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Sample records for autoimmune connective tissue

  1. Autoimmune connective tissue diseases.

    PubMed

    Østensen, Monika; Cetin, Irene

    2015-07-01

    Rheumatic diseases (RDs) occur preferentially in women, often during the childbearing age. The interaction of pregnancy and the RD is varied, ranging from spontaneous improvement to aggravation of disease symptoms or life-threatening flares. Risks for the mother with RD and the child differ in regard to the presence of organ manifestations, organ damage, disease activity, presence of specific autoantibodies, and therapy. Pregnancy complications comprise hypertension, preeclampsia, premature delivery, and side effects of therapy. Adverse pregnancy outcomes include recurrent miscarriage, intrauterine growth restriction, and fetal demise, and they are frequently encountered in RD with organ manifestations and harmful autoantibodies. Because of the difference in the prevalence of RDs, knowledge on the gestational course of disease and pregnancy outcome is limited to the fairly common RDs such as rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and antiphospholipid syndrome. Pregnancies in RD are connected with increased risks for mother and child and need interdisciplinary care and management. PMID:25891380

  2. Renal involvement in autoimmune connective tissue diseases

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Connective tissue diseases (CTDs) are a heterogeneous group of disorders that share certain clinical presentations and a disturbed immunoregulation, leading to autoantibody production. Subclinical or overt renal manifestations are frequently observed and complicate the clinical course of CTDs. Alterations of kidney function in Sjögren syndrome, systemic scleroderma (SSc), auto-immune myopathies (dermatomyositis and polymyositis), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), antiphospholipid syndrome nephropathy (APSN) as well as rheumatoid arthritis (RA) are frequently present and physicians should be aware of that. In SLE, renal prognosis significantly improved based on specific classification and treatment strategies adjusted to kidney biopsy findings. Patients with scleroderma renal crisis (SRC), which is usually characterized by severe hypertension, progressive decline of renal function and thrombotic microangiopathy, show a significant benefit of early angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitor use in particular and strict blood pressure control in general. Treatment of the underlying autoimmune disorder or discontinuation of specific therapeutic agents improves kidney function in most patients with Sjögren syndrome, auto-immune myopathies, APSN and RA. In this review we focus on impairment of renal function in relation to underlying disease or adverse drug effects and implications on treatment decisions. PMID:23557013

  3. Neutrophilic Skin Lesions in Autoimmune Connective Tissue Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hau, Estelle; Vignon Pennamen, Marie-Dominique; Battistella, Maxime; Saussine, Anne; Bergis, Maud; Cavelier-Balloy, Benedicte; Janier, Michel; Cordoliani, Florence; Bagot, Martine; Rybojad, Michel; Bouaziz, Jean-David

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The pathophysiology of neutrophilic dermatoses (NDs) and autoimmune connective tissue diseases (AICTDs) is incompletely understood. The association between NDs and AICTDs is rare; recently, however, a distinctive subset of cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE, the prototypical AICTD) with neutrophilic histological features has been proposed to be included in the spectrum of lupus. The aim of our study was to test the validity of such a classification. We conducted a monocentric retrospective study of 7028 AICTDs patients. Among these 7028 patients, a skin biopsy was performed in 932 cases with mainly neutrophilic infiltrate on histology in 9 cases. Combining our 9 cases and an exhaustive literature review, pyoderma gangrenosum, Sweet syndrome (n?=?49), Sweet-like ND (n?=?13), neutrophilic urticarial dermatosis (n?=?6), palisaded neutrophilic granulomatous dermatitis (n?=?12), and histiocytoid neutrophilic dermatitis (n?=?2) were likely to occur both in AICTDs and autoinflammatory diseases. Other NDs were specifically encountered in AICTDs: bullous LE (n?=?71), amicrobial pustulosis of the folds (n?=?28), autoimmunity-related ND (n?=?24), ND resembling erythema gyratum repens (n?=?1), and neutrophilic annular erythema (n?=?1). The improvement of AICTDS neutrophilic lesions under neutrophil targeting therapy suggests possible common physiopathological pathways between NDs and AICTDs. PMID:25546688

  4. Hair disorders associated with autoimmune connective tissue diseases.

    PubMed

    Cassano, N; Amerio, P; D'Ovidio, R; Vena, G A

    2014-10-01

    Hair disorders are frequently observed in various systemic diseases, including autoimmune connective tissue diseases (CTDs), with predilection of lupus erythematosus (LE), followed by dermatomyositis (DM) and scleroderma. Hair disorders in CTDs may manifest as various clinical patterns, such as telogen hair loss, diffuse thinning or fragility of hair, and scarring alopecia. Less common hair disorders include anagen effluvium, alopecia areata, and trichomegaly. Some drugs used to treat CTDs may cause hair loss in a drug-related manner or hyperthrichosis. In the assessment of common hair loss patterns, such as telogen effluvium, the possible association with CTDs must be borne in mind and should not be overlooked. Alopecia appears to be a significant sign in the course of LE and especially systemic LE. In DM, the involvement of the scalp is common, and is often characterized by a diffuse, violaceous, scaly, non-scarring and symptomatic hair loss. Linear scleroderma en coup de sabre is an uncommon localized form of morphea with involvement of the paramedian forehead and frontal scalp, where it is associated with cicatricial alopecia. The most important variant of scarring alopecia in the context of CTDs is that associated with discoid lupus erythematosus (DLE). In the diagnostic work-up of DLE-related cicatrical alopecia, histopathological and immunopathological studies are useful, and a relevant role has been attributed to dermatoscopy (trichoscopy) over the last years. Hair loss has been reported in several other CTDs, including mixed and undifferentiated CTDs, and primary Sjögren's syndrome, although it is likely to be underestimated in such diseases. PMID:24975949

  5. 351 Prevalence of Thyroid Peroxidase Autoantibodies (ANTI-TPO) in Women with Autoimmune Connective Tissue Diseases (ACTD)

    PubMed Central

    Papadopoulos, Georgios; Vakaloudi, Anastasia; Koutsika, Eirene; Anastasiou, Ekarerini; Koteli, Asimoula

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic autoimmune thyroiditis, manifested by positive test for antithyroid antibodies, is common in the general population, occurring in 10 to 20 percent of women. The aim of the study was to determine whether Anti-TPO is more prevalent in women with ACTD, compared to the general population. Methods Anti-TPO was determined in 290 women diagnosed with ACTD based on ACR (American College of Rheumatology) criteria and in 50 healthy women (control group). Among ACTD patients, 121 were diagnosed with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA), 44 Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), 43 Sjοgren's Syndrome (SS), 42 Systemic Scleroderma (SScl) and 40 Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA). Anti-TPO was measured by Chemiluminescent Microparticle Immunoassay (CMIA) on Architect i2000SR (ABBOT Laboratories). Results The prevalence of Anti-TPO in separate groups of patients had as follow: RA 28.93%, SLE 29.55%, SS 27.91%, SScl 23.81%, PsA 30% and control group 12%. Conclusions ACTD and thyroid autoimmune diseases often overlap with each other. Increased Anti-TPO may be most common among women patients with ACTD. On the other hand, these systemic diseases are often present in Hasimoto's thyroiditis subjects. Therefore it is clinically important to screen women patients with ACTD for the co-existence of thyroid disorders.

  6. Connective Tissue Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    Connective tissue is the material inside your body that supports many of its parts. It is the "cellular ... their work. Cartilage and fat are examples of connective tissue. There are over 200 disorders that impact connective ...

  7. Introduction: mechanisms of tissue injury in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Eilat, Dan

    2014-09-01

    This issue of Seminars in Immunopathology is devoted to the most recent developments in our understanding of the mechanisms leading to tissue injury in autoimmune diseases. These include rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, type I diabetes, autoimmune liver diseases, inflammatory bowel diseases, autoimmune skin diseases, autoimmune uveitis, and autoinflammatory diseases. This impressive account of basic and clinical research in a wide spectrum of immunological disorders provides the reader with a comprehensive view of the common and unique features of these diverse conditions. It may also provide one with many new ideas for therapeutic intervention in the natural course of these autoimmune syndromes. PMID:25168400

  8. Connective Tissue Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    Dabiri, Ganary; Falanga, Vincent

    2013-01-01

    Connective tissue disorders (CTD), which are often also termed collagen vascular diseases, include a number of related inflammatory conditions. Some of these diseases include rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), localized scleroderma (morphea variants localized to the skin), Sjogren’s syndrome, dermatomyositis, polymyositis, and mixed connective tissue disease. In addition to the systemic manifestations of these diseases, there are a number of cutaneous features that make these conditions recognizable on physical exam. Lower extremity ulcers and digital ulcers are an infrequent but disabling complication of long-standing connective tissue disease. The exact frequency with which these ulcers occur is not known, and the cause of the ulcerations is often multifactorial. Moreover, a challenging component of CTD ulcerations is that there are still no established guidelines for their diagnosis and treatment. The morbidity associated with these ulcerations and their underlying conditions is very substantial. Indeed, these less common but intractable ulcers represent a major medical and economic problem for patients, physicians and nurses, and even well organized multidisciplinary wound healing centers. PMID:23756459

  9. [Connective tissue diseases in adolescents].

    PubMed

    Peitz, J; Tantcheva-Poór, I

    2016-04-01

    In this article we provide a brief review of systemic lupus erythematosus, juvenile dermatomyositis, systemic scleroderma, and mixed connective tissue disease in adolescents. As skin manifestations often belong to the presenting symptoms and may have a significant impact on the quality of life, dermatologists play an important role in the management of patients with connective tissue diseases. Early diagnosis and therapy onset are crucial for the patients' long-term outcome. PMID:27000182

  10. Imaging of connective tissue diseases of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Abdel Razek, Ahmed Abdel Khalek

    2016-06-01

    We review the imaging appearance of connective tissue diseases of the head and neck. Bilateral sialadenitis and dacryoadenitis are seen in Sjögren's syndrome; ankylosis of the temporo-mandibular joint with sclerosis of the crico-arytenoid joint are reported in rheumatoid arthritis and lupus panniculitis with atypical infection are reported in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Relapsing polychondritis shows subglottic stenosis, prominent ear and saddle nose; progressive systemic sclerosis shows osteolysis of the mandible, fibrosis of the masseter muscle with calcinosis of the subcutaneous tissue and dermatomyositis/polymyositis shows condylar erosions and autoimmune thyroiditis. Vascular thrombosis is reported in antiphospholipid antibodies syndrome; cervical lymphadenopathy is seen in adult-onset Still's disease, and neuropathy with thyroiditis reported in mixed connective tissue disorder. Imaging is important to detect associated malignancy with connective tissue disorders. Correlation of the imaging findings with demographic data and clinical findings are important for the diagnosis of connective tissue disorders. PMID:26988082

  11. Pediatric Mixed Connective Tissue Disease.

    PubMed

    Berard, Roberta A; Laxer, Ronald M

    2016-05-01

    Pediatric-onset mixed connective tissue disease is among the rare disease entities in pediatric rheumatology and includes features of arthritis, polymyositis/dermatomyositis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and systemic sclerosis. Accurate recognition and diagnosis of the disease is paramount to prevent long-term morbidity. Advances in the genetic and immunologic understanding of the factors involved in the etiopathogenesis provide an opportunity for improvements in prognostication and targeted therapy. The development of a multinational cohort of patients with mixed connective tissue disease would be invaluable to provide more updated data regarding the clinical presentation, to develop a standardized treatment approach, disease activity and outcome tools, and to provide data on long-term outcomes and comorbidities. PMID:27032791

  12. Ocular involvement in cutaneous connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Frank A; Huang, John

    2016-01-01

    Connective tissue disorders commonly involve multiple organ systems including the skin and eye. The pathogenesis of many of these disorders affects the microvasculature in these organs. Redness, dryness, pain, and vision loss might be signs of ocular disease in a patient with connective tissue disease. Ocular involvement can potentially lead to blindness and indicate systemic involvement. Dermatologists should be aware of potential ocular involvement in cutaneous connective tissue disorders, and their recognition should prompt ophthalmologic evaluation. PMID:26903181

  13. Rheumatic fever, autoimmunity, and molecular mimicry: the streptococcal connection.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Madeleine W

    2014-01-01

    The group A streptococcus, Streptococcus pyogenes, and its link to autoimmune sequelae, has acquired a new level of understanding. Studies support the hypothesis that molecular mimicry between the group A streptococcus and heart or brain are important in directing immune responses in rheumatic fever. Rheumatic carditis, Sydenham chorea and a new group of behavioral disorders called pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections are reviewed with consideration of autoantibody and T cell responses and the role of molecular mimicry between the heart, brain and group A streptococcus as well as how immune responses contribute to pathogenic mechanisms in disease. In rheumatic carditis, studies have investigated human monoclonal autoantibodies and T cell clones for their crossreactivity and their mechanisms leading to valve damage in rheumatic heart disease. Although studies of human and animal sera from group A streptococcal diseases or immunization models have been crucial in providing clues to molecular mimicry and its role in the pathogenesis of rheumatic fever, study of human monoclonal autoantibodies have provided important insights into how antibodies against the valve may activate the valve endothelium and lead to T cell infiltration. Passive transfer of anti-streptococcal T cell lines in a rat model of rheumatic carditis illustrates effects of CD4+ T cells on the valve. Although Sydenham chorea has been known as the neurological manifestation of rheumatic fever for decades, the combination of autoimmunity and behavior is a relatively new concept linking brain, behavior and neuropsychiatric disorders with streptococcal infections. In Sydenham chorea, human mAbs and their expression in transgenic mice have linked autoimmunity to central dopamine pathways as well as dopamine receptors and dopaminergic neurons in basal ganglia. Taken together, the studies reviewed provide a basis for understanding streptococcal sequelae and how immune responses against group A streptococci influence autoimmunity and inflammatory responses in the heart and brain. PMID:24892819

  14. Cellular control of connective tissue matrix tension.

    PubMed

    Langevin, Helene M; Nedergaard, Maiken; Howe, Alan K

    2013-08-01

    The biomechanical behavior of connective tissue in response to stretching is generally attributed to the molecular composition and organization of its extracellular matrix. It also is becoming apparent that fibroblasts play an active role in regulating connective tissue tension. In response to static stretching of the tissue, fibroblasts expand within minutes by actively remodeling their cytoskeleton. This dynamic change in fibroblast shape contributes to the drop in tissue tension that occurs during viscoelastic relaxation. We propose that this response of fibroblasts plays a role in regulating extracellular fluid flow into the tissue, and protects against swelling when the matrix is stretched. This article reviews the evidence supporting possible mechanisms underlying this response including autocrine purinergic signaling. We also discuss fibroblast regulation of connective tissue tension with respect to lymphatic flow, immune function, and cancer. PMID:23444198

  15. The connective tissue platform technique for soft tissue augmentation.

    PubMed

    Zucchelli, Giovanni; Mazzotti, Claudio; Bentivogli, Valentina; Mounssif, Ilham; Marzadori, Matteo; Monaco, Carlo

    2012-12-01

    The presence of a localized alveolar ridge defect, especially in the maxillary anterior dentition, may complicate an esthetic rehabilitation. The goal of this case report is to describe a novel subepithelial connective tissue graft technique for soft tissue augmentation in Class III ridge defects. Surgical intervention consisted of in situ maintenance of a connective tissue "platform" at the edentulous space, which facilitated the stabilization and suturing of the connective tissue grafts used for soft tissue augmentation. Adequate graft thickness to treat the deep horizontal soft tissue loss was obtained by doubling the width of a de-epithelialized free gingival graft that was subsequently folded on itself. The soft tissue conditioning at the level of the pontic began 9 months after surgery by shaping the soft tissue with a bur and filling the space with flowable composite resin applied above the pontic. The final prosthetic phase began 14 months after surgery. A reproduction of the anatomical cementoenamel junction in the provisional and definitive restorations was performed to improve the soft tissue emergence profile. Nine months after surgery, a soft tissue augmentation of 5 mm in the vertical and 4 mm in the horizontal dimension was accomplished. The suggested surgical technique was able to accomplish horizontal and vertical soft tissue augmentation in a single surgical step. PMID:23057056

  16. Autoimmunity in connection with a metal implant: a case of autoimmune/autoinflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Loyo, Esthela; Jara, Luis J; López, Persio David; Puig, Ana Carolina

    2013-04-01

    Autoimmune/autoinflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA) has been recently proposed by Shoenfeld and Agmon-Levin as a new entity that comprises several conditions: the macrophagic-myofasciitis syndrome, the Gulf War syndrome, silicosis and post-vaccination phenomena, autoimmunity related to infectious fragments, hormones, aluminum, silicone, squalene oil, and pristane. We report the case of a 23-year-old woman who developed serial episodes of high fever, extreme fatigue, transient thrombocytopenia, multiple cervical adenopathies, hepatosplenomegaly, anemia, neutropenia, severe proteinuria and urine sediment abnormalities, elevated serum ferritin levels, and transient low positive antinuclear antibodies 1 year after she had a nickel-titanium chin implant for cosmetic reasons. The clinical picture simulated a variety of probable diseases: systemic lupus erythematosus, Kikuchi-Fujimoto syndrome, adult onset Still's disease, antiphospholipid syndrome, and hemophagocytic syndrome, among others, so she underwent an extensive medical investigation including two lymph node biopsies. She received treatment accordingly with steroids, methotrexate, and mofetil mycophenolate, with initial improvement of her symptoms, which recurred every time the dose was reduced. Two and a half years later the patient decided to retire the chin implant and afterwards all her systemic symptoms have disappeared. She remains in good health, without recurrence of any symptom and off medications until today. Albeit this patient fulfills proposed major ASIA criteria, to our knowledge it would be the first description of systemic features of autoinflammation in connection with a metal implant. PMID:26000140

  17. Evidence of connective tissue involvement in acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Langevin, Helene M; Churchill, David L; Wu, Junru; Badger, Gary J; Yandow, Jason A; Fox, James R; Krag, Martin H

    2002-06-01

    Acupuncture needle manipulation gives rise to "needle grasp," a biomechanical phenomenon characterized by an increase in the force necessary to pull the needle out of the tissue (pullout force). This study investigates the hypothesis that winding of connective tissue, rather than muscle contraction, is the mechanism responsible for needle grasp. We performed 1) measurements of pullout force in humans with and without needle penetration of muscle; 2) measurements of pullout force in anesthetized rats, with and without needle rotation, followed by measurements of connective tissue volume surrounding the needle; 3) imaging of rat abdominal wall explants, with and without needle rotation, using ultrasound scanning acoustic microscopy. We found 1) no evidence that increased penetration of muscle results in greater pullout force than increased penetration of subcutaneous tissue; 2) that both pullout force and subcutaneous tissue volume were increased by needle rotation; 3) that increased periodic architectural order was present in subcutaneous tissue with rotation, compared with no rotation. These data support connective tissue winding as the mechanism responsible for the increase in pullout force induced by needle rotation. Winding may allow needle movements to deliver a mechanical signal into the tissue and may be key to acupuncture's therapeutic mechanism. PMID:11967233

  18. Cutaneous Connective Tissue Diseases: Epidemiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Bobby Y.; Hantash, Basil M.

    2010-01-01

    Connective tissue diseases (CTDs) are a group of clinical disorders that have an underlying autoimmune pathogenesis. These include a diverse set of diseases such as relapsing polychondritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and eosinophilic fasciitis, along with more common entities like Sjogrens syndrome, dermatomyositis, scleroderma, and lupus erythematosus. The latter three will be the focus of this review, as they constitute the most significant and common CTD with cutaneous manifestations. The cutaneous signs often represent the preliminary stages of disease and the presenting clinical symptoms. Therefore, comprehensive knowledge of CTD manifestations is essential for accurate diagnosis, better assessment of prognosis, and effective management. Although the precise etiologies of CTDs remain obscure, recent advances have allowed for further understanding of their pathogenesis and improved disease classifications. In addition, there have been developments in therapeutic options for CTDs. This review provides an overview of the epidemiology, clinical presentations, and current treatment options of cutaneous lupus erythematous, dermatomyositis and scleroderma. PMID:21218179

  19. Microgravity Stress: Bone and Connective Tissue.

    PubMed

    Bloomfield, Susan A; Martinez, Daniel A; Boudreaux, Ramon D; Mantri, Anita V

    2016-01-01

    The major alterations in bone and the dense connective tissues in humans and animals exposed to microgravity illustrate the dependency of these tissues' function on normal gravitational loading. Whether these alterations depend solely on the reduced mechanical loading of zero g or are compounded by fluid shifts, altered tissue blood flow, radiation exposure, and altered nutritional status is not yet well defined. Changes in the dense connective tissues and intervertebral disks are generally smaller in magnitude but occur more rapidly than those in mineralized bone with transitions to 0 g and during recovery once back to the loading provided by 1 g conditions. However, joint injuries are projected to occur much more often than the more catastrophic bone fracture during exploration class missions, so protecting the integrity of both tissues is important. This review focuses on the research performed over the last 20 years in humans and animals exposed to actual spaceflight, as well as on knowledge gained from pertinent ground-based models such as bed rest in humans and hindlimb unloading in rodents. Significant progress has been made in our understanding of the mechanisms for alterations in bone and connective tissues with exposure to microgravity, but intriguing questions remain to be solved, particularly with reference to biomedical risks associated with prolonged exploration missions. © 2016 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 6:645-686, 2016. PMID:27065165

  20. Stretching Impacts Inflammation Resolution in Connective Tissue.

    PubMed

    Berrueta, Lisbeth; Muskaj, Igla; Olenich, Sara; Butler, Taylor; Badger, Gary J; Colas, Romain A; Spite, Matthew; Serhan, Charles N; Langevin, Helene M

    2016-07-01

    Acute inflammation is accompanied from its outset by the release of specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPMs), including resolvins, that orchestrate the resolution of local inflammation. We showed earlier that, in rats with subcutaneous inflammation of the back induced by carrageenan, stretching for 10 min twice daily reduced inflammation and improved pain, 2 weeks after carrageenan injection. In this study, we hypothesized that stretching of connective tissue activates local pro-resolving mechanisms within the tissue in the acute phase of inflammation. In rats injected with carrageenan and randomized to stretch versus no stretch for 48 h, stretching reduced inflammatory lesion thickness and neutrophil count, and increased resolvin (RvD1) concentrations within lesions. Furthermore, subcutaneous resolvin injection mimicked the effect of stretching. In ex vivo experiments, stretching of connective tissue reduced the migration of neutrophils and increased tissue RvD1 concentration. These results demonstrate a direct mechanical impact of stretching on inflammation-regulation mechanisms within connective tissue. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1621-1627, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26588184

  1. Performance of antinuclear antibody connective tissue disease screen.

    PubMed

    López-Hoyos, Marcos; Rodríguez-Valverde, Vicente; Martinez-Taboada, Victor

    2007-08-01

    Antinuclear antibodies (ANAs) have become routine laboratory parameters in clinical hospitals. However, ANA testing by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) assays is not an automated laboratory test. Efforts are being made to develop easy and semi- or automated methods to screen for ANAs. We evaluated the clinical performance of a new ELISA developed to screen for connective tissue disease related ANAs. The presence of serum ANA was studied with a commercial ELISA (Varelisa ANA CTD Screen) in 472 patients (202 SLE, 41 Sjögren syndrome, 11 CREST, 59 rheumatoid arthritis, 30 seronegative spondyloarthropaties, 77 inflammatory bowel disease, 13 reactive arthritis, 11 giant cell arteritis, 28 ankylosing spondilitis). A hundred and five sera from healthy subjects were used as controls. Receiver operator characteristics (ROC) analysis was carried out in order to optimize the cutoff. At target specificities of 80/90%, sensitivities of 80.8/ 73.9% were achieved. At the manufacturer's cutoff (ratio >or=1.0) sensitivity/specificity of 71.4/91.2% was found. At that cutoff, a positive likelihood ratio of 8.11 was found. For helping in the diagnosis of connective tissue diseases a test employing a subset of the most prevalent specificities reveals a good compromise as indicated by a high-positive likelihood ratio. However, the presence of ANAs in pathologies other than connective tissue diseases, such as SLE or Sjögren syndrome, may be of clinical significance as well. In these cases an IIF assay test is still mandatory, especially in autoimmune laboratories. PMID:17785321

  2. Inducing tissue specific tolerance in autoimmune disease with tolerogenic dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Suwandi, Jessica S; Toes, René E M; Nikolic, Tatjana; Roep, Bart O

    2015-01-01

    Current immunosuppressive therapy acts systemically, causing collateral damage and does not necessarily cope with the cause of rheumatoid arthritis. Tissue specific immune modulation may restore tolerance in patients with autoimmune diseases such as RA, but desires knowledge on relevant target autoantigens. We present the case of type 1 diabetes as prototype autoimmune disease with established autoantigens to set the stage for tissue-specific immune modulation using tolerogenic dendritic cells pulsed with autoantigen in RA. This approach induces autoantigen-specific regulatory T cells that exert their tissue-specific action through a combination of linked suppression and infectious tolerance, introducing a legacy of targeted, localised immune regulation in the proximity of the lesion. Several trials are in progress in RA employing various types of tolerogenic DCs. With knowledge on mode of action and confounding effects of concomitant immunosuppressive therapy, this strategy may provide novel immune intervention that may also prevent RA in high-risk subjects. PMID:26458178

  3. Some connective tissue disorders of the lung.

    PubMed Central

    Turner-Warwick, M.

    1988-01-01

    Many connective tissue disorders involve the lungs. The same clinical syndrome may be associated with several distinctive types of pathology in different patients. Fibrosing alveolitis is a common feature of a number of different syndromes. An hypothesis is set out in schematic form which may help to account for some of these differences and emphasizes the potential importance of the pulmonary vasculature in pathogenesis. Images Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 8 Figure 9 PMID:3074281

  4. Latest advances in connective tissue disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Vijay

    2013-01-01

    The connective tissue disorders comprise a number of related conditions that include systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and the antiphospholipid (Hughes) syndrome, scleroderma, myositis and Sjögren’s syndrome. They are characterized by autoantibody production and other immune-mediated dysfunction. There are common clinical and serological features with some patients having multiple overlapping connective tissue disorders. The latest advances include new approaches to therapy, including more focused utilization of existing therapies and the introduction of biological therapies in SLE, more precise protocols for assessment of severe disease manifestations such as in interstitial lung disease and pulmonary artery hypertension in scleroderma, new antibodies for disease characterization in myositis and new approaches to patient assessment in Sjögren’s syndrome. B cells have a critical role in most, if not all of these disorders such that B-cell depletion or suppression of B-cell activating cytokines improves disease in many patients. In particular, the introduction of rituximab, a monoclonal antibody targeting the CD20 molecule on B cells, into clinical practice for rheumatoid arthritis and B-cell lymphoma has been a key driver of experimental approaches to therapy in connective tissue disorders. Genetic studies also suggest a role for the innate immune system in disease pathogenesis, suggesting further future targets for biological therapies over the next few years. PMID:23904866

  5. Identifying heritable connective tissue disorders in childhood.

    PubMed

    Armon, Kate; Bale, Peter

    2012-06-01

    Heritable connective tissue diseases are rare. Each disorder estimated at 1-10 per 100,000. However, as a group they are prevalent enough to constitute an important diagnostic challenge. Connective tissue disorders most significantly affect three systems: musculoskeletal, ocular and cardiovascular. The cardinal feature of the majority of these disorders is ligamentous laxity, or joint hypermobility. The joints show an increased range of movement, and the child may present with arthralgias, effusions and an increased risk of joint or soft tissue injury. Marfan syndrome is the most common heritable connective tissue disorder. It is an autosomal dominant condition with high penetrance but with striking pleiomorphism. In 25% of individuals there is no family history. The diagnosis is often not made until late childhood. Individuals are tall with a low upper: lower segment ratio and an arm span greater than height. Other skeletal characteristics include pectus deformity and scoliosis. Myopia and astigmatism are common. Cardiac abnormalities include mitral valve prolapse, mitral regurgitation and arrhythmias. Early diagnosis, meticulous echocardiographic follow-up and multidisciplinary assessment are essential. The Ehlers-Danlos syndromes share a triad of features: skin hyperextensibility, articular hypermobility, and tissue fragility. The abnormalities are caused by genetic defects resulting in the faulty synthesis or structure of collagen. There is a wide variety of phenotypes and mode of inheritance. Symptom management and joint protection are important to improve quality of life and prevent secondary complications. Osteogenesis imperfecta encompasses a group of rare heritable disorders associated with low bone mass and increased susceptibility to fractures. Increased bone fractures after minimal trauma is the cardinal feature. Other features include blue sclera, hearing loss, scoliosis, deafness, and hypermobility. PMID:22916581

  6. Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias with connective tissue diseases features: A review.

    PubMed

    Cottin, Vincent

    2016-02-01

    A systematic approach is recommended to search for clinical and biological features of connective tissue disease (CTD) in any patient with interstitial lung disease (ILD). In the diagnostic approach to ILD, a diagnosis of CTD should be considered particularly in women and subjects younger than 50 years, and in those with an imaging and/or pathological pattern of non-specific interstitial pneumonia. However, the diagnosis of CTD may be difficult when ILD is the presenting or the dominant manifestation of CTD. A proportion of patients with ILD present symptoms that belong to the spectrum of CTD and/or biological autoimmune features, but do not fulfil diagnostic criteria for a given CTD. Some imaging and histopathological patterns may also suggest the presence of an underlying CTD. Although studies published to date used heterogeneous definitions and terminology for this condition, evidence is accumulating that even limited CTD features are relevant regarding symptoms, imaging features, pathological pattern and possibly evolution to overt CTD, whereas the impact on prognosis needs confirmation. Conversely, autoantibodies alone do not seem to impact the prognosis or management in patients with otherwise typical idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and no extra-pulmonary manifestation. A collective international multidisciplinary effort has proposed a uniform definition and criteria for 'interstitial pneumonia with autoimmune features', a condition characterized by limited CTD features occurring in the setting of ILD, with the aim of fostering future clinical studies. Referral of ILD patients suspect to have CTD to a rheumatologist and possibly multidisciplinary discussion may contribute to a better management. PMID:26212251

  7. Connective Tissue Disease-related Thoracic Disease.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Yutaka; Fischer, Aryeh; Solomon, Joshua J; Lynch, David A

    2015-06-01

    Pulmonary involvement is a frequent manifestation of connective tissue disease (CTD)-related thoracic disease. It is important to characterize the underlying pattern when pulmonary involvement occurs in a patient with CTD, and to exclude other causes. A systematic approach, evaluating each compartment of the lung (airway, interstitium, pleura, pulmonary vasculature) may be helpful. In complex cases, a multidisciplinary approach should be considered, potentially including the pulmonologist, rheumatologist, radiologist, pathologist, and sometimes the infectious disease specialist or oncologist. New techniques, such as quantitative computed tomography and MRI, are expected to be helpful for evaluation and management of CTD-associated thoracic disease. PMID:26024605

  8. Connective Tissue Disorder-Associated Vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Aman; Dhooria, Aadhaar; Aggarwal, Ashish; Rathi, Manish; Chandran, Vinod

    2016-06-01

    Vasculitides secondary to connective tissue diseases are classified under the category of 'vasculitis associated with systemic disease' in the revised International Chapel Hill Consensus Conference (CHCC) nomenclature. These secondary vasculitides may affect any of the small, medium or large vessels and usually portend a poor prognosis. Any organ system can be involved and the presentation would vary depending upon that involvement. Treatment depends upon the type and severity of presentation. In this review, we describe secondary vasculitis associated with rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, sarcoidosis, relapsing polychondritis, systemic sclerosis, Sjogren's syndrome and idiopathic inflammatory myositis, focusing mainly on recent advances in the past 3 years. PMID:27097818

  9. Generalized Connective Tissue Disease in Crtap-/- Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Baldridge, Dustin; Lennington, Jennifer; Weis, MaryAnn; Homan, Erica P.; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Munivez, Elda; Keene, Douglas R.; Hogue, William R.; Pyott, Shawna; Byers, Peter H.; Krakow, Deborah; Cohn, Daniel H.; Eyre, David R.; Lee, Brendan; Morello, Roy

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in CRTAP (coding for cartilage-associated protein), LEPRE1 (coding for prolyl 3-hydroxylase 1 [P3H1]) or PPIB (coding for Cyclophilin B [CYPB]) cause recessive forms of osteogenesis imperfecta and loss or decrease of type I collagen prolyl 3-hydroxylation. A comprehensive analysis of the phenotype of the Crtap-/- mice revealed multiple abnormalities of connective tissue, including in the lungs, kidneys, and skin, consistent with systemic dysregulation of collagen homeostasis within the extracellular matrix. Both Crtap-/- lung and kidney glomeruli showed increased cellular proliferation. Histologically, the lungs showed increased alveolar spacing, while the kidneys showed evidence of segmental glomerulosclerosis, with abnormal collagen deposition. The Crtap-/- skin had decreased mechanical integrity. In addition to the expected loss of proline 986 3-hydroxylation in α1(I) and α1(II) chains, there was also loss of 3Hyp at proline 986 in α2(V) chains. In contrast, at two of the known 3Hyp sites in α1(IV) chains from Crtap-/- kidneys there were normal levels of 3-hydroxylation. On a cellular level, loss of CRTAP in human OI fibroblasts led to a secondary loss of P3H1, and vice versa. These data suggest that both CRTAP and P3H1 are required to maintain a stable complex that 3-hydroxylates canonical proline sites within clade A (types I, II, and V) collagen chains. Loss of this activity leads to a multi-systemic connective tissue disease that affects bone, cartilage, lung, kidney, and skin. PMID:20485499

  10. Stem cell-derived tissue-associated regulatory T cells ameliorate the development of autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Haque, Mohammad; Song, Jianyong; Fino, Kristin; Sandhu, Praneet; Song, Xinmeng; Lei, Fengyang; Zheng, Songguo; Ni, Bing; Fang, Deyu; Song, Jianxun

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) have the potential to produce almost all of the cells in the body, including regulatory T cells (Tregs). However, the exact conditions required for the development of antigen (Ag)-specific Tregs from PSCs (i.e., PSC-Tregs) are not well delineated. Ag-specific PSC-Tregs can be tissue/organ-associated and migrate to local inflamed tissues/organs to suppress the autoimmune response after adoptive transfer, thereby avoiding potential overall immunosuppression from non-specific Tregs. In this study, we developed a new approach to generate functional Ag-specific Tregs from induced PSCs (iPSCs), i.e., iPSC-Tregs, which had the ability to generate an Ag-specific immunosuppressive response in a murine model of arthritis. We retrovirally transduced murine iPSCs with a construct containing genes of Ag-specific T cell receptor (TCR) and the transcriptional factor FoxP3. We differentiated the iPSCs into Ag-specific iPSC-Tregs using in vitro or in vivo Notch signaling, and demonstrated that adoptive transfer of such Tregs dramatically suppressed autoimmunity in a well-established Ag-induced arthritis model, including the inflammation, joint destruction, cartilage prostaglandin depletion, osteoclast activity, and Th17 production. Our results indicate that PSCs can be used to develop Ag-specific Tregs, which have a therapeutic potential for Treg-based therapies of autoimmune disorders. PMID:26846186

  11. Circulating Antibodies in Human Connective Tissue Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Moore, M.; Hughes, L. A.

    1973-01-01

    In a comparative study, sera from patients with connective tissue tumours, various carcinomata and from individuals without malignancy were evaluated by indirect immunofluorescence (IF) for antibodies reactive with apparently specific antigens shared by sarcoma derived tissue culture cell lines; for antibodies by IF to 2 tissue autoantigens (nuclear antigen and smooth muscle antigen) on rat liver substrate; and for HL-A antibodies by microcytotoxicity against a panel of 22 lymphocytes. Antibodies reactive with 11/16 cell lines originating from sarcomata were detected in 36% of all sarcoma sera tested, 12% carcinoma sera and 9% sera from controls. The incidence of antisarcoma antibody (ASA) was higher in the sera of sarcoma patients whose disease was in the primary phase (53%) compared with those in whom disease was advanced. A lower incidence (8%) of antibodies to nuclear antigen was detected in the sera of sarcoma patients compared with carcinoma patients (22%) and controls (23%), but the incidence of smooth muscle antibodies (SMA) was higher (45%) compared with carcinomata and controls (36% and 35% respectively). HL-A antibodies were present in 13% sarcoma sera, 36% carcinoma sera and 33% control sera. Evidence is presented to show that the various antibodies are distinct and that those reacting with sarcoma derived cell lines may be tumour associated antibodies possibly related to a virus specified antigen. ImagesFig. 1aFig. 1bFig. 1cFig. 1d PMID:4613373

  12. Fibroblast involvement in soft connective tissue calcification

    PubMed Central

    Ronchetti, Ivonne; Boraldi, Federica; Annovi, Giulia; Cianciulli, Paolo; Quaglino, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Soft connective tissue calcification is not a passive process, but the consequence of metabolic changes of local mesenchymal cells that, depending on both genetic and environmental factors, alter the balance between pro- and anti-calcifying pathways. While the role of smooth muscle cells and pericytes in ectopic calcifications has been widely investigated, the involvement of fibroblasts is still elusive. Fibroblasts isolated from the dermis of pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) patients and of patients exhibiting PXE-like clinical and histopathological findings offer an attractive model to investigate the mechanisms leading to the precipitation of mineral deposits within elastic fibers and to explore the influence of the genetic background and of the extracellular environment on fibroblast-associated calcifications, thus improving the knowledge on the role of mesenchymal cells on pathologic mineralization. PMID:23467434

  13. Autoimmune disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... tissue and antigens. As a result, the body sets off a reaction that destroys normal tissues. The exact cause of autoimmune disorders is unknown. One theory is that some microorganisms (such as bacteria or ...

  14. Gut-associated lymphoid tissue, gut microbes and susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Stanisavljević, S; Lukić, J; Momčilović, M; Miljković, M; Jevtić, B; Kojić, M; Golić, N; Mostarica Stojković, M; Miljković, D

    2016-06-01

    Gut microbiota and gut-associated lymphoid tissue have been increasingly appreciated as important players in pathogenesis of various autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an animal model of multiple sclerosis that can be induced with an injection of spinal cord homogenate emulsified in complete Freund's adjuvant in Dark Agouti (DA) rats, but not in Albino Oxford (AO) rats. In this study, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), Peyer's patches (PP) and gut microbiota were analysed in these two rat strains. There was higher proportion of CD4(+) T cells and regulatory T cells in non-immunised DA rats in comparison to AO rats. Also, DA rat MLN and PP cells were higher producers of pro-inflammatory cytokines interferon-γ and interleukin-17. Finally, microbial analyses showed that uncultivated species of Turicibacter and Atopostipes genus were exclusively present in AO rats, in faeces and intestinal tissue, respectively. Thus, it is clear that in comparison of an EAE-susceptible with an EAE-resistant strain of rats, various discrepancies at the level of gut associated lymphoid tissue, as well as at the level of gut microbiota can be observed. Future studies should determine if the differences have functional significance for EAE pathogenesis. PMID:26839070

  15. Autoimmune Diabetes Is Suppressed by Treatment with Recombinant Human Tissue Kallikrein-1

    PubMed Central

    Maneva-Radicheva, Lilia; Amatya, Christina; Parker, Camille; Ellefson, Jacob; Radichev, Ilian; Raghavan, Arvind; Charles, Matthew L.; Williams, Mark S.; Robbins, Mark S.; Savinov, Alexei Y.

    2014-01-01

    The kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) comprises a cascade of proteolytic enzymes and biogenic peptides that regulate several physiological processes. Over-expression of tissue kallikrein-1 and modulation of the KKS shows beneficial effects on insulin sensitivity and other parameters relevant to type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, much less is known about the role of kallikreins, in particular tissue kallikrein-1, in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D). We report that chronic administration of recombinant human tissue kallikrein-1 protein (DM199) to non-obese diabetic mice delayed the onset of T1D, attenuated the degree of insulitis, and improved pancreatic beta cell mass in a dose- and treatment frequency-dependent manner. Suppression of the autoimmune reaction against pancreatic beta cells was evidenced by a reduction in the relative numbers of infiltrating cytotoxic lymphocytes and an increase in the relative numbers of regulatory T cells in the pancreas and pancreatic lymph nodes. These effects may be due in part to a DM199 treatment-dependent increase in active TGF-beta1. Treatment with DM199 also resulted in elevated C-peptide levels, elevated glucagon like peptide-1 levels and a reduction in dipeptidyl peptidase-4 activity. Overall, the data suggest that DM199 may have a beneficial effect on T1D by attenuating the autoimmune reaction and improving beta cell health. PMID:25259810

  16. Autoimmune diabetes is suppressed by treatment with recombinant human tissue Kallikrein-1.

    PubMed

    Maneva-Radicheva, Lilia; Amatya, Christina; Parker, Camille; Ellefson, Jacob; Radichev, Ilian; Raghavan, Arvind; Charles, Matthew L; Williams, Mark S; Robbins, Mark S; Savinov, Alexei Y

    2014-01-01

    The kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) comprises a cascade of proteolytic enzymes and biogenic peptides that regulate several physiological processes. Over-expression of tissue kallikrein-1 and modulation of the KKS shows beneficial effects on insulin sensitivity and other parameters relevant to type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, much less is known about the role of kallikreins, in particular tissue kallikrein-1, in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D). We report that chronic administration of recombinant human tissue kallikrein-1 protein (DM199) to non-obese diabetic mice delayed the onset of T1D, attenuated the degree of insulitis, and improved pancreatic beta cell mass in a dose- and treatment frequency-dependent manner. Suppression of the autoimmune reaction against pancreatic beta cells was evidenced by a reduction in the relative numbers of infiltrating cytotoxic lymphocytes and an increase in the relative numbers of regulatory T cells in the pancreas and pancreatic lymph nodes. These effects may be due in part to a DM199 treatment-dependent increase in active TGF-beta1. Treatment with DM199 also resulted in elevated C-peptide levels, elevated glucagon like peptide-1 levels and a reduction in dipeptidyl peptidase-4 activity. Overall, the data suggest that DM199 may have a beneficial effect on T1D by attenuating the autoimmune reaction and improving beta cell health. PMID:25259810

  17. Meningeal Tertiary Lymphoid Tissues and Multiple Sclerosis: A Gathering Place for Diverse Types of Immune Cells during CNS Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Pikor, Natalia B.; Prat, Alexandre; Bar-Or, Amit; Gommerman, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    Collections of leukocytes in the meningeal space have been documented in Multiple Sclerosis (MS). These meningeal aggregates, which in the context of other autoimmune diseases have often been termed tertiary lymphoid tissues (TLT), have been associated with sub-pial cortical damage and disease progression. However, the key molecular and cellular signals required for their formation and maintenance remain unclear. Herein, we review TLT structures in other disease states in order to provide a framework for understanding these structures in the MS meninges. We then assess the evidence that the meningeal compartment serves as an important nexus for immune cells as well as a location for drainage of antigen into cervical lymph nodes. Extrapolating what is known about the molecular and cellular cues that initiate the formation of leukocyte aggregates in non-lymphoid tissues, we speculate on what signals lead to the formation and maintenance of meningeal TLT structures. Referring to the animal model of MS [experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE)], we also explore what is known about these structures in supporting B cell and T cell responses during neuroinflammation. Last, we examine the evidence that connects these structures to ongoing neuropathology. Collectively, our review points to the meningeal compartment as an important player in neuroinflammatory processes. Moreover, we hypothesize that in order to gain insights into pro- and anti-inflammatory properties of lymphocytes in MS, one must understand the cellular scaffolds that support lymphocyte retention within the meninges, thus highlighting the importance of non-immune cells (stromal cells) in the neuroinflammatory process. PMID:26793195

  18. Connective tissue growth factor in tumor pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Key roles for connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) are demonstrated in the wound repair process where it promotes myofibroblast differentiation and angiogenesis. Similar mechanisms are active in tumor-reactive stroma where CTGF is expressed. Other potential roles include prevention of hypoxia-induced apoptosis and promoting epithelial-mesenchymal transistion (EMT). CTGF expression in tumors has been associated to both tumor suppression and progression. For example, CTGF expression in acute lymphoblastic leukemia, breast, pancreas and gastric cancer correlates to worse prognosis whereas the opposite is true for colorectal, lung and ovarian cancer. This discrepancy is not yet understood. High expression of CTGF is a hallmark of ileal carcinoids, which are well-differentiated endocrine carcinomas with serotonin production originating from the small intestine and proximal colon. These tumors maintain a high grade of differentiation and low proliferation. Despite this, they are malignant and most patients have metastatic disease at diagnosis. These tumors demonstrate several phenotypes potentially related to CTGF function namely: cell migration, absent tumor cell apoptosis, as well as, reactive and well vascularised myofibroblast rich stroma and fibrosis development locally and in distal organs. The presence of CTGF in other endocrine tumors indicates a role in the progression of well-differentiated tumors. PMID:23259759

  19. Genetically-driven target tissue over-expression of CD40: A novel mechanism in autoimmune disease

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Amanda K.; Finkelman, Fred D.; Li, Cheuk Wun; Concepcion, Erlinda; Smith, Eric; Jacobson, Eric; Latif, Rauf; Keddache, Mehdi; Zhang, Weijia; Tomer, Yaron

    2012-01-01

    The CD40 gene, an important immune regulatory gene, is also expressed and functional on non-myeloid derived cells, many of which are targets for tissue specific autoimmune diseases, including beta cells in type 1 diabetes, intestinal epithelial cells in Crohn’s disease, and thyroid follicular cells in Graves’ disease (GD). Whether target tissue CD40 expression plays a role in autoimmune disease etiology has yet to be determined. Here we show, that target-tissue over-expression of CD40 plays a key role in the etiology of autoimmunity. Using a murine model of GD, we demonstrated that thyroidal CD40 over-expression augmented the production of thyroid specific antibodies, resulting in more severe experimental autoimmune Graves’ disease (EAGD), whereas deletion of thyroidal CD40 suppressed disease. Using transcriptome and immune-pathway analyses we showed that in both EAGD mouse thyroids and human primary thyrocytes, CD40 mediates this effect by activating downstream cytokines and chemokines, most notably IL-6. To translate these findings into therapy, we blocked IL-6 during EAGD induction in the setting of thyroidal CD40 over-expression, and showed decreased levels of TSHR stimulating antibodies and frequency of disease. We conclude that target tissue over-expression of CD40 plays a key role in the etiology of organ specific autoimmune disease. PMID:22888137

  20. GABAergic signaling and connectivity on Purkinje cells are impaired in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Mandolesi, Georgia; Grasselli, Giorgio; Musella, Alessandra; Gentile, Antonietta; Musumeci, Gabriele; Sepman, Helena; Haji, Nabila; Fresegna, Diego; Bernardi, Giorgio; Centonze, Diego

    2012-05-01

    A significant proportion of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients have functionally relevant cerebellar deficits, which significantly contribute to disability. Although clinical and experimental studies have been conducted to understand the pathophysiology of cerebellar dysfunction in MS, no electrophysiological and morphological studies have investigated potential alterations of synaptic connections of cerebellar Purkinje cells (PC). For this reason we analyzed cerebellar PC GABAergic connectivity in mice with MOG((35-55))-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a mouse model of MS. We observed a strong reduction in the frequency of the spontaneous inhibitory post-synaptic currents (IPSCs) recorded from PCs during the symptomatic phase of the disease, and in presence of prominent microglia activation not only in the white matter (WM) but also in the molecular layer (ML). The massive GABAergic innervation on PCs from basket and stellate cells was reduced and associated to a decrease of the number of these inhibitory interneurons. On the contrary no significant loss of the PCs could be detected. Incubation of interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) was sufficient to mimic the electrophysiological alterations observed in EAE mice. We thus suggest that microglia and pro-inflammatory cytokines, together with a degeneration of basket and stellate cells and their synaptic terminals, contribute to impair GABAergic transmission on PCs during EAE. Our results support a growing body of evidence that GABAergic signaling is compromised in EAE and in MS, and show a selective susceptibility to neuronal and synaptic degeneration of cerebellar inhibitory interneurons. PMID:22349452

  1. [Diabetic ketoacidosis responsive to methotrexate in a patient with a mixed connective tissue disease].

    PubMed

    Novik A, Victoria; Vega S, Jorge; Carreño P, Verónica; Lagos G, Macarena

    2007-01-01

    We report a 42 year-old woman with a hypothyroidism and a mixed connective tissue disease treated with prednisone and methotrexate. The patient had normal blood glucose levels but when the methotrexate dose was tapered, she presented a diabetic ketoacidosis that required up to 520 units of insulin per day. Due to the intensification of the mixed connective tissue disease symptoms, the doses of methotrexate and prednisone were increased again with a simultaneous normalization of serum glucose levels and glucose tolerance. In the following six months, when the dose of methotrexate was tapered again, the hyperglycemia reappeared and was again controlled increasing the dose. Thirty months after the episode of ketoacidosis, the patient was with a weekly dose of methotrexate, asymptomatic and with a normal glucose tolerance. Anti insulin antibodies were not detected and anti islet antibodies were indeterminate, due to interference with antinuclear antibodies. It is possible that the episode of ketoacidosis was unveiled by an autoimmune phenomenon. PMID:17369988

  2. Analgesic Drugs Alter Connective Tissue Remodeling and Mechanical Properties.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Chad C

    2016-01-01

    Exercising individuals commonly consume analgesics, but these medications alter tendon and skeletal muscle connective tissue properties, possibly limiting a person from realizing the full benefits of exercise training. I detail the novel hypothesis that analgesic medications alter connective tissue structure and mechanical properties by modifying fibroblast production of growth factors and matrix enzymes, which are responsible for extracellular matrix remodeling. PMID:26509485

  3. Expression and function of the autoimmune regulator (Aire) gene in non-thymic tissue

    PubMed Central

    Eldershaw, S A; Sansom, D M; Narendran, P

    2011-01-01

    Educational immune tolerance to self-antigens is induced primarily in the thymus where tissue-restricted antigens (TRAs) are presented to T lymphocytes by cells of the thymic stroma – a process known as central tolerance. The expression of these TRAs is controlled in part by a transcription factor encoded by the autoimmune regulatory (Aire) gene. Patients with a mutation of this gene develop a condition known as autoimmune–polyendocrinopathy–candidiasis–ectodermal–dystrophy (APECED), characterized by autoimmune destruction of endocrine organs, fungal infection and dental abnormalities. There is now evidence for TRA expression and for mechanisms of functional tolerance outside the thymus. This has led to a number of studies examining Aire expression and function at these extra-thymic sites. These investigations have been conducted across different animal models using different techniques and have often shown discrepant results. Here we review the studies of extra thymic Aire and discuss the evidence for its expression and function in both human and murine systems. PMID:21303359

  4. Pectus excavatum and heritable disorders of the connective tissue.

    PubMed

    Tocchioni, Francesca; Ghionzoli, Marco; Messineo, Antonio; Romagnoli, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Pectus excavatum, the most frequent congenital chest wall deformity, may be rarely observed as a sole deformity or as a sign of an underlying connective tissue disorder. To date, only few studies have described correlations between this deformity and heritable connective tissue disorders such as Marfan, Ehlers-Danlos, Poland, MASS (Mitral valve prolapse, not progressive Aortic enlargement, Skeletal and Skin alterations) phenotype among others. When concurring with connective tissue disorder, cardiopulmonary and vascular involvement may be associated to the thoracic defect. Ruling out the concomitance of pectus excavatum and connective tissue disorders, therefore, may have a direct implication both on surgical outcome and long term prognosis. In this review we focused on biological bases of connective tissue disorders which may be relevant to the pathogenesis of pectus excavatum, portraying surgical and clinical implication of their concurrence. PMID:24198927

  5. Pectus Excavatum and Heritable Disorders of the Connective Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Tocchioni, Francesca; Ghionzoli, Marco; Messineo, Antonio; Romagnoli, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Pectus excavatum, the most frequent congenital chest wall deformity, may be rarely observed as a sole deformity or as a sign of an underlying connective tissue disorder. To date, only few studies have described correlations between this deformity and heritable connective tissue disorders such as Marfan, Ehlers-Danlos, Poland, MASS (Mitral valve prolapse, not progressive Aortic enlargement, Skeletal and Skin alterations) phenotype among others. When concurring with connective tissue disorder, cardiopulmonary and vascular involvement may be associated to the thoracic defect. Ruling out the concomitance of pectus excavatum and connective tissue disorders, therefore, may have a direct implication both on surgical outcome and long term prognosis. In this review we focused on biological bases of connective tissue disorders which may be relevant to the pathogenesis of pectus excavatum, portraying surgical and clinical implication of their concurrence. PMID:24198927

  6. Analysis of apoptosis in relation to tissue destruction associated with Hashimoto's autoimmune thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Hammond, L J; Lowdell, M W; Cerrano, P G; Goode, A W; Bottazzo, G F; Mirakian, R

    1997-06-01

    The level of apoptosis has been investigated in thyroid tissue from eight patients with Graves's disease, one with Hashitoxicosis, three with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and five patients with multinodular goitre, using flow cytometry and an in situ immunofluorescence technique. Cryostat sections have also been studied for Bcl-2 and APO-1/Fas expression in the thyrocytes and infiltrating lymphocytes, to determine their susceptibility to apoptosis. An increased level of apoptosis was detected in Hashimoto's glands. This was associated with decreased Bcl-2 staining and a patchy APO-1/Fas reactivity on thyrocytes. In addition, APO-1/Fas expression was noted within the germinal centres of lymphoid follicles. It is suggested that the dysregulation of apoptosis-related genes could be an important factor in the progression of destructive thyroid autoimmune disease. PMID:9274522

  7. Autoimmune hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Lupoid hepatitis; Chronic acute liver disease ... This form of hepatitis is an autoimmune disease . The body's immune system cannot tell the difference between healthy body tissue and harmful, outside ...

  8. The decrease in silicon concentration of the connective tissues with age in rats is a marker of connective tissue turnover☆

    PubMed Central

    Jugdaohsingh, Ravin; Watson, Abigail I.E.; Pedro, Liliana D.; Powell, Jonathan J.

    2015-01-01

    Silicon may be important for bone and connective tissue health. Higher concentrations of silicon are suggested to be associated with bone and the connective tissues, compared with the non-connective soft tissues. Moreover, in connective tissues it has been suggested that silicon levels may decrease with age based upon analyses of human aorta. These claims, however, have not been tested under controlled conditions. Here connective and non-connective tissues were collected and analysed for silicon levels from female Sprague–Dawley rats of different ages (namely, 3, 5, 8, 12, 26 and 43 weeks; n = 8–10 per age group), all maintained on the same feed source and drinking water, and kept in the same environment from weaning to adulthood. Tissues (696 samples) were digested in nitric acid and analysed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry for total silicon content. Fasting serum samples were also collected, diluted and analysed for silicon. Higher concentrations of silicon (up to 50-fold) were found associated with bone and the connective tissues compared with the non-connective tissues. Although total silicon content increased with age in all tissues, the highest connective tissue silicon concentrations (up to 9.98 μg/g wet weight) were found in young weanling rats, decreasing thereafter with age (by 2–6 fold). Fasting serum silicon concentrations reflected the pattern of connective tissue silicon concentrations and, both measures, when compared to collagen data from a prior experiment in Sprague–Dawley rats, mirrored type I collagen turnover with age. Our findings confirm the link between silicon and connective tissues and would imply that young growing rats have proportionally higher requirements for dietary silicon than mature adults, for bone and connective tissue development, although this was not formally investigated here. However, estimation of total body silicon content suggested that actual Si requirements may be substantially lower than previously estimated which could explain why absolute silicon deficiency is difficult to achieve but, when it is achieved in young growing animals, it results in stunted growth and abnormal development of bone and other connective tissues. PMID:25687224

  9. The decrease in silicon concentration of the connective tissues with age in rats is a marker of connective tissue turnover.

    PubMed

    Jugdaohsingh, Ravin; Watson, Abigail I E; Pedro, Liliana D; Powell, Jonathan J

    2015-06-01

    Silicon may be important for bone and connective tissue health. Higher concentrations of silicon are suggested to be associated with bone and the connective tissues, compared with the non-connective soft tissues. Moreover, in connective tissues it has been suggested that silicon levels may decrease with age based upon analyses of human aorta. These claims, however, have not been tested under controlled conditions. Here connective and non-connective tissues were collected and analysed for silicon levels from female Sprague-Dawley rats of different ages (namely, 3, 5, 8, 12, 26 and 43 weeks; n=8-10 per age group), all maintained on the same feed source and drinking water, and kept in the same environment from weaning to adulthood. Tissues (696 samples) were digested in nitric acid and analysed by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry for total silicon content. Fasting serum samples were also collected, diluted and analysed for silicon. Higher concentrations of silicon (up to 50-fold) were found associated with bone and the connective tissues compared with the non-connective tissues. Although total silicon content increased with age in all tissues, the highest connective tissue silicon concentrations (up to 9.98 μg/g wet weight) were found in young weanling rats, decreasing thereafter with age (by 2-6 fold). Fasting serum silicon concentrations reflected the pattern of connective tissue silicon concentrations and, both measures, when compared to collagen data from a prior experiment in Sprague-Dawley rats, mirrored type I collagen turnover with age. Our findings confirm the link between silicon and connective tissues and would imply that young growing rats have proportionally higher requirements for dietary silicon than mature adults, for bone and connective tissue development, although this was not formally investigated here. However, estimation of total body silicon content suggested that actual Si requirements may be substantially lower than previously estimated which could explain why absolute silicon deficiency is difficult to achieve but, when it is achieved in young growing animals, it results in stunted growth and abnormal development of bone and other connective tissues. PMID:25687224

  10. Biomarkers of connective tissue disease in patients with intracranial aneurysms.

    PubMed

    Yurt, Alaattin; Vardar, Enver; Selçuki, Mehmet; Ertürk, Ali Riza; Ozbek, Gülriz; Atçi, Burak

    2010-09-01

    Connective tissue defects may play a significant role in the development of intracranial aneurysms (IAs). Multiorgan connective tissue disorders may, therefore, indicate a risk of IA development. We investigated biomarkers of connective tissue disease in patients with IAs. A series of 62 patients with IAs was studied by physical examination, echocardiography, ultrasound examination of the kidneys and abdomen, and microscopic examination of skin tissue (temporal area) and superficial temporal artery taken at operation. Patients with IAs had a higher incidence of biomarkers of systemic connective tissue disease than controls and identification of these markers may be important for screening for IAs. Microscopic investigation of biopsies of the skin and superficial temporal artery from patients and their relatives may become valuable for clinical diagnosis, identification of people at risk and basic studies of the pathogenesis of this vascular disease. PMID:20452221

  11. Micromechanics and constitutive modeling of connective soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Fallah, A; Ahmadian, M T; Firozbakhsh, K; Aghdam, M M

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a micromechanical model for connective soft tissues based on the available histological evidences is developed. The proposed model constituents i.e. collagen fibers and ground matrix are considered as hyperelastic materials. The matrix material is assumed to be isotropic Neo-Hookean while the collagen fibers are considered to be transversely isotropic hyperelastic. In order to take into account the effects of tissue structure in lower scales on the macroscopic behavior of tissue, a strain energy density function (SEDF) is developed for collagen fibers based on tissue hierarchical structure. Macroscopic response and properties of tissue are obtained using the numerical homogenization method with the help of ABAQUS software. The periodic boundary conditions and the proposed constitutive models are implemented into ABAQUS using the DISP and the UMAT subroutines, respectively. The existence of the solution and stable material behavior of proposed constitutive model for collagen fibers are investigated based on the poly-convexity condition. Results of the presented micromechanics model for connective tissues are compared and validated with available experimental data. Effects of geometrical and material parameters variation at microscale on macroscopic mechanical behavior of tissues are investigated. The results show that decrease in collagen content of the connective tissues like the tendon due to diseases leads 20% more stretch than healthy tissue under the same load which can results in connective tissue malfunction and hypermobility in joints. PMID:26807767

  12. Connective tissue diseases, multimorbidity and the ageing lung.

    PubMed

    Spagnolo, Paolo; Cordier, Jean-François; Cottin, Vincent

    2016-05-01

    Connective tissue diseases encompass a wide range of heterogeneous disorders characterised by immune-mediated chronic inflammation often leading to tissue damage, collagen deposition and possible loss of function of the target organ. Lung involvement is a common complication of connective tissue diseases. Depending on the underlying disease, various thoracic compartments can be involved but interstitial lung disease is a major contributor to morbidity and mortality. Interstitial lung disease, pulmonary hypertension or both are found most commonly in systemic sclerosis. In the elderly, the prevalence of connective tissue diseases continues to rise due to both longer life expectancy and more effective and better-tolerated treatments. In the geriatric population, connective tissue diseases are almost invariably accompanied by age-related comorbidities, and disease- and treatment-related complications, which contribute to the significant morbidity and mortality associated with these conditions, and complicate treatment decision-making. Connective tissue diseases in the elderly represent a growing concern for healthcare providers and an increasing burden of global health resources worldwide. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the regulation of the immune functions in the elderly and evidence-based guidelines specifically designed for this patient population are instrumental to improving the management of connective tissue diseases in elderly patients. PMID:26917611

  13. The Emerging Roles of Gamma–Delta T Cells in Tissue Inflammation in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Sakshi; Want, Muzamil Yaqub; Awasthi, Amit

    2016-01-01

    γδ (gamma–delta) T cells, a small population of unconventional T cells, have been found in central nervous system lesions of multiple sclerosis (MS) patients, but their function in disease activity is not clearly understood. Previous studies in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) were inconsistent in identifying their specific roles in suppressing or promoting disease pathogenesis. Emerging advancements in the biology of γδ T cells especially in the context of their being the major initial producers of IL-17, suggested their crucial role in pathogenesis of EAE. In addition, γδ T cells express high levels of IL-23R and IL-1R, which further enhance their effector functions in the pathogenesis of EAE. Nonetheless, activated heterogeneous γδ T cells display functional dichotomy, which is crucial in determining the outcomes of tissue inflammation in EAE. In this review, we discussed recent advances in understanding the biology of γδ T cells in tissue inflammation as well as their roles in suppressing or promoting the development of EAE. PMID:26858718

  14. Molecular basis of hereditary disorders of connective tissue.

    PubMed

    Tilstra, D J; Byers, P H

    1994-01-01

    The molecular basis for several hereditary disorders of connective tissues has been elucidated in recent years. In this chapter, we discuss recent advances in the molecular characterization of a number of these disorders and examine their clinical applications. PMID:8198373

  15. Autoimmune diseases - connecting risk alleles with molecular traits of the immune system.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Arcelus, Maria; Rich, Stephen S; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2016-03-01

    Genome-wide strategies have driven the discovery of more than 300 susceptibility loci for autoimmune diseases. However, for almost all loci, understanding of the mechanisms leading to autoimmunity remains limited, and most variants that are likely to be causal are in non-coding regions of the genome. A critical next step will be to identify the in vivo and ex vivo immunophenotypes that are affected by risk variants. To do this, key cell types and cell states that are implicated in autoimmune diseases will need to be defined. Functional genomic annotations from these cell types and states can then be used to resolve candidate genes and causal variants. Together with longitudinal studies, this approach may yield pivotal insights into how autoimmunity is triggered. PMID:26907721

  16. Silica associated mixed connective tissue disorder in a stone crusher.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Arjun; Suri, Jagdish Chander; Ray, Animesh; Sharma, Rahul Kumar

    2013-05-01

    Silica exposure has been implicated with the development of various connective tissue diseases. We report a case of 32-year-old stone crusher who developed silicosis with mixed connective tissue disorder (MCTD) 6 years after exposure to silica. This association of silicosis with MCTD has never been reported from the Indian subcontinent, although the problem of this pneumoconiosis remains rampant. This rare association urges us to report this case. PMID:24421595

  17. Silica associated mixed connective tissue disorder in a stone crusher

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Arjun; Suri, Jagdish Chander; Ray, Animesh; Sharma, Rahul Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Silica exposure has been implicated with the development of various connective tissue diseases. We report a case of 32-year-old stone crusher who developed silicosis with mixed connective tissue disorder (MCTD) 6 years after exposure to silica. This association of silicosis with MCTD has never been reported from the Indian subcontinent, although the problem of this pneumoconiosis remains rampant. This rare association urges us to report this case. PMID:24421595

  18. Interpretation of autoantibody positivity in interstitial lung disease and lung-dominant connective tissue disease*

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Daniel Antunes Silva; Kawassaki, Alexandre de Melo; Baldi, Bruno Guedes

    2013-01-01

    The initial evaluation of patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD) primarily involves a comprehensive, active search for the cause. Autoantibody assays, which can suggest the presence of a rheumatic disease, are routinely performed at various referral centers. When interstitial lung involvement is the condition that allows the definitive diagnosis of connective tissue disease and the classical criteria are met, there is little debate. However, there is still debate regarding the significance, relevance, specificity, and pathophysiological role of autoimmunity in patients with predominant pulmonary involvement and only mild symptoms or formes frustes of connective tissue disease. The purpose of this article was to review the current knowledge of autoantibody positivity and to discuss its possible interpretations in patients with ILD and without clear etiologic associations, as well as to enhance the understanding of the natural history of an allegedly new disease and to describe the possible prognostic implications. We also discuss the proposition of a new term to be used in the classification of ILDs: lung-dominant connective tissue disease. PMID:24473767

  19. FIBROBLAST CYTOSKELETAL REMODELING CONTRIBUTES TO CONNECTIVE TISSUE TENSION

    PubMed Central

    Langevin, Helene M.; Bouffard, Nicole A.; Fox, James R.; Palmer, Bradley M.; Wu, Junru; Iatridis, James C.; Barnes, William D.; Badger, Gary J.; Howe, Alan K.

    2011-01-01

    The viscoelastic behavior of connective tissue is generally attributed to the material properties of the extracellular matrix rather than cellular activity. We have previously shown that fibroblasts within areolar connective tissue exhibit dynamic cytoskeletal remodeling within minutes in response to tissue stretch ex vivo and in vivo. Here, we tested the hypothesis that fibroblasts, through this cytoskeletal remodeling, actively contribute to the viscoelastic behavior of the whole tissue. We measured significantly increased tissue tension when cellular function was broadly inhibited by sodium azide and when cytoskeletal dynamics were compromised by disrupting microtubules (with colchicine) or actomyosin contractility (via Rho kinase inhibition). These treatments led to a decrease in cell body cross-sectional area and cell field perimeter (obtained by joining the end of all of a fibroblast’s processes). Suppressing lamellipodia formation by inhibiting Rac-1 decreased cell body cross-sectional area but did not affect cell field perimeter or tissue tension. Thus, by changing shape, fibroblasts can dynamically modulate the viscoelastic behavior of areolar connective tissue through Rho-dependent cytoskeletal mechanisms. These results have broad implications for our understanding of the dynamic interplay of forces between fibroblasts and their surrounding matrix, as well as for the neural, vascular and immune cell populations residing within connective tissue. PMID:20945345

  20. Associated Autoimmune Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education Bulletin Associated Autoimmune Diseases Updated June 2014 Celiac Disease and Associated Autoimmune Diseases: The Connection People who have celiac disease or dermatitis herpetiformis (celiac disease that manifests as ...

  1. Optical clearing in dense connective tissues to visualize cellular connectivity in situ.

    PubMed

    Calve, Sarah; Ready, Andrew; Huppenbauer, Christopher; Main, Russell; Neu, Corey P

    2015-01-01

    Visualizing the three-dimensional morphology and spatial patterning of cells embedded deep within dense connective tissues of the musculoskeletal system has been possible only by utilizing destructive techniques. Here we utilize fructose-based clearing solutions to image cell connectivity and deep tissue-scale patterning in situ by standard confocal microscopy. Optical clearing takes advantage of refractive index matching of tissue and the embedding medium to visualize light transmission through a broad range of bovine and whole mount murine tissues, including cartilage, bone, and ligament, of the head and hindlimb. Using non-destructive methods, we show for the first time intercellular chondrocyte connections throughout the bulk of cartilage, and we reveal in situ patterns of osteocyte processes and the lacunar-canalicular system deep within mineralized cortical bone. Optical clearing of connective tissues is expected to find broad application for the study of cell responses in normal physiology and disease pathology. PMID:25581165

  2. Optical Clearing in Dense Connective Tissues to Visualize Cellular Connectivity In Situ

    PubMed Central

    Calve, Sarah; Ready, Andrew; Huppenbauer, Christopher; Main, Russell; Neu, Corey P.

    2015-01-01

    Visualizing the three-dimensional morphology and spatial patterning of cells embedded deep within dense connective tissues of the musculoskeletal system has been possible only by utilizing destructive techniques. Here we utilize fructose-based clearing solutions to image cell connectivity and deep tissue-scale patterning in situ by standard confocal microscopy. Optical clearing takes advantage of refractive index matching of tissue and the embedding medium to visualize light transmission through a broad range of bovine and whole mount murine tissues, including cartilage, bone, and ligament, of the head and hindlimb. Using non-destructive methods, we show for the first time intercellular chondrocyte connections throughout the bulk of cartilage, and we reveal in situ patterns of osteocyte processes and the lacunar-canalicular system deep within mineralized cortical bone. Optical clearing of connective tissues is expected to find broad application for the study of cell responses in normal physiology and disease pathology. PMID:25581165

  3. Hypericin-mediated selective photomodification of connective tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Hovhannisyan, V. Guo, H. W.; Chen, Y. F.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Ghukasyan, V.; Dong, C. Y.

    2014-12-29

    Controllable modification of biological molecules and supramolecular components of connective tissue are important for biophysical and biomedical applications. Through the use of second harmonic generation imaging, two-photon fluorescence microscopy, and spectrofluorimetry, we found that hypericin, a natural pigment, induces photosensitized destruction of collagen fibers but does not affect elastic fibers and lipids in chicken tendon, skin, and blood vessels. We demonstrated the dynamics and efficiency of collagen photomodification and investigated mechanisms of this processes. Our results suggest that hypericin–mediated photoprocesses in biological tissues may be useful in biomedical applications that require selective modification of connective tissues.

  4. Hypericin-mediated selective photomodification of connective tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovhannisyan, V.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Ghukasyan, V.; Guo, H. W.; Chen, Y. F.; Dong, C. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Controllable modification of biological molecules and supramolecular components of connective tissue are important for biophysical and biomedical applications. Through the use of second harmonic generation imaging, two-photon fluorescence microscopy, and spectrofluorimetry, we found that hypericin, a natural pigment, induces photosensitized destruction of collagen fibers but does not affect elastic fibers and lipids in chicken tendon, skin, and blood vessels. We demonstrated the dynamics and efficiency of collagen photomodification and investigated mechanisms of this processes. Our results suggest that hypericin-mediated photoprocesses in biological tissues may be useful in biomedical applications that require selective modification of connective tissues.

  5. A Proteomic Comparison of Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Pancreatic Tissue from Autoimmune Pancreatitis, Chronic Pancreatitis, and Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paulo, Joao A; Kadiyala, Vivek; Brizard, Scott; Banks, Peter A; Steen, Hanno; Conwell, Darwin L

    2015-01-01

    Context Formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is a standard for specimen preservation, and as such FFPE tissue banks are an untapped resource of histologically-characterized specimens for retrospective biomarker investigation for pancreatic disease. Objectives We use liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to compare FFPE specimens from three different diseases of the exocrine pancreas. Design We investigated the proteomic profile of FFPE pancreatic tissue from 9 archived specimens that were histologically classified as: autoimmune pancreatitis (n=3), chronic pancreatitis (n=3), and pancreatic cancer (n=3), using LC-MS/MS. Setting This is a proteomic analysis experiment of FFPE pancreatic tissue in an academic center. Patients FFPE tissue specimens were provided by Dana-Farber/Harvard Cancer Center (Boston, MA, USA). Interventions FFPE tissue specimens were collected via routine surgical resection procedures. Main outcome measures We compared proteins identified from chronic pancreatitis, autoimmune pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer FFPE pancreatic tissue. Results We identified 386 non-redundant proteins from 9 specimens. Following our filtering criteria, 73, 29, and 53 proteins were identified exclusively in autoimmune pancreatitis, chronic pancreatitis, and pancreatic cancer specimens, respectively. Conclusions We report that differentially-expressed proteins can be identified among FFPE tissues specimens originating from individuals with different histological diagnoses. These proteins merit further confirmation with a greater number of specimens and orthogonal validation, such as immunohistochemistry. The mass spectrometry-based methodology used herein has the potential to enhance diagnostic biomarker and therapeutic target discovery, further advancing pancreatic research. PMID:23846938

  6. T-Cell Avidity and Tuning: The Flexible Connection Between Tolerance and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    van den Boorn, Jasper G.; Le Poole, I. Caroline; Luiten, Rosalie M.

    2007-01-01

    Thymic T-cell selection mechanisms generate a cross-reactive, self-MHC restricted peripheral T-cell pool. Affinity and avidity are of profound influence on this selection and the generation of immunity. Autoreactive T cells can escape thymic deletion by lowering their avidity and retain this tuned state in the periphery. Upon activation, tuned T cells can cause autoimmunity, while immunotherapeutic strategies may be hampered by existing T-cell tolerance. The regulation of T-cell avidity and tuning therefore determines the balance between tolerance and autoimmunity and should be taken into account in the design of therapeutic strategies aimed at T-cell reactivity. PMID:16818373

  7. Invited review: mesenchymal progenitor cells in intramuscular connective tissue development.

    PubMed

    Miao, Z G; Zhang, L P; Fu, X; Yang, Q Y; Zhu, M J; Dodson, M V; Du, M

    2016-01-01

    The abundance and cross-linking of intramuscular connective tissue contributes to the background toughness of meat, and is thus undesirable. Connective tissue is mainly synthesized by intramuscular fibroblasts. Myocytes, adipocytes and fibroblasts are derived from a common pool of progenitor cells during the early embryonic development. It appears that multipotent mesenchymal stem cells first diverge into either myogenic or non-myogenic lineages; non-myogenic mesenchymal progenitors then develop into the stromal-vascular fraction of skeletal muscle wherein adipocytes, fibroblasts and derived mesenchymal progenitors reside. Because non-myogenic mesenchymal progenitors mainly undergo adipogenic or fibrogenic differentiation during muscle development, strengthening progenitor proliferation enhances the potential for both intramuscular adipogenesis and fibrogenesis, leading to the elevation of both marbling and connective tissue content in the resulting meat product. Furthermore, given the bipotent developmental potential of progenitor cells, enhancing their conversion to adipogenesis reduces fibrogenesis, which likely results in the overall improvement of marbling (more intramuscular adipocytes) and tenderness (less connective tissue) of meat. Fibrogenesis is mainly regulated by the transforming growth factor (TGF) β signaling pathway and its regulatory cascade. In addition, extracellular matrix, a part of the intramuscular connective tissue, provides a niche environment for regulating myogenic differentiation of satellite cells and muscle growth. Despite rapid progress, many questions remain in the role of extracellular matrix on muscle development, and factors determining the early differentiation of myogenic, adipogenic and fibrogenic cells, which warrant further studies. PMID:26350682

  8. Propagation in cardiac tissue adjacent to connective tissue: two-dimensional modeling studies.

    PubMed

    Street, A M; Plonsey, R

    1999-01-01

    The conditions for activation transmission across a region of extracellular space was demonstrated in two-dimensional preparations with results consistent with those previously seen in the one-dimensional fiber studies. In addition, one sees changes in action potential morphology which occur in the tissue nearest the connective-tissue border as well as changes in conduction velocity along the border. These results hinge on an adequate representation of the connective-tissue region achieved by careful implementation of the boundary conditions in the intracellular and interstitial spaces and the expansion of the connective-tissue discretization to a "double-tier network" description. Through a series of simulations, a clear dependence on fiber orientation is illustrated in the efficacy to transmit activation. The collision of a front with an embedded connective-tissue region was also examined. The results revealed that fibers aligned normal to a planar stimulus would more greatly disrupt the advancement of a planar front. Such pronounced disruptions have been shown to be proarrhythmic in the literature. The increasing evidence of the ability of connective tissue to transmit activation has implications in understanding spread of activation through infarcted tissues and through the healthy ventricular wall in the presence of connective-tissue sheets. PMID:9919822

  9. Immunological basis for the development of tissue inflammation and organ-specific autoimmunity in animal models of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Korn, Thomas; Mitsdoerffer, Meike; Kuchroo, Vijay K

    2010-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an animal model for multiple sclerosis (MS) that has shaped our understanding of autoimmune tissue inflammation in the central nervous system (CNS). Major therapeutic approaches to MS have been first validated in EAE. Nevertheless, EAE in all its modifications is not able to recapitulate the full range of clinical and histopathogenic aspects of MS. Furthermore, autoimmune reactions in EAE-prone rodent strains and MS patients may differ in terms of the relative involvement of various subsets of immune cells. However, the role of specific molecules that play a role in skewing the immune response towards pathogenic autoreactivity is very similar in mice and humans. Thus, in this chapter, we will focus on the identification of a novel subset of inflammatory T cells, called Th17 cells, in EAE and their interplay with other immune cells including protective regulatory T cells (T-regs). It is likely that the discovery of Th17 cells and their relationship with T-regs will change our understanding of organ-specific autoimmune diseases in the years to come. PMID:19513635

  10. The role of biologics in treatment of connective tissue disease-associated interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Sharp, C; Dodds, N; Mayers, L; Millar, A B; Gunawardena, H; Adamali, H

    2015-09-01

    With an increased understanding of the molecular pathways of inflammation and autoimmunity, the development of targeted biological agents has revolutionized the management of connective tissue diseases (CTDs). There has been an explosion in the development of these drugs in the last decade, targeting diseases in diverse fields including: allergic disorders, oncology, neuroinflammatory disorders, inflammatory bowel disease, macular degeneration and CTDs. In this last field, commonly applied biologics fall into two categories: cytokine inhibitors and lymphocyte-targeted therapies. The former group includes the antitumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?), anti-interleukin (IL)-6 receptor monoclonal antibodies and IL-1 receptor antagonists, whilst the latter encompasses the anti-CD20, B-cell depleting, monoclonal antibody (mAb), Rituximab and the anti-T-cell activation agent, Abatacept. This review will examine our developing experience in the use of these agents in the treatment of CTD-related interstitial lung diseases, with a particular focus on B-cell depletion. PMID:25614613

  11. [50 years of connective tissue research: from the French Connective Tissue Club to the French Society of Extracellular Matrix Biology].

    PubMed

    Maquart, François-Xavier; Borel, Jacques-Paul

    2012-01-01

    The history of connective tissue research began in the late 18th century. However, it is only 50 years later that the concept of connective tissue was shaped. It took another fifty years before biochemical knowledge of extracellular matrix macromolecules began to emerge in the first half of the 20th century. In 1962, thanks to Ladislas and Barbara Robert, back from the US, the first society called "French Connective Tissue Club" was created in Paris. The first board was constituted of Albert Delaunay, Suzanne Bazin and Ladislas Robert. Very quickly, under the influence of these pioneers, national and international meetings were organized and, in 1967, a "Federation of the European Connective Tissue Clubs" was created at the initiative of Ladislas Robert (Paris) and John Scott (Manchester). It spread rapidly to the major European nations. In 1982 the transformation of "Clubs" in "Societies" occurred, a name more in line with the requirements of the time. In 2008, the "French Connective Tissue Society" became the "French Society of Extracellular Matrix Biology" ("Société Française de Biologie de la Matrice Extracellulaire", SFBMEc), to better highlight the importance of the extracellular matrix in the biology of living organisms. The SFBMEc's mission today is to promote and develop scientific exchanges between academic, industrial, and hospital laboratories involved in research on the extracellular matrix. SFBMEc organizes or subsidizes scientific meetings and awards scholarships to Ph.D. students or post-docs to participate in international conferences. It includes 200 to 250 members from different disciplines, developing strong interactions between scientists, clinicians and pathologists. It is present all around the French territory in many research laboratories. During these last 50 years, the extraordinary advances made possible by the development of new investigation techniques, in particular molecular biology, cell and tissue imaging, molecular modeling, etc., have permitted a considerable increase of the knowledge in the field of connective tissue. PMID:22748045

  12. Histopathology of lung disease in the connective tissue diseases.

    PubMed

    Vivero, Marina; Padera, Robert F

    2015-05-01

    The pathologic correlates of interstitial lung disease (ILD) secondary to connective tissue disease (CTD) comprise a diverse group of histologic patterns. Lung biopsies in patients with CTD-associated ILD tend to demonstrate simultaneous involvement of multiple anatomic compartments of the lung. Certain histologic patterns tend to predominate in each defined CTD, and it is possible in many cases to confirm connective tissue-associated lung disease and guide patient management using surgical lung biopsy. This article will cover the pulmonary pathologies seen in rheumatoid arthritis, systemic sclerosis, myositis, systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren syndrome, and mixed CTD. PMID:25836637

  13. Connective tissue anomalies in patients with spontaneous cervical artery dissection

    PubMed Central

    Giossi, Alessia; Ritelli, Marco; Costa, Paolo; Morotti, Andrea; Poli, Loris; Del Zotto, Elisabetta; Volonghi, Irene; Chiarelli, Nicola; Gamba, Massimo; Bovi, Paolo; Tomelleri, Giampaolo; Carletti, Monica; Checcarelli, Nicoletta; Meneghetti, Giorgio; Morra, Michele; Chinaglia, Mauro; De Giuli, Valeria; Colombi, Marina; Padovani, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence of connective tissue abnormalities in patients with spontaneous cervical artery dissections (sCeAD). Methods: We systematically assessed clinically detectable signs of connective tissue aberration in a series of consecutive patients with sCeAD and of age- and sex-matched patients with ischemic stroke unrelated to CeAD (non-CeAD IS) by a standard examination protocol including 68 items, and performed extensive molecular investigation for hereditary connective tissue disorders in all patients with sCeAD. Results: The study group included 84 patients with sCeAD (mean age, 44.5 ± 7.8 years; 66.7% men) and 84 patients with non-CeAD IS. None of the patients with sCeAD met clinical or molecular diagnostic criteria for established hereditary connective tissue disorder. Connective tissue abnormalities were detected more frequently in the group of patients with sCeAD than in the group of those with non-CeAD IS (mean number of pathologic findings, 4.5 ± 3.5 vs 1.9 ± 2.3; p < 0.001). Eighty-one patients (96.4%) in the sCeAD group had at least one detectable sign compared with 55 patients (66.7%) in the group with non-CeAD IS (p < 0.001). Skeletal, ocular, and skin abnormalities, as well as craniofacial dysmorphisms, were the clinical signs more strongly associated with sCeAD. Signs suggesting connective tissue abnormality were also more frequently represented in patients with sCeAD than in patients with traumatic CeAD (28.6%, p < 0.001; mean number of pathologic findings, 1.7 ± 3.7, p = 0.045). Conclusions: Connective tissue abnormalities are frequent in patients with sCeAD. This reinforces the hypothesis that systemic aberrations of the connective tissue might be implicated in the pathogenesis of the disease. PMID:25355826

  14. [Connective tissue: big unifying element of the organism].

    PubMed

    Kapandji, A-I

    2012-10-01

    The anatomical unity of the organism is realized by the connective tissue, which assumes five functions: the filling of the spaces between organs; the connexion between these organs; the driving of the vascular and nervous pedicles to these organs; the stocking of nutritive reserves in fat pads; an aesthetic role with hollows and bumps erasing. The space filling is done with jointed polyedric volumes, which are constituted, according to the theories of J.-C. Guimberteau, with microvacuoles, filled with under pressure fundamental substance. This is a status of preconstraint resulting in a form memory. So, the connective tissue under constraint get back its initial status after this constraint is over, according to the laws of a new science, the tensegrity. The explorations of the connective tissue with a 25× magnifying micro endoscopes are showing micro fibrillar structures, evoluting under constraint. Its arrangement, that seems chaotic, is in fractal disposition, in reality, and follows the "universal parcimony law" established by Williams of Ockham. The structure of the connective tissue can be integrated in a holistic conception of the organism. Many characteristics of this tissue have still to be discovered. PMID:22884219

  15. Autoimmune encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Newman, M P; Blum, S; Wong, R C W; Scott, J G; Prain, K; Wilson, R J; Gillis, D

    2016-02-01

    Over the past decade, the clinical spectrum of autoimmune encephalitis has expanded with the emergence of several new clinicopathological entities. In particular, autoimmune encephalitis has recently been described in association with antibodies to surface receptors and ion channels on neurological tissues. Greater clinician awareness has resulted in autoimmune encephalitis being increasingly recognised in patients with unexplained neurological and psychiatric symptoms and signs. The clinical spectrum of presentations, as well as our understanding of disease mechanisms and treatment regimens, is rapidly developing. An understanding of these conditions is important to all subspecialties of Internal Medicine, including neurology and clinical immunology, psychiatry, intensive care and rehabilitation medicine. This review provides a contemporary overview of the aetiology, investigations and treatment of the most recently described autoimmune encephalitides. PMID:26899887

  16. Alveolar ridge augmentation by connective tissue grafting using a pouch method and modified connective tissue technique: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Ashish; Gupta, Narinder Dev

    2015-01-01

    Background: Localized alveolar ridge defect may create physiological and pathological problems. Developments in surgical techniques have made it simpler to change the configuration of a ridge to create a more aesthetic and more easily cleansable shape. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of alveolar ridge augmentation using a subepithelial connective tissue graft in pouch and modified connective tissue graft technique. Materials and Methods: In this randomized, double blind, parallel and prospective study, 40 non-smoker individuals with 40 class III alveolar ridge defects in maxillary anterior were randomly divided in two groups. Group I received modified connective tissue graft, while group II were treated with subepithelial connective tissue graft in pouch technique. The defect size was measured in its horizontal and vertical dimension by utilizing a periodontal probe in a stone cast at base line, after 3 months, and 6 months post surgically. Analysis of variance and Bonferroni post-hoc test were used for statistical analysis. A two-tailed P < 0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. Results: Mean values in horizontal width after 6 months were 4.70 0.87 mm, and 4.05 0.89 mm for group I and II, respectively. Regarding vertical heights, obtained mean values were 4.75 0.97 mm and 3.70 0.92 mm for group I and group II, respectively. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, connective tissue graft proposed significantly more improvement as compare to connective tissue graft in pouch. PMID:26759591

  17. Lack of connectivity between the induced and autoimmune repertoires of lpr/lpr mice.

    PubMed Central

    Very, D L; Panka, D J; Weissman, D; Wysocki, L; Manser, T; Marshak-Rothstein, A

    1993-01-01

    It has been proposed that the autoantibody-secreting cells active during autoimmune diseases are derived from B cells initially responding to environmental antigens. In order to test the relationship between the antigen-induced and autoimmune repertoires, we monitored the fate of antigen-activated idiotypically defined B cells present in mice that developed the systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE)-like syndrome associated with the lpr mutation. Mice homozygous for both the A/J-derived Igh and Ig kappa region haplotypes and the lpr mutation were bred. Immunization of these mice with p-azophenylarsonate (Ars)-protein conjugates elicited the idiotypic components (IdCR) characteristic of the A/J anti-Ars response and did not interfere with the spontaneous development of the lpr-mediated autoimmune disease. These Id/lpr mice provided an ideal system for studying the relationship between the exogenously and endogenously induced responses because: (1) VHIdCR antibodies have been shown to bind autoantigens in vitro; and (2) serological and molecular reagents exist which can identify and monitor VHIdCR antibody production as disease progresses. Serum samples and hybridoma cell lines derived from non-immune as well as Ars-keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH)-immunized Id/lpr mice were monitored for idiotype expression as well as Ars and ssDNA reactivity at various stages of disease progression. We found that antibodies utilizing the VHIdCR gene segment did not preferentially contribute to the autoantibody pool. Moreover, even when IdCR B-cell clones were expanded by deliberate immunization with Ars-KLH, Ars non-binding variants were only rarely detected among the activated B-cell populations of diseased mice. These results indicate that there is only minimal overlap between the VHIdCR conventional and autoimmune repertoires. Images Figure 1 PMID:8307604

  18. Bioreactors for Connective Tissue Engineering: Design and Monitoring Innovations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haj, A. J. El; Hampson, K.; Gogniat, G.

    The challenges for the tissue engineering of connective tissue lie in creating off-the-shelf tissue constructs which are capable of providing organs for transplantation. These strategies aim to grow a complex tissue with the appropri ate mechanical integrity necessary for functional load bearing. Monolayer culture systems lack correlation with the in vivo environment and the naturally occur ring cell phenotypes. Part of the development of more recent models is to create growth environments or bioreactors which enable three-dimensional culture. Evidence suggests that in order to grow functional load-bearing tissues in a bioreactor, the cells must experience mechanical loading stimuli similar to that experienced in vivo which sets out the requirements for mechanical loading bioreactors. An essential part of developing new bioreactors for tissue growth is identifying ways of routinely and continuously measuring neo-tissue formation and in order to fully identify the successful generation of a tissue implant, the appropriate on-line monitoring must be developed. New technologies are being developed to advance our efforts to grow tissue ex vivo. The bioreactor is a critical part of these develop ments in supporting growth of biological implants and combining this with new advances in the detection of tissue formation allows us to refine our protocols and move nearer to off-the-shelf implants for clinical applications.

  19. PDGFRα plays a crucial role in connective tissue remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Horikawa, Shinjiro; Ishii, Yoko; Hamashima, Takeru; Yamamoto, Seiji; Mori, Hisashi; Fujimori, Toshihiko; Shen, Jie; Inoue, Ran; Nishizono, Hirofumi; Itoh, Hiroshi; Majima, Masataka; Abraham, David; Miyawaki, Toshio; Sasahara, Masakiyo

    2015-01-01

    Platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) plays a pivotal role in the remodeling of connective tissues. Emerging data indicate the distinctive role of PDGF receptor-α (PDGFRα) in this process. In the present study, the Pdgfra gene was systemically inactivated in adult mouse (α-KO mouse), and the role of PDGFRα was examined in the subcutaneously implanted sponge matrices. PDGFRα expressed in the fibroblasts of Pdgfra-preserving control mice (Flox mice), was significantly reduced in the sponges in α-KO mice. Neovascularized areas were largely suppressed in the α-KO mice than in the Flox mice, whereas the other parameters related to the blood vessels and endothelial cells were similar. The deposition of collagen and fibronectin and the expression of collagen 1a1 and 3a1 genes were significantly reduced in α-KO mice. There was a significantly decrease in the number and dividing fibroblasts in the α-KO mice, and those of macrophages were similar between the two genotypes. Hepatocyte growth factor (Hgf) gene expression was suppressed in Pdgfra-inactivated fibroblasts and connective tissue. The findings implicate the role of PDGFRα-dependent ECM and HGF production in fibroblasts that promotes the remodeling of connective tissue and suggest that PDGFRα may be a relevant target to regulate connective tissue remodeling. PMID:26639755

  20. Mechanical behavior of carpal tunnel subsynovial connective tissue under compression.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Jessica E; Baer, Thomas E

    2011-01-01

    Subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) is a fluid-permeated loose connective tissue that occupies the majority of the space in the carpal tunnel not occupied by the digital flexor tendons or the median nerve. It is arranged in layers around these more discrete structures, presumably to assist with tendon gliding. As a result of this arrangement, the compressive behavior and the fluid permeability of this tissue may substantially affect the stresses in the median nerve resulting from contact with its neighboring tendons or with the walls of the tunnel itself. These stresses may contribute to damage of the median nerve and the development of carpal tunnel syndrome. In this study, the fluid permeability and the compressive behavior of the SSCT were investigated to better understand the mechanics of this tissue and how it may mediate mechanical insult to the median nerve. A custom experimental apparatus was built to allow simultaneous measurement of tissue compression and fluid flow. Using Darcy's law, the average SSCT fluid permeability was 8.78×10(15) m(4)/Ns. The compressive behavior of the SSCT demonstrated time dependence, with an initial modulus of 395kPa gradually decreasing to a value of 285kPa. These baseline tissue data may serve as a mechanical norm (toward which pathological tissue might be returned, therapeutically) and may serve as essential properties to include in future mechanical models of the carpal tunnel. PMID:22096431

  1. The specificity of capillaroscopic pattern in connective autoimmune diseases. A comparison with microvascular changes in diseases of social importance: arterial hypertension and diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Lambova, Sevdalina Nikolova; Müller-Ladner, Ulf

    2009-01-01

    Capillaroscopy is a method with substantial value for diagnosis and differentiation of primary and secondary Raynaud's phenomenon in rheumatic diseases. The most specific finding is in systemic sclerosis--the so-called "scleroderma pattern." which is characterized by the presence of dilated capillaries, hemorrhages, avascular areas, and neoangiogenesis. Similar changes are found in patients with dermatomyositis, overlap syndromes, and others and are termed "scleroderma-like pattern." For the development of these patterns, the most specific finding in the early phase is appearance of dilated capillaries. Capillaroscopic changes in connective autoimmune diseases are specific and differ significantly from those of that can be found in other diseases. Diseases of social importance such as diabetes mellitus and arterial hypertension often present as comorbidity in patients with rheumatic diseases. In diabetes mellitus, the capillaroscopic examination does not show dilated capillaries until the advanced stages of the disease. In the late stages of connective tissue disease, a loss of capillaries is typical. In addition, in diabetes mellitus, the diabetic stiff-hand syndrome and sclerodactyly are common complications, which have to be differentiated from similar signs in rheumatic diseases, and capillaroscopic examination appears to be useful in these situations. In arterial hypertension, a reduced capillary density in different body regions has been observed in patients with established disease as well as in preclinical stages. Analogous phenomenon of reduction in the nail-fold area has also been observed in a group of patients with essential hypertension, none of whom previously received hypertensive drugs. PMID:19779765

  2. Clinical Evaluation of Papilla Reconstruction Using Subepithelial Connective Tissue Graft

    PubMed Central

    Kaushik, Alka; PK, Pal; Chopra, Deepak; Chaurasia, Vishwajit Rampratap; Masamatti, Vinaykumar S; DK, Suresh; Babaji, Prashant

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aesthetics of the patient can be improved by surgical reconstruction of interdental papilla by using an advanced papillary flap interposed with subepithelial connective tissue graft. Materials and Methods: A total of fifteen sites from ten patients having black triangles/papilla recession in the maxillary anterior region were selected and subjected to presurgical evaluation. The sites were treated with interposed subepithelial connective tissue graft placed under a coronally advance flap. The integrity of the papilla was maintained by moving the whole of gingivopapillary unit coronally. The various parameters were analysed at different intervals. Results: There was a mean decrease in the papilla presence index score and distance from contact point to gingival margin, but it was statistically not significant. Also, there is increase in the width of the keratinized gingiva which was statistically highly significant. Conclusion: Advanced papillary flap with interposed sub–epithelial connective tissue graft can offer predictable results for the reconstruction of interdental papilla. If papilla loss occurs solely due to soft-tissue damage, reconstructive techniques can completely restore it; but if due to periodontal disease involving bone loss, reconstruction is generally incomplete and multiple surgical procedures may be required. PMID:25386529

  3. Smooth Muscle-Mediated Connective Tissue Remodeling in Pulmonary Hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mecham, Robert P.; Whitehouse, Loren A.; Wrenn, David S.; Parks, William C.; Griffin, Gail L.; Senior, Robert M.; Crouch, Edmond C.; Stenmark, Kurt R.; Voelkel, Norbert F.

    1987-07-01

    Abnormal accumulation of connective tissue in blood vessels contributes to alterations in vascular physiology associated with disease states such as hypertension and atherosclerosis. Elastin synthesis was studied in blood vessels from newborn calves with severe pulmonary hypertension induced by alveolar hypoxia in order to investigate the cellular stimuli that elicit changes in pulmonary arterial connective tissue production. A two- to fourfold increase in elastin production was observed in pulmonary artery tissue and medial smooth muscle cells from hypertensive calves. This stimulation of elastin production was accompanied by a corresponding increase in elastin messenger RNA consistent with regulation at the transcriptional level. Conditioned serum harvested from cultures of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells isolated from hypertensive animals contained one or more low molecular weight elastogenic factors that stimulated the production of elastin in both fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells and altered the chemotactic responsiveness of fibroblasts to elastin peptides. These results suggest that connective tissue changes in the pulmonary vasculature in response to pulmonary hypertension are orchestrated by the medial smooth muscle cell through the generation of specific differentiation factors that alter both the secretory phenotype and responsive properties of surrounding cells.

  4. Absorption of Hydrocortisone Acetate in Human Connective Tissue Using Phonophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Gurney, A. Burke; Wascher, Daniel; Schenck, Robert; Tennison, Alexandria; Jaramillo, Bettina

    2011-01-01

    Background: Therapeutic ultrasound to drive medication (phonophoresis) has been a mainstay in physical therapy. The most common drug used in phonophoresis is hydrocortisone acetate (HA). A number of studies have been done examining phonophoresis in the delivery of HA through the skin to underlying tissues; however, a study has never been done examining the absorption of HA using phonophoresis on human connective tissue. Hypothesis: Phonophoresis will facilitate the transmission of HA in human connective tissue. Study Design: Randomized controlled study. Methods: Twenty-one patients undergoing anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction surgery were randomly assigned to either a sham or true phonophoresis treatment group. The latter group received 6 minutes of 10% HA ultrasound at a point consistent with the gastrocnemius slip of the semitendinosis tendon (treatment site). The sham group received 6 minutes of 10% HA ultrasound to the same area, but the ultrasound was not turned on. The slip and a sample of the distal attachment of the tendon (control) were removed. Samples were analyzed for HA levels. Results: Although the mean and median levels of HA found at the treatment site were greater than those of the control site (means, 34.1 vs 22.9 parts per billion; medians, 7 vs 0 parts per billion), the levels of HA found at the treatment site were not significantly greater than those at the control site (P = 0.15). There were no statistically significant differences between the true and sham phonophoresis groups in HA levels (P = 0.80) nor in age, sex, or skin thickness. Conclusion: Phonophoresis does not appear to facilitate the absorption of HA in connective tissue when compared with simple absorption (sham). Clinical Relevance: Phonophoresis does not appear to enhance the transmission of HA in human connective tissue; therefore, use of phonophoresis should be reconsidered in inflammatory conditions. PMID:23016027

  5. A Framework for Modelling Connective Tissue Changes in VIIP Syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethier, C. R.; Best, L.; Gleason, R.; Mulugeta, L.; Myers, J. G.; Nelson, E. S.; Samuels, B. C.

    2014-01-01

    Insertion of astronauts into microgravity induces a cascade of physiological adaptations, notably including a cephalad fluid shift. Longer-duration flights carry an increased risk of developing Visual Impairment and Intracranial Pressure (VIIP) syndrome, a spectrum of ophthalmic changes including posterior globe flattening, choroidal folds, distension of the optic nerve sheath, kinking of the optic nerve and potentially permanent degradation of visual function. The slow onset of changes in VIIP, their chronic nature, and the similarity of certain clinical features of VIIP to ophthalmic findings in patients with raised intracranial pressure strongly suggest that: (i) biomechanical factors play a role in VIIP, and (ii) connective tissue remodeling must be accounted for if we wish to understand the pathology of VIIP. Our goal is to elucidate the pathophysiology of VIIP and suggest countermeasures based on biomechanical modeling of ocular tissues, suitably informed by experimental data, and followed by validation and verification. We specifically seek to understand the quasi-homeostatic state that evolves over weeks to months in space, during which ocular tissue remodeling occurs. This effort is informed by three bodies of work: (i) modeling of cephalad fluid shifts; (ii) modeling of ophthalmic tissue biomechanics in glaucoma; and (iii) modeling of connective tissue changes in response to biomechanical loading.

  6. New perspectives on rare connective tissue calcifying diseases.

    PubMed

    Rashdan, Nabil A; Rutsch, Frank; Kempf, Hervé; Váradi, András; Lefthériotis, Georges; MacRae, Vicky E

    2016-06-01

    Connective tissue calcifying diseases (CTCs) are characterized by abnormal calcium deposition in connective tissues. CTCs are caused by multiple factors including chronic diseases (Type II diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease), the use of pharmaceuticals (e.g. warfarin, glucocorticoids) and inherited rare genetic diseases such as pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), generalized arterial calcification in infancy (GACI) and Keutel syndrome (KTLS). This review explores our current knowledge of these rare inherited CTCs, and highlights the most promising avenues for pharmaceutical intervention. Advancing our understanding of rare inherited forms of CTC is not only essential for the development of therapeutic strategies for patients suffering from these diseases, but also fundamental to delineating the mechanisms underpinning acquired chronic forms of CTC. PMID:26930168

  7. Chloroquine cardiotoxicity mimicking connective tissue disease heart involvement.

    PubMed

    Vereckei, András; Fazakas, Adám; Baló, Timea; Fekete, Béla; Molnár, Mária Judit; Karádi, István

    2013-04-01

    The authors report a case of rare chloroquine cardiotoxicity mimicking connective tissue disease heart involvement in a 56-year-old woman with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) manifested suddenly as third degree A-V block with QT(c) interval prolongation and short torsade de pointes runs ultimately degenerating into ventricular fibrillation. Immunological tests suggested an MCTD flare, implying that cardiac arrest had resulted from myocardial involvement by MCTD. However, QT(c) prolongation is not a characteristic of cardiomyopathy caused by connective tissue disease, unless anti-Ro/SSA positivity is present, but that was not the case. Therefore, looking for another cause of QT(c) prolongation the possibility of chloroquine cardiotoxicity emerged, which the patient had been receiving for almost two years in supramaximal doses. Biopsy of the deltoid muscle was performed, because in chloroquine toxicity, specific lesions are present both in the skeletal muscle and in the myocardium, and electron microscopy revealed the accumulation of cytoplasmic curvilinear bodies, which are specific to antimalarial-induced myocyte damage and are absent in all other muscle diseases, except neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. Thus, the diagnosis of chloroquine cardiotoxicity was established. It might be advisable to supplement the periodic ophthalmological examination, which is currently the only recommendation for patients on long-term chloroquine therapy, with ECG screening. PMID:23409733

  8. Neurologic manifestations of inherited disorders of connective tissue.

    PubMed

    Debette, Stéphanie; Germain, Dominique P

    2014-01-01

    Inherited disorders of connective tissue are single gene disorders affecting structure or function of the connective tissue. Neurological manifestations are classic and potentially severe complications of many such disorders. The most common neurological manifestations are cerebrovascular. Ischemic stroke is a classic complication of vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (type IV), homocystinuria, and arterial tortuosity syndrome, and may occasionally be seen in Marfan syndrome and pseudoxanthoma elasticum with distinct underlying mechanisms for each disease. Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome can also lead to cervical artery dissection (with or without ischemic stroke), carotid-cavernous fistula, intracranial dissections and aneurysms potentially causing subarachnoid or intracerebral hemorrhage, and arterial rupture. Other neurological manifestations include nerve root compression and intracranial hypotension due to dural ectasia in Marfan and Loeys-Dietz syndrome, spinal cord compression in osteogenesis imperfecta, and mucopolysaccharidosis type I and VI, carpal tunnel syndrome in mucopolysaccharidosis type I, II, and VI. Impaired mental development can be observed in homocystinuria, mucopolysaccharidosis type II, and the severe form of mucopolysaccharidosis type I. For the neurologist, being aware of these complications and of the diagnostic criteria for inherited connective tissue disorders is important since neurological complications can be the first manifestation of the disease and because caution may be warranted for the management of these patients. PMID:24365320

  9. Carcinoma cells may modulate their supporting connective tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, S. D.; Hill, M. W.

    1986-01-01

    The patterns of growth of two chemically-induced murine squamous cell carcinoma cell lines and their effect on a deep connective tissue graft bed were examined in syngeneic C57Bl/6 mice. The two cell lines displayed markedly different patterns of histo-differentiation but in vivo the poorly-differentiated line (FS) gave rise to tumours with much lower inocula than the well-differentiated cell line (A5). To evaluate the effect of the tumour cells on the graft bed a bioassay involving transplantation of epidermal sheets was used. Whereas the pretreatment of the deep connective tissue graft bed with the FS cell line facilitated the subsequent growth of the epidermal sheets, beds treated with the A5 cell line, lethally irradiated tumour cells or receiving no treatment failed to support continued growth of normal epidermis. We suggest that this ability of a carcinoma cell line to modify the connective tissue may facilitate the establishment of metastatic deposits. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:3790425

  10. Connective tissue alterations in Fkbp10−/− mice

    PubMed Central

    Lietman, Caressa D.; Rajagopal, Abbhirami; Homan, Erica P.; Munivez, Elda; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Bertin, Terry K.; Chen, Yuqing; Hicks, John; Weis, MaryAnn; Eyre, David; Lee, Brendan; Krakow, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is an inherited brittle bone disorder characterized by bone fragility and low bone mass. Loss of function mutations in FK506-binding protein 10 (FKBP10), encoding the FKBP65 protein, result in recessive OI and Bruck syndrome, of which the latter is additionally characterized by joint contractures. FKBP65 is thought to act as a collagen chaperone, but it is unknown how loss of FKBP65 affects collagen synthesis and extracellular matrix formation. We evaluated the developmental and postnatal expression of Fkbp10 and analyzed the consequences of its generalized loss of function. Fkbp10 is expressed at low levels in E13.5 mouse embryos, particularly in skeletal tissues, and steadily increases through E17.5 with expression in not only skeletal tissues, but also in visceral tissues. Postnatally, expression is limited to developing bone and ligaments. In contrast to humans, with complete loss of function mutations, Fkbp10−/− mice do not survive birth, and embryos present with growth delay and tissue fragility. Type I calvarial collagen isolated from these mice showed reduced stable crosslink formation at telopeptide lysines. Furthermore, Fkbp10−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts show retention of procollagen in the cell layer and associated dilated endoplasmic reticulum. These data suggest a requirement for FKBP65 function during embryonic connective tissue development in mice, but the restricted expression postnatally in bone, ligaments and tendons correlates with the bone fragility and contracture phenotype in humans. PMID:24777781

  11. Response of mice connective tissue to three different endodontic materials.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Lucio Mitsuo; Cavalcante, Roberta Barroso; Gurgel-Filho, Eduardo Diogo; De-Deus, Gustavo André; Ximenes, Ana Beatriz; Da Silva, Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the biocompatibility of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) Bio and Portland cement (PC) and compare with those of ProRoot MTA. Polyethylene tubes were filled with materials and placed into dorsal subcutaneous connective tissue of Wistar albino rats. After 7, 30, and 60 days after the surgical procedure, the implants with the surrounding tissue were removed. Tissue samples were subjected to histological processing, and sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Sections were evaluated for the intensity of inflammation, predominant cell type, presence of fibrous capsule and granulation tissue. Data were submitted to Kruskal-Wallis test at a significant level of P ≤ 0.05. No statistical differences were observed at any evaluated condition among tested materials (P > 0.05). Statistically significant differences were observed between mean inflammatory scores, cell types and granulation tissue of the same material in different experimental periods (P < 0.05). Can be concluded that biocompatibility of MTA bio and PC were comparable with that of ProRoot MTA. PMID:23335503

  12. Mechanisms of lamellar collagen formation in connective tissues.

    PubMed

    Ghazanfari, Samaneh; Khademhosseini, Ali; Smit, Theodoor H

    2016-08-01

    The objective of tissue engineering is to regenerate functional tissues. Engineering functional tissues requires an understanding of the mechanisms that guide the formation and evolution of structure in the extracellular matrix (ECM). In particular, the three-dimensional (3D) collagen fiber arrangement is important as it is the key structural determinant that provides mechanical integrity and biological function. In this review, we survey the current knowledge on collagen organization mechanisms that can be applied to create well-structured functional lamellar tissues and in particular intervertebral disc and cornea. Thus far, the mechanisms behind the formation of cross-aligned collagen fibers in the lamellar structures is not fully understood. We start with cell-induced collagen alignment and strain-stabilization behavior mechanisms which can explain a single anisotropically aligned collagen fiber layer. These mechanisms may explain why there is anisotropy in a single layer in the first place. However, they cannot explain why a consecutive collagen layer is laid down with an alternating alignment. Therefore, we explored another mechanism, called liquid crystal phasing. While dense concentrations of collagen show such behavior, there is little evidence that the conditions for liquid crystal phasing are actually met in vivo. Instead, lysyl aldehyde-derived collagen cross-links have been found essential for correct lamellar matrix deposition. Furthermore, we suggest that supra-cellular (tissue-level) shear stress may be instrumental in the alignment of collagen fibers. Understanding the potential mechanisms behind the lamellar collagen structure in connective tissues will lead to further improvement of the regeneration strategies of functional complex lamellar tissues. PMID:27162076

  13. Diagnosis and Treatment of Connective Tissue Disease-Associated Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Strek, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is one of the most serious pulmonary complications associated with connective tissue diseases (CTDs), resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Although the various CTDs associated with ILD often are considered together because of their shared autoimmune nature, there are substantial differences in the clinical presentations and management of ILD in each specific CTD. This heterogeneity and the cross-disciplinary nature of care have complicated the conduct of prospective multicenter treatment trials and hindered our understanding of the development of ILD in patients with CTD. In this update, we present new information regarding the diagnosis and treatment of patients with ILD secondary to systemic sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, dermatomyositis and polymyositis, and Sjögren syndrome. We review information on risk factors for the development of ILD in the setting of CTD. Diagnostic criteria for CTD are presented as well as elements of the clinical evaluation that increase suspicion for CTD-ILD. We review the use of medications in the treatment of CTD-ILD. Although a large, randomized study has examined the impact of immunosuppressive therapy for ILD secondary to systemic sclerosis, additional studies are needed to determine optimal treatment strategies for each distinct form of CTD-ILD. Finally, we review new information regarding the subgroup of patients with ILD who meet some, but not all, diagnostic criteria for a CTD. A careful and systematic approach to diagnosis in patients with ILD may reveal an unrecognized CTD or evidence of autoimmunity in those previously believed to have idiopathic ILD. PMID:23460159

  14. Coverage of gingival recession using tunnel connective tissue graft technique

    PubMed Central

    Khuller, Nitin

    2009-01-01

    The recession of gingiva is increasingly becoming a more prominent condition in the oral health of many patients and should be treated at its earliest detection. The multi-factorial etiology, decision modality, and current trends followed in treatment of gingival recession are discussed in this presentation. The correction of class I and II gingival recessions are presented as a means of minimizing surgical trauma and achieving predictable aesthetic results. In this case report, I present an alternative technique in treating gingival recession- the tunnel connective tissue graft. PMID:20407659

  15. [Ultrasonography in chronic inflammatory rheumatic and connective tissue disorders].

    PubMed

    Mérot, O; Le Goff, B

    2014-08-01

    Musculoskeletal ultrasonography is now widely used by almost all rheumatologists thanks to an improvement in the quality of ultrasound unit and probe and to the systematic teaching of this imaging technique to the rheumatology fellows. Applications have broadened from the study of degenerative and mechanical diseases to inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Ultrasound is more sensitive than clinical examination. Power Doppler allows the direct visualisation of inflammation within the tissues. Finally, it is a prognostic tool helping the physician in the management of the disease. This review will focus on the value and applications of ultrasonography in the 2 most frequent rheumatic diseases: rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis. We will also give some recent data on the usefulness of this imaging technique in the study of musculoskeletal manifestations associated with connective tissue disease. PMID:24439720

  16. Erythropoietin-Derived Nonerythropoietic Peptide Ameliorates Experimental Autoimmune Neuritis by Inflammation Suppression and Tissue Protection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuqi; Luo, Bangwei; Han, Fuyu; Li, Xiaoming; Xiong, Jian; Jiang, Man; Yang, Xioafeng; Wu, Yuzhang; Zhang, Zhiren

    2014-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune neuritis (EAN) is an autoantigen-specific T-cell-mediated disease model for human demyelinating inflammatory disease of the peripheral nervous system. Erythropoietin (EPO) has been known to promote EAN recovery but its haematopoiesis stimulating effects may limit its clinic application. Here we investigated the effects and potential mechanisms of an EPO-derived nonerythropoietic peptide, ARA 290, in EAN. Exogenous ARA 290 intervention greatly improved EAN recovery, improved nerve regeneration and remyelination, and suppressed nerve inflammation. Furthermore, haematopoiesis was not induced by ARA 290 during EAN treatment. ARA 290 intervention suppressed lymphocyte proliferation and altered helper T cell differentiation by inducing increase of Foxp3+/CD4+ regulatory T cells and IL-4+/CD4+ Th2 cells and decrease of IFN-γ+/CD4+ Th1 cells in EAN. In addition, ARA 290 inhibited inflammatory macrophage activation and promoted its phagocytic activity. In vitro, ARA 290 was shown to promote Schwann cell proliferation and inhibit its inflammatory activation. In summary, our data demonstrated that ARA 290 could effectively suppress EAN by attenuating inflammation and exerting direct cell protection, indicating that ARA 290 could be a potent candidate for treatment of autoimmune neuropathies. PMID:24603865

  17. T Cells with Low Avidity for a Tissue-Restricted Antigen Routinely Evade Central and Peripheral Tolerance and Cause Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Zehn, Dietmar; Bevan, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Summary T cells causing autoimmunity must escape tolerance. We observed that CD8+ T cells with high avidity for an antigen expressed in the pancreas, kidney, and thymic medulla were efficiently removed from a polyclonal repertoire by central and peripheral tolerance mechanisms. However, both mechanisms spared low-avidity T cells from elimination. Neither the introduction of activated, self-antigen-specific CD4+ helper T cells nor a global inflammatory stimulus were sufficient to activate the low-avidity CD8+ T cells and did not break tolerance. In contrast, challenge with a recombinant bacterium expressing the self antigen primed the low-avidity T cells, and the animals rapidly developed autoimmune diabetes. We suggest that whereas thymic and peripheral tolerance mechanisms remove cells that can be primed by endogenous amounts of self antigen, they do not guard against tissue destruction by low-avidity effector T cells, which have been primed by higher amounts of self antigen or by crossreactive antigens. PMID:16879996

  18. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated with connective tissue diseases].

    PubMed

    Legendre, Paul; Mouthon, Luc

    2014-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a classical complication of connective tissue diseases (CTD), particularly in systemic sclerosis (SSc), systemic lupus erythematous (SLE) or mixed connective tissue diseases (MCTD). The prevalence of PAH in SSc, as measured by right heart catheterization (RHC), is estimated between 7.85 to 13%. The detection of PAH in SSc is based on trans-thoracic echocardiography. Early detection in pulmonary hypertension is the best way to improve the survival in these diseases. In the DETECT study, 19% of high-risk PAH patients with SSc (SSc diagnosed less than 3 years before and DLco<60% predicted) have PAH as measured by RHC. Specific treatments for PAH are less efficient in PAH related to SSc than in idiopathic PAH. The main characteristic of PAH related to CTD other than SSc is a good response to immunosuppressive treatment, with an improvement in 50% of cases in SLE or MCTD. The prognosis of PAH associated with CTD seem to improve with the diversification of treatments available, but remains reserved. Therapeutic combinations and new molecules should allow to improve the prognosis. PMID:25129118

  19. Myoarchitecture and connective tissue in hearts with tricuspid atresia

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Quintana, D; Climent, V; Ho, S; Anderson, R

    1999-01-01

    ObjectiveTo compare the atrial and ventricular myoarchitecture in the normal heart and the heart with tricuspid atresia, and to investigate changes in the three dimensional arrangement of collagen fibrils.?MethodsBlunt dissection and cell maceration with scanning electron microscopy were used to study the architecture of the atrial and ventricular musculature and the arrangement of collagen fibrils in three specimens with tricuspid atresia and six normal human hearts.?ResultsThere were significant modifications in the myoarchitecture of the right atrium and the left ventricle, both being noticeably hypertrophied. The middle layer of the ventricle in the abnormal hearts was thicker than in the normal hearts. The orientation of the superficial layer in the left ventricle in hearts with tricuspid atresia was irregular compared with the normal hearts. Scanning electron microscopy showed coarser endomysial sheaths and denser perimysial septa in hearts with tricuspid atresia than in normal hearts.?ConclusionsThe overall architecture of the muscle fibres and its connective tissue matrix in hearts with tricuspid atresia differed from normal, probably reflecting modelling of the myocardium that is inherent to the malformation. This is in concordance with clinical observations showing deterioration in pump function of the dominant left ventricle from very early in life.?? Keywords: tricuspid atresia; congenital heart defects; connective tissue; fibrosis PMID:9922357

  20. Connective tissue photodamage in the hairless mouse is partially reversible

    SciTech Connect

    Kligman, L.H.

    1987-03-01

    Photodamaged connective tissue in animal and human skin is characterized by excessive accumulations of elastic fibers, loss of mature collagen, concomitant overproduction of new collagen, and greatly increased levels of glycosaminoglycans. Formerly considered irreversible changes, we recently showed in hairless mice, post irradiation, that a band of normal connective tissue was laid down subepidermally. The present studies focused on 2 aspects of this repair: whether repair would occur if animals were protected by sunscreens after dermal damage was induced and irradiation continued; whether retinoic acid could enhance the repair process. To examine the first aspect, albino hairless mice were irradiated with Westinghouse FS 20 sunlamps thrice weekly for 30 weeks. Sunscreens of high sun-protection factors were applied after 10 and 20 weeks. Not only was further damage prevented, but the damage incurred before sunscreen application was repaired. This appeared as subepidermal reconstruction zones containing normal, mature collagen and a network of fine elastic fibers. The second aspect was examined by applying 0.05% retinoic acid, topically, to animals preirradiated for 10 weeks. In contrast to controls treated with vehicle, the reconstruction zone was significantly wider in retinoic acid-treated mice. The enhanced repair was dose-related.

  1. Connective tissue photodamage in the hairless mouse is partially reversible.

    PubMed

    Kligman, L H

    1987-03-01

    Photodamaged connective tissue in animal and human skin is characterized by excessive accumulations of elastic fibers, loss of mature collagen, concomitant overproduction of new collagen, and greatly increased levels of glycosaminoglycans. Formerly considered irreversible changes, we recently showed in hairless mice, post irradiation, that a band of normal connective tissue was laid down subepidermally. The present studies focused on 2 aspects of this repair: whether repair would occur if animals were protected by sunscreens after dermal damage was induced and irradiation continued; whether retinoic acid could enhance the repair process. To examine the first aspect, albino hairless mice were irradiated with Westinghouse FS 20 sunlamps thrice weekly for 30 weeks. Sunscreens of high sun-protection factors were applied after 10 and 20 weeks. Not only was further damage prevented, but the damage incurred before sunscreen application was repaired. This appeared as subepidermal reconstruction zones containing normal, mature collagen and a network of fine elastic fibers. The second aspect was examined by applying 0.05% retinoic acid, topically, to animals preirradiated for 10 weeks. In contrast to controls treated with vehicle, the reconstruction zone was significantly wider in retinoic acid-treated mice. The enhanced repair was dose-related. PMID:3819471

  2. Cell-based and biomaterial approaches to connective tissue repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stalling, Simone Suzette

    Connective tissue injuries of skin, tendon and ligament, heal by a reparative process in adults, filling the wound site with fibrotic, disorganized scar tissue that poorly reflects normal tissue architecture or function. Conversely, fetal skin and tendon have been shown to heal scarlessly. Complete regeneration is not intrinsically ubiquitous to all fetal tissues; fetal diaphragmatic and gastrointestinal injuries form scars. In vivo studies suggest that the presence of fetal fibroblasts is essential for scarless healing. In the orthopaedic setting, adult anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) heals poorly; however, little is known about the regenerative capacity of fetal ACL or fetal ACL fibroblasts. We characterized in vitro wound healing properties of fetal and adult ACL fibroblasts demonstrating that fetal ACL fibroblasts migrate faster and elaborate greater quantities of type I collagen, suggesting the healing potential of the fetal ACL may not be intrinsically poor. Similar to fetal ACL fibroblasts, fetal dermal fibroblasts also exhibit robust cellular properties. We investigated the age-dependent effects of dermal fibroblasts on tendon-to-bone healing in rat supraspinatus tendon injuries, a reparative injury model. We hypothesized delivery of fetal dermal fibroblasts would increase tissue organization and mechanical properties in comparison to adult dermal fibroblasts. However, at 1 and 8 weeks, the presence of dermal fibroblasts, either adult or fetal, had no significant effect on tissue histology or mechanical properties. There was a decreasing trend in cross-sectional area of repaired tendons treated with fetal dermal fibroblasts in comparison to adult, but this finding was not significant in comparison to controls. Finally, we synthesized a novel polysaccharide, methacrylated methylcellulose (MA-MC), and fabricated hydrogels using a well-established photopolymerization technique. We characterized the physical and mechanical properties of MA-MC hydrogels in vitro as well as in a subcutaneous mouse model. Stable MA-MC hydrogels, of varying weight percentages, demonstrated tunable swelling and mechanical properties in the absence of cytotoxic degradation products. In vivo, 6wt% MA-MC hydrogels maintained their shape and mechanical integrity while eliciting a minimal inflammatory response; highly desirable properties for soft tissue reconstruction. These cellulose-based photopolymerizable hydrogels can be further optimized for drug delivery and tissue engineering applications to enhance wound repair.

  3. The integrin-collagen connection - a glue for tissue repair?

    PubMed

    Zeltz, Cédric; Gullberg, Donald

    2016-02-15

    The α1β1, α2β1, α10β1 and α11β1 integrins constitute a subset of the integrin family with affinity for GFOGER-like sequences in collagens. Integrins α1β1 and α2β1 were originally identified on a subset of activated T-cells, and have since been found to be expressed on a number of cell types including platelets (α2β1), vascular cells (α1β1, α2β1), epithelial cells (α1β1, α2β1) and fibroblasts (α1β1, α2β1). Integrin α10β1 shows a distribution that is restricted to mesenchymal stem cells and chondrocytes, whereas integrin α11β1 appears restricted to mesenchymal stem cells and subsets of fibroblasts. The bulk of the current literature suggests that collagen-binding integrins only have a limited role in adult connective tissue homeostasis, partly due to a limited availability of cell-binding sites in the mature fibrillar collagen matrices. However, some recent data suggest that, instead, they are more crucial for dynamic connective tissue remodeling events - such as wound healing - where they might act specifically to remodel and restore the tissue architecture. This Commentary discusses the recent development in the field of collagen-binding integrins, their roles in physiological and pathological settings with special emphasis on wound healing, fibrosis and tumor-stroma interactions, and include a discussion of the most recently identified newcomers to this subfamily - integrins α10β1 and α11β1. PMID:26857815

  4. Skin involvement in systemic autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Rashtak, Shadi; Pittelkow, Mark R

    2008-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases present with varied and broad-ranging cutaneous manifestations. Connective tissue disorders have a plethora of skin manifestations such as rheumatoid nodules in rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic plaques in psoriatic arthritis, acne and pustulosis in SAPHO syndrome, livedo reticularis and ulceration in antiphospholipid antibody syndrome and xerosis in Sjgren syndrome. Cutaneous manifestations of autoimmune vasculitides such as polyarteritis nodosa, Kawasaki disease, Henoch-Schnlein purpura, cryoglobulinemic vasculitis, Behcet disease, Wegener granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis and Churg-Strauss syndrome range from papules, subcutaneous nodules and livedo reticularis, to palpable purpura, hemorrhagic bulla and ulcerating lesions. Pathological skin manifestations in autoimmune endocrinopathies include pretibial myxedema/dermopathy in Graves' disease, diabetic dermopathy and necrobiosis lipoidica in type I autoimmune diabetes mellitus, candidiasis, ectodermal dysplasia, vitiligo and alopecia areata in APECED and uniform hyperpigmentation of the skin in Addison's disease. Autoimmune gastrointestinal disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease (with erythema nodosum), gluten-sensitive enteropathy (with dermatitis herpetiformis), autoimmune hepatitis and primary biliary cirrhosis (with jaundice and pruritus), hematologic/oncologic disorders such as acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (with skin manifestations ranging from pruritic maculopapular eruptions and lichen planus-like lesions to generalized scleroderma), and paraneoplastic autoimmune dermatoses are discussed as well. PMID:18460895

  5. Sexual dimorphism in autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Rubtsova, Kira; Marrack, Philippa; Rubtsov, Anatoly V

    2015-06-01

    Autoimmune diseases occur when the immune system attacks and destroys the organs and tissues of its own host. Autoimmunity is the third most common type of disease in the United States. Because there is no cure for autoimmunity, it is extremely important to study the mechanisms that trigger these diseases. Most autoimmune diseases predominantly affect females, indicating a strong sex bias. Various factors, including sex hormones, the presence or absence of a second X chromosome, and sex-specific gut microbiota can influence gene expression in a sex-specific way. These changes in gene expression may, in turn, lead to susceptibility or protection from autoimmunity, creating a sex bias for autoimmune diseases. In this Review we discuss recent findings in the field of sex-dependent regulation of gene expression and autoimmunity. PMID:25915581

  6. Chest High Resolution Computed Tomography Findings in Connective Tissue Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Farrokh, Donya; Javanbakht, Aida; Raufi, Elahe

    2013-01-01

    Background Lung disorders are important for prognosis of connective tissue disease (CTD). Thus, chest radiography, High Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) of the chest and ultrasonic echocardiogram are suggested after the diagnosis of these conditions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate chest HRCT findings in patients with CTD. Materials and Methods In this descriptive cross-sectional study, we evaluated HRCT findings in patients with (CTD) hospitalized in Imam Reza Hospital in Mashhad from 2006 - 2011. Patients age, sex, type of rheumatic disease and HRCT results were collected and analyzed by SPSS version 16.0 software. Results Out of 75 patients (78.67% females, 21.33% males with a mean age of 41.6 years), 56% had respiratory symptoms. Scleroderma was the most common disease (38.6%) followed by rheumatoid arthritis (26.6%) and systemic lupus erythematosus (14.6%). Interstitial tissue involvement of the lung was the most frequent finding in patients with scleroderma, dermatomyositis, polymyositis and Sjogren's syndrome (48.3%, 57.1%, 60% and 66.7%, respectively). Pleural thickening was the most common finding in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (45%). Pleural effusion was the most frequent finding in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (45.4%). Lymphadenopathy and bronchiectasis had the lowest prevalence (1.3%). Conclusion Our data shows that interstitial tissue involvement, pleural thickening and pleural effusion are common in patients with rheumatic diseases which is consistent with some previous studies. PMID:25191473

  7. Meta-analysis reveals an association of PTPN22 C1858T with autoimmune diseases, which depends on the localization of the affected tissue.

    PubMed

    Zheng, J; Ibrahim, S; Petersen, F; Yu, X

    2012-12-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22 (PTPN22) is a strong susceptibility gene shared by many autoimmune diseases. The aim of this study was to explore the mechanisms underlying this relationship. We performed a comprehensive analysis of the association between PTPN22 polymorphism C1858T and autoimmune diseases. The results showed a remarkable pattern; PTPN22 C1858T was strongly associated with type I diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, immune thrombocytopenia, generalized vitiligo with concomitant autoimmune diseases, idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, Graves' disease, juvenile idiopathic arthritis, myasthenia gravis, systemic lupus erythematosus, anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis and Addison's disease. By contrast, PTPN22 C1858T showed a negligible association with systemic sclerosis, celiac disease, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, ankylosing spondylitis, pemphigus vulgaris, ulcerative colitis, primary sclerosing cholangitis, primary biliary cirrhosis, Crohn's disease and acute anterior uveitis. Further analysis revealed a clear distinction between the two groups of diseases with regard to their targeted tissues: most autoimmune diseases showing an insignificant association with PTPN22 C1858T manifest in skin, the gastrointestinal tract or in immune privileged sites. These results showed that the association of PTPN22 polymorphism with autoimmune diseases depends on the localization of the affected tissue, suggesting a role of targeted organ variation in the disease manifestations. PMID:23076337

  8. [Targeted therapies including monoclonal antibodies for connective tissue diseases].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Taichi; Sumida, Takayuki

    2009-03-01

    Recent advance of targeted therapies including monoclonal antibodies and fusion proteins has allowed effective strategies in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. And now, TNF inhibitors are broadly used for rheumatoid arthritis and prevent the disease progression. Meanwhile, B cell targeted therapies and anti-interleukin-6 receptor antibody treatment are not only used for second line biological agents for rheumatoid arthritis, but also expected for the treatments of various autoimmune diseases. Recent year, some of novel small molecules, which inhibit the signal transduction of various surface receptors of immune cells, are in clinical trials. These drugs will be a breakthrough for the treatment of some autoimmune disorders. PMID:19280937

  9. [Microflora in patients with systemic connective tissue diseases].

    PubMed

    Romanov, V A; Shilkina, N P; Gul'neva, M Iu; Ivanov, D V

    2008-01-01

    The study of microflora of skin, mucous tunic of nose and mouth, and the quantitative and qualitative structure of the intestinal and urinal microflora in cases of systemic connective tissues diseases, are reproduced. The decrease of the dominant state of typical representatives, and the increase of the role of pseudopathogenic bacteria in various biotypes, were observed. The frequency of S. aureus detection increased in skin, mucous tunic of nose and mouth. Pseudopathogenic microbes acquired greater significance in the forming of microbiocenosis of intestine, while the number of E. coli, Bifidobacterium and Lactobacterium decreased. The frequency of detection of microbes in urine decreased. The comparative analyses of the microflora in patients with systemic lupus erythromatosis and progressive systemic sclerosis demonstrated the common peculiarities for microflora character change. PMID:18488449

  10. Management of interstitial lung disease associated with connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Mathai, Stephen C; Danoff, Sonye K

    2016-01-01

    The lung is a common site of complications of systemic connective tissue disease (CTD), and lung involvement can present in several ways. Interstitial lung disease (ILD) and pulmonary hypertension are the most common lung manifestations in CTD. Although it is generally thought that interstitial lung disease develops later on in CTD it is often the initial presentation ("lung dominant" CTD). ILD can be present in most types of CTD, including rheumatoid arthritis, scleroderma, systemic lupus erythematosus, polymyositis or dermatomyositis, Sjögren's syndrome, and mixed connective tissue disease. Despite similarities in clinical and pathologic presentation, the prognosis and treatment of CTD associated ILD (CTD-ILD) can differ greatly from that of other forms of ILD, such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) can present as a primary vasculopathy in pulmonary arterial hypertension or in association with ILD (PH-ILD). Therefore, detailed history, physical examination, targeted serologic testing, and, occasionally, lung biopsy are needed to diagnose CTD-ILD, whereas both non-invasive and invasive assessments of pulmonary hemodynamics are needed to diagnose pulmonary hypertension. Immunosuppression is the mainstay of treatment for ILD, although data from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to support specific treatments are lacking. Furthermore, treatment strategies vary according to the clinical situation-for example, the treatment of a patient newly diagnosed as having CTD-ILD differs from that of someone with an acute exacerbation of the disease. Immunosuppression is indicated only in select cases of pulmonary arterial hypertension related to CTD; more commonly, selective pulmonary vasodilators are used. For both diseases, comorbidities such as sleep disordered breathing, symptoms of dyspnea, and cough should be evaluated and treated. Lung transplantation should be considered in patients with advanced disease but is not always feasible because of other manifestations of CTD and comorbidities. Clinical trials of novel therapies including immunosuppressive therapies are needed to inform best treatment strategies. PMID:26912511

  11. Connective tissue progenitor cell growth characteristics on textured substrates

    PubMed Central

    Mata, Alvaro; Boehm, Cynthia; Fleischman, Aaron J; Muschler, George F; Roy, Shuvo

    2007-01-01

    Growth characteristics of human connective tissue progenitor (CTP) cells were investigated on smooth and textured substrates, which were produced using MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) fabrication technology. Human bone marrow derived cells were cultured for 9 days under conditions promoting osteoblastic differentiation on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) substrates comprising smooth (non-patterned) surfaces (SMOOTH), 4 different cylindrical post micro-textures (POSTS) that were 7–10 μm high and 5, 10, 20, and 40 μm diameter, respectively, and channel micro-textures (CHANNELS) with curved cross-sections that were 11 μm high, 45 μm wide, and separated by 5 μm wide ridges. Standard glass-tissue culture surfaces were used as controls. Micro-textures resulted in the modification of CTP morphology, attachment, migration, and proliferation characteristics. Specifically, cells on POSTS exhibited more contoured morphology with closely packed cytoskeletal actin microfilaments compared to the more random orientation in cells grown on SMOOTH. CTP colonies on 10 μm-diameter POSTS exhibited higher cell number than any other POSTS, and a significant increase in cell number (442%) compared to colonies on SMOOTH (71%). On CHANNELS, colonies tended to be denser (229%) than on POSTS (up to 140% on 10 μm POSTS), and significantly more so compared to those on SMOOTH (104%). PMID:18019838

  12. Vascularized interpositional periosteal connective tissue flap: A modern approach to augment soft tissue

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Chitra; Deora, Savita; Abraham, Dennis; Gaba, Rohini; Kumar, Baron Tarun; Kudva, Praveen

    2015-01-01

    Context: Nowadays esthetics plays an important role in dentistry along with function of the prosthesis. Various soft tissue augmentation procedures are available to correct the ridge defects in the anterior region. The newer technique, vascularized interpositional periosteal connective tissue (VIP-CT) flap has been introduced, which has the potential to augment predictable amount of tissue and has many benefits when compared to other techniques. Aim: The study was designed to determine the efficacy of the VIP-CT flap in augmenting the ridge defect. Materials and Methods: Ten patients with Class III (Seibert's) ridge defects were treated with VIP-CT flap technique before fabricating fixed partial denture. Height and width of the ridge defects were measured before and after the procedure. Subsequent follow-up was done every 3 months for 1-year. Statistical Analysis Used: Paired t-test was performed to detect the significance of the procedure. Results: The surgical site healed uneventfully. The predictable amount of soft tissue augmentation had been achieved with the procedure. The increase in height and width of the ridge was statistically highly significant. Conclusion: The VIP-CT flap technique was effective in augmenting the soft tissue in esthetic area that remained stable over a long period. PMID:25810597

  13. Development of mixed connective tissue disease and Sjögren's syndrome in a patient with trisomy X.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, M; Ikeda, K; Nakamura, T; Iwamoto, T; Furuta, S; Nakajima, H

    2015-10-01

    Increased risk of developing systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has been reported in patients with Klinefelter syndrome. Here, we describe a 16-year-old Japanese patient with trisomy X (47,XXX) who developed mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) and Sjögren's syndrome. She had polyarthritis, edematous fingers with Raynaud's phenomenon, sicca syndrome, interstitial lung disease, possible myositis, and was positive for anti-nuclear antibody, anti-nRNP antibody and rheumatoid factor. This is the first report in the literature of a case of MCTD with female polysomy X, which further supports the link between the presence of extra X chromosome(s) and the development of autoimmune diseases. PMID:25854827

  14. Infections, toxic chemicals and dietary peptides binding to lymphocyte receptors and tissue enzymes are major instigators of autoimmunity in autism.

    PubMed

    Vojdani, A; Pangborn, J B; Vojdani, E; Cooper, E L

    2003-01-01

    Similar to many complex autoimmune diseases, genetic and environmental factors including diet, infection and xenobiotics play a critical role in the development of autism. In this study, we postulated that infectious agent antigens such as streptokinase, dietary peptides (gliadin and casein) and ethyl mercury (xenobiotic) bind to different lymphocyte receptors and tissue enzyme (DPP IV or CD26). We assessed this hypothesis first by measuring IgG, IgM and IgA antibodies against CD26, CD69, streptokinase (SK), gliadin and casein peptides and against ethyl mercury bound to human serum albumin in patients with autism. A significant percentage of children with autism developed anti-SK, anti-gliadin and casein peptides and anti-ethyl mercury antibodies, concomitant with the appearance of anti-CD26 and anti-CD69 autoantibodies. These antibodies are synthesized as a result of SK, gliadin, casein and ethyl mercury binding to CD26 and CD69, indicating that they are specific. Immune absorption demonstrated that only specific antigens, like CD26, were capable of significantly reducing serum anti-CD26 levels. However, for direct demonstration of SK, gliadin, casein and ethyl mercury to CD26 or CD69, microtiter wells were coated with CD26 or CD69 alone or in combination with SK, gliadin, casein or ethyl mercury and then reacted with enzyme labeled rabbit anti-CD26 or anti-CD69. Adding these molecules to CD26 or CD69 resulted in 28-86% inhibition of CD26 or CD69 binding to anti-CD26 or anti-CD69 antibodies. The highest % binding of these antigens or peptides to CD26 or CD69 was attributed to SK and the lowest to casein peptides. We, therefore, propose that bacterial antigens (SK), dietary peptides (gliadin, casein) and Thimerosal (ethyl mercury) in individuals with pre-disposing HLA molecules, bind to CD26 or CD69 and induce antibodies against these molecules. In conclusion, this study is apparently the first to demonstrate that dietary peptides, bacterial toxins and xenobiotics bind to lymphocyte receptors and/or tissue enzymes, resulting in autoimmune reaction in children with autism. PMID:14611720

  15. Tertiary Lymphoid Tissue Forms in Retinas of Mice with Spontaneous Autoimmune Uveitis and Has Consequences on Visual Function.

    PubMed

    Kielczewski, Jennifer L; Horai, Reiko; Jittayasothorn, Yingyos; Chan, Chi-Chao; Caspi, Rachel R

    2016-02-01

    During chronic inflammation, tertiary lymphoid tissue (TLT) can form within an inflamed organ, including the CNS. However, little is known about TLT formation in the neuroretina. In a novel spontaneous autoimmune mouse model of uveitis (R161H), we identified well-organized lymphoid aggregates in the retina and examined them for TLT characteristics. Presence of immune cells, tissue-specific markers, and gene expression patterns typically associated with germinal centers and T follicular helper cells were examined using immunohistochemistry and gene analysis of laser capture microdissected retina. Our data revealed the retinal lymphoid structures contained CD4(+) T cells and B cells in well-defined zonal areas that expressed classic germinal center markers, peanut lectin (agglutinin) and GL-7. Gene expression analysis showed upregulation of T follicular helper cell markers, most notably CXCR5 and its ligand CXCL13, and immunohistochemical analysis confirmed CXCR5 expression, typically associated with CD4(+) T follicular helper cells. Highly organized stromal cell networks, a hallmark of organized lymphoid tissue, were also present. Positive staining for phospho-Zap70 in retina-specific T cells indicated CD4(+) T cells were being activated within these lymphoid structures. CD138(+)/B220(+) plasma cells were detected, suggesting the retinal lymphoid aggregates give rise to functional germinal centers, which produce Abs. Interestingly, eyes with lymphoid aggregates exhibited lower inflammatory scores by fundus examination and a slower initial rate of loss of visual function by electroretinography, compared with eyes without these structures. Our findings suggest that the lymphoid aggregates in the retina of R161H mice represent organized TLT, which impact the course of chronic uveitis. PMID:26712943

  16. Connective tissue growth factor is a substrate of ADAM28

    SciTech Connect

    Mochizuki, Satsuki; Tanaka, Rena; Shimoda, Masayuki; Onuma, Junko; Fujii, Yutaka; Jinno, Hiromitsu; Okada, Yasunori

    2010-11-26

    Research highlights: {yields} The hyper-variable region in the cysteine-rich domain of ADAM28 binds to C-terminal domain of CTGF. {yields} ADAM28 cleaves CTGF alone and CTGF in the CTGF/VEGF{sub 165} complex. {yields} CTGF digestion by ADAM28 releases biologically active VEGF{sub 165} from the complex. {yields} ADAM28, CTGF and VEGF{sub 165} are commonly co-expressed by carcinoma cells in human breast carcinoma tissues. {yields} These suggest that ADAM28 promotes VEGF{sub 165}-induced angiogenesis in the breast carcinomas by selective CTGF digestion in the CTGF/VEGF{sub 165} complex. -- Abstract: ADAM28, a member of the ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloproteinase) gene family, is over-expressed by carcinoma cells and the expression correlates with carcinoma cell proliferation and progression in human lung and breast carcinomas. However, information about substrates of ADAM28 is limited. We screened interacting molecules of ADAM28 in human lung cDNA library by yeast two-hybrid system and identified connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). Binding of CTGF to proADAM28 was demonstrated by yeast two-hybrid assay and protein binding assay. ADAM28 cleaved CTGF in dose- and time-dependent manners at the Ala{sup 181}-Tyr{sup 182} and Asp{sup 191}-Pro{sup 192} bonds in the hinge region of the molecule. ADAM28 selectively digested CTGF in the complex of CTGF and vascular endothelial growth factor{sub 165} (VEGF{sub 165}), releasing biologically active VEGF{sub 165} from the complex. RT-PCR and immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated that ADAM28, CTGF and VEGF are commonly co-expressed in the breast carcinoma tissues. These data provide the first evidence that CTGF is a novel substrate of ADAM28 and suggest that ADAM28 may promote VEGF{sub 165}-induced angiogenesis in the breast carcinomas by the CTGF digestion in the CTGF/VEGF{sub 165} complex.

  17. Inhibition of rheumatoid arthritis by blocking connective tissue growth factor

    PubMed Central

    Nozawa, Kazuhisa; Fujishiro, Maki; Takasaki, Yoshinari; Sekigawa, Iwao

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remains to be completely elucidated so far; however, it is known that proinflammatory cytokines play a pivotal role in the induction of RA. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF-?), in particular, is considered to play a central role in bone destruction by mediating the abnormal activation of osteoclasts or the production of proteolytic enzymes through direct or indirect mechanisms. The use of TNF-? blocking agents has a significant impact on RA therapy. Anti-TNF-? blocking agents such as infliximab are very effective for treatment of RA, especially for the prevention of articular destruction. We have previously shown that several proteins exhibited extensive changes in their expression after amelioration of RA with infliximab treatment. Among the proteins, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) has a significant role for the development of RA. Herein, we review the function of CTGF in the pathogenesis of RA and discuss the possibility of a novel treatment for RA. We propose that CTGF is a potentially novel effector molecule in the pathogenesis of RA. Blocking the CTGF pathways by biological agents may have great beneficial effect in patients with RA. PMID:25405094

  18. Connective tissue growth factor induces cardiac hypertrophy through Akt signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Hayata, Nozomi; Fujio, Yasushi; Yamamoto, Yasuhiro; Iwakura, Tomohiko; Obana, Masanori; Takai, Mika; Mohri, Tomomi; Nonen, Shinpei; Maeda, Makiko; Azuma, Junichi

    2008-05-30

    In the process of cardiac remodeling, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) is secreted from cardiac myocytes. Though CTGF is well known to promote fibroblast proliferation, its pathophysiological effects in cardiac myocytes remain to be elucidated. In this study, we examined the biological effects of CTGF in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. Cardiac myocytes stimulated with full length CTGF and its C-terminal region peptide showed the increase in cell surface area. Similar to hypertrophic ligands for G-protein coupled receptors, such as endothelin-1, CTGF activated amino acid uptake; however, CTGF-induced hypertrophy is not associated with the increased expression of skeletal actin or BNP, analyzed by Northern-blotting. CTGF treatment activated ERK1/2, p38 MAPK, JNK and Akt. The inhibition of Akt by transducing dominant-negative Akt abrogated CTGF-mediated increase in cell size, while the inhibition of MAP kinases did not affect the cardiac hypertrophy. These findings indicate that CTGF is a novel hypertrophic factor in cardiac myocytes.

  19. Tamoxifen downregulates connective tissue growth factor to ameliorate peritoneal fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jenq-Wen; Yen, Chung-Jen; Wu, Hon-Yen; Chiang, Chih-Kang; Cheng, Hui-Teng; Lien, Yu-Chung; Hung, Kuan-Yu; Tsai, Tun-Jun

    2011-01-01

    Peritoneal fibrosis (PF), including simple sclerosis and encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS), is a serious complication in patients on long-term peritoneal dialysis. Tamoxifen has successfully been used in treating EPS; however, the mechanism of tamoxifen in treating EPS fibrosis disorders remains unclear. This study demonstrates a possible antifibrotic mechanism of tamoxifen. A bleach-induced PF rat model was applied as the in vivo treatment target. Tamoxifen was intraperitoneally injected daily to treat PF. The PF scores and thickness of the submesothelial zone over the liver surface were measured as indicators for the severity of PF. Human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HPMC) were used as an in vitro model to test the antifibrotic effect of tamoxifen. Gene expressions of transforming growth factors-β (TGF-β), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and collagen were investigated using quantitative polymerase chain reactions. In HPMC, tamoxifen showed paradoxical effects between collagen I and TGF-β. Tamoxifen also inhibited TGF-β-induced collagen and CTGF. The possible antifibrotic effect of tamoxifen is through inhibiting CTGF to block collagen synthesis, although it enhances TGF-β which increases fibrosis. These results provide a possible molecular mechanism for tamoxifen. PMID:21242678

  20. Understanding Autoimmune Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... Autoimmune Diseases Progress and Promise Key Words The Immune System Your immune system is the network of cells and tissues throughout ... having two parts: the acquired and the innate immune systems. The acquired (or adaptive) immune system develops as ...

  1. Viscoelastic properties of bovine orbital connective tissue and fat: constitutive models

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Lawrence; Gupta, Vijay; Lee, Choongyeop; Kavehpore, Pirouz

    2012-01-01

    Reported mechanical properties of orbital connective tissue and fat have been too sparse to model strain–stress relationships underlying biomechanical interactions in strabismus. We performed rheological tests to develop a multi-mode upper convected Maxwell (UCM) model of these tissues under shear loading. From 20 fresh bovine orbits, 30 samples of connective tissue were taken from rectus pulley regions and 30 samples of fatty tissues from the posterior orbit. Additional samples were defatted to determine connective tissue weight proportion, which was verified histologically. Mechanical testing in shear employed a triborheometer to perform: strain sweeps at 0.5–2.0 Hz; shear stress relaxation with 1% strain; viscometry at 0.01–0.5 s−1 strain rate; and shear oscillation at 1% strain. Average connective tissue weight proportion was 98% for predominantly connective tissue and 76% for fatty tissue. Connective tissue specimens reached a long-term relaxation modulus of 668 Pa after 1,500 s, while corresponding values for fatty tissue specimens were 290 Pa and 1,100 s. Shear stress magnitude for connective tissue exceeded that of fatty tissue by five-fold. Based on these data, we developed a multimode UCM model with variable viscosities and time constants, and a damped hyperelastic response that accurately described measured properties of both connective and fatty tissues. Model parameters differed significantly between the two tissues. Viscoelastic properties of predominantly connective orbital tissues under shear loading differ markedly from properties of orbital fat, but both are accurately reflected using UCM models. These viscoelastic models will facilitate realistic global modeling of EOM behavior in binocular alignment and strabismus. PMID:21207094

  2. Application of C4d Immunohistochemistry on Routinely Processed Tissue Sections for the Diagnosis of Autoimmune Bullous Dermatoses.

    PubMed

    Villani, Axel P; Chouvet, Brigitte; Kanitakis, Jean

    2016-03-01

    The diagnosis of autoimmune bullous dermatoses relies greatly on direct immunofluorescence (DIF) examination performed on frozen tissue sections, showing deposits of immunoglobulins and/or C3 on specific cutaneous structures. However, frozen material is not always available for DIF; therefore, alternative techniques are needed in the diagnostic procedure. We therefore tested the usefulness of C4d immunohistochemistry on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections for the diagnosis of bullous pemphigoid (BP) and pemphigus (P). A retrospective immunohistochemical study was performed on biopsies of BP (n: 29) and P (n: 22, including 19 Pemphigus vulgaris and 3 paraneoplastic), submitted for routine histological examination and compared with DIF on the corresponding frozen sections. Twenty-five BP biopsies (86.2%) showed C4d deposits seen as a linear labeling along the dermal-epidermal junction and on the membrane of basal keratinocytes. Seventeen P biopsies (77.2%) showed C4d deposits in a classical "intercellular" pattern, predominating on the lower epidermal layers. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value reached 86%, 98%, 96%, and 92% in BP, respectively and 77%, 98%, 94%, and 92% in P, respectively. Furthermore, in the cases where serological tests were available, the sensitivity of C4d detection was higher than that of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay/indirect immunofluorescence in both BP (87% vs. 67%) and P (82% vs. 54.5%). We conclude that DIF on frozen sections still remains the gold standard for the immunopathological diagnosis of BP and P; however, in the absence of frozen material, C4d immunohistochemistry performed on routinely processed biopsy material can be of considerable help in confirming the diagnosis. PMID:25793311

  3. Connective tissue graft combined with autogenous bone graft in the treatment of peri-implant soft and hard tissue defect.

    PubMed

    Deliberador, Tatiana Miranda; Vieira, Juliana Souza; Bonacin, Rodrigo; Storrer, Carmen L Mueller; Santos, Felipe Rychuv; Giovanini, Allan Fernando

    2015-02-01

    The use of dental implants to improve functional and esthetic demands of dentition has increased significantly over the past two decades. Soft and hard tissue management is one of the factors contributing to improved esthetic results. This report describes the correction of an esthetic problem in a single implant combined connective tissue graft and autogenous bone graft. Four months after the surgical procedure, it could be observed that the combination of connective tissue graft and autogenous bone graft resulted in the augmentation of hard and soft tissue in the peri-implant area with favorable esthetic outcomes. PMID:25279396

  4. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organizations ​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Autoimmune Hepatitis Page Content On this page: What is autoimmune ... Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is autoimmune hepatitis? Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic—or long lasting— ...

  5. Autoimmune statin-induced myopathy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jonathan B.; Ghobrial, Ibrahim I.

    2015-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman with a history of statin use presented with a 4-month history of progressive weakness of both shoulders and thighs. Laboratory and electromyography testing confirmed the presence of generalized proximal myopathy and ruled out connective tissue disease, malignancy, or active viral infection. Muscle biopsy was consistent with necrotizing autoimmune myopathy. PMID:26333863

  6. Carpal tunnel syndrome as a herald of autoimmune rheumatic disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Pal, B

    1997-01-01

    In six patients aged 59-71 years carpal tunnel syndrome, seemingly idiopathic, was followed by connective tissue disorders, in most cases autoimmune in nature. Patients with idiopathic carpal tunnel syndrome may therefore require long-term follow-up, if inflammatory rheumatic conditions are not to be missed. PMID:9155757

  7. A Four-Step Model for the IL-6 Amplifier, a Regulator of Chronic Inflammations in Tissue-Specific MHC Class II-Associated Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    It is commonly thought that autoimmune diseases are caused by the breakdown of self-tolerance, which suggests the recognition of specific antigens by autoreactive CD4+ T cells contribute to the specificity of autoimmune diseases (Marrack et al., 2001; Mathis and Benoist, 2004). In several cases, however, even for diseases associated with class II major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles, the causative tissue-specific antigens recognized by memory/activated CD4+ T cells have not been established (Mocci et al., 2000; Skapenko et al., 2005). Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and arthritis in F759 knock-in mice (F759 mice) are such examples (Atsumi et al., 2002; Brennan et al., 2002; Falgarone et al., 2009). These include associations with class II MHC and CD4 molecules; increased numbers of memory/activated CD4+ T cells; and improved outcomes in response to suppressions and/or deficiencies in class II MHC molecules, CD4+ T cells, and the T cell survival cytokine IL-7. Regarding the development of arthritis in F759 mice, it is not only the immune system, but also non-immune tissue that are involved, indicating that the importance of their interactions (Sawa et al., 2006, 2009; Ogura et al., 2008; Hirano, 2010; Murakami et al., 2011). Furthermore, we have shown that local events such as microbleeding together with an accumulation of activated CD4+ T cells in a manner independent of tissue antigen-recognitions induces arthritis in the joints of F759 mice (Murakami et al., 2011). For example, local microbleeding-mediated CCL20 expression induce such an accumulation, causing arthritis development via chronic activation of an IL-17A-dependent IL-6 signaling amplification loop in type 1 collagen+ cells that is triggered by CD4+ T cell-derived cytokine(s) such as IL-17A, which leads to the synergistic activation of STAT3 and NF?B in non-hematopoietic cells in the joint (Murakami et al., 2011). We named this loop the IL-6-mediated inflammation amplifier, or IL-6 amplifier for short (Ogura et al., 2008; Hirano, 2010; Murakami et al., 2011). Thus, certain class II MHC-associated, tissue-specific autoimmune diseases, including some RA subtypes, may be induced by local events that cause an antigen-independent accumulation of effector CD4+ T cells followed by the induction of the IL-6 amplifier in the affected tissue. In other words, in certain cases, the target tissue itself may determine the specificity of the autoimmune disease via activation of the IL-6 amplifier. To explain this hypothesis, we have proposed a four-step model for MHC class II-associated autoimmune diseases (Murakami et al., 2011): (1) T cell activation regardless of antigen specificity; (2) local events inducing a tissue-specific accumulation of activated T cells; (3) transient activation of the IL-6 amplifier; and (4) enhanced sensitivity to cytokines in the target tissue. The interaction of these events results in chronic activation of the IL-6 amplifier and subsequent manifestation of autoimmune diseases. Thus, the IL-6 amplifier, which is chronically activated by these four events, is a critical regulator of chronic inflammations in tissue-specific MHC class II-associated autoimmune diseases. PMID:22566812

  8. [Peculiarities of the action of hyaluronidase of different origin to the connective tissue].

    PubMed

    Habriyev, R U; Kamayev, N O; Danilova, T I; Kakhoyan, E G

    2016-01-01

    The lecture is devoted to consideration of mechanism of therapeutic action of the enzyme hyaluronidase in hyperplastic connective tissue. Drugs based on hyaluronidase increase bioavailability of other drugs used in adjuvant therapy; they significantly increase effectiveness of treatment, and also provide targeted synthesis of hyaluronic acid, ths regulating the regeneration process of connective tissue. PMID:26973193

  9. Arthritis, a complex connective and synovial joint destructive autoimmune disease: animal models of arthritis with varied etiopathology and their significance.

    PubMed

    Naik, S R; Wala, S M

    2014-01-01

    Animal models play a vital role in simplifying the complexity of pathogenesis and understanding the indefinable processes and diverse mechanisms involved in the progression of disease, and in providing new knowledge that may facilitate the drug development program. Selection of the animal models has to be carefully done, so that there is morphologic similarity to human arthritic conditions that may predict as well as augment the effective screening of novel antiarthritic agents. The review describes exclusively animal models of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and osteoarthritis (OA). The development of RA has been vividly described using a wide variety of animal models with diverse insults (viz. collagen, Freund's adjuvant, proteoglycan, pristane, avridine, formaldehyde, etc.) that are able to simulate/trigger the cellular, biochemical, immunological, and histologic alterations, which perhaps mimic, to a great extent, the pathologic conditions of human RA. Similarly, numerous methods of inducing animal models with OA have also been described (such as spontaneous, surgical, chemical, and physical methods including genetically manipulated animals) which may give an insight into the events of alteration in connective tissues and their metabolism (synovial membrane/tissues along with cartilage) and bone erosion. The development of such arthritic animal models may throw light for better understanding of the etiopathogenic mechanisms of human arthritis and give new impetus for the drug development program on arthritis, a crippling disease. PMID:25121375

  10. Experiment K-7-29: Connective Tissue Studies. Part 3; Rodent Tissue Repair: Skeletal Muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauber, W.; Fritz, V. K.; Burkovskaya, T. E.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E. I.

    1994-01-01

    Myofiber injury-repair was studied in the rat gastrocnemius following a crush injury to the lower leg prior to flight in order to understand if the regenerative responses of muscles are altered by the lack of gravitational forces during Cosmos 2044 flight. After 14 days of flight, the gastrocnemius muscle was removed from the 5 injured flight rodents and various Earth-based treatment groups for comparison. The Earth-based animals consisted of three groups of five rats with injured muscles from a simulated, tail-suspended, and vivarium as well as an uninjured basal group. The gastrocnemius muscle from each was evaluated by histochemical and immunohistochemical techniques to document myofiber, vascular, and connective tissue alterations following injury. In general the repair process was somewhat similar in all injured muscle samples with regard to extracellular matrix organization and myofiber regeneration. Small and large myofibers were present with a newly organized extracellular matrix indicative of myogenesis and muscle regeneration. In the tail-suspended animals, a more complete repair was observed with no enlarged area of non-muscle cells or matrix material visible. In contrast, the muscle samples from the flight animals were less well differentiated with more macrophages and blood vessels in the repair region but small myofibers and proteoglycans, nevertheless, were in their usual configuration. Thus, myofiber repair did vary in muscles from the different groups, but for the most part, resulted in functional muscle tissue.

  11. Metals and kidney autoimmunity.

    PubMed Central

    Bigazzi, P E

    1999-01-01

    The causes of autoimmune responses leading to human kidney pathology remain unknown. However, environmental agents such as microorganisms and/or xenobiotics are good candidates for that role. Metals, either present in the environment or administered for therapeutic reasons, are prototypical xenobiotics that cause decreases or enhancements of immune responses. In particular, exposure to gold and mercury may result in autoimmune responses to various self-antigens as well as autoimmune disease of the kidney and other tissues. Gold compounds, currently used in the treatment of patients with progressive polyarticular rheumatoid arthritis, can cause a nephrotic syndrome. Similarly, an immune-mediated membranous nephropathy frequently occurred when drugs containing mercury were commonly used. Recent epidemiologic studies have shown that occupational exposure to mercury does not usually result in autoimmunity. However, mercury induces antinuclear antibodies, sclerodermalike disease, lichen planus, or membranous nephropathy in some individuals. Laboratory investigations have confirmed that the administration of gold or mercury to experimental animals leads to autoimmune disease quite similar to that observed in human subjects exposed to these metals. In addition, studies of inbred mice and rats have revealed that a few strains are susceptible to the autoimmune effects of gold and mercury, whereas the majority of inbred strains are resistant. These findings have emphasized the importance of genetic (immunogenetic and pharmacogenetic) factors in the induction of metal-associated autoimmunity. (italic)In vitro(/italic) and (italic)in vivo(/italic) research of autoimmune disease caused by mercury and gold has already yielded valuable information and answered a number of important questions. At the same time it has raised new issues about possible immunostimulatory or immunosuppressive mechanisms of xenobiotic activity. Thus it is evident that investigations of metal-induced renal autoimmunity have the potential to produce new knowledge with relevance to autoimmune disease caused by xenobiotics in general as well as to idiopathic autoimmunity. PMID:10502542

  12. Immediate implant placement and provisionalization with and without a connective tissue graft: an analysis of facial gingival tissue thickness.

    PubMed

    Rungcharassaeng, Kitichai; Kan, Joseph Y K; Yoshino, Shuji; Morimoto, Taichiro; Zimmerman, Grenith

    2012-12-01

    Facial gingival tissue thickness (FGTT) is important for an esthetically pleasing anterior restoration since it determines the soft tissue's ability to conceal the underlying restorative material. The purpose of this study was to investigate the change in FGTT after immediate implant placement and provisionalization with and without a connective tissue graft. Patients with a failing maxillary anterior tooth planned for immediate implant placement and provisionalization with (CT group) or without (NCT group) a subepithelial connective tissue graft were included in this study. After tooth extraction, direct measurement of the FGTT was performed; subsequent measurements were performed at the time of definitive prosthesis placement. Data were analyzed using independent and paired t tests at a significance level of α = .05. There was no statistically significant difference in the mean FGTT at tooth extraction between the CT and NCT groups. At prosthesis delivery, the mean FGTT for the CT group was significantly greater than that of the NCT group. The mean FGTT of both groups at prosthesis delivery was significantly higher than that at tooth extraction. The mean change in FGTT in the CT group was also significantly greater than that in the NCT group. Immediate implant placement and provisionalization in conjunction with a connective tissue graft is more likely to result in sufficient peri-implant tissue thickness to conceal underlying implant restorative materials than when performed without a connective tissue graft. PMID:23057055

  13. Clinical Features of Neuropsychiatric Syndromes in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and Other Connective Tissue Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kasama, Tsuyoshi; Maeoka, Airi; Oguro, Nao

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and related disorders are chronic inflammatory diseases characterized by abnormalities and, in some cases, even complete failure of immune responses as the underlying pathology. Although almost all connective tissue diseases and related disorders can be complicated by various neuropsychiatric syndromes, SLE is a typical connective tissue disease that can cause neurological and psychiatric syndromes. In this review, neuropsychiatric syndromes complicating connective tissue diseases, especially SLE are outlined, and pathological and other conditions that should be considered in the differential diagnosis are also discussed. PMID:26819561

  14. Hypothalamic inflammation and thermogenesis: the brown adipose tissue connection.

    PubMed

    Arruda, Ana Paula; Milanski, Marciane; Velloso, Licio A

    2011-02-01

    Hypothalamic inflammation and dysfunction are common features of experimental obesity. An imbalance between caloric intake and energy expenditure is generated as a consequence of this inflammation, leading to the progressive increase of body adiposity. Thermogenesis, is one of the main functions affected by obesity-linked hypothalamic dysfunction and the complete characterization of the mechanisms involved in this process may offer new therapeutic perspectives for obesity. The brown adipose tissue is an important target for hypothalamic action in thermogenesis. This tissue has been thoroughly studied in rodents and hibernating mammals; however, until recently, its advocated role in human thermogenesis was neglected due to the lack of substantial evidence of its presence in adult humans. The recent demonstration of the presence of functional brown adipose tissue in adult humans has renovated the interest in this tissue. Here, we review some of the work that shows how inflammation and dysfunction of the hypothalamus can control brown adipose tissue activity and how this can impact on whole body thermogenesis and energy expenditure. PMID:21271281

  15. Opposing effects of CTLA4 insufficiency on regulatory versus conventional T cells in autoimmunity converge on effector memory in target tissue.

    PubMed

    Devarajan, Priyadharshini; Miska, Jason; Lui, Jen Bon; Swieboda, Dominika; Chen, Zhibin

    2014-11-01

    Quantitative variations in CTLA4 expression, because of genetic polymorphisms, are associated with various human autoimmune conditions, including type 1 diabetes (T1D). Extensive studies have demonstrated that CTLA4 is not only essential for the suppressive role of regulatory T cells (T(reg)) but also required for intrinsic control of conventional T (T(conv)) cells. We report that a modest insufficiency of CTLA4 in mice, which mimics the effect of some human CTLA4 genetic polymorphisms, accompanied by a T1D-permissive MHC locus, was sufficient to induce juvenile-onset diabetes on an otherwise T1D-resistant genetic background. Reduction in CTLA4 levels had an unanticipated effect in promoting Treg function both in vivo and in vitro. It led to an increase in T(reg) memory in both lymphoid and nonlymphoid target tissue. Conversely, modulating CTLA4 by either RNA interference or Ab blockade promoted conventional effector memory T cell formation in the T(conv) compartment. The CD4(+) conventional effector memory T cells, including those within target tissue, produced IL-17 or IFN-γ. Blocking IL-7 signaling reduced the Th17 autoimmune compartment but did not suppress the T1D induced by CTLA4 insufficiency. Enhanced effector memory formation in both T(conv) and T(reg) lineages may underpin the apparently dichotomized impact of CTLA4 insufficiency on autoimmune pathogenesis. Therefore, although the presence of CTLA4 plays a critical role in controlling homeostasis of T cells, its quantitative variation may impose diverse or even opposing effects on distinct lineages of T cells, an optimal sum of which is necessary for preservation of T cell immunity while suppressing tissue damage. PMID:25246499

  16. Connective tissue disorders and cardiovascular complications: the indomitable role of transforming growth factor-beta signaling.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Jason B; Ikonomidis, John S; Jones, Jeffrey A

    2014-01-01

    Marfan Syndrome (MFS) and Loeys-Dietz Syndrome (LDS) represent heritable connective tissue disorders that cosegregate with a similar pattern of cardiovascular defects (thoracic aortic aneurysm, mitral valve prolapse/regurgitation, and aortic root dilatation with regurgitation). This pattern of cardiovascular defects appears to be expressed along a spectrum of severity in many heritable connective tissue disorders and raises suspicion of a relationship between the normal development of connective tissues and the cardiovascular system. Given the evidence of increased transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling in MFS and LDS, this signaling pathway may represent the common link in this relationship. To further explore this hypothetical link, this chapter will review the TGF-β signaling pathway, heritable connective tissue syndromes related to TGF-β receptor (TGFBR) mutations, and discuss the pathogenic contribution of TGF-β to these syndromes with a primary focus on the cardiovascular system. PMID:24443024

  17. Connective Tissue Disorders and Cardiovascular Complications: The indomitable role of Transforming Growth Factor-beta signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wheeler, Jason B.; Ikonomidis, John S.; Jones, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Marfan Syndrome (MFS) and Loeys-Dietz Syndrome (LDS) represent heritable connective tissue disorders that cosegregate with a similar pattern of cardiovascular defects (thoracic aortic aneurysm, mitral valve prolapse/regurgitation, and aortic dilatation with regurgitation). This pattern of cardiovascular defects appears to be expressed along a spectrum of severity in many heritable connective tissue disorders and raises suspicion of a relationship between the normal development of connective tissues and the cardiovascular system. Given the evidence of increased transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) signaling in MFS and LDS, this signaling pathway may represent the common link in this relationship. To further explore this hypothetical link, this chapter will review the TGF-β signaling pathway, heritable connective tissue syndromes related to TGF-β receptor (TGFBR) mutations, and discuss the pathogenic contribution of TGF-β to these syndromes with a primary focus on the cardiovascular system. PMID:24443024

  18. Therapeutic effects of CTLA4Ig gene-transduced adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on established autoimmune thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun Wha; Lee, Jung Min; Lee, Hee Woo; Yang, Jehoon; Youn, Hwa Young

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the beneficial effects of adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs) and ASCs that overexpress the CTLA4Ig gene (CTLA4Ig-ASCs) on established autoimmune thyroiditis and to examine changes in clinical chemistry parameters and the presence of humoral responses upon repeated long-term administration of autologous ASCs. This study also aimed to acquire desirable results in a preclinical study by using large-sized lab animals and applying ASCs that overexpress therapeutic genes. Experimental autoimmune thyroiditis was induced by immunization with thyroglobulin. Experimental dogs were divided into five groups: (i) ASC IT + IV, (ii) ASC IV, (iii) CTLA4Ig-ASC IT + IV, (iv) CTLA4Ig-ASC IV, and (v) control IT + IV (saline only), and they received intrathyroidal (IT; 10 million cells/250 µl saline per thyroid) administration one time or intravenous (IV; 20 million cells/5 ml) administration seven times within a 101-day period. Blood samples were collected every week, and thyroids were harvested on days 104-106. After serial ASC or CTLA4Ig transplantation, the levels of canine thyroglobulin autoantibodies (TgAA) in serum and the infiltration of T-lymphocytes between the follicles of the thyroid glands were decreased. The expression of FoxP3 in submandibular lymph nodes was significantly increased. Repeated long-term administration of autologous ASCs or CTLA4Ig-ASCs did not generate changes in clinical chemistry parameters or humoral responses.The TgAA test can detect autoimmune thyroiditis years before clinical signs of hypothyroidism occur. Thus, ASC and CTLA4Ig-ASC transplantation in that period can be attractive candidates to ameliorate autoimmune thyroiditis and prevent the development of hypothyroidism. PMID:25299180

  19. Response to methotrexate in fibrosing alveolitis associated with connective tissue disease.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, D G; Bacon, P A

    1980-01-01

    Methotrexate by intermittent intramuscular injection was used to treat three patients with fibrosing alveolitis complicating connective tissue diseases. All three patients had improvement of symptoms, two had radiological improvement, and one had significant improvement of pulmonary function. Two patients whose pulmonary symptoms, function, and chest radiographs had deteriorated on penicillamine improved when treated with methotrexate. Methotrexate may be a useful treatment for fibrosing alveolitis complicating connective tissue diseases. Images PMID:7466720

  20. Connective tissue and the heart. Functional significance and regulatory mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Burlew, B S; Weber, K T

    2000-08-01

    The heart has a three-dimensional extracellular fibrillar collagen scaffolding that normally serves a variety of functions important to tissue integrity and efficiency of muscular systolic pump and diastolic suction pump function (see article by Kovcs). An adverse accumulation of extracellular matrix structural protein compromises tissue stiffness and adversely affects myocardial viscoelasticity, this leads to ventricular diastolic and systolic dysfunction. Hormonal factors, such as chronic, inappropriate (relative to dietary salt intake and intravascular volume) elevations in circulating angiotensin II and aldosterone, are accompanied by fibrosis of right and left sides of the heart. Hemodynamic factors regulate cardiac myocyte work and their adaptive hypertrophic growth. The relative contributions of hormonal and hemodynamic factors in regulating growth of muscular and nonmuscular compartments must form the basis for the selection of pharmacologic intervention that will optimize the management of symptomatic heart failure that accompanies hypertensive heart disease and ischemic cardiomyopathy. Cardioprotective strategies that prevent alteration of normal cardiac tissue structure by fibrosis and appearance of abnormal ventricular stiffness (viscoelasticity) are based on negating the generation of these hormones or interfering with their receptor-ligand binding. A regression of established cardiac fibrosis and improvement in abnormal ventricular stiffness is feasible. Experimental and clinical findings with lisinopril in hypertensive heart disease, where cardiac fibrosis and abnormal ventricular stiffness are present, indicate that such cardioreparation should be a targeted objective of pharmacologic intervention. Systematic analysis of this approach using a controlled clinical trial format is warranted. In recognizing the importance of viscoelastic elements in regulating the mechanical behavior of cardiac tissue, and in turn systolic and diastolic ventricular function, a broader tissue compartment based paradigm (ECM versus myocyte) for the management of heart failure emerges. PMID:10986582

  1. Effects of microgravity on rat bone, cartlage and connective tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doty, S.

    1990-01-01

    The response to hypogravity by the skeletal system was originally thought to be the result of a reduction in weight bearing. Thus a reduced rate of new bone formation in the weight-bearing bones was accepted, when found, as an obvious result of hypogravity. However, data on non-weight-bearing tissues have begun to show that other physiological changes can be expected to occur to animals during spaceflight. This overview of the Cosmos 1887 data discusses these results as they pertain to individual bones or tissues because the response seems to depend on the architecture and metabolism of each tissue under study. Various effects were seen in different tissues from the rats flown on Cosmos 1887. The femur showed a reduced bone mineral content but only in the central region of the diaphysis. This same region in the tibia showed changes in the vascularity of bone as well as some osteocytic cell death. The humerus demonstrated reduced morphometric characteristics plus a decrease in mechanical stiffness. Bone mineral crystals did not mature normally as a result of flight, suggesting a defect in the matrix mineralization process. Note that these changes relate directly to the matrix portion of the bone or some function of bone which slowly responds to changes in the environment. However, most cellular functions of bone are rapid responders. The stimulation of osteoblast precursor cells, the osteoblast function in collagen synthesis, a change in the proliferation rate of cells in the epiphyseal growth plate, the synthesis and secretion of osteocalcin, and the movement of water into or out of tissues, are all processes which respond to environmental change. These rapidly responding events produced results from Cosmos 1887 which were frequently quite different from previous space flight data.

  2. Autoimmune-Featured Interstitial Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Vij, Rekha; Strek, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Patients with interstitial lung disease (ILD) may have features of an autoimmune disorder that do not meet the diagnostic criteria for connective tissue diseases. We determined the prevalence and characteristics of autoimmune-featured ILD (AIF-ILD) and compared these with those of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and known connective tissue disease-related ILD (CTD-ILD). Methods: Patients with ILD who did not meet the criteria for a connective tissue disease were defined as having AIF-ILD if they had a sign or symptom suggestive of a connective tissue disease and a serologic test reflective of an autoimmune process. Clinical characteristics, high-resolution CT images, and lung biopsy specimens were analyzed and compared with those of patients with IPF and CTD-ILD. Survival was evaluated using a Kaplan-Meier curve. Results: Two hundred subjects completed the questionnaire and serologic testing. AIF-ILD was identified in 32%, IPF in 29%, and CTD-ILD in 19%. Gender, age, and race differed among groups (P < .01). Sixty-two percent of patients with AIF-ILD had a typical usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP) pattern on CT images. In 31 patients with AIF-ILD, lung biopsy specimens showed UIP in 81% and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia in 6%. Patients with AIF-ILD and IPF had similar survival, worse than those with CTD-ILD (P < .01). Antinuclear antibody (ANA) titers ≥ 1:1280 were associated with improved survival in patients with AIF-ILD (P = .02). Conclusions: Systematic evaluation of symptoms and serologic tests in ILD can identify AIF-ILD. A UIP pattern on CT images and histopathology is common in AIF-ILD. Although survival for patients with AIF-ILD is poor, ANA titers ≥ 1:1280 are associated with improved survival. PMID:21565966

  3. Connective tissue spectrum abnormalities associated with spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leaks: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Reinstein, Eyal; Pariani, Mitchel; Bannykh, Serguei; Rimoin, David L; Schievink, Wouter I

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to assess the frequency of connective tissue abnormalities among patients with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks in a prospective study using a large cohort of patients. We enrolled a consecutive group of 50 patients, referred for consultation because of CSF leak. All patients have been carefully examined for the presence of connective tissue abnormalities, and based on findings, patients underwent genetic testing. Ancillary diagnostic studies included echocardiography, eye exam, and histopathological examinations of skin and dura biopsies in selected patients. We identified nine patients with heritable connective tissue disorders, including Marfan syndrome, Ehlers–Danlos syndrome and other unclassified forms. In seven patients, spontaneous CSF leak was the first noted manifestation of the genetic disorder. We conclude that spontaneous CSF leaks are associated with a spectrum of connective tissue abnormalities and may be the first noted clinical presentation of the genetic disorder. We propose that there is a clinical basis for considering spontaneous CSF leak as a clinical manifestation of heritable connective tissue disorders, and we suggest that patients with CSF leaks should be screened for connective tissue and vascular abnormalities. PMID:22929030

  4. Vaccines, adjuvants and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Guimares, Lusa Ea; Baker, Britain; Perricone, Carlo; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2015-10-01

    Vaccines and autoimmunity are linked fields. Vaccine efficacy is based on whether host immune response against an antigen can elicit a memory T-cell response over time. Although the described side effects thus far have been mostly transient and acute, vaccines are able to elicit the immune system towards an autoimmune reaction. The diagnosis of a definite autoimmune disease and the occurrence of fatal outcome post-vaccination have been less frequently reported. Since vaccines are given to previously healthy hosts, who may have never developed the disease had they not been immunized, adverse events should be carefully accessed and evaluated even if they represent a limited number of occurrences. In this review of the literature, there is evidence of vaccine-induced autoimmunity and adjuvant-induced autoimmunity in both experimental models as well as human patients. Adjuvants and infectious agents may exert their immune-enhancing effects through various functional activities, encompassed by the adjuvant effect. These mechanisms are shared by different conditions triggered by adjuvants leading to the autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA syndrome). In conclusion, there are several case reports of autoimmune diseases following vaccines, however, due to the limited number of cases, the different classifications of symptoms and the long latency period of the diseases, every attempt for an epidemiological study has so far failed to deliver a connection. Despite this, efforts to unveil the connection between the triggering of the immune system by adjuvants and the development of autoimmune conditions should be undertaken. Vaccinomics is a field that may bring to light novel customized, personalized treatment approaches in the future. PMID:26275795

  5. Progranulin antibodies in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Thurner, Lorenz; Preuss, Klaus-Dieter; Fadle, Natalie; Regitz, Evi; Klemm, Philipp; Zaks, Marina; Kemele, Maria; Hasenfus, Andrea; Csernok, Elena; Gross, Wolfgang L; Pasquali, Jean-Louis; Martin, Thierry; Bohle, Rainer Maria; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Systemic vasculitides constitute a heterogeneous group of diseases. Autoimmunity mediated by B lymphocytes and their humoral effector mechanisms play a major role in ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) as well as in non-ANCA associated primary systemic vasculitides and in the different types of autoimmune connective tissue disorders and rheumatoid arthritis. In order to detect autoantibodies in systemic vasculitides, we screened protein macroarrays of human cDNA expression libraries with sera from patients with ANCA-associated and ANCA-negative primary systemic vasculitides. This approach led to the identification of antibodies against progranulin, a 88 kDA secreted glycoprotein with strong anti-inflammatory activity in the course of disease of giant-cell arteritis/polymyalgia rheumatica (14/65), Takayasu's arteritis (4/13), classical panarteritis nodosa (4/10), Behcet's disease (2/6) and in the course of disease in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (31/75), Churg-Strauss syndrome (7/23) and in microscopic polyangiitis (7/19). In extended screenings the progranulin antibodies were also detected in other autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (39/91) and rheumatoid arthritis (16/44). Progranulin antibodies were detected only in 1 of 97 healthy controls. Anti-progranulin positive patients with systemic vasculitides, systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis had significant lower progranulin plasma levels, indicating a neutralizing effect. In light of the anti-inflammatory effects of progranulin, progranulin antibodies might exert pro-inflammatory effects thus contributing to the pathogenesis of the respective autoimmune diseases and might serve as a marker for disease activity. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that a positive progranulin antibody status was associated with active disease in granulomatosis with polyangiitis. PMID:23149338

  6. [Polyglandular autoimmune syndromes : An overview].

    PubMed

    Komminoth, P

    2016-05-01

    Polyglandular autoimmune syndromes (PGAS), also known as autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndromes (APS), are a heterogeneous group of rare, genetically caused diseases of the immune system which lead to inflammatory damage of various endocrine glands resulting in malfunctions. In addition, autoimmune diseases of non-endocrine organs may also be found. Early diagnosis of PGAS is often overlooked because of heterogeneous symptoms and the progressive occurrence of the individual diseases. The two most important forms of PGAS are the juvenile and adult types. The juvenile type (PGAS type 1) is caused by mutations in the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene on chromosome 21, exhibits geographic variations in incidence and is defined by the combination of mucocutaneous candidiasis, Addison's disease and hypoparathyroidism. In addition, autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) syndrome and other autoimmune diseases can also occur. The adult form of PGAS (PGAS type 2) is a multigenetic disorder associated with some HLA haplotypes, is more common than the juvenile type, shows female predominance and exhibits the combination of type 1 diabetes, autoimmune thyroid disease, Addison's disease and other autoimmune disorders. The histological alterations in affected organs of PGAS patients are similar to findings in sporadically occurring autoimmune diseases of these organs but there are no pathognomic fine tissue findings. If patients exhibit autoimmune changes in two different endocrine glands or if there are indications of several autoimmune disorders from the patient history, it is important to consider PGAS and inform the clinicians of this suspicion. PMID:27099223

  7. Connective tissue responses to some heavy metals. II. Lead: histology and ultrastructure.

    PubMed Central

    Ellender, G.; Ham, K. N.

    1987-01-01

    Lead loaded ion exchange resin beads implanted into the loose connective tissue of the rat pinna induced local lesions which differed widely from those of the control (sodium loaded) beads (Ellender & Ham 1987). These lesions were characterized by changes in the granulation tissue and the approximating connective tissue. Granulation tissue contained mononuclear phagocytes in various guises, and some cells with intranuclear inclusion bodies. The matrix of the granulation tissue contained collagen fibrils having a wide range of diameters suggestive of altered collagen biosynthesis. Foci of collagen mineralization occurred in zones of combined trauma and lead impregnation. Once mineralized they became enveloped by giant cells and epithelioid cells. Lead in damaged tissues is thought to modify the protective mechanism of calcification inhibition and the biosynthesis of the matrix. Images Fig. 6 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 PMID:3040063

  8. The calcium-phosphate balance, modulation of thyroid autoimmune processes and other adverse effects connected with thyroid arterial embolization.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Grzegorz; Jaroszuk, Andrzej; Zybek, Ariadna; Brzozowski, Krzysztof; Piasecki, Piotr; Ziecina, Piotr; Ruchala, Marek

    2014-06-01

    In search of new treatment options for thyroid diseases, when conventional procedures are ineffective, contraindicated or associated with serious side effects, safety of thyroid arteries embolization in the treatment of particular thyroid diseases was evaluated. The study included eight subjects with retrosternal toxic goiter, six patients affected by Graves' disease, five cases of retrosternal non-toxic goiter, two subjects with post-amiodarone hyperthyroidism, and one patient with severe thyroid-related orbitopathy, who underwent selective embolization of thyroid arteries. The study assessed and compared calcium-phosphate balance, modulation of thyroid autoimmunity and the presence of different side effects in patients who underwent the procedure. In addition, the serum concentrations of thyroid hormones, anti-thyroid autoantibodies and thyroid volume have been measured. Five of all enrolled subjects (22.7 %) experienced transient, not clinically relevant hypocalcaemia with no need for calcium supplementation. There were no significant changes in serum calcium levels in patients after embolization of both inferior thyroid arteries. The transient side effects associated with the treatment were neck pain and a slight increase in body temperature. Noted high concentration of free thyroid hormones immediately after the procedure was not accompanied by worsening of symptoms or signs of thyrotoxicosis. In patients with Graves' disease, a significant decrease in thyrotropin receptor antibodies level was observed. Thyroid arterial embolization does not disturb permanently calcium-phosphate balance, modulates positively thyroid autoimmune processes and is associated with no serious post-procedure side effects. Hence, it may be considered as a safe and effective treatment modality for selected thyroid disorders. PMID:24146411

  9. Autoimmune epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Greco, Antonio; Rizzo, Maria Ida; De Virgilio, Armando; Conte, Michela; Gallo, Andrea; Attanasio, Giuseppe; Ruoppolo, Giovanni; de Vincentiis, Marco

    2016-03-01

    Despite the fact that epilepsy is the third most common chronic brain disorder, relatively little is known about the processes leading to the generation of seizures. Accumulating data support an autoimmune basis in patients with antiepileptic drug-resistant seizures. Besides, recent studies show that epilepsy and autoimmune disease frequently co-occur. Autoimmune epilepsy is increasingly recognized in the spectrum of neurological disorders characterized by detection of neural autoantibodies in serum or spinal fluid and responsiveness to immunotherapy. An autoimmune cause is suspected based on frequent or medically intractable seizures and the presence of at least one neural antibody, inflammatory changes indicated in serum or spinal fluid or on MRI, or a personal or family history of autoimmunity. It is essential that an autoimmune etiology be considered in the initial differential diagnosis of new onset epilepsy, because early immunotherapy assures an optimal outcome for the patient. PMID:26626229

  10. Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Autoimmunity: A Case Report of an Unusual Presentation of Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Merrill, Andrea L.; Smith, Hedy

    2011-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) commonly presents asymptomatically or with symptomatic cytopenias. However, autoimmune phenomena in association with MDS have been well described in several case reports and case series. Typically, these autoimmune phenomena take the form of vasculitides, arthritis, connective tissue diseases, pulmonary infiltrates, or polymyalgia rheumatica. We present the case of a woman with MDS (karyotype 46,XX,+1,der(1;7)(q10;p10)[20], that evolved with an additional trisomy 8 clone) and a novel spectrum of autoimmune diseases including acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (AFOP) and lacrimal gland pseudotumor. PMID:22937307

  11. Efficacy of Connective Tissue with and without Periosteum in Regeneration of Intrabony Defects

    PubMed Central

    Esfahanian, Vahid; Golestaneh, Hedayatollah; Moghaddas, Omid; Ghafari, Mohammad Reza

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Connective tissue grafts with and without periosteum is used in regenerative treatments of bone and has demonstrated successful outcomes in previous investigations. The aim of present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of connective tissue graft with and without periosteum in regeneration of intrabony defects. Materials and methods. In this single-blind randomized split-mouth clinical trial, 15 pairs of intrabony defects in 15 patients with moderate to advanced periodontitis were treated by periosteal connective tissue graft + ABBM (test group) or non-periosteal connective tissue graft + ABBM (control group). Probing pocket depth, clinical attachment level, free gingival margin position, bone crestal position, crest defect depth and defect depth to stent were measured at baseline and after six months by surgical re-entry. Data was analyzed by Student’s t-test and paired t-tests (α=0.05). Results. Changes in clinical parameters after 6 months in the test and control groups were as follows: mean of PPD reduction: 3.1±0.6 (P<0.0001); 2.5±1.0 mm (P<0.0001), CAL gain: 2.3±0.9 (P<0.0001); 2.2±1.0 mm (P<0.0001), bone fill: 2.2±0.7 mm (P<0.0001); 2.2±0.7 mm (P<0.0001), respectively. No significant differences in the position of free gingival margin were observed during 6 months compared to baseline in both groups. Conclusion. Combinations of periosteal connective tissue graft + ABBM and non-periosteal connective tissue graft + ABBM were similarly effective in treating intrabony defects without any favor for any group. Connective tissue and perio-steum can be equally effective in regeneration of intrabony defects. PMID:25587379

  12. The transcription, translation, transport-trail and autoimmunity: Guilt by association.

    PubMed

    Tagoe, Clement E

    2015-12-01

    The autoimmune connective tissue diseases (ACTD) are a group of diseases which share clinical features and genetic inheritance. They are characterized by systemic autoimmunity and autoantibody production with a striking predilection for cellular components involved in transcription, translation and cellular transport. Although multiple triggers of autoimmunity have been proposed for this group of diseases including microbial agents such as viruses and bacteria, drugs, ultraviolet light, environmental toxins, stress, hormones and heavy metals, the prominence of autoantibodies to components of the transcription, translation, cellular transport-trail (TTTT) suggests that the agent(s) triggering the autoimmune response potentially utilize the TTTT. For the ACTD, viruses and viral agents are the likely triggers of autoimmunity as a result of aberrant viral latency with the production of autoantibodies to the components of the cellular TTTT machinery through multiple mechanisms, perhaps including molecular mimicry, bystander activation and epitope spreading. PMID:26519101

  13. Adipose tissue and sustainable development: a connection that needs protection

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Angelo; Picard-Deland, Éliane; Panahi, Shirin; Marette, André

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is generally considered as an excess body fat that increases the risk to develop ergonomic, metabolic, and psychosocial problems. As suggested in this paper, body fat gain is also a protective adaptation that prevents body lipotoxicity, contributes to the secretion of molecules involved in metabolic regulation, and dilutes lipid soluble persistent organic pollutants. Recent literature shows that this protective role of adipose tissue is more solicited in a modern context in which unsuspected factors can affect energy balance to a much greater extent than what is generally perceived by health care professionals. These factors include short sleep duration, demanding mental work, and chemical pollution whose impact is more detectable in a context dominated by economic productivity and competitiveness. Since these factors might also include the increase in atmospheric CO2, it is likely that obesity prevention will need the support of a promotion in sustainable development, whether it is for human health, and well-being or global ecological protection. PMID:26074821

  14. Functional role of periostin in development and wound repair: implications for connective tissue disease

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Integrity of the extracellular matrix (ECM) is essential for maintaining the normal structure and function of connective tissues. ECM is secreted locally by cells and organized into a complex meshwork providing physical support to cells, tissues, and organs. Initially thought to act only as a scaffold, the ECM is now known to provide a myriad of signals to cells regulating all aspects of their phenotype from morphology to differentiation. Matricellular proteins are a class of ECM related molecules defined through their ability to modulate cell–matrix interactions. Matricellular proteins are expressed at high levels during development, but typically only appear in postnatal tissue in wound repair or disease, where their levels increase substantially. Members of the CCN family, tenascin-C, osteopontin, secreted protein acidic rich in cysteine (SPARC), bone sialoprotein, thrombospondins, and galectins have all been classed as matricellular proteins. Periostin, a 90 kDa secreted homophilic cell adhesion protein, was recently added to matricellular class of proteins based on its expression pattern and function during development as well as in wound repair. Periostin is expressed in connective tissues including the periodontal ligament, tendons, skin and bone, and is also prominent in neoplastic tissues, cardiovascular disease, as well as in connective tissue wound repair. This review will focus on the functional role of periostin in tissue physiology. Fundamentally, it appears that periostin influences cell behaviour as well as collagen fibrillogenesis, and therefore exerts control over the structural and functional properties of connective tissues in both health and disease. Periostin is a novel matricellular protein with close homology to Drosophila fasciclin 1. In this review, the functional role of periostin is discussed in the context of connective tissue physiology, in development, disease, and wound repair. PMID:18642132

  15. Autoimmunity in 2014.

    PubMed

    Selmi, Carlo

    2015-10-01

    Our PubMed search for peer-reviewed articles published in the 2014 solar year retrieved a significantly higher number of hits compared to 2013 with a net 28 % increase. Importantly, full articles related to autoimmunity constitute approximately 5 % of immunology articles. We confirm that our understanding of autoimmunity is becoming a translational paradigm with pathogenetic elements rapidly followed by new treatment options. Furthermore, numerous clinical and pathogenetic elements and features are shared among autoimmune diseases, and this is well illustrated in the recent literature. More specifically, the past year witnessed critical revisions of our understanding and management of antiphospholipid syndrome with new exciting data on the pathogenicity of the serum anti-beta2 glycoprotein autoantibody, a better understanding of the current and new treatments for rheumatoid arthritis, and new position papers on important clinical questions such as vaccinations in patients with autoimmune disease, comorbidities, or new classification criteria. Furthermore, data confirming the important connections between innate immunity and autoimmunity via toll-like receptors or the critical role of T regulatory cells in tolerance breakdown and autoimmunity perpetuation were also reported. Lastly, genetic and epigenetic data were provided to confirm that the mosaic of autoimmunity warrants a susceptible individual background which may be geographically determined and contribute to the geoepidemiology of diseases. The 2014 literature in the autoimmunity world should be cumulatively regarded as part of an annus mirabilis in which, on a different level, the 2014 Annual Meeting of the American College of Rheumatology in Boston was attended by over 16,000 participants with over selected 3000 abstracts. PMID:26335699

  16. Cells of the connective tissue differentiate and migrate into pollen sacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, M. C. M.; Wijesekara, Kolitha B.

    2002-01-01

    In angiosperms, archesporial cells in the anther primordium undergo meiosis to form haploid pollen, the sole occupants of anther sacs. Anther sacs are held together by a matrix of parenchyma cells, the connective tissue. Cells of the connective tissue are not known to differentiate. We report the differentiation of parenchyma cells in the connective tissue of two Gordonia species into pollen-like structures (described as pseudopollen), which migrate into the anther sacs before dehiscence. Pollen and pseudopollen were distinguishable by morphology and staining. Pollen were tricolpate to spherical while pseudopollen were less rigid and transparent with a ribbed surface. Both types were different in size, shape, staining and surface architecture. The ratio of the number of pseudopollen to pollen was 1:3. During ontogeny in the connective tissue, neither cell division nor tetrad formation was observed and hence pseudopollen were presumed to be diploid. Only normal pollen germinated on a germination medium. Fixed preparations in time seemed to indicate that pseudopollen migrate from the connective tissue into the anther sac.

  17. Should Endovascular Therapy Be Considered for Patients With Connective Tissue Disorder?

    PubMed

    Gagné-Loranger, Maude; Voisine, Pierre; Dagenais, François

    2016-01-01

    Because of early diagnosis, strict imaging follow-up, and advances in medical and surgical management, life expectancy of Marfan patients has dramatically improved since the 1970s. Although disease of the root and ascending aorta are more frequent in patients with connective tissue disorders, a subset of patients present with diffuse disease that might involve any portion of the thoracoabdominal aorta. Thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) has gained widespread acceptance for the treatment of different pathologies of the descending aorta. In contrast, TEVAR in patients with connective tissue disorders is associated with a high risk of early and mid-term complications and reinterventions. Currently, a consensus of experts recommend that an open approach should be reserved for use in acceptable risk candidates with connective tissue disorders. TEVAR should be considered solely in patients in a complex repeat surgical setting or in patients judged to have prohibitive open surgical risk. Finally, as a bridge to a definite open repair, TEVAR might be life-saving in patients with connective tissue disorders who present with exsanguination or severe malperfusion. Future developments in stent-graft technology might decrease stent-graft-related complications in patients with connective tissue disorders, although securing a device with radial force in a fragile aorta in the long-term will be challenging. PMID:26577892

  18. Accelerated aging phenotype in mice with conditional deficiency for mitochondrial superoxide dismutase in the connective tissue.

    PubMed

    Treiber, Nicolai; Maity, Pallab; Singh, Karmveer; Kohn, Matthias; Keist, Alexander F; Ferchiu, Florentina; Sante, Lea; Frese, Sebastian; Bloch, Wilhelm; Kreppel, Florian; Kochanek, Stefan; Sindrilaru, Anca; Iben, Sebastian; Högel, Josef; Ohnmacht, Michael; Claes, Lutz E; Ignatius, Anita; Chung, Jin H; Lee, Min J; Kamenisch, York; Berneburg, Mark; Nikolaus, Thorsten; Braunstein, Kerstin; Sperfeld, Anne-Dorte; Ludolph, Albert C; Briviba, Karlis; Wlaschek, Meinhard; Florin, Lore; Angel, Peter; Scharffetter-Kochanek, Karin

    2011-04-01

    The free radical theory of aging postulates that the production of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species is the major determinant of aging and lifespan. Its role in aging of the connective tissue has not yet been established, even though the incidence of aging-related disorders in connective tissue-rich organs is high, causing major disability in the elderly. We have now addressed this question experimentally by creating mice with conditional deficiency of the mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase in fibroblasts and other mesenchyme-derived cells of connective tissues in all organs. Here, we have shown for the first time that the connective tissue-specific lack of superoxide anion detoxification in the mitochondria results in reduced lifespan and premature onset of aging-related phenotypes such as weight loss, skin atrophy, kyphosis (curvature of the spine), osteoporosis and muscle degeneration in mutant mice. Increase in p16(INK4a) , a robust in vivo marker for fibroblast aging, may contribute to the observed phenotype. This novel model is particularly suited to decipher the underlying mechanisms and to develop hopefully novel connective tissue-specific anti-aging strategies. PMID:21108731

  19. Remodeling of the Connective Tissue Microarchitecture of the Lamina Cribrosa in Early Experimental Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Michael D.; Grau, Vicente; Grimm, Jonathan; Reynaud, Juan; Bellezza, Anthony J.; Burgoyne, Claude F.; Downs, J. Crawford

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To characterize the trabeculated connective tissue microarchitecture of the lamina cribrosa (LC) in terms of total connective tissue volume (CTV), connective tissue volume fraction (CTVF), predominant beam orientation, and material anisotropy in monkeys with early experimental glaucoma (EG). Methods The optic nerve heads from three monkeys with unilateral EG and four bilaterally normal monkeys were three dimensionally reconstructed from tissues perfusion fixed at an intraocular pressure of 10 mm Hg. A three-dimensional segmentation algorithm was used to extract a binary, voxel-based representation of the porous LC connective tissue microstructure that was regionalized into 45 subvolumes, and the following quantities were calculated: total CTV within the LC, mean and regional CTVF, regional predominant beam orientation, and mean and regional material anisotropy. Results Regional variation within the laminar microstructure was considerable within the normal eyes of all monkeys. The laminar connective tissue was generally most dense in the central and superior regions for the paired normal eyes, and laminar beams were radially oriented at the periphery for all eyes considered. CTV increased substantially in EG eyes compared with contralateral normal eyes (82%, 44%, 45% increases; P < 0.05), but average CTVF changed little (−7%, 1%, and −2% in the EG eyes). There were more laminar beams through the thickness of the LC in the EG eyes than in the normal controls (46%, 18%, 17% increases). Conclusions The substantial increase in laminar CTV with little change in CTVF suggests that significant alterations in connective and nonconnective tissue components in the laminar region occur in the early stages of glaucomatous damage. PMID:18806292

  20. Autoimmune epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Britton, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Seizures are a common manifestation of autoimmune limbic encephalitis and multifocal paraneoplastic disorders. Accumulating evidence supports an autoimmune basis for seizures in the absence of syndromic manifestations of encephalitis. The autoimmune epilepsies are immunologically mediated disorders in which recurrent seizures are a primary and persistent clinical feature. When other etiologies have been excluded, an autoimmune etiology is suggested in a patient with epilepsy upon detection of neural autoantibodies and/or the presence of inflammatory changes on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) or magnetic resonance imaging. In such patients, immunotherapy may be highly effective, depending on the particular autoimmune epilepsy syndrome present. In this chapter, several autoimmune epilepsy syndromes are discussed. First, epilepsies secondary to other primary autoimmune disorders will be discussed, and then those associated with antibodies that are likely to be pathogenic, such as voltage-gated potassium channel-complex and N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor, gamma-aminobutyric acid A and B receptor antibodies. For each syndrome, the typical clinical, imaging, electroencephaloram, CSF, and serologic features, and pathophysiology and treatment are described. Finally, suggested guidelines for the recognition, evaluation, and treatment of autoimmune epilepsy syndromes are provided. PMID:27112680

  1. Silica, Silicosis, and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, Kenneth Michael

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation of dust containing crystalline silica is associated with a number of acute and chronic diseases including systemic autoimmune diseases. Evidence for the link with autoimmune disease comes from epidemiological studies linking occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust with the systemic autoimmune diseases systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Although little is known regarding the mechanism by which silica exposure leads to systemic autoimmune disease, there is a voluminous literature on silica exposure and silicosis that may help identify immune processes that precede development of autoimmunity. The pathophysiology of silicosis consists of deposition of silica particles in the alveoli of the lung. Ingestion of these particles by macrophages initiates an inflammatory response, which stimulates fibroblasts to proliferate and produce collagen. Silica particles are encased by collagen leading to fibrosis and the nodular lesions characteristic of the disease. The steps in the development of silicosis, including acute and chronic inflammation and fibrosis, have different molecular and cellular requirements, suggesting that silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis may be mechanistically separate. Significantly, it is unclear whether silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis contribute similarly to the development of autoimmunity. Nonetheless, the findings from human and animal model studies are consistent with an autoimmune pathogenesis that begins with activation of the innate immune system leading to proinflammatory cytokine production, pulmonary inflammation leading to activation of adaptive immunity, breaking of tolerance, and autoantibodies and tissue damage. The variable frequency of these immunological features following silica exposure suggests substantial genetic involvement and gene/environment interaction in silica-induced autoimmunity. However, numerous questions remain unanswered. PMID:27014276

  2. Silica, Silicosis, and Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Kenneth Michael

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation of dust containing crystalline silica is associated with a number of acute and chronic diseases including systemic autoimmune diseases. Evidence for the link with autoimmune disease comes from epidemiological studies linking occupational exposure to crystalline silica dust with the systemic autoimmune diseases systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Although little is known regarding the mechanism by which silica exposure leads to systemic autoimmune disease, there is a voluminous literature on silica exposure and silicosis that may help identify immune processes that precede development of autoimmunity. The pathophysiology of silicosis consists of deposition of silica particles in the alveoli of the lung. Ingestion of these particles by macrophages initiates an inflammatory response, which stimulates fibroblasts to proliferate and produce collagen. Silica particles are encased by collagen leading to fibrosis and the nodular lesions characteristic of the disease. The steps in the development of silicosis, including acute and chronic inflammation and fibrosis, have different molecular and cellular requirements, suggesting that silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis may be mechanistically separate. Significantly, it is unclear whether silica-induced inflammation and fibrosis contribute similarly to the development of autoimmunity. Nonetheless, the findings from human and animal model studies are consistent with an autoimmune pathogenesis that begins with activation of the innate immune system leading to proinflammatory cytokine production, pulmonary inflammation leading to activation of adaptive immunity, breaking of tolerance, and autoantibodies and tissue damage. The variable frequency of these immunological features following silica exposure suggests substantial genetic involvement and gene/environment interaction in silica-induced autoimmunity. However, numerous questions remain unanswered. PMID:27014276

  3. The arrangement and function of octopus arm musculature and connective tissue.

    PubMed

    Kier, William M; Stella, Michael P

    2007-10-01

    The morphology of the musculature and connective tissues of the arms of Octopus bimaculoides was analyzed with light microscopy. We also studied O. briareus and O. digueti, which possess relatively more elongate and less elongate arms, respectively. The morphology of the arms was found to be remarkably uniform among species. The arms consist of a densely packed three-dimensional arrangement of muscle fibers and connective tissue fibers surrounding a central axial nerve cord. Three primary muscle fiber orientations were observed: 1) transverse muscle fibers oriented in planes perpendicular to the long axis of the arm; 2) longitudinal muscle fibers oriented parallel to the long axis; and 3) oblique muscle fibers arranged in helixes around the arm. The proportion of the arm cross section occupied by each of these muscle fiber groups (relative to the total cross sectional area of the musculature) remains constant along the length of the arm, even though the arm tapers from base to tip. A thin circular muscle layer wraps the arm musculature on the aboral side only. Much of this musculature has its origin and insertion on several robust connective tissue sheets including a layer surrounding the axial nerve cord and crossed-fiber connective tissue sheets located on the oral and the aboral sides of the arm. An additional thin layer of connective tissue wraps the arm musculature laterally and also serves as a site of origin and insertion of some of the muscle fibers. The fibers of the oral and aboral crossed-fiber connective tissue sheets are arranged oblique to the long axis of the arm with the same fiber angle as the oblique muscle layers that originate and insert on the sheets. The oblique muscle layers and the crossed-fiber connective tissue sheets thus form composite right- and left-handed helical fiber arrays. Analysis of arm morphology from the standpoint of biomechanics suggests that the transverse musculature is responsible for elongation of the arms, the longitudinal musculature is responsible for shortening, and the oblique muscle layers and associated connective tissues create torsion. Arm bending may involve unilateral contraction of longitudinal muscle bundles in combination with resistance to arm diameter increase due to contraction of the transverse musculature or passive stiffness of the arm tissues. The arms may also be bent by a combination of decrease in diameter due to contraction of the transverse musculature and maintenance of constant length on one side of the arm by unilateral activity of longitudinal muscle bundles. An increase in flexural stiffness of the arm may be achieved by cocontraction of the transverse and longitudinal muscle. Torsional stiffness may be increased by simultaneous contraction of both the right- and left-handed oblique muscle layers. PMID:17624930

  4. Recurrent Compartment Syndrome in a Patient with Clinical Features of a Connective Tissue Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Barajas, Brenda D; Sun, Angela; Rimoin, David L; Reinstein, Eyal

    2013-01-01

    Arterial complications are common in vascular type Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome (EDS), accounting for 66% of first complications. Several cases in the literature have documented acute compartment syndrome (ACS) following vascular rupture in vascular type EDS. Other disorders of connective tissue have also demonstrated vascular fragility, leading to arterial aneurysm and rupture, but there have been no documented cases of ACS. Here, we report on a female patient with a history of recurrent compartment syndrome who exhibits some clinical findings seen in hypermobile and vascular EDS; however she does not meet clinical and molecular diagnostic criteria for either of them. We further review the literature on ACS in heritable connective tissue disorders and suggest that compartment syndrome may rarely complicate other heritable disorders of connective tissue. PMID:23633393

  5. Muscle connective tissue controls development of the diaphragm and is a source of congenital diaphragmatic hernias

    PubMed Central

    Merrell, Allyson J.; Ellis, Benjamin J.; Fox, Zachary D.; Lawson, Jennifer A.; Weiss, Jeffrey A.; Kardon, Gabrielle

    2015-01-01

    The diaphragm is an essential mammalian skeletal muscle, and defects in diaphragm development are the cause of congenital diaphragmatic hernias (CDH), a common and often lethal birth defect. The diaphragm is derived from multiple embryonic sources, but how these give rise to the diaphragm is unknown and, despite the identification of many CDH-associated genes, the etiology of CDH is incompletely understood. Using mouse genetics, we show that the pleuroperitoneal folds (PPFs), transient embryonic structures, are the source of the diaphragm’s muscle connective tissue, regulate muscle development, and their striking migration controls diaphragm morphogenesis. Furthermore, Gata4 mosaic mutations in PPF-derived muscle connective tissue fibroblasts result in the development of localized amuscular regions that are biomechanically weaker and more compliant and lead to CDH. Thus the PPFs and muscle connective tissue are critical for diaphragm development and mutations in PPF-derived fibroblasts are a source of CDH. PMID:25807280

  6. Cell density signal protein suitable for treatment of connective tissue injuries and defects

    DOEpatents

    Schwarz, Richard I.

    2002-08-13

    Identification, isolation and partial sequencing of a cell density protein produced by fibroblastic cells. The cell density signal protein comprising a 14 amino acid peptide or a fragment, variant, mutant or analog thereof, the deduced cDNA sequence from the 14 amino acid peptide, a recombinant protein, protein and peptide-specific antibodies, and the use of the peptide and peptide-specific antibodies as therapeutic agents for regulation of cell differentiation and proliferation. A method for treatment and repair of connective tissue and tendon injuries, collagen deficiency, and connective tissue defects.

  7. Energy expenditure associated with softening and stiffening of echinoderm connective tissue.

    PubMed

    Motokawa, Tatsuo; Sato, Eriko; Umeyama, Kenichi

    2012-04-01

    Catch connective tissue of echinoderms at rest (in the standard state) either stiffens or softens in response to different kinds of stimulation. The energy consumption associated with the changes was estimated by measurement of the oxygen consumption rate (VO(2)) in three types of connective tissues-echinoid catch apparatus (CA), holothuroid body-wall dermis (HD), and asteroid body-wall dermis (AD). Mechanical stimulation by repetitive compression (10%-15% strain), which increased viscosity measured by creep tests, was employed for inducing the stiff state. Noradrenaline (10(-3) mol l(-1)), which decreased viscosity of CA, and static 80% compressive strain, which decreased viscosity of HD, were used to induce the soft state in the respective tissues. The VO(2) (in μl/g/h) values of the standard state were 2.91 (CA), 1.41 (HD), and 0.56 (AD), which were less than 1/4 of the VO(2) of the resting body-wall muscle of the starfish. The VO(2) of the stiff state was about 1.5 times greater than that of the standard state in all types of connective tissues. The VO(2) of the soft state was 3.4 (CA)-9.1 (HD) times greater than that of the standard state. The economical nature of catch connective tissue in posture maintenance is discussed. PMID:22589405

  8. [Autoimmune thyroiditis].

    PubMed

    Cardot-Bauters, Catherine; Wémeau, Jean-Louis

    2014-06-01

    Autoimmune thyroiditis are common and benign disorders, affecting preferentially women, at any age of life. They may occur singly or integrated as a part of familial predisposition to autoimmune thyroid disease or autoimmune polyendocrinopathies. Clinical presentation is variable: goiter or thyroid atrophy, euthyroid or temporary or permanent hypothyroidism, rarely transient thyrotoxicosis. Commune features are the presence of antithyroperoxydase antibodies and lymphoplasmocytic infiltrate of the thyroid parenchyma. It is important to distinguish the cases in which thyroid dysfunction is transient and requires only monitoring and those in which hypothyroidism is permanent and justifies thyroid hormone replacement. In the forms with goiter, clinical and ultrasonic control of the thyroid is justified. PMID:25090773

  9. Aberrant Type I Interferon Regulation in Autoimmunity: Opposite Directions in MS and SLE, Shaped by Evolution and Body Ecology

    PubMed Central

    Reder, Anthony T.; Feng, Xuan

    2013-01-01

    Studying the action of mechanisms of type I interferon (IFN) provides the insight to elucidate the cause and therapy for autoimmune diseases. There are high IFN responses in some diseases such as connective tissue diseases, but low responses in multiple sclerosis. Distinct IFN features lead us to understand pathology of a spectrum of autoimmune diseases and help us to search genetic changes, gene expression, and biomarkers for diagnosis, disease progression, and treatment response. PMID:24062747

  10. The application of quantitative cytochemistry to the study of diseases of the connective tissues.

    PubMed

    Henderson, B

    1983-01-01

    The connective tissues are a complex organisation of tissues, cells and intercellular materials spread throughout the body and are subject to a large number of diseases. Such complexity makes the study of the metabolism of the connective tissues in health and more particularly in disease states difficult if one uses conventional biochemical methodology. Fortunately the techniques of quantitative cytochemistry, as developed in recent years, have made it possible to study the metabolism of even such complex and refractory connective tissues as bone. Using properly validated assays of enzyme activity in unfixed sections from various tissues a number of the diseases of the connective tissues have been studied. For example the synovia from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and related conditions have been studied using these techniques and marked alterations in the metabolism of the synovial lining cell population of this tissue have been demonstrated. These alterations in metabolism are believed to be related to the destruction of cartilage and bone found in such diseases. Investigations of the metabolism of the chondrocytes of articular cartilage in a strain of mice which spontaneously develops osteoarthritis has revealed a lack of certain key enzymes of carbohydrate metabolism in precisely those areas where degradation of the matrix of articular cartilage begins suggesting a causal relationship between these events. These same techniques have been used to study the cellular kinetics and metabolism of the dermis and epidermis in the disfiguring disease, psoriasis. The metabolism of healing bone fractures, the diagnosis and treatment of the mucopolysaccharidoses and the metabolic effects of currently used anti-inflammatory and anti-rheumatic drugs have also been examined. Perhaps the most exciting aspect of these studies has been the development and use of the technique of the cytochemical bioassay (CBA) to study hormonally mediated diseases of the connective tissues. Such studies have recently shed new light on the molecular lesion in pseudohypoparathyroidism. Though still in their relative infancy the studies described in this review show the potential inherent in the use of quantitative cytochemistry for the study of diseases of the connective tissues. PMID:6419282

  11. Serum levels of adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases, TIMP-1, are elevated in patients with autoimmune thyroid disorders: relevance to vascular inflammation.

    PubMed

    Jublanc, C; Beaudeux, J L; Aubart, F; Raphael, M; Chadarevian, R; Chapman, M J; Bonnefont-Rousselot, D; Bruckert, E

    2011-10-01

    Serum levels of ICAM-1 (Inter Cellular Adhesion Molecule-1), VCAM-1 (Vascular cell Adhesion Molecule-1-I), TIMP-1 (tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 1) and MMP-9 (Metalloproteinase 9) are well established markers of inflammation. The physiopathological link between inflammation, atherosclerosis and autoimmunity is well demonstrated. However, serum levels of these biomarkers in patients with autoimmune-mediated dysthyroidism, including their evolution after improvement of the thyroid disorder have not been assessed. So, we evaluated the circulating levels of these markers in autoimmune and in non-autoimmune-mediated dysthyroid patients, and their evolution after treatment of thyroid disease. We conducted a prospective study to evaluate these markers before and after treatment in hyperthyroid patients (n = 33; 28 patients with autoimmune disease), hypothyroid patients (n = 38; 33 patients with autoimmune disease) and euthyroid subjects (n = 33). At baseline, serum levels of ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and TIMP-1 were significantly elevated in patients with hyperthyroidism as compared to euthyroid and hypothyroid patients (respectively p = 0.0005 and p < 0.0001). In multivariate analysis, the differences remained significant for VCAM-1 and TIMP-1. Median levels of ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and TIMP-1 were significantly higher in patients with autoimmune-mediated dysthyroidism compared to euthyroid patients (respectively p < 0.0001 and p = 0.002). In hyperthyroid patients, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and TIMP-1 concentrations fell significantly after they had become euthyroid (respectively p = 0.0006; p < 0.0001 and p = 0.0009), although VCAM-1 values remained higher than those observed in the control group (p = 0.005). We found that autoimmune-mediated dysthyroidism were associated with increased peripheral blood concentrations of VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and TIMP-1. Whether these biological abnormalities translate into increase intima remodelling and atherosclerosis remains to be studied. PMID:20685094

  12. Optimizing Gingival Biotype Using Subepithelial Connective Tissue Graft: A Case Report and One-Year Followup

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Harpreet Singh; Yadav, Anil; Yadav, Priya; Nanda, Prashant

    2011-01-01

    Gingival recession is the exposure of root surfaces due to apical migration of the gingival tissue margins. The principal objectives of treating a gingival recession are to achieve better esthetics and reduce hypersensitivity. The gingival biotype is an important modifying factor in the treatment of gingival recession. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the significance of changing the soft tissue biotype to a more favorable one while attempting root coverage, to achieve more stable and long-lasting results using subepithelial connective tissue graft. PMID:22567432

  13. Telomere Dysfunction, Autoimmunity and Aging

    PubMed Central

    Hohensinner, Philipp J.; Goronzy, Jörg J.; Weyand, Cornelia M.

    2011-01-01

    Immune aging is associated with loss of critical immune functions, such as host protection from infection and malignancy. Unexpectedly, immunosenescence also renders the host susceptible to inflammation, which may translate into tissue-damaging disease as the senescent immune system loses its ability to maximize inflammatory protection while minimizing inflammatory injury. On the other hand, chronic inflammation associated with immune-mediated disease represents a profound stress factor for the immune system, affecting cellular turn-over, replication and exhaustion. Immune cell longevity is tightly connected to the functional integrity of telomeres which are regulated by cell multiplication, exposure to oxidative stress and DNA repair mechanisms. Lymphocytes are amongst the few cell types that can actively elongate telomeres through the action of telomerase. In patients with the autoimmune disease rheumatoid arthritis (RA), telomerase deficiency is associated with prematurity of immune aging. Patients with RA have other defects in DNA repair mechanisms, including the kinase Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM), critically involved in the repair of DNA double strand breaks. ATM deficiency in RA shortens lymphocyte survival. Dynamics of telomeric length and structure are beginning to be understood and have distinct patterns in different autoimmune diseases, suggesting a multitude of molecular mechanisms defining the interface between chronic immune stimulation and progressive aging of the immune system. PMID:22396899

  14. Mediastinal lymphadenopathy and pulmonary arterial hypertension in mixed connective tissue disease

    SciTech Connect

    Guit, G.L.; Shaw, P.C.; Ehrlich, J.; Kroon, H.M.; Oudkerk, M.

    1985-02-01

    A case of mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is presented in which mediastinal lymphadenopathy was the most prominent radiological finding detected by plain chest radiographs and computed tomography. Pulmonary arterial hypertension, which is a rare and often fatal complication of MCTD, also developed in this patient.

  15. Adult Bone Marrow-Derived Stem Cells in Muscle Connective Tissue and Satellite Cell Niches

    PubMed Central

    Dreyfus, Patrick A.; Chretien, Fabrice; Chazaud, Bénédicte; Kirova, Youlia; Caramelle, Philippe; Garcia, Luis; Butler-Browne, Gillian; Gherardi, Romain K.

    2004-01-01

    Skeletal muscle includes satellite cells, which reside beneath the muscle fiber basal lamina and mainly represent committed myogenic precursor cells, and multipotent stem cells of unknown origin that are present in muscle connective tissue, express the stem cell markers Sca-1 and CD34, and can differentiate into different cell types. We tracked bone marrow (BM)-derived stem cells in both muscle connective tissue and satellite cell niches of irradiated mice transplanted with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing BM cells. An increasing number of GFP+ mononucleated cells, located both inside and outside of the muscle fiber basal lamina, were observed 1, 3, and 6 months after transplantation. Sublaminal cells expressed unambiguous satellite cell markers (M-cadherin, Pax7, NCAM) and fused into scattered GFP+ muscle fibers. In muscle connective tissue there were GFP+ cells located close to blood vessels that expressed the ScaI or CD34 stem-cell antigens. The rate of settlement of extra- and intralaminal compartments by BM-derived cells was compatible with the view that extralaminal cells constitute a reservoir of satellite cells. We conclude that both muscle satellite cells and stem cell marker-expressing cells located in muscle connective tissue can derive from BM in adulthood. PMID:14982831

  16. Rn for treatment of periocular fibrous connective tissue sarcomas in the horse

    SciTech Connect

    Frauenfelder, H.C.; Blevins, W.E.; Page, E.H.

    1982-02-01

    Twelve periocular fibrous connective tissue sarcomas in 11 horses were treated with 222Rn. Follow-up periods ranged from 1 to 6 years; the overall nonrecurrence rate at 12 months after therapy was 92%. Two lesions recurred 2 years after treatment, and 1 after 3 years. One of the former lesions has not recurred after a 2nd 222Rn treatment.

  17. Aortic tear and dissection related to connective tissues abnormalities resembling Marfan syndrome in a Great Dane.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Jennifer A; Bach, Jonathan F; Bell, Cynthia M; Stepien, Rebecca L

    2015-06-01

    Aortic tears and acute aortic dissection are rarely reported in dogs. This report describes a case of aortic dissection and probable sinus of Valsalva rupture in a young Great Dane with associated histopathologic findings suggestive of a connective tissue abnormality. PMID:25890485

  18. Membranous glomerulonephritis in rheumatoid arthritis unrelated to gold, D-penicillamine or other connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Zarza, L P; Sanchez, E N; Acin, P A; Ara, J M; Baños, J G

    1996-07-01

    We report a 58-year-old woman with classical rheumatoid arthritis (RA) who developed a membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN). She had never been treated with gold or D-penicillamine; other connective tissue diseases as well as hepatitis B were excluded. We suggest that the responsible cause of MGN is RA. PMID:8853174

  19. Microstructure alterations in beef intramuscular connective tissue caused by hydrodynamic pressure processing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilized to evaluate microstructural changes in intramuscular connective tissue of beef semimembranosus muscle subjected to hydrodynamic pressure processing (HDP). Samples were HDP treated in a plastic container (HDP-PC) or a steel commercial unit (HDP-CU). C...

  20. Connective tissue integrity is lost in vitamin B-6-deficient chicks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masse, P. G.; Yamauchi, M.; Mahuren, J. D.; Coburn, S. P.; Muniz, O. E.; Howell, D. S.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the present investigation was to characterize further the connective tissue disorder produced by pyridoxine (vitamin B-6) deficiency, as previously evidenced by electron microscopy. Following the second post-natal week, fast growing male chicks were deprived of pyridoxine for a 1-mo period. Six weeks post-natally, blood concentrations in the experimental deficiency group had declined to deficiency levels as registered by low concentrations of pyridoxal phosphate (coenzyme form) in erythrocytes, but did not reach levels associated with neurological symptoms. Light microscopic study showed abnormalities in the extracellular matrix of the connective tissues. Collagen cross-links and the aldehyde contents were not significantly lower in cartilage and tendon collagens of vitamin B-6-deficient animals than in age-matched controls; also, their proteoglycan degrading protease and collagenase activities measured in articular cartilages were not greater. Thus, proteolysis was an unlikely alternative mechanism to account for the loss of connective tissue integrity. These results point to the need for further investigation into adhesive properties of collagen associated proteoglycans or other proteins in vitamin B-6-deficient connective tissue.

  1. Elastin Cables Define the Axial Connective Tissue System in the Murine Lung.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Willi; Bennett, Robert D; Ackermann, Maximilian; Ysasi, Alexandra B; Belle, Janeil; Valenzuela, Cristian D; Pabst, Andreas; Tsuda, Akira; Konerding, Moritz A; Mentzer, Steven J

    2015-11-01

    The axial connective tissue system is a fiber continuum of the lung that maintains alveolar surface area during changes in lung volume. Although the molecular anatomy of the axial system remains undefined, the fiber continuum of the lung is central to contemporary models of lung micromechanics and alveolar regeneration. To provide a detailed molecular structure of the axial connective tissue system, we examined the extracellular matrix of murine lungs. The lungs were decellularized using a 24 hr detergent treatment protocol. Systematic evaluation of the decellularized lungs demonstrated no residual cellular debris; morphometry demonstrated a mean 39 ± 7% reduction in lung dimensions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) demonstrated an intact structural hierarchy within the decellularized lung. Light, fluorescence, and SEM of precision-cut lung slices demonstrated that alveolar duct structure was defined by a cable line element encased in basement membrane. The cable line element arose in the distal airways, passed through septal tips and inserted into neighboring blood vessels and visceral pleura. The ropelike appearance, collagenase resistance and anti-elastin immunostaining indicated that the cable was an elastin macromolecule. Our results indicate that the helical line element of the axial connective tissue system is composed of an elastin cable that not only defines the structure of the alveolar duct, but also integrates the axial connective tissue system into visceral pleura and peripheral blood vessels. PMID:26285785

  2. Microstructure alterations in beef intramuscular connective tissue caused by hydrodynamic pressure processing.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, H; Bowker, B C; Eastridge, J S; Solomon, M B

    2013-11-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilized to evaluate microstructural changes in intramuscular connective tissue of beef semimembranosus muscle subjected to hydrodynamic pressure processing (HDP). Samples were HDP treated in a plastic container (HDP-PC) or a steel commercial unit (HDP-CU). Control and HDP samples were obtained immediately post-treatment and after 14days of aging for SEM and Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF) analysis. Immediately post-treatment, HDP treated samples exhibited lower (P<0.01) WBSF than did controls. After aging, HDP-PC samples had lower (P<0.01) WBSF than that of aged controls. SEM analysis indicated that HDP-PC treatment disrupted the integrity of the collagen fibril network of the endomysium in both the non-aged and aged samples. Aging effects on the intramuscular connective tissue were observed in the HDP-PC and control samples. Both WBSF and connective tissue changes were greater in the HDP-PC than in the HDP-CU treated samples. Data suggest that shockwave alterations to connective tissue contribute to the meat tenderization of HDP. PMID:23803280

  3. An unusual case of undifferentiated connective tissue disease presenting as cardiac tamponade.

    PubMed

    Hari, Pawan; Kondur, Ashok; Manickam, Palaniappan; Afonso, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac tamponade as an initial manifestation of undifferentiated connective tissue diseases (UCTD) is extremely rare, with only one case reported in literature thus far. We describe here, a case of a middle-aged man who presented with symptoms of fatigue, exertional dyspnea and orthopnea. His physical exam was significant for anasarca, elevated JVP and pulsus paradoxus. Chest X-ray showed pleural effusions and cardiomegaly, electrocardiogram revealed electrical alternans and a transthoracic echocardiogram demonstrated massive pericardial effusion with hemodynamic compromise. There was clear evidence of tamponade on right heart catheterization. All common causes of pericardial effusion were assiduously excluded before working up the patient for connective tissue disorders, which revealed a high antinuclear antibody titer (1:160), grossly elevated SSA, SSB antibodies and increased C-reactive protein levels (13.04 mg/dl). Patient had no signs or symptoms suggestive of systemic sclerosis (xerophthalmia or xerostomia) and did not meet criteria for any other known connective tissue diseases. He was therefore diagnosed with UCTD, and successfully treated with colchicine after emergency pericardiocentesis. This case presents UCTD as a rare cause of cardiac tamponade and large pericardial effusions and suggests that colchicine can be used to treat UCTD-associated effusions. These patients once diagnosed, are at risk of developing known connective tissue diseases within 5 years of disease onset and should be followed up in clinic periodically. PMID:20013265

  4. Autoimmune thyroid disorders.

    PubMed

    Antonelli, Alessandro; Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Corrado, Alda; Di Domenicantonio, Andrea; Fallahi, Poupak

    2015-02-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) result from a dysregulation of the immune system leading to an immune attack on the thyroid. AITD are T cell-mediated organ-specific autoimmune disorders. The prevalence of AITD is estimated to be 5%; however, the prevalence of antithyroid antibodies may be even higher. The AITD comprise two main clinical presentations: Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), both characterized by lymphocytic infiltration of the thyroid parenchyma. The clinical hallmarks of GD and HT are thyrotoxicosis and hypothyroidism, respectively. The mechanisms that trigger the autoimmune attack to the thyroid are still under investigation. Epidemiological data suggest an interaction among genetic susceptibility and environmental triggers as the key factor leading to the breakdown of tolerance and the development of disease. Recent studies have shown the importance of cytokines and chemokines in the pathogenesis of AT and GD. In thyroid tissue, recruited T helper 1 (Th1) lymphocytes may be responsible for enhanced IFN-γ and TNF-α production, which in turn stimulates CXCL10 (the prototype of the IFN-γ-inducible Th1 chemokines) secretion from the thyroid cells, therefore creating an amplification feedback loop, initiating and perpetuating the autoimmune process. Associations exist between AITD and other organ specific (polyglandular autoimmune syndromes), or systemic autoimmune disorders (Sjögren's syndrome, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, cryoglobulinemia, sarcoidosis, psoriatic arthritis). Moreover, several studies have shown an association of AITD and papillary thyroid cancer. These data suggest that AITD patients should be accurately monitored for thyroid dysfunctions, the appearance of thyroid nodules, and other autoimmune disorders. PMID:25461470

  5. [Autoimmune encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Davydovskaya, M V; Boyko, A N; Beliaeva, I A; Martynov, M Yu; Gusev, E I

    2015-01-01

    The authors consider the issues related to pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis and treatment of autoimmune encephalitis. It has been demonstrated that the development of autoimmune encephalitis can be associated with the oncologic process or be of idiopathic character. The pathogenesis of autoimmune encephalitis is caused by the production of antibodies that directly or indirectly (via T-cell mechanism) damage exo-and/or endocellular structures of the nerve cells. The presence of antobodies to endocellular structures of neurons in the cerebrospinal fluid of patients with autoimmune encephalitis in the vast majority of cases (> 95%) indicates the concomitant oncologic process, the presence of antibodies to membranes or neuronal synapses can be not associated with the oncologic process. Along with complex examination, including neuroimaging, EEG, cerebrospinal fluid and antibodies, the diagnostic algorithm in autoimmune encephalitis should include the search for the nidus of cancer. The treatment algorithm in autoimmune encephalitis included the combined immunosupressive therapy, plasmapheresis, immunoglobulines, cytostatics as well as treatment of the oncologic process. PMID:26322363

  6. Autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Mieli-Vergani, Giorgina; Heller, Solange; Jara, Paloma; Vergani, Diego; Chang, Mei-Hwei; Fujisawa, Tomoo; González-Peralta, Regino P; Kelly, Deirdre; Mohan, Neelam; Shah, Uzma; Murray, Karen F

    2009-08-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis is characterized by inflammatory liver histology, circulating nonorgan-specific autoantibodies, and increased levels of immunoglobulin G, in the absence of a known etiology. Two types of juvenile autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) are recognized according to seropositivity for smooth muscle and/or anti-nuclear antibody (AIH type 1) or liver kidney microsomal antibody (AIH type 2). There is a female predominance in both. AIH type 2 presents more acutely, at a younger age and commonly with immunoglobulin A deficiency, whereas duration of symptoms before diagnosis, clinical signs, family history of autoimmunity, presence of associated autoimmune disorders, response to treatment, and long-term prognosis are similar in the 2 groups. Immunosuppressive treatment with steroids and azathioprine, which should be instituted promptly to avoid progression to cirrhosis, induces remission in 80% of cases. Relapses are common, often due to nonadherence. Drugs effective in refractory cases include cyclosporine and mycophenolate mofetil. Long-term treatment is usually required, with only some 20% of AIH type 1 patients able to discontinue therapy successfully. In childhood, sclerosing cholangitis with strong autoimmune features, including interface hepatitis and serological features identical to AIH type 1, is as prevalent as AIH, but it affects boys and girls equally. Differential diagnosis relies on cholangiographic studies. In autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis liver parenchymal damage responds satisfactorily to immunosuppressive treatment, whereas bile duct disease tends to progress. In this article we review the state of the art of diagnosis, monitoring, and treatment for children with AIH. PMID:19561543

  7. Expanding the clinical and genetic heterogeneity of hereditary disorders of connective tissue.

    PubMed

    Alazami, Anas M; Al-Qattan, Sarah M; Faqeih, Eissa; Alhashem, Amal; Alshammari, Muneera; Alzahrani, Fatema; Al-Dosari, Mohammed S; Patel, Nisha; Alsagheir, Afaf; Binabbas, Bassam; Alzaidan, Hamad; Alsiddiky, Abdulmonem; Alharbi, Nasser; Alfadhel, Majid; Kentab, Amal; Daza, Riza M; Kircher, Martin; Shendure, Jay; Hashem, Mais; Alshahrani, Saif; Rahbeeni, Zuhair; Khalifa, Ola; Shaheen, Ranad; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2016-05-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) describes a group of clinical entities in which the connective tissue, primarily that of the skin, joint and vessels, is abnormal, although the resulting clinical manifestations can vary widely between the different historical subtypes. Many cases of hereditary disorders of connective tissue that do not seem to fit these historical subtypes exist. The aim of this study is to describe a large series of patients with inherited connective tissue disorders evaluated by our clinical genetics service and for whom a likely causal variant was identified. In addition to clinical phenotyping, patients underwent various genetic tests including molecular karyotyping, candidate gene analysis, autozygome analysis, and whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing as appropriate. We describe a cohort of 69 individuals representing 40 families, all referred because of suspicion of an inherited connective tissue disorder by their primary physician. Molecular lesions included variants in the previously published disease genes B3GALT6, GORAB, ZNF469, B3GAT3, ALDH18A1, FKBP14, PYCR1, CHST14 and SPARC with interesting variations on the published clinical phenotypes. We also describe the first recessive EDS-like condition to be caused by a recessive COL1A1 variant. In addition, exome capture in a familial case identified a homozygous truncating variant in a novel and compelling candidate gene, AEBP1. Finally, we also describe a distinct novel clinical syndrome of cutis laxa and marked facial features and propose ATP6V1E1 and ATP6V0D2 (two subunits of vacuolar ATPase) as likely candidate genes based on whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing of the two families with this new clinical entity. Our study expands the clinical spectrum of hereditary disorders of connective tissue and adds three novel candidate genes including two that are associated with a highly distinct syndrome. PMID:27023906

  8. Connective Tissue Reaction to White and Gray MTA Mixed With Distilled Water or Chlorhexidine in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yavari, Hamid Reza; Shahi, Shahriar; Rahimi, Saeed; Shakouie, Sahar; Roshangar, Leila; Mesgari Abassi, Mehran; Sattari Khavas, Sahar

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to compare the histocompatibility of white (WMTA) and gray (GMTA) mineral trioxide aggregate mixed with 0.12% chlorhexidine (CHX) and distilled water (DW) in subcutaneous connective tissues of rats. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The freshly mixed WMTA and GMTA with CHX or DW were inserted in polyethylene tubes and implanted into dorsal subcutaneous connective tissue of 50 Wistar Albino rats; tissue biopsies were collected and were then examined histologically 7, 15, 30, 60 and 90 days after the implantation procedure. The histology results were scored from 1-4; score 4 was considered as the worst finding. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA tests. RESULTS: All experimented materials were tolerated well by the connective tissues after 90-day evaluation, except for the WMTA/CHX group that had significantly more mean inflammatory scores (P<0.001). There was a statistically significant difference in the mean inflammation grades between experimental groups in each interval (P<0.001). After 90 days, GMTA/CHX group had the lowest inflammatory score. CONCLUSION: Although adding CHX to WMTA produces significantly higher inflammatory response, it seems a suitable substitute for DW in combination with GMTA. Further research is necessary to recommend this mixture for clinical use. PMID:23864873

  9. Mitral valve prolapse and joint hypermobility: evidence for a systemic connective tissue abnormality?

    PubMed Central

    Pitcher, D; Grahame, R

    1982-01-01

    Clinical evidence for an abnormally of extracardiac connective tissue was sought in 21 patients with idiopathic mitral valve prolapse and was compared to that in 21 matched controls. The incidence of rheumatic and orthopaedic complaints and the prevalence of hypermobile joints, Marfanoid habitus, and skeletal deformity were compared in the 2 groups. Skin thickness and elasticity were measured, and the mean values in the 2 groups were compared. hypermobile joints were significantly commoner in patients with mitral valve prolapse. Easy bruising was reported significantly more commonly by patients with mitral prolapse; the incidence of other rheumatic complaints was similar in the 2 groups. There was no significant difference in skin thickness, skin elasticity, and the prevalence of either skeletal deformity or Marfanoid habitus between patients with mitral valve prolapse and controls. The results support previous evidence of an association between mitral valve prolapse and benign hypermobility of the joints, but emphasise that many patients with mitral valve prolapse have no clinically apparent connective tissue abnormality outside the heart. It remains uncertain whether the valve lesion in these patients represents a tissue-specific abnormality of mitral valve collagen or the only clinical expression of a minor systemic connective tissue abnormality. PMID:7114917

  10. Autoimmune encephalopathies

    PubMed Central

    Leypoldt, Frank; Armangue, Thaís; Dalmau, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Over the last 10 years the continual discovery of novel forms of encephalitis associated with antibodies to cell-surface or synaptic proteins has changed the paradigms for diagnosing and treating disorders that were previously unknown or mischaracterized. We review here the process of discovery, the symptoms, and the target antigens of twelve autoimmune encephatilic disorders, grouped by syndromes and approached from a clinical perspective. Anti-NMDAR encephalitis, several subtypes of limbic encephalitis, stiff-person spectrum disorders, and other autoimmune encephalitides that result in psychosis, seizures, or abnormal movements are described in detail. We include a novel encephalopathy with prominent sleep dysfunction that provides an intriguing link between chronic neurodegeneration and cell-surface autoimmunity (IgLON5). Some of the caveats of limited serum testing are outlined. In addition, we review the underlying cellular and synaptic mechanisms that for some disorders confirm the antibody pathogenicity. The multidisciplinary impact of autoimmune encephalitis has been expanded recently by the discovery that herpes simplex encephalitis is a robust trigger of synaptic autoimmunity, and that some patients may develop overlapping syndromes, including anti-NMDAR encephalitis and neuromyelitis optica or other demyelinating diseases. PMID:25315420

  11. Fractal analysis of the structural complexity of the connective tissue in human carotid bodies

    PubMed Central

    Guidolin, Diego; Porzionato, Andrea; Tortorella, Cinzia; Macchi, Veronica; De Caro, Raffaele

    2014-01-01

    The carotid body (CB) may undergo different structural changes during perinatal development, aging, or in response to environmental stimuli. In the previous literature, morphometric approaches to evaluate these changes have considered quantitative first order parameters, such as volumes or densities, while changes in spatial disposition and/or complexity of structural components have not yet been considered. In the present study, different strategies for addressing morphological complexity of CB, apart from the overall amount of each tissue component, were evaluated and compared. In particular, we considered the spatial distribution of connective tissue in the carotid bodies of young control subjects, young opiate-related deaths and aged subjects, through analysis of dispersion (Morisita's index), gray level co-occurrence matrix (entropy, angular second moment, variance, correlation), and fractal analysis (fractal dimension, lacunarity). Opiate-related deaths and aged subjects showed a comparable increase in connective tissue with respect to young controls. However, the Morisita's index (p < 0.05), angular second moment (p < 0.05), fractal dimension (p < 0.01), and lacunarity (p < 0.01) permitted to identify significant differences in the disposition of the connective tissue between these two series. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was also calculated to evaluate the efficiency of each parameter. The fractal dimension and lacunarity, with areas under the ROC curve of 0.9651 (excellent accuracy) and 0.8835 (good accuracy), respectively, showed the highest discriminatory power. They evidenced higher level of structural complexity in the carotid bodies of opiate-related deaths than old controls, due to more complex branching of intralobular connective tissue. Further analyses will have to consider the suitability of these approaches to address other morphological features of the CB, such as different cell populations, vascularization, and innervation. PMID:25414672

  12. Adjuvants and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Israeli, E; Agmon-Levin, N; Blank, M; Shoenfeld, Y

    2009-11-01

    Some adjuvants may exert adverse effects upon injection or, on the other hand, may not trigger a full immunological reaction. The mechanisms underlying adjuvant adverse effects are under renewed scrutiny because of the enormous implications for vaccine development. In the search for new and safer adjuvants, several new adjuvants were developed by pharmaceutical companies utilizing new immunological and chemical innovations. The ability of the immune system to recognize molecules that are broadly shared by pathogens is, in part, due to the presence of special immune receptors called toll-like receptors (TLRs) that are expressed on leukocyte membranes. The very fact that TLR activation leads to adaptive immune responses to foreign entities explains why so many adjuvants used today in vaccinations are developed to mimic TLR ligands. Alongside their supportive role, adjuvants were found to inflict by themselves an illness of autoimmune nature, defined as 'the adjuvant diseases'. The debatable question of silicone as an adjuvant and connective tissue diseases, as well as the Gulf War syndrome and macrophagic myofaciitis which followed multiple injections of aluminium-based vaccines, are presented here. Owing to the adverse effects exerted by adjuvants, there is no doubt that safer adjuvants need to be developed and incorporated into future vaccines. Other needs in light of new vaccine technologies are adjuvants suitable for use with mucosally delivered vaccines, DNA vaccines, cancer and autoimmunity vaccines. In particular, there is demand for safe and non-toxic adjuvants able to stimulate cellular (Th1) immunity. More adjuvants were approved to date besides alum for human vaccines, including MF59 in some viral vaccines, MPL, AS04, AS01B and AS02A against viral and parasitic infections, virosomes for HBV, HPV and HAV, and cholera toxin for cholera. Perhaps future adjuvants occupying other putative receptors will be employed to bypass the TLR signaling pathway completely in order to circumvent common side effects of adjuvant-activated TLRs such as local inflammation and the general malaise felt because of the costly whole-body immune response to antigen. PMID:19880572

  13. The "washing line" suture technique for securing the Subepithelial Connective Tissue Graft.

    PubMed

    McCrea, Shane J J

    2014-07-01

    Following tooth extraction, resorption of the buccal wall of the socket will occur; this will be true for both the maxilla and the mandible. Where the extraction site is surrounded by natural dentition, the loss of the buccal alveolar plate can degrade the visual aesthetics of an implant-supported prosthetic rehabilitation. To aid the harmonization of the hard and soft tissue morphology, both hard and soft tissue augmentation can be carried out either consecutively with an extraction/immediate implant placement or prior to an implant placement in the delayed scenario. The contemporary method of increasing soft tissue volume is to use the Subepithelial Connective Tissue (auto) Graft (the SCTG). The graft requires fixation, otherwise it can be extruded from the recipient site. This article presents a novel suturing technique which can confidently secure the SCTG, thus resisting its dislodgement. PMID:25020220

  14. Beneficial Autoimmunity at Body Surfaces – Immune Surveillance and Rapid Type 2 Immunity Regulate Tissue Homeostasis and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dalessandri, Tim; Strid, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial cells (ECs) line body surface tissues and provide a physicochemical barrier to the external environment. Frequent microbial and non-microbial challenges such as those imposed by mechanical disruption, injury or exposure to noxious environmental substances including chemicals, carcinogens, ultraviolet-irradiation, or toxins cause activation of ECs with release of cytokines and chemokines as well as alterations in the expression of cell-surface ligands. Such display of epithelial stress is rapidly sensed by tissue-resident immunocytes, which can directly interact with self-moieties on ECs and initiate both local and systemic immune responses. ECs are thus key drivers of immune surveillance at body surface tissues. However, ECs have a propensity to drive type 2 immunity (rather than type 1) upon non-invasive challenge or stress – a type of immunity whose regulation and function still remain enigmatic. Here, we review the induction and possible role of type 2 immunity in epithelial tissues and propose that rapid immune surveillance and type 2 immunity are key regulators of tissue homeostasis and carcinogenesis. PMID:25101088

  15. Connective tissue growth factor is expressed in bone marrow stromal cells and promotes interleukin-7-dependent B lymphopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Laurence C; Strickland, Deborah H; Howlett, Meegan; Ford, Jette; Charles, Adrian K; Lyons, Karen M; Brigstock, David R; Goldschmeding, Roel; Cole, Catherine H; Alexander, Warren S; Kees, Ursula R

    2014-07-01

    Hematopoiesis occurs in a complex bone marrow microenvironment in which bone marrow stromal cells provide critical support to the process through direct cell contact and indirectly through the secretion of cytokines and growth factors. We report that connective tissue growth factor (Ctgf, also known as Ccn2) is highly expressed in murine bone marrow stromal cells. In contrast, connective tissue growth factor is barely detectable in unfractionated adult bone marrow cells. While connective tissue growth factor has been implicated in hematopoietic malignancies, and is known to play critical roles in skeletogenesis and regulation of bone marrow stromal cells, its role in hematopoiesis has not been described. Here we demonstrate that the absence of connective tissue growth factor in mice results in impaired hematopoiesis. Using a chimeric fetal liver transplantation model, we show that absence of connective tissue growth factor has an impact on B-cell development, in particular from pro-B to more mature stages, which is linked to a requirement for connective tissue growth factor in bone marrow stromal cells. Using in vitro culture systems, we demonstrate that connective tissue growth factor potentiates B-cell proliferation and promotes pro-B to pre-B differentiation in the presence of interleukin-7. This study provides a better understanding of the functions of connective tissue growth factor within the bone marrow, showing the dual regulatory role of the growth factor in skeletogenesis and in stage-specific B lymphopoiesis. PMID:24727816

  16. The autoimmune diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, N.R.; Mackay, I.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 25 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: Genetic Predisposition to Autoimmune Diseases; Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Autoimmune Aspects of Rheumatoid Arthritis; Immunology of Insulin-Dependent Diabetes; and Adrenal Autoimmunity and Autoimmune Polyglandular Syndromes.

  17. Mineralization/Anti-Mineralization Networks in the Skin and Vascular Connective Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiaoli; Uitto, Jouni

    2014-01-01

    Ectopic mineralization has been linked to several common clinical conditions with considerable morbidity and mortality. The mineralization processes, both metastatic and dystrophic, affect the skin and vascular connective tissues. There are several contributing metabolic and environmental factors that make uncovering of the precise pathomechanisms of these acquired disorders exceedingly difficult. Several relatively rare heritable disorders share phenotypic manifestations similar to those in common conditions, and, consequently, they serve as genetically controlled model systems to study the details of the mineralization process in peripheral tissues. This overview will highlight diseases with mineral deposition in the skin and vascular connective tissues, as exemplified by familial tumoral calcinosis, pseudoxanthoma elasticum, generalized arterial calcification of infancy, and arterial calcification due to CD73 deficiency. These diseases, and their corresponding mouse models, provide insight into the pathomechanisms of soft tissue mineralization and point to the existence of intricate mineralization/anti-mineralization networks in these tissues. This information is critical for understanding the pathomechanistic details of different mineralization disorders, and it has provided the perspective to develop pharmacological approaches to counteract the consequences of ectopic mineralization. PMID:23665350

  18. Mineralization/anti-mineralization networks in the skin and vascular connective tissues.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiaoli; Uitto, Jouni

    2013-07-01

    Ectopic mineralization has been linked to several common clinical conditions with considerable morbidity and mortality. The mineralization processes, both metastatic and dystrophic, affect the skin and vascular connective tissues. There are several contributing metabolic and environmental factors that make uncovering of the precise pathomechanisms of these acquired disorders exceedingly difficult. Several relatively rare heritable disorders share phenotypic manifestations similar to those in common conditions, and, consequently, they serve as genetically controlled model systems to study the details of the mineralization process in peripheral tissues. This overview will highlight diseases with mineral deposition in the skin and vascular connective tissues, as exemplified by familial tumoral calcinosis, pseudoxanthoma elasticum, generalized arterial calcification of infancy, and arterial calcification due to CD73 deficiency. These diseases, and their corresponding mouse models, provide insight into the pathomechanisms of soft tissue mineralization and point to the existence of intricate mineralization/anti-mineralization networks in these tissues. This information is critical for understanding the pathomechanistic details of different mineralization disorders, and it has provided the perspective to develop pharmacological approaches to counteract the consequences of ectopic mineralization. PMID:23665350

  19. Gingival Cyst of the Adult as Early Sequela of Connective Tissue Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Gil Escalante, Mariana; Tatakis, Dimitris N.

    2015-01-01

    The subepithelial connective tissue graft (SCTG) is a highly predictable procedure with low complication rate. The reported early complications consist of typical postsurgical sequelae, such as pain and swelling. This case report describes the development and management of a gingival cyst following SCTG to obtain root coverage. Three weeks after SCTG procedure, a slightly raised, indurated, ~5 mm diameter asymptomatic lesion was evident. Excisional biopsy was performed and the histopathological evaluation confirmed the gingival cyst diagnosis. At the 1-year follow-up, the site had complete root coverage and normal tissue appearance and the patient remained asymptomatic. PMID:26236510

  20. Specialized connective tissue: bone, the structural framework of the upper extremity

    PubMed Central

    Weatherholt, Alyssa M.; Fuchs, Robyn K.; Warden, Stuart J.

    2011-01-01

    Bone is a connective tissue containing cells, fibers and ground substance. There are many functions in the body in which the bone participates, such as storing minerals, providing internal support, protecting vital organs, enabling movement, and providing attachment sites for muscles and tendons. Bone is unique because its collagen framework absorbs energy, while the mineral encased within the matrix allows bone to resist deformation. This article provides an overview of the structure and function of bone tissue from a macroscopic to microscopic level and discusses the physiological processes contributing to upper extremity bone health. It concludes by discussing common conditions influencing upper extremity bone health. PMID:22047807

  1. A New Variant of Connective Tissue Nevus with Elastorrhexis and Predilection for the Upper Chest.

    PubMed

    Chu, Derek H; Goldbach, Hayley; Wanat, Karolyn A; Rubin, Adam I; Yan, Albert C; Treat, James R

    2015-01-01

    Localized changes in cutaneous elastic tissue often manifest with flesh-colored, hypopigmented, or yellow papules, plaques, and nodules. We present five children with clinically similar cobblestone plaques composed of multiple hypopigmented, nonfollicular, pinpoint papules located unilaterally over the upper chest. All lesions first appeared at birth or during early infancy. No associated extracutaneous abnormalities have been identified. Histopathology was remarkable for many, thick elastic fibers with elastorrhexis. We believe that these cases represent a distinct and unique variant of connective tissue nevi. PMID:25545833

  2. Rheumatic and autoimmune thyroid disorders: a causal or casual relationship?

    PubMed

    Bourji, Khalil; Gatto, Mariele; Cozzi, Franco; Doria, Andrea; Punzi, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    A number of dysfunctions may affect the thyroid gland leading either to hyper- or hypothyroidism which are mediated by autoimmune mechanisms. Thyroid abnormalities may represent an isolated alteration or they may be the harbinger of forthcoming disorders as is the case of well-characterized polyendocrine syndromes. Also, they may precede or follow the appearance of rheumatic manifestations in patients affected with connective tissue diseases or rheumatoid arthritis. The mechanisms by which autoimmune thyroid disorders may be linked to systemic autoimmune diseases have not been fully unraveled yet, however alterations of common pathways are suggested by shared genetic variants affecting autoantigen presentation and regulation of the immune response. On the other hand, the higher prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disorders over rheumatic diseases compels the chance of a mere causal concomitancy in the same patient. The aim of our paper is to provide an overview of available data on thyroid involvement in different rheumatic diseases and to go over the main rheumatic manifestations in the context of autoimmune thyroid diseases. PMID:25315745

  3. Temporomandibular joint dysfunction. Connective tissue variations in skin biopsy and mitral valve function.

    PubMed

    Westling, L; Holm, S; Wallentin, I

    1992-12-01

    Ten women with temporomandibular joint dysfunction and general joint hypermobility (score, 4 to 8) and 10 symptom-free female volunteers without systemic laxity (score, 0 to 2) were selected for the study. A biopsy of connective tissue from arm skin found that the total collagen concentrations were lower and the proteoglycan values were higher in the hypermobile TMJ patients than in the control subjects. The mitral region of the heart was inspected by echocardiography. Eight patients and four controls had slightly abnormal echocardiographic findings. Two patients fulfilled the criteria for mitral valve prolapse. The patients had significantly more musculoskeletal complaints than did the controls. The study suggests an association between joint hypermobility, abnormal skin connective tissue composition, mitral valve malfunction, and musculoskeletal disorders in young women with TMJ dysfunction, especially internal derangement. PMID:1488224

  4. Genetic Dissection of Marfan Syndrome and Related Connective Tissue Disorders: An Update 2012

    PubMed Central

    Hoffjan, S.

    2012-01-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is an autosomal dominant disorder of the connective tissue characterized by early development of thoracic aortic aneurysms/dissections together with symptoms of the ocular and skeletal systems. While most patients/families with a classic phenotypic expression of MFS harbour mutations in the gene encoding fibrillin-1 (FBN1), genetic studies of the recent years revealed that the clinical features, as well as the mutated genes, show a high degree of overlap between MFS and other connective tissue diseases (e.g. Loeys-Dietz syndrome, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, familial thoracic aneurysms and dissections and others). We summarize herein the current knowledge about the wide spectrum of differential diagnoses and their genetic background as well as novel therapeutic approaches in order to provide appropriate counselling and clinical follow-up for the patients. PMID:23326250

  5. Prevalence of Connective Tissue Diseases in Egyptian Patients Presenting with Fever of Unknown Origin

    PubMed Central

    Abdelbaky, Mohamad S.; Mansour, Howaida E.; Ibrahim, Shafika I.; Hassan, Iman A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To estimate the prevalence of connective tissue diseases in patients presenting with fever of unknown origin (FUO). Patients and methods: In this study thirty patients diagnosed as FUO (Group 1), in 2008, were included in an observational study and diagnostic workup. Additionally, retrospective analysis of seventy patients’ files (Group 2), for patients who presented with prolonged unexplained pyrexia to the same hospital in the previous two years, was performed. Patients were subjected to: full clinical assessment including full history taking, thorough clinical examination, laboratory investigations including the basic investigations for patients with prolonged fever, complete blood count, erythrocytes sedimentation rate, urine analysis and culture, blood culture, sputum culture and plain chest X ray. Further diagnostic work up and/or procedures were requested according to the potential diagnostic clues (PDC) present in every patient. Results: Out of 100 FUO patients, 50% were found to have infectious diseases, 24% were found to have connective tissue diseases, 8% miscellaneous causes and 7% neoplastic diseases (P < 0.05). In 11 patients no definite cause for FUO could be identified. Connective tissue patients were: eight systemic lupus patients (33.3%), five patients with familial mediterranean fever (20.8%), four patients with rheumatoid arthritis (16.6%), three patients (12.5%) with Still’s disease and Rheumatic fever and one patient with Behçet syndrome/Crohn’s disease (4.3%), (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Despite the advanced technology, FUO remains a challenging medical problem. Infections were the most common cause of FUO in Egypt, confirming the trends found in other parts of the world. There was an increased prevalence of connective tissue patients presented with prolonged unexplained fever. A keen clinical eye, meticulous history taking and repeated physical examination remained the most important diagnostic tools in FUO patients. PMID:21789030

  6. Repair of Dense Connective Tissues via Biomaterial-Mediated Matrix Reprogramming of the Wound Interface

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Feini; Pintauro, Michael P.; Haughan, Joanne; Henning, Elizabeth A.; Esterhai, John L.; Schaer, Thomas P.; Mauck, Robert L.; Fisher, Matthew B.

    2014-01-01

    Repair of dense connective tissues in adults is limited by their intrinsic hypocellularity and is exacerbated by a dense extracellular matrix (ECM) that impedes cellular migration to and local proliferation at the wound site. Conversely, healing in fetal tissues occurs due in part to an environment conducive to cell mobility and division. Here, we investigated whether the application of a degradative enzyme, collagenase, could reprogram the adult wound margin to a more fetal-like state, and thus abrogate the biophysical impediments that hinder migration and proliferation. We tested this concept using the knee meniscus, a commonly injured structure for which few regenerative approaches exist. To focus delivery and degradation to the wound interface, we developed a system in which collagenase was stored inside poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) electrospun nanofibers and released upon hydration. Through a series of in vitro and in vivo studies, our findings show that partial digestion of the wound interface improves repair by creating a more compliant and porous microenvironment that expedites cell migration to and/or proliferation at the wound margin. This innovative approach of targeted manipulation of the wound interface, focused on removing the naturally occurring barriers to adult tissue repair, may find widespread application in the treatment of injuries to a variety of dense connective tissues. PMID:25477175

  7. Histopathologic study of rat connective tissue responses to maxillofacial silicone elastomers.

    PubMed

    Bal, Bilge Turhan; Yilmaz, Handan; Aydin, Cemal; Karakoca, Seçil; Tokman, Benay

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this histopathologic study was to assess and compare the subcutaneous connective tissue reaction to three different maxillofacial silicone elastomers (Cosmesil, Multisil, Episil). The test materials were directly inserted subcutaneously into the dorsal subcutaneous tissue of Wistar albino rats. Histopathological examinations were done at 7, 30, and 90 days after the implantation procedure. The presence of inflammation, presence of inflammatory giant cells, and the thickness of fibrous connective tissue adjacent to each inserted sample were recorded. Data was evaluated by analysis of variance, Wilcoxon signed ranks test and Kruskal Wallis test. Cosmesil, Multisil and Episil silicone elastomers at 7 days elicited a severe inflammatory reaction. However, these reactions decreased by the 30 and 90 days. All silicone elastomers elicited a moderate inflammatory reaction at 30 and 90 days. There were no significant differences in tissue reaction between the materials at 7, 30, and 90 days (P > 0.05). All the maxillofacial silicone elastomers evaluated can not be assigned a favorable biocompatibility level based on this study's histologic findings. PMID:19399592

  8. Connective tissue reaction of rats to a new zinc-oxide-eugenol endodontic sealer.

    PubMed

    Trichês, Karen Melina; Júnior, Jacy Simi; Calixto, João Batista; Machado, Ricardo; Rosa, Tiago Pereira; Silva, Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal; Vansan, Luiz Pascoal

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the biocompatibility in rat subcutaneous connective tissue of a new zinc oxide endodontic sealer (Endomethasone N) compared to those provided by Endofill and Sealer 26. Polyethylene tubes containing the test materials were implanted into dorsal subcutaneous connective tissue of Wistar albino rats. After 7 and 42 days, the implants with the surrounding tissue were collected, fixed, and processed for histologic evaluation. Sections were evaluated for the presence of inflammatory cells (poly or monomorfonuclear), blood vessels, necrosis area, and thickness of fibrous capsule. Comparisons between groups and time-periods were performed with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U non-parametric tests for 5% significance level. No differences in the biocompatibility patterns among the materials for the 2 experimental periods were observed. Independently of the sealer, the tissue behavior showed a tendency to decrease the irritation effect over time. It can be concluded that all sealers are irritant, but its toxicity decreased with time. Endomethásone N showed biocompatible characteristics comparable with those provided by Endofill and Sealer 26. PMID:24123537

  9. Reaction of rat connective tissue to mineral trioxide aggregate and diaket

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to compare the reaction of rat connective tissue to two root-end filling materials: white Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (WMTA) and Diaket. Methods Each of the materials was placed in dentine tubes and implanted subcutaneously in the dorsal connective tissue of 21 Wistar albino rats. Tissue biopsies were collected 7, 30, and 60 days after the implantation procedure. The specimens were processed and stained with hematoxylin and eosin and examined microscopically. After determining inflammatory cell numbers in sections from each specimen, inflammatory reaction scores were defined as follows: 0; no or few inflammatory cells (no reaction), 1; less than 25 cells (mild reaction), 2; 25 to 125 cells, (moderate reaction), and 3; 125 or more cells (severe reaction). Statistical analysis was performed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests. Results There were statistically significant differences in the median inflammatory cell numbers throughout the three test periods, with the most severe degree of inflammation observed at the one-week period. Few cases of necrosis were observed with WMTA. Diaket exhibited the most severe degree of inflammation and necrosis. After 30 days, both materials provoked moderate inflammatory reaction. The eight-week period showed the least severe degree of inflammation in all groups. Conclusions It was concluded that WMTA exhibits a more favourable tissue response compared with Diaket which induced more severe inflammatory reaction than WMTA and the control. PMID:21569463

  10. Repair of dense connective tissues via biomaterial-mediated matrix reprogramming of the wound interface.

    PubMed

    Qu, Feini; Pintauro, Michael P; Haughan, Joanne E; Henning, Elizabeth A; Esterhai, John L; Schaer, Thomas P; Mauck, Robert L; Fisher, Matthew B

    2015-01-01

    Repair of dense connective tissues in adults is limited by their intrinsic hypocellularity and is exacerbated by a dense extracellular matrix (ECM) that impedes cellular migration to and local proliferation at the wound site. Conversely, healing in fetal tissues occurs due in part to an environment conducive to cell mobility and division. Here, we investigated whether the application of a degradative enzyme, collagenase, could reprogram the adult wound margin to a more fetal-like state, and thus abrogate the biophysical impediments that hinder migration and proliferation. We tested this concept using the knee meniscus, a commonly injured structure for which few regenerative approaches exist. To focus delivery and degradation to the wound interface, we developed a system in which collagenase was stored inside poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) electrospun nanofibers and released upon hydration. Through a series of in vitro and in vivo studies, our findings show that partial digestion of the wound interface improves repair by creating a more compliant and porous microenvironment that expedites cell migration to and/or proliferation at the wound margin. This innovative approach of targeted manipulation of the wound interface, focused on removing the naturally occurring barriers to adult tissue repair, may find widespread application in the treatment of injuries to a variety of dense connective tissues. PMID:25477175

  11. Dynamic morphometric characterization of local connective tissue network structure in humans using ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Langevin, Helene M; Rizzo, Donna M; Fox, James R; Badger, Gary J; Wu, Junru; Konofagou, Elisa E; Stevens-Tuttle, Debbie; Bouffard, Nicole A; Krag, Martin H

    2007-01-01

    Background In humans, connective tissue forms a complex, interconnected network throughout the body that may have mechanosensory, regulatory and signaling functions. Understanding these potentially important phenomena requires non-invasive measurements of collagen network structure that can be performed in live animals or humans. The goal of this study was to show that ultrasound can be used to quantify dynamic changes in local connective tissue structure in vivo. We first performed combined ultrasound and histology examinations of the same tissue in two subjects undergoing surgery: in one subject, we examined the relationship of ultrasound to histological images in three dimensions; in the other, we examined the effect of a localized tissue perturbation using a previously developed robotic acupuncture needling technique. In ten additional non-surgical subjects, we quantified changes in tissue spatial organization over time during needle rotation vs. no rotation using ultrasound and semi-variogram analyses. Results 3-D renditions of ultrasound images showed longitudinal echogenic sheets that matched with collagenous sheets seen in histological preparations. Rank correlations between serial 2-D ultrasound and corresponding histology images resulted in high positive correlations for semi-variogram ranges computed parallel (r = 0.79, p < 0.001) and perpendicular (r = 0.63, p < 0.001) to the surface of the skin, indicating concordance in spatial structure between the two data sets. Needle rotation caused tissue displacement in the area surrounding the needle that was mapped spatially with ultrasound elastography and corresponded to collagen bundles winding around the needle on histological sections. In semi-variograms computed for each ultrasound frame, there was a greater change in the area under the semi-variogram curve across successive frames during needle rotation compared with no rotation. The direction of this change was heterogeneous across subjects. The frame-to-frame variability was 10-fold (p < 0.001) greater with rotation than with no rotation indicating changes in tissue structure during rotation. Conclusion The combination of ultrasound and semi-variogram analyses allows quantitative assessment of dynamic changes in the structure of human connective tissue in vivo. PMID:17550618

  12. Autophagy and Autoimmunity Crosstalks

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Abhisek; Eissa, N. Tony

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy, initially viewed as a conserved bulk-degradation mechanism, has emerged as a central player in a multitude of immune functions. Autophagy is important in host defense against intracellular and extracellular pathogens, metabolic syndromes, immune cell homeostasis, antigen processing and presentation, and maintenance of tolerance. The observation that the above processes are implicated in triggering or exacerbating autoimmunity raises the possibility that autophagy is involved in mediating autoimmune processes, either directly or as a consequence of innate or adaptive functions mediated by the pathway. Genome-wide association studies have shown association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in autophagy related gene 5 (Atg5), and Atg16l1 with susceptibility to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and Crohn’s disease, respectively. Enhanced expression of Atg5 was also reported in blood of mice with experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a mouse model of multiple sclerosis (MS), and in T cells isolated from blood or brain tissues from patients with active relapse of MS. This review explores the roles of autophagy pathway in the innate and adaptive immune systems on regulating or mediating the onset, progression, or exacerbation of autoimmune processes. PMID:23596443

  13. Tissue Factor in Dermatitis Herpetiformis and Bullous Pemphigoid: Link between Immune and Coagulation System in Subepidermal Autoimmune Bullous Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zebrowska, Agnieszka; Wagrowska-Danilewicz, Malgorzata; Danilewicz, Marian; Wieczfinska, Joanna; Pniewska, Ewa; Zebrowski, Michal; Waszczykowska, Elzbieta; Wozniacka, Anna; Eusebio, Makandjou-Ola; Pietruczuk, Miroslawa; Pawliczak, Rafal

    2015-01-01

    Dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) and bullous pemphigoid (BP) are skin diseases associated with eosinophilic and neutrophilic infiltrations. Although chemokines are critical for the selective accumulation and activation of various leukocyte subsets in the inflammatory process, there are few findings concerning inflammatory cells and production of coagulation factors in blistering diseases. Skin biopsies were taken from 14 patients with DH, 27 with BP, and 20 control subjects. The localization and expression of tissue factor (TF) in skin lesions and perilesional skin were studied by immunohistochemistry and confirmed by Western Blot. Moreover the plasma concentrations of TF were measured by immunoassays. D dimers, fibrinogen, and selected coagulation parameters were measured by routine methods. Expression of TF in the epidermis and in inflammatory influxed cells in dermis was detected in skin biopsies from BP patients. Examined TF expression was detected in perilesional skin of all BP patients too. The expression of TF was not observed in biopsies from healthy people and DH patients. The findings of the study show an increased expression of tissue factor in the lesional and perilesional skin of patients with bullous pemphigoid. The difference in chemokine pattern expression and variations in the cellular infiltration in BP and DH cause variable expression of TF.

  14. A method for simultaneous fluorometry and rheology of connective tissue in bulk meat.

    PubMed

    Swatland, H J

    2005-08-01

    A probe tipped with optical fibres was mounted on the load cell of a compression tester and pushed into well-aged beef rib roasts (Canada Grade AAA, n=6, 33±3.6days post-mortem). Fluorescence (F; excitation 365nm, emission >420nm) and reflectance (R; 365nm) were measured through single optical fibres. Diffuse R was measured using different fibres for illumination and detection, thus responding to tissue between the two fibres. Replication was by a matrix pattern of penetrations on single roasts. For example, in a typical roast, F was correlated with the force of penetration (mean r=0.86±0.06, n=20, all P<0.001). R was less (P<0.001) strongly correlated with penetration force (mean r=0.46±0.10, n=20, all P<0.001). F signals from connective tissue contained less peaks than R signals from both connective and adipose tissue (respectively, 2.75±0.43 versus 5.57±0.67peakscm(-1), P<0.001, n=20 pairs) and F peaks were wider than R peaks (respectively, 3.54±0.88 versus 1.38±0.19mm, P<0.001, n=20 pairs). For the spinales dorsi aponeurosis, the depth at which peak force was reached was strongly correlated with the depths at which both peak F and peak R were reached (r=0.98, P<0.001, n=20 for both). Diffuse R was only weakly correlated with penetration force (mean r=0.29±0.12 with only 5/10 correlations significant P<0.001). This new method showed the primary resistance to dorso-ventral penetrometry of well-aged beef rib roasts originated from connective tissue. PMID:22063886

  15. Tbx4 and Tbx5 acting in connective tissue are required for limb muscle and tendon patterning

    PubMed Central

    Hasson, Peleg; DeLaurier, April; Bennett, Michael; Grigorieva, Elena; Naiche, L. A.; Papaioannou, Virginia E.; Mohun, Timothy J.; Logan, Malcolm P.O.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Proper functioning of the musculo-skeletal system requires the precise integration of bones, muscles and tendons. Complex morphogenetic events ensure that these elements are linked together in the appropriate 3D configuration. It has been difficult, however, to tease apart the mechanisms that regulate tissue morphogenesis. We find that deletion of Tbx5 in forelimb (or Tbx4 in hindlimbs) specifically affects muscle and tendon patterning without disrupting skeletal development thus suggesting that distinct cues regulate these processes. We identify muscle connective tissue as the site of action of these transcription factors and show that N-Cadherin and β-Catenin are key downstream effectors acting in muscle connective tissue regulating soft-tissue morphogenesis. In humans, TBX5 mutations lead to Holt-Oram syndrome, which is characterised by forelimb musculo-skeletal defects. Our results suggest that a focus on connective tissue is required to understand the aetiology of diseases affecting soft tissue formation. PMID:20152185

  16. Differences in infrared spectroscopic data of connective tissues in transflectance and transmittance modes

    PubMed Central

    Hanifi, Arash; McGoverin, Cushla; Ou, Ya-Ting; Safadi, Fayez; Spencer, Richard; Pleshko, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared imaging spectroscopy (FT-IRIS) has been used extensively to characterize the composition and orientation of macromolecules in thin tissue sections. Earlier and current studies of normal and polarized FT-IRIS data have primarily used tissues sectioned onto infrared transmissive substrates, such as salt windows. Recently, the use of low-emissivity (“low-e”) substrates has become of great interest because of their low cost and favourable infrared optical properties. However, data is collected in transflectance mode when using low-e slides and in transmittance mode using salt windows. In the current study we investigated the comparability of these two modes for assessment of the composition of connective tissues. FT-IRIS data were obtained in transflectance and transmittance modes from serial sections of cartilage, bone and tendon, and from a standard polymer, polymethylmethacrylate. Both non-polarized and polarized FTIR data differed in absorbance, and in some cases peak position, between transflectance and transmittance modes. However, the FT-IRIS analysis of the collagen fibril orientation in cartilage resulted in the expected zonal arrangement of fibrils in both transmittance and transflectance. We conclude that numerical comparison of FT-IRIS-derived parameters of tissue composition should account for substrate type and data collection mode, while analysis of overall tissue architecture may be more invariant between modes. PMID:23663670

  17. Molecular Regulation of CCN2 in the Intervertebral Disc: Lessons Learned from Other Connective Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Cassie M.; Shapiro, Irving M.; Risbud, Makarand V.

    2013-01-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CCN2/CTGF) plays an important role in extracellular matrix synthesis, especially in skeletal tissues such as cartilage, bone, and the intervertebral disc. As a result there is a growing interest in examining the function and regulation of this important molecule in the disc. This review discusses the regulation of CCN2 by TGF-β and hypoxia, two critical determinants that characterize the disc microenvironment, and discusses known functions of CCN2 in the disc. The almost ubiquitous regulation of CCN2 by TGF-β, including that seen in the disc, emphasizes the importance of the TGF-β-CCN2 relationship, especially in terms of extracellular matrix synthesis. Likewise, the unique cross-talk between CCN2 and HIF-1 in the disc highlights the tissue and niche specific mode of regulation. Taken together the current literature supports an anabolic role for CCN2 in the disc and its involvement in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis during both health and disease. Further studies of CCN2 in this tissue may reveal valuable targets for the biological therapy of disc degeneration. PMID:23567513

  18. Autoimmunity in diarrhoeal disease.

    PubMed

    Unsworth, D J; Walker-Smith, J A

    1985-06-01

    Evidence for autoimmunity in diarrhoeal disease is reviewed. Firstly, coeliac disease (CD) is considered. The incidence of tissue-reactive autoantibodies in both adults and children with CD (68% and 65%, respectively) is higher than the incidence of these autoantibodies in controls (6% in normal adults, and 14% and 9% in disease controls drawn respectively from adult and child populations). The R1 antireticulin antibody, when present, was found to disappear after several weeks on a gluten-free diet, but in contrast, other autoantibodies persisted. Secondly, a case is argued for a new disease category, namely "autoimmune enteropathy." Seven cases are reviewed in which patients presented with protracted diarrhoea, a small intestinal enteropathy which failed to heal during periods of total parenteral nutrition, and evidence of a predisposition to autoimmunity (namely, the presence of high titre autoantibodies including one specific for gut epithelium, and/or the presence of associated diseases regarded to be autoimmune). Thirdly, evidence for autoimmunity in inflammatory bowel disease is reviewed and includes discussion of serum goblet cell antibodies and of circulating T cells which participate in antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity in vitro using colonic epithelial cells as targets. Finally, an unusual child is described who presented with chronic diarrhoea and a flat small intestinal mucosa, who responded to gluten withdrawal but who later relapsed spontaneously during a strict gluten-free diet. Her mucosa healed only after a period of total parenteral nutrition and treatment with oral steroids. This child's enteropathy was also associated with thyrotoxicosis and a microscopic colitis. PMID:4020570

  19. Histological changes in connective tissue of rat tails after bipolar radiofrequency treatment.

    PubMed

    Beltrán-Frutos, E; Bernal-Mañas, C M; Navarro, S; Zuasti, A; Ferrer, C; Canteras, M; Seco-Rovira, V; García-Collado, A J; Pastor, L M

    2012-09-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) has been included in the techniques used in aesthetic surgery/medicine. To date, no studies have performed a histological assessment of changes in the tissue after application of bipolar radiofrequency (BRF) with low energy and frequency. The aim of this study was to examine changes that are produced in connective tissue, principally in the fibroblasts, following BRF treatment. Four groups of rats received a different number of RF sessions (1, 2, 3 and 5). The following parameters were determined: the number of fibroblasts/unit area (FA), the proliferation index (PI), the Heat shock Protein 47 index (HSPI) and the percentage of connective tissue (PC). For statistical analysis, two subgroups (A and B) were made for the variables FA, PI and PC, and another two subgroups (C and D) for the variable HSPI. Significant differences for FA, PI and PC were observed between subgroups A and B, FA and PI having higher values in A, while PC had higher values in B. The HSPI in subgroup C showed significantly higher values than in D. Low energy and frequency BRF led to an increase in the number, proliferation and biosynthetic activity of fibroblasts. The resulting stress suffered by fibroblasts as a result of heat may be associated with the phenomenon of hormesis. PMID:22806911

  20. Effect of Hormones on the Turnover of Polysaccharides in Connective Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Dziewiatkowski, Dominic D.

    1964-01-01

    A number of hormones somehow modify the turnover of the polysaccharides in a variety of connective tissues. In hypophysectomized animals the turnover of chondroitin sulfate and hyaluronic acid is decreased; when such animals are given growth hormone the turnover of chondroitin sulfate is enhanced but that of hyaluronic acid is unaltered. The effect of parathyroid extracts may be of a dual nature: in some connective tissues there may be an increase in the rate at which chondroitin sulfate is catabolized, in other tissues its synthesis may be stimulated. Thyroxine effectively restores toward normal the depressed synthesis and breakdown of polysaccharides in hypothyroid animals. Estradiol, in addition to inhibiting the resorption of the metaphyses in rats, inhibits the synthesis of chondroitin sulfate in cartilage and aorta. Cortisone too inhibits the synthesis of chondroitin sulfates and hyaluronic acid; its effect on their catabolism is not as striking. ImagesFigure 1Figure 9Figure 5Figure 6Figure 10Figure 11Figure 12Figure 13Figure 14Figure 15 PMID:14104083

  1. Neuroinflammatory Mechanisms of Connective Tissue Fibrosis: Targeting Neurogenic and Mast Cell Contributions

    PubMed Central

    Monument, Michael J.; Hart, David A.; Salo, Paul T.; Befus, A. Dean; Hildebrand, Kevin A.

    2015-01-01

    Significance: The pathogenesis of fibrogenic wound and connective tissue healing is complex and incompletely understood. Common observations across a vast array of human and animal models of fibroproliferative conditions suggest neuroinflammatory mechanisms are important upstream fibrogenic events. Recent Advances: As detailed in this review, mast cell hyperplasia is a common observation in fibrotic tissue. Recent investigations in human and preclinical models of hypertrophic wound healing and post-traumatic joint fibrosis provides evidence that fibrogenesis is governed by a maladaptive neuropeptide-mast cell-myofibroblast signaling pathway. Critical Issues: The blockade and manipulation of these factors is providing promising evidence that if timed correctly, the fibrogenic process can be appropriately regulated. Clinically, abnormal fibrogenic healing responses are not ubiquitous to all patients and the identification of those at-risk remains an area of priority. Future Directions: Ultimately, an integrated appreciation of the common pathobiology shared by many fibrogenic connective tissue conditions may provide a scientific framework to facilitate the development of novel antifibrotic prevention and treatment strategies. PMID:25785237

  2. Functional anatomy of the levator palpebrae superioris muscle and its connective tissue system.

    PubMed Central

    Ettl, A; Priglinger, S; Kramer, J; Koornneef, L

    1996-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND: The connective tissue system of the levator palpebrae superioris muscle (LPS) consists of the septa surrounding its muscle sheath, the superior transverse ligament (STL) commonly referred to as 'Whitnall's ligament' and the common sheath which is the fascia between the LPS and the superior rectus muscle (SRM). The anterior band-like component of the common sheath is called transverse superior fascial expansion (TSFE) of the SRM and LPS. It mainly extends from the connective tissue of the trochlea to the fascia of the lacrimal gland. A detailed description of the relation between the LPS and its connective tissue is presented. Furthermore, the course of the LPS in the orbit is described. The study was conducted to provide a morphological basis for biomechanical and clinical considerations regarding ptosis surgery. METHODS: Postmortem dissections were performed in 16 orbits from eight cadavers. The microscopical anatomy was demonstrated in six formalin preserved orbits from six cadavers which had been sectioned in the frontal and sagittal plane and stained with haematoxylin and azophloxin. Surface coil magnetic resonance imaging in the sagittal and coronal plane was performed in five orbits from five normal volunteers using a T1 weighted spin echo sequence. RESULTS: The STL and the TSFE surround the LPS to form a fascial sleeve around the muscle which has attachments to the medial and lateral orbital wall. The TSFE, which is thicker than the STL, blends with Tenon's capsule. The STL and the fascial sheath of the LPS muscle are suspended from the orbital roof by a framework of radial connective tissue septa. MR images show that the TSFE is located between the anterior third of the superior rectus muscle and the segment of the LPS muscle where it changes its course from upwards to downwards. In this area, the LPS reaches its highest point in the orbit (culmination point). The culmination point is located a few millimetres posterior to the equator and superior to the globe. CONCLUSION: Whitnall's ligament can be considered to consist of two distinct parts--the TSFE inferior to the LPS and the STL superior to the LPS. Since the medial and lateral main attachments of Whitnall's ligament are situated inferior to the level of the culmination point of the LPS, the ligament itself is unlikely to suspend the levator muscle. However, a suspension of the LPS may be achieved by the radial connective tissue septa of the superior orbit. The TSFE in connection with the globe may have an additional supporting function. The elasticity of Whitnall's ligament and its connections with highly elastic structures including Tenon's capsule, may provide the morphological substrate for the previously proposed passive (that is, without orbicularis action) lowering of the lid during downward saccades. Images PMID:8949713

  3. Familial occurrence and heritable connective tissue disorders in cervical artery dissection

    PubMed Central

    Goeggel Simonetti, Barbara; Schilling, Sabrina; Martin, Juan José; Kloss, Manja; Sarikaya, Hakan; Hausser, Ingrid; Engelter, Stefan; Metso, Tiina M.; Pezzini, Alessandro; Thijs, Vincent; Touzé, Emmanuel; Paolucci, Stefano; Costa, Paolo; Sessa, Maria; Samson, Yves; Béjot, Yannick; Altintas, Ayse; Metso, Antti J.; Hervé, Dominique; Lichy, Christoph; Jung, Simon; Fischer, Urs; Lamy, Chantal; Grau, Armin; Chabriat, Hugues; Caso, Valeria; Lyrer, Philippe A.; Stapf, Christian; Tatlisumak, Turgut; Brandt, Tobias; Tournier-Lasserve, Elisabeth; Germain, Dominique P.; Frank, Michael; Baumgartner, Ralf W.; Grond-Ginsbach, Caspar; Bousser, Marie-Germaine; Leys, Didier; Dallongeville, Jean; Bersano, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Objective: In a large series of patients with cervical artery dissection (CeAD), a major cause of ischemic stroke in young and middle-aged adults, we aimed to examine frequencies and correlates of family history of CeAD and of inherited connective tissue disorders. Methods: We combined data from 2 large international multicenter cohorts of consecutive patients with CeAD in 23 neurologic departments participating in the CADISP-plus consortium, following a standardized protocol. Frequency of reported family history of CeAD and of inherited connective tissue disorders was assessed. Putative risk factors, baseline features, and 3-month outcome were compared between groups. Results: Among 1,934 consecutive patients with CeAD, 20 patients (1.0%, 95% confidence interval: 0.6%–1.5%) from 17 families (0.9%, 0.5%–1.3%) had a family history of CeAD. Family history of CeAD was significantly more frequent in patients with carotid location of the dissection and elevated cholesterol levels. Two patients without a family history of CeAD had vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome with a mutation in COL3A1. This diagnosis was suspected in 2 additional patients, but COL3A1 sequencing was negative. Two patients were diagnosed with classic and hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, one patient with Marfan syndrome, and one with osteogenesis imperfecta, based on clinical criteria only. Conclusions: In this largest series of patients with CeAD to date, family history of symptomatic CeAD was rare and inherited connective tissue disorders seemed exceptional. This finding supports the notion that CeAD is a multifactorial disease in the vast majority of cases. PMID:25355833

  4. Depression and seizures as the main neuropsychiatric manifestation of mixed connective tissue disorder.

    PubMed

    Kiani, Ismaa Ghazanfar; Qureshi, Safina Hameed; Shah, Faridullah

    2014-05-01

    A 38 years female presented with arthralgia, dyspnoea, progressive proximal muscle weakness, seizures, weight loss, dysphagia, alopecia, and dryness of the eyes and mouth with tightening of the skin. Psychiatric evaluation revealed major depression. She had oral ulcers, tightening of the skin of the hands with restricted mouth opening, and proximal muscle weakness. Mixed connective tissue disorder (MCTD) with predominant polymyositis and neuropsychiatric manifestations was diagnosed as the patient had anti-RNP positive with significantly raised muscle enzymes. This case is unique because major depression in MCTD is rarely documented, severe polymyositis is a rarity and ANA was negative but characteristic anti-RNP antibody was positive. PMID:24906270

  5. A case of parasymphyseal and associated insufficiency fractures of pubic rami in a patient with mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Jung, J H; Jun, J B; Shim, S C; Kim, T H; Jung, S S; Lee, I H; Bae, S C; Yoo, D H; Joo, K B; Kim, S Y

    2000-07-01

    Parasymphyseal insufficiency fractures are uncommon. Furthermore, none have been reported in systemic rheumatic diseases other than rheumatoid arthritis. In this article we report on parasymphyseal insufficiency fractures in a patient with mixed connective tissue disease. PMID:10992733

  6. The muscular force transmission system: role of the intramuscular connective tissue.

    PubMed

    Turrina, Andrea; Martínez-González, Miguel Antonio; Stecco, Carla

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this review is to analyze in detail the microscopic structure and relations among muscular fibers, endomysium, perimysium, epimysium and deep fasciae. In particular, the multilayer organization and the collagen fiber orientation of these elements are reported. The endomysium, perimysium, epimysium and deep fasciae have not just a role of containment, limiting the expansion of the muscle with the disposition in concentric layers of the collagen tissue, but are fundamental elements for the transmission of muscular force, each one with a specific role. From this review it appears that the muscular fibers should not be studied as isolated elements, but as a complex inseparable from their fibrous components. The force expressed by a muscle depends not only on its anatomical structure, but also the angle at which its fibers are attached to the intramuscular connective tissue and the relation with the epimysium and deep fasciae. PMID:23294690

  7. Targeted Ablation of the Abcc6 Gene Results in Ectopic Mineralization of Connective Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Klement, John F.; Matsuzaki, Yasushi; Jiang, Qiu-Jie; Terlizzi, Joseph; Choi, Hae Young; Fujimoto, Norihiro; Li, Kehua; Pulkkinen, Leena; Birk, David E.; Sundberg, John P.; Uitto, Jouni

    2005-01-01

    Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), characterized by connective tissue mineralization of the skin, eyes, and cardiovascular system, is caused by mutations in the ABCC6 gene. ABCC6 encodes multidrug resistance-associated protein 6 (MRP6), which is expressed primarily in the liver and kidneys. Mechanisms producing ectopic mineralization as a result of these mutations remain unclear. To elucidate this complex disease, a transgenic mouse was generated by targeted ablation of the mouse Abcc6 gene. Abcc6 null mice were negative for Mrp6 expression in the liver, and complete necropsies revealed profound mineralization of several tissues, including skin, arterial blood vessels, and retina, while heterozygous animals were indistinguishable from the wild-type mice. Particularly striking was the mineralization of vibrissae, as confirmed by von Kossa and alizarin red stains. Electron microscopy revealed mineralization affecting both elastic structures and collagen fibers. Mineralization of vibrissae was noted as early as 5 weeks of age and was progressive with age in Abcc6−/− mice but was not observed in Abcc6+/− or Abcc6+/+ mice up to 2 years of age. A total body computerized tomography scan of Abcc6−/− mice revealed mineralization in skin and subcutaneous tissue as well as in the kidneys. These data demonstrate aberrant mineralization of soft tissues in PXE-affected organs, and, consequently, these mice recapitulate features of this complex disease. PMID:16135817

  8. Irradiation by pulsed Nd:YAG laser induces the production of extracellular matrix molecules by cells of the connective tissues: a tool for tissue repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monici, Monica; Basile, Venere; Cialdai, Francesca; Romano, Giovanni; Fusi, Franco; Conti, Antonio

    2008-04-01

    Many studies demonstrated that mechanical stress is a key factor for tissue homeostasis, while unloading induce loss of mass and impairment of function. Because of their physiological function, muscle, connective tissue, bone and cartilage dynamically interact with mechanical and gravitational stress, modifying their properties through the continuous modification of their composition. Indeed, it is known that mechanical stress increases the production of extracellular matrix (ECM) components by cells, but the mechanotransduction mechanisms and the optimal loading conditions required for an optimal tissue homeostasis are still unknown. Considering the importance of cell activation and ECM production in tissue regeneration, a proper use of mechanical stimulation could be a powerful tool in tissue repair and tissue engineering. Studies exploring advanced modalities for supplying mechanical stimuli are needed to increase our knowledge on mechanobiology and to develop effective clinical applications. Here we describe the effect of photomechanical stress, supplied by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser on ECM production by cells of connective tissues. Cell morphology, production of ECM molecules (collagens, fibronectin, mucopolysaccharides), cell adhesion and cell energy metabolism have been studied by using immunofluorescence and autofluorescence microscopy. The results show that photomechanical stress induces cytoskeleton remodelling, redistribution of membrane integrins, increase in production of ECM molecules. These results could be of consequence for developing clinical protocols for the treatment of connective tissue dideases by pulsed Nd:YAG laser.

  9. [Autoimmune mechanisms in endocrinology--the polyglandular autoimmune endocrine syndrome].

    PubMed

    Hrnciar, J; Hrnciarová, M

    1991-06-01

    Autoimmune endocrinopathies belong to so-called organ specific autoimmune diseases. These diseases combine very often and from the polyglandular autoimmune endocrine syndrome (PAES), where autoantibodies either destroy or stimulate individual endocrine glands or hormone receptors in target tissues. Thus a wide range of combinations of hypofunctional or hyperfunctional clinical syndromes develops. PAES is a good natural model of endocrine polyautoaggressiveness. In its development the following aetiopathogenetic factors participate: 1. Hereditary familial disposition, expressed e.g. by certain inherited HHS genes (e.g. A1, B8, DR 3, 4). 2. Aberrant expression of these DR genes on endocrine organs due to bacterial or viral infections, pregnancy, stimulation of the thyroid gland by TSH or immunoglobulins (TSIg). 3. Antigenic mimicri and the presentation of autoantigens to immunocompetent cells. 4. Impaired immunoregulation--antigen specific insufficiency of suppressor T lymphocytes. 5. Local and general amplification reaction to an autoimmune process. 6. The development and autoreproduction of organ specific autoimmune endocrine disease and its development into the final stage of endocrine disease where autoantibodies may disappear. The diagnosis of PAES in clinical practice is difficult. Common immunological tests are not very conclusive. To assess a polyglandular affection we found useful the multiaxial synchronous test where stimulation of several hypothalamic releasing hormones combined with a hypoglycaemic stimulus is used. Autoimmune lymphocytic hypophysitis is part of PAES. In clinical practice this syndrome is therefore frequently incorrectly diagnosed and then incorrectly treated. PMID:1897135

  10. Connective tissue changes and physical properties of developing and ageing skeletal muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Alnaqeeb, M A; Al Zaid, N S; Goldspink, G

    1984-01-01

    Selective staining of the connective tissue and image analysis showed that in the extensor digitorum longus and soleus muscles of the rat there was an increase in the thickness of the endomysium in both early growth and senility. The perimysium thickness was more or less constant throughout life except in senility when the concentration of this component also increased. The stiffness (length-passive tension) of these muscles was found to increase throughout life. Log transforms of the length-passive tension plots had particularly steep slopes in the senile extensor digitorum longus muscle. Except in the senile soleus muscle, the increase in stiffness was closely correlated with the increase in endomysium and perimysium and with total muscle collagen (as measured biochemically) with age. The relationship between the initial length and the active tension in the extensor digitorum longus muscle changed with age. The older muscles showed a greater decline in tension for each decrement of length resulting from the increased development of the connective tissue. Images Fig. 1 PMID:6526719

  11. Cerebral lesions in patients with connective tissue diseases and systemic vasculitides: are there specific patterns?

    PubMed

    Schedel, Joerg; Kuchenbuch, Sonja; Schoelmerich, Juergen; Feuerbach, Stefan; Geissler, Angela; Mueller-Ladner, Ulf

    2010-04-01

    This study was performed to evaluate whether specific patterns of cerebral lesions can be identified in different rheumatic disease entities. In 132 patients with different connective tissue diseases and vasculitides (systemic lupus erythematosus [SLE], systemic sclerosis [SSc], mixed connective tissue disease [MCTD], Wegener's granulomatosis [WG], immunocomplex vasculitides, antiphospholipid antibody syndrome [APS]), cerebral magnetic resonance imaging scans were performed. Patients were examined clinically, and laboratory parameters including autoantibodies were determined. Distinct distibution patterns could be identified; in WG, most lesions were seen in the cortex, the periventricular region, basal ganglia, and pons. In both SSc and MCTD, highest numbers of lesions could be detected in the corticomedullary junction. In APS, basal ganglia and periventricular white matter were involved predominantly. Generally, the maximum score of cerebral lesions correlated significantly with patients' age. Pathological values for antinuclear antibodies and increased levels of antiphospholipid antibodies were significantly correlated with the presence of cerebral lesions. WG patients and patients with other vasculitides most frequently showed neurological abnormalities. This study in patients with different rheumatic diseases showed distinct distribution patterns of cerebral lesions, which might help to differentiate between them. PMID:20398025

  12. Leucine Supplementation Accelerates Connective Tissue Repair of Injured Tibialis Anterior Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Marcelo G.; Silva, Meiricris T.; Carlassara, Eduardo O. C.; Gonalves, Dawit A.; Abrahamsohn, Paulo A.; Kettelhut, Isis C.; Moriscot, Anselmo S.; Aoki, Marcelo S.; Miyabara, Elen H.

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of leucine supplementation on the skeletal muscle regenerative process, focusing on the remodeling of connective tissue of the fast twitch muscle tibialis anterior (TA). Young male Wistar rats were supplemented with leucine (1.35 g/kg per day); then, TA muscles from the left hind limb were cryolesioned and examined after 10 days. Although leucine supplementation induced increased protein synthesis, it was not sufficient to promote an increase in the cross-sectional area (CSA) of regenerating myofibers (p > 0.05) from TA muscles. However, leucine supplementation reduced the amount of collagen and the activation of phosphorylated transforming growth factor-? receptor type I (T?R-I) and Smad2/3 in regenerating muscles (p < 0.05). Leucine also reduced neonatal myosin heavy chain (MyHC-n) (p < 0.05), increased adult MyHC-II expression (p < 0.05) and prevented the decrease in maximum tetanic strength in regenerating TA muscles (p < 0.05). Our results suggest that leucine supplementation accelerates connective tissue repair and consequent function of regenerating TA through the attenuation of T?R-I and Smad2/3 activation. Therefore, future studies are warranted to investigate leucine supplementation as a nutritional strategy to prevent or attenuate muscle fibrosis in patients with several muscle diseases. PMID:25268835

  13. Evaluation of muscular lesions in connective tissue diseases: thallium 201 muscular scans

    SciTech Connect

    Guillet, G.; Guillet, J.; Sanciaume, C.; Maleville, J.; Geniaux, M.; Morin, P.

    1988-04-01

    We performed thallium 201 muscle scans to assess muscular involvement in 40 patients with different connective tissue diseases (7 with dermatomyositis, 7 with systemic lupus erythematosus, 12 with progressive systemic scleroderma, 2 with calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal involvement, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasia (CREST) syndrome, 3 with monomelic scleroderma, 6 with morphea, and 3 with Raynaud's disease). Only 12 of these patients complained of fatigability and/or myalgia. Electromyography was performed and serum levels of muscle enzymes were measured in all patients. Comparison of thallium 201 exercise recording with the other tests revealed that scan sensitivity is greater than electromyographic and serum muscle enzymes levels. Thallium 201 scans showed abnormal findings in 32 patients and revealed subclinical lesions in 18 patients, while electromyography findings were abnormal in 25 of these 32 patients. Serum enzyme levels were raised in only 8 patients. Thallium 201 scanning proved to be a useful guide for modifying therapy when laboratory data were conflicting. It was useful to evaluate treatment efficacy. Because our data indicate a 100% positive predictive value, we believe that thallium 201 scanning should be advised for severe systemic connective tissue diseases with discordant test results.

  14. Connective tissue, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome(s), and head and cervical pain.

    PubMed

    Castori, Marco; Morlino, Silvia; Ghibellini, Giulia; Celletti, Claudia; Camerota, Filippo; Grammatico, Paola

    2015-03-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is an umbrella term for a growing group of hereditary disorders of the connective tissue mainly manifesting with generalized joint hypermobility, skin hyperextensibility, and vascular and internal organ fragility. In contrast with other well known heritable connective tissue disorders with severe cardiovascular involvement (e.g., Marfan syndrome), most EDS patients share a nearly normal life span, but are severely limited by disabling features, such as pain, fatigue and headache. In this work, pertinent literature is reviewed with focus on prevalence, features and possible pathogenic mechanisms of headache in EDSs. Gathered data are fragmented and generally have a low level of evidence. Headache is reported in no less than 1/3 of the patients. Migraine results the most common type in the hypermobility type of EDS. Other possibly related headache disorders include tension-type headache, new daily persistent headache, headache attributed to spontaneous cerebrospinal fluid leakage, headache secondary to Chiari malformation, cervicogenic headache and neck-tongue syndrome, whose association still lacks of reliable prevalence studies. The underlying pathogenesis seems complex and variably associated with cardiovascular dysautonomia, cervical spine and temporomandibular joint instability/dysfunction, meningeal fragility, poor sleep quality, pain-killer drugs overuse and central sensitization. Particular attention is posed on a presumed subclinical cervical spine dysfunction. Standard treatment is always symptomatic and usually unsuccessful. Assessment and management procedures are discussed in order to put some basis for ameliorating the actual patients' needs and nurturing future research. PMID:25655119

  15. Autoimmune encephalopathies.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ming; Hacohen, Yael; Vincent, Angela

    2015-06-01

    Antibody-mediated diseases of the central nervous system are a relatively new and challenging field in autoimmune neurologic disease and of major clinical importance in children and adults. The antibodies bind to cell-surface epitopes on neuronal or glial proteins, and the patients demonstrate either focal or more generalized clinical signs depending on the extent of brain regions targeted by the antibodies. The presence of seizures, movement disorders, autonomic dysfunction and sleep disorders, alongside neuroimaging and electrophysiological features may indicate a specific antibody-mediated disorder. However, phenotypic variation may be observed in children with the same antibody. Regardless, many patients benefit from immunotherapy with substantial improvement. PMID:26022169

  16. Associated Autoimmune Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... celiac disease are type 1 diabetes and autoimmune thyroid disease. The tendency to develop autoimmune diseases is believed ... confusion, weight loss, and coma (if left untreated). Thyroid Disease There are two common forms of autoimmune thyroid ...

  17. Transcription factor redundancy and tissue-specific regulation: Evidence from functional and physical network connectivity

    PubMed Central

    Kuntz, Steven G.; Williams, Brian A.; Sternberg, Paul W.; Wold, Barbara J.

    2012-01-01

    Two major transcriptional regulators of Caenorhabditis elegans bodywall muscle (BWM) differentiation, hlh-1 and unc-120, are expressed in muscle where they are known to bind and regulate several well-studied muscle-specific genes. Simultaneously mutating both factors profoundly inhibits formation of contractile BWM. These observations were consistent with a simple network model in which the muscle regulatory factors drive tissue-specific transcription by binding selectively near muscle-specific targets to activate them. We tested this model by measuring the number, identity, and tissue-specificity of functional regulatory targets for each factor. Some joint regulatory targets (218) are BWM-specific and enriched for nearby HLH-1 binding. However, contrary to the simple model, the majority of genes regulated by one or both muscle factors are also expressed significantly in non-BWM tissues. We also mapped global factor occupancy by HLH-1, and created a genetic interaction map that identifies hlh-1 collaborating transcription factors. HLH-1 binding did not predict proximate regulatory action overall, despite enrichment for binding among BWM-specific positive regulatory targets of hlh-1. We conclude that these tissue-specific factors contribute much more broadly to the transcriptional output of muscle tissue than previously thought, offering a partial explanation for widespread HLH-1 occupancy. We also identify a novel regulatory connection between the BWM-specific hlh-1 network and the hlh-8/twist nonstriated muscle network. Finally, our results suggest a molecular basis for synthetic lethality in which hlh-1 and unc-120 mutant phenotypes are mutually buffered by joint additive regulation of essential target genes, with additional buffering suggested via newly identified hlh-1 interacting factors. PMID:22730465

  18. Celiac disease as an autoimmune condition

    PubMed Central

    Sur, Genel; Lupan, Iulia; Tilinca, Mariana; Deleanu, Diana

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases have become a major medical problem of recent years. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease model. The aim of our study was to follow the changes in the clinical autoimmunity picture of the celiac disease from recent years. The study of autoimmunity in celiac disease has focused on associated diseases with the aforementioned disease: type 1 diabetes mellitus, thyroid autoimmunity disease, Graves disease, Hashimoto's disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, spondyloarthritis, hyperprolactinemia, Turner syndrome, Addison's disease, sensory neuronopathies. Immune reactivity to tissue transglutaminase targeted autoantibodies and other autoantigens, including transglutaminase 3, actin, ganglioside, collagen, calreticulin or zonulin which have been reported in the celiac disease. New research directions given by celiac disease autoimmunity, interleukin 1, interleukin 2, protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22, CD4+CD25+ T lymphocytes, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4, infection with Necator americanus and definitive identification of pathogenic T cell epitopes, seem to provide a solution in celiac disease treatment. PMID:26155154

  19. Characterization of connective tissue progenitors through phase contrast and multicolor fluorescence time-lapse microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwee, Edward; Powell, Kimerly; Muschler, George

    2015-03-01

    Connective tissue progenitors (CTPs) are defined as the heterogeneous population of tissue resident stem and progenitor cells capable of proliferating and differentiating into connective tissue phenotypes. The prevalence and variation in clonal progeny of CTPs can be characterized using a colony formation assay. However, colony assays do not directly assess the characteristics of the colony founding CTP. We developed a large field of view, time lapse microscopy system with phase contrast and fluorescence capabilities that enables tracking from seeding through colony formation. Cells derived from the trabecular surface of bone were prepared and seeded in an Ibidi-Ph+ chamber slide. Phase contrast images of the slide were obtained every hour using a DMI6000 Leica microscope, 10X objective, and Retiga 2000R camera. Cells were stained using fluorescent antibodies for multiple markers at the time of plating to determine marker expression on seeded cells and re-stained to determine expression on their progeny. Colonies were identified and characterized using automated image processing and quantitative analysis methods. Following colony identification, the time lapse was reversed to identify and characterize the colony founding CTP according to morphology and marker expression. As a representative example, a CD73+/CD90-/CD105- and a CD73+/CD90+/CD105- CTP resulted in a colony with an area of 3720826 microns2 and percent area expression of 2.98%, 3.62%, and 1.13% for CD73, CD90, and CD105, respectively. This method can be used to study CTPs and other stem and progenitor cell populations to benefit point-of-care methods for assay and isolation in cell based therapies.

  20. Herpesviruses and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Posnett, David N

    2008-05-01

    Herpesvirus infection, in particular EBV infection, has been implicated in several major autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), multiple sclerosis (MS) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Herpesvirus infection has potential roles in both initiating the autoimmune process and exacerbating disease progression. In particular, EBV has a proposed role in initiating the anti-nucleoprotein antibodies that are characteristic of SLE through molecular mimicry. There is also evidence to suggest that there is productive infection with EBV in the brain lesions of MS patients and in the synovium of RA patients. Research has been conducted in a mouse gamma-herpesvirus model, as it serves as a useful model for productive infection within autoimmune target tissues. The novel mechanisms by which EBV could contribute bystander effects by amplification of innate immune responses, along with preclinical and epidemiological studies into the role of herpesviruses in SLE, MS and RA, and clinical studies into the potential benefit of antiviral therapy, are discussed in this review. PMID:18465661

  1. Gangliosides and autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Misasi, R; Dionisi, S; Farilla, L; Carabba, B; Lenti, L; Di Mario, U; Dotta, F

    1997-09-01

    Gangliosides are sialic acid-containing glycolipids which are formed by a hydrophobic portion, the ceramide, and a hydrophilic part, i.e. the oligosaccharide chain. First described in neural tissue, several studies have shown that gangliosides are almost ubiquitous molecules expressed in all vertebrate tissues. Within cells, gangliosides are usually associated with plasma membranes, where they can act as receptors for a variety of molecules and have been shown to take part in cell-to-cell interaction and in signal transduction. In addition, gangliosides are expressed in cytosol membranes like those of secretory granules of some endocrine cells (adrenal medulla, pancreatic islets). As far as the role of gangliosides in diseases is concerned, there are some cases in which an aberrant ganglioside expression plays a crucial role in the disease pathogenetic process. These diseases include two major forms of ganglioside storage, namely GM2-gangliosidosis (Tay-Sachs and its beta-hexosaminidase deficiency) and GM1-gangliosidosis (beta-galactosidase deficiency), where the most prominent pathological characteristic is the lysosomal ganglioside accumulation in neurons. Other inflammatory or degenerative diseases both within and outside the nervous system have been shown to be associated with an altered pattern of ganglioside expression in the target organ. Since monoclonal antibodies have been discovered and used in immunology, a large variety of ganglioside antigens has been described both as blood group antigens and as tumour-related antigens. Several studies have also indicated that gangliosides can act not only as antigens, but also as autoantigens. As a matter of fact, auto-antibodies to gangliosides, detected by immunostaining methods performed directly on TLC plates or by ELISA, have been described in several autoimmune disorders such as Guillain-Barré syndrome, multiple sclerosis, lupus erythematosus, Hashimoto's thyroiditis and, last but not least, insulin-dependent (type 1) diabetes mellitus. This last disease is caused by the autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic islet cells in genetically predisposed individuals. Autoantibodies and T lymphocytes directed towards multiple islet autoantigens have been detected in the circulation, well before the clinical onset of the disease, in a prodromal phase during which pancreatic islet beta-cells are presumably destroyed. Among the target autoantigens, some are of protein nature but others are acidic glycolipids such as sulphatides158 and the gangliosides GT3, GD3 and especially GM2-1. This last component is specifically expressed in pancreatic islets and has been shown to represent a target of IgG autoantibodies highly associated with diabetes development in first-degree relatives of type 1 diabetic individuals. In addition, the GM2-1 ganglioside appears to be one of the antigens recognized by cytoplasmic ICA, a heterogeneous group of antibodies which specifically react with islets on pancreatic frozen sections. In conclusion, studies performed in the last decade have clearly indicated that gangliosides represent a heterogeneous class of molecules that are involved in several cellular processes that are of crucial importance in physiological as well as in pathological conditions. Interestingly, these molecules, despite their small size, have been shown to represent not only important antigens in tumour immunology but are also able to elicit a specific autoimmune response, thus representing important autoantigens in some autoimmune disorders. It is of interest that, in addition to neurological autoimmune disorders where autoimmunity to gangliosides is frequent and usually of considerable magnitude, an autoimmune response to this class of molecules has been observed in autoimmune diabetes. (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED) PMID:9307889

  2. The Role of Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF/CCN2) in Skeletogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Arnott, John A; Lambi, Alex G; Mundy, Christina M; Hendesi, Honey; Pixley, Robin A; Owen, Thomas A; Safadi, Fayez F; Popoff, Steven N

    2012-01-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a 38kDa, cysteine rich, extracellular matrix protein composed of four domains or modules. CTGF has been shown to regulate a diverse array of cellular functions and has been implicated in more complex biological processes such as angiogenesis, chondrogenesis, and osteogenesis. A role for CTGF in the development and maintenance of skeletal tissues first came to light in studies demonstrating its expression in cartilage and bone cells which was dramatically increased during skeletal repair or regeneration. The physiological significance of CTGF in skeletogenesis was confirmed in CTGF-null mice, which exhibited multiple skeletal dysmorphisms as a result of impaired growth plate chondrogenesis, angiogenesis, and bone formation/mineralization. Given the emerging importance of CTGF in osteogenesis and chondrogenesis, this review will focus on its expression in skeletal tissues, its effects on osteoblast and chondrocyte differentiation and function, and the skeletal implications of ablation or over-expression of CTGF in knockout or transgenic mouse models, respectively. In addition, this review will examine the role of integrin-mediated signaling and the regulation of CTGF expression as it relates to skeletogenesis. We will emphasize CTGF studies in bone or bone cells, and will identify opportunities for future investigations concerning CTGF and chondrogenesis/osteogenesis. PMID:21967332

  3. Phosphaturic mesenchymal tumour mixed connective tissue variant: report of three cases with unusual histological findings

    PubMed Central

    Shustik, David A; Ng, David CE; Sittampalam, Kesavan

    2015-01-01

    Phosphaturic mesenchymal tumour mixed connective tissue variant (PMTMCT) is a rare tumour occurring in bone and soft tissue that usually behaves in a benign manner. Elaboration of biologically active substances by this tumour gives rise to a paraneoplastic syndrome known as oncogenic osteomalacia, manifesting clinically as bone pain, generalized weakness and pathological fractures. Recognition of PMTMCT and its associated syndrome is important, as resection of the tumour in most instances results in prompt resolution of symptoms. Previously reported cases of this tumour have emphasized the consistent presence of certain histological features that are considered prerequisite for making the diagnosis of PMTMCT. We describe three cases of PMTMCT, of which two first presented with progressive symptoms of osteomalacia and one remained clinically silent aside from the symptom of a palpable lump. Our cases highlight the wide-ranging histological patterns displayed by these tumours, and draw attention to certain microscopic findings that until now have been given little if any mention. Tentacular growth pattern and satellite nodules appear to be common findings in PMTMCTs, and can make complete surgical excision of these tumours challenging. The ability of this otherwise histologically benign tumour to permeate vascular spaces has to our knowledge never been described previously. One tumour lacked the characteristic calcifying matrix of PMTMCT, suggesting that in some tumours this defining feature may be focal if not entirely absent. PMTMCT shares features with and can resemble a variety of bone and soft tissue neoplasms, requiring the surgical pathologist to be familiar with this entity. PMID:26261662

  4. Mercury species in lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues after exposure to methyl mercury: Correlation with autoimmune parameters during and after treatment in susceptible mice

    SciTech Connect

    Havarinasab, Said; Bjoern, Erik; Nielsen, Jesper B.; Hultman, Per . E-mail: perhu@imk.liu.se

    2007-05-15

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is present in the environment as a result of the global cycling of mercury, although anthropogenic sources may dramatically increase the availability in confined geographical areas. Accumulation of MeHg in the aquatic food chain is the dominating way of exposure in mammals, which accumulate MeHg in all organs, including Brain. Demethylation has been described in the organs, especially in phagocytic cells, but mainly in the flora of the intestinal tract. While most of the inorganic mercury (Hg{sup 2+}) formed in the intestine is excreted, a fraction is reabsorbed which together with the local demethylation increases the organ Hg{sup 2+} concentration. MeHg is a well-known immunosuppressive agent, while Hg{sup 2+} is associated with immunostimulation and autoimmunity especially in genetically susceptible rodents, creating a syndrome, i.e. mercury-induced autoimmunity (HgIA). This study aimed at exploring the effect of MeHg with regard to HgIA, and especially the immunological events after stopping treatment, correlated with the presence of MeHg and Hg{sup 2+} in the organs. Treatment of A.SW mice for 30 days with 4.2 mg MeHg/L drinking water (corresponding to approximately 420 {mu}g Hg/kg body weight/day) caused all the HgIA features observed after primary treatment with inorganic Hg, except systemic immune complex deposits. The total Hg concentration was 5-fold higher in the kidneys as compared with lymph nodes, but the fraction of Hg{sup 2+} was similar (17-20%). After stopping treatment, the renal and lymph node MeHg concentration declined according to first order kinetics during the initial 4-6 weeks, but then slower. A similar decline in the organ Hg{sup 2+} concentration occurred during the initial 2 weeks after stopping treatment but then ceased, causing the Hg{sup 2+} concentration to exceed that of MeHg in the lymph nodes and kidneys after 3 and 8 weeks, respectively. The selective increase in lymph node Hg{sup 2+} fraction is likely to be due to demethylation of MeHg in the macrophage-rich lymphoid tissue. The major autoantibody in HgIA, anti-fibrillarin antibodies, tended to increase during the initial 6 weeks after stopping treatment, while all other HgIA features including antichromatin antibodies declined to control levels after 2-4 weeks. This indicates differences in either dose requirement or induction mechanisms for the different HgIA parameters. The selective accumulation of Hg{sup 2+} in lymph nodes following MeHg treatment should be taken into account when the effect of MeHg on the immune system is evaluated.

  5. Helicobacter pylori and autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hasni, S; Ippolito, A; Illei, GG

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a widely prevalent microbe, with between 50 and 80% of the population infected worldwide. Clinically, infection with H. pylori is commonly associated with peptic ulcer disease, but many of those infected remain asymptomatic. H. pylori has evolved a number of means to affect the host immune response and has been implicated in many diseases mitigated by immune dysregulation, such as immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP), atrophic gastritis, and mucosa associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma. Autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and Sjogren’s syndrome, are the result of a dysregulated host immune system which targets otherwise healthy tissues. The exact etiology of autoimmune diseases is unclear, but it has long been suggested that exposure to certain environmental agents, such as viral and bacterial infection or chemical exposures, in genetically susceptible individuals may be the catalyst for the initiation of autoimmune processes. Because of its prevalence and ability to affect human immune function, many researchers have hypothesized that H. pylori might contribute to the development of autoimmune diseases. In this article, we review the available literature regarding the role of chronic H. pylori infection in various autoimmune disease states. PMID:21902767

  6. In vitro evaluation of the angiostatic potential of drugs using an endothelialized tissue-engineered connective tissue.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Pierre-Luc; Berthod, François; Germain, Lucie; Auger, François A

    2005-11-01

    The development of a new pharmacological strategy, the angiostatic therapy, to inhibit solid tumor progression has increased the need of powerful in vitro models to screen the angiostatic potential of new drug candidates. We produced an endothelialized reconstructed connective tissue (ERCT) that promotes the spontaneous formation of a human capillary-like network by coculture of human endothelial cells isolated from umbilical cord or from newborn foreskin, with dermal fibroblasts in a collagen sponge. Three inhibitors of angiogenesis, tamoxifen, ilomastat, and echistatin, were used to assess the efficiency of our ERCT to discriminate, in vitro, an angiostatic potential. The capillary-like structures were characterized by their immunoreactivity to human platelet-endothelial cellular adhesion molecule-1 antibodies and were quantified on histological cross-sections of biopsies taken after 10, 17, 24, and 31 days of culture. A dose-response significant inhibition of the capillary-like formation was detected when increasing concentrations of tamoxifen, ilomastat, or echistatin were added for 1 week to the culture medium of the ERCT. Tamoxifen was found to be angiogenic at 10 microM and to have a cytotoxic effect at 40 microM 1 week after drug removal. Echistatin induced a rapid, slight, and reversible inhibition of capillary-like formation, whereas ilomastat caused a very precocious, strong, and reversible inhibition of angiogenesis. In addition, a 16-h hypoxia promoted the formation of 10 times larger vessels (>300 microm(2)), compared with normoxic condition. These results suggest that our model could be efficiently used to study the long-term angiostatic potential of drugs in vitro in a very physiological environment. PMID:16055674

  7. Uptake and intracellular transport of the connective tissue growth factor: a potential mode of action.

    PubMed Central

    Wahab, N A; Brinkman, H; Mason, R M

    2001-01-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a secreted cysteine-rich protein now considered as an important effector molecule in both physiological and pathological processes. An increasing amount of evidence indicates that CTGF plays a key role in the pathogenesis of different fibrotic disorders including diabetic nephropathy. However, the molecular mechanisms by which CTGF exerts its effects are not known. Here we provide the first evidence for the existence of an intracellular transport pathway for the growth factor in human mesangial cells. Our results demonstrate that CTGF is internalized from the cell surface in endosomes and accumulates in a juxtanuclear organelle from which the growth factor is then translocated into the cytosol. In the cytosol CTGF is phosphorylated by protein kinase C and PMA treatment can enhance this phosphorylation. Phosphorylated CTGF may have an important role in the cytosol, but it is also translocated into the nucleus where it may directly affect transcription. PMID:11563972

  8. CCN2: a mechanosignaling sensor modulating integrin-dependent connective tissue remodeling in fibroblasts?

    PubMed

    Leask, Andrew

    2013-08-01

    Tensegrity (tensional integrity) is an emerging concept governing the structure of the body. Integrin-mediated mechanical tension is essential for connective tissue function in vivo. For example, in adult skin fibroblasts, the integrin β1 subunit mediates adhesion to collagen and fibronectin. Moreover, integrin β1, through its abilities to activate latent TGFβ1 and promote collagen production through focal adhesion kinase/rac1/nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase (NOX)/reactive oxygen species (ROS), is essential for dermal homeostasis, repair and fibrosis. The integrin β1-interacting protein CCN2, a member of the CCN family of proteins, is induced by TGFβ1; yet, CCN2 is not a simple downstream mediator of TGFβ1, but instead synergistically promote TGFβ1-induced adhesive signaling and fibrosis. Due to its selective ability to sense mechanical forces in the microenvironment, CCN2 may represent an exquisitely precise target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:23729366

  9. A simulation model for stem cells differentiation into specialized cells of non-connective tissues.

    PubMed

    Pisu, Massimo; Concas, Alessandro; Fadda, Sarah; Cincotti, Alberto; Cao, Giacomo

    2008-10-01

    A novel mathematical model to simulate stem cells differentiation into specialized cells of non-connective tissues is proposed. The model is based upon material balances for growth factors coupled with a mass-structured population balance describing cell growth, proliferation and differentiation. The proposed model is written in a general form and it may be used to simulate a generic cell differentiation pathway during in vitro cultivation when specific growth factors are used. Literature experimental data concerning the differentiation of central nervous stem cells into astrocytes are successfully compared with model results, thus demonstrating the validity of the proposed model as well as its predictive capability. Finally, sensitivity analysis of model parameters is also performed in order to clarify what mechanisms most strongly influence differentiation and cell types distribution. PMID:18667361

  10. New developments on the role of intramuscular connective tissue in meat toughness.

    PubMed

    Purslow, Peter P

    2014-01-01

    Intramuscular connective tissue (IMCT) forms a series of continuous networks integrating muscle fibers and fascicles into a whole organ. The contributions of IMCT to cooked meat toughness have long been recognized. This review concentrates on (a) the potential to manipulate IMCT in the growing animal, (b) postmortem effects on structure and properties of IMCT, and (c) developments in techniques to quantify IMCT in meat. A new hypothesis can explain why IMCT is enzymatically degraded in postmortem aging; however, after cooking, no differences are seen in the IMCT contribution to toughness. This hypothesis proposes that heat-insoluble collagen occurs in a weak pool and a strong pool, where the weak pool is most easily degraded by both proteolysis and heat. Far from being a constant background feature, the IMCT contribution to cooked meat toughness can be varied and deserves fresh research on how to achieve this. PMID:24437687

  11. Nonspecific interstitial pneumonia overlaps organizing pneumonia in lung-dominant connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue-Ren; Peng, Shou-Chun; Wei, Lu-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Here, we reported two cases of nonspecific interstitial pneumonia overlap organizing pneumonia (NSIP/OP) with lung-dominant connective tissue disease (LD-ILD). The first case is a patient with hands of chapped skin, right-sided pleuritic chest discomfort, weakness, positive ANA and antibodies to Ro/SS-A (+++) and Ro-52 (++). In the second case, there were Reynaud's disease, and nucleolus-ANA increased (1:800). Chest high resolution CT scan in both cases showed ground-glass opacifications, predominantly in basal and subpleural region and the pathologic manifestation were correlated with NSIP/OP, which were previously discovered in Sjogren syndrome, PM/DM and other rheumatic diseases. The two cases of NSIP/OP with LD-CTD we reported expand disease spectrum of NSIP/OP pathological types in ILD. However, it is necessary to process large-scale studies. PMID:26617847

  12. Exome analysis of connective tissue dysplasia: death and rebirth of clinical genetics?

    PubMed

    Wilson, Golder N

    2014-05-01

    Exome results are reported for two patients with connective tissue dysplasia, one refining a clinical diagnosis of Ehlers-Danlos to Marfan syndrome, the other suggesting arthrogryposis derived from maternofetal Stickler syndrome. Patient 1 had mutations in transthyretin (TTR), fibrillin (FBN1), and a calcium channel (CACNA1A) gene suggesting diagnoses of transthyretin amyloidosis, Marfan syndrome, and familial hemiplegic migraines, respectively. Patient 2 presented with arthrogryposis that was correlated with his mother's habitus and arthritis once COL2A1 mutations suggestive of Stickler syndrome were defined. Although DNA results often defy prediction by the best of clinicians, these patients illustrate needs for ongoing clinical scholarship (e.g., to delineate guidelines for management of mutations like that for hyperekplexia in Patient 2) and for interpretation of polygenic change that is optimized by clinical genetic/syndromology experience (e.g., suggesting acetazolamide therapy for Patient 1 and explaining arthrogryposis in Patient 2). PMID:24664531

  13. Ischemic Colitis Due to a Mesenteric Arteriovenous Malformation in a Patient with a Connective Tissue Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Poullos, Peter D.; Thompson, Atalie C.; Holz, Grant; Edelman, Lauren A.; Jeffrey, R. Brooke

    2014-01-01

    Ischemic colitis is a rare, life-threatening, consequence of mesenteric arteriovenous malformations. Ischemia ensues from a steal phenomenon through shunting, and may be compounded by the resulting portal hypertension. Computed tomographic angiography is the most common first-line test because it is quick, non-invasive, and allows for accurate anatomic characterization. Also, high-resolution three-dimensional images can be created for treatment planning. Magnetic resonance angiography is similarly sensitive for vascular mapping. Conventional angiography remains the gold standard for diagnosis and also allows for therapeutic endovascular embolization. Our patient underwent testing using all three of these modalities. We present the first reported case of this entity in a patient with a vascular connective tissue disorder. PMID:25926912

  14. Antinuclear antibodies and their detection methods in diagnosis of connective tissue diseases: a journey revisited

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Yashwant; Bhatia, Alka; Minz, Ranjana Walker

    2009-01-01

    It has been more than 50 years since antinuclear antibodies were first discovered and found to be associated with connective tissue diseases. Since then different methods have been described and used for their detection or confirmation. For many decades immunofluorescent antinuclear antibody test has been the "gold standard" in the diagnosis of these disorders. However to increase the sensitivity and specificity of antinuclear antibody detection further approaches were explored. Today a battery of newer techniques are available some of which are now considered better and are competing with the older methods. This article provides an overview on advancement in antinuclear antibody detection methods, their future prospects, advantages, disadvantages and guidelines for use of these tests. PMID:19121207

  15. Antinuclear antibodies and their detection methods in diagnosis of connective tissue diseases: a journey revisited.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Yashwant; Bhatia, Alka; Minz, Ranjana Walker

    2009-01-01

    It has been more than 50 years since antinuclear antibodies were first discovered and found to be associated with connective tissue diseases. Since then different methods have been described and used for their detection or confirmation. For many decades immunofluorescent antinuclear antibody test has been the "gold standard" in the diagnosis of these disorders. However to increase the sensitivity and specificity of antinuclear antibody detection further approaches were explored. Today a battery of newer techniques are available some of which are now considered better and are competing with the older methods. This article provides an overview on advancement in antinuclear antibody detection methods, their future prospects, advantages, disadvantages and guidelines for use of these tests. PMID:19121207

  16. Spontaneous Esophageal Perforation in a Patient with Mixed Connective Tissue Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lyman, David

    2011-01-01

    Spontaneous esophageal perforation is a rare and life-threatening disorder. Failure to diagnosis within the first 24-48 hours of presentation portends a poor prognosis. A patient with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) on low-dose prednisone and methotrexate presented moribund with chest and shoulder pain, a left hydropneumothorax, progressive respiratory failure and shock. Initial management focussed on presumed community acquired pneumonia (CAP) in a patient on immunosuppressants. Bilateral yeast empyemas were treated and attributed to immunosuppression. On day 26, the patient developed mediastinitis, and the diagnosis of esophageal perforation was first considered. A review of the literature suggests that the diagnosis and management of spontaneous esophageal perforation could have been more timely and the outcome less catastrophic. PMID:22279514

  17. Contribution of Underlying Connective Tissue Cells to Taste Buds in Mouse Tongue and Soft Palate.

    PubMed

    Boggs, Kristin; Venkatesan, Nandakumar; Mederacke, Ingmar; Komatsu, Yoshihiro; Stice, Steve; Schwabe, Robert F; Mistretta, Charlotte M; Mishina, Yuji; Liu, Hong-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Taste buds, the sensory organs for taste, have been described as arising solely from the surrounding epithelium, which is in distinction from other sensory receptors that are known to originate from neural precursors, i.e., neural ectoderm that includes neural crest (NC). Our previous study suggested a potential contribution of NC derived cells to early immature fungiform taste buds in late embryonic (E18.5) and young postnatal (P1-10) mice. In the present study we demonstrated the contribution of the underlying connective tissue (CT) to mature taste buds in mouse tongue and soft palate. Three independent mouse models were used for fate mapping of NC and NC derived connective tissue cells: (1) P0-Cre/R26-tdTomato (RFP) to label NC, NC derived Schwann cells and derivatives; (2) Dermo1-Cre/RFP to label mesenchymal cells and derivatives; and (3) Vimentin-CreER/mGFP to label Vimentin-expressing CT cells and derivatives upon tamoxifen treatment. Both P0-Cre/RFP and Dermo1-Cre/RFP labeled cells were abundant in mature taste buds in lingual taste papillae and soft palate, but not in the surrounding epithelial cells. Concurrently, labeled cells were extensively distributed in the underlying CT. RFP signals were seen in the majority of taste buds and all three types (I, II, III) of differentiated taste bud cells, with the neuronal-like type III cells labeled at a greater proportion. Further, Vimentin-CreER labeled cells were found in the taste buds of 3-month-old mice whereas Vimentin immunoreactivity was only seen in the CT. Taken together, our data demonstrate a previously unrecognized origin of taste bud cells from the underlying CT, a conceptually new finding in our knowledge of taste bud cell derivation, i.e., from both the surrounding epithelium and the underlying CT that is primarily derived from NC. PMID:26741369

  18. Regulatory mechanisms of anthrax toxin receptor 1-dependent vascular and connective tissue homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Besschetnova, Tatiana Y.; Ichimura, Takaharu; Katebi, Negin; St. Croix, Brad; Bonventre, Joseph V.; Olsen, Bjorn R.

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that angiogenesis is linked to fibrotic processes in fibroproliferative diseases, but insights into pathophysiological processes are limited, due to lack of understanding of molecular mechanisms controlling endothelial and fibroblastic homeostasis. We demonstrate here that the matrix receptor anthrax toxin receptor 1 (ANTXR1), also known as tumor endothelial marker 8 (TEM8), is an essential component of these mechanisms. Loss of TEM8 function in mice causes reduced synthesis of endothelial basement membrane components and hyperproliferative and leaky blood vessels in skin. In addition, endothelial cell alterations in mutants are almost identical to those of endothelial cells in infantile hemangioma lesions, including activated VEGF receptor signaling in endothelial cells, increased expression of the downstream targets VEGF and CXCL12, and increased numbers of macrophages and mast cells. In contrast, loss of TEM8 in fibroblasts leads to increased rates of synthesis of fiber-forming collagens, resulting in progressive fibrosis in skin and other organs. Compromised interactions between TEM8-deficient endothelial and fibroblastic cells cause dramatic reduction in the activity of the matrix-degrading enzyme MMP2. In addition to insights into mechanisms of connective tissue homeostasis, our data provide molecular explanations for vascular and connective tissue abnormalities in GAPO syndrome, caused by loss-of-function mutations in ANTXR1. Furthermore, the loss of MMP2 activity suggests that fibrotic skin abnormalities in GAPO syndrome are, in part, the consequence of pathophysiological mechanisms underlying syndromes (NAO, Torg and Winchester) with multicentric skin nodulosis and osteolysis caused by homozygous loss-of-function mutations in MMP2. PMID:25572963

  19. Contribution of Underlying Connective Tissue Cells to Taste Buds in Mouse Tongue and Soft Palate

    PubMed Central

    Mederacke, Ingmar; Komatsu, Yoshihiro; Stice, Steve; Schwabe, Robert F.; Mistretta, Charlotte M.; Mishina, Yuji; Liu, Hong-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Taste buds, the sensory organs for taste, have been described as arising solely from the surrounding epithelium, which is in distinction from other sensory receptors that are known to originate from neural precursors, i.e., neural ectoderm that includes neural crest (NC). Our previous study suggested a potential contribution of NC derived cells to early immature fungiform taste buds in late embryonic (E18.5) and young postnatal (P1-10) mice. In the present study we demonstrated the contribution of the underlying connective tissue (CT) to mature taste buds in mouse tongue and soft palate. Three independent mouse models were used for fate mapping of NC and NC derived connective tissue cells: (1) P0-Cre/R26-tdTomato (RFP) to label NC, NC derived Schwann cells and derivatives; (2) Dermo1-Cre/RFP to label mesenchymal cells and derivatives; and (3) Vimentin-CreER/mGFP to label Vimentin-expressing CT cells and derivatives upon tamoxifen treatment. Both P0-Cre/RFP and Dermo1-Cre/RFP labeled cells were abundant in mature taste buds in lingual taste papillae and soft palate, but not in the surrounding epithelial cells. Concurrently, labeled cells were extensively distributed in the underlying CT. RFP signals were seen in the majority of taste buds and all three types (I, II, III) of differentiated taste bud cells, with the neuronal-like type III cells labeled at a greater proportion. Further, Vimentin-CreER labeled cells were found in the taste buds of 3-month-old mice whereas Vimentin immunoreactivity was only seen in the CT. Taken together, our data demonstrate a previously unrecognized origin of taste bud cells from the underlying CT, a conceptually new finding in our knowledge of taste bud cell derivation, i.e., from both the surrounding epithelium and the underlying CT that is primarily derived from NC. PMID:26741369

  20. Hair loss in autoimmune systemic diseases.

    PubMed

    Parodi, A; Cozzani, E

    2014-02-01

    Hair loss is commonly seen in autoimmune diseases. In pemphigus, although scalp involvement is common, hair loss is rarely reported. In classical bullous pemphigoid, alopecia is not reported while it is described in the Brusting-Perry variant of bullous pemphigoid and in epidermolysis bullosa acquisita. In these two diseases alopecia is cicatricial. In connective tissue diseases, in lupus erythematosus (LE) hair loss is frequent; in particular in LE there are two types of alopecia: non scarring and scarring alopecia. The non scarring form is a finding of acute systemic LE and the scarring form develops when a typical discoid lesion is located on the scalp. In dermatomyositis alopecia is usually non scarring and generalized. In scleroderma, alopecia is associated with en coupe de sabre morphea. PMID:24566567

  1. Control of connective tissue metabolism by lasers: recent developments and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Abergel, R.P.; Meeker, C.A.; Lam, T.S.; Dwyer, R.M.; Lesavoy, M.A.; Uitto, J.

    1984-12-01

    Various laser modalities are currently in extensive use in dermatology and plastic surgery, particularly for treatment of vascular and pigmented lesions. A relatively new area of laser utilization involves the possible biologic effects of the lasers. In this overview, recent studies are summarized which indicate that lasers at specific wavelengths and energy densities modulate the connective tissue metabolism by skin fibroblasts both in vitro and in vivo. Specifically, the neodymium-yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd: YAG) laser was shown to selectively suppress collagen production both in fibroblast cultures and in normal skin in vivo, thus suggesting that this laser modality may be useful for the treatment of fibrotic conditions such as keloids and hypertrophic scars. Furthermore, two low-energy lasers, helium-neon (He-Ne) and gallium-arsenide (Ga-As), were shown to stimulate collagen production in human skin fibroblast cultures, suggesting that these lasers could be used for enhancement of wound healing processes. These experimental approaches illustrate the future possibilities for applying lasers for the modulation of various biologic functions of cells in tissues and attest to the potential role of lasers in the treatment of cutaneous disorders.

  2. [Reparative regeneration of connective tissue structures of mammals under antioxidant therapy conditions].

    PubMed

    Belova, S V; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M

    2015-01-01

    The influence of administration of the antioxidant complexes consisting of nonenzymatic antioxidants (alpha-tocopherol acetate preparation) and enzymatic antioxidants (ceruloplasmin) has been studied in rabbits with experimental arthritis. The introduction of alpha-tocopherol acetate (at a daily dose of 4 mg) improved metabolic processes in the organism (decreased in the rate of erythrocyte precipitation, total leukocytes and their stub and segmental forms; increased in erythrocyte count; reduced the glycosaminoglycan content as determined from uronic acid and hexose level; decreased ceruloplasmin activity and malonic dialdehyde level ion blood serum, all at p < 0.05), thus favoring reduction in the total activity of the inflammatory process as judged from hematological and biochemical data. Intra-articular introduction of ceruloplasmin (1.5 mg/kg, once per week) positively influenced the state of joint structures in damaged knee joints of the animals: decreased the activity of ceruloplasmin (from 5.28 ± 0.06 to 3.94 ± 0.01 AU), and malonic dialdehyde level (0.18 ± 0.02 to 0.08 ± 0.01 μM) in the articular fluid (all at p < 0.05). These effects are probably related to the elimination of inefficiency of the antioxidant system in the synovial medium, thus preventing inflammatory destruction of articular tissues, hindering the development of pannus, and assisting the activation of reparative regeneration of connective tissue structures. PMID:25826874

  3. Alterations of Dermal Connective Tissue Collagen in Diabetes: Molecular Basis of Aged-Appearing Skin

    PubMed Central

    Argyropoulos, Angela J.; Robichaud, Patrick; Balimunkwe, Rebecca Mutesi; Fisher, Gary J.; Hammerberg, Craig; Yan, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of the collagen, the major structural protein in skin, contribute significantly to human skin connective tissue aging. As aged-appearing skin is more common in diabetes, here we investigated the molecular basis of aged-appearing skin in diabetes. Among all known human matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), diabetic skin shows elevated levels of MMP-1 and MMP-2. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) coupled real-time PCR indicated that elevated MMPs in diabetic skin were primarily expressed in the dermis. Furthermore, diabetic skin shows increased lysyl oxidase (LOX) expression and higher cross-linked collagens. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) further indicated that collagen fibrils were fragmented/disorganized, and key mechanical properties of traction force and tensile strength were increased in diabetic skin, compared to intact/well-organized collagen fibrils in non-diabetic skin. In in vitro tissue culture system, multiple MMPs including MMP-1 and MM-2 were induced by high glucose (25 mM) exposure to isolated primary human skin dermal fibroblasts, the major cells responsible for collagen homeostasis in skin. The elevation of MMPs and LOX over the years is thought to result in the accumulation of fragmented and cross-linked collagen, and thus impairs dermal collagen structural integrity and mechanical properties in diabetes. Our data partially explain why old-looking skin is more common in diabetic patients. PMID:27104752

  4. Intracranial phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor, mixed connective tissue variant presenting without oncogenic osteomalacia

    PubMed Central

    Bower, Regina S.; Daugherty, Wilson P.; Giannini, Caterina; Parney, Ian F.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Phosphaturic mesenchymal tumor, mixed connective tissue variant (PMTMCT) is a rare tumor typically occurring in soft tissues and bone, causing oncogenic (tumor-induced) osteomalacia (TIO) through secretion of the phosphaturic hormone, fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23). Rare tumors identical to PMTMCT occur without known TIO. Intracranial localization of PMTMCT is extremely rare, with only two cases reported in the literature. We present a very unusual case of a patient with an intracranial PMTMCT that presented with neurologic changes without osteomalacia. Case Description: A 67-year-old woman presented with progressive incontinence, apathy, and abulia after having undergone a total knee replacement 1 month earlier. Imaging disclosed a large left frontal anterior fossa mass. She underwent uncomplicated surgical resection of this tumor. Surprisingly, histopathology suggested PMTMCT. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay demonstrating FGF-23 expression in the tumor confirmed the diagnosis. Serum FGF-23 levels postoperatively were normal and she had no clinical or laboratory evidence of osteomalacia or phosphaturia. Conclusion: This report should serve to alert clinicians to the possibility that PMTMCT can be included in the differential diagnosis of intracranial masses even in the absence of tumor-induced osteomalacia. PMID:23372968

  5. Biocompatibility of four root canal sealers: a histopathological evaluation in rat subcutaneous connective tissue.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Camila Maggi Maia; Pinto, Shelon Cristina Souza; Zedebski, Rosário de Arruda Moura; Santos, Fábio André; Pilatti, Gibson Luiz

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the subcutaneous biocompatibility of: Epiphany, AH Plus, Pulp Canal Sealer and Sealapex root canal sealers. Sixty rats were randomly assigned to 4 groups, according to the sealer. Polyethylene tubes containing the tested materials were inserted into the connective tissue. The implants were removed after 7, 15 and 30 days, and the tissue samples were processed, stained and examined by light microscopy. The descriptive analysis considered: thickness of the fibrous capsule, severity of the inflammatory reaction, and presence of giant cells. After 7 days, all sealers induced moderate to severe inflammatory reaction. After 15 days, Epiphany and AH Plus sealers showed a moderate inflammatory reaction, while Pulp Canal Sealer and Sealapex induced severe and mild inflammatory reactions, respectively. After 30 days, mild inflammatory reactions were observed for Epiphany, Sealapex and AH Plus. Sealapex induced the lowest inflammatory response at all evaluation periods, and only Pulp Canal Sealer did not show a decreased in the inflammatory reaction over time. PMID:21519643

  6. In vitro selection and characterization of deoxyribonucleic acid aptamers against connective tissue growth factor.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuang; Huo, Yongwei; Tian, Hong; Zhang, Qiannan; Lv, Yifei; Hao, Zhiming

    2015-02-20

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a secreted matricellular protein possessing complex biological functions. CTGF modulates a number of signaling pathways that are involved in cell adhesion, migration, angiogenesis, myofibroblast activation, extracellular matrix deposition and tissue remodeling. Aptamers are oligonucleic acid chains or polypeptides that bind with specific target molecules hence have the potential to be used in the detection and blockade of the targets. In this study, we selected CTGF-targeting DNA aptamers by using systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX). After 8 iterative rounds of selection, cloning, DNA sequencing and affinity determination, six aptamers with high affinities to CTGF were obtained. Among them, one (C-ap17P) binds with the N-terminal region (aa 1-190) and the other five (C-ap11, 12, 14, 15 and 18) bind with the C-terminal region (aa 191-350) of hCTGF specifically. The biological stability assay indicated that a representative aptamer, C-ap17P, could keep its integrity at a rather high level for at least 24 h in complete DMEM cell culture medium. These CTGF aptamers might be used as a easy and fast detection tool for CTGF and be developed as CTGF-specific inhibitors for both research works and clinical applications. PMID:25603056

  7. Alterations of Dermal Connective Tissue Collagen in Diabetes: Molecular Basis of Aged-Appearing Skin.

    PubMed

    Argyropoulos, Angela J; Robichaud, Patrick; Balimunkwe, Rebecca Mutesi; Fisher, Gary J; Hammerberg, Craig; Yan, Yan; Quan, Taihao

    2016-01-01

    Alterations of the collagen, the major structural protein in skin, contribute significantly to human skin connective tissue aging. As aged-appearing skin is more common in diabetes, here we investigated the molecular basis of aged-appearing skin in diabetes. Among all known human matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), diabetic skin shows elevated levels of MMP-1 and MMP-2. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) coupled real-time PCR indicated that elevated MMPs in diabetic skin were primarily expressed in the dermis. Furthermore, diabetic skin shows increased lysyl oxidase (LOX) expression and higher cross-linked collagens. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) further indicated that collagen fibrils were fragmented/disorganized, and key mechanical properties of traction force and tensile strength were increased in diabetic skin, compared to intact/well-organized collagen fibrils in non-diabetic skin. In in vitro tissue culture system, multiple MMPs including MMP-1 and MM-2 were induced by high glucose (25 mM) exposure to isolated primary human skin dermal fibroblasts, the major cells responsible for collagen homeostasis in skin. The elevation of MMPs and LOX over the years is thought to result in the accumulation of fragmented and cross-linked collagen, and thus impairs dermal collagen structural integrity and mechanical properties in diabetes. Our data partially explain why old-looking skin is more common in diabetic patients. PMID:27104752

  8. Activin A-Smad Signaling Mediates Connective Tissue Growth Factor Synthesis in Liver Progenitor Cells.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ze-Yang; Jin, Guan-Nan; Wang, Wei; Sun, Yi-Min; Chen, Wei-Xun; Chen, Lin; Liang, Hui-Fang; Datta, Pran K; Zhang, Ming-Zhi; Zhang, Bixiang; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Liver progenitor cells (LPCs) are activated in chronic liver damage and may contribute to liver fibrosis. Our previous investigation reported that LPCs produced connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2), an inducer of liver fibrosis, yet the regulatory mechanism of the production of CTGF/CCN2 in LPCs remains elusive. In this study, we report that Activin A is an inducer of CTGF/CCN2 in LPCs. Here we show that expression of both Activin A and CTGF/CCN2 were upregulated in the cirrhotic liver, and the expression of Activin A positively correlates with that of CTGF/CCN2 in liver tissues. We go on to show that Activin A induced de novo synthesis of CTGF/CCN2 in LPC cell lines LE/6 and WB-F344. Furthermore, Activin A contributed to autonomous production of CTGF/CCN2 in liver progenitor cells (LPCs) via activation of the Smad signaling pathway. Smad2, 3 and 4 were all required for this induction. Collectively, these results provide evidence for the fibrotic role of LPCs in the liver and suggest that the Activin A-Smad-CTGF/CCN2 signaling in LPCs may be a therapeutic target of liver fibrosis. PMID:27011166

  9. Connective Tissue Growth Factor Is Required for Skeletal Development and Postnatal Skeletal Homeostasis in Male Mice

    PubMed Central

    Canalis, Ernesto; Zanotti, Stefano; Beamer, Wesley G.; Economides, Aris N.; Smerdel-Ramoya, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), a member of the cysteine-rich 61 (Cyr 61), CTGF, nephroblastoma overexpressed (NOV) (CCN) family of proteins, is synthesized by osteoblasts, and its overexpression inhibits osteoblastogenesis and causes osteopenia. The global inactivation of Ctgf leads to defective endochondral bone formation and perinatal lethality; therefore, the consequences of Ctgf inactivation on the postnatal skeleton are not known. To study the function of CTGF, we generated Ctgf+/LacZ heterozygous null mice and tissue-specific null Ctgf mice by mating Ctgf conditional mice, where Ctgf is flanked by lox sequences with mice expressing the Cre recombinase under the control of the paired-related homeobox gene 1 (Prx1) enhancer (Prx1-Cre) or the osteocalcin promoter (Oc-Cre). Ctgf+/LacZ heterozygous mice exhibited transient osteopenia at 1 month of age secondary to decreased trabecular number. A similar osteopenic phenotype was observed in 1-month-old Ctgf conditional null male mice generated with Prx1-Cre, suggesting that the decreased trabecular number was secondary to impaired endochondral bone formation. In contrast, when the conditional deletion of Ctgf was achieved by Oc-Cre, an osteopenic phenotype was observed only in 6-month-old male mice. Osteoblast and osteoclast number, bone formation, and eroded surface were not affected in Ctgf heterozygous or conditional null mice. In conclusion, CTGF is necessary for normal skeletal development but to a lesser extent for postnatal skeletal homeostasis. PMID:20534727

  10. Activin A-Smad Signaling Mediates Connective Tissue Growth Factor Synthesis in Liver Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Ze-Yang; Jin, Guan-Nan; Wang, Wei; Sun, Yi-Min; Chen, Wei-Xun; Chen, Lin; Liang, Hui-Fang; Datta, Pran K.; Zhang, Ming-Zhi; Zhang, Bixiang; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Liver progenitor cells (LPCs) are activated in chronic liver damage and may contribute to liver fibrosis. Our previous investigation reported that LPCs produced connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2), an inducer of liver fibrosis, yet the regulatory mechanism of the production of CTGF/CCN2 in LPCs remains elusive. In this study, we report that Activin A is an inducer of CTGF/CCN2 in LPCs. Here we show that expression of both Activin A and CTGF/CCN2 were upregulated in the cirrhotic liver, and the expression of Activin A positively correlates with that of CTGF/CCN2 in liver tissues. We go on to show that Activin A induced de novo synthesis of CTGF/CCN2 in LPC cell lines LE/6 and WB-F344. Furthermore, Activin A contributed to autonomous production of CTGF/CCN2 in liver progenitor cells (LPCs) via activation of the Smad signaling pathway. Smad2, 3 and 4 were all required for this induction. Collectively, these results provide evidence for the fibrotic role of LPCs in the liver and suggest that the Activin A-Smad-CTGF/CCN2 signaling in LPCs may be a therapeutic target of liver fibrosis. PMID:27011166

  11. Dynamic vibration cooperates with connective tissue growth factor to modulate stem cell behaviors.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhixiang; Zerdoum, Aidan B; Duncan, Randall L; Jia, Xinqiao

    2014-07-01

    Vocal fold disorders affect 3-9% of the U.S. population. Tissue engineering offers an alternative strategy for vocal fold repair. Successful engineering of vocal fold tissues requires a strategic combination of therapeutic cells, biomimetic scaffolds, and physiologically relevant mechanical and biochemical factors. Specifically, we aim to create a vocal fold-like microenvironment to coax stem cells to adopt the phenotype of vocal fold fibroblasts (VFFs). Herein, high frequency vibratory stimulations and soluble connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) were sequentially introduced to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) cultured on a poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL)-derived microfibrous scaffold for a total of 6 days. The initial 3-day vibratory culture resulted in an increased production of hyaluronic acids (HA), tenascin-C (TNC), decorin (DCN), and matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP1). The subsequent 3-day CTGF treatment further enhanced the cellular production of TNC and DCN, whereas CTGF treatment alone without the vibratory preconditioning significantly promoted the synthesis of collagen I (Col 1) and sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAGs). The highest level of MMP1, TNC, Col III, and DCN production was found for cells being exposed to the combined vibration and CTGF treatment. Noteworthy, the vibration and CTGF elicited a differential stimulatory effect on elastin (ELN), HA synthase 1 (HAS1), and fibroblast-specific protein-1 (FSP-1). The mitogenic activity of CTGF was only elicited in naïve cells without the vibratory preconditioning. The combined treatment had profound, but opposite effects on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, Erk1/2 and p38, and the Erk1/2 pathway was critical for the observed mechano-biochemical responses. Collectively, vibratory stresses and CTGF signals cooperatively coaxed MSCs toward a VFF-like phenotype and accelerated the synthesis and remodeling of vocal fold matrices. PMID:24456068

  12. Ultrastructural Changes Associated with Reversible Stiffening in Catch Connective Tissue of Sea Cucumbers

    PubMed Central

    Tamori, Masaki; Ishida, Kinji; Matsuura, Eri; Ogasawara, Katsutoshi; Hanasaka, Tomohito; Takehana, Yasuhiro; Motokawa, Tatsuo; Osawa, Tokuji

    2016-01-01

    The dermis of sea cucumbers is a catch connective tissue or a mutable collagenous tissue that shows rapid, large and reversible stiffness changes in response to stimulation. The main component of the dermis is the extracellular material composed of collagen fibrils embedded in a hydrogel of proteoglycans. The stiffness of the extracellular material determines that of the dermis. The dermis has three mechanical states: soft (Sa), standard (Sb) and stiff (Sc). We studied the ultrastructural changes associated with the stiffness changes. Transverse sections of collagen fibrils in the dermis showed irregular perimeters with electron-dense protrusions or arms that cross-bridged between fibrils. The number of cross-bridges increased in stiffer dermis. The distance between the fibrils was shorter in Sc than that in other states, which was in accord with the previous report that water exuded from the tissue in the transition Sb→Sc. The ultrastructure of collagen fibrils that had been isolated from the dermis was also studied. Fibrils aggregated by tensilin, which causes the transition Sa→Sb possibly through an increase in cohesive forces between fibrils, had larger diameter than those dispersed by softenin, which antagonizes the effect of tensilin. No cross-bridges were found in isolated collagen fibrils. From the present ultrastructural study we propose that three different mechanisms work together to increase the dermal stiffness. 1.Tensilin makes collagen fibrils stronger and stiffer in Sa→Sb through an increase in cohesive forces between subfibrils that constituted fibrils; 2. Cross-bridging by arms caused the fibrils to be a continuous network of bundles both in Sa→Sb and in Sb→Sc; 3. The matrix embedding the fibril network became stiffer in Sb→Sc, which was produced by bonding associated with water exudation. PMID:27192546

  13. Fibroblastic connective tissue nevus: a rare cutaneous lesion analyzed in a series of 25 cases.

    PubMed

    de Feraudy, Sbastien; Fletcher, Christopher D M

    2012-10-01

    Fibroblastic connective tissue nevus (FCTN) represents a rare and distinct benign cutaneous mesenchymal lesion of fibroblastic/myofibroblastic lineage, which broadens the spectrum of lesions presently recognized as connective tissue nevus. A series of 25 cases of FCTN has been analyzed to further characterize the clinicopathologic spectrum and immunohistochemical features of this entity. Sixteen patients were female (64%) and 9 were male (36%), with age at presentation ranging from 1.5 months to 58 years (median, 10 y). Most patients presented with a solitary, slowly growing, painless plaque-like or nodular skin lesion. Eleven cases (44%) arose on the trunk, 9 (36%) on the head and neck, and 5 (20%) on the limbs. The lesion was present for a median duration of 11.5 months (mean, 13.2 mo). Grossly, the lesions were tan-brown to tan-white, smooth, and firm. Their size ranged from 0.3 to 2.0 cm in greatest dimension (mean size, 0.67 cm; median, 0.6 cm). All tumors showed poor circumscription and were situated primarily in the reticular deep dermis, extending into the superficial subcutis in 13 cases (52%). The lesion was associated with papillomatous epidermis in 17 cases (70%) and the presence of adipose tissue in the reticular dermis in 14 cases (60.9%). All tumors were composed of a proliferation of bland intradermal fibroblastic/myofibroblastic cells with indistinct palely eosinophilic cytoplasm and tapering nuclei, with no significant cytologic atypia or pleomorphism, arranged in short-intersecting fascicles and entrapping appendages. No mitoses were identified. Immunostains showed positivity for CD34 in 20 of 23 cases (87%) and weak focal positivity for smooth muscle actin in 9 of 19 cases (47%). No case stained positively for desmin or S100 protein. Clinical follow-up was obtained for 14 patients (median duration, 4 y). No tumor recurred locally, even when surgical excision was incomplete. No lesion metastasized. FCTN occurs most commonly as a plaque on the trunk and head/neck of children, involves deep dermis and superficial subcutis, and stains mainly for CD34. FCTN most likely represents a localized developmental dermal anomaly; it is entirely benign and should not be confused with dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans or other neoplasms such as dermatomyofibroma. PMID:22892597

  14. Large leg ulcers due to autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Rozin, Alexander P.; Egozi, Dana; Ramon, Yehuda; Toledano, Kohava; Braun-Moscovici, Yolanda; Markovits, Doron; Schapira, Daniel; Bergman, Reuven; Melamed, Yehuda; Ullman, Yehuda; Balbir-Gurman, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Large leg ulcers (LLU) may complicate autoimmune diseases. They pose a therapeutic challenge and are often resistant to treatment. To report three cases of autoimmune diseases complicated with LLU. Case Report Case 1. A 55-year old woman presented with long-standing painful LLU due to mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). Biopsy from the ulcer edge showed small vessel vasculitis. IV methylprednisolone (MethP) 1 G/day, prednisolone (PR) 1mg/kg, monthly IV cyclophosphamide (CYC), cyclosporine (CyA) 100mg/day, IVIG 125G, ciprofloxacin+IV Iloprost+enoxaparin+aspirin (AAVAA), hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HO), maggot debridement and autologous skin transplantation were performed and the LLU healed. Case 2. A 45-year old women with MCTD developed multiple LLU’s with non-specific inflammation by biopsy. MethP, PR, hydroxychloroquine (HCQ), azathioprine (AZA), CYC, IVIG, AAVAA failed. Treatment for underlying the LLU tibial osteomyelitis and addition of CyA was followed by the LLU healing. Case 3. A 20-year-old man with history of polyarteritis nodosa (PAN) developed painful LLU’s due to small vessel vasculitis (biopsy). MethP, PR 1 mg/kg, CYC, CyA 100 mg/d, AAVAA failed. MRSA sepsis and relapse of systemic PAN developed. IV vancomycin, followed by ciprofloxacin, monthly IVIG (150 g/for 5 days) and infliximab (5 mg/kg) were instituted and the LLU’s healed. Conclusions LLU are extremely resistant to therapy. Combined use of multiple medications and services are needed for healing of LLU due to autoimmune diseases. PMID:21169912

  15. Hierarchical mechanics of connective tissues: integrating insights from nano to macroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Gohl, Kheng Lim; Listrat, Anne; Bchet, Daniel

    2014-10-01

    As the key component of the musculoskeletal system, the extracellular matrix of soft connective tissues such as ligaments and tendons is a biological example of fibre-reinforced composite but with a complex hierarchical architecture. To establish a comprehensive structure-function relationship at the respective levels (i.e., from molecule to tissue) of the hierarchical architecture is challenging and requires a multidisciplinary approach, involving the integration of findings from the fields of molecular biology, biochemistry, structural biology, materials science and biophysics. Accordingly, in recent years, some of these fields, namely structural biology, materials science and biophysics, have made significant progress in the microscale and nanoscale studies of extracellular matrix using new tools, such as microelectromechanical systems, optical tweezers and atomic force microscopy, complemented by new techniques in simultaneous imaging and mechanical testing and computer modelling. The intent of this paper is to review the key findings on the mechanical response of extracellular matrix at the respective levels of the hierarchical architecture. The main focus is on the structure and function--the findings are compared across the different levels to provide insights that support the goal of establishing a comprehensive structure-function relationship of extracellular matrix. For this purpose, the review is divided into two parts. The first part explores the features of key structural units of extracellular matrix, namely tropocollagen molecule (the lowest level), microfibril, collagen fibril, collagen fibre and fascicle. The second part examines the mechanics of the structural units at the respective levels. Finally a framework for extracellular matrix mechanics is proposed to support the goal to establish a comprehensive structure-function relationship. The framework describes the integration of the mechanisms of reinforcement by the structural units at the respective levels of the hierarchical architecture in a consistent manner, both to allow comparison of these mechanisms, and to make prediction of the interconnection of these mechanisms that can also assist in the identification of effective mechanical pathways. From a design perspective, this is a step in the direction towards the development of effective strategies for engineering materials to replace or repair damaged tissues, and for exogenous cross-linking therapy to enhance the mechanical properties of injured tissues. PMID:25992406

  16. Connectivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grush, Mary, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Connectivity has dramatically changed the landscape of higher education IT. From "on-demand" services for net-gen students and advanced eLearning systems for faculty, to high-performance computing grid resources for researchers, IT now provides more networked services than ever to connect campus constituents to each other and to the world.…

  17. Autoimmune cytopenias in common variable immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Podjasek, Jenna C; Abraham, Roshini S

    2012-01-01

    Common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) is a humoral immunodeficiency whose primary diagnostic features include hypogammaglobulinemia involving two or more immunoglobulin isotypes and impaired functional antibody responses in the majority of patients. While increased susceptibility to respiratory and other infections is a common thread that binds a large cross-section of CVID patients, the presence of autoimmune complications in this immunologically and clinically heterogeneous disorder is recognized in up to two-thirds of patients. Among the autoimmune manifestations reported in CVID (20-50%; Chapel et al., 2008; Cunningham-Rundles, 2008), autoimmune cytopenias are by far the most common occurring variably in 4-20% (Michel et al., 2004; Chapel et al., 2008) of these patients who have some form of autoimmunity. Association of autoimmune cytopenias with granulomatous disease and splenomegaly has been reported. The spectrum of autoimmune cytopenias includes thrombocytopenia, anemia, and neutropenia. While it may seem paradoxical "prima facie" that autoimmunity is present in patients with primary immune deficiencies, in reality, it could be considered two sides of the same coin, each reflecting a different but inter-connected facet of immune dysregulation. The expansion of CD21 low B cells in CVID patients with autoimmune cytopenias and other autoimmune features has also been previously reported. It has been demonstrated that this unique subset of B cells is enriched for autoreactive germline antibodies. Further, a correlation has been observed between various B cell subsets, such as class-switched memory B cells and plasmablasts, and autoimmunity in CVID. This review attempts to explore the most recent concepts and highlights, along with treatment of autoimmune hematological manifestations of CVID. PMID:22837758

  18. Amplification of autoimmune disease by infection

    PubMed Central

    Posnett, David N; Yarilin, Dmitry

    2005-01-01

    Reports of infection with certain chronic persistent microbes (herpesviruses or Chlamydiae) in human autoimmune diseases are consistent with the hypothesis that these microbes are reactivated in the setting of immunodeficiency and often target the site of autoimmune inflammation. New experimental animal models demonstrate the principle. A herpesvirus or Chlamydia species can be used to infect mice with induced transient autoimmune diseases. This results in increased disease severity and even relapse. The evidence suggests that the organisms are specifically imported to the inflammatory sites and cause further tissue destruction, especially when the host is immunosuppressed. We review the evidence for the amplification of autoimmune inflammatory disease by microbial infection, which may be a general mechanism applicable to many human diseases. We suggest that patients with autoimmune disorders receiving immunosuppressing drugs should benefit from preventive antiviral therapy. PMID:15743493

  19. The cytotoxic evaluation of mineral trioxide aggregate and bioaggregate in the subcutaneous connective tissue of rats

    PubMed Central

    Acar, Gözde; Yalcin, Yagmur; Dindar, Seckin; Sancakli, Hande; Erdemir, Ugur

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the cytotoxic effects of ProRoot MTA and DiaRoot BA, a bioceramic nanoparticulate cement, on subcutaneous rat tissue. Study Design: Fifty Sprouge Dawley rats were used in this study. Polyethylene tubes filled with ProRoot MTA and DiaRoot BioAggregate, along with a control group of empty, were implanted into dorsal connective tissue of rats for 7, 15, 30, 60, and 90 days. After estimated time intervals the rats were sacrificed. The specimens were fixed, stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and then evaluated under a light microscope for inflammatory reactions and mineralization. Results: All groups evoked a severe to moderate chronic inflammatory reaction at 7 and 15 days, which decreased with time. Both the MTA and BioAggregate groups showed similar inflammatory reactions, except at 90 days when MTA showed statistically significant greater inflammation (p>0.05). The MTA group showed foreign body reaction at all times. Compared to BioAggregate, MTA showed significantly more foreign body reaction at 60 and 90 days (p<0.0001). After 30 days foreign body reaction of BioAggregate decreased significantly. Both MTA and BioAggregate groups showed similar necrosis at 7 and 15 days (p=0.094 and p=0.186 respectively). No necrosis was observed after 15 days. Similarly there was no fibrosis after 30 days for both MTA and BioAggregate groups (p>0.05). Conclusions: Since DiaRoot BioAggregate showed significantly better results than MTA, we can conclude that it is more biocompatible. However, further studies are required to confirm this result. Key words:Biocompatibility, mineral trioxide aggregate, bioAggregate. PMID:23722144

  20. Intramuscular Connective Tissue Differences in Spastic and Control Muscle: A Mechanical and Histological Study

    PubMed Central

    de Bruin, Marije; Smeulders, Mark J.; Kreulen, Michiel; Huijing, Peter A.; Jaspers, Richard T

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral palsy (CP) of the spastic type is a neurological disorder characterized by a velocity-dependent increase in tonic stretch reflexes with exaggerated tendon jerks. Secondary to the spasticity, muscle adaptation is presumed to contribute to limitations in the passive range of joint motion. However, the mechanisms underlying these limitations are unknown. Using biopsies, we compared mechanical as well as histological properties of flexor carpi ulnaris muscle (FCU) from CP patients (n = 29) and healthy controls (n = 10). The sarcomere slack length (mean 2.5 µm, SEM 0.05) and slope of the normalized sarcomere length-tension characteristics of spastic fascicle segments and single myofibre segments were not different from those of control muscle. Fibre type distribution also showed no significant differences. Fibre size was significantly smaller (1933 µm2, SEM 190) in spastic muscle than in controls (2572 µm2, SEM 322). However, our statistical analyses indicate that the latter difference is likely to be explained by age, rather than by the affliction. Quantities of endomysial and perimysial networks within biopsies of control and spastic muscle were unchanged with one exception: a significant thickening of the tertiary perimysium (3-fold), i.e. the connective tissue reinforcement of neurovascular tissues penetrating the muscle. Note that this thickening in tertiary perimysium was shown in the majority of CP patients, however a small number of patients (n = 4 out of 23) did not have this feature. These results are taken as indications that enhanced myofascial loads on FCU is one among several factors contributing in a major way to the aetiology of limitation of movement at the wrist in CP and the characteristic wrist position of such patients. PMID:24977410

  1. Alteration of Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF) Expression in Orbital Fibroblasts from Patients with Graves’ Ophthalmopathy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Pei-Chen; Wei, Yau-Huei

    2015-01-01

    Graves’ ophthalmopathy (GO) is a disfiguring and sometimes blinding disease, which is characterized by inflammation and swelling of orbital tissues, with fibrosis and adipogenesis being predominant features. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the expression levels of fibrosis-related genes, especially that of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), are altered in orbital fibroblasts of patients with GO. The role of oxidative stress in the regulation of CTGF expression in GO orbital fibroblasts is also examined. By a SYBR Green-based real time quantitative PCR (RT-QPCR), we demonstrated that the mRNA expression levels of fibronectin, apolipoprotein J, and CTGF in cultured orbital fibroblasts from patients with GO were significantly higher than those of age-matched normal controls (p = 0.007, 0.037, and 0.002, respectively). In addition, the protein expression levels of fibronectin, apolipoprotein J, and CTGF analyzed by Western blot were also significantly higher in GO orbital fibroblasts (p = 0.046, 0.032, and 0.008, respectively) as compared with the control. Furthermore, after treatment of orbital fibroblasts with a sub-lethal dose of hydrogen peroxide (200 μM H2O2), we found that the H2O2-induced increase of CTGF expression was more pronounced in the GO orbital fibroblasts as compared with those in normal controls (20% vs. 7%, p = 0.007). Importantly, pre-incubation with antioxidants including N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and vitamin C, respectively, resulted in significant attenuation of the induction of CTGF in GO orbital fibroblasts in response to H2O2 (p = 0.004 and 0.015, respectively). Taken together, we suggest that oxidative stress plays a role in the alteration of the expression of CTGF in GO orbital fibroblasts that may contribute to the pathogenesis and progression of GO. Antioxidants may be used in combination with the therapeutic agents for effective treatment of GO. PMID:26599235

  2. Development of a hyperelastic material model of subsynovial connective tissue using finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Yusuke; Thoreson, Andrew R; Zhao, Chunfeng; Amadio, Peter C; An, Kai-Nan

    2016-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is one of the most common disorders of the hand. Assessment of carpal tunnel tissue mechanical behavior, especially that of the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT), is important to better understand the mechanisms of CTS. The aim of this study was to develop a hyperelastic material model of human SSCT using mechanical test data and finite element modeling (FEM). Experimental shear test data of SSCT from 7 normal subjects and 7 CTS patients collected in a prior study was used to define material response. Hyperelastic coefficients (μ and α) from the first-order Ogden material property definition were iteratively solved using specimen-specific FEM models simulating the mechanical test conditions. A typical Ogden hyperelastic response for the normal and CTS SSCT was characterized by doing the same with data from all samples averaged together. The mean Ogden coefficients (μ/α) for the normal cadaver and CTS patient SSCT were 1.25×10(-5)MPa/4.51 and 1.99×10(-6)MPa/10.6, respectively when evaluating coefficients for individual specimens. The Ogden coefficients for the typical (averaged data) model for normal cadaver and CTS patient SSCT were 1.63×10(-5)MPa/3.93 and 5.00×10(-7)MPa/9.55, respectively. Assessment of SSCT mechanical response with a hyperelastic material model demonstrated significant differences between patient and normal cadaver. The refined assessment of these differences with this model may be important for future model development and in understanding clinical presentation of CTS. PMID:26482734

  3. Examining the connectivity between different cellular processes in the Barrett tissue microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Phelan, J J; Feighery, R; Eldin, O S; Meachair, S Ó; Cannon, A; Byrne, R; MacCarthy, F; O'Toole, D; Reynolds, J V; O'Sullivan, J

    2016-02-28

    In Barrett associated tumorigenesis, oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis are reprogrammed early in the disease sequence and act mutually to promote disease progression. However, the link between energy metabolism and its connection with other central cellular processes within the Barrett microenvironment is unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between metabolism (ATP5B/GAPDH), hypoxia (HIF1α), inflammation (IL1β/SERPINA3), p53 and obesity status using in-vivo and ex-vivo models of Barrett oesophagus. At the protein level, ATP5B (r = 0.71, P < 0.0001) and p53 (r = 0.455, P = 0.015) were found to be strongly associated with hypoxia. In addition, levels of ATP5B (r = 0.53, P = 0.0031) and GAPDH (r = -0.39, P = 0.0357) were positively associated with p53 expression. Moreover, we demonstrate that ATP5B (r = 0.8, P < 0.0001) and GAPDH (r = 0.43, P = 0.022) were positively associated with IL1β expression. Interestingly, obesity was negatively associated with oxidative phosphorylation (r = -0.6016, P = 0.0177) but positively associated with glycolysis (r = 0.743, P = 0.0015). Comparable correlations were exhibited in the ex-vivo explant tissue between metabolism, p53, hypoxia, inflammation and angiogenesis (P < 0.05). We have shown that metabolism is closely linked with many cellular processes in the Barrett tissue microenvironment. PMID:26688097

  4. The impact of autoimmune disorders and adverse pregnancy outcome.

    PubMed

    Mecacci, Federico; Pieralli, Annalisa; Bianchi, Barbara; Paidas, Michael J

    2007-08-01

    Autoimmune diseases are a group of heterogeneous disorders equally characterized by the same pathogenetic mechanism: an immunological reaction against self antigens promoted by antibodies, immuno-complex formation, and self-reactive T lymphocytes. Autoimmune diseases may be separated into organ-restricted diseases and systemic ones. The damage of single organs produced by antibodies focused against specific cellular antigens characterizes the first group of diseases, whereas the latter are produced by a systemic inflammatory process initiated by inappropriate and excess immune activation that leads to immuno-complex formation and deposition onto sensitive tissues. Since connective and vascular tissue are principally damaged in these disorders, systemic autoimmune diseases are more commonly known as "connective tissue diseases" (CTD) and include: systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, systemic sclerosis, Sjogren syndrome, and others. Although they are considered as different from a pathogenetic point of view, they overlap in many aspects, such as general symptoms as fever and fatigue, chronical ongoing, steroid therapy. As patients suffering from CTD are predominantly young women between the ages of 20 and 40 years, which is the period of the highest childbearing potential, particular interest must be regarded to the impact that these diseases and their therapies have on pregnancy and, conversely, the effect of pregnancy on these disorders, which may have long-lasting implications for mothers and neonates. Adverse fetal outcomes, maternal disease flares, and drug potential teratogenic risk are the main reasons why women suffering from CTD and who are pregnant or intend to become pregnant are considered a high-risk population. These patients require integrated, interdisciplinary care, addressing every aspect of rheumatology, obstetrics, and neonatology to reduce maternal, fetal, and neonatal complications. PMID:17825677

  5. Experiment K-6-02. Biomedical, biochemical and morphological alterations of muscle and dense, fibrous connective tissues during 14 days of spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vailas, A.; Zernicke, R.; Grindeland, R.; Kaplanski, A.

    1990-01-01

    Findings on the connective tissue response to short-term space flight (12 days) are discussed. Specifically, data regarding the biochemical, biomechanical and morphological characteristics of selected connective tissues (humerus, vertebral body, tendon and skeletal muscle) of growing rats is given. Results are given concerning the humerus cortical bone, the vertebral bone, nutritional effects on bone biomechanical properties, and soft tense fiber connective tissue response.

  6. Tissue types (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... are 4 basic types of tissue: connective tissue, epithelial tissue, muscle tissue, and nervous tissue. Connective tissue supports ... binds them together (bone, blood, and lymph tissues). Epithelial tissue provides a covering (skin, the linings of the ...

  7. Induction of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis in Mice and Evaluation of the Disease-dependent Distribution of Immune Cells in Various Tissues.

    PubMed

    Barthelmes, Julia; Tafferner, Nadja; Kurz, Jennifer; de Bruin, Natasja; Parnham, Michael J; Geisslinger, Gerd; Schiffmann, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is presumed to be an inflammatory autoimmune disease, which is characterized by lesion formation in the central nervous system (CNS) resulting in cognitive and motor impairment. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a useful animal model of MS, because it is also characterized by lesion formation in the CNS, motor impairment and is also driven by autoimmune and inflammatory reactions. One of the EAE models is induced with a peptide derived from the myelin oligodendrocyte protein (MOG)35-55 in mice. The EAE mice develop a progressive disease course. This course is divided into three phases: the preclinical phase (day 0 - 9), the disease onset (day 10 - 11) and the acute phase (day 12 - 14). MS and EAE are induced by autoreactive T cells that infiltrate the CNS. These T cells secrete chemokines and cytokines which lead to the recruitment of further immune cells. Therefore, the immune cell distribution in the spinal cord during the three disease phases was investigated. To highlight the time point of the disease at which the activation/proliferation/accumulation of T cells, B cells and monocytes starts, the immune cell distribution in lymph nodes, spleen and blood was also assessed. Furthermore, the levels of several cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-23, TNFα, IFNγ) in the three disease phases were determined, to gain insight into the inflammatory processes of the disease. In conclusion, the data provide an overview of the functional profile of immune cells during EAE pathology. PMID:27214391

  8. Deregulated expression of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) is linked to poor outcome in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Wells, Julia E; Howlett, Meegan; Cole, Catherine H; Kees, Ursula R

    2015-08-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) has long been associated with human cancers. The role it plays in these neoplasms is diverse and tumour specific. Recurring patterns in clinical outcome, histological desmoplasia and mechanisms of action have been found. When CTGF is overexpressed compared to low-expressing normal tissue or is underexpressed compared to high-expressing normal tissue, the functional outcome favours tumour survival and disease progression. CTGF acts by altering proliferation, drug resistance, angiogenesis, adhesion and migration contributing to metastasis. The pattern of CTGF expression and tumour response helps to clarify the role of this matricellular protein across a multitude of human cancers. PMID:24832082

  9. Modulating human connective tissue progenitor cell behavior on cellulose acetate scaffolds by surface microtextures

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eun Jung; Boehm, Cynthia A.; Fleischman, Aaron J.; Muschler, George F.; Kostov, Yordan V.; Roy, Shuvo

    2014-01-01

    Soft lithography techniques are used to fabricate cellulose acetate (CA) scaffolds with surface microtextures to observe growth characteristics of the progeny of human marrow-derived connective tissue progenitor cells (CTPs). Human CTPs were collected and cultured on CA scaffolds comprised postmicrotextures and smooth surfaces for up to 30 days. Cells on the smooth surfaces migrated without any preferred orientation for up to 30 days. On microtextures, cells tended to direct their processes toward posts and other cells on day 9. By day 30, cells on microtextures covered the surface with extracellular matrix. DNA quantification revealed approximately threefold more cells on microtextures than on the smooth surfaces. The alkaline phosphatase (AP) mRNA expression was slightly higher on smooth surfaces on day 9. However, by day 30, AP mRNA showed higher expression on microtextures. The mRNA expression of collagen type I was increased on microtextures by day 30, whereas smooth surfaces demonstrated similar expression. The osteocalcin mRNA expression was increased on postmicrotextures relative to smooth surfaces by day 30. PMID:18680188

  10. Connective tissue growth factor as a novel therapeutic target in high grade serous ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Moran-Jones, Kim; Gloss, Brian S; Murali, Rajmohan; Chang, David K; Colvin, Emily K; Jones, Marc D; Yuen, Samuel; Howell, Viive M; Brown, Laura M; Wong, Carol W; Spong, Suzanne M; Scarlett, Christopher J; Hacker, Neville F; Ghosh, Sue; Mok, Samuel C; Birrer, Michael J; Samimi, Goli

    2015-12-29

    Ovarian cancer is the most common cause of death among women with gynecologic cancer. We examined molecular profiles of fibroblasts from normal ovary and high-grade serous ovarian tumors to identify novel therapeutic targets involved in tumor progression. We identified 2,300 genes that are significantly differentially expressed in tumor-associated fibroblasts. Fibroblast expression of one of these genes, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. CTGF protein expression in ovarian tumor fibroblasts significantly correlated with gene expression levels. CTGF is a secreted component of the tumor microenvironment and is being pursued as a therapeutic target in pancreatic cancer. We examined its effect in in vitro and ex vivo ovarian cancer models, and examined associations between CTGF expression and clinico-pathologic characteristics in patients. CTGF promotes migration and peritoneal adhesion of ovarian cancer cells. These effects are abrogated by FG-3019, a human monoclonal antibody against CTGF, currently under clinical investigation as a therapeutic agent. Immunohistochemical analyses of high-grade serous ovarian tumors reveal that the highest level of tumor stromal CTGF expression was correlated with the poorest prognosis. Our findings identify CTGF as a promoter of peritoneal adhesion, likely to mediate metastasis, and a potential therapeutic target in high-grade serous ovarian cancer. These results warrant further studies into the therapeutic efficacy of FG-3019 in high-grade serous ovarian cancer. PMID:26575166

  11. Connective tissue growth factor as a novel therapeutic target in high grade serous ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Moran-Jones, Kim; Gloss, Brian S.; Murali, Rajmohan; Chang, David K.; Colvin, Emily K.; Jones, Marc D.; Yuen, Samuel; Howell, Viive M.; Brown, Laura M.; Wong, Carol W.; Spong, Suzanne M.; Scarlett, Christopher J.; Hacker, Neville F.; Ghosh, Sue; Mok, Samuel C.; Birrer, Michael J.; Samimi, Goli

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most common cause of death among women with gynecologic cancer. We examined molecular profiles of fibroblasts from normal ovary and high-grade serous ovarian tumors to identify novel therapeutic targets involved in tumor progression. We identified 2,300 genes that are significantly differentially expressed in tumor-associated fibroblasts. Fibroblast expression of one of these genes, connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), was confirmed by immunohistochemistry. CTGF protein expression in ovarian tumor fibroblasts significantly correlated with gene expression levels. CTGF is a secreted component of the tumor microenvironment and is being pursued as a therapeutic target in pancreatic cancer. We examined its effect in in vitro and ex vivo ovarian cancer models, and examined associations between CTGF expression and clinico-pathologic characteristics in patients. CTGF promotes migration and peritoneal adhesion of ovarian cancer cells. These effects are abrogated by FG-3019, a human monoclonal antibody against CTGF, currently under clinical investigation as a therapeutic agent. Immunohistochemical analyses of high-grade serous ovarian tumors reveal that the highest level of tumor stromal CTGF expression was correlated with the poorest prognosis. Our findings identify CTGF as a promoter of peritoneal adhesion, likely to mediate metastasis, and a potential therapeutic target in high-grade serous ovarian cancer. These results warrant further studies into the therapeutic efficacy of FG-3019 in high-grade serous ovarian cancer. PMID:26575166

  12. NADPH oxidase 4 contributes to connective tissue growth factor expression through Smad3-dependent signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin-Hua; Zhang, Qiu-Yan; Pan, Li-Long; Liu, Si-Yu; Xu, Peng; Luo, Xiao-Ling; Zou, Si-Li; Xin, Hong; Qu, Le-Feng; Zhu, Yi-Zhun

    2016-05-01

    Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β)/Smad signaling has been implicated in connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) expression in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are involved in activation of TGF-β/Smad signaling. However, detailed mechanisms underlying the process remain unclear. In present study, we demonstrated TGF-β1 strongly induced CTGF expression, Smad3 activation, NADPH oxidase 4 (Nox4) expression and increased ROS production in primary rat VSMC in vitro. NADPH oxidases inhibitor diphenylene iodonium (DPI) eliminated TGF-β1-induced CTGF expression and ROS generation. In addition, small-interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing of Smad3 or Nox4 significantly suppressed TGF-β1-mediated CTGF expression in VSMC. Furthermore, Nox4 silencing or inhibition eliminated TGF-β1-induced Smad3 activation and interaction between Nox4 and Smad3. In vivo studies further identified a positive correlation of Nox4 levels with Smad3 activation and CTGF expression in atherosclerotic arteries of patients and animal models. These data established that a novel mechanistic link of Nox4-dependent activation of Smad3 to increased TGF-β1-induced CTGF in the process of vascular remodeling, which suggested a new potential pathway for therapeutic interventions. PMID:26945889

  13. Differential regulation of connective tissue growth factor in renal cells by histone deacetylase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Komorowsky, Claudiu; Ocker, Matthias; Goppelt-Struebe, Margarete

    2009-08-01

    Regulation of the profibrotic and angiogenesis modulating cytokine connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) occurs primarily at the transcriptional level. Therefore, we hypothesized that histone deacetylating enzymes (HDAC), which modulate the accessibility of transcriptionally active promoter regions, might play a role in the regulation of CTGF gene expression. We analyzed microvascular endothelial cells, which showed immunoreactivity for acetylated histone in kidney sections, and compared them with renal tubular epithelial cells. Treatment of cultured endothelial cells with different HDAC inhibitors up-regulated CTGF mRNA and protein. Pre-treatment with HDAC inhibitors facilitated induction of CTGF by transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) or lysophosphatidic acid. Transcription factors of the FoxO family were involved in the up-regulation of CTGF as shown at protein level and by reporter gene analyses. In tubular epithelial cells, up-regulation of CTGF was only observed when these cells were cultured as subconfluent cells. Dense cells, which are more likely to resemble tubular cells in vivo, showed no up-regulation upon treatment with HDAC inhibitors and were protected against CTGF induction by TGF-beta. Taken together, our data indicate that the effect of HDAC inhibitors on CTGF expression is largely cell dependent in non-tumour cells. Different cell type-specific transcription factors seem to determine whether CTGF expression is reduced or increased in cells exposed to HDAC inhibitors. PMID:20141616

  14. Natural history of alcoholic hepatitis. IV. Glycosaminoglycuronans and collagen in the hepatic connective tissue.

    PubMed

    Galambos, J T; Shapira, R

    1973-11-01

    The extractable and nonextractable collagen and glycosaminoglycuronans (GAG) were estimated and characterized in 32 dried, defatted human livers obtained at necropsy. 10 had normal livers. 22 of the 32 livers were from patients who drank in excess: 5 had fatty livers, 7 had alcholic hepatitis, and 10 had cirrhosis. Livers with alcoholic hepatitis or cirrhosis had significantly increased total and 1 N NaCl-extractable collagen. Only alcoholic hepatitis livers had significantly increased Tris-buffer-extractable GAG, but the amino acid composition of these GAG (proteoglycans) was no different from that of normal livers. The major fraction of these GAG had isoelectric pH (pI) connective tissue of these cirrhotic livers. PMID:4270646

  15. Autoantibody testing for connective tissue diseases. Comparison of immunodiffusion, immunoblot, and enzyme immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Bridges, A J; Lorden, T E; Havighurst, T C

    1997-10-01

    We evaluated 500 consecutive patient serum samples for the presence of six autoantibodies by three antibody detection methods: immunodiffusion, immunoblot, and enzyme immunoassay. Clinical data were reviewed for each patient with positive antibody test results. Serum samples from 60 patients revealed antibodies to Sm, ribonucleoprotein (RNP), SSA/Ro, SSB/La, Scl-70, or Jo-1. There were 7 false-positive test results (1%). All three methods detected autoantibodies in 36 (68%) of 53 patients with connective tissue disease. Immunoblot was the most sensitive method to detect autoantibodies (92%). Enzyme immunoassay and immunodiffusion were less sensitive (81% and 74%, respectively). Antiribonucleoprotein and anti-SSB/La antibodies were more often detected by immunoblotting, whereas anti-SSA/Ro antibodies were more often detected by enzyme immunoassay. Newer antibody detection methods (immunoblot and enzyme immunoassay) are less time consuming than immunodiffusion and show good interassay sensitivity without loss of specificity. A combination of immunoblot and enzyme immunoassay yielded excellent assay sensitivity (100%) and specificity (99%) for detection of autoantibodies. PMID:9322593

  16. IgA autoreactivity: a feature common to inflammatory bowel and connective tissue diseases

    PubMed Central

    KAZEMI-SHIRAZI, L; GASCHE, C H; NATTER, S; GANGL, A; SMOLEN, J; SPITZAUER, S; VALENT, P; KRAFT, D; VALENTA, R

    2002-01-01

    The immunopathogenic mechanisms in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are not yet fully established. The aim of this study was to determine the profile and magnitude of IgA and IgG autoantibodies in IBD patients. The autoantigen profile defined by IgA and IgG antibodies from 24 IBD (14 Crohn’s disease [CD], 10 ulcerative colitis [UC]), three coeliac, 12 connective tissue disease (CTD) patients and 10 healthy individuals was studied in human cellular extracts by Western blotting. The magnitude of the IgA and IgG1-4 subclass responses was measured by ELISA. IBD patients could not be distinguished from healthy individuals on the basis of IgG autoantibodies to Western blotted proteins. IgG subclass analysis indicated no clear bias towards Th1 or Th2 immune responses in IBD or CTD. In accordance with previous work, we found that IgA autoreactivity was strongest in coeliac disease patients. Unexpectedly, IBD as well as CTD patients exhibited strong IgA autoantibody reactivities to components of similar molecular weights (16–80 kD) in intestinal and non-intestinal epithelial cell lines. Our data indicate immunopathogenic similarities between IBD and CTD. PMID:11982597

  17. IgA autoreactivity: a feature common to inflammatory bowel and connective tissue diseases.

    PubMed

    Kazemi-Shirazi, L; Gasche, C H; Natter, S; Gangl, A; Smolen, J; Spitzauer, S; Valent, P; Kraft, D; Valenta, R

    2002-04-01

    The immunopathogenic mechanisms in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) are not yet fully established. The aim of this study was to determine the profile and magnitude of IgA and IgG autoantibodies in IBD patients. The autoantigen profile defined by IgA and IgG antibodies from 24 IBD (14 Crohn's disease CD], 10 ulcerative colitis UC]), three coeliac, 12 connective tissue disease (CTD) patients and 10 healthy individuals was studied in human cellular extracts by Western blotting. The magnitude of the IgA and IgG1-4 subclass responses was measured by ELISA. IBD patients could not be distinguished from healthy individuals on the basis of IgG autoantibodies to Western blotted proteins. IgG subclass analysis indicated no clear bias towards Th1 or Th2 immune responses in IBD or CTD. In accordance with previous work, we found that IgA autoreactivity was strongest in coeliac disease patients. Unexpectedly, IBD as well as CTD patients exhibited strong IgA autoantibody reactivities to components of similar molecular weights (16-80 kD) in intestinal and non-intestinal epithelial cell lines. Our data indicate immunopathogenic similarities between IBD and CTD. PMID:11982597

  18. The Effect of Displacement on the Mechanical Properties of Human Cadaver Subsynovial Connective Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Vanhees, Matthias; Morizaki, Yutaka; Thoreson, Andrew R.; Larson, Dirk; Zhao, Chunfeng; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C.

    2012-01-01

    The subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) in the carpal tunnel may participate in the origin of carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), yet material properties of the SSCT have not been well-characterized. We investigated the response of the SSCT to repeated ramp stretch tests. Eight human cadaver wrists were used. The physiological excursion of the flexor digitorum superficialis of the third digit (FDS 3) was measured, starting from a neutral position to maximal flexion of the metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joints. The FDS 3 tendon was pulled to 40, 60, 90, and 120% of the physiological excursion. Two ‘ramp stretch’ cycles were performed at every excursion level, except for 120% of excursion, where 3 cycles were performed. The ratio of energy absorbed between the second (E2) and first (E1) ramp-stretch was 0.94 (Std. Dev. = 0.07) for 60%, 0.84 (Std. Dev. = 0.11) for 90%, and 0.68 (Std. Dev. = 0.11) for 120% of the physiological excursion. A significant decrease occurred in energy absorbed after the first ramp-stretch cycle at 90% and 120% of the physiological excursion, which was not seen at 60%. Our data are consistent with a stepwise damage occurring in the SSCT. Furthermore, the damage seems to initiate within the physiological range of tendon excursion. This finding may be important in understanding the pathophysiology of conditions that are associated with SSCT pathology, such as carpal tunnel syndrome. PMID:22573580

  19. Molecular mechanisms for uremic toxin-induced oxidative tissue damage via a cardiovascular-renal connection.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD), marked by a progressive loss in renal function, is a leading cause of hemodialysis initiation and cardiovascular disease (CVD). There are currently 13.3 million patients with CKD and 300 thousand patients are currently undergoing hemodialysis in Japan. Therefore, preventing the initiation of dialysis and reducing the risk of cardiovascular death are high-priority issues from the viewpoint of public health and economic implications. Understanding the molecular mechanism responsible for the progression of CKD and cardiovascular damage regarding crosstalk between the kidney and cardiovascular system is an important issue in controlling the pathogenesis of CKD-CVD. However, the mechanisms involved in CKD-CVD are not well understood. This hinders the development of new treatment strategies. We have been investigating the role of protein bound uremic toxins, that are difficult to remove by hemodialysis, on the onset and progression of CKD and CVD. The relationship between their redox properties and the pathogenesis of CKD-CVD was examined. In this review, we focus on two sulfate conjugated uremic toxins, namely, indoxyl sulfate (IS) and p-cresyl sulfate (PCS), and summarize recent studies that provide new insights on the molecular mechanisms responsible for uremic toxin-induced oxidative tissue damage via a cardiovascular-renal connection. PMID:23903229

  20. Paraquat increases connective tissue growth factor expression and impairs lung fibroblast proliferation and viscoelasticity.

    PubMed

    Zhang, N; Xie, Y-P; Pang, L; Zang, X-X; Wang, J; Shi, D; Wu, Y; Liu, X-L; Wang, G-H

    2014-12-01

    This in vitro study was designed to investigate the molecular mechanisms of paraquat-induced damage using cultured human fetal lung fibroblasts (MRC-5 cells), in order to promote the development of improved therapies for paraquat poisoning. Paraquat's effects on proliferation were examined by flow cytometry, on viscoelasticity by the micropipette aspiration technique, and on connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Paraquat was found to significantly reduce the proliferation index of MRC-5 cells in a concentration-dependent manner (p < 0.05) and to significantly impair the viscoelastic properties in a time-independent manner (p < 0.05). Exposure to paraquat led to a significant and time-dependent increase in CTGF expression (p < 0.05) and induced changes in the morphology and biomechanical characteristics of the MRC-5 cells. These findings not only provide novel insights into the mechanisms of paraquat-induced lung fibrosis but may represent useful targets of improved molecular-based therapies for paraquat poisoning. PMID:24556028

  1. Connective Tissue Growth Factor Is Required for Normal Follicle Development and Ovulation

    PubMed Central

    Nagashima, Takashi; Kim, Jaeyeon; Li, Qinglei; Lydon, John P.; DeMayo, Francesco J.; Lyons, Karen M.

    2011-01-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a cysteine-rich protein the synthesis and secretion of which are hypothesized to be selectively regulated by activins and other members of the TGF-β superfamily. To investigate the in vivo roles of CTGF in female reproduction, we generated Ctgf ovarian and uterine conditional knockout (cKO) mice. Ctgf cKO mice exhibit severe subfertility and multiple reproductive defects including disrupted follicle development, decreased ovulation rates, increased numbers of corpus luteum, and smaller but functionally normal uterine horns. Steroidogenesis is disrupted in the Ctgf cKO mice, leading to increased levels of serum progesterone. We show that disrupted follicle development is accompanied by a significant increase in granulosa cell apoptosis. Moreover, despite normal cumulus expansion, Ctgf cKO mice exhibit a significant decrease in oocytes ovulated, likely due to impaired ovulatory process. During analyses of mRNA expression, we discovered that Ctgf cKO granulosa cells show gene expression changes similar to our previously reported granulosa cell-specific knockouts of activin and Smad4, the common TGF-β family intracellular signaling protein. We also discovered a significant down-regulation of Adamts1, a progesterone-regulated gene that is critical for the remodeling of extracellular matrix surrounding granulosa cells of preovulatory follicles. These findings demonstrate that CTGF is a downstream mediator in TGF-β and progesterone signaling cascades and is necessary for normal follicle development and ovulation. PMID:21868453

  2. Direct determination of fatty acids in fish tissues: quantifying top predator trophic connections.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Christopher C; Nichols, Peter D; Pethybridge, Heidi; Young, Jock W

    2015-01-01

    Fatty acids are a valuable tool in ecological studies because of the large number of unique structures synthesized. They provide versatile signatures that are being increasingly employed to delineate the transfer of dietary material through marine and terrestrial food webs. The standard procedure for determining fatty acids generally involves lipid extraction followed by methanolysis to produce methyl esters for analysis by gas chromatography. By directly transmethylating ~50 mg wet samples and adding an internal standard it was possible to greatly simplify the analytical methodology to enable rapid throughput of 20-40 fish tissue fatty acid analyses a day including instrumental analysis. This method was verified against the more traditional lipid methods using albacore tuna and great white shark muscle and liver samples, and it was shown to provide an estimate of sample dry mass, total lipid content, and a condition index. When large fatty acid data sets are generated in this way, multidimensional scaling, analysis of similarities, and similarity of percentages analysis can be used to define trophic connections among samples and to quantify them. These routines were used on albacore and skipjack tuna fatty acid data obtained by direct methylation coupled with literature values for krill. There were clear differences in fatty acid profiles among the species as well as spatial differences among albacore tuna sampled from different locations. PMID:25376156

  3. NBAS mutations cause a multisystem disorder involving bone, connective tissue, liver, immune system, and retina.

    PubMed

    Segarra, Nuria Garcia; Ballhausen, Diana; Crawford, Heather; Perreau, Matthieu; Campos-Xavier, Belinda; van Spaendonck-Zwarts, Karin; Vermeer, Cees; Russo, Michel; Zambelli, Pierre-Yves; Stevenson, Brian; Royer-Bertrand, Beryl; Rivolta, Carlo; Candotti, Fabio; Unger, Sheila; Munier, Francis L; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Bonafé, Luisa

    2015-12-01

    We report two unrelated patients with a multisystem disease involving liver, eye, immune system, connective tissue, and bone, caused by biallelic mutations in the neuroblastoma amplified sequence (NBAS) gene. Both presented as infants with recurrent episodes triggered by fever with vomiting, dehydration, and elevated transaminases. They had frequent infections, hypogammaglobulinemia, reduced natural killer cells, and the Pelger-Huët anomaly of their granulocytes. Their facial features were similar with a pointed chin and proptosis; loose skin and reduced subcutaneous fat gave them a progeroid appearance. Skeletal features included short stature, slender bones, epiphyseal dysplasia with multiple phalangeal pseudo-epiphyses, and small C1-C2 vertebrae causing cervical instability and myelopathy. Retinal dystrophy and optic atrophy were present in one patient. NBAS is a component of the synthaxin-18 complex and is involved in nonsense-mediated mRNA decay control. Putative loss-of-function mutations in NBAS are already known to cause disease in humans. A specific founder mutation has been associated with short stature, optic nerve atrophy and Pelger-Huët anomaly of granulocytes (SOPH) in the Siberian Yakut population. A more recent report associates NBAS mutations with recurrent acute liver failure in infancy in a group of patients of European descent. Our observations indicate that the phenotypic spectrum of NBAS deficiency is wider than previously known and includes skeletal, hepatic, metabolic, and immunologic aspects. Early recognition of the skeletal phenotype is important for preventive management of cervical instability. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26286438

  4. [The connective tissues, from the origin of the concept to its "Maturation" to extracellular matrix. Application to ocular tissues. Contribution to the history of medical sciences].

    PubMed

    Labat-Robert, J; Robert, L; Pouliquen, Y

    2011-06-01

    The "Tissue" concept emerged apparently in the medical literature at about the French revolution, during the second half of the 18(th) century. It was found in the texts written by the physicians of Béarn and Montpellier, the Bordeu-s and also by the famous physician, Felix Vicq d'Azyr, the last attending physician of the queen Marie-Antoinette, "Bordeu et al. (1775) et Pouliquen (2009)". It was elaborated into a coherent doctrine somewhat later by Xavier Bichat, considered as the founder of modern pathological anatomy, Bichat. With the advent of histochemistry, from the beginning of the 20(th) century, several of the principal macromolecular components of connective tissues, collagens, elastin, "acid mucopolysaccharides" (later glycosaminoglycans and proteoglycans) and finally structural glycoproteins were characterized. These constituents of connective tissues were then designated as components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), closely associated to the cellular components of these tissues by adhesive (structural) glycoproteins as fibronectin, several others and cell receptors, "recognising" ECM-components as integrins, the elastin-receptor and others. This molecular arrangement fastens cells to the ECM-components they synthesize and mediates the exchange of informations between the cells to the ECM (inside-out) and also from the ECM-components to the cells (outside-in). This macromolecular arrangement is specific for each tissue as a result of the differentiation of their cellular components. It is also the basis and condition of the fulfillment of the specific functions of differentiated tissues. This is a short description of the passage of the "tissue" concept from its vague origin towards its precise identification at the cellular and molecular level up to the recognition of its functional importance and its establishment as an autonomous science. This can be considered as a new example of the importance of metaphors for the progress of science, Keller (1995). PMID:21620590

  5. Toxicology of Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hultman, Per; Kono, Dwight H.

    2010-01-01

    Susceptibility to most autoimmune diseases is dependent on polygenic inheritance, environmental factors, and poorly defined stochastic events. One of the significant challenges facing autoimmune disease research is in identifying the specific events that trigger loss of tolerance and autoimmunity. Although many intrinsic factors, including age, sex, and genetics, contribute to autoimmunity, extrinsic factors such as drugs, chemicals, microbes, or other environmental factors can also act as important initiators. This review explores how certain extrinsic factors, namely drugs and chemicals, can promote the development of autoimmunity, focusing on a few better characterized agents that, in most instances, have been shown to produce autoimmune manifestations in human populations. Mechanisms of autoimmune disease induction are discussed in terms of research obtained using specific animal models. Although a number of different pathways have been delineated for drug/chemical-induced autoimmunity some similarities do exist and a working model is proposed. PMID:20078109

  6. Perspectives on autoimmunity

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, I.R.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book are: HLA and Autoimmunity; Self-Recognition and Symmetry in the Immune System; Immunology of Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus; Multiple Sclerosis; Autoimmunity and Immune Pathological Aspects of Virus Disease; Analyses of the Idiotypes and Ligand Binding Characteristics of Human Monoclonal Autoantibodies to DNA: Do We Understand Better Systemic Lupus Erythematosus. Autoimmunity and Rheumatic Fever; Autoimmune Arthritis Induced by Immunization to Mycobacterial Antigens; and The Interaction Between Genetic Factors and Micro-Organisms in Ankylosing Spondylitis: Facts and Fiction.

  7. Thyroid autoimmunity as a window to autoimmunity: An explanation for sex differences in the prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Merrill, Stephen J; Mu, Ying

    2015-06-21

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs), predominately Graves׳ disease and Hashimoto׳s thyroiditis, comprise the most common autoimmune diseases in humans. Both have the production of anti-thyroid antibody as an important aspect and both are much more prevalent in females, being at least 10 times more common than in males. Using these two clues, a hypothesis for the initiation of thyroid autoimmunity is proposed that helps to make the case that the thyroid is one of the most sensitive sites for autoimmunity and helps account for the prevalence and the observed sex differences in AITDs and associated diseases, such as type 1 diabetes and Latent Autoimmune Diabetes in Adults (LADA). The primary mechanisms proposed involve the underlying state of inflammation as a result of the adipokines, especially leptin, TNF-α, and IL-6, and the receptors able to recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMP׳s) and damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMP׳s) through Toll-like receptors (TLR) and others receptors present on thyrocytes. The adipokines are produced by adipose tissue, but have hormone-like and immune modulating properties. As the levels of leptin are significantly higher in females, an explanation for the sex difference in thyroid autoimmunity emerges. The ability of the thyrocytes to participate in innate immunity through the TLR provides an adjuvant-like signal and allows for the action of other agents, such as environmental factors, viruses, bacteria, and even stress to provide the initiation step to break tolerance to thyroid self-antigens. Seeing the thyroid as one of the most sensitive sites for autoimmunity, means that for many autoimmune disorders, if autoimmunity is present, it is likely to also be present in the thyroid - and that that condition in the thyroid was probably earlier. The evidence is seen in multiple autoimmune syndrome. PMID:25576242

  8. Relationship of CD146 expression to activation of circulating T cells: exploratory studies in healthy donors and patients with connective tissue diseases

    PubMed Central

    Hadjinicolaou, A V; Wu, L; Fang, B; Watson, P A; Hall, F C; Busch, R

    2013-01-01

    The endothelial cell adhesion molecule, CD146, is expressed on ≍ 2% of normal circulating T cells, correlating with T cell activation, endothelial interactions and T helper type 17 (Th17) effector functions. In this study, we have characterized CD146 expression in circulating T cells from healthy controls and patients with stable, well-controlled autoimmune connective tissue diseases (CTDs). In vitro, anti-CD3/anti-CD28 stimulation induced CD146 expression in both CD4 and CD8 T cells. In healthy controls and CTD patients, CD146 was associated with expression of recent and chronic activation markers (CD25+, OX-40+, CD69+, CD27–) and was confined to CD45RO+/RA–/CD28+ populations within the CD4 subset. Except for CD69, these markers were not associated with CD146 in the CD8 subset. Surprisingly, most CTD patients exhibited no T cell hyperactivation ex vivo. In five of five patients with secondary Sjögren's syndrome circulating T cells appeared activated despite therapy, and CD146 up-regulation, associated with activation markers, was observed both on CD4 and CD8 T cells. There was no association between CD146 and putative pro-atherogenic T cell subsets. In conclusion, the relationship of CD146 expression to T cell activation differs between T cell subsets in healthy subjects and correlates with systemic hyperactivity, where present, in patients with CTDs, as exemplified by the patients with secondary Sjögren's syndrome in this study. PMID:23738744

  9. Presence of Antiphospholipid Antibodies as a Risk Factor for Thrombotic Events in Patients with Connective Tissue Diseases and Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura.

    PubMed

    Habe, Koji; Wada, Hideo; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Ohishi, Kohshi; Ikejiri, Makoto; Matsubara, Kimiko; Morioka, Tatsuhiko; Kamimoto, Yuki; Ikeda, Tomoaki; Katayama, Naoyuki; Mizutani, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Objective Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a well-known complication of habitual abortion and/or thrombosis and is frequently associated with autoimmune diseases. Methods We retrospectively investigated the relationships between the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs) and the incidence of thrombotic events (THEs) in 147 patients with various connective tissue diseases (CTD) suspected of having APS and 86 patients with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP). THEs were observed in 41 patients, including 14 cases of venous thrombosis, 21 cases of arterial thrombosis and eight cases of complications of pregnancy. Results The prevalence of THE was significantly high in the systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients compared with the other CTD patients and ITP patients. The frequency of lupus anticoagulant (LA), anticardiolipin antibodies (aCL)-β2-glycoprotein (GPI) complex IgG and aPL was significantly high in the SLE patients compared with the ITP patients. Subsequently, the rate of development of THE was significantly high in the patients with aPLs. In particular, the incidence of THE was significantly high in the SLE or ITP patients with LA, aCL-β2GPI IgG or aPL. The optimal cut-off values for LA, aCL IgG and aCL-β2GPI complex IgG for the risk of THEs were higher in the SLE patients in comparison to the values obtained when using the kit provided by the manufacturer. Conclusion Although aPLs is frequently associated with SLE and is a causative factor for thrombosis, the optimal cut-off value for aPL for predicting the occurrence of THEs varies among different underlying diseases. PMID:26984073

  10. Role of connective tissue growth factor in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Wahab, N A; Yevdokimova, N; Weston, B S; Roberts, T; Li, X J; Brinkman, H; Mason, R M

    2001-01-01

    We characterized a rabbit polyclonal antibody raised against human recombinant connective tissue growth factor (CTGF). The antibody recognised a higher molecular mass form (approx. 56 kDa) of CTGF in mesangial cell lysates as well as the monomeric (36-38 kDa) and lower molecular mass forms (<30 kDa) reported previously. Immunohistochemistry detected CTGF protein in glomeruli of kidneys of non-obese diabetic mice 14 days after the onset of diabetes, and this was prominent by 70 days. CTGF protein is also present in glomeruli of human patients with diabetic nephropathy. No CTGF was detected in either normal murine or human glomeruli. Transient transfection of a transformed human mesangial cell line with a CTGF-V5 epitope fusion protein markedly increased fibronectin and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 synthesis in cultures maintained in normal glucose (4 mM) conditions; a CTGF-antisense construct reduced the elevated synthesis of these proteins in high glucose (30 mM) cultures. Culture of primary human mesangial cells for 14 days in high glucose, or in low glucose supplemented with recombinant CTGF or transforming growth factor beta1, markedly increased CTGF mRNA levels and fibronectin synthesis. However, whilst co-culture with a CTGF-antisense oligonucleotide reduced the CTGF mRNA pool by greater than 90% in high glucose, it only partially reduced fibronectin mRNA levels and synthesis. A chick anti-CTGF neutralizing antibody had a similar effect on fibronectin synthesis. Thus both CTGF and CTGF-independent pathways mediate increased fibronectin synthesis in high glucose. Nevertheless CTGF expression in diabetic kidneys is likely to be a key event in the development of glomerulosclerosis by affecting both matrix synthesis and, potentially through plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, its turnover. PMID:11563971

  11. Asthma and airways collapse in two heritable disorders of connective tissue

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, A W; Pearson, S B; Davies, S; Gooi, H C; Bird, H A

    2007-01-01

    Objectives This study investigated the clinical impression that there was an increased prevalence of respiratory disorders in both the Hypermobility Syndrome (HMS)/Benign Joint Hypermobility Syndrome (BJHS) and Ehlers–Danlos Syndrome (EDS), compared with the normal population. Methods A questionnaire was distributed to 509 subjects (221 healthy controls, 126 HMS, 162 EDS) who documented respiratory symptoms and previously diagnosed respiratory and atopic disorders. A subgroup of 157 responders underwent full clinical and serological assessments, and 57 subjects were assessed physiologically. Results A significant increase in the frequency of a wide range of respiratory symptoms and reduced exercise tolerance was observed in subjects with both HMS and EDS compared with controls. In particular, there was an increased prevalence of asthmatic symptoms (HMS: OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.4–4.1, p = 0.002; EDS: OR 3.1, 95% CI 1.8–5.2, p<0.001) and atopy (HMS: OR 2.7, 95% CI 1.6–4.5, p<0.001; EDS: OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.6–4.4, p<0.001), which was subsequently confirmed by clinical assessment. Pulmonary physiological studies revealed increased lung volumes, impaired gas exchange and an increased tendency of both the lower and upper airways to collapse. Conclusions We have demonstrated, for the first time, that individuals with HMS/BJHS and EDS have respiratory symptoms in association with various pulmonary physiological abnormalities. The increased prevalence of asthma may be due to linkage disequilibrium between the genes causing these conditions or a function of the connective tissue defect itself. In the non‐asthmatic population, changes in the mechanical properties of the bronchial airways and lung parenchyma may underlie the observed increased tendency of the airways to collapse. PMID:17412739

  12. A patient with ascending aortic dilatation, similar to phenotypes of connective tissue disorders.

    PubMed

    Onrat, S T; Emmiler, M; Sivaci, Y; Sylemez, Z; Ozgz, A; Imirzalio?lu, N

    2009-01-01

    We report on the clinical and molecular findings of a patient who presented alopecia, epicanthus, micrognathia, retrognathia, high arched palate, hypertelorism, Chiari type I malformation, mixed-type hearing loss but with normal heartbeat Q-T interval, malformed earlobes, down-slanted palpebral fissures, downturned corners of the mouth, syndactyly, atopic eczema, and seizures. The patient was a male adult, 23 years old, with short stature (153 cm) and low weight (50.5 kg), due to severe aortic insufficiency and dilatation of the ascending aorta. Conventional cytogenetic screening did not show any chromosomal gains or losses. Molecular genetic screening was conducted for gene mutations involved in various syndromes; the mutations found included [beta-fibrinogen -455 G>A wt/wt (wt/mut), PAI-1 4G/5G (4G/4G), HPA1 a/b (a/a), MTHFR C677T wt/wt (wt/mut), ACE I/D (I/I), and Apo E E3/E4]. Many clinical and molecular genetics findings overlapped with other conditions associated with arterial tortuosity and arterial aneurysms, including the Marfan, Ehler-Danlos, Shprintzen-Goldberg, and Loeys-Dietz syndromes. Although a diagnosis of Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome was based on clinical findings and radiographic findings indicate other syndromes, aortic root dilatation seems to be a new symptom, similar to phenotypes of connective tissue disorders. The unique grouping of clinical manifestations in this patient and the molecular genetics findings lead us to suggest that this case could be an example of a previously unrecognized syndrome. PMID:19551629

  13. Prospective cohort study of breast implants and the risk of connective-tissue diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, I-Min; Cook, Nancy R; Shadick, Nancy A; Pereira, Eduardo; Buring, Julie E

    2011-01-01

    Background A 2000 meta-analysis indicated no overall association between breast implants and risk of connective-tissue diseases (CTDs). However, a large retrospective cohort study we previously conducted suggested, instead, a small increased risk of CTDs. Because of limitations inherent to the retrospective cohort study design, we sought clarification by conducting a prospective cohort study of the association of breast implants with CTD risk. Methods Participants were 23 847 US women (mean age 56.6 years), 3950 of whom had breast implants and 19 897 did not. Women reported their breast implant status at baseline in 2001 and were followed for a median of 3.63 years. During follow-up, women reported incident CTD, confirmed using a CTD screening questionnaire (CSQ) and medical records. Results In multivariate analyses, the rate ratios for self-reported CTD (113 vs 377 cases in the implanted and non-implanted group, respectively) were 1.60 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.28–2.00], for CSQ-confirmed CTD (77 vs 226 cases), 1.80 (1.37–2.38) and for medical record confirmed CTD (21 vs 74 cases), 1.39 (0.82–2.35). Conclusions Although this prospective cohort study represented a stronger design than the retrospective cohort study, the present data should still be viewed cautiously because of remaining methodological limitations, including the potential for differential self-reporting of CTD and CTD symptoms among women with and without breast implants, the difficulty of obtaining medical records for women reporting CTD and the low and possibly differential confirmation of self-reported disease against medical records. A reasonable conclusion is the lack of a large increase in CTD risk (e.g. ≥2-fold) associated with breast implants. PMID:20943932

  14. Lung transplantation in patients with connective tissue disorders and esophageal dysmotility.

    PubMed

    Gasper, Warren J; Sweet, Matthew P; Golden, Jeffrey A; Hoopes, Charles; Leard, Lorriana E; Kleinhenz, Mary Ellen; Hays, Steven R; Patti, Marco G

    2008-01-01

    Lung and esophageal dysfunction are common in patients with connective tissue disease (CTD). Recent reports have suggested a link between pathologic gastroesophageal reflux and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) after lung transplant. Because patients with CTD have a high incidence of esophageal dysmotility and reflux, this group may be at increased risk of allograft dysfunction after lung transplantation. Little is known about antireflux surgery in these patients. Our aims were to describe: (i) the esophageal motility and reflux profile of patients with CTD referred for lung transplantation; and (ii) the safety and outcomes of laparoscopic fundoplication in this group. A retrospective review of 26 patients with CTD referred for lung transplantation between July 2003 and June 2007 at a single center. Esophageal studies included manometry and ambulatory 24-h pH monitoring. Twenty-three patients had esophageal manometry and ambulatory 24-h pH monitoring. Nineteen patients (83%) had pathologic distal reflux and 7 (30%) also had pathologic proximal reflux. Eighteen patients (78%) had impaired or absent peristalsis. Eleven of 26 patients underwent lung transplantation. Ten patients are alive at a median follow-up of 26 months (range 3-45) and one has bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome-1. Six patients had a laparoscopic fundoplication, 1 before transplantation and 5 after. All fundoplication patients are alive at median follow-up of 25 months (range 19-45). In conclusion, esophageal dysmotility and reflux are common in CTD patients referred for lung transplant. For this group, laparoscopic fundoplication is safe in experienced hands. PMID:18459990

  15. Mechanisms of bradykinin-induced expression of connective tissue growth factor and nephrin in podocytes.

    PubMed

    Msallem, J Abou; Chalhoub, H; Al-Hariri, M; Saad, L; Jaffa, M A; Ziyadeh, F N; Jaffa, A A

    2015-12-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is the main cause of morbidity and mortality in diabetes and is characterized by mesangial matrix deposition and podocytopathy, including podocyte loss. The risk factors and mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of DN are still not completely defined. In the present study, we aimed to understand the cellular mechanisms through which activation of B2 kinin receptors contribute to the initiation and progression of DN. Stimulation of cultured rat podocytes with bradykinin (BK) resulted in a significant increase in ROS generation, and this was associated with a significant increase in NADPH oxidase (NOX)1 and NOX4 protein and mRNA levels. BK stimulation also resulted in a signicant increase in the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Akt, and this effect was inhibited in the presence of NOX1 and Nox4 small interfering (si)RNA. Furthermore, podocytes stimulated with BK resulted in a significant increase in protein and mRNA levels of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and, at the same time, a significant decrease in protein and mRNA levels of nephrin. siRNA targeted against NOX1 and NOX4 significantly inhibited the BK-induced increase in CTGF. Nephrin expression was increased in response to BK in the presence of NOX1 and NOX4 siRNA, thus implicating a role for NOXs in modulating the BK response in podocytes. Moreover, nephrin expression in response to BK was also significantly increased in the presence of siRNA targeted against CTGF. These findings provide novel aspects of BK signal transduction pathways in pathogenesis of DN and identify novel targets for interventional strategies. PMID:26447218

  16. Changes in Testicular Interstitial Connective Tissue of Hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) During Ageing and After Exposure to Short Photoperiod.

    PubMed

    Beltrán-Frutos, E; Seco-Rovira, V; Ferrer, C; Martínez-Hernández, J; Madrid, J F; Sáez, F J; Canteras, M; Pastor, L M

    2016-02-01

    The testicular interstitium of Syrian hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) was studied during ageing and in testicular regression after exposure to a short photoperiod, in relation to the interstitial cells and their connective tissue. This tissue was assessed histochemically using Masson's trichrome technique and the expression of Heat Shock Protein 47 (HSP-47) and collagen IV (α5) was assessed in Leydig cells. Finally, an ultrastructural analysis of some cells of the testicular interstitium was made. Leydig cells were positive for HSP-47 and collagen IV (α5). Ageing did not change the parameters studied while the short photoperiod altered the synthetic activity of Leydig cells. The positivity index of these cells for HSP-47 was significantly higher in the regressed testis, but was lower for collagen IV (α5). During ageing no change were observed. Ultrastructural Leydig cells showed a discontinuous basal lamina that did not change during ageing. The basal lamina was not identified in Leydig cells regressed by exposure to a short photoperiod. In conclusion; the intertubular connective tissue suffers little change with age. By contrast, in the testis regressed after exposure to a short photoperiod the studied parameters related to the intertubular connective tissue were altered. These changes are probably related with the low synthetic activity of regressed Leydig cell. PMID:26602183

  17. Cyclic distension of fibrin-based tissue constructs: Evidence of adaptation during growth of engineered connective tissue

    PubMed Central

    Syedain, Zeeshan H.; Weinberg, Justin S.; Tranquillo, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    Tissue engineering provides a means to create functional living tissue replacements. Here, we examine the effects of 3 weeks of cyclic distension (CD) on fibrin-based tubular tissue constructs seeded with porcine valve interstitial cells. CD with circumferential strain amplitude ranging from 2.5% to 20% was applied to evaluate the effects of CD on fibrin remodeling into tissue. We hypothesized that during long-term CD cells adapt to cyclic strain of constant strain amplitude (constant CD), diminishing tissue growth. We thus also subjected constructs to CD with strain amplitude that was incremented from 5% to 15% over the 3 weeks of CD [incremental CD (ICD)]. For constant CD, improvement occurred in construct mechanical properties and composition, peaking at 15% strain: ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and tensile modulus increased 47% and 45%, respectively, over statically incubated controls (to 1.1 and 4.7 MPa, respectively); collagen density increased 29% compared with controls (to 27 mg/ml). ICD further improved outcomes. UTS increased 98% and modulus increased 62% compared with the largest values with constant CD, and collagen density increased 34%. Only in the case of ICD was the ratio of collagen content to cell number greater (70%) than controls, consistent with increased collagen deposition per cell. Studies with human dermal fibroblasts showed similar improvements, generalizing the findings, and revealed a 255% increase in extracellular signal-regulated kinase signaling for ICD vs. constant CD. These results suggest cell adaptation may limit conventional strategies of stretching with constant strain amplitude and that new approaches might optimize bioreactor operation. PMID:18436647

  18. Proteoglycan metabolism in the connective tissue of pregnant and non-pregnant human cervix. An in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Norman, M; Ekman, G; Ulmsten, U; Barchan, K; Malmström, A

    1991-04-15

    Profound changes occur in the cervix during pregnancy. In particular, the connective tissue is remodelled. To elucidate the mechanisms behind this process, the metabolism of cervical connective tissue was studied using tissue cultures. Cervical biopsies from non-pregnant and pregnant women were incubated with [35S]sulphate. The proteoglycans of the tissue specimens were purified by ion-exchange and gel chromatography and characterized by SDS/PAGE and by enzymic degradation. In the non-pregnant cervix, the incorporation of [35S]sulphate into the proteoglycans was linear for 48 h. During the first 6 h of incubation the accumulation of chiefly one small labelled proteoglycan (apparent Mr 110,000) substituted with dermatan sulphate was recorded. This is in accordance with the known proteoglycan composition of non-pregnant cervical tissue. In addition, small amounts of two larger radioactive dermatan/chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans (apparent Mr values 220,000 and greater than 500,000) were recorded. After longer periods of incubation the proportion of heparan sulphate proteoglycans increased considerably. The pregnant tissue showed a clearly different composition of labelled proteoglycans. An increased accumulation of the two larger dermatan/chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans was seen in addition to the dominant small dermatan sulphate proteoglycan of the non-pregnant cervix. The rate of accumulation of these two proteoglycans was about 3 times higher in the pregnant tissue, whereas that of the small dermatan sulphate proteoglycan was only increased 2-fold. The fact that the concentration of proteoglycans in the pregnant cervix is approximately one-half of that in the non-pregnant cervix indicates that the turnover of proteoglycans in pregnant cervical tissue is significantly increased. The major effect of this profound change of metabolism was a 50% decrease in proteoglycan content and a 2-fold increased proportion of a dermatan sulphate proteoglycan with an apparent Mr of 220,000. PMID:2025230

  19. Proteoglycan metabolism in the connective tissue of pregnant and non-pregnant human cervix. An in vitro study.

    PubMed Central

    Norman, M; Ekman, G; Ulmsten, U; Barchan, K; Malmström, A

    1991-01-01

    Profound changes occur in the cervix during pregnancy. In particular, the connective tissue is remodelled. To elucidate the mechanisms behind this process, the metabolism of cervical connective tissue was studied using tissue cultures. Cervical biopsies from non-pregnant and pregnant women were incubated with [35S]sulphate. The proteoglycans of the tissue specimens were purified by ion-exchange and gel chromatography and characterized by SDS/PAGE and by enzymic degradation. In the non-pregnant cervix, the incorporation of [35S]sulphate into the proteoglycans was linear for 48 h. During the first 6 h of incubation the accumulation of chiefly one small labelled proteoglycan (apparent Mr 110,000) substituted with dermatan sulphate was recorded. This is in accordance with the known proteoglycan composition of non-pregnant cervical tissue. In addition, small amounts of two larger radioactive dermatan/chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans (apparent Mr values 220,000 and greater than 500,000) were recorded. After longer periods of incubation the proportion of heparan sulphate proteoglycans increased considerably. The pregnant tissue showed a clearly different composition of labelled proteoglycans. An increased accumulation of the two larger dermatan/chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans was seen in addition to the dominant small dermatan sulphate proteoglycan of the non-pregnant cervix. The rate of accumulation of these two proteoglycans was about 3 times higher in the pregnant tissue, whereas that of the small dermatan sulphate proteoglycan was only increased 2-fold. The fact that the concentration of proteoglycans in the pregnant cervix is approximately one-half of that in the non-pregnant cervix indicates that the turnover of proteoglycans in pregnant cervical tissue is significantly increased. The major effect of this profound change of metabolism was a 50% decrease in proteoglycan content and a 2-fold increased proportion of a dermatan sulphate proteoglycan with an apparent Mr of 220,000. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 7. PMID:2025230

  20. Tissue Stretch Decreases Soluble TGF-β1 and Type-1 Procollagen in Mouse Subcutaneous Connective Tissue: Evidence From Ex Vivo and In Vivo Models

    PubMed Central

    Bouffard, Nicole A.; Cutroneo, Kenneth R.; Badger, Gary J.; White, Sheryl L.; Buttolph, Thomas R.; Ehrlich, H. Paul; Stevens-Tuttle, Debbie; Langevin, Helene M.

    2011-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) plays a key role in connective tissue remodeling, scarring, and fibrosis. The effects of mechanical forces on TGF-β1 and collagen deposition are not well understood. We tested the hypothesis that brief (10 min) static tissue stretch attenuates TGF-β1-mediated new collagen deposition in response to injury. We used two different models: (1) an ex vivo model in which excised mouse subcutaneous tissue (N = 44 animals) was kept in organ culture for 4 days and either stretched (20% strain for 10 min 1 day after excision) or not stretched; culture media was assayed by ELISA for TGF-β1; (2) an in vivo model in which mice (N = 22 animals) underwent unilateral subcutaneous microsurgical injury on the back, then were randomized to stretch (20–30% strain for 10 min twice a day for 7 days) or no stretch; subcutaneous tissues of the back were immunohistochemically stained for Type-1 procollagen. In the ex vivo model, TGF-β1 protein was lower in stretched versus non-stretched tissue (repeated measures ANOVA, P < 0.01). In the in vivo model, microinjury resulted in a significant increase in Type-1 procollagen in the absence of stretch (P < 0.001), but not in the presence of stretch (P = 0.21). Thus, brief tissue stretch attenuated the increase in both soluble TGF-β1 (ex vivo) and Type-1 procollagen (in vivo) following tissue injury. These results have potential relevance to the mechanisms of treatments applying brief mechanical stretch to tissues (e.g., physical therapy, respiratory therapy, mechanical ventilation, massage, yoga, acupuncture). PMID:17654495

  1. Pearls in autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Jozélio Freire; Pereira, Rosa Maria Rodrigues; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2011-05-01

    This manuscript does a review of the more frequent issues published at Autoimmunity Reviews, Journal of Autoimmunity and Autoimmunity in the period of January-December 2009. The following topics were commented: (1) multiple sclerosis (MS) and its relationships with Epstein Barr infection, with vitamin D polymorphism and the new modalities of MS treatment. (2) Type 1 diabetes and genetic discovers, studies with GAD 65 and IA-2 autoantigen and the association T1D and autoimmune organ-specific diseases. (3) Autoimmune thyroid disorders and its association with susceptibility genes and polymorphisms. (4) Multiplex autoantibody profiling approaches in MS and rheumatoid arthritis. (5) Th17 cytokine in primary biliary cirrhosis, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and celiac disease. (6) Vitamin D and experimental autoimmune prostatitis and pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. PMID:26000114

  2. Smell and autoimmunity: a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Perricone, Carlo; Shoenfeld, Netta; Agmon-Levin, Nancy; de Carolis, Caterina; Perricone, Roberto; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2013-08-01

    The sense of smell is an ancient sensory modality vital for sampling and perceiving the chemical composition of surrounding environments. Olfaction involves a pathway of biochemical and electrophysiological processes, which allows the conversion of molecular information into sensations. Disturbances in the olfactory function have been investigated mainly in neurological/neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases; impaired sense of smell has been associated with depressed mood. Only recently, smell capability was tested in other diseases, particularly autoimmune diseases. Shoenfeld and colleagues opened this chapter showing that patients affected with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have disturbances in their olfactory functions and revealed its association with neuropsychiatric manifestations of the disease. This evidence was confirmed in experimental models and replicated in other SLE populations. The connection between autoimmunity and the sense of smell was lately emphasized by studies on patients with Sjögren's syndrome and in patients with other autoimmune/immune-mediated diseases, such as polydermatomyositis, recurrent spontaneous abortion, and hereditary angioedema. Genetic susceptibility and hormonal and environmental factors may play a role in these conditions. Olfactory receptor gene clusters are located in proximity to key locus of susceptibility for autoimmune diseases such as the major histocompatibility complex, suggesting not only a physic linkage, but a functional association. Nonetheless, gender- and hormone-mediated effects are fundamental in the development of autoimmune diseases. The different connections between smell and autoimmunity, genes and hormones may suggest that this is another tessera of a mosaic which is waiting the answer of Oedipus. PMID:23233263

  3. Structural changes in connective tissues caused by a moderate laser heating

    SciTech Connect

    Bagratashvili, Viktor N; Bagratashvili, N V; Sviridov, A P; Shakh, G Sh; Ignat'eva, Natalia Yu; Lunin, Valery V; Grokhovskaya, T E; Averkiev, S V

    2002-10-31

    The structural changes in adipose and fibrous tissues caused by 2- and 3-W IR laser irradiation are studied by the methods of IR and Raman spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. It is shown that heating of fibrous tissue samples to 50 {sup 0}C and adipose tissue samples to 75 {sup 0}C by IR laser radiation changes the supramolecular structure of their proteins and triacylglycerides, respectively, without the intramolecular bond breaking. Heating of fibrous tissue to 70 {sup 0}C and adipose tissue to 90 - 110 {sup 0}C leads to a partial reversible denaturation of proteins and to oxidation of fats.

  4. An Evaluation of Collagen Metabolism in Non Human Primates Associated with the Bion 11 Space Program-Markers of Urinary Collagen Turnover and Muscle Connective Tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vailas, Arthur C.; Martinez, Daniel A.

    1999-01-01

    Patients exhibiting changes in connective tissue and bone metabolism also show changes in urinary by-products of tissue metabolism. Furthermore, the changes in urinary connective tissue and bone metabolites precede alterations at the tissue macromolecular level. Astronauts and Cosmonauts have also shown suggestive increases in urinary by-products of mineralized and non-mineralized tissue degradation. Thus, the idea of assessing connective tissue and bone response in spaceflight monkeys by measurement of biomarkers in urine has merit. Other investigations of bone and connective histology, cytology and chemistry in the Bion 11 monkeys will allow for further validation of the relationship of urinary biomarkers and tissue response. In future flights the non-invasive procedure of urinary analysis may be useful in early detection of changes in these tissues. Purpose: The purpose of this grant investigation was to evaluate mineralized and non-mineralized connective tissue responses of non-human primates to microgravity by the non-invasive analysis of urinary biomarkers. Secondly, we also wanted to assess muscle connective tissue adaptive changes in three weight-bearing skeletal muscles: the soleus, medial gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior by obtaining pre-flight and post-flight small biopsy specimens in collaboration with Dr. V. Reggie Edgerton's laboratory at the University of California at Los Angeles.

  5. An Evaluation of Collagen Metabolism in Non Human Primates Associated with the Bion 11 Space Program-Markers of Urinary Collagen Turnover and Muscle Connective Tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vailas, Arthur C.; Martinez, Daniel A.

    1999-01-01

    Patients exhibiting changes in connective tissue and bone metabolism also show changes in urinary by-products of tissue metabolism. Furthermore, the changes in urinary connective tissue and bone metabolites precede alterations at the tissue macromolecular level. Astronauts and Cosmonauts have also shown suggestive increases in urinary by-products of mineralized and non-mineralized tissue degradation. Thus, the idea of assessing connective tissue and bone response in spaceflight monkeys by measurement of biomarkers in urine has merit. Other investigations of bone and connective histology, cytology and chemistry in the Bion 11 monkeys will allow for further validation of the relationship of urinary biomarkers and tissue response. In future flights the non-invasive procedure of urinary analysis may be useful in early detection of changes in these tissues. The purpose of this grant investigation was to evaluate mineralized and non-mineralized connective tissue responses of non-human primates to microgravity by the non-invasive analysis of urinary biomarkers. Secondly, we also wanted to assess muscle connective tissue adaptive changes in three weight-bearing skeletal muscles: the soleus, media] gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior by obtaining pre-flight and post-flight small biopsy specimens in collaboration with Dr. V. Reggie Edgerton's laboratory at the University of California at Los Angeles.

  6. [Narcolepsy as an autoimmune disease].

    PubMed

    Givaty, Gili; Ganelin-Cohen, Esther

    2013-03-01

    Narcolepsy is a chronic sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and irresistible sleep attacks that occur during the activities of daily living. Falling asleep in the middle of essential activities such as driving or crossing the street may lead to life-threatening situations. Narcolepsy is estimated to affect 0.002% of the Israeli population. By using animal models, human autopsies and brain biopsies, it has recently been shown that the destruction of the orexin-secreting neurons underlies the pathogenicity of this disease. Orexin is a neurotransmitter involved in the sleep arousal cycle and also in the development of hunger sensations. Based on circumstantial evidence, it is estimated that the autoimmune system is responsible for the destruction of the orexin-secreting neurons. There are several findings in the literature that might connect the autoimmunity with the narcolepsy existence. For instance: narcolepsy is associated with high frequency of specific HLA system alleles, especially DQB1*0602. Furthermore, polymorphism in the alpha chain of the T cell receptors was found among narcolepsy patients. A more direct connection is the discovery of the Trib--an autoantigen. This protein is presented by orexin-secreting neurons and was recently found in narcoleptic patients exclusively, and not in the healthy control group. Nevertheless, there is still no agreement within the scientific community since a direct link between the autoimmune mechanism and narcolepsy has not yet been proved. Several trials using immune modulator therapy did not show any significant improvement. PMID:23713377

  7. Insights into IL-37, the role in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wang-Dong; Zhao, Yi; Liu, Yi

    2015-12-01

    Autoimmune diseases are characterized by the impaired function and the destruction of tissues that are caused by an immune response in which aberrant antibodies are generated and attack the body's own cells and tissues. Interleukin (IL) -37, a new member of the IL-1 family, broadly reduces innate inflammation as well as acquired immune responses. Recently, studies have shown that expression of IL-37 was abnormal in autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), ankylosing spondylitis (AS), psoriasis, Graves' disease (GD). In addition, functional analysis indicated that IL-37 is negatively involved in the development and pathogenesis of these autoimmune disorders. The strong association of this cytokine with autoimmune diseases promotes us to systematically review what had been published recently on the crucial nature of IL-37 in relation to autoimmune diseases gaining attention for its regulatory capability in these autoimmune disorders. PMID:26264940

  8. Outer causes inner conflicts: environment and autoimmunity.

    PubMed Central

    Heimer, H

    1999-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are some of the most common yet least understood maladies in medicine today. Some estimates place the number of sufferers of such diseases as high as 20% of the U.S. population, most of them women. The disorders involved range from the familiar to the relatively uncommon to the obscure. What these disorders have in common is that they cause the immune system to attack the body's own tissues. Uncertainty in the field of autoimmune disease extends even to the fundamental questions of what an autoimmune disease is and how many people are affected; identifying specific environmental risk factors for autoimmune diseases is still highly speculative. To gain some sense of direction, scientists are looking at a few documented environmental exposures that have led to autoimmune syndromes, as well as some animal models that exhibit autoimmune syndromes similar to those seen in humans. At a September 1998 NIEHS workshop on environmental links to autoimmune diseases, participants prioritized research needs in five main categories, a step that should help scientists develop strategies for investigating this family of diseases. PMID:10504165

  9. Human autoimmune diseases: a comprehensive update.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lifeng; Wang, Fu-Sheng; Gershwin, M Eric

    2015-10-01

    There have been significant advances in our understanding of human autoimmunity that have led to improvements in classification and diagnosis and, most importantly, research advances in new therapies. The importance of autoimmunity and the mechanisms that lead to clinical disease were first recognized about 50 years ago following the pioneering studies of Macfarlane Burnett and his Nobel Prize-winning hypothesis of the 'forbidden clone'. Such pioneering efforts led to a better understanding not only of autoimmunity, but also of lymphoid cell development, thymic education, apoptosis and deletion of autoreactive cells. Contemporary theories suggest that the development of an autoimmune disease requires a genetic predisposition and environmental factors that trigger the immune pathways that lead, ultimately, to tissue destruction. Despite extensive research, there are no genetic tools that can be used clinically to predict the risk of autoimmune disease. Indeed, the concordance of autoimmune disease in identical twins is 12-67%, highlighting not only a role for environmental factors, but also the potential importance of stochastic or epigenetic phenomena. On the other hand, the identification of cytokines and chemokines, and their cognate receptors, has led to novel therapies that block pathological inflammatory responses within the target organ and have greatly improved the therapeutic effect in patients with autoimmune disease, particularly rheumatoid arthritis. Further advances involving the use of multiplex platforms for diagnosis and identification of new therapeutic agents should lead to major breakthroughs within the next decade. PMID:26212387

  10. Predictors of mortality in connective tissue disease-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a major cause of mortality in connective tissue disease (CTD). We sought to quantify survival and determine factors predictive of mortality in a cohort of patients with CTD-associated PAH (CTD-PAH) in the current era of advanced PAH therapy. Methods Patients with right heart catheter proven CTD-PAH were recruited from six specialised PAH treatment centres across Australia and followed prospectively. Using survival methods including Cox proportional hazards regression, we modelled for all-cause mortality. Independent variables included demographic, clinical and hemodynamic data. Results Among 117 patients (104 (94.9%) with systemic sclerosis), during 2.6 ± 1.8 (mean ± SD) years of follow-up from PAH diagnosis, there were 32 (27.4%) deaths. One-, two- and three-year survivals were 94%, 89% and 73%, respectively. In multiple regression analysis, higher mean right atrial pressure (mRAP) at diagnosis (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.13, 95% CI: 1.04 to 1.24, P = 0.007), lower baseline six-minute walk distance (HR = 0.64, 95% CI: 0.43 to 0.97, P = 0.04), higher baseline World Health Organization functional class (HR = 3.42, 95% CI: 1.25 to 9.36, P = 0.04) and presence of a pericardial effusion (HR = 3.39, 95% CI: 1.07 to 10.68, P = 0.04) were predictive of mortality. Warfarin (HR = 0.20, 95% CI: 0.05 to 0.78, P = 0.02) and combination PAH therapy (HR = 0.20, 95% CI: 0.05 to 0.83, P = 0.03) were protective. Conclusions In this cohort of CTD-PAH patients, three-year survival was 73%. Independent therapeutic predictors of survival included warfarin and combination PAH therapy. Our findings suggest that anticoagulation and combination PAH therapy may improve survival in CTD-PAH. This observation merits further evaluation in randomised controlled trials. PMID:23039366

  11. Optimum scratch assay condition to evaluate connective tissue growth factor expression for anti-scar therapy.

    PubMed

    Moon, Heekyung; Yong, Hyeyoung; Lee, Ae-Ri Cho

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate a potential anti-scar therapy, we first need to have a reliable in vitro wound model to understand dermal fibroblast response upon cell injury and how cytokine levels are changed upon different wound heal phases. An in vitro wound model with different scratch assay conditions on primary human foreskin fibroblast monolayer cultures was prepared and cytokine levels and growth properties were evaluated with the aim of determining optimum injury conditions and observation time. Morphological characteristics of differently scratched fibroblasts from 0 to 36 h post injury (1 line, 2 lines and 3 lines) were investigated. The expression of connective tissue growth factor, CTGF, which is a key mediator in hyper-tropic scarring, and relative intensity of CTGF as a function of time were determined by western blot and gelatin Zymography. After injury (1 line), CTGF level was increased more than 2-fold within 1 h and continuously increased up to 3-fold at 6 h and was leveled down to reach normal value at 36 h, at which cell migration was complete. In more serious injury (2 lines), higher expression of CTGF was observed. The down regulation of CTGF expression after CTGF siRNA/lipofectamine transfection in control, 1 line and 2 lines scratch conditions were 40%, 75% and 55%, respectively. As a model anti-CTGF based therapy, CTGF siRNA with different ratios of linear polyethyleneimine (PEI) complexes (1:1, 1:5, 1:10, 1:20 and 1:30) were prepared and down-regulation efficacy of CTGF was evaluated with our optimized scratch assay, which is 1 line injury at 6 h post injury observation time. As the cationic linear PEI ratio increased, the down regulation efficacy was increased from 20% (1:20) to 55% (1:30). As CTGF level was increased to the highest at 6 h and leveled down afterwards, CTGF level at 6 h could provide the most sensitive response upon CTGF siRNA transfection. The scratch assay in the present study can be employed as a useful experimental tool to differentiate between anti-scar therapies for their down regulation efficacy of CTGF. PMID:22370794

  12. Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF/CCN2) Is Negatively Regulated during Neuron-Glioblastoma Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Feitosa, Natalia M.; Faria, Jane Cristina O.; Coelho-Aguiar, Juliana M.; de Souza, Jorge Marcondes; Neto, Vivaldo Moura; Abreu, José Garcia

    2013-01-01

    Connective-tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) is a matricellular-secreted protein involved in complex processes such as wound healing, angiogenesis, fibrosis and metastasis, in the regulation of cell proliferation, migration and extracellular matrix remodeling. Glioblastoma (GBM) is the major malignant primary brain tumor and its adaptation to the central nervous system microenvironment requires the production and remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Previously, we published an in vitro approach to test if neurons can influence the expression of the GBM extracellular matrix. We demonstrated that neurons remodeled glioma cell laminin. The present study shows that neurons are also able to modulate CTGF expression in GBM. CTGF immnoreactivity and mRNA levels in GBM cells are dramatically decreased when these cells are co-cultured with neonatal neurons. As proof of particular neuron effects, neonatal neurons co-cultured onto GBM cells also inhibit the reporter luciferase activity under control of the CTGF promoter, suggesting inhibition at the transcription level. This inhibition seems to be contact-mediated, since conditioned media from embryonic or neonatal neurons do not affect CTGF expression in GBM cells. Furthermore, the inhibition of CTGF expression in GBM/neuronal co-cultures seems to affect the two main signaling pathways related to CTGF. We observed inhibition of TGFβ luciferase reporter assay; however phopho-SMAD2 levels did not change in these co-cultures. In addition levels of phospho-p44/42 MAPK were decreased in co-cultured GBM cells. Finally, in transwell migration assay, CTGF siRNA transfected GBM cells or GBM cells co-cultured with neurons showed a decrease in the migration rate compared to controls. Previous data regarding laminin and these results demonstrating that CTGF is down-regulated in GBM cells co-cultured with neonatal neurons points out an interesting view in the understanding of the tumor and cerebral microenvironment interactions and could open up new strategies as well as suggest a new target in GBM control. PMID:23383241

  13. Antibodies to carbonic anhydrase in patients with connective tissue diseases: relationship with lung involvement.

    PubMed

    Caccavo, D; Afeltra, A; Rigon, A; Vadacca, M; Zobel, B B; Zennaro, D; Arcarese, L; Buzzulini, F; Pellegrino, N M; Amoroso, A

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the presence of antibodies to carbonic anhydrase I and/or II (ACAI and ACAII) in patients affected by connective tissue diseases (CTD) and to investigate their association with lung involvement evaluated by High resolution CT scan (HRCT). Ninety-six patients affected by CTD were studied, i.e. 33 rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 8 psoriatic arthritis (PA), 8 ankylosing spondilitis (AS), 23 Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE), 10 Sjogren Syndrome (SS), and 14 Systemic Sclerosis (SSc). ACA were detected by ELISA. The lung involvement was evaluated by means of a previously described HRCT score. According to a receiver operator characteristic curve, patients were divided into those with HRCT score > or = 10 and those with HRCT score < 10, where HRCT score > or = 10 was predictive of interstitial lung disease. ACAI and/or ACAII were detected in 30/96 patients (31.2%) (P < 0.0001 in comparison with controls). In particular, the prevalence of ACAI and/or ACAII was significantly higher in patients with RA (P = 0.002), PA (P < 0.0001), SLE (P = 0.0003) and SSc (P < 0.0001). A positive correlation was found between HRCT scores and CRP or ACAI levels (P = < 0.0001 and P = 0.004, respectively). Thirty-nine of 96 patients (40.6%) showed a HRCT score > or = 10 and both their CRP and ACAI levels were significantly higher when compared with patients showing a HRCT score less than 10 (P < 0.0006 and P = 0.0009, respectively). Moreover, C3 and C4 complement fractions inversely correlated with HRCT scores (P = 0.0004 and P < 0.0001, respectively) and lower values of C3 and C4 complement fractions were found in patients with HRCT score > or = 10 than in those with HRCT score less than 10 (P = 0.014 and P = 0.007, respectively). Due to the lower levels of complement fractions detected in patients with HRCT score > or = 10, a possible immune-complex-mediated pathogenic mechanism of lung involvement could be suggested. PMID:18831934

  14. Short- and Long-term Outcomes in Patients with Connective Tissue Diseases Undergoing Percutaneous Coronary Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Li; Chen, Hui; Li, Wei-Ping; Gao, Hong-Li; Li, Dong-Bao; Zhao, Hui-Qiang; Yao, Dao-Kuo; Li, Hong-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background: Coronary artery disease (CAD) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with connective tissue diseases (CTDs). Risk factors and clinical characteristics in these patients are not equivalent to those in traditional CAD patients. The objective of this study was to report short- and long-term clinical outcomes in a consecutive series of patients with CTD who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with stent implantation. Methods: The study group comprised 106 consecutive patients with CTD who underwent PCI in Beijing Friendship Hospital between January 2009 and June 2012. Medical records were analyzed retrospectively including clinical basic material, coronary angiogram data, and the incidence of major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) during the short- and long-term (median 3 years) follow-up. Results: Ninety-two of the patients (86.8%) had one or more traditional CAD risk factors. Multivessel disease was present in more than 2/3 of patients (73.6%). The left anterior descending coronary artery was the most commonly affected vessel (65.1%). Five bare-metal stents and 202 drug-eluting stents were implanted. After a median follow-up period of 36 months, thirteen patients (12.3%) died from cardiac causes, the rate of stent thrombosis was 9.4%, and the rate of target vessel revascularization (TVR) was 14.2%. Multivariate analysis revealed that hypertension (hazard ratio [HR] = 3.07, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.30–7.24, P = 0.041), anterior myocardial infarction (HR = 2.77, 95% CI: 1.06–7.03, P = 0.04), longer duration of steroid treatment (HR = 3.60, 95% CI: 1.43–9.08, P = 0.032), and C-reactive protein level >10 mg/L (HR = 3.98, 95% CI: 1.19–12.56, P = 0.036) were independent predictors of MACEs. Conclusions: Patients with CTD and CAD may have severe coronary lesions. PCI in these patients tends to result in an increased rate of stent thrombosis and TVR during long-term follow-up, which may be influenced by traditional and nontraditional risk factors. PMID:26996475

  15. A case of mixed connective tissue disease with pseudo-pseudo Meigs' syndrome (PPMS)-like features.

    PubMed

    Cheah, C K; Ramanujam, S; Mohd Noor, N; Gandhi, C; D Souza, Beryl A; Gun, S C

    2016-02-01

    Pseudo-pseudo Meigs' syndrome (PPMS) has been reported to be a rare presentation of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, such a presentation is not common in other forms of connective tissue disease. We presented a case of gross ascites, pleural effusion, and marked elevation of CA-125 level (PPMS-like features) that led to a diagnosis of MCTD. The patient responded to systemic steroid therapy. PMID:26377236

  16. Surgical treatment of localized gingival recessions using coronally advanced flaps with or without subepithelial connective tissue graft

    PubMed Central

    Bellver-Fernández, Ricardo; Martínez-Rodriguez, Ana-María; Gioia-Palavecino, Claudio; Caffesse, Raul-Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Background A coronally advanced flap with subepithelial connective tissue graft is the gold standard surgical treatment of gingival recessions, since it offers a higher probability of achieving complete root coverage compared with other techniques. However, optimum short- and middle-term clinical results have also been obtained with coronally advanced flaps alone. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the results obtained by the surgical treatment of localized gingival recessions using coronally advanced flaps with or without subepithelial connective tissue graft. Material and Methods The reduction of recession height was assessed, together with the gain in gingival attachment apical to the recession, and total reduction of recession, in a comparative study of two techniques. Twenty-two gingival recessions were operated upon: 13 in the control group (coronally advanced flap) and 9 in the test group (coronally advanced flap associated to subepithelial connective tissue graft). Results After 18 months, the mean reduction of recession height was 2.2 ± 0.8 mm in the control group and 2.3 ± 0.7 mm in the test group, with a mean gain in gingival attachment of 1.3 ± 0.9 mm and 2.3 ± 1.3 mm, respectively. In percentage terms, the mean reduction of recession height was 84.6 ± 19.6% in the control group and 81.7 ± 17.8% in the test group, with a mean gain in gingival attachment of 20.5 ± 37.4% and 184.4 ± 135.5%, respectively. Conclusions Significant reduction of gingival recession was achieved with both techniques, though the mean gain in gingival attachment (in mm and as a %) was greater in test group. Key words:Gingival recession, coronally advanced flap, subepthelial connective tissue graft. PMID:26595836

  17. Deformation of the Early Glaucomatous Monkey Optic Nerve Head Connective Tissue after Acute IOP Elevation in 3-D Histomorphometric Reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hongli; Thompson, Hilary; Roberts, Michael D.; Sigal, Ian A.; Downs, J. Crawford

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To retest the hypothesis that monkey ONH connective tissues become hypercompliant in early experimental glaucoma (EEG), by using 3-D histomorphometric reconstructions, and to expand the characterization of EEG connective tissue deformation to nine EEG eyes. Methods. Trephinated ONH and peripapillary sclera from both eyes of nine monkeys that were perfusion fixed, with one normal eye at IOP 10 mm Hg and the other EEG eye at 10 (n = 3), 30 (n = 3), or 45 (n = 3) mm Hg were serial sectioned, 3-D reconstructed, 3-D delineated, and quantified with 3-D reconstruction techniques developed in prior studies by the authors. Overall, and for each monkey, intereye differences (EEG eye minus normal eye) for each parameter were calculated and compared by ANOVA. Hypercompliance in the EEG 30 and 45 eyes was assessed by ANOVA, and deformations in all nine EEG eyes were separately compared by region without regard for fixation IOP. Results. Hypercompliant deformation was not significant in the overall ANOVA, but was suggested in a subset of EEG 30/45 eyes. EEG eye deformations included posterior laminar deformation, neural canal expansion, lamina cribrosa thickening, and posterior (outward) bowing of the peripapillary sclera. Maximum posterior laminar deformation and scleral canal expansion co-localized to either the inferior nasal or superior temporal quadrants in the eyes with the least deformation and involved both quadrants in the eyes achieving the greatest deformation. Conclusions. The data suggest that, in monkey EEG, ONH connective tissue hypercompliance may occur only in a subset of eyes and that early ONH connective tissue deformation is maximized in the superior temporal and/or inferior nasal quadrants. PMID:20702834

  18. Spatial arrangement of the heart muscle fascicles and intramyocardial connective tissue in the Spanish fighting bull (Bos taurus).

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Quintana, D; Climent, V; Garcia-Martinez, V; Rojo, M; Hurlé, J M

    1994-01-01

    The spatial arrangement of the muscle fascicles and intramyocardial connective tissue was examined in the ventricles of the heart of the Spanish fighting bull (Bos taurus). In both ventricles, the muscle fascicles of the myocardium are arranged in 3 main directions, forming 3 muscle layers within the ventricular wall. The preferentially vertical arrangement of the muscle fascicles in the superficial and deep layers at the level of the fibrous aortic rings and the base of the semilunar valve leaflets suggests that these fascicles are actively involved in valvular dynamics. After controlled digestion of myocytes and elastic fibres with NaOH, a 3-dimensional arrangement of the scaffolding of connective tissue that supports the muscle fascicles and myocytes was observed. The arrangement and structure of this scaffolding may influence the order of contraction of muscle fascicles in different layers of the ventricle. In addition, differences were observed between the connective tissue scaffolding surrounding the myocytes of the 2 ventricles; these variations were correlated with the different biomechanical properties. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:8014119

  19. Transforming Growth Factor-β–Independent Role of Connective Tissue Growth Factor in the Development of Liver Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Keiko; Jawaid, Safdar; Sasaki, Takako; Bou-Gharios, George; Sakai, Takao

    2015-01-01

    We previously identified transforming growth factor (TGF)-β signaling as a fibronectin-independent mechanism of type I collagen fibrillogenesis following adult liver injury. To address the contribution of TGF-β signaling during the development of liver fibrosis, we generated adult mice lacking TGF-β type II receptor (TGF-βIIR) from the liver. TGF-βIIR knockout livers indeed showed a dominant effect in reducing fibrosis, but fibrosis still remained approximately 45% compared with control and fibronectin knockout livers. Unexpectedly, this was accompanied by significant up-regulation of connective tissue growth factor mRNA levels. Organized type I collagen networks in TGF-βIIR knockout livers colocalized well with fibronectin. We provide evidence that elimination of TGF-βIIR is not sufficient to completely prevent liver fibrosis. Our results indicate a TGF-β–independent mechanism of type I collagen production and suggest connective tissue growth factor as its potent mediator. We advocate combined elimination of TGF-β signaling and connective tissue growth factor as a potential therapeutic target by which to attenuate liver fibrosis. PMID:25108224

  20. Sirolimus for Autoimmune Disease of Blood Cells

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-22

    Autoimmune Pancytopenia; Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS); Evans Syndrome; Idiopathic Thrombocytopenic Purpura; Anemia, Hemolytic, Autoimmune; Autoimmune Neutropenia; Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic; Inflammatory Bowel Disease; Rheumatoid Arthritis

  1. B-LINK: A hemicentin, plakin and integrin-dependent adhesion system that links tissues by connecting adjacent basement membranes

    PubMed Central

    Morrissey, Meghan A.; Keeley, Daniel P.; Hagedorn, Elliott J.; McClatchey, Shelly T. H.; Chi, Qiuyi; Hall, David H.; Sherwood, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Basement membrane (BM), a sheet-like form of extracellular matrix, surrounds most tissues. During organogenesis specific adhesions between adjoining tissues frequently occur, however their molecular basis is unclear. Using live-cell imaging and electron microscopy we identify an adhesion system that connects the uterine and gonadal tissues through their juxtaposed BMs at the site of anchor cell (AC) invasion in C. elegans. We find that the extracellular matrix component hemicentin (HIM-4), found between BMs, forms punctate accumulations under the AC and controls BM linkage to promote rapid invasion. Through targeted screening we identify the integrin-binding cytolinker plakin (VAB-10A) and integrin (INA-1/PAT-3) as key BM-BM linkage regulators: VAB-10A localizes to the AC-BM interface and tethers hemicentin to the AC while integrin promotes hemicentin punctae formation. Together, plakin, integrin and hemicentin are founding components of a cell-directed adhesion system, which we name a B-LINK (Basement membrane-LINKage), that connects adjacent tissues through adjoining BMs. PMID:25443298

  2. Direct microCT imaging of non-mineralized connective tissues at high resolution.

    PubMed

    Naveh, Gili R S; Brumfeld, Vlad; Dean, Mason; Shahar, Ron; Weiner, Steve

    2014-01-01

    The 3D imaging of soft tissues in their native state is challenging, especially when high resolution is required. An X-ray-based microCT is, to date, the best choice for high resolution 3D imaging of soft tissues. However, since X-ray attenuation of soft tissues is very low, contrasting enhancement using different staining materials is needed. The staining procedure, which also usually involves tissue fixation, causes unwanted and to some extent unknown tissue alterations. Here, we demonstrate that a method that enables 3D imaging of soft tissues without fixing and staining using an X-ray-based bench-top microCT can be applied to a variety of different tissues. With the sample mounted in a custom-made loading device inside a humidity chamber, we obtained soft tissue contrast and generated 3D images of fresh, soft tissues with a resolution of 1 micron voxel size. We identified three critical conditions which make it possible to image soft tissues: humidified environment, mechanical stabilization of the sample and phase enhancement. We demonstrate the capability of the technique using different specimens: an intervertebral disc, the non-mineralized growth plate, stingray tessellated radials (calcified cartilage) and the collagenous network of the periodontal ligament. Since the scanned specimen is fresh an interesting advantage of this technique is the ability to scan a specimen under load and track the changes of the different structures. This method offers a unique opportunity for obtaining valuable insights into 3D structure-function relationships of soft tissues. PMID:24437605

  3. Sex steroids in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Martocchia, A; Stefanelli, M; Cola, S; Falaschi, P

    2011-01-01

    A sexual dysmorphism in the immune response has been described and females display an increased incidence of autoimmune diseases. Experimental data show that sex steroids influence immune cell development and have immunomodulatory effects. The distribution, the action (genomic and nongenomic), the sex and tissue-depending expression pattern of estrogen, progesterone and androgen receptors and their functional disruptions in corresponding receptor knockout animals will be discussed, pointing out the difference among sex steroid hormones. Recent advances indicate an immunomodulatory role of sex steroids in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis. The outcomes of the clinical trials will help to find the best use of sex steroids in combination with current therapeutic drugs in autoimmune diseases. Sex steroid receptor modulating drugs will provide new therapeutic approaches in these pathologies. PMID:21463254

  4. Environmental Basis of Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Floreani, Annarosa; Leung, Patrick S C; Gershwin, M Eric

    2016-06-01

    The three common themes that underlie the induction and perpetuation of autoimmunity are genetic predisposition, environmental factors, and immune regulation. Environmental factors have gained much attention for their role in triggering autoimmunity, with increasing evidence of their influence as demonstrated by epidemiological studies, laboratory research, and animal studies. Environmental factors known to trigger and perpetuate autoimmunity include infections, gut microbiota, as well as physical and environmental agents. To address these issues, we will review major potential mechanisms that underlie autoimmunity including molecular mimicry, epitope spreading, bystander activation, polyclonal activation of B and T cells, infections, and autoinflammatory activation of innate immunity. The association of the gut microbiota on autoimmunity will be particularly highlighted by their interaction with pharmaceutical agents that may lead to organ-specific autoimmunity. Nonetheless, and we will emphasize this point, the precise mechanism of environmental influence on disease pathogenesis remains elusive. PMID:25998909

  5. An official European Respiratory Society/American Thoracic Society research statement: interstitial pneumonia with autoimmune features.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Aryeh; Antoniou, Katerina M; Brown, Kevin K; Cadranel, Jacques; Corte, Tamera J; du Bois, Roland M; Lee, Joyce S; Leslie, Kevin O; Lynch, David A; Matteson, Eric L; Mosca, Marta; Noth, Imre; Richeldi, Luca; Strek, Mary E; Swigris, Jeffrey J; Wells, Athol U; West, Sterling G; Collard, Harold R; Cottin, Vincent

    2015-10-01

    Many patients with an idiopathic interstitial pneumonia (IIP) have clinical features that suggest an underlying autoimmune process but do not meet established criteria for a connective tissue disease (CTD). Researchers have proposed differing criteria and terms to describe these patients, and lack of consensus over nomenclature and classification limits the ability to conduct prospective studies of a uniform cohort.The "European Respiratory Society/American Thoracic Society Task Force on Undifferentiated Forms of Connective Tissue Disease-associated Interstitial Lung Disease" was formed to create consensus regarding the nomenclature and classification criteria for patients with IIP and features of autoimmunity.The task force proposes the term "interstitial pneumonia with autoimmune features" (IPAF) and offers classification criteria organised around the presence of a combination of features from three domains: a clinical domain consisting of specific extra-thoracic features, a serologic domain consisting of specific autoantibodies, and a morphologic domain consisting of specific chest imaging, histopathologic or pulmonary physiologic features.A designation of IPAF should be used to identify individuals with IIP and features suggestive of, but not definitive for, a CTD. With IPAF, a sound platform has been provided from which to launch the requisite future research investigations of a more uniform cohort. PMID:26160873

  6. Interaction of Borrelia burgdorferi with peripheral blood fibrocytes, antigen-presenting cells with the potential for connective tissue targeting.

    PubMed Central

    Grab, D. J.; Lanners, H.; Martin, L. N.; Chesney, J.; Cai, C.; Adkisson, H. D.; Bucala, R.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Borrelia Burgdorferi has a predilection for collagenous tissue and can interact with fibronectin and cellular collagens. While the molecular mechanisms of how B. burgdorferi targets connective tissues and causes arthritis are not understood, the spirochetes can bind to a number of different cell types, including fibroblasts. A novel circulating fibroblast-like cell called the peripheral blood fibrocyte has recently been described. Fibrocytes express collagen types I and III as well as fibronectin. Besides playing a role in wound healing, fibrocytes have the potential to target to connective tissue and the functional capacity to recruit, activate, and present antigen to CD4(+) T cells. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Rhesus monkey fibrocytes were isolated and characterized by flow cytometry. B. burgdorferi were incubated with human or monkey fibrocyte cultures in vitro and the cellular interactions analyzed by light and electron microscopy. The two strains of B. burgdorferi studied included JD1, which is highly pathogenic for monkeys, and M297, which lacks the cell surface OspA and OspB proteins. RESULTS: In this study, we demonstrate that B. burgdorferi binds to both human and monkey (rhesus) fibrocytes in vitro. This process does not require OspA or OspB. In addition, the spirochetes are not phagocytosed but are taken into deep recesses of the cell membrane, a process that may protect them from the immune system. CONCLUSIONS: This interaction between B. burgdorferi and peripheral blood fibrocytes provides a potential explanation for the targeting of spirochetes to joint connective tissue and may contribute to the inflammatory process in Lyme arthritis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:10072447

  7. Comparison of ADM and Connective Tissue Graft as the Membrane in Class II Furcation Defect Regeneration: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Esfahanian, Vahid; Farhad, Shirin; Sadighi Shamami, Mehrnaz

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Furcally-involved teeth present unique challenges to the success of periodontal therapy and influence treatment outcomes. This study aimed to assess to compare use of ADM and connective tissue membrane in class II furcation defect regeneration. Materials and methods. 10 patient with 2 bilaterally class II furcation defects in first and/or second maxilla or man-dibular molar without interproximal furcation involvement, were selected. Four weeks after initial phase of treatment, before and thorough the surgery pocket depth (PD), clinical attachment level to stent (CAL-S), free gingival margin to stent(FGM-S) , crestal bone to stent (Crest-S), horizontal defect depth to stent (HDD-S) and vertical defect depth to stent (VDD-S) and crestal bone to defect depth measured from stent margin. Thereafter, one side randomly treated using connective tissue and DFDBA (study group) and opposite side received ADM and DFDBA (control group). After 6 months, soft and hard tissue parameters measured again in re-entry. Results. Both groups presented improvements after therapies (P & 0.05). No inter-group differences were seen in PD re-duction (P = 0.275), CAL gain (P = 0.156), free gingival margin (P = 0.146), crest of the bone (P = 0.248), reduction in horizontal defects depth (P = 0.139) and reduction in vertical defects depth (P = 0.149). Conclusion. Both treatments modalities have potential of regeneration without any adverse effect on healing process. Connective tissue grafts did not have significant higher bone fill compared to that of ADM. PMID:25093054

  8. Comparison of ADM and Connective Tissue Graft as the Membrane in Class II Furcation Defect Regeneration: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Esfahanian, Vahid; Farhad, Shirin; Sadighi Shamami, Mehrnaz

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Furcally-involved teeth present unique challenges to the success of periodontal therapy and influence treatment outcomes. This study aimed to assess to compare use of ADM and connective tissue membrane in class II furcation defect regeneration. Materials and methods. 10 patient with 2 bilaterally class II furcation defects in first and/or second maxilla or man-dibular molar without interproximal furcation involvement, were selected. Four weeks after initial phase of treatment, before and thorough the surgery pocket depth (PD), clinical attachment level to stent (CAL-S), free gingival margin to stent(FGM-S) , crestal bone to stent (Crest-S), horizontal defect depth to stent (HDD-S) and vertical defect depth to stent (VDD-S) and crestal bone to defect depth measured from stent margin. Thereafter, one side randomly treated using connective tissue and DFDBA (study group) and opposite side received ADM and DFDBA (control group). After 6 months, soft and hard tissue parameters measured again in re-entry. Results. Both groups presented improvements after therapies (P & 0.05). No inter-group differences were seen in PD re-duction (P = 0.275), CAL gain (P = 0.156), free gingival margin (P = 0.146), crest of the bone (P = 0.248), reduction in horizontal defects depth (P = 0.139) and reduction in vertical defects depth (P = 0.149). Conclusion. Both treatments modalities have potential of regeneration without any adverse effect on healing process. Connective tissue grafts did not have significant higher bone fill compared to that of ADM. PMID:25093054

  9. Endothelial cell markers reflecting endothelial cell dysfunction in patients with mixed connective tissue disease

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between cardiovascular risk factors and endothelial dysfunction in patients with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) and to determine which biomarkers are associated with atherosclerotic complications, such as cardiovascular disease. Methods Fifty MCTD patients and 38 healthy age-matched and sex-matched controls were enrolled in this study. In order to describe endothelial dysfunction, we assessed flow-mediated dilation (FMD), nitrate-mediated dilation (NMD) and carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT). We investigated FMD of the brachial artery after reactive hyperemia and NMD after sublingual nitroglycerin administration, while the IMT of the common carotid artery was determined by ultrasound. Anti-U1 ribonucleoprotein (anti-U1RNP) antibodies, anti-cardiolipin (anti-CL) antibodies, anti-endothelial cell antibody (AECA) and endothelial cell markers, such as soluble thrombomodulin (TM) and von Willebrand factor antigen (vWFAg), were assessed. Results The endothelium-dependent vasodilation (FMD) was significantly impaired in patients with MCTD, as compared with controls (%FMD: 4.7 ± 4.2% vs. 8.7 ± 5.0%; P < 0.001), while the percentage NMD did not differ (%NMD: 14.3 ± 6.6% vs. 17.1 ± 6.7%; P = 0.073). Mean carotid IMT values were higher in patients than in controls (IMT: MCTD, 0.64 ± 0.13 mm vs. controls, 0.53 ± 0.14 mm; P < 0.001). FMD negatively correlated with disease duration, the levels of apolipoprotein A1, the paraoxonase-1 activity, and systolic blood pressure in MCTD patients. The percentage FMD was significantly lower in MCTD patients with cardiovascular diseases (CVD), than in those without CVD (%FMD: 3.5 ± 2.9 vs. 5.8 ± 4.8, P < 0.0002), while percentage NMD did not differ between patients with and without CVDs. Serum levels of autoantibodies (anti-U1RNP, AECA and anti-CL) were significantly higher in MCTD patients and differed between MCTD patients with and without CVD. Endothelial cell markers such as soluble TM (12.2 ± 8.1 ng/ml vs. 3.2 ± 1.3 ng/ml; P < 0.001) and vWFAg (224.1 ± 115% vs. 89.4 ± 27.1%, P < 0.001) were the highest in MCTD patients with CVD. Conclusions FMD is a reliable sensitive marker of endothelial cell dysfunction in MCTD. Beside the traditional risk factors, anti-U1RNP, AECA and anti-CL antibodies may be important not only in the pathogenesis of MCTD but in the induction of endothelial cell activation, and may play crucial roles in the development of early atherosclerosis in MCTD. PMID:20459625

  10. Contribution of myofibrillar and connective tissue components to the Warner-Bratzler shear force of cooked beef.

    PubMed

    Girard, I; Bruce, H L; Basarab, J A; Larsen, I L; Aalhus, J L

    2012-12-01

    Myofibrillar (MF-SF) and connective tissue (CT-SF) peak shear forces were interpolated from Warner-Bratzler shear force (SF) deformation curves of cooked bovine M. gluteus medius (GM) and M. semitendinosus (ST) from 112 crossbred steers in a 2×2×2 factorial experiment examining the interactions between slaughter age, growth promotants and breed cross (British versus Continental). Mixed model analyses, Pearson correlations and stepwise multiple regression identified relationships between shear forces, meat quality measurements and production treatments. Connective tissue contribution to SF increased with slaughter age and implantation in the ST and with slaughter age only in the GM. Myofibrillar contribution to SF increased with slaughter age for the ST and with Continental genetics for the GM. Variation in ST SF and MF-SF was best described by muscle weight, which increased with animal age, while GM SF and MF-SF variation was best described by cooking loss, indicating that ST and GM SF were most affected by connective and myofibrillar proteins, respectively. PMID:22842042

  11. Diagnostic Exome Sequencing Identifies a Novel Gene, EMILIN1, Associated with Autosomal‐Dominant Hereditary Connective Tissue Disease

    PubMed Central

    Capuano, Alessandra; Bucciotti, Francesco; Farwell, Kelly D.; Tippin Davis, Brigette; Mroske, Cameron; Hulick, Peter J.; Weissman, Scott M.; Gao, Qingshen; Spessotto, Paola; Doliana, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heritable connective tissue diseases are a highly heterogeneous family of over 200 disorders that affect the extracellular matrix. While the genetic basis of several disorders is established, the etiology has not been discovered for a large portion of patients, likely due to rare yet undiscovered disease genes. By performing trio‐exome sequencing of a 55‐year‐old male proband presenting with multiple symptoms indicative of a connective disorder, we identified a heterozygous missense alteration in exon 1 of the Elastin Microfibril Interfacer 1 (EMILIN1) gene, c.64G>A (p.A22T). The proband presented with ascending and descending aortic aneurysms, bilateral lower leg and foot sensorimotor peripheral neuropathy, arthropathy, and increased skin elasticity. Sanger sequencing confirmed that the EMILIN1 alteration, which maps around the signal peptide cleavage site, segregated with disease in the affected proband, mother, and son. The impaired secretion of EMILIN‐1 in cells transfected with the mutant p.A22T coincided with abnormal protein accumulation within the endoplasmic reticulum. In skin biopsy of the proband, we detected less EMILIN‐1 with disorganized and abnormal coarse fibrils, aggregated deposits underneath the epidermis basal lamina, and dermal cells apoptosis. These findings collectively suggest that EMILIN1 may represent a new disease gene associated with an autosomal‐dominant connective tissue disorder. PMID:26462740

  12. Autoimmune liver disease, autoimmunity and liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Marco; Neuberger, James M

    2014-01-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC), primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) and autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) represent the three major autoimmune liver diseases (AILD). PBC, PSC, and AIH are all complex disorders in that they result from the effects of multiple genes in combination with as yet unidentified environmental factors. Recent genome-wide association studies have identified numerous risk loci for PBC and PSC that host genes involved in innate or acquired immune responses. These loci may provide a clue as to the immune-based pathogenesis of AILD. Moreover, many significant risk loci for PBC and PSC are also risk loci for other autoimmune disorders, such type I diabetes, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis, suggesting a shared genetic basis and possibly similar molecular pathways for diverse autoimmune conditions. There is no curative treatment for all three disorders, and a significant number of patients eventually progress to end-stage liver disease requiring liver transplantation (LT). LT in this context has a favourable overall outcome with current patient and graft survival exceeding 80% at 5years. Indications are as for other chronic liver disease although recent data suggest that while lethargy improves after transplantation, the effect is modest and variable so lethargy alone is not an indication. In contrast, pruritus rapidly responds. Cholangiocarcinoma, except under rigorous selection criteria, excludes LT because of the high risk of recurrence. All three conditions may recur after transplantation and are associated with a greater risk of both acute cellular and chronic ductopenic rejection. It is possible that a crosstalk between alloimmune and autoimmune response perpetuate each other. An immunological response toward self- or allo-antigens is well recognised after LT in patients transplanted for non-autoimmune indications and sometimes termed "de novo autoimmune hepatitis". Whether this is part of the spectrum of rejection or an autoimmune process is not clear. In this manuscript, we review novel findings about disease processes and mechanisms that lead to autoimmunity in the liver and their possible involvement in the immune response vs. the graft after LT. PMID:24084655

  13. Association of Extrahepatic Manifestations with Autoimmune Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Guan Wee; Heneghan, Michael A

    2015-01-01

    For many patients with autoimmune hepatitis (AIH), the presence of extrahepatic features is well recognised both at the time of presentation and during long-term follow-up. Concomitant 'autoimmune disorders' have been described in 20-50% of patients with AIH, both in adults and children. Indeed, the presence of these associated phenomena has been incorporated into both the original and revised International AIH group scoring systems as an aid to codifying the diagnosis. In acute index presentations, non-specific joint pains sometimes flitting in nature have been reported in 10-60% of patients, and while joint swelling is uncommon, rheumatoid arthritis and mixed connective tissue disease have been reported in 2-4% of patients with AIH. For a majority of patients, these joint symptoms resolve within days of the introduction of immunosuppressive therapy. Rarer features at index presentation include a maculopapular skin rash and unexplained fever, which are features that tend to resolve quickly with treatment. Interestingly, joint pain and stiffness are also well recognised in the context of steroid withdrawal and cessation in AIH. The occasional co-presentation of AIH with coeliac disease is clinically important (1-6%), since for some patients, there is a risk of immunosuppression malabsorption, thus delaying effective treatment. Similarly, the co-existence of selective IgA deficiency (IgAD) can occur in patients with coeliac disease or in isolation. Selective IgAD as a co-existing extraheaptic feature seems to be more common in paediatric patients with AIH. For these patients, they are at an increased risk of respiratory and sinus infections. Although, typically associated with primary sclerosing cholangitis, the presence of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD; both Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis) has been described in 2-8% of patients with AIH. Interestingly, for patients with autoimmune sclerosing cholangitis, a distinct pattern of IBD has been recently described. Other conditions have been reported at a lower frequency, including Sjogren's syndrome 1-7%, systemic lupus erythematosus 1-3% and glomerulonephritis 1%. Rarer still and at a frequency of <1% include fibrosing alveolitis, haemolytic anaemia, uveitis, mononeuritis multiplex, polymyositis and multiple sclerosis. In contrast, the reported associations between AIH and thyroiditis 8-23%, diabetes 1-10% and psoriasis 3% are commonly seen and notable in clinical practice. PMID:26641498

  14. American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... WITH #25FOR25 CAMPAIGN DURING NATIONAL AUTOIMMUNE DISEASE AWARENESS MONTH AARDA officially kicks of National Autoimmune DIsease Awareness ... Click here to read more. Autoimmune Disease Awareness Month AARDA and the NCAPG held two important events ...

  15. [Narcolepsy as an autoimmune disease].

    PubMed

    Sarkanen, Tomi; Vaarala, Outi; Julkunen, Ilkka; Partinen, Markku

    2015-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder of central origin. Hypocretin deficiency is the essential feature of type 1 narcolepsy. The biological background of type 2 narcolepsy (without cataplexy) is less clear. Infections or other external factors are thought to function as triggers of narcolepsy. After the H1N1 vaccination campaign, the incidence of narcolepsy increased clearly in countries where a vaccine boosted with the AS03 adjuvant was used. According to the current view, the increase of narcolepsy in connection with the pandemic vaccine especially in children and adolescents was associated with the virus component of the vaccine, but the adjuvant may also have boosted the development of autoimmune response. PMID:26245045

  16. The saddle connective tissue graft: a periodontal plastic surgery technique to obtain soft tissue coronal gain on immediate implants. A case report.

    PubMed

    González, David; Cabello, Gustavo; Olmos, Gema; Niñoles, Carlos L

    2015-01-01

    Based on recent studies regarding the advantages of flapless immediate implants on the maintenance of the soft tissue architecture (especially at papillae level) in those situations where it is necessary to extract an anterior tooth, this case report describes a clinical procedure designed to replace a hopeless central incisor (2.1) showing root resorption adjacent to an implant-supported crown (1.1), whose gingival margin is 2 mm coronal regarding the hopeless tooth to be replaced. After the extraction of the hopeless tooth (2.1), a flapless immediate implant was placed. The implant-bone gap was then filled with bone substitute and a palatal connective tissue graft was placed ad modum saddle extending at buccal level from apical to the mucogingival line, sealing the socket and extending until 6 mm at palatal level ad modum saddle. This procedure allowed symmetry of the soft tissue margins between the two implants (1.1 and 2.1) to be obtained as well as the preservation of the inter-implant papillae (1.1). PMID:26171446

  17. Autoimmune effector memory T cells: the bad and the good

    PubMed Central

    Devarajan, Priyadharshini; Chen, Zhibin

    2014-01-01

    Immunological memory is a hallmark of adaptive immunity, a defense mechanism endowed to vertebrates during evolution. However, an autoimmune pathogenic role of memory lymphocytes is also emerging with accumulating evidence, despite reasonable skepticism on their existence in a chronic setting of autoimmune damage. It is conceivable that autoimmune memory would be particularly harmful since memory cells would constantly remember and attack the body's healthy tissues. It is even more detrimental given the resistance of memory T cells to immunomodulatory therapies. In this review, we focus on self-antigen-reactive CD4+ effector memory T (TEM) cells, surveying the evidence for the role of the TEM compartment in autoimmune pathogenesis. We will also discuss the role of TEM cells in chronic and acute infectious disease settings and how they compare to their counterparts in autoimmune diseases. With their long-lasting potency, the autoimmune TEM cells could also play a critical role in anti-tumor immunity, which may be largely based on their reactivity to self-antigens. Therefore, although autoimmune TEM cells are bad due to their role in relentless perpetration of tissue damage in autoimmune disease settings, they are unlikely a by-product of industrial development along the modern surge of autoimmune disease prevalence. Rather, they may be a product of evolution for their good in clearing damaged host cells in chronic infections and malignant cells in cancer settings. PMID:24203440

  18. NK Cell Autoreactivity and Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Poggi, Alessandro; Zocchi, Maria Raffaella

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidences have pointed out the relevance of natural killer (NK) cells in organ-specific and systemic autoimmune diseases. NK cells bear a plethora of activating and inhibiting receptors that can play a role in regulating reactivity with autologous cells. The activating receptors recognize natural ligands up-regulated on virus-infected or stressed or neoplastic cells. Of note, several autoimmune diseases are thought to be linked to viral infections as one of the first event in inducing autoimmunity. Also, it is conceivable that autoimmunity can be triggered when a dysregulation of innate immunity occurs, activating T and B lymphocytes to react with self-components. This would imply that NK cells can play a regulatory role during adaptive immunity; indeed, innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), comprising the classical CD56+ NK cells, have a role in maintaining or alternating tissue homeostasis secreting protective and/or pro-inflammatory cytokines. In addition, NK cells display activating receptors involved in natural cytotoxicity and the activating isoforms of receptors for HLA class I that can interact with healthy host cells and induce damage without any evidence of viral infection or neoplastic-induced alteration. In this context, the interrelationship among ILC, extracellular-matrix components, and mesenchymal stromal cells can be considered a key point for the control of homeostasis. Herein, we summarize evidences for a role of NK cells in autoimmune diseases and will give a point of view of the interplay between NK cells and self-cells in triggering autoimmunity. PMID:24550913

  19. Raised serum hyaluronate levels in scleroderma: an effect of growth factor induced activation of connective tissue cells?

    PubMed Central

    Engström-Laurent, A; Feltelius, N; Hällgren, R; Wasteson, A

    1985-01-01

    The circulating levels of hyaluronate were determined in 36 patients with scleroderma and in 36 control subjects matched for age and sex. The mean serum hyaluronate concentration in patients with progressive systemic sclerosis (n = 25) was 131 +/- 67 (SD) microgram/l and significantly greater (p less than 0.001) than that of the controls (mean level 49 +/- 21 (SD) microgram/l). Hyaluronate levels in patients with localised scleroderma (n = 4) were 141 +/- 47 (SEM) microgram/l and in patients with scleroderma-associated overlap syndromes (n = 7) 202 +/- 54 (SEM) microgram/l. The increase in serum hyaluronate probably reflected an enhanced synthesis or outflow of hyaluronate from the connective tissue, or both; it could not be explained by affection of the liver, which is the catabolic site of hyaluronate. The hyaluronate values were not related to certain serological indicators of inflammatory activity or to the extent of the skin lesions or the severity of internal organ manifestations. A positive correlation was noted between circulating platelet counts and hyaluronate levels (p less than 0.001). Plasma beta-thromboglobulin was measured in 15 of the patients with systemic sclerosis and found to correlate positively with platelet counts. Raised levels of beta-thromboglobulin were associated with the highest hyaluronate values. Platelet-derived growth factor, which stimulates connective tissue cells and is stored in the alpha-granules of platelets together with beta-thromboglobulin, was shown to enhance hyaluronate synthesis in fibroblast cultures. The results suggest an involvement in scleroderma of connective tissue activating substances released from platelets. PMID:3876080

  20. The Autoimmune Ecology

    PubMed Central

    Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Ramirez-Santana, Carolina; Alzate, Maria A.; Molano-Gonzalez, Nicolas; Rojas-Villarraga, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (ADs) represent a heterogeneous group of disorders that affect specific target organs or multiple organ systems. These conditions share common immunopathogenic mechanisms (i.e., the autoimmune tautology), which explain the clinical similarities they have among them as well as their familial clustering (i.e., coaggregation). As part of the autoimmune tautology, the influence of environmental exposure on the risk of developing ADs is paramount (i.e., the autoimmune ecology). In fact, environment, more than genetics, shapes immune system. Autoimmune ecology is akin to exposome, that is all the exposures – internal and external – across the lifespan, interacting with hereditary factors (both genetics and epigenetics) to favor or protect against autoimmunity and its outcomes. Herein, we provide an overview of the autoimmune ecology, focusing on the immune response to environmental agents in general, and microbiota, cigarette smoking, alcohol and coffee consumption, socioeconomic status (SES), gender and sex hormones, vitamin D, organic solvents, and vaccines in particular. Inclusion of the autoimmune ecology in disease etiology and health will improve the way personalized medicine is currently conceived and applied. PMID:27199979

  1. Autoimmune Autonomic Ganglionopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... organizations outside of the National Institutes of Health. Overview Listen Autoimmune autonomic ganglionopathy (AAG) is rare autoimmune disorder in which the body's immune system mistakenly attacks and damages certain parts of the autonomic nervous system . Signs and symptoms of the condition vary ...

  2. Possible role of human herpesvirus 6 as a trigger of autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Broccolo, Francesco; Fusetti, Lisa; Ceccherini-Nelli, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) infection is common and has a worldwide distribution. Recently, HHV-6A and HHV-6B have been reclassified into two distinct species based on different biological features (genetic, antigenic, and cell tropism) and disease associations. A role for HHV-6A/B has been proposed in several autoimmune disorders (AD), including multiple sclerosis (MS), autoimmune connective tissue diseases, and Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The focus of this review is to discuss the above-mentioned AD associated with HHV-6 and the mechanisms proposed for HHV-6A/B-induced autoimmunity. HHV-6A/B could trigger autoimmunity by exposing high amounts of normally sequestered cell antigens, through lysis of infected cells. Another potential trigger is represented by molecular mimicry, with the synthesis of viral proteins that resemble cellular molecules, as a mechanism of immune escape. The virus could also induce aberrant expression of histocompatibility molecules thereby promoting the presentation of autoantigens. CD46-HHV-6A/B interaction is a new attractive mechanism proposed: HHV-6A/B (especially HHV-6A) could participate in neuroinflammation in the context of MS by promoting inflammatory processes through CD46 binding. Although HHV-6A/B has the ability to trigger all the above-mentioned mechanisms, more studies are required to fully elucidate the possible role of HHV-6A/B as a trigger of AD. PMID:24282390

  3. Expression of transforming growth factor-β1 and connective tissue growth factor in congenital biliary atresia and neonatal hepatitis liver tissue.

    PubMed

    Li, F B; Zhao, H; Peng, K R; Gao, Z G; Huang, S J; Tou, J F; Shu, X L; Gu, W Z

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the expression of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in the liver tissue of infants with congenital biliary atresia and neonatal hepatitis, as well as the relationship between the expression of the two factors and liver fibrosis. Thirty-six infants who met the cholestasis criteria were classified into congenital biliary atresia and neonatal hepatitis groups. All specimens were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and Masson's trichrome, and the degree of liver fibrosis was assessed. The scope and level of CTGF and TGF-β1 expression in the different specimens was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and observation. Liver fibrosis in the congenital biliary atresia group was more advanced than that in the neonatal hepatitis group, and the difference was significant (P < 0.01). In the neonatal hepatitis patients, CTGF and TGF-β1 were mainly expressed in the hepatocytes, while they were expressed in both hepatocytes and biliary epithelial cells in the congenital biliary atresia patients, and in these patients the expression was significantly stronger than in the neonatal hepatitis patients (P < 0.01). With the aggravation of hepatic fibrosis, CTGF and TGF-β1 expression levels in liver tissue gradually increased, and their expression levels were significantly correlated (P < 0.01). Liver fibrosis is present in both congenital biliary atresia and neonatal hepatitis patients. The gradual increase of CTGF and TGF-β1 expression levels in liver tissue is associated with liver fibrosis. Early expression of CTGF and TGF-β1 in biliary epithelial cells may be involved in the pathogenesis of congenital biliary atresia. PMID:26909983

  4. Circulating Protein Fragments of Cartilage and Connective Tissue Degradation Are Diagnostic and Prognostic Markers of Rheumatoid Arthritis and Ankylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Bay-Jensen, Anne C.; Wichuk, Stephanie; Byrjalsen, Inger; Leeming, Diana J.; Morency, Nathalie; Christiansen, Claus; Karsdal, Morten A.; Maksymowych, Walter P.

    2013-01-01

    Inflammation driven connective tissue turnover is key in rheumatic diseases, such as ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Few biomarkers are available for measuring disease prognosis or the efficacy of interventions applied in these tissue-related conditions. Type II collagen is the primary structural protein of cartilage and type III collagen of connective tissues, and obvious targets for the collagenalytic, which increase during tissue inflammation. The objective of the study was to investigate the diagnostic and prognostic utility of cartilage, C2M, and synovial, C3M, turnover biomarkers in AS. Serum samples were retrieved from patients suffering from AS (n = 103), RA (n = 47) and healthy controls (n = 56). AS progressors were defined as having new vertebral syndesmophytes or more that 3 unit change in mSASSS over a two-year period. Type II collagen degradation markers in serum were measured by the C2M ELISA, and type III collagen degradation by the C3M ELISA. Logistic regression and dichotomized decision tree were used to analyze the prognostic value of the markers individually or in combination. Both C2M and C3M levels were significantly higher in RA patients than in healthy controls (p<0.0001). Diagnostic utility was analyzed by ROC and areas under the curve (AUCs) were 72% and 89% for C2M and C3M, respectively. Both C2M and C3M, were significantly higher in serum samples from AS patient than from healthy controls (p<0.0001). The AUCs of C2M and C3M, respectively, were 70% and 81% for AS. A combination of C2M and C3M, dichotomized according to best cut-offs for individual markers, could correctly identify 80% of the progressors and 61% of the non-progressors. The present study is the first to show that specific biomarkers of cartilage and connective tissue degradation facilitate both diagnosis and prediction of progression of RA and AS. PMID:23365672

  5. Non-marfan idiopathic medionecrosis (cystic medial necrosis) presenting with multiple visceral artery aneurysms and diffuse connective tissue fragility: Two brothers

    SciTech Connect

    Kubota, Jun; Tsunemura, Mami; Amano, Shigeko; Tokizawa, Shigemi; Oowada, Susumu; Shinkai, Hiroko; Maehara, Yasunobu; Endo, Keigo

    1997-05-15

    Two brothers with multiple visceral artery aneurysms or dilatations and diffuse connective tissue fragility who did not have clinical features of Marfan syndrome are reported. One presented with retroperitoneal hemorrhage during angiography, and idiopathic medionecrosis was proved by resection of the aneurysms. These cases belong to the heterogeneous group of Marfan syndrome. The angiographical features (multiple dilation of visceral arteries) suggests fragility of connective tissue and is predictive of hazards during and after a catheterization and operation.

  6. Computational modeling of type I collagen fibers to determine the extracellular matrix structure of connective tissues.

    PubMed

    Israelowitz, Meir; Rizvi, Syed W H; Kramer, James; von Schroeder, Herbert P

    2005-07-01

    A method is presented for generating computer models of biological tissues. The method uses properties of extracellular matrix proteins to predict the structure and physical chemistry of the elements that make up the tissue. The method begins with Protein Data Bank coordinate positions of amino acids as input into TissueLab software. From the amino acid sequence, a type I collagen-like triple helix backbone was computationally constructed and boundary spheres were added based on known chemical and physical properties of the amino acids. Boundary spheres determined the contact surface characteristics of the collagen molecules and intermolecular interactions were then determined by considering the relationships of the contact surfaces and by resolving the energy-minimum state using feasible sequential quadratic programming. From this, the software created fibrils that corresponded exactly to known collagen parameters and were further confirmed by finite element modeling. Computationally derived fibrils were then used to create collagen fibers and three-dimensional collagen matrices. By resolving the energy-minimum state, large complex components of the extracellular space as well as other structures can be determined to provide three-dimensional structure of molecules, molecular interactions and the tissues that they form. PMID:15980018

  7. Dynamics of connective-tissue localization during chronic Borrelia burgdorferi infection.

    PubMed

    Imai, Denise M; Feng, Sunlian; Hodzic, Emir; Barthold, Stephen W

    2013-08-01

    The etiologic agent of Lyme disease, Borrelia burgdorferi, localizes preferentially in the extracellular matrix during persistence. In chronically infected laboratory mice, there is a direct association between B. burgdorferi and the proteoglycan decorin, which suggests that decorin has a role in defining protective niches for persistent spirochetes. In this study, the tissue colocalization of B. burgdorferi with decorin and the dynamics of borrelial decorin tropism were evaluated during chronic infection. Spirochetes were found to colocalize absolutely with decorin, but not collagen I in chronically infected immunocompetent C3H mice. Passive immunization of infected C3H-scid mice with B. burgdorferi-specific immune serum resulted in the localization of spirochetes in decorin-rich microenvironments, with clearance of spirochetes from decorin-poor microenvironments. In passively immunized C3H-scid mice, tissue spirochete burdens were initially reduced, but increased over time as the B. burgdorferi-specific antibody levels waned. Concurrent repopulation of the previously cleared decorin-poor microenvironments was observed with the rising tissue spirochete burden and declining antibody titer. These findings indicate that the specificity of B. burgdorferi tissue localization during chronic infection is determined by decorin, driven by the borrelia-specific antibody response, and fluctuates with the antibody response. PMID:23797360

  8. Use of subepithelial connective tissue graft as a biological barrier: a human clinical and histologic case report.

    PubMed

    Santagata, Mario; Guariniello, Luigi; Prisco, Rosario V E; Tartaro, Gianpaolo; D'Amato, Salvatore

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to develop a method to study the healing process after gingival grafting and to observe the histologic results after use of the modified edentulous ridge expansion technique. A 47-year-old nonsmoking woman with a noncontributory past medical history affected by edentulism associated with a horizontal alveolar ridge defect was referred to the authors for surgical correction of the deficit to improve implant support and the final esthetics of an implant-borne prosthesis. At the 4-month follow-up visit, a biopsy was performed by a punch technique in the same sites of healing abutment connection. The tissue was elevated from the attached gingival. Clinically, the grafted tissues seemed to be attached to the bone surfaces. The histologic findings revealed dense grafted tissues, providing long-term stability to the area. No ligament or bone, characteristic for periodontal regeneration, were observed. The presence of thick attached keratinized tissue around implants may constitute a protective factor against marginal inflammation or trauma. PMID:23110330

  9. Unusual Glycosaminoglycans from a Deep Sea Hydrothermal Bacterium Improve Fibrillar Collagen Structuring and Fibroblast Activities in Engineered Connective Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Senni, Karim; Gueniche, Farida; Changotade, Sylvie; Septier, Dominique; Sinquin, Corinne; Ratiskol, Jacqueline; Lutomski, Didier; Godeau, Gaston; Guezennec, Jean; Colliec-Jouault, Sylvia

    2013-01-01

    Biopolymers produced by marine organisms can offer useful tools for regenerative medicine. Particularly, HE800 exopolysaccharide (HE800 EPS) secreted by a deep-sea hydrothermal bacterium displays an interesting glycosaminoglycan-like feature resembling hyaluronan. Previous studies demonstrated its effectiveness to enhance in vivo bone regeneration and to support osteoblastic cell metabolism in culture. Thus, in order to assess the usefulness of this high-molecular weight polymer in tissue engineering and tissue repair, in vitro reconstructed connective tissues containing HE800 EPS were performed. We showed that this polysaccharide promotes both collagen structuring and extracellular matrix settle by dermal fibroblasts. Furthermore, from the native HE800 EPS, a low-molecular weight sulfated derivative (HE800 DROS) displaying chemical analogy with heparan-sulfate, was designed. Thus, it was demonstrated that HE800 DROS mimics some properties of heparan-sulfate, such as promotion of fibroblast proliferation and inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) secretion. Therefore, we suggest that the HE800EPS family can be considered as an innovative biotechnological source of glycosaminoglycan-like compounds useful to design biomaterials and drugs for tissue engineering and repair. PMID:23612369

  10. Connective tissue growth factor stimulates the proliferation, migration and differentiation of lung fibroblasts during paraquat-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhizhou; Sun, Zhaorui; Liu, Hongmei; Ren, Yi; Shao, Danbing; Zhang, Wei; Lin, Jinfeng; Wolfram, Joy; Wang, Feng; Nie, Shinan

    2015-07-01

    It is well established that paraquat (PQ) poisoning can cause severe lung injury during the early stages of exposure, finally leading to irreversible pulmonary fibrosis. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is an essential growth factor that is involved in tissue repair and pulmonary fibrogenesis. In the present study, the role of CTGF was examined in a rat model of pulmonary fibrosis induced by PQ poisoning. Histological examination revealed interstitial edema and extensive cellular thickening of interalveolar septa at the early stages of poisoning. At 2 weeks after PQ administration, lung tissue sections exhibited a marked thickening of the alveolar walls with an accumulation of interstitial cells with a fibroblastic appearance. Masson's trichrome staining revealed a patchy distribution of collagen deposition, indicating pulmonary fibrogenesis. Western blot analysis and immunohistochemical staining of tissue samples demonstrated that CTGF expression was significantly upregulated in the PQ-treated group. Similarly, PQ treatment of MRC-5 human lung fibroblast cells caused an increase in CTGF in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the addition of CTGF to MRC-5 cells triggered cellular proliferation and migration. In addition, CTGF induced the differentiation of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts, as was evident from increased expression of ?-smooth muscle actin (?-SMA) and collagen. These findings demonstrate that PQ causes increased CTGF expression, which triggers proliferation, migration and differentiation of lung fibroblasts. Therefore, CTGF may be important in PQ-induced pulmonary fibrogenesis, rendering this growth factor a potential pharmacological target for reducing lung injury. PMID:25815693

  11. Neurologic autoimmunity: mechanisms revealed by animal models.

    PubMed

    Bradl, Monika; Lassmann, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, neurologic autoimmunity has become a major consideration in the diagnosis and management of patients with many neurologic presentations. The nature of the associated antibodies and their targets has led to appreciation of the importance of the accessibility of the target antigen to antibodies, and a partial understanding of the different mechanisms that can follow antibody binding. This chapter will first describe the basic principles of autoimmune inflammation and tissue damage in the central and peripheral nervous system, and will then demonstrate what has been learnt about neurologic autoimmunity from circumstantial clinical evidence and from passive, active, and occasionally spontaneous or genetic animal models. It will cover neurologic autoimmune diseases ranging from disorders of neuromuscular transmission, peripheral and ganglionic neuropathy, to diseases of the central nervous system, where autoantibodies are either pathogenic and cause destruction or changes in function of their targets, where they are harmless bystanders of T-cell-mediated tissue damage, or are not involved at all. Finally, this chapter will summarize the relevance of current animal models for studying the different neurologic autoimmune diseases, and it will identify aspects where future animal models need to be improved to better reflect the disease reality experienced by affected patients, e.g., the chronicity or the relapsing/remitting nature of their disease. PMID:27112675

  12. Molecular Diagnosis in Autoimmune Skin Blistering Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Otten, J.V.; Hashimoto, T.; Hertl, M.; Payne, A.S.; Sitaru, C.

    2014-01-01

    Blister formation in skin and mucous membranes results from a loss of cell-cell or cell-matrix adhesion and is a common outcome of pathological events in a variety of conditions, including autoimmune and genetic diseases, viral and bacterial infections, or injury by physical and chemical factors. Autoantibodies against structural components maintaining cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion induce tissue damage in autoimmune blistering diseases. Detection of these autoantibodies either tissue-bound or circulating in serum is essential to diagnose the autoimmune nature of disease. Various immunofluorescence methods as well as molecular immunoassays, including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunoblotting, belong to the modern diagnostic algorithms for these disorders. There is still a considerable need to increase awareness of the rare autoimmune blistering diseases, which often show a severe, chronic-relapsing course, among physicians and the public. This review article describes the immunopathological features of autoimmune bullous diseases and the molecular immunoassays currently available for their diagnosis and monitoring. PMID:24160488

  13. Cell Damage and Autoimmunity: A Critical Appraisal

    PubMed Central

    Leskovek, Natasha V.; Mackay, Ian R.; Rose, Noel R.

    2008-01-01

    In April 2007, an international Colloquium bridging scientific and clinical disciplines was held to discuss the role of cellular and tissue damage in the initiation, development and persistence of autoimmune disease. Five potential etiologic and pathophysiologic processes fundamental to autoimmune disease (i.e. inflammation, infection, apoptosis, environmental exposure and genetics were the focus of the presentations and integrative discussions at the Colloquium. The information presented on these topics is condensed in this review. Inflammation has close clinico-pathologic associations with autoimmunity, but future analyses will require better definition and metrics of inflammation, particularly for the earliest cellular and molecular components dependent on recruitment of elements of innate immunity. Although infection may be associated with increased levels of autoantibodies, most infections and virtually all vaccinations in humans lack well-established links to autoimmune diseases. Further application of well designed, long-term epidemiologic and population-based studies are urgently needed to relate antecedent exposures with later occurring stigmata of autoimmunity with a goal of discerning potentially susceptible individuals or subpopulations. Suspect infections requiring closer interrogation include EB virus (SLE and other diseases), HCV (autoimmune hepatitis), beta hemolytic streptococci (rheumatic carditis) and H. pylori (autoimmune gastritis) among others. And even if a micro-organism were to be incriminated, mechanisms of initiation/perpetuation of autoimmunity continue to challenge investigators. Plausible mechanisms include potentiation and diversion of innate immunity; exposure or spillage of intracellular autoantigens; or provision of autoantigenic mimics. Integrity of apoptosis as a critical safeguard against autoimmunity was discussed in the contexts of overreactivity causing autoantigens to gain enhanced exposure to the immune system, or under-reactivity producing insufficient elimination of autoreactive clones of lymphocytes. Although environmental agents are widely believed to serve as necessary triggers of autoimmune disease in genetically predisposed individuals, only a few such agents (mainly drugs and some nutrients) have been clearly identified and their mechanism of action defined. Finally an essential genetic foundation underlies all these hazards for autoimmunity in the form of risk-associated polymorphisms in immunoregulatory genes. They may be predictive of future or impending disease. PMID:18194728

  14. Ehlers–Danlos syndrome type VIII is clinically heterogeneous disorder associated primarily with periodontal disease, and variable connective tissue features

    PubMed Central

    Reinstein, Eyal; DeLozier, Celia Dawn; Simon, Ziv; Bannykh, Serguei; Rimoin, David L; Curry, Cynthia J

    2013-01-01

    Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (EDS) type VIII (periodontitis type) is a distinct form of EDS characterized by periodontal disease leading to precocious dental loss and a spectrum of joint and skin manifestations. EDS type VIII is transmitted in an autosomal dominant pattern; however, the mutated gene has not been identified. There are insufficient data on the spectrum of clinical manifestations and natural history of the disorder, and only a limited number of patients and pedigrees with this condition have been reported. We present a four-generation EDS type VIII kindred and show that EDS VIII is clinically variable and although some cases lack the associated skin and joint manifestations, microscopic evidence of collagen disorganization is detectable. We further propose that the diagnosis of EDS type VIII should be considered in familial forms of periodontitis, even when the associated skin and joint manifestations are unconvincing for the diagnosis of a connective tissue disorder. This novel observation highlights the uncertainty of using connective tissue signs in clinical practice to diagnose EDS type VIII. PMID:22739343

  15. Vascular and connective tissue anomalies associated with X-linked periventricular heterotopia due to mutations in Filamin A

    PubMed Central

    Reinstein, Eyal; Frentz, Sophia; Morgan, Tim; García-Miñaúr, Sixto; Leventer, Richard J; McGillivray, George; Pariani, Mitchel; van der Steen, Anthony; Pope, Michael; Holder-Espinasse, Muriel; Scott, Richard; Thompson, Elizabeth M; Robertson, Terry; Coppin, Brian; Siegel, Robert; Bret Zurita, Montserrat; Rodríguez, Jose I; Morales, Carmen; Rodrigues, Yuri; Arcas, Joaquín; Saggar, Anand; Horton, Margaret; Zackai, Elaine; Graham, John M; Rimoin, David L; Robertson, Stephen P

    2013-01-01

    Mutations conferring loss of function at the FLNA (encoding filamin A) locus lead to X-linked periventricular nodular heterotopia (XL-PH), with seizures constituting the most common clinical manifestation of this disorder in female heterozygotes. Vascular dilatation (mainly the aorta), joint hypermobility and variable skin findings are also associated anomalies, with some reports suggesting that this might represents a separate syndrome allelic to XL-PH, termed as Ehlers-Danlos syndrome-periventricular heterotopia variant (EDS-PH). Here, we report a cohort of 11 males and females with both hypomorphic and null mutations in FLNA that manifest a wide spectrum of connective tissue and vascular anomalies. The spectrum of cutaneous defects was broader than previously described and is inconsistent with a specific type of EDS. We also extend the range of vascular anomalies associated with XL-PH to included peripheral arterial dilatation and atresia. Based on these observations, we suggest that there is little molecular or clinical justification for considering EDS-PH as a separate entity from XL-PH, but instead propose that there is a spectrum of vascular and connective tissues anomalies associated with this condition for which all individuals with loss-of-function mutations in FLNA should be evaluated. In addition, since some patients with XL-PH can present primarily with a joint hypermobility syndrome, we propose that screening for cardiovascular manifestations should be offered to those patients when there are associated seizures or an X-linked pattern of inheritance. PMID:23032111

  16. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, Hypermobility Type: An Underdiagnosed Hereditary Connective Tissue Disorder with Mucocutaneous, Articular, and Systemic Manifestations

    PubMed Central

    Castori, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type, constituting a phenotypic continuum with or, perhaps, corresponding to the joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS/EDS-HT), is likely the most common, though the least recognized, heritable connective tissue disorder. Known for decades as a hereditary condition with predominant rheumatologic manifestations, it is now emerging as a multisystemic disorder with widespread manifestations. Nevertheless, the practitioners' awareness of this condition is generally poor and most patients await years or, perhaps, decades before reaching the correct diagnosis. Among the various sites of disease manifestations, skin and mucosae represent a neglected organ where the dermatologist can easily spot diagnostic clues, which consistently integrate joint hypermobility and other orthopedic/neurologic manifestations at physical examination. In this paper, actual knowledge on JHS/EDS-HT is summarized in various sections. Particular attention has been posed on overlooked manifestations, including cutaneous, mucosal, and oropharyngeal features, and early diagnosis techniques, as a major point of interest for the practicing dermatologist. Actual research progresses on JH/EDS-HT envisage an unexpected link between heritable dysfunctions of the connective tissue and a wide range of functional somatic syndromes, most of them commonly diagnosed in the office of various specialists, comprising dermatologists. PMID:23227356

  17. Effect of Th17 and Treg Axis Disorder on Outcomes of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in Connective Tissue Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lilei; Zhou, Xiaohui; Yang, Kang

    2014-01-01

    This prospective cohort study is to verify the hypothesis that the balance of Th17 and Treg cells frequencies in the peripheral circulation is disturbed in patients with varying degrees of connective tissue diseases-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension (CTD-aPAH) and to prove the influence of Th17/Treg imbalance on prognosis. We detected the frequencies and absolute counts of Th17 and Treg cells and related serum cytokines secretion and expressions of key transcription factors in 117 patients with connective tissue diseases (CTD), 53 patients with CTD-aPAH, and 48 healthy volunteers. Moreover, the median value according to levels of Th17/Treg ratios in patients with CTD-aPAH was chosen as basis of group division for survival analysis. CTD-aPAH patients revealed significant increase in peripheral Th17 cells, Th17-related cytokines, and ROR γt mRNA levels. They also presented a significant decrease in Treg cells, Treg-related cytokines, and Foxp3 mRNA levels as compared with CTD patients and healthy controls. More importantly, the Th17/Treg ratio was significantly related to the severity and prognosis of CTD-aPAH. This study indicated that the Th17/Treg axis disorder plays a critical role in CTD-aPAH. Furthermore, the dynamic balance between Th17 and Treg cells was likely to influence prognosis of patients with CTD-aPAH. PMID:25214713

  18. Migration of connective tissue-derived cells is mediated by ultra-low concentration gradient fields of EGF

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Qingjun; Majeska, Robert J.; Vazquez, Maribel

    2011-01-01

    The directed migration of cells towards chemical stimuli incorporates simultaneous changes in both the concentration of a chemotactic agent and its concentration gradient, each of which may influence cell migratory response. In this study, we utilized a microfluidic system to examine the interactions between Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) concentration and EGF gradient in stimulating the chemotaxis of connective-tissue derived fibroblast cells. Cells seeded within microfluidic devices were exposed to concentration gradients established by EGF concentrations that matched or exceeded those required for maximum chemotactic responses seen in transfilter migration assays. The migration of individual cells within the device was measured optically after steady-state gradients had been experimentally established. Results illustrate that motility was maximal at EGF concentration gradients between .01- and 0.1-ng/(mL.mm) for all concentrations used. In contrast, the numbers of motile cells continually increased with increasing gradient steepness for all concentrations examined. Microfluidics-based experiments exposed cells to minute changes in EGF concentration and gradient that were in line with the acute EGFR phosphorylation measured. Correlation of experimental data with established mathematical models illustrated that the fibroblasts studied exhibit an unreported chemosensitivity to minute changes in EGF concentration, similar to that reported for highly motile cells, such as macrophages. Our results demonstrate that shallow chemotactic gradients, while previously unexplored, are necessary to induce the rate of directed cellular migration and the number of motile cells in the connective tissue-derived cells examined. PMID:21536028

  19. Effect of sex hormones on blood pressure and vascular connective tissue in castrated and noncastrated male rats.

    PubMed

    Fischer, G M; Swain, M L

    1977-06-01

    Aortic collagen and elastin were quantitated in three groups of castrated and two groups of noncastrated male rats treated by intramuscular injection for 3 wk with oil, testosterone, or estradiol. The greatest differences were found between the castrated rats receiving testosterone and those receiving estradiol, the estradiol-treated rats having significantly lower total collagen, percent collagen, total elastin, and collagen/elastin (C/E), and higher percent elastin than those rats receiving testosterone. In noncastrated rats, administration of estradiol resulted in significantly lower total collagen, percent collagen, total elastin, and C/E. Systolic blood pressure was highest in rats receiving testerone and lowest in rats receiving estradiol. It is concluded that 1) estradiol in the presence or absence of testosterone decreases total accumulation of vascular connective tissue and alters the proportions of collagen and elastin so that the vessel is more distensible, 2) testosterone has an opposite but less marked effect than estradiol on vascular connective tissue, and 3) estradiol and testosterone alter blood pressure in opposite directions in the male rat. PMID:879300

  20. Muscle Degeneration in Neuramindase 1 Deficient Mice Results from Infiltration of the Muscle Fibers by Expanded Connective Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Zanoteli, Edmar; van de Vlekkert, Diantha; Bonten, Erik J.; Hu, Huimin; Mann, Linda; Gomero, Elida M.; Harris, A. John; Ghersi, Giulio; dAzzo, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Neuraminidase 1 (NEU1) regulates the catabolism of sialoglycoconjugates in lysosomes. Congenital NEU1 deficiency in children is the basis of sialidosis, a severe neurosomatic disorder in which patients experience a broad spectrum of clinical manifestations varying in the age of onset and severity. Osteoskeletal deformities and muscle hypotonia have been described in patients with sialidosis. Here we present the first comprehensive analysis of the skeletal muscle pathology associated with loss of Neu1 function in mice. In this animal model, skeletal muscles showed an expansion of the epimysial and perimysial spaces, associated with proliferation of fibroblast-like cells and abnormal deposition of collagens. Muscle fibers located adjacent to the expanded connective tissue underwent extensive invagination of their sarcolemma, which resulted in the infiltration of the fibers by fibroblast-like cells and extracellular matrix, and in their progressive cytosolic fragmentation. Both the expanded connective tissue and the juxtaposed infiltrated muscle fibers were strongly positive for lysosomal markers, and displayed increased proteolytic activity of lysosomal cathepsins and metalloproteinases. These combined features could lead to abnormal remodeling of the extracellular matrix that could be responsible for sarcolemmal invagination and progressive muscle fiber degeneration, ultimately resulting in an overt atrophic phenotype. This unique pattern of muscle damage, which has never been described in any myopathy, might explain the neuromuscular manifestations reported in patients with the type II severe form of sialidosis. More broadly, these findings point to a potential role of NEU1 in cell proliferation and extracellular matrix remodeling. PMID:20388541

  1. Molecular Mechanism for Connective Tissue Destruction by Dipeptidyl Aminopeptidase IV Produced by the Periodontal Pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Kumagai, Yumi; Yagishita, Hisao; Yajima, Ayako; Okamoto, Tatsuya; Konishi, Kiyoshi

    2005-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a pathogen associated with adult periodontitis. It produces dipeptidyl aminopeptidase IV (DPPIV), which may act as a virulence factor by contributing to the degradation of connective tissue. We investigated the molecular mechanism by which DPPIV contributes to the destruction of connective tissue. DPPIV itself did not show gelatinase or collagenase activity toward human type I collagen, but it promoted the activity of the host-derived matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) (gelatinase) and MMP-1 (collagenase). DPPIV bound to fibronectin and mediated the adhesion of P. gingivalis to fibronectin. Mutant DPPIV with catalytic Ser mutagenized to Ala (DPPSA) did not accelerate the degradation of collagen and gelatin by MMPs but retained fibronectin-binding activity. The adhesion of human gingival fibroblasts and NIH 3T3 cells to fibronectin was inhibited by DPPIV. Strain 4351ADPPSA exhibited an intermediate level of virulence in mice, between that of the strain expressing wild-type DPPIV (4351ADPP) and that of the strain harboring only the plasmid vector (4351AVEC). It is suggested that both activity promoting the degradation of collagen and gelatin and binding to fibronectin are required for full virulence. These results reveal novel biological functions of DPPIV and suggest a pathological role in the progression of periodontitis. PMID:15845467

  2. Increased connective tissue attachment to silicone implants by a water vapor plasma treatment.

    PubMed

    Jensen, C; Gurevich, L; Patriciu, A; Struijk, J J; Zachar, V; Pennisi, C P

    2012-12-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is the most common type of silicone polymer for the fabrication of implantable medical devices. Because of its inherent hydrophobic nature, the PDMS surface does not readily promote cellular adhesion, which leads to diverse clinical issues. Previously, we reported a simple water vapor plasma treatment of PDMS surfaces that resulted in stable long-term wettability and excellent in vitro cell compatibility. In this work, we report investigation of the in vivo local responses to PDMS implants treated by water vapor plasma using a subcutaneous rat model. The local tissue responses were assessed after 2 and 4 weeks of implantation by means of macroscopic and histomorphometric analysis. After 2 weeks of implantation, the plasma-treated implants elicited the formation of fibrous tissue capsules that were significantly thinner, more adherent, and vascularized than the control counterparts. The improved cell adhesion was correlated with an increased amount of cells attached to the implant surface after retrieval. There was no difference in the inflammatory response between untreated and treated samples. This study provides a rational approach to optimize the long-term performance of silicone implants, which is likely to have a significant impact in clinical applications demanding enhanced tissue integration of the implants. PMID:22767530

  3. The echinoderm collagen fibril: a hero in the connective tissue research of the 1990s.

    PubMed

    Szulgit, Greg

    2007-07-01

    Collagen fibrils are some of the most-abundant and important extracellular structures in our bodies, yet we are unsure of their shape and size. This is largely due to an inherent difficulty in isolating them from their surrounding tissues. Echinoderms have collagenous tissues that are similar to ours in many ways, yet they can be manipulated to easily relinquish their collagen fibrils, providing an excellent opportunity to study native fibrillar structure. In the early 1990s, they were found to defy the commonly accepted fibrillar model of the time in that they were much shorter, they were shaped like double-ended spindles, and their centers exhibited a reversal in molecular polarity. Realization of these features helped to reform the questions that were being asked about vertebrate fibrils, shifting the focus toward shape and size. Since then, researchers working with both groups (echinoderms and vertebrates) have worked together to find the structure of native fibrils. This information will be fundamental in understanding what holds collagenous tissues together at the fibrillar level, and could have important implications for people with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. PMID:17563083

  4. Hormonal modulation of connective tissue homeostasis and sex differences in risk for osteoarthritis of the knee

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Young female athletes experience a higher incidence of ligament injuries than their male counterparts, females experience a higher incidence of joint hypermobility syndrome (a risk factor for osteoarthritis development), and post-menopausal females experience a higher prevalence of osteoarthritis than age-matched males. These observations indicate that fluctuating sex hormone levels in young females and loss of ovarian sex hormone production due to menopause likely contribute to observed sex differences in knee joint function and risk for loss of function. In studies of osteoarthritis, however, there is a general lack of appreciation for the heterogeneity of hormonal control in both women and men. Progress in this field is limited by the relatively few preclinical osteoarthritis models, and that most of the work with established models uses only male animals. To elucidate sex differences in osteoarthritis, it is important to examine sex hormone mechanisms in cells from knee tissues and the sexual dimorphism in the role of inflammation at the cell, tissue, and organ levels. There is a need to determine if the risk for loss of knee function and integrity in females is restricted to only the knee or if sex-specific changes in other tissues play a role. This paper discusses these gaps in knowledge and suggests remedies. PMID:23374322

  5. Detection of Luse bodies, spiralled collagen, dysplastic collagen, and intracellular collagen in rheumatoid connective tissues: an electron microscopic study.

    PubMed Central

    Neurath, M F

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease leading to alterations of the extracellular matrix in tendons, ligaments, and cartilage. The structural changes of the collagenous systems in rheumatoid connective tissues are largely unknown, however. METHODS--Thirty four samples of menisci, 36 cruciate ligaments, and four tendons were taken during joint surgery in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. Eighteen menisci, 35 ligaments, and 30 tendons obtained at necropsy served as a control group. The extracellular matrix in the two groups was analysed by the combined use of transmission and scanning electron microscopy, immunohistochemistry with monoclonal antibodies recognising collagen types IV and VI, and ultramorphometry. RESULTS--Normal tendons and ligaments predominantly showed a unidirectional fibril arrangement. Whereas type IV collagen showed a positive staining pattern along all basement membranes, type VI collagen formed fine, filaments aligned in parallel. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis a significant reduction of the mean diameter of the collagen fibrils was found owing to the presence of thin collagenous fibrils 20-60 nm in diameter. Most of these fibrils showed considerable changes in their arrangement with irregular courses (so-called interfibrillar dysplastic collagen). Up to 410 nm thick frayed fibrils with irregular outlines (spiralled collagen) and intracellular collagen forms were found in rheumatoid tissues. In addition, atypical thick collagenous structures with 41 nm periodicity (Luse bodies) were detected in the matrix. The upregulation of type IV collagen in rheumatoid arthritis was associated with an increase in the vascular density. The expression of type VI collagen was upregulated in fibrotic zones. CONCLUSIONS--The dramatic ultrastructural collagen changes lead to a structural and functional insufficiency of the extracellular matrix in rheumatoid connective tissues. The results suggest that collagen alterations may contribute to the development of tendon and ligament ruptures in rheumatoid arthritis. Images PMID:8484694

  6. Autoimmunity in picornavirus infections.

    PubMed

    Massilamany, Chandirasegaran; Koenig, Andreas; Reddy, Jay; Huber, Sally; Buskiewicz, Iwona

    2016-02-01

    Enteroviruses are small, non-enveloped, positive-sense single-strand RNA viruses, and are ubiquitously found throughout the world. These viruses usually cause asymptomatic or mild febrile illnesses, but have a propensity to induce severe diseases including type 1 diabetes and pancreatitis, paralysis and neuroinflammatory disease, myocarditis, or hepatitis. This pathogenicity may result from induction of autoimmunity to organ-specific antigens. While enterovirus-triggered autoimmunity can arise from multiple mechanisms including antigenic mimicry and release of sequestered antigens, the recent demonstration of T cells expressing dual T cell receptors arising as a natural consequence of Theiler's virus infection is the first demonstration of this autoimmune mechanism. PMID:26554915

  7. Autoimmunity in visual loss.

    PubMed

    Petzold, Axel; Wong, Sui; Plant, Gordon T

    2016-01-01

    There are a number of autoimmune disorders which can affect visual function. There are a very large number of mechanisms in the visual pathway which could potentially be the targets of autoimmune attack. In practice it is the retina and the anterior visual pathway (optic nerve and chiasm) that are recognised as being affected in autoimmune disorders. Multiple Sclerosis is one of the commonest causes of visual loss in young adults because of the frequency of attacks of optic neuritis in that condition, however the basis of the inflammation in Multiple Sclerosis and the confirmation of autoimmunity is lacking. The immune process is known to be highly unusual in that it is not systemic and confined to the CNS compartment. Previously an enigmatic partner to Multiple Sclerosis, Neuromyelitis Optica is now established to be autoimmune and two antibodies - to Aquaporin4 and to Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein - have been implicated in the pathogenesis. The term Chronic Relapsing Inflammatory Optic Neuropathy is applied to those cases of optic neuritis which require long term immunosuppression and hence are presumed to be autoimmune but where no autoimmune pathogenesis has been confirmed. Optic neuritis occurring post-infection and post vaccination and conditions such as Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and various vasculitides may cause direct autoimmune attack to visual structures or indirect damage through occlusive vasculopathy. Chronic granulomatous disorders such as Sarcoidosis affect vision commonly by a variety of mechanisms, whether and how these are placed in the autoimmune panoply is unknown. As far as the retina is concerned Cancer Associated Retinopathy and Melanoma Associated Retinopathy are well characterised clinically but a candidate autoantibody (recoverin) is only described in the former disorder. Other, usually monophasic, focal retinal inflammatory disorders (Idiopathic Big Blind Spot Syndrome, Acute Zonal Occult Outer Retinopathy and Acute Macular Neuroretinitis) are of obscure pathogenesis but an autoimmune disorder of the post-infectious type is plausible. Visual loss in autoimmunity is an expanding field: the most significant advances in research have resulted from taking a well characterised phenotype and making educated guesses at the possible molecular targets of autoimmune attack. PMID:27112687

  8. Autoimmunity and the Gut

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Andrew W.

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases have increased dramatically worldwide since World War II. This is coincidental with the increased production and use of chemicals both in industrial countries and agriculture, as well as the ease of travel from region to region and continent to continent, making the transfer of a pathogen or pathogens from one part of the world to another much easier than ever before. In this review, triggers of autoimmunity are examined, principally environmental. The number of possible environmental triggers is vast and includes chemicals, bacteria, viruses, and molds. Examples of these triggers are given and include the mechanism of action and method by which they bring about autoimmunity. PMID:24900918

  9. MicroRNAs in Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Zigang; Li, Wenhui; Fu, Baoquan

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases (ADs) are featured by body's immune responses being directed towards its own specific target organs or multiple organ systems, causing persistent inflammation and consequent tissue damage. miRNAs are small noncoding RNAs in a size of approximately 22 nt that play important regulatory roles in many organisms by cleavage or translational inhibition of targeted mRNAs. Many miRNAs are reported to be differentially expressed in ADs and may play a pivotal role in regulating immune responses and autoimmunity. In this review, current research progress in the miRNAs in ADs was elucidated. PMID:24991561

  10. Does autoimmunity against thyroglobulin play a role in the pathogenesis of Graves’ ophthalmopathy: a review

    PubMed Central

    Shanmuganathan, Thayalini; Girgis, Christian; Lahooti, Hooshang; Champion, Bernard; Wall, Jack R

    2015-01-01

    While most authors believe that autoimmunity against the TSH receptor expressed in the orbital connective tissue cells is the main reaction that leads to the development of ophthalmopathy in patients with Graves’ hyperthyroidism, an older hypothesis that deserves fresh consideration is based on the notion that thyroglobulin (Tg) in the thyroid gland passes in a retrograde fashion to the orbit where it is recognized by Tg autoantibodies, leading to inflammation. Here, we review new evidence that supports a role of Tg and propose a new hypothesis based on the notion that Tg is targeted in the orbit leading to a complex cascade of reactions that leads to Graves’ ophthalmopathy. PMID:26664042

  11. Connective tissue growth factor is activated by gastrin and involved in gastrin-induced migration and invasion.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Sabin; Bakke, Ingunn; Kumar, J; Beisvag, Vidar; Sandvik, Arne K; Thommesen, Liv; Varro, Andrea; Nørsett, Kristin G

    2016-06-17

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) has been reported in gastric adenocarcinoma and in carcinoid tumors. The aim of this study was to explore a possible link between CTGF and gastrin in gastric epithelial cells and to study the role of CTGF in gastrin induced migration and invasion of AGS-GR cells. The effects of gastrin were studied using RT-qPCR, Western blot and assays for migration and invasion. We report an association between serum gastrin concentrations and CTGF abundancy in the gastric corpus mucosa of hypergastrinemic subjects and mice. We found a higher expression of CTGF in gastric mucosa tissue adjacent to tumor compared to normal control tissue. We showed that gastrin induced expression of CTGF in gastric epithelial AGS-GR cells via MEK, PKC and PKB/AKT pathways. CTGF inhibited gastrin induced migration and invasion of AGS-GR cells. We conclude that CTGF expression is stimulated by gastrin and involved in remodeling of the gastric epithelium. PMID:27179776

  12. Integrin-extracellular matrix interactions in connective tissue remodeling and osteoblast differentiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, R. K.; Moursi, A.; Zimmerman, D.; Lull, J.; Damsky, C.

    1995-01-01

    The differentiaton of bone cells is a complex multistep process. Bone is somewhat unusual in that it is very actively and continually remodeled in the adult and that maintenance of its mass in the mature organism is exquisitely sensitive to mechanical as well as chemical signals. Bone is also unique because it consists of a very large amount of extracellular matrix (ECM) that is mineralized. The integrin family of ECM receptors has been shown to play an important role in tissue morphogenesis in several systems. Our studies on the regulation of matrix remodeling enzymes by integrins in rabbit synovial fibroblasts show that two b1 integrin fibronectin (FN) receptor complexes (alpha 5 beta 1 and alpha 4 beta 1) cooperate in detecting subtle changes in the composition of the ECM. As a result of signal transduction by these integrins, the levels of mRNA and protein for several members of the metalloproteinase family are regulated in these cells. We have also used antibody and RGD peptide perturbation studies to determine the significance of cell/ECM interactions to normal osteogenesis. We found that interactions between the cell binding domain of FN and integrins are required for both normal morphogenesis and gene expression in cultured osteoblasts that differentiate to form bone-like tissue in culture. These data lead us to propose that beta 1 integrins play an important role in osteoblast differentiation as well as in bone remodeling.

  13. Type 1 diabetes and polyglandular autoimmune syndrome: A review

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Martin P; Matheis, Nina; Kahaly, George J

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disorder caused by inflammatory destruction of the pancreatic tissue. The etiopathogenesis and characteristics of the pathologic process of pancreatic destruction are well described. In addition, the putative susceptibility genes for T1D as a monoglandular disease and the relation to polyglandular autoimmune syndrome (PAS) have also been well explored. The incidence of T1D has steadily increased in most parts of the world, especially in industrialized nations. T1D is frequently associated with autoimmune endocrine and non-endocrine diseases and patients with T1D are at a higher risk for developing several glandular autoimmune diseases. Familial clustering is observed, which suggests that there is a genetic predisposition. Various hypotheses pertaining to viral- and bacterial-induced pancreatic autoimmunity have been proposed, however a definitive delineation of the autoimmune pathomechanism is still lacking. In patients with PAS, pancreatic and endocrine autoantigens either colocalize on one antigen-presenting cell or are expressed on two/various target cells sharing a common amino acid, which facilitates binding to and activation of T cells. The most prevalent PAS phenotype is the adult type 3 variant or PAS type III, which encompasses T1D and autoimmune thyroid disease. This review discusses the findings of recent studies showing noticeable differences in the genetic background and clinical phenotype of T1D either as an isolated autoimmune endocrinopathy or within the scope of polyglandular autoimmune syndrome. PMID:25685279

  14. Autoimmune liver disease panel

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lindor KD. Primary biliary cirrhosis. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal ... Czaia AJ. Autoimmune hepatitis. In: In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal ...

  15. Autoimmune Lymphoproliferative Syndrome (ALPS)

    MedlinePlus

    ... About NIAID News & Events Volunteer NIAID > Health & Research Topics > Autoimmune Lymphproliferative Syndrome (ALPS) Skip Website Tools Website Tools Print this page Order publications ​​​​​ Contact Info​ View a list of ...

  16. The neuroimmune connection interferes with tissue regeneration and chronic inflammatory disease in the skin.

    PubMed

    Peters, Eva M J; Liezmann, Christiane; Klapp, Burghard F; Kruse, Johannes

    2012-07-01

    Research over the past decades has revealed close interactions between the nervous and immune systems that regulate peripheral inflammation and link psychosocial stress with chronic somatic disease. Besides activation of the sympathetic and the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis, stress leads to increased neurotrophin and neuropeptide production in organs at the self-environment interface. The scope of this short review is to discuss key functions of these stress mediators in the skin, an exemplary stress-targeted and stress-sensitive organ. We will focus on the skin's response to acute and chronic stress in tissue regeneration and pathogenesis of allergic inflammation, psoriasis, and skin cancer to illustrate the impact of local stress-induced neuroimmune interaction on chronic inflammation. PMID:22823443

  17. Antigenic properties of a non-collagenous reticulin component of normal connective tissue

    PubMed Central

    Pras, M.; Johnson, G. D.; Holborow, E. J.; Glynn, L. E.

    1974-01-01

    Rabbit antisera raised against a saline-insoluble non-collagenous reticulin component (NCRC) of pig and human kidney gave immunofluorescent staining of basement membranes, stroma of liver and kidney and newly formed blood vessels in pig, rat and human tissue. The staining patterns closely resembled those reported for anti-reticulin antibodies, and both species-specific and species-shared determinants could be distinguished. Although the antisera reacted least with rat glomeruli in cryostat sections, rabbit immunoglobulin localized persistently but harmlessly in the renal glomeruli of rats given the antisera intravenously. Absorption with NCRC of sera from patients with gluten-sensitive enteropathy in most cases removed the anti-reticulin antibody characteristic of this group of diseases. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5 PMID:4137544

  18. Viral triggers for autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Christen, Urs; Hintermann, Edith; Holdener, Martin; von Herrath, Matthias G.

    2009-01-01

    In this review we want to consider some of the requirements for autoimmune disease to develop and how this may be reproduced in animal models. Besides a genetic predisposition, environmental triggering factors seem to play a central role in the etiology of many autoimmune diseases. In theory, a structural similarity or identity between the host and an invading pathogen might cause the immune system of the host to react not only to the pathogen but also to self-components. However, in order for such a process of molecular mimicry to induce autoimmunity the mechanisms of maintaining tolerance or ignorance to the self-components need to be circumvented. Subsequently, in order to advance autoimmunity to overt autoimmune disease the frequency and avidity of autoaggressive lymphocytes has to be of sufficient magnitude. Intuitively, one would assume that tolerance might be stronger to identical structures than to structures that just share a certain degree of similarity. Self-reactive lymphocytes with high-avidity are more likely to be deleted or functionally silenced by central and/or peripheral tolerance mechanisms. Thus, perfect mimicry between identical structures might fail in inducing autoimmunity because of efficient tolerance mechanisms. In contrast, imperfect mimicry between similar but not identical structures might on one hand circumvent tolerance but on the other hand result in the generation of lymphocytes with only low- to intermediate avidity. Here we examine animal models that use the concept of molecular mimicry as a potential mechanism for inducing or accelerating autoimmunity. We focus on the RIP-LCMV model for type 1 diabetes and the novel cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) model for autoimmune hepatitis, which use either identical or similar triggering and target antigens. PMID:19716269

  19. Influence of laser photobiomodulation upon connective tissue remodeling during wound healing.

    PubMed

    Medrado, Alena P; Soares, Ana Prates; Santos, Elisngela T; Reis, Slvia Regina A; Andrade, Zilton A

    2008-09-18

    The modulation of collagen fibers during experimental skin wound healing was studied in 112 Wistar rats submitted to laser photobiomodulation treatment. A standardized 8mm-diameter wound was made on the dorsal skin of all animals. In half of them, 0.2ml of a silica suspension was injected along the border of the wound in order to enhance collagen deposition and facilitate observation. The others received saline as vehicle. The treatment was carried out by means of laser rays from an aluminum-gallium arsenide diode semiconductor with 9mW applied every other day (total dose=4J/cm2) on the borders of the wound. Tissue sections obtained from four experimental groups representing sham-irradiated animals, laser, silica and the association of both, were studied after 3, 7, 10, 15, 20, 30 and 60 days from the laser application. The wounded skin area was surgically removed and submitted to histological, immunohistochemical, ultrastructural, and immunofluorescent studies. Besides the degree and arrangement of collagen fibers and of their isotypes, the degree of edema, the presence of several cell types especially pericytes and myofibroblasts, were described and measured. The observation of Sirius-red stained slides under polarized microscopy revealed to be of great help during the morphological analysis of the collagen tissue dynamic changes. It was demonstrated that laser application was responsible for edema regression and a diminution in the number of inflammatory cells (p<0.05). An evident increase in the number of actin-positive cells was observed in the laser-treated wounds. Collagen deposition was less than expected in silica-treated wounds, and laser treatment contributed to its better differentiation and modulation in all irradiated groups. Thus, laser photobiomodulation was able to induce several modifications during the cutaneous healing process, especially in favoring newly-formed collagen fibers to be better organized and compactedly disposed. PMID:18602833

  20. Autoimmunity in Waldenstrm's macroglobulinaemia.

    PubMed

    Jnsson, V; Kierkegaard, A; Salling, S; Molander, S; Andersen, L P; Christiansen, M; Wiik, A

    1999-07-01

    Fifty-seven consecutive patients with Waldenstrm's Macroglobuliemia were studied retrospectively for autoimmune manifestations. 28 patients or 51% (16 women and 13 men) had clinical and/or serological autoimmune manifestations, two or more of these being concomitant in 20 (12 women and 8 men). The predominant findings were Coombs' positive autoimmune hemolytic anemia (16%), seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (16%), inflammatory gastric ulcer with parietal cell autoantibodies (12%), and IgM-cardiolipin syndrome (11%). 40% of the autoimmune manifestations were present at the time of diagnosis of the Waldenstrm's Macroglobulinaemia and 60% were observed over a mean period of 4.7 years. All patients had an IgM M-component. There was no correlation between autoimmunity and the size of the M-component or the degree of hypo-IgG and hypo-IgA gammaglobulinemia. The only correlation between autoimmunity and infection was found in patients with gastric ulcer and parietal cell autoantibodies, in whom the infection was caused by Helicobacter pylori. PMID:10439374

  1. Autoimmunity in 2013.

    PubMed

    Selmi, Carlo

    2014-08-01

    The peer-reviewed publications in the field of autoimmunity published in 2013 represented a significant proportion of immunology articles and grew since the previous year to indicate that more immune-mediated phenomena may recognize an autoimmune mechanism and illustrated by osteoarthritis and atherosclerosis. As a result, our understanding of the mechanisms of autoimmunity is becoming the paradigm for translational research in which the progress in disease pathogenesis for both tolerance breakdown and inflammation perpetuation is rapidly followed by new treatment approaches and clinical management changes. The similarities across the autoimmune disease spectrum outnumber differences, particularly when treatments are compared. Indeed, the therapeutics of autoimmune diseases are based on a growing armamentarium that currently includes monoclonal antibodies and small molecules which act by targeting molecular markers or intracellular mediators with high specificity. Among the over 100 conditions considered as autoimmune, the common grounds are well illustrated by the data reported for systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis or by the plethora of studies on Th17 cells and biomarkers, particularly serum autoantibodies. Further, we are particularly intrigued by studies on the genomics, epigenetics, and microRNA at different stages of disease development or on the safe and effective use of abatacept acting on the costimulation of T and B cells in rheumatoid arthritis. We are convinced that the data published in 2013 represent a promising background for future developments that will exponentially impact the work of laboratory and clinical scientists over the next years. PMID:24819586

  2. The epigenetics of autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Meda, Francesca; Folci, Marco; Baccarelli, Andrea; Selmi, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    The etiology of autoimmune diseases remains largely unknown. Concordance rates in monozygotic twins are lower than 50% while genome-wide association studies propose numerous significant associations representing only a minority of patients. These lines of evidence strongly support other complementary mechanisms involved in the regulation of genes expression ultimately causing overt autoimmunity. Alterations in the post-translational modification of histones and DNA methylation are the two major epigenetic mechanisms that may potentially cause a breakdown of immune tolerance and the perpetuation of autoimmune diseases. In recent years, several studies both in clinical settings and experimental models proposed that the epigenome may hold the key to a better understanding of autoimmunity initiation and perpetuation. More specifically, data support the impact of epigenetic changes in systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune diseases, in some cases based on mechanistical observations. We herein discuss what we currently know and what we expect will come in the next future. Ultimately, epigenetic treatments already being used in oncology may soon prove beneficial also in autoimmune diseases. PMID:21278766

  3. Serum amyloid P-component levels in amyloidosis, connective tissue diseases, infection, and malignancy as compared to normal serum.

    PubMed

    Skinner, M; Vaitukaitis, J L; Cohen, A S; Benson, M D

    1979-10-01

    A highly sensitive radioimmunoassay was developed to measure the serum levels of SAP. Sera from 50 normal individuals ranging in age from 4 to 89 years had a mean level of 7.47 mg/dl and showed no variations with age. Sera from persons with various clinical types of amyloidosis, connective tissue diseases, and bacterial pneumonia did not differ significantly from normal values. A significant difference was noted in the sera from persons with malignancy, where a mean value of 10.79 mg/dl was determined. Although a number of similarities exist between SAP and CRP, SAP does not share the property of being an acute-phase reactant. PMID:479670

  4. Development of diagnostic and treatment strategies for glaucoma through understanding and modification of scleral and lamina cribrosa connective tissue

    PubMed Central

    Quigley, Harry A.; Cone, Frances E.

    2013-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that the state of ocular connective tissues and their response in glaucomatous disease affects the degree of glaucoma damage. Both experimental and clinical data suggest that improved diagnostic and prognostic information could be derived from assessment of the mechanical responsiveness of the sclera and lamina cribrosa to intraocular pressure (IOP). Controlled mutagenesis of the sclera has produced a mouse strain that is relatively resistant to increased IOP. Alteration of the baseline scleral state could be accomplished through either increased cross-linking of fibrillar components or their reduction. The sclera is a dynamic structure, altering its structure and behavior in response to IOP change. The biochemical pathways that control these responses are fertile areas for new glaucoma treatments. PMID:23535950

  5. Relation between regional echo intensity and myocardial connective tissue in chronic left ventricular disease.

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, T R; Logan-Sinclair, R B; Surin, C; McAnulty, R J; Heard, B; Laurent, G J; Gibson, D G

    1984-01-01

    Cross sectional echocardiograms were recorded within one week of death in seven patients with valvular heart disease, four with coronary artery disease, and nine with congenital heart disease. Regional echo amplitude was measured from the cross sectional display by constructing histograms of pixel intensity. Parietal pericardium was used as an internal standard for setting the gain of the instrument. At necropsy myocardium was taken from the free wall of the left ventricle, the papillary muscles, and the septum. Fibrosis was assessed histologically and biochemically as hydroxyproline content. In individual samples histological and biochemical estimates were correlated. In all regions other than the septum in patients with left ventricular hypertrophy, log [collagen] correlated with median pixel intensity. The amplitude of reflected echoes from the hypertrophied septum was significantly higher than that from other samples but was similarly correlated with collagen content. Agreement between echo amplitude and histological grade was significantly less good. Thus in chronic left ventricular disease myocardial collagen content appears to be the major determinant of regional echo intensity. Reproducibility of measurements and more rigorous definition of tissue abnormalities will, however, require further study. Images PMID:6689920

  6. Changes in bone tissue under conditions of hypokinesia and in connection with age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podrushnyak, E. P.; Suslov, E. I.

    1980-01-01

    X-ray micrography was used to study the optical density of the blackening of X-ray photographs made of five bones in 9 young people (ages 24 to 29) before and after strict bed rest for 16 to 37 days. Photometric studies of the X-ray film determined the relative concentration of bone structure before and after hypokinesia. In addition, the bone tissues of 25 cadavers of practically healthy individuals (aged 18 to 70) who died from injuries were investigated using X-ray structural analysis. Results show that the reaction to the state of hypokinesia is not uniform in different individuals and is quite often directly reversed. It was established that pronounced osteoporosis can be found in a relatively short time after conditions of hypokinesia in healthy young individuals. Results show that the stabilization of the crystalline structure of hydroxyapatite, especially its crystal formation, is finished by the age of 20 to 25. From 25 to 60, the crystal lattice remains in stable condition but X-ray analysis shows a reduction in the hydroxyapatite density.

  7. Methotrexate inhibits neutrophil function by stimulating adenosine release from connective tissue cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cronstein, B.N.; Eberle, M.A.; Levin, R.I. ); Gruber, H.E. )

    1991-03-15

    Although commonly used to control a variety of inflammatory diseases, the mechanism of action of a low dose of methotrexate remains a mystery. Methotrexate accumulates intracellularly where it may interfere with purine metabolism. Therefore, the authors determined whether a 48-hr pretreatment with methotrexate affected adenosine release from ({sup 14}C)adenine-labeled human fibroblasts and umbilical vein endothelial cells. Methotrexate significantly increased adenosine release by fibroblasts. The effect of methotrexate on adenosine release was not due to cytotoxicity since cells treated with maximal concentrations of methotrexate took up ({sup 14}C)adenine and released {sup 14}C-labeled purine (a measure of cell injury) in a manner identical to control cells. Methotrexate treatment of fibroblasts dramatically inhibited adherence to fibroblasts by both unstimulated neutrophils and stimulated neutrophils. One hypothesis that explains the effect of methotrexate on adenosine release is that, by inhibition of 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) transformylase, methotrexate induces the accumulation of AICAR, the nucleoside precursor of which has previously been shown to cause adenosine release from ischemic cardiac tissue. The observation that the antiinflammatory actions of methotrexate are due to the capacity of methotrexate to induce adenosine release may form the basis for the development of an additional class of antiinflammatory drugs.

  8. The Zinc Transporter SLC39A13/ZIP13 Is Required for Connective Tissue Development; Its Involvement in BMP/TGF-β Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Shimoda, Shinji; Mishima, Kenji; Higashiyama, Hiroyuki; Idaira, Yayoi; Asada, Yoshinobu; Kitamura, Hiroshi; Yamasaki, Satoru; Hojyo, Shintaro; Nakayama, Manabu; Ohara, Osamu; Koseki, Haruhiko; dos Santos, Heloisa G.; Bonafe, Luisa; Ha-Vinh, Russia; Zankl, Andreas; Unger, Sheila; Kraenzlin, Marius E.; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Saito, Ichiro; Rivolta, Carlo; Ikegawa, Shiro; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Hirano, Toshio

    2008-01-01

    Background Zinc (Zn) is an essential trace element and it is abundant in connective tissues, however biological roles of Zn and its transporters in those tissues and cells remain unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we report that mice deficient in Zn transporter Slc39a13/Zip13 show changes in bone, teeth and connective tissue reminiscent of the clinical spectrum of human Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS). The Slc39a13 knockout (Slc39a13-KO) mice show defects in the maturation of osteoblasts, chondrocytes, odontoblasts, and fibroblasts. In the corresponding tissues and cells, impairment in bone morphogenic protein (BMP) and TGF-β signaling were observed. Homozygosity for a SLC39A13 loss of function mutation was detected in sibs affected by a unique variant of EDS that recapitulates the phenotype observed in Slc39a13-KO mice. Conclusions/Significance Hence, our results reveal a crucial role of SLC39A13/ZIP13 in connective tissue development at least in part due to its involvement in the BMP/TGF-β signaling pathways. The Slc39a13-KO mouse represents a novel animal model linking zinc metabolism, BMP/TGF-β signaling and connective tissue dysfunction. PMID:18985159

  9. Experiment K-7-29: Connective Tissue Studies. Part 1; Rat Skin, Normal and Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vailas, A. C.; Grindeland, R.; Ashman, R.; Choy, V.; Durnova, G.; Graf, B.; Griffith, P.; Kaplansky, A. S.; Kolis, S.; Martinez, D.; Rao, J. S.; Rayford, A. R.; Reddy, B. R.; Sears, J.; Thielke, R.; Ulm, M.; Vanderby, R.

    1994-01-01

    The skin repair studies started to be problematic for the following reasons: (1) It was very difficult to locate the wound and many lesions were not of the same dimensions. A considerable amount of time was devoted to the identification of the wound using polarized light. We understand that this experiment was added on to the overall project. Marking of the wound site and standard dimensions should be recommended for the next flight experiment. (2) The tissue was frozen, therefore thawing and fixation caused problems with some of the immunocytochemical staining for obtaining better special resolution with light microscopy image processing. Despite these problems, we were unable to detect any significant qualitative differences for the following wound markers: (1) Collagen Type 3, (2) Hematotoxylin and Eosin, and (3) Macrophage Factor 13. All protein markers were isolated from rat sources and antibodies prepared and tested for cross reactivity with other molecules at the University of Wisconsin Hybridoma Facility. However, rat skin from the non lesioned site 'normal' showed interesting biochemical results. Skin was prepared for the following measurements: (1) DNA content, (2) Collagen content by hydroxyproline, and (3) uronic acid content and estimation of ground substance. The results indicated there was a non-significant increase (10%) in the DNA concentration of skin from flight animals. However, the data expressed as a ratio DNA/Collagen estimates the cell or nuclear density that supports a given quantity of collagen showed a dramatic increase in the flight group (33%). This means flight conditions may have slowed down collagen secretion and/or increased cell proliferation in adult rat skin. Further biochemical tests are being done to determine the crosslinking of elastin which will enhance the insight to assessing changes in skin turnover.

  10. Biocompatibility of RealSeal, its primer and AH Plus implanted in subcutaneous connective tissue of rats

    PubMed Central

    GRECCA, Fabiana Soares; KOPPER, Patrícia Maria Poli; dos SANTOS, Régis Burmeister; FOSSATI, Anna Christina; CARRARD, Vinicius Coelho; ACASIGUA, Gerson Arison Xavier; de FIGUEIREDO, José Antônio Poli

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study tested rat connective tissue response to RealSeal, RealSeal primer or AH Plus after 7, 15, 30, 60 and 90 days of implantation. Material and methods Thirty Wistar rats had subcutaneous sockets created on their back and received four implants each of polyethylene tubes containing one of the materials tested according to the groups: AH (AH Plus Sealer); RS (RealSeal Sealer); RP (RealSeal Primer); CG (control group – empty tube). After histological processing, sections were analyzed to identify the presence of neutrophils, lymphocytes and plasma cells, eosinophils, macrophages and giant cells, as well as fibrous capsule and abscesses, by an examiner using light microscope. Kruskal- Wallis and multiple-comparisons test were used for statistical analysis. Significance level was set at 5%. Results Lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate scores significantly higher than those of the control group were observed at 14 and 60 days in AH group, and at 90 days in RS group (p<0.05). There were no differences in terms of presence of macrophages, giant cells, eosinophils, neutrophils or fibrosis. AH Plus group scored higher for abscesses at 7 days than after any other period (p=0.031). RP group scored higher for lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate at 14 days than at 90 days (p=0.04). Conclusion The main contribution of this study was to demonstrate that issues involved with tissue tolerance of a Resilon-containing sealer, RealSeal Sealer, cannot be attributed to its primer content. PMID:21437470

  11. Decorin Interacts with Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF)/CCN2 by LRR12 Inhibiting Its Biological Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Vial, Cecilia; Gutiérrez, Jaime; Santander, Cristian; Cabrera, Daniel; Brandan, Enrique

    2011-01-01

    Fibrotic disorders are the end point of many chronic diseases in different tissues, where an accumulation of the extracellular matrix occurs, mainly because of the action of the connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2). Little is known about how this growth factor activity is regulated. We found that decorin null myoblasts are more sensitive to CTGF than wild type myoblasts, as evaluated by the accumulation of fibronectin or collagen III. Decorin added exogenously negatively regulated CTGF pro-fibrotic activity and the induction of actin stress fibers. Using co-immunoprecipitation and in vitro interaction assays, decorin and CTGF were shown to interact in a saturable manner with a Kd of 4.4 nm. This interaction requires the core protein of decorin. Experiments using the deletion mutant decorin indicated that the leucine-rich repeats (LRR) 10–12 are important for the interaction with CTGF and the negative regulation of the cytokine activity, moreover, a peptide derived from the LRR12 was able to inhibit CTGF-decorin complex formation and CTGF activity. Finally, we showed that CTGF specifically induced the synthesis of decorin, suggesting a mechanism of autoregulation. These results suggest that decorin interacts with CTGF and regulates its biological activity. PMID:21454550

  12. Increased connective tissue growth factor associated with cardiac fibrosis in the mdx mouse model of dystrophic cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Au, Carol G; Butler, Tanya L; Sherwood, Megan C; Egan, Jonathan R; North, Kathryn N; Winlaw, David S

    2011-01-01

    Cardiomyopathy contributes to morbidity and mortality in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a progressive muscle-wasting disorder. A major feature of the hearts of DMD patients and the mdx mouse model of the disease is cardiac fibrosis. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is involved in the fibrotic process in many organs. This study utilized the mdx mouse model to assess the role of CTGF and other extracellular matrix components during the development of fibrosis in the dystrophic heart. Left ventricular function of mdx and control mice at 6, 29 and 43 weeks was measured by echocardiography. Young (6 weeks old) mdx hearts had normal function and histology. At 29 weeks of age, mdx mice developed cardiac fibrosis and increased collagen expression. The onset of fibrosis was associated with increased CTGF transcript and protein expression. Increased intensity of CTGF immunostaining was localized to fibrotic areas in mdx hearts. The upregulation of CTGF was also concurrent with increased expression of tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMP-1). These changes persisted in 43 week old mdx hearts and were combined with impaired cardiac function and increased gene expression of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2, MMP-9). In summary, an association was observed between cardiac fibrosis and increased CTGF expression in the mdx mouse heart. CTGF may be a key mediator of early and persistent fibrosis in dystrophic cardiomyopathy. PMID:21121985

  13. Restricting dietary magnesium accelerates ectopic connective tissue mineralization in a mouse model of pseudoxanthoma elasticum (Abcc6?/?)

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Qiujie; Uitto, Jouni

    2012-01-01

    Ectopic mineralization, linked to a number of diseases, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in humans. Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) is a heritable multisystem disorder characterized by calcium phosphate deposition in various tissues. The mineral content of diet has been suggested to modify the disease severity in PXE. The aim of this study is to explore the role of diet with reduced magnesium in modifying tissue mineralization in a mouse model of PXE. Abcc6?/? mice were placed on either standard rodent diet (control) or an experimental diet low in magnesium at weaning (4 wks) and examined for mineralization in the skin and internal organs at the ages of 1.5, 2 or 6 months by computerized morphometric analysis of histopathologic sections and by chemical assay of calcium and phosphate. Experimental Abcc6?/? mice demonstrated an accelerated, early-onset mineralization of connective tissues, as compared to control mice. Wild-type or heterozygous mice on experimental diet did not show evidence of mineralization up to 6 months of age. All mice on experimental diet showed decreased urinary calcium, increased urinary phosphate and elevated parathyroid serum levels. However, no difference in bone density at 6 months of age was noted. Our findings indicate that the mineral content, particularly magnesium, can modify the extent and the onset of mineralization in Abcc6?/? mice, and suggest that dietary magnesium levels may contribute to the phenotypic variability of PXE. The control of mineralization by dietary magnesium may have broader implications in general population in the context of vascular mineralization. PMID:22897576

  14. Connective Tissue Growth Factor Reporter Mice Label a Subpopulation of Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells that Reside in the Trabecular Bone Region

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wen; Strecker, Sara; Liu, Yaling; Wang, Liping; Assanah, Fayekah; Smith, Spenser; Maye, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Few gene markers selectively identify mesenchymal progenitor cells inside the bone marrow. We have investigated a cell population located in the mouse bone marrow labeled by Connective Tissue Growth Factor reporter expression (CTGF-EGFP). Bone marrow flushed from CTGF reporter mice yielded an EGFP+ stromal cell population. Interestingly, the percentage of stromal cells retaining CTGF reporter expression decreased with age in vivo and was half the frequency in females compared to males. In culture, CTGF reporter expression and endogenous CTGF expression marked the same cell types as those labeled using Twist2-Cre and Osterix-Cre fate mapping approaches, which previously has been shown to identify mesenchymal progenitors in vitro. Consistent with this past work, sorted CTGF+ cells displayed an ability to differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes in vitro and into osteoblast, adipocyte, and stromal cell lineages after transplantation into a parietal bone defect. In vivo examination of CTGF reporter expression in bone tissue sections revealed it marked cells highly localized to the trabecular bone region and was not expressed in the perichondrium or periosteum. Mesenchymal cells retaining high CTGF reporter expression were adjacent to, but distinct from mature osteoblasts lining bone surfaces and endothelial cells forming the vascular sinuses. Comparison of CTGF and Osterix reporter expression in bone tissue sections indicated an inverse correlation between the strength of CTGF expression and osteoblast maturation. Down-regulation of CTGF reporter expression also occurred during in vitro osteogenic differentiation. Collectively, our studies indicate that CTGF reporter mice selectively identify a subpopulation of bone marrow mesenchymal progenitor cells that reside in the trabecular bone region. PMID:25464947

  15. Induction of anti-proliferative connective tissue growth factor expression in Wilms tumor cells by sphingosine 1-phosphate receptor 2

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mei-Hong; Sanchez, Teresa; Pappalardo, Anna; Lynch, Kevin R.; Hla, Timothy; Ferrer, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF), a member of the CCN family of secreted matricellular proteins, regulates fibrosis, angiogenesis, cell proliferation, apoptosis, tumor growth and metastasis. However, the role of CTGF and its regulation mechanism in Wilms tumor remains largely unknown. We found that the bioactive lipid sphingosine-1 phosphate (S1P) induced CTGF expression in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in a Wilms tumor cell line (WiT49), while FTY720-P, an S1P analogue that binds all S1P receptors except S1P2, did not. Further, the specific S1P2 antagonist JTE-013 completely inhibited S1P-induced CTGF expression, whereas the S1P1 antagonist VPC44116 did not, indicating this effect was mediated by S1P2. This was confirmed by adenoviral transduction of S1P2 in WiT49 cells, which showed that overexpression of S1P2 increased the expression of CTGF. Induction of CTGF by S1P was sensitive to ROCK inhibitor Y-27632 and JNK inhibitor SP600125, suggesting the requirement of RhoA/ROCK and JNK pathways for S1P-induced CTGF expression. Interestingly, the expression levels of CTGF were decreased in 8 out of 10 Wilms tumor tissues compared with matched normal tissues by quantitative real-time PCR and western blot analysis. In vitro, human recombinant CTGF significantly inhibited the proliferation of WiT49 cells. In addition, overexpression of CTGF resulted in significant inhibition of WiT49 cell growth. Taken together, these data suggest that CTGF protein induced by S1P2 might act as a growth inhibitor in Wilms tumor. PMID:18922980

  16. Survival of Danish cancer patients 1943-1987. Eye, brain and nervous system, thyroid, bone and connective tissue.

    PubMed

    Frisch, M; Olsen, J H

    1993-01-01

    The cancers covered in this chapter are those of the eye, brain and nervous system, thyroid, bone and connective tissue. Generally, detailed interpretations of data on cancers of the bone and connective tissue are inadvisable owing to small numbers of patients and major changes in diagnosis and registration over time. A slight but steady increase in survival was observed among patients diagnosed in 1943-87 with cancer of the eye. Relative five year survival increased from 60 to 68% in men and from 61 to 74% in women during the 45-year period. The predominant type of eye cancer seen in children, retinoblastoma, had a very favourable prognosis, with a relative five year survival rate of more than 80% since around 1960. Since that time, overall survival for patients with cancers of the brain and nervous system also increased. Relative five year survival improved from 25 to 36% in men and from 34 to 48% in women during 1960-85. Our data do not indicate to which extent therapeutic and diagnostic advances underlie the improvement in survival. Overall survival of patients with thyroid cancer also increased during 1943-87. Relative five-year survival improved from 26 to 58% in men and from 28 to 68% in women. Some of the improvement reflects earlier diagnosis of localized tumours, particularly in young women. A substantial improvement in survival was observed among children and adolescents (< 20 years) diagnosed in 1943-87 with primary bone cancers. Over the study period, the relative five-year survival in that age category and increased from 25 to 48% in males and from 16 to 52% in females. Use of adjuvant chemotherapy in cases of Ewing's sarcoma and osteosarcoma contributed importantly to the improvement in prognosis. Overall survival of patients with soft-tissue cancer associated with no specific organ increased until approximately 1970, after which time no further improvement was observed. The decreased survival seen in women during the last decade of the study is puzzling; the increase in mean age at diagnosis would only partially explain it. PMID:8512738

  17. Reconceiving autoimmunity: An overview.

    PubMed

    Tauber, Alfred I

    2015-06-21

    Three interconnected positions are advocated: (1) although serving as a useful model, the immune self does not exist as such; (2) instead of a self/nonself demarcation, the immune system 'sees' itself, i.e., it does not ignore the 'self' or attack the 'other;' but exhibits a spectrum of responses, which when viewed from outside the system appear as discrimination of 'self' and 'nonself' based on certain criteria of reactivity. When immune reactions are conceived in terms of normal physiology and open exchange with the environment, where borders dividing host and foreign are elusive and changing, host defense is only part of the immune system's functions, which actually comprise two basic tasks: protection, i.e., to preserve host integrity, and maintenance of organismic identity. And thus (3) if the spectrum of immunity is enlarged, differentiating low reactive 'autoimmune' reactions from activated immune responses against the 'other' is only a matter of degree. Simply, all immunity is 'autoimmunity,' and the pathologic state of immunity directed at normal constituents of the organism is a particular case of dis-regulation, which appropriately is designated, autoimmune. Other uses of 'autoimmunity' and its congeners function as the semantic remnants of Burnet's original self/nonself theory and should be replaced. A new nomenclature is proposed, concinnity, which more accurately designates the physiology of the animal's ordinary housekeeping economy mediated by the immune system than 'autoimmunity' when used to describe such normal functions. PMID:24880023

  18. Autoimmune movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Mckeon, Andrew; Vincent, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune movement disorders encapsulate a large and diverse group of neurologic disorders occurring either in isolation or accompanying more diffuse autoimmune encephalitic illnesses. The full range of movement phenomena has been described and, as they often occur in adults, many of the presentations can mimic neurodegenerative disorders, such as Huntington disease. Disorders may be ataxic, hypokinetic (parkinsonism), or hyperkinetic (myoclonus, chorea, tics, and other dyskinetic disorders). The autoantibody targets are diverse and include neuronal surface proteins such as leucine-rich, glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1) and glycine receptors, as well as antibodies (such as intracellular antigens) that are markers of a central nervous system process mediated by CD8+ cytotoxic T cells. However, there are two conditions, stiff-person syndrome (also known as stiff-man syndrome) and progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus (PERM), that are always autoimmune movement disorders. In some instances (such as Purkinje cell cytoplasmic antibody-1 (PCA-1) autoimmunity), antibodies detected in serum and cerebrospinal fluid can be indicative of a paraneoplastic cause, and may direct the cancer search. In other instances (such as 65kDa isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65) autoimmunity), a paraneoplastic cause is very unlikely, and early treatment with immunotherapy may promote improvement or recovery. Here we describe the different types of movement disorder and the clinical features and antibodies associated with them, and discuss treatment. PMID:27112684

  19. Autoimmune basal ganglia disorders.

    PubMed

    Dale, Russell C; Brilot, Fabienne

    2012-11-01

    The basal ganglia are deep nuclei in the brain that include the caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, and substantia nigra. Pathological processes involving the basal ganglia often result in disorders of movement and behavior. A number of different autoimmune disorders predominantly involve the basal ganglia and can result in movement and psychiatric disorders. The classic basal ganglia autoimmune disorder is Sydenham chorea, a poststreptococcal neuropsychiatric disorder. Resurgence in the interest in Sydenham chorea is the result of the descriptions of other poststreptococcal neuropsychiatric disorders including tics and obsessive-compulsive disorder, broadly termed pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infection. Encephalitic processes affecting the basal ganglia are also described including the syndromes basal ganglia encephalitis, encephalitis lethargica, and bilateral striatal necrosis. Last, systemic autoimmune disorders such as systemic lupus erythematosus and antiphospholipid syndrome can result in chorea or parkinsonism. Using paradigms learned from other autoantibody associated disorders, the authors discuss the autoantibody hypothesis and the role of systemic inflammation in autoimmune basal ganglia disorders. Identification of these entities is important as the clinician has an increasing therapeutic repertoire to modulate or suppress the aberrant immune system. PMID:22832771

  20. Curcumin and autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Bright, John J

    2007-01-01

    The immune system has evolved to protect the host from microbial infection; nevertheless, a breakdown in the immune system often results in infection, cancer, and autoimmune diseases. Multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, myocarditis, thyroiditis, uveitis, systemic lupus erythromatosis, and myasthenia gravis are organ-specific autoimmune diseases that afflict more than 5% of the population worldwide. Although the etiology is not known and a cure is still wanting, the use of herbal and dietary supplements is on the rise in patients with autoimmune diseases, mainly because they are effective, inexpensive, and relatively safe. Curcumin is a polyphenolic compound isolated from the rhizome of the plant Curcuma longa that has traditionally been used for pain and wound-healing. Recent studies have shown that curcumin ameliorates multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and inflammatory bowel disease in human or animal models. Curcumin inhibits these autoimmune diseases by regulating inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-12, TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma and associated JAK-STAT, AP-1, and NF-kappaB signaling pathways in immune cells. Although the beneficial effects of nutraceuticals are traditionally achieved through dietary consumption at low levels for long periods of time, the use of purified active compounds such as curcumin at higher doses for therapeutic purposes needs extreme caution. A precise understanding of effective dose, safe regiment, and mechanism of action is required for the use of curcumin in the treatment of human autoimmune diseases. PMID:17569223

  1. Epigenetics in human autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    STRICKLAND, FAITH M.; RICHARDSON, BRUCE C.

    2010-01-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms are essential for normal development and function of the immune system. Similarly, a failure to maintain epigenetic homeostasis in the immune response due to factors including environmental influences, leads to aberrant gene expression, contributing to immune dysfunction and in some cases the development of autoimmunity in genetically predisposed individuals. This is exemplified by systemic lupus erythematosus, where environmentally induced epigenetic changes contribute to disease pathogenesis in those genetically predisposed. Similar interactions between genetically determined susceptibility and environmental factors are implicated in other systemic autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and scleroderma, as well as in organ specific autoimmunity. The skin is exposed to a wide variety of environmental agents, including UV radiation, and is prone to the development of autoimmune conditions such as atopic dermatitis, psoriasis and some forms of vitiligo, depending on environmental and genetic influences. Herein we review how disruption of epigenetic mechanisms can alter immune function using lupus as an example, and summarize how similar mechanisms may contribute to other human autoimmune rheumatic and skin diseases. PMID:18432408

  2. Autoimmunity and Asbestos Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Pfau, Jean C.; Serve, Kinta M.; Noonan, Curtis W.

    2014-01-01

    Despite a body of evidence supporting an association between asbestos exposure and autoantibodies indicative of systemic autoimmunity, such as antinuclear antibodies (ANA), a strong epidemiological link has never been made to specific autoimmune diseases. This is in contrast with another silicate dust, crystalline silica, for which there is considerable evidence linking exposure to diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Instead, the asbestos literature is heavily focused on cancer, including mesothelioma and pulmonary carcinoma. Possible contributing factors to the absence of a stronger epidemiological association between asbestos and autoimmune disease include (a) a lack of statistical power due to relatively small or diffuse exposure cohorts, (b) exposure misclassification, (c) latency of clinical disease, (d) mild or subclinical entities that remain undetected or masked by other pathologies, or (e) effects that are specific to certain fiber types, so that analyses on mixed exposures do not reach statistical significance. This review summarizes epidemiological, animal model, and in vitro data related to asbestos exposures and autoimmunity. These combined data help build toward a better understanding of the fiber-associated factors contributing to immune dysfunction that may raise the risk of autoimmunity and the possible contribution to asbestos-related pulmonary disease. PMID:24876951

  3. The Relationship between Frontotemporal Effective Connectivity during Picture Naming, Behavior, and Preserved Cortical Tissue in Chronic Aphasia.

    PubMed

    Meier, Erin L; Kapse, Kushal J; Kiran, Swathi

    2016-01-01

    While several studies of task-based effective connectivity of normal language processing exist, little is known about the functional reorganization of language networks in patients with stroke-induced chronic aphasia. During oral picture naming, activation in neurologically intact individuals is found in "classic" language regions involved with retrieval of lexical concepts [e.g., left middle temporal gyrus (LMTG)], word form encoding [e.g., left posterior superior temporal gyrus, (LpSTG)], and controlled retrieval of semantic and phonological information [e.g., left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG)] as well as domain-general regions within the multiple demands network [e.g., left middle frontal gyrus (LMFG)]. After stroke, lesions to specific parts of the left hemisphere language network force reorganization of this system. While individuals with aphasia have been found to recruit similar regions for language tasks as healthy controls, the relationship between the dynamic functioning of the language network and individual differences in underlying neural structure and behavioral performance is still unknown. Therefore, in the present study, we used dynamic causal modeling (DCM) to investigate differences between individuals with aphasia and healthy controls in terms of task-induced regional interactions between three regions (i.e., LIFG, LMFG, and LMTG) vital for picture naming. The DCM model space was organized according to exogenous input to these regions and partitioned into separate families. At the model level, random effects family wise Bayesian Model Selection revealed that models with driving input to LIFG best fit the control data whereas models with driving input to LMFG best fit the patient data. At the parameter level, a significant between-group difference in the connection strength from LMTG to LIFG was seen. Within the patient group, several significant relationships between network connectivity parameters, spared cortical tissue, and behavior were observed. Overall, this study provides some preliminary findings regarding how neural networks for language reorganize for individuals with aphasia and how brain connectivity relates to underlying structural integrity and task performance. PMID:27014039

  4. The Relationship between Frontotemporal Effective Connectivity during Picture Naming, Behavior, and Preserved Cortical Tissue in Chronic Aphasia

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Erin L.; Kapse, Kushal J.; Kiran, Swathi

    2016-01-01

    While several studies of task-based effective connectivity of normal language processing exist, little is known about the functional reorganization of language networks in patients with stroke-induced chronic aphasia. During oral picture naming, activation in neurologically intact individuals is found in “classic” language regions involved with retrieval of lexical concepts [e.g., left middle temporal gyrus (LMTG)], word form encoding [e.g., left posterior superior temporal gyrus, (LpSTG)], and controlled retrieval of semantic and phonological information [e.g., left inferior frontal gyrus (LIFG)] as well as domain-general regions within the multiple demands network [e.g., left middle frontal gyrus (LMFG)]. After stroke, lesions to specific parts of the left hemisphere language network force reorganization of this system. While individuals with aphasia have been found to recruit similar regions for language tasks as healthy controls, the relationship between the dynamic functioning of the language network and individual differences in underlying neural structure and behavioral performance is still unknown. Therefore, in the present study, we used dynamic causal modeling (DCM) to investigate differences between individuals with aphasia and healthy controls in terms of task-induced regional interactions between three regions (i.e., LIFG, LMFG, and LMTG) vital for picture naming. The DCM model space was organized according to exogenous input to these regions and partitioned into separate families. At the model level, random effects family wise Bayesian Model Selection revealed that models with driving input to LIFG best fit the control data whereas models with driving input to LMFG best fit the patient data. At the parameter level, a significant between-group difference in the connection strength from LMTG to LIFG was seen. Within the patient group, several significant relationships between network connectivity parameters, spared cortical tissue, and behavior were observed. Overall, this study provides some preliminary findings regarding how neural networks for language reorganize for individuals with aphasia and how brain connectivity relates to underlying structural integrity and task performance. PMID:27014039

  5. Cystic Lesions in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Gompertz, Macarena; Morales, Claudia; Aldana, Hernán; Castillo, Jaime; Berger, Zoltán

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) can be chronic or recurrent, but frequently completely reversible after steroid treatment. A cystic lesion in AIP is a rare finding, and it can mimic a pancreatic cystic neoplasm. Difficulties in an exact diagnosis interfere with treatment, and surgery cannot be avoided in some cases. We report the history of a 63-year-old male presenting with jaundice and pruritus. AIP was confirmed by imaging and elevated IgG4 blood levels, and the patient completely recovered after corticosteroid therapy. One year later, he presented with a recurrent episode of AIP with elevated IgG4 levels, accompanied by the appearance of multiple intrapancreatic cystic lesions. All but 1 of these cysts disappeared after steroid treatment, but the remaining cyst in the pancreatic head was even somewhat larger 1 year later. Pancreatoduodenectomy was finally performed. Histology showed the wall of the cystic lesion to be fibrotic; the surrounding pancreatic tissue presented fibrosis, atrophy and lymphoplasmacytic infiltration by IgG4-positive cells, without malignant elements. Our case illustrates the rare possibility that cystic lesions can be part of AIP. These pseudocysts appear in the pancreatic segments involved in the autoimmune disease and can be a consequence of the local inflammation or related to ductal strictures. Steroid treatment should be initiated, after which these cysts can completely disappear with recovery from AIP. Surgical intervention may be necessary in some exceptional cases. PMID:26675058

  6. EBV and Autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Ascherio, Alberto; Munger, Kassandra L

    2015-01-01

    Although a role of EBV in autoimmunity is biologically plausible and evidence of altered immune responses to EBV is abundant in several autoimmune diseases, inference on causality requires the determination that disease risk is higher in individuals infected with EBV than in those uninfected and that in the latter it increases following EBV infection. This determination has so far been possible only for multiple sclerosis (MS) and, to some extent, for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), whereas evidence is either lacking or not supportive for other autoimmune conditions. In this chapter, we present the main epidemiological findings that justify the conclusion that EBV is a component cause of MS and SLE and possible mechanisms underlying these effects. PMID:26424654

  7. Epigenetics and Autoimmune Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Quintero-Ronderos, Paula; Montoya-Ortiz, Gladis

    2012-01-01

    Epigenetics is defined as the study of all inheritable and potentially reversible changes in genome function that do not alter the nucleotide sequence within the DNA. Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation, histone modification, nucleosome positioning, and microRNAs (miRNAs) are essential to carry out key functions in the regulation of gene expression. Therefore, the epigenetic mechanisms are a window to understanding the possible mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of complex diseases such as autoimmune diseases. It is noteworthy that autoimmune diseases do not have the same epidemiology, pathology, or symptoms but do have a common origin that can be explained by the sharing of immunogenetic mechanisms. Currently, epigenetic research is looking for disruption in one or more epigenetic mechanisms to provide new insights into autoimmune diseases. The identification of cell-specific targets of epigenetic deregulation will serve us as clinical markers for diagnosis, disease progression, and therapy approaches. PMID:22536485

  8. Autoimmune encephalitis update

    PubMed Central

    Dalmau, Josep; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer-associated immune-mediated disorders of the central nervous system are a heterogeneous group. These disorders include the classic paraneoplastic neurologic disorders and the more recently described autoimmune encephalitis associated with antibodies to neuronal cell-surface or synaptic receptors that occur with and without a cancer association. Autoimmune encephalitis is increasingly recognized as the cause of a variety of neuropsychiatric syndromes that can be severe and prolonged. In contrast to the classic paraneoplastic disorders that are poorly responsive to tumor treatment and immunotherapy, autoimmune encephalitis often responds to these treatments, and patients can have full or marked recoveries. As early treatment speeds recovery, reduces disability, and decreases relapses that can occur in about 20% of cases, it is important that the immune pathogenesis of these disorders is recognized. PMID:24637228

  9. Cellular Targeting in Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Jennifer L.; Serafin, Donald S.; Timoshchenko, Roman G.; Tarrant, Teresa K.

    2012-01-01

    Many biologic agents that were first approved for the treatment of malignancies are now being actively investigated and used in a variety of autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated vasculitis, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and Sjogren’s syndrome. The relatively recent advance of selective immune targeting has significantly changed the management of autoimmune disorders, and in part, can be attributed to the progress made in understanding effector cell function and their signaling pathways. In this review, we will discuss the recent FDA approved biologic therapies that directly target immune cells as well as the most promising investigational drugs affecting immune cell function and signaling for the treatment of autoimmune disease. PMID:23054625

  10. Inflammasomes and autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Patrick J.; McDermott, Michael F.; Kanneganti, Thirumala-Devi

    2010-01-01

    The NOD-like receptor (NLR) family members are cytosolic sensors of microbial components and danger signals. A subset of NLRs control inflammasome assembly that results in caspase-1 activation and, in turn, IL-1β and IL-18 production. Excessive inflammasome activation can cause autoinflammatory disorders, including the hereditary periodic fevers. Autoinflammatory and autoimmune diseases form a disease spectrum of aberrant, immune-mediated inflammation against self, through innate and adaptive immunity. However, the role of inflammasomes in autoimmune disease is less clear than in autoinflammation, despite the numerous effects IL-1β and IL-18 can have on shaping adaptive immunity. We summarize the role of inflammasomes in autoimmune disorders, highlight the need for a better understanding of inflammasomes in these conditions and offer suggestions for future research directions. PMID:21163704

  11. Treating Human Autoimmunity: Current Practice and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblum, Michael D.; Gratz, Iris K.; Paw, Jonathan S.; Abbas, Abul K.

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are caused by immune cells attacking the host tissues they are supposed to protect. Recent advances suggest that maintaining a balance of effector and regulatory immune function is critical for avoiding autoimmunity. New therapies, including costimulation blockade, regulatory T cell therapy, antigen-specific immunotherapy, and manipulating the interleukin-2 pathway, attempt to restore this balance. This review discusses these advances as well as the challenges that must be overcome to target these therapies to patients suffering from autoimmune disease while avoiding the pitfalls of general immunosuppression. PMID:22422994

  12. The architecture of the connective tissue in the musculoskeletal system-an often overlooked functional parameter as to proprioception in the locomotor apparatus.

    PubMed

    van der Wal, Jaap

    2009-01-01

    The architecture of the connective tissue, including structures such as fasciae, sheaths, and membranes, is more important for understanding functional meaning than is more traditional anatomy, whose anatomical dissection method neglects and denies the continuity of the connective tissue as integrating matrix of the body.The connective tissue anatomy and architecture exhibits two functional tendencies that are present in all areas of the body in different ways and relationships. In body cavities, the "disconnecting" quality of shaping space enables mobility; between organs and body parts, the "connecting" dimension enables functional mechanical interactions. In the musculoskeletal system, those two features of the connective tissue are also present. They cannot be found by the usual analytic dissection procedures. An architectural description is necessary.This article uses such a methodologic approach and gives such a description for the lateral elbow region. The result is an alternative architectural view of the anatomic substrate involved in the transmission and conveyance of forces over synovial joints. An architectural description of the muscular and connective tissue organized in series with each other to enable the transmission of forces over these dynamic entities is more appropriate than is the classical concept of "passive" force-guiding structures such as ligaments organized in parallel to actively force-transmitting structures such as muscles with tendons.The discrimination between so-called joint receptors and muscle receptors is an artificial distinction when function is considered. Mechanoreceptors, also the so-called muscle receptors, are arranged in the context of force circumstances-that is, of the architecture of muscle and connective tissue rather than of the classical anatomic structures such as muscle, capsules, and ligaments. In the lateral cubital region of the rat, a spectrum of mechanosensitive substrate occurs at the transitional areas between regular dense connective tissue layers and the muscle fascicles organized in series with them. This substrate exhibits features of type and location of the mechanosensitive nerve terminals that usually are considered characteristic for "joint receptors" as well as for "muscle receptors."The receptors for proprioception are concentrated in those areas where tensile stresses are conveyed over the elbow joint. Structures cannot be divided into either joint receptors or muscle receptors when muscular and collagenous connective tissue structures function in series to maintain joint integrity and stability. In vivo, those connective tissue structures are strained during movements of the skeletal parts, those movements in turn being induced and led by tension in muscular tissue. In principle, because of the architecture, receptors can also be stimulated by changes in muscle tension without skeletal movement, or by skeletal movement without change in muscle tension. A mutual relationship exists between structure (and function) of the mechanoreceptors and the architecture of the muscular and regular dense connective tissue. Both are instrumental in the coding of proprioceptive information to the central nervous system. PMID:21589740

  13. Anti Tumor Immunity Can Be Uncoupled From Autoimmunity Following Hsp70-Mediated Inflammatory Killing Of Normal Pancreas1

    PubMed Central

    Kottke, Timothy; Pulido, Jose; Thompson, Jill; Sanchez-Perez, Luis; Chong, Heung; Calderwood, Stuart K.; Selby, Peter; Harrington, Kevin; Melcher, Alan; Vile, Richard

    2009-01-01

    We have a long term interest in the connectivity between autoimmunity and tumor rejection. However, outside of the melanocyte/melanoma paradigm, little is known about whether autoimmune responses to normal tissue can induce rejection of tumors of the same histological type. Here, we induced direct, pathogen-like cytotoxicity to the normal pancreas in association with the immune adjuvant hsp70. In sharp contrast to our studies with a similar approach for the treatment of prostate cancer, inflammatory killing of the normal pancreas induced a Th-1-like, anti-self response to pancreatic antigens which was rapidly suppressed by a concomitant suppressive regulatory T cell (Treg) response. Interestingly, even when Treg cells were depleted, the Th-1-like response was insufficient to induce significant ongoing autoimmunity. However, the Th-1-like response to antigens expressed in the pancreas at the time of damage was sufficient to induce rejection of tumors expressing either a foreign (ova) antigen, or fully syngeneic tumor antigens (on PancO2 tumor cells), provided that Treg were depleted prior to inflammatory killing of the normal pancreas. Taken together, these data indicate that profound differences exist between the immunoprotective mechanisms in place between different tissues (pancreas and prostate) in their response to pathogen-like damage. Moreover, they also show that, although multiple layers of immunological safeguards are in place to prevent the development of severe autoimmune consequences in the pancreas (in contrast to the prostate), tumor rejection responses can still be de-coupled from pathological autoimmune responses in vivo, which may provide novel insights into the immunotherapeutic treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:19738045

  14. Vitamin D Status and Bone and Connective Tissue Turnover in Brown Bears (Ursus arctos) during Hibernation and the Active State

    PubMed Central

    Vestergaard, Peter; Støen, Ole-Gunnar; Swenson, Jon E.; Mosekilde, Leif; Heickendorff, Lene; Fröbert, Ole

    2011-01-01

    Background Extended physical inactivity causes disuse osteoporosis in humans. In contrast, brown bears (Ursus arctos) are highly immobilised for half of the year during hibernation without signs of bone loss and therefore may serve as a model for prevention of osteoporosis. Aim To study 25-hydroxy-vitamin D (25OHD) levels and bone turnover markers in brown bears during the hibernating state in winter and during the active state in summer. We measured vitamin D subtypes (D2 and D3), calcitropic hormones (parathyroid hormone [PTH], 1,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D [1,25(OH)2D]) and bone turnover parameters (osteocalcin, ICTP, CTX-I), PTH, serum calcium and PIIINP. Material and Methods We drew blood from seven immobilised wild brown bears during hibernation in February and in the same bears while active in June. Results Serum 25-hydroxy-cholecalciferol (25OHD3) was significantly higher in the summer than in the winter (22.8±4.6 vs. 8.8±2.1 nmol/l, two tailed p - 2p = 0.02), whereas 25-hydroxy-ergocalciferol (25OHD2) was higher in winter (54.2±8.3 vs. 18.7±1.7 nmol/l, 2p<0.01). Total serum calcium and PTH levels did not differ between winter and summer. Activated 1,25(OH)2D demonstrated a statistically insignificant trend towards higher summer levels. Osteocalcin levels were higher in summer than winter, whereas other markers of bone turnover (ICTP and CTX-I) were unchanged. Serum PIIINP, which is a marker of connective tissue and to some degree muscle turnover, was significantly higher during summer than during winter. Conclusions Dramatic changes were documented in the vitamin D3/D2 ratio and in markers of bone and connective tissue turnover in brown bears between hibernation and the active state. Because hibernating brown bears do not develop disuse osteoporosis, despite extensive physical inactivity we suggest that they may serve as a model for the prevention of this disease. PMID:21731765

  15. Vaccination and autoimmunity-'vaccinosis': a dangerous liaison?

    PubMed

    Shoenfeld, Y; Aron-Maor, A

    2000-02-01

    The question of a connection between vaccination and autoimmune illness (or phenomena) is surrounded by controversy. A heated debate is going on regarding the causality between vaccines, such as measles and anti-hepatitis B virus (HBV), and multiple sclerosis (MS). Brain antibodies as well as clinical symptoms have been found in patients vaccinated against those diseases. Other autoimmune illnesses have been associated with vaccinations. Tetanus toxoid, influenza vaccines, polio vaccine, and others, have been related to phenomena ranging from autoantibodies production to full-blown illness (such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA)). Conflicting data exists regarding also the connection between autism and vaccination with measles vaccine. So far only one controlled study of an experimental animal model has been published, in which the possible causal relation between vaccines and autoimmune findings has been examined: in healthy puppies immunized with a variety of commonly given vaccines, a variety of autoantibodies have been documented but no frank autoimmune illness was recorded. The findings could also represent a polyclonal activation (adjuvant reaction). The mechanism (or mechanisms) of autoimmune reactions following immunization has not yet been elucidated. One of the possibilities is molecular mimicry; when a structural similarity exists between some viral antigen (or other component of the vaccine) and a self-antigen. This similarity may be the trigger to the autoimmune reaction. Other possible mechanisms are discussed. Even though the data regarding the relation between vaccination and autoimmune disease is conflicting, it seems that some autoimmune phenomena are clearly related to immunization (e.g. Guillain-Barre syndrome). The issue of the risk of vaccination remains a philosophical one, since to date the advantages of this policy have not been refuted, while the risk for autoimmune disease has not been irrevocably proved. We discuss the pros and cons of this issue (although the temporal relationship (i.e. always 2-3 months following immunization) is impressive). PMID:10648110

  16. [Autoimmune hemolytic anemia in children].

    PubMed

    Becheur, M; Bouslama, B; Slama, H; Toumi, N E H

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune hemolytic anemia is a rare condition in children which differs from the adult form. It is defined by immune-mediated destruction of red blood cells caused by autoantibodies. Characteristics of the autoantibodies are responsible for the various clinical entities. Classifications of autoimmune hemolytic anemia include warm autoimmune hemolytic anemia, cold autoimmune hemolytic anemia, and paroxysmal cold hemoglobinuria. For each classification, this review discusses the epidemiology, etiology, clinical presentation, laboratory evaluation, and treatment options. PMID:26575109

  17. A Mouse Strain Where Basal Connective Tissue Growth Factor Gene Expression Can Be Switched from Low to High

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Heather E.; Kim, Hyung-Suk; Hiller, Sylvia; Sulik, Kathleen K.; Maeda, Nobuyo

    2010-01-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) is a signaling molecule that primarily functions in extracellular matrix maintenance and repair. Increased Ctgf expression is associated with fibrosis in chronic organ injury. Studying the role of CTGF in fibrotic disease in vivo, however, has been hampered by perinatal lethality of the Ctgf null mice as well as the limited scope of previous mouse models of Ctgf overproduction. Here, we devised a new approach and engineered a single mutant mouse strain where the endogenous Ctgf-3? untranslated region (3?UTR) was replaced with a cassette containing two 3?UTR sequences arranged in tandem. The modified Ctgf allele uses a 3?UTR from the mouse FBJ osteosarcoma oncogene (c-Fos) and produces an unstable mRNA, resulting in 60% of normal Ctgf expression (Lo allele). Upon Cre-expression, excision of the c-Fos-3?UTR creates a transcript utilizing the more stable bovine growth hormone (bGH) 3?UTR, resulting in increased Ctgf expression (Hi allele). Using the Ctgf Lo and Hi mutants, and crosses to a Ctgf knockout or Cre-expressing mice, we have generated a series of strains with a 30-fold range of Ctgf expression. Mice with the lowest Ctgf expression, 30% of normal, appear healthy, while a global nine-fold overexpression of Ctgf causes abnormalities, including developmental delay and craniofacial defects, and embryonic death at E10-12. Overexpression of Ctgf by tamoxifen-inducible Cre in the postnatal life, on the other hand, is compatible with life. The Ctgf Lo-Hi mutant mice should prove useful in further understanding the function of CTGF in fibrotic diseases. Additionally, this method can be used for the production of mouse lines with quantitative variations in other genes, particularly with genes that are broadly expressed, have distinct functions in different tissues, or where altered gene expression is not compatible with normal development. PMID:20877562

  18. Cloning the full-length cDNA for rat connective tissue growth factor: implications for skeletal development.

    PubMed

    Xu, J; Smock, S L; Safadi, F F; Rosenzweig, A B; Odgren, P R; Marks, S C; Owen, T A; Popoff, S N

    2000-02-01

    The mammalian osteopetroses represent a pathogenetically diverse group of skeletal disorders characterized by excess bone mass resulting from reduced osteoclastic bone resorption. Abnormalities involving osteoblast function and skeletal development have also been reported in many forms of the disease. In this study, we used the rat mutation, osteopetrosis (op), to examine differences in skeletal gene expression between op mutants and their normal littermates. RNA isolated from calvaria and long bones was used as a template for mRNA-differential display. Sequence information for one of the many cDNA that were selectively expressed in either normal or mutant bone suggested that it is the rat homologue of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) previously cloned in the human, mouse, and other species. A consensus sequence was assembled from overlapping 5'-RACE clones and used to confirm the rat CTGF cDNA protein coding region. Northern blot analysis confirmed that this message was highly (8- to 10-fold) over-expressed in op versus normal bone; it was also upregulated in op kidney but none of the other tissues (brain, liver, spleen, thymus) examined. In primary rat osteoblast cultures, the CTGF message exhibits a temporal pattern of expression dependent on their state of differentiation. Furthermore, CTGF expression is regulated by prostaglandin E(2), a factor known to modulate osteoblast differentiation. Since members of the CTGF family regulate the expression of specific genes, such as collagen and fibronectin, we propose that CTGF may play a previously unreported role in normal skeletal modeling/remodeling. Its dramatic over-expression in the op mutant skeleton may be secondary to the uncoupling of bone resorption and bone formation resulting in dysregulation of osteoblast gene expression and function. PMID:10679821

  19. Evaluation of autoimmune phenomena in patients with pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS).

    PubMed

    Stagi, Stefano; Rigante, Donato; Lepri, Gemma; Bertini, Federico; Matucci-Cerinic, Marco; Falcini, Fernanda

    2014-12-01

    The pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS) are basically characterized by obsessive-compulsive symptoms and/or tics triggered by group-A beta-hemolytic Streptococcus infections. Poor data are available about the clear definition of PANDAS's autoimmune origin. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of autoimmune phenomena, including thyroid function abnormalities, specific celiac disease antibodies, and positivity of organ- or nonorgan-specific autoantibodies in a large cohort of Caucasian children and adolescents with PANDAS. Seventy-seven consecutive patients (59 males, 18 females; mean age 6.3±2.5 years, range 2.0-14.5 years) strictly fulfilling the clinical criteria for PANDAS diagnosis were recruited. In all subjects we evaluated serum concentrations of free-T3, free-T4, thyrotropin, and the following auto-antibodies: anti-thyroperoxidase, anti-thyroglobulin, anti-thyrotropin receptor, anti-gliadin, anti-endomysium, anti-tissue transglutaminase, anti-nuclear, anti-smooth muscle, anti-extractable nuclear antigens, anti-phospholipid, plus lupus-like anticoagulant. The results were compared with those obtained from 197 age- and sex-matched healthy controls (130 males, 67 females; mean age 6.8±2.9 years, range 2.3-14.8 years). The frequencies of subclinical (3.8% vs 3.6%) and overt hypothyroidism (1.2% vs 0%), autoimmune thyroiditis (2.46% vs 1.14%), celiac disease (1.2% vs 0.05%), and positivity of organ- and nonorgan-specific autoantibodies (5.1% vs 4.8%) were not statistically significant between patients with PANDAS and controls. Evaluating the overall disease duration, we did not observe any significant difference between patients with (3.4±2.15 years) and without (3.4±2.89 years) autoimmune abnormalities. However, PANDAS patients with autoimmune diseases or positivity for any organ- and nonorgan-specific antibodies showed significantly higher anti-streptolysin O and anti-DNAse B titers, as well as a history of more frequent throat infections than controls (p<0.0001). Abnormalities of thyroid function and thyroid autoimmune diseases, as well as the association with celiac disease or organ- and nonorgan-specific autoimmunity seem not more frequent in children and adolescents with PANDAS than in healthy controls. A potential relationship between autoimmunity and PANDAS should be assessed further in larger studies. Children and adolescents with PANDAS should not be actually screened for thyroid function, celiac disease and/or autoimmune diseases. PMID:25151976

  20. Undifferentiated Connective Tissue Disease

    MedlinePlus

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  1. Finite Element Model of Subsynovial Connective Tissue Deformation due to Tendon Excursion in the Human Carpal Tunnel

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Jacqueline; Thoreson, Andrew; Yoshii, Yuichi; Zhao, Kristin D.; Amadio, Peter C.; An, Kai-Nan

    2010-01-01

    Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) is a nerve entrapment disease which has been extensively studied by the engineering and medical community. Although the direct cause is unknown, in vivo and in vitro medical research has shown that tendon excursion creates micro tears in the subsynovial connective tissue (SSCT) surrounding the tendon in the carpal tunnel. One proposed mechanism for the SSCT injury is shearing which is believed to cause fibrosis of the SSCT. Few studies have reported quantitative observations of SSCT response to mechanical loading. Our proposed model is a 2-D section that consists of an FDS tendon, interstitial SSCT and adjacent stationary tendons. We believe that developing this model will allow the most complete quantitative observations of SSCT response to mechanical loading reported thus far. Boundary conditions were applied to the FEA model to simulate single finger flexion. A velocity was applied to the FDS tendon in the model to match loading conditions of the documented cadaver wrist kinematics studies. The cadaveric and FEA displacement results were compared to investigate the magnitude of stiffness required for the SSCT section of the model. The relative motions between the model and cadavers matched more closely than the absolute displacements. Since cadaveric models do not allow identification of the SSCT layers, an FEA model will help determine the displacement and stress experienced by each SSCT layer. Thus, we believe this conceptual model is a first step in understanding how the SSCT layers are recruited during tendon excursion. PMID:20887993

  2. Comparative morphological study on the lingual papillae and their connective tissue cores (CTC) in reeves' muntjac deer (Muntiacus reevesi).

    PubMed

    Zheng, JinHua; Kobayashi, Kan

    2006-11-01

    The lingual papillae and their connective tissue cores (CTC) from Reeves' muntjac deers (herbivorous artiodactyla) were studied using light and scanning electron microscopy and then compared to those of other mammalian species. At the posterior portion of the tongue, the Reeves' muntjac has a lingual prominence on which large conical papillae are distributed. On the dorsal surface of the anterior tongue, numerous filiform papillae were found. Externally, each filiform papilla consists of a rod-shaped main process and several small accessory processes. Their CTCs consist of 10 or more rod-shaped processes arranged in a horseshoe pattern and several posterior processes forming a small circular pattern. This structure is a common characteristic of artiodactyla, through which Reeves' muntjac deer can be categorized in a position in the artiodactyla class lying between the bighorn sheep and the East African bongo. Fungiform papillae are distributed among the filiform papillae on the anterior portion of the tongue. Large fungiform papillae are also sparsely distributed on the lingual prominence and have several taste buds in the epithelium on the surface. Ten or more vallate papillae are distributed at the postero-lateral area of the lingual prominence and numerous taste buds are distributed in the epithelium of their side. PMID:17140149

  3. The Prevalence of Atherosclerosis in Those with Inflammatory Connective Tissue Disease by Race, Age, and Traditional Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Alenghat, Francis J.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammation promotes cardiovascular disease. Inflammatory connective tissue diseases (CTD) like lupus and rheumatoid arthritis associate with cardiovascular risk, but it is unknown whether particular groups of patients have enhanced propensity for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) associated with their CTD. Analysis of aggregate health record data at a large U.S. academic center identified CTD and ASCVD status for 287,467 African American and white adults. ASCVD prevalence in those with CTD was 29.7% for African Americans and 14.7% for white patients with prevalence ratios, compared to those without CTD, of 3.1 and 1.8, respectively. When different types of CTD were analyzed individually (rheumatoid arthritis; lupus; scleroderma; Sjögren Syndrome; dermatomyositis/polymyositis; unspecified/mixed CTD; other inflammatory arthropathy), increased ASCVD rates were found in nearly all subsets, always with higher prevalence ratios in African Americans. The prevalence ratio of ASCVD was particularly high in young African Americans. Furthermore, individuals lacking traditional cardiovascular risk factors had more ASCVD if they had CTD (prevalence ratio 2.9). Multivariate analysis confirmed a positive interaction between CTD and African-American race and a negative interaction between CTD and age. The factors driving the observed disproportionate CTD-associated ASCVD in African Americans, young adults, and those without traditional risk factors warrant further study. PMID:26842423

  4. Expression variations of connective tissue growth factor in pulmonary arteries from smokers with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Si-jing; Li, Min; Zeng, Da-xiong; Zhu, Zhong-ming; Hu, Xian-Wei; Li, Yong-huai; Wang, Ran; Sun, Geng-yun

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoking contributes to the development of pulmonary hypertension (PH) complicated with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and the pulmonary vascular remodeling, the structural basis of PH, could be attributed to abnormal proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs).In this study, morphometrical analysis showed that the pulmonary vessel wall thickness in smoker group and COPD group was significantly greater than in nonsmokers. In addition, we determined the expression patterns of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and cyclin D1 in PASMCs harvested from smokers with normal lung function or mild to moderate COPD, finding that the expression levels of CTGF and cyclin D1 were significantly increased in smoker group and COPD group. In vitro experiment showed that the expression of CTGF, cyclin D1 and E2F were significantly increased in human PASMCs (HPASMCs) treated with 2% cigarette smoke extract (CSE), and two CTGF siRNAs with different mRNA hits successfully attenuated the upregulated cyclin D1 and E2F, and significantly restored the CSE-induced proliferation of HPASMCs by causing cell cycle arrest in G0. These findings suggest that CTGF may contribute to the pathogenesis of abnormal proliferation of HPASMCs by promoting the expression of its downstream effectors in smokers with or without COPD. PMID:25708588

  5. Elevated Urinary Connective Tissue Growth Factor in Diabetic Nephropathy Is Caused by Local Production and Tubular Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Gerritsen, Karin G. F.; Leeuwis, Jan Willem; Koeners, Maarten P.; Bakker, Stephan J. L.; van Oeveren, Willem; Aten, Jan; Tarnow, Lise; Rossing, Peter; Wetzels, Jack F. M.; Joles, Jaap A.; Kok, Robbert Jan; Goldschmeding, Roel; Nguyen, Tri Q.

    2015-01-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF; CCN2) plays a role in the development of diabetic nephropathy (DN). Urinary CTGF (uCTGF) is elevated in DN patients and has been proposed as a biomarker for disease progression, but it is unknown which pathophysiological factors contribute to elevated uCTGF. We studied renal handling of CTGF by infusion of recombinant CTGF in diabetic mice. In addition, uCTGF was measured in type 1 DN patients and compared with glomerular and tubular dysfunction and damage markers. In diabetic mice, uCTGF was increased and fractional excretion (FE) of recombinant CTGF was substantially elevated indicating reduced tubular reabsorption. FE of recombinant CTGF correlated with excretion of endogenous CTGF. CTGF mRNA was mainly localized in glomeruli and medullary tubules. Comparison of FE of endogenous and recombinant CTGF indicated that 60% of uCTGF had a direct renal source, while 40% originated from plasma CTGF. In DN patients, uCTGF was independently associated with markers of proximal and distal tubular dysfunction and damage. In conclusion, uCTGF in DN is elevated as a result of both increased local production and reduced reabsorption due to tubular dysfunction. We submit that uCTGF is a biomarker reflecting both glomerular and tubulointerstitial hallmarks of diabetic kidney disease. PMID:26171399

  6. Targeting connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) in acute lymphoblastic leukemia preclinical models: anti-CTGF monoclonal antibody attenuates leukemia growth.

    PubMed

    Lu, Hongbo; Kojima, Kensuke; Battula, Venkata Lokesh; Korchin, Borys; Shi, Yuexi; Chen, Ye; Spong, Suzanne; Thomas, Deborah A; Kantarjian, Hagop; Lock, Richard B; Andreeff, Michael; Konopleva, Marina

    2014-03-01

    Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF/CCN2) is involved in extracellular matrix production, tumor cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, and metastasis. Recent studies have shown that CTGF expression is elevated in precursor B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and that increased expression of CTGF is associated with inferior outcome in B-ALL. In this study, we characterized the functional role and downstream signaling pathways of CTGF in ALL cells. First, we utilized lentiviral shRNA to knockdown CTGF in RS4;11 and REH ALL cells expressing high levels of CTGF mRNA. Silencing of CTGF resulted in significant suppression of leukemia cell growth compared to control vector, which was associated with AKT/mTOR inactivation and increased levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27. CTGF knockdown sensitized ALL cells to vincristine and methotrexate. Treatment with an anti-CTGF monoclonal antibody, FG-3019, significantly prolonged survival of mice injected with primary xenograft B-ALL cells when co-treated with conventional chemotherapy (vincristine, L-asparaginase and dexamethasone). Data suggest that CTGF represents a targetable molecular aberration in B-ALL, and blocking CTGF signaling in conjunction with administration of chemotherapy may represent a novel therapeutic approach for ALL patients. PMID:24154679

  7. Subepithelial connective tissue graft with and without the use of plasma rich in growth factors for treating root exposure

    PubMed Central

    Lafzi, Ardeshir; Shirmohammadi, Adileh; Behrozian, Ahmad; Kashefimehr, Atabak; Khashabi, Ehsan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical efficiency of the subepithelial connective tissue graft (SCTG) with and without plasma rich in growth factor (PRGF) in the treatment of gingival recessions. Methods Twenty bilateral buccal gingival Miller's Class I and II recessions were selected. Ten of the recessions were treated with SCTG and PRGF (test group). The rest ten of the recessions were treated with SCTG (control group). The clinical parameters including recession depth (RD), percentage of root coverage (RC), mucogingival junction (MGJ) position, clinical attachment level (CAL), and probing depth (PD) were measured at the baseline, and 1 and 3 months later. The data were analyzed using the Wilcoxon signed rank and Mann-Whitney U tests. Results After 3 months, both groups showed a significant improvement in all of the mentioned criteria except PD. Although the amount of improvement was better in the SCTG+PRGF group than the SCTG only group, this difference was not statistically significant. The mean RC was 70.85±12.57 in the test group and 75.83±24.68 in the control group. Conclusions Both SCTG+PRGF and SCTG only result in favorable clinical outcomes, but the added benefit of PRGF is not evident. PMID:23346462

  8. Reaction of Rat Subcutaneous Connective Tissue to Resin Composites Polymerized with Different Light Curing Units and Different Lightening Methods

    PubMed Central

    Feiz, Atiyeh; Arbabzadeh Zavareh, Farahnaz; Mohammad Razavi, Seyed; Badrian, Hamid; Dolatyar, Sepideh; Vajihi, Mansoureh

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine and compare the reaction of rat subcutaneous connective tissue to resin composites polymerized with different lights curing and lightening methods. In this in vivo study, 20 mature Wister Albino rats were used. The composite discs, 4 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick, were cured by QTH or LED light curing units with 4 different lightning methods (full power QTH, full power LED, pulse LED, and ramp LED). Five resin composite discs were implanted in each rat, so that 4 of 5 discs for implantation of cured composite discs differently and central one as control without implantation. After sacrificing at 7, 14, 30, and 60 days the inflammatory grade, fibrosis, and necrosis were determined. Freedman and Cochran tests were used to analyze the data using SPSS software ver. 15. The results of the study showed significant differences in inflammation grade and fibrosis among control group and 4 experimental groups at day 14 (P < 0.05). In necrosis, there was no significant difference among 4 groups in different times (P > 0.05). In conclusion, neither the type of light curing units (LED or QTH) nor the lightening methods can affect the grade of inflammatory reaction. PMID:22761617

  9. CCN2/Connective Tissue Growth Factor Is Essential for Pericyte Adhesion and Endothelial Basement Membrane Formation during Angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bau-Lin; van Handel, Ben; Hofmann, Jennifer J.; Chen, Tom T.; Choi, Aaron; Ong, Jessica R.; Benya, Paul D.; Mikkola, Hanna; Iruela-Arispe, M. Luisa; Lyons, Karen M.

    2012-01-01

    CCN2/Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF) is a matricellular protein that regulates cell adhesion, migration, and survival. CCN2 is best known for its ability to promote fibrosis by mediating the ability of transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) to induce excess extracellular matrix production. In addition to its role in pathological processes, CCN2 is required for chondrogenesis. CCN2 is also highly expressed during development in endothelial cells, suggesting a role in angiogenesis. The potential role of CCN2 in angiogenesis is unclear, however, as both pro- and anti-angiogenic effects have been reported. Here, through analysis of Ccn2-deficient mice, we show that CCN2 is required for stable association and retention of pericytes by endothelial cells. PDGF signaling and the establishment of the endothelial basement membrane are required for pericytes recruitment and retention. CCN2 induced PDGF-B expression in endothelial cells, and potentiated PDGF-B-mediated Akt signaling in mural (vascular smooth muscle/pericyte) cells. In addition, CCN2 induced the production of endothelial basement membrane components in vitro, and was required for their expression in vivo. Overall, these results highlight CCN2 as an essential mediator of vascular remodeling by regulating endothelial-pericyte interactions. Although most studies of CCN2 function have focused on effects of CCN2 overexpression on the interstitial extracellular matrix, the results presented here show that CCN2 is required for the normal production of vascular basement membranes. PMID:22363445

  10. Collagen Gel Contraction as a Measure of Fibroblast Function in an Animal Model of Subsynovial Connective Tissue Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tai-Hua; Thoreson, Andrew R.; Gingery, Anne; Larson, Dirk R.; Passe, Sandra M.; An, Kai-Nan; Zhao, Chunfeng; Amadio, Peter C.

    2015-01-01

    Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a peripheral neuropathy characterized by non-inflammatory fibrosis of the subsynovial connective tissues (SSCT). A rabbit model of CTS was developed to test the hypothesis that SSCT fibrosis causes the neuropathy. We used a cell-seeded collagen-gel contraction model to characterize the fibrosis in this model in terms of cellular mechanics, specifically to compare the ability of SSCT cells from the rabbit model and normal rabbits to contract the gel, and to assess the effect of transforming growth factor-β1,which is upregulated in CTS, on these cells. SSCT fibrosis was induced in six retired breeder female rabbits which were sacrificed at 6 weeks (N=3) and 12 weeks (n=3). An additional two rabbits served as controls. SSCT was harvested according to a standard protocol. Gels seeded with SSCT cells from rabbits sacrificed at 6 weeks had significantly higher tensile strength (p<0.001) and Young’s modulus (p<0.001) than gels seeded with cells from rabbits sacrificed at 12 weeks or control animals. TGF-β1 significantly increased the decay time constant (p<0.001), tensile strength (p<0.001) and Young’s modulus (p<0.001) regardless of the cell source. This model may be useful in screening therapeutic agents that may block SSCT fibrosis, identifying possible candidates for CTS treatment. PMID:25626430

  11. Cucurbitacin I Attenuates Cardiomyocyte Hypertrophy via Inhibition of Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CCN2) and TGF- β/Smads Signalings

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hara; Park, Kye Won; Park, Woo Jin; Yang, Seung Yul; Yang, Dong Kwon

    2015-01-01

    Cucurbitacin I is a naturally occurring triterpenoid derived from Cucurbitaceae family plants that exhibits a number of potentially useful pharmacological and biological activities. However, the therapeutic impact of cucurbitacin I on the heart has not heretofore been reported. To evaluate the functional role of cucurbitacin I in an in vitro model of cardiac hypertrophy, phenylephrine (PE)-stimulated cardiomyocytes were treated with a sub-cytotoxic concentration of the compound, and the effects on cell size and mRNA expression levels of ANF and β-MHC were investigated. Consequently, PE-induced cell enlargement and upregulation of ANF and β-MHC were significantly suppressed by pretreatment of the cardiomyocytes with cucurbitacin I. Notably, cucurbitacin I also impaired connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and MAPK signaling, pro-hypertrophic factors, as well as TGF-β/Smad signaling, the important contributing factors to fibrosis. The protective impact of cucurbitacin I was significantly blunted in CTGF-silenced or TGF-β1-silenced hypertrophic cardiomyocytes, indicating that the compound exerts its beneficial actions through CTGF. Taken together, these findings signify that cucurbitacin I protects the heart against cardiac hypertrophy via inhibition of CTGF/MAPK, and TGF- β/Smad-facilitated events. Accordingly, the present study provides new insights into the defensive capacity of cucurbitacin I against cardiac hypertrophy, and further suggesting cucurbitacin I’s utility as a novel therapeutic agent for the management of heart diseases. PMID:26296085

  12. Personal Authentication Analysis Using Finger-Vein Patterns in Patients with Connective Tissue Diseases—Possible Association with Vascular Disease and Seasonal Change -

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Miyuki; Miura, Naoto; Fujii, Takao; Ohmura, Koichiro; Yoshifuji, Hajime; Yukawa, Naoichiro; Imura, Yoshitaka; Nakashima, Ran; Ikeda, Takaharu; Umemura, Shin-ichiro; Miyatake, Takafumi; Mimori, Tsuneyo

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine how connective tissue diseases affect finger-vein pattern authentication. Methods The finger-vein patterns of 68 patients with connective tissue diseases and 24 healthy volunteers were acquired. Captured as CCD (charge-coupled device) images by transmitting near-infrared light through fingers, they were followed up in once in each season for one year. The similarity of the follow-up patterns and the initial one was evaluated in terms of their normalized cross-correlation C. Results The mean C values calculated for patients tended to be lower than those calculated for healthy volunteers. In midwinter (February in Japan) they showed statistically significant reduction both as compared with patients in other seasons and as compared with season-matched healthy controls, whereas the values calculated for healthy controls showed no significant seasonal changes. Values calculated for patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) or mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) showed major reductions in November and, especially, February. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and patients with dermatomyositis or polymyositis (DM/PM) did not show statistically significant seasonal changes in C values. Conclusions Finger-vein patterns can be used throughout the year to identify patients with connective tissue diseases, but some attention is needed for patients with advanced disease such as SSc. PMID:26701644

  13. Comparison of two techniques of harvesting connective tissue and its effects on healing pattern at palate and recession coverage at recipient site

    PubMed Central

    Pandit, Nymphea; Khasa, Meenakshi; Gugnani, Shalini; Malik, Rajvir; Bali, Deepika

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To compare the healing pattern in palate following harvestation of connective tissue graft by two different techniques and to compare the recession coverage at the recipient sites. Materials and Methods: 30 recession sites with Miller's class I and II recession in 16 patients were recruited for this study. Sites were randomly divided into 2 treatment groups. Group I used Unigraft Knife to harvest the connective tissue whereas in group II patients Langer & Langer techniques was used to harvest the connective tissue graft from the palate. Healing was evaluated at the donor site using- wound size(WS), immediate bleeding (iB) and delayed bleeding (dB), complete wound epithelialization (CE), sensibility disorders (S) and post operative pain (PP) at baseline, 1st, 4th, and 12th week postoperatively. Recession coverage was assessed by measuring Clinical Attachment Level (CAL), vertical recession (VR), width of keratinized gingiva (KT). Results: On comparison between Group I and II, a statistically significant larger wound size was observed in Group I. CWE was higher in Group II. A non significant difference was observed when SD, and delayed bleeding were compared at all time intervals. A non-significant difference was observed in the clinical parameters at the recipient site. Conclusion: When evaluating the WS and CWE, the Langer and Langer technique was found to be better than the Unigraft knife technique for harvesting the connective tissue graft, whereas both the techniques were found to be effective in root coverage procedure outcomes. PMID:27041892

  14. Study of chemical properties and evaluation of collagen in mantle, epidermal connective tissue and tentacle of Indian Squid, Loligo duvauceli Orbigny.

    PubMed

    Raman, Maya; Mathew, Saleena

    2014-08-01

    The chemical composition and evaluation of Indian squid (Loligo duvauceli) mantle, epidermal connective tissue and tentacle is investigated in this current study. It is observed that squid mantle contains 22.2% total protein; 63.5% of the total protein is myofibrillar protein. The unique property of squid myofibrillar protein is its water solubility. Squid mantle contains 12.0% total collagen. Epidermal connective tissue has highest amounts of total collagen (17.8%). SDS-PAGE of total collagen identified high molecular weight α-, β- and γ- sub-chains. Amino acid profile analysis indicates that mantle and tentacle contain essential amino acids. Arginine forms a major portion of mantle collagen (272.5 g/100 g N). Isoleucine, glutamic acid and lysine are other amino acids that are found in significantly high amounts in the mantle. Sulphur containing cystine is deficit in mantle collagen. Papain digest of mantle and epidermal connective tissue is rich in uronic acid, while papain digest, collagenase digest and urea digest of epidermal connective tissue has significant amounts of sialic acid (25.2, 33.2 and 99.8 μmol /100 g, respectively). PAS staining of papain digest, collagenase digest and urea digest also identify the association of hexoses with low molecular weight collagen fragments. Histochemical sectioning also emphasized the localized distribution of collagen in epidermal and dermal region and very sparse fibres traverse the myotome bundles. PMID:25114341

  15. Scurfy mice: A model for autoimmune disease

    SciTech Connect

    Godfrey, V.L.

    1993-01-01

    Autoimmune disease-the condition in which the body attacks its own tissue-has been an object of public concern recently. Former President George Bush and his wife Barbara both are afflicted with Graves' disease in which the body's own immune system attakcs the thyroid gland. The safety of breast implants was called into question because of evidence that some recipients had developed autoimmune disorders such a rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, and scleroderma. Women, the media pointed out, have a higher-than-average incidence of many autoimmune disorders. These events suggest the need to know more about what makes the immune system work so well and what makes it go awry. At ORNL's Biology Division, progress is being in understanding the underlying causes of immune disease by studying mice having a disease that causes them to be underdeveloped; to have scaly skin, small ears, and large spleens; to open their eyes late; and to die early. These [open quotes]scurfy[close quotes]mice are helping us better understand the role of the thymus gland in autoimmune disease.

  16. Autoimmune Channelopathies of the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Kleopa, Kleopas A

    2011-01-01

    Ion channels are complex transmembrane proteins that orchestrate the electrical signals necessary for normal function of excitable tissues, including the central nervous system, peripheral nerve, and both skeletal and cardiac muscle. Progress in molecular biology has allowed cloning and expression of genes that encode channel proteins, while comparable advances in biophysics, including patch-clamp electrophysiology and related techniques, have made the functional assessment of expressed proteins at the level of single channel molecules possible. The role of ion channel defects in the pathogenesis of numerous disorders has become increasingly apparent over the last two decades. Neurological channelopathies are frequently genetically determined but may also be acquired through autoimmune mechanisms. All of these autoimmune conditions can arise as paraneoplastic syndromes or independent from malignancies. The pathogenicity of autoantibodies to ion channels has been demonstrated in most of these conditions, and patients may respond well to immunotherapies that reduce the levels of the pathogenic autoantibodies. Autoimmune channelopathies may have a good prognosis, especially if diagnosed and treated early, and if they are non-paraneoplastic. This review focuses on clinical, pathophysiologic and therapeutic aspects of autoimmune ion channel disorders of the nervous system. PMID:22379460

  17. Celiac disease-associated autoimmune endocrinopathies.

    PubMed

    Kumar, V; Rajadhyaksha, M; Wortsman, J

    2001-07-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune disorder induced by gluten intake in genetically susceptible individuals. It is characterized by the presence of serum antibodies to endomysium, reticulin, gliadin, and tissue transglutaminase. The incidence of CD in various autoimmune disorders is increased 10- to 30-fold in comparison to the general population, although in many cases CD is clinically asymptomatic or silent. The identification of such cases with CD is important since it may help in the control of type I diabetes or endocrine functions in general, as well as in the prevention of long-term complications of CD, such as lymphoma. It is believed that CD may predispose an individual to other autoimmune disorders such as type I diabetes, autoimmune thyroid, and other endocrine diseases and that gluten may be a possible trigger. The onset of type I diabetes at an early age in patients with CD, compared to non-CD, and the prevention or delay in onset of diabetes by gluten-free diet in genetically predisposed individuals substantiates this antigen trigger hypothesis. Early identification of CD patients in highly susceptible population may result in the treatment of subclinical CD and improved control of associated disorders. PMID:11427410

  18. Nonsegmental vitiligo and autoimmune mechanism.

    PubMed

    Oiso, Naoki; Suzuki, Tamio; Fukai, Kazuyoshi; Katayama, Ichiro; Kawada, Akira

    2011-01-01

    Nonsegmental vitiligo is a depigmented skin disorder showing acquired, progressive, and depigmented lesions of the skin, mucosa, and hair. It is believed to be caused mainly by the autoimmune loss of melanocytes from the involved areas. It is frequently associated with other autoimmune diseases, particularly autoimmune thyroid diseases including Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves' disease, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, psoriasis, pernicious anemia, systemic lupus erythematosus, Addison's disease, and alopecia areata. This indicates the presence of genetically determined susceptibility to not only vitiligo but also to other autoimmune disorders. Here, we summarize current understanding of autoimmune pathogenesis in non-segmental vitiligo. PMID:21804820

  19. Nonsegmental Vitiligo and Autoimmune Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Oiso, Naoki; Suzuki, Tamio; Fukai, Kazuyoshi; Katayama, Ichiro; Kawada, Akira

    2011-01-01

    Nonsegmental vitiligo is a depigmented skin disorder showing acquired, progressive, and depigmented lesions of the skin, mucosa, and hair. It is believed to be caused mainly by the autoimmune loss of melanocytes from the involved areas. It is frequently associated with other autoimmune diseases, particularly autoimmune thyroid diseases including Hashimoto's thyroiditis and Graves' disease, rheumatoid arthritis, type 1 diabetes, psoriasis, pernicious anemia, systemic lupus erythematosus, Addison's disease, and alopecia areata. This indicates the presence of genetically determined susceptibility to not only vitiligo but also to other autoimmune disorders. Here, we summarize current understanding of autoimmune pathogenesis in non-segmental vitiligo. PMID:21804820

  20. Autoimmunity, Seizures, and Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Rebecca; Dalmau, Josep

    2013-01-01

    Summary The recent discovery of a category of autoimmune encephalitis associated with antibodies against neuronal cell-surface and synaptic proteins has renewed interest for autoimmune causes of epilepsy. The identification of autoimmune encephalitis has changed paradigms in the diagnosis and management of several novel and treatable syndromes that occur with seizures and status epilepticus previously attributed to viral or idiopathic etiologies. This review focuses on the novel group of autoimmune encephalitis and also discusses some classical paraneoplastic syndromes that constitute another group of autoimmune disorders that may result in seizures. PMID:24001072

  1. Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) and autoimmune thyroiditis.

    PubMed

    Matejkova-Behanova, M

    2001-09-01

    Latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA) is characterized by clinical presentation as type 2 diabetes after 25 years of age, initial control achieved with diet or oral hypoglycaemic agents during at least 6 months, presence of autoantibodies (first of all GADA) and some immunogenetic features of diabetes mellitus type 1. In patients with an autoimmune endocrine disease, which could be also autoimmune diabetes, there is a high risk of development of another autoimmune endocrine disorder. The coexistence of two or more autoimmune endocrine diseases is pathognomonic for autoimmune polyglandular syndrome. Autoimmune thyroiditis and type 1 diabetes mellitus are the most common combination of autoimmune endocrine diseases reported. Most studies reported the prevalence of autoimmune thyroiditis in "typical" type 1 adult diabetic subjects about 20 - 40%. Little is known about the prevalence of autoimmune thyroiditis in subjects with LADA. Only a few studies confirmed a high prevalence of thyroid autoantibodies in type 2 diabetic subjects with GADA compared to type 2 diabetic subjects without GADA and compared to non-diabetic population too. PMID:11674844

  2. Autoimmune disorders in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Boitard, C; Debray-Sachs, M; Bach, J F

    1986-01-01

    The development of IDDM correlates with the presence of biologic markers pointing to the involvement of the immune system in the disease process. In addition to clinical observations of association of IDDM with other autoimmune disease and morphologic evidence of a mononuclear cell infiltration of the islets of Langerhans at the onset of the disease, anti-islet cell antibodies are detected in the serum of IDDM patients. Moreover, a strong genetic association with HL-A DR3 and DR4 identifies a genetic background compatible with autoimmune phenomena. Whether autoimmune phenomena are primary or secondary to an initial damage of the islets by infectious agents or other environmental factors is unknown. Whether or not the autoimmune response participates in the selective destruction of insulin-secreting cells has been a major issue in the past five years. The presence of T lymphocytes and anti-islet cell antibodies, which selectively inhibit or lyse insulin-secreting cells in vitro, strongly suggests that it may be the case. A definitive demonstration is difficult to provide in human IDDM. The development of animal models for IDDM has allowed useful insight into the pathogenetic mechanisms responsible for IDDM. In both the BB rat and the low-dose streptozotocin mouse model, the role of the immune system in the destruction of the islets of Langerhans is supported by the prevention of the disease by treatments interfering with the immune system. The BB rat develops a spontaneous autoimmune disease on a genetic background defined by the association with a major histocompatibility complex allele without any evidence for a role in initial damage of islets of a triggering infectious or chemical process. The low-dose streptozotocin model is an autoimmune IDDM secondary to the selective damage of islet cells by a toxin. The present scheme of an islet cell target and specific autoreactive T and B lymphocyte clones raises two major issues: what is the target antigen on islet cells and what is the role at the molecular level of class II major histocompatibility complex genes in susceptibility for IDDM? The first issue is presently being addressed in several laboratories using the hybridoma technology. The second issue is addressed at the biochemical level by studying restriction site polymorphism of major histocompatibility genes in susceptible individuals and IDDM patients, and at the functional level by studying the action of monoclonal antibodies to class II antigen on the development of IDDM in animal models. These steps are likely to be a prerequisite to antigen-specific immunotherapy in IDDM. PMID:3082114

  3. Compromised central tolerance of ICA69 induces multiple organ autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Fan, Yong; Gualtierotti, Giulio; Tajima, Asako; Grupillo, Maria; Coppola, Antonina; He, Jing; Bertera, Suzanne; Owens, Gregory; Pietropaolo, Massimo; Rudert, William A; Trucco, Massimo

    2014-09-01

    For reasons not fully understood, patients with an organ-specific autoimmune disease have increased risks of developing autoimmune responses against other organs/tissues. We identified ICA69, a known β-cell autoantigen in Type 1 diabetes, as a potential common target in multi-organ autoimmunity. NOD mice immunized with ICA69 polypeptides exhibited exacerbated inflammation not only in the islets, but also in the salivary glands. To further investigate ICA69 autoimmunity, two genetically modified mouse lines were generated to modulate thymic ICA69 expression: the heterozygous ICA69(del/wt) line and the thymic medullary epithelial cell-specific deletion Aire-ΔICA69 line. Suboptimal central negative selection of ICA69-reactive T-cells was observed in both lines. Aire-ΔICA69 mice spontaneously developed coincident autoimmune responses to the pancreas, the salivary glands, the thyroid, and the stomach. Our findings establish a direct link between compromised thymic ICA69 expression and autoimmunity against multiple ICA69-expressing organs, and identify a potential novel mechanism for the development of multi-organ autoimmune diseases. PMID:25088457

  4. Parallel Aspects of the Microenvironment in Cancer and Autoimmune Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rahat, Michal A.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer and autoimmune diseases are fundamentally different pathological conditions. In cancer, the immune response is suppressed and unable to eradicate the transformed self-cells, while in autoimmune diseases it is hyperactivated against a self-antigen, leading to tissue injury. Yet, mechanistically, similarities in the triggering of the immune responses can be observed. In this review, we highlight some parallel aspects of the microenvironment in cancer and autoimmune diseases, especially hypoxia, and the role of macrophages, neutrophils, and their interaction. Macrophages, owing to their plastic mode of activation, can generate a pro- or antitumoral microenvironment. Similarly, in autoimmune diseases, macrophages tip the Th1/Th2 balance via various effector cytokines. The contribution of neutrophils, an additional plastic innate immune cell population, to the microenvironment and disease progression is recently gaining more prominence in both cancer and autoimmune diseases, as they can secrete cytokines, chemokines, and reactive oxygen species (ROS), as well as acquire an enhanced ability to produce neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) that are now considered important initiators of autoimmune diseases. Understanding the contribution of macrophages and neutrophils to the cancerous or autoimmune microenvironment, as well as the role their interaction and cooperation play, may help identify new targets and improve therapeutic strategies. PMID:26997761

  5. Tenascin-Y: a protein of novel domain structure is secreted by differentiated fibroblasts of muscle connective tissue.

    PubMed

    Hagios, C; Koch, M; Spring, J; Chiquet, M; Chiquet-Ehrismann, R

    1996-09-01

    Tenascin-Y was identified in chicken as a novel member of the tenascin (TN) family of ECM proteins. Like TN-C, TN-R, and TN-X, TN-Y is a multidomain protein consisting of heptad repeats, epidermal growth factor-like repeats, fibronectin type III-like (FNIII) domains and a domain homologous to fibrinogen. In contrast to all other known TNs, the series of FNIII domains is interrupted by a novel domain, rich in serines (S) and prolines (P) that occur as repeated S-P-X-motifs, where X stands for any amino acid. Interestingly, the TN-Y-type FNIII domains are 70-100% identical with respect to their DNA sequence. Different TN-Y variants are created by alternative splicing of FNIII domains. Although, based on sequence comparisons TN-Y is most similar to mammalian TN-X, these molecules are not species homologues. TN-Y is predominantly expressed in embryonic and adult chicken heart and skeletal muscle and, to a lower extent, also in several non-muscular tissues. Two major transcripts of approximately 6.5 and 9.5 kb are differentially expressed during heart and skeletal muscle development and are also present in the adult. Anti-TN-Y antibodies recognize a approximately 400-kD double band and a approximately 300-kD form of TN-Y on immunoblots of chicken heart extracts. In situ hybridization and immunofluorescence analysis of aortic smooth muscle, heart, and skeletal muscle revealed that TN-Y is mainly expressed and secreted by cells within muscle-associated connective tissue. Cultured primary muscle fibroblasts released a approximately 220-kD doublet and a approximately 170-kD single TN-Y variant only when cultured in 10% horse serum but not in medium containing 10% fetal calf serum. All TN-Y variants isolated bind to heparin under physiologically relevant conditions that may indicate an important function retained in all tenascins. PMID:8830777

  6. Clinical and biometrical evaluation of socket preservation using demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft with and without the palatal connective tissue as a biologic membrane

    PubMed Central

    Moghaddas, Hamid; Amjadi, Mohammad Reza; Naghsh, Narges

    2012-01-01

    Background: Alveolar ridge preservation following tooth extraction has the ability to maintain the ridge dimensions and allow the implant placement in an ideal position fulfilling both functional and aesthetic results. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of the palatal connective tissue as a biological membrane for socket preservation with demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft (DFDBA). Materials and Methods: Twelve extraction sites were treated with DFDBA with (case group) and without (control group) using autogenous palatal connective tissue membrane before placement of implants. Alveolar width and height, amount of keratinized tissue, and gingival level were measured at pre-determined points using a surgical stent at two times, the time of socket preservation surgery Results: In both groups a decrease in all socket dimensions was found. The average decrease in socket width, height, keratinized tissue, and gingival level in case group was 1.16, 0.72, 3.58, and 1.27 mm, and in control group was 2.08, 0.86, 4.52, and 1.58 mm respectively. Statistical analysis showed that decrease in socket width (P = 0.012), keratinized tissue (P ≤ 0.001), and gingival level (P = 0.031) in case group was significantly lower than that of the control group. Results showed no meaningful difference in socket height changes when compared with case and control groups (P = 0.148). Conclusion: Under the limits of this study, connective tissue membrane could preserve socket width, amount of keratinized tissue, and the gingival level more effectively than DFDBA alone. PMID:23559955

  7. Capillaroscopic pattern in systemic lupus erythematosus and undifferentiated connective tissue disease: what we still have to learn?

    PubMed

    Lambova, Sevdalina Nikolova; Müller-Ladner, Ulf

    2013-03-01

    In rheumatology, specific is the capillaroscopic pattern in systemic sclerosis (SSc), the so-called "scleroderma type". Capillaroscopic pattern in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is less specific and includes a wide range of microvascular changes-"SLE-type" capillaroscopic pattern, non-specific findings and in a small percentage "scleroderma-like" pattern. The latter finding is currently associated with a potential subclinical overlap with SSc. Various microvascular changes have been observed in a different proportion of patients with undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD). The aim of the study was to evaluate the capillaroscopic changes in SLE and UCTD. Patients from the following groups were included in the study: 30 female patients with SLE (mean age, 49 ± 15.4 years), 31 patients with UCTD (mean age, 50 ± 17 years; 30 females and 1 male); 34 age- and sex-matched healthy volunteers were examined as a control group. Nailfold capillaroscopy was performed using videocapillaroscope Videocap 3.0 (DS Medica). Capillaroscopic findings were compared with clinical and laboratory data of the patients. At capillaroscopic examination, the most frequent capillaroscopic changes in SLE patients were the presence of elongated capillaries in 43 % (13/30), an increased tortuosity in 70 % (21/30) and a prominent subpapillary plexus in 60 % (18/30) of the cases. In 80 % (24/30) of the patients, dilated capillaries were found; in 6.6 % (2/30), giant capillary loops; and in 16.6 % (5/30), haemorrhages. In 50 % of the patients, an "SLE-type" capillaroscopic pattern was found. In 30 % (9/30) of the cases the capillaroscopic examination revealed "non-specific changes", in 6.6 % (2/30) of the patients it was found a normal capillaroscopic pattern and in 13.3 % (4/30) a "scleroderma-like" pattern. Positive tests for ANA were detected in 73.3 % (11/15) of the patients with "SLE-type" capillaroscopic pattern. In all the patients with "scleroderma-like" capillaroscopic finding, positive autoantibodies with a high titre were found, without signs for overlap with other connective tissue disease (CTD). In two out of four patients with such capillaroscopic findings, a vasculitis of peripheral vessels was evident and in the other two secondary RP and high immunologic activity. A "scleroderma-like" pattern was found in 38 % (12/31) of the patients with UCTD. In 51 % (16/31) of the patients from this group, "non-specific" capillaroscopic findings were observed. For the evaluation of the predictive value of capillaroscopic pattern for the development of a distinct rheumatic disorder in patients with UCTD, a longer period of follow-up is necessary. In SLE patients, it has been found that capillaroscopic examination reveals microvascular changes also in the absence of RP. Here, the results from the study illustrate the correlation between capillaroscopic changes and immunological profile. "Scleroderma-like" capillaroscopic pattern may be observed in the context of active vasculitis of peripheral vessels as well as in patients with secondary RP and high immunologic activity. It does not have an obligatory association with an overlap syndrome with other CTD. Capillaroscopic findings in UCTD are heterogeneous. The potential of capillaroscopic examination in UCTD for evaluating the prognosis of the disease needs