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Sample records for aureus ca-mrsa infections

  1. Practical management: community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA): the latest sports epidemic.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Holly J; Nikore, Vineet; Takagishi, Josh

    2007-09-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has gained international recognition as a superbug that causes serious infectious outbreaks in high-risk populations such as athletes. Clusters of cases in various athletic teams, particularly contact sports, have been reported since 1993 in the United States and more recently in Canada. CA-MRSA infections are not limited to North America, and all athletes are considered high risk. Skin-to-skin contact appears to be the primary mode of transmission. While typical infections are local skin and soft-tissue abscesses, CA-MRSA infections can spread systemically and lead to significant morbidity and mortality if not promptly identified and treated. The gold standard of treatment for all abscesses is incision and drainage with wound culture for bacterial identification and antibiotic sensitivity testing. A limited number of antibiotics are currently useful in the treatment of CA-MRSA and are reviewed. Geographical variation in patterns of antibiotic resistance further complicates the treatment. Meticulous, consistent use of infection prevention strategies is critical to control outbreaks in the athletic population. Good hygiene, prompt identification of infection, limited exposure to infected persons and contaminated objects, and proper treatment combined with close follow-up of infected athletes will help contain CA-MRSA outbreaks. Future research is needed to explore person-to-person and fomite transmission risks, to define the significance of nasal carriage and skin colonization in relation to CA-MRSA infections, and to further investigate antibiotic resistance patterns. Universal education is needed for all athletes and personnel who provide care in the athletic setting to help control this widespread epidemic. PMID:17873553

  2. CA-MRSA. The new sports pathogen.

    PubMed

    Kurkowski, Christina

    2007-01-01

    Skin infections in athletes caused by community-associated Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) have been observed within many cities throughout the United States and within many countries throughout the world (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], 2003). As the incidence rises in the athletic population, clinicians must learn to identify risk factors for CA-MRSA, diagnosis and treat infections with judicious use of antimicrobial agents and facilitate strategies to limit transmission. Recently, a new consensus guideline for handling CA-MRSA outbreaks in sports has been released by the CDC (Gorwitz et al., 2006). This article includes a review of the evolution of MRSA; distinguishes between healthcare associated Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-MRSA) and CA-MRSA; and reviews the diagnosis, management, and prevention strategies to limit transmission of CA-MRSA. PMID:17921891

  3. Staphylococcus aureus and Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) in and Around Therapeutic Whirlpools in College Athletic Training Rooms

    PubMed Central

    Kahanov, Leamor; Kim, Young Kyun; Eberman, Lindsey; Dannelly, Kathleen; Kaur, Haninder; Ramalinga, A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has become a leading cause of skin and soft tissue infection in the nonhospitalized community. Care of the athletes in athletic training rooms is specifically designed with equipment tailored to the health care needs of the athletes, yet recent studies indicate that CA-MRSA is still prevalent in athletic facilities and that cleaning methods may not be optimal. Objective: To investigate the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and CA-MRSA in and around whirlpools in the athletic training room. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I university. Patients or Other Participants: Student-athletes (n = 109) consisting of 46 men (42%) and 63 women (58%) representing 6 sports. Main Outcome Measure(s): Presence of MRSA and Staphylococcus aureus in and around the whirlpool structures relative to sport and number of athletes using the whirlpools. Results: We identified Staphylococcus aureus in 22% (n = 52/240) of the samples and MRSA in 0.8% (n = 2/240). A statistically significant difference existed between the number of athletes using the whirlpool and the presence of Staphylococcus aureus in and around the whirlpools (F2,238 = 2.445, P = .007). However, Staphylococcus aureus was identified regardless of whether multiple athletes used a whirlpool or no athletes used a whirlpool. We did not identify a relationship between the number of athletes who used a whirlpool and Staphylococcus aureus or MRSA density (P = .134). Conclusions: Staphylococcus aureus and MRSA were identified in and around the whirlpools. Transmission of the bacteria can be reduced by following the cleaning and disinfecting protocols recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Athletic trainers should use disinfectants registered by the Environmental Protection Agency to sanitize all whirlpools between uses. PMID:25710853

  4. Systemic CA-MRSA infection following trauma during soccer match in inner Brazil: clinical and molecular characterization.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Carlos Henrique; da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes Ribeiro de Souza; Bonesso, Mariana Fávero; da Cunha, Fabiana Picoli; Barbosa, Alexandre Naime; Fortaleza, Carlos Magno Castelo Branco

    2013-07-01

    Even though community-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) was described a decade ago, reports from Brazil are scarce and cases occurred in large urban centers. We report MRSA sepsis in a 16-year-old male from a small town and who had no history of exposure to healthcare or recent travel. After trauma during a soccer match, he presented swelling in the right thigh, which evolved in a month to cellulitis complicated by local abscess, orchitis and pneumonia. The patient presented severe sepsis, with fever and respiratory failure. Laboratory findings included blood leukocyte counts above 40,000/mm(3) and thrombocytopenia. He was submitted to mechanical ventilation and therapy with vancomycin and imipenem. He had a slow but favorable response to therapy and was discharged after six weeks of hospitalization. MRSA grew from blood cultures and respiratory aspirates obtained before antimicrobial therapy. The isolate belonged to sequence type 5, spa type t311, harbored SCCmec type IV and genes for Panton-Valentine leukocidin and Enterotoxin A. The pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern was distinct from North American classic CA-MRSA clones. However, the sequence type and the spa type revealed that the clone belong to the same clonal complex isolated in Argentina. This is the first CA-MRSA infection reported in that region, with significant epidemiologic and clinical implications. PMID:23602786

  5. Potential therapeutic drug target identification in Community Acquired-Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) using computational analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Pramod Kumar; Singh, Gurmit; Singh, Satendra; Gautam, Budhayash; Saad, Esmaiel IF

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant strain of community-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) strain has highlighted the urgent need for the alternative and effective therapeutic approach to combat the menace of this nosocomial pathogen. In the present work novel potential therapeutic drug targets have been identified through the metabolic pathways analysis. All the gene products involved in different metabolic pathways of CA-MRSA in KEGG database were searched against the proteome of Homo sapiens using the BLASTp program and the threshold of E-value was set to as 0.001. After database searching, 152 putative targets were identified. Among all 152 putative targets, 39 genes encoding for putative targets were identified as the essential genes from the DEG database which are indispensable for the survival of CA-MRSA. After extensive literature review, 7 targets were identified as potential therapeutic drug target. These targets are Fructose-bisphosphate aldolase, Phosphoglyceromutase, Purine nucleoside phosphorylase, Uridylate kinase, Tryptophan synthase subunit beta, Acetate kinase and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 1-carboxyvinyltransferase. Except Uridylate kinase all the identified targets were involved in more than one metabolic pathways of CA-MRSA which underlines the importance of drug targets. These potential therapeutic drug targets can be exploited for the discovery of novel inhibitors for CA-MRSA using the structure based drug design (SBDD) strategy. PMID:23055607

  6. Comparison of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus in Healthy Community Hospital Visitors [CA-MRSA] and Hospital Staff [HA-MRSA

    PubMed Central

    Pathare, Nirmal A; Tejani, Sara; Asogan, Harshini; Al Mahruqi, Gaitha; Al Fakhri, Salma; Zafarulla, Roshna; Pathare, Anil V.

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevalence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus [CA-MRSA] is unknown in Oman. Methods Nasal and cell phones swabs were collected from hospital visitors and health-care workers on sterile polyester swabs and directly inoculated onto a mannitol salt agar containing oxacillin, allowing growth of methicillin-resistant microorganisms. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed using Kirby Bauer’s disc diffusion method on the isolates. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined for vancomycin and teicoplanin against the resistant isolates of MRSA by the Epsilometer [E] test. A brief survey questionnaire was requested be filled to ascertain the exposure to known risk factors for CA-MRSA carriage. Results Overall, nasal colonization with CA-MRSA was seen in 34 individuals (18%, 95% confidence interval [CI] =12.5%–23.5%), whereas, CA-MRSA was additionally isolated from the cell phone surface in 12 participants (6.3%, 95% CI =5.6%–6.98%). Nasal colonization prevalence with hospital-acquired [HA] MRSA was seen in 16 individuals (13.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI] =7.5%–20.06%), whereas, HA-MRSA was additionally isolated from the cell phone surface in 3 participants (2.6%, 95% CI =1.7–4.54). Antibiotic sensitivity was 100% to linezolid and rifampicin in the CA-MRSA isolates. Antibiotic resistance to vancomycin and clindamycin varied between 9–11 % in the CA-MRSA isolates. Mean MIC for vancomycin amongst CA- and HA-MRSA were 6.3 and 9.3 μg/ml, whereas for teicoplanin they were 13 and 14 μg/ml respectively by the E-test. There was no statistically significant correlation between CA-MRSA nasal carriage and the risk factors (P>0.05, Chi-square test). Conclusions The prevalence of CA-MRSA in the healthy community hospital visitors was 18 % (95% CI, 12.5% to 23.5%) as compared to 13.8% HA-MRSA in the hospital health-care staff. Despite a significant prevalence of CA-MRSA, these strains were mostly sensitive

  7. Molecular modeling, dynamics studies and virtual screening of Fructose 1, 6 biphosphate aldolase-II in community acquired- methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA).

    PubMed

    Yadav, Pramod Kumar; Singh, Gurmit; Gautam, Budhayash; Singh, Satendra; Yadav, Madhu; Srivastav, Upasana; Singh, Brijendra

    2013-01-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has recently emerged as a nosocomial pathogen to the community which commonly causes skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs). This strain (MW2) has now become resistant to the most of the beta-lactam antibiotics; therefore it is the urgent need to identify the novel drug targets. Recently fructose 1,6 biphosphate aldolase-II (FBA) has been identified as potential drug target in CA-MRSA. The FBA catalyses the retro-ketolic cleavage of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) to yield dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (G3P) in glycolytic pathway. In the present research work the 3D structure of FBA was predicted using the homology modeling method followed by validation. The molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) of the predicted model was carried out using the 2000 ps time scale and 1000000 steps. The MDS results suggest that the modeled structure is stable. The predicted model of FBA was used for virtual screening against the NCI diversity subset-II ligand databases which contain 1364 compounds. Based on the docking energy scores, it was found that top four ligands i.e. ZINC01690699, ZINC13154304, ZINC29590257 and ZINC29590259 were having lower energy scores which reveal higher binding affinity towards the active site of FBA. These ligands might act as potent inhibitors for the FBA so that the menace of antimicrobial resistance in CA-MRSA can be conquered. However, pharmacological studies are required to confirm the inhibitory activity of these ligands against the FBA in CA-MRSA. PMID:23423142

  8. THE FREQUENCY OF COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED METHICILLIN-RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS (CA-MRSA) AMONG SAMPLES IN INSTITUTE FOR PUBLIC HEALTH IN CANTON SARAJEVO

    PubMed Central

    Bektas, Sabaheta; Obradovic, Amina; Aljicevic, Mufida; Numanovic, Fatima; Hodzic, Dunja; Sporisevic, Lutvo

    2016-01-01

    Background: The increase in the incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections lacking risk factors for exposure to the health care system has been associated with the recognition of new MRSA clones known as community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA). These strains have been distinguished from health care-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA) strains by epidemiological, molecular and genetic means as well as by antibiotic susceptibility profile, tissue tropism and virulence traits. Objective: To assess prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility profile of CA-MRSA in Canton Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Results: Out of 1.905 positive Staphylococcus aureus isolates from various samples of outpatients collected during six months, 279 (14,64%) were MRSA isolates. Out of 279 MRSA samples, 133 (47,67%) were found in nasal swabs, from which 48 (36,09%) were in the age group <1 year and 39 (29,32 %) are in the age 1-5 year. Rate of the positive skin swabs was highest among the subject of age group <1 year (46 or 54,12 %) and 1-5 year (18 or 21,18 %). Predominantly antibiotic types among MRSA strains are resistant to penicillin and cefoxitin (36,90 %) and to penicillin, cefoxitin and erythromycin (61,35 %). Conclusion: Continued monitoring of epidemiology and emerging drug resistance data is critical for the effective management of these infections. PMID:27047271

  9. The role of primary care prescribers in the diagnosis and management of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus skin and soft tissue infections.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Kenneth R; Golik, Monica V; Davidson, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Nosocomial infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were first reported in the United States in the early 1960s. Beginning in the 1990s, healthy individuals from the community with no risk factors for resistant bacteria began presenting with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections, acquiring the name "community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus" (CA-MRSA). CA-MRSA has a tendency to affect the skin and skin structures, generally in the form of abscesses and furuncles, carbuncles, and cellulitis. Cases of invasive infections including bacteremia, endocarditis, and necrotizing pneumonia have also been reported. A patient complaint of a "spider bite" is frequently associated with CA-MRSA. CA-MRSA and the traditional health care-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus are distinguished by their genetic composition, virulence factors, and susceptibility patterns to non-beta-lactam antibiotics. Appropriate management of CA-MRSA skin and skin structure infections includes incision and drainage of infected tissue and appropriate antimicrobial therapy. It has been suggested that when prevalence of CA-MRSA within a community eclipses 10%-15%, empiric use of non-beta-lactam antibiotics with in vitro activity against CA-MRSA be initiated when treating skin and skin structure infections. CA-MRSA retains susceptibility to a range of older antibiotics available in oral formulations such as minocycline, doxycycline, sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim, moxifloxacin, levofloxacin, and clindamycin. Local susceptibility patterns and individual patient factors should guide the selection of antibiotics. PMID:19617720

  10. Replacement of HA-MRSA by CA-MRSA Infections at an Academic Medical Center in the Midwestern United States, 2004-5 to 2008

    PubMed Central

    David, Michael Z.; Cadilla, Adriana; Boyle-Vavra, Susan; Daum, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    We noted anecdotally that infections designated as health care-associated (HA-) MRSA by epidemiologic criteria seemed to be decreasing in incidence at the University of Chicago Medical Center (UCMC) after 2004. We compared MRSA patients seen at any site of clinical care at UCMC and the isolates that caused their infections in 2004-5 (n = 545) with those in 2008 (n = 135). The percent of patients with MRSA infections cultured > 2 days after hospital admission decreased from 19.5% in 2004-5 to 7.4% in 2008 (p = 0.001). The percent in 2004-5 compared with 2008 who had a hospitalization (49.1% to 26.7%, p = 0.001) or surgery (43.0% to 14.1%, p<0.001) in the previous year decreased. In 2008 a greater percent of patients was seen in the emergency department (23.1% vs. 39.3%) and a smaller percent both in intensive care units (15.6% vs. 6.7%) and in other inpatient units (40.7% vs. 32.6%) (p<0.001). The percent of patients with CA-MRSA infections by the CDC epidemiologic criteria increased from 36.5% in 2004-5 to 62.2% in 2008 (p<0.001). The percent of MRSA isolates sharing genetic characteristics of USA100 decreased from 27.9% (152/545) to 12.6% (17/135), while the percent with CA-MRSA (USA300) characteristics increased from 53.2% (290/545) to 66.7% (90/135). The percent of infections that were invasive did not change significantly. Our data suggest that HA-MRSA infections, both by epidemiologic and microbiologic criteria, relative to CA-MRSA, decreased between 2004-5 and 2008 at UCMC. PMID:24755631

  11. Application of the Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) Fingerprinting to Analyze Genetic Variation in Community Associated-Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (CA-MRSA) Isolates in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mobasherizadeh, Sina; Shojaei, Hasan; Havaei, Seyed Asghar; Mostafavizadeh, Kamyar; Davoodabadi, Fazollah; Khorvash, Farzin; Ataei, Behrooz; Daei-Naser, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to apply RAPD technique to analyze the genetic variability among the Iranian CA-MRSA isolates. The RAPD amplification was implemented on 25 strains isolated from the anterior nares of 410 healthy children using four randomly selected oligonucleotide primers from the stocks available in our laboratory, including the primers 1254, GE6, OLP6 and OLP13 from our stock. The amplified PCR products were detected on a 1.5% agarose gel and subjected to further analysis to establish the band profiles and genetic relationships using the Gel Compar® program. The Iranian CA-MRSA isolates produced distinct RAPD patterns which varied based on the primer used, however, the primer 1254 revealed highly polymorphic patterns consisting 5 discernable RAPD types (RT), “RT1” (12, 48%), “RT2” (8, 32%), “RT3” (3, 12%), and “RT4 and RT5”, (a single RAPD type each, 4%). Phylogenetic analysis based on RAPD profiles divided most of the CA-MRSA isolates into 2 distinct but related RAPD clusters, a small group and two single unrelated RAPD types. This study shows that the simple and cost-effective but rather difficult to optimize RAPD fingerprinting could be used to evaluate genetic and epidemiological relationships of CA-MRSA isolates on condition that the patterns are obtained from carefully optimized laboratory tests. PMID:27045409

  12. The emerging ST8 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clone in the community in Japan: associated infections, genetic diversity, and comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Iwao, Yasuhisa; Ishii, Rumiko; Tomita, Yusuke; Shibuya, Yasuhiro; Takano, Tomomi; Hung, Wei-Chun; Higuchi, Wataru; Isobe, Hirokazu; Nishiyama, Akihito; Yano, Mio; Matsumoto, Tetsuya; Ogata, Kikuyo; Okubo, Takeshi; Khokhlova, Olga; Ho, Pak-Leung; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2012-04-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has become a major concern worldwide. In the United States, ST8 CA-MRSA with SCCmecIVa (USA300) has been predominant, affecting the entire United States. In this study, we investigated Japanese ST8 CA-MRSA with new SCCmecIVl (designated ST8 CA-MRSA/J), which has emerged in Japan since 2003. Regarding community spread and infections, ST8 CA-MRSA/J spread in 16.2-34.4% as a major genotype in the community in Japan, and was associated with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs), colitis, and invasive infections (sepsis, epidural abscesses, and necrotizing pneumonia), including influenza prodrome cases and athlete infections, similar to USA300. It spread to even public transport and Hong Kong through a Japanese family. Regarding genetic diversity, ST8 CA-MRSA/J included ST and spa variants and was classified into at least three pulsed-field gel electrophoresis types, ST8 Jα to γ. Of those, ST8 Jβ was associated with severe invasive infections. As for genomics, ST8 CA-MRSA/J showed high similarities to USA300, but with marked diversity in accessory genes; e.g., ST8 CA-MRSA/J possessed enhanced cytolytic peptide genes of CA-MRSA, but lacked the Panton-Valentine leukocidin phage and arginine catabolic mobile element, unlike USA300. The unique features of ST8 CA-MRSA/J included a novel mosaic SaPI (designated SaPIj50) carrying the toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 gene with high expression; the evolution included salvage (through recombination) of hospital-acquired MRSA virulence. The data suggest that ST8 CA-MRSA/J has become a successful native clone in Japan, in association with not only SSTIs but also severe invasive infections (posing a threat), requiring attention. PMID:22350401

  13. Differential Distribution and Expression of Panton-Valentine Leucocidin among Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Saïd-Salim, Battouli; Mathema, Barun; Braughton, Kevin; Davis, Stacy; Sinsimer, Daniel; Eisner, William; Likhoshvay, Yekaterina; DeLeo, Frank R.; Kreiswirth, Barry N.

    2005-01-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is an emerging threat worldwide. CA-MRSA strains differ from hospital-acquired MRSA strains in their antibiotic susceptibilities and genetic backgrounds. Using several genotyping methods, we clearly define CA-MRSA at the genetic level and demonstrate that the prototypic CA-MRSA strain, MW2, has spread as a homogeneous clonal strain family that is distinct from other CA-MRSA strains. The Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL)-encoding genes, lukF and lukS, are prevalent among CA-MRSA strains and have previously been associated with CA-MRSA infections. To better elucidate the role of PVL in the pathogenesis of CA-MRSA, we first analyzed the distribution and expression of PVL among different CA-MRSA strains. Our data demonstrate that PVL genes are differentially distributed among CA-MRSA strains and, when they are present, are always transcribed, albeit with strain-to-strain variability of transcript levels. To directly test whether PVL is critical for the pathogenesis of CA-MRSA, we evaluated the lysis of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) during phagocytic interaction with PVL-positive and PVL-negative CA-MRSA strains. Unexpectedly, there was no correlation between PVL expression and PMN lysis, suggesting that additional virulence factors underlie leukotoxicity and, thus, the pathogenesis of CA-MRSA. PMID:16000462

  14. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Ocular Infection in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Yu-Chuan; Hsiao, Ching-Hsi; Yeh, Lung-Kun; Ma, David H.K.; Chen, Phil Y.F.; Lin, Hsin-Chiung; Tan, Hsin-Yuan; Chen, Hung-Chi; Chen, Shin-Yi; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection is an important public health issue. This observational study aimed to characterize clinical features, antibiotic susceptibility, and genotypes of ocular infections caused by MRSA based on the clinical and molecular definitions of community-associated (CA) and healthcare-associated (HA) strains. Fifty-nine patients with culture-proven S aureus ocular infection were enrolled from January 1, 2010 to December 31, 2011 at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taiwan. Antibiotic susceptibility was verified using disk diffusion/E test. For characterization, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence type (MLST), and Panton–Valentine leukocidin (PVL) gene, were performed. MRSA isolates from the patients with HA factors were classified as clinically defined HA-MRSA, and those carrying SCCmec type I to III as molecularly defined HA-MRSA. Thirty-four patients with MRSA ocular infection were identified. The most common clone of CA-MRSA and HA-MRSA isolates was ST59/PFGE type D/SCCmec IV,VT/PVL (+) (n = 12) and CC 239/PFGE type A/SCCmec III, IIIA/PVL(−) (n = 10), respectively. All the 11 patients with molecularly defined HA-MRSA infections and 50% of the 22 patients with molecularly defined CA-MRSA infections were found to have HA factors (P = .005). CA-MRSA tended to cause lid infections, whereas HA-MRSA tended to cause corneal infections. Contrary to HA-MRSA isolates, nearly all the CA-MRSA isolates were susceptible to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and fluoroquinolones under either clinical or molecular classifications. In Taiwan, CA-MRSA isolates exhibited considerably higher susceptibility to fluoroquinolones when compared with HA-MRSA isolates. A strong correlation was observed between the HA factors and molecularly defined HA-MRSA isolates. PMID:26496268

  15. Combating CA-MRSA in Physical Education, Sports, and Dance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Amanda K.; Howard-Shaughnessy, Candice; Adams, Jon E.

    2007-01-01

    By now most people have heard about the deadly bacteria that can fester in locker rooms, on sports equipment, and in dance facilities, among other places. This article was written to help PERD professionals become better informed about these bacteria, called community-acquired methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (CA-MRSA). Readers will…

  16. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST30-SCCmec IVc clone as the major cause of community-acquired invasive infections in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, S; de Vedia, L; Lopez Furst, M J; Gardella, N; Di Gregorio, S; Ganaha, M C; Prieto, S; Carbone, E; Lista, N; Rotrying, F; Stryjewski, M E; Mollerach, M

    2013-03-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infections have become a major concern worldwide. We conducted a prospective multicenter study of invasive CA-MRSA to evaluate clinical features and genotype of strains causing invasive infections in Argentina. A total of 55 patients with invasive CA-MRSA infections were included. Most patients (60%) had bloodstream infections, 42% required admission to intensive care unit and 16% died. No CA-MRSA isolates were multiresistant (resistant ⩾3 classes of antibiotics). All isolates carried Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes and staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCCmec) type IV. The majority CA-MRSA strains belonged to ST30 and had identical pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns, qualifying as a clonal dissemination of a highly transmissible strain. The main clone recovered from patients with CA-MRSA invasive infections was genotyped as pulsed-field gel electrophoresis type C-ST30, SCCmec type IVc-spa type 019, PVL positive. It has become predominant and replaced the previously described CA-MRSA clone (PFGE type A, ST5, SCCmec type IV, spa type 311). PMID:23340226

  17. Ceftaroline Fosamil Use in 2 Pediatric Patients With Invasive Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections.

    PubMed

    Williams, Amanda W; Newman, Patrick M; Ocheltree, Sara; Beaty, Rachel; Hassoun, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is one of the most common pathogens causing pediatric infections including skin and soft tissue infections, pyogenic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and septic shock. For decades, patients were treated with antibiotics such as vancomycin and clindamycin, but there is an increasing incidence of resistance to these traditional therapies. We describe 2 cases of patients with CA-MRSA invasive infections with bacteremia who experienced vancomycin therapy failure but who were successfully treated with ceftaroline fosamil. Case 1 involves an 8-year-old Hispanic male who was diagnosed with CA-MRSA bacteremia, thigh abscess, and osteomyelitis. The patient was admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit in septic shock. Case 2 involves an 8-year-old Caucasian male who was diagnosed with CA-MRSA sepsis, right arm abscess, and osteomyelitis. We were able to successfully treat both patients with CA-MRSA sepsis and invasive infection-who failed vancomycin therapy-with ceftaroline fosamil with no adverse efiects. Despite the positive outcome in both pediatric patients, clinical trials with ceftaroline fosamil are needed to further support its use in pediatric patients. PMID:26766937

  18. Invasive Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Japanese Girl with Disseminating Multiple Organ Infection: A Case Report and Review of Japanese Pediatric Cases

    PubMed Central

    Yonezawa, Ryuta; Kuwana, Tsukasa; Kawamura, Kengo; Inamo, Yasuji

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric invasive community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infection is very serious and occasionally fatal. This infectious disease is still a relatively rare and unfamiliar infectious disease in Japan. We report a positive outcome in a 23-month-old Japanese girl with meningitis, osteomyelitis, fasciitis, necrotizing pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and bacteremia due to CA-MRSA treated with linezolid. PCR testing of the CA-MRSA strain was positive for PVL and staphylococcal enterotoxin b and negative for ACME. SCC mec was type IVa. This case underscores the selection of effective combinations of antimicrobial agents for its treatment. We need to be aware of invasive CA-MRSA infection, which rapidly progresses with a serious clinical course, because the incidence of the disease may be increasing in Japan. PMID:26819794

  19. Ceftaroline Fosamil Use in 2 Pediatric Patients With Invasive Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Newman, Patrick M.; Ocheltree, Sara; Beaty, Rachel; Hassoun, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is one of the most common pathogens causing pediatric infections including skin and soft tissue infections, pyogenic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and septic shock. For decades, patients were treated with antibiotics such as vancomycin and clindamycin, but there is an increasing incidence of resistance to these traditional therapies. We describe 2 cases of patients with CA-MRSA invasive infections with bacteremia who experienced vancomycin therapy failure but who were successfully treated with ceftaroline fosamil. Case 1 involves an 8-year-old Hispanic male who was diagnosed with CA-MRSA bacteremia, thigh abscess, and osteomyelitis. The patient was admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit in septic shock. Case 2 involves an 8-year-old Caucasian male who was diagnosed with CA-MRSA sepsis, right arm abscess, and osteomyelitis. We were able to successfully treat both patients with CA-MRSA sepsis and invasive infection—who failed vancomycin therapy—with ceftaroline fosamil with no adverse efiects. Despite the positive outcome in both pediatric patients, clinical trials with ceftaroline fosamil are needed to further support its use in pediatric patients. PMID:26766937

  20. Emerging ST121/agr4 community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with strong adhesin and cytolytic activities: trigger for MRSA pneumonia and fatal aspiration pneumonia in an influenza-infected elderly.

    PubMed

    Wan, T-W; Tomita, Y; Saita, N; Konno, K; Iwao, Y; Hung, W-C; Teng, L-J; Yamamoto, T

    2016-09-01

    The pathogenesis of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) pneumonia in influenza-infected elderly individuals has not yet been elucidated in detail. In the present study, a 92-year-old man infected with influenza developed CA-MRSA pneumonia. His CA-MRSA was an emerging type, originated in ST121/agr4 S. aureus, with diversities of Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL)(-)/spat5110/SCCmecV(+) versus PVL(+)/spat159((etc.))/SCCmec (-), but with common virulence potentials of strong adhesin and cytolytic activities. Resistance to erythromycin/clindamycin (inducible-type) and gentamicin was detected. Pneumonia improved with the administration of levofloxacin, but with the subsequent development of fatal aspiration pneumonia. Hence, characteristic CA-MRSA with strong adhesin and cytolytic activities triggered influenza-related sequential complications. PMID:27358743

  1. Skin Infections in Young People (Aged 14-18 Years): An Integrative Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambe, Catherine I.; Hoare, Karen J.

    2014-01-01

    Skin infections are a major cause of preventable hospitalization, with young people being particularly susceptible. Community-associated methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (CA-MRSA) infection typically presents as skin infection. CA-MRSA infection rates have increased rapidly in the past decade. Exploration of literature…

  2. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Recovered from Healthcare- and Community-Associated Infections in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Maksoud, Mohamed; Ismail, Ghada; Hafez, Soad; El-Kholy, Amani; Attia, Ehab; Talaat, Maha

    2016-01-01

    Background. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has created significant epidemiological, infection-control, and therapeutic management challenges during the past three decades. Aim. To analyze the pattern of resistance of healthcare- and community-associated MRSA in Egypt and the trend of resistance of HA-MRSA over time (2005–2013). Methods. MRSA isolates were recovered from healthcare-associated (HA) and community-associated (CA) Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) infections. They were tested against 11 antimicrobial discs and the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of vancomycin was determined. Inducible clindamycin resistance (iMLSB) was also screened using D-test. Findings. Of 631 S. aureus, MRSA was identified in 343 (76.6%) and 21 (11.5%) of HA and CA S. aureus isolates, respectively. The proportion of HA-MRSA increased significantly from 48.6% in 2005 to 86.8% in 2013 (p value < 0.001). Multidrug resistance (MDR) was observed in 85.8% of HA-MRSA and 48.6% of CA-MRSA. Vancomycin intermediate resistant S. aureus (VISA) was detected in 1.2% of HA-MRSA and none was detected in CA-MRSA. Among HA-MRSA strains, 5.3% showed iMLSB compared to 9.5% among CA-MRSA. Conclusion. The upsurge of the prevalence rates of HA-MRSA over time is alarming and urges for an effective infection control strategy and continuous monitoring of antimicrobial use. PMID:27433480

  3. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Recovered from Healthcare- and Community-Associated Infections in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Maksoud, Mohamed; El-Shokry, Mona; Ismail, Ghada; Hafez, Soad; El-Kholy, Amani; Attia, Ehab; Talaat, Maha

    2016-01-01

    Background. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has created significant epidemiological, infection-control, and therapeutic management challenges during the past three decades. Aim. To analyze the pattern of resistance of healthcare- and community-associated MRSA in Egypt and the trend of resistance of HA-MRSA over time (2005-2013). Methods. MRSA isolates were recovered from healthcare-associated (HA) and community-associated (CA) Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) infections. They were tested against 11 antimicrobial discs and the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of vancomycin was determined. Inducible clindamycin resistance (iMLSB) was also screened using D-test. Findings. Of 631 S. aureus, MRSA was identified in 343 (76.6%) and 21 (11.5%) of HA and CA S. aureus isolates, respectively. The proportion of HA-MRSA increased significantly from 48.6% in 2005 to 86.8% in 2013 (p value < 0.001). Multidrug resistance (MDR) was observed in 85.8% of HA-MRSA and 48.6% of CA-MRSA. Vancomycin intermediate resistant S. aureus (VISA) was detected in 1.2% of HA-MRSA and none was detected in CA-MRSA. Among HA-MRSA strains, 5.3% showed iMLSB compared to 9.5% among CA-MRSA. Conclusion. The upsurge of the prevalence rates of HA-MRSA over time is alarming and urges for an effective infection control strategy and continuous monitoring of antimicrobial use. PMID:27433480

  4. Molecular characteristics of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from outpatients with skin and soft tissue infections in Wuhan, China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoli; Liang, Jiansheng; Jiang, Yuanshan; Wang, Bin; Yuan, Hong; Zhang, Lihua; Zhou, Yanfei; Xu, Huiqiong; Zhou, Wang

    2016-06-01

    This study aims to investigate the antimicrobial susceptibility, molecular characteristics and virulence genes of community-acquired methicillin-resistant ITALIC! Staphylococcus aureus(CA-MRSA) isolates with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs). Outpatients with SSTIs visiting five medical and health institutions were enrolled from 2011 to 2013. Available ITALIC! S. aureus isolates were characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility testing, and detection of PVL genes. For CA-MRSA isolates, we performed typing of staphylococcal cassette chromosome ITALIC! mec(SCC ITALIC! mec), multi locus sequence typing (MLST) and carriage of 27 virulence genes. A total of 203 ITALIC! S. aureusstrains were isolated from 1400 outpatients with SSTIs, and 21 (10.3%) were CA-MRSA isolates. The positive rate of PVL genes among ITALIC! S. aureus, CA-MRSA and methicillin-susceptible ITALIC! S. aureus(MSSA) isolates were 39.4%, 71.4% and 35.7%, respectively. CA-MRSA strains had greater sensitivity to non-β-lactam antimicrobial agents. All CA-MRSA isolates belonged to SCC ITALIC! mecIV and V, accounting for 47.6% and 52.4%, respectively. ST59 was the most common lineage accounting for 76.2%; ST59-SCC ITALIC! mecIVa-PVL-positive clone was found to be the predominant clone, accounting for 38.1%. All CA-MRSA isolates were found to be positive for one or more virulence genes, 28.6% of isolates carried PVL, ITALIC! seb, ITALIC! sek, ITALIC! seq, ITALIC! hla, ITALIC! hlb, ITALIC! hldand ITALIC! hlg-2. CA-MRSA infections were relatively uncommon in outpatients with SSTIs, but they carried many virulence genes, ST59-SCC ITALIC! mecIV a-PVL-positive clone was the predominant clone in Wuhan, China. PMID:27060098

  5. Incidence of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus carrying Pantone-Valentine leucocidin gene at a referral hospital in United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Dash, Nihar; Panigrahi, Debadatta; Al Zarouni, Mansour; Yassin, Faten; Al-Shamsi, Moza

    2014-04-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is an emerging pathogen in hospitalized patients worldwide. The present study was undertaken to identify CA-MRSA in hospitalized patients in a 350-bed tertiary care hospital in Sharjah, UAE over a 2-year period from January 2011 to December 2012. CA-MRSA was defined based on identification within first 48 h of admission in the hospital. Staphylococcal cassette chromosome (SCC) mec typing of the CA-MRSA isolates was carried out by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Detection of PVL and mecA genes was done by PCR using the GenoType(®) MRSA test system (Hain Lifescience). Patient's clinical data and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of the CA-MRSA isolates were also evaluated. Fifty seven of the 187 MRSA isolates were identified as CA-MRSA. All the CA-MRSA strains in our study belonged to SCCmecIV type and were positive for both PVL and mecA genes. The patients with CA-MRSA infections were young (median age, 32 years) and the majority of infections involved the skin and soft tissue (36%). Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of the CA-MRSA isolates showed a better susceptibility profile to the non-beta-lactam antimicrobials with the exception of ciprofloxacin having 28% resistance. This study evidently strengthens the recent observation of an increase in CA-MRSA emergence among hospitalized patients in the UAE. PMID:23919760

  6. Prospective Multicenter Study of Community-Associated Skin and Skin Structure Infections due to Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Buenos Aires, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    López Furst, María José; de Vedia, Lautaro; Fernández, Silvina; Gardella, Noella; Ganaha, María Cristina; Prieto, Sergio; Carbone, Edith; Lista, Nicolás; Rotryng, Flavio; Morera, Graciana I.; Mollerach, Marta; Stryjewski, Martín E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is now the most common cause of skin and skin structure infections (SSSI) in several world regions. In Argentina prospective, multicenter clinical studies have only been conducted in pediatric populations. Objective Primary: describe the prevalence, clinical and demographic characteristics of adult patients with community acquired SSSI due to MRSA; secondary: molecular evaluation of CA-MRSA strains. Patients with MRSA were compared to those without MRSA. Materials and Methods Prospective, observational, multicenter, epidemiologic study, with molecular analysis, conducted at 19 sites in Argentina (18 in Buenos Aires) between March 2010 and October 2011. Patients were included if they were ≥14 years, were diagnosed with SSSI, a culture was obtained, and there had no significant healthcare contact identified. A logistic regression model was used to identify factors associated with CA-MRSA. Pulse field types, SCCmec, and PVL status were also determined. Results A total of 311 patients were included. CA-MRSA was isolated in 70% (218/311) of patients. Clinical variables independently associated with CA-MRSA were: presence of purulent lesion (OR 3.29; 95%CI 1.67, 6.49) and age <50 years (OR 2.39; 95%CI 1.22, 4.70). The vast majority of CA-MRSA strains causing SSSI carried PVL genes (95%) and were SCCmec type IV. The sequence type CA-MRSA ST30 spa t019 was the predominant clone. Conclusions CA-MRSA is now the most common cause of SSSI in our adult patients without healthcare contact. ST30, SCCmec IV, PVL+, spa t019 is the predominant clone in Buenos Aires, Argentina. PMID:24324543

  7. Virulence determinants associated with the Asian community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus lineage ST59

    PubMed Central

    Li, Min; Dai, Yingxin; Zhu, Yuanjun; Fu, Chih-Lung; Tan, Vee Y.; Wang, Yanan; Wang, Xing; Hong, Xufen; Liu, Qian; Li, Tianming; Qin, Juanxiu; Ma, Xiaowei; Fang, Jingyuan; Otto, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Understanding virulence is vital for the development of novel therapeutics to target infections with community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA), which cause an ongoing epidemic in the United States and are on a global rise. However, what defines virulence particularly of global CA-MRSA lineages is poorly understood. Threatening a vast population, the predominant Asian CA-MRSA lineage ST59 is of major epidemiological importance. However, there have been no molecular analyses using defined virulence gene deletion mutants in that lineage as of yet. Here, we compared virulence in skin, lung, and blood infection models of ST59 CA-MRSA isolates with geographically matched hospital-associated MRSA isolates. We selected a representative ST59 CA-MRSA isolate based on toxin expression and virulence characteristics, and produced isogenic gene deletion mutants of important CA-MRSA virulence determinants (α-toxin, PSM α, Agr) in that isolate for in-vitro and in-vivo analyses. Our results demonstrate strongly enhanced virulence of ST59 CA-MRSA over hospital-associated lineages, supporting the notion that enhanced virulence is characteristic for CA-MRSA. Furthermore, they show strong and significant contribution of Agr, α-toxin, and PSMα to pathogenesis of ST59 CA-MRSA skin, lung, and blood infection, emphasizing the value of drug development efforts targeted toward those virulence determinants. PMID:27296890

  8. Clinical features and molecular characteristics of invasive community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in Taiwanese children.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Jung; Su, Lin-Hui; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Lin, Tzou-Yien; Wong, Kin-Sun; Chen, Yi-Ywan M; Huang, Yhu-Chering

    2007-11-01

    Highly virulent community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has been associated with morbidity and mortality in various countries of the world. We characterized the clinical and molecular features of pediatric invasive CA-MRSA infections in Taiwan. Between July 2000 and June 2005, 31 previously healthy children with invasive CA-MRSA infections were identified from 423 children with community-onset methicillin-resistant S. aureus infections. The medical records were reviewed. The clinical isolates, if available, were collected for molecular characterization. Sixteen (51.6%) patients were male, and the mean age was 5.7 years. Adolescents accounted for 9 (29%) cases. Eighteen children had bone and/or joint infections, 14 had deep-seated soft tissue infections, 11 had pneumonia, and 2 had central nervous system infections. Multiorgan involvement was identified in 8 of 20 bacteremic cases. Twenty-two patients (71%) required surgical interventions. The mean hospital stay was 27.4 days. All of the 15 available isolates were classified as sequence type (ST) 59 or its single locus variant and belonged to 2 previously reported community-associated clones containing staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type IV or type V(T) in Taiwan. Most of the isolates were multiresistant to clindamycin (94%) and erythromycin (97%). Eleven (73.3%) isolates carried pvl genes, and the strains harboring pvl genes were significantly associated with lung involvement. In conclusion, invasive CA-MRSA infections in pediatric population were not limited to young children. Surgical interventions were often required, and a prolonged course of antibiotic therapy was needed. A multiresistant CA-MRSA clone characterized as ST59 was identified from these children in Taiwan. PMID:17662565

  9. Practices and Procedures to Prevent the Transmission of Skin and Soft Tissue Infections in High School Athletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fritz, Stephanie A.; Long, Marcus; Gaebelein, Claude J.; Martin, Madeline S.; Hogan, Patrick G.; Yetter, John

    2012-01-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are frequent in student athletes and are often caused by community-associated methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (CA-MRSA). We evaluated the awareness of CA-MRSA among high school coaches and athletic directors in Missouri (n = 4,408) and evaluated hygiene practices affecting SSTI transmission. Of…

  10. Immunopathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus pulmonary infection

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Dane; Prince, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common human pathogen highly evolved as both a component of the commensal flora and as a major cause of invasive infection. Severe respiratory infection due to staphylococci has been increasing due to the prevalence of more virulent USA300 CA-MRSA strains in the general population. The ability of S. aureus to adapt to the milieu of the respiratory tract has facilitated its emergence as a respiratory pathogen. Its metabolic versatility, the ability to scavenge iron, coordinate gene expression, and the horizontal acquisition of useful genetic elements have all contributed to its success as a component of the respiratory flora, in hospitalized patients, as a complication of influenza and in normal hosts. The expression of surface adhesins facilitates its persistence in the airways. In addition, the highly sophisticated interactions of the multiple S. aureus virulence factors, particularly the α-hemolysin and protein A, with diverse immune effectors in the lung such as ADAM10, TNFR1, EGFR, immunoglobulin, and complement all contribute to the pathogenesis of staphylococcal pneumonia. PMID:22037948

  11. Risk Factors for Community-Associated Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infection in Children of Maui

    PubMed Central

    Seifried, Steven E

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infection, and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) infection overall, has dramatically increased in the past 10 years. Children and Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders (NHPI) are disproportionately affected by CA-MRSA infection. The purpose of this case-control study was to identify risk factors for CA-S. aureus skin infections in children of Maui, Hawai‘i, as a foundation for reducing the transmission of these infections. Survey data were obtained from patients in pediatric clinician offices over an 8-month period. NHPI participants were well-represented as 58% of cases and 54% of controls. Chi-square analysis and logistic regression were used to identify risk factors. Significant risk factors predictive of infection among all participants were (a) skin abrasions or wounds, (b) household contact, and (c) overweight or obesity. Risk factors predictive of infection among NHPI were (a) skin abrasions or wounds, (b) antibiotic use within 6 months, (c) overweight or obesity, and (d) a history of eczema or other skin disorder. The role of overweight or obesity in S. aureus skin infections among NHPI has not been identified in previous research and indicates a focus for additional education. Further research is needed to better understand the role of eczema, antibiotic use, overweight and obesity, and socio-cultural factors in these infections. PMID:22900237

  12. Epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and treatment options for skin and soft tissue infection caused by community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Farley, Jason E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This article reviews the evolving epidemiology of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) and the appropriate outpatient management of CA-MRSA skin and soft tissue infection. Further, the paper will provide the basis upon which an individualized patient educational plan may be developed. Data Sources: To complete this review, a search of English language publications was conducted through Medline and CINAHL databases (1966–2006). Conclusions: The epidemiology of CA-MRSA is becoming increasingly complex. Research that addresses the impact of this organism in high-risk populations and within families is urgently needed. Implications for Practice: Nurse practitioners must remain informed of the epidemiology of common and emerging drug-resistant organisms in their patient populations. PMID:18271763

  13. Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Case Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sowash, Madeleine G.; Uhlemann, Anne-Catrin

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, the emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has changed the landscape of S. aureus infections around the globe. Initially recognized for its ability to cause disease in young and healthy individuals without healthcare exposures as well as for its distinct genotype and phenotype, this original description no longer fully encompasses the diversity of CA-MRSA as it continues to expand its niche. Using four case studies, we highlight a wide range of the clinical presentations and challenges of CA-MRSA. Based on these cases we further explore the globally polygenetic background of CA-MRSA with a special emphasis on generally less characterized populations. PMID:24085688

  14. METHICILLIN-RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS INFECTIONS OF THE EYE AND ORBIT (AN AMERICAN OPHTHALMOLOGICAL SOCIETY THESIS)

    PubMed Central

    Blomquist, Preston Howard

    2006-01-01

    Purpose To ascertain if methicillin-resistant Staphyloccocus aureus (MRSA) ophthalmic infections are increasing. Methods A retrospective review of all patients with a culture positive for MRSA in the Parkland Health and Hospital System, the urban public healthcare system for Dallas County, Texas, for the years 2000 through 2004 was performed. Patients with ocular, orbital, and ocular adnexal infection were identified, and isolates were categorized as nosocomial or community-acquired (CA). Results A total of 3,640 patients with a culture positive for MRSA were identified, with 1,088 patients (30%) considered to have acquired the isolate via nosocomial transmission and 2,552 patients (70%) considered to have CA-MRSA. Forty-nine patients (1.3%) had ophthalmic MRSA involvement. For both ophthalmic and nonophthalmic cases, the number of CA-MRSA patients increased each year, whereas the numbers of nosocomial patients remained fairly constant. Patients with ophthalmic MRSA tended to be younger than other MRSA patients (P = .023). The most common manifestation of ophthalmic MRSA infection was preseptal cellulitis and/or lid abscess followed by conjunctivitis, but sight-threatening infections, including corneal ulcers, endophthalmitis, orbital cellulitis, and blebitis, also occurred. Empirical antibiotic coverage was initially prescribed in 48 (98%) of ophthalmic cases and did not adequately cover for the MRSA isolate in 24 (50%). Conclusions CA-MRSA is becoming increasingly prevalent, and ophthalmologists will see more ophthalmic MRSA infections. Although ophthalmic CA-MRSA commonly presents as preseptal lid infection and conjunctivitis, sight-threatening infections also occur. Ophthalmologists must identify MRSA patients, adjust empirical treatment regimens where MRSA is endemic, and take steps to control emergence of resistant organisms in both inpatient and outpatient practices. PMID:17471350

  15. Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus necrotizing pneumonia without evidence of antecedent viral upper respiratory infection

    PubMed Central

    Toro, Cristina Moran; Janvier, Jack; Zhang, Kunyan; Fonseca, Kevin; Gregson, Dan; Church, Deirdre; Laupland, Kevin; Rabin, Harvey; Elsayed, Sameer; Conly, John

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: USA300 community-associated (CA) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains causing necrotizing pneumonia have been reported in association with antecedent viral upper respiratory tract infections (URI). METHODS: A case series of necrotizing pneumonia presenting as a primary or coprimary infection, secondary to CA-MRSA without evidence of antecedent viral URI, is presented. Cases were identified through the infectious diseases consultation service records. Clinical and radiographic data were collected by chart review and electronic records. MRSA strains were isolated from sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage, pleural fluid or blood cultures and confirmed using standard laboratory procedures. MRSA strains were characterized by susceptibility testing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, spa typing, agr typing and multilocus sequence typing. Testing for respiratory viruses was performed by appropriate serological testing of banked sera, or nucleic acid testing of nasopharyngeal or bronchoalveloar lavage specimens. RESULTS: Ten patients who presented or copresented with CA necrotizing pneumonia secondary to CA-MRSA from April 2004 to October 2011 were identified. The median length of stay was 22.5 days. Mortality was 20.0%. Classical risk factors for CA-MRSA were identified in seven of 10 (70.0%) cases. Chest tube placement occurred in seven of 10 patients with empyema. None of the patients had historical evidence of antecedent URI. In eight of 10 patients, serological or nucleic acid testing testing revealed no evidence of acute viral coinfection. Eight strains were CMRSA-10 (USA300). The remaining two strains were a USA300 genetically related strain and a USA1100 strain. CONCLUSION: Pneumonia secondary to CA-MRSA can occur in the absence of an antecedent URI. Infections due to CA-MRSA are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Clinicians need to have an awareness of this clinical entity, particularly in patients who are in risk

  16. In vivo bioluminescence imaging to evaluate systemic and topical antibiotics against community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus-infected skin wounds in mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yi; Ramos, Romela Irene; Cho, John S; Donegan, Niles P; Cheung, Ambrose L; Miller, Lloyd S

    2013-02-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) frequently causes skin and soft tissue infections, including impetigo, cellulitis, folliculitis, and infected wounds and ulcers. Uncomplicated CA-MRSA skin infections are typically managed in an outpatient setting with oral and topical antibiotics and/or incision and drainage, whereas complicated skin infections often require hospitalization, intravenous antibiotics, and sometimes surgery. The aim of this study was to develop a mouse model of CA-MRSA wound infection to compare the efficacy of commonly used systemic and topical antibiotics. A bioluminescent USA300 CA-MRSA strain was inoculated into full-thickness scalpel wounds on the backs of mice and digital photography/image analysis and in vivo bioluminescence imaging were used to measure wound healing and the bacterial burden. Subcutaneous vancomycin, daptomycin, and linezolid similarly reduced the lesion sizes and bacterial burden. Oral linezolid, clindamycin, and doxycycline all decreased the lesion sizes and bacterial burden. Oral trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole decreased the bacterial burden but did not decrease the lesion size. Topical mupirocin and retapamulin ointments both reduced the bacterial burden. However, the petrolatum vehicle ointment for retapamulin, but not the polyethylene glycol vehicle ointment for mupirocin, promoted wound healing and initially increased the bacterial burden. Finally, in type 2 diabetic mice, subcutaneous linezolid and daptomycin had the most rapid therapeutic effect compared with vancomycin. Taken together, this mouse model of CA-MRSA wound infection, which utilizes in vivo bioluminescence imaging to monitor the bacterial burden, represents an alternative method to evaluate the preclinical in vivo efficacy of systemic and topical antimicrobial agents. PMID:23208713

  17. Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Lacking PVL, as a Cause of Severe Invasive Infection Treated with Linezolid

    PubMed Central

    Gavino, Alexandra; Miragaia, Maria; Varandas, Luis; de Lencastre, Herminia; Brito, Maria Joao

    2013-01-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is an emerging public health problem worldwide. Severe invasive infections have been described, mostly associated with the presence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL). In Portugal limited information exists regarding CA-MRSA infections. In this study we describe the case of a previously healthy 12-year-old female, sport athlete, who presented to the hospital with acetabulofemoral septic arthritis, myositis, fasciitis, acetabulum osteomyelitis, and pneumonia. The MRSA isolated from blood and synovial fluid was PVL negative and staphylococcal enterotoxin type P (SEP) and type L (SEL) positive, with a vancomycin MIC of 1.0 mg/L and resistant to clindamycin and ciprofloxacin. The patient was submitted to multiple surgical drainages and started on vancomycin, rifampicin, and gentamycin. Due to persistence of fever and no microbiological clearance, linezolid was started with improvement. This is one of the few reported cases of severe invasive infection caused by CA-MRSA in Portugal, which was successfully treated with linezolid. In spite of the severity of infection, the MRSA isolate did not produce PVL. PMID:23509655

  18. The changing face of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Kale, P; Dhawan, B

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important cause of infection, both in hospitalised patients with significant healthcare exposure and in patients without healthcare risk factors. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) are known for their rapid community transmission and propensity to cause aggressive skin and soft tissue infections and community-acquired pneumonia. The distinction between the healthcare-associated (HA)-MRSA and CA-MRSA is gradually fading owing to the acquisition of multiple virulence factors and genetic elements. The movement of CA-MRSA strains into the nosocomial setting limits the utility of using clinical risk factors alone to designate community or HA status. Identification of unique genetic characteristics and genotyping are valuable tools for MRSA epidemiological studies. Although the optimum pharmacotherapy for CA-MRSA infections has not been determined, many CA-MRSA strains remain broadly susceptible to several non-β-lactam antibacterial agents. This review aimed at illuminating the characteristic features of CA-MRSA, virulence factors, changing clinical settings and molecular epidemiology, insurgence into the hospital settings and therapy with drug resistance. PMID:27514947

  19. Hyperexpression of α-hemolysin explains enhanced virulence of sequence type 93 community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) ST93 clone is becoming dominant in Australia and is clinically highly virulent. In addition, sepsis and skin infection models demonstrate that ST93 CA-MRSA is the most virulent global clone of S. aureus tested to date. While the determinants of virulence have been studied in other clones of CA-MRSA, the basis for hypervirulence in ST93 CA-MRSA has not been defined. Results Here, using a geographically and temporally dispersed collection of ST93 isolates we demonstrate that the ST93 population hyperexpresses key CA-MRSA exotoxins, in particular α-hemolysin, in comparison to other global clones. Gene deletion and complementation studies, and virulence comparisons in a murine skin infection model, showed unequivocally that increased expression of α-hemolysin is the key staphylococcal virulence determinant for this clone. Genome sequencing and comparative genomics of strains with divergent exotoxin profiles demonstrated that, like other S. aureus clones, the quorum sensing agr system is the master regulator of toxin expression and virulence in ST93 CA-MRSA. However, we also identified a previously uncharacterized AraC/XylS family regulator (AryK) that potentiates toxin expression and virulence in S. aureus. Conclusions These data demonstrate that hyperexpression of α-hemolysin mediates enhanced virulence in ST93 CA-MRSA, and additional control of exotoxin production, in particular α-hemolysin, mediated by regulatory systems other than agr have the potential to fine-tune virulence in CA-MRSA. PMID:24512075

  20. Establishment of ST30 as the predominant clonal type among community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Li-Yang; Koh, Yin-Ling; Chlebicka, Nidhi Loomba; Tan, Thean-Yen; Krishnan, Prabha; Lin, Raymond Tzer-Pin; Tee, Nancy; Barkham, Timothy; Koh, Tse-Hsien

    2006-03-01

    The number of infections attributable to community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) in Singapore is progressively increasing. Most cases in the past 2 years were caused by Panton-Valentine leukocidin-positive isolates belonging to sequence type 30, according to multilocus sequence typing. This has clearly become the predominant sequence type among CA-MRSA isolates in Singapore. PMID:16517901

  1. Epicutaneous model of community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus skin infections.

    PubMed

    Prabhakara, Ranjani; Foreman, Oded; De Pascalis, Roberto; Lee, Gloria M; Plaut, Roger D; Kim, Stanley Y; Stibitz, Scott; Elkins, Karen L; Merkel, Tod J

    2013-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common etiological agents of community-acquired skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI). Although the majority of S. aureus community-acquired SSTIs are uncomplicated and self-clearing in nature, some percentage of these cases progress into life-threatening invasive infections. Current animal models of S. aureus SSTI suffer from two drawbacks: these models are a better representation of hospital-acquired SSTI than community-acquired SSTI, and they involve methods that are difficult to replicate. For these reasons, we sought to develop a murine model of community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus SSTI (CA-MRSA SSTI) that can be consistently reproduced with a high degree of precision. We utilized this model to begin to characterize the host immune response to this type of infection. We infected mice via epicutaneous challenge of the skin on the outer ear pinna using Morrow-Brown allergy test needles coated in S. aureus USA300. When mice were challenged in this model, they developed small, purulent, self-clearing lesions with predictable areas of inflammation that mimicked a human infection. CFU in the ear pinna peaked at day 7 before dropping by day 14. The T(h)1 and T(h)17 cytokines gamma interferon (IFN-γ), interleukin-12 (IL-12) p70, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IL-17A, IL-6, and IL-21 were all significantly increased in the draining lymph node of infected mice, and there was neutrophil recruitment to the infection site. In vivo neutrophil depletion demonstrated that neutrophils play a protective role in preventing bacterial dissemination and fatal invasive infection. PMID:23381997

  2. Nasal colonization in children with community acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Davoodabadi, Fazlollah; Mobasherizadeh, Sina; Mostafavizadeh, Kamyar; Shojaei, Hasan; Havaei, Seyed Asghar; Koushki, Ali Mehrabi; Moghadasizadeh, Zahra; Meidani, Mohsen; Shirani, Kiana

    2016-01-01

    Background: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a frequent cause of infections. The changing epidemiology of MRSA became evident in the 1990s when CA-MRSA cases were first reported. Nasal carriage of CA-MRSA is associated with an increased risk for development of infections in various populations. Materials and Methods: Anterior nares culture for the presence of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and MRSA was taken from 345 children attending kindergartens, who didn’t have any known risk factor for MRSA colonization. Also, children demographic variables were recorded. Identification of SA and community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) with standard microbiological test was performed. Finally, the susceptibility of isolated to various antibiotics determined. The data were analyzed with Whonet 5.6 software. Results: Of 345 children, 20 children (5.8%) were colonized with CA-MRSA, 86 children (24.9%) with MSSA and 239 cases (69.3%) didn’t have SA colonization. The highest rate of MSSA and MRSA colonization was obtained at the age of 6 years. The frequency distribution of SA (MSSA and MRSA) colonization prevalence didn’t have any significant differences based on age, gender and the admission time (P > 0.05); but it was significantly different in the urban areas (P < 0.001). The lowest resistance rate of CA-MRSA isolates, with a frequency of 10%, was detected with gentamicin, rifampin, and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole. Conclusions: In summary, CA-MRSA colonization was observed in child care centers remarkably. Therefore, by facing various infections due to SA especially in areas of low socio-economic status, it must be considered. Based on antibiogram test, empirical treatment with rifampin, gentamicin and ciprofloxacin is recommended during CA-MRSA infections. PMID:27274501

  3. Capsaicin Protects Mice from Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Yan; Leng, Bingfeng; Dong, Jing; Li, Hongen; Luo, Mingjing; Zhang, Yu; Dai, Xiaohan; Luo, Yonghuang; Deng, Xuming

    2012-01-01

    Background α-toxin is one of the major virulence factors secreted by most Staphylococcus aureus strains, which played a central role in the pathogenesis of S. aureus pneumonia. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of capsaicin on the production of α-toxin by community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) strain USA 300 and to further assess its performance in the treatment of CA-MRSA pneumonia in a mouse model. Methodology/Principal Findings The in vitro effects of capsaicin on α-toxin production by S. aureus USA 300 were determined using hemolysis, western blot, and real-time RT-PCR assays. The influence of capsaicin on the α-toxin-mediated injury of human alveolar epithelial cells was determined using viability and cytotoxicity assays. Mice were infected intranasally with S. aureus USA300; the in vivo protective effects of capsaicin against S. aureus pneumonia were assessed by monitoring the mortality, histopathological changes and cytokine levels. Low concentrations of capsaicin substantially decreased the production of α-toxin by S. aureus USA 300 without affecting the bacterial viability. The addition of capsaicin prevented α-toxin-mediated human alveolar cell (A549) injury in co-culture with S. aureus. Furthermore, the in vivo experiments indicated that capsaicin protected mice from CA-MRSA pneumonia caused by strain USA 300. Conclusions/Significance Capsaicin inhibits the production of α-toxin by CA-MRSA strain USA 300 in vitro and protects mice from CA-MRSA pneumonia in vivo. However, the results need further confirmation with other CA-MRSA lineages. This study supports the views of anti-virulence as a new antibacterial approach for chemotherapy. PMID:22427935

  4. Incidence and risk factors for community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in New York City, 2006-2012.

    PubMed

    Baker, P; Cohen, B; Liu, J; Larson, E

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to describe changes in incidence and risk factors for community-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infections upon admission to two New York City hospitals from 2006 to 2012. We examined the first hospitalization for adult patients using electronic health record and administrative data and determined the annual incidence/1000 admissions of total S. aureus, total MRSA, and CA-MRSA (within 48 h of admission) in clinical specimens over the study period. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with CA-MRSA in 2006 and 2012. In 137 350 admissions, the incidence of S. aureus, MRSA, and CA-MRSA/1000 admissions were 15·6, 7·0, and 3·5, respectively. The total S. aureus and MRSA isolations decreased significantly over the study period (27% and 25%, respectively) while CA-MRSA incidence was unchanged. CA-MRSA increased as a proportion of all MRSA between 2006 (46%) and 2012 (62%), and was most frequently isolated from respiratory (1·5/1000) and blood (0·7/1000) cultures. Logistic regression analysis of factors associated with isolation of CA-MRSA showed that age ⩾65 years [odds ratio (OR) 2·3, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1·2-4·5], male gender (OR 1·8, 95% CI 1·2-2·8) and history of renal failure (OR 2·6, 95% CI 1·6-4·2) were significant predictors of infection in 2006. No predictors were identified in 2012. PMID:26364503

  5. Multiplex PCR for rapid detection of Staphylococcus aureus isolates suspected to represent community-acquired strains.

    PubMed

    Strommenger, B; Braulke, C; Pasemann, B; Schmidt, C; Witte, W

    2008-02-01

    The continuous spread of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (caMRSA) and the introduction of these highly virulent isolates into hospitals represent increasing threats. The timely recognition of caMRSA strains is crucial for infection control purposes. Thus, we developed a PCR-based assay for the easy and rapid determination of those caMRSA clones that currently are the most prevalent in Germany and Central Europe. This assay was able to correctly identify the majority of the isolates as caMRSA of sequence type 80 (ST80), clonal complex 1 (USA400), and ST8 (USA300). In combination with spa typing-BURP (based upon repeat pattern) analysis and resistance typing, it provides a means for the extensive characterization of suspicious isolates. Thus, this assay represents a reliable tool for monitoring the emergence and spread of different caMRSA clones. The resulting information, in combination with careful interpretation of the epidemiological records, might help to prevent the further spread of those highly virulent caMRSA clones. PMID:18032620

  6. Increased Susceptibility of Humanized NSG Mice to Panton-Valentine Leukocidin and Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infection

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Ching Wen; Kolar, Stacey L.; Müller, Sabrina; Rodriguez, Maria D.; Rezai-Zadeh, Kavon; Fan, Xuemo; Beenhouwer, David O.; Town, Terrence; Liu, George Y.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of skin and soft-tissue infections worldwide. Mice are the most commonly used animals for modeling human staphylococcal infections. However a supra-physiologic S. aureus inoculum is required to establish gross murine skin pathology. Moreover, many staphylococcal factors, including Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) elaborated by community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA), exhibit selective human tropism and cannot be adequately studied in mice. To overcome these deficiencies, we investigated S. aureus infection in non-obese diabetic (NOD)/severe combined immune deficiency (SCID)/IL2rγnull (NSG) mice engrafted with human CD34+ umbilical cord blood cells. These “humanized” NSG mice require one to two log lower inoculum to induce consistent skin lesions compared with control mice, and exhibit larger cutaneous lesions upon infection with PVL+ versus isogenic PVL- S. aureus. Neutrophils appear important for PVL pathology as adoptive transfer of human neutrophils alone to NSG mice was sufficient to induce dermonecrosis following challenge with PVL+ S. aureus but not PVL- S. aureus. PMX53, a human C5aR inhibitor, blocked PVL-induced cellular cytotoxicity in vitro and reduced the size difference of lesions induced by the PVL+ and PVL- S. aureus, but PMX53 also reduced recruitment of neutrophils and exacerbated the infection. Overall, our findings establish humanized mice as an important translational tool for the study of S. aureus infection and provide strong evidence that PVL is a human virulence factor. PMID:26618545

  7. Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in non-outbreak skin infections

    PubMed Central

    Bonesso, Mariana Fávero; Marques, Silvio Alencar; Camargo, Carlos Henrique; Fortaleza, Carlos Magno Castelo Branco; da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes Ribeiro de Souza

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and risk factors for the acquisition of MRSA (Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus) as the main cause of skin and soft tissue infections. S. aureus were characterized for the presence of PVL, TSST-1 and mecA genes. SCCmec typing was carried out in mecA positive strains and PFGE was performed only in these strains. During the study period, 127 outpatients attending a dermatology clinical the Botucatu Medical School, a regional tertiary hospital in Botucatu, Sao Paulo, Brazil, were diagnosed with active skin infections. A total 66 (56.9%) S. aureus strains were isolated. The methicillin resistance gene mecA was detected in seven (10.6%) S. aureus strains. The SCCmec types detected in the seven mecA-positive S. aureus strains were type Ia in one, type II in three, and type IV in three. The PVL gene was detected in 10 (15.1%) in sensitive strains. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis revealed non-clonal diversity among the isolates. The risk factors associated with MRSA acquisition in this study were previous ciprofloxacin use and working in a healthcare environment. The risk factors indicate plausible routes of CA-MRSA transmission among the subjects studied. PMID:25763047

  8. Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in non-outbreak skin infections.

    PubMed

    Bonesso, Mariana Fávero; Marques, Silvio Alencar; Camargo, Carlos Henrique; Fortaleza, Carlos Magno Castelo Branco; da Cunha, Maria de Lourdes Ribeiro de Souza

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and risk factors for the acquisition of MRSA (Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus) as the main cause of skin and soft tissue infections. S. aureus were characterized for the presence of PVL, TSST-1 and mecA genes. SCCmec typing was carried out in mecA positive strains and PFGE was performed only in these strains. During the study period, 127 outpatients attending a dermatology clinical the Botucatu Medical School, a regional tertiary hospital in Botucatu, Sao Paulo, Brazil, were diagnosed with active skin infections. A total 66 (56.9%) S. aureus strains were isolated. The methicillin resistance gene mecA was detected in seven (10.6%) S. aureus strains. The SCCmec types detected in the seven mecA-positive S. aureus strains were type Ia in one, type II in three, and type IV in three. The PVL gene was detected in 10 (15.1%) in sensitive strains. Pulsed field gel electrophoresis revealed non-clonal diversity among the isolates. The risk factors associated with MRSA acquisition in this study were previous ciprofloxacin use and working in a healthcare environment. The risk factors indicate plausible routes of CA-MRSA transmission among the subjects studied. PMID:25763047

  9. Detection and genetic characterization of PVL-positive ST8-MRSA-IVa and exfoliative toxin D-positive European CA-MRSA-Like ST1931 (CC80) MRSA-IVa strains in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Paul, Shyamal Kumar; Ghosh, Souvik; Kawaguchiya, Mitsuyo; Urushibara, Noriko; Hossain, Mohammad Akram; Ahmed, Salma; Mahmud, Chand; Jilani, Md Shariful Alam; Haq, Jalaluddin Ashraful; Ahmed, Abdullah Akhtar; Kobayashi, Nobumichi

    2014-08-01

    Severe skin lesions caused by Staphylococcus aureus infection are associated with production from bacterial cells of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), a typical virulence factor of community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA), as well as other toxins represented by exfoliative toxins. Through a retrospective study of 26 S. aureus strains isolated from skin lesions of diabetic patients admitted to a hospital in Bangladesh, 2 PVL-gene-positive MRSA-IVa strains and 8 PVL-negative, exfoliative toxin D (ETD) gene (etd)-positive MRSA-IVa strains were isolated. A PVL-positive MRSA-IVa strain had a type I arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME), belonged to ST8/agr-type I/spa-type t121 (a variant of t008), and harbored blaZ, tet(K), msrA, and aph(3')-IIIa, which are mostly typical characteristics found in USA300, a predominant CA-MRSA clone in the United States. Another PVL-positive MRSA strain, belonging to ST1929 (CC88)/agr-type III/spa-type t3341, was negative for ACME, but possessed blaZ and tet(K). The etd-positive MRSA-IVa strains possessed the epidermal cell differentiation inhibitor B (EDIN-B)-encoding gene (edinB) and belonged to ST1931 (CC80)/agr-type III/spa-type t11023 (a variant of t044), which was genetic trait similar to that of the European CA-MRSA ST80 clone. However, unlike the European ST80 strains, the etd-positive MRSA strains detected in the present study harbored seb, sek, and seq, while they were negative for tet(K), aph(3')-IIIa, and fusB, showing susceptibility to fusidic acid. These findings suggested that etd-positive ST1931 MRSA strains belong to the same lineage as the European ST80 MRSA clone, evolving from a common ancestral clone via acquisition of a different pathogenicity island. This is the first report of a USA300-like MRSA-IV strain, PVL-positive ST1929 (CC88) MRSA-IV, and European ST80 CA-MRSA-like etd-positive ST1931 (CC80) MRSA-IV strains isolated in Bangladesh. PMID:24552553

  10. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a Malaysian tertiary centre.

    PubMed

    Rashid, Zetti Zainol; Bahari, Norazlah; Othman, Amizah; Jaafar, Roslinda; Mohamed, Nurul Azmawati; Jabbari, Idimaz; Sulong, Anita; Hashim, Rohaidah; Ahmad, Norazah

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is a pathogen recognized to be distinct in both phenotype and genotype from hospital-acquired MRSA. We have identified CA-MRSA cases in Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia Medical Centre, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, including their antibiotic susceptibility patterns and genotypic characteristics. Cases were identified during January to December 2009 from routine clinical specimens, where culture and antibiotic susceptibility results yielded pauci-resistant MRSA isolates suspected as being CA-MRSA. The patients' clinical data were collected and their specimens were sent for molecular confirmation and analysis. Five cases of CA-MRSA were identified, which had a multi-sensitive pattern on antibiotic susceptibility tests and were resistant to only penicillin and oxacillin. All cases were skin and soft-tissue infections, including diabetic foot with gangrene, infected scalp hematoma, philtrum abscess in a healthcare worker, thrombophlebitis complicated with abscess and infected bedsore. All five cases were confirmed MRSA by detection of mecA. SCCmec typing (ccr and mec complex) revealed SCCmec type IV for all cases except the infected bedsore case. Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene was positive in all isolates. As clinical features among methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus, CA-MRSA and "nosocomial CA-MRSA" are indistinct, early recognition is necessary in order to initiate appropriate antibiotics and infection control measures. Continual surveillance of pauci-resistant MRSA and molecular analysis are necessary in order to identify emerging strains as well as their epidemiology and transmission, both in the community and in healthcare setting. PMID:23682444

  11. Pediatric Staphylococcus aureus Isolate Genotypes and Infections from the Dawn of the Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant S. aureus Epidemic Era in Chicago, 1994 to 1997

    PubMed Central

    Acree, Mary Ellen; Sieth, Julia J.; Boxrud, Dave J.; Dobbins, Ginette; Lynfield, Ruth; Boyle-Vavra, Susan; Daum, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    Widespread infections with community-associated (CA) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have occurred in the United States with the dissemination of the USA300 strain beginning in 2000. We examined 105 isolates obtained from children treated at the University of Chicago from 1994 to 1997 (75 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus [MSSA] and 30 MRSA isolates) in order to investigate for possible evidence of USA300 during this period. Infections were defined epidemiologically based on medical record review. The isolates underwent multilocus sequence typing (MLST), as well as assays for the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes, the protein A gene (spa), and arcA and opp3, proxy markers for the arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME), characteristic of USA300 MRSA. MRSA isolates also underwent staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) subtyping. MSSA isolates belonged to 17 sequence type (ST) groups. The 12 epidemiologically defined CA-MRSA infection isolates were either ST1 (n = 4) or ST8 (n = 8). They belonged to 3 different PFGE types: USA100 (n = 1), USA400 (n = 5), and USA500 (n = 6). Among the CA-MRSA infection isolates, 8 (67%) were PVL+. None of the MRSA or MSSA isolates contained arcA or opp3. Only one MRSA isolate was USA300 by PFGE. This was a health care-associated (HA) MRSA isolate, negative for PVL, that carried SCCmec type II. USA300 with its characteristic features was not identified in the collection from the years 1994 to 1997. PMID:26019202

  12. Novel Phenol-soluble Modulin Derivatives in Community-associated Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Identified through Imaging Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, David J.; Okumura, Cheryl Y.; Hollands, Andrew; Kersten, Roland; Akong-Moore, Kathryn; Pence, Morgan A.; Malone, Cheryl L.; Derieux, Jaclyn; Moore, Bradley S.; Horswill, Alexander R.; Dixon, Jack E.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Nizet, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes a wide range of human disease ranging from localized skin and soft tissue infections to potentially lethal systemic infections. S. aureus has the biosynthetic ability to generate numerous virulence factors that assist in circumventing the innate immune system during disease pathogenesis. Recent studies have uncovered a set of extracellular peptides produced by community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) with homology to the phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs) from Staphylococcus epidermidis. CA-MRSA PSMs contribute to skin infection and recruit and lyse neutrophils, and truncated versions of these peptides possess antimicrobial activity. In this study, novel CA-MRSA PSM derivatives were discovered by the use of microbial imaging mass spectrometry. The novel PSM derivatives are compared with their parent full-length peptides for changes in hemolytic, cytolytic, and neutrophil-stimulating activity. A potential contribution of the major S. aureus secreted protease aureolysin in processing PSMs is demonstrated. Finally, we show that PSM processing occurs in multiple CA-MRSA strains by structural confirmation of additional novel derivatives. This work demonstrates that IMS can serve as a useful tool to go beyond genome predictions and expand our understanding of the important family of small peptide virulence factors. PMID:22371493

  13. Modeling the transmission of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: a dynamic agent-based simulation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been a deadly pathogen in healthcare settings since the 1960s, but MRSA epidemiology changed since 1990 with new genetically distinct strain types circulating among previously healthy people outside healthcare settings. Community-associated (CA) MRSA strains primarily cause skin and soft tissue infections, but may also cause life-threatening invasive infections. First seen in Australia and the U.S., it is a growing problem around the world. The U.S. has had the most widespread CA-MRSA epidemic, with strain type USA300 causing the great majority of infections. Individuals with either asymptomatic colonization or infection may transmit CA-MRSA to others, largely by skin-to-skin contact. Control measures have focused on hospital transmission. Limited public health education has focused on care for skin infections. Methods We developed a fine-grained agent-based model for Chicago to identify where to target interventions to reduce CA-MRSA transmission. An agent-based model allows us to represent heterogeneity in population behavior, locations and contact patterns that are highly relevant for CA-MRSA transmission and control. Drawing on nationally representative survey data, the model represents variation in sociodemographics, locations, behaviors, and physical contact patterns. Transmission probabilities are based on a comprehensive literature review. Results Over multiple 10-year runs with one-hour ticks, our model generates temporal and geographic trends in CA-MRSA incidence similar to Chicago from 2001 to 2010. On average, a majority of transmission events occurred in households, and colonized rather than infected agents were the source of the great majority (over 95%) of transmission events. The key findings are that infected people are not the primary source of spread. Rather, the far greater number of colonized individuals must be targeted to reduce transmission. Conclusions Our findings suggest

  14. The dominant Australian community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clone ST93-IV [2B] is highly virulent and genetically distinct.

    PubMed

    Chua, Kyra Y L; Seemann, Torsten; Harrison, Paul F; Monagle, Shaun; Korman, Tony M; Johnson, Paul D R; Coombs, Geoffrey W; Howden, Brian O; Davies, John K; Howden, Benjamin P; Stinear, Timothy P

    2011-01-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) USA300 has spread rapidly across North America, and CA-MRSA is also increasing in Australia. However, the dominant Australian CA-MRSA strain, ST93-IV [2B] appears distantly related to USA300 despite strikingly similar clinical and epidemiological profiles. Here, we compared the virulence of a recent Australian ST93 isolate (JKD6159) to other MRSA, including USA300, and found that JKD6159 was the most virulent in a mouse skin infection model. We fully sequenced the genome of JKD6159 and confirmed that JKD6159 is a distinct clone with 7616 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) distinguishing this strain from all other S. aureus genomes. Despite its high virulence there were surprisingly few virulence determinants. However, genes encoding α-hemolysin, Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and α-type phenol soluble modulins were present. Genome comparisons revealed 32 additional CDS in JKD6159 but none appeared to encode new virulence factors, suggesting that this clone's enhanced pathogenicity could lie within subtler genome changes, such as SNPs within regulatory genes. To investigate the role of accessory genome elements in CA-MRSA epidemiology, we next sequenced three additional Australian non-ST93 CA-MRSA strains and compared them with JKD6159, 19 completed S. aureus genomes and 59 additional S. aureus genomes for which unassembled genome sequence data was publicly available (82 genomes in total). These comparisons showed that despite its distinctive genotype, JKD6159 and other CA-MRSA clones (including USA300) share a conserved repertoire of three notable accessory elements (SSCmecIV, PVL prophage, and pMW2). This study demonstrates that the genetically distinct ST93 CA-MRSA from Australia is highly virulent. Our comparisons of geographically and genetically diverse CA-MRSA genomes suggest that apparent convergent evolution in CA-MRSA may be better explained by the rapid dissemination of a

  15. Cutaneous Immune Defenses Against Staphylococcus aureus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ji Hae; Seo, Ho Seong; Lim, Sang Young; Park, Kyungho

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is a virulent bacterium that abundantly colonizes inflammatory skin diseases. Since S. aureus infections occur in an impaired skin barrier, it is important to understand the protective mechanism through cutaneous immune responses against S. aureus infections and the interaction with Staphylococcal virulence factors. In this review, we summarize not only the pathogenesis and key elements of S. aureus skin infections, but also the cutaneous immune system against its infections and colonization. The information obtained from this area may provide the groundwork for further immunomodulatory therapies or vaccination strategies to prevent S. aureus infections. PMID:26064853

  16. Antimicrobial activity of tigecycline against community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates recovered from North American medical centers.

    PubMed

    Mendes, Rodrigo E; Sader, Helio S; Deshpande, Lalitagauri; Jones, Ronald N

    2008-04-01

    A total of 1989 community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) were susceptibility tested by broth microdilution. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, SCCmec type, and polymerase chain reaction for Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes were also performed. The overall tigecycline susceptibility rate was 98.2%. Glycopeptides, quinupristin/dalfopristin, linezolid, and chloramphenicol were also active against this collection (< or =0.7% resistant). The vast majority (70.8%) of the CA-MRSA was SCCmec type IV, from which 88.4% belonged to the USA300-0114 clone and 94.7% were PVL positive. Tigecycline showed in vitro activity comparable with other highly active parenteral agents and represents an option for treating complicated infections caused by CA-MRSA. PMID:18068326

  17. Antimicrobial Resistance and Molecular Characteristics of Nasal Staphylococcus aureus Isolates From Newly Admitted Inpatients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xu; Sun, Kangde; Dong, Danfeng; Luo, Qingqiong; Peng, Yibing; Chen, Fuxiang

    2016-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, or methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), is a significant pathogen in both nosocomial and community infections. Community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) strains tend to be multi-drug resistant and to invade hospital settings. This study aimed to assess the antimicrobial resistance and molecular characteristicsof nasal S. aureus among newlyadmitted inpatients.In the present study, 66 S. aureus isolates, including 10 healthcare-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA), 8 CA-MRSA, and 48 methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) strains, were found in the nasal cavities of 62 patients by screening 292 newlyadmitted patients. Antimicrobial resistance and molecular characteristics of these isolates, including spa-type, sequence type (ST) and SCCmec type, were investigated. All isolates were sensitive to linezolid, teicoplanin, and quinupristin/dalfopristin, but high levels of resistance to penicillin and erythromycin were detected. According to D-test and erm gene detection results, the cMLS(B) and iMLS(B) phenotypes were detected in 24 and 16 isolates, respectively. All 10 HA-MRSA strains displayed the cMLS(B) phenotypemediated by ermA or ermA/ermC, while the cMLS(B) CA-MRSA and MSSA strains carried the ermB gene. Molecular characterization revealedall 10 HA-MRSA strains were derived from the ST239-SCCmec III clone, and four out of eight CA-MRSA strains were t437-ST59-SCCmec V. The results suggest that patients play an indispensable role in transmitting epidemic CA-MRSA and HA-MRSA strains. PMID:26915614

  18. Antimicrobial Resistance and Molecular Characteristics of Nasal Staphylococcus aureus Isolates From Newly Admitted Inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xu; Sun, Kangde; Luo, Qingqiong; Peng, Yibing

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, or methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), is a significant pathogen in both nosocomial and community infections. Community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) strains tend to be multi-drug resistant and to invade hospital settings. This study aimed to assess the antimicrobial resistance and molecular characteristicsof nasal S. aureus among newlyadmitted inpatients.In the present study, 66 S. aureus isolates, including 10 healthcare-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA), 8 CA-MRSA, and 48 methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) strains, were found in the nasal cavities of 62 patients by screening 292 newlyadmitted patients. Antimicrobial resistance and molecular characteristics of these isolates, including spa-type, sequence type (ST) and SCCmec type, were investigated. All isolates were sensitive to linezolid, teicoplanin, and quinupristin/dalfopristin, but high levels of resistance to penicillin and erythromycin were detected. According to D-test and erm gene detection results, the cMLSB and iMLSB phenotypes were detected in 24 and 16 isolates, respectively. All 10 HA-MRSA strains displayed the cMLSB phenotypemediated by ermA or ermA/ermC, while the cMLSB CA-MRSA and MSSA strains carried the ermB gene. Molecular characterization revealedall 10 HA-MRSA strains were derived from the ST239-SCCmec III clone, and four out of eight CA-MRSA strains were t437-ST59-SCCmec V. The results suggest that patients play an indispensable role in transmitting epidemic CA-MRSA and HA-MRSA strains. PMID:26915614

  19. Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Epidemiology and Clinical Consequences of an Emerging Epidemic

    PubMed Central

    David, Michael Z.; Daum, Robert S.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Staphylococcus aureus is an important cause of skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs), endovascular infections, pneumonia, septic arthritis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, foreign-body infections, and sepsis. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates were once confined largely to hospitals, other health care environments, and patients frequenting these facilities. Since the mid-1990s, however, there has been an explosion in the number of MRSA infections reported in populations lacking risk factors for exposure to the health care system. This increase in the incidence of MRSA infection has been associated with the recognition of new MRSA clones known as community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA). CA-MRSA strains differ from the older, health care-associated MRSA strains; they infect a different group of patients, they cause different clinical syndromes, they differ in antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, they spread rapidly among healthy people in the community, and they frequently cause infections in health care environments as well. This review details what is known about the epidemiology of CA-MRSA strains and the clinical spectrum of infectious syndromes associated with them that ranges from a commensal state to severe, overwhelming infection. It also addresses the therapy of these infections and strategies for their prevention. PMID:20610826

  20. Community-onset Staphylococcus aureus Surveillance Programme annual report, 2012.

    PubMed

    Coombs, Geoffrey W; Daly, Denise A; Pearson, Julie C; Nimmo, Graeme R; Collignon, Peter J; McLaws, Mary-Louise; Robinson, James O; Turnidge, John D

    2014-03-01

    In 2012, the Australian Group on Antimicrobial Resistance (AGAR) conducted a community-onset period-prevalence survey of clinical Staphylococcus aureus isolated from hospital outpatients and general practice patients including nursing homes, long term care facilities and hospice patients. Day surgery and dialysis patients were excluded. Twenty-nine medical microbiology laboratories from all state and mainland territories participated. Isolates were tested by Vitek2® (AST-P612 card). Results were compared with previous AGAR community surveys. Nationally, the proportion of S. aureus that were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) increased significantly from 11.5% in 2000 to 17.9% in 2012 (P<0.0001). Resistance to the non-ß-lactam antimicrobials varied between regions. No resistance was detected to vancomycin, teicoplanin or linezolid. Resistance in methicillin susceptible S. aureus was rare apart from erythromycin (12.8%) and was absent for vancomycin, teicoplanin, linezolid and daptomycin. The proportion of S. aureus characterised as health care-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA) was 5.1%. Three HA-MRSA clones were characterised, with 72.9% and 26.4% of HA-MRSA classified as ST22-IV [2B] (EMRSA-15) and ST239-III [3A] (Aus-2/3 EMRSA) respectively. Multi-clonal community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) accounted for 12.5% of all S. aureus. Regional variation in resistance in MRSA was primarily due to the differential distribution of the 2 major HA-MRSA clones; ST239-III [3A] (Aus-2/3 EMRSA), which is resistant to multiple non-ß-lactam antimicrobials, and ST22-IV [2B] (EMRSA-15), which is resistant to ciprofloxacin and typically erythromycin. Although the majority of CA-MRSA were non-multi-resistant, a significant expansion of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) positive CA-MRSA clones has occurred nationally. The mean age of patients (31.7 years, 95% CI 28.9-34.5) with a PVL positive CA-MRSA infection was significantly lower (P<0.0001), than the mean age of patients with a PVL

  1. High frequency of Panton-Valentine leukocidin in Staphylococcus aureus causing pediatric infections in the city of Cartagena-Colombia.

    PubMed

    Correa-Jiménez, Oscar; Pinzón-Redondo, Hernando; Reyes, Niradiz

    2016-01-01

    Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL) is a pore-forming toxin that has been epidemiologically associated with CA-MRSA infections. However, its role in the pathogenicity of Staphylococcus aureus is still unclear. We evaluated the prevalence of PVL-coding genes in methicillin-resistant (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive (MSSA) isolates that cause infections in pediatric patients in the city of Cartagena, Colombia. We obtained S. aureus isolates from patients at the Napoleon Franco Pareja Children's Hospital in Cartagena. Then, we evaluated the presence of the nuc, mecA, and PVL genes in these isolates by multiplex PCR and determined the antibiotic susceptibility profiles using CLSI standards. We further correlated methicillin susceptibility and the presence of PVL genes with clinical variables. Overall PVL prevalence in S. aureus isolates was 73.91%, with a frequency of 80.92% among MRSA isolates and 67.59% among MSSA. We found a correlation between erythromycin resistance and lack of PVL and found that PVL+ cases were more common in older patients. We found a high PVL prevalence in both MRSA and MSSA isolates, in concordance with previous regional reports. PMID:26631434

  2. Community-Based Intervention to Manage an Outbreak of MRSA Skin Infections in a County Jail

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Abdallah F.; Chaussee, Michael S.; McDowell, Emily J.; Huntington, Mark K.

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a community-based intervention to manage an outbreak of communityassociated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) skin infections in a midwestern county jail. A systematic investigation conducted by a family medicine residency program identified 64 total cases and 19 MRSA cases between January 1 and December 31, 2007. Factors contributing to MRSA transmission included inadequate surveillance, lack of antibacterial soap, and a defective laundry process. All 19 isolates were CA-MRSA and all seven tested by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were USA300. Four of the seven isolates showed variation of their PFGE patterns. A primary care approach using community-based resources effectively reduced the number of cases in this heterogeneous outbreak of CA-MRSA, with the last MRSA being isolated in October 2007. PMID:20466702

  3. Community-based intervention to manage an outbreak of MRSA skin infections in a county jail.

    PubMed

    Elias, Abdallah F; Chaussee, Michael S; McDowell, Emily J; Huntington, Mark K

    2010-07-01

    This article describes a community-based intervention to manage an outbreak of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) skin infections in a midwestern county jail. A systematic investigation conducted by a family medicine residency program identified 64 total cases and 19 MRSA cases between January 1 and December 31, 2007. Factors contributing to MRSA transmission included inadequate surveillance, lack of antibacterial soap, and a defective laundry process. All 19 isolates were CA-MRSA and all seven tested by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were USA300. Four of the seven isolates showed variation of their PFGE patterns. A primary care approach using community-based resources effectively reduced the number of cases in this heterogeneous outbreak of CA-MRSA, with the last MRSA being isolated in October 2007. PMID:20466702

  4. Origin and Evolution of European Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Thierry; Andersen, Paal S.; Skov, Robert L.; De Grassi, Anna; Simões, Patricia Martins; Tristan, Anne; Petersen, Andreas; Aziz, Maliha; Kiil, Kristoffer; Cirković, Ivana; Udo, Edet E.; del Campo, Rosa; Vuopio-Varkila, Jaana; Ahmad, Norazah; Tokajian, Sima; Peters, Georg; Schaumburg, Frieder; Olsson-Liljequist, Barbro; Givskov, Michael; Driebe, Elizabeth E.; Vigh, Henrik E.; Shittu, Adebayo; Ramdani-Bougessa, Nadjia; Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Price, Lance B.; Vandenesch, Francois; Larsen, Anders R.; Laurent, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) was recognized in Europe and worldwide in the late 1990s. Within a decade, several genetically and geographically distinct CA-MRSA lineages carrying the small SCCmec type IV and V genetic elements and the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) emerged around the world. In Europe, the predominant CA-MRSA strain belongs to clonal complex 80 (CC80) and is resistant to kanamycin/amikacin and fusidic acid. CC80 was first reported in 1993 but was relatively rare until the late 1990s. It has since been identified throughout North Africa, the Middle East, and Europe, with recent sporadic reports in sub-Saharan Africa. While strongly associated with skin and soft tissue infections, it is rarely found among asymptomatic carriers. Methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) CC80 strains are extremely rare except in sub-Saharan Africa. In the current study, we applied whole-genome sequencing to a global collection of both MSSA and MRSA CC80 isolates. Phylogenetic analyses strongly suggest that the European epidemic CA-MRSA lineage is derived from a PVL-positive MSSA ancestor from sub-Saharan Africa. Moreover, the tree topology suggests a single acquisition of both the SCCmec element and a plasmid encoding the fusidic acid resistance determinant. Four canonical SNPs distinguish the derived CA-MRSA lineage and include a nonsynonymous mutation in accessory gene regulator C (agrC). These changes were associated with a star-like expansion into Europe, the Middle East, and North Africa in the early 1990s, including multiple cases of cross-continent imports likely driven by human migrations. PMID:25161186

  5. A Case of Acute Pyogenic Sacroiliitis and Bacteremia Caused by Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suyoung; Lee, Kang Lock; Baek, Hae Lim; Jang, Seung Jun; Moon, Song Mi

    2013-01-01

    Pyogenic sacroiliitis is a rare osteoarticular infection, occurring most frequently in children and young adults. Diagnosis of the disease is challenging because of a general lack of awareness of the disease and its nonspecific signs and symptoms. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common causative bacteria in pyogenic sacroiliitis. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) has typically been considered a hospital-associated pathogen; however, community-acquired (CA)-MRSA infections are becoming increasingly common in Korea. We report the first domestic case of acute pyogenic sacroiliitis with abscess and bacteremia caused by CA-MRSA. The pathogen carried the type IV-A staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) without the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) gene, and was identified as sequence type (ST) 72 by multilocus sequence typing. PMID:24475359

  6. A study of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in patients with pyoderma

    PubMed Central

    Venniyil, Prasanth V.; Ganguly, Satyaki; Kuruvila, Sheela; Devi, Sheela

    2016-01-01

    Background: Health care–associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(HA-MRSA) are resistant to multiple antibiotics, therefore infections caused by them are difficult to treat resulting in high morbidity and mortality. While most of the research activities and public health initiatives are focused on HA-MRSA, the newly emerging pathogen, community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus(CA-MRSA) is gaining in significance in respect to patient morbidity. There is a significant paucity of data regarding CA-MRSA in the developing parts of the world. Aim: To study the proportions of HA-MRSA and CA-MRSA infections among patients with culture-proven S. aureus infection and to find out how many of these patients showed presence of MRSA in nasal cultures of healthy contacts. Materials and Methods: Clinical details of 227 patients were recorded in the study, such as the duration and recurrence of the infection, history of antibiotic intake, and the presence of other medical illnesses. A pus swab was taken from each lesion and sent for culture and sensitivity. If the culture grew S. aureus, they were screened for methicillin resistance. A swab from the anterior nares of the healthy contact of each patient, whenever available, was collected and it was screened for MRSA. Results: Furunculosis was most common among the primary pyodermas (53/134; 39. 5%). Out of 239 pus culture samples obtained from 227 patients, 192 (84.58%) grew S. aureus; of these 150 (78.12%) were methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA), whereas 42 (21.98%) were MRSA. Out of the 42 MRSA isolated, 33 turned out to be CA-MRSA (78%) and 9 (22%) were HA-MRSA. Nasal swabs of healthy contacts of 34 MRSA patients were cultured. Out of them, two grew MRSA in the culture. Conclusion: The isolation rate of S. aureus was high in our study. Furthermore, our study, although hospital based, clearly indicated the substantial magnitude of the CA-MRSA problem in the local population. PMID:27294048

  7. Hyaluronan Modulation Impacts Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Infection.

    PubMed

    Ibberson, Carolyn B; Parlet, Corey P; Kwiecinski, Jakub; Crosby, Heidi A; Meyerholz, David K; Horswill, Alexander R

    2016-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of chronic biofilm infections. Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a large glycosaminoglycan abundant in mammalian tissues that has been shown to enhance biofilm formation in multiple Gram-positive pathogens. We observed that HA accumulated in an S. aureus biofilm infection using a murine implant-associated infection model and that HA levels increased in a mutant strain lacking hyaluronidase (HysA). S. aureus secretes HysA in order to cleave HA during infection. Through in vitro biofilm studies with HA, the hysA mutant was found to accumulate increased biofilm biomass compared to the wild type, and confocal microscopy showed that HA is incorporated into the biofilm matrix. Exogenous addition of purified HysA enzyme dispersed HA-containing biofilms, while catalytically inactive enzyme had no impact. Additionally, induction of hysA expression prevented biofilm formation and also dispersed an established biofilm in the presence of HA. These observations were corroborated in the implant model, where there was decreased dissemination from an hysA mutant biofilm infection compared to the S. aureus wild type. Histopathology demonstrated that infection with an hysA mutant caused significantly reduced distribution of tissue inflammation compared to wild-type infection. To extend these studies, the impact of HA and S. aureus HysA on biofilm-like aggregates found in joint infections was examined. We found that HA contributes to the formation of synovial fluid aggregates, and HysA can disrupt aggregate formation. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that HA is a relevant component of the S. aureus biofilm matrix and HysA is important for dissemination from a biofilm infection. PMID:27068096

  8. Genomic insights into the emergence and spread of international clones of healthcare-, community- and livestock-associated meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Blurring of the traditional definitions.

    PubMed

    Bal, A M; Coombs, G W; Holden, M T G; Lindsay, J A; Nimmo, G R; Tattevin, P; Skov, R L

    2016-09-01

    The evolution of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from meticillin-susceptible S. aureus has been a result of the accumulation of genetic elements under selection pressure from antibiotics. The traditional classification of MRSA into healthcare-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA) and community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) is no longer relevant as there is significant overlap of identical clones between these groups, with an increasing recognition of human infection caused by livestock-associated MRSA (LA-MRSA). Genomic studies have enabled us to model the epidemiology of MRSA along these lines. In this review, we discuss the clinical relevance of genomic studies, particularly whole-genome sequencing, in the investigation of outbreaks. We also discuss the blurring of each of the three epidemiological groups (HA-MRSA, CA-MRSA and LA-MRSA), demonstrating the limited relevance of this classification. PMID:27530849

  9. Evidence based approach to the treatment of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Peppard, William J; Daniels, Anne; Fehrenbacher, Lynne; Winner, Jamie

    2009-01-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infections have increased dramatically over the last two decades. The types of infections can range from complicated skin and skin structure infections (cSSSI) to pneumonia and endocarditis. Oral antimicrobial therapy, such as trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, clindamycin, long-acting tetracyclines, or linezolid may provide enhanced benefit to those with uncomplicated cutaneous lesions when used in conjunction with incision and drainage in an outpatient setting. However, resistance, susceptibilities, patient-specific circumstances, and adverse effects can impact a healthcare professional's choice of antibiotics. In patients with complicated infections requiring hospitalization or parenteral treatment, vancomycin remains the drug of choice, even though increased resistance and decreased efficacy have crept into clinical practice. Linezolid, quinupristin/dalfopristin, daptomycin, and tigecycline are alternative intravenous agents for the treatment of CA-MRSA. Investigational agents such as dalbavancin, telavancin, oritivancin, iclaprim, ceftobiprole, ceftaroline, and others may expand our therapeutic armamentarium for the treatment of infections caused by CA-MRSA in the future. PMID:21694885

  10. Kinin receptor expression during Staphylococcus aureus infection

    PubMed Central

    Bengtson, Sara H.; Phagoo, Stephen B.; Norrby-Teglund, Anna; Påhlman, Lisa; Mörgelin, Matthias; Zuraw, Bruce L.; Leeb-Lundberg, L. M. Fredrik; Herwald, Heiko

    2006-01-01

    An inappropriate host response to invading bacteria is a critical parameter that often aggravates the outcome of an infection. Staphylococcus aureus is a major human Gram-positive pathogen that causes a wide array of community- and hospital-acquired diseases ranging from superficial skin infections to severe conditions such as staphylococcal toxic shock. Here we find that S aureus induces inflammatory reactions by modulating the expression and response of the B1 and B2 receptors, respectively. This process is initiated by a chain of events, involving staphylococcal-induced cytokine release from monocytes, bacteria-triggered contact activation, and conversion of bradykinin to its metabolite desArg9bradykinin. The data of the present study implicate an important and previously unknown role for kinin receptor regulation in S aureus infections. PMID:16735595

  11. Low prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among men who have sex with men attending an STI clinic in Amsterdam: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Joore, I K C W; van Rooijen, Martijn Sebastiaan; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten Franciscus; de Neeling, A J; van Dam, Alje; de Vries, Henry J C

    2013-01-01

    Objective Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is common among men who have sex with men (MSM) in the USA. It is unknown whether this is also the case in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Sexually transmitted infection outpatient low-threshold clinic, Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Participants Between October 2008 and April 2010, a total of 211 men were included, in two groups: (1) 74 MSM with clinical signs of a skin or soft tissue infection (symptomatic group) and (2) 137 MSM without clinical signs of such infections (asymptomatic group). Primary outcome measures S aureus and MRSA infection and/or colonisation. Swabs were collected from the anterior nasal cavity, throat, perineum, penile glans and, if present, from infected skin lesions. Culture for S aureus was carried out on blood agar plates and for MRSA on selective chromagar plates after enrichment in broth. If MRSA was found, the spa-gene was sequenced. Secondary outcome measures Associated demographic characteristics, medical history, risk factors for colonisation with S aureus and high-risk sexual behaviour were collected through a self-completed questionnaire. Results The prevalence of S aureus colonisation in the nares was 37%, the pharynx 11%, the perianal region 12%, the glans penis 10% and in skin lesions 40%. In multivariable analysis adjusting for age, anogenital S aureus colonisation was significantly associated with the symptomatic group (p=0.01) and marginally with HIV (p=0.06). MRSA was diagnosed in two cases: prevalence 0.9% (95% CI 0.1% to 3.4%)). Neither had CA-MRSA strains. Conclusions CA-MRSA among MSM in Amsterdam is rare. Genital colonisation of S aureus is not associated with high-risk sexual behaviour. PMID:23468471

  12. Skin infections in young people (aged 14-18 years): an integrative review.

    PubMed

    Lambe, Catherine I; Hoare, Karen J

    2014-06-01

    Skin infections are a major cause of preventable hospitalization, with young people being particularly susceptible. Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infection typically presents as skin infection. CA-MRSA infection rates have increased rapidly in the past decade. Exploration of literature specific to young people aged 14-18 years is therefore timely. Integrative review using the methods described by Whittemore and Knafl was undertaken. Electronic databases of Medline, CINAHL, Scopus, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and Google databases were searched for English-language articles published after 1990. Twenty primary studies were included and the findings are reported here. Data analysis revealed factors influencing skin infections in young people may be host-, transmission-, or pathogen-specific. Strategies to address host and transmission factors may be effective in controlling skin infection rates in young people. PMID:23945044

  13. Mild Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infection Improves the Course of Subsequent Endogenous S. aureus Bacteremia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Sanne; de Vogel, Corné P.; van Belkum, Alex; Bakker-Woudenberg, Irma A. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus carriers with S. aureus bacteremia may have a reduced mortality risk compared to non-carriers. A role for the immune system is suggested. Here, we study in mice the effect of mild S. aureus skin infection prior to endogenous or exogenous S. aureus bacteremia, and evaluate protection in relation to anti-staphylococcal antibody levels. Skin infections once or twice by a clinical S. aureus isolate (isolate P) or S. aureus strain 8325-4 were induced in mice free of S. aureus and anti-staphylococcal antibodies. Five weeks later, immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels in blood against 25 S. aureus antigens were determined, and LD50 or LD100 bacteremia caused by S. aureus isolate P was induced. S. aureus skin infections led to elevated levels of anti-staphylococcal IgG in blood. One skin infection improved the course of subsequent severe endogenous bacteremia only. A second skin infection further improved animal survival rate, which was associated with increased pre-bacteremia IgG levels against Efb, IsaA, LukD, LukE, Nuc, PrsA and WTA. In conclusion, S. aureus isolate P skin infection in mice reduces the severity of subsequent endogenous S. aureus bacteremia only. Although cellular immune effects cannot be rules out, anti-staphylococcal IgG against specified antigens may contribute to this effect. PMID:26060995

  14. Antimicrobial therapy of Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection.

    PubMed

    Tacconelli, Evelina; Cataldo, Maria A

    2007-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection (BSI) contributes significantly to the morbidity and mortality of in-patients. The optimal therapy for methicillin-susceptible S. aureus BSI consists of penicillins. The efficacy of these drugs is well documented from several published data and supported from a long clinical experience. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains are responsible for the majority of nosocomial BSI and are recovered with increasing frequency at hospital admission. Although glycopeptides still represent the drugs of choice, there are several concerns on the treatment of MRSA BSI: reports of clinical failure with vancomycin treatment, regardless of the in vitro susceptibility; increasing reports of MRSA strains with reduced vancomycin susceptibility; difficulty in therapeutic dosage monitoring of teicoplanin; lack of evidence on the efficacy of combination therapy. Recently, new drugs have been introduced in the therapeutic arsenal for MRSA infections, but their clinical use is not yet clearly established for BSI. The review summarises evidence on present therapeutic options for the treatment of S. aureus BSI. PMID:17931086

  15. Staphylococcus aureus Infections in New Zealand, 2000–2011

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jane; Ritchie, Stephen R.; Roberts, Sally A.; Fraser, John D.; Baker, Michael G.

    2014-01-01

    The incidence rate for invasive and noninvasive Staphylococcus aureus infections in New Zealand is among the highest reported in the developed world. Using nationally collated hospital discharge data, we analyzed the epidemiology of serious S. aureus infections in New Zealand during 2000–2011. During this period, incidence of S. aureus skin and soft tissue infections increased significantly while incidence of staphylococcal sepsis and pneumonia remained stable. We observed marked ethnic and sociodemographic inequality across all S. aureus infections; incidence rates for all forms of S. aureus infections were highest among Māori and Pacific Peoples and among patients residing in areas of high socioeconomic deprivation. The increased incidence of S. aureus skin and soft tissue infections, coupled with the demographic disparities, is of considerable concern. Future work should aim to reduce this disturbing national trend. PMID:24960446

  16. Molecular epidemiology and antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus blood culture isolates: results of the Quebec Provincial Surveillance Programme.

    PubMed

    Lévesque, S; Bourgault, A M; Galarneau, L A; Moisan, D; Doualla-Bell, F; Tremblay, C

    2015-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to characterize methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) blood culture isolates and to determine their relative importance in both nosocomial and community-acquired infections. A total of 535 MRSA blood culture isolates were analysed. In vitro susceptibility to 14 agents was determined. The genes nuc, mecA and coding for PVL toxin were identified by PCR. All isolates were characterized by PFGE or spa typing to assess their genomic relationships. Most MRSA isolates were retrieved from nosocomial bloodstream infections (474, 89%) and were of the CMRSA2 genotype. Healthcare-associated (HA)-MRSA bloodstream infections were associated with older age (70-89 years, P = 0·002) and most often secondary to central line infections (P = 0·005). Among MRSA strains associated with community-acquired (CA)-MRSA, 28·8% were isolated in intravenous drug users. CA-MRSA genotypes were more frequently found in young adults (20-39 years, P < 0·0001) with skin/soft tissue as the primary sources of infection (P = 0·006). CMRSA10 genotype was the predominant CA-MRSA strain. All MRSA isolates were susceptible to doxycycline, tigecycline, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and vancomycin. Both the presence of the genes coding for PVL toxin (89·8%) and susceptibility to clindamycin (86·5%) were predictive of CA-MRSA genotypes. Whereas in the USA, HA-MRSA have been replaced by USA300 (CMRSA10) clone as the predominant MRSA strain type in positive blood cultures from hospitalized patients, this phenomenon has not been observed in the province of Quebec. PMID:25140694

  17. Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus responsible for human colonization and infection in an area of Italy with high density of pig farming

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Livestock-Associated MRSA (LA-MRSA) belonging to ST398 lineage, common among pigs and other animals, emerged in Central and Northern Europe, becoming a new risk factor for MRSA among farm workers. Strains belonging to ST398 can be responsible for human colonization and infection, mainly in areas with high livestock-farming. The aim of this study was to investigate the occurrence of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) human colonization and infections in an area of the Lombardy Region (Italy), the Italian region with the highest density of pig farming. Methods In the period March-April 2010, 879 nasal swabs were taken from subjects at admission to a local hospital serving an area of the Lombardy Region devoted to agriculture and farming. In the period March 2010-February 2011, all MRSA strains from community-acquired infection (CAI) observed in the same hospital, were collected. Molecular characterization of the isolates included SCCmec typing, spa typing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Results Out of 879 nasal swabs examined, 9 (1%) yielded MRSA. Five strains were assigned to sequence type (ST)398 (spa t899, 3 isolates; t108 and t2922, 1 isolate each) and were therefore categorized as LA-MRSA. The other 4 isolates were likely of hospital origin. No strains were positive for Panton-Valentine Leukocidin genes. Twenty MRSA isolates were detected from CAI, 17 were from skin and soft-tissue infections and 3 from other infections. An MRSA isolate from otitis externa was t899/ST398 and PVL-negative, hence categorized as LA-MRSA. Four isolates were assigned to t127/ST1. Eight strains were PVL-positive community acquired (CA)-MRSA and belonged to different clones, the most frequent being ST8. Conclusions In an area of Italy with high density of pig farming, LA-MRSA is able to colonize the population and rarely to produce infections. Typical CA-MRSA is more common than LA-MRSA among CAI. PMID:23731504

  18. Retrospective study of necrotizing fasciitis and characterization of its associated Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has emerged as a prevalent pathogen of necrotizing fasciitis (NF) in Taiwan. A four-year NF cases and clinical and genetic differences between hospital acquired (HA)- and community-acquired (CA)-MRSA infection and isolates were investigated. Methods A retrospective study of 247 NF cases in 2004-2008 and antimicrobial susceptibilities, staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec) types, pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns, virulence factors, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) of 16 NF-associated MRSA in 2008 were also evaluated. Results In 247 cases, 42 microbial species were identified. S. aureus was the major prevalent pathogen and MRSA accounted for 19.8% of NF cases. Most patients had many coexisting medical conditions, including diabetes mellitus, followed by hypertension, chronic azotemia and chronic hepatic disease in order of decreasing prevalence. Patients with MRSA infection tended to have more severe clinical outcomes in terms of amputation rate (p < 0.05) and reconstruction rate (p = 0.001) than those with methicillin-sensitive S. aureus or non-S. aureus infection. NF patients infected by HA-MRSA had a significantly higher amputation rate, comorbidity, C-reactive protein level, and involvement of lower extremity than those infected by CA-MRSA. In addition to over 90% of MRSA resistant to erythromycin and clindamycin, HA-MRSA was more resistant than CA-MRSA to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (45.8% vs. 4%). ST59/pulsotype C/SCCmec IV and ST239/pulsotype A/SCCmec III isolates were the most prevalent CA- and HA-MRSA, respectively in 16 isolates obtained in 2008. In contrast to the gene for γ-hemolysin found in all MRSA, the gene for Panton-Valentine leukocidin was only identified in ST59 MRSA isolates. Other three virulence factors TSST-1, ETA, and ETB were occasionally identified in MRSA isolates tested. Conclusion NF patients with MRSA infection, especially HA-MRSA infection

  19. Differential responses of osteoblasts and macrophages upon Staphylococcus aureus infection

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is one of the primary causes of bone infections which are often chronic and difficult to eradicate. Bacteria like S. aureus may survive upon internalization in cells and may be responsible for chronic and recurrent infections. In this study, we compared the responses of a phagocytic cell (i.e. macrophage) to a non-phagocytic cell (i.e. osteoblast) upon S. aureus internalization. Results We found that upon internalization, S. aureus could survive for up to 5 and 7 days within macrophages and osteoblasts, respectively. Significantly more S. aureus was internalized in macrophages compared to osteoblasts and a significantly higher (100 fold) level of live intracellular S. aureus was detected in macrophages compared to osteoblasts. However, the percentage of S. aureus survival after infection was significantly lower in macrophages compared to osteoblasts at post-infection days 1–6. Interestingly, macrophages had relatively lower viability in shorter infection time periods (i.e. 0.5-4 h; significant at 2 h) but higher viability in longer infection time periods (i.e. 6–8 h; significant at 8 h) compared to osteoblasts. In addition, S. aureus infection led to significant changes in reactive oxygen species production in both macrophages and osteoblasts. Moreover, infected osteoblasts had significantly lower alkaline phosphatase activity at post-infection day 7 and infected macrophages had higher phagocytosis activity compared to non-infected cells. Conclusions S. aureus was found to internalize and survive within osteoblasts and macrophages and led to differential responses between osteoblasts and macrophages. These findings may assist in evaluation of the pathogenesis of chronic and recurrent infections which may be related to the intracellular persistence of bacteria within host cells. PMID:25059520

  20. Simulated Antibiotic Exposures in an In Vitro Hollow-Fiber Infection Model Influence Toxin Gene Expression and Production in Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strain MW2

    PubMed Central

    Pichereau, Solen; Pantrangi, Madhulatha; Couet, William; Badiou, Cedric; Lina, Gerard; Shukla, Sanjay K.

    2012-01-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) strain MW2 harbors a plethora of toxins to mediate its virulence. However, toxin expression and regulation with simulated clinical antimicrobial exposures are unclear. This study evaluated these relationships using an in vitro pharmacodynamic hollow-fiber infection model. Clinical doses of clindamycin, linezolid, minocycline, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (SXT), and vancomycin were simulated over 72 h against MW2 in the hollow fiber model. Expression levels of lukSF-PV and enterotoxin genes sec4, sek, seq, and sel2 were quantified by real-time PCR. Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) was quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and cytotoxicity was determined on polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs). Vancomycin produced the maximum MW2 killing (2.53 log10 CFU/ml) after the first dose, but the greatest sustained killing over 72 h occurred with linezolid and clindamycin. Vancomycin and minocycline induced gene upregulation from 0 to 8 h, followed by downregulation for the remaining simulation period. Clindamycin decreased gene expression in the first 24 h, followed by moderate increases (2.5-fold) thereafter. Linezolid increased gene expression 11.4- to 200.4-fold but inhibited PVL production (0.6 ± 0.3 versus 5.9 ± 0.2 μg/ml, linezolid versus control at 72 h; P < 0.05). Similar effects on PVL production occurred with clindamycin and minocycline. SXT increased PVL production at 48 h (2.8-fold) and 72 h (4.9-fold) of treatment (P < 0.05), resulting in increased PVL cytotoxicity on PMNs. Linezolid, clindamycin, and minocycline were the most effective agents on decreasing the virulence potential in CA-MRSA, notably after 8 h of treatment. SXT had minimal effects on toxin gene regulation, but it increased production and cytotoxicity of PVL toxin in the model and may enhance virulence when it is used to treat severe infections. PMID:22064533

  1. Epidemiology of emerging methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Denmark: a nationwide study in a country with low prevalence of MRSA infection.

    PubMed

    Faria, Nuno A; Oliveira, Duarte C; Westh, Henrik; Monnet, Dominique L; Larsen, Anders R; Skov, Robert; de Lencastre, Hermínia

    2005-04-01

    Strict infection control measures introduced during the 1970s have kept the incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections extremely low in Denmark. Nevertheless, similarly to other countries, MRSA infections began to appear in the community in the late 1990s. A nationwide surveillance program has collected and stored all MRSA isolates since 1988 and, since 1999, clinical information has been also recorded. We used this information and isolates in a detailed epidemiological and molecular analysis of the 81 MRSA infections identified in Denmark in 2001. MRSA isolates were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), spa typing, multilocus sequence typing, and SCCmec typing. Comparison of the 45 community-onset MRSA (CO-MRSA) infections with the 36 hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA) infections showed several striking contrasts. Most CO-MRSA were recovered from skin and soft tissue infections caused by isolates carrying the Panton-Valentine leucocidin toxin genes, and the majority (84%) of isolates belonged to a single clonal type, ST80-IV, which has been found in the community in other European countries. Clone ST80-IV could be traced in Denmark back to 1993. ST80-IV was rarely found in HA-MRSA infections, which belonged to a large number of clonal types, including some pandemic MRSA clones. The low number of HA-MRSA infections and the diversity of MRSA clones in Danish hospitals may be the result of successful infection control measures that prevent spread of clones in hospitals. The mechanism of spread of the ST80-IV clone in the Danish community is not known, and new control measures are needed to control further spread of this and other CA-MRSA clones. PMID:15815005

  2. Panton-valentine leukocidin-positive and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1-positive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: a French multicenter prospective study in 2008.

    PubMed

    Robert, Jérôme; Tristan, Anne; Cavalié, Laurent; Decousser, Jean-Winoc; Bes, Michèle; Etienne, Jerome; Laurent, Frédéric

    2011-04-01

    The epidemiology of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) differs from country to country. We assess the features of the ST80 European clone, which is the most prevalent PVL-positive CA-MRSA clone in Europe, and the TSST-1 ST5 clone that was recently described in France. In 2008, all MRSA strains susceptible to fluoroquinolones and gentamicin and resistant to fusidic acid that were isolated in 104 French laboratories were characterized using agr alleles, spa typing, and the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec element and PCR profiling of 21 toxin genes. Three phenotypes were defined: (i) kanamycin resistant, associated with the ST80 clone; (ii) kanamycin and tobramycin resistant, associated with the ST5 clone; and (iii) aminoglycoside susceptible, which was less frequently associated with the ST5 clone. Among the 7,253 MRSA strains isolated, 91 (1.3%) were ST80 CA-MRSA (89 phenotype 1) and 190 (2.6%) were ST5 CA-MRSA (146 phenotype 2, 42 phenotype 3). Compared to the latter, ST80 CA-MRSAs were more likely to be community acquired (80% versus 46%) and found in young patients (median age, 26.0 years versus 49.5 years) with deep cutaneous infections (48% versus 6%). They were less likely to be tetracycline susceptible (22% versus 85%) and to be isolated from respiratory infections (6% versus 27%). The TSST-1 ST5 clone has rapidly emerged in France and has become even more prevalent than the ST80 European clone, whose prevalence has remained stable. The epidemiological and clinical patterns of the two clones differ drastically. Given the low prevalence of both among all staphylococcal infections, no modification of antibiotic recommendations is required yet. PMID:21220529

  3. Panton-Valentine Leukocidin-Positive and Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin 1-Positive Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: a French Multicenter Prospective Study in 2008▿

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Jérôme; Tristan, Anne; Cavalié, Laurent; Decousser, Jean-Winoc; Bes, Michèle; Etienne, Jerome; Laurent, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    The epidemiology of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) differs from country to country. We assess the features of the ST80 European clone, which is the most prevalent PVL-positive CA-MRSA clone in Europe, and the TSST-1 ST5 clone that was recently described in France. In 2008, all MRSA strains susceptible to fluoroquinolones and gentamicin and resistant to fusidic acid that were isolated in 104 French laboratories were characterized using agr alleles, spa typing, and the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec element and PCR profiling of 21 toxin genes. Three phenotypes were defined: (i) kanamycin resistant, associated with the ST80 clone; (ii) kanamycin and tobramycin resistant, associated with the ST5 clone; and (iii) aminoglycoside susceptible, which was less frequently associated with the ST5 clone. Among the 7,253 MRSA strains isolated, 91 (1.3%) were ST80 CA-MRSA (89 phenotype 1) and 190 (2.6%) were ST5 CA-MRSA (146 phenotype 2, 42 phenotype 3). Compared to the latter, ST80 CA-MRSAs were more likely to be community acquired (80% versus 46%) and found in young patients (median age, 26.0 years versus 49.5 years) with deep cutaneous infections (48% versus 6%). They were less likely to be tetracycline susceptible (22% versus 85%) and to be isolated from respiratory infections (6% versus 27%). The TSST-1 ST5 clone has rapidly emerged in France and has become even more prevalent than the ST80 European clone, whose prevalence has remained stable. The epidemiological and clinical patterns of the two clones differ drastically. Given the low prevalence of both among all staphylococcal infections, no modification of antibiotic recommendations is required yet. PMID:21220529

  4. Staphylococcus aureus ST121: a globally disseminated hypervirulent clone.

    PubMed

    Rao, Qing; Shang, Weilong; Hu, Xiaomei; Rao, Xiancai

    2015-12-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of bacterial infections in hospitals and communities worldwide. With the development of typing methods, several pandemic clones have been well characterized, including the extensively spreading hospital-associated meticillin-resistant S. aureus (HA-MRSA) clone ST239 and the emerging hypervirulent community-associated (CA) MRSA clone USA300. The multilocus sequence typing method was set up based on seven housekeeping genes; S. aureus groups were defined by the sharing of alleles at ≥ 5 of the seven loci. In many cases, the predicted founder of a group would also be the most prevalent ST within the group. As a predicted founder of major S. aureus groups, approximately 90 % of ST121 strains was meticillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA). The majority of ST121 strains carry accessory gene regulator type IV, whereas staphylococcal protein A gene types for ST121 are exceptionally diverse. More than 90 % of S. aureus ST121 strains have Panton-Valentine leukocidin; other enterotoxins, haemolysins, leukocidins and exfoliative toxins also contribute to the high virulence of ST121 strains. Patients suffering from S. aureus ST121 infections often need longer hospitalization and prolonged antimicrobial therapy. In this review, we tried to summarize the epidemiology of the S. aureus clone ST121 and focused on the molecular types, toxin carriage and disease spectrum of this globally disseminated clone. PMID:26445995

  5. Magnetic nanoparticle targeted hyperthermia of cutaneous Staphylococcus aureus infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Ho; Yamayoshi, Itsukyo; Mathew, Steven; Liln, Hubert; Nayfach, Joseph; Simon, Scott I.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of wound infections that do not adequately respond to standard-of-care antimicrobial treatment has been increasing. To address this challenge, a novel antimicrobial magnetic thermotherapy platform has been developed in which a high-amplitude, high-frequency, alternating magnetic field (AMF) is used to rapidly heat magnetic nanoparticles that are bound to Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The antimicrobial efficacy of this platform was evaluated in the treatment of both an in vitro culture model of S. aureus biofilm and a mouse model of cutaneous S. aureus infection. We demonstrated that an antibody-targeted magnetic nanoparticle bound to S. aureus was effective at thermally inactivating S. aureus and achieving accelerated wound healing without causing tissue injury. PMID:23149904

  6. Magnetic nanoparticle targeted hyperthermia of cutaneous Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Ho; Yamayoshi, Itsukyo; Mathew, Steven; Lin, Hubert; Nayfach, Joseph; Simon, Scott I

    2013-03-01

    The incidence of wound infections that do not adequately respond to standard-of-care antimicrobial treatment has been increasing. To address this challenge, a novel antimicrobial magnetic thermotherapy platform has been developed in which a high-amplitude, high-frequency, alternating magnetic field is used to rapidly heat magnetic nanoparticles that are bound to Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). The antimicrobial efficacy of this platform was evaluated in the treatment of both an in vitro culture model of S. aureus biofilm and a mouse model of cutaneous S. aureus infection. We demonstrated that an antibody-targeted magnetic nanoparticle bound to S. aureus was effective at thermally inactivating S. aureus and achieving accelerated wound healing without causing tissue injury. PMID:23149904

  7. Lysostaphin in treatment of neonatal Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    PubMed

    Oluola, Okunola; Kong, Lingkun; Fein, Mindy; Weisman, Leonard E

    2007-06-01

    This study describes lysostaphin's effect against methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus in suckling rats. Standard techniques determined minimal inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy. The numbers of surviving rats after vancomycin, oxacillin, and lysostaphin treatment were comparable and were different from that of controls (P < 0.00001). Lysostaphin appears effective in the treatment of neonatal S. aureus infection. PMID:17420212

  8. Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clonal Complex 80 Type IV (CC80-MRSA-IV) Isolated from the Middle East: A Heterogeneous Expanding Clonal Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Harastani, Houda H.; Tokajian, Sima T.

    2014-01-01

    Background The emergence of community-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has caused a change in MRSA epidemiology worldwide. In the Middle East, the persistent spread of CA-MRSA isolates that were associated with multilocus sequence type (MLST) clonal complex 80 and with staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type IV (CC80-MRSA-IV), calls for novel approaches for infection control that would limit its spread. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, the epidemiology of CC80-MRSA-IV was investigated in Jordan and Lebanon retrospectively covering the period from 2000 to 2011. Ninety-four S. aureus isolates, 63 (67%) collected from Lebanon and 31 (33%) collected from Jordan were included in this study. More than half of the isolates (56%) were associated with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs), and 73 (78%) were Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) positive. Majority of the isolates (84%) carried the gene for exofoliative toxin d (etd), 19% had the Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin-1 gene (tst), and seven isolates from Jordan had a rare combination being positive for both tst and PVL genes. spa typing showed the prevalence of type t044 (85%) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) recognized 21 different patterns. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed the prevalence (36%) of a unique resistant profile, which included resistance to streptomycin, kanamycin, and fusidic acid (SKF profile). Conclusions The genetic diversity among the CC80 isolates observed in this study poses an additional challenge to infection control of CA-MRSA epidemics. CA-MRSA related to ST80 in the Middle East was distinguished in this study from the ones described in other countries. Genetic diversity observed, which may be due to mutations and differences in the antibiotic regimens between countries may have led to the development of heterogeneous strains. Hence, it is difficult to maintain “the European CA-MRSA clone” as a uniform clone and it

  9. Can Panton Valentine Leukocidin Gene And Clindamycin Susceptibility Serve As Predictors of Community Origin of MRSA From Skin and Soft Tissue Infections?

    PubMed Central

    Shashindran, Nandita; Nagasundaram, Niveditha; Thappa, Devinder Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Community associated Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) strains have begun to replace Hospital Associated MRSA (HA-MRSA) strains in hospital settings all over the world. With the epidemiological distinctions between these strains beginning to become ill-defined, the categorisation of a strain as CA-MRSA or HA-MRSA is dependent on molecular methods to detect the presence of SCCmec (Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome mec) elements. However other markers like the presence of Panton Valentine Leukocidin toxin (pvl) genes or Clindamycin susceptibility may also be associated with community origin of MRSA. Aim To determine the prevalence of CA-MRSA among MRSA strains isolated from skin and soft tissue infections and to evaluate the usefulness of Panton Valentine Leukocidin and Clindamycin susceptibility as markers of community origin of MRSA. Materials and Methods One hundred isolates of MRSA from skin and soft tissue were studied for the presence of SCCmec IV and V genes and Panton valentine leukocidin gene by Polymerase chain reaction. Inducible clindamycin resistance was screened for using the D-test. Statistical analysis used Fischer’s exact test. A p-value <0.05 was considered significant Results Eighteen out of 100 MRSA strains were found to be CA-MRSA based on presence of SCCmecV. The proportion of Panton Valentine Leukocidin gene carriage among CA- MRSA as compared to HA-MRSA was found to be statistically significant (p<0.0001). Among the CA-MRSA strains, 94.4% were found to be susceptible to Clindamycin as against only 13.4% of the HA-MRSA strains (p<0.0001). The odds of an MRSA strain being CA-MRSA if it was both Clindamycin susceptible and PVL gene positive was calculated to be 68.25 (p<0.0001). Conclusion Both Clindamycin susceptibility and pvl gene carriage were found to be independent predictors of community origin of MRSA, but taken together the association was highly significant. PMID:26894063

  10. Recurrent Furunculosis Caused by a Community-Acquired Staphylococcus aureus Strain Belonging to the USA300 Clone

    PubMed Central

    Balachandra, Shirish; Pardos de la Gandara, Maria; Salvato, Scott; Urban, Tracie; Parola, Claude; Khalida, Chamanara; Kost, Rhonda G.; Evering, Teresa H.; Pastagia, Mina; D'Orazio, Brianna M.; Tomasz, Alexander; de Lencastre, Herminia

    2015-01-01

    Background: A 24-year-old female with recurrent skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) was enrolled as part of a multicenter observational cohort study conducted by a practice-based research network (PBRN) on community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA). Methods: Strains were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), spa typing, and multilocus sequence typing. MRSA strains were analyzed for SCCmec type and the presence of the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME) using PCR. Results: In the first episode, S. aureus was recovered from the wound and inguinal folds; in the second, S. aureus was recovered from a lower abdomen furuncle, inguinal folds, and patellar fold. Molecular typing identified CA-MRSA clone USA300 in all samples as spa-type t008, ST8, SCCmecIVa, and a typical PFGE pattern. The strain carried virulence genes pvl and ACME type I. Five SSTI episodes were documented despite successful resolution by antibiotic treatment, with and without incision and drainage. Conclusions: The source of the USA300 strain remains unknown. The isolate may represent a persistent strain capable of surviving extensive antibiotic pressure or a persistent environmental reservoir may be the source, possibly in the patient's household, from which bacteria were repeatedly introduced into the skin flora with subsequent infections. PMID:25668150

  11. Impact of Staphylococcus aureus on Pathogenesis in Polymicrobial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Nisha; Biswas, Raja; Götz, Friedrich

    2014-01-01

    Polymicrobial infections involving Staphylococcus aureus exhibit enhanced disease severity and morbidity. We reviewed the nature of polymicrobial interactions between S. aureus and other bacterial, fungal, and viral cocolonizers. Microbes that were frequently recovered from the infection site with S. aureus are Haemophilus influenzae, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Corynebacterium sp., Lactobacillus sp., Candida albicans, and influenza virus. Detailed analyses of several in vitro and in vivo observations demonstrate that S. aureus exhibits cooperative relations with C. albicans, E. faecalis, H. influenzae, and influenza virus and competitive relations with P. aeruginosa, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Lactobacillus sp., and Corynebacterium sp. Interactions of both types influence changes in S. aureus that alter its characteristics in terms of colony formation, protein expression, pathogenicity, and antibiotic susceptibility. PMID:24643542

  12. Molecular epidemiologic study of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene among family members in Japan.

    PubMed

    Uehara, Yuki; Ito, Teruyo; Ogawa, Yu; Hirotaki, Shintaro; Shoji, Takayo; Tame, Tomoyuki; Horikoshi, Yuho; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2015-09-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is one of the worldwide concerns of antimicrobial chemotherapy. An accumulation of ten patients in five families (A-E) suffering from skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI) of CA-MRSA was experienced in 2012, in Fuchu-shi, Tokyo, Japan. Molecular epidemiological investigation was performed for the 10 MRSA strains obtained from 8 children and 2 of their parents to assess endemic patterns of CA-MRSA in the community. Results of molecular typing, presence of toxin genes and antimicrobial susceptibilities were analyzed combined with the patients' clinical information. Each family had its own unique MRSA strain: A, ST30-SCCmec IVd; B, ST8-SCCmec IVd; C, ST8-SCCmec IVa; D, ST8-SCCmec IVl; E, ST8-SCCmec IVl and ST858-SCCmec IVl. Seven strains from the families A-C carried Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene. Three strains from the families D and E carried toxic shock syndrome toxin gene. Strains belonged to the same family demonstrated genetically related banding patterns of pulsed-filed gel electrophoresis. The family C experienced intrafamilial transmission of USA300-0114. Our data showed the MRSA clones disseminating in this community were highly diverse. They contained USA300-0114 clone, the rapidly distributing clone in the world, as well as MRSA clones identified in Japan. Our results suggested intrafamilial transmission of MRSA could be initial phenomenon of wide transmission in a community, therefore CA-MRSA SSTI in children and their family members should be monitored closely in order to notice the spread of highly pathogenic and transmittable strains. PMID:26091885

  13. Vitamin D sufficiency and Staphylococcus aureus infection in children.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jeffrey W; Hogan, Patrick G; Hunstad, David A; Fritz, Stephanie A

    2015-05-01

    Vitamin D promotes epithelial immunity by upregulating antimicrobial peptides, including LL-37, which have bactericidal activity against Staphylococcus aureus. We found that children with vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency [25-hydroxyvitamin D <30 ng/mL] were more likely to present with recurrent, rather than primary, S. aureus skin or soft tissue infection. Vitamin D sufficiency may be one of a myriad of host and environmental factors that can be directly impacted to reduce the frequency of S. aureus skin and soft tissue infection. PMID:25860535

  14. Staphylococcus aureus small colony variants in diabetic foot infections.

    PubMed

    Cervantes-García, Estrella; García-Gonzalez, Rafael; Reyes-Torres, Angélica; Resendiz-Albor, Aldo Arturo; Salazar-Schettino, Paz María

    2015-01-01

    Background : Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is one of the major pathogens causing chronic infections. The ability of S. aureus to acquire resistance to a diverse range of antimicrobial compounds results in limited treatment options, particularly in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). A mechanism by which S. aureus develops reduced susceptibility to antimicrobials is through the formation of small colony variants (SCVs). Infections by SCVs of S. aureus are an upcoming problem due to difficulties in laboratory diagnosis and resistance to antimicrobial therapy. Methods : A prospective study was performed on 120 patients diagnosed with both type 2 diabetes mellitus and infected diabetic foot ulcers. The study was carried out from July 2012 to December 2013 in Hospital General de Mexico. The samples were cultured in blood agar, mannitol salt agar, and MacConkey agar media, and incubated at 37°C in aerobic conditions. Results : We describe the first known cases of diabetic foot infections caused by MRSA-SCVs in patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus and infected diabetic foot ulcers. In all of our cases, the patients had not received any form of gentamicin therapy. Conclusions : The antibiotic therapy commonly used in diabetic patients with infected diabetic foot ulcers fails in the case of MRSA-SCVs because the intracellular location protects S. aureus-SCVs from the host's defenses and also helps them resist antibiotics. The cases studied in this article add to the spectrum of persistent and relapsing infections attributed to MRSA-SCVs and emphasizes that these variants may also play a relevant role in diabetic foot infections. PMID:25787018

  15. Staphylococcus aureus small colony variants in diabetic foot infections

    PubMed Central

    Cervantes-García, Estrella; García-Gonzalez, Rafael; Reyes-Torres, Angélica; Resendiz-Albor, Aldo Arturo; Salazar-Schettino, Paz María

    2015-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is one of the major pathogens causing chronic infections. The ability of S. aureus to acquire resistance to a diverse range of antimicrobial compounds results in limited treatment options, particularly in methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). A mechanism by which S. aureus develops reduced susceptibility to antimicrobials is through the formation of small colony variants (SCVs). Infections by SCVs of S. aureus are an upcoming problem due to difficulties in laboratory diagnosis and resistance to antimicrobial therapy. Methods A prospective study was performed on 120 patients diagnosed with both type 2 diabetes mellitus and infected diabetic foot ulcers. The study was carried out from July 2012 to December 2013 in Hospital General de Mexico. The samples were cultured in blood agar, mannitol salt agar, and MacConkey agar media, and incubated at 37°C in aerobic conditions. Results We describe the first known cases of diabetic foot infections caused by MRSA-SCVs in patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus and infected diabetic foot ulcers. In all of our cases, the patients had not received any form of gentamicin therapy. Conclusions The antibiotic therapy commonly used in diabetic patients with infected diabetic foot ulcers fails in the case of MRSA-SCVs because the intracellular location protects S. aureus-SCVs from the host's defenses and also helps them resist antibiotics. The cases studied in this article add to the spectrum of persistent and relapsing infections attributed to MRSA-SCVs and emphasizes that these variants may also play a relevant role in diabetic foot infections. PMID:25787018

  16. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus infections in children with Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Jeffrey N; Kaplan, Sheldon L; Mason, Edward O; Hulten, Kristina G

    2015-11-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections in the Down syndrome (DS) population have not been well characterized. This study determined clinical and molecular characteristics of S. aureus infections in children with DS followed at Texas Children's Hospital (TCH), from 2001 to 2011. Patients were retrospectively identified from an ongoing S. aureus surveillance study. Medical records were reviewed. Isolates were characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis patterns, and detection of PVL genes (pvl), mupA (high-level mupirocin resistance gene), smr (chlorhexidine resistance conferring gene), and Staphylococcal Chromosomal Cassette mec (SCCmec) type. Twenty-six patients with DS had a total of 34 S. aureus infections (8 recurrent); 61% were MRSA. DS patients represented 16.8 per 10,000 community onset S. aureus infections seen at TCH. Among 26 initial infections 17 were skin and soft tissue (SSTI), 7 were outer or middle ear and 2 were invasive infections. Seventeen patients were hospitalized. Thirteen (65%) of 20 available isolates were USA300, 14 were pvl+, 5 were mupA+, and 8 were smr+. Five of 8 (63%) recurrent infections were ear infections. All 4 recurrent ear isolates available for study were smr+, ciprofloxacin non-susceptible and treated with ciprofloxacin otic drops. S. aureus infections among patients with DS were similar in presentation to other patient groups, except for a greater proportion being associated with ear infections. Seventy percent of ear fluid isolates carried antiseptic and fluoroquinolone resistance genes. A study of a greater number of DS patients is warranted to further explore these findings. PMID:26386776

  17. Molecular tracing of the emergence, diversification, and transmission of S. aureus sequence type 8 in a New York community.

    PubMed

    Uhlemann, Anne-Catrin; Dordel, Janina; Knox, Justin R; Raven, Kathy E; Parkhill, Julian; Holden, Matthew T G; Peacock, Sharon J; Lowy, Franklin D

    2014-05-01

    During the last 2 decades, community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) strains have dramatically increased the global burden of S. aureus infections. The pandemic sequence type (ST)8/pulsed-field gel type USA300 is the dominant CA-MRSA clone in the United States, but its evolutionary history and basis for biological success are incompletely understood. Here, we use whole-genome sequencing of 387 ST8 isolates drawn from an epidemiological network of CA-MRSA infections and colonizations in northern Manhattan to explore short-term evolution and transmission patterns. Phylogenetic analysis predicted that USA300 diverged from a most common recent ancestor around 1993. We found evidence for multiple introductions of USA300 and reconstructed the phylogeographic spread of isolates across neighborhoods. Using pair-wise single-nucleotide polymorphism distances as a measure of genetic relatedness between isolates, we observed that most USA300 isolates had become endemic in households, indicating their critical role as reservoirs for transmission and diversification. Using the maximum single-nucleotide polymorphism variability of isolates from within households as a threshold, we identified several possible transmission networks beyond households. Our study also revealed the evolution of a fluoroquinolone-resistant subpopulation in the mid-1990s and its subsequent expansion at a time of high-frequency outpatient antibiotic use. This high-resolution phylogenetic analysis of ST8 has documented the genomic changes associated with USA300 evolution and how some of its recent evolution has been shaped by antibiotic use. By integrating whole-genome sequencing with detailed epidemiological analyses, our study provides an important framework for delineating the full diversity and spread of USA300 and other emerging pathogens in large urban community populations. PMID:24753569

  18. Staphylococcus aureus Infections: Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, Clinical Manifestations, and Management

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Joshua S.; Eichenberger, Emily; Holland, Thomas L.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen that causes a wide range of clinical infections. It is a leading cause of bacteremia and infective endocarditis as well as osteoarticular, skin and soft tissue, pleuropulmonary, and device-related infections. This review comprehensively covers the epidemiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and management of each of these clinical entities. The past 2 decades have witnessed two clear shifts in the epidemiology of S. aureus infections: first, a growing number of health care-associated infections, particularly seen in infective endocarditis and prosthetic device infections, and second, an epidemic of community-associated skin and soft tissue infections driven by strains with certain virulence factors and resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. In reviewing the literature to support management strategies for these clinical manifestations, we also highlight the paucity of high-quality evidence for many key clinical questions. PMID:26016486

  19. Antibiotic Combinations with Daptomycin for Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Nadrah, Kristina; Strle, Franc

    2011-01-01

    Daptomycin is a lipopeptide antibiotic with a unique mechanism of action on Gram-positive bacteria. It is approved for treatment of skin and soft-tissue infections with Gram-positive bacteria, bacteraemia and right-sided infective endocarditis caused by Staphylococcus aureus. Diminishing susceptibility of S. aureus to daptomycin during treatment of complicated infections and clinical failure have been described. Combinations of daptomycin with other antibiotics including gentamicin, rifampin, beta-lactams, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX), or clarithromycin present a new approach for therapy. In vitro and animal studies have shown that such combinations may, in some cases, be superior to daptomycin monotherapy. In this paper we focus on the antibiotic combinations for complicated S. aureus infections. PMID:22312555

  20. Acute haematogenous community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus osteomyelitis in an adult: Case report and review of literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has of late emerged as a cause of community-acquired infections among immunocompetent adults without risk factors. Skin and soft tissue infections represent the majority of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) clinical presentations, whilst invasive and life-threatening illness like necrotizing pneumonia, necrotizing fasciitis, pyomyositis, osteomyelitis and sepsis syndrome are less common. Although more widely described in the pediatric age group, the occurrence of CA-MRSA osteomyelitis in adults is an uncommonly reported entity. Case presentation We describe an invasive CA-MRSA infection in a 28 year-old previously healthy male, manifesting with bacteraemia, osteomyelitis of femur, pyomyositis and septic arthritis of the knee. Initially a preliminary diagnosis of osteosarcoma was suggested by imaging studies and patient underwent a bone biopsy. MRSA was subsequently isolated from blood cultures taken on day of admission, bone, tissue and pus cultures. Incision and drainage of abscess was performed and patient was treated with vancomycin, with fusidic acid added later. It took 6 months for the inflammatory markers to normalize, warranting 6-months of anti-MRSA therapy. Patient was a fervent deer hunter and we speculate that he acquired this infection from extensive direct contact with deer. Molecular characterization of this isolate showed that it belonged to multilocus sequence type (MLST) ST30 and exhibited the staphylococcal chromosome cassette mec (SCCmec) type IV, staphylococcus protein A (spa) type t019, accessory gene regulator (agr) type III and dru type dt10m. This strain harbored Panton-Valentine leukocidin (pvl) genes together with 3 other virulent genes; sei (enterotoxin), hlg (hemolysin) and fnbA (fibronectin binding protein). Conclusion This case study alerts physicians that beyond the most commonly encountered skin and soft tissue infections, pvl

  1. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus and characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from bovine mastitis in Korea.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hyang-Mi; Lee, Ae-Li; Jung, Suk-Chan; Kim, Mal-Nam; Jang, Geum-Chan; Wee, Sung-Hwan; Lim, Suk-Kyung

    2011-02-01

    A total of 402 Staphylococcus aureus isolates from bovine mastitis milk collected during 2003-2009 in Korea were tested for susceptibility to 20 antimicrobial agents. All S. aureus isolates were susceptible to 11 of 20 antimicrobials tested; no resistance was observed against pirlimycin, telithromycin, novobiocin, penicillin/novobiocin, quinupristin/dalfopristin, clindamycin, rifampin, ciprofloxacin, trimethprim/sulfamethoxazol, vancomycin, and linezolid. Over 66% of the S. aureus isolates were resistant to penicillin. Resistance was also seen for gentamicin (11.9%), erythromycin (7.7%), methicillin (oxacillin and cefoxitin, 6.2%), and tetracycline (4.2%). No noticeable change was observed in penicillin, gentamicin, and erythromycin resistance over the 7-year period. Tetracycline resistance appeared to decrease consistently, whereas methicillin resistance was observed from 2005. About 2.7% (11/402) were resistant to three or more antimicrobials. Genotyping of the 17 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolated from each cow revealed two staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) types (IV and IVa), three spa types (t286, t324, and untypable), and two sequence types (ST1 and ST72). Eleven of 17 (64.7%) MRSA strains belonged to SCCmec IVa-t324-ST72. The rest of strains belonged to SCCmec IVa-t286-ST1 (n = 3) and SCCmec IV-untypable-ST72 (n = 3). None of the MRSA carried the Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene. These characteristics are the same as those found in community-acquired (CA) MRSA strains prevalent in humans in Korea. Three pulsed-field gel electrophoresis types (A-C) were observed among the 17 MRSA strains examined, and 14 strains belonged to the same pulsed-field gel electrophoresis pattern regardless of their geographical origin and year of isolation. The results of this study provide evidence of CA-MRSA infection in dairy cattle for the first time in Korea. PMID:21034263

  2. Zosteriform Staphylococcus aureus Cutaneous Infection: Report of Two Patients With Dermatomal Bacterial Infection.

    PubMed

    Schepp, Elizabeth D; Cohen, Philip R

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe cutaneous infections, which are zosteriform in distribution, including two patients with dermatomal Staphylococcus aureus infection. Herpes zoster infectious lesions usually occur in a dermatomal distribution. Other viruses, such as herpes simplex virus, can also appear with zosteriform lesions and closely mimic the clinical presentation of herpes zoster. Additionally, other skin infections, less commonly, are zosteriform. Two patients who developed zosteriform S aureus skin infection are described. A medical literature search for zosteriform dermatomal infections yielded other cutaneous infections with a zosteriform presentation. Two patients had S aureus and methicillin-resistant S aureus infection with skin lesions occupying the T11-T12 dermatomes and the T4 dermatome, respectively. They responded to antibacterial agents and adjuvant therapy. Patients with viral, fungal, and spirochete zosteriform infections are summarized. In addition to varicella-zoster virus infection, zosteriform skin infection can occur with viral (varicella-zoster virus, herpes simplex virus, and Epstein-Barr virus), superficial (dermatophyte), and deep (phaeohyphomycosis and zygomycosis) fungal, and bacterial (S aureus and methicillin-resistant S aureus) infections. These infections should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a zosteriform infection that does not present with the classic clinical picture for herpes zoster or that does not respond to standard treatments for varicellazoster virus. PMID:26861424

  3. Staphylococcus aureus infection of the feet following fish pedicure.

    PubMed

    Veraldi, S; Nazzaro, G; Çuka, E

    2014-10-01

    We report a case of Staphylococcus aureus infection of the feet that appeared after a "fish pedicure" (immersion of the feet in a tank with the fish Garra rufa, that nibbles off dead skin). Clinical picture was characterized by maceration, purulent discharge, scales, crusts, itching and burning sensation. Bacteriological examinations were positive for Staphylococcus aureus. Mycological examinations were negative. The patient was successfully treated with ciprofloxacin. Only one case of skin foot infection after fish pedicure was reported so far. Fish pedicure can be a potentially dangerous procedure in immunocompromised or diabetic patients. PMID:24771416

  4. The agr Inhibitors Solonamide B and Analogues Alter Immune Responses to Staphylococccus aureus but Do Not Exhibit Adverse Effects on Immune Cell Functions.

    PubMed

    Baldry, Mara; Kitir, Betül; Frøkiær, Hanne; Christensen, Simon B; Taverne, Nico; Meijerink, Marjolein; Franzyk, Henrik; Olsen, Christian A; Wells, Jerry M; Ingmer, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections are becoming increasingly difficult to treat due to antibiotic resistance with the community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) strains such as USA300 being of particular concern. The inhibition of bacterial virulence has been proposed as an alternative approach to treat multi-drug resistant pathogens. One interesting anti-virulence target is the agr quorum-sensing system, which regulates virulence of CA-MRSA in response to agr-encoded autoinducing peptides. Agr regulation confines exotoxin production to the stationary growth phase with concomitant repression of surface-expressed adhesins. Solonamide B, a non-ribosomal depsipeptide of marine bacterial origin, was recently identified as a putative anti-virulence compound that markedly reduced expression of α-hemolysin and phenol-soluble modulins. To further strengthen solonamide anti-virulence candidacy, we report the chemical synthesis of solonamide analogues, investigation of structure-function relationships, and assessment of their potential to modulate immune cell functions. We found that structural differences between solonamide analogues confer significant differences in interference with agr, while immune cell activity and integrity is generally not affected. Furthermore, treatment of S. aureus with selected solonamides was found to only marginally influence the interaction with fibronectin and biofilm formation, thus addressing the concern that application of compounds inducing an agr-negative state may have adverse interactions with host factors in favor of host colonization. PMID:26731096

  5. The agr Inhibitors Solonamide B and Analogues Alter Immune Responses to Staphylococccus aureus but Do Not Exhibit Adverse Effects on Immune Cell Functions

    PubMed Central

    Baldry, Mara; Kitir, Betül; Frøkiær, Hanne; Christensen, Simon B.; Taverne, Nico; Meijerink, Marjolein; Franzyk, Henrik; Olsen, Christian A.; Wells, Jerry M.; Ingmer, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections are becoming increasingly difficult to treat due to antibiotic resistance with the community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) strains such as USA300 being of particular concern. The inhibition of bacterial virulence has been proposed as an alternative approach to treat multi-drug resistant pathogens. One interesting anti-virulence target is the agr quorum-sensing system, which regulates virulence of CA-MRSA in response to agr-encoded autoinducing peptides. Agr regulation confines exotoxin production to the stationary growth phase with concomitant repression of surface-expressed adhesins. Solonamide B, a non-ribosomal depsipeptide of marine bacterial origin, was recently identified as a putative anti-virulence compound that markedly reduced expression of α-hemolysin and phenol-soluble modulins. To further strengthen solonamide anti-virulence candidacy, we report the chemical synthesis of solonamide analogues, investigation of structure–function relationships, and assessment of their potential to modulate immune cell functions. We found that structural differences between solonamide analogues confer significant differences in interference with agr, while immune cell activity and integrity is generally not affected. Furthermore, treatment of S. aureus with selected solonamides was found to only marginally influence the interaction with fibronectin and biofilm formation, thus addressing the concern that application of compounds inducing an agr-negative state may have adverse interactions with host factors in favor of host colonization. PMID:26731096

  6. Staphylococcus aureus α toxin potentiates opportunistic bacterial lung infections.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Taylor S; Hilliard, Jamese J; Jones-Nelson, Omari; Keller, Ashley E; O'Day, Terrence; Tkaczyk, Christine; DiGiandomenico, Antonio; Hamilton, Melissa; Pelletier, Mark; Wang, Qun; Diep, Binh An; Le, Vien T M; Cheng, Lily; Suzich, JoAnn; Stover, C Kendall; Sellman, Bret R

    2016-03-01

    Broad-spectrum antibiotic use may adversely affect a patient's beneficial microbiome and fuel cross-species spread of drug resistance. Although alternative pathogen-specific approaches are rationally justified, a major concern for this precision medicine strategy is that co-colonizing or co-infecting opportunistic bacteria may still cause serious disease. In a mixed-pathogen lung infection model, we find that the Staphylococcus aureus virulence factor α toxin potentiates Gram-negative bacterial proliferation, systemic spread, and lethality by preventing acidification of bacteria-containing macrophage phagosomes, thereby reducing effective killing of both S. aureus and Gram-negative bacteria. Prophylaxis or early treatment with a single α toxin neutralizing monoclonal antibody prevented proliferation of co-infecting Gram-negative pathogens and lethality while also promoting S. aureus clearance. These studies suggest that some pathogen-specific, antibody-based approaches may also work to reduce infection risk in patients colonized or co-infected with S. aureus and disparate drug-resistant Gram-negative bacterial opportunists. PMID:26962155

  7. Nuclease Modulates Biofilm Formation in Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Kiedrowski, Megan R.; Kavanaugh, Jeffrey S.; Malone, Cheryl L.; Mootz, Joe M.; Voyich, Jovanka M.; Smeltzer, Mark S.; Bayles, Kenneth W.; Horswill, Alexander R.

    2011-01-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) is an emerging contributor to biofilm-related infections. We recently reported that strains lacking sigma factor B (sigB) in the USA300 lineage of CA-MRSA are unable to develop a biofilm. Interestingly, when spent media from a USA300 sigB mutant was incubated with other S. aureus strains, biofilm formation was inhibited. Following fractionation and mass spectrometry analysis, the major anti-biofilm factor identified in the spent media was secreted thermonuclease (Nuc). Considering reports that extracellular DNA (eDNA) is an important component of the biofilm matrix, we investigated the regulation and role of Nuc in USA300. The expression of the nuc gene was increased in a sigB mutant, repressed by glucose supplementation, and was unaffected by the agr quorum-sensing system. A FRET assay for Nuc activity was developed and confirmed the regulatory results. A USA300 nuc mutant was constructed and displayed an enhanced biofilm-forming capacity, and the nuc mutant also accumulated more high molecular weight eDNA than the WT and regulatory mutant strains. Inactivation of nuc in the USA300 sigB mutant background partially repaired the sigB biofilm-negative phenotype, suggesting that nuc expression contributes to the inability of the mutant to form biofilm. To test the generality of the nuc mutant biofilm phenotypes, the mutation was introduced into other S. aureus genetic backgrounds and similar increases in biofilm formation were observed. Finally, using multiple S. aureus strains and regulatory mutants, an inverse correlation between Nuc activity and biofilm formation was demonstrated. Altogether, our findings confirm the important role for eDNA in the S. aureus biofilm matrix and indicates Nuc is a regulator of biofilm formation. PMID:22096493

  8. Staphylococcus aureus Clumping Factor A Remains a Viable Vaccine Target for Prevention of S. aureus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Scully, Ingrid L.; Buurman, Ed T.; Eiden, Joseph; Jansen, Kathrin U.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In a recent article, X. Li et al. [mBio 7(1):e02232-15, 2016, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/mBio.02232-15] investigate the utility of a vaccine composed of the Staphylococcus aureus protein clumping factor A (ClfA) in protecting mice from S. aureus infection. ClfA, one of the first proteins to be identified as a potential vaccine antigen for S. aureus prophylaxis, is currently a component of several investigational vaccines. The authors conclude that ClfA may not be effective for S. aureus prophylaxis. In contrast, previously published papers reporting positive data suggested that ClfA was potentially an important vaccine target to prevent invasive S. aureus disease. This commentary addresses the observed differences between the findings of Li et al. and those from other publications, highlighting the importance for preclinical vaccine antigen assessments to reflect the biological role of said antigen in virulence and, consequently, the importance of choosing appropriate preclinical disease models to test such antigens. PMID:26956591

  9. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in HIV-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Hidron, Alicia I; Kempker, Russell; Moanna, Abeer; Rimland, David

    2010-01-01

    Concordant with the emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the community setting, colonization and infections with this pathogen have become a prevalent problem among the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive population. A variety of different host- and, possibly, pathogen-related factors may play a role in explaining the increased prevalence and incidence observed. In this article, we review pathophysiology, epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and treatment of MRSA in the HIV-infected population. PMID:21694896

  10. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant "Staphylococcus aureus": Considerations for School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alex, Aniltta; Letizia, MariJo

    2007-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (MRSA) is a disease-causing organism that has been present in hospital settings since the 1960s. However, a genetically distinct strain of MRSA, called community-acquired methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (CA-MRSA), has emerged in recent years in community settings among healthy…

  11. Polyclonal non multiresistant methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates from clinical cases of infection occurring in Palermo, Italy, during a one-year surveillance period

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The evolving epidemiology of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is characterized by the emergence of infections caused by non multiresistant MRSA carrying staphylococcal chromosomal cassette (SCC)mec IV or V in the healthcare settings. A molecular epidemiological analysis of non multiresistant MRSA isolates from four acute general hospitals was performed in Palermo, Italy, during a one year period. Methods For the purpose of the study, MRSA isolates were defined as non multiresistant when they were susceptible to at least three classes of non β-lactam antibiotics. Seventy-five isolates were submitted to antimicrobial susceptibility testing, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for SCCmec, accessory gene regulator (agr) groups, arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME) and Panton Valentine leukocidin (PVL) toxin genes. For epidemiological typing, Multiple-Locus Variable-Number Tandem Repeat Fingerprinting (MLVF) was performed on all isolates and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) on ST8 isolates. Results Non multiresistant MRSA isolates were isolated from all hospitals. Resistances to ciprofloxacin, macrolides and tetracycline were the most prevalent. MLST attributed 46 isolates with ST22, 13 with ST8, eight with ST1, three with ST50 and three with ST398. SCCmec type IV was found in all isolates. PVL was detected in one ST22 isolate. All isolates tested negative for the ACME element. MLVF identified 31 different patterns, some subtype clusters ranging in size between two and 22 isolates. The closely related PFGE patterns of the ST8 isolates differed from USA300. Conclusions A polyclonal circulation of non multiresistant MRSA along with blurring of boundaries between healthcare associated (HA)-MRSA and community associated (CA)-MRSA appear to be occurring in our epidemiological setting. A better understanding of spread of MRSA with the support of molecular typing can provide invaluable information in

  12. Characterization of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains among inpatients and outpatients in a referral hospital in Tehran, Iran.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Fateh; Shokoohizadeh, Leili

    2016-08-01

    Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common causes of a variety of infections ranging from wound infections to urinary tract infections (UTI) in hospital and community. In this study during 3 years we characterized the antibiotic resistance patterns of 491 hospital acquired MRSA and community associated MRSA strains by the guidelines of clinical and laboratory standard institute. A combination of high resolution PhP typing method and SCCmec typing were used for clonal dissemination of isolates. Among all 491 MRSA strains, diverse PhP types consisting of 29 common types (CTs) and 4 single types (STs) and also 2 different SCCmec types (III and IVa) were detected. In addition, 18 CTs were common among CA- and HA-MRSA strains and the presence of all 4 STs was limited to HA-MRSA strains. All isolates were resistant to penicillin and high level resistance was observed against ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, tobramycin and kanamycin and the rate of resistance to most of the antibiotic tested among HA-MRSA was significantly higher than CA-MRSA isolates. Moreover, all isolates showed susceptibility to linezolid, vancomycin and quinupristin-dalfopristin and very low resistance to fusidic acid, nitrofurantoin and chloramphenicol were detected. Our findings illustrated the increasing rate of clonal dissemination and persistence of highly antibiotic resistant CA-MRSA strains in Tehran hospitals, and also indicated the important role of the hospitals as the reservoir of MRSA strains. PMID:27265678

  13. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Formation in Urinary Tract Infection

    PubMed Central

    YOUSEFI, Masoud; POURMAND, Mohammad Reza; FALLAH, Fatemeh; HASHEMI, Ali; MASHHADI, Rahil; NAZARI-ALAM, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the antibiotic susceptibility pattern as well as the phenotypic and genotypic biofilm formation ability of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from patients with urinary tract infection (UTI). Methods: A total of 39 isolates of S. aureus were collected from patients with UTI. The antibiotic susceptibility patterns of the isolates were determined by the Kirby-Bauer disk-diffusion. We used the Modified Congo red agar (MCRA) and Microtiter plate methods to assess the ability of biofilm formation. All isolates were examined for determination of biofilm related genes, icaA, fnbA, clfA and bap using PCR method. Results: Linezolid, quinupristin/dalfopristin and chloramphenicol were the most effective agents against S. aureus isolates. Overall, 69.2% of S. aureus isolates were biofilm producers. Resistance to four antibiotics such as nitrofurantoin (71.4% vs. 28.6%, P=0.001), tetracycline (57.7% vs. 42.3%, P=0.028), erythromycin and ciprofloxacin (56% vs. 44%, P=0.017) was higher among biofilm producers than non-biofilm producers. The icaA, fnbA and clfA genes were present in all S. aureus isolates. However, bap gene was not detected in any of the isolates. Conclusion: Our findings reinforce the role of biofilm formation in resistance to antimicrobial agents. Trimethoprimsulfamethoxazole and doxycycline may be used as an effective treatment for UTI caused by biofilm producers S. aureus. Our results suggest that biofilm formation is not dependent to just icaA, fnbA, clfA and bap genes harbor in S. aureus strains. PMID:27252918

  14. Superantigen profiling of Staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis isolates.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jin-Won; Karau, Melissa J; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E; Ballard, Alessandro D; Tilahun, Ashenafi; Khaleghi, Shahryar Rostamkolaei; David, Chella S; Patel, Robin; Rajagopalan, Govindarajan

    2014-06-01

    The frequency of superantigen production among Staphylococcus aureus isolates associated with endocarditis is not well defined. We tested 154 S. aureus isolates from definite infective endocarditis cases for the presence of staphylococcal enterotoxins A-E, H, and TSST-1 by PCR, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and using an HLA-DR3 transgenic mouse splenocyte proliferation assay. Sixty-three isolates (50.8%) tested positive for at least 1 superantigen gene, with 21 (16.9%) testing positive for more than 2. tst (28.6%) was most common, followed by seb (27%), sea (22.2%), sed (20.6%), see (17.5%), and sec (11.1%). Of 41 methicillin-resistant S. aureus, 21 had superantigen genes, with sed being more frequently detected in this group compared to methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (P < 0.05). Superantigen genes were not associated with mortality (P = 0.81). 75% of PCR-positive isolates induced robust splenocyte proliferation. Overall, more than half of S. aureus isolates causing endocarditis carry superantigen genes, of which most are functional. PMID:24745820

  15. Demography and Intercontinental Spread of the USA300 Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, Philippe; Martins-Simões, Patrícia; Villain, Adrien; Barbier, Maxime; Tristan, Anne; Bouchier, Christiane; Ma, Laurence; Bes, Michele; Laurent, Frederic; Guillemot, Didier; Wirth, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) was recognized worldwide during the 1990s; in less than a decade, several genetically distinct CA-MRSA lineages carrying Panton-Valentine leukocidin genes have emerged on every continent. Most notably, in the United States, the sequence type 18-IV (ST8-IV) clone known as USA300 has become highly prevalent, outcompeting methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) and other MRSA strains in both community and hospital settings. CA-MRSA bacteria are much less prevalent in Europe, where the European ST80-IV European CA-MRSA clone, USA300 CA-MRSA strains, and other lineages, such as ST22-IV, coexist. The question that arises is whether the USA300 CA-MRSA present in Europe (i) was imported once or on very few occasions, followed by a broad geographic spread, anticipating an increased prevalence in the future, or (ii) derived from multiple importations with limited spreading success. In the present study, we applied whole-genome sequencing to a collection of French USA300 CA-MRSA strains responsible for sporadic cases and micro-outbreaks over the past decade and United States ST8 MSSA and MRSA isolates. Genome-wide phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the population structure of the French isolates is the product of multiple introductions dating back to the onset of the USA300 CA-MRSA clone in North America. Coalescent-based demography of the USA300 lineage shows that a strong expansion occurred during the 1990s concomitant with the acquisition of the arginine catabolic mobile element and antibiotic resistance, followed by a sharp decline initiated around 2008, reminiscent of the rise-and-fall pattern previously observed in the ST80 lineage. A future expansion of the USA300 lineage in Europe is therefore very unlikely. PMID:26884428

  16. Superantigens in Staphylococcus aureus isolated from prosthetic joint infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Choon K; Karau, Melissa J; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E; Tilahun, Ashenafi Y; David, Chella S; Mandrekar, Jayawant N; Patel, Robin; Rajagopalan, Govindarajan

    2015-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common cause of prosthetic joint infection (PJI). The prevalence of superantigens (SAgs) among PJI-associated S. aureus is unknown. Eighty-four S. aureus isolates associated with PJI isolated between 1999 and 2006 were studied. SAg genes, sea, seb, sec, sed, see, seg, seh, sei, and tst, were assayed by PCR. Seventy-eight (92.9%) isolates carried at least 1 SAg gene studied, with 61 (72.6%) harboring more than 1. seg was most commonly (70.2%), and seh was least frequently (4.8%) detected. tst-positive isolates were associated with early infection and increased erythrocyte sedimentation rate at diagnosis (P=0.006 and P=0.021, respectively). seg and sei were associated with methicillin resistance (P=0.008 and P=0.002, respectively). A majority of PJI-associated isolates studied produced biologically active SAgs in both planktonic and biofilm growth modes. SAg genes are prevalent in S. aureus causing PJI. PMID:25619753

  17. Superantigens in Staphylococcus aureus isolated from prosthetic joint infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Choon K.; Karau, Melissa J.; Greenwood-Quaintance, Kerryl E.; Tilahun, Ashenafi Y.; David, Chella S.; Mandrekar, Jayawant N.; Patel, Robin; Rajagopalan, Govindarajan

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common cause of prosthetic joint infection (PJI). The prevalence of superantigens (SAgs) among PJI-associated S. aureus is unknown. Eighty-four S. aureus isolates associated with PJI isolated between 1999 and 2006 were studied. SAg genes, sea, seb, sec, sed, see, seg, seh, sei and tst, were assayed by PCR. Seventy-eight (92.9%) isolates carried at least one SAg gene studied, with 61 (72.6%) harboring more than one. seg was most commonly (70.2%) and seh was least frequently (4.8%) detected. tst-positive isolates were associated with early infection and increased ESR at diagnosis (P = 0.006 and P = 0.021, respectively). seg and sei were associated with methicillin resistance (P = 0.008 and 0.002, respectively). SAg genes are prevalent in S. aureus causing PJI; a majority of PJI-associated isolates produce biologically active SAgs in both planktonic and biofilm growth modes. PMID:25619753

  18. Molecular epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in a university hospital in northwestern Spain.

    PubMed

    Ariza-Miguel, Jaime; Hernández, Marta; Fernández-Natal, Isabel; Rodríguez-Lázaro, David

    2014-09-01

    Continuous monitoring of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is necessary to understand the clonal evolution of successful lineages. In this study, we identified the MRSA clones circulating in a Spanish hospital during a 2-year period, assessed their relationship with antimicrobial resistance profiles, and investigated the presence of the emerging community-associated and livestock-associated MRSA lineages (CA-MRSA, LA-MRSA). CC5-MRSA-IV isolates were the most frequently recovered, which supports the previously reported prevalence of this clone in Spanish hospitals. We observed ST125 isolates that harbored specific cassette chromosome recombinase (ccr) gene elements of the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) types IV and VI. That clone, which was first detected only recently, has increased resistance to erythromycin. Furthermore, 94% of the infections were caused by non-multiresistant isolates. Neither CA-MRSA nor LA-MRSA isolates were observed. These findings, along with related events over the last decade, suggest the establishment of a clonal endemic population in the Spanish clinical environment. PMID:26419454

  19. Population structure of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) in Portugal over a 19-year period (1992-2011).

    PubMed

    Tavares, A; Faria, N A; de Lencastre, H; Miragaia, M

    2014-03-01

    Despite their clinical relevance, few studies have addressed the epidemiology of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA). In particular, it is not clear how MSSA population structure has evolved over time and how it might have been shaped by the emergence of MRSA in the community (CA-MRSA). In the present study we have evaluated the MSSA population structure over time, its geographical distribution and relatedness with MRSA in Portugal. A total of 465 MSSA from infection and colonization, collected over a 19-year period (1992-2011) in the northern, central and southern regions of Portugal were analyzed. Isolates were characterized by spa typing and multilocus-sequence typing (MLST). Isolates with predominant spa types were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Isolates relatedness was analyzed by eBURST and BURP. The 172 spa types found among the 465 MSSA were grouped into 18 spa-CC (clonal complexes). Ten clonal types were more prevalent (40 %): one major clone (ST30-t012) was present in the entire study period and all over the country and the other nine were intermittently detected over time (ST5-t002, ST8-t008, ST15-t084, ST34-t166, ST72-t148, ST1-t127, ST7-t091, ST398-t571 and ST34-t136). Interestingly, three MSSA clonal types observed only after 1996 were closely related with CA-MRSA epidemic strains (ST8-t008, ST72-t148 and ST1-t127) found currently in Portugal. The MSSA population in Portugal is genetically diverse; however, some dominant clonal types have been established and widely disseminated for almost two decades. We identified MSSA isolates that were related with emergent CA-MRSA clones found in Portugal. PMID:24057140

  20. Manipulation of Autophagy in Phagocytes Facilitates Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    O'Keeffe, Kate M.; Wilk, Mieszko M.; Leech, John M.; Murphy, Alison G.; Laabei, Maisem; Monk, Ian R.; Massey, Ruth C.; Lindsay, Jodi A.; Foster, Timothy J.; Geoghegan, Joan A.

    2015-01-01

    The capacity for intracellular survival within phagocytes is likely a critical factor facilitating the dissemination of Staphylococcus aureus in the host. To date, the majority of work on S. aureus-phagocyte interactions has focused on neutrophils and, to a lesser extent, macrophages, yet we understand little about the role played by dendritic cells (DCs) in the direct killing of this bacterium. Using bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs), we demonstrate for the first time that DCs can effectively kill S. aureus but that certain strains of S. aureus have the capacity to evade DC (and macrophage) killing by manipulation of autophagic pathways. Strains with high levels of Agr activity were capable of causing autophagosome accumulation, were not killed by BMDCs, and subsequently escaped from the phagocyte, exerting significant cytotoxic effects. Conversely, strains that exhibited low levels of Agr activity failed to accumulate autophagosomes and were killed by BMDCs. Inhibition of the autophagic pathway by treatment with 3-methyladenine restored the bactericidal effects of BMDCs. Using an in vivo model of systemic infection, we demonstrated that the ability of S. aureus strains to evade phagocytic cell killing and to survive temporarily within phagocytes correlated with persistence in the periphery and that this effect is critically Agr dependent. Taken together, our data suggest that strains of S. aureus exhibiting high levels of Agr activity are capable of blocking autophagic flux, leading to the accumulation of autophagosomes. Within these autophagosomes, the bacteria are protected from phagocytic killing, thus providing an intracellular survival niche within professional phagocytes, which ultimately facilitates dissemination. PMID:26099586

  1. Vitamin A deficiency predisposes to Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Wiedermann, U; Tarkowski, A; Bremell, T; Hanson, L A; Kahu, H; Dahlgren, U I

    1996-01-01

    We have investigated the consequences of vitamin A deficiency in a rat model of T-cell-dependent and superantigen-mediated Staphylococcus aureus arthritis. After intravenous inoculation of enterotoxin A-producing staphylococci, the vitamin-A-deficient rats showed a decreased weight gain compared with the paired fed controls despite equal food consumption. The control rats developed arthritis in the first few days after bacterial inoculation, with a peak frequency at day 5, and then gradually recovered; however, the frequency of arthritis 18 days after bacterial inoculation was 86% among the vitamin A-deficient rats and 44% among the control rats. During this period, 3 of 10 deficient rats and 1 of 10 control rats died. Further in vitro analysis revealed that T-cell responses to S. aureus were significantly higher in the vitamin A-deficient rats than in the control animals. In contrast, B-cell reactivity, measured as immunoglobulin levels, autoantibody levels, and specific antibacterial antibody levels in serum, did not differ between the groups. Interestingly, the innate host defense mechanisms against S. aureus were also profoundly affected by vitamin A deficiency. Thus, despite a larger number of circulating phagocytic cells in the vitamin-A-deficient group, the capacity to phagocytize and exert intracellular killing of S. aureus was significantly decreased in comparison with the control rats. Furthermore, serum from the vitamin A-deficient rats inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus displayed decreased complement lysis activity. Our results suggest that the increased susceptibility to S. aureus infection observed in the vitamin-A-deficient rats is due to a concerted action of antigen-specific T-cell hyperactivity, impaired function of the phagocytes, and decreased complement activity. PMID:8557341

  2. Fluoroquinolone Therapy in Staphylococcus aureus Infections: Where Do We Stand?

    PubMed Central

    Gade, Neeta D; Qazi, Mohiuddin S

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The study aimed to evaluate the utility of various commonly used fluoroquinolones against Staphylococcus aureus isolates. Materials and Methods: A total of 250 isolates of S. aureus were studied from different clinical specimens like blood, pus, wound swabs, sputum, ear swabs, and body fluids between November 2009 and December 2011. All the isolates were tested for their susceptibility to fluoroquinolones and other antimicrobial agents by Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion method using criteria of standard zone of inhibition. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) detection was done by cefoxitin disk diffusion method. The MRSA isolates were tested for minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) to vancomycin by E-test strips. All the MRSA strains were sent to National Staphylococcal Phage-typing Centre, Maulana Azad Medical College, New Delhi for phage typing. Results: A total of 107 strains of S. aureus (42.8%) were detected as MRSA. Multidrug resistance was observed among the MRSA strains more commonly than among the MSSA stains. Among the fluoroquinolones, maximum resistance in MRSA was seen to ciprofloxacin (92.5%), followed by ofloxacin (80.4%). None of the S. aureus isolates showed resistance to vancomycin and linezolid. The MICs of vancomycin for the MRSA tested ranged from 0.5 to 2 μg/ml. Phage typing pattern of 107 MRSA isolates revealed that 37 (34.6%) MRSA isolates were nontypeable and 70 (65.4%) were typeable. Conclusion: Ciprofloxacin can no longer be used in empirical therapy against MRSA infections. Use of other members of fluoroquinolone should be limited only to those strains that show laboratory confirmation of their susceptibility. Vancomycin remains the drug of choice to treat MRSA infections. PMID:24701103

  3. Cataract surgery during active methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection

    PubMed Central

    Mansour, Ahmad M; Salti, Haytham I

    2014-01-01

    We present two patients with active, foul-smelling, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) wounds of the forehead and sternum following craniotomy or open heart surgery. Both had debilitating cataracts and were told by the infectious diseases team that cataract surgery is very risky. Both underwent sequential bilateral phacoemulsification with no sign of infection. Patients with active MRSA wound infections may safely undergo cataract surgery with additional precautions observed intraoperatively (good wound construction) and postoperatively (topical antibiotics and close observation). Banning such surgeries can unnecessarily jeopardize the lifestyles of such patients. PMID:24790402

  4. Superior in vitro activity of carbapenems over anti-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and some related antimicrobial agents for community-acquired MRSA but not for hospital-acquired MRSA.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tomomi; Higuchi, Wataru; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2009-02-01

    Eighty-eight strains of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL)-positive and -negative community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) and 152 strains of hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA) were examined for susceptibility to carbapenems, oxacillin, and other antimicrobial agents. CA-MRSA strains were more susceptible to carbapenems (MIC(90), 1-4 microg/ml) than HA-MRSA strains (MIC(90), 32-64 microg/ml). Among the carbapenems examined, CA-MRSA strains were most susceptible to imipenem (MIC(50), 0.12 microg/ml; MIC(90), 1 microg/ml). A similar tendency was observed with oxacillin, but less markedly (MIC(90): 32 microg/ml for CA-MRSA and > or =256 microg/ml for HA-MRSA). This difference was also observed between CA-MRSA and HA-MRSA in susceptibility levels to cephems, erythromycin, clindamycin, and levofloxacin, but not to ampicillin, vancomycin, teicoplanin, linezolid, and arbekacin. The data indicate that, in terms of MIC(50) or MIC(90) values, CA-MRSA is 64-256 times more susceptible to imipenem than HA-MRSA, and for CA-MRSA, some carbapenems, e.g., imipenem, show better in vitro activity than anti-MRSA or some related agents. PMID:19280303

  5. Identification of potential anti-infectives against Staphylococcus aureus using a Caenorhabditis elegans infection model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Cin; Rahman, Noorsaadah Abd; Nathan, Sheila

    2014-09-01

    The alarming increase of antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and a delay in antibiotics development point to the need for novel therapeutic approaches to combat infection. To discover novel anti-infective agents, we screened a number of synthetic compounds comprising mainly of chalcone derivatives to explore their potential in promoting the survival of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans upon infection by S. aureus. Screening of seven chalcone derivatives using both agar- and liquid-based assays revealed three positive hits that significantly prolonged the survival of S. aureus-infected nematodes. All the hits did not interfere with bacterial growth in vitro, proposing that the three compounds identified most probably act through mechanisms distinct from conventional antibiotics that target bacterial replication.

  6. Staphylococcus aureus Regulatory RNAs as Potential Biomarkers for Bloodstream Infections.

    PubMed

    Bordeau, Valérie; Cady, Anne; Revest, Matthieu; Rostan, Octavie; Sassi, Mohamed; Tattevin, Pierre; Donnio, Pierre-Yves; Felden, Brice

    2016-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a commensal bacterium and pathogen. Identifying biomarkers for the transition from colonization to disease caused by this organism would be useful. Several S. aureus small RNAs (sRNAs) regulate virulence. We investigated presence and expression of 8 sRNAs in 83 S. aureus strains from 42 patients with sepsis or septic shock and 41 asymptomatic colonized carriers. Small pathogenicity island sRNAs sprB and sprC were clade specific. Six sRNAs had variable expression not correlated with clinical status. Expression of RNAIII was lower in strains from septic shock patients than in strains from colonized patients. When RNAIII was associated with expression of sprD, colonizing strains could be discriminated from strains in patients with bloodstream infections, including patients with sepsis and septic shock. Isolates associated with colonization might have sRNAs with target expression different from those of disease isolates. Monitoring expression of RNAIII and sprD could help determine severity of bloodstream infections. PMID:27224202

  7. Staphylococcus aureus Regulatory RNAs as Potential Biomarkers for Bloodstream Infections

    PubMed Central

    Bordeau, Valérie; Cady, Anne; Revest, Matthieu; Rostan, Octavie; Sassi, Mohamed; Tattevin, Pierre; Donnio, Pierre-Yves

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a commensal bacterium and pathogen. Identifying biomarkers for the transition from colonization to disease caused by this organism would be useful. Several S. aureus small RNAs (sRNAs) regulate virulence. We investigated presence and expression of 8 sRNAs in 83 S. aureus strains from 42 patients with sepsis or septic shock and 41 asymptomatic colonized carriers. Small pathogenicity island sRNAs sprB and sprC were clade specific. Six sRNAs had variable expression not correlated with clinical status. Expression of RNAIII was lower in strains from septic shock patients than in strains from colonized patients. When RNAIII was associated with expression of sprD, colonizing strains could be discriminated from strains in patients with bloodstream infections, including patients with sepsis and septic shock. Isolates associated with colonization might have sRNAs with target expression different from those of disease isolates. Monitoring expression of RNAIII and sprD could help determine severity of bloodstream infections. PMID:27224202

  8. Personal Hygiene and Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Mei; Wolkoff, Barbara; Dodson, Douglas; Gladbach, Stephen; Zhu, Bao-Ping

    2006-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections outside the healthcare setting are an increasing concern. We conducted a case-control study to investigate an MRSA outbreak during 2002–2003 in a Missouri prison and focused on hygiene factors. Information on sociodemographic characteristics, medical history, and hygiene practices of study participants was collected by interview and medical record review. Logistic regression was used to evaluate MRSA infection in relation to hygiene factors individually and as a composite hygiene score; potential confounding factors were controlled. Selected MRSA isolates were analyzed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). MRSA infection was significantly associated with a low composite hygiene score. Transmission among prison inmates appeared to be responsible for this outbreak. PFGE analysis showed that isolates were indistinguishable and associated with community-onset MRSA infections in other US prisons. Improving hygiene practices and environmental conditions may help prevent and interrupt future MRSA outbreaks in prison settings. PMID:16704779

  9. Photodynamic therapy for Staphylococcus aureus infected burn wounds in mice.

    PubMed

    Lambrechts, Saskia A G; Demidova, Tatiana N; Aalders, Maurice C G; Hasan, Tayyaba; Hamblin, Michael R

    2005-07-01

    The rise of multiply antibiotic resistant bacteria has led to searches for novel antimicrobial therapies to treat infections. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a potential candidate; it uses the combination of a photosensitizer with visible light to produce reactive oxygen species that lead to cell death. We used PDT mediated by meso-mono-phenyl-tri(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)-porphyrin (PTMPP) to treat burn wounds in mice with established Staphylococcus aureus infections The third degree burn wounds were infected with bioluminescent S. aureus. PDT was applied after one day of bacterial growth by adding a 25% DMSO/500 microM PTMPP solution to the wound followed by illumination with red light and periodic imaging of the mice using a sensitive camera to detect the bioluminescence. More than 98% of the bacteria were eradicated after a light dose of 210 J cm(-2) in the presence of PTMPP. However, bacterial re-growth was observed. Light alone or PDT both delayed the wound healing. These data suggest that PDT has the potential to rapidly reduce the bacterial load in infected burns. The treatment needs to be optimized to reduce wound damage and prevent recurrence. PMID:15986057

  10. Staphylococcus aureus Nasal Colonization and Subsequent Infection in Intensive Care Unit Patients: Does Methicillin Resistance Matter?

    PubMed Central

    Honda, Hitoshi; Krauss, Melissa J.; Coopersmith, Craig M.; Kollef, Marin H.; Richmond, Amy M.; Fraser, Victoria J.; Warren, David K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Staphylococcus aureus is a significant cause of infection in intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Colonization with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) is a risk factor for subsequent S. aureus infection. However, MRSA-colonized patients may have more co-morbidities than methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA)-colonized, or non-colonized patients and therefore more susceptible to infection on that basis. Design Prospective cohort study Setting A 24-bed surgical ICU (SICU) and 19-bed medical ICU (MICU) of a 1252-bed, academic hospital. Patients Patients had nasal swab cultures for S. aureus performed upon ICU admission from December 2002 to August 2007 Methods Patients in the ICU for > 48 hours were examined for an ICU-acquired S. aureus infection, defined as development of S. aureus infection > 48 hours after ICU admission. Results One thousand four hundred thirty-three (27.8%) of 5,161 patients had S. aureus colonization at admission [674 (47.0%) with MRSA; 759 (53.0%) with MSSA]. An ICU-acquired S. aureus infection developed in 113 (2.2%) patients. 75 (66.4%) of 113 had an infection due to MRSA. Risk factors associated with an ICU-acquired S. aureus infection included MRSA colonization at admission [adjusted hazard ratio (aHR), 4.70; 95% confidence interval (CI), 3.07–7.21] and MSSA colonization at admission (aHR, 2.47; 95% CI, 1.52–4.01). Conclusion ICU patients colonized with S. aureus were at greater risk of developing a S. aureus infection in the ICU. Even after adjusting for patient-specific risk factors, MRSA-colonized patients were more likely to develop S. aureus infection compared to MSSA-colonized or non-colonized patients. PMID:20426656

  11. Discovery of potential anti-infectives against Staphylococcus aureus using a Caenorhabditis elegans infection model

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The limited antibiotic options for effective control of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections has led to calls for new therapeutic approaches to combat this human pathogen. An alternative approach to control MRSA is through the use of anti-infective agents that selectively disrupt virulence-mediated pathways without affecting microbial cell viability or by modulating the host natural immune defenses to combat the pathogen. Methods We established a C. elegans – S. aureus liquid-based assay to screen for potential anti-infectives against S. aureus. The assay was utilized to screen 37 natural extracts and 29 synthetic compounds for the ability to extend the lifespan of infected nematodes. Disc diffusion and MIC microdilution tests were used to evaluate the anti-microbial properties of these natural extracts and synthetic compounds whilst in vivo bacterial CFU within the C. elegans gut were also enumerated. Results We screened a total of 37 natural extracts and 29 synthetic compounds for anti-infective properties. The screen successfully revealed 14 natural extracts from six plants (Nypa fruticans, Swietenia macrophylla, Curcuma longa, Eurycoma longifolia, Orthosiphon stamineus and Silybum eburneum) and one marine sample (Faunus ater) that improved the survival of S. aureus-infected worms by at least 2.8-fold as well as 14 synthetic compounds that prolonged the survival of S. aureus-infected nematodes by 4-fold or greater. An anti-microbial screen of all positive hits demonstrated that 8/28 hits had no effect on S. aureus growth. Of these 8 candidates, 5 of them also protected the worms from MRSA infection. We also noted that worms exposed to N. fruticans root and O. stamineus leaf extracts showed reduced intestinal colonization by live S. aureus. This suggests that these extracts could possibly activate host immunity to eliminate the bacteria or interfere with factor/s that prevents pathogen accumulation. Conclusion We have successfully

  12. Draft Genome Sequence of Isolate Staphylococcus aureus LHSKBClinical, Isolated from an Infected Hip

    PubMed Central

    Stipetic, Laurence H.; Hamilton, Graham; Dalby, Matthew J.; Davies, Robert L.; Meek, R. M. Dominic; Ramage, Gordon; Smith, David G. E.

    2015-01-01

    We report here the genome sequence of a clinical isolate of Staphylococcus aureus from an orthopedic infection. Phenotypically diverse Staphylococcus aureus strains are associated with orthopedic infections and subsequent implant failure, and some are highly resistant to antibiotics. This genome sequence will support further analyses of strains causing orthopedic infections. PMID:25931597

  13. Staphylococcus aureus Panton-Valentine Leukocidin Is a Very Potent Cytotoxic Factor for Human Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Löffler, Bettina; Hussain, Muzaffar; Grundmeier, Matthias; Brück, Michaela; Holzinger, Dirk; Varga, Georg; Roth, Johannes; Kahl, Barbara C.; Proctor, Richard A.; Peters, Georg

    2010-01-01

    The role of the pore-forming Staphylococcus aureus toxin Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) in severe necrotizing diseases is debated due to conflicting data from epidemiological studies of community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) infections and various murine disease-models. In this study, we used neutrophils isolated from different species to evaluate the cytotoxic effect of PVL in comparison to other staphylococcal cytolytic components. Furthermore, to study the impact of PVL we expressed it heterologously in a non-virulent staphylococcal species and examined pvl-positive and pvl-negative clinical isolates as well as the strain USA300 and its pvl-negative mutant. We demonstrate that PVL induces rapid activation and cell death in human and rabbit neutrophils, but not in murine or simian cells. By contrast, the phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs), a newly identified group of cytolytic staphylococcal components, lack species-specificity. In general, after phagocytosis of bacteria different pvl-positive and pvl-negative staphylococcal strains, expressing a variety of other virulence factors (such as surface proteins), induced cell death in neutrophils, which is most likely associated with the physiological clearing function of these cells. However, the release of PVL by staphylococcal strains caused rapid and premature cell death, which is different from the physiological (and programmed) cell death of neutrophils following phagocytosis and degradation of virulent bacteria. Taken together, our results question the value of infection-models in mice and non-human primates to elucidate the impact of PVL. Our data clearly demonstrate that PVL acts differentially on neutrophils of various species and suggests that PVL has an important cytotoxic role in human neutrophils, which has major implications for the pathogenesis of CA-MRSA infections. PMID:20072612

  14. Longitudinal Antibiotic Susceptibility Profiles of Staphylococcus aureus Cutaneous Infections in a Pediatric Outpatient Population.

    PubMed

    Slater, Nathaniel A; Gilligan, Peter H; Morrell, Dean S

    2016-09-01

    This longitudinal update on Staphylococcus aureus prevalence and antibiotic resistance patterns surveyd 291 cultures from 188 patients in a pediatric outpatient dermatology clinic with suspected skin and soft tissue infections. The prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus remained stable at 24%. Staphylococcus aureus resistance to tetracyclines modestly but demonstrably increased in the interval since 2009. PMID:27384814

  15. Molecular characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from tertiary care hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Atif H.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) tends to be resistant to multiple antibiotics. Methicillin resistance is conferred by the acquisition of the mecA gene, which is carried by a mobile genetic element called the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec). There are five major types of SCCmec elements (I–V). The majority of hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA) strains carry SCCmec types I, II, or III, whereas community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA) strains carry SCCmec types IV or V. In addition, Panton-Valentine Leucocidin (PVL) is a gene encoding a powerful cytotoxin that is strongly associated with CA-MRSA strains. The present study was aimed to identify the types of SCCmec and PVL genes among clinical MRSA isolates. Methods: This study was conducted in 5 tertiary care hospitals in Makkah city from March to September of 2012. A total of 206 S. aureus clinical isolates were analysed using standard microbiological methods. Multiplex PCR was performed on genomic DNA from MRSA isolates in order to identify the types of SCCmec. In addition, PCR was performed to detect the PVL gene among the isolates. Results: Of the 206 S. aureus isolates, 114 (55.3%) were MRSA, and 100 of the MRSA isolates carried the mecA gene. Results from SCCmec typing revealed that 3% were type I; 9% were type II; 47% were type III, and 29% were type IV. Nineteen per cent of the isolates harboured the PVL gene. Furthermore, there was a statistically significant correlation between the presence of the PVL gene and SCCmec type IV. Conclusion: The virulence of MRSA strains is increasing in both hospital and community settings in Makkah, highlighting the importance of their rapid identification in order to appropriately control infection. PMID:25097499

  16. Blue Light Phototherapy Kills Methycillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enwemeka, Chukuka S.; Williams, Debora; Enwemeka, Sombiri K.; Hollosi, Steve; Yens, David

    2010-05-01

    Background: Methycillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria continue to defy most available antibiotics. As a result infections with MRSA remain a growing public health concern. As a paradigm shift and a significant departure from the on-going trend to develop stronger drug-based therapies, we studied the effect of 405 nm and 470 nm wavelengths of blue light on two strains of MRSA—US-300 strain of CA-MRSA and the IS853 strain of HA-MRSA—in vitro. Methods: We cultured and plated each strain, following which bacteria colonies were irradiated with 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, 19, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, or 60 Jcm-2 energy densities—just once. Specimens were incubated at 35° C for 24 h. Then, digital images obtained were quantified to obtain colony counts and the aggregate area occupied by bacteria colonies. Results: Each wavelength produced a statistically significant dose-dependent reduction in both the number and the aggregate area of colonies formed by each bacteria strain (P<0.001). Maximum eradication of the US-300 (92.1%) and the IS-853 colonies (93.5%) was achieved within 10 minutes of irradiation with each wavelength. The longer the irradiation the more bacteria were eradicated. However, the effect was non-linear as increases of energy densities between 1.0 and 15 J cm-2 resulted in more bacteria death than similar increases between 15 J cm-2 and 60 J cm-2. Conclusion: At low doses, blue light photo-destroys HA-MRSA and CA-MRSA in vitro; raising the prospect that phototherapy may be an effective clinical tool in the on-going effort to stem MRSA infections.

  17. Antimicrobial Photodynamic Therapy for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiu-jun; Fang, Yong; Yao, Min

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most common multidrug resistant bacteria both in hospitals and in the community. In the last two decades, there has been growing concern about the increasing resistance to MRSA of the most potent antibiotic glycopeptides. MRSA infection poses a serious problem for physicians and their patients. Photosensitizer-mediated antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT) appears to be a promising and innovative approach for treating multidrug resistant infection. In spite of encouraging reports of the use of antimicrobial PDT to inactivate MRSA in large in vitro studies, there are only few in vivo studies. Therefore, applying PDT in the clinic for MRSA infection is still a long way off. PMID:23555074

  18. Staphylococcus aureus infections: transmission within households and the community

    PubMed Central

    Knox, Justin; Uhlemann, Anne-Catrin; Lowy, Franklin D.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus , both methicillin susceptible and resistant, are now major community-based pathogens worldwide. The basis for this is multifactorial and includes the emergence of epidemic clones with enhanced virulence, antibiotic resistance, colonization potential, or transmissibility. Household reservoirs of these unique strains are crucial to their success as community-based pathogens. Staphylococci become resident in households, either as colonizers or environmental contaminants, increasing the risk for recurrent infections. Interactions of household members with others in different households or at community sites including schools and daycare facilities play a critical role in the ability of these strains to become endemic. Colonization density at these sites appears to play an important role in facilitating transmission. The integration of research tools including whole genome sequencing, mathematical modeling and social network analysis have provided additional insight into the transmission dynamics of these strains. Thus far, interventions designed to reduce recurrent infections among household members have had limited success, likely due to the multiplicity of potential sources for recolonization. The development of better strategies to reduce the number of household-based infections will depend on greater insight into the different factors that contribute to the success of these uniquely successful epidemic clones of S. aureus. PMID:25864883

  19. Staphylococcus aureus infections: transmission within households and the community.

    PubMed

    Knox, Justin; Uhlemann, Anne-Catrin; Lowy, Franklin D

    2015-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus, both methicillin susceptible and resistant, are now major community-based pathogens worldwide. The basis for this is multifactorial and includes the emergence of epidemic clones with enhanced virulence, antibiotic resistance, colonization potential, or transmissibility. Household reservoirs of these unique strains are crucial to their success as community-based pathogens. Staphylococci become resident in households, either as colonizers or environmental contaminants, increasing the risk for recurrent infections. Interactions of household members with others in different households or at community sites, including schools and daycare facilities, have a critical role in the ability of these strains to become endemic. Colonization density at these sites appears to have an important role in facilitating transmission. The integration of research tools, including whole-genome sequencing (WGS), mathematical modeling, and social network analysis, has provided additional insight into the transmission dynamics of these strains. Thus far, interventions designed to reduce recurrent infections among household members have had limited success, likely due to the multiplicity of potential sources for recolonization. The development of better strategies to reduce the number of household-based infections will depend on greater insight into the different factors that contribute to the success of these uniquely successful epidemic clones of S. aureus. PMID:25864883

  20. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of community- and hospital-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from United States Hospitals: results from the AWARE Ceftaroline Surveillance Program (2012-2014).

    PubMed

    Sader, Helio S; Mendes, Rodrigo E; Jones, Ronald N; Flamm, Robert K

    2016-09-01

    Among 8437 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates collected from 143 medical centers in the United States (2012-2014), 7116 and 1321 were reported as community-acquired (CA) and hospital-acquired (HA) MRSA, respectively. CA-/HA-MRSA were most often isolated from patients with skin and skin structure infections (SSSI; 68.4/26.9%), pneumonia (13.7/49.0%) and bacteremia (10.0/17.7%). Overall, susceptibility rates were generally lower among HA-MRSA compared to CA-MRSA strains, especially for clindamycin (44.6 vs. 66.1%) and levofloxacin (21.4 vs. 35.5%). Also, susceptibility rates were lower for these two compounds among isolates from pneumonia compared to SSSI and bacteremia. Ceftaroline was broadly active against 98.0% of CA-MRSA and 94.3% of HA-MRSA (MIC50/90, 1μg/mL for both; no resistant isolate) overall, with little variation among infection type subsets. PMID:27394637

  1. Schistosoma spindale infection in a captive jackal (Canis aureus).

    PubMed

    Vimalraj, P G; Latchumikanthan, A

    2015-03-01

    This report is based on the findings from a captive jackal (Canis aureus) housed in Amirthi Zoological Park, Javadu Hills, Vellore. The animal was reported to be dull, depressed and also had diarrhea. Fecal samples were collected in 10 % formalin and subjected to direct and sedimentation method of faecal examination and was examined for endoparasitic infection. Surprisingly, fecal examination revealed two spindle shaped eggs having terminal spine with a size of 250μ by 60μ. The eggs were identified as belonging to Schistosoma spindale and as per the standard keys (Soulsby 1982). PMID:25698875

  2. Staphylococcus aureus Colonization in Children with Community-Associated Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infections and Their Household Contacts

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Stephanie A.; Hogan, Patrick G.; Hayek, Genevieve; Eisenstein, Kimberly A.; Rodriguez, Marcela; Krauss, Melissa; Garbutt, Jane; Fraser, Victoria J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To measure prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus colonization in household contacts of children with acute S. aureus skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI), determine risk factors for S. aureus colonization in household contacts, and assess anatomic sites of S. aureus colonization in patients and household contacts. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting St. Louis Children’s Hospital Emergency Department and ambulatory wound center and nine community pediatric practices affiliated with a practice-based research network. Participants Patients with community-associated S. aureus SSTI and S. aureus colonization (in the nose, axilla, and/or inguinal folds) and their household contacts. Outcome Measures Colonization of household contacts of pediatric patients with S. aureus colonization and SSTI. Results Of 183 index patients, 61% were colonized with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), 30% with methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA), and 9% with both MRSA and MSSA. Of 609 household contacts, 323 (53%) were colonized with S. aureus: 115 (19%) with MRSA, 195 (32%) with MSSA, and 13 (2%) with both. Parents were more likely than other household contacts to be colonized with MRSA (OR 1.72, 95% CI 1.12, 2.63). MRSA colonized the inguinal folds more frequently than MSSA (OR 1.67, 95% CI 1.16, 2.41), and MSSA colonized the nose more frequently than MRSA (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.19, 2.56). Conclusions Household contacts of children with S. aureus SSTI had a high rate of MRSA colonization compared to the general population. The inguinal fold is a prominent site of MRSA colonization, which may be an important consideration for active surveillance programs in hospitals. PMID:22665030

  3. Memory Th1 Cells Are Protective in Invasive Staphylococcus aureus Infection.

    PubMed

    Brown, Aisling F; Murphy, Alison G; Lalor, Stephen J; Leech, John M; O'Keeffe, Kate M; Mac Aogáin, Micheál; O'Halloran, Dara P; Lacey, Keenan A; Tavakol, Mehri; Hearnden, Claire H; Fitzgerald-Hughes, Deirdre; Humphreys, Hilary; Fennell, Jérôme P; van Wamel, Willem J; Foster, Timothy J; Geoghegan, Joan A; Lavelle, Ed C; Rogers, Thomas R; McLoughlin, Rachel M

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms of protective immunity to Staphylococcus aureus infection in humans remain elusive. While the importance of cellular immunity has been shown in mice, T cell responses in humans have not been characterised. Using a murine model of recurrent S. aureus peritonitis, we demonstrated that prior exposure to S. aureus enhanced IFNγ responses upon subsequent infection, while adoptive transfer of S. aureus antigen-specific Th1 cells was protective in naïve mice. Translating these findings, we found that S. aureus antigen-specific Th1 cells were also significantly expanded during human S. aureus bloodstream infection (BSI). These Th1 cells were CD45RO+, indicative of a memory phenotype. Thus, exposure to S. aureus induces memory Th1 cells in mice and humans, identifying Th1 cells as potential S. aureus vaccine targets. Consequently, we developed a model vaccine comprising staphylococcal clumping factor A, which we demonstrate to be an effective human T cell antigen, combined with the Th1-driving adjuvant CpG. This novel Th1-inducing vaccine conferred significant protection during S. aureus infection in mice. This study notably advances our understanding of S. aureus cellular immunity, and demonstrates for the first time that a correlate of S. aureus protective immunity identified in mice may be relevant in humans. PMID:26539822

  4. Memory Th1 Cells Are Protective in Invasive Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lalor, Stephen J.; Leech, John M.; O’Keeffe, Kate M.; Mac Aogáin, Micheál; O’Halloran, Dara P.; Lacey, Keenan A.; Tavakol, Mehri; Hearnden, Claire H.; Fitzgerald-Hughes, Deirdre; Humphreys, Hilary; Fennell, Jérôme P.; van Wamel, Willem J.; Foster, Timothy J.; Geoghegan, Joan A.; Lavelle, Ed C.; Rogers, Thomas R.; McLoughlin, Rachel M.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanisms of protective immunity to Staphylococcus aureus infection in humans remain elusive. While the importance of cellular immunity has been shown in mice, T cell responses in humans have not been characterised. Using a murine model of recurrent S. aureus peritonitis, we demonstrated that prior exposure to S. aureus enhanced IFNγ responses upon subsequent infection, while adoptive transfer of S. aureus antigen-specific Th1 cells was protective in naïve mice. Translating these findings, we found that S. aureus antigen-specific Th1 cells were also significantly expanded during human S. aureus bloodstream infection (BSI). These Th1 cells were CD45RO+, indicative of a memory phenotype. Thus, exposure to S. aureus induces memory Th1 cells in mice and humans, identifying Th1 cells as potential S. aureus vaccine targets. Consequently, we developed a model vaccine comprising staphylococcal clumping factor A, which we demonstrate to be an effective human T cell antigen, combined with the Th1-driving adjuvant CpG. This novel Th1-inducing vaccine conferred significant protection during S. aureus infection in mice. This study notably advances our understanding of S. aureus cellular immunity, and demonstrates for the first time that a correlate of S. aureus protective immunity identified in mice may be relevant in humans. PMID:26539822

  5. Clearance of experimental cutaneous Staphylococcus aureus infections in mice

    PubMed Central

    Onunkwo, Charles C.; Hahn, Beth L.

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcal skin infections are quite common in human patients. These infections often clear spontaneously, but may also progress locally and/or disseminate to cause serious and sometimes fatal deep infections. The present studies were undertaken to examine the clearance phase of experimental cutaneous Staphylococcus aureus infections in a mouse model system. Previous work in this system has shown that staphylococci applied to the skin rapidly disseminate to the spleen and kidney. In the present experiments the bacteria were found to persist at the skin infection site at a time (8 days after inoculation) when they had disappeared from the spleen and kidney. Examination of the infected skin at earlier times revealed rapid (within 6 h) invasion into the stratum corneum, stratum Malpighii, and dermis, but subsequent redistribution of bacteria (at 1–2 days) to more superficial sites, particularly crusts located just above the skin surface. The crusts seen in these infections were of two distinct types, which were termed type 1 and type 2. Type 1 crusts appeared first, consisted of bacteria, inflammatory cells, and debris, and developed over an intact epidermis. Type 2 crusts arose from the process of dermal necrosis previously reported to take place at 2 days in this model system. In the latter situation the bacteria were not really cleared from the epidermis and dermis; rather those layers were transformed into a superficial crust that contained the bacteria. Deep hair follicle infections in the dermis were found in these infections, but they did not persist and did not seem to be a reservoir for organisms in the dermis. Resolution of these experimental infections appeared to involve redistribution of invading bacteria to more superficial locations in crusts above the skin surface, marked proliferation of the epidermis, loss of the bacteria-laden crusts from the skin, and eventual healing of the cutaneous damage. PMID:20130894

  6. Use of mupirocin-chlorhexidine treatment to prevent Staphylococcus aureus surgical-site infections.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, X; Slekovec, C; Talon, D

    2010-05-01

    Evaluation of: Bode LGM, Kluytmans JAJW, Wertheim HFL et al.: Preventing surgical-site infections in nasal carriers of Staphylococcus aureus. N. Engl. J. Med. 362, 9-17 (2010). Staphylococcus aureus is the main pathogen responsible for surgical-site infections and nasal carriage is a major risk factor for subsequent infection with this bacteria. Mupirocin is considered to be the topical antibacterial agent of choice for eradication of nasal S. aureus. The paper by Bode et al. provides strong evidence that the combination of a rapid identification of a S. aureus nasal carrier, mupirocin nasal ointment and chlorhexidine gluconate soap, significantly reduces the rate of S. aureus surgical-site infection by nearly 60%. In conclusion, mupirocin nasal ointment use in S. aureus carriers before surgery has numerous advantages with few side effects. PMID:20441543

  7. MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION OF STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS STRAINS ISOLATED FROM INFECTIVE ENDOCARDITIS.

    PubMed

    Oprea, Mihaela; Patriche, David Sebastian; Străuţ, Monica; Antohe, Felicia

    2014-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is an infection of the heart endothelium and valves and is frequently a consequence of a sanguine flow turbulence and injury of endocardium. Recent studies revealed an increase of Staphylococcus aureus strains involved in IE, but no evident correlations between the genetic background of this bacterium and IE involvement of certain strains have been found yet. In this study we analyzed the virulence profile, including adhesins, exotoxins, superantigens and biofilm determinants, along with agr type detection, for S. aureus strains isolated from IE, versus non-IE originating strains. We performed also bacterial typing (SCCmec typing, spa-typing and MLST typing), in order to compare our strains with international databases repositories. Although the study was carried out on a reduced number of isolates, our observations confirm the previous works, showing that no major differences were observed between the genetic backgrounds of the two groups of strains analyzed. Notably, the added value of this study was optimization of two new multiplex PCR protocols, and the enrichment of international databases with three new spa-types, three new MLST alleles and four new MLST sequence types. PMID:26201122

  8. [Clonal eosinophilia revealed by recurrent Staphylococcus aureus infection].

    PubMed

    Vandenbos, F; Figueredo, M; Dumon-Gubeno, M-C; Nicolle, I; Tarhini, A; Medioni, L-D; Naman, H; Mouroux, J

    2011-06-01

    Acquired eosinophilia is currently classified into secondary (reactional to underlying diseases), clonal (presence of a bone marrow histological, cytogenetic or molecular marker of a myeloid malignancy) and idiopathic (neither secondary nor clonal) categories. We report the case of a 47-year-old male who was admitted to the hospital for Staphylococcus aureus recurring infections. An hypereosinophilia was discovered and led to molecular analysis. The identification of FIP1L1-PDGFRA fusion gene permitted the diagnostic of clonal eosinophilia. Treatment by imatinib mesylate induced an haematological remission, the control of the infection and thoracotomy cicatrization. This case is original because of its infectious presentation and the efficacy of imatinib mesylate to control the infectious process. PMID:21665081

  9. Beta-Hemolysin Promotes Skin Colonization by Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Katayama, Yuki; Sekine, Miwa; Fukuda, Minoru; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    Colonization by Staphylococcus aureus is a characteristic feature of several inflammatory skin diseases and is often followed by epidermal damage and invasive infection. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of skin colonization by a virulent community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) strain, MW2, using a murine ear colonization model. MW2 does not produce a hemolytic toxin, beta-hemolysin (Hlb), due to integration of a prophage, ϕSa3mw, inside the toxin gene (hlb). However, we found that strain MW2 bacteria that had successfully colonized murine ears included derivatives that produced Hlb. Genome sequencing of the Hlb-producing colonies revealed that precise excision of prophage ϕSa3mw occurred, leading to reconstruction of the intact hlb gene in their chromosomes. To address the question of whether Hlb is involved in skin colonization, we constructed MW2-derivative strains with and without the Hlb gene and then subjected them to colonization tests. The colonization efficiency of the Hlb-producing mutant on murine ears was more than 50-fold greater than that of the mutant without hlb. Furthermore, we also showed that Hlb toxin had elevated cytotoxicity for human primary keratinocytes. Our results indicate that S. aureus Hlb plays an important role in skin colonization by damaging keratinocytes, in addition to its well-known hemolytic activity for erythrocytes. PMID:23292775

  10. Healthcare- and Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Fatal Pneumonia with Pediatric Deaths in Krasnoyarsk, Siberian Russia: Unique MRSA's Multiple Virulence Factors, Genome, and Stepwise Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Khokhlova, Olga E.; Hung, Wei-Chun; Wan, Tsai-Wen; Iwao, Yasuhisa; Takano, Tomomi; Higuchi, Wataru; Yachenko, Svetlana V.; Teplyakova, Olga V.; Kamshilova, Vera V.; Kotlovsky, Yuri V.; Nishiyama, Akihito; Reva, Ivan V.; Sidorenko, Sergey V.; Peryanova, Olga V.; Reva, Galina V.; Teng, Lee-Jene; Salmina, Alla B.; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a common multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogen. We herein discussed MRSA and its infections in Krasnoyarsk, Siberian Russia between 2007 and 2011. The incidence of MRSA in 3,662 subjects was 22.0% and 2.9% for healthcare- and community-associated MRSA (HA- and CA-MRSA), respectively. The 15-day mortality rates for MRSA hospital- and community-acquired pneumonia (HAP and CAP) were 6.5% and 50%, respectively. MRSA CAP cases included pediatric deaths; of the MRSA pneumonia episodes available, ≥27.3% were associated with bacteremia. Most cases of HA-MRSA examined exhibited ST239/spa3(t037)/SCCmecIII.1.1.2 (designated as ST239Kras), while all CA-MRSA cases examined were ST8/spa1(t008)/SCCmecIV.3.1.1(IVc) (designated as ST8Kras). ST239Kras and ST8Kras strongly expressed cytolytic peptide (phenol-soluble modulin α, PSMα; and δ-hemolysin, Hld) genes, similar to CA-MRSA. ST239Kras pneumonia may have been attributed to a unique set of multiple virulence factors (MVFs): toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1), elevated PSMα/Hld expression, α-hemolysin, the staphylococcal enterotoxin SEK/SEQ, the immune evasion factor SCIN/SAK, and collagen adhesin. Regarding ST8Kras, SEA was included in MVFs, some of which were common to ST239Kras. The ST239Kras (strain OC3) genome contained: a completely unique phage, φSa7-like (W), with no att repetition; S. aureus pathogenicity island SaPI2R, the first TSST-1 gene-positive (tst+) SaPI in the ST239 lineage; and a super copy of IS256 (≥22 copies/genome). ST239Kras carried the Brazilian SCCmecIII.1.1.2 and United Kingdom-type tst. ST239Kras and ST8Kras were MDR, with the same levofloxacin resistance mutations; small, but transmissible chloramphenicol resistance plasmids spread widely enough to not be ignored. These results suggest that novel MDR and MVF+ HA- and CA-MRSA (ST239Kras and ST8Kras) emerged in Siberian Russia (Krasnoyarsk) associated with fatal pneumonia, and also with ST

  11. Healthcare- and Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Fatal Pneumonia with Pediatric Deaths in Krasnoyarsk, Siberian Russia: Unique MRSA's Multiple Virulence Factors, Genome, and Stepwise Evolution.

    PubMed

    Khokhlova, Olga E; Hung, Wei-Chun; Wan, Tsai-Wen; Iwao, Yasuhisa; Takano, Tomomi; Higuchi, Wataru; Yachenko, Svetlana V; Teplyakova, Olga V; Kamshilova, Vera V; Kotlovsky, Yuri V; Nishiyama, Akihito; Reva, Ivan V; Sidorenko, Sergey V; Peryanova, Olga V; Reva, Galina V; Teng, Lee-Jene; Salmina, Alla B; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a common multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogen. We herein discussed MRSA and its infections in Krasnoyarsk, Siberian Russia between 2007 and 2011. The incidence of MRSA in 3,662 subjects was 22.0% and 2.9% for healthcare- and community-associated MRSA (HA- and CA-MRSA), respectively. The 15-day mortality rates for MRSA hospital- and community-acquired pneumonia (HAP and CAP) were 6.5% and 50%, respectively. MRSA CAP cases included pediatric deaths; of the MRSA pneumonia episodes available, ≥27.3% were associated with bacteremia. Most cases of HA-MRSA examined exhibited ST239/spa3(t037)/SCCmecIII.1.1.2 (designated as ST239Kras), while all CA-MRSA cases examined were ST8/spa1(t008)/SCCmecIV.3.1.1(IVc) (designated as ST8Kras). ST239Kras and ST8Kras strongly expressed cytolytic peptide (phenol-soluble modulin α, PSMα; and δ-hemolysin, Hld) genes, similar to CA-MRSA. ST239Kras pneumonia may have been attributed to a unique set of multiple virulence factors (MVFs): toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1), elevated PSMα/Hld expression, α-hemolysin, the staphylococcal enterotoxin SEK/SEQ, the immune evasion factor SCIN/SAK, and collagen adhesin. Regarding ST8Kras, SEA was included in MVFs, some of which were common to ST239Kras. The ST239Kras (strain OC3) genome contained: a completely unique phage, φSa7-like (W), with no att repetition; S. aureus pathogenicity island SaPI2R, the first TSST-1 gene-positive (tst+) SaPI in the ST239 lineage; and a super copy of IS256 (≥22 copies/genome). ST239Kras carried the Brazilian SCCmecIII.1.1.2 and United Kingdom-type tst. ST239Kras and ST8Kras were MDR, with the same levofloxacin resistance mutations; small, but transmissible chloramphenicol resistance plasmids spread widely enough to not be ignored. These results suggest that novel MDR and MVF+ HA- and CA-MRSA (ST239Kras and ST8Kras) emerged in Siberian Russia (Krasnoyarsk) associated with fatal pneumonia, and also with ST

  12. The Role of Staphylococcus aureus Virulence Factors in Skin Infection and Their Potential as Vaccine Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Lacey, Keenan A.; Geoghegan, Joan A.; McLoughlin, Rachel M.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) causes the vast majority of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) in humans. S. aureus has become increasingly resistant to antibiotics and there is an urgent need for new strategies to tackle S. aureus infections. Vaccines offer a potential solution to this epidemic of antimicrobial resistance. However, the development of next generation efficacious anti-S. aureus vaccines necessitates a greater understanding of the protective immune response against S. aureus infection. In particular, it will be important to ascertain if distinct immune mechanisms are required to confer protection at distinct anatomical sites. Recent discoveries have highlighted that interleukin-17-producing T cells play a particularly important role in the immune response to S. aureus skin infection and suggest that vaccine strategies to specifically target these types of T cells may be beneficial in the treatment of S. aureus SSTIs. S. aureus expresses a large number of cell wall-anchored (CWA) proteins, which are covalently attached to the cell wall peptidoglycan. The virulence potential of many CWA proteins has been demonstrated in infection models; however, there is a paucity of information regarding their roles during SSTIs. In this review, we highlight potential candidate antigens for vaccines targeted at protection against SSTIs. PMID:26901227

  13. Subtle genetic changes enhance virulence of methicillin resistant and sensitive Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Highlander, Sarah K; Hultén, Kristina G; Qin, Xiang; Jiang, Huaiyang; Yerrapragada, Shailaja; Mason, Edward O; Shang, Yue; Williams, Tiffany M; Fortunov, Régine M; Liu, Yamei; Igboeli, Okezie; Petrosino, Joseph; Tirumalai, Madhan; Uzman, Akif; Fox, George E; Cardenas, Ana Maria; Muzny, Donna M; Hemphill, Lisa; Ding, Yan; Dugan, Shannon; Blyth, Peter R; Buhay, Christian J; Dinh, Huyen H; Hawes, Alicia C; Holder, Michael; Kovar, Christie L; Lee, Sandra L; Liu, Wen; Nazareth, Lynne V; Wang, Qiaoyan; Zhou, Jianling; Kaplan, Sheldon L; Weinstock, George M

    2007-01-01

    Background Community acquired (CA) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) increasingly causes disease worldwide. USA300 has emerged as the predominant clone causing superficial and invasive infections in children and adults in the USA. Epidemiological studies suggest that USA300 is more virulent than other CA-MRSA. The genetic determinants that render virulence and dominance to USA300 remain unclear. Results We sequenced the genomes of two pediatric USA300 isolates: one CA-MRSA and one CA-methicillin susceptible (MSSA), isolated at Texas Children's Hospital in Houston. DNA sequencing was performed by Sanger dideoxy whole genome shotgun (WGS) and 454 Life Sciences pyrosequencing strategies. The sequence of the USA300 MRSA strain was rigorously annotated. In USA300-MRSA 2658 chromosomal open reading frames were predicted and 3.1 and 27 kilobase (kb) plasmids were identified. USA300-MSSA contained a 20 kb plasmid with some homology to the 27 kb plasmid found in USA300-MRSA. Two regions found in US300-MRSA were absent in USA300-MSSA. One of these carried the arginine deiminase operon that appears to have been acquired from S. epidermidis. The USA300 sequence was aligned with other sequenced S. aureus genomes and regions unique to USA300 MRSA were identified. Conclusion USA300-MRSA is highly similar to other MRSA strains based on whole genome alignments and gene content, indicating that the differences in pathogenesis are due to subtle changes rather than to large-scale acquisition of virulence factor genes. The USA300 Houston isolate differs from another sequenced USA300 strain isolate, derived from a patient in San Francisco, in plasmid content and a number of sequence polymorphisms. Such differences will provide new insights into the evolution of pathogens. PMID:17986343

  14. Sequence type 72 community-associated meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus emerged as a predominant clone of nasal colonization in newly admitted patients.

    PubMed

    Park, S Y; Chung, D R; Yoo, J R; Baek, J Y; Kim, S H; Ha, Y E; Kang, C-I; Peck, K R; Lee, N Y; Song, J-H

    2016-08-01

    Current knowledge of community-associated (CA) meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage in hospitalized patients is incomplete. Genotypic characteristics of 637 nasal MRSA isolates from newly admitted patients in South Korea were investigated. Sequence type (ST) 72 accounted for 52.1%, 46.3%, and 52.8% of the isolates during the periods of 2007-2008, 2009-2010, and 2013-2014, respectively. Instead of classic MRSA clones responsible for healthcare-associated infections, including ST5 and ST239, MRSA with community genotype ST72 was the predominant strain in newly admitted patients regardless of age and home province of the patients. Active strategies are needed to prevent healthcare-associated infection by CA-MRSA. PMID:26874934

  15. [Severe infection by methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus producing Panton-Valentine leukocidin: reports of two cases].

    PubMed

    Brizuela, Martín; Pérez, Guadalupe; Ruvinsky, Silvina; Sarkis, Claudia; Romero, Romina; Mastroianni, Alejandra; Casimir, Lidia; Venuta, María E; Gómez Bonduele, Verónica; Bologna, Rosa

    2016-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major etiologic agent of infections in children from the community and the hospital setting. The severity of these conditions is associated with virulence factors, including the Panton-Valentine leukocidin. Both methicillin resistant and sensitive Staphylococcus aureus produce this leukocidin although with varying frequency. We present two children with severe infection by sensitive Staphylococcus aureus producer of Panton-Valentine leukocidin with musculoskeletal and endovascular complications. It is essential the suspected diagnosis, appropriate antibiotic treatment and early surgical management to improve the approach of these infections. Epidemiological surveillance should be mantained to detect the frequency of infections caused by these bacteria. PMID:27399020

  16. Dissemination of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus SCCmec type IV and SCCmec type V epidemic clones in a tertiary hospital: challenge to infection control.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, B; Rao, C; Udo, E E; Gadepalli, R; Vishnubhatla, S; Kapil, A

    2015-01-01

    Two-hundred MRSA strains from inpatients with healthcare-associated (HA) and 100 MRSA strains from outpatients with community-associated (CA) skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL) toxin, seh and arcA genes. Based on SCCmec typing, HA-MRSA isolates were further divided into HA-SCCmec I/II/III MRSA and HA-SCCmec IV/V MRSA, and CA-MRSA isolates into CA-SCCmec I/II/III MRSA and CA-SCCmec IV/V MRSA. SCCmec types were further characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, spa typing and multi-locus sequence typing. Seventy-five (37·5%) HA-MRSA isolates and 83/100 CA-MRSA isolates were SCCmec IV/V genotype. HA-SCCmec IV/V MRSA was associated with malignancy (P = 0·03) and bone fractures (P = 0·02) compared to CA-SCCmec IV/V MRSA. HA-SCCmec IV/V MRSA was associated with PVL gene carriage compared to HA-SCCmec I/II/III MRSA (P < 0·001). ST22-MRSA-IV (EMRSA-15), ST772-MRSA-V, and ST36-MRSA-IV and ST239:EMRSA-I:III were the major clones identified. Our study documents the emergence of SCCmec IV and SCCmec V MRSA clones in an Indian hospital. PMID:24690229

  17. Inflammasome Activation Can Mediate Tissue-Specific Pathogenesis or Protection in Staphylococcus aureus Infection.

    PubMed

    Melehani, Jason H; Duncan, Joseph A

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive coccus that interacts with human hosts on a spectrum from quiet commensal to deadly pathogen. S. aureus is capable of infecting nearly every tissue in the body resulting in cellulitis, pneumonia, osteomyelitis, endocarditis, brain abscesses, bacteremia, and more. S. aureus has a wide range of factors that promote infection, and each site of infection triggers a different response in the human host. In particular, the different patterns of inflammasome activation mediate tissue-specific pathogenesis or protection in S. aureus infection. Although still a nascent field, understanding the unique host-pathogen interactions in each infection and the role of inflammasomes in mediating pathogenesis may lead to novel strategies for treating S. aureus infections. Reviews addressing S. aureus virulence and pathogenesis (Thammavongsa et al. 2015), as well as epidemiology and pathophysiology (Tong et al. 2015), have recently been published. This review will focus on S. aureus factors that activate inflammasomes and their impact on innate immune signaling and bacterial survival. PMID:27460814

  18. Expanded Glucose Import Capability Affords Staphylococcus aureus Optimized Glycolytic Flux during Infection

    PubMed Central

    Vitko, Nicholas P.; Grosser, Melinda R.; Khatri, Dal; Lance, Thurlow R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Acquisition of numerous virulence determinants affords Staphylococcus aureus greater pathogenicity than other skin-colonizing staphylococci in humans. Additionally, the metabolic adaptation of S. aureus to nonrespiratory conditions encountered during infection (e.g., hypoxia, nitric oxide, iron chelation) has been implicated as contributing to S. aureus virulence. Specifically, S. aureus has been shown to ferment glycolytic substrates in nonrespiratory environments encountered within the host. Here, we show that S. aureus has acquired unique carbohydrate transporters that facilitate the maximal uptake of host sugars and serve to support nonrespiratory growth in inflamed tissue. The carbohydrate substrates of 11 S. aureus transporters were identified, and at least four of their genes encode S. aureus glucose transporters (glcA, glcB, glcC, and glcU). Moreover, two transporter genes (glcA and glcC) are unique to S. aureus and contribute disproportionately to the nonrespiratory growth of S. aureus on glucose. Targeted inactivation of sugar transporters reduced glucose uptake and attenuated S. aureus in a murine model of skin and soft tissue infections. These data expand the evidence for metabolic adaptation of S. aureus to invasive infection and demonstrate the specific requirement for the fermentation of glucose over all other available carbohydrates. Ultimately, acquisition of foreign genes allows S. aureus to adopt a metabolic strategy resembling that of infiltrating host immune cells: high glycolytic flux coupled to lactate excretion. PMID:27329749

  19. New antimicrobial approaches to gram positive respiratory infections.

    PubMed

    Liapikou, Adamantia; Cilloniz, Catia; Mensa, Josep; Torres, Antonio

    2015-06-01

    Nowadays, we face growing resistance among gram-positive and gram-negative pathogens that cause respiratory infection in the hospital and in the community. The spread of penicillin- and macrolide-resistant pneumococci, Community-acquired methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (Ca-MRSA), the emergence of glycopeptide-resistant staphylococci underline the need for underline the need for therapeutic alternatives. A number of new therapeutic agents, with activity against the above Gram (+) respiratory pathogens, as ceftaroline, ceftopibrole, telavancin, tedizolid have become available, either in clinical trials or have been approved for clinical use. Especially, the development of new oral antibiotics, as nemonaxacin, omadacyclin, cethromycin and solithromycin will give a solution to the lack of oral drugs for outpatient treatment. In the future the clinician needs to optimize the use of old and new antibiotics to treat gram (+) respiratory serious infections. PMID:24878422

  20. Role of BrnQ1 and BrnQ2 in branched-chain amino acid transport and virulence in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Julienne C; Omer, Sameha; Sheldon, Jessica R; Welch, Ian; Heinrichs, David E

    2015-03-01

    The branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs; Ile, Leu, and Val) not only are important nutrients for the growth of Staphylococcus aureus but also are corepressors for CodY, which regulates virulence gene expression, implicating BCAAs as an important link between the metabolic state of the cell and virulence. BCAAs are either synthesized intracellularly or acquired from the environment. S. aureus encodes three putative BCAA transporters, designated BrnQ1, BrnQ2, and BrnQ3; their functions have not yet been formally tested. In this study, we mutated all three brnQ paralogs so as to characterize their substrate specificities and their roles in growth in vitro and in vivo. We demonstrated that in the community-associated, methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) strain USA300, BrnQ1 is involved in uptake of all three BCAAs, BrnQ2 transports Ile, and BrnQ3 does not have a significant role in BCAA transport under the conditions tested. Of the three, only BrnQ1 is essential for USA300 to grow in a chemically defined medium that is limited for Leu or Val. Interestingly, we observed that a brnQ2 mutant grew better than USA300 in media limited for Leu and Val, owing to the fact that this mutation leads to overexpression of brnQ1. In a murine infection model, the brnQ1 mutant was attenuated, but in contrast, brnQ2 mutants had significantly increased virulence compared to that of USA300, a phenotype we suggest is at least partially linked to enhanced in vivo scavenging of Leu and Val through BrnQ1. These data uncover a hitherto-undiscovered connection between nutrient acquisition and virulence in CA-MRSA. PMID:25547798

  1. The therapeutic effect of chlorogenic acid against Staphylococcus aureus infection through sortase A inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin; Bi, Chongwei; Cai, Hongjun; Liu, Bingrun; Zhong, Xiaobo; Deng, Xuming; Wang, Tiedong; Xiang, Hua; Niu, Xiaodi; Wang, Dacheng

    2015-01-01

    The emergence and wide spread of multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) requires the development of new therapeutic agents with alternative modes of action. Anti-virulence strategies are hoped to meet that need. Sortase A (SrtA) has attracted great interest as a potential drug target to treat infections caused by S. aureus, as many of the surface proteins displayed by SrtA function as virulence factors by mediating bacterial adhesion to specific organ tissues, invasion of host cells, and evasion of the host-immune responses. It has been suggested that inhibitors of SrtA might be promising candidates for the treatment and/or prevention of S. aureus infections. In this study, we report that chlorogenic acid (CHA), a natural compound that lacks significant anti-S. aureus activity, inhibit the activity of SrtA in vitro (IC50 = 33.86 ± 5.55 μg/ml) and the binding of S. aureus to fibrinogen (Fg). Using molecular dynamics simulations and mutagenesis assays, we further demonstrate that CHA binds to the binding sites of C184 and G192 in the SrtA. In vivo studies demonstrated that CHA prevent mice from S. aureus-induced renal abscess, resulting in a significant survival advantage. These findings indicate that CHA is a promising therapeutic compound against SrtA during S. aureus infections. PMID:26528244

  2. Three-Dimensional Human Skin Models to Understand Staphylococcus aureus Skin Colonization and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Popov, Lauren; Kovalski, Joanna; Grandi, Guido; Bagnoli, Fabio; Amieva, Manuel R.

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is both a major bacterial pathogen as well as a common member of the human skin microbiota. Due to its widespread prevalence as an asymptomatic skin colonizer and its importance as a source of skin and soft tissue infections, an improved understanding of how S. aureus attaches to, grows within, and breaches the stratified layers of the epidermis is of critical importance. Three-dimensional organotypic human skin culture models are informative and tractable experimental systems for future investigations of the interactions between S. aureus and the multi-faceted skin tissue. We propose that S. aureus virulence factors, primarily appreciated for their role in pathogenesis of invasive infections, play alternative roles in promoting asymptomatic bacterial growth within the skin. Experimental manipulations of these cultures will provide insight into the many poorly understood molecular interactions occurring at the interface between S. aureus and stratified human skin tissue. PMID:24567733

  3. Three-Dimensional Human Skin Models to Understand Staphylococcus aureus Skin Colonization and Infection.

    PubMed

    Popov, Lauren; Kovalski, Joanna; Grandi, Guido; Bagnoli, Fabio; Amieva, Manuel R

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is both a major bacterial pathogen as well as a common member of the human skin microbiota. Due to its widespread prevalence as an asymptomatic skin colonizer and its importance as a source of skin and soft tissue infections, an improved understanding of how S. aureus attaches to, grows within, and breaches the stratified layers of the epidermis is of critical importance. Three-dimensional organotypic human skin culture models are informative and tractable experimental systems for future investigations of the interactions between S. aureus and the multi-faceted skin tissue. We propose that S. aureus virulence factors, primarily appreciated for their role in pathogenesis of invasive infections, play alternative roles in promoting asymptomatic bacterial growth within the skin. Experimental manipulations of these cultures will provide insight into the many poorly understood molecular interactions occurring at the interface between S. aureus and stratified human skin tissue. PMID:24567733

  4. Methamphetamine Alters the Antimicrobial Efficacy of Phagocytic Cells during Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infection

    PubMed Central

    Mihu, Mircea Radu; Roman-Sosa, Jessica; Varshney, Avanish K.; Eugenin, Eliseo A.; Shah, Bhavikkumar P.; Ham Lee, Hiu; Nguyen, Long N.; Guimaraes, Allan J.; Fries, Bettina C.; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Methamphetamine (METH) is a major drug of abuse in the United States and worldwide. Furthermore, Staphylococcus aureus infections and METH use are coemerging public health problems. S. aureus is the single most important bacterial pathogen in infections among injection drug users, with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) being extremely common. Notably, the incidence of SSTI, especially in drug users, is difficult to estimate because such infections are often self-treated. Although there is substantial information on the behavioral and cognitive defects caused by METH in drug users, there is a dearth of knowledge regarding its impact on bacterial infections and immunity. Therefore, we hypothesized that METH exacerbates S. aureus skin infection. Using a murine model of METH administration and wound infection, we demonstrated that METH reduces wound healing and facilitates host-mediated collagen degradation by increased expression and production of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). Additionally, we found that METH induces S. aureus biofilm formation and leads to detrimental effects on the functions of human and murine phagocytic cells, enhancing susceptibility to S. aureus infection. Our findings provide empirical evidence of the adverse impact of METH use on the antimicrobial efficacy of the cells that comprise innate immunity, the initial host response to combat microbial infection. PMID:26507236

  5. The effect of inoculum volume on the microbiologic detection of naturally occurring Staphylococcus aureus intramammary infections.

    PubMed

    Walker, Jennifer B; Rajala-Schultz, Päivi J; DeGraves, Fred J

    2010-09-01

    Currently no standard definitions for the diagnosis of Staphylococcus aureus intramammary infection (IMI) exist. As a result, criteria applied in research to diagnose S. aureus IMIs have varied making comparisons between published works difficult. The goal of the current study was to define the optimal inoculum volume used in the diagnosis of naturally occurring S. aureus IMIs. Microbiologic results from 2 field studies examining S. aureus IMIs were used to examine the effects of inoculum volume on the microbiologic detection of S. aureus. A total of 1,583 milk samples were included in the analysis, and the results of using a 0.01-ml and a 0.1-ml inoculum are presented. Using a 0.01-ml inoculum resulted in a sensitivity of 91% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 88.6-93%) and a specificity of 99.4% (95% CI: 98.6-99.8%). Using the larger 0.1-ml inoculum resulted in a sensitivity of 96.8% (95% CI: 95.2-97.9%) and a specificity of 99.3% (95% CI: 98.4-99.7%). All false-positive samples were from S. aureus-negative quarters in S. aureus-positive cows. There were no false-positive cultures from S. aureus-negative cows. Of the false-negative samples, the majority (77%) were from 6 of the 34 S. aureus-positive quarters. Results from the current study of naturally occurring S. aureus IMIs support the hypothesis that, when using quarter level milk samples, a S. aureus IMI is most accurately diagnosed using a 0.1-ml inoculum. Regardless of inoculum volume, a single quarter sample culture that is positive with S. aureus (>or=1 colony-forming unit) is sufficient to diagnose a S. aureus IMI. PMID:20807927

  6. Evidence for Community Transmission of Community-Associated but Not Health-Care-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Strains Linked to Social and Material Deprivation: Spatial Analysis of Cross-sectional Data

    PubMed Central

    Tosas Auguet, Olga; Betley, Jason R.; Stabler, Richard A.; Patel, Amita; Ioannou, Avgousta; Marbach, Helene; Hearn, Pasco; Aryee, Anna; Goldenberg, Simon D.; Otter, Jonathan A.; Desai, Nergish; Karadag, Tacim; Grundy, Chris; Gaunt, Michael W.; Cooper, Ben S.; Edgeworth, Jonathan D.; Kypraios, Theodore

    2016-01-01

    Background Identifying and tackling the social determinants of infectious diseases has become a public health priority following the recognition that individuals with lower socioeconomic status are disproportionately affected by infectious diseases. In many parts of the world, epidemiologically and genotypically defined community-associated (CA) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains have emerged to become frequent causes of hospital infection. The aim of this study was to use spatial models with adjustment for area-level hospital attendance to determine the transmission niche of genotypically defined CA- and health-care-associated (HA)-MRSA strains across a diverse region of South East London and to explore a potential link between MRSA carriage and markers of social and material deprivation. Methods and Findings This study involved spatial analysis of cross-sectional data linked with all MRSA isolates identified by three National Health Service (NHS) microbiology laboratories between 1 November 2011 and 29 February 2012. The cohort of hospital-based NHS microbiology diagnostic services serves 867,254 usual residents in the Lambeth, Southwark, and Lewisham boroughs in South East London, United Kingdom (UK). Isolates were classified as HA- or CA-MRSA based on whole genome sequencing. All MRSA cases identified over 4 mo within the three-borough catchment area (n = 471) were mapped to small geographies and linked to area-level aggregated socioeconomic and demographic data. Disease mapping and ecological regression models were used to infer the most likely transmission niches for each MRSA genetic classification and to describe the spatial epidemiology of MRSA in relation to social determinants. Specifically, we aimed to identify demographic and socioeconomic population traits that explain cross-area extra variation in HA- and CA-MRSA relative risks following adjustment for hospital attendance data. We explored the potential for associations with

  7. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: Prevalence and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Beam, Joel W; Buckley, Bernadette

    2006-01-01

    Reference/Citation: Salgado CD, Farr BM, Calfee DP. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: a meta-analysis of prevalence and risk factors. Clin Infect Dis.20033613113912522744. Clinical Question: What are the prevalence rates and risk factors associated with community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)? Data Sources: Studies were identified by searching MEDLINE (January 1966–February 2002) and abstracts from scientific meetings (1996–2001). Reviews of citations and reference lists were performed to identify additional eligible studies. The search terms included Staphylococcus aureus , infection, colonization, methicillin resistance, community-acquired, community-onset, prevalence, frequency, and risk factors. Study Selection: The search was limited to English-language investigations identified from the electronic and manual searches. Studies were divided into 2 groups, as follows: group 1, retrospective or prospective studies that reported the prevalence of community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA) among hospital patients who were colonized (presence of bacteria without infection) or infected with MRSA; and group 2, studies that reported the prevalence of MRSA colonization in the community. The studies were evaluated independently by 2 authors, and case reports were excluded. Data Extraction: Data extraction and study quality assessment procedures were not fully explained. The outcome measures for hospital patients were definitions of CA-MRSA used in the study, prevalence of CA-MRSA, sample size, number and type of risk factors assessed, and number of patients with ≥1 health care–associated risk factor. The studies were grouped based on type, retrospective or prospective. The pooled prevalence of CA-MRSA was calculated for each group (retrospective or prospective) and was limited to the prevalence among patients with MRSA. The proportion of patients who reported ≥1 health care–associated risk factor was also

  8. Epidemiological and molecular characteristics of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Turkey: A multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Dündar, Devrim; Willke, Ayse; Sayan, Murat; Koc, Meliha Meric; Akan, Ozay Arıkan; Sumerkan, Bulent; Saltoglu, Nese; Yaman, Akgun; Ayaz, Celal; Koksal, Iftihar

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the epidemiological and molecular features of clinical meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates in Turkey. MRSA isolates were collected from six regions of Turkey. The mecA and nuc genes were detected by PCR. Antimicrobial susceptibilities were determined by the disk diffusion method. Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) and staphylococcal protein A (spa) typing were performed by the sequencing method for 270 randomly selected MRSA isolates. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) definition was used for epidemiological diagnosis of community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA). Resistance rates of MRSA to ciprofloxacin, gentamicin, clindamycin, erythromycin, rifampicin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and tetracycline were 93.4%, 81.2%, 38.5%, 57.8%, 93.9%, 1.1% and 93.1%, respectively. The most frequent SCCmec type was SCCmec III (91.1%). SCCmec type IV was found in 5.2% of the isolates. The most frequent spa type was t030 (81.1%). Five isolates were CA-MRSA if only the epidemiological definition was used (5/725; 0.7%). Two isolates were defined as CA-MRSA both by epidemiological features and SCCmec typing (2/270; 0.7%). Of 14 SCCmec type IV isolates, 12 were not defined as CA-MRSA by epidemiological features. In conclusion, this is the most comprehensive multicentre study in Turkey investigating MRSA using both epidemiological and genotypic features. The CA-MRSA rate is low in Turkey. Combined use of epidemiological and genotypic methods is the most accurate approach for the diagnosis of CA-MRSA. PMID:27530838

  9. AraC-Type Regulator Rsp Adapts Staphylococcus aureus Gene Expression to Acute Infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Tianming; He, Lei; Song, Yan; Villaruz, Amer E; Joo, Hwang-Soo; Liu, Qian; Zhu, Yuanjun; Wang, Yanan; Qin, Juanxiu; Otto, Michael; Li, Min

    2016-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen that can cause two categories of severe infections. Acute infections are characterized by pronounced toxin production, while chronic infections often involve biofilm formation. However, it is poorly understood how S. aureus controls the expression of genes associated with acute versus biofilm-associated virulence. We here identified an AraC-type transcriptional regulator, Rsp, that promotes the production of key toxins while repressing major biofilm-associated genes and biofilm formation. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis and modeling of regulatory networks indicated that upregulation of the accessory gene regulator (Agr) and downregulation of the ica operon coding for the biofilm exopolysaccharide polysaccharide intercellular adhesin (PIA) were central to the regulatory impact of Rsp on virulence. Notably, the Rsp protein directly bound to the agrP2 and icaADBC promoters, resulting in strongly increased levels of the Agr-controlled toxins phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs) and alpha-toxin and reduced production of PIA. Accordingly, Rsp was essential for the development of bacteremia and skin infection, representing major types of acute S. aureus infection. Our findings give important insight into how S. aureus adapts the expression of its broad arsenal of virulence genes to promote different types of disease manifestations and identify the Rsp regulator as a potential target for strategies to control acute S. aureus infection. PMID:26712209

  10. Clinical Characteristics of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infection for Chronic Periprosthetic Hip and Knee Infection

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Dong Jin; Moon, Kyoung Ho; Kim, Myung Ku; Kwon, Dae Gyu

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Deep infection after hip and knee arthroplasty is a serious complication and is difficult to treat due to its toxicity. The aims of our study were to find out the differences of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) infection after hip and knee arthroplasty focusing on clinical course and laboratory findings. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed 61 staphylococcal infection cases after hip and knee arthroplasty (MSSA in 25 patients, MRSA in 36 patients). Vital signs, laboratory tests, microbiology and clinical courses were analyzed. The average follow-up period was 3.8 years (range, 2 to 10.1 years). Results At initial visit, MRSA group showed significant higher erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein (CRP) and neutrophil percentage. The average duration for the normalization of CRP was longer in MRSA group (MRSA: 36.7±25.1 days, MSSA: 24.7±13.6 days; P=0.008). The mean interval between staging operation was longer in MRSA group (MRSA: mean 8.7 weeks [range, 6.4 to 21.4 weeks], MSSA: mean 6.8 weeks [range, 6 to 13.1 weeks]; P=0.012). MRSA group (13.9%) revealed higher recurrence rate than MSSA group (4%). Two patients (5.6%) from MRSA group expired by sepsis. One limb amputation (2.7%) was carried out in MRSA group. Conclusion MRSA infection after arthroplasty showed more toxic serologic parameter and poorer prognosis. Aggressive treatment should be considered for MRSA infection following arthroplasty.

  11. Efficacy of dicloxacillin-coated polyurethane catheters in preventing subcutaneous Staphylococcus aureus infection in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Sherertz, R J; Forman, D M; Solomon, D D

    1989-01-01

    In a mouse model, dicloxacillin-coated polyurethane catheters or control (uncoated) catheters were placed subcutaneously and then Staphylococcus aureus was inoculated at the time of insertion, 24 or 48 h later. The in vivo half-life of the antibiotic was 11 to 16 h. When 10(5) CFU of S. aureus were inoculated at the time of catheter insertion, dicloxacillin-coated catheters kept the number of S. aureus removed from catheters by sonication below 10(2) CFU at 12, 24, 48, and 96 h after inoculation compared with titers greater than 10(3.5) CFU for control catheters (P less than 0.05). When S. aureus was inoculated 24 h after catheter insertion, control catheters averaged greater than 10(2) CFU of S. aureus removed compared with less than 10(1.5) CFU for the dicloxacillin-coated catheters (P less than 0.05). No difference was found between coated and control catheters when S. aureus was inoculated 48 h after catheter insertion, but S. aureus titers averaged less than 10(2) CFU for all experimental groups. Our data suggest that in mice, regional prophylaxis of S. aureus subcutaneous space infection is feasible with catheters coated with dicloxacillin and that the presence of antibiotic is only necessary for the first 24 to 48 h. PMID:2802545

  12. High prevalence of hospital-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the community in Portugal: evidence for the blurring of community-hospital boundaries.

    PubMed

    Tavares, A; Miragaia, M; Rolo, J; Coelho, C; de Lencastre, H

    2013-10-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a leading cause of infection in the community (CA-MRSA), but in spite of its relevance, no data exist concerning its epidemiology in Portugal. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the prevalence, population structure, and origin of MRSA in the Portuguese community. A total of 527 isolates, both methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) and MRSA, were collected from individuals with no healthcare-related risk factors attending 16 healthcare institutions in Portugal. Isolates were characterized for the presence of mecA, Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), and arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME), and by staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), spa, and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Susceptibility to a panel of 13 antibiotics was tested. Isolates relatedness was analyzed by goeBURST and BURP. We found a high frequency (21.6%) of MRSA in the community. However, only 11.4% of the isolates belonged to typical CA-MRSA epidemic clones (USA300, USA400, USA700, Southwest Pacific, European, and ST398). The remaining isolates, which constituted the great majority (88.6%), belonged to hospital-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA) epidemic clones, namely, to the EMRSA-15 clone (77.2%). PVL was rare and carried by 17 isolates only (five MRSA and 12 MSSA). In the whole collection, some MRSA and MSSA were highly related. The high frequency of MRSA in the community in Portugal seems to result mainly from dissemination from the hospital. They might also have emerged from an extant MSSA population, by SCCmec acquisition, or MRSA clonal introduction from abroad. PMID:23604782

  13. β-Lactams Interfering with PBP1 Induce Panton-Valentine Leukocidin Expression by Triggering sarA and rot Global Regulators of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Dumitrescu, Oana; Choudhury, Priya; Boisset, Sandrine; Badiou, Cédric; Bes, Michele; Benito, Yvonne; Wolz, Christiane; Vandenesch, François; Etienne, Jerome; Cheung, Ambrose L.; Bowden, Maria Gabriela; Lina, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    Previous articles reported that beta-lactam antibiotics increase the expression of Staphylococcus aureus Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) by activating its transcription. We investigated the mechanisms underlying the inductor effect of beta-lactams on PVL expression by determining targets and regulatory pathways possibly implicated in this process. We measured PVL production in the presence of oxacillin (nonselective), imipenem (penicillin-binding protein 1 [PBP1] selective), cefotaxime (PBP2 selective), cefaclore (PBP3 selective), and cefoxitin (PBP4 selective). In vitro, we observed increased PVL production consistent with luk-PV mRNA levels that were 20 to 25 times higher for community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) cultures treated with PBP1-binding oxacillin and imipenem than for cultures treated with other beta-lactams or no antibiotic at all. This effect was also observed in vivo, with increased PVL mRNA levels in lung tissues from CA-MRSA-infected mice treated with imipenem but not cefoxitin. To confirm the involvement of PBP1 inhibition in this pathway, PBP1 depletion by use of an inducible pbp1 antisense RNA showed a dose-dependent relationship between the level of pbp1 antisense RNA and the luk-PV mRNA level. Upon imipenem treatment of exponential-phase cultures, we observed an increased sarA mRNA level after 30 min of incubation followed by a decreased rot mRNA level after 1 to 4 h of incubation. Unlike the agr and saeRS positive regulators, which were nonessential for PVL induction by beta-lactams, the sarA (positive) and rot (negative) PVL regulators were necessary for PVL induction by imipenem. Our results suggest that antibiotics binding to PBP1 increase PVL expression by modulating sarA and rot, which are essential mediators of the inductor effect of beta-lactams on PVL expression. PMID:21502633

  14. A privileged intraphagocyte niche is responsible for disseminated infection of Staphylococcus aureus in a zebrafish model

    PubMed Central

    Prajsnar, Tomasz K; Hamilton, Ruth; Garcia-Lara, Jorge; McVicker, Gareth; Williams, Alexander; Boots, Michael; Foster, Simon J; Renshaw, Stephen A

    2012-01-01

    The innate immune system is the primary defence against the versatile pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus. How this organism is able to avoid immune killing and cause infections is poorly understood. Using an established larval zebrafish infection model, we have shown that overwhelming infection is due to subversion of phagocytes by staphylococci, allowing bacteria to evade killing and found foci of disease. Larval zebrafish coinfected with two S. aureus strains carrying different fluorescent reporter gene fusions (but otherwise isogenic) had bacterial lesions, at the time of host death, containing predominantly one strain. Quantitative data using two marked strains revealed that the strain ratios, during overwhelming infection, were often skewed towards the extremes, with one strain predominating. Infection with passaged bacterial clones revealed the phenomenon not to bedue to adventitious mutations acquired by the pathogen. After infection of the host, all bacteria are internalized by phagocytes and the skewing of population ratios is absolutely dependent on the presence of phagocytes. Mathematical modelling of pathogen population dynamics revealed the data patterns are consistent with the hypothesis that a small number of infected phagocytes serve as an intracellular reservoir for S. aureus, which upon release leads to disseminated infection. Strategies to specifically alter neutrophil/macrophage numbers were used to map the potential subpopulation of phagocytes acting as a pathogen reservoir, revealing neutrophils as the likely ‘niche’. Subsequently in a murine sepsis model, S. aureus abscesses in kidneys were also found to be predominantly clonal, therefore likely founded by an individual cell, suggesting a potential mechanism analogous to the zebrafish model with few protected niches. These findings add credence to the argument that S. aureus control regimes should recognize both the intracellular as well as extracellular facets of the S. aureus life cycle

  15. Impacts of enterotoxin gene cluster-encoded superantigens on local and systemic experimental Staphylococcus aureus infections.

    PubMed

    Nowrouzian, F L; Ali, A; Badiou, C; Dauwalder, O; Lina, G; Josefsson, E

    2015-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is both a component of the normal skin flora and an important pathogen. It expresses a range of recognized and putative virulence factors, such as enterotoxins with superantigenic properties. Several superantigen genes, i.e., seg, sei, selm, seln, and selo, are encoded by the enterotoxin gene cluster (egc), which is found in the majority of S. aureus isolates. Carriage of egc is associated with fitness of S. aureus in the gut microbiota, but it is not known if it contributes to pathogenicity. We constructed egc+ (functional for the seg, selm, and selo genes) and isogenic egc- S. aureus mutants, and investigated their virulence profiles in murine infection models. No effect of egc was seen in a local skin and soft tissue infection model, but in an invasive infection model, increased weight loss was observed after infection with the egc+ as compared to the egc- mutant. Mortality and arthritis were not affected by egc status. Our data suggest that egc has limited effects on the virulence of S. aureus. It may primarily function as a colonization factor increasing commensal fitness, although it might have some aggravating effects on the infection when the bacteria reach the blood. PMID:25864191

  16. Biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus isolates from skin and soft tissue infections.

    PubMed

    Kwiecinski, Jakub; Kahlmeter, Gunnar; Jin, Tao

    2015-05-01

    Many diseases caused by Staphylococcus aureus are associated with biofilm formation. However, the ability of S. aureus isolates from skin and soft tissue infections to form biofilms has not yet been investigated. We tested 160 isolates from patients with various skin infections for biofilm-forming capacity in different growth media. All the isolates formed biofilms, the extent of which depended on the type of growth medium. The thickest biofilms were formed when both plasma and glucose were present in the broth; in this case, S. aureus incorporated host fibrin into the biofilm's matrix. There were no differences in the biofilm formation between isolates from different types of skin infections, except for a particularly good biofilm formation by isolates from diabetic wounds and a weaker biofilm formation by isolates from impetigo. In conclusion, biofilm formation is a universal behavior of S. aureus isolates from skin infections. In some cases, such as in diabetic wounds, a particularly strong biofilm formation most likely contributes to the chronic and recurrent character of the infection. Additionally, as S. aureus apparently uses host fibrin as part of the biofilm structure, we suggest that plasma should be included more frequently in in vitro biofilm studies. PMID:25586078

  17. Immunological Mechanisms Underlying the Genetic Predisposition to Severe Staphylococcus aureus Infection in the Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    von Köckritz-Blickwede, Maren; Rohde, Manfred; Oehmcke, Sonja; Miller, Lloyd S.; Cheung, Ambrose L.; Herwald, Heiko; Foster, Simon; Medina, Eva

    2008-01-01

    Host genetic variations play a significant role in conferring predisposition to infection. In this study, we examined the immune mechanisms underlying the host genetic predisposition to severe Staphylococcus aureus infection in different mouse strains. Whereas C57BL/6 mice were the most resistant in terms of control of bacterial growth and survival, A/J, DBA/2, and BALB/c mice were highly susceptible and succumbed to infection shortly after bacterial inoculation. Other strains (C3H/HeN, CBA, and C57BL/10) exhibited intermediate susceptibility levels. Susceptibility of mice to S. aureus was associated with an inability to limit bacterial growth in the kidneys and development of pathology. Resistance to S. aureus in C57BL/6 mice was dependent on innate immune mechanisms because Rag2-IL2Rγ−/− C57BL/6 mice, which are deficient in B, T, and NK cells, were also resistant to infection. Indeed, neutrophil depletion or inhibition of neutrophil recruitment rendered C57BL/6 mice completely susceptible to S. aureus, indicating that neutrophils are essential for the observed resistance. Although neutrophil function is not inhibited in A/J mice, expression of neutrophil chemoattractants KC and MIP-2 peaked earlier in the kidneys of C57BL/6 mice than in A/J mice, indicating that a delay in neutrophil recruitment to the site of infection may underlie the increased susceptibility of A/J mice to S. aureus. PMID:18974303

  18. Infective endocarditis due to Staphylococcus aureus: 59 prospectively identified cases with follow-up.

    PubMed

    Fowler, V G; Sanders, L L; Kong, L K; McClelland, R S; Gottlieb, G S; Li, J; Ryan, T; Sexton, D J; Roussakis, G; Harrell, L J; Corey, G R

    1999-01-01

    Fifty-nine consecutive patients with definite Staphylococcus aureus infective endocarditis (IE) by the Duke criteria were prospectively identified at our hospital over a 3-year period. Twenty-seven (45.8%) of the 59 patients had hospital-acquired S. aureus bacteremia. The presumed source of infection was an intravascular device in 50.8% of patients. Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) revealed evidence of IE in 20 patients (33.9%), whereas transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) revealed evidence of IE in 48 patients (81.4%). The outcome for patients was strongly associated with echocardiographic findings: 13 (68.4%) of 19 patients with vegetations visualized by TTE had an embolic event or died of their infection vs. five (16.7%) of 30 patients whose vegetations were visualized only by TEE (P < .01). Most patients with S. aureus IE developed their infection as a consequence of a nosocomial or intravascular device-related infection. TEE established the diagnosis of S. aureus IE in many instances when TTE was nondiagnostic. Visualization of vegetations by TTE may provide prognostic information for patients with S. aureus IE. PMID:10028079

  19. In Vitro and In Vivo Models of Staphylococcus aureus Endophthalmitis Implicate Specific Nutrients in Ocular Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sadaka, Ama; Palmer, Kelli; Suzuki, Takashi; Gilmore, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To define global transcriptional responses of Staphylococcus aureus and its codY mutant (CodY is a transcription regulator of virulence and metabolic genes in response to branched-chain amino acids) when growing in bovine aqueous (AH) and vitreous humor (VH) in vitro, and to investigate the impact of codY deletion on S. aureus virulence in a novel murine anterior chamber (AC) infection model. Methods For the in vitro model, differential transcriptomic gene expression of S. aureus and its codY mutant grown in chemically defined medium (CDM), AH, and VH was analyzed. Furthermore, the strains were inoculated into the AC of mice. Changes in bacterial growth, electroretinography and inflammation scores were monitored. Results Bovine AH and VH provide sufficient nutrition for S. aureus growth in vitro. Transcriptome analysis identified 72 unique open reading frames differentially regulated ≥10-fold between CDM, AH, and VH. In the AC model, we found comparable growth of the codY mutant and wild type strains in vivo. Average inflammation scores and retinal function were significantly worse for codY mutant-infected eyes at 24 h post-infection. Conclusion Our in vitro bovine AH and VH models identified likely nutrient sources for S. aureus in the ocular milieu. The in vivo model suggests that control of branched-chain amino acid availability has therapeutic potential in limiting S. aureus endophthalmitis severity. PMID:25340474

  20. Practices and Procedures to Prevent the Transmission of Skin and Soft Tissue Infections in High School Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Stephanie A.; Long, Marcus; Gaebelein, Claude J.; Martin, Madeline S.; Hogan, Patrick G.; Yetter, John

    2013-01-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI) are frequent in student athletes and are often caused by community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA). We evaluated the awareness of CA-MRSA among high school coaches and athletic directors in Missouri (n = 4,408) and evaluated hygiene practices affecting SSTI transmission. Of 1,642 (37%) respondents, 61% received MRSA educational information during the past year and 32% indicated their school had written guidelines for managing SSTI in athletes. Coaches and athletic directors aware of written guidelines reported a lower incidence of SSTI in student athletes (26%) compared to those without written policies (34%, p=0.03). When confronted with SSTI, 49% of respondents referred student athletes to the school nurse or a physician. A relationship exists between school policies for SSTI management and lower incidence of SSTI. Educational initiatives by school nurses in conjunction with athletic staff may lead to practices that limit SSTI in this at-risk population. PMID:22472636

  1. Predictive Factors for Metastatic Infection in Patients With Bacteremia Caused by Methicillin-Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Fumiya; Hosaka, Yumiko; Hoshina, Tokio; Tamura, Kumi; Nakaharai, Kazuhiko; Kato, Tetsuro; Nakazawa, Yasushi; Yoshida, Masaki; Hori, Seiji

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Metastatic infections such as infective endocarditis and psoas abscess are serious complications of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia because failure to identify these infections may result in bacteremia relapse or poor prognosis. In the present study, we determined the predictive factors for metastatic infection due to methicillin-sensitive S. aureus bacteremia. Methods: A retrospective cohort study was conducted among patients with methicillin-sensitive S. aureus bacteremia at the Jikei University Hospital between January 2008 and December 2012. Factors analyzed included the underlying disease, initial antimicrobial treatment and primary site of infection. Results: During the 5-year study period, 73 patients met the inclusion criteria and were assessed. The most common primary site of bacteremia was catheter-related bloodstream infection (25/73 [34.2%]). Metastatic infection occurred in 14 of 73 patients (19.2%) (infective endocarditis [3], septic pulmonary abscess [3], spondylitis [4], psoas abscess [4], epidural abscess [3] and septic arthritis [1]). Six patients had multiple metastatic infections. Multivariate analysis revealed that the predictive factors associated with the development of metastatic infection were a delay in appropriate antimicrobial treatment of >48 hours, persistent fever for >72 hours after starting antibiotic treatment and lowest C-reactive protein levels of >3 mg/dL during 2 weeks after the onset of bacteremia. Conclusions: This study demonstrated that additional diagnostic tests should be conducted to identify metastatic infection, particularly in patients with delayed antimicrobial treatment, persistent fever and persistently high C-reactive protein levels. PMID:25250988

  2. Distinct Pathogenesis and Host Responses during Infection of C. elegans by P. aeruginosa and S. aureus

    PubMed Central

    Irazoqui, Javier E.; Troemel, Emily R.; Feinbaum, Rhonda L.; Luhachack, Lyly G.; Cezairliyan, Brent O.; Ausubel, Frederick M.

    2010-01-01

    The genetically tractable model host Caenorhabditis elegans provides a valuable tool to dissect host-microbe interactions in vivo. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus utilize virulence factors involved in human disease to infect and kill C. elegans. Despite much progress, virtually nothing is known regarding the cytopathology of infection and the proximate causes of nematode death. Using light and electron microscopy, we found that P. aeruginosa infection entails intestinal distention, accumulation of an unidentified extracellular matrix and P. aeruginosa-synthesized outer membrane vesicles in the gut lumen and on the apical surface of intestinal cells, the appearance of abnormal autophagosomes inside intestinal cells, and P. aeruginosa intracellular invasion of C. elegans. Importantly, heat-killed P. aeruginosa fails to elicit a significant host response, suggesting that the C. elegans response to P. aeruginosa is activated either by heat-labile signals or pathogen-induced damage. In contrast, S. aureus infection causes enterocyte effacement, intestinal epithelium destruction, and complete degradation of internal organs. S. aureus activates a strong transcriptional response in C. elegans intestinal epithelial cells, which aids host survival during infection and shares elements with human innate responses. The C. elegans genes induced in response to S. aureus are mostly distinct from those induced by P. aeruginosa. In contrast to P. aeruginosa, heat-killed S. aureus activates a similar response as live S. aureus, which appears to be independent of the single C. elegans Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) protein. These data suggest that the host response to S. aureus is possibly mediated by pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Because our data suggest that neither the P. aeruginosa nor the S. aureus–triggered response requires canonical TLR signaling, they imply the existence of unidentified mechanisms for pathogen detection in C. elegans, with

  3. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) contribute to S. aureus orthopedic biofilm infection

    PubMed Central

    Heim, Cortney E.; Vidlak, Debbie; Scherr, Tyler D.; Kozel, Jessica A.; Holzapfel, Melissa; Muirhead, David E.; Kielian, Tammy

    2014-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a heterogeneous population of immature monocytes and granulocytes that are potent inhibitors of T cell activation. A role for MDSCs in bacterial infections has only recently emerged and nothing is known about MDSC function in the context of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) infection. Since S. aureus biofilms are capable of subverting immune-mediated clearance, we examined whether MDSCs could play a role in this process. CD11b+Gr-1+ MDSCs represented the main cellular infiltrate during S. aureus orthopedic biofilm infection, accounting for over 75% of the CD45+ population. Biofilm-associated MDSCs inhibited T cell proliferation and cytokine production, which correlated with a paucity of T cell infiltrates at the infection site. Analysis of FACS-purified MDSCs recovered from S. aureus biofilms revealed increased Arg-1, iNOS, and IL-10 expression, key mediators of MDSC suppressive activity. Targeted depletion of MDSCs and neutrophils using the mAb 1A8 (anti-Ly6G) improved bacterial clearance by enhancing the intrinsic pro-inflammatory attributes of infiltrating monocytes and macrophages. Furthermore, the ability of monocytes/macrophages to promote biofilm clearance in the absence of MDSC action was revealed with RB6-C85 (anti-Gr-1 or anti-Ly6G/Ly6C) administration, which resulted in significantly increased S. aureus burdens both locally and in the periphery, since effector Ly-6C monocytes and by extension, mature macrophages, were also depleted. Collectively, these results are the first to demonstrate that MDSCs are key contributors to the chronicity of S. aureus biofilm infection, as their immunosuppressive function prevents monocyte/macrophage proinflammatory activity, which facilitates biofilm persistence. PMID:24646737

  4. Staphylococcal Esx Proteins Modulate Apoptosis and Release of Intracellular Staphylococcus aureus during Infection in Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Korea, Charalampia G.; Balsamo, Giuliana; Pezzicoli, Alfredo; Merakou, Christina; Tavarini, Simona; Bagnoli, Fabio; Serruto, Davide

    2014-01-01

    The opportunistic pathogen Staphylococcus aureus is one of the major causes of health care-associated infections. S. aureus is primarily an extracellular pathogen, but it was recently reported to invade and replicate in several host cell types. The ability of S. aureus to persist within cells has been implicated in resistance to antimicrobials and recurrent infections. However, few staphylococcal proteins that mediate intracellular survival have been identified. Here we examine if EsxA and EsxB, substrates of the ESAT-6-like secretion system (Ess), are important during intracellular S. aureus infection. The Esx proteins are required for staphylococcal virulence, but their functions during infection are unclear. While isogenic S. aureus esxA and esxB mutants were not defective for epithelial cell invasion in vitro, a significant increase in early/late apoptosis was observed in esxA mutant-infected cells compared to wild-type-infected cells. Impeding secretion of EsxA by deleting C-terminal residues of the protein also resulted in a significant increase of epithelial cell apoptosis. Furthermore, cells transfected with esxA showed an increased protection from apoptotic cell death. A double mutant lacking both EsxA and EsxB also induced increased apoptosis but, remarkably, was unable to escape from cells as efficiently as the single mutants or the wild type. Thus, using in vitro models of intracellular staphylococcal infection, we demonstrate that EsxA interferes with host cell apoptotic pathways and, together with EsxB, mediates the release of S. aureus from the host cell. PMID:25047846

  5. Novel characteristics of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains belonging to multilocus sequence type 59 in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tomomi; Higuchi, Wataru; Zaraket, Hassan; Otsuka, Taketo; Baranovich, Tatiana; Enany, Shymaa; Saito, Kohei; Isobe, Hirokazu; Dohmae, Soshi; Ozaki, Kyoko; Takano, Misao; Iwao, Yasuhisa; Shibuya, Michiko; Okubo, Takeshi; Yabe, Shizuka; Shi, Da; Reva, Ivan; Teng, Lee-Jene; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2008-03-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) strains, which often produce Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL), are increasingly noted worldwide. In this study, we examined 42 MRSA strains (25 PVL-positive [PVL+] strains and 17 PVL-negative [PVL(-)] strains) isolated in Taiwan for their molecular characteristics. The PVL+ MRSA strains included CA-MRSA strains with multilocus sequence type (ST) 59 (major PVL+ MRSA in Taiwan), its variants, and worldwide CA-MRSA ST30 strains. The PVL(-) MRSA strains included the pandemic Hungarian MRSA ST239 strain, the Hungarian MRSA ST239 variant, MRSA ST59 (largely hospital-acquired MRSA strains) and its variants, the pandemic New York/Japan MRSA ST5 strain (Japanese type), and the MRSA ST8 strain. The major PVL+ CA-MRSA ST59 strain possessed a tetracycline resistance-conferring (tetK positive) penicillinase plasmid and a drug resistance gene cluster (a possible composite transposon) for multidrug resistance. Moreover, it carried a novel staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) with two distinct ccrC genes (ccrC2-C8). This SCCmec (previously named SCCmec type V(T)) was tentatively designated SCCmec type VII. Sequencing of the PVL genes revealed the polymorphisms, and the PVL+ CA-MRSA ST59 strain possessed the ST59-specific PVL gene sequence. The data suggest that a significant amount of clonal spread is occurring in Taiwan and that the major PVL+ CA-MRSA ST59 Taiwan strain exhibits unique genetic characteristics, such as a novel SCCmec type and an ST59-specific PVL gene sequence. PMID:18086843

  6. Short Term, Low Dose Simvastatin Pretreatment Alters Memory Immune Function Following Secondary Staphylococcus aureus Infection.

    PubMed

    Smelser, Lisa K; Walker, Callum; Burns, Erin M; Curry, Michael; Black, Nathanael; Metzler, Jennifer A; McDowell, Susan A; Bruns, Heather A

    2016-01-01

    Statins are potent modulators of immune responses, resulting in their ability to enhance host survival from primary bacterial infections. Alterations in primary immune responses that may be beneficial for survival following infection may also result in alterations in the generation of the immunologic memory response and subsequently affect immune responses mounted during secondary bacterial infection. In this study, we report that levels of total serum IgG2c, following primary infection, were decreased in simvastatin pretreated mice, and investigate the effect of simvastatin treatment, prior to primary infection, on immune responses activated during secondary S. aureus infection. A secondary infection model was implemented whereby simvastatin pretreated and control mice were reinfected with S. aureus 14 days after primary infection, with no additional simvastatin treatment, and assessed for survival and alterations in immune function. While survivability to secondary S. aureus infection was not different between simvastatin pretreated and control mice, memory B and T lymphocyte functions were altered. Memory B cells, isolated 14 days after secondary infection, from simvastatin pretreated mice and stimulated ex vivo produced increased levels of IgG1 compared to memory B cells isolated from control mice, while levels of IgM and IgG2c remained similar. Furthermore, memory B and T lymphocytes from simvastatin pretreated mice exhibited a decreased proliferative response when stimulated ex vivo compared to memory cells isolated from control mice. These findings demonstrate the ability of a short term, low dose simvastatin treatment to modulate memory immune function. PMID:26927218

  7. Systemic Staphylococcus aureus infection mediated by Candida albicans hyphal invasion of mucosal tissue

    PubMed Central

    Schlecht, Lisa Marie; Peters, Brian M.; Krom, Bastiaan P.; Freiberg, Jeffrey A.; Hänsch, Gertrud M.; Filler, Scott G.

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus are often co-isolated in cases of biofilm-associated infections. C. albicans can cause systemic disease through morphological switch from the rounded yeast to the invasive hyphal form. Alternatively, systemic S. aureus infections arise from seeding through breaks in host epithelial layers although many patients have no documented portal of entry. We describe a novel strategy by which S. aureus is able to invade host tissue and disseminate via adherence to the invasive hyphal elements of Candida albicans. In vitro and ex vivo findings demonstrate a specific binding of the staphylococci to the candida hyphal elements. The C. albicans cell wall adhesin Als3p binds to multiple staphylococcal adhesins. Furthermore, Als3p is required for C. albicans to transport S. aureus into the tissue and cause a disseminated infection in an oral co-colonization model. These findings suggest that C. albicans can facilitate the invasion of S. aureus across mucosal barriers, leading to systemic infection in co-colonized patients. PMID:25332378

  8. Staphylococcus aureus infection induces protein A–mediated immune evasion in humans

    PubMed Central

    Pauli, Noel T.; Kim, Hwan Keun; Falugi, Fabiana; Huang, Min; Dulac, John; Henry Dunand, Carole; Zheng, Nai-Ying; Kaur, Kaval; Andrews, Sarah F.; Huang, Yunping; DeDent, Andrea; Frank, Karen M.; Charnot-Katsikas, Angella; Schneewind, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacterial infection commonly results in chronic or recurrent disease, suggesting that humoral memory responses are hampered. Understanding how S. aureus subverts the immune response is critical for the rescue of host natural humoral immunity and vaccine development. S. aureus expresses the virulence factor Protein A (SpA) on all clinical isolates, and SpA has been shown in mice to expand and ablate variable heavy 3 (VH3) idiotype B cells. The effects of SpA during natural infection, however, have not been addressed. Acutely activated B cells, or plasmablasts (PBs), were analyzed to dissect the ongoing immune response to infection through the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The B cells that were activated by infection had a highly limited response. When screened against multiple S. aureus antigens, only high-affinity binding to SpA was observed. Consistently, PBs underwent affinity maturation, but their B cell receptors demonstrated significant bias toward the VH3 idiotype. These data suggest that the superantigenic activity of SpA leads to immunodominance, limiting host responses to other S. aureus virulence factors that would be necessary for protection and memory formation. PMID:25348152

  9. Infectious Dose Dictates the Host Response during Staphylococcus aureus Orthopedic-Implant Biofilm Infection.

    PubMed

    Vidlak, Debbie; Kielian, Tammy

    2016-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of prosthetic joint infections (PJIs) that are typified by biofilm formation. Given the diversity of S. aureus strains and their propensity to cause community- or hospital-acquired infections, we investigated whether the immune response and biofilm growth during PJI were conserved among distinct S. aureus clinical isolates. Three S. aureus strains representing USA200 (UAMS-1), USA300 (LAC), and USA400 (MW2) lineages were equally effective at biofilm formation in a mouse model of PJI and elicited similar leukocyte infiltrates and cytokine/chemokine profiles. Another factor that may influence the course of PJI is infectious dose. In particular, higher bacterial inocula could accelerate biofilm formation and alter the immune response, making it difficult to discern underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. To address this issue, we compared the effects of two bacterial doses (10(3) or 10(5) CFU) on inflammatory responses in interleukin-12p40 (IL-12p40) knockout mice that were previously shown to have reduced myeloid-derived suppressor cell recruitment concomitant with bacterial clearance after low-dose challenge (10(3) CFU). Increasing the infectious dose of LAC to 10(5) CFU negated these differences in IL-12p40 knockout animals, demonstrating the importance of bacterial inoculum on infection outcome. Collectively, these observations highlight the importance of considering infectious dose when assessing immune responsiveness, whereas biofilm formation during PJI is conserved among clinical isolates commonly used in mouse S. aureus infection models. PMID:27091926

  10. Staphylococcus aureus infection induces protein A-mediated immune evasion in humans.

    PubMed

    Pauli, Noel T; Kim, Hwan Keun; Falugi, Fabiana; Huang, Min; Dulac, John; Henry Dunand, Carole; Zheng, Nai-Ying; Kaur, Kaval; Andrews, Sarah F; Huang, Yunping; DeDent, Andrea; Frank, Karen M; Charnot-Katsikas, Angella; Schneewind, Olaf; Wilson, Patrick C

    2014-11-17

    Staphylococcus aureus bacterial infection commonly results in chronic or recurrent disease, suggesting that humoral memory responses are hampered. Understanding how S. aureus subverts the immune response is critical for the rescue of host natural humoral immunity and vaccine development. S. aureus expresses the virulence factor Protein A (SpA) on all clinical isolates, and SpA has been shown in mice to expand and ablate variable heavy 3 (VH3) idiotype B cells. The effects of SpA during natural infection, however, have not been addressed. Acutely activated B cells, or plasmablasts (PBs), were analyzed to dissect the ongoing immune response to infection through the production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The B cells that were activated by infection had a highly limited response. When screened against multiple S. aureus antigens, only high-affinity binding to SpA was observed. Consistently, PBs underwent affinity maturation, but their B cell receptors demonstrated significant bias toward the VH3 idiotype. These data suggest that the superantigenic activity of SpA leads to immunodominance, limiting host responses to other S. aureus virulence factors that would be necessary for protection and memory formation. PMID:25348152

  11. First report in South America of companion animal colonization by the USA1100 clone of community-acquired meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (ST30) and by the European clone of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (ST71)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant staphylococci can colonize and cause diseases in companion animals. Unfortunately, few molecular studies have been carried out in Brazil and other countries with the aim of characterizing these isolates. Consequently, little is known about the potential role of companion animals in transmitting these resistant bacteria to humans. In this work we searched for mecA gene among Staphylococcus isolates obtained from nasal microbiota of 130 healthy dogs and cats attended in a veterinary clinic located in the west region of Rio de Janeiro. The isolates recovered were identified to the species level and characterized using molecular tools. Results A community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) isolate related to USA1100 (Southwest Pacific clone) and susceptible to all non-β-lactams was detected in a cat (1.7%, 1/60). Another coagulase-positive isolate harboring mecA was recovered from a dog (1.4%, 1/70) and identified as Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) related to the European clone (ST71). The two isolates of Staphylococcus conhii subsp. urealyticus (1.4%, 1/70 dogs and 1.7%, 1/60 cats), similarly to the MRSP isolate, also presented high-level multiresistance. The majority of the methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci recovered were Staphylococcus saprophyticus (5.7%, 4/70 dogs and 6.7%, 4/60 cats) and all clustered into the same PFGE type. Conclusions This work demonstrates that mecA-harboring Staphylococcus isolates are common members of the nasal microbiota of the healthy companion animals studied (9.2%, 12/130 animals), including some high-level multiresistant isolates of S. pseudintermedius and S. conhii subsp. urealyticus. The detection, for the first time in South America, of USA1100-related CA-MRSA and of ST71 MRSP (European clone), colonizing companion animals, is of concern. Both S. pseudintermedius and S. aureus are important agents of infections for animals. The USA1100 CA-MRSA

  12. Protective Role of Surfactant Protein D in Ocular Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhiyong; Abdel-Razek, Osama; Hawgood, Samuel; Wang, Guirong

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common pathogens causing keratitis. Surfactant protein D (SP-D) plays a critical role in host defense and innate immunity. In order to investigate the role of SP-D in ocular S. aureus infection, the eyes of wild-type (WT) and SP-D knockout (SP-D KO) C57BL/6 mice were infected with S. aureus (107 CFU/eye) in the presence and absence of cysteine protease inhibitor(E64).Bacterial counts in the ocular surface were examined 3, 6, 12, 24 hrs after infection. Bacterial phagocytosis by neutrophils and bacterial invasion in ocular epithelial cells were evaluated quantitatively. S. aureus-induced ocular injury was determined with corneal fluorescein staining. The results demonstrated that SP-D is expressed in ocular surface epithelium and the lacrimal gland; WT mice had increased clearance of S. aureus from the ocular surface (p<0.05) and reduced ocular injury compared with SP-D KO mice. The protective effects of SP-D include increased bacterial phagocytosis by neutrophils (p<0.05) and decreased bacterial invasion into epithelial cells (p<0.05) in WT mice compared to in SP-D KO mice. In the presence of inhibitor (E64), WT mice showed enhanced bacterial clearance (p<0.05) and reduced ocular injury compared to absent E64 while SP-D KO mice did not. Collectively, we concluded that SP-D protects the ocular surface from S. aureus infection but cysteine protease impairs SP-D function in this murine model, and that cysteine protease inhibitor may be a potential therapeutic agent in S. aureus keratitis. PMID:26398197

  13. Increased infectivity of Staphylococcus aureus in an experimental model of snake venom-induced tissue damage.

    PubMed

    Saravia-Otten, Patricia; Gutierrez, Jose Maria; Arvidson, Staffan; Thelestam, Monica; Flock, Jan-Ingmar

    2007-09-01

    Soft-tissue infection is commonly found in patients bitten by Latin American Bothrops snakes. Staphylococcus aureus, which is not present in the mouth of the snake, is frequently isolated from these infections. The effects of B. asper venom on infection with S. aureus were analyzed in a model of infection in envenomated mouse gastrocnemius muscle. Inoculation of 50 colony-forming units (cfu) of S. aureus was enough to cause infection in envenomated muscle, compared with >5x104 cfu without venom. This effect was also achieved by injection of venom myotoxin III (an A(2) phospholipase). A sarA mutant strain in which production of extracellular toxins and enzymes is up-regulated and binding of fibronectin, fibrinogen, and other host proteins is down-regulated was much less virulent than the corresponding parental strain, indicating that the ability of S. aureus to mask itself with host molecules might be more important than the effects of secreted toxins and enzymes in this kind of infection. PMID:17674318

  14. Staphylococcus aureus epidemic in a neonatal nursery: a strategy of infection control.

    PubMed

    Bertini, Giovanna; Nicoletti, PierLuigi; Scopetti, Franca; Manoocher, Pourshaban; Dani, Carlo; Orefici, Graziella

    2006-08-01

    The risk of nosocomial infection due to Staphylococcus aureus in fullterm newborns is higher under hospital conditions where there are overcrowded nurseries and inadequate infection control techniques. We report on an outbreak of skin infection in a Maternity Nursery (May 21, 2000) and the measures undertaken to bring the epidemic under control. These measures included: separating neonates already present in the nursery on August 23, 2000 from ones newly arriving by creating two different cohorts, one of neonates born before this date and one of neonates born later; restricting healthcare workers caring for S. aureus- infected infants from working with non-infected infants; disallowing carrier healthcare workers from caring for patients; introducing contact and droplet precautions (including the routine use of gowns, gloves, and mask); ensuring appropriate disinfection of potential sources of contamination. A representative number of isolates were typed by genomic DNA restriction length polymorphism analysis by means of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Among the 227 cases of skin lesions, microbiological laboratory analyses confirmed that 175 were staphylococcal infections. The outbreak showed a gradual reduction in magnitude when the overcrowding of the Nursery was reduced by separating the newborns into the two different Nurseries (two cohorts). The genotyping of the strains by PFGE confirmed the nurse-to-newborn transmission of S. aureus. The measures adopted for controlling the S. aureus outbreak can, in retrospect, be assessed to have been very effective. PMID:16602005

  15. Evaluating efficacy of bacteriophage therapy against Staphylococcus aureus infections using a silkworm larval infection model.

    PubMed

    Takemura-Uchiyama, Iyo; Uchiyama, Jumpei; Kato, Shin-ichiro; Inoue, Tetsuyoshi; Ujihara, Takako; Ohara, Naoya; Daibata, Masanori; Matsuzaki, Shigenobu

    2013-10-01

    Silkworm larva has recently been recognized as an alternative model animal for higher mammals to evaluate the effects of antibiotics. In this study, we examined the efficacy of the bacteriophage (phage) therapy, which harnesses phages as antibacterial agents, against Staphylococcus aureus infections, using the silkworm larval infection model. Two newly isolated staphylococcal phages, S25-3 and S13', were used as therapeutic phage candidates. They were assigned to two different lytic phage genera, Twort-like and AHJD-like viruses, based on their morphologies and the N-terminal amino acid sequences of the major capsid proteins. Both had a broad host range and strong lytic activity and showed preservative quality. Administration of these phages alone caused no adverse effects in the silkworm larvae. Moreover, the viruses showed life-prolonging effects in the silkworm larval infection model 10 min, 6 h, 12 h, and 24 h following infection. Such phage effects in the silkworm larval model were almost paralleled to the therapeutic efficacies in mouse models. These results suggest that phages S25-3 and S13' are eligible as therapeutic candidates and that the silkworm larval model is valid for the evaluation of phage therapy as well as mouse models. PMID:23869440

  16. Identification of Infantile Diarrhea Caused by Breast Milk-Transmitted Staphylococcus aureus Infection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhong; Pan, Wei-Guang; Xian, Wei-Yi; Cheng, Hang; Zheng, Jin-Xin; Hu, Qing-Hua; Yu, Zhi-Jian; Deng, Qi-Wen

    2016-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a well-known organism which is responsible for a variety of human infectious diseases including skin infections, pneumonia, bacteremia, and endocarditis. Few of the microorganisms can be transmitted from mother to the newborn or infant by milk breastfeeding. This study aims to identify transmission of S. aureus from healthy, lactating mothers to their infants by breastfeeding. Stool specimens of diarrheal infants and breast milk of their mother (totally three pairs) were collected and six Staphylococcus aureus isolates were cultured positively. Homology and molecular characters of isolated strains were tested using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), spa typing, and multilocus sequence typing. Furthermore, toxin genes detection was also performed. Each pair of isolates has the same PFGE type and spa type. Four Sequence types (STs) were found among all the isolates; they are ST15, ST188, and ST59, respectively. Among the strains, seb, sec, and tst genes were found, and all were negative for pvl gene. The homology of the S. aureus strains isolated from the infants' stool and the mothers' milk was genetically demonstrated, which indicated that breastfeeding may be important in the transmission of S. aureus infection, and the character of S. aureus needed to be further evaluated. PMID:27344596

  17. Sternal and costochondral infections with gentamicin and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus following thoracic surgery.

    PubMed

    Cafferkey, M T; Luke, D A; Keane, C T

    1983-01-01

    Six patients in a thoracic unit developed sternal osteomyelitis and costochondritis following median sternotomy. Five of the patients were operated on in another hospital. Gentamicin and methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in pure culture in each case. The S. aureus isolate from 2 patients was of the same phage type suggesting cross-infection. Antibiotic prophylaxis administered in the perioperative period was ineffective. One patient, treated with amikacin (to which all of the strains were sensitive in vitro) and cefuroxime, died from overwhelming infection in spite of débridement and resuturing of the wound. The remaining 5 patients were cured with vancomycin therapy usually coupled with surgical intervention. PMID:6557667

  18. The herbal-derived honokiol and magnolol enhances immune response to infection with methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun-Jin; Kim, Hyung-Ip; Kim, Ji-Ae; Jun, Soo Youn; Kang, Sang Hyeon; Park, Dong June; Son, Seok-Jun; Kim, Younghoon; Shin, Ok Sarah

    2015-05-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistant strains such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) reminds us an urgent need to develop a new immune-modulating agent for preventing S. aureus infection. In this study, we found that herbal medicines, honokiol and magnolol, caused a significant cellular immune modulatory effect during S. aureus infection. In mouse macrophages, these compounds drove upregulation of an antioxidant effect in response to S. aureus, resulting in a dampened total cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and decreased production of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines, whereas honokiol induced increased types I and III interferon messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels in response to MSSA infection. Moreover, the internalization of S. aureus by human alveolar epithelial cells was inhibited by these compounds. Furthermore, honokiol and magnolol treatment promoted a delay in killing during MSSA infection in Caenorhabditis elegans, suggesting antimicrobial function in vivo. In conclusion, honokiol and magnolol may be considered as attractive immune-modulating treatment for S. aureus infection. PMID:25586586

  19. Trends of Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections in a neonatal intensive care unit from 2000-2009

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Invasive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) infections are major causes of numerous neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) outbreaks. There have been increasing reports of MRSA outbreaks in various neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) over the last decade. Our objective was to review the experience of Staphylococcus aureus sepsis in our NICU in the last decade and describe the trends in the incidence of Staphylococcus aureus blood stream infections from 2000 to 2009. Methods A retrospective perinatal database review of all neonates admitted to our NICU with blood cultures positive for Staphylococcus aureus from (Jan 1st 2000 to December 31st 2009) was conducted. Infants were identified from the database and data were collected regarding their clinical characteristics and co-morbidities, including shock with sepsis and mortality. Period A represents patients admitted in 2000-2003. Period B represents patients seen in 2004-2009. Results During the study period, 156/11111 infants were identified with Staphylococcus aureus blood stream infection: 41/4486 (0.91%) infants in Period A and 115/6625 (1.73%) in Period B (p < 0.0004). Mean gestation at birth was 26 weeks for infants in both periods. There were more MRSA infections in Period B (24% vs. 55% p < 0.05) and they were associated with more severe outcomes. In comparing the cases of MRSA infections observed in the two periods, infants in period B notably had significantly more pneumonia cases (2.4% vs. 27%, p = 0.0005) and a significantly higher mortality rate (0% vs. 15.7%, p = 0.0038). The incidences of skin and soft tissue infections and of necrotizing enterocolitis were not significantly changed in the two periods. Conclusion There was an increase in the incidence of Staphylococcus aureus infection among neonates after 2004. Although MSSA continues to be a problem in the NICU, MRSA infections were more prevalent in the

  20. Clindamycin-susceptibility Rates of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus Varies by Infection Type in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Amanda; Selvarangan, Rangaraj; Ogden, Richard; French, Brandon; Yu, Diana

    2016-08-01

    Hospital-wide antibiograms provide general susceptibility patterns. Specific antibiograms were created for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates based on infection process and epidemiology. Using clinical microbiology laboratory data and patient profiles, high clindamycin resistance rates were seen for nonskin and soft tissue infections and noncommunity-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolates. PMID:27164465

  1. Preclinical Efficacy of Clumping Factor A in Prevention of Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue; Wang, Xiaogang; Thompson, Christopher D.; Park, Saeyoung; Park, Wan Beom

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus infections has become increasingly difficult because of the emergence of multidrug-resistant isolates. Development of a vaccine to prevent staphylococcal infections remains a priority. To determine whether clumping factor A (ClfA) is a good target protein for inclusion in a multivalent vaccine, we evaluated its efficacy in a variety of relevant staphylococcal infection models, challenging with different S. aureus strains. ClfA adsorbed to Alhydrogel and mixed with Sigma Adjuvant System was more immunogenic and stimulated a more robust Th17 response than ClfA administered with alum alone. ClfA immunization induced the production of functional antibodies in rabbits and mice that blocked S. aureus binding to fibrinogen and were opsonic for S. aureus strains that produced little or no capsular polysaccharide. Mice immunized with ClfA showed a modest reduction in the bacterial burden recovered from subcutaneous abscesses provoked by S. aureus USA300 strain LAC. In addition, the ClfA vaccine reduced lethality in a sepsis model following challenge with strain Newman, but not ST80. Vaccination with ClfA did not protect against surgical wound infection, renal abscess formation, or bacteremia. Passive immunization with antibodies to ClfA did not protect against staphylococcal bacteremia in mice or catheter-induced endocarditis in rats. Some enhancement of bacteremia was observed by ClfA immunization or passive administration of ClfA antibodies when mice were challenged by the intraperitoneal route. Although rodent models of staphylococcal infection have their limitations, our data do not support the inclusion of ClfA in an S. aureus multivalent vaccine. PMID:26838725

  2. Biofilm Matrix Exoproteins Induce a Protective Immune Response against Staphylococcus aureus Biofilm Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gil, Carmen; Solano, Cristina; Burgui, Saioa; Latasa, Cristina; García, Begoña; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus biofilm mode of growth is associated with several chronic infections that are very difficult to treat due to the recalcitrant nature of biofilms to clearance by antimicrobials. Accordingly, there is an increasing interest in preventing the formation of S. aureus biofilms and developing efficient antibiofilm vaccines. Given the fact that during a biofilm-associated infection, the first primary interface between the host and the bacteria is the self-produced extracellular matrix, in this study we analyzed the potential of extracellular proteins found in the biofilm matrix to induce a protective immune response against S. aureus infections. By using proteomic approaches, we characterized the exoproteomes of exopolysaccharide-based and protein-based biofilm matrices produced by two clinical S. aureus strains. Remarkably, results showed that independently of the nature of the biofilm matrix, a common core of secreted proteins is contained in both types of exoproteomes. Intradermal administration of an exoproteome extract of an exopolysaccharide-dependent biofilm induced a humoral immune response and elicited the production of interleukin 10 (IL-10) and IL-17 in mice. Antibodies against such an extract promoted opsonophagocytosis and killing of S. aureus. Immunization with the biofilm matrix exoproteome significantly reduced the number of bacterial cells inside a biofilm and on the surrounding tissue, using an in vivo model of mesh-associated biofilm infection. Furthermore, immunized mice also showed limited organ colonization by bacteria released from the matrix at the dispersive stage of the biofilm cycle. Altogether, these data illustrate the potential of biofilm matrix exoproteins as a promising candidate multivalent vaccine against S. aureus biofilm-associated infections. PMID:24343648

  3. Non-invasive Imaging of Staphylococcus aureus Infections with a Nuclease-Activated Probe

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Frank J.; Huang, Lingyan; Olson, Michael E.; Powers, Kristy M.; Hernandez, Luiza I.; Meyerholz, David K.; Thedens, Daniel R.; Behlke, Mark A.; Horswill, Alexander R.; McNamara, James O.

    2013-01-01

    Technologies that enable the rapid detection and localization of bacterial infections in living animals could address an unmet need for infectious disease diagnostics. We describe a molecular imaging approach for the specific, non-invasive detection of S. aureus based on the activity of its secreted nuclease, micrococcal nuclease (MN). Several short, synthetic oligonucleotides, rendered resistant to mammalian serum nucleases by various chemical modifications, flanked with a fluorophore and quencher, were activated upon degradation by recombinant MN and in S. aureus culture supernatants. A probe consisting of a pair of deoxythymidines flanked by several 2′-O-methyl-modified nucleotides was activated in culture supernatants of S. aureus but not in culture supernatants of several other pathogenic bacteria. Systemic administration of this probe to mice bearing bioluminescent S. aureus muscle infections resulted in probe activation at the infection sites in an MN-dependent manner. This novel bacterial imaging approach has potential clinical applicability for S. aureus and several other medically significant pathogens. PMID:24487433

  4. IL-17 is essential for host defense against cutaneous Staphylococcus aureus infection in mice

    PubMed Central

    Cho, John S.; Pietras, Eric M.; Garcia, Nairy C.; Ramos, Romela Irene; Farzam, David M.; Monroe, Holly R.; Magorien, Julie E.; Blauvelt, Andrew; Kolls, Jay K.; Cheung, Ambrose L.; Cheng, Genhong; Modlin, Robert L.; Miller, Lloyd S.

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common cause of skin and soft tissue infections, and rapidly emerging antibiotic-resistant strains are creating a serious public health concern. If immune-based therapies are to be an alternative to antibiotics, greater understanding is needed of the protective immune response against S. aureus infection in the skin. Although neutrophil recruitment is required for immunity against S. aureus, a role for T cells has been suggested. Here, we used a mouse model of S. aureus cutaneous infection to investigate the contribution of T cells to host defense. We found that mice deficient in γδ but not αβ T cells had substantially larger skin lesions with higher bacterial counts and impaired neutrophil recruitment compared with WT mice. This neutrophil recruitment was dependent upon epidermal Vγ5+ γδ T cell production of IL-17, but not IL-21 and IL-22. Furthermore, IL-17 induction required IL-1, TLR2, and IL-23 and was critical for host defense, since IL-17R–deficient mice had a phenotype similar to that of γδ T cell–deficient mice. Importantly, γδ T cell–deficient mice inoculated with S. aureus and treated with a single dose of recombinant IL-17 had lesion sizes and bacterial counts resembling those of WT mice, demonstrating that IL-17 could restore the impaired immunity in these mice. Our study defines what we believe to be a novel role for IL-17–producing epidermal γδ T cells in innate immunity against S. aureus cutaneous infection. PMID:20364087

  5. Emergence of Panton-Valentine leucocidin-positive ST8-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (USA300 clone) in Korea causing healthcare-associated and hospital-acquired bacteraemia.

    PubMed

    Jung, J; Song, E H; Park, S Y; Lee, S-R; Park, S-J; Sung, H; Kim, M-N; Kim, S-H; Lee, S-O; Choi, S-H; Woo, J H; Kim, Y S; Chong, Y P

    2016-08-01

    Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL)-positive sequence type (ST)8-MRSA-SCCmec IVa (USA300) is the epidemic strain of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) in North America. USA300 is extremely rare in South Korea, and PVL-negative ST72 SCCmec type IVc is the predominant CA-MRSA clone. In a multicentre, prospective cohort study of S. aureus bacteraemia, we identified PVL-positive ST8-MRSA isolates by performing multilocus sequence typing and PCR for PVL. We analyzed the clinical characteristics of patients with PVL-positive ST8-MRSA bacteraemia, and performed SCCmec, spa, and agr typing, PCR for arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME), virulence gene profiling, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Among a total of 818 MRSA isolates, we identified ten isolates of PVL-positive ST8-MRSA (USA300) (3 from Hospital D, 4 from Hospital G, and 3 from Hospital A), all of which involved exclusively healthcare-associated (5 isolates) and hospital-acquired bacteraemia (5 isolates). This strain accounted for 8~10 % of the hospital-acquired MRSA bacteraemia in Hospitals D and G. Bacteraemia of unknown origin was the most common type of infection followed by pneumonia. All the isolates were SCCmec type IVa, spa type t008, and agr group I. Eight of the isolates harboured ACME. In a PFGE analysis, four isolates were identical to the USA300 control strain, five differed by a single band, and the remaining one differed by two bands. All the isolates were pulsed-field type USA300. This is the first report of healthcare-associated and hospital-acquired bacteraemia caused by USA300 in South Korea. USA300 seems to be an emerging hospital clone in this country. PMID:27209287

  6. Protective immunization against Staphylococcus aureus infection in a novel experimental wound model in mice.

    PubMed

    Schennings, Torgny; Farnebo, Filip; Szekely, Laszlo; Flock, Jan-Ingmar

    2012-10-01

    A novel murine experimental wound infection model was used to assess the efficacy of multi-component immunization against Staphylococcus aureus infection. Necrotic lesions were induced in mice with venom from Bothrops asper and infected with a low inoculum, 1 × 10(2) CFU. The wound infection model therefore more resembles a clinical case of S. aureus infection compared with conventional infection models where far more bacteria are required. Before infection, mice were immunized with four recombinant S.aureus proteins expressed from Escherichia coli: (i) domains 1-3 of Extracellular adherence protein (Eap), (ii) Efb - D (fusion protein combining Extracellular fibrinogen binding protein (Efb) and a fibronectin binding domain (D) of the fibronectin binding protein (FnBP) and (iii) clumping factor A (ClfA). In the immunized group, lower bacterial colonization, undisturbed crust formation and significantly faster wound healing were found compared with the unimmunized control group. Efb and Eap have previously been found to impair wound healing and neutralization of these proteins by antibodies restores a more natural wound healing process. This effect is further also enhanced by the proposed opsonic activity of antibodies against ClfA and FnBP. PMID:22958286

  7. Staphylococcus aureus Infection Induced Oxidative Imbalance in Neutrophils: Possible Protective Role of Nanoconjugated Vancomycin

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Subhankari Prasad; Pramanik, Panchanan; Roy, Somenath

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infection causes oxidative stress in neutrophils. The immune cells use reactive oxygen species (ROS) for carrying out their normal functions while an excess amount of ROS can attack cellular components that lead to cell damage. The present study was aimed to test the protective role of nanoconjugated vancomycin against vancomycin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (VSSA) and vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (VRSA) infection induced oxidative stress in neutrophils. VSSA- and VRSA-infection were developed in Swiss mice by intraperitoneal injection of 5 × 106 CFU/mL bacterial solutions. Nanoconjugated vancomycin was treated to VSSA- and VRSA-infected mice at its effective dose for 10 days. Vancomycin was treated to VSSA and VRSA infected mice at similar dose, respectively, for 10 days. The result reveals that in vivo VSSA and VRSA infection significantly increases the level of lipid peroxidation, protein oxidation, oxidized glutathione level, and nitrite generation and decreases the level of reduced glutathione, antioxidant enzyme status, and glutathione-dependent enzymes as compared to control group; which were increased or decreased significantly near to normal in nanoconjugated vancomycin-treated group. These finding suggests the potential use and beneficial protective role of nanoconjugated vancomycin against VSSA and VRSA infection induced oxidative imbalance in neutrophils. PMID:22530141

  8. Orthosiphon stamineus protects Caenorhabditis elegans against Staphylococcus aureus infection through immunomodulation

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Cin; Tan, Man-Wah; Nathan, Sheila

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Amidst growing concerns over the spread of antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains, the identification of alternative therapeutic molecules has become paramount. Previously, we utilized a Caenorhabditis elegans–S. aureus screening platform to identify potential anti-infective agents from a collection of natural extracts and synthetic compounds. One of the hits obtained from the screen was the aqueous extract of Orthosiphon stamineus leaves (UE-12) that enhanced the survival of infected nematodes without interfering with bacterial growth. In this study, we used a fluorescent transgenic reporter strain and observed that the repressed expression of the lys-7 defense gene in infected nematodes was restored in the presence of UE-12. Analysis of a selected panel of PMK-1 and DAF-16-regulated transcripts and loss-of-function mutants in these pathways indicates that the protective role of UE-12 is mediated via the p38 MAP kinase and insulin-like signaling pathways. Further analysis of a panel of known bioactive compounds of UE-12 proposed eupatorin (C18H16O7) as the possible candidate active molecule contributing to the anti-infective property of UE-12. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest that the O. stamineus leaf extract is a promising anti-infective agent that confers an advantage in survival against S. aureus infection by modulating the immune response of the infected host. PMID:24972867

  9. Orthosiphon stamineus protects Caenorhabditis elegans against Staphylococcus aureus infection through immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Kong, Cin; Tan, Man-Wah; Nathan, Sheila

    2014-01-01

    Amidst growing concerns over the spread of antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains, the identification of alternative therapeutic molecules has become paramount. Previously, we utilized a Caenorhabditis elegans-S. aureus screening platform to identify potential anti-infective agents from a collection of natural extracts and synthetic compounds. One of the hits obtained from the screen was the aqueous extract of Orthosiphon stamineus leaves (UE-12) that enhanced the survival of infected nematodes without interfering with bacterial growth. In this study, we used a fluorescent transgenic reporter strain and observed that the repressed expression of the lys-7 defense gene in infected nematodes was restored in the presence of UE-12. Analysis of a selected panel of PMK-1 and DAF-16-regulated transcripts and loss-of-function mutants in these pathways indicates that the protective role of UE-12 is mediated via the p38 MAP kinase and insulin-like signaling pathways. Further analysis of a panel of known bioactive compounds of UE-12 proposed eupatorin (C18H16O7) as the possible candidate active molecule contributing to the anti-infective property of UE-12. Taken together, these findings strongly suggest that the O. stamineus leaf extract is a promising anti-infective agent that confers an advantage in survival against S. aureus infection by modulating the immune response of the infected host. PMID:24972867

  10. [Treatment with arbekacin of surgical infections by resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus. Arbekacin Study Group].

    PubMed

    Morimoto, K; Nakatani, S; Kaji, M; Kinoshita, H; Fujimoto, M; Hirata, S; Ueda, T; Tamate, S; Yamazaki, O

    1994-06-01

    The frequency of infection by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is high in Japan and control of such strains is urgently needed. Arbekacin (ABK), a semisynthetic aminoglycoside, has potent activity against S. aureus, including resistant strains, and against Gram-negative bacteria as well. For this reason, in surgical infections (which are often caused by more than one bacterium), this drug might be particularly effective. We calculated the MIC and the decrease in the MIC when cultures of 59 resistant strains of S. aureus isolated in our wards at Osaka City University Hospital, contained arbekacin in the medium. We also used the drug to treat 12 infections caused by resistant strains of S. aureus. The MICs of vancomycin had a single peak at 0.5 microgram/ml, and those for ABK had double peaks at 0.5 and 4.0 micrograms/ml. The effect of arbekacin in lowering the MIC of minocycline (MINO) was slight because of the low MIC of MINO. Effects on fosfomycin (FOM), ampicillin, clavulanic acid/ticarcillin, cefotiam, cefuzonam, flomoxef, and imipenem/cilastatin were strong; the peaks were lowered by 1/2(7)-1/2(11). When 1.0 micrograms/ml ABK was present in the medium, the efficacy of FOM was increased enough that, by prediction from the pharmacokinetics of FOM (blood level when given at the usual dose), all but one (2%) of the 47 resistant strains would be eradicated clinically. If 2.0 micrograms/ml ABK were in the medium, all strain would be eradicated, by our calculations. We treated 11 infections and one colonization by resistant strains of S. aureus with ABK and evaluated the response in these cases of infection. Four infections were treated with FOM as well. The clinical efficacy was good in four infections (three patients), fair in four, and poor in three, for an efficacy rate of 36%. All presumed causative bacteria were eradicated in two (18%) of the 11 infections and S. aureus strains were eradicated in three (27%) of the 11 infections. No symptoms of

  11. Antibody-Based Biologics and Their Promise to Combat Staphylococcus aureus Infections.

    PubMed

    Sause, William E; Buckley, Peter T; Strohl, William R; Lynch, A Simon; Torres, Victor J

    2016-03-01

    The growing incidence of serious infections mediated by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains poses a significant risk to public health. This risk is exacerbated by a prolonged void in the discovery and development of truly novel antibiotics and the absence of a vaccine. These gaps have created renewed interest in the use of biologics in the prevention and treatment of serious staphylococcal infections. In this review, we focus on efforts towards the discovery and development of antibody-based biologic agents and their potential as clinical agents in the management of serious S. aureus infections. Recent promising data for monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting anthrax and Ebola highlight the potential of antibody-based biologics as therapeutic agents for serious infections. PMID:26719219

  12. An update on the epidemiology, pathogenesis and management of infective endocarditis with emphasis on Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Tak, Tahir; Reed, Kurt D; Haselby, Ray C; McCauley, Charles S; Shukla, Sanjay K

    2002-01-01

    The incidence of infective endocarditis (IE) is thought to be around 4/100,000 person years in the general population, and 15/100,000 over the age of 50 years. The risk of acquiring IE is higher among patients with valvular heart disease (e.g., rheumatic valves, bicuspid aortic valves, myxomatous degeneration, etc.), congenital heart disease (e.g., coarctation, patent ductus arteriosus, ventricular septal defect, etc.), prosthetic cardiac valves, and among intravenous drug abusers. Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common infective agents of IE, and most commonly originates from nosocomial sources, e.g., intravenous and arterial catheters, pacemaker leads, and prosthetic valves. Endocarditis caused by S aureus has a mortality rate of approximately 20% to 40%. In up to 40% of patients, IE caused by S aureus is associated with embolic complications. The risk of death increases with the development of complications. The epidemiology and microbiology of S aureus are changing rapidly, and resistance to antibiotics, especially methicillin, is becoming more widespread. In this review we will focus on the epidemiology, microbiology, and pathogenesis of S aureus IE, and also summarize the current guidelines for diagnosis, treatment, and prophylaxis of this clinical condition. PMID:12426917

  13. Clinical and Molecular Characterization of Invasive Heteroresistant Vancomycin-Intermediate Staphylococcus aureus Infections in Korean Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eu Suk; Bae, In-Gyu; Cho, Jeong Eun; Choi, Yun Jung; Kim, Il-Hwan; Kang, Gi-Su; Sin, Hye-yun; Song, Kyoung-Ho; Park, Chulmin; Lee, Dong-Gun; Kim, Moonsuk; Park, Kyoung Un; Kim, Hong Bin

    2016-03-01

    Invasive heteroresistant vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (h-VISA) isolates were identified and characterized in 10 Korean hospitals from July 2009 to June 2011. The prevalence of h-VISA infections was 3.3% (42/1,289). Most (41/42) were health care-associated infections caused by strains belonging to sequence type 5. Cases of persistent bacteremia were frequent (17/42), and 30-day mortality was high (16/40). PMID:26677256

  14. The receptor for advanced glycation end products promotes bacterial growth at distant body sites in Staphylococcus aureus skin infection.

    PubMed

    Achouiti, Ahmed; Van't Veer, Cornelis; de Vos, Alex F; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-09-01

    The receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) has been implicated in the regulation of skin inflammation. We here sought to study the role of RAGE in host defense during skin infection caused by Staphylococcus (S.) aureus, the most common pathogen in this condition. Wild-type (Wt) and RAGE deficient (rage(-/-)) mice were infected subcutaneously with S. aureus and bacterial loads and local inflammation were quantified at regular intervals up to 8 days after infection. While bacterial burdens were similar in both mouse strains at the primary site of infection, rage(-/-) mice had lower bacterial counts in lungs and liver. Skin cytokine and chemokine levels did not differ between groups. In accordance with the skin model, direct intravenous infection with S. aureus was associated with lower bacterial loads in lungs and liver of rage(-/-) mice. Together these data suggest that RAGE does not impact local host defense during S. aureus skin infection, but facilitates bacterial growth at distant body sites. PMID:26086798

  15. Metabolic Profiling for Detection of Staphylococcus aureus Infection and Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Näsström, Elin; Kouremenos, Konstantinos; Sundén-Cullberg, Jonas; Guo, YongZhi; Moritz, Thomas; Wolf-Watz, Hans; Johansson, Anders; Fallman, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Due to slow diagnostics, physicians must optimize antibiotic therapies based on clinical evaluation of patients without specific information on causative bacteria. We have investigated metabolomic analysis of blood for the detection of acute bacterial infection and early differentiation between ineffective and effective antibiotic treatment. A vital and timely therapeutic difficulty was thereby addressed: the ability to rapidly detect treatment failures because of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) were used in vitro and for infecting mice, while natural MSSA infection was studied in humans. Samples of bacterial growth media, the blood of infected mice and of humans were analyzed with combined Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry. Multivariate data analysis was used to reveal the metabolic profiles of infection and the responses to different antibiotic treatments. In vitro experiments resulted in the detection of 256 putative metabolites and mice infection experiments resulted in the detection of 474 putative metabolites. Importantly, ineffective and effective antibiotic treatments were differentiated already two hours after treatment start in both experimental systems. That is, the ineffective treatment of MRSA using cloxacillin and untreated controls produced one metabolic profile while all effective treatment combinations using cloxacillin or vancomycin for MSSA or MRSA produced another profile. For further evaluation of the concept, blood samples of humans admitted to intensive care with severe sepsis were analyzed. One hundred thirty-three putative metabolites differentiated severe MSSA sepsis (n = 6) from severe Escherichia coli sepsis (n = 10) and identified treatment responses over time. Combined analysis of human, in vitro, and mice samples identified 25 metabolites indicative of effective treatment of S. aureus sepsis. Taken together, this study provides a

  16. Efficacy of Lantibiotic Treatment of Staphylococcus aureus-Induced Skin Infections, Monitored by In Vivo Bioluminescent Imaging.

    PubMed

    van Staden, Anton Du Preez; Heunis, Tiaan; Smith, Carine; Deane, Shelly; Dicks, Leon M T

    2016-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a bacterial pathogen responsible for the majority of skin and soft tissue infections. Antibiotics are losing their efficacy as treatment for skin and soft tissue infections as a result of increased resistance in a variety of pathogens, including S. aureus It is thus imperative to explore alternative antimicrobial treatments to ensure future treatment options for skin and soft tissue infections. A select few lantibiotics, a group of natural defense peptides produced by bacteria, inhibit the growth of numerous clinical S. aureus isolates, including methicillin-resistant strains. In this study, the antimicrobial activities of nisin, clausin, and amyloliquecidin, separately administered, were compared to that of a mupirocin-based ointment, which is commonly used as treatment for S. aureus-induced skin infections. Full-thickness excisional wounds, generated on the dorsal surfaces of mice, were infected with a bioluminescent strain of S. aureus (strain Xen 36). The infections were monitored in real time using in vivo bioluminescent imaging. Lantibiotic treatments significantly reduced the bioluminescence of S. aureus Xen 36 to a level similar to that recorded with mupirocin treatment. Wound closure, however, was more pronounced during lantibiotic treatment. Lantibiotics thus have the potential to be used as an alternative treatment option for S. aureus-induced skin infections. PMID:27067340

  17. Risk factors and gene type for infections of MRSA in diabetic foot patients in Tianjin, China.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shu-Hong; Chu, Yue-Jie; Wang, Peng-Hua; Jun, Xu; Min, Ding; Li, Xue-Mei

    2013-06-01

    The objective was to study risk factors and gene type of DF patients infected with MRSA. A total of 429 DF patients were recruited. The patients with S aureus infections were divided into MRSA and MSSA groups. MRSA were genotyped by SCCmec. pvl and lukE-lukD were detected. A total of 559 pathogens were isolated from them, with G+ bacteria firstly(59.0%), followed G- bacilli (37.7%) and true fungi (3.3%). The 3 most frequently isolated pathogens were S aureus (35.2%), S epidermidis (12.3%), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (11.2%). SCCmec III MRSA and SCCmec IVa MRSA had the same antibacterial spectrum. mecA positive rate was 100%. lukE-lukD and pvl positive rates were 100% and 0%, respectively. 28 strains belonged to SCCmec III and the others belonged to SCCmec IVa. The G+ cocci were the main pathogens, S aureus and S epidermidis were predominant among them. Antibiotic usage in 6 months prior to hospitalization, long course of ulcer, osteomyelitis and hypoproteinemia are risk factors for MRSA. SCCmec IVa is high in proportion to MRSA isolates, suggesting that CA-MRSA has become major pathogen of DF infection. All the MRSA were harboring lukE-lukD, which has been reported to present poor leucotoxin compared to pvl, and may be a response to atypical local inflammatory reaction in DF infection. PMID:23771611

  18. Novel Tissue Level Effects of the Staphylococcus aureus Enterotoxin Gene Cluster Are Essential for Infective Endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Stach, Christopher S.; Vu, Bao G.; Merriman, Joseph A.; Herrera, Alfa; Cahill, Michael P.; Schlievert, Patrick M.; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara

    2016-01-01

    Background Superantigens are indispensable virulence factors for Staphylococcus aureus in disease causation. Superantigens stimulate massive immune cell activation, leading to toxic shock syndrome (TSS) and contributing to other illnesses. However, superantigens differ in their capacities to induce body-wide effects. For many, their production, at least as tested in vitro, is not high enough to reach the circulation, or the proteins are not efficient in crossing epithelial and endothelial barriers, thus remaining within tissues or localized on mucosal surfaces where they exert only local effects. In this study, we address the role of TSS toxin-1 (TSST-1) and most importantly the enterotoxin gene cluster (egc) in infective endocarditis and sepsis, gaining insights into the body-wide versus local effects of superantigens. Methods We examined S. aureus TSST-1 gene (tstH) and egc deletion strains in the rabbit model of infective endocarditis and sepsis. Importantly, we also assessed the ability of commercial human intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) plus vancomycin to alter the course of infective endocarditis and sepsis. Results TSST-1 contributed to infective endocarditis vegetations and lethal sepsis, while superantigens of the egc, a cluster with uncharacterized functions in S. aureus infections, promoted vegetation formation in infective endocarditis. IVIG plus vancomycin prevented lethality and stroke development in infective endocarditis and sepsis. Conclusions Our studies support the local tissue effects of egc superantigens for establishment and progression of infective endocarditis providing evidence for their role in life-threatening illnesses. In contrast, TSST-1 contributes to both infective endocarditis and lethal sepsis. IVIG may be a useful adjunct therapy for infective endocarditis and sepsis. PMID:27124393

  19. Morphology-Independent Virulence of Candida Species during Polymicrobial Intra-abdominal Infections with Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Nash, Evelyn E.; Peters, Brian M.; Fidel, Paul L.

    2015-01-01

    Intra-abdominal polymicrobial infections cause significant morbidity and mortality. An experimental mouse model of Candida albicans-Staphylococcus aureus intra-abdominal infection (IAI) results in 100% mortality by 48 to 72 h postinoculation, while monomicrobial infections are avirulent. Mortality is associated with robust local and systemic inflammation without a requirement for C. albicans morphogenesis. However, the contribution of virulence factors coregulated during the yeast-to-hypha transition is unknown. This also raised the question of whether other Candida species that are unable to form hyphae are as virulent as C. albicans during polymicrobial IAI. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the ability of non-albicans Candida (NAC) species with various morphologies and C. albicans transcription factor mutants (efg1/efg1 and cph1/cph1) to induce synergistic mortality and the accompanying inflammation. Results showed that S. aureus coinoculated with C. krusei or C. tropicalis was highly lethal, similar to C. albicans, while S. aureus-C. dubliniensis, S. aureus-C. parapsilosis, and S. aureus-C. glabrata coinoculations resulted in little to no mortality. Local and systemic interleukin-6 (IL-6) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) levels were significantly elevated during symptomatic and/or lethal coinfections, and hypothermia strongly correlated with mortality. Coinoculation with C. albicans strains deficient in the transcription factor Efg1 but not Cph1 reversed the lethal outcome. These results support previous findings and demonstrate that select Candida species, without reference to any morphological requirement, induce synergistic mortality, with IL-6 and PGE2 acting as key inflammatory factors. Mechanistically, signaling pathways controlled by Efg1 are critical for the ability of C. albicans to induce mortality from an intra-abdominal polymicrobial infection. PMID:26483410

  20. Noninvasive In Vivo Imaging to Evaluate Immune Responses and Antimicrobial Therapy against Staphylococcus aureus and USA300 MRSA Skin Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cho, John S.; Zussman, Jamie; Donegan, Niles P.; Irene Ramos, Romela; Garcia, Nairy C.; Uslan, Daniel Z.; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Simon, Scott I.; Cheung, Ambrose L.; Modlin, Robert L.; Kim, Jenny; Miller, Lloyd S.

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus skin infections represent a significant public health threat because of the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains such as methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). As greater understanding of protective immune responses and more effective antimicrobial therapies are needed, a S. aureus skin wound infection model was developed in which full-thickness scalpel cuts on the backs of mice were infected with a bioluminescent S. aureus (methicillin sensitive) or USA300 community-acquired MRSA strain and in vivo imaging was used to noninvasively monitor the bacterial burden. In addition, the infection-induced inflammatory response was quantified using in vivo fluorescence imaging of LysEGFP mice. Using this model, we found that both IL-1α and IL-1β contributed to host defense during a wound infection, whereas IL-1β was more critical during an intradermal S. aureus infection. Furthermore, treatment of a USA300 MRSA skin infection with retapamulin ointment resulted in up to 85-fold reduction in bacterial burden and a 53% decrease in infection-induced inflammation. In contrast, mupirocin ointment had minimal clinical activity against this USA300 strain, resulting in only a 2-fold reduction in bacterial burden. Taken together, this S. aureus wound infection model provides a valuable preclinical screening method to investigate cutaneous immune responses and the efficacy of topical antimicrobial therapies. PMID:21191403

  1. Infections of diabetic foot ulcers with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Cervantes-García, Estrella; García-González, Rafael; Reséndiz-Albor, Aldo; Salazar-Schettino, Paz Maria

    2015-03-01

    Infected diabetic foot is the most common reason for hospitalization and complications in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM2). Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is frequently isolated from such lesions, and its presence is growing, seriously deteriorating the infected patient's quality of life. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of MRSA as well as other microbiota in 100 patients diagnosed with (DM2) and with infected foot ulcers at the Hospital General de Mexico. The main results obtained show a prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus (42%), followed by Escherichia coli (36%) and, in lower percentages, other bacteria. MRSA was predominant (34%), and we conclude that the use of cefoxitin instead of oxacillin as the first-choice antibiotic has an advantage because it is a better inducer of methicillin-resistance expression. PMID:25573977

  2. The Impact of Infectious Disease Specialist Consultation for Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infections: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Julie; Solligård, Erik; Damås, Jan Kristian; DeWan, Andrew; Åsvold, Bjørn Olav; Bracken, Michael B

    2016-03-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common cause of severe bloodstream infection. We performed a systematic review to assess whether consultation with infectious disease specialists decreased all-cause mortality or rate of complications of S aureus bloodstream infections. The review also assessed parameters associated with the quality of management of the infection. We searched for eligible studies in PubMed, Embase, Scopus, and clinical trials.gov as well as the references of included studies. We identified 22 observational studies and 1 study protocol for a randomized trial. A meta-analysis was not performed because of the high risk of bias in the included studies. The outcomes are reported in a narrative review. Most included studies reported survival benefit, in the adjusted analysis. Recommended management strategies were carried out significantly more often among patients seen by an infectious disease specialist. Trials, such as cluster-randomized controlled trials, can more validly assess the studies at low risk of bias. PMID:27047985

  3. The Impact of Infectious Disease Specialist Consultation for Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infections: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Paulsen, Julie; Solligård, Erik; Damås, Jan Kristian; DeWan, Andrew; Åsvold, Bjørn Olav; Bracken, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common cause of severe bloodstream infection. We performed a systematic review to assess whether consultation with infectious disease specialists decreased all-cause mortality or rate of complications of S aureus bloodstream infections. The review also assessed parameters associated with the quality of management of the infection. We searched for eligible studies in PubMed, Embase, Scopus, and clinical trials.gov as well as the references of included studies. We identified 22 observational studies and 1 study protocol for a randomized trial. A meta-analysis was not performed because of the high risk of bias in the included studies. The outcomes are reported in a narrative review. Most included studies reported survival benefit, in the adjusted analysis. Recommended management strategies were carried out significantly more often among patients seen by an infectious disease specialist. Trials, such as cluster-randomized controlled trials, can more validly assess the studies at low risk of bias. PMID:27047985

  4. Skin bacteriology and the role of Staphylococcus aureus in infection.

    PubMed

    Noble, W C

    1998-12-01

    Many of the staphylococci and coryneforms that inhabit normal human skin do not cause skin disease. Amongst the remainder the mechanisms of pathogenicity vary widely. For Proteus, Pseudomonas and Brevibacterium species proteolysis is a major determinant. The precise role of Corynebacterium minutissimum in erythrasma and the propionibacteria in acne is not known. Staphylococcus aureus, however, produces a wide range of non-specific agents, such as haemolysins and leucocidins as well as highly specific toxins such as the epidermolytic toxins involved in bullous impetigo and scalded skin syndrome. Most of the current attention, however, is devoted to the role of the enterotoxins and toxic shock toxin as superantigens, with emphasis on their role in atopic dermatitis. Molecularly similar toxins in the streptococci play a similar role and may also have a role in the aetiology of psoriasis. PMID:9990407

  5. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus non-aureus Infection in an Irradiated Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Kolappaswamy, Krishnan; Shipley, Steven T; Tatarov, Ivan I; DeTolla, Louis J

    2008-01-01

    We describe a case of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus non-aureus infection in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta). The nonhuman primate described was part of a research project that involved whole-body gamma irradiation and subsequently developed acute generalized dermatitis with skin dryness, peeling, and erythema around the eyes. After initial evaluation, which included microbiologic culture and 6 d of medical treatment, the animal was euthanized due to concern regarding a possible outbreak of infectious or zoonotic disease. On the basis of skin culture, diagnosis of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus non-aureus was confirmed. This report underscores the importance of the occupational risk of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus non-aureus to research and animal care staff in a research animal facility setting. PMID:18459716

  6. Vaccination With a UV-Irradiated Genetically Attenuated Mutant of Staphylococcus aureus Provides Protection Against Subsequent Systemic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Burnside, Kellie; Lembo, Annalisa; Harrell, Maria Isabel; Klein, Jessica Abbey; Lopez-Guisa, Jesus; Siegesmund, Amy M.; Torgerson, Troy R.; Oukka, Mohamed; Molina, Douglas M.; Rajagopal, Lakshmi

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus are gram-positive bacteria that cause clinically significant infections in humans. Severe S. aureus infections are particularly problematic in hospitalized patients and reoccur despite therapeutic measures. The absence of natural protective immune responses and the lack of high-throughput approaches to identify S. aureus antigens have imposed constraints in the development of effective vaccines. Here, we showed that vaccination with the genetically attenuated S. aureus mutant, inactivated using UV irradiation rather than heat, significantly increased survival and diminished bacterial burden and kidney abscesses when mice were challenged with virulent methicillin-sensitive or methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Protection conferred by immunization could be transferred to the naive host and was not observed in B-cell–deficient mice. Using a novel S. aureus whole-proteome microarray, we show that immunoglobulin G antibody responses to 83 proteins were observed in the immunized mice. These results suggest that protection against S. aureus infections requires antibody responses to the wide repertoire of antigens/virulence factors. Vaccination using UV-irradiated genetically attenuated S. aureus induces humoral immunity and provides a vaccine strategy for pathogens that fail to induce protective immunity. We also describe a novel, high-throughput technology to easily identify S. aureus antigens for vaccine development. PMID:22966130

  7. DNA microarray analysis of Staphylococcus aureus causing bloodstream infection: bacterial genes associated with mortality?

    PubMed

    Blomfeldt, A; Aamot, H V; Eskesen, A N; Monecke, S; White, R A; Leegaard, T M; Bjørnholt, J V

    2016-08-01

    Providing evidence for microbial genetic determinants' impact on outcome in Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections (SABSI) is challenging due to the complex and dynamic microbe-host interaction. Our recent population-based prospective study reported an association between the S. aureus clonal complex (CC) 30 genotype and mortality in SABSI patients. This follow-up investigation aimed to examine the genetic profiles of the SABSI isolates and test the hypothesis that specific genetic characteristics in S. aureus are associated with mortality. SABSI isolates (n = 305) and S. aureus CC30 isolates from asymptomatic nasal carriers (n = 38) were characterised by DNA microarray analysis and spa typing. Fisher's exact test, least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (LASSO) and elastic net regressions were performed to discern within four groups defined by patient outcome and characteristics. No specific S. aureus genetic determinants were found to be associated with mortality in SABSI patients. By applying LASSO and elastic net regressions, we found evidence suggesting that agrIII and cna were positively and setC (=selX) and seh were negatively associated with S. aureus CC30 versus non-CC30 isolates. The genes chp and sak, encoding immune evasion molecules, were found in higher frequencies in CC30 SABSI isolates compared to CC30 carrier isolates, indicating a higher virulence potential. In conclusion, no specific S. aureus genes were found to be associated with mortality by DNA microarray analysis and state-of-the-art statistical analyses. The next natural step is to test the hypothesis in larger samples with higher resolution methods, like whole genome sequencing. PMID:27177754

  8. β-Lactam Resistance in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 Is Increased by Inactivation of the ClpXP Protease

    PubMed Central

    Bæk, Kristoffer T.; Gründling, Angelika; Mogensen, René G.; Thøgersen, Louise; Petersen, Andreas; Paulander, Wilhelm

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has acquired the mecA gene encoding a peptidoglycan transpeptidase, penicillin binding protein 2a (PBP2a), which has decreased affinity for β-lactams. Quickly spreading and highly virulent community-acquired (CA) MRSA strains recently emerged as a frequent cause of infection in individuals without exposure to the health care system. In this study, we found that the inactivation of the components of the ClpXP protease substantially increased the β-lactam resistance level of a CA-MRSA USA300 strain, suggesting that the proteolytic activity of ClpXP controls one or more pathways modulating β-lactam resistance. These pathways do not involve the control of mecA expression, as the cellular levels of PBP2a were unaltered in the clp mutants. An analysis of the cell envelope properties of the clpX and clpP mutants revealed a number of distinct phenotypes that may contribute to the enhanced β-lactam tolerance. Both mutants displayed significantly thicker cell walls, increased peptidoglycan cross-linking, and altered composition of monomeric muropeptide species compared to those of the wild types. Moreover, changes in Sle1-mediated peptidoglycan hydrolysis and altered processing of the major autolysin Atl were observed in the clp mutants. In conclusion, the results presented here point to an important role for the ClpXP protease in controlling cell wall metabolism and add novel insights into the molecular factors that determine strain-dependent β-lactam resistance. PMID:24867990

  9. Active Immunization with an Octa-Valent Staphylococcus aureus Antigen Mixture in Models of S. aureus Bacteremia and Skin Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Sanne; Koedijk, Dennis G. A. M.; Back, Jaap Willem; Neef, Jolanda; Dreisbach, Annette; van Dijl, Jan Maarten; Bakker-Woudenberg, Irma A. J. M.; Buist, Girbe

    2015-01-01

    Proteomic studies with different Staphylococcus aureus isolates have shown that the cell surface-exposed and secreted proteins IsaA, LytM, Nuc, the propeptide of Atl (pro-Atl) and four phenol-soluble modulins α (PSMα) are invariantly produced by this pathogen. Therefore the present study was aimed at investigating whether these proteins can be used for active immunization against S. aureus infection in mouse models of bacteremia and skin infection. To this end, recombinant His-tagged fusions of IsaA, LytM, Nuc and pro-Atl were isolated from Lactococcus lactis or Escherichia coli, while the PSMα1-4 peptides were chemically synthesized. Importantly, patients colonized by S. aureus showed significant immunoglobulin G (IgG) responses against all eight antigens. BALB/cBYJ mice were immunized subcutaneously with a mixture of the antigens at day one (5 μg each), and boosted twice (25 μg of each antigen) with 28 days interval. This resulted in high IgG responses against all antigens although the response against pro-Atl was around one log lower compared to the other antigens. Compared to placebo-immunized mice, immunization with the octa-valent antigen mixture did not reduce the S. aureus isolate P load in blood, lungs, spleen, liver, and kidneys in a bacteremia model in which the animals were challenged for 14 days with a primary load of 3 × 105 CFU. Discomfort scores and animal survival rates over 14 days did not differ between immunized mice and placebo-immunized mice upon bacteremia with S. aureus USA300 (6 × 105 CFU). In addition, this immunization did not reduce the S. aureus isolate P load in mice with skin infection. These results show that the target antigens are immunogenic in both humans and mice, but in the used animal models do not result in protection against S. aureus infection. PMID:25710376

  10. Detection and Measurement of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin-Like K (SEl-K) Secretion by Staphylococcus aureus Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar, Jorge L.; Varshney, Avanish K.; Wang, Xiaobo; Stanford, Lindsay; Scharff, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin-like K (SEl-K) is a potent mitogen that elicits T-cell proliferation and cytokine production at very low concentrations. However, unlike the classical enterotoxins SEB and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1), the gene for SEl-K is commonly present in more than half of all Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates and is present in almost all USA300 community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) isolates. Sequencing of the sel-k gene in over 20 clinical isolates and comparative analysis with all 14 published sel-k sequences indicate that there are at least 6 variants of the sel-k gene, including one that is conserved among all examined USA300 strains. Additionally, we have developed a highly sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that specifically detects and measures SEl-K protein in culture supernatants and biological fluids. Quantification of in vitro SEl-K secretion by various S. aureus isolates using this novel capture ELISA revealed detectable amounts of SEl-K secretion by all isolates, with the highest secretion levels being exhibited by MRSA strains that coexpress SEB. In vivo secretion was measured in a murine thigh abscess model, where similar levels of SEl-K accumulation were noted regardless of whether the infecting strain exhibited high or low secretion of SEl-K in vitro. We conclude that SEl-K is commonly expressed in the setting of staphylococcal infection, in significant amounts. SEl-K should be further explored as a target for passive immunotherapy against complicated S. aureus infection. PMID:24808237

  11. Prevention of Staphylococcus aureus Infections by Glycoprotein Vaccines Synthesized in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Wacker, Michael; Wang, Linhui; Kowarik, Michael; Dowd, Meghan; Lipowsky, Gerd; Faridmoayer, Amir; Shields, Kelly; Park, Saeyoung; Alaimo, Cristina; Kelley, Kathryn A.; Braun, Martin; Quebatte, Julien; Gambillara, Veronica; Carranza, Paula; Steffen, Michael; Lee, Jean C.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of superficial and invasive human disease that is often refractory to antimicrobial therapy. Vaccines have the potential to reduce the morbidity, mortality, and economic impact associated with staphylococcal infections. However, single-component vaccines targeting S. aureus have failed to show efficacy in clinical trials. Methods. A novel glycoengineering technology for creation of a multicomponent staphylococcal vaccine is described. Genes encoding S. aureus capsular polysaccharide (CP) biosynthesis, PglB (a Campylobacter oligosaccharyl transferase), and a protein carrier (detoxified Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoprotein A or S. aureus α toxin [Hla]) were coexpressed in Escherichia coli. Recombinant proteins N-glycosylated with S. aureus serotype 5 or 8 CPs were purified from E. coli. Results. Rabbits and mice immunized with the glycoprotein vaccines produced antibodies that were active in vitro in functional assays. Active and passive immunization strategies targeting the CPs protected mice against bacteremia, and vaccines targeting Hla protected against lethal pneumonia. The CP-Hla bioconjugate vaccine protected against both bacteremia and lethal pneumonia, providing broad-spectrum efficacy against staphylococcal invasive disease. Conclusions. Glycoengineering technology, whereby polysaccharide and protein antigens are enzymatically linked in a simple E. coli production system, has broad applicability for use in vaccine development against encapsulated microbial pathogens. PMID:24308931

  12. SarA based novel therapeutic candidate against Staphylococcus aureus associated with vascular graft infections.

    PubMed

    Arya, Rekha; Ravikumar, R; Santhosh, R S; Princy, S Adline

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common pathogen seen in prosthetic vascular graft, leading to high morbidity and mortality. The virulence genes for severity of infections are under the control of global regulators. Staphylococcal accessory regulator A (SarA) a known master controller of biofilm formation is an attractive target for the drug development. A structure based screening of lead compounds was employed for the identification of novel small molecule inhibitors targeted to interact to the DNA binding domain of the transcriptional activator, SarA and hinder its response over the control of genes that up-regulate the phenotype, biofilm. The top-hit SarA selective inhibitor, 4-[(2,4-diflurobenzyl)amino] cyclohexanol (SarABI) was further validated in-vitro for its efficacy. The SarABI was found to have MBIC50value of 200 μg/ml and also down-regulated the expression of the RNA effector, (RNAIII), Hemolysin (hld), and fibronectin-binding protein (fnbA). The anti-adherence property of SarABI on S. aureus invasion to the host epithelial cell lines (Hep-2) was examined where no significant attachment of S. aureus was observed. The SarABI inhibits the colonization of MDR S. aureus in animal model experiment significantly cohere to the molecular docking studies and in vitro experiments. So, we propose that the SarABI could be a novel substitute to overcome a higher degree of MDR S. aureus colonization on vascular graft. PMID:26074884

  13. Polymorphisms in Fibronectin Binding Proteins A and B among Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Isolates Are Not Associated with Arthroplasty Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sharma-Kuinkel, Batu; Park, Lawrence P.; Rude, Thomas H.; Ruffin, Felicia; Hos, Nina J.; Seifert, Harald; Rieg, Siegbert; Kern, Winfried V.; Lower, Steven K.; Fowler, Vance G.; Kaasch, Achim J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in fibronectin binding protein A (fnbA) of Staphylococcus aureus are associated with cardiac device infections. However, the role of fnbA SNPs in S. aureus arthroplasty infection is unknown. Methods Bloodstream S. aureus isolates from a derivation cohort of patients at a single U.S. medical center with S. aureus bacteremia (SAB) and prosthetic hip or knee arthroplasties that were infected (PJI, n = 27) or uninfected (PJU, n = 43) underwent sequencing of fnbA and fnbB. A validation cohort of S. aureus bloodstream PJI (n = 12) and PJU (n = 58) isolates from Germany also underwent fnbA and fnbB sequencing. Results Overall, none of the individual fnbA or fnbB SNPs were significantly associated with the PJI or PJU clinical groups within the derivation cohort. Similarly, none of the individual fnbA or fnbB SNPs were associated with PJI or PJU when the analysis was restricted to patients with either early SAB (i.e., bacteremia occurring <1 year after placement or manipulation of prostheses) or late SAB (i.e., bacteremia >1 year after placement or manipulation of prostheses). Conclusions In contrast to cardiac device infections, there is no association between nonsynonymous SNPs in fnbA or fnbB of bloodstream S. aureus isolates and arthroplasty infection. These results suggest that initial steps leading to S. aureus infection of cardiovascular and orthopedic prostheses may arise by distinct processes. PMID:26606522

  14. Sigma Factor SigB Is Crucial to Mediate Staphylococcus aureus Adaptation during Chronic Infections

    PubMed Central

    Tuchscherr, Lorena; Bischoff, Markus; Lattar, Santiago M.; Noto Llana, Mariangeles; Pförtner, Henrike; Niemann, Silke; Geraci, Jennifer; Van de Vyver, Hélène; Fraunholz, Martin J.; Cheung, Ambrose L.; Herrmann, Mathias; Völker, Uwe; Sordelli, Daniel O.; Peters, Georg; Löffler, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen that causes a range of infections from acute invasive to chronic and difficult-to-treat. Infection strategies associated with persisting S. aureus infections are bacterial host cell invasion and the bacterial ability to dynamically change phenotypes from the aggressive wild-type to small colony variants (SCVs), which are adapted for intracellular long-term persistence. The underlying mechanisms of the bacterial switching and adaptation mechanisms appear to be very dynamic, but are largely unknown. Here, we analyzed the role and the crosstalk of the global S. aureus regulators agr, sarA and SigB by generating single, double and triple mutants, and testing them with proteome analysis and in different in vitro and in vivo infection models. We were able to demonstrate that SigB is the crucial factor for adaptation in chronic infections. During acute infection, the bacteria require the simultaneous action of the agr and sarA loci to defend against invading immune cells by causing inflammation and cytotoxicity and to escape from phagosomes in their host cells that enable them to settle an infection at high bacterial density. To persist intracellularly the bacteria subsequently need to silence agr and sarA. Indeed agr and sarA deletion mutants expressed a much lower number of virulence factors and could persist at high numbers intracellularly. SigB plays a crucial function to promote bacterial intracellular persistence. In fact, ΔsigB-mutants did not generate SCVs and were completely cleared by the host cells within a few days. In this study we identified SigB as an essential factor that enables the bacteria to switch from the highly aggressive phenotype that settles an acute infection to a silent SCV-phenotype that allows for long-term intracellular persistence. Consequently, the SigB-operon represents a possible target to develop preventive and therapeutic strategies against chronic and therapy-refractory infections. PMID

  15. Differential Role of Rapamycin and Torin/KU63794 in Inflammatory Response of 264.7 RAW Macrophages Stimulated by CA-MRSA

    PubMed Central

    Shappley, Rebekah K. H.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Rapamycin suppresses the RAW264.7 macrophage mediated inflammatory response but in lower doses induces it. In the present study, we tested the suppression of the inflammatory response in the presence of mTOR 1 and 2 inhibitors, Torin and KU63794. Methods. RAW264.7 cells were stimulated for 18 hrs with 106 to 107 CFU/mL inocula of community-acquired- (CA-) MRSA isolate, USA400 strain MW2, in the presence of Vancomycin. Then, in sequential experiments, we added Torin, KU63794, and Rapamycin alone and in various combinations. Supernatants were collected and assayed for TNF, IL-1, IL-6, INF, and NO. Results. Rapamycin induces 10–20% of the inflammatory cascade at dose of 0.1 ng/mL and suppresses it by 60% at dose of 10 ng/mL. The induction is abolished in the presence of Torin KU63794. Torin and KU63794 are consistently suppressing cytokine production 50–60%. Conclusions. There is a differential response between Rapamycin (mTOR-1 inhibitor) and Torin KU63794 (mTOR 1 and 2 inhibitors). Torin and KU63794 exhibit a dose related suppression. Rapamycin exhibits a significant induction-suppression biphasic response. Knowledge of such response may allow manipulation of the septic inflammatory cascade for clinical advantages. PMID:24800098

  16. [Directed therapeutic approach to Staphylococcus aureus infections. Clinical aspects of prescription].

    PubMed

    Carmona-Torre, F; Rua, M; Del Pozo, J L

    2016-09-01

    Infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus have had classically an important impact in morbidity and mortality in the nosocomial and community scene. The description of methicillin resistance among nosocomial isolates of S. aureus and his widespread diffusion has become methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in one of the most common causes of bacterial nosocomial infections. In the last years MRSA strains have also emergence in the community. This together with a progressive increase in resistance to antibiotics used classically has become vancomycin in the treatment of choice in most cases according to clinical guidelines. As a result, a progressive rise in the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) to vancomycin has been reported. In this context strains with intermediate susceptibility to vancomycin (MIC 8-4 mg/L) and heteroresistance have been noted. These strains are associated with a higher risk of treatment failure when using vancomycin. Among isolates of S. aureus susceptible to vancomycin there has been described stains with elevated MICs (≥1.5 mg/L). It is controversial if the presence of these strains has an impact on clinical outcome if treatment with vancomycin or β-lactams is prescribed. The development of new antibiotics with activity against MRSA and exploring synergies offer a promising alternative to treatment with vancomycin. PMID:27608307

  17. Peptidoglycan-linked protein A promotes T cell-dependent antibody expansion during Staphylococcus aureus infection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hwan Keun; Falugi, Fabiana; Missiakas, Dominique M.; Schneewind, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    A hallmark of Staphylococcus aureus disease in humans is persistent infections without development of protective immune responses. Infected patients generate VH3 plasmablast expansions and increased VH3 idiotype Ig; however, the mechanisms for staphylococcal modification of immune responses are not known. We report here that S. aureus-infected mice generate VH3 antibody expansions via a mechanism requiring MHC-restricted antigen presentation to CD4+ T cells and staphylococcal protein A (SpA), a cell wall-anchored surface molecule that binds Fcγ and VH3 variant heavy chains of Ig. VH3 expansion occurred with peptidoglycan-linked SpA from the bacterial envelope but not with recombinant SpA, and optimally required five tandem repeats of its Ig-binding domains. Signaling via receptor-interacting serine/threonine protein kinase 2 (RIPK2) was essential for implementing peptidoglycan-linked SpA superantigen activity. VH3 clan IgG from S. aureus-infected or SpA-treated animals was not pathogen-specific, suggesting that SpA cross-linking of VH3 idiotype B-cell receptors and activation via attached peptidoglycan are the determinants of staphylococcal escape from adaptive immune responses. PMID:27140614

  18. Peptidoglycan-linked protein A promotes T cell-dependent antibody expansion during Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hwan Keun; Falugi, Fabiana; Missiakas, Dominique M; Schneewind, Olaf

    2016-05-17

    A hallmark of Staphylococcus aureus disease in humans is persistent infections without development of protective immune responses. Infected patients generate VH3 plasmablast expansions and increased VH3 idiotype Ig; however, the mechanisms for staphylococcal modification of immune responses are not known. We report here that S. aureus-infected mice generate VH3 antibody expansions via a mechanism requiring MHC-restricted antigen presentation to CD4(+) T cells and staphylococcal protein A (SpA), a cell wall-anchored surface molecule that binds Fcγ and VH3 variant heavy chains of Ig. VH3 expansion occurred with peptidoglycan-linked SpA from the bacterial envelope but not with recombinant SpA, and optimally required five tandem repeats of its Ig-binding domains. Signaling via receptor-interacting serine/threonine protein kinase 2 (RIPK2) was essential for implementing peptidoglycan-linked SpA superantigen activity. VH3 clan IgG from S. aureus-infected or SpA-treated animals was not pathogen-specific, suggesting that SpA cross-linking of VH3 idiotype B-cell receptors and activation via attached peptidoglycan are the determinants of staphylococcal escape from adaptive immune responses. PMID:27140614

  19. Comparison of Outcomes among Adult Patients with Nosocomial Bacteremia Caused by Methicillin-Susceptible and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jann-Tay; Hsu, Le-Yin; Lauderdale, Tsai-Ling; Fan, Wen-Chien; Wang, Fu-Der

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have shown that patients with bacteremia caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have worse outcomes than those with bacteremia caused by methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA). However, only a limited number of studies have stratified the MRSA isolates into healthcare-associated (HA-) and community-associated (CA-) MRSA strains in such a comparison. This three-year retrospective cohort study, enrolling adult patients with nosocomial S. aureus bacteremia (SAB), was designed to investigate whether CA-MRSA and/or HA-MRSA strains were associated with different outcomes in comparison to MSSA in such a setting. The drug susceptibilities and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) types were determined for all of the causative isolates available. The MRSA bacteremia was further categorized into those caused by CA-MRSA strains (CA-MRSA-S bacteremia) when the causative isolates carried the type IV or V SCCmec element, those caused by HA-MRSA strains (HA-MRSA-S bacteremia) when the isolates carried the type I, II, or III SCCmec element, or unclassified MRSA bacteremia when the isolates were not available. The relevant demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were collected by reviewing the patients’ charts. The primary outcome was all-cause in-hospital mortality. A total of 353 patients were studied. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 32.6%, with 23.3% in MSSA, 30.5% in CA-MRSA-S, 47.5% in HA-MRSA-S, and 35.3% in unclassified MRSA bacteremia, respectively. The multivariate analysis showed that HA-MRSA-S, but not CA-MRSA-S, bacteremia was associated with a significantly worse outcome compared with MSSA. The other risk factors independently associated with all-cause in-hospital mortality included the Charlson co-morbidity index, septic shock, thrombocytopenia, and persistent bacteremia. Resistance to linezolid and daptomycin was found among the MRSA isolates. The present study showed that bacteremia caused by HA

  20. Specific Behaviors Predict Staphylococcus aureus Colonization and Skin and Soft Tissue Infections Among Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Persons.

    PubMed

    Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F; Wang, Xun; Weintrob, Amy; Lalani, Tahaniyat; Bavaro, Mary; Okulicz, Jason F; Mende, Katrin; Ellis, Michael; Agan, Brian K

    2015-04-01

    Background.  Few data exist on the incidence and risk factors of Staphylococcus aureus colonization and skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) among patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Methods.  Over a 2-year period, we prospectively evaluated adults infected with HIV for incident S aureus colonization at 5 body sites and SSTIs. Cox proportional hazard models using time-updated covariates were performed. Results.  Three hundred twenty-two participants had a median age of 42 years (interquartile range, 32-49), an HIV duration of 9.4 years (2.7-17.4), and 58% were on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Overall, 102 patients (32%) became colonized with S aureus with an incidence rate of 20.6 (95% confidence interval [CI], 16.8-25.0) per 100 person-years [PYs]. Predictors of colonization in the final multivariable model included illicit drug use (hazard ratios [HR], 4.26; 95% CI, 1.33-13.69) and public gym use (HR 1.66, 95% CI, 1.04-2.66), whereas antibacterial soap use was protective (HR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.32-0.78). In a separate model, perigenital colonization was associated with recent syphilis infection (HR, 4.63; 95% CI, 1.01-21.42). Fifteen percent of participants developed an SSTI (incidence rate of 9.4 cases [95% CI, 6.8-12.7] per 100 PYs). Risk factors for an SSTI included incident S aureus colonization (HR 2.52; 95% CI, 1.35-4.69), public shower use (HR, 2.59; 95% CI, 1.48-4.56), and hospitalization (HR 3.54; 95% CI, 1.67-7.53). The perigenital location for S aureus colonization was predictive of SSTIs. Human immunodeficiency virus-related factors (CD4 count, HIV RNA level, and HAART) were not associated with colonization or SSTIs. Conclusions.  Specific behaviors, but not HIV-related factors, are predictors of colonization and SSTIs. Behavioral modifications may be the most important strategies in preventing S aureus colonization and SSTIs among persons infected with HIV. PMID:26380335

  1. Daily Bathing with Chlorhexidine-based Soap and the Prevention of Staphylococcus aureus Transmission and Infection

    PubMed Central

    Viray, Melissa A.; Morley, James C.; Coopersmith, Craig M; Kollef, Marin H.; Fraser, Victoria J.; Warren, David K.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Determine if daily bathing with chlorhexidine-based soap decreased methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) transmission and ICU-acquired S. aureus infection among ICU patients. Design Prospective pre-post-intervention study with control unit Setting 1,250 bed tertiary-care teaching hospital Patients Medical and surgical intensive care unit (ICU) patients Methods Active surveillance for MRSA colonization was performed in both ICUs. In June 2005, a chlorhexidine bathing protocol was implemented in the surgical ICU. Changes in S. aureus transmission and infection rate before and after implementation were analyzed using time-series methodology. Results The intervention unit had a 20.68% decrease in MRSA acquisition after institution of the bathing protocol [pre-intervention 12.64 vs. post-intervention 10.03 cases/1000 patient-days-at-risk (95% CI: −5.19 – −0.04, p = 0.046)]. There was no significant change in MRSA acquisition in the control ICU during the study period [10.97 pre-June 2005 vs. 11.33/1000 patient-days at risk post-June 2005 (95% CI −37.40 – 15.19, p = 0.40)]. There was a 20.77% decrease in all S. aureus (including MRSA) acquisition in the intervention ICU from 2002-2007 [19.73 pre-intervention to 15.63 cases per 1000 patient-days at risk post-intervention (95% CI −7.25 – −0.95, p=0.012)]. The incidence of ICU-acquired MRSA infections decreased by 41.37% in the intervention ICU (1.96 pre-intervention vs. 1.15 infections per 1000 patient-days at risk post-intervention; p=0.001). Conclusions Institution of daily chlorhexidine bathing in an ICU resulted in a decrease in the transmission of S. aureus, including MRSA. These data support the use of routine daily chlorhexidine baths to decrease rates of S. aureus transmission and infections. PMID:24521588

  2. Protein A suppresses immune responses during Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection in guinea pigs

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kim, Hwan Keun; Falugi, Fabiana; Thomer, Lena; Missiakas, Dominique M.; Schneewind, Olaf

    2015-01-06

    Staphylococcus aureus infection is not associated with the development of protective immunity, and disease relapses occur frequently. We hypothesize that protein A, a factor that binds immunoglobulin Fcγ and cross-links VH3 clan B cell receptors (IgM), is the staphylococcal determinant for host immune suppression. To test this, vertebrate IgM was examined for protein A cross-linking. High VH3 binding activity occurred with human and guinea immunoglobulin, whereas mouse and rabbit immunoglobulins displayed little and no binding, respectively. Establishing a guinea pig model of S. aureus bloodstream infection, we show that protein A functions as a virulence determinant and suppresses host Bmore » cell responses. Immunization with SpAKKAA, which cannot bind immunoglobulin, elicits neutralizing antibodies that enable guinea pigs to develop protective immunity.« less

  3. A β-lactone-based antivirulence drug ameliorates Staphylococcus aureus skin infections in mice.

    PubMed

    Weinandy, Franziska; Lorenz-Baath, Katrin; Korotkov, Vadim S; Böttcher, Thomas; Sethi, Shneh; Chakraborty, Trinad; Sieber, Stephan A

    2014-04-01

    Skin infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus are a major clinical concern, especially if they are caused by multi-resistant strains. In these cases, a spread into deeper soft tissues or the bloodstream results in life-threatening conditions that are difficult to treat by conventional antibiotics. Previous in vitro experiments with a small β-lactone-based molecule demonstrated that antibiotic-sensitive and -resistant S. aureus strains are effectively disarmed in their virulence and corresponding pathogenicity. In this work, in vivo mouse studies show that this methodology is effective for the treatment of skin abscesses in mice. A single dose of the β-lactone significantly decreased abscess size even when applied 6 h post-infection. Although the molecule requires pharmacological optimization (improved stability, for example), this study emphasizes the potential value of antivirulence therapies. PMID:24678014

  4. Montanide ISA 71 VG is Advantageous to Freund's Adjuvant in Immunization Against S. aureus Infection of Mice.

    PubMed

    Klimka, A; Michels, L; Glowalla, E; Tosetti, B; Krönke, M; Krut, O

    2015-05-01

    The enormous capacity of Staphylococcus aureus to acquire antibiotic resistance makes it a permanent task to search for and to develop new anti-infectives. One of the possible approaches is the early active immunization of risk patients and animal stocks to prevent S. aureus infections. Based on a S. aureus proteome screen with S. aureus-specific human antiserum, we have previously identified several anchorless cell wall proteins to be used as novel vaccine candidates. To develop an efficient anti-S. aureus vaccine, the supplemented adjuvants Montanide(™) ISA 71 VG and ISA 206 were compared to Freund's adjuvant in terms of handling, induction of cytokine profile, triggering antigen-specific immunoglobulin production of different IgG subclasses and provision of increased survival rates in our S. aureus sepsis mouse model. Immunization with ISA 71 VG in comparison with Freund's adjuvant induced slightly delayed but comparably strong increase of antigen-specific antibody titres and conferred protective effect against S. aureus challenge. In contrast using ISA 206 as adjuvant, significantly lower IgG titres and consequently, no protective effect against S. aureus infection were observed. Handling and tolerability of the Montanide is superior to Freund's adjuvant. Montanide(™) ISA 71 VG can serve as an effective adjuvant replacement for Freund's adjuvant in research with a prospective usage in animal and human vaccines against bacterial pathogens. PMID:25689117

  5. Prospective multicenter surveillance identifies Staphylococcus aureus infections caused by livestock-associated strains in an agricultural state.

    PubMed

    Nair, Rajeshwari; Wu, James; Carrel, Margaret; O'Brien, Ashley; Quick, Megan; Farina, Sarah; Wardyn, Shylo; Thapaliya, Dipendra; Grenier, Dylan; Smith, Tara C

    2016-07-01

    We conducted a surveillance study to investigate the epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus infections in Iowa, using a convenience sample. Diagnostic laboratories submitted 20 S. aureus isolates per month for a 20-month period between 2011 and 2013. Of the 2226 isolates analyzed, 73.6% were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and 26.4% were methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA). S. aureus infections in 25 patients (1%) were caused by ST398- and ST9-associated strain types, and appeared to be a common occurrence in areas of the state with the highest numbers of hogs and hog farms. Twenty nine (5.1%) of MSSA isolates and 10 (40.0%) livestock-associated strains were multi-drug resistant. PMID:27198741

  6. Peripheral Intravenous Catheter Placement Is an Underrecognized Source of Staphylococcus aureus Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Eloise D.; Sullivan, Sean B.; Whittier, Susan; Lowy, Franklin D.; Uhlemann, Anne-Catrin

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have focused on the risks of peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVs) as sources for Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB), a life-threatening complication. We identified 34 PIV-related infections (7.6%) in a cohort of 445 patients with SAB. Peripheral intravenous catheter-related SAB was associated with significantly longer bacteremia duration and thrombophlebitis at old PIV sites rather than current PIVs. PMID:27191005

  7. Clonal expansion during Staphylococcus aureus infection dynamics reveals the effect of antibiotic intervention.

    PubMed

    McVicker, Gareth; Prajsnar, Tomasz K; Williams, Alexander; Wagner, Nelly L; Boots, Michael; Renshaw, Stephen A; Foster, Simon J

    2014-02-01

    To slow the inexorable rise of antibiotic resistance we must understand how drugs impact on pathogenesis and influence the selection of resistant clones. Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen with populations of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in hospitals and the community. Host phagocytes play a crucial role in controlling S. aureus infection, which can lead to a population "bottleneck" whereby clonal expansion of a small fraction of the initial inoculum founds a systemic infection. Such population dynamics may have important consequences on the effect of antibiotic intervention. Low doses of antibiotics have been shown to affect in vitro growth and the generation of resistant mutants over the long term, however whether this has any in vivo relevance is unknown. In this work, the population dynamics of S. aureus pathogenesis were studied in vivo using antibiotic-resistant strains constructed in an isogenic background, coupled with systemic models of infection in both the mouse and zebrafish embryo. Murine experiments revealed unexpected and complex bacterial population kinetics arising from clonal expansion during infection in particular organs. We subsequently elucidated the effect of antibiotic intervention within the host using mixed inocula of resistant and sensitive bacteria. Sub-curative tetracycline doses support the preferential expansion of resistant microorganisms, importantly unrelated to effects on growth rate or de novo resistance acquisition. This novel phenomenon is generic, occurring with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in the presence of β-lactams and with the unrelated human pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The selection of resistant clones at low antibiotic levels can result in a rapid increase in their prevalence under conditions that would previously not be thought to favor them. Our results have key implications for the design of effective treatment regimes to limit the spread of antimicrobial resistance, where

  8. Strain Specific Phage Treatment for Staphylococcus aureus Infection Is Influenced by Host Immunity and Site of Infection.

    PubMed

    Pincus, Nathan B; Reckhow, Jensen D; Saleem, Danial; Jammeh, Momodou L; Datta, Sandip K; Myles, Ian A

    2015-01-01

    The response to multi-drug resistant bacterial infections must be a global priority. While mounting resistance threatens to create what the World Health Organization has termed a "post-antibiotic era", the recent discovery that antibiotic use may adversely impact the microbiome adds further urgency to the need for new developmental approaches for anti-pathogen treatments. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), in particular, has declared itself a serious threat within the United States and abroad. A potential solution to the problem of antibiotic resistance may not entail looking to the future for completely novel treatments, but instead looking into our history of bacteriophage therapy. This study aimed to test the efficacy, safety, and commercial viability of the use of phages to treat Staphylococcus aureus infections using the commercially available phage SATA-8505. We found that SATA-8505 effectively controls S. aureus growth and reduces bacterial viability both in vitro and in a skin infection mouse model. However, this killing effect was not observed when phage was cultured in the presence of human whole blood. SATA-8505 did not induce inflammatory responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cultures. However, phage did induce IFN gamma production in primary human keratinocyte cultures and induced inflammatory responses in our mouse models, particularly in a mouse model of chronic granulomatous disease. Our findings support the potential efficacy of phage therapy, although regulatory and market factors may limit its wider investigation and use. PMID:25909449

  9. Strain Specific Phage Treatment for Staphylococcus aureus Infection Is Influenced by Host Immunity and Site of Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pincus, Nathan B.; Jammeh, Momodou L.; Datta, Sandip K.; Myles, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    The response to multi-drug resistant bacterial infections must be a global priority. While mounting resistance threatens to create what the World Health Organization has termed a “post-antibiotic era”, the recent discovery that antibiotic use may adversely impact the microbiome adds further urgency to the need for new developmental approaches for anti-pathogen treatments. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), in particular, has declared itself a serious threat within the United States and abroad. A potential solution to the problem of antibiotic resistance may not entail looking to the future for completely novel treatments, but instead looking into our history of bacteriophage therapy. This study aimed to test the efficacy, safety, and commercial viability of the use of phages to treat Staphylococcus aureus infections using the commercially available phage SATA-8505. We found that SATA-8505 effectively controls S. aureus growth and reduces bacterial viability both in vitro and in a skin infection mouse model. However, this killing effect was not observed when phage was cultured in the presence of human whole blood. SATA-8505 did not induce inflammatory responses in peripheral blood mononuclear cultures. However, phage did induce IFN gamma production in primary human keratinocyte cultures and induced inflammatory responses in our mouse models, particularly in a mouse model of chronic granulomatous disease. Our findings support the potential efficacy of phage therapy, although regulatory and market factors may limit its wider investigation and use. PMID:25909449

  10. Clinical Effectiveness of Mupirocin for Preventing Staphylococcus aureus Infections in Nonsurgical Settings: A Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Nair, Rajeshwari; Perencevich, Eli N; Blevins, Amy E; Goto, Michihiko; Nelson, Richard E; Schweizer, Marin L

    2016-03-01

    A systematic literature review and meta-analysis was performed to identify effectiveness of mupirocin decolonization in prevention of Staphylococcus aureus infections, among nonsurgical settings. Of the 15 662 unique studies identified up to August 2015, 13 randomized controlled trials, 22 quasi-experimental studies, and 1 retrospective cohort study met the inclusion criteria. Studies were excluded if mupirocin was not used for decolonization, there was no control group, or the study was conducted in an outbreak setting. The crude risk ratios were pooled (cpRR) using a random-effects model. We observed substantial heterogeneity among included studies (I(2) = 80%). Mupirocin was observed to reduce the risk for S. aureus infections by 59% (cpRR, 0.41; 95% confidence interval [CI], .36-.48) and 40% (cpRR, 0.60; 95% CI, .46-.79) in both dialysis and nondialysis settings, respectively. Mupirocin decolonization was protective against S. aureus infections among both dialysis and adult intensive care patients. Future studies are needed in other settings such as long-term care and pediatrics. PMID:26503378

  11. Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B–Specific Monoclonal Antibody 20B1 Successfully Treats Diverse Staphylococcus aureus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Varshney, Avanish K.; Wang, Xiaobo; Scharff, Matthew D.; MacIntyre, Jennifer; Zollner, Richard S.; Kovalenko, Oleg V.; Martinez, Luis R.; Byrne, Fergus R.; Fries, Bettina C.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has become a major health threat in the United States. Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) is a potent superantigen that contributes to its virulence. High mortality and frequent failure of therapy despite available antibiotics have stimulated research efforts to develop adjunctive therapies. Methods. Treatment benefits of SEB-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) 20B1 were investigated in mice in sepsis, superficial skin, and deep-tissue infection models. Results. Mice challenged with a SEB-producing MRSA strain developed fatal sepsis, extensive tissue skin infection, and abscess-forming deep-seeded thigh muscle infection. Animals preimmunized against SEB or treated passively with mAb 20B1 exhibited enhanced survival in the sepsis model, whereas decrease of bacterial burden was observed in the superficial skin and deep-tissue models. mAb 20B1 bound to SEB in the infected tissue and decreased abscess formation and proinflammatory cytokine levels, lymphocyte proliferation, and neutrophil recruitment. Conclusions. mAb 20B1, an SEB-neutralizing mAb, is effective against MRSA infection. mAb 20B1 protects against lethal sepsis and reduces skin tissue invasion and deep-abscess formation. The mAb penetrates well into the abscess and binds to SEB. It affects the outcome of S. aureus infection by modulating the host's proinflammatory immune response. PMID:23922375

  12. Coordinated Molecular Cross-Talk between Staphylococcus aureus, Endothelial Cells and Platelets in Bloodstream Infection.

    PubMed

    Garciarena, Carolina D; McHale, Tony M; Watkin, Rebecca L; Kerrigan, Steven W

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen often carried asymptomatically on the human body. Upon entry to the otherwise sterile environment of the cardiovascular system, S. aureus can lead to serious complications resulting in organ failure and death. The success of S. aureus as a pathogen in the bloodstream is due to its ability to express a wide array of cell wall proteins on its surface that recognise host receptors, extracellular matrix proteins and plasma proteins. Endothelial cells and platelets are important cells in the cardiovascular system and are a major target of bloodstream infection. Endothelial cells form the inner lining of a blood vessel and provide an antithrombotic barrier between the vessel wall and blood. Platelets on the other hand travel throughout the cardiovascular system and respond by aggregating around the site of injury and initiating clot formation. Activation of either of these cells leads to functional dysregulation in the cardiovascular system. In this review, we will illustrate how S. aureus establish intimate interactions with both endothelial cells and platelets leading to cardiovascular dysregulation. PMID:26690226

  13. Coordinated Molecular Cross-Talk between Staphylococcus aureus, Endothelial Cells and Platelets in Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Garciarena, Carolina D.; McHale, Tony M.; Watkin, Rebecca L.; Kerrigan, Steven W.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen often carried asymptomatically on the human body. Upon entry to the otherwise sterile environment of the cardiovascular system, S. aureus can lead to serious complications resulting in organ failure and death. The success of S. aureus as a pathogen in the bloodstream is due to its ability to express a wide array of cell wall proteins on its surface that recognise host receptors, extracellular matrix proteins and plasma proteins. Endothelial cells and platelets are important cells in the cardiovascular system and are a major target of bloodstream infection. Endothelial cells form the inner lining of a blood vessel and provide an antithrombotic barrier between the vessel wall and blood. Platelets on the other hand travel throughout the cardiovascular system and respond by aggregating around the site of injury and initiating clot formation. Activation of either of these cells leads to functional dysregulation in the cardiovascular system. In this review, we will illustrate how S. aureus establish intimate interactions with both endothelial cells and platelets leading to cardiovascular dysregulation. PMID:26690226

  14. Impact of prophylactic CpG Oligodeoxynucleotide application on implant-associated Staphylococcus aureus bone infection.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Shneh; Thormann, Ulrich; Sommer, Ursula; Stötzel, Sabine; Mohamed, Walid; Schnettler, Reinhard; Domann, Eugen; Chakraborty, Trinad; Alt, Volker

    2015-09-01

    TLR-9 ligand CpG oligodeoxynucleotide type B (CpG ODN) induces a proinflammatory environment. We evaluated the effects of a preoperative CpG ODN application in an implant-associated Staphylococcus aureus bone infection model by monitoring bacterial loads and cytokine and chemokine levels. A total of 95 rats were used in four different groups: CpG ODN group (group 1; n=25), non-CpG-ODN group (group 2; n=25); saline pretreatment (group 3; n=25), and one uninfected group (group 4; n=20). A single dose of CpG-ODN was administered to the left tibialis anterior muscle 3days prior to surgery and the tibia midshaft was osteotomized, stabilized by an intramedullary implant and subsequently contaminated with 10(3) colony forming units (CFUs) of S. aureus in groups 1-3. The osteotomy gap in animals of group 4 was not contaminated with S. aureus and those animals did not receive any pretreatment. CpG ODN administration resulted in significant reduction of the bacterial load in tibia tissue homogenate and on the implant surface on day 1 post-infection compared to non-CpG-ODN pretreatment (p<0.05; p<0.05). Reductions in bacterial CFUs, compared to non-treated (saline) controls, were approximately 67% and 77% for bone tissue homogenates and implants. No bacteria were detected in uninfected rats. Early reduction of bacterial CFUs in the tibia was accompanied by increased levels of proinflammatory mediators MIP-2, IL-1β and RANTES in bone tissue milieu of the CpG ODN treated group compared to controls. At day 42 post-infection, bone marrow tissue of rats pretreated with CpG ODN had comparable high bacterial CFU numbers as the non-CpG ODN or saline treated groups. Microbiological analysis of implants removed from CpG ODN treated rats showed high bacterial growth densities on their surfaces which were not different from those observed in controls. In histology, all animals of groups 1-3 showed established infected non-unions. Additionally, inflammatory mediator profiles in bone

  15. Correlation between fundamental binding forces and clinical prognosis of Staphylococcus aureus infections of medical implants

    SciTech Connect

    Yongsunthon, Ruchirej; Fowler, Vance; Lower, Brian H.; Vellano, Francis P.; Alexander, Emily; Reller, L. Barth; Corey, G. Ralph; Lower, Steven

    2007-03-01

    Atomic force microscopy was used to “fish” for binding reactions between a fibronectin-coated probe (i.e., substrate simulating an implant device) and each of 15 different strains of S. aureus isolated from either patients with infected cardiac prosthesis (invasive group) or healthy human subjects (control group). There is a strong distinction (p=0.01) in the binding force-signature observed for the invasive vs. control populations. This observation suggests that a microorganism’s “force taxonomy” may provide a fundamental and practical indicator of the risk that bacterial infections pose to patients with implanted medical devices.

  16. Alternatives to vancomycin for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections.

    PubMed

    Micek, Scott T

    2007-09-15

    Vancomycin remains the reference standard for the treatment of systemic infection caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). However, as a result of limited tissue distribution, as well as the emergence of isolates with reduced susceptibility and in vitro resistance to vancomycin, the need for alternative therapies that target MRSA has become apparent. New treatment options for invasive MRSA infections include linezolid, daptomycin, tigecycline, and quinupristin/dalfopristin. Additionally, a number of new anti-MRSA compounds are in development, including novel glycopeptides (dalbavancin, telavancin, and oritavancin), ceftobiprole, and iclaprim. The present article will review clinical issues surrounding the newly marketed and investigational agents with activity against MRSA. PMID:17712745

  17. Experimental Staphylococcus aureus intramammary challenge in late lactation dairy cows: quarter and cow effects determining the probability of infection.

    PubMed

    Schukken, Y H; Leslie, K E; Barnum, D A; Mallard, B A; Lumsden, J H; Dick, P C; Vessie, G H; Kehrli, M E

    1999-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors at the quarter and cow level that determine whether a quarter remains infected after an intramammary challenge with Staphylococcus aureus Newbould 305. A total of 135 cows were studied. Information on animal characteristics, cow-conformation, cow somatic cell count (SCC), and bacteriology, blood vitamin E levels, serology for retro-viral infections, bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency-carrier status, and the presence of bovine lymphocyte antigens class I alleles was collected on each animal. All quarters of all cows were then challenged with Staphylococcus aureus Newbould 305. The challenge with S. aureus Newbould 305 resulted in 28 cows (20.7%) that did not establish infection in any of the quarters, 21 (15.6%) cows had 1 quarter infected, 35 (25.9%) had 2 quarters infected, 24 (17.8%) had 3 quarters infected, and 27 (20.0%) had all quarters infected. A higher prechallenge SCC decreased the risk of infection. An infection with Corynebacterium bovis prior to challenge decreased the risk of S.aureus infection. Of the bovine lymphocyte antigen alleles, the presence of the W20A allele proved to be significantly associated with a decreased risk of infection. No other factors proved to be significant. PMID:10575606

  18. Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis Virulence Strains as Causative Agents of Persistent Infections in Breast Implants

    PubMed Central

    Chessa, Daniela; Ganau, Giulia; Spiga, Luisella; Bulla, Antonio; Mazzarello, Vittorio; Campus, Gian Vittorio; Rubino, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus aureus are currently considered two of the most important pathogens in nosocomial infections associated with catheters and other medical implants and are also the main contaminants of medical instruments. However because these species of Staphylococcus are part of the normal bacterial flora of human skin and mucosal surfaces, it is difficult to discern when a microbial isolate is the cause of infection or is detected on samples as a consequence of contamination. Rapid identification of invasive strains of Staphylococcus infections is crucial for correctly diagnosing and treating infections. The aim of the present study was to identify specific genes to distinguish between invasive and contaminating S. epidermidis and S. aureus strains isolated on medical devices; the majority of our samples were collected from breast prostheses. As a first step, we compared the adhesion ability of these samples with their efficacy in forming biofilms; second, we explored whether it is possible to determine if isolated pathogens were more virulent compared with international controls. In addition, this work may provide additional information on these pathogens, which are traditionally considered harmful bacteria in humans, and may increase our knowledge of virulence factors for these types of infections. PMID:26811915

  19. A stable luciferase reporter plasmid for in vivo imaging in murine models of Staphylococcus aureus infections.

    PubMed

    Bacconi, Marta; Haag, Andreas F; Torre, Antonina; Castagnetti, Andrea; Chiarot, Emiliano; Delany, Isabel; Bensi, Giuliano

    2016-04-01

    In vivo imaging of bioluminescent bacteria permits their visualization in infected mice, allowing spatial and temporal evaluation of infection progression. Most available bioluminescent strains were obtained by integration of the luciferase genes into the bacterial chromosome, a challenging and time-consuming approach. Recently, episomal plasmids were used, which were introduced in bacteria and expressed all genes required for bioluminescence emission. However, the plasmid was progressively lost in vitro and in vivo, if bacteria were not maintained under antibiotic selective pressure. Increased stability could be obtained inserting into the plasmid backbone sequences that assured plasmid partition between daughter bacterial cells, or caused death of bacteria that had lost the plasmid. So far, no detailed analysis was performed of either plasmid stability in vivo or contribution of different stabilizing sequence types. Here we report the construction of a plasmid, which includes the Photorhabdus luminescens lux cassette expressed under the control of a Staphylococcus aureus specific gene promoter, and toxin/antitoxin (T/A) and partition sequences (Par) conferring stability and transmissibility of the plasmid. Following infection of mice with S. aureus carrying this plasmid, we demonstrated that the promoter-lux fusion was functional in vivo, that the plasmid was retained by 70-100% of bacterial cells 7 days post-infection, and that both stabilizing sequence types were required to maximize plasmid retention. These data suggest that the plasmid can be a valuable tool to study gene expression and bacterial spread in small laboratory animals infected with S. aureus or possibly other Gram-positive human pathogens. PMID:26685857

  20. Healthcare Associated Infections of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A Case-Control-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Zhenjiang; Peng, Yang; Chen, Xiaofeng; Bi, Jiaqi; Li, Ying; Ye, Xiaohua; Shi, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most widespread and dangerous pathogens in healthcare settings. We carried out this case-control-control study at a tertiary care hospital in Guangzhou, China, to examine the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns, risk factors and clinical outcomes of MRSA infections. Methods A total of 57 MRSA patients, 116 methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) patients and 102 S. aureus negative patients were included in this study. We applied the disk diffusion method to compare the antimicrobial susceptibilities of 18 antibiotics between MRSA and MSSA isolates. Risk factors of MRSA infections were evaluated using univariate and multivariate logistic regression models. We used Cox proportional hazards models and logistic regression analysis to assess the hospital stay duration and fatality for patients with MRSA infections. Results The MRSA group had significantly higher resistance rates for most drugs tested compared with the MSSA group. Using MSSA patients as controls, the following independent risk factors of MRSA infections were identified: 3 or more prior hospitalizations (OR 2.8, 95% CI 1.3–5.8, P = 0.007), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (OR 5.9, 95% CI 1.7–20.7, P = 0.006), and use of a respirator (OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.0–12.9, P = 0.046). With the S. aureus negative patients as controls, use of a respirator (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.0–13.9, P = 0.047) and tracheal intubation (OR 8.2, 95% CI 1.5–45.1, P = 0.016) were significant risk factors for MRSA infections. MRSA patients had a longer hospital stay duration and higher fatality in comparison with those in the two control groups. Conclusions MRSA infections substantially increase hospital stay duration and fatality. Thus, MRSA infections are serious issues in this healthcare setting and should receive more attention from clinicians. PMID:26470023

  1. Complication of an Ahmed glaucoma valve implant: tube exposure with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection

    PubMed Central

    Pansegrau, Morgan L.; Mengarelli, Eddie; Dersu, Inci Irak

    2015-01-01

    Summary Neovascular glaucoma is commonly treated surgically with implantation of glaucoma drainage devices. We report the case of a 57-year-old man who underwent an uneventful Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV) placement for radiation-induced neovascular glaucoma but later developed early postoperative infection with tube exposure. The infection was identified 3 weeks postoperatively and antibiotic treatment was immediately initiated. However, the conjunctival melt progressed, and the AGV had to be removed. Culture of the device revealed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). There is a potential increased risk of postoperative infection and tube exposure following glaucoma valve implantation in patients with previous radiation therapy. To our knowledge, this is the second case in the literature of MRSA causing early postoperative infection following drainage device placement that required explantation. PMID:27330471

  2. Correlation between fundamental binding forces and clinical prognosis of Staphylococcus aureus infections of medical implants

    SciTech Connect

    Yongsunthon, Ruchirej; Fowler, Vance; Lower, Brian H.; Vellano, Francis P.; Alexander, Emily; Reller, L. Barth; Corey, G. Ralph; Lower, Steven

    2007-02-01

    Implanted medical devices (e.g., prosthetic heart valves, permanent pacemakers) significantly improve the quality of life for many humans. However, a common clinical observation is that such devices become colonized with potentially life-threatening Staphylococcus aureus biofilms, which are difficult to combat with host defenses or antibiotics. This study attempts to draw a correlation between the clinical outcome of patients with implanted cardiac devices and the fundamental binding forces ultimately responsible for the initiation of an S. aureus biofilm in-situ. Atomic force microscopy was used to measure forces between a fibronectin-coated probe (simulating a prosthetic implant) and 15 different strains of S. aureus isolated from either patients with infected cardiac devices (invasive population) or healthy human subjects (control population). The fibronectin-coated probe was repeatedly brought into and out of contact with a bacterium’s surface, “fishing” for a reaction with the cell’s fibronectin-binding proteins. More than 40,000 force profiles were measured on 5-10 different cells for each of the 15 clinical strains. A unique force-signature was observed for a binding event between the fibronectin-coated probe and the bacteria. When grouped by the frequency of this force-signature, there was a strong distinction (p=0.01) between the invasive and control populations of S. aureus. This discovery suggests that biofilm forming bacteria may be classified according to their “force taxonomy”, which could have a positive effect on health care as it bridges the long-standing disconnect between macroscopic, clinical investigations and nanometer-scale forces ultimately responsible for a bond between S. aureus and the surface of a prosthetic device.

  3. MRI Visualization of Staphyloccocus aureus-Induced Infective Endocarditis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ring, Janine; Hoerr, Verena; Tuchscherr, Lorena; Kuhlmann, Michael T.; Löffler, Bettina; Faber, Cornelius

    2014-01-01

    Infective endocarditis (IE) is a severe and often fatal disease, lacking a fast and reliable diagnostic procedure. The purpose of this study was to establish a mouse model of Staphylococcus aureus-induced IE and to develop a MRI technology to characterize and diagnose IE. To establish the mouse model of hematogenous IE, aortic valve damage was induced by placing a permanent catheter into right carotid artery. 24 h after surgery, mice were injected intravenously with either iron particle-labeled or unlabeled S. aureus (strain 6850). To distinguish the effect of IE from mere tissue injury or recruited macrophages, subgroups of mice received sham surgery prior to infection (n = 17), received surgery without infection (n = 8), or obtained additionally injection of free iron particles to label macrophages (n = 17). Cardiac MRI was performed 48 h after surgery using a self-gated ultra-short echo time (UTE) sequence (TR/TE, 5/0.31 ms; in-plane/slice, 0.125/1 mm; duration, 12∶08 min) to obtain high-resolution, artifact-free cinematographic images of the valves. After MRI, valves were either homogenized and plated on blood agar plates for determination of bacterial titers, or sectioned and stained for histology. In the animal model, both severity of the disease and mortality increased with bacterial numbers. Infection with 105 S. aureus bacteria reliably caused endocarditis with vegetations on the valves. Cinematographic UTE MRI visualised the aortic valve over the cardiac cycle and allowed for detection of bacterial vegetations, while mere tissue trauma or labeled macrophages were not detected. Iron labeling of S. aureus was not required for detection. MRI results were consistent with histology and microbial assessment. These data showed that S. aureus-induced IE in mice can be detected by MRI. The established mouse model allows for investigation of the pathophysiology of IE, testing of novel drugs and may serve for the development of a clinical diagnostic

  4. Empirical therapy in Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus infections: An Up-To-Date approach.

    PubMed

    VanEperen, Alison S; Segreti, John

    2016-06-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) continues to be an important pathogen worldwide, with high prevalence of infection in both community and hospital settings. Timely and appropriate choice of empirical therapy in the setting of MRSA infection is imperative due to the high rate of associated morbidity and mortality with MRSA infections. Initial choices should be made based on the site and severity of the infection, most notably moderate skin and soft tissue infections which may be treated with oral antibiotics (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, clindamycin, doxycycline/minocycline, linezolid) in the outpatient setting, versus choice of parenteral therapy in the inpatient setting of more invasive or severe disease. Though the current recommendations continue to strongly rely on vancomycin as a standard empiric choice in the setting of severe/invasive infections, alternative therapies exist with studies supporting their non-inferiority. This includes the use of linezolid in pneumonia and severe skin and skin structure infections (SSSI) and daptomycin for MRSA bacteremia, endocarditis, SSSIs and bone/joint infections. Additionally, concerns continue to arise in regards to vancomycin, such as increasing isolate MICs, and relatively high rates of clinical failures with vancomycin. Thus, the growing interest in vanomycin alternatives, such as ceftaroline, ceftobribole, dalbavancin, oritavancin, and tedizolid, and their potential role in treating MRSA infections. PMID:27066882

  5. Intracellular survival of Staphylococcus aureus during persistent infection in the insect Tenebrio molitor.

    PubMed

    McGonigle, John E; Purves, Joanne; Rolff, Jens

    2016-06-01

    Survival of bacteria within host cells and tissues presents a challenge to the immune systems of higher organisms. Escape from phagocytic immune cells compounds this issue, as immune cells become potential vehicles for pathogen dissemination. However, the duration of persistence within phagocytes and its contribution to pathogen load has yet to be determined. We investigate the immunological significance of intracellular persistence within the insect model Tenebrio molitor, assessing the extent, duration and location of bacterial recovery during a persistent infection. Relative abundance of Staphylococcus aureus in both intracellular and extracellular fractions was determined over 21 days, and live S. aureus were successfully recovered from both the hemolymph and within phagocytic immune cells across the entire time course. The proportion of bacteria recovered from within phagocytes also increased over time. Our results show that to accurately estimate pathogen load it is vital to account for bacteria persisting within immune cells. PMID:26778297

  6. MRSA Infections in HIV-Infected People Are Associated with Decreased MRSA-Specific Th1 Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Utay, Netanya S.; Roque, Annelys; Timmer, J. Katherina; Morcock, David R.; DeLeage, Claire; Somasunderam, Anoma; Weintrob, Amy C.; Agan, Brian K.; Estes, Jacob D.; Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F.; Douek, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    People with HIV infection are at increased risk for community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs). Lower CD4 T-cell counts, higher peak HIV RNA levels and epidemiological factors may be associated with increased risk but no specific immune defect has been identified. We aimed to determine the immunologic perturbations that predispose HIV-infected people to MRSA SSTIs. Participants with or without HIV infection and with MRSA SSTI, MRSA colonization or negative for MRSA were enrolled. Peripheral blood and skin biopsies from study participants were collected. Flow cytometry, flow cytometry with microscopy, multiplex assays of cell culture supernatants and immunohistochemistry were used to evaluate the nature of the immune defect predisposing HIV-infected people to MRSA infections. We found deficient MRSA-specific IFNγ+ CD4 T-cell responses in HIV-infected people with MRSA SSTIs compared to MRSA-colonized participants and HIV-uninfected participants with MRSA SSTIs. These IFNγ+ CD4 T cells were less polyfunctional in HIV-infected participants with SSTIs compared to those without SSTIs. However, IFNγ responses to cytomegalovirus and Mycobacterium avium antigens and MRSA-specific IL-17 responses by CD4 T cells were intact. Upon stimulation with MRSA, peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HIV-infected participants produced less IL-12 and IL-15, key drivers of IFNγ production. There were no defects in CD8 T-cell responses, monocyte responses, opsonization, or phagocytosis of Staphylococcus aureus. Accumulation of CD3 T cells, CD4 T cells, IL-17+ cells, myeloperoxidase+ neutrophils and macrophage/myeloid cells to the skin lesions were similar between HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected participants based on immunohistochemistry. Together, these results indicate that MRSA-specific IFNγ+ CD4 T-cell responses are essential for the control of initial and recurrent MRSA infections in HIV-infected people. PMID

  7. MRSA Infections in HIV-Infected People Are Associated with Decreased MRSA-Specific Th1 Immunity.

    PubMed

    Utay, Netanya S; Roque, Annelys; Timmer, J Katherina; Morcock, David R; DeLeage, Claire; Somasunderam, Anoma; Weintrob, Amy C; Agan, Brian K; Estes, Jacob D; Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F; Douek, Daniel C

    2016-04-01

    People with HIV infection are at increased risk for community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs). Lower CD4 T-cell counts, higher peak HIV RNA levels and epidemiological factors may be associated with increased risk but no specific immune defect has been identified. We aimed to determine the immunologic perturbations that predispose HIV-infected people to MRSA SSTIs. Participants with or without HIV infection and with MRSA SSTI, MRSA colonization or negative for MRSA were enrolled. Peripheral blood and skin biopsies from study participants were collected. Flow cytometry, flow cytometry with microscopy, multiplex assays of cell culture supernatants and immunohistochemistry were used to evaluate the nature of the immune defect predisposing HIV-infected people to MRSA infections. We found deficient MRSA-specific IFNγ+ CD4 T-cell responses in HIV-infected people with MRSA SSTIs compared to MRSA-colonized participants and HIV-uninfected participants with MRSA SSTIs. These IFNγ+ CD4 T cells were less polyfunctional in HIV-infected participants with SSTIs compared to those without SSTIs. However, IFNγ responses to cytomegalovirus and Mycobacterium avium antigens and MRSA-specific IL-17 responses by CD4 T cells were intact. Upon stimulation with MRSA, peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HIV-infected participants produced less IL-12 and IL-15, key drivers of IFNγ production. There were no defects in CD8 T-cell responses, monocyte responses, opsonization, or phagocytosis of Staphylococcus aureus. Accumulation of CD3 T cells, CD4 T cells, IL-17+ cells, myeloperoxidase+ neutrophils and macrophage/myeloid cells to the skin lesions were similar between HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected participants based on immunohistochemistry. Together, these results indicate that MRSA-specific IFNγ+ CD4 T-cell responses are essential for the control of initial and recurrent MRSA infections in HIV-infected people. PMID

  8. Surveillance of infection status of drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus in an Indian teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Debasmita; Rath, Shakti; Sahu, Mahesh C.; Pattnaik, Lolly; Debata, Nagen K.; Padhy, Rabindra N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To access nosocomial and community accounts of multidrug resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) isolated by surveillance in a teaching hospital, over a period of 30 months. Methods Clinical samples from nosocomial sources, i.e., wards and cabins, intensive care unit (ICU) and neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) sources, as well as community or outpatient department (OPD) sources of a hospital were used for isolating strains of S. aureus resistant to methicillin/oxacillin and vancomycin, over a period, November 2009-April 2012. Results Of a total of 1 507 S. aureus isolates, 485 strains from community and 1 022 isolates were from nosocomial sources; Out of 485 (100%) OPD S. aureus isolates, 390 (80.41%) were MRSA strains. Similarly, from wards and cabins of 564 (100%) isolates, 461 (81.73%) strains were MRSA; whereas of 458 (100%) isolates obtained from ICU and NICU, 363 (79.25%) strains were MRSA. It was ascertained with χ2-tests of independence that MRSA strains were equally distributed in “community” or “wards and cabins” or “ICU and NICU” sources, alike rest other drug-resistant S. aureus strains. Antibiotic sensitivity patterns of isolated strains with 16 antibiotics were ascertained. Out of 390 (100%) MRSA strains isolated from OPD, 80 (20.51%) were vancomycin resistant (VRSA) and 173 (44.35%) strains were moderately sensitive to vancomycin or called, vancomycin intermediate strains (VISA). Similarly, from nosocomial sources, out of 461 (100%) MRSA isolates obtained from wards and cabins, 110 (23.86%) strains were VRSA and 208 (45.11%) were VISA strains, whereas out of 363 MRSA isolates obtained from ICU and NICU, 61 (16.8%) VRSA strains and 164 (45.17%) VISA strains were found. A progressive increase of percent values of drug resistance to 16 antibiotics used for antibiotic profiling revealed its subtle infection dynamics. Conclusions This study revealed the appalling state of occurrence of MRSA and VRSA in a

  9. Multiply antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: introduction, transmission, and evolution of nosocomial infection.

    PubMed

    Locksley, R M; Cohen, M L; Quinn, T C; Tompkins, L S; Coyle, M B; Kirihara, J M; Counts, G W

    1982-09-01

    A burn patient with a multiply antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection was transferred to Harborview Medical Center from a burn unit in another state. Despite standard wound precautions, transmission to 34 patients occurred during the subsequent 15 months. Twenty-seven of the patients were infected. Disease included pneumonia, empyema, bacteremia, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and burn and wound infections. Seventeen of the 34 patients died. Phage typing and plasmid analysis showed the spread of multiply resistant S. aureus from the burn unit to the surgical intensive care unit where a study evaluating the use of chloramphenicol in cases of bowel sepsis was in progress. During this period the organism became resistant to chloramphenicol by acquiring either of two chloramphenicol R-plasmids. Using plasmid profiles and antibiograms, four epidemic strains were identified that assisted in identifying patient and personnel reservoirs. The outbreak was controlled only after rifampin was added to vancomycin treatment of infected patients, which correlated with eradication of the carrier state. PMID:7114628

  10. Alternative agents to vancomycin for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections.

    PubMed

    Culos, Kathryn A; Cannon, Joan P; Grim, Shellee A

    2013-01-01

    Resistant gram-positive infections, specifically methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), carry an increased risk for morbidity and mortality. Historically, MRSA has been a cause of nosocomial infections, although recent reports have noted an increased prevalence in community-acquired MRSA infections. Vancomycin is the preferred agent to treat MRSA. However, cases of S. aureus with reduced susceptibility to vancomycin have been reported, prompting the need for alternative treatment options. In this review, we discuss the currently available agents with MRSA activity and those in development. Linezolid and quinupristin/dalfopristin have been demonstrated as effective although potential toxicities must be taken into consideration before their use. Daptomycin, tigecycline, telavancin, and ceftaroline are well tolerated but lack the clinical data to support a superior place in treatment over vancomycin. Several new agents in various stages of development have also demonstrated MRSA activity. Currently, vancomycin remains the gold-standard treatment option for MRSA infections. In situations that limit its use, consideration of patient-specific parameters, cost, and relevant clinical data demonstrating drug safety and efficacy should be employed for the selection of the appropriate alternative agent. PMID:21642833

  11. Interactions of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa in Polymicrobial Wound Infection

    PubMed Central

    Pastar, Irena; Nusbaum, Aron G.; Gil, Joel; Patel, Shailee B.; Chen, Juan; Valdes, Jose; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Plano, Lisa R.; Tomic-Canic, Marjana; Davis, Stephen C.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the pathology resulting from Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa polymicrobial wound infections is of great importance due to their ubiquitous nature, increasing prevalence, growing resistance to antimicrobial agents, and ability to delay healing. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus USA300 is the leading cause of community-associated bacterial infections resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. We utilized a well-established porcine partial thickness wound healing model to study the synergistic effects of USA300 and P. aeruginosa on wound healing. Wound re-epithelialization was significantly delayed by mixed-species biofilms through suppression of keratinocyte growth factor 1. Pseudomonas showed an inhibitory effect on USA300 growth in vitro while both species co-existed in cutaneous wounds in vivo. Polymicrobial wound infection in the presence of P. aeruginosa resulted in induced expression of USA300 virulence factors Panton-Valentine leukocidin and α-hemolysin. These results provide evidence for the interaction of bacterial species within mixed-species biofilms in vivo and for the first time, the contribution of virulence factors to the severity of polymicrobial wound infections. PMID:23451098

  12. Vaccination with non-toxic mutant toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 induces IL-17-dependent protection against Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    PubMed

    Narita, Kouji; Hu, Dong-Liang; Asano, Krisana; Nakane, Akio

    2015-06-01

    Toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1) is one of superantigens produced by Staphylococcus aureus. We have previously demonstrated that vaccination with non-toxic mutant TSST-1 (mTSST-1) develops host protection to lethal S. aureus infection in mice. However, the detailed mechanism underlying this protection is necessary to elucidate because the passive transfer of antibodies against TSST-1 fails to provide complete protection against S. aureus infection. In this study, the results showed that interleukin-17A (IL-17A)-producing cells were increased in the spleen cells of mTSST-1-vaccinated mice. The main source of IL-17A in mTSST-1-vaccinated mice was T-helper 17 (Th17) cells. The protective effect of vaccination was induced when the vaccinated wild type but not IL-17A-deficient mice were challenged with S. aureus. Gene expression of chemokines, CCL2 and CXCL1, and infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages were increased in spleens and livers of vaccinated mice after infection. The IL-17A-dependent immune response was TSST-1 specific because TSST-1-deficient S. aureus failed to induce the response. The present study suggests that mTSST-1 vaccination is able to provide the IL-17A-dependent host defense against S. aureus infection which promotes chemokine-mediated infiltration of phagocytes into the infectious foci. PMID:25857736

  13. Identification of Staphylococcus aureus Proteins Recognized by the Antibody-Mediated Immune Response to a Biofilm Infection

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Rebecca A.; Leid, Jeff G.; Camper, Anne K.; Costerton, J. William; Shirtliff, Mark E.

    2006-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes persistent, recurrent infections (e.g., osteomyelitis) by forming biofilms. To survey the antibody-mediated immune response and identify those proteins that are immunogenic in an S. aureus biofilm infection, the tibias of rabbits were infected with methicillin-resistant S. aureus to produce chronic osteomyelitis. Sera were collected prior to infection and at 14, 28, and 42 days postinfection. The sera were used to perform Western blot assays on total protein from biofilm grown in vitro and separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Those proteins recognized by host antibodies in the harvested sera were identified via matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight analysis. Using protein from mechanically disrupted total and fractionated biofilm protein samples, we identified 26 and 22 immunogens, respectively. These included a cell surface-associated β-lactamase, lipoprotein, lipase, autolysin, and an ABC transporter lipoprotein. Studies were also performed using microarray analyses and confirmed the biofilm-specific up-regulation of most of these genes. Therefore, although the biofilm antigens are recognized by the immune system, the biofilm infection can persist. However, these proteins, when delivered as vaccines, may be important in directing the immune system toward an early and effective antibody-mediated response to prevent chronic S. aureus infections. Previous works have identified S. aureus proteins that are immunogenic during acute infections, such as sepsis. However, this is the first work to identify these immunogens during chronic S. aureus biofilm infections and to simultaneously show the global relationship between the antigens expressed during an in vivo infection and the corresponding in vitro transcriptomic and proteomic gene expression levels. PMID:16714572

  14. Evaluation of Multidrug Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and their Association with Biofilm Production in a Tertiary Care Hospital, Tripura, Northeast India

    PubMed Central

    Bir, Raunak; Majumdar, Tapan

    2015-01-01

    Background High morbidity and mortality rates are associated with Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) because of development of multidrug resistance. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) has the ability to colonize and form biofilms on biomaterials which is causing resistance towards antimicrobials and thus making them difficult to eradicate from the infected hosts. Materials and Methods Culture isolation, identification was done following standard protocol and antibiogram of the isolates were done. The detection of MRSA, Macrolide-Lincosamide-Streptogramin B resistance (MLSB), vancomycin resistance phenotypes were done by using cefoxitin disc diffusion test, D zone test and vancomycin E test. Biofilm was detected by Congo red agar method. Results A total of 100 (31.7%) S. aureus strains were isolated from 315 clinical specimens. The prevalence of MRSA was 47% (47/100) with 85.1% were homogeneous MRSA and 14.9% were heterogeneous. Out of 47 MRSA strains, 63.8% were Hospital acquired-MRSA (HA-MRSA) infections whereas rests 36.2% were caused by Community acquired-MRSA (CA-MRSA) strains. Maximum number of MRSA isolates belonged to group A biotype (34%). A 14.9% isolates were of nontypeable group. Out of 100 S. aureus isolates, the prevalence of Vancomycin resistant S. aureus (VRSA) was found to be 3%. The MLSB phenotypes showed that the rates of inducible MLSB (iMLSB), constitutive MLSB (cMLSB) and Macrolide-Streptogramin B (MSB) in case of MRSA to be 19.1%, 31.9% and 12.8%. Prevalence of low-level (MUPL) and high-level mupirocin resistance (MUPH) among MRSA was 19.1% and 6.4%. Biofilm production was found in 55% strains of S. aureus. Out of 47 MRSA strains 76.6%were producing biofilm in comparison to 38.8% in methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA). Higher degree of antibiotic resistance in biofilm producers was seen especially in case of ciprofloxacin, co-trimoxazole, rifampicin, kanamycin, erythromycin and clindamycin whereas gentamycin, tetracycline and

  15. A new lipase as a pharmaceutical target for battling infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus: Gene cloning and biochemical characterization.

    PubMed

    Ünlü, Aişe; Tanriseven, Aziz; Sezen, I Yavuz; Çelik, Ayhan

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus lipases along with other cell-wall-associated proteins and enzymes (i.e., catalase, coagulase, protease, hyaluronidase, and β-lactamase) play important roles in the pathogenesis of S. aureus and are important subject of drug targeting. The appearance of antibiotic-resistant types of pathogenic S. aureus (e.g., methicillin-resistant S. aureus, MRSA) is a worldwide medical problem. In the present work, a novel lipase from a newly isolated MRSA strain from a cow with subclinical mastitis was cloned and biochemically characterized. The mature part of the lipase was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by nickel affinity chromatography. It displays a high lipase activity at pH 8.0 and 25 °C using p-nitrophenyl palmitate and has a preference for medium-long-chain substrates of p-nitrophenyl esters (pNPC10-C16). Furthermore, in search of inhibitors, the effect of farnesol on the growth of S. aureus and the lipase activity was also studied. Farnesol inhibits the growth of S. aureus and is a mixed-type inhibitor with Ki and Ki (') values of 0.2 and 1.2 mmol L(-1), respectively. A lipase with known properties could not only serve as a template for developing inhibitors for S. aureus but also a valuable addition to enzyme toolbox of biocatalysis. The discovery of this lipase can be potentially important and could provide a new target for pharmaceutical intervention against S. aureus infection. PMID:25385356

  16. Panton-Valentine leukocidin positive Staphylococcal aureus infections of the head and neck: case series and brief review of literature.

    PubMed

    Hanratty, John; Changez, Huma; Smith, Andrew; Wales, Craig

    2015-04-01

    Panton-valentine leukocidin (PVL) is a pore-forming cytotoxin produced by some clones of Staphylococcus aureus that is associated with infections ranging from uncomplicated skin and soft tissue infections to life-threatening necrotizing pneumonia. PVL S aureus-associated maxillofacial infections are rarely reported; therefore, a high degree of clinical suspicion is warranted and close liaison with microbiologists and appropriate samples are required for optimal management. This report discusses the management and learning points from 3 such cases managed by the Greater Glasgow and Clyde National Health Service maxillofacial surgical teams. PMID:25544295

  17. Reduction of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infection among Veterans in Atlanta

    PubMed Central

    Stenehjem, Edward; Stafford, Cortney; Rimland, David

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Describe local changes in the incidence of community-onset and hospital-onset methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection and evaluate the impact of MRSA active surveillance on hospital-onset infection. DESIGN Observational study using prospectively collected data. SETTING Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center (AVAMC). PATIENTS All patients seen at the AVAMC over an 8-year period with clinically and microbiologically proven MRSA infection. METHODS All clinical cultures positive for MRSA were prospectively identified, and corresponding clinical data were reviewed. MRSA infections were classified into standard clinical and epidemiologic categories. The Veterans Health Administration implemented the MRSA directive in October 2007, which required active surveillance cultures in acute care settings. RESULTS The incidence of community-onset MRSA infection peaked in 2007 at 5.45 MRSA infections per 1,000 veterans and decreased to 3.14 infections per 1,000 veterans in 2011 (P ≤ .001 for trend). Clinical and epidemiologic categories of MRSA infections did not change throughout the study period. The prevalence of nasal MRSA colonization among veterans admitted to AVAMC decreased from 15.8% in 2007 to 11.2% in 2011 (P < .001 for trend). The rate of intensive care unit (ICU)–related hospital-onset MRSA infection decreased from October 2005 through March 2007, before the MRSA directive. Rates of ICU-related hospital-onset MRSA infection remained stable after the implementation of active surveillance cultures. No change was observed in rates of non-ICU-related hospital-onset MRSA infection. CONCLUSIONS Our study of the AVAMC population over an 8-year period shows a consistent trend of reduction in the incidence of MRSA infection in both the community and healthcare settings. The etiology of this reduction is most likely multifactorial. PMID:23221194

  18. Analysis of Bacterial Biofilms on a Cochlear Implant Following Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus Infection

    PubMed Central

    An, Yun Suk; Choi, June; Song, Jae Jun; Chae, Sung Won; Jung, Hak Hyun

    2015-01-01

    To demonstrate biofilm formations on a cochlear implant magnet of a pediatric patient suffering from a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection. The appearance of biofilm colonies was analyzed on different magnet sections. The appearance of MRSA biofilms on the surface of an explanted cochlear implant was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), focusing on the pattern of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) within the biofilms. SEM revealed unique biofilms with a three-dimensional EPS complex and tower-like formations. Biofilm configurations changed from the margin to the center of the magnet. Biofilms were solitary and scattered at the margin; large and plate-like in the center; and stacked in layers, forming towers and water channels, in the middle region. After a MRSA infection, biofilm formations were observed on the surface of a magnet. Bacterial biofilms provide optimal conditions for bacterial growth and antibiotic resistance and can cause intractable infections that lead to device failure. PMID:26771017

  19. Hybrid in situ replacement for Samson group V Staphylococcus aureus aortic graft infection

    PubMed Central

    Karpenko, A A; Ignatenko, P V; Beliaev, A M

    2013-01-01

    Aortic prosthesis replacements including extra-anatomical bypass procedures, in situ revascularisations with the neoaortoiliac system, antibiotic bounded prostheses or allogeneic grafts have high graft reinfection rates. We described a case of a 68-year-old man with Samson group V Staphylococcus aureus infection of his aortobifemoral graft. He underwent an explantation of the infected graft, wound debridement and a hybrid in situ allogeneic aortoiliofemoral replacement. During surgery one of the limbs of the cryopreserved human aortic allogeneic graft was anastomosed with the endarterectomised left common iliac artery, which later was angioplastied and stented. The closed system Jackson-Pratt drains were used to prevent perigraft fluid collection. The groin wound was treated with the vacuum-assisted closure dressing. On review in 6 months he remained symptom free. We conclude that a hybrid management of infected aortic prosthesis may reduce graft reinfection. PMID:23897382

  20. Hybrid in situ replacement for Samson group V Staphylococcus aureus aortic graft infection.

    PubMed

    Karpenko, A A; Ignatenko, P V; Beliaev, A M

    2013-01-01

    Aortic prosthesis replacements including extra-anatomical bypass procedures, in situ revascularisations with the neoaortoiliac system, antibiotic bounded prostheses or allogeneic grafts have high graft reinfection rates. We described a case of a 68-year-old man with Samson group V Staphylococcus aureus infection of his aortobifemoral graft. He underwent an explantation of the infected graft, wound debridement and a hybrid in situ allogeneic aortoiliofemoral replacement. During surgery one of the limbs of the cryopreserved human aortic allogeneic graft was anastomosed with the endarterectomised left common iliac artery, which later was angioplastied and stented. The closed system Jackson-Pratt drains were used to prevent perigraft fluid collection. The groin wound was treated with the vacuum-assisted closure dressing. On review in 6 months he remained symptom free. We conclude that a hybrid management of infected aortic prosthesis may reduce graft reinfection. PMID:23897382

  1. Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infection Recurrences Among Household Members: An Examination of Host, Behavioral, and Pathogen-Level Predictors

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Loren G.; Eells, Samantha J.; David, Michael Z.; Ortiz, Nancy; Taylor, Alexis R.; Kumar, Neha; Cruz, Denise; Boyle-Vavra, Susan; Daum, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Many patients suffer from recurrent Staphylococcus aureus infections, but there are few data examining recurrence predictors. Methods. We followed adults and children after treatment for S. aureus skin infections and their household contacts in Los Angeles and Chicago. We surveyed subjects for S. aureus body colonization, household fomite contamination, and behavioral and clinical factors at baseline and 3 and 6 months later. Using repeated measures modeling, we examined host, pathogen, behavioral, and clinical factors associated with recurrence. Results. Among 330 index subjects, 182 (55%) were infected with an isolate of the USA300 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) genetic background. Recurrences occurred in 39% by month 3 and 51% by month 6. Among 588 household contacts, 10% reported a skin infection by month 3 and 13% by month 6. Among index subjects, recurrence was associated with (P < .05) Los Angeles site, diabetes, recent hospitalization, recent skin infection, recent cephalexin use, and household S. aureus or MRSA fomite contamination; recurrence was inversely associated with recent contact sports participation. In the multivariate model, independent predictors of recurrence in index patients were recent hospitalization, household MRSA fomite contamination, and lack of recent contact sports participation. Among household contacts, independent predictors of subsequent skin infection were Chicago site, antibiotic use in the prior year, and skin infection in the prior 3 months. Conclusions. In our longitudinal study, patients with a S. aureus skin infection were more likely to suffer a recurrence if household fomites were MRSA contaminated. Interventions to prevent recurrence may be enhanced by decontamination of household fomites. PMID:25428411

  2. Fibrinogen Is at the Interface of Host Defense and Pathogen Virulence in Staphylococcus aureus Infection.

    PubMed

    Ko, Ya-Ping; Flick, Matthew J

    2016-06-01

    Fibrinogen not only plays a pivotal role in hemostasis but also serves key roles in antimicrobial host defense. As a rapidly assembled provisional matrix protein, fibrin(ogen) can function as an early line of host protection by limiting bacterial growth, suppressing dissemination of microbes to distant sites, and mediating host bacterial killing. Fibrinogen-mediated host antimicrobial activity occurs predominantly through two general mechanisms, namely, fibrin matrices functioning as a protective barrier and fibrin(ogen) directly or indirectly driving host protective immune function. The potential of fibrin to limit bacterial infection and disease has been countered by numerous bacterial species evolving and maintaining virulence factors that engage hemostatic system components within vertebrate hosts. Bacterial factors have been isolated that simply bind fibrinogen or fibrin, promote fibrin polymer formation, or promote fibrin dissolution. Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic gram-positive bacterium, the causative agent of a wide range of human infectious diseases, and a prime example of a pathogen exquisitely sensitive to host fibrinogen. Indeed, current data suggest fibrinogen serves as a context-dependent determinant of host defense or pathogen virulence in Staphylococcus infection whose ultimate contribution is dictated by the expression of S. aureus virulence factors, the path of infection, and the tissue microenvironment. PMID:27056151

  3. Polymorphisms in Fibronectin Binding Protein A of Staphylococcus Aureus are Associated with Infection of Cardiovascular Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Lower, Steven; Lamlertthon, Supaporn; Casillas-Ituarte, Nadia; Lins, Roberto D.; Yongsunthon, Ruchirej; Taylor, Eric S.; DiBartola, Alex; Edmondson, Catherine; McIntyre, Lauren M.; Reller, L. Barth; Que, Yok-Ai; Ros, Robert; Lower, Brian; Fowler, Vance

    2011-11-08

    Medical implants, like cardiovascular devices, improve the quality of life for countless individuals but may become infected with bacteria like Staphylococcus aureus. Such infections take the form of a bio-film, a structured community of bacterial cells adherent to the surface of a solid substrate. Every bio-film begins with an attractive force or bond between bacterium and substratum. We used atomic force microscopy to probe experimentally forces between a fibronectin-coated surface (i.e., proxy for an implanted cardiac device) and fibronectin-binding receptors on the surface of individual living bacteria from each of 80 clinical isolates of S. aureus. These isolates originated from humans with infected cardiac devices (CDI; n = 26), uninfected cardiac devices (n = 20), and the anterior nares of asymptomatic subjects (n = 34). CDI isolates exhibited a distinct bindingforce signature and had speci!c single amino acid polymorphisms in fibronectin-binding protein A corresponding to E652D, H782Q, and K786N. In silico molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that residues D652, Q782, and N786 in fibronectin-binding protein A form extra hydrogen bonds with fibronectin, complementing the higher binding force and energy measured by atomic force microscopy for the CDI isolates. This study is significant, because it links pathogenic bacteria biofilms from the length scale of bonds acting across a nanometer-scale space to the clinical presentation of disease at the human dimension.

  4. The Sbi Protein Contributes to Staphylococcus aureus Inflammatory Response during Systemic Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Cintia Daniela; Garófalo, Ailin; Gómez, Marisa I.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important human pathogen that causes infections that may present high morbidity and mortality. Among its many virulence factors protein A (SpA) and Staphylococcal binding immunoglobulin protein (Sbi) bind the Fc portion of IgG interfering with opsonophagocytosis. We have previously demonstrated that SpA interacts with the TNF-α receptor (TNFR) 1 through each of the five IgG binding domains and induces the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. The IgG binding domains of Sbi are homologous to those of SpA, which allow us to hypothesize that Sbi might also have a role in the inflammatory response induced by S. aureus. We demonstrate that Sbi is a novel factor that participates in the induction of the inflammatory response during staphylococcal infections via TNFR1 and EGFR mediated signaling as well as downstream MAPKs. The expression of Sbi significantly contributed to IL-6 production and modulated CXCL-1 expression as well as neutrophil recruitment to the site of infection, thus demonstrating for the first time its relevance as a pro-inflammatory staphylococcal antigen in an in vivo model. PMID:26126119

  5. Polymorphisms in fibronectin binding protein A of Staphylococcus aureus are associated with infection of cardiovascular devices

    PubMed Central

    Lower, Steven K.; Lamlertthon, Supaporn; Casillas-Ituarte, Nadia N.; Lins, Roberto D.; Yongsunthon, Ruchirej; Taylor, Eric S.; DiBartola, Alex C.; Edmonson, Catherine; McIntyre, Lauren M.; Reller, L. Barth; Que, Yok-Ai; Ros, Robert; Lower, Brian H.; Fowler, Vance G.

    2011-01-01

    Medical implants, like cardiovascular devices, improve the quality of life for countless individuals but may become infected with bacteria like Staphylococcus aureus. Such infections take the form of a biofilm, a structured community of bacterial cells adherent to the surface of a solid substrate. Every biofilm begins with an attractive force or bond between bacterium and substratum. We used atomic force microscopy to probe experimentally forces between a fibronectin-coated surface (i.e., proxy for an implanted cardiac device) and fibronectin-binding receptors on the surface of individual living bacteria from each of 80 clinical isolates of S. aureus. These isolates originated from humans with infected cardiac devices (CDI; n = 26), uninfected cardiac devices (n = 20), and the anterior nares of asymptomatic subjects (n = 34). CDI isolates exhibited a distinct binding-force signature and had specific single amino acid polymorphisms in fibronectin-binding protein A corresponding to E652D, H782Q, and K786N. In silico molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate that residues D652, Q782, and N786 in fibronectin-binding protein A form extra hydrogen bonds with fibronectin, complementing the higher binding force and energy measured by atomic force microscopy for the CDI isolates. This study is significant, because it links pathogenic bacteria biofilms from the length scale of bonds acting across a nanometer-scale space to the clinical presentation of disease at the human dimension. PMID:22025727

  6. Patients with Panton-Valentine leukocidin positive Staphylococcus aureus infections run an increased risk of longer hospitalisation.

    PubMed

    Cupane, L; Pugacova, N; Berzina, D; Cauce, V; Gardovska, D; Miklaševics, E

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of purulent infections. The spectrum of staphylococcal infections varies from mild superficial to invasive life-threatening diseases due to S. aureus ability to produce a wide range of virulence factors, including toxins. A prospective observational study was conducted in the Children Clinical University Hospital in Riga, Latvia. During a period of sixteen months from November 2006 to March 2008 224 S. aureus isolates were collected. Our study revealed that Panton-Valentine leukocidine (PVL) genes are carried by a high number (75%) of S. aureus isolates recovered from children hospitalised in the Children Clinical University hospital. Most of these isolates were associated with abscesses and other skin and soft tissue infections. Patients with PVL positive invasive infections stayed significantly longer in hospital than patients with PVL negative invasive infections. Clonal distribution of PVL positive S. aureus isolates were closely related, which provides evidence for the wide spread of PVL producing spa type t435 and ST121 staphylococci in community. PMID:22493751

  7. Differences in Epidemiological and Molecular Characteristics of Nasal Colonization with Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA-MRSA) in Children from a University Hospital and Day Care Centers

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Erika A.; Correa, Margarita M.; Ospina, Sigifredo; Atehortúa, Santiago L.; Jiménez, J. Natalia

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical significance of Staphylococcus aureus colonization has been demonstrated in hospital settings; however, studies in the community have shown contrasting results regarding the relevance of colonization in infection by community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA). In Colombia there are few studies on S. aureus colonization. The aim of this study was to determine the molecular and epidemiological characteristics of nasal colonization by S. aureus (MSSA-MRSA) in children from a university hospital and day care centers (DCCs) of Medellin, Colombia. Methods An observational cross-sectional study was conducted in 400 children (200 in each setting), aged 0 months to 5 years, during 2011. Samples were collected from each nostril and epidemiological information was obtained from the parents. Genotypic analysis included spa typing, PFGE, MLST, SCCmec typing, detection of genes for virulence factors and agr groups. Results Frequency of S. aureus colonization was 39.8% (n = 159) (hospital 44.5% and DCCs 35.0%) and by MRSA, 5.3% (n = 21) (hospital 7.0% and DCCs 3.5%). Most S. aureus colonized children were older than two years (p = 0.005), the majority of them boys (59.1%), shared a bedroom with a large number of people (p = 0.028), with history of β-Lactamase inhibitors usage (p = 0.020). MSSA strains presented the greatest genotypic diversity with 15 clonal complexes (CC). MRSA isolates presented 6 CC, most of them (47.6%) belonged to CC8-SCCmec IVc and were genetically related to previously reported infectious MRSA strains. Conclusion Differences in epidemiological and molecular characteristics between populations may be useful for the understanding of S. aureus nasal colonization dynamics and for the design of strategies to prevent S. aureus infection and dissemination. The finding of colonizing MRSA with similar molecular characteristics of those causing infection demonstrates the dissemination capacity of S. aureus and the risk of infection

  8. Interactions between Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus during co-cultivations and polymicrobial infections.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Angela T; Oglesby-Sherrouse, Amanda G

    2016-07-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus are versatile bacterial pathogens and common etiological agents in polymicrobial infections. Microbial communities containing both of these pathogens are shaped by interactions ranging from parasitic to mutualistic, with the net impact of these interactions in many cases resulting in enhanced virulence. Polymicrobial communities of these organisms are further defined by multiple aspects of the host environment, with important implications for disease progression and therapeutic outcomes. This mini-review highlights the impact of these interactions on the host and individual pathogens, the molecular mechanisms that underlie these interactions, and host-specific factors that drive interactions between these two important pathogens. PMID:27236810

  9. Ecthyma-gangrenosum-like lesions associated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    PubMed

    Sen, Hüseyin; Inangil, Gökhan; Sahin, Levent; Dere, Kamer; Ozkan, Sezai; Dağli, Güner

    2009-07-01

    Ecthyma gangrenosum (EG) manifests as a skin lesion and is commonly associated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa septicemia in immunocompromised patients. Other viral, fungal and bacterial agents can also cause EG. The first clinical observation is grouped vesicles with surrounding erythema. Within a few days, they evolve into a gangrenous ulcer with a black/gray eschar surrounded by an erythematous halo. Herein, we present a patient with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who developed EG-like lesions due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection while he was in the intensive care unit. PMID:19027336

  10. Clinical, Microbiological, and Genetic Characteristics of Heteroresistant Vancomycin-Intermediate Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia in a Teaching Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Di Gregorio, Sabrina; Perazzi, Beatriz; Ordoñez, Andrea Martinez; De Gregorio, Stella; Foccoli, Monica; Lasala, María Beatriz; García, Susana; Vay, Carlos; Famiglietti, Angela

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of vancomycin intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (VISA) and heterogeneous VISA (hVISA) is of major concern worldwide. Our objective was to investigate the prevalence, phenotypic and molecular features of hVISA strains isolated from bacteremic patients and to determine the clinical significance of the hVISA phenotype in patients with bacteremia. A total of 104 S. aureus blood isolates were collected from a teaching hospital of Argentina between August 2009 and November 2010. No VISA isolate was recovered, and 3 out of 92 patients (3.3%) were infected with hVISA, 2 of them methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) (4.5% of MRSA). Macro Etest and prediffusion method detected 3/3 and 2/3 hVISA respectively. Considering the type of bacteremia, the three cases were distributed as follows: two patients had suffered multiple episodes of bacteremia (both hVISA strains recovered in the second episode), while only one patient had suffered a single episode of bacteremia with hVISA infection. MRSA bloodstream isolates exhibiting the hVISA phenotype were related to HA-MRSA Cordobes clone (ST5-SCCmec I-spa t149) and MRSA Argentinean pediatric clone (ST100-SCCmec IVNV-spa t002), but not to CA-MRSA-ST30-SCCmec IV-spa t019 clone that was one of the most frequent in our country. Although still relatively infrequent in our hospital, hVISA strains were significantly associated with multiple episodes of bacteremia (p=0.037) and genetically unrelated. PMID:25535825

  11. Evaluation of a nisin-eluting nanofiber scaffold to treat Staphylococcus aureus-induced skin infections in mice.

    PubMed

    Heunis, Tiaan D J; Smith, Carine; Dicks, Leon M T

    2013-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a virulent pathogen and a major causative agent of superficial and invasive skin and soft tissue infections (SSSTIs). Antibiotic resistance in S. aureus, among other bacterial pathogens, has rapidly increased, and this is placing an enormous burden on the health care sector and has serious implications for infected individuals, especially immunocompromised patients. Alternative treatments thus need to be explored to continue to successfully treat infections caused by S. aureus, including antibiotic-resistant strains of S. aureus. In this study, an antimicrobial nanofiber wound dressing was generated by electrospinning nisin (Nisaplin) into poly(ethylene oxide) and poly(d,l-lactide) (50:50) blend nanofibers. Active nisin diffused from the nanofiber wound dressings for at least 4 days in vitro, as shown by consecutive transfers onto plates seeded with strains of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The nisin-containing nanofiber wound dressings significantly reduced S. aureus Xen 36 bioluminescence in vivo and viable cell numbers in a murine excisional skin infection model. The bacterial burden of wounds treated with nisin-containing nanofiber wound dressings was 4.3 × 10(2) CFU/wound, whereas wounds treated with control nanofiber wound dressings had 2.2 × 10(7) CFU/wound on the last day of the trial (day 7). Furthermore, the wound dressings stimulated wound closure of excisional wounds, and no adverse effects were observed by histological analysis. Nisin-containing nanofiber wound dressings have the potential to treat S. aureus skin infections and to potentially accelerate wound healing of excisional wounds. PMID:23733456

  12. Evaluation of a Nisin-Eluting Nanofiber Scaffold To Treat Staphylococcus aureus-Induced Skin Infections in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Heunis, Tiaan D. J.; Smith, Carine

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a virulent pathogen and a major causative agent of superficial and invasive skin and soft tissue infections (SSSTIs). Antibiotic resistance in S. aureus, among other bacterial pathogens, has rapidly increased, and this is placing an enormous burden on the health care sector and has serious implications for infected individuals, especially immunocompromised patients. Alternative treatments thus need to be explored to continue to successfully treat infections caused by S. aureus, including antibiotic-resistant strains of S. aureus. In this study, an antimicrobial nanofiber wound dressing was generated by electrospinning nisin (Nisaplin) into poly(ethylene oxide) and poly(d,l-lactide) (50:50) blend nanofibers. Active nisin diffused from the nanofiber wound dressings for at least 4 days in vitro, as shown by consecutive transfers onto plates seeded with strains of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The nisin-containing nanofiber wound dressings significantly reduced S. aureus Xen 36 bioluminescence in vivo and viable cell numbers in a murine excisional skin infection model. The bacterial burden of wounds treated with nisin-containing nanofiber wound dressings was 4.3 × 102 CFU/wound, whereas wounds treated with control nanofiber wound dressings had 2.2 × 107 CFU/wound on the last day of the trial (day 7). Furthermore, the wound dressings stimulated wound closure of excisional wounds, and no adverse effects were observed by histological analysis. Nisin-containing nanofiber wound dressings have the potential to treat S. aureus skin infections and to potentially accelerate wound healing of excisional wounds. PMID:23733456

  13. Selenium Deficiency Facilitates Inflammation Following S. aureus Infection by Regulating TLR2-Related Pathways in the Mouse Mammary Gland.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xuejiao; Zhang, Zecai; Li, Ying; Shen, Peng; Hu, Xiaoyu; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng

    2016-08-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential micronutrient affecting various aspects of health. Se deficiency has been associated with inflammation and immune responses. Mastitis poses a serious problem for humans and animals in the postpartum period. Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) is the most common infectious bacterial pathogen associated with mastitis. The present study sought to determine the effects and underlying mechanism of dietary Se on S. aureus-induced inflammation using a model of mouse mastitis. ELISA and Western blotting were performed to detect protein levels. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) was performed to detect messenger RNA (mRNA) levels. The histopathological changes indicated that Se deficiency resulted in increased inflammatory lesions in S. aureus mastitis, whereas Se deficiency did not induce inflammatory lesions in the mammary gland. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity was increased in Se-deficient mice with S. aureus mastitis. Analysis of cytokine mRNA and protein showed that Se deficiency leads to increased TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 production in S. aureus mastitis. In addition, Se deficiency enhanced the mRNA and protein expressions of toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2), which were originally upregulated by S. aureus in the mammary gland tissues and human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293)-mTLR2 cells. When Se-deficient mice were infected with S. aureus, the phosphorylation of IκB, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 was greatly increased. The results indicate that Se deficiency could intensify the inflammatory reaction in S. aureus mastitis. This work contributes to the exploration of new methods of preventing or treating of S. aureus mastitis and other infectious diseases. PMID:26743867

  14. Variability of antibiotic susceptibility and toxin production of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from skin, soft tissue, and bone related infections

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic commensal bacterium that mostly colonizes the skin and soft tissues. The pathogenicity of S. aureus is due to both its ability to resist antibiotics, and the production of toxins. Here, we characterize a group of genes responsible for toxin production and antibiotic resistance of S. aureus strains isolated from skin, soft tissue, and bone related infections. Results A total of 136 S. aureus strains were collected from five different types of infection: furuncles, pyomyositis, abscesses, Buruli ulcers, and osteomyelitis, from hospital admissions and out-patients in Benin. All strains were resistant to benzyl penicillin, while 25% were resistant to methicillin, and all showed sensitivity to vancomycin. Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) was the most commonly produced virulence factor (70%), followed by staphylococcal enterotoxin B (44%). Exfoliative toxin B was produced by 1.3% of the strains, and was only found in isolates from Buruli ulcers. The tsst-1, sec, and seh genes were rarely detected (≤1%). Conclusions This study provides new insight into the prevalence of toxin and antibiotic resistance genes in S. aureus strains responsible for skin, soft tissue, and bone infections. Our results showed that PVL was strongly associated with pyomyositis and osteomyelitis, and that there is a high prevalence of PVL-MRSA skin infections in Benin. PMID:23924370

  15. Dissecting the Mechanisms of Linezolid Resistance in a Drosophila melanogaster Infection Model of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Diaz, Lorena; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.; Panesso, Diana; Albert, Nathaniel D.; Singh, Kavindra V.; Tran, Truc T.; Munita, Jose M.; Murray, Barbara E.; Arias, Cesar A.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Mini-host models are simple experimental systems to study host-pathogen interactions. We adapted a Drosophila melanogaster infection model to evaluate the in vivo effect of different mechanisms of linezolid (LNZ) resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. Methods. Fly survival was evaluated after infection with LNZ-resistant S. aureus strains NRS119 (which has mutations in 23S ribosomal RNA [rRNA]), CM-05 and 004-737X (which carry cfr), LNZ-susceptible derivatives of CM-05 and 004-737X (which lack cfr), and ATCC 29213 (an LNZ-susceptible control). Flies were then fed food mixed with LNZ (concentration, 15–500 µg/mL). Results were compared to those in mouse peritonitis, using LNZ via oral gavage at 80 and 120 mg/kg every 12 hours. Results. LNZ at 500 µg/mL in fly food protected against all strains, while concentrations of 15–250 µg/mL failed to protect against NRS119 (survival, 1.6%–20%). An in vivo effect of cfr was only detected at concentrations of 30 and 15 µg/mL. In the mouse peritonitis model, LNZ (at doses that mimic human pharmacokinetics) protected mice from challenge with the cfr+ 004-737X strain but was ineffective against the NRS119 strain, which carried 23S rRNA mutations. Conclusions. The fly model offers promising advantages to dissect the in vivo effect of LNZ resistance in S. aureus, and findings from this model appear to be concordant with those from the mouse peritonitis model. PMID:23547139

  16. Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus Colonization and Risk Factors for Infection Among Military Personnel in a Shipboard Setting.

    PubMed

    Curry, Jennifer A; Maguire, Jason D; Fraser, Jamie; Tribble, David R; Deiss, Robert G; Bryan, Coleman; Tisdale, Michele D; Crawford, Katrina; Ellis, Michael; Lalani, Tahaniyat

    2016-06-01

    Staphylococcal skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs), especially those due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are an important public health issue for the military. Limited data exist regarding the prevalence of S. aureus colonization in the shipboard setting. We conducted a cross-sectional, observational study to determine the point prevalence of S. aureus colonization among military personnel onboard a naval vessel. Asymptomatic active duty personnel completed a survey for risk factors associated with colonization and SSTIs. Culture specimens were obtained from the anterior nares, pharynx, groin, and perirectal regions. MRSA isolates underwent testing for antimicrobial resistance, virulence factors, and pulsed-field type. 400 individuals were enrolled, 198 (49.5%) of whom were colonized with S. aureus, with MRSA identified in 14 participants (3.5%). No significant risk factors were associated with MRSA colonization. USA800 was the most common colonizing MRSA strain in the cohort and was detected in 10 participants (71%). Two participants (14%) were colonized with USA300 MRSA. In this first report of S. aureus epidemiology in a shipboard setting, we observed high rates of S. aureus and MRSA colonization. Longitudinal studies are needed to document the incident rates of S. aureus colonization during shipboard deployment and its impact on SSTI risk. PMID:27244061

  17. Antibacterial activity of honey against strains of Staphylococcus aureus from infected wounds.

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, R A; Molan, P C; Harding, K G

    1999-01-01

    The antibacterial action of honey in infected wounds does not depend wholly on its high osmolarity. We tested the sensitivity of 58 strains of coagulase-positive Staphylococcus aureus, isolated from infected wounds, to a pasture honey and a manuka honey. There was little variation between the isolates in their sensitivity to honey: minimum inhibitory concentrations were all between 2 and 3% (v/v) for the manuka honey and between 3 and 4% for the pasture honey. Thus, these honeys would prevent growth of S. aureus if diluted by body fluids a further seven-fold to fourteen-fold beyond the point where their osmolarity ceased to be completely inhibitory. The antibacterial action of the pasture honey relied on release of hydrogen peroxide, which in vivo might be reduced by catalase activity in tissues or blood. The action of manuka honey stems partly from a phytochemical component, so this type of honey might be more effective in vivo. Comparative clinical trials with standardized honeys are needed. PMID:10472280

  18. Contribution of Toll-Like Receptor 2 to the Innate Response against Staphylococcus aureus Infection in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kohanawa, Masashi; Zhao, Songji; Ozaki, Michitaka; Haga, Sanae; Kuge, Yuji; Tamaki, Nagara

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common pathogen that causes a wide range of infectious diseases. The function of TLRs, specifically TLR2, during S. aureus infection is still debated. In this study, we investigated the extent to which TLR2 contributes to the host innate response against the bacterial infection using TLR2-deficient mice. Intravenous inoculation with S. aureus resulted in all TLR2-deficient mice dying within 4 d, along with a high bacterial burden in the livers. However, histological examination showed the same degree of macrophage and neutrophil accumulation in the livers of infected TLR2-deficient mice as that in infected wild-type (WT) mice. TLR2-deficient mouse macrophages also showed normal phagocytic activity, although they failed to express CD36 that appeared on the surface of WT mouse cells upon challenge with heat-killed S. aureus. These data indicate that TLR2, as well as CD36, does not directly affect S. aureus clearance and that CD36 expression on macrophages depends on the presence of TLR2. In vivo infection with S. aureus caused significantly elevated production of TNF-α and IL-6 in the livers and blood of TLR2-deficient mice compared with those in WT mice, while the hepatic and serum levels of IL-10 decreased in these mice. In contrast, lower expression of IL-6 and IL-10, but not of TNF-α, at both the gene and protein levels was found in TLR2-deficient mouse macrophages compared to that in WT mouse cells, in response to challenge with heat-killed S. aureus. These findings suggest that the S. aureus-induced pro-inflammatory cytokine response is not dependent on macrophages and that TLR2 deficiency results in decreased IL-10 release by macrophages, which contributes to dysregulated cytokine balance, impaired bacterial clearance, and mouse death. Therefore, TLR2 possesses a protective function during S. aureus infection by regulating pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine responses. PMID:24058538

  19. Emergence of Hospital- and Community-Associated Panton-Valentine Leukocidin-Positive Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Genotype ST772-MRSA-V in Ireland and Detailed Investigation of an ST772-MRSA-V Cluster in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Shore, Anna C.; Corcoran, Suzanne; Tecklenborg, Sarah; Coleman, David C.; O'Connell, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Sequence type 22 (ST22) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) harboring staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) IV (ST22-MRSA-IV) has predominated in Irish hospitals since the late 1990s. Six distinct clones of community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) have also been identified in Ireland. A new strain of CA-MRSA, ST772-MRSA-V, has recently emerged and become widespread in India and has spread into hospitals. In the present study, highly similar MRSA isolates were recovered from seven colonized neonates in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in a maternity hospital in Ireland during 2010 and 2011, two colonized NICU staff, one of their colonized children, and a NICU environmental site. The isolates exhibited multiantibiotic resistance, spa type t657, and were assigned to ST772-MRSA-V by DNA microarray profiling. All isolates encoded resistance to macrolides [msr(A) and mpb(BM)] and aminoglycosides (aacA-aphD and aphA3) and harbored the Panton-Valentine leukocidin toxin genes (lukF-PV and lukS-PV), enterotoxin genes (sea, sec, sel, and egc), and one of the immune evasion complex genes (scn). One of the NICU staff colonized by ST772-MRSA-V was identified as the probable index case, based on recent travel to India. Seven additional hospital and CA-ST772-MRSA-V isolates recovered from skin and soft tissue infections in Ireland between 2009 and 2011 exhibiting highly similar phenotypic and genotypic characteristics to the NICU isolates were also identified. The clinical details of four of these patients revealed connections with India through ethnic background or travel. Our study indicates that hospital-acquired and CA-ST772-MRSA-V is currently emerging in Ireland and may have been imported from India on several occasions. PMID:22189119

  20. Molecular Types of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Methicillin-Sensitive S. aureus Strains Causing Skin and Soft Tissue Infections and Nasal Colonization, Identified in Community Health Centers in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Pardos de la Gandara, Maria; Raygoza Garay, Juan Antonio; Mwangi, Michael; Tobin, Jonathan N.; Tsang, Amanda; Khalida, Chamanara; D'Orazio, Brianna; Kost, Rhonda G.; Leinberger-Jabari, Andrea; Coffran, Cameron; Evering, Teresa H.; Coller, Barry S.; Balachandra, Shirish; Urban, Tracie; Parola, Claude; Salvato, Scott; Jenks, Nancy; Wu, Daren; Burgess, Rhonda; Chung, Marilyn; de Lencastre, Herminia

    2015-01-01

    In November 2011, The Rockefeller University Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCTS), the Laboratory of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, and Clinical Directors Network (CDN) launched a research and learning collaborative project with six community health centers in the New York City metropolitan area to determine the nature (clonal type) of community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus strains causing skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs). Between November 2011 and March 2013, wound and nasal samples from 129 patients with active SSTIs suspicious for S. aureus were collected and characterized by molecular typing techniques. In 63 of 129 patients, the skin wounds were infected by S. aureus: methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was recovered from 39 wounds and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) was recovered from 24. Most—46 of the 63–wound isolates belonged to the CC8/Panton-Valentine leukocidin-positive (PVL+) group of S. aureus clone USA300: 34 of these strains were MRSA and 12 were MSSA. Of the 63 patients with S. aureus infections, 30 were also colonized by S. aureus in the nares: 16 of the colonizing isolates were MRSA, and 14 were MSSA, and the majority of the colonizing isolates belonged to the USA300 clonal group. In most cases (70%), the colonizing isolate belonged to the same clonal type as the strain involved with the infection. In three of the patients, the identity of invasive and colonizing MRSA isolates was further documented by whole-genome sequencing. PMID:26063853

  1. Molecular Types of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Methicillin-Sensitive S. aureus Strains Causing Skin and Soft Tissue Infections and Nasal Colonization, Identified in Community Health Centers in New York City.

    PubMed

    Pardos de la Gandara, Maria; Raygoza Garay, Juan Antonio; Mwangi, Michael; Tobin, Jonathan N; Tsang, Amanda; Khalida, Chamanara; D'Orazio, Brianna; Kost, Rhonda G; Leinberger-Jabari, Andrea; Coffran, Cameron; Evering, Teresa H; Coller, Barry S; Balachandra, Shirish; Urban, Tracie; Parola, Claude; Salvato, Scott; Jenks, Nancy; Wu, Daren; Burgess, Rhonda; Chung, Marilyn; de Lencastre, Herminia; Tomasz, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    In November 2011, The Rockefeller University Center for Clinical and Translational Science (CCTS), the Laboratory of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, and Clinical Directors Network (CDN) launched a research and learning collaborative project with six community health centers in the New York City metropolitan area to determine the nature (clonal type) of community-acquired Staphylococcus aureus strains causing skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs). Between November 2011 and March 2013, wound and nasal samples from 129 patients with active SSTIs suspicious for S. aureus were collected and characterized by molecular typing techniques. In 63 of 129 patients, the skin wounds were infected by S. aureus: methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was recovered from 39 wounds and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) was recovered from 24. Most-46 of the 63-wound isolates belonged to the CC8/Panton-Valentine leukocidin-positive (PVL(+)) group of S. aureus clone USA300: 34 of these strains were MRSA and 12 were MSSA. Of the 63 patients with S. aureus infections, 30 were also colonized by S. aureus in the nares: 16 of the colonizing isolates were MRSA, and 14 were MSSA, and the majority of the colonizing isolates belonged to the USA300 clonal group. In most cases (70%), the colonizing isolate belonged to the same clonal type as the strain involved with the infection. In three of the patients, the identity of invasive and colonizing MRSA isolates was further documented by whole-genome sequencing. PMID:26063853

  2. The Control of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Blood Stream Infections in England

    PubMed Central

    Duerden, Brian; Fry, Carole; Johnson, Alan P.; Wilcox, Mark H.

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) blood stream infection (BSI) is a major healthcare burden in some but not all healthcare settings, and it is associated with 10%–20% mortality. The introduction of mandatory reporting in England of MRSA BSI in 2001 was followed in 2004 by the setting of target reductions for all National Health Service hospitals. The original national target of a 50% reduction in MRSA BSI was considered by many experts to be unattainable, and yet this goal has been far exceeded (∼80% reduction with rates still declining). The transformation from endemic to sporadic MRSA BSI involved the implementation of serial national infection prevention directives, and the deployment of expert improvement teams in organizations failed to meet their improvement trajectory targets. We describe and appraise the components of the major public health infection prevention campaign that yielded major reductions in MRSA infection. There are important lessons and opportunities for other healthcare systems where MRSA infection remains endemic. PMID:26380336

  3. Longitudinal study of horses for carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus following wound infections.

    PubMed

    Bergström, Karin; Bengtsson, Björn; Nyman, Ann; Grönlund Andersson, Ulrika

    2013-05-01

    An outbreak of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections in horses in Sweden raised questions concerning the risk posed by horses to their surroundings following MRSA infections. This initiated a longitudinal study to investigate how long MRSA-infected horses remained positive and to test the sensitivity of different anatomical sampling sites for detection of MRSA. Between October 2008 and June 2010, 9 of 15 horses notified as having MRSA-infected wounds fitted the case criteria for the study. The cases were sampled at five anatomical sites (nostrils, corner of mouth, pastern, perineum, and previous infection site) on six to seven occasions or more during approximately 12-18 months. MRSA-specific broth and agar were used for culture. Verified MRSA isolates were spa-typed. The sensitivity of sampling sites was calculated. The most sensitive sampling site was the nostrils, with a sensitivity of 0.91 (95% CI: 0.59-1.00). The other test sites had a sensitivity of 0-0.09. Individual cases tested positive, but with time all tested negative. The observed carriage time ranged from 55 to 711 days (median=143, IQR: 111-172 days), but these data should be interpreted with caution since only a small number of cases were studied. PMID:23428383

  4. Evaluation of high-dose daptomycin for therapy of experimental Staphylococcus aureus foreign body infection

    PubMed Central

    Schaad, Heinz J; Bento, Manuela; Lew, Daniel P; Vaudaux, Pierre

    2006-01-01

    Background Daptomycin is a novel cyclic lipopeptide whose bactericidal activity is not affected by current antibiotic resistance mechanisms displayed by S. aureus clinical isolates. This study reports the therapeutic activity of high-dose daptomycin compared to standard regimens of oxacillin and vancomycin in a difficult-to-treat, rat tissue cage model of experimental therapy of chronic S. aureus foreign body infection. Methods The methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) strain I20 is a clinical isolate from catheter-related sepsis. MICs, MBCs, and time-kill curves of each antibiotic were evaluated as recommended by NCCLS, including supplementation with physiological levels (50 mg/L) of Ca2+ for daptomycin. Two weeks after local infection of subcutaneously implanted tissue cages with MSSA I20, each animal received (i.p.) twice-daily doses of daptomycin, oxacillin, or vancomycin for 7 days, or was left untreated. The reductions of CFU counts in each treatment group were analysed by ANOVA and Newman-Keuls multiple comparisons procedures. Results The MICs and MBCs of daptomycin, oxacillin, or vancomycin for MSSA strain I20 were 0.5 and 1, 0.5 and 1, or 1 and 2 mg/L, respectively. In vitro elimination of strain I20 was more rapid with 8 mg/L of daptomycin compared to oxacillin or vancomycin. Twice-daily administered daptomycin (30 mg/kg), oxacillin (200 mg/kg), or vancomycin (50 mg/kg vancomycin) yielded bactericidal antibiotic levels in infected cage fluids throughout therapy. Before therapy, mean (± SEM) viable counts of strain I20 were 6.68 ± 0.10 log10 CFU/mL of cage fluid (n = 74). After 7 days of therapy, the mean (± SEM) reduction in viable counts of MSSA I20 was 2.62 (± 0.30) log10 CFU/mL in cages (n = 18) of daptomycin-treated rats, exceeding by >2-fold (P < 0.01) the viable count reductions of 0.92 (± 0.23; n = 19) and 0.96 (± 0.24; n = 18) log10 CFU/mL in cages of oxacillin-treated and vancomycin-treated rats, respectively. Viable counts in cage

  5. Geographic Distribution of Staphylococcus aureus Causing Invasive Infections in Europe: A Molecular-Epidemiological Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Grundmann, Hajo; Aanensen, David M.; van den Wijngaard, Cees C.; Spratt, Brian G.; Harmsen, Dag; Friedrich, Alexander W.

    2010-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important human pathogens and methicillin-resistant variants (MRSAs) are a major cause of hospital and community-acquired infection. We aimed to map the geographic distribution of the dominant clones that cause invasive infections in Europe. Methods and Findings In each country, staphylococcal reference laboratories secured the participation of a sufficient number of hospital laboratories to achieve national geo-demographic representation. Participating laboratories collected successive methicillin-susceptible (MSSA) and MRSA isolates from patients with invasive S. aureus infection using an agreed protocol. All isolates were sent to the respective national reference laboratories and characterised by quality-controlled sequence typing of the variable region of the staphylococcal spa gene (spa typing), and data were uploaded to a central database. Relevant genetic and phenotypic information was assembled for interactive interrogation by a purpose-built Web-based mapping application. Between September 2006 and February 2007, 357 laboratories serving 450 hospitals in 26 countries collected 2,890 MSSA and MRSA isolates from patients with invasive S. aureus infection. A wide geographical distribution of spa types was found with some prevalent in all European countries. MSSA were more diverse than MRSA. Genetic diversity of MRSA differed considerably between countries with dominant MRSA spa types forming distinctive geographical clusters. We provide evidence that a network approach consisting of decentralised typing and visualisation of aggregated data using an interactive mapping tool can provide important information on the dynamics of MRSA populations such as early signalling of emerging strains, cross border spread, and importation by travel. Conclusions In contrast to MSSA, MRSA spa types have a predominantly regional distribution in Europe. This finding is indicative of the selection and spread of a limited number

  6. Population-based epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection: clonal complex 30 genotype is associated with mortality.

    PubMed

    Blomfeldt, A; Eskesen, A N; Aamot, H V; Leegaard, T M; Bjørnholt, J V

    2016-05-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infections (SABSI) are associated with a high burden of morbidity and mortality. The impact of specific S. aureus genotypes on outcome is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the epidemiology and outcome of SABSI, with a special emphasis on the impact of bacterial clonal lineage on mortality. We conducted a 3-year population-based prospective study between 2011 and 2014, including 303 consecutive adult patients. Clinical data were obtained from interviews and medical records. S. aureus isolates were genotyped using DNA microarrays. The incidence rate of SABSI was 27.6 per 100,000 inhabitants [95 % confidence interval (CI) 24.6-31.0]. The median age of the patients was 71 years (interquartile range 56-81 years) and 61.4 % were male. Most SABSI (70.6 %) occurred in hospitals or associated to healthcare, and 34.1 % of these were associated with intravascular catheters. Only five (1.6 %) SABSI were caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The 30-day case fatality rate was 20.8 % (95 % CI 16.6-25.7). S. aureus clonal complex 30 [hazard ratio (HR) 3.9; 95 % CI 1.8-8.5, p = 0.001], unknown focus of infection (HR 4.5; 95 % CI 1.9-10.8, p = 0.001) and respiratory tract infection (HR 12.7; 95 % CI 4.6-34.6, p < 0.001) were independent predictors of mortality in a Cox regression analysis after adjusting for age, sex and underlying conditions. A high proportion of potential preventable SABSI calls for effective infection control measures. S. aureus clonal complex 30 genotype was associated with mortality in patients with bloodstream infections. The genetic basis underlying this association remains to be demonstrated. PMID:26873380

  7. Effects of antimicrobial peptides on Staphylococcus aureus growth and biofilm formation in vitro following isolation from implant-associated infections

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guangfeng; Zhong, Huiming; Zhang, Mao; Hong, Yucai

    2015-01-01

    To prevent biomaterial-associated infections, antibiotic agents are recommended for various medical conditions requiring biomaterial implants, but resistance often appears after the introduction of antibiotics into clinical use. Therefore, new strategies for the prevention or treatment for biomaterial-associated infections are required. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of antimicrobial peptides on growth and biofilm formation of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from implant-associated infections. A total of 20 patients with culture-proven staphylococcal infection associated with stable orthopedic implants were selected as the experimental group. S. aureus were isolated from tissue biopsies for identification, the isolated strains were mixed with Tet213 incubated at 37°C and viable bactrial number of S. aureus was counted. For the biofilm formation, the broad spectrum AMP Tet213 was selected and loaded onto the Ti coating first. At the same time Ti coated with Tet213 were mixed with S. aureus in vitro to form biofilm. After 30 min, 2 h, 4 h, 6 h, 8 h, the population of S. aureus in the biofilm was counted. Tet213 showed significant antibacterial effect on 16 strains (P < 0.05, Table 1). The inhibition rate reached above 80% among 12 strains of the clinically isolated strain. In biofilm experiments, counts of the NO. 1, 2, 3, 4 strains in biofilms decreased significantly after 2 h (P < 0.05), while there was no obvious difference in counts of NO. 5 strain (P > 0.05). The broad spectrum AMP Tet213 could strongly reduce the growth and biofilm formation of S. aureus in vitro, and the use of this might be an important new approach to target implant-associated infections. PMID:25785171

  8. Characterization and Comparison of 2 Distinct Epidemic Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clones of ST59 Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chih-Jung; Unger, Clemens; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Lindsay, Jodi A.; Huang, Yhu-Chering; Götz, Friedrich

    2013-01-01

    Sequence type (ST) 59 is an epidemic lineage of community-associated (CA) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates. Taiwanese CA-MRSA isolates belong to ST59 and can be grouped into 2 distinct clones, a virulent Taiwan clone and a commensal Asian-Pacific clone. The Taiwan clone carries the Panton–Valentine leukocidin (PVL) genes and the staphylococcal chromosomal cassette mec (SCCmec) VT, and is frequently isolated from patients with severe disease. The Asian-Pacific clone is PVL-negative, carries SCCmec IV, and a frequent colonizer of healthy children. Isolates of both clones were characterized by their ability to adhere to respiratory A549 cells, cytotoxicity to human neutrophils, and nasal colonization of a murine and murine sepsis models. Genome variation was determined by polymerase chain reaction of selected virulence factors and by multi-strain whole genome microarray. Additionally, the expression of selected factors was compared between the 2 clones. The Taiwan clone showed a much higher cytotoxicity to the human neutrophils and caused more severe septic infections with a high mortality rate in the murine model. The clones were indistinguishable in their adhesion to A549 cells and persistence of murine nasal colonization. The microarray data revealed that the Taiwan clone had lost the ø3-prophage that integrates into the β-hemolysin gene and includes staphylokinase- and enterotoxin P-encoding genes, but had retained the genes for human immune evasion, scn and chps. Production of the virulence factors did not differ significantly in the 2 clonal groups, although more α-toxin was expressed in Taiwan clone isolates from pneumonia patients. In conclusion, the Taiwan CA-MRSA clone was distinguished by enhanced virulence in both humans and an animal infection model. The evolutionary acquisition of PVL, the higher expression of α-toxin, and possibly the loss of a large portion of the β-hemolysin-converting prophage likely contribute to

  9. Staphylococcus aureus skin and soft tissue infections in primary healthcare in Denmark: a 12-year population-based study.

    PubMed

    Dalager-Pedersen, M; Søgaard, M; Schønheyder, H C

    2011-08-01

    A rise in community-onset Staphylococcus aureus infections has been observed in European countries. To ascertain secular trends of S. aureus infections in primary healthcare in Denmark, we conducted this register-based study in the North Denmark region, during the period 1997-2008. We identified all skin and mucosa specimens obtained by general practitioners and all prescriptions for the preferred oral anti-staphylococcal antibiotic, dicloxacillin. Repeat observations within a 12-month period were excluded prior to the calculation of age and gender standardised incidence rates per 100,000 person-years. We included 108,758 specimens, of which 42,778 (39%) yielded S. aureus. The annual incidence rate of specimens doubled during the study period, reaching 2,399 in 2008. The overall rate of S. aureus isolates increased 2-fold to a stable rate at about 850, but for isolates from children and for impetigo specimens, the increase was steeper, with a peak in 2002. A total of 156,462 dicloxacillin prescriptions had been redeemed and the annual prescription rate increased 2.5-fold, peaking at 3,714 in 2007. In conclusion, the annual rates of specimens, S. aureus infections and dicloxacillin prescriptions more than doubled in primary healthcare during the 12-year study period. A major impetigo epidemic and calls for antibiotic stewardship with increased utilisation of specimens were contributing factors. PMID:21279531

  10. The Lantibiotic NAI-107 Efficiently Rescues Drosophila melanogaster from Infection with Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Thomas T; Mojsoska, Biljana; Cruz, João C S; Donadio, Stefano; Jenssen, Håvard; Løbner-Olesen, Anders; Rewitz, Kim

    2016-09-01

    We used the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as a cost-effective in vivo model to evaluate the efficacy of novel antibacterial peptides and peptoids for treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. A panel of peptides with known antibacterial activity in vitro and/or in vivo was tested in Drosophila Although most peptides and peptoids that were effective in vitro failed to rescue lethal effects of S. aureus infections in vivo, we found that two lantibiotics, nisin and NAI-107, rescued adult flies from fatal infections. Furthermore, NAI-107 rescued mortality of infection with the MRSA strain USA300 with an efficacy equivalent to that of vancomycin, a widely applied antibiotic for the treatment of serious MRSA infections. These results establish Drosophila as a useful model for in vivo drug evaluation of antibacterial peptides. PMID:27381394

  11. The Lantibiotic NAI-107 Efficiently Rescues Drosophila melanogaster from Infection with Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus USA300

    PubMed Central

    Mojsoska, Biljana; Cruz, João C. S.; Donadio, Stefano; Jenssen, Håvard

    2016-01-01

    We used the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster as a cost-effective in vivo model to evaluate the efficacy of novel antibacterial peptides and peptoids for treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. A panel of peptides with known antibacterial activity in vitro and/or in vivo was tested in Drosophila. Although most peptides and peptoids that were effective in vitro failed to rescue lethal effects of S. aureus infections in vivo, we found that two lantibiotics, nisin and NAI-107, rescued adult flies from fatal infections. Furthermore, NAI-107 rescued mortality of infection with the MRSA strain USA300 with an efficacy equivalent to that of vancomycin, a widely applied antibiotic for the treatment of serious MRSA infections. These results establish Drosophila as a useful model for in vivo drug evaluation of antibacterial peptides. PMID:27381394

  12. In vitro activities of 28 antimicrobial agents against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from a clinical setting in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Neela, V; Sasikumar, M; Ghaznavi, G R; Zamberi, S; Mariana, S

    2008-09-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), an established nosocomial and emerging community pathogen associated with many fatalities due to its hyper-virulence and multiple drug resistant properties, is on the continuous rise. To update the current status on the susceptibility of local MRSA isolates to various classes of antibiotics and to identify the most potent antibiotics, thirty-two clinical isolates comprised of hospital acquired (HA) and community acquired (CA) infections were investigated by disk diffusion test. Of the 32 MRSA isolates, 14 (43.75%) and 18 (56.25%) were community and hospital acquired MRSA, respectively. All isolates were multiple drug resistant to more than 3 classes of antibiotics despite the source or specimen from which it was isolated. The oxacillin MICs for all isolates ranged from 2 to > or = 256 microg/ml. Twenty-five of 26 erythromycin-resistant MRSA isolates exhibited an inducible MLS(B) resistance phenotype while one showed an MS phenotype. More than half the isolates (68.75%) were resistant to at least one of the six aminoglycosides tested, with netilmicin as the most susceptible. The most effective antistaphylococcal agents were linezolid, vancomycin, teicoplanin and quinupristin/dalfopristin exhibited 100% susceptibility. Since MRSA is under continuous pressure of acquiring multiple drug resistance, it is imperative to focus routine surveillance on HA and CA-MRSA strains to monitor and limit the spread of this organism. PMID:19058585

  13. Swine Farming Is a Risk Factor for Infection With and High Prevalence of Carriage of Multidrug-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Wardyn, Shylo E.; Forshey, Brett M.; Farina, Sarah A.; Kates, Ashley E.; Nair, Rajeshwari; Quick, Megan K.; Wu, James Y.; Hanson, Blake M.; O'Malley, Sean M.; Shows, Hannah W.; Heywood, Ellen M.; Beane–Freeman, Laura E.; Lynch, Charles F.; Carrel, Margaret; Smith, Tara C.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Livestock-associated Staphylococcus aureus (LA-SA) has been documented worldwide. However, much remains unknown about LA-SA colonization and infection, especially in rural environments. Methods. We conducted a large-scale prospective study of 1342 Iowans, including individuals with livestock contact and a community-based comparison group. Nasal and throat swabs were collected to determine colonization at enrollment, and skin infection swabs over 17 months were assessed for S. aureus. Outcomes included carriage of S. aureus, methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), tetracycline-resistant S. aureus (TRSA), multidrug-resistant S. aureus (MDRSA), and LA-SA. Results. Of 1342 participants, 351 (26.2%; 95% confidence interval [CI], 23.8%–28.6%) carried S. aureus. MRSA was isolated from 34 (2.5%; 95% CI, 1.8%–3.5%) and LA-SA from 131 (9.8%; 95% CI, 8.3%–11.5%) of the 1342 participants. Individuals with current swine exposure were significantly more likely to carry S. aureus (prevalence ratio [PR], 1.8; 95% CI, 1.4–2.2), TRSA (PR, 8.4; 95% CI, 5.6–12.6), MDRSA (PR, 6.1; 95% CI, 3.8–10.0), and LA-SA (PR, 5.8; 95% CI, 3.9–8.4) than those lacking exposure. Skin infections (n = 103) were reported from 67 individuals, yielding an incidence rate of 6.6 (95% CI, 4.9–8.9) per 1000 person-months. Conclusions. Current swine workers are 6 times more likely to carry MDRSA than those without current swine exposure. We observed active infections caused by LA-SA. This finding suggests that individuals with livestock contact may have a high prevalence of exposure to, and potentially infection with, antibiotic-resistant S. aureus strains, including LA-SA strains. PMID:25931444

  14. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Profiles of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates Recovered from Humans, Environmental Surfaces, and Companion Animals in Households of Children with Community-Onset Methicillin-Resistant S. aureus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Morelli, John J.; Hogan, Patrick G.; Sullivan, Melanie L.; Muenks, Carol E.; Wang, Jeffrey W.; Thompson, Ryley M.; Burnham, Carey-Ann D.

    2015-01-01

    Our objective was to determine the antibiotic susceptibility profiles of Staphylococcus aureus isolates recovered from 110 households of children with community-onset methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections. Cultures were obtained from household members, household objects, and dogs and cats, yielding 1,633 S. aureus isolates. The S. aureus isolates were heterogeneous, although more than half were methicillin resistant. The highest proportion of MRSA was found in bathrooms. The majority of isolates were susceptible to antibiotics prescribed in outpatient settings. PMID:26248385

  15. A Multiple Antigenic Peptide Mimicking Peptidoglycan Induced T Cell Responses to Protect Mice from Systemic Infection with Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiang-Yu; Huang, Zhao-Xia; Chen, Yi-Guo; Lu, Xiao; Zhu, Ping; Wen, Kun; Fu, Ning; Liu, Bei-Yi

    2015-01-01

    Due to the enormous capacity of Staphylococcus aureus to acquire antibiotic resistance, it becomes imperative to develop vaccines for decreasing the risk of its life-threatening infections. Peptidoglycan (PGN) is a conserved and major component of S. aureus cell wall. However, it has not been used as a vaccine candidate since it is a thymus-independent antigen. In this study, we synthesized a multiple antigenic peptide, named MAP27, which comprised four copies of a peptide that mimics the epitope of PGN. After immunization with MAP27 five times and boosting with heat-inactivated bacterium one time, anti-MAP27 serum bound directly to S. aureus or PGN. Immunization with MAP27 decreased the bacterial burden in organs of BALB/c mice and significantly prolonged their survival time after S. aureus lethal-challenge. The percentage of IFN-γ+CD3+ T cells and IL-17+CD4+ T cells in spleen, as well as the levels of IFN-γ, IL-17A/F and CCL3 in spleen and lung, significantly increased in the MAP27-immunized mice after infection. Moreover, in vitro incubation of heat-inactivated S. aureus with splenocytes isolated from MAP27-immunized mice stimulated the production of IFN-γ and IL-17A/F. Our findings demonstrated that MAP27, as a thymus-dependent antigen, is efficient at eliciting T cell-mediated responses to protect mice from S. aureus infection. This study sheds light on a possible strategy to design vaccines against S. aureus. PMID:26317210

  16. Proteomic Identification of saeRS-Dependent Targets Critical for Protective Humoral Immunity against Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fan; Cheng, Brian L; Boyle-Vavra, Susan; Alegre, Maria-Luisa; Daum, Robert S; Chong, Anita S; Montgomery, Christopher P

    2015-09-01

    Recurrent Staphylococcus aureus skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) are common despite detectable antibody responses, leading to the belief that the immune response elicited by these infections is not protective. We recently reported that S. aureus USA300 SSTI elicits antibodies that protect against recurrent SSTI in BALB/c but not C57BL/6 mice, and in this study, we aimed to uncover the specificity of the protective antibodies. Using a proteomic approach, we found that S. aureus SSTI elicited broad polyclonal antibody responses in both BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice and identified 10 S. aureus antigens against which antibody levels were significantly higher in immune BALB/c serum. Four of the 10 antigens identified are regulated by the saeRS operon, suggesting a dominant role for saeRS in protection. Indeed, infection with USA300Δsae failed to protect against secondary SSTI with USA300, despite eliciting a strong polyclonal antibody response against antigens whose expression is not regulated by saeRS. Moreover, the antibody repertoire after infection with USA300Δsae lacked antibodies specific for 10 saeRS-regulated antigens, suggesting that all or a subset of these antigens are necessary to elicit protective immunity. Infection with USA300Δhla elicited modest protection against secondary SSTI, and complementation of USA300Δsae with hla restored protection but incompletely. Together, these findings support a role for both Hla and other saeRS-regulated antigens in eliciting protection and suggest that host differences in immune responses to saeRS-regulated antigens may determine whether S. aureus infection elicits protective or nonprotective immunity against recurrent infection. PMID:26169277

  17. Staphylococcus aureus Isolates Carrying Panton-Valentine Leucocidin Genes: Their Frequency, Antimicrobial Patterns, and Association With Infectious Disease in Shahrekord City, Southwest Iran

    PubMed Central

    Shariati, Laleh; Validi, Majid; Hasheminia, Ali Mohammad; Ghasemikhah, Reza; Kianpour, Fariborz; Karimi, Ali; Nafisi, Mohammad Reza; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin

    2016-01-01

    Background: A diversity of virulence factors work together to create the pathogenicity of Staphylococcus aureus. These factors include cell surface components that promote adherence to surfaces as well as exoproteins such as Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL), encoded by the luk-PV genes, that invade or bypass the immune system and are toxic to the host, thereby enhancing the severity of infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of PVL-positive MRSA strains by real-time PCR and their antibiotic susceptibility patterns by phenotypic test. Materials and Methods: In total, 284 Staphylococcus isolates, identified by phenotypic methods from clinical samples of Shahrekord University Hospitals, Shahrekord, Iran, were tested for nuc, mecA, and PVL genes by TaqMan real-time PCR. The antibiotic susceptibility patterns of PVL-containing MRSA strains were determined via the disk diffusion method. Results: In total, 196 isolates (69%) were nuc positive (i.e., S. aureus); of those isolates, 96 (49%) were mecA positive (MRSA). Eighteen (18.8%) of the 96 MRSA positive and 3 (3%) of the 100 methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) strains were PVL positive. PVL-positive MRSA strains were mostly recovered from tracheal specimens. Eight PVL-positive MRSA strains were resistant to all the tested antibiotics except vancomycin. A significant correlation (P = 0.001) was found between the mecA positivity and the presence of luk-PV genes. Conclusions: Community acquired (CA)-MRSA is becoming a public health concern in many parts of the world, including Asian countries. The variable prevalence of luk-PV-positive MRSA isolates in different regions and their rather high frequency in pneumonia necessitate the application of rapid diagnostic methods such as real-time PCR to improve treatment effectiveness. PMID:27099685

  18. In vitro antibiogram pattern of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from wound infection and molecular analysis of mecA gene and restriction sites in methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Hemamalini, V.; Kavitha, V.; Ramachandran, Sridhar

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a common nosocomial pathogen with property to develop resistance to antimicrobial agents. But in the modern era, drug resistance had been developed by microbes due to its continuous usage of antibiotics. This study was carried out to evaluate antibiotic resistant pattern of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) using molecular genotyping. In view of the present problem, the study has been conducted to detect the molecular genotyping of mecA gene from MRSA and confirmation of its restriction sites using EcoRI and BamHI. The pus samples were swabbed out, and clinical strains were isolated using standard microbiological procedures. Then the strains were subjected to in vitro antibiotic susceptibility assay and identified MRSA. Further molecular genotyping of mecA gene was determined by polymerase chain reaction technique. The percentage analysis was done. The clinical strains were isolated from the wound infected patients. A total of 60 samples were collected, of 60 samples, 40 (66.7%) were showed positive to strains of S. aureus. The in vitro antibiotic susceptibility assay was carried to find the drug sensitive and resistant patterns. Further methicillin resistant strains (35%) of S. aureus were screened and subjected to molecular genotyping of mecA gene and was confirmed by restriction digestion. Overall, 70% of plasmids show positive for the presence of mecA gene, although all strains have restriction sites. Hence, the present study revealed that the early detection of antibiotic resistant character using molecular genotyping will help the infected patient to cure short period and will reduce the development of multidrug resistance. PMID:26605158

  19. Future trends in the treatment of serious Gram-positive infections.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Rosemarie; Bonatti, Hugo; Sawyer, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Gram-positive organisms are the most common bacterial pathogens that cause diseases in humans, with streptococci and staphylococci occurring most frequently. Immunization has been extremely successful in eradicating some Gram-positive infections, such as diphtheria and tetanus, and relatively successful for pneumococci. Staphylococcus aureus vaccines are under investigation. In terms of antimicrobial susceptibility, some Gram-positive organisms have remained sensitive to most antimicrobials, whereas others, including staphylococci, pneumococci and enterococci, have developed clinically relevant resistance. Extensive exposure to antimicrobials in the hospital setting has caused the spread of clones mainly in the hospital environment, yet multiresistance is now also found in community-acquired diseases. Community-acquired methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) and resistant pneumococci are the most important examples, but even viridans streptococci are becoming resistant to some antibiotics. Moreover, MRSA and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) are found in pets and farm animals. Because of these concerns, new antimicrobials have been developed during the past decade, including quinupristin/dalfopristin, linezolid, tigecycline, daptomycin and dalbavancin. Also under investigation are beta-lactams, streptogramins and quinolones with activity against MRSA, penicillin-resistant pneumococci and VRE. Finally, infection-control measures, including the identification of carriers of multiresistant organisms and appropriate isolation, must continue to be implemented. PMID:19271030

  20. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Non-Native Patients with Skin and Soft Tissue Infections in Shanghai

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hai-Hui; Zhu, Yue-Qiu; Guo, Xiao-Kui; Ni, Yu-Xing; Han, Li-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus is one predominant cause of skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs), but little information exists regarding the characterization of S. aureus from non-native patients with SSTIs in China. Methods In this study, we enrolled 52 non-native patients with S. aureus SSTIs, and 65 native control patients with S. aureus SSTIs in Shanghai. 52 and 65 S. aureus isolates were collected from both groups, respectively. S. aureus isolates were characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility testing, toxin gene detection, and molecular typing with sequence type, spa type, agr group and SCCmec type. Results Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) was detected in 8 non-native patients and 14 native patients with SSTIs. Overall, antimicrobial susceptibilities of S. aureus isolated from non-native patients were found higher than those from native patients. CC59 (ST338 and ST59) was found in a total of 14 isolates (4 from non-native patients; 10 from native patients), 9 of which were carrying lukS/F-PV (3 from non-native patients; 6 from native patients). ST7 was found in 12 isolates and all 12 isolates were found in native patients. The livestock-associated clone ST398 was found in 11 isolates (6 from non-native patients; 5 from native patients), and 5 ST398 lukS/F-PV-positive methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) were all discovered among non-native patients. The molecular epidemiology of S. aureus isolated from non-native patients was quite different from those from native patients. lukS/F-PV was more frequent in isolates originating from non-native patients with SSTIs compared to native patients (31 vs. 7, P <0.0001). Conclusions CC59 was the most common clonal complex among patients with SSTIs in Shanghai. The other most common sequence types were ST7 and Livestock ST398. The molecular epidemiology of S. aureus isolated from non-native patients was quite different from those from native patients. S. aureus isolated from non-native patients was

  1. Devastating renal outcome caused by skin infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jun-Hua; Fang, Yu-Wei; Yang, An-Hung; Tsai, Ming Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an emerging pathogen that infects the skin and soft tissue. However, there are few reports of renal complications from MRSA involving immunoglobulin (Ig)A-dominated rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (GN). Favorable renal outcomes from IgA GN are achieved by administering timely therapy. In the present study, we describe the case of a healthy young woman suffering from a cutaneous MRSA infection that initially presented with gross hematuria. Six months after eradicating the infection, severe impairment of renal function was noted because of intractable nausea and vomiting. Renal pathology revealed advanced IgA nephropathy with fibrocellular crescent formation. An aggressive treatment plan using immunosuppressants was not adopted because of her irreversible renal pathology, and she was therefore administered maintenance hemodialysis. This instructive case stresses the importance of being aware of the signs of IgA nephropathy post-MRSA infection, such as cutaneous lesions that are mostly painless and accompanied by hematuria and mild proteinuria. If the kidney cannot be salvaged, it will undergo irreversible damage with devastating consequences. PMID:27368023

  2. Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonisation and infection in Thoroughbred racehorses and veterinarians in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, T; Kinoshita, Y; Niwa, H; Shinzaki, Y; Tamura, N; Hobo, S; Kuwano, A

    2016-05-01

    Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections have been confirmed in hospitalised Thoroughbred racehorses at the hospitals of two training centres in Japan since 2009. To investigate the source of infection, the authors examined the rate of nasal MRSA colonisation in 600 healthy Thoroughbred racehorses, 53 veterinarians and 16 office staff at the racehorse hospitals of the two training centres. MRSA was not isolated from healthy Thoroughbred racehorses or hospital office staff. However, MRSA was isolated from 16 veterinarians (30.1 per cent), and the colonisation rate was significantly higher in veterinarians than in the office staff of the same hospitals. Also, 10 of the 16 MRSA strains (62.5 per cent) isolated from veterinarians were classified as type II by staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing and ST5 by multilocus sequence typing. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis demonstrated that these 10 MRSA strains of SCCmec type II and ST5 were genetically identical or very similar to 9 MRSA strains isolated from infected horses hospitalised at these hospitals between 2009 and 2013. These results indicate that SCCmec type II and ST5 MRSA strains were probably transmitted between veterinarians and infected horses. PMID:27114407

  3. Combination therapy with thioridazine and dicloxacillin combats meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Poulsen, Marianne Ø; Schøler, Lone; Nielsen, Anette; Skov, Marianne N; Kolmos, Hans Jørn; Kallipolitis, Birgitte H; Olsen, Anders; Klitgaard, Janne K

    2014-09-01

    The shortage of drugs active against meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a growing clinical problem. In vitro studies indicate that the phenothiazine thioridazine (TZ) might enhance the activity of the β-lactam antibiotic dicloxacillin (DCX) to a level where MRSA is killed, but experiments in simple animal models have not been performed. In the present study, we introduced Caenorhabditis elegans infected by S. aureus as an in vivo model to test the effect of TZ as a helper drug in combination with DCX. Because TZ is an anthelmintic, initial experiments were carried out to define the thresholds of toxicity, determined by larval development, and induction of stress-response markers. No measurable effects were seen at concentrations of less than 64 mg TZ l(-1). Seven different MRSA strains were tested for pathogenicity against C. elegans, and the most virulent strain (ATCC 33591) was selected for further analyses. In a final experiment, full-grown C. elegans were exposed to the test strain for 3 days and subsequently treated with 8 mg DCX l(-1) and 8 mg TZ l(-1) for 2 days. This resulted in a 14-fold reduction in the intestinal MRSA load as compared with untreated controls. Each drug alone resulted in a two- to threefold reduction in MRSA load. In conclusion, C. elegans can be used as a simple model to test synergy between DCX and TZ against MRSA. The previously demonstrated in vitro synergy can be reproduced in vivo. PMID:24913562

  4. Molecular Characterization and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Clinical Infection and Asymptomatic Carriers in Southwest Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Olasupo, Nurudeen A.; Egwari, Louis O.; Becker, Karsten

    2015-01-01

    Few reports from Africa suggest that resistance pattern, virulence factors and genotypes differ between Staphylococcus aureus from nasal carriage and clinical infection. We therefore compared antimicrobial resistance, selected virulence factors and genotypes of S. aureus from nasal carriage and clinical infection in Southwest Nigeria. Non-duplicate S. aureus isolates were obtained from infection (n = 217) and asymptomatic carriers (n = 73) during a cross sectional study in Lagos and Ogun States, Nigeria from 2010–2011. Susceptibility testing was performed using Vitek automated systems. Selected virulence factors were detected by PCR. The population structure was assessed using spa typing. The spa clonal complexes (spa-CC) were deduced using the Based Upon Repeat Pattern algorithm (BURP). Resistance was higher for aminoglycosides in clinical isolates while resistances to quinolones and tetracycline were more prevalent in carrier isolates. The Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) was more frequently detected in isolates from infection compared to carriage (80.2 vs 53.4%; p<0.001, chi2-test). Seven methicillin resistant S. aureus isolates were associated with spa types t002, t008, t064, t194, t8439, t8440 and t8441. The predominant spa types among the methicillin-susceptible S. aureus isolates were t084 (65.5%), t2304 (4.4%) and t8435 (4.1%). spa-CC 084 was predominant among isolates from infection (80.3%, n = 167) and was significantly associated with PVL (OR = 7.1, 95%CI: 3.9–13.2, p<0.001, chi2- test). In conclusion, PVL positive isolates were more frequently detected among isolates from infection compared to carriage and are associated with spa-CC 084. PMID:26348037

  5. Molecular Characterization and Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Clinical Infection and Asymptomatic Carriers in Southwest Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Ayepola, Olayemi O; Olasupo, Nurudeen A; Egwari, Louis O; Becker, Karsten; Schaumburg, Frieder

    2015-01-01

    Few reports from Africa suggest that resistance pattern, virulence factors and genotypes differ between Staphylococcus aureus from nasal carriage and clinical infection. We therefore compared antimicrobial resistance, selected virulence factors and genotypes of S. aureus from nasal carriage and clinical infection in Southwest Nigeria. Non-duplicate S. aureus isolates were obtained from infection (n = 217) and asymptomatic carriers (n = 73) during a cross sectional study in Lagos and Ogun States, Nigeria from 2010-2011. Susceptibility testing was performed using Vitek automated systems. Selected virulence factors were detected by PCR. The population structure was assessed using spa typing. The spa clonal complexes (spa-CC) were deduced using the Based Upon Repeat Pattern algorithm (BURP). Resistance was higher for aminoglycosides in clinical isolates while resistances to quinolones and tetracycline were more prevalent in carrier isolates. The Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) was more frequently detected in isolates from infection compared to carriage (80.2 vs 53.4%; p<0.001, chi2-test). Seven methicillin resistant S. aureus isolates were associated with spa types t002, t008, t064, t194, t8439, t8440 and t8441. The predominant spa types among the methicillin-susceptible S. aureus isolates were t084 (65.5%), t2304 (4.4%) and t8435 (4.1%). spa-CC 084 was predominant among isolates from infection (80.3%, n = 167) and was significantly associated with PVL (OR = 7.1, 95%CI: 3.9-13.2, p<0.001, chi2-test). In conclusion, PVL positive isolates were more frequently detected among isolates from infection compared to carriage and are associated with spa-CC 084. PMID:26348037

  6. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Detected at Four U.S. Wastewater Treatment Plants

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Rachel E. Rosenberg; Micallef, Shirley A.; Gibbs, Shawn G.; Davis, Johnnie A.; He, Xin; George, Ashish; Kleinfelter, Lara M.; Schreiber, Nicole A.; Mukherjee, Sampa; Joseph, Sam W.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The incidence of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infections is increasing in the United States, and it is possible that municipal wastewater could be a reservoir of this microorganism. To date, no U.S. studies have evaluated the occurrence of MRSA in wastewater. Objective: We examined the occurrence of MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) at U.S. wastewater treatment plants. Methods: We collected wastewater samples from two Mid-Atlantic and two Midwest wastewater treatment plants between October 2009 and October 2010. Samples were analyzed for MRSA and MSSA using membrane filtration. Isolates were confirmed using biochemical tests and PCR (polymerase chain reaction). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by Sensititre® microbroth dilution. Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL) screening, and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were performed to further characterize the strains. Data were analyzed by two-sample proportion tests and analysis of variance. Results: We detected MRSA (n = 240) and MSSA (n = 119) in 22 of 44 (50%) and 24 of 44 (55%) wastewater samples, respectively. The odds of samples being MRSA-positive decreased as treatment progressed: 10 of 12 (83%) influent samples were MRSA-positive, while only one of 12 (8%) effluent samples was MRSA-positive. Ninety-three percent and 29% of unique MRSA and MSSA isolates, respectively, were multidrug resistant. SCCmec types II and IV, the pvl gene, and USA types 100, 300, and 700 (PFGE strain types commonly found in the United States) were identified among the MRSA isolates. Conclusions: Our findings raise potential public health concerns for wastewater treatment plant workers and individuals exposed to reclaimed wastewater. Because of increasing use of reclaimed wastewater, further study is needed to evaluate the risk of exposure to antibiotic-resistant bacteria in treated

  7. Importance of B Lymphocytes and the IgG-Binding Protein Sbi in Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Fan; Chong, Anita S.; Montgomery, Christopher P.

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent Staphylococcus aureus infections are common, suggesting that immunity elicited by these infections is not protective. We previously reported that S. aureus skin infection (SSTI) elicited antibody-mediated immunity against secondary SSTI in BALB/c mice. In this study, we investigated the role of humoral immunity and the IgG-binding proteins Sbi and SpA in S. aureus SSTI. We found that B lymphocyte-deficient μMT mice were highly susceptible to infection, compared with congenic BALB/c mice. Importantly, transfer of immune serum protected μMT mice, demonstrating an appropriate response to protective antibody. We found that deletion of sbi, but not spa, impaired virulence, as assessed by skin lesion severity, and that Sbi-mediated virulence required B lymphocytes/antibody. Furthermore, neither Sbi nor SpA impaired the elicited antibody response or protection against secondary SSTI. Taken together, these findings highlight a B lymphocyte/antibody-dependent role of Sbi in the pathogenesis of S. aureus SSTI, and demonstrate that neither Sbi nor SpA interfered with elicited antibody-mediated immunity. PMID:26828524

  8. Increased Mortality Rates Associated with Staphylococcus aureus and Influenza Co-infection, Maryland and Iowa, USA(1).

    PubMed

    McDanel, Jennifer S; Perencevich, Eli N; Storm, Jeremy; Diekema, Daniel J; Herwaldt, Loreen; Johnson, J Kristie; Winokur, Patricia L; Schweizer, Marin L

    2016-07-01

    We retrospectively analyzed data for 195 respiratory infection patients who had positive Staphyloccocus aureus cultures and who were hospitalized in 2 hospitals in Iowa and Maryland, USA, during 2003-2009. Odds for death for patients who also had influenza-positive test results were >4 times higher than for those who had negative influenza test results. PMID:27315549

  9. Increased Mortality Rates Associated with Staphylococcus aureus and Influenza Co-infection, Maryland and Iowa, USA1

    PubMed Central

    Perencevich, Eli N.; Storm, Jeremy; Diekema, Daniel J.; Herwaldt, Loreen; Johnson, J. Kristie; Winokur, Patricia L.; Schweizer, Marin L.

    2016-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed data for 195 respiratory infection patients who had positive Staphyloccocus aureus cultures and who were hospitalized in 2 hospitals in Iowa and Maryland, USA, during 2003–2009. Odds for death for patients who also had influenza-positive test results were >4 times higher than for those who had negative influenza test results. PMID:27315549

  10. Importance of B Lymphocytes and the IgG-Binding Protein Sbi in Staphylococcus aureus Skin Infection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fan; Chong, Anita S; Montgomery, Christopher P

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent Staphylococcus aureus infections are common, suggesting that immunity elicited by these infections is not protective. We previously reported that S. aureus skin infection (SSTI) elicited antibody-mediated immunity against secondary SSTI in BALB/c mice. In this study, we investigated the role of humoral immunity and the IgG-binding proteins Sbi and SpA in S. aureus SSTI. We found that B lymphocyte-deficient μMT mice were highly susceptible to infection, compared with congenic BALB/c mice. Importantly, transfer of immune serum protected μMT mice, demonstrating an appropriate response to protective antibody. We found that deletion of sbi, but not spa, impaired virulence, as assessed by skin lesion severity, and that Sbi-mediated virulence required B lymphocytes/antibody. Furthermore, neither Sbi nor SpA impaired the elicited antibody response or protection against secondary SSTI. Taken together, these findings highlight a B lymphocyte/antibody-dependent role of Sbi in the pathogenesis of S. aureus SSTI, and demonstrate that neither Sbi nor SpA interfered with elicited antibody-mediated immunity. PMID:26828524

  11. Comparison of Staphylococcus aureus strains for ability to cause infective endocarditis and lethal sepsis in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Spaulding, Adam R; Satterwhite, Erin A; Lin, Ying-Chi; Chuang-Smith, Olivia N; Frank, Kristi L; Merriman, Joseph A; Schaefers, Matthew M; Yarwood, Jeremy M; Peterson, Marnie L; Schlievert, Patrick M

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of infective endocarditis (IE) and sepsis. Both methicillin-resistant (MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive (MSSA) strains cause these illnesses. Common S. aureus strains include pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) types USA200, 300, and 400 types where we hypothesize that secreted virulence factors contribute to both IE and sepsis. Rabbit cardiac physiology is considered similar to humans, and rabbits exhibit susceptibility to S. aureus superantigens (SAgs) and cytolysins. As such, rabbits are an excellent model for studying IE and sepsis, which over the course of four days develop IE vegetations and/or fatal septicemia. We examined the ability of MRSA and MSSA strains (4 USA200, 2 USA300, 2 USA400, and three additional common strains, FRI1169, Newman, and COL) to cause vegetations and lethal sepsis in rabbits. USA200, TSST-1(+) strains that produce only low amounts of α-toxin, exhibited modest LD(50) in sepsis (1 × 10(8) - 5 × 10(8)) colony-forming units (CFUs), and 3/4 caused significant IE. USA200 strain MNPE, which produces high-levels of α-toxin, was both highly lethal (LD(50) 5 × 10(6) CFUs) and effective in causing IE. In contrast, USA300 strains were highly effective in causing lethal sepsis (LD(50)s 1 × 10(6) and 5 × 10(7) CFUs) but were minimally capable of causing IE. Strain Newman, which is phylogenetically related to USA300 strains, was not highly lethal (LD(50) of 2 × 10(9) CFUs) and was effective in causing IE. USA400 strains were both highly lethal (LD(50)s of 1 × 10(7) and 5 × 10(7) CFUs) and highly effective causes of IE. The menstrual TSS isolate FRI1169, that is TSST-1(+), produces high-levels of α-toxin, but is not USA200, was both highly lethal and effective in causing IE. Additional studies showed that phenol soluble modulins (PSMs) produced by FRI1169 were important for sepsis but did not contribute to IE. Our studies show that these clonal groups of S. aureus differ in abilities to cause IE

  12. Simultaneous Bactericidal and Osteogenic Effect of Nanoparticulate Calcium Phosphate Powders Loaded with Clindamycin on Osteoblasts Infected with Staphylococcus Aureus

    PubMed Central

    Uskoković, Vuk; Desai, Tejal A.

    2014-01-01

    S aureus internalized by bone cells and shielded from the immune system provides a reservoir of bacteria in recurring osteomyelitis. Its targeting by the antibiotic therapy may thus be more relevant for treating chronic bone infection than eliminating only the pathogens colonizing the bone matrix. Assessed was the combined osteogenic and antibacterial effect of clindamycin-loaded calcium phosphate nanoparticles of different monophasic compositions on co-cultures comprising osteoblasts infected with S aureus. Antibiotic-carrying particles were internalized by osteoblasts and minimized the concentration of intracellular bacteria. In vitro treatments of the infected cells, however, could not prevent cell necrosis due to the formation of toxic byproducts of the degradation of the bacterium. Antibiotic-loaded particles had a positive morphological effect on osteoblasts per se, without reducing their viability, alongside stimulating upregulation of expression of different bone growth markers in infected osteoblasts to a higher degree than achieved during the treatment with antibiotic only. PMID:24582242

  13. Rapid Isolation of Staphylococcus aureus Pathogens from Infected Clinical Samples Using Magnetic Beads Coated with Fc-Mannose Binding Lectin.

    PubMed

    Bicart-See, A; Rottman, M; Cartwright, M; Seiler, B; Gamini, N; Rodas, M; Penary, M; Giordano, G; Oswald, E; Super, M; Ingber, D E

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe how Staphylococcus aureus bacteria can be rapidly isolated from clinical samples of articular fluid and synovial tissue using magnetic beads coated with the engineered chimeric human opsonin protein, Fc-mannose-binding lectin (FcMBL). The FcMBL-beads were used to capture and magnetically remove bacteria from purified cultures of 12 S. aureus strains, and from 8 articular fluid samples and 4 synovial tissue samples collected from patients with osteoarthritis or periprosthetic infections previously documented by positive S. aureus cultures. While the capture efficiency was high (85%) with purified S. aureus strains grown in vitro, direct FcMBL-bead capture from the clinical samples was initially disappointing (< 5% efficiency). Further analysis revealed that inhibition of FcMBL binding was due to coating of the bacteria by immunoglobulins and immune cells that masked FcMBL binding sites, and to the high viscosity of these complex biological samples. Importantly, capture of pathogens using the FcMBL-beads was increased to 76% efficiency by pretreating clinical specimens with hypotonic washes, hyaluronidase and a protease cocktail. Using this approach, S. aureus bacteria could be isolated from infected osteoarthritic tissues within 2 hours after sample collection. This FcMBL-enabled magnetic method for rapid capture and concentration of pathogens from clinical samples could be integrated upstream of current processes used in clinical microbiology laboratories to identify pathogens and perform antibiotic sensitivity testing when bacterial culture is not possible or before colonies can be detected. PMID:27275840

  14. Rapid Isolation of Staphylococcus aureus Pathogens from Infected Clinical Samples Using Magnetic Beads Coated with Fc-Mannose Binding Lectin

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, B.; Gamini, N.; Rodas, M.; Penary, M.; Giordano, G.; Oswald, E.; Super, M.; Ingber, D. E.

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe how Staphylococcus aureus bacteria can be rapidly isolated from clinical samples of articular fluid and synovial tissue using magnetic beads coated with the engineered chimeric human opsonin protein, Fc-mannose-binding lectin (FcMBL). The FcMBL-beads were used to capture and magnetically remove bacteria from purified cultures of 12 S. aureus strains, and from 8 articular fluid samples and 4 synovial tissue samples collected from patients with osteoarthritis or periprosthetic infections previously documented by positive S. aureus cultures. While the capture efficiency was high (85%) with purified S. aureus strains grown in vitro, direct FcMBL-bead capture from the clinical samples was initially disappointing (< 5% efficiency). Further analysis revealed that inhibition of FcMBL binding was due to coating of the bacteria by immunoglobulins and immune cells that masked FcMBL binding sites, and to the high viscosity of these complex biological samples. Importantly, capture of pathogens using the FcMBL-beads was increased to 76% efficiency by pretreating clinical specimens with hypotonic washes, hyaluronidase and a protease cocktail. Using this approach, S. aureus bacteria could be isolated from infected osteoarthritic tissues within 2 hours after sample collection. This FcMBL-enabled magnetic method for rapid capture and concentration of pathogens from clinical samples could be integrated upstream of current processes used in clinical microbiology laboratories to identify pathogens and perform antibiotic sensitivity testing when bacterial culture is not possible or before colonies can be detected. PMID:27275840

  15. Staphylococcus aureus infection of mice expands a population of memory γδ T cells that are protective against subsequent infection

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Alison G.; O’Keeffe, Kate M.; Lalor, Stephen J.; Maher, Belinda M.; Mills, Kingston H. G.; McLoughlin, Rachel M.

    2014-01-01

    The development of vaccines against S. aureus has consistently failed in clinical trials, likely due to inefficient induction of cellular immunity. T cell-derived IL-17 is one of the few known correlates of anti-staphyloccoal immunity, conferring protection against S. aureus infections through its ability to promote phagocytic cell effector functions. A comprehensive understanding of the discrete T cell subsets critical for site-specific IL-17-mediated bacterial clearance will therefore be necessary to inform the development of vaccines that efficiently target cellular immunity. In this study, we have identified a population of CD44+CD27− memory γδ T cells, expanded upon infection of C57BL/6 mice with S. aureus, which produce high levels of IL-17 and mediate enhanced bacterial clearance upon re-infection with the bacterium. These cells are comprised largely of the Vγ4+ subset and accumulate at the site of infection subsequent to an initial Vγ1.1+ and Vγ2+ T cell response. Moreover, these Vγ4+ T cells are retained in the peritoneum and draining mediastinal lymph nodes for a prolonged period following bacterial clearance. In contrast to its critical requirement for γδ T cell activation during the primary infection, IL-1 signalling was dispensable for activation and expansion of memory γδ T cells upon re-exposure to S. aureus. Our findings demonstrate that a γδ T cell memory response can be induced upon exposure to S. aureus, in a fashion analogous to that associated with classical αβ T cells, and suggest that induction of IL-17-expressing γδ T cells may be an important property of a protective vaccine against S. aureus. PMID:24623128

  16. Electronic hand hygiene monitoring as a tool for reducing health care-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    PubMed

    Kelly, J William; Blackhurst, Dawn; McAtee, Wendy; Steed, Connie

    2016-08-01

    Electronic monitoring of hand hygiene compliance using the World Health Organization's My 5 Moments for Hand Hygiene is a new innovation that has not yet been shown to reduce hospital infections. We analyzed existing data from 23 inpatient units over a 33-month period and found a significant correlation between unit-specific improvements in electronic monitoring compliance and reductions in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection rates (r = -0.37, P < .001). PMID:27346800

  17. Frequency and possible infection control implications of gastrointestinal colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Boyce, John M; Havill, Nancy L; Maria, Benedicte

    2005-12-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major cause of health care-associated infections. Multiple factors, including transmission from unrecognized reservoirs of MRSA, are responsible for failure to control the spread of MRSA. We conducted prospective surveillance to determine the frequency of gastrointestinal colonization with MRSA among patients and its possible impact on nosocomial transmission of MRSA. Stool specimens submitted for Clostridium difficile toxin A/B assays were routinely inoculated on colistin-naladixic acid agar plates, and S. aureus was identified by using standard methods. Methicillin resistance was confirmed by growth on oxacillin-salt screening agar. For patients whose stool yielded MRSA, information regarding any previous cultures positive for MRSA or other organisms that would require contact precautions was obtained from the laboratory's computer system. During a 1-year period, 151 (9.8%) of 1,543 patients who had one or more stool specimens screened had MRSA in their stool. Ninety-three (62%) of the 151 patients had no previous history of MRSA colonization or infection. Of these 93, 75 were inpatients. Sixty (80%) of the 75 inpatients with no previous history of MRSA were not under "contact precautions." The 60 patients would have spent an estimated total of 267 days without being placed under contact precautions if their positive stool cultures had not resulted in their being isolated. Placing patients under contact precautions based on their positive stool cultures prevented an estimated 35 episodes of MRSA transmission. We conclude that gastrointestinal colonization with MRSA may serve as an unrecognized reservoir from which transmission of MRSA may occur in health care facilities. PMID:16333087

  18. Review of Staphylococcus aureus infections requiring admission to a paediatric intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Miles, F; Voss, L; Segedin, E; Anderson, B

    2005-01-01

    Aims: To review clinical features and outcome of children with severe Staphylococcus aureus sepsis (SAS) presenting to a paediatric intensive care unit (PICU) with particular focus on ethnicity, clinical presentation, cardiac involvement, and outcome. Methods: Retrospective chart review of patients coded for SAS over 10 years (October 1993 to April 2004). Results: There were 58 patients identified with SAS over the 10 year study period; 55 were community acquired. This accounted for 4% of hospital admissions for SAS over this time; children with staphylococcal illness comprised 1% of all admissions to the PICU. Maori and Pacific children with SAS were overly represented in the PICU (81%) from a paediatric population where they contribute 21.6%. Musculoskeletal symptoms (79%) dominated presentation rather than isolated pneumonia (10%). An aggressive search for foci and surgical drainage of infective foci was required in 50% of children. Most children had multifocal disease (67%) and normal cardiac valves (95%); the few children (12%) presenting with methicillin resistant S aureus (MRSA) had community acquired infection. The median length of stay in the PICU was 3 (mean 5.8, SD 7.6, range 1–44) days. The median length of stay in hospital was 15 (mean 21, SD 22.7, range 2–149) days. Mortality due to SAS was 8.6% (95% CI 1.4–15.8%) compared with the overall mortality for the PICU of 6% (95% CI 5.3–6.7%). Ten children had significant morbidity after discharge. Conclusions: Community acquired SAS affects healthy children, is multifocal, and has high morbidity and mortality, in keeping with the high severity of illness scores on admission. It is imperative to look for sites of dissemination and to drain and debride foci. Routine echocardiography had low yield in the absence of pre-existing cardiac lesions, persisting fever, or persisting bacteraemia. PMID:16301556

  19. Pathophysiological Mechanisms of Staphylococcus Non-aureus Bone and Joint Infection: Interspecies Homogeneity and Specific Behavior of S. pseudintermedius

    PubMed Central

    Maali, Yousef; Martins-Simões, Patrícia; Valour, Florent; Bouvard, Daniel; Rasigade, Jean-Philippe; Bes, Michele; Haenni, Marisa; Ferry, Tristan; Laurent, Frédéric; Trouillet-Assant, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Implicated in more than 60% of bone and joint infections (BJIs), Staphylococci have a particular tropism for osteoarticular tissue and lead to difficult-to-treat clinical infections. To date, Staphylococcus aureus internalization in non-professional phagocytic cells (NPPCs) is a well-explored virulence mechanism involved in BJI chronicity. Conversely, the pathophysiological pathways associated with Staphylococcus non-aureus (SNA) BJIs have scarcely been studied despite their high prevalence. In this study, 15 reference strains from 15 different SNA species were compared in terms of (i) adhesion to human fibronectin based on adhesion microplate assays and (ii) internalization ability, intracellular persistence and cytotoxicity based on an in vitro infection model using human osteoblasts. Compared to S. aureus, S. pseudintermedius was the only species that significantly adhered to human fibronectin. This species was also associated with high (even superior to S. aureus) internalization ability, intracellular persistence and cytotoxicity. These findings were confirmed using a panel of 17 different S. pseudintermedius isolates. Additionally, S. pseudintermedius internalization by osteoblasts was completely abolished in β1 integrin-deficient murine osteoblasts. These results suggest the involvement of β1 integrin in the invasion process, although this mechanism was previously restricted to S. aureus. In summary, our results suggest that internalization into NPPCs is not a classical pathophysiologic mechanism of SNA BJIs. S. pseudintermedius appears to be an exception, and its ability to invade and subsequently induce cytotoxicity in NPPCs could explain its severe and necrotic forms of infection, notably in dogs, which exhibit a high prevalence of S. pseudintermedius infection. PMID:27462303

  20. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus colonization in HIV-infected outpatients is common and detection is enhanced by groin culture.

    PubMed

    Peters, P J; Brooks, J T; Limbago, B; Lowery, H K; McAllister, S K; Mindley, R; Fosheim, G; Gorwitz, R J; Guest, J L; Hageman, J; Fridge, J; Rimland, D

    2011-07-01

    SUMMARYAlthough high rates of clinical infection with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have been reported in HIV-infected adults, data on MRSA colonization are limited. We enrolled HIV-infected adults receiving care at the Atlanta VA Medical Center. Swabs from each participant's nares and groin were cultured with broth enrichment for S. aureus. Of 600 HIV-infected adults, 79 (13%) were colonized with MRSA and 180 (30%) with methicillin-susceptible S. aureus. MRSA pulsed-field gel electrophoresis types USA300 (n=44, 54%) and USA500/Iberian (n=29, 35%) predominated. Inclusion of groin swabs increased MRSA detection by 24% and USA300 detection by 38%. In multivariate analysis, MRSA colonization compared to no MRSA colonization was associated with a history of MRSA clinical infection, rarely or never using condoms, and contact with prisons and jails. In summary, the prevalence of MRSA colonization was high in this study of HIV-infected adults and detection of USA300 was enhanced by groin culture. PMID:20843384

  1. Multiclonal outbreak of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections on a collegiate football team.

    PubMed

    Hall, A J; Bixler, D; Haddy, L E

    2009-01-01

    An outbreak of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) occurred in a college football team in August 2006. Of 109 players on the team roster, 88 (81%) were interviewed during a cohort investigation. Twenty-five cases were identified, six of which were culture-confirmed. Available culture isolates were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), which identified two different MRSA strains associated with the outbreak. Playing positions with the most physical contact (offensive linemen, defensive linemen, and tight ends) had the greatest risk of infection [risk ratio (RR) 5.1, 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.3-11.5. Other risk factors included recent skin trauma (RR 1.9, 95% CI 0.95-3.7), use of therapeutic hydrocollator packs (RR 2.5, 95% CI 1.1-5.7), and miscellaneous training equipment use (RR 2.1, 95% CI 1.1-4.1). The outbreak was successfully controlled through team education and implementation of improved infection-control practices and hygiene policies. PMID:18419855

  2. G-CSF enhances resolution of Staphylococcus aureus wound infection in an age-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Brubaker, Aleah L; Kovacs, Elizabeth J

    2013-10-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that heightened bacterial colonization and delayed wound closure in aged mice could be attenuated by granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) treatment. Previously, we reported that aged mice had elevated bacterial levels, protracted wound closure, and reduced wound neutrophil accumulation after Staphylococcus aureus wound infection relative to young mice. In aseptic wound models, G-CSF treatment improved wound closure in aged mice to rates observed in young mice. Given these data, our objective was to determine if G-CSF could restore age-associated differences in wound bacterial burden and closure by increasing wound neutrophil recruitment. Young (3- to 4-month) and aged (18- to 20-month) BALB/c mice received three dorsal subcutaneous injections of G-CSF (250 ng/50 μL per injection) or saline control (50 μL per injection) 30 min after wound infection. Mice were killed at days 3 and 7 after wound infection, and bacterial colonization, wound size, wound leukocyte accumulation, and peripheral blood were evaluated. At days 3 and 7 after wound infection, bacterial colonization was significantly reduced in G-CSF-treated aged mice to levels observed in saline-treated young animals. Wound size was reduced in G-CSF-treated aged animals, with no effect on wound size in G-CSF-treated young mice. Local G-CSF treatment significantly enhanced neutrophil wound accumulation in aged mice, whereas there was no G-CSF-induced change in young mice. These data demonstrate that G-CSF enhances bacterial clearance and wound closure in an age-dependent manner. Moreover, G-CSF may be of therapeutic potential in the setting of postoperative wound infection or chronic nonhealing wounds in elderly patients. PMID:23856924

  3. Udder infections with Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, and Streptococcus uberis at calving in dairy herds with suboptimal udder health.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Å; Nyman, A-K; Aspán, A; Börjesson, S; Unnerstad, H Ericsson; Waller, K Persson

    2016-03-01

    Udder infections with Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, and Streptococcus uberis are common causes of bovine mastitis. To study these pathogens in early lactation, a 12-mo longitudinal, observational study was carried out in 13 herds with suboptimal udder health. The aims of the study were to investigate the occurrence of these pathogens and to identify if presence of the 3 pathogens, and of genotypes within the pathogens, differed with respect to herd, season, and parity. Quarter milk samples, collected at calving and 4 d in milk (DIM), were cultured for the 3 pathogens. Genotyping of staphylococcal and streptococcal isolates was performed using spa typing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, respectively. For each of the 3 pathogens, cows with an udder infection at calving or 4 DIM were allocated to 1 of 4 infection types: cleared (pathogen present only at calving), persistent (pathogen present in the same quarter at calving and 4 DIM), new (pathogen present only at 4 DIM), or cleared/new (pathogen present in 1 quarter at calving and in another quarter at 4 DIM). Associations between season or parity and overall occurrence of pathogens or infection types were determined using univariable mixed-effect logistic-regression models and the Fisher's exact test, respectively. The most commonly occurring pathogen was Staph. aureus, followed by Strep. dysgalactiae and Strep. uberis. Persistent infections were the most common infection type among Staph. aureus-infected cows, whereas cleared infections were the most common among Strep. dysgalactiae- and Strep. uberis-positive cows. The proportion of cows with persistent Staph. aureus infections and the proportion of cows having a Strep. uberis infection at calving or 4 DIM were higher in the multiparous cows than in primiparous cows. Infections with Strep. dysgalactiae were less common during the early housing season than during the late housing or pasture seasons, whereas persistent Strep. uberis

  4. Staphylococcus aureus infection of mice expands a population of memory γδ T cells that are protective against subsequent infection.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Alison G; O'Keeffe, Kate M; Lalor, Stephen J; Maher, Belinda M; Mills, Kingston H G; McLoughlin, Rachel M

    2014-04-15

    The development of vaccines against Staphylococcus aureus has consistently failed in clinical trials, likely due to inefficient induction of cellular immunity. T cell-derived IL-17 is one of the few known correlates of antistaphylococcoal immunity, conferring protection against S. aureus infections through its ability to promote phagocytic cell effector functions. A comprehensive understanding of the discrete T cell subsets critical for site-specific IL-17-mediated bacterial clearance will therefore be necessary to inform the development of vaccines that efficiently target cellular immunity. In this study, we have identified a population of CD44+ CD27- memory γδ T cells, expanded upon infection of C57BL/6 mice with S. aureus, which produce high levels of IL-17 and mediate enhanced bacterial clearance upon reinfection with the bacterium. These cells are comprised largely of the Vγ4+ subset and accumulate at the site of infection subsequent to an initial Vγ1.1+ and Vγ2+ T cell response. Moreover, these Vγ4+ T cells are retained in the peritoneum and draining mediastinal lymph nodes for a prolonged period following bacterial clearance. In contrast to its critical requirement for γδ T cell activation during the primary infection, IL-1 signaling was dispensable for activation and expansion of memory γδ T cells upon re-exposure to S. aureus. Our findings demonstrate that a γδ T cell memory response can be induced upon exposure to S. aureus, in a fashion analogous to that associated with classical αβ T cells, and suggest that induction of IL-17-expressing γδ T cells may be an important property of a protective vaccine against S. aureus. PMID:24623128

  5. Australian Staphylococcus aureus Sepsis Outcome Programme annual report, 2013.

    PubMed

    Coombs, Geoffrey W; Nimmo, Graeme R; Daly, Denise A; Le, Tam T; Pearson, Julie C; Tan, Hui-Leen; Robinson, James O; Collignon, Peter J; McLaws, Mary-Louise; Turnidge, John D

    2014-12-01

    From 1 January to 31 December 2013, around Australia 26 institutions around Australia participated in the Australian Staphylococcal Sepsis Outcome Programme (ASSOP). The aim of ASSOP 2013 was to determine the proportion of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB) isolates in Australia that are antimicrobial resistant, (with particular emphasis on susceptibility to methicillin) and to characterise the molecular epidemiology of the isolates. Overall 19.1% of the 2,010 SAB episodes were methicillin resistant, which is significantly higher than that reported in most European countries. Although the SAB 30-day all cause mortality appears to be decreasing in Australia, methicillin-resistant SAB associated mortality remains high (20.1%) and was significantly higher than methicillin-sensitive SAB associated mortality (13%) (P< 0.0001). With the exception of the ß-lactams and erythromycin, antimicrobial resistance in methicillin sensitive S. aureus remains rare. However, in addition to the ß-lactams, approximately 50% of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) were resistant to erythromycin and ciprofloxacin and approximately 20% were resistant to co-trimoxazole, tetracycline and gentamicin. Linezolid, daptomycin and teicoplanin resistance was detected in a small number of S. aureus isolates. Resistance to vancomycin was not detected. Resistance was largely attributable to 2 healthcare associated MRSA clones; ST22-IV [2B] (EMRSA-15) and ST239-III [3A] (Aus-2/3 EMRSA). ST22-IV [2B] (EMRSA-15) has now become the predominant healthcare associated clone in Australia. Approximately 60% of methicillin-resistant SAB were due to community associated clones. Although polyclonal, almost 50% of community associated clones were characterised as ST93-IV [2B] (Queensland CA-MRSA) and ST1-IV [2B] (WA1). CA-MRSA, in particular the ST45-V [5C2&5] (WA84) clone, has acquired multiple antimicrobial resistance determinants including ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, clindamycin, gentamicin and

  6. Failure of combination therapy for Staphylococcus aureus bone infection: a case of in vivo selection with resistance to rifampicin and fusidic acid.

    PubMed

    Aubin, Guillaume G; Bémer, Pascale; Guillouzouic, Aurélie; Launay, Elise; Geffroy, Loïc; Touchais, Sophie; Corvec, Stéphane

    2016-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the main etiologies of bone and device-related infections. Treatment of these orthopedic infections combines mostly rifampicin with other antibiotics. The recurrence or failure rate after fusidic acid/rifampicin treatment remains low (<10%). We discuss here a case of antibiotic treatment failure for Staphylococcus aureus bone infection with in vivo selection of rifampicin and fusidic acid resistance. We also report a new mutation in fusA gene involved in fusidic acid resistance. PMID:27194514

  7. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Colonization and Risk of Subsequent Infection in Critically Ill Children: Importance of Preventing Nosocomial Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Goldner, Brian W.; Ross, Tracy; Shepard, John W.; Carroll, Karen C.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization is a predictor of subsequent infection in hospitalized adults. The risk of subsequent MRSA infections in hospitalized children colonized with MRSA is unknown. Methods. Children admitted to an academic medical center’s pediatric intensive care unit between March 2007 and March 2010 were included in the study. Anterior naris swabs were cultured to identify children with MRSA colonization at admission. Laboratory databases were queried and National Healthcare Safety Network definitions applied to identify patients with MRSA infections during their hospitalization or after discharge. Results. The MRSA admission prevalence among 3140 children was 4.9%. Overall, 56 children (1.8%) developed an MRSA infection, including 13 (8.5%) colonized on admission and 43 (1.4%) not colonized on admission (relative risk [RR], 5.9; 95% confidence interval [CI], 3.4–10.1). Of those, 10 children (0.3%) developed an MRSA infection during their hospitalization, including 3 of 153 children (1.9%) colonized on admission and 7 of 2987 children (0.2%) not colonized on admission (RR, 8.4; 95% CI, 2.7–25.8). African-Americans and those with public health insurance were more likely to get a subsequent infection (P < .01 and P = .03, respectively). We found that 15 children acquired MRSA colonization in the pediatric intensive care unit, and 7 (47%) developed a subsequent MRSA infection. Conclusions. MRSA colonization is a risk factor for subsequent MRSA infection in children. Although MRSA colonized children may have lower risks of subsequent infection than adults, children who acquire MRSA in the hospital have similarly high rates of infection. Preventing transmission of MRSA in hospitalized children should remain a priority. PMID:21878424

  8. Nasopharyngeal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus among imprisoned males from Brazil without exposure to healthcare: risk factors and molecular characterization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous studies report high prevalence of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization among imprisoned populations. However, there are no data on that prevalence in Brazilian correctional institutions. Findings We tested 302 male prisoners for nasopharyngeal colonization with Staphylococcus aureus from February 2009 through April 2010. The overall isolation rate of S. aureus was 16.5% (50/302). Men who had sex with men, users of inhalatory drugs and those with previous lung or skin diseases were more likely to be colonized with S. aureus. MRSA was isolated from 0.7% of subjects (2/302). The two Community-associated (CA)-MRSA belonged to ST5 but were unrelated based on the PFGE results. Both harbored SCCmec IV, and did not possess the Panton-Valentine Leukocidin gene. Conclusion We found low prevalence of S. aureus and CA-MRSA among prisoners. MRSA isolates ST5 from two subjects harboured SCCmec IV and presented different PFGE patterns. PMID:24990470

  9. Impact of Time to Appropriate Therapy on Mortality in Patients with Vancomycin-Intermediate Staphylococcus aureus Infection.

    PubMed

    Burnham, Jason P; Burnham, C A; Warren, David K; Kollef, Marin H

    2016-09-01

    Despite the increasing incidence of vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (VISA) infections, few studies have examined the impact of delay in receipt of appropriate antimicrobial therapy on outcomes in VISA patients. We examined the effects of timing of appropriate antimicrobial therapy in a cohort of patients with sterile-site methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and VISA infections. In this single-center, retrospective cohort study, we identified all patients with MRSA or VISA sterile-site infections from June 2009 to February 2015. Clinical outcomes were compared according to MRSA/VISA classification, demographics, comorbidities, and antimicrobial treatment. Thirty-day all-cause mortality was modeled with Kaplan-Meier curves. Multivariate logistic regression analysis (MVLRA) was used to determine odds ratios for mortality. We identified 354 patients with MRSA (n = 267) or VISA (n = 87) sterile-site infection. Fifty-five patients (15.5%) were nonsurvivors. Factors associated with mortality in MVLRA included pneumonia, unknown source of infection, acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) II score, solid-organ malignancy, and admission from skilled care facilities. Time to appropriate antimicrobial therapy was not significantly associated with outcome. Presence of a VISA infection compared to that of a non-VISA S. aureus infection did not result in excess mortality. Linezolid use was a risk for mortality in patients with APACHE II scores of ≥14. Our results suggest that empirical vancomycin use in patients with VISA infections does not result in excess mortality. Future studies should (i) include larger numbers of patients with VISA infections to confirm the findings presented here and (ii) determine the optimal antibiotic therapy for critically ill patients with MRSA and VISA infections. PMID:27401565

  10. Identification of Unique Blood and Urine Biomarkers in Influenza Virus and Staphylococcus aureus Co-infection: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Prescott, Meagan A; Pastey, Manoj K

    2010-01-01

    Each year, there are estimated to be approximately 200,000 hospitalizations and 36,000 deaths due to influenza in the United States. Reports have indicated that most deaths are not directly due to influenza virus, but to secondary bacterial pneumonia, predominantly staphylococcal in origin. Here we identify the presence of candidate blood and urine biomarkers in mice with Staphyococcus aureus and influenza virus co-infection. In this pilot study, mice were grouped into four treatments: co-infected with influenza virus and S. aureus, singly infected with influenza virus or S. aureus, and a control group of uninfected mice (PBS treated). Gene expression changes were identified by DNA-microarrays from blood samples taken at day five post infection. Proteomic changes were obtained from urine samples collected at three and five days post infection using 2-D DIGE followed by protein ID by mass spectrometry. Differentially expressed genes and/or proteins were identified as candidate biomarkers for future validation in larger studies. PMID:21151588

  11. BRAIN ABSCESS DUE TO Staphylococcus aureus OF CRYPTOGENIC SOURCE IN AN HIV-1 INFECTED PATIENT IN USE OF ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY

    PubMed Central

    de OLIVEIRA, Anna Paula Romero; PAPPALARDO, Mara Cristina; DANTAS, Daniel; LINS, Diogo; VIDAL, José Ernesto

    2016-01-01

    The spectrum of neurological complications associated with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is broad. The most frequent etiologies include primary diseases (caused by HIV itself) or secondary diseases (opportunistic infections or neoplasms). Despite these conditions, HIV-infected patients are susceptible to other infections observed in patients without HIV infection. Here we report a rare case of a brain abscess caused by Staphylococcus aureus in an HIV-infected patient. After drainage of the abscess and treatment with oxacilin, the patient had a favorable outcome. This case reinforces the importance of a timely neurosurgical procedure that supported adequate management of an unusual cause of expansive brain lesions in HIV-1 infected patients. PMID:27074328

  12. Molecular epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from inpatients with infected diabetic foot ulcers in an Algerian University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Djahmi, N; Messad, N; Nedjai, S; Moussaoui, A; Mazouz, D; Richard, J-L; Sotto, A; Lavigne, J-P

    2013-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is the most common pathogen cultured from diabetic foot infection (DFI). The consequence of its spread to soft tissue and bony structures is a major causal factor for lower-limb amputation. The objective of the study was to explore ecological data and epidemiological characteristics of S. aureus strains isolated from DFI in an Algerian hospital setting. Patients were included if they were admitted for DFI in the Department of Diabetology at the Annaba University Hospital from April 2011 to March 2012. Ulcers were classified according to the Infectious Diseases Society of America/International Working Group on the Diabetic Foot classification system. All S. aureus isolates were analysed. Using oligonucleotide arrays, S. aureus resistance and virulence genes were determined and each isolate was affiliated to a clonal complex. Among the 128 patients, 277 strains were isolated from 183 samples (1.51 isolate per sample). Aerobic Gram-negative bacilli were the most common isolated organisms (54.9% of all isolates). The study of ecological data highlighted the extremely high rate of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs) (58.5% of all isolates). The situation was especially striking for S. aureus [(85.9% were methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA)], Klebsiella pneumonia (83.8%) and Escherichia coli (60%). Among the S. aureus isolates, 82.2% of MRSA belonged to ST239, one of the most worldwide disseminated clones. Ten strains (13.7%) belonged to the European clone PVL+ ST80. ermA, aacA-aphD, aphA, tetM, fosB, sek, seq, lukDE, fnbB, cap8 and agr group 1 genes were significantly associated with MRSA strains (p <0.01). The study shows for the first time the alarming prevalence of MDROs in DFI in Algeria. PMID:23521557

  13. The novel antibacterial drug XF-70 is a potent inhibitor of Staphylococcus aureus infection of the burn wound.

    PubMed

    Hurtuk, Michael G; He, L-K; Szilagyi, Andrea; Gamelli, Richard L; Hecht, David W; Kennedy, Richard H; Rhys-Williams, William; Love, William G; Shankar, Ravi

    2010-01-01

    The authors report the findings of in vivo studies of XF-70 (a novel, dicationic porphyrin) against Staphylococcus aureus in a murine model of a burn wound infection. Mice received a 15% total body scald burn wound, which were inoculated with S. aureus (1.8 x 10 CFU). After 24 hours, escharectomies were performed and groups (n = 8) received single or two doses (6 hours apart) of XF-70* (100 microg/wound) or silver sulfadiazine, Acticoat, or saline applied topically. Viable bacteria were quantified from homogenized burn tissue biopsies and the spleen by plating dilutions onto agar plates and CFU determination. A single dose of XF-70 reduced bacterial burden by 98.77% (untreated: 2.78 +/- 2.96 x 10 CFU/g vs XF-70 treated: 3.4 +/- 0.19 x 10 CFU/g, P < .01). Two XF-70 doses reduced the growth of S. aureus by 99.96% (1.2 +/- 0.6 x 10 CFU/g, P < .01). These results were similar to the results obtained from commonly used topical antibacterials silver sulfadiazine and Acticoat. The spleens of mice treated with saline had a robust growth of S. aureus (7.0 +/- 1.97 x 10 CFU/g) whereas those treated with one or two XF-70 doses grew only 3.5 +/- 0.002 x 10 CFU/g and 5.7 +/- 0.002 x 10 CFU/g, respectively, a significant (P < .001) reduction in S. aureus dissemination. Single and multiple doses of XF-70 were effective in controlling S. aureus growth in burn wounds and inhibited systemic dissemination of S. aureus. Early treatment of burn wounds with XF-70 may be effective in slowing bacterial dissemination to other tissues. PMID:20453736

  14. Incidence of invasive meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections in Germany, 2010 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Walter, Jan; Haller, Sebastian; Blank, Hans-Peter; Eckmanns, Tim; Abu Sin, Muna; Hermes, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Voluntary surveillance systems in Germany suggest a recent decline in the incidence of infections (subsequent to at least 2010) with meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from various types of specimens and settings. We asked whether this decline is reflected by data from the mandatory national surveillance system for invasive MRSA infections. Our analysis is based on the population in Germany in 2010 to 2014. Cases were identified from passive reporting by microbiological laboratories of the diagnosis of MRSA from blood culture or cerebrospinal fluid. Respective clinical data were subsequently added to the notification. We calculated risk ratios (RR) between consecutive years, stratifying cases by sex, age and federal state of residence. The national incidence increased from 4.6 episodes per 100,000 persons in 2010 to 5.6 in 2012 (2011 vs 2010: RR: 1.13, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.08-1.18; 2012 vs 2011: RR: 1.08, 95% CI: 1.04-1.13). It stagnated at 5.4 per 100,000 in 2013 (RR: 0.97, 95% CI: 0.93-1.01) before declining to 4.8 in 2014 (RR: 0.88, 95% CI: 0.84-0.91). This trend was observed in most, but not all federal states and strata of sex and age groups. Only 204 of 20,679 (1%) episodes of infection were notified as belonging to an outbreak. Our analysis corroborates previous findings that the incidence of invasive MRSA infections in Germany may be declining. PMID:26607355

  15. The efficacy of ethanolic extract of Lemon verbena on the skin infection due to Staphylococcus aureus in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Ghaemi, Ezzat Ollah; Khorshidi, Didar; Moradi, Abdolvahab; Seifi, Akhter; Mazendrani, Masomeh; Bazouri, Masod; Mansourian, Azad Reza

    2007-11-15

    Daily increasing of Staphylococcus aureus resistance to various antibiotics in particular penicillin and Methecilin has led the scientist to look fore new medicines in this area. In an in vitro laboratory studies, it has been demonstrated that ethanolic extract of Lemon verbena can prevent the growth of Staphylococcus aureus. In this study the efficacy of ethanolic extract of Lemon verbena against Staphylococcus aureus skin infection were assessed in an in vivo, in animal model. 200lambda of Staphylococcus aureus suspension, were inoculated intradermally on the shoulder of 63 laboratory 20-30 g mice. the mice were divided in to 4 groups, 2 control groups: Negative (without treatment) and positive (treated with Mupirucin) and 2 test groups that treated for 7 days by ointment prepared from ethanolic extract of Lemon verbena (group 3), or injection of Lemon verbena solution (group 4). The status of wounds, the rate of recovery was studied and the presence of local pus after dissection of mice on day 8 recorded and compared with each other. The wound appearance in the second day, on the injection site of S. aureus, in Group 1, 4, 3 and 2 were 84.2, 66.7, 46.2 and 23.1%, respectively. In the final day, the lesion still was remained in 78.9, 23.1, 92.3 and 77.7% in groups 1 -4, respectively. The necrotic and wide wounds were more observed in groups 1 and 3 vs two other groups. The results from this investigation indicate that the ointment prepared from ethanolic extract of Lemon verbena is a proper medication to prevent the skin infection by Staphylococcus aureus in early phase. PMID:19090293

  16. [Investigation of the effect of ibuprofen on wound healing in experimental Staphylococcus aureus soft tissue infections].

    PubMed

    Çitil, M Uğur; Mete, Ergun; Oğuz, E Oğuzhan; Abban Mete, Gülçin; Şahin, Barbaros; Kaleli, İlknur

    2015-04-01

    Soft tissue infections (STIs) occur as a result of the colonization of pathogenic bacteria upon the destruction of normal skin microbial flora and the skin integrity. Streptococci and staphylococci are the most frequent causes of bacterial STIs. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen are often used in STIs because of their analgesic and antipyretic effects. However, evidence suggests that these drugs might delay both epithelization and angiogenesis in the early phases of wound healing because of an antiproliferative effect. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ibuprofen on the wound healing in STIs caused by Staphylococcus aureus in immunosuppressed mice. A total of 120 female Balb/c mice were used in the study and the mice were assigned to four test groups and two control groups. The test groups were defined as follows; B (Bacteria group, n= 23), BI (Bacteria + Ibuprofen group, n= 23), BA (Bacteria + Ampicillin group, n= 23), BIA (Bacteria + Ampicillin + Ibuprofen group, n= 21); and the control groups were defined as follows; S1B2 (only immunosuppressed controls, n= 15) and S2B2 (Sham group). Immunosupression was induced with cyclophosphamide and the experimental infection was generated by subcutaneous inoculation of bacterial suspension (2 x 10(8) cfu/ml) of methicillin-sensitive S.aureus ATCC 25923 to the right hind leg. Ibuprofen was given to the mice by gastric gavage (50 mg/kg/day), and ampicillin (100 mg/kg/day) by intramuscular injection. Wound sizes that appear in the animals were measured on a daily basis. Serum and tissue (epithelial tissue, connective tissue, sebaceous glands, sweat glands) samples were obtained on the first, third and seventh days. The tissue samples were examined histopathologically by hematoxylin-eosin (HE) staining method and IL-1, IL-6, TNF-α and VEGF (Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor) levels were determined in serum samples by ELISA method. The tissue cytokine reactions were also

  17. Staphylococcus aureus and repeat bacteremia in febrile patients as early signs of sternal wound infection after cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Sternal wound infection is a devastating complication of cardiothoracic surgery that carries high postoperative morbidity and mortality rates. We explored whether our current program of extensive bacteriological examination including repeat blood cultures may contribute to the early diagnosis of sternal wound infection. Methods We retrospectively analyzed 112 patients who were subjected to our bacteriological examination protocol including within 90 days after cardiothoracic surgery. Univariate and multivariate analyses were made in order to identify risk factors for sternal infection. Results The median patient age was 75 years, and 65 patients were male. In 35 cases (31.2%) the blood cultures showed the presence of bacterial infection with the following frequencies: Staphylococcus aureus, 18 cases; Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus, 7 cases; other organisms, 10 cases. Eleven patients presented repeat bacteremia on at least 2 different occasions. Twenty patients (17.8%) presented sternal wound infections. There was no difference in operative mortality between the patients with and without sternal wound infection. Univariate and multivariate analyses demonstrated that bilateral mammary artery use (OR, 13.68, 95% CI, 1.09-167.36, p = 0.043), positive blood culture for Staphylococcus aureus (OR, 19.51, 95% CI, 4.46-104.33, p < 0.0001), repeat bacteremia (OR, 17.98, 95% CI, 2.51-161.77, p = 0.004) were risk factors that were associated for sternal wound infection. Conclusion Repeat blood cultures in febrile patients appear to be useful for the early detection of Staphylococcus aureus and repeat bacteremia, and these were associated with sternal wound infection. Bilateral internal mammary artery use was another risk factor of sternal wound infection in febrile patients. These factors may identify patients suitable for expeditious radiological examination and aggressive treatments. PMID:24885820

  18. RNA-Seq Analysis of the Host Response to Staphylococcus aureus Skin and Soft Tissue Infection in a Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Rebecca A.; Bruno, Vincent M.; Burns, Drusilla L.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI), which are primarily self-limiting. We conducted a comprehensive analysis of the host transcriptome during a S. aureus SSTI to provide insight on the protective mechanisms that thwart these infections. We utilized a murine SSTI model in which one ear is epicutaneously challenged while the other is not. We then harvested these infected and uninfected ears, as well as ears from naïve mice, at one, four, and seven days post-challenge, and performed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) using the Illumina platform. RNA-seq data demonstrated a robust response at the site of infection. Comparison of gene expression profiles between infected ears and the non-infected ears of challenged mice defined the local response to infection, while comparisons of expression profiles of non-infected ears from challenged mice to ears of naïve mice revealed changes in gene expression levels away from the site indicative of a systemic response. Over 1000 genes exhibited increased expression locally at all tested time points. The local response was more robust than the systemic response. Through evaluation of the RNA-seq data using the Upstream Regulator Analytic as part of the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software package, we found that changes in the activation and inhibition of regulatory pathways happen first locally, and lag behind systemically. The activated pathways are highly similar at all three time points during SSTI, suggesting a stable global response over time. Transcript increases and pathway activation involve pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators, chemotaxis, cell signaling, keratins, and TH1/TH17 cytokines. Transcript decreases and pathway inhibition demonstrate that metabolic genes and anti-inflammatory pathways are repressed. These data provide insight on the host responses that may aid in resolution of this self-limited S. aureus infection, and may shed light on potential immune correlates of

  19. RNA-Seq Analysis of the Host Response to Staphylococcus aureus Skin and Soft Tissue Infection in a Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Brady, Rebecca A; Bruno, Vincent M; Burns, Drusilla L

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of skin and soft tissue infections (SSTI), which are primarily self-limiting. We conducted a comprehensive analysis of the host transcriptome during a S. aureus SSTI to provide insight on the protective mechanisms that thwart these infections. We utilized a murine SSTI model in which one ear is epicutaneously challenged while the other is not. We then harvested these infected and uninfected ears, as well as ears from naïve mice, at one, four, and seven days post-challenge, and performed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) using the Illumina platform. RNA-seq data demonstrated a robust response at the site of infection. Comparison of gene expression profiles between infected ears and the non-infected ears of challenged mice defined the local response to infection, while comparisons of expression profiles of non-infected ears from challenged mice to ears of naïve mice revealed changes in gene expression levels away from the site indicative of a systemic response. Over 1000 genes exhibited increased expression locally at all tested time points. The local response was more robust than the systemic response. Through evaluation of the RNA-seq data using the Upstream Regulator Analytic as part of the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software package, we found that changes in the activation and inhibition of regulatory pathways happen first locally, and lag behind systemically. The activated pathways are highly similar at all three time points during SSTI, suggesting a stable global response over time. Transcript increases and pathway activation involve pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators, chemotaxis, cell signaling, keratins, and TH1/TH17 cytokines. Transcript decreases and pathway inhibition demonstrate that metabolic genes and anti-inflammatory pathways are repressed. These data provide insight on the host responses that may aid in resolution of this self-limited S. aureus infection, and may shed light on potential immune correlates of

  20. [Successful management of ruptured aortic arch aneurysm infected with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus].

    PubMed

    Kawahira, T; Tsukube, T; Hayashi, T; Kozawa, S; Ogawa, K

    2008-09-01

    A 64-year-old woman was admitted due to back pain and dyspnea. She was suffering from fever of unknown origin for a few weeks without aortic aneurysm by enhanced chest computed tomography (CT). Chest CT taken 1 month later revealed rupture of aortic arch aneurysm. Total arch replacement was performed with in situ grafting under selective cerebral perfusion combined with deep hypothermic circulatory arrest. Rifampicin (RFP) was sprinkled on the graft at operation and omentopexy was done 5 days after the 1st operation. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was isolated on the culture of the aneurysmal wall, therefore, polymyxin B immobilized fiber with direct hemoperfusion (PMX-DHP) was also conducted with antibiotic therapy. Her clinical course after the 2nd operation was uneventful with no infective complication. We report a successful case of ruptured aneurysm of aortic arch infected with MRSA and review our strategy as one of feasible options without using homograft or preparative RFP-bonded vascular prosthesis. PMID:18788376

  1. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and infection control for restorative dental treatment in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Hall, David L

    2003-01-01

    The prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in nursing home residents now averages 20-35%. This includes both numerous asymptomatic mostly unidentified carriers, and the occasional patient with an active infection. Among the most common sites for positive MRSA colonization are the nares and mouth (saliva). Ohio State University (OSU) dental students perform routine restorative dental care onsite in local nursing homes using portable equipment including handpieces that can generate aerosols. Using a series of cultured test swabs and plates, this pilot study suggests that protection for both dental health care personnel and patients are provided by the following: 1. universal barrier precautions (for example, gloves, gowns, masks, hats, facial shields, glasses), 2. surface disinfectants, 3. pre-op 0.12% chlorhexidene mouth rinses, 4. high volume evacuation, 5. perioral skin scrubs. Additional infection control methods, techniques and equipment were evaluated and compared including rubber dam isolation, hand excavation and bond technique, high-speed air turbine and electric "high" speed handpiece. There was no indication of a special tendency or heightened ability of MRSA to aerosolize. PMID:14650558

  2. Outbreak of Panton-Valentine Leukocidin-Associated Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Infection in a Rugby Team, France, 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Couvé-Deacon, Elodie; Tristan, Anne; Pestourie, Nathalie; Faure, Christian; Doffoel-Hantz, Valérie; Garnier, Fabien; Laurent, Frédéric; Lina, Gerard; Ploy, Marie-Cecile

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus strains that produce Panton-Valentine leukocidin are known to cause community infections. We describe an outbreak of skin abscesses caused by Panton-Valentine leukocidin-producing methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (clonal complex 121) in a professional rugby team in France during July 2010-February 2011. Eight team members were carriers; 7 had skin abscesses. PMID:26690308

  3. Outbreak of Panton-Valentine Leukocidin–Associated Methicillin-Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Infection in a Rugby Team, France, 2010–2011

    PubMed Central

    Couvé-Deacon, Elodie; Tristan, Anne; Pestourie, Nathalie; Faure, Christian; Doffoel-Hantz, Valérie; Garnier, Fabien; Laurent, Frédéric; Lina, Gerard

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus strains that produce Panton-Valentine leukocidin are known to cause community infections. We describe an outbreak of skin abscesses caused by Panton-Valentine leukocidin–producing methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (clonal complex 121) in a professional rugby team in France during July 2010–February 2011. Eight team members were carriers; 7 had skin abscesses. PMID:26690308

  4. Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa co-infection is associated with cystic fibrosis-related diabetes and poor clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Limoli, D H; Yang, J; Khansaheb, M K; Helfman, B; Peng, L; Stecenko, A A; Goldberg, J B

    2016-06-01

    Cystic fibrosis-related diabetes (CFRD) patients suffer from accelerated rates of pulmonary decline compared to cystic fibrosis (CF) patients with normal glucose tolerance (NGT). However, the mechanisms underlying this difference are unknown. While CFRD is associated with increased respiratory infections, a link between infection and enhanced pulmonary dysfunction remains unclear. The development of glucose intolerance is spectral, resulting in impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) prior to the diagnosis of CFRD. Inclusion of IGT patients within the NGT group may diminish the ability to identify correlations with CFRD. With this in mind, this study aimed to determine if the association between CFRD and respiratory infections is correlated with pulmonary decline. Respiratory cultures from 234 CF patients with confirmed diagnosis of NGT or CFRD were analyzed to measure rates of infection, focusing on the two most prevalent bacteria in CF, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Infection status was correlated with pulmonary function and confounding clinical variables including age, gender, blood glucose levels, and CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) phenotype were considered in multivariate analyses. CFRD patients, particularly those with extremely high blood glucose levels, were more likely than NGT patients to be co-infected with S. aureus and P. aeruginosa, compared to infection with only one pathogen. Co-infection was associated with decreased lung function and increased frequency of pulmonary exacerbations, even after adjustment for confounding variables. Alterations in the microbial community composition, as opposed to the presence of a single pathogen, may account for greater pulmonary decline in CFRD patients. PMID:26993289

  5. Host Immune Transcriptional Profiles Reflect the Variability in Clinical Disease Manifestations in Patients with Staphylococcus aureus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Banchereau, Romain; Jordan-Villegas, Alejandro; Ardura, Monica; Mejias, Asuncion; Baldwin, Nicole; Xu, Hui; Saye, Elizabeth; Rossello-Urgell, Jose; Nguyen, Phuong; Blankenship, Derek; Creech, Clarence B.; Pascual, Virginia; Banchereau, Jacques; Chaussabel, Damien; Ramilo, Octavio

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections are associated with diverse clinical manifestations leading to significant morbidity and mortality. To define the role of the host response in the clinical manifestations of the disease, we characterized whole blood transcriptional profiles of children hospitalized with community-acquired S. aureus infection and phenotyped the bacterial strains isolated. The overall transcriptional response to S. aureus infection was characterized by over-expression of innate immunity and hematopoiesis related genes and under-expression of genes related to adaptive immunity. We assessed individual profiles using modular fingerprints combined with the molecular distance to health (MDTH), a numerical score of transcriptional perturbation as compared to healthy controls. We observed significant heterogeneity in the host signatures and MDTH, as they were influenced by the type of clinical presentation, the extent of bacterial dissemination, and time of blood sampling in the course of the infection, but not by the bacterial isolate. System analysis approaches provide a new understanding of disease pathogenesis and the relation/interaction between host response and clinical disease manifestations. PMID:22496797

  6. Staphylococcus aureus dynamically adapts global regulators and virulence factor expression in the course from acute to chronic infection.

    PubMed

    Tuchscherr, Lorena; Löffler, Bettina

    2016-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an important pathogen of severe invasive tissue infection, e.g. osteomyelitis that can develop to chronicity and become extremely difficult to treat. Recent research revealed that S. aureus can dynamically switch to small colony variants (SCVs) that are adapted bacterial phenotypes for long-term persistence. The underlying mechanisms of the bacterial switching and adaptation process are largely dependent on an intact Sigma B regulon. As SigB is known as a transcription factor that modulates the stress response of several Gram-positive bacteria, it is most likely required by the bacteria to cope with the intracellular stress conditions. Here, we demonstrate in a long-term infection model of human osteoblasts that S. aureus continuously upregulated the expression of SigB during intracellular persistence. The increased SigB expression was accompanied by upregulation of adhesins and downregulation of toxins, which are characteristics for SCV phenotypes. These data further stress the role of SigB during chronic infections that could be a novel target for preventive or therapeutic measures to avoid chronic infections. PMID:26123224

  7. Soluble CD163 masks fibronectin-binding protein A-mediated inflammatory activation of Staphylococcus aureus infected monocytes.

    PubMed

    Kneidl, Jessica; Mysore, Vijayashree; Geraci, Jennifer; Tuchscherr, Lorena; Löffler, Bettina; Holzinger, Dirk; Roth, Johannes; Barczyk-Kahlert, Katarzyna

    2014-03-01

    Binding to fibronectin (FN) is a crucial pathogenic factor of Staphylococcus aureus mediated by fibronectin-binding protein A (FnBP-A) and extracellular adherence protein (Eap). Recently, we have shown that binding of soluble CD163 (sCD163) to FN linked to these molecules exhibits anti-microbial effects by enhancing phagocytosis and killing activity of S. aureus-infected monocytes. However, it remained unclear whether sCD163 also influences the monocytic activation status. Using genetically modified staphylococcal strains we now identified FnBP-A, but not Eap, as activator of the inflammatory response of monocytes to infection. FnBP-A-mediated inflammatory activation was masked by sCD163 binding to S. aureus promoting efficient pathogen elimination. Thus, sCD163 protects monocytes from overwhelming activation upon staphylococcal infection by dampening the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines TNFα, IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 and DAMP molecule MRP8/14. Moreover, sCD163 limited expression of pro-apoptotic transcription factor NR4A1 induced during S. aureus infection and inhibited induction of chemokine CXCL2promoting survival of staphylococci in vivo. sCD163-mediated effects were not due to general immunosuppression since MAP kinase activation and ROS production were unaltered during infection of monocytes with sCD163-bound bacteria. Thus, sCD163 promotes a specific defence of the immune system against FnBP-A-mediated inflammatory activation enabling successful pathogen elimination, tissue recovery and resolution of inflammation. PMID:24118665

  8. Insulin Treatment Directly Restores Neutrophil Phagocytosis and Bactericidal Activity in Diabetic Mice and Thereby Improves Surgical Site Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yano, Hidekazu; Fujino, Keiichi; Nakashima, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Yoritsuna; Miyazaki, Hiromi; Hamada, Koji; Ono, Satoshi; Iwaya, Keiichi; Saitoh, Daizoh; Seki, Shuhji; Tanaka, Yuji

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial infections, including surgical site infections (SSI), are a common and serious complication of diabetes. Staphylococcus aureus, which is eliminated mainly by neutrophils, is a major cause of SSI in diabetic patients. However, the precise mechanisms by which diabetes predisposes to staphylococcal infection are not fully elucidated. The effect of insulin on this infection is also not well understood. We therefore investigated the effect of insulin treatment on SSI and neutrophil function in diabetic mice. S. aureus was inoculated into the abdominal muscle in diabetic db/db and high-fat-diet (HFD)-fed mice with or without insulin treatment. Although the diabetic db/db mice developed SSI, insulin treatment ameliorated the infection. db/db mice had neutrophil dysfunction, such as decreased phagocytosis, superoxide production, and killing activity of S. aureus; however, insulin treatment restored these functions. Ex vivo treatment (coincubation) of neutrophils with insulin and euglycemic control by phlorizin suggest that insulin may directly activate neutrophil phagocytic and bactericidal activity independently of its euglycemic effect. However, insulin may indirectly restore superoxide production by neutrophils through its euglycemic effect. HFD-fed mice with mild hyperglycemia also developed more severe SSI by S. aureus than control mice and had impaired neutrophil phagocytic and bactericidal activity, which was improved by insulin treatment. Unlike db/db mice, in HFD mice, superoxide production was increased in neutrophils and subsequently suppressed by insulin treatment. Glycemic control by insulin also normalized the neutrophil superoxide-producing capability in HFD mice. Thus, insulin may restore neutrophil phagocytosis and bactericidal activity, thereby ameliorating SSI. PMID:23027538

  9. Genomic characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus strains associated with high within-herd prevalence of intramammary infections in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Cremonesi, P; Pozzi, F; Raschetti, M; Bignoli, G; Capra, E; Graber, H U; Vezzoli, F; Piccinini, R; Bertasi, B; Biffani, S; Castiglioni, B; Luini, M

    2015-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most important causes of mastitis in dairy cattle. Based on previous research, Staph. aureus genotypes with different pathogenic and contagious properties can cause intramammary infection (IMI) and coexist in the same herd. Our study aimed to compare Staph. aureus strains from herds that differed in IMI prevalence using different molecular approaches such as ribosomal spacer (RS)-PCR, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), spa typing, ribotyping, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and multiplex PCR. For this purpose, 31 dairy herds with Staph. aureus IMI were selected, and 16 of these were chosen for a comparison study: the 8 high-prevalence (HP) herds had Staph. aureus IMI prevalence >28% and the 8 low-prevalence (LP) herds had an IMI prevalence <4%. A total of 650 isolates of Staph. aureus from mammary quarters of all positive cows were genotyped with RS-PCR, a technique based on amplification of a portion of the intergenic spacer 16S-23S rRNA, and a subset of 54 strains was also analyzed by multiplex PCR, ribotyping, PFGE, MLST, and spa typing. The RS-PCR analysis revealed 12 different profiles. Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated from 5 out of 8 HP herds showed a profile identical to the genotype B (GTB), described in previous studies as being strongly associated with high within-herd prevalence of Staph. aureus mastitis and the presence of the genes coding for enterotoxins sea, sed, and sej, a long x-region of spa gene, and 3 lukE fragments. Moreover, all strains isolated in the HP herds possessed genes coding for staphylococcal enterotoxins. In LP herds, a limited number of strains of 6 genotypes, different from those isolated in HP herds, were identified and GTB was not found. Within these genotypes, 4 strains were positive for the mecA gene. Preliminary results and comparison with other genotyping methods confirmed that genotyping by RS-PCR is an accurate, rapid, and inexpensive tool for future field studies on Staph

  10. Pharmacodynamics of Glycopeptides in the Mouse Peritonitis Model of Streptococcus pneumoniae or Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Knudsen, Jenny Dahl; Fuursted, Kurt; Raber, Susan; Espersen, Frank; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2000-01-01

    The emergence of resistance to various antibiotics in pneumococci leaves the glycopeptides as the only antibiotics against which pneumococci have no resistance mechanism. This situation has led to a renewed interest in the use of glycopeptides. It has not yet been possible to conclude which one or more of the pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) parameters are the most important and best predictors for the effects of treatment with glycopeptides in animal models or in humans. We used the mouse peritonitis model with immunocompetent mice and with Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae as infective organisms. A wide spectrum of different treatment regimens with vancomycin and teicoplanin was tested to study the pharmacodynamics of these drugs. In studies in which the single dose that protected 50% of lethally infected mice (ED50) was given as one dose or was divided into two doses, survival was significantly decreased when the dose was divided. The only statistically significant correlations between the percentage of survival of the mice after 6 days and each of the PK/PD parameters were for peak concentration (Cmax)/MIC and S. aureus and for the free fraction of Cmax (Cmax-free)/MIC and S. pneumoniae. For S. pneumoniae, the ED50 for different dosing regimens increased with the number of doses given; e.g., the single-dose ED50s for vancomycin and teicoplanin were 0.65 and 0.45 mg/kg, respectively, but the ED50s for dosing regimens with 2-h doses given for 48 h were 6.79 and 5.67 mg/kg, respectively. In experiments with 39 different vancomycin dosing regimens and 40 different teicoplanin dosing regimens against S. pneumoniae, the different PK/PD parameters were analyzed using logistic regression. The Cmax-free/MIC was one of two parameters that best explained the effect for both drugs; for vancomycin, the other important parameter was the AUC/MIC, and for teicoplanin, the other parameter was the time the free fraction of the drug is above the MIC

  11. Pharmacodynamics of glycopeptides in the mouse peritonitis model of Streptococcus pneumoniae or Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, J D; Fuursted, K; Raber, S; Espersen, F; Frimodt-Moller, N

    2000-05-01

    The emergence of resistance to various antibiotics in pneumococci leaves the glycopeptides as the only antibiotics against which pneumococci have no resistance mechanism. This situation has led to a renewed interest in the use of glycopeptides. It has not yet been possible to conclude which one or more of the pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) parameters are the most important and best predictors for the effects of treatment with glycopeptides in animal models or in humans. We used the mouse peritonitis model with immunocompetent mice and with Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae as infective organisms. A wide spectrum of different treatment regimens with vancomycin and teicoplanin was tested to study the pharmacodynamics of these drugs. In studies in which the single dose that protected 50% of lethally infected mice (ED(50)) was given as one dose or was divided into two doses, survival was significantly decreased when the dose was divided. The only statistically significant correlations between the percentage of survival of the mice after 6 days and each of the PK/PD parameters were for peak concentration (C(max))/MIC and S. aureus and for the free fraction of C(max) (C(max-free))/MIC and S. pneumoniae. For S. pneumoniae, the ED(50) for different dosing regimens increased with the number of doses given; e.g., the single-dose ED(50)s for vancomycin and teicoplanin were 0.65 and 0. 45 mg/kg, respectively, but the ED(50)s for dosing regimens with 2-h doses given for 48 h were 6.79 and 5.67 mg/kg, respectively. In experiments with 39 different vancomycin dosing regimens and 40 different teicoplanin dosing regimens against S. pneumoniae, the different PK/PD parameters were analyzed using logistic regression. The C(max-free)/MIC was one of two parameters that best explained the effect for both drugs; for vancomycin, the other important parameter was the AUC/MIC, and for teicoplanin, the other parameter was the time the free fraction of the drug is

  12. Antimicrobial Resistance

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibiotic are known as methicillin-resistant S. aureus or MRSA. Antibiotics and other antimicrobial drugs first became widely ... factors for infection are known as community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA). Recently, several cases overseas and in ...

  13. Protein A suppresses immune responses during Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hwan Keun; Falugi, Fabiana; Thomer, Lena; Missiakas, Dominique M.; Schneewind, Olaf

    2015-01-06

    Staphylococcus aureus infection is not associated with the development of protective immunity, and disease relapses occur frequently. We hypothesize that protein A, a factor that binds immunoglobulin Fcγ and cross-links VH3 clan B cell receptors (IgM), is the staphylococcal determinant for host immune suppression. To test this, vertebrate IgM was examined for protein A cross-linking. High VH3 binding activity occurred with human and guinea immunoglobulin, whereas mouse and rabbit immunoglobulins displayed little and no binding, respectively. Establishing a guinea pig model of S. aureus bloodstream infection, we show that protein A functions as a virulence determinant and suppresses host B cell responses. Immunization with SpAKKAA, which cannot bind immunoglobulin, elicits neutralizing antibodies that enable guinea pigs to develop protective immunity.

  14. Transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection through solid organ transplantation: confirmation via whole genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wendt, J M; Kaul, D; Limbago, B M; Ramesh, M; Cohle, S; Denison, A M; Driebe, E M; Rasheed, J K; Zaki, S R; Blau, D M; Paddock, C D; McDougal, L K; Engelthaler, D M; Keim, P S; Roe, C C; Akselrod, H; Kuehnert, M J; Basavaraju, S V

    2014-11-01

    We describe two cases of donor-derived methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia that developed after transplantation of organs from a common donor who died from acute MRSA endocarditis. Both recipients developed recurrent MRSA infection despite appropriate antibiotic therapy, and required prolonged hospitalization and hospital readmission. Comparison of S. aureus whole genome sequence of DNA extracted from fixed donor tissue and recipients' isolates confirmed donor-derived transmission. Current guidelines emphasize the risk posed by donors with bacteremia from multidrug-resistant organisms. This investigation suggests that, particularly in the setting of donor endocarditis, even a standard course of prophylactic antibiotics may not be sufficient to prevent donor-derived infection. PMID:25250717

  15. Genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains, isolated on three different geography locations

    PubMed Central

    Ostojić, Maja; Hukić, Mirsada

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of hospital-acquired infections worldwide. Increased frequency of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in hospitalized patients and possibility of vancomycin resistance requires rapid and reliable characterization of isolates and control of MRSA spread in hospitals. Typing of isolates helps to understand the route of a hospital pathogen spread. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of MRSA samples on three different geography locations. In addition, our aim was to evaluate three different methods of MRSA typing: spa-typing, agr-typing and GenoType MRSA. We included 104 samples of MRSA, isolated in 3 different geographical locations in clinical hospitals in Zagreb, Mostar, and Heidelberg, during the period of six months. Genotyping and phenotyping were done by spa-typing, agr-typing and dipstick assay GenoType MRSA. We failed to type all our samples by spa-typing. The most common spa-type in clinical hospital Zagreb was t041, in Mostar t001, and in Heidelberg t003. We analyzed 102/104 of our samples by agr-typing method. We did not find any agr-type IV in our locations. We analyzed all our samples by the dipstick assay GenoType MRSA. All isolates in our study were MRSA strains. In Zagreb there were no positive strains to PVL gene. In Mostar we have found 5/25 positive strains to PVL gene, in Heidelberg there was 1/49. PVL positive isolates were associated with spa-type t008 and agr-type I, thus, genetically, they were community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA). Dipstick assay GenoType MRSA has demonstrated sufficient specificity, sensibility, simple performance and low cost, so we could introduce it to work in smaller laboratories. Using this method may expedite MRSA screening, thus preventing its spread in hospitals. PMID:26295294

  16. Comparative Proteomic Profiling of Atopic Dermatitis Patients Based on History of Eczema Herpeticum Infection and Staphylococcus aureus Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Broccardo, Carolyn J; Mahaffey, Spencer; Schwarz, John; Wruck, Lisa; David, Gloria; Schlievert, Patrick M; Reisdorph, Nichole A; Leung, Donald YM

    2010-01-01

    Background Atopic dermatitis is the most common inflammatory skin disorder in the general population worldwide and the majority of patients are colonized with Staphylococcus aureus. Eczema herpeticum is a disseminated herpes simplex virus infection that occurs in a small subset of patients. Objectives The goal was to conduct proteomic profiling of atopic dermatitis patients based on Staphylococcus aureus colonization status and history of eczema herpeticum. We hoped to identify new biomarkers for improved diagnosis and prediction of eczema herpeticum and Staphylococcus aureus susceptibility, and to generate new hypotheses regarding disease pathogenesis. Methods Skin taping was performed on nonlesional skin of non-atopic controls and on lesional and nonlesional skin of atopic dermatitis patients. Subjects were classified according to history of eczema herpeticum and Staphylococcus aureus colonization. Proteins were analyzed using mass spectrometry; diagnostic groups were compared for statistically significant differences in protein expression. Results Proteins related to the skin barrier (filaggrin-2, corneodesmosin, desmoglein-1, desmocollin-1, and transglutaminase-3) and generation of natural moisturizing factor (arginase-1, caspase-14, gamma-glutamyl cyclotransferase) were expressed at significantly lower levels in lesional versus nonlesional sites of atopic dermatitis patients with and without history of eczema herpeticum; epidermal fatty acid binding protein was expressed at significantly higher levels in patients with methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Conclusion This non-invasive, semi-quantitative profiling method has revealed novel proteins likely involved in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. The lower expression of skin barrier proteins and enzymes involved in the generation of the natural moisturizing factor could further exacerbate barrier defects and perpetuate water loss from the skin. The greater expression of epidermal fatty acid

  17. Daptomycin efficacy in the central nervous system of a patient with disseminated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Staphylococcus aureus has emerged as a major nosocomial pathogen in the last decades and also represents the second most common pathogen isolated from patients in outpatient settings. Although methicillin-resistant S.aureus infections were traditionally limited to hospitals, community-associated cases of methicillin-resistant S.aureus infections have been reported. In our case, we observed an unexpected event during treatment. Case presentation A 60-year-old Caucasian man developed fever and multiple muscle and brain abscesses caused by Panton-Valentine leukocidin-negative community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus. Conclusion Although our patient was given antimicrobials active against the isolated methicillin-resistant S. aureus strain, it was only after the introduction of daptomycin that his skin, soft tissue and muscle lesions and also brain manifestations improved. PMID:22938025

  18. Molecular Types and Genetic Profiles of Staphylococcus aureus Strains Isolated from Bovine Intramammary Infections and Extramammary Sites▿

    PubMed Central

    Haveri, M.; Hovinen, M.; Roslöf, A.; Pyörälä, S.

    2008-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus isolates collected from sites of intramammary infection during a 10-month period and from extramammary sites (dairy cow teat skin, teat canals, and skin lesions; milking liners; and hands and nostrils of milking personnel) at two separately managed Finnish dairy herd establishments were analyzed to study the sources and reservoirs of bovine S. aureus intramammary infection. Selected isolates were subjected to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) typing and PCR analysis for genes encoding hemolysins (hla to hlg), leukocidins (lukED and lukM), superantigens (sea, sec, sed, seg to seo, seu, and tst), adhesins (fnbA and fnbB), and penicillin and methicillin resistance (blaZ and mecA). S. aureus was found throughout the herds in 94% of the cows. Nine PFGE types were found, with the herds each having their own predominant type and sharing one type. The degree of diversity of PFGE types in herd II, which integrated foreign heifers, was higher than that in herd I. For both herds, the majority of the PFGE-typed isolates both from milk and from extramammary sites represented the predominant PFGE types. In isolates from herd I, the most prevalent genes were hla-hlg, lukED, and fnbA; in those from herd II, they were hla, hld, hlg, lukED, and fnbA. The other genes were pulsotype linked within the herds. The predominant PFGE types carried both fnbA and fnbB; only fnbA was detected in the other PFGE types. No connection between specific virulence genes and the origins of isolates was found. The results suggest that for the two herds, most S. aureus isolates from extramammary sites were indistinguishable from the isolates infecting the mammary gland and that those sites can thus act as origins and reservoirs of intramammary infections. However, contamination in the opposite direction cannot be excluded. PMID:18799704

  19. An Evaluation of a Teat Dip with Dodecyl Benzene Sulfonic Acid in Preventing Bovine Mammary Gland Infection from Experimental Exposure to Streptococcus agalactiae and Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Barnum, D. A.; Johnson, R. E.; Brooks, B. W.

    1982-01-01

    The effectiveness of a teat dip with dodecyl benzene sulfonic acid (1.94%) for the prevention of intramammary infections was determined in cows experimentally challenged with Streptococcus agalactiae and Staphylococcus aureus. The infection rates with Streptococcus agalactiae and Staphylococcus aureus were 62.5% and 75% in undipped quarters, 12.5% and 21.5% in dipped quarters with a reduction rate of 80% and 71% respectively. The significance of some findings in relation to mastitis control are discussed. PMID:17422110

  20. Potential Role for Telavancin in Bacteremic Infections Due to Gram-Positive Pathogens: Focus on Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Corey, G. Ralph; Rubinstein, Ethan; Stryjewski, Martin E.; Bassetti, Matteo; Barriere, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia (SAB) is one of the most common serious bacterial infections and the most frequent invasive infection due to methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Treatment is challenging, particularly for MRSA, because of limited treatment options. Telavancin is a bactericidal lipoglycopeptide antibiotic that is active against a range of clinically relevant gram-positive pathogens including MRSA. In experimental animal models of sepsis telavancin was shown to be more effective than vancomycin. In clinically evaluable patients enrolled in a pilot study of uncomplicated SAB, cure rates were 88% for telavancin and 89% for standard therapy. Among patients with infection due to only gram-positive pathogens enrolled in the 2 phase 3 studies of telavancin for treatment of hospital-acquired pneumonia, cure rates for those with bacteremic S. aureus pneumonia were 41% (9/22, telavancin) and 40% (10/25, vancomycin) with identical mortality rates. These data support further evaluation of telavancin in larger, prospective studies of SAB. PMID:25472944

  1. Full-thickness porcine burns infected with Staphylococcus aureus or Pseudomonas aeruginosa can be effectively treated with topical antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Tsai, David M; Tracy, Lauren E; Lee, Cameron C Y; Hackl, Florian; Kiwanuka, Elizabeth; Minasian, Raquel A; Onderdonk, Andrew; Junker, Johan P E; Eriksson, Elof; Caterson, E J

    2016-03-01

    Burn and blast injuries are frequently complicated by invasive infections, which lead to poor wound healing, delay in treatment, disability, or death. Traditional approach centers on early debridement, fluid resuscitation, and adjunct intravenous antibiotics. These modalities often prove inadequate in burns, where compromised local vasculature limits the tissue penetration of systemic antibiotics. Here, we demonstrate the treatment of infected burns with topical delivery of ultrahigh concentrations of antibiotics. Standardized burns were inoculated with Staphylococcus aureus or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. After debridement, burns were treated with either gentamicin (2 mg/mL) or minocycline (1 mg/mL) at concentrations greater than 1,000 times the minimum inhibitory concentration. Amount of bacteria was quantified in tissue biopsies and wound fluid following treatment. After six days of gentamicin or minocycline treatment, S. aureus counts decreased from 4.2 to 0.31 and 0.72 log CFU/g in tissue, respectively. Similarly, P. aeruginosa counts decreased from 2.5 to 0.0 and 1.5 log CFU/g in tissue, respectively. Counts of both S. aureus and P. aeruginosa remained at a baseline of 0.0 log CFU/mL in wound fluid for both treatment groups. The findings here demonstrate that super-therapeutic concentrations of antibiotics delivered topically can rapidly reduce bacterial counts in infected full-thickness porcine burns. This treatment approach may aid wound bed preparation and accelerate time to grafting. PMID:26800421

  2. Identification of immune genes and proteins involved in the response of bovine mammary tissue to Staphylococcus aureus infection

    PubMed Central

    Lutzow, Ylva C Strandberg; Donaldson, Laurelea; Gray, Christian P; Vuocolo, Tony; Pearson, Roger D; Reverter, Antonio; Byrne, Keren A; Sheehy, Paul A; Windon, Ross; Tellam, Ross L

    2008-01-01

    Background Mastitis in dairy cattle results from infection of mammary tissue by a range of micro-organisms but principally coliform bacteria and Gram positive bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus. The former species are often acquired by environmental contamination while S. aureus is particularly problematic due to its resistance to antibiotic treatments and ability to reside within mammary tissue in a chronic, subclinical state. The transcriptional responses within bovine mammary epithelial tissue subjected to intramammary challenge with S. aureus are poorly characterised, particularly at the earliest stages of infection. Moreover, the effect of infection on the presence of bioactive innate immune proteins in milk is also unclear. The nature of these responses may determine the susceptibility of the tissue and its ability to resolve the infection. Results Transcriptional profiling was employed to measure changes in gene expression occurring in bovine mammary tissues sampled from three dairy cows after brief and graded intramammary challenges with S. aureus. These limited challenges had no significant effect on the expression pattern of the gene encoding β-casein but caused coordinated up-regulation of a number of cytokines and chemokines involved in pro-inflammatory responses. In addition, the enhanced expression of two genes, S100 calcium-binding protein A12 (S100A12) and Pentraxin-3 (PTX3) corresponded with significantly increased levels of their proteins in milk from infected udders. Both genes were shown to be expressed by mammary epithelial cells grown in culture after stimulation with lipopolysaccharide. There was also a strong correlation between somatic cell count, a widely used measure of mastitis, and the level of S100A12 in milk from a herd of dairy cows. Recombinant S100A12 inhibited growth of Escherichia coli in vitro and recombinant PTX3 bound to E. coli as well as C1q, a subunit of the first component of the complement cascade. Conclusion The

  3. Role of Berberine in the Treatment of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections.

    PubMed

    Chu, Ming; Zhang, Ming-Bo; Liu, Yan-Chen; Kang, Jia-Rui; Chu, Zheng-Yun; Yin, Kai-Lin; Ding, Ling-Yu; Ding, Ran; Xiao, Rong-Xin; Yin, Yi-Nan; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Yue-Dan

    2016-01-01

    Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid widely used in the treatment of microbial infections. Recent studies have shown that berberine can enhance the inhibitory efficacy of antibiotics against clinical multi-drug resistant isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrated that sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of berberine exhibited no bactericidal activity against MRSA, but affected MRSA biofilm development in a dose dependent manner within the concentration ranging from 1 to 64 μg/mL. Further study indicated that berberine inhibited MRSA amyloid fibrils formation, which consist of phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs). Molecular dynamics simulation revealed that berberine could bind with the phenyl ring of Phe19 in PSMα2 through hydrophobic interaction. Collectively, berberine can inhibit MRSA biofilm formation via affecting PSMs' aggregation into amyloid fibrils, and thereby enhance bactericidal activity of antibiotics. These findings will provide new insights into the multiple pharmacological properties of berberine in the treatment of microbial-generated amyloid involved diseases. PMID:27103062

  4. Role of Berberine in the Treatment of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Ming; Zhang, Ming-Bo; Liu, Yan-Chen; Kang, Jia-Rui; Chu, Zheng-Yun; Yin, Kai-Lin; Ding, Ling-Yu; Ding, Ran; Xiao, Rong-Xin; Yin, Yi-Nan; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Wang, Yue-Dan

    2016-04-01

    Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid widely used in the treatment of microbial infections. Recent studies have shown that berberine can enhance the inhibitory efficacy of antibiotics against clinical multi-drug resistant isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrated that sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of berberine exhibited no bactericidal activity against MRSA, but affected MRSA biofilm development in a dose dependent manner within the concentration ranging from 1 to 64 μg/mL. Further study indicated that berberine inhibited MRSA amyloid fibrils formation, which consist of phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs). Molecular dynamics simulation revealed that berberine could bind with the phenyl ring of Phe19 in PSMα2 through hydrophobic interaction. Collectively, berberine can inhibit MRSA biofilm formation via affecting PSMs’ aggregation into amyloid fibrils, and thereby enhance bactericidal activity of antibiotics. These findings will provide new insights into the multiple pharmacological properties of berberine in the treatment of microbial-generated amyloid involved diseases.

  5. Local Intramedullary Delivery of Vancomycin Can Prevent the Development of Long Bone Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Caroline; Canden, Ahranee; Burr, Michael; Agarwal, Jayant

    2016-01-01

    Current treatments for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections require intravenously delivered vancomycin; however, systemically delivered vancomycin has its problems. To determine the feasibility and safety of locally delivering vancomycin hydrochloride (~25 mg/Kg) to the medullary canal of long bones, we conducted a pharmacokinetics study using a rat tibia model. We found that administering the vancomycin intraosseously resulted in very low concentrations of vancomycin in the blood plasma and the muscle surrounding the tibia, reducing the risk for systemic toxicity, which is often seen with traditional intravenous administration of vancomycin. Additionally, we were able to inhibit the development of osteomyelitis in the tibia if the treatment was administered locally at the same time as a bacterial inoculum (i.e., Log10 7.82 CFU/mL or 6.62x107 CFU/mL), when compared to an untreated group. These findings suggest that local intramedullary vancomycin delivery can achieve sufficiently high local concentrations to prevent development of osteomyelitis while minimizing systemic toxicity. PMID:27472197

  6. Role of Berberine in the Treatment of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Ming; Zhang, Ming-bo; Liu, Yan-chen; Kang, Jia-rui; Chu, Zheng-yun; Yin, Kai-lin; Ding, Ling-yu; Ding, Ran; Xiao, Rong-xin; Yin, Yi-nan; Liu, Xiao-yan; Wang, Yue-dan

    2016-01-01

    Berberine is an isoquinoline alkaloid widely used in the treatment of microbial infections. Recent studies have shown that berberine can enhance the inhibitory efficacy of antibiotics against clinical multi-drug resistant isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). However, the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrated that sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of berberine exhibited no bactericidal activity against MRSA, but affected MRSA biofilm development in a dose dependent manner within the concentration ranging from 1 to 64 μg/mL. Further study indicated that berberine inhibited MRSA amyloid fibrils formation, which consist of phenol-soluble modulins (PSMs). Molecular dynamics simulation revealed that berberine could bind with the phenyl ring of Phe19 in PSMα2 through hydrophobic interaction. Collectively, berberine can inhibit MRSA biofilm formation via affecting PSMs’ aggregation into amyloid fibrils, and thereby enhance bactericidal activity of antibiotics. These findings will provide new insights into the multiple pharmacological properties of berberine in the treatment of microbial-generated amyloid involved diseases. PMID:27103062

  7. Impact of the Maturation of Human Primary Bone-Forming Cells on Their Behavior in Acute or Persistent Staphylococcus aureus Infection Models

    PubMed Central

    Josse, Jérôme; Guillaume, Christine; Bour, Camille; Lemaire, Flora; Mongaret, Céline; Draux, Florence; Velard, Frédéric; Gangloff, Sophie C.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most frequently involved pathogens in bacterial infections such as skin abscess, pneumonia, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and implant-associated infection. As for bone homeostasis, it is partly altered during infections by S. aureus by the induction of various responses from osteoblasts, which are the bone-forming cells responsible for extracellular matrix synthesis and its mineralization. Nevertheless, bone-forming cells are a heterogeneous population with different stages of maturation and the impact of the latter on their responses toward bacteria remains unclear. We describe the impact of S. aureus on two populations of human primary bone-forming cells (HPBCs) which have distinct maturation characteristics in both acute and persistent models of interaction. Cell maturation did not influence the internalization and survival of S. aureus inside bone-forming cells or the cell death related to the infection. By studying the expression of chemokines, cytokines, and osteoclastogenic regulators by HPBCs, we observed different profiles of chemokine expression according to the degree of cell maturation. However, there was no statistical difference in the amounts of proteins released by both populations in the presence of S. aureus compared to the non-infected counterparts. Our findings show that cell maturation does not impact the behavior of HPBCs infected with S. aureus and suggest that the role of bone-forming cells may not be pivotal for the inflammatory response in osteomyelitis. PMID:27446812

  8. Impact of the Maturation of Human Primary Bone-Forming Cells on Their Behavior in Acute or Persistent Staphylococcus aureus Infection Models.

    PubMed

    Josse, Jérôme; Guillaume, Christine; Bour, Camille; Lemaire, Flora; Mongaret, Céline; Draux, Florence; Velard, Frédéric; Gangloff, Sophie C

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most frequently involved pathogens in bacterial infections such as skin abscess, pneumonia, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and implant-associated infection. As for bone homeostasis, it is partly altered during infections by S. aureus by the induction of various responses from osteoblasts, which are the bone-forming cells responsible for extracellular matrix synthesis and its mineralization. Nevertheless, bone-forming cells are a heterogeneous population with different stages of maturation and the impact of the latter on their responses toward bacteria remains unclear. We describe the impact of S. aureus on two populations of human primary bone-forming cells (HPBCs) which have distinct maturation characteristics in both acute and persistent models of interaction. Cell maturation did not influence the internalization and survival of S. aureus inside bone-forming cells or the cell death related to the infection. By studying the expression of chemokines, cytokines, and osteoclastogenic regulators by HPBCs, we observed different profiles of chemokine expression according to the degree of cell maturation. However, there was no statistical difference in the amounts of proteins released by both populations in the presence of S. aureus compared to the non-infected counterparts. Our findings show that cell maturation does not impact the behavior of HPBCs infected with S. aureus and suggest that the role of bone-forming cells may not be pivotal for the inflammatory response in osteomyelitis. PMID:27446812

  9. Transcription of Clumping Factor A in Attached and Unattached Staphylococcus aureus In Vitro and during Device-Related Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wolz, Christiane; Goerke, Christiane; Landmann, Regine; Zimmerli, Werner; Fluckiger, Ursula

    2002-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the pathogens most frequently isolated in device-related infections. S. aureus is equipped with surface-associated proteins promoting specific binding to matrix molecules. Clumping factor A (ClfA, encoded by clfA) mediates adhesion to fibrinogen. Whereas the contribution of ClfA to pathogenicity is well documented, the influence of different growth and host parameters on gene activity is unclear. To elucidate this question, we investigated clfA transcript levels in an animal model of device-related infection and in planktonic and sessile bacteria grown in vitro. Specific mRNA from the S. aureus strains Newman, Reynolds, and RN6390 was quantified by LightCycler reverse transcription-PCR. In vitro, clfA transcript levels were low in the early logarithmic growth phase, but a clear increase was observed after the late logarithmic phase. Quantities of clfA transcripts were four to six times higher in the planktonic than in the sessile bacterial subpopulations grown to the stationary phase. During infection, in strains Newman and Reynolds levels of clfA transcripts in exudates accumulating in the infected devices were lower than those in the bacteria grown in vitro to stationary phase. clfA mRNA levels in the exudates increased during the initial phase of infection and remained constant after 96 h postinoculation. In contrast to the in vitro results, quantities of clfA transcripts in the unattached bacteria of the exudates never exceeded the level of clfA transcripts in the sessile bacteria attached to glass beads. However, a clear increase in clfA quantities in the sessile bacteria was observed late in infection after 144 h. In conclusion, maximal clfA transcript levels are reached late during growth in vitro and in vivo. PMID:12010960

  10. Emergence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin-positive ST59 methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus with high cytolytic peptide expression in association with community-acquired pediatric osteomyelitis complicated by pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Sawanobori, Emi; Hung, Wei-Chun; Takano, Tomomi; Hachuda, Koji; Horiuchi, Tadahiro; Higuchi, Wataru; Hung, Wei-Wen; Iwao, Yasuhisa; Nishiyama, Akihito; Reva, Ivan; Reva, Galina; Teng, Lee-Jene; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2015-10-01

    A 15-year-old boy, who had had a furuncle on his femur, developed femoral pyomyositis and osteomyelitis complicated by septic pulmonary embolism. Panton-Valentine leukocidin-positive (PVL(+)) ST59 methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) was isolated from pus and blood. Chemotherapy was started with cefazolin, followed by combination therapy with meropenem/vancomycin with surgery. The MSSA (strain KS1) was positive for increased levels of cytolytic peptide (psmα and hld) and staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB), and manifested IS1216V-mediated multidrug resistance (to erythromycin, clindamycin, kanamycin, streptomycin, and chloramphenicol), similar to a genome-analyzed reference strain (PM1) of ST59/SCCmecV(5C2&5) community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (Taiwan CA-MRSA), but unlike another reference strain (M013) of Taiwan CA-MRSA in terms of resistance. The data suggest that CA-MSSA KS1, characterized by PVL, increased levels of cytolytic peptide, SEB, and multidrug resistance, is a possible ancestral strain of Taiwan CA-MRSA and causes the unique association of osteomyelitis and septic pulmonary embolism, requiring complicated management. PMID:25070278

  11. Molecular characterization of Staphylococcus aureus isolates causing skin and soft tissue infections in patients from Malakand, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Madzgalla, S; Syed, M A; Khan, M A; Rehman, S S; Müller, E; Reissig, A; Ehricht, R; Monecke, S

    2016-09-01

    Comparatively few studies have been published describing Staphylococcus aureus/MRSA epidemiology in Central Asia including Pakistan. Here, we report the genotyping of Staphylococcus aureus strains (that include both methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) from community- and hospital-acquired skin and soft-tissue infections in a tertiary care hospital in the Malakand district of the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Province of Pakistan. Forty-five isolates of Staphylococcus aureus were characterized by microarray hybridization. Twenty isolates (44 %) were MRSA, whereas 22 (49 %) were PVL-positive. Fourteen isolates (31 %) harboured both mecA and PVL genes. The dominant clones were CC121-MSSA (n = 15, 33 %) and the PVL-positive "Bengal Bay Clone" (ST772-MRSA-V; n = 13, 29 %). The PVL-positive CC8-MRSA-IV strain "USA300" was found once. The pandemic ST239-MRSA-III strain was absent, although it has previously been observed in Pakistan. These observations require a re-assessment of schemes for initial antibiotic therapy to cover MRSA and they emphasise the need for a rapid and non-molecular test for PVL. PMID:27262852

  12. Demonstration of the preclinical correlate of protection for Staphylococcus aureus clumping factor A in a murine model of infection.

    PubMed

    Scully, Ingrid L; Timofeyeva, Yekaterina; Keeney, David; Matsuka, Yury V; Severina, Elena; McNeil, Lisa K; Nanra, Jasdeep; Hu, George; Liberator, Paul A; Jansen, Kathrin U; Anderson, Annaliesa S

    2015-10-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus virulence factor clumping factor A (ClfA) is a component of an investigational S. aureus prophylactic vaccine. ClfA enables S. aureus to bind to fibrinogen and platelets during the initial stages of invasive disease. Here we demonstrate that ectopic expression of ClfA is sufficient to render nonpathogenic Lactococcus lactis lethal in a murine model of systemic infection. In contrast, L. lactis expressing ClfAY338A, which cannot bind fibrinogen, did not cause death in the mice. Pathogenicity was also prevented by immunization with ClfA. This model was then used to define a preclinical correlate of protection by measuring functional antibody in a S. aureus fibrinogen binding inhibition assay (FBI) and correlating that titer with protective outcomes. Although many humans have pre-existing antibodies that bind to ClfA, only sera with a threshold functional titer in the FBI were protective in this preclinical model. This confirms that fibrinogen binding is critical for ClfA-mediated pathogenesis and demonstrates that functional antibodies against ClfA are sufficient to protect against ClfA-mediated pathogenesis in vivo, enabling the definition of a preclinical correlate of protection for ClfA-containing vaccines based on FBI titer. PMID:26319743

  13. Panton-Valentine Leukocidin-Positive Staphylococcus aureus in Ireland from 2002 to 2011: 21 Clones, Frequent Importation of Clones, Temporal Shifts of Predominant Methicillin-Resistant S. aureus Clones, and Increasing Multiresistance

    PubMed Central

    Shore, Anna C.; Tecklenborg, Sarah C.; Brennan, Gráinne I.; Ehricht, Ralf; Monecke, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    There has been a worldwide increase in community-associated (CA) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. CA-MRSA isolates commonly produce the Panton-Valentine leukocidin toxin encoded by the pvl genes lukF-PV and lukS-PV. This study investigated the clinical and molecular epidemiologies of pvl-positive MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) isolates identified by the Irish National MRSA Reference Laboratory (NMRSARL) between 2002 and 2011. All pvl-positive MRSA (n = 190) and MSSA (n = 39) isolates underwent antibiogram-resistogram typing, spa typing, and DNA microarray profiling for multilocus sequence type, clonal complex (CC) and/or sequence type (ST), staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type assignment, and virulence and resistance gene detection. Where available, patient demographics and clinical data were analyzed. The prevalence of pvl-positive MRSA increased from 0.2% to 8.8%, and that of pvl-positive MSSA decreased from 20% to 2.5% during the study period. The pvl-positive MRSA and MSSA isolates belonged to 16 and 5 genotypes, respectively, with CC/ST8-MRSA-IV, CC/ST30-MRSA-IV, CC/ST80-MRSA-IV, CC1/ST772-MRSA-V, CC30-MSSA, CC22-MSSA, and CC121-MSSA predominating. Temporal shifts in the predominant pvl-positive MRSA genotypes and a 6-fold increase in multiresistant pvl-positive MRSA genotypes occurred during the study period. An analysis of patient data indicated that pvl-positive S. aureus strains, especially MRSA strains, had been imported into Ireland several times. Two hospital and six family clusters of pvl-positive MRSA were identified, and 70% of the patient isolates for which information was available were from patients in the community. This study highlights the increased burden and changing molecular epidemiology of pvl-positive S. aureus in Ireland over the last decade and the contribution of international travel to the influx of genetically diverse pvl-positive S. aureus isolates into Ireland. PMID:24371244

  14. A report on infection dynamics of inducible clindamycin resistance of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from a teaching hospital in India

    PubMed Central

    Dubey, Debasmita; Rath, Shakti; Sahu, Mahesh C.; Rout, Subhrajita; Debata, Nagen K.; Padhy, Rabindra N.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the infection of hospital- and community-acquired “erythromycin-induced clindamycin resistant” strains or D-test positives of clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) (with and without methicillin resistance) in a hospital. Methods Strains of S. aureus isolated from clinical specimens were subjected to D-test and antibiotic profiling. Results Of the total 278 isolates, 140 (50.35%) were D-test positives and the rest were D-test negatives. Further, of 140 (100%) positives, 87 (62.14%) and 53 (37.85%) strains were from males and females, respectively. Of 140 (100%) positives, 117 (83.57%) were methicillin resistant S. aureus and 23 (16.42%) were methicillin sensitive S. aureus; of 140 strains, 103 (73.57%) strains from persons with and 37 (26.42%) were without related infections; of 140 strains, 91 (65%) and 49 (35%) were from hospital- and community-acquired samples, respectively. In 140 strains, 118 (84.28%) with comorbidities and 22 (15.71%) without comorbidities cases were recorded; similarly, persons with prior antibiotic uses contributed 108 (77.14%) and without 32 (22.85%) positive strains. These binary data of surveillance were analyzed by a univariate analysis. It was evident that the prior antibiotic uses and comorbidities due to other ailments were the determinative factors in D-test positivity, corroborated by low P values, P=0.001 1 and 0.002 4, respectively. All isolates (278) were resistant to 17 antibiotics of nine groups, in varying degrees; the minimum of 28% resistance for vancomycin and the maximum of 97% resistance for gentamicin were recorded. Further, of 278 strains, only 42 (15.1%) strains were resistant constitutively to both antibiotics, erythromycin resistant and clindamycin resistant, while 45 (16.2%) strains were constitutively sensitive to both antibiotics (erythromycin sensitive and clindamycin sensitive). Further, of the rest 191 (68.7%) strains were with erythromycin resistant and

  15. Dissemination of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), USA300 Sequence Type 8 Lineage in Latin-America

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Jinnethe; Rincón, Sandra; Díaz, Lorena; Panesso, Diana; Contreras, Germán A.; Zurita, Jeannete; Carrillo, Carlos; Rizzi, Adele; Guzmán, Manuel; Adachi, Javier; Chowdhury, Shahreen; Murray, Barbara E.; Arias, Cesar A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococus aureus (MRSA) is an important nosocomial and community-associated (CA) pathogen. Recently, a variant of the MRSA USA300 clone emerged and disseminated in South-America causing important clinical problems. Methods S. aureus isolates were prospectively collected (2006 to 2008) from 32 tertiary hospitals in Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela. MRSA isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing, pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and categorized as healthcare-associated (HA)-like or CA-like clones based on genotypic characteristics and detection of genes encoding the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and staphylococcal cassette mec (SCCmec) IV. Additionally, MLST of representative isolates of each major CA-MRSA pulsotype, and detection of USA300-associated toxins and the arcA gene were performed in all isolates categorized as CA-MRSA. Results A total of 1570 S. aureus were included; 651 were MRSA (41%), with the highest rates of MRSA isolation in Peru (62%), and lowest in Venezuela (26%) and 71%, 27%, and 2% were classified as HA-like, CA-like, and non-CA/HA-like clones, respectively. Only 9 MRSA isolates were confirmed to have reduced susceptibility to glycopeptides (GISA phenotype). The most common pulsotype (designated ComA) amongst the CA-like MRSA strains was found in 96% of isolates with the majority (81%) having ≤6 bands difference with the USA300-0114 strain. Representative isolates of this clone were ST8 but, unlike the USA300-0114 strain, they harbored a different SCCmec IV subtype and lacked arcA (an indicator of the arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME)). Conclusion A variant CA-MRSA USA300 clone has now become established in South America and, in some countries, is endemic in hospital settings. PMID:19911971

  16. Effectiveness of Hospital-Wide Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Infection Control Policies Differs by Ward Specialty

    PubMed Central

    Sadsad, Rosemarie; Sintchenko, Vitali; McDonnell, Geoff D.; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L.

    2013-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major cause of preventable nosocomial infections and is endemic in hospitals worldwide. The effectiveness of infection control policies varies significantly across hospital settings. The impact of the hospital context towards the rate of nosocomial MRSA infections and the success of infection control is understudied. We conducted a modelling study to evaluate several infection control policies in surgical, intensive care, and medical ward specialties, each with distinct ward conditions and policies, of a tertiary public hospital in Sydney, Australia. We reconfirm hand hygiene as the most successful policy and find it to be necessary for the success of other policies. Active screening for MRSA, patient isolation in single-bed rooms, and additional staffing were found to be less effective. Across these ward specialties, MRSA transmission risk varied by 13% and reductions in the prevalence and nosocomial incidence rate of MRSA due to infection control policies varied by up to 45%. Different levels of infection control were required to reduce and control nosocomial MRSA infections for each ward specialty. Infection control policies and policy targets should be specific for the ward and context of the hospital. The model we developed is generic and can be calibrated to represent different ward settings and pathogens transmitted between patients indirectly through health care workers. This can aid the timely and cost effective design of synergistic and context specific infection control policies. PMID:24340085

  17. [Atypical presentation of diffuse tropical pyomiositis of the psoas due to methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus].

    PubMed

    Ticse, Ray; Melgarejo, Weymar; Fuentes-Dávila, Alfredo; Ortíz, Jesús; Zegarra, Jaime

    2012-03-01

    Diffuse tropical primary pyomyositis is an infrequent entity in our country, with few cases associated to community-acquired Methicillin- resistant Staphylococcus aureus. There are no reported cases of Community-Acquired Methicillin- Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA- MRSA) in Peru. We present the case of a 70 year old male with a previous diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus, receiving irregular treatment, who was admitted to the hospital with a history of 10 days of low back pain radiating to the left leg, fever and forced flexion of the right hip due to pain during movement. The diagnosis of diffuse pyomyositis of both psoas muscles was performed with MRI and culture of a posterior paravertebral collection, from which Staphylococcus aureus resistant to oxacillin, penicillin and dicloxacillin was isolated. PMID:22510919

  18. Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated at the military hospital of Constantine/Algeria.

    PubMed

    Ouchenane, Z; Agabou, A; Smati, F; Rolain, J-M; Raoult, D

    2013-12-01

    Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec is a genetic mobile element that carries the gene mecA mediating the methicillin resistance in staphylococci. The aim of this study is to type the Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) in 64 non-redundant methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains recovered at the military hospital of Constantine (Algeria) between 2005 and 2007. Methicillin resistance was detected by oxacillin and cefoxitin discs and PBP2a test, and then confirmed by mecA PCR. The SCCmec complex types were determined by real time PCR. The analysis showed that 50 isolates were hospital acquired (HA-MRSA) and 14 were community-acquired (CA-MRSA). SCCmec type IV and V (traditionally attributed to CA-MRSA) were harbored by both HA-MRSA and CA-MRSA, while SCCmec type I, II and III were not recorded. These findings motivate more investigations to be carried on HA-MRSA in our hospital and other national health care centers. PMID:23880229

  19. In vitro infectability of prosthetic mesh by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Harrell, A G; Novitsky, Y W; Kercher, K W; Foster, M; Burns, J M; Kuwada, T S; Heniford, B T

    2006-04-01

    Although mesh use is important for effective herniorrhaphy in adults, prosthetic infections can cause serious morbidity. Bacterial adherence to the mesh is a known precursor to prosthetic infection. We compared the ability of common mesh prosthetics to resist bacterial adherence. The meshes studied included polypropylene (Marlex, expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) with and without silver chlorhexidine coating (DualMesh Plus and Dualmesh) composite meshes (Composix E/X, Proceed, and Parietex Composite) and lightweight polypropylene meshes (TiMesh, Ultrapro, and Vypro). Fifteen samples of each mesh type were individually inoculated with a suspension of 10(8 )methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in tryptic soy broth. After incubation at 37 degrees C for 1 h, the mesh pieces were then removed and serially washed. The colony-forming units (CFU) of MRSA present in the initial inoculum, at the end of the 1-h warm-water bath (broth count), and the pooled washes (wash count), were determined using serial dilutions and spot plating. The bacteria not accounted for in the broth or wash counts were considered adhered to the mesh. Samples of each mesh type were also analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Data are presented as the mean percentage adherence with ANOVA and Tukey's test used to determine significance (P<0.05). The DualMesh Plus mesh had no detectable MRSA in the broth or the pooled wash samples. Dualmesh had less adherence compared with Marlex, Proceed, and Vypro (P<0.05). Conversely, Vypro had a statistically higher adherence (96%, P<0.05) as compared to TiMesh, Ultrapro, Composix E/X, and Parietex Composite. SEM confirmed bacterial adherence to all the mesh types except DualMesh Plus. The ability of a biomaterial to resist infection has an important clinical significance. DualMesh Plus, due to its antimicrobial coating, is the only mesh type of the nine tested that demonstrated a bactericidal property. Standard PTFE (Dualmesh) also

  20. Antimicrobial resistance and molecular analysis of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus collected in a Spanish hospital.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Porto, Miriam; Lecuona, María; Aguirre-Jaime, Armando; Castro, Beatriz; Delgado, Teresa; Cuervo, Milagros; Pedroso, Yanet; Arias, Ángeles

    2015-04-01

    Clonal distribution of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in hospitals may differ according to the geographic location and time period. Knowledge of MRSA clonal epidemiology in hospital settings involves much more than the study of healthcare-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA) clones. In recent years, investigators have documented the introduction of both community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) and livestock-associated MRSA (LA-MRSA) clones, the emergence of clones carrying Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) XI, and the genetic diversity among sporadic MRSA isolates. The allocation of certain antibiotypes to dominant MRSA clones in an institution allows their use as phenotypic markers for a preliminary search for new clones, early detection of clonal shift, and as a guide for better empirical therapy, infection control, and treatment within a particular institution. For these reasons, we identified 938 strains detected in a System of Universal Active Surveillance of MRSA in clinical samples during the period 2009-2010, obtaining the clonal distribution of MRSA at the Hospital Universitario de Canarias (Tenerife, Spain) and the relationship between antimicrobial susceptibility and three major clones present. The antibiotypes that best defined the ST5-MRSA-IV (Pediatric) clone showed resistance to tobramycin and susceptibility to clindamycin, erythromycin, gentamicin, rifampin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, vancomycin, quinupristin/dalfopristin, and linezolid, whereas the ST22-MRSA-IV clone (EMRSA-15) showed susceptibility to these antibiotics, and finally, the ST36-MRSA-II clone (EMRSA-16) was resistant to clindamycin, erythromycin, and tobramycin and susceptible to the remaining antimicrobials. Similar observations would allow the early detection of changes in clonal epidemiology by analysis of antimicrobial susceptibility of the isolates within a single institution. PMID:25365597

  1. Comparative Efficacies of Human Simulated Exposures of Tedizolid and Linezolid against Staphylococcus aureus in the Murine Thigh Infection Model

    PubMed Central

    Keel, R. A.; Tessier, P. R.; Crandon, J. L.

    2012-01-01

    Tedizolid (formally torezolid) is an expanded-spectrum oxazolidinone with enhanced in vitro potency against Gram-positive pathogens, including methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The efficacies of human simulated exposures of tedizolid and linezolid against S. aureus in an immunocompetent mouse thigh model over 3 days were compared. Four strains of MRSA and one of MSSA with tedizolid and linezolid MICs ranging from 0.25 to 0.5 and from 2 to 4 μg/ml, respectively, were utilized. Tedizolid or linezolid was administered in a regimen simulating a human steady-state 24-h area under the free concentration-time curve of 200 mg every 24 h (Q24) or 600 mg Q12, respectively. Thighs were harvested after 4, 8, 12, 24, 36, 48, and 72 h, and efficacy was determined by the change in bacterial density. The mean bacterial density in control mice increased over the 3-day period. After 24 h of treatment, a reduction in bacterial density of ≥1 log CFU was observed for both the tedizolid and linezolid treatments. Antibacterial activity was enhanced for both agents with a reduction of ≥2.6 log CFU after 72 h of treatment. Any statistically significant differences (P ≤ 0.05) in efficacy between the agents were transient and did not persist throughout the 72-h treatment period. The tedizolid and linezolid regimens demonstrated similar in vivo efficacies against the S. aureus isolates tested. Both agents were bacteriostatic at 24 h and bactericidal on the third day of treatment. These data support the clinical utility of tedizolid for skin and skin structure infections caused by S. aureus, as well as the bactericidal activity of the oxazolidinones after 3 days of treatment. PMID:22687504

  2. Pharmacokinetic/Pharmacodynamic Correlation of Cefquinome Against Experimental Catheter-Associated Biofilm Infection Due to Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yu-Feng; Shi, Wei; Yu, Yang; Tao, Meng-Ting; Xiong, Yan Q.; Sun, Jian; Liu, Ya-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm formations play an important role in Staphylococcus aureus pathogenesis and contribute to antibiotic treatment failures in biofilm-associated infections. The aim of this study was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) profiles of cefquinome against an experimental catheter-related biofilm model due to S. aureus, including three clinical isolates and one non-clinical isolate. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimal biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC), biofilm bactericidal concentration (BBC), minimal biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) and biofilm prevention concentration (BPC) and in vitro time-kill curves of cefquinome were studied in both planktonic and biofilm cells of study S. aureus strains. The in vivo post-antibiotic effects (PAEs), PK profiles and efficacy of cefquinome were performed in the catheter-related biofilm infection model in murine. A sigmoid Emax model was utilized to determine the PK/PD index that best described the dose-response profiles in the model. The MICs and MBICs of cefquinome for the four S. aureus strains were 0.5 and 16 μg/mL, respectively. The BBCs (32–64 μg/mL) and MBECs (64–256 μg/mL) of these study strains were much higher than their corresponding BPC values (1–2 μg/mL). Cefquinome showed time-dependent killing both on planktonic and biofilm cells, but produced much shorter PAEs in biofilm infections. The best-correlated PK/PD parameters of cefquinome for planktonic and biofilm cells were the duration of time that the free drug level exceeded the MIC (fT > MIC, R2 = 96.2%) and the MBIC (fT > MBIC, R2 = 94.7%), respectively. In addition, the AUC24h/MBIC of cefquinome also significantly correlated with the anti-biofilm outcome in this model (R2 = 93.1%). The values of AUC24h/MBIC for biofilm-static and 1-log10-unit biofilm-cidal activity were 22.8 and 35.6 h; respectively. These results indicate that the PK/PD profiles of cefquinome could be used as valuable guidance for

  3. Pathogenic role of macrophages in intradermal infection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in thermally injured mice.

    PubMed

    Asai, Akira; Tsuda, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Makiko; Hanafusa, Toshiaki; Herndon, David N; Suzuki, Fujio

    2010-10-01

    Intradermal infection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in burned mice was pathogenically analyzed. An abscess was formed in normal mice intradermally infected with 10(8) CFU/mouse of MRSA, and all of these mice survived after the infection; however, abscess formation was not demonstrated to occur in burned mice similarly exposed to the pathogen, and all of these mice died within 5 days of infection. In burned mice, MRSA infected at the burn site intradermal tissues spread quickly throughout the whole body, while in normal mice, the pathogen remained localized at the infection site. Macrophages (Mφ) isolated from the infection site tissues of normal mice produced interleukin-12 (IL-12) but not IL-10 and were characterized as M1Mφ. These M1Mφ were not isolated from the infection site tissues of burned mice. When normal-mouse infection site tissue Mφ were adoptively transferred to burned mice at the MRSA infection site, an abscess formed, and the infection did not develop into sepsis. In contrast, an abscess did not form and sepsis developed in normal mice that were inoculated with burned-mouse infection site tissue Mφ. These Mφ produced IL-10 but not IL-12 and were characterized as M2Mφ. These results indicate that abscess formation is a major mechanism of host resistance against intradermal MRSA infection. M1Mφ in the tissues surrounding the infection site play a pivotal role in abscess formation; however, the abscess is not formed in burned mice where M2Mφ predominate. M2Mφ have been described as inhibitor cells for Mφ conversion from resident Mφ to M1Mφ. PMID:20679444

  4. Immunisation With Immunodominant Linear B Cell Epitopes Vaccine of Manganese Transport Protein C Confers Protection against Staphylococcus aureus Infection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui-Jie; Zhang, Jin-Yong; Wei, Chao; Yang, Liu-Yang; Zuo, Qian-Fei; Zhuang, Yuan; Feng, You-Jun; Srinivas, Swaminath; Zeng, Hao; Zou, Quan-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination strategies for Staphylococcus aureus, particularly methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections have attracted much research attention. Recent efforts have been made to select manganese transport protein C, or manganese binding surface lipoprotein C (MntC), which is a metal ion associated with pathogen nutrition uptake, as potential candidates for an S. aureus vaccine. Although protective humoral immune responses to MntC are well-characterised, much less is known about detailed MntC-specific B cell epitope mapping and particularly epitope vaccines, which are less-time consuming and more convenient. In this study, we generated a recombinant protein rMntC which induced strong antibody response when used for immunisation with CFA/IFA adjuvant. On the basis of the results, linear B cell epitopes within MntC were finely mapped using a series of overlapping synthetic peptides. Further studies indicate that MntC113-136, MntC209-232, and MntC263-286 might be the original linear B-cell immune dominant epitope of MntC, furthermore, three-dimensional (3-d) crystal structure results indicate that the three immunodominant epitopes were displayed on the surface of the MntC antigen. On the basis of immunodominant MntC113-136, MntC209-232, and MntC263-286 peptides, the epitope vaccine for S. aureus induces a high antibody level which is biased to TH2 and provides effective immune protection and strong opsonophagocytic killing activity in vitro against MRSA infection. In summary, the study provides strong proof of the optimisation of MRSA B cell epitope vaccine designs and their use, which was based on the MntC antigen in the development of an MRSA vaccine. PMID:26895191

  5. Immunisation With Immunodominant Linear B Cell Epitopes Vaccine of Manganese Transport Protein C Confers Protection against Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hui-Jie; Zhang, Jin-Yong; Wei, Chao; Yang, Liu-Yang; Zuo, Qian-Fei; Zhuang, Yuan; Feng, You-Jun; Srinivas, Swaminath; Zeng, Hao; Zou, Quan-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination strategies for Staphylococcus aureus, particularly methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections have attracted much research attention. Recent efforts have been made to select manganese transport protein C, or manganese binding surface lipoprotein C (MntC), which is a metal ion associated with pathogen nutrition uptake, as potential candidates for an S. aureus vaccine. Although protective humoral immune responses to MntC are well-characterised, much less is known about detailed MntC-specific B cell epitope mapping and particularly epitope vaccines, which are less-time consuming and more convenient. In this study, we generated a recombinant protein rMntC which induced strong antibody response when used for immunisation with CFA/IFA adjuvant. On the basis of the results, linear B cell epitopes within MntC were finely mapped using a series of overlapping synthetic peptides. Further studies indicate that MntC113-136, MntC209-232, and MntC263-286 might be the original linear B-cell immune dominant epitope of MntC, furthermore, three-dimensional (3-d) crystal structure results indicate that the three immunodominant epitopes were displayed on the surface of the MntC antigen. On the basis of immunodominant MntC113-136, MntC209-232, and MntC263-286 peptides, the epitope vaccine for S. aureus induces a high antibody level which is biased to TH2 and provides effective immune protection and strong opsonophagocytic killing activity in vitro against MRSA infection. In summary, the study provides strong proof of the optimisation of MRSA B cell epitope vaccine designs and their use, which was based on the MntC antigen in the development of an MRSA vaccine. PMID:26895191

  6. Impact of the Combination of Daptomycin and Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole on Clinical Outcomes in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Claeys, Kimberly C.; Smith, Jordan R.; Casapao, Anthony M.; Mynatt, Ryan P.; Avery, Lisa; Shroff, Anjali; Yamamura, Deborah; Davis, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Complicated Staphylococcus aureus infections, including bacteremia, are often associated with treatment failures, prolonged hospital stays, and the emergence of resistance to primary and even secondary therapies. Daptomycin is commonly used as salvage therapy after vancomycin failure for the treatment of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections. Unfortunately, the emergence of daptomycin resistance, especially in deep-seated infections, has been reported, prompting the need for alternative or combination therapy. Numerous antibiotic combinations with daptomycin have been investigated clinically and in vitro. Of interest, the combination of daptomycin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) has proved to be rapidly bactericidal in vitro to strains that are both susceptible and nonsusceptible to daptomycin. However, to date, there is limited clinical evidence supporting the use of this combination. This was a multicenter, retrospective case series of patients treated with the combination of daptomycin and TMP-SMX for at least 72 h. The objective of this study was to describe the safety and effectiveness of this regimen in clinical practice. The most commonly stated reason that TMP-SMX was added to daptomycin was persistent bacteremia and/or progressive signs and symptoms of infection. After the initiation of combination therapy, the median time to clearance of bacteremia was 2.5 days. Microbiological eradication was demonstrated in 24 out of 28 patients, and in vitro synergy was demonstrated in 17 of the 17 recovered isolates. Further research with this combination is necessary to describe the optimal role and its impact on patient outcomes. PMID:25605354

  7. Enzyme activated photodynamic therapy for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection both inv itro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiu-Jun; Zhu, Yun-Qing; Peng, Yin-Bo; Chen, You-Shuang; Hu, Yi-Ping; Lu, Hua-Xiang; Yu, Wei-Rong; Fang, Yong; Du, Jian-Zhong; Yao, Min

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has become one of the most common multi-drug resistant bacteria in both hospital and community. The aim of this study is to investigate the selective inhibition of MRSA by a modified photosensitizer (LAEtNBS) in vitro and the efficacy of MRSA infection treatment by photodynamic therapy (PDT) with LAEtNBS in vivo. LAEtNBS was synthesized by adding a cationic photosensitizer molecule (EtNBS-COOH) and a quencher molecule to two side chains of cephalosporin, which was then shown to have similar absorption and emission wavelengths with EtNBS-COOH, but suppressed yields of fluorescence quantum and singlet oxygen. The selective inactivation and less phototoxicity of LAEtNBS, compared to that of EtNBS-COOH, were assessed and confirmed by conducting PDT to two Staphylococcus aureus strains and human skin cells at a fluence of 15 J/cm(2) with 640±10 nm LED light. Furthermore, using mouse skin wound model infected with 10(8) CFU of MRSA, we found that both LAEtNBS and EtNBS-COOH were able to treat MRSA infection and enhance wound repair. However, there was no significant difference in the two photosensitizers that might be due to the environment in vivo. Modification of the photosensitizer will be very beneficial for developing new strategies to treat drug resistant bacterial infection with less harm to host tissue. PMID:24857792

  8. Impact of the combination of daptomycin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole on clinical outcomes in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections.

    PubMed

    Claeys, Kimberly C; Smith, Jordan R; Casapao, Anthony M; Mynatt, Ryan P; Avery, Lisa; Shroff, Anjali; Yamamura, Deborah; Davis, Susan L; Rybak, Michael J

    2015-04-01

    Complicated Staphylococcus aureus infections, including bacteremia, are often associated with treatment failures, prolonged hospital stays, and the emergence of resistance to primary and even secondary therapies. Daptomycin is commonly used as salvage therapy after vancomycin failure for the treatment of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) infections. Unfortunately, the emergence of daptomycin resistance, especially in deep-seated infections, has been reported, prompting the need for alternative or combination therapy. Numerous antibiotic combinations with daptomycin have been investigated clinically and in vitro. Of interest, the combination of daptomycin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMX) has proved to be rapidly bactericidal in vitro to strains that are both susceptible and nonsusceptible to daptomycin. However, to date, there is limited clinical evidence supporting the use of this combination. This was a multicenter, retrospective case series of patients treated with the combination of daptomycin and TMP-SMX for at least 72 h. The objective of this study was to describe the safety and effectiveness of this regimen in clinical practice. The most commonly stated reason that TMP-SMX was added to daptomycin was persistent bacteremia and/or progressive signs and symptoms of infection. After the initiation of combination therapy, the median time to clearance of bacteremia was 2.5 days. Microbiological eradication was demonstrated in 24 out of 28 patients, and in vitro synergy was demonstrated in 17 of the 17 recovered isolates. Further research with this combination is necessary to describe the optimal role and its impact on patient outcomes. PMID:25605354

  9. In Vitro Approach for Identification of the Most Effective Agents for Antimicrobial Lock Therapy in the Treatment of Intravascular Catheter-Related Infections Caused by Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Hogan, S; Zapotoczna, M; Stevens, N T; Humphreys, H; O'Gara, J P; O'Neill, E

    2016-05-01

    Infection of intravascular catheters by Staphylococcus aureus is a significant risk factor within the health care setting. To treat these infections and attempt salvage of an intravascular catheter, antimicrobial lock solutions (ALSs) are being increasingly used. However, the most effective ALSs against these biofilm-mediated infections have yet to be determined, and clinical practice varies greatly. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the efficacies of antibiotics and antiseptics in current clinical use against biofilms produced by reference and clinical isolates of S. aureus Static and flow biofilm assays were developed using newly described in vivo-relevant conditions to examine the effect of each agent on S. aureus within the biofilm matrix. The antibiotics daptomycin, tigecycline, and rifampin and the antiseptics ethanol and Taurolock inactivated established S. aureus biofilms, while other commonly used antistaphylococcal antibiotics and antiseptic agents were less effective. These findings were confirmed by live/dead staining of S. aureus biofilms formed and treated within a flow cell model. The results from this study demonstrate the most effective clinically used agents and their concentrations which should be used within an ALS to treat S. aureus-mediated intravascular catheter-related infections. PMID:26926633

  10. Synergistic Antibacterial Activity of Plant Peptide MBP-1 and Silver Nanoparticles Combination on Healing of Infected Wound Due to Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Salouti, Mojtaba; Mirzaei, Fatemeh; Shapouri, Reza; Ahangari, Azam

    2016-01-01

    Background: Wound infection is a common problem in hospitals and is typically caused by the antibiotic-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, which is a major pathogen for skin and soft tissue infections worldwide. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the synergistic antibacterial effect of plant peptide MBP-1 and silver nanoparticles on infected wounds caused by S. aureus. Materials and Methods: The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of MBP-1 and silver nanoparticles both on their own and in combination form were determined against S. aureus via macrodilution and microdilution methods. The synergistic antibacterial effect of silver nanoparticles and MBP-1 was investigated on infected wounds caused by S. aureus in a mouse model. Results: The MIC and MBC of MBP-1 were found to be 0.6 and 0.7 mg/mL, respectively. MIC and MBC of silver nanoparticles were determined to be 6.25 and 12.5 mg/L, respectively. MIC and MBC of the silver nanoparticles and MBP-1 combination were found to be 3.125 mg/mL, 0.5 mg/L; and 6.25 mg/mL, 0.6 mg/L, respectively. The infected wound healed properly after the combined use of MBP-1 and silver nanoparticles. Conclusions: The synergistic effect was found on the healing of infected wounds caused by S. aureus by using an MBP-1 and silver nanoparticles combination in a mouse model. PMID:27099683

  11. Individual Constituents from Essential Oils Inhibit Biofilm Mass Production by Multi-Drug Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Espina, Laura; Pagán, Rafael; López, Daniel; García-Gonzalo, Diego

    2015-01-01

    Biofilm formation by Staphylococcus aureus represents a problem in both the medical field and the food industry, because the biofilm structure provides protection to embedded cells and it strongly attaches to surfaces. This circumstance is leading to many research programs seeking new alternatives to control biofilm formation by this pathogen. In this study we show that a potent inhibition of biofilm mass production can be achieved in community-associated methicillin-resistant S. aureus (CA-MRSA) and methicillin-sensitive strains using plant compounds, such as individual constituents (ICs) of essential oils (carvacrol, citral, and (+)-limonene). The Crystal Violet staining technique was used to evaluate biofilm mass formation during 40 h of incubation. Carvacrol is the most effective IC, abrogating biofilm formation in all strains tested, while CA-MRSA was the most sensitive phenotype to any of the ICs tested. Inhibition of planktonic cells by ICs during initial growth stages could partially explain the inhibition of biofilm formation. Overall, our results show the potential of EOs to prevent biofilm formation, especially in strains that exhibit resistance to other antimicrobials. As these compounds are food additives generally recognized as safe, their anti-biofilm properties may lead to important new applications, such as sanitizers, in the food industry or in clinical settings. PMID:26102069

  12. Staphylococcus aureus Panton-Valentine leukocidin induces an inflammatory response in human phagocytes via the NLRP3 inflammasome

    PubMed Central

    Holzinger, Dirk; Gieldon, Laura; Mysore, Vijayashree; Nippe, Nadine; Taxman, Debra J.; Duncan, Joseph A.; Broglie, Peter M.; Marketon, Kristina; Austermann, Judith; Vogl, Thomas; Foell, Dirk; Niemann, Silke; Peters, Georg; Roth, Johannes; Löffler, Bettina

    2012-01-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus pore-forming toxin PVL is most likely causative for life-threatening necrotizing infections, which are characterized by massive tissue inflammation and necrosis. Whereas the cytotoxic action of PVL on human neutrophils is already well established, the PVL effects on other sensitive cell types, such as monocytes and macrophages, are less clear. In this study, we used different types of human leukocytes (neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, lymphocytes) to investigate cell-specific binding of PVL subunits and subsequent proinflammatory and cytotoxic effects. In all PVL-sensitive cells, we identified the binding of the subunit LukS-PV as the critical factor for PVL-induced cytotoxicity, which was followed by binding of LukF-PV. LukS-PV binds to monocytes, macrophages, and neutrophils but not to lymphocytes. Additionally, we showed that PVL binding to monocytes and macrophages leads to release of caspase-1-dependent proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18. PVL activates the NLRP3 inflammasome, a signaling complex of myeloid cells that is involved in caspase-1-dependent IL-1β processing in response to pathogens and endogenous danger signals. Specific inhibition of this pathway at several steps significantly reduced inflammasome activation and subsequent pyronecrosis. Furthermore, we found that PAMPs and DAMPs derived from dying neutrophils can dramatically enhance this response by up-regulating pro-IL-1β in monocytes/macrophages. This study analyzes a specific host signaling pathway that mediates PVL-induced inflammation and cytotoxicity, which has high relevance for CA-MRSA-associated and PVL-mediated pathogenic processes, such as necrotizing infections. PMID:22892107

  13. Staphylococcus aureus Panton-Valentine leukocidin induces an inflammatory response in human phagocytes via the NLRP3 inflammasome.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, Dirk; Gieldon, Laura; Mysore, Vijayashree; Nippe, Nadine; Taxman, Debra J; Duncan, Joseph A; Broglie, Peter M; Marketon, Kristina; Austermann, Judith; Vogl, Thomas; Foell, Dirk; Niemann, Silke; Peters, Georg; Roth, Johannes; Löffler, Bettina

    2012-11-01

    The Staphylococcus aureus pore-forming toxin PVL is most likely causative for life-threatening necrotizing infections, which are characterized by massive tissue inflammation and necrosis. Whereas the cytotoxic action of PVL on human neutrophils is already well established, the PVL effects on other sensitive cell types, such as monocytes and macrophages, are less clear. In this study, we used different types of human leukocytes (neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, lymphocytes) to investigate cell-specific binding of PVL subunits and subsequent proinflammatory and cytotoxic effects. In all PVL-sensitive cells, we identified the binding of the subunit LukS-PV as the critical factor for PVL-induced cytotoxicity, which was followed by binding of LukF-PV. LukS-PV binds to monocytes, macrophages, and neutrophils but not to lymphocytes. Additionally, we showed that PVL binding to monocytes and macrophages leads to release of caspase-1-dependent proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β and IL-18. PVL activates the NLRP3 inflammasome, a signaling complex of myeloid cells that is involved in caspase-1-dependent IL-1β processing in response to pathogens and endogenous danger signals. Specific inhibition of this pathway at several steps significantly reduced inflammasome activation and subsequent pyronecrosis. Furthermore, we found that PAMPs and DAMPs derived from dying neutrophils can dramatically enhance this response by up-regulating pro-IL-1β in monocytes/macrophages. This study analyzes a specific host signaling pathway that mediates PVL-induced inflammation and cytotoxicity, which has high relevance for CA-MRSA-associated and PVL-mediated pathogenic processes, such as necrotizing infections. PMID:22892107

  14. Contribution of Staphylococcus aureus Coagulases and Clumping Factor A to Abscess Formation in a Rabbit Model of Skin and Soft Tissue Infection

    PubMed Central

    Malachowa, Natalia; Kobayashi, Scott D.; Porter, Adeline R.; Braughton, Kevin R.; Scott, Dana P.; Gardner, Donald J.; Missiakas, Dominique M.; Schneewind, Olaf; DeLeo, Frank R.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus produces numerous factors that facilitate survival in the human host. S. aureus coagulase (Coa) and von Willebrand factor-binding protein (vWbp) are known to clot plasma through activation of prothrombin and conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin. In addition, S. aureus clumping factor A (ClfA) binds fibrinogen and contributes to platelet aggregation via a fibrinogen- or complement-dependent mechanism. Here, we evaluated the contribution of Coa, vWbp and ClfA to S. aureus pathogenesis in a rabbit model of skin and soft tissue infection. Compared to skin abscesses caused by the Newman wild-type strain, those caused by isogenic coa, vwb, or clfA deletion strains, or a strain deficient in coa and vwb, were significantly smaller following subcutaneous inoculation in rabbits. Unexpectedly, we found that fibrin deposition and abscess capsule formation appear to be independent of S. aureus coagulase activity in the rabbit infection model. Similarities notwithstanding, S. aureus strains deficient in coa and vwb elicited reduced levels of several proinflammatory molecules in human blood in vitro. Although a specific mechanism remains to be determined, we conclude that S. aureus Coa, vWbp and ClfA contribute to abscess formation in rabbits. PMID:27336691

  15. Liver Cirrhosis and Diabetes Mellitus Are Risk Factors for Staphylococcus aureus Infection in Patients with Healthcare-Associated or Hospital-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Huang-Pin; Chu, Chien-Ming; Lin, Chun-Yao; Yu, Chung-Chieh; Hua, Chung-Ching; Yu, Teng-Jen; Liu, Yu-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Background. The risk factors for Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) pneumonia are not fully identified. The aim of this work was to find out the clinical characteristics associated with S. aureus infection in patients with healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP) and hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP), which may be applicable for more appropriate selection of empiric antibiotic therapy. Methods. From July 2007 to June 2010, patients who were admitted to the intensive care unit with severe HCAP/HAP and severe sepsis were enrolled in this study. Lower respiratory tract sample was semiquantitatively cultured. Initial broad-spectrum antibiotics were chosen by Taiwan or American guidelines for pneumonia management. Standard bundle therapies were provided to all patients according to the guidelines of the Surviving Sepsis Campaign. Results. The most frequently isolated pathogens were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, S. aureus, Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Escherichia coli. Patients with positive isolation of S. aureus in culture had significantly higher history of liver cirrhosis and diabetes mellitus, with odds ratios of 3.098 and 1.899, respectively. The S. aureus pneumonia was not correlated with history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hypertension, and hemodialysis. Conclusion. Liver cirrhosis and diabetes mellitus may be risk factors for S. aureus infection in patients with severe HCAP or HAP. PMID:26998356

  16. Voriconazole curative treatment for Acremonium species keratitis developed in a patient with concomitant Staphylococcus aureus corneal infection: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cretì, Anna; Esposito, Vincenzo; Bocchetti, Maria; Baldi, Gianluca; De Rosa, Pasquale; Parrella, Roberto; Chirianni, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    The case of a 49-year-old male Caucasian, with more than a 3-year history of recurrent keratoconjunctivitis treated with steroids, antibiotics and midriatics, is reported. A combined Acremonium spp. and S. aureus infection was detected. After unsuccessful therapy with fluconazole, the Acremonium spp. infection was eradicated by voriconazole treatment. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of complete regression of this kind of infection by the use of voriconazole. Therefore, we strongly recommend, in the event of a compatible clinical picture, laboratory testing for mycetes even in the absence of traumatic events, and the use of the new generation azoles, in order avoid a keratoplasty intervention and disease progression to severe endophthalmitis. PMID:16433048

  17. Two Novel Point Mutations in Clinical Staphylococcus aureus Reduce Linezolid Susceptibility and Switch on the Stringent Response to Promote Persistent Infection

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei; Chua, Kyra; Davies, John K.; Newton, Hayley J.; Seemann, Torsten; Harrison, Paul F.; Holmes, Natasha E.; Rhee, Hyun-Woo; Hong, Jong-In; Hartland, Elizabeth L.; Stinear, Timothy P.; Howden, Benjamin P.

    2010-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus frequently invades the human bloodstream, leading to life threatening bacteremia and often secondary foci of infection. Failure of antibiotic therapy to eradicate infection is frequently described; in some cases associated with altered S. aureus antimicrobial resistance or the small colony variant (SCV) phenotype. Newer antimicrobials, such as linezolid, remain the last available therapy for some patients with multi-resistant S. aureus infections. Using comparative and functional genomics we investigated the molecular determinants of resistance and SCV formation in sequential S. aureus isolates from a patient who had a persistent and recurrent S. aureus infection, after failed therapy with multiple antimicrobials, including linezolid. Two point mutations in key staphylococcal genes dramatically affected clinical behaviour of the bacterium, altering virulence and antimicrobial resistance. Most strikingly, a single nucleotide substitution in relA (SACOL1689) reduced RelA hydrolase activity and caused accumulation of the intracellular signalling molecule guanosine 3′, 5′-bis(diphosphate) (ppGpp) and permanent activation of the stringent response, which has not previously been reported in S. aureus. Using the clinical isolate and a defined mutant with an identical relA mutation, we demonstrate for the first time the impact of an active stringent response in S. aureus, which was associated with reduced growth, and attenuated virulence in the Galleria mellonella model. In addition, a mutation in rlmN (SACOL1230), encoding a ribosomal methyltransferase that methylates 23S rRNA at position A2503, caused a reduction in linezolid susceptibility. These results reinforce the exquisite adaptability of S. aureus and show how subtle molecular changes cause major alterations in bacterial behaviour, as well as highlighting potential weaknesses of current antibiotic treatment regimens. PMID:20548948

  18. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection of the subacromial bursa: an unusual complication following subacromial corticosteroid injection (a report of two cases)

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Sian A; Gurunaidu, Subramaniam; Pritchard, Mark G

    2014-01-01

    Subacromial corticosteroid injections are frequently used for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes in shoulder pain. Subacromial septic bursitis is a recognized but rare complication. There have been no reports of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections of the subacromial bursa after subacromial injections in the literature. We describe case reports of two patients who presented with subacromial methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus septic bursitis following subacromial corticosteroid injections in the community and highlight the diagnostic and management challenges of this condition.

  19. Comparative Exoproteomics and Host Inflammatory Response in Staphylococcus aureus Skin and Soft Tissue Infections, Bacteremia, and Subclinical Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Yun Khoon; Awang Hamat, Rukman; van Belkum, Alex; Chong, Pei Pei

    2015-01-01

    The exoproteome of Staphylococcus aureus contains enzymes and virulence factors that are important for host adaptation. We investigated the exoprotein profiles and cytokine/chemokine responses obtained in three different S. aureus-host interaction scenarios by using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE) and two-dimensional immunoblotting (2D-IB) combined with tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) and cytometric bead array techniques. The scenarios included S. aureus bacteremia, skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs), and healthy carriage. By the 2-DGE approach, 12 exoproteins (the chaperone protein DnaK, a phosphoglycerate kinase [Pgk], the chaperone GroEL, a multisensor hybrid histidine kinase, a 3-methyl-2-oxobutanoate hydroxymethyltransferase [PanB], cysteine synthase A, an N-acetyltransferase, four isoforms of elongation factor Tu [EF-Tu], and one signature protein spot that could not be reliably identified by MS/MS) were found to be consistently present in more than 50% of the bacteremia isolates, while none of the SSTI or healthy-carrier isolates showed any of these proteins. By the 2D-IB approach, we also identified five antigens (methionine aminopeptidase [MetAPs], exotoxin 15 [Set15], a peptidoglycan hydrolase [LytM], an alkyl hydroperoxide reductase [AhpC], and a haptoglobin-binding heme uptake protein [HarA]) specific for SSTI cases. Cytokine and chemokine production varied during the course of different infection types and carriage. Monokine induced by gamma interferon (MIG) was more highly stimulated in bacteremia patients than in SSTI patients and healthy carriers, especially during the acute phase of infection. MIG could therefore be further explored as a potential biomarker of bacteremia. In conclusion, 12 exoproteins from bacteremia isolates, MIG production, and five antigenic proteins identified during SSTIs should be further investigated for potential use as diagnostic markers. PMID:25809633

  20. An outbreak of infections caused by strains of Staphylococcus aureus resistant to methicillin and aminoglycosides. II. Epidemiologic studies.

    PubMed

    Crossley, K; Landesman, B; Zaske, D

    1979-03-01

    Studies to determine the epidemiologic behavior of strains of Staphylococcus aureus resistant to methicillin and aminoglycosides (MARS) were conducted over a period of two and one-half years, during which MARS were isolated from 201 patients at a hospital in the midwestern United States. Most cases of infection or colonization with MARS (156 of 201) occurred in patients with burns. In the burn unit, MARS were recovered from the air, from the hair and hands of personnel, and from inanimate objects. Nasal (72%) and rectal (66%) colonization were common among burned patients with infected or colonized burn wounds but occurred in only six of 74 burn unit personnel. When compared with two control periods, the prophylactic use of antistaphylococcal agents in patients with burns increased markedly at the time the outbreak began. Of the 45 patients without burns from whom MARS were isolated, 42 (93%) were surgical patients. MARS were not demonstrated in the air or environment of patients with infected surgical wounds. None of 334 non-burn unit hospital personnel were found to be carriers of MARS. Four phage types (83A, 6/75/85, 29/52/80, and 92) were recovered during the outbreak. A determinant of antibiotic resistance was probably transmitted among strains of S. aureus. PMID:255553

  1. Proteome-wide antigen discovery of novel protective vaccine candidates against Staphylococcus aureus infection.

    PubMed

    Rasmussen, Karina Juhl; Mattsson, Andreas Holm; Pilely, Katrine; Asferg, Cecilie Antoinette; Ciofu, Oana; Vitved, Lars; Koch, Claus; Kemp, Michael

    2016-08-31

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a rapidly growing problem, especially in hospitals where MRSA cause increased morbidity and mortality and a significant rise in health expenditures. As many strains of MRSA are resistant to other antimicrobials in addition to methicillin, there is an urgent need to institute non-antimicrobial measures, such as vaccination, against the spread of MRSA. With the aim of finding new protective antigens for vaccine development, this study used a proteome-wide in silico antigen prediction platform to screen the proteome of S. aureus strain MRSA252. Thirty-five different S. aureus proteins were identified, recombinantly expressed, and tested for protection in a lethal sepsis mouse model using S. aureus strain MRSA252 as the challenge organism. We found that 13 of the 35 recombinant peptides yielded significant protection and that 12 of these antigens were highly conserved across 70 completely sequenced S. aureus strains. Thus, this in silico platform was capable of identifying novel candidates for inclusion in future vaccines against MRSA. PMID:27496278

  2. Development of a biofilm inhibitor molecule against multidrug resistant Staphylococcus aureus associated with gestational urinary tract infections

    PubMed Central

    Balamurugan, P.; Hema, M.; Kaur, Gurmeet; Sridharan, V.; Prabu, P. C.; Sumana, M. N.; Princy, S. Adline

    2015-01-01

    Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) is a globally widespread human infection caused by an infestation of uropathogens. Eventhough, Escherichia coli is often quoted as being the chief among them, Staphylococcus aureus involvement in UTI especially in gestational UTI is often understated. Staphylococcal accessory regulator A (SarA) is a quorum regulator of S. aureus that controls the expression of various virulence and biofilm phenotypes. Since SarA had been a focussed target for antibiofilm agent development, the study aims to develop a potential drug molecule targeting the SarA of S. aureus to combat biofilm associated infections in which it is involved. In our previous studies, we have reported the antibiofilm activity of SarA based biofilm inhibitor, (SarABI) with a 50% minimum biofilm inhibitory concentration (MBIC50) value of 200 μg/mL against S. aureus associated with vascular graft infections and also the antibiofilm activity of the root ethanolic extracts of Melia dubia against uropathogenic E. coli. In the present study, in silico design of a hybrid molecule composed of a molecule screened from M. dubia root ethanolic extracts and a modified SarA based inhibitor (SarABIM) was undertaken. SarABIM is a modified form of SarABI where the fluorine groups are absent in SarABIM. Chemical synthesis of the hybrid molecule, 4-(Benzylamino)cyclohexyl 2-hydroxycinnamate (henceforth referred to as UTI Quorum-Quencher, UTIQQ) was then performed, followed by in vitro and in vivo validation. The MBIC50 and MBIC90 of UTIQQ were found to be 15 and 65 μg/mL, respectively. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) images witnessed biofilm reduction and bacterial killing in either UTIQQ or in combined use of antibiotic gentamicin and UTIQQ. Similar results were observed with in vivo studies of experimental UTI in rat model. So, we propose that the drug UTIQQ would be a promising candidate when used alone or, in combination with an antibiotic for staphylococcal associated UTI. PMID

  3. Risk of Infection and Death due to Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Long-Term Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Datta, Rupak; Huang, Susan S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Patients with newly acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) have significant risks of short-term morbidity and mortality due to this pathogen. We were interested in assessing whether long-term carriers have persistent risks of disease and whether all carriers, regardless of the duration of carriage, should be considered to be reasonable candidates for interventions to reduce the risk of infection. Methods We conducted a single-center retrospective cohort study to evaluate the risk of subsequent MRSA infection and death among patients known to have harbored MRSA for at least 1 year (i.e., prevalent carriers). Results Among 281 prevalent carriers, 65 (23%) developed a total of 96 discrete and unrelated MRSA infections in the year after their identification as prevalent carriers. The most common infections were pneumonia (accounting for 39% of MRSA infections), soft-tissue infection (14%), and central venous catheter infection (14%). Twenty-four percent of all infections involved bacteremia. Thirty-eight MRSA infections occurred during a new hospitalization, and 32 (84%) of these infections were the reason for admission to the hospital. MRSA contributed to 14 deaths, with 6 of these deaths deemed to be attributable to MRSA. Harboring MRSA for <2 years and MRSA colonization at the time of detection as a prevalent carrier were predictive of subsequent infection with MRSA. Conclusions Individuals who are known to have harbored MRSA for >1 year are at high risk for subsequent MRSA morbidity and mortality and should be considered to be targets for intervention, in addition to individuals who have newly acquired this pathogen. PMID:18532892

  4. Antimicrobial susceptibility, virulence determinant carriage and molecular characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus isolates associated with skin and soft tissue infections.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fangyou; Liu, Yunling; Lv, Jinnan; Qi, Xiuqin; Lu, Chaohui; Ding, Yu; Li, Dan; Liu, Huanle; Wang, Liangxing

    2015-01-01

    A better understanding of the antimicrobial susceptibility, carriage of virulence determinants and molecular characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus isolates associated with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) may provide further insights related to clinical outcomes with these infections. From January 2012 to September 2013, a total of 128 non-duplicate S. aureus isolates were recovered from patients with SSTIs. All 128 S. aureus SSTI isolates carried at least five virulence genes tested. Virulence genes detected among at least 70% of all tested isolates included hld (100%), hla (95.3%), icaA (96.9%), clf (99.2%), sdrC (79.7%), sdrD (70.3%), and sdrE (72.7%). The prevalence of MRSA isolates with 10 virulence genes tested (54.4%, 31/56) was significantly higher than that among MSSA isolates (35.2%, 25/71) (p<0.05). The positive rates of seb, sen, sem, sdrE and pvl among MRSA isolates were significantly higher than among MSSA isolates (p<0.05). ST7 and ST630 accounting for 10.9% were found to be the predominant STs. The most prevalent spa type was t091 (8.6%). MRSA-ST59-SCCmec IV was the most common clone (12.3%) among MRSA isolates whereas among MSSA isolates the dominant clone was MSSA-ST7 (15.5%). Six main clonal complexes (CCs) were found, including CC5 (52.3%), CC7 (11.7%), CC59 (8.6%), CC88 (6.3%), CC398 (4.7%), and CC121 (3.1%). A higher carriage of seb and sec was found among CC59 isolates. In comparison to CC5 and CC7 isolates, those with the highest carriage rates (>80.0%) of sdrC and sdrD, CC59 isolates had lower prevalence of these two virulence genes. All CC59 isolates were susceptible to gentamicin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, while CC5 and CC7 isolates had resistance rates to these two antimicrobials of 25.4% and 20.9%, and 40.0% and 40.0%, respectively. The resistance rates for tetracycline, clindamycin, and erythromycin among CC5 isolates were lower than among CC7 and CC59 isolates. In conclusion, the molecular typing of S. aureus SSTI

  5. Quercus infectoria: a candidate for the control of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections.

    PubMed

    Chusri, S; Voravuthikunchai, S P

    2008-04-01

    Acetone, ethyl acetate, 95% ethanol and aqueous extracts of Quercus infectoria (Q. infectoria) demonstrated significant antibacterial activities against all strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA). Inhibition zones were in the range 11.75-16.82 mm. Both MRSA and MSSA strains exhibited minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) values at 0.13 and 0.13-1.00 mg/mL, respectively. At 2 MIC, the growth of two representative MRSA strains was continually inhibited for at least 20 h. Surviving MRSA cells were not detected within 12-14 h after treatment with the extract at 4 MIC concentration. Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 demonstrated similar results. PMID:18338770

  6. Importance of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus eradication in carriers to prevent postoperative methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus surgical site infection.

    PubMed

    Pofahl, Walter E; Ramsey, Keith M; Nobles, Delores L; Cochran, M Kathy; Goettler, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Although infrequent, postoperative methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) surgical site infection (SSI) is associated with significant morbidity and cost. Previous studies have identified the importance of MRSA screening to diminish the risk of postoperative MRSA SSI. The current study quantifies the importance of eradication of the MRSA carrier state to prevent MRSA SSI. Beginning February 2007, all admissions to an 800-bed tertiary care hospital were screened for MRSA by nasal swab using rapid polymerase chain reaction-based testing. Patients found to be nasal carriers of MRSA were treated with 2 per cent mupirocin nasal ointment and 4 per cent chlorhexidine soap before surgery. The subset of patients undergoing procedures that are part of the Surgical Care Improvement Project (SCIP) were followed for MRSA SSI (n = 8980). The results of preoperative MRSA screening and eradication of the carrier state were analyzed. Since the initiation of universal MRSA screening, 11 patients undergoing SCIP procedures have developed MRSA SSI (0.12%). Of these, six patients (55%) had negative preoperative screens. Of the five patients with positive preoperative screens, only one received treatment to eradicate the carrier state. In patients who develop MRSA SSI, failure to treat the carrier state before surgery results in MRSA SSI. PMID:21396301

  7. Emergence of a novel subpopulation of CC398 Staphylococcus aureus infecting animals is a serious hazard for humans

    PubMed Central

    van der Mee-Marquet, Nathalie L.; Corvaglia, Anna; Haenni, Marisa; Bertrand, Xavier; Franck, Jean-Baptiste; Kluytmans, Jan; Girard, Myriam; Quentin, Roland; François, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, Staphylococcus aureus from clonal complex (CC)398 were mostly described as colonizing asymptomatic raised pigs and pig-farmers. Currently, the epidemiology of the CC398 lineage is becoming more complex. CC398 human-adapted isolates are increasingly being identified in bloodstream infections in humans living in animal-free environments. In addition, CC398 isolates are increasingly responsible for invasive infections in various animals. CC398 isolates that colonize asymptomatic pigs and the isolates that infect humans living in animal-free environments (human-adapted isolates) both lack several clinically important S. aureus–associated virulence factors but differ on the basis of their prophage content. Recent findings have provided insight into the influence of a φMR11-like helper prophage on the ability of CC398 isolates to infect humans. To assess the recent spread of the CC398 lineage to various animal species and to investigate the links between the φMR11-like prophage and the emergence of CC398 isolates infecting animals, we studied 277 isolates causing infections in unrelated animals. The prevalence of CC398 isolates increased significantly between 2007 and 2013 (p < 0.001); 31.8% of the animal isolates harbored the φMR11-like prophage. High-density DNA microarray experiments with 37 representative infected-animal isolates positive for φMR11-like DNA established that most infected-animal isolates carried many genetic elements related to antimicrobial resistance and virulence genes, and a φ3 prophage encoding immune-modulating proteins and associated with animal-to-human jumps. Our findings suggest recent clonal expansion and dissemination of a new subpopulation of CC398 isolates, responsible for invasive infections in various animals, with a considerable potential to colonize and infect humans, probably greater than that of human-adapted CC398 isolates, justifying active surveillance. PMID:25538688

  8. Australian Group on Antimicrobial Resistance Australian Staphylococcus aureus Sepsis Outcome Programme annual report, 2014.

    PubMed

    Coombs, Geoffrey W; Daley, Denise A; Thin Lee, Yung; Pearson, Julie C; Robinson, J Owen; Nimmo, Graeme R; Collignon, Peter; Howden, Benjamin P; Bell, Jan M; Turnidge, John D

    2016-01-01

    From 1 January to 31 December 2014, 27 institutions around Australia participated in the Australian Staphylococcal Sepsis Outcome Programme (ASSOP). The aim of ASSOP 2014 was to determine the proportion of Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB) isolates in Australia that are antimicrobial resistant, with particular emphasis on susceptibility to methicillin and to characterise the molecular epidemiology of the isolates. Overall, 18.8% of the 2,206 SAB episodes were methicillin resistant, which was significantly higher than that reported in most European countries. The 30-day all-cause mortality associated with methicillin-resistant SAB was 23.4%, which was significantly higher than the 14.4% mortality associated with methicillin-sensitive SAB (P <0.0001). With