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Sample records for autologous fibrin glue

  1. Adhesive strength of autologous fibrin glue.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, H; Hirozane, K; Kamiya, A

    2000-03-01

    To establish an easy and rapid method for measuring the adhesive strength of fibrin glue and to clarify the factor(s) most affecting the strength, a study was made on the effect of the concentration of plasma components on the strength of cryoprecipitate (Cryo) prepared from a subject's own autologous plasma to be used as fibrin glue. The adhesive strength of the Cryo was measured with various supporting materials instead of animal skin using a tester of tension and compression. The results were as follows: (1) the strength of Cryo applied to ground flat glass (4 cm2) was significantly greater than that applied to clear glass, clear plastic, or smooth and flat wood chips; (2) the adhesive strength of Cryo depended on the concentration of thrombin with the optimal concentration being 50 units/ml; (3) the concentration of CaCl2 did not affect the adhesive strength of Cryo; (4) the adhesive reaction was dependent on the temperature and the adhesive strength more quickly reached a steady state at 37 degrees C than at lower temperature; (5) the adhesive strength was correlated well with the total concentration of fibrinogen and fibronectin. These results indicate that the adhesive strength of Cryo can be easily and quickly evaluated using a tester and ground glass with thrombin at 50 units/ml, and that the adhesive strength of Cryo can be predicted from the total concentration of fibrinogen and fibronectin. PMID:10726885

  2. Use of autologous fibrin glue for endoscopic treatment of esophageal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Matthias; Seeber, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: Esophageal leaks are a potentially life-threatening condition. One treatment option is injection therapy with commercially available fibrin glue. We describe herein a method to close esophageal leaks by injecting autologous fibrin glue prepared exclusively with the patient's own blood. PMID:26528493

  3. Clinical evaluations of autologous fibrin glue and polyglycolic acid sheets as oral surgical wound coverings after partial glossectomy.

    PubMed

    Kouketsu, Atsumu; Nogami, Shinnosuke; Fujiwara, Minami; Mori, Shiro; Yamauchi, Kensuke; Hashimoto, Wataru; Miyashita, Hitoshi; Kurihara, Jun; Kawai, Tadashi; Higuchi, Keisuke; Takahashi, Tetsu

    2016-08-01

    Polyglycolic acid (PGA) sheets and commercial fibrin glue are commonly used to cover open wound surfaces in oral surgery. Compared to commercial fibrin glue composed of pooled allogeneic blood, autologous fibrin glue is less expensive and poses lower risks of viral infection and allergic reaction. Here, we evaluated postoperative pain, scar contracture, ingestion, tongue dyskinesia, and postoperative bleeding in 24 patients who underwent partial glossectomy plus the application of a PGA sheet and an autologous fibrin glue covering (autologous group) versus 11 patients in whom a PGA sheet and commercial fibrin glue were used (allogeneic group). The evaluated clinical measures were nearly identical in both groups. Remarkable wound surface granulation was recognized in two cases in the autologous group. No complications were observed in either group, including viral infection or allergic reaction. Abnormal postoperative bleeding in the wound region was observed in one case in the allogeneic group. Coagulation and adhesion of the autologous fibrin glue were equivalent to those of conventional therapy with a PGA sheet and commercial fibrin glue. Thus, our results show that covering wounds with autologous fibrin glue and PGA sheets may help avoid the risks of viral infection and allergic reaction in partial glossectomy cases. PMID:27341770

  4. Autologous Fibrin Glue as an Encapsulating Scaffold for Delivery of Retinal Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Tamer A. E.; Ringuette, Randy; Wallace, Valerie A.; Griffith, May

    2015-01-01

    The retina is a highly sophisticated piece of the neural machinery that begins the translation of incoming light signals into meaningful visual information. Several degenerative diseases of the retina are characterized by photoreceptor loss and eventually lead to irreversible blindness. Regenerative medicine, using tissue engineering-based constructs to deliver progenitor cells or photoreceptors along with supporting carrier matrix is a promising approach for restoration of structure and function. Fresh fibrin glue (FG) produced by the CryoSeal®FS system in combination with mouse retinal progenitor cells (RPCs) were evaluated in this study. In vitro expanded RPCs isolated from postnatal mouse retina were encapsulated into FG and cultured in the presence of the protease inhibitor, tranexamic acid. Encapsulation of RPCs into FG did not show adverse effects on cell proliferation or cell survival. RPCs exhibited fibroblast-like morphology concomitantly with attachment to the encapsulating FG surface. They expressed α7 and β3 integrin subunits that could mediate attachment to fibrin matrix via an RGD-independent mechanism. The three-dimensional environment and the attachment surface provided by FG was associated with a rapid down-regulation of the progenitor marker SOX2 and enhanced the expression of the differentiation markers cone-rod homeobox and recoverin. However, the in vitro culture conditions did not promote full differentiation into mature photoreceptors. Nevertheless, we have shown that autologous fibrin, when fabricated into a scaffold for RPCs for delivery to the retina, provides the cells with external cues that could potentially improve the differentiation events. Hence, transient encapsulation of RPCs into FG could be a valid and potential treatment strategy to promote retinal regeneration following degenerative diseases. However, further optimization is necessary to maximize the outcomes in terms of mature photoreceptors. PMID:25692127

  5. Fibrin glue in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Anita; Kumar, Sandeep; Kumar, Abhiyan; Bansal, Raseena; Bhartiya, Shibal

    2009-01-01

    Suturing is a time consuming task in ophthalmology and suture induced irritation and redness are frequent problems. Postoperative wound infection and corneal graft rejection are examples of possible suture related complications. To prevent these complications, ophthalmic surgeons are switching to sutureless surgery. A number of recent developments have established tissue adhesives like cyanoacrylate glue and fibrin glue as attractive alternatives to sutures. A possible and promising new application for tissue adhesives is to provide a platform for tissue engineering. Currently, tissue glue is being used for conjunctival closure following pterygium and strabismus surgery, forniceal reconstruction surgery, amniotic membrane transplantation, lamellar corneal grafting, closure of corneal perforations and descematoceles, management of conjunctival wound leaks after trabeculectomy, lid surgery, adnexal surgery and as a hemostat to minimise bleeding. The purpose of this review is to discuss the currently available information on fibrin glue. PMID:19700876

  6. Autologous plasma rich in growth factors in the prevention of severe bleeding after teeth extractions in patients with bleeding disorders: a controlled comparison with fibrin glue

    PubMed Central

    Cocero, Nadia; Pucci, Fabrizio; Messina, Maria; Pollio, Berardino; Mozzati, Marco; Bergamasco, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Background Dental extractions in haemophiliacs may cause secondary bleeding, requiring repeated surgical and haematological interventions. As a local haemostatic, fibrin glue has recognised efficacy but, as a plasma-derived product, it carries the risk of viral infections. We, therefore, compared fibrin glue with an autologous haemostatic, plasma rich in growth factors (PRGF), in a controlled trial. Material and methods One hundred and twenty patients with different blood disorders were randomised into two cohorts to undergo dental extraction procedures without hospitalisation. Prior to the extractions, patients underwent systemic haematological treatment. Complications were defined as secondary bleeding after the 7-day follow-up period or protracting after the repair procedure. Results There were 106 extractions (7 retained 3rd molars) in the group managed with fibrin glue: secondary bleeding affected 3/60 patients (5%) on the third day after extraction and necessitated additional surgery and systemic treatment (in one case the procedure had to be repeated on the 7th day). In the PRGF arm there were 98 extractions (23 retained 3rd molars): secondary bleeding affected two patients (3.3%) on the first day after extraction and was arrested with surgery without systemic treatment. Four out of the five secondary bleeds occurred in patients with haemophilia A. Concomitant diabetes or liver disease significantly increased the bleeding risk. Discussion The bleeding rates in the study and control arm prove that PRGF works as well as fibrin glue as a local haemostatic. Further assets are that PRGF has autologous origin, does not require additional systemic treatment in post-extraction repair surgery, is associated with an earlier onset of neo-angiogenesis and, overall, can reduce patients’ distress and costs to the health system. PMID:25369587

  7. [Fibrin glue and bone regeneration].

    PubMed

    Zilch, H; Wolff, R

    1987-01-01

    The osteoinductive property of fibrin glue with and without admixture of aprotinin was proven in animal model. Aprotinin as an inhibitor of the fibrinolysis is supposed to be an inhibitor of the osteogenesis, too. Three holes of 4 mm diameter and 2 mm depth were placed into the diaphysis of both femura in 12 adults dogs. The defects were filled with either pure fibrin glue or with glue containing aprotinin (3000 KIE), or with nothing (vacant). After 8 weeks the quantity of the new built woven-bone was examined by plane geometry and the "Bone Metabolising Unit (BMU)" (Frost) which are crossing the border of lamellar bone and new woven bone were counted out. There was seen no statistical significantly between the three groups neither in the quantity of new bone nor in the BMU. Therefore the fibrin glue has no osteoinductive property. PMID:2441537

  8. Fibrin Glue as a Drug Delivery System

    PubMed Central

    Spicer, Patrick P.; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2010-01-01

    Fibrin glue has been used surgically for decades for hemostasis as well as a sealant. It has also been researched as both a gel for cell delivery and a vehicle for drug delivery. The drug delivery applications for fibrin glue span tissue engineering to chemotherapy and involve several mechanisms for drug matrix interactions and control of release kinetics. Additionally, drugs or factors can be loaded in the gel via impregnation and tethering to the gel through covalent linkages or affinity based systems. This review highlights recent research of fibrin glue as a drug delivery vehicle. PMID:20637815

  9. Comparative repair capacity of knee osteochondral defects using regenerated silk fiber scaffolds and fibrin glue with/without autologous chondrocytes during 36 weeks in rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Kazemnejad, Somaieh; Khanmohammadi, Manijeh; Mobini, Sahba; Taghizadeh-Jahed, Masoud; Khanjani, Sayeh; Arasteh, Shaghayegh; Golshahi, Hannaneh; Torkaman, Giti; Ravanbod, Roya; Heidari-Vala, Hamed; Moshiri, Ali; Tahmasebi, Mohammad-Naghi; Akhondi, Mohammad-Mehdi

    2016-06-01

    The reconstruction capability of osteochondral (OCD) defects using silk-based scaffolds has been demonstrated in a few studies. However, improvement in the mechanical properties of natural scaffolds is still challengeable. Here, we investigate the in vivo repair capacity of OCD defects using a novel Bombyx mori silk-based composite scaffold with great mechanical properties and porosity during 36 weeks. After evaluation of the in vivo biocompatibility and degradation rate of these scaffolds, we examined the effectiveness of these fabricated scaffolds accompanied with/without autologous chondrocytes in the repair of OCD lesions of rabbit knees after 12 and 36 weeks. Moreover, the efficiency of these scaffolds was compared with fibrin glue (FG) as a natural carrier of chondrocytes using parallel clinical, histopathological and mechanical examinations. The data on subcutaneous implantation in mice showed that the designed scaffolds have a suitable in vivo degradation rate and regenerative capacity. The repair ability of chondrocyte-seeded scaffolds was typically higher than the scaffolds alone. After 36 weeks of implantation, most parts of the defects reconstructed by chondrocytes-seeded silk scaffolds (SFC) were hyaline-like cartilage. However, spontaneous healing and filling with a scaffold alone did not eventuate in typical repair. We could not find significant differences between quantitative histopathological and mechanical data of SFC and FGC. The fabricated constructs consisting of regenerated silk fiber scaffolds and chondrocytes are safe and suitable for in vivo repair of OCD defects and promising for future clinical trial studies. PMID:26822846

  10. [Treatment of pseudoarthrosis of the carpal scaphoid with fibrin glue].

    PubMed

    Carozzi, S

    1983-08-01

    The author think that "Fibrin Seal Glue" and mechanical syntesis is an opimal method for osteosintesis of the Carpal scaphoid. He speaks about 5 patients treated with optimal results in 50 days mean. PMID:6395974

  11. Autologous fibrin sealant (Vivostat®) in the neurosurgical practice: Part I: Intracranial surgical procedure

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Francesca; Certo, Francesco; Basile, Luigi; Maugeri, Rosario; Grasso, Giovanni; Meccio, Flavia; Ganau, Mario; Iacopino, Domenico G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hemorrhages, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) fistula and infections are the most challenging postoperative complications in Neurosurgery. In this study, we report our preliminary results using a fully autologous fibrin sealant agent, the Vivostat® system, in achieving hemostasis and CSF leakage repair during cranio-cerebral procedures. Methods: From January 2012 to March 2014, 77 patients were studied prospectively and data were collected and analyzed. Autologous fibrin sealant, taken from patient's blood, was prepared with the Vivostat® system and applied on the resection bed or above the dura mater to achieve hemostasis and dural sealing. The surgical technique, time to bleeding control and associated complications were recorded. Results: A total of 79 neurosurgical procedures have been performed on 77 patients. In the majority of cases (98%) the same autologous fibrin glue provided rapid hemostasis and dural sealing. No patient developed allergic reactions or systemic complications in association with its application. There were no cases of cerebral hematoma, swelling, infection, or epileptic seizures after surgery whether in the immediate or in late period follow-up. Conclusions: In this preliminary study, the easy and direct application of autologous fibrin sealant agent helped in controlling cerebral bleeding and in providing prompt and efficient dural sealing with resolution of CSF leaks. Although the use of autologous fibrin glue seems to be safe, easy, and effective, further investigations are strongly recommended to quantify real advantages and potential limitations. PMID:25984391

  12. Effect of collagen sponge and fibrin glue on bone repair

    PubMed Central

    SANTOS, Thiago de Santana; ABUNA, Rodrigo Paolo Flores; de ALMEIDA, Adriana Luisa Gonçalves; BELOTI, Marcio Mateus; ROSA, Adalberto Luiz

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ability of hemostatic agents to promote bone repair has been investigated using in vitro and in vivo models but, up to now, the results are inconclusive. Objective In this context, the aim of this study was to compare the potential of bone repair of collagen sponge with fibrin glue in a rat calvarial defect model. Material and Methods Defects of 5 mm in diameter were created in rat calvariae and treated with either collagen sponge or fibrin glue; untreated defects were used as control. At 4 and 8 weeks, histological analysis and micro-CT-based histomorphometry were carried out and data were compared by two-way ANOVA followed by Student-Newman-Keuls test when appropriated (p≤0.05). Results Three-dimensional reconstructions showed increased bone formation in defects treated with either collagen sponge or fibrin glue compared with untreated defects, which was confirmed by the histological analysis. Morphometric parameters indicated the progression of bone formation from 4 to 8 weeks. Additionally, fibrin glue displayed slightly higher bone formation rate when compared with collagen sponge. Conclusion Our results have shown the benefits of using collagen sponge and fibrin glue to promote new bone formation in rat calvarial bone defects, the latter being discreetly more advantageous. PMID:26814464

  13. Successful management of congenital chyloperitoneum with fibrin glue.

    PubMed

    Antao, Brice; Croaker, David; Squire, Roly

    2003-11-01

    Chylous ascites in children has been treated in a variety of ways, including a low-fat diet, medium chain triglycerides, diuretics, total parental nutrition, surgical exploration, and internal peritoneo-venous shunting. The authors describe a child with persistent congenital chyloperitoneum treated successfully with the application of fibrin glue and recommend this as an effective alternative to traditional approaches. PMID:14614734

  14. Warning: fatal reaction to the use of fibrin glue in deep hepatic wounds. Case reports.

    PubMed

    Berguer, R; Staerkel, R L; Moore, E E; Moore, F A; Galloway, W B; Mockus, M B

    1991-03-01

    Two cases of severe hypotension following the use of fibrin glue for hemostasis in hepatic injuries are reported. A systemic reaction to bovine thrombin via large venous lacerations is suspected. A preliminary animal study supports this hypothesis. Caution is advised in the use of fibrin glue for hemostasis in deep hepatic wounds. PMID:2002531

  15. Evaluation of an in vivo heterotopic model of osteogenic differentiation of equine bone marrow and muscle mesenchymal stem cells in fibrin glue scaffold.

    PubMed

    McDuffee, Laurie A; Esparza Gonzalez, Blanca P; Nino-Fong, Rodolfo; Aburto, Enrique

    2014-02-01

    Autologous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used as a potential cell-based therapy in various animal and human diseases. Their differentiation capacity makes them useful as a novel strategy in the treatment of tissue injury in which the healing process is compromised or delayed. In horses, bone healing is slow, taking a minimum of 6-12 months. The osteogenic capacity of equine bone marrow and muscle MSCs mixed with fibrin glue or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) as a scaffold is assessed. Bone production by the following groups was compared: Group 1, bone marrow (BM) MSCs in fibrin glue; Group 2, muscle (M) MSCs in fibrin glue; Group 3, BM MSCs in PBS; Group 4, M MSCs in PBS and as a control; Group 5, fibrin glue without cells. BM and M MSCs underwent osteogenic stimulation for 48 h prior to being injected intramuscularly into nude mice. After 4 weeks, the mice were killed and muscle samples were collected and evaluated for bone formation and mineralization by using radiology, histochemistry and immunohistochemistry. Positive bone formation and mineralization were confirmed in Group 1 in nude mice based on calcium deposition and the presence of osteocalcin and collagen type I; in addition, a radiopaque area was observed on radiographs. However, no evidence of mineralization or bone formation was observed in Groups 2-5. In this animal model, equine BM MSCs mixed with fibrin glue showed better osteogenic differentiation capacity compared with BM MSCs in PBS and M MSCs in either carrier. PMID:24258028

  16. Sutureless colon anastomosis with fibrin glue in the rat.

    PubMed

    Haukipuro, K A; Hulkko, O A; Alavaikko, M J; Laitinen, S T

    1988-08-01

    The only technique available for creating an intestinal anastomosis without tissue strangulation is gluing. Theoretically, this could lead to a higher hydroxyproline content and greater mechanical strength than in a sutured anastomosis. To test the hypothesis, 83 rats underwent left colon resection and inverted primary anastomosis with either one layer of sutures (NG group) or fibrin glue (FG group). Seven-day FG anastomoses showed less adhesions (P = .02) but one subclinical leakage and a further radiologic one, compared with a greater amount of adhesions but no leakages in the NG group. The mean bursting pressures (mmHg) in the FG and NG groups, respectively, were 25 +/- 20 (SD) and 63 +/- 23 (N.S.) 30 minutes after surgery, 107 +/- 33 and 115 +/- 30 after one day, 81 +/- 31 and 133 +/- 26 (P less than .001) after four days, and 161 +/- 36 and 175 +/- 24 after seven days. The somewhat earlier rise in hydroxyproline content in the glued anastomoses did not lead to significant intergroup differences. The glued anastomoses were thus weak during the critical lag period of healing. Also, by preventing adhesion formation, the glue may reduce the extra blood supply from perianastomotic vessels. The outcomes might have differed more under demanding experimental or clinical situations. PMID:2456902

  17. Fibrin glue as a protective tool for microanastomoses in limb reconstructive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Stefan; Schildhauer, Thomas A.; Dudda, Marcel; Sauber, Jeannine; Spindler, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Fibrin glue becomes a more and more routinely used tool for stabilization of microanastomoses and nerve repair. This paper summarizes the technical properties and advantages of its use in a wide variety of microsurgical contexts, and includes an exemplary limb reconstructive case. Patients and methods: A total of 131 patients who had undergone elective and emergency microsurgery mainly of the limbs were retrospectively analyzed, as was the use of free flaps. Results: The use of fibrin glue allows for proper positioning of anastomoses and repaired nerves. No torsion of the pedicle could be seen. The flap survival rated >94%. The fibrin glue could stay in place in >99%. In the rare case of revision, the fibrin glue could easily be removed without damaging the region of the microanastomosis. Conclusion: Fibrin glue should not be used to repair insufficient, i.e., leaking anastomoses, but it does protect the site of anastomosis from tissue and fluid pressure. It prevents the pedickle from torsion and its use facilitates relocation of the microanastomoses in cases of revision surgery. PMID:26759762

  18. Hybrid composites of calcium phosphate granules, fibrin glue, and bone marrow for skeletal repair.

    PubMed

    Le Nihouannen, Damien; Goyenvalle, Eric; Aguado, Eric; Pilet, Paul; Bilban, Melitta; Daculsi, Guy; Layrolle, Pierre

    2007-05-01

    Synthetic bone substitutes, such as calcium phosphate ceramics, give good results in clinical applications. In order to adapt to surgical sites, bioceramics come in the form of blocks or granules, and are either dense or porous. Combining these bioceramics with fibrin glue provides a mouldable and self-hardening composite biomaterial with the biochemical properties of each component. Critical-sized defects in the femoral condyle of rabbits were filled with TricOs/fibrin glue/bone marrow hybrid/composite material. The TricOs granules (1-2 mm) were composed of hydroxyapatite and beta tricalcium phosphate (60/40 in weight). The fibrin glue was composed of fibrinogen, thrombin and other biological factors and mixed with MBCP granules either simultaneously or sequentially. Bone marrow was also added to the MBCP/fibrin composite prior to filling the defects. After 3, 6, 12, and 24 weeks of implantation, the newly-formed bone was analysed with histology, histomorphometry and mechanical tests. The newly-formed bone had grown centripetally. Simultaneous application of fibrin glue showed better results for mechanical properties than sequential application after 6 weeks. Around 40% of bone had formed after 24 weeks in the three groups. Although the addition of bone marrow did not improve bone formation, the MBCP/fibrin material could be used in clinical bone filling applications. PMID:17117470

  19. A new technique using fibrin glue in the management of auricular hematoma.

    PubMed

    Mohamad, Shwan H; Barnes, Martyn; Jones, Stephen; Mahendran, Suresh

    2014-11-01

    : This study aims to describe a new technique for the management of auricular hematoma using fibrin glue. Five difficult cases of auricular hematoma were managed using this technique, including 2 recurrent and 3 delayed presentations. After skin preparation and local anesthetic, an incision was made, the hematoma was evacuated, and the cavity was washed out with saline. Fibrin glue was applied liberally; a dental roll pressure dressing was applied and secured with a prolene bead suture. The patients were given a course of oral antibiotic and reviewed after 5 days for removal of the external dressing. They were later assessed to exclude re-accumulation of the hematoma. All patients had complete resolution of the hematoma without re-accumulation; they were satisfied with the cosmetic results and experienced no complications. This case series provides evidence that fibrin glue is effective in the management of auricular hematoma. Larger studies may provide further evidence of the effectiveness of this new technique. PMID:24699189

  20. Characterization of a fibrin glue-GDNF slow-release preparation.

    PubMed

    Cheng, H; Fraidakis, M; Blombäck, B; Lapchak, P; Hoffer, B; Olson, L

    1998-01-01

    One novel method to deliver trophic factor locally in the CNS is to mix it into fibrin glue. In the present studies, [125I]-labeled GDNF-containing fibrin glue balls were used to determine binding and spread of the trophic factor. First, the binding of different concentrations of [125I]-labeled GDNF in fibrin glue was determined in vitro. Within the six concentrations used (from 200 nM to 0.004 nM, 0 M as control), there was a strong linear correlation between the [125I]-GDNF concentration and the recovered radioactivity (r = 0.992). The mean bound radioactivity in 16 samples with 4 nM [125I]-GDNF was 71262 +/- 2710 CPM, and accounted for 89.8% of the mean initial count of free [125I]-GDNF (79369 +/- 3499 CPM). Second, [125I]-GDNF-containing glue balls were implanted into the anterior chamber of adult rats. The implanted fibrin glue balls decreased in size with time, but could still be identified on the irises 2 wk after implantation. Radioactivity was concentrated at the implantation sites in the early stages with a distribution in the surrounding iris tissue, which became separated into focal radioactive spots at the third week. Counts of radioactivity were significantly higher in the [125I]-GDNF glue ball-implanted irises than controls until 14 days after implantation. A study of the [125I] decay over time using least-squares linear regression demonstrated first-order kinetics (r = -0.98, p <0.02) with k = 0.0091 and T 1/2 = 76 h. Finally, [125I]-GDNF-containing glue balls were implanted in the spinal cord of adult rats. Radioactivity was concentrated at the implantation sites in the early stages and was later distributed more widely in the surrounding thoracic cord. The [125I]-GDNF-containing glue degraded over time and became a porous meshwork with decreasing radioactivity at the later time points. Radioactivity in the spinal cords subjected to implantation of [125I]-GDNF-containing glue balls was higher than in controls for 14 days. Study of the [125I] decay

  1. Hemostasis of solid viscus trauma by intraparenchymal injection of fibrin glue.

    PubMed

    Hauser, C J

    1989-03-01

    Fibrin glue (FG) is an effective hemostatic agent applied topically to the spleen. In this study, FG was found to be an effective hemostatic agent when applied topically in standardized wounds of the canine liver, spleen, and pancreas. It was markedly more effective, however, when injected intraparenchymally. In a case of severe blunt trauma in a patient with acute alcoholic hepatitis, intraparenchymal FG was lifesaving. Fibrin glue is a useful adjunct in the management of trauma to all the abdominal solid viscera. Intraparenchymal injection is the preferred mode of FG application. PMID:2465750

  2. Fibrin glue repair leads to enhanced axonal elongation during early peripheral nerve regeneration in an in vivo mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Koulaxouzidis, Georgios; Reim, Gernot; Witzel, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Microsurgical suturing is the gold standard of nerve coaptation. Although literature on the usefulness of fibrin glue as an alternative is becoming increasingly available, it remains contradictory. Furthermore, no data exist on how both repair methods might influence the morphological aspects (arborization; branching) of early peripheral nerve regeneration. We used the sciatic nerve transplantation model in thy-1 yellow fluorescent protein mice (YFP; n = 10). Pieces of nerve (1cm) were grafted from YFP-negative mice (n = 10) into those expressing YFP. We performed microsuture coaptations on one side and used fibrin glue for repair on the contralateral side. Seven days after grafting, the regeneration distance, the percentage of regenerating and arborizing axons, the number of branches per axon, the coaptation failure rate, the gap size at the repair site and the time needed for surgical repair were all investigated. Fibrin glue repair resulted in regenerating axons travelling further into the distal nerve. It also increased the percentage of arborizing axons. No coaptation failure was detected. Gap sizes were comparable in both groups. Fibrin glue significantly reduced surgical repair time. The increase in regeneration distance, even after the short period of time, is in line with the results of others that showed faster axonal regeneration after fibrin glue repair. The increase in arborizing axons could be another explanation for better functional and electrophysiological results after fibrin glue repair. Fibrin glue nerve coaptation seems to be a promising alternative to microsuture repair. PMID:26330844

  3. Comparison of fibrin glue and suture in the healing of teat incisions in lactating goats.

    PubMed

    Alan, M; Yener, Z; Tasal, I; Bakir, B

    2008-05-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate whether fibrin glue can be used to close experimentally induced incisions of the teat (mammary papillae) in lactating goats and to compare the healing of the glued with the sutured incisions. Four clinically healthy lactating dairy goats, namely 8 mammary papillae were used. After surgical preparation of the papillae, a 3.5 cm long incision of each papilla was made through skin, muscular layer and mucosa into the papillary sinus. The wounds in the right papillae in all goats were closed with U-shaped uninterrupted 00 chromic catgut sutures. The wounds in the left papillae in all goats were closed, using fibrin glue. One incision was seen to be dehisced and fistulous one day after in fibrin glued teats. The animals were slaughtered 8 days after surgical manipulation. The mammary papillae were removed and examined in the viewpoint on gross and microscopic findings. The healing of wounds was slower and feeble in glued mammary papillary incisions, however faster and stronger in sutured incisions on day 8 after operations. But, available outcomes like less tissue thickness and positive cosmetic results could be obtained byfibrin glue used on mammary papillary incisions, which are very important for teats to be milked by hand and milking machine. Results suggest that it is advisable to use only one or two simple interrupted sutures in teat incisions glued with fibrin to prevent the dehiscence but with a more reliable healing than the sutured incisions. PMID:18547021

  4. Fibrin glue from stored human plasma. An inexpensive and efficient method for local blood bank preparation.

    PubMed

    Spotnitz, W D; Mintz, P D; Avery, N; Bithell, T C; Kaul, S; Nolan, S P

    1987-08-01

    European surgeons have used fibrin glue extensively during thoracic, cardiovascular, and general surgical operations. Until now, however, it has been available only as a commercial preparation made from pooled human plasma, and it has not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in the United States because of a high associated risk of hepatitis and acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Methods of obtaining fibrinogen, an essential component of fibrin glue, from cryoprecipitate or fresh frozen plasma have been published recently. However, the cryoprecipitate method results in relatively low concentrations of fibrinogen, which can reduce glue effectiveness. The fresh frozen plasma method is more expensive and does not meet the standards of the American Association of Blood Banks for the "closed" system required for safe handling and management of blood component products. Both the cryoprecipitate and the fresh frozen plasma methods result in waste of unstable clotting factors. These factors are necessary to replace human plasma clotting deficiencies but are not necessary for the production of fibrin glue. The authors have developed an efficient, high-concentration blood bank method for producing and maintaining a local supply of a safer and less expensive but equally effective material derived from stored human plasma. This material is produced using approved blood bank techniques for a "closed" system in blood component production, thus reducing the risks of contamination and infection, and its fibrinogen concentration is higher than that of standard cryoprecipitate. The cost of 1 unit of this fibrin glue is comparable to that for 1 unit of cryoprecipitate and less than that for 1 unit of fresh frozen plasma.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2440358

  5. Evaluation of bone matrix gelatin/fibrin glue and chitosan/gelatin composite scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z H; Zhang, J; Zhang, Q; Gao, Y; Yan, J; Zhao, X Y; Yang, Y Y; Kong, D M; Zhao, J; Shi, Y X; Li, X L

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate bone matrix gelatin (BMG)/fibrin glue and chitosan/gelatin composite scaffolds for cartilage tissue engineering. Chondrocytes were isolated from costal cartilage of Sprague-Dawley rats and seeded on BMG/fibrin glue or chitosan/gelatin composite scaffolds. After different in vitro culture durations, the scaffolds were subjected to hematoxylin and eosin, Masson's trichrome, and toluidine blue staining, anti-collagen II and anti-aggrecan immunohistochemistry, and scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) analysis. After 2 weeks of culture, chondrocytes were distributed evenly on the surfaces of both scaffolds. Cell numbers and the presence of extracellular matrix components were markedly increased after 8 weeks of culture, and to a greater extent on the chitosan/gelatin scaffold. The BMG/fibrin glue scaffold showed signs of degradation after 8 weeks. Immunofluorescence analysis confirmed higher levels of collagen II and aggrecan using the chitosan/gelatin scaffold. SEM revealed that the majority of cells on the surface of the BMG/fibrin glue scaffold demonstrated a round morphology, while those in the chitosan/gelatin group had a spindle-like shape, with pseudopodia. Chitosan/gelatin scaffolds appear to be superior to BMG/ fibrin glue constructs in supporting chondrocyte attachment, proliferation, and biosynthesis of cartilaginous matrix components. PMID:27525846

  6. Fibrinogen and thrombin concentrations are critical for fibrin glue adherence in rat high-risk colon anastomoses

    PubMed Central

    Buen, Eliseo Portilla-de; Orozco-Mosqueda, Abel; Leal-Cortés, Caridad; Vázquez-Camacho, Gonzalo; Fuentes-Orozco, Clotilde; Alvarez-Villaseñor, Andrea Socorro; Macías-Amezcua, Michel Dassaejv; González-Ojeda, Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Fibrin glues have not been consistently successful in preventing the dehiscence of high-risk colonic anastomoses. Fibrinogen and thrombin concentrations in glues determine their ability to function as sealants, healers, and/or adhesives. The objective of the current study was to compare the effects of different concentrations of fibrinogen and thrombin on bursting pressure, leaks, dehiscence, and morphology of high-risk ischemic colonic anastomoses using fibrin glue in rats. METHODS: Colonic anastomoses in adult female Sprague-Dawley rats (weight, 250-350 g) treated with fibrin glue containing different concentrations of fibrinogen and thrombin were evaluated at post-operative day 5. The interventions were low-risk (normal) or high-risk (ischemic) end-to-end colonic anastomoses using polypropylene sutures and topical application of fibrinogen at high (120 mg/mL) or low (40 mg/mL) concentrations and thrombin at high (1000 IU/mL) or low (500 IU/mL) concentrations. RESULTS: Ischemia alone, anastomosis alone, or both together reduced the bursting pressure. Glues containing a low fibrinogen concentration improved this parameter in all cases. High thrombin in combination with low fibrinogen also improved adherence exclusively in low-risk anastomoses. No differences were detected with respect to macroscopic parameters, histopathology, or hydroxyproline content at 5 days post-anastomosis. CONCLUSIONS: Fibrin glue with a low fibrinogen content normalizes the bursting pressure of high-risk ischemic left-colon anastomoses in rats at day 5 after surgery. PMID:24714834

  7. Fibrin glue-assisted for the treatment of corneal perforations using glycerin-cryopreserved corneal tissue

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Nuo; Li, Cheng; Chen, Wen-Sheng; Qin, Wen-Juan; Xue, Yu-Hua; Wu, Hu-Ping

    2014-01-01

    AIM To evaluate the outcomes and safety of lamellar keratoplasty (LK) assisted by fibrin glue in corneal perforations. METHODS Six eyes of 6 patients affected by different corneal pathologies (2 posttraumatic corneal scar and 3 bacterial keratitis) underwent LK procedures by using fibrin glue. The mean corneal perforation diameter was 1.35±0.64mm (range, 0.7-2.5mm), and the greatest diameter of the ulcerative stromal defect was 2.47±0.77mm in average (range, 1.5-3.5mm). The donor corneal lamella diameters were 0.20-mm larger and thicker than the recipient to restore a physiologic corneal thickness and shape: mean donor diameter was 8.34±0.28mm (range, 8.2-8.7mm) and mean thickness was 352±40.27mm (range, 220-400mm). Mean follow-up was 7.33±1.97 months (range, 6-11 months). Postoperatively, the graft status, graft clarity, anterior chamber response, the visual prognosis, intraocular pressures, and postoperative complications were recorded. RESULTS All the corneal perforations were successfully healed after the procedure. The best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA) ranged from 20/1 000 to 20/50 in their initial presentation, and from 20/100 to 20/20 in their last visit, showed increase in all the patients. No major complications such as graft dislocation and graft failure were noted. Neovascularization developed in the superficial stroma of donor graft in 1 case. High intraocular pressure developed on day 2 after surgery, while was remained in normal range after application of anti-glaucomatous eyedrops for 1 week in 1 case. CONCLUSION Fibrin glue-assisted sutureless LK is valuable for maintaining the ocular integrity in the treatment of corneal perforations. PMID:24634865

  8. Endoluminal embolization of bilateral atherosclerotic common iliac aneurysms with fibrin tissue glue (Beriplast)

    SciTech Connect

    Beese, Richard C.; Tomlinson, Mark A.; Buckenham, Timothy M.

    2000-05-15

    The standard surgical approach to nonleaking iliac aneurysms found at repair of a leaking abdominal aortic aneurysm is to minimize the operative risk by repairing the abdominal aorta only. This means that the bypassed iliac aneurysms may have to be repaired later. As this population of patients are usually elderly with coexisting medical problems, interventional radiology is being used to embolize these aneurysms, thus avoiding the morbidity and mortality associated with further general anesthesia and surgery. Various materials and stents have been reported to be effective in the treatment of iliac aneurysms. We report the successful use of endoluminal fibrin tissue glue (Beriplast) to treat two large iliac aneurysms in a patient who had had a previous abdominal aortic aneurysm repair. We discuss the technique involved and the reasons why we used tissue glue in this patient.

  9. Fixation of fractured inferior orbital wall using fibrin glue in inferior blowout fracture surgery.

    PubMed

    Jo, Eun Jun; Yang, Ho Jik; Kim, Jong Hwan

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of surgical treatment for orbital fracture are to return soft tissue to its original position as well as reduce and fix the bone fragments properly. Reduction of the orbital bone through a subciliary or conjunctival incision and reduction using a urinary balloon catheter were simultaneously performed on 53 patients between 2010 and 2013. Fibrin glue was used to attach the reduced bone fragments. These patients had less than 2 cm(2) of bone defect and showed diplopia, eye movement limitation, and enophthalmos. Diplopia, eye movement limitation, and enophthalmos were each reduced to 3/32, 2/25, and 2/48, respectively. There were no adverse effects, such as infection or hematoma, and because implants were not used, there was no possibility of its extrusion or foreign body reaction. The operation time decreased compared with when using an implant, and the bone fragments remained in a fixed position even after removing the urinary balloon catheter. Therefore, the use of fibrin glue proved to be effective in orbital floor fractures. PMID:25565237

  10. Free-electron laser effects on fibrin tissue glue: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joos, Karen M.; Topadze, Katie; Shieh, Charles; Shen, Jin-Hui; Casagrande, Vivien A.

    2000-06-01

    One glaucoma challenge is the treatment of leaking trabeculectomy blebs. Simple methods such as patching, autologous blood injection, compression sutures or cyanoacrylate glue application often fail. Because the conjunctiva is thin and ischemic, it often can't be sutured together so major surgery is required to excise the thin tissue and advance healthy conjunctiva. We report the preliminary results of Tisseel and Tisseel treated with two wavelengths from Vanderbilt's free electron laser placed on leaking trabeculectomy bleb holes in Dutch belted rabbits. The holes were healed at one week in the sutured group and in the 7.7 micrometer FEL-treated Tisseel group. One hole was healed in the cyanoacrylate glue-treated group. Holes remained in the other treatment groups. Tisseel irradiated with 7.7 micrometer energy from the free electron laser may promote healing of trabeculectomy bleb holes.

  11. Scalded Skin of Rat Treated by Using Fibrin Glue Combined with Allogeneic Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yadong; Li, Ying; Fang, Guojian; Zhang, Keji

    2014-01-01

    Background It is difficult to achieve satisfactory results with the traditional treatment of large-area skin defects and deep burns. Objective To test the treatment effect of an active dressing film made of a mixture of fibrin glue and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) for repairing burn wounds on the skin of rats. Methods Two scald wounds were made on the back of each rat. A total of 30 scald wounds were randomly divided into 3 groups, with 10 wounds in each group. In the experimental treatment group, the scald wounds were covered with the fibrin glue and BMSC mixture. The wounds of the experimental control group were covered with fibrin glue only. No intervention was administered to the blank control group. Thirty days after treatment, pathological sections were cut from the scalded local tissues of all rats from the 3 groups and observed with a microscope. Results The speed of scald wound healing in the experimental treatment group was faster than the other 2 groups. In the experimental treatment group, histopathological analysis revealed that the sebaceous glands showed obviously proliferous at the edge of the new tissue and gradually extended to the deep dermal layer of the new tissue. Conclusion BMSCs may have an active role in promoting skin tissue repair and generating skin appendages. Allogeneic BMSCs mixed with fibrin glue can contribute to the quick formation of a film-like gel over the scald wounds, which might be of significance for emergency treatment and skin-grafting operations. PMID:24966626

  12. Successful Treatment of Congenital Chyloperitoneum with Platelet-Rich Fibrin Glue

    PubMed Central

    Joudi, Marjan; Alamdari, Daryoush Hamidi; Rahimi, Hamid-Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background Congenital chyloperitoneum is an uncommon clinical condition. A few cases of congenital chyloperitoneum in children have been described who were treated in a variety of methods. Case Presentation Congenital chyloperito was diagnosed in a 5-day-old baby boy with a significant abdominal distension. Due to the failed conservative managements by medium-chain triglycerides (MCT) enriched milk and partial parenteral nutrition (PPN), the authors tried platelet rich fibrin glue (PRFG) as an alternative choice which was applied through an already inserted intra-abdominal catheter. PRFG successfully stopped the lymph leakage from all over the small intestinal mesentery; thereby PRFG may be considered as an effective alternative treatment before surgical intervention. Conclusion Applying PRFG is an easy, safe, and effective alternative option that may be used to close the chylous ascites lymph leakage in children if conservative management with PPN fails. PMID:23795263

  13. Fibrin glue protection of primary anastomosis in the obstructed left colon. An experimental study on the rat.

    PubMed

    Hulkko, O A; Haukipuro, K A; Laitinen, S T

    1988-01-01

    A left-sided colon obstruction was produced with a polypropylene sling in 65 rats. Colon resection and primary anastomosis were performed three days later. The animals were then randomly allocated to the FG (fibrin glue) group receiving sealing of the anastomosis with 0.4 ml of fibrin glue (Beriplast R), or to the NG (non-glue) group. The anastomoses were assessed 30 min, two days and four days later. Adhesion formation was similar in both groups. The number of macroscopic or radiological leakages did not differ either. At 30 min the mean bursting pressure was 74.6 +/- 8.6 (SD) mmHg in the FG group and 58.3 +/- 21.6 mmHg in NG (non-glue) group (p less than 0.05, Mann-Whitney test). Later on the strength of the anastomoses was equal in both groups. We conclude that the initial sealing of weak points in the anastomoses was beneficial but the inherent strength per se could not be enhanced. PMID:2451367

  14. Medpor Implant Fixation Using Fibrin Glue in the Treatment of Medial Orbital Wall Fracture.

    PubMed

    Kang, Nakheon; Song, Seung Han; Kyung, Hyunwoo; Oh, Sang-Ha

    2015-06-01

    The optimal treatment modalities are determined based on the symptoms and degree of the bone defects in patients with medial orbital wall blowout fracture. Most of the patients in this series underwent implant surgery. However, there are many patients whose implants were not fixed during surgery. Therefore, some patients who had implant migration occurred had been reported. We have therefore used methods for applying fibrin glue (Tisseel, Baxter Healthcare, Norfolk, United Kingdom) for the fixation of implant. Between 2007 and 2013, a total of 168 patients underwent porous polyethylene orbital implant (Medpor) surgery with the application of Tisseel. All the patients underwent surgical treatments via a transcaruncular approach, for which the Medpor was used. Postoperative complications include 6 cases of the limitation of extraoccular movement, 10 cases of diplopia, and 7 cases of enophthalmos. However, there were no specific complications caused by Tisseel. All the patients were satisfied with the treatment outcomes. In this study, we report the usefulness of Tisseel in the fixation of the medial orbital wall fracture using the Medpor implant with a review of literatures. PMID:26080196

  15. Fibrin glue eliminates the need for packing after complex liver injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Feinstein, A. J.; Varela, J. E.; Cohn, S. M.; Compton, R. P.; McKenney, M. G.

    2001-01-01

    Hemostasis after traumatic liver injury can be extremely difficult to obtain, particularly in coagulopathic patients who have suffered extensive liver damage. We determined the ability of a fibrin glue preparation (FG) to terminate ongoing bleeding using a new, clinically relevant porcine model of complex hepatic injury. Anesthetized swine (n = 6, 18 to 19 kg) received an external blast to the right upper abdomen and were immediately anticoagulated with intravenous heparin (200 u/kg). Uncontrolled hemorrhage from blast continued from time of injury (t = 0 minutes) to t = 15 minutes. Lactated Ringer's solution was infused to keep mean arterial pressure (MAP) > 80 mm Hg until the end of experiment (t = 90 minutes). Animals underwent routine surgical techniques to control bleeding, and FG was employed in the event these measures failed. Estimated blood loss and fluid resuscitation volume were measured. Serial MAP, arterial base excess, and temperature were recorded. Animals were severely injured with significant blood loss prior to laparotomy (26 +/- 6 cc/kg) and during routine surgical efforts to arrest hemorrhage (11 +/- 2 cc/kg). Bleeding could not be controlled with standard techniques in any animal. FG rapidly controlled hemorrhage and eliminated the need for packing. Re-bleeding was noted in only one animal (portal vein injury). FG can control severe hepatic hemorrhage when surgical techniques fail. Further work in the clinical arena is warranted to determine the potential benefits of FG in arresting hemorrhage in hemodynamically unstable coagulopathic patients with complex hepatic injuries. PMID:11769337

  16. THE ROLE OF FIBRIN GLUE AND SUTURE ON THE FIXATION OF ULTRA FROZEN PRESERVED MENISCUS TRANSPLANTATION IN RABBITS

    PubMed Central

    Reckers, Leandro José; Fagundes, Djalma José; Pozo Raymundo, José Luiz; Granata Júnior, Geraldo Sérgio de Mello; Moreira, Márcia Bento; Paiva, Vanessa Carla; Negrini Fagundes, Anna Luiza; Cohen, Moises

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the ability of fibrin adhesive in promoting the meniscus fixation within two, four and eight weeks compared to the conventional soft-tissue suture technique. Materials and Methods: 36 right medial menisci of rabbits preserved at negative 73° Celsius for 30 days were transplanted to animals of the same sample and fixed with soft-tissue suture or fibrin glue. After 2, 4 or 8 weeks, the appearance of the menisci and the quality of fixation were macroscopically checked and evaluated by a scoring system. The findings were subjected to the statistical study of variance analysis (p ≤ 0.05%). Results: The deep-frozen meniscus preservation maintained the integrity of the meniscus transplant, and, macroscopically, there was no significant reduction of the length of the meniscus in all post-transplant periods (p = 0.015). The menisci fixed with fibrin showed slight changes in color and surface roughness. There were no signs of rejection or infection in both groups. Suture fixation scoring was superior (p = 0.015) in all periods (80% of total fixation) as compared to the setting promoted by fibrin (20% of total fixation). Conclusion: The homologous transplantation of the meniscus of rabbits experienced various degrees of integration to the knee according to the fixation method; the surgical soft tissues suturing technique was shown to be superior in the evaluation of scores compared to the fixation with fibrin adhesive. PMID:27004186

  17. Differentiation within autologous fibrin scaffolds of porcine dermal cells with the mesenchymal stem cell phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Puente, Pilar de la

    2013-02-01

    Porcine mesenchymal stem cells (pMSCs) are an attractive source of cells for tissue engineering because their properties are similar to those of human stem cells. pMSCs can be found in different tissues but their dermal origin has not been studied in depth. Additionally, MSCs differentiation in monolayer cultures requires subcultured cells, and these cells are at risk of dedifferentiation when implanting them into living tissue. Following this, we attempted to characterize the MSCs phenotype of porcine dermal cells and to evaluate their cellular proliferation and differentiation in autologous fibrin scaffolds (AFSs). Dermal biopsies and blood samples were obtained from 12 pigs. Dermal cells were characterized by flow cytometry. Frozen autologous plasma was used to prepare AFSs. pMSC differentiation was studied in standard structures (monolayers and pellets) and in AFSs. The pMSCs expressed the CD90 and CD29 markers of the mesenchymal lineage. AFSs afforded adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation. The porcine dermis can be proposed to be a good source of MSCs with adequate proliferative capacity and a suitable expression of markers. The pMSCs also showed optimal proliferation and differentiation in AFSs, such that these might serve as a promising autologous and implantable material for use in tissue engineering. -- Highlights: ► Low fibrinogen concentration provides a suitable matrix for cell migration and differentiation. ► Autologous fibrin scaffolds is a promising technique in tissue engineering. ► Dermal cells are an easily accessible mesenchymal stem cell source. ► Fibrin scaffolds afforded adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic differentiation.

  18. Filling and shielding for postoperative gastric perforations of endoscopic submucosal dissection using polyglycolic acid sheets and fibrin glue

    PubMed Central

    Takimoto, Kengo; Hagiwara, Akeo

    2016-01-01

    Background and study aims: Many medical institutions in Japan perform endoscopic mucosal dissection (ESD) to treat early gastric cancer. Perforations can occur during ESD, and clipping has been reported as useful for treating small pinhole perforations. However, it is often difficult to close postoperative perforations because they usually have large diameters, and the muscle layer around the perforated region is often fragile, so additional open surgery is the only currently used method to treat large perforations and delayed perforations. Another method for large perforation is needed to treat perforations endoscopically. Ono et al. reported a case in which a postoperative perforation was closed using a polyglycolic acid (PGA) sheet and fibrin glue. In addition, it has been used by the authors’ group to repair duodenal injuries that occur during ESD. We report 3 cases in which PGA sheets and fibrin glue were successfully used to repair postoperative gastric perforations endoscopically. This method is simple, safe, and effective, and is a new way to treat large perforations and delayed perforations that occur following ESD. PMID:27556075

  19. Optimization and Use of 3D sintered porous material in medical field for mixing fibrin glue.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmotte, Y.; Laroumanie, H.; Brossard, G.

    2012-04-01

    In medical field, Mixing of two or more chemical components (liquids and/or gases) is extremely important as improper mixing can affect the physico-chemical properties of the final product. At Baxter Healthcare Corporation, we are using a sintered porous material (PM) as a micro-mixer in medical device for mixing Fibrinogen and Thrombin in order to obtain a homogeneous polymerized Fibrin glue clot used in surgery. First trials were carried out with an interconnected PM from Porvair® (made of PE - porosity: 40% - permeability: 18Darcy). The injection rate is very low, usually about 10mL/min (Re number about 50) which keeps fluids in a laminar flow. Such a low flow rate does not favour mixing of fluids having gradient of viscosity if a mixer is not used. Promising results that were obtained lead the team to understand this ability to mix fluids which will be presented in the poster. Topology of porous media (PM) which associates a solid phase with interconnected (or not) porous structure is known and used in many commodity products. Researches on PM usually focus on flows inside this structure. By opposition to transport and filtration capacity, as well as mechanic and thermic properties, mixing is rarely associated with PM. However over the past few years, we shown that some type of PM have a real capacity to mix certain fluids. Poster will also describe the problematic of mixing complex biological fluids as fibrinogen and Thrombin. They indeed present a large viscosity difference (ratio about 120) limiting the diffusion and the interaction between the two solutions. As those products are expensive, we used Water (1cPo) and Glycerol 87% (120cPo) which are matching the viscosities of Thrombin and Fibrinogen. A parametric investigation of the "porous micro-mixer" as well as a scale up investigation was carried out to examine the influence of both diffusion and advection to successful mix fluids of different viscosity. Experiments were implemented with Planar Laser

  20. Haemostasis with fibrin glue injection into the pericardial space for right ventricular perforation caused by an iatrogenic procedural complication.

    PubMed

    Arai, Hirofumi; Miyamoto, Takamichi; Hara, Nobuhiro; Obayashi, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    An 89-year-old woman with severe aortic valve stenosis and bradycardia presented with circulatory shock due to cardiac tamponade. We performed pericardiocentesis, and then diagnosed right ventricular perforation by echocardiography with microcavitation contrast medium just before inserting a drainage tube. We then inserted the drainage tube in the appropriate position and withdrew blood-filled fluid. The patient was haemodynamically stabilised, but haemorrhage from the perforation site continued for a few days. We injected fibrin glue into the pericardial space through the drainage tube and achieved haemostasis. Thus, we avoided surgery to close the perforation in this high-risk patient. There was no recurrence of haemorrhage. She subsequently had elective aortic valve replacement at another hospital. No adhesions in the pericardial space were seen during surgery. PMID:27190133

  1. Fibrin glue is a candidate scaffold for long-term therapeutic protein expression in spontaneously differentiated adipocytes in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyagi, Yasuyuki; Kuroda, Masayuki; Asada, Sakiyo; Tanaka, Shigeaki; Konno, Shunichi; Tanio, Masami; Aso, Masayuki; Okamoto, Yoshitaka; Nakayama, Toshinori; Saito, Yasushi; Bujo, Hideaki

    2012-01-01

    Adipose tissue is expected to provide a source of cells for protein replacement therapies via auto-transplantation. However, the conditioning of the environment surrounding the transplanted adipocytes for their long-term survival and protein secretion properties has not been established. We have recently developed a preparation procedure for preadipocytes, ceiling culture-derived proliferative adipocytes (ccdPAs), as a therapeutic gene vehicle suitable for stable gene product secretion. We herein report the results of our evaluation of using fibrin glue as a scaffold for the transplanted ccdPAs for the expression of a transduced gene in a three-dimensional culture system. The ccdPAs secreted the functional protein translated from an exogenously transduced gene, as well as physiological adipocyte proteins, and the long viability of ccdPAs (up to 84 days) was dependent on the fibrinogen concentrations. The ccdPAs spontaneously accumulated lipid droplets, and their expression levels of the transduced exogenous gene with its product were maintained for at least 56 days. The fibrinogen concentration modified the adipogenic differentiation of ccdPAs and their exogenous gene expression levels, and the levels of exogenously transduced gene expression at the different fibrinogen concentrations were dependent on the extent of adipogenic differentiation in the gel. These results indicate that fibrin glue helps to maintain the high adipogenic potential of cultured adipocytes after passaging in a 3D culture system, and suggests that once they are successfully implanted at the transplantation site, the cells exhibit increased expression of the transduced gene with adipogenic differentiation.

  2. Effect of fibrin glue and endothelial cell growth factor on the early healing response of the transplanted allogenic meniscus: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Nabeshima, Y; Kurosaka, M; Yoshiya, S; Mizuno, K

    1995-01-01

    Twentyfour meniscal allotransplantations were conducted in 12 adult mongrel dogs. The medial meniscus was replaced using a deep-frozen meniscal allograft. The junction between the meniscus and capsule was treated in one of the three ways. In the control group, the meniscus was sutured only to the adjacent capsular tissue (group C). In the second group, fibrin glue was injected at the junction (group F), and in the third group, fibrin glue and endothelial cell growth factor (ECGF) were injected at the juncture between the transplanted meniscus and the adjacent capsule before the meniscus was sutured (group FE). Histological observation was performed to investigate the effect of fibrin glue and ECGF on the healing process of transplants at various intervals of 1, 4, 8 and 12 weeks. No immunological response was noted in any of the knees. The healing of the transplanted meniscus was first observed at the peripheral attachment. Also, the pannus-like tissue extended from the synovium to the surface of the meniscus. The healing rate in each group at 1 week and 12 weeks was 22% and 77% in group C, 52% and 80% in group F, and 64% and 80% in group FE, respectively. At 4 and 8 weeks, early cellular repopulation was found in group FE and the area which contained new cells was larger than the acellular central core at 8 weeks. However, there was no difference among the three groups at 12 weeks.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7773819

  3. Staple Line Coverage with a Polyglycolic Acid Patch and Fibrin Glue without Pleural Abrasion after Thoracoscopic Bullectomy for Primary Spontaneous Pneumothorax

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Ki Pyo; Kim, Do Kyun; Kang, Kyung Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background This study was conducted to determine the efficacy of staple line coverage using a polyglycolic acid patch and fibrin glue without pleural abrasion to prevent recurrent postoperative pneumothorax. Methods A retrospective analysis was carried out of 116 operations performed between January 2011 and April 2013. During this period, staple lines were covered with a polyglycolic acid patch and fibrin glue in 58 cases (group A), while 58 cases underwent thoracoscopic bullectomy only (group B). Results The median follow-up period was 33 months (range, 22 to 55 months). The duration of chest tube drainage was shorter in group A (group A 2.7±1.2 day vs. group B 3.9±2.3 day, p=0.001). Prolonged postoperative air leakage occurred more frequently in group B than in group A (43% vs. 19%, p=0.005). The postoperative recurrence rate of pneumothorax was significantly lower in group A (8.6%) than in group B (24.1%) (p=0.043). The total cost of treatment during the follow-up period, including the cost for the treatment of postoperative recurrent pneumothorax, was not significantly different between the two groups (p=0.43). Conclusion Without pleural abrasion, staple line coverage with a medium-sized polyglycolic acid patch and fibrin glue after thoracoscopic bullectomy for primary spontaneous pneumothorax is a useful technique that can reduce the duration of postoperative pleural drainage and the postoperative recurrence rate of pneumothorax. PMID:27066431

  4. The Effect of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Their Conditioned Media Topically Delivered in Fibrin Glue on Chronic Wound Healing in Rats.

    PubMed

    Mehanna, Radwa A; Nabil, Iman; Attia, Noha; Bary, Amany A; Razek, Khalid A; Ahmed, Tamer A E; Elsayed, Fatma

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) represent a modern approach for management of chronic skin injuries. In this work, we describe BM-MSCs application versus their conditioned media (CM) when delivered topically admixed with fibrin glue to enhance the healing of chronic excisional wounds in rats. Fifty-two adult male rats were classified into four groups after induction of large-sized full-thickness skin wound: control group (CG), fibrin only group (FG), fibrin + MSCs group (FG + SCs), and fibrin + CM group (FG + CM). Healing wounds were evaluated functionally and microscopically. Eight days after injury, number of CD68+ macrophages infiltrating granulation tissue was considerably higher in the latter two groups. Although--later--none of the groups depicted a substantially different healing rate, the quality of regenerated skin was significantly boosted by the application of either BM-MSCs or their CM both (1) structurally as demonstrated by the obviously increased mean area percent of collagen fibers in Masson's trichrome-stained skin biopsies and (2) functionally as supported by the interestingly improved epidermal barrier as well as dermal tensile strength. Thus, we conclude that topically applied BM-MSCs and their CM-via fibrin vehicle--could effectively improve the quality of healed skin in chronic excisional wounds in rats, albeit without true acceleration of wound closure. PMID:26236740

  5. The Effect of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Their Conditioned Media Topically Delivered in Fibrin Glue on Chronic Wound Healing in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mehanna, Radwa A.; Nabil, Iman; Attia, Noha; Bary, Amany A.; Razek, Khalid A.; Ahmed, Tamer A. E.; Elsayed, Fatma

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) represent a modern approach for management of chronic skin injuries. In this work, we describe BM-MSCs application versus their conditioned media (CM) when delivered topically admixed with fibrin glue to enhance the healing of chronic excisional wounds in rats. Fifty-two adult male rats were classified into four groups after induction of large-sized full-thickness skin wound: control group (CG), fibrin only group (FG), fibrin + MSCs group (FG + SCs), and fibrin + CM group (FG + CM). Healing wounds were evaluated functionally and microscopically. Eight days after injury, number of CD68+ macrophages infiltrating granulation tissue was considerably higher in the latter two groups. Although—later—none of the groups depicted a substantially different healing rate, the quality of regenerated skin was significantly boosted by the application of either BM-MSCs or their CM both (1) structurally as demonstrated by the obviously increased mean area percent of collagen fibers in Masson's trichrome-stained skin biopsies and (2) functionally as supported by the interestingly improved epidermal barrier as well as dermal tensile strength. Thus, we conclude that topically applied BM-MSCs and their CM—via fibrin vehicle—could effectively improve the quality of healed skin in chronic excisional wounds in rats, albeit without true acceleration of wound closure. PMID:26236740

  6. Mini-open transthoracic approach for resection of a calcified herniated thoracic disc and repair of the dural surface with fibrin glue: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Katsuhito; Murakami, Hideki; Demura, Satoru; Kato, Satoshi; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-08-01

    This study reports a case of severe anterior compression of the spinal cord by a calcified herniated thoracic disc at the T9/10 level in a 46-year-old woman. She underwent resection of the calcified herniated thoracic disc and the integrated dura, using a microscopically assisted mini-open transthoracic approach. The remaining dura mater was shaped and repaired by alternate overlapping without suture. The dural surface was reinforced with a combination of fibrin glue and a polyglycolic acid sheet. This novel procedure prevented postoperative cerebrospinal fluid leakage. The patient made an excellent recovery, without any complications. PMID:26321561

  7. Cascade® Autologous System Platelet-Rich Fibrin Matrix in the Treatment of Chronic Leg Ulcers

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Sean M.; Hessler, Karen; Dardik, Herbert

    2012-01-01

    Problem Lower extremity ulcers (venous, diabetic) are often unresponsive to standard treatment. Various systemic and local cellular, vascular, and anatomical factors can result in nonhealing wounds that are refractory to normal healing processes and standard care. Solution Several published wound care guidelines strongly suggest that if an ulcer does not respond to standard good wound care within 4 weeks, then advanced wound therapies should be considered. These advanced therapies include wound bed preparation agents (negative wound pressure therapy, hyperbaric oxygen), recombinant growth factors, or bioengineered cell therapies. New Technology The Cascade® system produces platelet-rich fibrin matrix (PRFM), a novel autologous sterile biologic, produced at the bedside from a small volume (18 mL) of the patient's own blood by using Vacutainer® separation technology optimized for fibrin and platelet isolation. Prepared as an easy to apply, suturable membrane, without the use of exogenous thrombin, PRFM consists of a dense cross-linked fibrin lattice containing intact, viable platelets with their full complement of platelet-derived growth factors. Indications for Use From the FDA 510(k) clearance: The Cascade system “is designed to be used for the safe and rapid preparation of autologous platelet-rich plasma from a small sample of blood at the patient point of care.” PRFM has been used to successfully treat severe venous leg ulcer (VLU), neuropathic diabetic foot ulcer (DFU), mixed arterial and Charcot-deformity associated foot ulcers. Cautions When treating venous or DFUs, the Cascade system should be used together with standard wound care practice (therapeutic compression for VLU and weight off-loading, debridement, and infection control for DFU) in patients with an adequate blood supply to the lower limb. PMID:24527280

  8. Treatment of life-threatening wounds with a combination of allogenic platelet-rich plasma, fibrin glue and collagen matrix, and a literature review

    PubMed Central

    ASADI, MEHDI; ALAMDARI, DARYOUSH HAMIDI; RAHIMI, HAMID REZA; ALIAKBARIAN, MOHSEN; JANGJOO, ALI; ABDOLLAHI, ABBAS; BAHAR, MOSTAFA MEHRABI; AZADMAND, ALI; FORGHANI, NASER; SADEGH, MOHAMMAD NORI; KHAYAMY, MOHAMMAD ESMAIL; SEIFALIAN, ALEXANDER

    2014-01-01

    Currently there is no ideal procedure for the treatment of recalcitrant ulcers that are unresponsive to the majority of common treatments. However, several novel approaches have been proposed, including bone marrow stem cells, platelets, fibrin glue and collagen matrix. For the first approach treatment of a chronic wound, a non-invasive method is highly desirable. The present study was undertaken with the aim of evaluating the effect of a combination of platelets, fibrin glue and collagen matrix (PFC) in one treatment. A total of ten patients with aggressive, refractory, life-threatening wounds were recruited for the study and their treatment effects were evaluated. Initially, the ulcers were extensively debrided, measured and photographed at weekly intervals. The PFC combination was applied topically to the wound every two days. Following treatment, the wound was completely closed in nine patients and was markedly reduced in the other patient. The mean 100% healing time for the nine patients was 11.3±5.22 weeks. There was no evidence of local or systemic complications or any abnormal tissue formation, keloid or hypertrophic scarring. Therefore, the results of the present study indicate that in the first approach, the combination of PFC components may be used safely in order to synergize the effect of chronic wound healing. PMID:25009595

  9. Recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 suspended in fibrin glue enhances bone formation during distraction osteogenesis in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunfeng; Li, Rui; Hu, Jing; Song, Donghui; Jiang, Xiaowen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) has high potential for bone formation, but its in vivo effects are unpredictable due to the short life time. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of recombinant human (rh) BMP-2 suspended in fibrin on bone formation during distraction osteogenesis (DO) in rabbits. Material and methods The in vitro release kinetics of rhBMP-2 suspended in fibrin was tested using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Unilateral tibial lengthening for 10 mm was achieved in 48 rabbits. At the completion of osteodistraction, vehicle, fibrin, rhBMP-2 or rhBMP-2 suspended in fibrin (rhBMP-2 + fibrin) was injected into the center of the lengthened gap, with 12 animals in each group. Eight weeks later, the distracted callus was examined by histology, micro-CT and biomechanical testing. Radiographs of the distracted tibiae were taken at both 4 and 8 weeks after drug treatment. Results It was found that fibrin prolonged the life span of rhBMP-2 in vitro with sustained release during 17 days. The rhBMP-2 + fibrin treated animals showed the best results in bone mineral density, bone volume fraction, cortical bone thickness by micro-CT evaluation and mechanical properties by the three-point bending test when compared to the other groups (p < 0.05). In histological images, rhBMP-2 + fibrin treatment showed increased callus formation and better gap bridging compared to the other groups. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that fibrin holds promise to be a good carrier of rhBMP-2, and rhBMP-2 suspended in fibrin showed a stronger promoting effect on bone formation during DO in rabbits. PMID:27279839

  10. Aulogous fibrin sealant (Vivostat®) in the neurosurgical practice: Part II: Vertebro-spinal procedures

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Francesca; Maugeri, Rosario; Basile, Luigi; Meccio, Favia; Iacopino, Domenico Gerardo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Epidural hematomas, cerebrospinal fluid fistula, and spinal infections are challenging postoperative complications following vertebro-spinal procedures. We report our preliminary results using autologous fibrin sealant as both fibrin glue and a hemostatic during these operations. Methods: Prospectively, between January 2013 and March 2015, 68 patients received an autologous fibrin sealant prepared with the Vivostat® system applied epidurally to provide hemostasis and to seal the dura. The surgical technique, time to bleeding control, and associated complications were recorded. Results: Spinal procedures were performed in 68 patients utilizing autologous fibrin glue/Vivostat® to provide rapid hemostasis and/or to seal the dura. Only 2 patients developed postoperative dural fistulas while none exhibited hemorrhages, allergic reactions, systemic complications, or infections. Conclusions: In this preliminary study, the application of autologous fibrin sealant with Vivostat® resulted in rapid hemostasis and/or acted as an effective dural sealant. Although this product appears to be safe and effective, further investigations are warranted. PMID:26904371

  11. Fibrin sealant augmentation with autologous pericranium for duraplasty after suboccipital decompression in Chiari 1 patients: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Lam, Fred C.; Penumaka, Anirudh; Chen, Clark C.; Fischer, Edwin G.; Kasper, Ekkehard M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The Chiari 1 malformation (CM1) involves decent of the tonsils of the cerebellum through the foramen magnum. Symptomatic disease requires a posterior fossa decompression with or without an expansile duraplasty. To date, the optimal surgical treatment for CM1 has not been delineated. The extent of bony removal, size of the dural opening, necessity for expansion of the dural space, choice of materials for the duraplasty, and possible need for augmentation with dural sealant are all factors that continue to be debated amongst neurological surgeons worldwide. We herein evaluate the use of fibrin sealant augmentation in combination with locally harvested autologous pericranium for duraplasty in adult CM1 decompression. Methods: Retrospective data collected from January 2006 to December 2011. Data were reviewed for surgical site infection or meningitis, cerebrospinal fluid leak, symptomatic pseudomeningocele, radiographic improvement of hindbrain compression, and postoperative recurrence of symptoms at a minimum of 1 year of follow-up. Outcomes were studied clinically, radiographically, as well as by using a patient-specific questionnaire. Results: Twenty-two consecutive patients were included. One patient required a revision for a delayed graft dehiscence in the setting of a rare form of aseptic meningitis with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pleocytosis due to a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) allergy. All remaining patients had successful decompressions with full resolution of their symptoms except for one patient who had persistent headaches. Conclusion: Autologous pericranium with dural sealant augmentation is an effective technique for expansile duraplasty in CM1 decompressions. PMID:23493237

  12. Biochemical, mechanical, and morphological properties of a completely autologous platelet-rich wound sealant.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiuwen; Ren, Jianan; Luan, Jianfeng; Yao, Gengong; Li, Jieshou

    2012-06-01

    The optimal composition of fibrin sealant preparations is not known. We, therefore, sought to construct a series of sealants from autologous components and compare their functioning to Bioseal a commonly used sealant. Characteristics of the platelet-rich plasma, cryoprecipitate, and thrombin were determined and compared to commercial glue from composition, function, and microscopy aspects. The concentrations of platelets as well as fibronectin in autologous fibrin glues were significantly higher than those in commercial ones (P < 0.001). Mechanical values (maximum amplitude and clot strength) obtained from thrombelastograph assays in two groups were not significantly different (P > 0.05). A dense platelet surface and fibrin net structures could be observed in the autologous samples, whereas there were only sparse fibrin nets without cellular components in Bioseal. Characterization of autologous and Bioseal fibrin sealants and their performance do not have significant difference in biochemical and mechanical properties. The entirely autologous platelet-rich gel in the present study may get wide application in future practice after confirmation of its safety, efficiency, and economic benefits. PMID:22395185

  13. Articular cartilage restoration in load-bearing osteochondral defects by implantation of autologous chondrocyte-fibrin constructs: an experimental study in sheep.

    PubMed

    Munirah, S; Samsudin, O C; Chen, H C; Salmah, S H Sharifah; Aminuddin, B S; Ruszymah, B H I

    2007-08-01

    Ovine articular chondrocytes were isolated from cartilage biopsy and culture expanded in vitro. Approximately 30 million cells per ml of cultured chondrocytes were incorporated with autologous plasma-derived fibrin to form a three-dimensional construct. Full-thickness punch hole defects were created in the lateral and medial femoral condyles. The defects were implanted with either an autologous 'chondrocyte-fibrin' construct (ACFC), autologous chondrocytes (ACI) or fibrin blanks (AF) as controls. Animals were killed after 12 weeks. The gross appearance of the treated defects was inspected and photographed. The repaired tissues were studied histologically and by scanning electron microscopy analysis. All defects were assessed using the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) classification. Those treated with ACFC, ACI and AF exhibited median scores which correspond to a nearly-normal appearance. On the basis of the modified O'Driscoll histological scoring scale, ACFC implantation significantly enhanced cartilage repair compared to ACI and AF. Using scanning electron microscopy, ACFC and ACI showed characteristic organisation of chondrocytes and matrices, which were relatively similar to the surrounding adjacent cartilage. Implantation of ACFC resulted in superior hyaline-like cartilage regeneration when compared with ACI. If this result is applicable to humans, a better outcome would be obtained than by using conventional ACI. PMID:17785753

  14. Full-thickness skin wound healing using autologous keratinocytes and dermal fibroblasts with fibrin: bilayered versus single-layered substitute.

    PubMed

    Idrus, Ruszymah Bt Hj; Rameli, Mohd Adha bin P; Low, Kiat Cheong; Law, Jia Xian; Chua, Kien Hui; Latiff, Mazlyzam Bin Abdul; Saim, Aminuddin Bin

    2014-04-01

    Split-skin grafting (SSG) is the gold standard treatment for full-thickness skin defects. For certain patients, however, an extensive skin lesion resulted in inadequacies of the donor site. Tissue engineering offers an alternative approach by using a very small portion of an individual's skin to harvest cells for propagation and biomaterials to support the cells for implantation. The objective of this study was to determine the effectiveness of autologous bilayered tissue-engineered skin (BTES) and single-layer tissue-engineered skin composed of only keratinocytes (SLTES-K) or fibroblasts (SLTES-F) as alternatives for full-thickness wound healing in a sheep model. Full-thickness skin biopsies were harvested from adult sheep. Isolated fibroblasts were cultured using medium Ham's F12: Dulbecco modified Eagle medium supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum, whereas the keratinocytes were cultured using Define Keratinocytes Serum Free Medium. The BTES, SLTES-K, and SLTES-F were constructed using autologous fibrin as a biomaterial. Eight full-thickness wounds were created on the dorsum of the body of the sheep. On 4 wounds, polyvinyl chloride rings were used as chambers to prevent cell migration at the edge. The wounds were observed at days 7, 14, and 21. After 3 weeks of implantation, the sheep were euthanized and the skins were harvested. The excised tissues were fixed in formalin for histological examination via hematoxylin-eosin, Masson trichrome, and elastin van Gieson staining. The results showed that BTES, SLTES-K, and SLTES-F promote wound healing in nonchambered and chambered wounds, and BTES demonstrated the best healing potential. In conclusion, BTES proved to be an effective tissue-engineered construct that can promote the healing of full-thickness skin lesions. With the support of further clinical trials, this procedure could be an alternative to SSG for patients with partial- and full-thickness burns. PMID:24637651

  15. Use of fibrin glue in preventing pseudorecurrence after laparoscopic total extraperitoneal repair of large indirect inguinal hernia

    PubMed Central

    Sürgit, Önder; Çavuşoğlu, Nadir Turgut; Ünal, Yılmaz; Koşar, Pınar Nergis; İçen, Duygu

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Seroma is among the most common complications of laparoscopic total extraperitoneal (TEP) for especially large indirect inguinal hernia, and may be regarded as a recurrence by some patients. A potential area localized behind the mesh and extending from the inguinal cord into the scrotum may be one of the major etiological factors of this complication. Our aim is to describe a novel technique in preventing pseudorecurrence by using fibrin sealant to close that potential dead space. Methods Forty male patients who underwent laparoscopic TEP for indirect inguinal hernia with at least 100-mL volume were included in this prospective clinical study. While fibrin sealant was used to close the potential dead space in the study group, nothing was used in the control group. The volume of postoperative fluid collection on ultrasound was compared between the groups. Results Patient characteristics and the volumes of hernia sac were similar between the 2 groups. The mean volume of postoperative fluid collection was found as 120.2 mL in the control group and 53.7 mL in the study group, indicating a statistical significance (P < 0.001). Conclusion Minimizing the potential dead space with a fibrin sealant can reduce the amount of postoperative fluid collection, namely the incidence of pseudorecurrence. PMID:27617253

  16. Use of Autologous Human mesenchymal Stromal Cell/Fibrin Clot Constructs in Upper Limb Non-Unions: Long-Term Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Bottai, Vanna; Ghilardi, Marco; D'Alessandro, Delfo; Danti, Serena; Dell'Osso, Giacomo; Guido, Giulio; Petrini, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Background Tissue engineering appears to be an attractive alternative to the traditional approach in the treatment of fracture non-unions. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are considered an appealing cell source for clinical intervention. However, ex vivo cell expansion and differentiation towards the osteogenic lineage, together with the design of a suitable scaffold have yet to be optimized. Major concerns exist about the safety of MSC-based therapies, including possible abnormal overgrowth and potential cancer evolution. Aims We examined the long-term efficacy and safety of ex vivo expanded bone marrow MSCs, embedded in autologous fibrin clots, for the healing of atrophic pseudarthrosis of the upper limb. Our research work relied on three main issues: use of an entirely autologous context (cells, serum for ex vivo cell culture, scaffold components), reduced ex vivo cell expansion, and short-term MSC osteoinduction before implantation. Methods and Findings Bone marrow MSCs isolated from 8 patients were expanded ex vivo until passage 1 and short-term osteo-differentiated in autologous-based culture conditions. Tissue-engineered constructs designed to embed MSCs in autologous fibrin clots were locally implanted with bone grafts, calibrating their number on the extension of bone damage. Radiographic healing was evaluated with short- and long-term follow-ups (range averages: 6.7 and 76.0 months, respectively). All patients recovered limb function, with no evidence of tissue overgrowth or tumor formation. Conclusions Our study indicates that highly autologous treatment can be effective and safe in the long-term healing of bone non-unions. This tissue engineering approach resulted in successful clinical and functional outcomes for all patients. PMID:24023694

  17. Treatment of non-healing sternum wound after open-heart surgery with allogenic platelet-rich plasma and fibrin glue-preliminary outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Tashnizi, Mohammad Abbasi; Alamdari, Daryoush Hamidi; Khayami, Mohammad Esmail; Rahimi, Hamid Reza; Moeinipour, Aliasghar; Amouzeshi, Ahmad; Seifalian, Alexander M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Non-healing wound in the sternal region after coronary arteries bypass graft surgery is a serious complication. For healing a chronic wound, several novel approaches have been proposed recently such as using bone marrow stem cells, platelets and fibrin glue (PFG); but a non-invasive method is highly desirable in the first approach for treatment. The current study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of the combination of PFG in one treatment. Materials and Methods: We report on the treatment of six patients with life-threatening chronic sternum wounds, which caused septicemia with multi-drug resistant pathogens. The ulcers were extensively debrided initially and were measured and photographed at weekly intervals. The combination of PFG was applied topically on the wound after every 2 days. Results: The wounds were completely closed in five patients and significantly reduced in size in one. There was no evidence of local or systemic complications and any abnormal tissue formation, keloid or hypertrophic scarring. Conclusions: Our study suggests, in the first approach, PFG can be used safely in order to heal a non healing sternum wound following coronary artery bypass surgery. PMID:24459346

  18. Combined left hepatectomy with fenestration and using a harmonic scalpel, fibrin glue and closed suction drainage to prevent bile leakage and ascites in the management of symptomatic polycystic liver disease: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Surgical treatment is the usual therapy for patients with polycystic liver disease and with severe symptoms, yet the results of surgery are often disappointing and the optimal surgical approach is uncertain. Case presentation We present the case of a 41-year-old Greek woman who underwent combined left hepatectomy with fenestration for symptomatic polycystic liver disease using ultrasound scalpel, fibrin glue and closed suction drain to prevent bile leakage, haemorrhage and ascites. Liver resection using the ultrasound scissors allowed quick parenchyma dissection under haemostatic conditions with safe coagulation of small vessels and bile ducts. Moreover, the ultrasound scalpel was applied to the cyst cavities exposed on the peritoneum to ablate the fluid-producing epithelial cyst lining. We also covered the cut cystic cavities exposed to the peritoneum surface of the liver with fibrin glue. Instead of allowing the opened cysts to drain into the abdominal cavity, we used two wide bore closed suction fluted drains. We did not observe excessive fluid loss through the drainage after the second postoperative day. The drain tubes were removed on the third postoperative day. Conclusion In our patient, effective treatment of ascites and prevention of bile leakage and bleeding indicate that this new approach is promising and may become a useful surgical technique for polycystic liver disease.

  19. A Novel Approach for Treatment of an Unusual Presentation of Radicular Cysts Using Autologous Periosteum and Platelet-Rich Fibrin in Combination with Demineralized Freeze-Dried Bone Allograft

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Veena A.; Desai, Manthan H.; Patil, Veerendra S.; Reddy Kaveti, Hanisha; Ganji, Kiran Kumar; Danappanavar, Prasanna M.

    2013-01-01

    Radicular cysts are the most common cystic lesions affecting the jaws. They are most commonly found at the apices of the involved teeth. This condition is usually asymptomatic but can result in a slow-growth tumefaction in the affected region. The following case report presents the successful treatment of radicular cysts using autologous periosteum and platelet-rich fibrin with demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft. PMID:23984115

  20. Glorious Glue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guhin, Paula

    2010-01-01

    There's something irresistible about squeezing out lines and shapes with a bottle of glue. It's fun, yes. But, even better: it's tactile. The glue dries slightly raised on the surface, lending itself to several exciting treatments. In this article, the author describes some activities that confirm how a simple art material like glue can be…

  1. Mussel Glue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    A mytilus edilus, a common blue ocean mussel is attaching itself to the underside of a wet glass in a laboratory. It secretes a glue like substance in the form of multiple threads which attach to surfaces such as shells, rocks, piers and ships. This natural super glue hardens within minutes and tightly affixes to its selected platform even in the roughest seas. Its superior adhesive properties suggest many practical applications. One company, Bio-Polymers, Inc., has developed a synthetic mussel glue for the commercial market.

  2. Dural repair using autologous fat: Our experience and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Di Vitantonio, Hambra; De Paulis, Danilo; Del Maestro, Mattia; Ricci, Alessandro; Dechordi, Soheila Raysi; Marzi, Sara; Millimaggi, Daniele F.; Galzio, Renato J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Various materials have been proposed to obliterate dead spaces and to reconstruct dural defects during a neurosurgical approach. This study describes our technique of using the abdominal autologous fat graft and evaluates the complications and characteristics related to the use of this tissue during cranial procedures. Methods: Autologous fat grafts were used in 296 patients with basicranial and convexity extraaxial tumors from April 2005 to January 2015. The adipose tissue was removed from the paraumbilical abdominal region and was transformed into a thin foil. When possible, a watertight suture was made between the dural or bone edge with a fat graft. We always used fibrin glue to reinforce the dural closure. Results: Complications occurred between 2 days and 1 year following procedure. Cerebrospinal fluid leaks were found in 11 cases. No case of mortality, pseudomeningoceles, fistula, infections, bacterial meningitides, or lipoid meningitides was reported. No patient required removal of the graft. No adhesion was observed between the brain and the autologous fat. Other fat-related complications observed were 2 cases of fat necrosis in the abdomen and 2 cases of abdominal hemorrhage. Conclusion: The technique of harvesting and applying fat grafts is fairly simple, although it must be performed meticulously to be effective. Our experience has led us to believe that the use of fat grafts presents low morbidity and mortality. However, a neurosurgeon should never forget the possible late or early complications related to the use of fat grafts. PMID:27500007

  3. Closing microvascular lesions with fibrin sealant-attached muscle pads.

    PubMed

    Fehm, Nando Percy; Vatankhah, Bijan; Dittmar, Michael S; Tevetoglu, Yesim; Retzl, Gerald; Horn, Markus

    2005-01-01

    Fibrin sealants are used in a variety of surgical procedures, mainly for purposes of hemostasis and assisted wound healing. The combined use of fibrin sealant and autologous muscle pads for hemostasis was not reported previously. Arterial incisions in the common carotid artery in rats were closed by the combined application of fibrin sealant and an autologous muscle pad. Postsurgical vessel patency and degree of stenosis were evaluated by color duplex sonography, computed tomography angiography, and postmortem histology. The combined application of muscle pad and fibrin sealant and achievement of hemostasis was feasible in all animals. Seventy-eight percent of animals showed no or only slight postsurgical vessel stenosis. Our method is simple and quick to perform, showing a high potential for hemostasis in microvascular lesions. Therefore, it might be used in future experimental studies for conservation of vessel patency after arterial catheterization and in experimental or clinical vascular surgery. PMID:16184526

  4. The effects of fibrin tissue adhesive on the middle ear.

    PubMed

    Katzke, D; Pusalkar, A; Steinbach, E

    1983-02-01

    This study investigated the effects of fibrin glue ('Tissucol', Immuno Pty. Ltd.) in the middle and inner ear. Small amounts of the adhesive were used in 36 operations performed on 18 rabbits. The light microscopic examination of these ears four, eight and 12 weeks after surgery showed that the adhesive was well tolerated and that it did not have any toxic effect on the middle ear or membranous labyrinth. The fibrin tissue adhesive can therefore safely be used to facilitate reconstructive middle-ear surgery and, with the aid of fascia, also for the closure of labyrinthine fistulae; or to achieve a definite seal of oval window niche after stapes surgery. PMID:6600776

  5. [Animal experiments on cementing small osteochondral fragments with fibrin glue].

    PubMed

    Zilch, H

    1980-01-01

    An experiment on revascularization of glued osteochondral fragments was carried out. A chiseled part of the medial femoral condyle of the knee joint of the rabbit was fixed on the right side with an acryl adhesive and on the left side with a new fibrinogen adhesive system (FAS), consisting of highly concentrated fibrinogen, thrombin, and factor XIII. The animals were sacrificed after three, six, ten, and twenty eight days. The FAS is changed into granulation tissue rich in vessels and, therefore, there is a quick revascularization of the fragments soon after three days. On the contrary the acryl adhesive is a foreign body and prevents ingrowth of capillaries during the time of investigation. Immobilization with plaster is necessary to prevent the fragment from gliding off. PMID:6972890

  6. TAPE: A Biodegradable Hemostatic Glue Inspired by a Ubiquitous Compound in Plants for Surgical Application.

    PubMed

    Kim, Keumyeon; Lee, Haeshin; Hong, Seonki

    2016-01-01

    This video describes the simplest protocol for preparing biodegradable surgical glue that has an effective hemostatic ability and greater water-resistant adhesion strength than commercial tissue adhesives. Medical adhesives have attracted great attention as potential alternative tools to sutures and staples due to their convenience in usage with minimal invasiveness. Although there are several protocols for developing tissue adhesives including those commercially available such as fibrin glues and cyanoacrylate-based materials, mostly they require a series of chemical syntheses of organic molecules, or complicated protein-purification methods, in the case of bio-driven materials (i.e., fibrin glue). Also, the development of surgical glues exhibiting high adhesive properties while maintaining biodegradability is still a challenge due to difficulties in achieving good performance in the wet environment of the body. We illustrate a new method to prepare a medical glue, known as TAPE, by the weight-based separation of a water-immiscible supramolecular aggregate formed after a physical mixing of a plant-derived, wet-resistant adhesive molecule, Tannic Acid (TA), and a well-known biopolymer, Poly(Ethylene) glycol (PEG). With our approach, TAPE shows high adhesion strength, which is 2.5-fold more than commercial fibrin glue in the presence of water. Furthermore, TAPE is biodegradable in physiological conditions and can be used as a potent hemostatic glue against tissue bleeding. We expect the widespread use of TAPE in a variety of medical settings and drug delivery applications, such as polymers for muco-adhesion, drug depots, and others. PMID:27341544

  7. Glue Guns: Aiming for Safety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Ken

    2010-01-01

    While glue guns are very useful, there are safety issues. Regardless of the temperature setting, glue guns can burn skin. The teacher should demonstrate and supervise the use of glue guns and have a plan should a student get burned. There should be an initial first aid protocol in place, followed by a visit to the school nurse. An accident report…

  8. What Is the Biological and Clinical Relevance of Fibrin?

    PubMed

    Litvinov, Rustem I; Weisel, John W

    2016-06-01

    As our knowledge of the structure and functions of fibrinogen and fibrin has increased tremendously, several key findings have given some people a superficial impression that the biological and clinical significance of these clotting proteins may be less than earlier thought. Most strikingly, studies of fibrinogen knockout mice demonstrated that many of these mice survive to weaning and beyond, suggesting that fibrin(ogen) may not be entirely necessary. Humans with afibrinogenemia also survive. Furthermore, in recent years, the major emphasis in the treatment of arterial thrombosis has been on inhibition of platelets, rather than fibrin. In contrast to the initially apparent conclusions from these results, it has become increasingly clear that fibrin is essential for hemostasis; is a key factor in thrombosis; and plays an important biological role in infection, inflammation, immunology, and wound healing. In addition, fibrinogen replacement therapy has become a preferred, major treatment for severe bleeding in trauma and surgery. Finally, fibrin is a unique biomaterial and is used as a sealant or glue, a matrix for cells, a scaffold for tissue engineering, and a carrier and/or a vector for targeted drug delivery. PMID:27056152

  9. Influence of Delivery Method on Neuroprotection by Bone Marrow Mononuclear Cell Therapy following Ventral Root Reimplantation with Fibrin Sealant

    PubMed Central

    Barbizan, Roberta; Castro, Mateus V.; Barraviera, Benedito; Ferreira, Rui S.; Oliveira, Alexandre L. R.

    2014-01-01

    The present work compared the local injection of mononuclear cells to the spinal cord lateral funiculus with the alternative approach of local delivery with fibrin sealant after ventral root avulsion (VRA) and reimplantation. For that, female adult Lewis rats were divided into the following groups: avulsion only, reimplantation with fibrin sealant; root repair with fibrin sealant associated with mononuclear cells; and repair with fibrin sealant and injected mononuclear cells. Cell therapy resulted in greater survival of spinal motoneurons up to four weeks post-surgery, especially when mononuclear cells were added to the fibrin glue. Injection of mononuclear cells to the lateral funiculus yield similar results to the reimplantation alone. Additionally, mononuclear cells added to the fibrin glue increased neurotrophic factor gene transcript levels in the spinal cord ventral horn. Regarding the motor recovery, evaluated by the functional peroneal index, as well as the paw print pressure, cell treated rats performed equally well as compared to reimplanted only animals, and significantly better than the avulsion only subjects. The results herein demonstrate that mononuclear cells therapy is neuroprotective by increasing levels of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). Moreover, the use of fibrin sealant mononuclear cells delivery approach gave the best and more long lasting results. PMID:25157845

  10. Fibrin gel as alternative scaffold for respiratory tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Cornelissen, Christian G; Dietrich, Maren; Krüger, Stefan; Spillner, Jan; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Jockenhoevel, Stefan

    2012-03-01

    Fibrin gel has proven a valuable scaffold for tissue engineering. Complex geometries can be produced by injection molding; it offers effective cell seeding and can be produced autologous. In order to evaluate its suitability for respiratory tissue engineering, we examined proliferation, functionality, and differentiation of respiratory epithelial cells on fibrin gel in comparison to culture on collagen-coated, microporous membranes. Respiratory epithelial cells formed a confluent layer by day 4, and proliferation showed no significant difference with respect to surface. Measurement of the transepithelial electrical resistance reflected the development of a confluent epithelial cell layer and the subsequent initiation of adequate ion-transfer processes. Appearance of ciliae could be detected at similar time points, and ciliary beating could be observed for cells on both surfaces. Histology and immunohistochemistry of cells grown on fibrin gel revealed the onset of adequate differentiation. As no significant differences in respiratory epithelial cells' proliferation, function, and differentiation could be observed between cells grown on fibrin gel compared to cells on a collagen-coated, microporous surface, we concluded that fibrin gel might prove a suitable scaffold for respiratory tissue engineering and merits further investigation to overcome the limitations associated with scaffolds currently in use. PMID:22009317

  11. A prospective, randomized, double-blind trial of the use of fibrin sealant for face lifts.

    PubMed

    Oliver, D W; Hamilton, S A; Figle, A A; Wood, S H; Lamberty, B G

    2001-12-01

    Fibrin sealant imitates the final phase of the blood coagulation process. Fibrinogen is converted into fibrin on a tissue surface by the action of thrombin, which is then cross-linked by factor XIIIa, creating a mechanically stable fibrin network. This fibrin network is thought to reduce the amount of postoperative bleeding by sealing capillary vessels and allowing raw operative surfaces to adhere. The authors conducted a prospective, double-blind, randomized, controlled trial on the use of fibrin sealant in 20 consecutive patients undergoing bilateral face lifts by the same surgeon. Each patient was randomized for the use of fibrin sealant on either the right or the left side with the contralateral side acting as the control. Total drainage was recorded on each side for 24 hours before drains were removed. The age range of the patients in the trial (all of whom were women) was 44 to 70 years (mean, 55). The side treated with fibrin glue had a median drainage of 10 ml and the control side 30 ml. The Wilcoxon signed rank test shows a significant difference in drainage between sides (p = 0.002). The reduction in postoperative drainage could also reduce pain and bruising, increasing patient satisfaction with this procedure. The need for drains may also be obviated. PMID:11743409

  12. Glue Sniffers with Special Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Denis

    1987-01-01

    Glue sniffing and solvent misuse have seriously affected children and teenagers throughout the United Kingdom. This article discusses glue sniffing in terms of prevalence, association with disability, physical and psychological effects, signs and symptoms, counseling for sniffers, and successful interventions including an approach using videotape…

  13. Rapidly light-activated surgical protein glue inspired by mussel adhesion and insect structural crosslinking.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Eun Young; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Yang, Yun Jung; Kim, Bum Jin; Choi, Bong-Hyuk; Jung, Gyu Yong; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2015-10-01

    Currently approved surgical tissue glues do not satisfy the requirements for ideal bioadhesives due to limited adhesion in wet conditions and severe cytotoxicity. Herein, we report a new light-activated, mussel protein-based bioadhesive (LAMBA) inspired by mussel adhesion and insect dityrosine crosslinking chemistry. LAMBA exhibited substantially stronger bulk wet tissue adhesion than commercially available fibrin glue and good biocompatibility in both in vitro and in vivo studies. Besides, the easily tunable, light-activated crosslinking enabled an effective on-demand wound closure and facilitated wound healing. Based on these outstanding properties, LAMBA holds great potential as an ideal surgical tissue glue for diverse medical applications, including sutureless wound closures of skin and internal organs. PMID:26197411

  14. Treatment of osteochondral defects in the rabbit's knee joint by implantation of allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells in fibrin clots.

    PubMed

    Berninger, Markus T; Wexel, Gabriele; Rummeny, Ernst J; Imhoff, Andreas B; Anton, Martina; Henning, Tobias D; Vogt, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    bone (11). The sandwich-technique combines bone grafting with current approaches in Tissue Engineering (5,6). This combination seems to be able to overcome the limitations seen in osteochondral grafts alone. After autologous bone grafting to the subchondral defect area, a membrane seeded with autologous chondrocytes is sutured above and facilitates to match the topology of the graft with the injured site. Of course, the previous bone reconstruction needs additional surgical time and often even an additional surgery. Moreover, to date, long-term data is missing (12). Tissue Engineering without additional bone grafting aims to restore the complex structure and properties of native articular cartilage by chondrogenic and osteogenic potential of the transplanted cells. However, again, it is usually only the cartilage tissue that is more or less regenerated. Additional osteochondral damage needs a specific further treatment. In order to achieve a regeneration of the multilayered structure of osteochondral defects, three-dimensional tissue engineered products seeded with autologous/allogeneic cells might provide a good regeneration capacity (11). Beside autologous chondrocytes, mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) seem to be an attractive alternative for the development of a full-thickness cartilage tissue. In numerous preclinical in vitro and in vivo studies, mesenchymal stem cells have displayed excellent tissue regeneration potential (13,14). The important advantage of mesenchymal stem cells especially for the treatment of osteochondral defects is that they have the capacity to differentiate in osteocytes as well as chondrocytes. Therefore, they potentially allow a multilayered regeneration of the defect. In recent years, several scaffolds with osteochondral regenerative potential have therefore been developed and evaluated with promising preliminary results (1,15-18). Furthermore, fibrin glue as a cell carrier became one of the preferred techniques in experimental cartilage

  15. Platelet Rich Fibrin in Periodontal Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Arunachalam, Muthukumaraswamy; Pulikkotil, Shaju J.; Sonia, Nath

    2016-01-01

    Periodontitis is a chronic bacterial infection resulting in destruction of the supporting structures of the teeth. Regeneration of the lost tissues has faced difficulties primarily due to the lack of support during the intricate healing processes. A surgical additive which can ‘jump start’ the healing process to a more predictable regenerative process is always on the wish list of any periodontist. Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) is a second generation platelet concentrate that has been considered to be an important, easy to obtain, predictable surgical additive for periodontal regeneration. This autologous scaffold provides the much needed bio-chemical mediators which has the potential for enhancing reconstruction of the periodontium. This review article tries to understand as to why PRF would be an important link to reach predictable periodontal regeneration. PMID:27386002

  16. 21 CFR 178.3120 - Animal glue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Animal glue. 178.3120 Section 178.3120 Food and... and Production Aids § 178.3120 Animal glue. Animal glue may be safely used as a component of articles..., transporting, or holding food, subject to the provisions of this section. (a) Animal glue consists of...

  17. 21 CFR 178.3120 - Animal glue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Animal glue. 178.3120 Section 178.3120 Food and... and Production Aids § 178.3120 Animal glue. Animal glue may be safely used as a component of articles..., transporting, or holding food, subject to the provisions of this section. (a) Animal glue consists of...

  18. 21 CFR 178.3120 - Animal glue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Animal glue. 178.3120 Section 178.3120 Food and... Animal glue. Animal glue may be safely used as a component of articles intended for use in producing... the provisions of this section. (a) Animal glue consists of the proteinaceous extractives...

  19. 21 CFR 178.3120 - Animal glue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Animal glue. 178.3120 Section 178.3120 Food and... and Production Aids § 178.3120 Animal glue. Animal glue may be safely used as a component of articles..., transporting, or holding food, subject to the provisions of this section. (a) Animal glue consists of...

  20. 21 CFR 178.3120 - Animal glue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Animal glue. 178.3120 Section 178.3120 Food and... and Production Aids § 178.3120 Animal glue. Animal glue may be safely used as a component of articles..., transporting, or holding food, subject to the provisions of this section. (a) Animal glue consists of...

  1. Human Adipose Stromal Vascular Cell Delivery in a Fibrin Spray

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerlin, Ludovic; Rubin, J. Peter; Pfeifer, Melanie E.; Moore, L.R.; Donnenberg, Vera S.; Donnenberg, Albert D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Adipose tissue represents a practical source of autologous mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) and vascular-endothelial progenitor cells, available for regenerative therapy without in vitro expansion. One of the problems confronting the therapeutic application of such cells is how to immobilize them at the wound site. Here, we evaluated in vitro the growth and differentiation of human adipose stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells after delivery using a fibrin spray system. Methods SVF cells were harvested from four human adult patients undergoing elective abdominoplasty using the LipiVage™ system. After collagenase digestion, mesenchymal and endothelial progenitor cells (pericytes, supra-adventitial stromal cells, endothelial progenitors) were quantified by flow cytometry before culture. SVF cells were applied to culture vessels using the Tisseel™ fibrin spray system. SVF cell growth and differentiation was documented by immunofluorescence staining and photomicrography. Results SVF cells remained viable following application and were expanded up to three weeks, when they reached confluence and adipogenic differentiation. Under angiogenic conditions, SVF cells formed endothelial (vWF+, CD31+ and CD34+) tubules surrounded by CD146+ and α-SMA+ perivascular/stromal cells. Discussion Human adipose tissue is a rich source of autologous stem cells, which are readily available for regenerative applications such as wound healing, without in vitro expansion. Our results indicate that mesenchymal and endothelial progenitor cells, prepared in a closed system from unpassaged lipoaspirate samples, retain their growth and differentiation capacity when applied and immobilized on a substrate using a clinically approved fibrin sealant spray system. PMID:23260090

  2. The GlueX Detector

    SciTech Connect

    David Lawrence

    2009-12-01

    The GlueX detector is being built along with the new experimental Hall D at Jefferson lab as part of the 12~GeV upgrade project which received CD-3 approval in fall 2008. GlueX is a fixed target experiment built around a 2~Tesla superconducting solenoid having charged particle tracking and calorimetry with large acceptance. A high rate DAQ system consisting of pipeline electronics will allow the detector to operate at high luminosity ($10^{8}$ tagged $\\gamma$/sec on target). Details on the photon beam and GlueX detector are given including capabilities in resolutions and rates.

  3. Preservation of the cardiac function in infarcted rat hearts by the transplantation of adipose-derived stem cells with injectable fibrin scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuelian; Wang, Haibin; Ma, Xiang; Adila, Azhati; Wang, Baozhu; Liu, Fen; Chen, Bangdang; Wang, Changyong; Ma, Yitong

    2010-12-01

    Cell-based therapy can improve cardiac function but is limited by the low cell retention and survival within ischemic tissues. Injectable cardiac tissue engineering aims to support cell-based therapies and enhance their efficacy for cardiac diseases. So far, no research has been devoted to studying the usefulness of the combination of fibrin glue (as scaffold) and adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) to treat myocardial infarction. In our study, the rat ADSCs were isolated from subcutaneous adipose tissues. The surface phenotype of these cells was analyzed by flow cytometry. The fibrin glue was then co-injected with ADSCs into the left ventricular wall of rat infarction models. The structure and functional consequences of transplantation were determined by detailed histological analysis and echocardiography. Most cultured ADSCs expressed CD105 and CD90, and were negative for CD34 and CD45. After injection, both the 24-h cell retention and four-week graft size were significantly higher and larger in the Fibrin + ADSCs group than those of the ADSCs group alone (P < 0.01). The heart function improved significantly in the Fibrin + ADSCs group compared with that of the ADSCs group four weeks after transplantation (P < 0.01). In addition, the arteriole densities within the infarcted area improved significantly in the Fibrin + ADSCs group compared with those in the ADSCs group four weeks after transplantation (P < 0.01). In conclusion, the ADSCs with the fibrin glue has the therapeutic potential to improve the function of infarcted hearts. The method of in situ injectable tissue engineering combining fibrin glue with ADSCs is promising clinically. PMID:21127347

  4. Traumatic dislocation of the incudostapedial joint repaired with fibrin tissue adhesive.

    PubMed

    Nikolaidis, Vasilios

    2011-03-01

    We present a case of traumatic dislocation of the incudostapedial joint (ISJ) and a simple method for controlled application of the glue using commercial fibrin tissue adhesive. A 26-year-old female presented to our ENT clinic for hearing impairment to her left ear 2 months after a head trauma due to a motorcycle accident. The audiogram revealed a 40- to 50-dB HL conductive hearing loss with a notch configuration in bone conduction curve on the left ear. Computed tomography of the left temporal bone revealed a longitudinal fracture line. An exploratory tympanotomy was performed under general anesthesia. The ISJ was found dislocated while the incus was trapped by the edges of the bony lateral attic wall fracture. A small bony edge that impeded incus movement was removed and a small amount of the glue was precisely applied to the lenticular process of the incus with an angled incision knife. The long process of the incus was firmly pressed over the stapes for 30 seconds with a 90° hook and 60 seconds after the application of the glue the ISJ was repaired. One year after our patient achieved full airbone gap (ABG) closure (ABG, ≤10 dB HL), while she demonstrated overclosure in frequencies 2 and 4 kHz. Fibrin tissue glue allowed safe, rapid, and accurate repair of the ISJ and resulted in an anatomically normal articulation as the mass and shape of the ossicles was preserved. Moreover, our patient achieved full ABG closure. PMID:21344438

  5. Autologous bone-marrow mesenchymal cell induced chondrogenesis (MCIC).

    PubMed

    Huh, Sung Woo; Shetty, Asode Ananthram; Ahmed, Saif; Lee, Dong Hwan; Kim, Seok Jung

    2016-01-01

    Degenerative and traumatic articular cartilage defects are common, difficult to treat, and progressive lesions that cause significant morbidity in the general population. There have been multiple approaches to treat such lesions, including arthroscopic debridement, microfracture, multiple drilling, osteochondral transplantation and autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) that are currently being used in clinical practice. Autologous bone-marrow mesenchymal cell induced chondrogenesis (MCIC) is a single-staged arthroscopic procedure. This method combines a modified microfracture technique with the application of a bone marrow aspirate concentrate (BMAC), hyaluronic acid and fibrin gel to treat articular cartilage defects. We reviewed the current literatures and surgical techniques for mesenchymal cell induced chondrogenesis. PMID:27489409

  6. Transglutaminases: nature's biological glues.

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Martin; Casadio, Rita; Bergamini, Carlo M

    2002-01-01

    Transglutaminases (Tgases) are a widely distributed group of enzymes that catalyse the post-translational modification of proteins by the formation of isopeptide bonds. This occurs either through protein cross-linking via epsilon-(gamma-glutamyl)lysine bonds or through incorporation of primary amines at selected peptide-bound glutamine residues. The cross-linked products, often of high molecular mass, are highly resistant to mechanical challenge and proteolytic degradation, and their accumulation is found in a number of tissues and processes where such properties are important, including skin, hair, blood clotting and wound healing. However, deregulation of enzyme activity generally associated with major disruptions in cellular homoeostatic mechanisms has resulted in these enzymes contributing to a number of human diseases, including chronic neurodegeneration, neoplastic diseases, autoimmune diseases, diseases involving progressive tissue fibrosis and diseases related to the epidermis of the skin. In the present review we detail the structural and regulatory features important in mammalian Tgases, with particular focus on the ubiquitous type 2 tissue enzyme. Physiological roles and substrates are discussed with a view to increasing and understanding the pathogenesis of the diseases associated with transglutaminases. Moreover the ability of these enzymes to modify proteins and act as biological glues has not gone unnoticed by the commercial sector. As a consequence, we have included some of the present and future biotechnological applications of this increasingly important group of enzymes. PMID:12366374

  7. The GlueX Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Curtis A. Meyer

    2006-11-01

    The GlueX experiment at Jefferson Lab is part of the planned CEBAF 12GeV upgrade. The project received its Critical Decision 1 (CD1) in February of 2006, and CD2 is anticipated in 2007. The GlueX experiment will search for and study the spectrum of gluonic excitations of mesons in the 1.5 to 2.5GeV/c^2 mass region using an 8.5 to 9GeV beam of linearly polarized photons.

  8. Glues Used in Airplane Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, S W; Truax, T R

    1920-01-01

    This report was prepared for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics and presents the results of investigations conducted by the Forest Products Laboratory of the United States Forest Service on the manufacture, preparation, application, testing and physical properties of the different types of glues used in wood airplane parts.

  9. Fabrication and physical and biological properties of fibrin gel derived from human plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Haiguang; Ma, Lie; Zhou, Jie; Mao, Zhengwei; Gao, Changyou; Shen, Jiacong

    2008-03-01

    The fast development of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine drives the old biomaterials, for example, fibrin glue, to find new applications in these areas. Aiming at developing a commercially available hydrogel for cell entrapment and delivery, in this study we optimized the fabrication and gelation conditions of fibrin gel. Fibrinogen was isolated from human plasma by a freeze-thaw circle. Gelation of the fibrinogen was accomplished by mixing with thrombin. Absorbance of the fibrinogen/thrombin mixture at 550 nm as a function of reaction time was monitored by UV-VIS spectroscopy. It was found that the clotting time is significantly influenced by the thrombin concentration and the temperature, while less influenced by the fibrinogen concentration. After freeze-drying, the fibrin gel was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), revealing fibrous microstructure. Thermal gravimetric analysis found that the degradation temperature of the crosslinked fibrin gel starts from 288 °C, which is about 30 °C higher than that of the fibrinogen. The hydrogel has an initial water-uptake ratio of ~50, decreased to 30-40 after incubation in water for 11 h depending on the thrombin concentration. The fibrin gels lost their weights in PBS very rapidly, while slowly in DMEM/fetal bovine serum and DMEM. In vitro cell culture found that human fibroblasts could normally proliferate in the fibrin gel with spreading morphology. In conclusion, the fibrin gel containing higher concentration of fibrinogen (20 mg ml-1) and thrombin (5 U ml-1) has suitable gelation time and handling properties, and thus is applicable as a delivery vehicle for cells such as fibroblasts.

  10. Novel Technique Using Polyester Fabric and Fibrin Sealant Patch for Acute Aortic Dissection.

    PubMed

    Ohira, Suguru; Fukumoto, Atsushi; Matsushiro, Takuya; Yaku, Hitoshi

    2016-08-01

    We describe a simple and effective technique for acute aortic dissection using a combination of polyester fabric and a fibrin sealant patch (FSP) to achieve effective reinforcement and haemostasis of the aortic stump. Firstly, the 0.61mm thick knitted polyester fabric sheet was cut to half of the size of the FSP. Next, fibrin glue was sprayed onto the collagen layer of the FSP. Subsequently, a fabric sheet was placed upon it, and the FSP was put together with the irrigated collagen layer, and then completely dried to bind the patch. As a result, the dry fibrinogen/thrombin layers, as an adhesive surface, faced outward. This patch was trimmed to a 10-15-mm-wide strip. The composite patch was inserted into the false lumen. The stump was gently pressed to fix the aortic intima and adventitia. There are several advantages: the combined patch can be prepared during systemic cooling, and therefore can minimise the circulatory arrest time; secondly, the false lumen is not directly exposed to fibrin glue and so the risk of embolism is extremely low; thirdly, the expected haemostatic effect is greater as FSP lines the exterior of the intima, achieving haemostasis for suture holes. PMID:27011040

  11. Hyaluronan and Fibrin Biomaterial as Scaffolds for Neuronal Differentiation of Adult Stem Cells Derived from Adipose Tissue and Skin

    PubMed Central

    Gardin, Chiara; Vindigni, Vincenzo; Bressan, Eriberto; Ferroni, Letizia; Nalesso, Elisa; Puppa, Alessandro Della; D’Avella, Domenico; Lops, Diego; Pinton, Paolo; Zavan, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Recently, we have described a simple protocol to obtain an enriched culture of adult stem cells organized in neurospheres from two post-natal tissues: skin and adipose tissue. Due to their possible application in neuronal tissue regeneration, here we tested two kinds of scaffold well known in tissue engineering application: hyaluronan based membranes and fibrin-glue meshes. Neurospheres from skin and adipose tissue were seeded onto two scaffold types: hyaluronan based membrane and fibrin-glue meshes. Neurospheres were then induced to acquire a glial and neuronal-like phenotype. Gene expression, morphological feature and chromosomal imbalance (kariotype) were analyzed and compared. Adipose and skin derived neurospheres are able to grow well and to differentiate into glial/neuron cells without any chromosomal imbalance in both scaffolds. Adult cells are able to express typical cell surface markers such as S100; GFAP; nestin; βIII tubulin; CNPase. In summary, we have demonstrated that neurospheres isolated from skin and adipose tissues are able to differentiate in glial/neuron-like cells, without any chromosomal imbalance in two scaffold types, useful for tissue engineering application: hyaluronan based membrane and fibrin-glue meshes. PMID:22072917

  12. Polyphosphate enhances fibrin clot structure

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stephanie A.

    2008-01-01

    Polyphosphate, a linear polymer of inorganic phosphate, is present in platelet dense granules and is secreted on platelet activation. We recently reported that polyphosphate is a potent hemostatic regulator, serving to activate the contact pathway of blood clotting and accelerate factor V activation. Because polyphosphate did not alter thrombin clotting times, it appeared to exert all its procoagulant actions upstream of thrombin. We now report that polyphosphate enhances fibrin clot structure in a calcium-dependent manner. Fibrin clots formed in the presence of polyphosphate had up to 3-fold higher turbidity, had higher mass-length ratios, and exhibited thicker fibers in scanning electron micrographs. The ability of polyphosphate to enhance fibrin clot turbidity was independent of factor XIIIa activity. When plasmin or a combination of plasminogen and tissue plasminogen activators were included in clotting reactions, fibrin clots formed in the presence of polyphosphate exhibited prolonged clot lysis times. Release of polyphosphate from activated platelets or infectious microorganisms may play an important role in modulating fibrin clot structure and increasing its resistance to fibrinolysis. Polyphosphate may also be useful in enhancing the structure of surgical fibrin sealants. PMID:18544683

  13. Platelet rich fibrin in jaw defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nica, Diana; Ianes, Emilia; Pricop, Marius

    2016-03-01

    Platelet rich fibrin (PRF) is a tissue product of autologous origin abundant in growth factors, widely used in regenerative procedures. Aim of the study: Evaluation of the regenerative effect of PRF added in the bony defects (after tooth removal or after cystectomy) Material and methods: The comparative nonrandomized study included 22 patients divided into 2 groups. The first group (the test group) included 10 patients where the bony defects were treated without any harvesting material. The second group included 12 patients where the bony defects were filled with PRF. The bony defect design was not critical, with one to two walls missing. After the surgeries, a close clinically monitoring was carried out. The selected cases were investigated using both cone beam computer tomography (CBCT) and radiographic techniques after 10 weeks postoperatively. Results: Faster bone regeneration was observed in the bony defects filled with PRF comparing with the not grafted bony defects. Conclusions: PRF added in the bony defects accelerates the bone regeneration. This simplifies the surgical procedures and decreases the economic costs.

  14. The Use Fibrin Sealant after Spinal Intradural Tumor Surgery: Is It Necessary?

    PubMed Central

    Won, Young Il; Chung, Chun Kee; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Park, Sung Bae

    2016-01-01

    Objective A fibrin sealant is commonly applied after closure of an incidental or intended durotomy to reduce the complications associated with the leakage of cerebrospinal fluid. Routine usage might not be essential after closure of an intended durotomy, which has clear cut-margins. We investigated the efficacy of fibrin sealants for primary intradural spinal cord tumor surgery. Methods A retrospective review was performed for 231 consecutive surgically treated patients with primary intradural spinal cord tumors without extradural extension. Fibrin sealants were not used for 47 patients (group I: age, 51.57±16.75 years) and were applied to 184 patients (group II: age, 48.8±14.7 years). The surgical procedures were identical except for the use of a fibrin sealant after closure of the durotomy. The primary outcome was the occurrence of complications (wound problems, hematoma collection, infection, and neurological deterioration). The covariates were age, sex, body mass index, operation time, pre-/postoperative ambulation, number of laminectomies, and type of tumor. Results Schwannoma was the most common pathology (n=134), followed by meningioma (n=35) and ependymoma (n=31). Complications occurred in 13 patients (3 in group I and 10 in group II, p=0.73). The postoperative ambulation status (p<0.01; odds ratio, 28.8; 95% confidence interval, 6.9-120.0) and operation time (p=0.04; cutoff, 229 minutes; sensitivity, 62%; specificity, 72%) were significant factors, whereas the use of a fibrin glue was not (p=0.47). Conclusion The use of a fibrin sealant might not be essential to reduce complications after surgery for primary spinal intradural tumor. PMID:27123027

  15. A new heterologous fibrin sealant as a scaffold to cartilage repair-Experimental study and preliminary results.

    PubMed

    de Barros, Caio Nunes; Miluzzi Yamada, Ana Lúcia; Junior, Rui Seabra F; Barraviera, Benedito; Hussni, Carlos Alberto; de Souza, Jaqueline Brandão; Watanabe, Marcos Jun; Rodrigues, Celso Antônio; Garcia Alves, Ana Liz

    2016-07-01

    Autologous fibrin gel is commonly used as a scaffold for filling defects in articular cartilage. This biomaterial can also be used as a sealant to control small hemorrhages and is especially helpful in situations where tissue reparation capacity is limited. In particular, fibrin can act as a scaffold for various cell types because it can accommodate cell migration, differentiation, and proliferation. Despite knowledge of the advantages of this biomaterial and mastery of the techniques required for its application, the durability of several types of sealant at the site of injury remains questionable. Due to the importance of such data for evaluating the quality and efficiency of fibrin gel formulations on its use as a scaffold, this study sought to analyze the heterologous fibrin sealant developed from the venom of Crotalus durissus terrificus using studies in ovine experimental models. The fibrin gel developed from the venom of this snake was shown to act as a safe, stable, and durable scaffold for up to seven days, without causing adverse side effects. Fibrin gel produced from the venom of the Crotalus durissus terrificus snake possesses many clinical and surgical uses. It presents the potential to be used as a biomaterial to help repair skin lesions or control bleeding, and it may also be used as a scaffold when applied together with various cell types. The intralesional use of the fibrin gel from the venom of this snake may improve surgical and clinical treatments in addition to being inexpensive and adequately consistent, durable, and stable. The new heterologous fibrin sealant is a scaffold candidate to cartilage repair in this study. PMID:26264444

  16. Glue Film Thickness Measurements by Spectral Reflectance

    SciTech Connect

    B. R. Marshall

    2010-09-20

    Spectral reflectance was used to determine the thickness of thin glue layers in a study of the effect of the glue on radiance and reflectance measurements of shocked-tin substrates attached to lithium fluoride windows. Measurements based on profilometry of the components were found to be inaccurate due to flatness variations and deformation of the tin substrate under pressure during the gluing process. The accuracy of the spectral reflectance measurements were estimated to be ±0.5 μm, which was sufficient to demonstrate a convincing correlation between glue thickness and shock-generated light.

  17. Esthetics and super glue: a case report.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Sheldon; Wood, Robert; Facchiano, Anne M; Bergloff, Jonathan F

    2003-01-01

    This article describes how a man attempted to repair damage to his maxillary teeth with super glue. Such action is discouraged, however, because of possible adverse reactions in the hard and soft tissues. PMID:14719578

  18. Spiders Tune Glue Viscosity to Maximize Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Amarpuri, Gaurav; Zhang, Ci; Diaz, Candido; Opell, Brent D; Blackledge, Todd A; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-11-24

    Adhesion in humid conditions is a fundamental challenge to both natural and synthetic adhesives. Yet, glue from most spider species becomes stickier as humidity increases. We find the adhesion of spider glue, from five diverse spider species, maximizes at very different humidities that matches their foraging habitats. By using high-speed imaging and spreading power law, we find that the glue viscosity varies over 5 orders of magnitude with humidity for each species, yet the viscosity at maximal adhesion for each species is nearly identical, 10(5)-10(6) cP. Many natural systems take advantage of viscosity to improve functional response, but spider glue's humidity responsiveness is a novel adaptation that makes the glue stickiest in each species' preferred habitat. This tuning is achieved by a combination of proteins and hygroscopic organic salts that determines water uptake in the glue. We therefore anticipate that manipulation of polymer-salts interaction to control viscosity can provide a simple mechanism to design humidity responsive smart adhesives. PMID:26513350

  19. [Cementing of small osteochondral fragments in hand surgery using a fibrin glue--clinical experiences].

    PubMed

    Zilch, H; Talke, M

    1980-01-01

    A short historical review of the development of a new fibrinogen adhesive system, consisting of highly concentrated fibrinogen, thrombin, and factor XIII, is given. Small osteochondral fragments are well fixed with this system. This was demonstrated in five cases with good success, the fragments being early revascularized. Some of these patients have had severe damage to the finger joint surface. The problems of a prematured fibrinolysis were discussed. PMID:6972891

  20. Animal experiments on hemostasis with a collagen-fibrin tissue-adhesive sealant in the nephrostomy tract.

    PubMed

    Pfab, R; Ascherl, R; Erhardt, W; Geissdörfer, K; Stemberger, A; Blümel, G; Hartung, R

    1987-01-01

    After a median laparatomy, nephrostomy was performed on 22 porcine kidneys: puncture, dilatation and introduction of a 26-French operating sheath through the parenchyma into the renal pelvis. At the end of the operation, an 8-French nephrostomy catheter prepared with a collagen-fibrin tissue-adhesive sealant was introduced through the operating sheath and the sheath was afterwards extracted. The hemostasis in the nephrostomy tract was very good in all 22 cases. There were no complications such as wound infection or stone formation during a post-operative period of between one and 95 days. Experimental investigations showed severe bleeding in nontamponade of the nephrostomy tract, in tamponade with an 8-French nephrostomy catheter and in tamponade of the nephrostomy tract with the collagen fleece wrapped around an 8-French nephrostomy catheter but not coated with the fibrin glue. PMID:2441506

  1. Astrocytes: Everything but the glue

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Perez, Oscar; Lopez-Virgen, Veronica; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    The current knowledge in neuroscience indicates that neural tissue has two major cell populations: neurons and glia (term derived from the Greek word for glue). Neuronal population is characterized by the capacity to produce action potentials, whereas glial cells are typically identified as the subordinate cell population of neurons. To date, this point of view has changed dramatically and growing evidence indicates that glial cells play a crucial role in normal mental functions and the pathogenesis of neurological diseases. Classically, glial cells include four major populations clearly discernible in the adult brain: astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia cells and NG2 glia. Astrocytes, also referred as to astroglia, are by far the most abundant cell lineage in the adult brain. These cells are in close contact with several tissue components of the brain parenchyma including neurons, vasculature, extracellular matrix and other glial populations. Hence, the number and strategic position of astrocytes provide them with exceptional capacity for modulating multiple functions in the neural tissue. PMID:25938129

  2. Autologous Therapies in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sumir; Mahajan, Bharat Bhushan; Singh, Amarbir

    2014-01-01

    Autologous therapy is a therapeutic intervention that uses an individual’s cells or tissues, which are processed outside the body, and reintroduced into the donor. This emerging field presently represents a mere tip of the iceberg with much knowledge and applications yet to be discovered. It, being free from risks of hypersensitivity reactions and transmission of infectious agents, has been explored in various fields, such as plastic surgery, orthopedics, and dermatology. This review article focuses on various forms of autologous therapies used in dermatology along with their applications and mechanisms of action. PMID:25584137

  3. Autologous Microvascular Breast Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishnan, Venkat

    2013-01-01

    Autologous microvascular breast reconstruction is widely accepted as a key component of breast cancer treatment. There are two basic donor sites; the anterior abdominal wall and the thigh/buttock region. Each of these regions provides for a number of flaps that are successfully utilised in breast reconstruction. Refinement of surgical technique and the drive towards minimising donor site morbidity whilst maximising flap vascularity in breast reconstruction has seen an evolution towards perforator based flap reconstructions, however myocutaneous flaps are still commonly practiced. We review herein the current methods of autologous microvascular breast reconstruction. PMID:23362474

  4. Imaging Thromboembolism with Fibrin-Avid 99mTc-Peptide: Evaluation in Swine

    PubMed Central

    Aruva, Mohan R.; Daviau, Judy; Sharma, Shubh S.; Thakur, Mathew L.

    2006-01-01

    A pentapeptide, Gly-Pro-Arg-Pro-Pro, with high affinity for α-chain-fibrin was labeled with 99mTc (99mTc-TP850) and evaluated in swine to image experimental venous thromboembolism (deep vein thrombosis [DVT]) and pulmonary embolism (PE). Methods Scatchard analysis was performed to determine fibrin affinity for TP850 and the number of binding sites (receptors) per milligram of fibrin. DVT was induced in the left jugular vein and PE was induced by introducing a preformed autologous blood clot into the right atrium using a 7-French introducer sheath inserted into the right jugular vein. 99mTc-TP850 was injected at 4, 24, 48, 72, 96, or 120 h later. Animals were imaged for up to 4 h after injection, heparinized, and sacrificed. Lungs were extirpated, radiographed, and imaged, and the PE was removed. Other tissues, including blood and normal lungs, were harvested and, concomitantly, 99mTc was counted for determination of target-to-tissue ratios and the percentage injected dose per gram of tissue. Results The affinity for human fibrin was 10−9 mol/L and there were >1015 receptors per milligram of fibrin. DVT and PE were visualized for up to 4 h after injection with high DVT/blood (7.9–22.6), DVT/muscle (31.1–89.4), PE/blood (1–155), and PE/lung (0.8–245) ratios. Thereafter, the PEs fragmented spontaneously below the spatial resolution of the γ-camera and, despite the high associated radioactivity, could not be localized in vivo. The fragmented clots were detectable by scintigraphy on excised lungs and provided excellent concordance with radiograms. Conclusion 99mTc-TP850 with its modest affinity (10−9 mol/L), rapid blood clearance, and high DVT and PE uptake is a promising agent for imaging vascular thrombosis. PMID:16391200

  5. The GlueX DIRC project

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Stevens, J.; Barbosa, F.; Bessuille, J.; Chudakov, E.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Fanelli, C.; Frye, J.; Hardin, J.; Kelsey, J.; Patsyuk, M.; et al

    2016-07-20

    Here, the GlueX experiment was designed to search for and study the pattern of gluonic excitations in the meson spectrum produced through photoproduction reactions at a new tagged photon beam facility in Hall D at Jefferson Laboratory. The particle identification capabilities of the GlueX experiment will be enhanced by constructing a DIRC (Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov light) detector, utilizing components of the decommissioned BaBar DIRC. The DIRC will allow systematic studies of kaon final states that are essential for inferring the quark flavor content of both hybrid and conventional mesons. In this contribution, the design for the GlueX DIRCmore » will be discussed including new expansion volumes, read out with MaPMTs, that are currently under development.« less

  6. The GlueX DIRC project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevens, J.; Barbosa, F.; Bessuille, J.; Chudakov, E.; Dzhygadlo, R.; Fanelli, C.; Frye, J.; Hardin, J.; Kelsey, J.; Patsyuk, M.; Schwartz, C.; Schwiening, J.; Shepherd, M.; Whitlatch, T.; Williams, M.

    2016-07-01

    The GlueX experiment was designed to search for and study the pattern of gluonic excitations in the meson spectrum produced through photoproduction reactions at a new tagged photon beam facility in Hall D at Jefferson Laboratory. The particle identification capabilities of the GlueX experiment will be enhanced by constructing a DIRC (Detection of Internally Reflected Cherenkov light) detector, utilizing components of the decommissioned BaBar DIRC. The DIRC will allow systematic studies of kaon final states that are essential for inferring the quark flavor content of both hybrid and conventional mesons. The design for the GlueX DIRC is presented, including the new expansion volumes that are currently under development.

  7. Physics Prospects with GlueX

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander Somov

    2011-10-01

    The new experiment GlueX is being currently constructed at Jefferson Lab. The experiment was designed to search for hybrid mesons with exotic-quantum-numbers using a beam of linearly polarized photons incident on a liquid hydrogen target. We will discuss the discovery potential of the GlueX experiment and briefly overview its physics program. GlueX is a new experiment at Jefferson Lab. whose physics program is intended to improve our knowledge of strong interactions. The main goal of the experiment is to search for gluonic excitations in photoproduction. The experiment is expected to collect a data sample a few order of magnitudes larger than all existing photoproduction data. The physics topics of the experiment spans from light meson spectroscopy to Primakoff production of pseudoscalar mesons. The construction of the experiment has started in 2009 and the commissioning stage is expected to be finished in 2015.

  8. [Mycelial wastes of penicillin fermentation as glue components].

    PubMed

    Kadimaliev, D A; Revin, V V; Vatolin, A K; Groshev, V M; Bychkov, M V

    2002-01-01

    A new trend in the rational use of micelial wastes after antibiotics fermentation was elaborated. The modification of P. chrysogenum micelium by means of acid and alkaline solutions allows to use it as bone glue component. As a result physico-mechanical characteristics of the mixture increase, while the ratio cost-price decreases. The obtained glue composition can be used in the production of glue paper tape, for paper and wood glue. PMID:12728627

  9. Role of EVICEL Fibrin Sealant to Assist Hemostasis in Cranial and Spinal Epidural Space: A Neurosurgical Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Gazzeri, Roberto; Fiore, Claudio; Galarza, Marcelo

    2015-05-01

    A variety of techniques have been used to stop venous bleeding from the cranial and spinal epidural space. These generally consist of packing with oxidized regenerated cellulose, fibrillar collagen, and so forth, and in cranial surgery, tack-up sutures. Bipolar coagulation may also be used to control bleeding from spinal venous plexus, but it may bear the risk of healthy nervous tissue injury: dissipation of heat from the tips of the bipolar forceps may induce thermal injury to adjacent neural structures. Quick and safe hemostasis reduces the duration of surgery. Efficient control of bleeding is also a prerequisite for the realization of the planned therapeutic procedure, that is, the result of surgery, and can thereby reduce perioperative morbidity. Fibrin sealant is safely used to increase hemostasis and to treat cerebrospinal leakage. Between January 2014 and March 2015, the authors used injection of fibrin sealant (EVICEL®, Johnson & Johnson Wound Management, Somerville, NJ) into the cranial and spinal epidural space to assist in hemostasis in 97 patients. EVICEL injection was used in 81 cases of cranial surgery and 16 cases of spinal surgery. When the venous bleeding continued from the epidural space after packing with classical hemostatic agents, fibrin sealant was used to stop venous bleeding. When arterial bleeding was present, fibrin sealant was not used. In all cases, the results were judged to be excellent with stoppage of epidural bleeding, or good with mild persistent oozing. During the 10-minute observation period, no patients treated with EVICEL required additional hemostatic measures. No complications related to the fibrin glue were encountered. PMID:26055033

  10. Summary of Glue Tests 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, D.; /Fermilab

    1993-01-07

    I have reported most of the results of my adhesive testing to members of the VLPC design team at one time or another, usually verbally, but I am wnnng this summary as an easy reference to the results I obtained. The adhesives I tested were for two primary purposes. The first was adhering optical fibers to Torlon 7130; the other was for securing an aluminum nitride substrate to the same material. I have not had access to a scanning electron microscope and someone with the knowledge to determine actual failure mechanisms, so the deductions I have made about why some adhesives have worked well at low temperatures for some purposes and not for other applications while a different material never worked and another always worked are partially speculation. They should be taken merely at face value with no particular results 'carved in stone' so to speak. The first aspect of my testing was adhesion of optical fiber to torlon. Knowing that this is a very important joint, I tested a variety of glues of two primary types: acrylic and W cure. W cure adhesives are known to possess reasonably good properties at low temperatures and are quite convenient to use as long as a W source is available. The W cure adhesives I tested were: Loctite Utak 376 and also 7EN484(?), Master Bond 1 Component W 15-7, and Norland optical adhesive 61. I found them quite easy to use, and they were packaged in a way in which they were not likely to cause a mess. Lab 6 e Perimenters generally used the Loctite 376 optical cure adhesive in their research into connecting scintillating fibers to the standard type. The acrylics I tested were Loctite Speed Bonder 324 and Permabond Quick Bond 610. These worked reasonably well, but they require a considerably longer set time than the W cure adhesives and are more complicated to use. (5 minutes set time or so for the acrylics versus about 30 seconds for the W. The Loctite must have the activator applied about 5 minutes prior to the adhesive application and the

  11. Sutureless cataract incision closure using laser-activated tissue glues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eaton, Alexander M.; Bass, Lawrence S.; Libutti, Steven K.; Schubert, Herman D.; Treat, Michael R.

    1991-06-01

    With the advent of phacoemulsification and foldable intraocular lenses, there is renewed interest in sutureless cataract wound. We report the use of laser activated tissue glues for the closure of scleral tunnel cataract incisions. Two glue mixtures were tested in enucleated porcine eyes. Glue A was composed of hyaluronic acid, human albumin, and indocyanine green dye. Glue B contained hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfate, human albumin, and indocyanine green dye. A Spectra Physics diode laser (808 nm) with a power density of 7-1 1 watts/cm2 was used for glue activation. Wound bursting pressures, as determined by the presence of fluid at the wound margin, was significantly higher with both glue combinations than without the glue (PGlue A was 69.9 17.1 mm Hg, and for Glue B was 42.9 9.4 mm Hg. These results suggest that laser activated tissue glues may be an alternative to suture closure of scleral tunnel cataract incisions.

  12. Zinc modulates thrombin adsorption to fibrin

    SciTech Connect

    Hopmeier, P.; Halbmayer, M.; Fischer, M.; Marx, G. )

    1990-05-01

    Human thrombin with high affinity to Sepharose insolubilized fibrin monomers (high-affinity thrombin) was used to investigate the effect of Zn(II) on the thrombin adsorption to fibrin. Results showed that at Zn(II) concentrations exceeding 100 mumols/l, thrombin binding to fibrin was decreased concomitant with the Zn(II) concentration and time; at lower Zn(II) concentrations, thrombin adsorption was enhanced. Experimental results were identical by using 125I-labelled high-affinity alpha-thrombin or by measuring the thrombin activity either by chromogenic substrate or by a clotting time method. In contrast, Ca(II) alone (final conc. 3 mmol/l) or in combination with Zn(II) was not effective. However, at higher Ca(II) concentrations (7.5-15 mmol/l), thrombin adsorption was apparently decreased. Control experiments revealed that Zn(II) had no impact on the clottability of fibrinogen, and that the results of the experiments with Ca(II) were not altered by possible cross-linking of fibrin. We conclude that unlike Ca(II), Zn(II) is highly effective in modulating thrombin adsorption to fibrin.

  13. The glue ear 'epidemic': a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Alderson, David

    2011-12-01

    This paper explores the historical context of the dramatic rise in surgery for glue ear in the mid-20th century, and questions the published assertion that this represented a manufactured 'epidemic'. In examining historical sources, the reader's theoretical viewpoint greatly influences their conclusions: the sustained rise in treatment for glue ear may be seen as the advance of science in a golden age or the resistance of insular professionals to reason in the light of new scientific study methods. Current views on the practice of medicine, consumerism, science and standardisation, rationing and the nature of 'truth' all affect the way that we see this period. Technological advances clearly allowed better diagnosis and more effective treatment, but these did not appear to drive an 'epidemic', rather they were developed to meet the pre-existing challenges of otological practice. The proposition that an 'epidemic' was created does not appear to have any solid grounding. Society's perception of what constitutes disease and what needs treatment may have evolved, but the prevalence of other important diseases changed dramatically over this time period, and a real change in the epidemiology of glue ear cannot be dismissed. In defining the case for and against surgical treatment, a solely positivist, quantitative worldview cannot give us a complete picture of benefit and risk to individuals, families and society at large. PMID:21653931

  14. Fibrin Architecture in Clots: A Quantitative Polarized Light Microscopy Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, Peter; Przyklenk, Karin

    2009-01-01

    Fibrin plays a vital structural role in thrombus integrity. Thus, the ability to assess fibrin architecture has potential to provide insight into thrombosis and thrombolysis. Fibrin has an anisotropic molecular structure, which enables it to be seen with polarized light. Therefore, we aimed to determine if automated polarized light microscopy methods of quantifying two structural parameters; fibrin fiber bundle orientation and fibrin's optical retardation (OR: a measure of molecular anisotropy) could be used to assess thrombi. To compare fibrin fiber bundle orientation we analyzed picrosirius red-stained sections obtained from clots formed: (A) in vitro, (B) in injured and stenotic coronary arteries, and (C) in surgically created aortic aneurysms (n = 6 for each group). To assess potential changes in OR, we examined fibrin in picrosirius red-stained clots formed after ischemic preconditioning (10 minutes ischemia + 10 minutes reflow; a circumstance shown to enhance lysability) and in control clots (n = 8 each group). The degree of fibrin organization differed significantly according to the location of clot formation; fibrin was most aligned in the aneurysms and least aligned in vitro whereas fibrin in the coronary clots had an intermediate organization. The OR of fibrin in the clots formed after ischemic preconditioning was lower than that in controls (2.9 ± 0.5 nm versus 5.4 ± 1.0 nm, P < 0.05). The automated polarized light analysis methods not only enabled fibrin architecture to be assessed, but also revealed structural differences in clots formed under different circumstances. PMID:19054699

  15. Fibrin biomatrix-conjugated platelet-derived growth factor AB accelerates wound healing in severe thermal injury.

    PubMed

    Mittermayr, Rainer; Branski, Ludwik; Moritz, Martina; Jeschke, Marc G; Herndon, David N; Traber, Daniel; Schense, Jason; Gampfer, Jörg; Goppelt, Andreas; Redl, Heinz

    2016-05-01

    Controlled delivery of growth factors from biodegradable biomatrices could accelerate and improve impaired wound healing. The study aim was to determine whether platelet-derived growth factor AB (PDGF.AB) with a transglutaminase (TG) crosslinking substrate site released from a fibrin biomatrix improves wound healing in severe thermal injury. The binding and release kinetics of TG-PDGF.AB were determined in vitro. Third-degree contact burns (dorsum of Yorkshire pigs) underwent epifascial necrosectomy 24 h post-burn. Wound sites were covered with autologous meshed (3:1) split-thickness skin autografts and either secured with staples or attached with sprayed fibrin sealant (FS; n = 8/group). TG-PDGF.AB binds to the fibrin biomatrix using the TG activity of factor XIIIa, and is subsequently released through enzymatic cleavage. Three doses of TG-PDGF.AB in FS (100 ng, 1 µg and 11 µg/ml FS) were tested. TG-PDGF.AB was bound to the fibrin biomatrix as evidenced by western blot analysis and subsequently released by enzymatic cleavage. A significantly accelerated and improved wound healing was achieved using sprayed FS containing TG-PDGF.AB compared to staples alone. Low concentrations (100 ng-1 µg TG-PDGF.AB/ml final FS clot) demonstrated to be sufficient to attain a nearly complete closure of mesh interstices 14 days after grafting. TG-PDGF.AB incorporated in FS via a specific binding technology was shown to be effective in grafted third-degree burn wounds. The adhesive properties of the fibrin matrix in conjunction with the prolonged growth factor stimulus enabled by this binding technology could be favourable in many pathological situations associated with wound-healing disturbances. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23723146

  16. Autologous gastrointestinal reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Bianchi, A

    1995-02-01

    The patient with short bowel syndrome is essentially unable to absorb sufficient nutrients. This is caused by either short mucosal contact time, insufficient mucosal surface area (enterocyte mass), or a combination of the two. Management consists primarily in sustaining health and growth by intravenous nutrition and in enhancing the natural intestinal adaptation response. Surgery in the form of autologous gastrointestinal reconstruction (AGIR) is designed to redistribute the patient's own residual absorptive bowel to enhance adaptation and, possibly, to increase the absorptive mucosal surface by neomucosal growth. The alternative and ultimate fallback procedure in the management of intestinal failure is bowel transplantation, with its associated serious immunosuppression-related complications. Imaginative AGIR techniques provide new hope for the future. PMID:7728509

  17. Encapsulation of cardiomyocytes in a fibrin hydrogel for cardiac tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Yuan Ye, Kathy; Sullivan, Kelly Elizabeth; Black, Lauren Deems

    2011-01-01

    Culturing cells in a three dimensional hydrogel environment is an important technique for developing constructs for tissue engineering as well as studying cellular responses under various culture conditions in vitro. The three dimensional environment more closely mimics what the cells observe in vivo due to the application of mechanical and chemical stimuli in all dimensions (1). Three-dimensional hydrogels can either be made from synthetic polymers such as PEG-DA (2) and PLGA (3) or a number of naturally occurring proteins such as collagen (4), hyaluronic acid (5) or fibrin (6,7). Hydrogels created from fibrin, a naturally occurring blood clotting protein, can polymerize to form a mesh that is part of the body's natural wound healing processes (8). Fibrin is cell-degradable and potentially autologous (9), making it an ideal temporary scaffold for tissue engineering. Here we describe in detail the isolation of neonatal cardiomyocytes from three day old rat pups and the preparation of the cells for encapsulation in fibrin hydrogel constructs for tissue engineering. Neonatal myocytes are a common cell source used for in vitro studies in cardiac tissue formation and engineering (4). Fibrin gel is created by mixing fibrinogen with the enzyme thrombin. Thrombin cleaves fibrinopeptides FpA and FpB from fibrinogen, revealing binding sites that interact with other monomers (10). These interactions cause the monomers to self-assemble into fibers that form the hydrogel mesh. Because the timing of this enzymatic reaction can be adjusted by altering the ratio of thrombin to fibrinogen, or the ratio of calcium to thrombin, one can injection mold constructs with a number of different geometries (11,12). Further we can generate alignment of the resulting tissue by how we constrain the gel during culture (13). After culturing the engineered cardiac tissue constructs for two weeks under static conditions, the cardiac cells have begun to remodel the construct and can generate a

  18. Platelets and fibrin strands during clot retraction.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, E; Korell, U; Richter, J

    1984-03-15

    The ultrastructure of platelet fibrin contacts (PFC) and the course of the strands was investigated in serial sections of retracted clots with the help of specimen tilting. We found after retraction in a test tube as well as under isometric conditions in the resonance thrombograph, after HARTERT, an uniform type of PFC. The side to side contact between platelet surface and fibrin strands displayed a 15 nm wide space which was bridged of 10 - 30 nm by filamentary structure. In each case the direction of the fibrin strands changed on contact with the platelet surface (bend). These bends recurred if the adhering strands ran over a longer distance on the platelet surface. The bends can be explained by non-directional movement of the platelets or of their pseudopodia. Microfilaments (actomyosin) which run straight in pseudopodia and often also twisted in the platelet body support this assumption. The described mechanism - contact of the thrombin activated platelets with fibrin strands and simultaneous nondirectional movement of the platelets which bind further sections of the adhering strands to their surface - would provide a more satisfactory explanation for the retraction of the clot to 1/10 of its original volume. PMID:6539004

  19. Dry-cured ham restructured with fibrin.

    PubMed

    Romero de Ávila, M D; Hoz, L; Ordóñez, J A; Cambero, M I

    2014-09-15

    The viability of a fibrinogen-thrombin system (FT) to bind fresh deboned hams for incorporation in the salting and ripening processes, to produce cured ham, was studied. The effects of the different processing variables (pH, NaCl concentration, temperature and gelation time) on FT, a meat emulsion mixed with FT, fresh pork portions and deboned hams restructured with FT were analyzed. The most stable and firmest fibrin gels were obtained after 6h of adding the FT, with less than 2% NaCl and pH 7-8.4. Scanning electron microscopy of the fibrin gel showed fibrillar structures with a high degree of cross-linking and a high density. Two structures were found in the binding area of restructured meat; one in the central part with similar characteristics to fibrin gels and, another in the area of contact between the meat surfaces, where a filamentous structure connected the fibrin gels with the muscle bundles. PMID:24767091

  20. Autologous blood storage in obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Herbert, W N; Owen, H G; Collins, M L

    1988-08-01

    Autologous transfusion, storage of one's own blood for subsequent infusion if needed, is safe and effective in a variety of scheduled operative procedures. Obstetric involvement in such programs is very limited, however. Thirty pregnant women with placenta previa or other potential complications underwent 55 phlebotomies in an autologous transfusion program. Phlebotomies were performed at an average gestational age of 32.4 weeks (range 13-40). Changes in mean diastolic blood pressure and pulse were minimal. Electronic fetal monitoring tracings were normal during the 34 procedures in which it was used. The frequency of mild donor reactions (4%) was consistent with that in nonpregnant donors. After entry into this program, 15 patients received a total of 29 U of packed red blood cells (23 autologous; six homologous). Homologous transfusion was avoided in 86.7% of patients receiving blood. Selected pregnant women can participate safely in autologous blood collection programs, minimizing the need, and therefore the risks, of homologous transfusion. PMID:3292974

  1. Impact of EmbryoGlue as the embryo transfer medium.

    PubMed

    Hazlett, William David; Meyer, Liza R; Nasta, Tricia E; Mangan, Patricia A; Karande, Vishvanath C

    2008-07-01

    Routine use of EmbryoGlue did not significantly improve pregnancy or implantation rates in nonselected patients receiving either a day 3 or day 5 embryo transfer compared with standard culture media. Future prospective randomized studies need to be performed to determine whether EmbryoGlue is beneficial in a selected patient population. PMID:17765233

  2. Autologous gluteal lipograft.

    PubMed

    Nicareta, Beatriz; Pereira, Luiz Haroldo; Sterodimas, Aris; Illouz, Yves Gérard

    2011-04-01

    In the past 25 years, several different techniques of lipoinjection have been developed. The authors performed a prospective study to evaluate the patient satisfaction and the rate of complications after an autologous gluteal lipograft among 351 patients during January 2002 and January 2008. All the patients included in the study requested gluteal augmentation and were candidates for the procedure. Overall satisfaction with body appearance after gluteal fat augmentation was rated on a scale of 1 (poor), 2 (fair), 3 (good), 4 (very good), and 5 (excellent). The evaluation was made at follow-up times of 12 and 24 months. The total amount of clean adipose tissue transplanted to the buttocks varied from 100 to 900 ml. In nine cases, liponecrosis was treated by aspiration with a large-bore needle connected to a 20-ml syringe, performed as an outpatient procedure. Infection of the grafted area also occurred for four patients and was treated by incision drainage and use of antibiotics. Of the 21 patients who expressed the desire of further gluteal augmentation, 16 had one more session of gluteal fat grafting. The remaining five patients did not have enough donor area and instead received gluteal silicone implants. At 12 months, 70% reported that their appearance after gluteal fat augmentation was "very good" to "excellent," and 23% responded that their appearance was "good." Only 7% of the patients thought their appearance was less than good. At 24 months, 66% reported that their appearance after gluteal fat augmentation was "very good" (36%) to "excellent" (30%), and 27% responded that their appearance was "good." However, 7% of the patients continued to think that their appearance was less than good. At this writing, the average follow-up time for this group of patients has been 4.9 years. The key to successful gluteal fat grafting is familiarity with the technique, knowledge of the gluteal topography, and understanding of the patient's goals. With experience, the

  3. GlueX: Meson Spectroscopy in Photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Salgado, Carlos; Smith, Elton S.

    2014-03-01

    The goal of the GlueX experiment \\cite{gluex} is to provide crucial data to help understand the soft gluonic fields responsible for binding quarks in hadrons. Hybrid mesons, and in particular exotic hybrid mesons, provide the ideal laboratory for testing QCD in the confinement regime since these mesons explicitly manifest the gluonic degrees of freedom. Photoproduction is expected to be effective in producing exotic hybrids but there is little data on the photoproduction of light mesons. GlueX will use the new 12-GeV electron beam at Jefferson Lab to produce a 9-GeV beam of linearly polarized photons using the technique of coherent bremsstrahlung. A solenoid-based hermetic detector is under construction, which will be used to collect data on meson production and decays. These data will also be used to study the spectrum of conventional mesons, including the poorly understood excited vector mesons. This talk will give an update on the experiment as well as describe theoretical developments \\cite{Dudek:2011bn} to help understand how these data can provide insights into the fundamental theory of strong interactions.

  4. Combination of fibrin-agarose hydrogels and adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells for peripheral nerve regeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carriel, Víctor; Garrido-Gómez, Juan; Hernández-Cortés, Pedro; Garzón, Ingrid; García-García, Salomé; Sáez-Moreno, José Antonio; Sánchez-Quevedo, María del Carmen; Campos, Antonio; Alaminos, Miguel

    2013-04-01

    Objective. The objective was to study the effectiveness of a commercially available collagen conduit filled with fibrin-agarose hydrogels alone or with fibrin-agarose hydrogels containing autologous adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) in a rat sciatic nerve injury model. Approach. A 10 mm gap was created in the sciatic nerve of 48 rats and repaired using saline-filled collagen conduits or collagen conduits filled with fibrin-agarose hydrogels alone (acellular conduits) or with hydrogels containing ADMSCs (ADMSC conduits). Nerve regeneration was assessed in clinical, electrophysiological and histological studies. Main results. Clinical and electrophysiological outcomes were more favorable with ADMSC conduits than with the acellular or saline conduits, evidencing a significant recovery of sensory and motor functions. Histological analysis showed that ADMSC conduits produce more effective nerve regeneration by Schwann cells, with higher remyelination and properly oriented axonal growth that reached the distal areas of the grafted conduits, and with intensely positive expressions of S100, neurofilament and laminin. Extracellular matrix was also more abundant and better organized around regenerated nerve tissues with ADMSC conduits than those with acellular or saline conduits. Significance. Clinical, electrophysiological and histological improvements obtained with tissue-engineered ADMSC conduits may contribute to enhancing axonal regeneration by Schwann cells.

  5. Autologous chondrocytes. Autologous chondrocyte implantation: more data needed.

    PubMed

    2011-05-01

    There is no standard surgical treatment for young adults with persistent, incapacitating symptoms of knee cartilage damage. ChondroCelect is the first cell therapy product to be authorised in the European Union. It contains a dense suspension of chondrocytes cultured from a biopsy of the patient's knee cartilage for 4 weeks before being reimplanted. Clinical evaluation of Chondro-Celect only includes one trial, versus subchondral microfracture, in 118 patients. After 3 years of follow-up, there was no difference in the symptom score between the groups. Histological outcome was better after autologous chondrocyte implantation, but methodological problems make it difficult to interpret the observed difference. Long-term functional outcomes remain to be determined. More joint complications occurred after autologous chondrocyte implantation than after subchondral bone microfracture: more frequently symptomatic cartilage hypertrophy (27% versus 13%, possibly related to the implantation technique), joint swelling (22% versus 6.6%), joint effusion (24% versus 9.8%), and joint crepitations (18% versus 6.6%). Autologous chondrocyte implantation was sometimes associated with flu-like syndrome (in 7.8% of patients), which did not occur with the microfracture technique. Autologous chondrocyte implantation is more complex than microfracture. During routine use, there is a risk that one patient will inadvertently receive chondrocytes collected from another patient, leading to a risk of rejection. In practice, this autologous chondrocyte product should only be used by highly specialised teams, and its assessment must continue. PMID:21648176

  6. Toward an understanding of fibrin branching structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogelson, Aaron L.; Keener, James P.

    2010-05-01

    The blood clotting enzyme thrombin converts fibrinogen molecules into fibrin monomers which polymerize to form a fibrous three-dimensional gel. The concentration of thrombin affects the architecture of the resulting gel, in particular, a higher concentration of thrombin produces a gel with more branch points per unit volume and with shorter fiber segments between branch points. We propose a mechanism by which fibrin branching can occur and show that this mechanism can lead to dependence of the gel’s structure (at the time of gelation) on the rate at which monomer is supplied. A higher rate of monomer supply leads to a gel with a higher branch concentration and with shorter fiber segments between branch points. The origin of this dependence is explained.

  7. THE CONVERSION OF FIBRINOGEN TO FIBRIN

    PubMed Central

    Shulman, Sidney; Katz, Sidney; Ferry, John D.

    1953-01-01

    1. Fibrin clots prepared in the absence of calcium can be dissolved in solutions of lithium chloride and bromide and sodium bromide and iodide, as well as of guanidine hydrochloride and urea. These salts do not denature fibrinogen under the same conditions of concentration, temperature, and time. Sedimentation experiments on the fibrin solutions show in each case a single sharp peak with a sedimentation constant close to that of fibrinogen. 2. At lower concentrations, these salts inhibit the clotting of fibrinogen by thrombin, but in the case of lithium bromide and sodium iodide, at least, allow an intermediate polymer to accumulate whose sedimentation constant is close to that of the polymer observed in systems inhibited by hexamethylene glycol or urea. PMID:13069679

  8. Mechanisms of fibrin polymerization and clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Litvinov, Rustem I.

    2013-01-01

    Research on all stages of fibrin polymerization, using a variety of approaches including naturally occurring and recombinant variants of fibrinogen, x-ray crystallography, electron and light microscopy, and other biophysical approaches, has revealed aspects of the molecular mechanisms involved. The ordered sequence of fibrinopeptide release is essential for the knob-hole interactions that initiate oligomer formation and the subsequent formation of 2-stranded protofibrils. Calcium ions bound both strongly and weakly to fibrin(ogen) have been localized, and some aspects of their roles are beginning to be discovered. Much less is known about the mechanisms of the lateral aggregation of protofibrils and the subsequent branching to yield a 3-dimensional network, although the αC region and B:b knob-hole binding seem to enhance lateral aggregation. Much information now exists about variations in clot structure and properties because of genetic and acquired molecular variants, environmental factors, effects of various intravascular and extravascular cells, hydrodynamic flow, and some functional consequences. The mechanical and chemical stability of clots and thrombi are affected by both the structure of the fibrin network and cross-linking by plasma transglutaminase. There are important clinical consequences to all of these new findings that are relevant for the pathogenesis of diseases, prophylaxis, diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:23305734

  9. 21 CFR 864.7300 - Fibrin monomer paracoagulation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... clotting within a blood vessel) or in the differential diagnosis between disseminated intravascular coagulation and primary fibrinolysis (dissolution of the fibrin in a blood clot). (b) Classification. Class...

  10. 21 CFR 864.7300 - Fibrin monomer paracoagulation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... clotting within a blood vessel) or in the differential diagnosis between disseminated intravascular coagulation and primary fibrinolysis (dissolution of the fibrin in a blood clot). (b) Classification. Class...

  11. 21 CFR 864.7300 - Fibrin monomer paracoagulation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... clotting within a blood vessel) or in the differential diagnosis between disseminated intravascular coagulation and primary fibrinolysis (dissolution of the fibrin in a blood clot). (b) Classification. Class...

  12. Scaffold architecture and fibrin gels promote meniscal cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Pawelec, K. M. E-mail: jw626@cam.ac.uk; Best, S. M.; Cameron, R. E.; Wardale, R. J. E-mail: jw626@cam.ac.uk

    2015-01-01

    Stability of the knee relies on the meniscus, a complex connective tissue with poor healing ability. Current meniscal tissue engineering is inadequate, as the signals for increasing meniscal cell proliferation have not been established. In this study, collagen scaffold structure, isotropic or aligned, and fibrin gel addition were tested. Metabolic activity was promoted by fibrin addition. Cellular proliferation, however, was significantly increased by both aligned architectures and fibrin addition. None of the constructs impaired collagen type I production or triggered adverse inflammatory responses. It was demonstrated that both fibrin gel addition and optimized scaffold architecture effectively promote meniscal cell proliferation.

  13. Management of pulpal floor perforation and grade II Furcation involvement using mineral trioxide aggregate and platelet rich fibrin: A clinical report

    PubMed Central

    Bains, Rhythm; Bains, Vivek K.; Loomba, Kapil; Verma, Kavita; Nasir, Afreena

    2012-01-01

    To report the management of an iatrogenic perforation of pulpal floor in the furcation of mandibular first molar, using Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) and platelet rich fibrin (PRF). Unpredictable endodontic root/pulp chamber floor perforations resulting in unacceptable high rate of clinical failure has now been a lesser threat with the advent of new technologies and biocompatible materials that utilize the applications of basic research along with tissue engineering concept in clinical practice. Present case report illustrates the use of MTA and platelet rich fibrin (PRF) for the repair of the perforation defect and regeneration of the lost periodontium in furcation area. Although, histologic events and reaction of MTA with PRF is not studied so far, however, the autologous and biocompatible nature of the components used for present treatment modalities seems to be beneficial for the long term clinical results obtained in our case. PMID:23230369

  14. Clinical effect of tetracycline demineralization and fibrin-fibronectin sealing system application on healing response following flap debridement surgery.

    PubMed

    Trombelli, L; Scabbia, A; Scapoli, C; Calura, G

    1996-07-01

    The aim of this controlled clinical trial was to assess the effect on healing following tetracycline (TTC) conditioning and fibrin-fibronectin sealing system (FFSS) application in association with flap debridement surgery (FDS) in 11 patients under treatment for moderate to severe periodontitis. Selection criteria included the presence of two bilateral, homologous, non-molar, interproximal sites with probing depth > or = 5 mm. The areas bilateral to the trial sites were matched for number and type of the teeth, and similar periodontal involvement. After initial therapy, a split-mouth design was used in which one area was treated by flap debridement surgery alone (control), and the contralateral area was treated following surgery with a 4-minute burnishing application of 100 mg/ml TTC solution and FFSS (test). Fibrin glue was applied with a syringe on the demineralized root surfaces and surrounding bone margins. Healing by primary intention was encouraged by flap repositioning with interrupted sutures left in place for 14 days. A monthly maintenance recall program was followed. Patients were clinically evaluated at baseline and 6 months and the following measurements were taken: gingival index, plaque control record, clinical attachment level, probing depth, recession, bleeding on probing. Statistical evaluation indicated that both approaches resulted in significant probing depth reduction and clinical attachment gain. However, the differences in healing between the test and control groups were not clinically nor statistically significant. These results suggest there is no additional benefit with TTC demineralization and topical FFSS application in conjunction with flap debridement surgery. PMID:8832480

  15. The use of fibrin and gelatin fixation to repair a kinked internal carotid artery in carotid endarterectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Hisashi; Sanada, Yasuhiro; Tanikawa, Rokuya; Kato, Amami

    2016-01-01

    Background: The kinking of the internal carotid artery (ICA) after final closure in carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is thought to be uncommon. When it occurs, it is mandatory to reconstruct ICA to preserve normal blood flow. We herein present a case in which a fixation technique was applied to repair an ICA that became kinked during CEA. Case Description: A 68-year-old man presented with cerebral infarction due to an artery-to-artery embolism from the right cervical ICA stenosis. CEA was performed 12 days after admission. After final closure, a distal portion of ICA was found to have been kinked following plaque resection in CEA procedure. Fixation with fibrin glue and gelatin was used to reinforce the arterial wall and repair the kink. Postoperative magnetic resonance angiography demonstrated the release of the kink in ICA. Conclusion: Fixation with fibrin and gelatin is a salvage armamentarium that can be considered in CEA for the repair of kinked or tortuous ICA. PMID:27308092

  16. The GlueX Project at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Papandreou, Zisis

    2009-01-01

    One of the main scientific questions that remains unanswered in subatomic physics is the nature and behaviour of the "Glue" which holds the quarks together. The puzzling feature of this construction is that quarks are never found free, but only in triplets or pairs, a phenomenon known as "confinement". Since gluons carry colour charge, they can form chromoelectric flux tubes, which may result in unusual objects, such as glue-balls or hybrid combinations of gluons and quarks. In certain models, the later can be produced with quantum numbers not allowed in the simple quark picture. An international experiment (GlueX) at Jefferson Lab, Virginia, is being designed to search for such exotic hybrid mesons and thus elucidate the phenomenon of confinement. GlueX is considered a 'discovery' experiment; its salient features, the planned methodology of partial- wave analysis, and the R&D progress of its detector subsystems will be

  17. UNDERSIDE FROM SOUTH BANKS; NOTICE NEW GLUE LAM CROSSBEAMS SISTERED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    UNDERSIDE FROM SOUTH BANKS; NOTICE NEW GLUE LAM CROSSBEAMS SISTERED TO OLDER BEAMS, NEW STRINGERS AND COMPONENTS MAKE UP A NEARLY NEW SUPPORT SYSTEM - Short Bridge, Spanning South Santiam River at High Deck Road, Cascadia, Linn County, OR

  18. Rebooting autoimmunity with autologous HSCT.

    PubMed

    Snowden, John A

    2016-01-01

    Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is increasingly used for severe autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, but the mechanisms involved have yet to be elucidated. In this issue of Blood, Delemarre et al report their findings in both animal and human models which provide insights into restoration of functionality and diversity within the regulatory T-cell (Treg) compartment following HSCT. PMID:26744435

  19. Contaminating fibrin in CPD-blood: solubility in plasma and distribution in blood components following separation

    SciTech Connect

    Skjonsberg, O.H.; Kierulf, P.; Gravem, K.; Fagerhol, M.K.; Godal, H.C.

    1986-01-01

    In order to estimate the solubility of contaminating fibrin in CPD-blood, thrombin induced fibrin polymerzation in CPD-plasma was examined by light scattering and fibrinopeptide A (FPA) determinations. In addition, I-125 fibrin monomer enriched CPD-blood was used to investigate fibrin monomer retention in blood bags and transfusion filters (170 microns) and fibrin distribution in blood components derived from CPD-blood. Initial fibrin polymerization in CPD-blood occurred after conversion of 15 per cent of the fibrinogen to fibrin, implying that substantial amounts of fibrin may be kept solubilized in CPD-blood bags. Only minor amounts of I-125 fibrin monomers were retained in blood bags (2.4 per cent) and in transfusion filters (2.9 per cent) after sham transfusions. After separating I-125-fibrin monomer enriched CPD-blood into its constituent components, the major part of fibrin (75.0 per cent) could be traced in the cryoprecipitate.

  20. 21 CFR 864.7300 - Fibrin monomer paracoagulation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Fibrin monomer paracoagulation test. 864.7300 Section 864.7300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7300 Fibrin monomer paracoagulation test....

  1. 21 CFR 864.7300 - Fibrin monomer paracoagulation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Fibrin monomer paracoagulation test. 864.7300 Section 864.7300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7300 Fibrin monomer paracoagulation test....

  2. Circulating Microparticles Alter Formation, Structure, and Properties of Fibrin Clots

    PubMed Central

    Zubairova, Laily D.; Nabiullina, Roza M.; Nagaswami, Chandrasekaran; Zuev, Yuriy F.; Mustafin, Ilshat G.; Litvinov, Rustem I.; Weisel, John W.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the importance of circulating microparticles in haemostasis and thrombosis, there is limited evidence for potential causative effects of naturally produced cell-derived microparticles on fibrin clot formation and its properties. We studied the significance of blood microparticles for fibrin formation, structure, and susceptibility to fibrinolysis by removing them from platelet-free plasma using filtration. Clots made in platelet-free and microparticle-depleted plasma samples from the same healthy donors were analyzed in parallel. Microparticles accelerate fibrin polymerisation and support formation of more compact clots that resist internal and external fibrinolysis. These variations correlate with faster thrombin generation, suggesting thrombin-mediated kinetic effects of microparticles on fibrin formation, structure, and properties. In addition, clots formed in the presence of microparticles, unlike clots from the microparticle-depleted plasma, contain 0.1–0.5-μm size granular and CD61-positive material on fibres, suggesting that platelet-derived microparticles attach to fibrin. Therefore, the blood of healthy individuals contains functional microparticles at the levels that have a procoagulant potential. They affect the structure and stability of fibrin clots indirectly through acceleration of thrombin generation and through direct physical incorporation into the fibrin network. Both mechanisms underlie a potential role of microparticles in haemostasis and thrombosis as modulators of fibrin formation, structure, and resistance to fibrinolysis. PMID:26635081

  3. The GlueX Start Counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llodra, Anthony; Pooser, Eric; GlueX Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The GlueX experiment, which is online as of October of 2014, will study meson photo production with unprecedented precision. This experiment will use the coherent bremsstrahlung technique to produce a 9 GeV linearly polarized photon beam incident on a liquid H2 target kept at a few degrees Kelvin. A Start Counter detector has been fabricated to identify the accelerator electron beam buckets, approximately 2 nanoseconds apart, and to provide accurate timing information. This detector is designed to operate at photon intensities of up to 108 γ/s in the coherent peak and provide a timing resolution of less than 350 picoseconds so as to provide successful identification of the electron beam buckets. It consists of a cylindrical array of 30 scintillators with pointed ends that bend towards the beam at the downstream end. The EJ-200 scintillator is best suited for the Start Counter due to its fast decay time on the order of 2 nanoseconds and long attenuation length. Silicon Photo Multiplier (SiPM) detectors have been selected as the readout system and are to be placed as close as possible, less than 300 micron, to the upstream end of each scintillator. The methods/details of the assembly and the optimization of the surface quality of scintillator paddles are discussed. This work was supported in part by DoE Contracts DE-FG02-99ER41065 and DE-AC05-06OR23177.

  4. The GlueX Start Counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pooser, Eric; GlueX Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The GlueX experiment will be one of the largest photo-production facilities in the world and is currently under construction. This experiment will use the coherent bremsstrahlung technique to produce a 9 GeV linearly polarized photon beam incident on a liquid H2 target. A Start Counter detector has been designed to identify the accelerator electron beam buckets, approximately 2 ns apart, and to provide accurate timing information. It is now under construction at Florida International University (FIU). This detector is designed to operate at photon intensities of up to 108 γ /s in the coherent peak. It consists of an array of 30 individual scintillators with ``pointed'' ends that bend toward the beam at the downstream end. SiPM detectors, which comprise the readout system, are placed as close as possible at the end of each scintillator. The EJ-200 scintillator is best suited for the timing studies with a fast decay time of 2.0 ns. The physical properties of the scintillators, configured to the desired geometry, have been studied extensively at FIU. Geant4 simulations are currently underway to replicate and to understand our experimental results. The results of these timing studies and simulations are discussed.

  5. The GlueX Start Counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pooser, Eric; GlueX Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    The GlueX experiment will study meson photoproduction with unprecedented precision. This experiment will use the coherent bremsstrahlung technique to produce a 9 GeV linearly polarized photon beam incident on a liquid H2 target. A Start Counter detector has been fabricated to identify the accelerator electron beam buckets, approximately 2 ns apart, and to provide accurate timing information which is used in the level-1 trigger of the experiment. This detector is designed to operate at photon intensities of up to 108 γ / s in the coherent peak and provide a timing resolution < 350 ps so as to provide successful identification of the electron beam buckets to within 99 % accuracy. Furthermore, the Start Counter detector will provide excellent solid angle coverage, ~ 90 % of 4 π hermeticity , and a high degree of segmentation for background rejection. It consists of a cylindrical array of 30 scintillators with pointed ends that bend towards the beam at the downstream end. Silicon PhotoMultiplier (SiPM) detectors have been selected as the readout system. The physical properties of the Start Counter have been studied extensively. The results of theses studies are discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, and Office of Nuclear Physics under Contracts DE-AC05-06OR23177 & DE-FG02-99ER41065.

  6. The GlueX Start Counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pooser, Eric; GlueX Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    The GlueX experiment will study meson photoproduction with unprecedented precision. This experiment will use the coherent bremsstrahlung technique to produce a 9 GeV linearly polarized photon beam incident on a liquid H2 target. A Start Counter detector has been fabricated to identify the accelerator electron beam buckets, approximately 2 ns apart, and to provide accurate timing information which is used in the level-1 trigger of the experiment. This detector is designed to operate at photon intensities of up to 108 γ / s in the coherent peak and provide a timing resolution < 350ps so as to provide successful identification of the electron beam buckets to within 99 % accuracy. Furthermore, the Start Counter detector will provide excellent solid angle coverage, ~ 90 % of 4 π hermeticity , and a high degree of segmentation for background rejection. It consists of a cylindrical array of 30 scintillators with pointed ends that bend towards the beam at the downstream end. Silicon PhotoMultiplier (SiPM) detectors have been selected as the readout system. The physical properties of the Start Counter have been studied extensively. The results of theses studies are discussed. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics under Contracts DE-AC05-06OR23177 & DE-FG02-99ER41065.

  7. The GlueX Start Counter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pooser, Eric; GlueX Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    The GlueX experiment will study meson photoproduction with unprecedented precision. This experiment will use the coherent bremsstrahlung technique to produce a 9 GeV linearly polarized photon beam incident on a liquid H2 target. A Start Counter detector has been fabricated to identify the accelerator electron beam buckets, approximately 2 ns apart, and to provide accurate timing information which is used in the level-1 trigger of the experiment. This detector is designed to operate at photon intensities of up to 108 γ / s in the coherent peak and provide a timing resolution <350 ps so as to provide successful identification of the electron beam buckets to within 99% accuracy. Furthermore, the Start Counter detector will provide excellent solid angle coverage, ~90% of 4π hermeticity, and a high degree of segmentation for background rejection. It consists of a cylindrical array of 30 scintillators with pointed ends that bend towards the beam at the downstream end. Silicon PhotoMultiplier (SiPM) detectors have been selected as the readout system. The physical properties of the scintillators, have been studied extensively at FIU. The results of these studies are discussed.

  8. Concentration of Fibrin and Presence of Plasminogen Affect Proliferation, Fibrinolytic Activity, and Morphology of Human Fibroblasts and Keratinocytes in 3D Fibrin Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Reinertsen, Erik; Skinner, Michael; Wu, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Fibrin is a hemostatic protein found in the clotting cascade. It is used in the operating room to stop bleeding and deliver cells and growth factors to heal wounds. However, formulations of clinically approved fibrin are optimized for hemostasis, and the extent to which biochemical and physical cues in fibrin mediate skin cell behavior is not fully understood nor utilized in the design of biomaterials. To determine if the concentration of fibrinogen and the presence of plasminogen affect cell behavior relevant to wound healing, we fabricated three-dimensional fibrin constructs made from 5, 10, or 20 mg/mL of clinical fibrin or plasminogen-depleted (PD) fibrin. We cultured dermal fibroblasts or epidermal keratinocytes in these constructs. Fibroblasts proliferated similarly in both types of fibrin, but keratinocytes proliferated more in low concentrations of clinical fibrin and less in PD fibrin. Clinical fibrin constructs with fibroblasts were less stiff and degraded faster than PD fibrin constructs with fibroblasts. Similarly, keratinocytes degraded clinical fibrin, but not PD fibrin. Fibroblast spreading varied with fibrin concentration in both types of fibrin. In conclusion, the concentration of fibrinogen and the presence of plasminogen affect fibroblast and keratinocyte proliferation, morphology, and fibrin degradation. Creating materials with heterogeneous regions of fibrin formulations and concentrations could be a novel strategy for controlling the phenotype of encapsulated fibroblasts and keratinocytes, and the subsequent biomechanical properties of the construct. However, other well-investigated aspects of wound healing remain to be utilized in the design of fibrin biomaterials, such as autocrine and paracrine signaling between fibroblasts, keratinocytes, and immune cells. PMID:24738616

  9. Measurement of Fibrin Fiber Strength using AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawerth, Louise; Falvo, Mchael; Canning, Anthony; Matthews, Garrett; Superfine, Richard; Guthold, Martin

    2003-11-01

    Blood clots usually form in the event of injury or damage to blood vessels to prevent the loss of blood. Moreover, as we age, blood clots often form in undesired locations, i.e. in blood vessels around the heart or brain, or in uninjured vessels resulting in heart attacks or strokes. Fibrin fibers, the skeleton of a blood clot, essentially perform the mechanical task of creating a blockage that stems blood flow. Thus, a better understanding of the mechanical properties of these fibers, such as the tensile strength and Young's modulus, will enhance our understanding of blood clots. For quantitative stress and strain measurements, we need to image the deformation of the fiber and measure the applied force simultaneously. For this reason, we are combining fluorescent microscopy with atomic force microscopy. Fibrin fibers were fluorescently labeled with streptavidin-coated quantum dots and deposited on a functionalized glass substrate, imaged and manipulated under buffer. We will describe our progress in obtaining quantitative lateral force measurements under buffer simultaneous with strain measurements from optical microscope images.

  10. Kinetics of ligation of fibrin oligomers.

    PubMed

    Nelb, G W; Kamykowski, G W; Ferry, J D

    1980-07-10

    Human fibrinogen was treated with thrombin in the presence of fibrinoligase and calcium ion at pH 8.5, ionic strength 0.45, and the ensuring polymerization was interrupted at various time intervals (t) both before and after the clotting time (tc) by solubilization with a solution of sodium dodecyl sulfate and urea. Aliquots of the solubilized protein were subjected to gel electrophoresis on polyacrylamide gels after disulfide reduction by dithiothreitol and on agarose gels without reduction. The degree of gamma-gamma ligation was determined from the former and the size distribution of ligated oligomers, for degree of polymerization x from 1 to 10, from the latter. The degree of gamma-gamma ligation was calculated independently from the size distribution with the assumption that every junction between two fibrin monomers remaining intact after solubilization is ligated, and this agreed well with the direct determination. The size distribution at t/tc = 1.3 to 1.6 differed somewhat from that calculated by the classical theory of linear polycondensation on the assumption that all reactive sites react with equal probability and rate. Analysis of the difference suggests that ligation of a fibrin digomer is not a random process; the probability of ligation of a given junction between two monomers increases with the oligomer length. The number-average degree of polymerization, xn, of ligated oligomers increases approximately linearly with time up to a value of 1.6. PMID:7391026

  11. Fibrin-mediated lentivirus gene transfer: implications for lentivirus microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Raut, Shruti; Lei, Pedro; Padmashali, Roshan; Andreadis, Stelios T.

    2010-01-01

    We employed fibrin hydrogel as bioactive matrix for lentivirus mediated gene transfer. Fibrin-mediated gene transfer was highly efficient and exhibited strong dependence on fibrinogen concentration. Efficient gene transfer was achieved with fibrinogen concentration between 3.75 – 7.5 mg/mL. Lower fibrinogen concentrations resulted in diffusion of virus out of the gel while higher concentrations led to ineffective fibrin degradation by target cells. Addition of fibrinolytic inhibitors decreased gene transfer in a dose-dependent manner suggesting that fibrin degradation by target cells may be necessary for successful gene delivery. Under these conditions transduction may be limited only to cells interacting with the matrix thereby providing a method for spatially localized gene delivery. Indeed, when lentivirus-containing fibrin microgels were spotted in an array format gene transfer was confined to virus-containing fibrin spots with minimal cross-contamination between neighboring sites. Collectively, our data suggest that fibrin may provide an effective matrix for spatially-localized gene delivery with potential applications in high-throughput lentiviral microarrays and in regenerative medicine. PMID:20153386

  12. Revascularization Induced Maturogenesis of Non-Vital Immature Permanent Tooth Using Platelet-Rich-Fibrin: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Nagaveni, N B; Pathak, Sidhant; Poornima, P; Joshi, Jooie S

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this report is to describe a novel method of revascularization therapy done in a non-vital, immature permanent tooth using Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF),in a recently developed scaffold material to overcome limitations associated with the traditional method of revascularization using natural blood clot. PRF prepared from autologous blood was placed in the root canal and patient was followed up regularly at one, three, six, nine and 12 months for detailed clinical and radiographic evaluation. At 12 months, radiographic examination revealed root elongation, root end closure, continued thickening of the root dentinal walls, obliteration of root canal space, and normal periradicular anatomy. However, more long term prospective trials and histological studies are highly needed before to testify PRF a panacea for the regenerative endodontic therapy in children. PMID:26696103

  13. Interactions between ultrasound stimulated microbubbles and fibrin clots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acconcia, Christopher; Leung, Ben Y. C.; Hynynen, Kullervo; Goertz, David E.

    2013-07-01

    While it is well established that ultrasound stimulated microbubbles (USMBs) can potentiate blood clot lysis, the mechanisms are not well understood. Here we examine the interaction between USMBs and fibrin clots, which are comprised of fibrin networks that maintain the mechanical integrity of blood clots. High speed camera observations demonstrated that USMBs can penetrate fibrin clots. Two-photon microscopy revealed that penetrating bubbles can leave behind patent "tunnels" along their paths and that fluid can be transported into the clots. Finally, it is observed that primary radiation forces associated with USMBs can induce local deformation and macroscopic translation of clot boundaries.

  14. Tumour imaging by the detection of fibrin clots in tumour stroma using an anti-fibrin Fab fragment

    PubMed Central

    Obonai, Toshifumi; Fuchigami, Hirobumi; Furuya, Fumiaki; Kozuka, Naoyuki; Yasunaga, Masahiro; Matsumura, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of early and aggressive types of cancer is important for providing effective cancer therapy. Cancer-induced fibrin clots exist only within lesions. Previously, we developed a monoclonal antibody (clone 102-10) that recognizes insoluble fibrin but not fibrinogen or soluble fibrin and confirmed that fibrin clots form continuously in various cancers. Here, we describe the development of a Fab fragment probe of clone 102-10 for tumour imaging. The distribution of 102-10 Fab was investigated in genetically engineered mice bearing pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), and its effect on blood coagulation was examined. Immunohistochemical and ex vivo imaging revealed that 102-10 Fab was distributed selectively in fibrin clots in PDAC tumours 3 h after injection and that it disappeared from the body after 24 h. 102-10 Fab had no influence on blood coagulation or fibrinolysis. Tumour imaging using anti-fibrin Fab may provide a safe and effective method for the diagnosis of invasive cancers by detecting fibrin clots in tumour stroma. PMID:27009516

  15. Autologous serum improves bone formation in a primary stable silica-embedded nanohydroxyapatite bone substitute in combination with mesenchymal stem cells and rhBMP-2 in the sheep model

    PubMed Central

    Boos, Anja M; Weigand, Annika; Deschler, Gloria; Gerber, Thomas; Arkudas, Andreas; Kneser, Ulrich; Horch, Raymund E; Beier, Justus P

    2014-01-01

    New therapeutic strategies are required for critical size bone defects, because the gold standard of transplanting autologous bone from an unharmed area of the body often leads to several severe side effects and disadvantages for the patient. For years, tissue engineering approaches have been seeking a stable, axially vascularized transplantable bone replacement suitable for transplantation into the recipient bed with pre-existing insufficient conditions. For this reason, the arteriovenous loop model was developed and various bone substitutes have been vascularized. However, it has not been possible thus far to engineer a primary stable and axially vascularized transplantable bone substitute. For that purpose, a primary stable silica-embedded nanohydroxyapatite (HA) bone substitute in combination with blood, bone marrow, expanded, or directly retransplanted mesenchymal stem cells, recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein 2 (rhBMP-2), and different carrier materials (fibrin, cell culture medium, autologous serum) was tested subcutaneously for 4 or 12 weeks in the sheep model. Autologous serum lead to an early matrix change during degradation of the bone substitute and formation of new bone tissue. The best results were achieved in the group combining mesenchymal stem cells expanded with 60 μg/mL rhBMP-2 in autologous serum. Better ingrowth of fibrovascular tissue could be detected in the autologous serum group compared with the control (fibrin). Osteoclastic activity indicating an active bone remodeling process was observed after 4 weeks, particularly in the group with autologous serum and after 12 weeks in every experimental group. This study clearly demonstrates the positive effects of autologous serum in combination with mesenchymal stem cells and rhBMP-2 on bone formation in a primary stable silica-embedded nano-HA bone grafting material in the sheep model. In further experiments, the results will be transferred to the sheep arteriovenous loop model in

  16. [Autologous Fat Grafting in Scar Revision].

    PubMed

    Yu, Pan-xi; Cai, Jing-long

    2016-04-01

    Regenerative medicine is an emerging discipline. Adipose tissue is a rich source of fat cells and mesenchymal stem cells, and autologous fat grafting has increasingly been applied in plastic surgeries and dermatological treatments. This paper reviews the latest advances in autologous fat grafting in scar revision. PMID:27181904

  17. Microporous Nanofibrous Fibrin-based Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Osathanon, Thanaphum; Linnes, Michael L.; Rajachar, Rupak M.; Ratner, Buddy D.; Somerman, Martha J.; Giachelli, Cecilia M.

    2008-01-01

    The fibrotic response of the body to synthetic polymers limits their success in tissue engineering and other applications. Though porous polymers have demonstrated improved healing, difficulty in controlling their pore sizes and pore interconnections has clouded the understanding of this phenomenon. In this study, a novel method to fabricate natural polymer/calcium phosphate composite scaffolds with tightly controllable pore size, pore interconnection, and calcium phosphate deposition was developed. Microporous, nanofibrous fibrin scaffolds were fabricated using sphere-templating methods. Composite scaffolds were created by solution deposition of calcium phosphate on fibrin surfaces or by direct incorporation of nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite (nHA). The SEM results showed that fibrin scaffolds exhibited a highly porous and interconnected structure. Osteoblast-like cells, obtained from murine calvaria, attached, spread and showed a polygonal morphology on the surface of the biomaterial. Multiple cell layers and fibrillar matrix deposition were observed. Moreover, cells seeded on mineralized fibrin scaffolds exhibited significantly higher alkaline phosphatase activity as well as osteoblast marker gene expression compared to fibrin scaffolds and nHA incorporated fibrin scaffolds (0.25 g and 0.5 g). All types of scaffolds were degraded both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, these scaffolds promoted bone formation in a mouse calvarial defect model and the bone formation was enhanced by addition of rhBMP-2. PMID:18640716

  18. Alterations in Fibrin Structure in Patients with Liver Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lisman, Ton; Ariëns, Robert A S

    2016-06-01

    The hemostatic balance in patients with liver diseases is relatively well preserved due to concomitant alterations in pro- and antihemostatic pathways. Thrombin generation studies support the notion of hemostatic competence in liver diseases, but in such tests alterations in fibrinogen level and function are not taken into account. We have recently studied structural and functional properties of the fibrin clot in patients with liver diseases. Although we have confirmed previous findings that hypersialylation of the fibrinogen molecule in patients with liver diseases contributes to a defective fibrinogen-to-fibrin conversion, we have found that once the clot has been formed, it has a thrombogenic nature as assessed by permeability assays. These thrombogenic properties of the fibrin clot in cirrhosis relate to incompletely characterized intrinsic changes in the fibrinogen molecule, which may include oxidation and hypersialylation. In addition, in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease thrombogenic properties of the fibrin clot are not only due to liver disease but also to obesity and the metabolic syndrome. During liver transplantation, the clot normalizes and becomes increasingly permeable, and the functional properties of the fibrin clot are markedly normalized by fibrinogen concentrate, when added to plasma samples in vitro. These new insights in the functional properties of the fibrin clot in patients with liver diseases facilitate a more rational approach to treatment and prevention of both bleeding and thrombotic complications. PMID:27071046

  19. Fibrin sealant use in pilonidal sinus: Systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Kayaalp, Cuneyt; Ertugrul, Ismail; Tolan, Kerem; Sumer, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To review the current data about the success rates of fibrin sealant use in pilonidal disease. METHODS: Fibrin sealant can be used for different purposes in pilonidal sinus treatment, such as filling in the sinus tracts, covering the open wound after excision and lay-open treatment, or obliterating the subcutaneous dead space before skin closure. We searched Pubmed, Google-Scholar, Ebsco-Host, clinicaltrials, and Cochrane databases and found nine studies eligible for analysis; these studies included a total of 217 patients (84% male, mean age 24.2 ± 7.8). RESULTS: In cases where fibrin sealant was used to obliterate the subcutaneous dead space, there was no reduction in wound complication rates (9.8% vs 14.6%, P = 0.48). In cases where sealant was used to cover the laid-open area, the wound healing time and patient comfort were reported better than in previous studies (mean 17 d, 88% satisfaction). When fibrin sealant was used to fill the sinus tracts, the recurrence rate was around 20%, despite the highly selected grouping of patients. CONCLUSION: Consequently, using fibrin sealant to decrease the risk of seroma formation was determined to be an ineffective course of action. It was not advisable to fill the sinus tracts with fibrin sealant because it was not superior to other cost-effective and minimally invasive treatments. New comparative studies can be conducted to confirm the results of sealant use in covering the laid-open area. PMID:27022454

  20. Platelet-derived microparticles associate with fibrin during thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Siljander, P; Carpen, O; Lassila, R

    1996-06-01

    Platelet-derived microparticles (MP) are reported to express both pro- and anticoagulant activities. Nevertheless, their functional significance has remained unresolved. The present study monitored the generation and fate of MP in an experimental model of thrombosis with costimulation of platelets by collagen and thrombin. When minimally anticoagulated (0.5 micromol/L PPACK) blood was perfused over immobilized fibrillar type I collagen in a flow chamber at a low shear rate (300 s(-1)), endogenous thrombin was generated, as evidenced by thrombin-antithrombin III complex. In contrast to full anticoagulation 150 micromol/L PPACK) and the absence of collagen, large platelet aggregates and fibrin ensued during perfusions over collagen in the presence of thrombin. In these thrombi, MP, defined as GPIIbIIIa- and P-selectin-positive vesicles (<1 micron), were found to align fibrin in immunofluorescence and scanning immunoelectron microscopy. Moreover, in sections of embolectomized thromboemboli from patients GPIIbIIIa- and P-selectin-positive material compatible with MP was detected in a fibrin strand-like pattern. In vitro binding studies showed that MP bound to fibrin and acted there as procoagulants. In summary, we show that MP generated during thrombus formation associate with local fibrin. This adhesive function fibrin could imply a sustained modulatory role for MP in evolving thrombi. PMID:8639834

  1. Multivalent Viral Capsids with Internal Cargo for Fibrin Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Obermeyer, Allie C.; Capehart, Stacy L.; Jarman, John B.; Francis, Matthew B.

    2014-01-01

    Thrombosis is the cause of many cardiovascular syndromes and is a significant contributor to life-threatening diseases, such as myocardial infarction and stroke. Thrombus targeted imaging agents have the capability to provide molecular information about pathological clots, potentially improving detection, risk stratification, and therapy of thrombosis-related diseases. Nanocarriers are a promising platform for the development of molecular imaging agents as they can be modified to have external targeting ligands and internal functional cargo. In this work, we report the synthesis and use of chemically functionalized bacteriophage MS2 capsids as biomolecule-based nanoparticles for fibrin imaging. The capsids were modified using an oxidative coupling reaction, conjugating ∼90 copies of a fibrin targeting peptide to the exterior of each protein shell. The ability of the multivalent, targeted capsids to bind fibrin was first demonstrated by determining the impact on thrombin-mediated clot formation. The modified capsids out-performed the free peptides and were shown to inhibit clot formation at effective concentrations over ten-fold lower than the monomeric peptide alone. The installation of near-infrared fluorophores on the interior surface of the capsids enabled optical detection of binding to fibrin clots. The targeted capsids bound to fibrin, exhibiting higher signal-to-background than control, non-targeted MS2-based nanoagents. The in vitro assessment of the capsids suggests that fibrin-targeted MS2 capsids could be used as delivery agents to thrombi for diagnostic or therapeutic applications. PMID:24960118

  2. Fibrin Sealants in Dura Sealing: A Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background Fibrin sealants are widely used in neurosurgery to seal the suture line, provide watertight closure, and prevent cerebrospinal fluid leaks. The aim of this systematic review is to summarize the current efficacy and safety literature of fibrin sealants in dura sealing and the prevention/treatment of cerebrospinal fluid leaks. Methods A comprehensive electronic literature search was run in the following databases: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Cochrane Central Resister of Controlled Trials, clinicaltrials.gov, MEDLINE/PubMed, and EMBASE. Titles and abstracts of potential articles of interest were reviewed independently by 3 of the authors. Results A total of 1006 database records and additional records were identified. After screening for duplicates and relevance, a total of 78 articles were assessed by the investigators for eligibility. Thirty-eight were excluded and the full-text of 40 articles were included in the qualitative synthesis. Seven of these included only safety data and were included in the safety assessment. The remaining 33 articles included findings from 32 studies that enrolled a total of 2935 patients who were exposed to fibrin sealant. Among these 33 studies there were only 3 randomized controlled trials, with the remaining being prospective cohort analysis, case controlled studies, prospective or retrospective case series. One randomized controlled trial, with 89 patients exposed to fibrin sealant, found a greater rate of intraoperative watertight dura closure in the fibrin sealant group than the control group (92.1% versus 38.0%, p<0.001); however, post-operative cerebrospinal fluid leakage occurred in more fibrin sealant than control patients (6.7% versus 2.0%, p>0.05). Other clinical trials evaluated the effect of fibrin sealant in the postoperative prevention of cerebrospinal fluid leaks. These were generally lower level evidence studies (ie, not prospective, randomized, controlled trials) that were not designed or

  3. In the rat, citrullinated autologous fibrinogen is immunogenic but the induced autoimmune response is not arthritogenic

    PubMed Central

    Duplan, V; Foulquier, C; Clavel, C; Al Badine, R; Serre, G; Saoudi, A; Sebbag, M

    2006-01-01

    Conversion of arginyl to citrullyl residues (citrullination) is essential for the formation of the epitopes recognized by rheumatoid arthritis (RA)-associated autoantibodies to citrullinated proteins (ACPA). ACPA are secreted by plasma cells of the rheumatoid synovial tissue where their major target, citrullinated fibrin, is abundant. Although numerous arguments suggest that ACPA play an important role in RA, their pathological relevance remains to be established. In the present study, we assessed the immunogenicity and arthritogenicity of complete Freund's adjuvant-emulsified autologous citrullinated (C-rFBG) or non-citrullinated (NC-rFBG) fibrinogen in Lewis (LEW) and Brown–Norway rats, which exhibit drastic differences in their susceptibility to induced autoimmune diseases. NC-rFBG induced no antibody response. In contrast, a single injection of C-rFBG induced an IgG response directed mainly to citrullinated determinants of rFBG. However, all rat strains remained devoid of clinical and histological signs of arthritis up to 3 months after C-rFBG inoculation. Next, in LEW rats, we tested whether autoimmunity to C-rFBG could aggravate acute ankle arthritis triggered by intra-articular injection of incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA). However, such arthritis evolved identically in the presence or absence of anti-C-rFBG autoantibodies. However, IFA-injected joints were devoid of citrullinated fibrin deposits. Therefore, citrullination allows breakdown of immunological tolerance but the autoimmune response developed is not spontaneously arthritogenic. Whether or not it can aggravate arthritis with citrullinated fibrin deposits remains to be evaluated. PMID:16907920

  4. Relevance of matter and glue dynamics for baryon number fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Wei-jie; Pawlowski, Jan M.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the impact of the matter and glue dynamics on baryon number fluctuations and the kurtosis of baryon number distribution. This is done within the framework of QCD-improved low-energy effective models. In particular, we include the momentum scale dependence of the quark-meson scattering and the nontrivial dispersions of both quarks and mesons. On the gluonic side, we take into account the backreaction of the matter sector on the glue dynamics. It is shown that the above fluctuations lead to a more rapid change of the baryon number fluctuations as well as the kurtosis of with the chiral crossover. We also study the signatures of quark confinement in low-energy QCD. It is shown that, contrary to the common picture, the effective thermal distribution in the presence of confining glue backgrounds does not tend towards the colorless baryonic one. Instead, the dominance of colorless hadronic states is obtained in a subtle interplay of quark and glue contributions to the canonical potential.

  5. Gravity: The Glue of the Universe. History and Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Harry; Smith, Diana Gilbert

    This book presents a story of the history of gravity, the glue of the universe, and is based on two premises: (1) an understanding of mathematics is not required to grasp the concepts and implications of relativity; and (2) relativity has altered forever the perceptions of gravity, space, time, and how the universe works. A narrative text section…

  6. Mechanisms of vasculogenesis in 3D fibrin matrices mediated by the interaction of adipose-derived stem cells and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rohringer, Sabrina; Hofbauer, Pablo; Schneider, Karl H; Husa, Anna-Maria; Feichtinger, Georg; Peterbauer-Scherb, Anja; Redl, Heinz; Holnthoner, Wolfgang

    2014-10-01

    Vascularization of tissue-engineered constructs is essential to provide sufficient nutrient supply and hemostasis after implantation into target sites. Co-cultures of adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) with outgrowth endothelial cells (OEC) in fibrin gels were shown to provide an effective possibility to induce vasculogenesis in vitro. However, the mechanisms of the interaction between these two cell types remain unclear so far. The aim of this study was to evaluate differences of direct and indirect stimulation of ASC-induced vasculogenesis, the influence of ASC on network stabilization and molecular mechanisms involved in vascular structure formation. Endothelial cells (EC) were embedded in fibrin gels either containing non-coated or ASC-coated microcarrier beads as well as ASC alone. Moreover, EC-seeded constructs incubated with ASC-conditioned medium were used in addition to constructs with ASC seeded on top. Vascular network formation was visualized by green fluorescent protein expressing cells or immunostaining for CD31 and quantified. RT-qPCR of cells derived from co-cultures in fibrin was performed to evaluate changes in the expression of EC marker genes during the first week of culture. Moreover, angiogenesis-related protein levels were measured by performing angiogenesis proteome profiler arrays. The results demonstrate that proximity of endothelial cells and ASC is required for network formation and ASC stabilize EC networks by developing pericyte characteristics. We further showed that ASC induce controlled vessel growth by secreting pro-angiogenic and regulatory proteins. This study reveals angiogenic protein profiles involved in EC/ASC interactions in fibrin matrices and confirms the usability of OEC/ASC co-cultures for autologous vascular tissue engineering. PMID:25086616

  7. One-step apexification using platelet rich fibrin matrix and mineral trioxide aggregate apical barrier.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Anisha; Yadav, Amit; Shetty, Neeta

    2014-01-01

    The absence of a natural apical constriction in a nonvital young permanent tooth makes endodontic treatment a challenge. There is a need to induce or create an apical barrier against, which the obturating material can be condensed. Traditionally, calcium hydroxide is the material of choice to induce apexification. Due to certain drawbacks such as prolonged treatment duration and unpredictable apical barrier formation, it is being replaced by materials, which have a more predictable outcome like mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). One-step apexification with MTA reduces the treatment time when compared with traditional calcium hydroxide apexification, which requires an average time of 12-19 months. In one-step apexification using MTA, the technical problem encountered is controlling the overfill or underfill of MTA. The use of a matrix material helps to overcome this shortcoming. Platelet rich fibrin (PRF) is an immune platelet concentrate, which can be used as a matrix, it also promotes wound healing and repair. This case report presents a case of one step apexification using MTA as an apical barrier and autologous PRF as an internal matrix. PMID:25728119

  8. Tissue-Engineered Fibrin-Based Heart Valve with a Tubular Leaflet Design

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Miriam; Heta, Eriona; Moreira, Ricardo; Gesche, Valentine N.; Schermer, Thomas; Frese, Julia

    2014-01-01

    The general approach in heart valve tissue engineering is to mimic the shape of the native valve in the attempt to recreate the natural haemodynamics. In this article, we report the fabrication of the first tissue-engineered heart valve (TEHV) based on a tubular leaflet design, where the function of the leaflets of semilunar heart valves is performed by a simple tubular construct sutured along a circumferential line at the root and at three single points at the sinotubular junction. The tubular design is a recent development in pericardial (nonviable) bioprostheses, which has attracted interest because of the simplicity of the construction and the reliability of the implantation technique. Here we push the potential of the concept further from the fabrication and material point of view to realize the tube-in-tube valve: an autologous, living HV with remodelling and growing capability, physiological haemocompatibility, simple to construct and fast to implant. We developed two different fabrication/conditioning procedures and produced fibrin-based constructs embedding cells from the ovine umbilical cord artery according to the two different approaches. Tissue formation was confirmed by histology and immunohistology. The design of the tube-in-tube foresees the possibility of using a textile coscaffold (here demonstrated with a warp-knitted mesh) to achieve enhanced mechanical properties in vision of implantation in the aortic position. The tube-in-tube represents an attractive alternative to the conventional design of TEHVs aiming at reproducing the valvular geometry. PMID:23829551

  9. A CCR2 macrophage endocytic pathway mediates extravascular fibrin clearance in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Motley, Michael P.; Madsen, Daniel H.; Jürgensen, Henrik J.; Spencer, David E.; Szabo, Roman; Holmbeck, Kenn; Flick, Matthew J.; Lawrence, Daniel A.; Castellino, Francis J.; Weigert, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Extravascular fibrin deposition accompanies many human diseases and causes chronic inflammation and organ damage, unless removed in a timely manner. Here, we used intravital microscopy to investigate how fibrin is removed from extravascular space. Fibrin placed into the dermis of mice underwent cellular endocytosis and lysosomal targeting, revealing a novel intracellular pathway for extravascular fibrin degradation. A C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2)-positive macrophage subpopulation constituted the majority of fibrin-uptaking cells. Consequently, cellular fibrin uptake was diminished by elimination of CCR2-expressing cells. The CCR2-positive macrophage subtype was different from collagen-internalizing M2-like macrophages. Cellular fibrin uptake was strictly dependent on plasminogen and plasminogen activator. Surprisingly, however, fibrin endocytosis was unimpeded by the absence of the fibrin(ogen) receptors, αMβ2 and ICAM-1, the myeloid cell integrin-binding site on fibrin or the endocytic collagen receptor, the mannose receptor. The study identifies a novel fibrin endocytic pathway engaged in extravascular fibrin clearance and shows that interstitial fibrin and collagen are cleared by different subsets of macrophages employing distinct molecular pathways. PMID:26647393

  10. A CCR2 macrophage endocytic pathway mediates extravascular fibrin clearance in vivo.

    PubMed

    Motley, Michael P; Madsen, Daniel H; Jürgensen, Henrik J; Spencer, David E; Szabo, Roman; Holmbeck, Kenn; Flick, Matthew J; Lawrence, Daniel A; Castellino, Francis J; Weigert, Roberto; Bugge, Thomas H

    2016-03-01

    Extravascular fibrin deposition accompanies many human diseases and causes chronic inflammation and organ damage, unless removed in a timely manner. Here, we used intravital microscopy to investigate how fibrin is removed from extravascular space. Fibrin placed into the dermis of mice underwent cellular endocytosis and lysosomal targeting, revealing a novel intracellular pathway for extravascular fibrin degradation. A C-C chemokine receptor type 2 (CCR2)-positive macrophage subpopulation constituted the majority of fibrin-uptaking cells. Consequently, cellular fibrin uptake was diminished by elimination of CCR2-expressing cells. The CCR2-positive macrophage subtype was different from collagen-internalizing M2-like macrophages. Cellular fibrin uptake was strictly dependent on plasminogen and plasminogen activator. Surprisingly, however, fibrin endocytosis was unimpeded by the absence of the fibrin(ogen) receptors, αMβ2 and ICAM-1, the myeloid cell integrin-binding site on fibrin or the endocytic collagen receptor, the mannose receptor. The study identifies a novel fibrin endocytic pathway engaged in extravascular fibrin clearance and shows that interstitial fibrin and collagen are cleared by different subsets of macrophages employing distinct molecular pathways. PMID:26647393

  11. Nano-thrombelastography of fibrin during blood plasma clotting.

    PubMed

    Feller, Tímea; Kellermayer, Miklós S Z; Kiss, Balázs

    2014-06-01

    Hemostasis is a complex process that relies on the sensitive balance between the formation and breakdown of the thrombus, a three-dimensional polymer network of the fibrous protein fibrin. Neither the details of the fibrinogen-fibrin transition, nor the exact mechanisms of fibrin degradation are fully understood at the molecular level. In the present work we investigated the nanoscale-changes in the viscoelasticity of the 3D-fibrin network during fibrinogenesis and streptokinase (STK)-induced fibrinolysis by using a novel application of force spectroscopy, named nano-thrombelastography. In this method the changes in the bending of an oscillating atomic-force-microscope (AFM) cantilever in human blood-plasma droplet were followed as a function of time. Whereas the global features of the time-dependent change in cantilever deflection corresponded well to a macroscopic thrombelastogram, the underlying force spectra revealed large, sample-dependent oscillations in the range of 3-50nN and allowed the separation of elastic and viscous components of fibrin behavior. Upon STK treatment the nano-thrombelastogram signal decayed gradually. The decay was driven by a decrease in thrombus elasticity, whereas thrombus viscosity decayed with a time delay. In scanning AFM images mature fibrin appeared as 17-nm-high and 12-196-nm-wide filaments. STK-treatment resulted in the decrease of filament height and the appearance of a surface roughness with 23.7nm discrete steps that corresponds well to the length of a fibrinogen monomer. Thus, the initial decay of thrombus elasticity during fibrinolysis may be caused by the axial rupture of fibrin fibers. PMID:24736106

  12. Foam-like compression behavior of fibrin networks.

    PubMed

    Kim, Oleg V; Liang, Xiaojun; Litvinov, Rustem I; Weisel, John W; Alber, Mark S; Purohit, Prashant K

    2016-02-01

    The rheological properties of fibrin networks have been of long-standing interest. As such there is a wealth of studies of their shear and tensile responses, but their compressive behavior remains unexplored. Here, by characterization of the network structure with synchronous measurement of the fibrin storage and loss moduli at increasing degrees of compression, we show that the compressive behavior of fibrin networks is similar to that of cellular solids. A nonlinear stress-strain response of fibrin consists of three regimes: (1) an initial linear regime, in which most fibers are straight, (2) a plateau regime, in which more and more fibers buckle and collapse, and (3) a markedly nonlinear regime, in which network densification occurs by bending of buckled fibers and inter-fiber contacts. Importantly, the spatially non-uniform network deformation included formation of a moving "compression front" along the axis of strain, which segregated the fibrin network into compartments with different fiber densities and structure. The Young's modulus of the linear phase depends quadratically on the fibrin volume fraction while that in the densified phase depends cubically on it. The viscoelastic plateau regime corresponds to a mixture of these two phases in which the fractions of the two phases change during compression. We model this regime using a continuum theory of phase transitions and analytically predict the storage and loss moduli which are in good agreement with the experimental data. Our work shows that fibrin networks are a member of a broad class of natural cellular materials which includes cancellous bone, wood and cork. PMID:25982442

  13. Sepsis after autologous fat grafting.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Simon G; Parrett, Brian M; Yaremchuk, Michael J

    2010-10-01

    Autologous fat grafting is an increasingly popular technique, with numerous examples of excellent results. Adherence to key principles, including sterile technique and low-volume injection throughout layers of tissue, appears to be critical to obtaining good results. Reports of adverse outcomes are infrequent, but several case reports document both infectious and aesthetic complications. This case report represents an extreme complication, including abscess formation, life-threatening sepsis, and residual deformity. It serves as yet another reminder that early adoption of surgical procedures by those without a sound understanding of the underlying principles and techniques can have disastrous consequences. Furthermore, physicians operating on any patient must understand the potential for complications and be able to manage these appropriately when they occur. PMID:20885205

  14. Fibrin(ogen)olytic activity of bumblebee venom serine protease

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu Yuling; Choo, Young Moo; Yoon, Hyung Joo; Jia Jingming; Cui Zheng; Wang Dong; Kim, Doh Hoon; Sohn, Hung Dae; Jin, Byung Rae

    2011-09-01

    Bee venom is a rich source of pharmacologically active components; it has been used as an immunotherapy to treat bee venom hypersensitivity, and venom therapy has been applied as an alternative medicine. Here, we present evidence that the serine protease found in bumblebee venom exhibits fibrin(ogen)olytic activity. Compared to honeybee venom, bumblebee venom contains a higher content of serine protease, which is one of its major components. Venom serine proteases from bumblebees did not cross-react with antibodies against the honeybee venom serine protease. We provide functional evidence indicating that bumblebee (Bombus terrestris) venom serine protease (Bt-VSP) acts as a fibrin(ogen)olytic enzyme. Bt-VSP activates prothrombin and directly degrades fibrinogen into fibrin degradation products. However, Bt-VSP is not a plasminogen activator, and its fibrinolytic activity is less than that of plasmin. Taken together, our results define roles for Bt-VSP as a prothrombin activator, a thrombin-like protease, and a plasmin-like protease. These findings offer significant insight into the allergic reaction sequence that is initiated by bee venom serine protease and its potential usefulness as a clinical agent in the field of hemostasis and thrombosis. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: > Bumblebee venom serine protease (Bt-VSP) is a fibrin(ogen)olytic enzyme. > Bt-VSP activates prothrombin. > Bt-VSP directly degrades fibrinogen into fibrin degradation products. > Bt-VSP is a hemostatically active protein that is a potent clinical agent.

  15. Phase-separated chitosan–fibrin microbeads for cell delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhewei; Wang, Limin; Stegemann, Jan P.

    2011-01-01

    Matrix-enhanced delivery of cells is a promising approach to improving current cell therapies. Our objective was to create cell-laden composite microbeads that combine the attractive features of the natural polymers chitosan and fibrin. Liquid polydimethylsiloxane was used to emulsify a chitosan–fibrinogen solution containing suspended human fibroblast cells, followed by initiation of thrombin-mediated polymerization of fibrin and thermal/pH-mediated gelation of chitosan. Chitosan/fibrin weight percent (wt%) ratios of 100/0, 75/25, 50/50 and 25/75 were investigated. Microbead diameters ranged from 275 ± 99 μm to 38 ± 10 μm using impeller speeds from 600 to 1400 rpm. Fibroblasts remained viable on day 1 post-fabrication in all matrices, but cell viability was markedly higher in high-fibrin microbeads by day 8 post-fabrication. Cell spreading and interaction with the extracellular matrix was also markedly increased in high-fibrin matrices. Such composite microbeads containing viable entrapped cells have potential for minimally invasive delivery of cells for a variety of tissue repair applications. PMID:21736519

  16. Fibrin network pattern changes of platelet-rich fibrin in young versus old age group of individuals: A cell block cytology study

    PubMed Central

    Yajamanya, Shravanthi Raghav; Chatterjee, Anirban; Babu, Chaitanya Nischay; Karunanithi, Deepika

    2016-01-01

    Background: To evaluate variations in fibrin network patterns of the platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) in different age groups. Materials and Methods: Ninety-five patients were divided into three age groups: Group 1: (20–39 years); Group 2: (40–59 years); and Group 3: (60 years and above). PRF was prepared from blood samples of all patients and were subjected to cell block cytology method of histological analysis and slides were prepared to histologically assess the age-related changes in (i) fibrin network patterns in terms of density and (ii) entrapment of platelets and white blood cells (WBCs) within fibrin meshwork. Results: Two types of fibrin network pattern arrangements noticed: Dense and loose types in three age groups. However, there was a noticeable decrease in the dense type of fibrin network with progressing age and increase in the loose type of fibrin arrangement. Furthermore, variation in a number of platelets and WBCs entrapped within fibrin network in relation to age was noticed. Conclusion: From the current study it can be concluded that age can be considered as one of the influencing factors on quality of PRF in terms of fibrin network patterns and hence, platelet and WBCs entrapment within these fibrin networks. PMID:27143826

  17. Verification system for postoperative autologous blood retransfusion.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Takeki; Kimura, Eizen; Kobayashi, Shinji; Ishihara, Ken

    2013-01-01

    Medical staff members should match blood products with patients using a barcode authentication system for blood transfusion to prevent medical accidents. However, our hospital only verifies the blood products of the Japanese Red Cross Society and the preserved autologous blood, not the autologous blood salvaged during the operation or from the oxygenator. In this study, we developed the barcode medication administration system and mobile device for verification. This system will prevent blood transfusion errors in the ward setting. PMID:23920751

  18. The Forward Calorimeter of the GlueX Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, Daniel; GlueX Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    The Forward Calorimeter (FCAL) of the GlueX experiment is a lead glass electromagnetic calorimeter currently being built in Hall D of Jefferson Lab. The GlueX experiment is a photoproduction experiment that will utilize coherent bremsstrahlung radiation to map out the light meson spectrum, including a search for hybrid mesons with exotic quantum numbers (JPC). The FCAL will detect photons between 1° and 10 .8° downstream from the target. The calorimeter is built out of 2800 elements, each of which consists of a lead glass block, an FEU 84-3 PMT, and a custom Cockcroft-Walton electronic base. In the Fall of 2011, a 25 element prototype detector was installed in Hall B of Jefferson Lab to measure the energy and timing resolution of the calorimeter using electrons between 100 and 250 MeV. The design and construction of FCAL and the results from the prototype test will be discussed.

  19. [Nerve anastomoses. Sutures or fibrinogenic glue? Preliminary results].

    PubMed

    Boedts, D; Bouckaert, J I

    1984-01-01

    A comparative animal experiment was set up between two nerve anastomosis techniques, one by sealing nerve ends with a fibrinogen-thrombine glue and the other by classical perineural suturing. It was concluded that glueing nerve ends, from the surgical-technical point of view is a better method than suturing. It is an easy, time-sparing method which allows excellent coaptation of the severed nerves with minimal iatrogenic trauma. On the long run however some questions remain. There is the problem of induced fibrosis by using high doses of aprotinine and factor XIII at the site of the nerve junctions and on the other hand the influence of fibrinolysis in traumatized tissues, with early decrease of tensile strength at the junctions before nerve healing. So glued nerve ends should be completely free of tension, protected against secondary shearing forces, and also immobilization of the region is required. PMID:6385609

  20. Glue, steam and Clarivein--Best practice techniques and evidence.

    PubMed

    Whiteley, Mark S

    2015-11-01

    In July 2013, the National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) recommended "endothermal" ablation (meaning endovenous thermal ablation) is the first line treatment for truncal venous reflux in varicose veins. The initial endovenous thermoablation devices were radiofrequency ablation and endovenous laser ablation. More recently, Glue (cyanoacrylate), endovenous steam and Clarivein (mechanochemical ablation or MOCA) have entered the market as new endovenous techniques for the treatment of varicose veins. Glue and Clarivein do not require tumescent anaesthesia and do not use heat and therefore termed non-tumescent non-thermal (NTNT). Steam both requires tumescence and is also a thermal technique (TT). This article reviews the current position of these 3 new technologies in the treatment of varicose veins. PMID:26556699

  1. Fibrin self-assembly is adapted to oxidation.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Mark A; Bychkova, Anna V; Shchegolikhin, Alexander N; Leonova, Vera B; Kostanova, Elizaveta A; Biryukova, Marina I; Sultimova, Natalia B; Konstantinova, Marina L

    2016-06-01

    Fibrinogen is extremely susceptible to attack by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Having been suffered an oxidative modification, the fibrinogen molecules, now with altered spatial structure and function of fibrin network, affect hemostasis differently. However, the potential effects of the oxidative stress on the early stages of the fibrin self-assembly process remain unexplored. To clarify the damaging influence of ROS on the knob 'A': hole 'a' and the D:D interactions, the both are operating on the early stages of the fibrin polymerization, we have used a novel approach based on exploration of FXIIIa-mediated self-assembly of the cross-linked fibrin oligomers dissolved in the moderately concentrated urea solutions. The oligomers were composed of monomeric desA fibrin molecules created by cleaving the fibrinopeptides A off the fibrinogen molecules with a thrombin-like enzyme, reptilase. According to the UV-absorbance and fluorescence measurements data, the employed low ozone/fibrinogen ratios have induced only a slight fibrinogen oxidative modification that was accompanied by modest chemical transformations of the aromatic amino acid residues of the protein. Else, a slight consumption of the accessible tyrosine residues has been observed due to intermolecular dityrosine cross-links formation. The set of experimental data gathered with the aid of electrophoresis, elastic light scattering and analytical centrifugation has clearly witnessed that the oxidation can serve as an effective promoter for the observed enhanced self-assembly of the covalently cross-linked oligomers. At urea concentration of 1.20M, the pristine and oxidized fibrin oligomers were found to comprise a heterogeneous set of the double-stranded protofibrils that are cross-linked only by γ-γ dimers and the fibers consisting on average of four strands that are additionally linked by α polymers. The amounts of the oxidized protofibrils and the fibers accumulated in the system were higher than those

  2. [Adjusting gingival tissues morphology after dental implantation with fibrin use].

    PubMed

    Maĭborodin, I V; Kolesnikov, I S; Sheplev, B V; Ragimova, T M; Kovyntsev, A N; Kovyntsev, D N; Shevela, A I

    2009-01-01

    In gingival tissues of 62 patients after dental implantation of traditional type and with the use of thrombocyte rich fibrin preparation (TRFP) microcirculation and leucocytal infiltration were studied. It was disclosed that in all terms after titanium screw dental implant setting lymphostasis and leucocytal infiltration were seen as signs of active inflammatory process in gingival tissues. 3 months later after implants setting with the use of TRFP the lymphatic vessels status was normalized, the degree of leucocytal infiltration was reduced; when implantation was made without use of fibrin technologies in gingival tissues more leucocytes were found and lymphatic bed components were remained dilated. Besides fibrin preparation use in the process of dental implantation promoted quicker and stronger implant fixation, but granulomatous inflammatory process could develop and amount of eosinophils in gingival tissues could also increased. PMID:19365340

  3. Arthroscopic repair of acetabular chondral delamination with fibrin adhesive.

    PubMed

    Tzaveas, Alexandros P; Villar, Richard N

    2010-01-01

    Acetabular chondral delamination is a frequent finding at hip arthroscopy. The cartilage is macroscopically normal but disrupted from the subchondral bone. Excision of chondral flaps is the usual procedure for this type of lesion. However, we report 19 consecutive patients in whom the delaminated chondral flap was re-attached to the underlying subchondral bone with fibrin adhesive. We used the modified Harris hip score for assessment of pain and function. Improvement in pain and function was found to be statistically significant six months and one year after surgery. No local or general complications were noted. Three patients underwent further surgery for unrelated reasons. In each, the area of fibrin repair appeared intact and secure. Our results suggest that fibrin is a safe agent to use for acetabular chondral delamination. PMID:20235074

  4. Search for Gluonic Excitations in Hadrons with GlueX

    SciTech Connect

    Igor Senderovich

    2011-12-01

    The GlueX experiment will employ a linearly polarized 9 GeV tagged photon beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target to search for exotic states in the light meson spectrum. Optimized for this purpose, the detector has a highly uniform acceptance over nearly 4p solid angle, with high efficiency for both neutral and charged final state particles. An overview of the physics motivation and detector design will be given.

  5. Superselective Embolization in Posttraumatic Priapism with Glubran 2 Acrylic Glue

    SciTech Connect

    Gandini, Roberto; Spinelli, Alessio; Konda, Daniel Reale, Carlo Andrea; Fabiano, Sebastiano; Pipitone, Vincenzo; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2004-09-15

    Two patients with posttraumatic priapism underwent transcatheter embolization using microcoils, resulting in temporary penile detumescence and an apparent resolution of the artero-venous fistula. In both cases, priapism recurred 24 hours after the procedure and was successfully treated through selective transcatheter embolization of the nidus using acrylic glue (Glubran 2). The patients showed complete recovery of sexual activity within 30 days from the procedure and persistent exclusion of the artero-venous fistula after a 12-month follow-up.

  6. [Autologous transfusion in obstetrics and fetal safety].

    PubMed

    Rech, F; Patella, A; Cecchi, A; Ippolito, M; Indraccolo, S R

    1994-06-01

    It is common knowledge that for modern medicine transfusion therapy represents a precious resource and an often mandatory option. It is equally known that autohemotransfusion (or autologous transfusion) provides further advantages: certainty of blood availability when necessary, absence of transfusion reactions, elimination of the risk of infections that is still associated with the traditional homologous transfusions. In its most widespread application, autotransfusion provides for the donation of one or more units of autologous blood, mostly before elective surgery. Even in obstetrics the practice of autologous blood donation with the aim of autotransfusion is finding increasing employment. However, there are still controversial aspects and the need is pointed out for more authoritative verifications as refers to the alleged innocuity to the fetus of acute maternal blood loss. The present study was performed to contribute personal experience to a better definition of the possible interactions between autologous blood donation during pregnancy and unborn child welfare. To this end, 80 term pregnant women underwent fetal heart rate electronic monitoring before, during and after the donation of one unit of autologous blood. Both during and after the phlebotomy there were no cardiotocographic signs of fetal hypo-oxygenation. Even the non stress tests performed at a distance of 24 hours and those that were periodically repeated afterwards were normal, confirming the safety of autologous predonation during pregnancy. However, the authors think that in obstetrics it is still premature to consider the experimental phase of autotransfusion as definitively exhausted. PMID:7936387

  7. Fibrin activates GPVI in human and mouse platelets.

    PubMed

    Alshehri, Osama M; Hughes, Craig E; Montague, Samantha; Watson, Stephanie K; Frampton, Jon; Bender, Markus; Watson, Steve P

    2015-09-24

    The glycoprotein VI (GPVI)-Fc receptor γ (FcRγ) chain is the major platelet signaling receptor for collagen. Paradoxically, in a FeCl3 injury model, occlusion, but not initiation of thrombus formation, is delayed in GPVI-deficient and GPVI-depleted mice. In this study, we demonstrate that GPVI is a receptor for fibrin and speculate that this contributes to development of an occlusive thrombus. We observed a marked increase in tyrosine phosphorylation, including the FcRγ chain and Syk, in human and mouse platelets induced by thrombin in the presence of fibrinogen and the αIIbβ3 blocker eptifibatide. This was not seen in platelets stimulated by a protease activated receptor (PAR)-4 peptide, which is unable to generate fibrin from fibrinogen. The pattern of tyrosine phosphorylation was similar to that induced by activation of GPVI. Consistent with this, thrombin did not induce tyrosine phosphorylation of Syk and the FcRγ chain in GPVI-deficient mouse platelets. Mouse platelets underwent full spreading on fibrin but not fibrinogen, which was blocked in the presence of a Src kinase inhibitor or in the absence of GPVI. Spreading on fibrin was associated with phosphatidylserine exposure (procoagulant activity), and this too was blocked in GPVI-deficient platelets. The ectodomain of GPVI was shown to bind to immobilized monomeric and polymerized fibrin. A marked increase in embolization was seen following FeCl3 injury in GPVI-deficient mice, likely contributing to the delay in occlusion in this model. These results demonstrate that GPVI is a receptor for fibrin and provide evidence that this interaction contributes to thrombus growth and stability. PMID:26282541

  8. Fibrin activates GPVI in human and mouse platelets

    PubMed Central

    Alshehri, Osama M.; Montague, Samantha; Watson, Stephanie K.; Frampton, Jon; Bender, Markus; Watson, Steve P.

    2015-01-01

    The glycoprotein VI (GPVI)-Fc receptor γ (FcRγ) chain is the major platelet signaling receptor for collagen. Paradoxically, in a FeCl3 injury model, occlusion, but not initiation of thrombus formation, is delayed in GPVI-deficient and GPVI-depleted mice. In this study, we demonstrate that GPVI is a receptor for fibrin and speculate that this contributes to development of an occlusive thrombus. We observed a marked increase in tyrosine phosphorylation, including the FcRγ chain and Syk, in human and mouse platelets induced by thrombin in the presence of fibrinogen and the αIIbβ3 blocker eptifibatide. This was not seen in platelets stimulated by a protease activated receptor (PAR)-4 peptide, which is unable to generate fibrin from fibrinogen. The pattern of tyrosine phosphorylation was similar to that induced by activation of GPVI. Consistent with this, thrombin did not induce tyrosine phosphorylation of Syk and the FcRγ chain in GPVI-deficient mouse platelets. Mouse platelets underwent full spreading on fibrin but not fibrinogen, which was blocked in the presence of a Src kinase inhibitor or in the absence of GPVI. Spreading on fibrin was associated with phosphatidylserine exposure (procoagulant activity), and this too was blocked in GPVI-deficient platelets. The ectodomain of GPVI was shown to bind to immobilized monomeric and polymerized fibrin. A marked increase in embolization was seen following FeCl3 injury in GPVI-deficient mice, likely contributing to the delay in occlusion in this model. These results demonstrate that GPVI is a receptor for fibrin and provide evidence that this interaction contributes to thrombus growth and stability. PMID:26282541

  9. Profile of solvent abusers (glue sniffers) in East Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Zabedah, M Y; Razak, M; Zakiah, I; Zuraidah, A B

    2001-12-01

    Solvent abuse is deliberate sniffing of an organic solvent for the intention of altering the physiological state of the individual. It is also commonly known as glue sniffing because glue is the most commonly abused substance. This form of substance abuse is widespread throughout the world and usually popular among secondary school children and young adults because of its easy availability and it is cheaper compared with most drugs of abuse. In Malaysia this problem has been recognized especially among the children in East Malaysia. In this study, 37 children and young adults from or around Kota Kinabalu, Sabah were referred to Bukit Padang Psychiatric Hospital by the Anti-drug Task force for suspected solvent abuse. These children were interviewed using questionaire and examined physically. Blood and urine were analysed for toluene and hippuric acid. 27 of the children, age ranging between 8 and 20 years, willingly admitted to sniffing glue for a period between a few months to 2 years. Most of them were children of Fillipino illegal immigrants in Kota Kinabalu. Biochemical parameters were found to be normal. Two of them were pale with low hemoglobin and 7 had eosinophilia. Haematuria and proteinuria were found in 21 children (78%). 16 blood samples with toluene levels ranging from 0.3 to 41 microg/ml and 10 urine samples have elevated urinary hippuric acid levels ranging from 1.2 to 7.4 mg/ml. Strong positive correlation was noted between mean blood toluene levels and duration of abuse. PMID:12166590

  10. Charged Particle Tracking for the GlueX Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Simon; GlueX Collaboration

    2011-04-01

    The GlueX experiment is a new experiment under construction at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility designed to study gluonic degrees of freedom via the production of ``hybrid'' mesons with exotic quantum numbers. At full luminosity, the trigger rate is expected to be on the order of 150 kHz and the data rate to tape is expected to be on the order of 300 MB/s. In order to reduce the reconstruction time, the current GlueX analysis framework is multi-threaded such that multiple events can be analyzed in parallel on multi-core machines. The tracking code presents the largest bottleneck in the event reconstruction. By taking advantage of Single-Instruction, Multiple-Data (SIMD) instructions in the three-vector and matrix operations needed in the tracking code, the reconstruction can be sped up considerably. The current status of the tracking reconstruction for GlueX will be presented. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy contract DE-AC05-06OR23177, under which Jefferson Science Associates, LLC operates Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility.

  11. Enhanced Neurite Growth from Mammalian Neurons in Three-Dimensional Salmon Fibrin Gels

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Yo-El; Janmey, Paul A.; McCormick, Margaret; Sawyer, Evelyn S.; Flanagan, Lisa A.

    2007-01-01

    Three-dimensional fibrin matrices have been used as cellular substrates in vitro and as bridging materials for central nervous system repair. Cells can be embedded within fibrin gels since the polymerization process is non-toxic, making fibrin an attractive scaffold for transplanted cells. Most studies have utilized fibrin prepared from human or bovine blood proteins. However, fish fibrin may be well suited for neuronal growth since fish undergo remarkable central nervous system regeneration and molecules implicated in this process are present in fibrin. We assessed the growth of mammalian central nervous system neurons in bovine, human, and salmon fibrin and found that salmon fibrin gels encouraged the greatest degree of neurite (dendrite and axon) growth and were the most resistant to degradation by cellular proteases. The neurite growth-promoting effect was not due to the thrombin used to polymerize the gels or to any copurifying plasminogen. Co-purified fibronectin partially accounted for the effect on neurites, and blockade of fibrinogen/fibrin-binding integrins markedly decreased neurite growth. Anion exchange chromatography revealed different elution profiles for salmon and mammalian fibrinogens. These data demonstrate that salmon fibrin encourages the growth of neurites from mammalian neurons and suggest that salmon fibrin may be a beneficial scaffold for neuronal regrowth after CNS injury. PMID:17258313

  12. Structural basis for the nonlinear mechanics of fibrin networks under compression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Oleg V; Litvinov, Rustem I; Weisel, John W; Alber, Mark S

    2014-08-01

    Fibrin is a protein polymer that forms a 3D filamentous network, a major structural component of protective physiological blood clots as well as life threatening pathological thrombi. It plays an important role in wound healing, tissue regeneration and is widely employed in surgery as a sealant and in tissue engineering as a scaffold. The goal of this study was to establish correlations between structural changes and mechanical responses of fibrin networks exposed to compressive loads. Rheological measurements revealed nonlinear changes of fibrin network viscoelastic properties under dynamic compression, resulting in network softening followed by its dramatic hardening. Repeated compression/decompression enhanced fibrin clot stiffening. Combining fibrin network rheology with simultaneous confocal microscopy provided direct evidence of structural modulations underlying nonlinear viscoelasticity of compressed fibrin networks. Fibrin clot softening in response to compression strongly correlated with fiber buckling and bending, while hardening was associated with fibrin network densification. Our results suggest a complex interplay of entropic and enthalpic mechanisms accompanying structural changes and accounting for the nonlinear mechanical response in fibrin networks undergoing compressive deformations. These findings provide new insight into the fibrin clot structural mechanics and can be useful for designing fibrin-based biomaterials with modulated viscoelastic properties. PMID:24840618

  13. Structural basis for the nonlinear mechanics of fibrin networks under compression

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Oleg V.; Litvinov, Rustem I.; Weisel, John W.; Alber, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    Fibrin is a protein polymer that forms a 3D filamentous network, a major structural component of protective physiological blood clots as well as life threatening pathological thrombi. It plays an important role in wound healing, tissue regeneration and is widely employed in surgery as a sealant and in tissue engineering as a scaffold. The goal of this study was to establish correlations between structural changes and mechanical responses of fibrin networks exposed to compressive loads. Rheological measurements revealed nonlinear changes of fibrin network viscoelastic properties under dynamic compression, resulting in network softening followed by its dramatic hardening. Repeated compression/decompression enhanced fibrin clot stiffening. Combining fibrin network rheology with simultaneous confocal microscopy provided direct evidence of structural modulations underlying nonlinear viscoelasticity of compressed fibrin networks. Fibrin clot softening in response to compression strongly correlated with fiber buckling and bending, while hardening was associated with fibrin network densification. Our results suggest a complex interplay of entropic and enthalpic mechanisms accompanying structural changes and accounting for the nonlinear mechanical response in fibrin networks undergoing compressive deformations. These findings provide new insight into the fibrin clot structural mechanics and can be useful for designing fibrin-based biomaterials with modulated viscoelastic properties. PMID:24840618

  14. Comparative evaluation of the biological properties of fibrin for bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Joung-Hwan; Kim, Hye-Jin; Kim, Tae-Il; Woo, Kyung Mi

    2014-01-01

    Fibrin is a natural provisional matrix found in wound healing, while type I collagen is a major organic component of bone matrix. Despite the frequent use of fibrin and type I collagen in bone regenerative approaches, their comparative efficacies have not yet been evaluated. In the present study, we compared the effects of fibrin and collagen on the proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts and protein adsorption. Compared to collagen, fibrin adsorbed approximately 6.7 times more serum fibronectin. Moreover, fibrin allowed the proliferation of larger MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts, especially at a low cell density. Fibrin promoted osteoblast differentiation at higher levels than collagen, as confirmed by Runx2 expression and transcriptional activity, alkaline phosphatase activity, and calcium deposition. The results of the present study suggest that fibrin is superior to collagen in the support of bone regeneration. [BMB Reports 2014; 47(2): 110-114] PMID:24257120

  15. Potential of nanocrystalline cellulose-fibrin nanocomposites for artificial vascular graft applications.

    PubMed

    Brown, Elvie E; Hu, Dehong; Abu Lail, Nehal; Zhang, Xiao

    2013-04-01

    The potential of synthesizing new nanocomposites from nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) and fibrin for small-diameter replacement vascular graft (SDRVG) application was demonstrated. Periodate oxidation of NCC can augment reactive carbonyl groups on NCC and facilitate its cross-linking with fibrin. NCC-fibrin nanocomposites were synthesized, composed of homogeneously dispersed oxidized NCC (ONCC) in a fibrin matrix, with fibrin providing elasticity and ONCC providing strength. The maximum strength and elongation of the nanocomposites were determined by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) and compared with a native blood vessel. The manipulation of degree of oxidation of NCC and the NCC-to-fibrin ratio resulted in the variation of strength and elongation of the nanocomposites, indicating that the nanocomposites can be tailored to conform to the diverse mechanical properties of native blood vessels. A mechanistic understanding of the molecular interactions of ONCC and fibrin was illustrated. This study established fundamental information to utilizing NCC for SDRVG applications. PMID:23421631

  16. Cutaneous collagenous vasculopathy associated with intravascular occlusive fibrin thrombi.

    PubMed

    Salama, Samih; Chorneyko, Kathy; Belovic, Brian

    2014-04-01

    Cutaneous collagenous vasculopathy (CCV) is a rare cutaneous microangiopathy that clinically resembles generalized essential telangiectasia with only 12 cases reported to date. The perivascular fibrosis is thought to be due to production of abnormal collagen by veil cells in the outer vessel walls as a result of unknown factors. This report is of an 84-year-old male with progressive telangiectasia. Biopsies showed characteristic features of CCV. In addition, there were multiple intravascular fibrin thrombi, some organizing and associated with endothelial cell hyperplasia with recanalization reminiscent of glomeruloid bodies and simulating reactive angioendotheliomatosis (RAE). Histochemically and ultrastructurally fibrin was noted within the vessel walls integrating into the fibrous tissue around the vessels; however, the patient had no evidence of coagulation disorder, cryoglobulinemia or cold agglutinemia. Immunofluorescence showed fibrinogen within the vessel walls but no immunoglobulins or C3. As well, there were minimal inflammatory cells. This suggests pauci-inflammatory injury to the endothelial cells by unknown angiogenic factors causing local intravascular fibrin thrombi with fibrin leaking and incorporating into the vessel walls, eventually leading to reparative perivascular fibrosis. This case suggests that some cases of CCV are related to a primary local intravascular occlusive thrombotic microangiopathy. However, the primary triggering factor causing the endothelial cell damage has yet to be elucidated. PMID:24350781

  17. Fibrin polymerization as a phase transition wave: A mathematical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, A. I.

    2016-06-01

    A mathematical model of fibrin polymerization is described. The problem of the propagation of phase transition wave is reduced to a nonlinear Stefan problem. A one-dimensional discontinuity fitting difference scheme is described, and the results of one-dimensional computations are presented.

  18. Fiber optic immunosensor for cross-linked fibrin concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moskowitz, Samuel E.

    2000-08-01

    Working with calcium ions in the blood, platelets produce thromboplastin which transforms prothrombin into thrombin. Removing peptides, thrombin changes fibrinogen into fibrin. Cross-linked insoluble fibrin polymers are solubilized by enzyme plasmin found in blood plasma. Resulting D-dimers are elevated in patients with intravascular coagulation, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, myocardial infarction, multiple trauma, cancer, impaired renal and liver functions, and sepsis. Consisting principally of a NIR 780 nm GaAlAs laser diode and a 800 nm avalanche photodiode (APD), the fiber-optic immunosensor can determined D-dimer concentration to levels <0.1 ng/ml. A capture monoclonal antibody to the antigen soluble cross-linked fibrin is employed. Immobilized at the tip of an optical fiber by avidin-biotin, the captured antigen is detected by a second antibody which is labeled with NN 382 fluorescent dye. An evanescent wave traveling on an excitation optical fiber excites the antibody-antigen fluorophore complex. Concentration of cross-linked fibrin is directly proportional to the APD measured intensity of fluorescence. NIR fluorescence has advantages of low background interference, short fluorescence lifetime, and large difference between excitation and emission peaks. Competitive ELISA test for D-dimer concentration requires trained personnel performing a time consuming operation.

  19. Investigating the interaction between acoustically stimulated microbubbles and fibrin clots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acconcia, Christopher; Leung, Ben; Hynynen, Kullervo; Goertz, David

    2012-11-01

    While it is well established that ultrasound stimulated microbubbles can potentiate thrombolysis, the mechanisms of action are poorly understood. The objective of this work was to gain a more fundamental understanding of how acoustically stimulated microbubbles interact with and potentially degrade fibrin clots. Owing to their optical transparency, the use of fibrin clots allowed to optically observe microbubbles interacting with the clot boundary and any resultant disruption of the fluorescently tagged fibrin network. It was found that microbubbles could readily penetrate into fibrin clots with velocities up to 0.2 m/s and to depths related to the number of pulses applied. At lower pressures (0.2-0.55 MPa), microbubbles as small as 3μm were observed to penetrate, whereas higher pressures (>0.9 MPa) caused the penetration of larger microbubbles (10-30μm), formed by coalescence prior to entry. In some cases, patent 'tunnels' remained along the path taken by penetrating microbubbles. Tunnel diameters ranged between 9-35μm depending largely on pressure and pulse duration. Two-photon microscopy indicated either patent tunnels or paths of disrupted fibers consistent with collapsed tunnel. Fluid flow within the clot was observed to accompany penetrating microbubbles, which may have implications for lytic enzyme penetration.

  20. Oriented fibrin gels formed by polymerization in strong magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torbet, J.

    1981-01-01

    Fibrinogen is a soluble plasma protein which, after cleavage by the specific proteolytic enzyme thrombin, polymerizes to form the filamentous fibrin network during blood clotting (see refs 1 and 2 for reviews). Fibrinogen has a molecular weight of 340,000 and is composed of two identical halves, each containing three peptide chains designated Aα, Bβ and γ. Fibrin monomers are produced by thrombin which releases the small negatively charged fibrinopeptides A and B. The overall shape of the fibrinogen molecule has not been unequivocally established1,2. The trinodular, elongated (~450 Å long) structure proposed by Hall and Slayter3 is the most widely accepted model and it has obtained additional support from recent work4-6. Fibrin monomers are also about 450 Å long7 and in fibres they probably have a half-staggered arrangement along the axis7,8. The fibres are an assembly of protofibrils whose structure and packing are not reliably known. We report here that highly oriented fibrin gels are formed when polymerization takes place slowly in a strong magnetic field. It is shown that the protofibrils pack into a three-dimensional crystalline lattice. We introduce magnetically induced birefringence as a potential tool for studying polymerization and briefly speculate on the applications of strong magnetic fields.

  1. Generation of a Fibrin Based Three-Layered Skin Substitute.

    PubMed

    Kober, Johanna; Gugerell, Alfred; Schmid, Melanie; Kamolz, Lars-Peter; Keck, Maike

    2015-01-01

    A variety of skin substitutes that restore epidermal and dermal structures are currently available on the market. However, the main focus in research and clinical application lies on dermal and epidermal substitutes whereas the development of a subcutaneous replacement (hypodermis) is often disregarded. In this study we used fibrin sealant as hydrogel scaffold to generate a three-layered skin substitute. For the hypodermal layer adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) and mature adipocytes were embedded in the fibrin hydrogel and were combined with another fibrin clot with fibroblasts for the construction of the dermal layer. Keratinocytes were added on top of the two-layered construct to form the epidermal layer. The three-layered construct was cultivated for up to 3 weeks. Our results show that ASCs and fibroblasts were viable, proliferated normally, and showed physiological morphology in the skin substitute. ASCs were able to differentiate into mature adipocytes during the course of four weeks and showed morphological resemblance to native adipose tissue. On the surface keratinocytes formed an epithelial-like layer. For the first time we were able to generate a three-layered skin substitute based on a fibrin hydrogel not only serving as a dermal and epidermal substitute but also including the hypodermis. PMID:26236715

  2. Effect of Allogeneic Platelet Lysate and Cyanoacrylate Tissue Glue on the Fibrovascularization of the Porous Polyethylene Implant.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Sinan; Sahin, Cihan; Tas, Arzu Caputcu; Muftuoglu, Tuba; Karagoz, Huseyin

    2016-01-01

    Because of limited autogenous tissue sources, donor site morbidity, and difficulty of shaping the autologous tissue, surgeons often need to use alloplastic frameworks in reconstruction of 3-dimensional tissue defects. Synthetic porous polyethylene (PP) implant is widely used in plastic surgery for 3-dimensional reconstruction of the lost or highly deformed tissues. One of the main factors of PP implant exposure is delayed fibrovascular ingrowth. In the present study, the authors investigated the effect allogeneic plateletlysate (PL) and cyanoacrylate tissue glue (CTG) (2-octyl cyanoacrylate) on the fibrovascularization of the PP implant.Twenty adult female Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups equally, according to the different surgical techniques and implanted materials used. Only PP implant was implanted subcutaneously through a skin incision on the chest wall skin of the rats in the control group; however, CTG was applied with PP implant in the cyanoacrylate group, PL was applied with PP implant in the platelet group, CTG and platelet was applied together with PP implant in the combination group. All of the implants in each group were histologically assessed at postoperative second week. Determination of the collagen density in the tissues, inflammation, and necrosis and vascularization status was assessed semiquantitatively.A denser collagen structure, low inflammation, and necrosis were found in PL groups. There was, however, a significant decrease in vascular density with PL-treated groups. PL treatment may have a potential to reduce complications related to PP implants. PMID:26703066

  3. Postoperative Autologous Reinfusion in Total Knee Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Crescibene, A.; Martire, F.; Gigliotti, P.; Rende, A.; Candela, M.

    2015-01-01

    Surgeries for total knee replacement (TKR) are increasing and in this context there is a need to develop new protocols for management and use of blood transfusion therapy. Autologous blood reduces the need for allogeneic blood transfusion and the aim of the present study was to verify the safety and the clinical efficacy. An observational retrospective study has been conducted on 124 patients, undergoing cemented total knee prosthesis replacement. Observed population was stratified into two groups: the first group received reinfusion of autologous blood collected in the postoperative surgery and the second group did not receive autologous blood reinfusion. Analysis of data shows that patients undergoing autologous blood reinfusion received less homologous blood bags (10.6% versus 30%; p = 0.08) and reduced days of hospitalization (7.88 ± 0.7 days versus 8.96 ± 2.47 days for the control group; p = 0.03). Microbiological tests were negative in all postoperatively salvaged and reinfused units. Our results emphasize the effectiveness of this procedure and have the characteristics of simplicity, low cost (€97.53 versus €103.79; p < 0.01), and easy reproducibility. Use of autologous drainage system postoperatively is a procedure that allows reducing transfusion of homologous blood bags in patients undergoing TKR. PMID:26442168

  4. Increased Plasminogen Activator (Urokinase) in Tissue Culture After Fibrin Deposition

    PubMed Central

    Bernik, Maria B.

    1973-01-01

    Lysis of fibrin in tissue culture has been shown to be due to plasminogen activator identified immunologically as urokinase. The present study examines fibrinolytic events in culture, particularly mechanisms leading to increased urokinase levels and accelerated fibrinolysis. Deposition of fibrin on cells in culture was followed by a two- to six-fold increase in urokinase in the supernates and rapid disappearance of the fibrin. Investigation of factors that might be responsible for these events (including fibrin, fibrinogen, vasoactive stimuli, and the enzymes thrombin and plasmin) indicated that the enhanced urokinase yields were mediated through plasmin and thrombin. Study of the possible modes of action of thrombin and plasmin indicated that these enzymes are capable of acting on the cells themselves as well as on cell-produced material. The effect on cells was manifested by mitotic activity or, occasionally, cell injury and death. Although these effects influenced urokinase levels, enhanced yields were explained best by the action of enzymes on cellproduced material. Studies with plasmin and thrombin, and also trypsin, indicated that proteolytic enzymes may act in various ways—affect the stability of urokinase, interfere with inhibition of urokinase by naturally occurring inhibitor(s), and induce urokinase activity from inactive material. Plasma and thrombin appeared to act primarily through the latter mechanism. Inactive material, which gave rise to urokinase upon exposure to proteolytic enzymes and which may represent urokinase precursor, was found in cultures of kidney, lung, spleen, and thyroid. Urokinase in such inactive state appears to be readily accessible to activation by enzymes, particularly plasmin and thrombin, thus facilitating removal of fibrin and possibly also providing pathways to excessive fibrinolysis. PMID:4266421

  5. First results from the GlueX experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al Ghoul, H.; Anassontzis, E. G.; Barbosa, F.; Barnes, A.; Beattie, T. D.; Bennett, D. W.; Berdnikov, V. V.; Black, T.; Boeglin, W.; Brooks, W. K.; Cannon, B.; Chernyshov, O.; Chudakov, E.; Crede, V.; Dalton, M. M.; Deur, A.; Dobbs, S.; Dolgolenko, A.; Dugger, M.; Egiyan, H.; Eugenio, P.; Foda, A. M.; Frye, J.; Furletov, S.; Gan, L.; Gasparian, A.; Gerasimov, A.; Gevorgyan, N.; Goryachev, V. S.; Guegan, B.; Guo, L.; Hakobyan, H.; Hakobyan, H.; Hardin, J.; Huber, G. M.; Ireland, D.; Ito, M. M.; Jarvis, N. S.; Jones, R. T.; Kakoyan, V.; Kamel, M.; Klein, F. J.; Kourkoumeli, C.; Kuleshov, S.; Lara, M.; Larin, I.; Lawrence, D.; Leckey, J.; Levine, W. I.; Livingston, K.; Lolos, G. J.; Mack, D.; Mattione, P. T.; Matveev, V.; McCaughan, M.; McGinley, W.; McIntyre, J.; Mendez, R.; Meyer, C. A.; Miskimen, R.; Mitchell, R. E.; Mokaya, F.; Moriya, K.; Nigmatkulov, G.; Ochoa, N.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Papandreou, Z.; Pedroni, R.; Pennington, M.; Pentchev, L.; Ponosov, A.; Pooser, E.; Pratt, B.; Qiang, Y.; Reinhold, J.; Ritchie, B. G.; Robison, L.; Romanov, D.; Salgado, C.; Schumacher, R. A.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Semenova, I. A.; Senderovich, I.; Seth, K. K.; Shepherd, M. R.; Smith, E. S.; Sober, D. I.; Somov, A.; Somov, S.; Soto, O.; Sparks, N.; Staib, M. J.; Stevens, J. R.; Subedi, A.; Tarasov, V.; Taylor, S.; Tolstukhin, I.; Tomaradze, A.; Toro, A.; Tsaris, A.; Vasileiadis, G.; Vega, I.; Voulgaris, G.; Walford, N. K.; Whitlatch, T.; Williams, M.; Wolin, E.; Xiao, T.; Zarling, J.; Zihlmann, B.

    2016-05-01

    The GlueX experiment at Jefferson Lab ran with its first commissioning beam in late 2014 and the spring of 2015. Data were collected on both plastic and liquid hydrogen targets, and much of the detector has been commissioned. All of the detector systems are now performing at or near design specifications and events are being fully reconstructed, including exclusive production of π0, η and ω mesons. Linearly-polarized photons were successfully produced through coherent bremsstrahlung and polarization transfer to the ρ has been observed.

  6. Polyions act as an electrostatic glue for mesoscopic particle aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordi, F.; Cametti, C.; Sennato, S.

    2005-06-01

    Although complexation of charged particles induced by polyions of opposite charge is a well-known phenomenon, the possibility of obtaining equilibrium clusters stuck together by flexible polyions, which act as an electrostatic glue, is not completely recognized. In this Letter, we call attention towards the behavior of polyions in attaching together charged particles, by means of controlled electrostatic interactions. As an example, we present some features of equilibrium clusters composed of cationic liposomes built up by DOTAP and glued up by an anionic polyion, polyacrylate sodium salt. We discuss briefly some applications in nanostructure science and biotechnology.

  7. Silicon photomultiplier characterization for the GlueX barrel calorimeter

    SciTech Connect

    F. Barbosa, J.E. McKisson, J. McKisson, Y. Qiang, E. Smith, C. Zorn

    2012-12-01

    GlueX is a new detector being constructed at Jefferson Laboratory to study gluonic excitations and confinement via the detection of exotic meson states. The hermetic detector includes a barrel calorimeter where the photodetectors must operate in a high magnetic field exceeding 0.5 T. After extensive tests with a variety of sensors, the chosen photodetector will be a custom silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) array manufactured by Hamamatsu Corporation. This paper will focus on the characterization of the first 80 production samples of these SiPMs, including dark rate, photodetection efficiency (PDE), crosstalk, response uniformity and radiation tolerance.

  8. Spiritual and Religious Supports Part 8: Church G.L.U.E.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Barbara J.

    2009-01-01

    CLC Network is an organization that partners with churches, schools, and families to help promote and build inclusive and interdependent communities for those with disabilities. This article describes CLC Network's most recent tool--a book entitled the G.L.U.E. Training Manual. G.L.U.E. is an adhesive process to allow each individual to be firmly…

  9. Transcatheter glue arterial embolization of a mass in the hind limb of a dog

    PubMed Central

    de La Villeon, Guillaume; Louvet, Arnaud; Behr, Luc; Borenstein, Nicolas

    2011-01-01

    This article reports the use of transarterial glue embolization in the treatment of a soft-tissue mass in the hind limb of a dog that was referred for a > 15-cm diameter soft tissue mass in the caudal thigh. Clinical improvement showed that the percutaneous therapeutic cyanoacrylate glue embolization procedure was technically feasible and useful. PMID:21629422

  10. GLUE!: An Architecture for the Integration of External Tools in Virtual Learning Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alario-Hoyos, Carlos; Bote-Lorenzo, Miguel L.; Gomez-Sanchez, Eduardo; Asensio-Perez, Juan I.; Vega-Gorgojo, Guillermo; Ruiz-Calleja, Adolfo

    2013-01-01

    The integration of external tools in Virtual Learning Environments (VLEs) aims at enriching the learning activities that educational practitioners may design and enact. This paper presents GLUE!, an architecture that enables the lightweight integration of multiple existing external tools in multiple existing VLEs. GLUE! fosters this integration by…

  11. Elastic behavior and platelet retraction in low- and high-density fibrin gels.

    PubMed

    Wufsus, Adam R; Rana, Kuldeepsinh; Brown, Andrea; Dorgan, John R; Liberatore, Matthew W; Neeves, Keith B

    2015-01-01

    Fibrin is a biopolymer that gives thrombi the mechanical strength to withstand the forces imparted on them by blood flow. Importantly, fibrin is highly extensible, but strain hardens at low deformation rates. The density of fibrin in clots, especially arterial clots, is higher than that in gels made at plasma concentrations of fibrinogen (3-10 mg/mL), where most rheology studies have been conducted. Our objective in this study was to measure and characterize the elastic regimes of low (3-10 mg/mL) and high (30-100 mg/mL) density fibrin gels using shear and extensional rheology. Confocal microscopy of the gels shows that fiber density increases with fibrinogen concentration. At low strains, fibrin gels act as thermal networks independent of fibrinogen concentration. Within the low-strain regime, one can predict the mesh size of fibrin gels by the elastic modulus using semiflexible polymer theory. Significantly, this provides a link between gel mechanics and interstitial fluid flow. At moderate strains, we find that low-density fibrin gels act as nonaffine mechanical networks and transition to affine mechanical networks with increasing strains within the moderate regime, whereas high-density fibrin gels only act as affine mechanical networks. At high strains, the backbone of individual fibrin fibers stretches for all fibrin gels. Platelets can retract low-density gels by >80% of their initial volumes, but retraction is attenuated in high-density fibrin gels and with decreasing platelet density. Taken together, these results show that the nature of fibrin deformation is a strong function of fibrin fiber density, which has ramifications for the growth, embolization, and lysis of thrombi. PMID:25564864

  12. Elastic Behavior and Platelet Retraction in Low- and High-Density Fibrin Gels

    PubMed Central

    Wufsus, Adam R.; Rana, Kuldeepsinh; Brown, Andrea; Dorgan, John R.; Liberatore, Matthew W.; Neeves, Keith B.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrin is a biopolymer that gives thrombi the mechanical strength to withstand the forces imparted on them by blood flow. Importantly, fibrin is highly extensible, but strain hardens at low deformation rates. The density of fibrin in clots, especially arterial clots, is higher than that in gels made at plasma concentrations of fibrinogen (3–10 mg/mL), where most rheology studies have been conducted. Our objective in this study was to measure and characterize the elastic regimes of low (3–10 mg/mL) and high (30–100 mg/mL) density fibrin gels using shear and extensional rheology. Confocal microscopy of the gels shows that fiber density increases with fibrinogen concentration. At low strains, fibrin gels act as thermal networks independent of fibrinogen concentration. Within the low-strain regime, one can predict the mesh size of fibrin gels by the elastic modulus using semiflexible polymer theory. Significantly, this provides a link between gel mechanics and interstitial fluid flow. At moderate strains, we find that low-density fibrin gels act as nonaffine mechanical networks and transition to affine mechanical networks with increasing strains within the moderate regime, whereas high-density fibrin gels only act as affine mechanical networks. At high strains, the backbone of individual fibrin fibers stretches for all fibrin gels. Platelets can retract low-density gels by >80% of their initial volumes, but retraction is attenuated in high-density fibrin gels and with decreasing platelet density. Taken together, these results show that the nature of fibrin deformation is a strong function of fibrin fiber density, which has ramifications for the growth, embolization, and lysis of thrombi. PMID:25564864

  13. Spray- and laser-assisted biomaterial processing for fast and efficient autologous cell-plus-matrix tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Klopsch, Christian; Gäbel, Ralf; Kaminski, Alexander; Mark, Peter; Wang, Weiwei; Toelk, Anita; Delyagina, Evgenya; Kleiner, Gabriela; Koch, Lothar; Chichkov, Boris; Mela, Petra; Jockenhoevel, Stefan; Ma, Nan; Steinhoff, Gustav

    2015-12-01

    At present, intensive investigation aims at the creation of optimal valvular prostheses. We introduced and tested the applicability and functionality of two advanced cell-plus-matrix seeding technologies, spray-assisted bioprocessing (SaBP) and laser-assisted bioprocessing (LaBP), for autologous tissue engineering (TE) of bioresorbable artificial grafts. For SaBP, human mesenchymal stem cells (HMSCs), umbilical cord vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and fibrin were simultaneously spray-administered on poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) substrates. For LaBP, HUVECs and HMSCs were separately laser-printed in stripes, followed by fibrin sealing. Three-leaflet valves were manufactured following TE of electrospun PCL tissue equivalents. Grafts were monitored in vitro under static and dynamic conditions in bioreactors. SaBP and LaBP resulted in TE of grafts with homogeneous cell distribution and accurate cell pattern, respectively. The engineered valves demonstrated immediate sufficient performance, complete cell coating, proliferation, engraftment, HUVEC-mediated invasion, HMSC differentiation and extracellular matrix deposition. SaBP revealed higher efficiency, with at least 12-fold shorter processing time than the applied LaBP set-up. LaBP realized coating with higher cell density and minimal cell-scaffold distance. Fibrin and PCL stability remain issues for improvement. The introduced TE technologies resulted in complete valvular cell-plus-matrix coating, excellent engraftment and HMSCs differentiation. SaBP might have potential for intraoperative table-side TE considering the procedural duration and ease of implementation. LaBP might accelerate engraftment with precise patterns. PMID:23208947

  14. The mechanics of fibrin networks and their alterations by platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jawerth, Louise Marie

    Fibrin is a biopolymer that assembles into a network during blood coagulation to become the structural scaffold of a blood clot. The precise mechanics of this network are crucial for a blood clot to properly stem the flow of blood at the site of vascular injury while still remaining pliable enough to avoid dislocation. A hallmark of fibrin's mechanical response is strain-stiffening: at small strains, its response is low and linear; while at high strains, its stiffness increases non-linearly with increasing strain. The physical origins of strain-stiffening have been studied for other biopolymer systems but have remained elusive for biopolymer networks composed of stiff filaments, such as fibrin. To understand the origins of this intriguing behavior, we directly observe and quantify the motion of all of the fibers in the fibrin networks as they undergo shear in 3D using confocal microscopy. We show that the strain-stiffening response of a clot is a result of the full network deformation rather than an intrinsic strain-stiffening response of the individual fibers. We observe a distinct transition from a linear, low-strain regime, where all fibers avoid any internal stretching, to a non-linear, high-strain regime, where an increasing number of fibers become stretched. This transition is characterized by a high degree of non-affine motion. Moreover, we are able to precisely calculate the non-linear stress-strain response of the network by using the strains on each fiber measured directly with confocal microscopy and by assuming the fibers behave like linearly elastic beams. This result confirms that it is the network deformation that causes the strain-stiffening behavior of fibrin clots. These data are consistent with predictions for low-connectivity networks with soft, bending, or floppy modes. Moreover, we show that the addition of small contractile cells, platelets, increases the low-strain stiffness of the network while the high-strain stiffness is independent of

  15. Beam Test Results of the GlueX Forward Calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Kevin; Moriya, Kei; Shepherd, Matthew

    2013-04-01

    GlueX is an experiment to begin running in the near future at Jefferson Lab. Our research group is responsible for the forward calorimeter (FCAL) that is designed to measure the energy of photons produced from the decays of mesons. Recently, we conducted a beam test at Jefferson Lab using a prototype of the FCAL. Its goal was to experimentally verify the energy resolution of the FCAL as a function of beam energy. The prototype was tested with recoil electrons ranging in energy from 113MeV to 277MeV. We obtained the resolution by comparing the reconstructed energy to the known energy. In addition, we corrected our measured resolution for multiple scattering and energy loss based on a GEANT4 simulation of the prototype. Another important goal of the beam test was to measure the timing resolution of the channels on our flash analog to digital converters (fADCs). For GlueX, we need to require the timing resolution to be much less than the bunch spacing (2ns). The results of our studies indicate that the energy resolution of the FCAL is consistent with our predictions. We also found the timing resolution as a function of signal size and the results agreed with a similar study. For signals of about at least 75mV, the timing resolution achieved was significantly lower than 2ns.

  16. Sweet Syndrome After Autologous Stem Cell Transplant.

    PubMed

    Alkan, Ali; İdemen, Celal; Okçu Heper, Aylin; Utkan, Güngör

    2016-02-01

    Sweet syndrome (acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis) is a rare clinical entity characterized by skin lesions, neutrophilia, fever, and neutrophilic infiltration of the dermis. It may be a consequence of malignant disease, comorbidities, or drugs. We present a case of acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis in a patient after autologous stem cell transplant. PMID:25748978

  17. Cord Blood Banking Standards: Autologous Versus Altruistic.

    PubMed

    Armitage, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Cord blood (CB) is either donated to public CB banks for use by any patient worldwide for whom it is a match or stored in a private bank for potential autologous or family use. It is a unique cell product that has potential for treating life-threatening diseases. The majority of CB products used today are for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and are accessed from public banks. CB is still evolving as a hematopoietic stem cell source, developing as a source for cellular immunotherapy products, such as natural killer, dendritic, and T-cells, and fast emerging as a non-hematopoietic stem cell source in the field of regenerative medicine. This review explores the regulations, standards, and accreditation schemes that are currently available nationally and internationally for public and private CB banking. Currently, most of private banking is under regulated as compared to public banking. Regulations and standards were initially developed to address the public arena. Early responses from the medical field regarding private CB banking was that at the present time, because of insufficient scientific data to support autologous banking and given the difficulty of making an accurate estimate of the need for autologous transplantation, private storage of CB as "biological insurance" should be discouraged (1, 2, 3). To ensure success and the true realization of the full potential of CB, whether for autologous or allogeneic use, it is essential that each and every product provided for current and future treatments meets high-quality, international standards. PMID:26779485

  18. Cord Blood Banking Standards: Autologous Versus Altruistic

    PubMed Central

    Armitage, Sue

    2016-01-01

    Cord blood (CB) is either donated to public CB banks for use by any patient worldwide for whom it is a match or stored in a private bank for potential autologous or family use. It is a unique cell product that has potential for treating life-threatening diseases. The majority of CB products used today are for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and are accessed from public banks. CB is still evolving as a hematopoietic stem cell source, developing as a source for cellular immunotherapy products, such as natural killer, dendritic, and T-cells, and fast emerging as a non-hematopoietic stem cell source in the field of regenerative medicine. This review explores the regulations, standards, and accreditation schemes that are currently available nationally and internationally for public and private CB banking. Currently, most of private banking is under regulated as compared to public banking. Regulations and standards were initially developed to address the public arena. Early responses from the medical field regarding private CB banking was that at the present time, because of insufficient scientific data to support autologous banking and given the difficulty of making an accurate estimate of the need for autologous transplantation, private storage of CB as “biological insurance” should be discouraged (1, 2, 3). To ensure success and the true realization of the full potential of CB, whether for autologous or allogeneic use, it is essential that each and every product provided for current and future treatments meets high-quality, international standards. PMID:26779485

  19. Potential of nanocrystalline cellulose-fibrin nanocomposites for artificial vascular graft applications

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Elvie; Hu, Dehong; Abu-Lail, Nehal; Zhang, Xiao

    2013-02-19

    Nanocrystalline cellulose, a new bio-nanomaterial is utilized as a reinforcing material for biocompatible fibrin matrix to form into a nanocomposite for small-diameter replacement vascular graft application (SDRVG). The periodate oxidation of NCC, which provided it with a reactive carbonyl group, allowed molecular interaction between NCC and fibrin. Such interaction resulted into an effective mechanical reinforcement indicated by the improvement of max. force, elongation at break and modulus when oxidized NCC (ONCC) was incorporated into fibrin. The nanocomposite’s mechanical properties can be manipulated to conform to the native blood vessel by varying the ONCC to fibrin ratio and/or by controlling the degree of oxidation of NCC. Using atomic force microscopy had provided fundamental information on the effects of molecular interactions to the nanolevel mechanical properties of NCC/fibrin nanocomposites. This fundamental information established the positive feasibility and commenced continuing investigation for the practical SDRVG application of NCC/fibrin nanocomposite.

  20. Interaction of Fibrin with the VLDL Receptor: Further Characterization and Localization of the Fibrin-Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Yakovlev, Sergiy; Medved, Leonid

    2016-01-01

    Our recent study revealed that fibrin interacts with the VLDL receptor (VLDLR) on endothelial cells through its βN-domains and this interaction promotes transendothelial migration of leukocytes and thereby inflammation. The major aims of the present study were to further characterize this interaction and localize fibrin-binding site in the VLDL receptor. To localize the fibrin-binding site, we expressed a soluble extracellular portion of this receptor, sVLDLRHT, its N- and C-terminal regions, VLDLR(1–8)HT and des(1–8)VLDLRHT, respectively, and a number of VLDLR fragments containing various combinations of CR-domains, and confirmed their proper folding by fluorescence spectroscopy. Interaction of these fragments with the (β15–66)2 fragment corresponding to a pair of VLDLR-binding βN-domains of fibrin was tested by different methods. Our experiments performed by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance revealed that the VLDLR(1–8)HT fragment containing eight CR-domain of VLDLR and its sub-fragments, VLDLR(1–4)HT and VLDLR(2–4)HT, interact with (β15–66)2 with practically the same affinity as sVLDLRHT while the affinity of VLDLR(2–3)HT was about 2-fold lower. In contrast, des(1–8)VLDLRHT exhibited no binding. Complex formation in solution between the fibrin-binding fragments of VLDLR and (β15–66)2 was detected by fluorescence spectroscopy. In addition, formation of a complex between VLDLR(2–4)HT and (β15–66)2 in solution was confirmed by size-exclusion chromatography. Thus, the results obtained indicate that minimal fibrin-binding structures are located within the second and third CR-domains of the VLDL receptor and the presence of the fourth CR-domain is required for the high affinity binding. They also indicate that tryptophan residues of CR-domains are involved in this binding. PMID:26153297

  1. Obstructive fibrinous tracheal pseudomembrane: a rare condition in postextubation stridor.

    PubMed

    Nakwan, Narongwit

    2014-07-01

    Obstructive fibrinous tracheal pseudomembrane (OFTP) is an airway complication that occurs after endotracheal intubation. It originates from superficial mucosal abrasion and desquamation of necrotic tracheal epithelium at the site of cuff pressure. This condition is a rare cause of postextubation stridor. We present a case of postextubation stridor secondary to OFTP, resulting in clinical features of upper airway obstruction > 8 h after extubation. The case features complete obstruction at the tip of the endotracheal tube from OFTP. PMID:24170917

  2. Altered plasma fibrin clot properties in essential thrombocythemia.

    PubMed

    Małecki, Rafał; Gacka, Małgorzata; Kuliszkiewicz-Janus, Małgorzata; Jakobsche-Policht, Urszula; Kwiatkowski, Jacek; Adamiec, Rajmund; Undas, Anetta

    2016-03-01

    Patients with increased thromboembolic risk tend to form denser fibrin clots which are relatively resistant to lysis. We sought to investigate whether essential thrombocythemia (ET) is associated with altered fibrin clot properties in plasma. Ex vivo plasma fibrin clot permeability coefficient (Ks), turbidimetry and clot lysis time (CLT) were measured in 43 consecutive patients with ET (platelet count from 245 to 991 × 10(3)/µL) and 50 control subjects matched for age, sex and comorbidities. Fibrinolysis proteins and inhibitors together with platelet activation markers were determined. Reduced Ks (-38%, p < 0.0001) and prolonged CLT (+34%, p < 0.0001) were observed in ET. The differences remained significant after adjustment for fibrinogen and platelet count. ET was associated with a slightly shorter lag phase (-5%, p = 0.01) and higher maximum absorbency of the turbidimetric curve (+6%, p < 0.001). The ET patients had higher plasma P-selectin by 193% (p < 0.00001) and platelet factor 4 (PF4) by 173% (p < 0.00001), with higher P-selectin observed in 19 (44%) patients with JAK-2 gene V617F mutation. Higher t-PA (+20%, p < 0.001), 23% higher plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, PAI-1 (+23%, p < 0.01) and unaltered thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor, plasminogen and α2-antiplasmin activity were found in the ET group. Ks inversely correlated with fibrinogen, PF4 and C-reactive protein. CLT positively correlated only with PAI-1. Patients with ET display prothrombotic plasma fibrin clot phenotype including impaired fibrinolysis, which represents a new prothrombotic mechanism in this disease. PMID:25989112

  3. Dialysis catheter fibrin sheath stripping: a useful technique after failed catheter exchange.

    PubMed

    Mohamad Ali, Af; Uhwut, E; Liew, Sk

    2012-01-01

    Fibrin sheath formation around long-term haemodialysis catheter is a common cause of failed dialysis access. Treatment options include pharmacological and mechanical methods. This paper reports a case of failed dialysis access due to fibrin sheath encasement. Pharmacologic thrombolysis, mechanical disruption using guide wire and catheter exchange had failed to address the issue. Eventually, fibrin sheath stripping using the loop snare technique was able to successfully restore the catheter function. PMID:22970064

  4. Physical Determinants of Fibrinolysis in Single Fibrin Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Bucay, Igal; O’Brien, E. Tim; Wulfe, Steven D.; Superfine, Richard; Wolberg, Alisa S.; Falvo, Michael R.; Hudson, Nathan E.

    2015-01-01

    Fibrin fibers form the structural backbone of blood clots; fibrinolysis is the process in which plasmin digests fibrin fibers, effectively regulating the size and duration of a clot. To understand blood clot dissolution, the influence of clot structure and fiber properties must be separated from the effects of enzyme kinetics and perfusion rates into clots. Using an inverted optical microscope and fluorescently-labeled fibers suspended between micropatterned ridges, we have directly measured the lysis of individual fibrin fibers. We found that during lysis 64 ± 6% of fibers were transected at one point, but 29 ± 3% of fibers increase in length rather than dissolving or being transected. Thrombin and plasmin dose-response experiments showed that the elongation behavior was independent of plasmin concentration, but was instead dependent on the concentration of thrombin used during fiber polymerization, which correlated inversely with fiber diameter. Thinner fibers were more likely to lyse, while fibers greater than 200 ± 30 nm in diameter were more likely to elongate. Because lysis rates were greatly reduced in elongated fibers, we hypothesize that plasmin activity depends on fiber strain. Using polymer physics- and continuum mechanics-based mathematical models, we show that fibers polymerize in a strained state and that thicker fibers lose their prestrain more rapidly than thinner fibers during lysis, which may explain why thick fibers elongate and thin fibers lyse. These results highlight how subtle differences in the diameter and prestrain of fibers could lead to dramatically different lytic susceptibilities. PMID:25714359

  5. Extraction Socket Management Utilizing Platelet Rich Fibrin: A Proof-of-Principle Study of the "Accelerated-Early Implant Placement" Concept.

    PubMed

    Kotsakis, Georgios A; Boufidou, Foteini; Hinrichs, James E; Prasad, Hari S; Rohrer, Michael; Tosios, Kostantinos I

    2016-04-01

    Dental implants are widely accepted as the golden standard for the rehabilitation of an edentulous site following the extraction of a tooth. The ideal time for implant placement is dependent on the time required for partial or complete tissue healing and the adequacy of socket dimensions. The use of autologous growth factors is a promising new concept that aids clinicians in minimizing treatment time and increasing patient satisfaction. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a protocol for "accelerated-early" implant placement. In this protocol, platelet rich fibrin is employed to accelerate soft and hard tissue healing and to provide a better-healed recipient site for accelerated, early implant placement. Histological analysis revealed that at 6 weeks postextraction, the application of our approach resulted in delicate newly formed bone showing intense osteoblastic activity surrounded by connective tissue as well as areas of mineralized tissue. The present study is a proof-of-principle study of the acceleration of the physiologic postextraction healing sequelae with the use of autologous growth factors. The accelerated-early implant placement concept is a bioengineered protocol that may aid clinicians to achieve increased primary stability, by placing implants in ridges in an advanced stage of bone healing, while offering patients the benefits associated with early implant placement. Controlled studies are warranted to verify the reproducibility of this treatment concept and identify specific indications where the use of the presented technique can lead to significant clinical results. PMID:26389580

  6. Immunohistological assessment of fibrin deposition and thrombus formation in canine mammary neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Golombiewski, A; Gutberlet, K; Rudolph, R

    1997-08-01

    A commercially available monoclonal antibody against human fibrin was used to detect fibrin in canine formalin-fixed, paraffin wax-embedded tissue by applying a slightly modified alkaline phosphatase anti-alkaline phosphatase (APAAP) technique. Twenty-eight mammary tumours from six bitches were examined for the presence of fibrin. Thrombi and extravascular fibrin deposits were detected in 15 tumours (12 complex adenocarcinomas, one adenocarcinoma, two solid carcinomas), and a single thrombus was detected in one adenoma; 12 tumours (three adenomas, one complex adenoma, four complex adenocarcinomas and four adenocarcinomas) did not show any staining reaction. PMID:9352443

  7. 21 CFR 864.7320 - Fibrinogen/fibrin degradation products assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... dissolution of the fibrin in a blood clot) and in monitoring therapy for disseminated intravascular coagulation (nonlocalized clotting in the blood vessels). (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  8. 21 CFR 864.7320 - Fibrinogen/fibrin degradation products assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... dissolution of the fibrin in a blood clot) and in monitoring therapy for disseminated intravascular coagulation (nonlocalized clotting in the blood vessels). (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  9. 21 CFR 864.7320 - Fibrinogen/fibrin degradation products assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... dissolution of the fibrin in a blood clot) and in monitoring therapy for disseminated intravascular coagulation (nonlocalized clotting in the blood vessels). (b) Classification. Class II (performance standards)....

  10. Comparison of the fibrin-binding activities in the N- and C-termini of fibronectin.

    PubMed Central

    Rostagno, A A; Schwarzbauer, J E; Gold, L I

    1999-01-01

    Fibronectin (Fn) binds to fibrin in clots by covalent and non-covalent interactions. The N- and C-termini of Fn each contain one non-covalent fibrin-binding site, which are composed of type 1 (F1) structural repeats. We have previously localized the N-terminal site to the fourth and fifth F1 repeats (4F1.5F1). In the current studies, using proteolytic and recombinant proteins representing both the N- and C-terminal fibrin-binding regions, we localized and characterized the C-terminal fibrin-binding site, compared the relative fibrin-binding activities of both sites and determined the contribution of each site to the fibrin-binding activity of intact Fn. By fibrin-affinity chromatography, a protein composed of the 10F1 repeat through to the C-terminus of Fn (10F1-COOH), expressed in COS-1 cells, and 10F1-12F1, produced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, displayed fibrin-binding activity. However, since 10F1 and 10F1.11F1 were not active, the presence of 12F1 is required for fibrin binding. A proteolytic fragment of 14.4 kDa, beginning 14 residues N-terminal to 10F1, was isolated from the fibrin-affinity matrix. Radio-iodinated 14.4 kDa fibrin-binding peptide/protein (FBP) demonstrated a dose-dependent and saturable binding to fibrin-coated wells that was both competitively inhibited and reversed by unlabelled 14.4 kDa FBP. Comparison of the fibrin-binding affinities of proteolytic FBPs from the N-terminus (25.9 kDa FBP), the C-terminus (14.4 kDa) and intact Fn by ELISA yielded estimated Kd values of 216, 18 and 2.1 nM, respectively. The higher fibrin-binding affinity of the N-terminus was substantiated by the ability of both a recombinant 4F1.5F1 and a monoclonal antibody (mAb) to this site to maximally inhibit biotinylated Fn binding to fibrin by 80%, and by blocking the 90% inhibitory activity of a polyclonal anti-Fn, by absorption with the 25.9 kDa FBP. We propose that whereas the N-terminal site appears to contribute to most of the binding activity of native Fn to

  11. Optical imaging of fibrin deposition to elucidate participation of mast cells in foreign body responses

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Hong; Tang, Ewin N.; Baker, David W.; Tang, Liping

    2014-01-01

    Mast cell activation has been shown to be an initiator and a key determinant of foreign body reactions. However, there is no non-invasive method that can quantify the degree of implant-associated mast cell activation. Taking advantage of the fact that fibrin deposition is a hallmark of mast cell activation around biomaterial implants, a near infrared probe was fabricated to have high affinity to fibrin. Subsequent in vitro testing confirmed that this probe has high affinity to fibrin. Using a subcutaneous particle implantation model, we found significant accumulation of fibrin-affinity probes at the implant sites as early as 15 min following particle implantation. The accumulation of fibrin-affinity probes at the implantation sites could also be substantially reduced if anti-coagulant – heparin was administered at the implant sites. Further studies have shown that subcutaneous administration of mast cell activator – compound 48/80 – prompted the accumulation of fibrin-affinity probes. However, implant-associated fibrin-affinity probe accumulation was substantially reduced in mice with mast cell deficiency. The results show that our fibrin-affinity probes may serve as a powerful tool to monitor and measure the extent of biomaterial-mediated fibrin deposition and mast cell activation in vivo. PMID:24342726

  12. The potential applications of fibrin-coated electrospun polylactide nanofibers in skin tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Bacakova, Marketa; Musilkova, Jana; Riedel, Tomas; Stranska, Denisa; Brynda, Eduard; Zaloudkova, Margit; Bacakova, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    Fibrin plays an important role during wound healing and skin regeneration. It is often applied in clinical practice for treatment of skin injuries or as a component of skin substitutes. We prepared electrospun nanofibrous membranes made from poly(l-lactide) modified with a thin fibrin nanocoating. Fibrin surrounded the individual fibers in the membrane and also formed a thin fibrous mesh on several places on the membrane surface. The cell-free fibrin nanocoating remained stable in the cell culture medium for 14 days and did not change its morphology. On membranes populated with human dermal fibroblasts, the rate of fibrin degradation correlated with the degree of cell proliferation. The cell spreading, mitochondrial activity, and cell population density were significantly higher on membranes coated with fibrin than on nonmodified membranes, and this cell performance was further improved by the addition of ascorbic acid in the cell culture medium. Similarly, fibrin stimulated the expression and synthesis of collagen I in human dermal fibroblasts, and this effect was further enhanced by ascorbic acid. The expression of beta1-integrins was also improved by fibrin, and on pure polylactide membranes, it was slightly enhanced by ascorbic acid. In addition, ascorbic acid promoted deposition of collagen I in the form of a fibrous extracellular matrix. Thus, the combination of nanofibrous membranes with a fibrin nanocoating and ascorbic acid seems to be particularly advantageous for skin tissue engineering. PMID:26955273

  13. The potential applications of fibrin-coated electrospun polylactide nanofibers in skin tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Bacakova, Marketa; Musilkova, Jana; Riedel, Tomas; Stranska, Denisa; Brynda, Eduard; Zaloudkova, Margit; Bacakova, Lucie

    2016-01-01

    Fibrin plays an important role during wound healing and skin regeneration. It is often applied in clinical practice for treatment of skin injuries or as a component of skin substitutes. We prepared electrospun nanofibrous membranes made from poly(l-lactide) modified with a thin fibrin nanocoating. Fibrin surrounded the individual fibers in the membrane and also formed a thin fibrous mesh on several places on the membrane surface. The cell-free fibrin nanocoating remained stable in the cell culture medium for 14 days and did not change its morphology. On membranes populated with human dermal fibroblasts, the rate of fibrin degradation correlated with the degree of cell proliferation. The cell spreading, mitochondrial activity, and cell population density were significantly higher on membranes coated with fibrin than on nonmodified membranes, and this cell performance was further improved by the addition of ascorbic acid in the cell culture medium. Similarly, fibrin stimulated the expression and synthesis of collagen I in human dermal fibroblasts, and this effect was further enhanced by ascorbic acid. The expression of beta1-integrins was also improved by fibrin, and on pure polylactide membranes, it was slightly enhanced by ascorbic acid. In addition, ascorbic acid promoted deposition of collagen I in the form of a fibrous extracellular matrix. Thus, the combination of nanofibrous membranes with a fibrin nanocoating and ascorbic acid seems to be particularly advantageous for skin tissue engineering. PMID:26955273

  14. The conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin. XIII. Dissolution of fibrin and inhibition of clotting by various neutral salts.

    PubMed

    SHULMAN, S; KATZ, S; FERRY, J D

    1953-07-01

    1. Fibrin clots prepared in the absence of calcium can be dissolved in solutions of lithium chloride and bromide and sodium bromide and iodide, as well as of guanidine hydrochloride and urea. These salts do not denature fibrinogen under the same conditions of concentration, temperature, and time. Sedimentation experiments on the fibrin solutions show in each case a single sharp peak with a sedimentation constant close to that of fibrinogen. 2. At lower concentrations, these salts inhibit the clotting of fibrinogen by thrombin, but in the case of lithium bromide and sodium iodide, at least, allow an intermediate polymer to accumulate whose sedimentation constant is close to that of the polymer observed in systems inhibited by hexamethylene glycol or urea. PMID:13069679

  15. Surgical Re-entry of an Intentionally Replanted Periodontally Compromised Tooth Treated with Platelet Rich Fibrin (PRF): Hopeless to Hopeful.

    PubMed

    Ryana, Haneet Kour; Srinath, Rashmi; Prakash, Shobha

    2016-06-01

    Intentional replantation is generally contraindicated in periodontally compromised teeth however, there are reports suggesting that it can be a successful treatment alternative for periodontally involved hopeless teeth. Currently there is dearth of evidence regarding the success of this therapy, especially evidence for the effectiveness of autologous platelet rich fibrin is lacking. We present a case report of a 23-year-old male patient with periodontally hopeless left maxillary central incisor having bone loss extending beyond root apex. The tooth was gently extracted and replanted utilizing root conditioning and combined regenerative therapy (Xenograft, PRF and Type I Collagen Membrane). Surgical re-entry at nine months revealed bone formation in the apical third of the tooth. At one year, 87% radiographic bone gain was accomplished. The improvement in the clinical and radiographic parameters reinforced by the re-entry surgery findings strongly suggest that intentional replantation may be a cost-effective substitute to implants and tooth supported prosthesis in situations where conventional periodontal therapy would yield compromised outcomes. PMID:27504421

  16. Evaluation of intrabony defects treated with platelet-rich fibrin or autogenous bone graft: A comparative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Ashish; Bains, Vivek Kumar; Gupta, Vivek; Jhingran, Rajesh; Singh, G. P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The primary objective of this study was to compare clinically and radiographically the efficacy of autologous platelet rich fibrin (PRF) and autogenous bone graft (ABG) obtained using bone scrapper in the treatment of intrabony periodontal defects. Materials and Methods: Thirty-eight intrabony defects (IBDs) were treated with either open flap debridement (OFD) with PRF or OFD with ABG. Clinical parameters were recorded at baseline and 6 months postoperatively. The defect-fill and defect resolution at baseline and 6 months were calculated radiographically (intraoral periapical radiographs [IOPA] and orthopantomogram [OPG]). Results: Significant probing pocket depth (PPD) reduction, clinical attachment level (CAL) gain, defect fill and defect resolution at both PRF and ABG treated sites with OFD was observed. However, inter-group comparison was non-significant (P > 0.05). The bivariate correlation results revealed that any of the two radiographic techniques (IOPA and OPG) can be used for analysis of the regenerative therapy in IBDs. Conclusion: The use of either PRF or ABG were effective in the treatment of three wall IBDs with an uneventful healing of the sites. PMID:25713492

  17. Platelet-Rich Fibrin Promotes an Accelerated Healing of Achilles Tendon When Compared to Platelet-Rich Plasma in Rat

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Franciele; L. Duré, Gustavo; P. Klein, Caroline; F. Bampi, Vinícius; V. Padoin, Alexandre; D. Silva, Vinícius; Braga-Silva, Jefferson

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Autologous platelet concentrate has been used to improve the function and regeneration of injured tissues. Tendinopathies are common in clinical practice, although long-term treatment is required. On the basis of lead time, we compared the effect of using platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) in repairing rat Achilles tendon. METHODS The effectiveness of using PRP and PRF was evaluated after 14 and 28 postoperative days by histological analysis. The quantification of collagen types I and III was performed by Sirius red staining. Qualitatively, the data were verified with hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) staining. RESULTS In Sirius red staining, no significant treatment differences were found between groups. Statistical difference was observed only between PRP (37.2% collagen) and the control group (16.2%) 14 days after treatment. Intra-groups compared twice showed a difference for collagen I (27.8% and 47.7%) and III (66.9% and 46.0%) in the PRF group. The control group showed differences only in collagen I (14.2% and 40.9%) and no other finding was observed in the PRP group. In H&E staining, PRF showed a better cellular organization when compared to the other groups at 28 days. CONCLUSION Our study suggests that PRF promotes accelerated regeneration of the Achilles tendon in rats, offering promising prospects for future clinical use. PMID:26284178

  18. Surgical Re-entry of an Intentionally Replanted Periodontally Compromised Tooth Treated with Platelet Rich Fibrin (PRF): Hopeless to Hopeful

    PubMed Central

    Srinath, Rashmi; Prakash, Shobha

    2016-01-01

    Intentional replantation is generally contraindicated in periodontally compromised teeth however, there are reports suggesting that it can be a successful treatment alternative for periodontally involved hopeless teeth. Currently there is dearth of evidence regarding the success of this therapy, especially evidence for the effectiveness of autologous platelet rich fibrin is lacking. We present a case report of a 23-year-old male patient with periodontally hopeless left maxillary central incisor having bone loss extending beyond root apex. The tooth was gently extracted and replanted utilizing root conditioning and combined regenerative therapy (Xenograft, PRF and Type I Collagen Membrane). Surgical re-entry at nine months revealed bone formation in the apical third of the tooth. At one year, 87% radiographic bone gain was accomplished. The improvement in the clinical and radiographic parameters reinforced by the re-entry surgery findings strongly suggest that intentional replantation may be a cost-effective substitute to implants and tooth supported prosthesis in situations where conventional periodontal therapy would yield compromised outcomes. PMID:27504421

  19. Fibrin gel-immobilized primary osteoblasts in calcium phosphate bone cement: in vivo evaluation with regard to application as injectable biological bone substitute.

    PubMed

    Kneser, U; Voogd, A; Ohnolz, J; Buettner, O; Stangenberg, L; Zhang, Y H; Stark, G B; Schaefer, D J

    2005-01-01

    Osteogenic injectable bone substitutes may be useful for many applications. We developed a novel injectable bone substitute based on osteoblast-fibrin glue suspension and calcium phosphate bone cement (BC). Human osteoblasts were isolated from trabecular bone samples and cultured under standard conditions. Osteoblasts were suspended in fibrinogen solution (FS). BC was cured with thrombin solution. 8 x 4 mm injectable bone discs were prepared using silicon molds and a custom-made applicator device. Discs containing BC, BC/FS, or BC/FS/osteoblasts were implanted subcutaneously into athymic nude mice. After 3, 9 and 24 weeks, specimens were explanted and subjected to morphologic and biomechanical evaluation. In vitro fibrin gel-embedded osteoblasts displayed a differentiated phenotype as evidenced by alkaline phosphatase, collagen type 1 and von Kossa stains. A proportion of osteoblasts appeared morphologically intact over a 3-day in vitro period following application into the BC. BC/FS and BC/FS/osteoblast discs were sparsely infiltrated with vascularized connective tissue. There was no bone formation in implants from all groups. However, positive von Kossa staining only in BC/FS/osteoblast groups suggests engraftment of at least some of the transplanted cells. Biomechanical evaluation demonstrated initial stability of the composites. Young's modulus and maximal load did not differ significantly in the BC/FS and BC/FS/osteoblast groups. The practicability of osteoblast-containing injectable bone could be demonstrated. The dense microstructure and the suboptimal initial vascularization of the composites may explain the lack of bone formation. Modifications with regard to enhanced osteoblast survival are mandatory for a possible application as injectable osteogenic bone replacement system. PMID:16046862

  20. Socket preservation by beta-tri-calcium phosphate with collagen compared to platelet-rich fibrin: A clinico-radiographic study

    PubMed Central

    Das, Swati; Jhingran, Rajesh; Bains, Vivek Kumar; Madan, Rohit; Srivastava, Ruchi; Rizvi, Iram

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study was primarily designed to determine the clinico-radiographic efficacy of platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) and beta-tri-calcium phosphate with collagen (β-TCP-Cl) in preserving extraction sockets. Materials and Methods: For Group I (PRF), residual sockets (n = 15) were filled with autologous PRF obtained from patients' blood; and for Group II (β-TCP-Cl), residual sockets (n = 15) were filled with β-TCP-Cl. For the sockets randomly selected for Group II (β-TCP-Cl), the reshaped Resorbable Tissue Replacement cone was inserted into the socket. Results: Clinically, there was a significantly greater decrease in relative socket depth, but apposition in midcrestal height in Group II (β-TCP-Cl) as compared to Group I (PRF), whereas more decrease in buccolingual width of Group I (PRF) than Group II (β-TCP-Cl) after 6 months. Radiographically, the mean difference in socket height, residual ridge, and width (coronal, middle, and apical third of socket) after 6 months was higher in Group I (PRF) as compared to Group II (β-TCP-Cl). The mean density (in Hounsfield Units) at coronal, middle, and apical third of socket was higher in Group I (PRF) as compared to Group II (β-TCP-Cl). There were statistically significant apposition and resorption for Group I (PRF) whereas nonsignificant resorption and significant apposition for Group II (β-TCP-Cl) in buccal and lingual/palatal cortical plate, respectively, at 6 months on computerized tomography scan. Conclusion: The use of either autologous PRF or β-TCP-Cl was effective in socket preservation. Results obtained from PRF were almost similar to β-TCP-Cl; therefore being autologous, nonimmune, cost-effective, easily procurable regenerative biomaterial, PRF proves to be an insight into the future biofuel for regeneration. PMID:27095909

  1. Bioorthogonal Click Chemistry-Based Synthetic Cell Glue.

    PubMed

    Koo, Heebeom; Choi, Myunghwan; Kim, Eunha; Hahn, Sei Kwang; Weissleder, Ralph; Yun, Seok Hyun

    2015-12-22

    Artificial methods of cell adhesion can be effective in building functional cell complexes in vitro, but methods for in vivo use are currently lacking. Here, a chemical cell glue based on bioorthogonal click chemistry with high stability and robustness is introduced. Tetrazine (Tz) and trans-cyclooctene (TCO) conjugated to the cell surface form covalent bonds between cells within 10 min in aqueous conditions. Glued, homogeneous, or heterogeneous cell pairs remain viable and stably attached in a microfluidic flow channel at a shear stress of 20 dyn cm(-2) . Upon intravenous injection of assembled Jurkat T cells into live mice, fluorescence microscopy shows the trafficking of cell pairs in circulation and their infiltration into lung tissues. These results demonstrate the promising potential of chemically glued cell pairs for various applications ranging from delivering therapeutic cells to studying cell-cell interactions in vivo. PMID:26768353

  2. Relative Gain Monitoring of the GlueX Calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Anassontzis, Efstratios G.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Vasileiadis, G.; Voulgaris, G.; Kappos, E.; Beattie, T.; Krueger, S.; Lolos, G. J.; Papandreou, Z.; Semenov, A. Yu.; Frye, John M.; Leckey, John P.; Shepherd, Matt; Bogart, T.; Smith, Elton S.

    2014-02-01

    The relative gain of the photodetectors for the GlueX Barrel and Forward calorimeters will be monitored using modular LED driver systems. The BCAL system consists of a global controller that feeds power, bias voltage and trigger signals to 96 local controllers situated at the ends of the 48 BCAL modules, which drive 40 LEDs associated with the 40 light guides at the end of each module. The FCAL system consists also of a global controller, a local controller for each acrylic quadrant covering the face of the FCAL, and ten 4-LED pulser boards per local controller connected in a star configuration along the edges of the acrylic panes. The respective systems are currently being installed on the detectors and their tested performance is presented herein.

  3. Quark and Glue Components of the Proton Spin from Lattice Calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Keh-Fei

    2016-02-01

    The status of lattice calculations of the quark spin, the quark orbital angular momentum, the glue angular momentum and glue spin in the nucleon is summarized. The quark spin calculation is recently carried out from the anomalous Ward identity with chiral fermions and is found to be small mainly due to the large negative anomaly term which is believed to be the source of the ‘proton spin crisis’. We also present the first calculation of the glue spin at finite nucleon momenta.

  4. Increased fibrin formation and impaired fibrinolytic capacity in severe chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Mörtberg, Josefin; Blombäck, Margareta; Wallén, Åkan; He, Shu; Jacobson, Stefan H; Spaak, Jonas

    2016-06-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is associated with a concurrent increased risk of thrombosis and bleeding. We aimed to investigate whether CKD is associated with increased fibrin formation, impaired fibrin degradation, or both. Twenty-one patients with CKD stage 4 (CKD 4), 15 haemodialysis patients, and 13 controls (C) without kidney disease were studied. We used a global assay to determine fibrin formation and degradation in plasma. Fibrin turbidity was measured over time to obtain a value of the coagulation activation profile (Cp) and the fibrinolysis activation profile (Fp), and the amount of fibrin formed, termed fibrin optical density sum (fibrin OD-sum). We used scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to visualize the fibrin network. Plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 antigen, thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor activity, fibrinogen, von Willebrand factor, antithrombin, albumin, and C-reactive protein were measured in plasma. Fibrin OD-sum was significantly elevated in haemodialysis patients [312 a.u.; 278-435 (median; interquartile range); P < 0.0013] and in CKD 4 (293 a.u.; 169-434; P = 0.0119) compared with controls (115 a.u.; 82-234). SEM showed a tight fibrin network in haemodialysis and CKD 4 patients. Fp was lower in the haemodialysis group than in controls (P = 0.030). Plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1 was lower in haemodialysis patients (P = 0.034). Thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor activity, Cp, antithrombin, and C-reactive protein did not differ between groups. Fibrinogen was significantly elevated and albumin decreased in both haemodialysis and CKD 4 patients compared with controls. Von Willebrand factor was elevated in haemodialysis patients compared with controls (P = 0.010). The prothrombotic state in severe CKD is characterized by impaired fibrinolysis in association with increased fibrin formation despite normal levels of endogenous fibrinolysis inhibitors. PMID:26650459

  5. Achieving ideal breast aesthetics with autologous reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Achieving ideal breast aesthetic has become a top priority for women considering breast reconstruction following mastectomy. The use of autologous tissue is generally regarded as providing the most natural results because donor tissues quality and consistency is similar to that of the native breast. There are several donor sites that are particularly useful for autologous reconstruction that include the abdomen, gluteal region, posterior thorax, and the thigh. Traditional and microsurgical techniques can be used. Shaping is a critical component and involves a basic understanding of the footprint, conus, and skin envelope. This manuscript will review many aspects of breast shaping in-order to achieve aesthetically pleasing results in a predictable manner. PMID:26005645

  6. Autologous Fat Grafting Improves Facial Nerve Function

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Marco; Lisa, Andrea; Caviggioli, Fabio; Maione, Luca; Murolo, Matteo; Vinci, Valeriano; Klinger, Francesco Maria

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a 45-year-old male patient who presented a retractile and painful scar in the nasolabial fold due to trauma which determined partial motor impairment of the mouth movements. We subsequently treated him with autologous fat grafting according to Coleman's technique. Clinical assessments were performed at 5 and 14 days and 1, 3, and 6 months after surgical procedure and we observed a progressive release of scar retraction together with an important improvement of pain symptoms. A second procedure was performed 6 months after the previous one. We observed total restoration of mimic movements within one-year follow-up. The case described confirms autologous fat grafting regenerative effect on scar tissue enlightening a possible therapeutic effect on peripheral nerve activity, hypothesizing that its entrapment into scar tissue can determine a partial loss of function. PMID:26167327

  7. The effect of an autologous cellular gel-matrix integrated implant system on wound healing

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This manuscript reports the production and preclinical studies to examine the tolerance and efficacy of an autologous cellular gel-matrix integrated implant system (IIS) aimed to treat full-thickness skin lesions. Methods The best concentration of fibrinogen and thrombin was experimentally determined by employing 28 formula ratios of thrombin and fibrinogen and checking clot formation and apparent stability. IIS was formed by integrating skin cells by means of the in situ gelification of fibrin into a porous crosslinked scaffold composed of chitosan, gelatin and hyaluronic acid. The in vitro cell proliferation within the IIS was examined by the MTT assay and PCNA expression. An experimental rabbit model consisting of six circular lesions was utilized to test each of the components of the IIS. Then, the IIS was utilized in an animal model to cover a 35% body surface full thickness lesion. Results The preclinical assays in rabbits demonstrated that the IIS was well tolerated and also that IIS-treated rabbit with lesions of 35% of their body surface, exhibited a better survival rate (p = 0,06). Conclusion IIS should be further studied as a new wound dressing which shows promising properties, being the most remarkable its good biological tolerance and cell growth promotion properties. PMID:20565787

  8. Cryptococcal meningitis post autologous stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chaaban, S; Wheat, L J; Assi, M

    2014-06-01

    Disseminated Cryptococcus disease occurs in patients with defective T-cell immunity. Cryptococcal meningitis following autologous stem cell transplant (SCT) has been described previously in only 1 patient, 4 months post SCT and while off antifungal prophylaxis. We present a unique case of Cryptococcus meningitis pre-engraftment after autologous SCT, while the patient was receiving fluconazole prophylaxis. A 41-year-old man with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma underwent autologous SCT. Post-transplant prophylaxis consisted of fluconazole 400 mg daily, levofloxacin 500 mg daily, and acyclovir 800 mg twice daily. On day 9 post transplant, he developed fever and headache. Peripheral white blood cell count (WBC) was 700/μL. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed lesions consistent with meningoencephalitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis revealed a WBC of 39 with 77% lymphocytes, protein 63, glucose 38, CSF pressure 20.5 cmH2 O, and a positive cryptococcal antigen. CSF culture confirmed Cryptococcus neoformans. The patient was treated with liposomal amphotericin B 5 mg/kg intravenously daily, and flucytosine 37.5 mg/kg orally every 6 h. He was switched to fluconazole 400 mg daily after 3 weeks of amphotericin therapy, with sterilization of the CSF with negative CSFCryptococcus antigen and negative CSF culture. Review of the literature revealed 9 cases of cryptococcal disease in recipients of SCT. Median time of onset was 64 days post transplant. Only 3 meningitis cases were described; 2 of them after allogeneic SCT. Fungal prophylaxis with fluconazole post autologous SCT is recommended at least through engraftment, and for up to 100 days in high-risk patients. A high index of suspicion is needed to diagnose and treat opportunistic infections, especially in the face of immunosuppression and despite adequate prophylaxis. Infection is usually fatal without treatment, thus prompt diagnosis and therapy might be life saving. PMID:24750320

  9. [Nutritional pathway for autologous stem cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Takashi; Imataki, Osamu; Inoue, Naomi; Katsumata, Mina; Katsuta, Tomoko; Kataoka, Tomomi; Yoshida, Takashi; Mochizuki, Takahiro; Motokawa, Satoshi; Tamai, Yotaro; Hagiwara, Shotaro; Kawakami, Kimihiro

    2007-08-01

    We developed a nutritional pathway for autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT) to be applied in our transplantation unit. We performed autologous SCT for 37 patients with malignant lymphoma and multiple myeloma during from April 2003 to July 2005. For 10 of them who underwent SCT since 2005,we intervened with nutritional support using our original nutritional pathway,to monitor the clinical course of SCT from the aspect of dietetics with a dietician making assessments of the individual nutrition status. From comparing the 2 groups with (n=27) or without (n=10) the nutritional pathway, oral intake at day 14 was significantly increased from 1,038 kcal to 1,440 kcal,and at discharge developed from 1,167 kcal to 1,446 kcal without statistical significance. Patients whose body weight decreased more than 5% were reduced from 52%(14/27) to 10%(1/10),and 3 days reduction of the CVC insertion period was observed after the intervention. Although the long-term clinical outcome was not fully evaluated, the efficacy of nutritional pathway for autologous SCT was suggested. PMID:17687206

  10. Aprotinin extends mechanical integrity time of cell-seeded fibrin sutures.

    PubMed

    Coffin, Spencer T; Gaudette, Glenn R

    2016-09-01

    Cell therapy has the potential to treat different pathologies, including myocardial infarctions (heart attacks), although cell engraftment remains elusive with most delivery methods. Biological sutures composed of fibrin have been shown to effectively deliver human mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) to infarcted hearts. However, human MSCs rapidly degrade fibrin making cell seeding and delivery time sensitive. To delay the degradation process, we propose using Aprotinin, a proteolytic enzyme inhibitor that has been shown to slow fibrinolysis. Human MSCs seeded on fibrin sutures and incubated with Aprotinin demonstrated similar cell viability, examined using a LIVE/DEAD stain, to controls. No differences in proliferation, as determined by Ki-67 presence, were observed. Human MSCs incubated in Aprotinin differentiated into adipocytes, osteocytes, and chondrocytes, confirming multipotency. The number of cells adhered to fibrin sutures increased through Aprotinin supplementation at 2, 3, and 5 day time points. Uniaxial tensile testing was used to examine the effect of Aprotinin on suture integrity. Sutures exposed to Aprotinin had higher ultimate tensile strength and modulus when compared to sutures exposed to standard growth media. Fibrin sutures incubated in Aprotinin had larger diameters and less fibrin degradation products compared to the controls, confirming decreased fibrinolysis. These data suggest that Aprotinin can reduce degradation of fibrin sutures without significant effects on MSC function, providing a novel method for extending the implantation window and increasing the number of cells delivered via fibrin sutures. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 2271-2279, 2016. PMID:27101153