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Sample records for autoimmune connective tissue

  1. Neutrophilic Skin Lesions in Autoimmune Connective Tissue Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hau, Estelle; Vignon Pennamen, Marie-Dominique; Battistella, Maxime; Saussine, Anne; Bergis, Maud; Cavelier-Balloy, Benedicte; Janier, Michel; Cordoliani, Florence; Bagot, Martine; Rybojad, Michel; Bouaziz, Jean-David

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The pathophysiology of neutrophilic dermatoses (NDs) and autoimmune connective tissue diseases (AICTDs) is incompletely understood. The association between NDs and AICTDs is rare; recently, however, a distinctive subset of cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE, the prototypical AICTD) with neutrophilic histological features has been proposed to be included in the spectrum of lupus. The aim of our study was to test the validity of such a classification. We conducted a monocentric retrospective study of 7028 AICTDs patients. Among these 7028 patients, a skin biopsy was performed in 932 cases with mainly neutrophilic infiltrate on histology in 9 cases. Combining our 9 cases and an exhaustive literature review, pyoderma gangrenosum, Sweet syndrome (n?=?49), Sweet-like ND (n?=?13), neutrophilic urticarial dermatosis (n?=?6), palisaded neutrophilic granulomatous dermatitis (n?=?12), and histiocytoid neutrophilic dermatitis (n?=?2) were likely to occur both in AICTDs and autoinflammatory diseases. Other NDs were specifically encountered in AICTDs: bullous LE (n?=?71), amicrobial pustulosis of the folds (n?=?28), autoimmunity-related ND (n?=?24), ND resembling erythema gyratum repens (n?=?1), and neutrophilic annular erythema (n?=?1). The improvement of AICTDS neutrophilic lesions under neutrophil targeting therapy suggests possible common physiopathological pathways between NDs and AICTDs. PMID:25546688

  2. [Gougerot-Sjögren syndrome, connective tissue diseases and autoimmune pathology].

    PubMed

    Kaplan, G; Vinceneux, P; Bourgeois, P; Kahn, M F

    1977-01-01

    Each of the following conditions has a 4 to 6 percent frequency of association with the Gugerot-Sjögren syndrome: systemic lupus erythematous, scleroderma, autoimmune liver disease (simple biliary cirrhosis and chronic active hepatitis), and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Association with a nodular periarteritis and a polymyositis is very much more unusual and should be discussed on account of the existence of myositis and the vascularity peculiar to the Gougerot-Sjögren syndrome. Very many true or supposedly autoimmune diseases have been reported in association with the Gougerot-Sjögren syndrome: mixed connectivity, atrophying polychondritis, Reynolds' syndrome (scleroderma plus simple biliary cirrhosis), thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura, thyrotoxicosis of simple hypothyroidism, and total or partial lipodystrophy. The lacrymal and salivary condition is almost constant during systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, simple biliary cirrhosis and mixed connectivity. From the point of view of autoimmune pathology, the Gougerot-Sjögren syndrome might constitute either an autonomous condition when found in isolation or represent the exocrine glandular expression of a dysimmunitary disease with which it is associated. PMID:910105

  3. [Autoimmune hepatitis associated with mixed connective tissue disease: report of a case and a review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Aoki, S; Tada, Y; Ohta, A; Koarada, S; Ushiyama, O; Suzuki, N; Nagasawa, K

    2001-04-01

    A case is reported of a 29 year old female who had autoimmune hepatitis associated with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). The patient developed MCTD at the age of 19, and was treated with prednisolone. Liver dysfunction developed 7 years later, which exacerbated shortly after the patient suffered intrauterine fetal death during the second trimester of pregnancy. Laboratory data showed negative anti-hepatitis C antibody and hepatitis B antigen, but positive anti-smooth muscle antibody. A liver biopsy showed chronic active hepatitis. Referring to the criteria we diagnosed her as having autoimmune hepatitis. Although hepatomegaly is sometimes observed in MCTD patients, only 5 cases of autoimmune hepatitis associated with MCTD have been reported in the past. In our case, it is of note that autoimmune hepatitis developed while symptoms of MCTD were in remission, and that autoimmune hepatitis exacerbated with the emergence of anti-smooth muscle antibody following the termination of pregnancy. PMID:11411090

  4. Autoimmune phenomena and hepatitis C virus in lymphoproliferative and connective tissue disorders.

    PubMed

    Caligaris-Cappio, F; De Leo, A M; Bertero, M T

    1997-12-01

    Since hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is frequently detected in patients with lymphoproliferative or autoimmune disorders and since the virus may infect lymphocytes, the question is raised whether malignant transformation and autoimmune manifestations in the presence of HCV are HCV-related or merely fortuitous. A close association has been firmly established between HCV infection and essential type II mixed cryoglobulinemia (ECM), an indolent lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by cryoprecipitable immune-complexes (IC) that may evolve into classical non Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) retaining the ability to produce cryoprecipitable rheumatoid factor (RF). It is reasonable to consider HCV as one cofactor in lymphomagenesis, even if the precise pathogenetic relationship between HCV infection, the chronic presence of cryoprecipitable IC and the development of NHL have not been established yet. Several epidemiological studies have documented the ability of chronic HCV infection to favour the production of autoAb. It is not clear why only some patients with HCV infection develop autoAb, nor why the most frequent autoAb detected in HCV-infected subjects are cryoglobulins. Though a high prevalence of anti-HCV has been found in a variety of systemic and organ-specific autoimmune diseases, it is likely that several of these associations are fortuitous with the notable exception of membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis. As HCV can provoke or exacerbate inflammatory signs and cause the production of RF, it is reasonable to suspect that HCV infection may be able to trigger the development of some connective tissue diseases or to exacerbate their clinical course. Nonetheless, it is clinically prudent to conclude that the pathogenetic relationships of Sjögren syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis and polyarthritis with HCV infection are more likely to be regarded as mediated via the intermediate development of ECM. PMID:9498704

  5. [Undifferentiated connective tissue disease].

    PubMed

    Bodolay, Edit; Szegedi, Gyula

    2009-05-10

    Evolution of immunopathological diseases is usually slow and progressive. Non-differentiated collagen disease (NDC) or the term "undifferentiated connective tissue disease" (UCTD) represents a stage of disease where clinical symptoms and serological abnormalities suggest autoimmune disease, but they are not sufficient to fulfill the diagnostic criteria of any well-established connective tissue disease (CTD) such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), Sjögren's syndrome, mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), systemic sclerosis (SSc), polymyositis/ dermatomyositis (PM/DM) or rheumatoid arthritis (RA). 30-40 percent of patients presenting undifferentiated profile develops and reaches the stage of a well defined systemic autoimmune disease during five years follow up, while 60 percent remains in an undifferentiated stage.In the stage of NDC, immunoregulatory abnormalities and endothelial dysfunction are present. In conclusion, NDC represents a dynamic state, and it is important to recognize the possibility of a progression to a definite systemic autoimmune disease. PMID:19403430

  6. Connective Tissue Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... examples of connective tissue. There are over 200 disorders that impact connective tissue. Some, like cellulitis, are ... of an infection. Injuries can cause connective tissue disorders, such as scars. Others, such as Ehlers-Danlos ...

  7. Altered Th17 cells and Th17/regulatory T-cell ratios indicate the subsequent conversion from undifferentiated connective tissue disease to definitive systemic autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Szodoray, Peter; Nakken, Britt; Barath, Sandor; Csipo, Istvan; Nagy, Gabor; El-Hage, Fadi; Osnes, Liv T; Szegedi, Gyula; Bodolay, Edit

    2013-12-01

    A shift in the balance between Th17-cells and regulatory T-cells (Treg) is an important feature of systemic autoimmune diseases (SAID), and may also contribute to their development. Hereby, we assessed the distribution of peripheral Th17 and Treg-cells in patients with undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD), the forerunner of SAIDs and followed these parameters during the development towards definitive SAIDs. Fifty-one UCTD patients were investigated and followed-up for 3 years. Flow cytometry was used to identify and follow three cell-populations: Th17-cells (CD4+IL-17+ T-cells), natural regulatory T-cells (CD4(+)CD25(bright)FoxP3(+); nTregs) and IL-10 producing Type-1 regulatory T-cells (CD4+IL-10+ T-cells; Tr1). Altogether 37.3% of these patients progressed into SAIDs. Th17-cells were increased in UCTD vs. controls, which further increased in those, whom developed SAIDs eventually. The Th17/nTreg ratio gradually increased from controls through UCTD patients, reaching the highest values in SAID-progressed patients. Regarding the Th17/Tr1 ratios, a similar tendency was observed moreover Th17/Tr1 could distinguish between UCTD patients with, or without subsequent SAID progression in a very early UCTD stage. Various immunoserological markers showed association with Th17 and Th17/nTreg at baseline, indicating the consecutive development of a distinct SAID. The derailed Th17/Treg balance may contribute to disease progression therefore could function as a prognostic marker. PMID:23974054

  8. Connective tissue diseases and the liver.

    PubMed

    Youssef, Wael I; Tavill, Anthony S

    2002-10-01

    Connective tissue diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome, and scleroderma are systemic disorders that may have an autoimmune basis. The system manifestations vary, and there is frequent overlap among the syndromes. Liver involvement in patients with connective tissue diseases has been well documented but is generally considered rare. Although advanced liver disease with cirrhosis and liver failure is rare in patients with connective tissue diseases, clinical and biochemical evidence of associated liver abnormalities is common. Previous treatment with potentially hepatotoxic drugs or coincident viral hepatitis has usually been implicated as the main causes of liver disease in patients with connective tissue diseases. However, even after careful exclusion of these etiologies, the question remains whether to classify the patient as having a primary liver disease with associated autoimmune, clinical, and laboratory features or as having liver disease as a manifestation of generalized connective tissue disease. The main example of this pathogenetic dilemma is autoimmune hepatitis and SLE-associated hepatitis, which have been regarded as two different entities, although they have features in common of autoimmune syndromes. Several clinical and histopathologic features have been used to discriminate autoimmune hepatitis from SLE, a relevant diagnostic exercise because complications and therapy are quite different. Although hepatic steatosis and abnormal results on biochemical liver function tests are the most common hepatic abnormalities associated with connective tissue diseases, other less frequent abnormalities have been noted, such as nodular regenerative hyperplasia, portal vein obliteration and portal hypertension, features of primary biliary cirrhosis, and rarely portal fibrosis with abnormal lobular architecture. Vascular disorders of the liver also have been described, such as Budd-Chiari syndrome. Histologic assessment may reveal a variety of subclinical liver diseases. The aim of this contribution is to review the current published data regarding liver involvement in connective tissue diseases. PMID:12352299

  9. Linear connective tissue nevus.

    PubMed

    Asano, Yoshihide; Ihn, Hironobu; Tamaki, Kunihiko

    2007-01-01

    Multiple connective tissue nevi in linear arrangements, which was previously described as zosteriform connective tissue nevus, is a rare variant of connective tissue nevus. We herein report the case of an 8-year-old Japanese boy with this disease. He developed a small mass on the upper region of his right inner ankle at the age of one-half years. Then, other lesions had appeared on the inner side of his right lower leg, thigh, and groin within the next 2 years. Furthermore, multiple new lesions in linear arrangements had appeared on the right half of the abdomen and on the extensor side of the right forearm at the age of 8 years. A biopsy specimen revealed abnormalities in both the collagen bundles and the elastic fibers. Since the distribution was along Blaschko's lines, not dermatomes, we propose that the diagnosis "linear connective tissue nevus" is suitable for this clinical study. PMID:17845185

  10. Connective Tissue Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Dabiri, Ganary; Falanga, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Connective tissue disorders (CTD), which are often also termed collagen vascular diseases, include a number of related inflammatory conditions. Some of these diseases include rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), localized scleroderma (morphea variants localized to the skin), Sjogren’s syndrome, dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and mixed connective tissue disease. In addition to the systemic manifestations of these diseases, there are a number of cutaneous features that make these conditions recognizable on physical exam. Lower extremity ulcers and digital ulcers are an infrequent but disabling complication of long-standing connective tissue disease. The exact frequency with which these ulcers occur is not known, and the cause of the ulcerations is often multifactorial. Moreover, a challenging component of CTD ulcerations is that there are still no established guidelines for their diagnosis and treatment. The morbidity associated with these ulcerations and their underlying conditions is very substantial. Indeed, these less common but intractable ulcers represent a major medical and economic problem for patients, physicians and nurses, and even well organized multidisciplinary wound healing centers. PMID:23756459

  11. Connective tissue ulcers.

    PubMed

    Dabiri, Ganary; Falanga, Vincent

    2013-11-01

    Connective tissue disorders (CTD), which are often also termed collagen vascular diseases, include a number of related inflammatory conditions. Some of these diseases include rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), localized scleroderma (morphea variants localized to the skin), Sjogren's syndrome, dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and mixed connective tissue disease. In addition to the systemic manifestations of these diseases, there are a number of cutaneous features that make these conditions recognizable on physical exam. Lower extremity ulcers and digital ulcers are an infrequent but disabling complication of long-standing connective tissue disease. The exact frequency with which these ulcers occur is not known, and the cause of the ulcerations is often multifactorial. Moreover, a challenging component of CTD ulcerations is that there are still no established guidelines for their diagnosis and treatment. The morbidity associated with these ulcerations and their underlying conditions is very substantial. Indeed, these less common but intractable ulcers represent a major medical and economic problem for patients, physicians and nurses, and even well organized multidisciplinary wound healing centers. PMID:23756459

  12. Computed tomographic imaging in connective tissue diseases.

    PubMed

    Devaraj, Anand; Wells, Athol U; Hansell, David M

    2007-08-01

    The connective tissue diseases are a group of autoimmune mediated disorders characterized by multiorgan damage. High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) plays an important role in identifying patients with respiratory involvement. Although there is some overlap, typical HRCT appearances are increasingly recognized for each of the major connective tissue diseases and are described in detail in this review (rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, Sjögren syndrome, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, mixed connective tissue disease). The clinical utility of HRCT is discussed with respect to the detection of disease, diagnosis, staging of disease severity, prognostic evaluation, and monitoring of disease progression. The difficult problem of establishing the clinical significance of CT abnormalities is also addressed. PMID:17764057

  13. Immune Components of Liver Damage Associated with Connective Tissue Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Serov, Youri A.; Alazmi, Mansour; Baba, Kamaldeen

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune connective tissue diseases are associated with liver abnormalities and often have overlapping pathological and clinical manifestations. As a result, they can present great clinical challenges and evoke questions about diagnostic criteria for liver diseases. Moreover, discriminating between liver involvement as a manifestation of connective tissue disease and primary liver disease can be challenging since they share a similar immunological mechanism. Most patients with connective tissue diseases exhibit liver test abnormalities that likely result from coexisting, primary liver diseases, such as fatty liver disease, viral hepatitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, autoimmune hepatitis, and drug-related liver toxicity. Liver damage can be progressive, leading to cirrhosis, complications of portal hypertension, and liver-related death, and, therefore, must be accurately identified. In this review, we highlight the challenges facing the diagnosis of liver damage associated with connective tissue disease and identify immune mechanisms involved in liver damage associated with connective tissue diseases. PMID:26357616

  14. Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... My Care Team Forms & Medical Records Travel, Locations & Logistics About Your Visit Prepare for Your Test Insurance & ... autoimmune disease. This means the body's natural immune system does not behave normally. Instead of serving to ...

  15. Associated pulmonary arterial hypertension in connective tissue diseases.

    PubMed

    Cojocaru, Manole; Cojocaru, Inimioara Mihaela; Silosi, Isabela; Vrabie, Camelia Doina

    2011-04-01

    In recent years, major advances have been achieved in the understanding of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) patho-physiology. Associated pulmonary arterial hypertension (APAH) can occur in a variety of other conditions and circumstances including a number of systemic autoimmune diseases. As with PAH in general, clinical symptoms of APAH in systemic autoimmune diseases are unspecific. In addition, there is a long standing association between autoimmunity and APAH. It has been postulated that autoimmunity may play a role in the pathogenesis of APAH. This argument has been based on frequent coexisting clinical and serological rheumatic findings. There is no experimental model of immune mechanism-dependent severe APAH. The loss of self-tolerance could initiate a process which ultimately results in APAH. It is possible that T-cell deficiencies (in either function or number) may contribute to pulmonary vascular injury or disease. These conditions are often associated with autoantibodies as well as defects in the CD4 T-cell compartiment. However, it remains uncertain how autoimmune mechanisms contribute to the pathogenesis of APAH. There are data that show a significant association between APAH and connective tissue diseases (CTD). In this regard, systemic sclerosis, mixed connective tissue disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, dermato/polymyositis and primary Sjögren's syndrome are associated with APAH. The study of APAH in the systemic autoimmune diseases and its relation to basic immunologic disturbances may yet bring effective therapies in the future. APAH can be a severe complication attracting a high excess mortality in autoimmune diseases. The present review will focus on what is known about autoimmune phenomena in APAH patients. PMID:22205898

  16. [Connective tissue diseases in childhood].

    PubMed

    Gensch, K; Gudowius, S; Niehues, T; Kuhn, A

    2005-10-01

    Connective tissue diseases are a heterogeneous group of chronic multisystem inflammatory disorders including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS), dermato- (DM) and polymyositis (PM), mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), and Sjögren's syndrome (SS). Patients can present with similar clinical features, particularly during the first onset of symptoms, which frequently makes the diagnosis of a specific disease difficult. The incidence of connective tissue diseases is much lower in children than adults; however, the clinical picture is more variable. Clinical signs, such as fatigue, fever, or weight loss, may precede any systemic organ involvement and in children, mucocutaneous manifestations develop most frequently during the varying disease course. This review summarizes recent information on epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostic procedures, and treatment strategies of the different connective tissue diseases, concentrating on specific problems in childhood. PMID:16160808

  17. The diagnosis and classification of undifferentiated connective tissue diseases.

    PubMed

    Mosca, Marta; Tani, Chiara; Vagnani, Sabrina; Carli, Linda; Bombardieri, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The term undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD) refers to unclassifiable systemic autoimmune diseases which share clinical and serological manifestations with definite connective tissue diseases (CTDs) but not fulfilling any of the existing classification criteria. In this review we will go through the more recent evidence on UCTD and we will discuss in what extent the availability of new criteria for the CTDs could interfere with the "UCTD concept". The development of criteria able to identify early phases of defined CTD, may help in the differentiation of stable UCTD form their early stages and may offer a valuable guide to the treating physician to set up appropriate follow up schedules as well as therapeutic protocols. This simplified subset of CTD could offer a model to study clinic pathological correlations as well as the role of possible environmental factors in the development of autoimmunity. PMID:24518855

  18. Thoracic manifestations of connective tissue diseases.

    PubMed

    Ruano, Carina A; Lucas, Rita N; Leal, Cecília I; Lourenço, João; Pinheiro, Sofia; Fernandes, Otília; Figueiredo, Luísa

    2015-01-01

    Connective tissue diseases (CTDs) comprise several immunologic systemic disorders, each of which associated with a particular set of clinical manifestations and autoimmune profile. CTDs may cause numerous thoracic abnormalities, which vary in frequency and pattern according to the underlying disorder. The CTDs that most commonly involve the respiratory system are progressive systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren syndrome, polymyositis, dermatomyositis, and mixed connective tissue disease. Pulmonary abnormalities in this group of patients may result from CTD-related lung disease or treatment complications, namely drug toxicity and opportunistic infections. The most important thoracic manifestations of CTDs are interstitial lung disease and pulmonary arterial hypertension, with nonspecific interstitial pneumonia being the most common pattern of interstitial lung disease. High-resolution computed tomography is a valuable tool in the initial evaluation and follow-up of patients with CTDs. As such, general knowledge of the most common high-resolution computed tomographic features of CTD-related lung disease allows the radiologist to contribute to better patient management. PMID:25131613

  19. Epidemiology of connective tissue disorders.

    PubMed

    Gaubitz, M

    2006-10-01

    The reported prevalence and incidence of connective tissue disorders are quite variable, depending on differences in study methodology. Most important differences are the study duration, the classification criteria used for diagnosis and the country in which the study was undertaken. Sjögren's syndrome has the highest prevalence ranging between 0.5 and 3% of a given population. The prevalence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is estimated between 15 and 50 per 100 000 individuals, with a female:male ratio of 6-10:1 in the age group between 15 and 40 yrs. The prevalence of systemic sclerosis is lower, however, varying significantly between different studies and countries. The prevalence of overlap syndromes, especially mixed connective tissue disease, is unknown, and polymyositis and dermatomyositis are regarded as very rare rheumatic diseases. Though the classification criteria for the connective tissue disorders have not been developed for the purpose of diagnosing an individual patient, these criteria still are the most valuable tool for the identification of patients with systemic rheumatic diseases such as connective tissue disorders. PMID:16987829

  20. [Gastroenterologic aspects of connective tissue diseases].

    PubMed

    Altomonte, L; Zoli, A; Alessi, F; Ghirlanda, G; Greco, A V; Magarò, M

    1985-07-14

    The connective tissue disorders are a protean group of acquired diseases which have in common widespread immunologic and inflammatory alterations of connective tissue. The acquired connective tissue diseases generally include the following clinical entities: rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, polymyositis, polyarteritis nodosa, scleroderma, mixed connective tissue disease, Sjögren's and Behcet's sindromes. These entities have certain features in common which include sinovitis, pleuritis, myocarditis, endocarditis, pericarditis, peritonitis, vasculitis, myositis, changes in skin, alteration of connective tissue and nephritis. Gastrointestinal and hepatic involvement in connective tissue disorders are not the most important features, nevertheless appear almost regularly. Anorexia, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, malabsorption may affect patients suffering by rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus and other collagenophaties. In some cases mesenteric vasculitis may cause intestinal ischemia which may result in bowel infarction, mucosal ulceration, hemorrhage, perforation. After an extensive review of the existing literature the Authors make an accurate evaluation of gastrointestinal and hepatic alterations in connective tissue diseases. PMID:2862608

  1. Topical review-connective tissue diseases: orofacial manifestations including pain.

    PubMed

    Klasser, Gary D; Balasubramaniam, Ramesh; Epstein, Joel

    2007-01-01

    This topical review presents an overview of orofacial manifestations associated with the more common connective tissue diseases affecting multiple organs. The orofacial manifestations associated with these autoimmune disorders include oral mucosa alterations, salivary gland pathosis, sensory neuropathies, headaches, and temporomandibular disorders. Since many of these orofacial manifestations may be painful, the practitioner managing pain patients should be familiar with them. An understanding of the orofacial manifestations associated with these systemic diseases will enable the pain practitioner to establish an appropriate diagnosis within the context of the underlying systemic disease. This will allow the practitioner the opportunity to contribute and collaborate as a member of a multidisciplinary health-care team in the management of these systemic autoimmune diseases. PMID:17717956

  2. Acupuncture, connective tissue, and peripheral sensory modulation.

    PubMed

    Langevin, Helene M

    2014-01-01

    Although considerable controversy surrounds the legitimacy of acupuncture as a treatment, a growing literature on the physiological effects of acupuncture needling in animals and humans is providing new insights into basic cellular mechanisms including connective tissue mechanotransduction and purinergic signaling. This review summarizes these findings and proposes a model combining connective tissue plasticity and peripheral sensory modulation in response to the sustained stretching of tissue that results from acupuncture needle manipulation. PMID:25072149

  3. Autoimmunity in connection with a metal implant: a case of autoimmune/autoinflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Loyo, Esthela; Jara, Luis J; López, Persio David; Puig, Ana Carolina

    2013-04-01

    Autoimmune/autoinflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA) has been recently proposed by Shoenfeld and Agmon-Levin as a new entity that comprises several conditions: the macrophagic-myofasciitis syndrome, the Gulf War syndrome, silicosis and post-vaccination phenomena, autoimmunity related to infectious fragments, hormones, aluminum, silicone, squalene oil, and pristane. We report the case of a 23-year-old woman who developed serial episodes of high fever, extreme fatigue, transient thrombocytopenia, multiple cervical adenopathies, hepatosplenomegaly, anemia, neutropenia, severe proteinuria and urine sediment abnormalities, elevated serum ferritin levels, and transient low positive antinuclear antibodies 1 year after she had a nickel-titanium chin implant for cosmetic reasons. The clinical picture simulated a variety of probable diseases: systemic lupus erythematosus, Kikuchi-Fujimoto syndrome, adult onset Still's disease, antiphospholipid syndrome, and hemophagocytic syndrome, among others, so she underwent an extensive medical investigation including two lymph node biopsies. She received treatment accordingly with steroids, methotrexate, and mofetil mycophenolate, with initial improvement of her symptoms, which recurred every time the dose was reduced. Two and a half years later the patient decided to retire the chin implant and afterwards all her systemic symptoms have disappeared. She remains in good health, without recurrence of any symptom and off medications until today. Albeit this patient fulfills proposed major ASIA criteria, to our knowledge it would be the first description of systemic features of autoinflammation in connection with a metal implant. PMID:26000140

  4. Langerhans Cells Maintain Local Tissue Tolerance in a Model of Systemic Autoimmune Disease.

    PubMed

    King, Jennifer K; Philips, Rachael L; Eriksson, Anna U; Kim, Peter J; Halder, Ramesh C; Lee, Delphine J; Singh, Ram Raj

    2015-07-15

    Systemic autoimmune diseases such as lupus affect multiple organs, usually in a diverse fashion where only certain organs are affected in individual patients. It is unclear whether the "local" immune cells play a role in regulating tissue specificity in relation to disease heterogeneity in systemic autoimmune diseases. In this study, we used skin as a model to determine the role of tissue-resident dendritic cells (DCs) in local and systemic involvement within a systemic lupus disease model. Skin-resident DCs, namely, Langerhans cells (LCs), have been implicated in regulating tolerance or autoimmunity using elegant transgenic models, however, their role in local versus systemic immune regulation is unknown. We demonstrate that although lymphocytes from skin-draining lymph nodes of autoimmune-prone MRL/MpJ-Fas(lpr/lp) (r) (MRL-lpr) mice react spontaneously to a physiological skin self-Ag desmoglein-3, epicutaneous applications of desmoglein-3 induced tolerance that is dependent on LCs. Inducible ablation of LCs in adult preclinical MRL-lpr and MRL/MpJ-Fas(+/+) mice resulted in increased autoantibodies against skin Ags and markedly accelerated lupus dermatitis with increased local macrophage infiltration, but had no effect on systemic autoantibodies such as anti-dsDNA Abs or disease in other organs such as kidneys, lung, and liver. Furthermore, skin-draining lymph nodes of LC-ablated MRL-lpr mice had significantly fewer CD4(+) T cells producing anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 than LC-intact controls. These results indicate that a skin-resident DC population regulates local tolerance in systemic lupus and emphasize the importance of the local immune milieu in preventing tissue-specific autoimmunity, yet have no effect on systemic autoimmunity. PMID:26071559

  5. BIOLOGICAL FRAMEWORKS FOR ENGINEERS Session #19 [cm: Connective tissues

    E-print Network

    Sniadecki, Nathan J.

    ME411/511 BIOLOGICAL FRAMEWORKS FOR ENGINEERS Session #19 [cm: Connective tissues] General Objectives: Connective tissues are a group of tissues which bind structures together and provide a framework Mechanics of connective tissues and systems Central Framework: Connective tissues provide the mechanical

  6. BIOLOGICAL FRAMEWORKS FOR ENGINEERS Session #19 [cm: Connective tissues

    E-print Network

    Sniadecki, Nathan J.

    ME498/599 BIOLOGICAL FRAMEWORKS FOR ENGINEERS Session #19 [cm: Connective tissues] General Objectives: Connective tissues are a group of tissues which bind structures together and provide a framework Mechanics of connective tissues and systems Central Framework: Connective tissues provide the mechanical

  7. Growth hormone and connective tissue in exercise.

    PubMed

    Doessing, S; Kjaer, M

    2005-08-01

    Over the last few years, growth hormone (GH) has become increasingly popular as doping within different sports. However, the precise mechanisms behind the ergogenic (performance enhancing) effects of GH in athletes are still being debated. Besides a well-documented stimulatory effect of GH on carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism, and a possible anabolic effect on myofibrillar muscle protein, we suggest a role for GH as an anabolic agent in connective tissue in human skeletal muscle and tendon. Given the importance of the connective tissue for the function of skeletal muscle and tendon, a strengthening effect of GH on connective tissue could fit with the ergogenic effect of GH experienced by athletes. This review examines the endogenous secretion of GH and its mediators in relation to exercise. Furthermore, we consider the effect of endogenous GH and administered recombinant human GH (rhGH) on both myofibrillar and connective tissue protein synthesis, thus offering an alternative explanation for the ergogenic effect of GH. Finally, we suggest a possible therapeutic role for rhGH in clinical management of the frequently suffered injuries in the connective tissue. PMID:15998337

  8. The diagnosis and classification of mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Tani, Chiara; Carli, Linda; Vagnani, Sabrina; Talarico, Rosaria; Baldini, Chiara; Mosca, Marta; Bombardieri, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    The term "mixed connective tissue disease" (MCTD) concerns a systemic autoimmune disease typified by overlapping features between two or more systemic autoimmune diseases and the presence of antibodies against the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein autoantigen (U1snRNP). Since the first description of this condition in 1972, the understanding of clinical manifestations and long-term outcome of MCTD have significantly advanced. Polyarthritis, Raynaud's phenomenon, puffy fingers, lung involvement and esophageal dysmotility are the most frequently reported symptoms among the different cohorts during the course of the disease. Moreover, in recent years a growing interest has been focused on severe organ involvement such as pulmonary arterial hypertension and interstitial lung disease which can accrue during the long-term follow-up and can still significantly influence disease prognosis. Over the last years, significant advances have been made also in disease pathogenesis understanding and a central pathogenetic role of anti-U1RNP autoantibodies has clearly emerged. Although controversies on disease definition and classification still persist, MCTD identifies a group of patients in whom increased surveillance for specific manifestations and prognostic stratification became mandatory to improve patient's outcomes. PMID:24461387

  9. The respiratory system in connective tissue disorders.

    PubMed

    Crestani, B

    2005-06-01

    The connective tissue disorders (also called collagen vascular diseases) represent an heterogeneous group of immunologically mediated inflammatory disorders with a large variety of affected organs besides the lungs. The respiratory system may be involved in all its components: airways, vessels, parenchyma, pleura, respiratory muscles, etc. The frequency, clinical presentation, prognosis and response to therapy vary, depending on the pattern of involvement as well as on the underlying connective tissue disorders. The subject of this review is to describe the most frequent type of lung disorders observed in patients with connective tissue disease (CTD). We will focus on the most frequent CTD: systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, Sjogren's syndrome, dermatopolymyositis and mixed CTD. PMID:15876300

  10. Other manifestations of mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Pope, Janet E

    2005-08-01

    This article describes other manifestations of mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). We focus on inflammatory arthritis, the gastrointestinal tract (the esophagus in particular), the kidney, skin, and hematologic changes such as thrombocytopenia. Due to the complexity of potential organ involvements in MCTD, vigilance with appropriate diagnosis and treatment is warranted. PMID:16084323

  11. Gastrointestinal manifestations of mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Marshall, J B; Kretschmar, J M; Gerhardt, D C; Winship, D H; Winn, D; Treadwell, E L; Sharp, G C

    1990-05-01

    We examined the gastrointestinal tract abnormalities in 61 patients with mixed connective tissue disease. The first 34 were part of a prospective longitudinal study that included manometric and radiographic evaluation of the esophagus. Heartburn (48%) and dysphagia (38%) were by far the most common gastrointestinal symptoms. Seventeen percent of patients undergoing manometry had distal esophageal aperistalsis, and 43% low-amplitude peristalsis (less than 30 mmHg). Studies in 10 patients before and after treatment suggested that esophageal dysfunction in mixed connective tissue disease may be responsive to corticosteroids. Upper esophageal sphincter hypotension was also common. One patient had marked upper esophageal sphincter hypotension and recurrent aspiration, which resolved with corticosteroid therapy. Findings on radiographic studies of the stomach and small bowel in 54 patients and barium enemas in 16 patients were reviewed. Our series included one case each of malabsorption, colonic and small bowel perforations due to vasculitis, chronic active hepatitis, and acute pancreatitis. In conclusion, any area of the gastrointestinal tract may be affected by mixed connective tissue disease, although the esophagus is the most common location. The gastrointestinal aspects of mixed connective tissue disease overlap with those of progressive systemic sclerosis, polymyositis, and systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:2323516

  12. Connective tissue: Vascular and hematological (blood) support

    PubMed Central

    Calvino, Nick

    2003-01-01

    Abstract Connective Tissue (CT) is a ubiquitous component of all major tissues and structures of the body (50% of all body protein is CT), including that of the blood, vascular, muscle, tendon, ligament, fascia, bone, joint, IVD's (intervertebral discs) and skin. Because of its ubiquitous nature, CT is an often overlooked component of any essential nutritional program that may address the structure, and/or function of these tissues. The central role of CT in the health of a virtually all cells, tissues, organs, and organ systems, is discussed. General nutritional CT support strategies, as well as specific CT support strategies that focus on blood, vascular, structural system (eg, muscles, tendons, ligaments, fascia, bone, and joints), integument (skin) and inflammatory and immune mediation will be discussed here and will deal with connective tissue dynamics and dysfunction. An overview of the current scientific understanding and possible options for naturally enhancing the structure and function of CT through the application of these concepts will be discussed in this article, with specific attention on the vascular and hematological systems. PMID:19674592

  13. Secretory diarrhea in mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Thiele, D L; Krejs, G J

    1985-02-01

    Intractable diarrhea of 2 years' duration was evaluated in a patient with mixed connective tissue disease and dilatation of the proximal small bowel. Stool analysis revealed secretory diarrhea. Intestinal perfusion studies showed that the jejunum was secreting water and electrolytes. Chloride and bicarbonate secretion against an electrical gradient suggested active anion secretion. Absorption in the ileum was normal. No evidence for bacterial colonization of the small bowel, protein-losing enteropathy, or a hormonal cause of intestinal secretion could be found. This case report suggests that water and electrolyte secretion in dilated segments of small bowel may be another cause of diarrhea in cases of gastrointestinal involvement by systemic connective tissue disease. PMID:3969997

  14. Some connective tissue disorders of the lung.

    PubMed Central

    Turner-Warwick, M.

    1988-01-01

    Many connective tissue disorders involve the lungs. The same clinical syndrome may be associated with several distinctive types of pathology in different patients. Fibrosing alveolitis is a common feature of a number of different syndromes. An hypothesis is set out in schematic form which may help to account for some of these differences and emphasizes the potential importance of the pulmonary vasculature in pathogenesis. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:3074281

  15. Tissue Targeting of Anti-RNP Autoimmunity: Effects of T Cells and Myeloid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Greidinger, Eric L.; Zang, YunJuan; Fernandez, Irina; Berho, Mariana; Nassiri, Mehdi; Martinez, Laisel; Hoffman, Robert W.

    2010-01-01

    Using adoptive transfer techniques, we explored the immune cells implicated in a model of anti-RNP autoimmunity that presents either with pneumonitis or glomerulonephritis. Unfractionated splenocytes from donors without renal disease induced predominantly lung disease (8/14 (57%) lung versus 2/14 (14%) renal, p = 0.046). However, the CD4+ cells taken from these splenocytes induced renal disease more frequently than lung disease (7/10 (70%) renal versus 2/10 (20%) lung, p = 0.01). Adoptive transfer of RNP+ CD4+ T cells from short-term culture gave results similar to those with donor splenic CD4+ cells (8/11 (73%) of recipients with renal disease versus 3/11 (27%) with lung disease). Co-transfer of myeloid dendritic cells (MDCs) from the spleens of immunized mice along with CD4+ cells from immunized donors prevented the induction of renal disease (0/5 mice, p = 0.026 versus recipients of fresh CD4+ cells), though lung disease was still seen in 1/5 mice. Transfer of MDCs alone from immunized donors induced lung disease in 3/5 (60%) of recipients, with no nephritis. Co-transfer of splenocytes from mice with nephritis along with splenocytes from mice without nephritis led to renal disease in 4/5 recipients, with lung disease in 0/5 recipients. These findings indicate that RNP+ CD4+ T cells are sufficient to induce anti-RNP autoimmunity, that the tissue targeting of anti-RNP autoimmunity can be deviated to either a renal or pulmonary phenotype depending upon the presence of accessory cells including MDCs, and that dendritic cell subsets can play roles in both propagation of autoimmunity and end organ targeting. PMID:19180485

  16. Mathematical modelling of anisotropy in brous connective tissue

    E-print Network

    Sherratt, Jonathan A.

    Mathematical modelling of anisotropy in ®brous connective tissue Luke Olsen a , Philip K. Maini a present two modelling frameworks for studying dynamic anistropy in connective tissue, motivated background The term `®brous connective tissue' denotes a wide class of supporting tis- sues within

  17. The prognosis of mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, Ingrid E

    2005-08-01

    The prognosis for patients who have mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) varies from a benign course to severe progressive disease. In approximately one third of patients the clinical symptoms go into long-term remission and the anti-U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein antibodies disappear. One third of patients have a severe, progressive disease course. Persistent morbidity often is attributable to arthritis, easy fatiguability, and dyspnea on exertion. The most severe clinical manifestation is pulmonary hypertension which contributes to premature death in patients who have MCTD. Pulmonary hypertension is associated with proliferative vascular abnormalities that involve small pulmonary vessels, rather than interstitial lung disease. PMID:16084324

  18. Implementation of the Connective Tissue Screening Questionnaire in northeast Pennsylvania to identify comorbidities of connective tissue diseases in subjects with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Michael S; Wallace, Sean J; Clarke, Scott M; Tarafder, Mushfiqur R; McLaughlin, William A

    2014-04-01

    Previous studies have described an increased risk of developing an additional connective tissue disease (CTD) when one such ailment is present. We examine here the likelihood that individuals with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) screen positive for one or more of the following five autoimmune CTDs: Sjögren's syndrome, scleroderma, rheumatoid arthritis, dermatomyositis/polymyositis, and mixed connective tissue disorder. Five hundred SLE-diagnosed subjects were asked to complete a CTD screening questionnaire (CSQ). The results were analyzed according to the set of diagnostic criteria given by the American College of Rheumatology to identify probable cases of each CTD. Significant standardized prevalence ratios and comorbidities indicate an increased risk for the other autoimmune CTDs. In all, 96% of the subjects screened positive for at least one additional CTD, and 13% screened positive for at least two additional CTDs. We see that the SLE-diagnosed population may benefit from further attention regarding the presence of additional CTDs, which may further inform treatment strategies. We also see the application of the CSQ as a potentially important tool for clinical practice, and we describe the present study's limitations along with possible ways that these can be addressed. PMID:24327597

  19. Autoimmune hepatitis

    MedlinePLUS

    Lupoid hepatitis; Chronic acute liver disease ... This form of hepatitis is an autoimmune disease . The body's immune system cannot tell the difference between healthy body tissue and harmful, outside ...

  20. Fibroblast involvement in soft connective tissue calcification

    PubMed Central

    Ronchetti, Ivonne; Boraldi, Federica; Annovi, Giulia; Cianciulli, Paolo; Quaglino, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Soft connective tissue calcification is not a passive process, but the consequence of metabolic changes of local mesenchymal cells that, depending on both genetic and environmental factors, alter the balance between pro- and anti-calcifying pathways. While the role of smooth muscle cells and pericytes in ectopic calcifications has been widely investigated, the involvement of fibroblasts is still elusive. Fibroblasts isolated from the dermis of pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) patients and of patients exhibiting PXE-like clinical and histopathological findings offer an attractive model to investigate the mechanisms leading to the precipitation of mineral deposits within elastic fibers and to explore the influence of the genetic background and of the extracellular environment on fibroblast-associated calcifications, thus improving the knowledge on the role of mesenchymal cells on pathologic mineralization. PMID:23467434

  1. [Marfan syndrome and related connective tissue disorders].

    PubMed

    Steindl, Katharina

    2013-11-27

    Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominantly inherited connective tissue disorder with a prevalence of approximately 1:5000 people. Typical manifestations affect the cardiovascular system, eyes, skeleton, lungs, skin and dura mater. Most patients have a so-called marfanoid habitus with tall stature, long and narrow limbs, a long and narrow head shape and other skeletal abnormalities. Of particular medical importance are the possible complications such as severe scoliosis or pectus excavatum, spontaneous pneumothorax, retinal detachment, or an acute glaucoma evoked by lens luxation. However, the most dangerous complication is acute dissection of the ascending aorta, which is usually the result of a slowly progressive aortic dilatation. With the introduction of therapies the average life expectancy of previously just 32 years could be raised to above 60 years. PMID:24280605

  2. Treatment of mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Paul; Grossman, Jennifer M

    2005-08-01

    Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is believed to be incurable and seems to have a variable prognosis. Some patients have a mild self-limited disease, whereas others develop major organ involvement that requires aggressive treatment. Because no controlled clinical trials have been performed to guide therapy in MCTD, treatment strategies must rely largely upon the conventional therapies that are used for similar problems in other rheumatic conditions (systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, polymyositis). Given the heterogeneous clinical course of MCTD, therapy should be individualized to address the specific organ involved and the severity of underlying disease activity. Corticosteroids, antimalarials, methotrexate, cytotoxics (most often cyclophosphamide), and vasodilators have been used in the treatment of MCTD with varying degrees of success. PMID:16084325

  3. [Mixed connective tissue disease and correlated diseases].

    PubMed

    Rebora, A; Parodi, A

    1990-09-01

    Overlap syndromes (OS) are complex clinical entities in which symptoms and serological profiles of diverse connective tissue diseases, mainly systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS), dermato/polymyositis and Sjögren syndrome, converge in a single patient. On the basis of the personal experience, the Authors try to classify OS from the serological point of view. Six different serological profiles have been recognized. Anti-U1RNP antibodies define the classical mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) according to Sharp. These patients are probably most common and present with Raynaud's phenomenon and puffy hands which never reach sclerodactily. In Italian patients, the symptoms of lupus erythematosus are not as frequent as in USA patients, probably due to the prevalence of Negroes in the latter. The absence of renal involvement is, instead, common as in other series. The general trend of these patients is towards progressive systemic sclerosis and lung fibrosis. Anti-Ku antibodies define another group of patients with the same clinical symptoms as MCTD and good prognosis. Anti-Ki-SL antibodies, by contrast, characterize a less common group of patients in which the renal and the pulmonary involvement is frequent. Their prognosis is poor. Anti-Sm and anti Ro/SSA antibodies, which are more commonly found in SLE patients, may be detected also in some of the patients with OS who have a poor prognosis. Patients with anti-SSA, for example, have, as in PSS, an early onset and a rapid development of lung fibrosis. Finally, anti-La/SSB antibodies define patients who associate Sjögren syndrome to SLE or PSS.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2079345

  4. Chondroitin sulphate inhibits connective tissue mast cells.

    PubMed

    Theoharides, T C; Patra, P; Boucher, W; Letourneau, R; Kempuraj, D; Chiang, G; Jeudy, S; Hesse, L; Athanasiou, A

    2000-11-01

    1. Mast cells derive from the bone marrow and are responsible for the development of allergic and possibly inflammatory reactions. Mast cells are stimulated by immunoglobulin E (IgE) and specific antigen, but also by a number of neuropeptides such as neurotensin (NT), somatostatin or substance P (SP), to secrete numerous pro-inflammatory molecules that include histamine, cytokines and proteolytic enzymes. 2. Chondroitin sulphate, a major constituent of connective tissues and of mast cell secretory granules, had a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on rat peritoneal mast cell release of histamine induced by the mast cell secretagogue compound 48/80 (48/80). This inhibition was stronger than that of the clinically available mast cell 'stabilizer' disodium cromoglycate (cromolyn). Inhibition by chondroitin sulphate increased with the length of preincubation and persisted after the drug was washed off, while the effect of cromolyn was limited by rapid tachyphylaxis. 3. Immunologic stimulation of histamine secretion from rat connective tissue mast cells (CTMC) was also inhibited, but this effect was weaker in umbilical cord-derived human mast cells and was absent in rat basophilic leukemia (RBL) cells which are considered homologous to mucosal mast cells (MMC). Oligo- and monosaccharides were not as effective as the polysaccharides. 4. Inhibition, documented by light and electron microscopy, involved a decrease of intracellular calcium ion levels shown by confocal microscopy and image analysis. Autoradiography at the ultrastructural level showed that chondroitin sulphate was mostly associated with plasma and perigranular membranes. 5. Chondroitin sulphate appears to be a potent mast cell inhibitor of allergic and nonimmune stimulation with potential clinical implications. PMID:11082109

  5. Development of mixed connective tissue disease and Sjögren's syndrome in a patient with trisomy X.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, M; Ikeda, K; Nakamura, T; Iwamoto, T; Furuta, S; Nakajima, H

    2015-10-01

    Increased risk of developing systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has been reported in patients with Klinefelter syndrome. Here, we describe a 16-year-old Japanese patient with trisomy X (47,XXX) who developed mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) and Sjögren's syndrome. She had polyarthritis, edematous fingers with Raynaud's phenomenon, sicca syndrome, interstitial lung disease, possible myositis, and was positive for anti-nuclear antibody, anti-nRNP antibody and rheumatoid factor. This is the first report in the literature of a case of MCTD with female polysomy X, which further supports the link between the presence of extra X chromosome(s) and the development of autoimmune diseases. PMID:25854827

  6. [Interstitial lung disease related to systemic connective tissue diseases].

    PubMed

    Fiedorczyk, Ma?gorzata; Rojewska, Joanna; Kowal-Bielecka, Otylia; Sierakowski, Stanis?aw

    2005-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is one of the most frequent and most serious complications of connective tissue diseases such as systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, dermato- and polymyositis, Sjogren's syndrome, or mixed connective tissue disease. Diagnosis of ILD is often delayed in patients with connective tissue diseases because of the systemic character of the primary condition, restricted physical activity of the patient and insufficient awareness of the physycian. The aim of the current review is to present the up-to-date information on ethiopathology, classification, diagnosis and treatment of ILD in patients with connective tissue diseases. PMID:16786776

  7. [Capillaroscopic studies in connective tissue inflammations].

    PubMed

    Scagliusi, P; Scardigno, A; Marsico, A; Anelli, F; Petruzzellis, V; Pipitone, V

    1984-01-28

    Capillarioscopy has been unjustifiably neglected in the study of connective tissue diseases, where examination of the microcirculation is clearly important. A study of 80 cases is reported. 12 systemic lupus, 11 progressive systemic sclerosis (PSS), 20 rheumatoid arthritis (including 3 juvenile and 2 Still's disease); 9 Raynaud's disease (of which 3 idiopathic, 4 with rheumatoid arthritis and 2 with UCTD); 1 dermatomyositis; 11 other CTD (2 overlap syndrome--1 lupus + dermatomyositis; 1 lupus + PSS--3 Sjögren syndromes with rheumatoid arthritis, 1 MCTD, 2 primary mixed cryoglobulinaemia, 1 systemic vasculitis, 1 Behçet syndrome, and 1 UCTD); 9 miscellaneous forms (3 psoriatic arthropathy, 1 rheumatic pelvispondylitis, 1 allergic dermatitis, 1 pulmonary TB, 1 ulcerative colitis; 1 scapulohumeral periarthritis, 1 unclassifiable rheumatism; 7 healthy subjects). During capillarioscopy, from one to nine slides were prepared for each subject. These were interpreted separately by three persons who were unaware of the respective diagnosis. Calibre, tortuosity, length and number of capillaries were recorded, plus the visibility of the subpapillar plexus, height and number of the termal, subungual and/or ungual vallum haemorrhage, plugging. It was found that PSS, dermatomyositis, MCTD, and overlap-PSS revealed a very typical common pattern, possibly pathognomonic, namely marked reduction in the number of capillaries + megacapillaries. The other forms presented less evocative diagnostic patterns, though they were fairly indicative in some instances. Clinical correlations of particular significance with respect to prognosis, however, were not observed. PMID:6700829

  8. Analgesic Drugs Alter Connective Tissue Remodeling and Mechanical Properties.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Chad C

    2016-01-01

    Exercising individuals commonly consume analgesics, but these medications alter tendon and skeletal muscle connective tissue properties, possibly limiting a person from realizing the full benefits of exercise training. I detail the novel hypothesis that analgesic medications alter connective tissue structure and mechanical properties by modifying fibroblast production of growth factors and matrix enzymes, which are responsible for extracellular matrix remodeling. PMID:26509485

  9. A Proteomic Comparison of Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Pancreatic Tissue from Autoimmune Pancreatitis, Chronic Pancreatitis, and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paulo, Joao A; Kadiyala, Vivek; Brizard, Scott; Banks, Peter A; Steen, Hanno; Conwell, Darwin L

    2015-01-01

    Context Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is a standard for specimen preservation, and as such FFPE tissue banks are an untapped resource of histologically-characterized specimens for retrospective biomarker investigation for pancreatic disease. Objectives We use liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to compare FFPE specimens from three different diseases of the exocrine pancreas. Design We investigated the proteomic profile of FFPE pancreatic tissue from 9 archived specimens that were histologically classified as: autoimmune pancreatitis (n=3), chronic pancreatitis (n=3), and pancreatic cancer (n=3), using LC-MS/MS. Setting This is a proteomic analysis experiment of FFPE pancreatic tissue in an academic center. Patients FFPE tissue specimens were provided by Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center (Boston, MA, USA). Interventions FFPE tissue specimens were collected via routine surgical resection procedures. Main outcome measures We compared proteins identified from chronic pancreatitis, autoimmune pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer FFPE pancreatic tissue. Results We identified 386 non-redundant proteins from 9 specimens. Following our filtering criteria, 73, 29, and 53 proteins were identified exclusively in autoimmune pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer specimens, respectively. Conclusions We report that differentially-expressed proteins can be identified among FFPE tissues specimens originating from individuals with different histological diagnoses. These proteins merit further confirmation with a greater number of specimens and orthogonal validation, such as immunohistochemistry. The mass spectrometry-based methodology used herein has the potential to enhance diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic target discovery, further advancing pancreatic research. PMID:23846938

  10. The decrease in silicon concentration of the connective tissues with age in rats is a marker of connective tissue turnover.

    PubMed

    Jugdaohsingh, Ravin; Watson, Abigail I E; Pedro, Liliana D; Powell, Jonathan J

    2015-06-01

    Silicon may be important for bone and connective tissue health. Higher concentrations of silicon are suggested to be associated with bone and the connective tissues, compared with the non-connective soft tissues. Moreover, in connective tissues it has been suggested that silicon levels may decrease with age based upon analyses of human aorta. These claims, however, have not been tested under controlled conditions. Here connective and non-connective tissues were collected and analysed for silicon levels from female Sprague-Dawley rats of different ages (namely, 3, 5, 8, 12, 26 and 43 weeks; n=8-10 per age group), all maintained on the same feed source and drinking water, and kept in the same environment from weaning to adulthood. Tissues (696 samples) were digested in nitric acid and analysed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry for total silicon content. Fasting serum samples were also collected, diluted and analysed for silicon. Higher concentrations of silicon (up to 50-fold) were found associated with bone and the connective tissues compared with the non-connective tissues. Although total silicon content increased with age in all tissues, the highest connective tissue silicon concentrations (up to 9.98 ?g/g wet weight) were found in young weanling rats, decreasing thereafter with age (by 2-6 fold). Fasting serum silicon concentrations reflected the pattern of connective tissue silicon concentrations and, both measures, when compared to collagen data from a prior experiment in Sprague-Dawley rats, mirrored type I collagen turnover with age. Our findings confirm the link between silicon and connective tissues and would imply that young growing rats have proportionally higher requirements for dietary silicon than mature adults, for bone and connective tissue development, although this was not formally investigated here. However, estimation of total body silicon content suggested that actual Si requirements may be substantially lower than previously estimated which could explain why absolute silicon deficiency is difficult to achieve but, when it is achieved in young growing animals, it results in stunted growth and abnormal development of bone and other connective tissues. PMID:25687224

  11. The decrease in silicon concentration of the connective tissues with age in rats is a marker of connective tissue turnover?

    PubMed Central

    Jugdaohsingh, Ravin; Watson, Abigail I.E.; Pedro, Liliana D.; Powell, Jonathan J.

    2015-01-01

    Silicon may be important for bone and connective tissue health. Higher concentrations of silicon are suggested to be associated with bone and the connective tissues, compared with the non-connective soft tissues. Moreover, in connective tissues it has been suggested that silicon levels may decrease with age based upon analyses of human aorta. These claims, however, have not been tested under controlled conditions. Here connective and non-connective tissues were collected and analysed for silicon levels from female Sprague–Dawley rats of different ages (namely, 3, 5, 8, 12, 26 and 43 weeks; n = 8–10 per age group), all maintained on the same feed source and drinking water, and kept in the same environment from weaning to adulthood. Tissues (696 samples) were digested in nitric acid and analysed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry for total silicon content. Fasting serum samples were also collected, diluted and analysed for silicon. Higher concentrations of silicon (up to 50-fold) were found associated with bone and the connective tissues compared with the non-connective tissues. Although total silicon content increased with age in all tissues, the highest connective tissue silicon concentrations (up to 9.98 ?g/g wet weight) were found in young weanling rats, decreasing thereafter with age (by 2–6 fold). Fasting serum silicon concentrations reflected the pattern of connective tissue silicon concentrations and, both measures, when compared to collagen data from a prior experiment in Sprague–Dawley rats, mirrored type I collagen turnover with age. Our findings confirm the link between silicon and connective tissues and would imply that young growing rats have proportionally higher requirements for dietary silicon than mature adults, for bone and connective tissue development, although this was not formally investigated here. However, estimation of total body silicon content suggested that actual Si requirements may be substantially lower than previously estimated which could explain why absolute silicon deficiency is difficult to achieve but, when it is achieved in young growing animals, it results in stunted growth and abnormal development of bone and other connective tissues. PMID:25687224

  12. Interpretation of autoantibody positivity in interstitial lung disease and lung-dominant connective tissue disease*

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Daniel Antunes Silva; Kawassaki, Alexandre de Melo; Baldi, Bruno Guedes

    2013-01-01

    The initial evaluation of patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD) primarily involves a comprehensive, active search for the cause. Autoantibody assays, which can suggest the presence of a rheumatic disease, are routinely performed at various referral centers. When interstitial lung involvement is the condition that allows the definitive diagnosis of connective tissue disease and the classical criteria are met, there is little debate. However, there is still debate regarding the significance, relevance, specificity, and pathophysiological role of autoimmunity in patients with predominant pulmonary involvement and only mild symptoms or formes frustes of connective tissue disease. The purpose of this article was to review the current knowledge of autoantibody positivity and to discuss its possible interpretations in patients with ILD and without clear etiologic associations, as well as to enhance the understanding of the natural history of an allegedly new disease and to describe the possible prognostic implications. We also discuss the proposition of a new term to be used in the classification of ILDs: lung-dominant connective tissue disease. PMID:24473767

  13. Detection of Connective Tissue Disorders from 4D Aortic MR

    E-print Network

    of connective tissue disorders leading to aortic aneurysms and dissections. Automated and accurate segmentation bindevævs- sygdomme, som fører til aortic aneurysms og dissections. En automatisk og præcis metode til

  14. [CT imaging features of pulmonary involvement in connective tissue disorders].

    PubMed

    Brillet, P Y; Mama, N; Nunes, H; Uzunhan, Y; Abbad, S; Brauner, M W

    2009-11-01

    Connective tissue disorders correspond to a heterogeneous group of inflammatory diseases characterized by abnormal immune system activity leading to connective tissue alterations in multiple parts of the body. In adults, connective tissue disorders include rheumatoid arthritis, progressive systemic sclerosis, Sjögren syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis and polymyositis, ankylosing spondylitis, and mixed connective tissue disease. Broncho-pulmonary involvement may be variable with involvement of all anatomical components of the lung. Involvement of other intrathoracic structures (pleura, respiratory muscles, heart, rib cage) is frequent. The most specific manifestations include interstitial lung diseases and pulmonary hypertension. During follow-up, progressive respiratory diseases may occur due to the treatment, infections, pulmonary embolism or neoplasms. PMID:19953077

  15. Silica associated mixed connective tissue disorder in a stone crusher.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Arjun; Suri, Jagdish Chander; Ray, Animesh; Sharma, Rahul Kumar

    2013-05-01

    Silica exposure has been implicated with the development of various connective tissue diseases. We report a case of 32-year-old stone crusher who developed silicosis with mixed connective tissue disorder (MCTD) 6 years after exposure to silica. This association of silicosis with MCTD has never been reported from the Indian subcontinent, although the problem of this pneumoconiosis remains rampant. This rare association urges us to report this case. PMID:24421595

  16. Hypericin-mediated selective photomodification of connective tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Hovhannisyan, V. Guo, H. W.; Chen, Y. F.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Ghukasyan, V.; Dong, C. Y.

    2014-12-29

    Controllable modification of biological molecules and supramolecular components of connective tissue are important for biophysical and biomedical applications. Through the use of second harmonic generation imaging, two-photon fluorescence microscopy, and spectrofluorimetry, we found that hypericin, a natural pigment, induces photosensitized destruction of collagen fibers but does not affect elastic fibers and lipids in chicken tendon, skin, and blood vessels. We demonstrated the dynamics and efficiency of collagen photomodification and investigated mechanisms of this processes. Our results suggest that hypericin–mediated photoprocesses in biological tissues may be useful in biomedical applications that require selective modification of connective tissues.

  17. Hypericin-mediated selective photomodification of connective tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovhannisyan, V.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Ghukasyan, V.; Guo, H. W.; Chen, Y. F.; Dong, C. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Controllable modification of biological molecules and supramolecular components of connective tissue are important for biophysical and biomedical applications. Through the use of second harmonic generation imaging, two-photon fluorescence microscopy, and spectrofluorimetry, we found that hypericin, a natural pigment, induces photosensitized destruction of collagen fibers but does not affect elastic fibers and lipids in chicken tendon, skin, and blood vessels. We demonstrated the dynamics and efficiency of collagen photomodification and investigated mechanisms of this processes. Our results suggest that hypericin-mediated photoprocesses in biological tissues may be useful in biomedical applications that require selective modification of connective tissues.

  18. Optical Clearing in Dense Connective Tissues to Visualize Cellular Connectivity In Situ

    PubMed Central

    Calve, Sarah; Ready, Andrew; Huppenbauer, Christopher; Main, Russell; Neu, Corey P.

    2015-01-01

    Visualizing the three-dimensional morphology and spatial patterning of cells embedded deep within dense connective tissues of the musculoskeletal system has been possible only by utilizing destructive techniques. Here we utilize fructose-based clearing solutions to image cell connectivity and deep tissue-scale patterning in situ by standard confocal microscopy. Optical clearing takes advantage of refractive index matching of tissue and the embedding medium to visualize light transmission through a broad range of bovine and whole mount murine tissues, including cartilage, bone, and ligament, of the head and hindlimb. Using non-destructive methods, we show for the first time intercellular chondrocyte connections throughout the bulk of cartilage, and we reveal in situ patterns of osteocyte processes and the lacunar-canalicular system deep within mineralized cortical bone. Optical clearing of connective tissues is expected to find broad application for the study of cell responses in normal physiology and disease pathology. PMID:25581165

  19. Oral manifestations of connective tissue disease and novel therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Heath, Kenisha R; Rogers, Roy S; Fazel, Nasim

    2015-01-01

    Connective tissue diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc), and Sjögren syndrome (SS) have presented many difficulties both in their diagnosis and treatment. Known causes for this difficulty include uncertainty of disease etiology, the multitude of clinical presentations, the unpredictable disease course, and the variable cell types, soluble mediators, and tissue factors that are believed to play a role in the pathogenesis of connective tissue diseases. The characteristic oral findings seen with these specific connective tissue diseases may assist with more swift diagnostic capability. Additionally, the recent use of biologics may redefine the success rate in the treatment and management of the disease. In this review we describe the oral manifestations associated with SLE, SSc, and SS and review the novel biologic drugs used to treat these conditions. PMID:26632801

  20. Severe acute hepatitis related to hydroxychloroquine in a woman with mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Giner Galvañ, Vicente; Oltra, María Rosa; Rueda, Diego; Esteban, María José; Redón, Josep

    2007-06-01

    Antimalarial drugs are used for the control of mild manifestations of autoimmune diseases due to their low toxicity. Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), a alpha-hydroxylated derivative of chloroquine, is usually preferred because of its higher tolerability. Mild and unspecific gastrointestinal symptoms are the main secondary effects related to HCQ use. Less than 1% of subjects show liver enzyme increase, although the percentage can be as high as 50% in subjects with chronic liver disease. A woman with mixed connective tissue disease who developed a reversible acute hepatitis shortly after the initiation of low-dose HCQ is presented. Two previous cases of patients with acute liver failure have previously been published. All three cases have been reported in the absence of previous liver disease. It seems to be a dose-dependent, idiosyncratic, and molecule-specific toxic effect and must be considered, taking into account the potential bad prognosis. PMID:16575495

  1. Invited review: mesenchymal progenitor cells in intramuscular connective tissue development.

    PubMed

    Miao, Z G; Zhang, L P; Fu, X; Yang, Q Y; Zhu, M J; Dodson, M V; Du, M

    2016-01-01

    The abundance and cross-linking of intramuscular connective tissue contributes to the background toughness of meat, and is thus undesirable. Connective tissue is mainly synthesized by intramuscular fibroblasts. Myocytes, adipocytes and fibroblasts are derived from a common pool of progenitor cells during the early embryonic development. It appears that multipotent mesenchymal stem cells first diverge into either myogenic or non-myogenic lineages; non-myogenic mesenchymal progenitors then develop into the stromal-vascular fraction of skeletal muscle wherein adipocytes, fibroblasts and derived mesenchymal progenitors reside. Because non-myogenic mesenchymal progenitors mainly undergo adipogenic or fibrogenic differentiation during muscle development, strengthening progenitor proliferation enhances the potential for both intramuscular adipogenesis and fibrogenesis, leading to the elevation of both marbling and connective tissue content in the resulting meat product. Furthermore, given the bipotent developmental potential of progenitor cells, enhancing their conversion to adipogenesis reduces fibrogenesis, which likely results in the overall improvement of marbling (more intramuscular adipocytes) and tenderness (less connective tissue) of meat. Fibrogenesis is mainly regulated by the transforming growth factor (TGF) ? signaling pathway and its regulatory cascade. In addition, extracellular matrix, a part of the intramuscular connective tissue, provides a niche environment for regulating myogenic differentiation of satellite cells and muscle growth. Despite rapid progress, many questions remain in the role of extracellular matrix on muscle development, and factors determining the early differentiation of myogenic, adipogenic and fibrogenic cells, which warrant further studies. PMID:26350682

  2. [Progress of Autoantibody Examinations for Connective Tissue Diseases].

    PubMed

    Akashi, Kengo; Saegusa, Jun; Morinobu, Akio

    2015-05-01

    Connective tissue diseases are chronic inflammatory diseases that can affect multiple organs and, thus, have a broad spectrum of clinical presentations. Various autoantibodies are detected in patients with connective tissue diseases, represented by anti-nuclear antibody for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc), polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM), Sjögren's syndrome, and mixed connective tissue disease. Assessment of the autoantibody profile is fundamental for the clinical management of patients with connective tissue diseases, providing important data for the diagnosis, clinical characterization, and disease activity evaluation. Anti-ribosomal P antibody and anti-NMDA receptor antibody are associated with neuropsychiatric SLE. Anti-synthetase syndrome comprises the association of myositis (PM/DM), interstitial lung disease, fever, Raynaud's phenomenon, mechanic's hands, and anti-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase antibodies. Anti-MDA5 antibody is detected in patients with clinically amyopathic DM, often complicated by rapidly progressive interstitial lung disease. Between 50 and 75% of malignancy-associated DM patients are positive for anti-TIF1-? antibody. Anti-RNA polymerase III antibody is associated with diffuse cutaneous SSc and renal crisis. This review focuses on the importance and usefulness of these autoantibodies for the diagnosis and management of patients with connective tissue diseases in clinical practice. PMID:26524895

  3. Diagnosis and Treatment of Connective Tissue Disease-Associated Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Strek, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is one of the most serious pulmonary complications associated with connective tissue diseases (CTDs), resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Although the various CTDs associated with ILD often are considered together because of their shared autoimmune nature, there are substantial differences in the clinical presentations and management of ILD in each specific CTD. This heterogeneity and the cross-disciplinary nature of care have complicated the conduct of prospective multicenter treatment trials and hindered our understanding of the development of ILD in patients with CTD. In this update, we present new information regarding the diagnosis and treatment of patients with ILD secondary to systemic sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, dermatomyositis and polymyositis, and Sjögren syndrome. We review information on risk factors for the development of ILD in the setting of CTD. Diagnostic criteria for CTD are presented as well as elements of the clinical evaluation that increase suspicion for CTD-ILD. We review the use of medications in the treatment of CTD-ILD. Although a large, randomized study has examined the impact of immunosuppressive therapy for ILD secondary to systemic sclerosis, additional studies are needed to determine optimal treatment strategies for each distinct form of CTD-ILD. Finally, we review new information regarding the subgroup of patients with ILD who meet some, but not all, diagnostic criteria for a CTD. A careful and systematic approach to diagnosis in patients with ILD may reveal an unrecognized CTD or evidence of autoimmunity in those previously believed to have idiopathic ILD. PMID:23460159

  4. Histopathology of lung disease in the connective tissue diseases.

    PubMed

    Vivero, Marina; Padera, Robert F

    2015-05-01

    The pathologic correlates of interstitial lung disease (ILD) secondary to connective tissue disease (CTD) comprise a diverse group of histologic patterns. Lung biopsies in patients with CTD-associated ILD tend to demonstrate simultaneous involvement of multiple anatomic compartments of the lung. Certain histologic patterns tend to predominate in each defined CTD, and it is possible in many cases to confirm connective tissue-associated lung disease and guide patient management using surgical lung biopsy. This article will cover the pulmonary pathologies seen in rheumatoid arthritis, systemic sclerosis, myositis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren syndrome, and mixed CTD. PMID:25836637

  5. Connective tissue disease-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sung, Yon K; Chung, Lorinda

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by vascular remodeling of pulmonary arterioles that leads to increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right heart failure, and death. It is associated with connective tissue diseases, including systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and mixed connective tissue disease. PAH is characterized by dyspnea on exertion and fatigue. Syncopal events suggest severe disease. Patients may present with signs of right heart failure. One- and 3-year survival rates are approximately 81% and 52%, respectively. Given the high prevalence and mortality, algorithms for screening are currently under investigation and will hopefully lead to earlier diagnosis and improved survival. PMID:25836644

  6. Gastrointestinal systemic sclerosis in serologic mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Norman, D A; Fleischmann, R M

    1978-01-01

    Mixed connective tissue disease is a clinical entity defined by overlapping features of progressive systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, polymyositis, rheumatoid arthritis, and distinct serologic findings. Esophageal dilatation and dysmotility have been the only gastrointestinal manifestations reported. Three patients with serologic findings of mixed connective tissue disease and extensive gastrointestinal involvement compatible with the changes found in progressive systemic sclerosis are presented. Gastrointestinal manifestations of progressive systemic sclerosis are reviewed and were found to be indistinguishable from the findings in these patients. PMID:308806

  7. Mucochondroid (mucous connective) tissues in the heads of teleosts.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, M

    1988-01-01

    The distribution and structure of mucochondroid tissues in the heads of teleosts has been studied in 56 species from 26 families. The tissues could also be called mucous connective tissue and have previously been known as basophilic gelatinous tissue. They are a heterogeneous group of tissues that contain fibroblasts (type example--the subcutaneous mucochondroid of the Cobitidae) or hyaline cells (type example--the mucochondroid around the medulla oblongata and spinal cord of Rasbora heteromorpha), embedded in a pale-staining matrix in which there are variable numbers of collagen fibres and blood vessels. Mucochondroid tissue is especially common beneath the skin, in labial folds, around olfactory and accessory olfactory sacs, in opercular valves and beneath the sensory epithelia of the stato-acoustic organ. The histochemistry of several mucochondroid tissues has been studied in Misgurnus anguillicaudatus, Acanthopsis choirorhynchus, Gnathonemus petersi and Cyclopterus lumpus. They have widely different amounts and types of glycoproteins, glycosaminoglycans and connective tissue fibres. The ultrastructure of subcutaneous mucochondroid is described in Acanthophthalmus semicinctus. Its cells contain little rough endoplasmic reticulum and a small Golgi apparatus, but numerous plasmalemmal vesicles, especially in the cell processes. The matrix contains 23-35 nm diameter granules, collagen and 11-12 nm diameter microfibrils. The similarities between mucochondroid and hyaline cell chondroid (cartilage) at the ultrastructural level, are more obvious than their differences. PMID:3177897

  8. Dendritic Cells Induce Autoimmune Diabetes and Maintain Disease via De Novo Formation of Local Lymphoid Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Ludewig, Burkhard; Odermatt, Bernhard; Landmann, Salome; Hengartner, Hans; Zinkernagel, Rolf M.

    1998-01-01

    Activation of autoreactive T cells can lead to autoimmune diseases such as insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM). The initiation and maintenance of IDDM by dendritic cells (DC), the most potent professional antigen-presenting cells, were investigated in transgenic mice expressing the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus glycoprotein (LCMV-GP) under the control of the rat insulin promoter (RIP-GP mice). We show that after adoptive transfer of DC constitutively expressing the immunodominant cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) epitope of the LCMV-GP, RIP-GP mice developed autoimmune diabetes. Kinetic and functional studies of DC-activated CTL revealed that development of IDDM was dependent on dose and timing of antigenic stimulation. Strikingly, repeated CTL activation by DC led to severe destructive mononuclear infiltration of the pancreatic islets but also to de novo formation of islet-associated organized lymphoid structures in the pancreatic parenchyma. In addition, repetitive DC immunization induced IDDM with lymphoid neogenesis also in perforin-deficient RIP-GP mice, illustrating that CD8+ T cell–dependent inflammatory mechanisms independent of perforin could induce IDDM. Thus, DC presenting self-antigens not only are potent inducers of autoreactive T cells, but also help to maintain a peripheral immune response locally; therefore, the induction of autoimmunity against previously ignored autoantigens represents a potential hazard, particularly in DC-based antitumor therapies. PMID:9782126

  9. PDGFR? plays a crucial role in connective tissue remodeling.

    PubMed

    Horikawa, Shinjiro; Ishii, Yoko; Hamashima, Takeru; Yamamoto, Seiji; Mori, Hisashi; Fujimori, Toshihiko; Shen, Jie; Inoue, Ran; Nishizono, Hirofumi; Itoh, Hiroshi; Majima, Masataka; Abraham, David; Miyawaki, Toshio; Sasahara, Masakiyo

    2015-01-01

    Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) plays a pivotal role in the remodeling of connective tissues. Emerging data indicate the distinctive role of PDGF receptor-? (PDGFR?) in this process. In the present study, the Pdgfra gene was systemically inactivated in adult mouse (?-KO mouse), and the role of PDGFR? was examined in the subcutaneously implanted sponge matrices. PDGFR? expressed in the fibroblasts of Pdgfra-preserving control mice (Flox mice), was significantly reduced in the sponges in ?-KO mice. Neovascularized areas were largely suppressed in the ?-KO mice than in the Flox mice, whereas the other parameters related to the blood vessels and endothelial cells were similar. The deposition of collagen and fibronectin and the expression of collagen 1a1 and 3a1 genes were significantly reduced in ?-KO mice. There was a significantly decrease in the number and dividing fibroblasts in the ?-KO mice, and those of macrophages were similar between the two genotypes. Hepatocyte growth factor (Hgf) gene expression was suppressed in Pdgfra-inactivated fibroblasts and connective tissue. The findings implicate the role of PDGFR?-dependent ECM and HGF production in fibroblasts that promotes the remodeling of connective tissue and suggest that PDGFR? may be a relevant target to regulate connective tissue remodeling. PMID:26639755

  10. INTRODUCTION Articular cartilage is the dense connective tissue that functions

    E-print Network

    Buschmann, Michael

    INTRODUCTION Articular cartilage is the dense connective tissue that functions as a bearing material in synovial joints. Adult articular cartilage is avascular, aneural and alymphatic; cell nutrition is derived primarily from the synovial fluid (Mankin and Brandt, 1984). Nutrition in immature cartilage

  11. PDGFR? plays a crucial role in connective tissue remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Horikawa, Shinjiro; Ishii, Yoko; Hamashima, Takeru; Yamamoto, Seiji; Mori, Hisashi; Fujimori, Toshihiko; Shen, Jie; Inoue, Ran; Nishizono, Hirofumi; Itoh, Hiroshi; Majima, Masataka; Abraham, David; Miyawaki, Toshio; Sasahara, Masakiyo

    2015-01-01

    Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) plays a pivotal role in the remodeling of connective tissues. Emerging data indicate the distinctive role of PDGF receptor-? (PDGFR?) in this process. In the present study, the Pdgfra gene was systemically inactivated in adult mouse (?-KO mouse), and the role of PDGFR? was examined in the subcutaneously implanted sponge matrices. PDGFR? expressed in the fibroblasts of Pdgfra-preserving control mice (Flox mice), was significantly reduced in the sponges in ?-KO mice. Neovascularized areas were largely suppressed in the ?-KO mice than in the Flox mice, whereas the other parameters related to the blood vessels and endothelial cells were similar. The deposition of collagen and fibronectin and the expression of collagen 1a1 and 3a1 genes were significantly reduced in ?-KO mice. There was a significantly decrease in the number and dividing fibroblasts in the ?-KO mice, and those of macrophages were similar between the two genotypes. Hepatocyte growth factor (Hgf) gene expression was suppressed in Pdgfra-inactivated fibroblasts and connective tissue. The findings implicate the role of PDGFR?-dependent ECM and HGF production in fibroblasts that promotes the remodeling of connective tissue and suggest that PDGFR? may be a relevant target to regulate connective tissue remodeling. PMID:26639755

  12. Ultrastructure of vascular and connective tissue changes in primary syphilis.

    PubMed Central

    Wrzolkowa, T; Kozakiewicz, J

    1980-01-01

    Electron microscopical studies of primary syphilitic lesions showed intensive changes in the capillaries in the form of endothelial proliferation and extensive infilitration of different cells in the surrounding connective tissue. The degenerative changes in axon terminals could explain the painless course of primary induration. Images PMID:7000302

  13. Sjögren's syndrome: An underdiagnosed condition in mixed connective tissue disease

    PubMed Central

    Usuba, Fany Solange; Lopes, Jaqueline Barros; Fuller, Ricardo; Yamamoto, Joyce Hisae; Alves, Milton Ruiz; Pasoto, Sandra Gofinet; Caleiro, Maria Teresa C.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of sicca symptoms, dry eye, and secondary Sjögren's syndrome and to evaluate the severity of dry eye in patients with mixed connective tissue disease. METHODS: In total, 44 consecutive patients with mixed connective tissue disease (Kasukawa's criteria) and 41 healthy controls underwent Schirmer's test, a tear film breakup time test, and ocular surface staining to investigate dry eye. In addition, the dry eye severity was graded. Ocular and oral symptoms were assessed using a structured questionnaire. Salivary gland scintigraphy was performed in all patients. Classification of secondary Sjögren's syndrome was assessed according to the American-European Consensus Group criteria. RESULTS: The patients and controls had comparable ages (44.7±12.4 vs. 47.2±12.2 years) and frequencies of female gender (93 vs. 95%) and Caucasian ethnicity (71.4 vs. 85%). Ocular symptoms (47.7 vs. 24.4%) and oral symptoms (52.3 vs. 9.7%) were significantly more frequent in patients than in controls. Fourteen (31.8%) patients fulfilled Sjögren's syndrome criteria, seven of whom (50%) did not have this diagnosis prior to study inclusion. A further comparison of patients with mixed connective tissue disease with or without Sjögren's syndrome revealed that the former presented significantly lower frequencies of polyarthritis and cutaneous involvement than did the patients without Sjögren's syndrome. Moderate to severe dry eye was found in 13 of 14 patients with mixed connective tissue disease and Sjögren's syndrome (92.8%). CONCLUSIONS: Sjögren's syndrome, particularly with moderate to severe dry eye, is frequent in patients with mixed connective tissue disease. These findings alert the physician regarding the importance of the appropriate diagnosis of this syndrome in such patients. PMID:24626939

  14. Sustained deep-tissue pain alters functional brain connectivity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jieun; Loggia, Marco L; Edwards, Robert R; Wasan, Ajay D; Gollub, Randy L; Napadow, Vitaly

    2013-08-01

    Recent functional brain connectivity studies have contributed to our understanding of the neurocircuitry supporting pain perception. However, evoked-pain connectivity studies have employed cutaneous and/or brief stimuli, which induce sensations that differ appreciably from the clinical pain experience. Sustained myofascial pain evoked by pressure cuff affords an excellent opportunity to evaluate functional connectivity change to more clinically relevant sustained deep-tissue pain. Connectivity in specific networks known to be modulated by evoked pain (sensorimotor, salience, dorsal attention, frontoparietal control, and default mode networks: SMN, SLN, DAN, FCN, and DMN) was evaluated with functional-connectivity magnetic resonance imaging, both at rest and during a sustained (6-minute) pain state in healthy adults. We found that pain was stable, with no significant changes of subjects' pain ratings over the stimulation period. Sustained pain reduced connectivity between the SMN and the contralateral leg primary sensorimotor (S1/M1) representation. Such SMN-S1/M1 connectivity decreases were also accompanied by and correlated with increased SLN-S1/M1 connectivity, suggesting recruitment of activated S1/M1 from SMN to SLN. Sustained pain also increased DAN connectivity to pain processing regions such as mid-cingulate cortex, posterior insula, and putamen. Moreover, greater connectivity during pain between contralateral S1/M1 and posterior insula, thalamus, putamen, and amygdala was associated with lower cuff pressures needed to reach the targeted pain sensation. These results demonstrate that sustained pain disrupts resting S1/M1 connectivity by shifting it to a network known to process stimulus salience. Furthermore, increased connectivity between S1/M1 and both sensory and affective processing areas may be an important contribution to interindividual differences in pain sensitivity. PMID:23718988

  15. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease (AIED)

    MedlinePLUS

    ... or service advertised on this site. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease What is autoimmunity? How is it connected ... reaction. The immune system can attack just the ear, attack the ear and some other body part ...

  16. Autoimmune and gastrointestinal dysfunctions: does a subset of children with autism reveal a broader connection?

    PubMed

    Brown, Amy C; Mehl-Madrona, Lewis

    2011-08-01

    A large number of autoimmune disorders have a gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction component that may interplay with genetic, hormonal, environmental and/or stress factors. This narrarive review investigates possible links between autism, immune system abnormalities and GI symptoms in a subgroup of children with autism. A literature search on Medline (1950 to September 2010) was conducted to identify relevant articles by using the keywords 'autism and gastrointestinal' (71 publications) and 'autism and immune' (237 publications), cross-referencing and general searching to evaluate the available literature on the immunological and GI aspects of autism. Sufficient evidence exists to support that a subgroup of children with autism may suffer from concomitant immune-related GI symptoms. PMID:21780894

  17. Skin involvement in systemic autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Rashtak, Shadi; Pittelkow, Mark R

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases present with varied and broad-ranging cutaneous manifestations. Connective tissue disorders have a plethora of skin manifestations such as rheumatoid nodules in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic plaques in psoriatic arthritis, acne and pustulosis in SAPHO syndrome, livedo reticularis and ulceration in antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and xerosis in Sjögren syndrome. Cutaneous manifestations of autoimmune vasculitides such as polyarteritis nodosa, Kawasaki disease, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, cryoglobulinemic vasculitis, Behcet disease, Wegener granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis and Churg-Strauss syndrome range from papules, subcutaneous nodules and livedo reticularis, to palpable purpura, hemorrhagic bulla and ulcerating lesions. Pathological skin manifestations in autoimmune endocrinopathies include pretibial myxedema/dermopathy in Graves' disease, diabetic dermopathy and necrobiosis lipoidica in type I autoimmune diabetes mellitus, candidiasis, ectodermal dysplasia, vitiligo and alopecia areata in APECED and uniform hyperpigmentation of the skin in Addison's disease. Autoimmune gastrointestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (with erythema nodosum), gluten-sensitive enteropathy (with dermatitis herpetiformis), autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis (with jaundice and pruritus), hematologic/oncologic disorders such as acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (with skin manifestations ranging from pruritic maculopapular eruptions and lichen planus-like lesions to generalized scleroderma), and paraneoplastic autoimmune dermatoses are discussed as well. PMID:18460895

  18. A Framework for Modelling Connective Tissue Changes in VIIP Syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethier, C. R.; Best, L.; Gleason, R.; Mulugeta, L.; Myers, J. G.; Nelson, E. S.; Samuels, B. C.

    2014-01-01

    Insertion of astronauts into microgravity induces a cascade of physiological adaptations, notably including a cephalad fluid shift. Longer-duration flights carry an increased risk of developing Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, a spectrum of ophthalmic changes including posterior globe flattening, choroidal folds, distension of the optic nerve sheath, kinking of the optic nerve and potentially permanent degradation of visual function. The slow onset of changes in VIIP, their chronic nature, and the similarity of certain clinical features of VIIP to ophthalmic findings in patients with raised intracranial pressure strongly suggest that: (i) biomechanical factors play a role in VIIP, and (ii) connective tissue remodeling must be accounted for if we wish to understand the pathology of VIIP. Our goal is to elucidate the pathophysiology of VIIP and suggest countermeasures based on biomechanical modeling of ocular tissues, suitably informed by experimental data, and followed by validation and verification. We specifically seek to understand the quasi-homeostatic state that evolves over weeks to months in space, during which ocular tissue remodeling occurs. This effort is informed by three bodies of work: (i) modeling of cephalad fluid shifts; (ii) modeling of ophthalmic tissue biomechanics in glaucoma; and (iii) modeling of connective tissue changes in response to biomechanical loading.

  19. Meta-analysis reveals an association of PTPN22 C1858T with autoimmune diseases, which depends on the localization of the affected tissue.

    PubMed

    Zheng, J; Ibrahim, S; Petersen, F; Yu, X

    2012-12-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22 (PTPN22) is a strong susceptibility gene shared by many autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to explore the mechanisms underlying this relationship. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the association between PTPN22 polymorphism C1858T and autoimmune diseases. The results showed a remarkable pattern; PTPN22 C1858T was strongly associated with type I diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, immune thrombocytopenia, generalized vitiligo with concomitant autoimmune diseases, idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, Graves' disease, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, myasthenia gravis, systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis and Addison's disease. By contrast, PTPN22 C1858T showed a negligible association with systemic sclerosis, celiac disease, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, ankylosing spondylitis, pemphigus vulgaris, ulcerative colitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, Crohn's disease and acute anterior uveitis. Further analysis revealed a clear distinction between the two groups of diseases with regard to their targeted tissues: most autoimmune diseases showing an insignificant association with PTPN22 C1858T manifest in skin, the gastrointestinal tract or in immune privileged sites. These results showed that the association of PTPN22 polymorphism with autoimmune diseases depends on the localization of the affected tissue, suggesting a role of targeted organ variation in the disease manifestations. PMID:23076337

  20. [Non SLE connective tissue diseases: general aspects and kidney].

    PubMed

    Doria, A; Sabadini, E; Sinico, R A

    2005-01-01

    Connective tissue diseases represent a group of heterogeneous disorders that share certain common features, including inflammation of the skin, joints and other structures rich in connective tissue, as well as altered immunoregulation patterns, including autoantibody production and cell-mediated immunity abnormalities. While certain distinct clinical entities can be defined, manifestations can vary considerably from patient to patient, and the overlap of clinical features between and among specific diseases is common. Genetic, environmental and sex hormonal factors are likely to be of pathogenic importance. Among these diseases, systemic lupus erythematosus is the most frequent, followed by systemic sclerosis or scleroderma (SSc), Sjogren's disease, polymyositis and dermatomyositis and mixed connective tissue disease. Systemic sclerosis involves multiple organs in a process consisting of disseminated sclerosis affecting all compartments. Prominent vascular lesions typify the renal lesions. Scleroderma crisis is a major complication of SSc, characterized by severe hypertension, rapidly progressive renal failure, thrombotic microangiopathy with hemolitic anemia and low platelet count: the prompt use of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors significantly increased the 1-yr survival rate from 15 to 76%. Sjogren's syndrome is an immunologic disorder characterized by progressive lymphocytic destruction of the exocrine gland, frequently resulting in symptomatic eye and mouth dryness. The interstitial lesions constitute the principal renal manifestations: interstitial infiltrates and small lymphocytes, which can be homogenous and massive. In polymyositis and dermatomyositis renal involvement is rare. PMID:16419000

  1. Epidemiological study of patients with connective tissue diseases in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Maria Do Socorro Teixeira Moreira; Bértolo, Manoel Barros; Da Silva, Benedito Borges; De Deus Filho, Antônio; Almeida, Mayra Moreira; Veras, Fabíola Ferreira Hortêncio; Mendes, Luciano Cardoso

    2005-10-01

    To study the prevalence of connective tissue disorders and identify the epidemiological profile of the population from the northern and northeastern regions of Brazil. All patients admitted to the general medical ward at Getulio Vargas Hospital were screened through history and physical examination for the existence of known, suspected or possible connective tissue disorder. A total of 120 patients were enrolled in the study - 61 (50.8%) with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 41 (34.2%) with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 16 (13.3%) with systemic sclerosis (SS), one (0.8%) with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) and one (0.8%) with polymyositis (PM). Women accounted for (104) 86.7% of the participants and (83) 70.9% were non-Caucasians. The mean age was 36.8 years. Alopecia was the most frequent symptom (55/46.6%), followed by other cutaneous lesions (50/42.4%), dyspnea (47/39.8%) and chest pain (39/33.0%). The most frequent rheumatologic disorder encountered in our hospital-based study population was systemic lupus erythematosus, which is contrary to findings of the majority of studies performed in this country. PMID:16354468

  2. Chloroquine cardiotoxicity mimicking connective tissue disease heart involvement.

    PubMed

    Vereckei, András; Fazakas, Adám; Baló, Timea; Fekete, Béla; Molnár, Mária Judit; Karádi, István

    2013-04-01

    The authors report a case of rare chloroquine cardiotoxicity mimicking connective tissue disease heart involvement in a 56-year-old woman with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) manifested suddenly as third degree A-V block with QT(c) interval prolongation and short torsade de pointes runs ultimately degenerating into ventricular fibrillation. Immunological tests suggested an MCTD flare, implying that cardiac arrest had resulted from myocardial involvement by MCTD. However, QT(c) prolongation is not a characteristic of cardiomyopathy caused by connective tissue disease, unless anti-Ro/SSA positivity is present, but that was not the case. Therefore, looking for another cause of QT(c) prolongation the possibility of chloroquine cardiotoxicity emerged, which the patient had been receiving for almost two years in supramaximal doses. Biopsy of the deltoid muscle was performed, because in chloroquine toxicity, specific lesions are present both in the skeletal muscle and in the myocardium, and electron microscopy revealed the accumulation of cytoplasmic curvilinear bodies, which are specific to antimalarial-induced myocyte damage and are absent in all other muscle diseases, except neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. Thus, the diagnosis of chloroquine cardiotoxicity was established. It might be advisable to supplement the periodic ophthalmological examination, which is currently the only recommendation for patients on long-term chloroquine therapy, with ECG screening. PMID:23409733

  3. Neurologic manifestations of inherited disorders of connective tissue.

    PubMed

    Debette, Stéphanie; Germain, Dominique P

    2014-01-01

    Inherited disorders of connective tissue are single gene disorders affecting structure or function of the connective tissue. Neurological manifestations are classic and potentially severe complications of many such disorders. The most common neurological manifestations are cerebrovascular. Ischemic stroke is a classic complication of vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (type IV), homocystinuria, and arterial tortuosity syndrome, and may occasionally be seen in Marfan syndrome and pseudoxanthoma elasticum with distinct underlying mechanisms for each disease. Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome can also lead to cervical artery dissection (with or without ischemic stroke), carotid-cavernous fistula, intracranial dissections and aneurysms potentially causing subarachnoid or intracerebral hemorrhage, and arterial rupture. Other neurological manifestations include nerve root compression and intracranial hypotension due to dural ectasia in Marfan and Loeys-Dietz syndrome, spinal cord compression in osteogenesis imperfecta, and mucopolysaccharidosis type I and VI, carpal tunnel syndrome in mucopolysaccharidosis type I, II, and VI. Impaired mental development can be observed in homocystinuria, mucopolysaccharidosis type II, and the severe form of mucopolysaccharidosis type I. For the neurologist, being aware of these complications and of the diagnostic criteria for inherited connective tissue disorders is important since neurological complications can be the first manifestation of the disease and because caution may be warranted for the management of these patients. PMID:24365320

  4. Response of mice connective tissue to three different endodontic materials.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Lucio Mitsuo; Cavalcante, Roberta Barroso; Gurgel-Filho, Eduardo Diogo; De-Deus, Gustavo André; Ximenes, Ana Beatriz; Da Silva, Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the biocompatibility of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) Bio and Portland cement (PC) and compare with those of ProRoot MTA. Polyethylene tubes were filled with materials and placed into dorsal subcutaneous connective tissue of Wistar albino rats. After 7, 30, and 60 days after the surgical procedure, the implants with the surrounding tissue were removed. Tissue samples were subjected to histological processing, and sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Sections were evaluated for the intensity of inflammation, predominant cell type, presence of fibrous capsule and granulation tissue. Data were submitted to Kruskal-Wallis test at a significant level of P ? 0.05. No statistical differences were observed at any evaluated condition among tested materials (P > 0.05). Statistically significant differences were observed between mean inflammatory scores, cell types and granulation tissue of the same material in different experimental periods (P < 0.05). Can be concluded that biocompatibility of MTA bio and PC were comparable with that of ProRoot MTA. PMID:23335503

  5. The role of connective tissue growth factor in skeletal growth and development

    E-print Network

    The role of connective tissue growth factor in skeletal growth and development Reem A. Kanaan1 Gloucestershire Royal Hospital, U.K. Source of support: Self financing Summary Connective tissue growth factor-61, CTGF, NOV family; CTGF ­ connective tissue growth factor; Cyr61/CCN1 ­ cysteine-rich 61; NOV/CCN3

  6. The Arrangement and Function of Octopus Arm Musculature and Connective Tissue

    E-print Network

    Kier, William M.

    The Arrangement and Function of Octopus Arm Musculature and Connective Tissue William M. Kier-3280 ABSTRACT The morphology of the musculature and connective tissues of the arms of Octopus bimaculoides and connective tissue fibers surrounding a central axial nerve cord. Three primary muscle fiber orientations were

  7. Ontogenetic Changes in Fibrous Connective Tissue Organization in the Oval Squid, Sepioteuthis

    E-print Network

    Kier, William M.

    Ontogenetic Changes in Fibrous Connective Tissue Organization in the Oval Squid, Sepioteuthis in the organization and volume fraction of collagenous connective tissues were examined in the mantle of Sepioteuthis, the organization of connective tissue fibers is crucial for providing structural reinforcement, controlling shape

  8. [Ultrasonography in chronic inflammatory rheumatic and connective tissue disorders].

    PubMed

    Mérot, O; Le Goff, B

    2014-08-01

    Musculoskeletal ultrasonography is now widely used by almost all rheumatologists thanks to an improvement in the quality of ultrasound unit and probe and to the systematic teaching of this imaging technique to the rheumatology fellows. Applications have broadened from the study of degenerative and mechanical diseases to inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Ultrasound is more sensitive than clinical examination. Power Doppler allows the direct visualisation of inflammation within the tissues. Finally, it is a prognostic tool helping the physician in the management of the disease. This review will focus on the value and applications of ultrasonography in the 2 most frequent rheumatic diseases: rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis. We will also give some recent data on the usefulness of this imaging technique in the study of musculoskeletal manifestations associated with connective tissue disease. PMID:24439720

  9. Serological profiles in the connective tissue diseases in Zimbabwean patients.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, P; Stein, M; Ley, H; Johnston, C

    1989-01-01

    The serological profiles of 104 Zimbabwean patients with clinically diagnosed connective tissue diseases were determined. The prevalence of rheumatoid factor was less than would have been expected in other geographical groups, but the prevalence of antinuclear antibodies was similar. Despite considerable racial, socioeconomic, and genetic differences in our patient group compared with other previously published studies the specificity and sensitivity of antinuclear antibodies, notably to DNA and Sm, correlated well with clinical diagnoses. This study validates the use of these serological tests in the investigation of this group of patients. PMID:2784309

  10. Loss of the lupus autoantigen Ro52/Trim21 induces tissue inflammation and systemic autoimmunity by disregulating the IL-23-Th17 pathway.

    PubMed

    Espinosa, Alexander; Dardalhon, Valerie; Brauner, Susanna; Ambrosi, Aurelie; Higgs, Rowan; Quintana, Fransisco J; Sjöstrand, Maria; Eloranta, Maija-Leena; Ní Gabhann, Joan; Winqvist, Ola; Sundelin, Birgitta; Jefferies, Caroline A; Rozell, Björn; Kuchroo, Vijay K; Wahren-Herlenius, Marie

    2009-08-01

    Ro52/Trim21 is targeted as an autoantigen in systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren's syndrome. Polymorphisms in the Ro52 gene have been linked to these autoimmune conditions, but the molecular mechanism by which Ro52 may promote development of systemic autoimmune diseases has not been explored. To address this issue, we generated Ro52-null mice (Ro52(-/-)), which appear phenotypically normal if left unmanipulated. However, Ro52(-/-) mice develop severe dermatitis extending from the site of tissue injury induced by ear tags. The affected mice further develop several signs of systemic lupus with hypergammaglobulinemia, autoantibodies to DNA, proteinuria, and kidney pathology. Ro52, which was recently identified as an E3 ligase, mediates ubiquitination of several members of the interferon regulatory factor (IRF) family, and the Ro52-deficient mice have an enhanced production of proinflammatory cytokines that are regulated by the IRF transcription factors, including cytokines involved in the Th17 pathway (interleukin [IL] 6, IL-12/IL-23p40, and IL-17). Loss of IL-23/IL-17 by genetic deletion of IL-23/p19 in the Ro52(-/-) mice conferred protection from skin disease and systemic autoimmunity. These data reveal that the lupus-associated Ro52 protein is an important negative regulator of proinflammatory cytokine production, and they provide a mechanism by which a defective Ro52 function can lead to tissue inflammation and systemic autoimmunity through the IL-23-Th17 pathway. PMID:19635858

  11. Stem cell treatment for patients with autoimmune disease by systemic infusion of culture-expanded autologous adipose tissue derived mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Prolonged life expectancy, life style and environmental changes have caused a changing disease pattern in developed countries towards an increase of degenerative and autoimmune diseases. Stem cells have become a promising tool for their treatment by promoting tissue repair and protection from immune-attack associated damage. Patient-derived autologous stem cells present a safe option for this treatment since these will not induce immune rejection and thus multiple treatments are possible without any risk for allogenic sensitization, which may arise from allogenic stem cell transplantations. Here we report the outcome of treatments with culture expanded human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAdMSCs) of 10 patients with autoimmune associated tissue damage and exhausted therapeutic options, including autoimmune hearing loss, multiple sclerosis, polymyotitis, atopic dermatitis and rheumatoid arthritis. For treatment, we developed a standardized culture-expansion protocol for hAdMSCs from minimal amounts of fat tissue, providing sufficient number of cells for repetitive injections. High expansion efficiencies were routinely achieved from autoimmune patients and from elderly donors without measurable loss in safety profile, genetic stability, vitality and differentiation potency, migration and homing characteristics. Although the conclusions that can be drawn from the compassionate use treatments in terms of therapeutic efficacy are only preliminary, the data provide convincing evidence for safety and therapeutic properties of systemically administered AdMSC in human patients with no other treatment options. The authors believe that ex-vivo-expanded autologous AdMSCs provide a promising alternative for treating autoimmune diseases. Further clinical studies are needed that take into account the results obtained from case studies as those presented here. PMID:22017805

  12. Cell-based and biomaterial approaches to connective tissue repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stalling, Simone Suzette

    Connective tissue injuries of skin, tendon and ligament, heal by a reparative process in adults, filling the wound site with fibrotic, disorganized scar tissue that poorly reflects normal tissue architecture or function. Conversely, fetal skin and tendon have been shown to heal scarlessly. Complete regeneration is not intrinsically ubiquitous to all fetal tissues; fetal diaphragmatic and gastrointestinal injuries form scars. In vivo studies suggest that the presence of fetal fibroblasts is essential for scarless healing. In the orthopaedic setting, adult anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) heals poorly; however, little is known about the regenerative capacity of fetal ACL or fetal ACL fibroblasts. We characterized in vitro wound healing properties of fetal and adult ACL fibroblasts demonstrating that fetal ACL fibroblasts migrate faster and elaborate greater quantities of type I collagen, suggesting the healing potential of the fetal ACL may not be intrinsically poor. Similar to fetal ACL fibroblasts, fetal dermal fibroblasts also exhibit robust cellular properties. We investigated the age-dependent effects of dermal fibroblasts on tendon-to-bone healing in rat supraspinatus tendon injuries, a reparative injury model. We hypothesized delivery of fetal dermal fibroblasts would increase tissue organization and mechanical properties in comparison to adult dermal fibroblasts. However, at 1 and 8 weeks, the presence of dermal fibroblasts, either adult or fetal, had no significant effect on tissue histology or mechanical properties. There was a decreasing trend in cross-sectional area of repaired tendons treated with fetal dermal fibroblasts in comparison to adult, but this finding was not significant in comparison to controls. Finally, we synthesized a novel polysaccharide, methacrylated methylcellulose (MA-MC), and fabricated hydrogels using a well-established photopolymerization technique. We characterized the physical and mechanical properties of MA-MC hydrogels in vitro as well as in a subcutaneous mouse model. Stable MA-MC hydrogels, of varying weight percentages, demonstrated tunable swelling and mechanical properties in the absence of cytotoxic degradation products. In vivo, 6wt% MA-MC hydrogels maintained their shape and mechanical integrity while eliciting a minimal inflammatory response; highly desirable properties for soft tissue reconstruction. These cellulose-based photopolymerizable hydrogels can be further optimized for drug delivery and tissue engineering applications to enhance wound repair.

  13. Connective tissue disease-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Howard, Luke S.

    2015-01-01

    Although rare in its idiopathic form, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is not uncommon in association with various associated medical conditions, most notably connective tissue disease (CTD). In particular, it develops in approximately 10% of patients with systemic sclerosis and so these patients are increasingly screened to enable early detection. The response of patients with systemic sclerosis to PAH-specific therapy appears to be worse than in other forms of PAH. Survival in systemic sclerosis-associated PAH is inferior to that observed in idiopathic PAH. Potential reasons for this include differences in age, the nature of the underlying pulmonary vasculopathy and the ability of the right ventricle to cope with increased afterload between patients with systemic sclerosis-associated PAH and idiopathic PAH, while coexisting cardiac and pulmonary disease is common in systemic sclerosis-associated PAH. Other forms of connective tissue-associated PAH have been less well studied, however PAH associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has a better prognosis than systemic sclerosis-associated PAH and likely responds to immunosuppression. PMID:25705389

  14. Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated to connective tissue diseases.

    PubMed

    Galiè, N; Manes, A; Farahani, K V; Pelino, F; Palazzini, M; Negro, L; Romanazzi, S; Branzi, A

    2005-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a well-known complication of connective tissue diseases such as systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, mixed connective tissue diseases, and to a lesser extent, rheumatoid arthritis, dermatopolymyositis and primary Sjögren's syndrome. In these patients, pulmonary hypertension may occur in association with left heart disease, interstitial fibrosis or as a result of a isolated pulmonary arteriopathy. The incidence of pulmonary arterial hypertension in the limited form of systemic sclerosis is about 10%. The pathophysiologic mechanisms leading to pulmonary arterial hypertension remain unknown. Symptoms and clinical presentation are very similar to idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension but mortality was confirmed to be higher. Echocardiography is the reference investigation for the detection of pulmonary arterial hypertension but the results should be confirmed by right heart catheterization. Treatment appears more complex as compared to idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. Intravenous epoprostenol therapy has been shown to be effective in a special trail. Also, the endothelin receptor antagonists bosentan and sitaxentan, the phosphodyesterase-type-5 sildenafil and subcutaneous treprostinil have shown favourable results. PMID:16218473

  15. Myoarchitecture and connective tissue in hearts with tricuspid atresia

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Quintana, D; Climent, V; Ho, S; Anderson, R

    1999-01-01

    Objective—To compare the atrial and ventricular myoarchitecture in the normal heart and the heart with tricuspid atresia, and to investigate changes in the three dimensional arrangement of collagen fibrils.?Methods—Blunt dissection and cell maceration with scanning electron microscopy were used to study the architecture of the atrial and ventricular musculature and the arrangement of collagen fibrils in three specimens with tricuspid atresia and six normal human hearts.?Results—There were significant modifications in the myoarchitecture of the right atrium and the left ventricle, both being noticeably hypertrophied. The middle layer of the ventricle in the abnormal hearts was thicker than in the normal hearts. The orientation of the superficial layer in the left ventricle in hearts with tricuspid atresia was irregular compared with the normal hearts. Scanning electron microscopy showed coarser endomysial sheaths and denser perimysial septa in hearts with tricuspid atresia than in normal hearts.?Conclusions—The overall architecture of the muscle fibres and its connective tissue matrix in hearts with tricuspid atresia differed from normal, probably reflecting modelling of the myocardium that is inherent to the malformation. This is in concordance with clinical observations showing deterioration in pump function of the dominant left ventricle from very early in life.?? Keywords: tricuspid atresia; congenital heart defects; connective tissue; fibrosis PMID:9922357

  16. Course of mixed connective tissue disease in children.

    PubMed

    Michels, H

    1997-10-01

    Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) was first reported 25 years ago. This report provides an assessment of the course of juvenile (J) MCTD in 224 patients available in the literature until 1996, including our own 33 patients. Most patients improved and remissions were observed in 3-5% (up to 27%). Among the long-term problems, a loss in joint function was seen in up to 29% of the cases, renal involvement in up to 47%, restrictive lung disease in up to 54% and gastrointestinal manifestations consisting of oesophageal dysmotility in up to 29%. Cerebral involvement was rare but severe. Cardiovascular problems observed include cardiomyopathy, myopericarditis and pulmonary hypertension. Among other long-term problems were Raynaud's phenomenon and scleroderma-like skin changes in up to 86% of the patients. Seventeen of the 224 patients had died (7.6%) because of sepsis or infection (7), cerebral complications (3), heart failure (2), pulmonary hypertension (2), renal failure (2) or gastrointestinal bleeding (1). The mortality rate of JMCTD seems to be in the same range as that of juvenile systemic lupus erythematosus, dermatomyositis and scleroderma. When compared with the other connective tissue diseases, however, mainly minor long-term problems are seen in the surviving patients. PMID:9453280

  17. Galectin-3 in autoimmunity and autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Felipe L; Gatto, Mariele; Bassi, Nicola; Luisetto, Roberto; Ghirardello, Anna; Punzi, Leonardo; Doria, Andrea

    2015-08-01

    Galectin-3 (gal-3) is a ?-galactoside-binding lectin, which regulates cell-cell and extracellular interactions during self/non-self-antigen recognition and cellular activation, proliferation, differentiation, migration and apoptosis. It plays a significant role in cellular and tissue pathophysiology by organizing niches that drive inflammation and immune responses. Gal-3 has some therapeutic potential in several diseases, including chronic inflammatory disorders, cancer and autoimmune diseases. Gal-3 exerts a broad spectrum of functions which differs according to its intra- or extracellular localization. Recombinant gal-3 strategy has been used to identify potential mode of action of gal-3; however, exogenous gal-3 may not reproduce the functions of the endogenous gal-3. Notably, gal-3 induces monocyte-macrophage differentiation, interferes with dendritic cell fate decision, regulates apoptosis on T lymphocytes and inhibits B-lymphocyte differentiation into immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells. Considering the influence of these cell populations in the pathogenesis of several autoimmune diseases, gal-3 seems to play a role in development of autoimmunity. Gal-3 has been suggested as a potential therapeutic agent in patients affected with some autoimmune disorders. However, the precise role of gal-3 in driving the inflammatory process in autoimmune or immune-mediated disorders remains elusive. Here, we reviewed the involvement of gal-3 in cellular and tissue events during autoimmune and immune-mediated inflammatory diseases. PMID:26142116

  18. [Significance of anticardiolipin antibodies in connective tissue diseases].

    PubMed

    Scagliusi, P; Tortorelli, E; L'Abbate, M C; Pipitone, V

    1989-10-01

    Recent attention has focused on the possibility that the presence of Anticardiolipin Antibodies (ACA) in patients with connective tissue diseases, particularly with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), may be associated with clinical and serological symptoms that identify a particular subset of patients. This group is characterized by recurrent arterial and/or venous thrombosis, multiple abortions and or intrauterine fetal death, presence of Lupus AntiCoagulant (LAC), false positive VDRL, thrombocytopenia and neuro-psychiatric diseases. These clinical features may identify the so-called "Anticardiolipin Syndrome". In this work, we have measured ACA, by ELISA test, in 194 serum samples: 97 SLE patients, 5 Mixed Connective Tissue Disease (MCTD), 8 Progressive Systemic Sclerosis (PSS), 7 Dermato/PolyMyositis (D PM), 3 Sjögren Syndrome (SS), 3 Unclassifiable Connective Tissue Disease (UCTD), 9 Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), 1 Idiopathic Anticardiolipin Syndrome, 19 cases of Miscellanea, 42 healthy controls. The Optical Density (O.D.) was greater than 0 (higher than 0) in 89 serum samples (out of the 194): 43 SLE, 4 MCTD, 4 PSS, 3 D PM, 1 SS, 7 RA, 10 cases of Miscellanea, the Idiopathic Anticardiolipin Syndrome and 16 healthy controls. The O.D. was greater than m (greater than mean healthy controls level) + 3 Standard Deviations (S.D.) in a restricted number of cases (25 out of the 194): 14 SLE, 2 MCTD, 1 PSS, 1 D/PM, 1 SS, 1 RA, 3 cases of Miscellanea and 2 healthy controls. Therefore, we have noticed, first of all, the lack of specificity of positive results obtained: all the groups of patients, healthy controls included, had low as well as high levels of ACA. Moreover, we have examined the relationship between the presence of ACA and typical clinical features of the so-called. "Anticardiolipin Syndrome"; there was not difference of clinical symptoms between patients with low or high ACA levels. We have also clinically examined ACA negative patients; most of them had one or several clinical features of the "Syndrome", until almost complete clinical picture. Therefore, no correlation was found between clinical picture and immunological features of the so-called "Anti-cardiolipin Syndrome"; we would not exclude the existence of the "clinical" subset of patients, but of the "immunological" subset. PMID:2682375

  19. Autoimmune statin-induced myopathy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jonathan B.; Ghobrial, Ibrahim I.

    2015-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman with a history of statin use presented with a 4-month history of progressive weakness of both shoulders and thighs. Laboratory and electromyography testing confirmed the presence of generalized proximal myopathy and ruled out connective tissue disease, malignancy, or active viral infection. Muscle biopsy was consistent with necrotizing autoimmune myopathy. PMID:26333863

  20. A Four-Step Model for the IL-6 Amplifier, a Regulator of Chronic Inflammations in Tissue-Specific MHC Class II-Associated Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    It is commonly thought that autoimmune diseases are caused by the breakdown of self-tolerance, which suggests the recognition of specific antigens by autoreactive CD4+ T cells contribute to the specificity of autoimmune diseases (Marrack et al., 2001; Mathis and Benoist, 2004). In several cases, however, even for diseases associated with class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles, the causative tissue-specific antigens recognized by memory/activated CD4+ T cells have not been established (Mocci et al., 2000; Skapenko et al., 2005). Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and arthritis in F759 knock-in mice (F759 mice) are such examples (Atsumi et al., 2002; Brennan et al., 2002; Falgarone et al., 2009). These include associations with class II MHC and CD4 molecules; increased numbers of memory/activated CD4+ T cells; and improved outcomes in response to suppressions and/or deficiencies in class II MHC molecules, CD4+ T cells, and the T cell survival cytokine IL-7. Regarding the development of arthritis in F759 mice, it is not only the immune system, but also non-immune tissue that are involved, indicating that the importance of their interactions (Sawa et al., 2006, 2009; Ogura et al., 2008; Hirano, 2010; Murakami et al., 2011). Furthermore, we have shown that local events such as microbleeding together with an accumulation of activated CD4+ T cells in a manner independent of tissue antigen-recognitions induces arthritis in the joints of F759 mice (Murakami et al., 2011). For example, local microbleeding-mediated CCL20 expression induce such an accumulation, causing arthritis development via chronic activation of an IL-17A-dependent IL-6 signaling amplification loop in type 1 collagen+ cells that is triggered by CD4+ T cell-derived cytokine(s) such as IL-17A, which leads to the synergistic activation of STAT3 and NF?B in non-hematopoietic cells in the joint (Murakami et al., 2011). We named this loop the IL-6-mediated inflammation amplifier, or IL-6 amplifier for short (Ogura et al., 2008; Hirano, 2010; Murakami et al., 2011). Thus, certain class II MHC-associated, tissue-specific autoimmune diseases, including some RA subtypes, may be induced by local events that cause an antigen-independent accumulation of effector CD4+ T cells followed by the induction of the IL-6 amplifier in the affected tissue. In other words, in certain cases, the target tissue itself may determine the specificity of the autoimmune disease via activation of the IL-6 amplifier. To explain this hypothesis, we have proposed a four-step model for MHC class II-associated autoimmune diseases (Murakami et al., 2011): (1) T cell activation regardless of antigen specificity; (2) local events inducing a tissue-specific accumulation of activated T cells; (3) transient activation of the IL-6 amplifier; and (4) enhanced sensitivity to cytokines in the target tissue. The interaction of these events results in chronic activation of the IL-6 amplifier and subsequent manifestation of autoimmune diseases. Thus, the IL-6 amplifier, which is chronically activated by these four events, is a critical regulator of chronic inflammations in tissue-specific MHC class II-associated autoimmune diseases. PMID:22566812

  1. A case of hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis presenting with scleritis in a patient with undifferentiated connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Hyeon; Joo, Young-Bin; Kim, Jeana; Min, Jun-Ki

    2010-06-01

    Hypertrophic cranial pachymeningitis (HCP) is an uncommon disorder that causes a localized or diffuse thickening of the dura mater and has been reported to be infrequently associated with systemic autoimmune disorders such as Wegener's granulomatosis, rheumatoid arthritis, sarcoidosis, Behçet's disease, Sjögren syndrome, and temporal arteritis. Here, we report a case of HCP initially presented with scleritis and headache in a patient with undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD). HCP was initially suspected on brain magnetic resonance imaging and defined pathologically on meningial biopsy. Immunologic studies showed the presence of anti-RNP antibody. After high dose corticosteroid therapy, the patient's symptoms and radiologic abnormalities of brain were improved. Our case suggested that HCP should be considered in the differential diagnosis of headache in a patient with UCTD presenting with scleritis. PMID:20514324

  2. Vascularized interpositional periosteal connective tissue flap: A modern approach to augment soft tissue

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Chitra; Deora, Savita; Abraham, Dennis; Gaba, Rohini; Kumar, Baron Tarun; Kudva, Praveen

    2015-01-01

    Context: Nowadays esthetics plays an important role in dentistry along with function of the prosthesis. Various soft tissue augmentation procedures are available to correct the ridge defects in the anterior region. The newer technique, vascularized interpositional periosteal connective tissue (VIP-CT) flap has been introduced, which has the potential to augment predictable amount of tissue and has many benefits when compared to other techniques. Aim: The study was designed to determine the efficacy of the VIP-CT flap in augmenting the ridge defect. Materials and Methods: Ten patients with Class III (Seibert's) ridge defects were treated with VIP-CT flap technique before fabricating fixed partial denture. Height and width of the ridge defects were measured before and after the procedure. Subsequent follow-up was done every 3 months for 1-year. Statistical Analysis Used: Paired t-test was performed to detect the significance of the procedure. Results: The surgical site healed uneventfully. The predictable amount of soft tissue augmentation had been achieved with the procedure. The increase in height and width of the ridge was statistically highly significant. Conclusion: The VIP-CT flap technique was effective in augmenting the soft tissue in esthetic area that remained stable over a long period. PMID:25810597

  3. Connective tissue and immobilization. Key factors in musculoskeletal degeneration?

    PubMed

    Videman, T

    1987-08-01

    Periarticular connective tissue is one important part of the musculoskeletal system. Its unique ability to adapt to the shortest distance between its origin and insertion, however, produces harmful effects during immobilization. All situations that lead to immobilization can cause some degree of degenerative change in the musculoskeletal system. When immobilization, whatever its cause, cannot be avoided, every attempt should be made to minimize it and to try to treat its harmful effects. There is some evidence that early mobilization, traction, and continuous passive motion overcome the harmful effects of immobilization, but more knowledge on this subject is needed. Animal experiments play an important role in the attainment of knowledge of immobilization and mobilization processes in health and disease. PMID:3608308

  4. Chondrosarcoma of the calcaneum and massive soft tissue calcification in a patient with hereditary and acquired connective tissue diseases.

    PubMed

    Wicks, I P; Fleming, A

    1987-04-01

    We describe the first case of the coexistence of the hereditary connective tissue disorder multiple exostoses (HME) and an acquired connective tissue disorder manifest by the overlap of dermatomyositis (DM), scleroderma (PSS), high titre speckled pattern antinuclear antibodies, and increased antibodies to double stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Furthermore this patient developed chondrosarcoma of the calcaneum (an unusual site for this malignancy) and massive soft tissue calcification (an unusual feature of PSS, adult DM, and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)). PMID:3592793

  5. MDSC in Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Cripps, James G.; Gorham, James D.

    2011-01-01

    Myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) were first described nearly two decades ago. Until recently, however, descriptions of MDSC populations were found almost exclusively in animal models of cancer or in cancer patients. Over the last few years, an increasing number of reports have been published describing populations of myeloid cells with MDSC-like properties in murine models of autoimmune disease. In contrast to the proposed deleterious role of MDSC in cancer - where these cells likely inhibit tumor immunity - in the context of autoimmunity, MDSC have the potential to suppress the autoimmune response, thereby limiting tissue injury. A logical corollary of this hypothesis is that a failure of endogenous MDSC to appropriately control autoimmune T cell responses in vivo may actually contribute to the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease. PMID:21310255

  6. Approach to a patient with connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Kumar, T Sathish; Aggarwal, Amita

    2010-10-01

    Connective tissue disease (CTDs), though rare in childhood, are an important cause of morbidity. Most of them involve multiple organ systems and are associated with presence of autoantibodies. Systemic lupus eryethematosus (SLE) is the most common CTD, the others being Juvenile dermatomyositis, systemic sclerosis, mixed connective disease and Sjogren syndrome. The clinical presentation of CTD in childhood can range from an acute severe illness mimicking a serious infection, to an insidious onset of disease with gradual accumulation of symptoms and signs over wks to months. The presence of multi-system involvement, evidence of inflammation and lack of any obvious cause should alert a clinician to the possibility of CTD. Diagnosis is usually clinical and features like malar rash, Raynaud's phenomenon, Gottron's rash, photosensitivity, oral ulcers suggest a possibility of CTD. Presence of autoantibodies like anti-nuclear antibodies, anti-dsDNA etc. provide supportive evidence to a diagnosis of CTD. Most CTDs are treated with immunosuppressive drugs with good success. Early recognition and prompt treatment results in excellent outcome. PMID:20924723

  7. Polymer-tethered epidermal growth factor as an inductive biomaterial surface for connective tissue progenitors

    E-print Network

    Fan, Vivian H. (Vivian Hanbing)

    2006-01-01

    Connective tissue progenitors (CTP) can act as a pluripotent source of reparative cells during injury and therefore have great potential in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. However, the response of CTP to most ...

  8. PTPN22: the archetypal non-HLA autoimmunity gene

    PubMed Central

    Stanford, Stephanie M.; Bottini, Nunzio

    2015-01-01

    PTPN22 encodes a tyrosine phosphatase that is expressed by haematopoietic cells and functions as a key regulator of immune homeostasis by inhibiting T-cell receptor signalling and by selectively promoting type I interferon responses after activation of myeloid-cell pattern-recognition receptors. A single nucleotide polymorphism of PTPN22, 1858C>T (rs2476601), disrupts an interaction motif in the protein, and is the most important non-HLA genetic risk factor for rheumatoid arthritis and the second most important for juvenile idiopathic arthritis. PTPN22 exemplifies a shared autoimmunity gene, affecting the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitis and other autoimmune diseases. In this Review, we explore the role of PTPN22 in autoimmune connective tissue disease, with particular emphasis on candidate-gene and genome-wide association studies and clinical variability of disease. We also propose a number of PTPN22-dependent functional models of the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. PMID:25003765

  9. Viscoelastic properties of bovine orbital connective tissue and fat: constitutive models

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Lawrence; Gupta, Vijay; Lee, Choongyeop; Kavehpore, Pirouz

    2012-01-01

    Reported mechanical properties of orbital connective tissue and fat have been too sparse to model strain–stress relationships underlying biomechanical interactions in strabismus. We performed rheological tests to develop a multi-mode upper convected Maxwell (UCM) model of these tissues under shear loading. From 20 fresh bovine orbits, 30 samples of connective tissue were taken from rectus pulley regions and 30 samples of fatty tissues from the posterior orbit. Additional samples were defatted to determine connective tissue weight proportion, which was verified histologically. Mechanical testing in shear employed a triborheometer to perform: strain sweeps at 0.5–2.0 Hz; shear stress relaxation with 1% strain; viscometry at 0.01–0.5 s?1 strain rate; and shear oscillation at 1% strain. Average connective tissue weight proportion was 98% for predominantly connective tissue and 76% for fatty tissue. Connective tissue specimens reached a long-term relaxation modulus of 668 Pa after 1,500 s, while corresponding values for fatty tissue specimens were 290 Pa and 1,100 s. Shear stress magnitude for connective tissue exceeded that of fatty tissue by five-fold. Based on these data, we developed a multimode UCM model with variable viscosities and time constants, and a damped hyperelastic response that accurately described measured properties of both connective and fatty tissues. Model parameters differed significantly between the two tissues. Viscoelastic properties of predominantly connective orbital tissues under shear loading differ markedly from properties of orbital fat, but both are accurately reflected using UCM models. These viscoelastic models will facilitate realistic global modeling of EOM behavior in binocular alignment and strabismus. PMID:21207094

  10. Biomarkers in connective tissue disease-associated interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Bonella, Francesco; Costabel, Ulrich

    2014-04-01

    This article reviews major biomarkers in serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) with respect to their diagnostic and prognostic value in connective tissue disease-associated interstitial lung disease (CTD-ILD). In some CTD such as systemic sclerosis (SSc), the incidence of ILD is up to two-third of patients, and currently ILD represents the leading cause of death in SSc. Because of the extremely variable incidence and outcome of ILD in CTD, progress in the discovery and validation of biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis, patients' subtyping, response to treatment, or as surrogate endpoints in clinical trials is extremely important. In contrast to idiopathic interstitial pneumonias, autoantibodies play a crucial role as biomarkers in CTD-ILD because their presence is strictly linked to the pathogenesis and tissue damage. Patterns of autoantibodies, for instance, anticitrullinated peptide antibodies in rheumatoid arthritis or aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (ARS) in polymyositis/dermatomyositis, have been found to correlate with the presence and occasionally with the course of ILD in CTD. Besides autoantibodies, an increase in serum or BALF of a biomarker of pulmonary origin may be able to predict or reflect the development of fibrosis, the impairment of lung function, and ideally also the prognosis. Promising biomarkers are lung epithelium-derived proteins such as KL-6 (Krebs von den Lungen-6), SP-D (surfactant protein-D), SP-A (surfactant protein-A), YKL-40 (chitinase-3-like protein 1 [CHI3L1] or cytokines such as CCL18 [chemokine (C-C) motif ligand 18]). In the future, genetic/epigenetic markers, such as human leukocyte antigen (HLA) haplotypes, single nucleotide polymorphisms, and micro-RNA, may help to identify subtypes of patients with different needs of management and treatment strategies. PMID:24668534

  11. A high iodine intake in Wistar rats results in the development of a thyroid-associated ectopic thymic tissue and is accompanied by a low thyroid autoimmune reactivity.

    PubMed Central

    Mooij, P; de Wit, H J; Drexhage, H A

    1994-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that dietary iodine intake is an important modulator of autoimmune thyroid reactions. To study this role of iodine intake further, female Wistar rats were kept on an enriched iodine diet (EID, iodine intake 100 micrograms iodine/day) for a period of up to 18 weeks. Control rats were either on a normal iodine diet (NID, iodine intake 7 micrograms iodine/day) or a low iodine diet (LID, 2 days of 1% KClO4 followed by iodine-deficient drinking water/pellets). During the first 6 weeks of the EID rats developed a thyroid-associated ectopic thymic tissue (50-57% of the animals on EID versus 7-14% of NID rats and 0% of LID rats). This thyroid-associated ectopic thymic tissue showed a similar histology (cortex and medulla) and a similar marker pattern as normal rat thymus concerning TdT expression (positive cells in the cortex) and CD4/CD8 positivity (double-positive cells in the cortex, single-positive cells in the medulla). The excessive iodine diet also resulted in a lowered thyroid autoimmune reactivity as compared to the NID and LID, viz. (1) in a lower incidence of anti-colloid antibodies in serum (12.5% positivity in EID rats versus 36% in NID and 60% in LID rats at 18 weeks) and (2) lower numbers of intrathyroidal lymphoid cells, viz. lower numbers of dendritic cells and lower numbers of CD4 and CD8 positive lymphocytes. It is hypothesized that the development of the thyroid-associated ectopic thymic tissue in the EID rats is related to their low thyroid autoimmune responsiveness; the tissue might play a role in tolerance induction to thyroidal autoantigens. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8157280

  12. Connective tissue growth factor is a substrate of ADAM28

    SciTech Connect

    Mochizuki, Satsuki; Tanaka, Rena; Shimoda, Masayuki; Onuma, Junko; Fujii, Yutaka; Jinno, Hiromitsu; Okada, Yasunori

    2010-11-26

    Research highlights: {yields} The hyper-variable region in the cysteine-rich domain of ADAM28 binds to C-terminal domain of CTGF. {yields} ADAM28 cleaves CTGF alone and CTGF in the CTGF/VEGF{sub 165} complex. {yields} CTGF digestion by ADAM28 releases biologically active VEGF{sub 165} from the complex. {yields} ADAM28, CTGF and VEGF{sub 165} are commonly co-expressed by carcinoma cells in human breast carcinoma tissues. {yields} These suggest that ADAM28 promotes VEGF{sub 165}-induced angiogenesis in the breast carcinomas by selective CTGF digestion in the CTGF/VEGF{sub 165} complex. -- Abstract: ADAM28, a member of the ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase) gene family, is over-expressed by carcinoma cells and the expression correlates with carcinoma cell proliferation and progression in human lung and breast carcinomas. However, information about substrates of ADAM28 is limited. We screened interacting molecules of ADAM28 in human lung cDNA library by yeast two-hybrid system and identified connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). Binding of CTGF to proADAM28 was demonstrated by yeast two-hybrid assay and protein binding assay. ADAM28 cleaved CTGF in dose- and time-dependent manners at the Ala{sup 181}-Tyr{sup 182} and Asp{sup 191}-Pro{sup 192} bonds in the hinge region of the molecule. ADAM28 selectively digested CTGF in the complex of CTGF and vascular endothelial growth factor{sub 165} (VEGF{sub 165}), releasing biologically active VEGF{sub 165} from the complex. RT-PCR and immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated that ADAM28, CTGF and VEGF are commonly co-expressed in the breast carcinoma tissues. These data provide the first evidence that CTGF is a novel substrate of ADAM28 and suggest that ADAM28 may promote VEGF{sub 165}-induced angiogenesis in the breast carcinomas by the CTGF digestion in the CTGF/VEGF{sub 165} complex.

  13. Connective tissue growth factor induces cardiac hypertrophy through Akt signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Hayata, Nozomi; Fujio, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro; Iwakura, Tomohiko; Obana, Masanori; Takai, Mika; Mohri, Tomomi; Nonen, Shinpei; Maeda, Makiko; Azuma, Junichi

    2008-05-30

    In the process of cardiac remodeling, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) is secreted from cardiac myocytes. Though CTGF is well known to promote fibroblast proliferation, its pathophysiological effects in cardiac myocytes remain to be elucidated. In this study, we examined the biological effects of CTGF in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. Cardiac myocytes stimulated with full length CTGF and its C-terminal region peptide showed the increase in cell surface area. Similar to hypertrophic ligands for G-protein coupled receptors, such as endothelin-1, CTGF activated amino acid uptake; however, CTGF-induced hypertrophy is not associated with the increased expression of skeletal actin or BNP, analyzed by Northern-blotting. CTGF treatment activated ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, JNK and Akt. The inhibition of Akt by transducing dominant-negative Akt abrogated CTGF-mediated increase in cell size, while the inhibition of MAP kinases did not affect the cardiac hypertrophy. These findings indicate that CTGF is a novel hypertrophic factor in cardiac myocytes.

  14. Recent developments in myofibroblast biology: paradigms for connective tissue remodeling.

    PubMed

    Hinz, Boris; Phan, Sem H; Thannickal, Victor J; Prunotto, Marco; Desmoulière, Alexis; Varga, John; De Wever, Olivier; Mareel, Marc; Gabbiani, Giulio

    2012-04-01

    The discovery of the myofibroblast has opened new perspectives for the comprehension of the biological mechanisms involved in wound healing and fibrotic diseases. In recent years, many advances have been made in understanding important aspects of myofibroblast basic biological characteristics. This review summarizes such advances in several fields, such as the following: i) force production by the myofibroblast and mechanisms of connective tissue remodeling; ii) factors controlling the expression of ?-smooth muscle actin, the most used marker of myofibroblastic phenotype and, more important, involved in force generation by the myofibroblast; and iii) factors affecting genesis of the myofibroblast and its differentiation from precursor cells, in particular epigenetic factors, such as DNA methylation, microRNAs, and histone modification. We also review the origin and the specific features of the myofibroblast in diverse fibrotic lesions, such as systemic sclerosis; kidney, liver, and lung fibrosis; and the stromal reaction to certain epithelial tumors. Finally, we summarize the emerging strategies for influencing myofibroblast behavior in vitro and in vivo, with the ultimate goal of an effective therapeutic approach for myofibroblast-dependent diseases. PMID:22387320

  15. Mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus: is the cure for connective tissue diseases within connective tissue?

    PubMed

    Carrion, Flavio A; Figueroa, Fernando E

    2011-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are now known to display not only adult stem cell multipotency but also robust anti-inflammatory and regenerative properties. After widespread in vitro and in vivo preclinical testing in several autoimmune disease models, allogenic MSCs have been successfully applied in patients with severe treatment-refractory systemic lupus erythematosus. The impressive results of these uncontrolled phase I and II trials - mostly in patients with non-responding renal disease - point to the need to perform controlled multicentric trials. In addition, they suggest that there is much to be learned from the basic and clinical science of MSCs in order to reap the full potential of these multifaceted progenitor cells in the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:21586107

  16. Connective tissue growth factor: expression in human skin in vivo and inhibition by ultraviolet irradiation.

    PubMed

    Quan, Taihao; He, Tianyuan; Kang, Sewon; Voorhees, John J; Fisher, Gary J

    2002-03-01

    Connective tissue growth factor, which is induced by transforming growth factor beta, has been reported to mediate the stimulatory actions of transforming growth factor beta on type I procollagen synthesis. Connective tissue growth factor is expressed in fibrotic disease such as scleroderma, where it is believed to promote abnormal deposition of collagen. Connective tissue growth factor expression has not been described in normal human skin or cultured skin cells, however. We report here that connective tissue growth factor mRNA is constitutively expressed in normal human skin. In situ hybridization demonstrated that connective tissue growth factor mRNA was expressed in keratinocytes throughout the epidermis and in dermal cells. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed that the level of connective tissue growth factor mRNA in the epidermis and dermis of normal human skin was comparable to the level of housekeeping gene 36B4. Ultraviolet irradiation (2 minimal erythema dose, UVB/A2 source) reduced connective tissue growth factor mRNA expression throughout the epidermis and dermis in normal human skin in vivo. Connective tissue growth factor mRNA was reduced (30%) within 4 h post ultraviolet irradiation, and remained reduced (50%) 8-24 h post ultraviolet. Connective tissue growth factor mRNA and protein were also constitutively highly expressed in normal cultured human skin keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Ultraviolet irradiation of cultured normal human skin fibroblasts resulted in a time-dependent inhibition of connective tissue growth factor mRNA expression. At 24 h post ultraviolet, connective tissue growth factor mRNA expression was reduced 80%. Transforming growth factor beta1 rapidly induced connective tissue growth factor mRNA levels (5-fold within 4 h) in skin fibroblasts, but not keratinocytes, and this induction was attenuated 80% by ultraviolet irradiation. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that ultraviolet irradiation reduced protein binding to the transforming growth factor beta/Smad responsiveness elements in the connective tissue growth factor gene promoter, in human skin in vivo and human skin fibroblasts. Constitutive expression of connective tissue growth factor in normal human skin suggests that it is a physiologic regulator of procollagen synthesis. Ultraviolet reduction of connective tissue growth factor expression may contribute to reduced procollagen synthesis observed in ultraviolet-irradiated normal human skin and human skin fibroblasts. PMID:11874477

  17. Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease developed into autoimmune disease: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Shohei; Bando, Yuki; Saito, Norimitsu; Katsuoka, Kensei; Ishii, Masahiro

    2010-06-01

    We report herein the pathological findings and clinical courses of two cases of Kikuchi-Fujimoto disease (KFD) that developed into autoimmune diseases. The patients are currently undergoing treatment for a disease similar to Sjogren's syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus/mixed connective tissue disease. KFD is not an independent condition and most likely develops due to an autoimmune mechanism. Pediatricians should pay careful attention to KFD and encourage long-term follow-up in patients with this condition. PMID:20082108

  18. Absence of some common organ-specific and non-organ-specific autoimmunity in autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kluger, Nicolas; Krohn, Kai; Ranki, Annamari

    2013-01-01

    Background Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene, whose loss of function leads to the escape of self-reactive T cells from the thymus and autoimmunity. APECED patients typically develop tissue-specific autoantibodies and anti-cytokine antibodies. Consequently, various endocrine and non-endocrine autoimmune disorders appear. However, only a certain number of autoimmune diseases develop, while some common autoimmune conditions have not been reported or are seen only anecdotally. Objective We investigated the clinical manifestations and occurrence of antinuclear antibodies (AN-Abs) and antibodies against extractable nuclear antigens, citrullinated peptide, and transglutaminase in 24 patients and against bullous pemphigoid antigen 180 and desmogleins 1 (Dsg1) and Dsg3 in 30 patients of a Finnish cohort of APECED patients. Results Despite the loss of central tolerance, the autoantibodies investigated were not overrepresented among the APECED patients. None of the patients had a history of autoimmune connective tissue disease, rheumatoid arthritis, celiac disease, or autoimmune cutaneous bullous disorders. Altogether, 25% (6/24) had low-titer (1:80) AN-Abs. Two patients had anti-BP180 antibodies and two others had anti-Dsg3 antibodies without any cutaneous or mucosal symptoms. No anti-citrullinated peptide and anti-transglutaminase reactivity was found. Conclusions The mechanisms that drives tolerance to tissue autoantigens is not fully understood as even APECED patients, who are genetically prone to develop autoantibodies, are tolerant against some common autoantigens. The hypothesis that some of the anti-cytokine antibodies commonly found in APECED patients may be protective should be investigated in larger series. PMID:23781320

  19. Pulmonary manifestations of Sjögren syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, and mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Mira-Avendano, Isabel C; Abril, Andy

    2015-05-01

    Interstitial lung disease is a common and often life-threatening manifestation of different connective tissue disorders, often affecting its overall prognosis. Systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren syndrome, and mixed connective tissue disease, although all unique diseases, can have lung manifestations as an important part of these conditions. This article reviews the different pulmonary manifestations seen in these 3 systemic rheumatologic conditions. PMID:25836642

  20. Experimental diabetes and the lung. II. In vivo connective tissue metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ofulue, A F; Thurlbeck, W M

    1988-08-01

    In vivo lung connective tissue and DNA synthesis, following intraperitoneal injection of [14C]proline and [3H]thymidine, were studied in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats fed ad libitum. Insulin-treated diabetic and normal rats similarly fed, and undernourished rats weight-matched to the untreated diabetics, served as comparison groups. The ratio of unbound [14C]hydroxyproline to total [14C]hydroxyproline in the lung was used to assess connective tissue degradation. Compared to the normal group, the untreated diabetic animals showed similar synthesis of collagen and elastin, reduced synthesis of total protein and DNA, and decreased degradation of connective tissue. When compared with the normal group, the undernourished animals showed diminished synthesis of total protein, collagen, elastin, and DNA, and increased degradation of connective tissue. In comparison to the undernourished group, the untreated diabetic animals indicated increased synthesis of collagen and elastin, and diminished degradation of connective tissue; total protein and DNA syntheses were similar. The insulin-treated diabetic animals showed increased collagen and DNA synthesis. We conclude that experimental diabetes has a profound effect on lung connective tissue metabolism, supporting previous observations of connective tissue abnormalities and morphometric changes. The increase in lung collagen and elastin in diabetes is in part due to reduced breakdown of the connective tissue proteins. PMID:3057960

  1. Pulmonary arterial hypertension related to connective tissue disease: a review.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Saman; Palevsky, Harold I

    2014-02-01

    PAH associated with connective tissue diseases is associated with significant functional impairment and morbidity, and carries with it a poor prognosis. The mortality is as high as 10% to 15% in the first year after diagnosis; making it a devastating disease. The availability of ever-increasing numbers of treatment options in the recent era have improved survival in this patient population and have made early and accurate diagnosis a more important goal. According to the Registry to Evaluate Early and Long-Term Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Disease Management (REVEAL), 1-year, 3-year, 5-year, and 7-year survival rates from time of diagnostic right-sided heart catheterization in patients with PAH were found to be 85%, 68%, 57%, and 49%, respectively, which is a considerable improvement since the National Institutes of Health registry 2 decades previously. In a study by Condliffe and colleagues, survival rates in patients with SSC-associated PAH have improved to 78%at 1 year and 47% at 3 years. Patients with SLE-related PAH have a much higher survival rate of up to 75% at 3 years. Proper screening, early diagnosis, and early treatment can have a significant impact in reducing morbidity and mortality. A small study to assess outcomes in patients with asymptomatic CTD found to have exercise induced PAH suggest that bosentan may be safe and effective in improving the hemodynamics and outcomes in these patients. This study included only 10 patients, and additional randomized trials with larger numbers of subjects are needed to affirm this hypothesis. Studies are under way to find additional therapeutic modalities in the form of PDGF receptor blockers, VEGF blockers, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, endothelial dysfunction inhibitors, multikinase inhibitor of Raf-1, serotonin receptor antagonists,and rho kinase inhibitors. Despite these, clinical suspicion, early diagnosis, early PMID:24268012

  2. Distinct phenotypes in mixed connective tissue disease: subgroups and survival.

    PubMed

    Szodoray, P; Hajas, A; Kardos, L; Dezso, B; Soos, G; Zold, E; Vegh, J; Csipo, I; Nakken, B; Zeher, M; Szegedi, G; Bodolay, E

    2012-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the autoantibody profile, dominant clinical symptoms and cluster characteristics of different mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD phenotypes. Two-hundred-and-one patients with MCTD were followed-up longitudinally. Five clinical parameters, Raynaud's phenomenon, pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH), myositis, interstitial lung disease (ILD), erosive arthritis and five auto-antibodies besides anti-U1RNP, antiendothelial cell antibodies (AECA), anti-CCP, anti-cardiolipin (anti-CL), anti-SSA/SSB and IgM rheumatoid factor (RF) were selected for cluster analysis. The mean age of patients was 52.9 ± 12.4 years and the mean follow-up of the disease was 12.5 ± 7.2 years. Patients were classified into three cluster groups. Cluster 1 with 77 patients, cluster 2 with 79 patients and cluster 3 with 45 patients. In cluster 1 the prevalence of PAH (55.8%; p < 0.001), Raynaud's phenomenon (92.2%; p < 0.001) and livedo reticularis (24.6%, p < 0.001) was significantly greater than in cluster 2 and 3. In cluster 2, the incidence of ILD (98.7%; p < 0.001), myositis (77.2%; p < 0.001), and esophageal dysmotility (89.8%; p < 0.001) was significantly greater than that in cluster 1 and 3. In cluster 3, anti-CCP antibodies were present in 31 of 45 patients (68.8%) with erosions. Anti-CCP antibodies were present in 37 of 42 patients (88.0%) with erosions. PAH, angina, venous thrombosis was observed in cluster 1 and pulmonary fibrosis in cluster 2, musculosceletal damage, gastrointestinal symptoms and osteoporotic fractures were most frequent in cluster 3. Cumulative survival assessment indicated cluster 1 patients having the worst prognosis. Cluster analysis is valuable to differentiate among various subsets of MCTD and useful prognostic factor regarding the disease course. PMID:22864236

  3. [The effect of the biopolymer chondroitin sulfate on reparative regeneration of connective tissue].

    PubMed

    Belova, S V; Norkin, I A; Puchinyan, D M

    2015-01-01

    The research objective is a study of an intra-articular method of introduction of the preparation "mukosat" for stimulation of reparative regeneration of connective tissue of knee joints in rabbits with an experimental arthritis. It is ascertained that intra-articular maintenance of chondroitin sulfate (the preparation "mukosat") acts as a stimulus for reparative regeneration of connective tissue thus showing up positive changes in the status of connective tissue elements of joints: decrease in glycosaminoglycan content in blood serum and normalization of the composition of glycosaminoglycan carbohydrate component. It probably depends on stimulation of biosynthesis of autologous normal glycosaminoglycans in tissues of animal knee joints. PMID:26226692

  4. Experiment K-7-29: Connective Tissue Studies. Part 3; Rodent Tissue Repair: Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauber, W.; Fritz, V. K.; Burkovskaya, T. E.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E. I.

    1994-01-01

    Myofiber injury-repair was studied in the rat gastrocnemius following a crush injury to the lower leg prior to flight in order to understand if the regenerative responses of muscles are altered by the lack of gravitational forces during Cosmos 2044 flight. After 14 days of flight, the gastrocnemius muscle was removed from the 5 injured flight rodents and various Earth-based treatment groups for comparison. The Earth-based animals consisted of three groups of five rats with injured muscles from a simulated, tail-suspended, and vivarium as well as an uninjured basal group. The gastrocnemius muscle from each was evaluated by histochemical and immunohistochemical techniques to document myofiber, vascular, and connective tissue alterations following injury. In general the repair process was somewhat similar in all injured muscle samples with regard to extracellular matrix organization and myofiber regeneration. Small and large myofibers were present with a newly organized extracellular matrix indicative of myogenesis and muscle regeneration. In the tail-suspended animals, a more complete repair was observed with no enlarged area of non-muscle cells or matrix material visible. In contrast, the muscle samples from the flight animals were less well differentiated with more macrophages and blood vessels in the repair region but small myofibers and proteoglycans, nevertheless, were in their usual configuration. Thus, myofiber repair did vary in muscles from the different groups, but for the most part, resulted in functional muscle tissue.

  5. The transcription, translation, transport-trail and autoimmunity: Guilt by association.

    PubMed

    Tagoe, Clement E

    2015-12-01

    The autoimmune connective tissue diseases (ACTD) are a group of diseases which share clinical features and genetic inheritance. They are characterized by systemic autoimmunity and autoantibody production with a striking predilection for cellular components involved in transcription, translation and cellular transport. Although multiple triggers of autoimmunity have been proposed for this group of diseases including microbial agents such as viruses and bacteria, drugs, ultraviolet light, environmental toxins, stress, hormones and heavy metals, the prominence of autoantibodies to components of the transcription, translation, cellular transport-trail (TTTT) suggests that the agent(s) triggering the autoimmune response potentially utilize the TTTT. For the ACTD, viruses and viral agents are the likely triggers of autoimmunity as a result of aberrant viral latency with the production of autoantibodies to the components of the cellular TTTT machinery through multiple mechanisms, perhaps including molecular mimicry, bystander activation and epitope spreading. PMID:26519101

  6. T cell abnormalities in mixed connective tissue disease complicated with Klinefelter's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, K; Yoshimura, M; Nakao, H; Kanakura, Y; Kanayama, Y; Matsuzawa, Y

    1994-11-01

    We report a 28-year-old Japanese with Klinefelter's syndrome who developed mixed connective disease (MCTD) and Sjögren syndrome. Previously being well, he presented with Raynaud's phenomenon, dry eye, fever and polyarthralgia. Clinical examinations revealed anti-nRNP autoantibody, leukopenia and lung fibrosis. Then he was found to have Klinefelter's syndrome. Flow cytometric analysis showed a relative increase of peripheral CD8+ T lymphocytes carrying either HLA-DR or CD57. Lymphocyte IL-2 production induced in vitro by concanavalin A was decreased. Such T cell abnormalities may be implicated in the development of autoimmune disease in Klinefelter's syndrome. PMID:7849389

  7. Stretching of the back improves gait, mechanical sensitivity and connective tissue inflammation in a rodent model.

    PubMed

    Corey, Sarah M; Vizzard, Margaret A; Bouffard, Nicole A; Badger, Gary J; Langevin, Helene M

    2012-01-01

    The role played by nonspecialized connective tissues in chronic non-specific low back pain is not well understood. In a recent ultrasound study, human subjects with chronic low back pain had altered connective tissue structure compared to human subjects without low back pain, suggesting the presence of inflammation and/or fibrosis in the low back pain subjects. Mechanical input in the form of static tissue stretch has been shown in vitro and in vivo to have anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects. To better understand the pathophysiology of lumbar nonspecialized connective tissue as well as potential mechanisms underlying therapeutic effects of tissue stretch, we developed a carrageenan-induced inflammation model in the low back of a rodent. Induction of inflammation in the lumbar connective tissues resulted in altered gait, increased mechanical sensitivity of the tissues of the low back, and local macrophage infiltration. Mechanical input was then applied to this model as in vivo tissue stretch for 10 minutes twice a day for 12 days. In vivo tissue stretch mitigated the inflammation-induced changes leading to restored stride length and intrastep distance, decreased mechanical sensitivity of the back and reduced macrophage expression in the nonspecialized connective tissues of the low back. This study highlights the need for further investigation into the contribution of connective tissue to low back pain and the need for a better understanding of how interventions involving mechanical stretch could provide maximal therapeutic benefit. This tissue stretch research is relevant to body-based treatments such as yoga or massage, and to some stretch techniques used with physical therapy. PMID:22238664

  8. Autoimmunity in 2014.

    PubMed

    Selmi, Carlo

    2015-10-01

    Our PubMed search for peer-reviewed articles published in the 2014 solar year retrieved a significantly higher number of hits compared to 2013 with a net 28 % increase. Importantly, full articles related to autoimmunity constitute approximately 5 % of immunology articles. We confirm that our understanding of autoimmunity is becoming a translational paradigm with pathogenetic elements rapidly followed by new treatment options. Furthermore, numerous clinical and pathogenetic elements and features are shared among autoimmune diseases, and this is well illustrated in the recent literature. More specifically, the past year witnessed critical revisions of our understanding and management of antiphospholipid syndrome with new exciting data on the pathogenicity of the serum anti-beta2 glycoprotein autoantibody, a better understanding of the current and new treatments for rheumatoid arthritis, and new position papers on important clinical questions such as vaccinations in patients with autoimmune disease, comorbidities, or new classification criteria. Furthermore, data confirming the important connections between innate immunity and autoimmunity via toll-like receptors or the critical role of T regulatory cells in tolerance breakdown and autoimmunity perpetuation were also reported. Lastly, genetic and epigenetic data were provided to confirm that the mosaic of autoimmunity warrants a susceptible individual background which may be geographically determined and contribute to the geoepidemiology of diseases. The 2014 literature in the autoimmunity world should be cumulatively regarded as part of an annus mirabilis in which, on a different level, the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American College of Rheumatology in Boston was attended by over 16,000 participants with over selected 3000 abstracts. PMID:26335699

  9. Targeting CVD risk in chronic connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Malaviya, Anshuman P; Hall, Frances C

    2012-01-01

    Chronic inflammatory rheumatological conditions are associated with an increased burden of cardiovascular disease (CVD). In both rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) most excess mortality is cardiovascular. Increased CVD risk is also associated with psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, antiphospholipid syndrome and systemic sclerosis. Several studies report that CVD mortality increases early in disease in RA, with increased risk of MI within one year and increased risk of hospital admission for CVD within seven years of diagnosis. A linear association has been demonstrated between subclinical carotid atherosclerosis and raised inflammatory markers. SLE is associated with 2-10 times the risk of a CVD event compared with the general population. CVD is now a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in SLE. Antiphospholipid antibodies are associated with accelerated atherosclerosis, as well as thromboses. Atherogenesis in the context of autoimmune disease results from a complex interplay between traditional risk factors, disease-specific factors and drug-related adverse effects. Chronic inflammation itself modifies the lipid profile. PMID:22720456

  10. Pleural involvement in systemic autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Bouros, Demosthenes; Pneumatikos, Ioannis; Tzouvelekis, Argyris

    2008-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases, a heterogeneous group of immunologically mediated inflammatory disorders including multiorgan involvement, can affect the pleura with various frequencies, either as a single presenting feature or as part of multisystem involvement. Rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus represent the most common immunological diseases that affect the pleural cavity; however, there is considerable variation regarding the reported prevalence, natural history and prognosis of pleural involvement in both conditions. The definition of pleural disease in the remaining systemic autoimmune disorders is unquestionably imprecise and assumptive, since it is risky to support premises based on single case reports or retrospective data from very small series. In this article, we will review the manifestations of pleural disease caused by rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, scleroderma, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, mixed connective tissue disease, ankylosing spondylitis, Sjogren's syndrome and Wegener's granulomatosis. PMID:18477860

  11. The influence of tethered epidermal growth factor on connective tissue progenitor colony formation

    E-print Network

    Marcantonio, Nicholas A.

    Strategies to combine aspirated marrow cells with scaffolds to treat connective tissue defects are gaining increasing clinical attention and use. In situations such as large defects where initial survival and proliferation ...

  12. Molecular substrate design for the selective adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of marrow connective tissue progenitors

    E-print Network

    Au, Ada

    2005-01-01

    A multi-faceted approach was applied to the molecular design of substrates for the selective adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of connective tissue progenitors (CTPs) from human bone marrow aspirates. The basic ...

  13. Connective Tissue Disorders and Cardiovascular Complications: The indomitable role of Transforming Growth Factor-beta signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Jason B.; Ikonomidis, John S.; Jones, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Marfan Syndrome (MFS) and Loeys-Dietz Syndrome (LDS) represent heritable connective tissue disorders that cosegregate with a similar pattern of cardiovascular defects (thoracic aortic aneurysm, mitral valve prolapse/regurgitation, and aortic dilatation with regurgitation). This pattern of cardiovascular defects appears to be expressed along a spectrum of severity in many heritable connective tissue disorders and raises suspicion of a relationship between the normal development of connective tissues and the cardiovascular system. Given the evidence of increased transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-?) signaling in MFS and LDS, this signaling pathway may represent the common link in this relationship. To further explore this hypothetical link, this chapter will review the TGF-? signaling pathway, heritable connective tissue syndromes related to TGF-? receptor (TGFBR) mutations, and discuss the pathogenic contribution of TGF-? to these syndromes with a primary focus on the cardiovascular system. PMID:24443024

  14. Life-threatening acute pneumonitis in mixed connective tissue disease: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Rath, Eva; Zandieh, Shahin; Löckinger, Alexander; Hirschl, Mirko; Klaushofer, Klaus; Zwerina, Jochen

    2015-10-01

    Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is a rare connective tissue disease frequently involving the lungs. The main characteristic is a systemic sclerosis-like picture of slowly progressing interstitial lung disease consistent with lung fibrosis, while pulmonary arterial hypertension is rare. Herein, we present a case of a newly diagnosed MCTD patient developing life-threatening acute pneumonitis similar to lupus pneumonitis. Previous literature on this exceptionally rare complication of MCTD is reviewed and differential diagnosis and management discussed. PMID:26142172

  15. Effects of microgravity on rat bone, cartlage and connective tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, S.

    1990-01-01

    The response to hypogravity by the skeletal system was originally thought to be the result of a reduction in weight bearing. Thus a reduced rate of new bone formation in the weight-bearing bones was accepted, when found, as an obvious result of hypogravity. However, data on non-weight-bearing tissues have begun to show that other physiological changes can be expected to occur to animals during spaceflight. This overview of the Cosmos 1887 data discusses these results as they pertain to individual bones or tissues because the response seems to depend on the architecture and metabolism of each tissue under study. Various effects were seen in different tissues from the rats flown on Cosmos 1887. The femur showed a reduced bone mineral content but only in the central region of the diaphysis. This same region in the tibia showed changes in the vascularity of bone as well as some osteocytic cell death. The humerus demonstrated reduced morphometric characteristics plus a decrease in mechanical stiffness. Bone mineral crystals did not mature normally as a result of flight, suggesting a defect in the matrix mineralization process. Note that these changes relate directly to the matrix portion of the bone or some function of bone which slowly responds to changes in the environment. However, most cellular functions of bone are rapid responders. The stimulation of osteoblast precursor cells, the osteoblast function in collagen synthesis, a change in the proliferation rate of cells in the epiphyseal growth plate, the synthesis and secretion of osteocalcin, and the movement of water into or out of tissues, are all processes which respond to environmental change. These rapidly responding events produced results from Cosmos 1887 which were frequently quite different from previous space flight data.

  16. Saudi Guidelines on the Diagnosis and Treatment of Pulmonary Hypertension: Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with connective tissue diseases

    PubMed Central

    Boueiz, Adel; Hassoun, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    The explosive growth of medical literature on pulmonary hypertension (PH) has led to a steady increase in awareness of this disease within the medical community during the past decade. The recent revision of the classification of PH is presented in in the main guidelines. Group 1 PH or pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a heterogeneous group and includes PH due to inheritable, drug-induced, and toxin-induced causes and to such underlying systemic causes as connective tissue diseases, human immunodeficiency viral infection, portal hypertension, congenital heart disease, and schistosomiasis. Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune multisystem disorder, which affects over 240 persons per million in the United States.[1] Its manifestations are not confined to the skin but may also involve the lungs, kidneys, peripheral circulation, musculoskeletal system, gastrointestinal tract, and heart. The outcome of PAH associated with SSc is worse when compared to other subtypes of PAH. In this review, we summarize available information about the pulmonary vascular and cardiac manifestations of SSc with special emphasis on their prognostic implications as well as the peculiarity of their detection. PMID:25076994

  17. Undifferentiated connective tissue disease: natural history and evolution into definite CTD assessed in 84 patients initially diagnosed as early UCTD.

    PubMed

    Danieli, M G; Fraticelli, P; Salvi, A; Gabrielli, A; Danieli, G

    1998-01-01

    Connective tissue diseases (CTDs) are chronic multisystemic inflammatory disorders whose indicative signs or symptoms have a high sensitivity but poor specificity in predicting the evolution into a given CTD. We have analysed 84 consecutive patients initially diagnosed as having an early undifferentiated CTD (early UCTD) with the aim of verifying the evolution into one definite CTD and of evaluating the predictive value of clinical and laboratory parameters. During a 5-year study period, 33 patients developed signs of a full-blown CTD; the highest probability of evolution was in the first 48 months after the onset. Multivariate analysis allowed us to select those variables correlating with evolution into a particular CTD, such as sclerodactyly and oesophageal dysfunction for systemic sclerosis, xerostomia and anti-nuclear antibodies (SS-A pattern) for Sjögren's syndrome, and fever and anti-DNA antibodies for systemic lupus erythematosus. Furthermore, we assessed the prevalence of various clinical and laboratory manifestations, complications and prognosis of those patients diagnosed after a 5-year disease duration period as having a UCTD. In our series, major organs such as the kidney or heart seem to be spared, whereas we detected a relatively high prevalence of endocrine disease of autoimmune origin. PMID:9694051

  18. Autoimmune Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of CAM are herbal products, chiropractic , acupuncture , and hypnosis . If you have an autoimmune disease, you might ... help you to feel your best. Meditation, self-hypnosis, and guided imagery, are simple relaxation techniques that ...

  19. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... an autoimmune disease in which people cannot tolerate gluten because it damages the lining of their small ... or osteomalacia thinning of the hair and skin acne diabetes high blood pressure cataracts, a clouding in ...

  20. Autoimmune disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    ... is that some microorganisms (such as bacteria or viruses) or drugs may trigger changes that confuse the immune system. This may happen more often in people who have genes that make them more prone to autoimmune disorders. ...

  1. Pituitary gonadotropins and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Cocco, Cristina; Brancia, Carla; D'Amato, Filomena; Noli, Barbara

    2014-03-25

    Autoimmune disease occurs when the body produces an inappropriate immune response against its own tissues producing antibodies, called autoantibodies, reacting to specific antigens. Studies regarding the presence of an autoimmune process specifically involving gonadotropins date from over than 20 years ago, when antibodies to gonadotropic-secreting cells were found by immunofluorescence in sera from a group of patients affected by cryptorchidism. Later on, antibodies detected by the same technique, and directed to the same cells were also found at high titer in sera from patients affected by hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, Kallmann's syndrome, lymphocytic hypophysitis with isolated gonadotropin deficiency, as well as autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome. Concerning the autoimmune target/s within the gonadotropic cells, rarely autoantibodies were found labeling gonadotropins while in a large number of cases, auto-antigens remained to be identified. Since pituitary gonadotropins are fundamental for the sexual maturity and reproductive mechanisms, patients with infertility were largely investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the presence of circulating antibodies likely interfering with gonadotropin activity. In infertile women, autoantibodies to gonadotropins were found related to ovarian autoimmunity, ovarian disorders that cause infertility and also associated with in vitro fertilization treatments. In infertile men, autoantibodies to gonadotropins may alter the testicular spermatogenesis and cause apoptosis of the spermatogenic cells. In conclusion, circulating antibodies were found labeling gonadotropic cells and/or gonadotropins, and in both cases they could create dysfunctions in gonadotropin related mechanism. The intriguing question of what can cause the production of such autoantibodies is not clear yet. PMID:24153235

  2. Complement and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Ballanti, Eleonora; Perricone, Carlo; Greco, Elisabetta; Ballanti, Marta; Di Muzio, Gioia; Chimenti, Maria Sole; Perricone, Roberto

    2013-07-01

    The complement system is a component of the innate immune system. Its main function was initially believed to be limited to the recognition and elimination of pathogens through direct killing or stimulation of phagocytosis. However, in recent years, the immunoregulatory functions of the complement system were demonstrated and it was determined that the complement proteins play an important role in modulating adaptive immunity and in bridging innate and adaptive responses. When the delicate mechanisms that regulate this sophisticated enzymatic system are unbalanced, the complement system may cause damage, mediating tissue inflammation. Dysregulation of the complement system has been involved in the pathogenesis and clinical manifestations of several autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitides, Sjögren's syndrome, antiphospholipid syndrome, systemic sclerosis, dermatomyositis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Complement deficiencies have been associated with an increased risk to develop autoimmune disorders. Because of its functions, the complement system is an attractive therapeutic target for a wide range of diseases. Up to date, several compounds interfering with the complement cascade have been studied in experimental models for autoimmune diseases. The main therapeutic strategies are inhibition of complement activation components, inhibition of complement receptors, and inhibition of membrane attack complex. At present, none of the available agents was proven to be both safe and effective for treatment of autoimmune diseases in humans. Nonetheless, data from preclinical studies and initial clinical trials suggest that the modulation of the complement system could constitute a viable strategy for the treatment of autoimmune conditions in the decades to come. PMID:23615835

  3. Cartilage, bone, and intermandibular connective tissue in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri (Osteichthyes: Dipnoi).

    PubMed

    Kemp, Anne

    2013-10-01

    The connective tissue that links the bones of the mandible in the Australian lungfish, Neoceratodus forsteri, has been described as an intermandibular cartilage, and as such has been considered important for phylogenetic analyses among lower vertebrates. However, light and electron microscopy of developing lungfish jaws demonstrates that the intermandibular tissue, like the connective tissue that links the bones of the upper jaw, contains fibroblasts and numerous bundles of collagen fibrils, extending from the trabeculae of the bones supporting the tooth plates. It differs significantly in structure and in staining reactions from the cartilage and the bone found in this species. In common with the cladistian Polypterus and with actinopterygians and some amphibians, lungfish have no intermandibular cartilage. The connective tissue linking the mandibular bones has no phylogenetic significance for systematic grouping of lungfish, as it is present in a range of different groups among lower vertebrates. PMID:23801584

  4. Efficacy of Connective Tissue with and without Periosteum in Regeneration of Intrabony Defects

    PubMed Central

    Esfahanian, Vahid; Golestaneh, Hedayatollah; Moghaddas, Omid; Ghafari, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Connective tissue grafts with and without periosteum is used in regenerative treatments of bone and has demonstrated successful outcomes in previous investigations. The aim of present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of connective tissue graft with and without periosteum in regeneration of intrabony defects. Materials and methods. In this single-blind randomized split-mouth clinical trial, 15 pairs of intrabony defects in 15 patients with moderate to advanced periodontitis were treated by periosteal connective tissue graft + ABBM (test group) or non-periosteal connective tissue graft + ABBM (control group). Probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level, free gingival margin position, bone crestal position, crest defect depth and defect depth to stent were measured at baseline and after six months by surgical re-entry. Data was analyzed by Student’s t-test and paired t-tests (?=0.05). Results. Changes in clinical parameters after 6 months in the test and control groups were as follows: mean of PPD reduction: 3.1±0.6 (P<0.0001); 2.5±1.0 mm (P<0.0001), CAL gain: 2.3±0.9 (P<0.0001); 2.2±1.0 mm (P<0.0001), bone fill: 2.2±0.7 mm (P<0.0001); 2.2±0.7 mm (P<0.0001), respectively. No significant differences in the position of free gingival margin were observed during 6 months compared to baseline in both groups. Conclusion. Combinations of periosteal connective tissue graft + ABBM and non-periosteal connective tissue graft + ABBM were similarly effective in treating intrabony defects without any favor for any group. Connective tissue and perio-steum can be equally effective in regeneration of intrabony defects. PMID:25587379

  5. Adipose tissue and sustainable development: a connection that needs protection

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Angelo; Picard-Deland, Éliane; Panahi, Shirin; Marette, André

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is generally considered as an excess body fat that increases the risk to develop ergonomic, metabolic, and psychosocial problems. As suggested in this paper, body fat gain is also a protective adaptation that prevents body lipotoxicity, contributes to the secretion of molecules involved in metabolic regulation, and dilutes lipid soluble persistent organic pollutants. Recent literature shows that this protective role of adipose tissue is more solicited in a modern context in which unsuspected factors can affect energy balance to a much greater extent than what is generally perceived by health care professionals. These factors include short sleep duration, demanding mental work, and chemical pollution whose impact is more detectable in a context dominated by economic productivity and competitiveness. Since these factors might also include the increase in atmospheric CO2, it is likely that obesity prevention will need the support of a promotion in sustainable development, whether it is for human health, and well-being or global ecological protection. PMID:26074821

  6. Cells of the connective tissue differentiate and migrate into pollen sacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, M. C. M.; Wijesekara, Kolitha B.

    2002-01-01

    In angiosperms, archesporial cells in the anther primordium undergo meiosis to form haploid pollen, the sole occupants of anther sacs. Anther sacs are held together by a matrix of parenchyma cells, the connective tissue. Cells of the connective tissue are not known to differentiate. We report the differentiation of parenchyma cells in the connective tissue of two Gordonia species into pollen-like structures (described as pseudopollen), which migrate into the anther sacs before dehiscence. Pollen and pseudopollen were distinguishable by morphology and staining. Pollen were tricolpate to spherical while pseudopollen were less rigid and transparent with a ribbed surface. Both types were different in size, shape, staining and surface architecture. The ratio of the number of pseudopollen to pollen was 1:3. During ontogeny in the connective tissue, neither cell division nor tetrad formation was observed and hence pseudopollen were presumed to be diploid. Only normal pollen germinated on a germination medium. Fixed preparations in time seemed to indicate that pseudopollen migrate from the connective tissue into the anther sac.

  7. Should Endovascular Therapy Be Considered for Patients With Connective Tissue Disorder?

    PubMed

    Gagné-Loranger, Maude; Voisine, Pierre; Dagenais, François

    2016-01-01

    Because of early diagnosis, strict imaging follow-up, and advances in medical and surgical management, life expectancy of Marfan patients has dramatically improved since the 1970s. Although disease of the root and ascending aorta are more frequent in patients with connective tissue disorders, a subset of patients present with diffuse disease that might involve any portion of the thoracoabdominal aorta. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has gained widespread acceptance for the treatment of different pathologies of the descending aorta. In contrast, TEVAR in patients with connective tissue disorders is associated with a high risk of early and mid-term complications and reinterventions. Currently, a consensus of experts recommend that an open approach should be reserved for use in acceptable risk candidates with connective tissue disorders. TEVAR should be considered solely in patients in a complex repeat surgical setting or in patients judged to have prohibitive open surgical risk. Finally, as a bridge to a definite open repair, TEVAR might be life-saving in patients with connective tissue disorders who present with exsanguination or severe malperfusion. Future developments in stent-graft technology might decrease stent-graft-related complications in patients with connective tissue disorders, although securing a device with radial force in a fragile aorta in the long-term will be challenging. PMID:26577892

  8. Pathophysiological model for chronic low back pain integrating connective tissue and nervous system mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Langevin, Helene M; Sherman, Karen J

    2007-01-01

    Although chronic low back pain (cLBP) is increasingly recognized as a complex syndrome with multifactorial etiology, the pathogenic mechanisms leading to the development of chronic pain in this condition remain poorly understood. This article presents a new, testable pathophysiological model integrating connective tissue plasticity mechanisms with several well-developed areas of research on cLBP (pain psychology, postural control, neuroplasticity). We hypothesize that pain-related fear leads to a cycle of decreased movement, connective tissue remodeling, inflammation, nervous system sensitization and further decreased mobility. In addition to providing a new, testable framework for future mechanistic studies of cLBP, the integration of connective tissue and nervous system plasticity into the model will potentially illuminate the mechanisms of a variety of treatments that may reverse these abnormalities by applying mechanical forces to soft tissues (e.g. physical therapy, massage, chiropractic manipulation, acupuncture), by changing specific movement patterns (e.g. movement therapies, yoga) or more generally by increasing activity levels (e.g. recreational exercise). Non-invasive measures of connective tissue remodeling may eventually become important tools to evaluate and follow patients with cLBP in research and clinical practice. An integrative mechanistic model incorporating behavioral and structural aspects of cLBP will strengthen the rationale for a multidisciplinary treatment approach including direct mechanical tissue stimulation, movement reeducation, psychosocial intervention and pharmacological treatment to address this common and debilitating condition. PMID:16919887

  9. The autoimmune diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, N.R.; Mackay, I.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 25 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Genetic Predisposition to Autoimmune Diseases; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Autoimmune Aspects of Rheumatoid Arthritis; Immunology of Insulin-Dependent Diabetes; and Adrenal Autoimmunity and Autoimmune Polyglandular Syndromes.

  10. Tetramers reveal IL-17–secreting CD4+ T cells that are specific for U1-70 in lupus and mixed connective tissue disease

    PubMed Central

    Kattah, Nicole H.; Newell, Evan W.; Jarrell, Justin Ansel; Chu, Alvina D.; Xie, Jianming; Kattah, Michael G.; Goldberger, Ofir; Ye, Jessica; Chakravarty, Eliza F.; Davis, Mark M.; Utz, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Antigen-specific CD4+ T cells are implicated in the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but little is known about the peptide antigens that they recognize and their precise function in disease. We generated a series of MHC class II tetramers of I-Ek–containing peptides from the spliceosomal protein U1-70 that specifically stain distinct CD4+ T-cell populations in MRL/lpr mice. The T-cell populations recognize an epitope differing only by the presence or absence of a single phosphate residue at position serine140. The frequency of CD4+ T cells specific for U1-70(131-150):I-Ek (without phosphorylation) correlates with disease severity and anti–U1-70 autoantibody production. These T cells also express ROR?t and produce IL-17A. Furthermore, the U1-70–specific CD4+ T cells that produce IL-17A are detected in a subset of patients with SLE and are significantly increased in patients with mixed connective tissue disease. These studies provide tools for studying antigen-specific CD4+ T cells in lupus, and demonstrate an antigen-specific source of IL-17A in autoimmune disease. PMID:25713364

  11. Tetramers reveal IL-17-secreting CD4+ T cells that are specific for U1-70 in lupus and mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Kattah, Nicole H; Newell, Evan W; Jarrell, Justin Ansel; Chu, Alvina D; Xie, Jianming; Kattah, Michael G; Goldberger, Ofir; Ye, Jessica; Chakravarty, Eliza F; Davis, Mark M; Utz, Paul J

    2015-03-10

    Antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells are implicated in the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but little is known about the peptide antigens that they recognize and their precise function in disease. We generated a series of MHC class II tetramers of I-E(k)-containing peptides from the spliceosomal protein U1-70 that specifically stain distinct CD4(+) T-cell populations in MRL/lpr mice. The T-cell populations recognize an epitope differing only by the presence or absence of a single phosphate residue at position serine(140). The frequency of CD4(+) T cells specific for U1-70(131-150):I-E(k) (without phosphorylation) correlates with disease severity and anti-U1-70 autoantibody production. These T cells also express ROR?t and produce IL-17A. Furthermore, the U1-70-specific CD4(+) T cells that produce IL-17A are detected in a subset of patients with SLE and are significantly increased in patients with mixed connective tissue disease. These studies provide tools for studying antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells in lupus, and demonstrate an antigen-specific source of IL-17A in autoimmune disease. PMID:25713364

  12. Recurrent Compartment Syndrome in a Patient with Clinical Features of a Connective Tissue Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Barajas, Brenda D; Sun, Angela; Rimoin, David L; Reinstein, Eyal

    2013-01-01

    Arterial complications are common in vascular type Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS), accounting for 66% of first complications. Several cases in the literature have documented acute compartment syndrome (ACS) following vascular rupture in vascular type EDS. Other disorders of connective tissue have also demonstrated vascular fragility, leading to arterial aneurysm and rupture, but there have been no documented cases of ACS. Here, we report on a female patient with a history of recurrent compartment syndrome who exhibits some clinical findings seen in hypermobile and vascular EDS; however she does not meet clinical and molecular diagnostic criteria for either of them. We further review the literature on ACS in heritable connective tissue disorders and suggest that compartment syndrome may rarely complicate other heritable disorders of connective tissue. PMID:23633393

  13. Beneficial Autoimmunity at Body Surfaces – Immune Surveillance and Rapid Type 2 Immunity Regulate Tissue Homeostasis and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dalessandri, Tim; Strid, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial cells (ECs) line body surface tissues and provide a physicochemical barrier to the external environment. Frequent microbial and non-microbial challenges such as those imposed by mechanical disruption, injury or exposure to noxious environmental substances including chemicals, carcinogens, ultraviolet-irradiation, or toxins cause activation of ECs with release of cytokines and chemokines as well as alterations in the expression of cell-surface ligands. Such display of epithelial stress is rapidly sensed by tissue-resident immunocytes, which can directly interact with self-moieties on ECs and initiate both local and systemic immune responses. ECs are thus key drivers of immune surveillance at body surface tissues. However, ECs have a propensity to drive type 2 immunity (rather than type 1) upon non-invasive challenge or stress – a type of immunity whose regulation and function still remain enigmatic. Here, we review the induction and possible role of type 2 immunity in epithelial tissues and propose that rapid immune surveillance and type 2 immunity are key regulators of tissue homeostasis and carcinogenesis. PMID:25101088

  14. [Abdominal vascular structural and functional features in patients with connective tissue dysplasia].

    PubMed

    Lialiukova, E A; Orlova, N I; Aksenov, S I

    2012-01-01

    Doppler ultrasound study records decreased volume blood flow in patients with connective tissue dysplasia. Their hemodynamic features are more marked during food testing. Dysplasia-dependent structural changes in the vascular system, such as vascular hypoplasia, wall-occluding lesions, different types of deformities, are one of the causes of lower volumetric blood flow in the abdominal vessels. The found abdominal vascular structural and functional features in patients with connective tissue dysplasia can serve as the basis for blood flow disproportion in different stages of digestion. PMID:23214026

  15. Cell density signal protein suitable for treatment of connective tissue injuries and defects

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, Richard I. (Oakland, CA)

    2002-08-13

    Identification, isolation and partial sequencing of a cell density protein produced by fibroblastic cells. The cell density signal protein comprising a 14 amino acid peptide or a fragment, variant, mutant or analog thereof, the deduced cDNA sequence from the 14 amino acid peptide, a recombinant protein, protein and peptide-specific antibodies, and the use of the peptide and peptide-specific antibodies as therapeutic agents for regulation of cell differentiation and proliferation. A method for treatment and repair of connective tissue and tendon injuries, collagen deficiency, and connective tissue defects.

  16. The connective tissue of the adductor canal – a morphological study in fetal and adult specimens

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Flavia; de Vasconcellos Fontes, Ricardo Bragança; da Silva Baptista, Josemberg; Mayer, William Paganini; de Campos Boldrini, Silvia; Liberti, Edson Aparecido

    2009-01-01

    The adductor canal is a conical or pyramid-shaped pathway that contains the femoral vessels, saphenous nerve and a varying amount of fibrous tissue. It is involved in adductor canal syndrome, a claudication syndrome involving young individuals. Our objective was to study modifications induced by aging on the connective tissue and to correlate them to the proposed pathophysiological mechanism. The bilateral adductor canals and femoral vessels of four adult and five fetal specimens were removed en bloc and analyzed. Sections 12 µm thick were obtained and the connective tissue studied with Sirius Red, Verhoeff, Weigert and Azo stains. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) photomicrographs of the surfaces of each adductor canal were also analyzed. Findings were homogeneous inside each group. The connective tissue of the canal was continuous with the outer layer of the vessels in both groups. The pattern of concentric, thick collagen type I bundles in fetal specimens was replaced by a diffuse network of compact collagen bundles with several transversal fibers and an impressive content of collagen III fibers. Elastic fibers in adults were not concentrated in the thick bundles but dispersed in line with the transversal fiber system. A dynamic compression mechanism with or without an evident constricting fibrous band has been proposed previously for adductor canal syndrome, possibly involving the connective tissue inside the canal. The vessels may not slide freely during movement. These age-related modifications in normal individuals may represent necessary conditions for this syndrome to develop. PMID:19245505

  17. [Cardiac involvement in systemic autoimmune disease].

    PubMed

    Dropi?ski, Jerzy; Szczeklik, Wojciech; Rubi?, Pawe?

    2003-04-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases form a diverse group which includes: systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), scleroderma, dermato-polymyositis, Wegener's granulomatosis, Sjögren syndrome. Although multisystem involvement is the hallmark of these diseases, the heart seems to be less affected than other organ systems. The aim of the study was to study possible cardiac abnormalities in patients with documented systemic autoimmune diseases and to assess whether there was any relation between antiphospholipid, anti-dsDNA antibodies and myocardial dysfunction findings. 76 patients (53 with SLE, 9 with MCTD, 8 with scleroderma, 6 with Wegener's granulomatosis) were subjected to our study, 69% of these patients manifested cardiac involvement, based on two-dimentional echocardiografic examination (36%--post-inflammatory valvular thickening, 20%--pericardial effusions, 15%--valvular regurgitation, 7%--left atrial enlargement, 5%--left ventricular hypertrophy, 4%--left ventricular dysfunction). None of the patients showed characteristic, acute Libman-Sacks endocarditis, which probably can be explained by chronic corticosteroid-treatment. Clinical evidence of cardiac abnormalities has been observed, in as many as 58% of cases with positive echocardiographic findings. The frequency and extend of cardiac pathology positively correlated with the detection of antiphospholipid antibodies. No such relationship was observed in patients with the presence of very high titers of antinuclear antibodies (anti-dsDNA). In conclusion, our results indicate that echocardiography is a useful method for assessment and monitoring cardiac involvement in the systemic autoimmune diseases. PMID:12931489

  18. Autoimmune pancreatitis and cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Jani, Niraj; Buxbaum, James

    2015-11-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is part of a systemic fibrosclerotic process characterized by lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with immunoglobulin G subtype-4 (IgG4) positive cells. It characteristically presents with biliary obstruction due to mass-like swelling of the pancreas. Frequently AIP is accompanied by extra-pancreatic manifestations including retroperitoneal fibrosis, thyroid disease, and salivary gland involvement. Auto-antibodies, hypergammaglobulemia, and prompt resolution of pancreatic and extrapancreatic findings with steroids signify its autoimmune nature. Refractory cases are responsive to immunomodulators and rituximab. Involvement of the biliary tree, termed IgG4 associated cholangiopathy, mimics primary sclerosing cholangitis and is challenging to manage. High IgG4 levels and swelling of the pancreas with a diminutive pancreatic duct are suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. Given similarities in presentation but radical differences in management and outcome, differentiation from pancreatic malignancy is of paramount importance. There is controversy regarding the optimal diagnostic criterion and steroid trials to make the diagnosis. Additionally, the retroperitoneal location of the pancreas and requirement for histologic sampling, makes tissue acquisition challenging. Recently, a second type of autoimmune pancreatitis has been recognized with similar clinical presentation and steroid response though different histology, serologic, and extrapancreatic findings. PMID:26558153

  19. Autoimmune pancreatitis and cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Jani, Niraj; Buxbaum, James

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is part of a systemic fibrosclerotic process characterized by lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate with immunoglobulin G subtype-4 (IgG4) positive cells. It characteristically presents with biliary obstruction due to mass-like swelling of the pancreas. Frequently AIP is accompanied by extra-pancreatic manifestations including retroperitoneal fibrosis, thyroid disease, and salivary gland involvement. Auto-antibodies, hypergammaglobulemia, and prompt resolution of pancreatic and extrapancreatic findings with steroids signify its autoimmune nature. Refractory cases are responsive to immunomodulators and rituximab. Involvement of the biliary tree, termed IgG4 associated cholangiopathy, mimics primary sclerosing cholangitis and is challenging to manage. High IgG4 levels and swelling of the pancreas with a diminutive pancreatic duct are suggestive of autoimmune pancreatitis. Given similarities in presentation but radical differences in management and outcome, differentiation from pancreatic malignancy is of paramount importance. There is controversy regarding the optimal diagnostic criterion and steroid trials to make the diagnosis. Additionally, the retroperitoneal location of the pancreas and requirement for histologic sampling, makes tissue acquisition challenging. Recently, a second type of autoimmune pancreatitis has been recognized with similar clinical presentation and steroid response though different histology, serologic, and extrapancreatic findings. PMID:26558153

  20. Rn for treatment of periocular fibrous connective tissue sarcomas in the horse

    SciTech Connect

    Frauenfelder, H.C.; Blevins, W.E.; Page, E.H.

    1982-02-01

    Twelve periocular fibrous connective tissue sarcomas in 11 horses were treated with 222Rn. Follow-up periods ranged from 1 to 6 years; the overall nonrecurrence rate at 12 months after therapy was 92%. Two lesions recurred 2 years after treatment, and 1 after 3 years. One of the former lesions has not recurred after a 2nd 222Rn treatment.

  1. Mediastinal lymphadenopathy and pulmonary arterial hypertension in mixed connective tissue disease

    SciTech Connect

    Guit, G.L.; Shaw, P.C.; Ehrlich, J.; Kroon, H.M.; Oudkerk, M.

    1985-02-01

    A case of mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is presented in which mediastinal lymphadenopathy was the most prominent radiological finding detected by plain chest radiographs and computed tomography. Pulmonary arterial hypertension, which is a rare and often fatal complication of MCTD, also developed in this patient.

  2. Connective tissue integrity is lost in vitamin B-6-deficient chicks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masse, P. G.; Yamauchi, M.; Mahuren, J. D.; Coburn, S. P.; Muniz, O. E.; Howell, D. S.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to characterize further the connective tissue disorder produced by pyridoxine (vitamin B-6) deficiency, as previously evidenced by electron microscopy. Following the second post-natal week, fast growing male chicks were deprived of pyridoxine for a 1-mo period. Six weeks post-natally, blood concentrations in the experimental deficiency group had declined to deficiency levels as registered by low concentrations of pyridoxal phosphate (coenzyme form) in erythrocytes, but did not reach levels associated with neurological symptoms. Light microscopic study showed abnormalities in the extracellular matrix of the connective tissues. Collagen cross-links and the aldehyde contents were not significantly lower in cartilage and tendon collagens of vitamin B-6-deficient animals than in age-matched controls; also, their proteoglycan degrading protease and collagenase activities measured in articular cartilages were not greater. Thus, proteolysis was an unlikely alternative mechanism to account for the loss of connective tissue integrity. These results point to the need for further investigation into adhesive properties of collagen associated proteoglycans or other proteins in vitamin B-6-deficient connective tissue.

  3. Elastin Cables Define the Axial Connective Tissue System in the Murine Lung.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Willi; Bennett, Robert D; Ackermann, Maximilian; Ysasi, Alexandra B; Belle, Janeil; Valenzuela, Cristian D; Pabst, Andreas; Tsuda, Akira; Konerding, Moritz A; Mentzer, Steven J

    2015-11-01

    The axial connective tissue system is a fiber continuum of the lung that maintains alveolar surface area during changes in lung volume. Although the molecular anatomy of the axial system remains undefined, the fiber continuum of the lung is central to contemporary models of lung micromechanics and alveolar regeneration. To provide a detailed molecular structure of the axial connective tissue system, we examined the extracellular matrix of murine lungs. The lungs were decellularized using a 24 hr detergent treatment protocol. Systematic evaluation of the decellularized lungs demonstrated no residual cellular debris; morphometry demonstrated a mean 39?±?7% reduction in lung dimensions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) demonstrated an intact structural hierarchy within the decellularized lung. Light, fluorescence, and SEM of precision-cut lung slices demonstrated that alveolar duct structure was defined by a cable line element encased in basement membrane. The cable line element arose in the distal airways, passed through septal tips and inserted into neighboring blood vessels and visceral pleura. The ropelike appearance, collagenase resistance and anti-elastin immunostaining indicated that the cable was an elastin macromolecule. Our results indicate that the helical line element of the axial connective tissue system is composed of an elastin cable that not only defines the structure of the alveolar duct, but also integrates the axial connective tissue system into visceral pleura and peripheral blood vessels. Anat Rec, 298:1960-1968, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26285785

  4. [Gastrointestinal changes in mixed connective tissue disease. Apropos of a clinical case].

    PubMed

    Magarò, M; Negrini, A P; De Cunto, F; Sommella, L; Palumbo, P; Altomonte, L

    1981-09-22

    A case of mixed connective tissue disease is described. It began as chronic juvenile arthritis and progressed to acquire the typical features of SLE, PSS and PM. Dyspepsia and the patient's poor general condition, by focussing attention on the digestion and absorption functions, revealed the presence of the gastrointestinal alterations that often accompany SSP. PMID:7279257

  5. Microstructure alterations in beef intramuscular connective tissue caused by hydrodynamic pressure processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilized to evaluate microstructural changes in intramuscular connective tissue of beef semimembranosus muscle subjected to hydrodynamic pressure processing (HDP). Samples were HDP treated in a plastic container (HDP-PC) or a steel commercial unit (HDP-CU). C...

  6. Citrullination and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Valesini, Guido; Gerardi, Maria C; Iannuccelli, Cristina; Pacucci, Viviana A; Pendolino, Monica; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-06-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by the body's own immune system attack to the self-tissues, a condition enabled, in predisposed subjects, by the reduction of self-tolerance. A central role has been recently recognized to post-translational modifications, since they can promote generation of neo-(auto)antigens and in turn an autoimmune response. During the last years great attention has been paid to citrullination, because of its role in inducing anti-citrullinated proteins/peptide antibodies (ACPA), a class of autoantibodies with diagnostic, predictive and prognostic value for Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA). Nonetheless, citrullination has been reported to be a process present in a wide range of inflammatory tissues. Indeed, citrullinated proteins have been detected also in other inflammatory arthritides and in inflammatory conditions other than arthritides (polymyositis, inflammatory bowel disease and chronic tonsillitis). Moreover, environmental exposure to cigarette smoke and nanomaterials of air pollution may be able to induce citrullination in lung cells prior to any detectable onset of inflammatory responses, suggesting that protein citrullination could be considered as a sign of early cellular damage. Accordingly, citrullination seems to be implicated in all those para-physiological processes, such as cells death pathways, in which intracellular calcium concentration raises to higher levels than in physiologic conditions: hence, peptidylarginine deiminases enzymes are activated during apoptosis, autophagy and NETosis, processes which are well-known to be implicated in autoimmunity. Taken together, these data support the hypothesis that rather than being a disease-dependent process, citrullination is an inflammatory-dependent condition that plays a central role in autoimmune diseases. PMID:25636595

  7. Fractal analysis of the structural complexity of the connective tissue in human carotid bodies

    PubMed Central

    Guidolin, Diego; Porzionato, Andrea; Tortorella, Cinzia; Macchi, Veronica; De Caro, Raffaele

    2014-01-01

    The carotid body (CB) may undergo different structural changes during perinatal development, aging, or in response to environmental stimuli. In the previous literature, morphometric approaches to evaluate these changes have considered quantitative first order parameters, such as volumes or densities, while changes in spatial disposition and/or complexity of structural components have not yet been considered. In the present study, different strategies for addressing morphological complexity of CB, apart from the overall amount of each tissue component, were evaluated and compared. In particular, we considered the spatial distribution of connective tissue in the carotid bodies of young control subjects, young opiate-related deaths and aged subjects, through analysis of dispersion (Morisita's index), gray level co-occurrence matrix (entropy, angular second moment, variance, correlation), and fractal analysis (fractal dimension, lacunarity). Opiate-related deaths and aged subjects showed a comparable increase in connective tissue with respect to young controls. However, the Morisita's index (p < 0.05), angular second moment (p < 0.05), fractal dimension (p < 0.01), and lacunarity (p < 0.01) permitted to identify significant differences in the disposition of the connective tissue between these two series. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was also calculated to evaluate the efficiency of each parameter. The fractal dimension and lacunarity, with areas under the ROC curve of 0.9651 (excellent accuracy) and 0.8835 (good accuracy), respectively, showed the highest discriminatory power. They evidenced higher level of structural complexity in the carotid bodies of opiate-related deaths than old controls, due to more complex branching of intralobular connective tissue. Further analyses will have to consider the suitability of these approaches to address other morphological features of the CB, such as different cell populations, vascularization, and innervation. PMID:25414672

  8. Mineralization/Anti-Mineralization Networks in the Skin and Vascular Connective Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiaoli; Uitto, Jouni

    2014-01-01

    Ectopic mineralization has been linked to several common clinical conditions with considerable morbidity and mortality. The mineralization processes, both metastatic and dystrophic, affect the skin and vascular connective tissues. There are several contributing metabolic and environmental factors that make uncovering of the precise pathomechanisms of these acquired disorders exceedingly difficult. Several relatively rare heritable disorders share phenotypic manifestations similar to those in common conditions, and, consequently, they serve as genetically controlled model systems to study the details of the mineralization process in peripheral tissues. This overview will highlight diseases with mineral deposition in the skin and vascular connective tissues, as exemplified by familial tumoral calcinosis, pseudoxanthoma elasticum, generalized arterial calcification of infancy, and arterial calcification due to CD73 deficiency. These diseases, and their corresponding mouse models, provide insight into the pathomechanisms of soft tissue mineralization and point to the existence of intricate mineralization/anti-mineralization networks in these tissues. This information is critical for understanding the pathomechanistic details of different mineralization disorders, and it has provided the perspective to develop pharmacological approaches to counteract the consequences of ectopic mineralization. PMID:23665350

  9. Mineralization/anti-mineralization networks in the skin and vascular connective tissues.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiaoli; Uitto, Jouni

    2013-07-01

    Ectopic mineralization has been linked to several common clinical conditions with considerable morbidity and mortality. The mineralization processes, both metastatic and dystrophic, affect the skin and vascular connective tissues. There are several contributing metabolic and environmental factors that make uncovering of the precise pathomechanisms of these acquired disorders exceedingly difficult. Several relatively rare heritable disorders share phenotypic manifestations similar to those in common conditions, and, consequently, they serve as genetically controlled model systems to study the details of the mineralization process in peripheral tissues. This overview will highlight diseases with mineral deposition in the skin and vascular connective tissues, as exemplified by familial tumoral calcinosis, pseudoxanthoma elasticum, generalized arterial calcification of infancy, and arterial calcification due to CD73 deficiency. These diseases, and their corresponding mouse models, provide insight into the pathomechanisms of soft tissue mineralization and point to the existence of intricate mineralization/anti-mineralization networks in these tissues. This information is critical for understanding the pathomechanistic details of different mineralization disorders, and it has provided the perspective to develop pharmacological approaches to counteract the consequences of ectopic mineralization. PMID:23665350

  10. Gingival Cyst of the Adult as Early Sequela of Connective Tissue Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Gil Escalante, Mariana; Tatakis, Dimitris N.

    2015-01-01

    The subepithelial connective tissue graft (SCTG) is a highly predictable procedure with low complication rate. The reported early complications consist of typical postsurgical sequelae, such as pain and swelling. This case report describes the development and management of a gingival cyst following SCTG to obtain root coverage. Three weeks after SCTG procedure, a slightly raised, indurated, ~5?mm diameter asymptomatic lesion was evident. Excisional biopsy was performed and the histopathological evaluation confirmed the gingival cyst diagnosis. At the 1-year follow-up, the site had complete root coverage and normal tissue appearance and the patient remained asymptomatic. PMID:26236510

  11. Leon and Engman The Contribution of Autoimmunity to Chagas Heart

    E-print Network

    Engman, David M.

    proposed hypothesis is that Chagas disease is an autoimmune disease (reviewed in Eisen and Kahn, 1991 that Chagas disease is an autoimmune disease, tissue inflammation or cellular damage must be shownLeon and Engman The Contribution of Autoimmunity to Chagas Heart Disease J. S. Leon and D. M

  12. Celiac disease as an autoimmune condition

    PubMed Central

    Sur, Genel; Lupan, Iulia; Tilinca, Mariana; Deleanu, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases have become a major medical problem of recent years. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease model. The aim of our study was to follow the changes in the clinical autoimmunity picture of the celiac disease from recent years. The study of autoimmunity in celiac disease has focused on associated diseases with the aforementioned disease: type 1 diabetes mellitus, thyroid autoimmunity disease, Graves’ disease, Hashimoto's disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, spondyloarthritis, hyperprolactinemia, Turner syndrome, Addison's disease, sensory neuronopathies. Immune reactivity to tissue transglutaminase targeted autoantibodies and other autoantigens, including transglutaminase 3, actin, ganglioside, collagen, calreticulin or zonulin which have been reported in the celiac disease. New research directions given by celiac disease autoimmunity, interleukin 1, interleukin 2, protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22, CD4+CD25+ T lymphocytes, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4, infection with Necator americanus and definitive identification of pathogenic T cell epitopes, seem to provide a solution in celiac disease treatment. PMID:26155154

  13. An ultrastructural study of connective tissue in mollusc integument: I. Bivalvia.

    PubMed

    Bairati, A; Comazzi, M; Gioria, M

    2000-10-01

    The ultrastructure of the subepidermal connective tissue (SEC) in different areas of the integument of the bivalves Callista chione, Pecten jacobaeus, Mytilus galloprovincialis and Ostrea edulis was studied by transmission electron microscopy. The main organisation of the SEC was broadly similar in all species: the SEC was connected to the epidermis by a basement membrane and merged directly with the deeper connective tissue surrounding muscles. The SEC was not differentiated into layers like the papillary and reticular dermis of mammals, however, the architecture, thickness and shape of the basement membrane varied from species to species, as well as within species (in the foot, central or marginal zones of the mantle). The ultrastructure of the lamina densa was broadly similar to that in mammals: although basotubules and double pegs were absent, proteoglycans and rod-like units homologous to 'double tracks' were always abundant. A zone similar to the lamina lucida was irregularly present and was shot thorough with small protrusions of the lamina densa that connected with the epithelial hemidesmosomes or focal adhesions. Nevertheless zones were observed where the lamina densa fuse directly to the epithelial plasmamembrane. This variability of connection may be related to the various types of epidermal cell. A lamina fibroreticularis was not recognized since anchoring fibrils and microfibrils were not present; lamina densa protrusions into the extracellular matrix (ECM) of SEC characterize the connection between basement membrane and SEC. Collagen fibrils were small and of constant diameter and were never organised into fibres. Anchoring devices - similar to the anchoring plaques of mammalian dermis - were abundant and scattered between SEC collagen fibrils. The orange-pink pigmentation of C. chione seems due to electron-dense granules embedded within the connective ECM. PMID:11201282

  14. Scleroderma renal crisis in a case of mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Vij, Mukul; Agrawal, Vinita; Jain, Manoj

    2014-07-01

    Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is an overlap syndrome first defined in 1972 by Sharp et al. In this original study, the portrait emerged of a connective tissue disorder sharing features of systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis (scleroderma) and polymyositis. Scleroderma renal crisis (SRC) is an extremely infrequent but serious complication that can occur in MCTD. The histologic picture of SRC is that of a thrombotic micro-angiopathic process. Renal biopsy plays an important role in confirming the clinical diagnosis, excluding overlapping/superimposed diseases that might lead to acute renal failure in MCTD patients, helping to predict the clinical outcome and optimizing patient management. We herewith report a rare case of SRC in a patient with MCTD and review the relevant literature. PMID:24969199

  15. Population Pharmacokinetic Approach to the Use of Low Dose Cyclosporine in Patients with Connective Tissue Diseases.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Yasuhiro; Iwanaga, Nozomi; Mizoguchi, Akiko; Sonemoto, Emi; Hiraki, Yoichi; Ota, Yukio; Kasai, Hidefumi; Yukawa, Eiji; Ueki, Yukitaka; To, Hideto

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the population pharmacokinetics and dose personalization of cyclosporine in 36 patients with connective tissue diseases. A one-compartment open model with absorption was adopted as a pharmacokinetic model, and a nonlinear mixed effects model was used to analyze the population pharmacokinetic models. In the final model, age (AGE) and total body weight (TBW) were influential covariates on clearance (CL/F), which was expressed as CL/F (L/h)=17.8×(AGE/60)(-0.269)×(TBW/46.9)(0.408), in addition to the volume of distribution (Vd/F), (L)=98.0 and absorption rate constant (Ka) (h(-1))=0.67 (fixed). The results of the present study provide novel insights into factors involved in determining the most suitable dose and dosing strategy for individual patients with connective tissue disease. PMID:26328482

  16. Expression profile of peripheral tissue antigen genes in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) is dependent on mRNA levels of autoimmune regulator (Aire).

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Ernna H; Macedo, Claudia; Donate, Paula B; Almeida, Renata S; Pezzi, Nicole; Nguyen, Catherine; Rossi, Marcos A; Sakamoto-Hojo, Elza T; Donadi, Eduardo A; Passos, Geraldo A

    2013-01-01

    In the thymus of non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, the expression of the autoimmune regulator (Aire) gene varies with age, and its down-regulation in young mice precedes the later emergence of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D). In addition, the insulin (Ins2) peripheral tissue antigen (PTA) gene, which is Aire-dependent, is also deregulated in these mice. Based in these findings, we hypothesized that the imbalance in PTA gene expression in the thymus can be associated with slight variations in Aire transcript levels. To test this, we used siRNA to knockdown Aire by in vivo electro-transfection of the thymus of BALB/c mice. The efficiency of the electro-transfection was monitored by assessing the presence of irrelevant Cy3-labeled siRNA in the thymic stroma. Importantly, Aire-siRNA reached medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) down-regulating Aire. As expected, the in vivo Aire knockdown was partial and transient; the maximum 59% inhibition occurred in 48 h. The Aire knockdown was sufficient to down-regulate PTA genes; however, surprisingly, several others, including Ins2, were up-regulated. The modulation of these genes after in vivo Aire knockdown was comparable to that observed in NOD mice before the emergence of T1D. The in vitro transfections of 3.10 mTEC cells with Aire siRNA resulted in samples featuring partial (69%) and complete (100%) Aire knockdown. In these Aire siRNA-transfected 3.10 mTECs, the expression of PTA genes, including Ins2, was down-regulated. This suggests that the expression profile of PTA genes in mTECs is affected by fine changes in the transcription level of Aire. PMID:22564670

  17. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    MedlinePLUS

    Liver disease test panel - autoimmune ... Autoimmune disorders are a possible cause of liver disease. The most common of these diseases are autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis. This group of tests helps your health care provider ...

  18. Understanding Autoimmune Diseases

    MedlinePLUS

    ... This is called an autoimmune disease. (“Autoimmune” means immunity against the self.) The Immune System Autoimmune Diseases ... disease. Unfortunately, because these drugs also suppress normal immunity, they leave the body at risk for infection. ...

  19. A Comparative Study of Root Coverage Using Dynamatrix Plus versus Connective Tissue Graft 

    E-print Network

    Goodwin, Michael

    2015-05-12

    found that healing following 3 gingivectomy in monkeys resulted in connective tissue formation 1 to 2 days post- operatively but required a full 3 to 5 weeks before reaching maturity. 9 Reparative periodontal procedures include open flap... debridement and the modified Widman flap. Sites treated by reparative procedures healed in a manner that does not fully restore the architecture or the function of the periodontium. 10 Becker et al studied the repair of three-wall intrabony defects...

  20. Heterogeneity of ribosomal autoantibodies from human, murine and canine connective tissue diseases.

    PubMed

    Absi, M; La Vergne, J P; Marzouki, A; Giraud, F; Rigal, D; Reboud, A M; Reboud, J P; Monier, J C

    1989-11-01

    Antiribosomal auto-antibodies (anti-Rib.Ab) have been studied in connective tissue diseases (human, dog and mouse) by immunoblotting after one-dimensional (1D) or two-dimensional (2D) gel electrophoresis of rat ribosomes. Anti-Rib.Ab could be found in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other connective tissue diseases (progressive systemic sclerosis, PSS; Sjögren syndrome, SjS; mixed connective tissue disease, MCTD; and dermatomyositis, DM with the frequencies 41.7%, 54.6% and 33%, respectively. Immunoblotting after 1D gel electrophoresis showed the great heterogeneity of ribosomal proteins recognized by the anti-Rib.Ab. In the SLE, however, the most frequent antibodies stained bands of the 40S subunit: 30 kDa (34% of positive sera), 19.5 kDa (24.5%) and 43 kDa (17%). In RA, the 25-kDa band of the 60S subunit was the most common (54% of positive sera). In the other human connective tissue diseases, there was no particular predominance. In the MRL/1, anti-Rib.Ab were very frequent (92.6%). The 43-kDa band of the 40S subunit was found in 100% of positive sera. Seventeen out of nineteen dogs with SLE gave positive results on immunoblot, and all of them stained the 43-kDa band of the 40S subunit. 2D gel electrophoresis gave identification of Po, L7, L5, Sb, S19, S13 and L2 proteins in SLE, S3 and SjS, L35a and L37a in RA, and L7, S6 and/or L7a in MRL/1. PMID:2606513

  1. Duodenal hemorrhage and dermal vasculitis associated with mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Hirose, W; Nakane, H; Misumi, J; Sugi, T; Hara, M; Kawagoe, M; Nakamura, H

    1993-01-01

    We describe a 23-year-old woman with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) who developed duodenal bleeding responsive to treatment with corticosteroid and recurrent skin eruptions due to leukocytoclastic vasculitis. The endoscopic findings revealed patchy, reddened, edematous, friable mucosa with scattered small ulcers and oozing of blood in the second portion of the duodenum. Endoscopic pictures from the onset to healing are presented. This appears to be the first recorded occurrence of such findings in MCTD. PMID:8441150

  2. Autoimmune encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ming; Hacohen, Yael; Vincent, Angela

    2015-06-01

    Antibody-mediated diseases of the central nervous system are a relatively new and challenging field in autoimmune neurologic disease and of major clinical importance in children and adults. The antibodies bind to cell-surface epitopes on neuronal or glial proteins, and the patients demonstrate either focal or more generalized clinical signs depending on the extent of brain regions targeted by the antibodies. The presence of seizures, movement disorders, autonomic dysfunction and sleep disorders, alongside neuroimaging and electrophysiological features may indicate a specific antibody-mediated disorder. However, phenotypic variation may be observed in children with the same antibody. Regardless, many patients benefit from immunotherapy with substantial improvement. PMID:26022169

  3. Progressive Overgrowth of the Cerebriform Connective Tissue Nevus in Patients with Proteus Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Beachkofsky, Thomas M.; Sapp, Julie C.; Biesecker, Leslie G.; Darling, Thomas N.

    2011-01-01

    Background Proteus syndrome is a rare overgrowth disorder that almost always affects the skin. Objective Our purpose was to evaluate progression of skin lesions in patients with Proteus syndrome. Methods Skin findings were documented in 36 patients with Proteus syndrome. Progression of skin lesions in 16 of these patients was assessed by comparing photographs obtained on repeat visits for an average total duration of 53 months. Results The skin lesion most characteristic of Proteus syndrome, the cerebriform connective tissue nevus showed progression in 13 children but not in 3 adults. The cerebriform connective tissue nevus progressed by expansion into previously uninvolved skin, increased thickness, and development of new lesions. Lipomas increased in size and/or number in 8/10 children with lipomas. In contrast, epidermal nevi and vascular malformations generally did not spread or increase in number. Limitations Only 3 adults with Proteus syndrome were evaluated longitudinally. Conclusion The cerebriform connective tissue nevus in Proteus syndrome grows throughout childhood but tends to remain stable in adulthood. PMID:20709429

  4. Autoimmune thyrotoxicosis: diagnostic challenges.

    PubMed

    Ponto, Katharina A; Kahaly, George J

    2012-09-01

    Autoimmune thyrotoxicosis or Graves' disease (GD) is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism in the United States (full text available online: http://education.amjmed.com/pp1/249). GD occurs more often in women (ratio 5:1) and has a population prevalence of 1-2%. A genetic determinant to the susceptibility to GD is suspected because of familial clustering of the disease, a high sibling recurrence risk, and the familial occurrence of thyroid autoantibodies. GD is a systemic autoimmune thyroid disorder characterized by the infiltration of immune effector cells and thyroid-antigen-specific T cells into the thyroid and thyroid stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) expressing tissues, i.e. orbit, skin, with the production of autoantibodies to well-defined thyroidal antigens. Stimulatory autoantibodies in GD activate the TSHR leading to thyroid hyperplasia and unregulated thyroid hormone production and secretion. Diagnosis of GD is straightforward in a patient with a diffusely enlarged, heterogeneous, hypervascular (increased Doppler flow on neck ultrasound) thyroid gland, associated orbitopathy, biochemically confirmed thyrotoxicosis, positive TSHR autoantibodies, and often a family history of autoimmune disorders. PMID:22938935

  5. Mixed connective tissue disease presenting with progressive scleroderma symptoms in a 10-year-old girl

    PubMed Central

    Latu?kiewicz-Potemska, Joanna; Biernacka-Zieli?ska, Ma?gorzata; Sta?czyk, Jerzy; Smolewska, El?bieta

    2013-01-01

    Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is a systemic inflammatory disease affecting connective tissue with the underlying autoimmunological mechanism. The core of MCTD is an appearance of symptoms of several other inflammatory diseases of connective tissue – systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic scleroderma, poly- or dermatomyositis, rheumatoid arthritis at the same time, accompanied by a high level of anti-ribonucleoprotein antibodies (anti-U1RNP). The disease was described more than 40 years ago by Sharp et al. During recent years, many efforts to better understand clinical and serological features of MCTD have been made. Diagnosis of MCTD can be difficult. Obligatory international diagnostic criteria are required to be fulfilled. Several versions of such criteria have been proposed, but the most widely used one was described by Kasukawa. There is no consensus about treatment – a choice of drugs depends on symptoms. We present a case of a 10-year-old girl with sclerodactyly and trophic damages of fingers accompanied by symptoms of Raynaud's phenomenon. After an almost 2-year course of the disease, a diagnosis of MCTD has been established. PMID:24353496

  6. Connective tissue graft vs. emdogain: A new approach to compare the outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Sayar, Ferena; Akhundi, Nasrin; Gholami, Sanaz

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of this clinical trial study was to clinically evaluate the use of enamel matrix protein derivative combined with the coronally positioned flap to treat gingival recession compared to the subepithelial connective tissue graft by a new method to obtain denuded root surface area. Materials and Methods: Thirteen patients, each with two or more similar bilateral Miller class I or II gingival recession (40 recessions) were randomly assigned to the test (enamel matrix protein derivative + coronally positioned flap) or control group (subepithelial connective tissue graft). Recession depth, width, probing depth, keratinized gingival, and plaque index were recorded at baseline and at one, three, and six months after treatment. A stent was used to measure the denuded root surface area at each examination session. Results were analyzed using Kolmogorov-Smirnov, Wilcoxon, Friedman, paired-sample t test. Results: The average percentages of root coverage for control and test groups were 63.3% and 55%, respectively. Both groups showed significant keratinized gingival increase (P < 0.05). Recession depth decreased significantly in both groups. Root surface area was improved significantly from baseline with no significant difference between the two study groups (P > 0.05). The results of Friedman test were significant for clinical indices (P < 0.05), except for probing depth in control group (P = 0.166). Conclusion: Enamel matrix protein derivative showed the same results as subepithelial connective tissue graft with relatively easy procedure to perform and low patient morbidity. PMID:23878562

  7. From detecting astrocyte connectivity to uncovering drug effects in living tissues

    E-print Network

    Pires, Marcelo; Vaz, Sandra; Sebastião, Ana; Lind, Pedro G

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a simple procedure of multivariate signal analysis to uncover the connectivity structure among cells composing a living tissue and describe how to apply it for extracting insight on the effect of drugs in the tissue. The procedure is based in the covariance matrix of time resolved activity signals. By determining the time-lag that maximizes covariance one derives the weight of the corresponding connection between cells. Introducing simple constraints, it is possible to conclude if pairs of cells are connected or not and in which direction. After testing the method against synthetic data we apply it to study propagation of $Ca^{2+}$ waves in astrocytes, with the aim of uncovering the cell connectivity structure. Our method shows to be particularly suited for this type of networking signal propagation where signals are pulse-like and have short time-delays, and is shown to be superior to standard methods, namely a multivariate Granger algorithm. Finally, based the statistical analysis of the connec...

  8. Connective tissue reaction of rats to a new zinc-oxide-eugenol endodontic sealer.

    PubMed

    Trichês, Karen Melina; Júnior, Jacy Simi; Calixto, João Batista; Machado, Ricardo; Rosa, Tiago Pereira; Silva, Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal; Vansan, Luiz Pascoal

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the biocompatibility in rat subcutaneous connective tissue of a new zinc oxide endodontic sealer (Endomethasone N) compared to those provided by Endofill and Sealer 26. Polyethylene tubes containing the test materials were implanted into dorsal subcutaneous connective tissue of Wistar albino rats. After 7 and 42 days, the implants with the surrounding tissue were collected, fixed, and processed for histologic evaluation. Sections were evaluated for the presence of inflammatory cells (poly or monomorfonuclear), blood vessels, necrosis area, and thickness of fibrous capsule. Comparisons between groups and time-periods were performed with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U non-parametric tests for 5% significance level. No differences in the biocompatibility patterns among the materials for the 2 experimental periods were observed. Independently of the sealer, the tissue behavior showed a tendency to decrease the irritation effect over time. It can be concluded that all sealers are irritant, but its toxicity decreased with time. Endomethásone N showed biocompatible characteristics comparable with those provided by Endofill and Sealer 26. PMID:24123537

  9. Repair of dense connective tissues via biomaterial-mediated matrix reprogramming of the wound interface.

    PubMed

    Qu, Feini; Pintauro, Michael P; Haughan, Joanne E; Henning, Elizabeth A; Esterhai, John L; Schaer, Thomas P; Mauck, Robert L; Fisher, Matthew B

    2015-01-01

    Repair of dense connective tissues in adults is limited by their intrinsic hypocellularity and is exacerbated by a dense extracellular matrix (ECM) that impedes cellular migration to and local proliferation at the wound site. Conversely, healing in fetal tissues occurs due in part to an environment conducive to cell mobility and division. Here, we investigated whether the application of a degradative enzyme, collagenase, could reprogram the adult wound margin to a more fetal-like state, and thus abrogate the biophysical impediments that hinder migration and proliferation. We tested this concept using the knee meniscus, a commonly injured structure for which few regenerative approaches exist. To focus delivery and degradation to the wound interface, we developed a system in which collagenase was stored inside poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) electrospun nanofibers and released upon hydration. Through a series of in vitro and in vivo studies, our findings show that partial digestion of the wound interface improves repair by creating a more compliant and porous microenvironment that expedites cell migration to and/or proliferation at the wound margin. This innovative approach of targeted manipulation of the wound interface, focused on removing the naturally occurring barriers to adult tissue repair, may find widespread application in the treatment of injuries to a variety of dense connective tissues. PMID:25477175

  10. Fourier Transform Infrared Imaging and Infrared Fiber Optic Probe Spectroscopy Identify Collagen Type in Connective Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Hanifi, Arash; McCarthy, Helen; Roberts, Sally; Pleshko, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Hyaline cartilage and mechanically inferior fibrocartilage consisting of mixed collagen types are frequently found together in repairing articular cartilage. The present study seeks to develop methodology to identify collagen type and other tissue components using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectral evaluation of matrix composition in combination with multivariate analyses. FTIR spectra of the primary molecular components of repair cartilage, types I and II collagen, and aggrecan, were used to develop multivariate spectral models for discrimination of the matrix components of the tissues of interest. Infrared imaging data were collected from bovine bone, tendon, normal cartilage, meniscus and human repair cartilage tissues, and composition predicted using partial least squares analyses. Histology and immunohistochemistry results were used as standards for validation. Infrared fiber optic probe spectral data were also obtained from meniscus (a tissue with mixed collagen types) to evaluate the potential of this method for identification of collagen type in a minimally-invasive clinical application. Concentration profiles of the tissue components obtained from multivariate analysis were in excellent agreement with histology and immunohistochemistry results. Bone and tendon showed a uniform distribution of predominantly type I collagen through the tissue. Normal cartilage showed a distribution of type II collagen and proteoglycan similar to the known composition, while in repair cartilage, the spectral distribution of both types I and II collagen were similar to that observed via immunohistochemistry. Using the probe, the outer and inner regions of the meniscus were shown to be primarily composed of type I and II collagen, respectively, in accordance with immunohistochemistry data. In summary, multivariate analysis of infrared spectra can indeed be used to differentiate collagen type I and type II, even in the presence of proteoglycan, in connective tissues, using both imaging and fiber optic methodology. This has great potential for clinical in situ applications for monitoring tissue repair. PMID:23717662

  11. Mercury species in lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues after exposure to methyl mercury: Correlation with autoimmune parameters during and after treatment in susceptible mice

    SciTech Connect

    Havarinasab, Said; Bjoern, Erik; Nielsen, Jesper B.; Hultman, Per . E-mail: perhu@imk.liu.se

    2007-05-15

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is present in the environment as a result of the global cycling of mercury, although anthropogenic sources may dramatically increase the availability in confined geographical areas. Accumulation of MeHg in the aquatic food chain is the dominating way of exposure in mammals, which accumulate MeHg in all organs, including Brain. Demethylation has been described in the organs, especially in phagocytic cells, but mainly in the flora of the intestinal tract. While most of the inorganic mercury (Hg{sup 2+}) formed in the intestine is excreted, a fraction is reabsorbed which together with the local demethylation increases the organ Hg{sup 2+} concentration. MeHg is a well-known immunosuppressive agent, while Hg{sup 2+} is associated with immunostimulation and autoimmunity especially in genetically susceptible rodents, creating a syndrome, i.e. mercury-induced autoimmunity (HgIA). This study aimed at exploring the effect of MeHg with regard to HgIA, and especially the immunological events after stopping treatment, correlated with the presence of MeHg and Hg{sup 2+} in the organs. Treatment of A.SW mice for 30 days with 4.2 mg MeHg/L drinking water (corresponding to approximately 420 {mu}g Hg/kg body weight/day) caused all the HgIA features observed after primary treatment with inorganic Hg, except systemic immune complex deposits. The total Hg concentration was 5-fold higher in the kidneys as compared with lymph nodes, but the fraction of Hg{sup 2+} was similar (17-20%). After stopping treatment, the renal and lymph node MeHg concentration declined according to first order kinetics during the initial 4-6 weeks, but then slower. A similar decline in the organ Hg{sup 2+} concentration occurred during the initial 2 weeks after stopping treatment but then ceased, causing the Hg{sup 2+} concentration to exceed that of MeHg in the lymph nodes and kidneys after 3 and 8 weeks, respectively. The selective increase in lymph node Hg{sup 2+} fraction is likely to be due to demethylation of MeHg in the macrophage-rich lymphoid tissue. The major autoantibody in HgIA, anti-fibrillarin antibodies, tended to increase during the initial 6 weeks after stopping treatment, while all other HgIA features including antichromatin antibodies declined to control levels after 2-4 weeks. This indicates differences in either dose requirement or induction mechanisms for the different HgIA parameters. The selective accumulation of Hg{sup 2+} in lymph nodes following MeHg treatment should be taken into account when the effect of MeHg on the immune system is evaluated.

  12. Skeletal framework of mammalian heart muscle. Arrangement of inter- and pericellular connective tissue structures.

    PubMed

    Robinson, T F; Cohen-Gould, L; Factor, S M

    1983-10-01

    We have studied the connective tissue of mammalian heart muscle in order to obtain an integrated description of extracellular structures and their dispositions relative to cardiac myocytes. Light microscopy and several types of electron microscopy have been employed in these investigations. The epimysium, the sheath of connective tissue that surrounds the muscle, contains relatively large fibers of collagen and elastin. In papillary muscles of rat, the large collagen fibers of the epimysium form a weave pattern at slack length (sarcomere lengths 1.8 to 2.0 micron) but are well aligned in states of stretch along the long axis of the muscle (sarcomere length 2.3 to 2.5 micron). We propose that the epimysial collagen network protects the sarcomeres from being stretched beyond lengths favorable to maximal force production. The endomysium is defined as the connective tissue that surrounds and interconnects myocytes; it consists of intercellular struts (bundles of collagen fibrils, often attached near Z-band level), a weave of bundles of collagen fibrils that envelopes myocytes, and a collagen fibril-microthread-granule lattice that bridges cells and fills the extracellular matrix. In contracted muscles festoons of sarcolemma are attached to Z-bands, thus forming regions for transmission of force across the sarcolemma. Perimysial bundles of collagen connect epimysium to endomysium and surround groups of myocytes. Collagen fibers often have a twisted configuration, probably for enhanced tensile strength. Superimposed on the large extracellular structures is the polyanion-rich lattice comprised of unit collagen fibrils, microthreads, and granules. Amorphous ground substance forms a matrix in which the fibrils of collagen fibers are embedded; it appears continuous with the cell coat in regions of fiber attachment. Elastic fibers interconnect cells and helically wind around myocytes. Circumferential forces from elastin stretched about shortened, thickened myocytes in systole should promote elongation in tandem with intramyocyte forces of elongation. PMID:6684712

  13. Differences in infrared spectroscopic data of connective tissues in transflectance and transmittance modes.

    PubMed

    Hanifi, Arash; McGoverin, Cushla; Ou, Ya-Ting; Safadi, Fayez; Spencer, Richard G; Pleshko, Nancy

    2013-05-24

    Fourier transform infrared imaging spectroscopy (FT-IRIS) has been used extensively to characterize the composition and orientation of macromolecules in thin tissue sections. Earlier and current studies of normal and polarized FT-IRIS data have primarily used tissues sectioned onto infrared transmissive substrates, such as salt windows. Recently, the use of low-emissivity ("low-e") substrates has become of great interest because of their low cost and favorable infrared optical properties. However, data are collected in transflectance mode when using low-e slides and in transmittance mode using salt windows. In the current study we investigated the comparability of these two modes for assessment of the composition of connective tissues. FT-IRIS data were obtained in transflectance and transmittance modes from serial sections of cartilage, bone and tendon, and from a standard polymer, polymethylmethacrylate. Both non-polarized and polarized FTIR data differed in absorbance, and in some cases peak position, between transflectance and transmittance modes. However, the FT-IRIS analysis of the collagen fibril orientation in cartilage resulted in the expected zonal arrangement of fibrils in both transmittance and transflectance. We conclude that numerical comparison of FT-IRIS-derived parameters of tissue composition should account for substrate type and data collection mode, while analysis of overall tissue architecture may be more invariant between modes. PMID:23663670

  14. Differences in infrared spectroscopic data of connective tissues in transflectance and transmittance modes

    PubMed Central

    Hanifi, Arash; McGoverin, Cushla; Ou, Ya-Ting; Safadi, Fayez; Spencer, Richard; Pleshko, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared imaging spectroscopy (FT-IRIS) has been used extensively to characterize the composition and orientation of macromolecules in thin tissue sections. Earlier and current studies of normal and polarized FT-IRIS data have primarily used tissues sectioned onto infrared transmissive substrates, such as salt windows. Recently, the use of low-emissivity (“low-e”) substrates has become of great interest because of their low cost and favourable infrared optical properties. However, data is collected in transflectance mode when using low-e slides and in transmittance mode using salt windows. In the current study we investigated the comparability of these two modes for assessment of the composition of connective tissues. FT-IRIS data were obtained in transflectance and transmittance modes from serial sections of cartilage, bone and tendon, and from a standard polymer, polymethylmethacrylate. Both non-polarized and polarized FTIR data differed in absorbance, and in some cases peak position, between transflectance and transmittance modes. However, the FT-IRIS analysis of the collagen fibril orientation in cartilage resulted in the expected zonal arrangement of fibrils in both transmittance and transflectance. We conclude that numerical comparison of FT-IRIS-derived parameters of tissue composition should account for substrate type and data collection mode, while analysis of overall tissue architecture may be more invariant between modes. PMID:23663670

  15. Molecular Regulation of CCN2 in the Intervertebral Disc: Lessons Learned from Other Connective Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Cassie M.; Shapiro, Irving M.; Risbud, Makarand V.

    2013-01-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CCN2/CTGF) plays an important role in extracellular matrix synthesis, especially in skeletal tissues such as cartilage, bone, and the intervertebral disc. As a result there is a growing interest in examining the function and regulation of this important molecule in the disc. This review discusses the regulation of CCN2 by TGF-? and hypoxia, two critical determinants that characterize the disc microenvironment, and discusses known functions of CCN2 in the disc. The almost ubiquitous regulation of CCN2 by TGF-?, including that seen in the disc, emphasizes the importance of the TGF-?-CCN2 relationship, especially in terms of extracellular matrix synthesis. Likewise, the unique cross-talk between CCN2 and HIF-1 in the disc highlights the tissue and niche specific mode of regulation. Taken together the current literature supports an anabolic role for CCN2 in the disc and its involvement in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis during both health and disease. Further studies of CCN2 in this tissue may reveal valuable targets for the biological therapy of disc degeneration. PMID:23567513

  16. Tissue types (image)

    MedlinePLUS

    There are 4 basic types of tissue: connective tissue, epithelial tissue, muscle tissue, and nervous tissue. Connective tissue supports other tissues and binds them together (bone, blood, and lymph tissues). Epithelial tissue ...

  17. Neuroinflammatory Mechanisms of Connective Tissue Fibrosis: Targeting Neurogenic and Mast Cell Contributions

    PubMed Central

    Monument, Michael J.; Hart, David A.; Salo, Paul T.; Befus, A. Dean; Hildebrand, Kevin A.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: The pathogenesis of fibrogenic wound and connective tissue healing is complex and incompletely understood. Common observations across a vast array of human and animal models of fibroproliferative conditions suggest neuroinflammatory mechanisms are important upstream fibrogenic events. Recent Advances: As detailed in this review, mast cell hyperplasia is a common observation in fibrotic tissue. Recent investigations in human and preclinical models of hypertrophic wound healing and post-traumatic joint fibrosis provides evidence that fibrogenesis is governed by a maladaptive neuropeptide-mast cell-myofibroblast signaling pathway. Critical Issues: The blockade and manipulation of these factors is providing promising evidence that if timed correctly, the fibrogenic process can be appropriately regulated. Clinically, abnormal fibrogenic healing responses are not ubiquitous to all patients and the identification of those at-risk remains an area of priority. Future Directions: Ultimately, an integrated appreciation of the common pathobiology shared by many fibrogenic connective tissue conditions may provide a scientific framework to facilitate the development of novel antifibrotic prevention and treatment strategies. PMID:25785237

  18. State-of-the-Art Imaging of the Lung for Connective Tissue Disease (CTD).

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yoshiharu; Koyama, Hisanobu; Yoshikawa, Takeshi; Seki, Shinichiro

    2015-12-01

    Involvement of the respiratory system is common in connective tissue diseases (CTDs), and the resultant lung injury can affect every part of the lung: the pleura, alveoli, interstitium, vasculature, lymphatic tissue, and large and/or small airways. Most of the parenchymal manifestations of CTD are similar to those found in interstitial lung diseases (ILDs), especially idiopathic interstitial pneumonias, and can be classified using the same system. Although there is some overlap, each CTD is associated with a characteristic pattern of pulmonary involvement. For this reason, thin-section CT as well as pulmonary function tests and serum markers are utilized for diagnosis, disease severity assessment, and therapeutic efficacy evaluation of ILD associated with CTD. In addition, newly developed pulmonary magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedures have been recommended as useful alternative imaging options for patients with CTD. This review article will (1) address radiological findings for chest radiography and conventional or thin-section CT currently used for six major types of CTD, rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma (progressive systemic sclerosis), polymyositis/dermatomyositis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren syndrome and mixed connective tissue disease; (2) briefly deal with radiation dose reduction for thin-section CT examination; and (3) discuss clinically applicable or state-of-the-art MR imaging for CTD patients. PMID:26483318

  19. [Laboratory diagnostics of systemic autoimmune diseases. Part 1. Collagenoses].

    PubMed

    Hartung, K; Seelig, H-P

    2006-12-01

    This is the first part of a series of articles on the laboratory diagnostics of rheumatic diseases and will consider the systemic autoimmune diseases lupus erythematosus, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic sclerosis, dermato/polymyositis and mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD, SHARP syndrome). The basis for diagnostics is the presence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA). Initially, these antibodies are detected using a screening test. This must be followed by the identification of the patient's individual autoantibody specificities, which then yields important diagnostic clues. Disease activity may be monitored serologically by following the titers of selected autoantibodies and, in certain patients, by examining complement consumption. PMID:17119898

  20. Seronegative autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Alessandri, Cristiano; Conti, Fabrizio; Conigliaro, Paola; Mancini, Riccardo; Massaro, Laura; Valesini, Guido

    2009-09-01

    A close relationship exists between autoimmunity and autoantibodies; despite this, some patients are persistently negative for disease-specific autoantibodies. These conditions have been defined as seronegative autoimmune diseases. Although the prevalence of seronegative autoimmune diseases is low, they may represent a practical problem because they are often difficult cases. There are also situations in which autoantibodies are positive in healthy subjects. In particular, three different conditions can be described: latent autoimmunity, preclinical autoimmunity, and postclinical autoimmunity. Here, we analyze briefly the meaning of autoantibody negativity in the seronegative autoimmune diseases, focusing in particular on the specificities associated with systemic lupus erythematosus, antiphospholipid syndrome, and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:19758132

  1. [The value of RNase-ANA determinations for the diagnosis of Sharp syndrome (mixed connective tissue disease) (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Rosenthal, M

    1977-01-01

    The presence of antinuclear antibodies with speckled pattern is essential for the diagnosis of the Sharp Syndrome (moxed connective tissue disease=MCTD). It is however not a specific finding seen only in this condition. Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) with speckled pattern can be observed in sera of patients with various rheumatic diseases (rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren Syndrome) and even in healthy persons. Yet, utilizing the differentiation system of the antinuclear antibodies, it seems to be possible to establish the diagnosis of mixed connective tissue disease. The antinuclear antibodies in mixed connective tissue disease show high titres (1:2560--1:20,480), contain IgG and bind complement. The antigen is a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) which is sensitive to ribonuclease treatment. The latter observation allows a differentiation between the ANA in mixed connective tissue disease and the ANA in other conditions, especially in systemic lupus erythematosus and Sjögren Syndrome. PMID:299898

  2. Use of growth factors and adhesive ligands to promote connective tissue progenitor colony formation from fresh marrow

    E-print Network

    Marcantonio, Nicholas A. (Nicholas Alexander)

    2008-01-01

    The current gold standard for bone graft material is autologous bone, which provides mechanical support, possesses factors that promote bone formation, and contains connective tissue progenitors (CTPs), a heterogeneous ...

  3. Irradiation by pulsed Nd:YAG laser induces the production of extracellular matrix molecules by cells of the connective tissues: a tool for tissue repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monici, Monica; Basile, Venere; Cialdai, Francesca; Romano, Giovanni; Fusi, Franco; Conti, Antonio

    2008-04-01

    Many studies demonstrated that mechanical stress is a key factor for tissue homeostasis, while unloading induce loss of mass and impairment of function. Because of their physiological function, muscle, connective tissue, bone and cartilage dynamically interact with mechanical and gravitational stress, modifying their properties through the continuous modification of their composition. Indeed, it is known that mechanical stress increases the production of extracellular matrix (ECM) components by cells, but the mechanotransduction mechanisms and the optimal loading conditions required for an optimal tissue homeostasis are still unknown. Considering the importance of cell activation and ECM production in tissue regeneration, a proper use of mechanical stimulation could be a powerful tool in tissue repair and tissue engineering. Studies exploring advanced modalities for supplying mechanical stimuli are needed to increase our knowledge on mechanobiology and to develop effective clinical applications. Here we describe the effect of photomechanical stress, supplied by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser on ECM production by cells of connective tissues. Cell morphology, production of ECM molecules (collagens, fibronectin, mucopolysaccharides), cell adhesion and cell energy metabolism have been studied by using immunofluorescence and autofluorescence microscopy. The results show that photomechanical stress induces cytoskeleton remodelling, redistribution of membrane integrins, increase in production of ECM molecules. These results could be of consequence for developing clinical protocols for the treatment of connective tissue dideases by pulsed Nd:YAG laser.

  4. Familial occurrence and heritable connective tissue disorders in cervical artery dissection

    PubMed Central

    Goeggel Simonetti, Barbara; Schilling, Sabrina; Martin, Juan José; Kloss, Manja; Sarikaya, Hakan; Hausser, Ingrid; Engelter, Stefan; Metso, Tiina M.; Pezzini, Alessandro; Thijs, Vincent; Touzé, Emmanuel; Paolucci, Stefano; Costa, Paolo; Sessa, Maria; Samson, Yves; Béjot, Yannick; Altintas, Ayse; Metso, Antti J.; Hervé, Dominique; Lichy, Christoph; Jung, Simon; Fischer, Urs; Lamy, Chantal; Grau, Armin; Chabriat, Hugues; Caso, Valeria; Lyrer, Philippe A.; Stapf, Christian; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Brandt, Tobias; Tournier-Lasserve, Elisabeth; Germain, Dominique P.; Frank, Michael; Baumgartner, Ralf W.; Grond-Ginsbach, Caspar; Bousser, Marie-Germaine; Leys, Didier; Dallongeville, Jean; Bersano, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In a large series of patients with cervical artery dissection (CeAD), a major cause of ischemic stroke in young and middle-aged adults, we aimed to examine frequencies and correlates of family history of CeAD and of inherited connective tissue disorders. Methods: We combined data from 2 large international multicenter cohorts of consecutive patients with CeAD in 23 neurologic departments participating in the CADISP-plus consortium, following a standardized protocol. Frequency of reported family history of CeAD and of inherited connective tissue disorders was assessed. Putative risk factors, baseline features, and 3-month outcome were compared between groups. Results: Among 1,934 consecutive patients with CeAD, 20 patients (1.0%, 95% confidence interval: 0.6%–1.5%) from 17 families (0.9%, 0.5%–1.3%) had a family history of CeAD. Family history of CeAD was significantly more frequent in patients with carotid location of the dissection and elevated cholesterol levels. Two patients without a family history of CeAD had vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome with a mutation in COL3A1. This diagnosis was suspected in 2 additional patients, but COL3A1 sequencing was negative. Two patients were diagnosed with classic and hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, one patient with Marfan syndrome, and one with osteogenesis imperfecta, based on clinical criteria only. Conclusions: In this largest series of patients with CeAD to date, family history of symptomatic CeAD was rare and inherited connective tissue disorders seemed exceptional. This finding supports the notion that CeAD is a multifactorial disease in the vast majority of cases. PMID:25355833

  5. Connective tissue fibroblast properties are position-dependent during mouse digit tip regeneration.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuanyuan; Wang, Karen; Karapetyan, Adrine; Fernando, Warnakulusuriya Akash; Simkin, Jennifer; Han, Manjong; Rugg, Elizabeth L; Muneoka, Ken

    2013-01-01

    A key factor that contributes to the regenerative ability of regeneration-competent animals such as the salamander is their use of innate positional cues that guide the regeneration process. The limbs of mammals has severe regenerative limitations, however the distal most portion of the terminal phalange is regeneration competent. This regenerative ability of the adult mouse digit is level dependent: amputation through the distal half of the terminal phalanx (P3) leads to successful regeneration, whereas amputation through a more proximal location, e.g. the subterminal phalangeal element (P2), fails to regenerate. Do the connective tissue cells of the mammalian digit play a role similar to that of the salamander limb in controlling the regenerative response? To begin to address this question, we isolated and cultured cells of the connective tissue surrounding the phalangeal bones of regeneration competent (P3) and incompetent (P2) levels. Despite their close proximity and localization, these cells show very distinctive profiles when characterized in vitro and in vivo. In vitro studies comparing their proliferation and position-specific interactions reveal that cells isolated from the P3 and P2 are both capable of organizing and differentiating epithelial progenitors, but with different outcomes. The difference in interactions are further characterized with three-dimension cultures, in which P3 regenerative cells are shown to lack a contractile response that is seen in other fibroblast cultures, including the P2 cultures. In in vivo engraftment studies, the difference between these two cell lines is made more apparent. While both P2 and P3 cells participated in the regeneration of the terminal phalanx, their survival and proliferative indices were distinct, thus suggesting a key difference in their ability to interact within a regeneration permissive environment. These studies are the first to demonstrate distinct positional characteristics of connective tissue cells that are associated with their regenerative capabilities. PMID:23349966

  6. [Connective tissue dysplasia in patients with celiac desease as a problem of violation of adaptation reserve islands of the body].

    PubMed

    Tkachenko, E; Oreshko, L S; Soloveva, E A; Shabanova, A A; Zhuravleva, M S

    2015-01-01

    Clinically significant dysplasia of connective tissue in patients with celiac disease is often responsible for various visceral disorders. Different disturbances of motor and evacuation functions are often determined in this patients (gastroesophageal reflux, duodenogastral reflux, spastic and hyperkinetic dyskinesia). The clinical course of the celiac disease, associated with connective tissue dysplasia, is characterized by asthenovegetative syndrome, reduced tolerance to physical activity, general weakness, fatigue and emotional instability. These data should be considered in choosing a treatment. PMID:25993866

  7. Postextraction Socket Seal Surgery with an Epithelized Connective Tissue Graft Using a Subpapillar Tunneling Procedure.

    PubMed

    Stein, Jamal M; Hammächer, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Ridge preservation in the esthetic area is still a challenging procedure. The aim of the present case series was to introduce a technique for postextraction socket seal surgery using an epithelized connective tissue graft and socket filling with a xenogeneic biomaterial. Using a tunneling approach, the buccal gingiva and interdental papillae are undermined and augmented with the soft tissue graft. This method was applied and evaluated in 16 sites in 13 patients with need for extraction of at least one maxillary anterior tooth. Five months postoperative, the mean reduction of the horizontal width of the alveolar ridge was 0.5 mm, while the height of the mesial and distal papillae were reduced by 0.2 mm and 0.4 mm, respectively. The buccogingival margin of the alveolar ridge showed a vertical gain of 0.5 mm. Therefore, the presented technique seems appropriate for preservation of the alveolar ridge in esthetically relevant areas. PMID:26509992

  8. Pachydermoperiostosis (primary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy): report of a case with evidence of endothelial and connective tissue involvement.

    PubMed Central

    Matucci-Cerinic, M; Cinti, S; Morroni, M; Lotti, T; Nuzzaci, G; Lucente, E; di Lollo, S; Ceruso, M; Cagnoni, M

    1989-01-01

    A case of pachydermoperiostosis characterised by the presence of finger clubbing, periostosis, sweating of hands and feet is described. Modifications of capillaroscopic pattern and of arteriovenous anastomoses are reported. The periungual border and finger tip tissue showed diffuse endothelial hyperplasia, hyalinosis, and sclerosis with packing of collagen fibres. Electron microscopy showed hypertrophic and activated endothelia (numerous and hypertrophic Golgi complexes, several Weibel-Palade bodies, vesicles of micropinocytosis, and glycogen particles), the basal membrane thickened and reduplicated, perivasal infiltrate in superficial derma, reticulation and segmentary reduplication of basal membrane in arteriovenous shunt. In the perineural connective tissue numerous Luse bodies (long spacing collagen) were evident. The data indicate that in the early phase of pachydermoperiostosis morphological endothelial and collagen fibre abnormalities are present, though there is a normal peripheral blood flow. Images PMID:2930280

  9. The muscular force transmission system: role of the intramuscular connective tissue.

    PubMed

    Turrina, Andrea; Martínez-González, Miguel Antonio; Stecco, Carla

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this review is to analyze in detail the microscopic structure and relations among muscular fibers, endomysium, perimysium, epimysium and deep fasciae. In particular, the multilayer organization and the collagen fiber orientation of these elements are reported. The endomysium, perimysium, epimysium and deep fasciae have not just a role of containment, limiting the expansion of the muscle with the disposition in concentric layers of the collagen tissue, but are fundamental elements for the transmission of muscular force, each one with a specific role. From this review it appears that the muscular fibers should not be studied as isolated elements, but as a complex inseparable from their fibrous components. The force expressed by a muscle depends not only on its anatomical structure, but also the angle at which its fibers are attached to the intramuscular connective tissue and the relation with the epimysium and deep fasciae. PMID:23294690

  10. A case of mixed connective tissue disease complicated with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hideki; Tateishi, Seiko; Kawakami, Atsushi; Ida, Hiroaki; Fukuda, Taku; Sasaki, Michiyo; Koide, Yuji; Ashizawa, Naoto; Seto, Shinji; Hayashi, Tomayoshi; Sato, Shinichi; Eguchi, Katsumi

    2008-10-01

    A 54-year-old female was diagnosed as mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) complicated with secondary Sjögren's syndrome. Although she had no dyspnea on exertion, the chest X-ray showed cardiomegaly with interstitial pneumonia. The echocardiogram demonstrated asymmetric hypertrophy of the interventricular septum. Diagnosis of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) was confirmed by left ventriculography and myocardial biopsy. She was treated with prednisolone, resulting in improvement of swollen hand, elevated muscle enzymes and interstitial pneumonia. A rare complication of HOCM with MCTD was described. PMID:18493766

  11. Retropneumoperitoneum and pneumatosis intestinalis in 2 patients with mixed connective tissue disease and the overlap syndrome.

    PubMed

    Goulet, J R; Hurtubise, M; Senécal, J L

    1988-01-01

    Two patients with pneumatosis intestinalis (PI) and mixed connective tissue disease/overlap syndrome are discussed. One patient also presented a retropneumoperitoneum, a feature as yet undescribed in PI. A review of previously reported cases revealed that PI should be suspected in those patients known to have systemic sclerosis-type involvement of the oesophagus and the small bowel, and who present with abdominal distension. PI may occur early in the course of the disease, may resolve rapidly through medical intervention only, and is compatible with a 2-year survival rate. PMID:3135134

  12. Depression and seizures as the main neuropsychiatric manifestation of mixed connective tissue disorder.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Ismaa Ghazanfar; Qureshi, Safina Hameed; Shah, Faridullah

    2014-05-01

    A 38 years female presented with arthralgia, dyspnoea, progressive proximal muscle weakness, seizures, weight loss, dysphagia, alopecia, and dryness of the eyes and mouth with tightening of the skin. Psychiatric evaluation revealed major depression. She had oral ulcers, tightening of the skin of the hands with restricted mouth opening, and proximal muscle weakness. Mixed connective tissue disorder (MCTD) with predominant polymyositis and neuropsychiatric manifestations was diagnosed as the patient had anti-RNP positive with significantly raised muscle enzymes. This case is unique because major depression in MCTD is rarely documented, severe polymyositis is a rarity and ANA was negative but characteristic anti-RNP antibody was positive. PMID:24906270

  13. THORACIC INVOLVEMENT IN CONNECTIVE TISSUE DISEASES: RADIOLOGICAL PATTERNS AND FOLLOW-UP.

    PubMed

    Serra, G; Brun, A L; Ialongo, P; Chabi, M L; Grenier, P A

    2015-01-01

    Connective tissue diseases (CTDs) are a heterogeneous group of idiopathic inflammatory diseases involving various organs. A thoracic involvement is frequent, and chest-CT represents the imaging technique of reference in its assessment. Pulmonary abnormalities related to CTDs are various; although several disease-specific aspects have been described, the two most clinically relevant complications are represented by interstitial lung disease and pulmonary arterial hypertension. The early identification of a thoracic involvement, with the adoption of specific therapies, can significantly change patient's prognosis. The aim of this article is to review the most common typical and atypical CT features of thoracic involvement occurring in CT, especially focusing on interstitial lung disease. PMID:26223059

  14. Local delivery of nitric oxide: targeted delivery of therapeutics to bone and connective tissues

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Scott P.; Storm, Wesley L.; Koh, Ahyeon; Schoenfisch, Mark H.

    2012-01-01

    Non-invasive treatment of injuries and disorders affecting bones and connective tissue is a significant challenge facing the medical community. A treatment route that has recently been proposed is nitric oxide (NO) therapy. Nitric oxide plays several roles in physiology with many conditions lacking adequate levels of NO. As NO is a radical, localized delivery via NO donors is essential to promoting biological activity. Herein, we review current literature related to therapeutic NO delivery in the treatment of bone, skin and tendon repair. PMID:22433782

  15. Mixed connective tissue disease--clinical and radiological aspects of 20 cases.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, D J; Bennett, R M

    1977-09-01

    The clinical and radiological features of 20 cases of mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), a newly defined disorder, are described. MCTD shares a number of abnormalities with other collagen diseases, notably diffuse systemic sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus. However, patients with MCTD have a specific circulating antibody to extractable nuclear antigen (ENA). Most of the cases described exhibited multi-system involvement with radiological changes in the skeleton, chest, and gastro-intestinal tract. Twelve of the 20 cases had an erosive arthritis. This finding has not been previously noted in the radiological literature. PMID:901973

  16. Targeted ablation of the abcc6 gene results in ectopic mineralization of connective tissues.

    PubMed

    Klement, John F; Matsuzaki, Yasushi; Jiang, Qiu-Jie; Terlizzi, Joseph; Choi, Hae Young; Fujimoto, Norihiro; Li, Kehua; Pulkkinen, Leena; Birk, David E; Sundberg, John P; Uitto, Jouni

    2005-09-01

    Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), characterized by connective tissue mineralization of the skin, eyes, and cardiovascular system, is caused by mutations in the ABCC6 gene. ABCC6 encodes multidrug resistance-associated protein 6 (MRP6), which is expressed primarily in the liver and kidneys. Mechanisms producing ectopic mineralization as a result of these mutations remain unclear. To elucidate this complex disease, a transgenic mouse was generated by targeted ablation of the mouse Abcc6 gene. Abcc6 null mice were negative for Mrp6 expression in the liver, and complete necropsies revealed profound mineralization of several tissues, including skin, arterial blood vessels, and retina, while heterozygous animals were indistinguishable from the wild-type mice. Particularly striking was the mineralization of vibrissae, as confirmed by von Kossa and alizarin red stains. Electron microscopy revealed mineralization affecting both elastic structures and collagen fibers. Mineralization of vibrissae was noted as early as 5 weeks of age and was progressive with age in Abcc6(-/-) mice but was not observed in Abcc6(+/-) or Abcc6(+/+) mice up to 2 years of age. A total body computerized tomography scan of Abcc6(-/-) mice revealed mineralization in skin and subcutaneous tissue as well as in the kidneys. These data demonstrate aberrant mineralization of soft tissues in PXE-affected organs, and, consequently, these mice recapitulate features of this complex disease. PMID:16135817

  17. The other mechanism of muscular referred pain: the "connective tissue" theory.

    PubMed

    Han, Dong-Gyun

    2009-09-01

    Muscular referred pain, that is, pain perceived in a somatic area other than the site of the noxious stimulation, takes place on a specific place to each muscle in constant and predictable pattern. The central hyperexcitability theory focused on spinal cord, the most proper theory at present, can explain well the segmental pattern of referred pain showing delayed onset. But it is hard to explain the non segmental pattern of referred pain areas of superficial-seated or limb girdle and limb muscles. Referred pain areas of limb girdle and limb muscles appear on the skin above a belt of synergistic muscles beyond the segmental areas. In the case of forearm and calf muscles, referred pain shows up on the palm and sole, the point of force application to the outer object. This finding reflects biomechanical relationship between muscle and its referred pain area. From the phylogenetic perspective, aquatic vertebrated animals (e.g. fish) use myoseptum surrounding myomere, connected to skin to keep tensile strength with it for effective swimming. Likewise, in terrestrial vertebrated animals, there are skin parts weakly interconnected with muscles, though the tensile property of nearly all the skin devolutes except the points of action with the outside. These points are dynamic maximal skin tension areas connected with muscles through superficial fascia, in other words, referred pain areas. Referred pain of deep-seated or truncal muscles appears on the trunk segmentally via spinal cord (the central hyperexcitability theory), but superficial-seated or limb girdle and limb muscles elicit referred pain on dynamic maximal skin tension area through connective tissue (the "connective tissue" theory). PMID:19433346

  18. [A case of overlap syndrome: autoimmune idiopathic hepatitis/pulmonary idiopathic hypertension].

    PubMed

    Bertino, G; Ardiri, A M; Boemi, P M; Ierna, D; Pulvirenti, D; Neri, S

    2007-01-01

    In medical practice we frequently encounter autoimmune syndromes, called "overlap-syndromes," which are of difficult nosographic classification because of the presence of sero-immunologic and clinical features common to various diseases having an autoimmune pathogenesis. Some of these syndromes have already been extensively described in scientific literature such as, for example, the presence of clinical and biohumoral alterations with hepatic and extrahepatic involvement, in the course of viral and autoimmune chronic hepatitis. The described clinical case can be classified as a new "overlap syndrome": Type 1 autoimmune hepatitis (AIH)/Primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH). Although the presence of pulmonary hypertension has been extensively described in the course of various connective tissue diseases (S.L.E., Mixed Connective Tissue Disease, Scleroderma, Hashimoto's Thyroiditis, Sjögren's Syndrome), in recent scientific literature, the association is quite rare. The interest in the described clinical case lies both in the possibility to classify it in the context of a more complex "overlap syndrome" AIH/PPH and in the correlated diagnostic and therapeutic implications. Therefore, in cases of primary pulmonary hypertension, a thorough immunological and hepatic functionality study is always recommended in order to ensure an early diagnosis and a prompt AIH treatment, thus warding off the risk of a rapid progression in cirrhosis. PMID:17953282

  19. [Autoimmune pancreatitis].

    PubMed

    Rebours, Vinciane; Lévy, Philippe

    2014-12-01

    There are two types of autoimmune pancreatitis. Type 1 is a part of a polyexocrinopathy syndrome associated with an elevation of serum igG4. Other organs might be involved: salivary glands, biliary ducts, retroperitoneum, kidneys, etc. Relapse risk is elevated and evolution to exocrine and endocrine insufficiencies is possible. Type 2 is not linked to 16gG4 and might be associated to inflammatory bowel diseases that may occur before, during or after pancreatitis. Relapse risk is lower than for type 1. Main clinical manifestations are jaundice (type 1) or acute pancreatitis (type 2). The diagnosis relies mainly on a fine analysis of ductal abnormalities on MRCP with thick slices. Pancreatic lesions might be diffuse, multifocal or pseudotumoral. In the latter case, there is a high risk of misdiagnosis leading to inappropriate pancreatic resection. In doubtful cases, a pancreatic biopsy is warranted. Indications for treatment rely on symptoms. Corticosteroids and rarely immunosuppressive therapy or rituximab are the basis of treatment. PMID:25668826

  20. Massage-induced morphological changes of dense connective tissue in rat's tendon.

    PubMed

    Kassolik, Krzysztof; Andrzejewski, Waldemar; Dziegiel, Piotr; Jelen, Michal; Fulawka, Lukasz; Brzozowski, Marcin; Kurpas, Donata; Gworys, Bohdan; Podhorska-Okolow, Marzenna

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the experiment was to determine if possible changes in connective tissue induced by massage could have a positive effect justifing the use of massage in all post-traumatic connective tissue conditions, e.g. tendon injuries. The investigations were performed in a group of 18 Buffalo rats. The rats were divided into two groups (experimental and control). To standardize the massage procedure, it was performed with an algometer probe of 0.5 cm2 with constant pressure force of 1 kG (9,81 N). To analyse the number and diameter of collagen fibrils, two electron micrographs were performed for each rat of the collected segments of tendons of rat tail lateral extensor muscle. After image digitalization and calibration, the measurements were carried out using iTEM 5.0 software. The number of fibrils, their diameter and area were measured in a cross-sectional area. An increase of the number of collagen fibrils was observed in the tendons of massaged animals compared to the control group. Our study demonstrated that massage may cause a beneficial effect on metabolic activity of tendon's fibroblasts and, in consequence, may be applied for more effective use of massage for the prevention of tendon injury as well as after the injury has occurred. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2013, Vol. 51, No. 1, 103-106). PMID:23690224

  1. Leucine supplementation accelerates connective tissue repair of injured tibialis anterior muscle.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Marcelo G; Silva, Meiricris T; Carlassara, Eduardo O C; Gonçalves, Dawit A; Abrahamsohn, Paulo A; Kettelhut, Isis C; Moriscot, Anselmo S; Aoki, Marcelo S; Miyabara, Elen H

    2014-10-01

    This study investigated the effect of leucine supplementation on the skeletal muscle regenerative process, focusing on the remodeling of connective tissue of the fast twitch muscle tibialis anterior (TA). Young male Wistar rats were supplemented with leucine (1.35 g/kg per day); then, TA muscles from the left hind limb were cryolesioned and examined after 10 days. Although leucine supplementation induced increased protein synthesis, it was not sufficient to promote an increase in the cross-sectional area (CSA) of regenerating myofibers (p > 0.05) from TA muscles. However, leucine supplementation reduced the amount of collagen and the activation of phosphorylated transforming growth factor-? receptor type I (T?R-I) and Smad2/3 in regenerating muscles (p < 0.05). Leucine also reduced neonatal myosin heavy chain (MyHC-n) (p < 0.05), increased adult MyHC-II expression (p < 0.05) and prevented the decrease in maximum tetanic strength in regenerating TA muscles (p < 0.05). Our results suggest that leucine supplementation accelerates connective tissue repair and consequent function of regenerating TA through the attenuation of T?R-I and Smad2/3 activation. Therefore, future studies are warranted to investigate leucine supplementation as a nutritional strategy to prevent or attenuate muscle fibrosis in patients with several muscle diseases. PMID:25268835

  2. Evaluation of muscular lesions in connective tissue diseases: thallium 201 muscular scans

    SciTech Connect

    Guillet, G.; Guillet, J.; Sanciaume, C.; Maleville, J.; Geniaux, M.; Morin, P.

    1988-04-01

    We performed thallium 201 muscle scans to assess muscular involvement in 40 patients with different connective tissue diseases (7 with dermatomyositis, 7 with systemic lupus erythematosus, 12 with progressive systemic scleroderma, 2 with calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal involvement, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasia (CREST) syndrome, 3 with monomelic scleroderma, 6 with morphea, and 3 with Raynaud's disease). Only 12 of these patients complained of fatigability and/or myalgia. Electromyography was performed and serum levels of muscle enzymes were measured in all patients. Comparison of thallium 201 exercise recording with the other tests revealed that scan sensitivity is greater than electromyographic and serum muscle enzymes levels. Thallium 201 scans showed abnormal findings in 32 patients and revealed subclinical lesions in 18 patients, while electromyography findings were abnormal in 25 of these 32 patients. Serum enzyme levels were raised in only 8 patients. Thallium 201 scanning proved to be a useful guide for modifying therapy when laboratory data were conflicting. It was useful to evaluate treatment efficacy. Because our data indicate a 100% positive predictive value, we believe that thallium 201 scanning should be advised for severe systemic connective tissue diseases with discordant test results.

  3. Connective tissue, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome(s), and head and cervical pain.

    PubMed

    Castori, Marco; Morlino, Silvia; Ghibellini, Giulia; Celletti, Claudia; Camerota, Filippo; Grammatico, Paola

    2015-03-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is an umbrella term for a growing group of hereditary disorders of the connective tissue mainly manifesting with generalized joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility, and vascular and internal organ fragility. In contrast with other well known heritable connective tissue disorders with severe cardiovascular involvement (e.g., Marfan syndrome), most EDS patients share a nearly normal life span, but are severely limited by disabling features, such as pain, fatigue and headache. In this work, pertinent literature is reviewed with focus on prevalence, features and possible pathogenic mechanisms of headache in EDSs. Gathered data are fragmented and generally have a low level of evidence. Headache is reported in no less than 1/3 of the patients. Migraine results the most common type in the hypermobility type of EDS. Other possibly related headache disorders include tension-type headache, new daily persistent headache, headache attributed to spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leakage, headache secondary to Chiari malformation, cervicogenic headache and neck-tongue syndrome, whose association still lacks of reliable prevalence studies. The underlying pathogenesis seems complex and variably associated with cardiovascular dysautonomia, cervical spine and temporomandibular joint instability/dysfunction, meningeal fragility, poor sleep quality, pain-killer drugs overuse and central sensitization. Particular attention is posed on a presumed subclinical cervical spine dysfunction. Standard treatment is always symptomatic and usually unsuccessful. Assessment and management procedures are discussed in order to put some basis for ameliorating the actual patients' needs and nurturing future research. PMID:25655119

  4. Assessment of T Regulatory Cells and Expanded Profiling of Autoantibodies May Offer Novel Biomarkers for the Clinical Management of Systemic Sclerosis and Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cordiali-Fei, Paola; Mussi, Anna; D'Agosto, Giovanna; Trento, Elisabetta; Bordignon, Valentina; Trincone, Silvana; Vento, Antonella; Sperduti, Isabella; Cristaudo, Antonio; Ensoli, Fabrizio

    2013-01-01

    In order to identify disease biomarkers for the clinical and therapeutic management of autoimmune diseases such as systemic sclerosis (SSc) and undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD), we have explored the setting of peripheral T regulatory (T reg) cells and assessed an expanded profile of autoantibodies in patients with SSc, including either limited (lcSSc) or diffuse (dcSSc) disease, and in patients presenting with clinical signs and symptoms of UCTD. A large panel of serum antibodies directed towards nuclear, nucleolar, and cytoplasmic antigens, including well-recognized molecules as well as less frequently tested antigens, was assessed in order to determine whether different antibody profiles might be associated with distinct clinical settings. Beside the well-recognized association between lcSSc and anti-centromeric or dcSSC and anti-topoisomerase-I antibodies, we found a significative association between dcSSc and anti-SRP or anti-PL-7/12 antibodies. In addition, two distinct groups emerged on the basis of anti-RNP or anti-PM-Scl 75/100 antibody production among UCTD patients. The levels of T reg cells were significantly lower in patients with SSc as compared to patients with UCTD or to healthy controls; in patients with lcSSc, T reg cells were inversely correlated to disease duration, suggesting that their levels may represent a marker of disease progression. PMID:23818915

  5. Characterization of connective tissue progenitors through phase contrast and multicolor fluorescence time-lapse microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwee, Edward; Powell, Kimerly; Muschler, George

    2015-03-01

    Connective tissue progenitors (CTPs) are defined as the heterogeneous population of tissue resident stem and progenitor cells capable of proliferating and differentiating into connective tissue phenotypes. The prevalence and variation in clonal progeny of CTPs can be characterized using a colony formation assay. However, colony assays do not directly assess the characteristics of the colony founding CTP. We developed a large field of view, time lapse microscopy system with phase contrast and fluorescence capabilities that enables tracking from seeding through colony formation. Cells derived from the trabecular surface of bone were prepared and seeded in an Ibidi-Ph+ chamber slide. Phase contrast images of the slide were obtained every hour using a DMI6000 Leica microscope, 10X objective, and Retiga 2000R camera. Cells were stained using fluorescent antibodies for multiple markers at the time of plating to determine marker expression on seeded cells and re-stained to determine expression on their progeny. Colonies were identified and characterized using automated image processing and quantitative analysis methods. Following colony identification, the time lapse was reversed to identify and characterize the colony founding CTP according to morphology and marker expression. As a representative example, a CD73+/CD90-/CD105- and a CD73+/CD90+/CD105- CTP resulted in a colony with an area of 3720826 microns2 and percent area expression of 2.98%, 3.62%, and 1.13% for CD73, CD90, and CD105, respectively. This method can be used to study CTPs and other stem and progenitor cell populations to benefit point-of-care methods for assay and isolation in cell based therapies.

  6. Functional Connectivity in Islets of Langerhans from Mouse Pancreas Tissue Slices

    PubMed Central

    Stožer, Andraž; Gosak, Marko; Dolenšek, Jurij; Perc, Matjaž; Marhl, Marko; Rupnik, Marjan Slak; Korošak, Dean

    2013-01-01

    We propose a network representation of electrically coupled beta cells in islets of Langerhans. Beta cells are functionally connected on the basis of correlations between calcium dynamics of individual cells, obtained by means of confocal laser-scanning calcium imaging in islets from acute mouse pancreas tissue slices. Obtained functional networks are analyzed in the light of known structural and physiological properties of islets. Focusing on the temporal evolution of the network under stimulation with glucose, we show that the dynamics are more correlated under stimulation than under non-stimulated conditions and that the highest overall correlation, largely independent of Euclidean distances between cells, is observed in the activation and deactivation phases when cells are driven by the external stimulus. Moreover, we find that the range of interactions in networks during activity shows a clear dependence on the Euclidean distance, lending support to previous observations that beta cells are synchronized via calcium waves spreading throughout islets. Most interestingly, the functional connectivity patterns between beta cells exhibit small-world properties, suggesting that beta cells do not form a homogeneous geometric network but are connected in a functionally more efficient way. Presented results provide support for the existing knowledge of beta cell physiology from a network perspective and shed important new light on the functional organization of beta cell syncitia whose structural topology is probably not as trivial as believed so far. PMID:23468610

  7. Computer-assisted analysis of the extracellular matrix of connective tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krucinski, Slawomir; Krucinska, Izabella; Veeravanallur, Srinivasan; Slot, Krzysztof

    1997-04-01

    The new computerized imaging, circular polarized light microscopy technique was developed to measure the orientation of collagen fibers in images of serial sections of connective tissue. The system consists of a modified Olympus BX50 polarized microscope, a Sony AVC-D7 video camera, and a Silicon Graphics Indy computer. Both methods required the initial segmentation of fibers and used binary images. Segments of fiber midlines were traced with vertical and horizontal scanlines, or alternately the whole midlines were identified recursively from the Euclidean Distance Map of the image suing the novel definition of the Medial Axis Transform. The last technique produced connected midlines of the fibers and handled sinuous fibers well. The fiber midlines produced by this technique were traversed by a midline traversal algorithm , and the orientation distribution was obtained by least squares line fitting. The accuracy of the developed techniques was evaluated against synthetic images, composed of straight lines and sinuous curves. Kupier's statistic was used to evaluate the consistency of the fiber orientation calculations. Statistical analysis of the results showed, that the proposed Medial Axis Transform with Hilditch's connectivity preserving skeletonization produced the most accurate results. The developed method was used to measure collagen fiber orientation in microscopy images of canine meniscus, porcine aortic valve leaflet, bovine pericardium and bio- textiles.

  8. Thyroid autoimmunity as a window to autoimmunity: An explanation for sex differences in the prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Stephen J; Mu, Ying

    2015-06-21

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs), predominately Graves? disease and Hashimoto?s thyroiditis, comprise the most common autoimmune diseases in humans. Both have the production of anti-thyroid antibody as an important aspect and both are much more prevalent in females, being at least 10 times more common than in males. Using these two clues, a hypothesis for the initiation of thyroid autoimmunity is proposed that helps to make the case that the thyroid is one of the most sensitive sites for autoimmunity and helps account for the prevalence and the observed sex differences in AITDs and associated diseases, such as type 1 diabetes and Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults (LADA). The primary mechanisms proposed involve the underlying state of inflammation as a result of the adipokines, especially leptin, TNF-?, and IL-6, and the receptors able to recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMP?s) and damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMP?s) through Toll-like receptors (TLR) and others receptors present on thyrocytes. The adipokines are produced by adipose tissue, but have hormone-like and immune modulating properties. As the levels of leptin are significantly higher in females, an explanation for the sex difference in thyroid autoimmunity emerges. The ability of the thyrocytes to participate in innate immunity through the TLR provides an adjuvant-like signal and allows for the action of other agents, such as environmental factors, viruses, bacteria, and even stress to provide the initiation step to break tolerance to thyroid self-antigens. Seeing the thyroid as one of the most sensitive sites for autoimmunity, means that for many autoimmune disorders, if autoimmunity is present, it is likely to also be present in the thyroid - and that that condition in the thyroid was probably earlier. The evidence is seen in multiple autoimmune syndrome. PMID:25576242

  9. Toxicology of Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hultman, Per; Kono, Dwight H.

    2010-01-01

    Susceptibility to most autoimmune diseases is dependent on polygenic inheritance, environmental factors, and poorly defined stochastic events. One of the significant challenges facing autoimmune disease research is in identifying the specific events that trigger loss of tolerance and autoimmunity. Although many intrinsic factors, including age, sex, and genetics, contribute to autoimmunity, extrinsic factors such as drugs, chemicals, microbes, or other environmental factors can also act as important initiators. This review explores how certain extrinsic factors, namely drugs and chemicals, can promote the development of autoimmunity, focusing on a few better characterized agents that, in most instances, have been shown to produce autoimmune manifestations in human populations. Mechanisms of autoimmune disease induction are discussed in terms of research obtained using specific animal models. Although a number of different pathways have been delineated for drug/chemical-induced autoimmunity some similarities do exist and a working model is proposed. PMID:20078109

  10. Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease Autoimmune Inner Ear Disease Patient Health Information ... with a hearing loss. How Does the Healthy Ear Work? The ear has three main parts: the ...

  11. Ear-nose-throat manifestations of autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Papadimitraki, E D; Kyrmizakis, D E; Kritikos, I; Boumpas, D T

    2004-01-01

    Ear-nose-throat (ENT) manifestations of connective tissue disorders represent a diagnostic challenge for clinicians as they often constitute the initial sign of an otherwise asymptomatic autoimmune disease. Moreover, in patients with known autoimmune rheumatic diseases, ENT manifestations can be overlooked. Hearing disturbances may be seen in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, Wegener's granulomatosis, relapsing polychondritis, polyarteritis nodosa, Cogan's syndrome, Sjögren's syndrome, and less frequently in Churg-Strauss syndrome and Adamantiades-Behçet's disease. Nose and paranasal sinuses are variably affected during the course of Wegener's granulomatosis, Churg-Strauss syndrome, relapsing polychondritis and sarcoidosis. Recurrent mucosal ulcerations are common in systemic lupus erythematosus and Adamantiades-Behçet's disease. Xerostomia is a common feature of primary and secondary Sjögren's syndrome; salivary gland enlargement may be also seen in these patients, as well as in patients with sarcoidosis. The cricoarytenoid joint can be involved during the course of rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and gout; osteoarthritic changes have also been described. Motility disorders of the upper and/or the lower portions of the esophagus have been reported in patients with dermatomyositis/polymyositis, systemic sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus. Trigeminal nerve dysfunction may occur in patients with Sjögren's syndrome, systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus and mixed connective tissue disease. Peripheral facial nerve palsy has been described to complicate the course of Sjögren's syndrome and sarcoidosis. PMID:15301251

  12. Coexistence of five autoimmune diseases: diagnostic and therapeutic difficulties.

    PubMed

    Wielosz, Ewa; Majdan, Maria; Zychowska, Iwona; Jeleniewicz, Rados?aw

    2008-07-01

    We report the case of coexistence of five autoimmune diseases in a 36-year-old woman, who initially developed psoriasis. Several years later, the patient was diagnosed with a mixed connective tissue disease and primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). On admission to the Department of Rheumatology and Connective Tissue Diseases, the patient fulfilled classification criteria of an overlap syndrome systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with secondary antiphospholipid syndrome/systemic sclerosis (SSc)/Sjogren's syndrome (SS) with coexisting PBC and psoriasis. The SLE symptoms included discoid lupus erythematosus, arthritis, pancytopenia, antinuclear antibodies and anticardiolipin antibodies. Moreover, the patient met the criteria of antiphospholipid syndrome diagnosed based on preterm delivery before week 34, and high values of anticardiolipin antibodies were found at repeated determinations. The SSc symptoms included sclerodactyly, pulmonary fibrosis with pulmonary hypertension and esophageal dysfunction. The SS syndrome involved xerostomia, xerophthalmia, the positive Schirmer's test and presence of anti-SS antibodies. The literature reports overlap syndromes in various combinations; however, the coexistence of five autoimmune diseases is extremely rare. PMID:18320193

  13. Perspectives on autoimmunity

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, I.R.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book are: HLA and Autoimmunity; Self-Recognition and Symmetry in the Immune System; Immunology of Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus; Multiple Sclerosis; Autoimmunity and Immune Pathological Aspects of Virus Disease; Analyses of the Idiotypes and Ligand Binding Characteristics of Human Monoclonal Autoantibodies to DNA: Do We Understand Better Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. Autoimmunity and Rheumatic Fever; Autoimmune Arthritis Induced by Immunization to Mycobacterial Antigens; and The Interaction Between Genetic Factors and Micro-Organisms in Ankylosing Spondylitis: Facts and Fiction.

  14. Substance P and Chronic Pain in Patients with Chronic Inflammation of Connective Tissue

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective Evidence suggests that substance P (SP) is involved in chronic joint inflammation, such as the pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis. The goal of the research was to evaluate the correlation between chronic pain and changes in the SP level in patients with chronic inflammation of the connective tissue. Methods Patients with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis were enrolled in this study. The relationship between chronic pain intensity and the serum SP concentration was evaluated in these groups of patients with osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis. Results The results showed a positive correlation between the serum SP concentrations and chronic pain intensity. Conclusions 1. The SP serum concentration was significantly different between the groups of patients with OA and RA. 2. There was a positive correlation between the serum SP concentration and chronic pain intensity in OA and RA patients. PMID:26444559

  15. [A case of protein-losing gastroenteropathy accompanied by Sjögren syndrome and mixed connective tissue disease].

    PubMed

    Kakigao, Kana; Fukushima, Nobuyoshi; Mizutani, Takahiro; Haraguchi, Kazuhiro; Okamoto, Risa; Sawamura, Noriko; Oohashi, Tomoko; Mitsuyasu, Aya; Fujiyama, Takashi; Yoshimoto, Tsuyoshi; Koujima, Motoyuki; Kawabe, Ken; Fukuizumi, Kunitaka; Nakamuta, Makoto; Harada, Naohiko

    2012-10-01

    Case reports of protein-losing gastroenteropathy (PLGE) associated with not only mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) but also Sjögren syndrome (SjS) are very rare. We report a first case of PLGE in a patient with both MCTD and SjS. A 58-year-old Japanese woman was referred and admitted to our hospital because of abdominal fullness and lower leg edema. Her past medical history revealed SjS at age 40. Physical examination demonstrated lower leg edema and Raynaud's phenomenon. Blood chemistry data showed severe hypoproteinemia. Anti RNP antibody was positive. MCTD was diagnosed. The alpha-1 antitrypsin clearance level was high. The (99m)Tc-DTPA human serum albumin scintigraphy demonstrated abnormal accumulation in the intestine. PLGE associated with both MCTD and SjS was diagnosed, but she was successfully treated by prednisolone. PMID:23047635

  16. Ischemic Colitis Due to a Mesenteric Arteriovenous Malformation in a Patient with a Connective Tissue Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Poullos, Peter D.; Thompson, Atalie C.; Holz, Grant; Edelman, Lauren A.; Jeffrey, R. Brooke

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic colitis is a rare, life-threatening, consequence of mesenteric arteriovenous malformations. Ischemia ensues from a steal phenomenon through shunting, and may be compounded by the resulting portal hypertension. Computed tomographic angiography is the most common first-line test because it is quick, non-invasive, and allows for accurate anatomic characterization. Also, high-resolution three-dimensional images can be created for treatment planning. Magnetic resonance angiography is similarly sensitive for vascular mapping. Conventional angiography remains the gold standard for diagnosis and also allows for therapeutic endovascular embolization. Our patient underwent testing using all three of these modalities. We present the first reported case of this entity in a patient with a vascular connective tissue disorder. PMID:25926912

  17. The beneficial effect of plasmapheresis in mixed connective tissue disease with coexisting antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Szodoray, P; Hajas, A; Toth, L; Szakall, S; Nakken, B; Soltesz, P; Bodolay, E

    2014-09-01

    The authors report a rare case of a female patient with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) with coexisting antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Five years after the diagnosis of MCTD high concentrations of anticardiolipin (anti-CL) and anti-?2-glycoprotein (anti-?2GPI) autoantibodies were present in the patient's serum without thrombotic events. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation provoked APS, with the clinical manifestations of livedo reticularis, digital gangrene and leg ulcers. Skin biopsy from the necrotic area showed multiple fibrin microthrombi in the superficial vessels. Corticosteroid pulse therapy, and plasma exchange in combination with synchronized cyclophosphamide was administered, which led to improvement of the digital gangrenes, while no new lesions developed. The number of CD27high plasma cells decreased, and the previous high levels of autoantibodies also normalized in the peripheral blood. In the case of MCTD with coexisting APS combination therapy, including plasmapheresis has beneficial effects. PMID:24795068

  18. Ceramide inhibits connective tissue growth factor expression by human retinal pigment epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Shozo; Nagineni, Chandrasekharam N; Kitamura, Mizuki; Spee, Christine; Kannan, Ram; Hinton, David R

    2014-08-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is known to be involved in retinal fibrotic disorders. We used human retinal pigment epithelial cells (HRPE), which play critical roles in retinal fibrosis, to examine the expression of CTGF and its regulation by ceramide and TGF-?. Real-time PCR analysis showed downregulation of CTGF mRNA by C2 ceramide and upregulation by TGF-?. C2 ceramide also inhibited constitutive and TGF-?-enhanced CTGF secretion by HRPE cells. Predominant secretion (>80% of total) of CTGF from the apical side was observed in highly polarized HRPE cells. Fumonosin, an inhibitor of ceramide synthesis, stimulated CTGF secretion while 4HPR, an activator of ceramide synthesis, downregulated CTGF secretion. Based on these results demonstrating ceramide regulation of CTGF secretion by HRPE, we suggest that ceramide may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of retinal fibrotic diseases by inhibiting CTGF production. PMID:24758915

  19. Athlete's nodules: sports-related connective tissue nevi of the collagen type (collagenomas).

    PubMed

    Cohen, P R; Eliezri, Y D; Silvers, D N

    1992-08-01

    Sports-related connective tissue nevi of the collagen type (collagenomas) have been referred to as athlete's nodules. Surfers, boxers, marbles players, and football players are some of the athletes in whom these lesions have been observed. The nodules can be found on the dorsal aspect of the feet, knees, or knuckles and can readily be differentiated from other conditions by either clinical history or microscopic features or both. Treatment options include conservative measures or surgical intervention. Recurrent trauma and friction to the involved location are likely causative factors. Although the ultrastructural pathogenesis remains to be established, changes in the molecular metabolism of collagen resulting in enhanced synthesis and/or accumulation of collagen may have a contributory role. PMID:1511619

  20. Mixed connective tissue disease: a case with scleroderma renal crisis following abortion.

    PubMed

    Celikbilek, Mehmet; Elsurer, Rengin; Afsar, Baris; Ozdemir, Handan B; Sezer, Siren; Ozdemir, Nurhan F

    2007-09-01

    The term mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) has been applied to a particular subset of patients with overlapping clinical features of systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and polymyositis. Immune response to U1-ribonucleoprotein is the defining serological feature of MCTD. There are different organ and system involvements in MCTD including the heart, lung, kidney, muscle, joints, gastrointestinal, and hematologic involvements. Reports describing pregnancies in patients with MCTD are rare, and the results have been contradictory: a high risk of fetal loss and of disease exacerbation or no influence on fetus or mother. In MCTD, simultaneous pulmonary and renal involvement is very rare. In this paper, we report a case of MCTD with pulmonary involvement that developed scleroderma renal crisis after an abortion. PMID:17119864

  1. Low-dose cyclosporin for multiple colonic ulcers associated with mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Maeda, N; Abe, S; Yoshizawa, T; Ogawa, K; Sekigawa, I; Iida, N; Eguchi, M; Matsumoto, M; Hashimoto, H; Hirose, S

    1999-01-01

    This report describes a patient with multiple colonic ulcers and mixed connective tissue disease. The histological findings of the colonic lesions showed vasculitis with T-cell infiltration, and the peripheral T cells were frequently in the activated phase of the cell cycle. In this patient, low-dose cyclosporin treatment (2.5 mg/kg/day) inhibited the T-cell activation in the peripheral lymphocytes and was very effective in the gastrointestinal disorder, which might be related to T-cell activation. This case suggests the possibility that even low-dose cyclosporin can exert a great influence on peripheral T cells and directly inhibit T-cell activation, thereby improving symptoms related to T-cell activation. PMID:10524557

  2. Connective tissue reflex massage for type 2 diabetic patients with peripheral arterial disease: randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Castro-Sánchez, Adelaida María; Moreno-Lorenzo, Carmen; Matarán-Peñarrocha, Guillermo A; Feriche-Fernández-Castanys, Belen; Granados-Gámez, Genoveva; Quesada-Rubio, José Manuel

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of connective tissue massage to improve blood circulation and intermittent claudication symptoms in type 2 diabetic patients. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial was undertaken. Ninety-eight type 2 diabetes patients with stage I or II-a peripheral arterial disease (PAD) (Leriche-Fontaine classification) were randomly assigned to a massage group or to a placebo group treated using disconnected magnetotherapy equipment. Peripheral arterial circulation was determined by measuring differential segmental arterial pressure, heart rate, skin temperature, oxygen saturation and skin blood flow. Measurements were taken before and at 30?min, 6 months and 1 year after the 15-week treatment. After the 15-week program, the groups differed (P < .05) in differential segmental arterial pressure in right lower limb (lower one-third of thigh, upper and lower one-third of leg) and left lower limb (lower one-third of thigh and upper and lower one-third of leg). A significant difference (P < .05) was also observed in skin blood flow in digits 1 and 4 of right foot and digits 2, 4 and 5 of left foot. ANOVA results were significant (P < .05) for right and left foot oxygen saturation but not for heart rate and temperature. At 6 months and 1 year, the groups differed in differential segmental arterial pressure in upper third of left and right legs. Connective tissue massage improves blood circulation in the lower limbs of type 2 diabetic patients at stage I or II-a and may be useful to slow the progression of PAD. PMID:19933770

  3. Connective Tissue Reflex Massage for Type 2 Diabetic Patients with Peripheral Arterial Disease: Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Castro-Sánchez, Adelaida María; Moreno-Lorenzo, Carmen; Matarán-Peñarrocha, Guillermo A.; Feriche-Fernández-Castanys, Belen; Granados-Gámez, Genoveva; Quesada-Rubio, José Manuel

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of connective tissue massage to improve blood circulation and intermittent claudication symptoms in type 2 diabetic patients. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial was undertaken. Ninety-eight type 2 diabetes patients with stage I or II-a peripheral arterial disease (PAD) (Leriche-Fontaine classification) were randomly assigned to a massage group or to a placebo group treated using disconnected magnetotherapy equipment. Peripheral arterial circulation was determined by measuring differential segmental arterial pressure, heart rate, skin temperature, oxygen saturation and skin blood flow. Measurements were taken before and at 30?min, 6 months and 1 year after the 15-week treatment. After the 15-week program, the groups differed (P < .05) in differential segmental arterial pressure in right lower limb (lower one-third of thigh, upper and lower one-third of leg) and left lower limb (lower one-third of thigh and upper and lower one-third of leg). A significant difference (P < .05) was also observed in skin blood flow in digits 1 and 4 of right foot and digits 2, 4 and 5 of left foot. ANOVA results were significant (P < .05) for right and left foot oxygen saturation but not for heart rate and temperature. At 6 months and 1 year, the groups differed in differential segmental arterial pressure in upper third of left and right legs. Connective tissue massage improves blood circulation in the lower limbs of type 2 diabetic patients at stage I or II-a and may be useful to slow the progression of PAD. PMID:19933770

  4. Regulatory mechanisms of anthrax toxin receptor 1-dependent vascular and connective tissue homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Besschetnova, Tatiana Y; Ichimura, Takaharu; Katebi, Negin; St Croix, Brad; Bonventre, Joseph V; Olsen, Bjorn R

    2015-03-01

    It is well known that angiogenesis is linked to fibrotic processes in fibroproliferative diseases, but insights into pathophysiological processes are limited, due to lack of understanding of molecular mechanisms controlling endothelial and fibroblastic homeostasis. We demonstrate here that the matrix receptor anthrax toxin receptor 1 (ANTXR1), also known as tumor endothelial marker 8 (TEM8), is an essential component of these mechanisms. Loss of TEM8 function in mice causes reduced synthesis of endothelial basement membrane components and hyperproliferative and leaky blood vessels in skin. In addition, endothelial cell alterations in mutants are almost identical to those of endothelial cells in infantile hemangioma lesions, including activated VEGF receptor signaling in endothelial cells, increased expression of the downstream targets VEGF and CXCL12, and increased numbers of macrophages and mast cells. In contrast, loss of TEM8 in fibroblasts leads to increased rates of synthesis of fiber-forming collagens, resulting in progressive fibrosis in skin and other organs. Compromised interactions between TEM8-deficient endothelial and fibroblastic cells cause dramatic reduction in the activity of the matrix-degrading enzyme MMP2. In addition to insights into mechanisms of connective tissue homeostasis, our data provide molecular explanations for vascular and connective tissue abnormalities in GAPO syndrome, caused by loss-of-function mutations in ANTXR1. Furthermore, the loss of MMP2 activity suggests that fibrotic skin abnormalities in GAPO syndrome are, in part, the consequence of pathophysiological mechanisms underlying syndromes (NAO, Torg and Winchester) with multicentric skin nodulosis and osteolysis caused by homozygous loss-of-function mutations in MMP2. PMID:25572963

  5. Cutaneous Manifestations of Mixed Connective Tissue Disease: Study from a Tertiary Care Hospital in Eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Sen, Sumit; Sinhamahapatra, Pradyot; Choudhury, Supriyo; Gangopadhyay, Anusree; Bala, Sanchaita; Sircar, Geetabali; Chatterjee, Gobinda; Ghosh, Alakendu

    2014-01-01

    Context: Mixed connective tissue disorder is an uncommon disease. Some scientists are reluctant to recognize it as a separate entity. Some others have defined this ailment. Cutaneous features of this condition are unique. Researchers from India have described these features to relate to those described in the studies from other parts of the globe. Aims: This study aims to delineate the skin manifestations of clearly defined mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) patients, to compare them with those established as overlap syndrome, and to relate them with studies from other parts of the globe. Settings and Design: Successive patients who fulfilled the specific criteria for MCTD presenting in the skin outpatient department of a tertiary care hospital in eastern India were clinically examined from 2009 for 3 years. Materials and Methods: The number of participants was 23 and the dermatological features of these were compared with 22 patients with overlap syndrome. The antibody to uridine-rich U1 ribonucleoprotein was measured for all patients. Statistical Analysis Used: SPSS (Version 17) and MedCalc (Version 11.6). Results: The Male: Female ratio among the MCTD patients was 1:6.67 and that of the overlap syndrome was 1:10. Twenty patients of the MCTD group presented with synovitis as against only seven in the overlap group. Raynaud's phenomenon was present in some of the subjects. Puffy fingers were rare in our study. Facial numbness was reported by four of those suffering from MCTD. Antinuclear antibody (ANA) was essentially of a speckled pattern in this disease Conclusions: Cutaneous indicators of MCTD are distinct from overlap syndrome. Knowledge of these manifestations prevalent in a region may lead to early diagnosis of the disease. PMID:24470658

  6. Esophageal investigations in connective tissue disease: which tests are most appropriate?

    PubMed

    Ling, T C; Johnston, B T

    2001-01-01

    Our aim was to review the use of esophageal investigations in patients with suspected connective tissue disease (CTD). Forty-seven patients (39 women and 8 men) with suspected CTD were referred for esophageal manometry at the gastrointestinal physiology unit in the Royal Victoria Hospital, Belfast, U.K., over a 10-year period (1987-1997). The mean age was 51.7 years (range = 21-79 years). Chart review was conducted 1 to 10 years after manometry to confirm the final diagnoses: scleroderma was found in 11; CREST (calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly, telangiectasia), 8; mixed connective tissue disease, 14; Raynaud's alone, 5; and other CTDs, 9. All 47 successfully underwent esophageal manometry. In addition to manometry, 24 underwent gastroscopy; 27, barium meal; and 3, esophageal pH studies. Clinically significant esophageal abnormalities were noted in 8 (33%) on gastroscopy, in 15 (56%) on barium meal, and in 31 (66%) on manometry. Gastroscopy had a significantly lower positivity rate than the others (p < 0.05). Only three patients had pH testing, yet all three pH tests were abnormal. During manometry, abnormal findings were significantly more common in scleroderma-CREST when compared with other diagnoses (89% vs. 50%; p < 0.02). Thirty-three patients reported dysphagia. Abnormal manometry was more likely in these cases (82% vs. 33%; p < 0.02). A high percentage of patients with CTD have significant esophageal motility disorders. Investigations were more likely to be positive with scleroderma-CREST than other CTDs, even if dysphagia was present. Barium meal and manometry are more useful than OGD. pH studies were under-used. There is need for a standardized approach to esophageal investigations in patients with CTDs. PMID:11154166

  7. [Reparative regeneration of connective tissue structures of mammals under antioxidant therapy conditions].

    PubMed

    Belova, S V; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M

    2015-01-01

    The influence of administration of the antioxidant complexes consisting of nonenzymatic antioxidants (alpha-tocopherol acetate preparation) and enzymatic antioxidants (ceruloplasmin) has been studied in rabbits with experimental arthritis. The introduction of alpha-tocopherol acetate (at a daily dose of 4 mg) improved metabolic processes in the organism (decreased in the rate of erythrocyte precipitation, total leukocytes and their stub and segmental forms; increased in erythrocyte count; reduced the glycosaminoglycan content as determined from uronic acid and hexose level; decreased ceruloplasmin activity and malonic dialdehyde level ion blood serum, all at p < 0.05), thus favoring reduction in the total activity of the inflammatory process as judged from hematological and biochemical data. Intra-articular introduction of ceruloplasmin (1.5 mg/kg, once per week) positively influenced the state of joint structures in damaged knee joints of the animals: decreased the activity of ceruloplasmin (from 5.28 ± 0.06 to 3.94 ± 0.01 AU), and malonic dialdehyde level (0.18 ± 0.02 to 0.08 ± 0.01 ?M) in the articular fluid (all at p < 0.05). These effects are probably related to the elimination of inefficiency of the antioxidant system in the synovial medium, thus preventing inflammatory destruction of articular tissues, hindering the development of pannus, and assisting the activation of reparative regeneration of connective tissue structures. PMID:25826874

  8. Biocompatibility of four root canal sealers: a histopathological evaluation in rat subcutaneous connective tissue.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Camila Maggi Maia; Pinto, Shelon Cristina Souza; Zedebski, Rosário de Arruda Moura; Santos, Fábio André; Pilatti, Gibson Luiz

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the subcutaneous biocompatibility of: Epiphany, AH Plus, Pulp Canal Sealer and Sealapex root canal sealers. Sixty rats were randomly assigned to 4 groups, according to the sealer. Polyethylene tubes containing the tested materials were inserted into the connective tissue. The implants were removed after 7, 15 and 30 days, and the tissue samples were processed, stained and examined by light microscopy. The descriptive analysis considered: thickness of the fibrous capsule, severity of the inflammatory reaction, and presence of giant cells. After 7 days, all sealers induced moderate to severe inflammatory reaction. After 15 days, Epiphany and AH Plus sealers showed a moderate inflammatory reaction, while Pulp Canal Sealer and Sealapex induced severe and mild inflammatory reactions, respectively. After 30 days, mild inflammatory reactions were observed for Epiphany, Sealapex and AH Plus. Sealapex induced the lowest inflammatory response at all evaluation periods, and only Pulp Canal Sealer did not show a decreased in the inflammatory reaction over time. PMID:21519643

  9. In vitro selection and characterization of deoxyribonucleic acid aptamers against connective tissue growth factor.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuang; Huo, Yongwei; Tian, Hong; Zhang, Qiannan; Lv, Yifei; Hao, Zhiming

    2015-02-20

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a secreted matricellular protein possessing complex biological functions. CTGF modulates a number of signaling pathways that are involved in cell adhesion, migration, angiogenesis, myofibroblast activation, extracellular matrix deposition and tissue remodeling. Aptamers are oligonucleic acid chains or polypeptides that bind with specific target molecules hence have the potential to be used in the detection and blockade of the targets. In this study, we selected CTGF-targeting DNA aptamers by using systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). After 8 iterative rounds of selection, cloning, DNA sequencing and affinity determination, six aptamers with high affinities to CTGF were obtained. Among them, one (C-ap17P) binds with the N-terminal region (aa 1-190) and the other five (C-ap11, 12, 14, 15 and 18) bind with the C-terminal region (aa 191-350) of hCTGF specifically. The biological stability assay indicated that a representative aptamer, C-ap17P, could keep its integrity at a rather high level for at least 24 h in complete DMEM cell culture medium. These CTGF aptamers might be used as a easy and fast detection tool for CTGF and be developed as CTGF-specific inhibitors for both research works and clinical applications. PMID:25603056

  10. Connective tissues reflect different mechanisms of strabismus over the life span

    PubMed Central

    Demer, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Connective tissue pulleys determine extraocular muscle force directions and pulley heterotopy can induce strabismus. The etiology and type of pulley abnormalities vary with patient age, resulting in different but predictable types presentations of strabismus. Methods Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was obtained in 95 patients with pulley heterotopy, of whom 56 had childhood-onset pattern strabismus, and was compared with published data on 28 patients aged 69 ± 12 years who had sagging eye syndrome. Control data were from age-matched with no strabismus. Results Patients with childhood-onset strabismus had intact lateral rectus–superior rectus band ligaments and straight extraocular muscle paths but exhibited pulley array A pattern–associated incyclorotation or V pattern–associated excyclorotation. Rectus transposition surgery collapsed patterns. Patients with sagging eye syndrome exhibited blepharoptosis, superior sulcus defect, and inferolateral displacement of rectus pulleys with elongation of extraocular muscles that followed curved paths. Symmetrical lateral rectus pulley sag was associated with divergence paralysis esotropia; asymmetrical sag >1 mm, with cyclovertical strabismus. Both lateral rectus resection and medial rectus recession treated divergence paralysis esotropia. Partial vertical rectus tenotomy treated cyclovertical strabismus. Conclusions Childhood onset pulley abnormalities are associated with A or V pattern strabismus and external anatomical features suggest that these pulley defects are probably congenital. Adult onset pulley defects commonly result from age-related tissue involution and external features such as adnexal laxity are also helpful in recognizing involution as a possible etiology of strabismus. PMID:25173891

  11. Subcutaneous Connective Tissue Reactions to Various Endodontic Biomaterials: An Animal Study

    PubMed Central

    Saghiri, Mohammad Ali; Tanideh, Nader; Garcia-Godoy, Franklin; Lotfi, Mehrdad; Karamifar, Kasra; Amanat, Dariush

    2013-01-01

    Background and aims Biocompatibility of root-end filling materials is a matter of debate. The aim of this study was to compare the biocompatibility of a variety of commercial ProRoot WMTA cements and a resin-based cement (Geristore®) with different pH values of setting reaction and different aluminum contents, implanted into the subcutaneous connective tissue of rats at various time intervals. Materials and methods Fifty Sprague-Dawley rats were used in this study. Polyethylene tubes were filled with Angelus WMTA, ProRoot WMTA, Bioaggregate, and Geristore. Empty control tubes were implanted into subcutaneous tissues and harvested at 7-, 14-, 28- and 60-day intervals. Tissue sections of 5 ?m were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and observed under a light microscope. Inflammatory reactions were categorized as 0, none (without inflammatory cells); 1, mild (inflammatory cells ?25); 2, moderate (25–125 inflammatory cells); and 3, severe (>125 inflammatory cells). Statistical analysis was performed with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann Whitney U tests. Results ProRoot WMTA and Angelus elicited significantly less inflammation than other materials (P<0.05). After 7 days, however, all the materials induced significantly more inflammation than the controls (P<0.05). Angelus-MTA group exhi-bited no significant differences from the Bioaggregate group (P=0.15); however, ProRoot WMTA elicited significantly less inflammation than Bioaggregate (P=0.02). Geristore induced significantly more inflammation than other groups (P<0.05). Conclusion Geristore induced an inflammatory response higher than ProRoot WMTA; therefore, it is not recommended for clinical use. PMID:23486841

  12. The roles of connective tissue growth factor in the development of anastomotic esophageal strictures

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Haibin; Zhou, Zhihua; Wu, Yaoyi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to investigate the roles of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in the development of anastomotic strictures after surgical repair of the esophagus. Material and methods Tissues collected from the patients were divided into three groups based on the results of endoscopy and clinical grading. Patients without dysphagia after esophagectomy were used as the control population. The protein levels of CTGF, TGF-?1, Smad2, and Smad4 were determined by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and western blot analyses, while the mRNA levels of the two growth factors were evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Results Compared with the control group, significantly increased (p < 0.01) levels of CTGF and TGF-?1 protein were observed in the anastomotic stenosis (AS) group, and levels of the two proteins detected by the IHC and western blot analyses were also significantly increased with the increasing severity of stenosis (p < 0.05). The mRNA levels of CTGF and TGF-?1 in the tissues collected from the patients with stenosis were significantly up-regulated (p < 0.05) as compared with those from the control group. In addition, the levels of Smad2 and Smad4 protein were also significantly increased (p < 0.05) with the increasing severity of stenosis, and the protein levels were positively correlated with the levels of CTGF (r = 0.59, p < 0.05) and TGF-?1 (r = 0.63, p < 0.05). Conclusions Inhibition of CTGF protein or mRNA expression may be a distinctive and effective therapy for the treatment of postoperative anastomotic strictures. PMID:26322089

  13. Dynamic Vibration Cooperates with Connective Tissue Growth Factor to Modulate Stem Cell Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Zhixiang; Zerdoum, Aidan B.; Duncan, Randall L.

    2014-01-01

    Vocal fold disorders affect 3–9% of the U.S. population. Tissue engineering offers an alternative strategy for vocal fold repair. Successful engineering of vocal fold tissues requires a strategic combination of therapeutic cells, biomimetic scaffolds, and physiologically relevant mechanical and biochemical factors. Specifically, we aim to create a vocal fold-like microenvironment to coax stem cells to adopt the phenotype of vocal fold fibroblasts (VFFs). Herein, high frequency vibratory stimulations and soluble connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) were sequentially introduced to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) cultured on a poly(?-caprolactone) (PCL)-derived microfibrous scaffold for a total of 6 days. The initial 3-day vibratory culture resulted in an increased production of hyaluronic acids (HA), tenascin-C (TNC), decorin (DCN), and matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP1). The subsequent 3-day CTGF treatment further enhanced the cellular production of TNC and DCN, whereas CTGF treatment alone without the vibratory preconditioning significantly promoted the synthesis of collagen I (Col 1) and sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAGs). The highest level of MMP1, TNC, Col III, and DCN production was found for cells being exposed to the combined vibration and CTGF treatment. Noteworthy, the vibration and CTGF elicited a differential stimulatory effect on elastin (ELN), HA synthase 1 (HAS1), and fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1). The mitogenic activity of CTGF was only elicited in naïve cells without the vibratory preconditioning. The combined treatment had profound, but opposite effects on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, Erk1/2 and p38, and the Erk1/2 pathway was critical for the observed mechano-biochemical responses. Collectively, vibratory stresses and CTGF signals cooperatively coaxed MSCs toward a VFF-like phenotype and accelerated the synthesis and remodeling of vocal fold matrices. PMID:24456068

  14. Insights into IL-37, the role in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wang-Dong; Zhao, Yi; Liu, Yi

    2015-12-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by the impaired function and the destruction of tissues that are caused by an immune response in which aberrant antibodies are generated and attack the body's own cells and tissues. Interleukin (IL) -37, a new member of the IL-1 family, broadly reduces innate inflammation as well as acquired immune responses. Recently, studies have shown that expression of IL-37 was abnormal in autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), psoriasis, Graves' disease (GD). In addition, functional analysis indicated that IL-37 is negatively involved in the development and pathogenesis of these autoimmune disorders. The strong association of this cytokine with autoimmune diseases promotes us to systematically review what had been published recently on the crucial nature of IL-37 in relation to autoimmune diseases gaining attention for its regulatory capability in these autoimmune disorders. PMID:26264940

  15. Human autoimmune diseases: a comprehensive update.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifeng; Wang, Fu-Sheng; Gershwin, M Eric

    2015-10-01

    There have been significant advances in our understanding of human autoimmunity that have led to improvements in classification and diagnosis and, most importantly, research advances in new therapies. The importance of autoimmunity and the mechanisms that lead to clinical disease were first recognized about 50 years ago following the pioneering studies of Macfarlane Burnett and his Nobel Prize-winning hypothesis of the 'forbidden clone'. Such pioneering efforts led to a better understanding not only of autoimmunity, but also of lymphoid cell development, thymic education, apoptosis and deletion of autoreactive cells. Contemporary theories suggest that the development of an autoimmune disease requires a genetic predisposition and environmental factors that trigger the immune pathways that lead, ultimately, to tissue destruction. Despite extensive research, there are no genetic tools that can be used clinically to predict the risk of autoimmune disease. Indeed, the concordance of autoimmune disease in identical twins is 12-67%, highlighting not only a role for environmental factors, but also the potential importance of stochastic or epigenetic phenomena. On the other hand, the identification of cytokines and chemokines, and their cognate receptors, has led to novel therapies that block pathological inflammatory responses within the target organ and have greatly improved the therapeutic effect in patients with autoimmune disease, particularly rheumatoid arthritis. Further advances involving the use of multiplex platforms for diagnosis and identification of new therapeutic agents should lead to major breakthroughs within the next decade. PMID:26212387

  16. Smell and autoimmunity: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Perricone, Carlo; Shoenfeld, Netta; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; de Carolis, Caterina; Perricone, Roberto; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2013-08-01

    The sense of smell is an ancient sensory modality vital for sampling and perceiving the chemical composition of surrounding environments. Olfaction involves a pathway of biochemical and electrophysiological processes, which allows the conversion of molecular information into sensations. Disturbances in the olfactory function have been investigated mainly in neurological/neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases; impaired sense of smell has been associated with depressed mood. Only recently, smell capability was tested in other diseases, particularly autoimmune diseases. Shoenfeld and colleagues opened this chapter showing that patients affected with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have disturbances in their olfactory functions and revealed its association with neuropsychiatric manifestations of the disease. This evidence was confirmed in experimental models and replicated in other SLE populations. The connection between autoimmunity and the sense of smell was lately emphasized by studies on patients with Sjögren's syndrome and in patients with other autoimmune/immune-mediated diseases, such as polydermatomyositis, recurrent spontaneous abortion, and hereditary angioedema. Genetic susceptibility and hormonal and environmental factors may play a role in these conditions. Olfactory receptor gene clusters are located in proximity to key locus of susceptibility for autoimmune diseases such as the major histocompatibility complex, suggesting not only a physic linkage, but a functional association. Nonetheless, gender- and hormone-mediated effects are fundamental in the development of autoimmune diseases. The different connections between smell and autoimmunity, genes and hormones may suggest that this is another tessera of a mosaic which is waiting the answer of Oedipus. PMID:23233263

  17. Experiment K-6-02. Biomedical, biochemical and morphological alterations of muscle and dense, fibrous connective tissues during 14 days of spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vailas, A.; Zernicke, R.; Grindeland, R.; Kaplanski, A.

    1990-01-01

    Findings on the connective tissue response to short-term space flight (12 days) are discussed. Specifically, data regarding the biochemical, biomechanical and morphological characteristics of selected connective tissues (humerus, vertebral body, tendon and skeletal muscle) of growing rats is given. Results are given concerning the humerus cortical bone, the vertebral bone, nutritional effects on bone biomechanical properties, and soft tense fiber connective tissue response.

  18. Sirolimus for Autoimmune Disease of Blood Cells

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-20

    Autoimmune Pancytopenia; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS); Evans Syndrome; Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Autoimmune Neutropenia; Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic; Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Rheumatoid Arthritis

  19. Orthotic considerations for dense connective tissue and articular cartilage--the need for optimal movement and stress.

    PubMed

    McKee, Pat; Hannah, Susan; Priganc, Victoria W

    2012-01-01

    Orthotic intervention is an essential component of hand rehabilitation, addressing biological factors that affect activity and participation. Functional, pain-free joint mobility requires skeletal stability, healthy articular cartilage, and appropriate extensibility of periarticular dense connective tissues (DCTs). This article addresses basic science underlying clinical reasoning when considering orthoses to maintain or restore structural integrity, mobility and function of DCT structures, and articular cartilage. However, these tissues often have different and sometimes conflicting requirements for the maintenance and restoration of integrity and health. The duration of immobilization, especially at end range, should be carefully considered, as it impairs nutrition of tissues and adversely compresses articular cartilage, causing injury that may not be reversible. Immobilization also reduces extensibility of DCT. Thus, an intermittent orthotic wearing schedule is suggested, allowing movement wherever possible to promote tissue health. To optimize benefits and minimize harmful effects of orthotic intervention, further research on physiological responses of human tissues to immobilization and tension is needed. PMID:22507215

  20. Intramuscular Connective Tissue Differences in Spastic and Control Muscle: A Mechanical and Histological Study

    PubMed Central

    de Bruin, Marije; Smeulders, Mark J.; Kreulen, Michiel; Huijing, Peter A.; Jaspers, Richard T

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) of the spastic type is a neurological disorder characterized by a velocity-dependent increase in tonic stretch reflexes with exaggerated tendon jerks. Secondary to the spasticity, muscle adaptation is presumed to contribute to limitations in the passive range of joint motion. However, the mechanisms underlying these limitations are unknown. Using biopsies, we compared mechanical as well as histological properties of flexor carpi ulnaris muscle (FCU) from CP patients (n?=?29) and healthy controls (n?=?10). The sarcomere slack length (mean 2.5 µm, SEM 0.05) and slope of the normalized sarcomere length-tension characteristics of spastic fascicle segments and single myofibre segments were not different from those of control muscle. Fibre type distribution also showed no significant differences. Fibre size was significantly smaller (1933 µm2, SEM 190) in spastic muscle than in controls (2572 µm2, SEM 322). However, our statistical analyses indicate that the latter difference is likely to be explained by age, rather than by the affliction. Quantities of endomysial and perimysial networks within biopsies of control and spastic muscle were unchanged with one exception: a significant thickening of the tertiary perimysium (3-fold), i.e. the connective tissue reinforcement of neurovascular tissues penetrating the muscle. Note that this thickening in tertiary perimysium was shown in the majority of CP patients, however a small number of patients (n?=?4 out of 23) did not have this feature. These results are taken as indications that enhanced myofascial loads on FCU is one among several factors contributing in a major way to the aetiology of limitation of movement at the wrist in CP and the characteristic wrist position of such patients. PMID:24977410

  1. Alteration of Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF) Expression in Orbital Fibroblasts from Patients with Graves’ Ophthalmopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pei-Chen; Wei, Yau-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Graves’ ophthalmopathy (GO) is a disfiguring and sometimes blinding disease, which is characterized by inflammation and swelling of orbital tissues, with fibrosis and adipogenesis being predominant features. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the expression levels of fibrosis-related genes, especially that of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), are altered in orbital fibroblasts of patients with GO. The role of oxidative stress in the regulation of CTGF expression in GO orbital fibroblasts is also examined. By a SYBR Green-based real time quantitative PCR (RT-QPCR), we demonstrated that the mRNA expression levels of fibronectin, apolipoprotein J, and CTGF in cultured orbital fibroblasts from patients with GO were significantly higher than those of age-matched normal controls (p = 0.007, 0.037, and 0.002, respectively). In addition, the protein expression levels of fibronectin, apolipoprotein J, and CTGF analyzed by Western blot were also significantly higher in GO orbital fibroblasts (p = 0.046, 0.032, and 0.008, respectively) as compared with the control. Furthermore, after treatment of orbital fibroblasts with a sub-lethal dose of hydrogen peroxide (200 ?M H2O2), we found that the H2O2-induced increase of CTGF expression was more pronounced in the GO orbital fibroblasts as compared with those in normal controls (20% vs. 7%, p = 0.007). Importantly, pre-incubation with antioxidants including N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and vitamin C, respectively, resulted in significant attenuation of the induction of CTGF in GO orbital fibroblasts in response to H2O2 (p = 0.004 and 0.015, respectively). Taken together, we suggest that oxidative stress plays a role in the alteration of the expression of CTGF in GO orbital fibroblasts that may contribute to the pathogenesis and progression of GO. Antioxidants may be used in combination with the therapeutic agents for effective treatment of GO. PMID:26599235

  2. Alteration of Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF) Expression in Orbital Fibroblasts from Patients with Graves' Ophthalmopathy.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chieh-Chih; Wu, Shi-Bei; Chang, Pei-Chen; Wei, Yau-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO) is a disfiguring and sometimes blinding disease, which is characterized by inflammation and swelling of orbital tissues, with fibrosis and adipogenesis being predominant features. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the expression levels of fibrosis-related genes, especially that of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), are altered in orbital fibroblasts of patients with GO. The role of oxidative stress in the regulation of CTGF expression in GO orbital fibroblasts is also examined. By a SYBR Green-based real time quantitative PCR (RT-QPCR), we demonstrated that the mRNA expression levels of fibronectin, apolipoprotein J, and CTGF in cultured orbital fibroblasts from patients with GO were significantly higher than those of age-matched normal controls (p = 0.007, 0.037, and 0.002, respectively). In addition, the protein expression levels of fibronectin, apolipoprotein J, and CTGF analyzed by Western blot were also significantly higher in GO orbital fibroblasts (p = 0.046, 0.032, and 0.008, respectively) as compared with the control. Furthermore, after treatment of orbital fibroblasts with a sub-lethal dose of hydrogen peroxide (200 ?M H2O2), we found that the H2O2-induced increase of CTGF expression was more pronounced in the GO orbital fibroblasts as compared with those in normal controls (20% vs. 7%, p = 0.007). Importantly, pre-incubation with antioxidants including N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and vitamin C, respectively, resulted in significant attenuation of the induction of CTGF in GO orbital fibroblasts in response to H2O2 (p = 0.004 and 0.015, respectively). Taken together, we suggest that oxidative stress plays a role in the alteration of the expression of CTGF in GO orbital fibroblasts that may contribute to the pathogenesis and progression of GO. Antioxidants may be used in combination with the therapeutic agents for effective treatment of GO. PMID:26599235

  3. Imaging the Effect of Acupuncture Needling On Human Connective Tissue in Vivo E.E. Konofagou1

    E-print Network

    Konofagou, Elisa E.

    behavior during acupuncture needle manipulation, and may become a valuable tool for future studies. Acupuncture needle manipulation is an important and often overlooked aspect of acupuncture treatments. NeedleImaging the Effect of Acupuncture Needling On Human Connective Tissue in Vivo E.E. Konofagou1 , G

  4. Ectopic mineralization disorders of the extracellular matrix of connective tissue: Molecular genetics and pathomechanisms of aberrant calcification

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiaoli; Jiang, Qiujie; Uitto, Jouni

    2013-01-01

    Ectopic mineralization of connective tissues is a complex process leading to deposition of calcium phosphate complexes in the extracellular matrix, particularly affecting the skin and the arterial blood vessels and common in age-associated disorders. A number of initiating and contributing metabolic and environmental factors are linked to aberrant mineralization in these diseases, making the identification of precise pathomechanistic pathways exceedingly difficult. However, there has been significant recent progress in understanding the ectopic mineralization processes through study of heritable single-gene disorders, which have allowed identification of discreet pathways and contributing factors leading to aberrant connective tissue mineralization. These studies have provided support for the concept of an intricate mineralization/anti-mineralization network present in peripheral connective tissues, providing a perspective to development of pharmacologic approaches to limit the phenotypic consequences of ectopic mineralization. This overview summarizes the current knowledge of ectopic heritable mineralization disorders, with accompanying animal models, focusing on pseudoxanthoma elasticum and generalized arterial calcification of infancy, two autosomal recessive diseases manifesting with extensive connective tissue mineralization in the skin and the cardiovascular system. PMID:23891698

  5. Accumulation of connective tissue growth factor+ cells during the early phase of rat traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background Glial scar formation is a common histopathological feature of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Astrogliosis and expression of transforming growth factor beta (TGF-?) are key components of scar formation and blood-brain barrier modulation. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is considered a cytokine mediating the effects of TGF-?. Methods Here, we studied the CTGF expression in an open-skull weight-drop-induced TBI, with a focus on the early phase, most amenable to therapy. Results In normal rat brains of our study, CTGF+ cells were rarely observed. Significant parenchymal accumulation of CTGF+ non-neuron cells was observed 72 h post-TBI and increased continuously during the investigating time. We also observed that the accumulated CTGF+ non-neuron cells were mainly distributed in the perilesional areas and showed activated astrocyte phenotypes with typical stellate morphologic characteristics. Conclusion Our observations demonstrated the time-dependent and lesion-associated accumulation of cellular CTGF expression in TBI, suggesting a pathological role of CTGF in TBI. Virtual Slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http://www.diagnosticpathology.diagnomx.eu/vs/3963462091241165 PMID:25012526

  6. Anticyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies in patients with mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Takasaki, Yoshinari; Yamanaka, Kenjiro; Takasaki, Chiho; Matsushita, Masakazu; Yamada, Hirofumi; Nawata, Masuyuki; Matsudaira, Ran; Ikeda, Keigo; Kaneda, Kazuhiko; Hashimoto, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    The clinical significance of anticyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibodies in patients with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) was assessed. Altogether, 86 sera from MCTD patients, 96 from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, 42 from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, 23 from systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients, 21 from polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM) patients, and 17 from those with Sjögren's syndrome (SjS) were tested for anti-CCP antibodies using an enzyme-lined immunosorbent assay. Among the 96 RA patients, anti-CCP antibodies were detected in 85%, with the frequency being significantly higher than in MCTD, SLE, SSc, PM/DM, and SjS patients (9%, 14%, 13%, 14%, and 18%, respectively; P < 0.001). Among eight MCTD patients who fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for RA, only 50% had anti-CCP antibodies, and the prevalence was significantly lower than for all RA patients (p < 0.01). All eight patients who fulfilled the criteria for RA had overlap of SLE and SSc, except one patient, whereas the four anti-CCP-positive patients who did not fulfill the criteria for RA had SjS without overlapping features of SLE and SSc; moreover, most of their antibody titers were low. These results suggested that anti-CCP antibodies are associated with RA in MCTD patients, but careful diagnosis of RA is required if patients with low titers of anti-CCP antibodies lack overlapping SLE and SSc. PMID:17143695

  7. Significance of Pulmonary Arterial Pressure as a Prognostic Indicator in Lung-Dominant Connective Tissue Disease

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Atsushi; Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Naohiro; Kondoh, Yasuhiro; Kimura, Tomoki; Kataoka, Kensuke; Matsuda, Toshiaki; Yokoyama, Toshiki; Sakamoto, Koji; Nishiyama, Osamu; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2014-01-01

    Background Lung-dominant connective tissue disease (LD-CTD) is a new concept for classifying the subset of patients with interstitial pneumonia who have clinical features suggesting an associated CTD, but whose features fall short of a clear diagnosis of CTD under the current rheumatologic classification systems. The impact of mean pulmonary arterial pressure (MPAP) in LD-CTD has not been sufficiently elucidated. Objectives To evaluate the survival impact of MPAP measured during the initial evaluation in patients with LD-CTD. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the initial evaluation data of 100 LD-CTD patients undergoing pulmonary function test, 6-min walk test (6MWT), and right heart catheterization (RHC). Results The mean MPAP was 16.2±4.4 mm Hg, and 18 patients had MPAP?20 mm Hg. A univariate Cox proportional hazard model showed that MPAP and several variables have a statistically significant impact on survival. With stepwise, multivariate Cox proportional analysis, MPAP (HR ?=?1.293; 95% CI 1.130–1.480; p<0.001) and mean forced vital capacity (FVC) % predicted (HR?=?0.958; 95% CI 0.930–0.986; p?=?0.004) were shown to be independent determinants of survival. Conclusions Higher MPAP and lower %FVC at the initial evaluation were significant independent prognostic factors of LD-CTD. MPAP evaluation provides additional information of disease status and will help physicians to predict mortality in LD-CTD. PMID:25268705

  8. Repetitive differential finger motion increases shear strain between the flexor tendon and subsynovial connective tissue.

    PubMed

    Tat, Jimmy; Kociolek, Aaron M; Keir, Peter J

    2013-10-01

    Non-inflammatory fibrosis and thickening of the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) are characteristic in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) patients. These pathological changes have been linked to repetitive hand tasks that create shear forces between the flexor tendons and SSCT. We measured the relative motion of the flexor digitorum superficialis tendon and SSCT during two repetitive finger tasks using color Doppler ultrasound. Twelve participants performed flexion-extension cycles for 30?min with the long finger alone (differential movement) and with all four fingers together (concurrent movement). Shear strain index (SSI, a relative measure of excursion in flexion and extension) and maximum velocity ratio (MVR, the ratio of SSCT versus tendon during flexion and extension) were used to represent shear. A linear effect of exertion time was significant and corresponded with larger tendon shear in differential motion. The flexion SSI increased 20.4% from the first to the 30th minute, while MVR decreased 8.9% in flexion and 8.7% in extension. No significant changes were found during concurrent motion. These results suggest that exposure to repetitive differential finger tasks may increase the risk of shear injury in the carpal tunnel. PMID:23729391

  9. Connective tissue disease-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension in Chinese patients.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yan-Jie; Jiang, Xin; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Yong; Gao, Lan; Wang, Yu; Li, Guang-Tao; Hong, Tao; Huo, Yong; Jing, Zhi-Cheng; Zhang, Zhuo-Li

    2014-10-01

    We sought to investigate the characteristics, survival and risk factors for mortality in Chinese patients with connective tissue disease (CTD)-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension (APAH) in modern therapy era. 129 consecutive adult patients who visited one of three referral centres in China with a diagnosis of CTD-APAH confirmed by right heart catheterisation during the previous 5 years were enrolled. The end-point was all-cause death or data censoring. Systemic lupus erythematosus was the most common underlying CTD (49%) and systemic sclerosis just accounted for 6% in this cohort. The overall survival at 1 and 3 years was 92% and 80%, respectively. Pericardial effusion, a shorter 6-min walk distance, lower mixed venous oxygen saturation, higher pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and lower total cholesterol levels were all associated with a higher risk of death among the study population. Higher PVR and ALP were independent predictors of mortality. In conclusion, unlike in western patients, systemic lupus erythematosus is the most common underlying disease in Chinese patients with CTD-APAH. The survival of Chinese patients with CTD-APAH in the modern treatment era is similar to that in western countries. Elevated PVR and ALP are independent risk factors for poor outcomes. PMID:24791829

  10. Connective Tissue Mineralization in Abcc6?/? Mice, a Model for Pseudoxanthoma Elasticum

    PubMed Central

    Kavukcuoglu, N. Beril; Li, Qiaoli; Pleshko, Nancy; Uitto, Jouni

    2012-01-01

    Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) is a heritable multisystem disorder characterized by ectopic mineralization. However, the structure of the mineral deposits, their interactions with the connective tissue matrix, and the details of the progressive maturation of the mineral crystals are currently unknown. In this study, we examined the mineralization processes in Abcc6?/? mice, a model system for PXE, by energy dispersive X-ray, and Fourier transform infrared imaging spectroscopy (FT-IRIS). The results indicated that the principal components of the mineral deposits were calcium and phosphate which co-localized within the histologically demonstrable lesions determined by topographic mapping. The Ca/P ratio increased in samples with progressive mineralization reaching the value comparable to that in endochondral bone. A progressive increase in mineralization was also reflected by increased mineral-to-matrix ratio determined by FT-IRIS. Determination of the mineral phases by FT-IRIS suggested progressive maturation of the mineral deposits from amorphous calcium phosphate to hydroxyapatite. These results provide critical information of the mechanisms of mineralization in PXE, with potential pharmacologic implications. PMID:22421595

  11. Direct determination of fatty acids in fish tissues: quantifying top predator trophic connections.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Christopher C; Nichols, Peter D; Pethybridge, Heidi; Young, Jock W

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acids are a valuable tool in ecological studies because of the large number of unique structures synthesized. They provide versatile signatures that are being increasingly employed to delineate the transfer of dietary material through marine and terrestrial food webs. The standard procedure for determining fatty acids generally involves lipid extraction followed by methanolysis to produce methyl esters for analysis by gas chromatography. By directly transmethylating ~50 mg wet samples and adding an internal standard it was possible to greatly simplify the analytical methodology to enable rapid throughput of 20-40 fish tissue fatty acid analyses a day including instrumental analysis. This method was verified against the more traditional lipid methods using albacore tuna and great white shark muscle and liver samples, and it was shown to provide an estimate of sample dry mass, total lipid content, and a condition index. When large fatty acid data sets are generated in this way, multidimensional scaling, analysis of similarities, and similarity of percentages analysis can be used to define trophic connections among samples and to quantify them. These routines were used on albacore and skipjack tuna fatty acid data obtained by direct methylation coupled with literature values for krill. There were clear differences in fatty acid profiles among the species as well as spatial differences among albacore tuna sampled from different locations. PMID:25376156

  12. Increased serum concentration of BAFF/APRIL and IgA2 subclass in patients with mixed connective tissue disease complicated by interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Toshiyuki; Amano, Hirofumi; Kawano, Shinya; Minowa, Kentaro; Ando, Seiichiro; Watanabe, Takashi; Nakano, Soichiro; Suzuki, Jun; Morimoto, Shinji; Tokano, Yoshiaki; Takasaki, Yoshinari

    2014-03-01

    B cell activating factor (BAFF) and a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) are known to be crucial for B cell maturation and survival, and increased expression of these factors in various autoimmune diseases has been reported. Human B cells produce two IgA subclasses: IgA1 and IgA2, the latter being abundant in the distal intestine, saliva, colostrum and bronchial fluid. We investigated these parameters in patients with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) complicated by interstitial lung disease (ILD+), and compared them with those in MCTD patients without ILD (ILD-). Sixty-three MCTD patients were divided into two groups: 21 ILD+ patients and 42 ILD- patients. In each patient group we analyzed soluble BAFF/APRIL using ELISA, and IgA1 and IgA2 using double immunodiffusion. Furthermore, we analyzed BAFF-APRIL receptors, BCMA, BAFF-R and TACI, using flow cytometry. The ILD+ patients had significantly higher levels of BAFF/APRIL than the ILD- patients. There were significant correlations between BAFF/APRIL, BAFF/KL-6 and APRIL/KL-6. Although there was no significant inter-group difference in the serum IgA1 level, ILD+ patients had a significantly elevated IgA2 level in comparison with ILD- patients. Moreover, although there were no significant inter-group differences in the expression of BCMA, BAFF-R and TACI on B cells, the expression of BAFF-R was significantly decreased in the ILD+ patients. In recent years, relationships between BAFF/APRIL and IgA subclass have been reported. Our results suggest that an elevated level of BAFF/APRIL drives the maturation of B cells, subsequently leading to IgA2 class switching, and possibly to the development of ILD in patients with MCTD. PMID:24252051

  13. New Coupled-Particle Light-Scattering Assay for Detection of Ro/SSA (52 and 60 Kilodaltons) and La/SSB Autoantibodies in Connective Tissue Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bizzaro, Nicola; Bonelli, Fabrizio; Tonutti, Elio; Tozzoli, Renato; Villalta, Danilo

    2001-01-01

    The diagnostic and analytical performance of the coupled-particle light-scattering assay in detecting anti-Ro/SSA autoantibodies (the 60-kDa [Ro60] and the 52-kDa [Ro52] antibodies) and anti-La/SSB autoantibodies was evaluated. The antigens were obtained by recombinant DNA procedures to include the most immunogenic epitopes for each protein by using a prokaryotic expression system. Serum samples from 151 patients with connective tissue diseases and 52 control subjects (including patients with viral infections, patients with Lyme disease, and healthy subjects) were studied. Sensitivities for detection of anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB were 88.2 and 95.2%, respectively; specificities were 97.6 and 98.1%, respectively. The intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV) ranged from 4.3 to 10.9% for anti-Ro/SSA and from 2.8 to 12.5% for anti-La/SSB; interassay CVs ranged from 6.5 to 13.2% and from 8.2 to 14.5%, respectively. Among the anti-Ro/SSA-positive samples, Ro60 was recognized by 66% of the test sera and Ro52 was recognized by 95% of the test sera. Thirty-four percent of the Ro/SSA-positive sera were reactive only with the Ro52 antigen, indicating that anti-Ro52 is the most common antibody specificity recognized by anti-Ro/SSA autoantibodies. No differences were found between the prevalences of anti-Ro60 and anti-Ro52 in relation to systemic lupus erythematosus or Sjögren's syndrome. The results of the present study indicate that this new immunoassay is an efficient diagnostic tool for the detection of anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB antibodies in patients with autoimmune disorders. PMID:11527804

  14. Elevated adiponectin serum levels in women with systemic autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Toussirot, Eric; Gaugler, Béatrice; Bouhaddi, Malika; Nguyen, Nhu Uyen; Saas, Philippe; Dumoulin, Gilles

    2010-01-01

    Adipose tissue produces a wide range of proteins that may influence the immune system. In this study, we assessed the serum levels of leptin, adiponectin, and ghrelin, in association with the measurements of body composition, in 15 female patients with various autoimmune diseases (systemic lupus erythematosus, primary Sjögren's syndrome, sarcoidosis, mixed connective tissue disease, vasculitis, CREST syndrome, and polymyositis) and in 15 healthy female controls. There were no statistically significant differences between the patients and controls with regard to serum leptin, serum ghrelin, global fat mass, adiposity, and fat mass in the android or gynoid regions, whereas serum adiponectin levels were higher in patients than controls (16.3 ± 1.6 ?g/mL versus 9.7 ± 0.6 ?g/mL; P = .01). As adiponectin is known to exhibit potent anti-inflammatory properties, a high adiponectinemia in patients with systemic autoimmune disease may mitigate the inflammatory response. However, the precise consequences of these elevated serum adiponectin levels on the metabolic syndrome development and atherosclerotic cardiovascular risk in this patient population still needs to be determined. PMID:21234350

  15. Autoimmune primary ovarian insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Silva, C A; Yamakami, L Y S; Aikawa, N E; Araujo, D B; Carvalho, J F; Bonfá, E

    2014-01-01

    Primary ovarian insufficiency (POI) is defined as sustained amenorrhea, increased follicle-stimulating hormone and low estrogen levels, whereas diminished ovarian reserve (DOR) is characterized as regular menses and alterations of ovarian reserve tests. POI of autoimmune origin may be associated with adrenal autoimmunity, non-adrenal autoimmunity or isolated. This autoimmune disease is characterized by serum ovarian, adrenocortical or steroidogenic cell autoantibodies. POI of adrenal autoimmune origin is the most frequent type observed in 60-80% of patients. Clinically, amenorrhea is the hallmark of POI, however before menstruation stops completely, irregular cycles occur. Infertility, hot flushes, vaginal atrophy, and dyspareunia are also common. Autoimmune oophoritis is characterized by mononuclear inflammatory cell infiltrate in the theca cells of growing follicles, with early stage follicles without lymphocytic infiltration. This infiltrate includes plasma, B and T-cells. A novel classification criterion for autoimmune POI/DOR is proposed subdividing in three distinct categories (possible, probable and confirmed) according to autoantibodies, autoimmune disease and ovarian histology. Unfortunately, up to date guidelines for the treatment of autoimmune oophoritis are not available. Strategies to POI treatment include hormone replacement and infertility therapy. Assisted conception with donated oocytes has been proven to achieve pregnancy by intra cytoplasmic sperm injection in POI women. PMID:24418305

  16. Myosin Autoimmunity Is Not Essential for Cardiac Inflammation in Acute Chagas' Disease1

    E-print Network

    Engman, David M.

    Myosin Autoimmunity Is Not Essential for Cardiac Inflammation in Acute Chagas' Disease1 Juan S. It has been difficult to determine the contribution of autoimmunity to tissue inflammation, because other severe autoimmune myocarditis. In this case, myosin-specific DTH and Ab production were significantly

  17. The study of cells and tissues Tissues 4 basic types

    E-print Network

    Houde, Peter

    Histology The study of cells and tissues #12;Tissues ­ 4 basic types epithelial connective muscular, alveolar, simple, complex #12;Connective Tissues Non-binding Connective Tissue blood/lymph Binding Connective Tissue loose connective tissue dense connective tissue cartilage bone #12;Non-binding Connective

  18. Association of Extrahepatic Manifestations with Autoimmune Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Guan Wee; Heneghan, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    For many patients with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), the presence of extrahepatic features is well recognised both at the time of presentation and during long-term follow-up. Concomitant 'autoimmune disorders' have been described in 20-50% of patients with AIH, both in adults and children. Indeed, the presence of these associated phenomena has been incorporated into both the original and revised International AIH group scoring systems as an aid to codifying the diagnosis. In acute index presentations, non-specific joint pains sometimes flitting in nature have been reported in 10-60% of patients, and while joint swelling is uncommon, rheumatoid arthritis and mixed connective tissue disease have been reported in 2-4% of patients with AIH. For a majority of patients, these joint symptoms resolve within days of the introduction of immunosuppressive therapy. Rarer features at index presentation include a maculopapular skin rash and unexplained fever, which are features that tend to resolve quickly with treatment. Interestingly, joint pain and stiffness are also well recognised in the context of steroid withdrawal and cessation in AIH. The occasional co-presentation of AIH with coeliac disease is clinically important (1-6%), since for some patients, there is a risk of immunosuppression malabsorption, thus delaying effective treatment. Similarly, the co-existence of selective IgA deficiency (IgAD) can occur in patients with coeliac disease or in isolation. Selective IgAD as a co-existing extraheaptic feature seems to be more common in paediatric patients with AIH. For these patients, they are at an increased risk of respiratory and sinus infections. Although, typically associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis, the presence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD; both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis) has been described in 2-8% of patients with AIH. Interestingly, for patients with autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis, a distinct pattern of IBD has been recently described. Other conditions have been reported at a lower frequency, including Sjogren's syndrome 1-7%, systemic lupus erythematosus 1-3% and glomerulonephritis 1%. Rarer still and at a frequency of <1% include fibrosing alveolitis, haemolytic anaemia, uveitis, mononeuritis multiplex, polymyositis and multiple sclerosis. In contrast, the reported associations between AIH and thyroiditis 8-23%, diabetes 1-10% and psoriasis 3% are commonly seen and notable in clinical practice. PMID:26641498

  19. American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Summit. Read the press release ! Autoimmune Disease Awareness Month AARDA and the NCAPG held two important events for Autoimmune Disease Awareness Month. The State of Autoimmune Disease: a National Summit ...

  20. Methotrexate inhibits neutrophil function by stimulating adenosine release from connective tissue cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cronstein, B N; Eberle, M A; Gruber, H E; Levin, R I

    1991-01-01

    Although commonly used to control a variety of inflammatory diseases, the mechanism of action of a low dose of methotrexate remains a mystery. Methotrexate accumulates intracellularly where it may interfere with purine metabolism. Therefore, we determined whether a 48-hr pretreatment with methotrexate affected adenosine release from [14C]adenine-labeled human fibroblasts and umbilical vein endothelial cells. Methotrexate significantly increased adenosine release by fibroblasts from 4 +/- 1% to 31 +/- 6% of total purine released (EC50, 1 nM) and by endothelial cells from 24 +/- 4% to 42 +/- 7%. Methotrexate-enhanced adenosine release from fibroblasts was further increased to 51 +/- 4% (EC50, 6 nM) and from endothelial cells was increased to 58 +/- 5% of total purine released by exposure to stimulated (fMet-Leu-Phe at 0.1 microM) neutrophils. The effect of methotrexate on adenosine release was not due to cytotoxicity since cells treated with maximal concentrations of methotrexate took up [14C]adenine and released 14C-labeled purine (a measure of cell injury) in a manner identical to control cells. Methotrexate treatment of fibroblasts dramatically inhibited adherence to fibroblasts by both unstimulated neutrophils (IC50, 9 nM) and stimulated neutrophils (IC50, 13 nM). Methotrexate treatment inhibited neutrophil adherence by enhancing adenosine release from fibroblasts since digestion of extracellular adenosine by added adenosine deaminase completely abrogated the effect of methotrexate on neutrophil adherence without, itself, affecting adherence. One hypothesis that explains the effect of methotrexate on adenosine release is that, by inhibition of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) transformylase, methotrexate induces the accumulation of AICAR, the nucleoside precursor of which (5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside referred to hereafter as acadesine) has previously been shown to cause adenosine release from ischemic cardiac tissue. We found that acadesine also promotes adenosine release from and inhibits neutrophil adherence to connective tissue cells. The observation that the antiinflammatory actions of methotrexate are due to the capacity of methotrexate to induce adenosine release may form the basis for the development of an additional class of antiinflammatory drugs. PMID:2006182

  1. NK Cell Autoreactivity and Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Poggi, Alessandro; Zocchi, Maria Raffaella

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidences have pointed out the relevance of natural killer (NK) cells in organ-specific and systemic autoimmune diseases. NK cells bear a plethora of activating and inhibiting receptors that can play a role in regulating reactivity with autologous cells. The activating receptors recognize natural ligands up-regulated on virus-infected or stressed or neoplastic cells. Of note, several autoimmune diseases are thought to be linked to viral infections as one of the first event in inducing autoimmunity. Also, it is conceivable that autoimmunity can be triggered when a dysregulation of innate immunity occurs, activating T and B lymphocytes to react with self-components. This would imply that NK cells can play a regulatory role during adaptive immunity; indeed, innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), comprising the classical CD56+ NK cells, have a role in maintaining or alternating tissue homeostasis secreting protective and/or pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, NK cells display activating receptors involved in natural cytotoxicity and the activating isoforms of receptors for HLA class I that can interact with healthy host cells and induce damage without any evidence of viral infection or neoplastic-induced alteration. In this context, the interrelationship among ILC, extracellular-matrix components, and mesenchymal stromal cells can be considered a key point for the control of homeostasis. Herein, we summarize evidences for a role of NK cells in autoimmune diseases and will give a point of view of the interplay between NK cells and self-cells in triggering autoimmunity. PMID:24550913

  2. Proteoglycan metabolism in the connective tissue of pregnant and non-pregnant human cervix. An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Norman, M; Ekman, G; Ulmsten, U; Barchan, K; Malmström, A

    1991-04-15

    Profound changes occur in the cervix during pregnancy. In particular, the connective tissue is remodelled. To elucidate the mechanisms behind this process, the metabolism of cervical connective tissue was studied using tissue cultures. Cervical biopsies from non-pregnant and pregnant women were incubated with [35S]sulphate. The proteoglycans of the tissue specimens were purified by ion-exchange and gel chromatography and characterized by SDS/PAGE and by enzymic degradation. In the non-pregnant cervix, the incorporation of [35S]sulphate into the proteoglycans was linear for 48 h. During the first 6 h of incubation the accumulation of chiefly one small labelled proteoglycan (apparent Mr 110,000) substituted with dermatan sulphate was recorded. This is in accordance with the known proteoglycan composition of non-pregnant cervical tissue. In addition, small amounts of two larger radioactive dermatan/chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans (apparent Mr values 220,000 and greater than 500,000) were recorded. After longer periods of incubation the proportion of heparan sulphate proteoglycans increased considerably. The pregnant tissue showed a clearly different composition of labelled proteoglycans. An increased accumulation of the two larger dermatan/chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans was seen in addition to the dominant small dermatan sulphate proteoglycan of the non-pregnant cervix. The rate of accumulation of these two proteoglycans was about 3 times higher in the pregnant tissue, whereas that of the small dermatan sulphate proteoglycan was only increased 2-fold. The fact that the concentration of proteoglycans in the pregnant cervix is approximately one-half of that in the non-pregnant cervix indicates that the turnover of proteoglycans in pregnant cervical tissue is significantly increased. The major effect of this profound change of metabolism was a 50% decrease in proteoglycan content and a 2-fold increased proportion of a dermatan sulphate proteoglycan with an apparent Mr of 220,000. PMID:2025230

  3. Proteoglycan metabolism in the connective tissue of pregnant and non-pregnant human cervix. An in vitro study.

    PubMed Central

    Norman, M; Ekman, G; Ulmsten, U; Barchan, K; Malmström, A

    1991-01-01

    Profound changes occur in the cervix during pregnancy. In particular, the connective tissue is remodelled. To elucidate the mechanisms behind this process, the metabolism of cervical connective tissue was studied using tissue cultures. Cervical biopsies from non-pregnant and pregnant women were incubated with [35S]sulphate. The proteoglycans of the tissue specimens were purified by ion-exchange and gel chromatography and characterized by SDS/PAGE and by enzymic degradation. In the non-pregnant cervix, the incorporation of [35S]sulphate into the proteoglycans was linear for 48 h. During the first 6 h of incubation the accumulation of chiefly one small labelled proteoglycan (apparent Mr 110,000) substituted with dermatan sulphate was recorded. This is in accordance with the known proteoglycan composition of non-pregnant cervical tissue. In addition, small amounts of two larger radioactive dermatan/chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans (apparent Mr values 220,000 and greater than 500,000) were recorded. After longer periods of incubation the proportion of heparan sulphate proteoglycans increased considerably. The pregnant tissue showed a clearly different composition of labelled proteoglycans. An increased accumulation of the two larger dermatan/chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans was seen in addition to the dominant small dermatan sulphate proteoglycan of the non-pregnant cervix. The rate of accumulation of these two proteoglycans was about 3 times higher in the pregnant tissue, whereas that of the small dermatan sulphate proteoglycan was only increased 2-fold. The fact that the concentration of proteoglycans in the pregnant cervix is approximately one-half of that in the non-pregnant cervix indicates that the turnover of proteoglycans in pregnant cervical tissue is significantly increased. The major effect of this profound change of metabolism was a 50% decrease in proteoglycan content and a 2-fold increased proportion of a dermatan sulphate proteoglycan with an apparent Mr of 220,000. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 7. PMID:2025230

  4. Human Cytomegalovirus and Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) represents a prototypic pathogenic member of the ?-subgroup of the herpesvirus family. A range of HCMV features like its lytic replication in multiple tissues, the lifelong persistence through periods of latency and intermitting reactivation, the extraordinary large proteome, and extensive manipulation of adaptive and innate immunity make HCMV a high profile candidate for involvement in autoimmune disorders. We surveyed the available literature for reports on HCMV association with onset or exacerbation of autoimmune disease. A causative linkage between HCMV and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc), diabetes mellitus type 1, and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is suggested by the literature. However, a clear association of HCMV seroprevalence and disease could not be established, leaving the question open whether HCMV could play a coresponsible role for onset of disease. For convincing conclusions population-based prospective studies must be performed in the future. Specific immunopathogenic mechanisms by which HCMV could contribute to the course of autoimmune disease have been suggested, for example, molecular mimicry by UL94 in SSc and UL83/pp65 in SLE patients, as well as aggravation of joint inflammation by induction and expansion of CD4+/CD28? T-cells in RA patients. Further studies are needed to validate these findings and to lay the grounds for targeted therapeutic intervention. PMID:24967373

  5. An Evaluation of Collagen Metabolism in Non Human Primates Associated with the Bion 11 Space Program-Markers of Urinary Collagen Turnover and Muscle Connective Tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vailas, Arthur C.; Martinez, Daniel A.

    1999-01-01

    Patients exhibiting changes in connective tissue and bone metabolism also show changes in urinary by-products of tissue metabolism. Furthermore, the changes in urinary connective tissue and bone metabolites precede alterations at the tissue macromolecular level. Astronauts and Cosmonauts have also shown suggestive increases in urinary by-products of mineralized and non-mineralized tissue degradation. Thus, the idea of assessing connective tissue and bone response in spaceflight monkeys by measurement of biomarkers in urine has merit. Other investigations of bone and connective histology, cytology and chemistry in the Bion 11 monkeys will allow for further validation of the relationship of urinary biomarkers and tissue response. In future flights the non-invasive procedure of urinary analysis may be useful in early detection of changes in these tissues. The purpose of this grant investigation was to evaluate mineralized and non-mineralized connective tissue responses of non-human primates to microgravity by the non-invasive analysis of urinary biomarkers. Secondly, we also wanted to assess muscle connective tissue adaptive changes in three weight-bearing skeletal muscles: the soleus, media] gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior by obtaining pre-flight and post-flight small biopsy specimens in collaboration with Dr. V. Reggie Edgerton's laboratory at the University of California at Los Angeles.

  6. An Evaluation of Collagen Metabolism in Non Human Primates Associated with the Bion 11 Space Program-Markers of Urinary Collagen Turnover and Muscle Connective Tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vailas, Arthur C.; Martinez, Daniel A.

    1999-01-01

    Patients exhibiting changes in connective tissue and bone metabolism also show changes in urinary by-products of tissue metabolism. Furthermore, the changes in urinary connective tissue and bone metabolites precede alterations at the tissue macromolecular level. Astronauts and Cosmonauts have also shown suggestive increases in urinary by-products of mineralized and non-mineralized tissue degradation. Thus, the idea of assessing connective tissue and bone response in spaceflight monkeys by measurement of biomarkers in urine has merit. Other investigations of bone and connective histology, cytology and chemistry in the Bion 11 monkeys will allow for further validation of the relationship of urinary biomarkers and tissue response. In future flights the non-invasive procedure of urinary analysis may be useful in early detection of changes in these tissues. Purpose: The purpose of this grant investigation was to evaluate mineralized and non-mineralized connective tissue responses of non-human primates to microgravity by the non-invasive analysis of urinary biomarkers. Secondly, we also wanted to assess muscle connective tissue adaptive changes in three weight-bearing skeletal muscles: the soleus, medial gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior by obtaining pre-flight and post-flight small biopsy specimens in collaboration with Dr. V. Reggie Edgerton's laboratory at the University of California at Los Angeles.

  7. Comparative morphological study on the lingual papillae and their connective tissue cores in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Kouji; Zheng, Jin Hua; Kobayashi, Kan

    2008-08-01

    The morphological structure of the lingual papillae and their connective tissue cores (CTC) in a rabbit were studied using LM and SEM and were compared to that of other animal species. Externally, the filiform papillae distributed on the anterior surface of the dorsal tongue were short and conical with a round base and had a flat area on their anterior upper half. The CTC of the conical filiform papillae had a roughly triangular plate-like structure with a round top. Several small round protrusions were found on both inclined planes of the triangle. Spearhead-like filiform papillae were distributed on the anterior edge of the lingual prominence and branched filiform papillae were on the posteriorly wide area of the prominence. These papillae on the prominence had a slightly ramified CTC that differed from that of the CTC of the conical filiform papillae distributed on the anterior tongue. Dome-like fungiform papillae were distributed among the conical filiform papillae of the anterior tongue and had a CTC with a roundish structure that was almost but, not quite spherical in appearance with 1 to 10 small round concave indentations for taste buds on their upper surface. The foliate papillae had approximately 15 parallel ridges separated by grooves. These ridges contained a parallel thin plate-like CTC exhibited after removal of the epithelium. The vallate papilla was comprised of a spherical central papilla and had a circular wall with a flower-like CTC almost resembling a carnation. The stereostructure of the rabbit's filiform CTC are comparatively described as being morphologically in between those of rodents and those of the guinea pig and Japanese serow. Such evolution has probably occurred due to the species unique masticatory and gustatory needs and functions. PMID:18975613

  8. Mechanisms of bradykinin-induced expression of connective tissue growth factor and nephrin in podocytes.

    PubMed

    Msallem, J Abou; Chalhoub, H; Al-Hariri, M; Saad, L; Jaffa, M A; Ziyadeh, F N; Jaffa, A A

    2015-12-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetes and is characterized by mesangial matrix deposition and podocytopathy, including podocyte loss. The risk factors and mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of DN are still not completely defined. In the present study, we aimed to understand the cellular mechanisms through which activation of B2 kinin receptors contribute to the initiation and progression of DN. Stimulation of cultured rat podocytes with bradykinin (BK) resulted in a significant increase in ROS generation, and this was associated with a significant increase in NADPH oxidase (NOX)1 and NOX4 protein and mRNA levels. BK stimulation also resulted in a signicant increase in the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt, and this effect was inhibited in the presence of NOX1 and Nox4 small interfering (si)RNA. Furthermore, podocytes stimulated with BK resulted in a significant increase in protein and mRNA levels of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and, at the same time, a significant decrease in protein and mRNA levels of nephrin. siRNA targeted against NOX1 and NOX4 significantly inhibited the BK-induced increase in CTGF. Nephrin expression was increased in response to BK in the presence of NOX1 and NOX4 siRNA, thus implicating a role for NOXs in modulating the BK response in podocytes. Moreover, nephrin expression in response to BK was also significantly increased in the presence of siRNA targeted against CTGF. These findings provide novel aspects of BK signal transduction pathways in pathogenesis of DN and identify novel targets for interventional strategies. PMID:26447218

  9. Effect of Connective Tissue Growth Factor on Protein Kinase Expression and Activity in Human Corneal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Radhakrishnan, Siva S.; Blalock, Timothy D.; Robinson, Paulette M.; Secker, Genevieve; Daniels, Julie; Grotendorst, Gary R.; Schultz, Gregory S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate signal transduction pathways for connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in human corneal fibroblasts (HCF). Methods. Expression of 75 kinases in cultures of serum-starved (HCF) were investigated using protein kinase screens, and changes in levels of phosphorylation of 31 different phosphoproteins were determined at 0, 5, and 15 minutes after treatment with CTGF. Levels of phosphorylation of three signal transducing phosphoproteins (extracellular regulated kinase 1 [ERK1], extracellular regulated kinase 2 [ERK2] [MAPKs], and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 [STAT3]) were measured at nine time points after exposure to CTGF using Western immunoblots. Inhibition of Ras, MEK1/2 (MAPKK), and ERK1/2, on CTGF-stimulated fibroblast proliferation and collagen gel contraction was assessed using selective inhibitors farnesylthiosalicylic acid, PD-98059, and SB203580, respectively. Results. Thirty two of the 75 kinases (43%) evaluated by the kinase screen were detected in extracts of quiescent HCF, suggesting these kinases are available to respond acutely to CTGF exposure. Addition of CTGF increased levels of phosphorylation of five phosphoproteins (ERK1 and 2, MEK1/2 [MAPKK], STAT3, and SAPK/JNK), and decreased levels of phosphorylation of 14 phosphoproteins (including protein kinases B and C) after 5 and 15 minutes. Further analysis of ERK1 and 2 and STAT3 phosphorylation showed rapid increases within 1 minute of CTGF exposure that peaked between 5 and 10 minutes then returned to pretreatment levels by 30 minutes. Treatment of HCF with selective inhibitors of Ras, MEK 1/2, and ERK1/2 individually blocked both CTGF induced cell proliferation, and collagen gel contraction. Conclusions. Results from protein kinase screens and selective kinase inhibitors demonstrate Ras/MEK/ERK/STAT3 pathway is required for CTGF signaling in HCF. PMID:23139271

  10. Anti-endothelial cell antibodies in connective tissue diseases associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Dan; Guo, Sheng-Yu; Yang, Li-Li; Zhang, Xiao-Li; Fu, Wen-Yi

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence of anti-endothelial cell antibodies (AECA) in connective tissue diseases (CTD) associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and to corroborate the pathologic function of AECA in PAH-associated CTDs. Methods AECA were detected by cellular enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in sera of 19 PAH-associated CTD patients, 22 CTD patients without PAH involvement, and 20 age- and sex-matched healthy individuals as controls. Using IgG purified from the sera of AECA-positive, AECA-negative, and healthy subjects, the effects of AECA on the expression of ICAM-1 and the chemokine regulated upon activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) in cultured endothelial cells were also evaluated. Results A total of 12 of the 19 (63.2%) CTD patients with PAH, 9 of the 22 (40.9%) CTD patients without PAH, and 1 of the 20 (5%) healthy controls were positive for AECA, which were calculated as ELISA ratio (ER) values. ER values in PAH-associated CTD patients were significantly higher than those with CTD without PAH (3.68±2.05 versus 1.67±1.07, P<0.001). IgG purified from AECA-positive sera induced a significantly increased level of ICAM-1 expression after 48 h incubation (795.2±32.5 pg/mL) compared with AECA-negative or healthy control IgG (231.5±27.1 and 192.8±33.4 pg/mL, respectively; P<0.001). In addition, RANTES production by cultured human pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (HPAECs) increased in both a time- and concentration-dependent manner in response to incubation with purified AECA-positive IgG. Conclusions AECA could be involved in CTD and might participate in the pathogenesis of PAH-associated CTD. PMID:24822109

  11. The regulation of connective tissue growth factor expression influences the viability of human trabecular meshwork cells

    PubMed Central

    Kuespert, Sabrina; Junglas, Benjamin; Braunger, Barbara M; Tamm, Ernst R; Fuchshofer, Rudolf

    2015-01-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) induces extracellular matrix (ECM) synthesis and contractility in human trabecular meshwork (HTM) cells. Both processes are involved in the pathogenesis of primary open-angle glaucoma. To date, little is known about regulation and function of CTGF expression in the trabecular meshwork (TM). Therefore, we analysed the effects of different aqueous humour proteins and stressors on CTGF expression in HTM cells. HTM cells from three different donors were treated with endothelin-1, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1, angiotensin-II, H2O2 and heat shock and were analysed by immunohistochemistry, real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting. Viability after H2O2 treatment was measured in CTGF silenced HTM-N cells and their controls. Latrunculin A reduced expression of CTGF by about 50% compared to untreated HTM cells, whereas endothelin-1, IGF-1, angiotensin-II, heat shock and oxidative stress led to a significant increase. Silencing of CTGF resulted in a delayed expression of ?B-crystallin and in reduced cell viability in comparison to the controls after oxidative stress. Conversely, CTGF treatment led to a higher cell viability rate after H2O2 treatment. CTGF expression is induced by factors that have been linked to glaucoma. An increased level of CTGF appears to protect TM cells against damage induced by stress. The beneficial effect of CTGF for viability of TM cells is likely associated with the effects on increased ECM synthesis and higher contractility of the TM, thereby contributing to reduced aqueous humour outflow facility causing increased intraocular pressure. PMID:25704370

  12. Brachial Neuritis With Phrenic Nerve Involvement in a Patient With a Possible Connective Tissue Disease

    PubMed Central

    Subash, Meera; Patel, Gaurav; Welker, John

    2014-01-01

    Background. Brachial neuritis (BN) is a rare inflammatory condition of peripheral nerves, usually involving the cervicobrachial plexus. These patients present with sudden onset of shoulder and arm pain that evolves into muscle weakness and atrophy.. Case Report. A 33-year-old woman presented with a 1-month history of diffuse pain in her thorax. She had no trauma or inciting incident prior to the onset of this pain and was initially treated for muscle spasms. The patient was seen in the emergency room multiple times and was treated with several courses of antibiotics for pneumonia on the basis of clinical symptoms and abnormal x-rays. The pleuritic chest pain persisted for at least 4 months, and the patient was eventually admitted for worsening pain and dyspnea. On physical examination, crackles were heard at both lung bases, and chest inspection revealed increased expansion in the upper thorax but poor expansion of the lower thorax and mild paradoxical respiration. “Sniff” test revealed no motion of the left hemidiaphragm and reduced motion on the right hemidiaphragm. Her computed tomography scan revealed bilateral atelectasis, more severe at the left base. She reported no symptoms involving her joints or skin or abdomen. Her presentation and clinical course are best explained by BN with a bilateral diaphragmatic weakness. However, she had a positive ANA, RF, anti-RNP antibody, and anti SS-A. Conclusion. Patients with BN can present with diffuse thoracic pain, pleuritic chest pain, and diaphragmatic weakness. Our patient may represent a case of connective tissue disease presenting with brachial plexus neuritis. PMID:26425609

  13. Exercise training in pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with connective tissue diseases

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The objective of this prospective study was to assess short- and long-term efficacy of exercise training (ET) as add-on to medical therapy in patients with connective tissue disease-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension (CTD-APAH). Methods Patients with invasively confirmed CTD-APAH received ET in-hospital for 3 weeks and continued at home for 12 weeks. Efficacy parameters have been evaluated at baseline and after 15 weeks by blinded-observers. Survival rate has been evaluated in a follow-up period of 2.9 ± 1.9 years. Results Twenty-one consecutive patients were included and assessed at baseline, and after 3 weeks, 14 after 15 weeks. Patients significantly improved the mean distance walked in 6 minutes compared to baseline by 67 ± 52 meters after 3 weeks (p < 0.001) and by 71 ± 35 meters after 15 weeks (p = 0.003), scores of quality of life (p < 0.05), heart rate at rest, peak oxygen consumption, oxygen saturation and maximal workload. Systolic pulmonary artery pressure and diastolic systemic blood pressure improved significantly after 3 weeks of ET. The 1- and 2-year overall-survival rates were 100%, the 3-year survival 73%. In one patient lung transplantation was performed 6 months after ET. Conclusion ET as add-on to medical therapy is highly effective in patients with CTD-APAH to improve work capacity, quality of life and further prognostic relevant parameters and possibly improves the 1-, 2- and 3-year survival rate. Further randomized controlled studies are needed to confirm these results. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00491309. PMID:22709477

  14. Brachial Neuritis With Phrenic Nerve Involvement in a Patient With a Possible Connective Tissue Disease.

    PubMed

    Subash, Meera; Patel, Gaurav; Welker, John; Nugent, Kenneth

    2014-01-01

    Background. Brachial neuritis (BN) is a rare inflammatory condition of peripheral nerves, usually involving the cervicobrachial plexus. These patients present with sudden onset of shoulder and arm pain that evolves into muscle weakness and atrophy.. Case Report. A 33-year-old woman presented with a 1-month history of diffuse pain in her thorax. She had no trauma or inciting incident prior to the onset of this pain and was initially treated for muscle spasms. The patient was seen in the emergency room multiple times and was treated with several courses of antibiotics for pneumonia on the basis of clinical symptoms and abnormal x-rays. The pleuritic chest pain persisted for at least 4 months, and the patient was eventually admitted for worsening pain and dyspnea. On physical examination, crackles were heard at both lung bases, and chest inspection revealed increased expansion in the upper thorax but poor expansion of the lower thorax and mild paradoxical respiration. "Sniff" test revealed no motion of the left hemidiaphragm and reduced motion on the right hemidiaphragm. Her computed tomography scan revealed bilateral atelectasis, more severe at the left base. She reported no symptoms involving her joints or skin or abdomen. Her presentation and clinical course are best explained by BN with a bilateral diaphragmatic weakness. However, she had a positive ANA, RF, anti-RNP antibody, and anti SS-A. Conclusion. Patients with BN can present with diffuse thoracic pain, pleuritic chest pain, and diaphragmatic weakness. Our patient may represent a case of connective tissue disease presenting with brachial plexus neuritis. PMID:26425609

  15. Molecular Diagnosis in Autoimmune Skin Blistering Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Otten, J.V.; Hashimoto, T.; Hertl, M.; Payne, A.S.; Sitaru, C.

    2014-01-01

    Blister formation in skin and mucous membranes results from a loss of cell-cell or cell-matrix adhesion and is a common outcome of pathological events in a variety of conditions, including autoimmune and genetic diseases, viral and bacterial infections, or injury by physical and chemical factors. Autoantibodies against structural components maintaining cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion induce tissue damage in autoimmune blistering diseases. Detection of these autoantibodies either tissue-bound or circulating in serum is essential to diagnose the autoimmune nature of disease. Various immunofluorescence methods as well as molecular immunoassays, including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblotting, belong to the modern diagnostic algorithms for these disorders. There is still a considerable need to increase awareness of the rare autoimmune blistering diseases, which often show a severe, chronic-relapsing course, among physicians and the public. This review article describes the immunopathological features of autoimmune bullous diseases and the molecular immunoassays currently available for their diagnosis and monitoring. PMID:24160488

  16. Establishment of the culture model system that reflects the process of terminal differentiation of connective tissue-type mast cells.

    PubMed

    Takano, Hirotsugu; Nakazawa, Shunsuke; Okuno, Yasushi; Shirata, Naritoshi; Tsuchiya, Sohken; Kainoh, Takayuki; Takamatsu, Seigoh; Furuta, Kazuyuki; Taketomi, Yoshitaka; Naito, Yuko; Takematsu, Hiromu; Kozutsumi, Yasunori; Tsujimoto, Gozoh; Murakami, Makoto; Kudo, Ichiro; Ichikawa, Atsushi; Nakayama, Kazuhisa; Sugimoto, Yukihiko; Tanaka, Satoshi

    2008-04-30

    To understand physiological roles of tissue mast cells, we established a culture system where bone marrow-derived immature mast cells differentiate into the connective tissue-type mast cell (CTMC)-like cells through modifying the previous co-culture system with Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts. Our system was found to reproducibly mimic the differentiation of CTMCs on the basis of several criteria, such as granule maturation and sensitivity to cationic secretagogues. The gene expression profile obtained by the microarray analyses was found to reflect many aspects of the differentiation. Our system is thus helpful to gain deeper insights into terminal differentiation of CTMCs. PMID:18381075

  17. Structural changes in connective tissues caused by a moderate laser heating

    SciTech Connect

    Bagratashvili, Viktor N; Bagratashvili, N V; Sviridov, A P; Shakh, G Sh; Ignat'eva, Natalia Yu; Lunin, Valery V; Grokhovskaya, T E; Averkiev, S V

    2002-10-31

    The structural changes in adipose and fibrous tissues caused by 2- and 3-W IR laser irradiation are studied by the methods of IR and Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. It is shown that heating of fibrous tissue samples to 50 {sup 0}C and adipose tissue samples to 75 {sup 0}C by IR laser radiation changes the supramolecular structure of their proteins and triacylglycerides, respectively, without the intramolecular bond breaking. Heating of fibrous tissue to 70 {sup 0}C and adipose tissue to 90 - 110 {sup 0}C leads to a partial reversible denaturation of proteins and to oxidation of fats.

  18. Progesterone and Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Grant C.

    2011-01-01

    Sexual dimorphism in human immune systems is most apparent in the female predominance of certain autoimmune diseases (ADs) like systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Epidemiologic, observational and experimental evidence strongly suggest sex steroids are important modulators of genetic risk in human AD. In this regard, the roles of progesterone (Pg), an immunomodulatory female sex steroid, are poorly understood. Several lines of investigation indicate Pg and synthetic progestins impact risk of AD and immune-mediated injury in different ways depending on their concentrations and their engagement of various Pg receptors expressed in immune organs, immune cells or tissues targeted by immune attack. At low physiologic levels, Pg may enhance interferon-alpha (IFN-?) pathways important in SLE pathogenesis. Commonly used synthetic progestins may have the opposite effect. At pregnancy levels, Pg may suppress disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and multiple sclerosis (MS) via inhibition of T helper type 1 (Th1) and Th17 pathways and induction of anti-inflammatory molecules. Importantly, Pg’s immunomodulatory effects differ from those of estrogens and androgens. An additional layer of complexity arises from apparent interdependence of sex hormone signaling pathways. Identifying mechanisms by which Pg and other sex steroids modulate risk of AD and immune-mediated injury will require clarification of their cellular and molecular targets in vivo. These future studies should be informed by recent genetic discoveries in human AD, particularly those revealing their sex-specific genetic associations. PMID:22193289

  19. Using T-Cells for Transplantation and Autoimmune Therapy

    Cancer.gov

    Transplant complications and autoimmune diseases are primarily caused by T-cell immune responses against normal host tissue or transplanted tissues. Current treatment for these disorders is often not effective, and is typically associated with significant side effects, including global immune suppression. Researchers at NCI's Experimental Transplantation and Immunology Branch have developed a cellular therapy to treat graft-vs.-host disease (GVHD) that results from hematopoetic transplant and other autoimmune disorders.

  20. Coordination between catch connective tissue and muscles through nerves in the spine joint of the sea urchin Diadema setosum.

    PubMed

    Motokawa, Tatsuo; Fuchigami, Yoshiro

    2015-03-01

    Echinoderms have catch connective tissues that change their stiffness as a result of nervous control. The coordination between catch connective tissue and muscles was studied in the spine joint of the sea urchin Diadema setosum. Spine joints are equipped with two kinds of effector: spine muscles and a kind of catch connective tissue, which is called the catch apparatus (CA). The former is responsible for spine movements and the latter for maintenance of spine posture. Diadema show a shadow reaction in which they wave spines when a shadow falls on them, which is a reflex involving the radial nerves. Dynamic mechanical tests were performed on the CA in a joint at which the muscles were severed so as not to interfere with the mechanical measurements. The joint was on a piece of the test that contained other spines and a radial nerve. Darkening of the preparation invoked softening of the CA and spine waving (the shadow reaction). Electrical stimulation of the radial nerve invoked a similar response. These responses were abolished after the nerve pathways from the radial nerve to spines had been cut. A touch applied to the CA stiffened it and the adjacent spines inclined toward the touched CA. A touch to the base of the adjacent spine softened the CA and the spines around the touched spine inclined towards it. The softening of the CA can be interpreted as a response that reduces the resistance of the ligaments to spine movements. Our results clearly show coordination between catch connective tissue and muscles through nerves. PMID:25740901

  1. Spatial arrangement of the heart muscle fascicles and intramyocardial connective tissue in the Spanish fighting bull (Bos taurus).

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Quintana, D; Climent, V; Garcia-Martinez, V; Rojo, M; Hurlé, J M

    1994-01-01

    The spatial arrangement of the muscle fascicles and intramyocardial connective tissue was examined in the ventricles of the heart of the Spanish fighting bull (Bos taurus). In both ventricles, the muscle fascicles of the myocardium are arranged in 3 main directions, forming 3 muscle layers within the ventricular wall. The preferentially vertical arrangement of the muscle fascicles in the superficial and deep layers at the level of the fibrous aortic rings and the base of the semilunar valve leaflets suggests that these fascicles are actively involved in valvular dynamics. After controlled digestion of myocytes and elastic fibres with NaOH, a 3-dimensional arrangement of the scaffolding of connective tissue that supports the muscle fascicles and myocytes was observed. The arrangement and structure of this scaffolding may influence the order of contraction of muscle fascicles in different layers of the ventricle. In addition, differences were observed between the connective tissue scaffolding surrounding the myocytes of the 2 ventricles; these variations were correlated with the different biomechanical properties. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:8014119

  2. Markers of Inflammation and Fibrosis in the Orbital Fat/Connective Tissue of Patients with Graves' Orbitopathy: Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Pawlowski, Przemyslaw; Eckstein, Anja; Johnson, Kristian; Chyczewski, Lech; Mysliwiec, Janusz

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To assess FGF-?, TGF-?, and COX2 expression and immunocompetent cells in the orbital tissue of patients with severe and mild Graves' orbitopathy. Patients and Methods. Orbital tissue was taken from 27 patients with GO: (1) severe GO (n = 18), the mean clinical activity score (CAS) being 8.5 (SD 2.5); and (2) mild GO (n = 9), the mean CAS being 2.2 (SD 0.8), and from 10 individuals undergoing blepharoplasty. The expression of CD4+, CD8+, CD20+, and CD68 and FGF-?, TGF-?, and COX2 in the orbital tissue was evaluated by immunohistochemical methods. Results. We demonstrated predominant CD4+ T cells in severe GO. CD68 expression was observed in the fibrous connective area of mild GO and was robust in severe GO, while the prominent TGF-? expression was seen in all GO. Increased FGF-? expression was observed in the fibroblasts and adipocytes of severe GO. No expression of COX2 was found in patients with GO. Conclusions. Macrophages and CD4 T lymphocytes are both engaged in the active/severe and long stage of inflammation in the orbital tissue. FGF-? and TGF-? expression may contribute to tissue remodeling, fibrosis, and perpetuation of inflammation in the orbital tissue of GO especially in severe GO. PMID:25309050

  3. Increased expression of the stefin A cysteine proteinase inhibitor occurs in the myelomonocytic cell-infiltrated tissues of autoimmune motheaten mice.

    PubMed Central

    Mlinaric-Rascan, I.; Asa, S. L.; Siminovitch, K. A.

    1994-01-01

    Mice homozygous for the motheaten (me) and viable motheaten (me) mutations develop a progressively severe inflammatory disease in association with profound disruption of normal hematopoiesis. These mutant mice have been previously shown to manifest abnormally high expression in the bone marrow of cDNAs encoding three members of the stefin family of cysteine proteinase inhibitors. The data reported here reveal that increases in levels of both stefin transcripts and proteins occur in bone marrow, splenic and pulmonary tissues of me and mev mice, and correlate with the abnormal expansion of stefin A-producing myelomonocytic cells in these tissues. Increases in stefin expression are also apparent in me and mev skin and appear to reflect focal hyperplasia of stefin-producing epidermal cells as well as infiltration by stefin-expressing monocytic and granulocytic cells. Because the increases in stefin protein levels occur in the same tissues that are most adversely affected by the me mutation, it appears that overexpression of these proteins may distinguish the cell population responsible for disease pathogenesis and may be relevant to the severe tissue inflammation and damage observed in these mutant mice. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7943179

  4. Connective tissue growth factor gene expression and decline in renal function in lupus nephritis

    PubMed Central

    TACHAUDOMDACH, CHIRAPORN; KANTACHUVESIRI, SURASAK; CHANGSIRIKULCHAI, SIRIBHA; WIMOLLUCK, SURANGKANA; PINPRADAP, KOSET; KITIYAKARA, CHAGRIYA

    2012-01-01

    In lupus nephritis (LN), kidney inflammation may be followed by fibrosis and progressive decline in function. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-? is a notable mediator of fibrosis, but it has other beneficial roles, thus indicating a need for alternate therapeutic targets for inhibition of fibrosis. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) acts as a downstream mediator of TGF-? in promoting fibrosis, without mediating the immunosuppressive effects of TGF-?. Animal studies show that CTGF may have important roles in renal fibrosis, but data are limited in human subjects. The present study tested the hypothesis that renal CTGF mRNA expression is related to TGF-?1 and collagen I expression and is predictive of renal function deterioration in patients with LN (n=39). Gene expression was measured using multiplex real-time quantitative RT-PCR and renal function was estimated using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) glomerular filtration rate (GFR) equation. Decline in GFR was assessed by regression of GFR at biopsy to 1 year following biopsy. CTGF mRNA expression was significantly correlated with TGF-?1 and collagen I. GFR at biopsy was 89.2±39.2 ml/ min. Renal CTGF mRNA expression correlated inversely with baseline GFR. Renal CTGF mRNA was significantly higher in patients with moderate to severe CKD compared to those in the milder CKD group (low GFR 4.92±4.34 vs. high GFR 1.52±1.94, p<0.005). CTGF mRNA was also higher in patients with subsequent decline in GFR [GFR decline (5.19±4.46) vs. no GFR decline (1.79±1.97); P<0.01]. In conclusion, renal expression of CTGF was positively related to TGF-?1 and collagen I in patients with LN. Furthermore, high CTGF mRNA expression was associated with poor GFR at baseline and subsequent deterioration of kidney function. CTGF expression in the kidney may serve as an early marker for renal disease progression and could be evaluated as a target for therapeutic intervention to prevent renal failure in LN. PMID:22969957

  5. Frequency of Autoantibodies and Connective Tissue Diseases in Chinese Patients with Optic Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Zuohuizi; Huang, Dehui; Wei, Shihui

    2014-01-01

    Background Optic neuritis (ON) is often associated with other clinical or serological markers of connective tissue diseases (CTDs). To date, the effects of autoantibodies on ON are not clear. Purpose To assess the prevalence, clinical patterns, and short outcomes of autoantibodies and Sjögren’s syndrome (SS) involvement in Chinese ON patients and evaluate the relationship between ON, including their subtypes, and autoantibodies. Methods A total of 190 ON patients were divided into recurrent ON (RON), bilateral ON (BON), and isolated monocular ON (ION). Demographic, clinical, and serum autoantibodies data were compared between them with and without SS involvement. Serum was drawn for antinuclear antibody (ANA), extractable nuclear antigen antibodies (SSA/SSB), rheumatoid factor (RF), anticardiolipin antibodies (ACA), and anti-double-stranded DNA antibody (A-ds DNA), anticardiolipin antibody (ACLs), anti-?2-glycoprotein I (?2-GPI) and Aquaporin-4 antibodies (AQP4-Ab). Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) was used to evaluate the atrophy of the optic nerve. Results 68 patients (35.79%) had abnormal autoantibodies, 26(13.68%) patients met diagnostic criteria for CTDs, including 15(7.89%) patients meeting the criteria for SS. Antibodies including SSA/SSB 23 (30.26%) (p1 and p 2<0.001) and AQP4–Ab10 (13.16%) (p1?=?0.044, p2?=?0.01) were significantly different in patients in the RON group when compared with those in the BON (P1?=?RON VS ION) and ION (p2?=?RON VS ION) groups. SS was more common in RON patients (p1?=?0.04, p2?=?0.028). There was no significant difference between SSA/SSB positive and negative patients in disease characteristics or severity. Similar results were obtained when SS was diagnosed in SSA/SSB positive patients. Conclusion RON and BON were more likely associated with abnormal autoantibodies; furthermore, AQP4 antibody, SSA/SSB and SS were more common in the RON patients. AQP4 antibodydetermination is crucial in RON patients who will develop NMO. However, when compared with other autoantibodies, SSA/SSB detected in patients was not significantly associated with disease characteristics or severity. PMID:24950188

  6. Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF/CCN2) Is Negatively Regulated during Neuron-Glioblastoma Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Feitosa, Natalia M.; Faria, Jane Cristina O.; Coelho-Aguiar, Juliana M.; de Souza, Jorge Marcondes; Neto, Vivaldo Moura; Abreu, José Garcia

    2013-01-01

    Connective-tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) is a matricellular-secreted protein involved in complex processes such as wound healing, angiogenesis, fibrosis and metastasis, in the regulation of cell proliferation, migration and extracellular matrix remodeling. Glioblastoma (GBM) is the major malignant primary brain tumor and its adaptation to the central nervous system microenvironment requires the production and remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Previously, we published an in vitro approach to test if neurons can influence the expression of the GBM extracellular matrix. We demonstrated that neurons remodeled glioma cell laminin. The present study shows that neurons are also able to modulate CTGF expression in GBM. CTGF immnoreactivity and mRNA levels in GBM cells are dramatically decreased when these cells are co-cultured with neonatal neurons. As proof of particular neuron effects, neonatal neurons co-cultured onto GBM cells also inhibit the reporter luciferase activity under control of the CTGF promoter, suggesting inhibition at the transcription level. This inhibition seems to be contact-mediated, since conditioned media from embryonic or neonatal neurons do not affect CTGF expression in GBM cells. Furthermore, the inhibition of CTGF expression in GBM/neuronal co-cultures seems to affect the two main signaling pathways related to CTGF. We observed inhibition of TGF? luciferase reporter assay; however phopho-SMAD2 levels did not change in these co-cultures. In addition levels of phospho-p44/42 MAPK were decreased in co-cultured GBM cells. Finally, in transwell migration assay, CTGF siRNA transfected GBM cells or GBM cells co-cultured with neurons showed a decrease in the migration rate compared to controls. Previous data regarding laminin and these results demonstrating that CTGF is down-regulated in GBM cells co-cultured with neonatal neurons points out an interesting view in the understanding of the tumor and cerebral microenvironment interactions and could open up new strategies as well as suggest a new target in GBM control. PMID:23383241

  7. Connective tissue diseases in primary biliary cirrhosis: A population-based cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Li; Zhang, Feng-Chun; Chen, Hua; Zhang, Xuan; Xu, Dong; Li, Yong-Zhe; Wang, Qian; Gao, Li-Xia; Yang, Yun-Jiao; Kong, Fang; Wang, Ke

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To establish the frequency and clinical features of connective tissue diseases (CTDs) in a cohort of Chinese patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). METHODS: Three-hundred and twenty-two Chinese PBC patients were screened for the presence of CTD, and the systemic involvement was assessed. The differences in clinical features and laboratory findings between PBC patients with and without CTD were documented. The diversity of incidence of CTDs in PBC of different countries and areas was discussed. For the comparison of normally distributed data, Student’s t test was used, while non-parametric test (Wilcoxon test) for the non-normally distributed data and 2 × 2 ?2 or Fisher’s exact tests for the ratio. RESULTS: One-hundred and fifty (46.6%) PBC patients had one or more CTDs. The most common CTD was Sjögren’s syndrome (SS, 121 cases, 36.2%). There were nine cases of systemic sclerosis (SSc, 2.8%), 12 of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, 3.7%), nine of rheumatoid arthritis (RA, 2.8%), and 10 of polymyositis (PM, 3.1%) in this cohort. Compared to patients with PBC only, the PBC + SS patients were more likely to have fever and elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), higher serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) levels and more frequent rheumatoid factor (RF) and interstitial lung disease (ILD) incidences; PBC + SSc patients had higher frequency of ILD; PBC + SLE patients had lower white blood cell (WBC) count, hemoglobin (Hb), platelet count, ?-glutamyl transpeptidase and immunoglobulin M levels, but higher frequency of renal involvement; PBC + RA patients had lower Hb, higher serum IgG, alkaline phosphatase, faster ESR and a higher ratio of RF positivity; PBC + PM patients had higher WBC count and a tendency towards myocardial involvement. CONCLUSION: Besides the common liver manifestation of PBC, systemic involvement and overlaps with other CTDs are not infrequent in Chinese patients. When overlapping with other CTDs, PBC patients manifested some special clinical and laboratory features which may have effect on the prognosis. PMID:23964148

  8. Cardiovascular Involvement in Connective Tissue Disease: The Role of Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, XiaoBing; Lou, MeiNa; Li, Yongji; Ye, WenJing; Zhang, ZhiYong; Jia, Xiufen; Shi, HongYing; Zhu, XiaoChun; Wang, LiangXing

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to assess cardiovascular involvement in patients with connective tissue disease (CTD), and determine whether interstitial lung disease (ILD) in these patients is associated with elevated cardiovascular risk. Methods This study evaluated a retrospective cohort of 436 CTD patients admitted to a large teaching hospital in Zhejiang province, China, along with an additional 436 participants of an annual community health screening conducted in the physical examination center who served as age- and gender-matched controls. Demographic, clinical, serologic and imaging characteristics, as well as medications used by each participant were recorded. Cardiovascular involvement was defined by uniform criteria. Correlations between clinical/serologic factors and cardiovascular involvement were determined by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results CTD patients had a significantly higher cardiovascular involvement rate than controls (64.7% vs 23.4%), with higher rates of diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia, elevated systolic and diastolic pressures, C-reactive protein, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and lower albumin and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (all p < 0.05). Furthermore, CTP patients with cardiovascular involvement were significantly older, had higher systolic and diastolic pressures, C-reactive protein, glucose, and uric acid, higher rates of diabetes, hypertension, and use of moderate- to high-dose glucocorticoids, and longer disease duration compared to patients without involvement (all p < 0.05). Moreover, CTD in patients with cardiovascular involvement was more likely to be complicated by ILD (p < 0.01), which manifested as a higher alveolar inflammation score (p < 0.05). In the multivariate analysis, cardiovascular involvement in CTD patients was associated with age, systolic pressure, body mass index, uric acid, disease duration > 2 years, use of moderate- to high-dose glucocorticoids, and ILD with a high alveolar inflammation score. Conclusion Cardiovascular involvement is increased in CTD patients, and is associated with ILD with a higher alveolar inflammation score. Thus, early-stage echocardiography and CT scans should be used to detect potential cardiovascular complications in these patients. PMID:25775471

  9. B-LINK: A hemicentin, plakin and integrin-dependent adhesion system that links tissues by connecting adjacent basement membranes

    PubMed Central

    Morrissey, Meghan A.; Keeley, Daniel P.; Hagedorn, Elliott J.; McClatchey, Shelly T. H.; Chi, Qiuyi; Hall, David H.; Sherwood, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Basement membrane (BM), a sheet-like form of extracellular matrix, surrounds most tissues. During organogenesis specific adhesions between adjoining tissues frequently occur, however their molecular basis is unclear. Using live-cell imaging and electron microscopy we identify an adhesion system that connects the uterine and gonadal tissues through their juxtaposed BMs at the site of anchor cell (AC) invasion in C. elegans. We find that the extracellular matrix component hemicentin (HIM-4), found between BMs, forms punctate accumulations under the AC and controls BM linkage to promote rapid invasion. Through targeted screening we identify the integrin-binding cytolinker plakin (VAB-10A) and integrin (INA-1/PAT-3) as key BM-BM linkage regulators: VAB-10A localizes to the AC-BM interface and tethers hemicentin to the AC while integrin promotes hemicentin punctae formation. Together, plakin, integrin and hemicentin are founding components of a cell-directed adhesion system, which we name a B-LINK (Basement membrane-LINKage), that connects adjacent tissues through adjoining BMs. PMID:25443298

  10. Autoimmunity and the outer retina.

    PubMed

    Rahi, A H; Addison, D J

    1983-01-01

    Structurally and therefore antigenically the retina is a complex tissue. Since it develops as an extension from the neural tube it shares with the brain several cell membranes and cytoplasm associated antigens including those present in neurofilaments of the various neurones and the glial filaments of the astrocytes. The advent of monoclonal antibodies has helped to dissect, in detail, the antigenic makeup of the retina. Nervous system antigens (NS-3, 4 and 7) are generously represented in the retina. At least in the chick eye there seems to be a concentration gradient of retinal antigens along a dorsoventral axis which is believed to provide means by which neurones of developing retinal signal and receive the positional information necessary for the formation of specific synapses. It now seems certain that organ-specific antigens are presented not only in the photoreceptors and the retinal pigment epithelium but also in the retinal ganglion cells and the astrocytes. Photoreceptor outer-segment contains soluble antigens which when injected in rats, rabbits, guinea-pigs or monkeys produce varying degrees of intraocular inflammation leading to uveitis, retinal detachment, photoreceptor degeneration and occasionally retinal vasculitis. Both cell-mediated and humoral immunity to photoreceptor antigen has been demonstrated in various types of uveitis (including toxoplasmosis and sarcoidosis), pars planitis, vitriitis, Behçets disease, sympathetic ophthalmitis, Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada syndrome, birdshot retinopathy, retinitis pigmentosa and retinal vasculitis. Retinal autoimmunity is also found in retinal detachment and diabetic retinopathy, particularly after Argon laser photocoagulation. Antibodies to retinal antigens are also found in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and other systemic immune disorders without ocular involvement. The precise pathogenetic role of retinal autoimmunity in eye disease is therefore uncertain. It may simply represent an epiphenomenon which develops afer retinal damage due to physical, micro-organismal or immunological insult. Alternatively it is possible that although autoimmunity does not initiate ocular inflammation it perpetuates and maintains the inflammatory state and produces further damage to ocular tissues. PMID:6611615

  11. An Autoimmune Myositis-Overlap Syndrome Associated With Autoantibodies to Nuclear Pore Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Senécal, Jean-Luc; Isabelle, Catherine; Fritzler, Marvin J.; Targoff, Ira N.; Goldstein, Rose; Gagné, Michel; Raynauld, Jean-Pierre; Joyal, France; Troyanov, Yves; Dabauvalle, Marie-Christine

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune myositis encompasses various myositis-overlap syndromes, each being identified by the presence of serum marker autoantibodies. We describe a novel myositis-overlap syndrome in 4 patients characterized by the presence of a unique immunologic marker, autoantibodies to nuclear pore complexes. The clinical phenotype was characterized by prominent myositis in association with erosive, anti-CCP, and rheumatoid factor-positive arthritis, trigeminal neuralgia, mild interstitial lung disease, Raynaud phenomenon, and weight loss. The myositis was typically chronic, relapsing, and refractory to corticosteroids alone, but remitted with the addition of a second immunomodulating drug. There was no clinical or laboratory evidence for liver disease. The prognosis was good with 100% long-term survival (mean follow-up 19.5 yr). By indirect immunofluorescence on HEp-2 cells, sera from all 4 patients displayed a high titer of antinuclear autoantibodies (ANA) with a distinct punctate peripheral (rim) fluorescent pattern of the nuclear envelope characteristic of nuclear pore complexes. Reactivity with nuclear pore complexes was confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy. In a cohort of 100 French Canadian patients with autoimmune myositis, the nuclear pore complex fluorescent ANA pattern was restricted to these 4 patients (4%). It was not observed in sera from 393 adult patients with systemic sclerosis (n?=?112), mixed connective tissue disease (n?=?35), systemic lupus (n?=?94), rheumatoid arthritis (n?=?45), or other rheumatic diseases (n?=?107), nor was it observed in 62 normal adults. Autoantibodies to nuclear pore complexes were predominantly of IgG isotype. No other IgG autoantibody markers for defined connective tissue diseases or overlap syndromes were present, indicating a selective and highly focused immune response. In 3 patients, anti-nuclear pore complex autoantibody titers varied in parallel with myositis activity, suggesting a pathogenic link to pathophysiology. The nuclear pore complex proteins, that is, nucleoporins (nup), recognized by these sera were heterogeneous and included Nup358/RanBP2 (n?=?2 patients), Nup90 (n?=?1), Nup62 (n?=?1), and gp210 (n?=?1). Taken together the data suggest that nup autoantigens themselves drive the anti-nup autoimmune response. Immunogenetically, the 4 patients shared the DQA1?0501 allele associated with an increased risk for autoimmune myositis. In conclusion, we report an apparent novel subset of autoimmune myositis in our population of French Canadian patients with connective tissue diseases. This syndrome is recognized by the presence of a unique immunologic marker, autoantibodies to nuclear pore complexes that react with nups, consistent with an “anti-nup syndrome.” PMID:25500708

  12. Direct microCT imaging of non-mineralized connective tissues at high resolution.

    PubMed

    Naveh, Gili R S; Brumfeld, Vlad; Dean, Mason; Shahar, Ron; Weiner, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The 3D imaging of soft tissues in their native state is challenging, especially when high resolution is required. An X-ray-based microCT is, to date, the best choice for high resolution 3D imaging of soft tissues. However, since X-ray attenuation of soft tissues is very low, contrasting enhancement using different staining materials is needed. The staining procedure, which also usually involves tissue fixation, causes unwanted and to some extent unknown tissue alterations. Here, we demonstrate that a method that enables 3D imaging of soft tissues without fixing and staining using an X-ray-based bench-top microCT can be applied to a variety of different tissues. With the sample mounted in a custom-made loading device inside a humidity chamber, we obtained soft tissue contrast and generated 3D images of fresh, soft tissues with a resolution of 1 micron voxel size. We identified three critical conditions which make it possible to image soft tissues: humidified environment, mechanical stabilization of the sample and phase enhancement. We demonstrate the capability of the technique using different specimens: an intervertebral disc, the non-mineralized growth plate, stingray tessellated radials (calcified cartilage) and the collagenous network of the periodontal ligament. Since the scanned specimen is fresh an interesting advantage of this technique is the ability to scan a specimen under load and track the changes of the different structures. This method offers a unique opportunity for obtaining valuable insights into 3D structure-function relationships of soft tissues. PMID:24437605

  13. Type 1 diabetes and polyglandular autoimmune syndrome: A review

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Martin P; Matheis, Nina; Kahaly, George J

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disorder caused by inflammatory destruction of the pancreatic tissue. The etiopathogenesis and characteristics of the pathologic process of pancreatic destruction are well described. In addition, the putative susceptibility genes for T1D as a monoglandular disease and the relation to polyglandular autoimmune syndrome (PAS) have also been well explored. The incidence of T1D has steadily increased in most parts of the world, especially in industrialized nations. T1D is frequently associated with autoimmune endocrine and non-endocrine diseases and patients with T1D are at a higher risk for developing several glandular autoimmune diseases. Familial clustering is observed, which suggests that there is a genetic predisposition. Various hypotheses pertaining to viral- and bacterial-induced pancreatic autoimmunity have been proposed, however a definitive delineation of the autoimmune pathomechanism is still lacking. In patients with PAS, pancreatic and endocrine autoantigens either colocalize on one antigen-presenting cell or are expressed on two/various target cells sharing a common amino acid, which facilitates binding to and activation of T cells. The most prevalent PAS phenotype is the adult type 3 variant or PAS type III, which encompasses T1D and autoimmune thyroid disease. This review discusses the findings of recent studies showing noticeable differences in the genetic background and clinical phenotype of T1D either as an isolated autoimmune endocrinopathy or within the scope of polyglandular autoimmune syndrome. PMID:25685279

  14. Ovarian autoimmune disease: clinical concepts and animal models

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Bryce D; Kinsey, William K; McGinnis, Lynda K; Christenson, Lane K; Jasti, Susmita; Stevens, Anne M; Petroff, Brian K; Petroff, Margaret G

    2014-01-01

    The ovary is not an immunologically privileged organ, but a breakdown in tolerogenic mechanisms for ovary-specific antigens has disastrous consequences on fertility in women, and this is replicated in murine models of autoimmune disease. Isolated ovarian autoimmune disease is rare in women, likely due to the severity of the disease and the inability to transmit genetic information conferring the ovarian disease across generations. Nonetheless, autoimmune oophoritis is often observed in association with other autoimmune diseases, particularly autoimmune adrenal disease, and takes a toll on both society and individual health. Studies in mice have revealed at least two mechanisms that protect the ovary from autoimmune attack. These mechanisms include control of autoreactive T cells by thymus-derived regulatory T cells, as well as a role for the autoimmune regulator (AIRE), a transcriptional regulator that induces expression of tissue-restricted antigens in medullary thymic epithelial cells during development of T cells. Although the latter mechanism is incompletely defined, it is well established that failure of either results in autoimmune-mediated targeting and depletion of ovarian follicles. In this review, we will address the clinical features and consequences of autoimmune-mediated ovarian infertility in women, as well as the possible mechanisms of disease as revealed by animal models. PMID:25327908

  15. Does autoimmunity against thyroglobulin play a role in the pathogenesis of Graves’ ophthalmopathy: a review

    PubMed Central

    Shanmuganathan, Thayalini; Girgis, Christian; Lahooti, Hooshang; Champion, Bernard; Wall, Jack R

    2015-01-01

    While most authors believe that autoimmunity against the TSH receptor expressed in the orbital connective tissue cells is the main reaction that leads to the development of ophthalmopathy in patients with Graves’ hyperthyroidism, an older hypothesis that deserves fresh consideration is based on the notion that thyroglobulin (Tg) in the thyroid gland passes in a retrograde fashion to the orbit where it is recognized by Tg autoantibodies, leading to inflammation. Here, we review new evidence that supports a role of Tg and propose a new hypothesis based on the notion that Tg is targeted in the orbit leading to a complex cascade of reactions that leads to Graves’ ophthalmopathy. PMID:26664042

  16. Autoimmunity and the Gut

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Andrew W.

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases have increased dramatically worldwide since World War II. This is coincidental with the increased production and use of chemicals both in industrial countries and agriculture, as well as the ease of travel from region to region and continent to continent, making the transfer of a pathogen or pathogens from one part of the world to another much easier than ever before. In this review, triggers of autoimmunity are examined, principally environmental. The number of possible environmental triggers is vast and includes chemicals, bacteria, viruses, and molds. Examples of these triggers are given and include the mechanism of action and method by which they bring about autoimmunity. PMID:24900918

  17. Female-Specific Downregulation of Tissue Polymorphonuclear Neutrophils Drives Impaired Regulatory T Cell and Amplified Effector T Cell Responses in Autoimmune Dry Eye Disease.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Min, Kyungji; Zhang, Yibing; Su, John; Greenwood, Matthew; Gronert, Karsten

    2015-10-01

    Immune-driven dry eye disease primarily affects women; the cause for this sex-specific prevalence is unknown. Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN) have distinct phenotypes that drive inflammation but also regulate lymphocytes and are the rate-limiting cell for generating anti-inflammatory lipoxin A4 (LXA4). Estrogen regulates the LXA4 circuit to induce delayed female-specific wound healing in the cornea. However, the role of PMNs in dry eye disease remains unexplored. We discovered an LXA4-producing tissue PMN population in the corneal limbus, lacrimal glands, and cervical lymph nodes of healthy male and female mice. These tissue PMNs, unlike inflammatory PMNs, expressed a highly amplified LXA4 circuit and were sex-specifically regulated during immune-driven dry eye disease. Desiccating stress in females, unlike in males, triggered a remarkable decrease in lymph node PMN and LXA4 formation that remained depressed during dry eye disease. Depressed lymph node PMN and LXA4 in females correlated with an increase in effector T cells (Th1 and Th17), a decrease in regulatory T cells (Treg), and increased dry eye pathogenesis. Ab depletion of tissue PMN abrogated LXA4 formation in lymph nodes, as well as caused a marked increase in Th1 and Th17 cells and a decrease in Tregs. To establish an immune-regulatory role for PMN-derived LXA4 in dry eye, females were treated with LXA4. LXA4 treatment markedly inhibited Th1 and Th17 and amplified Treg in draining lymph nodes, while reducing dry eye pathogenesis. These results identify female-specific regulation of LXA4-producing tissue PMN as a potential key factor in aberrant effector T cell activation and initiation of immune-driven dry eye disease. PMID:26324767

  18. Stress proteins, autoimmunity, and autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Winfield, J B; Jarjour, W N

    1991-01-01

    At birth, the immune system is biased toward recognition of microbial antigens in order to protect the host from infection. Recent data suggest that an important initial line of defense in this regard involves autologous stress proteins, especially conserved peptides of hsp60, which are presented to T cells bearing gamma delta receptors by relatively nonpolymorphic class lb molecules. Natural antibodies may represent a parallel B cell mechanism. Through an evolving process of "physiological" autoreactivity and selection by immunodominant stress proteins common to all prokaryotes, B and T cell repertoires expand during life to meet the continuing challenge of infection. Because stress proteins of bacteria are homologous with stress proteins of the host, there exists in genetically susceptible individuals a constant risk of autoimmune disease due to failure of mechanisms for self-nonself discrimination. That stress proteins actually play a role in autoimmune processes is supported by a growing body of evidence which, collectively, suggests that autoreactivity in chronic inflammatory arthritis involves, at least initially, gamma delta cells which recognize epitopes of the stress protein hsp60. Alternate mechanisms for T cell stimulation by stress proteins undoubtedly also exist, e.g., molecular mimicry of the DR beta third hypervariable region susceptibility locus for rheumatoid arthritis by a DnaJ stress protein epitope in gram-negative bacteria. While there still is confusion with respect to the most relevant stress protein epitopes, a central role for stress proteins in the etiology of arthritis appears likely. Furthermore, insight derived from the work thus far in adjuvant-induced arthritis already is stimulating analyses of related phenomena in autoimmune diseases other than those involving joints. Only limited data are available in the area of humoral autoimmunity to stress proteins. Autoantibodies to a number of stress proteins have been identified in SLE and rheumatoid arthritis, but their pathogenetic significance remains to be established. Nevertheless, the capacity of certain stress proteins to bind to multiple proteins in the nucleus and cytoplasm both physiologically and during stress or injury to cells, suggests that stress proteins may be important elements in the "immunogenic particle" concept of the origin of antinuclear and other autoantibodies. In short, this fascinating group of proteins, so mysterious only a few years ago, has impelled truly extraordinary new lines of investigation into the nature of autoimmunity and autoimmune disease. PMID:2055095

  19. Analytical and numerical analyses of the micromechanics of soft fibrous connective tissues

    E-print Network

    Gal deBotton; Tal Oren

    2012-01-02

    State of the art research and treatment of biological tissues require accurate and efficient methods for describing their mechanical properties. Indeed, micromechanics motivated approaches provide a systematic method for elevating relevant data from the microscopic level to the macroscopic one. In this work the mechanical responses of hyperelastic tissues with one and two families of collagen fibers are analyzed by application of a new variational estimate accounting for their histology and the behaviors of their constituents. The resulting, close form expressions, are used to determine the overall response of the wall of a healthy human coronary artery. To demonstrate the accuracy of the proposed method these predictions are compared with corresponding 3-D finite element simulations of a periodic unit cell of the tissue with two families of fibers. Throughout, the analytical predictions for the highly nonlinear and anisotropic tissue are in agreement with the numerical simulations.

  20. The saddle connective tissue graft: a periodontal plastic surgery technique to obtain soft tissue coronal gain on immediate implants. A case report.

    PubMed

    González, David; Cabello, Gustavo; Olmos, Gema; Niñoles, Carlos L

    2015-01-01

    Based on recent studies regarding the advantages of flapless immediate implants on the maintenance of the soft tissue architecture (especially at papillae level) in those situations where it is necessary to extract an anterior tooth, this case report describes a clinical procedure designed to replace a hopeless central incisor (2.1) showing root resorption adjacent to an implant-supported crown (1.1), whose gingival margin is 2 mm coronal regarding the hopeless tooth to be replaced. After the extraction of the hopeless tooth (2.1), a flapless immediate implant was placed. The implant-bone gap was then filled with bone substitute and a palatal connective tissue graft was placed ad modum saddle extending at buccal level from apical to the mucogingival line, sealing the socket and extending until 6 mm at palatal level ad modum saddle. This procedure allowed symmetry of the soft tissue margins between the two implants (1.1 and 2.1) to be obtained as well as the preservation of the inter-implant papillae (1.1). PMID:26171446

  1. The epigenetics of autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Meda, Francesca; Folci, Marco; Baccarelli, Andrea; Selmi, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    The etiology of autoimmune diseases remains largely unknown. Concordance rates in monozygotic twins are lower than 50% while genome-wide association studies propose numerous significant associations representing only a minority of patients. These lines of evidence strongly support other complementary mechanisms involved in the regulation of genes expression ultimately causing overt autoimmunity. Alterations in the post-translational modification of histones and DNA methylation are the two major epigenetic mechanisms that may potentially cause a breakdown of immune tolerance and the perpetuation of autoimmune diseases. In recent years, several studies both in clinical settings and experimental models proposed that the epigenome may hold the key to a better understanding of autoimmunity initiation and perpetuation. More specifically, data support the impact of epigenetic changes in systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune diseases, in some cases based on mechanistical observations. We herein discuss what we currently know and what we expect will come in the next future. Ultimately, epigenetic treatments already being used in oncology may soon prove beneficial also in autoimmune diseases. PMID:21278766

  2. Costimulator B7-1 confers antigen-presenting-cell function to parenchymal tissue and in conjunction with tumor necrosis factor alpha leads to autoimmunity in transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Guerder, S; Picarella, D E; Linsley, P S; Flavell, R A

    1994-01-01

    Tolerance to peripheral antigens is thought to result from the inability of parenchymal tissue to stimulate T cells--an inability that is believed to relate to the lack of expression of the costimulatory signal(s) required for T-cell activation. To test this model, we generated transgenic mice expressing costimulatory molecule B7-1 on the B cells of the pancreas. We find that islets from these transgenic mice are immunogenic for naive T cells in vitro and in vivo. Nonetheless, mice expressing the costimulator B7-1 specifically on beta cells do not develop diabetes, suggesting that expression of the B7-1 costimulator is not sufficient to abrogate the tolerance to peripheral antigens. We have reported that tumor necrosis factor alpha subunit (TNF-alpha) expressed by beta cells leads to a local inflammation but no islet destruction. Strikingly, however, the combination of a local inflammation due to the expression of the cytokine TNF-alpha and the expression of B7-1 results in tissue destruction and diabetes. Images PMID:7515187

  3. Autoimmunity-related neutrophilic dermatosis: a newly described entity that is not exclusive of systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Saeb-Lima, Marcela; Charli-Joseph, Yann; Rodríguez-Acosta, Elva Dalia; Domínguez-Cherit, Judith

    2013-08-01

    Neutrophilic dermatoses have long been known to be associated with autoinmune systemic diseases. Recently, a small number of cases of a disorder distinct from Sweet syndrome or bullous lupus erythematosus (LE) have been described as specifically related to systemic LE under diverse terms, including nonbullous neutrophilic dermatosis, nonbullous neutrophilic LE, and Sweet-like neutrophilic dermatosis. We describe 7 patients that developed urticarial lesions in the context of a known or concurrently diagnosed autoimmune connective tissue disease. Of a total of 7 patients, 6 were afflicted by systemic LE and 1 by rheumatoid arthritis and secondary Sjögren syndrome. Histological findings in all patients included an interstitial and perivascular neutrophilic infiltrate with leukocytoclasia, vacuolar alteration along the dermal-edidermal junction, and no vasculitis. Most patients had active systemic disease at the time of the cutaneous eruption. Skin lesions resolved rapidly after the administration of immunomodulating agents. In conclusion, we provide additional evidence of the existence of a recently defined nonbullous neutrophilic dermatosis in the context of autoimmune connective tissue diseases and propose the term autoimmunity-related neutrophilic dermatosis as an appropriate designation. Furthermore, we believe that this entity should prompt physicians to screen the presence of an active systemic disorder in afflicted patients. PMID:23518639

  4. Oral mucosal manifestations of autoimmune skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Mayson B; Porter, Stephen R; Smoller, Bruce R; Sitaru, Cassian

    2015-10-01

    A group of autoimmune diseases is characterised by autoantibodies against epithelial adhesion structures and/or tissue-tropic lymphocytes driving inflammatory processes resulting in specific pathology at the mucosal surfaces and the skin. The most frequent site of mucosal involvement in autoimmune diseases is the oral cavity. Broadly, these diseases include conditions affecting the cell-cell adhesion causing intra-epithelial blistering and those where autoantibodies or infiltration lymphocytes cause a loss of cell-matrix adhesion or interface inflammation. Clinically, patients present with blistering, erosions and ulcers that may affect the skin as well as further mucosal surfaces of the eyes, nose and genitalia. While the autoimmune disease may be suspected based on clinical manifestations, demonstration of tissue-bound and circulating autoantibodies, or lymphocytic infiltrates, by various methods including histological examination, direct and indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, immunoblotting and quantitative immunoassay is a prerequisite for definitive diagnosis. Given the frequency of oral involvement and the fact that oral mucosa is the initially affected site in many cases, the informed practitioner should be well acquainted with diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of autoimmune dermatosis with oral involvement. This paper reviews the pathogenesis and clinical presentation of these conditions in the oral cavity with a specific emphasis on their differential diagnosis and current management approaches. PMID:26117595

  5. Non-marfan idiopathic medionecrosis (cystic medial necrosis) presenting with multiple visceral artery aneurysms and diffuse connective tissue fragility: Two brothers

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, Jun; Tsunemura, Mami; Amano, Shigeko; Tokizawa, Shigemi; Oowada, Susumu; Shinkai, Hiroko; Maehara, Yasunobu; Endo, Keigo

    1997-05-15

    Two brothers with multiple visceral artery aneurysms or dilatations and diffuse connective tissue fragility who did not have clinical features of Marfan syndrome are reported. One presented with retroperitoneal hemorrhage during angiography, and idiopathic medionecrosis was proved by resection of the aneurysms. These cases belong to the heterogeneous group of Marfan syndrome. The angiographical features (multiple dilation of visceral arteries) suggests fragility of connective tissue and is predictive of hazards during and after a catheterization and operation.

  6. Treatment of Gingival Recessions Associated to Cervical Abrasion Lesions with Subepithelial Connective Tissue Graft: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Deliberador, Tatiana M.; Bosco, Alvaro F.; Martins, Thiago M.; Nagata, Maria J. H.

    2009-01-01

    Extensive gingival recessions associated with cervical abrasions are common among the population. Several different surgical and/or restorative therapies have been proposed to correct these lesions. This manuscript reports the treatment of multiple gingival recessions associated to cervical abrasions. The procedure involved the utilization of subepithelial connective tissue graft (SCTG) combined with coronally advanced flap onto a previously restored root surface. At the postoperative follow-up visits, the success of the restorative/surgical approach was confirmed by the absence of bleeding to probing and periodontal pockets as well as presence of gingival tissue with normal color, texture and contouring. After 18 months of follow-up, the clinical conditions are stable with satisfactory root coverage and periodontal health. An excellent esthetical outcome was achieved and the patient is satisfied with case resolution. PMID:19826605

  7. Effect of hydroxyapatite content on physical properties and connective tissue reactions to a chitosan-hydroxyapatite composite membrane.

    PubMed

    Ito, M; Hidaka, Y; Nakajima, M; Yagasaki, H; Kafrawy, A H

    1999-06-01

    The present study investigated the effect on certain physical properties of adding various amounts of hydroxyapatite (HAP) to chitosan sol. Also investigated were connective tissue reactions to a composite membrane that is being developed for possible use in guided tissue regeneration and for the limitation of HA particle migration at sites of implantation. The physical properties evaluated were shrinkage, tensile strength, hardness, calcium ion release, and morphology. Assessment of physical properties indicated that a ratio of HA to chitosan sol of 4/11 by weight is optimal in the preparation of the composite membrane. Subperiosteal implantation of the membranes over rat calvaria revealed that the membranes were well tolerated, with fibrous encapsulation and occasional areas of osteogenesis. Increasing the hydroxyapatite content seems to enhance membrane degradation. PMID:10397977

  8. The fine structure of experimentally induced connective tissue complexes in the human.

    PubMed

    Stinson, W W; Richter, K M; Schilling, J A

    1974-07-01

    The growth, development and cellular activity of fibrocollagenous tissue complexes induced by the implantation of specially structured wire mesh cylinders in 22 human male volunteers were studied during the time course of fibroplasia utilizing light and electron microscopic techniques. The fibrocollagenous tissue complexes after 4 to 16 weeks of development demonstrated highly ordered lamellations made of zones consisting primarily of fibroblasts and zones consisting primarily of collagenous fibers. The development of the ordered lamellations is referable to specific fibrillogenic activities by the constituent fibroblasts. The initial role of the fibroblast in fibrillogenesis is indicative of an apocrine-like secretory process followed by a holocrine-like role which results in cytodestruction and concurrent formation of an avascular collagenic tissue referable to an organizing cicatrix in a healing wound. PMID:4599224

  9. Fibrillary glomerulonephritis with prevalent IgA deposition associated with undifferentiated connective tissue disease: A case report.

    PubMed

    Nebuloni, Manuela; Genderini, Augusto; Tosoni, Antonella; Caruso, Sabrina; di Belgiojoso, Giovanni Barbiano

    2010-02-01

    We described a 41-year-old female patient, who presented with proteinuria occurring 5 years after the onset of an undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD). At renal biopsy, a pattern of focal necrotizing glomerulonephritis with mesangial and parietal deposition of the IgA, C3 and K chains was observed. Electron microscopy showed organized fibrillary deposits in mesangial, subendothelial, intramembranous and subepithelial sites. Fibrils were randomly arranged, had no hollow core and had a diameter ranging between 10 and 23 nm. This case showed a rare combination of fibrillary glomerulonephritis and prevalent IgA deposition, in the clinical context of UCTD. PMID:25949407

  10. Fibrillary glomerulonephritis with prevalent IgA deposition associated with undifferentiated connective tissue disease: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Nebuloni, Manuela; Genderini, Augusto; Tosoni, Antonella; Caruso, Sabrina; di Belgiojoso, Giovanni Barbiano

    2010-01-01

    We described a 41-year-old female patient, who presented with proteinuria occurring 5 years after the onset of an undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD). At renal biopsy, a pattern of focal necrotizing glomerulonephritis with mesangial and parietal deposition of the IgA, C3 and K chains was observed. Electron microscopy showed organized fibrillary deposits in mesangial, subendothelial, intramembranous and subepithelial sites. Fibrils were randomly arranged, had no hollow core and had a diameter ranging between 10 and 23 nm. This case showed a rare combination of fibrillary glomerulonephritis and prevalent IgA deposition, in the clinical context of UCTD. PMID:25949407

  11. Origins of the sympathetic innervation to the nasal-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT): an anatomical substrate for a neuroimmune connection.

    PubMed

    Marafetti, Lucas E; Romeo, Horacio E

    2014-11-15

    The participation of sympathetic nerve fibers in the innervation of the nasal-associated lymphoid tissues (NALT) was investigated in hamsters. Vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2), an established sympathetic marker, is expressed in all neurons of superior cervical ganglia (SCG). In addition, VMAT2 -immunoreactive nerve fibers were localized in the NALT as well as in adjacent anatomical structures of the upper respiratory tract. Unilateral surgical ablation of the SCG abolished VMAT2 innervation patterns ipsilaterally while the contra lateral side is unaffected. These results provide the anatomical substrate for a neuroimmune connection in the NALT. PMID:25281233

  12. Unusual Glycosaminoglycans from a Deep Sea Hydrothermal Bacterium Improve Fibrillar Collagen Structuring and Fibroblast Activities in Engineered Connective Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Senni, Karim; Gueniche, Farida; Changotade, Sylvie; Septier, Dominique; Sinquin, Corinne; Ratiskol, Jacqueline; Lutomski, Didier; Godeau, Gaston; Guezennec, Jean; Colliec-Jouault, Sylvia

    2013-01-01

    Biopolymers produced by marine organisms can offer useful tools for regenerative medicine. Particularly, HE800 exopolysaccharide (HE800 EPS) secreted by a deep-sea hydrothermal bacterium displays an interesting glycosaminoglycan-like feature resembling hyaluronan. Previous studies demonstrated its effectiveness to enhance in vivo bone regeneration and to support osteoblastic cell metabolism in culture. Thus, in order to assess the usefulness of this high-molecular weight polymer in tissue engineering and tissue repair, in vitro reconstructed connective tissues containing HE800 EPS were performed. We showed that this polysaccharide promotes both collagen structuring and extracellular matrix settle by dermal fibroblasts. Furthermore, from the native HE800 EPS, a low-molecular weight sulfated derivative (HE800 DROS) displaying chemical analogy with heparan-sulfate, was designed. Thus, it was demonstrated that HE800 DROS mimics some properties of heparan-sulfate, such as promotion of fibroblast proliferation and inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) secretion. Therefore, we suggest that the HE800EPS family can be considered as an innovative biotechnological source of glycosaminoglycan-like compounds useful to design biomaterials and drugs for tissue engineering and repair. PMID:23612369

  13. Connective tissue growth factor stimulates the proliferation, migration and differentiation of lung fibroblasts during paraquat-induced pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    YANG, ZHIZHOU; SUN, ZHAORUI; LIU, HONGMEI; REN, YI; SHAO, DANBING; ZHANG, WEI; LIN, JINFENG; WOLFRAM, JOY; WANG, FENG; NIE, SHINAN

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that paraquat (PQ) poisoning can cause severe lung injury during the early stages of exposure, finally leading to irreversible pulmonary fibrosis. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is an essential growth factor that is involved in tissue repair and pulmonary fibrogenesis. In the present study, the role of CTGF was examined in a rat model of pulmonary fibrosis induced by PQ poisoning. Histological examination revealed interstitial edema and extensive cellular thickening of interalveolar septa at the early stages of poisoning. At 2 weeks after PQ administration, lung tissue sections exhibited a marked thickening of the alveolar walls with an accumulation of interstitial cells with a fibroblastic appearance. Masson’s trichrome staining revealed a patchy distribution of collagen deposition, indicating pulmonary fibrogenesis. Western blot analysis and immunohistochemical staining of tissue samples demonstrated that CTGF expression was significantly upregulated in the PQ-treated group. Similarly, PQ treatment of MRC-5 human lung fibroblast cells caused an increase in CTGF in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the addition of CTGF to MRC-5 cells triggered cellular proliferation and migration. In addition, CTGF induced the differentiation of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts, as was evident from increased expression of ?-smooth muscle actin (?-SMA) and collagen. These findings demonstrate that PQ causes increased CTGF expression, which triggers proliferation, migration and differentiation of lung fibroblasts. Therefore, CTGF may be important in PQ-induced pulmonary fibrogenesis, rendering this growth factor a potential pharmacological target for reducing lung injury. PMID:25815693

  14. Connective tissue growth factor stimulates the proliferation, migration and differentiation of lung fibroblasts during paraquat-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhizhou; Sun, Zhaorui; Liu, Hongmei; Ren, Yi; Shao, Danbing; Zhang, Wei; Lin, Jinfeng; Wolfram, Joy; Wang, Feng; Nie, Shinan

    2015-07-01

    It is well established that paraquat (PQ) poisoning can cause severe lung injury during the early stages of exposure, finally leading to irreversible pulmonary fibrosis. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is an essential growth factor that is involved in tissue repair and pulmonary fibrogenesis. In the present study, the role of CTGF was examined in a rat model of pulmonary fibrosis induced by PQ poisoning. Histological examination revealed interstitial edema and extensive cellular thickening of interalveolar septa at the early stages of poisoning. At 2 weeks after PQ administration, lung tissue sections exhibited a marked thickening of the alveolar walls with an accumulation of interstitial cells with a fibroblastic appearance. Masson's trichrome staining revealed a patchy distribution of collagen deposition, indicating pulmonary fibrogenesis. Western blot analysis and immunohistochemical staining of tissue samples demonstrated that CTGF expression was significantly upregulated in the PQ-treated group. Similarly, PQ treatment of MRC-5 human lung fibroblast cells caused an increase in CTGF in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the addition of CTGF to MRC-5 cells triggered cellular proliferation and migration. In addition, CTGF induced the differentiation of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts, as was evident from increased expression of ?-smooth muscle actin (?-SMA) and collagen. These findings demonstrate that PQ causes increased CTGF expression, which triggers proliferation, migration and differentiation of lung fibroblasts. Therefore, CTGF may be important in PQ-induced pulmonary fibrogenesis, rendering this growth factor a potential pharmacological target for reducing lung injury. PMID:25815693

  15. Chagas’ Disease and the Autoimmunity Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Kierszenbaum, Felipe

    1999-01-01

    The notion that the pathology of Chagas’ disease has an autoimmune component was initially based on the finding of circulating antibodies binding heart tissue antigens in patients and mice chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi. Later, T lymphocytes reactive with heart or nerve tissue antigens were found in chagasic mice and patients, extending the concept to include cell-mediated immunity. However, there is disagreement about whether the observed immunologic autoreactivities are triggered by T. cruzi epitopes and then affect host tissue antigens by virtue of molecular mimicry or are elicited by host antigens exposed to lymphocytes after tissue damage caused by the parasite. There is also disagreement about the relevance of immunologic autoreactivities to the pathogenesis of Chagas’ disease because of the lack of reproducibility of some key reports supporting the autoimmunity hypothesis, conflicting data from independent laboratories, conclusions invalidated by advances in our understanding of the immunologic mechanisms underlying cell lysis, and, last but not least, a lack of direct, incontrovertible evidence that cross-reacting antibodies or autoreactive cells mediate the typical pathologic changes associated with human Chagas’ disease. The data and views backing and questioning the autoimmunity hypothesis for Chagas’ disease are summarized in this review. PMID:10194457

  16. Structural arrangement of collagen fibrils in the periarterial connective tissue of the kidney: their functional relevance as a structural stabilizer against arterial pressure.

    PubMed

    Hosoyamada, Yasue; Sakai, Tatsuo

    2012-06-01

    Periarterial connective tissue with a moderate amount of collagen fibrils is known to be a specialized domain in the renal interstitium. This study aimed to clarify the microscopic architecture of the periarterial connective tissue as a mechanical supportive structure of the intrarenal arteries. Transmission and scanning electron microscopy revealed two populations of collagen fibrils in the periarterial connective tissue. The major one was composed of many bundles of collagen fibrils running in longitudinal directions, whereas the minor one was represented by a few circumferential bundles adjacent to the smooth muscles. The amount of collagen fibrils was obviously variable and correlated with the arterial caliber. The correlation between abundance of collagen fibrils and the arterial caliber was confirmed by morphometric analysis of the collagen fibril area per arterial perimeter on electron micrographs. The size of individual collagen fibrils was measured in periarterial connective tissue of arteries with various calibers. A positive correlation between the diameter of collagen fibrils and arterial caliber was confirmed, indicating the supportive function of collagen fibrils in the periarterial connective tissue. The accumulated morphological findings supported the hypothesis that the collagen fibrils in the periarterial connective tissue develop longitudinal tension with their tensile strength, whereas the smooth muscle cells in the media develop circumferential tension with active regulation of contracting force. PMID:22187217

  17. Cystic Lesions in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Gompertz, Macarena; Morales, Claudia; Aldana, Hernán; Castillo, Jaime; Berger, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) can be chronic or recurrent, but frequently completely reversible after steroid treatment. A cystic lesion in AIP is a rare finding, and it can mimic a pancreatic cystic neoplasm. Difficulties in an exact diagnosis interfere with treatment, and surgery cannot be avoided in some cases. We report the history of a 63-year-old male presenting with jaundice and pruritus. AIP was confirmed by imaging and elevated IgG4 blood levels, and the patient completely recovered after corticosteroid therapy. One year later, he presented with a recurrent episode of AIP with elevated IgG4 levels, accompanied by the appearance of multiple intrapancreatic cystic lesions. All but 1 of these cysts disappeared after steroid treatment, but the remaining cyst in the pancreatic head was even somewhat larger 1 year later. Pancreatoduodenectomy was finally performed. Histology showed the wall of the cystic lesion to be fibrotic; the surrounding pancreatic tissue presented fibrosis, atrophy and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration by IgG4-positive cells, without malignant elements. Our case illustrates the rare possibility that cystic lesions can be part of AIP. These pseudocysts appear in the pancreatic segments involved in the autoimmune disease and can be a consequence of the local inflammation or related to ductal strictures. Steroid treatment should be initiated, after which these cysts can completely disappear with recovery from AIP. Surgical intervention may be necessary in some exceptional cases. PMID:26675058

  18. Interferon-? and Systemic Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, K.M.; Cauvi, D.M.; Toomey, C.B; Morris, K.V.; Kono, D.H.

    2014-01-01

    The term interferon describes a family of proteins consisting of three major types (I, II, III) which differ in their primary protein sequences, cognate receptors, genetic loci, and cell types responsible for their production. The interferons, especially types I and II, overlap significantly in the genes they control resulting in a shared spectrum of diverse biological effects which includes regulation of both the innate and adaptive immune responses. As such, the interferons are major effectors in the pathogenesis of autoimmunity, especially systemic autoimmunity. The type I IFNs, because they are produced during the early stages of the innate immune response, are thought to play the foremost role in autoimmune responses. However, numerous studies have found that the single type II IFN, IFN-?, plays an essential role in the development and severity of systemic autoimmunity, particularly systemic lupus erythematosus. This is supported by animal studies where IFN-? is uniformly required in both spontaneous and induced models of lupus. Although expression of IFN-? in cells of the innate immune system is almost immediate after activation, expression in adaptive immunity requires a complex orchestration of cellular interactions, signaling events and epigenetic modifications. The multifaceted nature of IFN-? in adaptive immunity identifies numerous possible therapeutic targets that, because of the essential contribution of IFN-? to systemic autoimmunity, have the potential for producing significant benefits. PMID:23998448

  19. Autoimmune gastritis: Pathologist's viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Coati, Irene; Fassan, Matteo; Farinati, Fabio; Graham, David Y; Genta, Robert M; Rugge, Massimo

    2015-11-14

    Western countries are seeing a constant decline in the incidence of Helicobacter pylori-associated gastritis, coupled with a rising epidemiological and clinical impact of autoimmune gastritis. This latter gastropathy is due to autoimmune aggression targeting parietal cells through a complex interaction of auto-antibodies against the parietal cell proton pump and intrinsic factor, and sensitized T cells. Given the specific target of this aggression, autoimmune gastritis is typically restricted to the gastric corpus-fundus mucosa. In advanced cases, the oxyntic epithelia are replaced by atrophic (and metaplastic) mucosa, creating the phenotypic background in which both gastric neuroendocrine tumors and (intestinal-type) adenocarcinomas may develop. Despite improvements in our understanding of the phenotypic changes or cascades occurring in this autoimmune setting, no reliable biomarkers are available for identifying patients at higher risk of developing a gastric neoplasm. The standardization of autoimmune gastritis histology reports and classifications in diagnostic practice is a prerequisite for implementing definitive secondary prevention strategies based on multidisciplinary diagnostic approaches integrating endoscopy, serology, histology and molecular profiling. PMID:26576102

  20. Reconceiving autoimmunity: An overview.

    PubMed

    Tauber, Alfred I

    2015-06-21

    Three interconnected positions are advocated: (1) although serving as a useful model, the immune self does not exist as such; (2) instead of a self/nonself demarcation, the immune system 'sees' itself, i.e., it does not ignore the 'self' or attack the 'other;' but exhibits a spectrum of responses, which when viewed from outside the system appear as discrimination of 'self' and 'nonself' based on certain criteria of reactivity. When immune reactions are conceived in terms of normal physiology and open exchange with the environment, where borders dividing host and foreign are elusive and changing, host defense is only part of the immune system's functions, which actually comprise two basic tasks: protection, i.e., to preserve host integrity, and maintenance of organismic identity. And thus (3) if the spectrum of immunity is enlarged, differentiating low reactive 'autoimmune' reactions from activated immune responses against the 'other' is only a matter of degree. Simply, all immunity is 'autoimmunity,' and the pathologic state of immunity directed at normal constituents of the organism is a particular case of dis-regulation, which appropriately is designated, autoimmune. Other uses of 'autoimmunity' and its congeners function as the semantic remnants of Burnet's original self/nonself theory and should be replaced. A new nomenclature is proposed, concinnity, which more accurately designates the physiology of the animal's ordinary housekeeping economy mediated by the immune system than 'autoimmunity' when used to describe such normal functions. PMID:24880023

  1. Autoimmunity and Asbestos Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Pfau, Jean C.; Serve, Kinta M.; Noonan, Curtis W.

    2014-01-01

    Despite a body of evidence supporting an association between asbestos exposure and autoantibodies indicative of systemic autoimmunity, such as antinuclear antibodies (ANA), a strong epidemiological link has never been made to specific autoimmune diseases. This is in contrast with another silicate dust, crystalline silica, for which there is considerable evidence linking exposure to diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Instead, the asbestos literature is heavily focused on cancer, including mesothelioma and pulmonary carcinoma. Possible contributing factors to the absence of a stronger epidemiological association between asbestos and autoimmune disease include (a) a lack of statistical power due to relatively small or diffuse exposure cohorts, (b) exposure misclassification, (c) latency of clinical disease, (d) mild or subclinical entities that remain undetected or masked by other pathologies, or (e) effects that are specific to certain fiber types, so that analyses on mixed exposures do not reach statistical significance. This review summarizes epidemiological, animal model, and in vitro data related to asbestos exposures and autoimmunity. These combined data help build toward a better understanding of the fiber-associated factors contributing to immune dysfunction that may raise the risk of autoimmunity and the possible contribution to asbestos-related pulmonary disease. PMID:24876951

  2. Connective Tissue Growth Factor Is Involved in Structural Retinal Vascular Changes in Long-Term Experimental Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Van Geest, Rob J.; Leeuwis, Jan Willem; Dendooven, Amélie; Pfister, Frederick; Bosch, Klazien; Hoeben, Kees A.; Vogels, Ilse M.C.; Van der Giezen, Dionne M.; Dietrich, Nadine; Hammes, Hans-Peter; Goldschmeding, Roel; Klaassen, Ingeborg; Van Noorden, Cornelis J.F.

    2014-01-01

    Early retinal vascular changes in the development of diabetic retinopathy (DR) include capillary basal lamina (BL) thickening, pericyte loss and the development of acellular capillaries. Expression of the CCN (connective tissue growth factor/cysteine-rich 61/nephroblastoma overexpressed) family member CCN2 or connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a potent inducer of the expression of BL components, is upregulated early in diabetes. Diabetic mice lacking one functional CTGF allele (CTGF+/?) do not show this BL thickening. As early events in DR may be interrelated, we hypothesized that CTGF plays a role in the pathological changes of retinal capillaries other than BL thickening. We studied the effects of long-term (6-8 months) streptozotocin-induced diabetes on retinal capillary BL thickness, numbers of pericytes and the development of acellular capillaries in wild type and CTGF+/? mice. Our results show that an absence of BL thickening of retinal capillaries in long-term diabetic CTGF+/? mice is associated with reduced pericyte dropout and reduced formation of acellular capillaries. We conclude that CTGF is involved in structural retinal vascular changes in diabetic rodents. Inhibition of CTGF in the eye may therefore be protective against the development of DR. PMID:24217924

  3. Ehlers–Danlos syndrome type VIII is clinically heterogeneous disorder associated primarily with periodontal disease, and variable connective tissue features

    PubMed Central

    Reinstein, Eyal; DeLozier, Celia Dawn; Simon, Ziv; Bannykh, Serguei; Rimoin, David L; Curry, Cynthia J

    2013-01-01

    Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (EDS) type VIII (periodontitis type) is a distinct form of EDS characterized by periodontal disease leading to precocious dental loss and a spectrum of joint and skin manifestations. EDS type VIII is transmitted in an autosomal dominant pattern; however, the mutated gene has not been identified. There are insufficient data on the spectrum of clinical manifestations and natural history of the disorder, and only a limited number of patients and pedigrees with this condition have been reported. We present a four-generation EDS type VIII kindred and show that EDS VIII is clinically variable and although some cases lack the associated skin and joint manifestations, microscopic evidence of collagen disorganization is detectable. We further propose that the diagnosis of EDS type VIII should be considered in familial forms of periodontitis, even when the associated skin and joint manifestations are unconvincing for the diagnosis of a connective tissue disorder. This novel observation highlights the uncertainty of using connective tissue signs in clinical practice to diagnose EDS type VIII. PMID:22739343

  4. FcepsilonRI aggregation promotes survival of connective tissue-like mast cells but not mucosal-like mast cells.

    PubMed

    Ekoff, Maria; Strasser, Andreas; Nilsson, Gunnar

    2007-04-01

    Mast cells play a critical role in IgE-dependent immediate hypersensitivity reactions. This is facilitated by their capacity to release inflammatory mediators and to undergo activation-induced survival upon cross-linking of the high-affinity IgE-receptor (FcepsilonRI). Due to their heterogeneity, mast cells can be divided into two major groups: the connective tissue mast cells and the mucosal mast cells. We have previously shown that IL-3-dependent bone marrow-derived mast cells can undergo activation-induced survival that is dependent on the prosurvival gene A1. In this study, we have used two different protocols to develop murine connective tissue-like mast cells (CTLMC) and mucosal-like mast cells (MLMC) to investigate their capacity to survive an allergic reaction in vitro. In this study, we demonstrate that FcepsilonRI stimulation promotes survival of CTLMC but not MLMC. Similarly, a prominent induction of A1 is observed only in CTLMC but not MLMC. MLMC have a higher basal level of the proapoptotic protein Bim compared with CTLMC. These findings demonstrate a difference among mast cell populations in their ability to undergo activation-induced survival after FcepsilonRI stimulation, which might explain the slower turnover of CTMC in IgE-dependent reactions. PMID:17371974

  5. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, Hypermobility Type: An Underdiagnosed Hereditary Connective Tissue Disorder with Mucocutaneous, Articular, and Systemic Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Castori, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type, constituting a phenotypic continuum with or, perhaps, corresponding to the joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS/EDS-HT), is likely the most common, though the least recognized, heritable connective tissue disorder. Known for decades as a hereditary condition with predominant rheumatologic manifestations, it is now emerging as a multisystemic disorder with widespread manifestations. Nevertheless, the practitioners' awareness of this condition is generally poor and most patients await years or, perhaps, decades before reaching the correct diagnosis. Among the various sites of disease manifestations, skin and mucosae represent a neglected organ where the dermatologist can easily spot diagnostic clues, which consistently integrate joint hypermobility and other orthopedic/neurologic manifestations at physical examination. In this paper, actual knowledge on JHS/EDS-HT is summarized in various sections. Particular attention has been posed on overlooked manifestations, including cutaneous, mucosal, and oropharyngeal features, and early diagnosis techniques, as a major point of interest for the practicing dermatologist. Actual research progresses on JH/EDS-HT envisage an unexpected link between heritable dysfunctions of the connective tissue and a wide range of functional somatic syndromes, most of them commonly diagnosed in the office of various specialists, comprising dermatologists. PMID:23227356

  6. [MAIT cells in autoimmunity].

    PubMed

    Miyake, Sachiko

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal associated invariant T (MAIT) cells express a semi-invariant TCR? chain: V?7.2-J?33 in humans and V?19-J?33 in mice. They are restricted by a nonpolymorphic MHC-related molecule-1 (MR1), and cells are selected in the thymus. Interestingly, MAIT cells require B cells as well as commensal flora for their peripheral expansion. MAIT cells display antimicrobial capacity. Recently, vitamin metabolites were demonstrated as antigens created by intestinal flora for MAIT cells. MAIT cells play a protective role against autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of human multiple sclerosis (MS), wheras they play a pathogenic role in murine models of arthritis. In patients with autoimmune diseases, the frequency of MAIT cells in peripheral blood was significantly reduced. The frequency of MAIT cells reflected the disease activity in MS patients, suggesting the involvement of MAIT cells in the regulation of autoimmune diseases. PMID:24598064

  7. Inflammasomes and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Patrick J; McDermott, Michael F; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi

    2011-02-01

    The NOD-like receptor (NLR) family members are cytosolic sensors of microbial components and danger signals. A subset of NLRs control inflammasome assembly that results in caspase-1 activation and, in turn, IL-1? and IL-18 production. Excessive inflammasome activation can cause autoinflammatory disorders, including the hereditary periodic fevers. Autoinflammatory and autoimmune diseases form a disease spectrum of aberrant, immune-mediated inflammation against self, through innate and adaptive immunity. However, the role of inflammasomes in autoimmune disease is less clear than in autoinflammation, despite the numerous effects IL-1? and IL-18 can have on shaping adaptive immunity. We summarize the role of inflammasomes in autoimmune disorders, highlight the need for a better understanding of inflammasomes in these conditions and offer suggestions for future research directions. PMID:21163704

  8. Autoimmune encephalitis update

    PubMed Central

    Dalmau, Josep; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer-associated immune-mediated disorders of the central nervous system are a heterogeneous group. These disorders include the classic paraneoplastic neurologic disorders and the more recently described autoimmune encephalitis associated with antibodies to neuronal cell-surface or synaptic receptors that occur with and without a cancer association. Autoimmune encephalitis is increasingly recognized as the cause of a variety of neuropsychiatric syndromes that can be severe and prolonged. In contrast to the classic paraneoplastic disorders that are poorly responsive to tumor treatment and immunotherapy, autoimmune encephalitis often responds to these treatments, and patients can have full or marked recoveries. As early treatment speeds recovery, reduces disability, and decreases relapses that can occur in about 20% of cases, it is important that the immune pathogenesis of these disorders is recognized. PMID:24637228

  9. The Fine Structure of Experimentally Induced Connective Tissue Complexes in the Human

    PubMed Central

    Stinson, W. W.; Richter, K. M.; Schilling, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    The growth, development and cellular activity of fibrocollagenous tissue complexes induced by the implantation of specially structured wire mesh cylinders in 22 human male volunteers were studied during the time course of fibroplasia utilizing light and electron microscopic techniques. The fibrocollagenous tissue complexes after 4 to 16 weeks of development demonstrated highly ordered lamellations made of zones consisting primarily of fibroblasts and zones consisting primarily of collagenous fibers. The development of the ordered lamellations is referable to specific fibrillogenic activities by the constituent fibroblasts. The initial role of the fibroblast in fibrillogenesis is indicative of an apocrine-like secretory process followed by a holocrine-like role which results in cytodestruction and concurrent formation of an avascular collagenic tissue referable to an organizing cicatrix in a healing wound. ImagesFigs. 1-3.Figs. 4-9.Fig. 10.Fig. 11.Fig. 12.Figs. 13, 14.Fig. 15.Fig. 16.Fig. 17.Fig. 18, 19.Figs. 20-22.Fig. 23.Fig. 24. PMID:4599224

  10. Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis in Marmosets.

    PubMed

    Jagessar, S Anwar; Dijkman, Karin; Dunham, Jordon; 't Hart, Bert A; Kap, Yolanda S

    2016-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in the common marmoset, a small-bodied Neotropical primate, is a well-known and validated animal model for multiple sclerosis (MS). This model can be used for exploratory research, i.e., investigating the pathogenic mechanisms involved in MS, and applied research, testing the efficacy of new potential drugs.In this chapter, we will describe a method to induce EAE in the marmoset. In addition, we will explain the most common immunological techniques involved in the marmoset EAE research, namely isolation of mononuclear cells (MNC) from peripheral blood and lymphoid tissue, assaying T cell proliferation by thymidine incorporation, MNC phenotyping by flow cytometry, antibody measurement by ELISA, generation of B cell lines and antigen-specific T cell lines, and assaying cytotoxic T cells. PMID:25208751

  11. Distribution of fibronectin and other connective tissue components in human placenta.

    PubMed

    Isemura, M; Yamaguchi, Y; Munakata, H; Kurosawa, K; Furuyama, T; Yoshinaga, K; Masuda, T; Nagai, H; Motomiya, M; Yosizawa, Z

    1985-04-01

    Human placenta specimens obtained at term were investigated for distribution of fibronectin, collagens and glycosaminoglycans. When examined by the immunofluorescence staining technique with anti-plasma fibronectin antiserum, fibronectin was shown to be present around the fetal blood vessels and in the stroma of placental villi. The distribution of type IV collagen also was examined with specific antiserum. It was found that its distribution was similar to that of fibronectin. Conventional alcian blue staining indicated that the placental villi contained only small amounts of glycosaminoglycans. These data suggest that fibronectin and type IV collagen play important roles in tissue organization of the placental villi. PMID:3895573

  12. Altered Expression of Autoimmune Regulator in Infant Down Syndrome Thymus, a Possible Contributor to an Autoimmune Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Lundberg, Vanja; Lindgren, Susanne; Gudmundsdottir, Judith; Sandström, Kerstin; Kämpe, Olle; Annerén, Göran; Gustafsson, Jan; Sunnegårdh, Jan; van der Post, Sjoerd; Telemo, Esbjörn; Berglund, Martin; Ekwall, Olov

    2014-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS), caused by trisomy of chromosome 21, is associated with immunological dysfunctions such as increased frequency of infections and autoimmune diseases. Patients with DS share clinical features, such as autoimmune manifestations and specific autoantibodies, with patients affected by autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1. Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 is caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene, located on chromosome 21, which regulates the expression of tissue-restricted Ags (TRAs) in thymic epithelial cells. We investigated the expression of AIRE and TRAs in DS and control thymic tissue using quantitative PCR. AIRE mRNA levels were elevated in thymic tissue from DS patients, and trends toward increased expression of the AIRE-controlled genes INSULIN and CHRNA1 were found. Immunohistochemical stainings showed altered cell composition and architecture of the thymic medulla in DS individuals with increased frequencies of AIRE-positive medullary epithelial cells and CD11c-positive dendritic cells as well as enlarged Hassall’s corpuscles. In addition, we evaluated the proteomic profile of thymic exosomes in DS individuals and controls. DS exosomes carried a broader protein pool and also a larger pool of unique TRAs compared with control exosomes. In conclusion, the increased AIRE gene dose in DS could contribute to an autoimmune phenotype through multiple AIRE-mediated effects on homeostasis and function of thymic epithelial cells that affect thymic selection processes. PMID:25038256

  13. Altered expression of autoimmune regulator in infant down syndrome thymus, a possible contributor to an autoimmune phenotype.

    PubMed

    Skogberg, Gabriel; Lundberg, Vanja; Lindgren, Susanne; Gudmundsdottir, Judith; Sandström, Kerstin; Kämpe, Olle; Annerén, Göran; Gustafsson, Jan; Sunnegårdh, Jan; van der Post, Sjoerd; Telemo, Esbjörn; Berglund, Martin; Ekwall, Olov

    2014-09-01

    Down syndrome (DS), caused by trisomy of chromosome 21, is associated with immunological dysfunctions such as increased frequency of infections and autoimmune diseases. Patients with DS share clinical features, such as autoimmune manifestations and specific autoantibodies, with patients affected by autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1. Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 is caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene, located on chromosome 21, which regulates the expression of tissue-restricted Ags (TRAs) in thymic epithelial cells. We investigated the expression of AIRE and TRAs in DS and control thymic tissue using quantitative PCR. AIRE mRNA levels were elevated in thymic tissue from DS patients, and trends toward increased expression of the AIRE-controlled genes INSULIN and CHRNA1 were found. Immunohistochemical stainings showed altered cell composition and architecture of the thymic medulla in DS individuals with increased frequencies of AIRE-positive medullary epithelial cells and CD11c-positive dendritic cells as well as enlarged Hassall's corpuscles. In addition, we evaluated the proteomic profile of thymic exosomes in DS individuals and controls. DS exosomes carried a broader protein pool and also a larger pool of unique TRAs compared with control exosomes. In conclusion, the increased AIRE gene dose in DS could contribute to an autoimmune phenotype through multiple AIRE-mediated effects on homeostasis and function of thymic epithelial cells that affect thymic selection processes. PMID:25038256

  14. Integrin-extracellular matrix interactions in connective tissue remodeling and osteoblast differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, R. K.; Moursi, A.; Zimmerman, D.; Lull, J.; Damsky, C.

    1995-01-01

    The differentiaton of bone cells is a complex multistep process. Bone is somewhat unusual in that it is very actively and continually remodeled in the adult and that maintenance of its mass in the mature organism is exquisitely sensitive to mechanical as well as chemical signals. Bone is also unique because it consists of a very large amount of extracellular matrix (ECM) that is mineralized. The integrin family of ECM receptors has been shown to play an important role in tissue morphogenesis in several systems. Our studies on the regulation of matrix remodeling enzymes by integrins in rabbit synovial fibroblasts show that two b1 integrin fibronectin (FN) receptor complexes (alpha 5 beta 1 and alpha 4 beta 1) cooperate in detecting subtle changes in the composition of the ECM. As a result of signal transduction by these integrins, the levels of mRNA and protein for several members of the metalloproteinase family are regulated in these cells. We have also used antibody and RGD peptide perturbation studies to determine the significance of cell/ECM interactions to normal osteogenesis. We found that interactions between the cell binding domain of FN and integrins are required for both normal morphogenesis and gene expression in cultured osteoblasts that differentiate to form bone-like tissue in culture. These data lead us to propose that beta 1 integrins play an important role in osteoblast differentiation as well as in bone remodeling.

  15. Difficult treatment decisions in autoimmune hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Czaja, Albert J

    2010-01-01

    Treatment decisions in autoimmune hepatitis are complicated by the diversity of its clinical presentations, uncertainties about its natural history, evolving opinions regarding treatment end points, varied nature of refractory disease, and plethora of alternative immunosuppressive agents. The goals of this article are to review the difficult treatment decisions and to provide the bases for making sound therapeutic judgments. The English literature on the treatment problems in autoimmune hepatitis were identified by Medline search up to October 2009 and 32 years of personal experience. Autoimmune hepatitis may have an acute severe presentation, mild inflammatory activity, lack autoantibodies, exhibit atypical histological changes (centrilobular zone 3 necrosis or bile duct injury), or have variant features reminiscent of another disease (overlap syndrome). Corticosteroid therapy must be instituted early, applied despite the absence of symptoms, or modified in an individualized fashion. Pursuit of normal liver tests and tissue is the ideal treatment end point, but this objective must be tempered against the risk of side effects. Relapse after treatment withdrawal requires long-term maintenance therapy, preferably with azathioprine. Treatment failure or an incomplete response warrants salvage therapy that can include conventional medications in modified dose or empirical therapies with calcineurin inhibitors or mycophenolate mofetil. Liver transplantation supersedes empirical drug therapy in decompensated patients. Elderly and pregnant patients warrant treatment modifications. Difficult treatment decisions in autoimmune hepatitis can be simplified by recognizing its diverse manifestations and individualizing treatment, pursuing realistic goals, applying appropriate salvage regimens, and identifying problematic patients early. PMID:20180231

  16. Scurfy mice: A model for autoimmune disease

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, V.L.

    1993-01-01

    Autoimmune disease-the condition in which the body attacks its own tissue-has been an object of public concern recently. Former President George Bush and his wife Barbara both are afflicted with Graves' disease in which the body's own immune system attakcs the thyroid gland. The safety of breast implants was called into question because of evidence that some recipients had developed autoimmune disorders such a rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and scleroderma. Women, the media pointed out, have a higher-than-average incidence of many autoimmune disorders. These events suggest the need to know more about what makes the immune system work so well and what makes it go awry. At ORNL's Biology Division, progress is being in understanding the underlying causes of immune disease by studying mice having a disease that causes them to be underdeveloped; to have scaly skin, small ears, and large spleens; to open their eyes late; and to die early. These [open quotes]scurfy[close quotes]mice are helping us better understand the role of the thymus gland in autoimmune disease.

  17. [Polyglandular autoimmune syndromes].

    PubMed

    Maurer, A; Schwarting, A; Kahaly, G J

    2011-11-01

    Polyglandular autoimmune syndromes (PGA) are a heterogeneous group of diseases in which a genetically caused dysfunction of the immune system leads to a destruction of endocrine glands with subsequent loss of function. In addition non-endocrine autoimmune diseases are also frequently present. Due to different patterns of inheritance and occurrence of disease a differentiation is made between juvenile PGA (also called APECED, autoimmune polyendocrinopathy candidiasis ectodermal dystrophy) with a monogenetic alteration of the AIRE (autoimmune regulator) gene, different ethnic distribution and a typical triad of diseases and the adult form, mainly conditioned by mutations of the HLA (human leukocyte antigens) alleles on chromosome 6. The article will briefly deal with the very rare IPEX (immune dysfunction, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, x-linked) syndrome, where the FOXP3 gene on chromosome X is altered. Important for the diagnosis are the clinical appearance and functional tests of the endocrine glands and the testing for antibodies. Additionally for PGA I and IPEX genetic testing is advisable. Currently patient-adjusted hormone replacement therapy is very important and screening of family members is recommended. PMID:22033826

  18. Experimental autoimmune hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Billings, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Understanding of autoimmune sensorineural hearing loss (ASNHL) has been hindered by the inaccessibility of the inner ear to biopsy and the lack of workable animal models. A report in this issue of the JCI describes a mouse model of CD4+ T cell–mediated ASNHL induced by immunization with peptides from the inner ear–specific proteins cochlin and ?-tectorin. PMID:15085190

  19. Mixed connective tissue disease: an overview of clinical manifestations, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Hernandez, Oscar-Danilo; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2012-02-01

    The most common clinical manifestations of mixed connective disease are Raynaud's phenomenon, arthralgias, swollen joints, esophageal dysfunction, muscle weakness and fingers sausage-like appearance together with the presence of anti-ribonucleoprotein (RNP) antibodies. However, organ involvement is more extensive than first descriptions reported. The disease can be serious with development of pulmonary, kidney, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and central nervous system manifestations. The worst prognosis and high mortality are associated with the presence of pulmonary disease. Although a different set of clinical criteria have been proposed, there is no consensus about the most accurate. There is no full agreement about treatment and the initial impression of a satisfactory response to low doses of steroids is not always the rule. Herein, we review available evidence to a better approach to all previous topics. PMID:22424193

  20. Mycobacterium chelonae cutaneous infection in a patient with mixed connective tissue disease*

    PubMed Central

    Lage, Renan; Biccigo, Danilo Guerreiro Zeolo; Santos, Felipe Borba Calixto; Chimara, Erica; Pereira, Elisangela Samartin Pegas; da Costa, Adilson

    2015-01-01

    Around 50 mycobacteria species cause human disease. Immunosuppressive states predispose to non-tuberculous mycobaterium infection, such as Mycobacterium chelonae: AFB, non-tuberculous, fast growth of low virulence and uncommon as a human pathogen. It may compromise the skin and soft tissues, lungs, lymph nodes and there is also a disseminated presentation. The diagnosis involves AFB identification and culture on Agar and Lowenstein-Jensen medium base. A 41-year-old female with MCTD (LES predominance) is reported, presenting painless nodules in the right forearm. She denied local trauma. Immunosuppressed with prednisone and cyclophosphamide for 24 months. Lesion biopsy has demonstrated positive bacilloscopy (Ziehl-Neelsen stain) and M.chelonae in culture (Lowenstein-Jensen medium base), therefore clarithromycin treatment has been started (best therapy choice in the literature). PMID:25672306

  1. Mycobacterium chelonae cutaneous infection in a patient with mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Lage, Renan; Biccigo, Danilo Guerreiro Zeolo; Santos, Felipe Borba Calixto; Chimara, Erica; Pereira, Elisangela Samartin Pegas; Costa, Adilson da

    2015-01-01

    Around 50 mycobacteria species cause human disease. Immunosuppressive states predispose to non-tuberculous mycobaterium infection, such as Mycobacterium chelonae: AFB, non-tuberculous, fast growth of low virulence and uncommon as a human pathogen. It may compromise the skin and soft tissues, lungs, lymph nodes and there is also a disseminated presentation. The diagnosis involves AFB identification and culture on Agar and Lowenstein-Jensen medium base. A 41-year-old female with MCTD (LES predominance) is reported, presenting painless nodules in the right forearm. She denied local trauma. Immunosuppressed with prednisone and cyclophosphamide for 24 months. Lesion biopsy has demonstrated positive bacilloscopy (Ziehl-Neelsen stain) and M.chelonae in culture (Lowenstein-Jensen medium base), therefore clarithromycin treatment has been started (best therapy choice in the literature). PMID:25672306

  2. Compromised central tolerance of ICA69 induces multiple organ autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yong; Gualtierotti, Giulio; Tajima, Asako; Grupillo, Maria; Coppola, Antonina; He, Jing; Bertera, Suzanne; Owens, Gregory; Pietropaolo, Massimo; Rudert, William A.; Trucco, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    For reasons not fully understood, patients with an organ-specific autoimmune disease have increased risks of developing autoimmune responses against other organs/tissues. We identified ICA69, a known ?-cell autoantigen in Type 1 diabetes, as a potential common target in multi-organ autoimmunity. NOD mice immunized with ICA69 polypeptides exhibited exacerbated inflammation not only in the islets, but also in the salivary glands. To further investigate ICA69 autoimmunity, two genetically modified mouse lines were generated to modulate thymic ICA69 expression: the heterozygous ICA69del/wt line and the thymic medullary epithelial cell-specific deletion Aire-?ICA69 line. Suboptimal central negative selection of ICA69-reactive T-cells was observed in both lines. Aire-?ICA69 mice spontaneously developed coincident autoimmune responses to the pancreas, the salivary glands, the thyroid, and the stomach. Our findings establish a direct link between compromised thymic ICA69 expression and autoimmunity against multiple ICA69-expressing organs, and identify a potential novel mechanism for the development of multi-organ autoimmune diseases. PMID:25088457

  3. A case report of successful treatment with immunoadsorption onto protein A in mixed connective tissue disease in childhood.

    PubMed

    Rummler, Silke; Althaus, Karina; Maak, Bernhard; Barz, Dagmar

    2008-08-01

    An 11-year-old male patient suffering mixed connective tissue disease with life-threatening pulmonary arterial hypertension, progressive heart failure (New York Heart Association class III-IV), skin ulcers, Raynaud's phenomenon and arthritis, showing no improvement after intensive immunosuppressive therapy or high dose steroids, was treated with immunoadsorption onto protein A. With a combined therapy of low-dose cortisone and bosentan and 22 sessions of immunoadsorption, his condition improved significantly and he continues in clinical remission. At the time of writing no further immunosuppressive therapy or immunoadsorption had been necessary. The patient is now 15 years old and healthy with an age-based constitution comparable to the normal population. PMID:18789123

  4. Lung-dominant connective tissue disease among patients with interstitial lung disease: prevalence, functional stability, and common extrathoracic features*

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Daniel Antunes Silva; Dias, Olívia Meira; de Almeida, Guilherme Eler; Araujo, Mariana Sponholz; Kawano-Dourado, Letícia Barbosa; Baldi, Bruno Guedes; Kairalla, Ronaldo Adib; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the characteristics of a cohort of patients with lung-dominant connective tissue disease (LD-CTD). METHODS: This was a retrospective study of patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD), positive antinuclear antibody (ANA) results (? 1/320), with or without specific autoantibodies, and at least one clinical feature suggestive of connective tissue disease (CTD). RESULTS: Of the 1,998 patients screened, 52 initially met the criteria for a diagnosis of LD-CTD: 37% were male; the mean age at diagnosis was 56 years; and the median follow-up period was 48 months. During follow-up, 8 patients met the criteria for a definitive diagnosis of a CTD. The remaining 44 patients comprised the LD-CTD group, in which the most prevalent extrathoracic features were arthralgia, gastroesophageal reflux disease, and Raynaud's phenomenon. The most prevalent autoantibodies in this group were ANA (89%) and anti-SSA (anti-Ro, 27%). The mean baseline and final FVC was 69.5% and 74.0% of the predicted values, respectively (p > 0.05). Nonspecific interstitial pneumonia and usual interstitial pneumonia patterns were found in 45% and 9% of HRCT scans, respectively; 36% of the scans were unclassifiable. A similar prevalence was noted in histological samples. Diffuse esophageal dilatation was identified in 52% of HRCT scans. Nailfold capillaroscopy was performed in 22 patients; 17 showed a scleroderma pattern. CONCLUSIONS: In our LD-CTD group, there was predominance of females and the patients showed mild spirometric abnormalities at diagnosis, with differing underlying ILD patterns that were mostly unclassifiable on HRCT and by histology. We found functional stability on follow-up. Esophageal dilatation on HRCT and scleroderma pattern on nailfold capillaroscopy were frequent findings and might come to serve as diagnostic criteria. PMID:25972968

  5. Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae autoantibodies in autoimmune diseases: from bread baking to autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Maurizio; Perricone, Roberto; Blank, Miri; Perricone, Carlo; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2013-10-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is best known as the baker's and brewer's yeast, but its residual traces are also frequent excipients in some vaccines. Although anti-S. cerevisiae autoantibodies (ASCAs) are considered specific for Crohn's disease, a growing number of studies have detected high levels of ASCAs in patients affected with autoimmune diseases as compared with healthy controls, including antiphospholipid syndrome, systemic lupus erythematosus, type 1 diabetes mellitus, and rheumatoid arthritis. Commensal microorganisms such as Saccharomyces are required for nutrition, proper development of Peyer's aggregated lymphoid tissue, and tissue healing. However, even the commensal nonclassically pathogenic microbiota can trigger autoimmunity when fine regulation of immune tolerance does not work properly. For our purposes, the protein database of the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) was consulted, comparing Saccharomyces mannan to several molecules with a pathogenetic role in autoimmune diseases. Thanks to the NCBI bioinformation technology tool, several overlaps in molecular structures (50-100 %) were identified when yeast mannan, and the most common autoantigens were compared. The autoantigen U2 snRNP B? was found to conserve a superfamily protein domain that shares 83 % of the S. cerevisiae mannan sequence. Furthermore, ASCAs may be present years before the diagnosis of some associated autoimmune diseases as they were retrospectively found in the preserved blood samples of soldiers who became affected by Crohn's disease years later. Our results strongly suggest that ASCAs' role in clinical practice should be better addressed in order to evaluate their predictive or prognostic relevance. PMID:23292495

  6. Role of myeloid-derived suppressor cells in autoimmune disease

    PubMed Central

    Crook, Kristen R; Liu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) represent an important class of immunoregulatory cells that can be activated to suppress T cell functions. These MDSCs can inhibit T cell functions through cell surface interactions and the release of soluble mediators. MDSCs accumulate in the inflamed tissues and lymphoid organs of patients with autoimmune diseases. Much of our knowledge of MDSC function has come from studies involving cancer models, however many recent studies have helped to characterize MDSC involvement in autoimmune diseases. MDSCs are a heterogeneous group of immature myeloid cells with a number of different functions for the suppression of T cell responses. However, we have yet to fully understand their contributions to the development and regulation of autoimmune diseases. A number of studies have described beneficial functions of MDSCs during autoimmune diseases, and thus there appears to be a potential role for MDSCs in the treatment of these diseases. Nevertheless, many questions remain as to the activation, differentiation, and inhibitory functions of MDSCs. This review aims to summarize our current knowledge of MDSC subsets and suppressive functions in tissue-specific autoimmune disorders. We also describe the potential of MDSC-based cell therapy for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and note some of hurdles facing the implementation of this therapy. PMID:25621222

  7. Changes in bone tissue under conditions of hypokinesia and in connection with age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podrushnyak, E. P.; Suslov, E. I.

    1980-01-01

    X-ray micrography was used to study the optical density of the blackening of X-ray photographs made of five bones in 9 young people (ages 24 to 29) before and after strict bed rest for 16 to 37 days. Photometric studies of the X-ray film determined the relative concentration of bone structure before and after hypokinesia. In addition, the bone tissues of 25 cadavers of practically healthy individuals (aged 18 to 70) who died from injuries were investigated using X-ray structural analysis. Results show that the reaction to the state of hypokinesia is not uniform in different individuals and is quite often directly reversed. It was established that pronounced osteoporosis can be found in a relatively short time after conditions of hypokinesia in healthy young individuals. Results show that the stabilization of the crystalline structure of hydroxyapatite, especially its crystal formation, is finished by the age of 20 to 25. From 25 to 60, the crystal lattice remains in stable condition but X-ray analysis shows a reduction in the hydroxyapatite density.

  8. Methotrexate inhibits neutrophil function by stimulating adenosine release from connective tissue cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cronstein, B.N.; Eberle, M.A.; Levin, R.I. ); Gruber, H.E. )

    1991-03-15

    Although commonly used to control a variety of inflammatory diseases, the mechanism of action of a low dose of methotrexate remains a mystery. Methotrexate accumulates intracellularly where it may interfere with purine metabolism. Therefore, the authors determined whether a 48-hr pretreatment with methotrexate affected adenosine release from ({sup 14}C)adenine-labeled human fibroblasts and umbilical vein endothelial cells. Methotrexate significantly increased adenosine release by fibroblasts. The effect of methotrexate on adenosine release was not due to cytotoxicity since cells treated with maximal concentrations of methotrexate took up ({sup 14}C)adenine and released {sup 14}C-labeled purine (a measure of cell injury) in a manner identical to control cells. Methotrexate treatment of fibroblasts dramatically inhibited adherence to fibroblasts by both unstimulated neutrophils and stimulated neutrophils. One hypothesis that explains the effect of methotrexate on adenosine release is that, by inhibition of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) transformylase, methotrexate induces the accumulation of AICAR, the nucleoside precursor of which has previously been shown to cause adenosine release from ischemic cardiac tissue. The observation that the antiinflammatory actions of methotrexate are due to the capacity of methotrexate to induce adenosine release may form the basis for the development of an additional class of antiinflammatory drugs.

  9. Differences in irradiation susceptibility and turnover between mucosal and connective tissue-type mast cells of mice

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuzumi, T.; Waki, N.; Kanakura, Y.; Nagoshi, J.; Hirota, S.; Yoshikawa, K.; Kitamura, Y. )

    1990-08-01

    Although precursors of mast cells are derived from the bone marrow, phenotypes of mast cells are influenced by the tissues in which final differentiation occurs. Connective tissue-type mast cells (CTMC) and mucosal mast cells (MMC) are different in morphological, biochemical, immunological, and functional criteria. The purpose of the present study was to obtain information about the differentiation process of MMC. First, we compared changes in irradiation susceptibility in mice during the differentiation process of CTMC and MMC. The decrease in irradiation susceptibility was remarkable in the CTMC differentiation process, but it was moderate in that of MMC. Some morphologically identifiable CTMC in the peritoneal cavity had proliferative potential and were highly radioresistant, whereas such a radioresistant population of MMC was not detectable in the gastric mucosa. Second, we estimated the turnover of CTMC and MMC by determining the proportion of mast cells that were labeled with continuously administered bromodeoxyuridine. The turnover of MMC was significantly faster than that of CTMC. The absence of the radioresistant mast cell population in the gastric mucosa appeared to be related to the short life span of MMC.

  10. Experiment K-7-29: Connective Tissue Studies. Part 1; Rat Skin, Normal and Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vailas, A. C.; Grindeland, R.; Ashman, R.; Choy, V.; Durnova, G.; Graf, B.; Griffith, P.; Kaplansky, A. S.; Kolis, S.; Martinez, D.; Rao, J. S.; Rayford, A. R.; Reddy, B. R.; Sears, J.; Thielke, R.; Ulm, M.; Vanderby, R.

    1994-01-01

    The skin repair studies started to be problematic for the following reasons: (1) It was very difficult to locate the wound and many lesions were not of the same dimensions. A considerable amount of time was devoted to the identification of the wound using polarized light. We understand that this experiment was added on to the overall project. Marking of the wound site and standard dimensions should be recommended for the next flight experiment. (2) The tissue was frozen, therefore thawing and fixation caused problems with some of the immunocytochemical staining for obtaining better special resolution with light microscopy image processing. Despite these problems, we were unable to detect any significant qualitative differences for the following wound markers: (1) Collagen Type 3, (2) Hematotoxylin and Eosin, and (3) Macrophage Factor 13. All protein markers were isolated from rat sources and antibodies prepared and tested for cross reactivity with other molecules at the University of Wisconsin Hybridoma Facility. However, rat skin from the non lesioned site 'normal' showed interesting biochemical results. Skin was prepared for the following measurements: (1) DNA content, (2) Collagen content by hydroxyproline, and (3) uronic acid content and estimation of ground substance. The results indicated there was a non-significant increase (10%) in the DNA concentration of skin from flight animals. However, the data expressed as a ratio DNA/Collagen estimates the cell or nuclear density that supports a given quantity of collagen showed a dramatic increase in the flight group (33%). This means flight conditions may have slowed down collagen secretion and/or increased cell proliferation in adult rat skin. Further biochemical tests are being done to determine the crosslinking of elastin which will enhance the insight to assessing changes in skin turnover.

  11. Abdominal aortic aneurysms: an autoimmune disease?

    PubMed

    Jagadesham, Vamshi P; Scott, D Julian A; Carding, Simon R

    2008-12-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are a multifactorial degenerative vascular disorder. One of the defining features of the pathophysiology of aneurysmal disease is inflammation. Recent developments in vascular and molecular cell biology have increased our knowledge on the role of the adaptive and innate immune systems in the initiation and propagation of the inflammatory response in aortic tissue. AAAs share many features of autoimmune disease, including genetic predisposition, organ specificity and chronic inflammation. Here, this evidence is used to propose that the chronic inflammation observed in AAAs is a consequence of a dysregulated autoimmune response against autologous components of the aortic wall that persists inappropriately. Identification of the molecular and cellular targets involved in AAA formation will allow the development of therapeutic agents for the treatment of AAA. PMID:18980864

  12. The Architecture of the Connective Tissue in the Musculoskeletal System—An Often Overlooked Functional Parameter as to Proprioception in the Locomotor Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    van der Wal, Jaap

    2009-01-01

    The architecture of the connective tissue, including structures such as fasciae, sheaths, and membranes, is more important for understanding functional meaning than is more traditional anatomy, whose anatomical dissection method neglects and denies the continuity of the connective tissue as integrating matrix of the body. The connective tissue anatomy and architecture exhibits two functional tendencies that are present in all areas of the body in different ways and relationships. In body cavities, the “disconnecting” quality of shaping space enables mobility; between organs and body parts, the “connecting” dimension enables functional mechanical interactions. In the musculoskeletal system, those two features of the connective tissue are also present. They cannot be found by the usual analytic dissection procedures. An architectural description is necessary. This article uses such a methodologic approach and gives such a description for the lateral elbow region. The result is an alternative architectural view of the anatomic substrate involved in the transmission and conveyance of forces over synovial joints. An architectural description of the muscular and connective tissue organized in series with each other to enable the transmission of forces over these dynamic entities is more appropriate than is the classical concept of “passive” force-guiding structures such as ligaments organized in parallel to actively force-transmitting structures such as muscles with tendons. The discrimination between so-called joint receptors and muscle receptors is an artificial distinction when function is considered. Mechanoreceptors, also the so-called muscle receptors, are arranged in the context of force circumstances—that is, of the architecture of muscle and connective tissue rather than of the classical anatomic structures such as muscle, capsules, and ligaments. In the lateral cubital region of the rat, a spectrum of mechanosensitive substrate occurs at the transitional areas between regular dense connective tissue layers and the muscle fascicles organized in series with them. This substrate exhibits features of type and location of the mechanosensitive nerve terminals that usually are considered characteristic for “joint receptors” as well as for “muscle receptors.” The receptors for proprioception are concentrated in those areas where tensile stresses are conveyed over the elbow joint. Structures cannot be divided into either joint receptors or muscle receptors when muscular and collagenous connective tissue structures function in series to maintain joint integrity and stability. In vivo, those connective tissue structures are strained during movements of the skeletal parts, those movements in turn being induced and led by tension in muscular tissue. In principle, because of the architecture, receptors can also be stimulated by changes in muscle tension without skeletal movement, or by skeletal movement without change in muscle tension. A mutual relationship exists between structure (and function) of the mechanoreceptors and the architecture of the muscular and regular dense connective tissue. Both are instrumental in the coding of proprioceptive information to the central nervous system. PMID:21589740

  13. The architecture of the connective tissue in the musculoskeletal system-an often overlooked functional parameter as to proprioception in the locomotor apparatus.

    PubMed

    van der Wal, Jaap

    2009-01-01

    The architecture of the connective tissue, including structures such as fasciae, sheaths, and membranes, is more important for understanding functional meaning than is more traditional anatomy, whose anatomical dissection method neglects and denies the continuity of the connective tissue as integrating matrix of the body.The connective tissue anatomy and architecture exhibits two functional tendencies that are present in all areas of the body in different ways and relationships. In body cavities, the "disconnecting" quality of shaping space enables mobility; between organs and body parts, the "connecting" dimension enables functional mechanical interactions. In the musculoskeletal system, those two features of the connective tissue are also present. They cannot be found by the usual analytic dissection procedures. An architectural description is necessary.This article uses such a methodologic approach and gives such a description for the lateral elbow region. The result is an alternative architectural view of the anatomic substrate involved in the transmission and conveyance of forces over synovial joints. An architectural description of the muscular and connective tissue organized in series with each other to enable the transmission of forces over these dynamic entities is more appropriate than is the classical concept of "passive" force-guiding structures such as ligaments organized in parallel to actively force-transmitting structures such as muscles with tendons.The discrimination between so-called joint receptors and muscle receptors is an artificial distinction when function is considered. Mechanoreceptors, also the so-called muscle receptors, are arranged in the context of force circumstances-that is, of the architecture of muscle and connective tissue rather than of the classical anatomic structures such as muscle, capsules, and ligaments. In the lateral cubital region of the rat, a spectrum of mechanosensitive substrate occurs at the transitional areas between regular dense connective tissue layers and the muscle fascicles organized in series with them. This substrate exhibits features of type and location of the mechanosensitive nerve terminals that usually are considered characteristic for "joint receptors" as well as for "muscle receptors."The receptors for proprioception are concentrated in those areas where tensile stresses are conveyed over the elbow joint. Structures cannot be divided into either joint receptors or muscle receptors when muscular and collagenous connective tissue structures function in series to maintain joint integrity and stability. In vivo, those connective tissue structures are strained during movements of the skeletal parts, those movements in turn being induced and led by tension in muscular tissue. In principle, because of the architecture, receptors can also be stimulated by changes in muscle tension without skeletal movement, or by skeletal movement without change in muscle tension. A mutual relationship exists between structure (and function) of the mechanoreceptors and the architecture of the muscular and regular dense connective tissue. Both are instrumental in the coding of proprioceptive information to the central nervous system. PMID:21589740

  14. A Connective Tissue Graft as a Biologic Alternative to Class V Restorations in Miller Class I and II Recession Defects: Case Series.

    PubMed

    Nordland, W Peter; de Souza, Laura M; Swift, Edward J

    2016-01-01

    Although cervical lesions are commonly treated using restorative materials, the esthetics and durability of the restoration can be problematic. Despite improvements in bonding to dentin, the performance of resin-based cervical restorations suffers from a variety of clinical problems. Biologic options using connective tissue grafts to replace the lost soft tissues have proven longevity and esthetic benefits. A collection of case reports is presented to demonstrate a surgical alternative to correct carious and noncarious cervical lesions. Clinicians should consider the biologic option of replacing the missing gingival tissue prior to placement of restorative materials on exposed root surfaces. PMID:26697550

  15. Vitamin D Status and Bone and Connective Tissue Turnover in Brown Bears (Ursus arctos) during Hibernation and the Active State

    PubMed Central

    Vestergaard, Peter; Støen, Ole-Gunnar; Swenson, Jon E.; Mosekilde, Leif; Heickendorff, Lene; Fröbert, Ole

    2011-01-01

    Background Extended physical inactivity causes disuse osteoporosis in humans. In contrast, brown bears (Ursus arctos) are highly immobilised for half of the year during hibernation without signs of bone loss and therefore may serve as a model for prevention of osteoporosis. Aim To study 25-hydroxy-vitamin D (25OHD) levels and bone turnover markers in brown bears during the hibernating state in winter and during the active state in summer. We measured vitamin D subtypes (D2 and D3), calcitropic hormones (parathyroid hormone [PTH], 1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D [1,25(OH)2D]) and bone turnover parameters (osteocalcin, ICTP, CTX-I), PTH, serum calcium and PIIINP. Material and Methods We drew blood from seven immobilised wild brown bears during hibernation in February and in the same bears while active in June. Results Serum 25-hydroxy-cholecalciferol (25OHD3) was significantly higher in the summer than in the winter (22.8±4.6 vs. 8.8±2.1 nmol/l, two tailed p - 2p?=?0.02), whereas 25-hydroxy-ergocalciferol (25OHD2) was higher in winter (54.2±8.3 vs. 18.7±1.7 nmol/l, 2p<0.01). Total serum calcium and PTH levels did not differ between winter and summer. Activated 1,25(OH)2D demonstrated a statistically insignificant trend towards higher summer levels. Osteocalcin levels were higher in summer than winter, whereas other markers of bone turnover (ICTP and CTX-I) were unchanged. Serum PIIINP, which is a marker of connective tissue and to some degree muscle turnover, was significantly higher during summer than during winter. Conclusions Dramatic changes were documented in the vitamin D3/D2 ratio and in markers of bone and connective tissue turnover in brown bears between hibernation and the active state. Because hibernating brown bears do not develop disuse osteoporosis, despite extensive physical inactivity we suggest that they may serve as a model for the prevention of this disease. PMID:21731765

  16. Heart rate recovery is an important predictor of outcomes in patients with connective tissue disease–associated pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Quyen; Mummadi, Srinivas; Walker, Esteban; McCarthy, Kevin; Dweik, Raed A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Reduced heart rate recovery (HRR) after exercise is associated with increased mortality in cardiac and pulmonary diseases. We sought to evaluate the association between HRR after the 6-minute walk test (6MWT) and outcomes in patients with connective tissue disease–associated pulmonary hypertension (CTD-PH). Data were obtained by review of the medical records. HRR was defined as the difference in heart rate at the end of the 6MWT and after 1 minute (HRR1), 2 minutes (HRR2), and 3 minutes (HRR3) of rest. All patients with pulmonary hypertension and a diagnosis of systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, or mixed connective tissue disease who underwent the 6MWT between August 1, 2009, and October 30, 2011, were included (n = 66). By Kaplan-Meier analysis, HRR1, HRR2, and HRR3 at different cutoff points were all good predictors, with HRR1 of <16 being the best predictor of time to clinical worsening (log-rank P < 0.0001), hospitalization (log-rank P = 0.0001), and survival (log-rank P < 0.003). By proportional hazards regression, patients with HRR1 of <16 were at increased risk of clinical worsening (hazard ratio [HR]: 6.4 [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.6–19.2]; P < 0.0001], hospitalization (HR: 6.6 [95% CI: 2.4–23]; P < 0.0001), and death (HR: 4.5 [95% CI: 1.6–15.7]; P = 0.003). Patients in the highest tercile (HRR1 of ?19) were unlikely to have a clinical worsening event (HR: 0.1 [95% CI: 0.04–0.5]; P = 0.001], to be hospitalized (HR: 0.1 [95% CI: 0.02–0.5]; P = 0.001), or to die (HR: 0.3 [95% CI: 0.07–0.9]; P = 0.04]. In conclusion, in patients with CTD-PH, abnormal HRR1 (defined as HRR1 of <16) after the 6MWT is a strong predictor of clinical worsening, time to clinical worsening, survival, and hospitalization. PMID:26401258

  17. Heart rate recovery is an important predictor of outcomes in patients with connective tissue disease-associated pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Minai, Omar A; Nguyen, Quyen; Mummadi, Srinivas; Walker, Esteban; McCarthy, Kevin; Dweik, Raed A

    2015-09-01

    Reduced heart rate recovery (HRR) after exercise is associated with increased mortality in cardiac and pulmonary diseases. We sought to evaluate the association between HRR after the 6-minute walk test (6MWT) and outcomes in patients with connective tissue disease-associated pulmonary hypertension (CTD-PH). Data were obtained by review of the medical records. HRR was defined as the difference in heart rate at the end of the 6MWT and after 1 minute (HRR1), 2 minutes (HRR2), and 3 minutes (HRR3) of rest. All patients with pulmonary hypertension and a diagnosis of systemic sclerosis, systemic lupus erythematosus, or mixed connective tissue disease who underwent the 6MWT between August 1, 2009, and October 30, 2011, were included (n = 66). By Kaplan-Meier analysis, HRR1, HRR2, and HRR3 at different cutoff points were all good predictors, with HRR1 of <16 being the best predictor of time to clinical worsening (log-rank P < 0.0001), hospitalization (log-rank P = 0.0001), and survival (log-rank P < 0.003). By proportional hazards regression, patients with HRR1 of <16 were at increased risk of clinical worsening (hazard ratio [HR]: 6.4 [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.6-19.2]; P < 0.0001], hospitalization (HR: 6.6 [95% CI: 2.4-23]; P < 0.0001), and death (HR: 4.5 [95% CI: 1.6-15.7]; P = 0.003). Patients in the highest tercile (HRR1 of ?19) were unlikely to have a clinical worsening event (HR: 0.1 [95% CI: 0.04-0.5]; P = 0.001], to be hospitalized (HR: 0.1 [95% CI: 0.02-0.5]; P = 0.001), or to die (HR: 0.3 [95% CI: 0.07-0.9]; P = 0.04]. In conclusion, in patients with CTD-PH, abnormal HRR1 (defined as HRR1 of <16) after the 6MWT is a strong predictor of clinical worsening, time to clinical worsening, survival, and hospitalization. PMID:26401258

  18. The spectrum of autoimmune encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Dubey, Divyanshu; Sawhney, Anshudha; Greenberg, Benjamin; Lowden, Andrea; Warnack, Worthy; Khemani, Pravin; Stuve, Olaf; Vernino, Steven

    2015-10-15

    Despite being a potentially reversible neurological condition, no clear guidelines for diagnosis or management of autoimmune encephalitis exist. In this study we analyzed clinical presentation, laboratory and imaging characteristics, and outcome of autoimmune encephalitis from three teaching hospitals. Non-paraneoplastic autoimmune encephalitis associated with antibodies against membrane antigens was the most common syndrome, especially in the pediatric population. Clinical outcome was better for patients with shorter latency from symptom onset to diagnosis and initiation of immunomodulation. Patients with underlying malignancy were less likely to respond well to immunomodulatory therapy. The clinical spectrum of autoimmune encephalitis is fairly broad, but prompt recognition and treatment often leads to excellent outcome. PMID:26439968

  19. Autoantibodies in autoimmune liver diseases.

    PubMed

    Sener, Asli Gamze

    2015-11-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic hepatitis of unknown etiology characterized by clinical, histological, and immunological features, generally including circulating autoantibodies and a high total serum and/or gamma globulin. Liver-related autoantibodies are very significant for the correct diagnosis and classification of autoimmune liver diseases (AILD), namely autoimmune hepatitis types 1 and 2 (AIH-1 and 2), primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), and the sclerosing cholangitis types in adults and children. This article intends to review recent studies that investigate autoantibodies in autoimmune liver diseases from a microbiological perspective. PMID:26359647

  20. A mouse strain where basal connective tissue growth factor gene expression can be switched from low to high.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Heather E; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Hiller, Sylvia; Sulik, Kathleen K; Maeda, Nobuyo

    2010-01-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a signaling molecule that primarily functions in extracellular matrix maintenance and repair. Increased Ctgf expression is associated with fibrosis in chronic organ injury. Studying the role of CTGF in fibrotic disease in vivo, however, has been hampered by perinatal lethality of the Ctgf null mice as well as the limited scope of previous mouse models of Ctgf overproduction. Here, we devised a new approach and engineered a single mutant mouse strain where the endogenous Ctgf-3' untranslated region (3'UTR) was replaced with a cassette containing two 3'UTR sequences arranged in tandem. The modified Ctgf allele uses a 3'UTR from the mouse FBJ osteosarcoma oncogene (c-Fos) and produces an unstable mRNA, resulting in 60% of normal Ctgf expression (Lo allele). Upon Cre-expression, excision of the c-Fos-3'UTR creates a transcript utilizing the more stable bovine growth hormone (bGH) 3'UTR, resulting in increased Ctgf expression (Hi allele). Using the Ctgf Lo and Hi mutants, and crosses to a Ctgf knockout or Cre-expressing mice, we have generated a series of strains with a 30-fold range of Ctgf expression. Mice with the lowest Ctgf expression, 30% of normal, appear healthy, while a global nine-fold overexpression of Ctgf causes abnormalities, including developmental delay and craniofacial defects, and embryonic death at E10-12. Overexpression of Ctgf by tamoxifen-inducible Cre in the postnatal life, on the other hand, is compatible with life. The Ctgf Lo-Hi mutant mice should prove useful in further understanding the function of CTGF in fibrotic diseases. Additionally, this method can be used for the production of mouse lines with quantitative variations in other genes, particularly with genes that are broadly expressed, have distinct functions in different tissues, or where altered gene expression is not compatible with normal development. PMID:20877562

  1. [FULLERENE C60 INHIBITED FREE RADICAL AND DESTRUCTIVE PROCESSES IN CONNECTIVE TISSUE DURING ADJUVANT ARTHRITIS IN RATS].

    PubMed

    Mamontova, T V; Vesnina, L E; Mikityuk, M V; Bobrova, N A; Kutsenko, L A; Gordinskaya, I L; Kaidashev, I P

    2015-01-01

    The effects of fullerene C60 (FC60) on the level of free radical and destruction processes were studied in rats with experimental adjuvant arthritis (AA). It was shown the protective effect of FC60 during AA. The effect was accompanied by an increase of the antioxidant enzymes activity, superoxide dismutase in the liver (15.96 ± 0.38 ?mol/kg x s) and in the kidneys (5.36 ± 0.27 ?mol/kg x s) and catalase in the kidneys (9.56 ± 0.78 ?mol/kg x s) and in the heart (2.26 ± 0.41 ?mol/kg x s) in comparison to control group (43.83± 5.69%; 54.55 ± 6.18%; 11.68 ± 0.52 ?mol/kg x s; 3.43 ± 0.47 ?mol/kg x s; 4.77 ± 0.5 ?mol/kg x s; 0.98 ± 0.12 ?mol/kg x s accordingly). It was shown a protective effect of FC60 during AA directed on the depression of the destructive processes in connective tissue that was expressed through the reduction of the total collagenolitic activity level in cartilage (10.05 ± 0.06 ?mol/g/min) and bone (11.21 ± 0.04 ?mol/g/min) tissues, free hydroxyproline contents (1.54 ± 0.04 ?g/ml) and alkaline phasphatase activity (1.24 ± 0,14 ?mol/l x sec) in comparison to control group (11.91 ± 0.49 ?mol/g/min; 13.19 ± 0.15 ?mol/g/min; 2.25 ± 0.07 ?g/ ml; 2.19 ± 0.24 ?mol/l x sec accordingly). Taken together, these results accentuate the perspective of future investigations of action FC60 during rheumatoid arthritis as a feasible therapeutic agent. PMID:26387164

  2. Personal Authentication Analysis Using Finger-Vein Patterns in Patients with Connective Tissue Diseases—Possible Association with Vascular Disease and Seasonal Change -

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Miyuki; Miura, Naoto; Fujii, Takao; Ohmura, Koichiro; Yoshifuji, Hajime; Yukawa, Naoichiro; Imura, Yoshitaka; Nakashima, Ran; Ikeda, Takaharu; Umemura, Shin-ichiro; Miyatake, Takafumi; Mimori, Tsuneyo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine how connective tissue diseases affect finger-vein pattern authentication. Methods The finger-vein patterns of 68 patients with connective tissue diseases and 24 healthy volunteers were acquired. Captured as CCD (charge-coupled device) images by transmitting near-infrared light through fingers, they were followed up in once in each season for one year. The similarity of the follow-up patterns and the initial one was evaluated in terms of their normalized cross-correlation C. Results The mean C values calculated for patients tended to be lower than those calculated for healthy volunteers. In midwinter (February in Japan) they showed statistically significant reduction both as compared with patients in other seasons and as compared with season-matched healthy controls, whereas the values calculated for healthy controls showed no significant seasonal changes. Values calculated for patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) or mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) showed major reductions in November and, especially, February. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and patients with dermatomyositis or polymyositis (DM/PM) did not show statistically significant seasonal changes in C values. Conclusions Finger-vein patterns can be used throughout the year to identify patients with connective tissue diseases, but some attention is needed for patients with advanced disease such as SSc. PMID:26701644

  3. Study of chemical properties and evaluation of collagen in mantle, epidermal connective tissue and tentacle of Indian Squid, Loligo duvauceli Orbigny.

    PubMed

    Raman, Maya; Mathew, Saleena

    2014-08-01

    The chemical composition and evaluation of Indian squid (Loligo duvauceli) mantle, epidermal connective tissue and tentacle is investigated in this current study. It is observed that squid mantle contains 22.2% total protein; 63.5% of the total protein is myofibrillar protein. The unique property of squid myofibrillar protein is its water solubility. Squid mantle contains 12.0% total collagen. Epidermal connective tissue has highest amounts of total collagen (17.8%). SDS-PAGE of total collagen identified high molecular weight ?-, ?- and ?- sub-chains. Amino acid profile analysis indicates that mantle and tentacle contain essential amino acids. Arginine forms a major portion of mantle collagen (272.5 g/100 g N). Isoleucine, glutamic acid and lysine are other amino acids that are found in significantly high amounts in the mantle. Sulphur containing cystine is deficit in mantle collagen. Papain digest of mantle and epidermal connective tissue is rich in uronic acid, while papain digest, collagenase digest and urea digest of epidermal connective tissue has significant amounts of sialic acid (25.2, 33.2 and 99.8 ?mol /100 g, respectively). PAS staining of papain digest, collagenase digest and urea digest also identify the association of hexoses with low molecular weight collagen fragments. Histochemical sectioning also emphasized the localized distribution of collagen in epidermal and dermal region and very sparse fibres traverse the myotome bundles. PMID:25114341

  4. Current and Future Immunomodulation Strategies to Restore Tolerance in Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Bour-Jordan, Hélène

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases reflect a breakdown in self-tolerance that results from defects in thymic deletion of potentially autoreactive T cells (central tolerance) and in T-cell intrinsic and extrinsic mechanisms that normally control potentially autoreactive T cells in the periphery (peripheral tolerance). The mechanisms leading to autoimmune diseases are multifactorial and depend on a complex combination of genetic, epigenetic, molecular, and cellular elements that result in pathogenic inflammatory responses in peripheral tissues driven by self-antigen-specific T cells. In this article, we describe the different checkpoints of tolerance that are defective in autoimmune diseases as well as specific events in the autoimmune response which represent therapeutic opportunities to restore long-term tolerance in autoimmune diseases. We present evidence for the role of different pathways in animal models and the therapeutic strategies targeting these pathways in clinical trials in autoimmune diseases. PMID:23125012

  5. Referral Centres for Systemic Autoimmune Diseases, Fondazione

    E-print Network

    Chawla, Nitesh V.

    S-18 1 Referral Centres for Systemic Autoimmune Diseases, Fondazione IRCCS Ospedale Maggiore correspondence to: Dr Lorenzo Beretta, Referral Centres for Systemic Autoimmune Diseases, Fondazione IRCCS sclerosis (SSc) is a complex autoimmune disease with multiorgan involvement that results in significant

  6. Targeting Dendritic Cell Function during Systemic Autoimmunity to Restore Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Mackern-Oberti, Juan P.; Vega, Fabián; Llanos, Carolina; Bueno, Susan M.; Kalergis, Alexis M.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic autoimmune diseases can damage nearly every tissue or cell type of the body. Although a great deal of progress has been made in understanding the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases, current therapies have not been improved, remain unspecific and are associated with significant side effects. Because dendritic cells (DCs) play a major role in promoting immune tolerance against self-antigens (self-Ags), current efforts are focusing at generating new therapies based on the transfer of tolerogenic DCs (tolDCs) during autoimmunity. However, the feasibility of this approach during systemic autoimmunity has yet to be evaluated. TolDCs may ameliorate autoimmunity mainly by restoring T cell tolerance and, thus, indirectly modulating autoantibody development. In vitro induction of tolDCs loaded with immunodominant self-Ags and subsequent cell transfer to patients would be a specific new therapy that will avoid systemic immunosuppression. Herein, we review recent approaches evaluating the potential of tolDCs for the treatment of systemic autoimmune disorders. PMID:25229821

  7. Autoimmune Thyroiditis in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Rosalind S.

    2013-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroiditis (AIT) is the most common thyroid disorder in the pediatric age range. The disease results from an as yet poorly characterized defect or defects in immunoregulation and a cascade of events progressing from lymphocyte infiltration of the thyroid, to T-cell- and cytokine-mediated thyroid follicular cell injury, and apoptotic cell death. Approximately 70% of disease risk has been attributed to genetic background with environmental factors being important in triggering disease in susceptible individuals. The contribution of individual genes is small and probably polymorphisms in multiple genes play a role. Some immunosusceptibility genes affect immune recognition or response in general, while others are thyroid-specific. Environmental agents may act through an epigenetic mechanism. Antibodies (Abs) to a variety of thyroid-specific antigens are detectable in a majority of patients, but the role of Abs in mediating cell injury and death is unclear and only thyrotropin (TSH) receptor Abs significantly affect thyroid function by interfering with (or stimulating) the action of TSH. Nonetheless, thyroid peroxidase (TPO) Abs and thyroglobulin (Tg) Abs, present in a majority of patients, are valuable diagnostically as markers of underlying autoimmune thyroid destruction. TSH receptor blocking Abs are found in ˜18% of children and adolescents with severe hypothyroidism and, when persistent, may identify an adolescent likely to have a baby with TSH receptor blocking Ab-induced congenital hypothyroidism. AIT may coexist with other organ-specific autoimmune diseases. Although the most common age at presentation is adolescence, the disease may occur rarely in children <1 year of life. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:23154164

  8. Mechanically relevant consequences of the composite laminate-like design of the abdominal wall muscles and connective tissues.

    PubMed

    Brown, Stephen H M

    2012-05-01

    Together, three abdominal wall muscles (external oblique, internal oblique and transversus abdominis) form a tightly bound muscular sheet that has been likened to a composite-laminate structure. Previous work has demonstrated the ability of force generated by these three muscles to be passed between one another through connective tissue linkages. Muscle fibres in each muscle are obliquely oriented with respect to its neighbouring muscles. It is proposed here is that this unique morphology of the abdominal wall muscles functions, through the application of constraining forces amongst the muscles, to increase force- and stiffness-generating capabilities. This paper presents a mathematical formulation of the stress-strain relationship for a transversely isotropic fibrous composite, and establishes a strengthening and stiffening effect when stress can be transferred between the fibrous layers. Application of empirical mechanical properties to this formulation demonstrates this effect for the abdominal wall muscles and, in greater proportion, for the anterior aponeurosis of the abdominal wall. This has implications for increasing the stiffness and passive load bearing ability of the abdominal wall muscles, and has the potential to modulate the whole muscle force-length and force-velocity relationships during contraction. PMID:22137674

  9. Elevated Urinary Connective Tissue Growth Factor in Diabetic Nephropathy Is Caused by Local Production and Tubular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Gerritsen, Karin G. F.; Leeuwis, Jan Willem; Koeners, Maarten P.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; van Oeveren, Willem; Aten, Jan; Tarnow, Lise; Rossing, Peter; Wetzels, Jack F. M.; Joles, Jaap A.; Kok, Robbert Jan; Goldschmeding, Roel; Nguyen, Tri Q.

    2015-01-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF; CCN2) plays a role in the development of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Urinary CTGF (uCTGF) is elevated in DN patients and has been proposed as a biomarker for disease progression, but it is unknown which pathophysiological factors contribute to elevated uCTGF. We studied renal handling of CTGF by infusion of recombinant CTGF in diabetic mice. In addition, uCTGF was measured in type 1 DN patients and compared with glomerular and tubular dysfunction and damage markers. In diabetic mice, uCTGF was increased and fractional excretion (FE) of recombinant CTGF was substantially elevated indicating reduced tubular reabsorption. FE of recombinant CTGF correlated with excretion of endogenous CTGF. CTGF mRNA was mainly localized in glomeruli and medullary tubules. Comparison of FE of endogenous and recombinant CTGF indicated that 60% of uCTGF had a direct renal source, while 40% originated from plasma CTGF. In DN patients, uCTGF was independently associated with markers of proximal and distal tubular dysfunction and damage. In conclusion, uCTGF in DN is elevated as a result of both increased local production and reduced reabsorption due to tubular dysfunction. We submit that uCTGF is a biomarker reflecting both glomerular and tubulointerstitial hallmarks of diabetic kidney disease. PMID:26171399

  10. Inhibition of collagen production in scleroderma fibroblast cultures by a connective tissue glycoprotein extracted from normal dermis

    SciTech Connect

    Maquart, F.X.; Bellon, G.; Cornillet-Stoupy, J.; Randoux, A.; Triller, R.; Kalis, B.; Borel, J.P.

    1985-08-01

    It was shown in a previous paper that a connective tissue glycoprotein (CTGP) extracted from normal rabbit dermis was able to inhibit total protein and collagen syntheses by normal dermis fibroblast cultures. In the present study, the effects of CTGP on scleroderma fibroblasts were investigated. (/sup 14/C)Proline incorporation into total proteins of the supernatant was not significantly different from that found in controls. By contrast, the amount of collagen, expressed as percentage of total secreted protein, was far higher in scleroderma cultures than in normal ones (14.4% +/- 6.0% vs 4.6% +/- 0.9%). Addition of CTGP to the medium induced a concentration-dependent inhibition of (/sup 14/C)proline incorporation into proteins from both control and scleroderma cells. In control cultures, no significant decrease of the percentage of collagen was observed, but over 60 micrograms/ml, both cytotoxic effects and inhibition of protein synthesis occurred. In scleroderma cultures, the inhibition was twice as effective on collagen as on noncollagen protein synthesis. The inhibition of collagen secretion was not related either to changes in collagen hydroxylation or to the intracellular catabolism of newly synthesized procollagen.

  11. Outcome of high titer antinuclear antibody positivity in individuals without connective tissue disease: a 10-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Wijeyesinghe, Udara; Russell, Anthony S

    2008-11-01

    To ascertain the development of disease in a cohort of connective tissue disease (CTD)-negative patients 10 years after testing positive for antinuclear antibody (ANA) in high titer, a telephone survey and serological tests were conducted on a group of CTD-negative patients with high ANA titer identified in a previous study. Thirty-four out of 62 patients (55%) completed only the telephone survey and 27 completed both. The mean length of follow-up was 11.5 years. The ages ranged from 27 to 89 years with the mean being 58.9 years. The sex distribution included 4 (12%) men and 30 (88%) women. Twenty-one out of 27 patients (78%) remained ANA-positive. A total of five patients were diagnosed with CTD with two in the last 5 years. Common symptoms described, in order of frequency, were joint pain, Raynaud's phenomenon, and Sicca symptoms. This study shows that a considerable percentage of CTD-negative individuals with an initial high ANA titer continue to maintain their positivity even after an extended period. It is reassuring, however, that only a small number of these individuals go on to develop CTD. It confirms the fact that the ANA test, despite remaining a useful clinical tool, needs to be used in conjunction with other evidence and clinical judgement when attempting to validate the diagnosis of CTD. PMID:18500432

  12. The Effect of Low and High Velocity Tendon Excursion on the Mechanical Properties of Human Cadaver Subsynovial Connective Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Filius, Anika; Thoreson, Andrew R.; Yang, Tai-Hua; Vanhees, Matthias; An, Kai-Nan; Zhao, Chunfeng; Amadio, Peter C.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Fibrosis of the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) in the carpal tunnel is the most common histological finding in carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS). Fibrosis may result from damaged SSCT. Previous studies found that with low-velocity (2 mm/s), tendon excursions can irreversibly damage the SSCT. We investigated the effect of tendon excursion velocity in the generation of SSCT damage. Nine human cadaver wrists were used. Three repeated cycles of ramp-stretch testing were performed simulating 40, 60, 90 and 120% of the middle finger flexor tendon superficialis physiological excursion with an excursion velocity of 60 mm/s. Energy and force were calculated and normalized by values obtained in the first cycle for each excursion level. Data were compared with low-velocity excursion data. For high-velocity excursions, a significant drop in the excursion energy ratio was first observed at an excursion level of 60% physiological excursion (P<0.024) and that for low-velocity excursions was first observed at 90% physiological excursion (P<0.038). Furthermore, the energy ratio was lower at 60% for high velocities (P?0.039). Increasing velocity lowers the SSCT damage threshold. This finding may be relevant for understanding the pathogenesis of SSCT fibrosis, such as that accompanying CTS, and a relationship with occupational factors. PMID:24038298

  13. Cucurbitacin I Attenuates Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy via Inhibition of Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CCN2) and TGF- ?/Smads Signalings

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hara; Park, Kye Won; Park, Woo Jin; Yang, Seung Yul; Yang, Dong Kwon

    2015-01-01

    Cucurbitacin I is a naturally occurring triterpenoid derived from Cucurbitaceae family plants that exhibits a number of potentially useful pharmacological and biological activities. However, the therapeutic impact of cucurbitacin I on the heart has not heretofore been reported. To evaluate the functional role of cucurbitacin I in an in vitro model of cardiac hypertrophy, phenylephrine (PE)-stimulated cardiomyocytes were treated with a sub-cytotoxic concentration of the compound, and the effects on cell size and mRNA expression levels of ANF and ?-MHC were investigated. Consequently, PE-induced cell enlargement and upregulation of ANF and ?-MHC were significantly suppressed by pretreatment of the cardiomyocytes with cucurbitacin I. Notably, cucurbitacin I also impaired connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and MAPK signaling, pro-hypertrophic factors, as well as TGF-?/Smad signaling, the important contributing factors to fibrosis. The protective impact of cucurbitacin I was significantly blunted in CTGF-silenced or TGF-?1-silenced hypertrophic cardiomyocytes, indicating that the compound exerts its beneficial actions through CTGF. Taken together, these findings signify that cucurbitacin I protects the heart against cardiac hypertrophy via inhibition of CTGF/MAPK, and TGF- ?/Smad-facilitated events. Accordingly, the present study provides new insights into the defensive capacity of cucurbitacin I against cardiac hypertrophy, and further suggesting cucurbitacin I’s utility as a novel therapeutic agent for the management of heart diseases. PMID:26296085

  14. The Dopaminergic System in Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Rodrigo; Contreras, Francisco; Zouali, Moncef

    2014-01-01

    Bidirectional interactions between the immune and the nervous systems are of considerable interest both for deciphering their functioning and for designing novel therapeutic strategies. The past decade has brought a burst of insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in neuroimmune communications mediated by dopamine. Studies of dendritic cells (DCs) revealed that they express the whole machinery to synthesize and store dopamine, which may act in an autocrine manner to stimulate dopamine receptors (DARs). Depending on specific DARs stimulated on DCs and T cells, dopamine may differentially favor CD4+ T cell differentiation into Th1 or Th17 inflammatory cells. Regulatory T cells can also release high amounts of dopamine that acts in an autocrine DAR-mediated manner to inhibit their suppressive activity. These dopaminergic regulations could represent a driving force during autoimmunity. Indeed, dopamine levels are altered in the brain of mouse models of multiple sclerosis (MS) and lupus, and in inflamed tissues of patients with inflammatory bowel diseases or rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The distorted expression of DARs in peripheral lymphocytes of lupus and MS patients also supports the importance of dopaminergic regulations in autoimmunity. Moreover, dopamine analogs had beneficial therapeutic effects in animal models, and in patients with lupus or RA. We propose models that may underlie key roles of dopamine and its receptors in autoimmune diseases. PMID:24711809

  15. Mast Cell and Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yunzhi; Chen, Guangjie

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are important in innate immune system. They have been appreciated as potent contributors to allergic reaction. However, increasing evidence implicates the important role of mast cells in autoimmune disease like rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis. Here we review the current stage of knowledge about mast cells in autoimmune diseases. PMID:25944979

  16. Immunologic derangement preceding clinical autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Dellavance, A; Coelho Andrade, L E

    2014-10-01

    Autoantibodies are valuable markers for the recognition of autoimmune diseases. Over the last 25 years, several investigators have consistently shown that autoantibodies precede the clinical onset of cognate diseases by years or decades. This phenomenon, regularly observed in the natural history of autoimmune diseases, indicates that autoimmunity develops through successive stages across a variable period of time until the characteristic manifestations of disease are clinically apparent. Recent evidence indicates that the pre-clinical stages of autoimmune diseases involve a series of immunologic derangements and that this process is dynamic and progressive. During the years preceding clinical disease onset, there is progressive intensification in the humoral autoimmune response, characterized by increases in autoantibody titer, avidity, number of immunoglobulin isotypes, and spread of epitopes and of autoantigens targeted. This scenario is reminiscent of cancer processes that develop slowly by means of progressive stages, and may be interrupted by early detection and therapeutic intervention. Therefore, it might be reasoned that early intervention may be more effective in reverting the less firmly established autoimmune abnormalities at the pre-clinical stage of autoimmunity. With the continuous progress in novel immunologic therapeutic strategies, one can envision the possibility that early intervention at pre-clinical stages may lead to prevention of overt disease development and even cure of the autoimmune disorder. PMID:25228734

  17. Aquaporin-4 autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Zekeridou, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and a related spectrum of inflammatory CNS disorders are unified by detection of a serum autoantibody specific for the aquaporin-4 (AQP4) water channel, which is abundant in astrocytic foot processes. The classic clinical manifestations of NMO are optic neuritis and longitudinally extensive transverse myelitis. Newly recognized manifestations of AQP4 autoimmunity include lesions of circumventricular organs and skeletal muscle. NMO is commonly relapsing, is frequently accompanied by other autoimmune disorders, and sometimes occurs in a paraneoplastic context. The goals of treatment are to minimize neurologic disability in the acute attack and thereafter to prevent relapses and cumulative disability. The disease specificity of AQP4 immunoglobulin (Ig) G approaches 100% using optimized molecular-based detection assays. Clinical, immunohistopathologic, and in vitro evidence support this antibody being central to NMO pathogenesis. Current animal models yield limited histopathologic characteristics of NMO, with no clinical deficits to date. Recent descriptions of a myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein autoantibody in a minority of patients with NMO spectrum phenotype who lack AQP4-IgG predict serologic delineation of additional distinctive disease entities. PMID:26185772

  18. PRKDC mutations associated with immunodeficiency, granuloma, and autoimmune regulator–dependent autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Mathieu, Anne-Laure; Verronese, Estelle; Rice, Gillian I.; Fouyssac, Fanny; Bertrand, Yves; Picard, Capucine; Chansel, Marie; Walter, Jolan E.; Notarangelo, Luigi D.; Butte, Manish J.; Nadeau, Kari Christine; Csomos, Krisztian; Chen, David J.; Chen, Karin; Delgado, Ana; Rigal, Chantal; Bardin, Christine; Schuetz, Catharina; Moshous, Despina; Reumaux, Héloïse; Plenat, François; Phan, Alice; Zabot, Marie-Thérèse; Balme, Brigitte; Viel, Sébastien; Bienvenu, Jacques; Cochat, Pierre; van der Burg, Mirjam; Caux, Christophe; Kemp, E. Helen; Rouvet, Isabelle; Malcus, Christophe; Méritet, Jean-Francois; Lim, Annick; Crow, Yanick J.; Fabien, Nicole; Ménétrier-Caux, Christine; De Villartay, Jean-Pierre; Walzer, Thierry; Belot, Alexandre

    2015-01-01

    Background PRKDC encodes for DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), a kinase that forms part of a complex (DNA-dependent protein kinase [DNA-PK]) crucial for DNA double-strand break repair and V(D)J recombination. In mice DNA-PK also interacts with the transcription factor autoimmune regulator (AIRE) to promote central T-cell tolerance. Objective We sought to understand the causes of an inflammatory disease with granuloma and autoimmunity associated with decreasing T- and B-cell counts over time that had been diagnosed in 2 unrelated patients. Methods Genetic, molecular, and functional analyses were performed to characterize an inflammatory disease evocative of a combined immunodeficiency. Results We identified PRKDC mutations in both patients. These patients exhibited a defect in DNA double-strand break repair and V(D)J recombination. Whole-blood mRNA analysis revealed a strong interferon signature. On activation, memory T cells displayed a skewed cytokine response typical of TH2 and TH1 but not TH17. Moreover, mutated DNA-PKcs did not promote AIRE-dependent transcription of peripheral tissue antigens in vitro. The latter defect correlated in vivo with production of anti–calcium-sensing receptor autoantibodies, which are typically found in AIRE-deficient patients. In addition, 9 months after bone marrow transplantation, patient 1 had Hashimoto thyroiditis, suggesting that organ-specific autoimmunity might be linked to nonhematopoietic cells, such as AIRE-expressing thymic epithelial cells. Conclusion Deficiency of DNA-PKcs, a key AIRE partner, can present as an inflammatory disease with organ-specific autoimmunity, suggesting a role for DNA-PKcs in regulating autoimmune responses and maintaining AIRE-dependent tolerance in human subjects. PMID:25842288

  19. Clinical characteristics and survival in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and connective tissue disease-associated usual interstitial pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Previous studies have reported conflicting survival rates for connective tissue disease (CTD)-associated usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF/UIP). This study investigated the differences in the clinical characteristics and prognoses of patients diagnosed with CTD-UIP and IPF/UIP. Methods A retrospective review of patients with IPF (n=88) and CTD-UIP (n=67) from January 2008 to June 2013 was completed. We compared the demographics and clinical characteristics between the two groups. Survival rates were compared using a log-rank and Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. Results Undifferentiated-CTD (UCTD) accounted for 33% of the established CTD-UIP cases. No significant differences were identified in the demographic characteristics or physiological parameters between the UCTD and CTD patients (all P>0.05). However, the CTD-UIP patients were more likely to be young, female, and nonsmokers compared with the IPF/UIP group (all P<0.01). There was no difference in survival between the IPF/UIP and CTD-UIP patients [hazard ratio (HR), 1.74; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.86-3.50; P=0.113]. However, the removal of the UCTD patients from the CTD group revealed that IPF/UIP was associated with a 2.47-fold increased risk of mortality compared with CTD-UIP (HR, 2.47; 95% CI, 1.01-6.09; P=0.049). Conclusions Our findings indicate that the survival of CTD-UIP patients was similar compared with that of IPF/UIP patients. However, it appears that UCTD influences the survival rate of CTD-UIP patients. PMID:25922716

  20. Connective tissue growth factor/CCN2-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts retain intact transforming growth factor-{beta} responsiveness

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Yasuji; Hinchcliff, Monique; Wu, Minghua; Warner-Blankenship, Matthew; Lyons, Karen M.

    2008-03-10

    Background: The matricellular protein connective tissue growth factor (CCN2) has been implicated in pathological fibrosis, but its physiologic role remains elusive. In vitro, transforming growth factor-{beta} (TGF-{beta}) induces CCN2 expression in mesenchymal cells. Because CCN2 can enhance profibrotic responses elicited by TGF-{beta}, it has been proposed that CCN2 functions as an essential downstream signaling mediator for TGF-{beta}. To explore this notion, we characterized TGF-{beta}-induced activation of fibroblasts from CCN2-null (CCN2{sup -/-}) mouse embryos. Methods: The regulation of CCN2 expression was examined in vivo in a model of fibrosis induced by bleomycin. Cellular TGF-{beta} signal transduction and regulation of collagen gene expression were examined in CCN2{sup -/-} MEFs by immunohistochemistry, Northern, Western and RT-PCR analysis, immunocytochemistry and transient transfection assays. Results: Bleomycin-induced skin fibrosis in the mouse was associated with substantial CCN2 up-regulation in lesional fibroblasts. Whereas in vitro proliferation rate of CCN2{sup -/-} MEFs was markedly reduced compared to wild type MEFs, TGF-{beta}-induced activation of the Smad pathways, including Smad2 phosphorylation, Smad2/3 and Smad4 nuclear accumulation and Smad-dependent transcriptional responses, were unaffected by loss of CCN2. The stimulation of COL1A2 and fibronectin mRNA expression and promoter activity, and of corresponding protein levels, showed comparable time and dose-response in wild type and CCN2{sup -/-} MEFs, whereas stimulation of alpha smooth muscle actin and myofibroblast transdifferentiation showed subtle impairment in MEFs lacking CCN2. Conclusion: Whereas endogenous CCN2 plays a role in regulation of proliferation and TGF-{beta}-induced myofibroblast transdifferentiation, it appears to be dispensable for Smad-dependent stimulation of collagen and extracellular matrix synthesis in murine embryonic fibroblasts.

  1. Regulation of Connective Tissue Growth Factor and Cardiac Fibrosis by an SRF/MicroRNA-133a Axis

    PubMed Central

    Angelini, Aude; Li, Zhenlin; Mericskay, Mathias; Decaux, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Myocardial fibrosis contributes to the remodeling of heart and the loss of cardiac function leading to heart failure. SRF is a transcription factor implicated in the regulation of a large variety of genes involved in cardiac structure and function. To investigate the impact of an SRF overexpression in heart, we developed a new cardiac-specific and tamoxifen-inducible SRF overexpression mouse model by the Cre/loxP strategy. Here, we report that a high level overexpression of SRF leads to severe modifications of cardiac cytoarchitecture affecting the balance between cardiomyocytes and cardiac fibroblasts and also a profound alteration of cardiac gene expression program. The drastic development of fibrosis was characterized by intense sirius red staining and associated with an increased expression of genes encoding extracellular matrix proteins such as fibronectin, procollagen type 1?1 and type 3?1 and especially connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). Furthermore miR-133a, one of the most predominant cardiac miRNAs, is strongly downregulated when SRF is overexpressed. By comparison a low level overexpression of SRF has minor impact on these different processes. Investigation with miR-133a, antimiR-133a and AdSRF-VP16 experiments in H9c2 cardiac cells demonstrated that: 1)–miR-133a acts as a repressor of SRF and CTGF expression; 2)–a simultaneous overexpression of SRF by AdSRF-VP16 and inhibition of miR-133a by a specific antimiR increase CTGF expression; 3)–miR-133a overexpression can block the upregulation of CTGF induced by AdSRF-VP16. Taken together, these findings reveal a key role of the SRF/CTGF/miR-133a axis in the regulation of cardiac fibrosis. PMID:26440278

  2. Thyroid autoimmunity and environment.

    PubMed

    Tanda, M L; Piantanida, E; Lai, A; Lombardi, V; Dalle Mule, I; Liparulo, L; Pariani, N; Bartalena, L

    2009-06-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disorders (AITDs) are the result of a complex interplay between genetic and environmental factors, the former account for about 70-80% of liability to develop AITDs. However, at least 20-30% is contributed by environmental factors, which include certainly smoking (at least for Graves' disease and orbitopathy), probably stress, iodine and selenium intake, several drugs, irradiation, pollutants, viral and bacterial infections, allergy, pregnancy, and post-partum. Evidence for the intervention of these factors is often limited, and the mechanisms whereby environmental factors may concur to the onset of AITDs are in many instances unclear. Nevertheless, gene-environment interaction seems a fundamental process for the occurrence of AITDs. PMID:19343619

  3. Ionizing radiation and autoimmunity: Induction of autoimmune disease in mice by high dose fractionated total lymphoid irradiation and its prevention by inoculating normal T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaguchi, N.; Sakaguchi, S. Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, CA PRESTO, JRDC, Institute of Phical and Chemical Research, Tsukuba, Ibaraki ); Miyai, K. )

    1992-11-01

    Ionizing radiation can functionally alter the immune system and break self-tolerance. High dose (42.5 Gy), fractionated (2.5 Gy 17 times) total lymphoid irradiation (TLI) on mice caused various organ-specific autoimmune diseases, such as gastritis, thyroiditis, and orchitis, depending on the radiation dosages, the extent of lymphoid irradiation, and the genetic background of the mouse strains. Radiation-induced tissue damage is not the primary cause of the autoimmune disease because irradiation of the target organs alone failed to elicit the autoimmunity and shielding of the organs from irradiation was unable to prevent it. In contrast, irradiation of both the thymus and the peripheral lymphoid organs/tissues was required for efficient induction of autoimmune disease by TLI. TLI eliminated the majority of mature thymocytes and the peripheral T cells for 1 mo, and inoculation of spleen cell, thymocyte, or bone marrow cell suspensions (prepared from syngeneic nonirradiated mice) within 2 wk after TLI effectively prevented the autoimmune development. Depletion of T cells from the inocula abrogated the preventive activity. CD4[sup +] T cells mediated the autoimmune prevention but CD8[sup +] T cells did not. CD4[sup +] T cells also appeared to mediate the TLI-induced autoimmune disease because CD4[sup +] T cells from disease-bearing TLI mice adoptively transferred the autoimmune disease to syngeneic naive mice. Taken together, these results indicate that high dose, fractionated ionizing radiation on the lymphoid organs/tissues can cause autoimmune disease by affecting the T cell immune system, rather than the target self-Ags, presumably by altering T cell-dependent control of self-reactive T cells. 62 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. An autoimmune myositis-overlap syndrome associated with autoantibodies to nuclear pore complexes: description and long-term follow-up of the anti-Nup syndrome.

    PubMed

    Senécal, Jean-Luc; Isabelle, Catherine; Fritzler, Marvin J; Targoff, Ira N; Goldstein, Rose; Gagné, Michel; Raynauld, Jean-Pierre; Joyal, France; Troyanov, Yves; Dabauvalle, Marie-Christine

    2014-11-01

    Autoimmune myositis encompasses various myositis-overlap syndromes, each being identified by the presence of serum marker autoantibodies. We describe a novel myositis-overlap syndrome in 4 patients characterized by the presence of a unique immunologic marker, autoantibodies to nuclear pore complexes. The clinical phenotype was characterized by prominent myositis in association with erosive, anti-CCP, and rheumatoid factor-positive arthritis, trigeminal neuralgia, mild interstitial lung disease, Raynaud phenomenon, and weight loss. The myositis was typically chronic, relapsing, and refractory to corticosteroids alone, but remitted with the addition of a second immunomodulating drug. There was no clinical or laboratory evidence for liver disease. The prognosis was good with 100% long-term survival (mean follow-up 19.5 yr).By indirect immunofluorescence on HEp-2 cells, sera from all 4 patients displayed a high titer of antinuclear autoantibodies (ANA) with a distinct punctate peripheral (rim) fluorescent pattern of the nuclear envelope characteristic of nuclear pore complexes. Reactivity with nuclear pore complexes was confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy. In a cohort of 100 French Canadian patients with autoimmune myositis, the nuclear pore complex fluorescent ANA pattern was restricted to these 4 patients (4%). It was not observed in sera from 393 adult patients with systemic sclerosis (n?=?112), mixed connective tissue disease (n?=?35), systemic lupus (n?=?94), rheumatoid arthritis (n?=?45), or other rheumatic diseases (n?=?107), nor was it observed in 62 normal adults.Autoantibodies to nuclear pore complexes were predominantly of IgG isotype. No other IgG autoantibody markers for defined connective tissue diseases or overlap syndromes were present, indicating a selective and highly focused immune response. In 3 patients, anti-nuclear pore complex autoantibody titers varied in parallel with myositis activity, suggesting a pathogenic link to pathophysiology. The nuclear pore complex proteins, that is, nucleoporins (nup), recognized by these sera were heterogeneous and included Nup358/RanBP2 (n?=?2 patients), Nup90 (n?=?1), Nup62 (n?=?1), and gp210 (n?=?1). Taken together the data suggest that nup autoantigens themselves drive the anti-nup autoimmune response. Immunogenetically, the 4 patients shared the DQA1*0501 allele associated with an increased risk for autoimmune myositis.In conclusion, we report an apparent novel subset of autoimmune myositis in our population of French Canadian patients with connective tissue diseases. This syndrome is recognized by the presence of a unique immunologic marker, autoantibodies to nuclear pore complexes that react with nups, consistent with an "anti-nup syndrome." PMID:25500708

  5. Update on Autoimmune Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Liberal, Rodrigo; Vergani, Diego; Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), a liver disorder affecting both children and adults, is characterized by inflammatory liver histology, elevated transaminase levels, circulating nonorganspecific autoantibodies, and increased levels of immunoglobulin G, in the absence of a known etiology. Two types of AIH are recognized according to seropositivity: smooth muscle antibody and/or antinuclear antibody define AIH type 1 and antibodies to liver-kidney microsome type 1 and/or liver cytosol type 1 define AIH type 2. AIH type 1 affects both adults and children, while AIH type 2 is mainly a paediatric disease, though it does occasionally affects young adults. AIH should be considered during the diagnostic workup of any patient with increased liver enzyme levels. AIH is exquisitely responsive to immunosuppressive treatment with prednisolone with or without azathioprine, with symptom free long-term survival for the majority of patients. For those who do not respond to standard treatment, or who are difficult-to-treat, mycophenolate mofetil and, in the absence of a response, calcineurin inhibitors should be tried in addition to steroids. The pathogenesis of AIH is not fully understood, although there is mounting evidence that genetic susceptibility, molecular mimicry and impaired immunoregulatory networks contribute to the initiation and perpetuation of the autoimmune attack. Liver damage is thought to be mediated primarily by CD4 T-cells, although recent studies support the involvement of diverse populations, including Th17 cells. A deeper understanding of the pathogenesis of AIH is likely to contribute to the development of novel treatments, such as the adoptive transfer of autologous expanded antigenspecific regulatory T-cells, which ultimately aim at restoring tolerance to liver-derived antigens. PMID:26357634

  6. The expanding field of IgG4-mediated neurological autoimmune disorders.

    PubMed

    Huijbers, M G; Querol, L A; Niks, E H; Plomp, J J; van der Maarel, S M; Graus, F; Dalmau, J; Illa, I; Verschuuren, J J

    2015-08-01

    At least 13 different disease entities affecting the central nervous system, peripheral nervous system and connective tissue of the skin or kidneys are associated with immunoglobulin G4 (IgG4) immune reactivity. IgG4 has always been considered a benign, non-inflammatory subclass of IgG, in contrast to the well-known complement-activating pro-inflammatory IgG1 subclass. A comprehensive review of these IgG4 autoimmune disorders reveals striking similarities in epitope binding and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) associations. Mechanical interference of extracellular ligand-receptor interactions by the associated IgG4 antibodies seems to be the common/converging disease mechanism in these disorders. PMID:26032110

  7. Cellular stress and innate inflammation in organ-specific autoimmunity: lessons learned from vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Harris, John E

    2016-01-01

    For decades, research in autoimmunity has focused primarily on immune contributions to disease. Yet recent studies report elevated levels of reactive oxygen species and abnormal activation of the unfolded protein response in cells targeted by autoimmunity, implicating cellular stress originating from the target tissue as a contributing factor. A better understanding of this contribution may help to answer important lingering questions in organ-specific autoimmunity, as to what factors initiate disease and what directs its tissue specificity. Vitiligo, an autoimmune disease of the skin, has been the focus of translational research for over 30 years, and both melanocyte stress and immune mechanisms have been thought to be mutually exclusive explanations for pathogenesis. Chemical-induced vitiligo is a unique clinical presentation that reflects the importance of environmental influences on autoimmunity, provides insight into a new paradigm linking cell stress to the immune response, and serves as a template for other autoimmune diseases. In this review, I will discuss the evidence for cell stress contributions to a number of autoimmune diseases, the questions that remain, and how vitiligo, an underappreciated example of organ-specific autoimmunity, helps to answer them. PMID:26683142

  8. Relationship between meat toughness and properties of connective tissue from cows and young bulls heat treated at low temperatures for prolonged times.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Line; Ertbjerg, Per; Løje, Hanne; Risbo, Jens; van den Berg, Frans W J; Christensen, Mette

    2013-04-01

    The aim of the current study was to elucidate whether cows and young bulls require different combinations of heating temperature and heating time to reduce toughness of the meat. The combined effect of heating temperature and time on toughness of semitendinosus muscle from the two categories of beef was investigated and the relationship to properties of connective tissue was examined. Measurements of toughness, collagen solubility, cathepsin activity and protein denaturation of beef semitendinosus heated at temperatures between 53°C and 63°C for up to 19 1/2 h were conducted. The results revealed that slightly higher temperatures and prolonged heating times were required to reduce toughness of semitendinosus from cows to the same level as in young bulls. Reduced toughness of semitendinosus as a result of low temperature for prolonged time is suggested to result from weakening of the connective tissue, caused partly by denaturation or conformational changes of the proteins and/or by solubilization of collagen. PMID:23305828

  9. Degradation of connective tissue matrices by macrophages. II. Influence of matrix composition on proteolysis of glycoproteins, elastin, and collagen by macrophages in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, P.A.; Werb, Z.

    1980-12-01

    Thioglycollate-elicited mouse peritoneal macrophages were cultured in contact with the mixture of extracellular matrix proteins produced by rat smooth muscle cells in culture. Both live macrophages and their conditioned media hydrolyzed glycoproteins, elastin, and collagen. Live macrophages also degraded extracellular connective tissue proteins secreted by endothelial cells and fibroblasts. The glycoproteins in the matrix markedly inhibited the rate of digestion of the other macromolecules, particularly elastin. When plasminogen was added to the matrix, activation of plasminogen to plasmin resulted in the hydrolysis of the glycoprotein components, which then allowed the macrophage elastase easier access to its substrate, elastin. Thus, although plasmin has no direct elastinolytic activity, its presence accelerated the rate of hydrolysis of elastin and therefore the rate of matrix degradation. These findings may be important in an understanding of disease states, such as emphysema and atherosclerosis, that are characterized by the destruction of connective tissue.

  10. Adult soft tissue sarcoma

    MedlinePLUS

    Soft tissue sarcoma is cancer that forms in the soft tissue of the body. Soft tissue connects, supports, or surrounds other body parts. In adults, soft tissue sarcoma is rare. There are many different types of ...

  11. Pivotal Roles of GM-CSF in Autoimmunity and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Shiomi, Aoi; Usui, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) is a hematopoietic growth factor, which stimulates the proliferation of granulocytes and macrophages from bone marrow precursor cells. In autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, Th17 cells have been considered as strong inducers of tissue inflammation. However, recent evidence indicates that GM-CSF has prominent proinflammatory functions and that this growth factor (not IL-17) is critical for the pathogenicity of CD4+ T cells. Therefore, the mechanism of GM-CSF-producing CD4+ T cell differentiation and the role of GM-CSF in the development of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases are gaining increasing attention. This review summarizes the latest knowledge of GM-CSF and its relationship with autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. The potential therapies targeting GM-CSF as well as their possible side effects have also been addressed in this review. PMID:25838639

  12. Differential diagnosis and diagnostic flow chart of joint hypermobility syndrome/ehlers-danlos syndrome hypermobility type compared to other heritable connective tissue disorders.

    PubMed

    Colombi, Marina; Dordoni, Chiara; Chiarelli, Nicola; Ritelli, Marco

    2015-03-01

    Joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type (JHS/EDS-HT) is an evolving and protean disorder mostly recognized by generalized joint hypermobility and without a defined molecular basis. JHS/EDS-HT also presents with other connective tissue features affecting a variety of structures and organs, such as skin, eye, bone, and internal organs. However, most of these signs are present in variable combinations and severity in many other heritable connective tissue disorders. Accordingly, JHS/EDS-HT is an "exclusion" diagnosis which needs the absence of any consistent feature indicative of other partially overlapping connective tissue disorders. While both Villefranche and Brighton criteria include such an exclusion as a mandatory item, a systematic approach for reaching a stringent clinical diagnosis of JHS/EDS-HT is still lacking. The absence of a consensus on the diagnostic approach to JHS/EDS-HT concerning its clinical boundaries with similar conditions contribute to limit our actual understanding of the pathologic and molecular bases of this disorder. In this review, we revise the differential diagnosis of JHS/EDS-HT with those heritable connective tissue disorders which show a significant overlap with the former and mostly include EDS classic, vascular and kyphoscoliotic types, osteogenesis imperfecta, Marfan syndrome, Loeys-Dietz syndrome, arterial tortuosity syndrome, and lateral meningocele syndrome. A diagnostic flow chart is also offered with the attempt to support the less experienced clinician in stringently recognizing JHS/EDS-HT and stimulate the debate in the scientific community for both management and research purposes. PMID:25821090

  13. Autosomal dominant Marfan-like connective-tissue disorder with aortic dilation and skeletal anomaslies not linked to the Fibrillin genes

    SciTech Connect

    Boileau, C.; Coulon, M.; Alexandre, J.-A.; Junien, C. ); Jondeau, G.; Delorme, G.; Dubourg, O.; Bourdarias, J.-P. ); Babron, M.-C.; Bonaieti-Pellie, C. ); Sakai, L. ); Melki, J. )

    1993-07-01

    The authors describe a large family with a connective-tissue disorder that exhibits some of the skeletal and cardiovascular features seen in Marfan syndrome. However, none of the 19 affected individuals displayed ocular abnormalities and therefore did not comply with recognized criteria for this disease. These patients could alternatively be diagnosed as MASS (mitral valve, aorta, skeleton, and skin) phenotype patients or represent a distinct clinical entity, i.e., a new autosomal dominant connective-tissue disorder. The fibrillin genes located on chromosomes 15 and 5 are clearly involved in the classic form of Marfan syndrome and a clinically related disorder (congenital contractural arachnodactyly), respectively. To test whether one of these genes was also implicated in this French family, the authors performed genetic analyses. Blood samples were obtained for 56 family members, and four polymorphic fibrillin gene markers, located on chromosomes 15 (Fib15) and 5 (Fib5), respectively, were tested. Linkage between the disease allele and the markers of these two genes was excluded with lod scores of [minus]11.39 (for Fib15) and [minus]13.34 (for Fib5), at 0 = .001, indicating that the mutation is at a different locus. This phenotype thus represents a new connective-tissue disorder, overlapping but different from classic Marfan syndrome. 33 refs., 1 fig. 2 tabs.

  14. Sialic acids and autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, Vinay S; Pillai, Shiv

    2016-01-01

    An important underlying mechanism that contributes to autoimmunity is the loss of inhibitory signaling in the immune system. Sialic acid-recognizing Ig superfamily lectins or Siglecs are a family of cell surface proteins largely expressed in hematopoietic cells. The majority of Siglecs are inhibitory receptors expressed in immune cells that bind to sialic acid-containing ligands and recruit SH2-domain-containing tyrosine phosphatases to their cytoplasmic tails. They deliver inhibitory signals that can contribute to the constraining of immune cells, and thus protect the host from autoimmunity. The inhibitory functions of CD22/Siglec-2 and Siglec-G and their contributions to tolerance and autoimmunity, primarily in the B lymphocyte context, are considered in some detail in this review. The relevance to autoimmunity and unregulated inflammation of modified sialic acids, enzymes that modify sialic acid, and other sialic acid-binding proteins are also reviewed. PMID:26683151

  15. Dyslipidaemia in Rheumatological Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Toms, Tracey E; Panoulas, Vasileios F; Kitas, George D

    2011-01-01

    Autoimmunity forms the basis of many rheumatological diseases, and may contribute not only to the classical clinical manifestations but also to the complications. Many of the autoimmune rheumatological diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus are associated with an excess cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Much of this excess cardiovascular risk can be attributed to atherosclerotic disease. Atherosclerosis is a complex pathological process, with dyslipidaemia and inflammation fundamental to all stages of plaque evolution. The heightened inflammatory state seen in conjunction with many rheumatological diseases may accelerate plaque formation, both through direct effects on the arterial wall and indirectly through inflammation-mediated alterations in the lipid profile. Alongside these factors, antibodies produced as part of the autoimmune nature of these conditions may lead to alterations in the lipid profile and promote atherosclerosis. In this review, we discuss the association between several of the rheumatological autoimmune diseases and dyslipidaemia, and the potential cardiovascular impact this may confer. PMID:21660202

  16. IL-27-induced modulation of autoimmunity and its therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Meka, Rakeshchandra R; Venkatesha, Shivaprasad H; Dudics, Steven; Acharya, Bodhraj; Moudgil, Kamal D

    2015-12-01

    Interleukin-27 (IL-27) is a new member of the IL-12 family. It is produced by activated antigen-presenting cells and plays an important role in the regulation of CD4+ T cell differentiation and immune response. IL-27 activates multiple signaling cascades, including the JAK-STAT and p38 MAPK pathways. Several studies have revealed that IL-27 promotes the differentiation of Th1 and Tr1, but inhibits Th2, Th17, and Treg cells. However, a few studies have shown an opposite effect on certain T cell subsets, such as Treg. IL-27 displays both pro- and anti- inflammatory activities in different autoimmune diseases. Here, we have discussed the role of IL-27 in rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, colitis, lupus, psoriasis, type 1 diabetes, and uveitis. Most of this information is derived from experimental models of these autoimmune diseases. The mechanistic basis of the dual role of IL-27 in inflammation and autoimmunity is still not fully defined. In general, the pro-/anti-inflammatory activity of IL-27 is influenced by the underlying immune effector pathways, the phase of the disease, the presence or absence of counter-regulatory cytokines/T cell subsets, and the tissue/cell type under study. Despite a spectrum of outcomes in various autoimmune diseases, mostly anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory effects of IL-27 have been observed in this category of diseases. Accordingly, IL-27 represents a novel, promising target/agent for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:26253381

  17. Connective-Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF/CCN2) Induces Astrogenesis and Fibronectin Expression of Embryonic Neural Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Suzana A.; Reis, Alice H.; Dubois, Luiz Gustavo; Romão, Luciana Ferreira; Ferreira, Lais S. S.; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Moura Neto, Vivaldo; Abreu, José G.

    2015-01-01

    Connective-tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a modular secreted protein implicated in multiple cellular events such as chondrogenesis, skeletogenesis, angiogenesis and wound healing. CTGF contains four different structural modules. This modular organization is characteristic of members of the CCN family. The acronym was derived from the first three members discovered, cysteine-rich 61 (CYR61), CTGF and nephroblastoma overexpressed (NOV). CTGF is implicated as a mediator of important cell processes such as adhesion, migration, proliferation and differentiation. Extensive data have shown that CTGF interacts particularly with the TGF?, WNT and MAPK signaling pathways. The capacity of CTGF to interact with different growth factors lends it an important role during early and late development, especially in the anterior region of the embryo. ctgf knockout mice have several cranio-facial defects, and the skeletal system is also greatly affected due to an impairment of the vascular-system development during chondrogenesis. This study, for the first time, indicated that CTGF is a potent inductor of gliogenesis during development. Our results showed that in vitro addition of recombinant CTGF protein to an embryonic mouse neural precursor cell culture increased the number of GFAP- and GFAP/Nestin-positive cells. Surprisingly, CTGF also increased the number of Sox2-positive cells. Moreover, this induction seemed not to involve cell proliferation. In addition, exogenous CTGF activated p44/42 but not p38 or JNK MAPK signaling, and increased the expression and deposition of the fibronectin extracellular matrix protein. Finally, CTGF was also able to induce GFAP as well as Nestin expression in a human malignant glioma stem cell line, suggesting a possible role in the differentiation process of gliomas. These results implicate ctgf as a key gene for astrogenesis during development, and suggest that its mechanism may involve activation of p44/42 MAPK signaling. Additionally, CTGF-induced differentiation of glioblastoma stem cells into a less-tumorigenic state could increase the chances of successful intervention, since differentiated cells are more vulnerable to cancer treatments. PMID:26241738

  18. [Pathogenesis of autoimmune thyroid diseases].

    PubMed

    Sgarbi, José Augusto; Maciel, Rui M B

    2009-02-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD) is the most common organ-specific autoimmune disorder affecting 2% to 5% of the population in Western countries. Clinical presentation varies from hyperthyroidism in Graves' Disease to hypothyroidism in Hashimoto's thyroiditis. While the exact etiology of thyroid autoimmunity is not known, interaction between genetic susceptibility and environmental factors appears to be of fundamental importance to initiate the process of thyroid autoimmunity. It has been postulated that 79% of the susceptibility to develop AITD is attributed to genetic factors, while environmental factors contribute to 21%. The identified AITD susceptibility genes include immune-modulating genes, such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4), CD40 molecule, and protein tyrosine phosphatase-22 (PTPN22), and thyroid-specific genes, including TSH receptor (TSHR) and thyroglobulin (TG). The exact nature of the role environmental factors play in AITD is still not well known, but the involvement of several factors such as iodine diet content, stress, drugs and infections has been reported. However, there is no clear evidence of causality and the mechanisms by which environmental factors trigger thyroid autoimmunity in genetically predisposed individuals remain not fully understood. Knowledge of the precise mechanisms of interaction between environmental factors and genes in inducing thyroid autoimmunity could result in the development of new strategies for prevention and treatment. PMID:19347180

  19. Autoimmune diseases and rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Flachenecker, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This review gives an overview of the rehabilitation of autoimmune diseases. After general remarks on rehabilitation, the effects of acute and chronic exercises on inflammatory markers are summarized. Most of the available literature deals with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and multiple sclerosis (MS), and therefore, rehabilitation of these diseases is described in more detail. Exercise is the main component in the rehabilitation of patients with RA and aims at increasing physical capacity, muscle strength, aerobic endurance, cardiovascular fitness and functional abilities, and helps to prevent secondary deconditioning due to reduced activity levels. Since MS causes a wide range of symptoms, the rehabilitation of these patients requires a multidisciplinary approach and encompasses physiotherapy, exercise therapy, hippotherapy, cognitive rehabilitation, psychological therapy, strategies to improve fatigue and coping programs. The ultimate goal of rehabilitation is to enable patients with chronic conditions to reach and maintain their optimal physical, sensory, intellectual, psychological and social functional levels, and to attain independence and self-determination as far as possible. PMID:21619946

  20. Melanocyte antigen triggers autoimmunity in human psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Akiko; Siewert, Katherina; Stöhr, Julia; Besgen, Petra; Kim, Song-Min; Rühl, Geraldine; Nickel, Jens; Vollmer, Sigrid; Thomas, Peter; Krebs, Stefan; Pinkert, Stefan; Spannagl, Michael; Held, Kathrin; Kammerbauer, Claudia; Besch, Robert; Dornmair, Klaus; Prinz, Jörg C

    2015-12-14

    Psoriasis vulgaris is a common T cell-mediated inflammatory skin disease with a suspected autoimmune pathogenesis. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I allele, HLA-C*06:02, is the main psoriasis risk gene. Epidermal CD8(+) T cells are essential for psoriasis development. Functional implications of HLA-C*06:02 and mechanisms of lesional T cell activation in psoriasis, however, remained elusive. Here we identify melanocytes as skin-specific target cells of an HLA-C*06:02-restricted psoriatic T cell response. We found that a V?3S1/V?13S1 T cell receptor (TCR), which we had reconstituted from an epidermal CD8(+) T cell clone of an HLA-C*06:02-positive psoriasis patient specifically recognizes HLA-C*06:02-positive melanocytes. Through peptide library screening, we identified ADAMTS-like protein 5 (ADAMTSL5) as an HLA-C*06:02-presented melanocytic autoantigen of the V?3S1/V?13S1 TCR. Consistent with the V?3S1/V?13S1-TCR reactivity, we observed numerous CD8(+) T cells in psoriasis lesions attacking melanocytes, the only epidermal cells expressing ADAMTSL5. Furthermore, ADAMTSL5 stimulation induced the psoriasis signature cytokine, IL-17A, in CD8(+) T cells from psoriasis patients only, supporting a role as psoriatic autoantigen. This unbiased analysis of a TCR obtained directly from tissue-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells reveals that in psoriasis HLA-C*06:02 directs an autoimmune response against melanocytes through autoantigen presentation. We propose that HLA-C*06:02 may predispose to psoriasis via this newly identified autoimmune pathway. PMID:26621454

  1. Human adipose CD34+ CD90+ stem cells and collagen scaffold constructs grafted in vivo fabricate loose connective and adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Ferraro, Giuseppe A; De Francesco, Francesco; Nicoletti, Gianfranco; Paino, Francesca; Desiderio, Vincenzo; Tirino, Virginia; D'Andrea, Francesco

    2013-05-01

    Stem cell based therapies for the repair and regeneration of various tissues are of great interest for a high number of diseases. Adult stem cells, instead, are more available, abundant and harvested with minimally invasive procedures. In particular, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multi-potent progenitors, able to differentiate into bone, cartilage, and adipose tissues. Human adult adipose tissue seems to be the most abundant source of MSCs and, due to its easy accessibility; it is able to give a considerable amount of stem cells. In this study, we selected MSCs co-expressing CD34 and CD90 from adipose tissue. This stem cell population displayed higher proliferative capacity than CD34(-) CD90(-) cells and was able to differentiate in vitro into adipocytes (PPAR?(+) and adiponectin(+)) and endothelial cells (CD31(+) VEGF(+) Flk1(+)). In addition, in methylcellulose without VEGF, it formed a vascular network. The aim of this study was to investigate differentiation potential of human adipose CD34(+) /CD90(+) stem cells loaded onto commercial collagen sponges already used in clinical practice (Gingistat) both in vitro and in vivo. The results of this study clearly demonstrate that human adult adipose and loose connective tissues can be obtained in vivo, highlighting that CD34(+) /CD90 ASCs are extremely useful for regenerative medicine. PMID:23129214

  2. Celiac sprue: a unique autoimmune disorder

    PubMed Central

    Rashtak, Shadi; Marietta, Eric V; Murray, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    Celiac sprue (CS) is a gluten-sensitive enteropathy with many autoimmune features. CS involves multiple organs through immune and nonimmune processes, and is frequently associated with other autoimmune disorders. This article reviews the co-occurrence of CS with autoimmune disorders of the cutaneous, nervous, endocrine, musculoskeletal, gastrointestinal and cardiovascular systems. The types of autoimmune disorders associated with CS and the prevalence of CS in other autoimmune disorders are also discussed. A brief review of the literature on the potential mechanisms behind these associations and the therapeutic effects of a gluten-free diet for autoimmune comorbidities in CS is also provided. PMID:20477645

  3. Growth and maturational changes in dense fibrous connective tissue following 14 days of rhGH supplementation in the dwarf rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyparos, Antonios; Orth, Michael W.; Vailas, Arthur C.; Martinez, Daniel A.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) on patella tendon (PT), medial collateral ligament (MCL), and lateral collateral ligament (LCL) on collagen growth and maturational changes in dwarf GH-deficient rats. Twenty male Lewis mutant dwarf rats, 37 days of age, were randomly assigned to Dwarf + rhGH (n = 10) and Dwarf + vehicle (n = 10) groups. The GH group received 1.25 mg rhGH/kg body wt twice daily for 14 days. rhGH administration stimulated dense fibrous connective tissue growth, as demonstrated by significant increases in hydroxyproline specific activity and significant decreases in the non-reducible hydroxylysylpyridinoline (HP) collagen cross-link contents. The increase in the accumulation of newly accreted collagen was 114, 67, and 117% for PT, MCL, and LCL, respectively, in 72 h. These findings suggest that a short course rhGH treatment can affect the rate of new collagen production. However, the maturation of the tendon and ligament tissues decreased 18-25% during the rapid accumulation of de novo collagen. We conclude that acute rhGH administration in a dwarf rat can up-regulate new collagen accretion in dense fibrous connective tissues, while causing a reduction in collagen maturation. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  4. A theory of the pathogenesis of rheumatic fever, glomerulonephritis and other autoimmune diseases triggered by infection

    PubMed Central

    Adams, D. D.

    1969-01-01

    Inherited autoimmune disease appears to be due to a genetic defect which permits the formation of forbidden clones of antibody-forming cells. There is evidence that separate pathogenic and non-pathogenic autoantibodies occur, and that the former are directly responsible for the lesions of autoimmune disease. The observed initiation and aggravation of autoimmunity by tissue damage, including that inflicted by microbial infection, indicates that autoantigens in undamaged tissues are partially or completely inactive, as regards ability to stimulate autoantibody formation, even in people possessing the appropriate forbidden clones. Heterophile phenomena indicate that invading micro-organisms will sometimes carry antigens which are present in the host. If the appropriate forbidden clone is present, autoantibody formation will be stimulated. This mechanism appears to be particularly probable in rheumatic fever and glomerulonephritis. To avoid the inadvertent triggering of autoimmune disease in susceptible subjects, vaccines should be free of human antigens. PMID:5370051

  5. Autoimmune pancreatitis can develop into chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) has been recognized as a distinct type of pancreatitis that is possibly caused by autoimmune mechanisms. AIP is characterized by high serum IgG4 and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration in affected pancreatic tissue. Acute phase AIP responds favorably to corticosteroid therapy and results in the amelioration of clinical findings. However, the long-term prognosis and outcome of AIP remain unclear. We have proposed a working hypothesis that AIP can develop into ordinary chronic pancreatitis resembling alcoholic pancreatitis over a long-term course based on several clinical findings, most notably frequent pancreatic stone formation. In this review article, we describe a series of study results to confirm our hypothesis and clarify that: 1) pancreatic calcification in AIP is closely associated with disease recurrence; 2) advanced stage AIP might have earlier been included in ordinary chronic pancreatitis; 3) approximately 40% of AIP patients experience pancreatic stone formation over a long-term course, for which a primary risk factor is narrowing of both Wirsung’s and Santorini’s ducts; and 4) nearly 20% of AIP patients progress to confirmed chronic pancreatitis according to the revised Japanese Clinical Diagnostic Criteria, with independent risk factors being pancreatic head swelling and non-narrowing of the pancreatic body duct. PMID:24884922

  6. Autoimmune diseases and venous thromboembolism: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Zöller, Bengt; Li, Xinjun; Sundquist, Jan; Sundquist, Kristina

    2012-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is major health problem and is sometimes complicated by lethal pulmonary embolism (PE). Disturbances of the coagulation and anticoagulation systems are important risk factors for VTE. Comparative studies suggest that coagulation and innate immunity have a shared evolutionary origin. It is therefore unsurprising that the immune and coagulation systems are linked, with many molecular components being important for both systems. Systemic inflammation modulates thrombotic responses by suppressing fibrinolysis, upregulating procoagulant, and downregulating anticoagulants, and autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and Behçet’s syndrome have been linked to an increased risk of VTE. Recent reports have further shown that a majority of autoimmune and immune-mediated disorders are linked to an increased risk of venous thrombosis, PE, or VTE. For instance, a Swedish nationwide study found that the risk of PE was increased in the first year after hospitalization for 33 different autoimmune disorders. Especially high risks were noted for several autoimmune diseases such as immune thrombocytopenic purpura, polyarteritis nodosa, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, ulcerative colitis, and SLE. Another study from England, also based on hospitalization data, found that immune-mediated disorders were associated with an increased risk of VTE compared with other medical causes of hospitalization. Multiple mechanisms may operate and disease-specific factors, such as cardiolipin antibodies, have been identified. However, inflammation by itself appears to change the hemostatic balance in a thrombogenic direction. Recent epidemiological studies, together with previous experimental and clinical studies, indicate that autoimmune disorders should not only be viewed as inflammatory disorders, but also hypercoagulable disorders. Research to identify thrombotic risk factors, elucidate the mechanisms involved, and investigate prophylactic regiments is needed. The present review describes the epidemiological, clinical, and experimental evidence for the connection between VTE and autoimmune and immune-mediated disorders. PMID:22937487

  7. Autoimmunity at the ocular surface: pathogenesis and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Stern, ME; Schaumburg, CS; Dana, R; Calonge, M; Niederkorn, JY; Pflufelder, SC

    2013-01-01

    A healthy ocular surface environment is essential to preserve visual function, and as such the eye has evolved a complex network of mechanisms to maintain homeostasis. Fundamental to the health of the ocular surface is the immune system, designed to respond rapidly to environmental and microbial insults, whereas maintaining tolerance to self-antigens and commensal microbes. To this end, activation of the innate and adaptive immune response is tightly regulated to limit bystander tissue damage. However, aberrant activation of the immune system can result in autoimmunity to self-antigens localized to the ocular surface and associated tissues. Environmental, microbial and endogenous stress, antigen localization, and genetic factors provide the triggers underlying the immunological events that shape the outcome of the diverse spectrum of autoimmune-based ocular surface disorders. PMID:20485329

  8. Expression of a B-cell-restricted isoform of CD45 is associated with maturity in rat serosal and connective-tissue mast cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chunping; Moghaddami, Mahin; Mayrhofer, Graham

    2008-01-01

    A number of technical limitations make differential staining with dyes such as Alcian blue and Safranin O unsatisfactory as the primary method for assessing the maturity of connective tissue mast cells in rodents. We demonstrated for the first time that in the steady state, most serosal mast cells in normal rats express a high-molecular-weight isoform of CD45 that reacts with monoclonal antibody OX33 (OX33+) and has been reported previously only on B cells. However, a small proportion did not express this isoform (OX33?) and this subset predominated during the early stages of mast cell regeneration in the peritoneal cavity. Furthermore, there was a progressive increase in the proportion of donor-derived OX33+ cells after intraperitoneal adoptive transfer of purified OX33? mast cells to CD45 congenic recipients. These results indicate that serosal mast cells up-regulate expression of the OX33-reactive CD45 isoform(s) as they mature. Interestingly, acquisition of OX33-reactive CD45 did not correlate temporally with sulphation of glycosaminglycan in the mast cell granules. Expression of this isoform was used also to assess the maturity of connective tissue mast cells during mastocytosis in synovium associated with T-cell-mediated experimental polyarthritis. Together, our results demonstrate that OX33-reactive CD45 is a marker that can be used to assess the maturity of serosal and connective tissue mast cells during normal homeostasis and during pathological processes. The significance of differential expression of CD45 isoforms may be to regulate the sensitivity of maturing mast cells to the actions of growth factors and activating stimuli. PMID:19137648

  9. Localized Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhe; Tian, Rui; Zhang, Taiping; Zhao, Yupei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) is a rare disease with clinical presentations that greatly mimic pancreatic cancer (PC). It is critical for clinicians to distinguish AIP from PC because their treatments and prognoses are entirely different. Typical images show characteristic features such as diffuse pancreatic swelling and strictures of the main pancreatic duct (MPD). However, AIP may present as a localized pancreatic mass, in which case it is very difficult to differentiate from PC. Here, we report a case of a 40-year-old man with computed tomography (CT) imaging studies confirming an area of low-density neoplasm in the uncinate process of the pancreas with dilation in the common biliary duct (CBD) and MPD. Increased uptake in the uncinate mass was observed by positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scan, which strongly suggested PC. Further laboratory analyses showed a marked elevation of serum IgG4. Because there was not enough evidence to rule out a diagnosis of malignancy, a histopathological biopsy became the criterion standard. An endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided needle biopsy failed. As an alternative, a pancreaticoduodenectomy was conducted for the biopsy, and pathological analysis confirmed IgG4-related sclerotic chronic pancreatitis with moderate lymphoplasmacellular infiltration. We suggest that an accurate preoperative diagnosis for localized AIP with MPD and CBD obstructions mimicking PC is of great importance. Radiological imaging findings, particularly observations of diffused enlargement of the pancreas and delayed enhancement during the venous and portal phases, are essential for diagnosing AIP. Careful consideration should be given if serum IgG4 was taken as a special indicator for a differential diagnosis between AIP and PC. A history of IgG4-related diseases involving the biliary, lacrimal, salivary, retroperitoneal, renal, or pulmonary systems should also be highlighted. Thus, the pathology of extrapancreatic organs can be utilized as diagnostic evidence when the pathology for a pancreatic mass is not available, as in the case presented here. Furthermore, cautious use of hormone therapy is indicated for patients who cannot be ruled out as having PC. The results of future studies on localized AIP are eagerly awaited. PMID:26496272

  10. Th17 Cells in Immunity and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Bedoya, Simone Kennedy; Lam, Brandon; Lau, Kenneth; Larkin, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Th17 and IL-17 play important roles in the clearance of extracellular bacterial and fungal infections. However, strong evidence also implicates the Th17 lineage in several autoimmune disorders including multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, and asthma. The Th17 subset has also been connected with type I diabetes, although whether it plays a role in the pathogenicity of or protection from the disease remains a controversial issue. In this review we have provided a comprehensive overview of Th17 pathogenicity and function, including novel evidence for a protective role of Th17 cells in conjunction with the microbiota gut flora in T1D onset and progression. PMID:24454481

  11. Autoimmune disease and hair loss.

    PubMed

    Moghadam-Kia, Siamak; Franks, Andrew G

    2013-01-01

    Once systemic disease is in remission, it is prudent to recognize the importance of alopecia in the patient's overall sense of well-being and quality-of-life clinical outcome. Scarring alopecia (scalp discoid lupus erythematosus) can be the presenting manifestation of lupus in more than half of affected individuals. Diffuse nonscarring alopecia in lupus is usually responsive to treatment of the systemic disease. Severe, often intractable burning pruritus of the scalp is a frequent complaint in dermatomyositis. Lichen planopilaris may mimic other autoimmune forms of scarring alopecia. Alopecia can also be caused by medications used to treat systemic autoimmune disease and fibromyalgia. PMID:23159178

  12. Autoimmune Myocarditis, Valvulitis, and Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Jennifer M.; Cunningham, Madeleine W.; Fairweather, DeLisa; Huber, Sally A.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac myosin-induced autoimmune myocarditis (EAM) is a model of inflammatory heart disease initiated by CD4+ T cells (Smith and Allen 1991; Li, Heuser et al. 2004). It is a paradigm of the immune-mediated cardiac damage believed to play a role in the pathogenesis of a subset of postinfectious human cardiomyopathies (Rose, Herskowitz et al. 1993). Myocarditis is induced in susceptible mice by immunization with purified cardiac myosin (Neu, Rose et al. 1987) or specific peptides derived from cardiac myosin (Donermeyer, Beisel et al. 1995; Pummerer, Luze et al. 1996) (see Basic Protocol 1), or by adoptive transfer of myosin-reactive T cells (Smith and Allen 1991) (see Alternate Protocol). Myocarditis has been induced in Lewis rats by immunization with purified rat or porcine cardiac myosin (Kodama, Matsumoto et al. 1990; Li, Heuser et al. 2004) (see Basic Protocol 2) or S2-16 peptide (Li, Heuser et al. 2004), or by adoptive transfer of T cells stimulated by specific peptides derived from cardiac myosin (Wegmann, Zhao et al. 1994). Myocarditis begins 12 to 14 days after the first immunization, and is maximal after 21 days. Other animal models commonly used to study myocarditis development include the pathogen-induced models in which disease is initiated by viral infection. The first murine model of acute viral myocarditis causes sudden death via viral damage to cardiomyocytes (Huber, Gauntt et al. 1998; Horwitz, La Cava et al. 2000; Fong 2003; Fuse, Chan et al. 2005; Fairweather and Rose 2007; Cihakova and Rose 2008) whereas the second model is based on inoculation with heart-passaged coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) that includes damaged heart proteins (Fairweather, Frisancho-Kiss et al. 2004; Fairweather D 2004; Fairweather and Rose 2007; Cihakova and Rose 2008) In addition to the protocols used to induce EAM in mice and rats, support protocols are included for preparing purified cardiac myosin using mouse or rat heart tissue (see Support Protocol 1), preparing purified cardiac myosin for injection (see Support Protocol 2), and collecting and assessing hearts by histopathological means (see Support Protocol 3). PMID:23564686

  13. JOURNAL OF BIOLOGICAL RHYTHMS / June 2001Bartness et al. / PRV-REVEALED SCN PERIPHERAL CONNECTIONS SCN Efferents to Peripheral Tissues

    E-print Network

    Demas, Greg

    nucleus (SCN) is the principal generator of circa- dian rhythms and is part of an entrainment system that synchronizes the animal with its environment. Here, the authors review the possible communication of timing information from the SCN to peripheral tissues involved in regulating fundamental physiological functions

  14. Connecting fractional anisotropy from medical images with mechanical anisotropy of a hyperviscoelastic fibre-reinforced constitutive model for brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Chiara; Kleiven, Svein

    2014-01-01

    Brain tissue modelling has been an active area of research for years. Brain matter does not follow the constitutive relations for common materials and loads applied to the brain turn into stresses and strains depending on tissue local morphology. In this work, a hyperviscoelastic fibre-reinforced anisotropic law is used for computational brain injury prediction. Thanks to a fibre-reinforcement dispersion parameter, this formulation accounts for anisotropic features and heterogeneities of the tissue owing to different axon alignment. The novelty of the work is the correlation of the material mechanical anisotropy with fractional anisotropy (FA) from diffusion tensor images. Finite-element (FE) models are used to investigate the influence of the fibre distribution for different loading conditions. In the case of tensile–compressive loads, the comparison between experiments and simulations highlights the validity of the proposed FA–k correlation. Axon alignment affects the deformation predicted by FE models and, when the strain in the axonal direction is large with respect to the maximum principal strain, decreased maximum deformations are detected. It is concluded that the introduction of fibre dispersion information into the constitutive law of brain tissue affects the biofidelity of the simulations. PMID:24258158

  15. Invited Review Autoimmunity in Chagas heart disease

    E-print Network

    Engman, David M.

    Invited Review Autoimmunity in Chagas heart disease J.S. Leon, D.M. Engman* Northwestern University the genesis of autoimmunity in Chagas heart disease: (i) What mechanism(s) are potentially responsible for Parasitology Inc. Keywords: Myocarditis; Chagas heart disease Myosin; Autoimmunity 1. Introduction After

  16. Eosinophilic Fasciitis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Bone, Joint, and Muscle Disorders Autoimmune Disorders of Connective Tissue Eosinophilic Fasciitis Symptoms Diagnosis Prognosis and Treatment Drugs ... DOCTORS: Go to Professional Version Autoimmune Disorders of Connective Tissue Overview of Autoimmune Disorders of Connective Tissue Systemic ...

  17. The clinical spectrum of autoimmune congenital heart block.

    PubMed

    Brito-Zerón, Pilar; Izmirly, Peter M; Ramos-Casals, Manuel; Buyon, Jill P; Khamashta, Munther A

    2015-05-01

    Autoimmune congenital heart block (CHB) is an immune-mediated acquired disease that is associated with the placental transference of maternal antibodies specific for Ro and La autoantigens. The disease develops in a fetal heart without anatomical abnormalities that could otherwise explain the block, and which is usually diagnosed in utero, but also at birth or within the neonatal period. Autoantibody-mediated damage of fetal conduction tissues causes inflammation and fibrosis and leads to blockage of signal conduction at the atrioventricular (AV) node. Irreversible complete AV block is the principal cardiac manifestation of CHB, although some babies might develop other severe cardiac complications, such as endocardial fibroelastosis or valvular insufficiency, even in the absence of cardiac block. In this Review, we discuss the epidemiology, classification and management of women whose pregnancies are affected by autoimmune CHB, with a particular focus on the autoantibodies associated with autoimmune CHB and how we should test for these antibodies and diagnose this disease. Without confirmed effective preventive or therapeutic strategies and further research on the aetiopathogenic mechanisms, autoimmune CHB will remain a severe life-threatening disorder. PMID:25800217

  18. Cytokine-induced endogenous procollagenase stored in the extracellular matrix of soft connective tissue results in a burst of collagen breakdown following its activation.

    PubMed

    van der Zee, E; Everts, V; Beertsen, W

    1996-10-01

    Numerous data strongly suggest the involvement of cytokines and the matrix metalloproteinase collagenase (MMP-1) in the pathogenesis of periodontitis. Recently, we have demonstrated that, upon culturing under the influence of IL-1 alpha + EGF, a large amount of inactive procollagenase (MMP-1) is stored in the extracellular matrix of periosteal tissue. We now show that this endogenous reservoir of proenzyme can be operative after activation with plasmin and is able to induce a rapid and almost complete breakdown of the collagenous extracellular matrix. The level of collagen degradation following activation showed a strong correlation with the amount of proenzyme that was incorporated in the tissue. The highest level of degradation (70% of the total amount of collagenous proteins) was found with the IL-1 alpha + EGF-treated explants, followed by those treated with IL-1 alpha alone (35%). Explants cultured with EGF or in the absence of cytokines, containing only small amounts of procollagenase, showed little collagen breakdown following plasmin activation (7%). Inhibition of metalloproteinases by EDTA, or blockage of plasmin by PMSF, prevented the degradation in all explants irrespective of the amount of proenzyme present in the tissue. Our findings demonstrate that endogenous proenzyme stored in a native connective tissue matrix can be activated at a later time interval which results in a massive breakdown of the tissue. This study shows a possible pathway of collagenase-induced breakdown without recent de novo synthesis of the enzyme. Such a sequence may be operative in chronic inflammatory diseases, such as periodontitis, where production of procollagenase under the influence of cytokines spans a longer time period, whereas breakdown is often characterized by a cyclic behaviour. PMID:8915951

  19. Age-associated differences in triceps surae muscle composition and strength – an MRI-based cross-sectional comparison of contractile, adipose and connective tissue

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In human skeletal muscles, the aging process causes a decrease of contractile and a concomitant increase of intramuscular adipose (IMAT) and connective (IMCT) tissues. The accumulation of non-contractile tissues may contribute to the significant loss of intrinsic muscle strength typically observed at older age but their in vivo quantification is challenging. The purpose of this study was to establish MR imaging-based methods to quantify the relative amounts of IMCT, IMAT and contractile tissues in young and older human cohorts, and investigate their roles in determining age-associated changes in skeletal muscle strength. Methods Five young (31.6?±?7.0 yrs) and five older (83.4?±?3.2 yrs) Japanese women were subject to a detailed MR imaging protocol, including Fast Gradient Echo, Quantitative Fat/Water (IDEAL) and Ultra-short Echo Time (UTE) sequences, to determine contractile muscle tissue and IMAT within the entire Triceps Surae complex, and IMCT within both heads of the Gastrocnemius muscle. Specific force was calculated as the ratio of isometric plantarflexor force and the physiological cross-sectional area of the Triceps Surae complex. Results In the older cohort, total Triceps Surae volume was smaller by 17.5%, while the relative amounts of Triceps Surae IMAT and Gastrocnemius IMCT were larger by 55.1% and 48.9%, respectively. Differences of 38.6% and 42.1% in plantarflexor force and specific force were observed. After subtraction of IMAT and IMCT from total muscle volume, differences in intrinsic strength decreased to 29.6%. Conclusions Our data establishes that aging causes significant changes in skeletal muscle composition, with marked increases in non-contractile tissues. Such quantification of the remodeling process is likely to be of functional and clinical importance in elucidating the causes of the disproportionate age-associated decrease of force compared to that of muscle volume. PMID:24939372

  20. Connective tissue disease related interstitial lung diseases and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: provisional core sets of domains and instruments for use in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Saketkoo, Lesley Ann; Mittoo, Shikha; Huscher, Dörte; Khanna, Dinesh; Dellaripa, Paul F; Distler, Oliver; Flaherty, Kevin R; Frankel, Sid; Oddis, Chester V; Denton, Christopher P; Fischer, Aryeh; Kowal-Bielecka, Otylia M; LeSage, Daphne; Merkel, Peter A; Phillips, Kristine; Pittrow, David; Swigris, Jeffrey; Antoniou, Katerina; Baughman, Robert P; Castelino, Flavia V; Christmann, Romy B; Christopher-Stine, Lisa; Collard, Harold R; Cottin, Vincent; Danoff, Sonye; Highland, Kristin B; Hummers, Laura; Shah, Ami A; Kim, Dong Soon; Lynch, David A; Miller, Frederick W; Proudman, Susanna M; Richeldi, Luca; Ryu, Jay H; Sandorfi, Nora; Sarver, Catherine; Wells, Athol U; Strand, Vibeke; Matteson, Eric L; Brown, Kevin K; Seibold, James R

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Clinical trial design in interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) has been hampered by lack of consensus on appropriate outcome measures for reliably assessing treatment response. In the setting of connective tissue diseases (CTDs), some measures of ILD disease activity and severity may be confounded by non-pulmonary comorbidities. Methods The Connective Tissue Disease associated Interstitial Lung Disease (CTD-ILD) working group of Outcome Measures in Rheumatology—a non-profit international organisation dedicated to consensus methodology in identification of outcome measures—conducted a series of investigations which included a Delphi process including >248 ILD medical experts as well as patient focus groups culminating in a nominal group panel of ILD experts and patients. The goal was to define and develop a consensus on the status of outcome measure candidates for use in randomised controlled trials in CTD-ILD and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Results A core set comprising specific measures in the domains of lung physiology, lung imaging, survival, dyspnoea, cough and health-related quality of life is proposed as appropriate for consideration for use in a hypothetical 1-year multicentre clinical trial for either CTD-ILD or IPF. As many widely used instruments were found to lack full validation, an agenda for future research is proposed. Conclusion Identification of consensus preliminary domains and instruments to measure them was attained and is a major advance anticipated to facilitate multicentre RCTs in the field. PMID:24368713

  1. Long-term effects of bosentan on quality of life, survival, safety and tolerability in pulmonary arterial hypertension related to connective tissue diseases

    PubMed Central

    Denton, C P; Pope, J E; Peter, H-H; Gabrielli, A; Boonstra, A; van den Hoogen, F H J; Riemekasten, G; De Vita, S; Morganti, A; Dölberg, M; Berkani, O; Guillevin, L

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: This study investigated the long-term effects of bosentan, an oral endothelin ETA/ETB receptor antagonist, in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) exclusively related to connective tissue diseases (CTD). Methods: A total of 53 patients with PAH related to connective tissue diseases (PAH–CTD) in World Health Organization (WHO) functional class III received bosentan 62.5 mg twice a day for 4 weeks and then 125 mg twice a day for 44 weeks in this open non-comparative study. Assessments at weeks 16 and 48 included WHO class, clinical worsening, quality of life (Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) and health assessment questionnaire (HAQ) modified for scleroderma), and survival (week 48 only). Safety and tolerability were monitored throughout the study. Results: At week 48, WHO class improved in 27% of patients (95% CI 16–42%) and worsened in 16% (95% CI 7–29%). Kaplan–Meier estimates were 68% (95% CI 55–82%) for absence of clinical worsening and 92% (95% CI 85–100%) for survival. Overall changes in quality of life were minimal. There were no unexpected side effects observed during the study. Conclusions: In most patients, bosentan was associated with improvement or stability of clinical status. The 92% estimate for survival at 48 weeks is a significant achievement in this patient population. PMID:18055477

  2. Three-dimensional aspects of the lingual papillae and their connective tissue cores in the tongue of rats: a scanning electron microscope study.

    PubMed

    Reginato, Gabriela de Souza; Bolina, Cristina de Sousa; Watanabe, Ii-sei; Ciena, Adriano Polican

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the tridimensional morphological characteristics of the lingual papillae and their connective tissue cores (CTCs) in Sprague Dawley rats. Four types of papillae were reported on the dorsal surface. Filiform papillae were distributed on the tongue surface and after epithelial maceration a conic and multifilamentary shape of the CTCs was revealed. Fungiform papillae were reported on the rostral and middle regions covered by a squamous epithelium. After the removal of the epithelium, the shape of a volcano with the taste orifice at its top was noted. Foliate papillae were composed of five pairs of epithelial folds situated on the lateral-caudal margin of the tongue. After the removal of the epithelium, they were shown to be limited by thin laminar projections. The vallate papilla with an oval shape was present in the caudal region and delimited by an incomplete groove. The morphological characteristics of the lingual papillae of Sprague Dowley rats, three-dimensional SEM images, and the types of papillae on the dorsal surface were similar to those reported previously in other rodent mammals. The maceration technique revealed the details of extracellular matrix with varied shapes form of connective tissue cores. PMID:25436229

  3. CTGF directs fibroblast differentiation from human mesenchymal stem/stromal cells and defines connective tissue healing in a rodent injury model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang H; Shah, Bhranti; Moioli, Eduardo K; Mao, Jeremy J

    2010-09-01

    Fibroblasts are ubiquitous cells that demonstrate remarkable diversity. However, their origin and pathways of differentiation remain poorly defined. Here, we show that connective tissue growth factor (CTGF; also known as CCN2) is sufficient to induce human bone marrow mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) to differentiate into fibroblasts. CTGF-stimulated MSCs lost their surface mesenchymal epitopes, expressed broad fibroblastic hallmarks, and increasingly synthesized collagen type I and tenacin-C. After fibroblastic commitment, the ability of MSCs to differentiate into nonfibroblastic lineages - including osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes - was diminished. To address inherent heterogeneity in MSC culture, we established 18 single MSC-derived clones by limiting dilution. CTGF-treated MSCs were alpha-SMA-, differentiating into alpha-SMA+ myofibroblasts only when stimulated subsequently with TGF-beta1, suggestive of stepwise processes of fibroblast commitment, fibrogenesis, and pathological fibrosis. In rats, in vivo microencapsulated delivery of CTGF prompted postnatal connective tissue to undergo fibrogenesis rather than ectopic mineralization. The knowledge that fibroblasts have a mesenchymal origin may enrich our understanding of organ fibrosis, cancer stroma, ectopic mineralization, scarring, and regeneration. PMID:20679726

  4. Three-Dimensional Aspects of the Lingual Papillae and Their Connective Tissue Cores in the Tongue of Rats: A Scanning Electron Microscope Study

    PubMed Central

    Reginato, Gabriela de Souza; Watanabe, Ii-sei; Ciena, Adriano Polican

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to describe the tridimensional morphological characteristics of the lingual papillae and their connective tissue cores (CTCs) in Sprague Dawley rats. Four types of papillae were reported on the dorsal surface. Filiform papillae were distributed on the tongue surface and after epithelial maceration a conic and multifilamentary shape of the CTCs was revealed. Fungiform papillae were reported on the rostral and middle regions covered by a squamous epithelium. After the removal of the epithelium, the shape of a volcano with the taste orifice at its top was noted. Foliate papillae were composed of five pairs of epithelial folds situated on the lateral-caudal margin of the tongue. After the removal of the epithelium, they were shown to be limited by thin laminar projections. The vallate papilla with an oval shape was present in the caudal region and delimited by an incomplete groove. The morphological characteristics of the lingual papillae of Sprague Dowley rats, three-dimensional SEM images, and the types of papillae on the dorsal surface were similar to those reported previously in other rodent mammals. The maceration technique revealed the details of extracellular matrix with varied shapes form of connective tissue cores. PMID:25436229

  5. Academic and molecular matrices: A study of the transformations of connective tissue research at the University of Manchester (1947–1996)?

    PubMed Central

    García-Sancho, Miguel

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores the different identities adopted by connective tissue research at the University of Manchester during the second half of the 20th century. By looking at the long-term redefinition of a research programme, it sheds new light on the interactions between different and conflicting levels in the study of biomedicine, such as the local and the global, or the medical and the biological. It also addresses the gap in the literature between the first biomedical complexes after World War II and the emergence of biotechnology. Connective tissue research in Manchester emerged as a field focused on new treatments for rheumatic diseases. During the 1950s and 60s, it absorbed a number of laboratory techniques from biology, namely cell culture and electron microscopy. The transformations in scientific policy during the late 70s and the migration of Manchester researchers to the US led them to adopt recombinant DNA methods, which were borrowed from human genetics. This resulted in the emergence of cell matrix biology, a new field which had one of its reference centres in Manchester. The Manchester story shows the potential of detailed and chronologically wide local studies of patterns of work to understand the mechanisms by which new biomedical tools and institutions interact with long-standing problems and existing affiliations. PMID:21486662

  6. Fc?RIIB and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Espéli, Marion; Smith, Kenneth G C; Clatworthy, Menna R

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by adaptive immune responses against self-antigens, including humoral responses resulting in the production of autoantibodies. Autoantibodies generate inflammation by activating complement and engaging Fc? receptors (Fc?Rs). The inhibitory receptor Fc?RIIB plays a central role in regulating the generation of autoantibodies and their effector functions, which include activation of innate immune cells and the cellular arm of the adaptive immune system, via effects on antigen presentation to CD4 T cells. Polymorphisms in Fc?RIIB have been associated with susceptibility to autoimmunity but protection against infections in humans and mice. In the last few years, new mechanisms by which Fc?RIIB controls the adaptive immune response have been described. Notably, Fc?RIIB has been shown to regulate germinal center B cells and dendritic cell migration, with potential impact on the development of autoimmune diseases. Recent work has also highlighted the implication of Fc?RIIB on the regulation of the innate immune system, via inhibition of Toll-like receptor- and complement receptor-mediated activation. This review will provide an update on the role of Fc?RIIB in adaptive immune responses in autoimmunity, and then focus on their emerging function in innate immunity. PMID:26683154

  7. Autoimmunity and asthma

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Self peptides shape T-cell development through selectional processes in the thymus and secondary lymphoid organs to promote a diverse and balanced repertoire of conventional and regulatory T cells. Foreign proteins and their derivative peptides permeate our mucosal tissues to constitute another diverse array of peptides that may specify and diversify the mucosal T-cell repertoire. Indeed, the distinction between self peptides and environmental foreign peptides may be academic if both are present constantly within the body. The premise here is that the plethora of foreign peptides, present ubiquitously in our environment and body, form homeostatic niches to foster highly diversified repertoires of conventional and regulatory T cells that recognize persistent environmental peptides as self. Highly diversified repertoires that recognize myriads of self and environmental foreign peptides as homeostatic ligands may be critical for adaptive distinctions of friend or foe in mucosal tissues. The change from our agrarian past to the highly sterile environments of today may adversely impact the diversity and concentrations of foreign peptides that shape the mucosal T-cell repertoire. Various hygiene hypotheses postulate that the lack of factors such as infectious pathogens, innate receptor engagement or Th1 bias is key to the marked increase in immunological disease in modern society. In this version of the hygiene hypothesis, highly diverse constellations of innocuous environmental peptides are postulated to be the critical factor for immune balance and homeostasis. PMID:21487514

  8. Autoimmunity as a Candidate for the Etiopathogenesis of Meniere's Disease: Detection of Autoimmune Reactions and Diagnostic Biomarker Candidate

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Huhn; Kim, Jin Young; Lee, Hyun Jin; Gi, Mia; Kim, Bo Gyung; Choi, Jae Young

    2014-01-01

    Meniere's disease is an inner ear disorder that can manifest as fluctuating vertigo, sensorineural hearing loss, tinnitus, and aural fullness. However, the pathologic mechanism of Meniere's disease is still unclear. In this study, we evaluated autoimmunity as a potential cause of Meniere's disease. In addition we tried to find useful biomarker candidates for diagnosis. We investigated the protein composition of human inner ear fluid using liquid column mass spectrometry, the autoimmune reaction between circulating autoantibodies in patient serum and multiple antigens using the Protoarray system, the immune reaction between patient serum and mouse inner ear tissues using western blot analysis. Nine proteins, including immunoglobulin and its variants and interferon regulatory factor 7, were found only in the inner ear fluid of patients with Meniere's disease. Enhanced immune reactions with 18 candidate antigens were detected in patients with Meniere's disease in Protoarray analysis; levels of 8 of these antigens were more than 10-fold higher in patients than in controls. Antigen-antibody reactions between mouse inner ear proteins with molecular weights of 23–48 kDa and 63–75 kDa and patient sera were detected in 8 patients. These findings suggest that autoimmunity could be one of the pathologic mechanisms behind Meniere's disease. Multiple autoantibodies and antigens may be involved in the autoimmune reaction. Specific antigens that caused immune reactions with patient's serum in Protoarray analysis can be candidates for the diagnostic biomarkers of Meniere's disease. PMID:25330336

  9. Tumor cell and connective tissue cell interactions in human colorectal adenocarcinoma. Transfer of platelet-derived growth factor-AB/BB to stromal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sundberg, C.; Branting, M.; Gerdin, B.; Rubin, K.

    1997-01-01

    Mechanisms underlying stimulation of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) beta-receptors expressed on connective tissue cells in human colorectal adenocarcinoma were investigated in this study. PDGF-AB/BB, but not PDGF receptors, was expressed by tumor cells in situ, as well as in tumor cell isolates of low passage from human colorectal adenocarcinoma. In an experimental co-culture system, conditioned medium from tumor cells only marginally activated PDGF beta-receptors expressed on fibroblasts. In contrast, co-culturing of the two cell types led to a marked PDGF beta-receptor activation. Functional PDGF-AB/BB was found to be associated with heparinase-I-sensitive components on the tumor cell surface. PDGF-AB/BB, isolated from heparinase-I-sensitive cell surface components, induced a marked activation of PDGF beta-receptors. Furthermore, co-culturing tumor cells together with fibroblasts led to a sustained activation of PDGF beta-receptors expressed on fibroblasts. Double immunofluorescence staining of tissue sections from human colorectal adenocarcinoma, combined with computer-aided image analysis, revealed that nonproliferating tumor cells were the predominant cellular source of PDGF-AB/BB in the tumor stroma. In addition, PDGF-AB/BB-expressing tumor cells were found juxtapositioned to microvascular cells expressing activated PDGF beta-receptors. Confocal microscopy revealed a cytoplasmic and cell-membrane-associated expression of PDGF-AB/BB in tumor cells situated in the stroma. In contrast, epithelial cells situated in normal or tumorous acinar structures revealed only a cell-membrane-associated PDGF-AB/BB expression. The is vitro and in situ results demonstrate that tumor cells not only facilitate but also have the ability to modulate connective tissue cell responsiveness to PDGF-AB/BB in a paracrine fashion, through direct cell-cell interactions in human colorectal adenocarcinoma. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9250160

  10. Effects of IGF-I combined with GH on glucocorticoid-induced changes of bone and connective tissue turnover in man.

    PubMed

    Berneis, K; Oehri, M; Kraenzlin, M; Keller, U

    1999-08-01

    Chronic glucocorticoid therapy results in negative bone and connective tissue balance. To assess the effects of GH and a combination of IGF-I and GH, 24 healthy male volunteers received in a double blind fashion either recombinant human GH (0.3 IU/kg per day s.c.), or a combination of GH (0.3 IU/kg per day s.c.) and IGF-I (80 microgram/kg per day s.c.) or placebo (saline s.c.) during 6 days of methylprednisolone (0.5 mg/kg per day) treatment. Methylprednisolone decreased serum osteocalcin concentrations during placebo treatment from 32.9+/-2.1 to 9.0+/-1.4 microgram/l (P<0.0001), indicating diminished osteoblast activity, and procollagen type I (PICP) and procollagen type III (PIIINP) to 46 and 70% of baseline respectively (P<0.005), indicating diminished bone (PICP) and soft tissue collagen synthesis (PIIINP). Urinary excretion of pyridinoline, deoxypyridinoline and hydroxyproline increased during treatment with methylprednisolone alone, indicating increased bone resorption (P<0.05 or less). The combination of GH and IGF-I resulted in a significant blunting of the methylprednisolone effect on serum PICP and PIIINP concentrations (P<0.005 or less vs placebo); this effect was in part due to IGF-I, since serum PICP concentrations decreased less in the combination group than during GH treatment alone (P<0.05). In the groups receiving GH and GH combined with IGF-I, urinary hydroxyproline excretion increased more when compared with methylprednisolone alone (P<0.05 or less). These findings demonstrate that only the combination of GH and IGF-I, but not GH alone, markedly counteracts diminished bone and body collagen synthesis caused by glucocorticoids, whereas connective tissue resorption is enhanced during treatment with GH alone and in combination with IGF-I. PMID:10425464

  11. Connective tissue polarity. Optical second-harmonic microscopy, crossed-beam summation, and small-angle scattering in rat-tail tendon.

    PubMed Central

    Freund, I; Deutsch, M; Sprecher, A

    1986-01-01

    Connective tissue polarity has remained an intractable enigma for over two decades. We present new data on optical second harmonic generation in native, wet, rat-tail tendon. Scanning second-harmonic microscopy has revealed, for the first time, the existence of a discrete network of fine, polar, filamentous or columnar, structures, and, also, the presence of strongly polar surface, or near-surface patches. The thickness of these features was probed via crossed-beam optical frequency summation and the polar material is estimated to occupy a few percent of the tendon volume. The three-dimensional spatial distribution of filaments was studied with the aid of small-angle second-harmonic scattering, and the filaments were found to permeate the tendon cross-section in an apparently random fashion. These latter measurements also revealed that essentially all polar filaments had the same directionality. Concomitant studies of the polar collagen fibrils that comprise the bulk of tendon were in full accord with prior electron microscope results that had demonstrated that the directionality of these fibrils varies up/down in a purely random fashion, and thus cannot yield a net macroscopic polarity. Quantitative analysis of the second-harmonic data yields the conclusion that the observed polar structures cannot be simply local regions containing some accidental net excess of similarly oriented fibrils. The analytical expressions used in the analysis of the data obtained for this complex tissue were supported by extensive, realistic computer simulations. The discovery that the polarity of rat-tail tendon, and possibly other forms of connective tissue, resides in discrete structures, some of which are located near the tendon surface, should permit the ready isolation of polar-rich material for further study by a variety of techniques. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:3779007

  12. Few Foxp3? regulatory T cells are sufficient to protect adult mice from lethal autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Mayer, Christian T; Ghorbani, Peyman; Kühl, Anja A; Stüve, Philipp; Hegemann, Maike; Berod, Luciana; Gershwin, M Eric; Sparwasser, Tim

    2014-10-01

    Foxp3 specifies the Treg cell lineage and is indispensable for immune tolerance. Accordingly, rare Foxp3 mutations cause lethal autoimmunity. The mechanisms precipitating more prevalent human autoimmune diseases are poorly understood, but involve a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Many autoimmune diseases associate with a partial Treg-cell dysfunction, yet mouse models reflecting such complex pathophysiological processes are rare. Around 95% of Foxp3(+) Treg cells can be specifically depleted in bacterial artifical chromosome (BAC)-transgenic Depletion of REGulatory T cells (DEREG) mice through diphtheria toxin (DT) treatment. However, Treg-cell depletion fails to cause autoimmunity in adult DEREG mice for unclear reasons. By crossing Foxp3(GFP) knock-in mice to DEREG mice, we introduced additional genetic susceptibility that does not affect untreated mice. Strikingly, DT treatment of DEREG × Foxp3(GFP) mice rapidly causes autoimmunity characterized by blepharitis, tissue damage, and autoantibody production. This inflammatory disease is associated with augmented T-cell activation, increased Th2 cytokine production and myeloproliferation, and is caused by defective Treg-cell homeostasis, preventing few DT-insensitive Treg cells from repopulating the niche after Treg-cell depletion. Our study provides important insights into self-tolerance. We further highlight DEREG × Foxp3(GFP) mice as a model to investigate the role of environmental factors in precipitating autoimmunity. This may help to better understand and treat human autoimmunity. PMID:25042334

  13. DARC shuttles inflammatory chemokines across the blood-brain barrier during autoimmune central nervous system inflammation.

    PubMed

    Minten, Carsten; Alt, Carsten; Gentner, Melanie; Frei, Elisabeth; Deutsch, Urban; Lyck, Ruth; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole; Rot, Antal; Engelhardt, Britta

    2014-05-01

    The Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines, DARC, belongs to the family of atypical heptahelical chemokine receptors that do not couple to G proteins and therefore fail to transmit conventional intracellular signals. Here we show that during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, an animal model of multiple sclerosis, the expression of DARC is upregulated at the blood-brain barrier. These findings are corroborated by the presence of a significantly increased number of subcortical white matter microvessels staining positive for DARC in human multiple sclerosis brains as compared to control tissue. Using an in vitro blood-brain barrier model we demonstrated that endothelial DARC mediates the abluminal to luminal transport of inflammatory chemokines across the blood-brain barrier. An involvement of DARC in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis pathogenesis was confirmed by the observed ameliorated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in Darc(-/-) C57BL/6 and SJL mice, as compared to wild-type control littermates. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis studies in bone marrow chimeric Darc(-/-) and wild-type mice revealed that increased plasma levels of inflammatory chemokines in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis depended on the presence of erythrocyte DARC. However, fully developed experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis required the expression of endothelial DARC. Taken together, our data show a role for erythrocyte DARC as a chemokine reservoir and that endothelial DARC contributes to the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by shuttling chemokines across the blood-brain barrier. PMID:24625696

  14. DARC shuttles inflammatory chemokines across the blood–brain barrier during autoimmune central nervous system inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Minten, Carsten; Alt, Carsten; Gentner, Melanie; Frei, Elisabeth; Deutsch, Urban; Lyck, Ruth; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole; Rot, Antal

    2014-01-01

    The Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines, DARC, belongs to the family of atypical heptahelical chemokine receptors that do not couple to G proteins and therefore fail to transmit conventional intracellular signals. Here we show that during experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, an animal model of multiple sclerosis, the expression of DARC is upregulated at the blood–brain barrier. These findings are corroborated by the presence of a significantly increased number of subcortical white matter microvessels staining positive for DARC in human multiple sclerosis brains as compared to control tissue. Using an in vitro blood–brain barrier model we demonstrated that endothelial DARC mediates the abluminal to luminal transport of inflammatory chemokines across the blood–brain barrier. An involvement of DARC in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis pathogenesis was confirmed by the observed ameliorated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in Darc?/? C57BL/6 and SJL mice, as compared to wild-type control littermates. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis studies in bone marrow chimeric Darc?/? and wild-type mice revealed that increased plasma levels of inflammatory chemokines in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis depended on the presence of erythrocyte DARC. However, fully developed experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis required the expression of endothelial DARC. Taken together, our data show a role for erythrocyte DARC as a chemokine reservoir and that endothelial DARC contributes to the pathogenesis of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by shuttling chemokines across the blood–brain barrier. PMID:24625696

  15. New insights into immune mechanisms underlying autoimmune diseases of the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Di Sabatino, Antonio; Lenti, Marco Vincenzo; Giuffrida, Paolo; Vanoli, Alessandro; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2015-12-01

    Recent progresses in the immune mechanisms implicated in chronic inflammatory disorders have led to a more in-depth knowledge of the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, including autoimmune atrophic gastritis, celiac disease, autoimmune enteropathy and ulcerative colitis. While the pathogenic role of specific circulating autoantibodies, i.e., respectively anti-parietal cell, anti-tissue transglutaminase, anti-enterocyte and anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic, is still controversial, some common T-cell mediated mechanisms for inflammation - increase in T helper cell type 1/type 17 pro-inflammatory cytokines- or losing self-tolerance-abnormal regulatory T cell function - are recognized as crucial mediators of the tissue damage causing atrophy of the stomach mucosa in autoimmune atrophic gastritis, villous flattening of the small bowel in celiac disease and autoimmune enteropathy, and mucosal ulceration of the colon in ulcerative colitis. This review deals with novel advances in the immunological bases of the aforementioned autoimmune gastrointestinal disorders, and it also highlights immune mechanisms of progression from chronic inflammation to cancer and implications for new therapeutic targets. PMID:26275585

  16. The PD-1 Pathway in Tolerance and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Loise M.; Sage, Peter T.; Sharpe, Arlene H.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Regulatory T cells (Tregs) and the PD-1: PD-ligand (PD-L) pathway are both critical to terminating immune responses. Elimination of either can result in the breakdown of tolerance and the development of autoimmunity. The PD-1: PD-L pathway can thwart self-reactive T cells and protect against autoimmunity in many ways. In this review, we highlight how PD-1 and its ligands defend against potentially pathogenic self-reactive effector T cells by simultaneously harnessing two mechanisms of peripheral tolerance: (i) the promotion of Treg development and function and (ii) the direct inhibition of potentially pathogenic self-reactive T cells that have escaped into the periphery. Treg cells induced by the PD-1 pathway may also assist in maintaining immune homeostasis, keeping the threshold for T-cell activation high enough to safeguard against autoimmunity. PD-L1 expression on non-hematopoietic cells as well as hematopoietic cells endows PD-L1 with the capacity to promote Treg development and enhance Treg function in lymphoid organs and tissues that are targets of autoimmune attack. At sites where transforming growth factor-? is present (e.g. sites of immune privilege or inflammation), PD-L1 may promote the de novo generation of Tregs. When considering the consequences of uncontrolled immunity, it would be therapeutically advantageous to manipulate Treg development and sustain Treg function. Thus, this review also discusses how the PD-1 pathway regulates a number of autoimmune diseases and the therapeutic potential of PD-1: PD-L modulation. PMID:20636820

  17. Restoring the balance: immunotherapeutic combinations for autoimmune disease

    PubMed Central

    Smilek, Dawn E.; Ehlers, Mario R.; Nepom, Gerald T.

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmunity occurs when T cells, B cells or both are inappropriately activated, resulting in damage to one or more organ systems. Normally, high-affinity self-reactive T and B cells are eliminated in the thymus and bone marrow through a process known as central immune tolerance. However, low-affinity self-reactive T and B cells escape central tolerance and enter the blood and tissues, where they are kept in check by complex and non-redundant peripheral tolerance mechanisms. Dysfunction or imbalance of the immune system can lead to autoimmunity, and thus elucidation of normal tolerance mechanisms has led to identification of therapeutic targets for treating autoimmune disease. In the past 15 years, a number of disease-modifying monoclonal antibodies and genetically engineered biologic agents targeting the immune system have been approved, notably for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease and psoriasis. Although these agents represent a major advance, effective therapy for other autoimmune conditions, such as type 1 diabetes, remain elusive and will likely require intervention aimed at multiple components of the immune system. To this end, approaches that manipulate cells ex vivo and harness their complex behaviors are being tested in preclinical and clinical settings. In addition, approved biologic agents are being examined in combination with one another and with cell-based therapies. Substantial development and regulatory hurdles must be overcome in order to successfully combine immunotherapeutic biologic agents. Nevertheless, such combinations might ultimately be necessary to control autoimmune disease manifestations and restore the tolerant state. PMID:24795433

  18. In Vivo Visualization of (Auto)Immune Processes in the Central Nervous System of Rodents.

    PubMed

    Schläger, Christian; Litke, Tanja; Flügel, Alexander; Odoardi, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    The CNS is effectively shielded from the periphery by the blood-brain barrier (BBB) which limits the entry of cells and solutes. However, in autoimmune disorders such as multiple sclerosis, immune cells can overcome this barrier and induce the formation of CNS inflammatory lesions. Recently, two-photon laser scanning microscopy (TPLSM) has made it possible to visualize autoimmune processes in the living CNS in real time. However, along with a high microscopy standard, this technique requires an advanced surgical procedure to access the region of interest. Here, we describe in detail the necessary methodological steps to visualize (auto)immune processes in living rodent tissue. We focus on the procedures to image the leptomeningeal vessels of the thoracic spinal cord during transfer experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in LEW rats (AT EAE) and in active EAE in C57BL/6 mice (aEAE). PMID:25549830

  19. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-? in Thyroid Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Fallahi, Poupak; Vita, Roberto; Benvenga, Salvatore

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor- (PPAR-) ? expression has been shown in thyroid tissue from patients with thyroiditis or Graves' disease and furthermore in the orbital tissue of patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy (GO), such as in extraocular muscle cells. An increasing body of evidence shows the importance of the (C-X-C motif) receptor 3 (CXCR3) and cognate chemokines (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL)9, CXCL10, and CXCL11, in the T helper 1 immune response and in inflammatory diseases such as thyroid autoimmune disorders. PPAR-? agonists show a strong inhibitory effect on the expression and release of CXCR3 chemokines, in vitro, in various kinds of cells, such as thyrocytes, and in orbital fibroblasts, preadipocytes, and myoblasts from patients with GO. Recently, it has been demonstrated that rosiglitazone is involved in a higher risk of heart failure, stroke, and all-cause mortality in old patients. On the contrary, pioglitazone has not shown these effects until now; this favors pioglitazone for a possible use in patients with thyroid autoimmunity. However, further studies are ongoing to explore the use of new PPAR-? agonists in the treatment of thyroid autoimmune disorders. PMID:25722716

  20. Immunomodulatory strategies prevent the development of autoimmune emphysema

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The presence of anti-endothelial cell antibodies and pathogenic T cells may reflect an autoimmune component in the pathogenesis of emphysema. Whether immune modulatory strategies can protect against the development of emphysema is not known. Methods Sprague Dawley rats were immunized with human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) to induce autoimmune emphysema and treated with intrathymic HUVEC-injection and pristane. Measurements of alveolar airspace enlargement, cytokine levels, immuno histochemical, western blot analysis, and T cell repertoire of the lung tissue were performed. Results The immunomodulatory strategies protected lungs against cell death as demonstrated by reduced numbers of TUNEL and active caspase-3 positive cells and reduced levels of active caspase-3, when compared with lungs from HUVEC-immunized rats. Immunomodulatory strategies also suppressed anti-endothelial antibody production and preserved CNTF, IL-1alpha and VEGF levels. The immune deviation effects of the intrathymic HUVEC-injection were associated with an expansion of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells. Pristane treatment decreased the proportion of T cells expressing receptor beta-chain, V?16.1 in the lung tissue. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that interventions classically employed to induce central T cell tolerance (thymic inoculation of antigen) or to activate innate immune responses (pristane treatment) can prevent the development of autoimmune emphysema. PMID:21162738

  1. HOMOLOGOUS DISEASE IN THE ADULT RAT, A MODEL FOR AUTOIMMUNE DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Stastny, Peter; Stembridge, Vernie A.; Ziff, Morris

    1963-01-01

    The cutaneous lesions of adult rats with homologous disease are described, and evidence is presented to indicate that they have an immunologic basis. The skin changes included erythema, purpura, edema, and a variety of inflammatory lesions. In the more active lesions, dermal infiltration, hydropic degeneration, acanthosis, and atrophy of the epidermis with hyperkeratosis and follicular plugging were present. In some cases, ulceration and sloughing were also observed. More chronic lesions were characterized by atrophy of the epidermis and collagenization of the dermis with disappearance of the skin appendages. Rejection of autografts was observed simultaneously with acceptance of homografts. The histologic appearance of autografts undergoing rejection was similar to that of the spontaneous skin lesions, suggesting that the latter, too, had an immunologic basis. In favor of this, also, was the specificity of the dermatitis for the skin of the host, with sparing of neighboring homograft tissue. There was a histologic similarity between the spontaneous skin lesions of homologous disease and those of lupus erythematosus on the one hand, and scleroderma on the other, thus supporting the possibility that the cutaneous lesions of these connective tissue diseases of man may also have an immunologic basis. It was concluded that the adult rat with homologous disease may furnish a model for human autoimmune disease. PMID:14067911

  2. Neutrophil extracellular traps (Nets) impact upon autoimmune disorders

    PubMed Central

    Kotu?a, Iwona; Manda-Handzlik, Aneta

    2015-01-01

    Friend or foe? This is often asked question when it comes to neutrophil extracellular traps studies. There is no simple answer to that. At the time of their discovery they were considered to be protectors of our well-being. Excellent pathogen fighting skills were described as purely beneficial. But it was not long before those guardians of immunity reveal their dark side. What seemed to be profitable could also take its toll. They are perfectly constructed, made from nucleic deoxyribonucleic acid ornamented with cytoplasmic and granular proteins, to fight invaders. But this unique build is prone to become considered by our body as a threat. Since there is a thin line which when crossed turns a savior into enemy, it was postulated that Nets can play a significant role in autoimmune disorders pathogenesis and disease exacerbation. Recent years have brought a new insight into autoimmune disorders trying to connect the old knowledge and suspicions with modern discoveries. PMID:26557037

  3. Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Terry, Rachael L; Ifergan, Igal; Miller, Stephen D

    2016-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalitis (EAE), the animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS), has provided significant insight into the mechanisms that initiate and drive autoimmunity. Several central nervous system proteins and peptides have been used to induce disease, in a number of different mouse strains, to model the diverse clinical presentations of MS. In this chapter, we detail the materials and methods used to induce active and adoptive EAE. We focus on disease induction in the SJL/J, C57BL/6, and BALB/c mouse strains, using peptides derived from proteolipid protein, myelin basic protein, and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein. We also include a protocol for the isolation of leukocytes from the spinal cord and brain for flow cytometric analysis. PMID:25005074

  4. Autoimmune diseases and reproductive aging

    PubMed Central

    Bove, Riley

    2013-01-01

    As the population ages, more individuals with autoimmune diseases are experiencing reproductive senescence. Understanding the impact of menopause and age-related androgen decline on disease onset and course, as well as the potential for hormonal interventions, is critically important. In men, lupus erythematosis (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and multiple sclerosis (MS) are associated with lower androgen levels. However, the impact of age-related declines in testosterone, as well as of testosterone replacement, on disease course remains underexplored. In women, the course of all three diseases with onset after the age of menopause differs from that with onset before menopause. Early age at menopause is associated with increased disease risk, and after menopause, disease course changes in SLE and RA. Less is known about MS. This article summarizes what is known about the relationship between reproductive aging and autoimmune diseases in men and women, and highlights areas for further investigation. PMID:23522436

  5. Propylthiouracil-induced autoimmune disease

    PubMed Central

    Paiaulla, Santosh; Venkategowda, Pradeep Marur; Rao, S. Manimala; Balaraju, Banda

    2015-01-01

    Hyperthyroidism is a condition characterized by excessive production of thyroid hormones. Propylthiouracil (PTU) is commonly used as first line drug in the management of hyperthyroidism. This is a case report of 24-year-old female, a known case of hyperthyroidism since 4 years, who came with a history of fever and myalgia since 3 days and dyspnea with coughing out of blood since 1 day. Patient was taking PTU (100 mg per day) since 4 years for hyperthyroidism. Patient was immediately intubated for type-II respiratory failure. Diagnosed to be having PTU-induced autoimmune disease. PTU was stopped and treated with methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide. Clinical features improved over a period of 8 days and discharged home successfully. Having a high suspicion for the onset of autoimmune disease in hyperthyroidism patients who are on PTU therapy and timely treatment with immunosuppressants and supportive care along with the withdrawal of the drug can make a difference in morbidity and mortality. PMID:26321810

  6. Fundamental role of C1q in autoimmunity and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Son, Myoungsun; Diamond, Betty; Santiago-Schwarz, Frances

    2015-12-01

    C1q, historically viewed as the initiating component of the classical complement pathway, also exhibits a variety of complement-independent activities in both innate and acquired immunity. Recent studies focusing on C1q's suppressive role in the immune system have provided new insight into how abnormal C1q expression and bioactivity may contribute to autoimmunity. In particular, molecular networks involving C1q interactions with cell surface receptors and other ligands are emerging as mechanisms involved in C1q's modulation of immunity. Here, we discuss the role of C1q in controlling immune cell function, including recently elucidated mechanisms of action, and suggest how these processes are critical for maintaining tissue homeostasis under steady-state conditions and in preventing autoimmunity. PMID:26410546

  7. Autoimmunity: Experimental and clinical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, R.S.; Rose, N.R.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains five parts and a section of poster papers. Each part contains several papers. Some of the papers are: Molecular Genetics and T Cells in Autoimmunity; Gene Conversion: A Mechanism to Explain HLA-D Region and Disease Association; Genetics of the Complement System; Speculation on the Role of Somatic Mutation in the Generation of Anti-DNA Antibodies; and Monoclonal Anti-DNA Antibodies: The Targets and Origins of SLE.

  8. Effective treatment with low-dose methotrexate pulses of a child of mixed connective tissue disease with severe myositis refractory to corticosteroid.

    PubMed

    Nakata, S; Uematsu, K; Mori, T; Mitsushita, N; Kinoshita, T; Ishioka, C; Mutou, K; Yokota, S; Hirose, Y; Komiyama, A

    1997-06-01

    A 13-year-old girl with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) was described. She visited our hospital with recurrent parotid gland swelling, arthritis, and myositis. Sclerodactyly and Raynaud's phenomenon were also defined, and the laboratory findings of high titers of antinuclear antibody (speckled type), positive anti-RNP antibody, positive rheumatoid factor, and hypergammaglobulinemia suggested the diagnosis of MCTD associated with Sjögren syndrome. The muscle weakness and the increased levels of CK prompted us to examine the muscle biopsy and to perform the electromyography, both of which suggested severe muscle inflammation. The siarography and lip biopsy indicated definitively the association of Sjögren syndrome. Corticosteroid therapy including methyl-prednisolone pulses was started, but the effects were limited. The addition of low-dose methotrexate effectively lowered the levels of CK, and gradually improved the muscle strength. Thus, low-dose methotrexate therapy is recommended to the patients with MCTD who have severe myositis refractory to corticosteroid. PMID:9256610

  9. Characterization of bone PG II cDNA and its relationship to PG II mRNA from other connective tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Day, A A; Ramis, C I; Fisher, L W; Gehron-Robey, P; Termine, J D; Young, M F

    1986-01-01

    Two cDNA clones encoding the small proteoglycan II (PG II) of bone were isolated from a lambda gt11 expression library. These clones expressed recombinant protein which was cross-reactive with polyclonal and monoclonal antisera to PG II molecules from several connective tissues. The longest clone, lambda Pg 20 was studied in detail. The clone was shown to encode PG II by hybrid selected translation and immunoprecipitation. Northern analysis showed two species of the PG II message of approximately 1.4 and 1.8 kb. Substantial amounts of PG II message were found in bone, tendon, articular cartilage, skin, smooth muscle and cornea. Trace amounts of message were also detected in liver and brain. Radiolabeled bovine PG II cDNA hybridized to RNA from several other species including the human, rat and chicken. The level of PG II mRNA in chick embryonic fibroblasts was sensitive to transformation by Rous sarcoma virus. Images PMID:3027667

  10. The worsening of tibialis anterior muscle atrophy during recovery post-immobilization correlates with enhanced connective tissue area, proteolysis, and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Slimani, Lamia; Micol, Didier; Amat, Julien; Delcros, Geoffrey; Meunier, Bruno; Taillandier, Daniel; Polge, Cécile; Béchet, Daniel; Dardevet, Dominique; Picard, Brigitte; Attaix, Didier; Listrat, Anne; Combaret, Lydie

    2012-12-01

    Sustained muscle wasting due to immobilization leads to weakening and severe metabolic consequences. The mechanisms responsible for muscle recovery after immobilization are poorly defined. Muscle atrophy induced by immobilization worsened in the lengthened tibialis anterior (TA) muscle but not in the shortened gastrocnemius muscle. Here, we investigated some mechanisms responsible for this differential response. Adult rats were subjected to unilateral hindlimb casting for 8 days (I8). Casts were removed at I8, and animals were allowed to recover for 10 days (R1 to R10). The worsening of TA atrophy following immobilization occurred immediately after cast removal at R1 and was sustained until R10. This atrophy correlated with a decrease in type IIb myosin heavy chain (MyHC) isoform and an increase in type IIx, IIa, and I isoforms, with muscle connective tissue thickening, and with increased collagen (Col) I mRNA levels. Increased Col XII, Col IV, and Col XVIII mRNA levels during TA immobilization normalized at R6. Sustained enhanced peptidase activities of the proteasome and apoptosome activity contributed to the catabolic response during the studied recovery period. Finally, increased nuclear apoptosis prevailed only in the connective tissue compartment of the TA. Altogether, the worsening of the TA atrophy pending immediate reloading reflects a major remodeling of its fiber type properties and alterations in the structure/composition of the extracellular compartment that may influence its elasticity/stiffness. The data suggest that sustained enhanced ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent proteolysis and apoptosis are important for these adaptations and provide some rationale for explaining the atrophy of reloaded muscles pending immobilization in a lengthened position. PMID:23032683

  11. Altered circadian rhythms of natural killer (NK) cell activity in patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Masera, R G; Carignola, R; Staurenghi, A H; Sartori, M L; Lazzero, A; Griot, G; Angeli, A

    1994-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are a lymphocyte subset actively involved in cytotoxicity against tumor-transformed and virus-infected cells; they are a reliable model for the study of neuroendocrine-immune interactions. In previous works we demonstrated that in healthy subjects NK activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and susceptibility to endogenous modifiers display statistically validated circadian rhythms. In rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in other autoimmune rheumatic diseases abnormalities of the circadian rhythm of serum cortisol and altered levels of NK cell activity have been reported. We evaluated the circadian pattern of NK cell activity in 7 hospitalized patients with autoimmune rheumatic diseases (4 RA, 1 scleroderma, 2 mixed connective tissue disease). Temporal variations of in vitro responses to either positive recombinant (immune interferon, r IFN-gamma IFN-gamma: 650 IU/ml; recombinant interleukin-2, r IL-2 IL-2: 100 IU/ml) or negative (cortisol: 10(-6) M) modifiers were also studied. Blood was drawn at 4h intervals for 24 h, starting at 0800. PBMC preparations were immediately separated and incubated for 20h in the presence or absence of modifiers. NK activity was assessed with a direct non-radiometric 4h cytolytic assay, using K 562 cells as targets. Significant circadian variations of spontaneous NK activity were documented only in women with RA, with a peak in the evening hours and a minimum in the night or in the early morning (p < 0.05, PR 51.5%, phi 1829). Population-mean cosinor analysis did not yield detection of significant circadian variations of in vitro responsiveness to modifiers.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7924633

  12. Phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor, mixed connective tissue type, non-phosphaturic variant: report of a case and review of 32 cases from the Japanese published work.

    PubMed

    Honda, Rie; Kawabata, Yuka; Ito, Shusaku; Kikuchi, Fumihito

    2014-09-01

    Phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor, mixed connective tissue type (PMTMCT) is a rare neoplasm that can cause tumor-induced osteomalacia due to overproduction of a phosphaturic hormone, fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23). We report here a case of subcutaneous PMTMCT, non-phosphaturic variant, in the sole. We also review 32 Japanese cases of PMTMCT reported in detail. They occurred in 16 men and 15 women (one was unknown), with ages ranging 20-73 years (median, 48). Tumors were found in soft tissue, bone and sinuses in 17, 11 and four, respectively. A history of long-standing osteomalacia was noted in all cases except two non-phosphaturic variant cases. Serum FGF23 level was elevated in 11 of 12 cases examined. In terms of follow-up information, metastases were found in four patients, and two patients died of disease. In conclusion, PMTMCT is histologically a benign lesion; however, there may be rare metastatic and malignant cases. Wider recognition of the histological features of this unique neoplasm would aid its distinction from the large number of mesenchymal tumors for which it may be mistaken and should enable correct diagnosis of tumors with osteomalacia. PMID:25182295

  13. Long palatal connective tissue rolled pedicle graft with demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft plus platelet-rich fibrin combination: A novel technique for ridge augmentation - Three case reports

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Pathakota Krishnajaneya; Bolla, Vijayalakshmi; Koppolu, Pradeep; Srujan, Peruka

    2015-01-01

    Replacement of missing maxillary anterior tooth with localized residual alveolar ridge defect is challenging, considering the high esthetic demand. Various soft and hard tissue procedures were proposed to correct alveolar ridge deformities. Novel techniques have evolved in treating these ridge defects to improve function and esthetics. In the present case reports, a novel technique using long palatal connective tissue rolled pedicle graft with demineralized freeze-dried bone allografts (DFDBAs) plus Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) combination was proposed to correct the Class III localized anterior maxillary anterior alveolar ridge defect. The present technique resulted in predictable ridge augmentation, which can be attributed to the soft and hard tissue augmentation with a connective tissue pedicle and DFDBA plus PRF combination. This technique suggests a variation in roll technique with DFDBA plus PRF and appears to promise in gaining predictable volume in the residual ridge defect and can be considered for the treatment of moderate to severe maxillary anterior ridge defects. PMID:26015679

  14. Heat-Killed Trypanosoma cruzi Induces Acute Cardiac Damage and Polyantigenic Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Bonney, Kevin M.; Taylor, Joann M.; Daniels, Melvin D.; Epting, Conrad L.; Engman, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Chagas heart disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is a potentially fatal cardiomyopathy often associated with cardiac autoimmunity. T. cruzi infection induces the development of autoimmunity to a number of antigens via molecular mimicry and other mechanisms, but the genesis and pathogenic potential of this autoimmune response has not been fully elucidated. To determine whether exposure to T. cruzi antigens alone in the absence of active infection is sufficient to induce autoimmunity, we immunized A/J mice with heat-killed T. cruzi (HKTC) emulsified in complete Freund's adjuvant, and compared the resulting immune response to that induced by infection with live T. cruzi. We found that HKTC immunization is capable of inducing acute cardiac damage, as evidenced by elevated serum cardiac troponin I, and that this damage is associated with the generation of polyantigenic humoral and cell-mediated autoimmunity with similar antigen specificity to that induced by infection with T. cruzi. However, while significant and preferential production of Th1 and Th17-associated cytokines, accompanied by myocarditis, develops in T. cruzi-infected mice, HKTC-immunized mice produce lower levels of these cytokines, do not develop Th1-skewed immunity, and lack tissue inflammation. These results demonstrate that exposure to parasite antigen alone is sufficient to induce autoimmunity and cardiac damage, yet additional immune factors, including a dominant Th1/Th17 immune response, are likely required to induce cardiac inflammation. PMID:21283741

  15. Anatabine ameliorates experimental autoimmune thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Caturegli, Patrizio; De Remigis, Alessandra; Ferlito, Marcella; Landek-Salgado, Melissa A; Iwama, Shintaro; Tzou, Shey-Cherng; Ladenson, Paul W

    2012-09-01

    Tobacco smoking favorably influences the course of Hashimoto thyroiditis, possibly through the antiinflammatory proprieties of nicotine. In this study we tested anatabine, another tobacco alkaloid, in a model of experimental autoimmune thyroiditis. Experimental autoimmune thyroiditis was induced by different doses of thyroglobulin, to produce a disease of low, moderate, or high severity, in 88 CBA/J female mice: 43 drank anatabine supplemented water and 45 regular water. Mice were bled after immunization and killed to assess thyroid histopathology, thyroglobulin antibodies, T(4), and thyroid RNA expression of 84 inflammatory genes. We also stimulated in vitro a macrophage cell line with interferon-? or lipopolysaccharide plus or minus anatabine to quantitate inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase 2 protein expression. Anatabine reduced the incidence and severity of thyroiditis in the moderate disease category: only 13 of 21 mice (62%) developed thyroid infiltrates when drinking anatabine as compared with 22 of 23 (96%) controls (relative risk 0.59, P = 0.0174). The median thyroiditis severity was 0.5 and 2.0 in anatabine and controls, respectively (P = 0.0007 by Wilcoxon rank sum test). Anatabine also reduced the antibody response to thyroglobulin on d 14 (P = 0.029) and d 21 (P = 0.045) after immunization and improved the recovery of thyroid function on d 21 (P = 0.049). In the thyroid transcriptome, anatabine restored expression of IL-18 and IL-1 receptor type 2 to preimmunization levels. Finally, anatabine suppressed in a dose-dependent manner macrophage production of inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase 2. Anatabine ameliorates disease in a model of autoimmune thyroiditis, making the delineation of its mechanisms of action and potential clinical utility worthwhile. PMID:22807490

  16. Angiotensin receptors, autoimmunity, and preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yang; Zhou, Cissy Chenyi; Ramin, Susan M; Kellems, Rodney E

    2007-09-15

    Preeclampsia is a pregnancy-induced hypertensive disorder that causes substantial maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Despite being a leading cause of maternal death and a major contributor to maternal and perinatal morbidity, the mechanisms responsible for the pathogenesis of preeclampsia are poorly understood. Recent studies indicate that women with preeclampsia have autoantibodies that activate the angiotensin receptor, AT1, and that autoantibody-mediated receptor activation contributes to pathophysiology associated with preeclampsia. The research reviewed here raises the intriguing possibility that preeclampsia may be a pregnancy-induced autoimmune disease. PMID:17785770

  17. The Immunogenetics of Autoimmune Cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Palak J; Hirschfield, Gideon M

    2016-02-01

    The immune-mediated hepatobiliary diseases, primary biliary cirrhosis and primary sclerosing cholangitis are relatively rare, albeit and account for a significant amount of liver transplant activity and liver-related mortality globally. Precise disease mechanisms are yet to be described although a contributory role of genetic predisposition is firmly established. In addition to links with the major histocompatibility complex, a number of associations outside this region harbor additional loci which underscore the fundamental role of breaks in immune tolerance and mucosal immunogenicity in the pathogenesis of autoimmune biliary disease. We provide an overview of these key discoveries before discussing putative avenues of therapeutic exploitation based on existing findings. PMID:26593288

  18. Immunomodulatory vaccines against autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Sela, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Vaccines are for healthy people, to prevent them from becoming ill. Such prophylactic vaccines have been a great success. Therapeutic vaccines become more and more important, especially as life expectancy increases. Efforts to develop vaccines against such diseases as cancer, AIDS, hepatitis, tuberculosis, Alzheimer disease, and mad cow disease have not yet reached the stage where they can be successfully used on a daily basis. However, significant progress has been made in the realm of autoimmune diseases, resulting (at least in one case) in an immunomodulatory vaccine against multiple sclerosis that was developed in the author's laboratory, and that is in daily use by about 100,000 patients. The drug or therapeutic vaccine against the exacerbating-remitting type of multiple sclerosis is a copolymer of four amino acid residues, denoted Copaxone, which are related to myelin basic protein. This paper discusses Copaxone as well as a candidate immunomodulatory vaccine against myasthenia gravis, a peptide derived from the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Copolymer 1 (Cop 1, glatiramer acetate, Copaxone) is a synthetic amino acid random copolymer that is immunologically cross-reactive with myelin basic protein and suppresses experimental allergic encephalomyelitis in several animal species. Cop 1 slows the progression of disability and reduces the relapse rate in exacerbating-remitting multiple sclerosis patients. Cop 1 is a potent inducer of T helper 2 (Th2) regulatory cells in mice and humans; and Th2 cells are found in both the brains and spinal cords of Cop 1-treated mice and humans. MG and experimental autoimmune MG are T cell-regulated, antibody-mediated autoimmune diseases. Two peptides, representing sequences of the human AChR-alpha-subunit, p195-212 and p259-271, are immunodominant T-cell epitopes in MG patients and two strains of mice. Altered peptide ligand, composed of the randomly arranged two single amino acid analogs inhibits in vitro and in vivo MG-associated autoimmune responses. The active suppression is mediated by the CD4+ CD25+ immunoregulatory cells and is associated with the downregulation of Th1-type cytokines and upregulation of the secretion of IL-10 and the immunosuppressive cytokine transforming growth factor beta. PMID:16608409

  19. Autoimmunity-mediated antitumor immunity: tumor as an immunoprivileged self.

    PubMed

    Miska, Jason; Bas, Esperanza; Devarajan, Priyadharshini; Chen, Zhibin

    2012-10-01

    The association of autoimmunity with antitumor immunity challenges a paradigm of selective surveillance against tumors. Aided with well-characterized models of robust autoimmunity, we show that self-antigen-specific effector T (Teff) cell clones could eradicate tumor cells. However, a tumor microenvironment reinforced by Treg cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) presented a barrier to the autoimmune effectors, more so in tumors than in healthy tissues. This barrier required optimal CTLA4 expression in Teff cells. In a spontaneous model of breast cancer, subtle reductions in CTLA4 expression impeded tumor onset and progression, providing the first direct evidence that CTLA4 inhibits spontaneous tumor development. In an adoptive therapy model of lymphoma, self-antigen-specific Teff cells were potentiated by even a modest reduction of CTLA4. A subtle reduction of CTLA4 did not curtail Treg-cell suppression. Thus, Teff cells had an exquisite sensitivity to physiological levels of CTLA4 variations. However, both Treg and Teff cells were impacted by anti-CTLA4 antibody blockade. Therefore, whether CTLA4 impacts through Treg cells or Teff cells depends on its expression level. Overall, the results suggest that the tumor microenvironment represents an "immunoprivileged self" that could be overcome practically and at least partially by RNAi silencing of CTLA4 in Teff cells. PMID:22777737

  20. Frequency of rheumatic diseases in patients with autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Soy, Mehmet; Guldiken, Sibel; Arikan, Ender; Altun, Betul Ugur; Tugrul, Armagan

    2007-04-01

    We aimed to investigate the frequency of rheumatic diseases in patients suffering from autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATD). Sixty-five patients (56 F, 9 M), who were followed by diagnosis of ATD, were questioned and examined for the presence of rheumatic disease. Basic laboratory tests and antithyroid antibodies, antinuclear antibody and rheumatoid factor (RF) levels were also measured by appropriate methods. Various rheumatic diseases were detected in 40 (62%) of patients with ATD. The most frequent rheumatic conditions were fibromyalgia, recurrent aphthous stomatitis, osteoarthritis, keratoconjunctivitis sicca and xerostomia and carpal tunnel syndrome which were detected in 20 (31%), 13 (20%), 10 (15%), 9 (14%) and 8 (12%) of patients, respectively. Autoimmune diseases, except Sjogren's syndrome, which were detected in ten patients with ATD, are as follows-vitiligo: two; autoimmune hepatitis: two; oral lichen planus: one, ulcerative colitis: one, inflammatory arthritis in four patients (two of them had rheumatoid arthritis, one had psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis and one had mixed collagen tissue disease). RF was positive in two patients, one of them had rheumatoid arthritis and FANA was positive in six (9%) patients; all of them had hypothyroidism. The frequency of rheumatic diseases seems to be higher in patients suffering from ATD. Initial evaluation and a regular checking for rheumatic diseases in patients suffering from ATD were recommended. PMID:17102943

  1. ADAM17 at the interface between inflammation and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Lisi, Sabrina; D'Amore, Massimo; Sisto, Margherita

    2014-11-01

    The discovery of the disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 (ADAM17), originally identified as tumor necrosis factor-a converting enzyme (TACE) for its ability as sheddase of TNF-? inspired scientists to attempt to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying ADAM17 implication in diseased conditions. In recent years, it has become evident that this protease can modify many non matrix substrates, such as cytokines (e.g. TNF-?), cytokine receptors (e.g. IL-6R and TNF-R), ligands of ErbB (e.g. TGF-? and amphiregulin) and adhesion proteins (e.g. Lselectin and ICAM-1). Several recent studies have described experimental model system to better understand the role of specific signaling molecules, the interplay of different signals and tissue interactions in regulating ADAM17-dependent cleavage of most relevant substrates in inflammatory diseases. The central question is whether ADAM17 can influence the outcome of inflammation and if so, how it performs this regulation in autoimmunity, since inflammatory autoimmune diseases are often characterized by deregulated metalloproteinase activities. This review will explore the latest research on the influence of ADAM17 on the progression of inflammatory processes linked to autoimmunity and its role as modulator of inflammation. PMID:25171914

  2. Inhibition of hyaluronan synthesis restores immune tolerance during autoimmune insulitis

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Nadine; Kaber, Gernot; Johnson, Pamela Y.; Gebe, John A.; Preisinger, Anton; Falk, Ben A.; Sunkari, Vivekananda G.; Gooden, Michel D.; Vernon, Robert B.; Bogdani, Marika; Kuipers, Hedwich F.; Day, Anthony J.; Campbell, Daniel J.; Wight, Thomas N.; Bollyky, Paul L.

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that abundant deposits of the extracellular matrix polysaccharide hyaluronan (HA) are characteristic of autoimmune insulitis in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D), but the relevance of these deposits to disease was unclear. Here, we have demonstrated that HA is critical for the pathogenesis of autoimmune diabetes. Using the DO11.10xRIPmOVA mouse model of T1D, we determined that HA deposits are temporally and anatomically associated with the development of insulitis. Moreover, treatment with an inhibitor of HA synthesis, 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU), halted progression to diabetes even after the onset of insulitis. Similar effects were seen in the NOD mouse model, and in these mice, 1 week of treatment was sufficient to prevent subsequent diabetes. 4-MU reduced HA accumulation, constrained effector T cells to nondestructive insulitis, and increased numbers of intraislet FOXP3+ Tregs. Consistent with the observed effects of 4-MU treatment, Treg differentiation was inhibited by HA and anti-CD44 antibodies and rescued by 4-MU in an ERK1/2-dependent manner. These data may explain how peripheral immune tolerance is impaired in tissues under autoimmune attack, including islets in T1D. We propose that 4-MU, already an approved drug used to treat biliary spasm, could be repurposed to prevent, and possibly treat, T1D in at-risk individuals. PMID:26368307

  3. Development of Spontaneous Autoimmune Peripheral Polyneuropathy in B7-2–Deficient Nod Mice

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, Benoît; Rhee, Lesley; Bour-Jordan, Helene; Hsin, Honor; Montag, Anthony; Soliven, Betty; Arcella, Jennifer; Girvin, Ann M.; Miller, Stephen D.; Bluestone, Jeffrey A.

    2001-01-01

    An increasing number of studies have documented the central role of T cell costimulation in autoimmunity. Here we show that the autoimmune diabetes-prone nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse strain, deficient in B7-2 costimulation, is protected from diabetes but develops a spontaneous autoimmune peripheral polyneuropathy. All the female and one third of the male mice exhibited limb paralysis with histologic and electrophysiologic evidence of severe demyelination in the peripheral nerves beginning at 20 wk of age. No central nervous system lesions were apparent. The peripheral nerve tissue was infiltrated with dendritic cells, CD4+, and CD8+ T cells. Finally, CD4+ T cells isolated from affected animals induced the disease in NOD.SCID mice. Thus, the B7-2–deficient NOD mouse constitutes the first model of a spontaneous autoimmune disease of the peripheral nervous system, which has many similarities to the human disease, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). This model demonstrates that NOD mice have “cryptic” autoimmune defects that can polarize toward the nervous tissue after the selective disruption of CD28/B7-2 costimulatory pathway. PMID:11535635

  4. Helicobacter pylori and skin autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Magen, Eli; Delgado, Jorge-Shmuel

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune skin diseases are characterized by dysregulation of the immune system resulting in a loss of tolerance to skin self-antigen(s). The prolonged interaction between the bacterium and host immune mechanisms makes Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) a plausible infectious agent for triggering autoimmunity. Epidemiological and experimental data now point to a strong relation of H. pylori infection on the development of many extragastric diseases, including several allergic and autoimmune diseases. H. pylori antigens activate cross-reactive T cells and induce autoantibodies production. Microbial heat shock proteins (HSP) play an important role of in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases because of the high level of sequence homology with human HSP. Eradication of H. pylori infection has been shown to be effective in some patients with chronic autoimmune urticaria, psoriasis, alopecia areata and Schoenlein-Henoch purpura. There is conflicting and controversial data regarding the association of H. pylori infection with Behçet’s disease, scleroderma and autoimmune bullous diseases. No data are available evaluating the association of H. pylori infection with other skin autoimmune diseases, such as vitiligo, cutaneous lupus erythematosus and dermatomyositis. The epidemiological and experimental evidence for a possible role of H. pylori infection in skin autoimmune diseases are the subject of this review. PMID:24587626

  5. Audiovestibular disorders as autoimmune reaction in patients with melanoma.

    PubMed

    Barozzi, S; Ginocchio, D; Socci, M; Alpini, D; Cesarani, A

    2015-09-01

    Melanoma is an aggressive form of cancer derived from neuroectodermal melanocytes. Melanocytes are present in the skin and hair follicles, as well as in the eye (iris and choroids), the leptomeninges, the anal canal and the inner ear. In the inner ear melanocytes are found both in the intermediate layer of the stria vascularis of the cochlea and in the dark cells of the vestibular organs. They are believed to play an important role in the production of endolymphatic potentials and in the maintenance of normal volumes of the inner ear fluids. Recently, audiovestibular dysfunctions have been demonstrated in patients treated with immunotherapy for metastatic melanoma and have been related to an autoimmune attack on the normal melanocytes of the inner ear. Melanoma is an immunogenic tumor type frequently associated with spontaneous autoimmune manifestations which seem to be associated with better prognosis. The melanoma-associated antigens are also expressed in normal melanocytes in the skin, eye and ear. We hypothesize that inner ear melanocytes could be a target of an autoimmune process in patients affected by melanoma. The immune system could produce antibodies that cross-react with both the melanoma cells and the labyrinth melanocytes causing an altered homeostasis of endolymphatic liquids and provoking some labyrinthic disorders such as vertigo, hearing loss, aural fullness and tinnitus resembling or influencing Ménière's disease. In this perspective, audiovestibular disorders could be interpreted as an attempt by the individual immune system to develop anti-tumor response. In patients affected by melanoma an autoimmune genesis has already been advocated for ocular symptoms in melanoma-associated retinopathy, where the cross-reaction happens against retinal cells. A possible role of inner ear melanocytes should be considered as a potential cause of audiovestibular disorders. Further research is needed to demonstrate a connection between melanoma and labyrinth dysfunctions such as in melanoma-associated retinopathy. PMID:26115944

  6. Expression of transcription factors Slug in the lens epithelial cells undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal transition induced by connective tissue growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying-Na; Qin, Li; Li, Jing-Ming; Chen, Li; Pei, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    AIM To investigate the expression of transcription factors Slug in human lens epithelial cells (HLECs) undergoing epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) induced by connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). METHODS HLECs were treated with CTGF of different concentrations (20, 50 and 100 ng/mL) or without CTGF (control) for 24h. The morphological changes of HLECs were analysed by microscopy. The expression and cellular localization of Slug was evaluated by immumo-fluorescence. Expressions of Slug, E-cadherin and alpha smooth muscle actin (?-SMA) were further determined by Western blot analysis. RESULTS HLECs showed spidle fibrolasts-like characteristics and loosely connected each other after CTGF treatment. The immuno-fluorescence staining indicated that Slug was localized in the nuclei and its expression was induced by CTGF. The relative expressions of Slug protein were 1.64±0.11, 1.96 ±0.03, 3.12 ±0.10, and 4.08±0.14, respectively, in response to control group and treatment with CTGF of 20, 50 and 100 ng/mL (F=443.86, P<0.01). The increased Slug protein levels were correlated well with up-expression of ?-SMA (0.78±0.05, 0.85±0.06, 2.17±0.15, 2.86±0.10; F=449.85, P<0.01) and down-expression of E-cadherin (2.50±0.11, 1.79±0.26, 1.05±0.14, 0.63±0.08; F=101.55, P<0.01). CONCLUSION Transcription factor Slug may be involved in EMT of HLECs induced by CTGF in vitro. PMID:26558194

  7. Endothelin-1 induces connective tissue growth factor expression in human lung fibroblasts by ETAR-dependent JNK/AP-1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Weng, Chih-Ming; Yu, Chung-Chi; Kuo, Min-Liang; Chen, Bing-Chang; Lin, Chien-Huang

    2014-04-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) acts as a key mediator of vasoconstriction and tissue repair. Overproduction of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) underlies the development of lung fibrosis. ET-1 induces expression of matrix-associated genes in lung fibroblasts, however, little is known about the signaling pathway of CTGF expression caused by ET-1. In this study, we found that ET-1 caused concentration- and time-dependently increases in CTGF expression in human embryonic lung fibroblast cell line (WI-38). ET-1-induced CTGF expression was inhibited by BQ123 (ETAR antagonist), but not BQ788 (ETBR antagonist). Moreover, ET-1-induced CTGF expression was significantly reduced by JNK inhibitor (SP600125), the dominant-negative mutants of JNK1/2 (JNK1/2 DN), and AP-1 inhibitor (curcumin). ET-1 induced phosphorylations of JNK and c-Jun in time-dependent manners. AP-1 luciferase activity was concentration-dependently increased by ET-1, and this effect was attenuated by SP600125. We also found that ET-1-induced CTGF expression was most controlled by the AP-1 binding region of CTGF promoter. ET-1-indiced CTGF luciferase activity was predominately controlled by the sequence -747 to -408 bp upstream of the transcription start site on the human CTGF promoter. Furthermore, ET-1 caused the formation of AP-1-specific DNA-protein complex and the recruitment of c-Jun to the CTGF promoter. Moreover, we found that ET-1 induced ?-smooth muscle actin (?-SMA) expression, which was inhibited by BQ123, SP600125, curcumin, and anti-CTGF antibody. These results suggest that ET-1 stimulates expressions of CTGF and ?-SMA through ETAR/JNK/AP-1 signaling pathway, and CTGF is required for ET-1-induced ?-SMA expression in human lung fibroblasts. PMID:24486572

  8. Root coverage using subepithelial connective tissue graft with platelet-rich plasma in the treatment of gingival recession: A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Srinivas, B. V. V.; Rupa, N.; Halini Kumari, K. V.; Prasad, S. S. V.; Varalakshmi, U.; Sudhakar, K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The presence of gingival recession associated with an insufficient amount of keratinized tissue may indicate gingival augmentation procedure. It is a multifaceted problem for which several treatment options are available. The most predictable technique used for gingival augmentation is the subepithelial connective tissue graft (SCTG). Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an enhanced source of growth factors and helps in accelerated periodontal repair and regeneration. Aims: The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of SCTG along with PRP in the treatment of Miller's class I and II gingival recessions. Materials and Methods: Eleven subjects with Miller's class I and II gingival recessions were treated using SCTG with PRP. Clinical variables, including plaque index, gingival index, recession depth (RD), Recession width (RW), width of the keratinized gingiva, probing pocket depth (PD) and clinical attachment level (CAL) were recorded. Patients were recalled at baseline, 3 months, 6 months and 1-year after surgery and clinical recordings were taken. Root coverage percentage (%) was measured at the end of 1-year. Results: The clinical parameters were analyzed during the follow-up period by repeated measures ANOVA test. Twelve months follow-up results showed significant improvements in all the clinical parameters. Reduction of recession resulted in a significant decrease in CAL, PD, RW and RD at the end of 12 months. A statistically significant gain in width of keratinized gingiva and a mean root coverage of 84.72 ± 19.10 was obtained at the end of 12 months. Conclusion: From the results of this study, it may be concluded that SCTG with PRP is an effective and predictable method to treat miller's class I and II gingival recession. PMID:26538912

  9. Infection of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis induces development of mucosal-type but not connective tissue-type mast cells in genetically mast cell-deficient Ws/Ws rats.

    PubMed

    Arizono, N; Kasugai, T; Yamada, M; Okada, M; Morimoto, M; Tei, H; Newlands, G F; Miller, H R; Kitamura, Y

    1993-05-15

    Ws/Ws rats have a small deletion at the tyrosine kinase domain of the c-kit gene and are deficient in both mucosal mast cells (MMC) and connective tissue-type mast cells (CTMC). The role of the c-kit receptor in the development of MMC and CTMC was investigated by infecting Ws/Ws and control +/+ rats with Nippostrongylus brasiliensis (NB), which induces T-cell-dependent mast cell proliferation. Although mast cells did not develop in the skin of Ws/Ws rats, a