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Sample records for aureus mrsa col

  1. MRSA

    MedlinePlus

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus; Hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA) ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. www.cdc.gov/mrsa/index.html. ...

  2. MRSA

    MedlinePlus

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus; Hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA) ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. www.cdc.gov/mrsa/index. ...

  3. MRSA

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? MRSA KidsHealth > For Teens > MRSA Print A A A ... and how can you protect yourself? What Is MRSA? MRSA stands for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus . Staphylococcus_ ...

  4. Evaluation of Two New Chromogenic Media, CHROMagar MRSA and S. aureus ID, for Identifying Staphylococcus aureus and Screening Methicillin-Resistant S. aureus

    PubMed Central

    Hedin, Göran; Fang, Hong

    2005-01-01

    Thirty-nine methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates with diverse genetic backgrounds and two reference strains were correctly identified as S. aureus on CHROMagar MRSA and S. aureus ID media. Growth inhibition on CHROMagar MRSA was noted. A combination of cefoxitin disk and S. aureus ID was found suitable for rapid MRSA screening. PMID:16081989

  5. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Haddadin, A; Fappiano, S; Lipsett, P

    2002-01-01

    Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major nosocomial pathogen that causes severe morbidity and mortality worldwide. MRSA strains are endemic in many American and European hospitals and account for 29%–35% of all clinical isolates. Recent studies have documented the increased costs associated with MRSA infection, as well as the importance of colonisation pressure. Surveillance strategies have been proposed especially in high risk areas such as the intensive care unit. Pneumonia and bacteraemia account for the majority of MRSA serious clinical infections, but intra-abdominal infections, osteomyelitis, toxic shock syndrome, food poisoning, and deep tissue infections are also important clinical diseases. The traditional antibiotic therapy for MRSA is a glycopeptide, vancomycin. New antibiotics have been recently released that add to the armamentarium for therapy against MRSA and include linezolid, and quinupristin/dalfopristin, but cost, side effects, and resistance may limit their long term usefulness. PMID:12151652

  6. MRSA

    MedlinePlus

    MRSA stands for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. It causes a staph infection (pronounced "staff infection") that is resistant to several common antibiotics. There are two types of infection. ...

  7. MRSA

    MedlinePlus

    ... that are no longer killed by penicillin-type antibiotics. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a strain of staph bacteria that is resistant to penicillin and standard penicillin-related antibiotics. MRSA causes the same types of infections as ...

  8. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibiotics, your provider will consider the potential for antibiotic resistance. Thus, if MRSA is suspected, your provider will avoid treating you with beta-lactam antibiotics, a class of antibiotic observed not to be ...

  9. Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA): screening and decolonisation.

    PubMed

    Cookson, Barry; Bonten, Marc J M; Mackenzie, Fiona M; Skov, Robert L; Verbrugh, Henri A; Tacconelli, Evelina

    2011-03-01

    Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections are of increasing importance to clinicians, public health agencies and governments. Prevention and control strategies must address sources in healthcare settings, the community and livestock. This document presents the conclusions of a European Consensus Conference on the role of screening and decolonisation in the control of MRSA infection. The conference was held in Rome on 5-6 March 2010 and was organised jointly by the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) and the International Society of Chemotherapy (ISC). In an environment where MRSA is endemic, universal or targeted screening of patients to detect colonisation was considered to be an essential pillar of any MRSA control programme, along with the option of decolonising carriers dependent on relative risk of infection, either to self or others, in a specific setting. Staff screening may be useful but is problematic as it needs to distinguish between transient carriage and longer-term colonisation. The consequences of identification of MRSA-positive staff may have important effects on morale and the ability to maintain staffing levels. The role of environmental contamination in MRSA infection is unclear, but screening may be helpful as an audit of hygiene procedures. In all situations, screening procedures and decolonisation carry a significant cost burden, the clinical value of which requires careful evaluation. European initiatives designed to provide further information on the cost/benefit value of particular strategies in the control of infection, including those involving MRSA, are in progress. PMID:21163631

  10. Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in India: Prevalence & susceptibility pattern

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Sangeeta; Ray, Pallab; Manchanda, Vikas; Bajaj, Jyoti; Chitnis, D.S.; Gautam, Vikas; Goswami, Parijath; Gupta, Varsha; Harish, B.N.; Kagal, Anju; Kapil, Arti; Rao, Ratna; Rodrigues, Camilla; Sardana, Raman; Devi, Kh Sulochana; Sharma, Anita; Balaji, Veeragaghavan

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is endemic in India and is a dangerous pathogen for hospital acquired infections. This study was conducted in 15 Indian tertiary care centres during a two year period from January 2008 to December 2009 to determine the prevalence of MRSA and susceptibility pattern of S. aureus isolates in India. Methods: All S. aureus isolates obtained during the study period in the participating centres were included in the study. Each centre compiled their data in a predefined template which included data of the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern, location of the patient and specimen type. The data in the submitted templates were collated and analysed. Results: A total of 26310 isolates were included in the study. The overall prevalence of methicillin resistance during the study period was 41 per cent. Isolation rates for MRSA from outpatients, ward inpatients and ICU were 28, 42 and 43 per cent, respectively in 2008 and 27, 49 and 47 per cent, respectively in 2009. The majority of S. aureus isolates was obtained from patients with skin and soft tissue infections followed by those suffering from blood stream infections and respiratory infections. Susceptibility to ciprofloxacin was low in both MSSA (53%) and MRSA (21%). MSSA isolates showed a higher susceptibility to gentamicin, co-trimoxazole, erythromycin and clindamycin as compared to MRSA isolates. No isolate was found resistant to vancomycin or linezolid. Interpretation & conclusions: The study showed a high level of MRSA in our country. There is a need to study epidemiology of such infections. Robust antimicrobial stewardship and strengthened infection control measures are required to prevent spread and reduce emergence of resistance. PMID:23563381

  11. Comparison of BD GeneOhm Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) PCR versus the CHROMagar MRSA Assay for Screening Patients for the Presence of MRSA Strains▿

    PubMed Central

    Boyce, John M.; Havill, Nancy L.

    2008-01-01

    We compared the BD GeneOhm methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) real-time PCR assay with the CHROMagar MRSA assay for the detection of MRSA in 286 nasal surveillance specimens. Compared with the CHROMagar MRSA assay, PCR had sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive values of 100%, 98.6%, 95.8%, and 100%, respectively. The mean PCR turnaround time was 14.5 h. PMID:18032616

  12. Performance of CHROMagar MRSA Medium for Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Diederen, Bram; van Duijn, Inge; van Belkum, Alex; Willemse, Piet; van Keulen, Peter; Kluytmans, Jan

    2005-01-01

    CHROMagar MRSA was evaluated for its ability to identify methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). A well-defined collection consisting of 216 MRSA strains and 241 methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus isolates was used. The sensitivity of CHROMagar MRSA after 24 h of incubation was 95.4%, increasing to 100% after 48 h. The specificity was already 100% after 24 h. PMID:15815020

  13. Blue Light Phototherapy Kills Methycillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enwemeka, Chukuka S.; Williams, Debora; Enwemeka, Sombiri K.; Hollosi, Steve; Yens, David

    2010-05-01

    Background: Methycillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteria continue to defy most available antibiotics. As a result infections with MRSA remain a growing public health concern. As a paradigm shift and a significant departure from the on-going trend to develop stronger drug-based therapies, we studied the effect of 405 nm and 470 nm wavelengths of blue light on two strains of MRSA—US-300 strain of CA-MRSA and the IS853 strain of HA-MRSA—in vitro. Methods: We cultured and plated each strain, following which bacteria colonies were irradiated with 0, 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, 19, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, or 60 Jcm-2 energy densities—just once. Specimens were incubated at 35° C for 24 h. Then, digital images obtained were quantified to obtain colony counts and the aggregate area occupied by bacteria colonies. Results: Each wavelength produced a statistically significant dose-dependent reduction in both the number and the aggregate area of colonies formed by each bacteria strain (P<0.001). Maximum eradication of the US-300 (92.1%) and the IS-853 colonies (93.5%) was achieved within 10 minutes of irradiation with each wavelength. The longer the irradiation the more bacteria were eradicated. However, the effect was non-linear as increases of energy densities between 1.0 and 15 J cm-2 resulted in more bacteria death than similar increases between 15 J cm-2 and 60 J cm-2. Conclusion: At low doses, blue light photo-destroys HA-MRSA and CA-MRSA in vitro; raising the prospect that phototherapy may be an effective clinical tool in the on-going effort to stem MRSA infections.

  14. The influence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriers in a nursery and transmission of MRSA to their households.

    PubMed

    Mitsuda, T; Arai, K; Ibe, M; Imagawa, T; Tomono, N; Yokota, S

    1999-05-01

    We examined two persistent MRSA-carrier nurses in a maternity hospital to elucidate the transmission of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from healthcare providers to newborn infants and to the nurses' own families. Genotyping of the MRSA strains was performed by analyzing genomic DNA restriction length polymorphisms from pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE-RFLPs). The children of these nurses were carrying genotypically identical MRSA strains as their mother. Both MRSA carrier families remained asymptomatic over a two-year follow-up period. Eradication of nasal MRSA carriage from the two nurses resulted in declining MRSA carriage rates among infants in the nursery. Healthcare providers may become transient or persistent MRSA carriers whilst working in hospitals in which MRSA is endemic. They may then become a source of infection for patients as well as their own families. We recommend that healthcare providers should be examined for MRSA if an MRSA epidemic occurs in a hospital. The families of any such carriers should also be examined for MRSA. PMID:10363210

  15. Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) at ambient freshwater beaches

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fogarty, Lisa R.; Haack, Sheridan K.; Johnson, Heather E.; Brennan, Angela K.; Isaacs, Natasha M.; Spencer, Chelsea

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are a threat to human health worldwide, and although detected at marine beaches, they have been largely unstudied at freshwater beaches. Genes indicating S. aureus (SA; femA) and methicillin resistance (mecA) were detected at 11 and 12 of 13 US Great Lakes beaches and in 18% or 27% of 287 recreational water samples, respectively. Eight beaches had mecA + femA (potential MRSA) detections. During an intensive study, higher bather numbers, staphylococci concentrations, and femA detections were found in samples collected after noon than before noon. Local population density, beach cloud cover, and beach wave height were significantly correlated with SA or MRSA detection frequency. The Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene, associated with community-acquired MRSA, was detected in 12 out of 27 potential MRSA samples. The femA gene was detected less frequently at beaches that met US enterococci criteria or EU enterococci ‘excellent’ recreational water quality, but was not related to Escherichia coli-defined criteria. Escherichia coli is often the only indicator used to determine water quality at US beaches, given the economic and healthcare burden that can be associated with infections caused by SA and MRSA, monitoring of recreational waters for non-fecal bacteria such as staphylococci and/or SA may be warranted.

  16. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Detection: Comparison of Two Molecular Methods (IDI-MRSA PCR Assay and GenoType MRSA Direct PCR Assay) with Three Selective MRSA Agars (MRSA ID, MRSASelect, and CHROMagar MRSA) for Use with Infection-Control Swabs▿

    PubMed Central

    van Hal, S. J.; Stark, D.; Lockwood, B.; Marriott, D.; Harkness, J.

    2007-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an increasing problem. Rapid detection of MRSA-colonized patients has the potential to limit spread of the organism. We evaluated the sensitivities and specificities of MRSA detection by two molecular methods (IDI-MRSA PCR assay and GenoType MRSA Direct PCR assay) and three selective MRSA agars (MRSA ID, MRSASelect, and CHROMagar MRSA), using 205 (101 nasal, 52 groin, and 52 axillary samples) samples from consecutive known MRSA-infected and/or -colonized patients. All detection methods had higher MRSA detection rates for nasal swabs than for axillary and groin swabs. Detection of MRSA by IDI-MRSA was the most sensitive method, independent of the site (94% for nasal samples, 80% for nonnasal samples, and 90% overall). The sensitivities of the GenoType MRSA Direct assay and the MRSA ID, MRSASelect, and CHROMagar MRSA agars with nasal swabs were 70%, 72%, 68%, and 75%, respectively. All detection methods had high specificities (95 to 99%), independent of the swab site. Extended incubation for a further 24 h with selective MRSA agars increased the detection of MRSA, with a corresponding decline in specificity secondary to a significant increase in false-positive results. There was a noticeable difference in test performance of the GenoType MRSA Direct assay in detection of MRSA (28/38 samples [74%]) compared with detection of nonmultiresistant MRSA (17/31 samples [55%]) (susceptible to two or more non-β-lactam antibiotics). This was not observed with selective MRSA agar plates or IDI-MRSA. Although it is more expensive, in addition to rapid turnaround times of 2 to 4 h, IDI-MRSA offers greater detection of MRSA colonization, independent of the swab site, than do conventional selective agars and GenoType MRSA Direct. PMID:17537949

  17. Potential for pet animals to harbor methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) when residing with human MRSA patients

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Daniel O.; Lautenbach, Ebbing; Zaoutis, Theoklis; Leckerman, Kateri; Edelstein, Paul H.; Rankin, Shelley C.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Colonization by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) may be persistent in people, and is horizontally transmissible. The scientific literature suggests that domestic pets may also participate in cross-transmission of MRSA within households. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the prevalence of and risk factors for MRSA carriage by pets residing in households with an MRSA-infected person. From 66 households in which an MRSA infected patient resided, we screened 47 dogs and 52 cats using a swab protocol. Isolates from pets and humans were genotyped using two techniques, and compared for concordance. Human participants completed a 22-question survey of demographic and epidemiologic data relevant to staphylococcal transmission. Eleven of 99 pets (11.5%) representing 9 (13.6%) of households were MRSA-positive, but in only 6 of these households were the human and animal-source strains genetically concordant. Human infection by strain USA 100 was significantly associated with pet carriage [OR = 11.4 (95% C.I. 1.7, 76.9); p=0.013]. Yet, for each day of delay in sampling the pet after the person’s MRSA diagnosis, the odds of isolating any type of MRSA from the pet decreased by 13.9% [(95% C.I. 2.6%, 23.8%); p=0.017)]. It may be concluded that pets can harbor pandemic strains of MRSA while residing in a household with an infected person. However, the source of MRSA to the pet cannot always be attributed to the human patient. Moreover, the rapid attrition of the odds of obtaining a positive culture from pets over time suggests that MRSA carriage may be fleeting. PMID:22233337

  18. Comparison of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus in Healthy Community Hospital Visitors [CA-MRSA] and Hospital Staff [HA-MRSA

    PubMed Central

    Pathare, Nirmal A; Tejani, Sara; Asogan, Harshini; Al Mahruqi, Gaitha; Al Fakhri, Salma; Zafarulla, Roshna; Pathare, Anil V.

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevalence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus [CA-MRSA] is unknown in Oman. Methods Nasal and cell phones swabs were collected from hospital visitors and health-care workers on sterile polyester swabs and directly inoculated onto a mannitol salt agar containing oxacillin, allowing growth of methicillin-resistant microorganisms. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed using Kirby Bauer’s disc diffusion method on the isolates. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined for vancomycin and teicoplanin against the resistant isolates of MRSA by the Epsilometer [E] test. A brief survey questionnaire was requested be filled to ascertain the exposure to known risk factors for CA-MRSA carriage. Results Overall, nasal colonization with CA-MRSA was seen in 34 individuals (18%, 95% confidence interval [CI] =12.5%–23.5%), whereas, CA-MRSA was additionally isolated from the cell phone surface in 12 participants (6.3%, 95% CI =5.6%–6.98%). Nasal colonization prevalence with hospital-acquired [HA] MRSA was seen in 16 individuals (13.8%, 95% confidence interval [CI] =7.5%–20.06%), whereas, HA-MRSA was additionally isolated from the cell phone surface in 3 participants (2.6%, 95% CI =1.7–4.54). Antibiotic sensitivity was 100% to linezolid and rifampicin in the CA-MRSA isolates. Antibiotic resistance to vancomycin and clindamycin varied between 9–11 % in the CA-MRSA isolates. Mean MIC for vancomycin amongst CA- and HA-MRSA were 6.3 and 9.3 μg/ml, whereas for teicoplanin they were 13 and 14 μg/ml respectively by the E-test. There was no statistically significant correlation between CA-MRSA nasal carriage and the risk factors (P>0.05, Chi-square test). Conclusions The prevalence of CA-MRSA in the healthy community hospital visitors was 18 % (95% CI, 12.5% to 23.5%) as compared to 13.8% HA-MRSA in the hospital health-care staff. Despite a significant prevalence of CA-MRSA, these strains were mostly sensitive

  19. Antibacterial activity of Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus casei against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Karska-Wysocki, Barbara; Bazo, Mari; Smoragiewicz, Wanda

    2010-10-20

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a multidrug-resistant microorganism and the principal nosocomial pathogen worldwide. The antibacterial activity of lactic acid bacteria against MRSA from ten human clinical isolates as well as MRSA standard strain ATCC 43300 was tested in vitro. The Lactobacillus (Lb.) strains (Lb. acidophilus CL1285(®) and Lb. casei LBC80R) as pure cultures, which came from commercial food products were employed. The growth inhibitory effect produced by the antimicrobial activity of the lactic acid bacteria on the MRSA strains was tested on solid medium using agar diffusion methods as well as a using a liquid medium procedure that contained a mixture of MRSA and lactic acid bacteria cultures. In the latter instance, we were able to demonstrate that the direct interaction of lactic acid bacteria and MRSA in such a mixture led to the elimination of 99% of the MRSA cells after 24 h of their incubation at 37°C. PMID:20116228

  20. Isolation of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from swine in Japan.

    PubMed

    Baba, Kotaro; Ishihara, Kanako; Ozawa, Manao; Tamura, Yutaka; Asai, Tetsuo

    2010-10-01

    Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) sequence type (ST) 398 is widely prevalent in swine in Europe and North America. To determine the prevalence of MRSA, and specifically ST398, in Japanese swine, a total of 115 nasal swabs and 115 faecal samples from swine reared at 23 farms located in eastern Japan were investigated. MRSA was isolated from a nasal sample (0.9%) but not from any faecal samples. The strain of MRSA was classified as ST221 by multilocus sequence typing and as t002 by spa typing. The MRSA isolate exhibited resistance to ampicillin, meticillin and dihydrostreptomycin. Interestingly, it remained susceptible to cefazolin, ceftiofur, imipenem, gentamicin, kanamycin, chloramphenicol, oxytetracycline, erythromycin, azithromycin, tylosin, vancomycin, enrofloxacin and trimethoprim. The prevalence of MRSA amongst swine was low and MRSA ST398 was not recovered in the present study. PMID:20692816

  1. Use of BBL CHROMagar MRSA Medium for Identification of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Directly from Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Pape, John; Wadlin, Jill; Nachamkin, Irving

    2006-01-01

    We evaluated the ability of BBL CHROMagar MRSA medium (Becton Dickinson, Sparks, MD) to identify methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) directly upon subculture from positive blood culture bottles. There were 124 MRSA isolates recovered from blood cultures in the study. BBL CHROMagar MRSA medium was highly sensitive (97.6% [121/124] at 18 to 24 h of incubation and 100% [124/124] at 48 h) and 99.9% specific for identifying MRSA from positive blood cultures. PMID:16825383

  2. MRSA

    MedlinePlus

    ... several common antibiotics. There are two types of infection. Hospital-associated MRSA happens to people in healthcare settings. ... such as athletes involved in football and wrestling. Infection control is key to stopping MRSA in hospitals. To prevent community-associated MRSA Practice good hygiene ...

  3. Chloride anion transporters inhibit growth of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in vitro.

    PubMed

    Share, Andrew I; Patel, Khushali; Nativi, Cristina; Cho, Eun J; Francesconi, Oscar; Busschaert, Nathalie; Gale, Philip A; Roelens, Stefano; Sessler, Jonathan L

    2016-06-18

    A series of aminopyrrolic receptors were tested as anion transporters using POPC liposome model membranes. Many were found to be effective Cl(-) transporters and to inhibit clinical strains of Staphylococcus aureus growth in vitro. The best transporters proved effective against the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains, Mu50 and HP1173. Tris-thiourea tren-based chloride transporters were also shown to inhibit the growth of S. aureus in vitro. PMID:27223254

  4. Detection of mecA- and mecC-Positive Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Isolates by the New Xpert MRSA Gen 3 PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Denis, Olivier; Roisin, Sandrine; Idelevich, Evgeny A.; Knaack, Dennis; van Alen, Sarah; Kriegeskorte, André; Köck, Robin; Schaumburg, Frieder; Peters, Georg; Ballhausen, Britta

    2015-01-01

    An advanced methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) detection PCR approach targeting SCCmec-orfX along with mecA and mecC was evaluated for S. aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci. The possession of mecA and/or mecC was correctly confirmed in all cases. All methicillin-susceptible S. aureus strains (n = 98; including staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec element [SCCmec] remnants) and 98.1% of the MRSA strains (n = 160, including 10 mecC-positive MRSA) were accurately categorized. PMID:26491186

  5. Comparison of Two Commercial PCR Methods for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Screening in a Tertiary Care Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Schildgen, Verena; Winterfeld, Ingo; Knüver, Oliver; Schwarz, Katja; Messler, Sabine; Schildgen, Oliver; Mattner, Frauke

    2012-01-01

    Nose/throat-swabs from 1049 patients were screened for MRSA using CHROMagar MRSA, LightCycler Advanced MRSA, and Detect-Ready MRSA. Results were compared to the CHROMagar MRSA results, which was set as reference system. MRSA was detected in 3.05% of the patients with CHROMagar MRSA. LightCycler MRSA Advanced showed a higher clinical sensitivity (84.38%) than Detect-Ready MRSA (57.69%).The negative predictive values were high for both tests (>98%). The specificity and the positive predictive value were higher for the Detect-Ready MRSA test than for the LightCycler MRSA test (99.59% and 78.95% versus 98.52% and 64.29%). For routine screening LightCycler MRSA Advanced proved to be more efficient in our clinical setting as the clinical sensitivity was much higher than the sensitivity of Detect-Ready MRSA. CHROMagar MRSA detected more MRSA positive samples than both PCR methods, leading to the conclusion that the combination of PCR with cultural screening is still the most reliable way for the detection of MRSA. LightCycler MRSA Advanced was faster and needed less hands-on time. The advantage of Detect-Ready MRSA was the additional identification of methicillin-sensitive S.aureus (here in 34.63% of the samples), an information which can be possibly used for reducing the risk of postoperative infections in surgical patients in future. PMID:23028480

  6. Comparison of two commercial PCR methods for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) screening in a tertiary care hospital.

    PubMed

    Aydiner, Aylin; Lüsebrink, Jessica; Schildgen, Verena; Winterfeld, Ingo; Knüver, Oliver; Schwarz, Katja; Messler, Sabine; Schildgen, Oliver; Mattner, Frauke

    2012-01-01

    Nose/throat-swabs from 1049 patients were screened for MRSA using CHROMagar MRSA, LightCycler Advanced MRSA, and Detect-Ready MRSA. Results were compared to the CHROMagar MRSA results, which was set as reference system. MRSA was detected in 3.05% of the patients with CHROMagar MRSA. LightCycler MRSA Advanced showed a higher clinical sensitivity (84.38%) than Detect-Ready MRSA (57.69%).The negative predictive values were high for both tests (>98%). The specificity and the positive predictive value were higher for the Detect-Ready MRSA test than for the LightCycler MRSA test (99.59% and 78.95% versus 98.52% and 64.29%). For routine screening LightCycler MRSA Advanced proved to be more efficient in our clinical setting as the clinical sensitivity was much higher than the sensitivity of Detect-Ready MRSA. CHROMagar MRSA detected more MRSA positive samples than both PCR methods, leading to the conclusion that the combination of PCR with cultural screening is still the most reliable way for the detection of MRSA. LightCycler MRSA Advanced was faster and needed less hands-on time. The advantage of Detect-Ready MRSA was the additional identification of methicillin-sensitive S.aureus (here in 34.63% of the samples), an information which can be possibly used for reducing the risk of postoperative infections in surgical patients in future. PMID:23028480

  7. Structural Insights into the Anti-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Activity of Ceftobiprole*

    PubMed Central

    Lovering, Andrew L.; Gretes, Michael C.; Safadi, Susan S.; Danel, Franck; de Castro, Liza; Page, Malcolm G. P.; Strynadka, Natalie C. J.

    2012-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an antibiotic-resistant strain of S. aureus afflicting hospitals and communities worldwide. Of greatest concern is its development of resistance to current last-line-of-defense antibiotics; new therapeutics are urgently needed to combat this pathogen. Ceftobiprole is a recently developed, latest generation cephalosporin and has been the first to show activity against MRSA by inhibiting essential peptidoglycan transpeptidases, including the β-lactam resistance determinant PBP2a, from MRSA. Here we present the structure of the complex of ceftobiprole bound to PBP2a. This structure provides the first look at the molecular details of an effective β-lactam-resistant PBP interaction, leading to new insights into the mechanism of ceftobiprole efficacy against MRSA. PMID:22815485

  8. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Detected at Four U.S. Wastewater Treatment Plants

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, Rachel E. Rosenberg; Micallef, Shirley A.; Gibbs, Shawn G.; Davis, Johnnie A.; He, Xin; George, Ashish; Kleinfelter, Lara M.; Schreiber, Nicole A.; Mukherjee, Sampa; Joseph, Sam W.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The incidence of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) infections is increasing in the United States, and it is possible that municipal wastewater could be a reservoir of this microorganism. To date, no U.S. studies have evaluated the occurrence of MRSA in wastewater. Objective: We examined the occurrence of MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) at U.S. wastewater treatment plants. Methods: We collected wastewater samples from two Mid-Atlantic and two Midwest wastewater treatment plants between October 2009 and October 2010. Samples were analyzed for MRSA and MSSA using membrane filtration. Isolates were confirmed using biochemical tests and PCR (polymerase chain reaction). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by Sensititre® microbroth dilution. Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing, Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL) screening, and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) were performed to further characterize the strains. Data were analyzed by two-sample proportion tests and analysis of variance. Results: We detected MRSA (n = 240) and MSSA (n = 119) in 22 of 44 (50%) and 24 of 44 (55%) wastewater samples, respectively. The odds of samples being MRSA-positive decreased as treatment progressed: 10 of 12 (83%) influent samples were MRSA-positive, while only one of 12 (8%) effluent samples was MRSA-positive. Ninety-three percent and 29% of unique MRSA and MSSA isolates, respectively, were multidrug resistant. SCCmec types II and IV, the pvl gene, and USA types 100, 300, and 700 (PFGE strain types commonly found in the United States) were identified among the MRSA isolates. Conclusions: Our findings raise potential public health concerns for wastewater treatment plant workers and individuals exposed to reclaimed wastewater. Because of increasing use of reclaimed wastewater, further study is needed to evaluate the risk of exposure to antibiotic-resistant bacteria in treated

  9. Molecular detection and characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates from dogs in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Coelho, Céline; Torres, Carmen; Radhouani, Hajer; Pinto, Luís; Lozano, Carmen; Gómez-Sanz, Elena; Zaragaza, Myriam; Igrejas, Gilberto; Poeta, Patrícia

    2011-06-01

    Fifty-four healthy dogs were screened in Portugal for the presence of nasal methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage. Sixteen MRSA isolates (one/sample) were recovered from nasal samples of dogs, and they were typed by molecular methods (S. aureus protein A [spa]-, multilocus sequence typing-, staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec-typing). MRSA isolates were investigated for their susceptibility to antimicrobial agents by disk-diffusion test. The presence of resistance genes and of the Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene (lukF-lukS) was analyzed by PCR. Four different spa-types were identified among our MRSA isolates (t032, t432, t747, and t4726), with t032 as the most frequently detected. The sequence-type ST22 was identified in four tested MRSA isolates with different spa-types. All 16 isolates presented the staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type IV. Most of MRSA isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin, erythromycin, and clindamycin (94%-100%), and no resistance was identified to chloramphenicol, mupirocin, and trimethoprim-sulfametoxazole. The ermC and tetM resistance genes were detected in all MRSA isolates. The amino acid changes Ser84Leu in GyrA protein and Ser80Phe in GrlA protein were the most prevalent ones in our MRSA isolates. None of the MRSA strains carried the lukF-lukS genes. The results presented in this study indicate that healthy dogs may be a reservoir of MRSA that could be transmitted to humans by direct contact. PMID:21254810

  10. Antimicrobial treatment of nosocomial meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) pneumonia: current and future options.

    PubMed

    Welte, Tobias; Pletz, Mathias W

    2010-11-01

    Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a frequent cause of nosocomial pneumonia. Inadequate or inappropriate antimicrobial therapy, often caused by antimicrobial resistance, is associated with increased mortality for these infections. Agents currently recommended for the treatment of MRSA pneumonia include vancomycin and linezolid in the USA, and vancomycin, linezolid, teicoplanin and quinupristin/dalfopristin in Europe. Antimicrobials such as tigecycline and daptomycin, although approved for the treatment of some MRSA infections, have not demonstrated efficacy equivalent to the approved agents for MRSA pneumonia. Further agents lack data from randomised controlled trials (e.g. fosfomycin, fusidic acid or rifampicin in combination with vancomycin). Antimicrobial agents that have recently been approved or are being investigated as treatments for MRSA infections include the lipoglycopeptides telavancin (approved for the treatment of complicated skin and skin-structure infections in the USA and Canada), dalbavancin and oritavancin, the cephalosporins ceftobiprole and ceftaroline, and the dihydrofolate reductase inhibitor iclaprim. To be an effective treatment for MRSA pneumonia, antimicrobial agents must have activity against antimicrobial-resistant S. aureus, penetrate well into the lung, have a low potential for resistance development and have a good safety profile. Here, the available data for current and potential future MRSA pneumonia antimicrobials are reviewed and discussed. PMID:20724119

  11. Is methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) contamination of ward-based computer terminals a surrogate marker for nosocomial MRSA transmission and handwashing compliance?

    PubMed

    Devine, J; Cooke, R P; Wright, E P

    2001-05-01

    A survey of two acute district general hospitals (A and B) was undertaken to investigate the extent of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) contamination of ward-based computer terminals. Of 25 terminals examined, MRSA was identified in six (24%). Environmental contamination was of a low level. Five of the MRSA positive terminals were from hospital A which had a significantly higher rate of MRSA transmission compared to hospital B (1.02 vs. 0.49 new inpatient MRSA cases per 100 hospital admissions for 1999). MRSA containment and handwashing policies were similar at both hospitals, though only hospital B actively audited handwashing compliance and had a 44% higher rate of paper towel usage per hospital bed. Ward-based computer terminals pose a low risk of MRSA cross-infection. This risk can be further reduced if all staff wash their hands before and after patient contact. PMID:11358473

  12. Superior in vitro activity of carbapenems over anti-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and some related antimicrobial agents for community-acquired MRSA but not for hospital-acquired MRSA.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tomomi; Higuchi, Wataru; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2009-02-01

    Eighty-eight strains of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL)-positive and -negative community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) and 152 strains of hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA) were examined for susceptibility to carbapenems, oxacillin, and other antimicrobial agents. CA-MRSA strains were more susceptible to carbapenems (MIC(90), 1-4 microg/ml) than HA-MRSA strains (MIC(90), 32-64 microg/ml). Among the carbapenems examined, CA-MRSA strains were most susceptible to imipenem (MIC(50), 0.12 microg/ml; MIC(90), 1 microg/ml). A similar tendency was observed with oxacillin, but less markedly (MIC(90): 32 microg/ml for CA-MRSA and > or =256 microg/ml for HA-MRSA). This difference was also observed between CA-MRSA and HA-MRSA in susceptibility levels to cephems, erythromycin, clindamycin, and levofloxacin, but not to ampicillin, vancomycin, teicoplanin, linezolid, and arbekacin. The data indicate that, in terms of MIC(50) or MIC(90) values, CA-MRSA is 64-256 times more susceptible to imipenem than HA-MRSA, and for CA-MRSA, some carbapenems, e.g., imipenem, show better in vitro activity than anti-MRSA or some related agents. PMID:19280303

  13. [Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in veterinary medicine: a "new emerging pathogen"?].

    PubMed

    Walther, Birgit; Friedrich, Alexander W; Brunnberg, Leo; Wieler, Lothar H; Lübke-Becker, Antina

    2006-01-01

    The problem of nosocomial infections is of increasing importance in veterinary medicine. As an example, this review summarizes current knowledge regarding methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) as a typical example, as these pathogens are the most important agents of nosocomial infections in human medicine worldwide and are being increasingly reported in veterinary medicine. MRSA are classified by their ability to be resistant against oxacillin/methicillin, this feature being confered by mecA, a gene which was acquired by horizontal gene transfer of the staphylococcal gene cassette (SCCmec). It is this genetic information that enables MRSA to be resistant against all penicillins, cehalosporins and carbapenems. In addition, MRSA are often resistant against a variety of other antiinfectives, i.e. aminoglycosides, macrolides, lincosamide, streptomycins, tetracyclin, chloramphenicol, but also against fluorquinolones and rifampicin. Presumably, these highly adapted strains are particularly able to acquire resistance genes located on plasmids or transposons. They are also able to develop point mutations, further leading to resistant phenotypes. If these pathogens are leading to infectious diseases, veterinarians may be confronted with a worst-case scenario, being left without any antiinfective therapeutic. As Staphylococcus aureus is highly tenacid, professional hygiene management is of utmost importance. The increasing number of published sporadic MRSA infections, MRSA-infectious diseases as well as MRSA outbreaks in veterinary medicine justifies their recognition as a "New Emerging Pathogen". So far, horses and dogs are mostly affected by MRSA. Although transmission between humans and animals has been reported occasionally, the sources, routes of transmission or the epidemiological relevance of MRSA infections in animals are far from being understood. Therefore, epidemiological investigations utilizing molecular typing tools are mandatory. Typing tools like

  14. Epidemiology of emerging methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Denmark: a nationwide study in a country with low prevalence of MRSA infection.

    PubMed

    Faria, Nuno A; Oliveira, Duarte C; Westh, Henrik; Monnet, Dominique L; Larsen, Anders R; Skov, Robert; de Lencastre, Hermínia

    2005-04-01

    Strict infection control measures introduced during the 1970s have kept the incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections extremely low in Denmark. Nevertheless, similarly to other countries, MRSA infections began to appear in the community in the late 1990s. A nationwide surveillance program has collected and stored all MRSA isolates since 1988 and, since 1999, clinical information has been also recorded. We used this information and isolates in a detailed epidemiological and molecular analysis of the 81 MRSA infections identified in Denmark in 2001. MRSA isolates were characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), spa typing, multilocus sequence typing, and SCCmec typing. Comparison of the 45 community-onset MRSA (CO-MRSA) infections with the 36 hospital-acquired MRSA (HA-MRSA) infections showed several striking contrasts. Most CO-MRSA were recovered from skin and soft tissue infections caused by isolates carrying the Panton-Valentine leucocidin toxin genes, and the majority (84%) of isolates belonged to a single clonal type, ST80-IV, which has been found in the community in other European countries. Clone ST80-IV could be traced in Denmark back to 1993. ST80-IV was rarely found in HA-MRSA infections, which belonged to a large number of clonal types, including some pandemic MRSA clones. The low number of HA-MRSA infections and the diversity of MRSA clones in Danish hospitals may be the result of successful infection control measures that prevent spread of clones in hospitals. The mechanism of spread of the ST80-IV clone in the Danish community is not known, and new control measures are needed to control further spread of this and other CA-MRSA clones. PMID:15815005

  15. Comparison of the BD GeneOhm Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) PCR Assay to Culture by Use of BBL CHROMagar MRSA for Detection of MRSA in Nasal Surveillance Cultures from Intensive Care Unit Patients▿

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, James W.; Munier, Gina K.; Johnson, Charles L.

    2010-01-01

    This study compared the BD GeneOhm methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) real-time PCR assay to culture by the use of BBL CHROMagar MRSA for the detection of MRSA in 627 nasal surveillance specimens collected from intensive care unit (ICU) patients. The PCR assay had a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 100%, 96.7%, 70.3%, and 100%, respectively. Nine of 19 false-positive PCR specimens grew methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) from broth enrichment culture, of which two demonstrated evidence of mecA gene dropout. Compared to culture by the use of BBL CHROMagar MRSA, the BD GeneOhm MRSA PCR assay demonstrated sensitivity and specificity above 95% for the detection of MRSA nasal colonization and provided shorter turnaround time in generating positive and negative final results. PMID:20181916

  16. Detection of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from recreational beach using the mecA gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkifli, Aisya; Ahmad, Asmat

    2015-09-01

    Water samples were collected in triplicates from three different locations choosen from the recreational beach of Teluk Kemang, Port Dickson as sampling station including main area of recreation activity for the public. Bacteria were isolated from the water and cultured. Out of 286 presumptive Staphylococcus aureus enumerated by using culture method, only 4 (1.4 %) confirmed as Meticillin Resistant S. aureus (MRSA) based on PCR detection of mecA gene. Interestingly, all of MRSA detections were found at the main area of recreational activity. Our results suggested that public beaches may be reservoir for transmission of MRSA to beach visitors and PCR using the mecA gene is the fastest way to detect this pathogenic bacteria.

  17. Staphylococcus aureus and MRSA Growth and Biofilm Formation after Treatment with Antibiotics and SeNPs

    PubMed Central

    Cihalova, Kristyna; Chudobova, Dagmar; Michalek, Petr; Moulick, Amitava; Guran, Roman; Kopel, Pavel; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a dangerous pathogen resistant to β-lactam antibiotics. Due to its resistance, it is difficult to manage the infections caused by this strain. We examined this issue in terms of observation of the growth properties and ability to form biofilms in sensitive S. aureus and MRSA after the application of antibiotics (ATBs)—ampicillin, oxacillin and penicillin—and complexes of selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) with these ATBs. The results suggest the strong inhibition effect of SeNPs in complexes with conventional ATBs. Using the impedance method, a higher disruption of biofilms was observed after the application of ATB complexes with SeNPs compared to the group exposed to ATBs without SeNPs. The biofilm formation was intensely inhibited (up to 99% ± 7% for S. aureus and up to 94% ± 4% for MRSA) after application of SeNPs in comparison with bacteria without antibacterial compounds whereas ATBs without SeNPs inhibited S. aureus up to 79% ± 5% and MRSA up to 16% ± 2% only. The obtained results provide a basis for the use of SeNPs as a tool for the treatment of bacterial infections, which can be complicated because of increasing resistance of bacteria to conventional ATB drugs. PMID:26501270

  18. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in three dairy herds in southwest Germany.

    PubMed

    Spohr, M; Rau, J; Friedrich, A; Klittich, G; Fetsch, A; Guerra, B; Hammerl, J A; Tenhagen, B-A

    2011-06-01

    The objective of this study was to analyse the occurrence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in three dairy herds in the southwest of Germany that had experienced individual cases of clinical and subclinical mastitis associated with MRSA. The herds were identified by the detection of MRSA during routine resistance testing of mastitis pathogens. All quarters of all cows in the herds that were positive on California Mastitis Test were sampled for bacteriological analysis on two occasions. Bulk tank milk samples were also tested. Furthermore, nasal swabs were collected from people working on the farms and from cattle. Environmental samples were collected from associated pig holdings. Isolates were characterized using spa-typing and testing for antimicrobial resistance. Our results revealed a substantial spread of MRSA in the three dairy herds. In the first of the two investigations carried out on all cows in the three herds, milk samples of 5.1-16.7% of dairy cows were found positive for MRSA. The respective proportions in the second herd level investigation were 1.4-10.0%. Quarters harbouring MRSA had higher somatic cell counts than quarters that were negative on culture. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were also detected in nasal swabs of staff (7/9), cows (7/15) and calves (4/7), bulk tank milk samples (3/3) and environmental samples from pig premises (4/5) on the farm. Herds B and C had no contact to herd A. However, in all three herds MRSA of spa-type t011 were detected in milk samples. Results show that MRSA of spa-type t011 is a problem in dairy farms that needs urgent attention. PMID:20630047

  19. Comparison of the BD GeneOhm Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) PCR Assay to Culture by Use of BBL CHROMagar MRSA for Detection of MRSA in Nasal Surveillance Cultures from an At-Risk Community Population▿

    PubMed Central

    Farley, Jason E.; Stamper, Paul D.; Ross, Tracy; Cai, Mian; Speser, Sharon; Carroll, Karen C.

    2008-01-01

    We compared the BD GeneOhm methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) PCR assay to culture with BBL CHROMagar MRSA for nasal surveillance among 602 arrestees from the Baltimore City Jail. The sensitivity and specificity were 88.5% and 91.0%, respectively, and after secondary analysis using enrichment broth, they were 89.0% and 91.7%, respectively. Twenty-three of 42 false-positive PCR lysates contained methicillin-susceptible S. aureus. PMID:18057129

  20. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in slaughtered pigs and abattoir workers in Italy.

    PubMed

    Normanno, Giovanni; Dambrosio, Angela; Lorusso, Vanessa; Samoilis, Georgios; Di Taranto, Pietro; Parisi, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a pathogen present in the hospital environment (HA-MRSA), in the community (CA-MRSA) and in livestock, including pigs (LA-MRSA). MRSA may enter the human food chain during slaughtering and may infect humans coming into direct contact with pigs or pork products. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and characteristics of MRSA isolated from pigs and workers at industrial abattoirs in southern Italy. A total of 215 pig nasal swabs were screened for the presence of MRSA using PCR. An MRSA isolate was detected from each mecA/nuc PCR-positive sample and characterized by spa-typing, Multi-Locus Sequence Typing, SCC-mec and Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL), and also tested for the production of staphylococcal enterotoxins (SEs). Eighty-one MRSA isolates (37.6%) were obtained from the 215 pig nasal swabs; 37 of these isolates were further characterized, and showed 18 different spa-types and 8 different STs. The most frequently recovered STs were ST398 (CC398-t034, t011, t899, t1939 - 43.2%) followed by ST8 (CC8-t008, t064, t2953, t5270 - 24.3%) and ST1 (CC1-t127, t174, t2207 - 10.8%). Nine MRSA isolates were obtained from the 113 human swabs; the isolates showed 5 different spa-types and 5 different STs, including the novel ST2794 (t159). The most representative STs recovered were ST1 (CC1-t127) and ST398 (CC398-t034) (33.3%). None of the MRSA isolates showed the ability to produce SEs and PVL and all resulted resistant to two or more classes of antimicrobials. This study shows the great genetic diversity of MRSA strains in slaughtered pigs and in abattoir employees in Italy, and clearly demonstrates the need for improved hygiene standards to reduce the risk of occupational and food-borne infection linked to the handling/consumption of raw pork containing MRSA. PMID:26187827

  1. Quorum quenching and antimicrobial activity of goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis) against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Cech, Nadja B; Junio, Hiyas A; Ackermann, Laynez W; Kavanaugh, Jeffrey S; Horswill, Alexander R

    2012-09-01

    The popular herbal remedy goldenseal (Hydrastis canadensis L.) is traditionally used to treat skin infections. With this study, we show activity of H. canadensis extracts in vitro against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). An extract from H. canadensis leaves demonstrated more potent antimicrobial activity than the alkaloid berberine alone (MICs of 75 µg/mL and 150 µg/mL, respectively). LC-MS detected alkaloids and efflux-pump inhibitory flavonoids in the extract, and the latter may explain the enhanced efficacy of the extract compared to berberine alone. We also show evidence of anti-virulence activity as a second mechanism by which H. canadensis acts against S. aureus. The H. canadensis leaf extract (but not the isolated alkaloids berberine, hydrastine, and canadine) demonstrated quorum quenching activity against several clinically relevant MRSA isolates (USA300 strains). Our data suggest that this occurs by attenuation of signal transduction through the AgrCA two-component system. Consistent with this observation, the extract inhibited toxin production by MRSA and prevented damage by MRSA to keratinocyte cells in vitro. Collectively, our results show that H. canadensis leaf extracts possess a mixture of constituents that act against MRSA via several different mechanisms. These findings lend support for the traditional application of crude H. canadensis extracts in the prevention of infection. PMID:22814821

  2. Antibiofilm Effect of Octenidine Hydrochloride on Staphylococcus aureus, MRSA and VRSA

    PubMed Central

    Amalaradjou, Mary Anne Roshni; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Millions of indwelling devices are implanted in patients every year, and staphylococci (S. aureus, MRSA and vancomycin-resistant S. aureus (VRSA)) are responsible for a majority of infections associated with these devices, thereby leading to treatment failures. Once established, staphylococcal biofilms become resistant to antimicrobial treatment and host response, thereby serving as the etiological agent for recurrent infections. This study investigated the efficacy of octenidine hydrochloride (OH) for inhibiting biofilm synthesis and inactivating fully-formed staphylococcal biofilm on different matrices in the presence and absence of serum protein. Polystyrene plates and stainless steel coupons inoculated with S. aureus, MRSA or VRSA were treated with OH (zero, 0.5, one, 2 mM) at 37 °C for the prevention of biofilm formation. Additionally, the antibiofilm effect of OH (zero, 2.5, five, 10 mM) on fully-formed staphylococcal biofilms on polystyrene plates, stainless steel coupons and urinary catheters was investigated. OH was effective in rapidly inactivating planktonic and biofilm cells of S. aureus, MRSA and VRSA on polystyrene plates, stainless steel coupons and urinary catheters in the presence and absence of serum proteins. The use of two and 10 mM OH completely inactivated S. aureus planktonic cells and biofilm (>6.0 log reduction) on all matrices tested immediately upon exposure. Further, confocal imaging revealed the presence of dead cells and loss in biofilm architecture in the OH-treated samples when compared to intact live biofilm in the control. Results suggest that OH could be applied as an effective antimicrobial to control biofilms of S. aureus, MRSA and VRSA on appropriate hospital surfaces and indwelling devices. PMID:25437807

  3. Unexpected sequence types in livestock associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA): MRSA ST9 and a single locus variant of ST9 in pig farming in China.

    PubMed

    Wagenaar, Jaap A; Yue, Hua; Pritchard, Jane; Broekhuizen-Stins, Marian; Huijsdens, Xander; Mevius, Dik J; Bosch, Thijs; Van Duijkeren, Engeline

    2009-11-18

    In October 2008 nine farrow-to-finish pig farms were visited in Shuangliu County in Sichuan Province, China. One farm was empty for one month but not cleaned after depopulation. Dust samples were collected at each farm and analysed for the presence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Dust samples from four farms were also analysed for the presence of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA). On 5/9 farms MRSA was isolated and on 2/4 farms MSSA was isolated. On two farms, including the empty farm, no MRSA or MSSA could be detected. All MRSA isolates (n=43) belonged to spa type t899. MSSA isolates belonged to spa type t899 (n=12) and spa type t034 (n=2). From 4/9 farms the MRSA isolates of spa type t899 were assigned to multilocus sequence type (MLST) ST9 whereas on one farm the MRSA spa type t899 isolates belonged to a single locus variant of MLST ST9 (ST1376). MSSA isolates with spa type t899 belonged to MLST ST9 and the MSSA with spa type t034 belonged to MLST ST398. This is the first report on MRSA in pig farms in China and the first time that MRSA ST9 and a single locus variant of ST9 are detected in pig farms. This study shows that livestock associated MRSA is not restricted to clonal lineage ST398 as found in Europe and Northern America in commercial pigs but that other MRSA lineages are able to spread in livestock as well. The study confirms that livestock may act as a reservoir for MRSA. PMID:19608357

  4. Effects of Subinhibitory Concentrations of Ceftaroline on Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Biofilms.

    PubMed

    Lázaro-Díez, María; Remuzgo-Martínez, Sara; Rodríguez-Mirones, Cristina; Acosta, Felix; Icardo, Jose M; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Ramos-Vivas, José

    2016-01-01

    Ceftaroline (CPT) is a novel cephalosporin with in vitro activity against Staphylococcus aureus. Ceftaroline exhibits a level of binding affinity for PBPs in S. aureus including PBP2a of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The aims of this study were to investigate the morphological, physiological and molecular responses of MRSA clinical strains and MRSA biofilms to sub-MICs (1/4 and 1/16 MIC) of ceftaroline by using transmission, scanning and confocal microscopy. We have also used quantitative Real-Time PCR to study the effect of sub-MICs of ceftaroline on the expression of the staphylococcal icaA, agrA, sarA and sasF genes in MRSA biofilms. In one set of experiments, ceftaroline was able to inhibit biofilm formation in all strains tested at MIC, however, a strain dependent behavior in presence of sub-MICs of ceftaroline was shown. In a second set of experiments, destruction of preformed biofilms by addition of ceftaroline was evaluated. Ceftaroline was able to inhibit biofilm formation at MIC in all strains tested but not at the sub-MICs. Destruction of preformed biofilms was strain dependent because the biofilm formed by a matrix-producing strain was resistant to a challenge with ceftaroline at MIC, whereas in other strains the biofilm was sensitive. At sub-MICs, the impact of ceftaroline on expression of virulence genes was strain-dependent at 1/4 MIC and no correlation between ceftaroline-enhanced biofilm formation and gene regulation was established at 1/16 MIC. Our findings suggest that sub-MICs of ceftaroline enhance bacterial attachment and biofilm formation by some, but not all, MRSA strains and, therefore, stress the importance of maintaining effective bactericidal concentrations of ceftaroline to fight biofilm-MRSA related infections. PMID:26800524

  5. Effects of Subinhibitory Concentrations of Ceftaroline on Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Mirones, Cristina; Acosta, Felix; Icardo, Jose M.; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Ramos-Vivas, José

    2016-01-01

    Ceftaroline (CPT) is a novel cephalosporin with in vitro activity against Staphylococcus aureus. Ceftaroline exhibits a level of binding affinity for PBPs in S. aureus including PBP2a of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). The aims of this study were to investigate the morphological, physiological and molecular responses of MRSA clinical strains and MRSA biofilms to sub-MICs (1/4 and 1/16 MIC) of ceftaroline by using transmission, scanning and confocal microscopy. We have also used quantitative Real-Time PCR to study the effect of sub-MICs of ceftaroline on the expression of the staphylococcal icaA, agrA, sarA and sasF genes in MRSA biofilms. In one set of experiments, ceftaroline was able to inhibit biofilm formation in all strains tested at MIC, however, a strain dependent behavior in presence of sub-MICs of ceftaroline was shown. In a second set of experiments, destruction of preformed biofilms by addition of ceftaroline was evaluated. Ceftaroline was able to inhibit biofilm formation at MIC in all strains tested but not at the sub-MICs. Destruction of preformed biofilms was strain dependent because the biofilm formed by a matrix-producing strain was resistant to a challenge with ceftaroline at MIC, whereas in other strains the biofilm was sensitive. At sub-MICs, the impact of ceftaroline on expression of virulence genes was strain-dependent at 1/4 MIC and no correlation between ceftaroline-enhanced biofilm formation and gene regulation was established at 1/16 MIC. Our findings suggest that sub-MICs of ceftaroline enhance bacterial attachment and biofilm formation by some, but not all, MRSA strains and, therefore, stress the importance of maintaining effective bactericidal concentrations of ceftaroline to fight biofilm-MRSA related infections. PMID:26800524

  6. Prevalence of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus [MRSA] colonization or carriage among health-care workers.

    PubMed

    Pathare, Nirmal A; Asogan, Harshini; Tejani, Sara; Al Mahruqi, Gaitha; Al Fakhri, Salma; Zafarulla, Roshna; Pathare, Anil V

    2016-01-01

    In Oman, the prevalence of health care associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus [HA-MRSA] is unknown. Therefore, to estimate the prevalence of HA-MRSA, we collected nasal swabs and swabs from cell phones on sterile polyester swabs and immediately inoculated on the mannitol salt agar containing oxacillin from medical students and hospital health care providers. Antibiotic susceptibility testing of the isolates was then performed using the Kirby Bauer's disc diffusion method. Additionally, a brief survey questionnaire was used to acquire demographic data. Amongst the 311 participants enrolled, nasal colonization with HA-MRSA was found in 47 individuals (15.1%, 95% confidence interval [CI]=11.1%, 19.1%). HA-MRSA was also isolated from the cell phone surfaces in 28 participants (9.0%, 95% CI=8.6%, 9.3%). 5 participants (1.6%) showed positive results both from their nasal swabs and from their cell phones. Antibiotic resistance to erythromycin [48%] and clindamycin [29%] was relatively high. 9.3% HA-MRSA isolates were vancomycin resistant [6.6% nasal carriage]. There was no statistically significant correlation between HA-MRSA isolates and the demographic characteristics or the risk factors namely gender, underlying co-morbidities like diabetes, hypertension, skin/soft tissue infections, skin ulcers/wounds, recent exposure to antibiotics, or hospital visits (p>0.05, Chi-square test). PMID:26768668

  7. Contamination of environmental surfaces by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in rooms of inpatients with MRSA-positive body sites.

    PubMed

    Kurashige, E Jessica Ohashi; Oie, Shigeharu; Furukawa, H

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can contaminate environmental surfaces that are frequently touched by the hands of patients with MRSA colonization/infection. There have been many studies in which the presence or absence of MRSA contamination was determined but no studies in which MRSA contamination levels were also evaluated in detail. We evaluated MRSA contamination of environmental surfaces (overbed tables, bed side rails, and curtains) in the rooms of inpatients from whom MRSA was isolated via clinical specimens. We examined the curtains within 7-14 days after they had been newly hung. The environmental surfaces were wiped using gauze (molded gauze for wiping of surface bacteria; 100% cotton, 4cm×8cm) moistened with sterile physiological saline. The MRSA contamination rate and mean counts (range) were 25.0% (6/24 samples) and 30.6 (0-255)colony-forming units (cfu)/100cm(2), respectively, for the overbed tables and 31.6% (6/19 samples) and 159.5 (0-1620)cfu/100cm(2), respectively, for the bed side rails. No MRSA was detected in 24 curtain samples. The rate of MRSA contamination of environmental surfaces was high for the overbed tables and bed side rails but low for the curtains. Therefore, at least until the 14th day of use, frequent disinfection of curtains may be not necessary. PMID:27289247

  8. Synergism between Medihoney and rifampicin against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Müller, Patrick; Alber, Dagmar G; Turnbull, Lynne; Schlothauer, Ralf C; Carter, Dee A; Whitchurch, Cynthia B; Harry, Elizabeth J

    2013-01-01

    Skin and chronic wound infections caused by highly antibiotic resistant bacteria such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are an increasing and urgent health problem worldwide, particularly with sharp increases in obesity and diabetes. New Zealand manuka honey has potent broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity, has been shown to inhibit the growth of MRSA strains, and bacteria resistant to this honey have not been obtainable in the laboratory. Combinational treatment of chronic wounds with manuka honey and common antibiotics may offer a wide range of advantages including synergistic enhancement of the antibacterial activity, reduction of the effective dose of the antibiotic, and reduction of the risk of antibiotic resistance. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Medihoney in combination with the widely used antibiotic rifampicin on S. aureus. Using checkerboard microdilution assays, time-kill curve experiments and agar diffusion assays, we show a synergism between Medihoney and rifampicin against MRSA and clinical isolates of S. aureus. Furthermore, the Medihoney/rifampicin combination stopped the appearance of rifampicin-resistant S. aureus in vitro. Methylglyoxal (MGO), believed to be the major antibacterial compound in manuka honey, did not act synergistically with rifampicin and is therefore not the sole factor responsible for the synergistic effect of manuka honey with rifampicin. Our findings support the idea that a combination of honey and antibiotics may be an effective new antimicrobial therapy for chronic wound infections. PMID:23469049

  9. MRSA (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Story" 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy MRSA KidsHealth > For Parents > MRSA Print A A A ... and most infections can be treated easily. About MRSA MRSA stands for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, a ...

  10. Three-Way Comparison of BBL CHROMagar MRSA II, MRSASelect, and Spectra MRSA for Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Isolates in Nasal Surveillance Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Renzi, Pamela B.; Koch, Kim M.; Wissel, Carol M.

    2013-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major cause of hospital-acquired and life-threatening infections. Active surveillance programs for MRSA utilize either molecular or culture-based methods. A prospective study was performed to compare the performance of selective and differential chromogenic media, BBL CHROMagar MRSA II (CMRSA II; BD Diagnostics, Sparks, MD), MRSASelect (Bio-Rad Laboratories, Redmond, WA), and Spectra MRSA (Remel, Lenexa, KS), for the detection of MRSA in nasal swab specimens. A total of 515 compliant remnant nasal swab specimens were sequentially used to inoculate BBL Trypticase soy agar with 5% sheep blood (TSA II) and each chromogenic medium. After 24 h of incubation, colony color reactions and morphology on chromogenic media were compared to suspicious colonies on nonselective TSA II. MRSA on TSA II was confirmed by Gram staining, a coagulase test, and a cefoxitin disk test. The overall prevalence of MRSA and methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) on TSA II was 12.4% (64/515) and 9.7% (50/515), respectively. When each chromogenic medium was compared to the standard culture method, the sensitivity and specificity, respectively, were as follows: CMRSA II, 87.7% and 98.6%; MRSASelect, 89.0% and 93.4%; and Spectra MRSA, 83.6% and 92.1%. The positive predictive values were highest for CMRSA II (91.4%), followed by MRSASelect (69.1%) and Spectra MRSA (63.5%). False-positive results on chromogenic media were mainly due to color interpretation. The negative predictive values for all three media were greater than 97%. In conclusion, CMRSA II gave the best overall results for detecting MRSA from nasal specimens. PMID:23135930

  11. Evaluation of a New Selective Medium, BD BBL CHROMagar MRSA II, for Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Stool Specimens ▿

    PubMed Central

    Havill, Nancy L.; Boyce, John M.

    2010-01-01

    We compared the recovery of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) on a new selective chromogenic agar, BD BBL CHROMagar MRSA II (CMRSAII), to that on traditional culture media with 293 stool specimens. The recovery of MRSA was greater on the CMRSAII agar. Screening of stool samples can identify patients who were previously unknown carriers of MRSA. PMID:20392908

  12. Inactivating Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and other Pathogens by Bacteriocins OR-7 and E 50-52.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Worldwide, reports document the increasing frequency of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. Other human pathogens are recognized as unresponsive to antibiotics of last resort. These previously treatable infections now account for increased numbers of human disease and de...

  13. Inactivating Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Other Pathogens by Bacteriocins OR-7 and E 50-52.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Worldwide, reports document the increasing frequency of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. Other human pathogens are recognized as unresponsive to antibiotics of last resort. These previously treatable infections now account for increased numbers of human disease and de...

  14. Livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) isolates of swine origin form robust biofilms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization of livestock animals is common and prevalence rates for pigs have been reported to be as high as 49%. One hypothesis to explain the high prevalence of MRSA in swine herds is the ability of these organisms to exist as biofilms. To invest...

  15. Significant antibacterial activity and synergistic effects of camel lactoferrin with antibiotics against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Redwan, Elrashdy M; El-Baky, Nawal Abd; Al-Hejin, Ahmed M; Baeshen, Mohammed N; Almehdar, Hussein A; Elsaway, Abdulrahman; Gomaa, Abu-Bakr M; Al-Masaudi, Saad Berki; Al-Fassi, Fahad A; AbuZeid, Isam Eldin; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2016-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) causes major healthcare problems in many countries, as it is present as several hospital- and community-associated strains. Hospital-associated MRSA is one of the most prevalent nosocomial pathogens throughout the world and infections caused by community-acquired MRSA are rising. This emphasizes the need for new and efficient anti-MRSA agents. We evaluated the antibacterial effects of camel lactoferrin (cLf) and human lactoferrin (hLf) alone and in combination with several antibiotics against MRSA. Antimicrobials were tested against MRSA and an S. aureus control strain by the agar disc diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined for antimicrobials by the broth microdilution method. Synergy between cLf or hLf and antibiotics was examined by checkerboard and time-kill assays. The agar disc diffusion assay showed that MRSA growth was inhibited by cLf at 0.25-3 mg/ml and hLf at 1-3 mg/ml. cLf demonstrated 3 times higher inhibitory activity against MRSA than hLf in terms of MIC values (250 vs. 750 μg/ml, respectively). Biotinylated cLf was recognized by two membrane proteins of MRSA, 66-67 KDa. Combinations of cLf or hLf and oxacillin or vancomycin at sub-MIC levels enhanced in vitro antibacterial activity against MRSA compared with each agent alone. PMID:27130281

  16. Facet joint septic arthritis due to community acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) - A case report.

    PubMed

    Purushothaman, Rajesh; Inassi, Jojo; Marthya, Anwar

    2015-10-01

    Septic arthritis of facet joint (SAFJ) is extremely rare. Only about sixty cases have been reported so far. A single case of SAFJ in a series of 491 cases of spinal infections was first reported by David-Chaussé in 1981. A case report of SAFJ was published by Halpin in 1987. With the growing availability and use of MRI, more and more cases are being reported. The most common organism that causes SAFJ is Staphylococcus aureus. We are reporting a case of SAFJ caused by community acquired, methicillin resistant S aureus (MRSA) successfully treated by Linezolid. PMID:26719620

  17. Rapid detection of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus isolates by the MRSA-screen latex agglutination test.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, W B; van Pelt, C; Luijendijk, A; Verbrugh, H A; Goessens, W H

    1999-09-01

    The slide agglutination test MRSA-Screen (Denka Seiken Co., Niigata, Japan) was compared with the mecA PCR ("gold standard") for the detection of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. The MRSA-Screen test detected the penicillin-binding protein 2a (PBP2a) antigen in 87 of 90 genetically diverse methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) stock culture strains, leading to a sensitivity of 97%. The three discrepant MRSA strains displayed positive results only after induction of the mecA gene by exposure to methicillin. Both mecA PCR and MRSA-Screen displayed negative results among the methicillin-susceptible S. aureus strains (n = 106), as well as for Micrococcus spp. (n = 10), members of the family Enterobacteriaceae (n = 10), Streptococcus pneumoniae (n = 10), and Enterococcus spp. (n = 10) (specificity = 100%). Producing the same PBP2a antigen, all 10 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis strains score positived in both the latex test and the mecA PCR. Consequently, the MRSA-Screen test should be applied only after identification of the MRSA strain to the species level to rule out coagulase-negative staphylococci. In conclusion, due to excellent specificity and sensitivity the MRSA-Screen latex test has the potential to be successfully used for routine applications in the microbiology laboratory. PMID:10449498

  18. Genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains, isolated on three different geography locations

    PubMed Central

    Ostojić, Maja; Hukić, Mirsada

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of hospital-acquired infections worldwide. Increased frequency of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in hospitalized patients and possibility of vancomycin resistance requires rapid and reliable characterization of isolates and control of MRSA spread in hospitals. Typing of isolates helps to understand the route of a hospital pathogen spread. The aim of this study was to investigate and compare genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of MRSA samples on three different geography locations. In addition, our aim was to evaluate three different methods of MRSA typing: spa-typing, agr-typing and GenoType MRSA. We included 104 samples of MRSA, isolated in 3 different geographical locations in clinical hospitals in Zagreb, Mostar, and Heidelberg, during the period of six months. Genotyping and phenotyping were done by spa-typing, agr-typing and dipstick assay GenoType MRSA. We failed to type all our samples by spa-typing. The most common spa-type in clinical hospital Zagreb was t041, in Mostar t001, and in Heidelberg t003. We analyzed 102/104 of our samples by agr-typing method. We did not find any agr-type IV in our locations. We analyzed all our samples by the dipstick assay GenoType MRSA. All isolates in our study were MRSA strains. In Zagreb there were no positive strains to PVL gene. In Mostar we have found 5/25 positive strains to PVL gene, in Heidelberg there was 1/49. PVL positive isolates were associated with spa-type t008 and agr-type I, thus, genetically, they were community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA). Dipstick assay GenoType MRSA has demonstrated sufficient specificity, sensibility, simple performance and low cost, so we could introduce it to work in smaller laboratories. Using this method may expedite MRSA screening, thus preventing its spread in hospitals. PMID:26295294

  19. Antibacterial activity of extracellular compounds produced by a Pseudomonas strain against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The emergence of multidrug-resistant bacteria is a world health problem. Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) strains, is one of the most important human pathogens associated with hospital and community-acquired infections. The aim of this work was to evaluate the antibacterial activity of a Pseudomonas aeruginosa-derived compound against MRSA strains. Methods Thirty clinical MRSA strains were isolated, and three standard MRSA strains were evaluated. The extracellular compounds were purified by vacuum liquid chromatography. Evaluation of antibacterial activity was performed by agar diffusion technique, determination of the minimal inhibitory concentration, curve of growth and viability and scanning electron microscopy. Interaction of an extracellular compound with silver nanoparticle was studied to evaluate antibacterial effect. Results The F3 (ethyl acetate) and F3d (dichloromethane- ethyl acetate) fractions demonstrated antibacterial activity against the MRSA strains. Phenazine-1-carboxamide was identified and purified from the F3d fraction and demonstrated slight antibacterial activity against MRSA, and synergic effect when combined with silver nanoparticles produced by Fusarium oxysporum. Organohalogen compound was purified from this fraction showing high antibacterial effect. Using scanning electron microscopy, we show that the F3d fraction caused morphological changes to the cell wall of the MRSA strains. Conclusions These results suggest that P. aeruginosa-produced compounds such as phenazines have inhibitory effects against MRSA and may be a good alternative treatment to control infections caused by MRSA. PMID:23773484

  20. Evaluation of the BD GeneOhm Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Assay as a Method for Detection of MRSA Isolates, Using a Large Collection of European and North African Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Bes, Michele; Meugnier, Helene; Tigaud, Sylvestre; Etienne, Jérôme; Vandenesch, François; Laurent, Frédéric

    2014-01-01

    Using a large collection of European and North African methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates with a variety of genetic backgrounds and staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) types, we evaluated the reliability of the BD GeneOhm MRSA assay. Results revealed high performance of this test for detecting MRSA strains provided from Europe and North Africa (98.3%). PMID:25274997

  1. Staphylococcus aureus and Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) in and Around Therapeutic Whirlpools in College Athletic Training Rooms

    PubMed Central

    Kahanov, Leamor; Kim, Young Kyun; Eberman, Lindsey; Dannelly, Kathleen; Kaur, Haninder; Ramalinga, A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has become a leading cause of skin and soft tissue infection in the nonhospitalized community. Care of the athletes in athletic training rooms is specifically designed with equipment tailored to the health care needs of the athletes, yet recent studies indicate that CA-MRSA is still prevalent in athletic facilities and that cleaning methods may not be optimal. Objective: To investigate the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus and CA-MRSA in and around whirlpools in the athletic training room. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I university. Patients or Other Participants: Student-athletes (n = 109) consisting of 46 men (42%) and 63 women (58%) representing 6 sports. Main Outcome Measure(s): Presence of MRSA and Staphylococcus aureus in and around the whirlpool structures relative to sport and number of athletes using the whirlpools. Results: We identified Staphylococcus aureus in 22% (n = 52/240) of the samples and MRSA in 0.8% (n = 2/240). A statistically significant difference existed between the number of athletes using the whirlpool and the presence of Staphylococcus aureus in and around the whirlpools (F2,238 = 2.445, P = .007). However, Staphylococcus aureus was identified regardless of whether multiple athletes used a whirlpool or no athletes used a whirlpool. We did not identify a relationship between the number of athletes who used a whirlpool and Staphylococcus aureus or MRSA density (P = .134). Conclusions: Staphylococcus aureus and MRSA were identified in and around the whirlpools. Transmission of the bacteria can be reduced by following the cleaning and disinfecting protocols recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Athletic trainers should use disinfectants registered by the Environmental Protection Agency to sanitize all whirlpools between uses. PMID:25710853

  2. Alarming Proportions of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Wound Samples from Companion Animals, Germany 2010–2012

    PubMed Central

    Vincze, Szilvia; Stamm, Ivonne; Kopp, Peter A.; Hermes, Julia; Adlhoch, Cornelia; Semmler, Torsten; Wieler, Lothar H.; Lübke-Becker, Antina; Walther, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus (S.) aureus is an important cause of wound infections in companion animals, and infections with methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) are of particular concern due to limited treatment options and their zoonotic potential. However, comparable epidemiological data on MRSA infections in dogs, cats and horses is scarce, also limiting the knowledge about possible links to MRSA isolates from human populations. To gain more knowledge about the occurrence and genotypic variation of MRSA among wound swabs of companion animal origin in Germany we performed a survey (2010–2012) including 5,229 samples from 1,170 veterinary practices. S. aureus was identified in 201 (5.8%) canine, 140 (12.2%) feline and 138 (22.8%) equine swabs from a total of 3,479 canine, 1,146 feline and 604 equine wounds, respectively. High MRSA rates were identified with 62.7%, 46.4% and 41.3% in S. aureus of canine, feline and equine origin, respectively. Further genotyping including spa typing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) revealed a comparable distribution of spa types among canine and feline MRSA with CC22 (47.6%; 49.2%) and CC5 (30.2%; 29.2%) as predominant lineages followed by CC398 (13.5%; 7.7%) and CC8 (4.0%; 9.2%). In contrast, the majority of equine MRSA belonged to CC398 (87.7%). Our data highlight the importance of S. aureus and MRSA as a cause of wound infections, particularly in cats and horses in Germany. While “human-associated” MRSA lineages were most common in dogs and cats, a remarkable number of CC398-MRSA was detected in horses, indicating a replacement of CC8-MRSA as the predominant lineage within horses in Germany. These data enforce further longitudinal epidemiological approaches to examine the diversity and temporal relatedness of MRSA populations in humans and animals to assess probable sources of MRSA infections. This would enable a sound risk assessment and establishment of intervention strategies to limit the additional spread of MRSA. PMID

  3. Novel Quorum-Quenching Agents Promote Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Wound Healing and Sensitize MRSA to β-Lactam Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, David; Yu, Guanping; Hoch, Wyatt; Gabay, Dean; Long, Lisa; Ghannoum, Mahmoud; Nagy, Nancy; Harding, Clifford V.; Viswanathan, Rajesh

    2014-01-01

    The dwindling repertoire of antibiotics to treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) calls for novel treatment options. Quorum-quenching agents offer an alternative or an adjuvant to antibiotic therapy. Three biaryl hydroxyketone compounds discovered previously (F1, F12, and F19; G. Yu, D. Kuo, M. Shoham, and R. Viswanathan, ACS Comb Sci 16:85–91, 2014) were tested for efficacy in MRSA-infected animal models. Topical therapy of compounds F1 and F12 in a MRSA murine wound infection model promotes wound healing compared to the untreated control. Compounds F1, F12, and F19 afford significant survival benefits in a MRSA insect larva model. Combination therapy of these quorum-quenching agents with cephalothin or nafcillin, antibiotics to which MRSA is resistant in monotherapy, revealed additional survival benefits. The quorum-quenching agents sensitize MRSA to the antibiotic by a synergistic mode of action that also is observed in vitro. An adjuvant of 1 μg/ml F1, F12, or F19 reduces the MIC of nafcillin and cephalothin about 50-fold to values comparable to those for vancomycin, the antibiotic often prescribed for MRSA infections. These findings suggest that it is possible to resurrect obsolete antibiotic therapies in combination with these novel quorum-quenching agents. PMID:25534736

  4. Comparison of MRSASelect Agar, CHROMagar Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Medium, and Xpert MRSA PCR for Detection of MRSA in Nares: Diagnostic Accuracy for Surveillance Samples with Various Bacterial Densities ▿

    PubMed Central

    Wolk, D. M.; Marx, J. L.; Dominguez, L.; Driscoll, D.; Schifman, R. B.

    2009-01-01

    Rapid laboratory methods provide optimal support for active surveillance efforts to screen for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Most laboratories struggle to determine the optimal use of resources, considering options to balance cost, speed, and diagnostic accuracy. To assess the performance of common methods, the first comparison of MRSASelect agar (MS) and CHROMagar MRSA (CA), with and without broth enrichment followed by a 24-h subculture to MS, was performed. Results were compared to those of the Xpert MRSA assay. For direct culture methods, the agreement between MS and CA was 98.8%. At 18 h, direct MS identified 93% of all positive samples from direct culture and 84% of those identified by the Xpert MRSA. For Trypticase soy broth-enriched MS culture, incubated overnight and then subcultured for an additional 24 h, the agreement with Xpert MRSA was 96%. The agreement between direct MS and Xpert MRSA was 100% when semiquantitative culture revealed a bacterial density of 2+ or greater; however, discrepancies between culture and Xpert MRSA arose for MRSA bacterial densities of 1+ or less, indicating low density as a common cause of false-negative culture results. Since 1+ or less was established as the most common MRSA carrier state, broth enrichment or PCR may be critical for the identification of all MRSA carriers who may be reservoirs for transmission. In this active-surveillance convenience sample, the use of broth enrichment followed by subculture to MS offered a low-cost but sensitive method for MRSA screening, with performance similar to that of Xpert MRSA PCR. PMID:19828738

  5. Solid lipid nanoparticles of clotrimazole silver complex: An efficient nano antibacterial against Staphylococcus aureus and MRSA.

    PubMed

    Kalhapure, Rahul S; Sonawane, Sandeep J; Sikwal, Dhiraj R; Jadhav, Mahantesh; Rambharose, Sanjeev; Mocktar, Chunderika; Govender, Thirumala

    2015-12-01

    New and effective strategies to transform current antimicrobials are required to address the increasing issue of microbial resistance and declining introduction of new antibiotic drugs. In this context, metal complexes of known drugs and nano delivery systems for antibiotics are proving to be promising strategies. The aim of the study was therefore to synthesize a silver complex of clotrimazole and formulate it into a nano delivery system for enhanced and sustained antibacterial activity against susceptible and resistant Staphylococcus aureus. A silver complex of clotrimazole was synthesized, characterized and further encapsulated into solid lipid nanoparticles to evaluate its antibacterial activity against S. aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). An in vitro cytotoxicity study was performed on HepG2 cell lines to assess the overall biosafety of the synthesized clotrimazole silver complex to mammalian cells, and was found to be non-toxic to mammalian cells (cell viability >80%). The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of clotrimazole and clotrimazole-silver were 31.25 and 9.76 μg/mL against S. aureus, and 31.25 and 15.62 against MRSA, respectively. Clotrimazole SLNs exhibited MIC values of 104 and 208 μg/mL against both MSSA and MRSA at the end of 18 and 36 h, respectively, but thereafter completely lost its antibacterial activity. Clotrimazole-silver SLNs had an MIC value of 52 μg/mL up to 54 h, after which the MIC value was 104 μg/mL against both strains at the end of 72 h. Thus, clotrimazole-silver SLNs was found to be an efficient nanoantibiotic. PMID:26492156

  6. The Pleiotropic Antibacterial Mechanisms of Ursolic Acid against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao-Min; Jhan, Yun-Lian; Tsai, Shang-Jie; Chou, Chang-Hung

    2016-01-01

    (1) BACKGROUND: Several triterpenoids were found to act synergistically with classes of antibiotic, indicating that plant-derived chemicals have potential to be used as therapeutics to enhance the activity of antibiotics against multidrug-resistant pathogens. However, the mode of action of triterpenoids against bacterial pathogens remains unclear. The objective of this study is to evaluate the interaction between ursolic acid against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA); (2) METHODS: The ability of ursolic acid to damage mammalian and bacterial membranes was examined. The proteomic response of methicillin-resistant S. aureus in ursolic acid treatment was investigated using two-dimensional (2D) proteomic analysis; (3) RESULTS: Ursolic acid caused the loss of staphylococcal membrane integrity without hemolytic activity. The comparison of the protein pattern of ursolic acid-treated and normal MRSA cells revealed that ursolic acid affected a variety of proteins involved in the translation process with translational accuracy, ribonuclease and chaperon subunits, glycolysis and oxidative responses; (4) CONCLUSION: The mode of action of ursolic acid appears to be the influence on the integrity of the bacterial membrane initially, followed by inhibition of protein synthesis and the metabolic pathway. These findings reflect that the pleiotropic effects of ursolic acid against MRSA make it a promising antibacterial agent in pharmaceutical research. PMID:27399657

  7. Dissemination of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), USA300 Sequence Type 8 Lineage in Latin-America

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Jinnethe; Rincón, Sandra; Díaz, Lorena; Panesso, Diana; Contreras, Germán A.; Zurita, Jeannete; Carrillo, Carlos; Rizzi, Adele; Guzmán, Manuel; Adachi, Javier; Chowdhury, Shahreen; Murray, Barbara E.; Arias, Cesar A.

    2009-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococus aureus (MRSA) is an important nosocomial and community-associated (CA) pathogen. Recently, a variant of the MRSA USA300 clone emerged and disseminated in South-America causing important clinical problems. Methods S. aureus isolates were prospectively collected (2006 to 2008) from 32 tertiary hospitals in Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Venezuela. MRSA isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing, pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and categorized as healthcare-associated (HA)-like or CA-like clones based on genotypic characteristics and detection of genes encoding the Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and staphylococcal cassette mec (SCCmec) IV. Additionally, MLST of representative isolates of each major CA-MRSA pulsotype, and detection of USA300-associated toxins and the arcA gene were performed in all isolates categorized as CA-MRSA. Results A total of 1570 S. aureus were included; 651 were MRSA (41%), with the highest rates of MRSA isolation in Peru (62%), and lowest in Venezuela (26%) and 71%, 27%, and 2% were classified as HA-like, CA-like, and non-CA/HA-like clones, respectively. Only 9 MRSA isolates were confirmed to have reduced susceptibility to glycopeptides (GISA phenotype). The most common pulsotype (designated ComA) amongst the CA-like MRSA strains was found in 96% of isolates with the majority (81%) having ≤6 bands difference with the USA300-0114 strain. Representative isolates of this clone were ST8 but, unlike the USA300-0114 strain, they harbored a different SCCmec IV subtype and lacked arcA (an indicator of the arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME)). Conclusion A variant CA-MRSA USA300 clone has now become established in South America and, in some countries, is endemic in hospital settings. PMID:19911971

  8. Detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) using the NanoLantern Biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strohsahl, Christopher M.; Miller, Benjamin L.; Krauss, Todd D.

    2009-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading cause of human illness, and has developed the remarkable ability to resist the bactericidal capabilities of many of the world's leading antibiotics (i.e. MRSA). In an effort to enable rapid detection and treatment of MRSA infections, we have developed a DNA detection technology termed the NanoLantern(TM). The NanoLantern(TM) biosensor technology is based on the simple immobilization of a fluorophore-terminated DNA hairpin onto a gold chip. This produces a label-free sensor that allows for a positive response to be obtained without extensive processing of the sample, saving cost and increasing accuracy. We will also discuss a newly developed method of partial gene analysis, used to develop a DNA hairpin probe that is capable of detecting the presence of the mecR gene, a gene necessary for methicillin resistance to be present in S. aureus, with 100% sequence specificity. The successful incorporation of this probe into the NanoLantern(TM) platform, along with the concomitant development of the paired PCR assay has allowed for the successful detection of methicillin-resistance directly from a culture of S. aureus. These results represent an important step forward in terms of developing the ability to rapidly and effectively detect the presence of antibiotic resistance in bacterial infections.

  9. Identification and characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from Austrian companion animals and horses.

    PubMed

    Loncaric, Igor; Künzel, Frank; Licka, Theresia; Simhofer, Hubert; Spergser, Joachim; Rosengarten, Renate

    2014-01-31

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial resistance, resistance gene patterns and genetic relatedness of a collection of Austrian methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates from companion animals and horses. A total of 89 non-repetitive MRSA isolates collected during routine veterinary microbiological examinations from April 2004 to the end of 2012, and one isolate from 2013 were used for this study. The presence of mecA and other resistance genes was confirmed by PCR. Isolates were genotyped by spa typing, two multiple-locus variable-number tandem repeat analyses (MLVA) analyses, SCCmec typing and multilocus sequence typing (MLST). PCR targeting Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) and detection of staphylococcal enterotoxins (SE), toxic shock syndrome toxin (TSST) was performed using PCR assays. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed. Five sequence types (STs-ST398, ST254, ST22, ST5 and ST1), SCCmec types II, IVa, V, and non-type-abele, 8 spa-types (t003, t011, t036, t127, t386, t1348, and t4450), and two isolates could not be assigned, 21 MLVA-14Orsay types Multiplex-PCR MLVA (mMLVA) displayed 17 different MLVA types. The present study is the most comprehensive dealing with MRSA from Austrian companion animals and horses. The results confirm that MRSA ST398 is present in a wide range of animal species and is predominant especially in horses. In other companion animals it is unclear whether the infections with the different MRSA isolates investigated in the present study truly represents a rare phenomenon or may be an emerging problem in companion animals. PMID:24332703

  10. Vulvar Abscess Caused by Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) in a Postmenopausal Woman

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Hee; Kim, Soo Ah; Heo, Gyeong-Eun

    2016-01-01

    Infections of the vulva can present a complex differential to the gynecologist, ranging from superficial skin infections to lifethreatening necrotizing fasciitis. Recognition and timely treatment remain universal to skin and soft-tissue infections as the subcutaneous anatomy of the vulva can facilitate rapid spread to other tissues with significant morbidity and mortality. Employing a multidisciplinary team approach to care for vulvar cellulitis and abscess can guide treatment from antibiotic therapies to more aggressive surgical debridement. In this report, we describe a case of vulvar abscess caused by Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in a postmenopausal woman with underlying diseases of bronchiectasis and atelectasis. PMID:27617247

  11. Vulvar Abscess Caused by Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) in a Postmenopausal Woman.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Hee; Seap, Bel; Kim, Soo Ah; Heo, Gyeong-Eun

    2016-08-01

    Infections of the vulva can present a complex differential to the gynecologist, ranging from superficial skin infections to lifethreatening necrotizing fasciitis. Recognition and timely treatment remain universal to skin and soft-tissue infections as the subcutaneous anatomy of the vulva can facilitate rapid spread to other tissues with significant morbidity and mortality. Employing a multidisciplinary team approach to care for vulvar cellulitis and abscess can guide treatment from antibiotic therapies to more aggressive surgical debridement. In this report, we describe a case of vulvar abscess caused by Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in a postmenopausal woman with underlying diseases of bronchiectasis and atelectasis. PMID:27617247

  12. Anti-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) activity of Rubiaceae, Fabaceae and Poaceae plants: A search for new sources of useful alternative antibacterials against MRSA infections.

    PubMed

    Sharifi-Rad, M; Iriti, M; Sharifi-Rad, M; Gibbons, S; Sharifi-Rad, J

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effects of the extracts of the leaves of species from the Rubiaceae (Galium aparine L. and Asperula arvensis L.), Fabaceae (Lathyrus aphaca L. and Vicia narbonensis L.) and Poaceae (Digitaria sanguinalis (L.) Scop. and Hordeum murinum L.) plant families on a wide and extensive panel of isolated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains (MRSA). The effects of the methanolic leaf extracts of Rubiaceae, Fabaceae and Poaceae plants on MRSA were evaluated by the disc diffusion assay and the broth dilution method. Among a total of 177 S. aureus isolates, 92 (51.97%) were found to be methicillin-resistant in an antibiogram and this was confirmed by the presence of the mecA gene in polymerase chain reaction method. All MRSA isolates were sensitive to all extracts. There were dose-dependent inhibitions on tested microorganisms for all plant extracts which showed maximum inhibition zones at a concentration of 300 mg/L. L. aphaca, G. aparine and H. murinum exhibited the highest antibacterial activity on the MRSA strains compared to the positive control (P < 0.05), as well as higher total polyphenol and flavonoid contents than other plant extracts. Minimum inhibitory concentrations on MRSA isolates ranged from 388.4 ± 0.2 mg/L, in D. sanguinalis, to 5.5 ± 0.1 mg/L, in L. aphaca. The methanolic extracts of L. aphaca (Fabaceae), G. aparine (Rubiaceae), and H. murinum (Poaceae) proved to have high antibacterial activity on MRSA isolates, thus representing promising antimicrobial agents in clinical settings. PMID:27585260

  13. Structure elucidation of anti-methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) flavonoids from balsam poplar buds.

    PubMed

    Simard, François; Gauthier, Charles; Legault, Jean; Lavoie, Serge; Mshvildadze, Vakhtang; Pichette, André

    2016-09-15

    There is nowadays an urgent need for developing novel generations of antibiotic agents due to the increased resistance of pathogenic bacteria. As a rich reservoir of structurally diverse compounds, plant species hold promise in this regard. Within this framework, we isolated a unique series of antibacterial flavonoids, named balsacones N-U, featuring multiple cinnamyl chains on the flavan skeleton. The structures of these compounds, isolated as racemates, were determined using extensive 1D and 2D NMR analysis in tandem with HRMS. Balsacones N-U along with previously isolated balsacones A-M were evaluated for their antibacterial activity against clinical isolates of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Several of the tested balsacones were potent anti-MRSA agents showing MIC values in the low micromolar range. Structure-activity relationships study highlighted some important parameters involved in the antibacterial activity of balsacones such as the presence of cinnamyl and cinnamoyl chains at the C-3 and C-8 positions of the flavan skeleton, respectively. These results suggest that balsacones could represent a potential novel class of naturally occurring anti-MRSA agents. PMID:27436809

  14. Control of spread of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Burns Units.

    PubMed

    Muthotho, James N.; Waiyaki, Peter G.; Mbalu, Michael; Wairugu, Anne; Mwanthi, Beth; Odongo, Ben

    1995-02-01

    Results of four years' studies from a number of hospitals in Kenya have shown that nosocomial infections in burns units are due to Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Through chromosomal DNA and plasmid DNA, the stain is highly resistant to sulphonamide ointment and other antibiotics. 90% of patients admitted in burns units get colonized or infected with MRSA. The strain prolongs the duration of patients in hospitals. The burns degenerate to second and third degree burns, thereby necessitating skin grafting. The environment has been found to be contaminated with this strain with some staff members having chronic throat infections. Minocycline was found to be effective in treating the infected staff members. Cleaning this environment with Sodium dichloroisocyanurate (precepts)/Sodium hypochlorite (JIK) reduced drastically the mechanical transmission of bacteria in the units. The duration of stay of the patient was reduced. This shows that MRSA which is spread in government and private hospitals can cheaply be controlled by the proper use of disinfectants, antiseptics, and use of effective antibiotics when necessary. PMID:12160450

  15. Knowing prior methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection or colonization status increases the empirical use of glycopeptides in MRSA bacteraemia and may decrease mortality.

    PubMed

    Robinson, J O; Phillips, M; Christiansen, K J; Pearson, J C; Coombs, G W; Murray, R J

    2014-06-01

    To compare the management and outcome of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteraemia in patients known to be MRSA-colonized/infected (C-patients) with the management and outcome in those not known to be colonized/infected (NC-patients), we conducted a 10-year retrospective review of MRSA bacteraemia in an adult tertiary hospital. Clinical data were obtained by chart review, and mortality data from linked databases. Prior MRSA colonization/infection status was available to treating clinicians at the time of the bacteraemia as a 'Micro-Alert' tag on the patient's labels, in medical charts, and in electronic information systems. C-patients accounted for 35.4% of all MRSA bacteraemia episodes. C-patients were more likely to be indigenous, to be diabetic, or to have a history of previous S. aureus infection. Markers of illness severity (Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS)-II, need for admission to the intensive-care unit, length of stay, and metastatic seeding) were similar in both groups. Empirical therapy included a glycopeptide in 49.3% of C-patients vs. 18.9% of NC-patients (p <0.01), and contained an antibiotic to which the MRSA isolate tested susceptible in vitro in 56.7% of C-patients vs. 45.1% of NC-patients (p 0.13). All-cause 7-day and 30-day mortality were 7.5% vs. 18.9% (p 0.04), and 22.4% vs. 31.1% (p 0.20), in the C-patient and NC-patient groups, respectively. Knowing MRSA colonization status was significantly associated with lower 30-day mortality in Cox regression analysis (p <0.01). These data suggest that mortality from MRSA bacteraemia is lower in C-patients, which may reflect the earlier use of glycopeptides. The low use of empirical glycopeptides in septic patients known to be previously MRSA-colonized/infected may represent a missed opportunity for infection control to positively impact on clinical management. PMID:24224545

  16. Heteroresistance to glycopeptides in Italian meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates.

    PubMed

    Campanile, Floriana; Borbone, Sonia; Perez, Marianna; Bongiorno, Dafne; Cafiso, Viviana; Bertuccio, Taschia; Purrello, Simona; Nicolosi, Daria; Scuderi, Cristina; Stefani, Stefania

    2010-11-01

    The prevalence and molecular characterisation of heteroresistant vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus (hVISA) strains were determined in a large group of Italian strains isolated between 2005 and mid 2007. Amongst the 1284 strains isolated from documented infections in hospitalised patients (bloodstream infection, pneumonia, and skin and skin-structure infections), 139 S. aureus with vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) between 1 mg/L and 2 mg/L were screened for the presence of hVISA using three different methods and were confirmed by population analysis profile (PAP). Thirty-six hVISA strains (25.9%) were detected. Amongst the three screening methods used, the macro Etest (MET) demonstrated 100% specificity and 75% sensitivity. hVISA strains were accessory gene regulator (agr) types I and II and belonged to the major nosocomial clones circulating in Italy (ST8, ST239, ST247 and ST228). All strains were susceptible to quinupristin/dalfopristin, linezolid, daptomycin, tigecycline and dalbavancin. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that hVISA isolates are common amongst MRSA isolates with MICs between 1 mg/L and 2 mg/L in Italy. MET, with its high sensitivity and specificity, should be used for early detection of hVISA, especially in patients with serious or prolonged infections sustained by MRSA. Finally, the most recent anti-Gram-positive drugs maintained their full spectrum of in vitro activity against these strains. PMID:20727722

  17. Genotypic and phenotypic characterization of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clones with high-level mupirocin resistance.

    PubMed

    González-Domínguez, María; Seral, Cristina; Potel, Carmen; Sáenz, Yolanda; Álvarez, Maximiliano; Torres, Carmen; Castillo, Francisco Javier

    2016-06-01

    A high proportion of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates recovered in one year period showed high-level mupirocin-resistance (HLMUPR-MRSA) in our environment (27.2%). HLMUPR-MRSA isolates were mainly collected from skin and soft tissue samples, and diabetes was the main related comorbidity condition. These isolates were more frequently found in vascular surgery. HLMUPR-MRSA was more resistant to aminoglycosides than mupirocin-susceptible MRSA, linked to the presence of bifunctional and/or nucleotidyltransferase enzymes with/without macrolide resistance associated with the msr(A) gene. Most of HLMUPR-MRSA isolates belonged to ST125/t067. Nine IS257-ileS2 amplification patterns (p3 was the most frequent) were observed in HLMUPR-MRSA isolates, suggesting the presence of several mupirocin-resistance-carrying plasmids in our environment and promoting the emergence of mupirocin resistance. The presence of the same IS257-ileS2 amplification pattern p3 in 65% of HLMUPR-MRSA, all of them ST125/t067, suggests a clonal spread in our hospital and community environment which could explain the high prevalence of HLMUPR-MRSA during the study period. An outbreak situation or an increase in mupirocin consumption was not observed. PMID:27133306

  18. Isolation, Virulence, and Antimicrobial Resistance of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Methicillin Sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) Strains from Oklahoma Retail Poultry Meats

    PubMed Central

    Abdalrahman, Lubna S.; Stanley, Adriana; Wells, Harrington; Fakhr, Mohamed K.

    2015-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one the top five pathogens causing domestically acquired foodborne illness in the U.S. Only a few studies are available related to the prevalence of S. aureus and MRSA in the U.S. retail poultry industry. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of S. aureus (MSSA and MRSA) in retail chicken and turkey meats sold in Tulsa, Oklahoma and to characterize the recovered strains for their antimicrobial resistance and possession of toxin genes. A total of 167 (114 chicken and 53 turkey) retail poultry samples were used in this study. The chicken samples included 61 organic samples while the rest of the poultry samples were conventional. The overall prevalence of S. aureus was 57/106 (53.8%) in the conventional poultry samples and 25/61 (41%) in the organic ones. Prevalence in the turkey samples (64.2%) was higher than in the chicken ones (42.1%). Prevalence of S. aureus did not vary much between conventional (43.4%) and organic chicken samples (41%). Two chicken samples 2/114 (1.8%) were positive for MRSA. PFGE identified the two MRSA isolates as belonging to PFGE type USA300 (from conventional chicken) and USA 500 (from organic chicken) which are community acquired CA-MRSA suggesting a human based source of contamination. MLST and spa typing also supported this conclusion. A total of 168 Staphylococcus aureus isolates (101 chicken isolates and 67 turkey isolates) were screened for their antimicrobial susceptibility against 16 antimicrobials and their possession of 18 different toxin genes. Multidrug resistance was higher in the turkey isolates compared to the chicken ones and the percentage of resistance to most of the antimicrobials tested was also higher among the turkey isolates. The hemolysin hla and hld genes, enterotoxins seg and sei, and leucocidins lukE-lukD were more prevalent in the chicken isolates. The PVL gene lukS-lukF was detected only in chicken isolates including the MRSA ones. In conclusion, S. aureus is

  19. Salicylanilide carbamates: Promising antibacterial agents with high in vitro activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Zadrazilova, Iveta; Pospisilova, Sarka; Masarikova, Martina; Imramovsky, Ales; Ferriz, Juana Monreal; Vinsova, Jarmila; Cizek, Alois; Jampilek, Josef

    2015-09-18

    A series of twenty-one salicylanilide N-alkylcarbamates was assessed for novel antibacterial characteristics against three clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and S. aureus ATCC 29213 as the reference and quality control strain. The minimum inhibitory concentration was determined by the broth dilution micro-method with subsequent subcultivation of aliquots to assess minimum bactericidal concentration. The bactericidal kinetics was established by time-kill assay. Ampicillin, ciprofloxacin and vancomycin were used as reference antibacterial drugs. All the tested compounds exhibited highly potent anti-MRSA activity (⩽ 0.008-4 μg/mL) comparable or up to 250× higher than that of vancomycin, the standard in the treatment of serious MRSA infections. 4-Chloro-2-(3,4-dichlorophenylcarbamoyl)phenyl butylcarbamate and 4-chloro-2-(3,4-dichlorophenylcarbamoyl)phenyl ethylcarbamate were the most active compounds. In most cases, compounds provided reliable bacteriostatic activity, except for 4-chloro-2-(4-chlorophenylcarbamoyl)phenyl decylcarbamate exhibiting bactericidal effect at 8h (for clinical isolate of MRSA 63718) and at 24h (for clinical isolates of MRSA SA 630 and MRSA SA 3202) at 4× MIC. Structure-activity relationships are discussed. PMID:26079401

  20. Noninvasive In Vivo Imaging to Evaluate Immune Responses and Antimicrobial Therapy against Staphylococcus aureus and USA300 MRSA Skin Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cho, John S.; Zussman, Jamie; Donegan, Niles P.; Irene Ramos, Romela; Garcia, Nairy C.; Uslan, Daniel Z.; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Simon, Scott I.; Cheung, Ambrose L.; Modlin, Robert L.; Kim, Jenny; Miller, Lloyd S.

    2011-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus skin infections represent a significant public health threat because of the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains such as methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). As greater understanding of protective immune responses and more effective antimicrobial therapies are needed, a S. aureus skin wound infection model was developed in which full-thickness scalpel cuts on the backs of mice were infected with a bioluminescent S. aureus (methicillin sensitive) or USA300 community-acquired MRSA strain and in vivo imaging was used to noninvasively monitor the bacterial burden. In addition, the infection-induced inflammatory response was quantified using in vivo fluorescence imaging of LysEGFP mice. Using this model, we found that both IL-1α and IL-1β contributed to host defense during a wound infection, whereas IL-1β was more critical during an intradermal S. aureus infection. Furthermore, treatment of a USA300 MRSA skin infection with retapamulin ointment resulted in up to 85-fold reduction in bacterial burden and a 53% decrease in infection-induced inflammation. In contrast, mupirocin ointment had minimal clinical activity against this USA300 strain, resulting in only a 2-fold reduction in bacterial burden. Taken together, this S. aureus wound infection model provides a valuable preclinical screening method to investigate cutaneous immune responses and the efficacy of topical antimicrobial therapies. PMID:21191403

  1. An FDA-Drug Library Screen for Compounds with Bioactivities against Meticillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Qiu Ying; Tan, Yoke Yan Fion; Goh, Vanessa Chai Yin; Lee, David Jing Qin; Ng, Fui Mee; Ong, Esther H. Q.; Hill, Jeffrey; Chia, Cheng San Brian

    2015-01-01

    The lack of new antibacterial drugs entering the market and their misuse have resulted in the emergence of drug-resistant bacteria, posing a major health crisis worldwide. In particular, meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), a pathogen responsible for numerous human infections, has become endemic in hospitals worldwide. Drug repurposing, the finding of new therapeutic indications for approved drugs, is deemed a plausible solution to accelerate drug discovery and development in this area. Towards this end, we screened 1163 drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for bioactivities against MRSA in a 10 μM single-point assay. After excluding known antibiotics and antiseptics, six compounds were identified and their MICs were determined against a panel of clinical MRSA strains. A toxicity assay using human keratinocytes was also conducted to gauge their potential for repurposing as topical agents for treating MRSA skin infections. PMID:27025633

  2. In vitro activities of 28 antimicrobial agents against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from a clinical setting in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Neela, V; Sasikumar, M; Ghaznavi, G R; Zamberi, S; Mariana, S

    2008-09-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), an established nosocomial and emerging community pathogen associated with many fatalities due to its hyper-virulence and multiple drug resistant properties, is on the continuous rise. To update the current status on the susceptibility of local MRSA isolates to various classes of antibiotics and to identify the most potent antibiotics, thirty-two clinical isolates comprised of hospital acquired (HA) and community acquired (CA) infections were investigated by disk diffusion test. Of the 32 MRSA isolates, 14 (43.75%) and 18 (56.25%) were community and hospital acquired MRSA, respectively. All isolates were multiple drug resistant to more than 3 classes of antibiotics despite the source or specimen from which it was isolated. The oxacillin MICs for all isolates ranged from 2 to > or = 256 microg/ml. Twenty-five of 26 erythromycin-resistant MRSA isolates exhibited an inducible MLS(B) resistance phenotype while one showed an MS phenotype. More than half the isolates (68.75%) were resistant to at least one of the six aminoglycosides tested, with netilmicin as the most susceptible. The most effective antistaphylococcal agents were linezolid, vancomycin, teicoplanin and quinupristin/dalfopristin exhibited 100% susceptibility. Since MRSA is under continuous pressure of acquiring multiple drug resistance, it is imperative to focus routine surveillance on HA and CA-MRSA strains to monitor and limit the spread of this organism. PMID:19058585

  3. Colonisation of dentures by Staphylococcus aureus and MRSA in out-patient and in-patient populations.

    PubMed

    Lewis, N; Parmar, N; Hussain, Z; Baker, G; Green, I; Howlett, J; Kearns, A; Cookson, B; McDonald, A; Wilson, M; Ready, D

    2015-09-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important human pathogen, and colonisation with this organism can result in localised or systemic infections which may be fatal. One hundred in-patients admitted to a London teaching hospital and 100 out-patients attending prosthetic dentistry clinics were recruited into this study. Of the 100 out-patients, 27 % harboured S. aureus on their dentures, compared to 33 % of in-patients. Only one out-patient had MRSA colonising their dentures whereas 12 % of the in-patients harboured MRSA. The median total bacterial count of the denture plaque samples was 6.2 × 10(7) cfu/sample and 6.9 × 10(7) cfu/sample for the out-patient and in-patient populations, respectively. In most instances, where present, S. aureus comprised less than 1 % of the total viable denture microbiota. Phage typing demonstrated that EMRSA-15 and non-typeable strains were harboured on dentures. The results of this study have revealed that dentures are a potential reservoir of MRSA and so account should be taken of these findings when planning decontamination procedures for elimination of this pathogen. PMID:26071000

  4. Synergistic effects of diosmetin with erythromycin against ABC transporter over-expressed methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) RN4220/pUL5054 and inhibition of MRSA pyruvate kinase.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ben C L; Ip, Margaret; Gong, H; Lui, S L; See, Raymond H; Jolivalt, Claude; Fung, K P; Leung, P C; Reiner, Neil E; Lau, Clara B S

    2013-05-15

    Increasing prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) worldwide with limited therapeutic options is a growing public health concern. Natural products have been shown to possess antibacterial actions against MRSA. Flavonoids from natural products have been shown to possess antibacterial actions against MRSA by antagonizing its resistance mechanisms. Diosmin and diosmetin are natural flavonoids found in a variety of citrus fruits. The aim of this study was to investigate whether diosmin and diosmetin could inhibit the growth of MRSA and the in vitro enzymatic activity of a newly discovered MRSA drug target, pyruvate kinase (PK). By using a panel of MRSA strains with known resistant mechanisms, neither diosmin nor diosmetin was shown to possess direct antibacterial activities against all tested MRSA strains. However, in checkerboard assay, we found that diosmetin together with erythromycin, could synergistically inhibit the growth of ABC-pump overexpressed MRSA-RN4220/pUL5054, and time kill assay also showed that the antibacterial activities of diosmetin with erythromycin were bactericidal. Diosmetin was further shown to significantly suppress the MRSA PK activities in a dose dependent manner. In conclusion, the inhibition of MRSA PK by diosmetin could lead to a deficiency of ATP and affect the bacterial efflux pump which might contribute to the antibacterial actions of diosmetin against MRSA. PMID:23541215

  5. Evaluation of rep-PCR/DiversiLab versus PFGE and spa typing in genotyping methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Aguadero, V; González Velasco, C; Vindel, A; Gonzalez Velasco, M; Moreno, J J

    2015-01-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) is the 'gold standard' for genotyping of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA); however, the DiversiLab (DL) system, based on rep-PCR, is faster, simpler and could be better adapted to daily routine hospital work. We genotyped 100 MRSA isolates using PFGE, DL, and spa typing, and evaluated the discriminatory power of each technique and the correlation between them by Simpson's index(SI) and adjusted Rand coefficient (ARI), respectively. The isolates were from clinical samples from eight hospitals in Extremadura (Spain) during 2010. DL separated the 100 MRSA into 18 patterns, with 69% of the isolates grouped into four predominant patterns. spa typing reported 17 spa types, classifying 69% of MRSA into two major types (t067 and t002). PFGE revealed the existence of 27 patterns, gathering 54% of MRSA into three pulse types (E8a, E7a and E7b). SI values were 0.819, 0.726, 0.887 and 0.460 for DL, spa typing, PFGE and CC-BURP, respectively. ARI values of DL over PFGE, spa typing and CC-BURP were 0.151, 0.321 and 0.071, respectively. DL has less discriminatory power than PFGE but more than spa typing. The concordance of DL with PFGE is low, primarily because DL does not discriminate between the three predominant MRSA pulse types in our environment. PMID:26510268

  6. Effectiveness of Hospital-Wide Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Infection Control Policies Differs by Ward Specialty

    PubMed Central

    Sadsad, Rosemarie; Sintchenko, Vitali; McDonnell, Geoff D.; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L.

    2013-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major cause of preventable nosocomial infections and is endemic in hospitals worldwide. The effectiveness of infection control policies varies significantly across hospital settings. The impact of the hospital context towards the rate of nosocomial MRSA infections and the success of infection control is understudied. We conducted a modelling study to evaluate several infection control policies in surgical, intensive care, and medical ward specialties, each with distinct ward conditions and policies, of a tertiary public hospital in Sydney, Australia. We reconfirm hand hygiene as the most successful policy and find it to be necessary for the success of other policies. Active screening for MRSA, patient isolation in single-bed rooms, and additional staffing were found to be less effective. Across these ward specialties, MRSA transmission risk varied by 13% and reductions in the prevalence and nosocomial incidence rate of MRSA due to infection control policies varied by up to 45%. Different levels of infection control were required to reduce and control nosocomial MRSA infections for each ward specialty. Infection control policies and policy targets should be specific for the ward and context of the hospital. The model we developed is generic and can be calibrated to represent different ward settings and pathogens transmitted between patients indirectly through health care workers. This can aid the timely and cost effective design of synergistic and context specific infection control policies. PMID:24340085

  7. MRSA Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? MRSA Screening Share this page: Was this page helpful? Formal name: Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus Screening Related tests: Wound Culture At a Glance ...

  8. Structure of an amidohydrolase, SACOL0085, from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus COL

    PubMed Central

    Girish, Tavarekere S.; B, Vivek; Colaco, Melwin; Misquith, Sandra; Gopal, B.

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that rapidly acquires resistance to frontline antibiotics. The characterization of novel protein targets from this bacterium is thus an important step towards future therapeutic strategies. Here, the crystal structure of an amidohydrolase, SACOL0085, from S. aureus COL is described. SACOL0085 is a member of the M20D family of peptidases. Unlike other M20D peptidases, which are either monomers or dimers, SACOL0085 adopts a butterfly-shaped homotetrameric arrangement with extensive intersubunit interactions. Each subunit of SACOL0085 contains two Mn2+ ions at the active site. A conserved cysteine residue at the active site distinguishes M20D peptidases from other M20 family members. This cysteine, Cys103, serves as bidentate ligand coordinating both Mn2+ ions in SACOL0085. PMID:23385746

  9. Evaluation of the Combined Effects of Stilbenoid from Shorea gibbosa and Vancomycin against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    PubMed Central

    Basri, Dayang Fredalina; Luoi, Chan Kin; Azmi, Abdul Muin; Latip, Jalifah

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the combined effects of stilbenoids from Shorea gibbosa and vancomycin against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). A total of nine pure compounds, five stilbenoid dimers ε-viniferin, ampelopsin A, balanocarpol, laevifonol and diptoindonesin G and four stilbenoid trimers α-viniferin, johorenol A, ampelopsin E and vaticanol G were evaluated for their antibacterial activities against ATCC 33591 and a HUKM clinical isolate. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) for each active compound were determined using the serial microdilution and plate-streak techniques. The combined effect of stilbenoids with vancomycin against MRSA was evaluated using the checkerboard assay to determine their fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC) index values. The MIC value of α-viniferin on both MRSA strains was 100 μg/mL, whereas those of johorenol A on ATCC 33591 and HUKM strain were 100 μg/mL and 200 μg/mL, respectively. The MIC values of ampelopsin E and vaticanol G were higher than 400 μg/mL. Out of the five stilbenoid dimers, only ε-viniferin was capable of inhibiting the growth of both MRSA strains at MIC 400 μg/mL. The MBC value of ε-viniferin, α-viniferin and johorenol A showed bacteriostatic action against MRSA. The FIC index value of ε-viniferin and α-viniferin in combination with vancomycin showed an additive effect (0.5 < FIC ≤ 2.0) against both MRSA strains. Johorenol A-vancomycin combination was also additive against HUKM strain, but it showed synergistic interaction with vancomycin against ATCC 33591 (FIC < 0.5). Stilbenoid compounds from Shorea gibbosa have anti-MRSA activity and huge potential as an alternative phytotherapy in combating MRSA infections. PMID:24280704

  10. Prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among primary school children and prisoners in Jimma Town, Southwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus infections are increasingly reported from both health institutions and communities around the world. In particular, infections due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains have been detected worldwide. If MRSA becomes the most common form of S. aureus in a community, it makes the treatment of common infections much more difficult. But, report on the current status of community acquired MRSA in the study area is scanty. Methods Community-based cross sectional study was conducted to evaluate the current prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of MRSA among primary school children and prisoners in Jimma town. MRSA was detected using Cefoxitin (30μg) disc; and epidemiologic risk factors were assessed using pre-designed questionnaires distributed to the children’s parents and prisoners. A total of 354 nasal swabs were collected from primary school children and prisoners from December 2010 to March 2011 following standards microbiological methods. Results A total of 169 S. aureus isolates were recovered. The overall prevalence of MRSA among the study population was 23.08 % (39/169). Specifically, the prevalence of MRSA among primary school children and prisoners were 18.8% (27/144) and 48% (12/25), respectively. The isolated S. aureus and MRSA displayed multiple drug resistance (MDR) to 2 to 10 antibiotics. The most frequent MDR was Amp/Bac/Ery/Pen/Fox (resistance to Ampicillin, Bacitracin, Erythromycin, Penicillin, and Cefoxitin). Conclusion The present study revealed that MRSA could be prevalent in the healthy community, transmitted from hospital to the community. The high distribution of MRSA could be favored by potential risk factors. Thus, for comprehensive evaluation of the current prevalence of MRSA and design control measures, consideration need to be given to the healthy community besides data coming from health institutions. PMID:23731679

  11. Effectual detection of group B streptococci with reduced penicillin susceptibility (PRGBS) by commercially available methicillin-resistant-Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)-selective agar.

    PubMed

    Fukigai, Shinako; Morimoto, Makiko; Kimura, Kouji; Doyama, Yo; Miyazaki, Akira; Kamiya, Chitose; Banno, Hirotsugu; Morishima, Eriko; Onoda, Tomohiro; Nagano, Noriyuki; Jin, Wanchun; Wachino, Jun-Ichi; Yamada, Keiko; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2016-07-01

    We evaluated the feasibility and efficacy of a commercially available methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)-selective agar, chromID(™) MRSA, to detect group B streptococci with reduced penicillin susceptibility (PRGBS) in this study. The results showed 72.4% (21/29) sensitivity and 98.4% (60/61) specificity to detect PRGBS using this method. PMID:27198740

  12. Surveillance of Physician-Diagnosed Skin and Soft Tissue Infections Consistent With Methicillin-Resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (MRSA) among Nebraska High School Athletes, 2008-2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buss, Bryan F.; Connolly, Susan

    2014-01-01

    Though historically confined to hospital settings, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has received increasing attention in the wider community, particularly among athletes. A 2007-2008 investigation in Nebraska concluded that MRSA skin infections were an emerging problem among the state's student athletes. Statewide…

  13. Spread of community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in hospitals in Taipei, Taiwan in 2005, and comparison of its drug resistance with previous hospital-acquired MRSA.

    PubMed

    Takano, Tomomi; Saito, Kohei; Teng, Lee-Jene; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2007-01-01

    Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL)-positive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (PVL+ MRSA) is an emerging pathogen in the community worldwide. The incidence of PVL+ MRSA in Taipei, Taiwan was 23.3% for hospital MRSA. PVL+ MRSA was isolated from both outpatients and inpatients. Some PVL+ (mecA+) strains (36.8%) showed low MIC values (MRSA resistance pattern was oxacillin and clindamycin resistance (81%). There was no multidrug resistance over three drugs, in contrast to patient PVL- MRSA with resistance to five drugs as a major resistance pattern. The majority of PVL+ MRSA belonged to multilocus sequence (ST) type 59, while PVL+ MRSA belonged to ST239, ST59 and ST5. The data suggests that although PVL+ CA-MRSA is isolated at a high incidence from hospitals in Taipei, the drug resistance is mostly selected in the community and less prominent compared with previous PVL- hospital-acquired MRSA. PMID:17579274

  14. Risk factors for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus skin and soft tissue infection in MRSA-colonized patients discharged from a Veterans Affairs hospital.

    PubMed

    Cadena, J; Richardson, A M; Frei, C R

    2016-02-01

    Currently, limited studies have quantified the risk of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) for MRSA-colonized patients on discharge from hospital. Our retrospective, case-control study identified independent risk factors for the development of MRSA SSTIs among such patients detected by active MRSA nasal screening in an acute care hospital by PCR on admission, and bacteriological cultures on discharge. Cases were MRSA-colonized patients aged ⩾18 years who developed a MRSA SSTI post-discharge and controls were those who did not develop a MRSA SSTI post-discharge. Controls were matched to cases by length of follow-up (±10 days) for up to 18 months. Potential demographic and clinical risk factors for MRSA infection were identified using electronic queries and manual chart abstraction; data were compared by standard statistical tests and variables with P values ⩽0·05 in bivariable analysis were entered into a logistic regression model. Multivariable analysis demonstrated prior hospital admission within 12 months (P = 0·02), prior MRSA infection (P = 0·05), and previous myocardial infarction (P = 0·01) were independently predictive of a MRSA SSTI post-discharge. Identification of MRSA colonization upon admission and recognition of risk factors could help identify a high-risk population that could benefit from MRSA SSTI prevention strategies. PMID:26194247

  15. THE FREQUENCY OF COMMUNITY-ACQUIRED METHICILLIN-RESISTANT STAPHYLOCOCCUS AUREUS (CA-MRSA) AMONG SAMPLES IN INSTITUTE FOR PUBLIC HEALTH IN CANTON SARAJEVO

    PubMed Central

    Bektas, Sabaheta; Obradovic, Amina; Aljicevic, Mufida; Numanovic, Fatima; Hodzic, Dunja; Sporisevic, Lutvo

    2016-01-01

    Background: The increase in the incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections lacking risk factors for exposure to the health care system has been associated with the recognition of new MRSA clones known as community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA). These strains have been distinguished from health care-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA) strains by epidemiological, molecular and genetic means as well as by antibiotic susceptibility profile, tissue tropism and virulence traits. Objective: To assess prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility profile of CA-MRSA in Canton Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Results: Out of 1.905 positive Staphylococcus aureus isolates from various samples of outpatients collected during six months, 279 (14,64%) were MRSA isolates. Out of 279 MRSA samples, 133 (47,67%) were found in nasal swabs, from which 48 (36,09%) were in the age group <1 year and 39 (29,32 %) are in the age 1-5 year. Rate of the positive skin swabs was highest among the subject of age group <1 year (46 or 54,12 %) and 1-5 year (18 or 21,18 %). Predominantly antibiotic types among MRSA strains are resistant to penicillin and cefoxitin (36,90 %) and to penicillin, cefoxitin and erythromycin (61,35 %). Conclusion: Continued monitoring of epidemiology and emerging drug resistance data is critical for the effective management of these infections. PMID:27047271

  16. Multicenter Evaluation of BBL CHROMagar MRSA Medium for Direct Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus from Surveillance Cultures of the Anterior Nares

    PubMed Central

    Flayhart, Diane; Hindler, Janet F.; Bruckner, David A.; Hall, Geraldine; Shrestha, Rabin K.; Vogel, Sherilynn A.; Richter, Sandra S.; Howard, Wanita; Walther, Rhonda; Carroll, Karen C.

    2005-01-01

    Active surveillance for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is among the strategies recommended by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America for control of nosocomial MRSA infections. Infection control and laboratory personnel desire rapid, sensitive, and inexpensive methods to enhance surveillance activities. A multicenter study was performed to evaluate a new selective and differential chromogenic medium, BBL CHROMagar MRSA (C-MRSA) medium (BD Diagnostics, Sparks, MD), which enables recovery and concomitant identification of MRSA strains directly from nasal swab specimens taken from the anterior nares. Specimens were inoculated to C-MRSA and Trypticase soy agar with 5% sheep blood agar (TSA II, BD Diagnostics). Mauve colonies on C-MRSA at 24 h and 48 h and suspicious colonies on TSA II were confirmed as Staphylococcus aureus by Gram stain morphology and a coagulase test. In addition, the results of C-MRSA were compared to results of susceptibility testing (five different methods) of S. aureus strains isolated on TSA II. A total of 2,015 specimens were inoculated to C-MRSA and TSA II. Three hundred fifty-four S. aureus isolates were recovered; 208 (59%) were oxacillin (methicillin) susceptible and 146 (41%) were oxacillin resistant (MRSA). On C-MRSA, 139/146 or 95.2% of MRSA isolates were recovered, whereas recovery on TSA II was 86.9% (127/146) (P = 0.0027). The overall specificity of C-MRSA was 99.7%. When C-MRSA was compared to each susceptibility testing method, the sensitivity and specificity, respectively, were as follows: oxacillin MIC by broth microdilution, 94.4% and 96.7%; oxacillin screen agar, 94.3% and 96.7%; PBP2′ latex agglutination, 93.7% and 98.5%; cefoxitin disk diffusion, 95.0% and 98.1%; and mecA PCR, 95.1% and 98.1%. In this study, C-MRSA was superior to TSA II for recovery of MRSA from surveillance specimens obtained from the anterior nares and was comparable to conventional, rapid, and molecular susceptibility

  17. Multicenter evaluation of BBL CHROMagar MRSA medium for direct detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from surveillance cultures of the anterior nares.

    PubMed

    Flayhart, Diane; Hindler, Janet F; Bruckner, David A; Hall, Geraldine; Shrestha, Rabin K; Vogel, Sherilynn A; Richter, Sandra S; Howard, Wanita; Walther, Rhonda; Carroll, Karen C

    2005-11-01

    Active surveillance for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is among the strategies recommended by the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America for control of nosocomial MRSA infections. Infection control and laboratory personnel desire rapid, sensitive, and inexpensive methods to enhance surveillance activities. A multicenter study was performed to evaluate a new selective and differential chromogenic medium, BBL CHROMagar MRSA (C-MRSA) medium (BD Diagnostics, Sparks, MD), which enables recovery and concomitant identification of MRSA strains directly from nasal swab specimens taken from the anterior nares. Specimens were inoculated to C-MRSA and Trypticase soy agar with 5% sheep blood agar (TSA II, BD Diagnostics). Mauve colonies on C-MRSA at 24 h and 48 h and suspicious colonies on TSA II were confirmed as Staphylococcus aureus by Gram stain morphology and a coagulase test. In addition, the results of C-MRSA were compared to results of susceptibility testing (five different methods) of S. aureus strains isolated on TSA II. A total of 2,015 specimens were inoculated to C-MRSA and TSA II. Three hundred fifty-four S. aureus isolates were recovered; 208 (59%) were oxacillin (methicillin) susceptible and 146 (41%) were oxacillin resistant (MRSA). On C-MRSA, 139/146 or 95.2% of MRSA isolates were recovered, whereas recovery on TSA II was 86.9% (127/146) (P = 0.0027). The overall specificity of C-MRSA was 99.7%. When C-MRSA was compared to each susceptibility testing method, the sensitivity and specificity, respectively, were as follows: oxacillin MIC by broth microdilution, 94.4% and 96.7%; oxacillin screen agar, 94.3% and 96.7%; PBP2' latex agglutination, 93.7% and 98.5%; cefoxitin disk diffusion, 95.0% and 98.1%; and mecA PCR, 95.1% and 98.1%. In this study, C-MRSA was superior to TSA II for recovery of MRSA from surveillance specimens obtained from the anterior nares and was comparable to conventional, rapid, and molecular susceptibility methods

  18. Potentiation activity of multiple antibacterial agents by Salvianolate from the Chinese medicine Danshen against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing-Qing; Han, Jun; Zuo, Guo-Ying; Wang, Gen-Chun; Tang, Hua-Shu

    2016-05-01

    Salvianolate (SAL) is a prescribed medicine from the Chinese herb Danshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge). It has been widely used in treatment of coronary and other diseases with significant effects. The in vitro antimicrobial activities of SAL against infectious pathogens were assayed and its combined effects on 10 clinical isolates of SCCmec III type methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with ten antibiotics were evaluated. Susceptibility to each agent alone was tested using a broth microdilution method, and the chequerboard and time-kill experiments were used for the combined activities. The results showed MIC was 128-256 mg/L for SAL used alone against MRSA. Significant synergies were observed for SAL/Ampicillin (Fosfomycin, Erythromycin, Piperacillin-tazobactam or Clindamycin) combination against over half of the isolates, with their MICs reduced by times of dilution (TOD) to 4-32 (FICIs 0.375-0.5), respectively. SAL/AMP combination showed the best combined effect of synergy on bacteriostatic and bactericidal activities, while SAL/AMK combination reversed the resistance of MRSA to AMK. The results demonstrated that SAL enhanced widely the in vitro anti-MRSA efficacy of the ten antibacterial agents, which had potential for combinatory therapy of patients infected with MRSA and warrants further investigations. PMID:26639445

  19. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in rehabilitation and chronic-care-facilities: what is the best strategy?

    PubMed Central

    Minary-Dohen, Patrica; Bailly, Pascale; Bertrand, Xavier; Talon, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    Background The risk associated with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has been decreasing for several years in intensive care departments, but is now increasing in rehabilitation and chronic-care-facilities (R-CCF). The aim of this study was to use published data and our own experience to discuss the roles of screening for MRSA carriers, the type of isolation to be implemented and the efficiency of chemical decolonization. Discussion Screening identifies over 90% of patients colonised with MRSA upon admission to R-CCF versus only 50% for intensive care units. Only totally dependent patients acquire MRSA. Thus, strict geographical isolation, as opposed to "social reinsertion", is clearly of no value. However, this should not lead to the abandoning of isolation, which remains essential during the administration of care. The use of chemicals to decolonize the nose and healthy skin appeared to be of some value and the application of this procedure could make technical isolation unnecessary in a non-negligible proportion of cases. Summary Given the increase in morbidity associated with MRSA observed in numerous hospitals, the emergence of a community-acquired disease associated with these strains and the evolution of glycopeptide-resistant strains, the voluntary application of a strategy combining screening, technical isolation and chemical decolonization in R-CCF appears to be an urgent matter of priority. PMID:14672540

  20. Potential therapeutic drug target identification in Community Acquired-Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) using computational analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Pramod Kumar; Singh, Gurmit; Singh, Satendra; Gautam, Budhayash; Saad, Esmaiel IF

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of multidrug-resistant strain of community-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) strain has highlighted the urgent need for the alternative and effective therapeutic approach to combat the menace of this nosocomial pathogen. In the present work novel potential therapeutic drug targets have been identified through the metabolic pathways analysis. All the gene products involved in different metabolic pathways of CA-MRSA in KEGG database were searched against the proteome of Homo sapiens using the BLASTp program and the threshold of E-value was set to as 0.001. After database searching, 152 putative targets were identified. Among all 152 putative targets, 39 genes encoding for putative targets were identified as the essential genes from the DEG database which are indispensable for the survival of CA-MRSA. After extensive literature review, 7 targets were identified as potential therapeutic drug target. These targets are Fructose-bisphosphate aldolase, Phosphoglyceromutase, Purine nucleoside phosphorylase, Uridylate kinase, Tryptophan synthase subunit beta, Acetate kinase and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine 1-carboxyvinyltransferase. Except Uridylate kinase all the identified targets were involved in more than one metabolic pathways of CA-MRSA which underlines the importance of drug targets. These potential therapeutic drug targets can be exploited for the discovery of novel inhibitors for CA-MRSA using the structure based drug design (SBDD) strategy. PMID:23055607

  1. Antimicrobial Activity of Isothiocyanates from Cruciferous Plants against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Carla; Aires, Alfredo; Saavedra, Maria José

    2014-01-01

    Purified isothiocyanates from cruciferous plants (Brassicacea, Syn. Cruciferae) plants were evaluated against 15 isolates of methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolated from diabetic foot-ulcer patients aiming the study of the potential usage of allyl-isothiocyanate, benzyl-isothiocyanate and 2-phenylethyl-isothiocyanate against this important bacteria. Disc diffusion and minimum inhibitory concentration methods were used to access the antimicrobial activity. The index (Ia) and rate (Ra) of the antibacterial activity for each compound were calculated. The results showed a highly dose-dependent compound and chemical structure antibacterial effectiveness. The results showed a strong relation between the chemical structure of isothiocyanates and its antibacterial effectiveness. The benzyl-isothiocyanate was the most effective with a minimum inhibitory concentration varying between 2.9 and 110 µg· mL−1 with an antibacterial activity rate up to 87%. Moreover, their antibacterial activity was mainly bactericidal. This study provides scientific evidence that isothiocyanates have an interesting biological value and must be considered as an important tool to be used against MRSA. PMID:25353177

  2. Emerging ST121/agr4 community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with strong adhesin and cytolytic activities: trigger for MRSA pneumonia and fatal aspiration pneumonia in an influenza-infected elderly.

    PubMed

    Wan, T-W; Tomita, Y; Saita, N; Konno, K; Iwao, Y; Hung, W-C; Teng, L-J; Yamamoto, T

    2016-09-01

    The pathogenesis of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) pneumonia in influenza-infected elderly individuals has not yet been elucidated in detail. In the present study, a 92-year-old man infected with influenza developed CA-MRSA pneumonia. His CA-MRSA was an emerging type, originated in ST121/agr4 S. aureus, with diversities of Panton-Valentine leucocidin (PVL)(-)/spat5110/SCCmecV(+) versus PVL(+)/spat159((etc.))/SCCmec (-), but with common virulence potentials of strong adhesin and cytolytic activities. Resistance to erythromycin/clindamycin (inducible-type) and gentamicin was detected. Pneumonia improved with the administration of levofloxacin, but with the subsequent development of fatal aspiration pneumonia. Hence, characteristic CA-MRSA with strong adhesin and cytolytic activities triggered influenza-related sequential complications. PMID:27358743

  3. Practical management: community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA): the latest sports epidemic.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Holly J; Nikore, Vineet; Takagishi, Josh

    2007-09-01

    Community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has gained international recognition as a superbug that causes serious infectious outbreaks in high-risk populations such as athletes. Clusters of cases in various athletic teams, particularly contact sports, have been reported since 1993 in the United States and more recently in Canada. CA-MRSA infections are not limited to North America, and all athletes are considered high risk. Skin-to-skin contact appears to be the primary mode of transmission. While typical infections are local skin and soft-tissue abscesses, CA-MRSA infections can spread systemically and lead to significant morbidity and mortality if not promptly identified and treated. The gold standard of treatment for all abscesses is incision and drainage with wound culture for bacterial identification and antibiotic sensitivity testing. A limited number of antibiotics are currently useful in the treatment of CA-MRSA and are reviewed. Geographical variation in patterns of antibiotic resistance further complicates the treatment. Meticulous, consistent use of infection prevention strategies is critical to control outbreaks in the athletic population. Good hygiene, prompt identification of infection, limited exposure to infected persons and contaminated objects, and proper treatment combined with close follow-up of infected athletes will help contain CA-MRSA outbreaks. Future research is needed to explore person-to-person and fomite transmission risks, to define the significance of nasal carriage and skin colonization in relation to CA-MRSA infections, and to further investigate antibiotic resistance patterns. Universal education is needed for all athletes and personnel who provide care in the athletic setting to help control this widespread epidemic. PMID:17873553

  4. Identification of the third type of PVL phage in ST59 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng; Ito, Teruyo; Li, Shanshuang; Jin, Jingxun; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Lauderdale, Tsai-Ling Yang; Higashide, Masato; Hiramatsu, Keiichi

    2011-10-01

    The genes lukS-PV and lukF-PV for Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL) that confers high virulence to Staphylococcus aureus are located on the prophages (PVL phages) which have been classified into group 1 and 2 sfi21-like Siphoviridae. We report novel PVL phages lysogenized in ST59 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains isolated in Japan (JCSC7247) and Taiwan (JCSC5967). The genomes of φ7247PVL and φ5967PVL showed more than 99% identity, and the regions containing the five genes located at both ends of the prophages, int (integrase), hol (holin), ami (amidase), lukS-PV, and lukF-PV, are highly homologous to extant PVL phages. The genes for the structural module are less homologous to these phages, but are highly homologous to non-PVL phages belonging to group 3 Sfi21-like Siphoviridae, for example φN315. Subsequent PCR identification and nucleotide sequencing of an additional 11 Taiwanese ST59 MRSA isolates suggested they all carry the same phage as φ5967PVL, which differed from φ7247PVL by a single base. This study adds evidence to the notion that novel PVL phages would be generated through illegitimate recombination events by acquiring the region at which hol, ami, luk, and int genes would line up upon lytic growth, and suggests that the PVL-positive MRSA clones that have emerged worldwide may carry distinct phages. PMID:21732964

  5. Efficacy of Caltropis procera and Ficus sycomorus extracts in treating MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus)-keratitis in rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Sayed, Waiel F.; Salem, Wesam M. A.; Haridy, Mohie A. M.; Hassan, Ne'mat H.

    2015-01-01

    MRSA-induced keratitis in rabbit was used to evaluate the therapeutic effect of F. sycomorus leaves and C. procera latex extracts. Within the 6 rabbit groups tested, group 1 received sterilized saline, while other groups (2 to 6) received 100 μl of intrastromal injections of 1.5×103 colony forming unit (cfu) ml-1 of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). After 12 hours, groups 3 to 6 also received chloramphenicol, aqueous extract of C. procera latex, aqueous and alcoholic extracts of F. sycomorus leaves, respectively 3 times daily for 12 successive days. The tested extracts inhibited MRSA growth in vitro (i.e. on culture medium). Colony counts in cornea discs from groups 3 to 6 were significantly reduced (P ≤ 0.001) compared to group 2 (untreated). Clinical signs of keratitis were observed on group 2 until the end of experiment. In groups 3 to 6, gradual recovery was observed and signs disappeared by the 12th DPI (days post inoculation). Only mild symptoms persisted in group 5 (aqueous extract of leaves). In group 3 and 5, cornea, iris, ciliary body and conjunctiva showed mild leukocytic infiltration and depigmentation of melanin cells while recovery of cornea and iris was observed in groups 4 and 6. In conclusion, the used extracts have potential therapeutic effects on MRSA-induced keratitis in rabbit. PMID:26648824

  6. Isolation of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from HIV Patients Referring to HIV Referral Center, Shiraz, Iran, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    Hassanzadeh, Parvin; Hassanzadeh, Yashgin; Mardaneh, Jalal; Rezai, Esmaeel; Motamedifar, Mohammad

    2015-11-01

    Extension of drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains is one of the problems of modern society. Presence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in HIV-infected individuals is an important cause of severe infections. Therefore, the main goal of this study was to determine the prevalence rate of MRSA carriage rate among HIV patients referring to the Shiraz HIV referral center (Shiraz, Iran) during 2011-2012. Nasal swabs were obtained from HIV positive patients and were cultured on differential and selective media to isolate Staphylococcus aureus, which was confirmed by standard biochemical tests. For isolation of MRSA isolates, bacterial suspensions were cultured on Muller-Hinton Agar containing NaCl and Oxacillin. Finally, data were analyzed by the SPSS software. Of 180 HIV patients, MRSA was isolated from nasal cavity of 23 (12.8%) patients. Most of the isolates were recovered from male subjects who were under 40 years old. No variables such as skin disease, history of hospitalization or infectious disease had significant association with the MRSA colonization rate. The presence of MRSA isolates in the nasal cavity of HIV patients in such a rate warns us about the potential spreading of MRSA among HIV patients in our society and emphasizes on establishing better prevention strategies. PMID:26538782

  7. The herbal-derived honokiol and magnolol enhances immune response to infection with methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun-Jin; Kim, Hyung-Ip; Kim, Ji-Ae; Jun, Soo Youn; Kang, Sang Hyeon; Park, Dong June; Son, Seok-Jun; Kim, Younghoon; Shin, Ok Sarah

    2015-05-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistant strains such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) reminds us an urgent need to develop a new immune-modulating agent for preventing S. aureus infection. In this study, we found that herbal medicines, honokiol and magnolol, caused a significant cellular immune modulatory effect during S. aureus infection. In mouse macrophages, these compounds drove upregulation of an antioxidant effect in response to S. aureus, resulting in a dampened total cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and decreased production of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines, whereas honokiol induced increased types I and III interferon messenger RNA (mRNA) expression levels in response to MSSA infection. Moreover, the internalization of S. aureus by human alveolar epithelial cells was inhibited by these compounds. Furthermore, honokiol and magnolol treatment promoted a delay in killing during MSSA infection in Caenorhabditis elegans, suggesting antimicrobial function in vivo. In conclusion, honokiol and magnolol may be considered as attractive immune-modulating treatment for S. aureus infection. PMID:25586586

  8. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA): identification and susceptibility testing techniques.

    PubMed

    Reygaert, Wanda

    2009-01-01

    Many traditional techniques are useful for identification of MRSA strains, including techniques for detection of penicillin-resistance, such as the nitrocefin disk. Techniques for assessing methicillin-resistance vary from growth on special media or at a lower temperature, to detection of the mecA gene by manual (latex agglutination) and automated (PCR) methods. Technique development is now geared toward making MRSA identification more rapid. Real-time PCR has sped MRSA detection, but can be costly. Resistance to other drugs is also an issue. Clindamycin resistance may need to be induced, so a special disk diffusion test can be performed. Vancomycin resistance is becoming an issue, so alternative drugs need to be identified. Drugs that are currently available for MRSA infections include: daptomycin, linezolid, quinupristin/dalfopristin, and tigecycline. Drugs that are in the development phase include: ceftobiprole, dalbavancin, oritavancin, and telavancin. These drugs provide a promising arsenal against MRSA. PMID:19534447

  9. Rifampicin-fosfomycin coating for cementless endoprostheses: antimicrobial effects against methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Alt, Volker; Kirchhof, Kristin; Seim, Florian; Hrubesch, Isabelle; Lips, Katrin S; Mannel, Henrich; Domann, Eugen; Schnettler, Reinhard

    2014-10-01

    New strategies to decrease infection rates in cementless arthroplasty are needed, especially in the context of the growing incidence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections. The purpose of this study was to investigate the antimicrobial activity of a rifampicin-fosfomycin coating against methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) and MRSA in a rabbit infection prophylaxis model. Uncoated or rifampicin-fosfomycin-coated K-wires were inserted into the intramedullary canal of the tibia in rabbits and contaminated with an inoculation dose of 10(5) or 10(6) colony-forming units of MSSA EDCC 5055 in study 1 and MRSA T6625930 in study 2, respectively. After 28days the animals were killed and clinical, histological and microbiological assessment, including pulse-field gel electrophoresis, was conducted. Positive culture growth in agar plate testing and/or clinical signs and/or histological signs were defined positive for infection. Statistical evaluation was performed using Fisher's exact test. Both studies showed a statistically significant reduction of infection rates for rifampicin-fosfomycin-coated implants compared to uncoated K-wires (P=0.015). In both studies none of the 12 animals that were treated with a rifampicin-fosfomycin-coated implant showed clinical signs of infection or a positive agar plate testing result. In both studies, one animal of the coating group showed the presence of sporadic bacteria with concomitant inflammatory signs in histology. The control groups in both studies exhibited an infection rate of 100% with clear clinical signs of infection and positive culture growth in all animals. In summary, the rifampicin-fosfomycin-coating showed excellent antimicrobial activity against both MSSA and MRSA, and therefore warrants further clinical testing. PMID:24948548

  10. The Impact of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus (VRE) Flags on Hospital Operations.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, Erica S; Lee, Hang; Hou, Taige; Ware, Winston; Ryan, Erin E; Hooper, David C; Walensky, Rochelle P

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the impact of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (MRSA/VRE) designations, or flags, on selected hospital operational outcomes. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study of inpatients admitted to the Massachusetts General Hospital during 2010-2011. METHODS Operational outcomes were time to bed arrival, acuity-unrelated within-hospital transfers, and length of stay. Covariates considered included demographic and clinical characteristics: age, gender, severity of illness on admission, admit day of week, residence prior to admission, hospitalization within the prior 30 days, clinical service, and discharge destination. RESULTS Overall, 81,288 admissions were included. After adjusting for covariates, patients with a MRSA/VRE flag at the time of admission experienced a mean delay in time to bed arrival of 1.03 hours (9.63 hours [95% CI, 9.39-9.88] vs 8.60 hours [95% CI, 8.47-8.73]). These patients had 1.19 times the odds of experiencing an acuity-unrelated within-hospital transfer [95% CI, 1.13-1.26] and a mean length of stay 1.76 days longer (7.03 days [95% CI, 6.82-7.24] vs 5.27 days [95% CI, 5.15-5.38]) than patients with no MRSA/VRE flag. CONCLUSIONS MRSA/VRE designation was associated with delays in time to bed arrival, increased likelihood of acuity-unrelated within-hospital transfers and extended length of stay. Efforts to identify patients who have cleared MRSA/VRE colonization are critically important to mitigate inefficient use of resources and to improve inpatient flow. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:782-790. PMID:27019995

  11. Comparison of Xpert MRSA/SA Nasal and MRSA/SA ELITe MGB Assays for Detection of the mecA Gene with Susceptibility Testing Methods for Determination of Methicillin Resistance in Staphylococcus aureus Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Belmekki, Mohamed; Mammeri, Hedi; Hamdad, Farida; Rousseau, Florence; Canarelli, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    In a series of 82 Staphylococcus strains isolated from culture, 100% were identified as Staphylococcus aureus by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS); 99.9% (77/82) of them were resistant to benzylpenicillin, oxacillin, and cefoxitin, and 6.1% (5/82) were susceptible to methicillin. Xpert MRSA/SA assay results were concordant with the phenotypic results in 76.8% (63/82) of cases and discordant in 23.2% (19/82) of cases. The MRSA/SA ELITe MGB kit results were concordant with phenotypic results in 100% of the cases. When comparing the Xpert MRSA/SA assay results with the MRSA/SA ELITe MGB kit results, 78% (64/82) of the cases were concordant, while 22% (18/82) of the cases were discordant. No statistically significant differences were observed between the two techniques. The PCR protocol that was used to validate the results of these two methods gave the following results: 49 were conventional methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates (mecA positive and mecALGA251 negative), and 25 were phenotypic MRSA isolates (mecA negative and mecALGA251 positive). PMID:23863569

  12. The use of vancomycin in the treatment of adult patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection: a survey in a tertiary hospital in China

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jing; Hu, Jiali; Kang, Lei; Deng, Zhengjun; Wu, Jiaofen; Pan, Jiaqian

    2015-01-01

    Background: Vancomycin is frequently used in the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Objectives: To determine MRSA infection status and the use of vancomycin in its treatment at a teaching hospital in China. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 140 cases of MRSA infection that were treated from January 2013 to October 2014. We analyzed the etiology of MRSA infection and the use of vancomycin in these cases. Results: MRSA infection mainly occurred in elderly patients concomitant with a variety of diseases, which incidence was more in men than women. More cases of MRSA infection were encountered in the ICU than in other departments. The positive culture results for MRSA were obtained in the sputum (38.57%), pharyngeal swab (19.29%), blood (5.71%), and wound secretion (11.43%) samples. The MRSA patients were sensitive to vancomycin, with the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) being 1 μg/mL in 53.80% of the cases and 2 μg/mL in 44.10% of the cases, respectively. Among the 35 (25%) cases treated with vancomycin, 23 were cured, while 3 died and 7 (20%) were considered as an unreasonable application. Conclusions: MRSA infection mainly appeared in patients admitted to the ICU. The MIC of vancomycin had a tendency to increase gradually. PMID:26770588

  13. Neonatal mycotic internal iliac aneurysm due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) septicaemia successfully treated by coil embolisation.

    PubMed

    Khandanpour, N; Chaudhuri, A; Roebuck, D J; Armon, M P

    2007-06-01

    A 12-day-old term male neonate presented with septic arthritis, multiple skin and intrabdominal abscesses and a mycotic aneurysm of the right internal iliac artery. He was diagnosed as having methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) septicaemia and deemed unsuitable for surgical treatment of the aneurysm. Coil embolisation of the internal iliac artery was performed, followed by a successful recovery and with no evidence of residual or recurrent infection. The authors describe a method of treating internal iliac mycotic aneurysms in high-risk patients by endovascular means, which we believe has not been attempted in this precise scenario before. PMID:17276103

  14. The bactericidal effect of 470-nm light and hyperbaric oxygen on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Bumah, Violet Vakunseh; Whelan, Harry Thomas; Masson-Meyers, Daniela Santos; Quirk, Brendan; Buchmann, Ellen; Enwemeka, Chukuka Samuel

    2015-04-01

    It has been shown that, in vitro, hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) suppresses 28 % bacterial growth, while 470-nm blue light alone suppresses up to 92 % methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in one application in vitro. Therefore, we determined if combined 470-nm light (55 J/cm(2)) and HBO will yield 100 % bacterial suppression in experimental simulation of mild, moderate or severe MRSA infection. We cultured MRSA at 3 × 10(6), 5 × 10(6), 7 × 10(6), 8 × 10(6), or 12 × 10(6) CFU/ml and treated each concentration in four groups as follows: (1) control (no treatment) (2) photo-irradiation only, (3) photo-irradiation then HBO, (4) HBO only, and (5) HBO then photo-irradiation. Bacteria colonies were then quantified. The results showed that at each bacterial concentration, HBO alone was significantly less effective in suppressing MRSA than photo-irradiation or combined HBO and photo-irradiation (p < 0.0001). Similarly, at no bacterial concentration did combined HBO and 470-nm light treatment yield a statistically better result than 470-nm light alone (p > 0.05), neither did HBO treatment either before or after irradiation make a difference. Furthermore, at no bacterial concentration was 100 % MRSA suppression achieved. Indeed, the maximum bacterial suppression attained was in the mild infection model (3 × 10(6) CFU/ml), with blue light producing 97.3 ± 0.2 % suppression and HBO + 55 J/cm(2) yielding 97.5 ± 2.5 % suppression. We conclude that (1) HBO and 470-nm light individually suppress MRSA growth; (2) 470-nm blue light is more effective in suppressing MRSA than HBO; and (3) HBO did not act synergistically to heighten the bactericidal effect of 470-nm light. PMID:25700768

  15. Healthcare- and Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Fatal Pneumonia with Pediatric Deaths in Krasnoyarsk, Siberian Russia: Unique MRSA's Multiple Virulence Factors, Genome, and Stepwise Evolution.

    PubMed

    Khokhlova, Olga E; Hung, Wei-Chun; Wan, Tsai-Wen; Iwao, Yasuhisa; Takano, Tomomi; Higuchi, Wataru; Yachenko, Svetlana V; Teplyakova, Olga V; Kamshilova, Vera V; Kotlovsky, Yuri V; Nishiyama, Akihito; Reva, Ivan V; Sidorenko, Sergey V; Peryanova, Olga V; Reva, Galina V; Teng, Lee-Jene; Salmina, Alla B; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a common multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogen. We herein discussed MRSA and its infections in Krasnoyarsk, Siberian Russia between 2007 and 2011. The incidence of MRSA in 3,662 subjects was 22.0% and 2.9% for healthcare- and community-associated MRSA (HA- and CA-MRSA), respectively. The 15-day mortality rates for MRSA hospital- and community-acquired pneumonia (HAP and CAP) were 6.5% and 50%, respectively. MRSA CAP cases included pediatric deaths; of the MRSA pneumonia episodes available, ≥27.3% were associated with bacteremia. Most cases of HA-MRSA examined exhibited ST239/spa3(t037)/SCCmecIII.1.1.2 (designated as ST239Kras), while all CA-MRSA cases examined were ST8/spa1(t008)/SCCmecIV.3.1.1(IVc) (designated as ST8Kras). ST239Kras and ST8Kras strongly expressed cytolytic peptide (phenol-soluble modulin α, PSMα; and δ-hemolysin, Hld) genes, similar to CA-MRSA. ST239Kras pneumonia may have been attributed to a unique set of multiple virulence factors (MVFs): toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1), elevated PSMα/Hld expression, α-hemolysin, the staphylococcal enterotoxin SEK/SEQ, the immune evasion factor SCIN/SAK, and collagen adhesin. Regarding ST8Kras, SEA was included in MVFs, some of which were common to ST239Kras. The ST239Kras (strain OC3) genome contained: a completely unique phage, φSa7-like (W), with no att repetition; S. aureus pathogenicity island SaPI2R, the first TSST-1 gene-positive (tst+) SaPI in the ST239 lineage; and a super copy of IS256 (≥22 copies/genome). ST239Kras carried the Brazilian SCCmecIII.1.1.2 and United Kingdom-type tst. ST239Kras and ST8Kras were MDR, with the same levofloxacin resistance mutations; small, but transmissible chloramphenicol resistance plasmids spread widely enough to not be ignored. These results suggest that novel MDR and MVF+ HA- and CA-MRSA (ST239Kras and ST8Kras) emerged in Siberian Russia (Krasnoyarsk) associated with fatal pneumonia, and also with ST

  16. Healthcare- and Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Fatal Pneumonia with Pediatric Deaths in Krasnoyarsk, Siberian Russia: Unique MRSA's Multiple Virulence Factors, Genome, and Stepwise Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Khokhlova, Olga E.; Hung, Wei-Chun; Wan, Tsai-Wen; Iwao, Yasuhisa; Takano, Tomomi; Higuchi, Wataru; Yachenko, Svetlana V.; Teplyakova, Olga V.; Kamshilova, Vera V.; Kotlovsky, Yuri V.; Nishiyama, Akihito; Reva, Ivan V.; Sidorenko, Sergey V.; Peryanova, Olga V.; Reva, Galina V.; Teng, Lee-Jene; Salmina, Alla B.; Yamamoto, Tatsuo

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a common multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogen. We herein discussed MRSA and its infections in Krasnoyarsk, Siberian Russia between 2007 and 2011. The incidence of MRSA in 3,662 subjects was 22.0% and 2.9% for healthcare- and community-associated MRSA (HA- and CA-MRSA), respectively. The 15-day mortality rates for MRSA hospital- and community-acquired pneumonia (HAP and CAP) were 6.5% and 50%, respectively. MRSA CAP cases included pediatric deaths; of the MRSA pneumonia episodes available, ≥27.3% were associated with bacteremia. Most cases of HA-MRSA examined exhibited ST239/spa3(t037)/SCCmecIII.1.1.2 (designated as ST239Kras), while all CA-MRSA cases examined were ST8/spa1(t008)/SCCmecIV.3.1.1(IVc) (designated as ST8Kras). ST239Kras and ST8Kras strongly expressed cytolytic peptide (phenol-soluble modulin α, PSMα; and δ-hemolysin, Hld) genes, similar to CA-MRSA. ST239Kras pneumonia may have been attributed to a unique set of multiple virulence factors (MVFs): toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1), elevated PSMα/Hld expression, α-hemolysin, the staphylococcal enterotoxin SEK/SEQ, the immune evasion factor SCIN/SAK, and collagen adhesin. Regarding ST8Kras, SEA was included in MVFs, some of which were common to ST239Kras. The ST239Kras (strain OC3) genome contained: a completely unique phage, φSa7-like (W), with no att repetition; S. aureus pathogenicity island SaPI2R, the first TSST-1 gene-positive (tst+) SaPI in the ST239 lineage; and a super copy of IS256 (≥22 copies/genome). ST239Kras carried the Brazilian SCCmecIII.1.1.2 and United Kingdom-type tst. ST239Kras and ST8Kras were MDR, with the same levofloxacin resistance mutations; small, but transmissible chloramphenicol resistance plasmids spread widely enough to not be ignored. These results suggest that novel MDR and MVF+ HA- and CA-MRSA (ST239Kras and ST8Kras) emerged in Siberian Russia (Krasnoyarsk) associated with fatal pneumonia, and also with ST

  17. Prenylated flavonoids from Desmodium caudatum and evaluation of their anti-MRSA activity.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hisako; Kashiwada, Yoshiki; Shibata, Hirofumi; Takaishi, Yoshihisa

    2012-10-01

    Seven prenylated flavonoids and a prenylated chromanochroman derivative, together with eight known flavonoids, were isolated from roots of Desmodium caudatum. The 15 structures were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analyses. The antibacterial activity of many of other compounds was evaluated against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA: COL and 5) by a disc diffusion method, and the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) to MRSA were determined. PMID:22800912

  18. Synthesis and antibacterial evaluation of a novel series of synthetic phenylthiazole compounds against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Haroon; Reddy, P V Narasimha; Monteleone, Dennis; Mayhoub, Abdelrahman S; Cushman, Mark; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2015-04-13

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections are a significant global health challenge in part due to the emergence of strains exhibiting resistance to nearly all classes of antibiotics. This underscores the urgent need for the rapid development of novel antimicrobials to circumvent this burgeoning problem. Previously, whole-cell screening of a library of 2,5-disubstituted thiazole compounds revealed a lead compound exhibiting potent antimicrobial activity against MRSA. The present study, conducting a more rigorous analysis of the structure-activity relationship of this compound, reveals a nonpolar, hydrophobic functional group is favored at thiazole-C2 and an ethylidenehydrazine-1-carboximidamide moiety is necessary at C5 for the compound to possess activity against MRSA. Furthermore, the MTS assay confirmed analogs 5, 22d, and 25 exhibited an improved toxicity profile (not toxic up to 40 μg/mL to mammalian cells) over the lead 1. Analysis with human liver microsomes revealed compound 5 was more metabolically stable compared to the lead compound (greater than eight-fold improvement in the half-life in human liver microsomes). Collectively the results presented demonstrate the novel thiazole derivatives synthesized warrant further exploration for potential use as future antimicrobial agents for the treatment of multidrug-resistant S. aureus infections. PMID:25771109

  19. Synthesis and antibacterial evaluation of a novel series of synthetic phenylthiazole compounds against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Haroon; Narasimha Reddy, P. V.; Monteleone, Dennis; Mayhoub, Abdelrahman S.; Cushman, Mark; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2015-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infections are a significant global health challenge in part due to the emergence of strains exhibiting resistance to nearly all classes of antibiotics. This underscores the urgent need for the rapid development of novel antimicrobials to circumvent this burgeoning problem. Previously, whole-cell screening of a library of 2,5-disubstituted thiazole compounds revealed a lead compound exhibiting potent antimicrobial activity against MRSA. The present study, conducting a more rigorous analysis of the structure-activity relationship of this compound, reveals a nonpolar, hydrophobic functional group is favored at thiazole-C2 and an ethylidenehydrazine-1-carboximidamide moiety is necessary at C5 for the compound to possess activity against MRSA. Furthermore, the MTS assay confirmed analogues 5, 22d, and 25 exhibited an improved toxicity profile (not toxic up to 40 μg/mL to mammalian cells) over the lead 1. Analysis with human liver microsomes revealed compound 5 was more metabolically stable compared to the lead compound (greater than eight-fold improvement in the half-life in human liver microsomes). Collectively the results presented demonstrate the novel thiazole derivatives synthesized warrant further exploration for potential use as future antimicrobial agents for the treatment of multidrug-resistant S. aureus infections. PMID:25771109

  20. Dynamics of Biofilm Formation and the Interaction between Candida albicans and Methicillin-Susceptible (MSSA) and -Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    PubMed Central

    Zago, Chaiene Evelin; Silva, Sónia; Sanitá, Paula Volpato; Barbugli, Paula Aboud; Dias, Carla Maria Improta; Lordello, Virgínia Barreto; Vergani, Carlos Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Polymicrobial biofilms are an understudied and a clinically relevant problem. This study evaluates the interaction between C. albicans, and methicillin- susceptible (MSSA) and resistant (MRSA) S. aureus growing in single- and dual-species biofilms. Single and dual species adhesion (90 min) and biofilms (12, 24, and 48 h) were evaluated by complementary methods: counting colony-forming units (CFU mL-1), XTT-reduction, and crystal violet staining (CV). The secretion of hydrolytic enzymes by the 48 h biofilms was also evaluated using fluorimetric kits. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to assess biofilm structure. The results from quantification assays were compared using two-way ANOVAs with Tukey post-hoc tests, while data from enzymatic activities were analyzed by one-way Welch-ANOVA followed by Games-Howell post hoc test (α = 0.05). C. albicans, MSSA and MRSA were able to adhere and to form biofilm in both single or mixed cultures. In general, all microorganisms in both growth conditions showed a gradual increase in the number of cells and metabolic activity over time, reaching peak values between 12 h and 48 h (ρ<0.05). C. albicans single- and dual-biofilms had significantly higher total biomass values (ρ<0.05) than single biofilms of bacteria. Except for single MRSA biofilms, all microorganisms in both growth conditions secreted proteinase and phospholipase-C. SEM images revealed extensive adherence of bacteria to hyphal elements of C. albicans. C. albicans, MSSA, and MRSA can co-exist in biofilms without antagonism and in an apparent synergistic effect, with bacteria cells preferentially associated to C. albicans hyphal forms. PMID:25875834

  1. Stopping MRSA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vogel, Carl

    2008-01-01

    Last fall, a fever gripped the nation--an overheating of news stories about the so-called super bug: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, "staph," or simply "MRSA." The bacteria are not airborne contaminants, but when they enter a person's body through cuts, abrasions, or other breaks in the skin, they can cause infections, which can…

  2. [Guidelines for prevention, control and treatment of infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA): changes and updates of chapter 7.0: treatment of patients with MRSA infection].

    PubMed

    Kalenić, Smilja; Pal, Marina Payerl; Palcevski, Vera Vlahović; Horvatić, Jasminka; Mestrović, Tomislav; Barsić, Bruno; Stamenić, Valerija; Burcar, Ivan; Korusić, Andelko; Vucić, Marinko; Civljak, Rok; Stancić, Marin; Budimir, Ana

    2010-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important pathogen throughout the world, and as well in Croatia. Therefore it was decided to develop guidelines with the aim to reduce the number of patients infected/colonized with MRSA in healthcare facilities and in nursing homes in Croatia, consequently reducing MRSA-related morbidity and mortality. An interdisciplinary team of experts developed these guidelines using existing international guidelines from different countries, and literature reviews about prevention, control, treatment and laboratory diagnosis of MRSA infections. Grades of evidence for specific recommendations were determined using CDC/HICPAC grading system. Categorization is based on existing data, theoretical basis, applicability and economic impact. After a broad discussion in different professional societies, Guidelines were accepted. In the meantime, several new possibilities appeared in the treatment of patients with MRSA infections in Croatia, so the Chapter 7.0 Treatment of patients with MRSA infections is changed and updated according to the new treatment possibilities. The rest of the Guidelines was not changed. PMID:21294322

  3. MRSA in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a form of Staphylococcus aureus, a common bacterium that has developed resistance to several forms of antibiotics. MRSA has been around for many years, mostly in health care settings but has moved into the community in recent years. Infections can be seen anywhere but are mostly seen in…

  4. Differences in Epidemiological and Molecular Characteristics of Nasal Colonization with Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA-MRSA) in Children from a University Hospital and Day Care Centers

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Erika A.; Correa, Margarita M.; Ospina, Sigifredo; Atehortúa, Santiago L.; Jiménez, J. Natalia

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinical significance of Staphylococcus aureus colonization has been demonstrated in hospital settings; however, studies in the community have shown contrasting results regarding the relevance of colonization in infection by community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA). In Colombia there are few studies on S. aureus colonization. The aim of this study was to determine the molecular and epidemiological characteristics of nasal colonization by S. aureus (MSSA-MRSA) in children from a university hospital and day care centers (DCCs) of Medellin, Colombia. Methods An observational cross-sectional study was conducted in 400 children (200 in each setting), aged 0 months to 5 years, during 2011. Samples were collected from each nostril and epidemiological information was obtained from the parents. Genotypic analysis included spa typing, PFGE, MLST, SCCmec typing, detection of genes for virulence factors and agr groups. Results Frequency of S. aureus colonization was 39.8% (n = 159) (hospital 44.5% and DCCs 35.0%) and by MRSA, 5.3% (n = 21) (hospital 7.0% and DCCs 3.5%). Most S. aureus colonized children were older than two years (p = 0.005), the majority of them boys (59.1%), shared a bedroom with a large number of people (p = 0.028), with history of β-Lactamase inhibitors usage (p = 0.020). MSSA strains presented the greatest genotypic diversity with 15 clonal complexes (CC). MRSA isolates presented 6 CC, most of them (47.6%) belonged to CC8-SCCmec IVc and were genetically related to previously reported infectious MRSA strains. Conclusion Differences in epidemiological and molecular characteristics between populations may be useful for the understanding of S. aureus nasal colonization dynamics and for the design of strategies to prevent S. aureus infection and dissemination. The finding of colonizing MRSA with similar molecular characteristics of those causing infection demonstrates the dissemination capacity of S. aureus and the risk of infection

  5. Driving Forces of Mechanisms Regulating Oxacillin-Resistance Phenotypes of MRSA: Truly Oxacillin-Susceptible mecA-Positive Staphylococcus aureus Clinical Isolates also Exist.

    PubMed

    Pournaras, Spyros; Sabat, Artur J; Grundmann, Hajo; Hendrix, Ron; Tsakris, Athanasios; Friedrich, Alexander W

    2015-01-01

    As MRSA are considered Staphylococcus aureus isolates with oxacillin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ≥4 mg/L or harboring the mecA gene. However, the presence of mecA does not necessarily lead to oxacillin resistance and mecA gene-carrying isolates may have oxacillin MIC within the susceptible range (≥2 mg/L). During the last few years it has become apparent that oxacillin-susceptible (OS) mecA-positive S. aureus isolates (commonly called OS-MRSA) are rather commonly detected worldwide and may remain undiagnosed using phenotypic susceptibility testing methods. This review will summarize the current reports on OS-MRSA isolations and the underlying mechanisms regulating the expression of oxacillin resistance and also oxacillin susceptibility in mecA-positive S. aureus isolates. As MRSA commonly cause severe infections against which effective therapies are limited, understanding of these mechanisms could enable the identification of new targets for the treatment or reversion of the MRSA phenotype. PMID:25760336

  6. Studying the time trend of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Norway by use of non-stationary γ-Poisson distributions

    PubMed Central

    Moxnes, John F; Moen, Aina E Fossum; Leegaard, Truls Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Study the time development of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and forecast future behaviour. The major question: Is the number of MRSA isolates in Norway increasing and will it continue to increase? Design Time trend analysis using non-stationary γ-Poisson distributions. Setting Two data sets were analysed. The first data set (data set I) consists of all MRSA isolates collected in Oslo County from 1997 to 2010; the study area includes the Norwegian capital of Oslo and nearby surrounding areas, covering approximately 11% of the Norwegian population. The second data set (data set II) consists of all MRSA isolates collected in Health Region East from 2002 to 2011. Health Region East consists of Oslo County and four neighbouring counties, and is the most populated area of Norway. Participants Both data sets I and II consist of all persons in the area and time period described in the Settings, from whom MRSA have been isolated. Primary and secondary outcome measures MRSA infections have been mandatory notifiable in Norway since 1995, and MRSA colonisation since 2004. In the time period studied, all bacterial samples in Norway have been sent to a medical microbiological laboratory at the regional hospital for testing. In collaboration with the regional hospitals in five counties, we have collected all MRSA findings in the South-Eastern part of Norway over long time periods. Results On an average, a linear or exponential increase in MRSA numbers was observed in the data sets. A Poisson process with increasing intensity did not capture the dispersion of the time series, but a γ-Poisson process showed good agreement and captured the overdispersion. The numerical model showed numerical internal consistency. Conclusions In the present study, we find that the number of MRSA isolates is increasing in the most populated area of Norway during the time period studied. We also forecast a continuous increase until the year 2017. PMID:26438133

  7. Population-Based Estimates of Methicillin-Resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (MRSA) Infections among High School Athletes--Nebraska, 2006-2008

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buss, Bryan F.; Mueller, Shawn W.; Theis, Max; Keyser, Alison; Safranek, Thomas J.

    2009-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (MRSA) is an emerging cause of skin and soft-tissue infections among athletes. To determine statewide incidence among high school athletes, we surveyed all 312 Nebraska high schools regarding sport programs offered, program-specific participation numbers, number of athletes with physician-diagnosed…

  8. Evaluation of a New Selective Medium, BD BBL CHROMagar MRSA II, for Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Different Specimens▿

    PubMed Central

    Wendt, C.; Havill, N. L.; Chapin, K. C.; Boyce, J. M.; Dickenson, R.; Eigner, U.; Schütt, S.; Fahr, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    The sensitivity of screening for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) can be improved by adding other specimen sites to nares. We describe an evaluation of a new selective medium, BBL CHROMagar MRSA II (CMRSAII), for its ability to detect MRSA from different specimen types. CMRSAII is a chromogenic medium which incorporates cefoxitin for the detection of MRSA. A study was performed at four clinical laboratories with the following specimens: 1,446 respiratory, 694 stool, 1,275 skin, and 948 wound specimens and 688 blood culture bottles containing Gram-positive cocci. The recovery of MRSA on traditional culture media was compared to results with CMRSAII. S. aureus was tested by cefoxitin disk diffusion. CMRSAII was interpreted as positive for MRSA at 24 h (range, 18 to 28 h) based solely on the visualization of mauve-colored colonies and at 48 h (range, 36 to 52 h) based on detection of mauve colonies with subsequent confirmation as S. aureus (by coagulase or latex agglutination testing). MRSA was recovered more frequently on CMRSAII (89.8% at 24 h and 95.6% at 48 h) than on traditional culture plates (83.1% at 24 h and 79.8% at 48 h) for all specimen types combined (P < 0.001). The percent sensitivities of CMRSAII at 24- and 48-h reads, respectively, were 85.5 and 92.4% for respiratory specimens, 87.9% and 98.3% for stool specimens, 88.4% and 96.1% for skin specimens, 92.1% and 94.6% for wound specimens, and 100% and 100% for positive blood cultures. The specificity was 99.8% for respiratory specimens and 100% for all others. In conclusion, CMRSAII is a reliable screening medium for multiple specimen types. PMID:20392927

  9. Antibacterial Evaluation of Synthetic Thiazole Compounds In Vitro and In Vivo in a Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Skin Infection Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Haroon; Cushman, Mark; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), including strains resistant to current antibiotics, has contributed to an increase in the number of skin infections reported in humans in recent years. New therapeutic options are needed to counter this public health challenge. The aim of the present study was to examine the potential of thiazole compounds synthesized by our research group to be used topically to treat MRSA skin and wound infections. The broth microdilution method confirmed that the lead thiazole compound and four analogues are capable of inhibiting MRSA growth at concentrations as low as 1.3 μg/mL. Additionally, three compounds exhibited a synergistic relationship when combined with the topical antibiotic mupirocin against MRSA in vitro via the checkerboard assay. Thus the thiazole compounds have potential to be used alone or in combination with mupirocin against MRSA. When tested against human keratinocytes, four derivatives of the lead compound demonstrated an improved toxicity profile (were found to be non-toxic up to a concentration of 20 μg/mL). Utilizing a murine skin infection model, we confirmed that the lead compound and three analogues exhibited potent antimicrobial activity in vivo, with similar capability as the antibiotic mupirocin, as they reduced the burden of MRSA present in skin wounds by more than 90%. Taken altogether, the present study provides important evidence that these thiazole compounds warrant further investigation for development as novel topical antimicrobials to treat MRSA skin infections. PMID:26536129

  10. Artesunate has its enhancement on antibacterial activity of β-lactams via increasing the antibiotic accumulation within methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Weiwei; Li, Bin; Zheng, Xinchuan; Liu, Xin; Pan, Xichun; Qing, Rongxin; Cen, Yanyan; Zheng, Jiang; Zhou, Hong

    2013-06-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has now emerged as a predominant and serious pathogen because of its resistance to a large group of antibiotics, leading to high morbidity and mortality. Therefore, to develop new agents against resistance is urgently required. Previously, artesunate (AS) was found to enhance the antibacterial effect of β-lactams against MRSA. In this study, AS was first found to increase the accumulation of antibiotics (daunorubicin and oxacillin) within MRSA by laser confocal microscopy and liquid chromatography-tandem MS method, suggesting the increased antibiotics accumulation might be related to the enhancement of AS on antibiotics. Furthermore, AS was found not to destroy the cell structure of MRSA by transmission electron microscope. AS was found to inhibit gene expressions of important efflux pumps such as NorA, NorB and NorC, but not MepA, SepA and MdeA. In conclusion, our results showed that AS was capable of enhancing the antibacterial activity of β-lactams via increasing antibiotic accumulations within MRSA through inhibiting gene expressions of efflux pumps such as NorA, NorB and NorC, but did not destroy the cell structure of MRSA. AS could be further investigated as a candidate drug for treatment of MRSA infection. PMID:23549351

  11. Nasal carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among Swiss veterinary health care providers: detection of livestock- and healthcare-associated clones.

    PubMed

    Wettstein Rosenkranz, K; Rothenanger, E; Brodard, I; Collaud, A; Overesch, G; Bigler, B; Marschall, J; Perreten, V

    2014-07-01

    We screened a total of 340 veterinarians (including general practitioners, small animal practitioners, large animal practitioners, veterinarians working in different veterinary services or industry), and 29 veterinary assistants for nasal carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) at the 2012 Swiss veterinary annual meeting. MRSA isolates (n = 14) were detected in 3.8 % (95 % CI 2.1 - 6.3 %) of the participants whereas MRSP was not detected. Large animal practitioners were carriers of livestock-associated MRSA (LA-MRSA) ST398-t011-V (n = 2), ST398-t011-IV (n = 4), and ST398-t034-V (n = 1). On the other hand, participants working with small animals harbored human healthcare-associated MRSA (HCA-MRSA) which belonged to epidemic lineages ST225-t003-II (n = 2), ST225-t014-II (n = 1), ST5-t002-II (n = 2), ST5-t283-IV (n = 1), and ST88-t186-IV (n = 1). HCA-MRSA harbored virulence factors such as enterotoxins, β-hemolysin converting phage and leukocidins. None of the MRSA isolates carried Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL). In addition to the methicillin resistance gene mecA, LA-MRSA ST398 isolates generally contained additional antibiotic resistance genes conferring resistance to tetracycline [tet(M) and tet(K)], trimethoprim [dfrK, dfrG], and the aminoglycosides gentamicin and kanamycin [aac(6')-Ie - aph(2')-Ia]. On the other hand, HCA-MRSA ST5 and ST225 mainly contained genes conferring resistance to the macrolide, lincosamide and streptogramin B antibiotics [erm(A)], to spectinomycin [ant(9)-Ia], amikacin and tobramycin [ant(4')-Ia], and to fluoroquinolones [amino acid substitutions in GrlA (S84L) and GyrA (S80F and S81P)]. MRSA carriage may represent an occupational risk and veterinarians should be aware of possible MRSA colonization and potential for developing infection or for transmitting these strains. Professional exposure to animals should be reported upon hospitalization and before medical

  12. Multiclonal methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) outbreak and its control after use of the Veterans Affairs (VA) MRSA bundle in a VA long-term care facility, 2004-2014.

    PubMed

    Webb, Risa M; Denton, Carmelita; Spruill, Emily; Henson, Gay; Bruce, Lisa; Woods, Gail L; Swiatlo, Andrea; Walker, Erica D; Peel, Chere; Sullivan, Donna

    2016-06-01

    A multiclonal methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) outbreak with 91 infections occurred in our Veterans Affairs (VA) community living center over 46 months. Both similar and unique strains were shown by repetitive polymerase chain reaction to contribute to the outbreak, including 1 strain causing infections over a 33-month period. Most infections were soft tissue infections (67%). For 21 months after the initiation of the VA MRSA bundle, no infections were identified, and low rates of infection have been sustained an additional 4 years. The average annual rate of MRSA infection decreased by 62% (P < .001) from 0.6 per 1,000 resident days for 4 years prior to the bundle implementation to 0.09 per 1,000 resident days for 4 years after the bundle implementation. PMID:26922103

  13. Population Structure of a Hybrid Clonal Group of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus, ST239-MRSA-III

    PubMed Central

    Smyth, Davida S.; McDougal, Linda K.; Gran, Frode W.; Manoharan, Anand; Enright, Mark C.; Song, Jae-Hoon; de Lencastre, Herminia; Robinson, D. Ashley

    2010-01-01

    The methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal group known as ST239-MRSA-III is notable for its hybrid origin and for causing sustained hospital epidemics worldwide since the late 1970s. We studied the population structure of this MRSA clonal group using a sample of 111 isolates that were collected over 34 years from 29 countries. Genetic variation was assessed using typing methods and novel ascertainment methods, resulting in approximately 15 kb of sequence from 32 loci for all isolates. A single most parsimonious tree, free of homoplasy, partitioned 28 haplotypes into geographically-associated clades, including prominent European, Asian, and South American clades. The rate of evolution was estimated to be approximately 100× faster than standard estimates for bacteria, and dated the most recent common ancestor of these isolates to the mid-20th century. Associations were discovered between the ST239 phylogeny and the ccrB and dru loci of the methicillin resistance genetic element, SCCmec type III, but not with the accessory components of the element that are targeted by multiplex PCR subtyping tools. In summary, the evolutionary history of ST239 can be characterized by rapid clonal diversification that has left strong evidence of geographic and temporal population structure. SCCmec type III has remained linked to the ST239 chromosome during clonal diversification, but it has undergone homoplasious losses of accessory components. These results provide a population genetics framework for the precise identification of emerging ST239 variants, and invite a re-evaluation of the markers used for subtyping SCCmec. PMID:20062529

  14. Multidrug-Resistant and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Hog Slaughter and Processing Plant Workers and Their Community in North Carolina (USA)

    PubMed Central

    Neyra, Ricardo Castillo; Frisancho, Jose Augusto; Rinsky, Jessica L.; Resnick, Carol; Carroll, Karen Colleen; Rule, Ana Maria; Ross, Tracy; You, Yaqi; Price, Lance B.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Use of antimicrobials in industrial food-animal production is associated with the presence of antimicrobial-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) among animals and humans. Hog slaughter/processing plants process large numbers of animals from industrial animal operations and are environments conducive to the exchange of bacteria between animals and workers. Objectives: We compared the prevalence of multidrug-resistant S. aureus (MDRSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) carriage among processing plant workers, their household members, and community residents. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study of hog slaughter/processing plant workers, their household members, and community residents in North Carolina. Participants responded to a questionnaire and provided a nasal swab. Swabs were tested for S. aureus, and isolates were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility and subjected to multilocus sequence typing. Results: The prevalence of S. aureus was 21.6%, 30.2%, and 22.5% among 162 workers, 63 household members, and 111 community residents, respectively. The overall prevalence of MDRSA and MRSA tested by disk diffusion was 6.9% and 4.8%, respectively. The adjusted prevalence of MDRSA among workers was 1.96 times (95% CI: 0.71, 5.45) the prevalence in community residents. The adjusted average number of antimicrobial classes to which S. aureus isolates from workers were resistant was 2.54 times (95% CI: 1.16, 5.56) the number among isolates from community residents. We identified two MDRSA isolates and one MRSA isolate from workers as sequence type 398, a type associated with exposure to livestock. Conclusions: Although the prevalence of S. aureus and MRSA was similar in hog slaughter/processing plant workers and their household and community members, S. aureus isolates from workers were resistant to a greater number of antimicrobial classes. These findings may be related to the nontherapeutic use of antimicrobials in food

  15. Recommendations for the prevention and control of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates (MRSA) in hospitals and other healthcare facilities.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    The Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infection Control (KRINKO) at the Robert Koch-Institute Berlin published the "Recommendations for Preventing and Controlling Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Strains in Hospitals and Other Medical Facilities" in the Federal Health Gazette in 1999 [1]. These recommendations were translated for the current edition of GMS Krankenhaushygiene Interdisziplinär by the German Society of Hospital Hygiene.KRINKO's work is legitimated by section sign 23 para. 2 of the Infection Protection Act. Regarding the legal nature of the KRINKO recommendations, it should be noted that they are neither a formal act or an administrative regulation. The KRINKO recommendations are instead an evidence-based consensus of particularly qualified experts. The consensus is reached by including the Federal States' authorities and all competent professional bodies and associations. This is to guarantee that the KRINKO recommendations reflect the state-of-the-art of medical science, and are met with a high degree of user acceptance. The recommendations are published in the Federal Health Gazette and on the RKI's Internet pages (http://www.rki.de/).Link to the German original edition of the MRSA recommendations. PMID:20204101

  16. Caco-2 cells permeability evaluation of nifuroxazide derivatives with potential activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    B Fernandes, Mariane; Gonçalves, José E; C Tavares, Leoberto; Storpirtis, Sílvia

    2015-01-01

    Throughout the period of evaluation and selection in drug development, the assessment of the permeability potential of a compound to achieve an efficient refinement of the molecular structure has been widely appraised by the transport of substances across cell monolayers. This study aims to develop in vitro assays through Caco-2 cells in order to analyze the permeability of 5-nitro-heterocyclic compounds analogues to nifuroxazide with antimicrobial activity, especially showing promising activity against multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Caco-2 cell monolayers cultivated for 21 days in Transwell® plates were used for the in vitro permeability assays. The quantification of the nifuroxazide derivatives in the basolateral chambers was performed by a validated high performance liquid chromatography with UV (HPLC-UV) method. Apparent permeability values (Papp) show that these compounds can be considered as new drug candidates with the potential to present high absorption in vivo, according to the classifications of Yee and Biganzoli. The thiophenic derivatives showed permeability values higher than the furanic ones, being AminoTIO the compound with the greatest potential for the development of a new drug against MRSA, since it showed the best cytotoxicity, permeability and solubility ratio among all the derivatives. PMID:24918173

  17. Incidence and Characterisation of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from Nasal Colonisation in Participants Attending a Cattle Veterinary Conference in the UK

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Gavin K.; Harrison, Ewan M.; Craven, Emily F.; Petersen, Andreas; Larsen, Anders Rhod; Ellington, Matthew J.; Török, M. Estée; Peacock, Sharon J.; Parkhill, Julian; Zadoks, Ruth N.; Holmes, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    We sought to determine the prevalence of nasal colonisation with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus among cattle veterinarians in the UK. There was particular interest in examining the frequency of colonisation with MRSA harbouring mecC, as strains with this mecA homologue were originally identified in bovine milk and may represent a zoonotic risk to those in contact with dairy livestock. Three hundred and seven delegates at the British Cattle Veterinarian Association (BCVA) Congress 2011 in Southport, UK were screening for nasal colonisation with MRSA. Isolates were characterised by whole genome sequencing and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Eight out of three hundred and seven delegates (2.6%) were positive for nasal colonisation with MRSA. All strains were positive for mecA and none possessed mecC. The time since a delegate’s last visit to a farm was significantly shorter in the MRSA-positive group than in MRSA-negative counterparts. BCVA delegates have an increased risk of MRSA colonisation compared to the general population but their frequency of colonisation is lower than that reported from other types of veterinarian conference, and from that seen in human healthcare workers. The results indicate that recent visitation to a farm is a risk factor for MRSA colonisation and that mecC-MRSA are rare among BCVA delegates (<1% based on sample size). Contact with livestock, including dairy cattle, may still be a risk factor for human colonisation with mecC-MRSA but occurs at a rate below the lower limit of detection available in this study. PMID:23869220

  18. Phenotypic and genomic comparisons of highly vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains developed from multiple clinical MRSA strains by in vitro mutagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Kenichi; Tabuchi, Fumiaki; Matsuo, Miki; Tatsuno, Keita; Sato, Tomoaki; Okazaki, Mitsuhiro; Hamamoto, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Yasuhiko; Kaito, Chikara; Aoyagi, Tetsuji; Hiramatsu, Keiichi; Kaku, Mitsuo; Moriya, Kyoji; Sekimizu, Kazuhisa

    2015-01-01

    The development of vancomycin (VCM) resistance in Staphylococcus aureus threatens global health. Studies of the VCM-resistance mechanism and alternative therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. We mutagenized S. aureus laboratory strains and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) with ethyl methanesulfonate, and isolated mutants that exhibited high resistance to VCM (minimum inhibitory concentration = 32 μg/ml). These VCM-resistant strains were sensitive to linezolid and rifampicin, and partly to arbekacin and daptomycin. Beta-lactams had synergistic effects with VCM against these mutants. VCM-resistant strains exhibited a 2-fold increase in the cell wall thickness. Several genes were commonly mutated among the highly VCM-resistant mutants. These findings suggest that MRSA has a potential to develop high VCM resistance with cell wall thickening by the accumulation of mutations. PMID:26603341

  19. Optimization of the Antimicrobial Effect of Blue Light on Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bumah, Violet V.; Masson-Meyers, Daniela S.; Cashin, Susan; Enwemeka, Chukuka S.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective In previous studies, we showed that irradiation with 405 nm or 470 nm light suppresses up to 92% methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) growth in vitro and that the remaining bacteria re-colonize. In this study, the aim was to develop a protocol that yields 100% MRSA growth suppression. Materials and Methods We cultured 3 × 106 and 5 × 106 CFU/ml USA300 strain of MRSA and then irradiated each plate with varying fluences of 1–60 J/cm2 of 405 nm or 470 nm light, either once or twice at 6 hours intervals. Next, we plated 7 × 106 CFU/ml and irradiated it with 45, 50, 55, or 60 J/cm2 fluence, once, twice, or thrice at the same 6 hours intervals. In a third experiment, the same culture density was irradiated with 0, 165, 180, 220, or 240 J/cm2, either once, twice, or thrice. Results Irradiation with either wavelength significantly reduced the bacterial colonies regardless of bacterial density (P < 0.05). At 3 × 106 CFU/ml density, nearly 40% and 50% growth of MRSA were suppressed with as little as 3 J/cm2 of 405 nm and 470 nm wavelengths, respectively. Moreover, 100% of the colonies were suppressed with a single exposure to 55 or 60 J/cm2 of 470 nm light or double treatment with 50, 55, or 60 J/cm2 of 405 nm wavelength. At 5 × 106 CFU/ml density, irradiating twice with 50, 55, or 60 J/cm2 of either wavelength suppressed bacterial growth completely, lower fluences did not. The denser 7 × 106 CFU/ml culture required higher doses to achieve 100% suppression, either one shot with 220 J/cm2 of 470 nm light or two shots of the same dose using 405 nm. Conclusion The bactericidal effect of blue light can be optimized to yield 100% bacterial growth suppression, but with relatively high fluences for dense bacterial cultures, such as 7 × 106 CFU/ml. PMID:25639752

  20. A methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Sequence Type 8, spa type t11469 causing infection and colonizing horses in Italy.

    PubMed

    Carfora, Virginia; Caprioli, Andrea; Grossi, Ilaria; Pepe, Marco; Alba, Patricia; Lorenzetti, Serena; Amoruso, Roberta; Sorbara, Luigi; Franco, Alessia; Battisti, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    A Methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus(MRSA) was isolated in Italy from a pathological sample of a mare presenting chronic purulent sinusitis and that had undergone frontal-sinus surgery three months before. Humans, horses, dogs and environmental samples were subsequently collected at the mare's stable and at the Veterinary Hospital, where the mare was operated/hospitalized, and screened for the presence of MRSA that was detected from other horses and from the environment at both sites. All the MRSA isolates belonged to clonal complex (CC)8, ST8-t11469-SCCmec-IVa, and showed similar phenotypic and genetic multidrug resistance patterns and macrorestriction-pulsed-field gel electrophoresis profiles. The only MRSA detected from humans was a CC1, ST1-t127-SCCmec-IVa. This paper represents the first report of a clinical MRSA infection in a horse in Italy. This study also supports the opinion that improper use of antibiotics and hospitalization/surgery can represent risk factors for MRSA colonization/infection in horses, and that the environment is among important sources for exposure. PMID:27052029

  1. Treatment of localized abscesses induced by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) using MRgFUS: First in vivo results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieck, Birgit; Curiel, Laura; Mougenot, Charles; Zhang, Kunyan; Pichardo, Samuel

    2012-11-01

    Background. In the present work we study the therapeutic effect of focused ultrasound on localized abscess induced by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). MRSA is a major nosocomial pathogen in health-care facilities. The people, particularly those who are immunocompromised are prone to develop infectious sites that often are non-responsive to regular treatments. Because of its capability to induce a rise of temperature at a very precise location, the use of focused ultrasound represents a considerable opportunity to propose a new therapy for MRSA-related infections. Methods. A 50μL subcutaneous injection of MRSA strain USA 400 bacteria at a concentration of 7×103/μL was made on the left thigh of BALB/c mice and an abscess of 6±2 mm-length formed after 48hrs. A transducer operating at 3 MHz with a focal length of 50mm and diameter of 32mm was used to treat the abscess. The focal point was positioned 2mm under the skin at the abscess center. Forty-eight hours after injection 4 ultrasound exposures of 9s-each were applied to each abscess under Magnetic Resonance-guidance. Each exposure was followed by a 1 min pause. Real-time estimation of change of temperature was done using a communication toolbox (matMRI) developed in our laboratory. Three experimental groups of 6 animals each were tested: moderate temperature (MT), high temperature (HT) and control. MT and HT groups reached, respectively, 55°C and 65°C at end of exposure. Effectiveness of the treatment was assessed by culturing bacteria of the treated abscess 1 and 4 days after treatment. Spleen samples were cultured to test for septicemia. Results. Macroscopic evaluation of treated abscess indicated a diminution of external size of abscess 1d after treatment. Treatment did not cause open wounds. Bacteria counting 1 day after treatment was 0.7±1.1 × 105, 0.5±0.7 × 105 and 1.1±2.3 × 105 CFU/μl for MT, HT and control groups, respectively; for the 4-day end point, the count was 0.6±0.6

  2. Detection of mecA and enterotoxin genes in Staphylococcus aureus isolates associated with bovine mastitis and characterization of Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) in MRSA strains.

    PubMed Central

    Havaei, Seyed Asghar; Assadbeigi, Behnaz; Esfahani, Bahram Nasr; Hoseini, Nafiseh Sadat; Rezaei, Nahid; Havaei, Seyed Rouhollah

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Staphylococcus aureus is one of the main causatives of bovine mastitis. Resistance of some strains to methicillin, can complicate the treatment of its infections. On the other hand, enterotoxin production is also important. Therefore, the aim of our study was to investigate the methicillin resistance and enterotoxin production in S. aureus isolates caused bovine mastitis. Materials and Methods: Four hundred and fifty milk samples were collected. After isolation of Staphylococcus aureus, MRSA strains were detected by cefoxitin disc diffusion and oxacillin agar screening methods. DNA was extracted by phenol – chloroform method and PCR was applied for mecA, sea and seb genes. SCCmec types of mecA gene were identified using multiplex-PCR. Results: Fifty-four (12%) S. aureus were isolated. Out of these, 10 and 9 MRSA strains identified by cefoxitin disc diffusion and oxacillin agar screening methods, respectively. All 10 MRSA isolates identified by cefoxitin disc diffusion, were positive for mecA gene and all of them belonged to SCCmec type IV. The sea genes were detected in 19 isolates and only two isolates were positive for seb genes. One isolate possessed both sea and seb genes. Conclusion: Findings of this study indicated that results of cefoxitin disc diffusion test is in concordance with the PCR for mecA gene and has a higher sensitivity compared to oxacillin agar screening method. Finally, Our findings suggest that enterotoxin A is the dominant type. PMID:26668704

  3. Metabolic Footprint Analysis Uncovers Strain Specific Overflow Metabolism and D-Isoleucine Production of Staphylococcus Aureus COL and HG001

    PubMed Central

    Dörries, Kirsten; Lalk, Michael

    2013-01-01

    During infection processes, Staphylococcus aureus is able to survive within the host and to invade tissues and cells. For studying the interaction between the pathogenic bacterium and the host cell, the bacterial growth behaviour and its metabolic adaptation to the host cell environment provides first basic information. In the present study, we therefore cultivated S. aureus COL and HG001 in the eukaryotic cell culture medium RPMI 1640 and analyzed the extracellular metabolic uptake and secretion patterns of both commonly used laboratory strains. Extracellular accumulation of D-isoleucine was detected starting during exponential growth of COL and HG001 in RPMI medium. This non-canonical D-amino acid is known to play a regulatory role in adaptation processes. Moreover, individual uptake of glucose, accumulation of acetate, further overflow metabolites, and intermediates of the branched-chain amino acid metabolism constitute unique metabolic footprints. Altogether these time-resolved footprint analyses give first metabolic insights into staphylococcal growth behaviour in a culture medium used for infection related studies. PMID:24312553

  4. Treatment of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Pneumonia with Ceftaroline Fosamil in a Patient with Inhalational Thermal Injury.

    PubMed

    Faris, Janie; Mynatt, Ryan P; Hall Snyder, Ashley D; Rybak, Michael J

    2015-12-01

    A 48-year-old female, who was found unresponsive and suffered inhalation injury secondary to a house fire, was transferred to our burn center for definitive treatment. Post tracheostomy, the patient became febrile and tachycardic. On hospital day (HD) 5, the patient expressed thick yellow secretions during suctioning and diffuse rhonchi was noted on physical exam. Blood cultures and a culture from the broncheo-alvelolar lavage grew Gram-positive cocci in clusters and the patient was started on empiric vancomycin. Despite aggressive vancomycin dosing (1750 mg intravenously every 6 h), the patient's status continued to deteriorate. The organism was identified as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) with a vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 2 mg/L. Based on the potential for drug-drug interactions with linezolid, the patient was started on ceftaroline fosamil (MIC = 0.5 mg/L) 600 mg intravenously every 8 h with a prolonged 2-h infusion to anticipate suboptimal concentrations secondary to thermal burn injury. Post change in antibiotic therapy, a rapid clinical improvement was observed with the patient becoming afebrile at 48 h after initiation of ceftaroline. The patient completed a total of 14 days of ceftaroline therapy and was subsequently weaned from the ventilator on HD 22 and decannulated 2 days later. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the use of ceftaroline for the treatment of MRSA pneumonia in a patient with thermal injury. PMID:26541469

  5. Co-Therapy Using Lytic Bacteriophage and Linezolid: Effective Treatment in Eliminating Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from Diabetic Foot Infections

    PubMed Central

    Chhibber, Sanjay; Kaur, Tarsem; Sandeep Kaur

    2013-01-01

    Background Staphylococcus aureus remains the predominant pathogen in diabetic foot infections and prevalence of methicillin resistant S.aureus (MRSA) strains further complicates the situation. The incidence of MRSA in infected foot ulcers is 15–30% and there is an alarming trend for its increase in many countries. Diabetes acts as an immunosuppressive state decreasing the overall immune functioning of body and to worsen the situation, wounds inflicted with drug resistant strains represent a morbid combination in diabetic patients. Foot infections caused by MRSA are associated with an increased risk of amputations, increased hospital stay, increased expenses and higher infection-related mortality. Hence, newer, safer and effective treatment strategies are required for treating MRSA mediated diabetic foot infections. The present study focuses on the use of lytic bacteriophage in combination with linezolid as an effective treatment strategy against foot infection in diabetic population. Methodology Acute hindpaw infection with S.aureus ATCC 43300 was established in alloxan induced diabetic BALB/c mice. Therapeutic efficacy of a well characterized broad host range lytic bacteriophage, MR-10 was evaluated alone as well as in combination with linezolid in resolving the course of hindpaw foot infection in diabetic mice. The process of wound healing was also investigated. Results and Conclusions A single administration of phage exhibited efficacy similar to linezolid in resolving the course of hindpaw infection in diabetic animals. However, combination therapy using both the agents was much more effective in arresting the entire infection process (bacterial load, lesion score, foot myeloperoxidase activity and histopathological analysis). The entire process of tissue healing was also hastened. Use of combined agents has been known to decrease the frequency of emergence of resistant mutants, hence this approach can serve as an effective strategy in treating MRSA mediated

  6. Community-Associated Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clonal Complex 80 Type IV (CC80-MRSA-IV) Isolated from the Middle East: A Heterogeneous Expanding Clonal Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Harastani, Houda H.; Tokajian, Sima T.

    2014-01-01

    Background The emergence of community-associated methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has caused a change in MRSA epidemiology worldwide. In the Middle East, the persistent spread of CA-MRSA isolates that were associated with multilocus sequence type (MLST) clonal complex 80 and with staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type IV (CC80-MRSA-IV), calls for novel approaches for infection control that would limit its spread. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, the epidemiology of CC80-MRSA-IV was investigated in Jordan and Lebanon retrospectively covering the period from 2000 to 2011. Ninety-four S. aureus isolates, 63 (67%) collected from Lebanon and 31 (33%) collected from Jordan were included in this study. More than half of the isolates (56%) were associated with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs), and 73 (78%) were Panton-Valentine Leukocidin (PVL) positive. Majority of the isolates (84%) carried the gene for exofoliative toxin d (etd), 19% had the Toxic Shock Syndrome Toxin-1 gene (tst), and seven isolates from Jordan had a rare combination being positive for both tst and PVL genes. spa typing showed the prevalence of type t044 (85%) and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) recognized 21 different patterns. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing showed the prevalence (36%) of a unique resistant profile, which included resistance to streptomycin, kanamycin, and fusidic acid (SKF profile). Conclusions The genetic diversity among the CC80 isolates observed in this study poses an additional challenge to infection control of CA-MRSA epidemics. CA-MRSA related to ST80 in the Middle East was distinguished in this study from the ones described in other countries. Genetic diversity observed, which may be due to mutations and differences in the antibiotic regimens between countries may have led to the development of heterogeneous strains. Hence, it is difficult to maintain “the European CA-MRSA clone” as a uniform clone and it

  7. Synergistic effects of ovine-derived cathelicidins and other antimicrobials against Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Staphylococcus aureus 1056 MRSA.

    PubMed

    van der Linden, Danitsja S; Short, David; Dittmann, Antje; Yu, Pak-Lam

    2009-08-01

    Synergistic effects of ovine-derived cathelicidins SMAP29 and OaBac5mini with the antimicrobials polymyxin B, lysozyme, nisin and lactoferrin were investigated against E. coli O157:H7 and S. aureus 1056 MRSA. Lysozyme showed synergy against E. coli O157:H7 with SMAP29, polymyxin B and lactoferrin. Synergy was also found between SMAP29 and lactoferrin against this host. Against S. aureus 1056 MRSA, lysozyme showed synergy with OaBac5mini, polymyxin B and nisin, while synergy was also found between nisin and OaBac5mini and polymyxin B. Other combinations of the antimicrobials were either additive or non-synergistic. PMID:19396584

  8. Anatomical patterns of colonization of pets with staphylococcal species in homes of people with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) skin or soft tissue infection (SSTI).

    PubMed

    Iverson, S A; Brazil, A M; Ferguson, J M; Nelson, K; Lautenbach, E; Rankin, S C; Morris, D O; Davis, M F

    2015-03-23

    Methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP), and other pathogenic staphylococci can cause infections in companion animals and humans. Identification of colonized animals is fundamental to research and practice needs, but harmonized methods have not yet been established. To establish the optimal anatomic site for the recovery of methicillin-resistant coagulase positive staphylococci (CPS), survey data and swabs were collected from 196 pets (dogs, cats, reptiles, birds, fish and pocket pets) that lived in households with an MRSA-infected person. Using broth-enrichment culture and PCR for speciation, S. aureus was identified in 27 of 179 (15%) pets sampled at baseline and 19 of 125 (15%) pets sampled at a three-month follow-up home visit. S. pseudintermedius was isolated from 33 of 179 (18%) pets sampled at baseline and 21 of 125 (17%) of pets sampled at follow-up. The baseline MRSA and MRSP prevalence was 8% and 1% respectively from 145 mammalian pets. The follow-up MRSA and MRSP prevalence was 7% and <1% respectively from 95 mammalian pets. The mouth was the most sensitive single site sampled for isolation of S. aureus and S. pseudintermedius in mammals. In a subset of pets, from which all available isolates were identified, dual carriage of S. aureus and S. pseudintermedius was 22% at baseline and 11% at follow-up. These results identify the mouth as the most sensitive site to screen for pathogenic staphylococci and suggest that it should be included in sampling protocols. PMID:25623014

  9. Infection and colonization with methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398 versus other MRSA in an area with a high density of pig farms.

    PubMed

    Wulf, M W H; Verduin, C M; van Nes, A; Huijsdens, X; Voss, A

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of the emergence of animal related methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus ST398 in an area with a high density of pig farms. A retrospective analysis was performed of all MRSA isolates in the laboratory database from 2002 till 2008 including typing results and clinical data from infection control archives and patient charts. The implementation of the screening of people in contact with pigs and veal calves for MRSA led to an increase in the average number of newly identified carriers from 16 per year between July 2002 and July 2006 to 148 between July 2006 and December 2008. This is a 925% increase of which 82% (108/132) was due to ST398. The majority (74%) came from targeted screening but 7% was due to unexpected findings. A wide range of infections with ST398 occurred in patients with and without contact with livestock varying from post-operative wound infections to sepsis and post-trauma osteomyelitis with an overrepresentation of spa type t567 among the clinical isolates. ST398 isolates were more often multi-resistant than isolates of other spa-types. The emergence of MRSA ST398 led to an increase in both MRSA carriers and MRSA infections. PMID:21533878

  10. Antibacterial and synergic effects of gallic acid-grafted-chitosan with β-lactams against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae-Sung; Eom, Sung-Hwan; Kim, Young-Mog; Kim, Hye Seon; Yim, Mi-Jin; Lee, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Do-Hyung; Je, Jae-Young

    2014-10-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is spreading worldwide, emphasizing the need to search for new antibiotics. The anti-MRSA activities of gallic acid-grafted-chitosans (GA-g-chitosans) were investigated against 2 MRSA standards and 10 MRSA clinical isolates by determining the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs). GA-g-chitosan (I), which has the highest gallic acid content, exhibited the strongest anti-MRSA activities, with MICs of 32-64 μg/mL. A time-kill investigation revealed that GA-g-chitosan (I) exhibited a bactericidal effect at twice the MIC, also demonstrating good thermal and pH stability. Investigation of cell envelope integrity showed the release of intracellular components with an increasing absorbance value at 260 nm, indicating cell envelope damage caused by the GA-g-chitosan (I), which was further confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. When GA-g-chitosans were combined with β-lactams, including ampicillin and penicillin, synergistic effects were observed on the 2 standard MRSA strains and on the 10 clinical isolates, with fractional inhibitory indices ranging from 0.125 to 0.625. In the time-kill dynamic confirmation test, synergistic bactericidal effects were observed for the combinations of GA-g-chitosans with β-lactams, and over 4.0 log CFU/mL reductions were observed after 24 h when combination treatment was used. These results may prove GA-g-chitosans to be a potent agent when combined with ampicillin and penicillin for the elimination of MRSA. PMID:25216286

  11. Hospital-wide infection control practice and Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the intensive care unit (ICU): an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Workman, Rella

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives To estimate trends in infection/colonisation with meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in an intensive care unit (ICU). Design Observational study of results of ICU admission and weekly screens for MRSA. Setting and Participants All ICU admissions in 2001–2012. Interventions ICU admissions were screened for MRSA throughout. In late 2006, screening was extended to the whole hospital and extra measures taken in ICU. Main outcome measures Prevalence of MRSA in ICU admissions and number acquiring MRSA therein. Results In all, 366 of 6565 admissions to ICU were MRSA positive, including 270 of 4466 coming from within the hospital in which prevalence increased with time prior to transfer to ICU. Prevalence in this group was 9.4% (8.2–10.6) in 2001–2006, decreasing to 3.4% (2.3–4.5) in 2007–2009 and 1.3% (0.6–2.0) in 2010–2012, p < 0.001, due to decreased prevalence in those spending >5 days on wards before ICU admission: 18.9% (15.6–22.2) in 2001–2006, 7.1% (4.0–10.2) in 2007–2009 and 1.6% (0.1–3.1) in 2010–2012, p < 0.001. In addition, 201 patients acquired MRSA within ICU, the relative risk being greater when known positives present: 4.34 (3.98–4.70), p < 0.001. Acquisition rate/1000 bed days decreased from 13.3 (11.2–15.4) in 2001–2006 to 3.6 (2.6–4.6) in 2007–2012, p < 0.0001. Of 41 ICU-acquired MRSA bacteraemias, 38 were in 2001–2006. The risk of bacteraemia in those acquiring MRSA decreased from 25% (18.1–31.9) in 2001–2006 to 6.1% (0–12.8) thereafter, p = 0.022. Conclusions Following better hospital-wide infection control, fewer MRSA-positive patients were admitted to ICU with a parallel decrease in acquisition therein. Better practice there reduced the risk of bacteraemia. PMID:25383196

  12. Decolonisation of MRSA, S. aureus and E. coli by Cold-Atmospheric Plasma Using a Porcine Skin Model In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Maisch, Tim; Shimizu, Tetsuji; Li, Yang-Fang; Heinlin, Julia; Karrer, Sigrid; Morfill, Gregor; Zimmermann, Julia L.

    2012-01-01

    In the last twenty years new antibacterial agents approved by the U.S. FDA decreased whereas in parallel the resistance situation of multi-resistant bacteria increased. Thus, community and nosocomial acquired infections of resistant bacteria led to a decrease in the efficacy of standard therapy, prolonging treatment time and increasing healthcare costs. Therefore, the aim of this work was to demonstrate the applicability of cold atmospheric plasma for decolonisation of Gram-positive (Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus) and Gram-negative bacteria (E. coli) using an ex vivo pig skin model. Freshly excised skin samples were taken from six month old female pigs (breed: Pietrain). After application of pure bacteria on the surface of the explants these were treated with cold atmospheric plasma for up to 15 min. Two different plasma devices were evaluated. A decolonisation efficacy of 3 log10 steps was achieved already after 6 min of plasma treatment. Longer plasma treatment times achieved a killing rate of 5 log10 steps independently from the applied bacteria strains. Histological evaluations of untreated and treated skin areas upon cold atmospheric plasma treatment within 24 h showed no morphological changes as well as no significant degree of necrosis or apoptosis determined by the TUNEL-assay indicating that the porcine skin is still vital. This study demonstrates for the first time that cold atmospheric plasma is able to very efficiently kill bacteria applied to an intact skin surface using an ex vivo porcine skin model. The results emphasize the potential of cold atmospheric plasma as a new possible treatment option for decolonisation of human skin from bacteria in patients in the future without harming the surrounding tissue. PMID:22558091

  13. Caco-2 cells cytotoxicity of nifuroxazide derivatives with potential activity against Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Mariane B; Gonçalves, José E; Scotti, Marcus T; de Oliveira, Alex A; Tavares, Leoberto C; Storpirtis, Sílvia

    2012-04-01

    It is important to determine the toxicity of compounds and co-solvents that are used in cell monolayer permeability studies to increase confidence in the results obtained from these in vitro experiments. This study was designed to evaluate the cytotoxicity of new nifuroxazide derivatives with potential activity against Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Caco-2 cells to select analogues for further in vitro permeability analyses. In this study, nitrofurantoin and nifuroxazide, in addition to 6 furanic and 6 thiophenic nifuroxazide derivatives were tested at 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 μg/mL. In vitro cytotoxicity assays were performed according to the MTT (methyl tetrazolium) assay protocol described in ISO 10993-5. The viability of treated Caco-2 cells was greater than 83% for all tested nitrofurantoin concentrations, while those treated with nifuroxazide at 2, 4 and 6 μg/mL had viabilities greater than 70%. Treatment with the nifuroxazide analogues resulted in viability values greater than 70% at 2 and 4 μg/mL with the exception of the thiophenic methyl-substituted derivative, which resulted in cell viabilities below 70% at all tested concentrations. Caco-2 cells demonstrated reasonable viability for all nifuroxazide derivatives, except the thiophenic methyl-substituted compound. The former were selected for further permeability studies using Caco-2 cells. PMID:22285235

  14. ST2249-MRSA-III: a second major recombinant methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clone causing healthcare infection in the 1970s.

    PubMed

    Nimmo, G R; Steen, J A; Monecke, S; Ehricht, R; Slickers, P; Thomas, J C; Appleton, S; Goering, R V; Robinson, D A; Coombs, G W

    2015-05-01

    Typing of healthcare-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from Australia in the 1970s revealed a novel clone, ST2249-MRSA-III (CC45), present from 1973 to 1979. This clone was present before the Australian epidemic caused by the recombinant clone, ST239-MRSA-III. This study aimed to characterize the genome of ST2249-MRSA-III to establish its relationship to other MRSA clones. DNA microarray analysis was conducted and a draft genome sequence of ST2249 was obtained. The recombinant structure of the ST2249 genome was revealed by comparisons to publicly available ST239 and ST45 genomes. Microarray analysis of genomic DNA of 13 ST2249 isolates showed gross similarities with the ST239 chromosome in a segment around the origin of replication and with ST45 for the remainder of the chromosome. Recombination breakpoints were precisely determined by the changing pattern of nucleotide polymorphisms in the genome sequence of ST2249 isolate SK1585 compared with ST239 and ST45. One breakpoint was identified to the right of oriC, between sites 1014 and 1065 of the gene D484_00045. Another was identified to the left of oriC, between sites 1185 and 1248 of D484_01632. These results indicate that ST2249 inherited approximately 35.3% of its chromosome from an ST239-like parent and 64.7% from an ST45-like parent. ST2249-MRSA-III resulted from a major recombination between parents that resemble ST239 and ST45. Although only limited Australian archival material is available, the oldest extant isolate of ST2249 predates the oldest Australian isolate of ST239 by 3 years. It is therefore plausible that these two recombinant clones were introduced into Australia separately. PMID:25708549

  15. ST2249-MRSA-III: a second major recombinant methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clone causing healthcare infection in the 1970s

    PubMed Central

    Nimmo, G. R.; Steen, J. A.; Monecke, S.; Ehricht, R.; Slickers, P.; Thomas, J. C.; Appleton, S.; Goering, R. V.; Robinson, D. A.; Coombs, G. W.

    2015-01-01

    Typing of healthcare-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from Australia in the 1970s revealed a novel clone, ST2249-MRSA-III (CC45), present from 1973 to 1979. This clone was present before the Australian epidemic caused by the recombinant clone, ST239-MRSA-III. This study aimed to characterize the genome of ST2249-MRSA-III to establish its relationship to other MRSA clones. DNA microarray analysis was conducted and a draft genome sequence of ST2249 was obtained. The recombinant structure of the ST2249 genome was revealed by comparisons to publicly available ST239 and ST45 genomes. Microarray analysis of genomic DNA of 13 ST2249 isolates showed gross similarities with the ST239 chromosome in a segment around the origin of replication and with ST45 for the remainder of the chromosome. Recombination breakpoints were precisely determined by the changing pattern of nucleotide polymorphisms in the genome sequence of ST2249 isolate SK1585 compared with ST239 and ST45. One breakpoint was identified to the right of oriC, between sites 1014 and 1065 of the gene D484_00045. Another was identified to the left of oriC, between sites 1185 and 1248 of D484_01632. These results indicate that ST2249 inherited approximately 35.3% of its chromosome from an ST239-like parent and 64.7% from an ST45-like parent. ST2249-MRSA-III resulted from a major recombination between parents that resemble ST239 and ST45. Although only limited Australian archival material is available, the oldest extant isolate of ST2249 predates the oldest Australian isolate of ST239 by 3 years. It is therefore plausible that these two recombinant clones were introduced into Australia separately. PMID:25708549

  16. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) nasal real-time PCR: a predictive tool for contamination of the hospital environment.

    PubMed

    Livorsi, Daniel J; Livorsi, David J; Arif, Sana; Garry, Patricia; Kundu, Madan G; Satola, Sarah W; Davis, Thomas H; Batteiger, Byron; Kressel, Amy B

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE We sought to determine whether the bacterial burden in the nares, as determined by the cycle threshold (CT) value from real-time MRSA PCR, is predictive of environmental contamination with MRSA. METHODS Patients identified as MRSA nasal carriers per hospital protocol were enrolled within 72 hours of room admission. Patients were excluded if (1) nasal mupirocin or chlorhexidine body wash was used within the past month or (2) an active MRSA infection was suspected. Four environmental sites, 6 body sites and a wound, if present, were cultured with premoistened swabs. All nasal swabs were submitted for both a quantitative culture and real-time PCR (Roche Lightcycler, Indianapolis, IN). RESULTS At study enrollment, 82 patients had a positive MRSA-PCR. A negative correlation of moderate strength was observed between the CT value and the number of MRSA colonies in the nares (r=-0.61; P<0.01). Current antibiotic use was associated with lower levels of MRSA nasal colonization (CT value, 30.2 vs 27.7; P<0.01). Patients with concomitant environmental contamination had a higher median log MRSA nares count (3.9 vs 2.5, P=0.01) and lower CT values (28.0 vs 30.2; P<0.01). However, a ROC curve was unable to identify a threshold MRSA nares count that reliably excluded environmental contamination. CONCLUSIONS Patients with a higher burden of MRSA in their nares, based on the CT value, were more likely to contaminate their environment with MRSA. However, contamination of the environment cannot be predicted solely by the degree of MRSA nasal colonization. PMID:25627759

  17. Prevalence and clonality of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in the Atlantic Azores islands: predominance of SCCmec types IV, V and VI.

    PubMed

    Conceição, T; Tavares, A; Miragaia, M; Hyde, K; Aires-de-Sousa, M; de Lencastre, H

    2010-05-01

    In order to obtain insights into the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) population structure in the Azores archipelago, 106 MRSA isolates were collected from patients attending an Azorean central hospital between January 2007 and February 2008. Antimicrobial resistance was determined for all isolates. Molecular typing was performed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), spa typing, multilocus sequence typing (MLST), staphylococcal chromosome cassette mec (SCCmec) typing and the presence of Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL). The majority of the isolates (87%, n = 92) belonged to the EMRSA-15 clone (ST22, SCCmec-IVh), followed by the Pediatric clone (ST5-VI/IVc) (11%, n = 12). The Berlin clone (ST45-IVa) and a new clone (spa type t1839, ST1339 and SCCmec V variant) were represented by single isolates. All of the isolates carried SCCmec types IV, V or VI and a non-multiresistant antibiotic profile, resembling the currently emerging community MRSA. Moreover, PVL was described for the first time to be associated with the Pediatric clone carrying SCCmec type VI. We provided the first description of the population structure of MRSA in the Azores islands, which seems to be shaped by genetic events occurring locally, as well as by the regular population exchange between the islands, continental Portugal, the United Kingdom and the United States. PMID:20229224

  18. A cost-saving algorithm for rapid diagnosis of Staphylococcus aureus and susceptibility to oxacillin directly from positive blood culture bottles by combined testing with BinaxNOW® S. aureus and Xpert MRSA/SA Assay.

    PubMed

    Yossepowitch, Orit; Dan, Michael; Kutchinsky, Anuta; Gottesman, Tamar; Schwartz-Harari, Orna

    2014-04-01

    We studied an algorithm combining 2 rapid methods to detect Staphylococcus aureus and its susceptibility to oxacillin directly from positive blood cultures; our goal was to reduce the cost of the procedure, while maintaining accuracy and a short turnaround time. A total of 581 blood cultures containing gram-positive cocci in clusters were tested by BinaxNOW® Staphylococcus aureus Test. Positive samples were further assessed by the Xpert MRSA/SA BC Assay. Phenotypic methods have identified coagulase-negative staphylococci in 505 samples and S. aureus in 76 samples, of which 51 were oxacillin sensitive and 25 were oxacillin resistant. Sensitivity and specificity of the BinaxNOW® Test were 92% and 99%, respectively, compared to the phenotypic method. The Xpert MRSA/SA BC Assay showed complete concordance with phenotypic identification and antimicrobial susceptibility results. The combined rapid assays produced results within 2 hours and reduced the cost by 75% compared with the Xpert MRSA/SA BC Assay if used alone on all blood bottles. PMID:24503507

  19. In Vivo Assessment of Phage and Linezolid Based Implant Coatings for Treatment of Methicillin Resistant S. aureus (MRSA) Mediated Orthopaedic Device Related Infections.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Sandeep; Harjai, Kusum; Chhibber, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus comprises up to two-thirds of all pathogens in orthopaedic implant infections with two species respectively Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, being the predominate etiological agents isolated. Further, with the emergence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), treatment of S. aureus implant infections has become more difficult, thus representing a devastating complication. Use of local delivery system consisting of S.aureus specific phage along with linezolid (incorporated in biopolymer) allowing gradual release of the two agents at the implant site represents a new, still unexplored treatment option (against orthopaedic implant infections) that has been studied in an animal model of prosthetic joint infection. Naked wire, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) coated wire and phage and /or linezolid coated K-wire were surgically implanted into the intra-medullary canal of mouse femur bone of respective groups followed by inoculation of S.aureus ATCC 43300(MRSA). Mice implanted with K-wire coated with both the agents i.e phage as well as linezolid (dual coated wires) showed maximum reduction in bacterial adherence, associated inflammation of the joint as well as faster resumption of locomotion and motor function of the limb. Also, all the coating treatments showed no emergence of resistant mutants. Use of dual coated implants incorporating lytic phage (capable of self-multiplication) as well as linezolid presents an attractive and aggressive early approach in preventing as well as treating implant associated infections caused by methicillin resistant S. aureus strains as assessed in a murine model of experimental joint infection. PMID:27333300

  20. In Vivo Assessment of Phage and Linezolid Based Implant Coatings for Treatment of Methicillin Resistant S. aureus (MRSA) Mediated Orthopaedic Device Related Infections

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Sandeep; Harjai, Kusum; Chhibber, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus comprises up to two-thirds of all pathogens in orthopaedic implant infections with two species respectively Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis, being the predominate etiological agents isolated. Further, with the emergence of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), treatment of S. aureus implant infections has become more difficult, thus representing a devastating complication. Use of local delivery system consisting of S.aureus specific phage along with linezolid (incorporated in biopolymer) allowing gradual release of the two agents at the implant site represents a new, still unexplored treatment option (against orthopaedic implant infections) that has been studied in an animal model of prosthetic joint infection. Naked wire, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) coated wire and phage and /or linezolid coated K-wire were surgically implanted into the intra-medullary canal of mouse femur bone of respective groups followed by inoculation of S.aureus ATCC 43300(MRSA). Mice implanted with K-wire coated with both the agents i.e phage as well as linezolid (dual coated wires) showed maximum reduction in bacterial adherence, associated inflammation of the joint as well as faster resumption of locomotion and motor function of the limb. Also, all the coating treatments showed no emergence of resistant mutants. Use of dual coated implants incorporating lytic phage (capable of self-multiplication) as well as linezolid presents an attractive and aggressive early approach in preventing as well as treating implant associated infections caused by methicillin resistant S. aureus strains as assessed in a murine model of experimental joint infection. PMID:27333300

  1. The National One Week Prevalence Audit of Universal Meticillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Admission Screening 2012

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Christopher; Robotham, Julie; Savage, Joanne; Hopkins, Susan; Deeny, Sarah R.; Stone, Sheldon; Cookson, Barry

    2013-01-01

    Introduction The English Department of Health introduced universal MRSA screening of admissions to English hospitals in 2010. It commissioned a national audit to review implementation, impact on patient management, admission prevalence and extra yield of MRSA identified compared to “high-risk” specialty or “checklist-activated” screening (CLAS) of patients with MRSA risk factors. Methods National audit May 2011. Questionnaires to infection control teams in all English NHS acute trusts, requesting number patients admitted and screened, new or previously known MRSA; MRSA point prevalence; screening and isolation policies; individual risk factors and patient management for all new MRSA patients and random sample of negatives. Results 144/167 (86.2%) trusts responded. Individual patient data for 760 new MRSA patients and 951 negatives. 61% of emergency admissions (median 67.3%), 81% (median 59.4%) electives and 47% (median 41.4%) day-cases were screened. MRSA admission prevalence: 1% (median 0.9%) emergencies, 0.6% (median 0.4%) electives, 0.4% (median 0%) day-cases. Approximately 50% all MRSA identified was new. Inpatient MRSA point prevalence: 3.3% (median 2.9%). 104 (77%) trusts pre-emptively isolated patients with previous MRSA, 63 (35%) pre-emptively isolated admissions to “high-risk” specialties; 7 (5%) used PCR routinely. Mean time to MRSA positive result: 2.87 days (±1.33); 37% (219/596) newly identified MRSA patients discharged before result available; 55% remainder (205/376) isolated post-result. In an average trust, CLAS would reduce screening by 50%, identifying 81% of all MRSA. “High risk” specialty screening would reduce screening by 89%, identifying 9% of MRSA. Conclusions Implementation of universal screening was poor. Admission prevalence (new cases) was low. CLAS reduced screening effort for minor decreases in identification, but implementation may prove difficult. Cost effectiveness of this and other policies, awaits evaluation by

  2. A clonal complex 12 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain, West Australian MRSA-59, harbors a novel pseudo-SCCmec element.

    PubMed

    Monecke, Stefan; Coombs, Geoffrey W; Pearson, Julie; Hotzel, Helmut; Slickers, Peter; Ehricht, Ralf

    2015-11-01

    A West Australian methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain (WA MRSA-59) was characterized by microarray and sequencing. Its pseudo-staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) element comprised dcs, Q9XB68-dcs, mvaS-SCC, Q5HJW6, dru, ugpQ, ydeM, mecA-mecR-mecI, txbi mecI, tnp IS431, copA2-mco (copper resistance), ydhK, arsC-arsB-arsR (arsenic resistance), open reading frame PT43, and per-2. Recombinase genes, xylR (mecR2), and PSM-mec (phenol-soluble modulin) were absent. We suggest that mec complex A should be split into two subtypes. One harbors PSM-mec and xylR (mecR2). It is found in SCCmec types II, III, and VIII. The second subtype, described herein, is present in WA MRSA-59 and some coagulase-negative staphylococci. PMID:26349822

  3. A Clonal Complex 12 Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Strain, West Australian MRSA-59, Harbors a Novel Pseudo-SCCmec Element

    PubMed Central

    Coombs, Geoffrey W.; Pearson, Julie; Hotzel, Helmut; Slickers, Peter; Ehricht, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    A West Australian methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain (WA MRSA-59) was characterized by microarray and sequencing. Its pseudo-staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) element comprised dcs, Q9XB68-dcs, mvaS-SCC, Q5HJW6, dru, ugpQ, ydeM, mecA-mecR-mecI, txbi mecI, tnp IS431, copA2-mco (copper resistance), ydhK, arsC-arsB-arsR (arsenic resistance), open reading frame PT43, and per-2. Recombinase genes, xylR (mecR2), and PSM-mec (phenol-soluble modulin) were absent. We suggest that mec complex A should be split into two subtypes. One harbors PSM-mec and xylR (mecR2). It is found in SCCmec types II, III, and VIII. The second subtype, described herein, is present in WA MRSA-59 and some coagulase-negative staphylococci. PMID:26349822

  4. Diversity of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Strains Isolated from Inpatients of 30 Hospitals in Orange County, California

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Lyndsey O.; Murphy, Courtney R.; Spratt, Brian G.; Enright, Mark C.; Elkins, Kristen; Nguyen, Christopher; Terpstra, Leah; Gombosev, Adrijana; Kim, Diane; Hannah, Paul; Mikhail, Lydia; Alexander, Richard; Moore, Douglas F.; Huang, Susan S.

    2013-01-01

    There is a need for a regional assessment of the frequency and diversity of MRSA to determine major circulating clones and the extent to which community and healthcare MRSA reservoirs have mixed. We conducted a prospective cohort study of inpatients in Orange County, California, systematically collecting clinical MRSA isolates from 30 hospitals, to assess MRSA diversity and distribution. All isolates were characterized by spa typing, with selective PFGE and MLST to relate spa types with major MRSA clones. We collected 2,246 MRSA isolates from hospital inpatients. This translated to 91/10,000 inpatients with MRSA and an Orange County population estimate of MRSA inpatient clinical cultures of 86/100,000 people. spa type genetic diversity was heterogeneous between hospitals, and relatively high overall (72%). USA300 (t008/ST8), USA100 (t002/ST5) and a previously reported USA100 variant (t242/ST5) were the dominant clones across all Orange County hospitals, representing 83% of isolates. Fifteen hospitals isolated more t008 (USA300) isolates than t002/242 (USA100) isolates, and 12 hospitals isolated more t242 isolates than t002 isolates. The majority of isolates were imported into hospitals. Community-based infection control strategies may still be helpful in stemming the influx of traditionally community-associated strains, particularly USA300, into the healthcare setting. PMID:23637976

  5. Discovery of Benzocycloalkane Derivatives Efficiently Blocking Bacterial Virulence for the Treatment of Methicillin-Resistant S. aureus (MRSA) Infections by Targeting Diapophytoene Desaturase (CrtN).

    PubMed

    Wang, Youxin; Di, Hongxia; Chen, Feifei; Xu, Yong; Xiao, Qiang; Wang, Xuehai; Wei, Hanwen; Lu, Yanli; Zhang, Lingling; Zhu, Jin; Lan, Lefu; Li, Jian

    2016-05-26

    Antivirulence strategies are now attracting interest for the inherent mechanism of action advantages. In our previous work, diapophytoene desaturase (CrtN) was identified to be an attractive and drugable target for fighting pigmented S. aureus infections. In this research, we developed a series of effective benzocycloalkane-derived CrtN inhibitors with submicromolar IC50. Analogue 8 blocked the pigment biosynthesis of three MRSA strains with a nanomolar IC50 value. Corresponding to its mode of action, 8 did not function as a bactericidal agent. 8 could sensitize S. aureus to immune clearance. In vivo, 8 was proven to be efficacious in an S. aureus Newman sepsis model and abscess formation model. For two typical MRSAs, USA400 MW2 and Mu50, 8 significantly decreased the staphylococcal loads in the liver and kidneys. Moreover, 8 showed minimal antifungal activity compared to that of NTF. In summary, 8 has the potential to be developed as a therapeutic drug, especially against intractable MRSA issues. PMID:27139780

  6. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) contamination in bedside surfaces of a hospital ward and the potential effectiveness of enhanced disinfection with an antimicrobial polymer surfactant.

    PubMed

    Yuen, John W M; Chung, Terence W K; Loke, Alice Y

    2015-03-01

    The aim in this study was to assess the effectiveness of a quaternary ammonium chloride (QAC) surfactant in reducing surface staphylococcal contamination in a routinely operating medical ward occupied by patients who had tested positive for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The QAC being tested is an antibacterial film that is sprayed onto a surface and can remain active for up to 8 h. A field experimental study was designed with the QAC plus daily hypochlorite cleaning as the experimental group and hypochlorite cleaning alone as the control group. The method of swabbing on moistened surfaces was used for sampling. It was found that 83% and 77% of the bedside surfaces of MRSA-positive and MRSA-negative patients respectively were contaminated with staphylococci at 08:00 hours, and that the staphylococcal concentrations increased by 80% at 1200 h over a 4-hour period with routine ward and clinical activities. Irrespective of the MRSA status of the patients, high-touch surfaces around the bed-units within the studied medical ward were heavily contaminated (ranged 1 to 276 cfu/cm2 amongst the sites with positive culture) with staphylococcal bacteria including MRSA, despite the implementation of daily hypochlorite wiping. However, the contamination rate dropped significantly from 78% to 11% after the application of the QAC polymer. In the experimental group, the mean staphylococcal concentration of bedside surfaces was significantly (p<0.0001) reduced from 4.4±8.7 cfu/cm2 at 08:00 hours to 0.07±0.26 cfu/cm2 at 12:00 hours by the QAC polymer. The results of this study support the view that, in addition to hypochlorite wiping, the tested QAC surfactant is a potential environmental decontamination strategy for preventing the transmission of clinically important pathogens in medical wards. PMID:25768241

  7. Mycelium of fungi isolated from mouldy foods inhibits Staphylococcus aureus including MRSA - A rationale for the re-introduction of mycotherapy?

    PubMed

    Alnaimat, Sulaiman; Alharbi, Naiyf S; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Salmen, Saleh H; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam; Al-Johny, Bassam O; Wainwright, M

    2015-09-01

    Fungal mycelium capable of producing antibacterial agents was isolated from samples of apple, beetroot, lemon and orange; the mycelium of all isolates produced penicillin, while the apple and beetroot samples also produced the antibacterial mycotoxin patulin. The known penicillin-producing fungi were shown to produce penicillin, but not patulin. The mycelial discs of all of fruit and vegetable isolates, as well as the two known penicillin producing fungi, inhibited Staphylococcus aureus, and mycelium of all isolates inhibited MRSA, in contrast, only one of the two known penicillin-producers did so. The results are discussed in relation to the possibility of using the mycelium of Penicillium species in mycotherapy. PMID:26288565

  8. Mycelium of fungi isolated from mouldy foods inhibits Staphylococcus aureus including MRSA – A rationale for the re-introduction of mycotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Alnaimat, Sulaiman; Alharbi, Naiyf S.; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Salmen, Saleh H.; Chinnathambi, Arunachalam; Al-Johny, Bassam O.; Wainwright, M.

    2015-01-01

    Fungal mycelium capable of producing antibacterial agents was isolated from samples of apple, beetroot, lemon and orange; the mycelium of all isolates produced penicillin, while the apple and beetroot samples also produced the antibacterial mycotoxin patulin. The known penicillin-producing fungi were shown to produce penicillin, but not patulin. The mycelial discs of all of fruit and vegetable isolates, as well as the two known penicillin producing fungi, inhibited Staphylococcus aureus, and mycelium of all isolates inhibited MRSA, in contrast, only one of the two known penicillin-producers did so. The results are discussed in relation to the possibility of using the mycelium of Penicillium species in mycotherapy. PMID:26288565

  9. Cost Analysis of Universal Screening vs. Risk Factor-Based Screening for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Virginia R.; Longpre, Tara; Coyle, Doug; Suh, Kathryn N.; Taljaard, Monica; Ramotar, Karamchand; Forster, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Background The literature remains conflicted regarding the most effective way to screen for MRSA. This study was designed to assess costs associated with universal versus risk factor-based screening for the reduction of nosocomial MRSA transmission. Methods The study was conducted at The Ottawa Hospital, a large multi-centre tertiary care facility with approximately 47,000 admissions annually. From January 2006-December 2007, patients underwent risk factor-based screening for MRSA on admission. From January 2008 to August 2009 universal MRSA screening was implemented. A comparison of costs incurred during risk factor-based screening and universal screening was conducted. The model incorporated probabilities relating to the likelihood of being tested and the results of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing with associated effects in terms of MRSA bacteremia and true positive and negative test results. Inputted costs included laboratory testing, contact precautions and infection control, private room costs, housekeeping, and length of hospital stay. Deterministic sensitivity analyses were conducted. Results The risk factor-based MRSA screening program screened approximately 30% of admitted patients and cost the hospital over $780 000 annually. The universal screening program screened approximately 83% of admitted patients and cost over $1.94 million dollars, representing an excess cost of $1.16 million per year. The estimated additional cost per patient screened was $17.76. Conclusion This analysis demonstrated that a universal MRSA screening program was costly from a hospital perspective and was previously known to not be clinically effective at reducing MRSA transmission. These results may be useful to inform future model-based economic analyses of MRSA interventions. PMID:27462905

  10. Genome sequencing and molecular characterisation of Staphylococcus aureus ST772-MRSA-V, “Bengal Bay Clone”

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The PVL-positive ST772-MRSA-V is an emerging community-associated (CA-) MRSA clone that has been named Bengal Bay Clone since most patients have epidemiological connections to the Indian subcontinent. It is found increasingly common in other areas of the world. Methods One isolate of ST772-MRSA-V was sequenced using the Illumina Genome Analyzer System. After initial assembling the multiple sequence contigs were analysed using different in-house annotation scripts. Results were compared to microarray hybridisation results of clinical isolates of ST772-MRSA-V, of related strains and to another ST772-MRSA-V genome sequence. Results According to MLST e-burst analysis, ST772-MRSA-V belongs to Clonal Complex (CC)1, differing from ST1 only in one MLST allele (pta-22). However, there are several additional differences including agr alleles (group II rather than III), capsule type (5 rather than 8), the presence of the egc enterotoxin gene cluster and of the enterotoxin homologue ORF CM14 as well as the absence of the enterotoxin H gene seh. Enterotoxin genes sec and sel are present. ST772-MRSA-V harbours the genes encoding enterotoxin A (sea) and PVL (lukS/F-PV). Both are located on the same prophage. Conclusions ST772-MRSA-V may have emerged from the same lineage as globally spread CC1 and CC5 strains. It has acquired a variety of virulence factors, and for a CA-MRSA strain it has an unusually high number of genes associated with antibiotic resistance. PMID:24359724

  11. General Information about MRSA in the Community

    MedlinePlus

    ... Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir MRSA is methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus , a type of staph bacteria that is resistant to several antibiotics. In the general community, MRSA most often causes ...

  12. A rapid method combining immunofluorescence and flow cytometry for improved understanding of competitive interactions between lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) in mixed culture.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, John; Smoragiewicz, Wanda; Karska-Wysocki, Barbara

    2006-04-01

    The increasing frequency of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections in hospital and community settings highlights the need for effective anti-MRSA agents that will not contribute to the growing problem of antibiotic resistance. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) are known to exclude various pathogens through multiple mechanisms. In vitro models studying interactions of pathogens and LAB in mixed cultures use selective agar plates to quantify changes in target populations. We applied commercially available S. aureus-specific polyclonal antibodies conjugated with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) for this purpose, producing a bright green signal that clearly differentiates S. aureus from LAB species when mixed cultures are analyzed by flow cytometry and fluorescent microscopy. Flow cytometry of mixed cultures revealed a much larger population of MRSA cells than was detectable using selective agar plates. To our knowledge, this is the first time immunofluorescent flow cytometry has been applied to the study of competitive exclusion in mixed bacterial populations over time. PMID:16154216

  13. Frequency of biocide-resistant genes and susceptibility to chlorhexidine in high-level mupirocin-resistant, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MuH MRSA).

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingzhong; Zhao, Huanqiang; Han, Lizhong; Shu, Wen; Wu, Qiong; Ni, Yuxing

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of biocide-resistant determinants and the susceptibility to chlorhexidine in high-level mupirocin-resistant, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MuH MRSA). Fifty-three MuH MRSA isolates were analyzed for plasmid-borne genes (qacA/B, smr, qacG, qacH, and qacJ) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR); for chromosome-mediated genes (norA, norB, norC, mepA, mdeA, sepA, and sdrM) by PCR and quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR); and for susceptibility to chlorhexidine by MIC and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC). Furthermore, disinfectant efficacy was tested in the presence of 3.0% bovine serum albumin (BSA) in MBC detection. The plasmid-borne genes qacA/B (83.0%) and smr (77.4%) and overexpressions of chromosome-mediated genes norA (49.0%) and norB (28.8%) were predominantly found in isolates studied, and 90.6% of the isolates revealed tolerance to chlorhexidine. In the presence of BSA, the average MBC of chlorhexidine for these isolates rose to 256 μg/mL. Altogether, our results suggest that surveillance of sensitivity to biocides among MuH MRSA isolates is essential for hospital infection control. PMID:26008124

  14. Prevalence, antimicrobial susceptibility and molecular typing of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in bulk tank milk from southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Parisi, A; Caruso, M; Normanno, G; Latorre, L; Sottili, R; Miccolupo, A; Fraccalvieri, R; Santagada, G

    2016-09-01

    This paper assesses the prevalence of MRSA in bulk tank milk (BTM) samples from southern Italy, and the relationship between the Coagulase Positive Staphylococci count (CPS) and MRSA prevalence. Of 486 BTM samples tested, 12 samples (2.5%) resulted positive for the presence of MRSA. Great genetic diversity was found among the isolates: ST1/t127 and t174/IVa, ST5/t688/V, ST8/t unknown/IVa/V, ST45/t015/IVa, ST71/t524/V, ST88/t786/Iva, ST398/t011 and t899/IVa/V and ST2781/t1730/V. All isolates were pvl-negative and icaA positive. The majority of strains (58%) carried the ses (sec, seh, seg, seo, sem and sen) genes. All tested strains resulted susceptible to amikacin, cephalotin, cloramphenicol, gentamycin, trimethoprim - sulfamethoxazole, tobramycin and vancomycin, and variably resistant to ampicillin, oxacillin and tetracycline. No statistical association between the CPS count and MRSA detection was found in the MRSA-positive samples. Although some of the spa-types and STs detected in our survey are known to cause human infections, raw milk from Italian herds in the considered area is not a common source of MRSA. Nonetheless, it is necessary to assess the risk of foodborne infection and the risk related to the handling of milk. PMID:27217357

  15. Analysis of nosocomial outbreaks with multiply and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in Germany: implications for hospital hygiene.

    PubMed

    Witte, W; Braulke, C; Heuck, D; Cuny, C

    1994-01-01

    Two outbreaks of nosocomial infections with MRSA, one in a urological unit in connection with transurethral prostatectomy and the other in an orthopaedic clinic with infections after implantation of prosthetic hips, have been analyzed on the basis of typing MRSA by phage-patterns, plasmid profiles and genomic DNA fragment patterns. Main reasons for these outbreaks were obviously mistakes in hospital hygiene and an inappropriate antibiotic prophylaxis (in the first outbreak a quinolone over about 7 days, in the second a third generation cephalosporin). Both outbreaks could be stopped by measures of hospital hygiene including isolated or cohort nursing of affected patients, and change in antibiotic prophylaxis. Intensive care units (ICUs) are more often affected by MRSA than other clinical settings. As described by the example of an outbreak with MRSA in a municipal hospital, ICUs can play a special role in intrahospital spread of MRSA. The recently observed inter-regional clonal interhospital dissemination of MRSA in Germany is mainly due to a transfer of patients between hospitals; prewarning of the hospital of destination and a number of hygiene measures can prevent further spread. PMID:7927831

  16. Bio-inspired synthesis yields a tricyclic indoline that selectively resensitizes methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) to β-lactam antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Podoll, Jessica D.; Liu, Yongxiang; Chang, Le; Walls, Shane; Wang, Wei; Wang, Xiang

    2013-01-01

    The continuous emergence of resistant bacteria has become a major worldwide health threat. The current development of new antibacterials has lagged far behind. To discover reagents to fight against resistant bacteria, we initiated a chemical approach by synthesizing and screening a small molecule library, reminiscent of the polycyclic indole alkaloids. Indole alkaloids are a class of structurally diverse natural products, many of which were isolated from plants that have been used as traditional medicine for millennia. Specifically, we adapted an evolutionarily conserved biosynthetic strategy and developed a concise and unified diversity synthesis pathway. Using this pathway, we synthesized 120 polycyclic indolines that contain 26 distinct skeletons and a wide variety of functional groups. A tricyclic indoline, Of1, was discovered to selectively potentiate the activity of β-lactam antibiotics in multidrug-resistant methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), but not in methicillin-sensitive S. aureus. In addition, we found that Of1 itself does not have antiproliferative activity but can resensitize several MRSA strains to the β-lactam antibiotics that are widely used in the clinic, such as an extended-spectrum β-lactam antibiotic amoxicillin/clavulanic acid and a first-generation cephalosporin cefazolin. These data suggest that Of1 is a unique selective resistance-modifying agent for β-lactam antibiotics, and it may be further developed to fight against resistant bacteria in the clinic. PMID:24019472

  17. Emergence of Hospital- and Community-Associated Panton-Valentine Leukocidin-Positive Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Genotype ST772-MRSA-V in Ireland and Detailed Investigation of an ST772-MRSA-V Cluster in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Shore, Anna C.; Corcoran, Suzanne; Tecklenborg, Sarah; Coleman, David C.; O'Connell, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Sequence type 22 (ST22) methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) harboring staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) IV (ST22-MRSA-IV) has predominated in Irish hospitals since the late 1990s. Six distinct clones of community-associated MRSA (CA-MRSA) have also been identified in Ireland. A new strain of CA-MRSA, ST772-MRSA-V, has recently emerged and become widespread in India and has spread into hospitals. In the present study, highly similar MRSA isolates were recovered from seven colonized neonates in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) in a maternity hospital in Ireland during 2010 and 2011, two colonized NICU staff, one of their colonized children, and a NICU environmental site. The isolates exhibited multiantibiotic resistance, spa type t657, and were assigned to ST772-MRSA-V by DNA microarray profiling. All isolates encoded resistance to macrolides [msr(A) and mpb(BM)] and aminoglycosides (aacA-aphD and aphA3) and harbored the Panton-Valentine leukocidin toxin genes (lukF-PV and lukS-PV), enterotoxin genes (sea, sec, sel, and egc), and one of the immune evasion complex genes (scn). One of the NICU staff colonized by ST772-MRSA-V was identified as the probable index case, based on recent travel to India. Seven additional hospital and CA-ST772-MRSA-V isolates recovered from skin and soft tissue infections in Ireland between 2009 and 2011 exhibiting highly similar phenotypic and genotypic characteristics to the NICU isolates were also identified. The clinical details of four of these patients revealed connections with India through ethnic background or travel. Our study indicates that hospital-acquired and CA-ST772-MRSA-V is currently emerging in Ireland and may have been imported from India on several occasions. PMID:22189119

  18. Molecular modeling, dynamics studies and virtual screening of Fructose 1, 6 biphosphate aldolase-II in community acquired- methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA).

    PubMed

    Yadav, Pramod Kumar; Singh, Gurmit; Gautam, Budhayash; Singh, Satendra; Yadav, Madhu; Srivastav, Upasana; Singh, Brijendra

    2013-01-01

    Community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) has recently emerged as a nosocomial pathogen to the community which commonly causes skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTIs). This strain (MW2) has now become resistant to the most of the beta-lactam antibiotics; therefore it is the urgent need to identify the novel drug targets. Recently fructose 1,6 biphosphate aldolase-II (FBA) has been identified as potential drug target in CA-MRSA. The FBA catalyses the retro-ketolic cleavage of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) to yield dihydroxyacetone phosphate (DHAP) and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate (G3P) in glycolytic pathway. In the present research work the 3D structure of FBA was predicted using the homology modeling method followed by validation. The molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) of the predicted model was carried out using the 2000 ps time scale and 1000000 steps. The MDS results suggest that the modeled structure is stable. The predicted model of FBA was used for virtual screening against the NCI diversity subset-II ligand databases which contain 1364 compounds. Based on the docking energy scores, it was found that top four ligands i.e. ZINC01690699, ZINC13154304, ZINC29590257 and ZINC29590259 were having lower energy scores which reveal higher binding affinity towards the active site of FBA. These ligands might act as potent inhibitors for the FBA so that the menace of antimicrobial resistance in CA-MRSA can be conquered. However, pharmacological studies are required to confirm the inhibitory activity of these ligands against the FBA in CA-MRSA. PMID:23423142

  19. Imidazolidine-4-one derivatives in the search for novel chemosensitizers of Staphylococcus aureus MRSA: synthesis, biological evaluation and molecular modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Matys, Anna; Podlewska, Sabina; Witek, Karolina; Witek, Jagna; Bojarski, Andrzej J; Schabikowski, Jakub; Otrębska-Machaj, Ewa; Latacz, Gniewomir; Szymańska, Ewa; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna; Molnar, Joseph; Amaral, Leonard; Handzlik, Jadwiga

    2015-08-28

    A series of amine derivatives of 5-aromatic imidazolidine-4-ones (7-19), representing three subgroups: piperazine derivatives of 5-arylideneimidazolones (7-13), piperazine derivatives of 5-arylideneimidazolidine-2,4-dione (14-16) and primary amines of 5-naphthyl-5-methylimidazolidine-2,4-diones (17-19), was evaluated for their ability to improve antibiotics effectiveness in two strains of Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus: ATCC 25923 (a reference strain) and MRSA (methicillin resistant S. aureus) HEMSA 5 (a resistant clinical isolate). The latter compounds (17-19) were obtained by 4-step synthesis using Bucherer-Bergs condensation, two-phase bromoalkylation and Gabriel reactions. The naphthalen derivative: (Z)-5-(naphthalen-2-ylmethylene)-2-(piperazin-1-yl)-3H-imidazol-4(5H)-one (10) was the most potent in combination with β-lactam antibiotics and ciprofloxacin against the resistant strain. The high potency to increase efficacy of oxacillin was noted for (Z)-5-(anthracen-10-ylmethylene)-2-(piperazin-1-yl)-3H-imidazol-4(5H)one (12) too. In order to explain the mechanism of action of the compounds 10 and 12, docking studies with the use of crystal structures of a penicillin binding protein (PBP2a) and MecR1 were carried out. Their outcomes suggested that the most probable mechanism of action of the active compounds is the interaction with MecR1. Molecular dynamic experiments performed for the active compounds and compound 13 (structurally similar to 12) supported this hypothesis and provided possible explanation of activity dependencies of the tested compounds in terms of the restoration of antibiotic efficacy in S. aureus MRSA HEMSA 5. PMID:26160112

  20. The search and destroy strategy prevents spread and long-term carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: results from the follow-up screening of a large ST22 (E-MRSA 15) outbreak in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Böcher, S; Skov, R L; Knudsen, M A; Guardabassi, L; Mølbak, K; Schouenborg, P; Sørum, M; Westh, H

    2010-09-01

    In the aftermath of a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) ST22 hospital outbreak, we investigated the prevalence of long-term carriage, the efficacy of MRSA decolonization treatment (DT) and the spread of MRSA to households of patients and healthcare workers (HCWs). Furthermore, we evaluated the efficacy of repeated DT in long-term MRSA carriers. Of 250 index persons (58 HCWs and 192 patients), 102 persons (19 HCWs and 83 patients) and 67 household members agreed to participate. Samples from all 169 persons were taken from the nose, throat, wounds and devices/catheters, and urine samples were additionally taken from index persons. Samples from companion animals (n = 35) were taken from the nostrils and anus. Environmental sites (n = 490) screened were telephone, television remote control, toilet flush handle, favourite chair and skirting board beside the bed. Sixteen (19%) patients and two household members, but no HCWs, were ST22-positive. The throat was the most frequent site of colonization. In a multivariate analysis, chronic disease (p <0.001) and pharyngeal carriage (p <0.001) were associated with long-term MRSA carriage. MRSA was found in the environments of four long-term carriers. All animals tested were negative. MRSA-positive households were decolonized using nasal mupirocin TID and daily chlorhexidine body and hair wash for 5 days. Pharyngeal MRSA carriers also received fucidic acid (500 mg TID) combined with rifampicin (600 mg BID) or clindamycin (600 mg BID) for 7 days. The home environment was cleaned on days 2 and 5. At the end of follow-up, ten of 16 long-term carriers and the two household contacts were MRSA-negative. In conclusion, decolonization of MRSA carriers is possible, but should include treatment of household members and the environment. PMID:20041904

  1. Increased Cell Wall Teichoic Acid Production and D-alanylation Are Common Phenotypes among Daptomycin-Resistant Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Clinical Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Bertsche, Ute; Yang, Soo-Jin; Kuehner, Daniel; Wanner, Stefanie; Mishra, Nagendra N.; Roth, Tobias; Nega, Mulugeta; Schneider, Alexander; Mayer, Christoph; Grau, Timo; Bayer, Arnold S.; Weidenmaier, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Multiple mechanisms have been correlated with daptomycin-resistance (DAP-R) in Staphylococcus aureus. However, one common phenotype observed in many DAP-R S. Aureus strains is a thickened cell wall (CW). The first evidence for an impact of CW-linked glycopolymers on this phenotype was recently demonstrated in a single, well-characterized DAP-R methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) strain. In this isolate the thickened CW phenotype was linked to an increased production and D-alanylation of wall teichoic acids (WTA). In the current report, we extended these observations to methicillin-resistant daptomycin-sensitive/daptomyin-resistant (DAP-S/DAP-R) strain-pairs. These pairs included methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) isolates with and without single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in mprF (a genetic locus linked to DAP-R phenotype). We found increased CW dry mass in all DAP-R vs DAP-S isolates. This correlated with an increased expression of the WTA biosynthesis gene tagA, as well as an increased amount of WTA in the DAP-R vs DAP-S isolates. In addition, all DAP-R isolates showed a higher proportion of WTA D-alanylation vs their corresponding DAP-S isolate. We also detected an increased positive surface charge amongst the DAP-R strains (presumably related to the enhanced D-alanylation). In comparing the detailed CW composition of all isolate pairs, substantive differences were only detected in one DAP-S/DAP-R pair. The thickened CW phenotype, together with an increased surface charge most likely contributes to either: i) a charge-dependent repulsion of calcium complexed-DAP; and/or ii) steric-limited access of DAP to the bacterial cell envelope target. Taken together well-defined perturbations of CW structural and functional metrics contribute to the DAP-R phenotype and are common phenotypes in DAP-R S. Aureus isolates, both MSSA and MRSA. Note: Although “daptomycin-nonsusceptibility” is the generally accepted terminology, we have utilized the term

  2. Comparison of the next-generation Xpert MRSA/SA BC assay and the GeneOhm StaphSR assay to routine culture for identification of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus in positive-blood-culture broths.

    PubMed

    Buchan, Blake W; Allen, Stephen; Burnham, Carey-Ann D; McElvania TeKippe, Erin; Davis, Thomas; Levi, Michael; Mayne, Donna; Pancholi, Preeti; Relich, Ryan F; Thomson, Richard; Ledeboer, Nathan A

    2015-03-01

    A bloodstream infection with Staphylococcus aureus, including methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), is a serious condition that carries a high mortality rate and is also associated with significant hospital costs. The rapid and accurate identification and differentiation of methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) and MRSA directly from positive blood cultures has demonstrated benefits in both patient outcome and cost-of-care metrics. We compare the next-generation Xpert MRSA/SA BC (Xpert) assay to the GeneOhm StaphSR (GeneOhm) assay for the identification and detection of S. aureus and methicillin resistance in prospectively collected blood culture broths containing Gram-positive cocci. All results were compared to routine bacterial culture as the gold standard. Across 8 collection and test sites, the Xpert assay demonstrated a sensitivity of 99.6% (range, 96.4% to 100%) and a specificity of 99.5% (range, 98.0% to 100%) for identifying S. aureus, as well as a sensitivity of 98.1% (range, 87.5% to 100%) and a specificity of 99.6% (range, 98.3% to 100%) for identifying MRSA. In comparison, the GeneOhm assay demonstrated a sensitivity of 99.2% (range, 95.2% to 100%) and a specificity of 96.5% (range, 89.2% to 100%) for identifying S. aureus, as well as a sensitivity of 94.3% (range, 87.5% to 100%) and a specificity of 97.8% (range, 96.1% to 100%) for identifying MRSA. Five of six cultures falsely reported as negative for MRSA by the GeneOhm assay were correctly identified as positive by the Xpert assay, while one culture falsely reported as negative for MRSA by the Xpert assay was correctly reported as positive by the GeneOhm assay. PMID:25540397

  3. Rapid bench identification of methicillin-sensitive and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A multicenter comparative evaluation of Alere PBP2a Culture Colony Test (Alere) Versus Slidex MRSA detection (bioMérieux).

    PubMed

    Tasse, Jason; Dupieux, Céline; Caillon, Jocelyne; Lanotte, Philippe; Lamy, Brigitte; Aissa, Nejla; Bemer, Pascale; Mereghetti, Laurent; Michon, Anne-Laure; Lozniewski, Alain; Bes, Michèle; Trouillet-Assant, Sophie; Laurent, Frédéric

    2016-08-01

    Using 30 clinical isolates of Staphylococcus aureus representative of the most prevalent clones circulating in France, the performance of the Alere™ PBP2a Culture Colony Test (CCT) and the Slidex(®) MRSA detection kit (SMD) were compared in 5 different labs. CCT demonstrated better performance and was easier to conduct in routine. PMID:27216499

  4. Staphylococcus aureus mutants lacking cell wall-bound protein A found in isolates from bacteraemia, MRSA infection and a healthy nasal carrier.

    PubMed

    Sørum, Marit; Sangvik, Maria; Stegger, Marc; Olsen, Renate S; Johannessen, Mona; Skov, Robert; Sollid, Johanna U E

    2013-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen and a multitude of virulence factors enables it to cause infections, from superficial lesions to life-threatening systemic conditions. Staphylococcal protein A (SpA) is a surface protein contributing to S. aureus pathogenesis by interfering with immune responses and activating inflammation. Seven isolates with frameshift mutations in the spa repeat region were investigated to determine whether these mutations lead to truncation and secretion of SpA into the extracellular environment. Five isolates originated from blood cultures, one from an MRSA infection and one from a persistent nasal carrier. Full-length spa genes from the seven isolates were sequenced, and Western blot experiments were performed to localize SpA. Three isolates had identical deviating 25-bp spa repeats, but all isolates displayed different repeat successions. The DNA sequence revealed that the frameshift mutations created premature stop codons in all seven isolates, resulting in truncated SpA of different lengths, however, all lacking the XC region with the C-terminal sorting signal. SpA was detected by Western blot in six of the seven isolates, mainly extracellularly. Our findings demonstrate that S. aureus isolates with truncated SpA, not anchored to the cell wall, can still be found in bacteraemia, infection and among carriers. PMID:23620116

  5. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of triosephosphate isomerase from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA252)

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Somnath; Dutta, Debajyoti; Saha, Baisakhee; Das, Amit Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Triosephosphate isomerase from methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA252) was cloned in pQE30 vector, overexpressed in Escherichia coli M15 (pREP4) cells and purified to homogeneity. The protein was crystallized from 1.6 M trisodium citrate dihydrate pH 6.5 using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belonged to space group P43212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 79.15, c = 174.27 Å. X-ray diffraction data were collected and processed to a maximum resolution of 1.9 Å. The presence of two molecules in the asymmetric unit gave a Matthews coefficient (V M) of 2.64 Å3 Da−1, with a solvent content of 53.63%. PMID:19342791

  6. Investigation into the potential of sub-lethal photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT) to reduce susceptibility of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) to antibiotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassidy, C. M.; Donnelly, R. F.; Tunney, M. M.

    2009-06-01

    In PACT, a combination of a sensitising drug and visible light cause the selective destruction of microbial cells via singlet oxygen production. As singlet oxygen is a non-specific oxidizing agent and is only present during illumination, development of resistance to this treatment is thought to be unlikely. However, in response to oxidative stress, bacteria can up-regulate oxidative stress genes and associated antibiotic resistance genes. The up-regulation of these genes and potential transfer of genetic material may result in a resistant bacterial population. This study determined whether treatment of clinically isolated meticillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains with sub-lethal doses of methylene blue (MB) and meso-tetra (N-methyl-4-pyridyl) porphine tetra tosylate (TMP)-PACT resulted in reduced susceptibility to antibiotics and previously lethal PACT. Exposure of strains to sub-lethal doses of photosensitizer in combination with light had no effect on susceptibility to previously lethal photosensitization. Furthermore, exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of both photosensitizers caused no significant changes in the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for each strain tested. Any differences in susceptibility were not significant as they did not cross breakpoints between resistant and susceptible for any organism or antibiotic tested. Therefore, PACT remains an attractive alternative option for treatment of MRSA infections.

  7. The Tipper-Strominger Hypothesis and Triggering of Allostery in Penicillin-Binding Protein 2a of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    PubMed Central

    Fishovitz, Jennifer; Taghizadeh, Negin; Fisher, Jed F.; Chang, Mayland; Mobashery, Shahriar

    2015-01-01

    The transpeptidases involved in the synthesis of the bacterial cell wall (also known as penicillin-binding proteins, PBPs) have evolved to bind the acyl-d-Ala-d-Ala segment of the stem peptide of the nascent peptidoglycan for the physiologically important crosslinking of the cell wall. The Tipper-Strominger hypothesis stipulates that β-lactam antibiotics mimic the acyl-d-Ala-d-Ala moiety of the stem, and thus are recognized by the PBPs with bactericidal consequences. We document that this mimicry exists also at the allosteric site of PBP2a of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Interactions of different classes of β-lactam antibiotics, as mimics of the acyl-d-Ala-d-Ala moiety at the allosteric site, lead to a conformational change, across a distance of 60 Å to the active site. We directly visualize this change using an environmentally sensitive fluorescent probe affixed to the protein loops that frame the active site. This conformational mobility, documented in real time, allows antibiotic access to the active site of PBP2a. Furthermore, we document that this allosteric trigger enables synergy between two different β-lactam antibiotics, wherein occupancy at the allosteric site by one facilitates occupancy by a second at the transpeptidase catalytic site, thus lowering the minimal-inhibitory concentration. This synergy has important implications for the mitigation of facile emergence of resistance to these antibiotics by MRSA. PMID:25964995

  8. Ceftobiprole- and ceftaroline-resistant methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Chan, Liana C; Basuino, Li; Diep, Binh; Hamilton, Stephanie; Chatterjee, Som S; Chambers, Henry F

    2015-05-01

    The role of mecA mutations in conferring resistance to ceftobiprole and ceftaroline, cephalosporins with anti-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) activity, was determined with MRSA strains COL and SF8300. The SF8300 ceftaroline-passaged mutant carried a single mecA mutation, E447K (E-to-K change at position 447), and expressed low-level resistance. This mutation in COL conferred high-level resistance to ceftobiprole but only low-level resistance to ceftaroline. The COL ceftaroline-passaged mutant, which expressed high-level resistance to ceftobiprole and ceftaroline, had mutations in pbp2, pbp4, and gdpP but not mecA. PMID:25753637

  9. Prospective Comparison of a New Chromogenic Medium, MRSASelect, to CHROMagar MRSA and Mannitol-Salt Medium Supplemented with Oxacillin or Cefoxitin for Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Stoakes, Luba; Reyes, Romina; Daniel, Janis; Lennox, Gwen; John, Michael A.; Lannigan, Robert; Hussain, Zafar

    2006-01-01

    MRSASelect agar was compared to CHROMagar, mannitol-salt agar with oxacillin, and mannitol-salt agar with cefoxitin (MSA-CFOX) for the isolation of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The sensitivities and specificities were 97.3% and 99.8%, 82.9% and 99.1%, 80.2% and 79%, and 99.1% and 84.8%, respectively. MSA-CFOX and MRSASelect had a high sensitivity. MRSASelect, however, was more specific and proved to be a more reliable and rapid medium for the detection of MRSA. PMID:16455933

  10. Trends in Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia and impacts of infection control practices including universal MRSA admission screening in a hospital in Scotland, 2006–2010: retrospective cohort study and time-series intervention analysis

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Becky; López-Lozano, José-Maria; Gould, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To describe secular trends in Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia (SAB) and to assess the impacts of infection control practices, including universal methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) admission screening on associated clinical burdens. Design Retrospective cohort study and multivariate time-series analysis linking microbiology, patient management and health intelligence databases. Setting Teaching hospital in North East Scotland. Participants All patients admitted to Aberdeen Royal Infirmary between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2010: n=420 452 admissions and 1 430 052 acute occupied bed days (AOBDs). Intervention Universal admission screening programme for MRSA (August 2008) incorporating isolation and decolonisation. Primary and secondary measures Hospital-wide prevalence density, hospital-associated incidence density and death within 30 days of MRSA or methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) bacteraemia. Results Between 2006 and 2010, prevalence density of all SAB declined by 41%, from 0.73 to 0.50 cases/1000 AOBDs (p=0.002 for trend), and 30-day mortality from 26% to 14% (p=0.013). Significant reductions were observed in MRSA bacteraemia only. Overnight admissions screened for MRSA rose from 43% during selective screening to >90% within 4 months of universal screening. In multivariate time-series analysis (R2 0.45 to 0.68), universal screening was associated with a 19% reduction in prevalence density of MRSA bacteraemia (−0.035, 95% CI −0.049 to −0.021/1000 AOBDs; p<0.001), a 29% fall in hospital-associated incidence density (−0.029, 95% CI −0.035 to −0.023/1000 AOBDs; p<0.001) and a 46% reduction in 30-day mortality (−15.6, 95% CI −24.1% to −7.1%; p<0.001). Positive associations with fluoroquinolone and cephalosporin use suggested that antibiotic stewardship reduced prevalence density of MRSA bacteraemia by 0.027 (95% CI 0.015 to 0.039)/1000 AOBDs. Rates of MSSA bacteraemia were not

  11. Structure of ThiM from Vitamin B1 biosynthetic pathway of Staphylococcus aureus – Insights into a novel pro-drug approach addressing MRSA infections

    PubMed Central

    Drebes, Julia; Künz, Madeleine; Windshügel, Björn; Kikhney, Alexey G.; Müller, Ingrid B.; Eberle, Raphael J.; Oberthür, Dominik; Cang, Huaixing; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Perbandt, Markus; Betzel, Christian; Wrenger, Carsten

    2016-01-01

    Infections caused by the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are today known to be a substantial threat for global health. Emerging multi-drug resistant bacteria have created a substantial need to identify and discover new drug targets and to develop novel strategies to treat bacterial infections. A promising and so far untapped antibiotic target is the biosynthesis of vitamin B1 (thiamin). Thiamin in its activated form, thiamin pyrophosphate, is an essential co-factor for all organisms. Therefore, thiamin analogous compounds, when introduced into the vitamin B1 biosynthetic pathway and further converted into non-functional co-factors by the bacterium can function as pro-drugs which thus block various co-factor dependent pathways. We characterized one of the key enzymes within the S. aureus vitamin B1 biosynthetic pathway, 5-(hydroxyethyl)-4-methylthiazole kinase (SaThiM; EC 2.7.1.50), a potential target for pro-drug compounds and analyzed the native structure of SaThiM and complexes with the natural substrate 5-(hydroxyethyl)-4-methylthiazole (THZ) and two selected substrate analogues. PMID:26960569

  12. Structure of ThiM from Vitamin B1 biosynthetic pathway of Staphylococcus aureus – Insights into a novel pro-drug approach addressing MRSA infections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drebes, Julia; Künz, Madeleine; Windshügel, Björn; Kikhney, Alexey G.; Müller, Ingrid B.; Eberle, Raphael J.; Oberthür, Dominik; Cang, Huaixing; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Perbandt, Markus; Betzel, Christian; Wrenger, Carsten

    2016-03-01

    Infections caused by the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are today known to be a substantial threat for global health. Emerging multi-drug resistant bacteria have created a substantial need to identify and discover new drug targets and to develop novel strategies to treat bacterial infections. A promising and so far untapped antibiotic target is the biosynthesis of vitamin B1 (thiamin). Thiamin in its activated form, thiamin pyrophosphate, is an essential co-factor for all organisms. Therefore, thiamin analogous compounds, when introduced into the vitamin B1 biosynthetic pathway and further converted into non-functional co-factors by the bacterium can function as pro-drugs which thus block various co-factor dependent pathways. We characterized one of the key enzymes within the S. aureus vitamin B1 biosynthetic pathway, 5-(hydroxyethyl)-4-methylthiazole kinase (SaThiM; EC 2.7.1.50), a potential target for pro-drug compounds and analyzed the native structure of SaThiM and complexes with the natural substrate 5-(hydroxyethyl)-4-methylthiazole (THZ) and two selected substrate analogues.

  13. Performance of a New Chromogenic Medium, BBL CHROMagar MRSA II (BD), for Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Screening Samples ▿

    PubMed Central

    Van Vaerenbergh, Kristien; Cartuyvels, Reinoud; Coppens, Guy; Frans, Johan; Van den Abeele, Anne-Marie; De Beenhouwer, Hans

    2010-01-01

    Two chromogenic media for the detection of MRSA were compared: BBL CHROMagar MRSA II (BD) and MRSA ID agar (bioMérieux). Following overnight nonselective enrichment, 1,919 screening samples were inoculated on both chromogenic agars. After 24 h, the sensitivities of both media were high and comparable. Both media showed an important decrease in specificity after 48 h of incubation (decreases of 8% for MRSA II and 10% for MRSA ID), but MRSA II was significantly more specific at both time points. PMID:20181915

  14. Detection of Oxacillin-Susceptible mecA-Positive Staphylococcus aureus Isolates by Use of Chromogenic Medium MRSA ID

    PubMed Central

    Steffy, Katherin; Chatterjee, Maitrayee; Sugumar, Madhan; Dinesh, Kavitha R.; Manoharan, Anand; Karim, Shamsul; Biswas, Raja

    2013-01-01

    Reports of oxacillin-susceptible mecA-positive Staphylococcus aureus strains are on the rise. Because of their susceptibility to oxacillin and cefoxitin, it is very difficult to detect them by using routine phenotypic methods. We describe two such isolates that were detected by chromogenic medium and confirmed by characterization of the mecA gene element. PMID:23135944

  15. The effect of a cellulose dressing and topical vancomycin on methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Gram-positive organisms in chronic wounds: a case series.

    PubMed

    Albaugh, Karen W; Biely, Scott A; Cavorsi, Joseph P

    2013-05-01

    High levels of persistent bacteria may contribute to wound chronicity and delayed healing. A prospective study was conducted to: 1) evaluate the effect of applying vancomycin topically on appropriately cultured chronic lower leg wounds, specifically methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Gram-positive bacteria, and 2) evaluate its effect in combination with a cellulose dressing on healing. Twenty-three (23) outpatients (11 men, 12 women, average age 65 years [range 39-89 years]) with lower extremity wounds (15 venous ulcers, six chronic open wounds with a history of diabetes, and two chronic open trauma wounds) averaging 43.58 weeks' (range 5-121 weeks) duration and swab-cultured positive for MRSA or Gram-positive bacteria were provided 1 g vancomycin delivered by a cellulose dressing and changed every 72 hours. Patients served as their own control, and all wounds were debrided once a week. Wound surface area and bacterial and exudate levels were recorded weekly during the 3-week pretreatment period and compared to 3-week treatment period levels. Patients were followed until healed. Mean change in wound surface area was +14.5% (SD 71.91) per week before and -24.6% (SD 13.59) during the vancomycin treatment period (P = 0.014), average exudate levels decreased from 2.75 (range 1-4) to 1.81 (range 0-3) (P = 0.016), and the number of patients with positive wound cultures for MRSA or Gram-positive bacteria decreased from 23 to four after the 3-week study period. All wounds healed after an average of 8.18 weeks (SD 4.76, range 2-17 weeks). The results of this study suggest topical vancomycin applied using a dressing that retains moisture reduces wound bacterial load and may facilitate healing. Randomized, controlled clinical studies to evaluate the effectiveness and efficacy of this treatment modality and explore the relationship between wound culture results and healing are warranted. PMID:23669259

  16. CA-MRSA. The new sports pathogen.

    PubMed

    Kurkowski, Christina

    2007-01-01

    Skin infections in athletes caused by community-associated Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) have been observed within many cities throughout the United States and within many countries throughout the world (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], 2003). As the incidence rises in the athletic population, clinicians must learn to identify risk factors for CA-MRSA, diagnosis and treat infections with judicious use of antimicrobial agents and facilitate strategies to limit transmission. Recently, a new consensus guideline for handling CA-MRSA outbreaks in sports has been released by the CDC (Gorwitz et al., 2006). This article includes a review of the evolution of MRSA; distinguishes between healthcare associated Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-MRSA) and CA-MRSA; and reviews the diagnosis, management, and prevention strategies to limit transmission of CA-MRSA. PMID:17921891

  17. Synthesis, characterization, and evaluation of antibacterial effect of Ag nanoparticles against Escherichia coli O157:H7 and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)

    PubMed Central

    Paredes, Daissy; Ortiz, Claudia; Torres, Rodrigo

    2014-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been shown great interest because of their potential antibacterial effect. Recently, this has been increased due to resistance in some pathogenic bacteria strains to conventional antibiotics, which has initiated new studies to search for more effective treatments against resistant microorganisms. For these reasons, AgNPs have become an important approach for applications in nanobiotechnology in the development of antibiotic treatment of different bacterial infections. This study was aimed at synthesizing AgNPs using cysteine as a reducer agent and cetyl-tri-methyl-ammonium bromide as a stabilizer in order to obtain more efficient treatment against the pathogen bacteria Escherichia coli O157:H7. These AgNPs were characterized through UV-Vis spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering. From these analyses, formation of spherical nanoparticles with an average size of 55 nm was confirmed. Finally, minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericide concentration (MBC) of these AgNPs against pathogenic strains E. coli O157:H7 and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) were determined in both solid and liquid media. MIC and MBC values were around 0.25 μg/mL and 1 μg/mL, respectively. These parameters were comparable to those reported in the literature and were even more effective than other synthesized AgNPs. PMID:24729707

  18. MRSA in Croatia: prevalence and management.

    PubMed

    Budimir, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) are associated with increased morbidity, mortality and length of hospital stay. MRSA is a major pathogen in hospitals and an important pathogen in community infections with few severe and fatal cases. However, MRSA causes the majority of skin and soft tissue infections in the US. The burden of community MRSA is much smaller in Europe, but there are reports of livestock-associated MRSA (LA-MRSA) isolated from pigs and cattle causing significant infections in the people who are connected to these farms. MRSA has been present in Croatia for more than 45 years, and it exerts a different impact on health-care infections. A remarkable increase in MRSA percentage was noted in primarily sterile samples in 2002 (37%) in comparison to 2001 (31%). This percentage remained quite high until 2008, when the first signs of a reduced trend were observed. The lowest percentage was 22% in 2012. PMID:26559874

  19. Defining the Active Fraction of Daptomycin against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Using a Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Garonzik, Samira M.; Lenhard, Justin R.; Forrest, Alan; Holden, Patricia N.; Bulitta, Jϋrgen B.; Tsuji, Brian T.

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to study the pharmacodynamics of daptomycin in the presence of varying concentrations of human serum (HS) in vitro to quantify the fraction of daptomycin that is ‘active’. Time kill experiments were performed with daptomycin (0 to 256 mg/L) against two MRSA strains at log-phase growth, in the presence of HS (0%, 10%, 30%, 50%, 70%) combined with Mueller-Hinton broth. Daptomycin ≥ 2 mg/L achieved 99.9% kill within 8 h at all HS concentrations; early killing activity was slightly attenuated at higher HS concentrations. After 1 h, bacterial reduction of USA300 upon exposure to daptomycin 4 mg/L ranged from -3.1 to -0.5 log10CFU/mL in the presence of 0% to 70% HS, respectively. Bactericidal activity was achieved against both strains at daptomycin ≥ 4 mg/L for all fractions of HS exposure. A mechanism-based mathematical model (MBM) was developed to estimate the active daptomycin fraction at each %HS, comprising 3 bacterial subpopulations differing in daptomycin susceptibility. Time-kill data were fit with this MBM with excellent precision (r2 >0.95). The active fraction of daptomycin was estimated to range from 34.6% to 25.2% at HS fractions of 10% to 70%, respectively. Despite the reported low unbound fraction of daptomycin, the impact of protein binding on the activity of daptomycin was modest. The active fraction approach can be utilized to design in vitro experiments and to optimize therapeutic regimens of daptomycin in humans. PMID:27284923

  20. High prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carrying the mecC gene in a semi-extensive red deer (Cervus elaphus hispanicus) farm in Southern Spain.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Paula; Lozano, Carmen; González-Barrio, David; Zarazaga, Myriam; Ruiz-Fons, Francisco; Torres, Carmen

    2015-06-12

    The objective was to determine the prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage in red deer of a semi-extensive farm and in humans in contact with the estate animals, and to characterize obtained isolates. Nasal swabs of 65 deer and 15 humans were seeded on mannitol-salt-agar and oxacillin-resistance-screening-agar-base. Isolates were identified by microbiological and molecular methods. Antimicrobial susceptibility profile was determined for 16 antibiotics by disk-diffusion and the presence of eight antibiotic resistance genes, seven virulence genes and genes of immune-evasion-cluster (IEC) was analyzed by PCR. S. aureus was typed by PFGE-SmaI, spa, agr, SCCmec and MLST. Isolates were detected in 16 deer (24.6%). Eleven S. aureus isolates were methicillin-resistant (MRSA), and five were methicillin-susceptible (MSSA). All MRSA harbored mecC gene and were agr-III/SCCmecXI/ST1945 (four spa-t843 and seven spa-t1535). All mecC-MRSA carried blaZ-SCCmecXI and etd2, were IEC-type-E, and belonged to the same PFGE pattern. The five MSSA were typed as spa-t2420/agr-I/ST133. Regarding humans, S. aureus was recovered from six samples (40%). The isolates were MSSA and were typed as spa-t002/agr-II, spa-t012/agr-III or spa-t822/agr-III and showed different IEC types (A, B, D and F). blaZ and erm(A) genes were detected, as well as cna and tst genes. As conclusion, red deer analyzed in this study are frequent carriers of mecC-MRSA CC130 (16.9%), they are characterized by few resistance and virulence determinants, and by the presence of IEC type-E. Deer could be a source of mecC-MRSA which could potentially be transmitted to other animals, or even to humans. PMID:25912021

  1. Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study on Decolonization Procedures for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) among HIV-Infected Adults

    PubMed Central

    Weintrob, Amy; Bebu, Ionut; Agan, Brian; Diem, Alona; Johnson, Erica; Lalani, Tahaniyat; Wang, Xun; Bavaro, Mary; Ellis, Michael; Mende, Katrin; Crum-Cianflone, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Background HIV-infected persons have increased risk of MRSA colonization and skin and soft-tissue infections (SSTI). However, no large clinical trial has examined the utility of decolonization procedures in reducing MRSA colonization or infection among community-dwelling HIV-infected persons. Methods 550 HIV-infected adults at four geographically diverse US military HIV clinics were prospectively screened for MRSA colonization at five body locations every 6 months during a 2-year period. Those colonized were randomized in a double-blind fashion to nasal mupirocin (Bactroban) twice daily and hexachlorophene (pHisoHex) soaps daily for 7 days compared to placeboes similar in appearance but without specific antibacterial activity. The primary endpoint was MRSA colonization at 6-months post-randomization; secondary endpoints were time to MRSA clearance, subsequent MRSA infections/SSTI, and predictors for MRSA clearance at the 6-month time point. Results Forty-nine (9%) HIV-infected persons were MRSA colonized and randomized. Among those with 6-month colonization data (80% of those randomized), 67% were negative for MRSA colonization in both groups (p = 1.0). Analyses accounting for missing 6-month data showed no significant differences could have been achieved. In the multivariate adjusted models, randomization group was not associated with 6-month MRSA clearance. The median time to MRSA clearance was similar in the treatment vs. placebo groups (1.4 vs. 1.8 months, p = 0.35). There was no difference on subsequent development of MRSA infections/SSTI (p = 0.89). In a multivariable model, treatment group, demographics, and HIV-specific factors were not predictive of MRSA clearance at the 6-month time point. Conclusion A one-week decolonization procedure had no effect on MRSA colonization at the 6-month time point or subsequent infection rates among community-dwelling HIV-infected persons. More aggressive or novel interventions may be needed to reduce the burden of MRSA in

  2. General Information about MRSA in Healthcare Settings

    MedlinePlus

    ... infections can cause sepsis and death. MRSA is methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus , a type of staph bacteria that is resistant to many antibiotics. In a healthcare setting, such as a hospital ...

  3. Swine MRSA isolates form robust biofilms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization of livestock animals is common and prevalence rates for pigs have been reported to be as high as 49%. Measures to prevent, control, or eliminate MRSA in swine is of considerable public health concern. Bacterial colonization ...

  4. Swine MRSA isolates form robust biofilms

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization of livestock animals is common and prevalence rates for pigs have been reported to be as high as 49%. Measures to prevent, control, or eliminate MRSA in swine is of considerable public health concern. Bacterial colonization of both biol...

  5. MRSA - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... الذهبية المقاومة للمثيسيلين - العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Bosnian (Bosanski) MRSA (Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus) MRSA ( ...

  6. PS2-36: Population-based Evaluation of Patients with Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Infection in Relation to Animal Feeding Operations in Pennsylvania

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Brian; Pollak, Jonathan; Mercer, Dione; DeWalle, Joseph; Stewart, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Background/Aims New MRSA strains and epidemiologic patterns of infection have emerged in the past decade, with community-associated patterns now dominant. In Europe, these new community strains have been linked to animal feeding operations (AFOs), raising concerns about the widespread use of non-therapeutic antibiotics in animal feeds. No prior population-based studies have evaluated the risk of MRSA infection in relation to AFOs in the U.S. Methods We used Geisinger Clinic electronic health record data from 2001 to February 2010 on all primary care patients (n = 440,000). Three groups of patients were identified using specific ICD-9 codes: Community-onset MRSA (CO-MRSA) without risk factors (i.e., infection diagnosed as an outpatient, no antibiotics or hospitalizations in the prior year, no household contacts, no history of MRSA colonization); Hospital-onset MRSA (HO-MRSA) with risk factors (i.e., diagnosed in the hospital with at least one MRSA risk factor); and Skin infection (e.g., cellulitis, carbuncle, skin abscess) without MRSA infection or colonization history and without MRSA risk factors. MRSA cases were frequency-matched to controls with no history of MRSA or risk factors. Information on concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) were obtained from the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection, and included data on animal species (e.g., swine, dairy cattle, chickens), counts, animal equivalent units (AEUs), farm acreage, and manure generated, exported, and stored. Measures of density (e.g., AEUs per sq. mi. in township) and accessibility (e.g., distance from residence to nearest CAFO, gravity models) were derived and used in logistic regression models comparing the four groups. Results A total of 1926 MRSA cases were identified from 2003 to 2010. Of these, 1058 (55%) were identified in outpatient records, 530 (28%) from inpatient records, and 290 (15%) from medication orders. Inpatient cases increased from 2 in 2003 to 88 in 2005, remained

  7. [Reduction of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) in the exhaust air of two piggeries by a bio-trickling filter and a biological three-step air cleaning system].

    PubMed

    Clauss, Marcus; Schulz, Jochen; Stratmann-Selke, Janin; Decius, Maja; Hartung, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    "Livestock-associated" Methicillin-resistent Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA) are frequently found in the air of piggeries, are emitted into the ambient air of the piggeries and may also drift into residential areas or surrounding animal husbandries.. In order to reduce emissions from animal houses such as odour, gases and dust different biological air cleaning systems are commercially available. In this study the retention efficiencies for the culturable LA-MRSA of a bio-trickling filter and a combined three step system, both installed at two different piggeries, were investigated. Raw gas concentrations for LA-MRSA of 2.1 x 10(2) cfu/m3 (biotrickling filter) and 3.9 x 10(2) cfu/m3 (three step system) were found. The clean gas concentrations were in each case approximately one power of ten lower. Both systems were able to reduce the number of investigated bacteria in the air of piggeries on average about 90%. The investigated systems can contribute to protect nearby residents. However, considerable fluctuations of the emissions can occur. PMID:23540196

  8. Low level laser therapy (AlGaInP) applied at 5J/cm2 reduces the proliferation of Staphylococcus aureus MRSA in infected wounds and intact skin of rats*

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Daniela Conceição Gomes Gonçalves e; Plapler, Helio; da Costa, Mateus Matiuzzi; Silva, Silvio Romero Gonçalves e; de Sá, Maria da Conceição Aquino; Silva, Benedito Sávio Lima e

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Laser therapy is a low cost, non-invasive procedure with good healing results. Doubts exist as to whether laser therapy action on microorganisms can justify research aimed at investigating its possible effects on bacteria-infected wounds. OBJECTIVE To assess the effect of low intensity laser on the rate of bacterial contamination in infected wounds in the skin of rats. METHODS An experimental study using 56 male Wistar rats. The animals were randomly divided into eight groups of seven each. Those in the "infected" groups were infected by Staphylococcus aureus MRSA in the dorsal region. Red laser diode (AlGaInP) 658nm, 5J/cm2 was used to treat the animals in the "treated" groups in scan for 3 consecutive days. Samples were drawn before inoculating bacteria and following laser treatment. For statistical analysis we used the nonparametric Wilcoxon (paired data) method with a significance level of p <0.05. RESULTS The statistical analysis of median values showed that the groups submitted to laser treatment had low bacterial proliferation. CONCLUSION The laser (AlGaInP), with a dose of 5J/cm2 in both intact skin and in wounds of rats infected with Staphylococcus aureus MRSA, is shown to reduce bacterial proliferation. PMID:23539003

  9. Prevalence of qacA/B Genes and Mupirocin Resistance Among Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Isolates in the Setting of Chlorhexidine Bathing Without Mupirocin.

    PubMed

    Warren, David K; Prager, Martin; Munigala, Satish; Wallace, Meghan A; Kennedy, Colleen R; Bommarito, Kerry M; Mazuski, John E; Burnham, Carey-Ann D

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE We aimed to determine the frequency of qacA/B chlorhexidine tolerance genes and high-level mupirocin resistance among MRSA isolates before and after the introduction of a chlorhexidine (CHG) daily bathing intervention in a surgical intensive care unit (SICU). DESIGN Retrospective cohort study (2005-2012) SETTING A large tertiary-care center PATIENTS Patients admitted to SICU who had MRSA surveillance cultures of the anterior nares METHODS A random sample of banked MRSA anterior nares isolates recovered during (2005) and after (2006-2012) implementation of a daily CHG bathing protocol was examined for qacA/B genes and high-level mupirocin resistance. Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing was also performed. RESULTS Of the 504 randomly selected isolates (63 per year), 36 (7.1%) were qacA/B positive (+) and 35 (6.9%) were mupirocin resistant. Of these, 184 (36.5%) isolates were SCCmec type IV. There was a significant trend for increasing qacA/B (P=.02; highest prevalence, 16.9% in 2009 and 2010) and SCCmec type IV (P<.001; highest prevalence, 52.4% in 2012) during the study period. qacA/B(+) MRSA isolates were more likely to be mupirocin resistant (9 of 36 [25%] qacA/B(+) vs 26 of 468 [5.6%] qacA/B(-); P=.003). CONCLUSIONS A long-term, daily CHG bathing protocol was associated with a change in the frequency of qacA/B genes in MRSA isolates recovered from the anterior nares over an 8-year period. This change in the frequency of qacA/B genes is most likely due to patients in those years being exposed in prior admissions. Future studies need to further evaluate the implications of universal CHG daily bathing on MRSA qacA/B genes among hospitalized patients. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2016;37:590-597. PMID:26828094

  10. Use of antibiotics in animal agriculture & emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clones: Need to assess the impact on public health

    PubMed Central

    Mehndiratta, P.L.; Bhalla, P.

    2014-01-01

    Widespread use of antibiotics in human, veterinary medicine and agricultural settings has played a significant role in the emergence of resistant MRSA clones due to selection pressure. MRSA has now become established in human population as well as in various animal species. An animal associated clone, MRSA ST 398 has been reported from animal foods and also from human infections in the community as well as from the health care associated infections. Clonal relationship between strains of animal and human origins are indicators of interspecies transmission of clones. Spread of these organisms may pose a great impact on public health if animal associated strains enter into the community and health care settings. Surveillance is important to correlate the genetic changes associated with their epidemiological shift and expansion to predict its impact on public health. Strict regulations on the use of antibiotics in humans as well as in animal food production are required to control the emergence of drug resistant clones. This article reviews the information available on the role of antibiotics in emergence of MRSA strains, their epidemiological shift between humans and animals and its impact on the public health. PMID:25366200

  11. Application of the Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) Fingerprinting to Analyze Genetic Variation in Community Associated-Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (CA-MRSA) Isolates in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mobasherizadeh, Sina; Shojaei, Hasan; Havaei, Seyed Asghar; Mostafavizadeh, Kamyar; Davoodabadi, Fazollah; Khorvash, Farzin; Ataei, Behrooz; Daei-Naser, Abbas

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to apply RAPD technique to analyze the genetic variability among the Iranian CA-MRSA isolates. The RAPD amplification was implemented on 25 strains isolated from the anterior nares of 410 healthy children using four randomly selected oligonucleotide primers from the stocks available in our laboratory, including the primers 1254, GE6, OLP6 and OLP13 from our stock. The amplified PCR products were detected on a 1.5% agarose gel and subjected to further analysis to establish the band profiles and genetic relationships using the Gel Compar® program. The Iranian CA-MRSA isolates produced distinct RAPD patterns which varied based on the primer used, however, the primer 1254 revealed highly polymorphic patterns consisting 5 discernable RAPD types (RT), “RT1” (12, 48%), “RT2” (8, 32%), “RT3” (3, 12%), and “RT4 and RT5”, (a single RAPD type each, 4%). Phylogenetic analysis based on RAPD profiles divided most of the CA-MRSA isolates into 2 distinct but related RAPD clusters, a small group and two single unrelated RAPD types. This study shows that the simple and cost-effective but rather difficult to optimize RAPD fingerprinting could be used to evaluate genetic and epidemiological relationships of CA-MRSA isolates on condition that the patterns are obtained from carefully optimized laboratory tests. PMID:27045409

  12. Quick identification of kuraridin, a noncytotoxic anti-MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) agent from Sophora flavescens using high-speed counter-current chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ben Chung-Lap; Yu, Hua; Wong, Chun-Wai; Lui, Sau-Lai; Jolivalt, Claude; Ganem-Elbaz, Carine; Paris, Jean-Marc; Morleo, Barbara; Litaudon, Marc; Lau, Clara Bik-San; Ip, Margaret; Fung, Kwok-Pui; Leung, Ping-Chung; Han, Quan-Bin

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial resistance to antibiotics has become a serious problem of public health that concerns almost all currently used antibacterial agents and that manifests in all fields of their application. To find more antibacterial agents from natural resources is all the time considered as an important strategy. Sophora flavescens is a popularly used antibacterial herb in Chinese Medicine, from which prenylated flavones were reported as the antibacterial ingredients but with a major concern of toxicity. In our screening on the antibacterial activities of various chemicals of this herb, 18 fractions were obtained from 8 g of 50% ethanol extract on a preparative high-speed counter-current chromatography (HSCCC, 1000 ml). The system of n-hexane/ethyl acetate/methanol/water (1:1:1:1) was used as the two-phase separation solvent. A chalcone named kuraridin was isolated from the best anti-MRSA fraction, together with sophoraflavanone G, a known active ingredient of S. flavescens. Their structures were elucidated by analysis of the NMR spectra. Both compounds exhibited significant anti-MRSA effects, compared to baicalein that is a well known anti-MRSA natural product. More important, kuraridin showed no toxicity on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) at the concentration up to 64 μg/ml while sophoraflavanone G inhibited over 50% of cellular activity at 4 μg/ml or higher concentration. These data suggested that opening of ring A of the prenylated flavones might decrease the toxicity and remain the anti-MRSA effect, from a viewpoint of structure-activity relationship. PMID:22177235

  13. Livestock-Associated MRSA: The Impact on Humans

    PubMed Central

    Cuny, Christiane; Wieler, Lothar H.; Witte, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    During the past 25 years an increase in the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-MRSA) was recorded worldwide. Additionally, MRSA infections may occur outside and independent of hospitals, caused by community associated MRSA (CA-MRSA). In Germany, we found that at least 10% of these sporadic infections are due to livestock-associated MRSA (LA-MRSA), which is initially associated with livestock. The majority of these MRSA cases are attributed to clonal complex CC398. LA-MRSA CC398 colonizes the animals asymptomatically in about half of conventional pig farms. For about 77%–86% of humans with occupational exposure to pigs, nasal carriage has been reported; it can be lost when exposure is interrupted. Among family members living at the same farms, only 4%–5% are colonized. Spread beyond this group of people is less frequent. The prevalence of LA-MRSA in livestock seems to be influenced by farm size, farming systems, usage of disinfectants, and in-feed zinc. LA-MRSA CC398 is able to cause the same kind of infections in humans as S. aureus and MRSA in general. It can be introduced to hospitals and cause nosocomial infections such as postoperative surgical site infections, ventilator associated pneumonia, septicemia, and infections after joint replacement. For this reason, screening for MRSA colonization at hospital admittance is recommended for farmers and veterinarians with livestock contacts. Intrahospital dissemination, typical for HA-MRSA in the absence of sufficient hygiene, has only rarely been observed for LA-MRSA to date. The proportion of LA-MRSA among all MRSA from nosocomial infections is about 3% across Germany. In geographical areas with a comparatively high density of conventional farms, LA-MRSA accounts for up to 10% of MRSA from septicemia and 15% of MRSA from wound infections. As known from comparative genome analysis, LA-MRSA has evolved from human-adapted methicillin-susceptible S. aureus, and the jump to livestock was

  14. Livestock-Associated MRSA: The Impact on Humans.

    PubMed

    Cuny, Christiane; Wieler, Lothar H; Witte, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    During the past 25 years an increase in the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (HA-MRSA) was recorded worldwide. Additionally, MRSA infections may occur outside and independent of hospitals, caused by community associated MRSA (CA-MRSA). In Germany, we found that at least 10% of these sporadic infections are due to livestock-associated MRSA (LA-MRSA), which is initially associated with livestock. The majority of these MRSA cases are attributed to clonal complex CC398. LA-MRSA CC398 colonizes the animals asymptomatically in about half of conventional pig farms. For about 77%-86% of humans with occupational exposure to pigs, nasal carriage has been reported; it can be lost when exposure is interrupted. Among family members living at the same farms, only 4%-5% are colonized. Spread beyond this group of people is less frequent. The prevalence of LA-MRSA in livestock seems to be influenced by farm size, farming systems, usage of disinfectants, and in-feed zinc. LA-MRSA CC398 is able to cause the same kind of infections in humans as S. aureus and MRSA in general. It can be introduced to hospitals and cause nosocomial infections such as postoperative surgical site infections, ventilator associated pneumonia, septicemia, and infections after joint replacement. For this reason, screening for MRSA colonization at hospital admittance is recommended for farmers and veterinarians with livestock contacts. Intrahospital dissemination, typical for HA-MRSA in the absence of sufficient hygiene, has only rarely been observed for LA-MRSA to date. The proportion of LA-MRSA among all MRSA from nosocomial infections is about 3% across Germany. In geographical areas with a comparatively high density of conventional farms, LA-MRSA accounts for up to 10% of MRSA from septicemia and 15% of MRSA from wound infections. As known from comparative genome analysis, LA-MRSA has evolved from human-adapted methicillin-susceptible S. aureus, and the jump to livestock was

  15. MRSA CC398 in the pig production chain.

    PubMed

    Broens, E M; Graat, E A M; van der Wolf, P J; van de Giessen, A W; van Duijkeren, E; Wagenaar, J A; van Nes, A; Mevius, D J; de Jong, M C M

    2011-02-01

    In 2005, a distinct clone of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA CC398) was found in pigs and people in contact with pigs. The structure of the pig production chain in high technology pig husbandry enables pathogens to spread during animal trading, with an increasing prevalence in herds further down the chain. The objective of this study was to quantify the effect of the MRSA status of the supplying herd on the MRSA status of the receiving herd in order to gain more insight into the role of animal trading as a transmission route for MRSA CC398. Nasal samples (60-80 pigs per herd) were collected from 38 herds; in 20 herds, environmental samples were collected as well. Ten MRSA-positive herds (based on the results of nasal swabs of 10 individual pigs per herd) from a prior study were included in the data analysis. Herds were classified as MRSA positive if at least one sample tested positive. The 48 herds were part of 14 complete (40 herds) and 4 incomplete (8 herds) pig production chains. Fifty-six percent of the herds were classified as MRSA positive. MRSA-positive herds were observed at the start (breeding herds), middle (farrowing herds) and the end (finishing herds) of the pig production chain. All of the herds in 8 chains tested MRSA positive;, all of the herds in 5 chains tested MRSA negative and in the remaining 5 chains, MRSA-positive and MRSA-negative herds were detected. Seven spa types were found, which were all previously confirmed to belong to CC398. All of the isolates were susceptible to mupirocin, linezolid, rifampicin, fusidic acid and cotrimoxazole. Resistance against tetracycline, erythromycin and clindamycin was found in 100, 74 and 76% of the isolates, respectively. Seventy-nine percent of herds with a MRSA-positive supplier of pigs were MRSA positive, whereas 23% of herds with a MRSA-negative supplier were MRSA positive (OR=10.8; 95% CI: 1.5-110.1; P=0.011). The presence of entirely MRSA-positive and MRSA-negative chains and the

  16. Patients and Loved Ones: Information about MRSA in Healthcare Settings

    MedlinePlus

    ... infections. Some staph germs are resistant to several antibiotics, meaning the drugs are no longer able to cure the infections. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus or MRSA is a type of ...

  17. Engineering MRSA antimicrobials that are refractory to resistance development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most costly multi-drug resistant pathogens to both human animal health, with billions of dollars are spent annually to treat human infections. MRSA is also appearing in livestock (bovine, porcine, poultry) as well as companion animal...

  18. A New Synthetic Peptide with In vitro Antibacterial Potential Against Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Prada, Y A; Guzmán, F; Rondón, P; Escobar, P; Ortíz, C; Sierra, D A; Torres, R; Mejía-Ospino, E

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we performed the rational design of a cationic antimicrobial peptide, GIBIMPY4, using the software DEPRAMPs developed at the GIBIM research group. GIBIMPY4 has a length of 17 amino acids, it is amphipathic, its structure is α-helix and it has a net charge of (+5). Solid-phase peptide synthesis was performed using the Fmoc strategy in acid medium. The primary structure was confirmed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The antimicrobial activity of the peptide was evaluated by broth microdilution method by measuring optical density in 96-well microplates. The minimal inhibitory concentration of GIBIMPY4 to kill 50 % of the bacterial cells (MIC50) was 6.20 ± 0.02 µM for MRSA and 4.55 ± 0.02 µM for E. coli O157:H7, while also reporting a bacteriostatic effect for the later. GIBIMPY4 activity was sensitive to salt concentration in E. coli but insignificant effect in its activity against MRSA. The peptide seems to be a broad-spectrum antimicrobial agent based on the results against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria and was specific for bacterial cells E. coli O157:H7 with index of specificity equal to 9.01 in vitro assays. PMID:27301970

  19. Synergistic Interaction of Methanol Extract from Canarium odontophyllum Miq. Leaf in Combination with Oxacillin against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) ATCC 33591

    PubMed Central

    Sandra, Vimashiinee

    2016-01-01

    Canarium odontophyllum (CO) Miq. has been considered as one of the most sought-after plant species in Sarawak, Malaysia, due to its nutritional and pharmacological benefits. This study aimed to evaluate the pharmacodynamic interaction of crude methanol and acetone extracts from CO leaves in combination with oxacillin, vancomycin, and linezolid, respectively, against MRSA ATCC 33591 as preliminary study has reported its potential antistaphylococcal activity. The broth microdilution assay revealed that both methanol and acetone extracts were bactericidal with Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of 312.5 μg/mL and 156.25 μg/mL and Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC) of 625 μg/mL and 312.5 μg/mL, respectively. Fractional Inhibitory Concentration (FIC) indices were obtained via the chequerboard dilution assay where methanol extract-oxacillin, acetone extract-oxacillin, methanol extract-linezolid, and acetone extract-linezolid combinations exhibited synergism (FIC index ≤ 0.5). The synergistic action of the methanol extract-oxacillin combination was verified by time-kill analysis where bactericidal effect was observed at concentration of 1/8 × MIC of both compounds at 9.6 h compared to oxacillin alone. As such, these findings postulated that both extracts exert their anti-MRSA mechanism of action similar to that of vancomycin and provide evidence that the leaves of C. odontophyllum have the potential to be developed into antistaphylococcal agents. PMID:27006659

  20. Synergistic Interaction of Methanol Extract from Canarium odontophyllum Miq. Leaf in Combination with Oxacillin against Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) ATCC 33591.

    PubMed

    Basri, Dayang Fredalina; Sandra, Vimashiinee

    2016-01-01

    Canarium odontophyllum (CO) Miq. has been considered as one of the most sought-after plant species in Sarawak, Malaysia, due to its nutritional and pharmacological benefits. This study aimed to evaluate the pharmacodynamic interaction of crude methanol and acetone extracts from CO leaves in combination with oxacillin, vancomycin, and linezolid, respectively, against MRSA ATCC 33591 as preliminary study has reported its potential antistaphylococcal activity. The broth microdilution assay revealed that both methanol and acetone extracts were bactericidal with Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of 312.5 μg/mL and 156.25 μg/mL and Minimum Bactericidal Concentration (MBC) of 625 μg/mL and 312.5 μg/mL, respectively. Fractional Inhibitory Concentration (FIC) indices were obtained via the chequerboard dilution assay where methanol extract-oxacillin, acetone extract-oxacillin, methanol extract-linezolid, and acetone extract-linezolid combinations exhibited synergism (FIC index ≤ 0.5). The synergistic action of the methanol extract-oxacillin combination was verified by time-kill analysis where bactericidal effect was observed at concentration of 1/8 × MIC of both compounds at 9.6 h compared to oxacillin alone. As such, these findings postulated that both extracts exert their anti-MRSA mechanism of action similar to that of vancomycin and provide evidence that the leaves of C. odontophyllum have the potential to be developed into antistaphylococcal agents. PMID:27006659

  1. Draft Genome Sequences of Clinical Daptomycin-Nonsusceptible Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Strain APS211 and Its Daptomycin-Susceptible Progenitor APS210

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, David R.; Jiang, Jhih-Hang; Abbott, Iain J.; Spelman, Denis W.

    2015-01-01

    To assess the genetic factors contributing to daptomycin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus, the draft genome of a clinically derived daptomycin-nonsusceptible isolate APS211 was generated and compared to the draft sequence of its susceptible progenitor strain APS210. Four genetic differences were identified including a previously described mutation within the mprF gene. PMID:26067951

  2. Comparison of ESBL – And AmpC Producing Enterobacteriaceae and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Isolated from Migratory and Resident Population of Rooks (Corvus frugilegus) in Austria

    PubMed Central

    Mehinagic, Kemal; Rosengarten, Renate; Hoelzl, Franz; Knauer, Felix; Walzer, Chris

    2013-01-01

    In order to test whether rooks (Corvus frugilegus) represent good indicators for the potential circulation of antibiotics in their native habitat, two populations with different migratory behavior were tested for the presence of beta-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). In all, 54 and 102 samples of fresh feces of a migratory and a resident population were investigated. A total of 24 and 3 cefotaxime-resistant enterobacterial isolates were obtained from the migratory and resident population, respectively. In these isolates CTX-M-1 (n = 15), CTX-M-3 (n = 3), and CTX-M-15 (n = 3) genes were detected. TEM-1 and OXA-1 were associated with CTX-M in 3 and 2 isolates, respectively. In two E. coli isolates CMY-2 could be detected, where from one isolate displayed an overexpression of chromosomal AmpC as well. Among E. coli isolates the most common phylogenetic group was A (n = 11) and ST1683 (n = 5). In one E. coli of B2-ST131 the rfbO25b locus was detected. Three Enterobacter isolates were stably derepressed AmpC-producers. In five samples of the migratory population, PVL positive MRSA could be isolated. Two isolates were typed SCCmec IVa, spa type t127, and ST1. Three isolates carried a SCCmec type IVc, with spa type t852 and ST22. The highly significant difference of the occurrence of antibiotic resistance between the migratory population from eastern Europe compared to resident population in our study indicates that rooks may be good indicator species for the evaluation of environmental contamination with antibiotic resistant bacteria, especially due to their ecology, foraging behavior and differing migratory behavior. PMID:24391878

  3. MRSA Infections in HIV-Infected People Are Associated with Decreased MRSA-Specific Th1 Immunity.

    PubMed

    Utay, Netanya S; Roque, Annelys; Timmer, J Katherina; Morcock, David R; DeLeage, Claire; Somasunderam, Anoma; Weintrob, Amy C; Agan, Brian K; Estes, Jacob D; Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F; Douek, Daniel C

    2016-04-01

    People with HIV infection are at increased risk for community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs). Lower CD4 T-cell counts, higher peak HIV RNA levels and epidemiological factors may be associated with increased risk but no specific immune defect has been identified. We aimed to determine the immunologic perturbations that predispose HIV-infected people to MRSA SSTIs. Participants with or without HIV infection and with MRSA SSTI, MRSA colonization or negative for MRSA were enrolled. Peripheral blood and skin biopsies from study participants were collected. Flow cytometry, flow cytometry with microscopy, multiplex assays of cell culture supernatants and immunohistochemistry were used to evaluate the nature of the immune defect predisposing HIV-infected people to MRSA infections. We found deficient MRSA-specific IFNγ+ CD4 T-cell responses in HIV-infected people with MRSA SSTIs compared to MRSA-colonized participants and HIV-uninfected participants with MRSA SSTIs. These IFNγ+ CD4 T cells were less polyfunctional in HIV-infected participants with SSTIs compared to those without SSTIs. However, IFNγ responses to cytomegalovirus and Mycobacterium avium antigens and MRSA-specific IL-17 responses by CD4 T cells were intact. Upon stimulation with MRSA, peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HIV-infected participants produced less IL-12 and IL-15, key drivers of IFNγ production. There were no defects in CD8 T-cell responses, monocyte responses, opsonization, or phagocytosis of Staphylococcus aureus. Accumulation of CD3 T cells, CD4 T cells, IL-17+ cells, myeloperoxidase+ neutrophils and macrophage/myeloid cells to the skin lesions were similar between HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected participants based on immunohistochemistry. Together, these results indicate that MRSA-specific IFNγ+ CD4 T-cell responses are essential for the control of initial and recurrent MRSA infections in HIV-infected people. PMID

  4. MRSA Infections in HIV-Infected People Are Associated with Decreased MRSA-Specific Th1 Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Utay, Netanya S.; Roque, Annelys; Timmer, J. Katherina; Morcock, David R.; DeLeage, Claire; Somasunderam, Anoma; Weintrob, Amy C.; Agan, Brian K.; Estes, Jacob D.; Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F.; Douek, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    People with HIV infection are at increased risk for community-acquired methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs). Lower CD4 T-cell counts, higher peak HIV RNA levels and epidemiological factors may be associated with increased risk but no specific immune defect has been identified. We aimed to determine the immunologic perturbations that predispose HIV-infected people to MRSA SSTIs. Participants with or without HIV infection and with MRSA SSTI, MRSA colonization or negative for MRSA were enrolled. Peripheral blood and skin biopsies from study participants were collected. Flow cytometry, flow cytometry with microscopy, multiplex assays of cell culture supernatants and immunohistochemistry were used to evaluate the nature of the immune defect predisposing HIV-infected people to MRSA infections. We found deficient MRSA-specific IFNγ+ CD4 T-cell responses in HIV-infected people with MRSA SSTIs compared to MRSA-colonized participants and HIV-uninfected participants with MRSA SSTIs. These IFNγ+ CD4 T cells were less polyfunctional in HIV-infected participants with SSTIs compared to those without SSTIs. However, IFNγ responses to cytomegalovirus and Mycobacterium avium antigens and MRSA-specific IL-17 responses by CD4 T cells were intact. Upon stimulation with MRSA, peripheral blood mononuclear cells from HIV-infected participants produced less IL-12 and IL-15, key drivers of IFNγ production. There were no defects in CD8 T-cell responses, monocyte responses, opsonization, or phagocytosis of Staphylococcus aureus. Accumulation of CD3 T cells, CD4 T cells, IL-17+ cells, myeloperoxidase+ neutrophils and macrophage/myeloid cells to the skin lesions were similar between HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected participants based on immunohistochemistry. Together, these results indicate that MRSA-specific IFNγ+ CD4 T-cell responses are essential for the control of initial and recurrent MRSA infections in HIV-infected people. PMID

  5. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: the superbug.

    PubMed

    Ippolito, Giuseppe; Leone, Sebastiano; Lauria, Francesco N; Nicastri, Emanuele; Wenzel, Richard P

    2010-10-01

    Over the last decade, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains have emerged as serious pathogens in the nosocomial and community setting. Hospitalization costs associated with MRSA infections are substantially greater than those associated with methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) infections, and MRSA has wider economic effects that involve indirect costs to the patient and to society. In addition, there is some evidence suggesting that MRSA infections increase morbidity and the risk of mortality. Glycopeptides are the backbone antibiotics for the treatment of MRSA infections. However, several recent reports have highlighted the limitations of vancomycin, and its role in the management of serious infections is now being reconsidered. Several new antimicrobials demonstrate in vitro activity against MRSA and other Gram-positive bacteria. Data from large surveys indicate that linezolid, daptomycin, and tigecycline are almost universally active against MRSA. This review will briefly discuss the epidemiology, costs, outcome, and therapeutic options for the management of MRSA infections. PMID:20851011

  6. MRSA and the Workplace

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Publications and Products Programs Contact NIOSH NIOSH MRSA and the Workplace Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share ... infections from their healthcare provider Other FAQs About MRSA Signs and Symptoms What does a staph or ...

  7. Photos of MRSA Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... MRSA MRSA in the General Community Clinicians School & Daycare Leaders Coaches, Athletic Directors, and Team Healthcare Providers ... INFO U.S. Department of Health & Human Services HHS/Open USA.gov Top

  8. The changing epidemiology of Staphylococcus aureus?

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, H. F.

    2001-01-01

    Strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), which had been largely confined to hospitals and long-term care facilities, are emerging in the community. The changing epidemiology of MRSA bears striking similarity to the emergence of penicillinase-mediated resistance in S. aureus decades ago. Even though the origin (hospital or the community) of the emerging MRSA strains is not known, the prevalence of these strains in the community seems likely to increase substantially. PMID:11294701

  9. Can EDTA Change MRSA into MSSA? A Future Prospective!

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sonia; Sarkar, Soma; Ghosh, Sougata; (Mitra), Anita Nandi; Sinha, Anuradha; Chakravorty, Sriparna

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In the present era we are left behind with limited options for the treatment of serious infections caused by multidrug resistant S.aureus, most remarkably nosocomially acquired Methicillin resistant S.aureus (MRSA). The problem increases more when these strains easily become multidrug resistant (MDR) due to biofilm formation. Those staphylococcal species that are vancomycin and linezolid resistant are also resistant to other antistaphylococcal agents which call for an urgent intervention to develop newer antimicrobial agents. Aim The present study was undertaken with the aim to evaluate the antibiofilm effect of EDTA against the biofilm forming MRSA isolates, isolated from different clinical infections. Materials and Methods The biofilms formed on polystyrene microtitre plates by the MRSA strains were treated by different concentrations of EDTA to find out its anti-biofilm activity. Further simultaneously the antibiotic susceptibility pattern was noted down to check whether the MRSA strains become MSSA (Methicillin sensitive S.aureus). Results Our data demonstrates that EDTA at 4mM concentration inhibits biofilm of MRSA and at 20 mM have an ability to reduce and dissociate the biofilm membrane, allowing the antibiotics to enter and convert MRSA strains into MSSA. Conclusion These findings suggest that commercially available EDTA could be used in future to control MRSA and its biofilm- related infections. PMID:27042464

  10. The bactericidal effects of anti-MRSA agents with rifampicin and sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim against intracellular phagocytized MRSA.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Toshimori

    2007-06-01

    We experienced therapeutic failure with vancomycin in patients with serious methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections, in some of whom the bacteria were found to be alive in the leukocytes. We therefore evaluated the antimicrobial activity of several anti-MRSA agents (vancomycin, linezolid, quinupristin/dalfopristin, arbekacin) and co-administered agents (rifampicin, sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim) against clinically isolated MRSA in phagocytized human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. After allowing the leukocytes to phagocytize the bacteria, the mixture was separated into leukocytes and supernatant, to which MRSA agents were added, and incubated for 24 h. After incubation, the leukocytes were crushed and the intracellular MRSA was cultured quantitatively. Vancomycin resulted in a less than 1% survival ratio of extracellular MRSA, but it was one of the highest ratios of intracellular MRSA with 33.8% compared with other agents. The survival ratios of intracellular MRSA with vancomycin plus rifampicin and with vancomycin plus rifampicin plus sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim were 0.78% and 1.02%, respectively, which is significantly lower than that of vancomycin. For linezolid, quinupristin/dalfopristin, and arbekacin, there were no significant differences in the survival ratios between monotherapy and combination therapy against either extracellular or intracellular MRSA. The results suggest that the concomitant use of rifampicin or rifampicin plus sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim with vancomycin is effective for MRSA phagocytized in leukocytes when vancomycin monotherapy is not sufficiently effective. Combination therapy showed no difference in efficacy in the case of linezolid, quinupristin/dalfopristin, and arbekacin. PMID:17593499

  11. [Staphylococcus aureus and antibiotic resistance].

    PubMed

    Sancak, Banu

    2011-07-01

    After the report of first case of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in 1961, MRSA become a major problem worldwide. Over the last decade MRSA strains have emerged as serious pathogens in nosocomial and community settings. Glycopeptides (vancomycin and teicoplanin) are still the current mainstay of therapy for infections caused by MRSA. In the last decade dramatic changes have occurred in the epidemiology of MRSA infections. The isolates with reduced susceptibility and in vitro resistance to vancomycin have emerged. Recently, therapeutic alternatives such as quinupristin/dalfopristin, linezolid, tigecycline and daptomycin have been introduced into clinical practice for treating MRSA infections. Nevertheless, these drugs are only approved for certain indication and resistance has already been reported. In this review, the new information on novel drugs for treating MRSA infections and the resistance mechanisms of these drugs were discussed. PMID:21935792

  12. Use of oligoarrays for characterization of community-onset methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Koessler, Thibaud; Francois, Patrice; Charbonnier, Yvan; Huyghe, Antoine; Bento, Manuela; Dharan, Sasi; Renzi, Gesuele; Lew, Daniel; Harbarth, Stephan; Pittet, Didier; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2006-03-01

    Until recently, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was considered the prototype of a hospital-acquired bacterial pathogen. However, recent reports have shown that MRSA has now emerged in the community. Characterization of specific markers for distinguishing the origin of isolates could contribute to improved knowledge of MRSA epidemiology. The release of whole-genome sequences of hospital- and community-acquired S. aureus strains allowed the development of whole-genome content analysis techniques, including microarrays. We developed a microarray composed of 8,191 open reading frame-specific oligonucleotides covering >99% of the four sequenced S. aureus genomes (N315, Mu50, MW2, and COL) to evaluate gene contents of hospital- and community-onset S. aureus strains. In parallel, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, variable number of tandem repeats, antibiogram, staphylococcal cassette chromosome-mec element typing, and presence of the Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene were evaluated in a collection of 15 clinical isolates. Clusters obtained with microarrays showed a high degree of similarity with those obtained by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis or variable number of tandem repeats. Clusters clearly segregated hospital-onset strains from community-onset strains. Moreover, the microarray approach allowed definition of novel marker genes and chromosomal regions specific for given groups of isolates, thus providing better discrimination and additional information compared to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and variable number of tandem repeats. Finally, the comparative genome hybridization approach unraveled the occurrence of multiple horizontal transfer events leading to community-onset MRSA as well as the need for a specific genetic background in recipient strains for both the acquisition and the stability of the mec element. PMID:16517892

  13. Use of Oligoarrays for Characterization of Community-Onset Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Koessler, Thibaud; Francois, Patrice; Charbonnier, Yvan; Huyghe, Antoine; Bento, Manuela; Dharan, Sasi; Renzi, Gesuele; Lew, Daniel; Harbarth, Stephan; Pittet, Didier; Schrenzel, Jacques

    2006-01-01

    Until recently, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was considered the prototype of a hospital-acquired bacterial pathogen. However, recent reports have shown that MRSA has now emerged in the community. Characterization of specific markers for distinguishing the origin of isolates could contribute to improved knowledge of MRSA epidemiology. The release of whole-genome sequences of hospital- and community-acquired S. aureus strains allowed the development of whole-genome content analysis techniques, including microarrays. We developed a microarray composed of 8,191 open reading frame-specific oligonucleotides covering >99% of the four sequenced S. aureus genomes (N315, Mu50, MW2, and COL) to evaluate gene contents of hospital- and community-onset S. aureus strains. In parallel, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, variable number of tandem repeats, antibiogram, staphylococcal cassette chromosome-mec element typing, and presence of the Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene were evaluated in a collection of 15 clinical isolates. Clusters obtained with microarrays showed a high degree of similarity with those obtained by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis or variable number of tandem repeats. Clusters clearly segregated hospital-onset strains from community-onset strains. Moreover, the microarray approach allowed definition of novel marker genes and chromosomal regions specific for given groups of isolates, thus providing better discrimination and additional information compared to pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and variable number of tandem repeats. Finally, the comparative genome hybridization approach unraveled the occurrence of multiple horizontal transfer events leading to community-onset MRSA as well as the need for a specific genetic background in recipient strains for both the acquisition and the stability of the mec element. PMID:16517892

  14. The "hospital superbug": social representations of MRSA.

    PubMed

    Washer, Peter; Joffe, Helene

    2006-10-01

    The so-called 'hospital superbug' methcillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) became a topic of media and political concern in Britain from the middle of the 1990s. It was increasingly politicised in the period leading up to the British General Election of 2005. This study examines the meanings of MRSA that circulate in Britain by analysing newspaper coverage of the disease over the 10-year period 1995-2005. It utilises social representations theory and contextualises MRSA within existing research on representations of emerging infectious diseases (EIDs). A key pattern in the representation of EIDs is to externalise the threat they pose by linking the origin, risk and blame to 'the other' of those who represent them. It is in this light that this study investigates who and what MRSA is associated with and the impact that these associations have on levels of alarm and blame. Key findings are that MRSA is represented as a potentially lethal 'superbug', marking the end of a 'golden age of medicine' in which the story of the discovery of antibiotics has played such a key role. Furthermore, MRSA is constructed around an "it could be you/me" set of assumptions by way of the plethora of human interest stories that dominate the coverage. Finally, the blame for MRSA focuses not on its genesis, but rather on why it spreads. This is attributed to poor hygiene in hospitals, which is ultimately caused by mismanagement of the National Health Service and erosion of the authority and morality symbolised by the 'matron' role. This constellation of meanings informs a somewhat different pattern of response to MRSA when compared to many past EIDs. PMID:16782254

  15. An overview of livestock-associated MRSA in agriculture.

    PubMed

    Harper, Abby L; Ferguson, Dwight D; Leedom Larson, Kerry R; Hanson, Blake M; Male, Michael J; Donham, Kelley J; Smith, Tara C

    2010-04-01

    Researchers, veterinary and health care practitioners, and agricultural producers gathered in Johnston, Iowa, to attend the eighth annual Midwest Rural Agricultural Safety and Health Forum (MRASH), November 2009. Among several focus areas, four plenary talks were given on the current research being conducted examining methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) on swine farms in the United States. These focused on prevalence of MRSA on farms, both in swine and in human workers; the presence of MRSA in air samples and in swine barn shower facilities; and the presence of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-sensitive S. aureus in retail meats. These findings begin to elucidate the overall picture of livestock-associated MRSA in the Midwestern United States. PMID:20407991

  16. Low MRSA prevalence in horses at farm level

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In Europe, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) belonging to the clonal complex (CC) 398 has become an important pathogen in horses, circulating in equine clinics and causing both colonization and infection. Whether equine MRSA is bound to hospitals or can also circulate in the general horse population is currently unknown. This study, therefore, reports the nasal and perianal MRSA screening of 189 horses on 10 farms in a suspected high prevalence region (East- and West-Flanders, Belgium). Results Only one horse (0.53%) from one farm (10%) tested positive in the nose. It carried a spa type t011-SCCmecV isolate, resistant to β-lactams and tetracycline, which is typical for livestock-associated MRSA CC398. Conclusion In the region tested here, horses on horse farms seem unlikely to substantially contribute to the large animal associated ST398 MRSA reservoir present at intensive animal production units. PMID:23134703

  17. Inhibitors targeting on cell wall biosynthesis pathway of MRSA.

    PubMed

    Hao, Haihong; Cheng, Guyue; Dai, Menghong; Wu, Qinghua; Yuan, Zonghui

    2012-11-01

    Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), widely known as a type of new superbug, has aroused world-wide concern. Cell wall biosynthesis pathway is an old but good target for the development of antibacterial agents. Peptidoglycan and wall teichoic acids (WTAs) biosynthesis are two main processes of the cell wall biosynthesis pathway (CWBP). Other than penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs), some key factors (Mur enzymes, lipid I or II precursor, etc.) in CWBP are becoming attractive molecule targets for the discovery of anti-MRSA compounds. A number of new compounds, with higher affinity for PBPs or with inhibitory activity on such molecule targets in CWBP of MRSA, have been in the pipeline recently. This review concludes recent research achievements and provides a complete picture of CWBP of MRSA, including the peptidoglycan and wall teichoic acids synthesis pathway. The potential inhibitors targeting on CWBP are subsequently presented to improve development of novel therapeutic strategies for MRSA. PMID:22898792

  18. DOES THE NOSE KNOW? AN UPDATE ON MRSA DECOLONIZATION STRATEGIES

    PubMed Central

    Abad, C.L.; Pulia, M. S.; Safdar, N.

    2014-01-01

    Colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important step in the pathogenesis of active infection and is a key factor in the epidemiology of MRSA infection. Decolonization of patients found to have MRSA carriage may be of value in certain patient populations, especially those undergoing elective surgery. However, the most commonly used agent for decolonization, mupirocin, comes with a considerable risk of resistance if widely employed. Recent studies of other novel agents for decolonization show promise but further research is necessary. This review focuses on the pathogenesis from MRSA colonization to infection, identifies the risk factors for colonization, and summarizes decolonization strategies, including novel approaches that may ave a role in decreasing MRSA disease burden. PMID:24150839

  19. Community-Acquired Methicillin-Resistant "Staphylococcus aureus": Considerations for School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alex, Aniltta; Letizia, MariJo

    2007-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (MRSA) is a disease-causing organism that has been present in hospital settings since the 1960s. However, a genetically distinct strain of MRSA, called community-acquired methicillin-resistant "Staphylococcus aureus" (CA-MRSA), has emerged in recent years in community settings among healthy…

  20. Risk factors for anti-MRSA drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yasuhisa; Shigemura, Katsumi; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Fujisawa, Masato; Arakawa, Soichi

    2012-11-01

    Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA)-related infections have recently been spreading and are difficult to control, partly because affected patients are frequently in a poor condition. This study retrospectively investigated recent MRSA-related infections focusing on the relationship between clinical risk factors and anti-MRSA drug resistance. The patients with MRSA-related infections in Kobe University Hospital (Kobe, Japan) in 2009 were enrolled in the study. The relationships between various clinical risk factors as well as MRSA bacterial DNA concentration with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of anti-MRSA drugs were examined. In total, 44 patients were enrolled in the study and MRSA was isolated from blood (23 patients), urine (12 patients) and nasal secretions (9 patients). There was only one resistant strain to linezolid (LZD) among the anti-MRSA drugs tested, and this strain was considered staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) type IIa from phage open-reading frame typing analyses. Statistical analyses showed that MRSA bacterial DNA concentration, cancer and use of a respirator, respectively, had a significant relationship with the MICs of LZD (P=0.0058) and arbekacin (ABK) (P=0.0003), of quinupristin/dalfopristin (Q/D) (P=0.0500) and ABK (P=0.0133), and of Q/D (P=0.0198) and vancomycin (P=0.0036). In conclusion, bacterial DNA concentration, cancer and use of a respirator were found to be significant risk factors for lower susceptibilities to anti-MRSA drugs; one strain was resistant to LZD. We suggest that further investigation and surveillance for MRSA-related infection are necessary for preventing the spread of MRSA-related infections. PMID:22999766

  1. Audience readings of media messages about MRSA.

    PubMed

    Washer, P; Joffe, H; Solberg, C

    2008-09-01

    This paper explores whether, and to what extent, national newspaper messages tally with public perceptions about meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). It compares research on media messages about MRSA with interview data gathered from a demographically diverse sample of 60 people interviewed from the Greater London area. Across the interview sample there was a shared consensus that most people associated MRSA not with the history of antibiotic use, but with dirty and poorly managed hospitals. Some media messages, such as blaming MRSA on the alleged 'management culture' of the NHS, seemed to capture the Zeitgeist, whereas others, in particular the 'celebrity victims' of MRSA, did not seem to resonate with the audience. This study also found that ideas based on scientific understandings about germ theory and the immune system were held alongside folklore such as miasmic theory. The comparison of media and mind thus points to the existence of pre-scientific understandings of germs, contagion and blame in parallel with the biomedical story in the minds of the public. The findings contribute to our understanding of the public and patients' views of this infection. PMID:18621438

  2. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Recovered from Healthcare- and Community-Associated Infections in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Maksoud, Mohamed; El-Shokry, Mona; Ismail, Ghada; Hafez, Soad; El-Kholy, Amani; Attia, Ehab; Talaat, Maha

    2016-01-01

    Background. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has created significant epidemiological, infection-control, and therapeutic management challenges during the past three decades. Aim. To analyze the pattern of resistance of healthcare- and community-associated MRSA in Egypt and the trend of resistance of HA-MRSA over time (2005-2013). Methods. MRSA isolates were recovered from healthcare-associated (HA) and community-associated (CA) Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) infections. They were tested against 11 antimicrobial discs and the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of vancomycin was determined. Inducible clindamycin resistance (iMLSB) was also screened using D-test. Findings. Of 631 S. aureus, MRSA was identified in 343 (76.6%) and 21 (11.5%) of HA and CA S. aureus isolates, respectively. The proportion of HA-MRSA increased significantly from 48.6% in 2005 to 86.8% in 2013 (p value < 0.001). Multidrug resistance (MDR) was observed in 85.8% of HA-MRSA and 48.6% of CA-MRSA. Vancomycin intermediate resistant S. aureus (VISA) was detected in 1.2% of HA-MRSA and none was detected in CA-MRSA. Among HA-MRSA strains, 5.3% showed iMLSB compared to 9.5% among CA-MRSA. Conclusion. The upsurge of the prevalence rates of HA-MRSA over time is alarming and urges for an effective infection control strategy and continuous monitoring of antimicrobial use. PMID:27433480

  3. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Recovered from Healthcare- and Community-Associated Infections in Egypt

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Maksoud, Mohamed; Ismail, Ghada; Hafez, Soad; El-Kholy, Amani; Attia, Ehab; Talaat, Maha

    2016-01-01

    Background. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has created significant epidemiological, infection-control, and therapeutic management challenges during the past three decades. Aim. To analyze the pattern of resistance of healthcare- and community-associated MRSA in Egypt and the trend of resistance of HA-MRSA over time (2005–2013). Methods. MRSA isolates were recovered from healthcare-associated (HA) and community-associated (CA) Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) infections. They were tested against 11 antimicrobial discs and the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of vancomycin was determined. Inducible clindamycin resistance (iMLSB) was also screened using D-test. Findings. Of 631 S. aureus, MRSA was identified in 343 (76.6%) and 21 (11.5%) of HA and CA S. aureus isolates, respectively. The proportion of HA-MRSA increased significantly from 48.6% in 2005 to 86.8% in 2013 (p value < 0.001). Multidrug resistance (MDR) was observed in 85.8% of HA-MRSA and 48.6% of CA-MRSA. Vancomycin intermediate resistant S. aureus (VISA) was detected in 1.2% of HA-MRSA and none was detected in CA-MRSA. Among HA-MRSA strains, 5.3% showed iMLSB compared to 9.5% among CA-MRSA. Conclusion. The upsurge of the prevalence rates of HA-MRSA over time is alarming and urges for an effective infection control strategy and continuous monitoring of antimicrobial use. PMID:27433480

  4. Evolution of Ceftaroline-Resistant Mrsa in a Child with Cystic Fibrosis Following Repeated Antibiotic Exposure.

    PubMed

    Cannavino, Christopher R; Mendes, Rodrigo E; Sader, Helio S; Farrell, David J; Critchley, Ian A; Biek, Donald; Le, Jennifer; Skochko, Shannon M; Jones, Ronald N; Bradley, John S

    2016-07-01

    Ceftaroline is the first β-lactam antibiotic with activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). We describe a ceftaroline-resistant MRSA strain, isolated from a girl with cystic fibrosis after 22 ceftaroline treatment courses. MRSA genome sequencing documented a Tyr446Asn alteration in penicillin binding protein 2 that appeared responsible for resistance. Noncompartmental ceftaroline pharmacokinetic evaluation in our patient documented increased clearance and volume of distribution compared with adults. PMID:27093165

  5. Fatal Septicemia Linked to Transmission of MRSA Clonal Complex 398 in Hospital and Nursing Home, Denmark.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Rikke Thoft; Kemp, Michael; Holm, Anette; Skov, Marianne Nielsine; Detlefsen, Mette; Hasman, Henrik; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Kaas, Rolf Sommer; Nielsen, Jesper Boye; Westh, Henrik; Kolmos, Hans Jørn

    2016-05-01

    We describe 2 fatal cases of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal complex 398 septicemia in persons who had no contact with livestock. Whole-genome sequencing of the isolated MRSA strains strongly suggest that both were of animal origin and that the patients had been infected through 2 independent person-to-person transmission chains. PMID:27089007

  6. Fatal Septicemia Linked to Transmission of MRSA Clonal Complex 398 in Hospital and Nursing Home, Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Michael; Holm, Anette; Skov, Marianne Nielsine; Detlefsen, Mette; Hasman, Henrik; Aarestrup, Frank Møller; Kaas, Rolf Sommer; Nielsen, Jesper Boye; Westh, Henrik; Kolmos, Hans Jørn

    2016-01-01

    We describe 2 fatal cases of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) clonal complex 398 septicemia in persons who had no contact with livestock. Whole-genome sequencing of the isolated MRSA strains strongly suggest that both were of animal origin and that the patients had been infected through 2 independent person-to-person transmission chains. PMID:27089007

  7. Risk factors and gene type for infections of MRSA in diabetic foot patients in Tianjin, China.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shu-Hong; Chu, Yue-Jie; Wang, Peng-Hua; Jun, Xu; Min, Ding; Li, Xue-Mei

    2013-06-01

    The objective was to study risk factors and gene type of DF patients infected with MRSA. A total of 429 DF patients were recruited. The patients with S aureus infections were divided into MRSA and MSSA groups. MRSA were genotyped by SCCmec. pvl and lukE-lukD were detected. A total of 559 pathogens were isolated from them, with G+ bacteria firstly(59.0%), followed G- bacilli (37.7%) and true fungi (3.3%). The 3 most frequently isolated pathogens were S aureus (35.2%), S epidermidis (12.3%), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (11.2%). SCCmec III MRSA and SCCmec IVa MRSA had the same antibacterial spectrum. mecA positive rate was 100%. lukE-lukD and pvl positive rates were 100% and 0%, respectively. 28 strains belonged to SCCmec III and the others belonged to SCCmec IVa. The G+ cocci were the main pathogens, S aureus and S epidermidis were predominant among them. Antibiotic usage in 6 months prior to hospitalization, long course of ulcer, osteomyelitis and hypoproteinemia are risk factors for MRSA. SCCmec IVa is high in proportion to MRSA isolates, suggesting that CA-MRSA has become major pathogen of DF infection. All the MRSA were harboring lukE-lukD, which has been reported to present poor leucotoxin compared to pvl, and may be a response to atypical local inflammatory reaction in DF infection. PMID:23771611

  8. Staphylococcus aureus colonization in healthy horses in Atlantic Canada

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Shelly; Reid-Smith, Richard; McClure, J. Trenton; Weese, J. Scott

    2008-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonization was not identified in any of 497 horses from Atlantic Canada. Methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) was isolated from a subsample of 19/242 (7.9%) horses. Colonization with MSSA is relatively common in healthy horses in Atlantic Canada, but MRSA is currently rare or absent. PMID:18978975

  9. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resistance Funding Information National Library of Medicine, MedlinePlus ​​​​​​​​​​​​ Javascript Error Your browser JavaScript is turned off causing certain features of the ...

  10. Prevalence and characterization of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates from retail meat and humans in Georgia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is increasing interest in the presence of Staphylococcus aureus, specifically methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), on retail meat products. In this study, staphylococci were isolated from retail pork and retail beef in Georgia and MRSA from the products were compared to human MRSA from the...