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Sample records for auditory signals requires

  1. Requirements for security signalling

    SciTech Connect

    Pierson, L.G.; Tarman, T.D.

    1995-02-05

    There has been some interest lately in the need for ``authenticated signalling``, and the development of signalling specifications by the ATM Forum that support this need. The purpose of this contribution is to show that if authenticated signalling is required, then supporting signalling facilities for directory services (i.e. key management) are also required. Furthermore, this contribution identifies other security related mechanisms that may also benefit from ATM-level signalling accommodations. For each of these mechanisms outlined here, an overview of the signalling issues and a rough cut at the required fields for supporting Information Elements are provided. Finally, since each of these security mechanisms are specified by a number of different standards, issues pertaining to the selection of a particular security mechanism at connection setup time (i.e. specification of a required ``Security Quality of Service``) are also discussed.

  2. Motor-related signals in the auditory system for listening and learning.

    PubMed

    Schneider, David M; Mooney, Richard

    2015-08-01

    In the auditory system, corollary discharge signals are theorized to facilitate normal hearing and the learning of acoustic behaviors, including speech and music. Despite clear evidence of corollary discharge signals in the auditory cortex and their presumed importance for hearing and auditory-guided motor learning, the circuitry and function of corollary discharge signals in the auditory cortex are not well described. In this review, we focus on recent developments in the mouse and songbird that provide insights into the circuitry that transmits corollary discharge signals to the auditory system and the function of these signals in the context of hearing and vocal learning. PMID:25827273

  3. Hearing conspecific vocal signals alters peripheral auditory sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Gall, Megan D.; Wilczynski, Walter

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether hearing advertisement calls over several nights, as happens in natural frog choruses, modified the responses of the peripheral auditory system in the green treefrog, Hyla cinerea. Using auditory evoked potentials (AEP), we found that exposure to 10 nights of a simulated male chorus lowered auditory thresholds in males and females, while exposure to random tones had no effect in males, but did result in lower thresholds in females. The threshold change was larger at the lower frequencies stimulating the amphibian papilla than at higher frequencies stimulating the basilar papilla. Suprathreshold responses to tonal stimuli were assessed for two peaks in the AEP recordings. For the peak P1 (assessed for 0.8–1.25 kHz), peak amplitude increased following chorus exposure. For peak P2 (assessed for 2–4 kHz), peak amplitude decreased at frequencies between 2.5 and 4.0 kHz, but remained unaltered at 2.0 kHz. Our results show for the first time, to our knowledge, that hearing dynamic social stimuli, like frog choruses, can alter the responses of the auditory periphery in a way that could enhance the detection of and response to conspecific acoustic communication signals. PMID:25972471

  4. Differential auditory signal processing in an animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Dukhwan; Kim, Chongsun; Chang, Sun O.

    2002-05-01

    Auditory evoked responses were collected in male zebra finches (Poephila guttata) to objectively determine differential frequency selectivity. First, the mating call of the animal was recorded and analyzed for its frequency components through the customized program. Then, auditory brainstem responses and cortical responses of each anesthetized animal were routinely recorded in response to tone bursts of 1-8 kHz derived from the corresponding mating call spectrum. From the results, most mating calls showed relatively consistent spectral structures. The upper limit of the spectrum was well under 10 kHz. The peak energy bands were concentrated in the region less than 5 kHz. The assessment of auditory brainstem responses and cortical evoked potentials showed differential selectivity with a series of characteristic scales. This system appears to be an excellent model to investigate complex sound processing and related language behaviors. These data could also be used in designing effective signal processing strategies in auditory rehabilitation devices such as hearing aids and cochlear implants. [Work supported by Brain Science & Engineering Program from Korean Ministry of Science and Technology.

  5. Hearing conspecific vocal signals alters peripheral auditory sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Gall, Megan D; Wilczynski, Walter

    2015-06-01

    We investigated whether hearing advertisement calls over several nights, as happens in natural frog choruses, modified the responses of the peripheral auditory system in the green treefrog, Hyla cinerea. Using auditory evoked potentials (AEP), we found that exposure to 10 nights of a simulated male chorus lowered auditory thresholds in males and females, while exposure to random tones had no effect in males, but did result in lower thresholds in females. The threshold change was larger at the lower frequencies stimulating the amphibian papilla than at higher frequencies stimulating the basilar papilla. Suprathreshold responses to tonal stimuli were assessed for two peaks in the AEP recordings. For the peak P1 (assessed for 0.8-1.25 kHz), peak amplitude increased following chorus exposure. For peak P2 (assessed for 2-4 kHz), peak amplitude decreased at frequencies between 2.5 and 4.0 kHz, but remained unaltered at 2.0 kHz. Our results show for the first time, to our knowledge, that hearing dynamic social stimuli, like frog choruses, can alter the responses of the auditory periphery in a way that could enhance the detection of and response to conspecific acoustic communication signals. PMID:25972471

  6. Auditory Signal Processing in Communication: Perception and Performance of Vocal Sounds

    PubMed Central

    Prather, Jonathan F.

    2013-01-01

    Learning and maintaining the sounds we use in vocal communication require accurate perception of the sounds we hear performed by others and feedback-dependent imitation of those sounds to produce our own vocalizations. Understanding how the central nervous system integrates auditory and vocal-motor information to enable communication is a fundamental goal of systems neuroscience, and insights into the mechanisms of those processes will profoundly enhance clinical therapies for communication disorders. Gaining the high-resolution insight necessary to define the circuits and cellular mechanisms underlying human vocal communication is presently impractical. Songbirds are the best animal model of human speech, and this review highlights recent insights into the neural basis of auditory perception and feedback-dependent imitation in those animals. Neural correlates of song perception are present in auditory areas, and those correlates are preserved in the auditory responses of downstream neurons that are also active when the bird sings. Initial tests indicate that singing-related activity in those downstream neurons is associated with vocal-motor performance as opposed to the bird simply hearing itself sing. Therefore, action potentials related to auditory perception and action potentials related to vocal performance are co-localized in individual neurons. Conceptual models of song learning involve comparison of vocal commands and the associated auditory feedback to compute an error signal that is used to guide refinement of subsequent song performances, yet the sites of that comparison remain unknown. Convergence of sensory and motor activity onto individual neurons points to a possible mechanism through which auditory and vocal-motor signals may be linked to enable learning and maintenance of the sounds used in vocal communication. PMID:23827717

  7. The effect of psychological stress and expectation on auditory perception: A signal detection analysis.

    PubMed

    Hoskin, Robert; Hunter, Mike D; Woodruff, Peter W R

    2014-11-01

    Both psychological stress and predictive signals relating to expected sensory input are believed to influence perception, an influence which, when disrupted, may contribute to the generation of auditory hallucinations. The effect of stress and semantic expectation on auditory perception was therefore examined in healthy participants using an auditory signal detection task requiring the detection of speech from within white noise. Trait anxiety was found to predict the extent to which stress influenced response bias, resulting in more anxious participants adopting a more liberal criterion, and therefore experiencing more false positives, when under stress. While semantic expectation was found to increase sensitivity, its presence also generated a shift in response bias towards reporting a signal, suggesting that the erroneous perception of speech became more likely. These findings provide a potential cognitive mechanism that may explain the impact of stress on hallucination-proneness, by suggesting that stress has the tendency to alter response bias in highly anxious individuals. These results also provide support for the idea that top-down processes such as those relating to semantic expectation may contribute to the generation of auditory hallucinations. PMID:25280122

  8. Application of auditory signals to the operation of an agricultural vehicle: results of pilot testing.

    PubMed

    Karimi, D; Mondor, T A; Mann, D D

    2008-01-01

    The operation of agricultural vehicles is a multitask activity that requires proper distribution of attentional resources. Human factors theories suggest that proper utilization of the operator's sensory capacities under such conditions can improve the operator's performance and reduce the operator's workload. Using a tractor driving simulator, this study investigated whether auditory cues can be used to improve performance of the operator of an agricultural vehicle. Steering of a vehicle was simulated in visual mode (where driving error was shown to the subject using a lightbar) and in auditory mode (where a pair of speakers were used to convey the driving error direction and/or magnitude). A secondary task was also introduced in order to simulate the monitoring of an attached machine. This task included monitoring of two identical displays, which were placed behind the simulator, and responding to them, when needed, using a joystick. This task was also implemented in auditory mode (in which a beep signaled the subject to push the proper button when a response was needed) and in visual mode (in which there was no beep and visual, monitoring of the displays was necessary). Two levels of difficulty of the monitoring task were used. Deviation of the simulated vehicle from a desired straight line was used as the measure of performance in the steering task, and reaction time to the displays was used as the measure of performance in the monitoring task. Results of the experiments showed that steering performance was significantly better when steering was a visual task (driving errors were 40% to 60% of the driving errors in auditory mode), although subjective evaluations showed that auditory steering could be easier, depending on the implementation. Performance in the monitoring task was significantly better for auditory implementation (reaction time was approximately 6 times shorter), and this result was strongly supported by subjective ratings. The majority of the

  9. Signal type and signal-to-noise ratio interact to affect cortical auditory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Billings, Curtis J; Grush, Leslie D

    2016-08-01

    Use of speech signals and background noise is emerging in cortical auditory evoked potential (CAEP) studies; however, the interaction between signal type and noise level remains unclear. Two experiments determined the interaction between signal type and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) on CAEPs. Three signals (syllable /ba/, 1000-Hz tone, and the /ba/ envelope with 1000-Hz fine structure) with varying SNRs were used in two experiments, demonstrating signal-by-SNR interactions due to both envelope and spectral characteristics. When using real-world stimuli such as speech to evoke CAEPs, temporal and spectral complexity leads to differences with traditional tonal stimuli, especially when presented in background noise. PMID:27586784

  10. A hardware model of the auditory periphery to transduce acoustic signals into neural activity

    PubMed Central

    Tateno, Takashi; Nishikawa, Jun; Tsuchioka, Nobuyoshi; Shintaku, Hirofumi; Kawano, Satoyuki

    2013-01-01

    To improve the performance of cochlear implants, we have integrated a microdevice into a model of the auditory periphery with the goal of creating a microprocessor. We constructed an artificial peripheral auditory system using a hybrid model in which polyvinylidene difluoride was used as a piezoelectric sensor to convert mechanical stimuli into electric signals. To produce frequency selectivity, the slit on a stainless steel base plate was designed such that the local resonance frequency of the membrane over the slit reflected the transfer function. In the acoustic sensor, electric signals were generated based on the piezoelectric effect from local stress in the membrane. The electrodes on the resonating plate produced relatively large electric output signals. The signals were fed into a computer model that mimicked some functions of inner hair cells, inner hair cell–auditory nerve synapses, and auditory nerve fibers. In general, the responses of the model to pure-tone burst and complex stimuli accurately represented the discharge rates of high-spontaneous-rate auditory nerve fibers across a range of frequencies greater than 1 kHz and middle to high sound pressure levels. Thus, the model provides a tool to understand information processing in the peripheral auditory system and a basic design for connecting artificial acoustic sensors to the peripheral auditory nervous system. Finally, we discuss the need for stimulus control with an appropriate model of the auditory periphery based on auditory brainstem responses that were electrically evoked by different temporal pulse patterns with the same pulse number. PMID:24324432

  11. Effects of age, signal level, and signal rate on the auditory middle latency response.

    PubMed

    Tucker, D A; Ruth, R A

    1996-04-01

    The effects of age, signal rate, and signal level on the maturing auditory middle latency response (AMLR) were evaluated in 50 normal-hearing subjects ranging in age from 2 days to 35 years. Ipsilateral and contralateral AMLR waveforms were recorded in newborns (n = 10), children (n = 10), preteens (n = 10), teens (n = 10), and adults (n = 10). The AMLR Pa waveform was obtained in 70 to 100 percent of all subjects. The variables of age, signal level, and site of recording significantly affected Pa peak amplitude and absolute latency. However, stimulus rate did not significantly affect the response. PMID:8652873

  12. Auditory Evaluation of Sound Signals Radiated by a Vibrating Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MEUNIER, S.; HABAULT, D.; CANÉVET, G.

    2001-11-01

    This paper presents a combination of vibroacoustic and psychoacoustic studies of sounds radiated by a vibrating structure. The calculated sound field is the sound pressure radiated by a baffled thin-plate structure immersed in a fluid, on the surface of which the acceleration is given. Various configurations are selected for the time and space functions of the acceleration variable, each configuration leading to a particular acoustic signal (a low-frequency tone complex in our case). These signals are then transformed into sound files, which are used as test signals in psychoacoustic experiments for assessing their perceptual attributes and quality. Two experiments were run. In the first one, the unpleasantness of a series of signals at different levels was measured by direct estimation and compared with their calculated loudness and sharpness using Zwicker's model. The same measurements were repeated with the signals set to the same maximum amplitude. In the second experiment, the pleasantness of another series of sounds at equal loudness was measured, as well as dissimilarity and preference on pairs of these sounds. An MDS analysis was run to extract auditory attributes that could account for the perceived differences between sounds and correlate with the estimated pleasantness. The results from the first experiment show that pleasantness is always highly (and negatively) correlated with loudness. The same holds for sharpness, when sounds are played at the same maximum amplitude. The second experiment shows that the perceptual attributes revealed by the MDS analysis are related to pitch and timbre, the latter being highly correlated with pleasantness. Overall, this study confirms the interest of extending vibroacoustic studies to a more complete “psychomechanical” investigation of the whole process of sound generation. It is suggested that such investigations may apply to product sound quality and to active or passive noise control, by providing

  13. Sound Sequence Discrimination Learning Motivated by Reward Requires Dopaminergic D2 Receptor Activation in the Rat Auditory Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kudoh, Masaharu; Shibuki, Katsuei

    2006-01-01

    We have previously reported that sound sequence discrimination learning requires cholinergic inputs to the auditory cortex (AC) in rats. In that study, reward was used for motivating discrimination behavior in rats. Therefore, dopaminergic inputs mediating reward signals may have an important role in the learning. We tested the possibility in the…

  14. Neural interactions in unilateral colliculus and between bilateral colliculi modulate auditory signal processing

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Hui-Xian; Cheng, Liang; Chen, Qi-Cai

    2013-01-01

    In the auditory pathway, the inferior colliculus (IC) is a major center for temporal and spectral integration of auditory information. There are widespread neural interactions in unilateral (one) IC and between bilateral (two) ICs that could modulate auditory signal processing such as the amplitude and frequency selectivity of IC neurons. These neural interactions are either inhibitory or excitatory, and are mostly mediated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate, respectively. However, the majority of interactions are inhibitory while excitatory interactions are in the minority. Such unbalanced properties between excitatory and inhibitory projections have an important role in the formation of unilateral auditory dominance and sound location, and the neural interaction in one IC and between two ICs provide an adjustable and plastic modulation pattern for auditory signal processing. PMID:23626523

  15. The effect of auditory verbal imagery on signal detection in hallucination-prone individuals

    PubMed Central

    Moseley, Peter; Smailes, David; Ellison, Amanda; Fernyhough, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive models have suggested that auditory hallucinations occur when internal mental events, such as inner speech or auditory verbal imagery (AVI), are misattributed to an external source. This has been supported by numerous studies indicating that individuals who experience hallucinations tend to perform in a biased manner on tasks that require them to distinguish self-generated from non-self-generated perceptions. However, these tasks have typically been of limited relevance to inner speech models of hallucinations, because they have not manipulated the AVI that participants used during the task. Here, a new paradigm was employed to investigate the interaction between imagery and perception, in which a healthy, non-clinical sample of participants were instructed to use AVI whilst completing an auditory signal detection task. It was hypothesized that AVI-usage would cause participants to perform in a biased manner, therefore falsely detecting more voices in bursts of noise. In Experiment 1, when cued to generate AVI, highly hallucination-prone participants showed a lower response bias than when performing a standard signal detection task, being more willing to report the presence of a voice in the noise. Participants not prone to hallucinations performed no differently between the two conditions. In Experiment 2, participants were not specifically instructed to use AVI, but retrospectively reported how often they engaged in AVI during the task. Highly hallucination-prone participants who retrospectively reported using imagery showed a lower response bias than did participants with lower proneness who also reported using AVI. Results are discussed in relation to prominent inner speech models of hallucinations. PMID:26435050

  16. Instantaneous and Frequency-Warped Signal Processing Techniques for Auditory Source Separation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Avery Li-Chun

    which require a small fraction of the computational power of conventional FIR implementations. This design strategy is based on truncated and stabilized IIR filters. These signal-processing methods have been applied to the problem of auditory source separation, resulting in voice separation from complex music that is significantly better than previous results at far lower computational cost.

  17. Auditory Cortex Is Required for Fear Potentiation of Gap Detection

    PubMed Central

    Weible, Aldis P.; Liu, Christine; Niell, Cristopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Auditory cortex is necessary for the perceptual detection of brief gaps in noise, but is not necessary for many other auditory tasks such as frequency discrimination, prepulse inhibition of startle responses, or fear conditioning with pure tones. It remains unclear why auditory cortex should be necessary for some auditory tasks but not others. One possibility is that auditory cortex is causally involved in gap detection and other forms of temporal processing in order to associate meaning with temporally structured sounds. This predicts that auditory cortex should be necessary for associating meaning with gaps. To test this prediction, we developed a fear conditioning paradigm for mice based on gap detection. We found that pairing a 10 or 100 ms gap with an aversive stimulus caused a robust enhancement of gap detection measured 6 h later, which we refer to as fear potentiation of gap detection. Optogenetic suppression of auditory cortex during pairing abolished this fear potentiation, indicating that auditory cortex is critically involved in associating temporally structured sounds with emotionally salient events. PMID:25392510

  18. A Visual or Tactile Signal Makes Auditory Speech Detection More Efficient by Reducing Uncertainty

    PubMed Central

    Tjan, Bosco S.; Chao, Ewen; Bernstein, Lynne E.

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic speech is easier to detect in noise when the talker can be seen. This finding could be explained by integration of multisensory inputs or refinement of auditory processing from visual guidance. In two experiments, we studied two-interval forced choice detection of an auditory “ba” in acoustic noise, paired with various visual and tactile stimuli that were identically presented in both observation intervals. Detection thresholds were reduced under the multisensory conditions versus the auditory-only condition, even though the visual and/or tactile stimuli alone could not inform the correct response. Results were analyzed relative to an ideal observer for which intrinsic (internal) noise and efficiency were independent contributors to detection sensitivity. Across experiments, intrinsic noise was unaffected by the multisensory stimuli, arguing against the merging (integrating) of multisensory inputs into a unitary speech signal; but sampling efficiency was increased to varying degrees, supporting refinement of knowledge about the auditory stimulus. The steepness of the psychometric functions decreased with increasing sampling efficiency, suggesting that the “task-irrelevant” visual and tactile stimuli reduced uncertainty about the acoustic signal. Visible speech was not superior for enhancing auditory speech detection. Our results reject multisensory neuronal integration and speech-specific neural processing as explanations for enhanced auditory speech detection under noisy conditions. Instead, our results support a more rudimentary form of multisensory interaction – the otherwise task-irrelevant sensory systems inform the auditory system about when to listen. PMID:24400652

  19. Requirements for signaling channel authentication

    SciTech Connect

    Tarman, T.D.

    1995-12-11

    This contribution addresses requirements for ATM signaling channel authentication. Signaling channel authentication is an ATM security service that binds an ATM signaling message to its source. By creating this binding, the message recipient, and even a third party, can confidently verify that the message originated from its claimed source. This provides a useful mechanism to mitigate a number of threats. For example, a denial of service attack which attempts to tear-down an active connection by surreptitiously injecting RELEASE or DROP PARTY messages could be easily thwarted when authenticity assurances are in place for the signaling channel. Signaling channel authentication could also be used to provide the required auditing information for accurate billing which is impervious to repudiation. Finally, depending on the signaling channel authentication mechanism, end-to-end integrity of the message (or at least part of it) can be provided. None of these capabilities exist in the current specifications.

  20. A topographic instructive signal guides the adjustment of the auditory space map in the optic tectum.

    PubMed

    Hyde, P S; Knudsen, E I

    2001-11-01

    Maps of auditory space in the midbrain of the barn owl (Tyto alba) are calibrated by visual experience. When owls are raised wearing prismatic spectacles that displace the visual field in azimuth, the auditory receptive fields of neurons in the optic tectum shift to compensate for the optical displacement of the visual field. This shift results primarily from a shift in the tuning of tectal neurons for interaural time difference. The visually based instructive signal that guides this plasticity could be based on a topographic, point-by-point comparison between auditory and visual space maps or on a foveation-dependent visual assessment of the accuracy of auditory orienting responses. To distinguish between these two possibilities, we subjected owls to optical conditions that differed in the center of gaze and the visual periphery. A topographic signal would cause the portions of the space map representing the central and peripheral regions of visual space to adjust differently, according to the optical conditions that exist in each region. In contrast, a foveation-based signal would cause both portions of the map to adjust similarly, according to the optical conditions that exist at the center of gaze. In six of seven experiments, adaptive changes were as predicted by a topographic instructive signal. Although the results do not rule out the possible contribution of a foveation-based signal, they demonstrate that a topographic instructive signal is, indeed, involved in the calibration of the auditory space map in the barn owl optic tectum. PMID:11606646

  1. Speech motor learning changes the neural response to both auditory and somatosensory signals

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Takayuki; Coppola, Joshua H.; Ostry, David J.

    2016-01-01

    In the present paper, we present evidence for the idea that speech motor learning is accompanied by changes to the neural coding of both auditory and somatosensory stimuli. Participants in our experiments undergo adaptation to altered auditory feedback, an experimental model of speech motor learning which like visuo-motor adaptation in limb movement, requires that participants change their speech movements and associated somatosensory inputs to correct for systematic real-time changes to auditory feedback. We measure the sensory effects of adaptation by examining changes to auditory and somatosensory event-related responses. We find that adaptation results in progressive changes to speech acoustical outputs that serve to correct for the perturbation. We also observe changes in both auditory and somatosensory event-related responses that are correlated with the magnitude of adaptation. These results indicate that sensory change occurs in conjunction with the processes involved in speech motor adaptation. PMID:27181603

  2. Pip and Pop: Nonspatial Auditory Signals Improve Spatial Visual Search

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Burg, Erik; Olivers, Christian N. L.; Bronkhorst, Adelbert W.; Theeuwes, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Searching for an object within a cluttered, continuously changing environment can be a very time-consuming process. The authors show that a simple auditory pip drastically decreases search times for a synchronized visual object that is normally very difficult to find. This effect occurs even though the pip contains no information on the location…

  3. Auditory Warnings, Signal-Referent Relations, and Natural Indicators: Re-Thinking Theory and Application

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petocz, Agnes; Keller, Peter E.; Stevens, Catherine J.

    2008-01-01

    In auditory warning design the idea of the strength of the association between sound and referent has been pivotal. Research has proceeded via constructing classification systems of signal-referent associations and then testing predictions about ease of learning of different levels of signal-referent relation strength across and within different…

  4. The influence of signal type on the internal auditory representation of a room

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teret, Elizabeth

    Currently, architectural acousticians make no real distinction between a room impulse response and the auditory system's internal representation of a room. With this lack of a good model for the auditory representation of a room, it is indirectly assumed that our internal representation of a room is independent of the sound source needed to make the room characteristics audible. The extent to which this assumption holds true is examined with perceptual tests. Listeners are presented with various pairs of signals (music, speech, and noise) convolved with synthesized impulse responses of different reverberation times. They are asked to adjust the reverberation of one of the signals to match the other. Analysis of the data show that the source signal significantly influences perceived reverberance. Listeners are less accurate when matching reverberation times of varied signals than they are with identical signals. Additional testing shows that perception of reverberation can be linked to the existence of transients in the signal.

  5. Auditory signals evolve from hybrid- to eye-centered coordinates in the primate superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jungah; Groh, Jennifer M

    2012-07-01

    Visual and auditory spatial signals initially arise in different reference frames. It has been postulated that auditory signals are translated from a head-centered to an eye-centered frame of reference compatible with the visual spatial maps, but, to date, only various forms of hybrid reference frames for sound have been identified. Here, we show that the auditory representation of space in the superior colliculus involves a hybrid reference frame immediately after the sound onset but evolves to become predominantly eye centered, and more similar to the visual representation, by the time of a saccade to that sound. Specifically, during the first 500 ms after the sound onset, auditory response patterns (N = 103) were usually neither head nor eye centered: 64% of neurons showed such a hybrid pattern, whereas 29% were more eye centered and 8% were more head centered. This differed from the pattern observed for visual targets (N = 156): 86% were eye centered, <1% were head centered, and only 13% exhibited a hybrid of both reference frames. For auditory-evoked activity observed within 20 ms of the saccade (N = 154), the proportion of eye-centered response patterns increased to 69%, whereas the hybrid and head-centered response patterns dropped to 30% and <1%, respectively. This pattern approached, although did not quite reach, that observed for saccade-related activity for visual targets: 89% were eye centered, 11% were hybrid, and <1% were head centered (N = 162). The plainly eye-centered visual response patterns and predominantly eye-centered auditory motor response patterns lie in marked contrast to our previous study of the intraparietal cortex, where both visual and auditory sensory and motor-related activity used a predominantly hybrid reference frame (Mullette-Gillman et al. 2005, 2009). Our present findings indicate that auditory signals are ultimately translated into a reference frame roughly similar to that used for vision, but suggest that such signals might

  6. Auditory and tactile signals combine to influence vision during binocular rivalry.

    PubMed

    Lunghi, Claudia; Morrone, Maria Concetta; Alais, David

    2014-01-15

    Resolution of perceptual ambiguity is one function of cross-modal interactions. Here we investigate whether auditory and tactile stimuli can influence binocular rivalry generated by interocular temporal conflict in human subjects. Using dichoptic visual stimuli modulating at different temporal frequencies, we added modulating sounds or vibrations congruent with one or the other visual temporal frequency. Auditory and tactile stimulation both interacted with binocular rivalry by promoting dominance of the congruent visual stimulus. This effect depended on the cross-modal modulation strength and was absent when modulation depth declined to 33%. However, when auditory and tactile stimuli that were too weak on their own to bias binocular rivalry were combined, their influence over vision was very strong, suggesting the auditory and tactile temporal signals combined to influence vision. Similarly, interleaving discrete pulses of auditory and tactile stimuli also promoted dominance of the visual stimulus congruent with the supramodal frequency. When auditory and tactile stimuli were presented at maximum strength, but in antiphase, they had no influence over vision for low temporal frequencies, a null effect again suggesting audio-tactile combination. We also found that the cross-modal interaction was frequency-sensitive at low temporal frequencies, when information about temporal phase alignment can be perceptually tracked. These results show that auditory and tactile temporal processing is functionally linked, suggesting a common neural substrate for the two sensory modalities and that at low temporal frequencies visual activity can be synchronized by a congruent cross-modal signal in a frequency-selective way, suggesting the existence of a supramodal temporal binding mechanism. PMID:24431437

  7. A psychophysiological evaluation of the perceived urgency of auditory warning signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burt, J. L.; Bartolome, D. S.; Burdette, D. W.; Comstock, J. R. Jr

    1995-01-01

    One significant concern that pilots have about cockpit auditory warnings is that the signals presently used lack a sense of priority. The relationship between auditory warning sound parameters and perceived urgency is, therefore, an important topic of enquiry in aviation psychology. The present investigation examined the relationship among subjective assessments of urgency, reaction time, and brainwave activity with three auditory warning signals. Subjects performed a tracking task involving automated and manual conditions, and were presented with auditory warnings having various levels of perceived and situational urgency. Subjective assessments revealed that subjects were able to rank warnings on an urgency scale, but rankings were altered after warnings were mapped to a situational urgency scale. Reaction times differed between automated and manual tracking task conditions, and physiological data showed attentional differences in response to perceived and situational warning urgency levels. This study shows that the use of physiological measures sensitive to attention and arousal, in conjunction with behavioural and subjective measures, may lead to the design of auditory warnings that produce a sense of urgency in an operator that matches the urgency of the situation.

  8. Auditory-visual speech perception and synchrony detection for speech and nonspeech signals

    PubMed Central

    Conrey, Brianna; Pisoni, David B.

    2012-01-01

    Previous research has identified a “synchrony window” of several hundred milliseconds over which auditory-visual (AV) asynchronies are not reliably perceived. Individual variability in the size of this AV synchrony window has been linked with variability in AV speech perception measures, but it was not clear whether AV speech perception measures are related to synchrony detection for speech only or for both speech and nonspeech signals. An experiment was conducted to investigate the relationship between measures of AV speech perception and AV synchrony detection for speech and nonspeech signals. Variability in AV synchrony detection for both speech and nonspeech signals was found to be related to variability in measures of auditory-only (A-only) and AV speech perception, suggesting that temporal processing for both speech and nonspeech signals must be taken into account in explaining variability in A-only and multisensory speech perception. PMID:16838548

  9. Integration of auditory and somatosensory error signals in the neural control of speech movements

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yongqiang; Gracco, Vincent L.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated auditory and somatosensory feedback contributions to the neural control of speech. In task I, sensorimotor adaptation was studied by perturbing one of these sensory modalities or both modalities simultaneously. The first formant (F1) frequency in the auditory feedback was shifted up by a real-time processor and/or the extent of jaw opening was increased or decreased with a force field applied by a robotic device. All eight subjects lowered F1 to compensate for the up-shifted F1 in the feedback signal regardless of whether or not the jaw was perturbed. Adaptive changes in subjects' acoustic output resulted from adjustments in articulatory movements of the jaw or tongue. Adaptation in jaw opening extent in response to the mechanical perturbation occurred only when no auditory feedback perturbation was applied or when the direction of adaptation to the force was compatible with the direction of adaptation to a simultaneous acoustic perturbation. In tasks II and III, subjects' auditory and somatosensory precision and accuracy were estimated. Correlation analyses showed that the relationships 1) between F1 adaptation extent and auditory acuity for F1 and 2) between jaw position adaptation extent and somatosensory acuity for jaw position were weak and statistically not significant. Taken together, the combined findings from this work suggest that, in speech production, sensorimotor adaptation updates the underlying control mechanisms in such a way that the planning of vowel-related articulatory movements takes into account a complex integration of error signals from previous trials but likely with a dominant role for the auditory modality. PMID:21562187

  10. Detectability of auditory signals presented without defined observation intervals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, C. S.; Nichols, T. L.

    1976-01-01

    Ability to detect tones in noise was measured without defined observation intervals. Latency density functions were estimated for the first response following a signal and, separately, for the first response following randomly distributed instances of background noise. Detection performance was measured by the maximum separation between the cumulative latency density functions for signal-plus-noise and for noise alone. Values of the index of detectability, estimated by this procedure, were approximately those obtained with a 2-dB weaker signal and defined observation intervals. Simulation of defined- and non-defined-interval tasks with an energy detector showed that this device performs very similarly to the human listener in both cases.

  11. Intracortical Multiplication of Thalamocortical Signals in Mouse Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling-yun; Li, Ya-tang; Zhou, Mu; Tao, Huizhong W.; Zhang, Li I.

    2013-01-01

    Cortical processing of sensory information initiates from the transformation of thalamically-relayed signals. By optogenetically silencing intracortical circuits to isolate thalamic inputs to layer 4 neurons, we show that intracortical excitation linearly amplifies thalamocortical responses underlying frequency and direction selectivity with preserved spectral range and tuning, and prolongs the response duration. This signal pre-amplification and prolongation enhances the salience of thalamocortically-relayed information and ensures its robust, faithful and more persistent representation. PMID:23933752

  12. Neuroestrogen signaling in the songbird auditory cortex propagates into a sensorimotor network via an 'interface' nucleus.

    PubMed

    Pawlisch, B A; Remage-Healey, L

    2015-01-22

    Neuromodulators rapidly alter activity of neural circuits and can therefore shape higher order functions, such as sensorimotor integration. Increasing evidence suggests that brain-derived estrogens, such as 17-β-estradiol, can act rapidly to modulate sensory processing. However, less is known about how rapid estrogen signaling can impact downstream circuits. Past studies have demonstrated that estradiol levels increase within the songbird auditory cortex (the caudomedial nidopallium, NCM) during social interactions. Local estradiol signaling enhances the auditory-evoked firing rate of neurons in NCM to a variety of stimuli, while also enhancing the selectivity of auditory-evoked responses of neurons in a downstream sensorimotor brain region, HVC (proper name). Since these two brain regions are not directly connected, we employed dual extracellular recordings in HVC and the upstream nucleus interfacialis of the nidopallium (NIf) during manipulations of estradiol within NCM to better understand the pathway by which estradiol signaling propagates to downstream circuits. NIf has direct input into HVC, passing auditory information into the vocal motor output pathway, and is a possible source of the neural selectivity within HVC. Here, during acute estradiol administration in NCM, NIf neurons showed increases in baseline firing rates and auditory-evoked firing rates to all stimuli. Furthermore, when estradiol synthesis was blocked in NCM, we observed simultaneous decreases in the selectivity of NIf and HVC neurons. These effects were not due to direct estradiol actions because NIf has little to no capability for local estrogen synthesis or estrogen receptors, and these effects were specific to NIf because other neurons immediately surrounding NIf did not show these changes. Our results demonstrate that transsynaptic, rapid fluctuations in neuroestrogens are transmitted into NIf and subsequently HVC, both regions important for sensorimotor integration. Overall, these

  13. Specialized Postsynaptic Morphology Enhances Neurotransmitter Dilution and High-Frequency Signaling at an Auditory Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Graydon, Cole W.; Cho, Soyoun; Diamond, Jeffrey S.; Kachar, Bechara; von Gersdorff, Henrique

    2014-01-01

    Sensory processing in the auditory system requires that synapses, neurons, and circuits encode information with particularly high temporal and spectral precision. In the amphibian papillia, sound frequencies up to 1 kHz are encoded along a tonotopic array of hair cells and transmitted to afferent fibers via fast, repetitive synaptic transmission, thereby promoting phase locking between the presynaptic and postsynaptic cells. Here, we have combined serial section electron microscopy, paired electrophysiological recordings, and Monte Carlo diffusion simulations to examine novel mechanisms that facilitate fast synaptic transmission in the inner ear of frogs (Rana catesbeiana and Rana pipiens). Three-dimensional anatomical reconstructions reveal specialized spine-like contacts between individual afferent fibers and hair cells that are surrounded by large, open regions of extracellular space. Morphologically realistic diffusion simulations suggest that these local enlargements in extracellular space speed transmitter clearance and reduce spillover between neighboring synapses, thereby minimizing postsynaptic receptor desensitization and improving sensitivity during prolonged signal transmission. Additionally, evoked EPSCs in afferent fibers are unaffected by glutamate transporter blockade, suggesting that transmitter diffusion and dilution, and not uptake, play a primary role in speeding neurotransmission and ensuring fidelity at these synapses. PMID:24920639

  14. Vocalization–whisking coordination and multisensory integration of social signals in rat auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Rajnish P; Mielke, Falk; Bobrov, Evgeny; Brecht, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Social interactions involve multi-modal signaling. Here, we study interacting rats to investigate audio-haptic coordination and multisensory integration in the auditory cortex. We find that facial touch is associated with an increased rate of ultrasonic vocalizations, which are emitted at the whisking rate (∼8 Hz) and preferentially initiated in the retraction phase of whisking. In a small subset of auditory cortex regular-spiking neurons, we observed excitatory and heterogeneous responses to ultrasonic vocalizations. Most fast-spiking neurons showed a stronger response to calls. Interestingly, facial touch-induced inhibition in the primary auditory cortex and off-responses after termination of touch were twofold stronger than responses to vocalizations. Further, touch modulated the responsiveness of auditory cortex neurons to ultrasonic vocalizations. In summary, facial touch during social interactions involves precisely orchestrated calling-whisking patterns. While ultrasonic vocalizations elicited a rather weak population response from the regular spikers, the modulation of neuronal responses by facial touch was remarkably strong. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03185.001 PMID:25485525

  15. Processing speech signal using auditory-like filterbank provides least uncertainty about articulatory gestures

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Prasanta Kumar; Goldstein, Louis M.; Narayanan, Shrikanth S.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding how the human speech production system is related to the human auditory system has been a perennial subject of inquiry. To investigate the production–perception link, in this paper, a computational analysis has been performed using the articulatory movement data obtained during speech production with concurrently recorded acoustic speech signals from multiple subjects in three different languages: English, Cantonese, and Georgian. The form of articulatory gestures during speech production varies across languages, and this variation is considered to be reflected in the articulatory position and kinematics. The auditory processing of the acoustic speech signal is modeled by a parametric representation of the cochlear filterbank which allows for realizing various candidate filterbank structures by changing the parameter value. Using mathematical communication theory, it is found that the uncertainty about the articulatory gestures in each language is maximally reduced when the acoustic speech signal is represented using the output of a filterbank similar to the empirically established cochlear filterbank in the human auditory system. Possible interpretations of this finding are discussed. PMID:21682422

  16. Suppressed visual looming stimuli are not integrated with auditory looming signals: Evidence from continuous flash suppression

    PubMed Central

    Moors, Pieter; Huygelier, Hanne; Wagemans, Johan; de-Wit, Lee; van Ee, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies using binocular rivalry have shown that signals in a modality other than the visual can bias dominance durations depending on their congruency with the rivaling stimuli. More recently, studies using continuous flash suppression (CFS) have reported that multisensory integration influences how long visual stimuli remain suppressed. In this study, using CFS, we examined whether the contrast thresholds for detecting visual looming stimuli are influenced by a congruent auditory stimulus. In Experiment 1, we show that a looming visual stimulus can result in lower detection thresholds compared to a static concentric grating, but that auditory tone pips congruent with the looming stimulus did not lower suppression thresholds any further. In Experiments 2, 3, and 4, we again observed no advantage for congruent multisensory stimuli. These results add to our understanding of the conditions under which multisensory integration is possible, and suggest that certain forms of multisensory integration are not evident when the visual stimulus is suppressed from awareness using CFS. PMID:26034573

  17. Dependence of auditory spatial updating on vestibular, proprioceptive, and efference copy signals.

    PubMed

    Genzel, Daria; Firzlaff, Uwe; Wiegrebe, Lutz; MacNeilage, Paul R

    2016-08-01

    Humans localize sounds by comparing inputs across the two ears, resulting in a head-centered representation of sound-source position. When the head moves, information about head movement must be combined with the head-centered estimate to correctly update the world-centered sound-source position. Spatial updating has been extensively studied in the visual system, but less is known about how head movement signals interact with binaural information during auditory spatial updating. In the current experiments, listeners compared the world-centered azimuthal position of two sound sources presented before and after a head rotation that depended on condition. In the active condition, subjects rotated their head by ∼35° to the left or right, following a pretrained trajectory. In the passive condition, subjects were rotated along the same trajectory in a rotating chair. In the cancellation condition, subjects rotated their head as in the active condition, but the chair was counter-rotated on the basis of head-tracking data such that the head effectively remained fixed in space while the body rotated beneath it. Subjects updated most accurately in the passive condition but erred in the active and cancellation conditions. Performance is interpreted as reflecting the accuracy of perceived head rotation across conditions, which is modeled as a linear combination of proprioceptive/efference copy signals and vestibular signals. Resulting weights suggest that auditory updating is dominated by vestibular signals but with significant contributions from proprioception/efference copy. Overall, results shed light on the interplay of sensory and motor signals that determine the accuracy of auditory spatial updating. PMID:27169504

  18. What you see isn't always what you get: Auditory word signals trump consciously perceived words in lexical access.

    PubMed

    Ostrand, Rachel; Blumstein, Sheila E; Ferreira, Victor S; Morgan, James L

    2016-06-01

    Human speech perception often includes both an auditory and visual component. A conflict in these signals can result in the McGurk illusion, in which the listener perceives a fusion of the two streams, implying that information from both has been integrated. We report two experiments investigating whether auditory-visual integration of speech occurs before or after lexical access, and whether the visual signal influences lexical access at all. Subjects were presented with McGurk or Congruent primes and performed a lexical decision task on related or unrelated targets. Although subjects perceived the McGurk illusion, McGurk and Congruent primes with matching real-word auditory signals equivalently primed targets that were semantically related to the auditory signal, but not targets related to the McGurk percept. We conclude that the time course of auditory-visual integration is dependent on the lexicality of the auditory and visual input signals, and that listeners can lexically access one word and yet consciously perceive another. PMID:27011021

  19. Frontal top-down signals increase coupling of auditory low-frequency oscillations to continuous speech in human listeners.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyojin; Ince, Robin A A; Schyns, Philippe G; Thut, Gregor; Gross, Joachim

    2015-06-15

    Humans show a remarkable ability to understand continuous speech even under adverse listening conditions. This ability critically relies on dynamically updated predictions of incoming sensory information, but exactly how top-down predictions improve speech processing is still unclear. Brain oscillations are a likely mechanism for these top-down predictions [1, 2]. Quasi-rhythmic components in speech are known to entrain low-frequency oscillations in auditory areas [3, 4], and this entrainment increases with intelligibility [5]. We hypothesize that top-down signals from frontal brain areas causally modulate the phase of brain oscillations in auditory cortex. We use magnetoencephalography (MEG) to monitor brain oscillations in 22 participants during continuous speech perception. We characterize prominent spectral components of speech-brain coupling in auditory cortex and use causal connectivity analysis (transfer entropy) to identify the top-down signals driving this coupling more strongly during intelligible speech than during unintelligible speech. We report three main findings. First, frontal and motor cortices significantly modulate the phase of speech-coupled low-frequency oscillations in auditory cortex, and this effect depends on intelligibility of speech. Second, top-down signals are significantly stronger for left auditory cortex than for right auditory cortex. Third, speech-auditory cortex coupling is enhanced as a function of stronger top-down signals. Together, our results suggest that low-frequency brain oscillations play a role in implementing predictive top-down control during continuous speech perception and that top-down control is largely directed at left auditory cortex. This suggests a close relationship between (left-lateralized) speech production areas and the implementation of top-down control in continuous speech perception. PMID:26028433

  20. Brain-Generated Estradiol Drives Long-Term Optimization of Auditory Coding to Enhance the Discrimination of Communication Signals

    PubMed Central

    Tremere, Liisa A.; Pinaud, Raphael

    2011-01-01

    Auditory processing and hearing-related pathologies are heavily influenced by steroid hormones in a variety of vertebrate species including humans. The hormone estradiol has been recently shown to directly modulate the gain of central auditory neurons, in real-time, by controlling the strength of inhibitory transmission via a non-genomic mechanism. The functional relevance of this modulation, however, remains unknown. Here we show that estradiol generated in the songbird homologue of the mammalian auditory association cortex, rapidly enhances the effectiveness of the neural coding of complex, learned acoustic signals in awake zebra finches. Specifically, estradiol increases mutual information rates, coding efficiency and the neural discrimination of songs. These effects are mediated by estradiol’s modulation of both rate and temporal coding of auditory signals. Interference with the local action or production of estradiol in the auditory forebrain of freely-behaving animals disrupts behavioral responses to songs, but not to other behaviorally-relevant communication signals. Our findings directly show that estradiol is a key regulator of auditory function in the adult vertebrate brain. PMID:21368039

  1. The effects of spectral and temporal parameters on perceived confirmation of an auditory non-speech signal.

    PubMed

    Bodendörfer, Xaver; Kortekaas, Reinier; Weingarten, Markus; Schlittmeier, Sabine

    2015-08-01

    In human-machine interactions, the confirmation of an action or input is a very important information for users. A paired comparison experiment explored the effects of four acoustic parameters on the perceived confirmation of auditory non-speech signals. Reducing the frequency-ratio and the pulse-to-pulse time between two successive pulses increased perceived confirmation. The effects of the parameters frequency and number of pulses were not clear-cut. The results provide information for designing auditory confirmation signals. It is shown that findings about the effects of certain parameters on the perceived urgency of warning signals cannot be easily inverted to perceived confirmation. PMID:26328737

  2. The Role of Amygdala Nuclei in the Expression of Auditory Signaled Two-Way Active Avoidance in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, June-Seek; Cain, Christopher K.; LeDoux, Joseph E.

    2010-01-01

    Using a two-way signaled active avoidance (2-AA) learning procedure, where rats were trained in a shuttle box to avoid a footshock signaled by an auditory stimulus, we tested the contributions of the lateral (LA), basal (B), and central (CE) nuclei of the amygdala to the expression of instrumental active avoidance conditioned responses (CRs).…

  3. Signal detection in amplitude-modulated maskers. II. Processing in the songbird's auditory forebrain.

    PubMed

    Nieder, A; Klump, G M

    2001-03-01

    In the natural environment, acoustic signals have to be detected in ubiquitous background noise. Temporal fluctuations of background noise can be exploited by the auditory system to enhance signal detection, especially if spectral masking components are coherently amplitude modulated across several auditory channels (a phenomenon called 'comodulation masking release'). In this study of neuronal mechanisms of masking release in the primary auditory forebrain (field L) of awake European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris), we determined and compared neural detection thresholds for 20-ms probe tones presented in a background of sinusoidally amplitude modulated (10-Hz) noise maskers. Responses of a total of 34 multiunit clusters were recorded via radiotelemetry with chronically implanted microelectrodes from unrestrained birds. For maskers consisting of a single noise band centred around the recording site's characteristic frequency, a substantial reduction in detection threshold (21 dB on average) was found when probe tones were presented during envelope dips rather than during envelope peaks. Such effects could also explain results obtained for masking protocols where the on-frequency noise band was presented together with excitatory or inhibitory flanking bands that were either coherently modulated (in-phase) or incoherently modulated (phase-shifted). Generally, masking release for probe tones in maskers with flanking bands extending beyond the frequency range of a cell cluster's excitatory tuning curve was not substantially improved. Only some of the neurophysiological results are in agreement with behavioural data from the same species if only the average population response is considered. A subsample of individual neurons, however, could account for behavioural thresholds. PMID:11264677

  4. Decision-related cortical potentials during an auditory signal detection task with cued observation intervals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squires, K. C.; Squires, N. K.; Hillyard, S. A.

    1975-01-01

    Cortical-evoked potentials were recorded from human subjects performing an auditory detection task with confidence rating responses. Unlike earlier studies that used similar procedures, the observation interval during which the auditory signal could occur was clearly marked by a visual cue light. By precisely defining the observation interval and, hence, synchronizing all perceptual decisions to the evoked potential averaging epoch, it was possible to demonstrate that high-confidence false alarms are accompanied by late-positive P3 components equivalent to those for equally confident hits. Moreover the hit and false alarm evoked potentials were found to covary similarly with variations in confidence rating and to have similar amplitude distributions over the scalp. In a second experiment, it was demonstrated that correct rejections can be associated with a P3 component larger than that for hits. Thus it was possible to show, within the signal detection paradigm, how the two major factors of decision confidence and expectancy are reflected in the P3 component of the cortical-evoked potential.

  5. Synchrony capture filterbank: auditory-inspired signal processing for tracking individual frequency components in speech.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, Ramdas; Peddinti, Vijay Kumar; Cariani, Peter

    2013-06-01

    A processing scheme for speech signals is proposed that emulates synchrony capture in the auditory nerve. The role of stimulus-locked spike timing is important for representation of stimulus periodicity, low frequency spectrum, and spatial location. In synchrony capture, dominant single frequency components in each frequency region impress their time structures on temporal firing patterns of auditory nerve fibers with nearby characteristic frequencies (CFs). At low frequencies, for voiced sounds, synchrony capture divides the nerve into discrete CF territories associated with individual harmonics. An adaptive, synchrony capture filterbank (SCFB) consisting of a fixed array of traditional, passive linear (gammatone) filters cascaded with a bank of adaptively tunable, bandpass filter triplets is proposed. Differences in triplet output envelopes steer triplet center frequencies via voltage controlled oscillators (VCOs). The SCFB exhibits some cochlea-like responses, such as two-tone suppression and distortion products, and possesses many desirable properties for processing speech, music, and natural sounds. Strong signal components dominate relatively greater numbers of filter channels, thereby yielding robust encodings of relative component intensities. The VCOs precisely lock onto harmonics most important for formant tracking, pitch perception, and sound separation. PMID:23742379

  6. Vertex potentials evoked during auditory signal detection - Relation to decision criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squires, K. C.; Hillyard, S. A.; Lindsay, P. H.

    1973-01-01

    Vertex potentials were recorded from eight subjects performing in an auditory threshold detection task with rating scale responses. The amplitudes and latencies of both the N1 and the late positive (P3) components were found to vary systematically with the criterion level of the decision. These changes in the waveshape of the N1 component were comparable to those produced by varying the signal intensity in a passive condition, but the late positive component in the active task was not similarly related to the passively evoked P2 component. It was suggested that the N1 and P3 components represent distinctive aspects of the decision process, with N1 signifying the quantity of signal information received and P3 reflecting the certainty of the decision based upon that information.

  7. The afferent signaling complex: Regulation of type I spiral ganglion neuron responses in the auditory periphery.

    PubMed

    Reijntjes, Daniël O J; Pyott, Sonja J

    2016-06-01

    The spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) are the first action potential generating neurons in the auditory pathway. The type I SGNs contact the sensory inner hair cells via their peripheral dendrites and relay auditory information to the brainstem via their central axon fibers. Individual afferent fibers show differences in response properties that are essential for normal hearing. The mechanisms that give rise to the heterogeneity of afferent responses are very poorly understood but are likely already in place at the peripheral dendrites where synapses are formed and action potentials are generated. To identify these molecular mechanisms, this review synthesizes a variety of literature and comprehensively outlines the cellular and molecular components positioned to regulate SGN afferent dendrite excitability, especially following glutamate release. These components include 1) proteins of the SGN postsynapses and neighboring supporting cells that together shape glutamatergic signaling, 2) the ion channels and transporters that determine the intrinsic excitability of the SGN afferent dendrites, and 3) the neurotransmitter receptors that extrinsically modify this excitability via synaptic input from the lateral olivocochlear efferents. This cellular and molecular machinery, together with presynaptic specializations of the inner hair cells, can be collectively referred to as the type I afferent signaling complex. As this review underscores, interactions of this signaling complex determine excitability of the SGN afferent dendrites and the afferent fiber responses. Moreover, this complex establishes the environmental milieu critical for the development and maintenance of the SGN afferent dendrites and synapses. Motivated by these important functions, this review also indicates areas of future research to elucidate the contributions of the afferent signaling complex to both normal hearing and also hearing loss. PMID:27018296

  8. Recurrence of task set-related MEG signal patterns during auditory working memory.

    PubMed

    Peters, Benjamin; Bledowski, Christoph; Rieder, Maria; Kaiser, Jochen

    2016-06-01

    Processing of auditory spatial and non-spatial information in working memory has been shown to rely on separate cortical systems. While previous studies have demonstrated differences in spatial versus non-spatial processing from the encoding of to-be-remembered stimuli onwards, here we investigated whether such differences would be detectable already prior to presentation of the sample stimulus. We analyzed broad-band magnetoencephalography data from 15 healthy adults during an auditory working memory paradigm starting with a visual cue indicating the task-relevant stimulus feature for a given trial (lateralization or pitch) and a subsequent 1.5-s pre-encoding phase. This was followed by a sample sound (0.2s), the delay phase (0.8s) and a test stimulus (0.2s) after which participants made a match/non-match decision. Linear discriminant functions were trained to decode task-specific signal patterns throughout the task, and temporal generalization was used to assess whether the neural codes discriminating between the tasks during the pre-encoding phase would recur during later task periods. The spatial versus non-spatial tasks could indeed be discriminated after the onset of the cue onwards, and decoders trained during the pre-encoding phase successfully discriminated the tasks during both sample stimulus encoding and during the delay phase. This demonstrates that task-specific neural codes are established already before the memorandum is presented and that the same patterns are reestablished during stimulus encoding and maintenance. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Auditory working memory. PMID:26683086

  9. Canonical Notch signaling plays an instructive role in auditory supporting cell development

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Dean P.; Chrysostomou, Elena; Doetzlhofer, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    The auditory sensory epithelium, composed of mechano-sensory hair cells (HCs) and highly specialized glial-like supporting cells (SCs), is critical for our ability to detect sound. SCs provide structural and functional support to HCs and play an essential role in cochlear development, homeostasis and repair. Despite their importance, however, surprisingly little is known about the molecular mechanisms guiding SC differentiation. Here, we provide evidence that in addition to its well-characterized inhibitory function, canonical Notch signaling plays a positive, instructive role in the differentiation of SCs. Using γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT to acutely block canonical Notch signaling, we identified a cohort of Notch-regulated SC-specific genes, with diverse functions in cell signaling, cell differentiation, neuronal innervation and synaptogenesis. We validated the newly identified Notch-regulated genes in vivo using genetic gain (Emx2Cre/+; Rosa26N1ICD/+) and loss-of-function approaches (Emx2Cre/+; Rosa26DnMAML1/+). Furthermore, we demonstrate that Notch over-activation in the differentiating murine cochlea (Emx2Cre/+; Rosa26N1ICD/+) actively promotes a SC-specific gene expression program. Finally, we show that outer SCs –so called Deiters’ cells are selectively lost by prolonged reduction (Emx2Cre/+; Rosa26DnMAML1/+/+) or abolishment of canonical Notch signaling (Fgfr3-iCreER; Rbpj−/Δ), indicating a critical role for Notch signaling in Deiters’ cell development. PMID:26786414

  10. Canonical Notch signaling plays an instructive role in auditory supporting cell development.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Dean P; Chrysostomou, Elena; Doetzlhofer, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    The auditory sensory epithelium, composed of mechano-sensory hair cells (HCs) and highly specialized glial-like supporting cells (SCs), is critical for our ability to detect sound. SCs provide structural and functional support to HCs and play an essential role in cochlear development, homeostasis and repair. Despite their importance, however, surprisingly little is known about the molecular mechanisms guiding SC differentiation. Here, we provide evidence that in addition to its well-characterized inhibitory function, canonical Notch signaling plays a positive, instructive role in the differentiation of SCs. Using γ-secretase inhibitor DAPT to acutely block canonical Notch signaling, we identified a cohort of Notch-regulated SC-specific genes, with diverse functions in cell signaling, cell differentiation, neuronal innervation and synaptogenesis. We validated the newly identified Notch-regulated genes in vivo using genetic gain (Emx2(Cre/+); Rosa26(N1ICD/+)) and loss-of-function approaches (Emx2(Cre/+); Rosa26(DnMAML1/+)). Furthermore, we demonstrate that Notch over-activation in the differentiating murine cochlea (Emx2(Cre/+); Rosa26(N1ICD/+)) actively promotes a SC-specific gene expression program. Finally, we show that outer SCs -so called Deiters' cells are selectively lost by prolonged reduction (Emx2(Cre/+); Rosa26(DnMAML1/+/+)) or abolishment of canonical Notch signaling (Fgfr3-iCreER; Rbpj(-/Δ)), indicating a critical role for Notch signaling in Deiters' cell development. PMID:26786414

  11. Increased Signal Complexity Improves the Breadth of Generalization in Auditory Perceptual Learning

    PubMed Central

    Brown, David J.; Proulx, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Perceptual learning can be specific to a trained stimulus or optimally generalized to novel stimuli with the breadth of generalization being imperative for how we structure perceptual training programs. Adapting an established auditory interval discrimination paradigm to utilise complex signals, we trained human adults on a standard interval for either 2, 4, or 10 days. We then tested the standard, alternate frequency, interval, and stereo input conditions to evaluate the rapidity of specific learning and breadth of generalization over the time course. In comparison with previous research using simple stimuli, the speed of perceptual learning and breadth of generalization were more rapid and greater in magnitude, including novel generalization to an alternate temporal interval within stimulus type. We also investigated the long term maintenance of learning and found that specific and generalized learning was maintained over 3 and 6 months. We discuss these findings regarding stimulus complexity in perceptual learning and how they can inform the development of effective training protocols. PMID:24349800

  12. Subthreshold membrane responses underlying sparse spiking to natural vocal signals in auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Perks, Krista Eva; Gentner, Timothy Q.

    2015-01-01

    Natural acoustic communication signals, such as speech, are typically high-dimensional with a wide range of co-varying spectro-temporal features at multiple timescales. The synaptic and network mechanisms for encoding these complex signals are largely unknown. We are investigating these mechanisms in high-level sensory regions of the songbird auditory forebrain, where single neurons show sparse, object-selective spiking responses to conspecific songs. Using whole-cell in-vivo patch clamp techniques in the caudal mesopallium and the caudal nidopallium of starlings, we examine song-driven subthreshold and spiking activity. We find that both the subthreshold and the spiking activity are reliable (i.e., the same song drives a similar response each time it is presented) and specific (i.e. responses to different songs are distinct). Surprisingly, however, the reliability and specificity of the sub-threshold response was uniformly high regardless of when the cell spiked, even for song stimuli that drove no spikes. We conclude that despite a selective and sparse spiking response, high-level auditory cortical neurons are under continuous, non-selective, stimulus-specific synaptic control. To investigate the role of local network inhibition in this synaptic control, we then recorded extracellularly while pharmacologically blocking local GABA-ergic transmission. This manipulation modulated the strength and the reliability of stimulus-driven spiking, consistent with a role for local inhibition in regulating the reliability of network activity and the stimulus specificity of the subthreshold response in single cells. We discuss these results in the context of underlying computations that could generate sparse, stimulus-selective spiking responses, and models for hierarchical pooling. PMID:25728189

  13. Subthreshold membrane responses underlying sparse spiking to natural vocal signals in auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Perks, Krista E; Gentner, Timothy Q

    2015-03-01

    Natural acoustic communication signals, such as speech, are typically high-dimensional with a wide range of co-varying spectro-temporal features at multiple timescales. The synaptic and network mechanisms for encoding these complex signals are largely unknown. We are investigating these mechanisms in high-level sensory regions of the songbird auditory forebrain, where single neurons show sparse, object-selective spiking responses to conspecific songs. Using whole-cell in vivo patch clamp techniques in the caudal mesopallium and the caudal nidopallium of starlings, we examine song-driven subthreshold and spiking activity. We find that both the subthreshold and the spiking activity are reliable (i.e. the same song drives a similar response each time it is presented) and specific (i.e. responses to different songs are distinct). Surprisingly, however, the reliability and specificity of the subthreshold response was uniformly high regardless of when the cell spiked, even for song stimuli that drove no spikes. We conclude that despite a selective and sparse spiking response, high-level auditory cortical neurons are under continuous, non-selective, stimulus-specific synaptic control. To investigate the role of local network inhibition in this synaptic control, we then recorded extracellularly while pharmacologically blocking local GABAergic transmission. This manipulation modulated the strength and the reliability of stimulus-driven spiking, consistent with a role for local inhibition in regulating the reliability of network activity and the stimulus specificity of the subthreshold response in single cells. We discuss these results in the context of underlying computations that could generate sparse, stimulus-selective spiking responses, and models for hierarchical pooling. PMID:25728189

  14. Calcium Signaling Is Required for Erythroid Enucleation

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Sarah M.; Humbert, Patrick O.

    2016-01-01

    Although erythroid enucleation, the property of erythroblasts to expel their nucleus, has been known for 7ore than a century, surprisingly little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms governing this unique developmental process. Here we show that similar to cytokinesis, nuclear extrusion requires intracellular calcium signaling and signal transduction through the calmodulin (CaM) pathway. However, in contrast to cytokinesis we found that orthochromatic erythroblasts require uptake of extracellular calcium to enucleate. Together these functional studies highlight a critical role for calcium signaling in the regulation of erythroid enucleation. PMID:26731108

  15. Calcium Signaling Is Required for Erythroid Enucleation.

    PubMed

    Wölwer, Christina B; Pase, Luke B; Russell, Sarah M; Humbert, Patrick O

    2016-01-01

    Although erythroid enucleation, the property of erythroblasts to expel their nucleus, has been known for 7ore than a century, surprisingly little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms governing this unique developmental process. Here we show that similar to cytokinesis, nuclear extrusion requires intracellular calcium signaling and signal transduction through the calmodulin (CaM) pathway. However, in contrast to cytokinesis we found that orthochromatic erythroblasts require uptake of extracellular calcium to enucleate. Together these functional studies highlight a critical role for calcium signaling in the regulation of erythroid enucleation. PMID:26731108

  16. The role of amygdala nuclei in the expression of auditory signaled two-way active avoidance in rats

    PubMed Central

    Choi, June-Seek; Cain, Christopher K.; LeDoux, Joseph E.

    2010-01-01

    Using a two-way signaled active avoidance (2-AA) learning procedure, where rats were trained in a shuttle box to avoid a footshock signaled by an auditory stimulus, we tested the contributions of the lateral (LA), basal (B), and central (CE) nuclei of the amygdala to the expression of instrumental active avoidance conditioned responses (CRs). Discrete or combined lesions of the LA and B, performed after the rats had reached an asymptotic level of avoidance performance, produced deficits in the CR, whereas CE lesions had minimal effect. Fiber-sparing excitotoxic lesions of the LA/B produced by infusions of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) also impaired avoidance performance, confirming that neurons in the LA/B are involved in mediating avoidance CRs. In a final series of experiments, bilateral electrolytic lesions of the CE were performed on a subgroup of animals that failed to acquire the avoidance CR after 3 d of training. CE lesions led to an immediate rescue of avoidance learning, suggesting that activity in CE was inhibiting the instrumental CR. Taken together, these results indicate that the LA and B are essential for the performance of a 2-AA response. The CE is not required, and may in fact constrain the instrumental avoidance response by mediating the generation of competing Pavlovian responses, such as freezing. PMID:20189958

  17. The development of stimulus-specific auditory responses requires song exposure in male but not female zebra finches

    PubMed Central

    Maul, Kristen K.; Voss, Henning U.; Parra, Lucas C.; Salgado-Commissariat, Delanthi; Ballon, Douglas; Tchernichovski, Ofer; Helekar, Santosh A.

    2013-01-01

    Juvenile male zebra finches develop their song by imitation. Females do not sing but are attracted to males' songs. With functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) and Event Related Potentials (ERPs) we tested how early auditory experience shapes responses in the auditory forebrain of the adult bird. Adult male birds kept in isolation over the sensitive period for song learning showed no consistency in auditory responses to conspecific songs, calls, and syllables. Thirty seconds of song playback each day over development, which is sufficient to induce song imitation, was also sufficient to shape stimulus-specific responses. Strikingly, adult females kept in isolation over development showed responses similar to those of males that were exposed to songs. We suggest that early auditory experience with songs may be required to tune perception towards conspecific songs in males, whereas in females song selectivity develops even without prior exposure to song. PMID:19937773

  18. Transmembrane channel-like (TMC) genes are required for auditory and vestibular mechanosensation

    PubMed Central

    Kawashima, Yoshiyuki; Kurima, Kiyoto; Pan, Bifeng; Griffith, Andrew J.; Holt, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations of the transmembrane channel-like 1 (TMC1) gene can cause dominant and recessive forms of deafness in humans and mice. TMC1 is one of eight mammalian TMC genes of unknown function. The multi-pass transmembrane topologic structure of the proteins they encode suggests roles as a receptor, transporter, channel or pump. Tmc1 and the closely related Tmc2 gene are expressed in neurosensory hair cells of the auditory and vestibular end organs of the mouse inner ear. Recent studies have demonstrated that Tmc1 and Tmc2 are specifically required for mechanoelectrical transduction in hair cells. The exact role of these proteins in mechanoelectrical transduction is unknown. TMC1 and TMC2 are viable candidates for the mechanoelectrical transduction channel of hair cells, whose component molecules have eluded identification for over 30 years. We expect that studies of TMC proteins will yield insights into molecular components and mechanisms of mechanosensation in auditory and vestibular hair cells, as well as in other tissues and organs. PMID:25074487

  19. Habitat-related differences in auditory processing of complex tones and vocal signal properties in four songbirds.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Jeffrey R; Vélez, Alejandro; Henry, Kenneth S

    2015-04-01

    We examined temporal processing of harmonic tone complexes in two woodland species (tufted titmice and white-breasted nuthatches) and two open-habitat species (house sparrows and white-crowned sparrows). Envelope and fine-structure processing were quantified using the envelope following response (EFR) and frequency following response (FFR). We predicted stronger EFRs in the open-habitat species based on broader auditory filters and greater amplitude modulation of vocal signals in this group. We predicted stronger FFRs in woodland species based on narrower auditory filters. As predicted, EFR amplitude was generally greatest in the open habitat species. FFR amplitude, in contrast, was greatest in white-crowned sparrows with no clear difference between habitats. This result cannot be fully explained by species differences in audiogram shape and might instead reflect greater acoustic complexity of songs in the white-crowned sparrow. Finally, we observed stronger FFRs in woodland species when tones were broadcast with the next higher harmonic in the complex. Thus, species such as nuthatches that have songs with strong harmonics may process these sounds using enhanced spectral processing instead of enhanced amplitude-envelope processing. The results suggest coevolution between signal design and temporal processing of complex signals and underscore the need to study auditory processing with a diversity of signals. PMID:25682175

  20. To modulate and be modulated: estrogenic influences on auditory processing of communication signals within a socio-neuro-endocrine framework.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Kathleen M; Vicario, David S

    2012-02-01

    Gonadal hormones modulate behavioral responses to sexual stimuli, and communication signals can also modulate circulating hormone levels. In several species, these combined effects appear to underlie a two-way interaction between circulating gonadal hormones and behavioral responses to socially salient stimuli. Recent work in songbirds has shown that manipulating local estradiol levels in the auditory forebrain produces physiological changes that affect discrimination of conspecific vocalizations and can affect behavior. These studies provide new evidence that estrogens can directly alter auditory processing and indirectly alter the behavioral response to a stimulus. These studies show that: 1) Local estradiol action within an auditory area is necessary for socially relevant sounds to induce normal physiological responses in the brains of both sexes; 2) These physiological effects occur much more quickly than predicted by the classical time-frame for genomic effects; 3) Estradiol action within the auditory forebrain enables behavioral discrimination among socially relevant sounds in males; and 4) Estradiol is produced locally in the male brain during exposure to particular social interactions. The accumulating evidence suggests a socio-neuro-endocrinology framework in which estradiol is essential to auditory processing, is increased by a socially relevant stimulus, acts rapidly to shape perception of subsequent stimuli experienced during social interactions, and modulates behavioral responses to these stimuli. Brain estrogens are likely to function similarly in both songbird sexes because aromatase and estrogen receptors are present in both male and female forebrain. Estrogenic modulation of perception in songbirds and perhaps other animals could fine-tune male advertising signals and female ability to discriminate them, facilitating mate selection by modulating behaviors. PMID:22201281

  1. Development of a Method to Compensate for Signal Quality Variations in Repeated Auditory Event-Related Potential Recordings

    PubMed Central

    Paukkunen, Antti K. O.; Leminen, Miika M.; Sepponen, Raimo

    2010-01-01

    Reliable measurements are mandatory in clinically relevant auditory event-related potential (AERP)-based tools and applications. The comparability of the results gets worse as a result of variations in the remaining measurement error. A potential method is studied that allows optimization of the length of the recording session according to the concurrent quality of the recorded data. In this way, the sufficiency of the trials can be better guaranteed, which enables control of the remaining measurement error. The suggested method is based on monitoring the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and remaining measurement error which are compared to predefined threshold values. The SNR test is well defined, but the criterion for the measurement error test still requires further empirical testing in practice. According to the results, the reproducibility of average AERPs in repeated experiments is improved in comparison to a case where the number of recorded trials is constant. The test-retest reliability is not significantly changed on average but the between-subject variation in the value is reduced by 33–35%. The optimization of the number of trials also prevents excessive recordings which might be of practical interest especially in the clinical context. The efficiency of the method may be further increased by implementing online tools that improve data consistency. PMID:20407635

  2. The contribution of auditory temporal processing to the separation of competing speech signals in listeners with normal hearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, Trudy J.; Pichora-Fuller, Kathy

    2002-05-01

    The hallmark of auditory function in aging adults is difficulty listening in a background of competing talkers, even when hearing sensitivity in quiet is good. Age-related physiological changes may contribute by introducing small timing errors (jitter) to the neural representation of sound, compromising the fidelity of the signal's fine temporal structure. This may preclude the association of spectral features to form an accurate percept of one complex stimulus, distinct from competing sounds. For simple voiced speech (vowels), the separation of two competing stimuli can be achieved on the basis of their respective harmonic (temporal) structures. Fundamental frequency (F0) differences in competing stimuli facilitate their segregation. This benefit was hypothesized to rely on the adequate temporal representation of the speech signal(s). Auditory aging was simulated via the desynchronization (~0.25-ms jitter) of the spectral bands of synthesized vowels. The perceptual benefit of F0 difference for the identification of concurrent vowel pairs was examined for intact and jittered vowels in young adults with normal hearing thresholds. Results suggest a role for reduced signal fidelity in the perceptual difficulties encountered in noisy everyday environments by aging listeners. [Work generously supported by the Michael Smith Foundation for Health Research.

  3. Verbal Recall of Auditory and Visual Signals by Normal and Deficient Reading Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Maureen Julianne

    Verbal recall of bisensory memory tasks was compared among 48 9- to 12-year old boys in three groups: normal readers, primary deficit readers, and secondary deficit readers. Auditory and visual stimulus pairs composed of digits, which incorporated variations of intersensory and intrasensory conditions were administered to Ss through a Bell and…

  4. Representation of Reward Feedback in Primate Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Brosch, Michael; Selezneva, Elena; Scheich, Henning

    2011-01-01

    It is well established that auditory cortex is plastic on different time scales and that this plasticity is driven by the reinforcement that is used to motivate subjects to learn or to perform an auditory task. Motivated by these findings, we study in detail properties of neuronal firing in auditory cortex that is related to reward feedback. We recorded from the auditory cortex of two monkeys while they were performing an auditory categorization task. Monkeys listened to a sequence of tones and had to signal when the frequency of adjacent tones stepped in downward direction, irrespective of the tone frequency and step size. Correct identifications were rewarded with either a large or a small amount of water. The size of reward depended on the monkeys’ performance in the previous trial: it was large after a correct trial and small after an incorrect trial. The rewards served to maintain task performance. During task performance we found three successive periods of neuronal firing in auditory cortex that reflected (1) the reward expectancy for each trial, (2) the reward-size received, and (3) the mismatch between the expected and delivered reward. These results, together with control experiments suggest that auditory cortex receives reward feedback that could be used to adapt auditory cortex to task requirements. Additionally, the results presented here extend previous observations of non-auditory roles of auditory cortex and shows that auditory cortex is even more cognitively influenced than lately recognized. PMID:21369350

  5. Adaptive categorization of sound frequency does not require the auditory cortex in rats.

    PubMed

    Gimenez, Tyler L; Lorenc, Maja; Jaramillo, Santiago

    2015-08-01

    A defining feature of adaptive behavior is our ability to change the way we interpret sensory stimuli depending on context. Rapid adaptation in behavior has been attributed to frontal cortical circuits, but it is not clear if sensory cortexes also play an essential role in such tasks. In this study we tested whether the auditory cortex was necessary for rapid adaptation in the interpretation of sounds. We used a two-alternative choice sound-categorization task for rats in which the boundary that separated two acoustic categories changed several times within a behavioral session. These shifts in the boundary resulted in changes in the rewarded action for a subset of stimuli. We found that extensive lesions of the auditory cortex did not impair the ability of rats to switch between categorization contingencies and sound discrimination performance was minimally impaired. Similar results were obtained after reversible inactivation of the auditory cortex with muscimol. In contrast, lesions of the auditory thalamus largely impaired discrimination performance and, as a result, the ability to modify behavior across contingencies. Thalamic lesions did not impair performance of a visual discrimination task, indicating that the effects were specific to audition and not to motor preparation or execution. These results suggest that subcortical outputs of the auditory thalamus can mediate rapid adaptation in the interpretation of sounds. PMID:26156379

  6. Enhancement of signal-to-noise ratio and phase locking for small inputs by a low-threshold outward current in auditory neurons.

    PubMed

    Svirskis, Gytis; Kotak, Vibhakar; Sanes, Dan H; Rinzel, John

    2002-12-15

    Neurons possess multiple voltage-dependent conductances specific for their function. To investigate how low-threshold outward currents improve the detection of small signals in a noisy background, we recorded from gerbil medial superior olivary (MSO) neurons in vitro. MSO neurons responded phasically, with a single spike to a step current injection. When bathed in dendrotoxin (DTX), most cells switched to tonic firing, suggesting that low-threshold potassium currents (I(KLT)) participated in shaping these phasic responses. Neurons were stimulated with a computer-generated steady barrage of random inputs, mimicking weak synaptic conductance transients (the "noise"), together with a larger but still subthreshold postsynaptic conductance, EPSG (the "signal"). DTX reduced the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), defined as the ratio of probability to fire in response to the EPSG and the probability to fire spontaneously in response to noise. The reduction was mainly attributable to the increase of spontaneous firing in DTX. The spike-triggered reverse correlation indicated that, for spike generation, the neuron with I(KLT) required faster inward current transients. This narrow temporal integration window contributed to superior phase locking of firing to periodic stimuli before application of DTX. A computer model including Hodgkin-Huxley type conductances for spike generation and for I(KLT) (Rathouz and Trussell, 1998) showed similar response statistics. The dynamic low-threshold outward current increased SNR and the temporal precision of integration of weak subthreshold signals in auditory neurons by suppressing false positives. PMID:12486197

  7. Auditory object salience: human cortical processing of non-biological action sounds and their acoustic signal attributes

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, James W.; Talkington, William J.; Tallaksen, Katherine C.; Frum, Chris A.

    2012-01-01

    Whether viewed or heard, an object in action can be segmented as a distinct salient event based on a number of different sensory cues. In the visual system, several low-level attributes of an image are processed along parallel hierarchies, involving intermediate stages wherein gross-level object form and/or motion features are extracted prior to stages that show greater specificity for different object categories (e.g., people, buildings, or tools). In the auditory system, though relying on a rather different set of low-level signal attributes, meaningful real-world acoustic events and “auditory objects” can also be readily distinguished from background scenes. However, the nature of the acoustic signal attributes or gross-level perceptual features that may be explicitly processed along intermediate cortical processing stages remain poorly understood. Examining mechanical and environmental action sounds, representing two distinct non-biological categories of action sources, we had participants assess the degree to which each sound was perceived as object-like versus scene-like. We re-analyzed data from two of our earlier functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) task paradigms (Engel et al., 2009) and found that scene-like action sounds preferentially led to activation along several midline cortical structures, but with strong dependence on listening task demands. In contrast, bilateral foci along the superior temporal gyri (STG) showed parametrically increasing activation to action sounds rated as more “object-like,” independent of sound category or task demands. Moreover, these STG regions also showed parametric sensitivity to spectral structure variations (SSVs) of the action sounds—a quantitative measure of change in entropy of the acoustic signals over time—and the right STG additionally showed parametric sensitivity to measures of mean entropy and harmonic content of the environmental sounds. Analogous to the visual system, intermediate stages

  8. Retrosplenial Cortex Is Required for the Retrieval of Remote Memory for Auditory Cues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todd, Travis P.; Mehlman, Max L.; Keene, Christopher S.; DeAngeli, Nicole E.; Bucci, David J.

    2016-01-01

    The retrosplenial cortex (RSC) has a well-established role in contextual and spatial learning and memory, consistent with its known connectivity with visuo-spatial association areas. In contrast, RSC appears to have little involvement with delay fear conditioning to an auditory cue. However, all previous studies have examined the contribution of…

  9. Engineered Deafness Reveals That Mouse Courtship Vocalizations Do Not Require Auditory Experience

    PubMed Central

    Mahrt, Elena J.; Perkel, David J.; Tong, Ling; Rubel, Edwin W; Portfors, Christine V.

    2013-01-01

    Auditory experience during development is necessary for normal language acquisition in humans. Although songbirds, some cetaceans, and maybe bats may also be vocal learners, vocal learning has yet to be well established for a laboratory mammal. Mice are potentially an excellent model organism for studying mechanisms underlying vocal communication. Mice vocalize in different social contexts, yet whether they learn their vocalizations remains unresolved. To address this question, we compared ultrasonic courtship vocalizations emitted by chronically deaf and normal hearing adult male mice. We deafened CBA/CaJ male mice, engineered to express diphtheria toxin (DT) receptors in hair cells, by systemic injection of DT at postnatal day 2 (P2). By P9, almost all inner hair cells were absent and by P16 all inner and outer hair cells were absent in DTR mice. These mice did not show any auditory brainstem responses as adults. Wild-type littermates, also treated with DT at P2, had normal hair cells and normal auditory brainstem responses. We compared the temporal structure of vocalization bouts, the types of vocalizations, the patterns of syllables, and the acoustic features of each syllable type emitted by hearing and deaf males in the presence of a female. We found that almost all of the vocalization features we examined were similar in hearing and deaf animals. These findings indicate that mice do not need auditory experience during development to produce normal ultrasonic vocalizations in adulthood. We conclude that mouse courtship vocalizations are not acquired through auditory feedback-dependent learning. PMID:23536072

  10. Engineered deafness reveals that mouse courtship vocalizations do not require auditory experience.

    PubMed

    Mahrt, Elena J; Perkel, David J; Tong, Ling; Rubel, Edwin W; Portfors, Christine V

    2013-03-27

    Auditory experience during development is necessary for normal language acquisition in humans. Although songbirds, some cetaceans, and maybe bats may also be vocal learners, vocal learning has yet to be well established for a laboratory mammal. Mice are potentially an excellent model organism for studying mechanisms underlying vocal communication. Mice vocalize in different social contexts, yet whether they learn their vocalizations remains unresolved. To address this question, we compared ultrasonic courtship vocalizations emitted by chronically deaf and normal hearing adult male mice. We deafened CBA/CaJ male mice, engineered to express diphtheria toxin (DT) receptors in hair cells, by systemic injection of DT at postnatal day 2 (P2). By P9, almost all inner hair cells were absent and by P16 all inner and outer hair cells were absent in DTR mice. These mice did not show any auditory brainstem responses as adults. Wild-type littermates, also treated with DT at P2, had normal hair cells and normal auditory brainstem responses. We compared the temporal structure of vocalization bouts, the types of vocalizations, the patterns of syllables, and the acoustic features of each syllable type emitted by hearing and deaf males in the presence of a female. We found that almost all of the vocalization features we examined were similar in hearing and deaf animals. These findings indicate that mice do not need auditory experience during development to produce normal ultrasonic vocalizations in adulthood. We conclude that mouse courtship vocalizations are not acquired through auditory feedback-dependent learning. PMID:23536072

  11. The autophagy pathway maintained signaling crosstalk with the Keap1-Nrf2 system through p62 in auditory cells under oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Ken; Dan, Katsuaki; Goto, Fumiyuki; Tshuchihashi, Nana; Nomura, Yasuyuki; Fujioka, Masato; Kanzaki, Sho; Ogawa, Kaoru

    2015-02-01

    The main purposes of our study were to consider the effect of autophagy on auditory cells under oxidative stress, and the function of possible crosstalk among p62, Keap1 and Nrf2 in autophagy-deficient auditory cells. First, we described how cell death was induced in auditory cell line (HEI-OC1) exposed to H2O2. We found that the decision for the cell death of auditory cells under oxidative stress depends on the balance between autophagy and necrosis due to ATP depletion, and autophagy plays a cytoprotective function in oxidative stress-induced necrosis. Our data clearly suggested that autophagy was a cell survival mechanism in H2O2-induced cell death, based on the observation that suppression of autophagy by knockdown of Atg7 sensitized, whereas activation of autophagy by rapamycin protected against H2O2-induced cell death. Next, our results regarding the relationship among p62, Nrf2 and Keap1 by siRNA paradoxically showed that p62 creates a positive feedback loop in the Keap1/Nrf2 pathway. Autophagy impaired by Atg7 knockdown degrades Keap1 in a p62-dependent manner, whereas Nrf2 is activated. As a result, the cell death induced by H2O2 was promoted in auditory cells. Taken together, these results suggested that the autophagy pathway maintained signaling crosstalk with the Keap1-Nrf2 system through p62 in auditory cells under oxidative stress. PMID:25435427

  12. Habituation of Auditory Steady State Responses Evoked by Amplitude-Modulated Acoustic Signals in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Prado-Gutierrez, Pavel; Castro-Fariñas, Anisleidy; Morgado-Rodriguez, Lisbet; Velarde-Reyes, Ernesto; Martínez, Agustín D.; Martínez-Montes, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Generation of the auditory steady state responses (ASSR) is commonly explained by the linear combination of random background noise activity and the stationary response. Based on this model, the decrease of amplitude that occurs over the sequential averaging of epochs of the raw data has been exclusively linked to the cancelation of noise. Nevertheless, this behavior might also reflect the non-stationary response of the ASSR generators. We tested this hypothesis by characterizing the ASSR time course in rats with different auditory maturational stages. ASSR were evoked by 8-kHz tones of different supra-threshold intensities, modulated in amplitude at 115 Hz. Results show that the ASSR amplitude habituated to the sustained stimulation and that dishabituation occurred when deviant stimuli were presented. ASSR habituation increased as animals became adults, suggesting that the ability to filter acoustic stimuli with no-relevant temporal information increased with age. Results are discussed in terms of the current model of the ASSR generation and analysis procedures. They might have implications for audiometric tests designed to assess hearing in subjects who cannot provide reliable results in the psychophysical trials. PMID:26557360

  13. 49 CFR 236.205 - Signal control circuits; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Signal control circuits; requirements. 236.205... Block Signal Systems Standards § 236.205 Signal control circuits; requirements. The circuits shall be so... fouling point derail equipped with switch circuit controller is not in derailing position, (d) When...

  14. 49 CFR 236.14 - Spring switch signal protection; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Spring switch signal protection; requirements. 236... Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.14 Spring switch signal protection; requirements. (a... track signaled for movements in only one direction through a spring switch in automatic block...

  15. 49 CFR 236.14 - Spring switch signal protection; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Spring switch signal protection; requirements. 236... Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.14 Spring switch signal protection; requirements. (a... track signaled for movements in only one direction through a spring switch in automatic block...

  16. 49 CFR 236.14 - Spring switch signal protection; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Spring switch signal protection; requirements. 236... Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.14 Spring switch signal protection; requirements. (a... track signaled for movements in only one direction through a spring switch in automatic block...

  17. 49 CFR 236.14 - Spring switch signal protection; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Spring switch signal protection; requirements. 236... Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.14 Spring switch signal protection; requirements. (a... track signaled for movements in only one direction through a spring switch in automatic block...

  18. 49 CFR 236.14 - Spring switch signal protection; requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Spring switch signal protection; requirements. 236... Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.14 Spring switch signal protection; requirements. (a... track signaled for movements in only one direction through a spring switch in automatic block...

  19. Selective attention and the auditory vertex potential. 2: Effects of signal intensity and masking noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwent, V. L.; Hillyard, S. A.; Galambos, R.

    1975-01-01

    A randomized sequence of tone bursts was delivered to subjects at short inter-stimulus intervals with the tones originating from one of three spatially and frequency specific channels. The subject's task was to count the tones in one of the three channels at a time, ignoring the other two, and press a button after each tenth tone. In different conditions, tones were given at high and low intensities and with or without a background white noise to mask the tones. The N sub 1 component of the auditory vertex potential was found to be larger in response to attended channel tones in relation to unattended tones. This selective enhancement of N sub 1 was minimal for loud tones presented without noise and increased markedly for the lower tone intensity and in noise added conditions.

  20. Neural processing of auditory signals in the time domain: delay-tuned coincidence detectors in the mustached bat.

    PubMed

    Suga, Nobuo

    2015-06-01

    The central auditory system produces combination-sensitive neurons tuned to a specific combination of multiple signal elements. Some of these neurons act as coincidence detectors with delay lines for the extraction of spectro-temporal information from sounds. "Delay-tuned" neurons of mustached bats are tuned to a combination of up to four signal elements with a specific delay between them and form a delay map. They are produced in the inferior colliculus by the coincidence of the rebound response following glycinergic inhibition to the first harmonic of a biosonar pulse with the short-latency response to the 2nd-4th harmonics of its echo. Compared with collicular delay-tuned neurons, thalamic and cortical ones respond more to pulse-echo pairs than individual sounds. Cortical delay-tuned neurons are clustered in the three separate areas. They interact with each other through a circuit mediating positive feedback and lateral inhibition for adjustment and improvement of the delay tuning of cortical and subcortical neurons. The current article reviews the mechanisms for delay tuning and the response properties of collicular, thalamic and cortical delay-tuned neurons in relation to hierarchical signal processing. PMID:25752443

  1. 78 FR 36738 - Signal System Reporting Requirements

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-19

    ... modernize our regulatory system and to reduce unjustified regulatory burdens and costs.'' See 77 FR 28469... annually. See 61 FR 33871 (July 1, 1996). FRA determined that a five-year reporting period would...). In 1984, FRA amended its Signal and Train Control Regulations, including 49 CFR Part 233. See 49...

  2. Effects of Lengthening the Speech Signal on Auditory Word Discrimination in Kindergartners with SLI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segers, Eliane; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2005-01-01

    In the present study, it was investigated whether kindergartners with specific language impairment (SLI) and normal language achieving (NLA) kindergartners can benefit from slowing down the entire speech signal or part of the speech signal in a synthetic speech discrimination task. Subjects were 19 kindergartners with SLI and 24 NLA controls.…

  3. Acoustic duetting in Drosophila virilis relies on the integration of auditory and tactile signals.

    PubMed

    LaRue, Kelly M; Clemens, Jan; Berman, Gordon J; Murthy, Mala

    2015-01-01

    Many animal species, including insects, are capable of acoustic duetting, a complex social behavior in which males and females tightly control the rate and timing of their courtship song syllables relative to each other. The mechanisms underlying duetting remain largely unknown across model systems. Most studies of duetting focus exclusively on acoustic interactions, but the use of multisensory cues should aid in coordinating behavior between individuals. To test this hypothesis, we develop Drosophila virilis as a new model for studies of duetting. By combining sensory manipulations, quantitative behavioral assays, and statistical modeling, we show that virilis females combine precisely timed auditory and tactile cues to drive song production and duetting. Tactile cues delivered to the abdomen and genitalia play the larger role in females, as even headless females continue to coordinate song production with courting males. These data, therefore, reveal a novel, non-acoustic, mechanism for acoustic duetting. Finally, our results indicate that female-duetting circuits are not sexually differentiated, as males can also produce 'female-like' duets in a context-dependent manner. PMID:26046297

  4. Acoustic duetting in Drosophila virilis relies on the integration of auditory and tactile signals

    PubMed Central

    LaRue, Kelly M; Clemens, Jan; Berman, Gordon J; Murthy, Mala

    2015-01-01

    Many animal species, including insects, are capable of acoustic duetting, a complex social behavior in which males and females tightly control the rate and timing of their courtship song syllables relative to each other. The mechanisms underlying duetting remain largely unknown across model systems. Most studies of duetting focus exclusively on acoustic interactions, but the use of multisensory cues should aid in coordinating behavior between individuals. To test this hypothesis, we develop Drosophila virilis as a new model for studies of duetting. By combining sensory manipulations, quantitative behavioral assays, and statistical modeling, we show that virilis females combine precisely timed auditory and tactile cues to drive song production and duetting. Tactile cues delivered to the abdomen and genitalia play the larger role in females, as even headless females continue to coordinate song production with courting males. These data, therefore, reveal a novel, non-acoustic, mechanism for acoustic duetting. Finally, our results indicate that female-duetting circuits are not sexually differentiated, as males can also produce ‘female-like’ duets in a context-dependent manner. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07277.001 PMID:26046297

  5. 14 CFR 171.311 - Signal format requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) NAVIGATIONAL FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES Microwave Landing System (MLS) § 171.311 Signal format requirements. The signals radiated by the MLS must conform to the signal format in which angle... ±50 Hz in any one second period. The MLS angle/data and DME equipment must operate on one of...

  6. 14 CFR 171.311 - Signal format requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) NAVIGATIONAL FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES Microwave Landing System (MLS) § 171.311 Signal format requirements. The signals radiated by the MLS must conform to the signal format in which angle... ±50 Hz in any one second period. The MLS angle/data and DME equipment must operate on one of...

  7. Subcortical modulation in auditory processing and auditory hallucinations.

    PubMed

    Ikuta, Toshikazu; DeRosse, Pamela; Argyelan, Miklos; Karlsgodt, Katherine H; Kingsley, Peter B; Szeszko, Philip R; Malhotra, Anil K

    2015-12-15

    Hearing perception in individuals with auditory hallucinations has not been well studied. Auditory hallucinations have previously been shown to involve primary auditory cortex activation. This activation suggests that auditory hallucinations activate the terminal of the auditory pathway as if auditory signals are submitted from the cochlea, and that a hallucinatory event is therefore perceived as hearing. The primary auditory cortex is stimulated by some unknown source that is outside of the auditory pathway. The current study aimed to assess the outcomes of stimulating the primary auditory cortex through the auditory pathway in individuals who have experienced auditory hallucinations. Sixteen patients with schizophrenia underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) sessions, as well as hallucination assessments. During the fMRI session, auditory stimuli were presented in one-second intervals at times when scanner noise was absent. Participants listened to auditory stimuli of sine waves (SW) (4-5.5kHz), English words (EW), and acoustically reversed English words (arEW) in a block design fashion. The arEW were employed to deliver the sound of a human voice with minimal linguistic components. Patients' auditory hallucination severity was assessed by the auditory hallucination item of the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS). During perception of arEW when compared with perception of SW, bilateral activation of the globus pallidus correlated with severity of auditory hallucinations. EW when compared with arEW did not correlate with auditory hallucination severity. Our findings suggest that the sensitivity of the globus pallidus to the human voice is associated with the severity of auditory hallucination. PMID:26275927

  8. Synaptic Plasticity and NO-cGMP-PKG Signaling Coordinately Regulate ERK-Driven Gene Expression in the Lateral Amygdala and in the Auditory Thalamus Following Pavlovian Fear Conditioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ota, Kristie T.; Monsey, Melissa S.; Wu, Melissa S.; Young, Grace J.; Schafe, Glenn E.

    2010-01-01

    We have recently hypothesized that NO-cGMP-PKG signaling in the lateral nucleus of the amygdala (LA) during auditory fear conditioning coordinately regulates ERK-driven transcriptional changes in both auditory thalamic (MGm/PIN) and LA neurons that serve to promote pre- and postsynaptic alterations at thalamo-LA synapses, respectively. In the…

  9. Exon circularization requires canonical splice signals.

    PubMed

    Starke, Stefan; Jost, Isabelle; Rossbach, Oliver; Schneider, Tim; Schreiner, Silke; Hung, Lee-Hsueh; Bindereif, Albrecht

    2015-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs), an abundant class of noncoding RNAs in higher eukaryotes, are generated from pre-mRNAs by circularization of adjacent exons. Using a set of 15 circRNAs, we demonstrated their cell-type-specific expression and circular versus linear processing in mammalian cells. Northern blot analysis combined with RNase H cleavage conclusively proved a circular configuration for two examples, LPAR1 and HIPK3. To address the circularization mechanism, we analyzed the sequence requirements using minigenes derived from natural circRNAs. Both canonical splice sites are required for circularization, although they vary in flexibility and potential use of cryptic sites. Surprisingly, we found that no specific circRNA exon sequence is necessary and that potential flanking intron structures can modulate circularization efficiency. In combination with splice inhibitor assays, our results argue that the canonical spliceosomal machinery functions in circRNA biogenesis, constituting an alternative splicing mode. PMID:25543144

  10. [Asymmetry and spatial specificity of auditory aftereffects following adaptation to signals simulating approach and withdrawal of sound sources].

    PubMed

    Malinina, E S

    2014-01-01

    The spatial specificity of auditory approaching and withdrawing aftereffects was investigated in an anechoic chamber. The adapting and testing stimuli were presented from loudspeakers located in front of the subject at the distance of 1.1 m (near) and 4.5 m (far) from the listener's head. Approach and withdrawal of stimuli were simulated by increasing or decreasing the amplitude of the wide-noise impulse sequence. The listeners were required to determine the movement direction of test stimulus following each 5-s adaptation period. The listeners' "withdrawal" responses were used for psychometric functions plotting and for quantitative assessment of auditory aftereffect. The data summarized for all 8 participants indicated that the asymmetry of approaching and withdrawing aftereffects depended on spatial localization of adaptor and test. The asymmetry of aftereffects was largest when adaptor and test were presented from the same loudspeaker (either near or far). Adaptation to the approach induced a directionally dependent displacement of the psychometric functions relative to control condition without adaptation and adaptation to the withdrawal was not. The magnitude of approaching aftereffect was greater when adaptor and test were located in near spatial domain than when they came from far domain. When adaptor and test were presented from the distinct loudspeakers, magnitude approaching aftereffect was decreasing in comparison to the same spatial localization, but after adaptation to withdrawal it was increasing. As a result, the directionally dependent displacements of the psychometric functions relative to control condition were observed after adaptation as to approach and to withdrawal. The discrepancy of the psychometric functions received after adaptation to approach and to withdrawal at near and far spatial domains was greater under the same localization of adaptor and test in comparison to their distinct localization. We assume that the peculiarities of

  11. Hwanggunchungyitang prevents cadmium-induced ototoxicity through suppression of the activation of caspase-9 and extracellular signal-related kinase in auditory HEI-OC1 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su-Jin; Shin, Bong-Gi; Choi, In-Young; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Min-Cheol; Myung, Noh-Yil; Moon, Phil-Dong; Lee, Jeong-Han; An, Hyo-Jin; Kim, Na-Hyung; Lee, Joo-Young; So, Hong-Seob; Park, Rae-Kil; Jeong, Hyun-Ja; Um, Jae-Young; Kim, Hyung-Min; Hong, Seung-Heon

    2009-02-01

    Hwanggunchungyitang (HGCYT) is a newly designed herbal drug formula for the purpose of treating auditory diseases. A number of heavy metals have been associated with toxic effects to the peripheral or central auditory system. Cadmium (Cd(2+)) is a heavy metal and a potent carcinogen implicated in tumor development through occupational and environmental exposure. However, the auditory effect of Cd(2+) is not poorly understood. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether HGCYT prevent the ototoxic effects induced by Cd(2+) in auditory cell line, HEI-OC1. HGCYT inhibited the cell death, reactive oxygen species generation (ROS), activation of caspase-9, and extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) induced by Cd(2+). In addition, we observed that cochlear hair cells in middle turn were damaged by Cd(2+). However, HGCYT prevented the destruction of hair cell arrays of the rat primary organ of Corti explants in the presence of Cd(2+). These results support the notion that ROS are involved in Cd(2+) ototoxicity and suggest HGCYT therapeutic usefulness, against Cd(2+)-induced activation of caspase-9 and ERK. PMID:19182378

  12. The acquisition of mechano‐electrical transducer current adaptation in auditory hair cells requires myosin VI

    PubMed Central

    Marcotti, Walter; Corns, Laura F.; Goodyear, Richard J.; Rzadzinska, Agnieszka K.; Avraham, Karen B.; Steel, Karen P.; Richardson, Guy P.

    2016-01-01

    Key points The transduction of sound into electrical signals occurs at the hair bundles atop sensory hair cells in the cochlea, by means of mechanosensitive ion channels, the mechano‐electrical transducer (MET) channels.The MET currents decline during steady stimuli; this is termed adaptation and ensures they always work within the most sensitive part of their operating range, responding best to rapidly changing (sound) stimuli.In this study we used a mouse model (Snell's waltzer) for hereditary deafness in humans that has a mutation in the gene encoding an unconventional myosin, myosin VI, which is present in the hair bundles.We found that in the absence of myosin VI the MET current fails to acquire its characteristic adaptation as the hair bundles develop.We propose that myosin VI supports the acquisition of adaptation by removing key molecules from the hair bundle that serve a temporary, developmental role. Abstract Mutations in Myo6, the gene encoding the (F‐actin) minus end‐directed unconventional myosin, myosin VI, cause hereditary deafness in mice (Snell's waltzer) and humans. In the sensory hair cells of the cochlea, myosin VI is expressed in the cell bodies and along the stereocilia that project from the cells’ apical surface. It is required for maintaining the structural integrity of the mechanosensitive hair bundles formed by the stereocilia. In this study we investigate whether myosin VI contributes to mechano‐electrical transduction. We report that Ca2+‐dependent adaptation of the mechano‐electrical transducer (MET) current, which serves to keep the transduction apparatus operating within its most sensitive range, is absent in outer and inner hair cells from homozygous Snell's waltzer mutant mice, which fail to express myosin VI. The operating range of the MET channels is also abnormal in the mutants, resulting in the absence of a resting MET current. We found that cadherin 23, a component of the hair bundle's transient lateral links

  13. FGF signaling is required for initiation of feather placode development.

    PubMed

    Mandler, Markus; Neubüser, Annette

    2004-07-01

    Morphogenesis of hairs and feathers is initiated by an as yet unknown dermal signal that induces placode formation in the overlying ectoderm. To determine whether FGF signals are required for this process we over-expressed soluble versions of FGFR1 or FGFR2 in the skin of chicken embryos. This produced a complete failure of feather formation prior to any morphological or molecular signs of placode development. We further show that Fgf10 is expressed in the dermis of nascent feather primordia, and that anti-FGF10 antibodies block feather placode development in skin explants. In addition we show that FGF10 can induce expression of positive and negative regulators of feather development and can induce its own expression under conditions of low BMP signaling. Together these results demonstrate that FGF signaling is required for the initiation of feather placode development and implicate FGF10 as an early dermal signal involved in this process. PMID:15201222

  14. Regulatory T cells require TCR signaling for their suppressive function

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Amanda M.; Lu, Wen; Sindhava, Vishal J.; Huang, Yanping; Burkhardt, Janis K.; Yang, Enjun; Riese, Matthew J.; Maltzman, Jonathan S.; Jordan, Martha S.; Kambayashi, Taku

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a subset of CD4+ T cells that maintain immune tolerance in part by their ability to inhibit the proliferation of conventional CD4+ T cells (Tconvs). The role of the T cell receptor (TCR) and the downstream signaling pathways required for this suppressive function of Tregs are not fully understood. To yield insight into how TCR-mediated signals influence Treg suppressive function, we assessed the ability of Tregs with altered TCR-mediated signaling capacity to inhibit Tconv proliferation. Mature Tregs deficient in SLP-76, an adaptor protein that nucleates the proximal signaling complex downstream of the TCR, were unable to inhibit Tconv proliferation, suggesting that TCR signaling is required for Treg suppressive function. Moreover, Tregs with defective PLCγ activation due to a Y145F mutation of SLP-76 were also defective in their suppressive function. Conversely, enhancement of diacylglycerol-mediated signaling downstream of PLCγ by genetic ablation of a negative regulator of diacylglycerol kinase ζ increased the suppressive ability of Tregs. Since SLP-76 is also important for integrin activation and signaling, we tested the role of integrin activation in Treg-mediated suppression. Tregs lacking the adaptor proteins ADAP or Crk/CrkL, which are required for TCR-mediated integrin activation, inhibited Tconv proliferation to a similar extent as wildtype Tregs. Together, these data suggest that TCR-mediated PLCγ activation but not integrin activation is required for Tregs to inhibit Tconv proliferation. PMID:25821220

  15. Signal-to-noise ratio in the membrane potential of the owl's auditory coincidence detectors

    PubMed Central

    Funabiki, Kazuo; Kuokkanen, Paula T.; Kempter, Richard; Carr, Catherine E.

    2012-01-01

    Owls use interaural time differences (ITDs) to locate a sound source. They compute ITD in a specialized neural circuit that consists of axonal delay lines from the cochlear nucleus magnocellularis (NM) and coincidence detectors in the nucleus laminaris (NL). Recent physiological recordings have shown that tonal stimuli induce oscillatory membrane potentials in NL neurons (Funabiki K, Ashida G, Konishi M. J Neurosci 31: 15245–15256, 2011). The amplitude of these oscillations varies with ITD and is strongly correlated to the firing rate. The oscillation, termed the sound analog potential, has the same frequency as the stimulus tone and is presumed to originate from phase-locked synaptic inputs from NM fibers. To investigate how these oscillatory membrane potentials are generated, we applied recently developed signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) analysis techniques (Kuokkanen PT, Wagner H, Ashida G, Carr CE, Kempter R. J Neurophysiol 104: 2274–2290, 2010) to the intracellular waveforms obtained in vivo. Our theoretical prediction of the band-limited SNRs agreed with experimental data for mid- to high-frequency (>2 kHz) NL neurons. For low-frequency (≤2 kHz) NL neurons, however, measured SNRs were lower than theoretical predictions. These results suggest that the number of independent NM fibers converging onto each NL neuron and/or the population-averaged degree of phase-locking of the NM fibers could be significantly smaller in the low-frequency NL region than estimated for higher best-frequency NL. PMID:22933726

  16. Responses of neurons in the auditory pathway of the barn owl to partially correlated binaural signals.

    PubMed

    Albeck, Y; Konishi, M

    1995-10-01

    VLVa and ICcC. 5. Almost all ramp neurons occurred in either ICx or ICcLS where neurons are more broadly tuned to frequency than those in the lower nuclei. The synthesis of this response type requires, however, not only the convergence of different frequency channels but also inhibition between different ITD channels. We modeled the ramp response as a three-step process. First, different spectral channels converge to create broad frequency tuning. The response to variation in BC will be linear (or parabolic) because it is a sum of linear (parabolic) responses. Second, the activity in some adjacent ITD channels is subtracted by lateral inhibition. Finally, the result is rectified using a high threshold to avoid negative activity. PMID:8989405

  17. 29 CFR 1926.1421 - Signals-voice signals-additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Signals-voice signals-additional requirements. 1926.1421 Section 1926.1421 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Cranes...

  18. 29 CFR 1926.1421 - Signals-voice signals-additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Signals-voice signals-additional requirements. 1926.1421 Section 1926.1421 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Cranes...

  19. 29 CFR 1926.1421 - Signals-voice signals-additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Signals-voice signals-additional requirements. 1926.1421 Section 1926.1421 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Cranes...

  20. 29 CFR 1926.1421 - Signals-voice signals-additional requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Signals-voice signals-additional requirements. 1926.1421 Section 1926.1421 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Cranes...

  1. Auditory agnosia.

    PubMed

    Slevc, L Robert; Shell, Alison R

    2015-01-01

    Auditory agnosia refers to impairments in sound perception and identification despite intact hearing, cognitive functioning, and language abilities (reading, writing, and speaking). Auditory agnosia can be general, affecting all types of sound perception, or can be (relatively) specific to a particular domain. Verbal auditory agnosia (also known as (pure) word deafness) refers to deficits specific to speech processing, environmental sound agnosia refers to difficulties confined to non-speech environmental sounds, and amusia refers to deficits confined to music. These deficits can be apperceptive, affecting basic perceptual processes, or associative, affecting the relation of a perceived auditory object to its meaning. This chapter discusses what is known about the behavioral symptoms and lesion correlates of these different types of auditory agnosia (focusing especially on verbal auditory agnosia), evidence for the role of a rapid temporal processing deficit in some aspects of auditory agnosia, and the few attempts to treat the perceptual deficits associated with auditory agnosia. A clear picture of auditory agnosia has been slow to emerge, hampered by the considerable heterogeneity in behavioral deficits, associated brain damage, and variable assessments across cases. Despite this lack of clarity, these striking deficits in complex sound processing continue to inform our understanding of auditory perception and cognition. PMID:25726291

  2. Meaning From Environmental Sounds: Types of Signal-Referent Relations and Their Effect on Recognizing Auditory Icons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Peter; Stevens, Catherine

    2004-01-01

    This article addresses the learnability of auditory icons, that is, environmental sounds that refer either directly or indirectly to meaningful events. Direct relations use the sound made by the target event whereas indirect relations substitute a surrogate for the target. Across 3 experiments, different indirect relations (ecological, in which…

  3. Development of the auditory system

    PubMed Central

    Litovsky, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Auditory development involves changes in the peripheral and central nervous system along the auditory pathways, and these occur naturally, and in response to stimulation. Human development occurs along a trajectory that can last decades, and is studied using behavioral psychophysics, as well as physiologic measurements with neural imaging. The auditory system constructs a perceptual space that takes information from objects and groups, segregates sounds, and provides meaning and access to communication tools such as language. Auditory signals are processed in a series of analysis stages, from peripheral to central. Coding of information has been studied for features of sound, including frequency, intensity, loudness, and location, in quiet and in the presence of maskers. In the latter case, the ability of the auditory system to perform an analysis of the scene becomes highly relevant. While some basic abilities are well developed at birth, there is a clear prolonged maturation of auditory development well into the teenage years. Maturation involves auditory pathways. However, non-auditory changes (attention, memory, cognition) play an important role in auditory development. The ability of the auditory system to adapt in response to novel stimuli is a key feature of development throughout the nervous system, known as neural plasticity. PMID:25726262

  4. Manipulation of BDNF Signaling Modifies the Experience-Dependent Plasticity Induced by Pure Tone Exposure during the Critical Period in the Primary Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Anomal, Renata; de Villers-Sidani, Etienne; Merzenich, Michael M.; Panizzutti, Rogerio

    2013-01-01

    Sensory experience powerfully shapes cortical sensory representations during an early developmental “critical period” of plasticity. In the rat primary auditory cortex (A1), the experience-dependent plasticity is exemplified by significant, long-lasting distortions in frequency representation after mere exposure to repetitive frequencies during the second week of life. In the visual system, the normal unfolding of critical period plasticity is strongly dependent on the elaboration of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which promotes the establishment of inhibition. Here, we tested the hypothesis that BDNF signaling plays a role in the experience-dependent plasticity induced by pure tone exposure during the critical period in the primary auditory cortex. Elvax resin implants filled with either a blocking antibody against BDNF or the BDNF protein were placed on the A1 of rat pups throughout the critical period window. These pups were then exposed to 7 kHz pure tone for 7 consecutive days and their frequency representations were mapped. BDNF blockade completely prevented the shaping of cortical tuning by experience and resulted in poor overall frequency tuning in A1. By contrast, BDNF infusion on the developing A1 amplified the effect of 7 kHz tone exposure compared to control. These results indicate that BDNF signaling participates in the experience-dependent plasticity induced by pure tone exposure during the critical period in A1. PMID:23700463

  5. Heparan sulfate is required for bone morphogenetic protein-7 signaling.

    PubMed

    Irie, Atsushi; Habuchi, Hiroko; Kimata, Koji; Sanai, Yutaka

    2003-09-01

    Although genetic studies have suggested that heparan sulfate (HS) is involved in bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-mediated embryonic morphogenesis, it is unclear whether HS is directly involved in BMP-mediated signaling. Here, we investigate the involvement of HS in BMP-7 signaling. We show that HS and heparin chains specifically bind to BMP-7. Digestion of cell-surface HS with heparitinase interferes with BMP-7-mediated Smad phosphorylation in ROS 17/2.8 osteoblastic cells. Inhibiting sulfation of cell-surface HS with chlorate also causes interruption of Smad phosphorylation. Addition of exogenous heparin to ROS 17/2.8 cells prevents BMP-7-mediated Smad phosphorylation rather than enhances the BMP-7 signal, suggesting that HS should be anchored on the plasma membrane for BMP signaling. Moreover, BMP-7 binding to ROS 17/2.8 cells is inhibited by chlorate treatment and exogenous application of heparin. These results demonstrate that BMP-7 specifically binds to cell-surface HS and the BMP-7-HS interaction is required for BMP-7 signaling. PMID:12927798

  6. High resolution auditory perception system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Iftekhar; Ghatol, Ashok

    2005-04-01

    Blindness is a sensory disability which is difficult to treat but can to some extent be helped by artificial aids. The paper describes the design aspects of a high resolution auditory perception system, which is designed on the principle of air sonar with binaural perception. This system is a vision substitution aid for enabling blind persons. The blind person wears ultrasonic eyeglasses which has ultrasonic sensor array embedded on it. The system has been designed to operate in multiresolution modes. The ultrasonic sound from the transmitter array is reflected back by the objects, falling in the beam of the array and is received. The received signal is converted to a sound signal, which is presented stereophonically for auditory perception. A detailed study has been done as the background work required for the system implementation; the appropriate range analysis procedure, analysis of space-time signals, the acoustic sensors study, amplification methods and study of the removal of noise using filters. Finally the system implementation including both the hardware and the software part of it has been described. Experimental results on actual blind subjects and inferences obtained during the study have also been included.

  7. Auditory information systems in military aircraft: Current configurations versus the state of the art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doll, T. J.; Folds, D. J.; Leiker, L. A.

    1984-06-01

    The complete ensembles of auditory signals in selected USAF aircraft (the F-4D, F-15, two models of the F-16, the C-5, and the C-141) are described and evaluated. Human factors research related to the design of speech and non-speech and non-speech auditory signals is reviewed and the fundamentals of speech synthesis technology are described. Major findings are: that auditory signals are not well standardized among the aircraft, even between those with similar combat roles that a relatively large number of non-speech auditory signals are used, which may make it difficult for the aircrew to recall the meanings of all the signals; that some non-speech signals are sufficiently similar that they may be confused, particularly in high workload and stressful conditions; and that the criticality of the warnings is not reliably indicated by any characteristic of the signals. Five problem areas requiring further research are discussed: reduction of signal loudness, annoyance, and disruption of other functions; enhancement of the distinctiveness and masking resistance of non-speech signals; effects of concurrent warning signals on aircrew performance in critical operational contexts; additional uses of auditory information in order to relieve visual workload; the need for guidelines for deciding which information should be provided aurally, which should be speech versus non-speech, and for designing speech messages; and optimization of synthesized speech for cockpit applications, including its attention-getting capability, distinctiveness, intelligibility, and ease of comprehension.

  8. Axon Guidance in the Auditory System: Multiple Functions of Eph Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Cramer, Karina S.; Gabriele, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    The neural pathways of the auditory system underlie our ability to detect sounds and to transform amplitude and frequency information into rich and meaningful perception. While it shares some organizational features with other sensory systems, the auditory system has some unique functions that impose special demands on precision in circuit assembly. In particular, the cochlear epithelium creates a frequency map rather than a space map, and specialized pathways extract information on interaural time and intensity differences to permit sound source localization. The assembly of auditory circuitry requires the coordinated function of multiple molecular cues. Eph receptors and their ephrin ligands constitute a large family of axon guidance molecules with developmentally regulated expression throughout the auditory system. Functional studies of Eph/ephrin signaling have revealed important roles at multiple levels of the auditory pathway, from the cochlea to the auditory cortex. These proteins provide graded cues used in establishing tonotopically ordered connections between auditory areas, as well as discrete cues that enable axons to form connections with appropriate postsynaptic partners within a target area. Throughout the auditory system, Eph proteins help to establish patterning in neural pathways during early development. This early targeting, which is further refined with neuronal activity, establishes the precision needed for auditory perception. PMID:25010398

  9. Neural Correlates of Auditory Processing, Learning and Memory Formation in Songbirds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinaud, R.; Terleph, T. A.; Wynne, R. D.; Tremere, L. A.

    Songbirds have emerged as powerful experimental models for the study of auditory processing of complex natural communication signals. Intact hearing is necessary for several behaviors in developing and adult animals including vocal learning, territorial defense, mate selection and individual recognition. These behaviors are thought to require the processing, discrimination and memorization of songs. Although much is known about the brain circuits that participate in sensorimotor (auditory-vocal) integration, especially the ``song-control" system, less is known about the anatomical and functional organization of central auditory pathways. Here we discuss findings associated with a telencephalic auditory area known as the caudomedial nidopallium (NCM). NCM has attracted significant interest as it exhibits functional properties that may support higher order auditory functions such as stimulus discrimination and the formation of auditory memories. NCM neurons are vigorously dr iven by auditory stimuli. Interestingly, these responses are selective to conspecific, relative to heterospecific songs and artificial stimuli. In addition, forms of experience-dependent plasticity occur in NCM and are song-specific. Finally, recent experiments employing high-throughput quantitative proteomics suggest that complex protein regulatory pathways are engaged in NCM as a result of auditory experience. These molecular cascades are likely central to experience-associated plasticity of NCM circuitry and may be part of a network of calcium-driven molecular events that support the formation of auditory memory traces.

  10. Canonical wnt signaling is required for commissural axon guidance

    PubMed Central

    Avilés, Evelyn C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Morphogens have been identified as guidance cues for postcrossing commissural axons in the spinal cord. Shh has a dual effect on postcrossing commissural axons: a direct repellent effect mediated by Hhip as a receptor, and an indirect effect by shaping a Wnt activity gradient. Wnts were shown to be attractants for postcrossing commissural axons in both chicken and mouse embryos. In mouse, the effects of Wnts on axon guidance were concluded to depend on the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway. Canonical Wnt signaling was excluded based on the absence of axon guidance defects in mice lacking Lrp6 which is an obligatory coreceptor for Fzd in canonical Wnt signaling. In the loss‐of‐function studies reported here, we confirmed a role for the PCP pathway in postcrossing commissural axon guidance also in the chicken embryo. However, taking advantage of the precise temporal control of gene silencing provided by in ovo RNAi, we demonstrate that canonical Wnt signaling is also required for proper guidance of postcrossing commissural axons in the developing spinal cord. Thus, axon guidance does not seem to depend on any one of the classical Wnt signaling pathways but rather involve a network of Wnt receptors and downstream components. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 190–208, 2016 PMID:26014644

  11. An auditory feature detection circuit for sound pattern recognition

    PubMed Central

    Schöneich, Stefan; Kostarakos, Konstantinos; Hedwig, Berthold

    2015-01-01

    From human language to birdsong and the chirps of insects, acoustic communication is based on amplitude and frequency modulation of sound signals. Whereas frequency processing starts at the level of the hearing organs, temporal features of the sound amplitude such as rhythms or pulse rates require processing by central auditory neurons. Besides several theoretical concepts, brain circuits that detect temporal features of a sound signal are poorly understood. We focused on acoustically communicating field crickets and show how five neurons in the brain of females form an auditory feature detector circuit for the pulse pattern of the male calling song. The processing is based on a coincidence detector mechanism that selectively responds when a direct neural response and an intrinsically delayed response to the sound pulses coincide. This circuit provides the basis for auditory mate recognition in field crickets and reveals a principal mechanism of sensory processing underlying the perception of temporal patterns. PMID:26601259

  12. Central auditory disorders: toward a neuropsychology of auditory objects

    PubMed Central

    Goll, Johanna C.; Crutch, Sebastian J.; Warren, Jason D.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review Analysis of the auditory environment, source identification and vocal communication all require efficient brain mechanisms for disambiguating, representing and understanding complex natural sounds as ‘auditory objects’. Failure of these mechanisms leads to a diverse spectrum of clinical deficits. Here we review current evidence concerning the phenomenology, mechanisms and brain substrates of auditory agnosias and related disorders of auditory object processing. Recent findings Analysis of lesions causing auditory object deficits has revealed certain broad anatomical correlations: deficient parsing of the auditory scene is associated with lesions involving the parieto-temporal junction, while selective disorders of sound recognition occur with more anterior temporal lobe or extra-temporal damage. Distributed neural networks have been increasingly implicated in the pathogenesis of such disorders as developmental dyslexia, congenital amusia and tinnitus. Auditory category deficits may arise from defective interaction of spectrotemporal encoding and executive and mnestic processes. Dedicated brain mechanisms are likely to process specialised sound objects such as voices and melodies. Summary Emerging empirical evidence suggests a clinically relevant, hierarchical and fractionated neuropsychological model of auditory object processing that provides a framework for understanding auditory agnosias and makes specific predictions to direct future work. PMID:20975559

  13. Requirement for Pangolin/dTCF in Drosophila Wingless signaling.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Liang; Nellen, Denise; Basler, Konrad

    2003-05-13

    The Wingless (Wg) protein is a secreted glycoprotein involved in intercellular signaling. On activation of the Wg signaling pathway, Armadillo is stabilized, causing target genes to be activated by the transcription factor Pangolin (Pan). This study investigated the roles of Pan in the developing wing of Drosophila by clonal analysis. Three different aspects of wing development were examined: cell proliferation, wing margin specification, and wg self-refinement. Our results indicate that Pan function is critically required for all three of these processes. Consequently, lack of pan causes a severe reduction in the activity of the Wg target genes Distalless and vestigial within their normal domain of expression. Loss of pan function does not, however, lead to a derepression of these genes outside this domain. Thus, although Pan is positively required for the induction of Wg targets in the wing imaginal disk, it does not appear to play a default repressor function in the absence of Wg input. In contrast, lack of zygotic pan function causes a milder phenotype than that caused by the lack of wg function in the embryo. We show that this difference cannot be attributed to maternally provided pan product, indicating that a Pan repressor function usually prevents the expression of embryonic Wg targets. Together, our results suggest that for embryonic patterning the activator as well as repressor forms of Pan play important roles, while for wing development Pan operates primarily in the activator mode. PMID:12730381

  14. A Dynamic Compressive Gammachirp Auditory Filterbank

    PubMed Central

    Irino, Toshio; Patterson, Roy D.

    2008-01-01

    It is now common to use knowledge about human auditory processing in the development of audio signal processors. Until recently, however, such systems were limited by their linearity. The auditory filter system is known to be level-dependent as evidenced by psychophysical data on masking, compression, and two-tone suppression. However, there were no analysis/synthesis schemes with nonlinear filterbanks. This paper describe18300060s such a scheme based on the compressive gammachirp (cGC) auditory filter. It was developed to extend the gammatone filter concept to accommodate the changes in psychophysical filter shape that are observed to occur with changes in stimulus level in simultaneous, tone-in-noise masking. In models of simultaneous noise masking, the temporal dynamics of the filtering can be ignored. Analysis/synthesis systems, however, are intended for use with speech sounds where the glottal cycle can be long with respect to auditory time constants, and so they require specification of the temporal dynamics of auditory filter. In this paper, we describe a fast-acting level control circuit for the cGC filter and show how psychophysical data involving two-tone suppression and compression can be used to estimate the parameter values for this dynamic version of the cGC filter (referred to as the “dcGC” filter). One important advantage of analysis/synthesis systems with a dcGC filterbank is that they can inherit previously refined signal processing algorithms developed with conventional short-time Fourier transforms (STFTs) and linear filterbanks. PMID:19330044

  15. Primate Auditory Recognition Memory Performance Varies With Sound Type

    PubMed Central

    Chi-Wing, Ng; Bethany, Plakke; Amy, Poremba

    2009-01-01

    Neural correlates of auditory processing, including for species-specific vocalizations that convey biological and ethological significance (e.g. social status, kinship, environment),have been identified in a wide variety of areas including the temporal and frontal cortices. However, few studies elucidate how non-human primates interact with these vocalization signals when they are challenged by tasks requiring auditory discrimination, recognition, and/or memory. The present study employs a delayed matching-to-sample task with auditory stimuli to examine auditory memory performance of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), wherein two sounds are determined to be the same or different. Rhesus macaques seem to have relatively poor short-term memory with auditory stimuli, and we examine if particular sound types are more favorable for memory performance. Experiment 1 suggests memory performance with vocalization sound types (particularly monkey), are significantly better than when using non-vocalization sound types, and male monkeys outperform female monkeys overall. Experiment 2, controlling for number of sound exemplars and presentation pairings across types, replicates Experiment 1, demonstrating better performance or decreased response latencies, depending on trial type, to species-specific monkey vocalizations. The findings cannot be explained by acoustic differences between monkey vocalizations and the other sound types, suggesting the biological, and/or ethological meaning of these sounds are more effective for auditory memory. PMID:19567264

  16. Seeing the Song: Left Auditory Structures May Track Auditory-Visual Dynamic Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Mossbridge, Julia A.; Grabowecky, Marcia; Suzuki, Satoru

    2013-01-01

    Auditory and visual signals generated by a single source tend to be temporally correlated, such as the synchronous sounds of footsteps and the limb movements of a walker. Continuous tracking and comparison of the dynamics of auditory-visual streams is thus useful for the perceptual binding of information arising from a common source. Although language-related mechanisms have been implicated in the tracking of speech-related auditory-visual signals (e.g., speech sounds and lip movements), it is not well known what sensory mechanisms generally track ongoing auditory-visual synchrony for non-speech signals in a complex auditory-visual environment. To begin to address this question, we used music and visual displays that varied in the dynamics of multiple features (e.g., auditory loudness and pitch; visual luminance, color, size, motion, and organization) across multiple time scales. Auditory activity (monitored using auditory steady-state responses, ASSR) was selectively reduced in the left hemisphere when the music and dynamic visual displays were temporally misaligned. Importantly, ASSR was not affected when attentional engagement with the music was reduced, or when visual displays presented dynamics clearly dissimilar to the music. These results appear to suggest that left-lateralized auditory mechanisms are sensitive to auditory-visual temporal alignment, but perhaps only when the dynamics of auditory and visual streams are similar. These mechanisms may contribute to correct auditory-visual binding in a busy sensory environment. PMID:24194873

  17. Seeing the song: left auditory structures may track auditory-visual dynamic alignment.

    PubMed

    Mossbridge, Julia A; Grabowecky, Marcia; Suzuki, Satoru

    2013-01-01

    Auditory and visual signals generated by a single source tend to be temporally correlated, such as the synchronous sounds of footsteps and the limb movements of a walker. Continuous tracking and comparison of the dynamics of auditory-visual streams is thus useful for the perceptual binding of information arising from a common source. Although language-related mechanisms have been implicated in the tracking of speech-related auditory-visual signals (e.g., speech sounds and lip movements), it is not well known what sensory mechanisms generally track ongoing auditory-visual synchrony for non-speech signals in a complex auditory-visual environment. To begin to address this question, we used music and visual displays that varied in the dynamics of multiple features (e.g., auditory loudness and pitch; visual luminance, color, size, motion, and organization) across multiple time scales. Auditory activity (monitored using auditory steady-state responses, ASSR) was selectively reduced in the left hemisphere when the music and dynamic visual displays were temporally misaligned. Importantly, ASSR was not affected when attentional engagement with the music was reduced, or when visual displays presented dynamics clearly dissimilar to the music. These results appear to suggest that left-lateralized auditory mechanisms are sensitive to auditory-visual temporal alignment, but perhaps only when the dynamics of auditory and visual streams are similar. These mechanisms may contribute to correct auditory-visual binding in a busy sensory environment. PMID:24194873

  18. Are complex control signals required for human arm movement?

    PubMed

    Gribble, P L; Ostry, D J; Sanguineti, V; Laboissière, R

    1998-03-01

    It has been proposed that the control signals underlying voluntary human arm movement have a "complex" nonmonotonic time-varying form, and a number of empirical findings have been offered in support of this idea. In this paper, we address three such findings using a model of two-joint arm motion based on the lambda version of the equilibrium-point hypothesis. The model includes six one- and two-joint muscles, reflexes, modeled control signals, muscle properties, and limb dynamics. First, we address the claim that "complex" equilibrium trajectories are required to account for nonmonotonic joint impedance patterns observed during multijoint movement. Using constant-rate shifts in the neurally specified equilibrium of the limb and constant cocontraction commands, we obtain patterns of predicted joint stiffness during simulated multijoint movements that match the nonmonotonic patterns reported empirically. We then use the algorithm proposed by Gomi and Kawato to compute a hypothetical equilibrium trajectory from simulated stiffness, viscosity, and limb kinematics. Like that reported by Gomi and Kawato, the resulting trajectory was nonmonotonic, first leading then lagging the position of the limb. Second, we address the claim that high levels of stiffness are required to generate rapid single-joint movements when simple equilibrium shifts are used. We compare empirical measurements of stiffness during rapid single-joint movements with the predicted stiffness of movements generated using constant-rate equilibrium shifts and constant cocontraction commands. Single-joint movements are simulated at a number of speeds, and the procedure used by Bennett to estimate stiffness is followed. We show that when the magnitude of the cocontraction command is scaled in proportion to movement speed, simulated joint stiffness varies with movement speed in a manner comparable with that reported by Bennett. Third, we address the related claim that nonmonotonic equilibrium shifts are

  19. Endodermal Wnt signaling is required for tracheal cartilage formation

    PubMed Central

    Snowball, John; Ambalavanan, Manoj; Whitsett, Jeffrey; Sinner, Debora

    2015-01-01

    Tracheobronchomalacia is a common congenital defect in which the walls of the trachea and bronchi lack of adequate cartilage required for support of the airways. Deletion of Wls, a cargo receptor mediating Wnt ligand secretion, in the embryonic endoderm using ShhCre mice inhibited formation of tracheal-bronchial cartilaginous rings. The normal dorsal-ventral patterning of tracheal mesenchyme was lost. Smooth muscle cells, identified by Acta2 staining, were aberrantly located in ventral mesenchyme of the trachea, normally the region of Sox9 expression in cartilage progenitors. Wnt/β-catenin activity, indicated by Axin2 LacZ reporter, was decreased in tracheal mesenchyme of Wlsf/f;ShhCre/+ embryos. Proliferation of chondroblasts was decreased and reciprocally, proliferation of smooth muscle cells was increased in Wlsf/f;ShhCre/+ tracheal tissue. Expression of Tbx4, Tbx5, Msx1 and Msx2, known to mediate cartilage and muscle patterning, were decreased in tracheal mesenchyme of Wlsf/f;ShhCre/+ embryos. Ex vivo studies demonstrated that Wnt7b and Wnt5a, expressed by the epithelium of developing trachea, and active Wnt/β-catenin signaling are required for tracheal chondrogenesis before formation of mesenchymal condensations. In conclusion, Wnt ligands produced by the tracheal epithelium pattern the tracheal mesenchyme via modulation of gene expression and cell proliferation required for proper tracheal cartilage and smooth muscle differentiation. PMID:26093309

  20. Lipid rafts are required for Kit survival and proliferation signals

    PubMed Central

    Leifheit, Erica; Gooch, Stacie; Sindhu, Simran; Weinberg, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    In addition to its physiologic role as central regulator of the hematopoietic and reproductive systems, the Kit receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) is pathologically overexpressed in some forms of leukemia and constitutively activated by oncogenic mutations in mast-cell proliferations and gastrointestinal stromal tumors. To gain insight into the general activation and signaling mechanisms of RTKs, we investigated the activation-dependent dynamic membrane distributions of wild-type and oncogenic forms of Kit in hematopoietic cells. Ligand-induced recruitment of wild-type Kit to lipid rafts after stimulation by Kit ligand (KL) and the constitutive localization of oncogenic Kit in lipid rafts are necessary for Kit-mediated proliferation and survival signals. KL-dependent and oncogenic Kit kinase activity resulted in recruitment of the regulatory phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) subunit p85 to rafts where the catalytical PI3-K subunit p110 constitutively resides. Cholesterol depletion by methyl-β-cyclodextrin prevented Kit-mediated activation of the PI3-K downstream target Akt and inhibited cellular proliferation by KL-activated or oncogenic Kit, including mutants resistant to the Kit inhibitor imatinib-mesylate. Our data are consistent with the notion that Kit recruitment to lipid rafts is required for efficient activation of the PI3-K/Akt pathway and Kit-mediated proliferation. PMID:17554062

  1. Chronic itch development in sensory neurons requires BRAF signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Zhong-Qiu; Huo, Fu-Quan; Jeffry, Joseph; Hampton, Lori; Demehri, Shadmehr; Kim, Seungil; Liu, Xian-Yu; Barry, Devin M.; Wan, Li; Liu, Zhong-Chun; Li, Hui; Turkoz, Ahu; Ma, Kaijie; Cornelius, Lynn A.; Kopan, Raphael; Battey, James F.; Zhong, Jian; Chen, Zhou-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Chronic itch, or pruritus, is associated with a wide range of skin abnormalities. The mechanisms responsible for chronic itch induction and persistence remain unclear. We developed a mouse model in which a constitutively active form of the serine/threonine kinase BRAF was expressed in neurons gated by the sodium channel Nav1.8 (BRAFNav1.8 mice). We found that constitutive BRAF pathway activation in BRAFNav1.8 mice results in ectopic and enhanced expression of a cohort of itch-sensing genes, including gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) and MAS-related GPCR member A3 (MRGPRA3), in nociceptors expressing transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1). BRAFNav1.8 mice showed de novo neuronal responsiveness to pruritogens, enhanced pruriceptor excitability, and heightened evoked and spontaneous scratching behavior. GRP receptor expression was increased in the spinal cord, indicating augmented coding capacity for itch subsequent to amplified pruriceptive inputs. Enhanced GRP expression and sustained ERK phosphorylation were observed in sensory neurons of mice with allergic contact dermatitis– or dry skin–elicited itch; however, spinal ERK activation was not required for maintaining central sensitization of itch. Inhibition of either BRAF or GRP signaling attenuated itch sensation in chronic itch mouse models. These data uncover RAF/MEK/ERK signaling as a key regulator that confers a subset of nociceptors with pruriceptive properties to initiate and maintain long-lasting itch sensation. PMID:24216512

  2. Corneal Wound Healing Requires IKB kinase β Signaling in Keratocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang; Mongan, Maureen; Meng, Qinghang; Wang, Qin; Kao, Winston; Xia, Ying

    2016-01-01

    IkB kinase β (IKKβ) is a key signaling kinase for inflammatory responses, but it also plays diverse cell type-specific roles that are not yet fully understood. Here we investigated the role of IKKβ in the cornea using IkkβΔCS mice in which the Ikkβ gene was specifically deleted in the corneal stromal keratocytes. The IkkβΔCS corneas had normal morphology, transparency and thickness; however, they did not heal well from mild alkali burn injury. In contrast to the IkkβF/F corneas that restored transparency in 2 weeks after injury, over 50% of the IkkβΔCS corneas failed to fully recover. They instead developed recurrent haze with increased stromal thickness, severe inflammation and apoptosis. This pathogenesis correlated with sustained myofibroblast transformation with increased α smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression, higher levels of senescence β-Gal activity and scar tissue formation at the late stage of wound healing. In addition, the IkkβΔCS corneas displayed elevated expression of hemo-oxygenase-1 (HO-1), a marker of oxidative stress, and activation of stress signaling pathways with increased JNK, c-Jun and SMAD2/3 phosphorylation. These data suggest that IKKβ in keratocytes is required to repress oxidative stress and attenuate fibrogenesis and senescence in corneal wound healing. PMID:26987064

  3. The Drosophila Auditory System

    PubMed Central

    Boekhoff-Falk, Grace; Eberl, Daniel F.

    2013-01-01

    Development of a functional auditory system in Drosophila requires specification and differentiation of the chordotonal sensilla of Johnston’s organ (JO) in the antenna, correct axonal targeting to the antennal mechanosensory and motor center (AMMC) in the brain, and synaptic connections to neurons in the downstream circuit. Chordotonal development in JO is functionally complicated by structural, molecular and functional diversity that is not yet fully understood, and construction of the auditory neural circuitry is only beginning to unfold. Here we describe our current understanding of developmental and molecular mechanisms that generate the exquisite functions of the Drosophila auditory system, emphasizing recent progress and highlighting important new questions arising from research on this remarkable sensory system. PMID:24719289

  4. Organ abscission: exit strategies require signals and moving traffic.

    PubMed

    Liljegren, Sarah J

    2012-12-01

    Flowers are frequently programmed to release their outer organs after pollination. Managing the timing and extent of cell separation during abscission is crucial, as premature shedding could interfere with reproduction and the structural integrity of neighboring tissues would be affected by uninhibited loss of cellular adhesion. In Arabidopsis flowers, the framework of the cell signaling, membrane traffic and transcriptional networks responsible for organ abscission is now emerging. A proposed ligand-receptor system consisting of a secreted peptide and a pair of redundant receptor-like kinases switches on a mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade that leads to cell separation. A homeodomain transcription factor acting downstream of the ligand-receptor module may inhibit cell expansion and separation by restricting the expression of other closely related transcription factors. Three additional receptor-like kinases may inhibit abscission by reducing the pool of receptors at the cell surface available to be ligand-activated. A G-protein regulator is required to direct the movement of key molecules required for abscission. Expression of a polygalaturonase active during organ abscission is modulated by a zinc finger transcription factor. PMID:23047135

  5. The use of neural networks for the determination of the signal modulation frequency from the firing activity pattern in the auditory neurons of the frog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bibikov, N. G.; Grigor'ev, D. Yu.

    2007-11-01

    A two-layer backward propagation neural network was used for the determination of the modulation frequency of tonal signals from the firing patterns of single neurons located in the cochlear nuclei and the torus semicircularis of the grass frog ( Rana t. temporaria). As an input of the neural network, a sum of several single responses of a neuron to an amplitude-modulated stimulus was used. The number of inputs corresponded to the number of the time readouts of the summarized response (usually 60), and the number of output elements corresponded to the number of modulation frequencies to be distinguished (from 3 to 15). In the case of a good synchronization of the input firing activity with the signal envelope, the classification was successful even if the training and classification were performed with the use of individual responses. An increase in the number of summed responses to 10 20 lead to a simplification of the training procedure. The results of the study were discussed in the context of the problem of the formation of periodicity detectors at the upper levels of the auditory pathway in vertebrates.

  6. Early auditory enrichment with music enhances auditory discrimination learning and alters NR2B protein expression in rat auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinghong; Yu, Liping; Cai, Rui; Zhang, Jiping; Sun, Xinde

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that the functional development of auditory system is substantially influenced by the structure of environmental acoustic inputs in early life. In our present study, we investigated the effects of early auditory enrichment with music on rat auditory discrimination learning. We found that early auditory enrichment with music from postnatal day (PND) 14 enhanced learning ability in auditory signal-detection task and in sound duration-discrimination task. In parallel, a significant increase was noted in NMDA receptor subunit NR2B protein expression in the auditory cortex. Furthermore, we found that auditory enrichment with music starting from PND 28 or 56 did not influence NR2B expression in the auditory cortex. No difference was found in the NR2B expression in the inferior colliculus (IC) between music-exposed and normal rats, regardless of when the auditory enrichment with music was initiated. Our findings suggest that early auditory enrichment with music influences NMDA-mediated neural plasticity, which results in enhanced auditory discrimination learning. PMID:18706452

  7. 49 CFR 236.568 - Difference between speeds authorized by roadway signal and cab signal; action required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Difference between speeds authorized by roadway... Systems Rules and Instructions; Locomotives § 236.568 Difference between speeds authorized by roadway signal and cab signal; action required. If for any reason a cab signal authorizes a speed different...

  8. 49 CFR 236.568 - Difference between speeds authorized by roadway signal and cab signal; action required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Difference between speeds authorized by roadway... Systems Rules and Instructions; Locomotives § 236.568 Difference between speeds authorized by roadway signal and cab signal; action required. If for any reason a cab signal authorizes a speed different...

  9. 49 CFR 236.568 - Difference between speeds authorized by roadway signal and cab signal; action required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Difference between speeds authorized by roadway... Systems Rules and Instructions; Locomotives § 236.568 Difference between speeds authorized by roadway signal and cab signal; action required. If for any reason a cab signal authorizes a speed different...

  10. 49 CFR 236.568 - Difference between speeds authorized by roadway signal and cab signal; action required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Difference between speeds authorized by roadway... Systems Rules and Instructions; Locomotives § 236.568 Difference between speeds authorized by roadway signal and cab signal; action required. If for any reason a cab signal authorizes a speed different...

  11. 49 CFR 236.568 - Difference between speeds authorized by roadway signal and cab signal; action required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Difference between speeds authorized by roadway... Systems Rules and Instructions; Locomotives § 236.568 Difference between speeds authorized by roadway signal and cab signal; action required. If for any reason a cab signal authorizes a speed different...

  12. Auditory synesthesias.

    PubMed

    Afra, Pegah

    2015-01-01

    Synesthesia is experienced when sensory stimulation of one sensory modality (the inducer) elicits an involuntary or automatic sensation in another sensory modality or different aspect of the same sensory modality (the concurrent). Auditory synesthesias (AS) occur when auditory stimuli trigger a variety of concurrents, or when non-auditory sensory stimulations trigger auditory synesthetic perception. The AS are divided into three types: developmental, acquired, and induced. Developmental AS are not a neurologic disorder but a different way of experiencing one's environment. They are involuntary and highly consistent experiences throughout one's life. Acquired AS have been reported in association with neurologic diseases that cause deafferentation of anterior optic pathways, with pathologic lesions affecting the central nervous system (CNS) outside of the optic pathways, as well as non-lesional cases associated with migraine, and epilepsy. It also has been reported with mood disorders as well as a single idiopathic case. Induced AS has been reported in experimental and postsurgical blindfolding, as well as intake of hallucinogenics or psychedelics. In this chapter the three different types of synesthesia, their characteristics, and phenomologic differences, as well as their possible neural mechanisms are discussed. PMID:25726281

  13. Auditory system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ades, H. W.

    1973-01-01

    The physical correlations of hearing, i.e. the acoustic stimuli, are reported. The auditory system, consisting of external ear, middle ear, inner ear, organ of Corti, basilar membrane, hair cells, inner hair cells, outer hair cells, innervation of hair cells, and transducer mechanisms, is discussed. Both conductive and sensorineural hearing losses are also examined.

  14. Can You Hear Me Now? Musical Training Shapes Functional Brain Networks for Selective Auditory Attention and Hearing Speech in Noise

    PubMed Central

    Strait, Dana L.; Kraus, Nina

    2011-01-01

    Even in the quietest of rooms, our senses are perpetually inundated by a barrage of sounds, requiring the auditory system to adapt to a variety of listening conditions in order to extract signals of interest (e.g., one speaker's voice amidst others). Brain networks that promote selective attention are thought to sharpen the neural encoding of a target signal, suppressing competing sounds and enhancing perceptual performance. Here, we ask: does musical training benefit cortical mechanisms that underlie selective attention to speech? To answer this question, we assessed the impact of selective auditory attention on cortical auditory-evoked response variability in musicians and non-musicians. Outcomes indicate strengthened brain networks for selective auditory attention in musicians in that musicians but not non-musicians demonstrate decreased prefrontal response variability with auditory attention. Results are interpreted in the context of previous work documenting perceptual and subcortical advantages in musicians for the hearing and neural encoding of speech in background noise. Musicians’ neural proficiency for selectively engaging and sustaining auditory attention to language indicates a potential benefit of music for auditory training. Given the importance of auditory attention for the development and maintenance of language-related skills, musical training may aid in the prevention, habilitation, and remediation of individuals with a wide range of attention-based language, listening and learning impairments. PMID:21716636

  15. Sensory Processing of Backward-Masking Signals in Children with Language-Learning Impairment as Assessed with the Auditory Brainstem Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marler, Jeffrey A.; Champlin, Craig A.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the possible contribution of sensory mechanisms to an auditory processing deficit shown by some children with language-learning impairment (LLI). Auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were measured from 2 groups of school-aged (8-10 years) children. One group consisted of 10 children with LLI, and the other…

  16. RNA Type III Secretion Signals that require Hfq

    SciTech Connect

    Niemann, George; Brown, Roslyn N.; Mushamiri, Ivy T.; Nguyen, Nhu T.; Taiwo, Rukayat; Stufkens, Afke; Smith, Richard D.; Adkins, Joshua N.; McDermott, Jason E.; Heffron, Fred

    2013-05-01

    effector proteins from the bacterium to a host cell; however, the secretion signal is poorly defined. Effector N-termini are thought to contain the signal, but they lack homology, possess no identifiable motif, and adopt intrinsically disordered structures. We identified a panel of RNA secretion signals that facilitated reporter translocation into host cells via a mechanism dependent upon the RNA chaperone Hfq. Each of these signals was localized to an RNA leader sequence preceding the translational start codon. To obtain this panel of RNA signals, we fused untranslated leader sequences from 42 different Salmonella effector proteins to the adenylate cyclase reporter (CyaA'), and tested each of them for translocation into J774 macrophages. RNA sequences derived from five effectors, gtgA, cigR, gogB, sseL, and steD were sufficient for CyaA' injection into host cells. The gtgA RNA also directed translocation of the β-lactamase reporter. To determine the mechanism of signal recognition, we identified proteins that bound specifically to the gtgA RNA. One of the unique proteins identified was Hfq. Translocation of all five UTR fusions was abolished in the Hfq mutant, confirming the importance of Hfq. Our results suggest that Hfq may direct a subset of RNA transcripts to the T3S apparatus for translation and secretion. Signal diversity may explain why the T3S signal has been difficult to define.

  17. Selective attention and the auditory vertex potential. I - Effects of stimulus delivery rate. II - Effects of signal intensity and masking noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwent, V. L.; Hillyard, S. A.; Galambos, R.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of varying the rate of delivery of dichotic tone pip stimuli on selective attention measured by evoked-potential amplitudes and signal detectability scores were studied. The subjects attended to one channel (ear) of tones, ignored the other, and pressed a button whenever occasional targets - tones of a slightly higher pitch were detected in the attended ear. Under separate conditions, randomized interstimulus intervals were short, medium, and long. Another study compared the effects of attention on the N1 component of the auditory evoked potential for tone pips presented alone and when white noise was added to make the tones barely above detectability threshold in a three-channel listening task. Major conclusions are that (1) N1 is enlarged to stimuli in an attended channel only in the short interstimulus interval condition (averaging 350 msec), (2) N1 and P3 are related to different modes of selective attention, and (3) attention selectivity in multichannel listening task is greater when tones are faint and/or difficult to detect.

  18. Auditory orientation in crickets: Pattern recognition controls reactive steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulet, James F. A.; Hedwig, Berthold

    2005-10-01

    Many groups of insects are specialists in exploiting sensory cues to locate food resources or conspecifics. To achieve orientation, bees and ants analyze the polarization pattern of the sky, male moths orient along the females' odor plume, and cicadas, grasshoppers, and crickets use acoustic signals to locate singing conspecifics. In comparison with olfactory and visual orientation, where learning is involved, auditory processing underlying orientation in insects appears to be more hardwired and genetically determined. In each of these examples, however, orientation requires a recognition process identifying the crucial sensory pattern to interact with a localization process directing the animal's locomotor activity. Here, we characterize this interaction. Using a sensitive trackball system, we show that, during cricket auditory behavior, the recognition process that is tuned toward the species-specific song pattern controls the amplitude of auditory evoked steering responses. Females perform small reactive steering movements toward any sound patterns. Hearing the male's calling song increases the gain of auditory steering within 2-5 s, and the animals even steer toward nonattractive sound patterns inserted into the speciesspecific pattern. This gain control mechanism in the auditory-to-motor pathway allows crickets to pursue species-specific sound patterns temporarily corrupted by environmental factors and may reflect the organization of recognition and localization networks in insects. localization | phonotaxis

  19. 33 CFR 150.720 - What are the requirements for sound signals?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the requirements for sound signals? 150.720 Section 150.720 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... are the requirements for sound signals? The sound signal on each pumping platform complex must...

  20. 33 CFR 150.720 - What are the requirements for sound signals?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the requirements for sound signals? 150.720 Section 150.720 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... are the requirements for sound signals? The sound signal on each pumping platform complex must...

  1. 33 CFR 150.720 - What are the requirements for sound signals?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are the requirements for sound signals? 150.720 Section 150.720 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... are the requirements for sound signals? The sound signal on each pumping platform complex must...

  2. 33 CFR 150.720 - What are the requirements for sound signals?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What are the requirements for sound signals? 150.720 Section 150.720 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... are the requirements for sound signals? The sound signal on each pumping platform complex must...

  3. 33 CFR 150.720 - What are the requirements for sound signals?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What are the requirements for sound signals? 150.720 Section 150.720 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... are the requirements for sound signals? The sound signal on each pumping platform complex must...

  4. 49 CFR 236.12 - Spring switch signal protection; where required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Spring switch signal protection; where required... Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.12 Spring switch signal protection; where required. Signal protection shall be provided for facing and trailing movements through spring switch...

  5. 49 CFR 236.12 - Spring switch signal protection; where required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Spring switch signal protection; where required... Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.12 Spring switch signal protection; where required. Signal protection shall be provided for facing and trailing movements through spring switch...

  6. 49 CFR 236.12 - Spring switch signal protection; where required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Spring switch signal protection; where required... Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.12 Spring switch signal protection; where required. Signal protection shall be provided for facing and trailing movements through spring switch...

  7. 49 CFR 236.12 - Spring switch signal protection; where required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Spring switch signal protection; where required... Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.12 Spring switch signal protection; where required. Signal protection shall be provided for facing and trailing movements through spring switch...

  8. 49 CFR 236.12 - Spring switch signal protection; where required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Spring switch signal protection; where required... Rules and Instructions: All Systems General § 236.12 Spring switch signal protection; where required. Signal protection shall be provided for facing and trailing movements through spring switch...

  9. Brain Dynamics of Aging: Multiscale Variability of EEG Signals at Rest and during an Auditory Oddball Task1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Sleimen-Malkoun, Rita; Perdikis, Dionysios; Müller, Viktor; Blanc, Jean-Luc; Huys, Raoul; Temprado, Jean-Jacques

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The present work focused on the study of fluctuations of cortical activity across time scales in young and older healthy adults. The main objective was to offer a comprehensive characterization of the changes of brain (cortical) signal variability during aging, and to make the link with known underlying structural, neurophysiological, and functional modifications, as well as aging theories. We analyzed electroencephalogram (EEG) data of young and elderly adults, which were collected at resting state and during an auditory oddball task. We used a wide battery of metrics that typically are separately applied in the literature, and we compared them with more specific ones that address their limits. Our procedure aimed to overcome some of the methodological limitations of earlier studies and verify whether previous findings can be reproduced and extended to different experimental conditions. In both rest and task conditions, our results mainly revealed that EEG signals presented systematic age-related changes that were time-scale-dependent with regard to the structure of fluctuations (complexity) but not with regard to their magnitude. Namely, compared with young adults, the cortical fluctuations of the elderly were more complex at shorter time scales, but less complex at longer scales, although always showing a lower variance. Additionally, the elderly showed signs of spatial, as well as between, experimental conditions dedifferentiation. By integrating these so far isolated findings across time scales, metrics, and conditions, the present study offers an overview of age-related changes in the fluctuation electrocortical activity while making the link with underlying brain dynamics. PMID:26464983

  10. Brain Dynamics of Aging: Multiscale Variability of EEG Signals at Rest and during an Auditory Oddball Task(1,2,3).

    PubMed

    Sleimen-Malkoun, Rita; Perdikis, Dionysios; Müller, Viktor; Blanc, Jean-Luc; Huys, Raoul; Temprado, Jean-Jacques; Jirsa, Viktor K

    2015-01-01

    The present work focused on the study of fluctuations of cortical activity across time scales in young and older healthy adults. The main objective was to offer a comprehensive characterization of the changes of brain (cortical) signal variability during aging, and to make the link with known underlying structural, neurophysiological, and functional modifications, as well as aging theories. We analyzed electroencephalogram (EEG) data of young and elderly adults, which were collected at resting state and during an auditory oddball task. We used a wide battery of metrics that typically are separately applied in the literature, and we compared them with more specific ones that address their limits. Our procedure aimed to overcome some of the methodological limitations of earlier studies and verify whether previous findings can be reproduced and extended to different experimental conditions. In both rest and task conditions, our results mainly revealed that EEG signals presented systematic age-related changes that were time-scale-dependent with regard to the structure of fluctuations (complexity) but not with regard to their magnitude. Namely, compared with young adults, the cortical fluctuations of the elderly were more complex at shorter time scales, but less complex at longer scales, although always showing a lower variance. Additionally, the elderly showed signs of spatial, as well as between, experimental conditions dedifferentiation. By integrating these so far isolated findings across time scales, metrics, and conditions, the present study offers an overview of age-related changes in the fluctuation electrocortical activity while making the link with underlying brain dynamics. PMID:26464983

  11. Electrophysiological study of auditory development.

    PubMed

    Lippé, S; Martinez-Montes, E; Arcand, C; Lassonde, M

    2009-12-15

    Cortical auditory evoked potential (CAEP) testing, a non-invasive technique, is widely employed to study auditory brain development. The aim of this study was to investigate the development of the auditory electrophysiological signal without addressing specific abilities such as speech or music discrimination. We were interested in the temporal and spectral domains of conventional auditory evoked potentials. We analyzed cerebral responses to auditory stimulation (broadband noises) in 40 infants and children (1 month to 5 years 6 months) and 10 adults using high-density electrophysiological recording. We hypothesized that the adult auditory response has precursors that can be identified in infant and child responses. Results confirm that complex adult CAEP responses and spectral activity patterns appear after 5 years, showing decreased involvement of lower frequencies and increased involvement of higher frequencies. In addition, time-locked response to stimulus and event-related spectral pertubation across frequencies revealed alpha and beta band contributions to the CAEP of infants and toddlers before mutation to the beta and gamma band activity of the adult response. A detailed analysis of electrophysiological responses to a perceptual stimulation revealed general development patterns and developmental precursors of the adult response. PMID:19665050

  12. Auditory short-term memory in the primate auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Scott, Brian H; Mishkin, Mortimer

    2016-06-01

    Sounds are fleeting, and assembling the sequence of inputs at the ear into a coherent percept requires auditory memory across various time scales. Auditory short-term memory comprises at least two components: an active ׳working memory' bolstered by rehearsal, and a sensory trace that may be passively retained. Working memory relies on representations recalled from long-term memory, and their rehearsal may require phonological mechanisms unique to humans. The sensory component, passive short-term memory (pSTM), is tractable to study in nonhuman primates, whose brain architecture and behavioral repertoire are comparable to our own. This review discusses recent advances in the behavioral and neurophysiological study of auditory memory with a focus on single-unit recordings from macaque monkeys performing delayed-match-to-sample (DMS) tasks. Monkeys appear to employ pSTM to solve these tasks, as evidenced by the impact of interfering stimuli on memory performance. In several regards, pSTM in monkeys resembles pitch memory in humans, and may engage similar neural mechanisms. Neural correlates of DMS performance have been observed throughout the auditory and prefrontal cortex, defining a network of areas supporting auditory STM with parallels to that supporting visual STM. These correlates include persistent neural firing, or a suppression of firing, during the delay period of the memory task, as well as suppression or (less commonly) enhancement of sensory responses when a sound is repeated as a ׳match' stimulus. Auditory STM is supported by a distributed temporo-frontal network in which sensitivity to stimulus history is an intrinsic feature of auditory processing. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Auditory working memory. PMID:26541581

  13. PTEN regulation of the proliferation and differentiation of auditory progenitors through the PTEN/PI3K/Akt-signaling pathway in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chen; Zhao, Jing; Jin, Yecheng; Hou, Congzhe; Zong, Wen; Lu, Tingting

    2014-01-01

    The organ of Corti, which is the sensory organ of hearing, consists of a single row of inner hair cells and three rows of outer hair cells in mice. The auditory hair cells develop from auditory progenitors. Hair cell development is related to several genes, including PTEN. Homozygous null mutant (PTEN−/−) mice die at around embryonic day 9, when hair cells are extremely immature. Moreover, in heterozygous PTEN knockout mice, it was found that PTEN regulates the proliferation of auditory progenitors. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism underlying this regulation. In the present study, we generated PTEN conditional knockout in the inner ear of mice and studied the aforementioned molecular mechanisms. Our results showed that PTEN knockout resulted in supernumerary hair cells, increased p-Akt level, and decreased p27kip1 level. Furthermore, the presence of supernumerary hair cells could be explained by the delayed withdrawal of auditory progenitors from the cell cycle. The increased p-Akt level correlates with p27kip1 downregulation in the cochlea in the Pax2-PTEN−/− mice. The reduced p27kip1 could not maintain the auditory progenitors in the nonproliferative state and some progenitors continued to divide. Consequently, additional progenitors differentiated into supernumerary hair cells. We suggest that PTEN regulates p27kip1 through p-Akt, thereby regulating the proliferation and differentiation of auditory progenitors. PMID:24481416

  14. 29 CFR 1926.1419 - Signals-general requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in... person may give signals to a crane/derrick at a time, except in circumstances covered by paragraph (j) of... given from the operator's direction perspective. (l) (m) Communication with multiple...

  15. 29 CFR 1926.1419 - Signals-general requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in... person may give signals to a crane/derrick at a time, except in circumstances covered by paragraph (j) of... given from the operator's direction perspective. (l) (m) Communication with multiple...

  16. 29 CFR 1926.1419 - Signals-general requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in... person may give signals to a crane/derrick at a time, except in circumstances covered by paragraph (j) of... given from the operator's direction perspective. (l) (m) Communication with multiple...

  17. 29 CFR 1926.1419 - Signals-general requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Cranes and Derricks in... person may give signals to a crane/derrick at a time, except in circumstances covered by paragraph (j) of... given from the operator's direction perspective. (l) (m) Communication with multiple...

  18. A Model of Auditory-Cognitive Processing and Relevance to Clinical Applicability.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Brent

    2016-01-01

    Hearing loss and cognitive function interact in both a bottom-up and top-down relationship. Listening effort is tied to these interactions, and models have been developed to explain their relationship. The Ease of Language Understanding model in particular has gained considerable attention in its explanation of the effect of signal distortion on speech understanding. Signal distortion can also affect auditory scene analysis ability, however, resulting in a distorted auditory scene that can affect cognitive function, listening effort, and the allocation of cognitive resources. These effects are explained through an addition to the Ease of Language Understanding model. This model can be generalized to apply to all sounds, not only speech, representing the increased effort required for auditory environmental awareness and other nonspeech auditory tasks. While the authors have measures of speech understanding and cognitive load to quantify these interactions, they are lacking measures of the effect of hearing aid technology on auditory scene analysis ability and how effort and attention varies with the quality of an auditory scene. Additionally, the clinical relevance of hearing aid technology on cognitive function and the application of cognitive measures in hearing aid fittings will be limited until effectiveness is demonstrated in real-world situations. PMID:27355775

  19. Ca2+ Signaling During Mammalian Fertilization: Requirements, Players, and Adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Wakai, Takuya; Vanderheyden, Veerle; Fissore, Rafael A.

    2011-01-01

    Changes in the intracellular concentration of calcium ([Ca2+]i) represent a vital signaling mechanism enabling communication among cells and between cells and the environment. The initiation of embryo development depends on a [Ca2+]i increase(s) in the egg, which is generally induced during fertilization. The [Ca2+]i increase signals egg activation, which is the first stage in embryo development, and that consist of biochemical and structural changes that transform eggs into zygotes. The spatiotemporal patterns of [Ca2+]i at fertilization show variability, most likely reflecting adaptations to fertilizing conditions and to the duration of embryonic cell cycles. In mammals, the focus of this review, the fertilization [Ca2+]i signal displays unique properties in that it is initiated after gamete fusion by release of a sperm-derived factor and by periodic and extended [Ca2+]i responses. Here, we will discuss the events of egg activation regulated by increases in [Ca2+]i, the possible downstream targets that effect these egg activation events, and the property and identity of molecules both in sperm and eggs that underpin the initiation and persistence of the [Ca2+]i responses in these species. PMID:21441584

  20. Auditory color constancy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kluender, Keith R.; Kiefte, Michael

    2003-10-01

    It is both true and efficient that sensorineural systems respond to change and little else. Perceptual systems do not record absolute level be it loudness, pitch, brightness, or color. This fact has been demonstrated in every sensory domain. For example, the visual system is remarkable at maintaining color constancy over widely varying illumination such as sunlight and varieties of artificial light (incandescent, fluorescent, etc.) for which spectra reflected from objects differ dramatically. Results will be reported for a series of experiments demonstrating how auditory systems similarly compensate for reliable characteristics of spectral shape in acoustic signals. Specifically, listeners' perception of vowel sounds, characterized by both local (e.g., formants) and broad (e.g., tilt) spectral composition, changes radically depending upon reliable spectral composition of precursor signals. These experiments have been conducted using a variety of precursor signals consisting of meaningful and time-reversed vocoded sentences, as well as novel nonspeech precursors consisting of multiple filter poles modulating sinusoidally across a source spectrum with specific local and broad spectral characteristics. Constancy across widely varying spectral compositions shares much in common with visual color constancy. However, auditory spectral constancy appears to be more effective than visual constancy in compensating for local spectral fluctuations. [Work supported by NIDCD DC-04072.

  1. 33 CFR 175.110 - Visual distress signals required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... passenger vessel subject to the requirements of 46 CFR chapter I, subchapter C, unless visual distress... onboard. Devices suitable for day use and devices suitable for night use, or devices suitable for both...

  2. 33 CFR 175.110 - Visual distress signals required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... passenger vessel subject to the requirements of 46 CFR chapter I, subchapter C, unless visual distress... onboard. Devices suitable for day use and devices suitable for night use, or devices suitable for both...

  3. 33 CFR 175.110 - Visual distress signals required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... passenger vessel subject to the requirements of 46 CFR chapter I, subchapter C, unless visual distress... onboard. Devices suitable for day use and devices suitable for night use, or devices suitable for both...

  4. 33 CFR 175.110 - Visual distress signals required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... passenger vessel subject to the requirements of 46 CFR chapter I, subchapter C, unless visual distress... onboard. Devices suitable for day use and devices suitable for night use, or devices suitable for both...

  5. 33 CFR 175.110 - Visual distress signals required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... passenger vessel subject to the requirements of 46 CFR chapter I, subchapter C, unless visual distress... onboard. Devices suitable for day use and devices suitable for night use, or devices suitable for both...

  6. Bat's auditory system: Corticofugal feedback and plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suga, Nobuo

    2001-05-01

    The auditory system of the mustached bat consists of physiologically distinct subdivisions for processing different types of biosonar information. It was found that the corticofugal (descending) auditory system plays an important role in improving and adjusting auditory signal processing. Repetitive acoustic stimulation, cortical electrical stimulation or auditory fear conditioning evokes plastic changes of the central auditory system. The changes are based upon egocentric selection evoked by focused positive feedback associated with lateral inhibition. Focal electric stimulation of the auditory cortex evokes short-term changes in the auditory cortex and subcortical auditory nuclei. An increase in a cortical acetylcholine level during the electric stimulation changes the cortical changes from short-term to long-term. There are two types of plastic changes (reorganizations): centripetal best frequency shifts for expanded reorganization of a neural frequency map and centrifugal best frequency shifts for compressed reorganization of the map. Which changes occur depends on the balance between inhibition and facilitation. Expanded reorganization has been found in different sensory systems and different species of mammals, whereas compressed reorganization has been thus far found only in the auditory subsystems highly specialized for echolocation. The two types of reorganizations occur in both the frequency and time domains. [Work supported by NIDCO DC00175.

  7. 47 CFR 11.52 - EAS code and Attention Signal Monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false EAS code and Attention Signal Monitoring requirements. 11.52 Section 11.52 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT... Signal will not be used to actuate two-tone decoders but will be used as an aural alert signal. (b)...

  8. 47 CFR 11.52 - EAS code and Attention Signal Monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false EAS code and Attention Signal Monitoring requirements. 11.52 Section 11.52 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT... Signal will not be used to actuate two-tone decoders but will be used as an aural alert signal. (b)...

  9. 33 CFR 149.585 - What are the requirements for sound signals?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... sound signals? 149.585 Section 149.585 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Navigation Miscellaneous § 149.585 What are the requirements for sound signals? (a) Each pumping platform complex must have a sound signal, approved under subpart 67.10 of this chapter, that has a 2-mile...

  10. 33 CFR 149.585 - What are the requirements for sound signals?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... sound signals? 149.585 Section 149.585 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Navigation Miscellaneous § 149.585 What are the requirements for sound signals? (a) Each pumping platform complex must have a sound signal, approved under subpart 67.10 of this chapter, that has a 2-mile...

  11. 33 CFR 149.585 - What are the requirements for sound signals?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... sound signals? 149.585 Section 149.585 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Navigation Miscellaneous § 149.585 What are the requirements for sound signals? (a) Each pumping platform complex must have a sound signal, approved under subpart 67.10 of this chapter, that has a 2-mile...

  12. 33 CFR 149.585 - What are the requirements for sound signals?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... sound signals? 149.585 Section 149.585 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Navigation Miscellaneous § 149.585 What are the requirements for sound signals? (a) Each pumping platform complex must have a sound signal, approved under subpart 67.10 of this chapter, that has a 2-mile...

  13. 33 CFR 149.585 - What are the requirements for sound signals?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... sound signals? 149.585 Section 149.585 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Navigation Miscellaneous § 149.585 What are the requirements for sound signals? (a) Each pumping platform complex must have a sound signal, approved under subpart 67.10 of this chapter, that has a 2-mile...

  14. 49 CFR 236.204 - Track signaled for movements in both directions, requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Track signaled for movements in both directions... directions, requirements. On track signaled for movements in both directions, a train shall cause one or more... aggregate of the stopping distances for movements in each direction. Where such opposing signals are...

  15. 49 CFR 236.204 - Track signaled for movements in both directions, requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Track signaled for movements in both directions... directions, requirements. On track signaled for movements in both directions, a train shall cause one or more... aggregate of the stopping distances for movements in each direction. Where such opposing signals are...

  16. Auditory issues in handheld land mine detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vause, Nancy L.; Letowski, Tomasz R.; Ferguson, Larry G.; Mermagen, Timothy J.

    1999-08-01

    Most handled landmine detection systems use tones or other simple acoustic signals to provide detector information to the operator. Such signals are not necessarily the best carriers of information about the characteristics of hidden objects. To be effective, the auditory signals must present the information in a manner that the operator can comfortably and efficiently, the auditory signals must present the information in a manner that the operator can comfortably and efficiently interpret under stress and high mental load. The signals must also preserve their audibility and specific properties in various adverse acoustic environments. This paper will present several issues on optimizing the audio display interface between the operator and machine.

  17. 47 CFR 80.753 - Signal strength requirements at the service area contour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Signal strength requirements at the service area contour. 80.753 Section 80.753 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED... Station VHF Coverage § 80.753 Signal strength requirements at the service area contour. (a)...

  18. 47 CFR 80.753 - Signal strength requirements at the service area contour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Signal strength requirements at the service area contour. 80.753 Section 80.753 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED... Station VHF Coverage § 80.753 Signal strength requirements at the service area contour. (a)...

  19. 47 CFR 80.753 - Signal strength requirements at the service area contour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Signal strength requirements at the service area contour. 80.753 Section 80.753 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED... Station VHF Coverage § 80.753 Signal strength requirements at the service area contour. (a)...

  20. 47 CFR 11.51 - EAS code and Attention Signal Transmission requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false EAS code and Attention Signal Transmission requirements. 11.51 Section 11.51 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) Emergency Operations § 11.51 EAS code and Attention Signal Transmission requirements. (a) Analog and digital broadcast...

  1. 47 CFR 11.51 - EAS code and Attention Signal Transmission requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false EAS code and Attention Signal Transmission requirements. 11.51 Section 11.51 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) Emergency Operations § 11.51 EAS code and Attention Signal Transmission requirements. (a) Analog and digital broadcast...

  2. 47 CFR 11.51 - EAS code and Attention Signal Transmission requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false EAS code and Attention Signal Transmission requirements. 11.51 Section 11.51 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT SYSTEM (EAS) Emergency Operations § 11.51 EAS code and Attention Signal Transmission requirements. (a) Analog and digital broadcast...

  3. Frequency band-importance functions for auditory and auditory-visual speech recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, Ken W.

    2005-04-01

    In many everyday listening environments, speech communication involves the integration of both acoustic and visual speech cues. This is especially true in noisy and reverberant environments where the speech signal is highly degraded, or when the listener has a hearing impairment. Understanding the mechanisms involved in auditory-visual integration is a primary interest of this work. Of particular interest is whether listeners are able to allocate their attention to various frequency regions of the speech signal differently under auditory-visual conditions and auditory-alone conditions. For auditory speech recognition, the most important frequency regions tend to be around 1500-3000 Hz, corresponding roughly to important acoustic cues for place of articulation. The purpose of this study is to determine the most important frequency region under auditory-visual speech conditions. Frequency band-importance functions for auditory and auditory-visual conditions were obtained by having subjects identify speech tokens under conditions where the speech-to-noise ratio of different parts of the speech spectrum is independently and randomly varied on every trial. Point biserial correlations were computed for each separate spectral region and the normalized correlations are interpreted as weights indicating the importance of each region. Relations among frequency-importance functions for auditory and auditory-visual conditions will be discussed.

  4. Low Power Adder Based Auditory Filter Architecture

    PubMed Central

    Jayanthi, V. S.

    2014-01-01

    Cochlea devices are powered up with the help of batteries and they should possess long working life to avoid replacing of devices at regular interval of years. Hence the devices with low power consumptions are required. In cochlea devices there are numerous filters, each responsible for frequency variant signals, which helps in identifying speech signals of different audible range. In this paper, multiplierless lookup table (LUT) based auditory filter is implemented. Power aware adder architectures are utilized to add the output samples of the LUT, available at every clock cycle. The design is developed and modeled using Verilog HDL, simulated using Mentor Graphics Model-Sim Simulator, and synthesized using Synopsys Design Compiler tool. The design was mapped to TSMC 65 nm technological node. The standard ASIC design methodology has been adapted to carry out the power analysis. The proposed FIR filter architecture has reduced the leakage power by 15% and increased its performance by 2.76%. PMID:25506073

  5. How Does Auditory Training Work? Joined-Up Thinking and Listening.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Melanie; Henshaw, Helen

    2015-11-01

    Auditory training aims to compensate for degradation in the auditory signal and is offered as an intervention to help alleviate the most common complaint in people with hearing loss, understanding speech in a background noise. Yet there remain many unanswered questions. This article reviews some of the key pieces of evidence that assess the evidence for whether, and how, auditory training benefits adults with hearing loss. The evidence supports that improvements occur on the trained task; however, transfer of that learning to generalized real-world benefit is much less robust. For more than a decade, there has been an increasing awareness of the role that cognition plays in listening. But more recently in the auditory training literature, there has been an increased focus on assessing how cognitive performance relevant for listening may improve with training. We argue that this is specifically the case for measures that index executive processes, such as monitoring, attention switching, and updating of working memory, all of which are required for successful listening and communication in challenging or adverse listening conditions. We propose combined auditory-cognitive training approaches, where training interventions develop cognition embedded within auditory tasks, which are most likely to offer generalized benefits to the real-world listening abilities of people with hearing loss. PMID:27587911

  6. Auditory processing efficiency deficits in children with developmental language impairments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartley, Douglas E. H.; Moore, David R.

    2002-12-01

    The ``temporal processing hypothesis'' suggests that individuals with specific language impairments (SLIs) and dyslexia have severe deficits in processing rapidly presented or brief sensory information, both within the auditory and visual domains. This hypothesis has been supported through evidence that language-impaired individuals have excess auditory backward masking. This paper presents an analysis of masking results from several studies in terms of a model of temporal resolution. Results from this modeling suggest that the masking results can be better explained by an ``auditory efficiency'' hypothesis. If impaired or immature listeners have a normal temporal window, but require a higher signal-to-noise level (poor processing efficiency), this hypothesis predicts the observed small deficits in the simultaneous masking task, and the much larger deficits in backward and forward masking tasks amongst those listeners. The difference in performance on these masking tasks is predictable from the compressive nonlinearity of the basilar membrane. The model also correctly predicts that backward masking (i) is more prone to training effects, (ii) has greater inter- and intrasubject variability, and (iii) increases less with masker level than do other masking tasks. These findings provide a new perspective on the mechanisms underlying communication disorders and auditory masking.

  7. Sustainable Land Use Requires Attention to Ecological Signals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halvorson, W.L.; Castellanos, A.E.; Murrieta-Saldivar, J.

    2003-01-01

    This case study details the difficulties of landscape management, highlighting the challenges inherent in managing natural resources when multiple agencies are involved, when the land users have no incentive for conservation, and when government agencies have too few resources for effective management. Pumping of groundwater from the aquifer of La Costa de Hermosillo in the state of Sonora, Mexico, began in 1945 and developed so quickly that by the late 1950s salinity intrusion from the Gulf of California was occurring in the wells. In the 1970s, the irrigatable land in La Costa peaked at 132,516 ha and the extracted volume of water from the aquifer peaked at around 1.14 billion cubic meters annually. By the 1980s, 105 wells of the total of 498 were contaminated with seawater and, therefore, identified for closure. At present La Costa de Hermosillo still represents 15% of the total harvested land, 16% of the total annual production, and 23% of the gross agricultural production of the state of Sonora. However, there are approximately 80,000 ha of abandoned fields due to salt water intension, lack of water and/or lack of credit available to individual farmers. This unstable situation resulted from the interplay of water management policies and practices, and farm-land policies and practices. While government agencies have been able to enforce better water use for agricultural production, there remains a significant area that requires restoration from its degraded state. For this piece of the ecosystem management puzzle, government agencies have thus far been unable to affect a solution.

  8. Demodulation processes in auditory perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feth, Lawrence L.

    1994-08-01

    The long range goal of this project is the understanding of human auditory processing of information conveyed by complex, time-varying signals such as speech, music or important environmental sounds. Our work is guided by the assumption that human auditory communication is a 'modulation - demodulation' process. That is, we assume that sound sources produce a complex stream of sound pressure waves with information encoded as variations ( modulations) of the signal amplitude and frequency. The listeners task then is one of demodulation. Much of past. psychoacoustics work has been based in what we characterize as 'spectrum picture processing.' Complex sounds are Fourier analyzed to produce an amplitude-by-frequency 'picture' and the perception process is modeled as if the listener were analyzing the spectral picture. This approach leads to studies such as 'profile analysis' and the power-spectrum model of masking. Our approach leads us to investigate time-varying, complex sounds. We refer to them as dynamic signals and we have developed auditory signal processing models to help guide our experimental work.

  9. Neural mechanisms underlying auditory feedback control of speech

    PubMed Central

    Reilly, Kevin J.; Guenther, Frank H.

    2013-01-01

    The neural substrates underlying auditory feedback control of speech were investigated using a combination of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and computational modeling. Neural responses were measured while subjects spoke monosyllabic words under two conditions: (i) normal auditory feedback of their speech, and (ii) auditory feedback in which the first formant frequency of their speech was unexpectedly shifted in real time. Acoustic measurements showed compensation to the shift within approximately 135 ms of onset. Neuroimaging revealed increased activity in bilateral superior temporal cortex during shifted feedback, indicative of neurons coding mismatches between expected and actual auditory signals, as well as right prefrontal and Rolandic cortical activity. Structural equation modeling revealed increased influence of bilateral auditory cortical areas on right frontal areas during shifted speech, indicating that projections from auditory error cells in posterior superior temporal cortex to motor correction cells in right frontal cortex mediate auditory feedback control of speech. PMID:18035557

  10. Estrogenic modulation of auditory processing: a vertebrate comparison

    PubMed Central

    Caras, Melissa L.

    2013-01-01

    Sex-steroid hormones are well-known regulators of vocal motor behavior in several organisms. A large body of evidence now indicates that these same hormones modulate processing at multiple levels of the ascending auditory pathway. The goal of this review is to provide a comparative analysis of the role of estrogens in vertebrate auditory function. Four major conclusions can be drawn from the literature: First, estrogens may influence the development of the mammalian auditory system. Second, estrogenic signaling protects the mammalian auditory system from noise- and age-related damage. Third, estrogens optimize auditory processing during periods of reproductive readiness in multiple vertebrate lineages. Finally, brain-derived estrogens can act locally to enhance auditory response properties in at least one avian species. This comparative examination may lead to a better appreciation of the role of estrogens in the processing of natural vocalizations and may provide useful insights toward alleviating auditory dysfunctions emanating from hormonal imbalances. PMID:23911849

  11. Auditory Imagery: Empirical Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Timothy L.

    2010-01-01

    The empirical literature on auditory imagery is reviewed. Data on (a) imagery for auditory features (pitch, timbre, loudness), (b) imagery for complex nonverbal auditory stimuli (musical contour, melody, harmony, tempo, notational audiation, environmental sounds), (c) imagery for verbal stimuli (speech, text, in dreams, interior monologue), (d)…

  12. Auditory Training for Central Auditory Processing Disorder.

    PubMed

    Weihing, Jeffrey; Chermak, Gail D; Musiek, Frank E

    2015-11-01

    Auditory training (AT) is an important component of rehabilitation for patients with central auditory processing disorder (CAPD). The present article identifies and describes aspects of AT as they relate to applications in this population. A description of the types of auditory processes along with information on relevant AT protocols that can be used to address these specific deficits is included. Characteristics and principles of effective AT procedures also are detailed in light of research that reflects on their value. Finally, research investigating AT in populations who show CAPD or present with auditory complaints is reported. Although efficacy data in this area are still emerging, current findings support the use of AT for treatment of auditory difficulties. PMID:27587909

  13. Pump linewidth requirements for processing dispersion-altered DQPSK signals using FWM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dúill, Seán P. Ó.; Naimi, Sepideh T.; Barry, Liam P.

    2016-05-01

    We report on a potentially deleterious issue regarding the four-wave mixing (FWM)-based processing of dispersion-altered signals. We estimate the baudrate-dependent pump linewidth tolerances by calculating the extra optical signal to noise ratio (OSNR) penalty with respect to the propagation distance. We find that the issue is not important for 10 Gbaud differential quadrature phase shift keying (DQPSK) signals, though for 28 Gbaud (and 56 Gbaud) DQPSK signals we find that the pump linewidth requirements to implement FWM based optical signal processing needs to be in the sub-MHz range in order to avoid excessive OSNR penalties for the case of dispersion-altered signals. These results are pertinent for systems employing FWM, which could be all-optical wavelength converters for packet switching or mid-span spectral inversion techniques.

  14. Representation of speech in human auditory cortex: Is it special?

    PubMed Central

    Steinschneider, Mitchell; Nourski, Kirill V.; Fishman, Yonatan I.

    2013-01-01

    Successful categorization of phonemes in speech requires that the brain analyze the acoustic signal along both spectral and temporal dimensions. Neural encoding of the stimulus amplitude envelope is critical for parsing the speech stream into syllabic units. Encoding of voice onset time (VOT) and place of articulation (POA), cues necessary for determining phonemic identity, occurs within shorter time frames. An unresolved question is whether the neural representation of speech is based on processing mechanisms that are unique to humans and shaped by learning and experience, or is based on rules governing general auditory processing that are also present in non-human animals. This question was examined by comparing the neural activity elicited by speech and other complex vocalizations in primary auditory cortex of macaques, who are limited vocal learners, with that in Heschl’s gyrus, the putative location of primary auditory cortex in humans. Entrainment to the amplitude envelope is neither specific to humans nor to human speech. VOT is represented by responses time-locked to consonant release and voicing onset in both humans and monkeys. Temporal representation of VOT is observed both for isolated syllables and for syllables embedded in the more naturalistic context of running speech. The fundamental frequency of male speakers is represented by more rapid neural activity phase-locked to the glottal pulsation rate in both humans and monkeys. In both species, the differential representation of stop consonants varying in their POA can be predicted by the relationship between the frequency selectivity of neurons and the onset spectra of the speech sounds. These findings indicate that the neurophysiology of primary auditory cortex is similar in monkeys and humans despite their vastly different experience with human speech, and that Heschl’s gyrus is engaged in general auditory, and not language-specific, processing. PMID:23792076

  15. Functional imaging of auditory scene analysis.

    PubMed

    Gutschalk, Alexander; Dykstra, Andrew R

    2014-01-01

    Our auditory system is constantly faced with the task of decomposing the complex mixture of sound arriving at the ears into perceptually independent streams constituting accurate representations of individual sound sources. This decomposition, termed auditory scene analysis, is critical for both survival and communication, and is thought to underlie both speech and music perception. The neural underpinnings of auditory scene analysis have been studied utilizing invasive experiments with animal models as well as non-invasive (MEG, EEG, and fMRI) and invasive (intracranial EEG) studies conducted with human listeners. The present article reviews human neurophysiological research investigating the neural basis of auditory scene analysis, with emphasis on two classical paradigms termed streaming and informational masking. Other paradigms - such as the continuity illusion, mistuned harmonics, and multi-speaker environments - are briefly addressed thereafter. We conclude by discussing the emerging evidence for the role of auditory cortex in remapping incoming acoustic signals into a perceptual representation of auditory streams, which are then available for selective attention and further conscious processing. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Human Auditory Neuroimaging. PMID:23968821

  16. CSK Controls Retinoic Acid Receptor (RAR) Signaling: a RAR-c-SRC Signaling Axis Is Required for Neuritogenic Differentiation▿

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Nandini; De, Pradip K.; Wang, Mu; Zhang, Hongying; Dobrota, Erika A.; Robertson, Kent A.; Durden, Donald L.

    2007-01-01

    Herein, we report the first evidence that c-SRC is required for retinoic acid (RA) receptor (RAR) signaling, an observation that suggests a new paradigm for this family of nuclear hormone receptors. We observed that CSK negatively regulates RAR functions required for neuritogenic differentiation. CSK overexpression inhibited RA-mediated neurite outgrowth, a result which correlated with the inhibition of the SFK c-SRC. Consistent with an extranuclear effect of CSK on RAR signaling and neurite outgrowth, CSK overexpression blocked the downstream activation of RAC1. The conversion of GDP-RAC1 to GTP-RAC1 parallels the activation of c-SRC as early as 15 min following all-trans-retinoic acid treatment in LA-N-5 cells. The cytoplasmic colocalization of c-SRC and RARγ was confirmed by immunofluorescence staining and confocal microscopy. A direct and ligand-dependent binding of RAR with SRC was observed by surface plasmon resonance, and coimmunoprecipitation studies confirmed the in vivo binding of RARγ to c-SRC. Deletion of a proline-rich domain within RARγ abrogated this interaction in vivo. CSK blocked the RAR-RA-dependent activation of SRC and neurite outgrowth in LA-N-5 cells. The results suggest that transcriptional signaling events mediated by RA-RAR are necessary but not sufficient to mediate complex differentiation in neuronal cells. We have elucidated a nongenomic extranuclear signal mediated by the RAR-SRC interaction that is negatively regulated by CSK and is required for RA-induced neuronal differentiation. PMID:17325034

  17. Magnetic resonance imaging of the internal auditory canal

    SciTech Connect

    Daniels, D.L.; Herfkins, R.; Koehler, P.R.; Millen, S.J.; Shaffer, K.A.; Williams, A.L.; Haughton, V.M.

    1984-04-01

    Three patients with exclusively or predominantly intracanalicular neuromas and 5 with presumably normal internal auditory canals were examined with prototype 1.4- or 1.5-tesla magnetic resonance (MR) scanners. MR images showed the 7th and 8th cranial nerves in the internal auditory canal. The intracanalicular neuromas had larger diameter and slightly greater signal strength than the nerves. Early results suggest that minimal enlargement of the nerves can be detected even in the internal auditory canal.

  18. Improved Long-Term Memory via Enhancing cGMP-PKG Signaling Requires cAMP-PKA Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bollen, Eva; Puzzo, Daniela; Rutten, Kris; Privitera, Lucia; De Vry, Jochen; Vanmierlo, Tim; Kenis, Gunter; Palmeri, Agostino; D'Hooge, Rudi; Balschun, Detlef; Steinbusch, Harry MW; Blokland, Arjan; Prickaerts, Jos

    2014-01-01

    Memory consolidation is defined by the stabilization of a memory trace after acquisition, and consists of numerous molecular cascades that mediate synaptic plasticity. Commonly, a distinction is made between an early and a late consolidation phase, in which early refers to the first hours in which labile synaptic changes occur, whereas late consolidation relates to stable and long-lasting synaptic changes induced by de novo protein synthesis. How these phases are linked at a molecular level is not yet clear. Here we studied the interaction of the cyclic nucleotide-mediated pathways during the different phases of memory consolidation in rodents. In addition, the same pathways were studied in a model of neuronal plasticity, long-term potentiation (LTP). We demonstrated that cGMP/protein kinase G (PKG) signaling mediates early memory consolidation as well as early-phase LTP, whereas cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling mediates late consolidation and late-phase-like LTP. In addition, we show for the first time that early-phase cGMP/PKG signaling requires late-phase cAMP/PKA-signaling in both LTP and long-term memory formation. PMID:24813825

  19. Drosophila PI4KIIIalpha is required in follicle cells for oocyte polarization and Hippo signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yan; Denef, Natalie; Tang, Charm; Schüpbach, Trudi

    2011-01-01

    In a genetic screen we isolated mutations in CG10260, which encodes a phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase (PI4KIIIalpha), and found that PI4KIIIalpha is required for Hippo signaling in Drosophila ovarian follicle cells. PI4KIIIalpha mutations in the posterior follicle cells lead to oocyte polarization defects similar to those caused by mutations in the Hippo signaling pathway. PI4KIIIalpha mutations also cause misexpression of well-established Hippo signaling targets. The Merlin-Expanded-Kibra complex is required at the apical membrane for Hippo activity. In PI4KIIIalpha mutant follicle cells, Merlin fails to localize to the apical domain. Our analysis of PI4KIIIalpha mutants provides a new link in Hippo signal transduction from the cell membrane to its core kinase cascade. PMID:21429988

  20. Stray signal requirements for compact range reflectors based on RCS measurement errors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Teh-Hong; Burnside, Walter D.

    1991-01-01

    The authors present a performance criterion for compact range reflectors such that their edge diffracted stray signal levels meet a reasonable radar cross section (RCS) measurement error requirement. It is shown by example that one of the significant error sources is the diffracted fields emanating from the edges or junctions of the reflector. This measurement error is demonstrated by placing a diagonal square flat plate in the target zone and rotating it to appropriate angles. These angles are determined by bisecting the plane wave and stray signal directions. This results in a peak bistatic measurement of the edge diffracted stray signal. It is proposed that the diagonal flat plate be used to evaluate new reflector designs as well as existing systems. A reasonable stray signal performance level has been developed so that new reflector systems can be characterized in terms of an RCS measurement error requirement.

  1. Pre-LTP requires extracellular signal-regulated kinase in the ACC.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Manabu; Tian, Zhen; Darvish-Ghane, Soroush; Zhuo, Min

    2016-02-01

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinase is an important protein kinase for cortical plasticity. Long-term potentiation in the anterior cingulate cortex is believed to play important roles in chronic pain, fear, and anxiety. Previous studies of extracellular signal-regulated kinase are mainly focused on postsynaptic form of long-term potentiation (post-long-term potentiation). Little is known about the relationship between extracellular signal-regulated kinase and presynaptic long-term potentiation (pre-long-term potentiation) in cortical synapses. In this study, we examined whether pre-long-term potentiation in the anterior cingulate cortex requires the activation of presynaptic extracellular signal-regulated kinase. We found that p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors, PD98059 and U0126, suppressed the induction of pre-long-term potentiation. By contrast, these inhibitors did not affect the maintenance of pre-long-term potentiation. Using pharmacological inhibitors, we found that pre-long-term potentiation recorded for 1 h did not require transcriptional or translational processes. Our results strongly indicate that the activation of presynaptic extracellular signal-regulated kinase is required for the induction of pre-long-term potentiation, and this involvement may explain the contribution of extracellular signal-regulated kinase to mood disorders. PMID:27178245

  2. Pre-LTP requires extracellular signal-regulated kinase in the ACC

    PubMed Central

    Yamanaka, Manabu; Tian, Zhen; Darvish-Ghane, Soroush

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular signal-regulated kinase is an important protein kinase for cortical plasticity. Long-term potentiation in the anterior cingulate cortex is believed to play important roles in chronic pain, fear, and anxiety. Previous studies of extracellular signal-regulated kinase are mainly focused on postsynaptic form of long-term potentiation (post-long-term potentiation). Little is known about the relationship between extracellular signal-regulated kinase and presynaptic long-term potentiation (pre-long-term potentiation) in cortical synapses. In this study, we examined whether pre-long-term potentiation in the anterior cingulate cortex requires the activation of presynaptic extracellular signal-regulated kinase. We found that p42/p44 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors, PD98059 and U0126, suppressed the induction of pre-long-term potentiation. By contrast, these inhibitors did not affect the maintenance of pre-long-term potentiation. Using pharmacological inhibitors, we found that pre-long-term potentiation recorded for 1 h did not require transcriptional or translational processes. Our results strongly indicate that the activation of presynaptic extracellular signal-regulated kinase is required for the induction of pre-long-term potentiation, and this involvement may explain the contribution of extracellular signal-regulated kinase to mood disorders. PMID:27178245

  3. Differential requirement for BMP signaling in atrial and ventricular lineages establishes cardiac chamber proportionality

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Sara R.; Yelon, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    The function of an organ relies upon the proper relative proportions of its individual operational components. For example, effective embryonic circulation requires the appropriate relative sizes of each of the distinct pumps created by the atrial and ventricular cardiac chambers. Although the differences between atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes are well established, little is known about the mechanisms regulating production of proportional numbers of each cell type. We find that mutation of the zebrafish type I BMP receptor gene alk8 causes reduction of atrial size without affecting the ventricle. Loss of atrial tissue is evident in the lateral mesoderm prior to heart tube formation and results from the inhibition of BMP signaling during cardiac progenitor specification stages. Comparison of the effects of decreased and increased BMP signaling further demonstrates that atrial cardiomyocyte production correlates with levels of BMP signaling while ventricular cardiomyocyte production is less susceptible to manipulation of BMP signaling. Additionally, mosaic analysis provides evidence for a cell-autonomous requirement for BMP signaling during cardiomyocyte formation and chamber fate assignment. Together, our studies uncover a new role for BMP signaling in the regulation of chamber size, supporting a model in which differential reception of cardiac inductive signals establishes chamber proportion. PMID:19232521

  4. Conformational signaling required for synaptic plasticity by the NMDA receptor complex.

    PubMed

    Aow, Jonathan; Dore, Kim; Malinow, Roberto

    2015-11-24

    The NMDA receptor (NMDAR) is known to transmit important information by conducting calcium ions. However, some recent studies suggest that activation of NMDARs can trigger synaptic plasticity in the absence of ion flow. Does ligand binding transmit information to signaling molecules that mediate synaptic plasticity? Using Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging of fluorescently tagged proteins expressed in neurons, conformational signaling is identified within the NMDAR complex that is essential for downstream actions. Ligand binding transiently reduces FRET between the NMDAR cytoplasmic domain (cd) and the associated protein phosphatase 1 (PP1), requiring NMDARcd movement, and persistently reduces FRET between the NMDARcd and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), a process requiring PP1 activity. These studies directly monitor agonist-driven conformational signaling at the NMDAR complex required for synaptic plasticity. PMID:26553983

  5. Auditory imagery: empirical findings.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Timothy L

    2010-03-01

    The empirical literature on auditory imagery is reviewed. Data on (a) imagery for auditory features (pitch, timbre, loudness), (b) imagery for complex nonverbal auditory stimuli (musical contour, melody, harmony, tempo, notational audiation, environmental sounds), (c) imagery for verbal stimuli (speech, text, in dreams, interior monologue), (d) auditory imagery's relationship to perception and memory (detection, encoding, recall, mnemonic properties, phonological loop), and (e) individual differences in auditory imagery (in vividness, musical ability and experience, synesthesia, musical hallucinosis, schizophrenia, amusia) are considered. It is concluded that auditory imagery (a) preserves many structural and temporal properties of auditory stimuli, (b) can facilitate auditory discrimination but interfere with auditory detection, (c) involves many of the same brain areas as auditory perception, (d) is often but not necessarily influenced by subvocalization, (e) involves semantically interpreted information and expectancies, (f) involves depictive components and descriptive components, (g) can function as a mnemonic but is distinct from rehearsal, and (h) is related to musical ability and experience (although the mechanisms of that relationship are not clear). PMID:20192565

  6. Notch1 endocytosis is induced by ligand and is required for signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Chapman, G; Major, J A; Iyer, K; James, A C; Pursglove, S E; Moreau, J L M; Dunwoodie, S L

    2016-01-01

    The Notch signalling pathway is widely utilised during embryogenesis in situations where cell-cell interactions are important for cell fate specification and differentiation. DSL ligand endocytosis into the ligand-expressing cell is an important aspect of Notch signalling because it is thought to supply the force needed to separate the Notch heterodimer to initiate signal transduction. A functional role for receptor endocytosis during Notch signal transduction is more controversial. Here we have used live-cell imaging to examine trafficking of the Notch1 receptor in response to ligand binding. Contact with cells expressing ligands induced internalisation and intracellular trafficking of Notch1. Notch1 endocytosis was accompanied by transendocytosis of ligand into the Notch1-expressing signal-receiving cell. Ligand caused Notch1 endocytosis into SARA-positive endosomes in a manner dependent on clathrin and dynamin function. Moreover, inhibition of endocytosis in the receptor-expressing cell impaired ligand-induced Notch1 signalling. Our findings resolve conflicting observations from mammalian and Drosophila studies by demonstrating that ligand-dependent activation of Notch1 signalling requires receptor endocytosis. Endocytosis of Notch1 may provide a force on the ligand:receptor complex that is important for potent signal transduction. PMID:26522918

  7. Developmental shifts in gene expression in the auditory forebrain during the sensitive period for song learning

    PubMed Central

    London, Sarah E.; Dong, Shu; Replogle, Kirstin; Clayton, David F.

    2009-01-01

    A male zebra finch begins to learn to sing by memorizing a tutor’s song during a sensitive period in juvenile development. Tutor song memorization requires molecular signaling within the auditory forebrain. Using microarray and in situ hybridizations, we tested whether the auditory forebrain at an age just prior to tutoring expresses a different set of genes compared to later in life after song learning has ceased. Microarray analysis revealed differences in expression of thousands of genes in the male auditory forebrain at posthatch day 20 (P20) compared to adulthood. Further, song playbacks had essentially no impact on gene expression in P20 auditory forebrain, but altered expression of hundreds of genes in adults. Most genes that were song-responsive in adults were expressed at constitutively high levels at P20. Using in situ hybridization with a representative sample of 44 probes, we confirmed these effects and found that birds at P20 and P45 were similar in their gene expression patterns. Additionally, 8 of the probes showed male-female differences in expression. We conclude that the developing auditory forebrain is in a very different molecular state from the adult, despite its relatively mature gross morphology and electrophysiological responsiveness to song stimuli. Developmental gene expression changes may contribute to fine-tuning of cellular and molecular properties necessary for song learning. PMID:19360720

  8. Requirement of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling in pronephric kidney development.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Jon P; Miller, Rachel K; Zhou, Xiaolan; Weidinger, Gilbert; Deroo, Tom; Denayer, Tinneke; Park, Jae-Il; Ji, Hong; Hong, Ji Yeon; Li, Annette; Moon, Randall T; Jones, Elizabeth A; Vleminckx, Kris; Vize, Peter D; McCrea, Pierre D

    2009-01-01

    The pronephric kidney controls water and electrolyte balance during early fish and amphibian embryogenesis. Many Wnt signaling components have been implicated in kidney development. Specifically, in Xenopus pronephric development as well as the murine metanephroi, the secreted glycoprotein Wnt-4 has been shown to be essential for renal tubule formation. Despite the importance of Wnt signals in kidney organogenesis, little is known of the definitive downstream signaling pathway(s) that mediate their effects. Here we report that inhibition of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling within the pronephric field of Xenopus results in significant losses to kidney epithelial tubulogenesis with little or no effect on adjoining axis or somite development. We find that the requirement for Wnt/beta-catenin signaling extends throughout the pronephric primordium and is essential for the development of proximal and distal tubules of the pronephros as well as for the development of the duct and glomus. Although less pronounced than effects upon later pronephric tubule differentiation, inhibition of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway decreased expression of early pronephric mesenchymal markers indicating it is also needed in early pronephric patterning. We find that upstream inhibition of Wnt/beta-catenin signals in zebrafish likewise reduces pronephric epithelial tubulogenesis. We also find that exogenous activation of Wnt/beta-catenin signaling within the Xenopus pronephric field results in significant tubulogenic losses. Together, we propose Wnt/beta-catenin signaling is required for pronephric tubule, duct and glomus formation in Xenopus laevis, and this requirement is conserved in zebrafish pronephric tubule formation. PMID:19100832

  9. Spacecraft-spacecraft radio-metric tracking: Signal acquisition requirements and application to Mars approach navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, R. D.; Thurman, S.; Edwards, C.

    1994-01-01

    Doppler and ranging measurements between spacecraft can be obtained only when the ratio of the total received signal power to noise power density (P(sub t)/N(sub 0)) at the receiving spacecraft is sufficiently large that reliable signal detection can be achieved within a reasonable time period. In this article, the requirement on P(sub t)/N(sub 0) for reliable carrier signal detection is calculated as a function of various system parameters, including characteristics of the spacecraft computing hardware and a priori uncertainty in spacecraft-spacecraft relative velocity and acceleration. Also calculated is the P(sub t)/N(sub 0) requirements for reliable detection of a ranging signal, consisting of a carrier with pseudonoise (PN) phase modulation. Once the P(sub t)/N(sub 0) requirement is determined, then for a given set of assumed spacecraft telecommunication characteristics (transmitted signal power, antenna gains, and receiver noise temperatures) it is possible to calculate the maximum range at which a carrier signal or ranging signal may be acquired. For example, if a Mars lander and a spacecraft approaching Mars are each equipped with 1-m-diameter antennas, the transmitted power is 5 W, and the receiver noise temperatures are 350 K, then S-band carrier signal acquisition can be achieved at ranges exceeding 10 million km. An error covariance analysis illustrates the utility of in situ Doppler and ranging measurements for Mars approach navigation. Covariance analysis results indicate that navigation accuracies of a few km can be achieved with either data type. The analysis also illustrates dependency of the achievable accuracy on the approach trajectory velocity.

  10. Auditory target detection in reverberation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, Patrick M.; Freyman, Richard L.; Balakrishnan, Uma

    2004-04-01

    Measurements and theoretical predictions of auditory target detection in simulated reverberant conditions are reported. The target signals were pulsed 13-octave bands of noise and the masker signal was a continuous wideband noise. Target and masker signals were passed through a software simulation of a reverberant room with a rigid sphere modeling a listener's head. The location of the target was fixed while the location of the masker was varied in the simulated room. Degree of reverberation was controlled by varying the uniform acoustic absorption of the simulated room's surfaces. The resulting target and masker signals were presented to the listeners over headphones in monaural-left, monaural-right, or binaural listening modes. Changes in detection performance in the monaural listening modes were largely predictable from the changes in target-to-masker ratio in the target band, but with a few dB of extra masking in reverberation. Binaural detection performance was generally well predicted by applying Durlach's [in Foundations of Modern Auditory Theory (Academic, New York, 1972)] equalization-cancellation theory to the direct-plus-reverberant ear signals. Predictions in all cases were based on a statistical description of room acoustics and on acoustic diffraction by a sphere. The success of these detection models in the present well-controlled reverberant conditions suggests that they can be used to incorporate listening mode and source location as factors in speech-intelligibility predictions.

  11. Specific regions within the embryonic midbrain and cerebellum require different levels of FGF signaling during development

    PubMed Central

    Basson, M. Albert; Echevarria, Diego; Ahn, Christina Petersen; Sudarov, Anamaria; Joyner, Alexandra L.; Mason, Ivor J.; Martinez, Salvador; Martin, Gail R.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Development of the prospective midbrain and cerebellum are coordinated by FGF ligands produced by the isthmic organizer. Previous studies have suggested that the midbrain and cerebellum require different levels of FGF signaling for their development. However, little is known about the extent to which specific regions within these two parts of the brain differ in their requirement for FGF signaling during embryogenesis. In this study, we have explored the effects of inhibiting FGF signaling within the embryonic midbrain (mesencephalon) and cerebellum (rhombomere 1) by misexpressing Sprouty2 (Spry2) specifically in the mouse mesencephalon and rhombomere 1 from an early stage. We show that such Spry2 misexpression moderately reduces FGF signaling, and that this reduction causes the death of cells in the anterior mesencephalon, the region furthest from the source of FGF ligands. Interestingly, the remaining cells in the posterior mesencephalon develop into anterior midbrain, indicating that a low level of FGF signaling is sufficient to promote only anterior midbrain development. Spry2 misexpression also affects development of the vermis, the medial part of the cerebellum that spans the midline. We found that whereas misexpression of Spry2 alone caused loss of the anterior vermis, reducing FGF signaling further, by decreasing Fgf8 gene dosage, resulted in loss of the entire vermis. We provide evidence that cell death is not responsible for this tissue loss. Instead, our data suggest that the vermis fails to develop because reducing FGF signaling perturbs the balance between vermis and roof plate development in rhombomere 1. We suggest a molecular explanation for this phenomenon by providing evidence that FGF signaling functions to inhibit the BMP signaling that promotes roof plate development. PMID:18216176

  12. Auditory Temporal Processing Deficits in Children with Reading Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen-Mimran, Ravit; Sapir, Shimon

    2007-01-01

    The role of central auditory processing in reading skill development and reading disorders is unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine whether individuals with specific reading disabilities (SRD) have deficits in processing rapidly presented, serially ordered non-speech auditory signals. To this end, we compared 12 children with SRD and…

  13. Effects of an Auditory Lateralization Training in Children Suspected to Central Auditory Processing Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Lotfi, Yones; Moosavi, Abdollah; Bakhshi, Enayatollah; Sadjedi, Hamed

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Central auditory processing disorder [(C)APD] refers to a deficit in auditory stimuli processing in nervous system that is not due to higher-order language or cognitive factors. One of the problems in children with (C)APD is spatial difficulties which have been overlooked despite their significance. Localization is an auditory ability to detect sound sources in space and can help to differentiate between the desired speech from other simultaneous sound sources. Aim of this research was investigating effects of an auditory lateralization training on speech perception in presence of noise/competing signals in children suspected to (C)APD. Subjects and Methods In this analytical interventional study, 60 children suspected to (C)APD were selected based on multiple auditory processing assessment subtests. They were randomly divided into two groups: control (mean age 9.07) and training groups (mean age 9.00). Training program consisted of detection and pointing to sound sources delivered with interaural time differences under headphones for 12 formal sessions (6 weeks). Spatial word recognition score (WRS) and monaural selective auditory attention test (mSAAT) were used to follow the auditory lateralization training effects. Results This study showed that in the training group, mSAAT score and spatial WRS in noise (p value≤0.001) improved significantly after the auditory lateralization training. Conclusions We used auditory lateralization training for 6 weeks and showed that auditory lateralization can improve speech understanding in noise significantly. The generalization of this results needs further researches. PMID:27626084

  14. FOXO signaling is required for disuse muscle atrophy and is directly regulated by Hsp70

    PubMed Central

    Senf, Sarah M.; Dodd, Stephen L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine whether heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) directly regulates forkhead box O (FOXO) signaling in skeletal muscle. This aim stems from previous work demonstrating that Hsp70 overexpression inhibits disuse-induced FOXO transactivation and prevents muscle fiber atrophy. However, although FOXO is sufficient to cause muscle wasting, no data currently exist on the requirement of FOXO signaling in the progression of physiological muscle wasting, in vivo. In the current study we show that specific inhibition of FOXO, via expression of a dominant-negative FOXO3a, in rat soleus muscle during disuse prevented >40% of muscle fiber atrophy, demonstrating that FOXO signaling is required for disuse muscle atrophy. Subsequent experiments determined whether Hsp70 directly regulates FOXO3a signaling when independently activated in skeletal muscle, via transfection of FOXO3a. We show that Hsp70 inhibits FOXO3a-dependent transcription in a gene-specific manner. Specifically, Hsp70 inhibited FOXO3a-induced promoter activation of atrogin-1, but not MuRF1. Further studies showed that a FOXO3a DNA-binding mutant can activate MuRF1, but not atrogin-1, suggesting that FOXO3a activates these two genes through differential mechanisms. In summary, FOXO signaling is required for physiological muscle atrophy and is directly inhibited by Hsp70. PMID:19864323

  15. Attending to auditory memory.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Jacqueline F; Moscovitch, Morris; Alain, Claude

    2016-06-01

    Attention to memory describes the process of attending to memory traces when the object is no longer present. It has been studied primarily for representations of visual stimuli with only few studies examining attention to sound object representations in short-term memory. Here, we review the interplay of attention and auditory memory with an emphasis on 1) attending to auditory memory in the absence of related external stimuli (i.e., reflective attention) and 2) effects of existing memory on guiding attention. Attention to auditory memory is discussed in the context of change deafness, and we argue that failures to detect changes in our auditory environments are most likely the result of a faulty comparison system of incoming and stored information. Also, objects are the primary building blocks of auditory attention, but attention can also be directed to individual features (e.g., pitch). We review short-term and long-term memory guided modulation of attention based on characteristic features, location, and/or semantic properties of auditory objects, and propose that auditory attention to memory pathways emerge after sensory memory. A neural model for auditory attention to memory is developed, which comprises two separate pathways in the parietal cortex, one involved in attention to higher-order features and the other involved in attention to sensory information. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Auditory working memory. PMID:26638836

  16. Cost analysis for upgraded passenger car rear signal lighting requirements. Final report, December 1979-June 1980

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, R.F.; Wakeley, H.; Viergutz, O.J.

    1980-03-01

    A production cost analysis was performed on four candidate vehicle rear signal lighting system upgrades. The systems studied were: (1) a high-mounted brake (stop) lamp only; (2) a deceleration signal only; (3) combination of high-mounted brake lamp and the deceleration signal; and a (4) mandatory yellow (amber) rear turn signal lamp. The specific performance levels for the systems were established and the necessary changes in vehicle hardware were determined. Two of each market size class of vehicles were selected for design studies and quarter-scale design layouts of the vehicle modifications were made. Using standard production cost estimating techniques, the consumer costs of each of the four upgraded systems were estimated. Assuming any upgraded rear lighting requirements to become effective on 1983 models, the effects of leadtime on the manufacturers is discussed. The effects on fuel operating and maintenance costs are considered.

  17. Cell-specific activity-dependent fractionation of layer 2/3→5B excitatory signaling in mouse auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Ankur; Middleton, Jason W; Anderson, Charles T; Borges, Katharine; Suter, Benjamin A; Shepherd, Gordon M G; Tzounopoulos, Thanos

    2015-02-18

    Auditory cortex (AC) layer 5B (L5B) contains both corticocollicular neurons, a type of pyramidal-tract neuron projecting to the inferior colliculus, and corticocallosal neurons, a type of intratelencephalic neuron projecting to contralateral AC. Although it is known that these neuronal types have distinct roles in auditory processing and different response properties to sound, the synaptic and intrinsic mechanisms shaping their input-output functions remain less understood. Here, we recorded in brain slices of mouse AC from retrogradely labeled corticocollicular and neighboring corticocallosal neurons in L5B. Corticocollicular neurons had, on average, lower input resistance, greater hyperpolarization-activated current (Ih), depolarized resting membrane potential, faster action potentials, initial spike doublets, and less spike-frequency adaptation. In paired recordings between single L2/3 and labeled L5B neurons, the probabilities of connection, amplitude, latency, rise time, and decay time constant of the unitary EPSC were not different for L2/3→corticocollicular and L2/3→corticocallosal connections. However, short trains of unitary EPSCs showed no synaptic depression in L2/3→corticocollicular connections, but substantial depression in L2/3→corticocallosal connections. Synaptic potentials in L2/3→corticocollicular connections decayed faster and showed less temporal summation, consistent with increased Ih in corticocollicular neurons, whereas synaptic potentials in L2/3→corticocallosal connections showed more temporal summation. Extracellular L2/3 stimulation at two different rates resulted in spiking in L5B neurons; for corticocallosal neurons the spike rate was frequency dependent, but for corticocollicular neurons it was not. Together, these findings identify cell-specific intrinsic and synaptic mechanisms that divide intracortical synaptic excitation from L2/3 to L5B into two functionally distinct pathways with different input-output functions. PMID

  18. Two-signal requirement for growth-promoting function of Yap in hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Su, Tian; Bondar, Tanya; Zhou, Xu; Zhang, Cuiling; He, Hang; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2015-01-01

    The transcriptional coactivator Yes-associated protein (Yap) promotes proliferation and inhibits apoptosis, suggesting that Yap functions as an oncogene. Most oncogenes, however, require a combination of at least two signals to promote proliferation. In this study, we present evidence that Yap activation is insufficient to promote growth in the otherwise normal tissue. Using a mosaic mouse model, we demonstrate that Yap overexpression in a fraction of hepatocytes does not lead to their clonal expansion, as proliferation is counterbalanced by increased apoptosis. To shift the activity of Yap towards growth, a second signal provided by tissue damage or inflammation is required. In response to liver injury, Yap drives clonal expansion, suppresses hepatocyte differentiation, and promotes a progenitor phenotype. These results suggest that Yap activation is insufficient to promote growth in the absence of a second signal thus coordinating tissue homeostasis and repair. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02948.001 PMID:25667983

  19. Controlled levels of canonical Wnt signaling are required for neural crest migration.

    PubMed

    Maj, Ewa; Künneke, Lutz; Loresch, Elisabeth; Grund, Anita; Melchert, Juliane; Pieler, Tomas; Aspelmeier, Timo; Borchers, Annette

    2016-09-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling plays a dominant role in the development of the neural crest (NC), a highly migratory cell population that generates a vast array of cell types. Canonical Wnt signaling is required for NC induction as well as differentiation, however its role in NC migration remains largely unknown. Analyzing nuclear localization of β-catenin as readout for canonical Wnt activity, we detect nuclear β-catenin in premigratory but not migratory Xenopus NC cells suggesting that canonical Wnt activity has to decrease to basal levels to enable NC migration. To define a possible function of canonical Wnt signaling in Xenopus NC migration, canonical Wnt signaling was modulated at different time points after NC induction. This was accomplished using either chemical modulators affecting β-catenin stability or inducible glucocorticoid fusion constructs of Lef/Tcf transcription factors. In vivo analysis of NC migration by whole mount in situ hybridization demonstrates that ectopic activation of canonical Wnt signaling inhibits cranial NC migration. Further, NC transplantation experiments confirm that this effect is tissue-autonomous. In addition, live-cell imaging in combination with biophysical data analysis of explanted NC cells confirms the in vivo findings and demonstrates that modulation of canonical Wnt signaling affects the ability of NC cells to perform single cell migration. Thus, our data support the hypothesis that canonical Wnt signaling needs to be tightly controlled to enable migration of NC cells. PMID:27341758

  20. 47 CFR 11.52 - EAS code and Attention Signal Monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... requirements. 11.52 Section 11.52 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT...-tone decoders but will be used as an aural alert signal. (b) If manual interrupt is used as authorized... Integrated Public Alert and Warning System (IPAWS) to enable (whether through “pull” interface...

  1. 47 CFR 11.52 - EAS code and Attention Signal Monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... requirements. 11.52 Section 11.52 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT...-tone decoders but will be used as an aural alert signal. (b) If manual interrupt is used as authorized... Integrated Public Alert and Warning System (IPAWS) to enable (whether through “pull” interface...

  2. 47 CFR 11.52 - EAS code and Attention Signal Monitoring requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... requirements. 11.52 Section 11.52 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL EMERGENCY ALERT...-tone decoders but will be used as an aural alert signal. (b) If manual interrupt is used as authorized... Integrated Public Alert and Warning System (IPAWS) to enable (whether through “pull” interface...

  3. Notch-signalling is required for head regeneration and tentacle patterning in Hydra.

    PubMed

    Münder, Sandra; Tischer, Susanne; Grundhuber, Maresa; Büchels, Nathalie; Bruckmeier, Nadine; Eckert, Stefanie; Seefeldt, Carolin A; Prexl, Andrea; Käsbauer, Tina; Böttger, Angelika

    2013-11-01

    Local self-activation and long ranging inhibition provide a mechanism for setting up organising regions as signalling centres for the development of structures in the surrounding tissue. The adult hydra hypostome functions as head organiser. After hydra head removal it is newly formed and complete heads can be regenerated. The molecular components of this organising region involve Wnt-signalling and β-catenin. However, it is not known how correct patterning of hypostome and tentacles are achieved in the hydra head and whether other signals in addition to HyWnt3 are needed for re-establishing the new organiser after head removal. Here we show that Notch-signalling is required for re-establishing the organiser during regeneration and that this is due to its role in restricting tentacle activation. Blocking Notch-signalling leads to the formation of irregular head structures characterised by excess tentacle tissue and aberrant expression of genes that mark the tentacle boundaries. This indicates a role for Notch-signalling in defining the tentacle pattern in the hydra head. Moreover, lateral inhibition by HvNotch and its target HyHes are required for head regeneration and without this the formation of the β-catenin/Wnt dependent head organiser is impaired. Work on prebilaterian model organisms has shown that the Wnt-pathway is important for setting up signalling centres for axial patterning in early multicellular animals. Our data suggest that the integration of Wnt-signalling with Notch-Delta activity was also involved in the evolution of defined body plans in animals. PMID:24012879

  4. Spatial Coherence in Auditory Cortical Activity Fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Takamasa; Katura, Takusige; Yamazaki, Kyoko; Tanaka, Shigeru; Iwamoto, Mitsumasa; Tanaka, Naoki

    2007-07-01

    We examined activity fluctuations as ongoing and spontaneous activities that were recorded with voltage sensitive dye imaging in the auditory cortex of guinea pigs. We investigated whether such activities demonstrated spatial coherence, which represents the cortical functional organization. We used independent component analysis to extract neural activities from observed signals and a scaled signal-plus-noise model to estimate ongoing activities from the neural activities including response components. We mapped the correlation between the time courses in each channel and in the others for the whole observed region. Ongoing and spontaneous activities in the auditory cortex were found to have strong spatial coherence corresponding to the tonotopy, which is one of auditory functional organization.

  5. Electrophysiological measurement of human auditory function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galambos, R.

    1975-01-01

    Knowledge of the human auditory evoked response is reviewed, including methods of determining this response, the way particular changes in the stimulus are coupled to specific changes in the response, and how the state of mind of the listener will influence the response. Important practical applications of this basic knowledge are discussed. Measurement of the brainstem evoked response, for instance, can state unequivocally how well the peripheral auditory apparatus functions. It might then be developed into a useful hearing test, especially for infants and preverbal or nonverbal children. Clinical applications of measuring the brain waves evoked 100 msec and later after the auditory stimulus are undetermined. These waves are clearly related to brain events associated with cognitive processing of acoustic signals, since their properties depend upon where the listener directs his attention and whether how long he expects the signal.

  6. Ephrin-B2 reverse signaling is required for topography but not pattern formation of lateral superior olivary inputs to the inferior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Matthew M; Kavianpour, Sarah M; Gabriele, Mark L

    2013-05-01

    Graded and modular expressions of Eph-ephrins are known to provide positional information for the formation of topographic maps and patterning in the developing nervous system. Previously we have shown that ephrin-B2 is expressed in a continuous gradient across the tonotopic axis of the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus (CNIC), whereas patterns are discontinuous and modular in the lateral cortex of the IC (LCIC). The present study explores the involvement of ephrin-B2 signaling in the development of projections to the CNIC and LCIC arising from the lateral superior olivary nuclei (LSO) prior to hearing onset. Anterograde and retrograde fluorescent tracing methods in neonatal fixed tissue preparations were used to compare topographic mapping and the establishment of LSO layers/modules in wild-type and ephrin-B2(lacZ/+) mice (severely compromised reverse signaling). At birth, pioneer LSO axons occupy the ipsilateral IC in both groups but are delayed contralaterally in ephrin-B2(lacZ/+) mutants. By the onset of hearing, both wild-type and mutant projections form discernible layers bilaterally in the CNIC and modular arrangements within the ipsilateral LCIC. In contrast, ephrin-B2(lacZ/+) mice lack a reliable topography in LSO-IC projections, suggesting that fully functional ephrin-B2 reverse signaling is required for normal projection mapping. Taken together, these ephrin-B2 findings paired with known coexpression of EphA4 suggest the importance of these signaling proteins in establishing functional auditory circuits prior to experience. PMID:23042409

  7. SNMP is a signaling component required for pheromone sensitivity in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xin; Ha, Tal Soo; Smith, Dean P

    2008-08-01

    The only known volatile pheromone in Drosophila, 11-cis-vaccenyl acetate (cVA), mediates a variety of behaviors including aggregation, mate recognition, and sexual behavior. cVA is detected by a small set of olfactory neurons located in T1 trichoid sensilla on the antennae of males and females. Two components known to be required for cVA reception are the odorant receptor Or67d and the extracellular pheromone-binding protein LUSH. Using a genetic screen for cVA-insensitive mutants, we have identified a third component required for cVA reception: sensory neuron membrane protein (SNMP). SNMP is a homolog of CD36, a scavenger receptor important for lipoprotein binding and uptake of cholesterol and lipids in vertebrates. In humans, loss of CD36 is linked to a wide range of disorders including insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and atherosclerosis, but how CD36 functions in lipid transport and signal transduction is poorly understood. We show that SNMP is required in pheromone-sensitive neurons for cVA sensitivity but is not required for sensitivity to general odorants. Using antiserum to SNMP infused directly into the sensillum lymph, we show that SNMP function is required on the dendrites of cVA-sensitive neurons; this finding is consistent with a direct role in cVA signal transduction. Therefore, pheromone perception in Drosophila should serve as an excellent model to elucidate the role of CD36 members in transmembrane signaling. PMID:18653762

  8. Reconstructing speech from human auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Pasley, Brian N; David, Stephen V; Mesgarani, Nima; Flinker, Adeen; Shamma, Shihab A; Crone, Nathan E; Knight, Robert T; Chang, Edward F

    2012-01-01

    How the human auditory system extracts perceptually relevant acoustic features of speech is unknown. To address this question, we used intracranial recordings from nonprimary auditory cortex in the human superior temporal gyrus to determine what acoustic information in speech sounds can be reconstructed from population neural activity. We found that slow and intermediate temporal fluctuations, such as those corresponding to syllable rate, were accurately reconstructed using a linear model based on the auditory spectrogram. However, reconstruction of fast temporal fluctuations, such as syllable onsets and offsets, required a nonlinear sound representation based on temporal modulation energy. Reconstruction accuracy was highest within the range of spectro-temporal fluctuations that have been found to be critical for speech intelligibility. The decoded speech representations allowed readout and identification of individual words directly from brain activity during single trial sound presentations. These findings reveal neural encoding mechanisms of speech acoustic parameters in higher order human auditory cortex. PMID:22303281

  9. Reconstructing Speech from Human Auditory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Pasley, Brian N.; David, Stephen V.; Mesgarani, Nima; Flinker, Adeen; Shamma, Shihab A.; Crone, Nathan E.; Knight, Robert T.; Chang, Edward F.

    2012-01-01

    How the human auditory system extracts perceptually relevant acoustic features of speech is unknown. To address this question, we used intracranial recordings from nonprimary auditory cortex in the human superior temporal gyrus to determine what acoustic information in speech sounds can be reconstructed from population neural activity. We found that slow and intermediate temporal fluctuations, such as those corresponding to syllable rate, were accurately reconstructed using a linear model based on the auditory spectrogram. However, reconstruction of fast temporal fluctuations, such as syllable onsets and offsets, required a nonlinear sound representation based on temporal modulation energy. Reconstruction accuracy was highest within the range of spectro-temporal fluctuations that have been found to be critical for speech intelligibility. The decoded speech representations allowed readout and identification of individual words directly from brain activity during single trial sound presentations. These findings reveal neural encoding mechanisms of speech acoustic parameters in higher order human auditory cortex. PMID:22303281

  10. Auditory pattern perception in 'split brain' patients.

    PubMed

    Musiek, F E; Pinheiro, M L; Wilson, D H

    1980-10-01

    Three "split brain" subjects with normal peripheral hearing were tested on identifying monaurally presented auditory intensity and frequency patterns. One subject was tested before commissurotomy, ten days later, and one year after surgery. Results indicated that sectioning the corpus callosum dramatically affects the ability to verbally report both intensity and frequency patterns. However, the ability of the subjects to correctly "hum" frequency patterns was not impaired. Thus, it appears for a correct verbal report of an auditory pattern, interhemispheric transfer of acoustic information is required, while "humming" the pattern does not. Further application of this finding implicates auditory pattern tasks as as a potentially valuable test for detecting problems of higher auditory processing, particularly those affecting interhemispheric interaction. PMID:7417089

  11. In search of an auditory engram

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Jonathan; Mishkin, Mortimer; Saunders, Richard C.

    2005-01-01

    Monkeys trained preoperatively on a task designed to assess auditory recognition memory were impaired after removal of either the rostral superior temporal gyrus or the medial temporal lobe but were unaffected by lesions of the rhinal cortex. Behavioral analysis indicated that this result occurred because the monkeys did not or could not use long-term auditory recognition, and so depended instead on short-term working memory, which is unaffected by rhinal lesions. The findings suggest that monkeys may be unable to place representations of auditory stimuli into a long-term store and thus question whether the monkey's cerebral memory mechanisms in audition are intrinsically different from those in other sensory modalities. Furthermore, it raises the possibility that language is unique to humans not only because it depends on speech but also because it requires long-term auditory memory. PMID:15967995

  12. Ets2-dependent trophoblast signalling is required for gastrulation progression after primitive streak initiation.

    PubMed

    Polydorou, Christiana; Georgiades, Pantelis

    2013-01-01

    Although extraembryonic ectoderm trophoblast signals the embryo for primitive streak initiation, a prerequisite for gastrulation, it is unknown whether it also signals for the progression of gastrulation after primitive streak initiation. Here, using Ets2-/- mice, we show that trophoblast signalling is also required in vivo for primitive streak elongation, completion of intraembryonic mesoderm epithelial-mesenchymal transition and the development of anterior primitive streak derivatives such as the node. We show that Ets2-dependent trophoblast signalling is required for the maintenance of high levels of Nodal and Wnt3 expression in the epiblast and for the induction of Snail expression in the primitive streak, between embryonic day 6.3 and 6.7. Within extraembryonic ectoderm trophoblast, Ets2 maintains the expression of the transcription factors Elf5, Cdx2 and Eomes, and that of the signalling molecule Bmp4. We propose a model that provides a genetic explanation as to how Ets2 in trophoblast mediates the progression of gastrulation within the epiblast. PMID:23552073

  13. Cooperativity between MAPK and PI3K signaling activation is required for glioblastoma pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vitucci, Mark; Karpinich, Natalie O.; Bash, Ryan E.; Werneke, Andrea M.; Schmid, Ralf S.; White, Kristen K.; McNeill, Robert S.; Huff, Byron; Wang, Sophie; Van Dyke, Terry; Miller, C. Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma (GBM) genomes feature recurrent genetic alterations that dysregulate core intracellular signaling pathways, including the G1/S cell cycle checkpoint and the MAPK and PI3K effector arms of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling. Elucidation of the phenotypic consequences of activated RTK effectors is required for the design of effective therapeutic and diagnostic strategies. Methods Genetically defined, G1/S checkpoint-defective cortical murine astrocytes with constitutively active Kras and/or Pten deletion mutations were used to systematically investigate the individual and combined roles of these 2 RTK signaling effectors in phenotypic hallmarks of glioblastoma pathogenesis, including growth, migration, and invasion in vitro. A novel syngeneic orthotopic allograft model system was used to examine in vivo tumorigenesis. Results Constitutively active Kras and/or Pten deletion mutations activated both MAPK and PI3K signaling. Their combination led to maximal growth, migration, and invasion of G1/S-defective astrocytes in vitro and produced progenitor-like transcriptomal profiles that mimic human proneural GBM. Activation of both RTK effector arms was required for in vivo tumorigenesis and produced highly invasive, proneural-like GBM. Conclusions These results suggest that cortical astrocytes can be transformed into GBM and that combined dysregulation of MAPK and PI3K signaling revert G1/S-defective astrocytes to a primitive gene expression state. This genetically-defined, immunocompetent model of proneural GBM will be useful for preclinical development of MAPK/PI3K-targeted, subtype-specific therapies. PMID:23814263

  14. Layer specific and general requirements for ERK/MAPK signaling in the developing neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Lei; Larsen, Rylan S; Bjorklund, George Reed; Li, Xiaoyan; Wu, Yaohong; Philpot, Benjamin D; Snider, William D; Newbern, Jason M

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant signaling through the Raf/MEK/ERK (ERK/MAPK) pathway causes pathology in a family of neurodevelopmental disorders known as 'RASopathies' and is implicated in autism pathogenesis. Here, we have determined the functions of ERK/MAPK signaling in developing neocortical excitatory neurons. Our data reveal a critical requirement for ERK/MAPK signaling in the morphological development and survival of large Ctip2+ neurons in layer 5. Loss of Map2k1/2 (Mek1/2) led to deficits in corticospinal tract formation and subsequent corticospinal neuron apoptosis. ERK/MAPK hyperactivation also led to reduced corticospinal axon elongation, but was associated with enhanced arborization. ERK/MAPK signaling was dispensable for axonal outgrowth of layer 2/3 callosal neurons. However, Map2k1/2 deletion led to reduced expression of Arc and enhanced intrinsic excitability in both layers 2/3 and 5, in addition to imbalanced synaptic excitation and inhibition. These data demonstrate selective requirements for ERK/MAPK signaling in layer 5 circuit development and general effects on cortical pyramidal neuron excitability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11123.001 PMID:26848828

  15. The Human Brain Maintains Contradictory and Redundant Auditory Sensory Predictions

    PubMed Central

    Pieszek, Marika; Widmann, Andreas; Gruber, Thomas; Schröger, Erich

    2013-01-01

    Computational and experimental research has revealed that auditory sensory predictions are derived from regularities of the current environment by using internal generative models. However, so far, what has not been addressed is how the auditory system handles situations giving rise to redundant or even contradictory predictions derived from different sources of information. To this end, we measured error signals in the event-related brain potentials (ERPs) in response to violations of auditory predictions. Sounds could be predicted on the basis of overall probability, i.e., one sound was presented frequently and another sound rarely. Furthermore, each sound was predicted by an informative visual cue. Participants’ task was to use the cue and to discriminate the two sounds as fast as possible. Violations of the probability based prediction (i.e., a rare sound) as well as violations of the visual-auditory prediction (i.e., an incongruent sound) elicited error signals in the ERPs (Mismatch Negativity [MMN] and Incongruency Response [IR]). Particular error signals were observed even in case the overall probability and the visual symbol predicted different sounds. That is, the auditory system concurrently maintains and tests contradictory predictions. Moreover, if the same sound was predicted, we observed an additive error signal (scalp potential and primary current density) equaling the sum of the specific error signals. Thus, the auditory system maintains and tolerates functionally independently represented redundant and contradictory predictions. We argue that the auditory system exploits all currently active regularities in order to optimally prepare for future events. PMID:23308266

  16. Discrete Notch signaling requirements in the specification of hematopoietic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Albert D; Melick, Chase H; Clements, Wilson K; Stachura, David L; Distel, Martin; Panáková, Daniela; MacRae, Calum; Mork, Lindsey A; Crump, J Gage; Traver, David

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) require multiple molecular inputs for proper specification, including activity of the Notch signaling pathway. A requirement for the Notch1 and dispensability of the Notch2 receptor has been demonstrated in mice, but the role of the remaining Notch receptors has not been investigated. Here, we demonstrate that three of the four Notch receptors are independently required for the specification of HSCs in the zebrafish. The orthologues of the murine Notch1 receptor, Notch1a and Notch1b, are each required intrinsically to fate HSCs, just prior to their emergence from aortic hemogenic endothelium. By contrast, the Notch3 receptor is required earlier within the developing somite to regulate HSC emergence in a non-cell-autonomous manner. Epistatic analyses demonstrate that Notch3 function lies downstream of Wnt16, which is required for HSC specification through its regulation of two Notch ligands, dlc and dld. Collectively, these findings demonstrate for the first time that multiple Notch signaling inputs are required to specify HSCs and that Notch3 performs a novel role within the somite to regulate the neighboring precursors of hemogenic endothelium. PMID:25230933

  17. Toll-like receptor 9 trafficking and signaling for type I interferons requires PIKfyve activity.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Kachiko; Sasai, Miwa; Iwasaki, Akiko

    2015-09-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) traffic to distinct membranes for signaling. TLR7 and TLR9 recognize viral nucleic acids in the endosomes and induce robust anti-viral program. Signaling from these TLRs bifurcate at the level of distinct endosomal compartments, namely VAMP3(+) and LAMP(+) endosomes, to mediate the induction of cytokine and type I interferon (IFN) genes, respectively. The formation of the TLR9 endosome competent for IFNs induction requires AP-3. Phosphoinositides (PIs) mark distinct subcellular membranes and control membrane trafficking. However, their role in TLR trafficking and signaling in different dendritic cell (DC) subsets remains unclear. Here, we examined the role of phosphatidylinositol 3P 5-kinase, PIKfyve, in TLR9 trafficking and signaling. We demonstrate that inhibition of PIKfyve activity preferentially blocks TLR9 signaling for type I IFN induction in FLT3L-bone marrow-derived DCs. By confocal microscopy using RAW264.7 cells, we show that trafficking of both TLR9 and CpG to the LAMP1(+) compartment was blocked by PIKfyve inhibitor treatment, whereas their trafficking to the VAMP3(+) endosome remained intact. Further, AP-3 recruitment to TLR9 endosomes was impaired by PIKfyve inhibition. These data indicate that PIKfyve provides critical PIs necessary for the formation of endosome from which TLR9 signals to induce type I IFNs. PMID:25925170

  18. Enhanced peripheral visual processing in congenitally deaf humans is supported by multiple brain regions, including primary auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Gregory D.; Karns, Christina M.; Dow, Mark W.; Stevens, Courtney; Neville, Helen J.

    2014-01-01

    Brain reorganization associated with altered sensory experience clarifies the critical role of neuroplasticity in development. An example is enhanced peripheral visual processing associated with congenital deafness, but the neural systems supporting this have not been fully characterized. A gap in our understanding of deafness-enhanced peripheral vision is the contribution of primary auditory cortex. Previous studies of auditory cortex that use anatomical normalization across participants were limited by inter-subject variability of Heschl's gyrus. In addition to reorganized auditory cortex (cross-modal plasticity), a second gap in our understanding is the contribution of altered modality-specific cortices (visual intramodal plasticity in this case), as well as supramodal and multisensory cortices, especially when target detection is required across contrasts. Here we address these gaps by comparing fMRI signal change for peripheral vs. perifoveal visual stimulation (11–15° vs. 2–7°) in congenitally deaf and hearing participants in a blocked experimental design with two analytical approaches: a Heschl's gyrus region of interest analysis and a whole brain analysis. Our results using individually-defined primary auditory cortex (Heschl's gyrus) indicate that fMRI signal change for more peripheral stimuli was greater than perifoveal in deaf but not in hearing participants. Whole-brain analyses revealed differences between deaf and hearing participants for peripheral vs. perifoveal visual processing in extrastriate visual cortex including primary auditory cortex, MT+/V5, superior-temporal auditory, and multisensory and/or supramodal regions, such as posterior parietal cortex (PPC), frontal eye fields, anterior cingulate, and supplementary eye fields. Overall, these data demonstrate the contribution of neuroplasticity in multiple systems including primary auditory cortex, supramodal, and multisensory regions, to altered visual processing in congenitally deaf

  19. Auditory learning: a developmental method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yilu; Weng, Juyang; Hwang, Wey-Shiuan

    2005-05-01

    Motivated by the human autonomous development process from infancy to adulthood, we have built a robot that develops its cognitive and behavioral skills through real-time interactions with the environment. We call such a robot a developmental robot. In this paper, we present the theory and the architecture to implement a developmental robot and discuss the related techniques that address an array of challenging technical issues. As an application, experimental results on a real robot, self-organizing, autonomous, incremental learner (SAIL), are presented with emphasis on its audition perception and audition-related action generation. In particular, the SAIL robot conducts the auditory learning from unsegmented and unlabeled speech streams without any prior knowledge about the auditory signals, such as the designated language or the phoneme models. Neither available before learning starts are the actions that the robot is expected to perform. SAIL learns the auditory commands and the desired actions from physical contacts with the environment including the trainers. PMID:15940990

  20. Auditory perceptual restoration and illusory continuity correlates in the human brainstem.

    PubMed

    Bidelman, Gavin M; Patro, Chhayakanta

    2016-09-01

    When noise obstructs portions of target sounds the auditory system fills in missing information, a phenomenon known as auditory restoration or induction. Previous work in animal models demonstrates that neurons in primary auditory cortex (A1) are capable of restoring occluded target signals suggesting that early auditory cortex is capable of inducing continuity in discontinuous signals (i.e., endogenous restoration). Current consensus is that the neural correlates of auditory induction and perceptual restoration emerge no earlier than A1. Moreover, the neural mechanisms supporting induction in humans are poorly understood. Here, we show that in human listeners, auditory brainstem nuclei support illusory auditory continuity well before engagement of cerebral cortex. We recorded brainstem responses to modulated target tones that did or did not promote illusory auditory percepts. Auditory continuity was manipulated by introducing masking noise or brief temporal interruptions in otherwise continuous tones. We found that auditory brainstem responses paralleled illusory continuity by tagging target sounds even when they were occluded by the auditory scene. Our results reveal (i) a pre-attentive, subcortical origin to a presumed cortical function and (ii) that brainstem signal processing helps partially cancel the negative effects of masking by restoring missing portions of auditory objects that are fragmented in the soundscape. PMID:27241211

  1. Nodal signaling is required for closure of the anterior neural tube in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Aquilina-Beck, Allisan; Ilagan, Kristine; Liu, Qin; Liang, Jennifer O

    2007-01-01

    Background Nodals are secreted signaling proteins with many roles in vertebrate development. Here, we identify a new role for Nodal signaling in regulating closure of the rostral neural tube of zebrafish. Results We find that the neural tube in the presumptive forebrain fails to close in zebrafish Nodal signaling mutants. For instance, the cells that will give rise to the pineal organ fail to move from the lateral edges of the neural plate to the midline of the diencephalon. The open neural tube in Nodal signaling mutants may be due in part to reduced function of N-cadherin, a cell adhesion molecule expressed in the neural tube and required for neural tube closure. N-cadherin expression and localization to the membrane are reduced in fish that lack Nodal signaling. Further, N-cadherin mutants and morphants have a pineal phenotype similar to that of mutants with deficiencies in the Nodal pathway. Overexpression of an activated form of the TGFβ Type I receptor Taram-A (Taram-A*) cell autonomously rescues mesendoderm formation in fish with a severe decrease in Nodal signaling. We find that overexpression of Taram-A* also corrects their open neural tube defect. This suggests that, as in mammals, the mesoderm and endoderm have an important role in regulating closure of the anterior neural tube of zebrafish. Conclusion This work helps establish a role for Nodal signals in neurulation, and suggests that defects in Nodal signaling could underlie human neural tube defects such as exencephaly, a fatal condition characterized by an open neural tube in the anterior brain. PMID:17996054

  2. What causes auditory distraction?

    PubMed

    Macken, William J; Phelps, Fiona G; Jones, Dylan M

    2009-02-01

    The role of separating task-relevant from task-irrelevant aspects of the environment is typically assigned to the executive functioning of working memory. However, pervasive aspects of auditory distraction have been shown to be unrelated to working memory capacity in a range of studies of individual differences. We measured individual differences in global pattern matching and deliberate recoding of auditory sequences, and showed that, although deliberate processing was related to short-term memory performance, it did not predict the extent to which that performance was disrupted by task-irrelevant sound. Individual differences in global sequence processing were, however, positively related to the degree to which auditory distraction occurred. We argue that much auditory distraction, rather than being a negative function of working memory capacity, is in fact a positive function of the acuity of obligatory auditory processing. PMID:19145024

  3. Vitamin D signaling in the bovine immune system: a model for understanding human vitamin D requirements.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Corwin D; Reinhardt, Timothy A; Lippolis, John D; Sacco, Randy E; Nonnecke, Brian J

    2012-03-01

    The endocrine physiology of vitamin D in cattle has been rigorously investigated and has yielded information on vitamin D requirements, endocrine function in health and disease, general metabolism, and maintenance of calcium homeostasis in cattle. These results are relevant to human vitamin D endocrinology. The current debate regarding vitamin D requirements is centered on the requirements for proper intracrine and paracrine vitamin D signaling. Studies in adult and young cattle can provide valuable insight for understanding vitamin D requirements as they relate to innate and adaptive immune responses during infectious disease. In cattle, toll-like receptor recognition activates intracrine and paracrine vitamin D signaling mechanism in the immune system that regulates innate and adaptive immune responses in the presence of adequate 25-hydroxyvitamin D. Furthermore, experiments with mastitis in dairy cattle have provided in vivo evidence for the intracrine vitamin D signaling mechanism in macrophages as well as vitamin D mediated suppression of infection. Epidemiological evidence indicates that circulating concentrations above 32 ng/mL of 25-hydroxyvitamin D are necessary for optimal vitamin D signaling in the immune system, but experimental evidence is lacking for that value. Experiments in cattle can provide that evidence as circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations can be experimentally manipulated within ranges that are normal for humans and cattle. Additionally, young and adult cattle can be experimentally infected with bacteria and viruses associated with significant diseases in both cattle and humans. Utilizing the bovine model to further delineate the immunomodulatory role of vitamin D will provide potentially valuable insights into the vitamin D requirements of both humans and cattle, especially as they relate to immune response capacity and infectious disease resistance. PMID:22666545

  4. Auditory-motor learning influences auditory memory for music.

    PubMed

    Brown, Rachel M; Palmer, Caroline

    2012-05-01

    In two experiments, we investigated how auditory-motor learning influences performers' memory for music. Skilled pianists learned novel melodies in four conditions: auditory only (listening), motor only (performing without sound), strongly coupled auditory-motor (normal performance), and weakly coupled auditory-motor (performing along with auditory recordings). Pianists' recognition of the learned melodies was better following auditory-only or auditory-motor (weakly coupled and strongly coupled) learning than following motor-only learning, and better following strongly coupled auditory-motor learning than following auditory-only learning. Auditory and motor imagery abilities modulated the learning effects: Pianists with high auditory imagery scores had better recognition following motor-only learning, suggesting that auditory imagery compensated for missing auditory feedback at the learning stage. Experiment 2 replicated the findings of Experiment 1 with melodies that contained greater variation in acoustic features. Melodies that were slower and less variable in tempo and intensity were remembered better following weakly coupled auditory-motor learning. These findings suggest that motor learning can aid performers' auditory recognition of music beyond auditory learning alone, and that motor learning is influenced by individual abilities in mental imagery and by variation in acoustic features. PMID:22271265

  5. Antidepressant effects of sleep deprivation require astrocyte-dependent adenosine mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Hines, D J; Schmitt, L I; Hines, R M; Moss, S J; Haydon, P G

    2013-01-01

    Major depressive disorder is a debilitating condition with a lifetime risk of ten percent. Most treatments take several weeks to achieve clinical efficacy, limiting the ability to bring instant relief needed in psychiatric emergencies. One intervention that rapidly alleviates depressive symptoms is sleep deprivation; however, its mechanism of action is unknown. Astrocytes regulate responses to sleep deprivation, raising the possibility that glial signaling mediates antidepressive-like actions of sleep deprivation. Here, we found that astrocytic signaling to adenosine (A1) receptors was required for the robust reduction of depressive-like behaviors following 12 hours of sleep deprivation. As sleep deprivation activates synaptic A1 receptors, we mimicked the effect of sleep deprivation on depression phenotypes by administration of the A1 agonist CCPA. These results provide the first mechanistic insight into how sleep deprivation impacts mood, and provide a novel pathway for rapid antidepressant development by modulation of glial signaling in the brain. PMID:23321809

  6. Endothelial cell FGF signaling is required for injury response but not for vascular homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Oladipupo, Sunday S.; Smith, Craig; Santeford, Andrea; Park, Changwon; Sene, Abdoulaye; Wiley, Luke A.; Osei-Owusu, Patrick; Hsu, Joann; Zapata, Nicole; Liu, Fang; Nakamura, Rei; Lavine, Kory J.; Blumer, Kendall J.; Choi, Kyunghee; Apte, Rajendra S.; Ornitz, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) express fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) and are exquisitely sensitive to FGF signals. However, whether the EC or another vascular cell type requires FGF signaling during development, homeostasis, and response to injury is not known. Here, we show that Flk1-Cre or Tie2-Cre mediated deletion of FGFR1 and FGFR2 (Fgfr1/2Flk1-Cre or Fgfr1/2Tie2-Cre mice), which results in deletion in endothelial and hematopoietic cells, is compatible with normal embryonic development. As adults, Fgfr1/2Flk1-Cre mice maintain normal blood pressure and vascular reactivity and integrity under homeostatic conditions. However, neovascularization after skin or eye injury was significantly impaired in both Fgfr1/2Flk1-Cre and Fgfr1/2Tie2-Cre mice, independent of either hematopoietic cell loss of FGFR1/2 or vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (Vegfr2) haploinsufficiency. Also, impaired neovascularization was associated with delayed cutaneous wound healing. These findings reveal a key requirement for cell-autonomous EC FGFR signaling in injury-induced angiogenesis, but not for vascular homeostasis, identifying the EC FGFR signaling pathway as a target for diseases associated with aberrant vascular proliferation, such as age-related macular degeneration, and for modulating wound healing without the potential toxicity associated with direct manipulation of systemic FGF or VEGF activity. PMID:25139991

  7. Signals required for programming effector and memory development by CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Mescher, Matthew F; Curtsinger, Julie M; Agarwal, Pujya; Casey, Kerry A; Gerner, Michael; Hammerbeck, Christopher D; Popescu, Flavia; Xiao, Zhengguo

    2006-06-01

    Stimulation of naïve CD8+ T cells with antigen and costimulation results in proliferation and weak clonal expansion, but the cells fail to develop effector functions and are tolerant long term. Initiation of the program leading to the strong expansion and development of effector functions and memory requires a third signal that can be provided by interleukin-12 (IL-12) or interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha). CD4+ T cells condition dendritic cells (DCs) to effectively present antigen to CD8+ T cells, and this conditioning involves, at least in part, CD40-dependent upregulation of the production of these signal 3 cytokines by the DCs. Upon being fully activated, the cytotoxic T lymphocytes develop activation-induced non-responsiveness (AINR), a form of split anergy characterized by an inability to produce IL-2 to support continued expansion. If antigen remains present, IL-2 provided by CD4+ T cells can reverse AINR to allow further expansion of the effector population and conversion to responsive memory cells following antigen clearance. If IL-2 or potentially other proliferative signals are not available, persistent antigen holds cells in the AINR state and prevents the development of a responsive memory population. Thus, in addition to antigen and costimulation, CD8+ T cells require cytokine signals at distinct stages of the response to be programmed for optimal generation of effector and memory populations. PMID:16824119

  8. Melanocortin 4 receptor signaling in dopamine 1 receptor neurons is required for procedural memory learning

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Huxing; Mason, Brittany L.; Lee, Charlotte; Nishi, Akinori; Elmquist, Joel K; Lutter, Michael

    2012-01-01

    It is now widely recognized that exposure to palatable foods engages reward circuits that promote over-eating and facilitate the development of obesity. While the melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) has previously been shown to regulate food intake and energy expenditure, little is known about its role in food reward. We demonstrate that MC4R is co-expressed with the dopamine 1 receptor (D1R) in the ventral striatum. While MC4R-null mice are hyperphagic and obese, they exhibit impairments in acquisition of operant responding for a high fat reinforcement. Restoration of MC4R signaling in D1R neurons normalizes procedural learning without affecting motivation to obtain high fat diet. MC4R signaling in D1R neurons is also required for learning in a non-food-reinforced version of the cued water maze. Finally, MC4R signaling in neostriatal slices increases phosphorylation of the Thr34 residue of DARPP-32, a protein phosphatase-1 inhibitor that regulates synaptic plasticity. These data identify a novel requirement for MC4R signaling in procedural memory learning. PMID:22342812

  9. Psychology of auditory perception.

    PubMed

    Lotto, Andrew; Holt, Lori

    2011-09-01

    Audition is often treated as a 'secondary' sensory system behind vision in the study of cognitive science. In this review, we focus on three seemingly simple perceptual tasks to demonstrate the complexity of perceptual-cognitive processing involved in everyday audition. After providing a short overview of the characteristics of sound and their neural encoding, we present a description of the perceptual task of segregating multiple sound events that are mixed together in the signal reaching the ears. Then, we discuss the ability to localize the sound source in the environment. Finally, we provide some data and theory on how listeners categorize complex sounds, such as speech. In particular, we present research on how listeners weigh multiple acoustic cues in making a categorization decision. One conclusion of this review is that it is time for auditory cognitive science to be developed to match what has been done in vision in order for us to better understand how humans communicate with speech and music. WIREs Cogni Sci 2011 2 479-489 DOI: 10.1002/wcs.123 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26302301

  10. Biological impact of music and software-based auditory training.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Nina

    2012-01-01

    Auditory-based communication skills are developed at a young age and are maintained throughout our lives. However, some individuals - both young and old - encounter difficulties in achieving or maintaining communication proficiency. Biological signals arising from hearing sounds relate to real-life communication skills such as listening to speech in noisy environments and reading, pointing to an intersection between hearing and cognition. Musical experience, amplification, and software-based training can improve these biological signals. These findings of biological plasticity, in a variety of subject populations, relate to attention and auditory memory, and represent an integrated auditory system influenced by both sensation and cognition. PMID:22789822