of 130 km. Triassic and Lower Jurassic evaporites occur in nondiapiric anticlinal cores, in Neocomian salt pillows, and in Neogene to Holocene diapirs and fault laminae. The fold trend records the azimuth of plate convergence. The canted mountain-front trend follows an abrupt fault contact (of late Paleozoic or middle Cretaceous age) between Paleozoics on Saharan basement and Hercynian-type basement. The hydrocarbon potential of the Sahara Atlas depends on infolded rifts or aulacogens of early Jurassic age. The northward extension of the Saharan Paleozoic series into the Sahara Atlas is unlikely.

  17. Negotiating an ecological barrier: crossing the Sahara in relation to winds by common swifts.

    PubMed

    Åkesson, Susanne; Bianco, Giuseppe; Hedenström, Anders

    2016-09-26

    The Sahara Desert is one of the largest land-based barriers on the Earth, crossed twice each year by billions of birds on migration. Here we investigate how common swifts migrating between breeding sites in Sweden and wintering areas in sub-Saharan Africa perform the desert crossing with respect to route choice, winds, timing and speed of migration by analysing 72 geolocator tracks recording migration. The swifts cross western Sahara on a broad front in autumn, while in spring they seem to use three alternative routes across the Sahara, a western, a central and an eastern route across the Arabian Peninsula, with most birds using the western route. The swifts show slower migration and travel speeds, and make longer detours with more stops in autumn compared with spring. In spring, the stopover period in West Africa coincided with mostly favourable winds, but birds remained in the area, suggesting fuelling. The western route provided more tailwind assistance compared with the central route for our tracked swifts in spring, but not in autumn. The ultimate explanation for the evolution of a preferred western route is presumably a combination of matching rich foraging conditions (swarming insects) and favourable winds enabling fast spring migration.This article is part of the themed issue 'Moving in a moving medium: new perspectives on flight'. PMID:27528783

  18. Ambient measurements of selected VOCs in populated and remote sites of the Sahara desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yassaa, Noureddine; Ciccioli, Paolo; Brancaleoni, Enzo; Frattoni, Massimiliano; Meklati, Brahim Youcef

    2011-04-01

    For the first time, ambient levels of benzene, toluene, carbon tetrachloride and selected oxygenated organic compounds have been measured in both populated and remote sites in the Sahara desert. The levels of these species were generally found to be high in the industrialized regions of the North Sahara, progressively decreasing with latitude so that lowest levels were reached in remote desert sites close to the Equator. The emissions from traffic, and the oil production and its transformation, together with the solvent use were the main anthropogenic sources determining the levels of aromatic, aliphatic and chlorinated organic compounds in desert sites near two Algerian cities. Substantial levels of acetone and some semi-volatile compounds, emitted or formed by photochemical reactions, were also found. Although some of these compounds were below the detection limits in the most remote sites of the Sahara desert located in Mauritania and Niger, measurable levels of benzene and toluene were still found together with significant amounts of acetone. Data seem to indicate that forest fires occurring in the tropical regions of the North African continent were the most likely sources for the background levels measured during most of our measurements. The data presented here did not differ too much from those measured in the most isolated sites of the northern hemisphere.

  19. Wet phases in the Sahara/Sahel region and human migration patterns in North Africa.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Isla S; Mulitza, Stefan; Schefuss, Enno; Lopes dos Santos, Raquel A; Sinninghe Damsté, Jaap S; Schouten, Stefan

    2009-12-01

    The carbon isotopic composition of individual plant leaf waxes (a proxy for C(3) vs. C(4) vegetation) in a marine sediment core collected from beneath the plume of Sahara-derived dust in northwest Africa reveals three periods during the past 192,000 years when the central Sahara/Sahel contained C(3) plants (likely trees), indicating substantially wetter conditions than at present. Our data suggest that variability in the strength of Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC) is a main control on vegetation distribution in central North Africa, and we note expansions of C(3) vegetation during the African Humid Period (early Holocene) and within Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 3 ( approximately 50-45 ka) and MIS 5 ( approximately 120-110 ka). The wet periods within MIS 3 and 5 coincide with major human migration events out of sub-Saharan Africa. Our results thus suggest that changes in AMOC influenced North African climate and, at times, contributed to amenable conditions in the central Sahara/Sahel, allowing humans to cross this otherwise inhospitable region. PMID:19910531

  20. Comparing environmental changes and habitability settings in the geological history of Sahara and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ori, G. G.; Sabbadini, R.; Komatsu, G.

    2014-12-01

    Sahara has experienced during its long geological history a large number of climatic changes from humid conditions (with savanna-type environments) to dry conditions (with hot desert environments). Therefore, since the late Miocene (?), Sahara experienced periods with rivers, lakes, deltas, and swamps alternated with dry periods with strong aeolian activity and the formation of deflation surface and sand seas. The fluvio-lacustrine deposits formed during humid periods have been strongly reworked by wind processes during the dry periods leaving only the coarse-grained portion of the sediments (conglomerate to rudite). This highly efficient reworking eeolian mechanism affected both of the fluvial and deltaic channel deposits and the large inland lakes, flood plains and other waterlogged areas. The former occurs, at present day, as morphological features and coarse-grained remnants of large fluvial systems whereas the latter are mostly buried below sand seas such as Grand Erg Oriental, Erg Chech, and Azawad. While the sand to silt material accumulated (mostly by saltation) in the sand seas and sand sheets, the finer portion (able to enter the wind as suspended material) was probably swallowed in the large- scale atmospheric circulation redistributed in Sahara itself, in adjacent continents (mostly Europe and South America), and oceans. This geological setting is similar to the one of Mars where fluvial deposits and morphologies abound as largely eroded discontinuous remains. Large-scale alluvial basins and terminal lakes or waterlogged areas (such as the allucial plain in Zephyria) have been largely present in the Martian Noachian-Hesperian time (and possibly even later) but relatively scanty sedimentary deposits testify their existence. When deposits are present they are basically coarse-grained (e.g. the meandering channels of the Eberswalde deltaic plain) due to the long lasting aeolian erosion similarly than the Sahara example. The wind, that dominated the long

  1. Ar-40/Ar-39 laser-probe dating of diamond inclusions from the Premier kimberlite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, D.; Onstott, T. C.; Harris, J. W.

    1989-01-01

    The results of Ar-40/Ar-39 laser-probe analyses of individual eclogitic clinopyroxene inclusions from Premier diamonds are reported which yield a mean age of 1198 + or - 14 Myr. This age agrees well with Sm-Nd and Ar-40/Ar-39 analyses on similar Premier inclusions and is indistinguishable from the inferred time of emplacement of the host kimberlite, which implies that diamond formation was essentially synchronous with kimberlite generation. The extrapolated nonradiogenic Ar-40/Ar-36 ratio of 334 + or - 102 is similar to the present-day atmospheric composition. This value is inconsistent with Sr and Nd isotopic signatures from Premier eclogite inclusions, which suggest a depleted mantle source. Preentrapment equilibration of the inclusions with an Ar-36-rich fluid is the most probable explanation for the low nonradiogenic composition.

  2. NASA Names Premier X-Ray Observatory and Schedules Launch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-12-01

    NASA's Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility has been renamed the Chandra X-ray Observatory in honor of the late Indian-American Nobel laureate, Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar. The telescope is scheduled to be launched no earlier than April 8, 1999 aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia mission STS-93, commanded by astronaut Eileen Collins. Chandrasekhar, known to the world as Chandra, which means "moon" or "luminous" in Sanskrit, was a popular entry in a recent NASA contest to name the spacecraft. The contest drew more than six thousand entries from fifty states and sixty-one countries. The co-winners were a tenth grade student in Laclede, Idaho, and a high school teacher in Camarillo, CA. The Chandra X-ray Observatory Center (CXC), operated by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, will control science and flight operations of the Chandra X-ray Observatory for NASA from Cambridge, Mass. "Chandra is a highly appropriate name," said Harvey Tananbaum, Director of the CXC. "Throughout his life Chandra worked tirelessly and with great precision to further our understanding of the universe. These same qualities characterize the many individuals who have devoted much of their careers to building this premier X-ray observatory." "Chandra probably thought longer and deeper about our universe than anyone since Einstein," said Martin Rees, Great Britain's Astronomer Royal. "Chandrasekhar made fundamental contributions to the theory of black holes and other phenomena that the Chandra X-ray Observatory will study. His life and work exemplify the excellence that we can hope to achieve with this great observatory," said NASA Administrator Dan Goldin. Widely regarded as one of the foremost astrophysicists of the 20th century, Chandrasekhar won the Nobel Prize in 1983 for his theoretical studies of physical processes important to the structure and evolution of stars. He and his wife immigrated from India to the U.S. in 1935. Chandrasekhar served on the faculty of the University of

  3. How much rainfall sustained a Green Sahara during the mid-Holocene?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopcroft, Peter; Valdes, Paul; Harper, Anna

    2016-04-01

    The present-day Sahara desert has periodically transformed to an area of lakes and vegetation during the Quaternary in response to orbitally-induced changes in the monsoon circulation. Coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation model simulations of the mid-Holocene generally underestimate the required monsoon shift, casting doubt on the fidelity of these models. However, the climatic regime that characterised this period remains unclear. To address this, we applied an ensemble of dynamic vegetation model simulations using two different models: JULES (Joint UK Land Environment Simulator) a comprehensive land surface model, and LPJ (Lund-Potsdam-Jena model) a widely used dynamic vegetation model. The simulations are forced with a number of idealized climate scenarios, in which an observational climatology is progressively altered with imposed anomalies of precipitation and other related variables, including cloud cover and humidity. The applied anomalies are based on an ensemble of general circulation model simulations, and include seasonal variations but are spatially uniform across the region. When perturbing precipitation alone, a significant increase of at least 700mm/year is required to produce model simulations with non-negligible vegetation coverage in the Sahara region. Changes in related variables including cloud cover, surface radiation fluxes and humidity are found to be important in the models, as they modify the water balance and so affect plant growth. Including anomalies in all of these variables together reduces the precipitation change required for a Green Sahara compared to the case of increasing precipitation alone. We assess whether the precipitation changes implied by these vegetation model simulations are consistent with reconstructions for the mid-Holocene from pollen samples. Further, Earth System models predict precipitation increases that are significantly smaller than that inferred from these vegetation model simulations. Understanding

  4. Sahara Slide: Age, initiation, and processes of a giant submarine slide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiopoulou, Aggeliki; Masson, Douglas G.; Wynn, Russell B.; Krastel, Sebastian

    2010-07-01

    The Sahara Slide is a giant submarine landslide on the northwest African continental margin. The landslide is located on the open continental slope offshore arid Western Sahara, with a headwall at a water depth of ˜2000 m. High primary productivity in surface waters drives accumulation of thick fine-grained pelagic/hemipelagic sediment sequences in the slide source area. Rare but large-scale slope failures, such as the Sahara Slide that remobilized approximately 600 km3 of sediment, are characteristic of this sedimentological setting. Seismic profiles collected from the slide scar reveal a stepped profile with two 100 m high headwalls, suggesting that the slide occurred retrogressively as a slab-type failure. Sediment cores recovered from the slide deposit provide new insights into the process by which the slide eroded and entrained a volcaniclastic sand layer. When this layer was entrained at the base of the slide it became fluidized and resulted in low apparent friction, facilitating the exceptionally long runout of ˜900 km. The slide location appears to be controlled by the buried headwall of an older slope failure, and we suggest that the cause of the slide relates to differential sedimentation rates and compaction across these scarps, leading to local increases of pore pressure. Sediment cores yield a date of 50-60 ka for the main slide event, a period of global sea level rise which may have contributed to pore pressure buildup. The link with sea level rising is consistent with other submarine landslides on this margin, drawing attention to this potential hazard during global warming.

  5. 78 FR 54464 - Premier Empire Energy, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Premier Empire Energy, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based... above-referenced proceeding, of Premier Empire Energy, LLC's application for market-based rate...

  6. How well do analyses capture dust-generating winds in the Sahara and Sahel?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Alexander; Marsham, John; Knippertz, Peter; Parker, Douglas

    2016-04-01

    Airborne mineral dust is important for weather, climate and earth-system prediction. Uncertainty in winds, as well as the land-surface, are known to be key to model uncertainties for dust uplift. Recent research has shown that during the summer wet season in the Sahel strong winds generated by the cold outflow from organized convective systems are an important dust storm mechanism (so called haboobs), while over the inner Sahara nocturnal low-level jets forming on the pressure gradient around the heat low dominate. Together the Sahel and Sahara are the world's largest dust source. Until now there has been a severe shortage of data for evaluating models for this region. Here, we bring together new observations from the remote Sahara, made during the Fennec project, with Sahelian data from the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA), to provide an unprecedented evaluation of dust-generating winds in the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts ERA-Interim (ERA-I) reanalysis. Differences between observations and ERA-I are explored with specific attention to monsoon and non-monsoon influenced regions. The main results are: (1) High speed winds in instantaneous ERA-I grid-box mean winds are lacking compared to time-averaged wind speed observations; (2) agreement between ERA-I and observations is lower during the monsoon season, even in parts of the Sahara not directly affected by the monsoon; and (3) both the seasonal and diurnal variability is under-represented in ERA-I. ERA-I fails to capture the summertime maximum for monsoon-affected stations and seasonally, correlations between daily-mean ERA-I and observed winds vary from 0.8 to 0.4, with lower correlations for 3-hourly data. These differences demonstrate that the model used in the production of the ERA-I reanalysis is unable to represent some important dust uplift processes, especially during the monsoon season when moist convection plays a key role, and that the product is not sufficiently

  7. Sahara 99555 and D'Orbigny: Possible Pristine Parent Magma of Quenched Angrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikouchi, T.; McKay, G. A.; Jones, J. H.

    2004-01-01

    Angrites constitute a small, but important group of basaltic achondrites showing unusual mineralogy and old crystallization ages. The currently known angrites are divided into two subgroups. Angra dos Reis (ADOR) and LEW86010 show slow cooling histories ("slowly-cooled" angrites) and differ from the later found angrites (LEW87051, Asuka 881371, Sahara 99555, D Orbigny, NWA1670, NWA1298). This second group has textures that suggest rapid cooling histories ("quenched" angrites). The petrogenesis of angrites has been controversial, partly due to the small number of available samples. In this abstract, we suggest a possible parent melt composition for the quenched angrites and its relationship to the partial melts of carbonaceous chondrites.

  8. The role of convectively-generated cold pools on model biases in the Sahara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Carreras, Luis; Marsham, John H.; Parker, Douglas J.; Bain, Caroline L.; Milton, Sean; Saci, Azzedine; Salah-Ferroudj, Mohammed; Ouchene, Bouziane; Washington, Richard

    2013-04-01

    Radiosonde data from Fennec supersite-1 (Bordj Badji Mokhtar, Algeria) have been used to confront for the first time global model behaviour in the remote Sahara with regular in-situ profile observations. Convectively-generated cold pools are produced by the evaporation of precipitation and can propagate over large distances, particularly at night. These are an important component of mesoscale convective systems, which produce the majority of rainfall in the Sahel, and have been observed to ventilate the Sahara. Cold pools are, however, very poorly captured by parameterisations of convection. We assess how cold pool outflows from moist convection contribute to model biases in the Sahara and evaluate the impact of data assimilation on model analyses. The Saharan heat low is too warm and dry in the forecast and cold pools are shown to contribute to the majority of the mean bias. Although the model does not represent dust and cold pools are an important dust uplift mechanism, the sign of the errors is inconsistent with radiative impacts of dust. These biases can therefore be directly attributed to the missing advective cooling from cold pools. Cold pools cause 29% of the observed meridional humidity flux, but this contribution is absent both in the forecast and analysis, thus affecting the large-scale water cycle of the West African monsoon/Saharan heat low system. Assimilation of the radiosonde data reduces these errors, but significant temperature and meridional humidity-flux biases remain at night, when cold pools are most frequent and intense. This implies that significant errors remain in the analysis, and that these biases have a diurnal cycle which will in turn affect the diurnal cycle in the model. The model biases are consistent with the larger-scale heat-low biases in the operational Unified Model. Furthermore, model analyses show significant differences in the Sahara, hampering efforts to evaluate model performance in such a data-sparse region. These issues

  9. Investigating the Impact of the Premier League Reading Stars Programme on Children's Attainment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pabion, Clémence

    2014-01-01

    The evaluation of the Premier League Reading Stars (PLRS) programme in 2013 has established that the intervention is having a positive impact on the attainment of participating children in reading and writing: Three out of four children made at least six months' progress in just ten weeks. One child in three made a year's progress or more. The…

  10. Eolian sediment responses to late Quaternary climate changes: Temporal and spatial patterns in the Sahara

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swezey, C.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a compilation of eolian-based records of late Quaternary climate changes in the Sahara. Although the data are relatively sparse, when viewed as a whole, they reveal a general pattern of widespread eolian sediment mobilization prior to 11,000 cal. years BP, eolian sediment stabilization from 11,000 to 5000 cal. years BP, and a return to widespread eolian sediment mobilization after 5000 cal. years BP. Furthermore, an eolian-based record from southern Tunisia reveals the existence of millennial-scale changes in eolian sediment behavior. These millennial-scale variations provide examples of eolian sediment responses to climate changes at a scale intermediate between seasonal and orbital ('Milankovitch') changes, and they are also coincident with abrupt atmospheric and oceanic changes. The general synchroneity of the eolian stratigraphic records and their coincidence with various oceanic and atmospheric changes suggest that global forcing mechanisms have influenced late Quaternary eolian sediment behavior in the Sahara. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.

  11. A 45-year time series of dune mobility indicating constant windiness over the central Sahara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeesch, P.; Leprince, S.

    2012-07-01

    Although evidence is mounting that links global warming to changes in atmospheric dynamics over the Atlantic realm, similar studies over the African continent are lacking. And even if such models would exist, it would be difficult to verify their validity due to the paucity of meteorological observations and anemometers in the central Sahara. A pragmatic way around this problem is to monitor barchan dune velocity as a proxy for the windiness of desert areas. Dune migration rates are a measure of the amount of work done by the wind which does not require field measurements but can be observed from space instead. This paper presents a novel application of the remote sensing tool COSI-Corr for the construction of time series of dune mobility from sequences of optical satellite imagery. The technique has been applied to the Bodélé Depression in northern Chad, to demonstrate that dune migration rates in the central Sahara have been remarkably constant for nearly half a century, leading us to conclude that wind velocities have not changed more than 0.2% per year over that period. It is therefore unlikely that the frequency and intensity of dust storms originating from this ‘hot spot’ has significantly changed over the past decades either.

  12. Impact of Sahara dust transport on Cape Verde atmospheric element particles.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Silva, M; Almeida, S M; Freitas, M C; Pio, C A; Nunes, T; Cardoso, J

    2013-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to (1) conduct an elemental characterization of airborne particles sampled in Cape Verde and (2) assess the influence of Sahara desert on local suspended particles. Particulate matter (PM(10)) was collected in Praia city (14°94'N; 23°49'W) with a low-volume sampler in order to characterize its chemical composition by k0-INAA. The filter samples were first weighed and subsequently irradiated at the Portuguese Research Reactor. Results showed that PM(10) concentrations in Cape Verde markedly exceeded the health-based air quality standards defined by the European Union (EU), World Health Organization (WHO), and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), in part due to the influence of Sahara dust transport. The PM(10) composition was characterized essentially by high concentrations of elements originating from the soil (K, Sm, Co, Fe, Sc, Rb, Cr, Ce, and Ba) and sea (Na), and low concentrations of anthropogenic elements (As, Zn, and Sb). In addition, the high concentrations of PM measured in Cape Verde suggest that health of the population may be less affected compared with other sites where PM(10) concentrations are lower but more enriched with toxic elements. PMID:23514066

  13. Quality and management of hot water of intercalary continental, northern Sahara of Algeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tifrani, Ala Eddine; Nezli, Imed Eddine

    2016-07-01

    The Algerian Sahara is the biggest desert in the world, and it is known by that the main climatic characters which are the high temperature and the low precipitations. The northern Sahara is a part of this big area, located on the south-east of Algeria. Due to the rarely and insufficient precipitations (1 to 180 mm per year) the need for water is a rising problem, so the main source are the ground water. There are three ground water aquifers in the area, the phreatic table, the terminal complex and the intercalary continental, our study is focused on the intercalary continental which is the biggest non recharged aquifer in the world, many studies national and international estimated the reserve of the water around 6 million m3. Existing between 1000 and 2000 m depth, this depth gives the water a lot of characterization which need to be noted and updated for example the temperature (around 50°C), and the high mineralization, because of the vast area and the difference in depths between wells, which is a reason of variety, the main goal is the determination of chemical and physical setting of this water.

  14. Activity patterns in the Sahara Desert: an interpretation based on cross-sectional geometric properties.

    PubMed

    Nikita, Efthymia; Siew, Yun Ysi; Stock, Jay; Mattingly, David; Lahr, Marta Mirazón

    2011-11-01

    The Garamantian civilization flourished in modern Fezzan, Libya, between 900 BC and 500 AD, during which the aridification of the Sahara was well established. Study of the archaeological remains suggests a population successful at coping with a harsh environment of high and fluctuating temperatures and reduced water and food resources. This study explores the activity patterns of the Garamantes by means of cross-sectional geometric properties. Long bone diaphyseal shape and rigidity are compared between the Garamantes and populations from Egypt and Sudan, namely from the sites of Kerma, el-Badari, and Jebel Moya, to determine whether the Garamantian daily activities were more strenuous than those of other North African populations. Moreover, sexual dimorphism and bilateral asymmetry are assessed at an intra- and inter-population level. The inter-population comparisons showed the Garamantes not to be more robust than the comparative populations, suggesting that the daily Garamantian activities necessary for survival in the Sahara Desert did not generally impose greater loads than those of other North African populations. Sexual dimorphism and bilateral asymmetry in almost all geometric properties of the long limbs were comparatively low among the Garamantes. Only the lower limbs were significantly stronger among males than females, possibly due to higher levels of mobility associated with herding. The lack of systematic bilateral asymmetry in cross-sectional geometric properties may relate to the involvement of the population in bilaterally intensive activities or the lack of regular repetition of unilateral activities. PMID:21953517

  15. Geochemical variations in aeolian mineral particles from the Sahara-Sahel Dust Corridor.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Teresa; Querol, Xavier; Castillo, Sonia; Alastuey, Andrés; Cuevas, Emilio; Herrmann, Ludger; Mounkaila, Mohammed; Elvira, Josep; Gibbons, Wes

    2006-10-01

    The Sahara-Sahel Dust Corridor runs from Chad to Mauritania and expels huge amounts of mineral aerosols into the Atlantic Ocean. Data on samples collected from Algeria, Chad, Niger, and Western Sahara illustrate how corridor dust mineralogy and chemistry relate to geological source and weathering/transport history. Dusts sourced directly from igneous and metamorphic massifs are geochemically immature, retaining soluble cations (e.g., K, Na, Rb, Sr) and accessory minerals containing HFSE (e.g., Zr, Hf, U, Th) and REE. In contrast, silicate dust chemistry in desert basins (e.g., Bodélé Depression) is influenced by a longer history of transport, physical winnowing (e.g., loss of Zr, Hf, Th), chemical leaching (e.g., loss of Na, K, Rb), and mixing with intrabasinal materials such as diatoms and evaporitic salts. Mineral aerosols blown along the corridor by the winter Harmattan winds mix these basinal and basement materials. Dusts blown into the corridor from sub-Saharan Africa during the summer monsoon source from deeply chemically weathered terrains and are therefore likely to be more kaolinitic and stripped of mobile elements (e.g., Na, K, Mg, Ca, LILE), but retain immobile and resistant elements (e.g., Zr, Hf, REE). Finally, dusts blown southwestwards into the corridor from along the Atlantic Coastal Basin will be enriched in carbonate from Mesozoic-Cenozoic marine limestones, depleted in Th, Nb, and Ta, and locally contaminated by uranium-bearing phosphate deposits. PMID:16600327

  16. Remote monitoring of aerosol layers over Sofia during Sahara dust transport episode (April, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyanov, Dimitar; Grigorov, Ivan; Deleva, Atanaska; Kolev, Nikolay; Peshev, Zahari; Kolarov, Georgi; Donev, Evgeni; Ivanov, Danko

    2013-03-01

    In this work we present results of lidar remote sensing of aerosol layers in the atmosphere above Sofia during an episode of Sahara dust transport, 02-07 April, 2012. The investigations were made using two lidar systems, one equipped with a CuBr-vapor laser, emitting at wavelength 510.6 nm, and a second one - with Nd:YAG laser, at wavelengths 1064 nm and 532 nm. The results of lidar measurements are presented in terms of vertical atmospheric backscatter coefficient profiles and color maps of the aerosol stratification evolution. The involved into discussions ceilometer data (CHM 15k ceilometer) and satellite data from CALIPSO lidar, enhance the synergy of observations. Conclusion about atmospheric aerosol's origin was made upon analyses of the information of weather-forecast maps provided by the Forecast system of Barcelona Supercomputing Centre, which are accessible via Internet. Additional information was provided by calculations of the backward air mass trajectories, using online software of NOAA about HYSPLIT model. The comparison between the data from the two lidars and the ceilometer showed similar behavior of aerosol layers development in the atmosphere above Sofia. All information about aerosol layers origin, their altitude above ground, persistence during lidar observations, confirmed the conclusion of observation of a long-distance Sahara dust transport beyond Balkans and Sofia. An interesting completion of CALIPSO lidar and ground based lidars results of measurement is presented in case of thick opaque cloud layer in the atmosphere, which slices the path of lidar sensing in both directions.

  17. Biogeochemical inferences of mobility of early Holocene fisher-foragers from the Southern Sahara Desert.

    PubMed

    Stojanowski, Christopher M; Knudson, Kelly J

    2011-09-01

    North Africa is increasingly seen as an important context for understanding modern human evolution and reconstructing biocultural adaptations. The Sahara, in particular, witnessed a fluorescence of hunter-gatherer settlement at the onset of the Holocene after an extended occupational hiatus. Subsequent subsistence changes through the Holocene are contrary to those documented in other areas where mobile foraging gave way to settled agricultural village life. In North Africa, extractive fishing and hunting was supplanted by cattle and caprine pastoralism under deteriorating climatic conditions. Therefore, the initial stage of food production in North Africa witnessed a likely increase in mobility. However, there are few studies of paleomobility in Early Holocene hunter-gatherer Saharan populations and the degree of mobility is generally assumed. Here, we present radiogenic strontium isotope ratios from Early Holocene fisher-forager peoples from the site of Gobero, central Niger, southern Sahara Desert. Data indicate a relatively homogeneous radiogenic strontium isotope signature for this hunter-gather population with limited variability exhibited throughout the life course or among different individuals. Although the overall signature was local, some variation in the radiogenic strontium isotope data likely reflects transhumance into the nearby Aïr Massif. Data from Gobero were significantly less variable than in other worldwide hunter-gatherer populations, including those thought to be fairly sedentary. Strontium data from Gobero were also significantly different from contemporaneous sites in southwestern Libya. These patterns are discussed with respect to archaeological models of community organization and technological evolution. PMID:21766285

  18. Sahara Dust

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-15

    article title:  Casting Light and Shadows on a Saharan Dust Storm     ... (nadir) camera. High-altitude cirrus clouds cast shadows on the underlying ocean and dust layer, which are visible in shades of ... was unable to retrieve elevation data. However, the edges of shadows cast by the cirrus clouds onto the dust (indicated by blue and cyan ...

  19. A Senior High School Social Studies Unit on Africa South of the Sahara. World History Series, Bulletin No. 252.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Harry; And Others

    This secondary level curriculum guide provides a program and identifies materials for the study of the history and culture of Africa south of the Sahara. The primary purpose of this course is to stimulate thought and to encourage students to make valid generalizations and intelligent assessments of the forces and events that have and are shaping…

  20. Dune ages in the sand deserts of the southern Sahara and Sahel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bristow, Charlie; Armitage, Simon

    2015-04-01

    In this paper we aim to document the history of aeolian processes within the southern Sahara as part of the INQUA Dune Atlas. We review available luminescence ages for sand dunes across the southern Sahara and attempt to correlate periods of sand accumulation and to develop an improved understanding of the dune chronology on a regional basis. This was achieved by analysing dune age by country, as well as by latitude and longitude. The results show a very patchy spatial distribution of dune ages with large gaps that encompass some of the largest sand seas. Despite these gaps, some related patterns in dune morphology and stratigraphy appear to be consistent between northern Nigeria and southern Mali where older linear dunes are distinct from younger Late Holocene transverse and barchanoid dunes. Elsewhere in Mauretania linear dunes with different orientations appear to have accumulated at different times, most likely in response to changes in atmospheric circulation. Regional climatic changes are identified where dunes are transgressed by lake deposits within endorehic basins. We identify four locations where dune accumulation is terminated by lacustrine transgressions, two of which, in Lake Chad and the Bodélé Depression, occur shortly after the last glacial maximum (LGM). The third example at Gobiero in Niger occurred later, in the early Holocene, around 8.4 ka and a fourth marks a later transgression of Palaeolake MegaChad after 4.7 ka. Larger-scale latitudinal and longitudinal distributions in dune ages across the southern Sahara do not show any consistent patterns, though this may due to the small sample size relative to the study area. In addition, local variations in external controls such as wind regime, rainfall, vegetation and sand supply need to be considered, sometimes on a site by site basis. Limiting the analysis to dune ages determined using the single-aliquot regenerative-dose (SAR) protocol indicates a lack of dune preservation during the LGM and

  1. Initiation and early development of barchan dunes: A case study of the Moroccan Atlantic Sahara desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbelrhiti, Hicham

    2012-02-01

    This paper describes field measurements that document the formation of barchan dunes in the Moroccan Atlantic Sahara desert. The first mechanism described is the transformation of patches and proto-dunes at Cap Juby beach to barchan dunes of elementary size. This transformation is discussed in relation to the wind speed and saturation length. The second mechanism is the ejection of small barchans of elementary size by other small barchans in response to the perturbation of the target barchan by two other impacting small barchans. This remote initiation is discussed in relation to the bulk flux transported by the barchan dunes involved in this interaction and to their morphology. Other modes of barchan initiation observed in the field are also presented.

  2. Characterization of potential zones of dust generation at eleven stations in the southern Sahara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, I.; Assamoi, P.; Bertrand, J.; Giorgi, F.

    Synoptic wind data for multi-decadal periods at eleven stations located in the southern Sahara region (Agadez, Atar, Bilma, Dori, Gao, Kayes, Nema, Niamey, Nouadhibou, Ouagadougou and Tessalit) are used to study the monthly dust deflation power over the region. We found that, regardless of the conditions of the soil, the deflation power (or wind efficiency) is not sufficient to generate significant amounts of aerosols south of 15°N. North of this latitude, the deflation power is much larger, with potential zones of either very strong deflation (Nouadhibou and Bilma) or severe deflation (Gao, Tessalit, Nema, Atar, Agadez). Stations in the Sahel region such as Gao, Agadez and Tessalit are characterized by a gradual reinforcement of the deflation power between 1970 and 1984 in correspondence of increasing desertification over the region. During this same period, Bilma, a well know region of dust source, experienced a major reduction in deflation power due to shifts in large scale wind patterns.

  3. Subsurface valleys and geoarcheology of the eastern Sahara revealed by Shuttle radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccauley, J. F.; Schaber, G. G.; Breed, C. S.; Grolier, M. J.; Haynes, C. V.; Issawi, B.; Elachi, C.; Blom, R.

    1982-01-01

    Previously unknown buried valleys, geologic structures, and possible Stone Age occupation sites have been revealed through the Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-A) penetration of the extremely dry Selima Sand Sheet, dunes and drift sand of the eastern Sahara. Radar penetration of dry sand and soils varies with the wavelength of the incident signals, which is 24 cm for the SIR-A system, as well as incidence angle and electrical properties of the material which are largely determined by moisture content. The calculated depth of radar penetration of dry sand and granules has been established to be 5 m on the basis of laboratory measurements of Selima Sand Sheet sample electrical properties. September 1982 field studies in Egypt have verified SIR-A signal penetration depths of at least 1 m in the Selima Sand Sheet and drift sand, and 2 m or more in sand dunes.

  4. Dust and Biological Aerosols from the Sahara and Asia Influence Precipitation in the Western US

    SciTech Connect

    Creamean, Jessie; Suski, Kaitlyn; Rosenfeld, Daniel; Cazorla, Alberto; DeMott, Paul J.; Sullivan, Ryan C.; White, Allen B.; Ralph, F. M.; Minnis, Patrick; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Tomlinson, Jason M.; Prather, Kimberly

    2013-03-29

    Winter storms in California’s Sierra Nevada increase seasonal snowpack and provide critical water resources for the state. Thus, the mechanisms influencing precipitation in this region have been the subject of research for decades. Previous studies suggest Asian dust enhances cloud ice and precipitation (1), while few studies consider biological aerosols as an important global source of ice nuclei (IN). Here, we show that dust and biological aerosols transported from as far as the Sahara were present in glaciated high-altitude clouds coincident with elevated IN concentrations and ice-induced precipitation. This study presents the first direct cloud and precipitation measurements showing that Saharan and Asian dust and biological aerosols likely serve as IN and play an important role in orographic precipitation processes over the western United States.

  5. Shorelines in the Sahara desert: Archives of the hydrodynamics of Megalake Chad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuster, Mathieu; Roquin, Claude; Moussa, Abderamane; Duringer, Philippe; Bouchette, Frédéric; Ghienne, Jean-François; Allenbach, Bernard

    2014-05-01

    The African Humid Period corresponds to a major climate change event paced by the orbital parameters of Earth (precession of the equinoxes) with enhanced monsoon regime which has strongly modified the Holocene paleoenvironments of Africa. In sub-tropical north-Africa related reactivation of ancient river networks and the development of numerous lakes, have in turn temporarily favored human occupation of the Sahara. Megalake Chad, which extended over an area swept by the latitudinal fluctuations of the Intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ), represents one of the most emblematic case study of these climate-controlled environmental changes. This very large paleolake had a water-surface of more than 350000 sqkm (10°N-18°N, 12°E-19°E) and maximum depths of ~150 m to the North and of ~40 m in the area of the present-day Lake Chad. Satellite imagery (SRTM, Landsat, Pleiades) over the Chad basin reveals conspicuous clastic morphosedimentary structures which do not correspond to eolian or terrestrial landforms but that clearly correspond to typical coastal features. They include isolated ridges, Azov-type spits, beach ridges, wave-ravinement surface and wave-dominated deltas. These paleoshorelines provide firm outlines of the maximal extension of Megalake Chad and allow to track its size evolution which in turn informs about the precipitation/evaporation budget at basin-scale (~2000000 sqkm). Moreover, the particular shape and distribution of coastal landforms are mostly controlled by the alongshore drift induced by the prevailing winds. Wind-driven hydrodynamics was the major process for clastic sediments redistribution at basin-scale in the nearshore zone and resulted in the building of prominent sedimentary bodies (up to hundreds of kilometer long and few tens of meter thick). As a consequence, paleoshorelines of Megalake Chad represent a record of the paleo-wind regime over the Sahara-Sahel zone which was apparently dominated by an Harmattan-like wind.

  6. Chloroquine retinopathy: pattern of presentation in Ibadan, Sub-Sahara Africa.

    PubMed

    Oluleye, T S; Babalola, Y; Ijaduola, M

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundSelf-medication with chloroquine is common in Ibadan, Sub-Sahara Africa. Retinopathy from chloroquine is not uncommon. The aim was to determine the pattern of presentation.MethodologyCases of Chloroquine retinopathy seen at the Retina and Vitreous Unit of the University College Hospital, Ibadan between 2008 and 2014 were reviewed. Information on age, sex, duration of chloroquine use, and visual loss were retrieved. Visual acuity at presentation, anterior, and posterior segment findings were documented. The results were analyzed using proportions and percentages.ResultsFourteen cases were seen during the study period. Mean age was 50.7 years. Male to female ratio was 3.5 : 1. Average duration of visual loss before presentation was 2.7 years. Average duration of self-medication with chloroquine was 5.3 years. Presenting visual acuity showed 2(14%) cases of bilateral blindness(VA<3/60 in both eyes); 5(35.7%) cases of uniocular blindness; three cases of bilateral low vision(VA worse than 6/18 but better than 3/60). Anterior segment examination showed abnormal sluggish pupillary reaction in those with severe affectation. Dilated fundoscopy showed features ranging from mild macular pigmentary changes and bulls eye maculopathy to overt extensive retinal degeneration involving the posterior pole, attenuation of retinal vessels, optic atrophy, and beaten bronze appearance of atrophic maculopathy.ConclusionChloroquine retinopathy is not uncommon in Ibadan, Sub-Sahara Africa. Bulls eye maculopathy, extensive retinal, and macular degeneration with optic atrophy are the main presentations. Public health education is imperative. PMID:26427986

  7. Petrology and Geochemistry of D'Orbigny, Geochemistry of Sahara 99555, and the Origin of Angrites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mittlefehldt, David W.; Killgore, Marvin; Lee, Michael T.

    2001-01-01

    We have done detailed petrologic study of the angrite, D'Orbigny, and geochemical study of it and Sahara 99555. D'Orbigny is an igneous-textured rock composed of Ca-rich olivine, Al-Ti-diopside-hedenbergite, subcalcic kirschsteinite, two generations of hercynitic spinel and anorthite, with the mesostasis phases ulv6spinel, Ca-phosphate, a silicophosphate phase and Fe-sulfide. We report an unknown Fe-Ca-Al-Ti-silicate phase in the mesostasis not previously found in angrites. One hercynitic spinel is a large, rounded homogeneous grain of a different composition than the euhedral and zoned grains. We believe the former is a xenocryst, the first such described from angrites. The mafic phases are highly zoned; mg# of cores for olivine are approx.64, and for clinopyroxene approx.58, and both are zoned to Mg-free rims. The Ca content of olivine increases with decreasing mg#, until olivine with approx.20 mole% Ca is overgrown by subcalcic kirschsteinite with Ca approx.30-35 mole%. Detailed zoning sequences in olivine-subcalcic kirschsteinite and clinopyroxene show slight compositional reversals. There is no mineralogic control that can explain these reversals, and we believe they were likely caused by local additions of more primitive melt during crystallization of D'Orbigny. D'Orbigny is the most ferroan angrite with a bulk rock mg# of 32. Compositionally, it is virtually identical to Sahara 99555; the first set of compositionally identical angrites. Comparison with the other angrites shows that there is no simple petrogenetic sequence, partial melting with or without fractional crystallization, that can explain the angrite suite. Angra dos Reis remains a very anomalous angrite. Angrites show no evidence for the brecciation, shock, or impact or thermal metamorphism that affected the HED suite and ordinary chondrites. This suggests the angrite parent body may have followed a fundamentally different evolutionary path than did these other parent bodies.

  8. Dating lacustrine episodes in the eastern Sahara by the epimerization of isoleucine in ostrich eggshells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, G.H.; Wendorf, F.; Ernst, R.; Schild, R.; Close, A.E.; Friedman, I.; Schwarcz, H.P.

    1991-01-01

    The eggshell of the African ostrich, Struthio camelus, closely approximates a closed system for the retention of indigenous proteinaceous residues. Epimerization of the protein amino acid isoleucine follows linear first-order kinetics in laboratory simulations nearly to racemic equilibrium, and the variation in D/L ratio within a single fragment, or between fragments of the same age, is significantly less than in other carbonate systems. These observations suggest that the extent of isoleucine epimerization (aIle/Ile ratio) in ostrich eggshell offers the potential for high-resolution geochronology of Quaternary deposits. From the simulation experiments, and dated early Holocene samples for which we have in situ mean annual sediment temperature measurements, Arrhenius parameters have been calculated; the activation energy is 30.33 kcal mol-1, similar to that of other carbonate systems. We have measured the aIle/Ile ratio in ostrich eggshell associated with lacustrine episodes at Bir Tarfawi and Bir Sahara East, two depressions in what is currently the hyperarid eastern Sahara. The ratios can be used directly to indicate qualitatively the time represented by each series of lake sediment, and to correlate disjunct lacustrine deposits within and between the basins. Uranium-series disequilibrium dating of algal mats contained within some of the lake beds indicate that a major wet interval occurred about 130 ka ago. Using the U-series date for calibration, the amino acid ratios are used to date the most recent lacustrine interval to about 100 ka B.P., and two older intervals, one about 200 ?? 25 ka B.P., and an older interval that occurred prior to 250 ka ago. ?? 1991.

  9. Inside the “African Cattle Complex”: Animal Burials in the Holocene Central Sahara

    PubMed Central

    di Lernia, Savino; Tafuri, Mary Anne; Gallinaro, Marina; Alhaique, Francesca; Balasse, Marie; Cavorsi, Lucia; Fullagar, Paul D.; Mercuri, Anna Maria; Monaco, Andrea; Perego, Alessandro; Zerboni, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Cattle pastoralism is an important trait of African cultures. Ethnographic studies describe the central role played by domestic cattle within many societies, highlighting its social and ideological value well beyond its mere function as ‘walking larder’. Historical depth of this African legacy has been repeatedly assessed in an archaeological perspective, mostly emphasizing a continental vision. Nevertheless, in-depth site-specific studies, with a few exceptions, are lacking. Despite the long tradition of a multi-disciplinary approach to the analysis of pastoral systems in Africa, rarely do early and middle Holocene archaeological contexts feature in the same area the combination of settlement, ceremonial and rock art features so as to be multi-dimensionally explored: the Messak plateau in the Libyan central Sahara represents an outstanding exception. Known for its rich Pleistocene occupation and abundant Holocene rock art, the region, through our research, has also shown to preserve the material evidence of a complex ritual dated to the Middle Pastoral (6080–5120 BP or 5200–3800 BC). This was centred on the frequent deposition in stone monuments of disarticulated animal remains, mostly cattle. Animal burials are known also from other African contexts, but regional extent of the phenomenon, state of preservation of monuments, and associated rock art make the Messak case unique. GIS analysis, excavation data, radiocarbon dating, zooarchaeological and isotopic (Sr, C, O) analyses of animal remains, and botanical information are used to explore this highly formalized ritual and the lifeways of a pastoral community in the Holocene Sahara. PMID:23437260

  10. Microbial diversity and organic matter fractions under two arid soils in Algerian Sahara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabi, Mokhtar; Hamdi, Aissa Baelhadj; Zenkhri, Salah

    2016-07-01

    The Algerian Sahara is characterized by a heterogeneity of edaphic conditions and climatic dissimilarities; however, information on biological indicators of arid soils is weakly documented in this area. The researchers who have studied the biological activities of the soils of the arid regions have underlined their low organic matter content, particularly their very low rates of organic nitrogen; a low humification because seriously inhibited by a significant mineralization. The objective of the current work is to study the microbial biomass densities and organic matter fractions for different types of soil, under two arid soil in Algerian Sahara. The experiment was conducted in an alluvial soil in traditional palm grove of Guerrara, and in a saline soil in experimental field of university of Ouargla. Composite soil samples (10 subsamples each) were collected aseptically at 0-20 cm depth on two diagonal transects drawn over an area of 12 ha. The following germs densities were determined: Bacteria, Fungi and Actinomycetes. The soil organic matter fractions, the textural fractions, chemical attributes (organic C, total N, total limestone and gypsum) were also determined. The microbial groups count on both soils reveals that the bacterianmicroflora present a numerical superiority followed by the actinomycetes and finally fungi. The micro-organisms densities except fungal density, showed a prevalence of the bacterianmicroflora, and actinomycetes in alluvial soil compared to saline soil. Fractionation of soil organic matter show that all fractions are better represented in alluvial soil except non-extractable organic carbon (NEOC) which are better represented in saline soil. This confirms that alluvial soil has a relatively large biological activity than saline soil and that humification process is relatively pronounced by comparing it with the saline soil, which tends to contain little polycondenseshumic compounds.

  11. Forsterite and Olivine in Sahara-97210 (LL3.2) and Chainpur (LL3.4) Chondrules: Compositional Evolution and the Influence of Melting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruzicka, A.; Floss, C.

    2004-01-01

    It is generally accepted that chondrules contain relict grains that did not crystallize in situ, and that forsterite is one type of relict grain which is a likely precursor for chondrules. Chemically and morphologically similar forsterite is also found as "isolated grains", especially in carbonaceous chondrites. Using SIMS, we analyzed forsterite, ferrous overgrowths around forsterite, and coexisting normal olivine in 5 chondrules and 2 isolated grains in the Sahara-97210 ('Sahara") LL3.2 chondrite. We earlier used the same methods to study olivine in 3 Chainpur chondrules that contain relict forsterite. Our new data for Sahara provide additional insight into the processes affecting chondrules and their precursors.

  12. Transforming the Premier Perspective® Hospital Database into the Observational Medical Outcomes Partnership (OMOP) Common Data Model

    PubMed Central

    Makadia, Rupa; Ryan, Patrick B.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The Observational Medical Outcomes Partnership (OMOP) Common Data Model (CDM) has been implemented on various claims and electronic health record (EHR) databases, but has not been applied to a hospital transactional database. This study addresses the implementation of the OMOP CDM on the U.S. Premier Hospital database. Methods: We designed and implemented an extract, transform, load (ETL) process to convert the Premier hospital database into the OMOP CDM. Standard charge codes in Premier were mapped between the OMOP version 4.0 Vocabulary and standard charge descriptions. Visit logic was added to impute the visit dates. We tested the conversion by replicating a published study using the raw and transformed databases. The Premier hospital database was compared to a claims database, in regard to prevalence of disease. Findings: The data transformed into the CDM resulted in 1% of the data being discarded due to data errors in the raw data. A total of 91.4% of Premier standard charge codes were mapped successfully to a standard vocabulary. The results of the replication study resulted in a similar distribution of patient characteristics. The comparison to the claims data yields notable similarities and differences amongst conditions represented in both databases. Discussion: The transformation of the Premier database into the OMOP CDM version 4.0 adds value in conducting analyses due to successful mapping of the drugs and procedures. The addition of visit logic gives ordinality to drugs and procedures that wasn’t present prior to the transformation. Comparing conditions in Premier against a claims database can provide an understanding about Premier’s potential use in pharmacoepidemiology studies that are traditionally conducted via claims databases. Conclusion and Next Steps: The conversion of the Premier database into the OMOP CDM 4.0 was completed successfully. The next steps include refinement of vocabularies and mappings and continual maintenance of

  13. The Sahara from the Middle Jurassic to the Middle Cretaceous: Data on environments and climates based on outcrops in the Algerian Sahara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busson, G.; Cornée, A.

    The period investigated, succeeded the Upper Triassic and Liassic-Lower Dogger arid sedimentation which was characterized by the development of large evaporitic deposits. The north-eastern part of the Algerian Sahara is specially interesting as it constitutes part of the few dated continental Jurassic outcrops in North Africa (except in the Maghreb). Continental Lower-Middle Cretaceous is also well developed in the same region. The grading of these continental series into marine series particularly in the north-eastern part of the Maghreb has been investigated from an adequate number of well spaced wells. The Middle-Upper Jurassic (Lower Taouratine) consists of an argillaceous-sandy-ferruginous series, often grey coloured and rich in filicean wood and vertebrate remains in some levels. The ferralitic alteration products denote a more humid climate than that which prevailed during the Liassic-Lower-Dogger times. These products alternate with sandy conglomeratic events confirming the influences of alternating important run-off and aeolian winnowing. The large continental Lower and Middle Cretaceous detrital nappes are discussed. They constitute the uppermost part of the series, south of the Tinrhert Hamada (Alba-Vraconian series with the more detrital lateral equivalent), west of Tademait (Gara Samani). Data on lithology and paleobiology (fishes, Dinosaurs, other vertebrates, pelecypods, gastropods, wood debris, palynoflora) permit the reconstruction of the palaeo-environment and the conditions of deposition. This is similar to the sub-desertic terrestrial sedimentation by violent and ephemeral hydrodynamism model based on the modern Darfour example. The desertic conditions which prevailed in these Saharan areas during the Cretaceous are reflected as well as their possible consequences on the sedimentation of nearby oceanic areas (Atlantic and Tethys). This detrital sedimentation is finally reviewed in the context of its tectonic origins and an attempt is made to

  14. Greening of the Sahara - a paleo perspective on the history of water in the Middle East and North Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bar-Matthews, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Middle-East, mostly at its southern edge together with North Africa, the northern edge of the Sahara Desert, are located at the boundary between high- to-mid latitude and tropical-subtropical climate systems. The geographical duality of desert adjacent to Mediterranean-type climate regions played and still plays a major role on the water availability. Thanks to the number of important paleoclimate studies that been made on accurate dating of cave speleothems in Southern Arabia and Oman (Fleitmann et al., 2011) and in the northeast Sahara, the Negev Desert Israel (Vaks et al., 2010) and the study of sapropels in Eastern and central Mediterranean (Almogi-Labin et al., 2009; Osborne et al, 2008), it is clear that the region was graced with water during peak interglacials when the African monsoon and westerly storm/rainfall systems intensified. Northward penetration of the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone over the Arabian and African continents resulted in increased discharge of the Nile River and rivers that emerged from central Sahara into the Eastern Mediterranean Sea. Correspondingly, enhanced westerly wind activity led to an increase in rainfall from Atlantic-Mediterranean sources over the entire Mediterranean basin, which even penetrated south into the north-east corner of the Sahara Desert. The Saharo-Arabian Desert became narrower and climatic "windows" opened for the dispersal of hominids and animals out of the African continent at 250-239, 210-193, 138-120, 108-98, 87-84 and 10-6.5 ka BP, with severe dry conditions in between. Greening of the Sahara Desert at these intervals is supported also by various marine and terrestrial records, such as corals, lakes, tufa deposits and archeological findings. Dry conditions prevailed in the Sahara desert during glacials. This is in contrast to the climatic conditions in the Eastern Mediterranean coastal region and the Jordan Rift Valley (Bar-Matthews et al., 2003; Lisker et al., 2010), where water was available for

  15. Partaking in the global movement for occupational mental health: what challenges and ways forward for sub-Sahara Africa?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    There is an ongoing global movement for the entrenchment of occupational mental health as an integral part of occupational health and safety schemes. Aside from being a fundamental human right issue, this move has been demonstrated to be of cost-benefit in terms of workplace productivity and general economic growth. Despite being among the regions most prone to the human and economic repercussions of work-related mental health problems by reason of her socio-economic circumstance; sub-Sahara Africa is yet to fully plug into this movement. With a view to make recommendations on the ways forward for sub-Sahara Africa, this paper examines the current state of and the barriers to effective occupational mental health policy and practice in the region. PMID:22958579

  16. Geochemical and mineralogical evidence for Sahara and Sahel dust additions to Quaternary soils on Lanzarote, eastern Canary Islands, Spain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Muhs, D.R.; Budahn, J.; Skipp, G.; Prospero, J.M.; Patterson, D.; Bettis, E. Arthur, III

    2010-01-01

    Africa is the most important source of dust in the world today, and dust storms are frequent on the nearby Canary Islands. Previous workers have inferred that the Sahara is the most important source of dust to Canary Islands soils, with little contribution from the Sahel region. Soils overlying a late Quaternary basalt flow on Lanzarote, Canary Islands, contain, in addition to volcanic minerals, quartz and mica, exotic to the island's bedrock. Kaolinite in the soils also likely has an exotic origin. Trace-element geochemistry shows that the soils are derived from varying proportions of locally derived basalt and African dust. Major-element geochemistry, clay mineralogy and interpretation of satellite imagery suggest that dust additions to the Canary Islands come not only from the Sahara Desert, but also from the Sahel region. ?? Published 2010. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  17. Raman spectroscopic studies of the skins of the Sahara sand viper, the carpet python and the American black rat snake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, H. G. M.; Farwell, D. W.; Williams, A. C.; Barry, B. W.

    1993-07-01

    Vibrational Raman spectra of the skins of the snakes Cerastes vipera (Sahara sand viper) and Morelia argus (carpet python) have been recorded for the first time using visible and IR laser excitation. Full vibrational assignments are proposed and comparisons made with vibrational Raman spectra of the snake Elaphe obsoleta (American black rat snake); such studies may be important in correlating the permeabilities of human and snake skins to drugs and contaminants.

  18. The Palaeoclimate of Wadi Shati, Libyan Sahara: the last 130 ka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drake, Nick A.; Lem, Rachel E.; Armitage, Simon J.; White, Kevin H.; El-Hawat, Ahmed; Salem, Mustafa J.; Hounslow, Mark; Franke, Jan

    2014-05-01

    The Fezzan region of Libya forms a large closed basin that contains a wealth of ancient palaeolake and riverine sediments indicative of past humidity in the central Sahara. We have used remote sensing, DEM analysis and Ultra Ground Penetrating Radar to map these features and have dated them using OSL and radiocarbon methods. Results suggest humid conditions during both MIS 5 and the Holocene with larger lakes and more extensive river systems being present during MIS 5 suggestive of greater humidity at this time. A 4m core was collected from Holocene sediments of the largest lake found in the region (1200 km2 during MIS5 and 660 km2 during the Holocene). Core sediments were dated using OSL and analysed using XRF, Ion Chromatography, Laser Granulometry and chemical extractions for ostracods, diatoms, pollen and phytoliths. The base of the core is dominated by clays deposited in a perennial lake environment from 7.75 ka to 6.6 ka. Gypsum deposition started at about 6.5 ka indicating a more arid environment. Four clay layers are found amongst the gypsum from 6.3 to 6.25 ka, 6.2 to 6.1, 6.0 to 5.8 and 5.7-5.6 ka suggests that aridification was not a sudden event, but consisted of a series of arid/humid oscillations before the lake finally desiccated just before 5 ka. No pollen, diatoms or ostracods are preserved in the sediments but phytoliths were present. Both tree and grass phytoliths were found in lower parts of the core, suggesting a wooded savannah environment from 7.75 to about 7 ka. Trees decline and grass increases up the core, signifying an increasingly arid environment. By the time the first gypsum bed is deposited at about 6.5 ka trees have disappeared and grass dominates. These results do not support the hypothesis of a sudden aridification of the Sahara at 4.9 ka and instead suggest that in the Fezzan region a gradual aridification had started by 7.75 ka and that the climate oscillated during the lake desiccation that started at 6.5 ka and was complete by

  19. Sahara dust, ocean spray, volcanoes, biomass burning: pathways of nutrients into Andean rainforests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabian, P.; Rollenbeck, R.; Spichtinger, N.; Brothers, L.; Dominguez, G.; Thiemens, M.

    2009-10-01

    Regular rain and fogwater sampling in the Podocarpus National Park, on the humid eastern slopes of the Ecuadorian Andes, along an altitude profile between 1960 and 3180 m, has been carried out since 2002. The samples, accumulated over about 1-week intervals, were analysed for pH, conductivity and major ions (K+, Na+, NH4+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Cl-, SO42-, NO3-, PO43-). About 35% of the weekly samples had very low ion contents, with pH mostly above 5 and conductivity below 10 μS/cm. 10-days back trajectories (FLEXTRA) showed that respective air masses originated in pristine continental areas, with little or no obvious pollution sources. About 65%, however, were significantly loaded with cations and anions, with pH as low as 3.5 to 4.0 and conductivity up to 50 μS/cm. The corresponding back trajectories clearly showed that air masses had passed over areas of intense biomass burning, active volcanoes, and the ocean, with episodic Sahara and/or Namib desert dust interference. Enhanced SO42- and NO3+ were identified, by combining satellite-based fire pixel observations with back trajectories, as predominantly resulting from biomass burning. Analyses of oxygen isotopes 16O, 17O, and 18O in nitrate show that nitrate in the samples is indeed a product of atmospheric conversion of precursors. Some SO42-, about 10% of the total input, could be identified to originate from active volcanoes, whose plumes were encountered by about 10% of all trajectories. Enhanced Na+, K+, and Cl- were found to originate from ocean spray sources. They were associated with winds providing Atlantic air masses to the receptor site within less than 5 days. Episodes of enhanced Ca2+ and Mg2+ were found to be associated with air masses from African deserts. Satellite aerosol data confirm desert sources both on the Northern (Sahara) as on the Southern Hemisphere (Namib), depending on the season. A few significant PO43- peaks are related with air masses originating from North African phosphate mining fields.

  20. An integrated remote sensing and GIS analysis of the Kufrah Paleoriver, Eastern Sahara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoneim, Eman; Benedetti, Michael; El-Baz, Farouk

    2012-02-01

    A combined remote sensing (optical and radar imagery) and GIS (hydrologic network delineation) analysis allows mapping of the Kufrah Paleoriver of Libya and sheds light on its geomorphic evolution during the Neogene. The Kufrah system, which is now largely buried beneath the windblown sands of the Eastern Sahara, drained an area of about 236,000 km 2 in central and southern Libya. The river discharged across a large inland delta to the Al-Jaghbub depression in northern Libya, and ultimately through the Sirt Basin to the Mediterranean Sea. Radar imagery reveals buried features of the landscape including drainage divides, locations of possible stream capture, deeply-incised valleys, and the distal margins of the inland delta. Previous studies have shown that the Kufrah Paleoriver is the successor of the Sahabi River, which drained most of central Libya during the late Tertiary. Satellite imagery supports the concept of large-scale drainage rearrangement in the Quaternary, driven by tectonic subsidence that diverted streamflow and sediment discharge away from the Sahabi basin toward the inland delta of the lower Kufrah basin. Paleochannels crossing the delta suggest that at various times during the Quaternary, the Kufrah Paleoriver either drained externally through the deeply-incised Sahabi Paleochannel to the Mediterranean Sea, or drained internally to paleolakes in the Al-Jaghbub depression. Thick alluvial deposits on the delta and lake margins likely provided a major sediment source to build the Great Sand Sea, which covers the region today. The southwestern branch of the Kufrah drainage is aligned with an elongated trough that connects to the Amatinga River system in Chad. Thus the Kufrah watershed may have served as an outlet from Megalake Chad to the Mediterranean Sea during humid phases of the Neogene. If so, the combined Amatinga/Kufrah system may have served as one of the proposed natural corridors used by human and animal populations to cross the Sahara

  1. Airborne Fungi in Sahara Dust Aerosols Reaching the Eastern Caribbean: II. Species Identification Using Molecular Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Mota, A.; Betancourt, C.; Detres, Y.; Armstrong, R.

    2003-12-01

    Fungi samples from filters collected in Castle Bruce, Dominica from March through July 2002, were previously purified and identified to genus level using classic macroscopic and microscopic techniques. A total of 105 isolated colonies were cultured in liquid media and the mycelial mats used for DNA extraction. PCR was used to amplify the ITS region of the rDNA using the ITS1 and ITS4 primers. Both strands of the amplified products were sequenced and the final identification to species level was completed by a GenBank search. Fourteen different species and one fungal endophyte were identified from genders Aspergillus,Penicillium, Fusarium, Cladosporium, Curvularia and Phanerochaete. Some of these species such as A. fumigatus, A. japonicus, P. citrinum and C. cladosporoides are known to cause respiratory disorders in humans. A. fumigatus causes an aggressive pulmonary allergic response that might result in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. Other species such as F. equiseti and C. brachyspora are plant pathogens affecting economically important crops. Sahara dust is an important source of fungal spores of species that are not common in the Caribbean region.

  2. Dynamics of Green Sahara Periods and Their Role in Hominin Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Larrasoaña, Juan C.; Roberts, Andrew P.; Rohling, Eelco J.

    2013-01-01

    Astronomically forced insolation changes have driven monsoon dynamics and recurrent humid episodes in North Africa, resulting in green Sahara Periods (GSPs) with savannah expansion throughout most of the desert. Despite their potential for expanding the area of prime hominin habitats and favouring out-of-Africa dispersals, GSPs have not been incorporated into the narrative of hominin evolution due to poor knowledge of their timing, dynamics and landscape composition at evolutionary timescales. We present a compilation of continental and marine paleoenvironmental records from within and around North Africa, which enables identification of over 230 GSPs within the last 8 million years. By combining the main climatological determinants of woody cover in tropical Africa with paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic data for representative (Holocene and Eemian) GSPs, we estimate precipitation regimes and habitat distributions during GSPs. Their chronology is consistent with the ages of Saharan archeological and fossil hominin sites. Each GSP took 2–3 kyr to develop, peaked over 4–8 kyr, biogeographically connected the African tropics to African and Eurasian mid latitudes, and ended within 2–3 kyr, which resulted in rapid habitat fragmentation. We argue that the well-dated succession of GSPs presented here may have played an important role in migration and evolution of hominins. PMID:24146882

  3. Heat shock protein synthesis and thermotolerance in Cataglyphis, an ant from the Sahara desert.

    PubMed Central

    Gehring, W J; Wehner, R

    1995-01-01

    The ant Cataglyphis lives in the Sahara desert and is one of the most thermotolerant land animals known. It forages at body temperatures above 50 degrees C, and the critical thermal maxima are at 53.6 +/- 0.8 degrees C for Cataglyphis bombycina and 55.1 +/- 1.1 degrees C for Cataglyphis bicolor. The synthesis and accumulation of heat shock proteins (HSPs) were analyzed in Cataglyphis and compared to Formica, an ant living in more moderate climates, and to two Drosophila species. In Cataglyphis, protein synthesis continues at temperatures up to 45 degrees C as compared to 39 degrees C for Formica and Drosophila. The two Drosophila species, Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila ambigua, differ with respect to their maximal induction of HSP synthesis and accumulation by 3-4 degrees C. In contrast, the two ant species accumulate HSPs prior to their exposure to heat, and in Cataglyphis the temperature of maximal HSP induction by de novo protein synthesis is only 2 degrees C higher than in Formica. These findings are interpreted as preadaption of the ants prior to exposure to high temperatures. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7708762

  4. Bacterial Composition and Survival on Sahara Dust Particles Transported to the European Alps

    PubMed Central

    Meola, Marco; Lazzaro, Anna; Zeyer, Josef

    2015-01-01

    Deposition of Sahara dust (SD) particles is a frequent phenomenon in Europe, but little is known about the viability and composition of the bacterial community transported with SD. The goal of this study was to characterize SD-associated bacteria transported to the European Alps, deposited and entrapped in snow. During two distinct events in February and May 2014, SD particles were deposited and promptly covered by falling snow, thus preserving them in distinct ochre layers within the snowpack. In June 2014, we collected samples at different depths from a snow profile at the Jungfraujoch (Swiss Alps; 3621 m a.s.l.). After filtration, we performed various microbiological and physicochemical analyses of the snow and dust particles therein that originated in Algeria. Our results show that bacteria survive and are metabolically active after the transport to the European Alps. Using high throughput sequencing, we observed distinct differences in bacterial community composition and structure in SD-layers as compared to clean snow layers. Sporulating bacteria were not enriched in the SD-layers; however, phyla with low abundance such as Gemmatimonadetes and Deinococcus-Thermus appeared to be specific bio-indicators for SD. Since many members of these phyla are known to be adapted to arid oligotrophic environments and UV radiation, they are well suited to survive the harsh conditions of long-range airborne transport. PMID:26733988

  5. TL and ESR of quartz from the astrobleme of Aorounga (Sahara of Chad)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miallier, D.; Sanzelle, S.; Falguères, C.; Faïn, J.; Pilleyre, Th.; Vincent, P. M.

    The present work was intended to evaluate the time that elapsed since the meteorite fall that produced the giant astrobleme of Aorounga (Sahara of Chad). For this purpose the TL and ESR dating techniques using the additive dose method were applied to quartz grains extracted from an impactite and from a sandstone shocked and baked during the impact. The ESR Al centre was measured and resulted in an age of about 800 ka. The red TL and the blue TL showed unusual TL features: the additive dose response curves were marked by an initial saturated part followed by a second rise at around +0.5 kGy; the peaks showed erratic temperature shifts with dose; fading was observed for high temperature peaks. By comparison with previous work using samples baked by lava flows more than 1 Ma ago and presenting some of those features, it was assumed that the minimum age of the astrobleme was of the same order of magnitude. This is in agreement with other observations. A preliminary explanation for those ageing features is proposed. It is suspected that radiation induced traps contribute to the TL of the studied quartz grains. Most probably the 'malign-behaviour' of the quartz grains is also connected with shock effects.

  6. SHUTTLE IMAGING RADAR: PHYSICAL CONTROLS ON SIGNAL PENETRATION AND SUBSURFACE SCATTERING IN THE EASTERN SAHARA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaber, Gerald G.; McCauley, John F.; Breed, Carol S.; Olhoeft, Gary R.

    1986-01-01

    It is found that the Shuttle Imaging Radar A (SIR-A) signal penetration and subsurface backscatter within the upper meter or so of the sediment blanket in the Eastern Sahara of southern Egypt and northern Sudan are enhanced both by radar sensor parameters and by the physical and chemical characteristics of eolian and alluvial materials. The near-surface stratigraphy, the electrical properties of materials, and the types of radar interfaces found to be responsible for different classes of SIR-A tonal response are summarized. The dominant factors related to efficient microwave signal penetration into the sediment blanket include 1) favorable distribution of particle sizes, 2) extremely low moisture content and 3) reduced geometric scattering at the SIR-A frequency (1. 3 GHz). The depth of signal penetration that results in a recorded backscatter, called radar imaging depth, was documented in the field to be a maximum of 1. 5 m, or 0. 25 times the calculated skin depth, for the sediment blanket. The radar imaging depth is estimated to be between 2 and 3 m for active sand dune materials.

  7. Microbial Diversity of the Hypersaline Sidi Ameur and Himalatt Salt Lakes of the Algerian Sahara

    PubMed Central

    Boutaiba, Saad; Hacene, Hocine; Bidle, Kelly A.; Maupin-Furlow, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

    Microbial populations within hypersaline lakes often exhibit high activities of photosynthesis, dissimilatory sulphate reduction and other processes and, thus, can have profound impacts on biogeochemical cycles of carbon, nitrogen, sulphur and other important elements within arid lands. To further understand these types of ecosystems, the physicochemical and biological properties of Sidi Ameur and Himalatt Salt Lakes in the Algerian Sahara were examined and compared. Both lakes were relatively neutral in pH (7.2 to 7.4) and high in salt, at 12% and 20 % (w/v) salinity for Himalatt and Sidi Ameur Lakes, respectively, with dominant ions of sodium and chloride. The community compositions of microbes from all three domains (Bacteria, Archaea and Eukarya) were surveyed through the use of 16S and 18S ribosomal gene amplification and clone library clustering using amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) in conjunction with DNA sequencing and analysis. A high level of microbial diversity, particularly among the bacteria of the Himalatt Salt Lake and archaea of Sidi Ameur Lake, was found within these environments. Representatives from all known halophilic bacterial phyla as well as 6 different genera of halophilic archaea were identified. Moreover, several apparently novel phylotypes among both archaea and bacteria were revealed. PMID:21909172

  8. Ecoclimate Teleconnections: Remote Control of the Mid-Holocene Green Sahara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swann, A. L.; Fung, I.; Chiang, J. C.

    2011-12-01

    The mid-Holocene climate of Northern Africa was characterized by wetter conditions than present, as evidenced by higher paleo lake-levels and pollen assemblages of savannah vegetation suggesting a wetter, greener Sahara. Differences in orbital forcing and local vegetation have been proposed to explain the existence of savannah vegetation as far north as 23 N but climate model simulations have had difficultly reproducing sufficient precipitation over Northern Africa. We propose that remote forcing from forest cover in the mid latitudes is capable of pulling the Intertropical Convergence Zone northward, and, in conjunction with orbital forcing and forcing from local vegetation, explains the enhanced precipitation over Northern Africa ~6000 years ago. We use climate model simulations to show the relative importance of local and remote vegetation and discuss the mechanisms by which mid latitude vegetation influences sub tropical precipitation and productivity. The forcing of North African precipitation and therefore local productivity by mid latitude vegetation highlights a bi-directional interaction between ecosystems and climate.

  9. Characterization and antimicrobial potential of extremely halophilic archaea isolated from hypersaline environments of the Algerian Sahara.

    PubMed

    Quadri, Inès; Hassani, Imene Ikrame; l'Haridon, Stéphane; Chalopin, Morgane; Hacène, Hocine; Jebbar, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Halophilic archaea were isolated from different chotts and sebkha, dry salt lakes and salt flat respectively, of the Algerian Sahara and characterized using phenotypic and phylogenetic approaches. From 102 extremely halophilic strains isolated, forty three were selected and studied. These strains were also screened for their antagonistic potential and the production of hydrolytic enzymes. Sequencing of the 16S rRNA genes and phylogenetic analysis allowed the identification of 10 archaeal genera within the class Halobacteria: Natrinema (13 strains), Natrialba (12 strains), Haloarcula (4 strains), Halopiger (4 strains), Haloterrigena (3 strains), Halorubrum (2 strains), Halostagnicola (2 strains), Natronococcus, Halogeometricum and Haloferax (1 strain each). The most common producers of antimicrobial compounds belong to the genus Natrinema while the most hydrolytic isolates, with combined production of several enzymes, belong to the genus Natrialba. The strain affiliated to Halopiger djelfamassilliensis was found to produce some substances of interest (halocins, anti-Candida, enzymes). After partial purification and characterization of one of the strains Natrinema gari QI1, we found similarities between the antimicrobial compound and the halocin C8. Therefore, the gene encoding halocin C8 was amplified and sequenced. PMID:27242149

  10. Satellite imagery and airborne geophysics for geologic mapping of the Edembo area, Eastern Hoggar (Algerian Sahara)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamri, Takfarinas; Djemaï, Safouane; Hamoudi, Mohamed; Zoheir, Basem; Bendaoud, Abderrahmane; Ouzegane, Khadidja; Amara, Massinissa

    2016-03-01

    Satellite imagery combined with airborne geophysical data and field observations were employed for new geologic mapping of the Edembo area in the Eastern Hoggar (Tuareg Shield, Sahara). Multi-spectral band fusion, filtering, and transformation techniques, i.e., band combination, band-rationing and principal component analysis of ETM+ and ASTER data are used for better spectral discrimination of the different rocks units. A thematic map assessed by field data and available geologic information is compiled by supervised classification of satellite data with high overall accuracy (>90%). The automated extraction technique efficiently aided the detection of the structural lineaments, i.e., faults, shear zones, and joints. Airborne magnetic and Gamma-ray spectrometry data showed the pervasiveness of the large structures beneath the Paleozoic sedimentary cover and aeolian sands. The aeroradiometric K-range is used for discrimination of the high-K granitoids of Djanet from the peralumineous granites of Edembo, and to verify the Silurian sediments with their high K-bearing minerals. The new geological map is considered to be a high resolution improvement on all pre-existing maps of this hardly accessible area in the Tuareg Shield. Integration of the airborne geophysical and space-borne imagery data can hence provide a rapid means of geologically mapping areas hitherto poorly known or difficult to access.

  11. Characterization and evolution of Paleozoic source rock organic matter in Algerian Central Sahara

    SciTech Connect

    Takherist, D.; Arezki, A.; Mouaici, R.

    1995-08-01

    The objective of the proposed poster is to provide a knowledge of the evolution history of organic matter in an intracratonic basin. The Paleozoic source rocks (Ordovician - Silurian - Upper Devonian and Carboniferous) of the Algerian Central Sahara (Ahnet and Timimoun basins) experienced severe conditions of maturation during the geological history, therefore, the source rocks intervals are presently mature to overmature and only dry gas has been descovered throughout this zone. The several geochemical models (Genex, Basimod, Matoil) in addition to Afta and Zafta Data show that regionaly significant heating event occured with maximum palaeo-temperature and maximum gas generation at 300 +/- 30 My. However, high palaeotemperatures can not be explained only by the significant burial. An important anomalous heat flow is needed to explain the geothermal history. In this case, there has been no significant petroleum from the Paleozoic source rocks in this zone since this age; but following some assumptions, a certain hypothesis about a recent generation (-60 to -30 My) is now in discussion.

  12. Dynamics of green Sahara periods and their role in hominin evolution.

    PubMed

    Larrasoaña, Juan C; Roberts, Andrew P; Rohling, Eelco J

    2013-01-01

    Astronomically forced insolation changes have driven monsoon dynamics and recurrent humid episodes in North Africa, resulting in green Sahara Periods (GSPs) with savannah expansion throughout most of the desert. Despite their potential for expanding the area of prime hominin habitats and favouring out-of-Africa dispersals, GSPs have not been incorporated into the narrative of hominin evolution due to poor knowledge of their timing, dynamics and landscape composition at evolutionary timescales. We present a compilation of continental and marine paleoenvironmental records from within and around North Africa, which enables identification of over 230 GSPs within the last 8 million years. By combining the main climatological determinants of woody cover in tropical Africa with paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic data for representative (Holocene and Eemian) GSPs, we estimate precipitation regimes and habitat distributions during GSPs. Their chronology is consistent with the ages of Saharan archeological and fossil hominin sites. Each GSP took 2-3 kyr to develop, peaked over 4-8 kyr, biogeographically connected the African tropics to African and Eurasian mid latitudes, and ended within 2-3 kyr, which resulted in rapid habitat fragmentation. We argue that the well-dated succession of GSPs presented here may have played an important role in migration and evolution of hominins. PMID:24146882

  13. Diatom-inferred salinity and carbonate oxygen isotopes in Holocene waterbodies of the western Sahara and Sahel (Africa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasse, Françoise

    2002-03-01

    Thirteen Holocene palaeolakes in the western Sahara and Sahel have provided diatom records, with carbonate oxygen isotope profiles available from eight of them. Most of these palaeolakes were groundwater-fed. Lake water chemistry is reconstructed using diatom transfer functions. Lake water salinity and 18O records are assembled with some isotopic and chemical groundwater data to better understand the response of the hydrological systems to climate changes over the past 15,000 yr. Data are in general agreement with climate simulations using coupled atmosphere-ocean-vegetation models which show a mid-Holocene wetting over the whole of northwest Africa, and a rapid drying by 6-4 ka. The lake record also shows that at many sites the major lake infilling lags the end of the Younger Dryas by 1-2 ka. Regional differences also appear in the timing of the lake hydrological optimum: ca. 10.5-8.5 and 7.5-4.5 ka in the northern Sahara, 10-8.5 ka in the Aı̈r-Ténéré, 10-5.7 or 4.5 in the Sahel, and 7.5 ka in Lake Chad. The whole of the Holocene is punctuated by short-term drying events. Changes in water isotopic composition through time are partly explained by changes in rainfall amount and air humidity. During the wet Holocene period however, the very low δ values in the southern Sahara also imply changes in the moisture transport pattern or rainfall mechanisms. Data suggest an apparent decrease in 18O content of precipitation along the monsoon flow, in contrast with modern patterns. Changes in water availability and quality have driven population migrations in and out of the Sahara-Sahel, but relationships between climate and cultures are complex. Short-term dry events might have driven inventive adaptations. In the Sahara, drying at 5-4.5 ka coincides with both the collapse of the classical Neolithic civilization and the settlement of new cultures.

  14. Ultra-relativistic Au+Au and d+Au collisions:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Hauer, M.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Seals, H.; Sedykh, I.; Skulski, W.; Smith, C. E.; Stankiewicz, M. A.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Vaurynovich, S. S.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wenger, E.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    In this talk I will review PHOBOS data on charged particle multiplicities, obtained in Au+Au and d+Au collisions at RHIC. The general features of the Au+Au pseudorapidity distributions results will be discussed and compared to those of /line{p}p collisions. The total charged particle multiplicity, scaled by the number of participant pairs, is observed to be about 40% higher in Au+Au collisions than in /line{p}p and d+Au systems, but, surprisingly at the same level of e+e- collisions. Limiting fragmentation scaling is seen to be obeyed in Au+Au collisions.

  15. Analysis of available measures for malaria control in Africa south of the Sahara.

    PubMed

    Goriup, S

    1989-01-01

    Africa south of the Sahara is not homogeneous and presents several extreme conditions where malaria persistence is ensured by a complex and highly adaptable vector system. Plasmodium falciparum is the most widespread and life threatening of the malaria parasites of man, particularly for young children and pregnant women. Large-scale residual spraying was not totally effective and was very costly, and mass chemoprophylaxis was not feasible. The spread of chloroquine resistance added arguments against uncontrolled use of drugs. Chemoprophylaxis is now recommended only for pregnant women, especially in their first pregnancy, whilst chloroquine 25 mg base/kg over 3 days is recommended for curative treatment in villages. Second line treatment regimens should be available, together with the possibility of referring severe malaria cases quickly to appropriate clinical facilities. Other control measures include self-protection against mosquito bites by bednets (especially those impregnated with synthetic pyrethroids), mosquito coils, repellents, window and door screening; other measures to prevent man-mosquito contact, such as careful siting of settlements and zooprophylaxis; anti-larval measures, i.e. source reduction, protection of wells and water reservoirs, larviciding, introduction of larvivorous fish; and sprays against adult mosquitoes. The elaboration of strategies for control and their application requires a study of the existing situation. A core of specialists is required in each country, to help with decentralized planning and evaluation of malaria control and to ensure quality control of services, training and applied field research. Additional measures may become available in the future, especially anti-malaria vaccines, and countries should be ready to study their application. PMID:2696165

  16. A forest butterfly in sahara desert oases: isolation does not matter.

    PubMed

    Habel, Jan Christian; Husemann, Martin; Schmitt, Thomas; Dapporto, Leonardo; Rödder, Dennis; Vandewoestijne, Sofie

    2013-03-01

    Numerous studies addressing the impact of habitat fragmentation on genetic diversity have been performed. In this study, we analyze the effects of a seemingly nonpermeable matrix on the population structure of the forest-dwelling butterfly Pararge aegeria in geographically isolated oases at the northern margin of the Sahara desert using microsatellites, morphological characters, and species distribution modeling. Results from all analyses are mostly congruent and reveal 1) a split between European and North African populations, 2) rather low divergence between populations from the eastern and western part of North Africa (Morocco vs. Tunisia), 3) a lack of differentiation between the oasis and Atlas Mountain populations, 4) as well as among the oasis populations, and 5) no reduction of genetic variability in oasis populations. However, one exception to this general trend resulted from the analyses of wing shape; wings of butterflies from oases are more elongated compared with those from the other habitats. This pattern of phenotypic divergence may suggest a recent colonization of the oasis habitats by individuals, which might be accompanied by a rather dispersive behavior. Species distribution modeling suggests a fairly recent reexpansion of the species' climatic niche starting in the Holocene at about 6000 before present. The combined results indicate a rather recent colonization of the oases by highly mobile individuals from genetically diverse founder populations. The colonization was likely followed by the expansion and persistence of these founder populations under relatively stable environmental conditions. This, together with low rates of gene flow, likely prevented differentiation of populations via drift and led to the maintenance of high genetic diversity. PMID:23132908

  17. Evidence of rift valley fever seroprevalence in the Sahrawi semi-nomadic pastoralist system, Western Sahara

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The increasing global importance of Rift Valley fever (RVF) is clearly demonstrated by its geographical expansion. The presence of a wide range of host and vector species, and the epidemiological characteristics of RVF, have led to concerns that epidemics will continue to occur in previously unaffected regions of Africa. The proximity of the Sahrawi territories of Western Sahara to endemic countries, such as Mauritania, Senegal, and Mali with periodic isolation of virus and serological evidence of RVF, and the intensive livestock trade in the region results in a serious risk of RVF spread in the Sahrawi territories, and potentially from there to the Maghreb and beyond. A sero-epidemiological survey was conducted in the Saharawi territories between March and April 2008 to investigate the possible presence of the RVF virus (RVFV) and associated risk factors. A two-stage cluster sampling design was used, incorporating 23 sampling sites. Results A total of 982 serum samples was collected from 461 sheep, 463 goats and 58 camels. Eleven samples (0.97%) tested positive for IgG against the RVFV. There were clusters of high seroprevalence located mostly in the Tifariti (7.69%) and Mehaires (7.14%) regions, with the Tifariti event having been found in one single flock (4/26 positive animals). Goats and older animals were at a significantly increased risk being seropositive (p = 0.007 and p = 0.007, respectively). Conclusion The results suggest potential RVF activity in the study area, where intense livestock movement and trade with neighbouring countries might be considered as a primary determinant in the spread of the disease. The importance of a continuous field investigation is reinforced, in light of the risk of RVF expansion to historically unaffected regions of Africa. PMID:24758592

  18. Advances in understanding mineral dust and boundary layer processes over the Sahara from Fennec aircraft observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, C. L.; McQuaid, J. B.; Flamant, C.; Washington, R.; Brindley, H. E.; Highwood, E. J.; Marsham, J. H.; Parker, D. J.; Todd, M. C.; Banks, J. R.; Brooke, J. K.; Engelstaedter, S.; Estellés, V.; Formenti, P.; Garcia-Carreras, L.; Kocha, C.; Marenco, F.; Rosenberg, P.; Sodemann, H.; Allen, C. J. T.; Bourdon, A.; Bart, M.; Cavazos-Guerra, C.; Chevaillier, S.; Crosier, J.; Darbyshire, E.; Dean, A. R.; Dorsey, J. R.; Kent, J.; O'Sullivan, D.; Schepanski, K.; Szpek, K.; Woolley, A.

    2015-01-01

    The Fennec climate program aims to improve understanding of the Saharan climate system through a synergy of observations and modelling. We present a description of the Fennec airborne observations during 2011 and 2012 over the remote Sahara (Mauritania and Mali) and the advances in the understanding of mineral dust and boundary layer processes they have provided. Aircraft instrumentation aboard the UK FAAM BAe146 and French SAFIRE Falcon 20 is described, with specific focus on instrumentation specially developed and relevant to Saharan meteorology and dust. Flight locations, aims and associated meteorology are described. Examples and applications of aircraft measurements from the Fennec flights are presented, highlighting new scientific results delivered using a synergy of different instruments and aircraft. These include: (1) the first airborne measurement of dust particles sized up to 300 microns and associated dust fluxes in the Saharan atmospheric boundary layer (SABL), (2) dust uplift from the breakdown of the nocturnal low-level jet before becoming visible in SEVIRI satellite imagery, (3) vertical profiles of the unique vertical structure of turbulent fluxes in the SABL, (4) in-situ observations of processes in SABL clouds showing dust acting as CCN and IN at -15 °C, (5) dual-aircraft observations of the SABL dynamics, thermodynamics and composition in the Saharan heat low region (SHL), (6) airborne observations of a dust storm associated with a cold-pool (haboob) issued from deep convection over the Atlas, (7) the first airborne chemical composition measurements of dust in the SHL region with differing composition, sources (determined using Lagrangian backward trajectory calculations) and absorption properties between 2011 and 2012, (8) coincident ozone and dust surface area measurements suggest coarser particles provide a route for ozone depletion, (9) discrepancies between airborne coarse mode size distributions and AERONET sunphotometer retrievals under

  19. Crop drying by indirect active hybrid solar - Electrical dryer in the eastern Algerian Septentrional Sahara

    SciTech Connect

    Boughali, S.; Bouchekima, B.; Mennouche, D.; Bouguettaia, H.; Bechki, D.; Benmoussa, H.

    2009-12-15

    In the present work, a new specific prototype of an indirect active hybrid solar-electrical dryer for agricultural products was constructed and investigated at LENREZA Laboratory, University of Ouargla (Algerian Sahara). In the new configuration of air drying passage; the study was done in a somewhat high range of mass flow rate between 0.04 and 0.08 kg/m{sup 2} s a range not properly investigated by most researchers. Experimental tests with and without load were performed in winter season in order to study the thermal behavior of the dryer and the effect of high air masse flow on the collector and system drying efficiency. The fraction of electrical and solar energy contribution versus air mass flow rate was investigated. Slice tomato was studied with different temperatures and velocities of drying air in order to study the influence of these parameters on the removal moisture content from the product and on the kinetics drying and also to determine their suitable values. Many different thin layer mathematical drying models were compared according to their coefficient of determination (R{sup 2}) and reduced chi square ({chi}{sup 2}) to estimate experimental drying curves. The Middli model in this condition proved to be the best for predicting drying behavior of tomato slice with (R{sup 2} = 0.9995, {chi}{sup 2} = 0.0001). Finally an economic evaluation was calculated using the criterion of payback period which is found very small 1.27 years compared to the life of the dryer 15 years. (author)

  20. Crustal and upper mantle velocity structure of the Hoggar swell (Central Sahara, Algeria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayadi, A.; Dorbath, C.; Lesquer, A.; Bezzeghoud, M.

    2000-02-01

    The Hoggar region is known as one of the most important swells in the African continent. Its altitude culminates at 2908 m in the Tahat hill (Atakor). The Hoggar and other massifs of central Africa (Aı̈r, Eghei, Tibesti, Darfur, Cameroon mount, …) form a system of domal uplifts with similar scale, morphology and volcanic activity. The knowledge of the structure beneath the Hoggar swell will help us to understand the origin of continental swells. In order to get an image of the lithosphere in this region, we have performed a teleseismic field experiment. The 33 short-period seismic stations have been maintained for 2 1/2 month along a 700-km long NNW-SSW profile. This experiment crossed the Central Hoggar and extended northward into the In-Salah Sahara basin which is characterized by high heat flow values of deep origin. The high quality of the data recorded during this experiment allows us to perform a velocity inversion. The Hoggar appears to be characterized by lower mantle velocities. The anomalous zone extends from the upper lithosphere to the mantle. The weak velocity contrast is interpreted in agreement with gravity, geothermal and petrological data as due to extensive mantle modifications inherited from Cenozoic volcanic activity. It confirms that the Hoggar swell is not due to a large-scale uplift of hot asthenospheric materials but corresponds to a now cooled-off modified mantle. On the contrary, local low-velocity zones associated with the Atakor and Tahalra volcanic districts show that hot materials still exist at depths in relation with recent basaltic volcanism.

  1. Development of a method to measure and compare hospital waste: the Premier hospital waste index.

    PubMed

    Lowe, Timothy J; Kroch, Eugene; Martin, John; Bankowitz, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The authors developed 15 measures and a comparative index to assist acute care facilities in identifying and monitoring clinical and administrative functions for health care waste reduction. Primary clinical and administrative data were collected from 261 acute care facilities contained within a database maintained by Premier Inc, spanning October 1, 2010, to September 30, 2011. The measures and 4 index models were tested using the Cronbach α coefficient and item-to-total and Spearman rank correlations. The final index model was validated using 52 facilities that had complete data. Analysis of the waste measures showed good internal reliability (α = .85) with some overlap. Index modeling found that data transformation using the standard deviation and adjusting for the proportional contribution of each measure normalized the distribution and produced a Spearman rank correlation of 0.95. The waste measures and index methodology provide a simple and reliable means to identify and reduce waste and compare and monitor facility performance. PMID:23687221

  2. Injury Profile of a Professional Soccer Team in the Premier League of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hassabi, Mohammad; Mohammad-Javad Mortazavi, Seyed; Giti, Mohammad-Reza; Hassabi, Majid; Mansournia, Mohammad-Ali; Shapouran, Sara

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Despite numerous studies which have been done regarding soccer injuries worldwide, there is lack of available data considering the epidemiology of injuries in the Iranian soccer premier league, although it is the most popular sport in the country. The main goal of this research was to determine the incidence of physical injuries in the studied population, considering other characteristics such as site, type and mechanism as well. Methods Twenty one adult male professional soccer players (age 24±3), members of a team (Tehran-Pas) participating in Iranian premier league, were followed during a 4-month period. The injury characteristics and exposure times were recorded by the team physician during all the matches and training sessions. Results The total exposure time was 2610 playing hours (2352 h of training versus 258 h of competition). Eighty six percent of the injuries were acute. Incidence of acute injuries was 16.5 (95% CI: 12-22) per 1000 hours of playing (11.5 per 1000 hrs of training and 62 per 1000 hrs of competition). The most common types of injuries were strains followed by contusions, each of which constituted 30% of acute injuries. More than 80% of injuries occurred in lower limbs, especially in thigh and groin regions. Nearly 60% of acute injuries occurred in dominant side of the body, and collision was the reason of about half of the acute injuries. Severity of more than 70% of the injuries was minor. On average each injury had led the player being off the field for about 10 days. Conclusion The incidence of injury in this research is in range of numbers obtained in important international tournaments but the rate of injuries during training sessions is higher than comparable studies. PMID:22375208

  3. The evolution of physical and technical performance parameters in the English Premier League.

    PubMed

    Barnes, C; Archer, D T; Hogg, B; Bush, M; Bradley, P S

    2014-12-01

    This study examined the evolution of physical and technical soccer performance across a 7-season period in the English Premier League. Match performance observations (n=14 700) were analysed for emergent trends. Total distance covered during a match was ~2% lower in 2006-07 compared to 2012-13. Across 7 seasons, high-intensity running distance and actions increased by ~30% (890±299 vs. 1 151±337 m, p<0.001; ES: 0.82) and ~50% (118±36 vs. 176±46, p<0.001; ES: 1.41), respectively. Sprint distance and number of sprints increased by ~35% (232±114 vs. 350±139 m, p<0.001; ES: 0.93) and ~85% (31±14 vs. 57±20, p<0.001; ES: 1.46), respectively. Mean sprint distance was shorter in 2012-13 compared to 2006-07 (5.9±0.8 vs. 6.9±1.3 m, p<0.001; ES: 0.91), with the proportion of explosive sprints increasing (34±11 vs. 47±9%, p<0.001; ES: 1.31). Players performed more passes (35±17 vs. 25±13, p<0.001; ES: 0.66) and successful passes (83±10% vs. 76±13%, p<0.001; ES: 0.60) in 2012-13 compared to 2006-07. Whereas the number of short and medium passes increased across time (p<0.001; ES>0.6), the number of long passes varied little (p<0.001; ES: 0.11). This data demonstrates evolution of physical and technical parameters in the English Premier League, and could be used to aid talent identification, training and conditioning preparation. PMID:25009969

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT - PHYSICAL REMOVAL OF MICROBIAL CONTAMINATION AGENTS IN DRINKING WATER, WATTS P{REMIER ULTRA 5 REVERSE OSMOSIS DRINKING WATER TREATMENT SYSTEM (POU)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Watts Premier Ultra 5 system was tested for removal of bacteria and viruses at NSF International's Laboratory. Watts Premier submitted ten units, which were split into two groups of five. One group received 25 days of conditioning prior to challenge testing, while the secon...

  5. The Sahara-East Mediterranean dust and climate connection revealed by strontium and uranium isotopes in a Jerusalem speleothem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frumkin, Amos; Stein, Mordechai

    2004-01-01

    This paper explores the potential of Sr and U isotope systems in speleothems as tracers of eolian dust transport and hydrological conditions. The study focuses on a speleothem from Jerusalem spanning the past 220 kyr. This speleothem provides a precisely dated record of dust flux from the Sahara to the East Mediterranean. Enhanced dust flux and Terra Rossa soil development are reflected by elevated 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios in the speleothem (0.7082-0.7086), while lower 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios (˜0.7078) indicate higher contribution of the local bedrock due to low dust flux and low soil accumulation. The strontium isotope system in the speleothem is a robust monitor of the Sahara monsoon-modulated climate, since dust uptake is related to development or reduction in vegetation cover of Sahara soil. The [ 234U/ 238U] activity ratios in the speleothem range between 1.12 and 1.0. The high activity values may indicate selective removal of 234U from the soil while the low values converge to the bedrock. The migration of 234U to the cave reflects mainly the regional hydrological conditions that are modulated by the North Atlantic-Mediterranean climate system. Thus, the speleothem provides a combined record of the monsoon-North Atlantic climatic systems. Long-term stability in glacial 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios (0.7083±0.0001 over the past 220 kyr) suggests an overall similarity in eolian dust sources, and uniformity in the synoptic conditions that dominate the dust storm tracks during glacial periods.

  6. Revision of the genus Thyreocephalus and description of Afrus gen. nov. of Africa south of the Sahara (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae: Staphylininae).

    PubMed

    Janák, Jiří; Bordoni, Arnaldo

    2015-01-01

    A revision of the genus Thyreocephalus Guérin-Méneville, 1844 of Africa south of the Sahara is presented. A new genus Afrus gen. nov. was described with the type species Thyreocephalus spegazzinii Bernhauer, 1915, which resulted in following new combination: Afrus spegazzinii (Bernhauer, 1915), comb. nov. Eulissus collarti (Cameron, 1932) was transferred to Afrus. Based on a revision of types and of additional material, 32 species of the genus Thyreocephalus and two species of the genus Afrus are recognized in Africa south of the Sahara. All species are described or redescribed and illustrated, seven of them for the first time: Thyreocephalus camerunensis sp. nov., T. manfredi sp. nov., T. marginipennis sp. nov., T. meridioafricanus sp. nov., T. pseudoafricanus sp. nov., T. subcorticalis sp. nov. and T. tsingidianus sp. nov. Neotypes are designated for Eulissus ater Laporte, 1835, Xantholinus coeruleipennis Quedenfeldt, 1881, and X. interocularis Eppelsheim, 1895. Lectotypes are designated for Eulissus atlanticus Bernhauer, 1915, E. burgeoni Bernhauer, 1929, E. mokaensis Bernhauer, 1915, E. secretus Bernhauer, 1935, E. turneri Bernhauer, 1937, Xantholinus alluaudi Fauvel, 1907, X. mocquerysi Fauvel, 1903, X. pilosus Roth, 1851, Thyreocephalus diversiceps Bernhauer, 1936, and T. spegazzinii Bernhauer, 1915. Eulissus africanus Bernhauer, 1913, E. alluaudi (Fauvel, 1907) (originally described in Xantholinus Dejean, 1821), E. atlanticus Bernhauer, 1915, E. brunneiventris Tottenham, 1956, E. burgeoni Bernhauer, 1929, E. guineensis Bernhauer, 1912, E. mokaensis Bernhauer, 1915, E. secretus Bernhauer, 1935, E. strinatii Scheerpeltz, 1958, and Xantholinus nairobiensis Fauvel, 1907 were transferred to Thyreocephalus. Following synonymies are proposed: Thyreocephalus nairobiensis (Fauvel, 1907) = Eulissus turneri Bernhauer, 1937, syn. nov., Thyreocephalus interocularis (Eppelsheim, 1895) = Thyreocephalus diversiceps Bernhauer, 1936, syn. nov., Thyreocephalus mokaensis

  7. Qualitative Impact Assessment 2010: An Independent Study Conducted by BDRC Continental, Ltd., February-July 2010. Premier League Reading Stars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Literacy Trust, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Premier League Reading Stars (PLRS) is in its eighth year. To complement a pre-post quantitative survey, an impact evidence base was required to inform consideration of continued funding into 2011 and beyond. PLRS is very highly regarded among child participants, parents, and librarians. The structure of the scheme, its basis on football, and the…

  8. PHYSICAL REMOVAL OF MICROBIAL CONTAMINANTS IN DRINKING WATER – WATTS PREMIER INC. WP-4V DRINKING WATER TREATMENT SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Watts Premier WP-4V four-stage POU RO system was tested for removal of bacteria and viruses at NSF’s Drinking Water Treatment Systems Laboratory. Five systems were challenged with the bacteriophage viruses fr and MS2, and the bacteria Brevundimonas diminutaEM. The ...

  9. ETV REPORT: REMOVAL OF CHEMICAL CONTAMINANTS IN DRINKING WATER – WATTS PREMIER INC. WP-4V DRINKING WATER TREATMENT SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Watts Premier WP-4V POU drinking water treatment system was tested for removal of aldicarb, benzene, cadmium, carbofuran, cesium, chloroform, dichlorvos, dicrotophos, fenamiphos, mercury, mevinphos, oxamyl, strontium, and strychnine. The WP-4V employs a reverse osmosis (RO) m...

  10. PREMIER: a proposed mission to observe processes controlling atmospheric composition in the height range most important to climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerridge, Brian; Orphal, Johannes; van Weele, Michiel; Murtagh, Donal; McConnell, Jack; Hegglin, Michaela; Peuch, Vincent-Henri; Reise, Martin

    2010-05-01

    The PREMIER (PRocess Exploration through Measurements of Infrared and millimetre-wave Emitted Radiation) mission is one of three candidates for ESA's 7th Earth Explorer Core Mission (due for launch in 2016) that have been approved for Phase A study. The mission proposes to make detailed measurements in the mid/upper troposphere and lower stratosphere in order to quantify processes controlling atmospheric global composition in this height range of particular importance to climate. PREMIER would consist of an infrared limb imaging spectrometer which would observe 3D fields of trace gases, alongside a millimetre-wave limb sounder which would enable observations in the presence of most cirrus clouds, and also provide complementary trace gases. In addition, co-located data from EPS-MetOp would be combined with that from PREMIER, to extend the scientific impact of PREMIER down into the lower troposphere, to explore links to surface emissions and pollution. In this presentation, simulations of its capabilities will be described together with some preliminary results from airborne precursors

  11. 76 FR 72978 - Premier Trim, LLC, Spectrum Trim, LLC and Grant Products International, Inc. D/B/A Spectrum Grant...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... in the Federal Register on July 7, 2010 (75 FR 39047). At the request of the State agency, the... Employment and Training Administration Premier Trim, LLC, Spectrum Trim, LLC and Grant Products International, Inc. D/B/A Spectrum Grant De Mexico Including Workers Whose Unemployment Insurance (UI) Wages Are...

  12. Collective flow in Au + Au collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Ritter, H.G.; EOS Collaboration

    1994-05-01

    Based on a preliminary sample of Au + Au collisions in the EOS time projection chamber at the Bevalac, we study sideward flow as a function of bombarding energy between 0.25A GeV and 1.2A GeV. We focus on the increase in in-plane transverse momentum per nucleon with fragment mass. We also find event shapes to be close to spherical in the most central collisions, independent of bombarding energy and fragment mass up to {sup 4}He.

  13. Hydrochemical and isotopic characterisation of deep groundwater reservoirs in the Sahara desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, R.; Leis, A.; Dietzel, M.; Köhler, S. J.; Böttcher, M. E.; Savarino, J.; Morin, S.

    2009-04-01

    Large sedimentary basins are extended over hundreds of square kilometres cross the Libyan Sahara. These basins consist of several aquifer systems, which belong to various geological ages. Most common are Quaternary, Mesozoic and Palaeozoic aquifers. The Jabal Hasouna well fields are located about 700 km south of Tripoli and are part of the Great Man-Made River Project for water supply to the coastal areas. The well field area extends over 4000 km2 with 440 production and 44 standby wells. In this region the main Cambro-Ordovician Sandstone aquifer is overlain by a shallow carbonate aquifer with a basal aquitard, predominantly composed of marly limestone, clay and shale. Hydrochemical investigations involving collection and analysis of numerous deep groundwater samples from Hasouna well fields have been carried out to evaluate the regional groundwater quality and origin. Therefore, the groundwater samples were analyzed for major ions, trace elements, and environmental isotopes. Additionally, soil and rock samples were collected and characterized using XRD and XRF for mineralogical and chemical composition, respectively. The groundwater can be classified in Na-Ca-Cl-SO4, Na-Ca-Cl-SO4-HCO3, Ca-Na-Cl-SO4-HCO3 and Na-Ca-Mg-Cl-SO4 types with moderate to high salinity. Most solutions indicate elevated ion concentrations of chloride, sodium, sulphate and nitrate. In some parts of the investigation area the respective ion concentrations in the groundwater exceed the WHO quality limits. Stable hydrogen and oxygen isotopic composition of the H2O show that the groundwater composition typically falls below the Global Meteoric Water Line and are far away from the Mediterranean Meteoric Water Line. Accordingly, the groundwaters were recharged in a climate different from that of the recent Mediterranean. The relationship between stable hydrogen and oxygen isotope ratios indicate that the ancient groundwater was recharged under cooler climate conditions. In order to verify the

  14. Sahara Heat Low Perturbations and Water Vapor in the Sahel: A Positive Feedback System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caughman, L.; Evan, A. T.

    2013-12-01

    It is necessary to understand the drivers and feedbacks of global desertification, motivated by the increasing need to improve global food production and to sustainably manage ecosystems in the context of climate change. Climate change and land dynamics are the perturbations that are major drivers of an ecosystem shift to a ';';desertified'' state. This shift is typically sustained by positive feedbacks, which stabilize the system in the new state. This research focuses on changes in precipitation resulting from land-atmosphere interactions and changes in vegetation cover. We concentrate on the Sahel region of Africa (a strip of land that is a transitional area between the Sahara desert to the North and the rain forest to the South). It is a dry land, semi arid environment and is a bistable ecosystem that can either be in the state of 'dry' or 'wet'. After an abnormally wet/high precipitation period in the 1950s the Sahel experienced terrible droughts and desertification which peaked in the 1980s. Since then, precipitation has gradually increased and a sinusoidal model has been shown run on a multi decadal cycle. Discrepancies in the data exist, however, and although the overall cycle has been modeled well, the large inter-annual fluctuations in precipitation have yet to be sufficiently modeled or explained. This research offers new evidence as to why such a phenomenon exists and attempts to attribute this behavior to a coupled land-atmosphere feedback system, linking together changes in vegetation cover and precipitation in the Sahel. Using the model output data from a high resolution Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to look at Africa and compare the difference between perturbations and the mean, this research asserts that when the surface of the Saharan Heat Low (SHL) becomes extremely hot the pressure drops substantially. Subsequently, due to the West African Monsoon system, air rushes in from high-pressure areas, and pulls monsoon precipitation

  15. Advances in understanding mineral dust and boundary layer processes over the Sahara from Fennec aircraft observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder, C. L.; McQuaid, J. B.; Flamant, C.; Rosenberg, P. D.; Washington, R.; Brindley, H. E.; Highwood, E. J.; Marsham, J. H.; Parker, D. J.; Todd, M. C.; Banks, J. R.; Brooke, J. K.; Engelstaedter, S.; Estelles, V.; Formenti, P.; Garcia-Carreras, L.; Kocha, C.; Marenco, F.; Sodemann, H.; Allen, C. J. T.; Bourdon, A.; Bart, M.; Cavazos-Guerra, C.; Chevaillier, S.; Crosier, J.; Darbyshire, E.; Dean, A. R.; Dorsey, J. R.; Kent, J.; O'Sullivan, D.; Schepanski, K.; Szpek, K.; Trembath, J.; Woolley, A.

    2015-07-01

    The Fennec climate programme aims to improve understanding of the Saharan climate system through a synergy of observations and modelling. We present a description of the Fennec airborne observations during 2011 and 2012 over the remote Sahara (Mauritania and Mali) and the advances in the understanding of mineral dust and boundary layer processes they have provided. Aircraft instrumentation aboard the UK FAAM BAe146 and French SAFIRE (Service des Avions Français Instrumentés pour la Recherche en Environnement) Falcon 20 is described, with specific focus on instrumentation specially developed for and relevant to Saharan meteorology and dust. Flight locations, aims and associated meteorology are described. Examples and applications of aircraft measurements from the Fennec flights are presented, highlighting new scientific results delivered using a synergy of different instruments and aircraft. These include (1) the first airborne measurement of dust particles sizes of up to 300 microns and associated dust fluxes in the Saharan atmospheric boundary layer (SABL), (2) dust uplift from the breakdown of the nocturnal low-level jet before becoming visible in SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible Infra-Red Imager) satellite imagery, (3) vertical profiles of the unique vertical structure of turbulent fluxes in the SABL, (4) in situ observations of processes in SABL clouds showing dust acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN) at -15 °C, (5) dual-aircraft observations of the SABL dynamics, thermodynamics and composition in the Saharan heat low region (SHL), (6) airborne observations of a dust storm associated with a cold pool (haboob) issued from deep convection over the Atlas Mountains, (7) the first airborne chemical composition measurements of dust in the SHL region with differing composition, sources (determined using Lagrangian backward trajectory calculations) and absorption properties between 2011 and 2012, (8) coincident ozone and dust surface area

  16. Constraining the Sahara freshwater discharge during sapropel S5 time by a stable isotope record from the Greater Sirte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirks, Eleen; Kucera, Michal; Bachem, Paul; Schulz, Hartmut

    2016-04-01

    The Nile River and the Black Sea were long considered as the only significant eastern Mediterranean freshwater sources and therefore inferred as the primary agents promoting surface stratification associated with sapropel formation. Sapropel S5, deposited during the last interglacial, marks a time of possible movement of Homo sapiens out of Africa. Satellite images revealed the existence of ancient rivers that once ran through the Sahara desert and drained into the Gulf of Sirte. Anomalous Nd isotope records from sapropel S5 deposits indicate that these rivers may have been active during MIS 5e, implying another freshwater source into the eastern Mediterranean Sea during that period. To constrain the extent of freshwater discharge into the Mediterranean from the Kufrah River during MIS 5e, a new δ18O record of five planktonic foraminifera species was generated from sediment core GeoTü SL 96, located proximal to the assumed outflow of the Kufrah River. The record from core GeoTü SL 96 compared with seven other records from the eastern Mediterranean Sea reveal a pattern of oxygen isotope anomalies which implies that the Kufrah River delivered detectable amount of freshwater during the second part of sapropel S5. These results reinforce the hypothesis that Sahara river systems were active during MIS 5e, which has ramifications for the understanding of sapropel events, reconstruction of coastal landscape, and the better understanding of migration routes of early humans.

  17. Impacts of dust reduction on the northward expansion of the African monsoon during the Green Sahara period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pausata, Francesco S. R.; Messori, Gabriele; Zhang, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    The West African Monsoon (WAM) is crucial for the socio-economic stability of millions of people living in the Sahel. Severe droughts have ravaged the region in the last three decades of the 20th century, highlighting the need for a better understanding of the WAM dynamics. One of the most dramatic changes in the West African Monsoon (WAM) occurred between 15000-5000 yr BP, when increased summer rainfall led to the so-called "Green Sahara" and to a reduction in dust emissions from the region. However, model experiments are unable to fully reproduce the intensification and geographical expansion of the WAM during this period, even when vegetation over the Sahara is considered. Here, we use a fully coupled simulation for 6000 yr BP (Mid-Holocene) in which prescribed Saharan vegetation and dust concentrations are changed in turn. A closer agreement with proxy records is obtained only when both the Saharan vegetation changes and dust decrease are taken into account. The dust reduction strengthens the vegetation-albedo feedback, extending the monsoon's northern limit approximately 500 km further than the vegetation-change case only. We therefore conclude that accounting for changes in Saharan dust loadings is essential for improving model simulations of the WAM during the Mid-Holocene.

  18. Motion analysis of U11 to U16 elite English Premier League Academy players.

    PubMed

    Goto, Heita; Morris, John G; Nevill, Mary E

    2015-01-01

    This study examined (1) the distances and speeds covered during match play for U11 to U16 English Premier League Academy players, (2) the differences in match performance between retained and released players and (3) the effect of calculating speed zones in different ways when analysing match performance. Eighty-one academy outfield players (10-16 years old), competing in 11-a-side matches, were analysed using a 1-Hz global positioning system with three speed zones (absolute, squad and individual). Pitch dimensions were 78.7 × 54.1 m (U11 and U12), 88.0 × 64.2 m (U13) and 100.8 × 68.2 m (U14-U16). Match durations were 20 min × 2 + 15 min × 2 or 25 min × 3 (U11), 25 min × 3 (U12 and U13) and 40 min × 2 (U14-U16). The matches were part of the regular series of inter-academy matches between Premier League Academies during a season. Completion of at least a half of the duration of a match in two separate matches (mean ± s = 3.1 ± 0.8 matches; range: 2-4 matches) was the criterion for inclusion in the study. Total match running distance increased with age from ~5700 (U11) to ~6700 m · h(-1) (U15) (P < 0.01). Using the absolute speed zones, it was possible to discern differences in high-intensity (>6.0 m · s(-1)) distance covered with age (U11: 29 m · h(-1), U16: 164 m · h(-1), P < 0.01). Using the squad speed zones, it was possible to discern differences between retained and released players in the U11/U12s (moderate-speed running) and in the U15/U16s (walking, jogging and low-speed running) (P < 0.01). Thus, total and high-intensity running distances increase with age, and walking, jogging, low-speed running and moderate-speed running distances are greater in retained than in released players and these differences are best identified through the use of absolute and squad speed zones, respectively. PMID:25583077

  19. Evaluation of sports nutrition knowledge of New Zealand premier club rugby coaches.

    PubMed

    Zinn, Caryn; Schofield, Grant; Wall, Clare

    2006-04-01

    Little is known about if and how team coaches disseminate nutrition information to athletes. In a census survey, New Zealand premier rugby coaches (n = 168) completed a psychometrically validated questionnaire, received by either Internet or standard mail (response rate, 46%), identifying their nutrition advice dissemination practices to players, their level of nutrition knowledge, and the factors determining this level of knowledge. The majority of coaches provided advice to their players (83.8%). Coaches responded correctly to 55.6% of all knowledge questions. An independent t-test showed coaches who imparted nutrition advice obtained a significantly greater score, 56.8%, than those not imparting advice, 48.4% (P = 0.008). One-way ANOVA showed significant relationships between total knowledge score of all coaches and qualifications [F(1,166) = 5.28, P = 0.001], own knowledge rating [F(3,164) = 6.88, P = 0.001] and nutrition training [F(1,166) = 9.83, P = 0.002]. We conclude that these rugby coaches were inadequately prepared to impart nutrition advice to athletes and could benefit from further nutrition training. PMID:16779927

  20. Evolution of match performance parameters for various playing positions in the English Premier League.

    PubMed

    Bush, Michael; Barnes, Chris; Archer, David T; Hogg, Bob; Bradley, Paul S

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate position-specific evolution of physical and technical performance parameters in the English Premier League (EPL). Match performance observations (n=14700) were collected using a multiple-camera computerized tracking system across seven seasons (2006-07 to 2012-13). Data were analyzed relative to five playing positions: central defenders (n=3792), full backs (n=3420), central midfielders (n=3200), wide midfielders (n=2136) and attackers (n=2152). High-intensity running distance increased in the final season versus the first season in all playing positions (p<.05, ES: 0.9-1.3) with full backs displaying the greatest increase (∼36% higher in 2012-13). Similar trends were observed for sprint distance with full backs demonstrating the most pronounced increase across the seven seasons (36-63%, p<.001, ES: 0.8-1.3). Central players (central defenders and midfielders) illustrated the most pronounced increases in total passes and pass success rate (p<.05, ES: 0.7-0.9) whilst wide players (full backs and wide midfielders) demonstrated only small-moderate increases in total passes and pass success rate (p<.05, ES: 0.6-0.8). The data demonstrates that evolving tactics in the EPL have impacted on the physical demands of wide players and the technical requirements of central players. These findings could be used for talent identification or position-specific physical and technical training. PMID:25461429

  1. Descriptive epidemiology of injuries in a Brazilian premier league soccer team

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas Guina Fachina, Rafael Júlio; Andrade, Marília dos Santos; Silva, Fernando Roberto; Waszczuk-Junior, Silas; Montagner, Paulo César; Borin, João Paulo; de Lira, Claudio Andre Barbosa

    2013-01-01

    Soccer, which has a large number of participants, has a high injury incidence that causes both financial and time burdens. Therefore, knowledge about the epidemiology of soccer injuries could allow sports-medicine professionals, such as physicians and physiotherapists, to direct their work in specific preventive programs. Thus, our aim was to conduct an epidemiological survey of injuries sustained by professional soccer players from the same team who participated in the Brazilian championship premier league in 2009. To this end, we evaluated retrospectively player medical records from the team, which included name, date of birth, position, date of injury, mechanism of injury, and type of injury. In the period of study, 95 injuries were recorded: 42 (44.2%) were recorded during matches, and 53 (55.8%) during the training period. Injuries occurred more frequently in midfielders and strikers. All injuries happened in the lower limb, most of the injuries were muscular, and most occurred as the result of collisions with other athletes. In summary, this study demonstrates that there is a need for greater safety awareness in the training environment. PMID:24379722

  2. Descriptive epidemiology of injuries in a Brazilian premier league soccer team.

    PubMed

    de Freitas Guina Fachina, Rafael Júlio; Andrade, Marília Dos Santos; Silva, Fernando Roberto; Waszczuk-Junior, Silas; Montagner, Paulo César; Borin, João Paulo; de Lira, Claudio Andre Barbosa

    2013-01-01

    Soccer, which has a large number of participants, has a high injury incidence that causes both financial and time burdens. Therefore, knowledge about the epidemiology of soccer injuries could allow sports-medicine professionals, such as physicians and physiotherapists, to direct their work in specific preventive programs. Thus, our aim was to conduct an epidemiological survey of injuries sustained by professional soccer players from the same team who participated in the Brazilian championship premier league in 2009. To this end, we evaluated retrospectively player medical records from the team, which included name, date of birth, position, date of injury, mechanism of injury, and type of injury. In the period of study, 95 injuries were recorded: 42 (44.2%) were recorded during matches, and 53 (55.8%) during the training period. Injuries occurred more frequently in midfielders and strikers. All injuries happened in the lower limb, most of the injuries were muscular, and most occurred as the result of collisions with other athletes. In summary, this study demonstrates that there is a need for greater safety awareness in the training environment. PMID:24379722

  3. Measuring the tuning accuracy of thousands singing in unison: an English Premier Football League table of fans' singing tunefulness.

    PubMed

    Howard, David M

    2004-01-01

    Tunefulness in singing is well understood in the context of solo stage performance, singing in small groups and singing in choirs, with or without accompaniment, and it can be readily measured under laboratory conditions. When thousands of people are singing outside in support of their football team, however, the singing is impromptu; there is no conductor, no starting note, and generally no accompaniment. This paper describes the measurement of the tunefulness of the singing of fans of the twenty clubs in the 2001-2002 English Premier League. The technique adopted is unusual in that it makes direct reference to the formal definition of pitch as a subjective phenomenon. The results are presented in the form of a 2001-2002 English Premier League football fans singing league table. PMID:15260183

  4. Dust emission mechanisms in the central Sahara: new insights from remote field observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, C.; Washington, R.; Engelstaedter, S.

    2013-12-01

    North Africa is the world's largest source of mineral aerosol (dust). The Fennec Project, an international consortium led by the University of Oxford, is the first project to systematically instrument the remote central Sahara Desert. These observations have, among others, provided new insights into the atmospheric mechanisms of dust emission. Bordj Badji Mokhtar, in south-west Algeria, is within kilometres of the centre of the global mean summer dust maximum. The site, operated by Fennec partners ONM Algerie, has been heavily instrumented since summer 2011. During the Intensive Observation Period (IOP) in June 2011, four main emission mechanisms were observed and documented: cold pool outflows, low level jets (LLJs), monsoon surges and dry convective plumes. Establishing the relative importance of dust emission mechanisms has been a long-standing research goal. A detailed partitioning exercise of dust events during the IOP shows that 45% of the dust over BBM was generated by local emission in cold pool outflows, 14% by LLJs and only 2% by dry convective plumes. 27% of the dust was advected to the site rather than locally emitted and 12% of the dust was residual or ';background' dust. The work shows the primacy of cold pool outflows for dust emission in the region and also the important contribution of dust advection. In accordance with long-held ideas, the cube of wind speed is strongly correlated with dust emission. Surprisingly however, particles in long-range advection (>500km) were found to be larger than locally emitted dust. Although a clear LLJ wind structure is evident in the mean diurnal cycle during the IOP (12m/s peak winds at 935hPa between 04-05h), LLJs are only responsible for a relatively small amount of dust emission. There is significant daily variability in LLJ strength; the strongest winds are produced by a relatively small number of events. The position and strength of the Saharan Heat Low is strongly associated with the development (or

  5. A Unique Type 4 Chondrite from the Sahara-Acfer 217

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bland, P.; Hutchison, R.; Pillinger, C. T.; Bischoff, A.

    1992-07-01

    In 1991 a single stone weighing 174 g was recovered from the Sahara desert, Algeria (27 degrees 36'N, 3 degrees 53'E). From this a 36.83-g fragment was obtained that has 2 sawn surfaces and adjacent surface of partially weathered fusion crust. The sawn surface shows "brownish" weathering products that have generally produced alteration of the matrix in which a few relict chondrules and inclusions are set. One 4 by 5 mm triangular area bordering the fusion crust is dark grey in colour with small inclusions set in it. This may be an area of local shock melt glass. Mineralogy and petrography: In a polished thin section, area 20 mm^2, we found few chondrules, mainly olivine clasts in a weathered olivine-rich matrix, with minor pyroxene. The largest relict chondrule was type "I" (McSween, 1977) with a diameter of 350 micrometers; a 200-micrometer-diameter type "II" (McSween, 1977) barred olivine chondrule showed devitrified glass in the interstices of the olivine. The sample is highly brecciated with fractures cutting the section and offsetting chondrule fragments, but in PTS is only very weakly shocked: olivine shows occasional undulatory extinction, i.e., stage "S2" in the classification of Stoffler et al. (1991). Mineral Chemistry: 95% of olivine is close to Fa(sub)39 but a few grains lie in the range Fa(sub)17 to Fa(sub)43 and one is zoned from a Fa(sub)17 core to a Fa(sub)43 rim. The majority of pyroxene is Ca-rich at a mean composition of Fs(sub)21 Wo(sub)45. Low-Ca pyroxene is also unequilibrated with a mean close to Fs(sub)31 and one has a composition of Fs(sub)10 Wo(sub)2. Plagioclase is a common interstitial phase in the matrix and is variable in composition, but high-Na oligoclase or albite. Minor opaque phases are dominated by Cr-rich (32-38 wt% Cr2O3) spinel, which also contains significant Ti (5.3 wt% TiO2). For charge balance substantial Fe^3+ is required indicating that Fe is partitioned between approximately 13-21 wt% Fe2O3 and 35 wt% FeO. The spinel

  6. A humid corridor across the Sahara for the migration of early modern humans out of Africa 120,000 years ago

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Anne H.; Vance, Derek; Rohling, Eelco J.; Barton, Nick; Rogerson, Mike; Fello, Nuri

    2008-01-01

    It is widely accepted that modern humans originated in sub-Saharan Africa ≈150–200 thousand years ago (ka), but their route of dispersal across the currently hyperarid Sahara remains controversial. Given that the first modern humans north of the Sahara are found in the Levant ≈120–90 ka, northward dispersal likely occurred during a humid episode in the Sahara within Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5e (130–117 ka). The obvious dispersal route, the Nile, may be ruled out by notable differences between archaeological finds in the Nile Valley and the Levant at the critical time. Further west, space-born radar images reveal networks of—now buried—fossil river channels that extend across the desert to the Mediterranean coast, which represent alternative dispersal corridors. These corridors would explain scattered findings at desert oases of Middle Stone Age Aterian lithic industries with bifacial and tanged points that can be linked with industries further to the east and as far north as the Mediterranean coast. Here we present geochemical data that demonstrate that water in these fossil systems derived from the south during wet episodes in general, and penetrated all of the way to the Mediterranean during MIS 5e in particular. This proves the existence of an uninterrupted freshwater corridor across a currently hyperarid region of the Sahara at a key time for early modern human migrations to the north and out of Africa. PMID:18936490

  7. Peoples of Africa, Topic 1. Africa South of the Sahara: A Program of Study for Secondary School Social Studies Students. (Teaching and Student Guides).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA. Project Africa.

    This teaching guide and student text for Project Africa's curriculum program, "Africa South of the Sahara," deal with how four typical contemporary African peoples acquired their present way of life: (1) the Hausa of Northern Nigeria, (2) the Kung Bushmen of the Kalahari Desert, (3) the Mech'a Galla of Ethiopa, and (4) the Kikuyu of Kenya.…

  8. Dust emission from different sol types and geomorphic units in the Sahara - implications for modeling dust emission and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crouvi, Onn; Schepanski, Kerstin; Amit, Rivka; Gillespie, Alan; Enzel, Yehouda

    2014-05-01

    Mineral dust plays multiple roles in mediating physical and biogeochemical exchanges among the atmosphere, land and ocean, and thus is an active component of the global climate system. To estimate the past, current, and future impacts of dust on climate, sources of dust and their erodibility should be identified. The Sahara is the major source of dust on Earth. Based on qualitative analysis of remotely sensed data with low temporal resolution, the main sources of dust that have been identified are topographic depressions comprised of dry lake and playa deposits in hyprarid regions. Yet, recent studies cast doubts on these as the major sources and call for a search for others. Moreover, the susceptibility of soils to aeolian erosion (wind land erodibility) in the Sahara is still poorly known. In this study we identify and determine the soil types and geomorphic units most important as Saharan dust sources by correlating between the number of days with dust storms (NDS), derived from remote-sensing data of high temporal resolution, with the distribution of the soil types/geomorphic units. During 2006-8 the source of over 90% of the NDS was sand dunes, leptosols, calcisols, arenosols, and rock debris. Few dust storms originated from dry lake beds and playas. Land erodibility by wind for each soil type/geomorphic unit was estimated by a regression of the NDS and the number of days with high-speed wind events; the regression is relatively high for sand dunes and gypsisols. We use these regressions to differentiate between sources of dust that are supply-limited to those that are transport-limited. We propose that the fracturing of saltating sand and the removal of clay coatings from sand grains through eolian abrasion is the dominant dust-emission mechanism for the sand-rich areas covering large portion of the Sahara. Our results also explain the increased dustiness during the last glacial period, when sand dunes activity has been more common than during the Holocene

  9. The evolution of the 87Sr/86Sr in the Dead Sea brine: from the Sedom lagoon to Sahara dusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Mordechai

    2016-04-01

    The history of water-bodies in the Dead Sea brines commenced with the intrusion of the Sedom lagoon, possibly in the late Neogene and continued with the development of hypersaline and freshwater lakes (e.g. the modern Dead Sea and Sea of Galilee). 87Sr/86Sr ratios in these water-bodies decreased over the past ~ 5-6 Ma from 0.7087-0.7084 in salts deposited in the Sedom lagoon to ~ 0.7080 in modern Dead Sea brine. The 87Sr/86Sr ratios in the salts deposited from Sedom lagoon are significantly lower than those of the contemporaneous late Miocene seawater (~0.709). This difference was attributed to modification of the 87Sr/86Sr ratio in the Sedom lagoon solution by influx of Ca-chloride brines. The brines, in turn were formed by dolomitization of marine limestones of the DSR Cretaceous wall rocks (87Sr/86Sr ~ 0.7075) by the ingressing evaporated seawaters (Stein et al., 2000). After the disconnection of the Sedom lagoon from the open sea freshwater filled the lakes that occupied the Dead Sea basin. The freshwater influx modified the strontium isotope and chemical composition of the brine and provided bicarbonate and sulfate to the lake that led the precipitation of primary aragonite and gypsum. Freshwater that currently enter the lake are characterize by 87Sr/86Sr ~ 0.7081, significantly higher than the Cretaceous carbonates. Settled dust that deposits on the Judea Mountains is composed of calcite and quartz grains and is characterized by 87Sr/86Sr ratios ~ 0.7084. It appears that significant amounts of the strontium that entered the lakes with the freshwater originated from dissolution of the dust calcites. Large amounts of dust were transported from the Sahara desert to the Dead Sea watershed during glacial periods when the Sahara was dry and sea-level was low. The source of the detrital calcites however, is not known. They could be derived from dry paleo-lakes in the Sahara that were previously filled by waters that retained the required strontium isotope

  10. A humid corridor across the Sahara for the migration "Out of Africa" of early modern humans 120,000 years ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, A. H.; Vance, D.; Rohling, E. J.; Barton, N.; Rogerson, M.; Fello, N.

    2008-12-01

    The climatic history of the Sahara in the Quaternary is likely to have been a key control on the history of human migrations out of Africa. For example, it is widely accepted that modern humans originated in sub- Saharan Africa around 150-200 thousand years ago (ka), but their route of dispersal across the currently hyper-arid Sahara remains controversial. Given that the first modern humans north of the Sahara are found in the Levant around 120-90 ka, northward dispersal likely occurred during the humid episode in the Sahara within Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 5e (130-117 ka). The obvious dispersal route, the Nile, may be ruled out by notable differences between archaeological finds in the Nile Valley and the Levant at the critical time. Further west, space-born radar images reveal networks of - now buried - fossil river channels that extend across the desert to the Mediterranean coast, which represent alternative dispersal corridors. This would explain scattered findings at desert oases of Middle Stone Age (MSA) Aterian lithic industries with bifacial and tanged points that can be linked with industries further to the east and as far north as the Mediterranean coast. We have previously used neodymium and oxygen isotope data to suggest that there was enhanced Nile outflow to the Levantine Sea during Saharan humid periods in Stage 5e and the Holocene1. Here, however, we present further geochemical data which suggest that the freshwater signal from Africa was much stronger further west in the Ionian Sea. Furthermore, analyses of shell samples retrieved from the Libyan fossil river channels traces the geochemical signature found in the Ionian Sea to the Tibesti Mountains in the southern Sahara. These data demonstrate that water in the fossil river systems of the Sahara derived from the south during wet episodes in general, and penetrated all the way to the Mediterranean during MIS 5e in particular, confirming the existence of an uninterrupted freshwater corridor across

  11. John F. Kennedy, Jr., speaks to the media at KSC's HBO premiere 'From the Earth to the Moon.'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    John F. Kennedy, Jr., editor-in-chief of George Magazine, speaks with members of the national media at the Home Box Office (HBO) and Imagine Entertainment premiere of the 12-part miniseries 'From the Earth to the Moon' at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The series was filmed in part on location at KSC and dramatizes the human aspects of NASA's efforts to launch Americans to the Moon. The miniseries highlights NASA's Apollo program and the events leading up to and including the six successful missions to the Moon. A special 500-seat theater was constructed next to the Apollo/Saturn V Center for the KSC premiere showing. Speakers at the event included KSC Director Roy Bridges (at right); Jeff Bewkes, chairman and CEO for HBO; and John F. Kennedy, Jr. Also attending the event, which featured the episode entitled '1968,' were Buzz Aldrin, Apollo 11 astronaut, and Al Worden, Apollo 15 astronaut. The original miniseries event, created for HBO by actor Tom Hanks and Imagine Entertainment, will premiere on HBO beginning April 5, 1998.

  12. John F. Kennedy, Jr., speaks to invited guests at KSC's HBO premiere 'From the Earth to the Moon.'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    John F. Kennedy, Jr., editor-in-chief of George Magazine, greets invited guests at the Home Box Office (HBO) and Imagine Entertainment premiere of the 12-part miniseries 'From the Earth to the Moon' at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The series was filmed in part on location at KSC and dramatizes the human aspects of NASA's efforts to launch Americans to the Moon. The miniseries highlights NASA's Apollo program and the events leading up to and including the six successful missions to the Moon. A special 500- seat theater was constructed next to the Apollo/Saturn V Center for the KSC premiere showing. Speakers at the event included KSC Director Roy Bridges (at right); Jeff Bewkes, chairman and CEO for HBO; and John F. Kennedy, Jr. Also attending the event, which featured the episode entitled '1968,' were Buzz Aldrin, Apollo 11 astronaut, and Al Worden, Apollo 15 astronaut. The original miniseries event, created for HBO by actor Tom Hanks and Imagine Entertainment, will premiere on HBO beginning April 5, 1998.

  13. General Secretary Jiang Zemin and Premier Li Peng on family planning.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Z; Li, P

    1991-06-01

    Speeches given by General Secretary Jiang Zemin and Premier Li Peng to the forum on Family Planning (FP) Work in April 1991 are summarized. Jiang stated that the highest levels of communist party and governmental officials should be in charge of controlling population growth in China. There is great urgency to do so. The problems to be faced are a hugh population, scarce arable land, a poor economic foundation, and low per capita resources. Human resources are an asset for the socialist construction of China, but a rapid growth rate will retard economic and social development and affect the improvement in living standards and the quality of life. The strategy to place FP within state policy and place strict controls over population growth must be carried out resolutely. The future of socialism and the Chinese nation is at stake. Modernization cannot be accomplished with out controlling population growths. The 8th 5 year Plan and the 10 Year Program requirements will still contribute to 1.3 billion population by 2000 and 1.2 billion by 1995. There is historical responsibility, an urgency to strictly control population growth. Adherence to the 4 cardinal principles of socialism (the people's democratic dictatorship, the Communist Party leadership, and Marxist Leninist and Mao Zedong thought) must coexist with social development and family planning. All must be motivated. The provincial Party Secretary personally must oversee problems. The success or failure of FP should be used to evaluate the achievements of party committees and governments. The education on basic national conditions and the basic state policy on FP needs to be publicized through all organizations. There should be confidence in the masses. People must make FP their own cause voluntarily. Premier Li Peng stressed effective implementation and giving it high priority in order to achieve the 2nd step strategic goal of socialist modernization. Per capita output is low, and grain output will not increase

  14. Corporate social responsibility and mental health: the Premier League football Imagine Your Goals programme.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Claire; O'Hara, Stefanie; Thornicroft, Graham; Webber, Martin

    2014-08-01

    Football is increasingly used to facilitate recovery in mental health services, often in partnership with football clubs. However, few clubs have made mental health part of their corporate social responsibility programmes until recently. We report the impact on participants of the 'Imagine Your Goals' programme, run by 16 Premier League football clubs in conjunction with England's Time to Change programme to reduce mental health-related stigma and discrimination. Mixed methods evaluation used pre/post measures of well-being, access to social capital, focus groups held early on and towards the end of the two-year programmes, and questionnaires for coaching staff. There were no significant changes to participants' mental well-being scores between baseline and follow-up, nor to the total number of social resources accessible through their networks. However, there was a statistically significant increase at follow-up in the mean score of the personal skills subscale of the Resource Generator-UK. Participants' individual skills were also higher at follow-up. Qualitative data showed programmes had largely met participants' expectations in terms of socializing, providing structure and improving fitness levels, exceeded expectations in relationships with coaching staff and additional activities, but did not always meet them in improving football skills. Participants varied in their knowledge of exit opportunities, depending on which club's programme they attended. A minority of clubs reported difficulties in recruitment and concerns about planning for the future of the projects. Football clubs and the charitable foundations they set up can successfully deliver programmes to people with mental health problems which improve access to personal skills social capital and have other potential benefits. PMID:25137112

  15. [Severe keratomycosis due to Fusarium solani induced by a telluric foreign body: About a case in moroccan Sahara].

    PubMed

    Er-Rami, M; Souhail, H; Lemkhente, Z; El Mellouki, W; Lmimouni, B

    2011-09-01

    We report a case of severe keratitis due to Fusarium solani in a young man in the Sahara in Morocco where the climate is arid. This patient reported had a grain of sand in his right eye for a week after a sandstorm. On admission he had a corneal abscess. Despite rapid diagnosis and initiation of treatment with available antifungal drugs: amphotericin B and natamycin eye drops, the prognosis worsened and led to the enucleation of the right eye. Faced with a suspected eye infection after a microtrauma caused by grains of sand carried by a sandstorm, it is important to take biological samples to search for fungal infections among other. It is also important to have new triazole antifungal drugs available to treat ocular mycosis rapidly and effectively. PMID:24451564

  16. Implications of high altitude desert dust transport from Western Sahara to Nile Delta during biomass burning season.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Anup K; El-Askary, Hesham; Kafatos, Menas

    2010-11-01

    The air over major cities and rural regions of the Nile Delta is highly polluted during autumn which is the biomass burning season, locally known as black cloud. Previous studies have attributed the increased pollution levels during the black cloud season to the biomass or open burning of agricultural waste, vehicular, industrial emissions, and secondary aerosols. However, new multi-sensor observations (column and vertical profiles) from satellites, dust transport models and associated meteorology present a different picture of the autumn pollution. Here we show, for the first time, the evidence of long range transport of dust at high altitude (2.5-6 km) from Western Sahara and its deposition over the Nile Delta region unlike current Models. The desert dust is found to be a major contributor to the local air quality which was previously considered to be due to pollution from biomass burning enhanced by the dominant northerly winds coming from Europe. PMID:20797813

  17. Occurrence of fluororichterite and fluorian biotite in the In Tifar trachyte neck (Tazrouk district, Hoggar volcanic province, Sahara, Algeria)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azzouni-Sekkal, Abla; Bonin, Bernard; Ben El Khaznadji, Riad

    2013-09-01

    The unusual occurrence in the In Tifar trachyte neck (Tazrouk district, Hoggar volcanic province, Sahara, Algeria) of the fluorian biotite-fluororichterite association is presented. The two mineral species were previously unknown in the Hoggar and their association is uncommon worldwide. Ti-rich biotite has 28-40% OH sites occupied by fluorine, hence the use of the modifier "fluorian". Sodic-calcic fluororichterite has more than 55% OH sites filled by fluorine, hence the use of the prefix "fluoro". Well-defined F-Mg affinities are documented in both cases, while Cl remains very low. Temperatures are estimated roughly at 775-700 °C at low pressures. The fluorian biotite → fluororichterite sequence of crystallisation implies increasingly high fH2F2/fH2O ratios in metaluminous H2O-dominated evolving to peralkaline F-enriched fluids.

  18. Mineral Dust Analysis and Application in Refining Source Region Information for the Sahara and East Asia Deserts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, E. A.; Reid, J. S.; Westphal, D.; Cliff, S.; Dunlap, M.

    2002-12-01

    The study of transported mineral dust aerosols relies heavily on simplified dust source region parameters. Source regions are broadly defined by soil class and expected erodibility, factors which continuously changes with land use and climate conditions. Mineral dust particles may undergo numerous cycles of deposition and re-entrainment prior to collection and analysis. Using the Sahara Desert and the East Asia deserts as test cases, we investigate the possibility of retrieving source information from receptor sites through single particle and bulk analyses of collected aerosol particles. In June and July of 2000, Saharan mineral dust aerosols transported across the Atlantic Ocean to Puerto Rico were collected for bulk and single particle chemical and morphological analyses. The Puerto Rico Dust Experiment, (PRIDE), involved sampling aerosols upwind of the islands at various altitudes in the marine boundary layer (MBL) and Saharan Air Layer (SAL) via a Navajo research aircraft. A surface site included a Davis Rotating Drum (DRUM) cascade impactor to size segregate the aerosols into eight stages, from 12 to 0.1 micrometers, with four-hour time resolution. In April of 2001, size segregated Asian mineral dust aerosols were collected by three hour resolution DRUM samplers at surface sites in Cheju, Taiwan, for bulk chemical analysis. The aircraft samples and selected DRUM samples were subjected to single particle analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for particle morphology, and by Energy Dispersive Analysis with X-rays (EDAX) to derive elemental ratios of key soil elements. The DRUM samples were subjected to X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) to derive bulk elemental composition for elements Al though Zn. Cluster and principal component analysis of the data derived statistically significant particle groupings. By including particle morphology data, and using ternary analyses, derivation of additional source information was possible. Particle compositions

  19. Normalized difference water indexes have dissimilar performances in detecting seasonal and permanent water in the Sahara-Sahel transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campos, João C.; Sillero, Neftalí; Brito, José C.

    2012-09-01

    SummaryThe decrease of water resources can enhance poverty and increase insecurity in dry regions, at the same time leading to loss of biological diversity. For these reasons, the information about surface perennial and well-known water sources in the arid and semi-arid regions of Africa has been mapped. However, seasonal water can be missed in mapping due to their short and erratic appearance, while the mapping of any aquatic resources represents a foremost priority for protecting social, economic and biological values in the e.g. Sahara-Sahel transition zone. Therefore, Remote Sensing becomes crucial to monitor a variety of wetland systems in these regions. This work evaluates the performance of three Normalized Difference Water Indexes [Gao's NDWI (NDWINIR/MIR), McFeeters' NDWI (NDWIG/NIR) and Xu's NDWI (NDWIG/MIR)] in mapping of water systems across Mauritania. Maps with seasonal and permanent water were derived, using a multi-temporal series of Landsat 5 TM and Landsat 7 ETM+ images. The performance of indexes was compared based on 551 control points collected during five fieldwork missions to Mauritania between 2007 and 2011. Control points were separated in three classes of water availability (permanent, seasonal and non-water points) and then randomly assigned into two data sets: one for selecting the water availability thresholds for index reclassification and another for threshold validation. NDWIG/MIR and NDWINIR/MIR had good performances in detecting permanent and seasonal water, respectively, while NDWIG/NIR failed to detect most of the water bodies. The threshold selection generated water maps with seasonal and permanent features that might be missing in simple mapping of aquatic systems. The extensive data collection provides novel information about NDWI performances for water delineation in arid and semi-arid regions and for a future management of aquatic environments of the Sahara-Sahel transition zone.

  20. Dust aerosol emission over the Sahara during summertime from Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Martin C.; Cavazos-Guerra, Carolina

    2016-03-01

    Dust aerosols are an important component of the climate system and a challenge to incorporate into weather and climate models. Information on the location and magnitude of dust emission remains a key information gap to inform model development. Inadequate surface observations ensure that satellite data remain the primary source of this information over extensive and remote desert regions. Here, we develop estimates of the relative magnitude of active dust emission over the Sahara desert based on data from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP). Utilising the unique vertical profile of aerosol characteristics provided by CALIOP our algorithm identifies emission from aerosol extinction and lidar backscatter in the near surface layers. From the long-term CALIOP archive of day and night-time orbits over 2006-13 we construct coarse resolution maps of a new dust emission index (DEI) for the Sahara desert during the peak summer dust season (June to September). The spatial structure of DEI indicates highest emission over a broad zone focused on the border regions of Southern Algeria, Northern Mali and northwest Niger, displaced substantially (∼7°) to the east of the mean maximum in satellite-derived aerosol optical depth. In this region night-time emission exceeds that during the day. The DEI maps substantially corroborate recently derived dust source frequency count maps based on back-tracking plumes in high temporal resolution SEVIRI imagery. As such, a convergence of evidence from multiple satellite data sources using independent methods provides an increasingly robust picture of Saharan dust emission sources. Various caveats are considered. As such, quantitative estimates of dust emission may require a synergistic combined multi-sensor analysis.

  1. Quantifying the "Energy-Return-on-Investment" of desert greening in the Sahara/Sahel using a Global Climate Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowring, S. P. K.; Miller, L. M.; Ganzeveld, L.; Kleidon, A.

    2013-08-01

    "Greening" the world's deserts has been proposed as a way to produce additional food, sequester carbon, and alter the climate of desert regions. Here, we quantify the potential benefits in terms of energetic quantities and compare these to the energetic costs. We then compare these using the metric of Energy-Return-On-Investment (EROI). We apply EROI to a series of global climate model simulations where the arid Sahara/Sahel region is irrigated with various rates of desalinated water to produce biomass. The energy content of this biomass is greater than the energy input rate for a minimum irrigation rate of about 200 mm yr-1 in the winter and 500 mm yr-1 in the summer, thereby yielding an EROI ratio > 1 : 1, expressing energetic sustainability. Quantified annually, the EROI was > 1 : 1 for irrigation rates more than 500 mm yr-1, progressively increasing to a maximum of 1.8 : 1 with 900 mm yr-1, and then decreasing with further increases in the irrigation rate. Including the precipitation feedback arising from changes in moisture-recycling within the study region approximately doubles these EROI ratios. This overall result varies spatially and temporally, so while the entire Sahara/Sahel region is irrigated equally, the western coastal region from June to August had the highest EROI. Other factors would complicate such a large-scale modification of the Earth System, but this sensitivity study concludes that with a required energy input, desert greening may be energetically sustainable. Furthermore, we suggest that this type of EROI-analysis could be applied as a metric to assess a diverse range of human alterations to, and interventions within, the Earth System.

  2. Sirénomélie (Mermaid Syndrome): description du premier cas Congolais et revue de la literature

    PubMed Central

    Lubala, Toni Kasole; Mukuku, Olivier; Mutombo, Augustin Mulangu

    2014-01-01

    La sirénomélie est une forme rare de dysgénésie caudale généralement incompatible avec la vie du fait des malformations rénales graves qui y sont associées. En Afrique, elle est associée à des considérations mystico-religieuses et à la sorcellerie et expose la famille à une stigmatisation violente. Son étiologie est encore très controversée. A notre connaissance, il s'agit du premier cas congolais rapporté dans la littérature. PMID:25120875

  3. Magnetic susceptibilities of liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au and Fe-Au alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Ohno, S.; Shimakura, H.; Tahara, S.; Okada, T.

    2015-08-17

    The magnetic susceptibility of liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au, Fe-Au and Cu-Au alloys was investigated as a function of temperature and composition. Liquid Cr{sub 1-c}Au{sub c} with 0.5 ≤ c and Mn{sub 1-c}Au{sub c} with 0.3≤c obeyed the Curie-Weiss law with regard to their dependence of χ on temperature. The magnetic susceptibilities of liquid Fe-Au alloys also exhibited Curie-Weiss behavior with a reasonable value for the effective number of Bohr magneton. On the Au-rich side, the composition dependence of χ for liquid TM-Au (TM=Cr, Mn, Fe) alloys increased rapidly with increasing TM content, respectively. Additionally, the composition dependences of χ for liquid Cr-Au, Mn-Au, and Fe-Au alloys had maxima at compositions of 50 at% Cr, 70 at% Mn, and 85 at% Fe, respectively. We compared the composition dependences of χ{sub 3d} due to 3d electrons for liquid binary TM-M (M=Au, Al, Si, Sb), and investigated the relationship between χ{sub 3d} and E{sub F} in liquid binary TM-M alloys at a composition of 50 at% TM.

  4. Electrochemistry of Au(II) and Au(III) pincer complexes: determination of the Au(II)-Au(II) bond energy.

    PubMed

    Dann, Thomas; Roşca, Dragoş-Adrian; Wright, Joseph A; Wildgoose, Gregory G; Bochmann, Manfred

    2013-10-01

    The bond energy of the unsupported Au-Au bond in the Au(ii) dimer [(C(∧)N(∧)C)Au]2 and the difference between Au(III)-OH and Au(III)-H bond enthalpies have been determined experimentally by electrochemical methods, with Au-OH and Au-H complexes showing unexpected differences in their reduction pathways, supported by DFT modelling. PMID:24051607

  5. Magnetoresistance of Au films

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, D. L.; Song, X. H.; Zhang, X; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of the magnetoresistance (MR) of Au films as a function of temperature and film thickness reveals a strong dependence on grain size distribution and clear violation of the Kohler s rule. Using a model of random resistor network, we show that this result can be explained if the MR arises entirely from inhomogeneity due to grain boundary scattering and thermal activation of grain boundary atoms.

  6. Magnetoresistance of Au films

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhang, D. L.; Song, X. H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Xiaoguang

    2014-12-10

    Measurement of the magnetoresistance (MR) of Au films as a function of temperature and film thickness reveals a strong dependence on grain size distribution and clear violation of the Kohler s rule. Using a model of random resistor network, we show that this result can be explained if the MR arises entirely from inhomogeneity due to grain boundary scattering and thermal activation of grain boundary atoms.

  7. Holocene freshwater carbonate structures in the hyper-arid Gebel Uweinat region of the Sahara Desert (Southwestern Egypt)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinova, Margarita M.; Meckler, A. Nele; McKay, Christopher P.

    2014-01-01

    The eastern part of the Sahara is at present the driest region of the desert. Yet the extensive animal rock art in the area, presumed to depict real activities in the lives of the painters, suggests that environmental conditions were significantly different when the rock art was produced. Here we report on exploration of the area, which led to the discovery of morphologically-distinct carbonate structures that line the walls of two valleys in Gebel Uweinat, and were likely formed in standing water. The carbonate structures comprise what appear to be shoreline carbonate formations, and date back to 8100 and 9400 years BP. The chemical and morphological similarity of these formations to carbonate structures from modern lakes suggests that these lakes contained fresh, standing water suitable for human and animal use. However, the significant quartz content suggests that windblown sand was pervasive, and thus the vegetation cover may have been sparse. This discovery supports the possibility of grasslands in the area, which may have been able to support human habitation, and adds to the evidence for a wetter climate in the area in the early Holocene.

  8. Viruses in the desert: a metagenomic survey of viral communities in four perennial ponds of the Mauritanian Sahara

    PubMed Central

    Fancello, Laura; Trape, Sébatien; Robert, Catherine; Boyer, Mickaël; Popgeorgiev, Nikolay; Raoult, Didier; Desnues, Christelle

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present the first metagenomic study of viral communities from four perennial ponds (gueltas) located in the central Sahara (Mauritania). Three of the four gueltas (Ilij, Molomhar and Hamdoun) are located at the source of three different wadis belonging to the same hydrologic basin, whereas the fourth (El Berbera) belongs to a different basin. Overall, sequences belonging to tailed bacteriophages were the most abundant in all four metagenomes although electron microscopy and sequencing confirmed the presence of other viral groups, such as large DNA viruses. We observed a decrease in the local viral biodiversity in El Berbera, a guelta with sustained human activities, compared with the pristine Ilij and Molomhar, and sequences related to viruses infecting crop pests were also detected as a probable consequence of the agricultural use of the soil. However, the structure of the El Berbera viral community shared the common global characteristics of the pristine gueltas, that is, it was dominated by Myoviridae and, more particularly, by virulent phages infecting photosynthetic cyanobacteria, such as Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus spp. In contrast, the Hamdoun viral community was characterized by a larger proportion of phages with the potential for a temperate lifestyle and by dominant species related to phages infecting heterotrophic bacteria commonly found in terrestrial environments. We hypothesized that the differences observed in the structural and functional composition of the Hamdoun viral community resulted from the critically low water level experienced by the guelta. PMID:23038177

  9. A Review of e-Health Interventions for Maternal and Child Health in Sub-Sahara Africa.

    PubMed

    Obasola, Oluwaseun Ireti; Mabawonku, Iyabo; Lagunju, Ikeoluwa

    2015-08-01

    To review e-health interventions for maternal and child health (MCH) and to explore their influence on MCH practices in sub-Sahara Africa (SSA). Keyword searches were used to retrieve articles from four databases and the websites of organisations involved in e-health projects for MCH in SSA. A total of 18relevant articles were retrieved using inclusion and exclusion criteria. The researchers reveal the prevalence of the application of mobile phones for MCH care and the influence of the use of information and communication technology (ICT) for delivering MCH information and services to target populations. There is a need to move the application of ICT for MCH care from pilot initiatives to interventions involving all stakeholders on a sub-regional scale. These interventions should also adopt an integrated approach that takes care of the information needs at every stage along the continuum of care. It is anticipated that the study would be useful in the evolution and implementation of future ICT-based programmes for MCH in the region. PMID:25652059

  10. Trace element chemistry of peridotitic garnets in diamonds from the Premier (Cullinan) and Finsch kimberlites, South Africa: Contrasting styles of mantle metasomatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viljoen, K. S.; Harris, J. W.; Ivanic, T.; Richardson, S. H.; Gray, K.

    2014-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide, discuss, and interpret a comprehensive set of geochemical data (involving major elements as well as Ni, Ti, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Hf and the rare earth elements) for peridotitic garnets in diamonds from Premier and Finsch, with a view on the nature of the metasomatic processes operating up to the time of diamond crystallisation, and the location of these two diamondiferous kimberlites within and outside the region of low seismic velocity in the Kaapvaal lithosphere. Trace element data were acquired using an ion microprobe, and a new method for the analysis of Ni in garnet by ion microprobe is presented. Peridotitic garnets in diamonds from the Premier mine are characterised by a significantly higher proportion of the lherzolite paragenesis relative to diamonds from other South African mines, such as Finsch, Venetia and De Beers Pool. Based on Ni-in-garnet thermometry, inclusion encapsulation temperatures of 1055 °C to 1669 °C are calculated for peridotitic garnets from Premier, with an average temperature of 1215 °C. Calculated temperatures for garnets from Finsch range from 1036 °C to 1167 °C, and are generally lower than for Premier, with an average of 1098 °C. The garnets in the diamonds from Premier and Finsch reflect contrasting styles of metasomatism associated with diamond crystallisation, with a low temperature fluid-type metasomatism prevalent in the case of the Paleoarchean diamonds from Finsch, and a higher temperature melt-related metasomatism occurring in the case of the Paleoproterozoic diamonds from Premier. The metasomatic agent accompanying diamond crystallisation at Finsch is effective at introducing Sr, the light rare earth elements, and some Zr into the lithosphere, but is ineffective at transporting much Ca, Ti, Y and heavy rare earth elements. In the case of Premier the metasomatic agent is highly effective at element transport, introducing e.g. Ca, Fe, Ti, Zr, Y and the rare earth elements. The location

  11. Antibacterial Au nanostructured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Songmei; Zuber, Flavia; Brugger, Juergen; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Ren, Qun

    2016-01-01

    We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all the Au nanostructures, regardless their shapes, exhibited similar excellent antibacterial properties. A comparison of live cells attached to nanotopographic surfaces showed that the number of live S. aureus cells was <1% of that from flat and rough reference surfaces. Our micro/nanofabrication process is a scalable approach based on cost-efficient self-organization and provides potential for further developing functional surfaces to study the behavior of microbes on nanoscale topographies.We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It

  12. Interaction between the North-West Sahara Aquifer and the seismically active intraplate Hun Graben Fault system, Libya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamling, I. J.; Aoudia, A.

    2011-12-01

    The North-West Sahara Aquifer System (NWSAS) covers an area of ~1 million km2 spanning the countries of Algeria, Tunisia and Libya. The system is composed of two main aquifers, the Complexe Terminal (CT) and the deeper Continental Intercalaire (CI). Over the last ~40 years these aquifers have been increasingly exploited in order to provide water to these countries. There are estimated to be ~7000 drill sites across the aquifer, 4000 in Algeria, 2000 in Tunisia and a further ~1000 in Libya. Land subsidence, caused by anthropogenic activities such as groundwater pumping, is a global problem and has been observed in a number of places around the world. Here we investigate fault controlled subsidence related to the extraction of water in North Western Libya. Located ~600 km south east of Tripoli, the Hun Graben separates the Sirte Basin to the east from the Hamada al Hamra Platform to the west and lies on the eastern boundary of the North-West Sahara Aquifer System (NWSAS). The graben is composed of two border faults extending for ~130 km from the town of Hun to the north west. These faults, bounding the eastern and western margins of the graben, are known to be seismically active and were responsible for the magnitude 7.1 earthquake in 1935. Due to the lack of ground based instrumentation, there are currently no estimates of slip along these structures. Here we use ERS and Envisat SAR images acquired over the last 20 years and form a number of interferograms to study interseismic strain accumulation along these structures. Satellite Radar Interferometry (InSAR) is a widely used technique for monitoring deformation of the Earth's surface. By differencing the phase from two radar images acquired at different times, maps of range change between the radar and ground can be obtained with millimetre precision. Our analysis over the graben suggests that neither of the two border faults are actively deforming and therefore the causes of intraplate large earthquakes such as

  13. Takarkori rock shelter (SW Libya): an archive of Holocene climate and environmental changes in the central Sahara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremaschi, Mauro; Zerboni, Andrea; Mercuri, Anna Maria; Olmi, Linda; Biagetti, Stefano; di Lernia, Savino

    2014-10-01

    Rock shelters in the central Saharan massifs preserve anthropogenic stratigraphic sequences that represent both a precious archive for the prehistory of the region and a powerful proxy data for Holocene palaeoenvironments. The geoarchaeological (micromorphology) and archaeobotanical (pollen analysis) approaches were integrated to investigate the anthropogenic sedimentary sequence preserved within the Takarkori rock shelter, a Holocene archaeological site located in the Libyan central Sahara (southern Tadrart Acacus massif). The site was occupied throughout the Early and Middle Holocene (African Humid Period) by groups of hunter-gatherers before and by pastoral communities later. The investigation on the inner part of the sequence allows to recognize the anthropogenic contribution to sedimentation process, and to reconstruct the major changes in the Holocene climate. At the bottom of the stratigraphic sequence, evidence for the earliest frequentation of the site by hunters and gatherers has been recognized; it is dated to c. 10,170 cal yr BP and is characterized by high availability of water, freshwater habitats and sparsely wooded savannah vegetation. A second Early Holocene occupation ended at c. 8180 cal yr BP; this phase is marked by increased aridity: sediments progressively richer in organics, testifying to a more intense occupation of the site, and pollen spectra indicating a decrease of grassland and the spreading of cattails, which followed a general lowering of lake level or widening of shallow-water marginal habitats near the site. After this period, a new occupational phase is dated between c. 8180 and 5610 cal yr BP; this period saw the beginning of the frequentation of pastoral groups and is marked by an important change in the forming processes of the sequence. Sediments and pollen spectra confirm a new increase in water availability, which led to a change in the landscape surrounding the Takarkori rock shelter with the spreading of water bodies. The

  14. Overall and minority-focused recruitment strategies in the PREMIER multicenter trial of lifestyle interventions for blood pressure control.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Betty M; Kumanyika, Shiriki; Ard, Jamy D; Reams, Patrice; Johnson, Cheryl A; Karanja, Njeri; Charleston, Jeanne B; Appel, Lawrence J; Maurice, Vallerie; Harsha, David W

    2010-01-01

    Recruitment strategies employed by four clinical centers across the US and a coordinating center were examined to identify successful overall and minority-focused recruitment strategies for the PREMIER multicenter trial of lifestyle changes for blood pressure control. The goal was to recruit 800 adults (40% African Americans) with systolic blood pressure of 120-159 mm Hg and diastolic of 80-95 mm Hg, not taking antihypertensive medication. Clinical centers used combinations of mass distribution of brochures, mass media, email distribution lists, screening events, and a national website. Culturally appropriate strategies for African Americans were designed by a Minority Implementation (MI) committee. Diversity training was provided for study staff, and African Americans were included in the study design process. Main recruitment outcomes were number overall and number of African Americans recruited by each strategy. Of the 810 randomized PREMIER participants, 279 (34%) were African American with site-specific percentages of 56%, 46%, 27%, and 8%. Of African Americans recruited, 151 (54%) were from mass distribution of brochures (mailed letter, flyer included in Val-Pak coupons, or other), 66 (24%) from mass media (printed article, radio, TV story or ads, 52 (19%) from word of mouth, and 10 (3%) from email/website and screening events combined. Yields for Non-Hispanic Whites were 364 (69%) from brochures, 71 (13%) from mass media, 49 (9%) from word of mouth and 47 (9%) from email/website and screening events. Mass distribution of brochures was relatively more effective with Non-Hispanic Whites, while African Americans responded relatively better to other recruitment strategies. PMID:19879377

  15. A Continuous High-Resolution Climate-Proxy Record of the past 2600 Years from the Central Sahara Desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verschuren, D.; Schuster, M.; Cocquyt, C.; Russell, J. M.; Engstrom, D. R.; Kroepelin, S.

    2004-12-01

    Persistent lack of high-quality climate-proxy records from the arid-subarid belt of North Africa has hampered analysis of decade-to-century-scale climate tele-connections between warm-temperate southern Europe and the monsoonal climate regimes of sub-Saharan tropical Africa. Here we report recovery of a finely laminated sediment record from Lake Yoa, a stratified hypersaline lake occupying a Pleistocene deflation basin at Ounianga Kebir in northeastern Chad (20.0°N; 20.5°E). It represents a continuous, annual-resolution record of climate and environmental change during the past 2600 14C years from the hyper-arid core of the Sahara desert where rainfall is erratic and annual evaporation exceeds 600 cm. Lake Yoa is one of the very few permanent waters in this region maintained today by sub-surface inflow of fossil groundwater from sandstone aquifers recharged during the early-Holocene humid period. Preliminary sedimentological, chronological and fossil-diatom data suggest that Lake Yoa has been poly- to hyper-saline throughout the sampled period, and with conditions of physical and chemical limnology similar to those prevailing today for at least the past 1000 years. Given that the desert landscape in a large area surrounding Ounianga probably lacked significant ground cover throughout this period, we surmise that variation in aeolian mineral sediment input to the lake, partly reflected in distinct sand layers, could be exploited as a proxy of past changes in the intensity of dry northeasterly trade winds over central North Africa.

  16. Intercomparison of Satellite Dust Retrieval Products over the West African Sahara During the Fennec Campaign in June 2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, J.R.; Brindley, H. E.; Flamant, C.; Garay, M. J.; Hsu, N. C.; Kalashnikova, O. V.; Klueser, L.; Sayer, A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Dust retrievals over the Sahara Desert during June 2011 from the IASI, MISR, MODIS, and SEVIRI satellite instruments are compared against each other in order to understand the strengths and weaknesses of each retrieval approach. Particular attention is paid to the effects of meteorological conditions, land surface properties, and the magnitude of the dust loading. The period of study corresponds to the time of the first Fennec intensive measurement campaign, which provides new ground-based and aircraft measurements of the dust characteristics and loading. Validation using ground-based AERONET sunphotometer data indicate that of the satellite instruments, SEVIRI is most able to retrieve dust during optically thick dust events, whereas IASI and MODIS perform better at low dust loadings. This may significantly affect observations of dust emission and the mean dust climatology. MISR and MODIS are least sensitive to variations in meteorological conditions, while SEVIRI tends to overestimate the aerosol optical depth (AOD) under moist conditions (with a bias against AERONET of 0.31), especially at low dust loadings where the AOD<1. Further comparisons are made with airborne LIDAR measurements taken during the Fennec campaign, which provide further evidence for the inferences made from the AERONET comparisons. The effect of surface properties on the retrievals is also investigated. Over elevated surfaces IASI retrieves AODs which are most consistent with AERONET observations, while the AODs retrieved by MODIS tend to be biased low. In contrast, over the least emissive surfaces IASI significantly underestimates the AOD (with a bias of -0.41), while MISR and SEVIRI show closest agreement.

  17. Modeling the synergistic antibacterial effects of honey characteristics of different botanical origins from the Sahara Desert of Algeria

    PubMed Central

    Laallam, Hadda; Boughediri, Larbi; Bissati, Samia; Menasria, Taha; Mouzaoui, Mohamed S.; Hadjadj, Soumia; Hammoudi, Rokia; Chenchouni, Haroun

    2015-01-01

    Background: Honey has multiple therapeutic properties due to its composition with diverse components. Objectives: This study aims to investigate the antimicrobial efficacy of Saharan honeys against bacterial pathogens, the variation of honey floral origins, and its physicochemical characteristics. Materials and Methods: The antimicrobial activity of 32 samples of honey collected from the Algerian Sahara Desert was tested on four bacteria; Bacillus subtilis, Clostridium perfringens, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus. The botanical origin of honeys and their physicochemical properties were determined and their combined antibacterial effects were modeled using a generalized linear mixed model (GLMM). Results: Out of the 32 study samples, 14 were monofloral and 18 were multifloral. The pollen density was on average 7.86 × 106 grains/10 g of honey, water content was 14.6%, electrical conductivity (EC) was 0.5 μS/cm, pH was 4.38 ± 0 50, hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) content was 82 mg/kg of honey, total sugars = 83%, reducing sugars = 71%, and the concentration of proline = 525.5 ± 550.2 mg/kg of honey. GLMM revealed that the antibacterial effect of honey varied significantly between bacteria and floral origins. This effect increased with increasing of water content and reducing sugars in honey, but it significantly decreased with increase of honey EC. E. coli was the most sensitive species with an inhibition zone of 10.1 ± 4.7 mm, while C. perfringens was the less sensitive. Honeys dominated by pollen of Fabaceae sp. were most effective with an overall antimicrobial activity equals to 13.5 ± 4.7 mm. Conclusion: Saharan honeys, of certain botanical origins, have physicochemical and pollinic characteristics with relevant potential for antibacterial purposes. This encourages a more comprehensive characterization of honeys with in vivo and in vitro investigations. PMID:26594206

  18. Seed viability and germination success of Acacia tortilis along land-use and aridity gradients in the Eastern Sahara.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Gidske Leknæs; Krzywinski, Knut; Gjessing, Håkon K; Pierce, Richard Holton

    2016-01-01

    Our study focuses on the keystone species Acacia tortilis and is the first to investigate the effect of domestic ungulates and aridity on seed viability and germination over an extensive part of the Eastern Sahara. Bruchids infest its seeds and reduce their viability and germination, but ingestion by ruminant herbivores diminishes infestation levels and enhances/promotes seed viability and germination. The degree of these effects seems to be correlated with animal body mass. Significantly reduced numbers of wild ruminant ungulates have increased the potential importance of domestic animals and pastoral nomadism for the functionality of arid North African and Middle Eastern ecosystems. We sampled seeds (16,543) from A. tortilis in eight areas in three regions with different aridity and land use. We tested the effect of geography and sampling context on seed infestation using random effects logistic regressions. We did a randomized and balanced germination experiment including 1193 seeds, treated with different manure. Germination time and rates across geography, sampling context, and infestation status were analyzed using time-to-event analyses, Kaplan-Meier curves and proportional hazards Cox regressions. Bruchid infestation is very high (80%), and the effects of context are significant. Neither partial infestation nor adding manure had a positive effect on germination. There is a strong indication that intact, uningested seeds from acacia populations in the extremely arid Western Desert germinate more slowly and have a higher fraction of hard seeds than in the Eastern Desert and the Red Sea Hills. For ingested seeds in the pastoralist areas we find that intact seeds from goat dung germinate significantly better than those from camel dung. This is contrary to the expected body-mass effect. There is no effect of site or variation in tribal management. PMID:26811790

  19. Flash floods in the Sahara: A case study for the 28th January 2013 flood in Qena-Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawy, Moawad; Omar, Ahmed; Mamtimin, Buhalqem

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the torrential rainfall and its consequent surface runoff in the Sahara is a crucial issue for better flood protection and water management plans. This is often hampered by lack of the appropriate in situ measurements. Even now the satellite derived rainfall suffers from great uncertainty. Thus, we adjusted the data obtained from real-time satellite rainfall coverage (HYDIS) using the in situ observed rainfall (Robs). Hydro-morphological parameters were then integrated with the empirical curve number (CN) approach to estimate the surface runoff in Qena, Egypt during the 28th January 2013 flash flood event. We deduced that the study area received a total precipitation (∑Rcum) of ~35.6×106 [mm] and a total rain volume (∑Rvol) of ~88.9×109 [m3] mainly from wadi Qena (89.8%). The majority of the rainfalls fell at light intensity (<2.5 [mm hr-1]). The estimated total surface runoff (∑Qsur) was 26.5×106 mm and the total runoff volume (∑Qvol) was 66.2×106 [m3]. The total surface transmission losses (∑Tlos) were calculated as 9.1×106 [mm], which represents about 25.6% of the total precipitation (∑Rcum) and creates substantial opportunities for alluvial aquifer recharge. The total surface runoff (∑Qsur) and flood magnitude were generally low, therefore, flood influences were restricted to the destruction of some roads in Qena but no fatalities were involved, nevertheless. Most of the running water was contained by the El Sail Canal and poured into the Nile River. It is expected that the applied method in this study will be helpful for our understanding and quantification of flood hydrology and contribute to better risk management plan in the arid and hyper-arid regions.

  20. Crocodiles in the Sahara Desert: An Update of Distribution, Habitats and Population Status for Conservation Planning in Mauritania

    PubMed Central

    Brito, José C.; Martínez-Freiría, Fernando; Sierra, Pablo; Sillero, Neftalí; Tarroso, Pedro

    2011-01-01

    Background Relict populations of Crocodylus niloticus persist in Chad, Egypt and Mauritania. Although crocodiles were widespread throughout the Sahara until the early 20th century, increased aridity combined with human persecution led to local extinction. Knowledge on distribution, occupied habitats, population size and prey availability is scarce in most populations. This study evaluates the status of Saharan crocodiles and provides new data for Mauritania to assist conservation planning. Methodology/Principal Findings A series of surveys in Mauritania detected crocodile presence in 78 localities dispersed across 10 river basins and most tended to be isolated within river basins. Permanent gueltas and seasonal tâmoûrts were the most common occupied habitats. Crocodile encounters ranged from one to more than 20 individuals, but in most localities less than five crocodiles were observed. Larger numbers were observed after the rainy season and during night sampling. Crocodiles were found dead in between water points along dry river-beds suggesting the occurrence of dispersal. Conclusion/Significance Research priorities in Chad and Egypt should focus on quantifying population size and pressures exerted on habitats. The present study increased in by 35% the number of known crocodile localities in Mauritania. Gueltas are crucial for the persistence of mountain populations. Oscillations in water availability throughout the year and the small dimensions of gueltas affect biological traits, including activity and body size. Studies are needed to understand adaptation traits of desert populations. Molecular analyses are needed to quantify genetic variability, population sub-structuring and effective population size, and detect the occurrence of gene flow. Monitoring is needed to detect demographical and genetical trends in completely isolated populations. Crocodiles are apparently vulnerable during dispersal events. Awareness campaigns focusing on the vulnerability and

  1. Surface morphology and optical properties of porphyrin/Au and Au/porphyrin/Au systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalachyova, Yevgeniya; Lyutakov, Oleksiy; Solovyev, Andrey; Slepička, Petr; Švorčík, Vaclav

    2013-12-01

    Porphyrin/Au and Au/porphyrin/Au systems were prepared by vacuum evaporation and vacuum sputtering onto glass substrate. The surface morphology of as-prepared systems and those subjected to annealing at 160°C was studied by optical microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Absorption and luminescence spectra of as-prepared and annealed samples were measured. Annealing leads to disintegration of the initially continuous gold layer and formation of gold nanoclusters. An amplification of Soret band magnitude was observed on the Au/meso-tetraphenyl porphyrin (TPP) system in comparison with mere TPP. Additional enhancement of luminescence was observed after the sample annealing. In the case of sandwich Au/porphyrin/Au structure, suppression of one of the two porphyrins' luminescence maxima and sufficient enhancement of the second one were observed.

  2. Antibacterial Au nanostructured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wu, Songmei; Zuber, Flavia; Brugger, Juergen; Maniura-Weber, Katharina; Ren, Qun

    2016-02-01

    We present here a technological platform for engineering Au nanotopographies by templated electrodeposition on antibacterial surfaces. Three different types of nanostructures were fabricated: nanopillars, nanorings and nanonuggets. The nanopillars are the basic structures and are 50 nm in diameter and 100 nm in height. Particular arrangement of the nanopillars in various geometries formed nanorings and nanonuggets. Flat surfaces, rough substrate surfaces, and various nanostructured surfaces were compared for their abilities to attach and kill bacterial cells. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a Gram-positive bacterial strain responsible for many infections in health care system, was used as the model bacterial strain. It was found that all the Au nanostructures, regardless their shapes, exhibited similar excellent antibacterial properties. A comparison of live cells attached to nanotopographic surfaces showed that the number of live S. aureus cells was <1% of that from flat and rough reference surfaces. Our micro/nanofabrication process is a scalable approach based on cost-efficient self-organization and provides potential for further developing functional surfaces to study the behavior of microbes on nanoscale topographies. PMID:26648134

  3. REMOVAL OF CHEMICAL AND MICROBIAL CONTAMINANTS IN DRINKING WATER - WATTS PREMIER M-2400 POINT-OF-ENTRY REVERSE OSMOSIS DRINKINGWATER TREATMENT SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Watts Premier M-2400 POE RO Drinking Water Treatment System was tested at the NSF Drinking Water Treatment Systems Laboratory for removal of the viruses fr and MS2, the bacteria Brevundimonas diminuta, and chemicals aldicarb, benzene, cadmium, carbofuran, cesium, chl...

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, REMOVAL OF ARSENIC IN DRINKING WATER: WATTS PREMIER M-SERIES M-15,000 REVERSE OSMOSIS TREATMENT SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Verification testing of the Watts Premier M-Series M-15,000 RO Treatment System was conducted over a 31-day period from April 26, 2004, through May 26, 2004. This test was conducted at the Coachella Valley Water District (CVWD) Well 7802 in Thermal, California. The source water...

  5. 26Al-26Mg systematics in D’Orbigny and Sahara 99555 angrites: Implications for high-resolution chronology using extinct chronometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spivak-Birndorf, Lev; Wadhwa, Meenakshi; Janney, Philip

    2009-09-01

    We report on an investigation of the 26Al- 26Mg isotope systematics in the D'Orbigny and Sahara 99555 angrites. High precision Mg isotope compositions and Al/Mg ratios were measured in mineral separates and whole rock samples from D'Orbigny and Sahara 99555 using multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICPMS). Plagioclase separates from both angrites have resolvable excesses in 26Mg ( Δ26Mg) that correlate with their respective Al/Mg ratios. 26Al- 26Mg systematics in the mineral separates and whole rocks define precise isochrons that correspond to 26Al/ 27Al ratios of (5.06 ± 0.92) × 10 -7 and (5.13 ± 1.90) × 10 -7 and initial Δ26Mg values of -0.006 ± 0.040‰ and -0.016 ± 0.047‰ for D'Orbigny and Sahara 99555, respectively. The slopes and initial Δ26Mg values are identical for these two meteorites within errors and the data for both angrites considered together define an isochron corresponding to a 26Al/ 27Al ratio of (5.10 ± 0.55) × 10 -7 and initial Δ26Mg value of -0.012 ± 0.019. Relative to the Efremovka E60 CAI, the 26Al/ 27Al values reported here for these angrites imply 26Al- 26Mg ages of 4562.42 ± 0.29 Ma and 4562.43 ± 0.53 Ma for D'Orbigny and Sahara 99555, respectively. These 26Al- 26Mg ages are concordant with model ages determined using other extinct radionuclide chronometers (e.g., 53Mn- 53Cr and 182Hf- 182W), but are ˜2 Myr younger than the absolute 207Pb- 206Pb ages that have been reported recently for these angrites. The reason for this discrepancy is not presently known, but may imply disturbance of one or more of the isotope systems under consideration or a possible bias in the 207Pb- 206Pb ages of the angrites resulting from natural or analytical causes.

  6. Simulating Quaternary African Environments and the Green Sahara through dynamic coupling of Land Surface and Atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrow, Aidan; Singarayer, Joy; Valdes, Paul

    2010-05-01

    Paleoclimate records from Late Quaternary Africa imply rapid and spatially complex shifts between wet and dry conditions. There is abundant evidence that during numerous incursions in the past the extent of deserts, lakes and rivers is not static. In this work we use an asynchronously coupled atmosphere and vegetation model to investigate our current ability to model Quaternary Africa. We iterate the vegetation scheme BIOME with the Hadley Centre model and explore the changing relationship between African vegetation and climate over the last deglaciation. During the last deglaciation large amplitude perturbations of the African climate occurred, linked to orbitally forced changes in monsoon strength. Beginning and ending abruptly 7000 and 4000 years BP, a widespread greening of the Sahara is recorded in numerous paleoclimate archives. This greening represents the largest anomaly in the atmosphere-biosphere system in the last 12,000 years. Atmospheric models alone have failed to reproduce the extent of humidity change. Work by Claussen (1994) and Claussen and Gayler (1997) made large leaps forward by incorporating a dynamic vegetation model into simulations of the African Quaternary. Their work suggests that under some conditions multiple equilibria may exist in the atmosphere-biosphere system, providing a mechanism for rapid change. In this work we apply a similar method to an extensive suite of time slices from the last glacial maximum to the present. We investigate how the role of surface feedbacks in the climate system change through time by employing the Hadley Centre's atmosphere-only model HadAM3 with the BIOME model of Prentice et al (1992) and consider surface hydrology feedbacks using the surface water scheme HYDRA (Coe 1998). Equilibrium time slices across the deglacation are run for pre-industrial, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18, 21 and 24 kyr B.P. climates. Simulations are started with standard vegetation distributions and repeated with rainforest and desert

  7. Significance of ground-water chemistry in performance of North Sahara Tube wells in Algeria and Tunisia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clarke, Frank Eldridge; Jones, Blair F.

    1972-01-01

    Nine ground-water samples from the principal shallow and deep North Sahara aquifers of Algeria and Tunisia were examined to determine the relation of their chemical composition to corrosion and mineral encrustation thought to be contributing to observed decline in well capacities within a UNESCO/UNDP Special Fund Project area. Although the shallow and deep waters differ significantly in certain quality factors, all are sulfochloride types with corrosion potentials ranging from moderate to extreme. None appear to be sufficiently supersaturated with troublesome mineral species to cause rapid or severe encrustation of filter pipes or other well parts. However, calcium carbonate encrustation of deep-well cooling towers and related irrigation pipes can be expected because of loss of carbon dioxide and water during evaporative cooling. Corrosion products, particularly iron sulfide, can be expected to deposit in wells producing waters from the deep aquifers. This could reduce filterpipe openings and increase casing roughness sufficiently to cause significant reduction in well capacity. It seems likely, however, that normal pressure reduction due to exploitation of the artesian systems is a more important control of well performance. If troublesome corrosion and related encrustation are confirmed by downhole inspection, use of corrosion-resisting materials, such as fiber-glass casing and saw-slotted filter pipe (shallow wells only), or stainless-steel screen, will minimize the effects of the waters represented by these samples. A combination of corrosion-resisting stainless steel filter pipe electrically insulated from the casing with a nonconductive spacer and cathodic protection will minimize external corrosion of steel casing, if this is found to be a problem. However, such installations are difficult to make in very deep wells and difficult to control in remote areas. Both the shallow waters and the deep waters examined in this study will tend to cause soil

  8. Genesis and Paleo-ecological Interpretation of Swamp Ore Deposits at Sahara Paleo-lakes of East Niger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felix-Henningsen, Peter

    In formerly vegetated flat lake-shore areas of Pleistocene and Holocene paleo-lake depressions in the Sahara of East Niger (Ténéré, Tchigai mountains and in the Erg of Bilma), ancient dune sands are covered by rampart-like or flat beds of individual or networked rhizoconcretions. The massive goethite accumulation, which partly includes an outer fringe of lepidocrocite, impregnated the ancient dune sands. Apart from Fe, P, Ca, and Mg, other heavy metals were also concentrated. The formation and morphological differentiation of these swamp ores were generally bound at vegetated shallow water areas of paleo-lakes in ancient dune fields. Accordingly, the swamp ores of the Ténéré, which has flat to undulating relief, display a large dissemination. In contrast, in the Erg of Bilma the high altitude and steep slopes of ancient dune ridges led to steeper shore areas of the paleo-lakes, at which beds of rhizoconcretions were unable to develop. The oxides were formed by oxidation of Fe2 + -ions from the lake water and concentrated around the roots in the upper root zone of the swamp vegetation. The lack of oxygen in the warm lake water of the shore region, as well as the decomposition of vegetation residues, excluded high redox potentials within the deeper water near the subhydric soil surface. Hence, the formation of rhizoconcretions can only be explained by the specific physiological characteristics of the swamp vegetation, which was able to supply oxygen to the roots through an aerenchyma. The release of surplus oxygen from such roots obviously caused high redox potentials at the root surface and in the neighbouring root environment. As a result precipitation of Fe and Mn oxides occurred, which adsorbed nutrients and heavy metals from the soil solution. The redistribution of the ions from the reduced sediments of the lake basin into the root zone of the shore area resulted from diffusion and mass flow. Paleo-climatically, the swamp ore deposits denote humid periods

  9. Learning Curve Assessment of Robot-Assisted Radical Prostatectomy Compared with Open-Surgery Controls from the Premier Perspective Database

    PubMed Central

    Kreaden, Usha S.; Gabbert, Jessica; Thomas, Raju

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: The primary aims of this study were to assess the learning curve effect of robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) in a large administrative database consisting of multiple U.S. hospitals and surgeons, and to compare the results of RARP with open radical prostatectomy (ORP) from the same settings. Materials and Methods: The patient population of study was from the Premier Perspective Database (Premier, Inc., Charlotte, NC) and consisted of 71,312 radical prostatectomies performed at more than 300 U.S. hospitals by up to 3739 surgeons by open or robotic techniques from 2004 to 2010. The key endpoints were surgery time, inpatient length of stay, and overall complications. We compared open versus robotic, results by year of procedures, results by case volume of specific surgeons, and results of open surgery in hospitals with and without a robotic system. Results: The mean surgery time was longer for RARP (4.4 hours, standard deviation [SD] 1.7) compared with ORP (3.4 hours, SD 1.5) in the same hospitals (p<0.0001). Inpatient stay was shorter for RARP (2.2 days, SD 1.9) compared with ORP (3.2 days, SD 2.7) in the same hospitals (p<0.0001). The overall complications were less for RARP (10.6%) compared with ORP (15.8%) in the same hospitals, as were transfusion rates. ORP results in hospitals without a robot were not better than ORP with a robot, and pretreatment co-morbidity profiles were similar in all cohorts. Trending of results by year of procedure showed no differences in the three cohorts, but trending of RARP results by surgeon experience showed improvements in surgery time, hospital stay, conversion rates, and complication rates. Conclusions: During the initial 7 years of RARP development, outcomes showed decreased hospital stay, complications, and transfusion rates. Learning curve trends for RARP were evident for these endpoints when grouped by surgeon experience, but not by year of surgery. PMID:24350787

  10. Au20: A Tetrahedral Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jun; Li, Xi; Zhai, Hua Jin; Wang, Lai S.

    2003-02-07

    Photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that a 20 atom gold cluster has an extremely large energy gap, which is even greater than that of C60, and an electron affinity comparable with that of C60. This observation suggests that the Au20 cluster must be extremely stable and chemically inert. Using relativistic density functional calculations, we found that Au20 possesses a remarkable tetrahedral structure, which is a fragment of the bulk face-centered cubic lattice of gold with a small structural relaxation. Au20 is thus a true cluster molecule, while at the same time it is exactly part of the bulk, but with very different properties. The tetrahedral Au20 may possess interesting catalytic properties and may be synthesized in bulk quantity or assembled on non-interacting surfaces.

  11. The Double Burden of Obesity and Malnutrition in a Protracted Emergency Setting: A Cross-Sectional Study of Western Sahara Refugees

    PubMed Central

    Grijalva-Eternod, Carlos S.; Wells, Jonathan C. K.; Cortina-Borja, Mario; Salse-Ubach, Nuria; Tondeur, Mélody C.; Dolan, Carmen; Meziani, Chafik; Wilkinson, Caroline; Spiegel, Paul; Seal, Andrew J.

    2012-01-01

    Background Households from vulnerable groups experiencing epidemiological transitions are known to be affected concomitantly by under-nutrition and obesity. Yet, it is unknown to what extent this double burden affects refugee populations dependent on food assistance. We assessed the double burden of malnutrition among Western Sahara refugees living in a protracted emergency. Methods and Findings We implemented a stratified nutrition survey in October–November 2010 in the four Western Sahara refugee camps in Algeria. We sampled 2,005 households, collecting anthropometric measurements (weight, height, and waist circumference) in 1,608 children (6–59 mo) and 1,781 women (15–49 y). We estimated the prevalence of global acute malnutrition (GAM), stunting, underweight, and overweight in children; and stunting, underweight, overweight, and central obesity in women. To assess the burden of malnutrition within households, households were first classified according to the presence of each type of malnutrition. Households were then classified as undernourished, overweight, or affected by the double burden if they presented members with under-nutrition, overweight, or both, respectively. The prevalence of GAM in children was 9.1%, 29.1% were stunted, 18.6% were underweight, and 2.4% were overweight; among the women, 14.8% were stunted, 53.7% were overweight or obese, and 71.4% had central obesity. Central obesity (47.2%) and overweight (38.8%) in women affected a higher proportion of households than did GAM (7.0%), stunting (19.5%), or underweight (13.3%) in children. Overall, households classified as overweight (31.5%) were most common, followed by undernourished (25.8%), and then double burden–affected (24.7%). Conclusions The double burden of obesity and under-nutrition is highly prevalent in households among Western Sahara refugees. The results highlight the need to focus more attention on non-communicable diseases in this population and balance obesity prevention

  12. Geomorphologic approach for modelling the surface features of arid environments in a model of dust emissions: application to the Sahara desert

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callot, Yann; Marticorena, Béatrice; Bergametti, Gilles

    Mineral dust emissions from arid regions are influenced by the surface features encountered in the source regions. These surface features control both the erosion threshold and the intensity of the dust flux. Recently, a soil-derived dust emission scheme has been designed in order to provide an explicit representation of the mineral dust accounting for the influence of the surface features on the dust emissions. This physical scheme has been validated with micro-scale field measurements. Its large scale application has required the development of additional relations to estimate the input parameters from more accessible data: the mean height and the covering rate of the roughness elements and the mineralogical soil type. The determination of these surface data has been based on a geomorphologic approach which describes the surface features of arid areas in a 1 × 1° grid. Inside each square degree, up to five different areas characterised by different surface features have been distinguished. However, these areas have not been located inside the square degree. Each area can be constituted by several combined surface features, including roughness, vegetation, granulometry. Five main types of landscapes and eight main types of surface features have been distinguished. This approach is based on the combination of various data, mainly topographical, geological maps and climatological analysis. In addition to the problem of scale transfer, the main constraints to obtain a quantitative assessment are the confidence level of the existing data and the number of parameters to document. On the opposite, with this method, the fine scale required by the dust modelling can be separated from the scale accessible by the mapping approach, of the order of the square degree. This method can also be easily improved by aggregating new data and can be extended to other deserts. An example of application is given for the north-west of the Algerian Sahara where the method has been

  13. Interfacial nanodroplets guided construction of hierarchical Au, Au-Pt, and Au-Pd particles as excellent catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Aijing; Xu, Jie; Zhang, Xuehua; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Dayang; Xu, Haolan

    2014-01-01

    Interfacial nanodroplets were grafted to the surfaces of self-sacrificed template particles in a galvanic reaction system to assist the construction of 3D Au porous structures. The interfacial nanodroplets were formed via direct adsorption of surfactant-free emulsions onto the particle surfaces. The interfacial nanodroplets discretely distributed at the template particle surfaces and served as soft templates to guide the formation of porous Au structures. The self-variation of footprint sizes of interfacial nanodroplets during Au growth gave rise to a hierarchical pore size distribution of the obtained Au porous particles. This strategy could be easily extended to synthesize bimetal porous particles such as Au-Pt and Au-Pd. The obtained porous Au, Au-Pt, and Au-Pd particles showed excellent catalytic activity in catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol. PMID:24797697

  14. Interfacial nanodroplets guided construction of hierarchical Au, Au-Pt, and Au-Pd particles as excellent catalysts.

    PubMed

    Ma, Aijing; Xu, Jie; Zhang, Xuehua; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Dayang; Xu, Haolan

    2014-01-01

    Interfacial nanodroplets were grafted to the surfaces of self-sacrificed template particles in a galvanic reaction system to assist the construction of 3D Au porous structures. The interfacial nanodroplets were formed via direct adsorption of surfactant-free emulsions onto the particle surfaces. The interfacial nanodroplets discretely distributed at the template particle surfaces and served as soft templates to guide the formation of porous Au structures. The self-variation of footprint sizes of interfacial nanodroplets during Au growth gave rise to a hierarchical pore size distribution of the obtained Au porous particles. This strategy could be easily extended to synthesize bimetal porous particles such as Au-Pt and Au-Pd. The obtained porous Au, Au-Pt, and Au-Pd particles showed excellent catalytic activity in catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol. PMID:24797697

  15. Health and economic outcomes associated with uncontrolled surgical bleeding: a retrospective analysis of the Premier Perspectives Database

    PubMed Central

    Corral, Mitra; Ferko, Nicole; Hollmann, Sarah; Broder, Michael S; Chang, Eunice

    2015-01-01

    Background Bleeding remains a common occurrence in surgery. Data describing the burden of difficult-to-control bleeding and topical absorbable hemostat use are sparse. This study was conducted to estimate the clinical and economic impact that remains associated with uncontrolled surgical bleeding, even when hemostats are used during surgery. Methods This US retrospective analysis used the Premier Perspectives Database. Hospital discharges from 2012 were used to identify patients treated with hemostats during eight surgery types. Patients were included if they were ≥18 years, had an inpatient hospitalization with one of the eight surgeries, and received a hemostat on the day of surgery. Patients were stratified by procedure and presence or absence of major bleeding (uncontrolled) despite hemostat use. Outcomes were all-cause hospitalization costs, hemostat costs, length of stay, reoperation, and surgery-related complications (eg, mortality). Statistical significance was tested through chi-square or t-tests. Multivariate analyses were conducted for all-cause costs and length of stay using analysis of covariance. Results Among 25,048 procedures, major bleeding events occurred in 14,251 cases. Despite treatment with hemostats, major bleeding occurred in 32%–68% of cases. All-cause costs were significantly higher in patients with uncontrolled bleeding despite hemostat use versus controlled bleeding (US$24,203–$61,323 [uncontrolled], US$14,420–$45,593 [controlled]; P<0.001). Hemostat costs were significantly greater in the uncontrolled bleeding cohort for all surgery types except cystectomy and pancreatic surgery. Reoperation and mortality rates were significantly higher in the uncontrolled bleeding cohort in all surgical procedures except cystectomy and radical hysterectomy. Conclusion Uncontrolled intraoperative bleeding despite hemostat use is prevalent and associated with significantly higher hospital costs and worse clinical outcomes across several surgical

  16. Analysis of Diagnoses Associated with Multiple Sclerosis–Related In-Hospital Mortality Using the Premier Hospital Database

    PubMed Central

    Pocoski, Jennifer; Cutter, Gary; Kaufman, David W.; Pleimes, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Background: We sought to compare mortality rates and related diagnoses in hospitalized patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), those with diabetes mellitus (DM), and the general hospitalized population (GHP). Methods: Patients who died between 2007 and 2011 were identified in the US hospital–based Premier Healthcare Database. Demographic information was collected, mortality rates calculated, and principal diagnoses categorized. Results: Of 55,152 unique patients with MS identified, 1518 died. Mean age at death was 10 years younger for the MS group (63.4 years) than for the DM (73.3 years) and GHP (73.1 years) groups. Age-adjusted mortality rates, based on the 2000 US Standard Million Population, were 1077, 1248, and 1133 per 100,000, respectively. Infection was the most common principal diagnosis at the hospital stay during which the patient died in the MS cohort (43.1% vs. 26.3% and 24.0% in the DM and GHP groups, respectively). Other common principal diagnoses in the MS group included pulmonary (17.5%) and cardiovascular (12.1%) disease. Septicemia/sepsis/septic shock was a secondary diagnosis for 50.7% of patients with MS versus 36.0% and 31.0% of patients in the DM and GHP cohorts, respectively. Conclusions: Patients with MS had a shorter life span than patients with DM or the GHP and were more likely to have a principal diagnosis of infection at their final hospital stay. However, the database was limited to codes recorded in the hospital; diagnoses received outside the hospital were not captured. PMID:27252603

  17. Examining the External Training Load of an English Premier League Football Team With Special Reference to Acceleration.

    PubMed

    Akenhead, Richard; Harley, Jamie A; Tweddle, Simon P

    2016-09-01

    Akenhead, R, Harley, J, and Tweddle, S. Examining the external training load of an English Premier League football team with special reference to acceleration. J Strength Cond Res 30(9): 2424-2432, 2016-Practitioners and coaches often use external training load variables such as distance run and the number of high-speed running (HSR) activities to quantify football training. However, an important component of the external load may be overlooked when acceleration activities are not considered. The aim of this study was to describe the within-microcycle distribution of external load, including acceleration, during in-season 1-game weeks in an elite football team. Global Positioning System technology was used to collect time-motion data from 12 representative 7-day microcycles across a competitive season (48 training days, 295 data sets). Training time, total distance (TD), high-speed running (HSR) distance (>5.8 m·s), sprint running distance (>6.7 m·s) and acceleration variables were recorded during each training session. Data were analysed for interday and interposition differences using mixed linear modeling. The distribution of external load was characterized by the second training day of the microcycle (5 days prematch) exhibiting the highest values for all variables of training load, with the fourth day (1 day prematch) exhibiting the lowest values. Central midfield players covered ∼8-16% greater TD than other positions excluding wide midfielders (p ≤ 0.03, d = 0.2-0.4) and covered ∼17% greater distance accelerating 1-2 m·s than central defenders (p = 0.03, d = 0.7). When expressed relative to training duration and TD, the magnitude of interday and interposition differences were markedly reduced (p = 0.03, d = 0.2-0.3). When managing the distribution of training load, practitioners should be aware of the intensity of training sessions and consider the density of external load within sessions. PMID:26817740

  18. Symmetry energy from elliptic flow in 197Au + 197Au

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russotto, P.; Wu, P. Z.; Zoric, M.; Chartier, M.; Leifels, Y.; Lemmon, R. C.; Li, Q.; Łukasik, J.; Pagano, A.; Pawłowski, P.; Trautmann, W.

    2011-03-01

    The elliptic-flow ratio of neutrons with respect to protons or light complex particles in reactions of neutron-rich systems at relativistic energies is proposed as an observable sensitive to the strength of the symmetry term in the equation of state at supra-normal densities. The results obtained from the existing FOPI/LAND data for 197Au + 197Au collisions at 400 MeV/nucleon in comparison with the UrQMD model favor a moderately soft symmetry term with a density dependence of the potential term proportional to (ρ /ρ0) γ with γ = 0.9 ± 0.4.

  19. Flow in Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belt Tonjes, Marguerite; PHOBOS Collaboration; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Holynski, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Wozniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wyslouch, B.

    2004-08-01

    The study of flow can provide information on the initial state dynamics and the degree of equilibration attained in heavy-ion collisions. This contribution presents results for both elliptic and directed flow as determined from data recorded by the PHOBOS experiment in Au+Au runs at RHIC at \\sqrt{s_{{\\rm NN}}} = 19.6, 130 and 200 GeV. The PHOBOS detector provides a unique coverage in pseudorapidity for measuring flow at RHIC. The systematic dependence of flow on pseudorapidity, transverse momentum, centrality and energy is discussed.

  20. PALEODRAINAGES OF THE EASTERN SAHARA - THE RADAR RIVERS REVISITED (SIR - A/B IMPLICATIONS FOR A MID - TERTIARY TRANS - AFRICAN DRAINAGE SYSTEM).

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCauley, John F.; Breed, Carlos S.; Schaber, Gerald G.; McHugh, William P.; Issawi, Bahay; Haynes, C. Vance; Grolier, Maurice J.; El Kilani, Ali

    1986-01-01

    A complex history of Cenozoic fluvial activity in the presently hyperarid eastern Sahara is inferred from Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR) data and postflight field investigations in southwest Egypt and northwest Sudan. SIR images were coregistered with Landsat and existing maps as a guide to exploration of the buried paleodrainages (radar rivers) first discovered by SIR-A. Field observations explain the radar responses of three types of radar rivers: RR-1, RR-2, and RR-3. A generalized model of the radar rivers, based on field studies and regional geologic relations, shows apparent changes in river regimen since the large valleys were established during the late Paleogene-early Neogene eras. SIR-based mapping of these paleodrainages, although incomplete, reveals missing links in an area once thought to be devoid of master streams.

  1. Screening for Genes Coding for Putative Antitumor Compounds, Antimicrobial and Enzymatic Activities from Haloalkalitolerant and Haloalkaliphilic Bacteria Strains of Algerian Sahara Soils

    PubMed Central

    Selama, Okba; Amos, Gregory C. A.; Djenane, Zahia; Borsetto, Chiara; Laidi, Rabah Forar; Porter, David; Nateche, Farida; Wellington, Elizabeth M. H.; Hacène, Hocine

    2014-01-01

    Extreme environments may often contain unusual bacterial groups whose physiology is distinct from those of normal environments. To satisfy the need for new bioactive pharmaceuticals compounds and enzymes, we report here the isolation of novel bacteria from an extreme environment. Thirteen selected haloalkalitolerant and haloalkaliphilic bacteria were isolated from Algerian Sahara Desert soils. These isolates were screened for the presence of genes coding for putative antitumor compounds using PCR based methods. Enzymatic, antibacterial, and antifungal activities were determined by using cultural dependant methods. Several of these isolates are typical of desert and alkaline saline soils, but, in addition, we report for the first time the presence of a potential new member of the genus Nocardia with particular activity against the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In addition to their haloalkali character, the presence of genes coding for putative antitumor compounds, combined with the antimicrobial activity against a broad range of indicator strains and their enzymatic potential, makes them suitable for biotechnology applications. PMID:24977147

  2. Sedimentological evidences for progressive drying of the Sahara during the last 6000 years from the annually laminated record of Lake Yoa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francus, Pierre; von Suchodoletz, Hans; Dietze, Michael; Verschuren, Dirk; Kröpelin, Stefan

    2010-05-01

    Lake Yoa is a perennial lake entirely fed by groundwater and located in the Saharan desert of Northern Chad. It contains a unique continuous and high-resolution record of the climate history of the eastern Sahara for the last 6000 years (Kröpelin et al. 2008). Analyses of aquatic and terrestrial paleoecosystems revealed a slow and progressive drying of the region since mid-Holocene (Kröpelin et al. 2008 and Eggermont 2008). Here, we describe the sedimentological evolution of this finely laminated, undisturbed, 7.5 m-long sequence. Comparison of lamination counts with radiocarbon and 137-Cs dates indicates that these couplets are annual, i.e. varves. Counts were made using Fe, and Ca/Ti profiles as well as radiographs acquired using an Itrax µ-XRF core scanner with 100 µ resolution. Three facies could be distinguished. From 6 ka until 1.1 ka, couplets are: (1) a dark brown layer composed of organic matter, aeolian sands and finer detrital material; (2) a light brown layer of neoformed calcite. After 1.1 ka, couplets are formed by (1) a detrital layer consisting of a mixture of aeolian and resuspended material rich in both Fe and Ca and (2) organic-rich material. The change in varve facies corresponds to an abrupt decrease in Ca content and the simultaneous disappearance of neoformed calcite. This may be attributed to exhaustion of carbonate sources in the aquifer or surrounding dry lake beds as well as to a decrease of primary productivity triggering the precipitation of neoformed calcite. The laminated facies are intercalated with the third facies, of which there are relatively few. It consists of few coarser beds indicative of higher energy events due to changes in lake level or dune migration towards the coring site. Magnetic susceptibility broadly increases from bottom to top and may be indicative of the combined effect of changes in the sediment source and redox conditions in the water column. The clay fraction is interpreted to be of aeolian or fluvial

  3. Applying the concept of "energy return on investment" to desert greening of the Sahara/Sahel using a global climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowring, S. P. K.; Miller, L. M.; Ganzeveld, L.; Kleidon, A.

    2014-01-01

    Altering the large-scale dynamics of the Earth system through continual and deliberate human intervention now seems possible. In doing so, one should question the energetic sustainability of such interventions. Here, from the basis that a region might be unnaturally vegetated by employing technological means, we apply the metric of "energy return on investment" (EROI) to benchmark the energetic sustainability of such a scenario. We do this by applying EROI to a series of global climate model simulations where the entire Sahara/Sahel region is irrigated with increased rates of desalinated water to produce biomass. The energy content of this biomass is greater than the energy input rate for a minimum irrigation rate of about 200 mm yr-1 in the winter and 500 mm yr-1 in the summer, thereby yielding an EROI ratio >1 : 1, expressing energetic sustainability. Quantified annually, the EROI was >1 : 1 for irrigation rates more than 500 mm yr-1, progressively increasing to a maximum of 1.8 : 1 with 900 mm yr-1, and then decreasing with further increases in the irrigation rate. Including the precipitation feedback arising from changes in moisture recycling within the study region approximately doubles these EROI ratios. This overall result varies spatially and temporally, so while the entire Sahara/Sahel region is irrigated equally, the western coastal region from June to August had the highest EROI. Other factors would complicate such a large-scale modification of the Earth system, but this sensitivity study concludes that with a required energy input, desert greening may be energetically sustainable. More specifically, we have shown how this type of EROI analysis could be applied as a metric to assess a diverse range of human alterations to, and interventions within, the Earth system.

  4. Primary Premier for Belfast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McAlister, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The author talks about the Association for Science Education (ASE) Primary Science Committee's (PSC) March 2009 meeting which was held in Belfast as guests of ASE Northern Ireland. To mark the auspicious occasion of a body that usually meets four times a year in the Hatfield HQ crossing the Irish Sea to be hosted by its Celtic cousins, a Lord…

  5. Tier-specific evolution of match performance characteristics in the English Premier League: it's getting tougher at the top.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Paul S; Archer, David T; Hogg, Bob; Schuth, Gabor; Bush, Michael; Carling, Chris; Barnes, Chris

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the evolution of physical and technical performances in the English Premier League (EPL), with special reference to league ranking. Match performance observations (n = 14,700) were collected using a multiple-camera computerised tracking system across seven consecutive EPL seasons (2006-07 to 2012-13). Final league rankings were classified into Tiers: (A) 1st-4th ranking (n = 2519), (B) 5th-8th ranking (n = 2965), (C) 9th-14th ranking (n = 4448) and (D) 15th-20th ranking (n = 4768). Teams in Tier B demonstrated moderate increases in high-intensity running distance while in ball possession from the 2006-07 to 2012-13 season (P < 0.001; effect size [ES]: 0.68), with Tiers A, C and D producing less pronounced increases across the same period (P < 0.005; ES: 0.26, 0.41 and 0.33, respectively). Large increases in sprint distance were observed from the 2006-07 to 2012-13 season for Tier B (P < 0.001; ES: 1.21), while only moderate increases were evident for Tiers A, C and D (P < 0.001; ES: 0.75, 0.97 and 0.84, respectively). Tier B demonstrated large increases in the number of passes performed and received in 2012-13 compared to 2006-07 (P < 0.001; ES: 1.32-1.53) with small-to-moderate increases in Tier A (P < 0.001; ES: 0.30-0.38), Tier C (P < 0.001; ES: 0.46-0.54) and Tier D (P < 0.001; ES: 0.69-0.87). The demarcation line between 4th (bottom of Tier A) and 5th ranking (top of Tier B) in the 2006-07 season was 8 points, but this decreased to just a single point in the 2012-13 season. The data demonstrate that physical and technical performances have evolved more in Tier B than any other Tier in the EPL and could indicate a narrowing of the performance gap between the top two Tiers. PMID:26359805

  6. L’évaluation et le traitement du nourrisson exposé au virus d’immunodéficience humaine de type 1

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    RÉSUMÉ Dans les pays industrialisés, des soins et un traitement sont offerts aux femmes enceintes et aux nourrissons, afin de faire chuter à 2 % ou moins le taux d’infection périnatale au virus d’immunodéficience humaine de type 1 (VIH-1). Le pédiatre joue un rôle de premier plan dans la prévention de la transmission du VIH-1 de la mère à l’enfant par le dépistage des nourrissons exposés au VIH dont l’infection au VIH de la mère n’a pas été diagnostiquée avant l’accouchement. Il prescrit une prophylaxie antirétrovirale à ces nourrissons, afin de réduire le risque d’acquisition de l’infection au VIH-1 et d’en éviter le plus possible la transmission par le lait maternel. De plus, le pédiatre peut soigner les nourrissons exposés au VIH-1 en les surveillant pour obtenir un dépistage précoce de l’infection au VIH-1 et évaluer les toxicités à court et à long terme de l’exposition aux antirétroviraux, assurer une chimioprophylaxie de la pneumonie à Pneumocystis et soutenir les familles qui vivent avec une infection au VIH-1, grâce à des conseils thérapeutiques aux parents ou aux soignants.

  7. Towards Improving our Understanding on the Retrievals of Key Parameters Characterising Land Surface Interactions from Space: Introduction & First Results from the PREMIER-EO Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, Gareth; North, Matthew R.; Petropoulos, George P.; Srivastava, Prashant K.; Hodges, Crona

    2015-04-01

    Acquiring accurate information on the spatio-temporal variability of soil moisture content (SM) and evapotranspiration (ET) is of key importance to extend our understanding of the Earth system's physical processes, and is also required in a wide range of multi-disciplinary research studies and applications. The utility and applicability of Earth Observation (EO) technology provides an economically feasible solution to derive continuous spatio-temporal estimates of key parameters characterising land surface interactions, including ET as well as SM. Such information is of key value to practitioners, decision makers and scientists alike. The PREMIER-EO project recently funded by High Performance Computing Wales (HPCW) is a research initiative directed towards the development of a better understanding of EO technology's present ability to derive operational estimations of surface fluxes and SM. Moreover, the project aims at addressing knowledge gaps related to the operational estimation of such parameters, and thus contribute towards current ongoing global efforts towards enhancing the accuracy of those products. In this presentation we introduce the PREMIER-EO project, providing a detailed overview of the research aims and objectives for the 1 year duration of the project's implementation. Subsequently, we make available the initial results of the work carried out herein, in particular, related to an all-inclusive and robust evaluation of the accuracy of existing operational products of ET and SM from different ecosystems globally. The research outcomes of this project, once completed, will provide an important contribution towards addressing the knowledge gaps related to the operational estimation of ET and SM. This project results will also support efforts ongoing globally towards the operational development of related products using technologically advanced EO instruments which were launched recently or planned be launched in the next 1-2 years. Key Words: PREMIER

  8. Universality in fragment inclusive yields from Au+Au collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Insolia, A.; Tuvè, C.; Albergo, S.; Bieser, F.; Brady, F. P.; Caccia, Z.; Cebra, D.; Chacon, A. D.; Chance, J. L.; Choi, Y.; Costa, S.; Elliott, J. B.; Gilkes, M.; Hauger, J. A.; Hirsch, A. S.; Hjort, E. L.; Justice, M.; Keane, D.; Kintner, J.; Lisa, M.; Matis, H. S.; McMahan, M.; McParland, C.; Olson, D. L.; Partlan, M. D.; Porile, N. T.; Potenza, R.; Rai, G.; Rasmussen, J.; Ritter, H. G.; Romero, J. L.; Russo, G. V.; Scharenberg, R.; Scott, A.; Shao, Y.; Srivastava, B. K.; Symons, T. J. M.; Tincknell, M. L.; Wang, S.; Warren, P. G.; Wieman, H. H.; Wolf, K. L.

    2001-11-01

    The inclusive light fragment (Z⩽7) yield data in Au+Au reactions, measured by the EOS Collaboration at the LBNL Bevalac, are presented and discussed. For peripheral collisions the measured charge distributions develop progressively according to a power law which can be fitted by a single τ exponent independently of the bombarding energy in the range 250-1200 A MeV. In addition to this universal feature, we observe that the location of the maximum in the individual yields of different charged fragments shift towards lower multiplicity as the fragment charge increases from Z=3 to Z=7. This trend is common to all six measured beam energies. Moments of charge distributions and correlations among different moments are reported. Finally, the THe,DT thermometer has been constructed for central and peripheral collisions using the double yield ratios of He and D, T projectile fragments. The measured nuclear temperatures are in agreement with experimental findings in other fragmentation reactions.

  9. Global polarization measurement in Au+Au collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B.I.; Adams, J.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett,J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Bai,Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A.V.; Bravar, A.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai,X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Castillo, J.; Catu,O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen,H.F.; Chen, J.H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cosentino, M.R.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford,H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Daugherity, M.; de Moura, M.M.; Dedovich, T.G.; DePhillips, M.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho,P.; Dogra, S.M.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Mazumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W.R.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch,E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti,M.S.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.S.; Gorbunov, Y.G.; Gos,H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S.M.; Guimaraes, K.S.F.F.; Guo,Y.; Gupta, N.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J.W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte,B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A.M.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horner, M.J.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.W.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs,P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jiang, H.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khodyrev,V.Yu.; Kim, B.C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E.M.; Klein,S.R.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D.D.; et al.

    2007-08-02

    The system created in non-central relativisticnucleus-nucleus collisions possesses large orbital angular momentum. Dueto spin-orbit coupling, particles produced in such a system could becomeglobally polarized along the direction of the system angular momentum. Wepresent the results of Lambda and anti-Lambda hyperon global polarizationmeasurements in Au+Au collisions at sqrt sNN=62.4 GeV and 200 GeVperformed with the STAR detector at RHIC. The observed globalpolarization of Lambda and anti-Lambda hyperons in the STAR acceptance isconsistent with zero within the precision of the measurements. Theobtained upper limit, lbar P Lambda, anti-Lambda rbar<= 0.02, iscompared to the theoretical values discussed recently in theliterature.

  10. Nuclear Modification of Jet Fragmentation in Au+Au Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowan, Zachary; Phenix Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The characterization of energy in the quark gluon plasma is facilitated by measurements of modifications to the observed jet fragmentation. A favorable channel of study relies on direct photons created in the initial parton interactions of heavy ion collisions. Such a photon traverses the created medium unscathed and grants us a proxy for the transverse momentum of an away side jet. PHENIX Au+Au data recorded at √{sNN} = 200 GeV during RHIC run 14 benefit from the background rejection capability of the silicon vertex detector, enabling the extraction of a higher purity hadron signal. This advantage, combined with a larger integrated luminosity, allows previous PHENIX measurements of fragmentation functions to be extended to greater jet energies. In this talk, the status of the analysis of direct photon hadron correlations with the new data set will be discussed.

  11. Global polarization measurement in Au+Au collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sánchez, M. Calderón De La Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; Moura, M. M. De; Dedovich, T. G.; Dephillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gos, H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Horner, M. J.; Huang, H. Z.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E. M.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kowalik, K. L.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kumar, A.; Kurnadi, P.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; Lapointe, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C.-H.; Lehocka, S.; Levine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porile, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qattan, I. A.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Relyea, D.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Sazhin, P. S.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shen, W. Q.; Shimanskiy, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; Toledo, A. Szanto De; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Buren, G. Van; Kolk, N. Van Der; Leeuwen, M. Van; Molen, A. M. Vander; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; , C. Whitten, Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, J.; Wu, Y.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yue, Q.; Yurevich, V. I.; Zawisza, M.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, W. M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, Y.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, J.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zubarev, A. N.; Zuo, J. X.

    2007-08-01

    The system created in noncentral relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions possesses large orbital angular momentum. Because of spin-orbit coupling, particles produced in such a system could become globally polarized along the direction of the system angular momentum. We present the results of Λ and Λ¯ hyperon global polarization measurements in Au+Au collisions at sNN=62.4 and 200 GeV performed with the STAR detector at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The observed global polarization of Λ and Λ¯ hyperons in the STAR acceptance is consistent with zero within the precision of the measurements. The obtained upper limit, |PΛ,Λ¯|⩽0.02, is compared with the theoretical values discussed recently in the literature.

  12. d + Au hadron correlation measurements at PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    Anne M. Sickles

    2014-05-13

    In these proceedings, we discuss recent results from d + Au collisions in PHENIX ridge related measurements and their possible hydrodynamic origin. We present the v2 at midrapidity and measurements of the pseudorapidity dependence of the ridge, distinguishing between the d-going and Au-going directions. We investigate the possible geometrical origin by comparing v2 in d + Au to that in p + Pb, Au + Au and Pb + Pb collisions. Future plans to clarify the role of geometry in small collision systems at RHIC are discussed.

  13. Radiation, multiple dispersal and parallelism in the skinks, Chalcides and Sphenops (Squamata: Scincidae), with comments on Scincus and Scincopus and the age of the Sahara Desert.

    PubMed

    Carranza, S; Arnold, E N; Geniez, Ph; Roca, J; Mateo, J A

    2008-03-01

    Phylogenetic analysis using up to 1325 base pairs of mitochondrial DNA from 179 specimens and 30 species of Chalcides, Sphenops, Eumeces, Scincopus and Scincus indicates that Sphenops arose twice independently within Chalcides. It is consequently synonymized with that genus. Chalcides in this broader sense originated in Morocco, diversifying into four main clades about 10 Ma, after which some of its lineages dispersed widely to cover an area 40 times as large. Two separate lineages invaded the Canary Islands and at least five main lineages colonized southern Europe. At least five more spread across northern Africa, one extending into southwest Asia. Elongate bodies with reduced limbs have evolved at least four times in Chalcides, mesic 'grass-swimmers' being produced in one case and extensive adaptation to life in loose desert sand in two others. In clade, Chalcides striatus colonized SW Europe from NW Africa 2.6 Ma and C. chalcides mainland Italy 1.4 Ma, both invasions being across water, while C. c. vittatus reached Sardinia more recently, perhaps anthropogenically, and C. guentheri spread 1200km further east to Israel. C. minutus is a composite, with individuals from the type locality forming a long independent lineage and the remaining ones investigated being most closely related to C. mertensi. In the Northern clade, C. boulengeri and C. sepsoides spread east through sandy habitats north of the Sahara about 5 Ma, the latter reaching Egypt. C. bedriagai invaded Spain around the same time, perhaps during the Messinian period when the Mediterranean was dry, and shows considerable diversification. Although it is currently recognized as one species, the C. ocellatus clade exhibits as much phylogenetic depth as the other main clades of Chalcides, having at least six main lineages. These have independently invaded Malta and Sardinia from Tunisia and also southwest Arabia C. o. humilis appears to have spread over 4000 km through the Sahel, south of the Sahara quite

  14. Cometary Activity Beyond 4 AU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Womack, M.

    2000-10-01

    Recent observations of the distantly active comets 29 P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1, 2060 Chiron, and C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) are consistent with models that predict that the activity beyond 4 AU is dominated by outgassing of CO and CO2 molecules trapped in an amorphous water ice surface undergoing crystallization. The nominal CO production rates in Hale-Bopp, SW 1 and Chiron over the range of r = 4 to 9 AU are consistent with Q(CO) = (2.9+/-0.5)x1030r{(-2.5 +/- 0.1)}, with sporadic outbursts superimposed. The data indicate that the gas production rates in distant comets are primarily determined by the composition, and not the size, of the nucleus. The dust production rates, however, are very different among these comets and are not well-correlated with heliocentric distance. Thus, the gas and dust mixtures may not be uniform amongst these comets, nor in an individual comet. Development and sublimation of an icy grain coma at ~ 5 AU appears to be a common feature in distantly active comets. Sublimation of such icy grains is probably the main source of emission of OH, CH3OH, HCN, and H2S in comets beyond 4 AU. Studying the energetics of these phenomena provides an excellent opportunity to learn more about the composition and physical behavior of comet nuclei, as well as other icy bodies in the outer solar system, such as moons and Kuiper Belt Objects. This work was funded by the NSF CAREER Program.

  15. An improved atmosphere-surface model in Africa reveals the importance of vegetation and lakes in the Late Quaternary and Green Sahara periods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrow, A.; Singarayer, J. S.; Valdes, P. J.; B. R. I. D. G. E

    2011-12-01

    Paleoclimate records from Late Quaternary Africa imply high amplitude variability between wet and dry conditions. In this work, we use asynchronously coupled atmosphere and land surface models to investigate the mechanisms and feedbacks responsible for Northern Africa moisture fluctuations and find that model simulations are altered dramatically by the inclusion of land surface effects. During the last de-glaciation large amplitude perturbations of the African climate occurred linked to orbitaly forced changes in monsoon strength. Furthermore during the Holocene an abrupt and widespread greening of the Sahara is recorded in numerous paleoclimate archives. This greening represents the largest anomaly in the atmosphere-biosphere system in the last 12,000 years but is consistently misrepresented by modeling studies. Northern African climates are thought to highly sensitive to land surface feedbacks and it has been suggested that better representation of the land surface may improve model simulations. We investigate how the role of surface feedbacks in the climate system change over a uniquely extensive suite of time slice simulations from the last glacial maximum to the present. The Hadley Centre's atmosphere-only GCM, HadAM3 is asynchronously coupled with the equilibrium vegetation model BIOME (Prentice et al 1992) and surface hydrology feedbacks are considered using the surface water scheme HYDRA (Coe 1998). Equilibrium time slices are run at 3000 year intervals from the pre-industrial to 24 kyr B.P. This enables us to dissect the relative importance of orbital, vegetation and hydrologic systems in controlling the climate of Northern Africa across a complete spectrum of de-glacial to present climates. Although over millennial and longer time scales African water balance is steered by orbital configuration we show that the system is also affected by fluxes working across the land surface-atmosphere interface. Changes in the land surface cover seen by a GCM have a

  16. Gradual aridification of the Sahara during the last 11,000 years revealed by plant wax δD analyses of Lake Yoa (Chad)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rethemeyer, Janet; Kröpelin, Stefan; Karls, Jens; Thienemann, Matthias; Melles, Martin; Schefuß, Enno

    2014-05-01

    It is still an ongoing debate whether the transition of the last 'green Sahara' period to today's large desert during the Holocene, the African Humid Period (AHP), was a progressive or an abrupt change in hydrological conditions. Several climate records mainly from East Africa suggest a rapid decline of moisture availability at the end of the AHP including new data from a marine sequence off the Horn of Africa (Tierney & deMenocal, 2013). Other archives including sedimentological, geochemical and palynological data from the central North African Lakes Chad and Lake Yoa point to a gradual rather than an abrupt transition near 5,000 years ago (Amaral et al., 2013; Kröpelin et al., 2008). The discrepancy of the available paleo-hydrological reconstructions underline the importance of proxy parameters directly related to hydrological conditions for accurate assessment of continental rainfall changes. Here, we present the first molecular-isotopic data from Lake Yoa documenting the hydrologic evolution over the entire Holocene. Compound-specific carbon and hydrogen isotope analyses were performed on long-chain n-alkanes. Our data indicate relative high but variable contributions of plant-derived long-chain n-alkanes carrying a distinct leaf-wax signature, i.e., a high Carbon Preference Index (CPI). A trend towards higher CPI values since 7,300 years ago suggests declining soil degradation and vegetation cover under increasingly drier conditions. In parallel, the average-chain-length of the long-chain n-alkanes increases gradually towards the present implying higher relative contributions from grasses. Compound-specific carbon isotope data confirm this finding, indicating a mixed C3/C4 contribution in the early and mid-Holocene changing towards a C4-grass dominated vegetation in the late Holocene. Most importantly, compound-specific hydrogen isotope data reveal a continuous increase from 8,100 years ago towards the present, reflecting a gradual aridification. The large

  17. Four-year study of Middle East and Sahara dust intrusions in terms of particle lidar ratio: Observations with lidar and sun/sky photometer over Limassol, Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nisantzi, Argyro; Elisavet Mamouri, Rodanthi; Hadjimitsis, Diofantos; Ansmann, Albert

    2015-04-01

    The remote sensing station of the Cyprus University of Technology (CUT) at Limassol (34.7oN, 33oE, 50m above sea level a.s.l.) is located in the southeast part of the Mediterranean (150km south of Turkey and 250km west of Syria) and dust aerosol components from Sahara and Middle East deserts comprise the major sources of dust layers in the study area. The CUT station is equipped with a European Aerosol Research Lidar Network (EARLINET) lidar and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun/sky photometer. The combined database of four years (2010 -2013) of observations was used to compare extinction-to-backscatter ratios (lidar ratios) for dust from Middle East and Sahara deserts. For the first time, a long-term lidar study on the lidar ratio of Middle East desert dust is presented. The results are compared with respective findings for Saharan dust outbreaks. The Limassol lidar station at the island of Cyprus in the eastern Mediterranean Sea is unique because it is the only site of the EARLINET which is influenced by a statistically significant number (5-7) of Middle East dust outbreaks each year as well as by numerous Saharan dust outbreaks (>10 per year). For this analysis we considered 17 major dust outbreaks from the Middle East and 32 dust outbreaks from North Africa. Simultaneous EARLINET lidar and AERONET photometer observations were conducted at Limassol almost day by day over the four year period from April 2010 to December 2013. The quality of the retrieval is checked within a case study by comparing the results with respective Raman lidar solutions for particle backscatter, extinction, and lidar ratio. The applied combined lidar/photometer retrievals corroborate recent findings regarding the difference between Middle East and Saharan desert dust lidar ratios. We found values from 44-65 sr with a mean value of 52.7 sr for Saharan dust and from 35-46 sr with a mean value of 41.1 sr for Middle East dust. The presented data analysis, however, also demonstrates the

  18. Synthesis and optical property characterization of elongated AuPt and Pt@Au metal nanoframes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangji; Jang, Hee-Jeong; Jang, Ho Young; Hong, Soonchang; Moh, Sang Hyun; Park, Sungho

    2016-02-01

    We report a facile method to synthesize elongated nanoframes consisting of Pt and Au in solution. Pentagonal Au nanorods served as templates and successfully led to an elongated AuPt nanoframe after etching the core Au. Subsequently, the coating of Au around Pt ridges resulted in Pt@Au metal nanoframes. The resulting elongated nanostructure exhibited 5 well-defined ridges continuously connected along the long axis. During the shape evolution from pure Au nanorods to elongated Pt@Au metal nanoframes, their corresponding localized surface plasmon resonance bands were monitored. Especially, unique surface plasmon features were observed for elongated Pt@Au nanoframes where the short-axis oscillation of surface free electrons is strongly coupled but the long-axis oscillation is not coupled among the ridges.We report a facile method to synthesize elongated nanoframes consisting of Pt and Au in solution. Pentagonal Au nanorods served as templates and successfully led to an elongated AuPt nanoframe after etching the core Au. Subsequently, the coating of Au around Pt ridges resulted in Pt@Au metal nanoframes. The resulting elongated nanostructure exhibited 5 well-defined ridges continuously connected along the long axis. During the shape evolution from pure Au nanorods to elongated Pt@Au metal nanoframes, their corresponding localized surface plasmon resonance bands were monitored. Especially, unique surface plasmon features were observed for elongated Pt@Au nanoframes where the short-axis oscillation of surface free electrons is strongly coupled but the long-axis oscillation is not coupled among the ridges. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr08200e

  19. Une alternative au cobalt pour la synthese de nanotubes de carbone monoparoi par plasma inductif thermique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrier, Jean-Francois

    Les nanotubes de carbone de type monoparoi (C-SWNT) sont une classe recente de nanomateriaux qui ont fait leur apparition en 1991. L'interet qu'on leur accorde provient des nombreuses proprietes d'avant-plan qu'ils possedent. Leur resistance mecanique serait des plus rigide, tout comme ils peuvent conduire l'electricite et la chaleur d'une maniere inegalee. Non moins, les C-SWNT promettent de devenir une nouvelle classe de plateforme moleculaire, en servant de site d'attache pour des groupements reactifs. Les promesses de ce type particulier de nanomateriau sont nombreuses, la question aujourd'hui est de comment les realiser. La technologie de synthese par plasma inductif thermique se situe avantageusement pour la qualite de ses produits, sa productivite et les faibles couts d'operation. Par contre, des recherches recentes ont permis de mettre en lumiere des risques d'expositions reliees a l'utilisation du cobalt, comme catalyseur de synthese; son elimination ou bien son remplacement est devenu une preoccupation importante. Quatre recettes alternatives ont ete mises a l'essai afin de trouver une alternative plus securitaire a la recette de base; un melange catalytique ternaire, compose de nickel, de cobalt et d'oxyde d'yttrium. La premiere consiste essentiellement a remplacer la proportion massique de cobalt par du nickel, qui etait deja present dans la recette de base. Les trois options suivantes contiennent de nouveaux catalyseurs, en remplacement au Co, qui sont apparus dans plusieurs recherches scientifiques au courant des dernieres annees: le dioxyde de zircone (ZrO2), dioxyde de manganese (MnO2) et le molybdene (Mo). La methode utilisee consiste a vaporiser la matiere premiere, sous forme solide, dans un reacteur plasma a haute frequence (3 MHz) a paroi refroidi. Apres le passage dans le plasma, le systeme traverse une section dite de "croissance", isolee thermiquement a l'aide de graphite, afin de maintenir une certaine plage de temperature favorable a la

  20. Desert Dust Air Mass Mapping in the Western Sahara, using Particle Properties Derived from Space-based Multi-angle Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph; Petzold, Andreas; Wendisch, Manfred; Bierwirth, Eike; Dinter, Tilman; Fiebig, Marcus; Schladitz, Alexander; von Hoyningen-Huene, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Coincident observations made over the Moroccan desert during the SAhara Mineral dUst experiMent (SAMUM) 2006 field campaign are used both to validate aerosol amount and type retrieved from Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) observations, and to place the sub-orbital aerosol measurements into the satellite's larger regional context. On three moderately dusty days for which coincident observations were made, MISR mid-visible aerosol optical thickness (AOT) agrees with field measurements point-by-point to within 0.05 to 0.1. This is about as well as can be expected given spatial sampling differences; the space-based observations capture AOT trends and variability over an extended region. The field data also validate MISR's ability to distinguish and to map aerosol air masses, from the combination of retrieved constraints on particle size, shape, and single-scattering albedo. For the three study days, the satellite observations (a) highlight regional gradients in the mix of dust and background spherical particles, (b) identify a dust plume most likely part of a density flow, and (c) show an air mass containing a higher proportion of small, spherical particles than the surroundings, that appears to be aerosol pollution transported from several thousand kilometers away.

  1. Surviving in Mountain Climate Refugia: New Insights from the Genetic Diversity and Structure of the Relict Shrub Myrtus nivellei (Myrtaceae) in the Sahara Desert

    PubMed Central

    Migliore, Jérémy; Baumel, Alex; Juin, Marianick; Fady, Bruno; Roig, Anne; Duong, Nathalie; Médail, Frédéric

    2013-01-01

    The identification of past glacial refugia has become a key topic for conservation under environmental change, since they contribute importantly to shaping current patterns of biodiversity. However, little attention has been paid so far to interglacial refugia despite their key role for the survival of relict species currently occurring in climate refugia. Here, we focus on the genetic consequences of range contraction on the relict populations of the evergreen shrub Myrtus nivellei, endemic in the Saharan mountains since at least the end of the last Green Sahara period, around 5.5 ka B.P. Multilocus genotypes (nuclear microsatellites and AFLP) were obtained from 215 individuals collected from 23 wadis (temporary rivers) in the three main mountain ranges in southern Algeria (the Hoggar, Tassili n’Ajjer and Tassili n’Immidir ranges). Identical genotypes were found in several plants growing far apart within the same wadis, a pattern taken as evidence of clonality. Multivariate analyses and Bayesian clustering revealed that genetic diversity was mainly structured among the mountain ranges, while low isolation by distance was observed within each mountain range. The range contraction induced by the last episode of aridification has likely increased the genetic isolation of the populations of M. nivellei, without greatly affecting the genetic diversity of the species as a whole. The pattern of genetic diversity observed here suggests that high connectivity may have prevailed during humid periods, which is consistent with recent paleoenvironmental reconstructions. PMID:24058489

  2. Desert Dust Aerosol Air Mass Mapping in the Western Sahara, Using Particle Properties Derived from Space-Based Multi-Angle Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph; Petzold, Andreas; Wendisch, Manfred; Bierwirth, Eike; Dinter, Tilman; Esselborn, Michael; Fiebig, Marcus; Heese, Birgit; Knippertz, Peter; Mueller, Detlef; Schladitz, Alexander; Von Hoyningen-Huene, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Coincident observations made over the Moroccan desert during the Sahara mineral dust experiment (SAMUM) 2006 field campaign are used both to validate aerosol amount and type retrieved from multi-angle imaging spectroradiometer (MISR) observations, and to place the suborbital aerosol measurements into the satellite s larger regional context. On three moderately dusty days during which coincident observations were made, MISR mid-visible aerosol optical thickness (AOT) agrees with field measurements point-by-point to within 0.05 0.1. This is about as well as can be expected given spatial sampling differences; the space-based observations capture AOT trends and variability over an extended region. The field data also validate MISR s ability to distinguish and to map aerosol air masses, from the combination of retrieved constraints on particle size, shape and single-scattering albedo. For the three study days, the satellite observations (1) highlight regional gradients in the mix of dust and background spherical particles, (2) identify a dust plume most likely part of a density flow and (3) show an aerosol air mass containing a higher proportion of small, spherical particles than the surroundings, that appears to be aerosol pollution transported from several thousand kilometres away.

  3. Fluid flow paths discrimination in tight sand gas reservoirs using the Hydraulic Flow unit approach with an example from the Algerian Sahara

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokhal, Abdellah; Bougandoura, Adel; Ouadfeul, Sid-Ali

    2015-04-01

    In this work, fluid flow paths are discriminated from standard well logs and core data through the utilization of Hydraulic Flow Units Approach (HFU) and an intelligent network. Firstly, the flow zone indicator (FZI), which is a unique parameter for each hydraulic unit, was used to characterize each rock type. The number of hydraulic flow units and mean values of FZI for each HFU were calculated from porosity and permeability measured from core-rocks. Application to data of a borehole located in the Algerian Sahara shows the existence of three HFUs and a correlation coefficient greater than 0.9 in each HFU was observed. Some FZI were attributed for un-cored wells using the Fuzzy Logic system (FL). Well-logs data that are used as an input to train the fuzzy system are the neutron porosity, the bulk density, the slowness of the P wave, the resistivity of the shallow and the deep zones and the natural gamma ray. The calculated FZI associated to these depths interval are used as an output. The presented methodology was successfully applied to a large data set of laboratory and well logging measurements from the Hassi D'zaabat field. Keywords: Fluid flow; FZI, Hydraulic Flow Unit (HFU); Fuzzy logic.

  4. Biocontrol of Rhizoctonia solani damping-off and promotion of tomato plant growth by endophytic actinomycetes isolated from native plants of Algerian Sahara.

    PubMed

    Goudjal, Yacine; Toumatia, Omrane; Yekkour, Amine; Sabaou, Nasserdine; Mathieu, Florence; Zitouni, Abdelghani

    2014-01-20

    Thirty-four endophytic actinomycetes were isolated from the roots of native plants of the Algerian Sahara. Morphological and chemical studies showed that twenty-nine isolates belonged to the Streptomyces genus and five were non-Streptomyces. All isolates were screened for their in vitro antifungal activity against Rhizoctonia solani. The six that had the greatest pathogen inhibitory capacities were subsequently tested for their in vivo biocontrol potential on R. solani damping-off in sterilized and non-sterilized soils, and for their plant-growth promoting activities on tomato seedlings. In both soils, coating tomato seeds with antagonistic isolates significantly reduced (P<0.05) the severity of damping-off of tomato seedlings. Among the isolates tested, the strains CA-2 and AA-2 exhibited the same disease incidence reduction as thioperoxydicarbonic diamide, tetramethylthiram (TMTD) and no significant differences (P<0.05) were observed. Furthermore, they resulted in a significant increase in the seedling fresh weight, the seedling length and the root length of the seed-treated seedlings compared to the control. The taxonomic position based on 16S rDNA sequence analysis and phylogenetic studies indicated that the strains CA-2 and AA-2 were related to Streptomyces mutabilis NBRC 12800(T) (100% of similarity) and Streptomyces cyaneofuscatus JCM 4364(T) (100% of similarity), respectively. PMID:23920229

  5. Effect of the insulation by the mud on the convection in building in the Sahara of Algeria - case of Bechar City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benachour, Elhadj; Draoui, Belkacem; Imine, Baachir; Hasnat, Mohammed; Rahmani, Lakhdar

    2016-03-01

    The thermal behavior of the buildings is a current problem which arouses the interest of many researchers. Indeed, the control of the loads of air conditioning or heating requires a thorough knowledge. Since the thermal quality of the buildings in the Maghreb is there generally very insufficient in particular in the Sahara of Algeria, the insulation proved that it is a very important parameter to minimize the thermal diffusion process inside on all when the insulator is a local material as the Mud which is in our region with a significant amount and almost free quantity. This work presents a study of numerical simulation aiming at the role and the influence of the insulation by the mud Reduced like a local material to the town of Bechar located at the south west of Algeria, or one is interested in a comparative study for pursued these goals. In this context, an analogy was used for the functions which are discretized by the finite difference method and integrated in the Fluent code which is based on the finite volume method. The validation of this procedure was confirmed while comparing some results. The results are presented in the form of distributions of the isotherms, the streamlines, local and average Nusselt of which the goal to study the influence on comfort.

  6. Early to Middle Holocene landscape exploitation in a drying environment: Two case studies compared from the central Sahara (SW Fezzan, Libya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremaschi, Mauro; Zerboni, Andrea

    2009-08-01

    The erg Uan Kasa and the wadi Tanezzuft (Libyan Sahara) reacted in different ways to Holocene climatic changes. Consequently, the human groups settled there responded with different ways of adaptation to the drying environment. In the erg Uan Kasa, shallow lakes were formed from the Early to the Mid-Holocene, and their shores were densely inhabited from the Epipalaeolithic to the Pastoral-Neolithic periods. The erg dried out at c. 5000 years BP, but the area was not completely abandoned, as indicated by minor Late Pastoral-Neolithic sites composed of scattered fireplaces. During the wet Holocene, the wadi Tanezzuft was a large meandering river, and its banks were densely settled. At c. 5000 years BP, the stream was not completely dried out, but it changed its pattern, originating an alluvial plain. A large oasis was formed between c. 4000 and 2000 years BP, exploited by Late Pastoral-Neolithic pastoral communities, and later by Garamantians, which introduced soil management and agricultural practices. The Tanezzuft oasis suffered a drastic reduction in size during the first centuries AD, at the time of the abandonment of the Garamantian settlements.

  7. Trends and challenges toward integration of traditional medicine in formal health-care system: Historical perspectives and appraisal of education curricula in Sub-Sahara Africa

    PubMed Central

    Innocent, Ester

    2016-01-01

    The population residing Sub-Sahara Africa (SSA) continues to suffer from communicable health problems such as HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, and various neglected tropical as well as non-communicable diseases. The disease burden is aggravated by shortage of medical personnel and medical supplies such as medical devices and minimal access to essential medicine. For long time, human beings through observation and practical experiences learned to use different plant species that led to the emergence of traditional medicine (TM) systems. The ancient Pharaonic Egyptian TM system is one of the oldest documented forms of TM practice in Africa and the pioneer of world’s medical science. However, the medical practices diffused very fast to other continents being accelerated by advancement of technologies while leaving Africa lagging behind in the integration of the practice in formal health-care system. Challenging issues that drag back integration is the development of education curricula for training TM experts as the way of disseminating the traditional medical knowledge and practices imbedded in African culture. The few African countries such as Ghana managed to integrate TM products in the National Essential Medicine List while South Africa, Sierra Leone, and Tanzania have TM products being sold over the counters due to the availability of education training programs facilitated by research. This paper analyses the contribution of TM practice and products in modern medicine and gives recommendations that Africa should take in the integration process to safeguard the SSA population from disease burdens. PMID:27366358

  8. Trends and challenges toward integration of traditional medicine in formal health-care system: Historical perspectives and appraisal of education curricula in Sub-Sahara Africa.

    PubMed

    Innocent, Ester

    2016-01-01

    The population residing Sub-Sahara Africa (SSA) continues to suffer from communicable health problems such as HIV/AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, and various neglected tropical as well as non-communicable diseases. The disease burden is aggravated by shortage of medical personnel and medical supplies such as medical devices and minimal access to essential medicine. For long time, human beings through observation and practical experiences learned to use different plant species that led to the emergence of traditional medicine (TM) systems. The ancient Pharaonic Egyptian TM system is one of the oldest documented forms of TM practice in Africa and the pioneer of world's medical science. However, the medical practices diffused very fast to other continents being accelerated by advancement of technologies while leaving Africa lagging behind in the integration of the practice in formal health-care system. Challenging issues that drag back integration is the development of education curricula for training TM experts as the way of disseminating the traditional medical knowledge and practices imbedded in African culture. The few African countries such as Ghana managed to integrate TM products in the National Essential Medicine List while South Africa, Sierra Leone, and Tanzania have TM products being sold over the counters due to the availability of education training programs facilitated by research. This paper analyses the contribution of TM practice and products in modern medicine and gives recommendations that Africa should take in the integration process to safeguard the SSA population from disease burdens. PMID:27366358

  9. Mise au point d'un reacteur epitaxial CBE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelletier, Hubert

    carbone à 1, 5 · 1019 cm-3, en accord avec la courbe théorique. La croissance du matériau ternaire GaInP a aussi été réalisée en accord de maille avec le substrat de GaAs, et avec une rugosité de 0, 96 nm. Ceci constitue un premier pas dans la croissance d'alliages ternaires au laboratoire. Finalement, la mise en marche du réacteur d'épitaxie par jets chimiques permet maintenant à cinq étudiants gradués de faire progresser des projets reliés directement à la croissance épitaxiale au Laboratoire d'Épitaxie Avancée de l'Université de Sherbrooke. Mots-clés : Épitaxie par jets chimiques; Chemical beam epitaxy; CBE; MOMBE; GaAs; GaInP; LabVIEW; Théorie du vide.

  10. Wetting and energetics of solid Au and Au-Ge/SiC interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Z.; Wynblatt, P.

    1998-09-01

    A solid state wetting technique has been used to investigate the effects of alloying Au with Ge on the wetting and energetics of Au/SiC interfaces at 1123 K. Germanium was found to segregate to the Au/SiC interface, thereby lowering the contact angle of Au on SiC from 133 to 110, and doubling the work of adhesion of Au on SiC. Calculations based on a monolayer model predict a segregation of 0.89 monolayers of Ge at the Au/SiC interface for Au containing 2.3 at.% Ge. This agrees reasonably well with a coverage of 0.6 monolayers Ge at the Au/SiC interface obtained by direct measurements based on the crater edge profiling technique. The work also demonstrates that simple models of interfacial composition can be combined with the Gibbs adsorption isotherm to provide reliable estimates of interfacial composition at complex four-component interfaces.

  11. Gold nanowired: a linear (Au25)(n) polymer from Au25 molecular clusters.

    PubMed

    De Nardi, Marco; Antonello, Sabrina; Jiang, De-en; Pan, Fangfang; Rissanen, Kari; Ruzzi, Marco; Venzo, Alfonso; Zoleo, Alfonso; Maran, Flavio

    2014-08-26

    Au25(SR)18 has provided fundamental insights into the properties of clusters protected by monolayers of thiolated ligands (SR). Because of its ultrasmall core, 1 nm, Au25(SR)18 displays molecular behavior. We prepared a Au25 cluster capped by n-butanethiolates (SBu), obtained its structure by single-crystal X-ray crystallography, and studied its properties both experimentally and theoretically. Whereas in solution Au25(SBu)18(0) is a paramagnetic molecule, in the crystal it becomes a linear polymer of Au25 clusters connected via single Au-Au bonds and stabilized by proper orientation of clusters and interdigitation of ligands. At low temperature, [Au25(SBu)18(0)]n has a nonmagnetic ground state and can be described as a one-dimensional antiferromagnetic system. These findings provide a breakthrough into the properties and possible solid-state applications of molecular gold nanowires. PMID:25088331

  12. Pt{sub 3}Au and PtAu clusters: Electronic states and potential energy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, D.; Balasubramanian, K.

    1994-03-15

    We carried out complete active space multiconfiguration self-consistent-field calculations followed by multireference singles+doubles configuration interaction with the Davidson correction which included up to 3.55 million configurations employing relativistic effective core potentials on Pt{sub 3}+Au and PtAu clusters. Four low-lying electronic states were identified for Pt{sub 3}+Au. The {sup 2}{ital A}{sub 2} electronic state ({ital C}{sub 3{ital v}}) was found to be the ground state of Pt{sub 3}Au. Spin--orbit effects were found to be significant. We also computed six low-lying electronic states of PtAu and four low-lying electronic states of PtAu{sup +}. The 5/2 ({sup 2}{Delta}) and 0{sup +}({sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}) states were found to be the ground states of PtAu and PtAu{sup +}, respectively.

  13. Interplanetary dust between 1 and 5 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanley, J. E.; Singer, S. F.; Alvarez, J. M.

    1979-01-01

    Analyses of data from the Meteoroid Detection Experiment (MDE) and the Imaging Photopolarimeter (IPP) aboard Pioneer 10 and 11 have led to contradictory conclusions. While the MDE indicates a significant particle environment in the outer solar system (out to at least 5 AU), the IPP sees no zodiacal light (therefore implying no small particles) past 3.3 AU. These two results are reconciled by noting that the spectral index p (relating particle radius and particle concentration) is not a constant in the solar system but changes from less than 2 near 1 AU to more than 2.5 at 5 AU for particles in the range of 10 microns.

  14. Bright, NIR-emitting Au23 from Au25: characterization and applications including biolabeling.

    PubMed

    Muhammed, Madathumpady Abubaker Habeeb; Verma, Pramod Kumar; Pal, Samir Kumar; Kumar, R C Arun; Paul, Soumya; Omkumar, Ramakrishnapillai Vyomakesannair; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2009-10-01

    A novel interfacial route has been developed for the synthesis of a bright-red-emitting new subnanocluster, Au(23), by the core etching of a widely explored and more stable cluster, Au(25)SG(18) (in which SG is glutathione thiolate). A slight modification of this procedure results in the formation of two other known subnanoclusters, Au(22) and Au(33). Whereas Au(22) and Au(23) are water soluble and brightly fluorescent with quantum yields of 2.5 and 1.3 %, respectively, Au(33) is organic soluble and less fluorescent, with a quantum yield of 0.1 %. Au(23) exhibits quenching of fluorescence selectively in the presence of Cu(2+) ions and it can therefore be used as a metal-ion sensor. Aqueous- to organic-phase transfer of Au(23) has been carried out with fluorescence enhancement. Solvent dependency on the fluorescence of Au(23) before and after phase transfer has been studied extensively and the quantum yield of the cluster varies with the solvent used. The temperature response of Au(23) emission has been demonstrated. The inherent fluorescence of Au(23) was used for imaging human hepatoma cells by employing the avidin-biotin interaction. PMID:19711391

  15. The Electronic Properties and L3 XANES of Au and Nano-Au

    SciTech Connect

    Yiu, Y.M.; Zhang, P.; Sham, T.K.

    2004-04-20

    The electronic properties of Au crystal and nano Au have been investigated by theory and experiment. Molecularly capped nano-Au was synthesized using the two-phase method. Au nano-particles have been characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). They retain the fcc crystal structure. Their sizes have been determined to be in a range from 5.5 nm to 1.7 nm. The L3 X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) of nano-Au and Au foil have been recorded using synchrotron radiation, and examined by theoretical calculation based on the first principles. Both theory and experiment show that the nano-Au particles have essentially all the Au L3 XANES features of bulk Au in the near edge region with less pronounced resonance peaks. It is also shown that nano Au exhibits lower 4f binding energy than bulk Au in good agreement with quantum confined Au systems reported previously.

  16. Comment on 'Match Analysis of U9 and U10 English Premier League Academy Soccer Players using a Global Positioning System: Relevance for Talent Identification and Development'

    PubMed

    Carling, Christopher; Collins, Dave

    2014-08-21

    We read with interest the recent article written by Goto, Morris & Nevill: 'Match Analysis of U9 and U10 English Premier League Academy Soccer Players using a Global Positioning System: Relevance for Talent Identification and Development'. In summary, the authors reported time motion analysis data from match-play showing that players who were retained by their Academy covered a significantly greater distance overall and in low-speed running in comparison to peers who were released. Consequently, the authors discussed their results in the context of talent identification and development processes. In light of their findings and discussion, it is of our opinion that further debate in the context of the current body of literature is necessary. PMID:25148464

  17. Au nanorod helical superstructures with designed chirality.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xiang; Lu, Xuxing; Shen, Chenqi; Ke, Yonggang; Ni, Weihai; Wang, Qiangbin

    2015-01-14

    A great challenge for nanotechnology is to controllably organize anisotropic nanomaterials into well-defined three-dimensional superstructures with customized properties. Here we successfully constructed anisotropic Au nanorod (AuNR) helical superstructures (helices) with tailored chirality in a programmable manner. By designing the 'X' pattern of the arrangement of DNA capturing strands (15nt) on both sides of a two-dimensional DNA origami template, AuNRs functionalized with the complementary DNA sequences were positioned on the origami and were assembled into AuNR helices with the origami intercalated between neighboring AuNRs. Left-handed (LH) and right-handed (RH) AuNR helices were conveniently accomplished by solely tuning the mirrored-symmetric 'X' patterns of capturing strands on the origami. The inter-rod distance was precisely defined as 14 nm and inter-rod angle as 45°, thus a full helix contains 9 AuNRs with its length up to about 220 nm. By changing the AuNR/origami molar ratio in the assembly system, the average number of AuNR in the helices was tuned from 2 to 4 and 9. Intense chiroptical activities arose from the longest AuNR helices with a maximum anisotropy factor of ∼0.02, which is highly comparable to the reported macroscopic AuNR assemblies. We expect that our strategy of origami templated assembly of anisotropic chiral superstructures would inspire the bottom-up fabrication of optically active nanostructures and shed light on a variety of applications, such as chiral fluids, chiral signal amplification, and fluorescence combined chiral spectroscopy. PMID:25516475

  18. Comparison of PremierTM Rotaclone®, ProSpecTTM, and RIDASCREEN® Rotavirus Enzyme Immunoassay Kits for Detection of Rotavirus Antigen in Stool Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Rashi; Lyde, Freda; Esona, Mathew D.; Quaye, Osbourne; Bowen, Michael D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Rotaviruses are the major cause of severe dehydrating diarrhea in children throughout the world. Enzyme immunoassays (EIA) have been the standard method for detection of rotavirus in stool specimens since the 1980s. The World Health Organization (WHO) Rotavirus Surveillance Network has proposed including three EIA kits in the WHO-GSM (Global Management System/Système Mondial de Gestion ) catalogue for easy procurement of EIA kits by participating rotavirus surveillance network laboratories. Objectives In this study, we conducted a comparative analysis of 3 commercially available enzyme immunoassay kits: PremierTM Rotaclone® (Meridian Bioscience, Inc.), ProSpecTTM (Oxoid, Ltd.) and RIDASCREEN® (R-biopharm AG) for rotavirus diagnostics. Study design Using reverse-transcriptase-PCR (RT-PCR) as the gold standard, the 3 EIA kits were evaluated by testing a stool panel consisting of 56 rotavirus-positive and 54 rotavirus negative samples. Results The sensitivities of the PremierTM Rotaclone®, ProSpecTTM and RIDASCREEN® kits were 76.8%, 75% and 82.1% respectively, but did not differ significantly. The specificity of all the 3 kits was 100%. The use of RT-PCR as a gold standard lowered the observed sensitivity of all 3 EIA kits but helps to reduce equivocal results that can be seen when another EIA or other non-molecular methods are used as the reference assay in comparison studies. Conclusion Our study found that all three kits are suitable for use by rotavirus surveillance programs. PMID:23850415

  19. Aspects cliniques des cancers bronchopulmonaires primitifs au service d'oncologie du CHUA-HUJRA Antananarivo

    PubMed Central

    Refeno, Valéry; Hasiniatsy, Nomeharisoa Rodrigue Emile; Andrianandrasana, Ny Ony Tiana Florence; Ramahandrisoa, Andriatsihoarana Voahary Nasandratriniavo; Rakotonarivo, Jean Marc; Maevazaka, Joée Larissa; Rakotovao, Hanitrala Jean Louis; Rafaramino, Florine

    2015-01-01

    Le retard de diagnostic des cancers broncho-pulmonaires est l'une des sources du retard de leur prise en charge dans les pays en développement. A notre connaissance, l'aspect clinique des cancers broncho-pulmonaires au Centre Hospitalier Universitaire d'Antananarivo-Hôpital Universitaire Joseph Ravoahangy Andrianavalona (CHUA-HUJRA) n'a jamais été étudié. L'objectif était de décrire les aspects cliniques des cancers broncho-pulmonaires primitifs dans le plus grand centre de cancérologie de Madagascar. C'est une étude rétrospective et descriptive des patients atteints de cancers broncho-pulmonaires primitifs vus au service d'oncologie du CHUA-HUJRA du 1er janvier 2008 au 31 décembre 2013. Nous avons recensé 101 patients (80 hommes et 21 femmes). Les circonstances de découverte sont principalement la toux chronique (n = 29), la dyspnée (n = 16) et l'association d'une hémoptysie à la toux chronique (n = 12). Soixante et onze patients avaient un index de performans status ≥ à 2 au moment du diagnostic. On a retrouvé des bacilles de Koch actives dans le crachat de deux patients. Le délai moyen entre l'apparition des premiers signes et la première consultation était de 11 mois. Le délai moyen entre la première consultation et le diagnostic anatomopathologique était de 3 mois. Le cancer broncho-pulmonaire peut avoir des manifestations cliniques non spécifiques parfois trompeuses qui peuvent retarder leur prise en charge. De ce fait, il doit être recherché devant tout signe respiratoire persistant. Par ailleurs, le délai de prise en charge pré-hospitalière et hospitalière de ces cancers doit être amélioré. PMID:26958134

  20. Oxygen-assisted reduction of Au species on Au/SiO2 catalyst in room temperature CO oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zili; Zhou, Shenghu; Zhu, Haoguo; Dai, Sheng; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H

    2008-01-01

    An unexpected oxygen-assisted reduction of cationic Au species by CO was found on a Au/SiO2 catalyst at room temperature; CO oxidation activity increases simultaneously with the reduction of Au species, suggesting the key role of metallic Au played in CO oxidation on Au/SiO2.

  1. Impact of Climate Change on the Relict Tropical Fish Fauna of Central Sahara: Threat for the Survival of Adrar Mountains Fishes, Mauritania

    PubMed Central

    Trape, Sébastien

    2009-01-01

    Background Four central Sahara mountainous massifs provide habitats for relict populations of fish. In the Adrar of Mauritania all available data on the presence and distribution of fish come from pre-1960 surveys where five fish species were reported: Barbus pobeguini, Barbus macrops, Barbus mirei, Sarotherodon galilaeus, and Clarias anguillaris. Since 1970, drought has had a severe impact in the Adrar where rainfall decreased by 35%. To investigate whether the relict populations of fish have survived the continuing drought, a study was carried out from 2004 to 2008. Methodology/Principal Findings An inventory of perennial bodies of water was drawn up using a literature review and analysis of topographical and hydrological maps. Field surveys were carried out in order to locate the bodies of water described in the literature, identify the presence of fish, determine which species were present and estimate their abundance. The thirteen sites where the presence of fish was observed in the 1950s -Ksar Torchane, Ilij, Molomhar, Agueni, Tachot, Hamdoun, Terjit, Toungad, El Berbera, Timagazine, Dâyet el Mbârek, Dâyet et-Tefla, Nkedeï- were located and surveyed. The Ksar Torchane spring -type locality and the only known locality of B. mirei- has dried up at the height of the drought in 1984, and any fish populations have since become extinct there. The Timagazine, Dâyet el Mbârek and Dâyet et-Tefla pools have become ephemeral. The Hamdoun guelta appears to be highly endangered. The fish populations at the other sites remain unchanged. Four perennial pools which are home to populations of B. pobeguini are newly recorded. Conclusion/Significance The tropical relict fish populations of the Adrar mountains of Mauritania appear to be highly endangered. Of thirteen previously recorded populations, four have become extinct since the beginning of the drought period. New fish population extinctions may occur should low levels of annual rainfall be repeated. PMID:19204792

  2. The formation conditions of enstatite chondrites: Insights from trace element geochemistry of olivine-bearing chondrules in Sahara 97096 (EH3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquet, Emmanuel; Alard, Olivier; Gounelle, Matthieu

    2015-09-01

    We report in situ LA-ICP-MS trace element analyses of silicate phases in olivine-bearing chondrules in the Sahara 97096 (EH3) enstatite chondrite. Most olivine and enstatite present rare earth element (REE) patterns comparable to their counterparts in type I chondrules in ordinary chondrites. They thus likely share a similar igneous origin, likely under similar redox conditions. The mesostasis however frequently shows negative Eu and/or Yb (and more rarely Sm) anomalies, evidently out of equilibrium with olivine and enstatite. We suggest that this reflects crystallization of oldhamite during a sulfidation event, already inferred by others, during which the mesostasis was molten, where the complementary positive Eu and Yb anomalies exhibited by oldhamite would have possibly arisen due to a divalent state of these elements. Much of this igneous oldhamite would have been expelled from the chondrules, presumably by inertial acceleration or surface tension effects, and would have contributed to the high abundance of opaque nodules found outside them in EH chondrites. In two chondrules, olivine and enstatite exhibit negatively sloped REE patterns, which may be an extreme manifestation of a general phenomenon (possibly linked to near-liquidus partitioning) underlying the overabundance of light REE observed in most chondrule silicates relative to equilibrium predictions. The silicate phases in one of these two chondrules show complementary Eu, Yb, and Sm anomalies providing direct evidence for the postulated occurrence of the divalent state for these elements at some stage in the formation reservoir of enstatite chondrites. Our work supports the idea that the peculiarities of enstatite chondrites may not require a condensation sequence at high C/O ratios as has long been believed.

  3. Lagrangian dust model simulations for a case of moist convective dust emission and transport in the western Sahara region during Fennec/LADUNEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sodemann, H.; Lai, T. M.; Marenco, F.; Ryder, C. L.; Flamant, C.; Knippertz, P.; Rosenberg, P.; Bart, M.; McQuaid, J. B.

    2015-06-01

    Due to the harshness and inaccessibility of desert regions, the uncertainties concerning the processes of dust mobilization at the surface, airborne transport, and sedimentation are still considerable, limiting the ability to perform model simulations. In June 2011, a comprehensive data set of ground-based and airborne in situ measurements and remote sensing observations was acquired within the Fennec/Lagrangian Dust Source Inversion Experiment (LADUNEX) field campaign in the western Sahara region. Here we evaluate the ability of the state-of-the-art Lagrangian particle dispersion model FLEXPART, newly fitted with a dust mobilization capability, to simulate dust transport in this region. We investigate a case where a large mesoscale convective system (MCS) triggered dust emissions in central Mali, which subsequently moved as a large cold pool dust front toward northern Mauritania. Specifying dust mobilization for this case is shown to be an important obstacle to simulating dust transport during this event, since neither the MCS nor the associated cold pool-causing dust emission is represented in the meteorological analysis. Obtaining a realistic dust transport simulation for this case therefore requires an inversion approach using a manual specification of the dust sources supported by satellite imagery. When compared to in situ and remote sensing data from two aircraft, the Lagrangian dust transport simulations represent the overall shape and evolution of the dust plume well. While accumulation and coarse mode dust are well represented in the simulation, giant mode particles are considerably underestimated. Our results re-emphasize that dust emission associated with deep moist convection remains a key issue for reliable dust model simulations in northern Africa.

  4. GHYRAF (Gravity and HYdrology in AFrica): a New Experiment Combining Hydrology and Geodesy to Investigate Water Storage Changes from the Sahara to the Equatorial Monsoon Zone.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Linage, C.; Hinderer, J.; Boy, J.; Masson, F.; Gegout, P.; Diament, M.; de Viron, O.; Bayer, R.; Balmino, G.; Biancale, R.; Bonvalot, S.; Genthon, P.

    2007-12-01

    We present a new project using multi-disciplinary data (gravity, geodesy, hydrology, and meteorology) to determine seasonal changes in water storage in Africa. We foresee to concentrate on two areas: the desert zone in the Sahara (Tamanrasset, Algeria) where almost no hydrological change is present, and the equatorial monsoon band (Niger, Benin Republic) that provides on the contrary a large rainfall signal. This project will be a first attempt to do a ground validation of satellite-derived gravity observations such as GRACE or GOCE in Africa. We will pay attention to the various length scales involved in hydrological processes that are differently retrieved whether gravity is measured at the ground or by satellite. Our experience includes two types of ground-based gravity measurements. First we will perform a repeated survey with absolute gravimeters (AG) on a North-South profile during 2-3 years (2008-2010) to assess the large soil moisture changes as predicted by existing hydrological models such as GLDAS or LadWorld. Second we plan to establish a superconducting gravimeter (SG) to act as a continuously monitored base station in a region of large soil moisture changes. In addition, continuous geodetic GPS measurements will be made along the gravity profile to assess the vertical deformation which acts to alter ground gravity but not satellite gravity. In-situ measurements of hydrological parameters at each station will assist us in modelling local gravity effects. The goal is a better characterization of continental water storage, particularly in the critical areas of water management in the north and central parts of the African continent.

  5. A hydrological-economic model for sustainable groundwater use in sparse-data drylands: Application to the Amtoudi Oasis in southern Morocco, northern Sahara.

    PubMed

    Alcalá, Francisco J; Martínez-Valderrama, Jaime; Robles-Marín, Pedro; Guerrera, Francesco; Martín-Martín, Manuel; Raffaelli, Giuliana; de León, Julián Tejera; Asebriy, Lahcen

    2015-12-15

    A hydrological-economic model is introduced to describe the dynamics of groundwater-dependent economics (agriculture and tourism) for sustainable use in sparse-data drylands. The Amtoudi Oasis, a remote area in southern Morocco, in the northern Sahara attractive for tourism and with evidence of groundwater degradation, was chosen to show the model operation. Governing system variables were identified and put into action through System Dynamics (SD) modeling causal diagrams to program basic formulations into a model having two modules coupled by the nexus 'pumping': (1) the hydrological module represents the net groundwater balance (G) dynamics; and (2) the economic module reproduces the variation in the consumers of water, both the population and tourists. The model was operated under similar influx of tourists and different scenarios of water availability, such as the wet 2009-2010 and the average 2010-2011 hydrological years. The rise in international tourism is identified as the main driving force reducing emigration and introducing new social habits in the population, in particular concerning water consumption. Urban water allotment (PU) was doubled for less than a 100-inhabitant net increase in recent decades. The water allocation for agriculture (PI), the largest consumer of water, had remained constant for decades. Despite that the 2-year monitoring period is not long enough to draw long-term conclusions, groundwater imbalance was reflected by net aquifer recharge (R) less than PI+PU (G<0) in the average year 2010-2011, with net lateral inflow from adjacent Cambrian formations being the largest recharge component. R is expected to be much less than PI+PU in recurrent dry spells. Some low-technology actions are tentatively proposed to mitigate groundwater degradation, such as: wastewater capture, treatment, and reuse for irrigation; storm-water harvesting for irrigation; and active maintenance of the irrigation system to improve its efficiency. PMID:26282765

  6. [(CF3)4Au2(C5H5N)2]--a new alkyl gold(II) derivative with a very short Au-Au bond.

    PubMed

    Zopes, David; Hegemann, Corinna; Tyrra, Wieland; Mathur, Sanjay

    2012-09-11

    A new gold(II) species [(CF(3))(4)Au(2)(C(5)H(5)N)(2)] with a very short unsupported Au-Au bond (250.62(9) pm) was generated by photo irradiation of a silver aurate, [Ag(Py)(2)][Au(CF(3))(2)], unambiguously characterized by (19)F and (109)Ag NMR studies. PMID:22836874

  7. Discours prononce au cours du diner offert a l'issue du premier congres de l'API (Address Given on the Occasion of the First Meeting of the API)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spicer, Keith

    1978-01-01

    The speech, half in French and half in English, is an endorsement of the association, an indication of political, social and educational reforms it might influence, a reminder that members of the association, Canadian Parents for French, were present and interested, and an appeal for good public relations. (AMH)

  8. Thermal and photoinduced reduction of ionic Au(III) to elemental Au nanoparticles by dissolved organic matter in water: possible source of naturally occurring Au nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yin, Yongguang; Yu, Sujuan; Liu, Jingfu; Jiang, Guibin

    2014-01-01

    Naturally occurring Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been widely observed in ore deposits, coal, soil, and environmental water. Identifying the source of these naturally occurring AuNPs could be helpful for not only the discovery of Au deposits through advanced exploration methods, but also the elucidation of the biogeochemical cycle and environmental toxicity of ionic Au and engineered AuNPs. Here, we investigated the effect of natural/simulated sunlight and heating on the reduction of ionic Au by ubiquitous dissolved organic matter (DOM) in river water. The reductive process probed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that phenolic, alcoholic, and aldehyde groups in DOM act as reductive sites. Long-time exposure with thermal and photoirradiation induced the further fusion and growth of AuNPs to branched Au nanostructure as precipitation. The formation processes and kinetics of AuNPs were further investigated using humic acid (HA) as the DOM model, with comprehensive characterizing methods. We have observed that HA can reduce ionic Au(III) complex (as chloride or hydroxyl complex) to elemental Au nanoparticles under sunlight or heating. In this process, nearly all of the Au(III) could be reduced to AuNPs, in which HA serves as not only the reductive agent, but also the coating agent to stabilize and disperse AuNPs. The size and stability of AuNPs were highly dependent on the concentration ratio of Au(III) to HA. These results imply that, besides biological processes, this thermal or photochemical reduction process is another possible source of naturally occurring AuNPs in natural environments, which possibly has critical impacts on the transport and transformation of Au and engineered AuNPs. PMID:24471802

  9. Self-assembly of thiolated cyanine aggregates on Au(111) and Au nanoparticle surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menéndez, Guillermo O.; Cortés, Emiliano; Grumelli, Doris; Méndez de Leo, Lucila P.; Williams, Federico J.; Tognalli, Nicolás G.; Fainstein, Alejandro; Vela, María Elena; Jares-Erijman, Elizabeth A.; Salvarezza, Roberto C.

    2012-01-01

    Heptamethinecyanine J-aggregates display sharp, intense fluorescence emission making them attractive candidates for developing a variety of chem-bio-sensing applications. They have been immobilized on planar thiol-covered Au surfaces and thiol-capped Au nanoparticles by weak molecular interactions. In this work the self-assembly of novel thiolated cyanine (CNN) on Au(111) and citrate-capped AuNPs from solutions containing monomers and J-aggregates has been studied by using STM, XPS, PM-IRRAS, electrochemical techniques and Raman spectroscopy. Data show that CNN species adsorb on the Au surfaces by forming thiolate-Au bonds. We found that the J-aggregates are preferentially adsorbed on the Au(111) surface directly from the solution while adsorbed CNN monomers cannot organize into aggregates on the substrate surface. These results indicate that the CNN-Au interaction is not able to disorganize the large J-aggregates stabilized by π-π stacking to optimize the S-Au binding site but it is strong enough to hinder the π-π stacking when CNNs are chemisorbed as monomers. The optical properties of the J-aggregates remain active after adsorption. The possibility of covalently bonding CNN J-aggregates to Au planar surfaces and Au nanoparticles controlling the J-aggregate/Au distance opens a new path regarding their improved stability and the wide range of biological applications of both CNN and AuNP biocompatible systems.Heptamethinecyanine J-aggregates display sharp, intense fluorescence emission making them attractive candidates for developing a variety of chem-bio-sensing applications. They have been immobilized on planar thiol-covered Au surfaces and thiol-capped Au nanoparticles by weak molecular interactions. In this work the self-assembly of novel thiolated cyanine (CNN) on Au(111) and citrate-capped AuNPs from solutions containing monomers and J-aggregates has been studied by using STM, XPS, PM-IRRAS, electrochemical techniques and Raman spectroscopy. Data show

  10. Photoionization of Au+, Au2+, and Au3+ ions and developments in the synthesis of the metallofullerene Au@C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilcoyne, A. L. David; Muller, Alfred; Schippers, Stefan; Hellhund, Jonas; Borovik, Alexander; Mueller, Allison; Gross, Dylan; Johnson, Andrea; Macaluso, David; A. L. D. Kilcoyne Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    Absolute single photoionization of Au+, Au2+, and Au3+ ions was investigated via the merged-beams technique at AMO Beamline 10.0.1.2 of the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The absolute single photoionization yield was measured as a function of photon energy for each species from the metastable state ionization threshold region to well above the ground state ionization potential. Additional high-resolution measurements were performed for Au+ and Au2+ ions in the region of the ground and metastable state ionization thresholds to better resolve the detailed resonant structure found therein. This structure was used, along with the reported excited state energy levels of Au+, to preliminarily identify previously unreported excitation levels in all three ions. In addition and as a component of the same program, photoionization studies of the endohedral metallofullerene Au@C60+were performed using endohedral fullerene samples synthesized on-site at Beamline 10.0.1.2 of the ALS.

  11. Controlled Synthesis of Au@AgAu Yolk-Shell Cuboctahedra with Well-Defined Facets.

    PubMed

    Londono-Calderon, Alejandra; Bahena, Daniel; Yacaman, Miguel J

    2016-08-01

    The synthesis of Au@AgAu yolk-shell cuboctahedra nanoparticles formed by galvanic replacement in a seed-mediated method is described. Initially, single-crystal Au seeds are used for the formation of Au@Ag core-shell nanocubes, which serve as the template material for the deposition of an external Au layer. The well-controlled synthesis yields the formation of cuboctahedra nanoparticles with smooth inner and outer Au/Ag surfaces. The deposition/oxidation process is described to understand the formation of cuboctahedra and octahedra nanoparticles. The Au core maintains the initial morphology of the seed and remains static at the center of the yolk-shell because of residual Ag. Structural analysis of the shell indicates intrinsic stacking faults (SFs) near the surface. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) compositional analysis show an Au-Ag nonordered alloy forming the shell. The three-dimensional structure of the nanoparticles presented open facets on the [111] as observed by electron tomography SIRT reconstruction over a stack of high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) images. The geometrical model was validated by analyzing the direction of streaks in coherent nanobeam diffraction (NBD). The catalytic activity was evaluated using a model reaction based on the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NTP) by NaBH4 in the presence of Au@AgAu yolk-shell nanoparticles. PMID:27385583

  12. Au40: A large tetrahedral magic cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, De-En; Walter, Michael

    2011-11-01

    40 is a magic number for tetrahedral symmetry predicted in both nuclear physics and the electronic jellium model. We show that Au40 could be such a a magic cluster from density functional theory-based basin hopping for global minimization. The putative global minimum found for Au40 has a twisted pyramid structure, reminiscent of the famous tetrahedral Au20, and a sizable HOMO-LUMO gap of 0.69 eV, indicating its molecular nature. Analysis of the electronic states reveals that the gap is related to shell closings of the metallic electrons in a tetrahedrally distorted effective potential.

  13. Au40: A Large Tetrahedral Magic Cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Deen; Walter, Michael

    2011-01-01

    40 is a magic number for tetrahedral symmetry predicted in both nuclear physics and the electronic jellium model. We show that Au{sub 40} could be such a magic cluster from density functional theory-based basin hopping for global minimization. The putative global minimum found for Au{sub 40} has a twisted pyramid structure, reminiscent of the famous tetrahedral Au{sub 20}, and a sizable HOMO-LUMO gap of 0.69 eV, indicating its molecular nature. Analysis of the electronic states reveals that the gap is related to shell closings of the metallic electrons in a tetrahedrally distorted effective potential.

  14. d + Au hadron correlation measurements from PHENIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sickles, Anne M.

    2015-01-01

    Recent observations of extended pseudorapidity correlations at the LHC in p+p and p+Pb collisions are of great interest. Here we present related results from d+Au collisions at PHENIX. We present the observed v2 and discuss the possible origin in the geometry of the collision region. We also present new measurements of the pseudorapidity dependence of the ridge in d+Au collision. Future plans to clarify the role of geometry in small collision systems using 3 He + Au collisions are discussed.

  15. Au, Ge and AuGe Nanoparticles Fabricated by Laser Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Musaev, O.R.; Sutter, E.; Wrobel, J.M.; Kruger, M.B.

    2012-02-01

    A eutectic AuGe target immersed in distilled water was ablated by pulsed ultraviolet laser light. The structure of the ablated material was investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). The images show formation of nanowire structures of AuGe up to 100 nm in length, with widths of 5-10 nm. These nanostructures have Ge content significantly lower than the target material. Electron diffraction demonstrates that they crystallize in the {alpha}-AuGe structure. For comparison, laser ablation of pure Au and pure Ge targets was also performed under the same conditions. HRTEM shows that Ge forms spherical nanoparticles with a characteristic size of {approx}30 nm. Au forms spherical nanoparticles with diameters of {approx}10 nm. Similar to AuGe, it also forms chainlike structures with substantially lower aspect ratio.

  16. Ir-induced activation of Au towards CO adsorption: Ir films deposited on Au{111}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tianfu; Driver, Stephen M.; Pratt, Stephanie J.; Jenkins, Stephen J.; King, David A.

    2016-06-01

    We have investigated the interaction of CO with Ir/Au{111} bimetallic surfaces, and the influence of morphology changes as Ir moves sub-surface into the Au bulk, using reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS). The presence of Ir stabilises CO on exposed regions of the Au surface at temperatures up to around 200 K: we attribute this to low-coordinated Au sites, probably associated with lifting of the clean-surface 'herringbone' reconstruction by Ir deposition. The highest density of active Au sites is obtained after annealing the bimetallic surface to 500-600 K: we attribute this to morphology changes associated with the movement of Ir into bulk Au.

  17. Charged hadron transverse momentum distributions in Au+Au collisions at S=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Christof; PHOBOS Collaboration; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Ballintijn, M.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2003-03-01

    We present transverse momentum distributions of charged hadrons produced in Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s_NN) = 200 GeV. The evolution of the spectra for transverse momenta p_T from 0.25 to 5GeV/c is studied as a function of collision centrality over a range from 65 to 344 participating nucleons. We find a significant change of the spectral shape between proton-antiproton and peripheral Au+Au collisions. Comparing peripheral to central Au+Au collisions, we find that the yields at the highest p_T exhibit approximate scaling with the number of participating nucleons, rather than scaling with the number of binary collisions.

  18. RHIC Au beam in Run 2014

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, S. Y.

    2014-09-15

    Au beam at the RHIC ramp in run 2014 is reviewed together with the run 2011 and run 2012. Observed bunch length and longitudinal emittance are compared with the IBS simulations. The IBS growth rate of the longitudinal emittance in run 2014 is similar to run 2011, and both are larger than run 2012. This is explained by the large transverse emittance at high intensity observed in run 2012, but not in run 2014. The big improvement of the AGS ramping in run 2014 might be related to this change. The importance of the injector intensity improvement in run 2014 is emphasized, which gives rise to the initial luminosity improvement of 50% in run 2014, compared with the previous Au-Au run 2011. In addition, a modified IBS model, which is calibrated using the RHIC Au runs from 9.8 GeV/n to 100 GeV/n, is presented and used in the study.

  19. Counterion-Mediated Assembly of Spherical Nucleic Acid-Au Nanoparticle Conjugates (SNA-AuNPs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kewalramani, Sumit; Moreau, Liane; Guerrero-García, Guillermo; Mirkin, Chad; Olvera de La Cruz, Monica; Bedzyk, Michael; Afosr Muri Team

    2015-03-01

    Controlled crystallization of colloids from solution has been a goal of material scientists for decades. Recently, nucleic acid functionalized spherical Au nanoparticles (SNA-AuNPs) have been programmed to assemble in a wide variety of crystal structures. In this approach, the assembly is driven by Watson-Crick hybridization between DNAs coating the AuNPs. Here, we show that counterions can induce ordered assembly of SNA-AuNPs in bulk solutions, even in the absence of base pairing interactions. The electrostatics-driven assembly of spherical nucleic acid-Au nanoparticle conjugates (SNA-AuNPs) is probed as a function of counterion concentration and counterion valency [ +1 (Na+) or +2 (Ca2+) ] by in situ solution X-ray scattering. Assemblies of AuNPs capped with single-stranded (ss-) or double-stranded (ds-) DNA are examined. SAXS reveals disordered (gas-like) --> face-centered-cubic (FCC) --> glass-like phase transitions with increasing solution ionic strength. These studies demonstrate how non-base-pairing interactions can be tuned to create crystalline assemblies of SNA-AuNPs. The dependence of the inter-SNA-AuNP interactions on counterion valency and stiffness of the DNA corona will be discussed.

  20. Sclerometric study of galvanic AuNi and AuCo coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shugurov, A. R.; Panin, A. V.; Shesterikov, E. V.

    2011-03-01

    Mechanisms of wear in galvanic AuNi and AuCo coatings have been studied using the methods of sclerometry and atomic force microscopy. It is demonstrated that the scratch test at a small load can be used for a comparative analysis of the resistance of metal coatings to abrasive wear. It is established that a developed surface relief related to the formation of grain agglomerates provides for a higher wear resistance of AuCo coatings as compared to that of smooth AuNi films, which is explained by dissipation of the elastic energy of the contact interaction of the sclerometric indenter with the sample surface.

  1. DFT study on cysteine adsorption mechanism on Au(111) and Au(110)

    SciTech Connect

    Buimaga-Iarinca, Luiza; Floare, Calin G.; Calborean, Adrian; Turcu, Ioan

    2013-11-13

    Periodic density functional theory calculations were used to investigate relevant aspects of adsorption mechanisms of cysteine dimers in protonated form on Au(111) and Au(110) surfaces. The projected densities of states are explicitly discussed for all main chemical groups of cysteine, i.e. the amino group (NH2), the thiol group (SH) and the carboxylic group (COOH) to identify differences in adsorption mechanism. Special emphasis is put on the analysis of changes in the electronic structure of molecules adsorbed on Au(111) and Au(110) surfaces as well as the accompanying charge transfer mechanisms at molecule-substrate interaction.

  2. Systematic Measurements of Identified Particle Spectra in pp, d+Au and Au+Au Collisions from STAR

    SciTech Connect

    STAR Coll

    2009-04-11

    Identified charged particle spectra of {pi}{sup {+-}}, K{sup {+-}}, p and {bar p} at mid-rapidity (|y| < 0.1) measured by the dE/dx method in the STAR-TPC are reported for pp and d + Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV and for Au + Au collisions at 62.4 GeV, 130 GeV, and 200 GeV. Average transverse momenta, total particle production, particle yield ratios, strangeness and baryon production rates are investigated as a function of the collision system and centrality. The transverse momentum spectra are found to be flatter for heavy particles than for light particles in all collision systems; the effect is more prominent for more central collisions. The extracted average transverse momentum of each particle species follows a trend determined by the total charged particle multiplicity density. The Bjorken energy density estimate is at least several GeV/fm{sub 3} for a formation time less than 1 fm/c. A significantly larger net-baryon density and a stronger increase of the net-baryon density with centrality are found in Au + Au collisions at 62.4 GeV than at the two higher energies. Antibaryon production relative to total particle multiplicity is found to be constant over centrality, but increases with the collision energy. Strangeness production relative to total particle multiplicity is similar at the three measured RHIC energies. Relative strangeness production increases quickly with centrality in peripheral Au + Au collisions, to a value about 50% above the pp value, and remains rather constant in more central collisions. Bulk freeze-out properties are extracted from thermal equilibrium model and hydrodynamics-motivated blast-wave model fits to the data. Resonance decays are found to have little effect on the extracted kinetic freeze-out parameters due to the transverse momentum range of our measurements. The extracted chemical freeze-out temperature is constant, independent of collision system or centrality; its value is close to the predicted phase

  3. Systematic measurements of identified particle spectra in pp, d+Au, and Au+Au collisions at the star detector.

    SciTech Connect

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H. M.; Underwood, D. G.; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Illinois; Panjab Univ.; Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre; Kent State Univ.; Particle Physic Lab.; STAR Collaboration

    2009-01-01

    Identified charged-particle spectra of {pi}{sup {+-}}, K{sup {+-}}, p, and {bar p} at midrapidity (|y|<0.1) measured by the dE/dx method in the STAR (solenoidal tracker at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) time projection chamber are reported for pp and d+Au collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV and for Au+Au collisions at 62.4, 130, and 200 GeV. Average transverse momenta, total particle production, particle yield ratios, strangeness, and baryon production rates are investigated as a function of the collision system and centrality. The transverse momentum spectra are found to be flatter for heavy particles than for light particles in all collision systems; the effect is more prominent for more central collisions. The extracted average transverse momentum of each particle species follows a trend determined by the total charged-particle multiplicity density. The Bjorken energy density estimate is at least several GeV/fm{sup 3} for a formation time less than 1 fm/c. A significantly larger net-baryon density and a stronger increase of the net-baryon density with centrality are found in Au+Au collisions at 62.4 GeV than at the two higher energies. Antibaryon production relative to total particle multiplicity is found to be constant over centrality, but increases with the collision energy. Strangeness production relative to total particle multiplicity is similar at the three measured RHIC energies. Relative strangeness production increases quickly with centrality in peripheral Au+Au collisions, to a value about 50% above the pp value, and remains rather constant in more central collisions. Bulk freeze-out properties are extracted from thermal equilibrium model and hydrodynamics-motivated blast-wave model fits to the data. Resonance decays are found to have little effect on the extracted kinetic freeze-out parameters because of the transverse momentum range of our measurements. The extracted chemical freeze-out temperature is constant, independent of

  4. Systematic measurements of identified particle spectra in pp, d+Au, and Au+Au collisions at the STAR detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sánchez, M. Calderón De La Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; Silva, C. De; Dedovich, T. G.; Dephillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jin, F.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lapointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C.-H.; Levine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, C.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Rykov, V.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X.-H.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Tram, V. N.; Trattner, A. L.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Buren, G. Van; van Leeuwen, M.; Molen, A. M. Vander; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C., Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yue, Q.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W. M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, Y.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, J.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zuo, J. X.

    2009-03-01

    Identified charged-particle spectra of π±, K±, p, and pmacr at midrapidity (|y|<0.1) measured by the dE/dx method in the STAR (solenoidal tracker at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) time projection chamber are reported for pp and d+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV and for Au+Au collisions at 62.4, 130, and 200 GeV. Average transverse momenta, total particle production, particle yield ratios, strangeness, and baryon production rates are investigated as a function of the collision system and centrality. The transverse momentum spectra are found to be flatter for heavy particles than for light particles in all collision systems; the effect is more prominent for more central collisions. The extracted average transverse momentum of each particle species follows a trend determined by the total charged-particle multiplicity density. The Bjorken energy density estimate is at least several GeV/fm3 for a formation time less than 1 fm/c. A significantly larger net-baryon density and a stronger increase of the net-baryon density with centrality are found in Au+Au collisions at 62.4 GeV than at the two higher energies. Antibaryon production relative to total particle multiplicity is found to be constant over centrality, but increases with the collision energy. Strangeness production relative to total particle multiplicity is similar at the three measured RHIC energies. Relative strangeness production increases quickly with centrality in peripheral Au+Au collisions, to a value about 50% above the pp value, and remains rather constant in more central collisions. Bulk freeze-out properties are extracted from thermal equilibrium model and hydrodynamics-motivated blast-wave model fits to the data. Resonance decays are found to have little effect on the extracted kinetic freeze-out parameters because of the transverse momentum range of our measurements. The extracted chemical freeze-out temperature is constant, independent of collision system or centrality; its value is close

  5. 100-MeV proton beam intensity measurement by Au activation analysis using 197Au(p, pn)196Au and 197Au(p, p3n)194Au reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhtari Oranj, Leila; Jung, Nam-Suk; Oh, Joo-Hee; Lee, Hee-Seock

    2016-05-01

    The proton beam intensity of a 100-MeV proton linac at the Korea Multi-purpose Accelerator Complex (KOMAC) was measured by an Au activation analysis using 197Au(p, pn)196Au and 197Au(p, p3n)194Au reactions to determine the accuracy and precision of beam intensity measurement using Gafchromic film dosimetry method. The target, irradiated by 100-MeV protons, was arranged in a stack consisting of Au, Al foils and Pb plates. The yields of produced radio-nuclei in Au foils were obtained by gamma-ray spectroscopy. The FLUKA code was employed to calculate the energy spectrum of protons onto the front surface of Au foils located at three different depth points of the target and also to investigate the condition of incident beam on the target. A good agreement was found between the beam intensity measurements using the activation analysis method at three different depth points of the target. An excellent agreement was also observed between the beam intensity measurements using the Au activation analysis method and the dosimetry method using Gafchromic film.

  6. EVENT STRUCTURE AT RHIC FROM P-P TO AU-AU.

    SciTech Connect

    TRAINOR,T.A.

    2004-03-15

    Several correlation analysis techniques are applied to p-p and Au-Au collisions at RHIC. Strong large-momentum-scale correlations are observed which can be related to local charge and momentum conservation during hadronization and to minijet (minimum-bias parton fragment) correlations.

  7. Using supported Au nanoparticles as starting material for preparing uniform Au/Pd bimetallic catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Villa, Alberto; Prati, Laura; Su, Dangshen; Wang, Di; Veith, Gabriel M

    2010-01-01

    One of the best methods for producing bulk homogeneous (composition) supported bimetallic AuPd clusters involves the immobilization of a protected Au seed followed by the addition of Pd. This paper investigates the importance of this gold seed in controlling the resulting bimetallic AuPd clusters structures, sizes and catalytic activities by investigating three different gold seeds. Uniform Au-Pd alloy were obtained when a steric/electrostatic protecting group, poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), was used to form the gold clusters on activated carbon (AC). In contrast Au/AC precursors prepared using Au nanoparticles with only electrostatic stabilization (tetrakis(hydroxypropyl)phosphonium chloride (THPC)), or no stabilization (magnetron sputtering) produced inhomogeneous alloys and segregation of the gold and palladium. The uniform alloyed catalyst (Pd{at}Au{sub PVA}/AC) is the most active and selective catalyst, while the inhomogenous catalysts are less active and selective. Further study of the PVA protected Au clusters revealed that the amount of PVA used is also critical for the preparation of uniform alloyed catalyst, their stability, and their catalytic activity.

  8. Electrochemical Characterization of Protein Adsorption onto YNGRT-Au and VLGXE-Au Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Trzeciakiewicz, Hanna; Esteves-Villanueva, Jose; Soudy, Rania; Kaur, Kamaljit; Martic-Milne, Sanela

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption of the proteins CD13, mucin and bovine serum albumin on VLGXE-Au and YNGRT-Au interfaces was monitored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in the presence of [Fe(CN)6](3-/4-). The hydrophobicity of the Au surface was tailored using specific peptides, blocking agents and diluents. The combination of blocking agents (ethanolamine or n-butylamine) and diluents (hexanethiol or 2-mercaptoethanol) was used to prepare various peptide-modified Au surfaces. Protein adsorption onto the peptide-Au surfaces modified with the combination of n-butylamine and hexanethiol produced a dramatic decrease in the charge transfer resistance, Rct, for all three proteins. In contrast, polar peptide-surfaces induced a minimal change in Rct for all three proteins. Furthermore, an increase in Rct was observed with CD13 (an aminopeptidase overexpressed in certain cancers) in comparison to the other proteins when the VLGXE-Au surface was modified with n-butylamine as a blocking agent. The electrochemical data indicated that protein adsorption may be modulated by tailoring the peptide sequence on Au surfaces and that blocking agents and diluents play a key role in promoting or preventing protein adsorption. The peptide-Au platform may also be used for targeting cancer biomarkers with designer peptides. PMID:26262621

  9. The extraction characteristic of Au-Ag from Au concentrate by thiourea solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Bongju; Cho, Kanghee; On, Hyunsung; Choi, Nagchoul; Park, Cheonyoung

    2013-04-01

    The cyanidation process has been used commercially for the past 100 years, there are ores that are not amenable to treatment by cyanide. Interest in alternative lixiviants, such as thiourea, halogens, thiosulfate and malononitrile, has been revived as a result of a major increase in gold price, which has stimulated new developments in extraction technology, combined with environmental concern. The Au extraction process using the thiourea solvent has many advantages over the cyanidation process, including higher leaching rates, faster extraction time and less than toxicity. The purpose of this study was investigated to the extraction characteristic of Au-Ag from two different Au concentrate (sulfuric acid washing and roasting) under various experiment conditions (thiourea concentration, pH of solvent, temperature) by thiourea solvent. The result of extraction experiment showed that the Au-Ag extraction was a fast extraction process, reaching equilibrium (maximum extraction rate) within 30 min. The Au-Ag extraction rate was higher in the roasted concentrate than in the sulfuric acid washing. The higher the Au-Ag extraction rate (Au - 70.87%, Ag - 98.12%) from roasted concentrate was found when the more concentration of thiourea increased, pH decreased and extraction temperature increased. This study informs extraction method basic knowledge when thiourea was a possibility to eco-/economic resources of Au-Ag utilization studies including the hydrometallurgy.

  10. Electrochemical Characterization of Protein Adsorption onto YNGRT-Au and VLGXE-Au Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Trzeciakiewicz, Hanna; Esteves-Villanueva, Jose; Soudy, Rania; Kaur, Kamaljit; Martic-Milne, Sanela

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption of the proteins CD13, mucin and bovine serum albumin on VLGXE-Au and YNGRT-Au interfaces was monitored by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in the presence of [Fe(CN)6]3−/4−. The hydrophobicity of the Au surface was tailored using specific peptides, blocking agents and diluents. The combination of blocking agents (ethanolamine or n-butylamine) and diluents (hexanethiol or 2-mercaptoethanol) was used to prepare various peptide-modified Au surfaces. Protein adsorption onto the peptide-Au surfaces modified with the combination of n-butylamine and hexanethiol produced a dramatic decrease in the charge transfer resistance, Rct, for all three proteins. In contrast, polar peptide-surfaces induced a minimal change in Rct for all three proteins. Furthermore, an increase in Rct was observed with CD13 (an aminopeptidase overexpressed in certain cancers) in comparison to the other proteins when the VLGXE-Au surface was modified with n-butylamine as a blocking agent. The electrochemical data indicated that protein adsorption may be modulated by tailoring the peptide sequence on Au surfaces and that blocking agents and diluents play a key role in promoting or preventing protein adsorption. The peptide-Au platform may also be used for targeting cancer biomarkers with designer peptides. PMID:26262621

  11. Identified particles in Au+Au collisions at S=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phobos Collaboration; Wosiek, Barbara; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Ballintijn, M.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2003-03-01

    The yields of identified particles have been measured at RHIC for Au+Au collisions at S=200 GeV using the PHOBOS spectrometer. The ratios of antiparticle to particle yields near mid-rapidity are presented. The first measurements of the invariant yields of charged pions, kaons and protons at very low transverse momenta are also shown.

  12. Observation of anisotropic event shapes and transverse flow in ultrarelativistic Au+Au collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Barrette, J.; Bellwied, R.; Bennett, S.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Cleland, W.E.; Clemen, M.; Cole, J.; Cormier, T.M.; David, G.; Dee, J.; Dietzsch, O.; Drigert, M.; Gilbert, S.; Hall, J.R.; Hemmick, T.K.; Herrmann, N.; Hong, B.; Jiang, C.L.; Kwon, Y.; Lacasse, R.; Lukaszew, A.; Li, Q.; Ludlam, T.W.; McCorkle, S.; Mark, S.K.; Matheus, R.; O'Brien, E.; Panitkin, S.; Piazza, T.; Pruneau, C.; Rao, M.N.; Rosati, M.; daSilva, N.C.; Sedykh, S.; Sonnadara, U.; Stachel, J.; Takai, H.; Takagui, E.M.; Voloshin, S.; Wang, G.; Wessels, J.P.; Woody, C.L.; Xu, N.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zou, C. Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho 83402 McGill Univesity, Montreal, H3A 2T8 University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 SUNY, Stony Brook, New York, 11794 University of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo

    1994-11-07

    Event shapes for Au + Au collisions at 11.4 GeV/[ital c] per nucleon were studied over nearly the full solid angle with the E877 apparatus. The analysis was performed by Fourier expansion of azimuthal distributions of the transverse energy ([ital E][sub [ital T

  13. The role of plasmons and interband transitions in the color of AuAl2, AuIn2, and AuGa2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keast, V. J.; Birt, K.; Koch, C. T.; Supansomboon, S.; Cortie, M. B.

    2011-09-01

    First principles calculations of the optical properties of the intermetallic compounds AuAl2, AuIn2, and AuGa2 have been performed. Analysis of the dielectric functions showed that AuAl2 is unique because a bulk plasmon is seen in the optical region and contributes to the purple color of this material. An experimental electron energy-loss spectrum showed excellent agreement with the theoretical prediction and confirmed the presence of the bulk plasmon.

  14. Jets and dijets in Au+Au and p+p collisions at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Hardtke, D.; STAR Collaboration

    2002-12-09

    Recent data from RHIC suggest novel nuclear effects in the production of high p{sub T} hadrons. We present results from the STAR detector on high p{sub T} angular correlations in Au+Au and p+p collisions at {radical}S = 200 GeV/c. These two-particle angular correlation measurements verify the presence of a partonic hard scattering and fragmentation component at high p{sub T} in both central and peripheral Au+Au collisions. When triggering on a leading hadron with p{sub T}>4 GeV, we observe a quantitative agreement between the jet cone properties in p+p and all centralities of Au+Au collisions. This quantitative agreement indicates that nearly all hadrons with p{sub T}>4 GeV/c come from jet fragmentation and that jet fragmentation properties are not substantially modified in Au+Au collisions. STAR has also measured the strength of back-to-back high p{sub T} charged hadron correlations, and observes a small suppression of the back-to-back correlation strength in peripheral collisions, and a nearly complete disappearance o f back-to-back correlations in central Au+Au events. These phenomena, together with the observed strong suppression of inclusive yields and large value of elliptic flow at high p{sub T}, are consistent with a model where high p{sub T} hadrons come from partons created near the surface of the collision region, and where partons that originate or propagate towards the center of the collision region are substantially slowed or completely absorbed.

  15. Interaction of HNCO with Au(111) surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farkas, A. P.; Berkó, A.; Solymosi, F.

    2012-08-01

    The surface chemistry of isocyanic acid, HNCO, and its dissociation product, NCO, was studied on clean, O-dosed and Ar ion bombarded Au(111) surfaces. The techniques used are high resolution energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). The structure of Ar ion etched surface is explored by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). HNCO adsorbs molecularly on Au(111) surface at 100 K yielding strong losses at 1390, 2270 and 3230 cm- 1. The weakly adsorbed HNCO desorbs in two peaks characterized by Tp = 130 and 145 K. The dissociation of the chemisorbed HNCO occurs at 150 K to give NCO species characterized by a vibration at 2185 cm- 1. The dissociation process is facilitated by the presence of preadsorbed O and by defect sites on Au(111) produced by Ar ion bombardment. In the latter case the loss feature of NCO appeared at 2130 cm- 1. Isocyanate on Au(111) surface was found to be more stable than on the single crystal surfaces of Pt-group metals. Results are compared with those obtained on supported Au catalysts.

  16. GRACE-Based Analysis of Total Water Storage Trends and Groundwater Fluctuations in the North-Western Sahara Aquifer System (NWSAS) and Tindouf Aquifer in Northwest Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lezzaik, K. A.; Milewski, A.

    2013-12-01

    Optimal water management practices and strategies, in arid and semi-arid environments, are often hindered by a lack of quantitative and qualitative understanding of hydrological processes. Moreover, progressive overexploitation of groundwater resources to meet agricultural, industrial, and domestic requirements is drawing concern over the sustainability of such exhaustive abstraction levels, especially in environments where groundwater is a major source of water. NASA's GRACE (gravity recovery and climate change experiment) mission, since March 2002, has advanced the understanding of hydrological events, especially groundwater depletion, through integrated measurements and modeling of terrestrial water mass. In this study, GLDAS variables (rainfall rate, evapotranspiration rate, average soil moisture), and TRMM 3B42.V7A precipitation satellite data, were used in combination with 95 GRACE-generated gravitational anomalies maps, to quantify total water storage change (TWSC) and groundwater storage change (GWSC) from January 2003 to December 2010 (excluding June 2003), in the North-Western Sahara Aquifer System (NWSAS) and Tindouf Aquifer System in northwestern Africa. Separately processed and computed GRACE products by JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, NASA), CSR (Center of Space Research, UT Austin), and GFZ (German Research Centre for Geoscience, Potsdam), were used to determine which GRACE dataset(s) best reflect total water storage and ground water changes in northwest Africa. First-order estimates of annual TWSC for NWSAS (JPL: +5.297 BCM; CSR: -5.33 BCM; GFZ: -9.96 BCM) and Tindouf Aquifer System (JPL: +1.217 BCM; CSR: +0.203 BCM; GFZ: +1.019 BCM), were computed using zonal averaging over a span of eight years. Preliminary findings of annual GWSC for NWSAS (JPL: +2.45 BCM; CSR: -2.278 BCM; GFZ: -6.913 BCM) and Tindouf Aquifer System (JPL: +1.108 BCM; CSR: +0.094 BCM; GFZ: +0.910 BCM), were calculating using a water budget approach, parameterized by GLDAS

  17. Synthesis and characterization in AuCu–Si nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Novelo, T.E.; Amézaga-Madrid, P.; Maldonado, R.D.; Oliva, A.I.; Alonzo-Medina, G.M.

    2015-03-15

    Au/Cu bilayers with different Au:Cu concentrations (25:75, 50:50 and 75:25 at.%) were deposited on Si(100) substrates by thermal evaporation. The thicknesses of all Au/Cu bilayers were 150 nm. The alloys were prepared by thermal diffusion into a vacuum oven with argon atmosphere at 690 K during 1 h. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed different phases of AuCu and CuSi alloys in the samples after annealing process. CuSi alloys were mainly obtained for 25:75 at.% samples, meanwhile the AuCuII phase dominates for samples prepared with 50:50 at.%. Additionally, the Au:Cu alloys with 75:25 at.%, produce Au{sub 2}Cu{sub 3} and Au{sub 3}Cu phases. The formed alloys were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) to study the morphology and the elemental concentration of the formed alloys. - Highlights: • AuCu/Si alloy thin films were prepared by thermal diffusion. • Alloys prepared with 50 at.% of Au produce the AuCuII phase. • Alloys prepared with 75 at.% of Au produce Au{sub 3}Cu and Au{sub 2}Cu{sub 3} phases. • All alloys present diffusion of Si and Cu through the CuSi alloy formation.

  18. Body composition assessment of English Premier League soccer players: a comparative DXA analysis of first team, U21 and U18 squads.

    PubMed

    Milsom, Jordan; Naughton, Robert; O'Boyle, Andy; Iqbal, Zafar; Morgans, Ryland; Drust, Barry; Morton, James P

    2015-01-01

    Professional soccer players from the first team (1st team, n = 27), under twenty-one (U21, n = 21) and under eighteen (U18, n = 35) squads of an English Premier League soccer team were assessed for whole body and regional estimates of body composition using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Per cent body fat was lower in 1st team (10.0 ± 1.6) compared with both U21 (11.6 ± 2.5, P = 0.02) and U18 (11.4 ± 2.6, P = 0.01) players. However, this difference was not due to variations (P = 0.23) in fat mass between squads (7.8 ± 1.6 v. 8.8 ± 2.1 v. 8.2 ± 2.4 kg, respectively) but rather the presence of more lean mass in 1st team (66.9 ± 7.1 kg, P < 0.01) and U21 (64.6 ± 6.5 kg, P = 0.02) compared with U18 (60.6 ± 6.3 kg) players. Accordingly, fat mass index was not different (P = 0.138) between squads, whereas lean mass index was greater (P < 0.01) in 1st team players (20.0 ± 1.1 kg · m(-2)) compared with U18 players (18.8 ± 1.4 kg · m(-2)). Differences in lean mass were also reflective of higher lean tissue mass in all regions, for example, upper limbs/lower limbs and trunk. Data suggest that training and nutritional interventions for younger players should therefore be targeted to lean mass growth as opposed to body fat loss. PMID:25686107

  19. Match analysis of U9 and U10 english premier league academy soccer players using a global positioning system: relevance for talent identification and development.

    PubMed

    Goto, Heita; Morris, John G; Nevill, Mary E

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the match activity profile of U9 and U10 elite soccer players and to establish if there were any differences between players who were subsequently retained or released by their clubs. Such information should prove valuable in the design of training programs for these very young players and in the talent identification and development process. A Global Positioning System was used to analyze 2-4 interacademy 6-a-side matches of English Premier League Academy players (U9: N = 22 and U10: N = 12) who trained 3 times a week (4.5 hours). Speed zones were created based on 5 and 10-m sprint times, and an independent sample t-test was employed for a statistical analysis. Both squads covered ∼4,000 m in total or ∼4,700 m·h during a match (p = NS between squads), with the U10 squad tending to cover a greater distance at moderate (p = 0.10) and high speeds (p = 0.08) than the U9 squad. Retained group covered a greater distance than released group (retained vs. released: 4,478 ± 513 m vs. 4,091 ± 462 m, p < 0.05) during a match and covered a greater distance during low-speed running in absolute (1,226 ± 259 m vs. 1,005 ± 221 m, p < 0.05) and relative (1,325 ± 235 m·h vs. 1,132 ± 210 m·h, p < 0.05) terms. Thus, U9 and U10 players cover over 4000 m in match play, and those players who are retained by academies cover a greater distance in total and at low speeds (2.1-3.1 m·s). This information may support the preparation of squad training programs and the talent identification and development process. PMID:23799422

  20. Les perdus de vue en radiothérapie: expérience de l'Institut National d'Oncologie au Maroc

    PubMed Central

    Mezouri, Imane; Chenna, Hanane; Bellefqih, Sara; Elkacemi, Hanan; Kebdani, Tayeb; Benjaafar, Noureddine

    2014-01-01

    Les perdus de vue (PDV) sont toute personne incluse dans un programme et dont on est sans nouvelles depuis six mois. L'objectif de cette étude est de fournir une description objective du problème des malades PDV au service de radiothérapie à l'Institut National d'Oncologie (INO), elle permet d’étudier l'impact des facteurs socio-économiques, démographiques et ceux liés à la maladie entraînant l'abandon du traitement par le patient. Nous avons réalisé une étude rétrospective de 77 patients PDV parmi 2254 patient admis à l'INO du premier janvier au 31 décembre 2011 pour traitement par radiothérapie. La présente analyse a mis en évidence que les taux d'abandon sont associés à des facteurs liés à la maladie et qu’à la fois le patient et le médecin doivent être formés et être conscients de la façon dont les stades avancés de la maladie, le mauvais statut de performance ainsi que la combinaison des autres problèmes de santé peuvent suffisamment conduire le patient à l'abandon du traitement. PMID:25584129

  1. Au nanoparticles films used in biological sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosales Pérez, M.; Delgado Macuil, R.; Rojas López, M.; Gayou, V. L.; Sánchez Ramírez, J. F.

    2009-05-01

    Lactobacillus para paracasei are used commonly as functional food and probiotic substances. In this work Au nanoparticles self-assembled films were used for Lactobacillus para paracasei determination at five different concentrations. Functionalized substrates were immersed in a colloidal solution for one and a half hour at room temperature and dried at room temperature during four hours. After that, drops of Lactobacillus para paracasei in aqueous solution were put into the Au nanoparticles film and let dry at room temperature for another two hours. Infrared spectroscopy in attenuated total reflectance sampling mode was used to observe generation peaks due to substrate silanization, enhancement of Si-O band intensity due to the Au colloids added to silanized substrate and also to observe the enhancement of Lactobacillus para paracasei infrared intensity of the characteristic frequencies at 1650, 1534 and 1450 cm-1 due to surface enhancement infrared absorption.

  2. Au-Ag@Au Hollow Nanostructure with Enhanced Chemical Stability and Improved Photothermal Transduction Efficiency for Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tongtong; Song, Jiangluqi; Zhang, Wenting; Wang, Hao; Li, Xiaodong; Xia, Ruixiang; Zhu, Lixin; Xu, Xiaoliang

    2015-10-01

    Despite the fact that Au-Ag hollow nanoparticles (HNPs) have gained much attention as ablation agents for photothermal therapy, the instability of the Ag element limits their applications. Herein, excess Au atoms were deposited on the surface of a Au-Ag HNP by improving the reduction power of l-ascorbic acid (AA) and thereby preventing the reaction between HAuCl4 and the Ag element in the Au-Ag alloy nanostructure. Significantly, the obtained Au-Ag@Au HNPs show excellent chemical stability in an oxidative environment, together with remarkable increase in extinction peak intensity and obvious narrowing in peak width. Moreover, finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) was used to simulate the optical properties and electric field distribution of HNPs. The calculated results show that the proportion of absorption cross section in total extinction cross section increases with the improvement of Au content in HNP. As predicted by the theoretical calculation results, Au-Ag@Au nanocages (NCs) exhibit a photothermal transduction efficiency (η) as high as 36.5% at 808 nm, which is higher than that of Au-Ag NCs (31.2%). Irradiated by 808 nm laser at power densities of 1 W/cm(2), MCF-7 breast cancer cells incubated with PEGylated Au-Ag@Au NCs were seriously destroyed. Combined together, Au-Ag@Au HNPs with enhanced chemical stability and improved photothermal transduction efficiency show superior competitiveness as photothermal agents. PMID:26371629

  3. The role of interfaces in the magnetoresistance of Au/Fe/Au/Fe/GaAs(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Enders, A.; Monchesky, T. L.; Myrtle, K.; Urban, R.; Heinrich, B.; Kirschner, J.; Zhang, X.-G.; Butler, W. H.

    2001-06-01

    The electron transport and magnetoresistance (MR) were investigated in high quality crystalline epitaxial Fe(001) and Au(001) films and exchange coupled Au/Fe/Au/Fe/GaAs(001) trilayer structures. Fits to the experimental data were based on the semiclassical Boltzmann equation, which incorporates the electronic properties obtained from first-principles local density functional calculations. The fits require a surprisingly high asymmetry for the spin dependent electron lifetimes in Fe, {tau}{sup {down_arrow}}/{tau}{sup {up_arrow}}=10 at room temperature. Despite the large atomic terraces at the Au/vacuum and Fe/GaAs interfaces the scattering at the outer interfaces was found to be diffuse. The origin of MR in Au/Fe/Au/Fe/GaAs(001) structures is due to electron channeling in the Au spacer layer. The measured MR is consistent with the diffusivity parameters s{sup {up_arrow}}=0.55, s{sup {down_arrow}}=0.77 at the metal{endash}metal interfaces. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  4. Plasmonic Fano resonance and dip of Au-SiO2-Au nanomatryoshka.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Jiunn-Woei; Chen, Huang-Chih; Kuo, Mao-Kuen

    2013-01-01

    This study theoretically investigates Fano resonances and dips of an Au-SiO2-Au nanomatryoshka that is excited by a nearby electric dipole. An analytical solution of dyadic Green's functions is used to analyze the radiative and nonradiative power spectra of a radial dipole in the proximity of a nanomatryoshka. From these spectra, the plasmon modes and Fano resonances that accompany the Fano dips are identified. In addition, the scattering and absorption spectra of a nanomatryoshka that is illuminated by a plane wave are investigated to confirm these modes and Fano dips. Our results reveal that a Fano dip splits each of the dipole and quadrupole modes into bonding and anti-bonding modes. The Fano dip and resonance result from the destructive interference of the plasmon modes of the Au shell and the Au core. The Fano factors that are obtained from the nonradiative power spectra of the Au shell and the Au core of a nanomatryoshka are in accordance with those obtained from the absorption cross section spectra. Moreover, these Fano factors increase as the plasmonic coupling of the Au shell with the core increases for both dipole and quadrupole modes. PMID:24206789

  5. Plasmonic Fano resonance and dip of Au-SiO2-Au nanomatryoshka

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This study theoretically investigates Fano resonances and dips of an Au-SiO2-Au nanomatryoshka that is excited by a nearby electric dipole. An analytical solution of dyadic Green's functions is used to analyze the radiative and nonradiative power spectra of a radial dipole in the proximity of a nanomatryoshka. From these spectra, the plasmon modes and Fano resonances that accompany the Fano dips are identified. In addition, the scattering and absorption spectra of a nanomatryoshka that is illuminated by a plane wave are investigated to confirm these modes and Fano dips. Our results reveal that a Fano dip splits each of the dipole and quadrupole modes into bonding and anti-bonding modes. The Fano dip and resonance result from the destructive interference of the plasmon modes of the Au shell and the Au core. The Fano factors that are obtained from the nonradiative power spectra of the Au shell and the Au core of a nanomatryoshka are in accordance with those obtained from the absorption cross section spectra. Moreover, these Fano factors increase as the plasmonic coupling of the Au shell with the core increases for both dipole and quadrupole modes. PMID:24206789

  6. Fabrication of segmented Au/Co/Au nanowires: insights in the quality of Co/Au junctions.

    PubMed

    Jang, Bumjin; Pellicer, Eva; Guerrero, Miguel; Chen, Xiangzhong; Choi, Hongsoo; Nelson, Bradley J; Sort, Jordi; Pané, Salvador

    2014-08-27

    Electrodeposition is a versatile method, which enables the fabrication of a variety of wire-like nanoarchitectures such as nanowires, nanorods, and nanotubes. By means of template-assisted electrodeposition, segmented Au/Co/Au nanowires are grown in anodic aluminum oxide templates from two different electrolytes. To tailor the properties of the cobalt segments, several electrochemical conditions are studied as a function of current density, pulse deposition, and pH. The morphology, crystal structure, and magnetic properties are accordingly investigated. Changes in the deposition conditions affect the cobalt electrocrystallization process directly. Cobalt tends to crystallize mainly in the hexagonal close-packed structure, which is the reason cobalt might not accommodate satisfactorily on the face-centered cubic Au surface or vice versa. We demonstrate that by modifying the electrolyte and the applied current densities, changes in the texture and the crystalline structure of cobalt lead to a good quality connection between dissimilar segments. In particular, lowering the bath pH, or using pulse plating at a high overpotential, produces polycrystalline fcc Co and thus well-connected Co/Au bimetallic junctions with smooth interface. These are crucial factors to be carefully considered taking into account that nanowires are potential building blocks in micro- and nanoelectromechanical systems. PMID:25025496

  7. Evidence of final-state suppression of high-p{_ T} hadrons in Au + Au collisions using d + Au measurements at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Becker, B.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Harrington, A. S.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Khan, N.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lee, J. W.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sedykh, I.; Skulski, W.; Smith, C. E.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wysłouch, B.; Zhang, J.

    Transverse momentum spectra of charged hadrons with pT < 6 GeV/c have been measured near mid-rapidity (0.2 < ɛ < 1.4) by the PHOBOS experiment at RHIC in Au + Au and d + Au collisions at {√ {s{NN}} = {200 GeV}}. The spectra for different collision centralities are compared to {p + ¯ {p}} collisions at the same energy. The resulting nuclear modification factor for central Au + Au collisions shows evidence of strong suppression of charged hadrons in the high-pT region (>2 GeV/c). In contrast, the d + Au nuclear modification factor exhibits no suppression of the high-pT yields. These measurements suggest a large energy loss of the high-pT particles in the highly interacting medium created in the central Au + Au collisions. The lack of suppression in d + Au collisions suggests that it is unlikely that initial state effects can explain the suppression in the central Au + Au collisions. PACS: 25.75.-q

  8. Revisiting the S-Au(111) interaction: Static or Dynamic?

    SciTech Connect

    Biener, M M; Biener, J; Friend, C M

    2004-08-17

    The chemical inertness typically observed for Au does not imply a general inability to form stable bonds with non-metals but is rather a consequence of high reaction barriers. The Au-S interaction is probably the most intensively studied interaction of Au surfaces with non-metals as, for example, it plays an important role in Au ore formation, and controls the structure and dynamics of thiol-based self-assembled-monolayers (SAMs). In recent years a quite complex picture of the interaction of sulfur with Au(111) surfaces emerged, and a variety of S-induced surface structures was reported under different conditions. The majority of these structures were interpreted in terms of a static Au surface, where the positions of the Au atoms remain essentially unperturbed. Here we demonstrate that the Au(111) surface exhibits a very dynamic character upon interaction with adsorbed sulfur: low sulfur coverages modify the surface stress of the Au surface leading to lateral expansion of the surface layer; large-scale surface restructuring and incorporation of Au atoms into a growing two-dimensional AuS phase were observed with increasing sulfur coverage. These results provide new insight into the Au-S surface chemistry, and reveal the dynamic character of the Au(111) surface.

  9. Le premier developpement du langage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lezine, Irene

    1974-01-01

    This article emphasizes the importance of studying prelinguistic communication in infants. Motor development and environmental influences are seen to be important aspects of linguistic development. The possible link between sensorimotor activity and the syntactic structure of language development needs further exploration. (MS)

  10. Controlled deposition of Au on (BiO)2CO3 microspheres: the size and content of Au nanoparticles matter.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiuyan; Hao, Xiaodong; Guo, Xiaolong; Dong, Fan; Zhang, Yuxin

    2015-05-21

    Novel 3D Au/(BiO)2CO3 (Au/BOC) heterostructures with size-controlled Au nanoparticles (NPs) (2-10 nm) were first synthesized and used in photocatalytic removal of ppb-level NO for air cleaning. The photocatalytic performance of Au/BOC heterostructures was enhanced by fine-tuning the content of Au and the size of Au NPs. A new photocatalysis mechanism of surface scattering and reflecting (SSR) coupled with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) was proposed to understand the enhanced photocatalytic activity. PMID:25906416

  11. Charged hadron transverse momentum distributions in Au+Au collisions at √ SNN = 200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Ballintijn, M.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.; van Nieuwenhuizen, Gerrit; PHOBOS Collaboration

    2003-04-01

    We present transverse momentum distributions of charged hadrons produced in Au+Au collisions at √ SNN = 200 GeV. The evolution of the spectra for transverse momenta p T from 0.25 to 5 GeV/C is studied as a function of collision centrality. We find a significant change of the spectral shape between proton-antiproton and peripheral Au+Au collisions. When comparing peripheral to central Au+Au collisions, we find that the yields at the highest p T exhibit approximate scaling with the number of participating nucleons, rather than scaling with the number of binary collisions.

  12. Suppression of Upsilon production in d + Au and Au + Au collisions at root s(NN) = 200 GeV (vol 735, pg 127, 2014)

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Gliske, S.; Krueger, K.; Spinka, H. M.; Underwood, D. G.

    2014-07-30

    We report measurements of Υ meson production in p + p, d +Au, and Au+Aucollisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the Υ yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d +Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p +p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Υ (1S + 2S + 3S) in the rapidity range |y| < 1 in d + Aucollisions of RdAu = 0.79 ± 0.24(stat.) ± 0.03(syst.) ± 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 ±0.1(stat.) ±0.02(syst.) ±0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Υ mesons in Au + Aucollisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark–Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.

  13. Nanoporous Au: an unsupported pure gold catalyst?

    SciTech Connect

    Wittstock, A; Neumann, B; Schaefer, A; Dumbuya, K; Kuebel, C; Biener, M; Zielasek, V; Steinrueck, H; Gottfried, M; Biener, J; Hamza, A; B?umer, M

    2008-09-04

    The unique properties of gold especially in low temperature CO oxidation have been ascribed to a combination of various effects. In particular, particle sizes below a few nm and specific particle-support interactions have been shown to play important roles. On the contrary, recent reports revealed that monolithic nanoporous gold (npAu) prepared by leaching a less noble metal, such as Ag, out of the corresponding alloy can also exhibit remarkably high catalytic activity for CO oxidation, even though no support is present. Therefore, it was claimed to be a pure and unsupported gold catalyst. We investigated npAu with respect to its morphology, surface composition and catalytic properties. In particular, we studied the reaction kinetics for low temperature CO oxidation in detail taking mass transport limitation due to the porous structure of the material into account. Our results reveal that Ag, even if removed almost completely from the bulk, segregates to the surface resulting in surface concentrations of up to 10 at%. Our data suggest that this Ag plays a significant role in activation of molecular oxygen. Therefore, npAu should be considered as a bimetallic catalyst rather than a pure Au catalyst.

  14. Characterization of Au and Bimetallic PtAu Nanoparticles on PDDA-Graphene Sheets as Electrocatalysts for Formic Acid Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yung, Tung-Yuan; Liu, Ting-Yu; Huang, Li-Ying; Wang, Kuan-Syun; Tzou, Huei-Ming; Chen, Po-Tuan; Chao, Chi-Yang; Liu, Ling-Kang

    2015-09-01

    Nanocomposite materials of the Au nanoparticles (Au/PDDA-G) and the bimetallic PtAu nanoparticles on poly-(diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA)-modified graphene sheets (PtAu/PDDA-G) were prepared with hydrothermal method at 90 °C for 24 h. The composite materials Au/PDDA-G and PtAu/PDDA-G were evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) for exploring the structural characterization for the electrochemical catalysis. According to TEM results, the diameter of Au and bimetallic PtAu nanoparticles is about 20-50 and 5-10 nm, respectively. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicate that both of PtAu and Au nanoparticles exhibit the crystalline plane of (111), (200), (210), and (311). Furthermore, XRD data also show the 2°-3° difference between pristine graphene sheets and the PDDA-modified graphene sheets. For the catalytic activity tests of Au/PDDA-G and PtAu/PDDA-G, the mixture of 0.5 M aqueous H2SO4 and 0.5 M aqueous formic acid was used as model to evaluate the electrochemical characterizations. The catalytic activities of the novel bimetallic PtAu/graphene electrocatalyst would be anticipated to be superior to the previous electrocatalyst of the cubic Pt/graphene.

  15. Strangelet search in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, Y.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Belaga, V. V.; Bellingeri-Laurikainen, A.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betts, R. R.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Blyth, S.-L.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Botje, M.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bravar, A.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cadman, R. V.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sánchez, M. Calderón De La Barca; Callner, J.; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chung, S. U.; Coffin, J. P.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; Moura, M. M. De; Dedovich, T. G.; Dephillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, F.; Dunin, V. B.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Eckardt, V.; Edwards, W. R.; Efimov, L. G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. G.; Gos, H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, N.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T. W.; Hepplemann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D.; Hollis, R.; Horner, M. J.; Huang, H. Z.; Hughes, E. W.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jia, F.; Jones, P. G.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu.; Kim, B. C.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Kislov, E. M.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kowalik, K. L.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A. I.; Kumar, A.; Kurnadi, P.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lange, S.; Lapointe, S.; Laue, F.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C.-H.; Lehocka, S.; Levine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lin, X.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Lynn, D.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, J. G.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Martin, L.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McClain, C. J.; McShane, T. S.; Melnick, Yu.; Meschanin, A.; Millane, J.; Miller, M. L.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mironov, C.; Mischke, A.; Mitchell, J.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nepali, N. S.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldenburg, M.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Pal, S. K.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pavlinov, A. I.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porile, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potekhin, M.; Potrebenikova, E.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Putschke, J.; Qattan, I. A.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Relyea, D.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Sazhin, P. S.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shen, W. Q.; Shimanskiy, S. S.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Speltz, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stadnik, A.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; Toledo, A. Szanto De; Szeliga, B.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Buren, G. Van; Kolk, N. Van Der; Leeuwen, M. Van; Molen, A. M. Vander; Varma, R.; Vasilevski, I. M.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vernet, R.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Waggoner, W. T.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Watson, J. W.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wetzler, A.; , C. Whitten, Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, J.; Wu, Y.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yue, Q.; Yurevich, V. I.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, W. M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, Y.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, J.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zubarev, A. N.; Zuo, J. X.

    2007-07-01

    We have searched for strangelets in a triggered sample of 61 million central (top 4%) Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV near beam rapidities at the STAR solenoidal tracker detector at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. We have sensitivity to metastable strangelets with lifetimes of order ⩾0.1 ns, in contrast to limits over ten times longer in BNL Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) studies and longer still at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). Upper limits of a few 10-6 to 10-7 per central Au+Au collision are set for strangelets with mass ≳30 GeV/c2.

  16. Directed Flow of Charged Kaons in Au+Au Collisions from the BES Program at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandit, Yadav; STAR Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    We report the measurement of the directed flow (v1) for charged kaons in Au+Au collisions at =7.7, 11.5, 19.6, 27, 39, 62.4 and 200 GeV as a function of rapidity and compare these results for pions, protons and antiprotons. These new kaon results may help to constrain the medium properties and collision dynamics including the in-medium kaon potential and baryon number transport in these collisions.

  17. Flow and bose-einstein correlations in Au-Au collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phobos Collaboration; Manly, Steven; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; Garcia, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyinski, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2003-03-01

    Argonne flow and Bose-Einstein correlations have been measured in Au-Au collisions at S=130 and 200 GeV using the PHOBOS detector at RHIC. The systematic dependencies of the flow signal on the transverse momentum, pseudorapidity, and centrality of the collision, as well as the beam energy are shown. In addition, results of a 3-dimensional analysis of two-pion correlations in the 200 GeV data are presented.

  18. Photoinduced drug release from thermosensitive AuNPs-liposome using a AuNPs-switch.

    PubMed

    An, Xueqin; Zhang, Fan; Zhu, Yinyan; Shen, Weiguo

    2010-10-14

    A thermosensitive liposome with embedded AuNPs in a bilayer was prepared using supercritical CO(2). The AuNPs-liposome can absorb a certain wavelength light, convert optical energy into heat, induce phase transition, and release drug. The results show that drug release from the liposome is due to the photothermic effects inducing phase transition of the liposome rather than destruction of the liposome structure. PMID:20820547

  19. Enhanced Second Harmonic Generation in AU/AI2O3/AU absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Fenglun; Bai, Songang; Li, Qiang; Qu, Yurui; Min, Qiu

    2016-01-01

    A kind of metal-insulator-metal (MIM) metamaterial absorber for generating second harmonic signal is investigated. The absorbers exhibit high absorption efficiency at the dip and notably enhance the generated second harmonic signal by a factor of over 30, in contrast to an Au/alumina double-layer without Au disk on the top. This study demonstrates the potential of metamaterial absorber for nonlinear photonics.

  20. Quantification of training load during one-, two- and three-game week schedules in professional soccer players from the English Premier League: implications for carbohydrate periodisation.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Liam; Orme, Patrick; Di Michele, Rocco; Close, Graeme L; Morgans, Ryland; Drust, Barry; Morton, James P

    2016-07-01

    Muscle glycogen is the predominant energy source for soccer match play, though its importance for soccer training (where lower loads are observed) is not well known. In an attempt to better inform carbohydrate (CHO) guidelines, we quantified training load in English Premier League soccer players (n = 12) during a one-, two- and three-game week schedule (weekly training frequency was four, four and two, respectively). In a one-game week, training load was progressively reduced (P < 0.05) in 3 days prior to match day (total distance = 5223 ± 406, 3097 ± 149 and 2912 ± 192 m for day 1, 2 and 3, respectively). Whilst daily training load and periodisation was similar in the one- and two-game weeks, total accumulative distance (inclusive of both match and training load) was higher in a two-game week (32.5 ± 4.1 km) versus one-game week (25.9 ± 2 km). In contrast, daily training total distance was lower in the three-game week (2422 ± 251 m) versus the one- and two-game weeks, though accumulative weekly distance was highest in this week (35.5 ± 2.4 km) and more time (P < 0.05) was spent in speed zones >14.4 km · h(-1) (14%, 18% and 23% in the one-, two- and three-game weeks, respectively). Considering that high CHO availability improves physical match performance but high CHO availability attenuates molecular pathways regulating training adaptation (especially considering the low daily customary loads reported here, e.g., 3-5 km per day), we suggest daily CHO intake should be periodised according to weekly training and match schedules. PMID:26536538

  1. Fabrication of High Sensitive Immunochromato Kit Using Au Colloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Koji

    Au colloid have characteristics of surface plasmon resonance with absorption at 500 nm~600 nm wavelength. Surface on the citric acid Au colloid can be conjugated with protein eg. antibody. Various particle size of Au colloid makes it high sensitive immunochromato as diagnostics. High sensitive immunochromato will be useful for application of cancer marker eg. prostate specific antigen and influenza early diagnosis.

  2. Bonding, Luminescence, Metallophilicity in Linear Au3 and Au2Ag Chains Stabilized by Rigid Diphosphanyl NHC Ligands.

    PubMed

    Ai, Pengfei; Mauro, Matteo; Gourlaouen, Christophe; Carrara, Serena; De Cola, Luisa; Tobon, Yeny; Giovanella, Umberto; Botta, Chiara; Danopoulos, Andreas A; Braunstein, Pierre

    2016-09-01

    The heterofunctional and rigid ligand N,N'-diphosphanyl-imidazol-2-ylidene (PCNHCP; P = P(t-Bu)2), through its phosphorus and two N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) donors, stabilizes trinuclear chain complexes, with either Au3 or AgAu2 cores, and dinuclear Au2 complexes. The two oppositely situated PCNHCP (L) ligands that "sandwich" the metal chain can support linear and rigid structures, as found in the known tricationic Au(I) complex [Au3(μ3-PCNHCP,κP,κCNHC,κP)2](OTf)3 (OTf = CF3SO3; [Au3L2](OTf)3; Chem. Commun. 2014, 50, 103-105) now also obtained by transmetalation from [Ag3(μ3-PCNHCP,κP,κCNHC,κP)2](OTf)3 ([Ag3L2](OTf)3), or in the mixed-metal tricationic [Au2Ag(μ3-PCNHCP,κP,κCNHC,κP)2](OTf)3 ([Au2AgL2](OTf)3). The latter was obtained stepwise by the addition of AgOTf to the digold(I) complex [Au2(μ2-PCNHCP,κP,κCNHC)2](OTf)2 ([Au2L2](OTf)2). The latter contains two dangling P donors and displays fluxional behavior in solution, and the Au···Au separation of 2.8320(6) Å in the solid state is consistent with metallophilic interactions. In the solvento complex [Au3Cl2(tht)(μ3-PCNHCP,κP,κCNHC,κP)](OTf)·MeCN ([Au3Cl2(tht)L](OTf)·MeCN), which contains only one L and one tht ligand (tht = tetrahydrothiophene), the metal chain is bent (148.94(2)°), and the longer Au···Au separation (2.9710(4) Å) is in line with relaxation of the rigidity due to a more "open" structure. Similar features were observed in [Au3Cl2(SMe2)L](OTf)·2MeCN. A detailed study of the emission properties of [Au3L2](OTf)3, [Au3Cl2(tht)L](OTf)·MeCN, [Au2L2](OTf)2, and [Au2AgL2](OTf)3 was performed by means of steady state and time-resolved photophysical techniques. The complex [Au3L2](OTf)3 displays a bright (photoluminescence quantum yield = 80%) and narrow emission band centered at 446 nm with a relatively small Stokes' shift and long-lived excited-state lifetime on the microsecond timescale, both in solution and in the solid state. In line with the very narrow emission

  3. Experimental and Theoretical Studies on Oxidation of Cu-Au Alloy Surfaces: Effect of Bulk Au Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Michio; Tsuda, Yasutaka; Oka, Kohei; Kojima, Kazuki; Diño, Wilson Agerico; Yoshigoe, Akitaka; Kasai, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    We report results of our experimental and theoretical studies on the oxidation of Cu-Au alloy surfaces, viz., Cu3Au(111), CuAu(111), and Au3Cu(111), using hyperthermal O2 molecular beam (HOMB). We observed strong Au segregation to the top layer of the corresponding clean (111) surfaces. This forms a protective layer that hinders further oxidation into the bulk. The higher the concentration of Au in the protective layer formed, the higher the protective efficacy. As a result, of the three Cu-Au surfaces studied, Au3Cu(111) is the most stable against dissociative adsorption of O2, even with HOMB. We also found that this protective property breaks down for oxidations occurring at temperatures above 300 K. PMID:27516137

  4. Identified particle distributions in pp and Au+Au collisions atsqrt sNN=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Anderson, M; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal,S.K.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele,S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bhardwaj,S.; Bhaskar, P.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar,A.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez,M.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Castro, M.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, B.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov,L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Ganti, M.S.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grigoriev, V.; Cronstal, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, S.M.; Gupta, A.; Gushin, E.; Hallman, T.J.; Hardtke, D.; Harris,J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Herston, T.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang,S.L.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kaneta, M.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Konstantinov, A.S.; Kopytine,S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger,K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; et al.

    2003-10-06

    Transverse mass and rapidity distributions for charged pions, charged kaons, protons and antiprotons are reported for {radical}sNN = 200 GeV pp and Au+Au collisions at RHIC. The transverse mass distributions are rapidity independent within |y| < 0.5, consistent with a boost-invariant system in this rapidity interval. Spectral shapes and relative particle yields are similar in pp and peripheral Au+Au collisions and change smoothly to central Au+Au collisions. No centrality dependence was observed in the kaon and antiproton production rates relative to the pion production rate from medium-central to central collisions. Chemical and kinetic equilibrium model fits to our data reveal strong radial flow and relatively long duration from chemical to kinetic freeze-out in central Au+Au collisions. The chemical freeze-out temperature appears to be independent of initial conditions at RHIC energies.

  5. Experimental and Theoretical Studies on Oxidation of Cu-Au Alloy Surfaces: Effect of Bulk Au Concentration.

    PubMed

    Okada, Michio; Tsuda, Yasutaka; Oka, Kohei; Kojima, Kazuki; Diño, Wilson Agerico; Yoshigoe, Akitaka; Kasai, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    We report results of our experimental and theoretical studies on the oxidation of Cu-Au alloy surfaces, viz., Cu3Au(111), CuAu(111), and Au3Cu(111), using hyperthermal O2 molecular beam (HOMB). We observed strong Au segregation to the top layer of the corresponding clean (111) surfaces. This forms a protective layer that hinders further oxidation into the bulk. The higher the concentration of Au in the protective layer formed, the higher the protective efficacy. As a result, of the three Cu-Au surfaces studied, Au3Cu(111) is the most stable against dissociative adsorption of O2, even with HOMB. We also found that this protective property breaks down for oxidations occurring at temperatures above 300 K. PMID:27516137

  6. Charged hadron transverse momentum distributions in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Ballintijn, M.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Lee, J. W.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2004-01-01

    We present transverse momentum distributions of charged hadrons produced in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV. The spectra were measured for transverse momenta pT from 0.25 to 4.5 GeV/c in a pseudorapidity range of 0.2<η<1.4. The evolution of the spectra is studied as a function of collision centrality, from 65 to 344 participating nucleons. The results are compared to data from proton-antiproton collisions and Au+Au collisions at lower RHIC energies. We find a significant change of the spectral shape between proton-antiproton and semi-peripheral Au+Au collisions. Comparing semi-peripheral to central Au+Au collisions, we find that the yields at high pT exhibit approximate scaling with the number of participating nucleons, rather than scaling with the number of binary collisions.

  7. The effect of Au amount on size uniformity of self-assembled Au nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.-H.; Wang, D.-C.; Chen, G.-Y.; Chen, K.-Y.

    2008-03-01

    The self-assembled fabrication of nanostructure, a dreaming approach in the area of fabrication engineering, is the ultimate goal of this research. A finding was proved through previous research that the size of the self-assembled gold nanoparticles could be controlled with the mole ratio between AuCl4- and thiol. In this study, the moles of Au were fixed, only the moles of thiol were adjusted. Five different mole ratios of Au/S with their effect on size uniformity were investigated. The mole ratios were 1:1/16, 1:1/8, 1:1, 1:8, 1:16, respectively. The size distributions of the gold nanoparticles were analyzed by Mac-View analysis software. HR-TEM was used to derive images of self-assembled gold nanoparticles. The result reached was also the higher the mole ratio between AuCl4- and thiol the bigger the self-assembled gold nanoparticles. Under the condition of moles of Au fixed, the most homogeneous nanoparticles in size distribution derived with the mole ratio of 1:1/8 between AuCl4- and thiol. The obtained nanoparticles could be used, for example, in uniform surface nanofabrication, leading to the fabrication of ordered array of quantum dots.

  8. Azimuthal anisotropy of ϕ meson in U+U and Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bairathi, Vipul

    2016-01-01

    The measurements of the azimuthal anisotropy of φ meson in the U+U and Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC) are reported. The centrality dependence of the Fourier coefficients v2, v3, v4 and v5 is presented for φ meson at midrapidity (|ƞ| < 1.0), in U+U and Au+Au collisions at -√8NN = 193 and 200 GeV, respectively. The ƞ-sub event plane method is used with a n gap of 0.1 to suppress the non-flow effects. A strong centrality dependence is observed for the φ meson elliptic flow (v2), whereas no clear centrality dependence is observed for v3, v4 and v5. Ratios of the Fourier coefficients, v3/v2 and v4/v22 as a function of transverse momentum (pT) are also presented. A systematic comparison of the Fourier coefficients for the two systems U+U and Au+Au is discussed.

  9. From the Ternary Eu(Au/In)2 and EuAu4(Au/In)2 with Remarkable Au/In Distributions to a New Structure Type: The Gold-Rich Eu5Au16(Au/In)6 Structure.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Simon; Card, Nathan; Mudring, Anja-Verena

    2015-09-01

    The ternary Eu(Au/In)2 (EuAu(0.46)In(1.54(2))) (I), EuAu4(Au/In)2 (EuAu(4+x)In(2-x) with x = 0.75(2) (II), 0.93(2), and 1.03(2)), and Eu5Au16(Au/In)6 (Eu5Au(17.29)In(4.71(3))) (III) have been synthesized, and their structures were characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. I and II crystallize with the CeCu2-type (Pearson Symbol oI12; Imma; Z = 4; a = 4.9018(4) Å; b = 7.8237(5) Å; c = 8.4457(5) Å) and the YbAl4Mo2-type (tI14; I4/mmm; Z = 2; a = 7.1612(7) Å; c = 5.5268(7) Å) and exhibit significant Au/In disorder. I is composed of an Au/In-mixed diamond-related host lattice encapsulating Eu atoms, while the structure of II features ribbons of distorted, squared Au8 prisms enclosing Eu, Au, and In atoms. Combination of these structural motifs leads to a new structure type as observed for Eu5Au16(Au/In)6 (Eu5Au(17.29)In(4.71(3))) (oS108; Cmcm; Z = 4; a = 7.2283(4) Å; b = 9.0499(6) Å; c = 34.619(2) Å), which formally represents a one-dimensional intergrowth of the series EuAu2-"EuAu4In2". The site preferences of the disordered Au/In positions in II were investigated for different hypothetical "EuAu4(Au/In)2" models using the projector-augmented wave method and indicate that these structures attempt to optimize the frequencies of the heteroatomic Au-In contacts. A chemical bonding analysis on two "EuAu5In" and "EuAu4In2" models employed the TB-LMTO-ASA method and reveals that the subtle interplay between the local atomic environments and the bond energies determines the structural and site preferences for these systems. PMID:26270622

  10. Centrality dependence of direct photon production in (square root)S(NN) = 200 GeV Au + Au collisions.

    PubMed

    Adler, S S; Afanasiev, S; Aidala, C; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Amirikas, R; Aphecetche, L; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Azmoun, R; Babintsev, V; Baldisseri, A; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Batsouli, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Berdnikov, Y; Bhagavatula, S; Boissevain, J G; Borel, H; Borenstein, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J M; Butsyk, S; Camard, X; Chai, J-S; Chand, P; Chang, W C; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choi, I J; Choi, J; Choudhury, R K; Chujo, T; Cianciolo, V; Cobigo, Y; Cole, B A; Constantin, P; d'Enterria, D; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Devismes, A; Dietzsch, O; Drapier, O; Drees, A; du Rietz, R; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; Enokizono, A; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Fields, D E; Fleuret, F; Fokin, S L; Fox, B D; Fraenkel, Z; Frantz, J E; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Gogiberidze, G; Gonin, M; Gosset, J; Goto, Y; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Grau, N; Greene, S V; Perdekamp, M Grosse; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Hachiya, T; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hartouni, E P; Harvey, M; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Heffner, M; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Holzmann, W; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Ikonnikov, V V; Imai, K; Isenhower, D; Ishihara, M; Issah, M; Isupov, A; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jeong, Y; Jia, J; Jinnouchi, O; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Jouan, D; Kametani, S; Kamihara, N; Kang, J H; Kapoor, S S; Katou, K; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D H; Kim, D J; Kim, D W; Kim, E; Kim, G-B; Kim, H J; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Kiyoyama, K; Klein-Boesing, C; Kobayashi, H; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kopytine, M; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kuberg, C H; Kurita, K; Kuroki, Y; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Ladygin, V; Lajoie, J G; Lebedev, A; Leckey, S; Lee, D M; Lee, S; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Lim, H; Litvinenko, A; Liu, M X; Liu, Y; Maguire, C F; Makdisi, Y I; Malakhov, A; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masui, H; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Messer, F; Miake, Y; Milan, J; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Mukhopadhyay, D; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagle, J L; Nakamura, T; Nandi, B K; Nara, M; Newby, J; Nilsson, P; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Okada, K; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Ozawa, K; Pal, D; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V; Papavassiliou, V; Park, J; Parmar, A; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Peng, J-C; Peresedov, V; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Plasil, F; Purschke, M L; Purwar, A K; Rak, J; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reuter, M; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Roche, G; Romana, A; Rosati, M; Rosnet, P; Ryu, S S; Sadler, M E; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, T; Sakai, M; Sakai, S; Samsonov, V; Sanfratello, L; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shaw, M R; Shea, T K; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Silva, C L; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sondheim, W E; Sorensen, S P; Sourikova, I V; Staley, F; Stankus, P W; Stenlund, E; Stepanov, M; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Tanida, K; Tannenbaum, M J; Tarján, P; Tepe, J D; Thomas, T L; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; van Hecke, H W; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Veszprémi, V; Villatte, L; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, X R; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yang, Y; Yanovich, A; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, C; Zhou, S; Zhou, S J; Zolin, L

    2005-06-17

    The first measurement of direct photons in Au + Au collisions at (square root)S(NN) = 200 GeV is presented. The direct photon signal is extracted as a function of the Au + Au collision centrality and compared to next-to-leading order perturbative quantum chromodynamics calculations. The direct photon yield is shown to scale with the number of nucleon-nucleon collisions for all centralities. PMID:16090462

  11. Spectra and elliptic flow for Λ, Ξ, and Ω in 200 A GeV Au+Au collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiangrong; Song, Huichao

    2016-01-01

    Using VISHNU hybrid model, we calculate the pT-spectra and elliptic flow of Λ, Ξ, and Ω in 200 A GeV Au+Au collisions. Comparisons with the STAR measurements show that the model generally describes these soft hadron data. We also briefly study and discuss the mass ordering of elliptic flow among π, K, p, Λ, Ξ, and Ω in minimum bias Au+Au collisions.

  12. AU-FREDI - AUTONOMOUS FREQUENCY DOMAIN IDENTIFICATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Y.

    1994-01-01

    The Autonomous Frequency Domain Identification program, AU-FREDI, is a system of methods, algorithms and software that was developed for the identification of structural dynamic parameters and system transfer function characterization for control of large space platforms and flexible spacecraft. It was validated in the CALTECH/Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Large Spacecraft Control Laboratory. Due to the unique characteristics of this laboratory environment, and the environment-specific nature of many of the software's routines, AU-FREDI should be considered to be a collection of routines which can be modified and reassembled to suit system identification and control experiments on large flexible structures. The AU-FREDI software was originally designed to command plant excitation and handle subsequent input/output data transfer, and to conduct system identification based on the I/O data. Key features of the AU-FREDI methodology are as follows: 1. AU-FREDI has on-line digital filter design to support on-orbit optimal input design and data composition. 2. Data composition of experimental data in overlapping frequency bands overcomes finite actuator power constraints. 3. Recursive least squares sine-dwell estimation accurately handles digitized sinusoids and low frequency modes. 4. The system also includes automated estimation of model order using a product moment matrix. 5. A sample-data transfer function parametrization supports digital control design. 6. Minimum variance estimation is assured with a curve fitting algorithm with iterative reweighting. 7. Robust root solvers accurately factorize high order polynomials to determine frequency and damping estimates. 8. Output error characterization of model additive uncertainty supports robustness analysis. The research objectives associated with AU-FREDI were particularly useful in focusing the identification methodology for realistic on-orbit testing conditions. Rather than estimating the entire structure, as is

  13. Three views of two giant streams: Aligned observations at 1 AU, 4.6 AU, and 5.9 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siscoe, George; Intriligator, Devrie

    1993-01-01

    A close radial alignment of the Interplanetary Monitoring Platform (IMP) and Pioneers 10 and 11 spacecraft in 1974 allows a nearly unambiguous, empirical study of the radial evolution of the interaction regions of two contrasting weak and strong, giant streams. The study confirms the main aspects of the standard model of corotating interaction regions: an expanding and strengthening pair of forward-reverse shocks sandwich a stream interface. It adds the follwoing concepts: stream group speed--the speed at the stream interface tends to remain constant with distance; corotating stream complexes--interaction regions can include features like noncompressive density enhancements and streamer belts; secondary interfaces--a possible precursor to the reverse shock; and emerging stream interfaces--one emerged between 1 AU and 4.6 AU. The study uses the conservation specific entropy to correlate features between spacecraft.

  14. Di-hadron correlations with identified leading hadrons in 200 GeV Au + Au and d + Au collisions at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, D.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, J. H.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, T.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, W.; Li, Z. M.; Li, Y.; Li, C.; Li, X.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, R.; Ma, L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, X.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, G.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Wu; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, Z.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, N.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The STAR Collaboration presents for the first time two-dimensional di-hadron correlations with identified leading hadrons in 200 GeV central Au + Au and minimum-bias d + Au collisions to explore hadronization mechanisms in the quark gluon plasma. The enhancement of the jet-like yield for leading pions in Au + Au data with respect to the d + Au reference and the absence of such an enhancement for leading non-pions (protons and kaons) are discussed within the context of a quark recombination scenario. The correlated yield at large angles, specifically in the ridge region, is found to be significantly higher for leading non-pions than pions. The consistencies of the constituent quark scaling, azimuthal harmonic model and a mini-jet modification model description of the data are tested, providing further constraints on hadronization.

  15. From the ternary Eu(Au/In)2 and EuAu4(Au/In)2 with remarkable Au/In distributions to a new structure type: The gold-rich Eu5Au16(Au/In)6 structure

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Steinberg, Simon; Card, Nathan; Mudring, Anja -Verena

    2015-08-13

    The ternary Eu(Au/In)2 (EuAu0.46In1.54(2)) (I), EuAu4(Au/In)2 (EuAu4+xIn2–x with x = 0.75(2) (II), 0.93(2), and 1.03(2)), and Eu5Au16(Au/In)6 (Eu5Au17.29In4.71(3)) (III) have been synthesized, and their structures were characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. I and II crystallize with the CeCu2-type (Pearson Symbol oI12; Imma; Z = 4; a = 4.9018(4) Å; b = 7.8237(5) Å; c = 8.4457(5) Å) and the YbAl4Mo2-type (tI14; I4/mmm; Z = 2; a = 7.1612(7) Å; c = 5.5268(7) Å) and exhibit significant Au/In disorder. I is composed of an Au/In-mixed diamond-related host lattice encapsulating Eu atoms, while the structure of II features ribbons of distorted, squaredmore » Au8 prisms enclosing Eu, Au, and In atoms. Combination of these structural motifs leads to a new structure type as observed for Eu5Au16(Au/In)6 (Eu5Au17.29In4.71(3)) (oS108; Cmcm; Z = 4; a = 7.2283(4) Å; b = 9.0499(6) Å; c = 34.619(2) Å), which formally represents a one-dimensional intergrowth of the series EuAu2–“EuAu4In2”. The site preferences of the disordered Au/In positions in II were investigated for different hypothetical “EuAu4(Au/In)2” models using the projector-augmented wave method and indicate that these structures attempt to optimize the frequencies of the heteroatomic Au–In contacts. Furthermore, a chemical bonding analysis on two “EuAu5In” and “EuAu4In2” models employed the TB-LMTO-ASA method and reveals that the subtle interplay between the local atomic environments and the bond energies determines the structural and site preferences for these systems.« less

  16. Enhanced spin pumping at yttrium iron garnet/Au interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Burrowes, C.; Heinrich, B.; Kardasz, B.; Montoya, E. A.; Girt, E.; Sun Yiyan; Song, Young-Yeal; Wu Mingzhong

    2012-02-27

    Spin injection across the ferrimagnetic insulator yttrium iron garnet (YIG)/normal metal Au interface was studied using ferromagnetic resonance. The spin mixing conductance was determined by comparing the Gilbert damping parameter {alpha} in YIG/Au and YIG/Au/Fe heterostructures. The main purpose of this study was to correlate the spin pumping efficiency with chemical modifications of the YIG film surface using in situ etching and deposition techniques. By means of Ar{sup +} ion beam etching, one is able to increase the spin mixing conductance at the YIG/Au interface by a factor of 5 compared to the untreated YIG/Au interface.

  17. Thermal Desorption of Au from W(001) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Błaszczyszyn, R.; Chrzanowski, J.; Godowski, P. J.

    2000-12-01

    Adsorption of Au on W(001) at 450 K up to multilayer structures was investigated. Temperature programmed desorption technique was used in determination of coverage dependent desorption energy (region up to one monolayer). Results were discussed in terms of competitive interactions of Au--Au and Au--W atoms. Simple procedure for prediction of faceting behavior on the interface, basing on the desorption data, was postulated. It was deduced that the Au/W(001) interface should not show faceting tendency after thermal treatment.

  18. First results on d+Au collisions from PHOBOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Becker, B.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; Gburek, T.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Harrington, A. S.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Khan, N.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lee, J. W.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; Mignerey, A. C.; Noell, A.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Sedykh, I.; Skulski, W.; Smith, C. E.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Teng, R.; Tonjes, M. B.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Veres, G. I.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.; Zhang, J.

    2004-02-01

    We have measured transverse momentum distributions of charged hadrons produced in d+Au collisions at √SNN = 200 GeV, in the range 0.25 < pT < 6.0 GeV/c. With increasing collision centrality, the yield at high transverse momenta increases more rapidly than the overall particle density, leading to a strong modification of the spectral shape. This change in spectral shape is qualitatively different from observations in Au+Au collisions at the same energy. The results provide important information for discriminating between different models for the suppression of high-pT hadrons observed in Au+Au collisions.

  19. Surface effects on the radiation response of nanoporous Au foams

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, E. G.; Caro, M.; Wang, Y. Q.; Baldwin, K.; Caro, A.; Zepeda-Ruiz, L. A.; Bringa, E.; Nastasi, M.

    2012-11-05

    We report on an experimental and simulation campaign aimed at exploring the radiation response of nanoporous Au (np-Au) foams. We find different defect accumulation behavior by varying radiation dose-rate in ion-irradiated np-Au foams. Stacking fault tetrahedra are formed when np-Au foams are irradiated at high dose-rate, but they do not seem to be formed in np-Au at low dose-rate irradiation. A model is proposed to explain the dose-rate dependent defect accumulation based on these results.

  20. Synthesis, structure, and bonding in K12Au21Sn4. A polar intermetallic compound with dense Au20 and open AuSn4 layers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Bin; Kim, Sung-Jin; Miller, Gordon J.; and Corbett, John D.

    2009-10-29

    The new phase K{sub 12}Au{sub 21}Sn{sub 4} has been synthesized by direct reaction of the elements at elevated temperatures. Single crystal X-ray diffraction established its orthorhombic structure, space group Pmmn (No. 59), a = 12.162(2); b = 18.058(4); c = 8.657(2) {angstrom}, V = 1901.3(7) {angstrom}{sup 3}, and Z = 2. The structure consists of infinite puckered sheets of vertex-sharing gold tetrahedra (Au{sub 20}) that are tied together by thin layers of alternating four-bonded-Sn and -Au atoms (AuSn{sub 4}). Remarkably, the dense but electron-poorer blocks of Au tetrahedra coexist with more open and saturated Au-Sn layers, which are fragments of a zinc blende type structure that maximize tetrahedral heteroatomic bonding outside of the network of gold tetrahedra. LMTO band structure calculations reveal metallic properties and a pseudogap at 256 valence electrons per formula unit, only three electrons fewer than in the title compound and at a point at which strong Au-Sn bonding is optimized. Additionally, the tight coordination of the Au framework atoms by K plays an important bonding role: each Au tetrahedra has 10 K neighbors and each K atom has 8-12 Au contacts. The appreciably different role of the p element Sn in this structure from that in the triel members in K{sub 3}Au{sub 5}In and Rb{sub 2}Au{sub 3}Tl appears to arise from its higher electron count which leads to better p-bonding (valence electron concentrations = 1.32 versus 1.22).

  1. Isomorphism and solid solutions among Ag- and Au-selenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palyanova, Galina A.; Seryotkin, Yurii V.; Kokh, Konstantin A.; Bakakin, Vladimir V.

    2016-09-01

    Au-Ag selenides were synthesized by heating stoichiometric mixtures of elementary substances of initial compositions Ag2-xAuxSe with a step of x=0.25 (0≤x≤2) to 1050 °C and annealing at 500 °C. Scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, electron microprobe analysis and X-ray powder diffraction methods have been applied to study synthesized samples. Results of studies of synthesized products revealed the existence of three solid solutions with limited isomorphism Ag↔Au: naumannite Ag2Se - Ag1.94Au0.06Se, fischesserite Ag3AuSe2 - Ag3.2Au0.8Se2 and gold selenide AuSe - Au0.94Ag0.06Se. Solid solutions and AgAuSe phases were added to the phase diagram of Ag-Au-Se system. Crystal-chemical interpretation of Ag-Au isomorphism in selenides was made on the basis of structural features of fischesserite, naumannite, and AuSe.

  2. Direct Observation of Au Nanoclusters at Au/Si Interface and Enhanced SiO2 Growth Due to Catalytic Action by Au in Thermally Oxidized Au-Precipitated n-Type Si(001) Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Hirofumi; Kumamoto, Akihito; Imamura, Senji

    2013-04-01

    The behavior of Au nanoclusters at a Au/n-Si interface was investigated. In particular, SiO2 growth in thermally oxidized Au-precipitated n-type Si(001) surfaces was enhanced by the catalytic action of Au. When the Au-precipitated Si wafer was exposed to air for 30 d at room temperature (RT), a SiO2 film layer grew over Au nanoclusters on the Si surface. This is possibly because Si atoms may diffuse in an as-deposited Au layer and are oxidized in air at RT. In the case of oxidation at higher temperatures (850 °C for 30 min), Au nanoclusters were found to exist at the Au/n-Si interface. Moreover, the origin of protuberances observed by atomic force microscopy was found to be a bulge in the SiO2 film formed over the Au nanocluster, proving that the growth of the SiO2 film layer was enhanced by the catalytic action of Au.

  3. [Gold antirheumatic drug: desired and adverse effects of Au(I) and Au(III) [corrected] on the immune system.

    PubMed

    Griem, P; Gleichmann, E

    1996-01-01

    Three new findings are reviewed that help to understand the mechanisms of action of anti-rheumatic gold drugs, such as disodium aurothiomalate (Na2Au(I)TM): i) We found that Na2Au(I)TM selectively inhibits T-cell receptor-mediated antigen recognition by murine CD4+ T-cell hybridomas specific for antigenic peptides containing at least two cysteine residues. Presumably, Au(I) acts as a chelating agent forming linear complexes (Cys-Au(I)-Cys) which prevents correct antigen-processing and/or peptide recognition by the T-cell receptor, ii) We were able to show that Au(I) is oxidized to Au(III) in mononuclear phagocytes, such as macrophages. Because Au(III) rapidly oxidizes protein and itself is re-reduced to Au(I), this may introduce an Au(I)/Au(III) redox system into phagocytes which scavenges reactive oxygen species, such as hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and inactivates lysosomal enzymes, iii) Pretreatment with Au(III) of a model protein antigen, bovine ribonuclease A (RNase A), induced novel antigenic determinants recognized by CD4+ T lymphocytes. Analysis of the fine specificity of these "Au(III)-specific" T-cells revealed that they react to RNase peptides that are not presented to T-cells when the native protein, i.e., not treated with Au(III), is used as antigen. The T-cell recognition of these cryptic peptides did not require the presence of gold. This finding has important implications for understanding the pathogenesis of allergic and autoimmune responses induced by gold drugs. Taken together, our findings indicate that Au(I) and Au(III) each exert specific effects on several distinct functions of macrophages and the activation of T-cells. These effects may explain both the desired anti-inflammatory and the adverse effects of antirheumatic gold drugs. PMID:9036720

  4. Au-nanoparticles grafted on plasma treated PE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Švorčík, V.; Chaloupka, A.; Řezanka, P.; Slepička, P.; Kolská, Z.; Kasálková, N.; Hubáček, T.; Siegel, J.

    2010-03-01

    Polyethylene (PE) surface was treated with Ar plasma. Activated surface was grafted from methanol solution of 1,2-ethanedithiol. Then the sample was immersed into freshly prepared colloid solution of Au-nanoparticles. Finally Au layer was sputtered on the samples. Properties of the modified PE were studied using various methods: AFM, EPR, RBS and nanoindentation. It was shown that the plasma treatment results in degradation of polymer chain (AFM) and creation of free radicals by EPR. After grafting with dithiol, the concentration of free radicals declines. The presence of Au and S in the surface layer after the coating with Au-nanoparticles was proved by RBS. Plasma treatment changes PE surface morphology and increases surface roughness, too. Another significant change in surface morphology and roughness was observed after deposition of Au-nanoparticles. Nanoindentation measurements show that the grafting with Au-nanoparticles increases adhesion of subsequently sputtered Au layer.

  5. Collision-spike Sputtering of Au Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M

    2015-12-01

    Ion irradiation of nanoparticles leads to enhanced sputter yields if the nanoparticle size is of the order of the ion penetration depth. While this feature is reasonably well understood for collision-cascade sputtering, we explore it in the regime of collision-spike sputtering using molecular-dynamics simulation. For the particular case of 200-keV Xe bombardment of Au particles, we show that collision spikes lead to abundant sputtering with an average yield of 397 ± 121 atoms compared to only 116 ± 48 atoms for a bulk Au target. Only around 31 % of the impact energy remains in the nanoparticles after impact; the remainder is transported away by the transmitted projectile and the ejecta. The sputter yield of supported nanoparticles is estimated to be around 80 % of that of free nanoparticles due to the suppression of forward sputtering. PMID:26245857

  6. Collision-spike sputtering of Au nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2015-08-06

    Ion irradiation of nanoparticles leads to enhanced sputter yields if the nanoparticle size is of the order of the ion penetration depth. While this feature is reasonably well understood for collision-cascade sputtering, we explore it in the regime of collision-spike sputtering using molecular-dynamics simulation. For this specific case of 200-keV Xe bombardment of Au particles, we show that collision spikes lead to abundant sputtering with an average yield of 397 ± 121 atoms compared to only 116 ± 48 atoms for a bulk Au target. Only around 31% of the impact energy remains in the nanoparticles after impact; the remainder is transported away by the transmitted projectile and the ejecta. The sputter yield of supported nanoparticles is estimated to be around 80% of that of free nanoparticles due to the suppression of forward sputtering.

  7. Collision-spike sputtering of Au nanoparticles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2015-08-06

    Ion irradiation of nanoparticles leads to enhanced sputter yields if the nanoparticle size is of the order of the ion penetration depth. While this feature is reasonably well understood for collision-cascade sputtering, we explore it in the regime of collision-spike sputtering using molecular-dynamics simulation. For this specific case of 200-keV Xe bombardment of Au particles, we show that collision spikes lead to abundant sputtering with an average yield of 397 ± 121 atoms compared to only 116 ± 48 atoms for a bulk Au target. Only around 31% of the impact energy remains in the nanoparticles after impact; the remaindermore » is transported away by the transmitted projectile and the ejecta. The sputter yield of supported nanoparticles is estimated to be around 80% of that of free nanoparticles due to the suppression of forward sputtering.« less

  8. Tunable VO2/Au hyperbolic metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prayakarao, S.; Mendoza, B.; Devine, A.; Kyaw, C.; van Dover, R. B.; Liberman, V.; Noginov, M. A.

    2016-08-01

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) is known to have a semiconductor-to-metal phase transition at ˜68 °C. Therefore, it can be used as a tunable component of an active metamaterial. The lamellar metamaterial studied in this work is composed of subwavelength VO2 and Au layers and is designed to undergo a temperature controlled transition from the optical hyperbolic phase to the metallic phase. VO2 films and VO2/Au lamellar metamaterial stacks have been fabricated and studied in electrical conductivity and optical (transmission and reflection) experiments. The observed temperature-dependent changes in the reflection and transmission spectra of the metamaterials and VO2 thin films are in a good qualitative agreement with theoretical predictions. The demonstrated optical hyperbolic-to-metallic phase transition is a unique physical phenomenon with the potential to enable advanced control of light-matter interactions.

  9. Analysis of the residual linewidth in electron-paramagnetic resonance of AuEr and AuYb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spalden, Y. von; Baberschke, K.

    1981-04-01

    For single crystals of AuEr and polycrystalline AuYb the residual EPR linewidth due to inhomogeneous broadening is analyzed. Angular dependent experiments show uniquely that the main contribution is due to internal strain rather than to dipolar interaction. The independent experiments for AuEr and AuYb yield a consistent set of parameters but show a dipolar contribution two to three times smaller than calculated. An explanation for this is given. The very precise determination of Hres yields |Δg | = |ρJ1| < 0.005 for AuEr, a vanishing g-shift.

  10. Thermal stability of sputtered intermetallic Al-Au coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, M.; Mayrhofer, P. H.; Ross, I. M.; Rainforth, W. M.

    2007-09-15

    Recently, the authors have shown that single-phase Al{sub 2}Au coatings, prepared by unbalanced magnetron sputtering, exhibit a dense columnar structure and highest hardness and indentation moduli of 8 and 144 GPa, respectively, within the Al-Au films investigated. This study focuses on the thermal stability of Al{sub 2}Au with respect to films containing more Al and Au having Al/Au at. % ratios of 4.32 and 1.85, respectively. Single-phase Al{sub 2}Au has the highest onset temperature for recovery of 475 deg. C and recrystallization of 575 deg. C. Upon annealing Au- and Al-rich films, their stresses deviate from the linear thermoelastic behavior at temperatures (T) above 200 and 450 deg. C, respectively, due to pores and metallic phases present. Metastable Au within the as-deposited Au-rich film is consumed by the growing intermetallic AlAu and AlAu{sub 2} phases at T{>=}450 deg. C, which themselves melt at {approx}625 deg. C. Due to nanometer scale segregations of Al, encapsulated by Al{sub 2}Au in Al-rich coatings, their melting point is reduced by {approx}85 deg. C to 575 deg. C. Dynamic thermal analyses up to 1100 deg. C in synthetic air reveal the single-phase Al{sub 2}Au films with a superior thermal stability and only negligible oxidation. At 750 deg. C, the mass gain is {approx}1.5 mg/cm{sup 2} after 50 h isothermal exposure. Based on the investigations, the authors can conclude that single-phase intermetallic Al{sub 2}Au films have a high potential for oxidation protection of sensitive materials.

  11. Assembly of hybrid oligonucleotide modified gold (Au) and alloy nanoparticles building blocks.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Yu-Ching; Jen, Chun-Ping; Chen, Yu-Hung; Su, Chia-Hao; Tsai, Shu-Hui; Yeh, Chen-Sheng

    2006-01-01

    The alloy-based hybrid materials with macroscopic network arrays were developed by AuAg/Au and AuAgPd/Au nanoparticle composites through oligonucleotides hybridization. AuAg/Au and AuAgPd/Au exhibited distinct organization. The morphology of AuAg/Au conjugation assembled mainly as compact aggregates while AuAgPd/Au hybrid conjugated into the loosen network assemblies. The dehybridization temperatures were studied as a function of molar ratio of alloy/Au. It was found that higher alloy/gold molar ratio led to stronger hybridization for alloy/gold composite, accompanied with increased melting temperature. These results could be interpreted in terms of more alloy nanoparticles bound to a Au particle when the molar ratio of alloy/gold increased. The thermal analysis also showed that AuAg/Au exhibited higher dehybridization temperature. A modified model describing the dehybridization probability of an intact Au/alloy aggregate was performed to support the dehybridization temperature increased with increasing alloy/Au molar ratio. As to more oligonucleotides carried by AuAg (4.9 +/- 1.9 nm) than by AuAgPd (4.4 +/- 1.5 nm) due to larger size in AuAg, the efficient hybridization could result in higher dehybridization temperature in AuAg/Au. PMID:16573077

  12. Unwinding Au(+)···Au(+) Bonded Filaments in Ligand-Supported Gold(I) Polymer under Pressure.

    PubMed

    Paliwoda, Damian; Wawrzyniak, Paulina; Katrusiak, Andrzej

    2014-07-01

    The ultimately thin single-strand gold filaments, of Au(+)···Au(+) bonded gold(I) diethyldithiocarbamate polymer, AuEt2DTC, can be transformed depending on pressure and solvate contents. When synthesized in the presence of CH2Cl2, it crystallizes into a tetragonal AuEt2DTC·xCH2Cl2 phase α with ligand-supported and unsupported Au(+)···Au(+) bonded filaments modulated into molecular Au8-pitch helices. Low contents of CH2Cl2 favors the β phase of significantly reduced volume and orthorhombic space group Fddd. The α-AuEt2DTC·xCH2Cl2 crystal exhibits a highly unusual negative-area compressibility, due to the spring-like compression of helices. Above 0.05 GPa, the crystal transforms to phase β, where the Au16-pitch helices partly unwind their turns, which relaxes the tension generated by external pressure between neighboring helices of the opposite handedness. This is a unique observation of atomic-scale helical filaments transformation, which otherwise is a universal process analogous to the helix reversal between DNA forms B and Z, and in macroscopic world it is similar to nonperiodic unwind kinks in grapevine tendrils and telephone cords. Pressure also reduces the differences between the ligand-supported and unsupported Au(+)···Au(+) bonds. PMID:26279531

  13. Virus-templated Au and Au/Pt Core/shell Nanowires and Their Electrocatalytic Activitives for Fuel Cell Applications

    PubMed Central

    LEE, YOUJIN; KIM, JUNHYUNG; YUN, DONG SOO; NAM, YOON SUNG; SHAO-HORN, YANG; BELCHER, ANGELA M.

    2014-01-01

    A facile synthetic route was developed to make Au nanowires (NWs) from surfactant-mediated bio-mineralization of a genetically engineered M13 phage with specific Au binding peptides. From the selective interaction between Au binding M13 phage and Au ions in aqueous solution, Au NWs with uniform diameter were synthesized at room temperature with yields greater than 98 % without the need for size selection. The diameters of Au NWs were controlled from 10 nm to 50 nm. The Au NWs were found to be active for electrocatalytic oxidation of CO molecules for all sizes, where the activity was highly dependent on the surface facets of Au NWs. This low-temperature high yield method of preparing Au NWs was further extended to the synthesis of Au/Pt core/shell NWs with controlled coverage of Pt shell layers. Electro-catalytic studies of ethanol oxidation with different Pt loading showed enhanced activity relative to a commercial supported Pt catalyst, indicative of the dual functionality of Pt for the ethanol oxidation and Au for the anti-poisoning component of Pt. These new one-dimensional noble metal NWs with controlled compositions could facilitate the design of new alloy materials with tunable properties. PMID:24910712

  14. Simulation of Electric Field in Semi Insulating Au/CdTe/Au Detector under Flux

    SciTech Connect

    Franc, J.; James, R.; Grill, R.; Kubat, J.; Belas, E.; Hoschl, P.; Moravec, P.; Praus, P.

    2009-08-02

    We report our simulations on the profile of the electric field in semi insulating CdTe and CdZnTe with Au contacts under radiation flux. The type of the space charge and electric field distribution in the Au/CdTe/Au structure is at high fluxes result of a combined influence of charge formed due to band bending at the electrodes and from photo generated carriers, which are trapped at deep levels. Simultaneous solution of drift-diffusion and Poisson equations is used for the calculation. We show, that the space charge originating from trapped photo-carriers starts to dominate at fluxes 10{sup 15}-10{sup 16}cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, when the influence of contacts starts to be negligible.

  15. Admittance of Au/1,4-benzenedithiol/Au single-molecule junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, Kazumasa; Kurokawa, Shu; Sakai, Akira

    2012-12-01

    Employing the admittance formula for double-barrier junctions [Fu and Dudley, Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 65 (1993)], we have estimated an ac susceptance (imaginary part of admittance) of Au/1,4-benzenedithiol/Au single-molecule junctions from their current-voltage characteristics. In the MHz regime, we find that the junction susceptance shows a very small (˜0.1 aF) capacitive component that can be entirely masked by a larger electrode capacitance. Direct ac signal transmission measurements up to 1 GHz reveal no molecular signals and confirm the smallness of the molecular capacitance in the MHz regime.

  16. Net charge fluctuations in Au + Au interactions at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV.

    PubMed

    Adcox, K; Adler, S S; Ajitanand, N N; Akiba, Y; Alexander, J; Aphecetche, L; Arai, Y; Aronson, S H; Averbeck, R; Awes, T C; Barish, K N; Barnes, P D; Barrette, J; Bassalleck, B; Bathe, S; Baublis, V; Bazilevsky, A; Belikov, S; Bellaiche, F G; Belyaev, S T; Bennett, M J; Berdnikov, Y; Botelho, S; Brooks, M L; Brown, D S; Bruner, N; Bucher, D; Buesching, H; Bumazhnov, V; Bunce, G; Burward-Hoy, J; Butsyk, S; Carey, T A; Chand, P; Chang, J; Chang, W C; Chavez, L L; Chernichenko, S; Chi, C Y; Chiba, J; Chiu, M; Choudhury, R K; Christ, T; Chujo, T; Chung, M S; Chung, P; Cianciolo, V; Cole, B A; D'Enterria, D G; David, G; Delagrange, H; Denisov, A; Deshpande, A; Desmond, E J; Dietzsch, O; Dinesh, B V; Drees, A; Durum, A; Dutta, D; Ebisu, K; Efremenko, Y V; El Chenawi, K; En'yo, H; Esumi, S; Ewell, L; Ferdousi, T; Fields, D E; Fokin, S L; Fraenkel, Z; Franz, A; Frawley, A D; Fung, S-Y; Garpman, S; Ghosh, T K; Glenn, A; Godoi, A L; Goto, Y; Greene, S V; Grosse Perdekamp, M; Gupta, S K; Guryn, W; Gustafsson, H-A; Haggerty, J S; Hamagaki, H; Hansen, A G; Hara, H; Hartouni, E P; Hayano, R; Hayashi, N; He, X; Hemmick, T K; Heuser, J M; Hibino, M; Hill, J C; Ho, D S; Homma, K; Hong, B; Hoover, A; Ichihara, T; Imai, K; Ippolitov, M S; Ishihara, M; Jacak, B V; Jang, W Y; Jia, J; Johnson, B M; Johnson, S C; Joo, K S; Kametani, S; Kang, J H; Kann, M; Kapoor, S S; Kelly, S; Khachaturov, B; Khanzadeev, A; Kikuchi, J; Kim, D J; Kim, H J; Kim, S Y; Kim, Y G; Kinnison, W W; Kistenev, E; Kiyomichi, A; Klein-Boesing, C; Klinksiek, S; Kochenda, L; Kochetkov, V; Koehler, D; Kohama, T; Kotchetkov, D; Kozlov, A; Kroon, P J; Kurita, K; Kweon, M J; Kwon, Y; Kyle, G S; Lacey, R; Lajoie, J G; Lauret, J; Lebedev, A; Lee, D M; Leitch, M J; Li, X H; Li, Z; Lim, D J; Liu, M X; Liu, X; Liu, Z; Maguire, C F; Mahon, J; Makdisi, Y I; Manko, V I; Mao, Y; Mark, S K; Markacs, S; Martinez, G; Marx, M D; Masaike, A; Matathias, F; Matsumoto, T; McGaughey, P L; Melnikov, E; Merschmeyer, M; Messer, F; Messer, M; Miake, Y; Miller, T E; Milov, A; Mioduszewski, S; Mischke, R E; Mishra, G C; Mitchell, J T; Mohanty, A K; Morrison, D P; Moss, J M; Mühlbacher, F; Muniruzzaman, M; Murata, J; Nagamiya, S; Nagasaka, Y; Nagle, J L; Nakada, Y; Nandi, B K; Newby, J; Nikkinen, L; Nilsson, P; Nishimura, S; Nyanin, A S; Nystrand, J; O'Brien, E; Ogilvie, C A; Ohnishi, H; Ojha, I D; Ono, M; Onuchin, V; Oskarsson, A; Osterman, L; Otterlund, I; Oyama, K; Paffrath, L; Palounek, A P T; Pantuev, V S; Papavassiliou, V; Pate, S F; Peitzmann, T; Petridis, A N; Pinkenburg, C; Pisani, R P; Pitukhin, P; Plasil, F; Pollack, M; Pope, K; Purschke, M L; Ravinovich, I; Read, K F; Reygers, K; Riabov, V; Riabov, Y; Rosati, M; Rose, A A; Ryu, S S; Saito, N; Sakaguchi, A; Sakaguchi, T; Sako, H; Sakuma, T; Samsonov, V; Sangster, T C; Santo, R; Sato, H D; Sato, S; Sawada, S; Schlei, B R; Schutz, Y; Semenov, V; Seto, R; Shea, T K; Shein, I; Shibata, T-A; Shigaki, K; Shiina, T; Shin, Y H; Sibiriak, I G; Silvermyr, D; Sim, K S; Simon-Gillo, J; Singh, C P; Singh, V; Sivertz, M; Soldatov, A; Soltz, R A; Sorensen, S; Stankus, P W; Starinsky, N; Steinberg, P; Stenlund, E; Ster, A; Stoll, S P; Sugioka, M; Sugitate, T; Sullivan, J P; Sumi, Y; Sun, Z; Suzuki, M; Takagui, E M; Taketani, A; Tamai, M; Tanaka, K H; Tanaka, Y; Taniguchi, E; Tannenbaum, M J; Thomas, J; Thomas, J H; Thomas, T L; Tian, W; Tojo, J; Torii, H; Towell, R S; Tserruya, I; Tsuruoka, H; Tsvetkov, A A; Tuli, S K; Tydesjö, H; Tyurin, N; Ushiroda, T; van Hecke, H W; Velissaris, C; Velkovska, J; Velkovsky, M; Vinogradov, A A; Volkov, M A; Vorobyov, A; Vznuzdaev, E; Wang, H; Watanabe, Y; White, S N; Witzig, C; Wohn, F K; Woody, C L; Xie, W; Yagi, K; Yokkaichi, S; Young, G R; Yushmanov, I E; Zajc, W A; Zhang, Z; Zhou, S

    2002-08-19

    Data from Au + Au interactions at sqrt[s(NN)]=130 GeV, obtained with the PHENIX detector at the Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider, are used to investigate local net charge fluctuations among particles produced near midrapidity. According to recent suggestions, such fluctuations may carry information from the quark-gluon plasma. This analysis shows that the fluctuations are dominated by a stochastic distribution of particles, but are also sensitive to other effects, like global charge conservation and resonance decays. PMID:12190459

  17. Domain wall dynamics in a spin-reorientation transition system Au/Co/Au

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Sujoy; Seu, Keoki; Turner, Joshua J.; Park, Sungkyun; Kevan, Steve; Falco, Charles M.

    2009-05-14

    We report measurements of domain wall dynamics in an ultrathin Au/Co/Au system that exhibits a spin reorientation phase transition as a function of temperature.The domain walls exhibit cooperative motion throughout the temperature range of 150 - 300 K. The decay times were found to exhibit a maximum at the transition temperature. The slowdown has been explained as due to formation of a double well in the energy landscape by the different competing interactions. Our results show that the complex, slow dynamics can provide a more fundamental understanding of magnetic phase transitions.

  18. Measuring away-side jet modifications in Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Kun; STAR Collaboration

    2015-08-01

    We report measurements of jet correlations in Au+Au collisions at = 200 GeV by the STAR experiment. In this analysis we devise a novel method to subtract flow background using data itself. The correlation width is studied as a function of centrality and associated particle pTT. The width is found to increase with centrality at modest to high associated particle pTT. The increase can arise from jet modification by medium and/or event averaging of away-side jets deflected by medium flow. The discrimination of the physics mechanisms requires further study by three-particle correlations.

  19. Energy Dependence of Particle Multiplicities in Central Au+Au Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Corbo, J.; Decowski, M. P.; Garcia, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Henderson, C.; Hicks, D.; Hofman, D.; Hollis, R. S.; Hołyński, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Michałowski, J.; Mignerey, A.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Rafelski, M.; Rbeiz, M.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steadman, S. G.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S.; Stodulski, M.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J.-L.; Teng, R.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wadsworth, B.; Wolfs, F. L.; Wosiek, B.; Woźniak, K.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wysłouch, B.

    2002-01-01

    We present the first measurement of the pseudorapidity density of primary charged particles in Au+Au collisions at (sNN) = 200 GeV. For the 6% most central collisions, we obtain dNch/dη\\|\\|η\\|<1 = 650+/-35(syst). Compared to collisions at (sNN) = 130 GeV, the highest energy studied previously, an increase by a factor of 1.14+/-0.05 at 90% confidence level, is found. The energy dependence of the pseudorapidity density is discussed in comparison with data from proton-induced collisions and theoretical predictions.

  20. Beam Energy Scan a Case for the Chiral Magnetic Effect in Au-Au Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Longacre, R.

    2014-01-05

    The Chiral Magnetic Effect (CME) is predicted for Au-Au collisions at RHIC. However, many backgrounds can give signals that make the measurement hard to interpret. The STAR experiment has made measurements at different collisions energy ranging from √(sNN)=7.7 GeV to 62.4 GeV. In the analysis that is presented we show that the CME turns on with energy and is not present in central collisions where the induced magnetic is small.

  1. Two-Particle Interferometry of 200 GeV Au+Au Collisions at PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, M

    2004-04-19

    The PHENIX experiment has measured pion-pion, kaon-kaon, and proton-proton correlations in Au+Au collisions at {radical}S{sub NN} = 200GeV. The correlations are fit to extract radii using both the Bowler Coulomb correction and full calculation of the two-particle wave function. The resulting radii are similar for all three species and decrease with increasing k{sub t} as expected for collective flow. The R{sub out} and R{sub side} radii are approximately equal indicating a short emission duration.

  2. Onset of nuclear vaporization in [sup 197]Au+[sup 197]Au collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, M.B.; Hsi, W.C.; Lynch, W.G.; Bowman, D.R.; Gelbke, C.K.; Lisa, M.A.; Peaslee, G.F. ); Kunde, G.J.; Begemann-Blaich, M.L.; Hofmann, T.; Hubele, J.; Kempter, J.; Kreutz, P.; Kunze, W.D.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lynen, U.; Mang, M.; Mueller, W.F.J.; Neumann, M.; Ocker, B.; Ogilvie, C.A.; Pochodzalla, J.; Rosenberger, F.; Sann, H.; Schuettauf, A.; Serfling, V.; Stroth, J.; Trautmann, W.; Tucholski, A.; Woerner, A.; Zude, E.; Zwieglinski, B. ); Aiello, S.; Imme, G.; Pappalardo, V.; Raciti, G. ); Charity, R.J.; Sobotka, L.G. ); Iori, I.; Moroni, A.; Scardoni, R.; Ferr

    1993-09-06

    Multifragmentation has been measured for [sup 197]Au+[sup 197]Au collisions at [ital E]/[ital A]=100, 250, and 400 MeV. The mean fragment multiplicity increases monotonically with the charged particle multiplicity at [ital E]/[ital A]=100 MeV, but decreases for central collisions with incident energy, consistent with the onset of nuclear vaporization. Molecular dynamics calculations follow some trends but underpredict the observed fragment multiplicities. Including the statistical decay of excited residues improves the agreement for peripheral collisions but worsens it for central collisions.

  3. Relativistic multireference many-body perturbation theory calculations on Au64+ - Au69+ ions

    SciTech Connect

    Vilkas, M J; Ishikawa, Y; Trabert, E

    2006-03-31

    Many-body perturbation theory (MBPT) calculations are an adequate tool for the description of the structure of highly charged multi-electron ions and for the analysis of their spectra. They demonstrate this by way of a re-investigation of n=3, {Delta}n=0 transitions in the EUV spectra of Na-, Mg-, Al-like, and Si-like ions of Au that have been obtained previously by heavy-ion accelerator based beam-foil spectroscopy. They discuss the evidence and propose several revisions on the basis of the multi-reference many-body perturbation theory calculations of Ne- through P-like ions of Au.

  4. Initial-state geometry and fluctuations in Au + Au, Cu + Au, and U + U collisions at energies available at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenke, Björn; Tribedy, Prithwish; Venugopalan, Raju

    2014-06-01

    We study within the IP-Glasma and two-component MC-Glauber models the effects of initial-state geometry and fluctuations on multiplicities and eccentricities for several collision species at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). These include copper-gold (Cu + Au), gold-gold (Au + Au), and uranium-uranium (U + U) collisions. The multiplicity densities per participant pair are very similar in all systems studied. Ellipticities vary strongly between collision systems, most significantly for central collisions, while fluctuation driven odd moments vary little between systems. Event-by-event distributions of eccentricities in mid-central collisions are wider in Cu + Au relative to Au + Au and U + U systems. An anticorrelation between multiplicity and eccentricity is observed in ultracentral U + U collisions which is weaker in the IP-Glasma model than the two-component MC-Glauber model. In ultracentral Au + Au collisions the two models predict opposite signs for the slope of this correlation. Measurements of elliptic flow as a function of multiplicity in such central events can therefore be used to discriminate between models with qualitatively different particle production mechanisms.

  5. Bridging gold in electron-deficient Al2Au(n)(0/-) and BAlAu(n)(0/-) (n = 1-3) clusters.

    PubMed

    Yao, Wen-Zhi; Liu, Bing-Tao; Lu, Zhang-Hui; Li, Si-Dian

    2013-06-20

    The geometrical and electronic structures of the electron-deficient dialuminum aurides Al2Aun(0/-) and hybrid boron-aluminum aurides BAlAun(0/-) (n = 1-3) are systematically investigated based on the density and wave function theories. Ab initio theoretical evidence strongly suggests that bridging gold atoms exist in the ground states of C2v Al2Au(-) ((3)B1), C2v Al2Au ((2)B1), C2v Al2Au2(-) ((2)A1), C2v Al2Au2 ((1)A1), Cs Al2Au3(-) ((1)A'), and D3h Al2Au3 ((2)A1), which prove to possess an Al-Au-Al τ bond. For BAlAun(0/-) (n = 1-3) mixed clusters, bridging B-Au-Al units only exist in Cs BAlAu3(-) ((1)A') and Cs BAlAu3 ((2)A'), whereas Cs BAlAu(-) ((3)A''), Cs BAlAu ((2)A''), Cs BAlAu2(-) ((2)A'), and Cs BAlAu2 ((1)A') do not possess a bridging gold, as demonstrated by the fact that B-Al and B-Au exhibit significantly stronger electronic interaction than Al-Au in the same clusters. Orbital analyses indicate that Au 6s contributes approximately 98%-99% to the Au-based orbital in these Al-Au-Al/B-Au-Al interactions, whereas Au 5d contributes 1%-2%. The adiabatic and vertical detachment energies of Al2Aun(-) (n = 1-3) are calculated to facilitate future experimental characterizations. The results obtained in this work establish an interesting τ bonding model (Al-Au-Al/B-Au-Al) for electron-deficient systems in which Au 6s plays a major factor. PMID:23718624

  6. Cu-Au, Ag-Au, Cu-Ag, and Ni-Au intermetallics: First-principles study of temperature-composition phase diagrams and structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozoliņš, V.; Wolverton, C.; Zunger, Alex

    1998-03-01

    The classic metallurgical systems-noble-metal alloys-that have formed the benchmark for various alloy theories are revisited. First-principles fully relaxed general-potential linearized augmented plane-wave (LAPW) total energies of a few ordered structures are used as input to a mixed-space cluster expansion calculation to study the phase stability, thermodynamic properties, and bond lengths in Cu-Au, Ag-Au, Cu-Ag, and Ni-Au alloys. (i) Our theoretical calculations correctly reproduce the tendencies of Ag-Au and Cu-Au to form compounds and Ni-Au and Cu-Ag to phase separate at T=0 K. (ii) Of all possible structures, Cu3Au (L12) and CuAu (L10) are found to be the most stable low-temperature phases of Cu1-xAux with transition temperatures of 530 K and 660 K, respectively, compared to the experimental values 663 K and ~670 K. The significant improvement over previous first-principles studies is attributed to the more accurate treatment of atomic relaxations in the present work. (iii) LAPW formation enthalpies demonstrate that L12, the commonly assumed stable phase of CuAu3, is not the ground state for Au-rich alloys, but rather that ordered (100) superlattices are stabilized. (iv) We extract the nonconfigurational (e.g., vibrational) entropies of formation and obtain large values for the size-mismatched systems: 0.48 kB/atom in Ni0.5Au0.5 (T=1100 K), 0.37 kB/atom in Cu0.141Ag0.859 (T=1052 K), and 0.16 kB/atom in Cu0.5Au0.5 (T=800 K). (v) Using 8 atom/cell special quasirandom structures we study the bond lengths in disordered Cu-Au and Ni-Au alloys and obtain good qualitative agreement with recent extended x-ray-absorption fine-structure measurements.

  7. Electrostatic assembles and optical properties of Au CdTe QDs and Ag/Au CdTe QDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dongzhi; Wang, Wenxing; Chen, Qifan; Huang, Yuping; Xu, Shukun

    2008-09-01

    Au-CdTe and Ag/Au-CdTe assembles were firstly investigated through the static interaction between positively charged cysteamine-stabilized CdTe quantum dots (QDs) and negatively charged Au or core/shell Ag/Au nano-particles (NCs). The CdTe QDs synthesized in aqueous solution were capped with cysteamine which endowed them positive charges on the surface. Both Au and Ag/Au NCs were prepared through reducing precursors with gallic acid obtained from the hydrolysis of natural plant poly-phenols and favored negative charges on the surface of NCs. The fluorescence spectra of CdTe QDs exhibited strong quenching with the increase of added Au or Ag/Au NCs. Railey resonance scattering spectra of Au or Ag/Au NCs increased firstly and decreased latter with the concentration of CdTe QDs, accompanied with the solution color changing from red to purple and colorless at last. Experimental results on the effects of gallic acid, chloroauric acid tetrahydrate and other reagents demonstrated the static interaction occurred between QDs and NCs. This finding reveals the possibilities to design and control optical process and electromagnetic coupling in hybrid structures.

  8. Au/Pd core-shell nanoparticles with varied hollow Au cores for enhanced formic acid oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Chiajen; Huang, Chienwen; Hao, Yaowu; Liu, Fuqiang

    2013-03-01

    A facile method has been developed to synthesize Au/Pd core-shell nanoparticles via galvanic replacement of Cu by Pd on hollow Au nanospheres. The unique nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, and electrochemical measurements. When the concentration of the Au solution was decreased, grain size of the polycrystalline hollow Au nanospheres was reduced, and the structures became highly porous. After the Pd shell formed on these Au nanospheres, the morphology and structure of the Au/Pd nanoparticles varied and hence significantly affected the catalytic properties. The Au/Pd nanoparticles synthesized with reduced Au concentrations showed higher formic acid oxidation activity (0.93 mA cm-2 at 0.3 V) than the commercial Pd black (0.85 mA cm-2 at 0.3 V), suggesting a promising candidate as fuel cell catalysts. In addition, the Au/Pd nanoparticles displayed lower CO-stripping potential, improved stability, and higher durability compared to the Pd black due to their unique core-shell structures tuned by Au core morphologies.

  9. Au/Pd core-shell nanoparticles with varied hollow Au cores for enhanced formic acid oxidation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A facile method has been developed to synthesize Au/Pd core-shell nanoparticles via galvanic replacement of Cu by Pd on hollow Au nanospheres. The unique nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet–visible spectroscopy, and electrochemical measurements. When the concentration of the Au solution was decreased, grain size of the polycrystalline hollow Au nanospheres was reduced, and the structures became highly porous. After the Pd shell formed on these Au nanospheres, the morphology and structure of the Au/Pd nanoparticles varied and hence significantly affected the catalytic properties. The Au/Pd nanoparticles synthesized with reduced Au concentrations showed higher formic acid oxidation activity (0.93 mA cm-2 at 0.3 V) than the commercial Pd black (0.85 mA cm-2 at 0.3 V), suggesting a promising candidate as fuel cell catalysts. In addition, the Au/Pd nanoparticles displayed lower CO-stripping potential, improved stability, and higher durability compared to the Pd black due to their unique core-shell structures tuned by Au core morphologies. PMID:23452438

  10. Lateral spreading of Au contacts on InP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fatemi, Navid S.; Weizer, Victor G.

    1990-01-01

    The contact spreading phenomenon observed when small area Au contacts on InP are annealed at temperatures above about 400 C was investigated. It was found that the rapid lateral expansion of the contact metallization which consumes large quantities of InP during growth is closely related to the third stage in the series of solid state reactions that occur between InP and Au, i.e., to the Au3In-to-Au9In4 transition. Detailed descriptions are presented of both the spreading process and the Au3In-to-Au9In4 transition along with arguments that the two processes are manifestations of the same basic phenomenon.

  11. Structural and electronic properties of AuIr nanoalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Díaz, Laura M.; Pérez, Luis A.

    2013-01-01

    The lowest-energy structures of binary (AuIr) n , (AuIr3) s , and (Au3Ir) s clusters, with n = 2-20, and s = 5, modeled by the many-body Gupta potential, were obtained by using a genetic-symbiotic algorithm. These structures were further relaxed within the density functional theory to obtain the most stable structures for each composition. Segregation is observed in all the AuIr clusters, where the Ir atoms occupy the cluster core and the Au atoms are situated on the cluster surface. On the other hand, there is experimental evidence that the (AuIr) n nanoalloys could have an enhanced catalytic activity for CO oxidation. In order to study this phenomenon, we also performed first-principles density functional calculations of the CO and O2 adsorption on these bimetallic nanoclusters, considering three different compositions and a fixed cluster size of 20 atoms.

  12. Atomic and molecular adsorption on Au(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Santiago-Rodríguez, Yohaselly; Herron, Jeffrey A.; Curet-Arana, María C.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2014-09-01

    Periodic self-consistent density functional theory (DFT-GGA) calculations were used to study the adsorption of several atomic species, molecular species and molecular fragments on the Au(111) surface with a coverage of 1/4 monolayer (ML). Binding geometries, binding energies, and diffusion barriers were calculated for 27 species. Furthermore, we calculated the surface deformation energy associated with the binding events. The binding strength for all the analyzed species can be ordered as follows: NH3 < NO < CO < CH3 < HCO < NH2 < COOH < OH < HCOO < CNH2 < H < N < NH < NOH < COH < Cl,< HCO3 < CH2 < CN b HNO < O < F < S < C < CH. Although the atomic species preferred to bind at the three-fold fcc site, no tendency was observed in site preference for the molecular species and fragments. The intramolecular and adsorbate-surface vibrational frequencies were calculated for all the adsorbates on their most energetically stable adsorption site. Most of the theoretical binding energies and frequencies agreed with experimental values reported in the literature. In general, the values obtained with the PW91 functional are more accurate than RPBE in reproducing these experimental binding energies. The energies of the adsorbed species were used to calculate the thermochemical potential energy surfaces for decomposition of CO, NO, N2, NH3 and CH4, oxidation of CO, and hydrogenation of CO, CO2 and NO, giving insight into the thermochemistry of these reactions on gold nanoparticles. These potential energy surfaces demonstrated that: the decomposition of species is not energetically favorable on Au(111); the desorption of NH3, NO and CO are more favorable than their decomposition; the oxidation of CO and hydrogenation of CO and NO on Au(111) to form HCO and HNO, respectively, are also thermodynamically favorable.

  13. Photosynthetic electron transport system promotes synthesis of Au-nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Shabnam, Nisha; Pardha-Saradhi, P

    2013-01-01

    In this communication, a novel, green, efficient and economically viable light mediated protocol for generation of Au-nanoparticles using most vital organelle, chloroplasts, of the plant system is portrayed. Thylakoids/chloroplasts isolated from Potamogeton nodosus (an aquatic plant) and Spinacia oleracea (a terrestrial plant) turned Au³⁺ solutions purple in presence of light of 600 µmol m⁻² s⁻¹ photon flux density (PFD) and the purple coloration intensified with time. UV-Vis spectra of these purple colored solutions showed absorption peak at ∼545 nm which is known to arise due to surface plasmon oscillations specific to Au-nanoparticles. However, thylakoids/chloroplasts did not alter color of Au³⁺ solutions in dark. These results clearly demonstrated that photosynthetic electron transport can reduce Au³⁺ to Au⁰ which nucleate to form Au-nanoparticles in presence of light. Transmission electron microscopic studies revealed that Au-nanoparticles generated by light driven photosynthetic electron transport system of thylakoids/chloroplasts were in range of 5-20 nm. Selected area electron diffraction and powder X-ray diffraction indicated crystalline nature of these nanoparticles. Energy dispersive X-ray confirmed that these nanoparticles were composed of Au. To confirm the potential of light driven photosynthetic electron transport in generation of Au-nanoparticles, thylakoids/chloroplasts were tested for their efficacy to generate Au-nanoparticles in presence of light of PFD ranging from 60 to 600 µmol m⁻² s⁻¹. The capacity of thylakoids/chloroplasts to generate Au-nanoparticles increased remarkably with increase in PFD, which further clearly demonstrated potential of light driven photosynthetic electron transport in reduction of Au³⁺ to Au⁰ to form nanoparticles. The light driven donation of electrons to metal ions by thylakoids/chloroplasts can be exploited for large scale production of nanoparticles. PMID:23976990

  14. ‘Everybody knows’, but the rest of the world: the case of a caterpillar-borne reproductive loss syndrome in dromedary camels observed by Sahrawi pastoralists of Western Sahara

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The traditional knowledge of local communities throughout the world is a valuable source of novel ideas and information to science. In this study, the ethnoveterinary knowledge of Sahrawi pastoralists of Western Sahara has been used in order to put forward a scientific hypothesis regarding the competitive interactions between camels and caterpillars in the Sahara ecosystem. Methods Between 2005 and 2009, 44 semi-structured interviews were conducted with Sahrawi pastoralists in the territories administered by the Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic, Western Sahara, using a snow-ball sampling design. Results Sahrawi pastoralists reported the existence of a caterpillar-borne reproductive loss syndrome, known locally as duda, affecting their camels. On the basis of Sahrawi knowledge about duda and of a thorough literature review, we built the hypothesis that: 1) caterpillars of the family Lasiocampidae (genera Lasiocampa, Psilogaster, or Streblote) have sudden and rare outbreaks on Acacia treetops in the Western Sahara ecosystem after heavy rainfall; 2) during these outbreaks, camels ingest the caterpillars while browsing; 3) as a consequence of this ingestion, pregnant camels have sudden abortions or give birth to weaklings. This hypothesis was supported by inductive reasoning built on circumstantiated evidence and analogical reasoning with similar syndromes reported in mares in the United States and Australia. Conclusions The possible existence of a caterpillar-borne reproductive loss syndrome among camels has been reported for the first time, suggesting that such syndromes might be more widespread than what is currently known. Further research is warranted to validate the reported hypothesis. Finally, the importance of studying folk livestock diseases is reinforced in light of its usefulness in revealing as yet unknown biological phenomena that would deserve further investigation. Resumen ‘Todos lo saben’, menos el resto del mundo: el caso de un s

  15. Systematic studies of the centrality dependence of soft photon production in Au + Au collision with PHENIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannier, Benjamin

    2014-11-01

    Since the earliest days of Heavy Ion Physics thermal soft photon radiation emitted during the reaction had been theorized as a smoking gun signal for formation of a quark-gluon plasma and as a tool to characterize its properties. In recent years the existence of excess photon radiation in heavy ion collisions over the expectation from initial hard interactions has been confirmed at both RHIC and LHC energies by PHENIX and ALICE respectively. There the radiation has been found to exhibit elliptic flow v2 well above what can currently be reconciled with a picture of early emission from a plasma phase. During the 2007 and 2010 Au + Au runs PHENIX has measured a high purity sample of soft photons down to pT > 0.4 GeV / c using an external conversion method. We present recent systematic studies by PHENIX from that sample on the centrality dependence of the soft photon yield, and elliptic and triangular flow v2 and v3 in Au + Au collisions which fill in the experimental picture and enable discrimination of competing soft photon production scenarios.

  16. Photoionization of Au+ ions and developments in the synthesis of the metallofullerene Au@C60

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogolub, Kyren; Macaluso, David; Mueller, Allison; Johnson, Andrea; Müller, Alfred; Schippers, Stefan; Hellhund, Jonas; Borovik, Alexander; Anders, Andre; Aguilar, Alex; Kilcoyne, A. L. David

    2014-05-01

    Single photoionization of Au+ ions was investigated via the merged-beams technique at AMO Beamline 10.0.1.2 of the Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The relative single photoionization yield was measured as a function of photon energy in the 45 eV to 120 eV energy range. These measurements were made in preparation for future photoionization studies of the endohedral metallofullerene Au@C60, the production of which was also investigated. In proof-of-principle measurements a mass-resolved beam of Au@C60+was produced with a primary ion beam current in the single picoamp range without optimization of the ion source or synthesis parameters. Plans are presented for improved metallofullere production yield to be used in photoionization measurements of the endohedral fullerene ions in conjunction with the continuing study of pure Au. We would like to acknowledge the generous sharing of equipment vital to this work by Andre Anders, the Plasma Applications group leader at the Advanced Light Source, LBNL.

  17. Preparations for p-Au run in 2015

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.

    2014-12-31

    The p-Au particle collision is a unique category of collision runs. This is resulted from the different charge mass ratio of the proton and fully stripped Au ion (1 vs.79/197). The p-Au run requires a special acceleration ramp, and movement of a number of beam components as required by the beam trajectories. The DX magnets will be moved for the first time in the history of RHIC. In this note, the planning and preparations for p-Au run will be presented.

  18. An Exploration of Catalytic Chemistry on Au/Ni(111)

    SciTech Connect

    Sylvia T. Ceyer

    2011-12-09

    This project explored the catalytic oxidation chemistry that can be effected on a Au/Ni(111) surface alloy. A Au/Ni(111) surface alloy is a Ni(111) surface on which less than 60% of the Ni atoms are replaced at random positions by Au atoms. The alloy is produced by vapor deposition of a small amount of Au onto Ni single crystals. The Au atoms do not result in an epitaxial Au overlayer or in the condensation of the Au into droplets. Instead, Au atoms displace and then replace Ni atoms on a Ni(111) surface, even though Au is immiscible in bulk Ni. The two dimensional structure of the clean Ni surface is preserved. This alloy is found to stabilize an adsorbed peroxo-like O2 species that is shown to be the critical reactant in the low temperature catalytic oxidation of CO and that is suspected to be the critical reactant in other oxidation reactions. This investigation revealed a new, practically important catalyst for CO oxidation that has since been patented.

  19. Heatless synthesis of well dispersible Au nanoparticles using pectin biopolymer.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Hanan B; Zahran, M K; Emam, Hossam E

    2016-10-01

    Due to its potency to utilize in enormous applications, preparation of nanogold is of interest. Moreover, getting of highly dispersed nanogold with small size is extremely needful in specific fields. Herein, Au nanocolloid was prepared using alkali catalyzed pectin biopolymer. Pectin was concurrently used as reductant for Au ions and stabilizer for the produced Au nanoparticles (AuNPs). Reducing sugars were evaluated in the colloidal solution reflecting the role alkali in catalytic degradation of pectin to produce much powerful reducing moieties. The obtained Au nanocolloid was monitored via changing in color, UV-visible spectral and transmission electron microscopy. Using of NaOH as strong alkali achieving rapid rate of degradation reaction, resulted in 0.45g/L reducing sugars from 0.2g/L pectin which produced AuNPs with mean size of 6.5nm. In case of Na2CO3 which attained slow degradation rate led to, slightly low reducing sugar content (0.41g/L), fabricated comparatively size of AuNPs (7.5nm). In both cases, well distributed AuNPs was obtained with suitable stabilization up to 5 months and Na2CO3 exhibited higher stability. The current successful method used to produce small sized AuNPs with high dispersion is an innovative, one-step, easily, costless, energy saving and eco-friendly method. PMID:27212212

  20. Local anodic oxidation patterning of Au deposited Si surfaces.

    PubMed

    Vijaykumar, T; Kulkarni, G U

    2009-09-01

    Nanopatterning of Si(100) surfaces deposited with Au films from physical and chemical methods, has been carried out using a AFM set up mounted with a conducting tip. At a tip bias of -12 V, the LAO patterns drawn on various Au/SiOx surfaces have been compared with those on bare Si. The height of the oxide patterns is several times higher in the case of Au covered Si surfaces compared to patterns on bare Si surface. The enhancement in LAO is related to the catalytic activity of Au nanoparticulates at SiOx interface. PMID:19928226

  1. Prolonged reorganization of thiol-capped Au nanoparticles layered structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, Sarathi; Das, Kaushik; Konovalov, Oleg

    2013-09-01

    Prolonged reorganization behaviour of mono-, di-, tri- and multi-layer films of Au nanoparticles prepared by Langmuir-Blodgett method on hydrophobic Si(001) substrates have been studied by using X-ray scattering techniques. Out-of-plane study shows that although at the initial stage the reorganization occurs through the compaction of the films keeping the layered structure unchanged but finally all layered structures modify to monolayer structure. Due to this reorganization the Au density increases within the nanometer thick films. In-plane study shows that inside the reorganized films Au nanoparticles are distributed randomly and the particle size modifies as the metallic core of Au nanoparticles coalesces.

  2. Layer growth in Au-Pb/In solder joints

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, F.G.; Ganyard, F.P.; Karnowsky, M.M.

    1986-01-01

    The solid state reaction between a Pb-In solder alloy and thin film Au has been investigated at ten aging temperatures ranging from 70 to 170/sup 0/C. Also, bulk Au-solder samples were aged at 150/sup 0/C for metallographic analysis. No significant difference was found between the aging behavior of thin and bulk Au specimens. A thin single phase layer of Au/sub 9/In/sub 4/ was found adjacent to Au while a thick two-phase layer of AuIn/sub 2/ and Pb was found between Au/sub 9/In/sub 4/ and solder. The Pb phase was shown to have considerable mobility and able to ripen at room temperature. Peculiar planar interface instabilities and voids in the Au-Au/sub 9/In/sub 4/ interface were found. The total layer thickness was found to vary linearly with aging time, indicating an interface-controlled reaction. An activation energy of 14,000 calories per mole was found by regression analysis of the kinetic data.

  3. Do Methanethiol Adsorbates on the Au(111) Surface Dissociate?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jian-Ge; Hagelberg, Frank

    2006-07-01

    The interaction of methanethiol molecules CH3SH with the Au(111) surface is investigated, and it is found for the first time that the S-H bond remains intact when the methanethiol molecules are adsorbed on the regular Au(111) surface. However, it breaks if defects are present in the Au(111) surface. At low coverage, the fcc region is favored for S atom adsorption, but at saturated coverage the adsorption energies at various sites are almost isoenergetic. The presented calculations show that a methanethiol layer on the regular Au(111) surface does not dimerize.

  4. Density functional study of the cysteine adsorption on Au nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, L. A.; López-Lozano, X.; Garzón, I. L.

    2009-04-01

    The adsorption of the cysteine amino acid (H-SCβH2-CαH-NH2-COOH) on the Au55 cluster is investigated through density functional theory calculations. Two isomers, with icosahedral (Ih) and chiral (C1) geometries, of the Au55 cluster are used to calculate the adsorption energy of the cysteine on different facets of these isomers. Results, only involving the S(thiolate)-Au bonding show that the higher adsorption energies are obtained when the sulfur atom is bonded to an asymmetrical bridge site at the facet containing Au atoms with the lowest coordination of the C1 cluster isomer.

  5. Electron paramagnetic resonance in positively charged Au25 molecular nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Akbari-Sharbaf, Arash; Hesari, Mahdi; Workentin, Mark S; Fanchini, Giovanni

    2013-01-14

    In this study, we investigated the unpaired electrons and singly occupied molecular orbitals (SOMO) of positively charged Au(25) molecular clusters using solid-state electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The EPR powder spectra of the positively charged (Au(25) (+)) and neutral (Au(25) (0)) species of Au(25) are discussed and compared. Our study demonstrates that Au(25) (+) is paramagnetic with a SOMO that is mostly localized about the central gold atom in the core of the molecule and possesses a strong p-type atomic character. The unpaired electron spin is demonstrated to strongly interact with the nuclear spins from other (197)Au nuclei in the core of Au(25) (+) molecules and the hyperfine tensor describing such interaction was extracted from the comparison of the EPR spectra with quantum mechanical simulations assuming an anisotropic structure of the core. Our simulations suggest that the core of Au(25) (+) molecular clusters is more distorted than in the corresponding neutral counterpart. They also confirm previous hypotheses suggesting that the icosahedral core of Au(25) (+) experiences contraction with decreasing temperature. PMID:23320681

  6. Atomistic simulations of Au-silica nanocomposite film growth

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Saif A.; Heinig, K.-H.; Avasthi, D. K.

    2011-05-01

    The growth of Au-silica nanocomposite film is simulated in the framework of kinetic three dimensional lattice Monte Carlo simulations considering the basic phenomena in the deposition process. In case of co-sputter deposition, the growth kinetics of nanoparticles has been studied taking into consideration the effect of the energetic sputtered species reaching the surface of the film during deposition. Formation of Au nanorod like structures are predicted under certain growth conditions particularly when surface diffusion assisted phase separation plays the dominant role and bulk kinetics is frozen. The observed dependence of the Au nanoparticle size on Au/silica ratio is in agreement with the experimental results.

  7. Enhanced photoluminescence in Au-embedded ITO nanowires.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunsu; Park, Sunghoon; Jin, Changhyun; Lee, Chongmu

    2011-12-01

    Gold (Au)-embedded indium tin oxide (ITO) nanowires were synthesized by thermal evaporation of a mixture of In(2)O(3,) SnO(2) and graphite powders on Si (100) substrates coated with Au thin films followed by annealing. At the initial stages of annealing, Au formed a continuous linear core located along the long axis of each ITO nanowire. The morphology of the Au core changed from a continuous line to a discrete line, and then to a droplet-like chain, finally evolving into a peapod in which crystalline Au nanoparticles were encapsulated in crystalline ITO with increasing annealing temperature. The ITO nanowires with the Au core showed an emission band at ~380 nm in the ultraviolet region. The ultraviolet emission intensity increased rapidly with increasing annealing temperature. The intensity of emission from the Au-peapod ITO nanowires (annealed at 750 °C) was approximately 20 times higher than that of the emission from the Au-core/ITO-shell ITO nanowires with a continuous linear shaped-Au core (annealed at 550 °C). This ultraintense ultraviolet emission might have originated mainly from the enhanced crystalline quality of the annealed ITO nanowires. PMID:22087582

  8. Component conversion from pure Au nanorods to multiblock Ag-Au-Ag nanorods assisted by Pt nanoframe templates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangji; Jang, Hee-Jeong; Jang, Ho Young; Kim, Seong Kyu; Park, Sungho

    2016-07-14

    We developed a new method for synthesizing multiblock Ag-Au-Ag nanorods using Pt nanoframes that had been deposited on the edges of Au nanorod seeds. As a function of Au etching time, the length of the Au nanorod decreased symmetrically starting from the two ends, leading to the formation of empty inner space at the ends. Subsequent reduction of Ag ions could be selectively performed in the inner space confined by Pt nanoframes and the resulting Ag-Au-Ag nanorods exhibited characteristic LSPR modes originating from each block component (in a transverse direction) and SPR coupling (in a longitudinal direction). The high quality of the resulting multiblock nanorods enabled observation of the longitudinal quadrupole mode that was induced by Ag-Au SPR coupling in a long axis. The mode exhibited high sensitivity in accordance with the change in the surrounding media, demonstrating great potential for sensor applications. PMID:27315144

  9. Diffusion of the Linear CH3S-Au-SCH3 Complex on Au(111) from First Principles

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Deen; Dai, Sheng

    2009-01-01

    Recent experimental and computational advances have clearly established the importance of the linear alkylthiolate-Au-alkylthiolate (RS-Au-SR) complex at the interface between the thiolate groups and the gold surface. By using density functional theory-based first principles method, here we show that the elementary diffusion step of this linear complex on Au(111) has a barrier of only {approx}0.5 eV in the case of methylthiolate, indicating great mobility of the linear complex on Au(111). The role of this low barrier in the formation of a self-assembled monolayer of thiolate groups in the form of RS-Au-SR on Au(111) is discussed.

  10. Observation of D0 Meson Nuclear Modifications in Au +Au Collisions at √sNN =200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Borowski, W.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Brovko, S. G.; Bültmann, S.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, L.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Chwastowski, J.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Contin, G.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cui, X.; Das, S.; Davila Leyva, A.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; Derradi de Souza, R.; Dhamija, S.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Ding, F.; Djawotho, P.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Engle, K. S.; Eppley, G.; Eun, L.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Fedorisin, J.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Gliske, S.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, S.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hamed, A.; Han, L.-X.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kesich, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Konzer, J.; Koralt, I.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; LeVine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, W.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, Z. M.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Madagodagettige Don, D. M. M. D.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Ohlson, A.; Okorokov, V.; Oldag, E. W.; Olvitt, D. L.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Porter, J.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Przybycien, M.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Riley, C. K.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ross, J. F.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sangaline, E.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Solanki, D.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stevens, J. R.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Symons, T. J. M.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Turnau, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Vanfossen, J. A.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Vossen, A.; Wada, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, H.; Xu, J.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yan, W.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zawisza, Y.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhu, X.; Zhu, Y. H.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2014-10-01

    We report the first measurement of charmed-hadron (D0) production via the hadronic decay channel (D0→K-+π+) in Au +Au collisions at √sNN =200 GeV with the STAR experiment. The charm production cross section per nucleon-nucleon collision at midrapidity scales with the number of binary collisions, Nbin, from p +p to central Au +Au collisions. The D0 meson yields in central Au +Au collisions are strongly suppressed compared to those in p+p scaled by Nbin, for transverse momenta pT>3 GeV /c, demonstrating significant energy loss of charm quarks in the hot and dense medium. An enhancement at intermediate pT is also observed. Model calculations including strong charm-medium interactions and coalescence hadronization describe our measurements.

  11. Heterostructured Au/Pd-M (M = Au, Pd, Pt) nanoparticles with compartmentalized composition, morphology, and electrocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Patrick S; Bae, In-Tae; Maye, Mathew M

    2015-10-14

    The synthesis, processing, and galvanic exchange of three heterostructured nanoparticle systems is described. The surface accessibility and redox potential of a Au/Pd-Ag dumbbell nanoparticle, where a Au/Pd core/shell region, and a silver region make up the domains, was used to prepare the new nanostructures with controlled composition, morphology, and microstructure. Results indicate that the silver domain was particularly susceptible to galvanic displacement, and was exchanged to Au/Pd-M (M = Au, Pd, Pt). Interestingly, the dumbbell morphology remained after exchange, and the silver region was transformed to hollow, parachute, or concentric domains respectively. The morphology and microstructure change was visualized via TEM and HRTEM, and the composition changes were probed via STEM-EDS imaging and XPS. The electrocatalytic activity of the Au/Pd-M towards methanol oxidation was studied, with results indicating that the Au/Pd-Pt nanoparticles had high activity attributed to the porous nature of the platinum domains. PMID:26351824

  12. Datation de la grossesse en pratique courante au Cameroun: fiabilité de la date de dernières règles

    PubMed Central

    Ngowa, Jean Dupont Kemfang; Mando, Emmanuel; Guegang, Emilienne; Ngassam, Anny; Kasia, Jean Marie

    2014-01-01

    Introduction La détermination précise de l’âge gestationnel (AG) est essentielle pour un suivi adapté de la grossesse. La date de dernières règles (DDR) et l’échographie de datation du premier trimestre sont les moyens habituels de datation de la grossesse. La DDR est souvent imprécise du fait des erreurs de rappel ou d'un trouble du cycle menstruel. Cette étude transversale et descriptive avait pour objectif d’évaluer la fiabilité de la DDR dans la datation de la grossesse en pratique courante à Yaoundé. Méthodes Etude transversale et descriptive réalisée dans deux hôpitaux universitaires de Yaoundé du 15 décembre 2012 au 15 avril 2013. La collecte des données était effectuée par un interrogatoire des femmes enceintes au cours de la consultation prénatale et l'examen de leur dossier médical. Les femmes enceintes présentant une complication du premier trimestre (menace d'avortement, grossesse arrêtée ou extra-utérine, grossesse molaire) et celles ne se rappelant pas de leur DDR ont été exclues de l’étude. Les données étaient saisies dans Epi-Data 3.1 et analysées dans le logiciel SPSS. 21. Résultats Cinq cent huit femmes enceintes ont été enrôlées dans cette étude, 267(52,56%) d'entre elles avaient noté leur DDR sur un support tandis que 241(47,44%) utilisaient leur mémoire pour se rappeler leur DDR. Cent dix-sept (23,03%) femmes enceintes avait réalisé une échographie de datation du premier trimestre et parmi elles, 50 (42,70%) avaient une discordance des âges gestationnels théorique et échographique. Le rappel de la DDR par la mémoire (OR. 3,46; IC: 1,59-7,53), le cycle irrégulier (OR. 6,15; IC: 1,24-30,4) et le doute sur la DDR communiquée (OR. 31,06; IC: 3.95-244) étaient les facteurs significativement associés à la discordance des AG théorique et échographique. Conclusion La DDR utilisée pour la datation de la grossesse en pratique courante à Yaoundé est fréquemment imprécise. PMID:25309664

  13. Cardiopathies congénitales: aspects épidémiologiques et échocardiographies à propos de 109 cas au centre hospitalier universitaire pédiatrique Charles de Gaulle (CHUP-CDG) de Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Kinda, Georges; Millogo, Georges Rosario Christian; Koueta, Fla; Dao, Lassina; Talbousouma, Sollimy; Cissé, Hassane; Djiguimdé, Aristide; Yé, Diarra; Sorgho, Claudine Lougue

    2015-01-01

    Notre travail avait pour objectif d’étudier les aspects épidémiologiques et écho-cardiographiques des cardiopathies congénitales au CHUP-CDG afin d'y faire l’état des lieux. Pour se faire, nous avons mené sur une période de 27 mois d'aout 2009 à mai 2010 et d'octobre 2011 à décembre 2011, une étude rétrospective des comptes rendus d’échocardiographies Doppler des patients admis dans le service d'imagerie médicale. Nous avons utilisé une sonde cardiaque de 5MHz sur appareil Aloka Prosound 4000 Plus. Durant la période d’étude, 380 examens écho-cardiographiques ont été réalisés et ont permis de mettre en évidence 109 cas de cardiopathies congénitales avec 138 entités nosologiques différentes. Les cardiopathies congénitales représentaient 0,98% des 11169 entrées. Les souffles étaient au premier rang des motifs de demande de l’échographie Doppler cardiaque (121 cas sur 380) soit 39,53%. Les CIV étaient au premier plan des cardiopathies congénitales (28,26%), suivies des CIA (23,19%), des sténoses pulmonaires (19,57%), des Tétralogie de Fallot (9,42%). Dans leur forme isolée, les CIA étaient les plus fréquentes avec 21,95% des cas, suivies des CIV avec 20,73%. Sur 138 cas de cardiopathies congénitales (chez 109 enfants), 53 cas ont été observés chez des enfants de sexe féminin et 56 cas chez des enfants de sexe masculin soit un sexe ration de 1,1. La tranche d’âge présentant une fréquence élevée de cardiopathie congénitale est celle de 1mois- 30 mois avec 55% des cas. Les cardiopathies congénitales de l'enfant sont une réalité en Afrique, leurs fréquences dans toutes les séries rapportées sont certainement sous estimées en raison de l'inaccessibilité de l’échocardiographie doppler. PMID:26090039

  14. Component conversion from pure Au nanorods to multiblock Ag-Au-Ag nanorods assisted by Pt nanoframe templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sangji; Jang, Hee-Jeong; Jang, Ho Young; Kim, Seong Kyu; Park, Sungho

    2016-06-01

    We developed a new method for synthesizing multiblock Ag-Au-Ag nanorods using Pt nanoframes that had been deposited on the edges of Au nanorod seeds. As a function of Au etching time, the length of the Au nanorod decreased symmetrically starting from the two ends, leading to the formation of empty inner space at the ends. Subsequent reduction of Ag ions could be selectively performed in the inner space confined by Pt nanoframes and the resulting Ag-Au-Ag nanorods exhibited characteristic LSPR modes originating from each block component (in a transverse direction) and SPR coupling (in a longitudinal direction). The high quality of the resulting multiblock nanorods enabled observation of the longitudinal quadrupole mode that was induced by Ag-Au SPR coupling in a long axis. The mode exhibited high sensitivity in accordance with the change in the surrounding media, demonstrating great potential for sensor applications.We developed a new method for synthesizing multiblock Ag-Au-Ag nanorods using Pt nanoframes that had been deposited on the edges of Au nanorod seeds. As a function of Au etching time, the length of the Au nanorod decreased symmetrically starting from the two ends, leading to the formation of empty inner space at the ends. Subsequent reduction of Ag ions could be selectively performed in the inner space confined by Pt nanoframes and the resulting Ag-Au-Ag nanorods exhibited characteristic LSPR modes originating from each block component (in a transverse direction) and SPR coupling (in a longitudinal direction). The high quality of the resulting multiblock nanorods enabled observation of the longitudinal quadrupole mode that was induced by Ag-Au SPR coupling in a long axis. The mode exhibited high sensitivity in accordance with the change in the surrounding media, demonstrating great potential for sensor applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03484e

  15. Mesomorphic lamella rolling of au in vacuum.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chang-Ning; Chen, Shuei-Yuan; Shen, Pouyan

    2009-01-01

    Lamellar nanocondensates in partial epitaxy with larger-sized multiply twinned particles (MTPs) or alternatively in the form of multiple-walled tubes (MWTs) having nothing to do with MTP were produced by the very energetic pulse laser ablation of Au target in vacuum under specified power density and pulses. Transmission electron microscopic observations revealed (111)-motif diffraction and low-angle scattering. They correspond to layer interspacing (0.241-0.192 nm) and the nearest neighbor distance (ca. 0.74-0.55 nm) of atom clusters within the layer, respectively, for the lamella, which shows interspacing contraction with decreasing particle size under the influence of surface stress and rolls up upon electron irradiation. The uncapped MWT has nearly concentric amorphous layers interspaced by 0.458-0.335 nm depending on dislocation distribution and becomes spherical onions for surface-area reduction upon electron dosage. Analogous to graphene-derived tubular materials, the lamella-derived MWT of Au could have pentagon-hexagon pair at its zig-zag junction and useful optoelectronic properties worthy of exploration. PMID:20628452

  16. Interplanetary magnetic clouds at 1 AU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, L. W.; Burlaga, L. F.

    1981-01-01

    Magnetic clouds are defined as regions with a radial dimension approximately 0.25 AU (at 1 AU) in which the magnetic field strength is high and the magnetic field direction changes appreciably by means of rotation of one component of B nearly parallel to a plane. The magnetic field geometry in such a magnetic cloud is consistent with that of a magnetic loop, but it cannot be determined uniquely. Forty-five clouds were identified in interplanetary data obtained near Earth between 1967 and 1978; at least one cloud passed the Earth every three months. Three classes of clouds were identified, corresponding to the association of a cloud with a shock, a stream interface, or a CME. There are approximately equal numbers of clouds in each class, and the three types of clouds might be different manifestations of a coronal transient. The magnetic pressure inside the clouds is higher than the ion pressure and the sum is higher than the pressure of the material outside of the cloud.

  17. Mesomorphic Lamella Rolling of Au in Vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chang-Ning; Chen, Shuei-Yuan; Shen, Pouyan

    2009-11-01

    Lamellar nanocondensates in partial epitaxy with larger-sized multiply twinned particles (MTPs) or alternatively in the form of multiple-walled tubes (MWTs) having nothing to do with MTP were produced by the very energetic pulse laser ablation of Au target in vacuum under specified power density and pulses. Transmission electron microscopic observations revealed (111)-motif diffraction and low-angle scattering. They correspond to layer interspacing (0.241-0.192 nm) and the nearest neighbor distance (ca. 0.74-0.55 nm) of atom clusters within the layer, respectively, for the lamella, which shows interspacing contraction with decreasing particle size under the influence of surface stress and rolls up upon electron irradiation. The uncapped MWT has nearly concentric amorphous layers interspaced by 0.458-0.335 nm depending on dislocation distribution and becomes spherical onions for surface-area reduction upon electron dosage. Analogous to graphene-derived tubular materials, the lamella-derived MWT of Au could have pentagon-hexagon pair at its zig-zag junction and useful optoelectronic properties worthy of exploration.

  18. Mesomorphic Lamella Rolling of Au in Vacuum

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Lamellar nanocondensates in partial epitaxy with larger-sized multiply twinned particles (MTPs) or alternatively in the form of multiple-walled tubes (MWTs) having nothing to do with MTP were produced by the very energetic pulse laser ablation of Au target in vacuum under specified power density and pulses. Transmission electron microscopic observations revealed (111)-motif diffraction and low-angle scattering. They correspond to layer interspacing (0.241–0.192 nm) and the nearest neighbor distance (ca. 0.74–0.55 nm) of atom clusters within the layer, respectively, for the lamella, which shows interspacing contraction with decreasing particle size under the influence of surface stress and rolls up upon electron irradiation. The uncapped MWT has nearly concentric amorphous layers interspaced by 0.458–0.335 nm depending on dislocation distribution and becomes spherical onions for surface-area reduction upon electron dosage. Analogous to graphene-derived tubular materials, the lamella-derived MWT of Au could have pentagon–hexagon pair at its zig-zag junction and useful optoelectronic properties worthy of exploration. PMID:20628452

  19. Ordered arrays of Au catalysts by FIB assisted heterogeneous dewetting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benkouider, A.; Ronda, A.; David, T.; Favre, L.; Abbarchi, M.; Naffouti, M.; Osmond, J.; Delobbe, A.; Sudraud, P.; Berbezier, I.

    2015-12-01

    Synthesizing Au0.8Si0.2 nanocatalysts that are homogeneous in size and have controlled position is becoming a challenging and crucial prequisite for the fabrication of ordered semiconductor nanowires. In this study, Au0.8Si0.2 nanocatalysts are synthesized via dewetting of Au layers on Si(111) during thermal annealing in an ultra-high vacuum. In the first part of the paper, the mechanism of homogeneous dewetting is analyzed as a function of the Au-deposited thickness (h Au). We distinguish three different dewetting regimes: (I) for a low thickness ({h}{{Au}}≤slant 0.4 {nm}), a submonolyer coverage of Au is stabilized and there is no dewetting. (II) For an intermediate thickness (0.4 {nm}\\lt {h}{Au}≤slant 5 {nm}), there is both dewetting and Au0.8Si0.2 phase formation. The size and density of the Au0.8Si0.2 clusters are directly related to h Au. When cooling down to room temperature, the clusters decompose and reject the Si at the Au/Si substrate interface. (III) For a large thickness ({h}{{Au}}\\gt 5 {nm}), only dewetting takes place, without forming AuSi clusters. In this regime, the dewetting is kinetically controlled by the self-diffusion of Au (activation energy ∼0.43 eV) without evidence of an Si-alloying effect. As a practical consequence, when relying solely on the homogeneous dewetting of Au/Si(111) to form the Au0.8Si0.2 catalysts (without a supply of Si atoms from vapor), regime II should be used to obtain good size and density control. In the second part of the paper, a process for ordering the catalysts using focused ion beam-(FIB) assisted dewetting (heterogeneous dewetting) is developed. We show that no matter what the FIB milling conditions and the Au nominal thickness are, dewetting is promoted by ion beam irradiation and is accompanied by the formation of Au0.8Si0.2 droplets. The droplets preferentially form on the patterned areas, while in similar annealing conditions, they do not form on the unpatterned areas. This behavior is attributed

  20. Coating of a layer of Au on Al13 : The findings of icosahedral Al@Al12Au20- and Al12Au202- fullerenes using ab initio pseudopotential calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Vijay

    2009-02-01

    We report results of ab initio pseudopotential calculations on the nanocoating of gold on an icosahedral Al13 cluster and the findings of icosahedrally symmetric endohedral Al@Al12Au20- and empty cage Al12Au202- compound fullerenes formed of metal atoms. Twelve Al atoms cap the pentagonal faces of a dodecahedral Au20 cage in which each Au atom has three Al atoms and three Au atoms as nearest neighbors. Mixing of Al13 and Au20 magic clusters leads to a large heat of formation of 0.55 eV/atom and high stability of the Al@Al12Au20 compound fullerene. The binding energies of Al12Au20 and Al@Al12Au20 are 3.017 and 3.007 eV/atom, respectively, which are much larger than 2.457 eV/atom for Au32 fullerene, leading to the possibility of their high abundance.

  1. Facile synthesis of ultrathin Au nanorods by aging the AuCl(oleylamine) complex with amorphous Fe nanoparticles in chloroform.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhengquan; Tao, Jing; Lu, Xianmao; Zhu, Yimei; Xia, Younan

    2008-09-01

    Despite plenty of reports on the preparation of Au nanorods, it remains challenging to grow uniform Au nanorods with diameters below 5 nm. In this communication, we demonstrate the facile synthesis of ultrathin Au nanorods with a uniform diameter of 2 nm and an average aspect ratio of 30. The synthesis involves the room-temperature aging of a mixture of the [AuCl(oleylamine)] complex with amorphous Fe nanoparticles in chloroform. Analysis of the growth mechanism indicates that Au nanoparticles with a high density of defects were formed at early stages, followed by etching and redeposition process that gradually led to the growth of ultrathin Au nanorods along the 111 direction. This growth mechanism is different from the mechanism recently reported for ultrathin Au nanowires (ref ), where the [AuCl(oleylamine)] complex is assembled into polymer chains followed by reduction to form wires, although the template effect of oleylamine for the formation of ultrathin Au nanorods cannot be completely ruled out. PMID:18681484

  2. Gold Apes Hydrogen. The Structure and Bonding in the Planar B7Au2- and B7Au2 Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Hua JIN.; Wang, Lai S.; Zubarev, Dmitry Y.; Boldyrev, Alexander I.

    2006-02-09

    We produced the B7Au2- mixed cluster and studied its electronic structure and chemical bonding using photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio calculations. The photoelectron spectra of B7Au2- were observed to be relatively simple with vibrational resolution, in contrast to the complicated spectra observed for pure B7-, which had contributions from three isomers (Alexandrova et al., J. Phys. Chem. A, 2004, 108, 3509). Theoretical calculations show that B7Au2- possesses an extremely stable planar structure, identical to that of B7H2-, demonstrating that Au mimics H in its bonding to boron, analogous to the Au-Si bonding. The ground state structure of B7Au2- (B7H2-) can be viewed as adding two Au (H) atoms to the terminal B atoms of a higher-lying planar isomer of B7-. The bonding and stability in the planar B7Au2- (B7H2-) clusters are elucidated on the basis of the strong covalent B-Au (H) bonding and the concepts of aromaticity/antiaromaticity in these systems.

  3. Ultrafast charge carrier dynamics in Au/semiconductor nanoheterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambright, Scott

    The charge carrier dynamics in several Au/semiconductor core/shell heterostructures were examined. Firstly, Au/CdS core/shell nanocomposites were synthesized in a four step procedure culminating in a cation exchange performed on the shell. Previous studies of the ultrafast carrier dynamics in Au/CdS nanocomposites with epitaxial boundary regions reported the suppression of plasmon character in transient absorption spectra accompanied by broadband photoinduced absorption. The coupling of electron wavefunctions with lattice defects at the boundary of the two domains has been blamed for these phenomena. In the current study, transmission electron micrographs of Au/CdS synthesized using cation exchange showed no evidence of strain on the lattice of either component, while femtosecond transient absorption data show the retention of bleach regions attributed to CdS's 1S(e)-1S3/2(h) transition and Au's plasmon resonance. Accelerated rates of bleach recovery for both excitations ( tauexiton ≈ 300 ps, tauplasmon ≈ .7 ps) indicated that the interaction of Au and CdS domains leads to faster relaxation to their respective photoexcitations when compared to relaxation times in isolated Au and CdS nanoparticles. It was believed that the Au/CdS boundary was non-epitaxial in the presented core/shell nanocomposites. Secondly, these non-epitaxial Au/CdS core/shells were subsequently used to demonstrate near-field energy transfer from 5 nm diameter Au cores to CdS-encapsulated CdSe quantum dots. To this end, Au/CdS and CdSe/CdS nanocrystals were embedded in semiconductor-matrix-encapsulated-nanocrystal-arrays (SMENA) together. The encapsulation of both domains in the high band-gap semiconductor CdS was a means to suppress charge transfer between the two nanoparticles. The fluorescence intensity in these films was enhanced 6-fold in some cases as a result of the presence of Au domains. It was also demonstrated that the fluorescence enhancement was independent of the potential

  4. Gas phase selective hydrogenation over oxide supported Ni-Au.

    PubMed

    Cárdenas-Lizana, Fernando; Keane, Mark A

    2015-11-14

    The chemoselective continuous gas phase (T = 573 K; P = 1 atm) hydrogenation of nitroarenes (p-chloronitrobenzene (p-CNB) and m-dinitrobenzene (m-DNB)) has been investigated over a series of oxide (Al2O3 and TiO2) supported Au and Ni-Au (1 : 10 mol ratio; 0.1-1 mol% Au) catalysts. Monometallic supported Au with mean particle size 3-9 nm promoted exclusive formation of p-chloroaniline (p-CAN) and m-nitroaniline (m-NAN). Selective hydrogenation rate was higher over smaller Au particles and can be attributed to increased surface hydrogen (from TPD measurements) at higher metal dispersion. (S)TEM analysis has confirmed an equivalent metal particle size for the supported bimetallics at the same Au loading where TPR indicates Ni-Au interaction and EDX surface mapping established Ni in close proximity to Au on isolated nanoparticles with a composition (Au/Ni) close to the bulk value (= 10). Increased spillover hydrogen due to the incorporation of Ni in the bimetallics resulted in elevated -NO2 group reduction rate. Full selectivity to p-CAN was maintained over all the bimetallic catalysts. Conversion of m-DNB over the lower loaded Ni-Au/Al2O3 generated m-NAN as sole product. An increase in Ni content (0.01 → 0.1 mol%) or a switch from Al2O3 to TiO2 as support resulted in full -NO2 reduction (to m-phenylenediamine). Our results demonstrate the viability of Ni-promotion of Au in the continuous production of functionalised anilines. PMID:25752655

  5. CO oxidation on h-BN supported Au atom

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Min; Lyalin, Andrey; Taketsugu, Tetsuya

    2013-01-21

    The mechanism of CO oxidation by O{sub 2} on Au atoms supported on the pristine and defected hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) surface has been studied theoretically using density functional theory. It is found that O{sub 2} binds stronger than CO on an Au atom supported on the defect free h-BN surface and h-BN surface with nitrogen vacancy (V{sub N}-h-BN), but weaker than CO on a free Au atom or Au trapped by a boron vacancy (V{sub B}-h-BN). The excess of the positive or negative charge on Au can considerably change its catalytic properties and enhance activation of the adsorbed O{sub 2}. Coadsorption of CO and O{sub 2} on Au, Au/V{sub N}-h-BN, and Au/V{sub B}-h-BN results in additional charge transfer to O{sub 2}. Various pathways of the CO oxidation reaction by molecular oxygen are studied. We found two different pathways for CO oxidation: a two-step pathway where two CO{sub 2} molecules are formed independently, and a self-promotion pathway where oxidation of the first CO molecule is promoted by the second CO molecule. Interaction of Au with the defect-free and defected h-BN surface considerably affects the CO oxidation reaction pathways and barriers. Therefore, Au supported on the h-BN surface (pristine or defected) cannot be considered as pseudo-free atom and support effects have to be taken into account, even when the interaction of Au with the support is weak.

  6. Mixed Valent Gold Oxides: Syntheses, Structures, and Properties of Rb 5Au 3O 2, Rb 7Au 5O 2, and Cs 7Au 5O 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudring, Anja-Verena; Nuss, Jürgen; Wedig, Ulrich; Jansen, Martin

    2000-11-01

    The title compounds Rb5Au3O2, Rb7Au5O2, and Cs7Au5O2 are the first examples of mixed valent phases containing gold in the oxidation states +1 and -1. Their crystal structures (Rb5Au3O2, Pbam, a=736.4(1) pm, b=1430.8(2) pm, c=567.9(1) pm, Z=2, R(F)=0.053, 647 reflections; Rb7Au5O2, Immm, a=567.1(2) pm, b=930.1(1) pm, C=1659.4(3) pm, Z=2, R(F)=0.066, 409 reflections; Cs7Au5O2, Immm, a=599.4(1) pm, b=960.6(3) pm, c=1720.8(12) pm, Z=2, R(F)=0.039, 386 reflections) are characterized by the combination of distinctive structural features of gold(I) oxides and aurides: for Au(+1) a typical linear coordination by oxygen is found and the surroundings of Au(-1) bear a close resemblance to the binary 1:1 aurides. In consequence the overall structures of Rb5Au3O2 and M7Au5O2 can be described as intergrowths of M3AuO2 and MAu (M=Rb, Cs), constituting members of a homologous series [MAu]n[M3AuO2] with n=2 and 4, respectively. The crystal chemical evidence for the valence states assumed, also confirmed by Mößbauer spectroscopy, is supported by various band structure calculations (Hartee-Fock and density functional) clearly indicating the coexistence of two different oxidation states. The compounds have been synthesized by reacting binary aurides MAu and alkali monoxides M2O (M=Rb, Cs) with elemental gold in the required stochiometric amounts. Hereby, a further astonishing parallel to the chemistry of halogens is revealed. Like these, gold disproportionates upon interaction with bases.

  7. High transverse momentum {eta} meson production in p+p,d+Au, and Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, S. S.; Aronson, S. H.; Chujo, T.; David, G.; Desmond, E. J.; Drees, K. A.; Ewell, L.; Franz, A.; Guryn, W.; Haggerty, J. S.; Harvey, M.; Johnson, B. M.; Kistenev, E.; Kroon, P. J.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mitchell, J. T.; Morrison, D. P.; O'Brien, E.; Pinkenburg, C.

    2007-02-15

    Inclusive transverse momentum spectra of {eta} mesons in the range p{sub T}{approx_equal}2-12 GeV/c have been measured at midrapidity (|{eta}|<0.35) by the PHENIX experiment at RHIC in p+p,d+Au, and Au+Au collisions at {radical}(s{sub NN})=200 GeV. The {eta} mesons are reconstructed through their {eta}{yields}{gamma} {gamma} channel for the three colliding systems as well as through the {eta}{yields}{pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} decay mode in p+p and d+Au collisions. The nuclear modification factor in d+Au collisions, R{sub dAu}(p{sub T}){approx_equal}1.0-1.1, suggests at most only modest p{sub T} broadening (''Cronin enhancement''). In central Au+Au reactions, the {eta} yields are significantly suppressed, with R{sub AuAu}(p{sub T}){approx_equal}0.2. The ratio of {eta} to {pi}{sup 0} yields is approximately constant as a function of p{sub T} for the three colliding systems in agreement with the high-p{sub T} world average of R{sub {eta}/{pi}{sup 0}}{approx_equal}0.5 in hadron-hadron, hadron-nucleus, and nucleus-nucleus collisions for a wide range of center-of-mass energies ({radical}(s{sub NN}){approx_equal}3-1800 GeV) as well as, for high scaled momentum x{sub p}, in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations at {radical}(s)=91.2 GeV. These results are consistent with a scenario where high-p{sub T} {eta} production in nuclear collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider is largely unaffected by initial-state effects but where light-quark mesons ({pi}{sup 0},{eta}) are equally suppressed due to final-state interactions of the parent partons in the dense medium produced in Au+Au reactions.

  8. Facteurs de risque de l'infection par le VIH dans le district de santé de Meyomessala au Cameroun

    PubMed Central

    Mbopi-Keou, Francois-Xavier; Nguefack-Tsague, Georges; Kalla, Ginette Claude Mireille; Abessolo, Stéphanie Abo'o; Angwafo, Fru; Muna, Walinjom

    2014-01-01

    Introduction L'objectif de ce travail était de déterminer les facteurs de risque de l'infection par le VIH dans le district de santé de Meyomessala (Région du Sud) au Cameroun. Méthodes Il s'agissait d'une étude transversale, descriptive et analytique qui s'est déroulée de Février à Mai 2011. Pour cette étude, nous avons obtenu une clairance éthique. Résultats L’échantillon était constitué de 315 participants dont 181 (57,46%) hommes et 134 (42,54%) femmes. L’âge moyen était de 24,5±8ans (extrême: 15-45ans). Quarante personnes (40) étaient séropositifs, soit une prévalence de l'infection par le VIH de 12,7%. Cette prévalence augmentait significativement (p = 0) avec le nombre de partenaires occasionnels au cours des douze derniers mois, allant de 2,7% chez ceux n'ayant eu aucun partenaire occasionnel à 21,25% chez ceux ayant plus de trois partenaires occasionnels (RC = 9,72; IC = 1,27-74,14; P = 0,03). le fait d’être âgé entre 20 et 24 ans (RC = 4,88; IC = 1,74-13,67; p = 0), avoir plus de trois partenaires sexuels au cours des douze derniers mois (RC = 9,72; IC = 1,27-74,14; p = 0,03), avoir les rapports sexuels avec les prostitués (RC = 2,86; IC = 1,42-5,76; p = 0), avoir eu le chlamydia (RC = 3,00; IC = 1,07-8,39; p = 0,04), avoir eu la syphilis (RC = 3,35; IC = 1,57-7,14; p = 0), avoir des avantages sociaux lors du premier rapport sexuel (RC = 2,57; IC = 1,03-6,43; p = 0,04) constituaient des potentiels facteurs de risque du VIH. Conclusion Il apparait urgent d'intensifier les campagnes de sensibilisation au risque d'infection par le VIH et les maladies sexuellement transmissibles dans le district de santé de Meyomessala PMID:25419299

  9. Découverte fortuite de quadruplets au cours d'un accouchement: illustration d'un cas à l'Hôpital Central de Yaoundé (Cameroun)

    PubMed Central

    Fouelifack, Florent Ymele; Fouedjio, Jeanne Hortence; Dingom, Madye Ange Ngo; Fouogue, Jovanny Tsuala; Enow, Robinson Mbu

    2014-01-01

    Les auteurs rapportent une grossesse de haut rang (quadruplés) dont le nombre de fœtus n'a été découvert que pendant l'accouchement par voie vaginale. Faute de moyens, la parturiente reçue en phase active du travail n'a pas pu bénéficier de la césarienne d'urgence indiquée pour présentation en siège du premier jumeau. Ce n'est qu'après l'accouchement du deuxième fœtus que les deux derniers quadruplés ont été successivement découverts. Les difficultés et les pièges contextuels de la prise en charge des grossesses multiples sont passés en revue. Ce cas rappelle au personnel des salles d'accouchement la possibilité d'erreur de diagnostique sur les résultats d'échographies présentés par les parturientes. PMID:25419323

  10. Silver migration between Au38(SC2H4Ph)24 and doped AgxAu38-x(SC2H4Ph)24 nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bei; Salassa, Giovanni; Bürgi, Thomas

    2016-07-28

    A fast redistribution of metal atoms occurs upon mixing the AgxAu38-x and Au38 nanoclusters in solution, as observed by mass spectrometry. Physical separation of AgxAu38-x and Au38 species by a dialysis membrane prohibits the metal migration, which suggests that collisions between the reacting clusters are at the origin of the observation. PMID:27352728

  11. Registration of ‘AU-1101’ peanut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    AU-1101’ (Reg. No. CV-xxx, PI 661498) is a large-seeded virginia-type peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. subsp. hypogaea var. hypogaea) with high yield and medium maturity, uniform pod size and shape, high grade, superior shelling characters, low oil content, normal oleic acid content, and good flavor. AU-...

  12. Deposition of Au and Ag nanoparticles on PEDOT.

    PubMed

    Danieli, Tamar; Colleran, John; Mandler, Daniel

    2011-12-01

    The deposition of Au and Ag, locally and from bulk solution, on poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) was studied. Specifically, PEDOT was electrochemically polymerized onto a glassy carbon (GC) electrode and used for bulk deposition of Au and Ag from their respective ions dissolved in the solution as well as for the local deposition of these metals using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). These two sets of experiments were utilized to investigate the difference between Au and Ag electrochemical deposition on PEDOT. In particular, SECM experiments, which were conducted by the controlled anodic dissolution of Au and Ag microelectrodes close to GC/PEDOT, probed the effect of different PEDOT oxidation states on local deposition. The current-time transients recorded during the deposition, combined with scanning electron microscopy and EDX analysis provided insight into the reduction processes. AuCl(4)(-) and Ag(+) ions were electrochemically reduced at a potential equal to and more negative than the ions redox potentials (0.4 and 0.2 V, respectively) and more positive than -0.7 V, where the PEDOT starts transforming into the reduced, i.e. insulating, state. We found that the electroreduction of Ag(+) ions was diffusion-controlled and the PEDOT film served as a simple conductor. On the other hand, the reduction of AuCl(4)(-) ions was enhanced on GC/PEDOT as compared with bare GC, indicating that PEDOT catalyzes the reduction of AuCl(4)(-) to Au. PMID:21993698

  13. Microstructural evolution of eutectic Au-Sn solder joints

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Ho Geon

    2002-05-31

    Current trends toward miniaturization and the use of lead(Pb)-free solder in electronic packaging present new problems in the reliability of solder joints. This study was performed in order to understand the microstructure and microstructural evolution of small volumes of nominally eutectic Au-Sn solder joints (80Au-20Sn by weight), which gives insight into properties and reliability.

  14. Injury risk factors, screening tests and preventative strategies: a systematic review of the evidence that underpins the perceptions and practices of 44 football (soccer) teams from various premier leagues

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Alan; Carling, Chris; Davison, Michael; Nedelec, Mathieu; Le Gall, Franck; Berthoin, Serge; Dupont, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To systematically review the scientific level of evidence for the ‘Top 3’ risk factors, screening tests and preventative exercises identified by a previously published survey of 44 premier league football (soccer) teams. Also, to provide an overall scientific level of evidence and graded recommendation based on the current research literature. Methods A systematic literature search (Pubmed [MEDLINE], SportDiscus, PEDRO and Cochrane databases). The quality of the articles was assessed and a level of evidence (1++ to 4) was assigned. Level 1++ corresponded to the highest level of evidence available and 4, the lowest. A graded recommendation (A: strong, B: moderate, C: weak, D: insufficient evidence to assign a specific recommendation) for use in the practical setting was given. Results Fourteen studies were analysed. The overall level of evidence for the risk factors previous injury, fatigue and muscle imbalance were 2++, 4 and ‘inconclusive’, respectively. The graded recommendation for functional movement screen, psychological questionnaire and isokinetic muscle testing were all ‘D’. Hamstring eccentric had a weak graded ‘C’ recommendation, and eccentric exercise for other body parts was ‘D’. Balance/proprioception exercise to reduce ankle and knee sprain injury was assigned a graded recommendation ‘D’. Conclusions The majority of perceptions and practices of premier league teams have a low level of evidence and low graded recommendation. This does not imply that these perceptions and practices are not important or not valid, as it may simply be that they are yet to be sufficiently validated or refuted by research. PMID:25576530

  15. Formation of Cu x Au1- x phases by cold homogenization of Au/Cu nanocrystalline thin films.

    PubMed

    Tynkova, Alona; Katona, Gabor L; Langer, Gabor A; Sidorenko, Sergey I; Voloshko, Svetlana M; Beke, Dezso L

    2014-01-01

    It is shown, by using depth profiling with a secondary neutral mass spectrometer and structure investigations by XRD and TEM, that at low temperatures, at which the bulk diffusion is frozen, a complete homogenization can take place in the Cu/Au thin film system, which leads to formation of intermetallic phases. Different compounds can be formed depending on the initial thickness ratio. The process starts with grain boundary interdiffusion, which is followed by a formation of reaction layers at the grain boundaries that leads to the motion of the newly formed interfaces perpendicular to the grain boundary plane. Finally, the homogenization finishes when all the pure components have been consumed. The process is asymmetric: It is faster in the Au layer. In Au(25nm)/Cu(50nm) samples the final state is the ordered AuCu3 phase. Decrease of the film thicknesses, as expected, results in the acceleration of the process. It is also illustrated that changing the thickness ratio either a mixture of Cu-rich AuCu and AuCu3 phases (in Au(25nm)/Cu(25nm) sample), or a mixture of disordered Cu- as well as Au-rich solid solutions (in Au(25nm)/Cu(12nm) sample) can be produced. By using a simple model the interface velocity in both the Cu and Au layers were estimated from the linear increase of the average composition and its value is about two orders of magnitude larger in Au (ca. 10(-11) m/s) than in Cu (ca. 10(-13) m/s). PMID:25247132

  16. Formation of CuxAu1− x phases by cold homogenization of Au/Cu nanocrystalline thin films

    PubMed Central

    Tynkova, Alona; Katona, Gabor L; Langer, Gabor A; Sidorenko, Sergey I; Voloshko, Svetlana M

    2014-01-01

    Summary It is shown, by using depth profiling with a secondary neutral mass spectrometer and structure investigations by XRD and TEM, that at low temperatures, at which the bulk diffusion is frozen, a complete homogenization can take place in the Cu/Au thin film system, which leads to formation of intermetallic phases. Different compounds can be formed depending on the initial thickness ratio. The process starts with grain boundary interdiffusion, which is followed by a formation of reaction layers at the grain boundaries that leads to the motion of the newly formed interfaces perpendicular to the grain boundary plane. Finally, the homogenization finishes when all the pure components have been consumed. The process is asymmetric: It is faster in the Au layer. In Au(25nm)/Cu(50nm) samples the final state is the ordered AuCu3 phase. Decrease of the film thicknesses, as expected, results in the acceleration of the process. It is also illustrated that changing the thickness ratio either a mixture of Cu-rich AuCu and AuCu3 phases (in Au(25nm)/Cu(25nm) sample), or a mixture of disordered Cu- as well as Au-rich solid solutions (in Au(25nm)/Cu(12nm) sample) can be produced. By using a simple model the interface velocity in both the Cu and Au layers were estimated from the linear increase of the average composition and its value is about two orders of magnitude larger in Au (ca. 10−11 m/s) than in Cu (ca. 10−13 m/s). PMID:25247132

  17. Identification of Au–S complexes on Au(100)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Walen, Holly; Liu, Da -Jiang; Oh, Junepyo; Yang, Hyun Jin; Kim, Yousoo; Thiel, P. A.

    2016-01-25

    In this study, using a combination of scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we have identified a set of related Au–S complexes that form on Au(100), when sulfur adsorbs and lifts the hexagonal surface reconstruction. The predominant complex is diamond-shaped with stoichiometry Au4S5. All of the complexes can be regarded as combinations of S–Au–S subunits. The complexes exist within, or at the edges of, p(2 × 2) sulfur islands that cover the unreconstructed Au regions, and are observed throughout the range of S coverage examined in this study, 0.009 to 0.12 monolayers. A qualitative model is developedmore » which incorporates competitive formation of complexes, Au rafts, and p(2 × 2) sulfur islands, as Au atoms are released by the surface structure transformation.« less

  18. High-spin level scheme of {sup 183}Au

    SciTech Connect

    Song, L.T.; Zhou, X.H.; Zhang, Y. H.; Guo, Y. X.; Lei, X.G.; Zheng, Y.; Liu, M.L.; De Angelis, G.; Marginean, N.; Gadea, A.; Napoli, D.R.; Axiotis, M.; Rusu, C.; Martinez, T.

    2005-01-01

    High-spin states in {sup 183}Au have been studied experimentally using the {sup 159}Tb({sup 29}Si,5n){sup 183}Au reaction at a beam energy of 140 MeV. Three- or higherfold {gamma}-ray coincidences have been measured using the detector array of GASP. The level scheme of {sup 183}Au was revised and extended. A rotational band proposed as the unfavored signature branch of the {pi}i{sub 13/2} band has been observed for {sup 183}Au. Interaction properties between the two negative-signature bands of the {pi}h{sub 9/2}-{pi}f{sub 7/2} system have been discussed for the light odd-A Au nuclei.

  19. Sputtering of Au induced by single Xe ion impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Birtcher, R. C.; Donnelly, S. E.

    1999-12-06

    Sputtering of Au thin films has been determined for Xe ions with energies between 50 and 600 keV. In-situ transmission electron microscopy was used to observe sputtered Au during deposition on a carbon foil near the specimen. Total reflection and transmission sputtering yields for a 62 nm thick Au thin film were determined by ex-situ measurement of the total amount of Au on the carbon foils. In situ observations show that individual Xe ions eject Au nanoparticles as large as 7 nm in diameter with an average diameter of approximately 3 nm. Particle emission correlates with crater formation due to single ion impacts. Nanoparticle emission contributes significantly to the total sputtering yield for Xe ions in this energy range in either reflection or transmission geometry.

  20. Graphene quantum dots/Au hybrid nanoparticles as electrocatalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Peihui; Jiang, Linqin; Zhang, Weilong; Guan, Xiangfeng

    2015-11-01

    Graphene quantum dots/Au hybrid nanoparticles (denoted as GQDs-Au) were prepared by heating HAuCl4 with GQDs, and they showed higher electrocatalytic activity for hydrogen evolution reaction than that of pure Au nanoparticles.

  1. The AuScope VLBI Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovell, J.; McCallum, J.; Shabala, S.; Dickey, J.; Watson, C.; Titov, O.

    2012-12-01

    The AuScope VLBI array, consisting of three new 12-meter radio telescopes in Australia dedicated to geodesy, has recently commenced operations. The telescopes at Hobart (Tasmania), Katherine (Northern Territory) and Yarragadee (Western Australia) are co-located with other space geodetic techniques including Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and gravity infrastructure, and in the case of Yarragadee, Satellite Laser Ranging facilities. This new facility will make significant contributions to improving the densification of the International Celestial Reference Frame in the southern hemisphere, and subsequently, improve the International Terrestrial Reference Frame through the improved ability to detect and mitigate systematic error. Improvements to both the ICRF and ITRF, as well as the simultaneous densification of the GNSS network across Australia will enable the improved measurement of intraplate deformation across the Australian tectonic plate.

  2. Azimuthal Anisotropy in U +U and Au +Au Collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Averichev, G. S.; Banerjee, A.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Burton, T. P.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Horvat, S.; Huang, H. Z.; Huang, B.; Huang, X.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikola, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Kollegger, T.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kotchenda, L.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kulakov, I.; Kumar, L.; Kycia, R. A.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, W.; Li, Y.; Li, C.; Li, Z. M.; Li, X.; Li, X.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, L.; Ma, R.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, G. L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; Meehan, K.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V.; Olvitt, D. L.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Peterson, A.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Poljak, N.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, S.; Raniwala, R.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Roy, A.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, D.; Smirnov, N.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B. J.; Sun, X.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Z.; Sun, Y.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Szelezniak, M. A.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A. N.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Trzeciak, B. A.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbaek, F.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Y.; Wang, G.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y. F.; Xiao, Z.; Xie, W.; Xin, K.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, N.; Xu, Z.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, S.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J. L.; Zhao, F.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    Collisions between prolate uranium nuclei are used to study how particle production and azimuthal anisotropies depend on initial geometry in heavy-ion collisions. We report the two- and four-particle cumulants, v2{2 } and v2{4 }, for charged hadrons from U +U collisions at √{sNN }=193 GeV and Au +Au collisions at √{sNN}=200 GeV . Nearly fully overlapping collisions are selected based on the energy deposited by spectators in zero degree calorimeters (ZDCs). Within this sample, the observed dependence of v2{2 } on multiplicity demonstrates that ZDC information combined with multiplicity can preferentially select different overlap configurations in U +U collisions. We also show that v2 vs multiplicity can be better described by models, such as gluon saturation or quark participant models, that eliminate the dependence of the multiplicity on the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions.

  3. Predictions for {radical} (s) =200A; GeV Au+Au collisions from relativistic hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Schlei, B.R.; Schlei, B.R.; Strottman, D.

    1999-01-01

    The relativistic hydrodynamical model HYLANDER-C is used to give estimates for single inclusive particle momentum spectra in {radical} (s) =200 GeV/nucleon Au+Au collisions that will be investigated experimentally in the near future. The predictions are based on initial conditions that the initial fireball has a longitudinal extension of 1.6 fm and an initial energy density of 30.8 GeV/fm{sup 3} as obtained from a cascade model. For the collision energy considered here, different stopping scenarios are explored for the first time. Our calculations give particle yields of the order of 10thinsp000 to 20thinsp000 charged particles per event. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  4. Dynamic aperture calculation for the RHIC 2010 100 GeV Au-Au run lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Y.; Brown, K.; Fischer, W.; Ptitsyn, V.; Roser, T.; Schoefer, V.; Tepikian, S.; Trbojevic, D.

    2010-08-01

    In this note we summarize the dynamic aperture calculation with the 2010 RHIC 100 GeV Au-Au run lattices. This study was initiated to understand the observed large beam decay in the Yellow ring after rf re-bucketing in the beginning of this run. The off-line linear lattice models and the interaction region non-linearity models are used. The large beam decay in the Yellow ring after re-bucketing was eventually eliminated by lowering the Yellow tunes to 0.21 from 0.235 with {beta}* = 0.7m lattice. In this note we only focus on the numeric simulation instead of the beam experiments.

  5. Pion-kaon femtoscopy in Au+Au collisions at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poniatowska, Katarzyna; STAR Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    In non-identical particle correlations, e.g. pion-kaon femtoscopy, one can obtain information about source size and asymmetry in emission processes of pions and kaons. Such asymmetry give us knowledge of which type of particles is emitted first/second and/or from which region of the source. The studies of non-identical particle femtoscopy for Beam Energy Scan energies give us the opportunity to study how the source size and asymmetry in particle emission depend on the initial conditions of the collision. It also allows one to examine these parameters in the vicinity of the theoretical critical point. In these proceedings, we present STAR results of pion-kaon femtoscopy at mid-rapidity in Au+Au collisions at \\sqrt{sNN} = 7.7, 19.6 and 39 GeV.

  6. Pion-kaon femtoscopy in Au+Au collisions at STAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poniatowska, Katarzyna

    2015-05-01

    Femtoscopy analysis allows us to extract information about the properties of particle emission source created after collision. From HBT of two correlated pions one can calculate source sizes; in addition, from the non-identical particle correlations, e.g. pion-kaon femtoscopy, one can obtain information not only about source sizes but the asymmetry in the emission processes of particles of different types as well. Such asymmetry gives knowledge of which kind of particles are emitted first/second and/or from which region of the source. The studies of non-identical particle femtoscopy for different collision energies gives us the opportunity to study how the source size and asymmetry in particle emission depend on the initial conditions of the collision. In these proceedings, we will present STAR results of pion-kaon femtoscopy at mid-rapidity in Au + Au collisions from the Beam Energy Scan program.

  7. Results from Vernier Scans in RHIC from 2001/02 Au-Au and pp Operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drees, Angelika; Xu, Zhangbu; Zhang, Haibin

    2002-10-01

    A series of Vernier Scans (or Van-der-Meer Scans) has been performed during the Au-Au run as well as the pp run at a beam energy of 100 GeV in RHIC during the 2001/02 operation period. During a scan one beam is swept across the other in the two transverse planes while collision rates are monitored as a function of beam displacement. Scans were done at various settings of beta* and various IRs. Maximum collision rate and transverse beam profiles are derived from a Gauss fit to the scan data. This report explains the method and summarizes the data taken during this operation period. first results from the fits are shown and compared to prediction and earlier runs.

  8. Charge transport in single Au / alkanedithiol / Au junctions: coordination geometries and conformational degrees of freedom.

    PubMed

    Li, Chen; Pobelov, Ilya; Wandlowski, Thomas; Bagrets, Alexei; Arnold, Andreas; Evers, Ferdinand

    2008-01-01

    Recent STM molecular break-junction experiments have revealed multiple series of peaks in the conductance histograms of alkanedithiols. To resolve a current controversy, we present here an in-depth study of charge transport properties of Au|alkanedithiol|Au junctions. Conductance histograms extracted from our STM measurements unambiguously confirm features showing more than one set of junction configurations. On the basis of quantum chemistry calculations, we propose that certain combinations of different sulfur-gold couplings and trans/gauche conformations act as the driving agents. The present study may have implications for experimental methodology: whenever conductances of different junction conformations are not statistically independent, the conductance histogram technique can exhibit a single series only, even though a much larger abundance of microscopic realizations exists. PMID:18076172

  9. Steering epitaxial alignment of Au, Pd, and AuPd nanowire arrays by atom flux change.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Youngdong; Seo, Kwanyong; Han, Sol; Varadwaj, Kumar S K; Kim, Hyun You; Ryu, Ji Hoon; Lee, Hyuck Mo; Ahn, Jae Pyoung; Ihee, Hyotcherl; Kim, Bongsoo

    2010-02-10

    We have synthesized epitaxial Au, Pd, and AuPd nanowire arrays in vertical or horizontal alignment on a c-cut sapphire substrate. We show that the vertical and horizontal nanowire arrays grow from half-octahedral seeds by the correlations of the geometry and orientation of seed crystals with those of as-grown nanowires. The alignment of nanowires can be steered by changing the atom flux. At low atom deposition flux vertical nanowires grow, while at high atom flux horizontal nanowires grow. Similar vertical/horizontal epitaxial growth is also demonstrated on SrTiO(3) substrates. This orientation-steering mechanism is visualized by molecular dynamics simulations. PMID:20050692

  10. From the ternary Eu(Au/In)2 and EuAu4(Au/In)2 with remarkable Au/In distributions to a new structure type: The gold-rich Eu5Au16(Au/In)6 structure

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, Simon; Card, Nathan; Mudring, Anja -Verena

    2015-08-13

    The ternary Eu(Au/In)2 (EuAu0.46In1.54(2)) (I), EuAu4(Au/In)2 (EuAu4+xIn2–x with x = 0.75(2) (II), 0.93(2), and 1.03(2)), and Eu5Au16(Au/In)6 (Eu5Au17.29In4.71(3)) (III) have been synthesized, and their structures were characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. I and II crystallize with the CeCu2-type (Pearson Symbol oI12; Imma; Z = 4; a = 4.9018(4) Å; b = 7.8237(5) Å; c = 8.4457(5) Å) and the YbAl4Mo2-type (tI14; I4/mmm; Z = 2; a = 7.1612(7) Å; c = 5.5268(7) Å) and exhibit significant Au/In disorder. I is composed of an Au/In-mixed diamond-related host lattice encapsulating Eu atoms, while the structure of II features ribbons of distorted, squared Au8 prisms enclosing Eu, Au, and In atoms. Combination of these structural motifs leads to a new structure type as observed for Eu5Au16(Au/In)6 (Eu5Au17.29In4.71(3)) (oS108; Cmcm; Z = 4; a = 7.2283(4) Å; b = 9.0499(6) Å; c = 34.619(2) Å), which formally represents a one-dimensional intergrowth of the series EuAu2–“EuAu4In2”. The site preferences of the disordered Au/In positions in II were investigated for different hypothetical “EuAu4(Au/In)2” models using the projector-augmented wave method and indicate that these structures attempt to optimize the frequencies of the heteroatomic Au–In contacts. Furthermore, a chemical bonding analysis on two “EuAu5In” and “EuAu4In2” models employed the TB-LMTO-ASA method and reveals that the subtle interplay between the local atomic environments and the bond energies determines the structural and site preferences for these systems.

  11. A comparative study of the Au + H2, Au+ + H2, and Au- + H2 systems: Potential energy surfaces and dynamics of reactive collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorta-Urra, Anaís; Zanchet, Alexandre; Roncero, Octavio; Aguado, Alfredo

    2015-04-01

    In order to study the Au- + H2 collision, a new global potential energy surface (PES) describing the ground electronic state of AuH 2- system is developed and compared with the PESs of the neutral [Zanchet et al., J. Chem. Phys. 132, 034301 (2010)] and cationic systems [Anaís et al., J. Chem. Phys. 135, 091102 (2011)]. We found that Au- - H2 presents a H-Au-H insertion minimum attributed to the stabilization of the LUMO 3b2 orbital, which can be considered as the preamble of the chemisorption well appearing in larger gold clusters. While the LUMO orbital is stabilized, the HOMO 6a1 is destabilized, creating a barrier at the geometry where the energy orbitals' curves are crossing. In the anion, this HOMO is doubly occupied, while in the neutral system is half-filled and completely empty in the cation, explaining the gradual disappearance of the well and the barrier as the number of electrons decreases. The cation presents a well in the entrance channel partially explained by electrostatic interactions. The three systems' reactions are highly endothermic, by 1.66, 2.79, and 3.23 eV for AuH, AuH+, and AuH- products, respectively. The reaction dynamics is studied using quasi-classical trajectory method for the three systems. The one corresponding to the anionic system is new in this work. Collision energies between 1.00 and 8.00 eV, measured for the cation, are in good agreement with the simulated cross section for the AuH+. It was also found that the total fragmentation, in three atoms, competes becoming dominant at sufficiently high energy. Here, we study the competition between the two different reaction pathways for the anionic, cationic, and neutral species, explaining the differences using a simple model based on the topology of the potential energy surfaces.

  12. Biosynthesis of Au, Ag and Au-Ag nanoparticles using edible mushroom extract.

    PubMed

    Philip, Daizy

    2009-07-15

    Integration of green chemistry principles to nanotechnology is one of the key issues in nanoscience research. There is growing need to develop environmentally benign metal nanoparticle synthesis process that do not use toxic chemicals in the synthesis protocols to avoid adverse effects in medical applications. Here, it is a report on extracellular synthesis method for the preparation of Au, Ag and Au-Ag nanoparticles in water, using the extract of Volvariella volvacea, a naturally occurring edible mushroom, as reducing and protecting agents. Gold nanoparticles of different sizes (20-150 nm) and shapes from triangular nanoprisms to nearly spherical and hexagonal are obtained by this novel method. The size and shape of gold nanoparticles are also found to depend on temperature of the extract. The silver nanoparticles are spherical with size approximately 15 nm. There is increased productivity of nanoparticles as shown by sharp and intense surface plasmon resonance bands for the nanoparticles prepared using an excess of the extract. The Au-Ag nanoparticles prepared by co-reduction has only one plasmon band due to alloying of the constituents. All the synthesized nanoparticles are found to be photoluminescent and are highly crystalline as shown by SAED and XRD patterns with fcc phase oriented along the (111) plane. FTIR measurements were carried out to identify the possible biomolecules responsible for capping and efficient stabilization of the nanoparticles. It is found that Au nanoparticles are bound to proteins through free amino groups and silver nanoparticles through the carboxylate group of the amino acid residues. The position and intensity of the emission band is found to depend on composition of the nanoparticles indicating the possible use in therapeutic applications. PMID:19324587

  13. Biosynthesis of Au, Ag and Au-Ag nanoparticles using edible mushroom extract

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philip, Daizy

    2009-07-01

    Integration of green chemistry principles to nanotechnology is one of the key issues in nanoscience research. There is growing need to develop environmentally benign metal nanoparticle synthesis process that do not use toxic chemicals in the synthesis protocols to avoid adverse effects in medical applications. Here, it is a report on extracellular synthesis method for the preparation of Au, Ag and Au-Ag nanoparticles in water, using the extract of Volvariella volvacea, a naturally occurring edible mushroom, as reducing and protecting agents. Gold nanoparticles of different sizes (20-150 nm) and shapes from triangular nanoprisms to nearly spherical and hexagonal are obtained by this novel method. The size and shape of gold nanoparticles are also found to depend on temperature of the extract. The silver nanoparticles are spherical with size ˜15 nm. There is increased productivity of nanoparticles as shown by sharp and intense surface plasmon resonance bands for the nanoparticles prepared using an excess of the extract. The Au-Ag nanoparticles prepared by co-reduction has only one plasmon band due to alloying of the constituents. All the synthesized nanoparticles are found to be photoluminescent and are highly crystalline as shown by SAED and XRD patterns with fcc phase oriented along the (1 1 1) plane. FTIR measurements were carried out to identify the possible biomolecules responsible for capping and efficient stabilization of the nanoparticles. It is found that Au nanoparticles are bound to proteins through free amino groups and silver nanoparticles through the carboxylate group of the amino acid residues. The position and intensity of the emission band is found to depend on composition of the nanoparticles indicating the possible use in therapeutic applications.

  14. Tunneling characteristics of Au-alkanedithiol-Au junctions formed via nanotransfer printing (nTP).

    PubMed

    Niskala, Jeremy R; Rice, William C; Bruce, Robert C; Merkel, Timothy J; Tsui, Frank; You, Wei

    2012-07-25

    Construction of permanent metal-molecule-metal (MMM) junctions, though technically challenging, is desirable for both fundamental investigations and applications of molecule-based electronics. In this study, we employed the nanotransfer printing (nTP) technique using perfluoropolyether (PFPE) stamps to print Au thin films onto self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanedithiol formed on Au thin films. We show that the resulting MMM junctions form permanent and symmetrical tunnel junctions, without the need for an additional protection layer between the top metal electrode and the molecular layer. This type of junction makes it possible for direct investigations into the electrical properties of the molecules and the metal-molecule interfaces. Dependence of transport properties on the length of the alkane molecules and the area of the printed Au electrodes has been examined systematically. From the analysis of the current-voltage (I-V) curves using the Simmons model, the height of tunneling barrier associated with the molecule (alkane) has been determined to be 3.5 ± 0.2 eV, while the analysis yielded an upper bound of 2.4 eV for the counterpart at the interface (thiol). The former is consistent with the theoretical value of ~3.5-5.0 eV. The measured I-V curves show scaling with respect to the printed Au electrode area with lateral dimensions ranging from 80 nm to 7 μm. These results demonstrate that PFPE-assisted nTP is a promising technique for producing potentially scalable and permanent MMM junctions. They also demonstrate that MMM structures (produced by the unique PFPE-assisted nTP) constitute a reliable test bed for exploring molecule-based electronics. PMID:22720785

  15. {phi} meson production in Au + Au and p + p collisions at {radical}s{sub NN}=200 GeV

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, J.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Amonett, J.; Anderson, B.D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L.S.; Baudot, J.; Bekele, S.; Belaga, V.V.; Bellwied, R.; Berger, J.; Bezverkhny, B.I.; Bhardwaj, S.; Bhati, A.K.; Bichsel, H.; Billmeier, A.; Bland, L.C.; Blyth, C.O.; Bonner, B.E.; Botje, M.; Boucham, A.; Brandin, A.; Bravar, A.; Cadman, R.V.; Cai, X.Z.; Caines, H.; Calderon de la Barca Sanchez, M.; Carroll, J.; Castillo, J.; Cebra, D.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H.F.; Chen, Y.; Chernenko, S.P.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Christie, W.; Coffin, J.P.; Cormier, T.M.; Cramer, J.G.; Crawford, H.J.; Das, D.; Das, S.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Didenko, L.; Dietel, T.; Dong, W.J.; Dong, X.; Draper, J.E.; Du, F.; Dubey, A.K.; Dunin, V.B.; Dunlop, J.C.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Eckardt, V.; Efimov, L.G.; Emelianov, V.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Fachini, P.; Faine, V.; Faivre, J.; Fatemi, R.; Filimonov, K.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fisyak, Y.; Flierl, D.; Foley, K.J.; Fu, J.; Gagliardi, C.A.; Gagunashvili, N.; Gans, J.; Ganti, M.S.; Gaudichet, L.; Germain, M.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gonzalez, J.E.; Grachov, O.; Grebenyuk, O.; Gronstal, S.; Grosnick, D.; Guedon, M.; Guertin, S.M.; Gupta, A.; Gutierrez, T.D.; Hallman, T.J.; Hamed, A.; Hardtke, D.; Harris, J.W.; Heinz, M.; Henry, T.W.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffmann, G.W.; Horsley, M.; Huang, H.Z.; Huang, S.L.; Hughes, E.; Humanic, T.J.; Igo, G.; Ishihara, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W.W.; Janik, M.; Johnson, I.; Jones, P.G.; Judd, E.G.; Kabana, S.; Kaplan, M.; Keane, D.; Khodyrev; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klay, J.; Klein, S.R.; Klyachko, A.; Koetke, D.D.; Kollegger, T.; Kopytine, S.M.; Kotchenda, L.; Kovalenko, A.D.; Kramer, M.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravstov, V.I.; Krueger, K.; Kuhn, C.; Kulikov, A.I.; Kumar, A.; Kunde, G.J.; Kunz, C.L.; Kutuev, R.Kh.; et al.

    2004-06-01

    We report the STAR measurement of {psi} meson production in Au + Au and p + p collisions at {radical}s{sub NN} = 200 GeV. Using the event mixing technique, the {psi} spectra and yields are obtained at midrapidity for five centrality bins in Au+Au collisions and for non-singly-diffractive p+p collisions. It is found that the {psi} transverse momentum distributions from Au+Au collisions are better fitted with a single-exponential while the p+p spectrum is better described by a double-exponential distribution. The measured nuclear modification factors indicate that {psi} production in central Au+Au collisions is suppressed relative to peripheral collisions when scaled by the number of binary collisions (). The systematics of versus centrality and the constant {psi}/K{sup -} ratio versus beam species, centrality, and collision energy rule out kaon coalescence as the dominant mechanism for {psi} production.

  16. Charged particle multiplicity fluctuations in Au+Au collisions at \\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200\\, {\\rm GeV}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wozniak, Krzysztof; PHOBOS Collaboration; Back, B. B.; Baker, M. D.; Ballintijn, M.; Barton, D. S.; Betts, R. R.; Bickley, A. A.; Bindel, R.; Budzanowski, A.; Busza, W.; Carroll, A.; Chai, Z.; Decowski, M. P.; García, E.; George, N.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gushue, S.; Halliwell, C.; Hamblen, J.; Heintzelman, G. A.; Henderson, C.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Holynski, R.; Holzman, B.; Iordanova, A.; Johnson, E.; Kane, J. L.; Katzy, J.; Khan, N.; Kucewicz, W.; Kulinich, P.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W. T.; Manly, S.; McLeod, D.; Mignerey, A. C.; Nouicer, R.; Olszewski, A.; Pak, R.; Park, I. C.; Pernegger, H.; Reed, C.; Remsberg, L. P.; Reuter, M.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rosenberg, L.; Sagerer, J.; Sarin, P.; Sawicki, P.; Skulski, W.; Steinberg, P.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sukhanov, A.; Tang, J. L.; Trzupek, A.; Vale, C.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G. J.; Verdier, R.; Wolfs, F. L. H.; Wosiek, B.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Wyslouch, B.

    2004-08-01

    This paper presents the first PHOBOS results on charged particle multiplicity fluctuations measured for Au+Au collisions at the highest RHIC energy within a wide pseudorapidity range of |eegr| < 3. The dependence on collision geometry is removed in the analysis by using the normalized difference between the number of particles in separate eegr bins. We compare our data to HIJING model predictions.

  17. CO Oxidation mechanism on CeO2-supported Au nanoclusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kim H. Y.; Henkelman, G.

    2013-09-08

    To reveal the richer chemistry of CO oxidation by CeO2 supported Au Nanoclusters(NCs)/Nanoparticles, we design Au13 and Au12 supported on a flat and a stepped-CeO2 model (Au/CeO2) and study various kinds of CO oxidation mechanisms at the Au-CeO2 interface and the Au NC as well.

  18. Electronic and resonance Raman spectra of [Au2(CS3)2]2-. Spectroscopic properties of a "short" Au(I)-Au(I) bond.

    PubMed

    Cheng, E C; Leung, K H; Miskowski, V M; Yam, V W; Phillips, D L

    The anion [Au2(CS3)2]2- has an unusually short Au-Au distance (2.80 A) for a binuclear Au(I) complex. We report detailed Raman studies of the nBu4N+ salt of this complex, including FT-Raman of the solid and UV/vis resonance Raman of dimethyl sulfoxide solutions. All five totally symmetric vibrations of the anion have been located and assigned. A band at delta nu = 125 cm-1 is assigned to nu (Au2). The visible-region electronic absorption bands (384 (epsilon 30,680) and 472 nm (epsilon 610 M-1 cm-1)) are attributable to CS3(2-) localized transitions, as confirmed by the dominance of nu sym(C-Sexo) (delta nu = 951 cm-1) in RR spectra measured in this region. An absorption band at 314 nm (22,250 M-1 cm-1) is assigned as the metal-metal 1(d sigma*-->p sigma) transition, largely because nu sym(C-Sexo) is not strongly enhanced in RR involving this band. Observation of the expected strong resonance enhancement of nu (Au2) was precluded as a result of masking by intense solvent Rayleigh scattering in the UV. PMID:11196834

  19. A Bis(Diphosphanyl N-Heterocyclic Carbene) Gold Complex: A Synthon for Luminescent Rigid AuAg2 Arrays and Au5 and Cu6 Double Arrays.

    PubMed

    Ai, Pengfei; Mauro, Matteo; De Cola, Luisa; Danopoulos, Andreas A; Braunstein, Pierre

    2016-03-01

    A mononuclear bis(NHC)/Au(I) (NHC=N-heterocyclic carbene) cationic complex with a rigid bis(phosphane)-functionalized NHC ligand (PCNHC P) was used to construct linear Au3 and Ag2 Au arrays, a Au5 cluster with two intersecting crosslike Au3 arrays, and an unprecedented Cu6 complex with two parallel Cu3 arrays. The impact of metallophilic interactions on photoluminescence was studied experimentally. PMID:26823329

  20. Stream dynamics between 1 AU and 2 AU: A detailed comparison of observations and theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlaga, L. F.; Pizzo, V.; Lazarus, A.; Gazis, P. R.

    1984-01-01

    A radial alignment of three solar wind stream structures observed by IMP-7 and -8 (at 1.0 AU) and Voyager 1 and 2 (in the range 1.4 to 1.8 AU) in late 1977 is presented. It is demonstrated that several important aspects of the observed dynamical evolution can be both qualitatively and quantitatively described with a single-fluid 2-D MHD numerical model of quasi-steady corotating flow, including accurate prediction of: (1) the formation of a corotating shock pair at 1.75 AU in the case of a simple, quasi-steady stream; (2) the coalescence of the thermodynamic and magnetic structures associated with the compression regions of two neighboring, interacting, corotating streams; and (3) the dynamical destruction of a small (i.e., low velocity-amplitude, short spatial-scale) stream by its overtaking of a slower moving, high-density region associated with a preceding transient flow. The evolution of these flow systems is discussed in terms of the concepts of filtering and entrainment.

  1. Neutral pion production in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abelev, B. I.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alakhverdyants, A. V.; Anderson, B. D.; Arkhipkin, D.; Averichev, G. S.; Balewski, J.; Barannikova, O.; Barnby, L. S.; Baudot, J.; Baumgart, S.; Beavis, D. R.; Bellwied, R.; Benedosso, F.; Betancourt, M. J.; Betts, R. R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bichsel, H.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Biritz, B.; Bland, L. C.; Bnzarov, I.; Bombara, M.; Bonner, B. E.; Bouchet, J.; Braidot, E.; Brandin, A. V.; Bruna, E.; Bueltmann, S.; Burton, T. P.; Bystersky, M.; Cai, X. Z.; Caines, H.; Sánchez, M. Calderón De La Barca; Catu, O.; Cebra, D.; Cendejas, R.; Cervantes, M. C.; Chajecki, Z.; Chaloupka, P.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, H. F.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Chikanian, A.; Choi, K. E.; Christie, W.; Clarke, R. F.; Codrington, M. J. M.; Corliss, R.; Cormier, T. M.; Cosentino, M. R.; Cramer, J. G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, D.; Dash, S.; Daugherity, M.; Silva, L. C. De; Dedovich, T. G.; Dephillips, M.; Derevschikov, A. A.; de Souza, R. Derradi; Didenko, L.; Djawotho, P.; Dogra, S. M.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Mazumdar, M. R. Dutta; Efimov, L. G.; Elhalhuli, E.; Elnimr, M.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Erazmus, B.; Estienne, M.; Eun, L.; Fachini, P.; Fatemi, R.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, A.; Filip, P.; Finch, E.; Fine, V.; Fisyak, Y.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Gaillard, L.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganti, M. S.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Geromitsos, A.; Geurts, F.; Ghazikhanian, V.; Ghosh, P.; Gorbunov, Y. N.; Gordon, A.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grosnick, D.; Grube, B.; Guertin, S. M.; Guimaraes, K. S. F. F.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, N.; Guryn, W.; Haag, B.; Hallman, T. J.; Hamed, A.; Harris, J. W.; He, W.; Heinz, M.; Heppelmann, S.; Hippolyte, B.; Hirsch, A.; Hjort, E.; Hoffman, A. M.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R. S.; Huang, H. Z.; Humanic, T. J.; Huo, L.; Igo, G.; Iordanova, A.; Jacobs, P.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jakl, P.; Jena, C.; Jin, F.; Jones, C. L.; Jones, P. G.; Joseph, J.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kajimoto, K.; Kang, K.; Kapitan, J.; Kauder, K.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Kettler, D.; Khodyrev, V. Yu.; Kikola, D. P.; Kiryluk, J.; Kisiel, A.; Klein, S. R.; Knospe, A. G.; Kocoloski, A.; Koetke, D. D.; Konzer, J.; Kopytine, M.; Koralt, I.; Korsch, W.; Kotchenda, L.; Kouchpil, V.; Kravtsov, P.; Kravtsov, V. I.; Krueger, K.; Krus, M.; Kuhn, C.; Kumar, L.; Kurnadi, P.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Lapointe, S.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, C.-H.; Lee, J. H.; Leight, W.; Levine, M. J.; Li, C.; Li, N.; Li, Y.; Lin, G.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Liu, J.; Liu, L.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Longacre, R. S.; Love, W. A.; Lu, Y.; Ludlam, T.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Mahapatra, D. P.; Majka, R.; Mall, O. I.; Mangotra, L. K.; Manweiler, R.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Masui, H.; Matis, H. S.; Matulenko, Yu. A.; McDonald, D.; McShane, T. S.; Meschanin, A.; Milner, R.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mischke, A.; Mohanty, B.; Morozov, D. A.; Munhoz, M. G.; Nandi, B. K.; Nattrass, C.; Nayak, T. K.; Nelson, J. M.; Netrakanti, P. K.; Ng, M. J.; Nogach, L. V.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Okada, H.; Okorokov, V.; Olson, D.; Pachr, M.; Page, B. S.; Pal, S. K.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Perkins, C.; Peryt, W.; Phatak, S. C.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Ploskon, M. A.; Pluta, J.; Plyku, D.; Poljak, N.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Potukuchi, B. V. K. S.; Prindle, D.; Pruneau, C.; Pruthi, N. K.; Pujahari, P. R.; Putschke, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Ray, R. L.; Redwine, R.; Reed, R.; Ridiger, A.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Rose, A.; Roy, C.; Ruan, L.; Russcher, M. J.; Sahoo, R.; Sakai, S.; Sakrejda, I.; Sakuma, T.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarsour, M.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Seyboth, P.; Shabetai, A.; Shahaliev, E.; Shao, M.; Sharma, M.; Shi, S. S.; Shi, X.-H.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Simon, F.; Singaraju, R. N.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Sorensen, P.; Sowinski, J.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Staszak, D.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Suarez, M. C.; Subba, N. L.; Sumbera, M.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Sun, Z.; Surrow, B.; Symons, T. J. M.; de Toledo, A. Szanto; Takahashi, J.; Tang, A. H.; Tang, Z.; Tarini, L. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Thein, D.; Thomas, J. H.; Tian, J.; Timmins, A. R.; Timoshenko, S.; Tlusty, D.; Tokarev, M.; Trainor, T. A.; Tram, V. N.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tsai, O. D.; Ulery, J.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Buren, G. Van; Nieuwenhuizen, G. Van; Vanfossen, J. A., Jr.; Varma, R.; Vasconcelos, G. M. S.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Videbaek, F.; Vigdor, S. E.; Viyogi, Y. P.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Wada, M.; Walker, M.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, Q.; Wang, X.; Wang, X. L.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Westfall, G. D.; Whitten, C., Jr.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xie, W.; Xu, N.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Y.; Yepes, P.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yue, Q.; Zawisza, M.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhan, W.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, W. M.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhao, Y.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneev, R.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zuo, J. X.

    2009-10-01

    The results of midrapidity (0Au collisions, measured by the STAR experiment, are presented. The neutral pions are reconstructed from photons measured either by the STAR Barrel Electro-Magnetic Calorimeter or by the Time Projection Chamber via tracking of conversion electron-positron pairs. Our measurements are compared to previously published π± and π0 results. The nuclear modification factors RCP and RAA of π0 are also presented as a function of pT. In the most central Au+Au collisions, the binary collision scaled π0 yield at high pT is suppressed by a factor of about 5 compared to the expectation from the yield of p+p collisions. Such a large suppression is in agreement with previous observations for light quark mesons and is consistent with the scenario that partons suffer considerable energy loss in the dense medium formed in central nucleus-nucleus collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider.

  2. Observation of D0 meson nuclear modifications in Au+Au collisions at sNN=200 GeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Alford, J.; Anson, C. D.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; et al

    2014-09-30

    We report the first measurement of charmed-hadron (D0) production via the hadronic decay channel (D0→K-+π+) in Au+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV with the STAR experiment. The charm production cross section per nucleon-nucleon collision at midrapidity scales with the number of binary collisions, Nbin, from p+p to central Au+Au collisions. The D0 meson yields in central Au+Aucollisions are strongly suppressed compared to those in p+p scaled by Nbin, for transverse momenta pT>3 GeV/c, demonstrating significant energy loss of charm quarks in the hot and dense medium. An enhancement at intermediate pT is also observed. Model calculations including strong charm-medium interactions andmore » coalescence hadronization describe our measurements.« less

  3. Autonomous Repair Mechanism of Creep Damage in Fe-Au and Fe-Au-B-N Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Kwakernaak, C.; Tichelaar, F. D.; Sloof, W. G.; Kuzmina, M.; Herbig, M.; Raabe, D.; Brück, E.; van der Zwaag, S.; van Dijk, N. H.

    2015-12-01

    The autonomous repair mechanism of creep cavitation during high-temperature deformation has been investigated in Fe-Au and Fe-Au-B-N alloys. Combined electron-microscopy techniques and atom probe tomography reveal how the improved creep properties result from Au precipitation within the creep cavities, preferentially formed on grain boundaries oriented perpendicular to the applied stress. The selective precipitation of Au atoms at the free creep cavity surface results in pore filling, and thereby, autonomous repair of the creep damage. The large difference in atomic size between the Au and Fe strongly hampers the nucleation of precipitates in the matrix. As a result, the matrix acts as a reservoir for the supersaturated solute until damage occurs. Grain boundaries and dislocations are found to act as fast transport routes for solute gold from the matrix to the creep cavities. The mechanism responsible for the self-healing can be characterized by a simple model for cavity growth and cavity filling.

  4. Wafer-level Au-Au bonding in the 350-450 °C temperature range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tofteberg, Hannah R.; Schjølberg-Henriksen, Kari; Fasting, Eivind J.; Moen, Alexander S.; Taklo, Maaike M. V.; Poppe, Erik U.; Simensen, Christian J.

    2014-08-01

    Metal thermocompression bonding is a hermetic wafer-level packaging technology that facilitates vertical integration and shrinks the area used for device sealing. In this paper, Au-Au bonding at 350, 400 and 450 °C has been investigated, bonding wafers with 1 µm Au on top of 200 nm TiW. Test Si laminates with device sealing frames of 100, 200, and 400 µm in width were realized. Bond strengths measured by pull tests ranged from 8 to 102 MPa and showed that the bond strength increased with higher bonding temperatures and decreased with increasing frame width. Effects of eutectic reactions, grain growth in the Au film and stress relaxation causing buckles in the TiW film were most pronounced at 450 °C and negligible at 350 °C. Bond temperature below the Au-Si eutectic temperature 363 °C is recommended.

  5. Electronic and geometric structures of Au30 clusters: a network of 2e-superatom Au cores protected by tridentate protecting motifs with u3-S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Zhimei; Cheng, Longjiu

    2015-12-01

    Density functional theory calculations have been performed to study the experimentally synthesized Au30S(SR)18 and two related Au30(SR)18 and Au30S2(SR)18 clusters. The patterns of thiolate ligands on the gold cores for the three thiolate-protected Au30 nanoclusters are on the basis of the ``divide and protect'' concept. A novel extended protecting motif with u3-S, S(Au2(SR)2)2AuSR, is discovered, which is termed the tridentate protecting motif. The Au cores of Au30S(SR)18, Au30(SR)18 and Au30S2(SR)18 clusters are Au17, Au20 and Au14, respectively. The superatom-network (SAN) model and the superatom complex (SAC) model are used to explain the chemical bonding patterns, which are verified by chemical bonding analysis based on the adaptive natural density partitioning (AdNDP) method and aromatic analysis on the basis of the nucleus-independent chemical shift (NICS) method. The Au17 core of the Au30S(SR)18 cluster can be viewed as a SAN of one Au6 superatom and four Au4 superatoms. The shape of the Au6 core is identical to that revealed in the recently synthesized Au18(SR)14 cluster. The Au20 core of the Au30(SR)18 cluster can be viewed as a SAN of two Au6 superatoms and four Au4 superatoms. The Au14 core of Au30S2(SR)18 can be regarded as a SAN of two pairs of two vertex-sharing Au4 superatoms. Meanwhile, the Au14 core is an 8e-superatom with 1S21P6 configuration. Our work may aid understanding and give new insights into the chemical synthesis of thiolate-protected Au clusters.Density functional theory calculations have been performed to study the experimentally synthesized Au30S(SR)18 and two related Au30(SR)18 and Au30S2(SR)18 clusters. The patterns of thiolate ligands on the gold cores for the three thiolate-protected Au30 nanoclusters are on the basis of the ``divide and protect'' concept. A novel extended protecting motif with u3-S, S(Au2(SR)2)2AuSR, is discovered, which is termed the tridentate protecting motif. The Au cores of Au30S(SR)18, Au30(SR)18 and Au30S

  6. Medium-sized Au40(SR)24 and Au52(SR)32 nanoclusters with distinct gold-kernel structures and spectroscopic features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wen Wu; Li, Yadong; Gao, Yi; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-01-01

    We have analyzed the structures of two medium-sized thiolate-protected gold nanoparticles (RS-AuNPs) Au40(SR)24 and Au52(SR)32 and identified the distinct structural features in their Au kernels [Sci. Adv., 2015, 1, e1500425]. We find that both Au kernels of the Au40(SR)24 and Au52(SR)32 nanoclusters can be classified as interpenetrating cuboctahedra. Simulated X-ray diffraction patterns of the RS-AuNPs with the cuboctahedral kernel are collected and then compared with the X-ray diffraction patterns of the RS-AuNPs of two other prevailing Au-kernels identified from previous experiments, namely the Ino-decahedral kernel and icosahedral kernel. The distinct X-ray diffraction patterns of RS-AuNPs with the three different types of Au-kernels can be utilized as signature features for future studies of structures of RS-AuNPs. Moreover, the simulated UV/Vis absorption spectra and Kohn-Sham orbital energy-level diagrams are obtained for the Au40(SR)24 and Au52(SR)32, on the basis of time-dependent density functional theory computation. The extrapolated optical band-edges of Au40(SR)24 and Au52(SR)32 are 1.1 eV and 1.25 eV, respectively. The feature peaks in the UV/Vis absorption spectra of the two clusters can be attributed to the d --> sp electronic transition. Lastly, the catalytic activities of the Au40(SR)24 and Au52(SR)32 are examined using CO oxidation as a probe. Both medium-sized thiolate-protected gold clusters can serve as effective stand-alone nanocatalysts.We have analyzed the structures of two medium-sized thiolate-protected gold nanoparticles (RS-AuNPs) Au40(SR)24 and Au52(SR)32 and identified the distinct structural features in their Au kernels [Sci. Adv., 2015, 1, e1500425]. We find that both Au kernels of the Au40(SR)24 and Au52(SR)32 nanoclusters can be classified as interpenetrating cuboctahedra. Simulated X-ray diffraction patterns of the RS-AuNPs with the cuboctahedral kernel are collected and then compared with the X-ray diffraction patterns of the RS-Au

  7. Medium-sized Au40(SR)24 and Au52(SR)32 nanoclusters with distinct gold-kernel structures and spectroscopic features.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen Wu; Li, Yadong; Gao, Yi; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2016-01-21

    We have analyzed the structures of two medium-sized thiolate-protected gold nanoparticles (RS-AuNPs) Au40(SR)24 and Au52(SR)32 and identified the distinct structural features in their Au kernels [Sci. Adv., 2015, 1, e1500425]. We find that both Au kernels of the Au40(SR)24 and Au52(SR)32 nanoclusters can be classified as interpenetrating cuboctahedra. Simulated X-ray diffraction patterns of the RS-AuNPs with the cuboctahedral kernel are collected and then compared with the X-ray diffraction patterns of the RS-AuNPs of two other prevailing Au-kernels identified from previous experiments, namely the Ino-decahedral kernel and icosahedral kernel. The distinct X-ray diffraction patterns of RS-AuNPs with the three different types of Au-kernels can be utilized as signature features for future studies of structures of RS-AuNPs. Moreover, the simulated UV/Vis absorption spectra and Kohn-Sham orbital energy-level diagrams are obtained for the Au40(SR)24 and Au52(SR)32, on the basis of time-dependent density functional theory computation. The extrapolated optical band-edges of Au40(SR)24 and Au52(SR)32 are 1.1 eV and 1.25 eV, respectively. The feature peaks in the UV/Vis absorption spectra of the two clusters can be attributed to the d → sp electronic transition. Lastly, the catalytic activities of the Au40(SR)24 and Au52(SR)32 are examined using CO oxidation as a probe. Both medium-sized thiolate-protected gold clusters can serve as effective stand-alone nanocatalysts. PMID:26676095

  8. Ge-Au eutectic bonding of Ge {100} single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowlton, W. B.; Itoh, K. M.; Beeman, J. W.; Emes, J. H.; Loretto, D.; Haller, E. E.

    1993-11-01

    We present preliminary results on the eutectic bonding between two {100} Ge single crystal surfaces using thin films of Au ranging from 900Å/surface to 300Å/surface and Pd (10% the thickness of Au). Following bonding, plan view optical microscopy (OM) of the cleaved interface of samples with Au thicknesses ≤ 500Å/surface show a eutectic morphology more conducive to phonon transmission through the bond interface. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) cross sectional interface studies of a 300Å/surface Au sample show <100> epitaxial growth of Ge. In sections of the bond, lattice continuity of the Ge is apparent through the interface. TEM studies also reveal <110> heteroepitaxial growth of Au with a Au-Ge lattice mismatch of less than 2%. Eutectic bonds with 200Å/surface Au have been attained with characterization pending. An optical polishing technique for Ge has been optimized to insure intimate contact between the Ge surfaces prior to bonding. Interferometry analysis of the optically polished Ge surface shows that surface height fluctuations lie within ±150Å across an interval of 1mm. Characterization of phonon transmission through the interface is discussed with respect to low temperature detection of ballistic phonons.

  9. Tailoring the FeRh magnetostructural response with Au diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loving, M.; de Vries, M. A.; Jimenez-Villacorta, F.; Le Graët, C.; Liu, X.; Fan, R.; Langridge, S.; Heiman, D.; Marrows, C. H.; Lewis, L. H.

    2012-08-01

    Factors which contribute to magnetostructural transition control have been demonstrated by study of the effects of Au incorporation on the magnetic and structural character of CsCl-structured equiatomic FeRh thin films. Sputtered films were capped with 2 nm of Au deposited at 873 K and at 323 K and subsequently characterized with magnetometry and synchrotron-based structural probes. Diffusion of Au into the FeRh film layer at 873 K is confirmed by a reduction in the Au capping layer thickness relative to the film capped at 323 K. The impact of Au diffusion on the FeRh magnetostructural character is noted by a decrease in the onset of the transition temperature, a thermally broadened first-order transition and an increased sensitivity of the transition to applied magnetic field. Additionally, magnetization data indicate that Au diffusion causes retention of the ferromagnetic phase well below the normal magnetostructural transition temperature. These results are attributed to a multiphase FeRh film layer created by thermally driven Au diffusion.

  10. Electronic and chemical properties of supported Au nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Dong Chan; Lopez-Salido, Ignacio; Dietsche, Rainer; Bubek, Moritz; Kim, Young Dok

    2006-11-01

    Oxidation and reduction behaviors of Au nanoparticles with different sizes on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) and silica were studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). For Au nanoparticles smaller than ˜6 nm in diameter, we found a novel oxygen species formed in Au nanoparticles, which is absent in larger particles and Au bulk crystals. This new oxygen species is attributed to the subsurface oxygen: for a complete understanding of the structures of catalytically active Au, the new oxygen species should be taken into account. In this context, it is worth mentioning that the subsurface oxygen species has been suggested to play an important role in heterogeneous catalysis. With decreasing Au particle size, a positive core level shift can be observed, which can be mostly attributed to the final state effects. Increase of the number of undercoordinated atoms with decreasing particle size is evidenced by a reduced splitting between 5d 3/2 and 5d 5/2 states and a band narrowing. Our results on electronic structures of Au nanoparticles on silica are compared to those on other substrates such as zirconia and titania to shed light onto the metal-support interactions.

  11. Enantiospecific adsorption of cysteine on a chiral Au34 cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelayo, José de Jesús; Valencia, Israel; Díaz, Gabriela; López-Lozano, Xóchitl; Garzón, Ignacio L.

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of biological molecules like chiral amino acids with chiral metal clusters is becoming an interesting and active field of research because of its potential impact in, for example, chiral molecular recognition phenomena. In particular, the enantiospecific adsorption (EA) of cysteine (Cys) on a chiral Au55 cluster was theoretically predicted a few years ago. In this work, we present theoretical results, based on density functional theory, of the EA of non-zwitterionic cysteine interacting with the C3-Au34 chiral cluster, which has been experimentally detected in gas phase, using trapped ion electron diffraction. Our results show that, indeed, the adsorption energy of the amino acid depends on which enantiomers participate in the formation Cys-Au34 chiral complex. EA was obtained in the adsorption modes where both the thiol, and the thiol-amino functional groups of Cys are adsorbed on low-coordinated sites of the metal cluster surface. Similarly to what was obtained for the Cys-Au55 chiral complex, in the present work, it is found that the EA is originated from the different strength and location of the bond between the COOH functional group and surface Au atoms of the Au34 chiral cluster. Calculations of the vibrational spectrum for the different Cys-Au34 diastereomeric complexes predict the existence of a vibro-enantiospecific effect, indicating that the vibrational frequencies of the adsorbed amino acid depend on its handedness.

  12. Structural, electronic and magnetic properties of Au-based monolayer derivatives in honeycomb structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapoor, Pooja; Sharma, Munish; Kumar, Ashok; Ahluwalia, P. K.

    2016-05-01

    We present electronic properties of atomic layer of Au, Au2-N, Au2-O and Au2-F in graphene-like structure within the framework of density functional theory (DFT). The lattice constant of derived monolayers are found to be higher than the pristine Au monolayer. Au monolayer is metallic in nature with quantum ballistic conductance calculated as 4G0. Similarly, Au2-N and Au2-F monolayers show 4G0 and 2G0 quantum conductance respectively while semiconducting nature with calculated band gap of 0.28 eV has been observed for Au2-O monolayer. Most interestingly, half metalicity has been predicted for Au2-N and Au2-F monolayers. Our findings may have importance for the application of these monolayers in nanoelectronic and spintronics.

  13. First principles calculations of the optical and plasmonic response of Au alloys and intermetallic compounds.

    PubMed

    Keast, V J; Barnett, R L; Cortie, M B

    2014-07-30

    Pure Au is widely used in plasmonic applications even though its use is compromised by significant losses due to damping. There are some elements that are less lossy than Au (e.g. Ag or Al) but they will normally oxidize or corrode under ambient conditions. Here we examine whether alloying Au with a second element would be beneficial for plasmonic applications. In order to evaluate potential alternatives to pure Au, the density of states (DOS), dielectric function and plasmon quality factor have been calculated for alloys and compounds of Au with Al, Cd, Mg, Pd, Pt, Sn, Ti, Zn and Zr. Substitutional alloying of Au with Al, Cd, Mg and Zn was found to slightly improve the plasmonic response. Of the large number of intermetallic compounds studied, only AuAl2, Au3Cd, AuMg, AuCd and AuZn were found to be suitable for plasmonic applications. PMID:25001413

  14. First principles calculations of the optical and plasmonic response of Au alloys and intermetallic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keast, V. J.; Barnett, R. L.; Cortie, M. B.

    2014-07-01

    Pure Au is widely used in plasmonic applications even though its use is compromised by significant losses due to damping. There are some elements that are less lossy than Au (e.g. Ag or Al) but they will normally oxidize or corrode under ambient conditions. Here we examine whether alloying Au with a second element would be beneficial for plasmonic applications. In order to evaluate potential alternatives to pure Au, the density of states (DOS), dielectric function and plasmon quality factor have been calculated for alloys and compounds of Au with Al, Cd, Mg, Pd, Pt, Sn, Ti, Zn and Zr. Substitutional alloying of Au with Al, Cd, Mg and Zn was found to slightly improve the plasmonic response. Of the large number of intermetallic compounds studied, only AuAl2, Au3Cd, AuMg, AuCd and AuZn were found to be suitable for plasmonic applications.

  15. Crystal Structure of the PdAu24(SR)18(0) Superatom.

    PubMed

    Tofanelli, Marcus A; Ni, Thomas W; Phillips, Billy D; Ackerson, Christopher J

    2016-02-01

    The single-crystal X-ray structure of Pd-doped Au25(SR)18 was solved. The crystal structure reveals that in PdAu24(SR)18, the Pd atom is localized only to the centroid of the Au25(SR)18 cluster. This single-crystal X-ray structure shows that PdAu24(SR)18(0) is well conceptualized with the superatom theory. The PdAu24(SR)18(0) charge state is isoelectronic with Au25(SR)18(+1) as determined by a first order Jahn-Teller effect of similar magnitude and by electrochemical comparison. The previously reported increased stability of PdAu24(SR)18 can be rationalized in terms of Pd-Au bonds that are shorter than the Au-Au bonds in Au25(SR)18. PMID:26760220

  16. Mass spectrometric determination of the dissociation energy of the AuMg diatomic molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balducci, G.; Ciccioli, A.; Gigli, G.; Kudin, L. S.

    2003-02-01

    The dissociation energy of the intermetallic molecule AuMg was for the first time determined by the Knudsen-effusion mass spectrometry technique. Partial pressures of Au(g), Mg(g), AuMg(g) and Au 2(g) species produced under equilibrium vaporization of an appropriate alloy were monitored in the temperature range 1870-2333 K. The collected data were analyzed by the second- and third-law methods for the gaseous equilibria AuMg(g)=Au(g) + Mg(g) and AuMg(g) + Au(g)=Au 2(g) + Mg(g). The selected value for the dissociation energy of AuMg at 0 K is D0∘(AuMg)= 175.4±2.7 kJ/mol.

  17. Controlling Au Photodeposition on Large ZnO Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Joseph F S; Shortell, Matthew P; Noble, Christopher J; Harmer, Jeffrey R; Jaatinen, Esa A; Waclawik, Eric R

    2016-06-01

    This study investigated how to control the rate of photoreduction of metastable AuCl2(-) at the solid-solution interface of large ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) (50-100 nm size). Band-gap photoexcitation of electronic charge in ZnO by 370 nm UV light yielded Au NP deposition and the formation of ZnO-Au NP hybrids. Au NP growth was observed to be nonepitaxial, and the patterns of Au photodeposition onto ZnO NPs observed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy were consistent with reduction of AuCl2(-) at ZnO facet edges and corner sites. Au NP photodeposition was effective in the presence of labile oleylamine ligands attached to the ZnO surface; however, when a strong-binding dodecanethiol ligand coated the surface, photodeposition was quenched. Rates of interfacial electron transfer at the ZnO-solution interface were adjusted by changing the solvent, and these rates were observed to strongly depend on the solvent's permittivity (ε) and viscosity. From measurements of electron transfer from ZnO to the organic dye toluidine blue at the ZnO-solution interface, it was confirmed that low ε solvent mixtures (ε ≈ 9.5) possessed markedly higher rates of photocatalytic interfacial electron transfer (∼3.2 × 10(4) electrons·particle(-1)·s(-1)) compared to solvent mixtures with high ε (ε = 29.9, ∼1.9 × 10(4) electrons·particle(-1)·s(-1)). Dissolved oxygen content in the solvent and the exposure time of ZnO to band-gap, near-UV photoexcitation were also identified as factors that strongly affected Au photodeposition behavior. Production of Au clusters was favored under conditions that caused electron accumulation in the ZnO-Au NP hybrid. Under conditions where electron discharge was rapid (such as in low ε solvents), AuCl2(-) precursor ions photoreduced at ZnO surfaces in less than 5 s, leading to deposition of several small, isolated ∼6 nm Au NP on the ZnO host instead. PMID:27196721

  18. Fully Crystalline Faceted Fe-Au Core-Shell Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Langlois, C; Benzo, P; Arenal, R; Benoit, M; Nicolai, J; Combe, N; Ponchet, A; Casanove, M J

    2015-08-12

    Fe-Au core-shell nanoparticles displaying an original polyhedral morphology have been successfully synthesized through a physical route. Analyses using transmission electron microscopy show that the Au shell forms truncated pyramids epitaxially grown on the (100) facets of the iron cubic core. The evolution of the elastic energy and strain field in the nanoparticles as a function of their geometry and composition is calculated using the finite-element method. The stability of the remarkable centered core-shell morphology experimentally observed is attributed to the weak elastic energy resulting from the low misfit at the Fe/Au (100) interface compared to the surface energy contribution. PMID:26146846

  19. Energy level alignment in Au/pentacene/PTCDA trilayer stacks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sehati, P.; Braun, S.; Fahlman, M.

    2013-09-01

    Ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy is used to investigate the energy level alignment and molecular orientation at the interfaces in Au/pentacene/PTCDA trilayer stacks. We deduced a standing orientation for pentacene grown on Au while we conclude a flat lying geometry for PTCDA grown onto pentacene. We propose that the rough surface of polycrystalline Au induces the standing geometry in pentacene. It is further shown that in situ deposition of PTCDA on pentacene can influence the orientation of the surface pentacene layer, flipping part of the surface pentacene molecules into a flat lying geometry, maximizing the orbital interaction across the pentacene-PTCDA heterojunction.

  20. AuScope VLBI Project and Hobart 26-m Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, Jim; Dickey, John; Reid, Brett; McCallum, Jamie; Shabala, Stas; Watson, Christopher; Ellingsen, Simon; Memin, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    This is a report on the activities carried out at the three AuScope VLBI observatories and the Hobart 26-m antenna. In 2012 the three AuScope 12-m antennas at Hobart (Hb), Katherine (Ke), and Yarragadee (Yg) completed their first full year of operations as an array. The Hobart 26-m antenna (Ho) continued to make a contribution to IVS, providing overlap with the Hb time series. In total the AuScope antennas and the Hobart 26 m observed for 146 antenna days in 2012. In this report we also briefly highlight our research activities during 2012 and our plans for 2013.

  1. Performance d'un hôpital de zone sanitaire au Benin: un exemple de modèle d’évaluation

    PubMed Central

    Ahanhanzo, Yolaine Glèlè; Ouédraogo, Landaogo Soutongonoma Lionel; Saizonou, Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Premier niveau de référence de la pyramide sanitaire du Bénin, les hôpitaux de zone sanitaire s'acquittent de leurs missions dans un contexte difficile. L'objectif de la présente étude a été d’évaluer la performance de l'hôpital de la zone sanitaire de Comè en 2013. Méthodes L’étude était transversale, descriptive et évaluative. Les services retenus ont été sélectionnés par choix raisonné du fait de leur contribution au paquet d'activités de l'hôpital. Les clients externes et internes ont été sélectionnés par commodité. Les membres du conseil de gestion de l'hôpital de zone, les responsables d'organisation à base communautaire, les partenaires techniques et financiers ainsi que des chefs d'arrondissement ont été sélectionné par choix raisonné. La performance de l'hôpital a été mesurée à travers trois critères que sont la qualité des prestations, leur équité d'accès et leur pérennité. L'analyse des données a été faite sur la base de critères en utilisant une cotation analytique puis temporelle. Résultats La performance de l'hôpital de la zone sanitaire de Comè était très faible au premier semestre 2013 avec une qualité des prestations cotée à 35%, une équité d'accès cotée à 50% et une pérennité des actions cotée à 11%. Seul le niveau d'application de la fonction gouvernance était moyen. La méconnaissance des attributions des représentants de la communauté dans les instances de l'hôpital a constitué une limite à leur implication dans l'exercice des fonctions de l'hôpital. Les partenaires techniques et financiers ont participé au renforcement institutionnel de l'hôpital en termes d'amélioration du plateau technique. Conclusion L'application des fonctions de l'hôpital et une meilleure implication de la communauté ainsi que des partenaires contribueront à l'amélioration de la performance de l'hôpital de la zone sanitaire de Comè. PMID:25400830

  2. The growth and enhanced catalytic performance of Au@Pd core-shell nanodendrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haihua; Sun, Zhenhua; Yang, Yi; Su, Dangsheng

    2012-12-01

    Au@Pd core-shell nanodendrites were synthesized by reducing H2PdCl4 with ascorbic acid onto the surface of Au polyhedra at room temperature. The Au@Pd core-shell nanodendrites consisting of a Au core and nanoporous Pd shell, exhibited plasmonic properties and higher catalytic activity in comparison with Au@Pd core-shell nanocubes.Au@Pd core-shell nanodendrites were synthesized by reducing H2PdCl4 with ascorbic acid onto the surface of Au polyhedra at room temperature. The Au@Pd core-shell nanodendrites consisting of a Au core and nanoporous Pd shell, exhibited plasmonic properties and higher catalytic activity in comparison with Au@Pd core-shell nanocubes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, characterization and catalytic performance measurement of Au nanopolyhedra and Au@Pd core-shell nanostructures, TEM image of Au nanopolyhedra and Au@Pd core-shell nanodendrites after four cycles of the Suzuki coupling reaction, TEM and high-resolution images of a single Au@Pd core-shell nanodendrite, and XRD pattern of Au@Pd core-shell nanodendrites, UV-vis spectrum of Au@Pd nanodendrites in the range 200-400 nm, references. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr32849f

  3. Au plasmonics in a WS{sub 2}-Au-CuInS{sub 2} photocatalyst for significantly enhanced hydrogen generation

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Zhongzhou; Wang, Zhenxing E-mail: hej@nanoctr.cn; Shifa, Tofik Ahmed; Wang, Fengmei; Zhan, Xueying; Xu, Kai; He, Jun E-mail: hej@nanoctr.cn; Liu, Quanlin

    2015-11-30

    Promoting the activities of photocatalysts is still the critical challenge in H{sub 2} generation area. Here, a Au plasmon enhanced photocatalyst of WS{sub 2}-Au-CuInS{sub 2} is developed by inserting Au nanoparticles between WS{sub 2} nanotubes and CuInS{sub 2} (CIS) nanoparticles. Due to the localized surface plasmonic resonance properties from Au nanoparticles, WS{sub 2}-Au-CIS shows the best performance as compared to Au-CIS, CIS, WS{sub 2}-CIS, CIS-Au, WS{sub 2}-Au, and WS{sub 2}-CIS-Au. The surface plasmonic resonance effects dramatically intensify the absorption of visible light and help to inject hot electrons into the semiconductors. Our findings open up an efficient method to optimize the type-II structures for photocatalytic water splitting.

  4. Corrigendum to “Suppression of Υ production in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at √ SNN = 200 GeV" [Phys. Lett. B 735 (2014) 127-137

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-04-01

    We report measurements of Υ meson production in p + p, d + Au, and Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the Υ yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d + Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p + p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon (1S + 2S + 3S) in the rapidity range |y| < 1 in d + Au collisions of RdAu = 0.79 ± 0.24(stat.) ± 0.03(syst.) ± 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 ±0.1(stat.) ±0.02(syst.) ±0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au + Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark–Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.

  5. Corrigendum to “Suppression of Υ production in d+Au and Au+Au collisions at √ SNN = 200 GeV" [Phys. Lett. B 735 (2014) 127-137

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-04-01

    We report measurements of Υ meson production in p + p, d + Au, and Au+Au collisions using the STAR detector at RHIC. We compare the Υ yield to the measured cross section in p + p collisions in order to quantify any modifications of the yield in cold nuclear matter using d + Au data and in hot nuclear matter using Au+Au data separated into three centrality classes. Our p + p measurement is based on three times the statistics of our previous result. We obtain a nuclear modification factor for Upsilon (1S + 2S + 3S) in themore » rapidity range |y| < 1 in d + Au collisions of RdAu = 0.79 ± 0.24(stat.) ± 0.03(syst.) ± 0.10(p + p syst.). A comparison with models including shadowing and initial state parton energy loss indicates the presence of additional cold-nuclear matter suppression. Similarly, in the top 10% most-central Au + Au collisions, we measure a nuclear modification factor of R AA = 0.49 ±0.1(stat.) ±0.02(syst.) ±0.06(p + p syst.), which is a larger suppression factor than that seen in cold nuclear matter. Our results are consistent with complete suppression of excited-state Upsilon mesons in Au + Au collisions. The additional suppression in Au + Au is consistent with the level expected in model calculations that include the presence of a hot, deconfined Quark–Gluon Plasma. However, understanding the suppression seen in d + Au is still needed before any definitive statements about the nature of the suppression in Au + Au can be made.« less

  6. Transverse-energy distributions at midrapidity in p +p, d +Au, and Au +Au collisions at √sNN =62.4-200 GeV and implications for particle-production models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adler, S. S.; Afanasiev, S.; Aidala, C.; Ajitanand, N. N.; Akiba, Y.; Al-Jamel, A.; Alexander, J.; Aoki, K.; Aphecetche, L.; Armendariz, R.; Aronson, S. H.; Averbeck, R.; Awes, T. C.; Azmoun, B.; Babintsev, V.; Baldisseri, A.; Barish, K. N.; Barnes, P. D.; Bassalleck, B.; Bathe, S.; Batsouli, S.; Baublis, V.; Bauer, F.; Bazilevsky, A.; Belikov, S.; Bennett, R.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bjorndal, M. T.; Boissevain, J. G.; Borel, H.; Boyle, K.; Brooks, M. L.; Brown, D. S.; Bruner, N.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Bumazhnov, V.; Bunce, G.; Burward-Hoy, J. M.; Butsyk, S.; Camard, X.; Campbell, S.; Chai, J.-S.; Chand, P.; Chang, W. C.; Chernichenko, S.; Chi, C. Y.; Chiba, J.; Chiu, M.; Choi, I. J.; Choudhury, R. K.; Chujo, T.; Cianciolo, V.; Cleven, C. R.; Cobigo, Y.; Cole, B. A.; Comets, M. P.; Constantin, P.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Cussonneau, J. P.; Dahms, T.; Das, K.; David, G.; Deák, F.; Delagrange, H.; Denisov, A.; D'Enterria, D.; Deshpande, A.; Desmond, E. J.; Devismes, A.; Dietzsch, O.; Dion, A.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Drapier, O.; Drees, A.; Dubey, A. K.; Durum, A.; Dutta, D.; Dzhordzhadze, V.; Efremenko, Y. V.; Egdemir, J.; Enokizono, A.; En'yo, H.; Espagnon, B.; Esumi, S.; Fields, D. E.; Finck, C.; Fleuret, F.; Fokin, S. L.; Forestier, B.; Fox, B. D.; Fraenkel, Z.; Frantz, J. E.; Franz, A.; Frawley, A. D.; Fukao, Y.; Fung, S.-Y.; Gadrat, S.; Gastineau, F.; Germain, M.; Glenn, A.; Gonin, M.; Gosset, J.; Goto, Y.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Grau, N.; Greene, S. V.; Grosse Perdekamp, M.; Gunji, T.; Gustafsson, H.-Å.; Hachiya, T.; Hadj Henni, A.; Haggerty, J. S.; Hagiwara, M. N.; Hamagaki, H.; Hansen, A. G.; Harada, H.; Hartouni, E. P.; Haruna, K.; Harvey, M.; Haslum, E.; Hasuko, K.; Hayano, R.; He, X.; Heffner, M.; Hemmick, T. K.; Heuser, J. M.; Hidas, P.; Hiejima, H.; Hill, J. C.; Hobbs, R.; Holmes, M.; Holzmann, W.; Homma, K.; Hong, B.; Hoover, A.; Horaguchi, T.; Hur, M. G.; Ichihara, T.; Iinuma, H.; Ikonnikov, V. V.; Imai, K.; Inaba, M.; Inuzuka, M.; Isenhower, D.; Isenhower, L.; Ishihara, M.; Isobe, T.; Issah, M.; Isupov, A.; Jacak, B. V.; Jia, J.; Jin, J.; Jinnouchi, O.; Johnson, B. M.; Johnson, S. C.; Joo, K. S.; Jouan, D.; Kajihara, F.; Kametani, S.; Kamihara, N.; Kaneta, M.; Kang, J. H.; Katou, K.; Kawabata, T.; Kawagishi, T.; Kazantsev, A. V.; Kelly, S.; Khachaturov, B.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kikuchi, J.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, E.; Kim, E. J.; Kim, G.-B.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, Y.-S.; Kinney, E.; Kiss, Á.; Kistenev, E.; Kiyomichi, A.; Klein-Boesing, C.; Kobayashi, H.; Kochenda, L.; Kochetkov, V.; Kohara, R.; Komkov, B.; Konno, M.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kozlov, A.; Kroon, P. J.; Kuberg, C. H.; Kunde, G. J.; Kurihara, N.; Kurita, K.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; Kyle, G. S.; Lacey, R.; Lajoie, J. G.; Lebedev, A.; Leâ Bornec, Y.; Leckey, S.; Lee, D. M.; Lee, M. K.; Leitch, M. J.; Leite, M. A. L.; Li, X. H.; Lim, H.; Litvinenko, A.; Liu, M. X.; Maguire, C. F.; Makdisi, Y. I.; Malakhov, A.; Malik, M. D.; Manko, V. I.; Mao, Y.; Martinez, G.; Masui, H.; Matathias, F.; Matsumoto, T.; McCain, M. C.; McGaughey, P. L.; Miake, Y.; Miller, T. E.; Milov, A.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, G. C.; Mitchell, J. T.; Mohanty, A. K.; Morrison, D. P.; Moss, J. M.; Moukhanova, T. V.; Mukhopadhyay, D.; Muniruzzaman, M.; Murata, J.; Nagamiya, S.; Nagata, Y.; Nagle, J. L.; Naglis, M.; Nakamura, T.; Newby, J.; Nguyen, M.; Norman, B. E.; Nyanin, A. S.; Nystrand, J.; O'Brien, E.; Ogilvie, C. A.; Ohnishi, H.; Ojha, I. D.; Okada, K.; Omiwade, O. O.; Oskarsson, A.; Otterlund, I.; Oyama, K.; Ozawa, K.; Pal, D.; Palounek, A. P. T.; Pantuev, V.; Papavassiliou, V.; Park, J.; Park, W. J.; Pate, S. F.; Pei, H.; Penev, V.; Peng, J.-C.; Pereira, H.; Peresedov, V.; Peressounko, D. Yu.; Pierson, A.; Pinkenburg, C.; Pisani, R. P.; Purschke, M. L.; Purwar, A. K.; Qu, H.; Qualls, J. M.; Rak, J.; Ravinovich, I.; Read, K. F.; Reuter, M.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Riabov, Y.; Roche, G.; Romana, A.; Rosati, M.; Rosendahl, S. S. E.; Rosnet, P.; Rukoyatkin, P.; Rykov, V. L.; Ryu, S. S.; Sahlmueller, B.; Saito, N.; Sakaguchi, T.; Sakai, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sanfratello, L.; Santo, R.; Sarsour, M.; Sato, H. D.; Sato, S.; Sawada, S.; Schutz, Y.; Semenov, V.; Seto, R.; Sharma, D.; Shea, T. K.; Shein, I.; Shibata, T.-A.; Shigaki, K.; Shimomura, M.; Shohjoh, T.; Shoji, K.; Sickles, A.; Silva, C. L.; Silvermyr, D.; Sim, K. S.; Singh, C. P.; Singh, V.; Skutnik, S.; Smith, W. C.; Soldatov, A.; Soltz, R. A.; Sondheim, W. E.; Sorensen, S. P.; Sourikova, I. V.; Staley, F.; Stankus, P. W.; Stenlund, E.; Stepanov, M.; Ster, A.; Stoll, S. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Sullivan, J. P.; Sziklai, J.; Tabaru, T.; Takagi, S.; Takagui, E. M.; Taketani, A.; Tanaka, K. H.; Tanaka, Y.; Tanida, K.; Tannenbaum, M. J.; Taranenko, A.; Tarján, P.; Thomas, T. L.; Togawa, M.; Tojo, J.; Torii, H.; Towell, R. S.; Tram, V.-N.

    2014-04-01

    Measurements of the midrapidity transverse-energy distribution, dET/dη, are presented for p +p, d +Au, and Au +Au collisions at √sNN =200 GeV and additionally for Au +Au collisions at √sNN =62.4 and 130 GeV. The dET/dη distributions are first compared with the number of nucleon participants Npart, number of binary collisions Ncoll, and number of constituent-quark participants Nqp calculated from a Glauber model based on the nuclear geometry. For Au +Au, /Npart increases with Npart, while /Nqp is approximately constant for all three energies. This indicates that the two-component ansatz, dET/dη ∝(1-x)Npart/2+xNcoll, which was used to represent ET distributions, is simply a proxy for Nqp, and that the Ncoll term does not represent a hard-scattering component in ET distributions. The dET/dη distributions of Au +Au and d +Au are then calculated from the measured p +p ET distribution using two models that both reproduce the Au +Au data. However, while the number-of-constituent-quark-participant model agrees well with the d +Au data, the additive-quark model does not.

  7. From Superatomic Au25(SR)18- to Superatomic M@Au24(SR)18q Core-shell Clusters.

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Deen; Dai, Sheng

    2009-01-01

    Au{sub 25}(SR){sub 18}{sup -} belongs to a new type of superatom that features an icosahedral Au{sub 13} core-shell structure and a protective layer of six RS(Au-SR){sub 2} motifs. This superatom has a magic number of 8 free electrons that fully fill the 1s and 1p levels of the electron-shell model. By applying this superatom concept to the core-substitution chemistry of Au{sub 25}(SR){sub 18}{sup -}, we first scanned the periodic table for the potential core atom M by applying a simple rule derived from the 8-electron count and then optimized the selected candidates by density functional theory calculations to create many series of M{at}Au{sub 24}(SR){sub 18}{sup q} core-shell nanoclusters. We found that 16 elements from groups 1, 2, and 10-14 of the periodic table can maintain both electronic and geometric structures of the original Au{sub 25}(SR){sub 18}{sup -} magic cluster, indicating that the electron-counting rule based on the superatom concept is powerful in predicting viable M{at}Au{sub 24}(SR){sub 18}{sup q} clusters. Our work opens up a promising area for experimental exploration.

  8. Crystal structures and magnetic properties of CsAu4Si2 and CeAu2Si2

    SciTech Connect

    Sefat, A.; Palasyuk, A.; Bud'ko, S.; Corbett, J.; Canfield, P.

    2007-12-03

    Single crystals of CeAu{sub 4}Si{sub 2} and CeAu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} have been grown out of ternary fluxes rich in Au, and the former, also by sintering the stoichiometric composition at 750 C. The single-crystal X-ray refinement result for CeAu{sub 4}Si{sub 2} is orthorhombic, Cmmm (No. 65, Z=2), different from a tetragonal result found from an X-ray powder diffraction refinement [H. Nakashima, et al., J. Alloys Compds. 424 (2006) 7]. For CeAu{sub 2}Si{sub 2}, this is the first report of the stoichiometric crystalline phase, in the known tetragonal I4/mmm structure. The anisotropic field- and temperature-dependent magnetizations, as well as specific heat and resistivity data are compared. Although both compounds have related structural packing, they present unique magnetic features. CeAu{sub 2}Si{sub 2} is a typical antiferromagnet with T{sub N} = 8.8(1) K and CeAu{sub 4}Si{sub 2} features a ferromagnetic component below T{sub c}=3.3(1) K. Both phases have effective moments close in value to that of free Ce{sup 3+}.

  9. Gold surfaces and nanoparticles are protected by Au(0)-thiyl species and are destroyed when Au(I)-thiolates form.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Jeffrey R; Ford, Michael J; Halder, Arnab; Ulstrup, Jens; Hush, Noel S

    2016-03-15

    The synthetic chemistry and spectroscopy of sulfur-protected gold surfaces and nanoparticles is analyzed, indicating that the electronic structure of the interface is Au(0)-thiyl, with Au(I)-thiolates identified as high-energy excited surface states. Density-functional theory indicates that it is the noble character of gold and nanoparticle surfaces that destabilizes Au(I)-thiolates. Bonding results from large van der Waals forces, influenced by covalent bonding induced through s-d hybridization and charge polarization effects that perturbatively mix in some Au(I)-thiolate character. A simple method for quantifying these contributions is presented, revealing that a driving force for nanoparticle growth is nobleization, minimizing Au(I)-thiolate involvement. Predictions that Brust-Schiffrin reactions involve thiolate anion intermediates are verified spectroscopically, establishing a key feature needed to understand nanoparticle growth. Mixing of preprepared Au(I) and thiolate reactants always produces Au(I)-thiolate thin films or compounds rather than monolayers. Smooth links to O, Se, Te, C, and N linker chemistry are established. PMID:26929334

  10. Visible light photoactivity of TiO2 loaded with monometallic (Au or Pt) and bimetallic (Au/Pt) nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gołąbiewska, Anna; Lisowski, Wojciech; Jarek, Marcin; Nowaczyk, Grzegorz; Zielińska-Jurek, Anna; Zaleska, Adriana

    2014-10-01

    TiO2 modified with monometallic (Au or Pt) and bimetallic (Au/Pt) nanoparticles have been prepared using a water-in-oil microemulsion system (water/AOT/cyclohexane) followed by calcination step. The effect of metal ratio, reducing agent type (NaBH4 or N2H4), TiO2 matrix type (P-25, ST-01, TiO-5, TiO2 nanotubes or TiO2 obtained by TIP hydrolysis) as well as calcination temperature (from 350 to 650 °C) were systematically investigated. Obtained photocatalysts were characterized by UV-vis diffuse-reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), BET surface area measurements, scanning transmission microscopy (STEM), X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Photocatalytic activity under visible light (λ > 420 nm) has been estimated in phenol degradation reaction in aqueous phase. The results showed that phenol degradation rate under visible light in the presence of TiO2 loaded with Au/Pt nanoparticles differed from 0.7 to 2.2 μmol dm-3 min-1 for samples prepared using different reducing agent. Sodium borohydride (NaBH4) favors formation of smaller Au/Pt nanoparticles and higher amount gold in Au/Pt is in the form of electronegative species (Auδ-) resulted in higher photoactivity. TiO2 obtained by TIP hydrolysis in microemulsion system seems to be the best support for Au/Pt nanoparticles from all among investigated matrix. It was also observed that enhancement of calcination temperature from 450 to 650 °C resulted in rapid drop of Au/Pt-TiO2 photoactivity under visible light due to surface area shrinkage, crystal structure change and probably change in Au/Pt nanoparticles morphology.

  11. Activated Dissociation of HCl on Au(111).

    PubMed

    Shirhatti, Pranav R; Geweke, Jan; Steinsiek, Christoph; Bartels, Christof; Rahinov, Igor; Auerbach, Daniel J; Wodtke, Alec M

    2016-04-01

    We report zero-coverage reaction probabilities (S0) for HCl dissociative adsorption on Au(111) obtained by the seeded molecular beam hot-nozzle method. For measurements at normal incidence with mean translational energies ranging from 0.94 to 2.56 eV (nozzle temperatures 296 to 1060 K), S0 increased from 6 × 10(-6) to 2 × 10(-2). S0 also increased with increasing nozzle temperature for fixed incidence energy associated with the motion normal to the surface. Accounting for the influence of the vibrational state population and translational energy distributions in the incident beam, we are able to compare the experimental results to recent theoretical predictions. These calculations, performed employing 6-D quantum dynamics on an electronically adiabatic potential energy surface obtained using density functional theory at the level of the generalized gradient approximation and the static surface approximation, severely overestimate the reaction probabilities when compared with our experimental results. We discuss some possible reasons for this large disagreement. PMID:26990513

  12. The AuScope geodetic VLBI array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovell, J. E. J.; McCallum, J. N.; Reid, P. B.; McCulloch, P. M.; Baynes, B. E.; Dickey, J. M.; Shabala, S. S.; Watson, C. S.; Titov, O.; Ruddick, R.; Twilley, R.; Reynolds, C.; Tingay, S. J.; Shield, P.; Adada, R.; Ellingsen, S. P.; Morgan, J. S.; Bignall, H. E.

    2013-06-01

    The AuScope geodetic Very Long Baseline Interferometry array consists of three new 12-m radio telescopes and a correlation facility in Australia. The telescopes at Hobart (Tasmania), Katherine (Northern Territory) and Yarragadee (Western Australia) are co-located with other space geodetic techniques including Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and gravity infrastructure, and in the case of Yarragadee, satellite laser ranging (SLR) and Doppler Orbitography and Radiopositioning Integrated by Satellite (DORIS) facilities. The correlation facility is based in Perth (Western Australia). This new facility will make significant contributions to improving the densification of the International Celestial Reference Frame in the Southern Hemisphere, and subsequently enhance the International Terrestrial Reference Frame through the ability to detect and mitigate systematic error. This, combined with the simultaneous densification of the GNSS network across Australia, will enable the improved measurement of intraplate deformation across the Australian tectonic plate. In this paper, we present a description of this new infrastructure and present some initial results, including telescope performance measurements and positions of the telescopes in the International Terrestrial Reference Frame. We show that this array is already capable of achieving centimetre precision over typical long-baselines and that network and reference source systematic effects must be further improved to reach the ambitious goals of VLBI2010.

  13. Metanephrine neuroendocrine tumor marker detection by SERS using Au nanoparticle/Au film sandwich architecture.

    PubMed

    Boca, Sanda; Farcau, Cosmin; Baia, Monica; Astilean, Simion

    2016-02-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors, such as pheochromocytoma or paraganglioma, are dangerous tumors that constitute a potential threat for a large number of patients. Currently, the biochemical diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumors is based on measurement of the direct secretory products of the adrenomedullary-sympathetic system or of their metabolites, such as catecholamines or their metanephrine derivatives, from plasma or urine. The techniques used for analysis of plasma free metanephrines, i.e. high-performance liquid chromatography or high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass-spectrometry are technically-demanding and time consuming, which limit their availability. Here we demonstrate a simple, fast and low-cost method for detecting metanephrine by Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS). The protocol consists in using evaporation-induced self-assembly of gold (Au) nanoparticles incubated with the analyte, on planar gold films. The assembly process produces regions with a dense distribution of both inter-particle gaps and particle-film gaps. Finite-difference time-domain simulations confirm that both kinds of gaps are locations of enhanced electromagnetic fields resulting from inter-particle and particle-film plasmonic coupling, useful for SERS amplification. Metanephrine vibrational bands assignment was performed according to density functional theory calculations. Metanephrine metabolite was detected in liquid at concentration levels lower than previously reported for other similar metabolites. The obtained results demonstrate that the Au nanoparticle/Au film exhibits noticeable SERS amplification of the adsorbed metabolite and can be used in the design of efficient, stable SERS-active substrates for the detection and identification of specific tumor markers. PMID:26820563

  14. Heterostructured Au/Pd-M (M = Au, Pd, Pt) nanoparticles with compartmentalized composition, morphology, and electrocatalytic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, Patrick S.; Bae, In-Tae; Maye, Mathew M.

    2015-09-01

    The synthesis, processing, and galvanic exchange of three heterostructured nanoparticle systems is described. The surface accessibility and redox potential of a Au/Pd-Ag dumbbell nanoparticle, where a Au/Pd core/shell region, and a silver region make up the domains, was used to prepare the new nanostructures with controlled composition, morphology, and microstructure. Results indicate that the silver domain was particularly susceptible to galvanic displacement, and was exchanged to Au/Pd-M (M = Au, Pd, Pt). Interestingly, the dumbbell morphology remained after exchange, and the silver region was transformed to hollow, parachute, or concentric domains respectively. The morphology and microstructure change was visualized via TEM and HRTEM, and the composition changes were probed via STEM-EDS imaging and XPS. The electrocatalytic activity of the Au/Pd-M towards methanol oxidation was studied, with results indicating that the Au/Pd-Pt nanoparticles had high activity attributed to the porous nature of the platinum domains.The synthesis, processing, and galvanic exchange of three heterostructured nanoparticle systems is described. The surface accessibility and redox potential of a Au/Pd-Ag dumbbell nanoparticle, where a Au/Pd core/shell region, and a silver region make up the domains, was used to prepare the new nanostructures with controlled composition, morphology, and microstructure. Results indicate that the silver domain was particularly susceptible to galvanic displacement, and was exchanged to Au/Pd-M (M = Au, Pd, Pt). Interestingly, the dumbbell morphology remained after exchange, and the silver region was transformed to hollow, parachute, or concentric domains respectively. The morphology and microstructure change was visualized via TEM and HRTEM, and the composition changes were probed via STEM-EDS imaging and XPS. The electrocatalytic activity of the Au/Pd-M towards methanol oxidation was studied, with results indicating that the Au/Pd-Pt nanoparticles had

  15. Glass formability and the Al-Au system

    SciTech Connect

    Egami, Takeshi; Ojha, Madhusudan; Nicholson, Donald M.; Louzguine-Luzgin, Dmitri; Chen, Na; Inoue, A.

    2012-01-01

    The aluminum-gold system exhibits various features that suggest high glass formability, such as a deep eutectic, formation of icosahedral clusters in the intermetallic compound near the eutectic minimum and a strongly negative heat of mixing. However, it is very difficult to form a glass with this system. Various issues related to glass formability are discussed using the Al-Au system as a negative test-case. In particular, the atomic level pressure was calculated from first principles for the first time for Al{sub 2}Au, AlAu{sub 2} and AlAu{sub 4} intermetallic compounds. The atomic level pressure is very high in these compounds, suggesting frustrated electronic states which destabilize both crystalline and glassy phases.

  16. Assembling Bare Au Nanoparticles at Positively Charged Templates

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenjie; Zhang, Honghu; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Mallapragada, Surya; Vaknin, David

    2016-01-01

    In-situ X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and grazing incidence X-ray small-angle scattering (GISAXS) reveal that unfunctionalized (bare) gold nanoparticles (AuNP) spontaneously adsorb to a cationic lipid template formed by a Langmuir monolayer of DPTAP (1,2-dihexadecanoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane) at vapor/aqueous interfaces. Analysis of the XRR yields the electron density profile across the charged-interfaces along the surface normal showing the AuNPs assemble with vertical thickness comparable to the particle size. The GISAXS analysis indicates that the adsorbed mono-particle layer exhibits short-range in-plane correlations. By contrast, single-stranded DNA-functionalized AuNPs, while attracted to the positively charged surface (more efficiently with the addition of salt to the solution), display less in-plane regular packing compared to bare AuNPs. PMID:27225047

  17. Efficient synthesis of Au99(SR)42 nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chao; Lin, Jizhi; Shi, Yangwei; Li, Gao

    2015-03-01

    We report a new synthetic protocol of Au99(SPh)42 nanoclusters with moderate efficiency (~15% yield based on HAuCl4), via a combination of the ligand-exchange and ``size-focusing'' processes. The purity of the as-prepared gold nanoclusters is characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry and size exclusion chromatography.We report a new synthetic protocol of Au99(SPh)42 nanoclusters with moderate efficiency (~15% yield based on HAuCl4), via a combination of the ligand-exchange and ``size-focusing'' processes. The purity of the as-prepared gold nanoclusters is characterized by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry and size exclusion chromatography. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental section: the synthetic procedure of the Au99(SPh)42 nanoclusters and characterization of the Au cluster. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00543d

  18. Magnetic order of Au nanoparticle with clean surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Ryuju; Ishikawa, Soichiro; Sato, Hiroyuki; Sato, Tetsuya

    2015-11-01

    Au nanoparticles, which are kept in vacuum after the preparation by gas evaporation method, show ferromagnetism even in 1.7 nm in diameter. The intrinsic magnetism is examined by detecting the disappearance of spontaneous magnetization in Au bulk prepared by heating the nanoparticles without exposure to the air. The temperature dependence of spontaneous magnetization is not monotonic and the increase in magnetization is observed after Au nanoparticles are exposed to the air. The magnetic behavior can be interpreted by the ferrimagnetic-like core-shell structure with shell thickness of 0.16±0.01 nm and magnetic moment of (1.5±0.1)×10-2 μB/Au atom, respectively.

  19. Assembling Bare Au Nanoparticles at Positively Charged Templates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenjie; Zhang, Honghu; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Mallapragada, Surya; Vaknin, David

    2016-01-01

    In-situ X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and grazing incidence X-ray small-angle scattering (GISAXS) reveal that unfunctionalized (bare) gold nanoparticles (AuNP) spontaneously adsorb to a cationic lipid template formed by a Langmuir monolayer of DPTAP (1,2-dihexadecanoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane) at vapor/aqueous interfaces. Analysis of the XRR yields the electron density profile across the charged-interfaces along the surface normal showing the AuNPs assemble with vertical thickness comparable to the particle size. The GISAXS analysis indicates that the adsorbed mono-particle layer exhibits short-range in-plane correlations. By contrast, single-stranded DNA-functionalized AuNPs, while attracted to the positively charged surface (more efficiently with the addition of salt to the solution), display less in-plane regular packing compared to bare AuNPs. PMID:27225047

  20. Au/p-diamond ohmic contacts deposited by RF sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, C. M.; Wang, X. Q.; Wu, X. C.; Liu, C. X.; Hou, D. L.

    2008-12-01

    Ohmic contacts have been formed on diamond films using a monolayer Au. Au film was deposited by radio frequency sputtering. I- V measurements show the good ohmic behavior of the contacts in the as-deposited and annealed states and the specific contact resistivity obtained by circular transmission line model was 1.27 × 10 -3 and 5.43 × 10 -4 Ω cm 2, respectively. Radio frequency sputtering makes an obvious interdiffusion between Au and diamond in the as-deposited contacts. Annealing the contact enhances the interdiffusion. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses and cross-sectional scan electron microscopy reveal the presence of an intermediate layer at the interface due to the intermixing between Au and diamond. Surface native oxide of the diamond film was effectively removed by treating the substrate film in boiling aqua regia solution.

  1. Assembling Bare Au Nanoparticles at Positively Charged Templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wenjie; Zhang, Honghu; Kuzmenko, Ivan; Mallapragada, Surya; Vaknin, David

    2016-05-01

    In-situ X-ray reflectivity (XRR) and grazing incidence X-ray small-angle scattering (GISAXS) reveal that unfunctionalized (bare) gold nanoparticles (AuNP) spontaneously adsorb to a cationic lipid template formed by a Langmuir monolayer of DPTAP (1,2-dihexadecanoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane) at vapor/aqueous interfaces. Analysis of the XRR yields the electron density profile across the charged-interfaces along the surface normal showing the AuNPs assemble with vertical thickness comparable to the particle size. The GISAXS analysis indicates that the adsorbed mono-particle layer exhibits short-range in-plane correlations. By contrast, single-stranded DNA-functionalized AuNPs, while attracted to the positively charged surface (more efficiently with the addition of salt to the solution), display less in-plane regular packing compared to bare AuNPs.

  2. Dynamic features of rod-shaped Au nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Woong Young; Das, Anindita; Wang, Shuxin; Zhao, Shuo; Byun, Hee Young; Lee, Dana; Kumar, Santosh; Jin, Rongchao; Peteanu, Linda A.

    2015-08-01

    Gold nanoclusters hold many potential applications such as biosensing and optics due to their emission characteristics, small size, and non-toxicity. However, their low quantum yields remain problematic for further applications, and their fluorescence mechanism is still unclear. To increase the low quantum yields, various methods have been performed: doping, tuning structures, and changing number of gold atoms. In the past, most characterizations have been performed on spherical shaped nanoclusters; in this paper, several characterizations of various rod-shaped Au nanoclusters specifically on Au25 are shown. It has been determined that the central gold atom in Au25 nano-rod is crucial in fluorescence. Furthermore, single molecule analysis of silver doped Au25 nano-rod revealed that it has more photo-stability than conjugated polymers and quantum dots.

  3. Au transport in catalyst coarsening and Si nanowire formation.

    PubMed

    Kim, B J; Tersoff, J; Kodambaka, S; Jang, Ja-Soon; Stach, E A; Ross, F M

    2014-08-13

    The motion of Au between AuSi liquid eutectic droplets, both before and during vapor-liquid-solid growth, is important in controlling tapering and diameter uniformity in Si nanowires. We measure the kinetics of coarsening of AuSi droplets on Si(001) and Si(111), quantifying the size evolution of droplets during annealing in ultrahigh vacuum using in situ transmission electron microscopy. For individual droplets, we show that coarsening kinetics are modified when disilane or oxygen is added: coarsening rates increase in the presence of disilane but decrease in oxygen. Matching droplet size measurements on Si(001) with coarsening models confirms that Au transport is driven by capillary forces and that the kinetic coefficients depend on the gas environment present. We suggest that the gas effects are qualitatively similar whether transport is attachment limited or diffusion limited. These results provide insight into manipulating nanowire morphologies for advanced device fabrication. PMID:25040757

  4. Aspects épidémiologiques des fractures de membres liées à l'exercice de la fonction militaire au Togo

    PubMed Central

    Akpoto, Yao Messanvi; Abalo, Anani; Gnandi-pio, Faré; Sonhaye, Lantam; Tchaou, Mazamaesso; Sama, Hamza Doles; Assenouwe, Sarakawabalo; Lamboni, Damessane; Amavi, Kossigan Adodossi; Adam, Saliou; Kpelao, Essossinam; Tengue, Kodjo; Songne-Gnamkoulamba, Badjona

    2015-01-01

    Le but de notre étude était de déterminer la fréquence des fractures de membres liées à l'exercice de la fonction militaire au sein des Forces de Défense et de Sécurité en milieu africain en vue de ressortir l'impact des différentes circonstances de survenue. Nous avons entrepris une étude rétrospective descriptive allant du 1er janvier 2004 au 31 décembre 2013. Elle a concerné les agents des forces de défense et de sécurité traités pour des fractures de membres au cours de cette période. Sept cent quatre (704) cas de fractures de membres ont été dénombrés. L’âge moyen des patients était de 30,57 ans avec des extrêmes de 19 et 55 ans. La prédominance masculine était nette (95,71%). L'Armée de Terre (51,05%) et la Gendarmerie Nationale (38,86%) étaient les plus représentées. Les hommes du rang étaient majoritaires (43,08%), suivis des sous-officiers (32,59%). La fréquence annuelle des fractures de membres en rapport avec la profession militaire était de 63 cas. Les fractures de jambe étaient les lésions les plus recensées (32,96%). Les Formations et les stages militaires ont été les circonstances de survenue les plus rencontrées (42,60%), suivies des accidents de la circulation (39,43%). La perte des journées de service liée à ces lésions était estimée à 14009 jours par an. Les fractures de jambes occupent le premier rang des fractures de membres en rapport avec l'exercice de la profession militaire. Les formations-stages militaires et les accidents de la voie publique en sont les deux grandes circonstances de survenue. PMID:27081434

  5. Pd versus Au as evaporated metal contacts to molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Haick, Hossam; Ghabboun, Jamal; Cahen, David

    2005-01-24

    Indirect e-beam evaporation of metal on a cooled substrate that allows making reproducible and gentle electrical contact to molecular films of organic molecules yields strikingly different results with Pd and Au. This is attributed to different growth modes of the metals, which lead to different molecule/metal interactions and to Au penetration in between the molecules. These differences can radically change the effect of the molecules on the resulting junctions.

  6. Melting curve of metals Cu, Ag and Au under pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tam, Pham Dinh; Hoc, Nguyen Quang; Tinh, Bui Duc; Tan, Pham Duy

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the dependence of the melting temperature of metals Cu, Ag and Au under pressure in the interval from 0 kbar to 40 kbar is studied by the statistical moment method (SMM). This dependence has the form of near linearity and the calculated slopes of melting curve are 3.9 for Cu, 5.7 for Ag and 6 for Au. These results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  7. Formation, Migration, and Reactivity of Au-CO Complexes on Gold Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; McEntee, Monica; Tang, Wenjie; Neurock, Matthew; Baddorf, Arthur P; Maksymovych, Petro; Yates, John T

    2016-02-10

    We report experimental as well as theoretical evidence that suggests Au-CO complex formation upon the exposure of CO to active sites (step edges and threading dislocations) on a Au(111) surface. Room-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission infrared spectroscopy, and density functional theory calculations point to Au-CO complex formation and migration. Room-temperature STM of the Au(111) surface at CO pressures in the range from 10(-8) to 10(-4) Torr (dosage up to 10(6) langmuir) indicates Au atom extraction from dislocation sites of the herringbone reconstruction, mobile Au-CO complex formation and diffusion, and Au adatom cluster formation on both elbows and step edges on the Au surface. The formation and mobility of the Au-CO complex result from the reduced Au-Au bonding at elbows and step edges leading to stronger Au-CO bonding and to the formation of a more positively charged CO (CO(δ+)) on Au. Our studies indicate that the mobile Au-CO complex is involved in the Au nanoparticle formation and reactivity, and that the positive charge on CO increases due to the stronger adsorption of CO at Au sites with lower coordination numbers. PMID:26754257

  8. Competition between Hexagonal and Tetragonal Hexabromobenzene Packing on Au(111).

    PubMed

    Huang, Han; Tan, Zhiyu; He, Yanwei; Liu, Jian; Sun, Jiatao; Zhao, Kang; Zhou, Zhenhong; Tian, Guo; Wong, Swee Liang; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen

    2016-03-22

    Low-temperature scanning tunneling microscope investigations reveal that hexabromobenzene (HBB) molecules arrange in either hexagonally closely packed (hcp) [Formula: see text] or tetragonal [Formula: see text] structure on Au(111) dependent on a small substrate temperature difference around 300 K. The underlying mechanism is investigated by density functional theory calculations, which reveal that substrate-mediated intermolecular noncovalent C-Br···Br-C attractions induce hcp HBB islands, keeping the well-known Au(111)-22×√3 reconstruction intact. Upon deposition at 330 K, HBB molecules trap freely diffusing Au adatoms to form tetragonal islands. This enhances the attraction between HBB and Au(111) but partially reduces the intermolecular C-Br···Br-C attractions, altering the Au(111)-22×√3 reconstruction. In both cases, the HBB molecule adsorbs on a bridge site, forming a ∼15° angle between the C-Br direction and [112̅]Au, indicating the site-specific molecule-substrate interactions. We show that the competition between intermolecular and molecule-substrate interactions determines molecule packing at the subnanometer scale, which will be helpful for crystal engineering, functional materials, and organic electronics. PMID:26905460

  9. Catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol by magnetically recoverable Au nanocatalyst.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yang-Chuang; Chen, Dong-Hwang

    2009-06-15

    A novel magnetically recoverable Au nanocatalyst was fabricated by the simple adsorption-reduction of Au(III) ions on chitosan-coated iron oxide magnetic nanocarrier. Au nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 3.14 nm were well loaded on the surface of magnetic nanocarrier because chitosan layer provided an effective driving force in the formation and stabilization of Au nanoparticles. The resultant magnetically recoverable Au nanocatalyst exhibited excellent catalytic activity to the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) with sodium borohydride. The rate constants evaluated in terms of pseudo-first-order kinetic model increased with increasing the amount of Au nanocatalyst, decreasing the initial 4-NP concentration, and increasing the temperature. Also, the kinetic data suggested that this catalytic reaction was diffusion controlled owing to the presence of chitosan layer. In addition, catalyst reuse showed no trace of deactivation or poisoning during the catalytic and separation processes, revealing the stable nature and good catalytic ability of this nanocatalyst. PMID:19022566

  10. Spin Polarization and Quantum Spins in Au Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chi-Yen; Karna, Sunil K.; Wang, Chin-Wei; Li, Wen-Hsien

    2013-01-01

    The present study focuses on investigating the magnetic properties and the critical particle size for developing sizable spontaneous magnetic moment of bare Au nanoparticles. Seven sets of bare Au nanoparticle assemblies, with diameters from 3.5 to 17.5 nm, were fabricated with the gas condensation method. Line profiles of the X-ray diffraction peaks were used to determine the mean particle diameters and size distributions of the nanoparticle assemblies. The magnetization curves M(Ha) reveal Langevin field profiles. Magnetic hysteresis was clearly revealed in the low field regime even at 300 K. Contributions to the magnetization from different size particles in the nanoparticle assemblies were considered when analyzing the M(Ha) curves. The results show that the maximum particle moment will appear in 2.4 nm Au particles. A similar result of the maximum saturation magnetization appearing in 2.3 nm Au particles is also concluded through analysis of the dependency of the saturation magnetization MP on particle size. The MP(d) curve departs significantly from the 1/d dependence, but can be described by a log-normal function. Magnetization can be barely detected for Au particles larger than 27 nm. Magnetic field induced Zeeman magnetization from the quantum confined Kubo gap opening appears in Au nanoparticles smaller than 9.5 nm in diameter. PMID:23989607

  11. Structural and dynamical properties of liquid Al-Au alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, H. L.; Voigtmann, Th.; Kolland, G.; Kobatake, H.; Brillo, J.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate temperature- and composition-dependent structural and dynamical properties of Al-Au melts. Experiments are performed to obtain accurate density and viscosity data. The system shows a strong negative excess volume, similar to other Al-based binary alloys. We develop a molecular-dynamics (MD) model of the melt based on the embedded-atom method (EAM), gauged against the available experimental liquid-state data. A rescaling of previous EAM potentials for solid-state Au and Al improves the quantitative agreement with experimental data in the melt. In the MD simulation, the admixture of Au to Al can be interpreted as causing a local compression of the less dense Al system, driven by less soft Au-Au interactions. This local compression provides a microscopic mechanism explaining the strong negative excess volume of the melt. We further discuss the concentration dependence of self- and interdiffusion and viscosity in the MD model. Al atoms are more mobile than Au, and their increased mobility is linked to a lower viscosity of the melt.

  12. Biosupported Bimetallic Pd Au Nanocatalysts for Dechlorination of Environmental Contaminants

    SciTech Connect

    De Corte, S.; Fitts, J.; Hennebel, T.; Sabbe, T.; Bliznuk, V.; Verschuere, S.; van der Lelie, D.; Verstraete, W.; Boon, N.

    2011-08-30

    Biologically produced monometallic palladium nanoparticles (bio-Pd) have been shown to catalyze the dehalogenation of environmental contaminants, but fail to efficiently catalyze the degradation of other important recalcitrant halogenated compounds. This study represents the first report of biologically produced bimetallic Pd/Au nanoparticle catalysts. The obtained catalysts were tested for the dechlorination of diclofenac and trichloroethylene. When aqueous bivalent Pd(II) and trivalent Au(III) ions were both added to concentrations of 50 mg L{sup -1} and reduced simultaneously by Shewanella oneidensis in the presence of H{sub 2}, the resulting cell-associated bimetallic nanoparticles (bio-Pd/Au) were able to dehalogenate 78% of the initially added diclofenac after 24 h; in comparison, no dehalogenation was observed using monometallic bio-Pd or bio-Au. Other catalyst-synthesis strategies did not show improved dehalogenation of TCE and diclofenac compared with bio-Pd. Synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction, (scanning) transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy indicated that the simultaneous reduction of Pd and Au supported on cells of S. oneidensis resulted in the formation of a unique bimetallic crystalline structure. This study demonstrates that the catalytic activity and functionality of possibly environmentally more benign biosupported Pd-catalysts can be improved by coprecipitation with Au.

  13. Thermal stability of Mo/Au bilayers for TES applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra-Borderías, María; Fernández-Martínez, Iván; Fàbrega, Lourdes; Camón, Agustín; Gil, Oscar; González-Arrabal, Raquel; Sesé, Javier; Costa-Krämer, José Luis; Warot-Fonrose, Bénédicte; Serin, Virginie; Briones, Fernando

    2012-09-01

    Mo/Au bilayers are among the most suitable materials to be used as transition-edge sensors (TES) in cryogenic microcalorimeters and bolometers, developed, among other fields, for space missions. For this purpose the thermal stability of TES at temperatures below 150 °C is a critical issue. We report on the dependence of functional properties (superconducting critical temperature, residual resistance and α) as well as on microstructure, chemical composition and interface quality for optimized high quality Mo/Au bilayers on annealing temperature and time. Data show that the functional properties of the bilayers remain stable at T < 150 °C, but changes in microstructure, interface quality and functional properties were observed for layers heated at T ≥ 200 °C. Microstructural and chemical composition data suggest that the measured changes in residual resistance ratio (RRR) and TC at T ≥ 200 °C are mainly due to an increase in the average Au grain size and to Au migration along the Mo grain boundaries at the Au/Mo interface. A way to stabilize the functional properties of the Mo/Au bilayers against temperature enhancements is proposed.

  14. Hohlraum Te Inferred from Au L-Shell Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regan, S. P.; Epstein, R.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; May, M. J.; Schneider, M. B.; Barrios, M. A.; Moody, J. D.; Baker, K. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Brown, G. V.; Callahan, D.; Doeppner, T.; Fournier, K. B.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; Kauffman, R.; Khan, S.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Landen, O. L.; Liedahl, D. A.; Nagel, S. R.; Ross, J. S.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2014-10-01

    Laser-ablation plasmas created at the inner wall of the hohlraum (Au bubble) and at the laser entrance hole (LEH) radiate L-shell emission from Ne-like to Co-like charge states of Au. A 1-D spatially resolved and time-integrated spectrum in the 6- to 16-keV range with E/d E = 100 to 300 is recorded along the axis of the hohlraum. The Au L-shell spectral line shapes of the 2p3 / 2 - 3 s , 2p3 / 2 - 3d5 / 2 , and 2p1 / 2 - 3d3 / 2 transitions are analyzed using an atomic physics code to infer the Te of the radiating plasma. Preliminary results indicate the Au LEH plasma of a near-vacuum hohlraum has an inferred Te of 5 to 6 keV, while a gas-filled hohlraum has a significantly lower Te. A comparison of the Au L-shell spectra and the Te sensitivity will be presented, along with the plan to measure the L-shell emission from the Au bubble. This material is based upon work supported by the Department Of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944. Part of this work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  15. Electric fields and chiral magnetic effect in Cu + Au collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Wei-Tian; Huang, Xu-Guang

    2015-03-01

    The non-central Cu + Au collisions can create strong out-of-plane magnetic fields and in-plane electric fields. By using the HIJING model, we study the general properties of the electromagnetic fields in Cu + Au collisions at 200 GeV and their impacts on the charge-dependent two-particle correlator γq1q2 = < cos ⁡ (ϕ1 +ϕ2 - 2ψRP) > (see main text for definition) which was used for the detection of the chiral magnetic effect (CME). Compared with Au + Au collisions, we find that the in-plane electric fields in Cu + Au collisions can strongly suppress the two-particle correlator or even reverse its sign if the lifetime of the electric fields is long. Combining with the expectation that if γq1q2 is induced by elliptic-flow driven effects we would not see such strong suppression or reversion, our results suggest to use Cu + Au collisions to test CME and understand the mechanisms that underlie γq1q2.

  16. Synthesis of hybrid CdS-Au colloidal nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Aaron E; Popov, Inna; Banin, Uri

    2006-12-21

    We explore the growth mechanism of gold nanocrystals onto preformed cadmium sulfide nanorods to form hybrid metal nanocrystal/semiconductor nanorod colloids. By manipulating the growth conditions, it is possible to obtain nanostructures exhibiting Au nanocrystal growth at only one nanorod tip, at both tips, or at multiple locations along the nanorod surface. Under anaerobic conditions, Au growth occurs only at one tip of the nanorods, producing asymmetric structures. In contrast, the presence of oxygen and trace amounts of water during the reaction promotes etching of the nanorod surface, providing additional sites for metal deposition. Three growth stages are observed when Au growth is performed under air: (1) Au nanocrystal formation at both nanorod tips, (2) growth onto defect sites on the nanorod surface, and finally (3) a ripening process in which one nanocrystal tip grows at the expense of the other particles present on the nanorod. Analysis of the hybrid nanostructures by high-resolution TEM shows that there is no preferred orientation between the Au nanocrystal and the CdS nanorod, indicating that growth is nonepitaxial. The optical signatures of the nanocrystals and the nanorods (i.e., the surface plasmon and first exciton transition peaks, respectively) are spectrally distinct, allowing the different stages of the growth process to be easily monitored. The initial CdS nanorods exhibit band gap and trap state emission, both of which are quenched during Au growth. PMID:17165989

  17. DRIFTS-QMS study of room temperature CO oxidation on Au/SiO2 catalyst: nature and role of different Au species

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Zili; Zhou, Shenghu; Zhu, Haoguo; Dai, Sheng; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H

    2009-01-01

    The nature and role of different Au species on a Au/SiO2 catalyst in room temperature (rt) CO oxidation have been studied by operando diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRIFT) coupled with quadruple mass spectrometry (QMS). It has shown that different pretreatments (oxidative and reductive) of Au/SiO2 have significant effect on the nature of Au species and thus the CO oxidation performance. High temperature (500 C) O2-treatment leads to cationic Au species which is inactive for rt CO oxidation. Reductive treatment (either H2 or CO) results in metallic Au species that are immediately active for rt CO oxidation. Furthermore, CO oxidation activity is found in good correlation with the reduction degree of Au species, a clear indication of the essential role of metallic Au species played in rt CO oxidation. The accompanying slight deactivation with the oxidation of metallic Au species on reductively treated Au/SiO2 in CO oxidation suggests that cationic Au species may play a negative role in rt CO oxidation. The effect of water in rt CO oxidation on Au/SiO2 was also investigated. Two positive roles played by water in CO oxidation have been identified: activation of O2 and reduction of cationic Au species.

  18. Surface segregation phenomena in extended and nanoparticle surfaces of Cu-Au alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jonathan; Wang, Guofeng; Zhou, Guangwen

    2016-07-01

    Using density functional theory (DFT) and Monte Carlo (MC) simulations, we studied the surface segregation phenomena of Au atoms in the extended and nanoparticle surfaces of Cu-Au alloys. Our MC simulations predicted significant Au enrichment in the outermost layer of (111) and (100) extended surfaces, and Au enrichment in the two outermost layers of (110) extended surfaces. The equilibrium Cu-Au nanoparticles were predicted to develop into an Au-enriched shell structure, where Au atoms preferably segregate to the (100) facets while Cu atoms are mainly located on the (111) facet of the nanoparticles. Our simulation predictions agree with experimental measurements.

  19. Beam Energy Dependence of the Third Harmonic of Azimuthal Correlations in Au +Au Collisions at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, L.; Adkins, J. K.; Agakishiev, G.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Ahammed, Z.; Alekseev, I.; Aparin, A.; Arkhipkin, D.; Aschenauer, E. C.; Attri, A.; Averichev, G. S.; Bai, X.; Bairathi, V.; Bellwied, R.; Bhasin, A.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattarai, P.; Bielcik, J.; Bielcikova, J.; Bland, L. C.; Bordyuzhin, I. G.; Bouchet, J.; Brandenburg, J. D.; Brandin, A. V.; Bunzarov, I.; Butterworth, J.; Caines, H.; Calderón de la Barca Sánchez, M.; Campbell, J. M.; Cebra, D.; Chakaberia, I.; Chaloupka, P.; Chang, Z.; Chatterjee, A.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chen, J. H.; Chen, X.; Cheng, J.; Cherney, M.; Christie, W.; Contin, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Das, S.; De Silva, L. C.; Debbe, R. R.; Dedovich, T. G.; Deng, J.; Derevschikov, A. A.; di Ruzza, B.; Didenko, L.; Dilks, C.; Dong, X.; Drachenberg, J. L.; Draper, J. E.; Du, C. M.; Dunkelberger, L. E.; Dunlop, J. C.; Efimov, L. G.; Engelage, J.; Eppley, G.; Esha, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Eyser, O.; Fatemi, R.; Fazio, S.; Federic, P.; Fedorisin, J.; Feng, Z.; Filip, P.; Fisyak, Y.; Flores, C. E.; Fulek, L.; Gagliardi, C. A.; Garand, D.; Geurts, F.; Gibson, A.; Girard, M.; Greiner, L.; Grosnick, D.; Gunarathne, D. S.; Guo, Y.; Gupta, S.; Gupta, A.; Guryn, W.; Hamad, A. I.; Hamed, A.; Haque, R.; Harris, J. W.; He, L.; Heppelmann, S.; Heppelmann, S.; Hirsch, A.; Hoffmann, G. W.; Horvat, S.; Huang, T.; Huang, X.; Huang, B.; Huang, H. Z.; Huck, P.; Humanic, T. J.; Igo, G.; Jacobs, W. W.; Jang, H.; Jentsch, A.; Jia, J.; Jiang, K.; Judd, E. G.; Kabana, S.; Kalinkin, D.; Kang, K.; Kauder, K.; Ke, H. W.; Keane, D.; Kechechyan, A.; Khan, Z. H.; Kikoła, D. P.; Kisel, I.; Kisiel, A.; Kochenda, L.; Koetke, D. D.; Kosarzewski, L. K.; Kraishan, A. F.; Kravtsov, P.; Krueger, K.; Kumar, L.; Lamont, M. A. C.; Landgraf, J. M.; Landry, K. D.; Lauret, J.; Lebedev, A.; Lednicky, R.; Lee, J. H.; Li, X.; Li, C.; Li, X.; Li, Y.; Li, W.; Lin, T.; Lisa, M. A.; Liu, F.; Ljubicic, T.; Llope, W. J.; Lomnitz, M.; Longacre, R. S.; Luo, X.; Ma, R.; Ma, G. L.; Ma, Y. G.; Ma, L.; Magdy, N.; Majka, R.; Manion, A.; Margetis, S.; Markert, C.; Matis, H. S.; McDonald, D.; McKinzie, S.; Meehan, K.; Mei, J. C.; Minaev, N. G.; Mioduszewski, S.; Mishra, D.; Mohanty, B.; Mondal, M. M.; Morozov, D. A.; Mustafa, M. K.; Nandi, B. K.; Nasim, Md.; Nayak, T. K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Niida, T.; Nogach, L. V.; Noh, S. Y.; Novak, J.; Nurushev, S. B.; Odyniec, G.; Ogawa, A.; Oh, K.; Okorokov, V. A.; Olvitt, D.; Page, B. S.; Pak, R.; Pan, Y. X.; Pandit, Y.; Panebratsev, Y.; Pawlik, B.; Pei, H.; Perkins, C.; Pile, P.; Pluta, J.; Poniatowska, K.; Porter, J.; Posik, M.; Poskanzer, A. M.; Pruthi, N. K.; Putschke, J.; Qiu, H.; Quintero, A.; Ramachandran, S.; Raniwala, S.; Raniwala, R.; Ray, R. L.; Ritter, H. G.; Roberts, J. B.; Rogachevskiy, O. V.; Romero, J. L.; Ruan, L.; Rusnak, J.; Rusnakova, O.; Sahoo, N. R.; Sahu, P. K.; Sakrejda, I.; Salur, S.; Sandweiss, J.; Sarkar, A.; Schambach, J.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schmah, A. M.; Schmidke, W. B.; Schmitz, N.; Seger, J.; Seyboth, P.; Shah, N.; Shahaliev, E.; Shanmuganathan, P. V.; Shao, M.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, B.; Sharma, M. K.; Shen, W. Q.; Shi, Z.; Shi, S. S.; Shou, Q. Y.; Sichtermann, E. P.; Sikora, R.; Simko, M.; Singha, S.; Skoby, M. J.; Smirnov, N.; Smirnov, D.; Solyst, W.; Song, L.; Sorensen, P.; Spinka, H. M.; Srivastava, B.; Stanislaus, T. D. S.; Stepanov, M.; Stock, R.; Strikhanov, M.; Stringfellow, B.; Sumbera, M.; Summa, B.; Sun, Z.; Sun, X. M.; Sun, Y.; Surrow, B.; Svirida, D. N.; Tang, Z.; Tang, A. H.; Tarnowsky, T.; Tawfik, A.; Thäder, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Timmins, A. R.; Tlusty, D.; Todoroki, T.; Tokarev, M.; Trentalange, S.; Tribble, R. E.; Tribedy, P.; Tripathy, S. K.; Tsai, O. D.; Ullrich, T.; Underwood, D. G.; Upsal, I.; Van Buren, G.; van Nieuwenhuizen, G.; Vandenbroucke, M.; Varma, R.; Vasiliev, A. N.; Vertesi, R.; Videbæk, F.; Vokal, S.; Voloshin, S. A.; Vossen, A.; Wang, F.; Wang, G.; Wang, J. S.; Wang, H.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Webb, G.; Webb, J. C.; Wen, L.; Westfall, G. D.; Wieman, H.; Wissink, S. W.; Witt, R.; Wu, Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Xie, W.; Xie, G.; Xin, K.; Xu, Y. F.; Xu, Q. H.; Xu, N.; Xu, H.; Xu, Z.; Xu, J.; Yang, S.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Yang, C.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Q.; Ye, Z.; Ye, Z.; Yepes, P.; Yi, L.; Yip, K.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yu, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zha, W.; Zhang, X. P.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, S.; Zhang, Z.; Zhang, J. B.; Zhao, J.; Zhong, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhu, X.; Zoulkarneeva, Y.; Zyzak, M.; STAR Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    We present results from a harmonic decomposition of two-particle azimuthal correlations measured with the STAR detector in Au +Au collisions for energies ranging from √{sN N }=7.7 to 200 GeV. The third harmonic v32{2 }=⟨cos 3 (ϕ1-ϕ2)⟩ , where ϕ1-ϕ2 is the angular difference in azimuth, is studied as a function of the pseudorapidity difference between particle pairs Δ η =η1-η2 . Nonzero v32{2 } is directly related to the previously observed large-Δ η narrow-Δ ϕ ridge correlations and has been shown in models to be sensitive to the existence of a low viscosity quark gluon plasma phase. For sufficiently central collisions, v32{2 } persist down to an energy of 7.7 GeV, suggesting that quark gluon plasma may be created even in these low energy collisions. In peripheral collisions at these low energies, however, v32{2 } is consistent with zero. When scaled by the pseudorapidity density of charged-particle multiplicity per participating nucleon pair, v32{2 } for central collisions shows a minimum near √{sN N }=20 GeV .

  20. Azimuthal anisotophy in U + U and Au + Au collisions at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-11-24

    Collisions between prolate uranium nuclei are used to study how particle production and azimuthal anisotropies depend on initial geometry in heavy-ion collisions. We report the two- and four-particle cumulants, v2{2} and v2{4}, for charged hadrons from U+U collisions at √SNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √SNN = 200 GeV. Nearly fully overlapping collisions are selected based on the energy deposited by spectators in zero degree calorimeters (ZDCs). Within this sample, the observed dependence of v2{2} on multiplicity demonstrates that ZDC information combined with multiplicity can preferentially select different overlap configurations in U+U collisions. As a result, we also show that v2 vs multiplicity can be better described by models, such as gluon saturation or quark participant models, that eliminate the dependence of the multiplicity on the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions.

  1. Measurement of Direct Photons in Ultra-Relativistic Au+Au Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Haijiang

    Direct photons provide a tool to study the different stages of a heavy ion collision, especially the formation of the quark-gluon-plasma (QGP), without being influenced by the strong reaction and hadronization processes. The yield of direct photons can be determined from the inclusive photon yield and the photon yield from hadronic decays. At low pT, where a significant fraction of direct photon is expected to come from the thermalized medium of deconfined quarks and gluons and interacting hadrons, the measurement is very challenging. These so-called thermal photons carry information about the initial temperature of the medium. We present a new analysis technique that was developed to improve direct photon production measurement in the low and medium pT range. The technique was applied to the PHENIX Run4 Au+Au sqrt(sNN)=200GeV/c collisions dataset. It uses strict particle identification (PID) in the Electromagnetic Calorimeter (EMCal) and a charged particle veto to extract a clean photon signal. These photons are then tagged with EMCal photon candidates with loose PID cuts, which can be reconstructed with high efficiency, to determine the fraction of photons originating from neutral pion decays. Most systematic uncertainties and detector effects cancel in this method. The results are compared with recent PHENIX direct photon measurement through external conversion method and theoretical calculation predicting thermal photon production.

  2. Phospholipid Encapsulated AuNR@Ag/Au Nanosphere SERS Tags with Environmental Stimulus Responsive Signal Property.

    PubMed

    Su, Xueming; Wang, Yunqing; Wang, Wenhai; Sun, Kaoxiang; Chen, Lingxin

    2016-04-27

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) tags draw much attention due to the ultrasensitivity and multiplex labeling capability. Recently, a new kind of SERS tags was rationally designed by encapsulating metal nanoparticles with phospholipid bilayers, showing great potential in theranostics. The lipid bilayer coating confers biocompatibility and versatility to changing surface chemistry of the tag; however, its "soft" feature may influence SERS signal stability, which is rarely investigated. Herein, we prepared phospholipid-coated AuNR@Ag/Au nanosphere SERS tags by using three different kinds of Raman reporters, i.e., thio-containing 4-nitrothiophenol (NT), nitrogen-containing hydrophobic chromophore cyanine 7 monoacid (Cy7), and alkyl chain-chromophore conjugate 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindodicarbocyanine (DiD). It was found that signal responses were different upon additional stimulation which the tags may encounter in theranostic applications including the presence of detergent Triton X-100, lipid membrane, and photothermal treatment. Living-cell imaging also showed signal changing distinction. The different SERS signal performances were attributed to the different Raman reporter releasing behaviors from the tags. This work revealed that Raman reporter structure determined signal stability of lipid-coated SERS tags, providing guidance for the design of stimulus responsive tags. Moreover, it also implied the potential of SERS technique for real time drug release study of lipid based nanomedicine. PMID:27052206

  3. Azimuthal anisotophy in U + U and Au + Au collisions at RHIC

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Adamczyk, L.

    2015-11-24

    Collisions between prolate uranium nuclei are used to study how particle production and azimuthal anisotropies depend on initial geometry in heavy-ion collisions. We report the two- and four-particle cumulants, v2{2} and v2{4}, for charged hadrons from U+U collisions at √SNN = 193 GeV and Au+Au collisions at √SNN = 200 GeV. Nearly fully overlapping collisions are selected based on the energy deposited by spectators in zero degree calorimeters (ZDCs). Within this sample, the observed dependence of v2{2} on multiplicity demonstrates that ZDC information combined with multiplicity can preferentially select different overlap configurations in U+U collisions. As a result, we alsomore » show that v2 vs multiplicity can be better described by models, such as gluon saturation or quark participant models, that eliminate the dependence of the multiplicity on the number of binary nucleon-nucleon collisions.« less

  4. Thermal description of particle production in Au-Au collisions at RHIC energies (STAR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawfik, A.; Abbas, E.

    2015-07-01

    The hadron ratios measured in central Au-Au collisions are analysed by means of Hadron Resonance Gas (HRG) model over a wide range of nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energies, √ s NN = 7.7-200 GeV as offered by the RHIC Beam Energy Scan I (BES-I) (STAR Collaboration). The temperature and baryon chemical potential are deduced from fits of experimental ratios to thermal model calculations assuming chemical equilibrium. We find that the resulting freeze-out parameters using single hard-core value and point-like constituents of HRG are identical. This implies that the excluded-volume comes up with no effect on the extracted parameters. We compare the results with other studies and with the lattice QCD calculations. Various freeze-out conditions are confronted with the resulting data set. The effect of including new resonances is also analysed. At vanishing chemical potential, a limiting temperature was estimated, T lim = 158.5 ± 3 MeV.

  5. Scaling properties of proton and antiproton production in sqrt[s(NN)]=200 GeV Au+Au collisions.

    PubMed

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