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Sample records for australian square-kilometre-array pathfinder

  1. Building Educational Programs for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollow, R.; Hobbs, G.

    2010-08-01

    The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) will be an array of 36 antennas in Western Australia, each 12-m in diameter, and is due for operation in 2013. With a large instantaneous field-of-view ASKAP will survey the whole sky faster than existing radio telescopes, producing massive data sets. Government funding for ASKAP was contingent on it being available for education purposes, providing an exciting opportunity to develop innovative education projects for schools and citizen science. Building on the PULSE@Parkes program we plan to have a range of activities and resources, providing scope for student investigations. Challenges and educational opportunities are discussed.

  2. The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder: Performance of the Boolardy Engineering Test Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, D.; Allison, J. R.; Bannister, K.; Bell, M. E.; Bignall, H. E.; Chippendale, A. P.; Edwards, P. G.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Hegarty, S.; Heywood, I.; Hotan, A. W.; Indermuehle, B. T.; Lenc, E.; Marvil, J.; Popping, A.; Raja, W.; Reynolds, J. E.; Sault, R. J.; Serra, P.; Voronkov, M. A.; Whiting, M.; Amy, S. W.; Axtens, P.; Ball, L.; Bateman, T. J.; Bock, D. C.-J.; Bolton, R.; Brodrick, D.; Brothers, M.; Brown, A. J.; Bunton, J. D.; Cheng, W.; Cornwell, T.; DeBoer, D.; Feain, I.; Gough, R.; Gupta, N.; Guzman, J. C.; Hampson, G. A.; Hay, S.; Hayman, D. B.; Hoyle, S.; Humphreys, B.; Jacka, C.; Jackson, C. A.; Jackson, S.; Jeganathan, K.; Joseph, J.; Koribalski, B. S.; Leach, M.; Lensson, E. S.; MacLeod, A.; Mackay, S.; Marquarding, M.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Mirtschin, P.; Mitchell, D.; Neuhold, S.; Ng, A.; Norris, R.; Pearce, S.; Qiao, R. Y.; Schinckel, A. E. T.; Shields, M.; Shimwell, T. W.; Storey, M.; Troup, E.; Turner, B.; Tuthill, J.; Tzioumis, A.; Wark, R. M.; Westmeier, T.; Wilson, C.; Wilson, T.

    2016-09-01

    We describe the performance of the Boolardy Engineering Test Array, the prototype for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder telescope. Boolardy Engineering Test Array is the first aperture synthesis radio telescope to use phased array feed technology, giving it the ability to electronically form up to nine dual-polarisation beams. We report the methods developed for forming and measuring the beams, and the adaptations that have been made to the traditional calibration and imaging procedures in order to allow BETA to function as a multi-beam aperture synthesis telescope. We describe the commissioning of the instrument and present details of Boolardy Engineering Test Array's performance: sensitivity, beam characteristics, polarimetric properties, and image quality. We summarise the astronomical science that it has produced and draw lessons from operating Boolardy Engineering Test Array that will be relevant to the commissioning and operation of the final Australian Square Kilometre Array Path telescope.

  3. Discovery of H I gas in a young radio galaxy at z = 0.44 using the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, J. R.; Sadler, E. M.; Moss, V. A.; Whiting, M. T.; Hunstead, R. W.; Pracy, M. B.; Curran, S. J.; Croom, S. M.; Glowacki, M.; Morganti, R.; Shabala, S. S.; Zwaan, M. A.; Allen, G.; Amy, S. W.; Axtens, P.; Ball, L.; Bannister, K. W.; Barker, S.; Bell, M. E.; Bock, D. C.-J.; Bolton, R.; Bowen, M.; Boyle, B.; Braun, R.; Broadhurst, S.; Brodrick, D.; Brothers, M.; Brown, A.; Bunton, J. D.; Cantrall, C.; Chapman, J.; Cheng, W.; Chippendale, A. P.; Chung, Y.; Cooray, F.; Cornwell, T.; DeBoer, D.; Diamond, P.; Edwards, P. G.; Ekers, R.; Feain, I.; Ferris, R. H.; Forsyth, R.; Gough, R.; Grancea, A.; Gupta, N.; Guzman, J. C.; Hampson, G.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Haskins, C.; Hay, S.; Hayman, D. B.; Heywood, I.; Hotan, A. W.; Hoyle, S.; Humphreys, B.; Indermuehle, B. T.; Jacka, C.; Jackson, C.; Jackson, S.; Jeganathan, K.; Johnston, S.; Joseph, J.; Kendall, R.; Kesteven, M.; Kiraly, D.; Koribalski, B. S.; Leach, M.; Lenc, E.; Lensson, E.; Mackay, S.; Macleod, A.; Marquarding, M.; Marvil, J.; McClure-Griffiths, N.; McConnell, D.; Mirtschin, P.; Norris, R. P.; Neuhold, S.; Ng, A.; O'Sullivan, J.; Pathikulangara, J.; Pearce, S.; Phillips, C.; Popping, A.; Qiao, R. Y.; Reynolds, J. E.; Roberts, P.; Sault, R. J.; Schinckel, A.; Serra, P.; Shaw, R.; Shields, M.; Shimwell, T.; Storey, M.; Sweetnam, T.; Troup, E.; Turner, B.; Tuthill, J.; Tzioumis, A.; Voronkov, M. A.; Westmeier, T.; Wilson, C. D.

    2015-10-01

    We report the discovery of a new 21-cm H I absorption system using commissioning data from the Boolardy Engineering Test Array of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP). Using the 711.5-1015.5 MHz band of ASKAP we were able to conduct a blind search for the 21-cm line in a continuous redshift range between z = 0.4 and 1.0, which has, until now, remained largely unexplored. The absorption line is detected at z = 0.44 towards the GHz-peaked spectrum radio source PKS B1740-517 and demonstrates ASKAP's excellent capability for performing a future wide-field survey for H I absorption at these redshifts. Optical spectroscopy and imaging using the Gemini-South telescope indicates that the H I gas is intrinsic to the host galaxy of the radio source. The narrow [O III] emission lines show clear double-peaked structure, indicating either large-scale outflow or rotation of the ionized gas. Archival data from the XMM-Newton satellite exhibit an absorbed X-ray spectrum that is consistent with a high column density obscuring medium around the active galactic nucleus. The H I absorption profile is complex, with four distinct components ranging in width from 5 to 300 km s-1 and fractional depths from 0.2 to 20 per cent. In addition to systemic H I gas, in a circumnuclear disc or ring structure aligned with the radio jet, we find evidence for a possible broad outflow of neutral gas moving at a radial velocity of v ˜ 300 km s-1. We infer that the expanding young radio source (tage ≈ 2500 yr) is cocooned within a dense medium and may be driving circumnuclear neutral gas in an outflow of ˜1 M⊙ yr-1.

  4. Radio Quiet Protection at the Australian Square Kilometre array site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey-Smith, Lisa

    2015-08-01

    Radio astronomy relies on the detection of very faint signals from the universe. Many radio telescopes are now detrimentally affected by radio frequency interference (RFI), which results from a wide range of active spectrum users such as communications, aviation and satellites. This is why many new radio observatories are being sited at increasingly remote locations.The site for the Square Kilometre Array and its pathfinders in Australia is the Murchison Radio-Astronomy Observatory (MRO). The MRO is located more than 350km from the nearest population centre and has a large radio-quiet zone that is managed under a range of legislative agreements.In this talk I will describe the radio quiet zone, what protection it gives, how it works and how astronomers interact with the spectrum management authorities.

  5. Radio Continuum Surveys with Square Kilometre Array Pathfinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Ray P.; Afonso, J.; Bacon, D.; Beck, Rainer; Bell, Martin; Beswick, R. J.; Best, Philip; Bhatnagar, Sanjay; Bonafede, Annalisa; Brunetti, Gianfranco; Budavári, Tamás; Cassano, Rossella; Condon, J. J.; Cress, Catherine; Dabbech, Arwa; Feain, I.; Fender, Rob; Ferrari, Chiara; Gaensler, B. M.; Giovannini, G.; Haverkorn, Marijke; Heald, George; Van der Heyden, Kurt; Hopkins, A. M.; Jarvis, M.; Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie; Kothes, Roland; Van Langevelde, Huib; Lazio, Joseph; Mao, Minnie Y.; Martínez-Sansigre, Alejo; Mary, David; Mcalpine, Kim; Middelberg, E.; Murphy, Eric; Padovani, P.; Paragi, Zsolt; Prandoni, I.; Raccanelli, A.; Rigby, Emma; Roseboom, I. G.; Röttgering, H.; Sabater, Jose; Salvato, Mara; Scaife, Anna M. M.; Schilizzi, Richard; Seymour, N.; Smith, Dan J. B.; Umana, Grazia; Zhao, G.-B.; Zinn, Peter-Christian

    2013-03-01

    In the lead-up to the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project, several next-generation radio telescopes and upgrades are already being built around the world. These include APERTIF (The Netherlands), ASKAP (Australia), e-MERLIN (UK), VLA (USA), e-EVN (based in Europe), LOFAR (The Netherlands), MeerKAT (South Africa), and the Murchison Widefield Array. Each of these new instruments has different strengths, and coordination of surveys between them can help maximise the science from each of them. A radio continuum survey is being planned on each of them with the primary science objective of understanding the formation and evolution of galaxies over cosmic time, and the cosmological parameters and large-scale structures which drive it. In pursuit of this objective, the different teams are developing a variety of new techniques, and refining existing ones. To achieve these exciting scientific goals, many technical challenges must be addressed by the survey instruments. Given the limited resources of the global radio-astronomical community, it is essential that we pool our skills and knowledge. We do not have sufficient resources to enjoy the luxury of re-inventing wheels. We face significant challenges in calibration, imaging, source extraction and measurement, classification and cross-identification, redshift determination, stacking, and data-intensive research. As these instruments extend the observational parameters, we will face further unexpected challenges in calibration, imaging, and interpretation. If we are to realise the full scientific potential of these expensive instruments, it is essential that we devote enough resources and careful study to understanding the instrumental effects and how they will affect the data. We have established an SKA Radio Continuum Survey working group, whose prime role is to maximise science from these instruments by ensuring we share resources and expertise across the projects. Here we describe these projects, their science goals

  6. Science with the Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazio, Joseph; Huynh, Minh

    2010-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is the centimeter- and meter-wavelength telescope for the 21st Century. Its Key Science Projects are (a) The end of the Dark Ages, involving searches for an H i signature and the first metalrich systems; (b) Testing theories of gravitation using an array of pulsars to search for gravitational waves and relativistic binaries to probe the strong-field regime; (c) Observations of H i to a redshift z 2 from which to study the evolution of galaxies and dark energy. (d) Astrobiology including planetary formation within protoplanetary disks; and (c) The origin and evolution of cosmic magnetism, both within the Galaxy and in intergalactic space. The SKA will operate over the wavelength range of at least 1.2 cm to 4 m (70 MHz to 25 GHz), providing milliarcsecond resolution at the shortest wavelengths.

  7. The renaissance of radio astronomy: towards the Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, C.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, I will give a brief overview of the largest radio telescope in the world, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA). The history of this instrument, its development as a huge international project, as well as its main scientific goals, will be summarised. I will then focus on a particular science case by presenting how the first phase of the SKA (SKA1), whose observations are expected to start in the early 2020's, will change our radio view of the largest gravitationally bound structures of the Universe: galaxy clusters.

  8. The Square Kilometre Array: Current Status and Science Prospects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Robert

    2015-08-01

    The Square Kilometre Array has now entered the final design phase, with construction anticipated to begin from 2018. Even in its first deployment phase, termed SKA1, the SKA Observatory will provide a quantum leap in capability at radio frequencies between 50 MHz and 15 GHz, with survey speeds exceeding the current state-of-the art by factors between 20 and 200 over this range. These capabilities enable an extremely wide range of cutting edge programs, from understanding planet formation through the first glimpses of “cosmic dawn”. The project status and opportunities for participation in the science program will be highlighted in this presentation.

  9. Simulations of Array Configurations for the Square Kilometre Array (SKA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez-Monferrer, Sergio; Lal, Dharam Vir; Lobanov, Andrei P.; Guirado, José Carlos

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is a new generation radio telescope for the next decades, working at metre to centimetre wavelengths. The SKA will be operational at the same time than other new optical, X-ray and Gamma-ray telescopes. It is of extreme importance that the SKA becomes competitive and complementary to those instruments. An extensive study of technologies and possible configurations involved is needed to ensure the SKA will reach the design specifications. To compare imaging capabilities between different SKA configurations or between the SKA and other instruments, we have implemented figures of merit based on several characteristics of these instruments. In this work we are presenting some results of numerical tests based on the Spatial Dynamic Range (SDR), which quantifies the range of spatial scales than can be reconstructed from interferometric data (Lobanov, A.P., SKA Memo 38, 2003).

  10. The square kilometre array and the transient universe.

    PubMed

    Stappers, B W

    2013-06-13

    The square kilometre array (SKA) is a next generation radio telescope that will be built in southern Africa and Australasia. It will be built in two phases and will use a range of detectors, from aperture arrays to dishes, to span the frequency range from a few tens of megahertz to a few gigahertz. The combination of great sensitivity, wide field of view and unprecedented computing power mean that the SKA will be an excellent instrument for studying the transient radio universe. Transient radio emission is generated in extremes of: gravitational and magnetic fields, velocity, temperature, pressure and density. While we know about plenty of source classes for this type of short duration radio emission, there is still a large range of transient parameter space that has not yet been sampled owing to the limitations of current generation radio telescopes. PMID:23630382

  11. Scalable Data Mining and Archiving for the Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, D. L.; Mattmann, C. A.; Hart, A. F.; Lazio, J.; Bennett, T.; Wagstaff, K. L.; Thompson, D. R.; Preston, R.

    2011-12-01

    As the technologies for remote observation improve, the rapid increase in the frequency and fidelity of those observations translates into an avalanche of data that is already beginning to eclipse the resources, both human and technical, of the institutions and facilities charged with managing the information. Common data management tasks like cataloging both data itself and contextual meta-data, creating and maintaining scalable permanent archive, and making data available on-demand for research present significant software engineering challenges when considered at the scales of modern multi-national scientific enterprises such as the upcoming Square Kilometre Array project. The NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), leveraging internal research and technology development funding, has begun to explore ways to address the data archiving and distribution challenges with a number of parallel activities involving collaborations with the EVLA and ALMA teams at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), and members of the Square Kilometre Array South Africa team. To date, we have leveraged the Apache OODT Process Control System framework and its catalog and archive service components that provide file management, workflow management, resource management as core web services. A client crawler framework ingests upstream data (e.g., EVLA raw directory output), identifies its MIME type and automatically extracts relevant metadata including temporal bounds, and job-relevant/processing information. A remote content acquisition (pushpull) service is responsible for staging remote content and handing it off to the crawler framework. A science algorithm wrapper (called CAS-PGE) wraps underlying code including CASApy programs for the EVLA, such as Continuum Imaging and Spectral Line Cube generation, executes the algorithm, and ingests its output (along with relevant extracted metadata). In addition to processing, the Process Control System has been leveraged to provide data

  12. Searching for Extraterrestrial Intelligence with the Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemion, A.; Benford, J.; Cheng-Jin, J.; Chennamangalam, J.; Cordes, J. M.; Falcke, H. D. E.; Garrington, S. T.; Garrett, M. A.; Gurvits, L.; Hoare, M.; Korpela, E.; Lazio, J.; Messerschmitt, D.; Morrison, I.; O'Brien, T.; Paragi, Z.; Penny, A.; Spitler, L.; Tarter, J.; Werthimer, D.

    2015-04-01

    The vast collecting area of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), harnessed by sensitive receivers, flexible digital electronics and increased computational capacity, could permit the most sensitive and exhaustive search for technologically-produced radio emission from advanced extraterrestrial intelligence (SETI) ever performed. For example, SKA1-MID will be capable of detecting a source roughly analogous to terrestrial high-power radars (e.g. air route surveillance or ballistic missile warning radars, EIRP (EIRP = equivalent isotropic radiated power, ~10^17 erg sec^-1) at 10 pc in less than 15 minutes, and with a modest four beam SETI observing system could, in one minute, search every star in the primary beam out to ~100 pc for radio emission comparable to that emitted by the Arecibo Planetary Radar (EIRP ~2 x 10^20 erg sec^-1). The flexibility of the signal detection systems used for SETI searches with the SKA will allow new algorithms to be employed that will provide sensitivity to a much wider variety of signal types than previously searched for. Here we discuss the astrobiological and astrophysical motivations for radio SETI and describe how the technical capabilities of the SKA will explore the radio SETI parameter space. We detail several conceivable SETI experimental programs on all components of SKA1, including commensal, primary-user, targeted and survey programs and project the enhancements to them possible with SKA2. We also discuss target selection criteria for these programs, and in the case of commensal observing, how the varied use cases of other primary observers can be used to full advantage for SETI.

  13. The likelihood ratio as a tool for radio continuum surveys with Square Kilometre Array precursor telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlpine, K.; Smith, D. J. B.; Jarvis, M. J.; Bonfield, D. G.; Fleuren, S.

    2012-06-01

    In this paper we investigate the performance of the likelihood ratio method as a tool for identifying optical and infrared counterparts to proposed radio continuum surveys with Square Kilometre Array (SKA) precursor and pathfinder telescopes. We present a comparison of the infrared counterparts identified by the likelihood ratio in the VISTA Deep Extragalactic Observations (VIDEO) survey to radio observations with 6, 10 and 15 arcsec resolution. We cross-match a deep radio catalogue consisting of radio sources with peak flux density >60 ?Jy with deep near-infrared data limited to Ks≲ 22.6. Comparing the infrared counterparts from this procedure to those obtained when cross-matching a set of simulated lower resolution radio catalogues indicates that degrading the resolution from 6 arcsec to 10 and 15 arcsec decreases the completeness of the cross-matched catalogue by approximately 3 and 7 per cent respectively. When matching against shallower infrared data, comparable to that achieved by the VISTA Hemisphere Survey, the fraction of radio sources with reliably identified counterparts drops from ˜89 per cent, at Ks≲ 22.6, to 47 per cent with Ks≲ 20.0. Decreasing the resolution at this shallower infrared limit does not result in any further decrease in the completeness produced by the likelihood ratio matching procedure. However, we note that radio continuum surveys with the MeerKAT and eventually the SKA, will require long baselines in order to ensure that the resulting maps are not limited by instrumental confusion noise.

  14. Weak gravitational lensing with the Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M.; Bacon, D.; Camera, S.; Harrison, I.; Joachimi, B.; Metcalf, R. B.; Pourtsidou, A.; Takahashi, K.; Zuntz, J.; Abdalla, F. B.; Bridle, S.; Jarvis, M.; Kitching, T.; Miller, L.; Patel, P.

    2015-04-01

    We investigate the capabilities of various stages of the SKA to perform world-leading weak gravitational lensing surveys. We outline a way forward to develop the tools needed for pursuing weak lensing in the radio band. We identify the key analysis challenges and the key pathfinder experiments that will allow us to address them in the run up to the SKA. We identify and summarize the unique and potentially very powerful aspects of radio weak lensing surveys, facilitated by the SKA, that can solve major challenges in the field of weak lensing. These include the use of polarization and rotational velocity information to control intrinsic alignments, and the new area of weak lensing using intensity mapping experiments. We show how the SKA lensing surveys will both complement and enhance corresponding efforts in the optical wavebands through cross-correlation techniques and by way of extending the reach of weak lensing to high redshift.

  15. The Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) software architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, Juan C.; Humphreys, Ben

    2010-07-01

    The Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) is a 1% Square Kilometre Array (SKA) pathfinder radio telescope, comprising of 36 12-metre diameter reflector antennas, each with a Focal Plane Array consisting of approximately 100 dualpolarised elements operating at centimetre wavelengths and yielding a wide field-of-view (FOV) on the sky of about 30 square degrees. ASKAP is currently under construction and will be located in the remote radio-quiet desert Midwest region of Western Australia. It is expected to be fully operational in 2013. Key challenges include near real-time processing of large amount of data (~ 4 GB/s), control and monitoring of widely distributed devices (approx. 150,000 monitoring I/O points) and remote semi-automated operations. After evaluating several software technologies we have decided to use the EPICS framework for the Telescope Operating System and the Internet Communications Engine (ICE) middleware for the high-level service bus. This paper presents a summary of the overall ASKAP software architecture, as well as describing how EPICS and ICE technologies fit in the control software design.

  16. The Square Kilometre Array Science Data Processor. Preliminary compute platform design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broekema, P. C.; van Nieuwpoort, R. V.; Bal, H. E.

    2015-07-01

    The Square Kilometre Array is a next-generation radio-telescope, to be built in South Africa and Western Australia. It is currently in its detailed design phase, with procurement and construction scheduled to start in 2017. The SKA Science Data Processor is the high-performance computing element of the instrument, responsible for producing science-ready data. This is a major IT project, with the Science Data Processor expected to challenge the computing state-of-the art even in 2020. In this paper we introduce the preliminary Science Data Processor design and the principles that guide the design process, as well as the constraints to the design. We introduce a highly scalable and flexible system architecture capable of handling the SDP workload.

  17. Synergy between the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and the Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bacon, D.; Bridle, S.; Abdalla, F. B.; Brown, M.; Bull, P.; Camera, S.; Fender, R.; Grainge, K.; Ivezic, Z.; Jarvis, M.; Jackson, N.; Kirk, D.; Mann, B.; McEwen, J.; McKean, J.; Newman, J. A.; Raccanelli, A.; Sahlen, M.; Santos, M.; Tyson, T.; Zhao, G.

    2015-04-01

    We provide an overview of the science benefits of combining information from the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST). We first summarise the capabilities and timeline of the LSST and overview its science goals. We then discuss the science questions in common between the two projects, and how they can be best addressed by combining the data from both telescopes. We describe how weak gravitational lensing and galaxy clustering studies with LSST and SKA can provide improved constraints on the causes of the cosmological acceleration. We summarise the benefits to galaxy evolution studies of combining deep optical multi-band imaging with radio observations. Finally, we discuss the excellent match between one of the most unique features of the LSST, its temporal cadence in the optical waveband, and the time resolution of the SKA.

  18. Square Kilometre Array Telescope—Precision Reference Frequency Synchronisation via 1f-2f Dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Wang, B.; Zhu, X.; Gao, C.; Bai, Y.; Dong, J. W.; Wang, L. J.

    2015-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project is an international effort to build the world’s largest radio telescope, with a one-square-kilometre collecting area. In addition to its ambitious scientific objectives, such as probing cosmic dawn and the cradle of life, the SKA demands several revolutionary technological breakthroughs, such as ultra-high precision synchronisation of the frequency references for thousands of antennas. In this report, with the purpose of application to the SKA, we demonstrate a frequency reference dissemination and synchronisation scheme in which the phase-noise compensation function is applied at the client site. Hence, one central hub can be linked to a large number of client sites, thus forming a star-shaped topology. As a performance test, a 100-MHz reference frequency signal from a hydrogen maser (H-maser) clock is disseminated and recovered at two remote sites. The phase-noise characteristics of the recovered reference frequency signal coincide with those of the H-maser source and satisfy the SKA requirements. PMID:26349544

  19. Scalable, efficient ASICS for the square kilometre array: From A/D conversion to central correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmatz, M. L.; Jongerius, R.; Dittmann, G.; Anghel, A.; Engbersen, T.; van Lunteren, J.; Buchmann, P.

    2014-05-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) is a future radio telescope, currently being designed by the worldwide radio-astronomy community. During the first of two construction phases, more than 250,000 antennas will be deployed, clustered in aperture-array stations. The antennas will generate 2.5 Pb/s of data, which needs to be processed in real time. For the processing stages from A/D conversion to central correlation, we propose an ASIC solution using only three chip architectures. The architecture is scalable - additional chips support additional antennas or beams - and versatile - it can relocate its receiver band within a range of a few MHz up to 4GHz. This flexibility makes it applicable to both SKA phases 1 and 2. The proposed chips implement an antenna and station processor for 289 antennas with a power consumption on the order of 600W and a correlator, including corner turn, for 911 stations on the order of 90 kW.

  20. Square Kilometre Array Telescope—Precision Reference Frequency Synchronisation via 1f-2f Dissemination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Zhu, X.; Gao, C.; Bai, Y.; Dong, J. W.; Wang, L. J.

    2015-09-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project is an international effort to build the world’s largest radio telescope, with a one-square-kilometre collecting area. In addition to its ambitious scientific objectives, such as probing cosmic dawn and the cradle of life, the SKA demands several revolutionary technological breakthroughs, such as ultra-high precision synchronisation of the frequency references for thousands of antennas. In this report, with the purpose of application to the SKA, we demonstrate a frequency reference dissemination and synchronisation scheme in which the phase-noise compensation function is applied at the client site. Hence, one central hub can be linked to a large number of client sites, thus forming a star-shaped topology. As a performance test, a 100-MHz reference frequency signal from a hydrogen maser (H-maser) clock is disseminated and recovered at two remote sites. The phase-noise characteristics of the recovered reference frequency signal coincide with those of the H-maser source and satisfy the SKA requirements.

  1. Extending Cosmological Tests of General Relativity with the Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Tests of general relativity (GR) are still in their infancy on cosmological scales, but forthcoming experiments promise to greatly improve their precision over a wide range of distance scales and redshifts. One such experiment, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), will carry out several wide and deep surveys of resolved and unresolved neutral hydrogen (H i) 21 cm line-emitting galaxies, mapping a significant fraction of the sky from 0≤slant z≲ 6. I present forecasts for the ability of a suite of possible SKA H i surveys to detect deviations from GR by reconstructing the cosmic expansion and growth history. SKA Phase 1 intensity mapping surveys can achieve sub-1% measurements of f{σ }8 out to z≈ 1, with an SKA1-MID Band 2 survey out to z ≲ 0.6 able to surpass contemporary spectroscopic galaxy surveys such as DESI and Euclid in terms of constraints on modified gravity parameters if challenges such as foreground contamination can be tackled effectively. A more futuristic Phase 2 H i survey of ∼ {10}9 spectroscopic galaxy redshifts would be capable of detecting a ∼ 2% modification of the Poisson equation out to z ≈ 2.

  2. Square Kilometre Array Telescope--Precision Reference Frequency Synchronisation via 1f-2f Dissemination.

    PubMed

    Wang, B; Zhu, X; Gao, C; Bai, Y; Dong, J W; Wang, L J

    2015-01-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project is an international effort to build the world's largest radio telescope, with a one-square-kilometre collecting area. In addition to its ambitious scientific objectives, such as probing cosmic dawn and the cradle of life, the SKA demands several revolutionary technological breakthroughs, such as ultra-high precision synchronisation of the frequency references for thousands of antennas. In this report, with the purpose of application to the SKA, we demonstrate a frequency reference dissemination and synchronisation scheme in which the phase-noise compensation function is applied at the client site. Hence, one central hub can be linked to a large number of client sites, thus forming a star-shaped topology. As a performance test, a 100-MHz reference frequency signal from a hydrogen maser (H-maser) clock is disseminated and recovered at two remote sites. The phase-noise characteristics of the recovered reference frequency signal coincide with those of the H-maser source and satisfy the SKA requirements. PMID:26349544

  3. Possible gamma-ray burst radio detections by the Square Kilometre Array. New perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggeri, Alan Cosimo; Capozziello, Salvatore

    2016-09-01

    The next generation interferometric radio telescope, the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), which will be the most sensitive and largest radio telescope ever constructed, could greatly contribute to the detection, survey and characterization of Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). By the SKA, it will be possible to perform the follow up of GRBs even for several months. This approach would be extremely useful to extend the Spectrum Energetic Distribution (SED) from the gamma to the to radio band and would increase the number of radio detectable GRBs. In principle, the SKA could help to understand the physics of GRBs by setting constraints on theoretical models. This goal could be achieved by taking into account multiple observations at different wavelengths in order to obtain a deeper insight of the sources. Here, we present an estimation of GRB radio detections, showing that the GRBs can really be observed by the SKA. The approach that we present consists in determining blind detection rates derived by a very large sample consisting of merging several GRB catalogues observed by current missions as Swift, Fermi, Agile and INTEGRAL and by previous missions as BeppoSAX, CGRO, GRANAT, HETE-2, Ulysses and Wind. The final catalogue counts 7516 distinct sources. We compute the fraction of GRBs that could be observed by the SKA at high and low frequencies, above its observable sky. Considering the planned SKA sensitivity and through an extrapolation based on previous works and observations, we deduce the minimum fluence in the range 15-150 keV. This is the energy interval where a GRB should emit to be detectable in the radio band by the SKA. Results seem consistent with observational capabilities.

  4. Delensing cosmic microwave background B modes with the Square Kilometre Array Radio Continuum Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namikawa, Toshiya; Yamauchi, Daisuke; Sherwin, Blake; Nagata, Ryo

    2016-02-01

    We explore the potential use of the Radio Continuum (RC) survey conducted by the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) to remove (delens) the lensing-induced B-mode polarization and thus enhance future cosmic microwave background (CMB) searches for inflationary gravitational waves. Measurements of large-scale B-modes of the CMB are considered to be the best method for probing gravitational waves from the cosmic inflation. Future CMB experiments will, however, suffer from contamination by nonprimordial B modes, one source of which is the lensing B modes. Delensing, therefore, will be required for further improvement of the detection sensitivity for gravitational waves. Analyzing the use of the two-dimensional map of galaxy distribution provided by the SKA RC survey as a lensing mass tracer, we find that joint delensing using near-future CMB experiments and the SKA phase 1 will improve the constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio by more than a factor of ˜2 compared to those without the delensing analysis. Compared to the use of CMB data alone, the inclusion of the SKA phase 1 data will increase the significance of the constraints on the tensor-to-scalar ratio by a factor 1.2-1.6. For LiteBIRD combined with a ground-based experiment such as Simons Array and Advanced ACT, the constraint on the tensor-to-scalar ratio when adding SKA phase 2 data is improved by a factor of 2.3-2.7, whereas delensing with CMB data alone improves the constraints by only a factor 1.3-1.7. We conclude that the use of SKA data is a promising method for delensing upcoming CMB experiments such as LiteBIRD.

  5. Dynamic scheduling and planning parallel observations on large Radio Telescope Arrays with the Square Kilometre Array in mind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchner, Johannes

    2011-12-01

    Scheduling, the task of producing a time table for resources and tasks, is well-known to be a difficult problem the more resources are involved (a NP-hard problem). This is about to become an issue in Radio astronomy as observatories consisting of hundreds to thousands of telescopes are planned and operated. The Square Kilometre Array (SKA), which Australia and New Zealand bid to host, is aiming for scales where current approaches -- in construction, operation but also scheduling -- are insufficent. Although manual scheduling is common today, the problem is becoming complicated by the demand for (1) independent sub-arrays doing simultaneous observations, which requires the scheduler to plan parallel observations and (2) dynamic re-scheduling on changed conditions. Both of these requirements apply to the SKA, especially in the construction phase. We review the scheduling approaches taken in the astronomy literature, as well as investigate techniques from human schedulers and today's observatories. The scheduling problem is specified in general for scientific observations and in particular on radio telescope arrays. Also taken into account is the fact that the observatory may be oversubscribed, requiring the scheduling problem to be integrated with a planning process. We solve this long-term scheduling problem using a time-based encoding that works in the very general case of observation scheduling. This research then compares algorithms from various approaches, including fast heuristics from CPU scheduling, Linear Integer Programming and Genetic algorithms, Branch-and-Bound enumeration schemes. Measures include not only goodness of the solution, but also scalability and re-scheduling capabilities. In conclusion, we have identified a fast and good scheduling approach that allows (re-)scheduling difficult and changing problems by combining heuristics with a Genetic algorithm using block-wise mutation operations. We are able to explain and eradicate two problems in the

  6. Measurements of the cosmological evolution of magnetic fields with the Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Martin; Alexander, Paul; Bolton, Rosie; Geisbüsch, Jörn; Green, David A.; Riley, Julia

    2009-12-01

    We investigate the potential of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) for measuring the magnetic fields in clusters of galaxies via Faraday rotation of background polarized sources. The populations of clusters and radio sources are derived from an analytical cosmological model, combined with an extrapolation of current observational constraints. We adopt an empirical model for the Faraday screen in individual clusters, gauged to observations of nearby clusters and extrapolate the polarization properties for the radio source population from the National Radio Astronomy Observatory Very Large Array Sky Survey. We find that about 10 per cent of the sky is covered by a significant extragalactic Faraday screen. Most of it has rotation measures between 10 and 100 rad m-2. We argue that the cluster centres should have up to about 5000 rad m-2. We show that the proposed mid frequency aperture array of the SKA as well as the lowest band of the SKA dish array are well suited to make measurements for most of these rotation measure values, typically requiring a signal-to-noise ratio of 10. We calculate the spacing of sources forming a grid for the purpose of measuring foreground rotation measures: it reaches a spacing of 36 arcsec for a 100 h SKA observation per field. We also calculate the statistics for background rotation measure (RM) measurements in clusters of galaxies. We find that a first phase of the SKA would allow us to take stacking experiments out to high redshifts (>1), and provide improved magnetic field structure measurements for individual nearby clusters. The full SKA aperture array would be able to make very detailed magnetic field structure measurements of clusters with more than 100 background sources per cluster up to a redshift of 0.5 and more than 1000 background sources per cluster for nearby clusters, and could for reasonable assumptions about future measurements of electron densities in high-redshift clusters constrain the power-law index for the magnetic

  7. A failure of serendipity: the Square Kilometre Array will struggle to eavesdrop on human-like extraterrestrial intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forgan, D. H.; Nichol, R. C.

    2011-04-01

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will operate in frequency ranges often used by military radar and other communications technology. It has been shown that if extraterrestrial intelligences (ETIs) communicate using similar technology, then the SKA should be able to detect such transmissions up to distances of ~100 pc (~300 light years) from Earth. However, Mankind has greatly improved its communications technology over the last century, dramatically reducing signal leakage and making the Earth ‘radio quiet’. If ETIs follow the same pattern as the human race, will we be able to detect their signal leakage before they become radio quiet? We investigate this question using Monte Carlo realization techniques to simulate the growth and evolution of intelligent life in the Galaxy. We show that if civilizations are ‘human’ in nature (i.e. they are only ‘radio loud’ for ~100 years, and can only detect each other with an SKA-like instrument out to 100 pc, within a maximum communication time of 100 years), then the probability for such civilizations accidentally detecting each other is low (~10-7), much lower than if other, dedicated communication techniques are permissible (e.g. optical SETI or neutrino communication).

  8. African Astronomy and the Square Kilometre Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLeod, Gordon

    2010-02-01

    We highlight the growth of astronomy across Africa and the effect of hosting the Square Kilometer Array (SKA) will have on this growth. From the construction of a new 25m radio telescope in Nigeria, to new university astronomy programmes in Kenya, the HESS in Namibia and the Mauritian Radio Telescope, to the world class projects being developed in South Africa (Southern African Large Telescope and Karoo Array Telescope) astronomy is re-emerging across the continent. The SKA will represent the pinnacle of technological advancement in astronomy when constructed; requiring ultra high speed data transmission lines over 3000 km baselines and the World's fastest computer for correlation purposes. The investment alone to build the SKA on African soil will be of great economic benefit to its people, but the required network connectivity will significantly drive commercial expansion far beyond the initial value of the SKA investment. The most important consequence of hosting the SKA in Africa would be the impact on Human Capital Development (HCD) on the continent. Major HCD projects already underway producing excellent results will be presented. )

  9. The Square Kilometre Array: a challenge for 2020 to which Spain can contribute in 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdes-Montenegro, L.; Dios Santander-Vela, J. D.

    2013-05-01

    The SKA, composed of several hundreds of three different types of antennas with separations up to 3.000 km, and up to 200 square degrees field of view, will be the largest, most sensitive radio telescope ever built. It will be able to provide fundamental answers in areas such as the dark era, when gas in galaxies was first turned into stars and the first black holes formed, star formation in nearby galaxies from stellar birth to death, faint extragalactic emission, magnetism in galaxies, extrasolar planets, or confrontation of Einstein predictions with pulsars and black hole observations. The technological challenges involved offer an unprecedented opportunity to collaborate in the development of hardware and software technologies. The energy requirements of the SKA provide an opportunity to accelerate technology development in scalable renewable energy generation, distribution, storage and demand monitoring and reduction. Data transport will reach over a hundred times the current global internet traffic data rates, delivering as much data as the full World Wide Web. Processing this data torrent in real time will require high-performance distributed computing as well as data storage and innovative retrieval technologies in the exascale. This way to do science, based on data-intensive interdisciplinary cooperation, is the base of the concept of e-Science, which necessarily includes outreach as an indissoluble part of the knowledge-based human progress. The scientific and technological challenges and opportunities that SKA can bring to the Spanish community will be described in this talk.

  10. DETECTION OF FAST RADIO TRANSIENTS WITH MULTIPLE STATIONS: A CASE STUDY USING THE VERY LONG BASELINE ARRAY

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, David R.; Wagstaff, Kiri L.; Majid, Walid A.; Brisken, Walter F.; Deller, Adam T.; Tingay, Steven J.; Wayth, Randall B.

    2011-07-10

    Recent investigations reveal an important new class of transient radio phenomena that occur on submillisecond timescales. Often, transient surveys' data volumes are too large to archive exhaustively. Instead, an online automatic system must excise impulsive interference and detect candidate events in real time. This work presents a case study using data from multiple geographically distributed stations to perform simultaneous interference excision and transient detection. We present several algorithms that incorporate dedispersed data from multiple sites, and report experiments with a commensal real-time transient detection system on the Very Long Baseline Array. We test the system using observations of pulsar B0329+54. The multiple-station algorithms enhanced sensitivity for detection of individual pulses. These strategies could improve detection performance for a future generation of geographically distributed arrays such as the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder and the Square Kilometre Array.

  11. Detection of Fast Radio Transients with Multiple Stations: A Case Study Using the Very Long Baseline Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, David R.; Wagstaff, Kiri L.; Brisken, Walter F.; Deller, Adam T.; Majid, Walid A.; Tingay, Steven J.; Wayth, Randall B.

    2011-07-01

    Recent investigations reveal an important new class of transient radio phenomena that occur on submillisecond timescales. Often, transient surveys' data volumes are too large to archive exhaustively. Instead, an online automatic system must excise impulsive interference and detect candidate events in real time. This work presents a case study using data from multiple geographically distributed stations to perform simultaneous interference excision and transient detection. We present several algorithms that incorporate dedispersed data from multiple sites, and report experiments with a commensal real-time transient detection system on the Very Long Baseline Array. We test the system using observations of pulsar B0329+54. The multiple-station algorithms enhanced sensitivity for detection of individual pulses. These strategies could improve detection performance for a future generation of geographically distributed arrays such as the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder and the Square Kilometre Array.

  12. LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stebbins, Robin

    2008-01-01

    USA Pathfinder is a space mission dedicated to demonstrating technology for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). LISA is a joint ESA/NASA mission to detect low-frequency gravitational waves on the 0.0001 to 0.1 Hz frequency band. LISA is expected to observe 100's of merging massive black hole binaries out z-15, tens of thousands of close compact binary systems in the Milky Way, merging intermediate-mass black hole binaries, tens of stellar-mass black holes falling into supermassive black holes in galactic centers, and possibly other exotic sources. Several critical LISA technologies have not been demonstrated at the requisite level of performance. In spaceflight, and some fight hardware cannot be tested in a 1-g environment. Hence, the LISA Pathfinder mission is being implemented to demonstrate these critical LISA technologies in a relevant flight environment. LISA Pathfinder mimics one arm of the LISA constellation by shrinking the 5-million-kilometer armlength down to a few tens of centimeters. The experimental concept is to measure the relative separation between two test masses nominally following their own geodesics, and thereby determine the relative residual acceleration between them near 1 mHz, about a decade above the lowest frequency required by LISA. To implement such a concept, disturbances on the test masses must be kept very small by many design features, but chiefly by "drag-free" flight. A drag-free spacecraft follows a free-falling test mass which it encloses, but has no mechanical connection to. The spacecraft senses it's orientation and separation with respect to the proof mass, and its propulsion system is commanded to keep the spacecraft centered about the test mass. Thus, the spacecraft shields the test mass from most external influences, and minimizes the effect of force gradients arising from the spacecraft, and acting on the test mass. LISA Pathfinder will compare the geodesic of one test mass against that of the other. Only a

  13. H I observations of two new dwarf galaxies: Pisces A and B with the SKA Pathfinder KAT-7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carignan, C.; Libert, Y.; Lucero, D. M.; Randriamampandry, T. H.; Jarrett, T. H.; Oosterloo, T. A.; Tollerud, E. J.

    2016-03-01

    Context. Pisces A and Pisces B are the only two galaxies found via optical imaging and spectroscopy out of 22 Hi clouds identified in the GALFAHI survey as dwarf galaxy candidates. Aims: We derive the Hi content and kinematics of Pisces A and B. Methods: Our aperture synthesis Hi observations used the seven-dish Karoo Array Telescope (KAT-7), which is a pathfinder instrument for MeerKAT, the South African precursor to the mid-frequency Square Kilometre Array (SKA-MID). Results: The low rotation velocities of ~5 km s-1 and ~10 km s-1 in Pisces A and B, respectively, and their Hi content show that they are really dwarf irregular galaxies (dIrr). Despite that small rotation component, it is more the random motions ~9-11 km s-1 that provide most of the gravitational support, especially in the outer parts. The study of their kinematics, especially the strong gradients of random motions, suggest that those two dwarf galaxies are not yet in equilibrium. Conclusions: These Hi- rich galaxies may be indicative of a large population of dwarfs at the limit of detectability. However, such gas-rich dwarf galaxies will most likely never be within the virial radius of MW-type galaxies and become subhalo candidates. Systems such as Pisces A and B are more likely to be found at a few Mpc s from MW-type galaxies. The final FITS cube is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/587/L3

  14. DECIGO pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, M.; Kawamura, S.; Nakamura, T.; Tsubono, K.; Tanaka, T.; Funaki, I.; Seto, N.; Numata, K.; Sato, S.; Ioka, K.; Kanda, N.; Takashima, T.; Agatsuma, K.; Akutsu, T.; Akutsu, T.; Aoyanagi, K.-s.; Arai, K.; Arase, Y.; Araya, A.; Asada, H.; Aso, Y.; Chiba, T.; Ebisuzaki, T.; Enoki, M.; Eriguchi, Y.; Fujimoto, M.-K.; Fujita, R.; Fukushima, M.; Futamase, T.; Ganzu, K.; Harada, T.; Hashimoto, T.; Hayama, K.; Hikida, W.; Himemoto, Y.; Hirabayashi, H.; Hiramatsu, T.; Hong, F.-L.; Horisawa, H.; Hosokawa, M.; Ichiki, K.; Ikegami, T.; Inoue, K. T.; Ishidoshiro, K.; Ishihara, H.; Ishikawa, T.; Ishizaki, H.; Ito, H.; Itoh, Y.; Kamagasako, S.; Kawashima, N.; Kawazoe, F.; Kirihara, H.; Kishimoto, N.; Kiuchi, K.; Kobayashi, S.; Kohri, K.; Koizumi, H.; Koima, Y.; Kokeyama, K.; W-Kokuyama; Kotake, K.; Kozai, Y.; Kudoh, H.; Kunimori, H.; Kuninaka, H.; Kuroda, K.; Maeda, K.-i.; Matsuhara, H.; Mino, Y.; Miyakawa, O.; Miyoki, S.; Morimoto, M. Y.; Morioka, T.; Morisawa, T.; Moriwaki, S.; Mukohyama, S.; Musha, M.; Nagano, S.; Naito, I.; Nakagawa, N.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, H.; Nakao, K.; Nakasuka, S.; Nakayama, Y.; Nishida, E.; Nishiyama, K.; Nishizawa, A.; Niwa, Y.; Ohashi, M.; Ohishi, N.; Ohkawa, M.; Okutomi, A.; Onozato, K.; Oohara, K.; Sago, N.; Saijo, M.; Sakagami, M.; Sakai, S.-i.; Sakata, S.; Sasaki, M.; Sato, T.; Shibata, M.; Shinkai, H.; Somiya, K.; Sotani, H.; Sugiyama, N.; Suwa, Y.; Tagoshi, H.; Takahashi, K.; Takahashi, K.; Takahashi, T.; Takahashi, H.; Takahashi, R.; Takahashi, R.; Takamori, A.; Takano, T.; Taniguchi, K.; Taruya, A.; Tashiro, H.; Tokuda, M.; Tokunari, M.; Toyoshima, M.; Tsujikawa, S.; Tsunesada, Y.; Ueda, K.-i.; Utashima, M.; Yamakawa, H.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamazaki, T.; Yokoyama, J.; Yoo, C.-M.; Yoshida, S.; Yoshino, T.

    2008-07-01

    DECIGO pathfinder (DPF) is a milestone satellite mission for DECIGO (DECi-hertz Interferometer Gravitational wave Observatory) which is a future space gravitational wave antenna. DECIGO is expected to provide us fruitful insights into the universe, in particular about dark energy, a formation mechanism of supermassive black holes, and the inflation of the universe. Since DECIGO will be an extremely large mission which will formed by three drag-free spacecraft with 1000m separation, it is significant to gain the technical feasibility of DECIGO before its planned launch in 2024. Thus, we are planning to launch two milestone missions: DPF and pre-DECIGO. The conceptual design and current status of the first milestone mission, DPF, are reviewed in this article.

  15. Automated detection of extended sources in radio maps: progress from the SCORPIO survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggi, S.; Ingallinera, A.; Leto, P.; Cavallaro, F.; Bufano, F.; Schillirò, F.; Trigilio, C.; Umana, G.; Buemi, C. S.; Norris, R. P.

    2016-08-01

    Automated source extraction and parametrization represents a crucial challenge for the next-generation radio interferometer surveys, such as those performed with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and its precursors. In this paper, we present a new algorithm, called CAESAR (Compact And Extended Source Automated Recognition), to detect and parametrize extended sources in radio interferometric maps. It is based on a pre-filtering stage, allowing image denoising, compact source suppression and enhancement of diffuse emission, followed by an adaptive superpixel clustering stage for final source segmentation. A parametrization stage provides source flux information and a wide range of morphology estimators for post-processing analysis. We developed CAESAR in a modular software library, also including different methods for local background estimation and image filtering, along with alternative algorithms for both compact and diffuse source extraction. The method was applied to real radio continuum data collected at the Australian Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) within the SCORPIO project, a pathfinder of the Evolutionary Map of the Universe (EMU) survey at the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP). The source reconstruction capabilities were studied over different test fields in the presence of compact sources, imaging artefacts and diffuse emission from the Galactic plane and compared with existing algorithms. When compared to a human-driven analysis, the designed algorithm was found capable of detecting known target sources and regions of diffuse emission, outperforming alternative approaches over the considered fields.

  16. Pathfinder aircraft in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The unique Pathfinder solar-powered flying wing, is shown during a checkout flight from the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. This two-hour low-altitude flight over Rogers Dry Lake, Nov. 19, 1996, served to test aircraft systems and functional procedures, according to officials of AeroVironment, Inc., Pathfinder's developer and operator. Pathfinder was a lightweight, solar-powered, remotely piloted flying wing aircraft used to demonstrate the use of solar power for long-duration, high-altitude flight. Its name denotes its mission as the 'Pathfinder' or first in a series of solar-powered aircraft that will be able to remain airborne for weeks or months on scientific sampling and imaging missions. Solar arrays covered most of the upper wing surface of the Pathfinder aircraft. These arrays provided up to 8,000 watts of power at high noon on a clear summer day. That power fed the aircraft's six electric motors as well as its avionics, communications, and other electrical systems. Pathfinder also had a backup battery system that could provide power for two to five hours, allowing for limited-duration flight after dark. Pathfinder flew at airspeeds of only 15 to 20 mph. Pitch control was maintained by using tiny elevators on the trailing edge of the wing while turns and yaw control were accomplished by slowing down or speeding up the motors on the outboard sections of the wing. On September 11, 1995, Pathfinder set a new altitude record for solar-powered aircraft of 50,567 feet above Edwards Air Force Base, California, on a 12-hour flight. On July 7, 1997, it set another, unofficial record of 71,500 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii. In 1998, Pathfinder was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration. (See the Pathfinder Plus photos and project description.)

  17. Pathfinder Rear Ramp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder's rear rover ramp can be seen successfully unfurled in this image, taken at the end of Sol 2 by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP). This ramp was later used for the deployment of the microrover Sojourner, which occurred at the end of Sol 2. Areas of a lander petal and deflated airbag are visible at left. The image helped Pathfinder scientists determine that the rear ramp was the one to use for rover deployment. At upper right is the rock dubbed 'Barnacle Bill,' which Sojourner will later study.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  18. Pathfinder aircraft flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Pathfinder research aircraft's wing structure is clearly defined as it soars under a clear blue sky during a test flight from Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, in November of 1996. Pathfinder was a lightweight, solar-powered, remotely piloted flying wing aircraft used to demonstrate the use of solar power for long-duration, high-altitude flight. Its name denotes its mission as the 'Pathfinder' or first in a series of solar-powered aircraft that will be able to remain airborne for weeks or months on scientific sampling and imaging missions. Solar arrays covered most of the upper wing surface of the Pathfinder aircraft. These arrays provided up to 8,000 watts of power at high noon on a clear summer day. That power fed the aircraft's six electric motors as well as its avionics, communications, and other electrical systems. Pathfinder also had a backup battery system that could provide power for two to five hours, allowing for limited-duration flight after dark. Pathfinder flew at airspeeds of only 15 to 20 mph. Pitch control was maintained by using tiny elevators on the trailing edge of the wing while turns and yaw control were accomplished by slowing down or speeding up the motors on the outboard sections of the wing. On September 11, 1995, Pathfinder set a new altitude record for solar-powered aircraft of 50,567 feet above Edwards Air Force Base, California, on a 12-hour flight. On July 7, 1997, it set another, unofficial record of 71,500 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii. In 1998, Pathfinder was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration. (See the Pathfinder Plus photos and project description.)

  19. LUNASKA experiments using the Australia Telescope Compact Array to search for ultrahigh energy neutrinos and develop technology for the lunar Cherenkov technique

    SciTech Connect

    James, C. W.; Protheroe, R. J.; Ekers, R. D.; Phillips, C. J.; Roberts, P.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Bray, J. D.; McFadden, R. A.

    2010-02-15

    We describe the design, performance, sensitivity and results of our recent experiments using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) for lunar Cherenkov observations with a very wide (600 MHz) bandwidth and nanosecond timing, including a limit on an isotropic neutrino flux. We also make a first estimate of the effects of small-scale surface roughness on the effective experimental aperture, finding that contrary to expectations, such roughness will act to increase the detectability of near-surface events over the neutrino energy-range at which our experiment is most sensitive (though distortions to the time-domain pulse profile may make identification more difficult). The aim of our 'Lunar UHE Neutrino Astrophysics using the Square Kilometre Array' (LUNASKA) project is to develop the lunar Cherenkov technique of using terrestrial radio telescope arrays for ultrahigh energy (UHE) cosmic ray (CR) and neutrino detection, and, in particular, to prepare for using the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and its path-finders such as the Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) and the Low Frequency Array (LOFAR) for lunar Cherenkov experiments.

  20. MESUR Pathfinder Science Investigations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, M.

    1993-01-01

    The MESUR (Mars Environmental Survey) Pathfinder mission is the first Discovery mission planned for launch in 1996. MESUR Pathfinder is designed as an engineering demonstration of the entry, descent and landing approach to be employed by the follow-on MESUR Network mission, which will land of order 10 small stations on the surface of Mars to investigate interior, atmospheric and surface properties. Pathfinder is a small Mars lander, equipped with a microrover to deploy instruments and explore the local landing site. Instruments selected for Pathfinder include a surface imager on a 1 m pop-up mast (stereo with spectral filters), an atmospheric structure instrument/surface meteorology package, and an alpha proton x-ray spectrometer. The microrover will carry the alpha proton x-ray spectrometer to a number of different rocks and surface materials and provide close-up imaging...

  1. LISA and its pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The LISA Pathfinder Team

    2015-08-01

    On astronomical scales, gravity is the engine of the Universe. The launch of LISA Pathfinder this year to prepare the technology to detect gravitational waves will help us 'listen' to the whole Universe.

  2. Pathfinder: Humans in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John L.

    1988-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented on the Pathfinder program. Information is given on human exploration of the solar system, technical requirements interfaces, program objectives, space suits, human performance, man-machine systems, space habitats, life support systems, and artificial gravity

  3. Pathfinder aircraft in flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Pathfinder research aircraft's wing structure was clearly defined as it soared under a clear blue sky during a test flight July 27, 1995, from Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The center section and outer wing panels of the aircraft had ribs constructed of thin plastic foam, while the ribs in the inner wing panels are fabricated from lightweight composite material. Developed by AeroVironment, Inc., the Pathfinder was one of several unmanned aircraft being evaluated under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program. Pathfinder was a lightweight, solar-powered, remotely piloted flying wing aircraft used to demonstrate the use of solar power for long-duration, high-altitude flight. Its name denotes its mission as the 'Pathfinder' or first in a series of solar-powered aircraft that will be able to remain airborne for weeks or months on scientific sampling and imaging missions. Solar arrays covered most of the upper wing surface of the Pathfinder aircraft. These arrays provided up to 8,000 watts of power at high noon on a clear summer day. That power fed the aircraft's six electric motors as well as its avionics, communications, and other electrical systems. Pathfinder also had a backup battery system that could provide power for two to five hours, allowing for limited-duration flight after dark. Pathfinder flew at airspeeds of only 15 to 20 mph. Pitch control was maintained by using tiny elevators on the trailing edge of the wing while turns and yaw control were accomplished by slowing down or speeding up the motors on the outboard sections of the wing. On September 11, 1995, Pathfinder set a new altitude record for solar-powered aircraft of 50,567 feet above Edwards Air Force Base, California, on a 12-hour flight. On July 7, 1997, it set another, unofficial record of 71,500 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii. In 1998, Pathfinder was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus

  4. Pathfinder Aircraft in Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Pathfinder research aircraft's wing structure was clearly defined as it soared under a clear blue sky during a test flight July 27, 1995, from Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The center section and outer wing panels of the aircraft had ribs constructed of thin plastic foam, while the ribs in the inner wing panels are fabricated from lightweight composite material. Developed by AeroVironment, Inc., the Pathfinder was one of several unmanned aircraft being evaluated under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) program. Pathfinder was a lightweight, solar-powered, remotely piloted flying wing aircraft used to demonstrate the use of solar power for long- duration, high-altitude flight. Its name denotes its mission as the 'Pathfinder' or first in a series of solar-powered aircraft that will be able to remain airborne for weeks or months on scientific sampling and imaging missions. Solar arrays covered most of the upper wing surface of the Pathfinder aircraft. These arrays provided up to 8,000 watts of power at high noon on a clear summer day. That power fed the aircraft's six electric motors as well as its avionics, communications, and other electrical systems. Pathfinder also had a backup battery system that could provide power for two to five hours, allowing for limited-duration flight after dark. Pathfinder flew at airspeeds of only 15 to 20 mph. Pitch control was maintained by using tiny elevators on the trailing edge of the wing while turns and yaw control were accomplished by slowing down or speeding up the motors on the outboard sections of the wing. On September 11, 1995, Pathfinder set a new altitude record for solar- powered aircraft of 50,567 feet above Edwards Air Force Base, California, on a 12-hour flight. On July 7, 1997, it set another, unofficial record of 71,500 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii. In 1998, Pathfinder was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus

  5. The LISA Pathfinder Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Baird, J.; Binetruy, P.; Born, M.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Bursi, A.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesarini, A.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; Diepholz, I.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; Gallegos, J.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, L. I.; Gibert, F.; Giardini, D.; Giusteri, R.; Grimani, C.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Inchauspé, H.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Kaune, B.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C.; Lloro, I.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Mance, D.; Martín, V.; Martin-Porqueras, F.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P.; Mendes, J.; Mendes, L.; Moroni, A.; Nofrarias, M.; Paczkowski, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Petiteau, A.; Pivato, P.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ragnit, U.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Russano, G.; Sarra, P.; Schleicher, A.; Slutsky, J.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Sumner, T.; Texier, D.; Thorpe, J.; Trenkel, C.; Tu, H. B.; Vetrugno, D.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Wealthy, D.; Wen, S.; Weber, W.; Wittchen, A.; Zanoni, C.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2015-05-01

    LISA Pathfinder (LPF), the second of the European Space Agency's Small Missions for Advanced Research in Technology (SMART), is a dedicated technology validation mission for future spaceborne gravitational wave detectors, such as the proposed eLISA mission. LISA Pathfinder, and its scientific payload - the LISA Technology Package - will test, in flight, the critical technologies required for low frequency gravitational wave detection: it will put two test masses in a near-perfect gravitational free-fall and control and measure their motion with unprecedented accuracy. This is achieved through technology comprising inertial sensors, high precision laser metrology, drag-free control and an ultra-precise micro-Newton propulsion system. LISA Pathfinder is due to be launched in mid-2015, with first results on the performance of the system being available 6 months thereafter. The paper introduces the LISA Pathfinder mission, followed by an explanation of the physical principles of measurement concept and associated hardware. We then provide a detailed discussion of the LISA Technology Package, including both the inertial sensor and interferometric readout. As we approach the launch of the LISA Pathfinder, the focus of the development is shifting towards the science operations and data analysis - this is described in the final section of the paper

  6. JWST Pathfinder Telescope Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, Gary W.; Kennard, Scott H.; Broccolo, Ronald T.; Ellis, James M.; Daly, Elizabeth A.; Hahn, Walter G.; Amon, John N.; Mt. Pleasant, Stephen M.; Texter, Scott; Atkinson, Charles B.; McKay, Andrew; Levi, Joshua; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Feinberg, Lee

    2015-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a 6.5m, segmented, IR telescope that will explore the first light of the universe after the big bang. In 2014, a major risk reduction effort related to the Alignment, Integration, and Test (AI&T) of the segmented telescope was completed. The Pathfinder telescope includes two Primary Mirror Segment Assemblies (PMSA's) and the Secondary Mirror Assembly (SMA) onto a flight-like composite telescope backplane. This pathfinder allowed the JWST team to assess the alignment process and to better understand the various error sources that need to be accommodated in the flight build. The successful completion of the Pathfinder Telescope provides a final integration roadmap for the flight operations that will start in August 2015.

  7. JWST pathfinder telescope integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Gary W.; Kennard, Scott H.; Broccolo, Ronald T.; Ellis, James M.; Daly, Elizabeth A.; Hahn, Walter G.; Amon, John N.; Mt. Pleasant, Stephen M.; Texter, Scott; Atkinson, Charles B.; McKay, Andrew; Levi, Joshua; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Feinberg, Lee

    2015-08-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a 6.5m, segmented, IR telescope that will explore the first light of the universe after the big bang. In 2014, a major risk reduction effort related to the Alignment, Integration, and Test (AI and T) of the segmented telescope was completed. The Pathfinder telescope includes two Primary Mirror Segment Assemblies (PMSA's) and the Secondary Mirror Assembly (SMA) onto a flight-like composite telescope backplane. This pathfinder allowed the JWST team to assess the alignment process and to better understand the various error sources that need to be accommodated in the flight build. The successful completion of the Pathfinder Telescope provides a final integration roadmap for the flight operations that will start in August 2015.

  8. Pathfinder: A Retrospective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Lyons, Valerie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Mars is one of the most interesting planets in the solar system, featuring enormous canyons, giant volcanoes, and indications that, early in its history, it might have had rivers and perhaps even oceans. Five years ago, in July of 1997, the Pathfinder mission landed on Mars, bringing with it the microwave-oven sized Sojourner rover to wander around on the surface and analyse rocks. Among the experiments on the mission was one designed to analyse dust deposition. Pathfinder is only the first of an armada of spacecraft which will examine Mars from the pole to the equator in the next decade, culminating with a mission to bring humans to Mars.

  9. The LISA Pathfinder Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, james; McNamara, P. W.

    2011-01-01

    LISA Pathfinder is a dedicated technology demonstration space mission for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA), a NASA/ESA collaboration to operate a space-based observatory for gravitational waves in the milli-Hertz band. Although the formal partnership between the agencies was dissolved in the Spring of 2011, both agencies are actively pursuing concepts for LISA-like gravitational wave observatories. These concepts take advantage of the significant technology development efforts that have already been made, especially those of the LISA Pathfinder mission. LISA Pathfinder, which is in the late stages of implementation, will place two test masses in drag-free flight and measure the relative acceleration between them. This measurement will validate a number of technologies that are critical to LISA-like gravitational wave instruments including sensing and control of the test masses, drag-free control laws, microNewton thrusters, and picometer-level laser metrology. We will present the current status of the LISA Pathfinder mission and associated activities.

  10. Pathfinder Spies Dust Devils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This set of images from NASA's 1997 Pathfinder mission highlight the dust devils that gust across the surface of Mars. The right image shows the dusty martian sky as our eye would see it. The left image has been enhanced to expose the dust devils that lurk in the hazy sky.

  11. The LISA Pathfinder Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stebbins, Robin

    2009-01-01

    LISA Pathfinder (formerly known as SMART-2) is a European Space Agency (ESA) mission designed to pave the way for the joint ESA/NASA Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission by testing in flight the critical technologies required for spaceborne gravitational wave detection: it will put two test masses in a near-perfect gravitational free-fall and control and measure their motion with unprecedented accuracy. LISA Pathfinder is currently in the integration and test phase of the development, and is due to be launched on a dedicated launch vehicle in late 2011, with first results on the performance of the system being available approx 6 months later. This poster will describe the mission in detail, give the current status of the spacecraft development, and highlight the future milestones in the integration and test campaign.

  12. VR for Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackmon, Theodore

    1998-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) technology has played an integral role for Mars Pathfinder mission, operations Using an automated machine vision algorithm, the 3d topography of the Martian surface was rapidly recovered fro -a the stereo images captured. by the Tender camera to produce photo-realistic 3d models, An advanced, interface was developed for visualization and interaction with. the virtual environment of the Pathfinder landing site for mission scientists at the Space Flight Operations Facility of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The VR aspect of the display allowed mission scientists to navigate on Mars in Bud while remaining here on Earth, thus improving their spatial awareness of the rock field that surrounds the lenders Measurements of positions, distances and angles could be easily extracted from the topographic models, providing valuable information for science analysis and mission. planning. Moreover, the VR map of Mars has also been used to assist with the archiving and planning of activities for the Sojourner rover.

  13. SKA and its pathfinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stappers, Ben

    2011-07-01

    The Square Kilometer Array will be the largest radio telescope in theworld, spreading out over an entire continent. It will revolutionize manyareas of astronomy and astrophysics. It is also an enormous engineeringchallenge. I will introduce some of the pathfinder instruments being builtaround the world and how they are leading to the SKA. I will also discuss some of the science that will be enabled by the SKA and highlight some of the specific engineering challenges.

  14. Mars Pathfinder [foldout].

    PubMed

    1997-12-01

    The following foldout present images and analysis from the Mars Pathfinder Mission that are discussed in seven subsequent Reports. The center is a four-page panorama of the surface of Mars around the lander (Plate 1). The back of the foldout contains surface images (Plate 7), a different perspective of the landing site (Plate 2), rover targets (Plate 3), locations of rocks and other features (Plate 6) and data analysis (Plates 4, 4, 8, 9, and 10). PMID:9411794

  15. Mars Pathfinder Status at Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spear, A. J.; Freeman, Delma C., Jr.; Braun, Robert D.

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder Flight System is in final test, assembly and launch preparations at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Launch is scheduled for 2 Dec. 1996. The Flight System development, in particular the Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) system, was a major team effort involving JPL, other NASA centers and industry. This paper provides a summary Mars Pathfinder description and status at launch. In addition, a section by NASA's Langley Research Center, a key EDL contributor, is provided on their support to Mars Pathfinder. This section is included as an example of the work performed by Pathfinder team members outside JPL.

  16. The Mars Pathfinder Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, Matthew P.

    1997-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder, one of the first Discovery-class missions (quick, low-cost projects with focused science objectives), will land a single spacecraft with a microrover and several instruments on the surface of Mars in 1997. Pathfinder will be the first mission to use a rover, carrying a chemical analysis instrument, to characterize the rocks and soils in a landing area over hundreds of square meters on Mars, which will provide a calibration point or "ground truth" for orbital remote sensing observations. In addition to the rover, which also performs a number of technology experiments, Pathfinder carries three science instruments: a stereoscopic imager with spectral filters on an extendable mast, an alpha proton X ray spectrometer, and an atmospheric structure instrument/meteorology package. The instruments, the rover technology experiments, and the telemetry system will allow investigations of the surface morphology and geology at submeter to a hundred meters scale, the petrology and geochemistry of rocks and soils, the magnetic properties of dust, soil mechanics and properties, a variety of atmospheric investigations, and the rotational and orbital dynamics of Mars. Landing downstream from the mouth of a giant catastrophic outflow channel, Ares Vallis at 19.5 deg N, 32.8 deg W, offers the potential of identifying and analyzing a wide variety of crustal materials, from the ancient heavily cratered terrain, intermediate-aged ridged plains, and reworked channel deposits, thus allowing first-order scientific investigations of the early differentiation and evolution of the crust, the development of weathering products, and tile early environments and conditions on Mars.

  17. Delta II Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Final preparations for lift off of the DELTA II Mars Pathfinder Rocket are shown. Activities include loading the liquid oxygen, completing the construction of the Rover, and placing the Rover into the Lander. After the countdown, important visual events include the launch of the Delta Rocket, burnout and separation of the three Solid Rocket Boosters, and the main engine cutoff. The cutoff of the main engine marks the beginning of the second stage engine. After the completion of the second stage, the third stage engine ignites and then cuts off. Once the third stage engine cuts off spacecraft separation occurs.

  18. A Southern Sky Survey with Fermi LAT and ASKAP

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, Robert A.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2010-04-29

    We present the prospects for a future joint gamma-ray and radio survey of southern hemisphere sources using the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) and the upcoming Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) radio telescope. ASKAP is a next generation radio telescope designed to perform surveys at GHz frequencies at a much higher survey speed than previous radio telescopes, and is scheduled to start engineering observations in 2011. The survey capabilities of both Fermi LAT and ASKAP are described, and the planned science surveys for ASKAP are summarized. We give some expected details of the Variable and Slow Transient (VAST) survey using ASKAP, which will search for transients on timescales from 5 seconds to years. Some observational properties of faint and transient sources seen at gamma-ray and radio wavelengths are summarized, and prospects and strategies for using ASKAP survey data for LAT source counterpart identification are summarized.

  19. Pathfinder Rover Atop Mermaid Dune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder Lander camera image of Sojourner Rover atop the Mermaid 'dune' on Sol 30. Note the dark material excavated by the rover wheels. These, and other excavations brought materials to the surface for examination and allowed estimates of mechanical properties of the deposits.

    NOTE: original caption as published in Science Magazine

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  20. LISA Pathfinder ground testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzman, Felipe; LISA Pathfinder Team

    2010-01-01

    The space-based gravitational wave observatory LISA is a joint NASA-ESA mission that requires challenging technology to ensure pure geodetic trajectories of test masses and the interferometric measurement of distance variations between them. The LISA Pathfinder mission is an ESA-launched technology demonstrator of key LISA subsystems such as spacecraft control with micronewton thrusters, test mass drag-free control, and precision laser interferometry between free-flying test masses. Ground testing of pre-flight hardware of the Gravitational Reference Sensor and Optical Metrology subsystems is currently ongoing. Studies have been carried out on very sensitive torsion pendulums that effectively reproduce a free-fall condition for the test mass within a horizontal plane in the lab, down to frequencies < 0.1 mHz. Thermal gradient induced effects, impact of gas molecules, noisy charging, surface charge patches, and other effects have been investigated and their physical models consolidated. A final upper limit on non-modeled disturbances has also been obtained within one order of magnitude of LISA requirements at 1 mHz. The interferometry system has also been extensively studied to identify noise sources and develop approaches to mitigate them. Engineering models of the optical bench, laser head and laser modulators have been interconnected and tested for functionality and noise level in closed-loop operation, demonstrating the required optical metrology sensitivity to test mass displacement. This poster presents the current status in the development and implementation of LISA Pathfinder pre-flight systems and latest results of the ongoing ground testing efforts.

  1. Launch Abort System Pathfinder Arrival

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Orion Launch Abort System, or LAS, pathfinder returned home to NASA Langley on Oct. 18 on its way to NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The hardware was built at Langley and was used in preparation f...

  2. LISA Pathfinder: mission and status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonucci, F.; Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Benedetti, M.; Binetruy, P.; Boatella, C.; Bogenstahl, J.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Bosetti, P.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesa, M.; Chmeissani, M.; Ciani, G.; Conchillo, A.; Congedo, G.; Cristofolini, I.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; De Marchi, F.; Diaz-Aguilo, M.; Diepholz, I.; Dixon, G.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Fauste, J.; Ferraioli, L.; Fertin, D.; Fichter, W.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; García Marin, A.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, L.; Gilbert, F.; Giardini, D.; Grimani, C.; Grynagier, A.; Guillaume, B.; Guzmán, F.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hough, J.; Hoyland, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Jeannin, O.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Killow, C.; Llamas, X.; Lloro, I.; Lobo, A.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Mance, D.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P. W.; Mendes, J.; Mitchell, E.; Monsky, A.; Nicolini, D.; Nicolodi, D.; Nofrarias, M.; Pedersen, F.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Perreca, A.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Racca, G. D.; Rais, B.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Sanjuan, J.; Schleicher, A.; Schulte, M.; Shaul, D.; Stagnaro, L.; Strandmoe, S.; Steier, F.; Sumner, T. J.; Taylor, A.; Texier, D.; Trenkel, C.; Tombolato, D.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Weber, W. J.; Zweifel, P.

    2011-05-01

    LISA Pathfinder, the second of the European Space Agency's Small Missions for Advanced Research in Technology (SMART), is a dedicated technology demonstrator for the joint ESA/NASA Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission. The technologies required for LISA are many and extremely challenging. This coupled with the fact that some flight hardware cannot be fully tested on ground due to Earth-induced noise led to the implementation of the LISA Pathfinder mission to test the critical LISA technologies in a flight environment. LISA Pathfinder essentially mimics one arm of the LISA constellation by shrinking the 5 million kilometre armlength down to a few tens of centimetres, giving up the sensitivity to gravitational waves, but keeping the measurement technology: the distance between the two test masses is measured using a laser interferometric technique similar to one aspect of the LISA interferometry system. The scientific objective of the LISA Pathfinder mission consists then of the first in-flight test of low frequency gravitational wave detection metrology. LISA Pathfinder is due to be launched in 2013 on-board a dedicated small launch vehicle (VEGA). After a series of apogee raising manoeuvres using an expendable propulsion module, LISA Pathfinder will enter a transfer orbit towards the first Sun-Earth Lagrange point (L1). After separation from the propulsion module, the LPF spacecraft will be stabilized using the micro-Newton thrusters, entering a 500 000 km by 800 000 km Lissajous orbit around L1. Science results will be available approximately 2 months after launch.

  3. Mars Pathfinder Landing Site Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, Matthew (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder Project is an approved Discovery-class mission that will place a lander and rover on the surface of the Red Planet in July 1997. The Mars Pathfinder Landing Site Workshop was designed to allow the Mars scientific community to provide input as to where to land Pathfinder on Mars. The workshop was attended by over 60 people from around the United States and from Europe. Over 20 landing sites were proposed at the workshop, and the scientific questions and problems concerning each were addressed. The workshop and the discussion that occured during and afterward have significantly improved the ability to select a scientifically exciting but safe landing site on Mars.

  4. The Sonic Pathfinder: An Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodds, Allan G.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    An objective evaluation of the Sonic Pathfinder, a new ultrasonic mobility aid, showed that use of the aid changes mobility in many ways. Reduced perception of environmental sounds was not reflected in performance. The majority of users traveled slowly and exhibited less than optimal strategies. (Author/CL)

  5. Pathfinder Teaching and Learning Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii Univ., Honolulu. Sea Grant Program.

    This collection of teaching units were selected from materials developed during the Operation Pathfinder Institutes (OPI) which took place in the Pacific region between 1994 and 1999. The institutes were intended to provide upper elementary and middle school science teachers with an opportunity to develop a deeper understanding of the marine…

  6. Desert Pathfinder at Work

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-09-01

    The Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) project celebrates the inauguration of its outstanding 12-m telescope, located on the 5100m high Chajnantor plateau in the Atacama Desert (Chile). The APEX telescope, designed to work at sub-millimetre wavelengths, in the 0.2 to 1.5 mm range, passed successfully its Science Verification phase in July, and since then is performing regular science observations. This new front-line facility provides access to the "Cold Universe" with unprecedented sensitivity and image quality. After months of careful efforts to set up the telescope to work at the best possible technical level, those involved in the project are looking with satisfaction at the fruit of their labour: APEX is not only fully operational, it has already provided important scientific results. "The superb sensitivity of our detectors together with the excellence of the site allow fantastic observations that would not be possible with any other telescope in the world," said Karl Menten, Director of the group for Millimeter and Sub-Millimeter Astronomy at the Max-Planck-Institute for Radio Astronomy (MPIfR) and Principal Investigator of the APEX project. ESO PR Photo 30/05 ESO PR Photo 30/05 Sub-Millimetre Image of a Stellar Cradle [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 627 pix - 200k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 1254 pix - 503k] [Full Res - JPEG: 1539 x 2413 pix - 1.3M] Caption: ESO PR Photo 30/05 is an image of the giant molecular cloud G327 taken with APEX. More than 5000 spectra were taken in the J=3-2 line of the carbon monoxide molecule (CO), one of the best tracers of molecular clouds, in which star formation takes place. The bright peak in the north of the cloud is an evolved star forming region, where the gas is heated by a cluster of new stars. The most interesting region in the image is totally inconspicuous in CO: the G327 hot core, as seen in methanol contours. It is a truly exceptional source, and is one of the richest sources of emission from complex organic molecules in the

  7. Spacetime Metrology with LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Congedo, Giuseppe

    2012-04-01

    LISA is the proposed ESA-NASA gravitational wave detector in the 0.1 mHz - 0.1 Hz band. LISA Pathfinder is the down-scaled version of a single LISA arm. The arm - named Doppler link - can be treated as a differential accelerometer, measuring the relative acceleration between test masses. LISA Pathfinder - the in-flight test of the LISA instrumentation - is currently in the final implementation and planned to be launched in 2014. It will set stringent constraints on the ability to put test masses in geodesic motion to within the required differential acceleration of 3times10^{-14} m s^{-2} Hz^{-1/2} and track their relative motion to within the required differential displacement measurement noise of 9times10^{-12} m Hz^{-1/2}, around 1 mHz. Given the scientific objectives, it will carry out - for the first time with such high accuracy required for gravitational wave detection - the science of spacetime metrology, in which the Doppler link between two free-falling test masses measures the curvature. This thesis contains a novel approach to the calculation of the Doppler response to gravitational waves. It shows that the parallel transport of 4-vectors records the history of gravitational wave signals. In practice, the Doppler link is implemented with 4 bodies in LISA and 3 bodies in LISA Pathfinder. To compensate for noise sources a control logic is implemented during the measurement. The closed-loop dynamics of LISA Pathfinder can be condensed into operators acting on the motion coordinates, handling the couplings, as well as the cross-talks. The scope of system identification is the optimal calibration of the instrument. This thesis describes some data analysis procedures applied to synthetic experiments and shows the relevance of system identification for the success of LISA Pathfinder in demonstrating the principles of spacetime metrology for all future space-based missions.

  8. LISA Pathfinder: A Mission Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitson, Martin; LISA Pathfinder Team Team

    2016-03-01

    On December 3rd at 04:04 UTC, The European Space Agency launched the LISA Pathfinder satellite on board a VEGA rocket from Kourou in French Guiana. After a series of orbit raising manoeuvres and a 2 month long transfer orbit, LISA Pathfinder arrived at L1. Following a period of commissioning, the science operations commenced at the start of March, beginning the demonstration of technologies and methodologies which pave the way for a future large-scale gravitational wave observatory in space. This talk will present the scientific goals of the mission, discuss the technologies being tested, elucidate the link to a future space-based observatory, such as LISA, and present preliminary results from the in-orbit operations and experiments.

  9. Multispectral Imaging from Mars PATHFINDER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrand, William H.; Bell, James F., III; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Bishop, Janice L.; Morris, Richard V.

    2007-01-01

    The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was a mast-mounted instrument on the Mars Pathfinder lander which landed on Mars Ares Vallis floodplain on July 4, 1997. During the 83 sols of Mars Pathfinders landed operations, the IMP collected over 16,600 images. Multispectral images were collected using twelve narrowband filters at wavelengths between 400 and 1000 nm in the visible and near infrared (VNIR) range. The IMP provided VNIR spectra of the materials surrounding the lander including rocks, bright soils, dark soils, and atmospheric observations. During the primary mission, only a single primary rock spectral class, Gray Rock, was recognized; since then, Black Rock, has been identified. The Black Rock spectra have a stronger absorption at longer wavelengths than do Gray Rock spectra. A number of coated rocks have also been described, the Red and Maroon Rock classes, and perhaps indurated soils in the form of the Pink Rock class. A number of different soil types were also recognized with the primary ones being Bright Red Drift, Dark Soil, Brown Soil, and Disturbed Soil. Examination of spectral parameter plots indicated two trends which were interpreted as representing alteration products formed in at least two different environmental epochs of the Ares Vallis area. Subsequent analysis of the data and comparison with terrestrial analogs have supported the interpretation that the rock coatings provide evidence of earlier martian environments. However, the presence of relatively uncoated examples of the Gray and Black rock classes indicate that relatively unweathered materials can persist on the martian surface.

  10. Tracing the neutral gas environments of young radio AGN with ASKAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, J. R.; Sadler, E. M.; Moss, V. A.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Heywood, I.; Indermuehle, B. T.; McConnell, D.; Sault, R. J.; Whiting, M. T.

    2016-02-01

    At present neutral atomic hydrogen (H I) gas in galaxies at redshifts above {z ˜ 0.3} (the extent of 21 cm emission surveys in individual galaxies) and below {z ˜ 1.7} (where the Lyman-\\alpha line is not observable with ground-based telescopes) has remained largely unexplored. The advent of precursor telescopes to the Square Kilometre Array will allow us to conduct the first systematic radio-selected 21 cm absorption surveys for H I over these redshifts. While H I absorption is a tracer of the reservoir of cold neutral gas in galaxies available for star formation, it can also be used to reveal the extreme kinematics associated with jet-driven neutral outflows in radio-loud active galactic nuclei. Using the six-antenna Boolardy Engineering Test Array of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder, we have demonstrated that in a single frequency tuning we can detect H I absorption over a broad range of redshifts between z = 0.4 and 1.0. As part of our early science and commissioning program, we are now carrying out a search for absorption towards a sample of the brightest GPS and CSS sources in the southern sky. These intrinsically compact sources present us with an opportunity to study the circumnuclear region of recently re-started radio galaxies, in some cases showing direct evidence of mechanical feedback through jet-driven outflows. With the sensitivity of the full ASKAP array we will be able to study the kinematics of atomic gas in a few thousand radio galaxies, testing models of radio jet feedback well beyond the nearby Universe.

  11. MARS PATHFINDER ENCAPSULATION IN SAEF-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    McDonnell Douglas workers in the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2) are installing a shipping container around the Mars Pathfinder spacecraft/PAM-D upper stage booster assembly in preparation for transferring the Pathfinder to Launch Complex (LC) 17 on Cape Canaveral Air Station. The Pathfinder will be encased in a protective fairing before being mated to the McDonnell Douglas Delta II expendable launch vehicle that will loft it into orbit. Mars Pathfinder is slated for liftoff Dec. 2 from LC 17B.

  12. Pathfinder-Plus on flight in Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Pathfinder-Plus on a flight over Hawaii in 1998. Pathfinder was a remotely controlled, solar-powered flying wing, designed and built as a proof-of-concept vehicle for a much larger aircraft capable of flying at extremely high altitudes for weeks at a time. It was built by AeroVironment, Inc., a California company that developed the human-powered Gossamer Condor and Gossamer Albatross lightweight aircraft during the 1970s, and later made the solar-electric powered Gossamer Penguin and Solar Challenger. The basic configuration and concepts for Pathfinder were first realized with the HALSOL (High Altitude Solar) aircraft, built in 1983 by AeroVironment and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Pathfinder was constructed of advanced composites, plastics, and foam, and despite a wingspan of nearly 100 feet, it weighed only about 600 pounds. Pathfinder was one of several unpiloted prototypes under study by NASA's ERAST (Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology) program, a NASA-industry alliance which is helping develop advanced technologies that will enable aircraft to study the earth's environment during extremely long flights at altitudes in excess of 100,000 feet. (See project description below for Pathfinder's conversion to Pathfinder Plus.) In 1998, the Pathfinder solar-powered flying wing (see its photographs and project description) was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration and on Aug. 6, 1998, Pathfinder Plus set an altitude record (for propeller-driven aircraft) of approximately 80,285 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. The goal of the Pathfinder Plus flights was to validate new solar, aerodynamic, propulsion, and systems technology developed for its successor, the Centurion, which was designed to reach and sustain altitudes in the 100,000-foot range. The Centurion was succeeded by the Helios Prototype with a goal of reaching and sustaining flight at an altitude of 100,000 feet and flying non-stop for at least 4 days

  13. Pathfinder-Plus on flight over Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Pathfinder-Plus flying over the Hawaiian Islands in 1998 with Ni'ihau Island in the background. Pathfinder was a remotely controlled, solar-powered flying wing, designed and built as a proof-of-concept vehicle for a much larger aircraft capable of flying at extremely high altitudes for weeks at a time. It was built by AeroVironment, Inc., a California company that developed the human-powered Gossamer Condor and Gossamer Albatross lightweight aircraft during the 1970s, and later made the solar-electric powered Gossamer Penguin and Solar Challenger. The basic configuration and concepts for Pathfinder were first realized with the HALSOL (High Altitude Solar) aircraft, built in 1983 by AeroVironment and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Pathfinder was constructed of advanced composites, plastics, and foam, and despite a wingspan of nearly 100 feet, it weighed only about 600 pounds. Pathfinder was one of several unpiloted prototypes under study by NASA's ERAST (Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology) program, a NASA-industry alliance which is helping develop advanced technologies that will enable aircraft to study the earth's environment during extremely long flights at altitudes in excess of 100,000 feet. (See project description below for Pathfinder's conversion to Pathfinder Plus.) In 1998, the Pathfinder solar-powered flying wing (see its photographs and project description) was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration and on Aug. 6, 1998, Pathfinder Plus set an altitude record (for propeller-driven aircraft) of approximately 80,285 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. The goal of the Pathfinder Plus flights was to validate new solar, aerodynamic, propulsion, and systems technology developed for its successor, the Centurion, which was designed to reach and sustain altitudes in the 100,000-foot range. The Centurion was succeeded by the Helios Prototype with a goal of reaching and sustaining flight at an altitude of 100

  14. Pathfinder-Plus on flight over Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Pathfinder-Plus on flight over Hawaii. Pathfinder was a remotely controlled, solar-powered flying wing, designed and built as a proof-of-concept vehicle for a much larger aircraft capable of flying at extremely high altitudes for weeks at a time. It was built by AeroVironment, Inc., a California company that developed the human-powered Gossamer Condor and Gossamer Albatross lightweight aircraft during the 1970s, and later made the solar-electric powered Gossamer Penguin and Solar Challenger. The basic configuration and concepts for Pathfinder were first realized with the HALSOL (High Altitude Solar) aircraft, built in 1983 by AeroVironment and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Pathfinder was constructed of advanced composites, plastics, and foam, and despite a wingspan of nearly 100 feet, it weighed only about 600 pounds. Pathfinder was one of several unpiloted prototypes under study by NASA's ERAST (Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology) program, a NASA-industry alliance which is helping develop advanced technologies that will enable aircraft to study the earth's environment during extremely long flights at altitudes in excess of 100,000 feet. (See project description below for Pathfinder's conversion to Pathfinder Plus.) In 1998, the Pathfinder solar-powered flying wing (see its photographs and project description) was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration and on Aug. 6, 1998, Pathfinder Plus set an altitude record (for propeller-driven aircraft) of approximately 80,285 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. The goal of the Pathfinder Plus flights was to validate new solar, aerodynamic, propulsion, and systems technology developed for its successor, the Centurion, which was designed to reach and sustain altitudes in the 100,000-foot range. The Centurion was succeeded by the Helios Prototype with a goal of reaching and sustaining flight at an altitude of 100,000 feet and flying non-stop for at least 4 days above 50

  15. Mars Pathfinder Atmosphere Entry Trajectory Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, David A.

    1995-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder spacecraft will enter the Martian atmosphere directly from the interplanetary trajectory, at a relatively high velocity. The design of the nominal entry trajectory, and the accurate determination of potential trajectory dispersions, is necessary for the development of the Pathfinder Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) System.

  16. Software Aids Visualization Of Mars Pathfinder Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidner, Richard J.

    1996-01-01

    Report describes Simulator for Imager for Mars Pathfinder (SIMP) computer program. SIMP generates "virtual reality" display of view through video camera on Mars lander spacecraft of Mars Pathfinder mission, along with display of pertinent textual and graphical data, for use by scientific investigators in planning sequences of activities for mission.

  17. The Mars Pathfinder Science Data Processing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runkle, A. J.; Lorre, J. J.; Alexander, D. A.; LaVoie, S. K.; Woncik, P. J.; Duxbury, E. D.; McAuley, J. M.; Green, W. B.

    1998-01-01

    This paper will describe the system developed to support Mars Pathfinder, the technology that was used to provide sophisticated products at very low cost, and the variety of data products used to support Mars Pathfinder operations. This paper represents one phase of work performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Instittue of Technology, under a contract with National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  18. MARS PATHFINDER CAMERA TEST IN SAEF-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2), workers from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) are conducting a systems test of the imager for the Mars Pathfinder. Mounted on the Pathfinder lander, the imager (the white cylindrical element the worker is touching) is a specially designed camera featuring a stereo-imaging system with color capability provided by a set of selectable filters. It is mounted on an extendable mast that will pop up after the lander touches down on the Martian surface. The imager will transmit images of the terrain, allowing engineers back on Earth to survey the landing site before the Pathfinder rover is deployed to explore the area. The Mars Pathfinder is scheduled for launch aboard a Delta II expendable launch vehicle on Dec. 2. JPL manages the Pathfinder project for NASA.

  19. MARS PATHFINDER ENCAPSULATION IN SAEF-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder and mated PAM-D upper stage booster are ready for transfer from the Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2) on KSC to Launch Complex 17 on Cape Canaveral Air Station. Uppermost is the Mars Pathfinder assembly, with its lander encased in a protective aeroshell attached to the circular cruise stage. Lowermost on the workstand is the PAM-D booster that will give the Pathfinder the final 'kick' to send it on its way to Mars. Once at Launch Complex (LC) 17, the Pathfinder will be encased in a protective fairing before being mated to the Delta II expendable launch vehicle that will loft it into orbit. Mars Pathfinder is slated for liftoff from LC 17B on Dec. 2.

  20. Mars Pathfinder mission operations concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sturms, Francis M., Jr.; Dias, William C.; Nakata, Albert Y.; Tai, Wallace S.

    1994-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder Project plans a December 1996 launch of a single spacecraft. After jettisoning a cruise stage, an entry body containing a lander and microrover will directly enter the Mars atmosphere and parachute to a hard landing near the sub-solar latitude of 15 degrees North in July 1997. Primary surface operations last for 30 days. Cost estimates for Pathfinder ground systems development and operations are not only lower in absolute dollars, but also are a lower percentage of total project costs than in past planetary missions. Operations teams will be smaller and fewer than typical flight projects. Operations scenarios have been developed early in the project and are being used to guide operations implementation and flight system design. Recovery of key engineering data from entry, descent, and landing is a top mission priority. These data will be recorded for playback after landing. Real-time tracking of a modified carrier signal through this phase can provide important insight into the spacecraft performance during entry, descent, and landing in the event recorded data is never recovered. Surface scenarios are dominated by microrover activity and lander imaging during 7 hours of the Mars day from 0700 to 1400 local solar time. Efficient uplink and downlink processes have been designed to command the lander and microrover each Mars day.

  1. Low cost approach to Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spear, Anthony J.

    1995-10-01

    Mars Pathfinder, launching in December '96 and landing in July '97, will demo a low cost delivery system to the surface of Mars. Historically, spacecraft that orbit or land on a distant body carry a large amount of fuel for braking. Mars Pathfinder, thrusting only for navigation, enters directly into the Martian atmosphere, aerobrakes with its aeroshell, deploys a parachute at 10 km above the surface and, within 100 m off the surface, ignites solid rockets for final braking prior to deployment of air bags which cushion touchdown. After landing, petals open to upright the lander, exposing solar panels to the sun. Even though the lander and rover are expected to last longer, the major objectives of Mars Pathfinder, demonstrating EDL (Entry, Descent, Landing) and lander-rover surface operations, will occur within the first few days, at which time panoramic images of the surface will be transmitted and the rover will be deployed to conduct both mobility tests and rock composition measurements. While Mars Pathfinder is primarily an engineering demo, it accomplishes a focused, exciting set of science investigations with a stereo, multi-color lander imager; atmospheric instrumentation, used as a weather station after landing; and the rover with cameras and the APXS (Alpha Proton X-ray Spectrometer). This paper features Mars Pathfinder's approach to innovative and cost effective mission accomplishment, under a development cost cap. Mars Pathfinder is pathfinding a new way of doing business at NASA and JPL for small, low cost, Discovery class missions.

  2. Mars pathfinder lander deployment mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis-Smith, Greg R.

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder Lander employs numerous mechanisms, as well as autonomous mechanical functions, during its Entry, Descent and Landing (EDL) Sequence. This is the first US lander of its kind, since it is unguided and airbag-protected for hard landing using airbags, instead of retro rockets, to soft land. The arrival condition, location, and orientation of the Lander will only be known by the computer on the Lander. The Lander will then autonomously perform the appropriate sequence to retract the airbags, right itself, and open, such that the Lander is nearly level with no airbag material covering the solar cells. This function uses two different types of mechanisms - the Airbag Retraction Actuators and the Lander Petal Actuators - which are designed for the high torque, low temperature, dirty environment and for limited life application. The development of these actuators involved investigating low temperature lubrication, Electrical Discharge Machining (EDM) to cut gears, and gear design for limited life use.

  3. The Pathfinder Chemical Transfer Propulsion Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannum, Ned P.; Berkopec, Frank D.; Zurawski, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    Pathfinder is a research and technology initiative by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) intended to strengthen the technology base of the United States civil space program in preparation for future space exploration missions. Pathfinder begins in FY-89. One of the four major thrusts is the Chemical Transfer Propulsion program which will provide the propulsion technology for high performance, liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen expander cycle engines which are expected to be operated and maintained in space. These advanced engines will enhance or enable a variety of future space exploration missions. The goals and objectives, management, technical plan, and technology transfer for the Chemical Transfer Propulsion element of Pathfinder are described.

  4. MARS PATHFINDER PYRO SYSTEMS SWITCHING ACTIVITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder lander is subjected to electrical and functional tests of its pyrotechic petal deployer system by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) engineers and technicians in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility (SAEF-2). When the lander touches down on the surface of Mars next year, the pyrotechnic system will deploy its three petals open like a flower and allow the Sojourner autonomous rover to explore the Martian surface. The Mars Pathfinder is scheduled for launch aboard a Delta II expendable launch vehicle on Dec. 2, the beginning of a 24-day launch period. JPL is managing the Mars Pathfinder project for NASA.

  5. Navigation Flight Operations for Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, Robin M.; Kallemeyn, Pieter H., Jr.; Spencer, David A.; Braun, Robert D.

    2004-01-01

    On July 4, 1997, Mars Pathfinder became the first spacecraft to land on the surface of Mars in 21 years. Pathfinder was launched on December 4, 1996 and spent seven months en route to the red planet. This report discusses the navigation flight experience for the Mars Pathfinder interplanetary cruise. In particular, orbit determination and maneuver design and execution results are presented. Special emphasis is given to the navigation role in the days and hours leading up to and including the Entry, Descent, and Landing (EDL) phase.

  6. MARS PATHFINDER PYRO SYSTEMS SWITCHING ACTIVITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder lander is subjected to a electrical and functional tests of its pyrotechic petal deployer system by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) engineers and technicians in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility (SAEF-2). In the background is the Pathfinder cruise stage, which the lander will be mated to once its functional tests are complete. The lander will remain attached to this stage during its six-to-seven-month journey to Mars. When the lander touches down on the surface of Mars next year, the pyrotechnic system will deploy its three petals open like a flower and allow the Sojourner autonomous rover to explore the Martian surface. The Mars Pathfinder is scheduled for launch aboard a Delta II expendable launch vehicle on Dec. 2, the beginning of a 24-day launch period. JPL is managing the Mars Pathfinder project for NASA.

  7. Power and pyro subsystems for Mars Pathfinder

    SciTech Connect

    Shirbacheh, M.

    1997-12-31

    The Power and Pyro Subsystem (PPS) for Mars Pathfinder was designed to support the spacecraft activities during Launch, Cruise, Entry and Landing and Mars operation phases of the mission. The key design constraints were cost, volume and mass. The PPS consists of solar arrays, batteries and power electronics. This paper describes the Mars Pathfinder mission, key requirements on PPS, and PPS system architecture and description of each element of the PPS system.

  8. Pathfinder-Plus flight in Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Pathfinder-Plus flight in Hawaii June 2002 AeroVironment's Pathfinder-Plus solar-powered flying wing recently flew a three-flight demonstration of its ability to relay third-generation cell phone and video signals as well as provide Internet linkage. The two pods underneath the center section of the wing carried the advanced two-way telecom package, developed by Japanese telecommunications interests.

  9. LISA Pathfinder Instrument Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzman, Felipe

    2010-01-01

    LISA Pathfinder (LPF) is an ESA-launched demonstration mission of key technologies required for the joint NASA-ESA gravitational wave observatory in space, LISA. As part of the LPF interferometry investigations, analytic models of noise sources and corresponding noise subtraction techniques have been developed to correct for effects like the coupling of test mass jitter into displacement readout, and fluctuations of the laser frequency or optical pathlength difference. Ground testing of pre-flight hardware of the Optical Metrology subsystem is currently ongoing at the Albert Einstein Institute Hannover. In collaboration with NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, the LPF mission data analysis tool LTPDA is being used to analyze the data product of these tests. Furthermore, the noise subtraction techniques and in-flight experiment runs for noise characterization are being defined as part of the mission experiment master plan. We will present the data analysis outcome of preflight hardware ground tests and possible noise subtraction strategies for in-flight instrument operations.

  10. Mars Pathfinder Atmospheric Entry Navigation Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, R. D.; Spencer, D. A.; Kallemeyn, P. H.; Vaughan, R. M.

    1997-01-01

    On July 4, 1997, after traveling close to 500 million km, the Pathfinder spacecraft successfully completed entry, descent, and landing, coming to rest on the surface of Mars just 27 km from its target point. In the present paper, the atmospheric entry and approach navigation activities required in support of this mission are discussed. In particular, the flight software parameter update and landing site prediction analyses performed by the Pathfinder operations navigation team are described. A suite of simulation tools developed during Pathfinder's design cycle, but extendible to Pathfinder operations, are also presented. Data regarding the accuracy of the primary parachute deployment algorithm is extracted from the Pathfinder flight data, demonstrating that this algorithm performed as predicted. The increased probability of mission success through the software parameter update process is discussed. This paper also demonstrates the importance of modeling atmospheric flight uncertainties in the estimation of an accurate landing site. With these atmospheric effects included, the final landed ellipse prediction differs from the post-flight determined landing site by less then 0.5 km in downtrack.

  11. The EUSO-Balloon pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, J. H.; Ahmad, S.; Albert, J.-N.; Allard, D.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andreev, V.; Anzalone, A.; Arai, Y.; Asano, K.; Ave Pernas, M.; Baragatti, P.; Barrillon, P.; Batsch, T.; Bayer, J.; Bechini, R.; Belenguer, T.; Bellotti, R.; Belov, K.; Berlind, A. A.; Bertaina, M.; Biermann, P. L.; Biktemerova, S.; Blaksley, C.; Blanc, N.; Błȩcki, J.; Blin-Bondil, S.; Blümer, J.; Bobik, P.; Bogomilov, M.; Bonamente, M.; Briggs, M. S.; Briz, S.; Bruno, A.; Cafagna, F.; Campana, D.; Capdevielle, J.-N.; Caruso, R.; Casolino, M.; Cassardo, C.; Castellinic, G.; Catalano, C.; Catalano, G.; Cellino, A.; Chikawa, M.; Christl, M. J.; Cline, D.; Connaughton, V.; Conti, L.; Cordero, G.; Crawford, H. J.; Cremonini, R.; Csorna, S.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; de Castro, A. J.; De Donato, C.; de la Taille, C.; De Santis, C.; del Peral, L.; Dell'Oro, A.; De Simone, N.; Di Martino, M.; Distratis, G.; Dulucq, F.; Dupieux, M.; Ebersoldt, A.; Ebisuzaki, T.; Engel, R.; Falk, S.; Fang, K.; Fenu, F.; Fernández-Gómez, I.; Ferrarese, S.; Finco, D.; Flamini, M.; Fornaro, C.; Franceschi, A.; Fujimoto, J.; Fukushima, M.; Galeotti, P.; Garipov, G.; Geary, J.; Gelmini, G.; Giraudo, G.; Gonchar, M.; González Alvarado, C.; Gorodetzky, P.; Guarino, F.; Guzmán, A.; Hachisu, Y.; Harlov, B.; Haungs, A.; Hernández Carretero, J.; Higashide, K.; Ikeda, D.; Ikeda, H.; Inoue, N.; Inoue, S.; Insolia, A.; Isgrò, F.; Itow, Y.; Joven, E.; Judd, E. G.; Jung, A.; Kajino, F.; Kajino, T.; Kaneko, I.; Karadzhov, Y.; Karczmarczyk, J.; Karus, M.; Katahira, K.; Kawai, K.; Kawasaki, Y.; Keilhauer, B.; Khrenov, B. A.; Kim, J.-S.; Kim, S.-W.; Kim, S.-W.; Kleifges, M.; Klimov, P. A.; Kolev, D.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kudela, K.; Kurihara, Y.; Kusenko, A.; Kuznetsov, E.; Lacombe, M.; Lachaud, C.; Lee, J.; Licandro, J.; Lim, H.; López, F.; Maccarone, M. C.; Mannheim, K.; Maravilla, D.; Marcelli, L.; Marini, A.; Martinez, O.; Masciantonio, G.; Mase, K.; Matev, R.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Mernik, T.; Miyamoto, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mizumoto, Y.; Modestino, G.; Monaco, A.; Monnier-Ragaigne, D.; Morales de los Ríos, J. A.; Moretto, C.; Morozenko, V. S.; Mot, B.; Murakami, T.; Murakami, M. Nagano; Nagata, M.; Nagataki, S.; Nakamura, T.; Napolitano, T.; Naumov, D.; Nava, R.; Neronov, A.; Nomoto, K.; Nonaka, T.; Ogawa, T.; Ogio, S.; Ohmori, H.; Olinto, A. V.; Orleański, P.; Osteria, G.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Parizot, E.; Park, I. H.; Park, H. W.; Pastircak, B.; Patzak, T.; Paul, T.; Pennypacker, C.; Perez Cano, S.; Peter, T.; Picozza, P.; Pierog, T.; Piotrowski, L. W.; Piraino, S.; Plebaniak, Z.; Pollini, A.; Prat, P.; Prévôt, G.; Prieto, H.; Putis, M.; Reardon, P.; Reyes, M.; Ricci, M.; Rodríguez, I.; Rodríguez Frías, M. D.; Ronga, F.; Roth, M.; Rothkaehl, H.; Roudil, G.; Rusinov, I.; Rybczyński, M.; Sabau, M. D.; Sáez-Cano, G.; Sagawa, H.; Saito, A.; Sakaki, N.; Sakata, M.; Salazar, H.; Sánchez, S.; Santangelo, A.; Santiago Crúz, L.; Sanz Palomino, M.; Saprykin, O.; Sarazin, F.; Sato, H.; Sato, M.; Schanz, T.; Schieler, H.; Scotti, V.; Segreto, A.; Selmane, S.; Semikoz, D.; Serra, M.; Sharakin, S.; Shibata, T.; Shimizu, H. M.; Shinozaki, K.; Shirahama, T.; Siemieniec-Oziȩbło, G.; Silva López, H. H.; Sledd, J.; Słomińska, K.; Sobey, A.; Sugiyama, T.; Supanitsky, D.; Suzuki, M.; Szabelska, B.; Szabelski, J.; Tajima, F.; Tajima, N.; Tajima, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Takami, H.; Takeda, M.; Takizawa, Y.; Tenzer, C.; Tibolla, O.; Tkachev, L.; Tokuno, H.; Tomida, T.; Tone, N.; Toscano, S.; Trillaud, F.; Tsenov, R.; Tsunesada, Y.; Tsuno, K.; Tymieniecka, T.; Uchihori, Y.; Unger, M.; Vaduvescu, O.; Valdés-Galicia, J. F.; Vallania, P.; Valore, L.; Vankova, G.; Vigorito, C.; Villaseñor, L.; von Ballmoos, P.; Wada, S.; Watanabe, J.; Watanabe, S.; Watts, J.; Weber, M.; Weiler, T. J.; Wibig, T.; Wiencke, L.; Wille, M.; Wilms, J.; Włodarczyk, Z.; Yamamoto, T.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yang, J.; Yano, H.; Yashin, I. V.; Yonetoku, D.; Yoshida, K.; Yoshida, S.; Young, R.; Zotov, M. Yu.; Zuccaro Marchi, A.

    2015-11-01

    EUSO-Balloon is a pathfinder for JEM-EUSO, the Extreme Universe Space Observatory which is to be hosted on-board the International Space Station. As JEM-EUSO is designed to observe Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR)-induced Extensive Air Showers (EAS) by detecting their ultraviolet light tracks "from above", EUSO-Balloon is a nadir-pointing UV telescope too. With its Fresnel Optics and Photo-Detector Module, the instrument monitors a 50 km2 ground surface area in a wavelength band of 290-430 nm, collecting series of images at a rate of 400,000 frames/sec. The objectives of the balloon demonstrator are threefold: a) perform a full end-to-end test of a JEM-EUSO prototype consisting of all the main subsystems of the space experiment, b) measure the effective terrestrial UV background, with a spatial and temporal resolution relevant for JEM-EUSO. c) detect tracks of ultraviolet light from near space for the first time. The latter is a milestone in the development of UHECR science, paving the way for any future space-based UHECR observatory. On August 25, 2014, EUSO-Balloon was launched from Timmins Stratospheric Balloon Base (Ontario, Canada) by the balloon division of the French Space Agency CNES. From a float altitude of 38 km, the instrument operated during the entire astronomical night, observing UV-light from a variety of ground-covers and from hundreds of simulated EASs, produced by flashers and a laser during a two-hour helicopter under-flight.

  12. Overhead view of Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image, prepared by Pathfinder scientists at NASA/ Ames Research Center, is a view of the landing site from above. Seen in the lower right is Mermaid dune, with its long axis oriented northwest-southeast and its steeper side, the presumed slipface, toward the southwest. Dunes like Mermaid, the depositional tails and erosional moats associated with rocks in the area, and the fluted and polished surfaces on several boulders at the landing site all indicate an effective wind that blows from the northeast to the southwest.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  13. MARS PATHFINDER PYRO SYSTEMS SWITCHING ACTIVITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder lander is subjected to a electrical test of its pyrotechnic system by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) engineers Lorraine Garcia (foreground) and Linda Robeck in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility (SAEF-2). A wheel of the Sojourner autonomous rover, which is attached to one of the lander's petals, can be seen behind the lander. When the lander touches down on the surface of Mars next year, the pyrotechnic system will deploy its three petals open like a flower and allow the rover to explore the Martian surface. The Mars Pathfinder is scheduled for launch aboard a Delta II expendable launch vehicle on Dec. 2, the beginning of a 24-day launch period. JPL is managing the Mars Pathfinder project for NASA.

  14. MARS PATHFINDER PYRO SYSTEMS SWITCHING ACTIVITY

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder lander is subjected to a test of its pyrotechnic system by Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) engineer Jerry Gutierrez in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility (SAEF-2). A wheel of the Sojourner autonomous rover, which is attached to one of the lander's petals, can be seen behind the lander. When the lander touches down on the surface of Mars next year, the pyrotechnic system will deploy its three petals open like a flower and allow the rover to explore the Martian surface. The Mars Pathfinder is scheduled for launch aboard a Delta II expendable launch vehicle on Dec. 2, the beginning of a 24-day launch period. JPL is managing the Mars Pathfinder project for NASA.

  15. Dynamic Pathfinders: Leveraging Your OPAC to Create Resource Guides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Ben

    2008-01-01

    Library pathfinders are a time-tested method of leading library users to important resources. However, paper-based pathfinders suffer from space limitations, and both paper-based and Web-based pathfinders require frequent updates to keep up with new library acquisitions. This article details a step-by-step method to create an online dynamic…

  16. System modelling for LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Aguiló, Marc; Grynagier, Adrien; Rais, Boutheina

    LISA Pathfinder is the technology demonstrator for LISA, a space-borne gravitational waves observatory. The goal of the mission is to characterise the dynamics of the LISA Technology Package (LTP) to prove that on-board experimental conditions are compatible with the de-tection of gravitational waves. The LTP is a drag-free dynamics experiment which includes a control loop with sensors (interferometric and capacitive), actuators (capacitive actuators and thrusters), controlled disturbances (magnetic coils, heaters) and which is subject to various endogenous or exogenous noise sources such as infrared pressure or solar wind. The LTP experiment features new hardware which was never flown in space. The mission has a tight operation timeline as it is constrained to about 100 days. It is therefore vital to have efficient and precise means of investigation and diagnostics to be used during the on-orbit operations. These will be conducted using the LTP Data Analysis toolbox (LTPDA) which allows for simulation, parameter identification and various analyses (covariance analysis, state estimation) given an experimental model. The LTPDA toolbox therefore contains a series of models which are state-space representations of each component in the LTP. The State-Space Models (SSM) are objects of a state-space class within the LTPDA toolbox especially designed to address all the requirements of this tool. The user has access to a set of linear models which represent every satellite subsystem; the models are available in different forms representing 1D, 2D and 3D systems, each with settable symbolic and numeric parameters. To limit the possible errors, the models can be automatically linked to produce composite systems and closed-loops of the LTP. Finally, for the sake of completeness, accuracy and maintainability of the tool, the models contain all the physical information they mimic (i.e. variable units, description of parameters, description of inputs/outputs, etc). Models

  17. Pathfinder Landing Site in Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released 14 May 2004 This image of the Mars Pathfinder Landing site was acquired July 17, 2002, during northern spring.

    The THEMIS VIS camera is capable of capturing color images of the martian surface using its five different color filters. In this mode of operation, the spatial resolution and coverage of the image must be reduced to accommodate the additional data volume produced from the use of multiple filters. To make a color image, three of the five filter images (each in grayscale) are selected. Each is contrast enhanced and then converted to a red, green, or blue intensity image. These three images are then combined to produce a full color, single image. Because the THEMIS color filters don't span the full range of colors seen by the human eye, a color THEMIS image does not represent true color. Also, because each single-filter image is contrast enhanced before inclusion in the three-color image, the apparent color variation of the scene is exaggerated. Nevertheless, the color variation that does appear is representative of some change in color, however subtle, in the actual scene. Note that the long edges of THEMIS color images typically contain color artifacts that do not represent surface variation.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 19.4, Longitude 326.8 East (33.2 West). 38 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science

  18. Mars Pathfinder Landing Site and Surroundings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Mars Pathfinder landed on Mars on July 4, 1997, and continued operating until Sept. 27 of that year. The landing site is on an ancient flood plain of the Ares and Tiu outflow channels. The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter took an image on Dec. 21, 2006, that provides unprecedented detail of the geology of the region and hardware on the surface.

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] HiRISE Image This is the entire image. The crater at center bottom was unofficially named 'Big Crater' by the Pathfinder team. Its wall was visible from Pathfinder, located 3 kilometers (2 miles) to the north. The two bright features to the upper left of Big Crater are the 'Twin Peaks,' also observed by Pathfinder. The bright mound to the upper right of the Twin Peaks is 'North Knob,' seen in Pathfinder images as peaking over the horizon.

    At this scale there is no obvious geologic evidence of an ancient flood. Rather, impact craters dominate the scene, attesting to an old surface. The age is probably on the order of 1.8 billion to 3.5 billion years, when the Ares and Tiu floods are estimated to have occurred. Wind-formed linear ripples and dunes are seen throughout and are concentrated within craters. Sets of polygonal ridges of enigmatic origin are seen east of the Pathfinder lander. Rocks are visible over the entire image, with heavy concentrations near fresh-looking craters. Most of them are probably blocks tossed outward by crater-forming impacts.

    The complete image is centered at 19.1 degrees north latitude, 326.8 degrees east longitude. The range to the target site was 284.7 kilometers (177.9 miles). At this distance the image scale is 28.5 centimeters (11 inches) per pixel, so objects about 85 centimeters (33 inches) across are resolved. The image shown here has been map-projected to 25 centimeters (10 inches) per pixel. North is up. The image was taken at a local Mars time

  19. Mechanical design of the Mars Pathfinder mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eisen, Howard Jay; Buck, Carl W.; Gillis-Smith, Greg R.; Umland, Jeffrey W.

    1997-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder mission and the Sojourner rover is reported on, with emphasis on the various mission steps and the performance of the technologies involved. The mechanical design of mission hardware was critical to the success of the entry sequence and the landing operations. The various mechanisms employed are considered.

  20. Pathfinders on Black Dance in America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Loriene, Ed.

    This is a compilation of 18 pathfinders (i.e., a bibliographic instruction aid) on black dance in America, prepared by graduate students in the "Information Resources in the Humanities" and the "Information Resources in the Social Sciences" classes in the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Texas at Austin. The…

  1. NASA's Chemical Transfer Propulsion Program for Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannum, Ned P.; Berkopec, Frank D.; Zurawski, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    Pathfinder is a research and technology project, with specific deliverables, initiated by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) which will strengthen the technology base of the United States civil space program in preparation for future space exploration missions. Pathfinder begins in Fiscal Year 1989, and is to advance a collection of critical technologies for these missions and ensure technology readiness for future national decisions regarding exploration of the solar system. The four major thrusts of Pathfinder are: surface exploration, in-space operations, humans-in-space, and space transfer. The space transfer thrust will provide the critical technologies needed for transportation to, and return from, the Moon, Mars, and other planets in the solar system, as well as for reliable and cost-effective Earth-orbit operations. A key element of this thrust is the Chemical Transfer Propulsion program which will provide the propulsion technology for high performance, liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen expander cycle engines which may be operated and maintained in space. Described here are the program overview including the goals and objectives, management, technical plan, and technology transfer for the Chemical Transfer Propulsion element of Pathfinder.

  2. Mars Pathfinder mechanically pumped cooling loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birur, G. C.

    2001-01-01

    A mechanically pumped single-phase cooling loop was successfully flown on the Mars Pathfinder (MPF) Spacecraft which safely landed on the Martian surface on July 4, 1997. One of the key technologies that enabled the mission to succeed was an active heat rejection system (HRS) used to cool the electronics on the spacecraft during its seven-month cruise from Earth to Mars.

  3. Mars Pathfinder Project: Planetary Constants and Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, D.; Vaughn, R.

    1999-01-01

    This document provides a common set of astrodynamic constants and planetary models for use by the Mars pathfinder Project. It attempts to collect in a single reference all the quantities and models in use across the project during development and for mission operations.

  4. Free-Flight Experiments in LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, J. I.; Cutler, C. J.; Hewitson, M.; Jennrich, O.; Maghami, P.; Paczkowski, S.; Russano, G.; Vitale, S.; Weber, W. J.

    2014-01-01

    The LISA Pathfinder mission will demonstrate the technology of drag-free test masses for use as inertial references in future space-based gravitational wave detectors. To accomplish this, the Pathfinder spacecraft will perform drag-free flight about a test mass while measuring the acceleration of this primary test mass relative to a second reference test mass. Because the reference test mass is contained within the same spacecraft, it is necessary to apply forces on it to maintain its position and attitude relative to the spacecraft. These forces are a potential source of acceleration noise in the LISA Pathfinder system that are not present in the full LISA configuration. While LISA Pathfinder has been designed to meet it's primary mission requirements in the presence of this noise, recent estimates suggest that the on-orbit performance may be limited by this 'suspension noise'. The drift-mode or free-flight experiments provide an opportunity to mitigate this noise source and further characterize the underlying disturbances that are of interest to the designers of LISA-like instruments. This article provides a high-level overview of these experiments and the methods under development to analyze the resulting data.

  5. Regenerative fuel cell systems for project pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huff, J. R.; Hedstrom, J.; Vanderborgh, N. E.; Prokopius, P.

    1989-01-01

    The objectives of a surface power program, an element of the exploration thrust of the Pathfinder project, and plans for meeting them are outlined. Technological assessment and tradeoff studies of fuel cell and electrolyzer technologies suitable for use in a regenerative fuel cell are described. The viability of proton exchange membranes (PEM) in meeting the system requirements is discussed.

  6. Pathfinders: An Intellectual Guide to Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Claudia Ruediger; And Others

    Intended as an example for other college libraries, this collection of 38 pathfinders and bibliographies was developed by the reference staff of the Calvin Coolidge Library at Castleton State College, Vermont. Designed to present the types of literature available in particular subject fields and those works readily available in the Coolidge…

  7. Strategy for selecting Mars Pathfinder landing sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Kuzmin, Ruslin O.

    1994-01-01

    A strategy for Pathfinder site selection must be developed that is fundamentally different from most previous considerations. At least two approaches can be identified. In one approach, the objective is to select a site representing a key geologic unit on Mars, i.e., a unit that is widespread, easily recognized, and used frequently as a datum in various investigations. The second approach is to select a site that potentially affords access to a wide variety of rock types. Because rover range is limited, rocks from a variety of sources must be assembled in a small area for sampling. Regardless of the approach taken in site selection, the Pathfinder site should include eolian deposits and provisions should be made to obtain measurements on soils. A recommended approach for selecting the Mars Pathfinder landing site is to identify a deltaic deposit, composed of sediments derived from sources of various ages and geologic units that shows evidence of eolian activity. The site should be located as close as possible to the part of the outwash where rapid deposition occurred because the likelihood of 'sorting' by size and composition increases with distance, decreasing the probability of heterogeneity. In addition, it is recommended that field operation tests be conducted to gain experience and insight into conducting science with Pathfinder.

  8. The Magnetic Properties Experiments on Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knudsen, J. M.; Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Hviid, S. F.; Madsen, M. B.

    1996-09-01

    A remarkable result from the Viking missions was the discovery that the Martian soil is highly magnetic, in the sense that the soil is attracted by permanent magnets. Both the strong and weak magnets on the Viking landers were saturated with dust throughout the mission. Appropriate limits for the spontaneous magnetization sigma_S were advanced: 1 Am(2) (kg soil)(-1) < sigma_S < 7 Am(2) (kg soil)(-1) . The essential difference between the Magnet Arrays for Mars Pathfinder and the Viking Magnetic Properties Experiment is that Magnet Arrays on Pathfinder will include magnets of lower strengths that the weakest Viking magnet. The five magnets consist of small ring magnets concentric with oppositely polarized cylindrical magnets. The outer diameter of the ring magnets is 18 mm. Discrete (single phase) particles of strongly magnetic minerals (gamma -Fe2O3 or Fe3O4) will stick to all five magnets, while composite (multiphase) particles will stick preferentially to the strongest magnets. Two Magnet Arrays are placed on the Pathfinder lander, with a distance of 1180 and 1450 mm, respectively, from the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP). The magnets will attract airborne dust, and the dust on the magnets will be periodically viewed by the IMP. The images transmitted to Earth are the data on which conclusions on the magnetic properties of the dust will be based. Besides the Magnet Arrays the Pathfinder lander carries two other types of magnets. The Tip Plate Magnet is placed at a distance of 10 cm from the IMP, and thus allows a rather high resolution imaging of the dust clinging to the magnet. The Ramp Magnets are placed near the end of the ramps by which the micro-rover will descend to the surface. The dust on the Ramp Magnets will be studied by the APX-spectrometer of the micro-rover.

  9. Assessment of Mars Pathfinder landing site predictions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Golombek, M.P.; Moore, H.J.; Haldemann, A.F.C.; Parker, T.J.; Schofield, J.T.

    1999-01-01

    Remote sensing data at scales of kilometers and an Earth analog were used to accurately predict the characteristics of the Mars Pathfinder landing site at a scale of meters. The surface surrounding the Mars Pathfinder lander in Ares Vallis appears consistent with orbital interpretations, namely, that it would be a rocky plain composed of materials deposited by catastrophic floods. The surface and observed maximum clast size appears similar to predictions based on an analogous surface of the Ephrata Fan in the Channeled Scabland of Washington state. The elevation of the site measured by relatively small footprint delay-Doppler radar is within 100 m of that determined by two-way ranging and Doppler tracking of the spacecraft. The nearly equal elevations of the Mars Pathfinder and Viking Lander 1 sites allowed a prediction of the atmospheric conditions with altitude (pressure, temperature, and winds) that were well within the entry, descent, and landing design margins. High-resolution (~38 m/pixel) Viking Orbiter 1 images showed a sparsely cratered surface with small knobs with relatively low slopes, consistent with observations of these features from the lander. Measured rock abundance is within 10% of that expected from Viking orbiter thermal observations and models. The fractional area covered by large, potentially hazardous rocks observed is similar to that estimated from model rock distributions based on data from the Viking landing sites, Earth analog sites, and total rock abundance. The bulk and fine-component thermal inertias measured from orbit are similar to those calculated from the observed rock size-frequency distribution. A simple radar echo model based on the reflectivity of the soil (estimated from its bulk density), and the measured fraction of area covered by rocks was used to approximate the quasi-specular and diffuse components of the Earth-based radar echos. Color and albedo orbiter data were used to predict the relatively dust free or unweathered

  10. Potential landing sites for Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuzmin, Ruslan O.; Landheim, R.; Greeley, Ronald

    1994-01-01

    In addition to a better understanding of the geological evolution of Mars, new techniques for processing available data have emerged, new data have been acquired, and the engineering approaches for placing spacecraft on the surface have evolved. Selection of the Mars Pathfinder landing site must take these issues into account, along with mission constraints. An advantage of Mars Pathfinder is the rover for sampling surface materials over a range of tens of meters. However, engineering constraints and the limited scientific payload of this mission require new approaches for landing site selection. One approach is to select sites exhibiting a wide variety of rocks near the lander. An alternative approach is to select sites in which the regional geology consists of a single rock type representing a key datum for the geological study of Mars, and is uniformly distributed within the landing ellipse.

  11. Mars Pathfinder Project: Planetary Constants and Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, Robin

    1995-01-01

    This document provides a common set of astrodynamic constants and planetary models for use by the Mars Pathfinder Project. It attempts to collect in a single reference all the quantities and models in use across the project during development and for mission operations. These models are central to the navigation and mission design functions, but they are also used in other aspects of the project such as science observation planning and data reduction.

  12. Stress analysis of Pathfinder-2 models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrotra, S. C.; Mills, C. T. L.

    1984-01-01

    Stress analysis of the Pathfinder 2 fighter model was performed to determine a method for leading- and trailing-edge attachment that gives acceptable stress levels. Structural modeling of the wing was done using the finite element code SPAR. For the models studied, one ordinary lap joint was found to be satisfactory for the leading-edge flap, however, the alternating surface segmented lap joint method fo attachment was necessary for the trailing-edge flap to obtain acceptable stress levels.

  13. Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment (CHIME) pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandura, Kevin; Addison, Graeme E.; Amiri, Mandana; Bond, J. Richard; Campbell-Wilson, Duncan; Connor, Liam; Cliche, Jean-François; Davis, Greg; Deng, Meiling; Denman, Nolan; Dobbs, Matt; Fandino, Mateus; Gibbs, Kenneth; Gilbert, Adam; Halpern, Mark; Hanna, David; Hincks, Adam D.; Hinshaw, Gary; Höfer, Carolin; Klages, Peter; Landecker, Tom L.; Masui, Kiyoshi; Mena Parra, Juan; Newburgh, Laura B.; Pen, Ue-li; Peterson, Jeffrey B.; Recnik, Andre; Shaw, J. Richard; Sigurdson, Kris; Sitwell, Mike; Smecher, Graeme; Smegal, Rick; Vanderlinde, Keith; Wiebe, Don

    2014-07-01

    A pathfinder version of CHIME (the Canadian Hydrogen Intensity Mapping Experiment) is currently being commissioned at the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory (DRAO) in Penticton, BC. The instrument is a hybrid cylindrical interferometer designed to measure the large scale neutral hydrogen power spectrum across the redshift range 0.8 to 2.5. The power spectrum will be used to measure the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) scale across this poorly probed redshift range where dark energy becomes a significant contributor to the evolution of the Universe. The instrument revives the cylinder design in radio astronomy with a wide field survey as a primary goal. Modern low-noise amplifiers and digital processing remove the necessity for the analog beam forming that characterized previous designs. The Pathfinder consists of two cylinders 37m long by 20m wide oriented north-south for a total collecting area of 1,500 square meters. The cylinders are stationary with no moving parts, and form a transit instrument with an instantaneous field of view of ~100 degrees by 1-2 degrees. Each CHIME Pathfinder cylinder has a feedline with 64 dual polarization feeds placed every ~30 cm which Nyquist sample the north-south sky over much of the frequency band. The signals from each dual-polarization feed are independently amplified, filtered to 400-800 MHz, and directly sampled at 800 MSps using 8 bits. The correlator is an FX design, where the Fourier transform channelization is performed in FPGAs, which are interfaced to a set of GPUs that compute the correlation matrix. The CHIME Pathfinder is a 1/10th scale prototype version of CHIME and is designed to detect the BAO feature and constrain the distance-redshift relation. The lessons learned from its implementation will be used to inform and improve the final CHIME design.

  14. Overhead View of Area Surrounding Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Overhead view of the area surrounding the Pathfinder lander illustrating the Sojourner traverse. Red rectangles are rover positions at the end of sols 1-30. Locations of soil mechanics experiments, wheel abrasion experiments, and APXS measurements are shown. The A numbers refer to APXS measurements as discussed in the paper by Rieder et al. (p. 1770, Science Magazine, see image note). Coordinates are given in the LL frame.

    The photorealistic, interactive, three-dimensional virtual reality (VR) terrain models were created from IMP images using a software package developed for Pathfinder by C. Stoker et al. as a participating science project. By matching features in the left and right camera, an automated machine vision algorithm produced dense range maps of the nearfield, which were projected into a three-dimensional model as a connected polygonal mesh. Distance and angle measurements can be made on features viewed in the model using a mouse-driven three-dimensional cursor and a point-and-click interface. The VR model also incorporates graphical representations of the lander and rover and the sequence and spatial locations at which rover data were taken. As the rover moved, graphical models of the rover were added for each position that could be uniquely determined using stereo images of the rover taken by the IMP. Images taken by the rover were projected into the model as two-dimensional 'billboards' to show the proper perspective of these images.

    NOTE: original caption as published in Science Magazine

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  15. Imaging axon pathfinding in zebrafish in vivo.

    PubMed

    Leung, Louis; Holt, Christine E

    2012-09-01

    Axon pathfinding in the developing animal involves a highly dynamic process in which the axonal growth cone makes continuous decisions as it navigates toward its target. Changes occurring in the growth cone with respect to retracting from or extending into complex new territories can occur in minutes. Thus, the advent of strategies to visualize axon path-finding in vivo in a live intact animal is crucial for a better understanding of how the growth cone makes such rapid decisions in response to multiple cues. Combining these strategies with loss-of-function and/or gain-of-function techniques, one can gain some insight as to which molecules are crucial to particular growth cone behaviors at specific choice points during navigation. The major advantage of using zebrafish lies in the accessibility of major axon tracts for live microscopy, as their embryonic development occurs ex utero. Furthermore, the robust embryos remain healthy during immobilization and allow for good imaging for long periods. This protocol describes the method for stabilizing and preparing live zebrafish embryos for imaging labeled axonal tracts at high spatial and temporal resolution for up to 72 h. It has been used for retinotectal axon pathfinding, but can be adapted to visualize other axon tracts of interest. PMID:22949713

  16. Materials Adherence Experiment on Mars Pathfinder: Early results

    SciTech Connect

    Landis, G.A.; Jenkins, P.P.; Hunter, G.

    1997-12-31

    The Materials Adherence Experiment (MAE) on the Pathfinder Sojourner rover will measure the dust deposition rate. By August, the Sojourner Rover on Mars Pathfinder will have completed its primary mission, and the experiment will have data on dust deposition during the first three weeks of operation on Mars. This paper will present the initial data from the experiment. This will be the first presentation of the results from the Pathfinder MAE experiment.

  17. Pathfinder-Plus on a flight in Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Pathfinder-Plus on a flight in 1998 over Hawaiian waters. Pathfinder was a remotely controlled, solar-powered flying wing, designed and built as a proof-of-concept vehicle for a much larger aircraft capable of flying at extremely high altitudes for weeks at a time. It was built by AeroVironment, Inc., a California company that developed the human-powered Gossamer Condor and Gossamer Albatross lightweight aircraft during the 1970s, and later made the solar-electric powered Gossamer Penguin and Solar Challenger. The basic configuration and concepts for Pathfinder were first realized with the HALSOL (High Altitude Solar) aircraft, built in 1983 by AeroVironment and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Pathfinder was constructed of advanced composites, plastics, and foam, and despite a wingspan of nearly 100 feet, it weighed only about 600 pounds. Pathfinder was one of several unpiloted prototypes under study by NASA's ERAST (Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology) program, a NASA-industry alliance which is helping develop advanced technologies that will enable aircraft to study the earth's environment during extremely long flights at altitudes in excess of 100,000 feet. (See project description below for Pathfinder's conversion to Pathfinder Plus.) In 1998, the Pathfinder solar-powered flying wing (see its photographs and project description) was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration and on Aug. 6, 1998, Pathfinder Plus set an altitude record (for propeller-driven aircraft) of approximately 80,285 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. The goal of the Pathfinder Plus flights was to validate new solar, aerodynamic, propulsion, and systems technology developed for its successor, the Centurion, which was designed to reach and sustain altitudes in the 100,000-foot range. The Centurion was succeeded by the Helios Prototype with a goal of reaching and sustaining flight at an altitude of 100,000 feet and flying non-stop for at least

  18. Pathfinder-Plus takes off on flight in Hawaii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Pathfinder-Plus on a flight over Hawaii in 1998. Pathfinder was a remotely controlled, solar-powered flying wing, designed and built as a proof-of-concept vehicle for a much larger aircraft capable of flying at extremely high altitudes for weeks at a time. It was built by AeroVironment, Inc., a California company that developed the human-powered Gossamer Condor and Gossamer Albatross lightweight aircraft during the 1970s, and later made the solar-electric powered Gossamer Penguin and Solar Challenger. The basic configuration and concepts for Pathfinder were first realized with the HALSOL (High Altitude Solar) aircraft, built in 1983 by AeroVironment and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Pathfinder was constructed of advanced composites, plastics, and foam, and despite a wingspan of nearly 100 feet, it weighed only about 600 pounds. Pathfinder was one of several unpiloted prototypes under study by NASA's ERAST (Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology) program, a NASA-industry alliance which is helping develop advanced technologies that will enable aircraft to study the earth's environment during extremely long flights at altitudes in excess of 100,000 feet. (See project description below for Pathfinder's conversion to Pathfinder Plus.) In 1998, the Pathfinder solar-powered flying wing (see its photographs and project description) was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration and on Aug. 6, 1998, Pathfinder Plus set an altitude record (for propeller-driven aircraft) of approximately 80,285 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. The goal of the Pathfinder Plus flights was to validate new solar, aerodynamic, propulsion, and systems technology developed for its successor, the Centurion, which was designed to reach and sustain altitudes in the 100,000-foot range. The Centurion was succeeded by the Helios Prototype with a goal of reaching and sustaining flight at an altitude of 100,000 feet and flying non-stop for at least 4 days

  19. Pathfinder-Plus on flight over Hawaiian Islands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Pathfinder-Plus on flight over Hawaiian Islands in 1998. Pathfinder was a remotely controlled, solar-powered flying wing, designed and built as a proof-of-concept vehicle for a much larger aircraft capable of flying at extremely high altitudes for weeks at a time. It was built by AeroVironment, Inc., a California company that developed the human-powered Gossamer Condor and Gossamer Albatross lightweight aircraft during the 1970s, and later made the solar-electric powered Gossamer Penguin and Solar Challenger. The basic configuration and concepts for Pathfinder were first realized with the HALSOL (High Altitude Solar) aircraft, built in 1983 by AeroVironment and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Pathfinder was constructed of advanced composites, plastics, and foam, and despite a wingspan of nearly 100 feet, it weighed only about 600 pounds. Pathfinder was one of several unpiloted prototypes under study by NASA's ERAST (Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology) program, a NASA-industry alliance which is helping develop advanced technologies that will enable aircraft to study the earth's environment during extremely long flights at altitudes in excess of 100,000 feet. (See project description below for Pathfinder's conversion to Pathfinder Plus.) In 1998, the Pathfinder solar-powered flying wing (see its photographs and project description) was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration and on Aug. 6, 1998, Pathfinder Plus set an altitude record (for propeller-driven aircraft) of approximately 80,285 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. The goal of the Pathfinder Plus flights was to validate new solar, aerodynamic, propulsion, and systems technology developed for its successor, the Centurion, which was designed to reach and sustain altitudes in the 100,000-foot range. The Centurion was succeeded by the Helios Prototype with a goal of reaching and sustaining flight at an altitude of 100,000 feet and flying non-stop for at least 4

  20. Automated detection of extended sources in radio maps: progress from the SCORPIO survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riggi, S.; Ingallinera, A.; Leto, P.; Cavallaro, F.; Bufano, F.; Schillirò, F.; Trigilio, C.; Umana, G.; Buemi, C. S.; Norris, R. P.

    2016-04-01

    Automated source extraction and parameterization represents a crucial challenge for the next-generation radio interferometer surveys, such as those performed with the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) and its precursors. In this paper we present a new algorithm, dubbed CAESAR (Compact And Extended Source Automated Recognition), to detect and parametrize extended sources in radio interferometric maps. It is based on a pre-filtering stage, allowing image denoising, compact source suppression and enhancement of diffuse emission, followed by an adaptive superpixel clustering stage for final source segmentation. A parameterization stage provides source flux information and a wide range of morphology estimators for post-processing analysis. We developed CAESAR in a modular software library, including also different methods for local background estimation and image filtering, along with alternative algorithms for both compact and diffuse source extraction. The method was applied to real radio continuum data collected at the Australian Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) within the SCORPIO project, a pathfinder of the ASKAP-EMU survey. The source reconstruction capabilities were studied over different test fields in the presence of compact sources, imaging artefacts and diffuse emission from the Galactic plane and compared with existing algorithms. When compared to a human-driven analysis, the designed algorithm was found capable of detecting known target sources and regions of diffuse emission, outperforming alternative approaches over the considered fields.

  1. Data Triage of Astronomical Transients: A Machine Learning Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebbapragada, U.

    This talk presents real-time machine learning systems for triage of big data streams generated by photometric and image-differencing pipelines. Our first system is a transient event detection system in development for the Palomar Transient Factory (PTF), a fully-automated synoptic sky survey that has demonstrated real-time discovery of optical transient events. The system is tasked with discriminating between real astronomical objects and bogus objects, which are usually artifacts of the image differencing pipeline. We performed a machine learning forensics investigation on PTF’s initial system that led to training data improvements that decreased both false positive and negative rates. The second machine learning system is a real-time classification engine of transients and variables in development for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP), an upcoming wide-field radio survey with unprecedented ability to investigate the radio transient sky. The goal of our system is to classify light curves into known classes with as few observations as possible in order to trigger follow-up on costlier assets. We discuss the violation of standard machine learning assumptions incurred by this task, and propose the use of ensemble and hierarchical machine learning classifiers that make predictions most robustly.

  2. The ASKAP/EMU Source Finding Data Challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopkins, A. M.; Whiting, M. T.; Seymour, N.; Chow, K. E.; Norris, R. P.; Bonavera, L.; Breton, R.; Carbone, D.; Ferrari, C.; Franzen, T. M. O.; Garsden, H.; González-Nuevo, J.; Hales, C. A.; Hancock, P. J.; Heald, G.; Herranz, D.; Huynh, M.; Jurek, R. J.; López-Caniego, M.; Massardi, M.; Mohan, N.; Molinari, S.; Orrù, E.; Paladino, R.; Pestalozzi, M.; Pizzo, R.; Rafferty, D.; Röttgering, H. J. A.; Rudnick, L.; Schisano, E.; Shulevski, A.; Swinbank, J.; Taylor, R.; van der Horst, A. J.

    2015-10-01

    The Evolutionary Map of the Universe (EMU) is a proposed radio continuum survey of the Southern Hemisphere up to declination + 30°, with the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP). EMU will use an automated source identification and measurement approach that is demonstrably optimal, to maximise the reliability and robustness of the resulting radio source catalogues. As a step toward this goal we conducted a "Data Challenge" to test a variety of source finders on simulated images. The aim is to quantify the accuracy and limitations of existing automated source finding and measurement approaches. The Challenge initiators also tested the current ASKAPsoft source-finding tool to establish how it could benefit from incorporating successful features of the other tools. As expected, most finders show completeness around 100% at ≈ 10σ dropping to about 10% by ≈ 5σ. Reliability is typically close to 100% at ≈ 10σ, with performance to lower sensitivities varying between finders. All finders show the expected trade-off, where a high completeness at low signal-to-noise gives a corresponding reduction in reliability, and vice versa. We conclude with a series of recommendations for improving the performance of the ASKAPsoft source-finding tool.

  3. Reference antenna-based subspace tracking for RFI mitigation in radio astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellbourg, G.; Chippendale, A. P.; Kesteven, M. J.; Jeffs, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    Interference mitigation is becoming necessary to make radio astronomy work in bands that are heavily used to support our modern lives. It is becoming particularly difficult to work at frequencies between 1100 MHz and 1300 MHz that are rapidly filling up with satellite navigation signals. Antenna array radio telescopes present the possibility of applying spatial Radio Frequency Interference (RFI) mitigation. Spatial filtering techniques for RFI mitigation have been introduced to radio astronomy in the last decades. The success of these techniques relies on accurately estimating the RFI spatial signature (or RFI subspace). The use of a reference antenna steering at the RFI sources provides a good estimation of the RFI subspace when correlated with an array radio telescope. However, predicting the evolution of this subspace with time is necessary in a multiple RFI scenario, when only a single RFI source can be monitored at a time with the reference antenna. This paper introduces a subspace tracking approach, based on the power method applied to covariance data. The RFI spatial signature estimates provided by the reference antenna are used to initialize the power method to support a faster convergence. Practical examples are shown, applying the method to real data from a single 188 element phased array feed designed for the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope.

  4. Gamma-ray burst radio afterglows from Population III stars: simulation methods and detection prospects with SKA precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macpherson, D.; Coward, D.

    2015-10-01

    We investigate the prospects of detecting radio afterglows from long Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) from Population III (Pop III) progenitors using the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) precursor instruments MWA (Murchison Widefield Array) and ASKAP (Australian SKA Pathfinder). We derive a realistic model of GRB afterglows that encompasses the widest range of plausible physical parameters and observation angles. We define the best case scenario of Pop III GRB energy and redshift distributions. Using probability distribution functions fitted to the observed microphysical parameters of long GRBs, we simulate a large number of Pop III GRB afterglows to find the global probability of detection. We find that ASKAP may be able to detect 35 per cent of Pop III GRB afterglows in the optimistic case, and 27 per cent in the pessimistic case. A negligible number will be detectable by MWA in either case. Detections per image for ASKAP, found by incorporating intrinsic rates with detectable time-scales, are as high as ˜6000 and as low as ˜11, which shows the optimistic case is unrealistic. We track how the afterglow flux density changes over various time intervals and find that, because of their very slow variability, the cadence for blind searches of these afterglows should be as long as possible. We also find Pop III GRBs at high redshift have radio afterglow light curves that are indistinguishable from those of regular long GRBs in the more local Universe.

  5. Wide-field broad-band radio imaging with phased array feeds: a pilot multi-epoch continuum survey with ASKAP-BETA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heywood, I.; Bannister, K. W.; Marvil, J.; Allison, J. R.; Ball, L.; Bell, M. E.; Bock, D. C.-J.; Brothers, M.; Bunton, J. D.; Chippendale, A. P.; Cooray, F.; Cornwell, T. J.; De Boer, D.; Edwards, P.; Gough, R.; Gupta, N.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Hay, S.; Hotan, A. W.; Indermuehle, B.; Jacka, C.; Jackson, C. A.; Johnston, S.; Kimball, A. E.; Koribalski, B. S.; Lenc, E.; Macleod, A.; McClure-Griffiths, N.; McConnell, D.; Mirtschin, P.; Murphy, T.; Neuhold, S.; Norris, R. P.; Pearce, S.; Popping, A.; Qiao, R. Y.; Reynolds, J. E.; Sadler, E. M.; Sault, R. J.; Schinckel, A. E. T.; Serra, P.; Shimwell, T. W.; Stevens, J.; Tuthill, J.; Tzioumis, A.; Voronkov, M. A.; Westmeier, T.; Whiting, M. T.

    2016-04-01

    The Boolardy Engineering Test Array is a 6 × 12 m dish interferometer and the prototype of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP), equipped with the first generation of ASKAP's phased array feed (PAF) receivers. These facilitate rapid wide-area imaging via the deployment of simultaneous multiple beams within an ˜30 deg2 field of view. By cycling the array through 12 interleaved pointing positions and using nine digitally formed beams, we effectively mimic a traditional 1 h × 108 pointing survey, covering ˜150 deg2 over 711-1015 MHz in 12 h of observing time. Three such observations were executed over the course of a week. We verify the full bandwidth continuum imaging performance and stability of the system via self-consistency checks and comparisons to existing radio data. The combined three epoch image has arcminute resolution and a 1σ thermal noise level of 375 μJy beam-1, although the effective noise is a factor of ˜3 higher due to residual sidelobe confusion. From this we derive a catalogue of 3722 discrete radio components, using the 35 per cent fractional bandwidth to measure in-band spectral indices for 1037 of them. A search for transient events reveals one significantly variable source within the survey area. The survey covers approximately two-thirds of the Spitzer South Pole Telescope Deep Field. This pilot project demonstrates the viability and potential of using PAFs to rapidly and accurately survey the sky at radio wavelengths.

  6. Hillary Clinton visits Pathfinder projects in Brazil.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    In October 1995, US First Lady Hillary Clinton visited a maternity hospital in Salvador, Brazil, in which a family planning (FP)/reproductive health program has been administered by Pathfinder International since 1981 with funding from USAID. During her tour of the facility, Clinton learned about the high degree of unmet need for FP in the region which results from a lack of sufficient resources to meet demand. Clinton, in turn, praised the state of Bahia for its emphasis on FP in low-income areas. PMID:12179683

  7. Mars pathfinder Rover egress deployable ramp assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spence, Brian R.; Sword, Lee F.

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder Program is a NASA Discovery Mission, led by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, to launch and place a small planetary Rover for exploration on the Martian surface. To enable safe and successful egress of the Rover vehicle from the spacecraft, a pair of flight-qualified, deployable ramp assemblies have been developed. This paper focuses on the unique, lightweight deployable ramp assemblies. A brief mission overview and key design requirements are discussed. Design and development activities leading to qualification and flight systems are presented.

  8. Results from the Mars Pathfinder camera.

    PubMed

    Smith, P H; Bell, J F; Bridges, N T; Britt, D T; Gaddis, L; Greeley, R; Keller, H U; Herkenhoff, K E; Jaumann, R; Johnson, J R; Kirk, R L; Lemmon, M; Maki, J N; Malin, M C; Murchie, S L; Oberst, J; Parker, T J; Reid, R J; Sablotny, R; Soderblom, L A; Stoker, C; Sullivan, R; Thomas, N; Tomasko, M G; Wegryn, E

    1997-12-01

    Images of the martian surface returned by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) show a complex surface of ridges and troughs covered by rocks that have been transported and modified by fluvial, aeolian, and impact processes. Analysis of the spectral signatures in the scene (at 440- to 1000-nanometer wavelength) reveal three types of rock and four classes of soil. Upward-looking IMP images of the predawn sky show thin, bluish clouds that probably represent water ice forming on local atmospheric haze (opacity approximately 0.5). Haze particles are about 1 micrometer in radius and the water vapor column abundance is about 10 precipitable micrometers. PMID:9388170

  9. Mars PathFinder Rover Traverse Image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This figure contains an azimuth-elevation projection of the 'Gallery Panorama.' The original Simple Cylindrical mosaic has been reprojected to the inside of a sphere so that lines of constant azimuth radiate from the center and lines of constant elevation are concentric circles. This projection preserves the resolution of the original panorama. Overlaid onto the projected Martian surface is a delineation of the Sojourner rover traverse path during the 83 Sols (Martian days) of Pathfinder surface operations. The rover path was reproduced using IMP camera 'end of day' and 'Rover movie' image sequences and rover vehicle telemetry data as references.

  10. Mars Pathfinder Wheel Abrasion Experiment Ground Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G., Jr.; Siebert, Mark W.

    1998-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) sent a mission to the martian surface, called Mars Pathfinder. The mission payload consisted of a lander and a rover. The primary purpose of the mission was demonstrating a novel entry, descent, and landing method that included a heat shield, a parachute, rockets, and a cocoon of giant air bags. Once on the surface, the spacecraft returned temperature measurements near the Martian surface, atmosphere pressure, wind speed measurements, and images from the lander and rover. The rover obtained 16 elemental measurements of rocks and soils, performed soil-mechanics, atmospheric sedimentation measurements, and soil abrasiveness measurements.

  11. MAXIM Pathfinder x-ray interferometry mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gendreau, Keith C.; Cash, Webster C.; Shipley, Ann F.; White, Nicholas

    2003-03-01

    The MAXIM Pathfinder (MP) mission is under study as a scientific and technical stepping stone for the full MAXIM X-ray interferometry mission. While full MAXIM will resolve the event horizons of black holes with 0.1 microarcsecond imaging, MP will address scientific and technical issues as a 100 microarcsecond imager with some capabilities to resolve microarcsecond structure. We will present the primary science goals of MP. These include resolving stellar coronae, distinguishing between jets and accretion disks in AGN. This paper will also present the baseline design of MP. We will overview the challenging technical requirements and solutions for formation flying, target acquisition, and metrology.

  12. Pathfinder Instruments for Cloud and Aerosol Spaceborne Observations (PICASSO)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCormick, M. Patrick; Winker, David M.

    1998-01-01

    This paper will describe the planned 3-year Pathfinder Instruments for Cloud and Aerosol Spaceborne Observations (PICASSO) mission, its instrumentation and implementation. It will use LITE and other data, plus analyses, to show the feasibility of such a mission. PICASSO is being proposed for NASA's Earth System Science Pathfinder (ESSP) program with launch predicted in 2003.

  13. Primary Foreign Language Pathfinders: The Brighton and Hove Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enever, Janet; Watts, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on a two-year project located within one local authority (LA), Brighton and Hove City Council, which was selected in 2003 to become a Primary Foreign Language Pathfinder. The main aim of this Pathfinder was to work with 18 other LAs across the country to pilot fresh approaches towards delivering foreign languages in the…

  14. Imaging axon pathfinding in Xenopus in vivo.

    PubMed

    Leung, Louis; Holt, Christine E

    2012-09-01

    Axon pathfinding in the developing animal involves a highly dynamic process in which the axonal growth cone makes continuous decisions as it navigates toward its target. Changes occurring in the growth cone with respect to retracting from or extending into complex new territories can occur in minutes. Thus, the advent of strategies to visualize axon path-finding in vivo in a live intact animal is crucial for a better understanding of how the growth cone makes such rapid decisions in response to multiple cues. Combining these strategies with loss-of-function and/or gain-of-function techniques allows one to gain some insight as to which molecules are crucial to particular growth cone behaviors at specific choice points during navigation. The main advantage of using Xenopus lies in the accessibility of major axon tracts for live microscopy, as their embryonic development occurs ex utero. Furthermore, the robust embryos remain healthy during immobilization and allow for good imaging for long periods. This protocol describes the methods for stabilizing and preparing live Xenopus embryos for imaging labeled axonal tracts at high spatial and temporal resolution for up to 72 h. This approach can been used to investigate how the knockdown of certain gene functions can affect the speed of navigation through the well-studied Xenopus retinotectal pathway. It can be adapted to visualize other axon tracts of interest. PMID:22949712

  15. Overhead View of Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Planimetric (overhead view) map of the landing site, to a distance of 20 meters from the spacecraft. North is at the top in this and Plates 3-5. To produce this map, images were geometrically projected onto an assumed mean surface representing the ground. Features above the ground plane (primarily rocks) therefore appear displaced radially outward; the amount of distortion increases systematically with distance. The upper surfaces of the lander and rover also appear enlarged and displaced because of their height. Primary grid (white) is based on the Landing Site Cartographic (LSC) coordinate system, defined with X eastward, Y north, and Z up, and origin located at the mean ground surface immediately beneath the deployed position of the IMP camera gimbal center. Secondary ticks (cyan) are based on the Mars local level (LL) frame, which has X north, Y east, Z down, with origin in the center of the lander baseplate. Rover positions (including APXS measurements) are commonly reported in the LL frame. Yellow grid shows polar coordinates based on the LSC system. Cartographic image processing by U.S. Geological Survey.

    NOTE: original caption as published in Science Magazine

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  16. Pathfinder on lakebed rolling out for test flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Pathfinder research aircraft's wing structure is clearly defined in this photo as personnel from AeroVironment rolled it out onto the lakebed at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, for another test flight. Pathfinder was a lightweight, solar-powered, remotely piloted flying wing aircraft used to demonstrate the use of solar power for long-duration, high-altitude flight. Its name denotes its mission as the 'Pathfinder' or first in a series of solar-powered aircraft that will be able to remain airborne for weeks or months on scientific sampling and imaging missions. Solar arrays covered most of the upper wing surface of the Pathfinder aircraft. These arrays provided up to 8,000 watts of power at high noon on a clear summer day. That power fed the aircraft's six electric motors as well as its avionics, communications, and other electrical systems. Pathfinder also had a backup battery system that could provide power for two to five hours, allowing for limited-duration flight after dark. Pathfinder flew at airspeeds of only 15 to 20 mph. Pitch control was maintained by using tiny elevators on the trailing edge of the wing while turns and yaw control were accomplished by slowing down or speeding up the motors on the outboard sections of the wing. On September 11, 1995, Pathfinder set a new altitude record for solar-powered aircraft of 50,567 feet above Edwards Air Force Base, California, on a 12-hour flight. On July 7, 1997, it set another, unofficial record of 71,500 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility, Kauai, Hawaii. In 1998, Pathfinder was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration. (See the Pathfinder Plus photos and project description.)

  17. Java PathFinder User Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havelund, Klaus

    1999-01-01

    The JAVA PATHFINDER, JPF, is a translator from a subset of JAVA 1.0 to PROMELA, the programming language of the SPIN model checker. The purpose of JPF is to establish a framework for verification and debugging of JAVA programming based on model checking. The main goal is to automate program verification such that a programmer can apply it in the daily work without the need for a specialist to manually reformulate a program into a different notation in order to analyze the program. The system is especially suited for analyzing multi-threaded JAVA applications, where normal testing usually falls short. The system can find deadlocks and violations of boolean assertions stated by the programmer in a special assertion language. This document explains how to Use JPF.

  18. Model Checking JAVA Programs Using Java Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havelund, Klaus; Pressburger, Thomas

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a translator called JAVA PATHFINDER from JAVA to PROMELA, the "programming language" of the SPIN model checker. The purpose is to establish a framework for verification and debugging of JAVA programs based on model checking. This work should be seen in a broader attempt to make formal methods applicable "in the loop" of programming within NASA's areas such as space, aviation, and robotics. Our main goal is to create automated formal methods such that programmers themselves can apply these in their daily work (in the loop) without the need for specialists to manually reformulate a program into a different notation in order to analyze the program. This work is a continuation of an effort to formally verify, using SPIN, a multi-threaded operating system programmed in Lisp for the Deep-Space 1 spacecraft, and of previous work in applying existing model checkers and theorem provers to real applications.

  19. Pathfinder autonomous rendezvous and docking project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamkin, Stephen (Editor); Mccandless, Wayne (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    Capabilities are being developed and demonstrated to support manned and unmanned vehicle operations in lunar and planetary orbits. In this initial phase, primary emphasis is placed on definition of the system requirements for candidate Pathfinder mission applications and correlation of these system-level requirements with specific requirements. The FY-89 activities detailed are best characterized as foundation building. The majority of the efforts were dedicated to assessing the current state of the art, identifying desired elaborations and expansions to this level of development and charting a course that will realize the desired objectives in the future. Efforts are detailed across all work packages in developing those requirements and tools needed to test, refine, and validate basic autonomous rendezvous and docking elements.

  20. Electrostatic Charging of the Pathfinder Rover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siebert, Mark W.; Kolecki, Joseph C.

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder mission will send a lander and a rover to the martian surface. Because of the extremely dry conditions on Mars, electrostatic charging of the rover is expected to occur as it moves about. Charge accumulation may result in high electrical potentials and discharge through the martian atmosphere. Such discharge could interfere with the operation of electrical elements on the rover. A strategy was sought to mitigate this charge accumulation as a precautionary measure. Ground tests were performed to demonstrate charging in laboratory conditions simulating the surface conditions expected at Mars. Tests showed that a rover wheel, driven at typical rover speeds, will accumulate electrical charge and develop significant electrical potentials (average observed, 110 volts). Measurements were made of wheel electrical potential, and wheel capacitance. From these quantities, the amount of absolute charge was estimated. An engineering solution was developed and recommended to mitigate charge accumulation. That solution has been implemented on the actual rover.

  1. Statechart Analysis with Symbolic PathFinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasareanu, Corina S.

    2012-01-01

    We report here on our on-going work that addresses the automated analysis and test case generation for software systems modeled using multiple Statechart formalisms. The work is motivated by large programs such as NASA Exploration, that involve multiple systems that interact via safety-critical protocols and are designed with different Statechart variants. To verify these safety-critical systems, we have developed Polyglot, a framework for modeling and analysis of model-based software written using different Statechart formalisms. Polyglot uses a common intermediate representation with customizable Statechart semantics and leverages the analysis and test generation capabilities of the Symbolic PathFinder tool. Polyglot is used as follows: First, the structure of the Statechart model (expressed in Matlab Stateflow or Rational Rhapsody) is translated into a common intermediate representation (IR). The IR is then translated into Java code that represents the structure of the model. The semantics are provided as "pluggable" modules.

  2. Mars Pathfinder Airbag Impact Attenuation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waye, Donald; Cole, J. Kenneth; Rivellini, Tommaso P.

    1995-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder spacecraft, scheduled for launch in December 1996, is designed to validate a low cost Entry, Descent, and Landing system and to perform scientific surface operations. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories teamed to design, fabricate, test and validate a prototype 0.38 scale model of an airbag impact attenuation system. A computer code was developed to predict the performance of the airbag system. A test program in Sandia's High Altitude Chamber was performed to validate the code and demonstrate the feasibility of the airbag concept and design. In addition, freefall tests were performed at representative velocities to demonstrate the structural integrity of the airbag system design. The feasibility program demonstrated that the airbag impact attenuation design will protect the lander upon impact with the Martian surface.

  3. The Imager for Mars Pathfinder Insurance Pan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herkenhoff, K. E.; Johnson, J. R.; Weller, L. A.

    2003-01-01

    The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) obtained a full panorama of the Sagan Memorial Station landing site on Sol 2, before the IMP mast was deployed. The images in this panorama were taken in 4 filters (including stereo) and losslessly compressed to provide a high-quality multispectral survey of the landing site even if the IMP mast did not successfully deploy; this data set was therefore called the Insurance Pan. It was completed late in the afternoon of Sol 2, just before the IMP mast was (successfully) deployed. The data were stored in memory and returned to Earth after it became clear that downlink rates were higher than expected. The Insurance Pan horizontal (azimuth) coverage is nearly complete, with gaps caused by pointing errors and data packet losses. Stereo data were acquired in the blue (445 nm) filter, as well as right-eye green (531 nm), orange (600 nm), and near-infrared (752 nm) data.

  4. Modal analysis of PATHFINDER unmanned air vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Woehrle, T.G.; Costerus, B.W.; Lee, C.L.

    1994-10-19

    An experimental modal analysis was performed on PATHFINDER, a 450-lb, 100-ft wing span, flying-wing-design aircraft powered by solar/electric motors. The aircraft was softly suspended and then excited using random input from a long-stroke shaker. Modal data was taken from 92 measurement locations on the aircraft using newly designed, lightweight, tri-axial accelerometers. A conventional PC-based data acquisition system provided data handling. Modal parameters were calculated, and animated mode shapes were produced using SMS STARStruct{trademark} Modal Analysis System software. The modal parameters will be used for validation of finite element models, optimum placement of onboard accelerometers during flight testing, and vibration isolation design of sensor platforms.

  5. 360 Degree Panorama Mars Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This is the first contiguous, uniform 360-degree color panorama taken by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) over the course of sols 8, 9, and 10 (Martian days). Different regions were imaged at different times over the three Martian days to acquire consistent lighting and shadow conditions for all areas of the panorama. At left is a lander petal and a metallic mast which is a portion of the low-gain antenna. On the horizon the double 'Twin Peaks' are visible, about 1-2 kilometers away. The rock 'Couch' is the dark, curved rock at right of Twin Peaks. Another lander petal is at left-center, showing the fully deployed forward ramp at far left, and rear ramp at right, which rover Sojourner used to descend to the surface of Mars on July 5. Immediately to the left of the rear ramp is the rock Barnacle Bill, which scientists found to be andesitic, possibly indicating that it is a volcanic rock (a true andesite) or a physical mixture of particles. Just beyond Barnacle Bill, rover tracks lead to Sojourner, shown using its Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) instrument to study the large rock Yogi. Yogi, low in quartz content, appears to be more primitive than Barnacle Bill, and appeared more like the common basalts found on Earth. The tracks and circular pattern in the soil leading up to Yogi were part of Sojourner's soil mechanics experiments, in which varying amounts of pressure were applied to the wheels in order to determine physical properties of the soil. During its traverse to Yogi the rover stirred the soil and exposed material from several centimeters in depth. During one of the turns to deploy Sojourner's Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer, the wheels dug particularly deeply and exposed white material. Spectra of this white material show it is virtually identical to the rock Scooby Doo, and such white material may underlie much of the site. Deflated airbags are visible at the perimeter of all three lander petals. The IMP is a stereo imaging system with color

  6. Mars Pathfinder airbag impact attenuation system

    SciTech Connect

    Waye, D.E.; Cole, J.K.; Rivellini, T.P.

    1995-04-01

    The Mars Pathfinder spacecraft, scheduled for launch in November 1996, is designed to validate a low cost Entry, Descent, and Landing system and to perform scientific surface operations. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories teamed to design, fabricate, test and validate a prototype 0.38 scale model of an airbag impact attenuation system. A computer code was developed to predict the performance of the airbag system. A test program in Sandia`s High Altitude Chamber was performed to validate the code and demonstrate the feasibility of the airbag concept and design. In addition, freefall tests were performed at representative velocities to demonstrate the structural integrity of the airbag system design. The feasibility program demonstrated that the airbag impact attenuation design will protect the lander upon impact with the Martian surface.

  7. Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) image calibration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reid, R.J.; Smith, P.H.; Lemmon, M.; Tanner, R.; Burkland, M.; Wegryn, E.; Weinberg, J.; Marcialis, R.; Britt, D.T.; Thomas, N.; Kramm, R.; Dummel, A.; Crowe, D.; Bos, B.J.; Bell, J.F., III; Rueffer, P.; Gliem, F.; Johnson, J. R.; Maki, J.N.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Singer, Robert B.

    1999-01-01

    The Imager for Mars Pathfinder returned over 16,000 high-quality images from the surface of Mars. The camera was well-calibrated in the laboratory, with <5% radiometric uncertainty. The photometric properties of two radiometric targets were also measured with 3% uncertainty. Several data sets acquired during the cruise and on Mars confirm that the system operated nominally throughout the course of the mission. Image calibration algorithms were developed for landed operations to correct instrumental sources of noise and to calibrate images relative to observations of the radiometric targets. The uncertainties associated with these algorithms as well as current improvements to image calibration are discussed. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. JWST pathfinder telescope risk reduction cryo test program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Gary W.; Scorse, Thomas R.; Spina, John A.; Noël, Darin M.; Havey, Keith A.; Huguet, Jesse A.; Whitman, Tony L.; Wells, Conrad; Walker, Chanda B.; Lunt, Sharon; Hadaway, James B.; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Feinberg, Lee D.; Voyton, Mark F.; Lander, Juli A.; Marsh, James M.

    2015-08-01

    In 2014, the Optical Ground Support Equipment was integrated into the large cryo vacuum chamber at Johnson Space Center (JSC) and an initial Chamber Commissioning Test was completed. This insured that the support equipment was ready for the three Pathfinder telescope cryo tests. The Pathfinder telescope which consists of two primary mirror segment assemblies and the secondary mirror was delivered to JSC in February 2015 in support of this critical risk reduction test program prior to the flight hardware. This paper will detail the Chamber Commissioning and first optical test of the JWST Pathfinder telescope.

  9. JWST Pathfinder Telescope Risk Reduction Cryo Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, Gary W.; Scorse, Thomas R.; Spina, John A.; Noel, Darin M.; Havey, Keith A., Jr.; Huguet, Jesse A.; Whitman, Tony L.; Wells, Conrad; Walker, Chanda B.; Lunt, Sharon; Hadaway, James B.; Keski-Kuha, Ritva; Feinberg, Lee D.; Voyton, Mark F.; Lander, Juli A.; Marsh, James M.

    2015-01-01

    In 2014, the Optical Ground Support Equipment was integrated into the large cryo vacuum chamber at Johnson Space Center (JSC) and an initial Chamber Commissioning Test was completed. This insured that the support equipment was ready for the three Pathfinder telescope cryo tests. The Pathfinder telescope which consists of two primary mirror segment assemblies and the secondary mirror was delivered to JSC in February 2015 in support of this critical risk reduction test program prior to the flight hardware. This paper will detail the Chamber Commissioning and first optical test of the JWST Pathfinder telescope.

  10. Topographic Map of Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Topographic map of the landing site, to a distance of 60 meters from the lander in the LSC coordinate system. The lander is shown schematically in the center; 2.5 meter radius circle (black) centered on the camera was not mapped. Gentle relief [root mean square (rms) elevation variation 0.5 m; rms a directional slope 4O] and organization of topography into northwest and northeast-trending ridges about 20 meters apart are apparent. Roughly 30% of the illustrated area is hidden from the camera behind these ridges. Contours (0.2 m interval) and color coding of elevations were generated from a digital terrain model, which was interpolated by kriging from approximately 700 measured points. Angular and parallax point coordinates were measured manually on a large (5 m length) anaglyphic uncontrolled mosaic and used to calculate Cartesian (LSC) coordinates. Errors in azimuth on the order of 10 are therefore likely; elevation errors were minimized by referencing elevations to the local horizon. The uncertainty in range measurements increases quadratically with range. Given a measurement error of 1/2 pixel, the expected precision in range is 0.3 meter at 10 meter range, and 10 meters at 60 meter range. Repeated measurements were made, compared, and edited for consistency to improve the range precision. Systematic errors undoubtedly remain and will be corrected in future maps compiled digitally from geometrically controlled images. Cartographic processing by U.S. Geological Survey.

    NOTE: original caption as published in Science Magazine

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  11. Exobiology site priorities for Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, Jack D.; Desmarais, David J.

    1994-01-01

    The fact that life developed on the Earth within the first billion years of its history makes it quite plausible that life may have also developed on Mars. If life did develop on Mars, it undoubtedly left behind a fossil record. Such a fossil record is likely to be more accessible than either subsurface environments that may harbor life, or scattered 'oases' that may be present at the surface. Consequently, the post-Viking approach of Mars exobiology has shifted focus to search for evidence of an ancient martian biosphere. This has led to the emergence of a new subdiscipline of paleontology, herein termed 'exopaleontology', which deals with the exploration for fossils on other planets and whose core concepts derive from Earth-based Precambrian paleontology, microbial ecology, and sedimentology. Potential targets on Mars for subaqueous spring deposits, sedimentary cements, and evaporites are ancient terminal lake basins where hydrological systems could have endured for some time under arid conditions. Potential targets for the Mars Pathfinder mission include channeled impact craters and areas of deranged drainage associated with outflows in northwest Arabia and Xanthe Terra, where water may have ponded temporarily to form lakes. The major uncertainty of such targets is their comparatively younger age and the potentially short duration of hydrological activity compared to older paleolake basins found in the southern hemisphere. However, it has been suggested that cycles of catastrophic flooding associated with Tharsis volcanism may have sustained a large body of water, Oceanus Borealis, in the northern plains area until quite late in martian history. Although problematic, the shoreline areas of the proposed northern ocean provide potential targets for a Mars Pathfinder mission aimed at exploring for carbonates or other potentially fossiliferous marine deposits. Carbonates and evaporites possess characteristic spectra signatures in the near-infrared and should be

  12. The CO Mapping Array Pathfinder (COMAP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleary, Kieran; Bigot-Sazy, Marie-Anne; Chung, Dongwoo; Church, Sarah E.; Dickinson, Clive; Eriksen, Hans; gaier, todd; Goldsmith, Paul; Gundersen, Joshua O.; Harper, Stuart; Harris, Andrew I.; Lamb, James; Li, Tony; Munroe, Ryan; Pearson, Timothy J.; Readhead, Anthony C. S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Kathrine Wehus, Ingunn; Woody, David

    2016-01-01

    The CO Mapping Array Pathfinder (COMAP) will open a new window on both the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) and the Epoch of Galaxy Assembly by using carbon monoxide (CO) lines to trace the distribution of star-forming galaxies in both epochs. Phase I of COMAP comprises a 10-m telescope, located at the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO), equipped with a 19-pixel spectrometer array that will map a total of 10 square degrees of sky in the frequency range 30-34 GHz, with spectral resolution R~800. This band will be sensitive to CO(1-0) in the redshift slice z=2.4-2.8 and to CO(2-1) in the redshift slice z = 5.8-6.7.Constraining the CO power spectrum from the EoR will ultimately require measurements at multiple frequencies and arrays with hundreds of elements. The aim of this pathfinder experiment is to i) demonstrate the feasibility and future potential of wide-field CO intensity mapping, and ii) provide a test-bed for the technology development and observational strategies. Phase I of COMAP will focus on constraining the CO power spectrum from the Epoch of Galaxy Assembly, at z=2.4-2.8. A wide range of predictions for the strength of this power spectrum have appeared in the literature; much of this range can either be confirmed or ruled out by COMAP.Cross-correlation with galaxy surveys in this redshift range will allow us to disentangle the impact of cosmological parameters, star formation rate (SFR) and the CO-SFR connection. Cross-correlation will also establish confidence that the observed signal is CO and allow inferences to be drawn about the unobserved, but CO-luminous galaxy population. The COMAP fields will therefore be chosen to overlap with galaxy surveys.COMAP Phase I observations are planned to start in late 2017, continuing until late 2019.

  13. The magnetic properties experiments on Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madsen, M. B.; Hviid, S. F.; Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Knudsen, J. M.; Goetz, W.; Pedersen, C. T.; Dinesen, A. R.; Mogensen, C. T.; Olsen, M.; Hargraves, R. B.

    1999-04-01

    The Mars Pathfinder lander carried two magnet arrays, each containing five small permanent magnets of varying strength. The magnet arrays were passively exposed to the wind borne dust on Mars. By the end of the Mars Pathfinder mission a bull's-eye pattern was visible on the four strongest magnets of the arrays showing the presence of magnetic dust particles. From the images we conclude that the dust suspended in the atmosphere is not solely single phase particles of hematite (α-Fe2O3) and that single phase particles of the ferrimagnetic minerals maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) or magnetite (Fe3O4) are not present as free particles in any appreciable amount. The material on the strongest magnets seems to be indistinguishable from the bright surface material around the lander. From X-ray fluorescence it is known that the soil consists mainly of silicates. The element iron constitutes about 13% of the soil. The particles in the airborne dust seem to be composite, containing a few percent of a strongly magnetic component. We conclude that the magnetic phase present in the airborne dust particles is most likely maghemite. The particles thus appear to consist of silicate aggregates stained or cemented by ferric oxides, some of the stain and cement being maghemite. These results imply that Fe2+ ions were leached from the bedrock, and after passing through a state as free Fe2+ ions in liquid water, the Fe2+ was oxidized to Fe3+ and then precipitated. It cannot, however, be ruled out that the magnetic particles are titanomagnetite (or titanomaghemite) occurring in palagonite, having been inherited directly from the bedrock.

  14. Australian Extinctions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science Teacher, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Massive extinctions of animals and the arrival of the first humans in ancient Australia--which occurred 45,000 to 55,000 years ago--may be linked. Researchers at the Carnegie Institution, University of Colorado, Australian National University, and Bates College believe that massive fires set by the first humans may have altered the ecosystem of…

  15. Operations and Autonomy of the Mars Pathfinder Microrover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishkin, A. H.; Morrison, J. C.; Nguyen, T. T.; Stone, H. W.; Cooper, B. K.

    1998-01-01

    The Microrover Flight Experiment (MFEX) is a NSAS OACT (Office of Advanced Concepts and Technology) flight experiment which, integrated with the Mars Pathfinder (MPF) lander and spacecraft system, landed on Mars on July 4, 1997.

  16. Immersive Environments for Mission Operations: Beyond Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, J.; Hartman, F.; Cooper, B.

    1998-01-01

    Immersive environments are just beginning to be used to support mission operations at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. This technology contributed to the Mars Pathfinder Mission in planning sorties for the Sojourner rover.

  17. Dust on Mars: Materials Adherence Experiment results from Mars Pathfinder

    SciTech Connect

    Landis, G.A.; Jenkins, P.P.

    1997-12-31

    Mars Pathfinder is the first solar-powered probe to operate on the surface of Mars. Pathfinder consists of a lander and a small, autonomous, six-wheel solar-powered rover, Sojourner. The Pathfinder spacecraft reflects NASA`s new philosophy of exploiting new technologies to reduce mission cost. The Materials Adherence Experiment on Pathfinder was designed to measure the degradation of solar arrays due to dust settling out of the atmosphere and blocking light to the solar array, lowering the array power output. The MAE measurements indicate steady dust accumulation at a rate of about 0.28% per day. This value is consistent with the performance of the solar arrays, which have decreased in power at an estimated rate of 0.29% per day.

  18. LISA Pathfinder paves way for gravitational-wave probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Hamish

    2016-07-01

    Researchers working on the LISA Pathfinder space mission have successfully managed to isolate from the environment two 2 kg test masses at a special “Lagrangian point” between the Earth and the Sun.

  19. Selection of the Mars Pathfinder landing site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golombek, M. P.; Cook, R. A.; Moore, H. J.; Parker, T. J.

    1997-02-01

    The Mars Pathfinder spacecraft will land on a depositional fan near the mouth of the catastrophic outflow channel, Ares Vallis (19.5°N, 32.8°W). This site offers the prospect of analyzing a variety of rock types from the ancient cratered highlands, intermediate-age ridged plains, and reworked channel deposits. Analyses of these rocks by Pathfinder instruments will enable first-order scientific questions to be addressed, such as differentiation of the crust, the development of weathering products, and the nature of the early environment, as well as their subsequent evolution on Mars. Constraints imposed by (1) spacecraft and rover designs (which are robust), (2) entry, descent, and landing, (3) scientific potential at various sites, and (4) safety were important considerations in site selection. Engineering constraints require a 70 km by 200 km smooth, flat (low slopes) area located between 10° and 20°N that is below 0 km elevation, with average radar reflectivity, little dust, and moderate rock abundance. Three regions on Mars are between 10° and 20°N and below 0 km elevation: Chryse, Amazonis, and Isidis-Elysium. Science considerations favor sites at the mouths of outflow channels (grab bag sites offer an assay of rock types on Mars), highland sites (early crustal differentiation and climate), and sites covered with dark (unoxidized) material. Sites are considered safe if they are clearly below 0 km elevation, appear acceptably free of hazards in high-resolution (<50m/pixel) Viking orbiter images and have acceptable reflectivity and roughness at radar wavelengths, thermal inertia, rock abundance, red to violet ratio, and albedo. Recent 3.5-cm wavelength radar observations were used to verify elevation, reflectivity, and roughness within the landing ellipses. Three sites meet all of these criteria: Ares Vallis, Tritonis Lacus, and Isidis. Although Isidis appears to be safer than Tritonis and Ares, the greater scientific potential at Ares Vallis resulted in

  20. The Mars Pathfinder Mission and Science Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, M. P.

    1999-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder, the first low-cost, quick Discovery class mission to be completed, successfully landed on the surface of Mars on July 4, 1997, deployed and navigated a small rover, and collected data from 3 science instruments and 10 technology experiments. The mission operated on Mars for 3 months and returned 2.3 Gbits of new data, including over 16,500 lander and 550 rover images, 16 chemical analyses of rocks and soil, and 8.5 million individual temperature, pressure and wind measurements. The rover traversed 100 m clockwise around the lander, exploring about 200 square meters of the surface. The mission captured the imagination of the public, and garnered front page headlines during the first week. A total of about 566 million internet "hits" were registered during the first month of the mission, with 47 million "hits" on July 8th alone, making the Pathfinder landing by far the largest internet event in history at the time. Pathfinder was the first mission to deploy a rover on Mars. It carried a chemical analysis instrument, to characterize the rocks and soils in a landing area over hundreds of square meters on Mars, which provided a calibration point or "ground truth" for orbital remote sensing observations. The combination of spectral imaging of the landing area by the lander camera, chemical analyses aboard the rover, and close-up imaging of colors, textures and fabrics with the rover cameras offered the potential of identifying rocks (petrology and mineralogy). With this payload, a landing site in Ares Vallis was selected because it appeared acceptably safe and offered the prospect of analyzing a variety of rock types expected to be deposited by catastrophic floods, which enabled addressing first-order scientific questions such as differentiation of the crust, the development of weathering products, and the nature of the early Martian environment and its subsequent evolution. The 3 instruments and rover allowed seven areas of scientific investigation: the

  1. LISA Pathfinder as a micrometeorite instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, James

    2016-03-01

    The Solar System contains a population of dust and small particles originating from asteroids, comets, and other bodies. These particles have been studied using a number of techniques ranging from in-situ satellite detectors to analysis of lunar microcraters to ground-based observations of zodiacal light. We describe an approach for using the LISA Pathfinder [LPF] mission as an instrument to detect and characterize the dynamics of dust particles in the vicinity of Earth-Sun L1. Launched on Dec. 3rd, 2015, LPF is a dedicated technology demonstrator mission that will validate several key technologies for a future space-based gravitational-wave observatory. The primary science instrument aboard LPF is a precision accelerometer which we show will be capable of sensing discrete momentum impulses as small as 4 × 10-8 N . s. We then estimate the rate of such impulses resulting from impacts of micrometeoroids based on standard models of the micrometeoroid environment in the inner solar system. We find that LPF may detect dozens to hundreds of individual events corresponding to impacts of particles with masses > 10-9 g during LPF's roughly six-month science operations phase.

  2. Data Analysis for the LISA Pathfinder Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, James Ira

    2009-01-01

    The LTP (LISA Technology Package) is the core part of the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) Pathfinder mission. The main goal of the mission is to study the sources of any disturbances that perturb the motion of the freely-falling test masses from their geodesic trajectories as well as 10 test various technologies needed for LISA. The LTP experiment is designed as a sequence of experimental runs in which the performance of the instrument is studied and characterized under different operating conditions. In order to best optimize subsequent experimental runs, each run must be promptly analysed to ensure that the following ones make best use of the available knowledge of the instrument ' In order to do this, all analyses must be designed and tested in advance of the mission and have sufficient built-in flexibility to account for unexpected results or behaviour. To support this activity, a robust and flexible data analysis software package is also required. This poster presents two of the main components that make up the data analysis effort: the data analysis software and the mock-data challenges used to validate analysis procedures and experiment designs.

  3. The Mars Pathfinder Mission and Science Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golombek, M. P.

    1999-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder, the first low-cost, quick Discovery class mission to be completed, successfully landed on the surface of Mars on July 4, 1997, deployed and navigated a small rover, and collected data from 3 science instruments and 10 technology experiments. The mission operated on Mars for 3 months and returned 2.3 Gbits of new data, including over 16,500 lander and 550 rover images, 16 chemical analyses of rocks and soil, and 8.5 million individual temperature, pressure and wind measurements. The rover traversed 100 m clockwise around the lander, exploring about 200 square meters of the surface. The mission captured the imagination of the public, and garnered front page headlines during the first week. A total of about 566 million internet "hits" were registered during the first month of the mission, with 47 million "hits" on July 8th alone, making the Pathfinder landing by far the largest internet event in history at the time. Pathfinder was the first mission to deploy a rover on Mars. It carried a chemical analysis instrument, to characterize the rocks and soils in a landing area over hundreds of square meters on Mars, which provided a calibration point or "ground truth" for orbital remote sensing observations. The combination of spectral imaging of the landing area by the lander camera, chemical analyses aboard the rover, and close-up imaging of colors, textures and fabrics with the rover cameras offered the potential of identifying rocks (petrology and mineralogy). With this payload, a landing site in Ares Vallis was selected because it appeared acceptably safe and offered the prospect of analyzing a variety of rock types expected to be deposited by catastrophic floods, which enabled addressing first-order scientific questions such as differentiation of the crust, the development of weathering products, and the nature of the early Martian environment and its subsequent evolution. The 3 instruments and rover allowed seven areas of scientific investigation: the

  4. Constellation Pathfinder: A University Nanosatellite Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, Harlan E.; Petschek, Harry E.

    2002-08-01

    Under the task of nanosatellite mission design, we developed a mission concept that enables hundreds of one-kilogram spacecraft to be placed into orbit with a single mothership. We performed trade studies to arrive at a positive feasibility assessment. The results of that study were described in two publications. Second, under the task of spacecraft design, we developed nanosatellite designs needed to enable constellation missions. Design studies were conducted and subsystems prototyped, including a spin-table and launcher concept for a small stack of nanosatellites. Engineering design studies of this work appeared in the refereed literature. Instruments to be flown on such a small craft have been specified and then developed as part of a related AF SBIR effort. Undergraduate students (>100 in the Aerospace Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, and Electrical and Computer Engineering departments) played an enormous role in the mission and spacecraft definitions of the Constellation Pathfinder project. In addition to five publications, numerous invited and contributed presentations of these studies have been presented at national and international meetings.

  5. Bayesian model selection for LISA pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnesis, Nikolaos; Nofrarias, Miquel; Sopuerta, Carlos F.; Gibert, Ferran; Armano, Michele; Audley, Heather; Congedo, Giuseppe; Diepholz, Ingo; Ferraioli, Luigi; Hewitson, Martin; Hueller, Mauro; Korsakova, Natalia; McNamara, Paul W.; Plagnol, Eric; Vitale, Stefano

    2014-03-01

    The main goal of the LISA Pathfinder (LPF) mission is to fully characterize the acceleration noise models and to test key technologies for future space-based gravitational-wave observatories similar to the eLISA concept. The data analysis team has developed complex three-dimensional models of the LISA Technology Package (LTP) experiment onboard the LPF. These models are used for simulations, but, more importantly, they will be used for parameter estimation purposes during flight operations. One of the tasks of the data analysis team is to identify the physical effects that contribute significantly to the properties of the instrument noise. A way of approaching this problem is to recover the essential parameters of a LTP model fitting the data. Thus, we want to define the simplest model that efficiently explains the observations. To do so, adopting a Bayesian framework, one has to estimate the so-called Bayes factor between two competing models. In our analysis, we use three main different methods to estimate it: the reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo method, the Schwarz criterion, and the Laplace approximation. They are applied to simulated LPF experiments in which the most probable LTP model that explains the observations is recovered. The same type of analysis presented in this paper is expected to be followed during flight operations. Moreover, the correlation of the output of the aforementioned methods with the design of the experiment is explored.

  6. Status of the LISA Pathfinder LPF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzel, G.; Ruediger, A.

    LISA Laser Interferometer Space Antenna is the joint Nasa ESA project for the detection of gravitational waves GWs It consists of three spacecraft in an equilateral triangle of 5 million km sides orbiting on an Earth-like orbit around the sun Each spacecraft houses two free-falling test masses that determine the distances to the other spacecraft Distance changes due to GWs are monitored by laser interferometry down to minute relative changes in the order of 10 -23 The extremely small GW signals make a technology demonstrator the LISA Pathfinder LPF very desirable to verify that the employed technologies of 1 laser stability 2 picometer interferometry 3 drag-free control and 4 micronewton thrusters can meet the challenge The LPF will be carried on the ESA Smart-2 mission to be placed near the Lagrange point L1 with launch expected for 2009 LPF will consist of one spacecraft with two independent test masses the distances between these two test masses and the position changes with respect to the optical bench spacecraft will be monitored with a resolution only one power of ten away from the requirements of LISA proper A flight module of the optical bench has been built and has passed the necessary tests for space qualification

  7. The Status of the Ultra Fast Flash Observatory - Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, J. W.; Ahmad, S.; Ahn, K. B.; Barrillon, P.; Brandt, S.; Budtz-Jrgensen, C.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Chang, C.-H.; Chang, C.-Y.; Chang, Y. Y.; Chen, C. R.; Chen, P.; Cho, M.; Choi, H. S.; Choi, Y. J.; Connel, P.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Eyles, C.; Grossan, B.; Huang, J. J.; Huang, M. H. A.; Jeong, S.; Jung, A.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. B.; Kim, S.-W.; Kim, Y. W.; Krasnov, A. S.; Lee, J.; Lim, H.; Linder, E. V.; Liu, T. C.; Lund, N.; Min, K. W.; Na, G. W.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Park, I. H.; Reglero, V.; Ripa, J.; Rodrigo, J. M.; Smoot, G. F.; Suh, J. E.; Svertilov, S.; Vedenkin, N.; Wang, M.-Z.; Yashin, I.

    2014-01-01

    The Ultra Fast Flash Observatory (UFFO) is a project to study early optical emissions from Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). The primary scientific goal of UFFO is to see if GRBs can be calibrated with their rising times, so that they could be used as new standard candles. In order to minimize delay in optical follow-up measurements, which is now about 100 sec after trigger from the Swift experiment, we rotate a mirror to redirect light path so that optical measurement can be performed within a second after the trigger. We have developed a pathfinder mission, UFFO-pathfinder to launch on board the Lomonosov satellite in 2012. In this talk, I will present scientific motivations and descriptions of the design and development of UFFO-pathfinder.

  8. Mars Pathfinder Rover-Lewis Research Center Technology Experiments Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevenson, Steven M.

    1997-01-01

    An overview of NASA's Mars Pathfinder Program is given and the development and role of three technology experiments from NASA's Lewis Research Center and carried on the Mars Pathfinder rover is described. Two recent missions to Mars were developed and managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and launched late last year: Mars Global Surveyor in November 1996 and Mars Pathfinder in December 1996. Mars Global Surveyor is an orbiter which will survey the planet with a number of different instruments, and will arrive in September 1997, and Mars Pathfinder which consists of a lander and a small rover, landing on Mars July 4, 1997. These are the first two missions of the Mars Exploration Program consisting of a ten year series of small robotic martian probes to be launched every 26 months. The Pathfinder rover will perform a number of technology and operational experiments which will provide the engineering information necessary to design and operate more complex, scientifically oriented surface missions involving roving vehicles and other machinery operating in the martian environment. Because of its expertise in space power systems and technologies, space mechanisms and tribology, Lewis Research Center was asked by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which is heading the Mars Pathfinder Program, to contribute three experiments concerning the effects of the martian environment on surface solar power systems and the abrasive qualities of the Mars surface material. In addition, rover static charging was investigated and a static discharge system of several fine Tungsten points was developed and fixed to the rover. These experiments and current findings are described herein.

  9. MARS PATHFINDER LANDER REMOVED FROM SHIPPING CONTAINER IN SAEF-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In the SAEF-2 spacecraft checkout facility at Kennedy Space Center, engineers and technicians from Jet Propulsion Laboratory remove the Mars Pathfinder lander from its shipping container, still covered in protective wrapping. Pictured from L-R, Linda Robeck, Jerry Gutierrez, Lorraine Garcia, Chuck Foehlinger of JPL. The arrival of the spacecraft at KSC from Pasadena, CA occurred on Aug. 13, 1996. Launch of Mars Pathfinder aboard a McDonnell Douglas Delta II rocket will occur from Pad B at Complex 17 on Dec. 2.

  10. Atmosphere structure and meteorology instrument for Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seiff, Alvin

    1994-01-01

    The MESUR Science Definition Team recommended that all MESUR probes, including Pathfinder, carry an ASI/MET experiment, in order that no opportunity be lost to characterize the atmosphere of Mars in passing through it. The experiment was thus included on Pathfinder from the start (February 1992), but on an essentially noninterference basis: It was to make no unusual demands on the spacecraft. A Science Advisory Team was appointed by NASA Headquarters in September 1993 first met on November 3rd to initiate formal science participation, and the level of activity has since been high. The instrument passed its Preliminary Design Review on February 28th.

  11. MOC's Highest Resolution View of Mars Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] (A) Mars Pathfinder site, left: April 1998; right: January 2000.

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] (B) top: April 1998; bottom: January 2000.

    Can Mars Global Surveyor's 1.5 meter (5 ft) per pixel camera be used to find any evidence as to the fate of the Mars Polar Lander that was lost on December 3, 1999? One way to find out is to look for one of the other Mars landers and determine what, if anything, can be seen. There have been three successful Mars lander missions: Viking 1 (July 1976), Viking 2 (September 1976), and Mars Pathfinder (July 1997). Of these, the location of Mars Pathfinder is known the best because there are several distinct landmarks visible in the lander's images that help in locating the spacecraft. The MGS MOC Operations Team at Malin Space Science Systems has been tasked since mid-December 1999 with looking for the lost Polar Lander. Part of this effort has been to test the capabilities of MOC by taking a picture of the landing site of Mars Pathfinder.

    An attempt to photograph the Pathfinder site was made once before, in April 1998, by turning the entire MGS spacecraft so that the camera could point at the known location of the Mars Pathfinder lander. Turning the MGS spacecraft like this is not a normal operation--it takes considerable planning, and disrupts the on-going, normal acquisition of science data. It took 3 attempts to succeed, but on April 22, 1998, MOC acquired the picture seen on the left side of Figure A, above. The three near-by major landmarks that were visible to the Pathfinder's cameras are labeled here (North Peak, Big Crater, Twin Peaks). It was known at the time that this image was not adequate to see the Pathfinder lander because the camera was not in focus and had a resolution of only 3.3 meters (11 ft) per pixel. In this and all other images shown here, north is up. All views of the 1998 MOC image are illuminated from the lower right, all views

  12. PATHFINDER: Probing Atmospheric Flows in an Integrated and Distributed Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilhelmson, R. B.; Wojtowicz, D. P.; Shaw, C.; Hagedorn, J.; Koch, S.

    1995-01-01

    PATHFINDER is a software effort to create a flexible, modular, collaborative, and distributed environment for studying atmospheric, astrophysical, and other fluid flows in the evolving networked metacomputer environment of the 1990s. It uses existing software, such as HDF (Hierarchical Data Format), DTM (Data Transfer Mechanism), GEMPAK (General Meteorological Package), AVS, SGI Explorer, and Inventor to provide the researcher with the ability to harness the latest in desktop to teraflop computing. Software modules developed during the project are available in the public domain via anonymous FTP from the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA). The address is ftp.ncsa.uiuc.edu, and the directory is /SGI/PATHFINDER.

  13. LISA Pathfinder and eLISA news

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorpe, James Ira; Mueller, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Two important gatherings of the space-based gravitational-wave detector community were held in Zurich, Switzerland this past March. The first was a meeting of the Science Working Team for LISA Pathfinder (LPF), a dedicated technology demonstrator mission for a future LISA-like gravitational wave observatory. LPF is entering an extremely exciting phase with launch less than 15 months away. All flight components for both the European science payload, known as the LISA Technology Package (LTP), and the NASA science payload, known as the Space Technology 7 Disturbance Reduction System (ST7-DRS), have been delivered and are undergoing integration. The final flight component for the spacecraft bus, a cold-gas thruster based on the successful GAIA design, will be delivered later this year. Current focus is on completing integration of the science payload (see Figures 1 and 2) and preparation for operations and data analysis. After a launch in Summer 2015, LPF will take approximately 90 days to reach its operational orbit around the Earth-Sun Lagrange point (L1), where it will begin science operations. After 90 days of LTP operations followed by 90 days of DRS operations, LPF will have completed its prime mission of paving the way for a space-based observatory of gravitational waves in the milliHertz band. Immediately following the meeting of the LPF team, the eLISA consortium held its third progress meeting. The consortium (www.elisascience.org) is the organizing body of the European space-based gravitational-wave community, and it was responsible for the "The Gravitational Universe" whitepaper that resulted in the November 2013 election of a gravitational-wave science theme for ESA's Cosmic Visions L3 opportunity. In preparation for an L3 mission concept call, which is expected later this decade, and for launch in the mid 2030s, the eLISA consortium members are coordinating technology development and mission study activities which will build on the LPF results. The final

  14. A Pathfinder for Animal Research and Animal Rights.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, David C.

    1992-01-01

    This pathfinder was originally prepared for "Biomedical Research and Animal Rights," a session sponsored by the Veterinary Medical Libraries and Research Libraries Sections of the Medical Library Association. Current resources are described, from bibliographies to electronic bulletin boards, which relate to the issue of laboratory animal welfare…

  15. Pathfinders for Four Directions: An Indigenous Educational Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Loriene, Comp.

    The Four Directions Project, administered by the Pueblo of Laguna Department of Education, is a 5-year federally-funded technology innovation grant that aims to help Native people and their educators develop culturally relevant curricula through technology. This report includes the full text of 45 "pathfinders" designed by students in the Graduate…

  16. Re-examination of Mars Pathfinder parachute drag coefficient estimate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, P.; Schofield, T.; Lisano, M.

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission utilizes the Mars Pathfinder (MPF) parachute design. The MPF parachute drag coefficient is a driver for the MER entry, descent, and landing (EDL) design. As a result, a good estimate of the performance of the MPF parachute at Mars is required.

  17. Teacher Job Satisfaction: Lessons from the TSW Pathfinder Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butt, Graham; Lance, Ann; Fielding, Antony; Gunter, Helen; Rayner, Steve; Thomas, Hywel

    2005-01-01

    Government policy assumes that modernization and remodelling will be effective as external intervention mechanisms to improve job satisfaction. Based on data collected as part of the evaluation of the "Transforming the School Workforce Pathfinder Project", an argument is presented here which suggests that internal management models may be more…

  18. Results of the Imager for Mars Pathfinder Windsock Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, R.; Golombek, M.; Greeley, R.; Herkenhoff, K.; Kraft, M.; Murphy, J.; Smith, P.; Wilson, G.

    2000-01-01

    The IMP windsock experiment measured wind speeds at three heights within 1.2 m of the martian surface during Pathfinder landed operations. Data from the strongest breezes indicate aerodynamic roughness = 3 cm, wind friction speeds up to 1 m/sec.

  19. Sedimentary geomorphology of the Mars Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, James W., Jr.; Parker, Timothy Jay

    1997-01-01

    The first landing on Mars in over 20 years will take place July 4, 1997, near te mouth of the Ares Vallis outflow channel located in southeastern Chryse Planitia. Mars Pathfinder, unlike Viking 1, is expected to land on a surface that has a distinct and unambiguous fluvial signature.

  20. Relating MBSE to Spacecraft Development: A NASA Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Othon, Bill

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) has sponsored a Pathfinder Study to investigate how Model Based Systems Engineering (MBSE) and Model Based Engineering (MBE) techniques can be applied by NASA spacecraft development projects. The objectives of this Pathfinder Study included analyzing both the products of the modeling activity, as well as the process and tool chain through which the spacecraft design activities are executed. Several aspects of MBSE methodology and process were explored. Adoption and consistent use of the MBSE methodology within an existing development environment can be difficult. The Pathfinder Team evaluated the possibility that an "MBSE Template" could be developed as both a teaching tool as well as a baseline from which future NASA projects could leverage. Elements of this template include spacecraft system component libraries, data dictionaries and ontology specifications, as well as software services that do work on the models themselves. The Pathfinder Study also evaluated the tool chain aspects of development. Two chains were considered: 1. The Development tool chain, through which SysML model development was performed and controlled, and 2. The Analysis tool chain, through which both static and dynamic system analysis is performed. Of particular interest was the ability to exchange data between SysML and other engineering tools such as CAD and Dynamic Simulation tools. For this study, the team selected a Mars Lander vehicle as the element to be designed. The paper will discuss what system models were developed, how data was captured and exchanged, and what analyses were conducted.

  1. Modis, SeaWIFS, and Pathfinder funded activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Robert H.

    1995-01-01

    MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer), SeaWIFS (Sea-viewing Wide Field Sensor), Pathfinder, and DSP (Digital Signal Processor) objectives are summarized. An overview of current progress is given for the automatic processing database, client/server status, matchup database, and DSP support.

  2. Results of the Imager for Mars Pathfinder windsock experiment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sullivan, R.; Greeley, R.; Kraft, M.; Wilson, G.; Golombek, M.; Herkenhoff, K.; Murphy, J.; Smith, P.

    2000-01-01

    The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) windsock experiment measured wind speeds at three heights within 1.2 m of the Martian surface during Pathfinder landed operations. These wind data allowed direct measurement of near-surface wind profiles on Mars for the first time, including determination of aerodynamic roughness length and wind friction speeds. Winds were light during periods of windsock imaging, but data from the strongest breezes indicate aerodynamic roughness length of 3 cm at the landing site, with wind friction speeds reaching 1 m/s. Maximum wind friction speeds were about half of the threshold-of-motion friction speeds predicted for loose, fine-grained materials on smooth Martian terrain and about one third of the threshold-of-motion friction speeds predicted for the same size particles over terrain with aerodynamic roughness of 3 cm. Consistent with this, and suggesting that low wind speeds prevailed when the windsock array was not imaged and/or no particles were available for aeolian transport, no wind-related changes to the surface during mission operations have been recognized. The aerodynamic roughness length reported here implies that proposed deflation of fine particles around the landing site, or activation of duneforms seen by IMP and Sojourner, would require wind speeds >28 m/s at the Pathfinder top windsock height (or >31 m/s at the equivalent Viking wind sensor height of 1.6 m) and wind speeds >45 m/s above 10 m. These wind speeds would cause rock abrasion if a supply of durable particles were available for saltation. Previous analyses indicate that the Pathfinder landing site probably is rockier and rougher than many other plains units on Mars, so aerodynamic roughness length elsewhere probably is less than the 3-cm value reported for the Pathfinder site. Copyright 2000 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. Mars Pathfinder First Anniversary Special -- Refined Landing Site Location

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    It has been one year since NASA's Return to the Red Planet began with the spectacular landing of Mars Pathfinder and its microrover, Sojourner. The spacecraft bounced onto a flood-washed landscape on July 4, 1997.

    Mars Pathfinder was soon joined by the orbiting Mars Global Surveyor on September 11, 1997 (PDT). Mars Global Surveyor's high resolution camera, MOC, took a picture of the Mars Pathfinder landing site region during its 256th orbit on April 22, 1998. This picture--at about 5 meters (11 feet) per pixel--is the best available for the site. The previous best images were from the Viking 1 Orbiter in 1976, and had resolutions of about 38 meters (125 feet) per pixel.

    The MOC image has allowed scientists to determine the exact location of the Mars Pathfinder lander. Unfortunately, the image resolution is not good enough to actually see the lander--nor can any of the familiar boulders (e.g., 'Yogi') be seen at this resolution.

    Using the MOC image, the landing site location has been refined by Dr. Michael Malin, Principal Investigator for the Mars Global Surveyor MOC Team and a Participating Scientist on the Mars Pathfinder mission. The images above illustrate how the landing site was located by using the 'sight lines' published by T. Parker (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA) and topographic map provided by R. Kirk (U.S. Geological Survey, Flagstaff, AZ).

    Left image: MOC image 25603 subframe, shown at 15 meters (about 50 feet) per pixel resolution. Small, colored box is a topographic map of the Mars Pathfinder landing site produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (Flagstaff, AZ) from Mars Pathfinder stereographic images . Dark, heavy lines are 'sight lines' to various landmarks seen along the horizon in Mars Pathfinder camera images, measured by T. Parker and matched to features seen in Viking Orbiter images. These lines were published in Science, v. 278, p. 1746, December 5, 1997. The lighter, thinner sightlines are the same lines, adjusted to

  4. The LISA Pathfinder Mission. Tracing Einstein's Geodesics in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Racca, Giuseppe D.; McNamara, Paul W.

    2010-03-01

    LISA Pathfinder, formerly known as SMART-2, is the second of the European Space Agency’s Small Missions for Advance Research and Technology, and is designed to pave the way for the joint ESA/NASA Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission, by testing the core assumption of gravitational wave detection and general relativity: that free particles follow geodesics. The new technologies to be demonstrated in a space environment include: inertial sensors, high precision laser interferometry to free floating mirrors, and micro-Newton proportional thrusters. LISA Pathfinder will be launched on a dedicated launch vehicle in late 2011 into a low Earth orbit. By a transfer trajectory, the sciencecraft will enter its final orbit around the first Sun-Earth Lagrange point. First science results are expected approximately 3 months thereafter. Here, we give an overview of the mission including the technologies being demonstrated.

  5. Interface Generation and Compositional Verification in JavaPathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giannakopoulou, Dimitra; Pasareanu, Corina

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel algorithm for interface generation of software components. Given a component, our algorithm uses learning techniques to compute a permissive interface representing legal usage of the component. Unlike our previous work, this algorithm does not require knowledge about the component s environment. Furthermore, in contrast to other related approaches, our algorithm computes permissive interfaces even in the presence of non-determinism in the component. Our algorithm is implemented in the JavaPathfinder model checking framework for UML statechart components. We have also added support for automated assume-guarantee style compositional verification in JavaPathfinder, using component interfaces. We report on the application of the presented approach to the generation of interfaces for flight software components.

  6. First light of the LINC-NIRVANA Pathfinder experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergomi, M.; Viotto, V.; Arcidiacono, C.; Marafatto, L.; Farinato, J.; Baumeister, H.; Bertram, T.; Berwein, J.; Briegel, F.; Conrad, A.; Kittman, F.; Kopon, D.; Hofferbert, R.; Magrin, D.; Radhakrishnan Santhakumari, K. K.; Puglisi, A.; Xompero, M.; Briguglio, R.; Quiros-Pacheco, F.; Herbst, T. M.; Ragazzoni, R.

    2014-07-01

    The LINC-NIRVANA Pathfinder experiment is a test-bed to verify a very complex sub-system: the Ground-layer Wavefront Sensor, or GWS. Pathfinder will test the GWS in its final working environment and demonstrate on-sky the performance achievable with a multiple natural guide star, ground-layer adaptive optics system with a very wide FoV. The GWS uses up to 12 natural guide stars within a 2.8'-6' annular field of view and drives the LBT adaptive secondary mirror to correct the lower layers of atmospheric turbulence. This paper will trace the path of the instrument on its way to First Light on-sky in November 2013, from its installation on the telescope to the calibrations to its final operation, focusing in particular on opto-mechanical and software aspects and how they lead to the main achieved results.

  7. True Color of Mars - Pathfinder Sol 39 Sunrise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Sunrise, sol 39. This true color, pre-sunrise image (approximately 0530LST) is composed of six images extending 30 o in azimuth and 45 o in elevation and shows the brownish gray predawn sky. A description of the techniques used to generate this color image from IMP data can be found in Maki et al., 1999. Note: a calibrated output device is required accurately reproduce the correct colors.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The IMP was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal investigator.

  8. LISA Pathfinder: picometers and femtoNewtons in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewitson, Martin; LISA Pathfinder Team Team

    2016-03-01

    On December 3rd at 04:04 UTC, The European Space Agency launched the LISA Pathfinder satellite on board a VEGA rocket from Kourou in French Guiana. After a series of orbit raising manoeuvres and a 2 month long transfer orbit, LISA Pathfinder arrived at L1. Following a period of commissioning, the science operations commenced at the start of March, beginning the demonstration of technologies and methodologies which pave the way for a future large-scale gravitational wave observatory in space. This talk will present the scientific goals of the mission, discuss the technologies being tested, elucidate the link to a future space-based observatory, such as LISA, and present preliminary results from the in-orbit operations and experiments.

  9. Grid resolution and solution convergence for Mars Pathfinder forebody

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nettelhorst, Heather L.; Mitcheltree, Robert A.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the Discovery Program, NASA Plans to launch a series of probes to Mars. The Mars Pathfinder project is the first of this series with a scheduled Mars arrival in July 1997. The entry vehicle will perform a direct entry into the atmosphere and deliver a lander to the surface. Predicting the entry vehicle's flight performance and designing the forebody heatshield requires knowledge of the expected aerothermodynamic environment. Much of this knowledge can be obtained through computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis.

  10. 2005 PathfinderPlus Aero-Elastic Research Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navarro, Robert

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the 2005 Pathfinder along with an investigation of its aeroelastic responses. The contents include: 1) HALE Class of Vehicles; 2) Aero-elastic Research Flights Overall Objective; 3) General Arrangement; 4) Sensor Locations; 5) NASA Ramp Operations; 6) Lakebed Operations; 7) 1st Flight Data Set; 8) Tool development / data usage; 9) HALE Tool Development & Validation; 10) Building a HALE Foundation; 11) Compelling Needs Drive HALE Efforts; and 12) Team Photo

  11. Java PathFinder: A Translator From Java to Promela

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Havelund, Klaus

    1999-01-01

    JAVA PATHFINDER, JPF, is a prototype translator from JAVA to PROMELA, the modeling language of the SPIN model checker. JPF is a product of a major effort by the Automated Software Engineering group at NASA Ames to make model checking technology part of the software process. Experience has shown that severe bugs can be found in final code using this technique, and that automated translation from a programming language to a modeling language like PROMELA can help reducing the effort required.

  12. ST7-DRS on LISA Pathfinder: Initial Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutler, Curt; Ziemer, John; Barela, Phil; Demmons, Nathaniel; Dunn, Charles; Hruby, Vlad; Hsu, Oscar; Liepack, Otfrid; Maghami, Peiman; O'Donnell, James; Slutsky, Jacob; Thorpe, James; Romero-Wolfe, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    LISA Pathfinder (LPF), a European Space Agency Mission to demonstrate technologies for future space-based gravitational wave observatories, was launched from French Guiana on Dec 3, 2015. A payload on LPF is the NASA-provided ST7 Disturbance Reduction System (ST7-DRS). We will describe the current state of ST7-DRS, including results from the initial on-orbit commissioning and the experimental plan for the ST7-DRS operations in the summer of 2016.

  13. Goldstone radar contributions to Mars Pathfinder landing safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slade, Martin A.; Jurgens, R. F.

    1994-01-01

    Goldstar radar can provide topography 'profiles', statistical surface roughness, and radar images within a few degrees of the sub-Earth point. Goldstone/Very Large Array (VLA) bistatic radar observations can image the whole disk of Mars with integration times on the order of ten min before pixel smearing occurs. Data from all these radar techniques can be useful for observing the local surface conditions relating to landing safety issues for Mars Pathfinder.

  14. A pilot ASKAP survey of radio transient events in the region around the intermittent pulsar PSR J1107-5907

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, G.; Heywood, I.; Bell, M. E.; Kerr, M.; Rowlinson, A.; Johnston, S.; Shannon, R. M.; Voronkov, M. A.; Ward, C.; Banyer, J.; Hancock, P. J.; Murphy, Tara; Allison, J. R.; Amy, S. W.; Ball, L.; Bannister, K.; Bock, D. C.-J.; Brodrick, D.; Brothers, M.; Brown, A. J.; Bunton, J. D.; Chapman, J.; Chippendale, A. P.; Chung, Y.; DeBoer, D.; Diamond, P.; Edwards, P. G.; Ekers, R.; Ferris, R. H.; Forsyth, R.; Gough, R.; Grancea, A.; Gupta, N.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Hay, S.; Hayman, D. B.; Hotan, A. W.; Hoyle, S.; Humphreys, B.; Indermuehle, B.; Jacka, C. E.; Jackson, C. A.; Jackson, S.; Jeganathan, K.; Joseph, J.; Kendall, R.; Kiraly, D.; Koribalski, B.; Leach, M.; Lenc, E.; MacLeod, A.; Mader, S.; Marquarding, M.; Marvil, J.; McClure-Griffiths, N.; McConnell, D.; Mirtschin, P.; Neuhold, S.; Ng, A.; Norris, R. P.; O'Sullivan, J.; Pearce, S.; Phillips, C. J.; Popping, A.; Qiao, R. Y.; Reynolds, J. E.; Roberts, P.; Sault, R. J.; Schinckel, A. E. T.; Serra, P.; Shaw, R.; Shimwell, T. W.; Storey, M.; Sweetnam, A. W.; Tzioumis, A.; Westmeier, T.; Whiting, M.; Wilson, C. D.

    2016-03-01

    We use observations from the Boolardy Engineering Test Array (BETA) of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) telescope to search for transient radio sources in the field around the intermittent pulsar PSR J1107-5907. The pulsar is thought to switch between an `off' state in which no emission is detectable, a weak state and a strong state. We ran three independent transient detection pipelines on two-minute snapshot images from a 13 h BETA observation in order to (1) study the emission from the pulsar, (2) search for other transient emission from elsewhere in the image and (3) to compare the results from the different transient detection pipelines. The pulsar was easily detected as a transient source and, over the course of the observations, it switched into the strong state three times giving a typical time-scale between the strong emission states of 3.7 h. After the first switch it remained in the strong state for almost 40 min. The other strong states lasted less than 4 min. The second state change was confirmed using observations with the Parkes radio telescope. No other transient events were found and we place constraints on the surface density of such events on these time-scales. The high sensitivity Parkes observations enabled us to detect individual bright pulses during the weak state and to study the strong state over a wide observing band. We conclude by showing that future transient surveys with ASKAP will have the potential to probe the intermittent pulsar population.

  15. Radio continuum surveys five years from now: EMU and the synergy with optical surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andernach, Heinz; Norris, R. P.; Hopkins, A.; Seymour, N.

    2012-10-01

    Several small-scale precursors of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), are being built in South Africa, Australia and elsewhere. We present the prospects of a radio continuum survey called Evolutionary Map of the Universe (EMU) to be performed with the Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) between 2014 and 2017. The development of Phased Array Feeds (PAFs) will allow EMU to have much higher survey speed than previous radio interferometers, such that EMU is expected to yield a catalog of 70 million radio sources stronger than 50 microJy at 1.4 GHz at 10" resolution covering all the sky with DEC<+30deg. The complementarity of the FIRST radio survey and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey for imaging and spectroscopy has proven extremely useful for the study of galaxy evolution. EMU will be about 20 times more sensitive than FIRST, and cover three times the sky area. In order that EMU achieve its goals, a large fraction of EMU sources will have to be identified optically, and planning for such optical/NIR imaging and spectroscopic surveys has already begun. Cross-IDs of EMU sources will be attempted from SDSS, WISE, VISTA-VHS, SkyMapper, and ultimately using PanSTARRS and LSST data. While at the lower fluxes EMU will mainly detect 'normal' star-forming galaxies, many of them within reach of optical imaging and spectroscopic surveys, it will still detect vast amounts of the rarer and more exotic radio galaxies at redshifts which require the deepest imaging surveys possible.

  16. DISSECTING PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT FOR ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS USING XMM- AND CHANDRA-COSMOS SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect

    Salvato, M.; Hasinger, G.; Ilbert, O.; Rau, A.; Brusa, M.; Bongiorno, A.; Civano, F.; Elvis, M.; Zamorani, G.; Vignali, C.; Comastri, A.; Bardelli, S.; Bolzonella, M.; Cappelluti, N.; Aussel, H.; Le Floc'h, E.; Mainieri, V.; Capak, P.; Caputi, K.; and others

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we release accurate photometric redshifts for 1692 counterparts to Chandra sources in the central square degree of the Cosmic Evolution Survey (COSMOS) field. The availability of a large training set of spectroscopic redshifts that extends to faint magnitudes enabled photometric redshifts comparable to the highest quality results presently available for normal galaxies. We demonstrate that morphologically extended, faint X-ray sources without optical variability are more accurately described by a library of normal galaxies (corrected for emission lines) than by active galactic nucleus (AGN) dominated templates, even if these sources have AGN-like X-ray luminosities. Preselecting the library on the bases of the source properties allowed us to reach an accuracy {sigma}{sub {Delta}z/(1+z{sub s{sub p{sub e{sub c)}}}}}{approx}0.015 with a fraction of outliers of 5.8% for the entire Chandra-COSMOS sample. In addition, we release revised photometric redshifts for the 1735 optical counterparts of the XMM-detected sources over the entire 2 deg{sup 2} of COSMOS. For 248 sources, our updated photometric redshift differs from the previous release by {Delta}z > 0.2. These changes are predominantly due to the inclusion of newly available deep H-band photometry (H{sub AB} = 24 mag). We illustrate once again the importance of a spectroscopic training sample and how an assumption about the nature of a source together, with the number and the depth of the available bands, influences the accuracy of the photometric redshifts determined for AGN. These considerations should be kept in mind when defining the observational strategies of upcoming large surveys targeting AGNs, such as eROSITA at X-ray energies and the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder Evolutionary Map of the Universe in the radio band.

  17. PERFORMANCE OF A NOVEL FAST TRANSIENTS DETECTION SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Clarke, Nathan

    2013-03-01

    We investigate the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of a new incoherent dedispersion algorithm optimized for FPGA-based architectures intended for deployment on the Australian SKA Pathfinder and other Square Kilometre Array precursors for fast transients surveys. Unlike conventional CPU- and GPU-optimized incoherent dedispersion algorithms, this algorithm has the freedom to maximize the S/N by way of programmable dispersion profiles that enable the inclusion of different numbers of time samples per spectral channel. This allows, for example, more samples to be summed at lower frequencies where intra-channel dispersion smearing is larger, or it could even be used to optimize the dedispersion sum for steep spectrum sources. Our analysis takes into account the intrinsic pulse width, scatter broadening, spectral index and dispersion measure of the signal, and the system's frequency range, spectral and temporal resolution, and number of trial dedispersions. We show that the system achieves better than 80% of the optimal S/N where the temporal resolution and the intra-channel smearing time are smaller than a quarter of the average width of the pulse across the system's frequency band (after including scatter smearing). Coarse temporal resolutions suffer a {Delta}t {sup -1/2} decay in S/N, and coarse spectral resolutions cause a {Delta}{nu}{sup -1/2} decay in S/N, where {Delta}t and {Delta}{nu} are the temporal and spectral resolutions of the system, respectively. We show how the system's S/N compares with that of matched filter and boxcar filter detectors. We further present a new algorithm for selecting trial dispersion measures for a survey that maintains a given minimum S/N performance across a range of dispersion measures.

  18. High-velocity OH megamasers in IRAS 20100-4156: Evidence for a Supermassive Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey-Smith, L.; Allison, J. R.; Green, J. A.; Bannister, K. W.; Chippendale, A.; Edwards, P. G.; Heywood, I.; Hotan, A. W.; Lenc, E.; Marvil, J.; McConnell, D.; Phillips, C. P.; Sault, R. J.; Serra, P.; Stevens, J.; Voronkov, M.; Whiting, M.

    2016-05-01

    We report the discovery of new, high-velocity narrow-line components of the OH megamaser in IRAS 20100-4156. Results from the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP)'s Boolardy Engineering Test Array (BETA) and the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) provide two independent measurements of the OH megamaser spectrum. We found evidence for OH megamaser clumps at -409 and -562 km s-1 (blue-shifted) from the systemic velocity of the galaxy, in addition to the lines previously known. The presence of such high velocities in the molecular emission from IRAS 20100-4156 could be explained by a ˜50 pc molecular ring enclosing a ˜3.8 billion solar mass black hole. We also discuss two alternatives, i.e. that the narrow-line masers are dynamically coupled to the wind driven by the active galactic nucleus or they are associated with two separate galactic nuclei. The comparison between the BETA and ATCA spectra provides another scientific verification of ASKAP's BETA. Our data, combined with previous measurements of the source enabled us to study the variability of the source over a twenty-six year period. The flux density of the brightest OH maser components has reduced by more than a factor of two between 1988 and 2015, whereas a secondary narrow-line component has more than doubled in the same time. Plans for high-resolution VLBI follow-up of this source are discussed, as are prospects for discovering new OH megamasers during the ASKAP early science program.

  19. ASKAP H I imaging of the galaxy group IC 1459

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, P.; Koribalski, B.; Kilborn, V.; Allison, J. R.; Amy, S. W.; Ball, L.; Bannister, K.; Bell, M. E.; Bock, D. C.-J.; Bolton, R.; Bowen, M.; Boyle, B.; Broadhurst, S.; Brodrick, D.; Brothers, M.; Bunton, J. D.; Chapman, J.; Cheng, W.; Chippendale, A. P.; Chung, Y.; Cooray, F.; Cornwell, T.; DeBoer, D.; Diamond, P.; Forsyth, R.; Gough, R.; Gupta, N.; Hampson, G. A.; Harvey-Smith, L.; Hay, S.; Hayman, D. B.; Heywood, I.; Hotan, A. W.; Hoyle, S.; Humphreys, B.; Indermuehle, B.; Jacka, C.; Jackson, C. A.; Jackson, S.; Jeganathan, K.; Johnston, S.; Joseph, J.; Kamphuis, P.; Leach, M.; Lenc, E.; Lensson, E.; Mackay, S.; Marquarding, M.; Marvil, J.; McClure-Griffiths, N.; McConnell, D.; Meyer, M.; Mirtschin, P.; Neuhold, S.; Ng, A.; Norris, R. P.; O'Sullivan, J.; Pathikulangara, J.; Pearce, S.; Phillips, C.; Popping, A.; Qiao, R. Y.; Reynolds, J. E.; Roberts, P.; Sault, R. J.; Schinckel, A. E. T.; Shaw, R.; Shimwell, T. W.; Staveley-Smith, L.; Storey, M.; Sweetnam, A. W.; Troup, E.; Tzioumis, A.; Voronkov, M. A.; Westmeier, T.; Whiting, M.; Wilson, C.; Wong, O. I.; Wu, X.

    2015-09-01

    We present H I imaging of the galaxy group IC 1459 carried out with six antennas of the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder equipped with phased-array feeds. We detect and resolve H I in 11 galaxies down to a column density of ˜1020 cm-2 inside a ˜6 deg2 field and with a resolution of ˜1 arcmin on the sky and ˜8 km s-1 in velocity. We present H I images, velocity fields and integrated spectra of all detections, and highlight the discovery of three H I clouds - two in the proximity of the galaxy IC 5270 and one close to NGC 7418. Each cloud has an H I mass of ˜109 M⊙ and accounts for ˜15 per cent of the H I associated with its host galaxy. Available images at ultraviolet, optical and infrared wavelengths do not reveal any clear stellar counterpart of any of the clouds, suggesting that they are not gas-rich dwarf neighbours of IC 5270 and NGC 7418. Using Parkes data, we find evidence of additional extended, low-column-density H I emission around IC 5270, indicating that the clouds are the tip of the iceberg of a larger system of gas surrounding this galaxy. This result adds to the body of evidence on the presence of intragroup gas within the IC 1459 group. Altogether, the H I found outside galaxies in this group amounts to several times 109 M⊙, at least 10 per cent of the H I contained inside galaxies. This suggests a substantial flow of gas in and out of galaxies during the several billion years of the group's evolution.

  20. High-velocity OH megamasers in IRAS 20100-4156: evidence for a supermassive black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey-Smith, L.; Allison, J. R.; Green, J. A.; Bannister, K. W.; Chippendale, A.; Edwards, P. G.; Heywood, I.; Hotan, A. W.; Lenc, E.; Marvil, J.; McConnell, D.; Phillips, C. J.; Sault, R. J.; Serra, P.; Stevens, J.; Voronkov, M.; Whiting, M.

    2016-08-01

    We report the discovery of new, high-velocity narrow-line components of the OH megamaser in IRAS 20100-4156. Results from the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP)'s Boolardy Engineering Test Array (BETA) and the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) provide two independent measurements of the OH megamaser spectrum. We found evidence for OH megamaser clumps at -409 and -562 km s-1 (blue-shifted) from the systemic velocity of the galaxy, in addition to the lines previously known. The presence of such high velocities in the molecular emission from IRAS 20100-4156 could be explained by a ˜50 pc molecular ring enclosing a ˜3.8 billion solar mass black hole. We also discuss two alternatives, i.e. that the narrow-line masers are dynamically coupled to the wind driven by the active galactic nucleus or they are associated with two separate galactic nuclei. The comparison between the BETA and ATCA spectra provides another scientific verification of ASKAP's BETA. Our data, combined with previous measurements of the source enabled us to study the variability of the source over a 26 yr period. The flux density of the brightest OH maser components has reduced by more than a factor of 2 between 1988 and 2015, whereas a secondary narrow-line component has more than doubled in the same time. Plans for high-resolution very long baseline interferometry follow-up of this source are discussed, as are prospects for discovering new OH megamasers during the ASKAP early science programme.

  1. Drosophila multiplexin (Dmp) modulates motor axon pathfinding accuracy.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Frauke; Moussian, Bernard

    2009-06-01

    Multiplexins are multidomain collagens typically composed of an N-terminal thrombospondin-related domain, an interrupted triple helix and a C-terminal endostatin domain. They feature a clear regulatory function in the development of different tissues, which is chiefly conveyed by the endostatin domain. This domain can be found in proteolytically released monomeric and trimeric versions, and their diverse and opposed effects on the migratory behavior of epithelial and endothelial cell types have been demonstrated in cell culture experiments. The only Drosophila multiplexin displays specific features of both vertebrate multiplexins, collagens XV and XVIII. We characterized the Drosophila multiplexin (dmp) gene and found that three main isoforms are expressed from it, one of which is the monomeric endostatin version. Generation of dmp deletion alleles revealed that Dmp plays a role in motor axon pathfinding, as the mutants exhibit ventral bypass defects of the intersegmental nerve b (ISNb) similar to other motor axon guidance mutants. Transgenic overexpression of monomeric endostatin as well as of full-length Dmp, but not trimeric endostatin, were able to rescue these defects. In contrast, trimeric endostatin increased axon pathfinding accuracy in wild type background. We conclude that Dmp plays a modulating role in motor axon pathfinding and may be part of a buffering system that functions to avoid innervation errors. PMID:19469789

  2. LISA and LISA Pathfinder: Gravitational Wave Observation in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzman, Felipe

    2010-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a planned NASA-ESA gravitational wave observatory in the frequency range of 0.1 mHz--100 mHz. This observation band is inaccessible to ground-based detectors due to fluctuations in the Earth gravitational field. Gravitational wave sources for LISA include galactic binaries, mergers of supermassive black-hole binaries, extreme-mass-ratio inspirals, and cosmology backgrounds and bursts. LISA is a constellation of three spacecraft separated by 5 million km in an equilateral triangle, whose center follows the Earth in a heliocentric orbit with an orbital phase offset of 20 degrees. Challenging technology is required to ensure pure geodetic trajectories of the six onboard test masses, whose distance fluctuations will be measured by interspacecraft laser interferometers with picometer accuracy. LISA Pathfinder is an ESA-launched technology demonstration mission of key LISA subsystems such as spacecraft control with micronewton thrusters, test mass drag-free control, and precision laser interferometry between free-flying test masses. Ground testing of hardware of the Gravitational Reference Sensor and Optical Metrology subsystems of LISA Pathfinder is currently ongoing. A detailed description of the two missions and an overview of current investigations conducted by the community will be discussed. The current status in development and implementation of LISA Pathfinder pre-flight systems and latest results of the ongoing ground testing efforts will also be presented.

  3. Latest Results from the Mars Pathfinder Atmospheric Structure Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magalhaes, J. A.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder Atmospheric Structure Investigation (ASI) obtained information on Martian atmospheric structure from three science accelerometers, which measured the deceleration of the probe at all levels in the atmosphere. Entry, descent, and landing occurred within 850 km of the Viking 1 landing site and somewhat later in northern summer. Pathfinder entered at 3 AME Local Mars Time (LMT), which provided the first opportunity to study Mars' nighttime atmospheric structure, and Viking 1 entered at 4:15 PME LMT. Magalhaes et al and Schofield et al have previously reported on the analysis of accelerometer measurements from the entry phase, which ended at about 8.5 km. The derived temperature profile extends from 140 km altitude down to 8.9 km, with a vertical resolution ranging from 250 meters to 50 meters, respectively. Here we report on a refined analysis of the Pathfinder entry phase ASIE data in which the effects of the small angular motions of the entry vehicle have been removed, thus enabling a search for small amplitude and small vertical wavelength structures. In addition, we will report on the atmospheric structure at altitudes below 8 km which is being derived from the accelerometer data acquired during the parachute descent phase. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  4. Matrix interactions modulate neurotrophin-mediated neurite outgrowth and pathfinding

    PubMed Central

    Madl, Christopher M.; Heilshorn, Sarah C.

    2015-01-01

    Both matrix biochemistry and neurotrophic factors are known to modulate neurite outgrowth and pathfinding; however, the interplay between these two factors is less studied. While previous work has shown that the biochemical identity of the matrix can alter the outgrowth of neurites in response to neurotrophins, the importance of the concentration of cell-adhesive ligands is unknown. Using engineered elastin-like protein matrices, we recently demonstrated a synergistic effect between matrix-bound cell-adhesive ligand density and soluble nerve growth factor treatment on neurite outgrowth from dorsal root ganglia. This synergism was mediated by Schwann cell-neurite contact through L1CAM. Cell-adhesive ligand density was also shown to alter the pathfinding behavior of dorsal root ganglion neurites in response to a gradient of nerve growth factor. While more cell-adhesive matrices promoted neurite outgrowth, less cell-adhesive matrices promoted more faithful neurite pathfinding. These studies emphasize the importance of considering both matrix biochemistry and neurotrophic factors when designing biomaterials for peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:26170800

  5. True Color of Mars - Pathfinder Sol 10 at noon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The true color of Mars based upon three filters with the sky set to aluminance of 60. The color of the Pathfinder landing site is yellowish brown with only subtle variations. These colors are identical to the measured colors of the Viking landing sites reported by Huck et al. [1977]. This image was taken near local noon on Sol 10. A description of the techniques used to generate this color image from IMP data can be found in Maki et al., 1999. Note: a calibrated output device is required accurately reproduce the correct colors.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The IMP was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  6. Characterization of the LISA Pathfinder Drag Reduction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slutsky, Jacob; LISA Pathfinder Team

    2015-04-01

    The LISA Pathfinder mission will be launched this year by ESA, and so it is urgent to simulate and characterize key experiments to optimize and validate the Gravitational Reference Sensor (GRS) performance. Success of this technology directly applies to any future LISA-like mission. Pathfinder is comprised of both European and NASA payloads, the LISA Technology Package (LTP) and Space Technology 7 (ST-7), respectively. ST-7 includes a Colloid Micro-Newton Thruster (CMNT) system, to maneuver the spacecraft with low noise, and a control system for spacecraft and test mass actuation. European partners have developed the LTP Data Analysis (LTPDA) Matlab suite, including state-space simulations of the full mission to create mock data, analysis pipelines constructed to reduce this and eventual actual data. We have adapted this infrastructure to reflect CMNT physics and control design where they differ from LTP. We analyze the residual GRS acceleration noise, paying particular attention to ST-7 specific CMNT noise characterization experiments and the performance differentials between using the inertial and interferometric sensing systems of Pathfinder in and out of loop. I will discuss our current results analyzing simulated ST-7 experimental runs and our future plans.

  7. Pathfinder-Plus on a flight over Hawaiian island N'ihau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Pathfinder-Plus on a flight over the Hawaiian island of N'ihau in 1998. Pathfinder was a remotely controlled, solar-powered flying wing, designed and built as a proof-of-concept vehicle for a much larger aircraft capable of flying at extremely high altitudes for weeks at a time. It was built by AeroVironment, Inc., a California company that developed the human-powered Gossamer Condor and Gossamer Albatross lightweight aircraft during the 1970s, and later made the solar-electric powered Gossamer Penguin and Solar Challenger. The basic configuration and concepts for Pathfinder were first realized with the HALSOL (High Altitude Solar) aircraft, built in 1983 by AeroVironment and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Pathfinder was constructed of advanced composites, plastics, and foam, and despite a wingspan of nearly 100 feet, it weighed only about 600 pounds. Pathfinder was one of several unpiloted prototypes under study by NASA's ERAST (Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology) program, a NASA-industry alliance which is helping develop advanced technologies that will enable aircraft to study the earth's environment during extremely long flights at altitudes in excess of 100,000 feet. (See project description below for Pathfinder's conversion to Pathfinder Plus.) In 1998, the Pathfinder solar-powered flying wing (see its photographs and project description) was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration and on Aug. 6, 1998, Pathfinder Plus set an altitude record (for propeller-driven aircraft) of approximately 80,285 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. The goal of the Pathfinder Plus flights was to validate new solar, aerodynamic, propulsion, and systems technology developed for its successor, the Centurion, which was designed to reach and sustain altitudes in the 100,000-foot range. The Centurion was succeeded by the Helios Prototype with a goal of reaching and sustaining flight at an altitude of 100,000 feet and flying non

  8. Pathfinder-Plus on flight over Hawaiian island N'ihau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Pathfinder-Plus on a flight over the Hawaiian island of N'ihau in 1998. Pathfinder was a remotely controlled, solar-powered flying wing, designed and built as a proof-of-concept vehicle for a much larger aircraft capable of flying at extremely high altitudes for weeks at a time. It was built by AeroVironment, Inc., a California company that developed the human-powered Gossamer Condor and Gossamer Albatross lightweight aircraft during the 1970s, and later made the solar-electric powered Gossamer Penguin and Solar Challenger. The basic configuration and concepts for Pathfinder were first realized with the HALSOL (High Altitude Solar) aircraft, built in 1983 by AeroVironment and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Pathfinder was constructed of advanced composites, plastics, and foam, and despite a wingspan of nearly 100 feet, it weighed only about 600 pounds. Pathfinder was one of several unpiloted prototypes under study by NASA's ERAST (Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology) program, a NASA-industry alliance which is helping develop advanced technologies that will enable aircraft to study the earth's environment during extremely long flights at altitudes in excess of 100,000 feet. (See project description below for Pathfinder's conversion to Pathfinder Plus.) In 1998, the Pathfinder solar-powered flying wing (see its photographs and project description) was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration and on Aug. 6, 1998, Pathfinder Plus set an altitude record (for propeller-driven aircraft) of approximately 80,285 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. The goal of the Pathfinder Plus flights was to validate new solar, aerodynamic, propulsion, and systems technology developed for its successor, the Centurion, which was designed to reach and sustain altitudes in the 100,000-foot range. The Centurion was succeeded by the Helios Prototype with a goal of reaching and sustaining flight at an altitude of 100,000 feet and flying non

  9. Pathfinder-Plus on flight near Hawaiian island N'ihau

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Pathfinder-Plus on a flight with the Hawaiian island of N'ihau in the background. Pathfinder was a remotely controlled, solar-powered flying wing, designed and built as a proof-of-concept vehicle for a much larger aircraft capable of flying at extremely high altitudes for weeks at a time. It was built by AeroVironment, Inc., a California company that developed the human-powered Gossamer Condor and Gossamer Albatross lightweight aircraft during the 1970s, and later made the solar-electric powered Gossamer Penguin and Solar Challenger. The basic configuration and concepts for Pathfinder were first realized with the HALSOL (High Altitude Solar) aircraft, built in 1983 by AeroVironment and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Pathfinder was constructed of advanced composites, plastics, and foam, and despite a wingspan of nearly 100 feet, it weighed only about 600 pounds. Pathfinder was one of several unpiloted prototypes under study by NASA's ERAST (Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology) program, a NASA-industry alliance which is helping develop advanced technologies that will enable aircraft to study the earth's environment during extremely long flights at altitudes in excess of 100,000 feet. (See project description below for Pathfinder's conversion to Pathfinder Plus.) In 1998, the Pathfinder solar-powered flying wing (see its photographs and project description) was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration and on Aug. 6, 1998, Pathfinder Plus set an altitude record (for propeller-driven aircraft) of approximately 80,285 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. The goal of the Pathfinder Plus flights was to validate new solar, aerodynamic, propulsion, and systems technology developed for its successor, the Centurion, which was designed to reach and sustain altitudes in the 100,000-foot range. The Centurion was succeeded by the Helios Prototype with a goal of reaching and sustaining flight at an altitude of 100,000 feet and

  10. NASA Ocean Altimeter Pathfinder Project. Report 1; Data Processing Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koblinsky, C. J.; Beckley, Brian D.; Ray, Richard D.; Wang, Yan-Ming; Tsaoussi, Lucia; Brenner, Anita; Williamson, Ron

    1998-01-01

    The NOAA/NASA Pathfinder program was created by the Earth Observing System (EOS) Program Office to determine how satellite-based data sets can be processed and used to study global change. The data sets are designed to be long time-sedes data processed with stable calibration and community consensus algorithms to better assist the research community. The Ocean Altimeter Pathfinder Project involves the reprocessing of all altimeter observations with a consistent set of improved algorithms, based on the results from TOPEX/POSEIDON (T/P), into easy-to-use data sets for the oceanographic community for climate research. This report describes the processing schemes used to produce a consistent data set and two of the products derived f rom these data. Other reports have been produced that: a) describe the validation of these data sets against tide gauge measurements and b) evaluate the statistical properties of the data that are relevant to climate change. The use of satellite altimetry for earth observations was proposed in the early 1960s. The first successful space based radar altimeter experiment was flown on SkyLab in 1974. The first successful satellite radar altimeter was flown aboard the Geos-3 spacecraft between 1975 and 1978. While a useful data set was collected from this mission for geophysical studies, the noise in the radar measured and incomplete global coverage precluded ft from inclusion in the Ocean Altimeter Pathfinder program. This program initiated its analysis with the Seasat mission, which was the first satellite radar altimeter flown for oceanography.

  11. Neural pathfinding on uni- and multidirectional photopolymerized micropatterns.

    PubMed

    Tuft, Bradley W; Xu, Linjing; White, Scott P; Seline, Alison E; Erwood, Andrew M; Hansen, Marlan R; Guymon, C Allan

    2014-07-23

    Overcoming signal resolution barriers of neural prostheses, such as the commercially available cochlear impant (CI) or the developing retinal implant, will likely require spatial control of regenerative neural elements. To rationally design materials that direct nerve growth, it is first necessary to determine pathfinding behavior of de novo neurite growth from prosthesis-relevant cells such as spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) in the inner ear. Accordingly, in this work, repeating 90° turns were fabricated as multidirectional micropatterns to determine SGN neurite turning capability and pathfinding. Unidirectional micropatterns and unpatterned substrates are used as comparisons. Spiral ganglion Schwann cell alignment (SGSC) is also examined on each surface type. Micropatterns are fabricated using the spatial reaction control inherent to photopolymerization with photomasks that have either parallel line spacing gratings for unidirectional patterns or repeating 90° angle steps for multidirectional patterns. Feature depth is controlled by modulating UV exposure time by shuttering the light source at given time increments. Substrate topography is characterized by white light interferometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Both pattern types exhibit features that are 25 μm in width and 7.4 ± 0.7 μm in depth. SGN neurites orient randomly on unpatterned photopolymer controls, align and consistently track unidirectional patterns, and are substantially influenced by, but do not consistently track, multidirectional turning cues. Neurite lengths are 20% shorter on multidirectional substrates compared to unidirectional patterns while neurite branching and microfeature crossing events are significantly higher. For both pattern types, the majority of the neurite length is located in depressed surface features. Developing methods to understand neural pathfinding and to guide de novo neurite growth to specific stimulatory elements will enable design of innovative

  12. Laser Interferometry for Gravitational Wave Observation: LISA and LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzman, Felipe

    2010-01-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) is a planned NASA-ESA gravitational wave observatory in the frequency range of 0.1mHz-100mHz. This observation band is inaccessible to ground-based detectors due to the large ground motions of the Earth. Gravitational wave sources for LISA include galactic binaries, mergers of supermasive black-hole binaries, extreme-mass-ratio inspirals, and possibly from as yet unimagined sources. LISA is a constellation of three spacecraft separated by 5 million km in an equilateral triangle, whose center follows the Earth in a heliocentric orbit with an orbital phase offset oF 20 degrees. Challenging technology is required to ensure pure geodetic trajectories of the six onboard test masses, whose distance fluctuations will be measured by interspacecraft laser interferometers with picometer accuracy. LISA Pathfinder is an ESA-launched technology demonstration mission of key LISA subsystems such us spacecraft control with micro-newton thrusters, test mass drag-free control, and precision laser interferometry between free-flying test masses. Ground testing of flight hardware of the Gravitational Reference Sensor and Optical Metrology subsystems of LISA Pathfinder is currently ongoing. An introduction to laser interferometric gravitational wave detection, ground-based observatories, and a detailed description of the two missions together with an overview of current investigations conducted by the community will bc discussed. The current status in development and implementation of LISA Pathfinder pre-flight systems and latest results of the ongoing ground testing efforts will also be presented

  13. The Data Processor of the JEM-EUSO pathfinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotti, V.; Osteria, G.

    2014-06-01

    JEM-EUSO is a wide-angle refractive UV telescope being proposed for attachment to the Japanese Experiment Module on ISS. The main goal of the mission is to study Extreme Energy Cosmic Rays. Two pathfinder mission are now in progress: EUSO-TA and EUSO-Balloon. The EUSO-TA project foresees the installation of a telescope prototype in the Telescope Array site. The aim of this project is to calibrate the telescope with the TA fluorescence detector. An initial run of one year starting from 2013 is foreseen. EUSO-Balloon is a pathfinder mission in which a prototype telescope will be mounted on a stratospheric balloon. The main aim of this mission is to perform a end-to-end test of all the key technologies and instrumentation of JEM-EUSO detectors and to prove the global detection chain. EUSO-Balloon will measure the UV background fundamental for the development of the simulations. EUSO-Balloon has the potential to detect Extensive Air Showers from above, paving the way for any future space-based EECR observatory. We will present the Data Processor of the pathfinders. The DP is the component of the Electronics System which performs data management and instrument control. The DP controls front-end electronics, performs 2nd level trigger filtering, tags events with arrival time and payload position through a GPS system, manages mass memory for data storage, measures live and dead time of the telescope, provides signals for time synchronization of the event, performs housekeeping monitor and handles interface to the telemetry system. We will describe the main components of the DP, the state-of-the-art and the results of the tests carried out.

  14. Neural Pathfinding on Uni- and Multidirectional Photopolymerized Micropatterns

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Overcoming signal resolution barriers of neural prostheses, such as the commercially available cochlear impant (CI) or the developing retinal implant, will likely require spatial control of regenerative neural elements. To rationally design materials that direct nerve growth, it is first necessary to determine pathfinding behavior of de novo neurite growth from prosthesis-relevant cells such as spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) in the inner ear. Accordingly, in this work, repeating 90° turns were fabricated as multidirectional micropatterns to determine SGN neurite turning capability and pathfinding. Unidirectional micropatterns and unpatterned substrates are used as comparisons. Spiral ganglion Schwann cell alignment (SGSC) is also examined on each surface type. Micropatterns are fabricated using the spatial reaction control inherent to photopolymerization with photomasks that have either parallel line spacing gratings for unidirectional patterns or repeating 90° angle steps for multidirectional patterns. Feature depth is controlled by modulating UV exposure time by shuttering the light source at given time increments. Substrate topography is characterized by white light interferometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Both pattern types exhibit features that are 25 μm in width and 7.4 ± 0.7 μm in depth. SGN neurites orient randomly on unpatterned photopolymer controls, align and consistently track unidirectional patterns, and are substantially influenced by, but do not consistently track, multidirectional turning cues. Neurite lengths are 20% shorter on multidirectional substrates compared to unidirectional patterns while neurite branching and microfeature crossing events are significantly higher. For both pattern types, the majority of the neurite length is located in depressed surface features. Developing methods to understand neural pathfinding and to guide de novo neurite growth to specific stimulatory elements will enable design of innovative

  15. ER-20037 LLNL eternal pathfinder wing spar design study report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This document outlines the results of a design study performed by EDO-FSD on the LLNL Eternal Pathfinder Wing Spar/Fuel Tank. The main focus of the design study was the weight minimization of the composite wall of the mid span spar section of the aircraft. The torque, shear, moment and pressure loading requirements, as well as LLNL`s preliminary drawings, were used to develop a reduced weight mid-span spar design. The design study also encompassed details such as the pressure bulkheads, wing rod connectors, and attachment flanges.

  16. Symbolic PathFinder: Symbolic Execution of Java Bytecode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pasareanu, Corina S.; Rungta, Neha

    2010-01-01

    Symbolic Pathfinder (SPF) combines symbolic execution with model checking and constraint solving for automated test case generation and error detection in Java programs with unspecified inputs. In this tool, programs are executed on symbolic inputs representing multiple concrete inputs. Values of variables are represented as constraints generated from the analysis of Java bytecode. The constraints are solved using off-the shelf solvers to generate test inputs guaranteed to achieve complex coverage criteria. SPF has been used successfully at NASA, in academia, and in industry.

  17. Missile tracking and range safety: Tracking Interferometer Pathfinder System (TIPS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowgiallo, David J.; Rauen, Stephen; Peters, Wendy M.; Polisensky, Emil J.

    2013-05-01

    The tracking of missiles at close range proximity has been an ongoing challenge for many launch environments. The ability to provide accurate missile trajectory information is imperative for range safety and early termination of flight. In an effort to provide a potential solution to tracking issues that have plagued many traditional techniques, the Tracking Interferometer Pathfinder System (TIPS) was developed at the Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. The paper herein describes the design, field test, and results of an interferometer deployed for missile tracking.

  18. Rock and Soil Types at Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Type areas of rocks and soils. (A) Dark rock type and bright soil type: Shown is the dark rock Barnacle Bill. Reflectance spectra typical of fresh basalt and APXS spectra indicating more silica-rich basaltic andesite compositions characterize this type. These rocks are typically the small boulders and intermediate-sized cobbles at the Pathfinder site. The bright soil type is very common and in this case comprises Barnacle Bill's wind tail and much of the surround soil area. This soil has a high reflectance and a strongly reddened spectrum indicative of oxidized ferric minerals. (B) Bright rock type: Shown is the bright rock Wedge. Reflectance spectra typical of weathered basalt and APXS spectra indicating basaltic compositions characterize this type. These rocks are typically larger than 1 meter in diameter and many display morphologies indicating flood deposition. (C) Pink rock type: Shown is the pink rock Scooby Doo. APXS and reflectance spectra indicate a composition and optical characteristics similar to the drift soil. However, the morphology of the pink rock type indicates a cemented or rocklike structure. This material may be a chemically cemented hardpan that underlies much of the Pathfinder site. (D) Dark soil type: The dark soil type is typically found on the windward sides of rocks or in rock-free areas like Photometry Flats (shown here) where the bright soil has been striped away by aeolian action or in open areas. Other locations include the Mermaid Dune. (E) Disturbed soil type: The darkening of disturbed soil relative to its parent material, bright soil, as a result of changes in soil texture and compaction caused by movement of the rover and retraction of the lander airbag. (F) Lamb-like soil type: This soil type shows reflectance and spectral characteristics intermediate between the bright and dark soils. Its distinguishing feature is a weak spectral absorption near 900 nanometers not seen in either the bright or dark soils.

    NOTE: original

  19. Reduction and Analysis of Meteorology Data from the Mars Pathfinder Lander

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, James R.; Bridger, Alison F. C.; Haberle, Robert M.

    1998-01-01

    Dr. James Murphy is a member of the Mars Pathfinder Atmospheric Structure Investigation Meteorology (ASI/MET) Science Team. The activities of Dr. Murphy, and his collaborators are summarized in this report, which reviews the activities in support of the analysis of the meteorology data from the Mars Pathfinder Lander.

  20. 77 FR 6554 - Zephyr Power Transmission, LLC; Pathfinder Power Transmission, LLC; Duke-American Transmission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-08

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Zephyr Power Transmission, LLC; Pathfinder Power Transmission, LLC; Duke-American Transmission Company, LLC; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order Take notice that on January 30... (Commission), 18 CFR 381.302, Zephyr Power Transmission, LLC (Zephyr), Pathfinder Power Transmission, LLC...

  1. Processing TOVS Polar Pathfinder data using the distributed batch controller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duff, James; Salem, Kenneth M.; Schweiger, Axel; Livny, Miron

    1997-09-01

    The distributed batch controller (DBC) supports scientific batch data processing. Batch jobs are distributed by the DBC over a collection of computing resources. Since these resources may be widely scattered the DBC is well suited for collaborative research efforts whose resources may not be centrally located. The DBC provides its users with centralized monitoring and control of distributed batch jobs. Version 1 of the DBC is currently being used by the TOVS Polar Pathfinder project to generate Arctic atmospheric temperature and humidity profiles. Profile generating jobs are distributed and executed by the DBC on workstation clusters located at several sites across the US. This paper describes the data processing requirements of the TOVS Polar Pathfinder project, and how the DBC is being used to meet them. It also describes Version 2 of the DBC. DBC V2 is implemented in Java, and utilizes a number of advanced Java features such as threads and remote method invocation. It incorporates a number of functional enhancements. These include a flexible mechanism supporting interoperation of the DBC with a wider variety of execution resources and an improved user interface.

  2. Sedimentary Geochemistry of Martian Samples from the Pathfinder Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McLennan, Scott M.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this research project was to evaluate the APXS data collected on soils and rocks at the Pathfinder site in terms of sedimentary geochemistry. Below are described the major findings of this research: (1) An influential model to explain the chemical variation among Pathfinder soils and rocks is a two component mixing model where rocks of fairly uniform composition mix with soil of uniform composition; (2) The very strong positive correlation between MgO and SO, points to a control by a MgSO4 mineral however, spectroscopic data continue to suggest that Fe-sulfates, notably schwertmannite and jarosite, may be important components; (3) In an attempt to better understand the causes of complexities in mixing relationships, the possible influence of sedimentary transport has been evaluated; (4) Another aspect of this research has been to examine the possibility of sedimentary silica being a significant phase on Mars; and (5) On Earth, the geochemistry of sedimentary rocks has been used to constrain the chemical composition of the continental crust and an important part of this research was to evaluate this approach for Mars.

  3. NASA Ocean Altimeter Pathfinder Project. Report 2; Data Set Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koblinsky, C. J.; Ray, Richard D.; Beckley, Brian D.; Bremmer, Anita; Tsaoussi, Lucia S.; Wang, Yan-Ming

    1999-01-01

    The NOAA/NASA Pathfinder program was created by the Earth Observing System (EOS) Program Office to determine how existing satellite-based data sets can be processed and used to study global change. The data sets are designed to be long time-series data processed with stable calibration and community consensus algorithms to better assist the research community. The Ocean Altimeter Pathfinder Project involves the reprocessing of all altimeter observations with a consistent set of improved algorithms, based on the results from TOPEX/POSEIDON (T/P), into easy-to-use data sets for the oceanographic community for climate research. Details are currently presented in two technical reports: Report# 1: Data Processing Handbook Report #2: Data Set Validation This report describes the validation of the data sets against a global network of high quality tide gauge measurements and provides an estimate of the error budget. The first report describes the processing schemes used to produce the geodetic consistent data set comprised of SEASAT, GEOSAT, ERS-1, TOPEX/ POSEIDON, and ERS-2 satellite observations.

  4. True Color of Mars - Pathfinder Sol 24 at 4 PM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The brownish gray sky as it would be seen by an observer on Mars in this four-frame, true color mosaic taken on sol 24 (at approximately 1610 LST). The twin peaks can be seen on the horizon. The sky near the sun is a pale blue color. Azimuth extent is 60o and elevation extent is approximately 12odegrees. A description of the techniques used to generate this color image from IMP data can be found in Maki et al., 1999 (see full reference in Image Note). Note: a calibrated output device is required accurately reproduce the correct colors.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is an operating division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The IMP was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal investigator.

  5. Mars Pathfinder and Mars Global Surveyor Outreach Compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This videotape is a compilation of the best NASA JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory) videos of the Mars Pathfinder and Mars Global Surveyor missions. The mission is described using animation and narration as well as some actual footage of the entire sequence of mission events. Included within these animations are the spacecraft orbit insertion; descent to the Mars surface; deployment of the airbags and instruments; and exploration by Sojourner, the Mars rover. JPL activities at spacecraft control during significant mission events are also included at the end. The spacecraft cameras pan the surrounding Mars terrain and film Sojourner traversing the surface and inspecting rocks. A single, brief, processed image of the Cydonia region (Mars face) at an oblique angle from the Mars Global Surveyor is presented. A description of the Mars Pathfinder mission, instruments, landing and deployment process, Mars approach, spacecraft orbit insertion, rover operation are all described using computer animation. Actual color footage of Sojourner as well as a 360 deg pan of the Mars terrain surrounding the spacecraft is provided. Lower quality black and white photography depicting Sojourner traversing the Mars surface and inspecting Martian rocks also is included.

  6. Exploring MEDLINE Space with Random Indexing and Pathfinder Networks

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Trevor

    2008-01-01

    The integration of disparate research domains is a prerequisite for the success of the translational science initiative. MEDLINE abstracts contain content from a broad range of disciplines, presenting an opportunity for the development of methods able to integrate the knowledge they contain. Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA) and related methods learn human-like associations between terms from unannotated text. However, their computational and memory demands limits their ability to address a corpus of this size. Furthermore, visualization methods previously used in conjunction with LSA have limited ability to define the local structure of the associative networks LSA learns. This paper explores these issues by (1) processing the entire MEDLINE corpus using Random Indexing, a variant of LSA, and (2) exploring learned associations using Pathfinder Networks. Meaningful associations are inferred from MEDLINE, including a drug-disease association undetected by PUBMED search. PMID:18999236

  7. Aeolin Features and Processes at the Mars Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Kraft, Michael; Sullivan, Robert; Wilson, Gregory; Bridges, Nathan; Herkenhoff, Ken; Kuzmin, Ruslan; Malin, Michael; Ward, Wes

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder landing site contains abundant features attributed to aeolian, or wind, processes. These include wind tails, drift deposits, duneforms of various types, ripplelike features, and ventifacts (the first clearly seen on Mars). Many of these features are consistant with formation involving sand-size particles. Although some features, such as dunes, could develop from saltating sand-size aggregates of finer grains, the discovery of ventifact flutes cut in rocks strongly suggests that at least some of the grains are crystalline, rather than aggregates. Excluding the ventifacts, the orientations of the wind-related features correlate well with the orientations of bright wind steaks seen on Viking Orbiter images in the general area. They also correlate with wind direction predictions from the NASA-Ames General Circulation Model (GCM) which show that the strongest winds in the area occur in the northern hemisphere winter and are directed toward 209 degrees.

  8. The first mock data challenge for LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsky, A.; Hewitson, M.; Ferraioli, L.; Wanner, G.; Nofrarias, M.; Hueller, M.; Diepholz, I.; Grynagier, A.; Armano, M.; Benedetti, M.; Bogenstahl, J.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Bosetti, P.; Brandt, N.; Cavalleri, A.; Ciani, G.; Cristofolini, I.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; Dolesi, R.; Fauste, J.; Fertin, D.; Fichter, W.; García, A.; García, C.; Guzmán, F.; Fitzsimons, E.; Heinzel, G.; Hollington, D.; Hough, J.; Hoyland, D.; Jennrich, O.; Johlander, B.; Killow, C.; Lobo, A.; Mance, D.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P. W.; Nicolini, D.; Nicolodi, D.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Plagnol, E.; Racca, G. D.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Robertson, D.; Sanjuan, J.; Schulte, M. O.; Shaul, D. N. A.; Smit, M.; Stagnaro, L.; Steier, F.; Sumner, T. J.; Tateo, N.; Tombolato, D.; Vischer, G.; Vitale, S.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Weber, W. J.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2009-05-01

    The data analysis of the LISA Technology Package (LTP) will comprise a series of discrete experiments, each focusing on a particular noise measurement or characterization of the instrument in various operating modes. Each of these experiments must be analysed and planned in advance of the mission because the results of a given experiment will have an impact on those that follow. As such, a series of mock data challenges (MDCs) will be developed and carried out with the aim of preparing the analysis tools and optimizing the various planned analyses. The first of these MDCs (MDC1) is a simplified treatment of the dynamics along the axis joining the two test masses onboard LISA Pathfinder. The validation of the dynamical model by predicting the spectra of the interferometer output data is shown, a prediction for the data analysis is calculated and, finally, several simulated interferometer data sets are analysed and calibrated to equivalent out-of-loop test mass acceleration.

  9. Wheel Abrasion Experiment Metals Selection for Mars Pathfinder Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepp, Aloysius F.; Fatemi, Navid S.; Wilt, David M.; Ferguson, Dale C.; Hoffman, Richard; Hill, Maria M.; Kaloyeros, Alain E.

    1996-01-01

    A series of metals was examined for suitability for the Wheel Abrasion Experiment, one of ten microrover experiments of the Mars Pathfinder Mission. The seven candidate metals were: Ag, Al, Au, Cu, Ni, Pt, and W. Thin films of candidate metals from 0.1 to 1.0 micrometer thick were deposited on black anodized aluminum coupons by e-beam and resistive evaporation and chemical vapor deposition. Optical, corrosion, abrasion, and adhesion criteria were used to select Al, Ni, and Pt. A description is given of the deposition and testing of thin films, followed by a presentation of experimental data and a brief discussion of follow-on testing and flight qualification.

  10. Prediction and Validation of Mars Pathfinder Hypersonic Aerodynamic Data Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Braun, Robert D.; Weilmuenster, K. James; Mitcheltree, Robert A.; Engelund, Walter C.; Powell, Richard W.

    1998-01-01

    Postflight analysis of the Mars Pathfinder hypersonic, continuum aerodynamic data base is presented. Measured data include accelerations along the body axis and axis normal directions. Comparisons of preflight simulation and measurements show good agreement. The prediction of two static instabilities associated with movement of the sonic line from the shoulder to the nose and back was confirmed by measured normal accelerations. Reconstruction of atmospheric density during entry has an uncertainty directly proportional to the uncertainty in the predicted axial coefficient. The sensitivity of the moment coefficient to freestream density, kinetic models and center-of-gravity location are examined to provide additional consistency checks of the simulation with flight data. The atmospheric density as derived from axial coefficient and measured axial accelerations falls within the range required for sonic line shift and static stability transition as independently determined from normal accelerations.

  11. Aeolian features and processes at the Mars Pathfinder landing site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greeley, Ronald; Kraft, Michael; Sullivan, Robert; Wilson, Gregory; Bridges, Nathan; Herkenhoff, Ken; Kuzmin, Ruslan O.; Malin, Michael; Ward, Wes

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder landing site contains abundant features attributed to aeolian, or wind, processes. These include wind tails, drift deposits, duneforms of various types, ripplelike features, and ventifacts (the first clearly seen on Mars). Many of these features are consistant with formation involving sand-size particles. Although some features, such as dunes, could develop from saltating sand-size aggregates of finer grains, the discovery of ventifact flutes cut in rocks strongly suggests that at least some of the grains are crystalline, rather than aggregates. Excluding the ventifacts, the orientations of the wind-related features correlate well with the orientations of bright wind steaks seen on Viking Orbiter images in the general area. They also correlate with wind direction predictions from the NASA-Ames General Circulation Model (GCM) which show that the strongest winds in the area occur in the northern hemisphere winter and are directed toward 209°. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Drill/borescope System for the Mars Polar Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paige, D. A.; Wood, S. E.; Vasavada, A. R.

    1993-01-01

    The primary goals of the Mars Polar Pathfinder (MPP) Discovery Mission are to characterize the composition and structure of Mars' north polar ice cap, and to determine whether a climate record may be preserved in layers of ice and dust. The MPP would land as close as possible to the geographic north pole of Mars and use a set of instruments similar to those used by glaciologists to study polar ice caps on Earth: a radar sounder, a drill/borescope system, and a thermal probe. The drill/borescope system will drill approximately 50 cm into the surface and image the sides of the hole at 10 micron resolution for compositional and stratigraphic analysis. Several uncertainties have guided the development of this instrument, and they are discussed.

  13. Cerberus Plains: A most excellent Pathfinder landing site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plescia, Jeff B.

    1994-01-01

    The Cerberus Plains in southeastern Elysium and western Amazonis cover greater than 10(exp 5) sq km, extending an east-west distance of approximately 3000 km and a north-south distance of up to 700 km near 195 deg. Crater numbers are 89 plus or minus 15 craters greater than 1 km/10(exp 6) sq km, indicating a stratigraphic age of Upper Amazonian and an absolute age of 200-500 Ma. The material forming the surface is referred to as the Cerberus Formation. The two ideas postulated about the unit's origin are fluvial and volcanic. Regardless of which interpretation is correct, the Cerberus Plains is an important candidate for a pathfinder landing site because it represents the youngest major geologic event (be it fluvial or volcanic) on Mars.

  14. Mars Pathfinder Near-Field Rock Distribution Re-Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haldemann, A. F. C.; Golombek, M. P.

    2003-01-01

    We have completed analysis of a new near-field rock count at the Mars Pathfinder landing site and determined that the previously published rock count suggesting 16% cumulative fractional area (CFA) covered by rocks is incorrect. The earlier value is not so much wrong (our new CFA is 20%), as right for the wrong reason: both the old and the new CFA's are consistent with remote sensing data, however the earlier determination incorrectly calculated rock coverage using apparent width rather than average diameter. Here we present details of the new rock database and the new statistics, as well as the importance of using rock average diameter for rock population statistics. The changes to the near-field data do not affect the far-field rock statistics.

  15. Bayesian statistics for the calibration of the LISA Pathfinder experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Binetruy, P.; Born, M.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Bursi, A.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesarini, A.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; Diepholz, I.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, L.; Gibert, F.; Giardini, D.; Giusteri, R.; Grimani, C.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Inchauspé, H.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Kaune, B.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C.; Lloro, I.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Mance, D.; Martin, V.; Martin-Porqueras, F.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P.; Mendes, J.; Mitchell, E.; Moroni, A.; Nofrarias, M.; Paczkowski, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Pivato, P.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ragnit, U.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Russano, G.; Sarra, P.; Schleicher, A.; Slutsky, J.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Sumner, T.; Texier, D.; Thorpe, J.; Trenkel, C.; Tu, H. B.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Wealthy, D.; Wen, S.; Weber, W.; Wittchen, A.; Zanoni, C.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2015-05-01

    The main goal of LISA Pathfinder (LPF) mission is to estimate the acceleration noise models of the overall LISA Technology Package (LTP) experiment on-board. This will be of crucial importance for the future space-based Gravitational-Wave (GW) detectors, like eLISA. Here, we present the Bayesian analysis framework to process the planned system identification experiments designed for that purpose. In particular, we focus on the analysis strategies to predict the accuracy of the parameters that describe the system in all degrees of freedom. The data sets were generated during the latest operational simulations organised by the data analysis team and this work is part of the LTPDA Matlab toolbox.

  16. Wake Flow About the Mars Pathfinder Entry Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitcheltree, R. A.; Gnoffo, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    A computational approach is used to describe the aerothermodynamics of the Mars Pathfinder vehicle entering the Mars atmosphere at the maximum heating and maximum deceleration points in its trajectory. Ablating and nonablating boundary conditions are developed which produce maximum recombination of CO2 on the surface. For the maximum heating trajectory point, an axisymmetric, nonablating calculation predicts a stagnation-point value for the convective heating of 115 W/cm(exp 2). Radiative heating estimates predict an additional 5-12 W/cm(exp 2) at the stagnation point. Peak convective heating on the afterbody occurs on the vehicle's flat stern with a value of 5.9% of the stagnation value. The forebody flow exhibits chemical nonequilibrium behavior, and the flow is frozen in the near wake. Including ablation injection on the forebody lowers the stagnation-point convective heating 18%.

  17. State Space Modelling and Data Analysis Exercises in LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nofrarias, M.; Antonucci, F.; Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Benedetti, M.; Binetruy, P.; Bogenstahl, J.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Congedo, G.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; De Marchi, F.; Diaz-Aguilo, M.; Diepholz, I.; Dixon, G.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Fauste, J.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fichter, W.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, L.; Gibert, F.; Giardini, D.; Grimani, C.; Grynagier, A.; Guzmán, F.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hoyland, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C.; Llamas, X.; Lloro, I.; Lobo, A.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Mance, D.; Martin, V.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P.; Mendes, J.; Mitchell, E.; Nicolodi, D.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Russano, G.; Schleicher, A.; Shaul, D.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Sumner, T. J.; Taylor, A.; Texier, D.; Trenkel, C.; Tu, H. B.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Wealthy, D.; Wen, S.; Weber, W.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2013-01-01

    LISA Pathfinder is a mission planned by the European Space Agency (ESA) to test the key technologies that will allow the detection of gravitational waves in space. The instrument on-board, the LISA Technology package, will undergo an exhaustive campaign of calibrations and noise characterisation campaigns in order to fully describe the noise model. Data analysis plays an important role in the mission and for that reason the data analysis team has been developing a toolbox which contains all the functionality required during operations. In this contribution we give an overview of recent activities, focusing on the improvements in the modelling of the instrument and in the data analysis campaigns performed both with real and simulated data.

  18. Acquiring multiple stars with the LINC-NIRVANA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Albert R.; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Baumeister, Harald; Bergomi, Maria; Bertram, Thomas; Berwein, Jürgen; Briegel, Florian; Farinato, Jacopo; Herbst, Tom; Hofferbert, Ralph; Kittmann, Frank; Kürster, Martin; Kopon, Derek; Marafatto, Luca; Norris, Mark; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Viotto, Valentina

    2014-08-01

    The LINC-NIRVANA Pathfinder1 (LN-PF), a ground-layer adaptive optics (AO) system recently commissioned at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT), is one of 4 sensors that provide AO corrected images to the full LINC-NIRVANA instrument. With first light having taken place on November 17, 2013,2, 3 the core goals for the LN-PF have been accomplished. In this report, we look forward to one of the LN-PF extended goals. In particular, we review the acquisition mechanism required to place each of several star probes on its corresponding star in the target asterism. For emerging AO systems in general, co-addition of light from multiple stars stands as one of several methods being pursued to boost sky coverage. With 12 probes patrolling a large field of view (an annulus 6-arcminutes in diameter), the LN-PF will provide a valuable testbed to verify this method.

  19. Mars Pathfinder and the exploration of southern Amazonis Planitia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, Nadine G.

    1994-01-01

    The southern region of Amazonis Planitia provides a variety of target terrains for a roving vehicle such as the Mars Pathfinder Mission. A landing site is proposed at 4 deg N latitude 162 deg W longitude. This area has a reference altitude of between 0 and -1 km and consists of relatively smooth Amazonian-aged deposits within the entire 100 x 200 km landing ellipse. The proposed landing site is within the Upper Member Medusae Fossae Formation deposits (Amu) and near the boundary with Middle Member Medusae Fossae Formation deposits (Amm) and Member 1 Arcadia Formation plains (Aa(sub 1)). Slightly further afield are 107-km-diameter Nicholson crater, its ejecta deposits, and knobby terrain of proposed Hesperian age (HNu). Depending on the exact landing site of the spacecraft and the traverse distance of the rover, these materials also may be sampled.

  20. Structural analyses of the JPL Mars Pathfinder impact

    SciTech Connect

    Gwinn, K.W.

    1994-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate that finite element analysis can be used in the design process for high performance fabric structures. These structures exhibit extreme geometric nonlinearity; specifically, the contact and interaction of fabric surfaces with the large deformation which necessarily results from membrane structures introduces great complexity to analyses of this type. All of these features are demonstrated here in the analysis of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) Mars Pathfinder impact onto Mars. This lander system uses airbags to envelope the lander experiment package, protecting it with large deformation upon contact. Results from the analysis show the stress in the fabric airbags, forces in the internal tendon support system, forces in the latches and hinges which allow the lander to deploy after impact, and deceleration of the lander components. All of these results provide the JPL engineers with design guidance for the success of this novel lander system.

  1. Soil-like deposits observed by Sojourner, the Pathfinder rover

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, Henry J.; Bickler, Donald B.; Crisp, Joy A.; Eisen, Howard J.; Gensler, Jeffrey A.; Haldemann, Albert F.C.; Matijevic, Jacob R.; Reid, Lisa K.; Pavlics, Ferenc

    1999-01-01

    Most of the soil-like materials at the Pathfinder landing site behave like moderately dense soils on Earth with friction angles near 34°-39° and are called cloddy deposits. Cloddy deposits appear to be poorly sorted with dust-sized to granule-sized mineral or rock grains; they may contain pebbles, small rock fragments, and clods. Thin deposits of porous, compressible drifts with friction angles near 26°-28° are also present. Drifts are fine grained. Cohesions of both types of deposits are small. There may be indurated soil-like deposits and/or coated or crusted rocks. Cloddy deposits may be fluvial sediments of the Ares-Tiu floods, but other origins, such as ejecta from nearby impact craters, should be considered. Drifts are probably dusts that settled from the Martian atmosphere. Remote-sensing signatures of the deposits inferred from rover observations are consistent with those observed from orbit and Earth.

  2. Preliminary Results from the Mars Pathfinder ASI/MET Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberle, R. M.; Schofield, J. T.; Crisp, D.; Barnes, J. R.; Magalhaes, J. A.; Murphy, J. R.; Seiff, A.; Wilson, G.; Larsen, S.; Young, Richard E. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder successfully landed in the Ares Vallis flood plain (19.3 N, 33.6 W) on July 4, 1997. The spacecraft carried a suite of instruments to record the structure of the atmosphere during the entry, descent, and landing as well as for monitoring meteorological phenomenon while on the surface. Collectively, these instruments are known as the ASI/MET experiment (Atmospheric Structure Investigation/Meteorology). In this paper we present preliminary results from the ASI/MET experiment. As of this writing, the spacecraft is healthy and continues to take daily meteorological measurements. We expect this will continue for almost one more earth year. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. Classification of Mars Pathfinder Rock Surfaces Using Quantitative Morphologic Indices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yingst, R. A.; Haldemann, A. F. C.; Lemmon, M. T.

    2003-01-01

    We have examined the morphology of rocks in two regions of the MPF landing site in terms of location, size and dimensions, sphericity sphericity and elongation, and have correlated this information with spectral data extracted from associated rock surfaces, with the goal of improving the likelihood of discerning between rock and rock surface types. We use four highly diverse Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) images centered on Mini-Matterhorn and the Rock Garden because they are suited to demonstrate the wide morphologic variation of rocks at the site. A sampling of rocks was chosen at these locations that represented a range of shapes, textures and spectral signatures. In this initial analysis we focused upon the largest rocks that are situated in such a way as to allow easy viewing of most of the faces.

  4. Dust devil vortices seen by the Mars Pathfinder camera

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metzger, S.M.; Carr, J.R.; Johnson, J. R.; Parker, T.J.; Lemmon, M.T.

    1999-01-01

    Discovery of dust devil vortices in Mars Pathfinder (MPF) images reveals a dust entrainment mechanism at work on Mars. Scattering of visible light by dust in the Martian atmosphere creates a pronounced haze, preventing conventional image processing from displaying dust plumes. Spectral differencing techniques have enhanced five localized dust plumes from the general haze in images acquired near midday, which we determine to be dust devils. Processing of 440 nm images highlights dust devils as distinct occultation features against the horizon. The dust devils are interpreted to be 14-79 m wide, 46-350 m tall, travel at 0.5-4.6 m/s, with dust loading of 7E-5 kg m-3, relative to the general haze of 9E-8 kg m-3, and total particulate transport of 2.2 - 700 kg. The vortices match predictions from terrestrial analog studies. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Quality Health Information on the Internet: Developing a Diabetes Pathfinder for the Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Cleveland, Ana D.; Philbrick, Jodi; Pan, Xuequn (Della); Yu, Xinyu; Chen, Jiangping; O'Neill, Marty; Smith, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    A Web-based bilingual diabetes information pathfinder was created to help the Chinese population access quality health information on the Internet as part of a collaborative outreach project in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. A survey was conducted to identify the demographics, Internet usage, health information needs, and preferences for training sessions of the Chinese population. Breast cancer, diabetes, and breast cancer were the top three diseases of interest. The process of developing the pathfinder is described from start to finish, and it can serve as a model for the development of others. Pathfinder training sessions were held. PMID:20526379

  6. MARS PATHFINDER SMALL ROVER MATED TO LANDER'S PETALS IN SAEF-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    In KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF- 2), Jet Propulsion Laboratory workers are mating the Mars Pathfinder small rover to one of the lander's three petals. When the lander touches down on the surface of Mars next year, the three petals of the lander -- closed for the six to seven month journey to the Red Planet -- will open like a flower to allow the rover to begin its quest to explore the Martian surface. The Mars Pathfinder is set for launch aboard a Delta II expendable launch vehicle on Dec. 2, the beginning of a 24-day launch period. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory is managing the Mars Pathfinder project for NASA.

  7. Quality Health Information on the Internet: Developing a Diabetes Pathfinder for the Chinese Population.

    PubMed

    Cleveland, Ana D; Philbrick, Jodi; Pan, Xuequn Della; Yu, Xinyu; Chen, Jiangping; O'Neill, Marty; Smith, Lisa

    2009-10-01

    A Web-based bilingual diabetes information pathfinder was created to help the Chinese population access quality health information on the Internet as part of a collaborative outreach project in the Dallas-Fort Worth area. A survey was conducted to identify the demographics, Internet usage, health information needs, and preferences for training sessions of the Chinese population. Breast cancer, diabetes, and breast cancer were the top three diseases of interest. The process of developing the pathfinder is described from start to finish, and it can serve as a model for the development of others. Pathfinder training sessions were held. PMID:20526379

  8. Techniques for identifying dust devils in mars pathfinder images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Metzger, S.M.; Carr, J.R.; Johnson, J. R.; Parker, T.J.; Lemmon, M.T.

    2000-01-01

    Image processing methods used to identify and enhance dust devil features imaged by IMP (Imager for Mars Pathfinder) are reviewed. Spectral differences, visible red minus visible blue, were used for initial dust devil searches, driven by the observation that Martian dust has high red and low blue reflectance. The Martian sky proved to be more heavily dust-laden than pre-Pathfinder predictions, based on analysis of images from the Hubble Space Telescope. As a result, these initial spectral difference methods failed to contrast dust devils with background dust haze. Imager artifacts (dust motes on the camera lens, flat-field effects caused by imperfections in the CCD, and projection onto a flat sensor plane by a convex lens) further impeded the ability to resolve subtle dust devil features. Consequently, reference images containing sky with a minimal horizon were first subtracted from each spectral filter image to remove camera artifacts and reduce the background dust haze signal. Once the sky-flat preprocessing step was completed, the red-minus-blue spectral difference scheme was attempted again. Dust devils then were successfully identified as bright plumes. False-color ratios using calibrated IMP images were found useful for visualizing dust plumes, verifying initial discoveries as vortex-like features. Enhancement of monochromatic (especially blue filter) images revealed dust devils as silhouettes against brighter background sky. Experiments with principal components transformation identified dust devils in raw, uncalibrated IMP images and further showed relative movement of dust devils across the Martian surface. A variety of methods therefore served qualitative and quantitative goals for dust plume identification and analysis in an environment where such features are obscure.

  9. Inflight magnetic characterization of the test masses onboard LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Aguiló, Marc; García-Berro, Enrique; Lobo, Alberto

    2012-02-01

    Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) Pathfinder is a science and technology demonstrator of the European Space Agency within the framework of its LISA mission, the latter aiming to be the first space-borne gravitational wave observatory. The payload of LISA Pathfinder is the so-called LISA Technology Package, which is designed to measure relative accelerations between two test masses in nominal free fall. The diagnostics subsystem consists of several modules, one of which is the magnetic diagnostics unit. Its main function is the assessment of the differential acceleration noise between the test masses due to magnetic effects. This subsystem is composed of two onboard coils intended to produce controlled magnetic fields at the location of the test masses. These magnetic fields couple with the remanent magnetic moment and susceptibility and produce forces and torques on the test masses. These, in turn, produce kinematic excursions of the test masses which are sensed by the onboard interferometer. We prove that adequately processing these excursions, the magnetic properties of the test masses can be estimated using classical multiparameter estimation techniques. Moreover, we show that special processing procedures to minimize the effect of the multichannel cross-talks are needed. Finally, we demonstrate that the quality of our estimates is frequency-dependent. We also suggest that using a multiple frequency experiment, the global estimate can be obtained in such a way that the results of the magnetic experiment are more reliable. Finally, using our procedure, we compute the contribution of the magnetic noise to the total proof-mass acceleration noise.

  10. Comparison of Imager for Mars Pathfinder spectra with remote observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herkenhoff, K. E.; Johnson, J. R.; Lemmon, M.; Smith, P. H.

    2001-11-01

    The range of colors and albedos of materials at the Pathfinder landing site is similar to that observed in Viking Orbiter and HST images of Mars, but precise comparisons are hampered by the effects of atmospheric scattering in these data sets and differences in the effective wavelengths of the images. Such comparisons will allow the spectral units observed at the Pathfinder landing site to be placed into a global geologic context, and the composition, physical properties, and origins of Martian surface units to be inferred. We report our progress toward achieving these objectives by calibrating, modeling, and analyzing IMP multispectral observations of various surface materials and comparing them to the color and albedo units observed by the Viking Orbiter cameras, the WF/PC2 on HST, and the MOC wide-angle cameras on MGS. New digital terrain models (DTMs) have been derived from IMP stereo data, and new multispectral image cubes of IMP panoramas have been assembled using improved ISIS radiometric calibration, geometric registration and mosaicking software. The latest version of the IMP calibration software yields significantly different relative reflectances in some cases, but in general changes are small. We have also calibrated and assembled a mosaic of Insurance Pan images, which were losslessly compressed and taken under different illumination/viewing conditions than Super Pan; these data will be useful in better constraining the photometric and atmospheric models that are critically important to this investigation. Software tools were developed that evaluate and apply the University of Arizona atmospheric radiative transfer model. Scene reflectivity (as seen from orbit, in an arbitrary geometry) was simulated, including both direct and diffuse components to allow shadow brightness to be predicted. Surface normals from the new DTM were used to simulate sky brightness as a function of direction and predict the scene appearance for a given surface reflectivity.

  11. The MARS pathfinder end-to-end information system: A pathfinder for the development of future NASA planetary missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, Richard A.; Kazz, Greg J.; Tai, Wallace S.

    1996-01-01

    The development of the Mars pathfinder is considered with emphasis on the End-to-End Information System (EEIS) development approach. The primary mission objective is to successfully develop and deliver a single flight system to the Martian surface, demonstrating entry, descent and landing. The EEIS is a set of functions distributed throughout the flight, ground and Mission Operation Systems (MOS) that inter-operate in order to control, collect, transport, process, store and analyze the uplink and downlink information flows of the mission. Coherence between the mission systems is achieved though the EEIS architecture. The key characteristics of the system are: a concurrent engineering approach for the development of flight, ground and mission operation systems; the fundamental EEIS architectural heuristics; a phased incremental EEIS development and test approach, and an EEIS design deploying flight, ground and MOS operability features, including integrated ground and flight based toolsets.

  12. LISA Pathfinder and the road to space-based detection of gravitational waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, James

    2016-04-01

    The LISA Pathfinder spacecraft was launched on Dec 3rd, 2015 and began science operations in March 2016. Led by the European Space Agency with contributions from a number of European national agencies, universities, and NASA, LISA Pathfinder will demonstrate several key technologies and measurement technqiues for future space-based gravitational wave observatories. A successful LISA Pathfinder will retire much of the technical risk for such missions, which are the only proposed instruments capable of observing gravitational waves in the milliHertz band, a source-rich region expected to include singals from merging extragalactic massive black holes, capture of stellar-mass compact objects by massive black holes, and millions of individual close compact binaries in the Milky Way. I will present an overview of the LISA Pathfinder mission, it's current status, and the plans for operations and data analysis.

  13. Finally Here - The launch of LISA Pathfinder and the road to detecting Gravitational Waves in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, James; LISA Pathfinder Team

    2016-01-01

    The LISA Pathfinder spacecraft was launched in late 2015 and will begin science operations in early 2016. Led by the European Space Agency with contributions from a number of European national agencies, universities, and NASA, LISA Pathfinder will demonstrate several key technologies and measurement technqiues for future space-based gravitational wave observatories. A successful LISA Pathfinder will retire much of the technical risk for such missions, which are the only proposed instruments capable of observing gravitational waves in the milliHertz band, a source-rich region expected to include singals from merging extragalactic massive black holes, capture of stellar-mass compact objects by massive black holes, and millions of individual close compact binaries in the Milky Way. I will present an overview of the LISA Pathfinder mission, it's current status, and the plans for operations and data analysis.

  14. Old Desert Varnish-like Coatings and Young Breccias at the Mars Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murchie, S.; Barnouin-Jha, O.; Barnouin-Jha, K.; Bishop, J.; Johnson, J.; McSween, H.; Morris, R.

    2004-01-01

    Many rocks at the Mars Pathfinder landing site exhibit evidence for desert varnish-like coatings that formed during an early, moist climate. Later eolian erosion partly stripped the coatings. Rocks excavated subsequently have shapes consistent with breccias or conglomerates.

  15. Gambling on the Protestants: the Pathfinder Fund and birth control in Peru, 1958-1965.

    PubMed

    López, L Necochea

    2014-01-01

    Among the agencies involved in population control activities in the mid-twentieth century, none scored as many early victories in Latin America as did the Pathfinder Fund, founded by Procter & Gamble scion Clarence Gamble. This article analyzes a style in the delivery of family planning assistance in the developing world through the work of the Pathfinder Fund in Peru, the organization's hub in South America, and shows how Pathfinder personnel collaborated with local Protestant institutions. Its Protestant allies helped Pathfinder set up and manage rapid interventions such as the production of pamphlets, the smuggling of contraceptives, and the enrollment of physicians as advocates of the use of intrauterine devices. Although these rapid interventions helped quickly disseminate information and certain technologies among a fortunate few, they also weakened legitimate state agencies, neglected the monitoring of the safety of the drugs supplied, and alienated allies with their high-handed boldness. PMID:24976165

  16. Processing and Analysis of Mars Pathfinder Science Data at JPL's Science Data Processing Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    LaVoie, S.; Green, W.; Runkle, A.; Alexander, D.; Andres, P.; DeJong, E.; Duxbury, E.; Freda, D.; Gorjian, Z.; Hall, J.; Hartman, F.; Levoe, S.; Lorre, J.; McAuley, J.; Suzuki, S.; Woncik, P.; Wright, J.

    1998-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder mission required new capabilities and adaptation of existing capabilities in order to support science analysis and flight operations requirements imposed by the in-situ nature of the mission.

  17. Old Desert Varnish-like Coatings and Young Breccias at the Mars Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murchie, S.; Barnouin-Jha, O.; Barnouin-Jha, K.; Bishop, J.; Johnson, J.; McSween, H.; Morris, R.

    2004-03-01

    Many rocks at the Mars Pathfinder landing site exhibit evidence for desert varnish-like coatings, partially stripped by eolian erosion. Rocks excavated subsequently to coating formation have shapes consistent with breccias or conglomerates.

  18. Motoneuron axon pathfinding errors in zebrafish: Differential effects related to concentration and timing of nicotine exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Menelaou, Evdokia; Paul, Latoya T.; Perera, Surangi N.; Svoboda, Kurt R.

    2015-04-01

    Nicotine exposure during embryonic stages of development can affect many neurodevelopmental processes. In the developing zebrafish, exposure to nicotine was reported to cause axonal pathfinding errors in the later born secondary motoneurons (SMNs). These alterations in SMN axon morphology coincided with muscle degeneration at high nicotine concentrations (15–30 μM). Previous work showed that the paralytic mutant zebrafish known as sofa potato exhibited nicotine-induced effects onto SMN axons at these high concentrations but in the absence of any muscle deficits, indicating that pathfinding errors could occur independent of muscle effects. In this study, we used varying concentrations of nicotine at different developmental windows of exposure to specifically isolate its effects onto subpopulations of motoneuron axons. We found that nicotine exposure can affect SMN axon morphology in a dose-dependent manner. At low concentrations of nicotine, SMN axons exhibited pathfinding errors, in the absence of any nicotine-induced muscle abnormalities. Moreover, the nicotine exposure paradigms used affected the 3 subpopulations of SMN axons differently, but the dorsal projecting SMN axons were primarily affected. We then identified morphologically distinct pathfinding errors that best described the nicotine-induced effects on dorsal projecting SMN axons. To test whether SMN pathfinding was potentially influenced by alterations in the early born primary motoneuron (PMN), we performed dual labeling studies, where both PMN and SMN axons were simultaneously labeled with antibodies. We show that only a subset of the SMN axon pathfinding errors coincided with abnormal PMN axonal targeting in nicotine-exposed zebrafish. We conclude that nicotine exposure can exert differential effects depending on the levels of nicotine and developmental exposure window. - Highlights: • Embryonic nicotine exposure can specifically affect secondary motoneuron axons in a dose-dependent manner.

  19. A stamp commemorating NASA's Mars Pathfinder mission is unveiled at KSC's Visitor Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Nancy Warren, supervisor of stamp distribution for the U.S. Post Office, unveils the $3 commemorative Mars Pathfinder postage stamp at Kennedy Space Center's Visitor Complex on the second day of its issue. The stamp was first issued on Dec. 10 at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. It depicts the Sojourner rover at rest on the Pathfinder spacecraft with a panoramic Martian view that is based on one of the first mission images sent back to Earth.

  20. The semantic pathfinder: using an authoring metaphor for generic multimedia indexing.

    PubMed

    Snoek, Cees G M; Worring, Marcel; Geusebroek, Jan-Mark; Koelma, Dennis C; Seinstra, Frank J; Smeulders, Arnold W M

    2006-10-01

    This paper presents the semantic pathfinder architecture for generic indexing of multimedia archives. The semantic pathfinder extracts semantic concepts from video by exploring different paths through three consecutive analysis steps, which we derive from the observation that produced video is the result of an authoring-driven process. We exploit this authoring metaphor for machine-driven understanding. The pathfinder starts with the content analysis step. In this analysis step, we follow a data-driven approach of indexing semantics. The style analysis step is the second analysis step. Here, we tackle the indexing problem by viewing a video from the perspective of production. Finally, in the context analysis step, we view semantics in context. The virtue of the semantic pathfinder is its ability to learn the best path of analysis steps on a per-concept basis. To show the generality of this novel indexing approach, we develop detectors for a lexicon of 32 concepts and we evaluate the semantic pathfinder against the 2004 NIST TRECVID video retrieval benchmark, using a news archive of 64 hours. Top ranking performance in the semantic concept detection task indicates the merit of the semantic pathfinder for generic indexing of multimedia archives. PMID:16986547

  1. The influence of activity on axon pathfinding in the optic tectum.

    PubMed

    Kita, Elizabeth M; Scott, Ethan K; Goodhill, Geoffrey J

    2015-06-01

    The relative importance of neural activity versus activity-independent cues in shaping the initial wiring of the brain is still largely an open question. While activity is clearly critical for circuit rearrangements after initial connections have been made, whether it also plays a role in initial axon pathfinding remains to be determined. Here, we investigated this question using the guidance of zebrafish retinal ganglion cell axons to their targets in the tectum as a model. Recent results have implicated biased branching as a key feature of pathfinding in the zebrafish tectum. Using tetrodotoxin to silence neural activity globally, we found a decrease in the area covered by axon branches during pathfinding. After reaching the target, there were dynamic differences in axon length, area and the number of branches between conditions. However, other aspects of pathfinding were unaffected by silencing, including the ratio of branches directed toward the target, length, and number of branches, as well as turning angle, velocity, and number of growth cones per axon. These results challenge the hypothesis that neural connections develop in sequential stages of molecularly guided pathfinding and activity-based refinement. Despite a maintenance of overall guidance, axon pathfinding dynamics can nevertheless be altered by activity loss. PMID:25556913

  2. Validation of the Version 1 NOAA/NASA Pathfinder Sea Surface Temperature Data Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Elizabeth A.

    1998-01-01

    A high-resolution, global satellite-derived sea surface temperature (SST) data set called Pathfinder, from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) aboard the NOAA Polar Orbiters, is available from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (JPL PO.DAAC). Suitable for research as well as education, the Pathfinder SST data set is a result of a collaboration between the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and investigators at several universities. NOAA and NASA are the sponsors of the Pathfinder Program, which takes advantage of currently archived Earth science data from satellites. Where necessary, satellite sensors have been intercalibrated, algorithms improved and processing procedures revised, in order to produce long time-series, global measurements of ocean, land and atmospheric properties necessary for climate research. Many Pathfinder data sets are available to researchers now, nearly a decade before the first launch of NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS). The lessons learned from the Pathfinder programs will facilitate the processing and management of terabytes of data from EOS. The Oceans component of Pathfinder has undertaken to reprocess all Global Area Coverage (GAC) data acquired by the 5-channel AVHRRs since 1981. The resultant data products are consistent and stably calibrated [Rao, 1993a, Rao, 1993b, Brown et al., 1993], Earth-gridded SST fields at a variety of spatial and temporal resolutions.

  3. Scleroderma in Australian aborigines.

    PubMed

    Zurauskas, J; Beroukas, D; Walker, J G; Smith, M D; Ahern, M J; Roberts-Thomson, P J

    2005-01-01

    Scleroderma (systemic sclerosis) has not been reported before in Australian Aborigines. We describe in detail a community middle-aged Aboriginal woman whose diffuse scleroderma terminated fatally with a renal crisis. Moreover, we have identified a further five Aboriginal patients on the South Australian Scleroderma Register (two with diffuse, two with limited and one with overlap scleroderma), a number consistent with that expected from the 2001 census data for our state. However, an analysis of all antinuclear antibody (ANA) requests from the Top End of Australia over a 6-year period revealed only two Aborigines with low titre anticentromere antibody (despite frequent occurrence of ANA with other specificities). Neither of these Aborigines had features of scleroderma. In conclusion, scleroderma does occur in indigenous Australians but further studies are needed to confirm the apparent infrequency of centromere-associated limited scleroderma (which is the commonest form of scleroderma in our Caucasian population). PMID:15667472

  4. Effect of viewing mode on pathfinding in immersive Virtual Reality.

    PubMed

    White, Paul J; Byagowi, Ahmad; Moussavi, Zahra

    2015-08-01

    The use of Head Mounted Displays (HMDs) to view Virtual Reality Environments (VREs) has received much attention recently. This paper reports on the difference between actual humans' navigation in a VRE viewed through an HMD compared to that in the same VRE viewed on a laptop PC display. A novel Virtual Reality (VR) Navigation input device (VRNChair), designed by our team, was paired with an Oculus Rift DK2 Head-Mounted Display (HMD). People used the VRNChair to navigate a VRE, and we analyzed their navigational trajectories with and without the HMD to investigate plausible differences in performance due to the display device. It was found that people's navigational trajectories were more accurate while wearing the HMD compared to viewing an LCD monitor; however, the duration to complete a navigation task remained the same. This implies that increased immersion in VR results in an improvement in pathfinding. In addition, motion sickness caused by using an HMD can be reduced if one uses an input device such as our VRNChair. The VRNChair paired with an HMD provides vestibular stimulation as one moves in the VRE, because movements in the VRE are synchronized with movements in the real environment. PMID:26737323

  5. Trajectory Based Heating and Ablation Calculations for MESUR Pathfinder Aeroshell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y. K.; Henline, W. D.; Tauber, M. E.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Based on the geometry of Mars Environment Survey (MESUR) Pathfinder aeroshell and an estimated Mars entry trajectory, two-dimensional axisymmetric time dependent calculations have been obtained using GIANTS (Gauss-Siedel Implicit Aerothermodynamic Navier-Stokes code with Thermochemical Surface Conditions) code and CMA (Charring Material Thermal Response and Ablation) Program for heating analysis and heat shield material sizing. These two codes are interfaced using a loosely coupled technique. The flowfield and convective heat transfer coefficients are computed by the GIANTS code with a species balance condition for an ablating surface, and the time dependent in-depth conduction with surface blowing is simulated by the CMA code with a complete surface energy balance condition. In this study, SLA-561V has been selected as heat shield material. The solutions, including the minimum heat shield thicknesses over aeroshell forebody, pyrolysis gas blowing rates, surface heat fluxes and temperature distributions, flowfield, and in-depth temperature history of SLA-561V, are presented and discussed in detail.

  6. The NASA Cold Land Processes Pathfinder Mission (CLPP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, D.; McDonald, K.; Kim, E.

    2004-01-01

    The Cold Land Processes Pathfinder (CLPP) mission concept has been developed to measure hydrologic properties of the Cryosphere. The science driver for the mission is to understand the variability of global water cycling and its consequences for local water resources and climate. The CLPP mission is designed to reduce uncertainty of cold-region precipitation, storage, controls, and feedbacks to the land, atmosphere, and ocean, which in turn will improve prediction of future changes in water cycle dynamics. It will provide the first high-resolution global measurements of Earth's changing snow conditions to: 1) quantify the variability of processes in cold regions, 2) improve understanding of past changes, and 3) enable breakthroughs in prediction of future water resources, weather, and climate. The CLPP concept consists of active (C- and Ku-band) and passive (K- and Ka-band) microwave sensors (with high and moderate spatial resolution respectively) to observe snow water equivalent and snow wetness at local process scales. The CLPP global sampling framework provides necessary capability to relate observed local scale snow characteristics to atmospheric forcings, improve predictive models operating at multiple scales, and to tie the short-term CLPP record to the long-term low-resolution remote sensing climate record of global snow properties.

  7. Antenna Deployment for a Pathfinder Lunar Radio Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDowall, Robert J.; Minetto, F. A.; Lazio, T. W.; Jones, D. L.; Kasper, J. C.; Burns, J. O.; Stewart, K. P.; Weiler, K. W.

    2012-01-01

    A first step in the development of a large radio observatory on the moon for cosmological or other astrophysical and planetary goals is to deploy a few antennas as a pathfinder mission. In this presentation, we describe a mechanism being developed to deploy such antennas from a small craft, such as a Google Lunar X-prize lander. The antenna concept is to deposit antennas and leads on a polyimide film, such as Kapton, and to unroll the film on the lunar surface. The deployment technique utilized is to launch an anchor which pulls a double line from a reel at the spacecraft. Subsequently, the anchor is set by catching on the surface or collecting sufficient regolith. A motor then pulls in one end of the line, pulling the film off of its roller onto the lunar surface. Detection of a low frequency cutoff of the galactic radio background or of solar radio bursts by such a system would determine the maximum lunar ionospheric density at the time of measurement. The current design and testing, including videos of the deployment, will be presented. These activities are funded in part by the NASA Lunar Science Institute as an activity of the Lunar University Network for Astrophysical Research (LUNAR) consortium. Part of this research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  8. Slope Morphology of Twin Peaks, Mars Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Steven; Paine, Colin; Clarke, Jon; Caprarelli, Graziella

    2010-05-01

    Development of slope form over time has long been a concern of geomorphologists, although recently this concern has been moved to slope processes rather than form. There are two basic approaches. The first is theoretical, involving modeling of different types and rates of processes, and calculation of results in terms of slope evolution over time. Comparisons with real-life slopes can follow this approach [1], [2]. The second, inductive, approach involves field measurements to test ideas about slope evolution starting from the assumption that observed slopes represent different stages of an essentially similar evolution [3]. Space is substituted for time, and a number of slopes, assumed to be of increasing age, are measured and placed in an evolutionary sequence (e.g. [4], [5], [6]). [5] showed that slope angles are modally distributed, with the modal angles controlled by the materials (regolith) of which the slopes are formed, and by the processes operating on them. Data can be obtained directly from field work or from digital elevation models (DEM) derived from remote sensing investigations [7]. DEMs are particularly useful to study inaccessible planets, such as Mars, where on site observations are restricted to only a few landing sites. Here we present a study of slopes on the Twin Peaks, two small hills located 780 m north and 910 m south of the Mars Pathfinder landing site at the mouth of the Ares and Tiu flood channels. The presence of streamlined hills, jumbled surfaces and conglomerates suggested the region was modified by massive flooding 1.8 - 3.5 billion years ago [8], [9]. The streamlined forms and terraces of the Twin Peaks were taken to indicate catastrophic flood conditions that were believed to be prevalent in the area [8]. It was also suggested that the northernmost peak was topped by floodwater, causing its flatter appearance. Other researchers postulated alternative geomorphological origins for the features observed at the Pathfinder landing site

  9. Characterization of the LISA Pathfinder Drag Reduction System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slutsky, Jacob; LISA Pathfinder Team

    2016-03-01

    The LISA Pathfinder (LPF) mission launched in December 2015 with operations beginning March 2016. LPF is a technology demonstration mission built to prove and fully characterize the performance of the use of drag free test masses as Gravitational Reference Sensors (GRS) for future space based gravitational-wave observatories. As a joint ESA-NASA mission, LPF is comprised of both European and NASA payloads, the LISA Technology Package (LTP) and Disturbance Reduction System (DRS), respectively. DRS includes Colloid Micro-Newton Thruster (CMNT) systems, to precisely maneuver the spacecraft without disturbing the GRS, and a control system that directs spacecraft and test mass actuation. In order to fully characterize DRS/CMNT performance, we have developed a series of experiments, to take place during DRS operations beginning later this year. We have built analysis pipelines, validated on simulated data, to rapidly process experimental data and to identify any performance issues as they occur. European partners have developed the LTP Data Analysis (LTPDA) Matlab extension, and we have adapted and expanded this to DRS missions as the basis of our analysis pipelines. I will discuss the anticipated DRS performance and measurement accuracy, illustrated on simulated data.

  10. Model Checking Real Time Java Using Java PathFinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, Gary; Mehlitz, Peter C.; Visser, Willem

    2005-01-01

    The Real Time Specification for Java (RTSJ) is an augmentation of Java for real time applications of various degrees of hardness. The central features of RTSJ are real time threads; user defined schedulers; asynchronous events, handlers, and control transfers; a priority inheritance based default scheduler; non-heap memory areas such as immortal and scoped, and non-heap real time threads whose execution is not impeded by garbage collection. The Robust Software Systems group at NASA Ames Research Center has JAVA PATHFINDER (JPF) under development, a Java model checker. JPF at its core is a state exploring JVM which can examine alternative paths in a Java program (e.g., via backtracking) by trying all nondeterministic choices, including thread scheduling order. This paper describes our implementation of an RTSJ profile (subset) in JPF, including requirements, design decisions, and current implementation status. Two examples are analyzed: jobs on a multiprogramming operating system, and a complex resource contention example involving autonomous vehicles crossing an intersection. The utility of JPF in finding logic and timing errors is illustrated, and the remaining challenges in supporting all of RTSJ are assessed.

  11. Antenna Deployment for a Pathfinder Lunar Radio Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDowall, Robert J.; Minetto, F. A.; Lazio, T. W.; Jones, D. L.; Kasper, J. C.; Burns, J. O.; Stewart, K. P.; Weiler, K. W.

    2012-05-01

    A first step in the development of a large radio observatory on the moon for cosmological or other astrophysical and planetary goals is to deploy a few antennas as a pathfinder mission. In this presentation, we describe a mechanism being developed to deploy such antennas from a small craft, such as a Google Lunar X-prize lander. The antenna concept is to deposit antennas and leads on a polyimide film, such as Kapton, and to unroll the film on the lunar surface. The deployment technique utilized is to launch an anchor which pulls a double line from a reel at the spacecraft. Subsequently, the anchor is set by catching on the surface or collecting sufficient regolith. A motor then pulls in one end of the line, pulling the film off of its roller onto the lunar surface. Detection of a low frequency cutoff of the galactic radio background or of solar radio bursts by such a system would determine the maximum lunar ionospheric density at the time of measurement. The current design and testing, including videos of the deployment, will be presented. These activities are funded in part by the NASA Lunar Science Institute as an activity of the Lunar University Network for Astrophysical Research (LUNAR) consortium. Part of this research was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under a contract with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  12. Temperature Trends in the TOVS Pathfinder Path A Data Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, J.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    TOVS (Tiros Operational Vertical Sounder) is the suite of infra-red and microwave sounding instruments, including HIRS-2 and MSU, that have flown on the NOAA Polar orbiting operational satellites TIROS-N, NOAA 6-14 from November 1978 to the present day. Data has been analyzed for the entire time period using a consistent methodology to produce twice daily per satellite global fields of surface skin temperature, atmospheric temperature-moisture profile, cloud top pressure, and fractional cloud cover, OLR and clear sky OLR, and precipitation. All parameters were found to depend on the orbit time of observation which differed as a function of time both because of differing initial satellite orbits and orbit drift. This must be accounted for before one can attempt to find trends in the data. Methodology to account for orbit drift will be shown. Trends will then be shown, over the 21 year period 1979-1999, for surface skin temperature and atmospheric temperature profile. There has been global warming near the surface which falls off rapidly with height. Trends will also be shown for values of MSU2R and MSU4 which are computed from the soundings. These will be compared to trends of MSU2R and MSU4 observed by Spencer and Christy. There is generally good agreement between Spencer and Christy MSU2R trends and those computed from the TOVS Pathfinder data set, with the largest differences over the tropics.

  13. The Earth System Science Pathfinder Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crisp, David

    2003-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing the Earth System Science Pathfinder Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) Mission is shown. The contents include: 1) Why CO2?; 2) What Processes Control CO2 Sinks?; 3) OCO Science Team; 4) Space-Based Measurements of CO2; 5) Driving Requirement: Precise, Bias-Free Global Measurements; 6) Making Precise CO2 Measurements from Space; 7) OCO Spatial Sampling Strategy; 8) OCO Observing Modes; 9) Implementation Approach; 10) The OCO Instrument; 11) The OCO Spacecraft; 12) OCO Will Fly in the A-Train; 13) Validation Program Ensures Accuracy and Minimizes Spatially Coherent Biases; 14) Can OCO Provide the Required Precision?; 15) O2 Column Retrievals with Ground-based FTS; 16) X(sub CO2) Retrieval Simulations; 17) Impact of Albedo and Aerosol Uncertainty on X(sub CO2) Retrievals; 18) Carbon Cycle Modeling Studies: Seasonal Cycle; 19) Carbon Cycle Modeling Studies: The North-South Gradient in CO2; 20) Carbon Cycle Modeling Studies: Effect of Diurnal Biases; 21) Project Status and Schedule; and 22) Summary.

  14. Discrete derivative estimation in LISA Pathfinder data reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraioli, Luigi; Hueller, Mauro; Vitale, Stefano

    2009-05-01

    Data analysis for the LISA Technology package (LTP) experiment to be flown aboard the LISA Pathfinder mission requires the solution of the system dynamics for the calculation of the force acting on the test masses (TMs) starting from interferometer position data. The need for a solution to this problem has prompted us to implement a discrete time-domain derivative estimator suited for the LTP experiment requirements. We first report on the mathematical procedures for the definition of two methods; the first based on a parabolic fit approximation and the second based on a Taylor series expansion. These two methods are then generalized and incorporated into a more general class of five-point discrete derivative estimators. The same procedure employed for the second derivative can be applied to the estimation of the first derivative and of a data smoother allowing defining a class of simple five-point estimators for both. The performances of three particular realizations of the five-point second-derivative estimator are analyzed with simulated noisy data. This analysis pointed out that those estimators introducing large amount of high-frequency noise can determine systematic errors in the estimation of low-frequency noise levels.

  15. Experiences with operations and autonomy of the Mars Pathfinder Microrover.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishkin, A. H.; Morrison, J. C.; Nguyen, T. T.; Stone, H. W.; Cooper, B. K.; Wilcox, B. H.

    The Microrover Flight Experiment (MFEX) is a NASA OACT (Office of Advanced Concepts and Technology) flight experiment which, integrated with the Mars Pathfinder (MPF) lander and spacecraft system, landed on Mars on July 4, 1997. In the succeeding 30 sols (1 sol = 1 Martian day), the Sojourner microrover accomplished all of its primary and extended mission objectives. After completion of the originally planned extended mission, MFEX continued to conduct a series of technology experiments, deploy its alpha proton X-ray spectrometer (APXS) on rocks and soil, and image both terrain features and the lander. This mission was conducted under the constraints of a once-per-sol opportunity for command and telemetry transmissions between the lander and Earth operators. As such, the MFEX rover was required to carry out its mission, including terrain navigation and contingency response, under supervised autonomous control. For example, goal locations were specified daily by human operators; the rover then safely traversed to these locations. During traverses, the rover autonomously detected and avoided rock, slope, and drop-off hazards, changing its path as needed before turning back towards its goal. This capability to operate in an unmodeled environment, choosing actions in response to sensor input to accomplish requested objectives, is unique among robotic space missions to date.

  16. Polar Geophysics Products Derived from AVHRR: The "AVHRR Polar Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maslanik, James; Fowler, Charles; Scambos, Theodore

    1999-01-01

    This NOAA/NASA Pathfinder effort was established to locate, acquire, and process Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) imagery into geo-located and calibrated radiances, cloud masks, surface clear-sky broadband albedo, clear-sky skin temperatures, satellite viewing times, and viewing and solar geometry for the, high-latitude portions of the northern and southern hemispheres (all area north of 48N and south of 53S). AVHRR GAC data for August 1981 - July 1998 were acquired, with some gaps remaining, and processed into twice-daily 5-km grids, with some products also provided at 25-km resolution. AVHRR LAC data for 3.5 years of coverage in the northern hemisphere and 2.75 years of coverage in the southern hemisphere were processed into 1.25-km grids for the same suite of products. The resulting data sets are presently being transferred to the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) for archiving and distribution. Using these data, researchers now have at their disposal an extensive AVHRR data set for investigations of high-latitude processes. In addition, the data lend themselves to development and testing of algorithms. The products are particularly relevant for climate research and algorithm development as applied to relatively long time periods and large areas.

  17. Australian Curriculum Linked Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurrell, Derek

    2014-01-01

    In providing a continued focus on tasks and activities that help to illustrate key ideas embedded in the new Australian Curriculum, this issue will focus on Number in the Number and Algebra strand. In this article Derek Hurrell provides a few tried and proven activities to develop place value understanding. These activities are provided for…

  18. Fraud and Australian Academics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Brian

    1989-01-01

    A series of highly publicized cases of alleged fraud in the Australian academic community are described. Each case reveals an apparent failure of peer review. The right to pursue investigations and make comments that may offend powerful figures within the scholarly community is precarious. (MLW)

  19. Australian Curriculum Linked Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurrell, Derek

    2013-01-01

    In providing a continued focus on tasks and activities that help to illustrate key ideas embedded in the new Australian Curriculum, the focus in this issue is on Measurement in the Measurement and Geometry strand. The small unit of work on measurement presented in this article has activities that can be modified to meet the requirements of…

  20. Australian Curriculum Linked Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurrell, Derek; O'Neil, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    In providing a continued focus on tasks and activities that help to illustrate key ideas embedded in the new Australian Curriculum, this issue the authors focus, on Geometry in the Measurement and Geometry strand with strong links for an integrated focus on the Statistics and Probability strand. The small unit of work on the sorting and…

  1. Researching Australian Children's Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saxby, Maurice

    2004-01-01

    When in 1962 the author began to research the history of Australian children's literature, access to the primary sources was limited and difficult. From a catalogue drawer in the Mitchell Library of hand-written cards marked "Children's books" he could call up from the stacks, in alphabetical order, piles of early publications. His notes about the…

  2. Research Readings. Australian Apprenticeships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smart, Nigel, Ed.

    This volume on apprenticeships in Australia summarizes 11 research studies. After an "Introduction" (Nigel Smart), the reports are: "Apprenticeship in Australia: A Concise History" (John Ray); "Issues and Directions from the Australian Apprenticeship and Traineeship Literature" (Stephen Saunders); "Determinants of Apprentice Training by Small and…

  3. Pathfinder-Plus on flight over Hawaiian Islands, with N'ihau and Lehua in the background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Pathfinder-Plus on flight over Hawaiian Islands, with N'ihau and Lehua in the background. Pathfinder was a remotely controlled, solar-powered flying wing, designed and built as a proof-of-concept vehicle for a much larger aircraft capable of flying at extremely high altitudes for weeks at a time. It was built by AeroVironment, Inc., a California company that developed the human-powered Gossamer Condor and Gossamer Albatross lightweight aircraft during the 1970s, and later made the solar-electric powered Gossamer Penguin and Solar Challenger. The basic configuration and concepts for Pathfinder were first realized with the HALSOL (High Altitude Solar) aircraft, built in 1983 by AeroVironment and the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. Pathfinder was constructed of advanced composites, plastics, and foam, and despite a wingspan of nearly 100 feet, it weighed only about 600 pounds. Pathfinder was one of several unpiloted prototypes under study by NASA's ERAST (Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology) program, a NASA-industry alliance which is helping develop advanced technologies that will enable aircraft to study the earth's environment during extremely long flights at altitudes in excess of 100,000 feet. (See project description below for Pathfinder's conversion to Pathfinder Plus.) In 1998, the Pathfinder solar-powered flying wing (see its photographs and project description) was modified into the longer-winged Pathfinder Plus configuration and on Aug. 6, 1998, Pathfinder Plus set an altitude record (for propeller-driven aircraft) of approximately 80,285 feet at the Pacific Missile Range Facility. The goal of the Pathfinder Plus flights was to validate new solar, aerodynamic, propulsion, and systems technology developed for its successor, the Centurion, which was designed to reach and sustain altitudes in the 100,000-foot range. The Centurion was succeeded by the Helios Prototype with a goal of reaching and sustaining flight at an altitude of 100,000 feet

  4. PILOT the Pathfinder for an International Large Optical Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storey, J. W. V.; Ashley, M. C. B.; Burton, M. G.; Lawrence, J. S.

    PILOT is proposed as a partnership between Australia and Europe to develop a 2.4 m optical/infrared telescope for Dome C, Antarctica. Funding for a detailed designed study is being sought from Australian sources, with a view to commencing construction in early 2008. The current “strawman” design is for an f/10 dual Nasmyth configuration with provision for both a silicon carbide fast tip-tilt secondary mirror for the thermal infrared, and an adaptive secondary mirror to achieve diffraction-limited imaging at wavelengths as short as V-band.

  5. AVHRR-Based Polar Pathfinder Products: Evaluation, Enhancement, and Transition to MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowler, Charles; Maslanik, James; Stone, Robert; Stroeve, Julienne; Emery, William

    2001-01-01

    The AVHRR-Based Polar Pathfinder (APP) products include calibrated AVHRR channel data, surface temperatures, albedo, satellite scan and solar geometries, and a cloud mask composited into twice- per-day images, and daily averaged fields of sea ice motion, for regions poleward of 50 deg. latitude. Our goals under this grant, in general, are four-fold: 1. To quantify the APP accuracy and sources of error by comparing Pathfinder products with field measurements. 2. To determine the consistency of mean fields and trends in comparison with longer time series of available station data and forecast model output. 3. To investigate the consistency of the products between the different AVHRR instruments over the 1982-present period of the NOAA program. 4. To compare an annual cycle of the AVHRR Pathfinder products with MODIS to establish a baseline for extending Pathfinder-type products into the new ESE period. Year One tasks include intercomparisons of the Pathfinder products with field measurements, testing of algorithm assumptions, collection of field data, and further validation and possible improvement of the multi-sensor ice motion fields. Achievements for these tasks are summarized below.

  6. Detection and measurement of micrometeoroids with LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorpe, J. I.; Parvini, C.; Trigo-Rodríguez, J. M.

    2016-02-01

    The Solar System contains a population of dust and small particles originating from asteroids, comets, and other bodies. These particles have been studied using a number of techniques ranging from in-situ satellite detectors to analysis of lunar microcraters to ground-based observations of zodiacal light. In this paper, we describe an approach for using the LISA Pathfinder (LPF) mission as an instrument to detect and characterize the dynamics of dust particles in the vicinity of Earth-Sun L1. Launched on Dec. 3rd, 2015, LPF is a dedicated technology demonstrator mission that will validate several key technologies for a future space-based gravitational-wave observatory. The primary science instrument aboard LPF is a precision accelerometer which we show will be capable of sensing discrete momentum impulses as small as 4 × 10-8 N s. We then estimate the rate of such impulses resulting from impacts of micrometeoroids based on standard models of the micrometeoroid environment in the inner solar system. We find that LPF may detect dozens to hundreds of individual events corresponding to impacts of particles with masses >10-9g during LPF's roughly six-month science operations phase in a 5 × 105 km by 8 × 105 km Lissajous orbit around L1. In addition, we estimate the ability of LPF to characterize individual impacts by measuring quantities such as total momentum transferred, direction of impact, and location of impact on the spacecraft. Information on flux and direction provided by LPF may provide insight as to the nature and origin of the individual impact and help constrain models of the interplanetary dust complex in general. Additionally, this direct in situ measurement of micrometeoroid impacts will be valuable to designers of future spacecraft targeting the environment around L1.

  7. General geology and geomorphology of the Mars Pathfinder landing site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, A.W.; Gaddis, L.R.; Kirk, R.L.; Soderblom, L.A.; Tanaka, K.L.; Golombek, M.P.; Parker, T.J.; Greeley, Ronald; Kuzmin, R.O.

    1999-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder (MPF) spacecraft landed on relatively young (late Hesperian-early Amazonian; 3.1-0.7 Ga) plains in Chryse Planitia near the mouth of Ares Vallis. Images returned from the spacecraft reveal a complex landscape of ridges and troughs, large hills and crater rims, rocks and boulders of various sizes and shapes, and surficial deposits, indicating a complex, multistage geologic history of the landing site. After the deposition of one or more bedrock units, depositional and erosional fluvial processes shaped much of the present landscape. Multiple erosional events are inferred on the basis of observations of numerous channels, different orientations of many streamlined tails from their associated knobs and hills, and superposition of lineations and streamlines. Medium- and small-scale features, interpreted to be related to late-stage drainage of floodwaters, are recognized in several areas at the landing site. Streamlined knobs and hills seen in Viking orbiter images support this inference, as they seem to be complex forms, partly erosional and partly depositional, and may also indicate a series of scouring and depositional events that, in some cases, further eroded or partially buried these landforms. Although features such as these are cited as evidence for catastrophic flooding at Ares Vallis, some of these features may also be ascribed to alternative primary or secondary depositional processes, such as glacial or mass-wasting processes. Close inspection of the landing site reveals rocks that are interpreted to be volcanic in origin and others that may be conglomeratic. If such sedimentary rocks are confirmed, fluvial processes have had a greater significance on Mars than previously thought. For the last several hundred million to few billion years, eolian processes have been dominant. Dunes and dune-like features, ventifacts, and deflation and exhumation features around several rocks probably are the most recent landforms. The relatively pristine

  8. Preliminary Findings of the Photovoltaic Cell Calibration Experiment on Pathfinder Flight 95-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vargas-Aburto, Carlos

    1997-01-01

    The objective of the photovoltaic (PV) cell calibration experiment for Pathfinder was to develop an experiment compatible with an ultralight UAV to predict the performance of PV cells at AM0, the solar spectrum in space, using the Langley plot technique. The Langley plot is a valuable technique for this purpose and requires accurate measurements of air mass (pressure), cell temperature, solar irradiance, and current-voltage(IV) characteristics with the cells directed normal to the direct ray of the sun. Pathfinder's mission objective (95-3) of 65,000 ft. maximum altitude, is ideal for performing the Langley plot measurements. Miniaturization of electronic data acquisition equipment enabled the design and construction of an accurate and light weight measurement system that meets Pathfinder's low payload weight requirements.

  9. AVHRR-Based Polar Pathfinder Products: Evaluation, Enhancement and Transition to MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowler, Charles; Masalanik, James; Stone, Robert; Stroeve, Julienne; Emery, William

    2001-01-01

    The Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR)-Based Polar Pathfinder (APP) products include calibrated AVHRR channel data, surface temperatures, albedo, satellite scan and solar geometries, and cloud mask, all composited into twice-per-day images, and daily averaged fields of sea ice motion, for regions poleward of 50 latitude. Our general goals under this grant: (1) Quantify the APP accuracy and sources of error by comparing Pathfinder products with field measurements; (2) Determine the consistency of mean fields and trends in comparison with longer time series of available station data and forecast model output; (3) Investigate the consistency of the products between the different AVHRR instruments over the 1982-present period of the NOAA program; and (4) Compare and annual cycle of the APP products with MODIS to establish a baseline for extending Pathfinder-type products into the new ESE period.

  10. MARS PATHFINDER SMALL ROVER UNDERGOES FINAL FUNCTIONAL CHECK IN SAEF-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder small rover undergoes a final functional check in KSC's Spacecraft Assembly and Encapsulation Facility-2 (SAEF-2) before being attached to the Pathfinder lander. The six- wheeled robotic vehicle will become the first autonomous rover to explore the surface of another planet when it begins crawling across the Martian terrain next year. The small rover will be attached to one of the three petals of the Mars Pathfinder lander. After the petals are closed, a protective aeroshell will be installed around the lander and parachutes attached to it. This assembled entry vehicle will then be mated to the cruise stage that will carry the spacecraft on its interplanetary trajectory. The completed spacecraft assembly will be mated with an upper stage booster before going to the launch pad. Liftoff on a Delta II expendable launch vehicle currently is set for Dec. 2 at the beginning of a 24-day launch period.

  11. Photogrammetric analysis of horizon panoramas: The Pathfinder landing site in Viking orbiter images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oberst, J.; Jaumann, R.; Zeitler, W.; Hauber, E.; Kuschel, M.; Parker, T.; Golombek, M.; Malin, M.; Soderblom, L.

    1999-01-01

    Tiepoint measurements, block adjustment techniques, and sunrise/sunset pictures were used to obtain precise pointing data with respect to north for a set of 33 IMP horizon images. Azimuth angles for five prominent topographic features seen at the horizon were measured and correlated with locations of these features in Viking orbiter images. Based on this analysis, the Pathfinder line/sample coordinates in two raw Viking images were determined with approximate errors of 1 pixel, or 40 m. Identification of the Pathfinder location in orbit imagery yields geological context for surface studies of the landing site. Furthermore, the precise determination of coordinates in images together with the known planet-fixed coordinates of the lander make the Pathfinder landing site the most important anchor point in current control point networks of Mars. Copyright 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.

  12. Pathfinder technologies for bold new missions. [U.S. research and development program for space exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadin, Stanley R.; Rosen, Robert

    1987-01-01

    Project Pathfinder is a proposed U.S. Space Research and Technology program intended to enable bold new missions of space exploration. Pathfinder continues the advancement of technological capabilities and extends the foundation established under the Civil Space Technology Initiative, CSTI. By filling critical technological gaps, CSTI enhances access to Earth orbit and supports effective operations and science missions therein. Pathfinder, with a longer-term horizon, looks to a future that builds on Shuttle and Space Station and addresses technologies that support a range of exploration missions including: a return to the Moon to build an outpost; piloted missions to Mars; and continued scientific exploration of Earth and the other planets. The program's objective is to develop, within reasonable time frames, those emerging and innovative technologies that will make possible both new and enhanced missions and system concepts.

  13. Verification of Mars solar radiation model based on Mars Pathfinder data

    SciTech Connect

    Appelbaum, J.; Segalov, T.; Jenkins, P.P.; Landis, G.A.; Baraona, C.R.

    1997-12-31

    The solar radiation model for the Martian surface was developed based on the images taken by the two Viking Landers VL1 and VL2 cameras, and calculation of the solar flux function. This model was used for the design of the Pathfinder`s photovoltaic arrays. The Pathfinder is equipped with various instruments capable of measuring data from which solar radiation quantities may be derived. In the present study the authors use data of the Lander and Rover, and perform correlation calculation to the solar radiation model. This study shows that the solar radiation model predicts with good accuracy the solar radiation on the Martian surface for horizontal photovoltaic arrays and for an optical depth of 0.5 of the Martian atmosphere.

  14. Motoneuron axon pathfinding errors in zebrafish: differential effects related to concentration and timing of nicotine exposure.

    PubMed

    Menelaou, Evdokia; Paul, Latoya T; Perera, Surangi N; Svoboda, Kurt R

    2015-04-01

    Nicotine exposure during embryonic stages of development can affect many neurodevelopmental processes. In the developing zebrafish, exposure to nicotine was reported to cause axonal pathfinding errors in the later born secondary motoneurons (SMNs). These alterations in SMN axon morphology coincided with muscle degeneration at high nicotine concentrations (15-30 μM). Previous work showed that the paralytic mutant zebrafish known as sofa potato exhibited nicotine-induced effects onto SMN axons at these high concentrations but in the absence of any muscle deficits, indicating that pathfinding errors could occur independent of muscle effects. In this study, we used varying concentrations of nicotine at different developmental windows of exposure to specifically isolate its effects onto subpopulations of motoneuron axons. We found that nicotine exposure can affect SMN axon morphology in a dose-dependent manner. At low concentrations of nicotine, SMN axons exhibited pathfinding errors, in the absence of any nicotine-induced muscle abnormalities. Moreover, the nicotine exposure paradigms used affected the 3 subpopulations of SMN axons differently, but the dorsal projecting SMN axons were primarily affected. We then identified morphologically distinct pathfinding errors that best described the nicotine-induced effects on dorsal projecting SMN axons. To test whether SMN pathfinding was potentially influenced by alterations in the early born primary motoneuron (PMN), we performed dual labeling studies, where both PMN and SMN axons were simultaneously labeled with antibodies. We show that only a subset of the SMN axon pathfinding errors coincided with abnormal PMN axonal targeting in nicotine-exposed zebrafish. We conclude that nicotine exposure can exert differential effects depending on the levels of nicotine and developmental exposure window. PMID:25668718

  15. HOWARD EISEN, JPL'S LEAD MECHANICAL TECHNICIAN, HOLDS MARS PATHFINDER 'SOJOURNER' ROVER 1:1 SCALE DU

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder 'Sojourner' rover l:l scale duplicate test vehicle is held by Howard Eisen, its lead mechanical technician from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, with Kennedy Space Center's Vehicle Assembly Building looming in the background. The launch of NASA's Mars Pathfinder spacecraft aboard a McDonnell Douglas Delta II rocket is scheduled for Monday, Dec. 2, at 2:09:11 a.m. EST. This is a single instantaneous target launch time without a second opportunity on that day. Liftoff will occur from Pad B at Launch Complex 17 on Cape Canaveral Air Station, Fla. There is a 24-day launch opportunity which extends through Dec. 31.

  16. Mineralogic and compositional properties of Martian soil and dust: results from Mars Pathfinder

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bell, J.F., III; McSween, H.Y., Jr.; Crisp, J.A.; Morris, R.V.; Murchie, S.L.; Bridges, N.T.; Johnson, J. R.; Britt, D.T.; Golombek, M.P.; Moore, H.J.; Ghosh, A.; Bishop, J.L.; Anderson, R.C.; Brückner, J.; Economou, T.; Greenwood, J.P.; Gunnlaugsson, H.P.; Hargraves, R.M.; Hviid, S.; Knudsen, J.M.; Madsen, M.B.; Reid, R.; Rieder, R.; Soderblom, L.

    2000-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder obtained multispectral, elemental, magnetic, and physical measurements of soil and dust at the Sagan Memorial Station during the course of its 83 sol mission. We describe initial results from these measurements, concentrating on multispectral and elemental data, and use these data, along with previous Viking, SNC meteorite, and telescopic results, to help constrain the origin and evolution of Martian soil and dust. We find that soils and dust can be divided into at least eight distinct spectral units, based on parameterization of Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) 400 to 1000 nm multispectral images. The most distinctive spectral parameters for soils and dust are the reflectivity in the red, the red/blue reflectivity ratio, the near-IR spectral slope, and the strength of the 800 to 1000 nm absorption feature. Most of the Pathfinder spectra are consistent with the presence of poorly crystalline or nanophase ferric oxide(s), sometimes mixed with small but varying degrees of well-crystalline ferric and ferrous phases. Darker soil units appear to be coarser-grained, compacted, and/or mixed with a larger amount of dark ferrous materials relative to bright soils. Nanophase goethite, akaganeite, schwertmannite, and maghemite are leading candidates for the origin of the absorption centered near 900 nm in IMP spectra. The ferrous component in the soil cannot be well-constrained based on IMP data. Alpha proton X-ray spectrometer (APXS) measurements of six soil units show little variability within the landing site and show remarkable overall similarity to the average Viking-derived soil elemental composition. Differences exist between Viking and Pathfinder soils, however, including significantly higher S and Cl abundances and lower Si abundances in Viking soils and the lack of a correlation between Ti and Fe in Pathfinder soils. No significant linear correlations were observed between IMP spectral properties and APXS elemental chemistry. Attempts at constraining

  17. The SKA and its pathfinders in the next decade: synergies with the TMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spekkens, Kristine

    2014-07-01

    The next decade will be extremely exciting for centimeter- and meter-wave radio astronomy. Large new facilities such as ASKAP, LOFAR and MeerKAT, as well as major retrofits to existing facilities such as the JVLA and WSRT, are under construction or have begun operations. While revolutionary in and of themselves, these facilities are also important pathfinders to the SKA, whose construction will begin towards the end of this decade. This talk will review the key science that will be delivered by the SKA pathfinders as well as that anticipated with SKA Phase One (2018-2023) and Phase Two (>2023), with a focus on potential synergies with the TMT.

  18. Climate Change on Mars Inferred from Erosion Rates at the Mars Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, M. P.; Bridges, N. T.

    1999-01-01

    The observation that the Mars Pathfinder landing site probably looks very similar to when it was deposited by catastrophic floods some 1.8-3.5 Ga allows quantitative constraints to be placed on the rate of change at the landing site since that time. When combined with interpretations of data recently returned by the Mars Pathfinder and Global Surveyor missions and perspectives drawn from 20 years of analysis and interpretation of Viking data, these observations and inferences suggest an early warmer and wetter environment with vastly different erosion rates and a major climatic change on Mars. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  19. Observations by the Mars 1994 orbiter and possible correlations with Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, H. Uwe

    1994-01-01

    The Mars '94 spacecraft will still be operational when Mars Pathfinder begins its observations. While it will probably not be possible to detect the lander directly, the terrain, including the landing error ellipse, can be covered in high resolution (10 m) in various color bands. The stereo capability of the high resolution camera will provide a three-dimensional terrain map. The landing site of Pathfinder could possibly be chosen so that correlated observations of IMP and the remote sensing instruments onboard Mars '94 may be possible. We will discuss this scenario based on the presently adopted Mars '94 orbit and resulting enhancements stemming from correlations of data obtained by both spacecraft.

  20. Quantitative analysis of LISA pathfinder test-mass noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraioli, Luigi; Congedo, Giuseppe; Hueller, Mauro; Vitale, Stefano; Hewitson, Martin; Nofrarias, Miquel; Armano, Michele

    2011-12-01

    LISA Pathfinder (LPF) is a mission aiming to test the critical technology for the forthcoming space-based gravitational-wave detectors. The main scientific objective of the LPF mission is to demonstrate test masses free falling with residual accelerations below 3×10-14ms-2/Hz at 1 mHz. Reaching such an ambitious target will require a significant amount of system optimization and characterization, which will in turn require accurate and quantitative noise analysis procedures. In this paper, we discuss two main problems associated with the analysis of the data from LPF: i) excess noise detection and ii) noise parameter identification. The mission is focused on the low-frequency region ([0.1, 10] mHz) of the available signal spectrum. In such a region, the signal is dominated by the force noise acting on test masses. At the same time, the mission duration is limited to 90 days and typical data segments will be 24 hours in length. Considering those constraints, noise analysis is expected to deal with a limited amount of non-Gaussian data, since the spectrum statistics will be far from Gaussian and the lowest available frequency is limited by the data length. In this paper, we analyze the details of the expected statistics for spectral data and develop two suitable excess noise estimators. One is based on the statistical properties of the integrated spectrum, the other is based on the Kolmogorov-Smirnov test. The sensitivity of the estimators is discussed theoretically for independent data, then the algorithms are tested on LPF synthetic data. The test on realistic LPF data allows the effect of spectral data correlations on the efficiency of the different noise excess estimators to be highlighted. It also reveals the versatility of the Kolmogorov-Smirnov approach, which can be adapted to provide reasonable results on correlated data from a modified version of the standard equations for the inversion of the test statistic. Closely related to excess noise detection, the

  1. Review of Australian Higher Education: An Australian Policy Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montague, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Higher education is one of the key foundations that economic prosperity is founded upon. Government policies, funding and strategic planning require a fine balance to stimulate growth, prosperity health and well-being. The key Australian government policies influenced by a Review of Australian Higher Education report include attracting many more…

  2. Towards Inclusion: An Australian Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbes, Fiona

    2007-01-01

    This article outlines the views of the Australian Special Education Principals' Association (ASEPA) on inclusion and the impact this is having on Australian Government Schools from a school based perspective. ASEPA is a relatively young association and was formed in 1997 out of the need to put forward the case to support students with special…

  3. Australian University International Student Finances

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbes-Mewett, Helen; Marginson, Simon; Nyland, Chris; Ramia, Gaby; Sawir, Erlenawati

    2009-01-01

    The omission of international students from the Australian Vice-Chancellor's Committee (AVCC) 2007 national study on student finances is indicative of a pattern of exclusion. The exclusion is unacceptable from a humane perspective and feeds the belief that Australians perceive international students primarily as "cash cows". This study partially…

  4. Sexuality and Australian law.

    PubMed

    Kirby, Michael

    2005-01-01

    The author describes the changing legal environment concerning same-sex relationships in the common law world with special reference to Australia. He refers to shifts in public opinion recorded in opinion polls; important decisions of human rights courts and tribunals; and changes in national law and court decisions. He then reviews the Australian constitutional setting which divides lawmaking responsibility on such subjects between the federal, State and Territory legislatures. He describes initiatives adopted in the States and Territories and the more modest changes effected in federal law and practice. He concludes on a note of optimism concerning Australia's future reforms affecting discrimination on the grounds of sexuality. PMID:15814500

  5. Do Integrated Children's Services Improve Children's Outcomes?: Evidence from England's Children's Trust Pathfinders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Margaret; Bachmann, Max O.; Jones, Natalia R.; Reading, Richard; Thoburn, June; Husbands, Chris; Shreeve, Ann; Watson, Jacqueline

    2009-01-01

    Thirty-five children's trust pathfinders, local cross-sector partnerships, were introduced across England in 2003 to promote greater integration in children's services. Using administrative performance data, this paper tracks yearly trends in child service outputs and child well-being outcomes from 1997 to 2004 in these local areas, including the…

  6. Uncoupling nicotine mediated motoneuron axonal pathfinding errors and muscle degeneration in zebrafish

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, Lillian; Tanguay, Robert L.; Svoboda, Kurt R.

    2009-05-15

    Zebrafish embryos offer a unique opportunity to investigate the mechanisms by which nicotine exposure impacts early vertebrate development. Embryos exposed to nicotine become functionally paralyzed by 42 hpf suggesting that the neuromuscular system is compromised in exposed embryos. We previously demonstrated that secondary spinal motoneurons in nicotine-exposed embryos were delayed in development and that their axons made pathfinding errors (Svoboda, K.R., Vijayaraghaven, S., Tanguay, R.L., 2002. Nicotinic receptors mediate changes in spinal motoneuron development and axonal pathfinding in embryonic zebrafish exposed to nicotine. J. Neurosci. 22, 10731-10741). In that study, we did not consider the potential role that altered skeletal muscle development caused by nicotine exposure could play in contributing to the errors in spinal motoneuron axon pathfinding. In this study, we show that an alteration in skeletal muscle development occurs in tandem with alterations in spinal motoneuron development upon exposure to nicotine. The alteration in the muscle involves the binding of nicotine to the muscle-specific AChRs. The nicotine-induced alteration in muscle development does not occur in the zebrafish mutant (sofa potato, [sop]), which lacks muscle-specific AChRs. Even though muscle development is unaffected by nicotine exposure in sop mutants, motoneuron axonal pathfinding errors still occur in these mutants, indicating a direct effect of nicotine exposure on nervous system development.

  7. Pathfinder Networks and Author Cocitation Analysis: A Remapping of Paradigmatic Information Scientists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Howard D.

    2003-01-01

    Discussion of author cocitation analysis focuses on Pathfinder Networks (PFNET) where nodes represent authors and links represent weighted paths between nodes, the weights being cocitation counts. Highlights include remapping information science; comparison with principal components analysis; a correlation-based PFNET; and AuthorLink, a Web-based…

  8. Morning Martian Atmospheric Temperature Gradients and Fluctuations Observed by Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mihalov, John D.; Haberle, R. M.; Murphy, J. R.; Seiff, A.; Wilson, G. R.

    1999-01-01

    We have studied the most prominent atmospheric temperature fluctuations observed during Martian mornings by Mars Pathfinder and have concluded, based on comparisons with wind directions, that they appear to be a result of atmospheric heating associated with the Lander spacecraft. Also, we have examined the morning surface layer temperature lapse rates, which are found to decrease as autumn approaches at the Pathfinder location, and which have mean (and median) values as large as 7.3 K/m in the earlier portions of the Pathfinder landed mission. It is plausible that brief isolated periods with gradients twice as steep are associated with atmospheric heating adjacent to Lander air bag material. In addition, we have calculated the gradient with height of the structure function obtained with Mars Pathfinder, for Mars' atmospheric temperatures measured within about 1.3 m from the surface, assuming a power law dependence, and have found that these gradients superficially resemble those reported for the upper region of the terrestrial stable boundary layer.

  9. A Strategy to Characterize the LISA-Pathfinder Cold Gas Thruster System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Baird, J.; Binetruy, P.; Born, M.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Bursi, A.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesarini, A.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; Diepholz, I.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; Gallegos, J.; Garcia Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, L. I.; Gibert, F.; Giardini, D.; Giusteri, R.; Grimani, C.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Inchauspé, H.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Kaune, B.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C.; Lloro, I.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Mance, D.; Martin, V.; Martin-Porqueras, F.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P.; Mendes, J.; Mendes, L.; Moroni, A.; Nofrarias, M.; Paczkowski, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Petiteau, A.; Pivato, P.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ragnit, U.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Russano, G.; Sarra, P.; Schleicher, A.; Slutsky, J.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Sumner, T.; Texier, D.; Thorpe, J.; Trenkel, C.; Tu, H. B.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Wealthy, D.; Wen, S.; Weber, W.; Wittchen, A.; Zanoni, C.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2015-05-01

    The cold gas micro-propulsion system that will be used during the LISA-Pathfinder mission will be one of the most important component used to ensure the "free-fall" of the enclosed test masses. In this paper we present a possible strategy to characterize the effective direction and amplitude gain of each of the 6 thrusters of this system.

  10. LINC-NIRVANA Pathfinder: testing the next generation of wave front sensors at LBT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Albert R.; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Baumeister, Harald; Bergomi, Maria; Bertram, Thomas; Berwein, Juergen; Biddick, Chris; Bizenberger, Peter; Brangier, Matthieu; Briegel, Florian; Brunelli, Alessandro; Brynnel, Joar; Busoni, Lorenzo; Cushing, Norm; De Bonis, Fulvio; De La Pena, Michele; Esposito, Simone; Farinato, Jacopo; Fini, Luca; Green, Richard F.; Herbst, Tom; Hofferbert, Ralph; Kittmann, Frank; Kuerster, Martin; Laun, Werner; Meschke, Daniel; Mohr, Lars; Pavlov, Aleksei; Pott, Jorg-Uwe; Puglisi, Alfio; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Rakich, Andrew; Rohloff, Ralf-Rainer; Trowitzsch, Jan; Viotto, Valentina; Zhang, Xianyu

    2012-07-01

    LINC-NIRVANA will employ four wave front sensors to realize multi-conjugate correction on both arms of a Fizeau interferometer for LBT. Of these, one of the two ground-layer wave front sensors, together with its infrared test camera, comprise a stand-alone test platform for LINC-NIRVANA. Pathfinder is a testbed for full LINC-NIRVANA intended to identify potential interface problems early in the game, thus reducing both technical, and schedule, risk. Pathfinder will combine light from multiple guide stars, with a pyramid sensor dedicated to each star, to achieve ground-layer AO correction via an adaptive secondary: the 672-actuator thin shell at the LBT. The ability to achieve sky coverage by optically coadding light from multiple stars has been previously demonstrated; and the ability to achieve correction with an adaptive secondary has also been previously demonstrated. Pathfinder will be the first system at LBT to combine both of these capabilities. Since reporting our progress at A04ELT2, we have advanced the project in three key areas: definition of specific goals for Pathfinder tests at LBT, more detail in the software design and planning, and calibration. We report on our progress and future plans in these three areas, and on the project overall.

  11. Characterization of the Martian Surface Deposits by the Mars Pathfinder Rover, Sojourner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matijevic, J.

    1997-01-01

    Sojourner, the pathfinder rover, has discovered pebbles on the surface and in rocks that may be semidentary-not volcanic-in origin. Surface pebbles may have been rounded by Ares Flood Waters or liberated by weathering of sedimentary rocks called conglomerates.

  12. The Mars Pathfinder Propulsion Line Thermal Design: Testing, Analysis and Pre-Launch Modifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. Morgan; Novak, Keith S.

    1998-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder (MPF) spacecraft (S/C), launched in December 1996, is the second mission in NASA's Discovery Program. The MPF mission is primarily an engineering demonstration of key technologies and concepts for eventual use in future missions to Mars.

  13. Space Technology 5: Pathfinder for Future Micro-Sat Constellations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlisle, Candace; Finnegan, Eric

    2004-01-01

    research-quality science. Each ST-5 spacecraft will deploy a precision magnetometer to be used both for attitude determination and as a representative science instrument. The spacecraft has been developed with a low magnetic signature to avoid interference with the magnetometer. The spacecraft will be able to detect and respond autonomously to science events, i.e. significant changes in the magnetic field measurements. The three spacecraft will be a pathfinder for future constellation missions. They will be deployed to demonstrate an appropriate geometry for scientific measurements as a constellation. They will be operationally managed as a constellation, demonstrating automation and communication strategies that will be useful for future missions. The technologies and future mission concepts will be validated both on the ground and in space. Technologies will be validated on the ground by a combination of component level and system level testing of the flight hardware in a thermal vacuum environment. In flight, specific validation runs are planned for each of the technologies. Each validation run consists of one or more orbits with a specific validation objective. This paper will describe the ST-5 mission, and the applicability of the NMP technologies, spacecraft, and mission concepts to future missions. It will also discuss the validation approach for the ST-5 technologies and mission concepts.

  14. Simulation and template generation for LISA Pathfinder Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rais, Boutheina; Grynagier, Adrien; Diaz-Aguiló, Marc; Armano, Michele

    The LISA PathFinder (LPF) mission is a technology demonstration mission which aims at testing a number of critical technical challenges that the future LISA (Gravitational wave detection in space) mission will face: LPF can be seen as a complex laboratory experiment in space. It is therefore critical to be able to define which measurements and which actuations will be applied during the scientific part of the mission. The LISA Technology Package (LTP), part of ESA's hardware contribution to LPF, outlines hence the importance of developing an appropriate simulation tool in order to test these strate-gies before launch and to analyse the dynamical behaviour of the system during the mission. The detailed model of the simulation can be used in an off-line mode for further planning: cor-rect estimation of timeline priorities, risk factors, duty cycles, data analysis readiness. The Lisa Technology Package Data Analysis (LTPDA) team has developed an object-oriented MATLAB toolbox for general case of data analysis needs. However, to meet specific needs of LPF mis-sion, a template generation tool has been developed. It provides a recognizable data pattern, avoiding the risk of missing the model during mission's analysis. The aim of the template generator tool is to provide tools to analyse LTP system modeled in State Space Model (SSM). The SSM class, the aim of this poster, includes this tools within the LTPDA toolbox. It can be used to generate the time-domain response for any given actuation and/or noise, the frequency response using bode diagrams and the steady state of the system. It allows the user to project noises on system outputs to get spectra of outputs for given input noises spectra. This class is sufficiently general to be used with a variety of systems once the SSM of the system is provided in the library. Furthermore, one of the main objectives of the data analysis for LPF (the estimation of different parameters of the system), can be achieved by a new

  15. Rock Abrasion on Mars: Clues from the Pathfinder and Viking Landing Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, N. T.; Parker, T. J.; Kramer, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    A significant discovery of the Mars Pathfinder (MPF) mission was that many rocks exhibit characteristics of ventifacts, rocks that have been sculpted by saltating particles. Diagnostic features identifying the rocks as ventifacts am elongated pits, flutes, and grooves (collectively referred to as "flutes" unless noted otherwise). Faceted rocks or rock portions, circular pits, rills, and possibly polished rock surfaces are also seen and could be due, to aeolian abrasion. Many of these features were initially identified in rover images, where spatial resolution generally exceeded that of the IMP (Imager for Mars Pathfinder) camera. These images had two major limitations: 1) Only a limited number of rocks were viewed by the rover, biasing flute statistics; and 2) The higher resolution obtained by the rover images and the lack of such pictures at the Viking landing sites hampered comparisons of rock morphologies between the Pathfinder and Viking sites. To avoid this problem, rock morphology and ventifact statistics have been examined using new "super-resolution" IMP and Viking Lander images. Analyses of these images show that: 1) Flutes are seen on about 50% or more of the rocks in the near field at the MPF site; 2) The orientation of these flutes is similar to that for flutes identified in rover images; and 3) Ventifacts are significantly more abundant at the Pathfinder landing site than at the two Viking Landing sites, where rocks have undergone only a limited amount of aeolian abrasion. This is most likely due to the ruggedness of the Pathfinder site and a greater supply of abrading particles available shortly after the Arcs and Tiu Valles outflow channel floods.

  16. Transient Phenomena: Opportunities for New Discoveries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazio, T. Joseph W.

    Known classes of radio wavelength transients range from the nearby (stellar flares and radio pulsars) to the distant Universe (γ-ray burst afterglows). Hypothesized classes of radio transients include analogs of known objects, such as extrasolar planets emitting Jovian-like radio bursts and giant-pulse emitting pulsars in other galaxies, to the exotic, such as prompt emission from γ-ray bursts, evaporating black holes and transmitters from other civilizations. Time domain astronomy has been recognized internationally as a means of addressing key scientific questions in astronomy and physics, and pathfinders and Precursors to the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) are beginning to offer a combination of wider fields of view and more wavelength agility than has been possible in the past. These improvements will continue when the SKA itself becomes operational. I illustrate the range of transient phenomena and discuss how the detection and study of radio transients will improve immensely.

  17. Transient Phenomena: Opportunities for New Discoveries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lazio, T. Joseph W.

    2010-01-01

    Known classes of radio wavelength transients range from the nearby (stellar flares and radio pulsars) to the distant Universe (gamma-ray burst afterglows). Hypothesized classes of radio transients include analogs of known objects, such as extrasolar planets emitting Jovian-like radio bursts and giant-pulse emitting pulsars in other galaxies, to the exotic, such as prompt emission from gamma-ray bursts, evaporating black holes and transmitters from other civilizations. Time domain astronomy has been recognized internationally as a means of addressing key scientific questions in astronomy and physics, and pathfinders and Precursors to the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) are beginning to offer a combination of wider fields of view and more wavelength agility than has been possible in the past. These improvements will continue when the SKA itself becomes operational. I illustrate the range of transient phenomena and discuss how the detection and study of radio transients will improve immensely.

  18. Examining Alternatives to Wavelet Denoising for Astronomical Source Finding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurek, R.; Brown, S.

    2012-08-01

    The Square Kilometre Array and its pathfinders ASKAP and MeerKAT will produce prodigious amounts of data that necessitate automated source finding. The performance of automated source finders can be improved by pre-processing a dataset. In preparation for the WALLABY and DINGO surveys, we have used a test HI datacube constructed from actual Westerbork Telescope noise and WHISP HI galaxies to test the real world improvement of linear smoothing, the Duchamp source finder's wavelet denoising, iterative median smoothing and mathematical morphology subtraction, on intensity threshold source finding of spectral line datasets. To compare these pre-processing methods we have generated completeness-reliability performance curves for each method and a range of input parameters. We find that iterative median smoothing produces the best source finding results for ASKAP HI spectral line observations, but wavelet denoising is a safer pre-processing technique. In this paper we also present our implementations of iterative median smoothing and mathematical morphology subtraction.

  19. Engaging Indigenous Students in the Australian SKA Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollow, Robert; Harvey-Smith, Lisa; Brooks, Kate; Boddington, Leonie

    2015-08-01

    The Murchison region of Western Australia is the site of the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO) that includes the Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) and the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) and soon the SKA. This is also traditional land of the Wajarri Yamatji people. As part of its development in the region CSIRO has extensive engagement with the Wajarri Yamatji people. This includes educational, cultural, training and commercial opportunities. We outline the Indigenous Land Use Agreement (ILUA) between the Wajarri Yamatji and CSIRO, focusing on the educational and training aspects. Starting with "Wildflowers in the Sky" program in 2006 we have made extensive tours to all schools in the region providing teacher training and student engagement. More recently we have implemented a program where CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science staff visit the Pia Wadjarri Remote Community School, the closest school to the MRO, to mentor students. Students and staff from the school visit the MRO annually to explore the ASKAP telescope and see what is involved in its operation. An educational resource about ASKAP and astronomy that also incorporates traditional sky stories and local ecology is being trialled and developed. A cadetship and trainee program supporting Indigenous students has been implemented with the goal of providing employment opportunities and work skills in a diverse range of areas.

  20. Predictions for ASKAP neutral hydrogen surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, Alan R.; Meyer, Martin J.; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Bernyk, Maksym; Croton, Darren J.; Koribalski, Bärbel S.; Gerstmann, Derek; Westerlund, Stefan

    2012-11-01

    The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) will revolutionize our knowledge of gas-rich galaxies in the universe. Here we present predictions for two proposed extragalactic ASKAP neutral hydrogen (H I) emission-line surveys, based on semi-analytic models applied to cosmological N-body simulations. The ASKAP H I All-Sky Survey, known as Widefield ASKAP L-band Legacy All-sky Blind surveY (WALLABY), is a shallow 3 π survey (z = 0-0.26) which will probe the mass and dynamics of over 6 × 105 galaxies. A much deeper small-area H I survey, called Deep Investigation of Neutral Gas Origins (DINGO), aims to trace the evolution of H I from z = 0 to 0.43, a cosmological volume of 4 × 107 Mpc3, detecting potentially 105 galaxies. The high-sensitivity 30 antenna ASKAP core (diameter ˜2 km) will provide an angular resolution of 30 arcsec (at z = 0). Our simulations show that the majority of galaxies detected in WALLABY (87.5 per cent) will be resolved. About 5000 galaxies will be well resolved, i.e. more than five beams (2.5 arcmin) across the major axis, enabling kinematic studies of their gaseous discs. This number would rise to 1.6 × 105 galaxies if all 36 ASKAP antennas could be used; the additional six antennas provide baselines up to 6 km, resulting in an angular resolution of 10 arcsec. For DINGO this increased resolution is highly desirable to minimize source confusion, reducing confusion rates from a maximum of 10 per cent of sources at the survey edge to 3 per cent. We estimate that the sources detected by WALLABY and DINGO will span four orders of magnitude in total halo mass (from 1011 to 1015 M⊙) and nearly seven orders of magnitude in stellar mass (from 105 to 1012 M⊙), allowing us to investigate the process of galaxy formation across the last four billion years.

  1. Comparison of algorithms for determination of rotation measure and Faraday structure. I. 1100–1400 MHz

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, X. H.; Akahori, Takuya; Anderson, C. S.; Farnes, J. S.; O’Sullivan, S. P.; Rudnick, L.; O’Brien, T.; Bell, M. R.; Bray, J. D.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Ideguchi, S.; Kumazaki, K.; Stepanov, R.; Stil, J.; Wolleben, M.; Takahashi, K.; Weeren, R. J. van E-mail: larry@umn.edu

    2015-02-01

    Faraday rotation measures (RMs) and more general Faraday structures are key parameters for studying cosmic magnetism and are also sensitive probes of faint ionized thermal gas. A definition of which derived quantities are required for various scientific studies is needed, as well as addressing the challenges in determining Faraday structures. A wide variety of algorithms has been proposed to reconstruct these structures. In preparation for the Polarization Sky Survey of the Universe's Magnetism (POSSUM) to be conducted with the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder and the ongoing Galactic Arecibo L-band Feeds Array Continuum Transit Survey (GALFACTS), we run a Faraday structure determination data challenge to benchmark the currently available algorithms, including Faraday synthesis (previously called RM synthesis in the literature), wavelet, compressive sampling, and QU-fitting. The input models include sources with one Faraday thin component, two Faraday thin components, and one Faraday thick component. The frequency set is similar to POSSUM/GALFACTS with a 300 MHz bandwidth from 1.1 to 1.4 GHz. We define three figures of merit motivated by the underlying science: (1) an average RM weighted by polarized intensity, RM{sub wtd}, (2) the separation Δϕ of two Faraday components, and (3) the reduced chi-squared χ{sub r}{sup 2}. Based on the current test data with a signal-to-noise ratio of about 32, we find the following. (1) When only one Faraday thin component is present, most methods perform as expected, with occasional failures where two components are incorrectly found. (2) For two Faraday thin components, QU-fitting routines perform the best, with errors close to the theoretical ones for RM{sub wtd} but with significantly higher errors for Δϕ. All other methods, including standard Faraday synthesis, frequently identify only one component when Δϕ is below or near the width of the Faraday point-spread function. (3) No methods as currently implemented

  2. The directional dependence of apertures, limits and sensitivity of the lunar Cherenkov technique to a UHE neutrino flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, C. W.; Protheroe, R. J.

    2009-06-01

    We use computer simulations to obtain the directional-dependence of the lunar Cherenkov technique for ultra-high energy (UHE) neutrino detection. We calculate the instantaneous effective area of past lunar Cherenkov experiments at Parkes, Goldstone (Goldstone Lunar Ultra-high energy neutrino Experiment, GLUE), and Kalyazin, as a function of neutrino arrival direction, finding that the potential sensitivity to a point source of UHE neutrinos for these experiments was as much as thirty times that to an isotropic flux, depending on the beam-pointing position and incident neutrino energy. Convolving our results with the known lunar positions during the Parkes and Goldstone experiments allows us to calculate an exposure map, and hence the directional-dependence of the combined limit imposed by these experiments. In the 10 21-10 23 eV range, we find parts of the sky where the GLUE limit likely still dominates, and areas where none of the limits from either Parkes, GLUE, or experiments such as the Antarctic Impulsive Transient Antenna (ANITA) balloon experiment or FORTE (Fast On-orbit Recording of Transient Events) satellite experiment are likely to be significant. Hence a large anisotropic flux of UHE neutrinos from these regions is not yet excluded. We also determine the directional dependence of the aperture of future planned experiments with the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA), Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) and the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) to a UHE neutrino flux, and calculate the potential annual exposure to astronomical objects as a function of angular distance from the lunar trajectory through celestial coordinates. We find that the potential exposure of all experiments at 10 20 eV and below, integrated over a calendar year, is flat out to ˜25° from the lunar trajectory and then drops off rapidly. The region of greater sensitivity includes much of the Supergalactic Plane, including M87 and Cen A, as well as the Galactic Centre. At higher energies

  3. Comparison of Algorithms for Determination of Rotation Measure and Faraday Structure. I. 1100-1400 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X. H.; Rudnick, L.; Akahori, Takuya; Anderson, C. S.; Bell, M. R.; Bray, J. D.; Farnes, J. S.; Ideguchi, S.; Kumazaki, K.; O'Brien, T.; O'Sullivan, S. P.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Stepanov, R.; Stil, J.; Takahashi, K.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wolleben, M.

    2015-02-01

    Faraday rotation measures (RMs) and more general Faraday structures are key parameters for studying cosmic magnetism and are also sensitive probes of faint ionized thermal gas. A definition of which derived quantities are required for various scientific studies is needed, as well as addressing the challenges in determining Faraday structures. A wide variety of algorithms has been proposed to reconstruct these structures. In preparation for the Polarization Sky Survey of the Universe's Magnetism (POSSUM) to be conducted with the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder and the ongoing Galactic Arecibo L-band Feeds Array Continuum Transit Survey (GALFACTS), we run a Faraday structure determination data challenge to benchmark the currently available algorithms, including Faraday synthesis (previously called RM synthesis in the literature), wavelet, compressive sampling, and QU-fitting. The input models include sources with one Faraday thin component, two Faraday thin components, and one Faraday thick component. The frequency set is similar to POSSUM/GALFACTS with a 300 MHz bandwidth from 1.1 to 1.4 GHz. We define three figures of merit motivated by the underlying science: (1) an average RM weighted by polarized intensity, R{{M}wtd}, (2) the separation Δφ of two Faraday components, and (3) the reduced chi-squared χ r2. Based on the current test data with a signal-to-noise ratio of about 32, we find the following. (1) When only one Faraday thin component is present, most methods perform as expected, with occasional failures where two components are incorrectly found. (2) For two Faraday thin components, QU-fitting routines perform the best, with errors close to the theoretical ones for R{{M}wtd} but with significantly higher errors for Δφ . All other methods, including standard Faraday synthesis, frequently identify only one component when Δφ is below or near the width of the Faraday point-spread function. (3) No methods as currently implemented work well for

  4. Far beyond stacking: fully Bayesian constraints on sub-μJy radio source populations over the XMM-LSS-VIDEO field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwart, Jonathan T. L.; Santos, Mario; Jarvis, Matt J.

    2015-10-01

    Measuring radio source counts is critical for characterizing new extragalactic populations, brings a wealth of science within reach and will inform forecasts for SKA and its pathfinders. Yet there is currently great debate (and few measurements) about the behaviour of the 1.4-GHz counts in the μJy regime. One way to push the counts to these levels is via `stacking', the covariance of a map with a catalogue at higher resolution and (often) a different wavelength. For the first time, we cast stacking in a fully Bayesian framework, applying it to (i) the Square Kilometre Array Design Study (SKADS) simulation and (ii) Very Large Array (VLA) data stacked at the positions of sources from the VISTA Infra-red Deep Extragalactic Observations (VIDEO) survey. In the former case, the algorithm recovers the counts correctly when applied to the catalogue, but is biased high when confusion comes into play. This needs to be accounted for in the analysis of data from any relatively low-resolution Square Kilometre Array (SKA) pathfinders. For the latter case, the observed radio source counts remain flat below the 5-σ level of 85 μJy as far as 40 μJy, then fall off earlier than the flux hinted at by the SKADS simulations and a recent P(D) analysis (which is the only other measurement from the literature at these flux-density levels, itself extrapolated in frequency). Division into galaxy type via spectral-energy distribution reveals that normal spiral galaxies dominate the counts at these fluxes.

  5. Evaluating the Australian Traineeship System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, R. J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the Australian Traineeship System (ATS), a program integrating formal education and employment designed to increase options for dropouts. Discusses problems involving the centrality of ATS's educational component and implementation of a program evaluation strategy. Includes two references. (MLH)

  6. Correspondence and Least Squares Analyses of Soil and Rock Compositions for the Viking Lander 1 and Pathfinder Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, K. W.; Arvidson, R. E.; Jolliff, B. L.; Clark, B. C.

    2000-01-01

    Correspondence and Least Squares Mixing Analysis techniques are applied to the chemical composition of Viking 1 soils and Pathfinder rocks and soils. Implications for the parent composition of local and global materials are discussed.

  7. Kolmogorov-Smirnov like test for time-frequency Fourier spectrogram analysis in LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraioli, Luigi; Armano, Michele; Audley, Heather; Congedo, Giuseppe; Diepholz, Ingo; Gibert, Ferran; Hewitson, Martin; Hueller, Mauro; Karnesis, Nikolaos; Korsakova, Natalia; Nofrarias, Miquel; Plagnol, Eric; Vitale, Stefano

    2015-03-01

    A statistical procedure for the analysis of time-frequency noise maps is presented and applied to LISA Pathfinder mission synthetic data. The procedure is based on the Kolmogorov-Smirnov like test that is applied to the analysis of time-frequency noise maps produced with the spectrogram technique. The influence of the finite size windowing on the statistic of the test is calculated with a Monte Carlo simulation for 4 different windows type. Such calculation demonstrate that the test statistic is modified by the correlations introduced in the spectrum by the finite size of the window and by the correlations between different time bins originated by overlapping between windowed segments. The application of the test procedure to LISA Pathfinder data demonstrates the test capability of detecting non-stationary features in a noise time series that is simulating low frequency non-stationary noise in the system.

  8. Australian helminths in Australian rodents: an issue of biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Warner, L R

    1998-06-01

    The Australian public as well as Australian funding bodies are generally unsympathetic to native murids, rats and mice, in spite of the fact that 36% have either become extinct or critically endangered since European settlement. The endemic Australian parasites of these rats and mice have been even less sympathetically regarded. Prior to 1958 very little work was carried out on the helminths of Australian rodents and little more is known today. Records are known from only 28% of the extant host species, comprising some 109 species of helminth identified at least to generic level. The rodents invaded Australia from the north, perhaps through New Guinea in at least two separate waves, 5-8 then about 1 million years ago. The parasites they brought with them have adapted and speciated and there has been some host switching between rodent groups and between rodents and the Australian marsupials. This is illustrated particularly in the Trichostrongyloidea. The origins of the rodents from Southeast Asia down the Indonesian island chain are reflected in the presence of the nematode genus Tikusnema in both Australia and Indonesia, and Cyclodontostomum purvisi across Southeast Asia and into New Guinea. Hydromys chrysogaster, the Australian water-rat, illustrates how the biogeographical influences of the host's distribution and lifestyle can affect its parasite fauna. Most of the research to date is merely indicative of where more data are needed. The links between Australian and New Guinean helminth fauna, as well as the links between rodent and marsupial hosts and their fauna, cannot be determined without further research. PMID:9673864

  9. Characterization of the Martian surface deposits by the Mars Pathfinder rover, Sojourner. Rover Team.

    PubMed

    1997-12-01

    Sojourner, the Mars Pathfinder rover, discovered pebbles on the surface and in rocks that may be sedimentary-not volcanic-in origin. Surface pebbles may have been rounded by Ares flood waters or liberated by weathering of sedimentary rocks called conglomerates. Conglomerates imply that water existed elsewhere and earlier than the Ares flood. Most soil-like deposits are similar to moderately dense soils on Earth. Small amounts of dust are currently settling from the atmosphere. PMID:9388171

  10. Characteristics of the Mars Pathfinder Landing Site from CRISM Hyperspectral Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murchie, S.; Bishop, J.; Humm, D.; Morris, R.; Pelkey, S.; Seelos, F.; Seelos, K.

    2007-01-01

    Preliminary analysis of CRISM imaging of the Mars Pathfinder landing site is consistent with previously reported results from landed imaging. At tens of meters scale, the surface is largely dust-covered. Lee portions of topographic knobs are reddest and show most evidence for ferric mineralogy. The nearby 1.5-km diameter "Big Crater" exposes olivine, which is atypical of the northern plains. Big Crater may have penetrated northern plains material to expose buried basaltic highlands.

  11. Characterization of the Martian surface deposits by the Mars Pathfinder rover, Sojourner.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matijevic, J. R.; Crisp, J.; Bickler, D. B.; Banes, R. S.; Cooper, B. K.; Eisen, H. J.; Gensler, J.; Haldemann, A.; Hartman, F.; Jewett, K. A.; Matthies, L. H.; Laubach, S. L.; Mishkin, A. H.; Morrison, J. C.; Nguyen, T. T.; Sirota, A. R.; Stone, H. W.; Stride, S.; Sword, L. F.; Tarsala, J. A.; Thompson, A. D.; Wallace, M. T.; Welch, R.; Wellman, E.; Wilcox, B. H.; Ferguson, D.; Jenkins, P.; Kolecki, J.; Landis, G. A.; Wilt, D.; Rover Team

    1997-12-01

    The Mars Pathfinder rover discovered pebbles on the surface and in rocks that may be sedimentary - not volcanic - in origin. Surface pebbles may have been rounded by Ares flood waters or liberated by weathering of sedimentary rocks called conglomerates. Conglomerates imply that water existed elsewhere and earlier than the Ares flood. Most soil-like deposits are similar to moderately dense soils on Earth. Small amounts of dust are currently settling from the atmosphere.

  12. DSMC Simulations of Blunt Body Flows for Mars Entries: Mars Pathfinder and Mars Microprobe Capsules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, James N.; Wilmoth, Richard G.; Price, Joseph M.

    1997-01-01

    The hypersonic transitional flow aerodynamics of the Mars Pathfinder and Mars Microprobe capsules are simulated with the direct simulation Monte Carlo method. Calculations of axial, normal, and static pitching coefficients were obtained over an angle of attack range comparable to actual flight requirements. Comparisons are made with modified Newtonian and free-molecular-flow calculations. Aerothermal results were also obtained for zero incidence entry conditions.

  13. Overview of the development of the pathfinder ultra-long duration balloon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, Magdi A.; Stuchlik, David; Corbin, Brian; Smolinski, Michael; Abresch, Brian; Shreves, Christopher; Stancil, Robert; Cathey, Henry M.; Cannon, Scott

    2004-01-01

    The ultra-long duration balloon (ULDB) Pathfinder Project is developing a small pumpkin balloon system and a new communication package based on the iridium satellites technology to demonstrate a global, 100-day duration capability that is scalable to the full-scale ULDB. A set of trade studies has been conducted to determine the volume, mass and cost of the balloon system to support up to 90 kg payload mass to an altitude of 35 km. The Pathfinder test balloons will provide valuable data in the development of performance models for future ULDB flights. The iridium based communication package will include a power subsystem, a command and data-handling unit, a GPS receiver, and an iridium L-Band Transceiver (LBT) for global communications. The flight data will include, at a minimum: latitude, longitude, altitude, horizontal and vertical speeds, heading, time, and other balloon performance parameters (i.e., system voltages, temperatures, etc.). Although the system will be designed for global launch capability, initial flights will be launched from the proposed full-scale ULDB mission launch locations. This paper will present and discuss the initial series of trade studies conducted for the development of the pathfinder balloon and the design concept of the iridium based communication package.

  14. A Pathfinder analysis of pedagogical knowledge structures: a follow-up investigation.

    PubMed

    Housner, L D; Gomez, R; Griffey, D C

    1993-09-01

    This study is an extension of an earlier investigation of undergraduate students' acquisition of key pedagogical concepts in a physical education teaching methodology course. In that study, Pathfinder, a method for eliciting associative memory networks, was used to describe and compare the pedagogical knowledge structures of students to that of the course instructor. After the course, students' pedagogical knowledge structures corresponded more closely with that of the instructor, and students who corresponded the closest performed better in the course. The results raised an interesting issue regarding the acquisition of knowledge in undergraduate students. Did students acquire a generalizable body of pedagogical knowledge applicable beyond the context of the teaching methodology course or a highly contextualized reflection of their course instructor's knowledge base? In the present study the external validity of the pedagogical knowledge base was examined by using Pathfinder to compare the knowledge structures of students from the initial investigation with knowledge structures of five experienced teacher educators from five different teacher education programs. The findings indicated that students' knowledge structures became significantly more correspondent with that of the experienced teachers' structures from the beginning to the end of the course. Also, students' correspondence with teacher educators' structures following instruction was found to be significantly correlated with academic and teaching performance. The findings point to the external validity of the domain of knowledge under study and the robustness of Pathfinder for capturing pedagogical knowledge. PMID:8235050

  15. The Ultraviolet Spectro-Coronagraph Pathfinder Mission for the Detection of Coronal Suprathermal Seed Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strachan, Leonard; Laming, J. Martin; Ko, Yuan-Kuen; Korendyke, Clarence M.; Tun Beltran, Samuel; Socker, Dennis G.; Brown, Charles; Provornikova, Elena

    2016-05-01

    The Ultraviolet Spectro-Coronagraph (UVSC) Pathfinder is a Naval Research Laboratory experiment designed to make the first detection of suprathermal seed particles close to the Sun. It uses an innovative “stacked” occulting system to significantly increase the effective light gathering power of a traditional, 1-meter length, externally occulted coronagraph. The external occultation in combination with a low scatter variable line spaced grating provide the stray light suppression needed to measure non-Maxwellian departures in the wings of the H Lyman alpha emission line profile. After the removal of other factors, these departures may be interpreted as the signature of suprathermal tails of the proton velocity distribution in the corona. UVSC Pathfinder will provide information on the origins and spatial/temporal variability of proton seed particle populations. We will discuss the accuracy needed to make such measurements and describe how the results can be used to develop a capability for predicting the onset of Solar Energetic Particle (SEP) storms. The experiment is scheduled for a launch by the DoD Space Test Program in late 2018/early 2019 and should have excellent overlap with the Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus missions.UVSC Pathfinder is supported by funds from the Chief of Naval Research (via the NRL basic research program) and from NASA (via NDPR NNG13WF951 and NNH16AC29I).

  16. Activity-dependent competition regulates motor neuron axon pathfinding via PlexinA3

    PubMed Central

    Plazas, Paola V.; Nicol, Xavier; Spitzer, Nicholas C.

    2013-01-01

    The role of electrical activity in axon guidance has been extensively studied in vitro. To better understand its role in the intact nervous system, we imaged intracellular Ca2+ in zebrafish primary motor neurons (PMN) during axon pathfinding in vivo. We found that PMN generate specific patterns of Ca2+ spikes at different developmental stages. Spikes arose in the distal axon of PMN and were propagated to the cell body. Suppression of Ca2+ spiking activity in single PMN led to stereotyped errors, but silencing all electrical activity had no effect on axon guidance, indicating that an activity-based competition rule regulates this process. This competition was not mediated by synaptic transmission. Combination of PlexinA3 knockdown with suppression of Ca2+ activity in single PMN produced a synergistic increase in the incidence of pathfinding errors. However, expression of PlexinA3 transcripts was not regulated by activity. Our results provide an in vivo demonstration of the intersection of spontaneous electrical activity with the PlexinA3 guidance molecule receptor in regulation of axon pathfinding. PMID:23302694

  17. Atmosphere Processing Module Automation and Catalyst Durability Analysis for Mars ISRU Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Elspeth M.

    2016-01-01

    The Mars In-Situ Resource Utilization Pathfinder was designed to create fuel using components found in the planet’s atmosphere and regolith for an ascension vehicle to return a potential sample return or crew return vehicle from Mars. The Atmosphere Processing Module (APM), a subunit of the pathfinder, uses cryocoolers to isolate and collect carbon dioxide from Mars simulant gas. The carbon dioxide is fed with hydrogen into a Sabatier reactor where methane is produced. The APM is currently undergoing the final stages of testing at Kennedy Space Center prior to process integration testing with the other subunits of the pathfinder. The automation software for the APM cryocoolers was tested and found to perform nominally. The catalyst used for the Sabatier reactor was investigated to determine the factors contributing to catalyst failure. The results from the catalyst testing require further analysis, but it appears that the rapid change in temperature during reactor start up or the elevated operating temperature is responsible for the changes observed in the catalyst.

  18. Improving Bayesian analysis for LISA Pathfinder using an efficient Markov Chain Monte Carlo method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraioli, Luigi; Porter, Edward K.; Armano, Michele; Audley, Heather; Congedo, Giuseppe; Diepholz, Ingo; Gibert, Ferran; Hewitson, Martin; Hueller, Mauro; Karnesis, Nikolaos; Korsakova, Natalia; Nofrarias, Miquel; Plagnol, Eric; Vitale, Stefano

    2014-02-01

    We present a parameter estimation procedure based on a Bayesian framework by applying a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm to the calibration of the dynamical parameters of the LISA Pathfinder satellite. The method is based on the Metropolis-Hastings algorithm and a two-stage annealing treatment in order to ensure an effective exploration of the parameter space at the beginning of the chain. We compare two versions of the algorithm with an application to a LISA Pathfinder data analysis problem. The two algorithms share the same heating strategy but with one moving in coordinate directions using proposals from a multivariate Gaussian distribution, while the other uses the natural logarithm of some parameters and proposes jumps in the eigen-space of the Fisher Information matrix. The algorithm proposing jumps in the eigen-space of the Fisher Information matrix demonstrates a higher acceptance rate and a slightly better convergence towards the equilibrium parameter distributions in the application to LISA Pathfinder data. For this experiment, we return parameter values that are all within ˜1 σ of the injected values. When we analyse the accuracy of our parameter estimation in terms of the effect they have on the force-per-unit of mass noise, we find that the induced errors are three orders of magnitude less than the expected experimental uncertainty in the power spectral density.

  19. The Civic Mission of Australian Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Lawrence; Muirhead, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the origins and meaning of civic responsibility in the Australian model of the university, beginning with medieval European universities and progressing through Australian reforms of the 20th century. Warns against the university without a civic mission. (SLD)

  20. ASA24-Australian Version (Under Development)

    Cancer.gov

    In collaboration with the National Cancer Institute (NCI), a consortium of Australian Researchers is adapting the ASA24 system to the Australian context to account for variations in food consumed, portion sizes, and nutrient composition.

  1. "English" in the "Australian Curriculum: English"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This is the text of a paper given at the 2011 Symposium of the Australian Academy of the Humanities on the theme, "Educating the Nation: The Humanities in the New Australian Curriculum", the 42nd Annual Symposium of the Australian Academy of the Humanities at the University of Melbourne, 17 November 2011. It was presented in a session on "History,…

  2. Ethnic origin in the Australian census.

    PubMed

    Horn, R V

    1987-05-01

    "This article discusses the Australian statistics of ethnic origin, collected under the headings of race and ancestry in the Australian census, with particular reference to conceptual precision and neutrality and to validity of results. It deals with European and non-European groups, but not with the special problems of counting the Australian aboriginal population." PMID:12341346

  3. Changing Patterns of Governance for Australian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harman, Kay; Treadgold, Elaine

    2007-01-01

    Dissatisfaction with the "corporate" model for university governance, a model advocated by both sides of the Australian parliament and adopted by Australian universities over the past two decades, prompted the Australian Vice-Chancellors' Committee (AVCC) in 2003 to suggest an alternative "trusteeship" model. The paper discusses how this model…

  4. Australian Aboriginal Astronomy - An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Ray P.; Hamacher, Duane W.

    The traditional cultures of Aboriginal Australians include a significant astronomical component, perpetuated through oral tradition, ceremony, and art. This astronomical component includes a deep understanding of the motion of objects in the sky, and this knowledge was used for practical purposes such as constructing calendars. There is also evidence that traditional Aboriginal Australians made careful records and measurements of cyclical phenomena, paid careful attention to unexpected phenomena such as eclipses and meteorite impacts, and could determine the cardinal points to an accuracy of a few degrees.

  5. Second Languages and Australian Schooling. Australian Education Review No. 54

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lo Bianco, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    It is an underlying principle of Australian Education Review (AER) 54 that active efforts should be made to cultivate the latent bilingual potential within Australia's wider population and that this should be linked to major improvements in the quality of language teaching in schools. A combined approach of this kind will require investment in…

  6. A simple neural network model of the hippocampus suggesting its pathfinding role in episodic memory retrieval

    PubMed Central

    Samsonovich, Alexei V.; Ascoli, Giorgio A.

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this work is to extend the theoretical understanding of the relationship between hippocampal spatial and memory functions to the level of neurophysiological mechanisms underlying spatial navigation and episodic memory retrieval. The proposed unifying theory describes both phenomena within a unique framework, as based on one and the same pathfinding function of the hippocampus. We propose a mechanism of reconstruction of the context of experience involving a search for a nearly shortest path in the space of remembered contexts. To analyze this concept in detail, we define a simple connectionist model consistent with available rodent and human neurophysiological data. Numerical study of the model begins with the spatial domain as a simple analogy for more complex phenomena. It is demonstrated how a nearly shortest path is quickly found in a familiar environment. We prove numerically that associative learning during sharp waves can account for the necessary properties of hippocampal place cells. Computational study of the model is extended to other cognitive paradigms, with the main focus on episodic memory retrieval. We show that the ability to find a correct path may be vital for successful retrieval. The model robustly exhibits the pathfinding capacity within a wide range of several factors, including its memory load (up to 30,000 abstract contexts), the number of episodes that become associated with potential target contexts, and the level of dynamical noise. We offer several testable critical predictions in both spatial and memory domains to validate the theory. Our results suggest that (1) the pathfinding function of the hippocampus, in addition to its associative and memory indexing functions, may be vital for retrieval of certain episodic memories, and (2) the hippocampal spatial navigation function could be a precursor of its memory function. PMID:15774943

  7. Shh signaling guides spatial pathfinding of raphespinal tract axons by multidirectional repulsion

    PubMed Central

    Song, Lijuan; Liu, Yuehui; Yu, Yang; Duan, Xin; Qi, Shening; Liu, Yaobo

    2012-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying spatial pathfinding in the descending serotonergic raphespinal tract (RST) in the developing spinal cord, one of the most important nerve pathways for pain, sensory and motor functions. We provide evidence that ventral floor plate-secreted Sonic hedgehog (Shh) is responsible for the establishment of decreasing gradients in both the anterior-to-posterior (A-P) and the medial-to-lateral (M-L) directions in the ventral spinal cord during serotonergic RST axon projection. Downstream components of the Shh pathway, Patched 1 (Ptch1) and Smoothened (Smo), were expressed in the serotonergic caudal raphe nuclei and enriched in the descending serotonergic RST axons. Diffusible Shh repulsion of serotonergic RST axons was shown to be mediated by Shh-Ptch1 interactions and derepression of Smo. Using a co-culture assay, we showed that A-P graded repulsion mediated by Shh signaling pushed the serotonergic axons caudally through the ventral spinal cord and M-L graded repulsion mediated by Shh signaling simultaneously restricted the serotonergic axons to the ventral and ventral-lateral funiculus. Prominent pathfinding errors of serotonergic RST axons were observed in various Shh, Ptch1 and Smo mutants. We conclude that Shh signaling-mediated multidirectional repulsion is required to push descending serotonergic RST axons in the A-P direction, and to restrict these axons to the ventral and ventral-lateral funiculus in the M-L direction. This is the first demonstration that Shh signaling-mediated multidirectional repulsion of serotonergic RST axons maintains spatial axon pathfinding in the developing spinal cord. PMID:22064698

  8. A phased approach to commissioning MCAO: Status and plans for the Linc-Nirvana Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conrad, Al; Bertram, Thomas; Kürster, Martin; Herbst, Tom; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Farinato, Jacopo; Viotto, Valentina; Bergomi, Maria; Brunelli, Alessandro; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Bizenberger, Peter; Briegel, Florian; Hofferbert, Ralph; Gässler, Wolfgang; Meschke, Daniel; Mohr, Lars; Baumeister, Harald; Zhang, Xianyu; Trowitzsch, Jan; Berwein, Jürgen; Kittmann, Frank; Pott, Jorg-Uwe; Rohloff, Ralf-Rainer; Bonis, De Fulvio

    2011-09-01

    Layer-oriented multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) systems apply two or more wavefront-sensor/deformable-mirror (WFS/DM) pairs, each conjugate to a different turbulent layer in the atmosphere. Because these pairs apply correction in series, they are largely decoupled from one another, lending them to a phased commissioning approach. Commissioning instruments on large telescopes, while almost always successful in the end, can be, experience has shown, inefficient and difficult to schedule. For Linc-Nirvana we plan to take advantage of the natural decoupling between the ground-layer subsystem (a 12-star pyramid WFS operating in conjunction with the LBT adaptive secondary) and the mid-high subsystem (an 8-star pyramid WFS working in conjunction with a Xynetics 349 actuator DM) to mitigate the difficulties that have been experienced commissioning complex instruments on large, over-subscribed, telescopes. Pathfinder is a test-bed, consisting of only those subsystems needed to operate, stand-alone, one of the two Linc-Nirvana ground-layer subsystems. The Pathfinder effort will tease out top-level interface issues; while at the same time providing a valuable characterization of the Mount Graham ground-layer. To what extent will this ground-layer system provide a seeing-corrected image to the next WFS/DM pair in the Linc-Nirvana system: the mid-high wavefront-sensor (MHWS)? We will present status and plans for the Linc-Nirvana Pathfinder effort, a novel approach for commissioning MCAO systems on large telescopes.

  9. Free-Suspension Residual Flexibility Testing of Space Station Pathfinder: Comparison to Fixed-Base Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinker, Michael L.

    1998-01-01

    Application of the free-suspension residual flexibility modal test method to the International Space Station Pathfinder structure is described. The Pathfinder, a large structure of the general size and weight of Space Station module elements, was also tested in a large fixed-base fixture to simulate Shuttle Orbiter payload constraints. After correlation of the Pathfinder finite element model to residual flexibility test data, the model was coupled to a fixture model, and constrained modes and frequencies were compared to fixed-base test. modes. The residual flexibility model compared very favorably to results of the fixed-base test. This is the first known direct comparison of free-suspension residual flexibility and fixed-base test results for a large structure. The model correlation approach used by the author for residual flexibility data is presented. Frequency response functions (FRF) for the regions of the structure that interface with the environment (a test fixture or another structure) are shown to be the primary tools for model correlation that distinguish or characterize the residual flexibility approach. A number of critical issues related to use of the structure interface FRF for correlating the model are then identified and discussed, including (1) the requirement of prominent stiffness lines, (2) overcoming problems with measurement noise which makes the antiresonances or minima in the functions difficult to identify, and (3) the use of interface stiffness and lumped mass perturbations to bring the analytical responses into agreement with test data. It is shown that good comparison of analytical-to-experimental FRF is the key to obtaining good agreement of the residual flexibility values.

  10. Revalidation: implications for Australian anaesthetists.

    PubMed

    Roberts, L J

    2015-09-01

    In early 2015, the Medical Board of Australia commissioned research into international revalidation models and what might be applicable for Australia. This review examines the implications for Australian anaesthetists. What problem is revalidation seeking to address? What is happening in similar countries? Is there an issue with Australian anaesthetists' performance? Isn't continuing professional development enough? Could the Medical Board target known high-risk doctors? What is the evidence for the benefit of revalidation? How is and how should the profession be involved? Revalidation has been introduced in other developed countries. It commonly involves continuing professional development, feedback from colleagues, co-workers and patients, clinical audit and peer review. Although its evidence base is limited, the General Medical Council in the United Kingdom is evaluating its revalidation system, which should provide useful guidance for other countries. Australian anaesthetists and their professional organisations must remain informed about, and engaged in, the national debate about revalidation, to ensure that any new process is workable for Australian anaesthesia practice. PMID:26310418

  11. Arabic in Australian Islamic Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Presents census data on the Muslim population in Australia and overviews full-time independent Islamic schools offering a comprehensive education across the curriculum. Argues that these schools offer great potential for the successful development of Arabic language and cultural literacy skills required by Australian exporters and diplomats in the…

  12. Catalogue of Australian Cynipoidea (Hymenoptera)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A catalogue of all families, subfamilies, genera, and species of Cynipoidea present in Australia is presented here. The Australian cynipoid fauna is very poorly known, with 37 genera cited: one each for Austrocynipidae, Ibaliidae, Liopteridae, two for Cynipidae, and 32 for Figitidae. The first Austr...

  13. Staff Bullying in Australian Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Dan; Duncan, Deirdre J.; Edwards, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to estimate the prevalence of staff bullying in Australian schools, to identify bullies and targets and to examine some implications for school leaders in dealing with staff bullying. Design/methodology/approach: The quantitative research design survey instrument contained 11 demographic items, 44 questions of…

  14. Employee Participation: Some Australian Cases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lansbury, Russell D.; Davis, Edward M.

    1992-01-01

    The Australian Workplace Industrial Relations Survey of 2,353 companies showed sporadic employee participation in decision making. Although case studies of Ford Motor, Australia Post, Lend Lease, Telecom Australia, and Woodlawn Mining illustrate successful programs, most managers appear cautious about industrial democracy. (SK)

  15. The 2005 Australian Informatics Competition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, David

    2006-01-01

    This article describes the Australian Informatics Competition (AIC), a non-programming competition aimed at identifying students with potential in programming and algorithmic design. It is the first step in identifying students to represent Australia at the International Olympiad in Informatics. The main aim of the AIC is to increase awareness of…

  16. Australian Rural Education Award, 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education in Rural Australia, 1999

    1999-01-01

    Profiles and contact information for 14 candidate programs for the 1999 Australian Rural Education Award. Programs feature tree planting, transportation to boarding school, community development, business awareness, early childhood services, GIS technology, community-based curriculum development, reading resources, environmental service learning,…

  17. Stress Literacy in Australian Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varlow, Megan; Wuthrich, Viviana; Murrihy, Rachael; Remond, Louise; Tuqiri, Rebekka; van Kessel, Jacobine; Wheatley, Anna; Dedousis-Wallace, Anna; Kidman, Antony

    2009-01-01

    Stress literacy is a term that refers to knowledge about stress and stress management techniques. Levels of stress literacy were examined in more than nine hundred Australian adolescents by providing a short stress-management education session and assessing stress literacy using a pre-post survey design. It was found that while adolescents had a…

  18. Cataloguing Practices in Australian Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hine, Janet D.

    A survey sought to compile comprehensive information about the cataloging codes, classification schemes, subject headings lists, and filing rules used in Australian libraries. Questionnaires were sent to 112 libraries, and 98 returns were received, included in the sample were national, state, public, university, college, and special libraries.…

  19. Skills Gaps in Australian Firms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindorff, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a survey of more than 2000 managers examining perceptions of skills gaps in a range of Australian firms. It finds that three quarters report a skills gap, and almost one third report skills gaps across the whole organisation. Firm size and industry differences exist in perceptions of the effect of the skills gap…

  20. Geologic Measurements using Rover Images: Lessons from Pathfinder with Application to Mars 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, N. T.; Haldemann, A. F. C.; Herkenhoff, K. E.

    1999-01-01

    The Pathfinder Sojourner rover successfully acquired images that provided important and exciting information on the geology of Mars. This included the documentation of rock textures, barchan dunes, soil crusts, wind tails, and ventifacts. It is expected that the Marie Curie rover cameras will also successfully return important information on landing site geology. Critical to a proper analysis of these images will be a rigorous determination of rover location and orientation. Here, the methods that were used to compute rover position for Sojourner image analysis are reviewed. Based on this experience, specific recommendations are made that should improve this process on the '01 mission.

  1. Residual Gas Noise in the Test-mass Module for DECIGO Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okutomi, K.; Akutsu, T.; Ando, M.; Nikaido, M.; Tanaka, N.; Torii, Y.; Sato, S.; Izumi, K.; Chen, D.

    2015-05-01

    DECIGO Pathfinder is the first milestone mission for DECIGO, a future gravitational wave antenna. In DPF, residual gas noise acting on the test mass is estimated to increase and exceed the requirement for force noise of 1 × 10-15 N/√Hz due to geometry of the test-mass module. We performed a Monte Carlo simulation to calculate the residual gas noise and found that the engineering model of the test-mass module cannnot satisfy the requirement. To reduce the gas noise, we present revised geometry of the test-mass module using comb-like electrodes.

  2. Cloud-Aerosol LIDAR and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) Spacecraft: Independent Technical Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbrech, Richard J.; McManamen, John P.; Wilson, Timmy R.; Robinson, Frank; Schoren, William R.

    2004-01-01

    CALIPSO is a joint science mission between the CNES, LaRC and GSFC. It was selected as an Earth System Science Pathfinder satellite mission in December 1998 to address the role of clouds and aerosols in the Earth's radiation budget. The spacecraft includes a NASA light detecting and ranging (LIDAR) instrument, a NASA wide-field camera and a CNES imaging infrared radiometer. The scope of this effort was a review of the Proteus propulsion bus design and an assessment of the potential for personnel exposure to hydrazine propellant.

  3. Towards a Framework for Generating Tests to Satisfy Complex Code Coverage in Java Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staats, Matt

    2009-01-01

    We present work on a prototype tool based on the JavaPathfinder (JPF) model checker for automatically generating tests satisfying the MC/DC code coverage criterion. Using the Eclipse IDE, developers and testers can quickly instrument Java source code with JPF annotations covering all MC/DC coverage obligations, and JPF can then be used to automatically generate tests that satisfy these obligations. The prototype extension to JPF enables various tasks useful in automatic test generation to be performed, such as test suite reduction and execution of generated tests.

  4. Implications of Mars Pathfinder data for the accretion history of the terrestrial planets.

    PubMed

    Bertka, C M; Fei, Y

    1998-09-18

    Accretion models of the terrestrial planets often assume planetary bulk compositions with nonvolatile element abundance ratios equivalent to those of C1 carbonaceous chondrites. The moment of inertia factor of Mars reported by the Pathfinder team is inconsistent with a bulk planet C1 Fe/Si ratio or Fe content, which suggests that C1 chondrite accretion models are insufficient to explain the formation of Mars and the other terrestrial planets. Future planetary accretion models will have to account for variations in bulk Fe/Si ratios among the terrestrial planets. PMID:9743493

  5. Interior structure and seasonal mass redistribution of Mars from radio tracking of Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Folkner, W. M.; Yoder, C. F.; Yuan, D. N.; Standish, E. M.; Preston, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    Doppler and range measurements to the Mars Pathfinder lander made using its radio communications system have been combined with similar measurements from the Viking landers to estimate improved values of the precession of Mars' pole of rotation and the variation in Mars' rotation rate. The observed precession of -7576 +/- 35 milliarc seconds of angle per year implies a dense core and constrains possible models of interior composition. The estimated annual variation in rotation is in good agreement with a model of seasonal mass exchange of carbon dioxide between the atmosphere and ice caps.

  6. Mineralogy, Abundance, and Hydration State of Sulfates and Chlorides at the Mars Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolotov, M. Y.; Kuzmin, R. O.; Shock, E. L.

    2004-01-01

    Detection of elevated concentrations of S and Cl at the landing sites of Viking 1 and 2 [1], and Mars Pathfinder (MP) [2-5] reveals the presence of sulfates and chlorides in soil and rock samples [1-10]. These data are consistent with the findings of Ca sulfates and NaCl in Martian meteorites [11,12], and with Earth-based spectroscopic observations [13,14] tentatively indicating the presence of sulfates on Mars. Although the correlation of S and Mg in Viking and MP samples could reveal the occurrence of Mg sulfate [1-10], the mineralogy of sulfates and chlorides remains unclear.

  7. Interior structure and seasonal mass redistribution of Mars from radio tracking of Mars Pathfinder.

    PubMed

    Folkner, W M; Yoder, C F; Yuan, D N; Standish, E M; Preston, R A

    1997-12-01

    Doppler and range measurements to the Mars Pathfinder lander made using its radio communications system have been combined with similar measurements from the Viking landers to estimate improved values of the precession of Mars' pole of rotation and the variation in Mars' rotation rate. The observed precession of -7576 +/- 35 milliarc seconds of angle per year implies a dense core and constrains possible models of interior composition. The estimated annual variation in rotation is in good agreement with a model of seasonal mass exchange of carbon dioxide between the atmosphere and ice caps. PMID:9388168

  8. Alta FT-150: The Thruster for LISA Pathfinder and LISA/NGO Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paita, L.; Cesari, U.; Nania, F.; Priami, L.; Rossodivita, A.; Giusti, N.; Andrenucci, M.; Estublier, D.

    2013-01-01

    FT-150© FEEP thruster has successfully completed an endurance test at Alta's Micropropulsion laboratory. The updated thruster design dramatically enhances performance with respect to previous FEEP devices and marks a major step forward in the LISA Pathfinder and NGO programmes as well as space propulsion capability in general. The test campaign took place in two parts. Firstly, the new design was tested to validate that the new configuration was compliant with the requirements of the Lisa Pathfinder mission with particular emphasis on the achievement of required total impulse and minimum and maximum thrust levels.The second part of the campaign was aimed at testing a worst-case DFACS profile of the LISA Pathfinder mission using the Elegant Breadboard Power Control Unit (EBB PCU) commanding at 10 Hz and acquiring at 50 Hz. Both purposes of the campaign were successfully met. A total impulse of more than 1080 Ns and a firing time of more than 3500 hours were achieved. No degradation of efficiency and performance was recorded over the entire test. During the first part, more then 600 Ns of total impulse and about 2000 hours of firing time were achieved. Different thrust profiles were commanded with an average thrust of about 87 μN. The minimum and maximum thrust were 1 μN and 150 μN respectively. Short periods at zero N (i.e. thruster switched-off) were also commanded. The measured mass efficiency and specific impulse, 60% and 8000 s respectively, demonstrated that the current design of the thruster is fully compatible with the much larger impulse requirement of LISA mission. The simulation of the worst-case DFACS cycles at 10 Hz was also successfully performed. Three different DFACS cycles representative of the worst cases were performed. These cycles highlighted one of the main advantages of this technology: the controllability and response time that can be verified immediately with electrical feedback parameters like total voltage and beam current (data

  9. Cloud-Aerosol LIDAR and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) Spacecraft: Independent Technical Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbrech, Richard J.; McManamen, John P.; Wilson, Timmy R.; Robinson, Frank; Schoren, William R.

    2005-01-01

    CALIPSO is a joint science mission between the CNES, LaRC and GSFC. It was selected as an Earth System Science Pathfinder satellite mission in December 1998 to address the role of clouds and aerosols in the Earth's radiation budget. The spacecraft includes a NASA light detecting and ranging (LIDAR) instrument, a NASA wide-field camera and a CNES imaging infrared radiometer. The scope of this effort was a review of the Proteus propulsion bus design and an assessment of the potential for personnel exposure to hydrazine propellant.

  10. BAG: A code for predicting the performance of a gas bag impact attenuation system for the PATHFINDER lander

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, J.K.; Waye, D.E.

    1993-11-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is planning to launch a network of scientific probes to Mars beginning in late 1996. The precursor to this network will be PATHFINDER. Decelerating PATHFINDER from the high speed of its approach to Mars will require the use of several deceleration techniques working in series. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) has proposed that gas bags be used to cushion the payload`s ground impact on Mars. This report presents the computer code, BAG, which has been developed to calculate the pneumatic performance of gas bag impact attenuators and the one-dimensional rigid-body dynamic performance of a payload during ground impact.

  11. Radio Frequency Interference Mitigation Strategies: Summary of the E. & F. White Conference held in Sydney, Australia, December 1999

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Jon F.; Ekers, Ron D.; Bunton, John D.

    2000-12-01

    The E. & F. White Conference held in Sydney in December 1999 brought together expertise on a range of interference mitigation techniques from CSIRO, Australian and international industry and universities. Key goals were to enhance the understanding of techniques and their inter-relationship, to increase awareness of advanced technologies such as software radios and photonics, and to foster a cooperative approach to the development of interference mitigation techniques. The foremost application in mind was the square kilometre array (SKA) and the need to find ways to develop a hierarchical scheme for removing unwanted signals from astronomical data. This paper gives an overview of the topics discussed at the conference and summarises some of the key ideas and results that were presented.

  12. New reports of Australian cutaneous leishmaniasis in Northern Australian macropods.

    PubMed

    Dougall, A; Shilton, C; Low Choy, J; Alexander, B; Walton, S

    2009-10-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by various species of Leishmania is a significant zoonotic disease in many parts of the world. We describe the first cases of Australian cutaneous leishmaniasis in eight northern wallaroos, one black wallaroo and two agile wallabies from the Northern Territory of Australia. Diagnosis was made through a combination of gross appearance of lesions, cytology, histology, direct culture, serology and a species-specific real-time PCR. The causative organism was found to be the same unique species of Leishmania previously identified in red kangaroos. These clinical findings provide further evidence for the continuous transmission of the Australian Leishmania species and its presence highlights the importance of continued monitoring and research into the life-cycle of this parasite. PMID:19288959

  13. Overview of the development of the pathfinder ultra long duration balloon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, M.; Stuchlik, D.; Corbin, B.

    The Ultra Long Duration Balloon (ULDB) Pathfinder Project is developing a small pumpkin balloon system and new payload support systems to demonstrate a global 100 day duration capability that is scalable to a full scale flight. The proposed 56,600 m3 pumpkin balloon will be capable of supporting a small tracking payload on the order of 20-40 kg, to an altitude of 24 to 33 km. The Pathfinder Test Balloons will provide valuable data in the development of performance models for future ULDB flights. Attempts will be made to design and fabricate the balloons as close as possible to the full scale ULDB in order to maintain conformity and accuracy of the two balloons' performance models. The balloon system will be designed to handle a small global command and telemetry payload also under development. The payload will include a photo-voltaic power system, command and data handling unit, GPS receiver, and IRIDIUM transceiver for global communications. The flight data will include, at a minimum, position (latitude, longitude, and altitude), and time as well as other balloon performance parameters. Although the system will be designed for global launch capability, initial flights will be launched from the proposed full-scale ULDB mission launch locations. The overall project objectives as well as the trade studies for determining the balloon design parameters, performance, system power requirements, data transmission rates, termination options and overall system configuration will be discussed.

  14. Rock Statistics at the Mars Pathfinder Landing Site, Roughness and Roving on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haldemann, A. F. C.; Bridges, N. T.; Anderson, R. C.; Golombek, M. P.

    1999-01-01

    Several rock counts have been carried out at the Mars Pathfinder landing site producing consistent statistics of rock coverage and size-frequency distributions. These rock statistics provide a primary element of "ground truth" for anchoring remote sensing information used to pick the Pathfinder, and future, landing sites. The observed rock population statistics should also be consistent with the emplacement and alteration processes postulated to govern the landing site landscape. The rock population databases can however be used in ways that go beyond the calculation of cumulative number and cumulative area distributions versus rock diameter and height. Since the spatial parameters measured to characterize each rock are determined with stereo image pairs, the rock database serves as a subset of the full landing site digital terrain model (DTM). Insofar as a rock count can be carried out in a speedier, albeit coarser, manner than the full DTM analysis, rock counting offers several operational and scientific products in the near term. Quantitative rock mapping adds further information to the geomorphic study of the landing site, and can also be used for rover traverse planning. Statistical analysis of the surface roughness using the rock count proxy DTM is sufficiently accurate when compared to the full DTM to compare with radar remote sensing roughness measures, and with rover traverse profiles.

  15. ERASMUS-F: pathfinder for an E-ELT 3D instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelz, Andreas; Roth, Martin M.; Bacon, Roland; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss; Nicklas, Harald E.; Bryant, Julia J.; Colless, Matthew; Croom, Scott; Ellis, Simon; Fleischmann, Andreas; Gillingham, Peter; Haynes, Roger; Hopkins, Andrew; Kosmalski, Johan; O'Byrne, John W.; Olaya, Jean-Christophe; Rambold, William N.; Robertson, Gordon

    2010-07-01

    ERASMUS-F is a pathfinder study for a possible E-ELT 3D-instrumentation, funded by the German Ministry for Education and Research (BMBF). The study investigates the feasibility to combine a broadband optical spectrograph with a new generation of multi-object deployable fibre bundles. The baseline approach is to modify the spectrograph of the Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE), which is a VLT integral-field instrument using slicers, with a fibre-fed input. Taking advantage of recent developments in astrophotonics, it is planed to equip such an instrument with fused fibre bundles (hexabundles) that offer larger filling factors than dense-packed classical fibres. The overall project involves an optical and mechanical design study, the specifications of a software package for 3Dspectrophotometry, based upon the experiences with the P3d Data Reduction Software and an investigation of the science case for such an instrument. As a proof-of-concept, the study also involves a pathfinder instrument for the VLT, called the FIREBALL project.

  16. Percutaneous Transpedicular Fixation: Technical tips and Pitfalls of Sextant and Pathfinder Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Ahmed Salah Aldin

    2016-01-01

    Study Design The efficacy of the operative techniques, possible benefits as well as pitfalls and limitations of the techniques are discussed. Potential drawbacks are also detected. Purpose This study aims to report indications, techniques, and our experience with the use of the Sextant and PathFinder percutaneous transpedicular screw fixation systems. Overview of Literature Percutaneous pedicle screw insertion is a novel technique. Successful percutaneous placement of pedicle screws requires surgical skill and experience because of lack of anatomic surface landmarks. Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous placement of pedicle screws is effective. Many systems are now available. Methods We conducted a prospective operative and postoperative analysis of 40 patients with absolute indication for thoracic or lumbar instability between January 2009 and June 2013. All procedures were performed with the Sextant (group A) and PathFinder (group B) systems under fluoroscopic guidance. Operative techniques are discussed and the results compared. Results Percutaneous transpedicular screw fixation minimizes the morbidity associated with open techniques without compromising the quality of fixation. A total of 190 screws were inserted. There was no additional morbidity. Postoperative computed tomography images and plain X-rays were analyzed. Reduction of visual analog scale scores of back pain was evident. Conclusions Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous pedicular screws are feasible and can be safely done. Current systems allow multi-segmental fixation with significantly less difficulties. The described techniques have acceptable intra- and postoperative complication rates, and overall sufficient pain control with early mobilization of patients. PMID:26949466

  17. Time domain maximum likelihood parameter estimation in LISA Pathfinder data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Congedo, G.; Ferraioli, L.; Hueller, M.; De Marchi, F.; Vitale, S.; Armano, M.; Hewitson, M.; Nofrarias, M.

    2012-06-01

    LISA is the upcoming space-based gravitational-wave detector. LISA Pathfinder, to be launched in the coming years, will be the in-flight test of the LISA arm, with a hardware (control scheme, sensors, and actuators) identical in design to LISA. LISA Pathfinder will collect a picture of all noise disturbances possibly affecting LISA, achieving the unprecedented pureness of geodesic motion of test masses necessary for the detection of gravitational waves. The first steps of both missions will crucially depend on a very precise calibration of the key system parameters. Moreover, robust parameters estimation has a fundamental importance in the correct assessment of the residual acceleration noise between the test masses, an essential part of the data preprocessing for LISA. In this paper, we present a maximum likelihood parameter estimation technique in time domain employed for system identification, being devised for this calibration, and show its proficiency on simulated data and validation through Monte Carlo realizations of independent noise runs. We discuss its robustness to nonstandard scenarios possibly arising during the real mission. Furthermore, we apply the same technique to data produced in missionlike fashion during operational exercises with a realistic simulator provided by European Space Agency. The result of the investigation is that parameter estimation is mandatory to avoid systematic errors in the estimated differential acceleration noise.

  18. Sub-Femto-g Free Fall for Space-Based Gravitational Wave Observatories: LISA Pathfinder Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Baird, J. T.; Bassan, M.; Binetruy, P.; Born, M.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Caleno, M.; Carbone, L.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesarini, A.; Ciani, G.; Congedo, G.; Cruise, A. M.; Danzmann, K.; de Deus Silva, M.; De Rosa, R.; Diaz-Aguiló, M.; Di Fiore, L.; Diepholz, I.; Dixon, G.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fichter, W.; Fitzsimons, E. D.; Flatscher, R.; Freschi, M.; García Marín, A. F.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, L.; Gibert, F.; Giardini, D.; Giusteri, R.; Guzmán, F.; Grado, A.; Grimani, C.; Grynagier, A.; Grzymisch, J.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hoyland, D.; Hueller, M.; Inchauspé, H.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johann, U.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Kaune, B.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C. J.; Lobo, J. A.; Lloro, I.; Liu, L.; López-Zaragoza, J. P.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Mance, D.; Martín, V.; Martin-Polo, L.; Martino, J.; Martin-Porqueras, F.; Madden, S.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P. W.; Mendes, J.; Mendes, L.; Monsky, A.; Nicolodi, D.; Nofrarias, M.; Paczkowski, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Petiteau, A.; Pivato, P.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ragnit, U.; Raïs, B.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Robertson, D. I.; Rozemeijer, H.; Rivas, F.; Russano, G.; Sanjuán, J.; Sarra, P.; Schleicher, A.; Shaul, D.; Slutsky, J.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Stanga, R.; Steier, F.; Sumner, T.; Texier, D.; Thorpe, J. I.; Trenkel, C.; Tröbs, M.; Tu, H. B.; Vetrugno, D.; Vitale, S.; Wand, V.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Warren, C.; Wass, P. J.; Wealthy, D.; Weber, W. J.; Wissel, L.; Wittchen, A.; Zambotti, A.; Zanoni, C.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2016-06-01

    We report the first results of the LISA Pathfinder in-flight experiment. The results demonstrate that two free-falling reference test masses, such as those needed for a space-based gravitational wave observatory like LISA, can be put in free fall with a relative acceleration noise with a square root of the power spectral density of 5.2 ±0.1 fm s-2/√{Hz } , or (0.54 ±0.01 ) ×10-15 g/√{Hz } , with g the standard gravity, for frequencies between 0.7 and 20 mHz. This value is lower than the LISA Pathfinder requirement by more than a factor 5 and within a factor 1.25 of the requirement for the LISA mission, and is compatible with Brownian noise from viscous damping due to the residual gas surrounding the test masses. Above 60 mHz the acceleration noise is dominated by interferometer displacement readout noise at a level of (34.8 ±0.3 ) fm /√{Hz } , about 2 orders of magnitude better than requirements. At f ≤0.5 mHz we observe a low-frequency tail that stays below 12 fm s-2/√{Hz } down to 0.1 mHz. This performance would allow for a space-based gravitational wave observatory with a sensitivity close to what was originally foreseen for LISA.

  19. LISA Pathfinder Discharge Working Group: Activities, Results, and Lessons Learned for LISA/NGO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, T.; Bergner, P.; Hechenblaikner, G.; Brandt, N.

    2013-01-01

    In 2011, the European Space Agency (ESA) entrusted Astrium GmbH to identify the root cause and corrective measures for the shortcomings of the LISA Pathfinder discharge system baseline that were identified during the system level testing in the torsion pendulum at the University of Trento. The main goal was to maximize the discharge system robustness under the given constraint to minimize the impact on manufacturing and the AIT process of the existing flight hardware. Astrium GmbH set-up a dedicated discharge working group (DWG) for 9 months, bringing together the expertise of surface scientists (DLR Stuttgart, Uni Würzburg, Uni Modena, BEAR Trieste) with the existing significant knowledge in the LTP community (Uni Trento, Imperial College London, CGS, Selex Galileo, TWT GmbH, ESA). The findings resulted in a recommendation to modify the baseline discharge system of LISA Pathfinder, including the definition of dedicated manufacturing and AIT requirements. These findings have relevance also for LISA/NGO, since they allow for a significantly more robust discharge system design.

  20. Visualizing Mars Using Virtual Reality: A State of the Art Mapping Technique Used on Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoker, C.; Zbinden, E.; Blackmon, T.; Nguyen, L.

    1999-01-01

    We describe an interactive terrain visualization system which rapidly generates and interactively displays photorealistic three-dimensional (3-D) models produced from stereo images. This product, first demonstrated in Mars Pathfinder, is interactive, 3-D, and can be viewed in an immersive display which qualifies it for the name Virtual Reality (VR). The use of this technology on Mars Pathfinder was the first use of VR for geologic analysis. A primary benefit of using VR to display geologic information is that it provides an improved perception of depth and spatial layout of the remote site. The VR aspect of the display allows an operator to move freely in the environment, unconstrained by the physical limitations of the perspective from which the data were acquired. Virtual Reality offers a way to archive and retrieve information in a way that is intuitively obvious. Combining VR models with stereo display systems can give the user a sense of presence at the remote location. The capability, to interactively perform measurements from within the VR model offers unprecedented ease in performing operations that are normally time consuming and difficult using other techniques. Thus, Virtual Reality can be a powerful a cartographic tool. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  1. Coupling characterization and noise studies of the optical metrology system onboard the LISA Pathfinder mission

    SciTech Connect

    Hechenblaikner, Gerald; Gerndt, Ruediger; Johann, Ulrich; Luetzow-Wentzky, Peter; Wand, Vinzenz; Audley, Heather; Danzmann, Karsten; Garcia-Marin, Antonio; Heinzel, Gerhard; Nofrarias, Miquel; Steier, Frank

    2010-10-10

    We describe the first investigations of the complete engineering model of the optical metrology system (OMS), a key subsystem of the LISA Pathfinder science mission to space. The latter itself is a technological precursor mission to LISA, a spaceborne gravitational wave detector. At its core, the OMS consists of four heterodyne Mach-Zehnder interferometers, a highly stable laser with an external modulator, and a phase meter. It is designed to monitor and track the longitudinal motion and attitude of two floating test masses in the optical reference frame with (relative) precision in the picometer and nanorad range, respectively. We analyze sensor signal correlations and determine a physical sensor noise limit. The coupling parameters between motional degrees of freedom and interferometer signals are analytically derived and compared to measurements. We also measure adverse cross-coupling effects originating from system imperfections and limitations and describe algorithmic mitigation techniques to overcome some of them. Their impact on system performance is analyzed within the context of the Pathfinder mission.

  2. Longwave Radiative Flux Calculations in the TOVS Pathfinder Path A Data Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Amita; Susskind, Joel

    1999-01-01

    A radiative transfer model developed to calculate outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) and downwelling longwave, surface flux (DSF) from the Television and Infrared Operational Satellite (TIROS) Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) Pathfinder Path A retrieval products is described. The model covers the spectral range of 2 to 2800 cm in 14 medium medium spectral bands. For each band, transmittances are parameterized as a function of temperature, water vapor, and ozone profiles. The form of the band transmittance parameterization is a modified version of the approach we use to model channel transmittances for the High Resolution Infrared Sounder 2 (HIRS2) instrument. We separately derive effective zenith angle for each spectral band such that band-averaged radiance calculated at that angle best approximates directionally integrated radiance for that band. We develop the transmittance parameterization at these band-dependent effective zenith angles to incorporate directional integration of radiances required in the calculations of OLR and DSF. The model calculations of OLR and DSF are accurate and differ by less than 1% from our line-by-line calculations. Also, the model results are within 1% range of other line-by-line calculations provided by the Intercomparison of Radiation Codes in Climate Models (ICRCCM) project for clear-sky and cloudy conditions. The model is currently used to calculate global, multiyear (1985-1998) OLR and DSF from the TOVS Pathfinder Path A Retrievals.

  3. Observations at the Mars Pathfinder site: Do they provide "unequivocal" evidence of catastrophic flooding?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapman, M.G.; Kargel, J.S.

    1999-01-01

    After Mars Pathfinder landed at the mouth of Ares Vallis, a large channel that drains into the Chryse Planitia basin, the mission reports unanimously supported the interpretation that the lander site is the locus of catastrophic flooding by noting that all aspects of the scene are consistent with this interpretation. However, alternatives cannot be ruled out by any site observations, as all aspects of the scene are equally consistent with other interpretations of origin, namely, ice and mass-flow processes subsequently modified by wind erosion. The authors discuss alternative explanations for the geologic history of the channel based on a regional view of the circum-Chryse channels from Viking images (our best broad-scale information to date) and the local view from the recent Pathfinder landing site. Mega-indicators of channel origin, the regional geomorphology, geology, and planetary climatic conditions, taken together suggest some combination of flood, mass flow, glacial, and eolian processes. The macro-indicators of channel origin (sedimentologic) are also not indicative of one process of emplacement, either as single criteria or taken cumulatively. Finally, the micro-indicators of channel origin (geochemical and mineralogic composition) do not provide very tight constraints on the deposits' possible origins other than that water was in some way involved.

  4. Classification and Distribution of Mars Pathfinder Rocks Using Quantitative Morphologic Indices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yingst, R. A.; Biederman, K. L.; Monhead, A. M.; Haldemann, A. F. C.; Kowalczyk, M. R.

    2004-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder (MPF) landing site was predicted to contain a broad sampling of rock types varying in mineralogical, physical, mechanical and geochemical characteristics. Although rocks have been divided into several spectral categories based on Imager for Mars Pathfinder visible/near-infrared spectra, it has not been fully determined which of these stem from intrinsic mineralogical differences between rocks or rock surfaces, and which result from factors such as physical or chemical weathering. This has made isolation of unique mineralogy's difficult. Efforts in isolating and classifying spectral units among MPF rocks and soils have met with varying degrees of success, and the current understanding is such that many factors influencing spectral signatures cannot be quantified to a sufficient level so they may be removed. The result is that fundamental questions regarding information needed to reveal the present and past interactions between the rocks and rock surfaces and the Martian environment remain unanswered. But it is possible to approach the issue of identifying distinct rock and rock surface types from a different angle.

  5. A Wind Tunnel Study on the Mars Pathfinder (MPF) Lander Descent Pressure Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soriano, J. Francisco; Coquilla, Rachael V.; Wilson, Gregory R.; Seiff, Alvin; Rivell, Tomas

    2001-01-01

    The primary focus of this study was to determine the accuracy of the Mars Pathfinder lander local pressure readings in accordance with the actual ambient atmospheric pressures of Mars during parachute descent. In order to obtain good measurements, the plane of the lander pressure sensor opening should ideally be situated so that it is parallel to the freestream. However, due to two unfavorable conditions, the sensor was positioned in locations where correction factors are required. One of these disadvantages is due to the fact that the parachute attachment point rotated the lander's center of gravity forcing the location of the pressure sensor opening to be off tangent to the freestream. The second and most troublesome factor was that the lander descends with slight oscillations that could vary the amplitude of the sensor readings. In order to accurately map the correction factors required at each sensor position, an experiment simulating the lander descent was conducted in the Martian Surface Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. Using a 115 scale model at Earth ambient pressures, the test settings provided the necessary Reynolds number conditions in which the actual lander was possibly subjected to during the descent. In the analysis and results of this experiment, the readings from the lander sensor were converted to the form of pressure coefficients. With a contour map of pressure coefficients at each lander oscillatory position, this report will provide a guideline to determine the correction factors required for the Mars Pathfinder lander descent pressure sensor readings.

  6. Nazi medical experiments on Australian prisoners of war: Commentary on the testimony of an Australian soldier.

    PubMed

    Weisz, George M

    2015-12-01

    Archival research reveals that Australian prisoners of war were exposed to non-consensual medical experiments during World War II. This article discusses the first known case of an Australian soldier exposed to German medical experiments. PMID:26939510

  7. Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    First of NASA's Discovery missions. Launched in December 1996 and arrived at Mars on 4 July 1997. Mainly intended as a technology demonstration mission. Used airbags to cushion the landing on Mars. The Carl Sagan Memorial station returned images of an ancient flood plain in Ares Vallis. The 10 kg Sojourner rover used an x-ray spectrometer to study the composition of rocks and travelled about 100 ...

  8. Meteors in Australian Aboriginal Dreamings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamacher, Duane W.; Norris, Ray P.

    2010-06-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of Australian Aboriginal accounts of meteors. The data used were taken from anthropological and ethnographic literature describing oral traditions, ceremonies, and Dreamings of 97 Aboriginal groups representing all states of modern Australia. This revealed common themes in the way meteors were viewed between Aboriginal groups, focusing on supernatural events, death, omens, and war. The presence of such themes around Australia was probably due to the unpredictable nature of meteors in an otherwise well-ordered cosmos.

  9. Immune dysfunction in Australian Aborigines.

    PubMed

    Roberts-Thomson, P J; Roberts-Thomson, R A; Nikoloutsopoulos, T; Gillis, D

    2005-12-01

    An examination of the prevalence and phenotype of immune disorders in different ethnic groups may provide important clues to the etiopathogenesis of these disorders. Whilst still conjectural the restricted and somewhat unique polymorphisms of the MHC (and other genetic loci involving host defences) of the Australian Aborigines may provide an explanation for their apparent heightened susceptibility to newly encountered infections and their resistance to many (auto) immune and allergic disorders. In comparison with non-Aboriginal Australians, Australian Aborigines have heightened frequencies of rheumatic fever, systemic lupus erythematosus, various infections and post-streptococcal glomerulonephritis. In contrast various autoimmune disorders (e.g. rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, CREST, biliary cirrhosis, coeliac disease, pernicious anaemia, vitiligo), B27 related arthropathies, psoriasis, lymphoproliferative disorders and atopic disorders appear infrequent or absent. Similarly various autoantibodies occur with increased or diminished frequency. With continuing racial admixture, social deprivation and deleterious lifestyles of these people it is likely that further changes in both the frequencies and phenotype of these immune disorders will occur. It is only with a full understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms involved in these immune disorders that meaningful and clinical relevant interventions will be possible. PMID:16572744

  10. The Politics Are Personal: "The Australian" vs the Australian Curriculum in History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Tony; Collins, Sue

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the relationship between the conservative newspaper "The Australian" and the development of a national history curriculum in Australia. The lead author surveyed the major Australian press in the five-year period between 2007 and 2012 and found clear patterns of difference between "The Australian" and other press outlets in…

  11. Far-Field Rock Size-Frequency Distribution at the Mars Pathfinder Landing Site and Comparison to the Near Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haldemann, A. F. C.; Forsberg, N. K.; Golombek, M. P.; Bridges, N. T.

    2000-01-01

    Detailed measurements of rocks in the far field at the Mars Pathfinder landing site are consistent with the near field exponential drop off in the cumulative number or area covered by large diameter rocks (and with similar behavior at the Viking sites).

  12. Constraints on the Interior Structure and Seasonal Mass Redistribution of Mars from Radio Tracking of Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Preston, R. A.; Folkner, W. M.

    1997-01-01

    Doppler and range measurements to the Mars Pathfinder lander, made with its radio communications system, have been combined with similar measurements from the viking landers to estimate improved values of the precession of Mars' pole of rotation and the variation in Mars's rotation rate.

  13. Constraints on Martian Soil Composition as Inferred from Viking XRFS and Pathfinder APXS and IMP Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, N. T.; Crisp, J. A.

    2000-01-01

    With the successful operation of the Alpha Proton X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) during 1997's Mars Pathfinder (MPF) mission, geochemistry data are now available from three sites on Mars. APXS raw spectra for six soils and five rocks have been converted to compositional abundances. The Viking Lander X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometer (XRFS) successfully measured elemental abundances of nine soils at Viking 1 and eight soils at Viking 2. Although the three landing sites are located in different parts of Mars, the soils exhibit broad similarities, with an iron-rich chemistry similar to that of palagonite. However, the Pathfinder sods show some significant differences from Viking soils, notably an enrichment in silica and depletion in sulfur. The XRFS samples consisted of near-surface and deep (up to 22 cm) soils acquired by a collector head at the cod of a retractable boom. It was possible to collect and analyze pebbles as large a 2 cm, but only sod, some in the form of consolidated clods, was sampled. In contrast, the APXS measured materials in situ. This resulted in MPF "rock" analyses that probably had a significant dust component and, as explored here, "soil" analyses that may have contained a rocky component We examine several possibilities to explain these differences and other attributes of the APXS and XRFS data sets: 1) The APXS soil measurements actually sampled a mixture of Viking-like soil and small bits of high-silica, low-sulfur rock, 2) The soils were derived from high-silica rocks mixed with a minor component of globally-homogenized dust; these soils are chemically distinct and have a separate geologic history from the Viking soils. 3) The weathering environment was different at the Pathfinder landing site compared to the Viking sites, and 4) Uncertainties in the XRFS and APXS measurements result in reported elemental abundances different than those that are actually present We show that none of the possibilities can be discounted, but that an MPF soil

  14. Pathfinder Landing Site Observed by Mars Orbiter Camera - 'Big Crater' in Stereo View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    On its 256th orbit of Mars, the camera on-board the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft successfully observed the vicinity of the Pathfinder landing site. The images shown are a stereoscopic image pair in anaglyph format, made from the overlapping area of MOC 25603 and 23703. This image is reproduced at a scale of 5 m (16.4 feet) per pixel. Image 23703 was acquired on 13 April at 7:50 AM PDT; Image 25603 was acquired on 22 April at 1:11 PM PDT. The P237 observation was made from a distance of 675 km while the P256 measurement was made from 800 km. The viewing angle for 23703 was 21.2o, for 25603, 30.67o, giving an angular difference of about 9.5o. Owing to the relief on 'Big Crater,' this relatively small angular difference was in this case sufficient to show good stereo parallax.

    The resolution of the MOC image that covered the Pathfinder landing site (MOC 25603) was about 3.3 m or 11 feet per pixel. The Pathfinder lander and airbags form a roughly equilateral triangle 5 m on a side. Noting that the camera has not yet been focussed (it needs to be in the stable temperature conditions of the low altitude, circular mapping orbit in order to achieve best focus) and the hazy atmospheric conditions, the effective scale of the image is probably closer to 5 m (16.4 feet). Thus, the scale of the image was insufficient to resolve the lander (more than one pixel is needed to resolve a feature). In addition, the relatively high sun angle of the image (the sun was 40o above the horizon) reduced the length of shadows (for example, only a few boulders are seen), also decreasing the ability to discriminate small features. Work continues to locate intermediate-scale features in the lander and orbiter images in the hope of identifying the precise landing site based on these comparisons.

    Malin Space Science Systems and the California Institute of Technology built the MOC using spare hardware from the Mars Observer mission. MSSS operates the camera from its facilities in San Diego

  15. Bayesian parameter estimation in the second LISA Pathfinder mock data challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nofrarias, M.; Röver, C.; Hewitson, M.; Monsky, A.; Heinzel, G.; Danzmann, K.; Ferraioli, L.; Hueller, M.; Vitale, S.

    2010-12-01

    A main scientific output of the LISA Pathfinder mission is to provide a noise model that can be extended to the future gravitational wave observatory, LISA. The success of the mission depends thus upon a deep understanding of the instrument, especially the ability to correctly determine the parameters of the underlying noise model. In this work we estimate the parameters of a simplified model of the LISA Technology Package instrument. We describe the LISA Technology Package by means of a closed-loop model that is used to generate the data, both injected signals and noise. Then, parameters are estimated using a Bayesian framework, and it is shown that this method reaches the optimal attainable error, the Cramér-Rao bound. We also address an important issue for the mission: how to efficiently combine the results of different experiments to obtain a unique set of parameters describing the instrument.

  16. Injection of a Body into a Geodesic: Lessons Learnt from the LISA Pathfinder Case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bortoluzzi, Daniele; Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Baird, J.; Binetruy, P.; Born, M.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Bursi, A.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesarini, A.; Conklin, J.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; Diepholz, I.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; Slutsky, J.; Thorpe, J.

    2016-01-01

    Launch lock and release mechanisms constitute a common space business, however, some science missions due to very challenging functional and performance requirements need the development and testing of dedicated systems. In the LISA Pathfinder mission, a gold-coated 2-kg test mass must be injected into a nearly pure geodesic trajectory with a minimal residual velocity with respect to the spacecraft. This task is performed by the Grabbing Positioning and Release Mechanism, which has been tested on-ground to provide the required qualification. In this paper, we describe the test method that analyzes the main contributions to the mechanism performance and focuses on the critical parameters affecting the residual test mass velocity at the injection into the geodesic trajectory. The test results are also presented and discussed.

  17. Size Scales for Thermal Inhomogeneities in Mars' Atmosphere Surface Layer: Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mihalov, John D.; Haberle, Robert M.; Seiff, Alvin; Murphy, James R.; Schofield, John T.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Atmospheric temperature measurement at three heights with thin wire thermocouples on the 1.1 m Mars Pathfinder meteorology must allow estimates of the integral scale of the atmospheric thermal turbulence during an 83 sol period that begins in the summer. The integral scale is a measure for regions of perturbations. In turbulent media that roughly characterizes locations where the perturbations are correlated. Excluding some to intervals with violent excursions of the mean temperatures, integral scale values are found that increase relatively rapidly from a few tenths meters or less near down to several meters by mid-morning. During mid-morning, the diurnal and shorter time scale wind direction variations often place the meteorology mast in the thermal wake of the Lander.

  18. Mars 2024/2026 Pathfinder Mission: Mars Architectures, Systems, and Technologies for Exploration and Resources Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeitlin, Nancy; Mueller, Robert; Muscatello, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Integrate In Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU) sub-systems and examine advanced capabilities and technologies to verify Mars 2024 Forward architecture precursor pathfinder options: Integrated spacecraft/surface infrastructure fluid architecture: propulsion, power, life support center dot Power system feed and propellant scavenging from propulsion system center dot High quality oxygen for life support and EVA Fluid/cryogenic zero-loss transfer and long-term storage center dot Rapid depot-to-rover/spacecraft center dot Slow ISRU plant-to-ascent vehicle Integration of ISRU consumable production center dot Oxygen only from Mars atmosphere carbon dioxide center dot Oxygen, fuel, water, from extraterrestrial soil/regolith Test bed to evaluate long duration life, operations, maintenance on hardware, sensors, and autonomy

  19. The Mars Pathfinder atmospheric structure investigation/meteorology (ASI/MET) experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schofield, J. T.; Barnes, J. R.; Crisp, D.; Haberle, R. M.; Larsen, S.; Magalhaes, J. A.; Murphy, J. R.; Seiff, A.; Wilson, G.

    1997-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder atmospheric structure investigation/meteorology (ASI/MET) experiment measured the vertical density, pressure, and temperature structure of the martian atmosphere from the surface to 160 km, and monitored surface meteorology and climate for 83 sols (1 sol = 1 martian day = 24.7 hours). The atmospheric structure and the weather record are similar to those observed by the Viking 1 lander (VL-1) at the same latitude, altitude, and season 21 years ago, but there are differences related to diurnal effects and the surface properties of the landing site. These include a cold nighttime upper atmosphere; atmospheric temperatures that are 10 to 12 degrees kelvin warmer near the surface; light slope-controlled winds; and dust devils, identified by their pressure, wind, and temperature signatures. The results are consistent with the warm, moderately dusty atmosphere seen by VL-1.

  20. Development of a solar-cell dust opacity measurement instrument for Mars Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey; Jenkins, Phillip P.

    1996-01-01

    The atmosphere of Mars has a considerable load of suspended dust. Over time, this dust is deposited out of the atmosphere. The mechanism and the temporal and geographical variation of this deposition are not well characterized. Measurements of settling rates and dust properties are of considerable scientific interest. Atmospheric dust affects the atmospheric solar absorption and thus the heat balance of Mars, as well as serving as nucleation sites for water and CO2 frost. Knowledge of dust properties is of critical interest to design and prediction of the lifetime and power output of solar arrays, and also to design of mechanical mechanisms and radiators. An instrument has been designed and fabricated to measure the dust accumulation during the course of the Mars Pathfinder rover mission. The solar-cell coverglass transmission experiment will measure the change in optical opacity of a transparent coverglass as dust settles on the surface, and a quartz crystal monitor will measure the mass deposited.

  1. Overview of the Mars Pathfinder mission and assessment of landing site predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, M. P.; Cook, R. A.; Economou, T.; Folkner, W. M.; Haldemann, A. F.; Kallemeyn, P. H.; Knudsen, J. M.; Manning, R. M.; Moore, H. J.; Parker, T. J.; Rieder, R.; Schofield, J. T.; Smith, P. H.; Vaughan, R. M.

    1997-01-01

    Chemical analyses returned by Mars Pathfinder indicate that some rocks may be high in silica, implying differentiated parent materials. Rounded pebbles and cobbles and a possible conglomerate suggest fluvial processes that imply liquid water in equilibrium with the atmosphere and thus a warmer and wetter past. The moment of inertia indicates a central metallic core of 1300 to 2000 kilometers in radius. Composite airborne dust particles appear magnetized by freeze-dried maghemite stain or cement that may have been leached from crustal materials by an active hydrologic cycle. Remote-sensing data at a scale of generally greater than approximately 1 kilometer and an Earth analog correctly predicted a rocky plain safe for landing and roving with a variety of rocks deposited by catastrophic floods that are relatively dust-free.

  2. Mechanical joints and large components for pathfinder in-space assembly and construction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckenor, Jeff; Thomas, Frank

    1990-01-01

    This paper summarizes the background of the Pathfinder Project, In-Space Assembly, and Construction activity for fiscal year 1989. Work is presented on high strength mechanical truss joints and the definition of typical large components that might be required for assembly on-orbit and use on interplanetary space missions. Several mechanical joints were designed, and the most promising early design is presented in detail. The primary design drivers were the ability for robot assembly, the correction of up to a + or - 0.020 inch axial misalignment, and an axial load in the vicinity of + or - 100,000 lb. The most promising joint uses axisymmetric grooves to correct the misalignment and to transfer the load in a smooth path.

  3. The Mars Pathfinder atmospheric structure investigation/meteorology (ASI/MET) experiment.

    PubMed

    Schofield, J T; Barnes, J R; Crisp, D; Haberle, R M; Larsen, S; Magalhães, J A; Murphy, J R; Seiff, A; Wilson, G

    1997-12-01

    The Mars Pathfinder atmospheric structure investigation/meteorology (ASI/MET) experiment measured the vertical density, pressure, and temperature structure of the martian atmosphere from the surface to 160 km, and monitored surface meteorology and climate for 83 sols (1 sol = 1 martian day = 24.7 hours). The atmospheric structure and the weather record are similar to those observed by the Viking 1 lander (VL-1) at the same latitude, altitude, and season 21 years ago, but there are differences related to diurnal effects and the surface properties of the landing site. These include a cold nighttime upper atmosphere; atmospheric temperatures that are 10 to 12 degrees kelvin warmer near the surface; light slope-controlled winds; and dust devils, identified by their pressure, wind, and temperature signatures. The results are consistent with the warm, moderately dusty atmosphere seen by VL-1. PMID:9388169

  4. Overview of the Mars Pathfinder mission and assessment of landing site predictions.

    PubMed

    Golombek, M P; Cook, R A; Economou, T; Folkner, W M; Haldemann, A F; Kallemeyn, P H; Knudsen, J M; Manning, R M; Moore, H J; Parker, T J; Rieder, R; Schofield, J T; Smith, P H; Vaughan, R M

    1997-12-01

    Chemical analyses returned by Mars Pathfinder indicate that some rocks may be high in silica, implying differentiated parent materials. Rounded pebbles and cobbles and a possible conglomerate suggest fluvial processes that imply liquid water in equilibrium with the atmosphere and thus a warmer and wetter past. The moment of inertia indicates a central metallic core of 1300 to 2000 kilometers in radius. Composite airborne dust particles appear magnetized by freeze-dried maghemite stain or cement that may have been leached from crustal materials by an active hydrologic cycle. Remote-sensing data at a scale of generally greater than approximately 1 kilometer and an Earth analog correctly predicted a rocky plain safe for landing and roving with a variety of rocks deposited by catastrophic floods that are relatively dust-free. PMID:9388167

  5. Simulation-Based Verification of Autonomous Controllers via Livingstone PathFinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, A. E.; Pecheur, Charles

    2004-01-01

    AI software is often used as a means for providing greater autonomy to automated systems, capable of coping with harsh and unpredictable environments. Due in part to the enormous space of possible situations that they aim to addrs, autonomous systems pose a serious challenge to traditional test-based verification approaches. Efficient verification approaches need to be perfected before these systems can reliably control critical applications. This publication describes Livingstone PathFinder (LPF), a verification tool for autonomous control software. LPF applies state space exploration algorithms to an instrumented testbed, consisting of the controller embedded in a simulated operating environment. Although LPF has focused on NASA s Livingstone model-based diagnosis system applications, the architecture is modular and adaptable to other systems. This article presents different facets of LPF and experimental results from applying the software to a Livingstone model of the main propulsion feed subsystem for a prototype space vehicle.

  6. A Precision Radial Velocity Pathfinder Instrument in the H Band with a Laser Frequency Comb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terrien, Ryan; Mahadevan, S.; Ramsey, L.; Bender, C.; Redman, S.; Osterman, S.; Diddams, S.; Ycas, G.; Quinlan, F.; Botzer, B.

    2011-01-01

    We describe changes to the warm-bench, fiber-fed, Penn State Pathfinder instrument that enabled us to test the ability to recover precision radial velocities in the H-band. The use of thermal blocking filters that cut off at 1.7 microns allows us to observe in the H-band by blocking the overwhelming thermal flux beyond 2 microns. A PK-50 window provides further suppression of this thermal flux. We also describe the observations, reduction, and results from an August 2010 test run of this instrument with a 25 GHz NIST laser frequency comb calibration system. We obtained radial velocities of several bright stars with on-sky observation with the laser comb. Our results demonstrate the potential of our testbed configuration for obtaining precision radial velocities in the NIR, as well as the utility of laser frequency combs as wavelength calibrators in this wavelength regime.

  7. Flight Reconstruction of the Mars Pathfinder Disk-Gap-Band Parachute Drag Coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Prasun; Schofield, John T.; Lisano, Michael E.

    2003-01-01

    On July 4, 1997, the Mars Pathfinder (MPF) mission successfully landed on Mars. The entry, descent, and landing (EDL) scenario employed the use of a Disk-Gap-Band parachute design to decelerate the Lander. Flight reconstruction of the entry using MPF flight accelerometer data revealed that the MPF parachute decelerated faster than predicted. In the summer of 2003, the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission will send two Landers to the surface of Mars arriving in January 2004. The MER mission utilizes a similar EDL scenario and parachute design as that employed by MPF. As a result, characterizing the degree of underperformance of the MPF parachute system is critical for the MER EDL trajectory design. This paper provides an overview of the methodology utilized to estimate the MPF parachute drag coefficient as experienced on Mars.

  8. Magnetic polarisation effects of temperature sensors and heaters in LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanjuán, J.; Lobo, A.; Nofrarias, M.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Mateos, N.; Xirgu, X.

    2009-03-01

    Temperature sensors and heaters belong in the diagnostics subsystem of the LISA Technology Package (LTP) on board LISA Pathfinder, the technology demonstrator for LISA. A number of these diagnostics items are placed at short distances from the LTP proof masses, and are negative temperature coefficient (NTC) thermistors. By design, these devices have tiny amounts of ferromagnetic materials which therefore constitute a potential source of disturbance to the performance of the LTP. We present a detailed magnetic characterisation of the NTC's, and use the data to evaluate their impact on the acceleration noise budget of the LTP. The effect is seen to be small, and can be further reduced if the NTC's are submitted to a demagnetisation process before they are attached. Re-magnetisation is unlikely, as rather strong fields (mili-Tesla) are required to re-magnetise the NTC's

  9. Photodetector Development for the Wheel Abrasion Experiment on the Sojourner Microrover of the Mars Pathfinder Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilt, David M.; Jenkins, Phillip P.; Scheiman, David A.

    1997-01-01

    On-board the Mars Pathfinder spacecraft, launched in December of 1996, is a small roving vehicle named Sojourner. On Sojourner is an experiment to determine the abrasive characteristics of the Martian surface, called the Wheel Abrasion Experiment (WAE). The experiment works as follows: one of the wheels of the rover has a strip of black anodized aluminum bonded to the tread. The aluminum strip has thin coatings of aluminum, nickel and platinum deposited in patches. There are five (5) patches or samples of each metal, and the patches range in thickness from 200 A to 1000 A. The different metals were chosen for their differing hardness and their environmental stability. As the wheel is spun in the Martian soil, the thin patches of metal are abraded away, exposing the black anodization. The abrasion is monitored by measuring the amount of light reflected off of the samples. A photodetector was developed for this purpose, and that is the subject of this paper.

  10. In-flight thermal experiments for LISA Pathfinder: Simulating temperature noise at the Inertial Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibert, F.; Nofrarias, M.; Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Baird, J.; Binetruy, P.; Born, M.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Bursi, A.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesarini, A.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; Diepholz, I.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; Gallegos, J.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, Ll; Giardini, D.; Giusteri, R.; Grimani, C.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Inchauspé, H.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Kaune, B.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C.; Lloro, I.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Maghami, P.; Mance, D.; Martín, V.; Martin-Porqueras, F.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P.; Mendes, J.; Mendes, L.; Moroni, A.; Paczkowski, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Petiteau, A.; Pivato, P.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ragnit, U.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Russano, G.; Sarra, P.; Schleicher, A.; Slutsky, J.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Sumner, T.; Texier, D.; Thorpe, J.; Trenkel, C.; Tu, H. B.; Vetrugno, D.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Wealthy, D.; Wen, S.; Weber, W.; Wittchen, A.; Zanoni, C.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2015-05-01

    Thermal Diagnostics experiments to be carried out on board LISA Pathfinder (LPF) will yield a detailed characterisation of how temperature fluctuations affect the LTP (LISA Technology Package) instrument performance, a crucial information for future space based gravitational wave detectors as the proposed eLISA. Amongst them, the study of temperature gradient fluctuations around the test masses of the Inertial Sensors will provide as well information regarding the contribution of the Brownian noise, which is expected to limit the LTP sensitivity at frequencies close to 1 mHz during some LTP experiments. In this paper we report on how these kind of Thermal Diagnostics experiments were simulated in the last LPF Simulation Campaign (November, 2013) involving all the LPF Data Analysis team and using an end-to-end simulator of the whole spacecraft. Such simulation campaign was conducted under the framework of the preparation for LPF operations.

  11. In-flight thermal experiments for LISA Pathfinder: Simulating temperature noise at the Inertial Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armano, M.; Audley, H.; Auger, G.; Baird, J.; Binetruy, P.; Born, M.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Brandt, N.; Bursi, A.; Caleno, M.; Cavalleri, A.; Cesarini, A.; Cruise, M.; Danzmann, K.; Diepholz, I.; Dolesi, R.; Dunbar, N.; Ferraioli, L.; Ferroni, V.; Fitzsimons, E.; Freschi, M.; Gallegos, J.; García Marirrodriga, C.; Gerndt, R.; Gesa, Ll; Gibert, F.; Giardini, D.; Giusteri, R.; Grimani, C.; Harrison, I.; Heinzel, G.; Hewitson, M.; Hollington, D.; Hueller, M.; Huesler, J.; Inchauspé, H.; Jennrich, O.; Jetzer, P.; Johlander, B.; Karnesis, N.; Kaune, B.; Korsakova, N.; Killow, C.; Lloro, I.; Maarschalkerweerd, R.; Madden, S.; Maghami, P.; Mance, D.; Martín, V.; Martin-Porqueras, F.; Mateos, I.; McNamara, P.; Mendes, J.; Mendes, L.; Moroni, A.; Nofrarias, M.; Paczkowski, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Petiteau, A.; Pivato, P.; Plagnol, E.; Prat, P.; Ragnit, U.; Ramos-Castro, J.; Reiche, J.; Romera Perez, J. A.; Robertson, D.; Rozemeijer, H.; Russano, G.; Sarra, P.; Schleicher, A.; Slutsky, J.; Sopuerta, C. F.; Sumner, T.; Texier, D.; Thorpe, J.; Trenkel, C.; Tu, H. B.; Vetrugno, D.; Vitale, S.; Wanner, G.; Ward, H.; Waschke, S.; Wass, P.; Wealthy, D.; Wen, S.; Weber, W.; Wittchen, A.; Zanoni, C.; Ziegler, T.; Zweifel, P.

    2015-04-01

    Thermal Diagnostics experiments to be carried out on board LISA Pathfinder (LPF) will yield a detailed characterisation of how temperature fluctuations affect the LTP (LISA Technology Package) instrument performance, a crucial information for future space based gravitational wave detectors as the proposed eLISA. Amongst them, the study of temperature gradient fluctuations around the test masses of the Inertial Sensors will provide as well information regarding the contribution of the Brownian noise, which is expected to limit the LTP sensitivity at frequencies close to 1 mHz during some LTP experiments. In this paper we report on how these kind of Thermal Diagnostics experiments were simulated in the last LPF Simulation Campaign (November, 2013) involving all the LPF Data Analysis team and using an end-to-end simulator of the whole spacecraft. Such simulation campaign was conducted under the framework of the preparation for LPF operations.

  12. Thermo-elastic induced phase noise in the LISA Pathfinder spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibert, F.; Nofrarias, M.; Karnesis, N.; Gesa, L.; Martín, V.; Mateos, I.; Lobo, A.; Flatscher, R.; Gerardi, D.; Burkhardt, J.; Gerndt, R.; Robertson, D. I.; Ward, H.; McNamara, P. W.; Guzmán, F.; Hewitson, M.; Diepholz, I.; Reiche, J.; Heinzel, G.; Danzmann, K.

    2015-02-01

    During the on-station thermal test campaign of the LISA Pathfinder, the diagnostics subsystem was tested in nearly space conditions for the first time after integration in the satellite. The results showed the compliance of the temperature measurement system, obtaining temperature noise around {{10}-4} K H{{z}-1/2} in the frequency band 1-30 mHz. In addition, controlled injection of heat signals to the suspension struts anchoring the LISA Technology Package (LTP) core assembly to the satellite structure allowed us to experimentally estimate, for the first time, the phase noise contribution through thermo-elastic distortion of the LTP interferometer, the satellite's main instrument. Such contribution was found to be at {{10}-12} mH{{z}-1/2}, a factor of 30 below the measured noise at the lower end of the measurement bandwidth (1 mHz).

  13. A New Look at the AVHRR Polar Pathfinder Data and Why Good Data Sometimes Goes Bad

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, G.; Campbell, G.; Gallaher, D. W.; Stroeve, J. C.; Key, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    Intensification of global warming in recent decades has caused a rise of interest in year-to-year and decadal-scale climate variability in the Arctic. This is because the Arctic is believed to be one of the most sensitive and vulnerable regions to climatic changes. The enhanced vulnerability of the Arctic results from several positive feedbacks, including the temperature-albedo-melt feedback and the cloud-radiation feedback. Recent observations of record regional anomalies in sea ice extent, thinning of the margins of the Greenland ice sheet and reduction in northern hemispheric snow cover may reflect the effect of these feedbacks. The new AVHRR Polar Pathfinder (APP) data set at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) spans 30 years (1981-2011), providing a long-term record of surface temperature, albedo and cloud cover for investigation of several of these feedback mechanisms. Accuracy of long-term trend analysis depends on the ability to produce a consistent data record over multiple satellites and AVHRR sensor generations. While orbital parameters, resolutions, and sensors themselves have undergone only minor changes or stayed the same, calibration coefficients, gridding and projection parameters, and other data processing details have evolved over time. Unless the periodic post-processing is extremely methodical and quality controlled, it is likely that some changes will be missed: errors will creep in 'under the radar'. Analysis shows that updated calibration coefficients for the old AVHRR Polar Pathfinder visible channels were not applied correctly. Furthermore, image georeferencing changed significantly between software versions, and accurate swath compositing failed for an entire summer season. When viewed using only a small spatial extent or limited time span, these errors were not readily apparent. However, examination of the entire old APP albedo data record for the Greenland Ice sheet using high spatiotemporal resolution highlights the problems

  14. Sub-Femto-g Free Fall for Space-Based Gravitational Wave Observatories: LISA Pathfinder Results.

    PubMed

    Armano, M; Audley, H; Auger, G; Baird, J T; Bassan, M; Binetruy, P; Born, M; Bortoluzzi, D; Brandt, N; Caleno, M; Carbone, L; Cavalleri, A; Cesarini, A; Ciani, G; Congedo, G; Cruise, A M; Danzmann, K; de Deus Silva, M; De Rosa, R; Diaz-Aguiló, M; Di Fiore, L; Diepholz, I; Dixon, G; Dolesi, R; Dunbar, N; Ferraioli, L; Ferroni, V; Fichter, W; Fitzsimons, E D; Flatscher, R; Freschi, M; García Marín, A F; García Marirrodriga, C; Gerndt, R; Gesa, L; Gibert, F; Giardini, D; Giusteri, R; Guzmán, F; Grado, A; Grimani, C; Grynagier, A; Grzymisch, J; Harrison, I; Heinzel, G; Hewitson, M; Hollington, D; Hoyland, D; Hueller, M; Inchauspé, H; Jennrich, O; Jetzer, P; Johann, U; Johlander, B; Karnesis, N; Kaune, B; Korsakova, N; Killow, C J; Lobo, J A; Lloro, I; Liu, L; López-Zaragoza, J P; Maarschalkerweerd, R; Mance, D; Martín, V; Martin-Polo, L; Martino, J; Martin-Porqueras, F; Madden, S; Mateos, I; McNamara, P W; Mendes, J; Mendes, L; Monsky, A; Nicolodi, D; Nofrarias, M; Paczkowski, S; Perreur-Lloyd, M; Petiteau, A; Pivato, P; Plagnol, E; Prat, P; Ragnit, U; Raïs, B; Ramos-Castro, J; Reiche, J; Robertson, D I; Rozemeijer, H; Rivas, F; Russano, G; Sanjuán, J; Sarra, P; Schleicher, A; Shaul, D; Slutsky, J; Sopuerta, C F; Stanga, R; Steier, F; Sumner, T; Texier, D; Thorpe, J I; Trenkel, C; Tröbs, M; Tu, H B; Vetrugno, D; Vitale, S; Wand, V; Wanner, G; Ward, H; Warren, C; Wass, P J; Wealthy, D; Weber, W J; Wissel, L; Wittchen, A; Zambotti, A; Zanoni, C; Ziegler, T; Zweifel, P

    2016-06-10

    We report the first results of the LISA Pathfinder in-flight experiment. The results demonstrate that two free-falling reference test masses, such as those needed for a space-based gravitational wave observatory like LISA, can be put in free fall with a relative acceleration noise with a square root of the power spectral density of 5.2±0.1  fm s^{-2}/sqrt[Hz], or (0.54±0.01)×10^{-15}  g/sqrt[Hz], with g the standard gravity, for frequencies between 0.7 and 20 mHz. This value is lower than the LISA Pathfinder requirement by more than a factor 5 and within a factor 1.25 of the requirement for the LISA mission, and is compatible with Brownian noise from viscous damping due to the residual gas surrounding the test masses. Above 60 mHz the acceleration noise is dominated by interferometer displacement readout noise at a level of (34.8±0.3)  fm/sqrt[Hz], about 2 orders of magnitude better than requirements. At f≤0.5  mHz we observe a low-frequency tail that stays below 12  fm s^{-2}/sqrt[Hz] down to 0.1 mHz. This performance would allow for a space-based gravitational wave observatory with a sensitivity close to what was originally foreseen for LISA. PMID:27341221

  15. Pathfinding the Flight Advanced Stirling Convertor Design with the ASC-E3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Wayne A.; Wilson, Kyle; Smith, Eddie; Collins, Josh

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) was initially developed by Sunpower, Inc. under contract to NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) as a technology development project. The ASC technology fulfills NASA s need for high efficiency power convertors for future Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS). Early successful technology demonstrations between 2003 to 2005 eventually led to the expansion of the project including the decision in 2006 to use the ASC technology on the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG). Sunpower has delivered 22 ASC convertors of progressively mature designs to date to GRC. Currently, Sunpower with support from GRC, Lockheed Martin Space System Company (LMSSC), and the Department of Energy (DOE) is developing the flight ASC-F in parallel with the ASC-E3 pathfinders. Sunpower will deliver four pairs of ASC-E3 convertors to GRC which will be used for extended operation reliability assessment, independent validation and verification testing, system interaction tests, and to support LMSSC controller verification. The ASC-E3 and -F convertors are being built to the same design and processing documentation and the same product specification. The initial two pairs of ASC-E3 are built before the flight units and will validate design and processing changes prior to implementation on the ASC-F flight convertors. This paper provides a summary on development of the ASC technology and the status of the ASC-E3 build and how they serve the vital pathfinder role ahead of the flight build for ASRG. The ASRG is part of two of the three candidate missions being considered for selection for the Discovery 12 mission.

  16. Pathfinding the Flight Advanced Stirling Convertor Design with the ASC-E3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Wayne A.; Wilson, Kyle; Smith, Eddie; Collins, Josh

    2012-01-01

    The Advanced Stirling Convertor (ASC) was initially developed by Sunpower, Inc. under contract to NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) as a technology development project. The ASC technology fulfills NASA's need for high efficiency power convertors for future Radioisotope Power Systems (RPS). Early successful technology demonstrations between 2003 to 2005 eventually led to the expansion of the project including the decision in 2006 to use the ASC technology on the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG). Sunpower has delivered 22 ASC convertors of progressively mature designs to date to GRC. Currently, Sunpower with support from GRC, Lockheed Martin Space System Company (LMSSC), and the Department of Energy (DOE) is developing the flight ASC-F in parallel with the ASC-E3 pathfinders. Sunpower will deliver four pairs of ASC-E3 convertors to GRC which will be used for extended operation reliability assessment, independent validation and verification testing, system interaction tests, and to support LMSSC controller verification. The ASC-E3 and -F convertors are being built to the same design and processing documentation and the same product specification. The initial two pairs of ASC-E3 are built before the flight units and will validate design and processing changes prior to implementation on the ASC-F flight convertors. This paper provides a summary on development of the ASC technology and the status of the ASC-E3 build and how they serve the vital pathfinder role ahead of the flight build for ASRG. The ASRG is part of two of the three candidate missions being considered for selection for the Discovery 12 mission.

  17. AVHRR-Based Polar Pathfinder Products: Evaluation, Enhancement and Transition to MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fowler, Charles; Maslanik, James; Stone, Robert; Stroeve, Julienne; Emery, William

    2000-01-01

    Study of the environment has historically been done with observations and measurements in relatively few local areas. While some of these have been done over long time spans, most have not. The NOAA/NASA Pathfinder project was initiated to complement these data sets with satellite data that can provide information over larger spatial areas and longer time spans. The AVHRR Polar Pathfinder (APR) program was part of this project. The APR was to supply data from the NOAA AVHRR instruments that was consistently generated in a format usable to a wide range of scientific investigators. A grant was obtained from the NASA Research Announcement 97-MTPE-03 to evaluate the APP products, to provide any enhancements, and to compare with products from the new MODIS instrument. There was about a two year overlap between the projects, and this validation effort had several impacts on the APP products. The APP products are derived from the instruments aboard 4 NOAA satellites, NOAA-7, 9, 11, and 14. Initial validation efforts compared the thermal calibrations of these instruments, and differences are found. Calibration has undergone many revisions and techniques have changed since the satellites were launched. The first calibration methods were optimized for global ocean temperatures, as this was one of the primary and important uses of the AVHRR instruments. As the APP program started, newer methods that provided more accurate temperature retrievals over a wider range of temperatures were being developed. The calibration of a wider range of temperatures were necessary because of the extremely low values in the polar regions. These methods were also designed so that calibrated data was also consistent between all the NOAA satellites. These newer calibration methods were then adopted primarily because of the initial finding of this validation effort.

  18. The LTP Experiment on LISA Pathfinder: Operational Definition of TT Gauge in Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armano, Michele

    2011-10-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are planning the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) mission in order to detect GW. The need of accurate testing of free-fall and knowledge of noise in a space environment similar to LISA's is considered mandatory a pre-phase for the project. Therefore the LISA Pathfinder mission has been designed by ESA to fly the LISA Technology Package (LTP), aiming at testing free-fall by measuring the residual acceleration between two test-bodies in the dynamical scheme we address as "drag-free". The spectral map of the residual acceleration as function of frequency will convey information on the local noise level, thus producing a picture of the environmental working conditions for LISA itself. The thesis contains abundant material on the problem of compensating static gravity, the development of a theory of orthogonalization of reference and cross-talk for the LTP experiment. The construction of the laser detection procedure starting from GR and differential geometry arguments is carried on. Effort was put in pointing out the physical motivations for the choices made in several other papers by the author and colleagues. In this perspective the thesis is meant as a summary tool for the LTP collaboration. In the second part of the thesis we summarize our contributions for a measurement of G onboard LTP and review on possible tests of fundamental physics the mission might embody. A wide part of the thesis is now part of the LTP Operation Master Plan, describing the real science and operations onboard LISA Pathfinder. This thesis was defended on September 26th, 2006 at the University of Como, Italy.

  19. Summary of the results of the LISA-Pathfinder Test Mass release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanoni, C.; Bortoluzzi, D.; Conklin, J. W.; Köker, I.; Seutchat, B.; Vitale, S.

    2015-05-01

    The challenging goal of LISA-Pathfinder in terms of maximum non-gravitational forces applied on the test mass poses tight constraints on the design of the Gravitational Reference Sensor. In particular, large gaps (3-4 mm) must exist between the test mass and its housing and any system there located must be either gold coated or made of a gold-based material. As a consequence, a significant adhesion may arise between the test mass and the mechanism designed to cage it during the spacecraft launch and to release it to free-fall. The criticality of the latter phase is enhanced by the control force authority exerted to the test mass by the surrounding electrodes. Such a force is limited by the large gaps (order of μN). Since the expected adhesion force between the test mass and its holding devices is much larger than the force authority, a dynamic release must be realized. However, following this procedure adhesion converts into test mass velocity, which can be controlled by the capacitive force only if it is smaller than 5 μm/s. At the University of Trento (Italy) the Transferred Momentum Measurement Facility has been designed and developed to measure the impulse produced by metallic adhesion upon quick rupture, in representative conditions of the LISA-Pathfinder test mass release to free-fall. Large sets of data have been collected and a mathematical model of the in-flight release dynamics has been developed, in order to estimate the test mass release velocity. A summary of the results is presented, together with an overview of the recent developments and a prediction of the in-flight performance.

  20. Career Intentions of Australian Physical Education Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mäkelä, Kasper; Whipp, Peter R.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate Australian physical education (PE) teachers' career intentions and factors influencing their intentions. A sample (N = 234) of Western Australian PE teachers responded to a questionnaire determining PE teachers' work and the primary motivators for intention to leave the profession. Half (51.3%) of the…

  1. A global history of Australian trees.

    PubMed

    Bennett, Brett M

    2011-01-01

    Scholars studying the globalization of Australian trees have previously emphasized the rapid natural propagation of Australian trees outside of their native habitats, believing their success to be a reversal of "ecological imperialism" from the "new world" to the "old world." This article argues that the expansion of Australian trees should not be viewed as a biological phenomenon, but as the result of a long-term attempt by powerful states and state-sponsored scientists to select and breed Australian species that could grow in a variety of climates and ecological conditions. Five non-biological factors largely determined the success of these attempts to grow Australian trees: the abundance or paucity of natural forests, state power, the amount of scientific research directed to planting Australian trees, the cost of labor, and the ability to utilize hardwood timbers and bark. This paper compares the use of Australian trees in Australia, India, and South Africa to demonstrate that biology was not the determining factor in the long-term success of many Australian genera and species. PMID:20665086

  2. Government Financial Assistance for Australian University Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Reviews the assistance provided by governments to students in Australian universities. First provides some background information on the history and structure of the Australian higher education sector and then discusses the two major forms of government financial assistance: assistance with fees and assistance through income support. (EV)

  3. Australian Literature in the Primary Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Sullivan, Colleen, Ed.

    This book was designed to supply information on available resources in Australian children's literature and a tradition of teaching which incorporates the Australian experience in an inclusive manner. Essays and their authors consist of the following: (1) "Children's Books in Australia: Two Hundred Years of Social Life" (Maurice Saxby); (2) "One…

  4. Rethinking Majors in Australian Indigenous Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakata, Martin; Nakata, Vicky; Keech, Sarah; Bolt, Reuben

    2014-01-01

    The challenges of finding more productive ways of teaching and learning in Australian Indigenous Studies have been a key focal point for the Australian Indigenous Studies Learning and Teaching Network. This article contributes to this discussion by drawing attention to new possibilities for teaching and learning practices amid the priority being…

  5. Australian Aboriginal Language Early Childhood Education Programmes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, Tony

    This report discusses the provision of culturally appropriate early childhood programs in Australian Aboriginal language in Australia, and the education of teachers for these programs. The first section of the report examines the education of indigenous peoples in the context of the current Australian education system. Evidence in support of the…

  6. A National Australian Curriculum: In Whose Interests?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ditchburn, Geraldine

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of an Australian curriculum is likely to have a widespread and long-term impact on schools, teachers and students, and yet there has been a swift and an almost unquestioning acceptance of its introduction by the Australian public and by educators. This paper will use theoretical frameworks informed by Gramsci's cultural hegemony…

  7. Four Management Agendas for Australian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharrock, Geoff

    2012-01-01

    In a new mixed economy of higher learning, Australian universities require more strategic management to compete and collaborate sustainably. However, many scholars argue that new modes of university management are at odds with scholarly aims and values. This article examines how Australian universities frame their missions and communicate their…

  8. Are Young Muslims Adopting Australian Values?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kabir, Nahid Afrose

    2008-01-01

    Recently politicians in Australia have raised concerns that some Muslims are not adopting Australian values to a sufficient extent. In this paper I explore the notion of Australian values with respect to immigrant youth. By analysing interviews with 32 Muslim students who are 15-18 years of age and of diverse backgrounds in two state schools in…

  9. Understanding Culture and Diversity: Australian Aboriginal Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vize, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Australian Aboriginal culture is rich, complex and fascinating. The art of Aboriginal Australians shows a great understanding of the earth and its creatures. This article presents an activity which has been designed as a multi-age project. The learning outcomes have been written to suit both younger and older students. Aspects of the project could…

  10. Aurorae in Australian Aboriginal Traditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamacher, Duane W.

    2013-07-01

    Transient celestial phenomena feature prominently in the astronomical knowledge and traditions of Aboriginal Australians. In this paper, I collect accounts of the Aurora Australis from the literature regarding Aboriginal culture. Using previous studies of meteors, eclipses, and comets in Aboriginal traditions, I anticipate that the physical properties of aurora, such as their generally red colour as seen from southern Australia, will be associated with fire, death, blood, and evil spirits. The survey reveals this to be the case and also explores historical auroral events in Aboriginal cultures, aurorae in rock art, and briefly compares Aboriginal auroral traditions with other global indigenous groups, including the Maori of New Zealand.

  11. Rural surgery: the Australian experience.

    PubMed

    Bruening, Martin H; Maddern, Guy J

    2009-12-01

    A significant proportion of the Australian population resides nonmetropolitan regions. For the majority of these smaller regional centers, the surgical service delivery has been traditionally provided by either solo or two-person surgical practices. As medical students' interest in rural practice declined, new models were created to ensure medical care in these areas. This article outlines the past and current state of medical care in rural areas, highlighting models used in Port Augusta, Mount Gambier, and Port Lincoln. It concludes that these models are successful and should be further developed. PMID:19944815

  12. Australian developments in marine science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffin, Millard F.

    2012-07-01

    Australia is an island nation with about two thirds of its jurisdiction underwater. On 25 May 2012, Australia instituted the Seas and Submerged Lands (Limits of Continental Shelf) Proclamation 2012, confirming areas of seabed where Australia has exclusive rights to explore and exploit marine resources. This proclamation follows recommendations by the Commission on the Limits of the Continental Shelf, a body established under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, confirming Australia's entitlement to extended continental shelf, i.e., that beyond 200 nautical miles from the coastline, of some 2.56 million square kilometers, excluding Australian Antarctic Territory [Symonds et al., 2009] (Figure 1a).

  13. Australian Aboriginal Astronomy and Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, Philip A.

    Australian Aboriginal ethnoastronomical traditions were recorded from a wide variety of sources in different periods. While the corpus of mythology concerning the heavens is diverse, it is unified by beliefs of a Skyworld as land with its own topography, containing plants and animals familiar to those living below. Spirits of the dead reside alongside the Creation Ancestors as celestial bodies in the Skyworld. Aboriginal hunter-gatherers used the regular movement of constellations and planets to measure time and to indicate the season, while unexpected change in the sky was seen as an omen.

  14. Comets in Australian Aboriginal Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamacher, Duane W.; Norris, Ray P.

    2011-03-01

    We present 25 accounts of comets from 40 Australian Aboriginal communities, citing both supernatural perceptions of comets and historical accounts of historically bright comets. Historical and ethnographic descriptions include the Great Comets of 1843, 1861, 1901, 1910, and 1927. We describe the perceptions of comets in Aboriginal societies and show that they are typically associated with fear, death, omens, malevolent spirits, and evil magic, consistent with many cultures around the world. We also provide a list of words for comets in 16 different Aboriginal languages.

  15. The Superresolved Super Pan: Improved Resolution of the Mars Pathfinder Landing Site Using Superresolution on the IMP Super Pan Data Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stoker, Carol; Kanefsky, Bob

    2000-01-01

    The Imager for Mars Pathfinder Super Pan image cubes were combined using Superresolution to produce a data set with a factor of two higher spatial resolution than the starting products. The data product is presented.

  16. Australian scientists develop male contraceptive.

    PubMed

    1974-05-20

    The Australian Information Service in Canberra reports that Australian scientists have formulated a contraceptive pill to temporarily stop spermatogenesis in man, thus producing infertility. The research was done by a team consisting of Dr. Henry Burger, director of the Medical Reserach Center at Prince Henry's Hospital in Melbourne, Dr. Bryan Hudson, Principal Research Fellow at the Howard Florey Institute of Experimental Medicine at the Univeristy of Melbourne, and Dr. David de Kretser, senior lecturer in Monash University's Department of Medicine at Prince Henry's Hospital. The contraceptive pill consists of progestagen (d-norgestrel) with androgen (methyltestosterone), a combination that suppresses the production of the sperm but conserves libido and potency. The testing program has yet to be undertaken in human volunteers. There will be three phases to the drug trial: pretreatment, during which the health of the volunteers and the safety of the drug will be established; the treatment phase, lasting six months, during which the volunteers will be given daily oral dose of the drugs; and the recovery phase, lasting at least three months, during which the restoration of normal spermatogenesis will be observed. PMID:12333267

  17. Overview of the NOAA/NASA advanced very high resolution radiometer Pathfinder algorithm for sea surface temperature and associated matchup database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilpatrick, K. A.; Podestá, G. P.; Evans, R.

    2001-05-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)/NASA Oceans Pathfinder sea surface temperature (SST) data are derived from measurements made by the advanced very high resolution radiometers (AVHRRs) on board the NOAA 7, 9, 11, and 14 polar orbiting satellites. All versions of the Pathfinder SST algorithm are based on the NOAA/National Environmental Satellite Data and Information Service nonlinear SST operational algorithm (NLSST). Improvements to the NLSST operational algorithm developed by the Pathfinder program include the use of monthly calibration coefficients selected on the basis of channel brightness temperature difference (T4-T5). This channel difference is used as a proxy for water vapor regime. The latest version (version 4.2) of the Pathfinder processing includes the use of decision trees to determine objectively pixel cloud contamination and quality level (0-7) of the SST retrieval. The 1985-1998 series of AVHRR global measurements has been reprocessed using the Pathfinder version 4.2 processing protocol and is available at various temporal and spatial resolutions from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory Distributed Active Archive Center. One of the highlights of the Pathfinder program is that in addition to the daily global area coverage fields, a matchup database of coincident in situ buoy and satellite SST observations also is made available for independent algorithm development and validation.

  18. Precision Radial Velocities in the near-infrared Y and H bands with the Penn State Pathfinder Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahadevan, Suvrath; Ramsey, L.; Redman, S.; Bender, C.; Botzer, B.; Terrien, R.; Osterman, S.; Diddams, S.; Ycas, G.; Quinlan, F.; Roy, A.; Zonak, S.

    2011-01-01

    Precision radial velocities in the near infrared can help detect terrestrial mass planets around mid and late M dwarfs that are typically too faint in the optical for effective monitoring. We have demonstrated 10-15 m/s radial velocity precision in the NIR Y band with our warm-bench fiber-fed Pathfinder instrument at the 9m Hobby Eberly telescope, and will present these results as well as discuss results from the first on-sky observations with an H band laser frequency comb. We will also present the instrumental upgrades and modification to Pathfinder that have made high NIR velocity precision possible with the use of new calibration sources like Uranium lamps and laser combs. The ability to achieve this level of precision with a test bed bodes well for a stabilized spectrograph built on these principles, and we discuss progress toward this as well as challenges like modal noise and telluric absorption correction.

  19. Experiments and Spectral Studies of Martian Volcanic Rocks: Implications for the Origin of Pathfinder Rocks and Soils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rutherford, Malcolm J.; Mustard, Jack; Weitz, Catherine

    2002-01-01

    The composition and spectral properties of the Mars Pathfinder rocks and soils together with the identification of basaltic and andesitic Mars terrains based on Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) data raised interesting questions regarding the nature and origin of Mars surface rocks. We have investigated the following questions: (1) are the Pathfinder rocks igneous and is it possible these rocks could have formed by known igneous processes, such as equilibrium or fractional crystallization, operating within SNC magmas known to exist on Mars? If it is possible, what P (depth) and PH2O conditions are required? (2) whether TES-based interpretations of plagioclase-rich basalt and andesitic terrains in the south and north regions of Mars respectively are unique. Are the surface compositions of these regions plagioclase-rich, possibly indicating the presence of old AI-rich crust of Mars, or are the spectra being affected by something like surface weathering processes that might determine the spectral pyroxene to plagioclase ratio?

  20. Hubble's Look at Mars Shows Canyon Dust Storm, Cloudy Conditions for Pathfinder Landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope images of Mars, taken on June 27, 1997, reveal a significant dust storm which fills much of the Valles Marineris canyon system and extends into Xanthe Terra, about 600 miles (1000 kilometers) south of the landing site.

    It is difficult to predict the evolution of this storm and whether it will affect the Pathfinder observations.

    The pictures were taken in order to monitor the site in Ares Vallis where the Pathfinder spacecraft will land on July 4.

    The two images of Mars at the top of the figure are Hubble observations from June 27 (right) and May 17 (left). Visual comparison of these two images clearly shows the dust storm between 5 and 7 o'clock and about 2/3 of the way from the center of the planet's disk to the southern edge of the June image.

    The digital data were projected to form the map of the equatorial portion of the planet which is shown in the bottom portion of the figure. The green cross marks the location of the Pathfinder landing site, and the yellowish ribbon of dust which runs horizontally across the bottom of the map traces the location of Valles Marineris, a system of canyons which would stretch from Los Angeles to New York if placed on Earth.

    Most of the dust is confined within the canyons, which are up to 5-8 kilometers deep. The thickness of the dust cloud near the eastern end of the storm is similar to that observed by Viking lander 1 during the first of the two 1977 global dust storms which it studied.

    Other interesting features appear in this image. The northwestern portions of the planet are enveloped in unusually thick water ice clouds, similar to cirrus clouds on Earth; some clouds extend as far as Lunae Planum, the slightly darker region about halfway from the center to the left side of the map. The dark spot near the terminator (boundary between day and night) at about 9:00 in the June 27 planet image is Ascraeus Mons, a 27 kilometer high volcano, protruding through the clouds.

    The remnant

  1. Laboratory results and status update for Pathfinder, the LINC-NIRVANA NGS ground-layer AO subsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopon, Derek; Conrad, Al; Bertram, Thomas; Herbst, Tom; Kürster, Martin; Berwein, Juergen; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Farinato, Jacopo; Viotto, Valentina; Bergomi, Maria; Rohloff, Ralf-Rainer; Baumeister, Harald; De Bonis, Fulvio; Hofferbert, Ralph; Brunelli, Alessandro; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Pott, Jörg-Uwe; Bizenberger, Peter; Briegel, Florian; Meschke, Daniel; Mohr, Lars; Zhang, Xianyu; Kittmann, Frank

    2013-12-01

    The full LINC-NIRVANA instrument will be one of the most complex ground-based astronomical systems ever built. It will consist of multiple subsystems, including two multi-conjugate ground layer AO systems (MCAO) that drive the LBT adaptive secondaries, two mid-high layer AO systems with their own Xynetics 349 actuator DM's, a fringe tracker, and a beam combiner. In order to mitigate risk, we take a modular approach to instrument testing and commissioning by decoupling these subsystems individually. The first subsystem tested on-sky will be one of the ground-layer AO systems, part of a test-bed known as the Pathfinder. The Pathfinder consists of a 12-star pyramid WFS that drives one of the LBT's adaptive secondaries, a support structure known as "The Foot," and the infrared test camera (IRTC), which is used for acquisition and alignment. The 12 guide stars are acquired by moveable arms called "star enlargers," each of which contains its own optical path. The Pathfinder will be shipped from MPIA in Heidelberg, Germany to the LBT mountain lab on Mt. Graham, Arizona in February. The system will be unpacked, assembled in the LBT clean room, and internally optically aligned. We present the results of our system tests, including star enlarger alignment and system alignment. We also present our immediate plans for on-sky closed loop tests on the LBT scheduled for early Fall. Because plans for all ELTs call for ground layer correction, the Pathfinder provides valuable preliminary information not only for the full LINC-NIRVANA system, but also for future advanced MCAO systems.

  2. Mars Pathfinder Landing Site Workshop 2: Characteristics of the Ares Vallis Region and Field Trips in the Channeled Scabland, Washington

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, M. P. (Editor); Edgett, K. S. (Editor); Rice, J. W., Jr. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    This volume, the first of two comprising the technical report for this workshop, contains papers that have been accepted for presentation at the Mars Pathfinder Landing Site Workshop 2: Characteristics of the Ares Vallis Region, September 24-30, 1995, in Spokane, Washington. The Mars Pathfinder Project received a new start in October 1993 as one of the next missions in NASA's long-term Mars exploration program. The mission involves landing a single vehicle on the surface of Mars in 1997. The project is one of the first Discovery-class missions and is required to be a quick, low-cost mission and achieve a set of significant but focused engineering, science, and technology objectives. The primary objective is to demonstrate a low-cost cruise, entry, descent, and landing system required to place a payload on the martian surface in a safe, operational configuration. Additional objectives include the deployment and operation of various science instruments and a microrover. Pathfinder paves the way for a cost-effective implementation of future Mars lander missions. Also included in this volume is the field trip guide to the Channeled Scabland and Missoula Lake Break-out. On July 4, 1997, Mars Pathfinder is scheduled to land near 19.5 deg N, 32.8 deg W, in a portion of Ares Vallis. The landing ellipse covers a huge (100 x 200 km) area that appears to include both depositional and erosional landforms created by one or more giant, catastrophic floods. One of the best known terrestrial analogs to martian outflow channels (such as Ares Vallis) is the region known as the Channeled Scabland. The field trip guide describes some of the geomorphological features of the Channeled Scabland and adjacent Lake Missoula break-out area near Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho.

  3. Pathfinder first light: alignment, calibration, and commissioning of the LINC-NIRVANA ground-layer adaptive optics subsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopon, Derek; Conrad, Al; Arcidiacono, Carmelo; Herbst, Tom; Viotto, Valentina; Farinato, Jacopo; Bergomi, Maria; Ragazzoni, Roberto; Marafatto, Luca; Baumeister, Harald; Bertram, Thomas; Berwein, Jürgen; Briegel, Florian; Hofferbert, Ralph; Kittmann, Frank; Kürster, Martin; Mohr, Lars; Radhakrishnan, Kalyan

    2014-08-01

    We present descriptions of the alignment and calibration tests of the Pathfinder, which achieved first light during our 2013 commissioning campaign at the LBT. The full LINC-NIRVANA instrument is a Fizeau interferometric imager with fringe tracking and 2-layer natural guide star multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) systems on each eye of the LBT. The MCAO correction for each side is achieved using a ground layer wavefront sensor that drives the LBT adaptive secondary mirror and a mid-high layer wavefront sensor that drives a Xinetics 349 actuator DM conjugated to an altitude of 7.1 km. When the LINC-NIRVANA MCAO system is commissioned, it will be one of only two such systems on an 8-meter telescope and the only such system in the northern hemisphere. In order to mitigate risk, we take a modular approach to commissioning by decoupling and testing the LINC-NIRVANA subsystems individually. The Pathfinder is the ground-layer wavefront sensor for the DX eye of the LBT. It uses 12 pyramid wavefront sensors to optically co-add light from natural guide stars in order to make four pupil images that sense ground layer turbulence. Pathfinder is now the first LINC-NIRVANA subsystem to be fully integrated with the telescope and commissioned on sky. Our 2013 commissioning campaign consisted of 7 runs at the LBT with the tasks of assembly, integration and communication with the LBT telescope control system, alignment to the telescope optical axis, off-sky closed loop AO calibration, and finally closed loop on-sky AO. We present the programmatics of this campaign, along with the novel designs of our alignment scheme and our off-sky calibration test, which lead to the Pathfinder's first on-sky closed loop images.

  4. Mars Pathfinder Landing Site Workshop II: Characteristics of the Ares Vallis Region and Field Trips in the Channeled Scabland, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golombek, M. P.; Edgett, K. S.; Rice, J. W., Jr.

    1995-09-01

    This volume, the first of two comprising the technical report for this workshop, contains papers that have been accepted for presentation at the Mars Pathfinder Landing Site Workshop 2 24-30, 1995, in Spokane, Washington. The Mars Pathfinder Project received a new start in October 1993 as one of the next missions in NASA's long-term Mars exploration program. The mission involves landing a single vehicle on the surface of Mars in 1997. The project is one of the first Discovery-class missions and is required to be a quick, low-cost mission and achieve a set of significant but focused engineering, science, and technology objectives. The primary objective is to demonstrate a low-cost cruise, entry, descent, and landing system required to place a payload on the martian surface in a safe, operational configuration. Additional objectives include the deployment and operation of various science instruments and a microrover. Pathfinder paves the way for a cost-effective implementation of future Mars lander missions. Also included in this volume is the field trip guide to the Channeled Scabland and Missoula Lake Break-out. On July 4, 1997, Mars Pathfinder is scheduled to land near 19.5 deg N, 32.8 deg W, in a portion of Ares Vallis. The landing ellipse covers a huge (100 x 200 km) area that appears to include both depositional and erosional landforms created by one or more giant, catastrophic floods. One of the best known terrestrial analogs to martian outflow channels (such as Ares Vallis) is the region known as the Channeled Scabland. The field trip guide describes some of the geomorphological features of the Channeled Scabland and adjacent Lake Missoula break-out area near Lake Pend Oreille, Idaho.

  5. The JCMT 12CO(3-2) survey of the Cygnus X region. I. A pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottschalk, M.; Kothes, R.; Matthews, H. E.; Landecker, T. L.; Dent, W. R. F.

    2012-05-01

    Context. Cygnus X is one of the most complex areas in the sky, rich in massive stars; Cyg OB2 (2600 stars, 120 O stars) and other OB associations lie within its boundaries. This complicates interpretation, but also creates the opportunity to investigate accretion into molecular clouds and many subsequent stages of star formation, all within one small field of view. Understanding large complexes like Cygnus X is the key to understanding the dominant role that massive star complexes play in galaxies across the Universe. Aims: The main goal of this study is to establish feasibility of a high-resolution CO survey of the entire Cygnus X region by observing part of it as a pathfinder, and to evaluate the survey as a tool for investigating the star-formation process. We can investigate the mass accretion history of outflows, study interaction between star-forming regions and their cold environment, and examine triggered star formation around massive stars. Methods: A 2° × 4° area of the Cygnus X region has been mapped in the 12CO(3-2) line at an angular resolution of 15'' and a velocity resolution of ~0.4 km s-1 using HARP-B and ACSIS on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope. The star formation process is heavily connected to the life-cycle of the molecular material in the interstellar medium. The high critical density of the 12CO(3-2) transition reveals clouds in key stages of molecule formation, and shows processes that turn a molecular cloud into a star. Results: We observed ~15% of Cygnus X, and demonstrated that a full survey would be feasible and rewarding. We detected three distinct layers of 12CO(3-2) emission, related to the Cygnus Rift (500-800 pc), to W75N (1-1.8 kpc), and to DR 21 (1.5-2.5 kpc). Within the Cygnus Rift, H i self-absorption features are tightly correlated with faint diffuse CO emission, while HISA features in the DR 21 layer are mostly unrelated to any CO emission. 47 molecular outflows were detected in the pathfinder, 27 of them previously

  6. Selection and Assessment of Predictions of the Mars Pathfinder Landing Site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, M. P.; Moore, H. J.; Haldemann, A. F. C.; Cook, R. A.; Parker, T. J.; Schofield, J. T.

    1998-01-01

    The successful landing of the Mars Pathfinder spacecraft on Mars allows the review of the process of selecting the landing site and assessing predictions made for the site based on Viking and Earth-based data. Selection of the landing site for Mars Pathfinder was a two-phase process. The first phase took place from October 1993 to June 1994 and involved: initial identification of engineering constraints, definition of environmental conditions at the site for spacecraft design, and evaluation of the scientific potential of different landing sites. This phase culminated with the first "Mars Pathfinder Landing Site Workshop", held at the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Houston, Texas on April 18-19, 1994, in which suggested approaches and landing sites were solicited from the entire scientific community. A preliminary site was selected by the project for design purposes in June 1994. The second phase took place from July 1994 to March 1996 and involved: developing criteria for evaluating site safety using images and remote sensing data, testing of the spacecraft and landing subsystems (with design improvements) to establish quantitative engineering constraints on landing site characteristics, evaluating all potential landing sites on Mars, and certification of the site by the project. This phase included a second open workshop, "Mars Pathfinder Landing Site Workshop II: Characteristics of the Ares Vallis Region and Field Trips in the Channeled Scabland, Washington" held in Spokane and Moses Lake September 24-30, 1995 and formal acceptance of the site by NASA Headquarters. Engineering constraints on Pathfinder landing sites were developed from the initial design of the spacecraft and the entry, descent and landing scenario. The site must be within 5 degrees of the subsolar latitude at the time of landing (15N for maximum solar power and flexible communications with Earth. It also must be below 0 km elevation to enable enough time for the parachute to bring the lander

  7. The design and flight performance of the PoGOLite Pathfinder balloon-borne hard X-ray polarimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauvin, M.; Florén, H.-G.; Jackson, M.; Kamae, T.; Kawano, T.; Kiss, M.; Kole, M.; Mikhalev, V.; Moretti, E.; Olofsson, G.; Rydström, S.; Takahashi, H.; Lind, J.; Strömberg, J.-E.; Welin, O.; Iyudin, A.; Shifrin, D.; Pearce, M.

    2016-02-01

    In the 50 years since the advent of X-ray astronomy there have been many scientific advances due to the development of new experimental techniques for detecting and characterising X-rays. Observations of X-ray polarisation have, however, not undergone a similar development. This is a shortcoming since a plethora of open questions related to the nature of X-ray sources could be resolved through measurements of the linear polarisation of emitted X-rays. The PoGOLite Pathfinder is a balloon-borne hard X-ray polarimeter operating in the 25-240 keV energy band from a stabilised observation platform. Polarisation is determined using coincident energy deposits in a segmented array of plastic scintillators surrounded by a BGO anticoincidence system and a polyethylene neutron shield. The PoGOLite Pathfinder was launched from the SSC Esrange Space Centre in July 2013. A near-circumpolar flight was achieved with a duration of approximately two weeks. The flight performance of the Pathfinder design is discussed for the three Crab observations conducted. The signal-to-background ratio for the observations is shown to be 0.25 ±0.03 and the Minimum Detectable Polarisation (99 % C.L.) is (28.4 ±2.2) %. A strategy for the continuation of the PoGOLite programme is outlined based on experience gained during the 2013 maiden flight.

  8. Development, Qualification And Test Of A Power Control Unit For LISA Pathfinder FEEP Micro-Propulsion Subsystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceruti, Luca; Polli, Aldo

    2011-10-01

    In the frame of the Field Emission Electrical Propulsion (FEEP) development activities for LISA Pathfinder mission aimed to grow two different European technologies and then to provide and fly a Space- Qualified FEEP Subsystem, the design and development of a flexible electronic package (Power Control Unit), capable to feed and drive both two FEEP propulsion technology, have been completed successfully, with SELEX Galileo responsible both at PCU and Micro- Propulsion Subsystem (MPS) level. After selection of one of the two FEEP technologies (Slit technology) and following successful qualification and Critical Design Review, the manufacturing and testing of a full set of Power Control Unit flight hardware has been positively completed, leading to the timely delivery of three PCU to the LISA Pathfinder spacecraft integrator. In view of that, this paper is presenting an up-to-date status of the main LISA Pathfinder FEEP Subsystem achievements, in particular aiming at providing an overview of the Power Control Unit design, qualification achievements and presentation of the main outcome from the integrations and compatibility tests carried out between the PCU and the other FEEP Subsystem elements (i.e. thrusters and Neutraliser).

  9. Eclipses in Australian Aboriginal Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamacher, Duane W.; Norris, Ray P.

    2011-07-01

    We explore about fifty different Australian Aboriginal accounts of lunar and solar eclipses to determine how Aboriginal groups understood this phenomenon. We summarize the literature on Aboriginal references to eclipses. We show that many Aboriginal groups viewed eclipses negatively, frequently associating them with bad omens, evil magic, disease, blood and death. In many communities, elders or medicine men claimed to be able to control or avert eclipses by magical means, solidifying their roles as providers and protectors within their communities. We also show that some Aboriginal groups seem to have understood the motions of the Sun-Earth-Moon system, the connection between the lunar phases and tides, and acknowledged that solar eclipses were caused by the Moon blocking the Sun.

  10. The Australian terrestrial carbon budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haverd, V.; Raupach, M. R.; Briggs, P. R.; Canadell, J. G.; Davis, S. J.; Law, R. M.; Meyer, C. P.; Peters, G. P.; Pickett-Heaps, C.; Sherman, B.

    2013-02-01

    This paper reports a study of the full carbon (C-CO2) budget of the Australian continent, focussing on 1990-2011 in the context of estimates over two centuries. The work is a contribution to the RECCAP (REgional Carbon Cycle Assessment and Processes) project, as one of numerous regional studies. In constructing the budget, we estimate the following component carbon fluxes: net primary production (NPP); net ecosystem production (NEP); fire; land use change (LUC); riverine export; dust export; harvest (wood, crop and livestock) and fossil fuel emissions (both territorial and non-territorial). Major biospheric fluxes were derived using BIOS2 (Haverd et al., 2012), a fine-spatial-resolution (0.05°) offline modelling environment in which predictions of CABLE (Wang et al., 2011), a sophisticated land surface model with carbon cycle, are constrained by multiple observation types. The mean NEP reveals that climate variability and rising CO2 contributed 12 ± 24 (1σ error on mean) and 68 ± 15 TgC yr-1, respectively. However these gains were partially offset by fire and LUC (along with other minor fluxes), which caused net losses of 26 ± 4 TgC yr-1 and 18 ± 7 TgC yr-1, respectively. The resultant net biome production (NBP) is 36 ± 29 TgC yr-1, in which the largest contributions to uncertainty are NEP, fire and LUC. This NBP offset fossil fuel emissions (95 ± 6 TgC yr-1) by 38 ± 30%. The interannual variability (IAV) in the Australian carbon budget exceeds Australia's total carbon emissions by fossil fuel combustion and is dominated by IAV in NEP. Territorial fossil fuel emissions are significantly smaller than the rapidly growing fossil fuel exports: in 2009-2010, Australia exported 2.5 times more carbon in fossil fuels than it emitted by burning fossil fuels.

  11. Homicide victims among Australian immigrants.

    PubMed

    Kliewer, E V

    1994-09-01

    The homicide rates for various immigrant groups in Australia were calculated, and the influence of the rate in countries of origin on immigrant rates and the relationship between the birthplace of the accused and victim were examined. Age-sex standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) for homicide were calculated for the immigrant groups, based on 1984-1988 mortality data and 1986 census data. The Australian-born homicide rates were used as the standard. Standardised mortality ratios for countries of origin were derived from WHO data. A cross-tabulation of the birthplaces of the accused and the victim was compiled from 1989-1992 police records. Male SMRs ranged from 0.13 (P < 0.01) for immigrants from Africa and the Americas to 5.83 (P < 0.05) for Koreans. Several female groups had lower SMRs than the Australian-born, although none of these differences were significant. Indonesian females had the highest SMR (5.32, P < 0.01). There was a positive Spearman correlation between the ranking of homicide rates for the origin populations and the immigrants (males 0.64, P < 0.05; females 0.62, P < 0.05). Overall, 51.3 per cent of immigrants were killed by their compatriots. This ranged from zero for New Zealanders to 100 per cent for immigrants from the Middle East. In order to further identify factors contributing to the large differences in rates it is imperative to have information on the victim, the perpetrator and the circumstances surrounding the murder. PMID:7841261

  12. Innovation in Australian Workplaces: An Empirical Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Mark

    1999-01-01

    The determinants of innovation were examined using data from 698 Australian workplaces. Results suggest that better employee-management communications are associated with more change and that workplaces with higher levels of training undergo more change. (Author/JOW)

  13. Higher Degree Examination Procedures in Australian Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lovas, Stephen

    1980-01-01

    Detailed and wide-ranging suggestions are offered for reforming Australia's higher degree requirements. The author, an Australian PhD, compares them with requirements in other countries and finds them "particularly regressive, unenlightened, intellectually counterproductive, undemocratic, and uncivilized." (JSR)

  14. Terrestrial Analogs to Wind-Related Features at the Viking and Pathfinder Landing Sites on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Bridges, Nathan T.; Kuzmin, Ruslan O.; Laity, Julie E.

    2002-01-01

    Features in the Mojave Desert and Iceland provide insight into the characteristics and origin of Martian wind-related landforms seen by the Viking and Pathfinder landers. The terrestrial sites were chosen because they exhibit diverse wind features that are generally well understood. These features have morphologies comparable to those on Mars and include origins by deposition and erosion, with erosional processes modifying both soils and rocks. Duneforms and drifts are the most common depositional features seen at the Martian landing sites and indicate supplies of sand-sized particles blown by generally unidirectional winds. Erosional features include lag deposits, moat-like depressions around some rocks, and exhumed soil horizons. They indicate that wind can deflate at least some sediments and that this process is particularly effective where the wind interacts with rocks. The formation of ripples and wind tails involves a combination of depositional and erosional processes. Rock erosional features, or ventifacts, are recognized by their overall shapes, erosional flutes, and characteristic surface textures resulting from abrasion by windblown particles. The physics of saltation requires that particles in ripples and duneforms are predominantly sand-sized (60-2000 microns). The orientations of duneforms, wind tails, moats, and ventifacts are correlated with surface winds above particle threshold. Such winds are influenced by local topography and are correlated with winds at higher altitudes predicted by atmospheric models.

  15. Mars Pathfinder Landing Site: Evidence for a Change in Wind Regime from Lander and Orbiter Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greeley, Ronald; Kraft, Michael D.; Kuzmin, Ruslan O.; Bridges, Nathan T.

    2000-01-01

    Surface features related to the wind are observed in the vicinity of the Mars Pathfinder (MPR landing site data from the lander and in data from orbit by the Viking Orbiter and Mars Global Surveyor missions. Features seen from the surface include wind tails associated with small rocks, barchanoid duneforms, ripplelike patterns, and ventifact flutes cut into some rocks. Features seen from orbit include wind tails associated with impact craters, ridges inferred to be duneforms, and modified crater rims interpreted to have been eroded and mantled by windblown material. The orientations of these features show two prevailing directions. One is inferred to represent winds from the northeast, which is consistent with strongest winds predicted by a general circulation model to occur during the Martian northern winter under current conditions. A second wind blowing from the ESE was responsible for modifying the crater rims and cutting some of the ventifacts. The two wind regimes could reflect a change in climate related to Mars' obliquity or some other, unknown factor. Regardless of the cause, the MPF area has been subjected to a complex pattern of winds and supply of small particles, and the original surface formed by sedimentary processes from Tiu and Ares Vallis flooding events has been modified by repeated burial and exhumation.

  16. Continuation of the NVAP Global Water Vapor Data Sets for Pathfinder Science Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VonderHaar, Thomas H.; Engelen, Richard J.; Forsythe, John M.; Randel, David L.; Ruston, Benjamin C.; Woo, Shannon; Dodge, James (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This annual report covers August 2000 - August 2001 under NASA contract NASW-0032, entitled "Continuation of the NVAP (NASA's Water Vapor Project) Global Water Vapor Data Sets for Pathfinder Science Analysis". NASA has created a list of Earth Science Research Questions which are outlined by Asrar, et al. Particularly relevant to NVAP are the following questions: (a) How are global precipitation, evaporation, and the cycling of water changing? (b) What trends in atmospheric constituents and solar radiation are driving global climate? (c) How well can long-term climatic trends be assessed or predicted? Water vapor is a key greenhouse gas, and an understanding of its behavior is essential in global climate studies. Therefore, NVAP plays a key role in addressing the above climate questions by creating a long-term global water vapor dataset and by updating the dataset with recent advances in satellite instrumentation. The NVAP dataset produced from 1988-1998 has found wide use in the scientific community. Studies of interannual variability are particularly important. A recent paper by Simpson, et al. that examined the NVAP dataset in detail has shown that its relative accuracy is sufficient for the variability studies that contribute toward meeting NASA's goals. In the past year, we have made steady progress towards continuing production of this high-quality dataset as well as performing our own investigations of the data. This report summarizes the past year's work on production of the NVAP dataset and presents results of analyses we have performed in the past year.

  17. Atom optical experiments in the drop tower: a pathfinder for space based precision measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Sven; Resch, Andreas; Müntinga, Hauke; Laemmerzahl, Claus

    Recent years have seen much technological progress towards the application of ultra-cold atoms and degenerate quantum gases in future space based precision measurements. A first milestone was achieved by the QUANTUS collaboration with the successful creation of a Bose-Einstein condensate in a freely falling compact drop tower experiment. A next step will now be to demonstrate the feasibility of matter wave interferometry with increased precision due to the extended free evolution time available in zero gravity. This is a particular focus of the PRIMUS project, which also explores concepts to apply a fiber based optical frequency comb in such microgravity experiments. Here we report on the current status of this activity, including the first operation of an optical frequency comb in a microgravity environment. We also discuss the perspectives for space based fundamental physics experiments that might be enabled by such earth-bound pathfinder experiments in the long run. PRIMUS is a collaboration of ZARM at the Universitüt Bremen and of the Leibniz Universitüt Hannover. It is supported by the a a German Space Agency DLR with funds provided by the Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi) under grant number DLR 50 WM 0842.

  18. Using virtual reality for science mission planning: A Mars Pathfinder case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jacqueline H.; Weidner, Richard J.; Sacks, Allan L.

    1994-01-01

    NASA's Mars Pathfinder Project requires a Ground Data System (GDS) that supports both engineering and scientific payloads with reduced mission operations staffing, and short planning schedules. Also, successful surface operation of the lander camera requires efficient mission planning and accurate pointing of the camera. To meet these challenges, a new software strategy that integrates virtual reality technology with existing navigational ancillary information and image processing capabilities. The result is an interactive workstation based applications software that provides a high resolution, 3-dimensial, stereo display of Mars as if it were viewed through the lander camera. The design, implementation strategy and parametric specification phases for the development of this software were completed, and the prototype tested. When completed, the software will allow scientists and mission planners to access simulated and actual scenes of Mars' surface. The perspective from the lander camera will enable scientists to plan activities more accurately and completely. The application will also support the sequence and command generation process and will allow testing and verification of camera pointing commands via simulation.

  19. Mars Pathfinder meteorological observations on the basis of results of an atmospheric global circulation model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forget, Francois; Hourdin, F.; Talagrand, O.

    1994-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder Meteorological Package (ASI/MET) will measure the local pressure, temperature, and winds at its future landing site, somewhere between the latitudes 0 deg N and 30 deg N. Comparable measurements have already been obtained at the surface of Mars by the Viking Landers at 22 deg N (VL1) and 48 deg N (VL2), providing much useful information on the martian atmosphere. In particular the pressure measurements contain very instructive information on the global atmospheric circulation. At the Laboratoire de Meteorologie Dynamique (LMD), we have analyzed and simulated these measurements with a martian atmospheric global circulation model (GCM), which was the first to simulate the martian atmospheric circulation over more than 1 year. The model is able to reproduce rather accurately many observed features of the martian atmosphere, including the long- and short-period oscillations of the surface pressure observed by the Viking landers. From a meteorological point of view, we think that a landing site located near or at the equator would be an interesting choice.

  20. Precipitable Water Variability Using SSM/I and GOES VAS Pathfinder Data Sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerner, Jeffrey A.; Jedlovec, Gary J.; Kidder, Stanley Q.

    1996-01-01

    Determining moisture variability for all weather scenes is critical to understanding the earth's hydrologic cycle and global climate changes. Remote sensing from geostationary satellites provides the necessary temporal and spatial resolutions necessary for global change studies. Due to antenna size constraints imposed with the use of microwave radiometers, geostationary satellites have carried instruments passively measuring radiation at infrared wavelengths or shorter. The shortfall of using infrared instruments in moisture studies lies in its inability to sense terrestrial radiation through clouds. Microwave emissions, on the other hand, are mostly unaffected by cloudy atmospheres. Land surface emissivity at microwave frequencies exhibit both high temporal and spatial variability thus confining moisture retrievals at microwave frequencies to over marine atmospheres (a near uniform cold background). This study intercompares the total column integrated water content Precipitable Water, (PW) as derived from both the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) VISSR Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) pathfinder data sets. PW is a bulk parameter often used to quantify moisture variability and is important to understanding the earth's hydrologic cycle and climate system. This research has been spawned in an effort to combine two different algorithms which together can lead to a more comprehensive quantification of global water vapor. The approach taken here is to intercompare two independent PW retrieval algorithms and to validate the resultant retrievals against an existing data set, namely the European Center for Medium range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model analysis data.

  1. Alignment Test Results of the JWST Pathfinder Telescope Mirrors in the Cryogenic Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitman, Tony L.; Wells, Conrad; Hadaway, James; Knight, J. Scott; Lunt, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    After integration of the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) to the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) to become the OTIS, the James Webb Space Telescope OTIS is tested at NASAs Johnson Space Center (JSC) in the cryogenic vacuum Chamber A for alignment and optical performance. The alignment of the mirrors comprises a sequence of steps as follows: The mirrors are coarsely aligned using photogrammetry cameras with reflective targets attached to the sides of the mirrors. Then a multi-wavelength interferometer is aligned to the 18-segment primary mirror using cameras at the center of curvature to align reflected light from the segments and using fiducials at the edge of the primary mirror. Once the interferometer is aligned, the 18 primary mirror segments are then adjusted to optimize wavefront error of the aggregate mirror. This process phases the piston and tilt positions of all the mirror segments. An optical fiber placed at the Cassegrain focus of the telescope then emits light towards the secondary mirror to create a collimated beam emitting from the primary mirror. Portions of the collimated beam are retro-reflected from flat mirrors at the top of the chamber to pass through the telescope to the SI detector. The image on the detector is used for fine alignment of the secondary mirror and a check of the primary mirror alignment using many of the same analysis techniques used in the on-orbit alignment. The entire process was practiced and evaluated in 2015 at cryogenic temperature with the Pathfinder telescope.

  2. Effects of Sonic Line Transition on Aerothermodynamics of the Mars Pathfinder Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnoffo, Peter A.; Weilmuenster, K. James; Braun, Robert D.; Cruz, Christopher I.

    1995-01-01

    Flow field solutions over the Mars Pathfinder Probe spanning the trajectory through the Martian atmosphere at angles of attack from 0 to 11 degrees are obtained. Aerodynamic coefficients derived from these solutions reveal two regions where the derivative of pitching moment with respect to angle of attack is positive at small angles of attack. The behavior is associated with the transition of the sonic line location between the blunted nose and the windside shoulder of the 70 degree half-angle cone in a gas with a low effective ratio of specific heats. The transition first occurs as the shock layer gas chemistry evolves from highly nonequilibrium to near equilibrium, above approximately 6.5 km/s and 40 km altitude, causing the effective specific heat ratio to decrease. The transition next occurs in an equilibrium flow regime as velocities decrease through 3.5 km/s and the specific heat ratio increases again with decreasing enthalpy. The effects of the expansion over the shoulder into the wake are more strongly felt on the fustrum when the sonic line sits on the shoulder. The transition also produces a counter-intuitive trend in which windside heating levels decrease with increasing angle of attack resulting from an increase in the effective radius of curvature. Six-degree-of-freedom trajectory analyses utilizing the computed aerodynamic coefficients predict a moderate, 3 to 4 degree increase in total angle of attack as the probe, spinning at approximately 2 revolutions per minute, passes through these regions.

  3. NOVA2-mediated RNA regulation is required for axonal pathfinding during development

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Yuhki; Miranda-Rottmann, Soledad; Ruggiu, Matteo; Park, Christopher Y; Fak, John J; Zhong, Ru; Duncan, Jeremy S; Fabella, Brian A; Junge, Harald J; Chen, Zhe; Araya, Roberto; Fritzsch, Bernd; Hudspeth, A J; Darnell, Robert B

    2016-01-01

    The neuron specific RNA-binding proteins NOVA1 and NOVA2 are highly homologous alternative splicing regulators. NOVA proteins regulate at least 700 alternative splicing events in vivo, yet relatively little is known about the biologic consequences of NOVA action and in particular about functional differences between NOVA1 and NOVA2. Transcriptome-wide searches for isoform-specific functions, using NOVA1 and NOVA2 specific HITS-CLIP and RNA-seq data from mouse cortex lacking either NOVA isoform, reveals that NOVA2 uniquely regulates alternative splicing events of a series of axon guidance related genes during cortical development. Corresponding axonal pathfinding defects were specific to NOVA2 deficiency: Nova2-/- but not Nova1-/- mice had agenesis of the corpus callosum, and axonal outgrowth defects specific to ventral motoneuron axons and efferent innervation of the cochlea. Thus we have discovered that NOVA2 uniquely regulates alternative splicing of a coordinate set of transcripts encoding key components in cortical, brainstem and spinal axon guidance/outgrowth pathways during neural differentiation, with severe functional consequences in vivo. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14371.001 PMID:27223325

  4. Intercomparison Between in situ and AVHRR Polar Pathfinder-Derived Surface Albedo over Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroeve, Julienne C.; Box, Jason E.; Fowler, Charles; Haran, Terence; Key, Jeffery

    2001-01-01

    The Advanced Very High Resolution (AVHRR) Polar Pathfinder Data (APP) provides the first long time series of consistent, calibrated surface albedo and surface temperature data for the polar regions. Validations of these products have consisted of individual studies that analyzed algorithm performance for limited regions and or time periods. This paper reports on comparisons made between the APP-derived surface albedo and that measured at fourteen automatic weather stations (AWS) around the Greenland ice sheet from January 1997 to August 1998. Results show that satellite-derived surface albedo values are on average 10% less than those measured by the AWS stations. However, the station measurements tend to be biased high by about 4% and thus the differences in absolute albedo may be less (e.g. 6%). In regions of the ice sheet where the albedo variability is small, such as the dry snow facies, the APP albedo uncertainty exceeds the natural variability. Further work is needed to improve the absolute accuracy of the APP-derived surface albedo. Even so, the data provide temporally and spatially consistent estimates of the Greenland ice sheet albedo.

  5. PETER: A Hardware Simulator for the Test Mass-GRS System of LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marconi, L.; Stanga, R.; Bassan, M.; De Marchi, F.; Pucacco, G.; Visco, M.; Di Fiore, L.; De Rosa, R.; Garufi, F.

    2013-01-01

    Each LISA PathFinder test mass (TM) will be sensitive to forces along all its 6 Degrees of Freedom (DoFs). Extensive ground testing is required in order to evaluate the influence of cross-talks from the read-out and actuator channels. In the INFN laboratory of Firenze we have developed a facility for a good representation of the free fall conditions of the TM on flight. A hollow replica of a TM hanging from a double torsion pendulum can move inside a Gravitational Reference Sensor (GRS) with quasi free fall condition on two Dofs, in the frequency band (0.1 ÷ 100)mHz. On both DoFs, the target residual accelerations (yet to be achieved) at the low end frequency range are ≤ 3 × 10-13ms-2, limited by the thermal noise of the fibres. At higher frequencies, the sensitivity is limited by the readout noise of the readout, a replica of the flight electronics. After a long commissioning, we are now in operating conditions, and can carry out a series of experiments to better qualify the interaction between TM and GRS. In this paper we will show some significant qualification measurements and a first scientific measurements, i.e. the measurement and compensation of the DC bias in the GRS using two independent channels, as well as a measurement of the residual acceleration of the translational DoF, with the feedback loop closed on the rotational one, and viceversa.

  6. The slewing mirror telescope of the Ultra Fast Flash Observatory Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, S.; Ahmad, S.; Barrillon, P.; Brandt, S.; Budtz-Jørgensen, C.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Chen, P.; Choi, Y. J.; Connell, P.; Dagoret-Campagne, S.; Eyles, C.; Grossan, B.; Huang, M.-H. A.; Jung, A.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. B.; Kim, S.-W.; Kim, Y. W.; Krasnov, A. S.; Lee, J.; Lim, H.; Linder, E. V.; Liu, T.-C.; Lund, N.; Min, K. W.; Na, G. W.; Nam, J. W.; Park, I. H.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Ripa, J.; Reglero, V.; Rodrigo, J. M.; Smoot, G. F.; Suh, J. E.; Svertilov, S.; Vedenkin, N.; Wang, M.-Z.; Yashin, I.; Ahn, K.-B.

    2012-09-01

    The Slewing Mirror Telescope (SMT) is a key telescope of Ultra-Fast Flash Observatory (UFFO) space project to explore the first sub-minute or sub-seconds early photons from the Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs) afterglows. As the realization of UFFO, 20kg of UFFO-Pathfinder (UFFO-P) is going to be on board the Russian Lomonosov satellite in November 2012 by Soyuz-2 rocket. Once the UFFO Burst Alert & Trigger Telescope (UBAT) detects the GRBs, Slewing mirror (SM) will slew to bring new GRB into the SMT’s field of view rather than slewing the entire spacecraft. SMT can give a UV/Optical counterpart position rather moderated 4arcsec accuracy. However it will provide a important understanding of the GRB mechanism by measuring the sub-minute optical photons from GRBs. SMT can respond to the trigger over 35 degree x 35 degree wide field of view within 1 sec by using Slewing Mirror Stage (SMS). SMT is the reflecting telescope with 10cm Ritchey-Chretien type and 256 x 256 pixilated Intensified Charge-Coupled Device (ICCD). In this paper, we discuss the overall design of UFFO-P SMT instrument and payloads development status.

  7. Mars Pathfinder Spacecraft, Lander, and Rover Testing in Simulated Deep Space and Mars Surface Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Kenneth R.

    1997-01-01

    The Mars Pathfinder (MPF) Spacecraft was built and tested at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory during 1995/96. MPF is scheduled to launch in December 1996 and to land on Mars on July 4, 1997. The testing program for MPF required subjecting the mission hardware to both deep space and Mars surface conditions. A series of tests were devised and conducted from 1/95 to 7/96 to study the thermal response of the MPF spacecraft to the environmental conditions in which it will be exposed during the cruise phase (on the way to Mars) and the lander phase (landed on Mars) of the mission. Also, several tests were conducted to study the thermal characteristics of the Mars rover, Sojourner, under Mars surface environmental conditions. For these tests, several special test fixtures and methods were devised to simulate the required environmental conditions. Creating simulated Mars surface conditions was a challenging undertaking since Mars' surface is subjected to diurnal cycling between -20 C and -85 C, with windspeeds to 20 m/sec, occurring in an 8 torr CO2 atmosphere. This paper describes the MPF test program which was conducted at JPL to verify the MPF thermal design.

  8. The C. elegans histone deacetylase HDA-1 is required for cell migration and axon pathfinding.

    PubMed

    Zinovyeva, Anna Y; Graham, Serena M; Cloud, Veronica J; Forrester, Wayne C

    2006-01-01

    Histone proteins play integral roles in chromatin structure and function. Histones are subject to several types of posttranslational modifications, including acetylation, which can produce transcriptional activation. The converse, histone deacetylation, is mediated by histone deacetylases (HDACs) and often is associated with transcriptional silencing. We identified a new mutation, cw2, in the Caenorhabditis elegans hda-1 gene, which encodes a histone deacetylase. Previous studies showed that a mutation in hda-1, e1795, or reduction of hda-1 RNA by RNAi causes defective vulval and gonadal development leading to sterility. The hda-1(cw2) mutation causes defective vulval development and reduced fertility, like hda-1(e1795), albeit with reduced severity. Unlike the previously reported hda-1 mutation, hda-1(cw2) mutants are viable as homozygotes, although many die as embryos or larvae, and are severely uncoordinated. Strikingly, in hda-1(cw2) mutants, axon pathfinding is defective; specific axons often appear to wander randomly or migrate in the wrong direction. In addition, the long range migrations of three neuron types and fasciculation of the ventral nerve cord are defective. Together, our studies define a new role for HDA-1 in nervous system development, and provide the first evidence for HDAC function in regulating neuronal axon guidance. PMID:16313898

  9. CubeSats as pathfinders for planetary detection: the FIRST-S satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacour, S.; Lapeyrère, V.; Gauchet, L.; Arroud, S.; Gourgues, R.; Martin, G.; Heidmann, S.; Haubois, X.; Perrin, G.

    2014-08-01

    The idea behind FIRST (Fibered Imager foR a Single Telescope) is to use single-mode fibers to combine multiple apertures in a pupil plane as such as to synthesize a bigger aperture. The advantages with respect to a pure imager are i) relaxed tolerance on the pointing and cophasing, ii) higher accuracy in phase measurement, and iii) availability of compact, precise, and active single-mode optics like Lithium Niobate. The latter point being a huge asset in the context of a space mission. One of the problems of DARWIN or SIM-like projects was the difficulty to find low cost pathfinders missions. But the fact that Lithium Niobate optic is small and compact makes it easy to test through small nanosats missions. Moreover, they are commonly used in the telecom industry, and have already been tested on communication satellites. The idea of the FIRST-S demonstrator is to spatialize a 3U CubeSat with a Lithium Niobate nulling interferometer. The technical challenges of the project are: star tracking, beam combination, and nulling capabilities. The optical baseline of the interferometer would be 30 cm, giving a 2.2AU spatial resolution at distance of 10 pc. The scientific objective of this mission would be to study the visible emission of exozodiacal light in the habitable zone around the closest stars.

  10. Mars Pathfinder Landing Site Workshop 2: Characteristics of the Ares Vallis Region and Field Trips in the Channeled Scabland, Washington

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, M. P. (Editor); Edgett, K. S. (Editor); Rice, J. W. , Jr. (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    Mars Pathfinder will place a single lander on the surface of Mars on July 4, 1997, following a December 1996 launch. As a result of the very successful first Mars Pathfinder Landing Site Workshop, the project has selected the Ares Vallis outflow channel in Chryse Planitia as the landing site. This location is where a large catastrophic outflow channel debouches into the northern lowlands. A second workshop and series of field trips, entitled Mars Pathfinder Landing Site Workshop 2: Characteristics of the Ares Vallis Region and Field Trips in the Channeled Scabland, Washington, were held in Spokane and Moses Lake, Washington. The purpose of the workshop was to provide a focus for learning as much as possible about the Ares Vallis region on Mars before landing there. The rationale is that the more that can be learned about the general area prior to landing, the better scientists will be able interpret the observations made by the lander and rover and place them in the proper geologic context. The field trip included overflights and surface investigations of the Channeled Scabland (an Earth analog for the martian catastrophic outflow channels), focusing on areas particularly analogous to Ares Vallis and the landing site. The overflights were essential for placing the enormous erosional and depositional features of the Channeled Scabland into proper three-dimensional context. The field trips were a joint educational outreach activity involving K-12 science educators, Mars Pathfinder scientists and engineers, and interested scientists from the Mars scientific community. Part 1 of the technical report on this workshop includes a description of the Mars Pathfinder mission, abstracts accepted for presentation at the workshop, an introduction to the Channeled Scabland, and field trip guides for the overflight and two field trips. This part, Part 2, includes the program for the workshop, summaries of the workshop technical sessions, a summary of the field trips and ensuing

  11. Diffuse panbronchiolitis in an Australian aborigine

    PubMed Central

    Brown, James; Simpson, Graham

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB) is a chronic sino-bronchial disease. It has remained restricted to the Japanese and cases in the West are unusual. We present a patient of Australian aboriginal origin with DPB. The known efficacy of low-dose erythromycin in DPB is again described. Chronic respiratory disease is common in the Australian aboriginal population and DPB should be considered in the differential. PMID:25473569

  12. Diffuse panbronchiolitis in an Australian aborigine.

    PubMed

    Brown, James; Simpson, Graham

    2014-06-01

    Diffuse panbronchiolitis (DPB) is a chronic sino-bronchial disease. It has remained restricted to the Japanese and cases in the West are unusual. We present a patient of Australian aboriginal origin with DPB. The known efficacy of low-dose erythromycin in DPB is again described. Chronic respiratory disease is common in the Australian aboriginal population and DPB should be considered in the differential. PMID:25473569

  13. Why Do Chinese-Australian Students Outperform Their Australian Peers in Mathematics: A Comparative Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Dacheng; Singh, Michael

    2011-01-01

    International comparative studies and cross-cultural studies of mathematics achievement indicate that Chinese students (whether living in or outside China) consistently outperform their Western counterparts. This study shows that the gap between Chinese-Australian and other Australian students is best explained by differences in motivation to…

  14. Australian Thesaurus of Education Descriptors. A Word-Stock for Indexing and Retrieving Australian Educational Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavender, G. B.; Findlay, Margaret A.

    This core thesaurus of terms suitable for indexing Australian educational literature was developed by the Australian Council for Educational Research by means of a systematic and thorough revision of the "Thesaurus of ERIC Descriptors." Based on the actual terminology of education in Australia, this thesaurus includes: key words and phrases used…

  15. Marine Biodiversity in the Australian Region

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Alan J.; Rees, Tony; Beesley, Pam; Bax, Nicholas J.

    2010-01-01

    The entire Australian marine jurisdictional area, including offshore and sub-Antarctic islands, is considered in this paper. Most records, however, come from the Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) around the continent of Australia itself. The counts of species have been obtained from four primary databases (the Australian Faunal Directory, Codes for Australian Aquatic Biota, Online Zoological Collections of Australian Museums, and the Australian node of the Ocean Biogeographic Information System), but even these are an underestimate of described species. In addition, some partially completed databases for particular taxonomic groups, and specialized databases (for introduced and threatened species) have been used. Experts also provided estimates of the number of known species not yet in the major databases. For only some groups could we obtain an (expert opinion) estimate of undiscovered species. The databases provide patchy information about endemism, levels of threat, and introductions. We conclude that there are about 33,000 marine species (mainly animals) in the major databases, of which 130 are introduced, 58 listed as threatened and an unknown percentage endemic. An estimated 17,000 more named species are either known from the Australian EEZ but not in the present databases, or potentially occur there. It is crudely estimated that there may be as many as 250,000 species (known and yet to be discovered) in the Australian EEZ. For 17 higher taxa, there is sufficient detail for subdivision by Large Marine Domains, for comparison with other National and Regional Implementation Committees of the Census of Marine Life. Taxonomic expertise in Australia is unevenly distributed across taxa, and declining. Comments are given briefly on biodiversity management measures in Australia, including but not limited to marine protected areas. PMID:20689847

  16. Fiscal incentives for Australian bushland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, Norman J.

    1986-09-01

    The clearing of over 80% of the native vegetation from Australian agricultural areas has contributed significantly to the degradation classification applied to more than half this land. Soil erosion, siltation, and salinity damage continue to increase yearly. This situation not only threatens the productivity of the farm sector but has contributed to the estimated loss of 78 species of native flora, endangerment of an additional 2206 species, and the loss of 20 species of Australia's marsupials. Private returns diverge from social returns because the action (or inaction) of farmers has an impact upon others, both now and in the future. There is justification, therefore, for the public sector to intervene on behalf of society in an attempt to influence private decision making for the social good. This article argues for increased incentives from the public sector in Australia to encourage the voluntary cooperation of farmers to improve the balance between development and conservation. In contrast to the essentially temporary nature of man-made measures such as flood-mitigating capital works, increasing the area set aside to native bushland offers scope for the permanent stewardship of the resource—land.

  17. Elements of Australian petroleum geology

    SciTech Connect

    Masters, C.D.; Scott, E.W.

    1986-05-01

    The petroleum geology of Australia reflects the existence of a large cratonic block broken away from India and Antarctica in the early Mesozoic and early Tertiary that has resulted in a rifted passive-margin character on the northwestern, western, and southern boundaries of the continent. Pre-breakup paleozoic sediments are widely distributed but commonly not deeply buried nor particularly thick, and hence contribute minimally to petroleum resource occurrence. Like their Asian neighbors, much of Australian petroleum geology is nonmarine and associated with marginal rift basins. The small Gippsland basin on the southeastern coast, which is responsible for more than 90% of oil and 28% of the gas discovered in Australia, derives its petroleum from nonmarine Eocene to Cretaceous graben-fill sediments, sealed and buried by Oligocene marine shales. The most active play in Australia is in the Eromanga depression of the Great Artesian basin, where nonmarine oil is trapped stratigraphically in small fields in Jurassic and Cretaceous sandstones. These Mesozoic sediments are sag-fill deposits above the Permian-Triassic Cooper basin, and are responsible for some 12% of the gas reserves in Australia. Offshore of the western coast, graben basins filled with late Paleozoic to Mesozoic sediments are prolific and gas-prone - 55% of reserves - owing to coaly source rocks. North Sea-type, Upper Jurassic grabens off the northwestern coast of Australia contain Kimmeridgian hot shales, but developmental drilling, following the initial Jabiru discovery, has yet to demonstrate large reserves.

  18. Shuttle Laser Altimeter (SLA): A pathfinder for space-based laser altimetry and lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bufton, Jack; Blair, Bryan; Cavanaugh, John; Garvin, James

    1995-01-01

    The Shuttle Laser Altimeter (SLA) is a Hitchhiker experiment now being integrated for first flight on STS-72 in November 1995. Four Shuttle flights of the SLA are planned at a rate of about a flight every 18 months. They are aimed at the transition of the Goddard Space Flight Center airborne laser altimeter and lidar technology to low Earth orbit as a pathfinder for operational space-based laser remote sensing devices. Future alser altimeter sensors such as the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), an Earth Observing System facility instrument, and the Multi-Beam Laser Altimeter (MBLA), the land and vegetation laser altimeter for the NASA TOPSAT (Topography Satellite) Mission, will utilize systems and approaches being tested with SLA. The SLA Instrument measures the distance from the Space Shuttle to the Earth's surface by timing the two-way propagation of short (approximately 10 na noseconds) laser pulses. laser pulses at 1064 nm wavelength are generated in a laser transmitter and are detected by a telescope equipped with a silicon avalanche photodiode detector. The SLA data system makes the pulse time interval measurement to a precision of about 10 nsec and also records the temporal shape of the laser echo from the Earth's surface for interpretation of surface height distribution within the 100 m diam. sensor footprint. For example, tree height can be determined by measuring the characteristic double-pulse signature that results from a separation in time of laser backscatter from tree canopies and the underlying ground. This is accomplished with a pulse waveform digitizer that samples the detector output with an adjustable resolution of 2 nanoseconds or wider intervals in a 100 sample window centered on the return pulse echo. The digitizer makes the SLA into a high resolution surface lidar sensor. It can also be used for cloud and atmospheric aerosol lidar measurements by lengthening the sampling window and degrading the waveform resolution. Detailed test

  19. Shuttle Laser Altimeter (SLA): A pathfinder for space-based laser altimetry and lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bufton, Jack; Blair, Bryan; Cavanaugh, John; Garvin, James

    1995-09-01

    The Shuttle Laser Altimeter (SLA) is a Hitchhiker experiment now being integrated for first flight on STS-72 in November 1995. Four Shuttle flights of the SLA are planned at a rate of about a flight every 18 months. They are aimed at the transition of the Goddard Space Flight Center airborne laser altimeter and lidar technology to low Earth orbit as a pathfinder for operational space-based laser remote sensing devices. Future alser altimeter sensors such as the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS), an Earth Observing System facility instrument, and the Multi-Beam Laser Altimeter (MBLA), the land and vegetation laser altimeter for the NASA TOPSAT (Topography Satellite) Mission, will utilize systems and approaches being tested with SLA. The SLA Instrument measures the distance from the Space Shuttle to the Earth's surface by timing the two-way propagation of short (approximately 10 na noseconds) laser pulses. laser pulses at 1064 nm wavelength are generated in a laser transmitter and are detected by a telescope equipped with a silicon avalanche photodiode detector. The SLA data system makes the pulse time interval measurement to a precision of about 10 nsec and also records the temporal shape of the laser echo from the Earth's surface for interpretation of surface height distribution within the 100 m diam. sensor footprint. For example, tree height can be determined by measuring the characteristic double-pulse signature that results from a separation in time of laser backscatter from tree canopies and the underlying ground. This is accomplished with a pulse waveform digitizer that samples the detector output with an adjustable resolution of 2 nanoseconds or wider intervals in a 100 sample window centered on the return pulse echo. The digitizer makes the SLA into a high resolution surface lidar sensor. It can also be used for cloud and atmospheric aerosol lidar measurements by lengthening the sampling window and degrading the waveform resolution. Detailed test

  20. Integration and Testing of the Inertial Sensor for LISA Pathfinder mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarra, Paolo

    High-precision technologies are essential for space-borne gravitational wave observatory, but full on-ground testing is not feasible. The ESA (European Space Agency) mission LISA Pathfinder (LPF) is aimed to perform in-flight verification of these key technologies, among them the Inertial Sensor, also known as Gravitational Reference Sensor (GRS). The core of the Inertial Sensor is the gravitational reference test mass: a cube of 46 mm made of Au/Pt used as mirror of the LPF interferometer. The “free floating” test mass is surrounded by a capacitive sensor providing the information to perform the “drag-free” control loop required to keep the spacecraft centred with respect to some fiducial points. The Inertial Sensor is equipped with two mechanisms. The caging and venting mechanism lock the test mass during on-ground activities and at launch. It also open the valve for Inertial Sensor venting to space. The grabbing, positioning and release mechanism controls the test mass during in-flight operational phases from caged to free-floating condition. Charge control of the free floating test mass is performed by illuminating its surface, or the electrodes surfaces, with UV light. The Inertial Sensor is equipped with optical fibers and feed-throughs for UV photons supply. Another key component of the Inertial Sensor is the balance mass. Balance masses are required to null the self-gravitational fields seen by the test mass. The test mass, the sensing electrodes, the mechanisms, the balance masses and the UV optical fibers are accommodated inside a dedicated high-vacuum chamber. The vacuum chamber is maintained in static vacuum during on-ground phase an then vented to space to provide the required in-flight vacuum environment around the test mass. A challenging alignment accuracy is required for the manufacturing, assembly and integration of the various equipment composing the Inertial Sensor. In particular for the test mass and the capacitance sensor micron level

  1. Spectral heterogeneity on Phobos and Deimos: HiRISE observations and comparisons to Mars Pathfinder results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, N.; Stelter, R.; Ivanov, A.; Bridges, N. T.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; McEwen, A. S.

    2011-10-01

    The High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) onboard Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) has been used to observe Phobos and Deimos at spatial scales of around 6 and 20 m/px, respectively. HiRISE (McEwen et al., JGR, 112, CiteID E05S02, DOI: 10.1029/2005JE002605, 2007) has provided, for the first time, high-resolution colour images of the surfaces of the Martian moons. When processed, by the production of colour ratio images for example, the data show considerable small-scale heterogeneity, which might be attributable to fresh impacts exposing different materials otherwise largely hidden by a homogenous regolith. The bluer material that is draped over the south-eastern rim of the largest crater on Phobos, Stickney, has been perforated by an impact to reveal redder material and must therefore be relatively thin. A fresh impact with dark crater rays has been identified. Previously identified mass-wasting features in Stickney and Limtoc craters stand out strongly in colour. The interior deposits in Stickney appear more inhomogeneous than previously suspected. Several other local colour variations are also evident. Deimos is more uniform in colour but does show some small-scale inhomogeneity. The bright “streamers” (Thomas et al., Icarus, 123, 536-556,1996) are relatively blue. One crater to the south-west of Voltaire and its surroundings appear quite strongly reddened with respect to the rest of the surface. The reddening of the surroundings may be the result of ejecta from this impact. The spectral gradients at optical wavelengths observed for both Phobos and Deimos are quantitatively in good agreement with those found by unresolved photometric observations made by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP; Thomas et al., JGR, 104, 9055-9068, 1999). The spectral gradients of the blue and red units on Phobos bracket the results from IMP.

  2. Spectral heterogeneity on Phobos and Deimos: HiRISE observations and comparisons to Mars Pathfinder results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, N.; Stelter, R.; Ivanov, A.; Bridges, N.T.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; McEwen, A.S.

    2011-01-01

    The High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) onboard Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) has been used to observe Phobos and Deimos at spatial scales of around 6 and 20 m/px, respectively. HiRISE (McEwen et al.; JGR, 112, CiteID E05S02, DOI: 10.1029/2005JE002605, 2007) has provided, for the first time, high-resolution colour images of the surfaces of the Martian moons. When processed, by the production of colour ratio images for example, the data show considerable small-scale heterogeneity, which might be attributable to fresh impacts exposing different materials otherwise largely hidden by a homogenous regolith. The bluer material that is draped over the south-eastern rim of the largest crater on Phobos, Stickney, has been perforated by an impact to reveal redder material and must therefore be relatively thin. A fresh impact with dark crater rays has been identified. Previously identified mass-wasting features in Stickney and Limtoc craters stand out strongly in colour. The interior deposits in Stickney appear more inhomogeneous than previously suspected. Several other local colour variations are also evident. Deimos is more uniform in colour but does show some small-scale inhomogeneity. The bright streamers (Thomas et al.; Icarus, 123, 536556,1996) are relatively blue. One crater to the south-west of Voltaire and its surroundings appear quite strongly reddened with respect to the rest of the surface. The reddening of the surroundings may be the result of ejecta from this impact. The spectral gradients at optical wavelengths observed for both Phobos and Deimos are quantitatively in good agreement with those found by unresolved photometric observations made by the Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP; Thomas et al.; JGR, 104, 90559068, 1999). The spectral gradients of the blue and red units on Phobos bracket the results from IMP. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The Fourier-Kelvin Stellar Interferometer (FKSI): A Discovery Class TPF/DARWIN Pathfinder Mission Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danchi, W. C.; Allen, R. J.; Benford, D. J.; Deming, D.; Gezan, D. Y.; Kuchner, M.; Leisawitz, D. T.; Linfield, R.; Millan-Gabet, R.; Monnier, J. D.

    2003-01-01

    The Fourier-Kelvin Stellar Interferometer (FKSI) is a mission concept for an imaging and nulling interferometer for the mid-infrared spectral region (5-30 microns). FKSI is conceived as a scientific and technological pathfinder to TPF/DARWIN as well as SPIRIT, SPECS, and SAFIR. It will also be a high angular resolution system complementary to NGST. The scientific emphasis of the mission is on the evolution of protostellar systems, from just after the collapse of the precursor molecular cloud core, through the formation of the disk surrounding the protostar, the formation of planets in the disk, and eventual dispersal of the disk material. FKSI will also search for brown dwarfs and Jupiter mass and smaller planets, and could also play a very powerful role in the investigation of the structure of active galactic nuclei and extra-galactic star formation. We have been studying alternative interferometer architectures and beam combination techniques, and evaluating the relevant science and technology tradeoffs. Some of the technical challenges include the development of the cryocooler systems necessary for the telescopes and focal plane array, light and stiff but well-damped truss systems to support the telescopes, and lightweight and coolable optical telescopes. We present results of detailed design studies of the FKSI starting with a design consisting of five one meter diameter telescopes arranged along a truss structure in a linear non-redundant array, cooled to 35 K. A maximum baseline of 20 meters gives a nominal resolution of 26 mas at 5 microns. Using a Fizeau beam combination technique, a simple focal plane camera could be used to obtain both Fourier and spectral data simultaneously for a given orientation of the array. The spacecraft will be rotated to give sufficient Fourier data to reconstruct complex images of a broad range of astrophysical sources. Alternative and simpler three and two telescope designs emphasizing nulling and spectroscopy also have been

  4. Living with aphasia: three Indigenous Australian stories.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Elizabeth; Hersh, Deborah; Hayward, Colleen; Fraser, Joan; Brown, Melita

    2012-06-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular disorders and stroke in Australian Aboriginal communities is more than twice as high as non-Indigenous Australians. Approximately 30% of people who survive stroke are left with some level of aphasia, and yet Indigenous Australians appear to be infrequent users of speech-language pathology services, and there is virtually no research literature about the experiences of aphasia for this group of people. This paper presents the stories of living with aphasia for three Indigenous Australian men living in Perth, Western Australia. Their narratives were collected by an Indigenous researcher through in-depth, supported interviews, and were explored using both within-case and cross-case analyses for common and recurring themes. It is argued that there is value for speech-language pathologists, and other health professionals, to be aware of the broad experiences of living with aphasia for Indigenous Australians because their stories are rarely heard and because, as with people with aphasia generally, they are at risk of social isolation and tend to lack visibility in the community. This study explores the key issues which emerge for these three men and highlights the need for further research in this area. PMID:22472033

  5. Apical root canal transportation of different pathfinding systems and their effects on shaping ability of ProTaper Next

    PubMed Central

    Türker, Sevinç-Aktemur

    2015-01-01

    Background This study aimed to compare glide path preparation of different pathfinding systems and their effects on the apical transportation of ProTaper Next (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) in mesial root canals of extracted human mandibular molars, using digital subtraction radiography. Material and Methods The mesial canals of 40 mandibular first molars (with curvature angles between 25° and 35°) were selected for this study. The specimens were divided randomly into 4 groups with 10 canals each. Glide paths were created in group 1 with #10, #15 and #20 K-type (Dentsply Maillefer, Ballaigues, Switzerland) stainless steel manual files; in group 2 with Path-File (Dentsply Maillefer) #1, #2, and #3 and in group 3 with #16 ProGlider (Dentsply Maillefer) rotary instruments; in group 4 no glide paths were created. All canals were instrumented up to ProTaper Next X2 to the working length. A double digital radiograph technique was used, pre and post-instrumentation, to assess whether apical transportation and/or aberration in root canal morphology occurred. Instrument failures were also recorded. The data were analyzed statistically using ANOVA and Tukey tests (p<0.05). Results No significant differences were found among groups regarding apical transportation (p>0.05). Two ProTaper Next instruments failed in-group 4. Conclusions Within the parameters of this study, there was no difference between the performance of path-finding files and ProTaper Next system maintained root canal curvature well and was safe to use either with path-finding files or alone. Key words:Glide path, PathFile, ProGlider, ProTaper Next, transportation. PMID:26330936

  6. Opportunity to sample something different: The dark, unweathered, mafic sands of Cerberus and the Pathfinder 1997 Mars landing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgett, Kenneth S.; Singer, Robert B.; Geissler, P. E.

    1994-01-01

    A very important surface component, typically described as 'dark gray material', was not seen at the Viking lander sites, but is common to all low-albedo regions on Mars. Dark material probably includes unaltered mafic volcanic and/or crustal rock and soil not coated by dust, weathering rinds, or varnish. A Pathfinder landing in Cerberus (9 deg N - 16 deg N, 194 deg W - 215 deg W) will guarantee examination of materials that are distinctly different from the two Viking lander sites. In situ study of dark material will provide vital ground truth for orbiter-based observations like those anticipated from Mars '94/'96 and Mars Global Surveyor.

  7. Performance of the Primary Mirror Center-of-Curvature Optical Metrology System during Cryogenic Testing of the JWST Pathfinder Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaway, James B.; Wells, Conrad; Olczak, Gene; Waldman, Mark; Whitman, Tony; Cosentino, Joseph; Connolly, Mark; Chaney, David; Telfer, Randal

    2016-01-01

    The JWST primary mirror consists of 18 1.5 m hexagonal segments, each with 6-DoF and RoC adjustment. The telescope will be tested at its cryogenic operating temperature at Johnson Space Center. The testing will include center-of-curvature measurements of the PM, using the Center-of-Curvature Optical Assembly (COCOA) and the Absolute Distance Meter Assembly (ADMA). The performance of these metrology systems, including hardware, software, procedures, was assessed during two cryogenic tests at JSC, using the JWST Pathfinder telescope. This paper describes the test setup, the testing performed, and the resulting metrology system performance.

  8. Data Convergence - An Australian Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, S. S.; Howell, B.

    2012-12-01

    Coupled numerical physical, biogeochemical and sediment models are increasingly being used as integrators to help understand the cumulative or far field effects of change in the coastal environment. This reliance on modeling has forced observations to be delivered as data streams ingestible by modeling frameworks. This has made it easier to create near real-time or forecasting models than to try to recreate the past, and has lead in turn to the conversion of historical data into data streams to allow them to be ingested by the same frameworks. The model and observation frameworks under development within Australia's Commonwealth and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) are now feeding into the Australian Ocean Data Network's (AODN's) MARine Virtual Laboratory (MARVL) . The sensor, or data stream, brokering solution is centred around the "message" and all data flowing through the gateway is wrapped as a message. Messages consist of a topic and a data object and their routing through the gateway to pre-processors and listeners is determined by the topic. The Sensor Message Gateway (SMG) method is allowing data from different sensors measuring the same thing but with different temporal resolutions, units or spatial coverage to be ingested or visualized seamlessly. At the same time the model output as a virtual sensor is being explored, this again being enabled by the SMG. It is only for two way communications with sensor that rigorous adherence to standards is needed, by accepting existing data in less than ideal formats, but exposing them though the SMG we can move a step closer to the Internet Of Things by creating an Internet of Industries where each vested interest can continue with business as usual, contribute to data convergence and adopt more open standards when investment seems appropriate to that sector or business.Architecture Overview

  9. Australian Indigenous Perspectives on Quality Assurance in Children's Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutchins, Teresa; Frances, Katie; Saggers, Sherry

    2009-01-01

    The Australian Government has recently committed to the development of an integrated system of assuring national quality standards for Australian childcare and preschool services (Australian Government, 2008). This article addresses two fundamental issues relating to the development of an integrated system as it applies to Indigenous children's…

  10. Building Innovation: Learning with Technologies. Australian Education Review Number 56

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moyle, Kathryn

    2010-01-01

    Australian Education Review (AER) 56 explores national and international policy priorities for building students' innovation capabilities through information and communication technologies (ICT) in Australian schools. Section 1 sets out the Australian policy context for digital education and highlights some of the emerging challenges. It provides…

  11. Modelling Choice: Factors Influencing Modes of Delivery in Australian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Andrew; Ling, Peter; Hill, Doug

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of a study of Multiple Modes of Delivery in Australian universities that was commissioned by Australian Universities Teaching Committee over the period 2001-2004. The project examined and described the various means of educational delivery deployed by Australian universities. It identified the pedagogical,…

  12. Drama in the Australian National Curriculum: Decisions, Tensions and Uncertainties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinson, Madonna; Saunders, John Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    In September 2015, the Australian Federal Government endorsed the final version of the Australian Curriculum arts framework a document resulting from nearly seven years of consultation and development. "The Australian Curriculum: The Arts Version 8.0" comprises five subjects: dance, drama, media arts, music and visual arts. This article…

  13. Encephalization of Australian and New Guinean marsupials.

    PubMed

    Ashwell, K W S

    2008-01-01

    Encephalization of Australian marsupials was analyzed using the endocranial volume (ECV) of 52 species of Dasyuromorphia and Notoryctemorphia, 14 species of Peramelemorphia and 116 species of Diprotodontia from Australia and New Guinea and compared with 16 species of Ameridelphian marsupials and 3 species of native and recently introduced Australian eutherian carnivores (dingo, feral cat and feral fox). Linear regression analysis of the relationship between ECV and body weight for marsupials revealed that allometric parameters for these groups are different from those previously derived for samples of (mainly eutherian) mammals, with higher slopes for Dasyuromorphia and Diprotodontia and lower slopes for Ameridelphians and Peramelemorphia. Absolute ECV for small Australian and New Guinea marsupial carnivores (Antechinus and Sminthopsis) were found to be comparable to eutherians of similar body weight, but large marsupial carnivores such as the Tasmanian devil and thylacine had substantially smaller ECVs than eutherian carnivores of similar body weight. Similarly, members of some superfamilies within Diprotodontia (Burramyoidea, Petauroidea, Tarsipedoidea) had ECVs comparable to prosimians, whereas bandicoots, bilbies and many macropods were found to be poorly encephalized. When both encephalization quotient (EQ) and residuals from regression analysis were used to compare relative ECV of extinct/threatened species with common species there were no significant differences for any of the orders of Australian marsupials, suggesting that encephalization is not a major factor in the current extinction crisis for Australian marsupials. Similarly there were no consistent differences in relative ECV between marsupials from New Guinea and associated islands compared to Australia or between arid and non-arid Australian regions for any of the marsupial orders. The results indicate that marsupials are not uniformly poorly encephalized and that small marsupial carnivores and

  14. Astronomical Symbolism in Australian Aboriginal Rock Art

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Ray P.; Hamacher, Duane W.

    2011-05-01

    Traditional Aboriginal Australian cultures include a significant astronomical component, perpetuated through oral tradition and ceremony. This knowledge has practical navigational and calendrical functions, and sometimes extends to a deep understanding of the motion of objects in the sky. Here we explore whether this astronomical tradition is reflected in the rock art of Aboriginal Australians. We find several plausible examples of depictions of astronomical figures and symbols, and also evidence that astronomical observations were used to set out stone arrangements. However, we recognise that the case is not yet strong enough to make an unequivocal statement, and describe our plans for further research.

  15. Selection of the Australian indicator region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, C. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Each Australian state was examined for the availability of LANDSAT data, area, yield, and production characteristics, statistics, crop calendars, and other ancillary data. Agrophysical conditions that could influence labeling and classification accuracies were identified in connection with the highest producing states as determined from available Australian crop statistics. Based primarily on these production statistics, Western Australia and New South Wales were selected as the wheat indicator region for Australia. The general characteristics of wheat in the indicator region, with potential problems anticipated for proportion estimation are considered. The varieties of wheat, the diseases and pests common to New South Wales, and the wheat growing regions of both states are examined.

  16. New Insights into the Geology of the Mars Pathfinder Landing Site from Spectral and Morphologic Analysis of the 12-Color Superpan Panorama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murchie, S.; Barnouin-Jha, O.; Barnouin-Jha, K.; Bishop, J.; Johnson, J.; McSween, H.; Morris, R.

    2003-01-01

    New analyses of rocks and soils at the Mars Pathfinder landing site have been completed using the full Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) 12- color SuperPan panorama. These revise early conclusions that rocks at the landing site are a single lithology coated only by windblown dust. We conclude instead that there is also a second lithology in addition to the dominant gray rock, and that it is consistent with highlands material excavated from beneath a thin veneer of northern plains; that many rocks have cemented coatings that formed during an early, probably wetter climate; and that young rocks excavated after coating formation ceased are mainly breccias or conglomerates.

  17. Distinct Igneous APXS Rock Compositions on Mars from Pathfinder, MER and MSL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gellert, Ralf; Arvidson, Raymond; Clark, Benton, III; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, Richard V.; Squyres, Steven W.; Yen, Albert S.

    2015-01-01

    The alpha particle x-ray spectrometer (APXS) on all four Mars Rovers returned geochemical data from about 1000 rocks and soils along the combined traverses of over 50 kilometers. Here we discuss rocks likely of igneous origin, which might represent source materials for the soils and sediments identified along the traverses. Adirondack-type basalts, abundant in the plains of Gusev Crater, are primitive, olivine bearing basalts. They resemble in composition the basaltic soils encountered at all landing sites, except the ubiquitous elevated S, Cl and Zn in soils. They have been postulated to represent closely the average Martian crust composition. The recently identified new Martian meteorite Black Beauty has similar overall geochemical composition, very distinct from the earlier established SNC meteorites. The rim of the Noachian crater Endeavour, predating the sulfate-bearing Burns formation at Meridiani Planum, also resembles closely the composition of Adirondack basalts. At Gale Crater, the MSL Curiosity rover identified a felsic rock type exemplified by the mugearitic float rock JakeM, which is widespread along the traverse at Gale. While a surprise at that time, possibly related more evolved, alkaline rocks had been previously identified on Mars. Spirit encountered the Wishstone rocks in the Columbia Hills with approx. 6% Na2O+K2O, 15 % Al2O3 and low 12% FeO. Pathfinder rocks with elevated K and Na and >50% SiO2 were postulated to be andesitic. Recently Opportunity encountered the rock JeanBaptisteCharbonneau with >15% Al2O3, >50% SiO2 and approx. 10% FeO. A common characteristic all these rocks is the very low abundance of Cr, Ni and Zn, and an Fe/Mn ratio of about 50, indicating an unaltered Fe mineralogy. Beside these likely igneous rock types, which occurred always in several rocks, a few unique rocks were encountered, e.g. Bounce Rock, a pyroxene-bearing ejecta rock fragment resembling the Shergottite EETA 79001B meteorite. The APXS data can be used to

  18. Qualifciation test series of the indium needle FEEP micro-propulsion system for LISA Pathfinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharlemann, C.; Buldrini, N.; Killinger, R.; Jentsch, M.; Polli, A.; Ceruti, L.; Serafini, L.; DiCara, D.; Nicolini, D.

    2011-11-01

    The Laser Interferometer Space Antenna project (LISA) is a co-operative program between ESA and NASA to detect gravitational waves by measuring distortions in the space-time fabric. LISA Pathfinder is the precursor mission to LISA designed to validate the core technologies intended for LISA. One of the enabling technologies is the micro-propulsion system based on field emission thrusters necessary to achieve the uniquely stringent propulsion requirements. A consortium consisting of Astrium GmbH and the University of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt (formerly AIT) was commissioned by ESA to develop and qualify the micro-propulsion system based on the Indium Needle FEEP technology. Several successful tests have verified the proper Needle Field Emission Electric Propulsion (FEEP) operation and the thermal and mechanical design of subcomponents of the developed system. For all functional tests, the flight representative Power Control Unit developed by SELEX Galileo S.p.A (also responsible for the Micro-Propulsion Subsystem (MPS) development) was used. Measurements have shown the exceptional stability of the thruster. An acceptance test of one Thruster Cluster Assembly (TCA) over 3600 h has shown the stable long term operation of the developed system. During the acceptance test compliance to all the applicable requirements have been shown such as a thrust resolution of 0.1 μN, thrust range capability between 0 and 100 μN, thrust overshoot much lower than the required 0.3 μN+3% and many others. In particular important is the voltage stability of the thruster (±1% over the duration of the testing) and the confirmation of the very low thrust noise. Based on the acceptance test the lifetime of the thruster is expected to exceed 39,000 h generating a total impulse bit of 6300 Ns at an average thrust level of 50 μN. A flight representative qualification model of the Needle FEEP Cluster Assembly (DM1) equipped with one active TCA has performed a qualification program

  19. SZ effects in the Magneticum Pathfinder Simulation: Comparison with the Planck, SPT, and ACT results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolag, K.; Komatsu, E.; Sunyaev, R.

    2016-08-01

    We calculate the one-point probability density distribution functions (PDF) and the power spectra of the thermal and kinetic Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ and kSZ) effects and the mean Compton Y parameter using the Magneticum Pathfinder simulations, state-of-the-art cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of a large cosmological volume of (896 Mpc/h)3. These simulations follow in detail the thermal and chemical evolution of the intracluster medium as well as the evolution of super-massive black holes and their associated feedback processes. We construct full-sky maps of tSZ and kSZ from the light-cones out to z = 0.17, and one realisation of 8°.8 × 8°.8 deep light-cone out to z = 5.2. The local universe at z < 0.027 is simulated by a constrained realisation. The tail of the one-point PDF of tSZ from the deep light-cone follows a power-law shape with an index of -3.2. Once convolved with the effective beam of Planck, it agrees with the PDF measured by Planck. The predicted tSZ power spectrum agrees with that of the Planck data at all multipoles up to l ≈ 1000, once the calculations are scaled to the Planck 2015 cosmological parameters with Ωm = 0.308 and σ8 = 0.8149. Consistent with the results in the literature, however, we continue to find the tSZ power spectrum at l = 3000 that is significantly larger than that estimated from the high-resolution ground-based data. The simulation predicts the mean fluctuating Compton Y value of bar{Y}=1.18× 10^{-6} for Ωm = 0.272 and σ8 = 0.809. Nearly half (≈5 × 10-7) of the signal comes from halos below a virial mass of 1013 M⊙/h. Scaling this to the Planck 2015 parameters, we find bar{Y}=1.57× {}10^{-6}.

  20. Ames Research Center Shear Tests of SLA-561V Heat Shield Material for Mars-Pathfinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tauber, Michael; Tran, Huy; Henline, William; Cartledge, Alan; Hui, Frank; Tran, Duoc; Zimmerman, Norm

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the results of arc-jet testing at Ames Research Center on behalf of Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for the development of the Mars-Pathfinder heat shield. The current test series evaluated the performance of the ablating SLA-561V heat shield material under shear conditions. In addition, the effectiveness of several methods of repairing damage to the heat shield were evaluated. A total of 26 tests were performed in March 1994 in the 2 in. X 9 in. arc-heated turbulent Duct Facility, including runs to calibrate the facility to obtain the desired shear stress conditions. A total of eleven models were tested. Three different conditions of shear and heating were used. The non-ablating surface shear stresses and the corresponding, approximate, non-ablating surface heating rates were as follows: Condition 1, 170 N/m(exp 2) and 22 W/cm(exp 2); Condition 2, 240 N/m(exp 2) and 40 W/cm(exp 2); Condition 3, 390 N/m(exp 2) and 51 W/cm(exp 2). The peak shear stress encountered in flight is represented approximately by Condition 1; however, the heating rate was much less than the peak flight value. The peak heating rate that was available in the facility (at Condition 3) was about 30 percent less than the maximum value encountered during flight. Seven standard ablation models were tested, of which three models were instrumented with thermocouples to obtain in-depth temperature profiles and temperature contours. An additional four models contained a variety of repair plugs, gaps, and seams. These models were used to evaluated different repair materials and techniques, and the effect of gaps and construction seams. Mass loss and surface recession measurements were made on all models. The models were visually inspected and photographed before and after each test. The SLA-561 V performed well; even at test Condition 3, the char remained intact. Most of the resins used for repairs and gap fillers performed poorly. However, repair plugs made of SLA-561V performed