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Sample records for automated fuel monitoring

  1. New York City Police Department Automated Fuel Monitoring system. Volume II. Documentation report. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    McGrath, W.J.; McNamara, M.M.

    1981-11-16

    The New York City Police Department (NYCPD) Automated Fuel Monitoring system is briefly described from the original study, through system design, to implementation. The system provides complete control of fuel usage for an agency with 4,000 motor vehicles and 25,000 vehicle operators. As far as is known, it is the largest system of its kind installed to date. The system can be scaled up or down to meet the needs of other governmental units. Estimated annual cost savings to NYCPD are $2,000,000.

  2. Automated breeder fuel fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Goldmann, L.H.; Frederickson, J.R.

    1983-09-01

    The objective of the Secure Automated Fabrication (SAF) Project is to develop remotely operated equipment for the processing and manufacturing of breeder reactor fuel pins. The SAF line will be installed in the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF). The FMEF is presently under construction at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford site near Richland, Washington, and is operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The fabrication and support systems of the SAF line are designed for computer-controlled operation from a centralized control room. Remote and automated fuel fabriction operations will result in: reduced radiation exposure to workers; enhanced safeguards; improved product quality; near real-time accountability, and increased productivity. The present schedule calls for installation of SAF line equipment in the FMEF beginning in 1984, with qualifying runs starting in 1986 and production commencing in 1987. 5 figures.

  3. Automated techniques for spacecraft monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segnar, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    The feasibility of implementing automated spacecraft monitoring depends on four factors: sufficient computer resources, suitable monitoring function definitions, adequate spacecraft data, and effective and economical test systems. The advantages of automated monitoring lie in the decision-making speed of the computer and the continuous monitoring coverage provided by an automated monitoring program. Use of these advantages introduces a new concept of spacecraft monitoring in which system specialists, ground based or onboard, freed from routine and tedious monitoring, could devote their expertise to unprogrammed or contingency situations.

  4. Automated Characterization of Spent Fuel through the Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Coble, Jamie B.; Orton, Christopher R.; Schwantes, Jon M.

    2012-07-31

    This research developed an algorithm for characterizing spent nuclear fuel (SNF) samples based on simulated gamma spectra. The gamma spectra for a variety of light water reactor fuels typical of those found in the United States were simulated. Fuel nuclide concentrations were simulated in ORIGEN-ARP for 1296 fuel samples with a variety of reactor designs, initial enrichments, burn ups, and cooling times. The results of the ORIGEN-ARP simulation were then input to SYNTH to simulate the gamma spectrum for each sample. These spectra were evaluated with partial least squares (PLS)-based multivariate analysis methods to characterize the fuel according to reactor type (pressurized or boiling water reactor), enrichment, burn up, and cooling time. Characterizing some of the features in series by using previously estimated features in the prediction greatly improves the performance. By first classifying the spent fuel reactor type and then using type-specific models, the prediction error for enrichment, burn up, and cooling time improved by a factor of two to four. For some features, the prediction was further improved by including additional information, such as including the predicted burn up in the estimation of cooling time. The optimal prediction flow was determined based on the simulated data. A PLS discriminate analysis model was developed which perfectly classified SNF reactor type. Burn up was predicted within 0.1% root mean squared percent error (RMSPE) and both cooling time and initial enrichment within approximately 2% RMSPE.

  5. Automated fuel pin loading system

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.; Steffen, J.M.

    An automated loading system for nuclear reactor fuel elements utilizes a gravity feed conveyor which permits individual fuel pins to roll along a constrained path perpendicular to their respective lengths. The individual lengths of fuel cladding are directed onto movable transports, where they are aligned coaxially with the axes of associated handling equipment at appropriate production stations. Each fuel pin can be be reciprocated axially and/or rotated about its axis as required during handling steps. The fuel pins are inerted as a batch prior to welding of end caps by one of two disclosed welding systems.

  6. Automated fuel pin loading system

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Brown, William F.; Steffen, Jim M.

    1985-01-01

    An automated loading system for nuclear reactor fuel elements utilizes a gravity feed conveyor which permits individual fuel pins to roll along a constrained path perpendicular to their respective lengths. The individual lengths of fuel cladding are directed onto movable transports, where they are aligned coaxially with the axes of associated handling equipment at appropriate production stations. Each fuel pin can be reciprocated axially and/or rotated about its axis as required during handling steps. The fuel pins are inserted as a batch prior to welding of end caps by one of two disclosed welding systems.

  7. Automation-induced monitoring inefficiency: role of display location

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, I. L.; Molloy, R.; Parasuraman, R.

    1997-01-01

    Operators can be poor monitors of automation if they are engaged concurrently in other tasks. However, in previous studies of this phenomenon the automated task was always presented in the periphery, away from the primary manual tasks that were centrally displayed. In this study we examined whether centrally locating an automated task would boost monitoring performance during a flight-simulation task consisting of system monitoring, tracking and fuel resource management sub-tasks. Twelve nonpilot subjects were required to perform the tracking and fuel management tasks manually while watching the automated system monitoring task for occasional failures. The automation reliability was constant at 87.5% for six subjects and variable (alternating between 87.5% and 56.25%) for the other six subjects. Each subject completed four 30 min sessions over a period of 2 days. In each automation reliability condition the automation routine was disabled for the last 20 min of the fourth session in order to simulate catastrophic automation failure (0 % reliability). Monitoring for automation failure was inefficient when automation reliability was constant but not when it varied over time, replicating previous results. Furthermore, there was no evidence of resource or speed accuracy trade-off between tasks. Thus, automation-induced failures of monitoring cannot be prevented by centrally locating the automated task.

  8. Effects of adaptive task allocation on monitoring of automated systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parasuraman, R.; Mouloua, M.; Molloy, R.

    1996-01-01

    The effects of adaptive task allocation on monitoring for automation failure during multitask flight simulation were examined. Participants monitored an automated engine status task while simultaneously performing tracking and fuel management tasks over three 30-min sessions. Two methods of adaptive task allocation, both involving temporary return of the automated engine status task to the human operator ("human control"), were examined as a possible countermeasure to monitoring inefficiency. For the model-based adaptive group, the engine status task was allocated to all participants in the middle of the second session for 10 min, following which it was again returned to automation control. The same occurred for the performance-based adaptive group, but only if an individual participant's monitoring performance up to that point did not meet a specified criterion. For the nonadaptive control groups, the engine status task remained automated throughout the experiment. All groups had low probabilities of detection of automation failures for the first 40 min spent with automation. However, following the 10-min intervening period of human control, both adaptive groups detected significantly more automation failures during the subsequent blocks under automation control. The results show that adaptive task allocation can enhance monitoring of automated systems. Both model-based and performance-based allocation improved monitoring of automation. Implications for the design of automated systems are discussed.

  9. Powder handling for automated fuel processing

    SciTech Connect

    Frederickson, J.R.; Eschenbaum, R.C.; Goldmann, L.H.

    1989-04-09

    Installation of the Secure Automated Fabrication (SAF) line has been completed. It is located in the Fuel Cycle Plant (FCP) at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford site near Richland, Washington. The SAF line was designed to fabricate advanced reactor fuel pellets and assemble fuel pins by automated, remote operation. This paper describes powder handling equipment and techniques utilized for automated powder processing and powder conditioning systems in this line. 9 figs.

  10. 49 CFR 238.445 - Automated monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Automated monitoring. 238.445 Section 238.445 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Equipment § 238.445 Automated monitoring. (a) Each passenger train shall be equipped to monitor...

  11. 49 CFR 238.445 - Automated monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Automated monitoring. 238.445 Section 238.445 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Equipment § 238.445 Automated monitoring. (a) Each passenger train shall be equipped to monitor...

  12. 49 CFR 238.445 - Automated monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Automated monitoring. 238.445 Section 238.445 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Equipment § 238.445 Automated monitoring. (a) Each passenger train shall be equipped to monitor...

  13. 49 CFR 238.445 - Automated monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Automated monitoring. 238.445 Section 238.445 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Equipment § 238.445 Automated monitoring. (a) Each passenger train shall be equipped to monitor...

  14. 49 CFR 238.445 - Automated monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Automated monitoring. 238.445 Section 238.445 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Equipment § 238.445 Automated monitoring. (a) Each passenger train shall be equipped to monitor...

  15. 49 CFR 238.237 - Automated monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Automated monitoring. 238.237 Section 238.237... Equipment § 238.237 Automated monitoring. (a) Except as further specified in this paragraph, on or after... service for the first time on or after September 9, 2002, a working alerter shall be provided. (b)...

  16. 49 CFR 238.237 - Automated monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Automated monitoring. 238.237 Section 238.237... Equipment § 238.237 Automated monitoring. (a) Except as further specified in this paragraph, on or after... service for the first time on or after September 9, 2002, a working alerter shall be provided. (b)...

  17. 49 CFR 238.237 - Automated monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Automated monitoring. 238.237 Section 238.237... Equipment § 238.237 Automated monitoring. (a) Except as further specified in this paragraph, on or after... service for the first time on or after September 9, 2002, a working alerter shall be provided. (b)...

  18. 49 CFR 238.237 - Automated monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Automated monitoring. 238.237 Section 238.237... Equipment § 238.237 Automated monitoring. (a) Except as further specified in this paragraph, on or after... service for the first time on or after September 9, 2002, a working alerter shall be provided. (b)...

  19. 49 CFR 238.237 - Automated monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Automated monitoring. 238.237 Section 238.237... Equipment § 238.237 Automated monitoring. (a) Except as further specified in this paragraph, on or after... service for the first time on or after September 9, 2002, a working alerter shall be provided. (b)...

  20. Programs Automate Complex Operations Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center, just off the east coast of Florida on Merritt Island, has been the starting place of every human space flight in NASA s history. It is where the first Americans left Earth during Project Mercury, the terrestrial departure point of the lunar-bound Apollo astronauts, as well as the last solid ground many astronauts step foot on before beginning their long stays aboard the International Space Station. It will also be the starting point for future NASA missions to the Moon and Mars and temporary host of the new Ares series rockets designed to take us there. Since the first days of the early NASA missions, in order to keep up with the demands of the intricate and critical Space Program, the launch complex - host to the large Vehicle Assembly Building, two launch pads, and myriad support facilities - has grown increasingly complex to accommodate the sophisticated technologies needed to manage today s space missions. To handle the complicated launch coordination safely, NASA found ways to automate mission-critical applications, resulting in streamlined decision-making. One of these methods, management software called the Control Monitor Unit (CMU), created in conjunction with McDonnell Douglas Space & Defense Systems, has since left NASA, and is finding its way into additional applications.

  1. Automated Cryocooler Monitor and Control System Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britchcliffe, Michael J.; Conroy, Bruce L.; Anderson, Paul E.; Wilson, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    This software is used in an automated cryogenic control system developed to monitor and control the operation of small-scale cryocoolers. The system was designed to automate the cryogenically cooled low-noise amplifier system described in "Automated Cryocooler Monitor and Control System" (NPO-47246), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 35, No. 5 (May 2011), page 7a. The software contains algorithms necessary to convert non-linear output voltages from the cryogenic diode-type thermometers and vacuum pressure and helium pressure sensors, to temperature and pressure units. The control function algorithms use the monitor data to control the cooler power, vacuum solenoid, vacuum pump, and electrical warm-up heaters. The control algorithms are based on a rule-based system that activates the required device based on the operating mode. The external interface is Web-based. It acts as a Web server, providing pages for monitor, control, and configuration. No client software from the external user is required.

  2. Intelligent Automated Nuclear Fuel Pellet Inspection System

    SciTech Connect

    S. Keyvan

    1999-11-01

    At the present time, nuclear pellet inspection is performed manually using naked eyes for judgment and decisionmaking on accepting or rejecting pellets. This current practice of pellet inspection is tedious and subject to inconsistencies and error. Furthermore, unnecessary re-fabrication of pellets is costly and the presence of low quality pellets in a fuel assembly is unacceptable. To improve the quality control in nuclear fuel fabrication plants, an automated pellet inspection system based on advanced techniques is needed. Such a system addresses the following concerns of the current manual inspection method: (1) the reliability of inspection due to typical human errors, (2) radiation exposure to the workers, and (3) speed of inspection and its economical impact. The goal of this research is to develop an automated nuclear fuel pellet inspection system which is based on pellet video (photographic) images and uses artificial intelligence techniques.

  3. Automating the personnel dosimeter monitoring program

    SciTech Connect

    Compston, M.W.

    1982-12-01

    The personnel dosimetry monitoring program at the Portsmouth uranium enrichment facility has been improved by using thermoluminescent dosimetry to monitor for ionizing radiation exposure, and by automating most of the operations and all of the associated information handling. A thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) card, worn by personnel inside security badges, stores the energy of ionizing radiation. The dosimeters are changed-out periodically and are loaded 150 cards at a time into an automated reader-processor. The resulting data is recorded and filed into a useful form by computer programming developed for this purpose.

  4. Automated iodine monitor system. [for aqueous solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The feasibility of a direct spectrophotometric measurement of iodine in water was established. An iodine colorimeter, was built to demonstrate the practicality of this technique. The specificity of this method was verified when applied to an on-line system where a reference solution cannot be used, and a preliminary design is presented for an automated iodine measuring and controlling system meeting the desired specifications. An Automated iodine monitor/controller system based on this preliminary design was built, tested, and delivered to the Johnson Space Center.

  5. Monitored Retrievable Storage/Multi-Purpose Canister analysis: Simulation and economics of automation

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, P.C.; Stringer, J.B.

    1994-03-01

    Robotic automation is examined as a possible alternative to manual spent nuclear fuel, transport cask and Multi-Purpose canister (MPC) handling at a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) facility. Automation of key operational aspects for the MRS/MPC system are analyzed to determine equipment requirements, through-put times and equipment costs is described. The economic and radiation dose impacts resulting from this automation are compared to manual handling methods.

  6. Advanced prototype automated iodine monitor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The technique of detecting and measuring parts-per-million concentrations of aqueous iodine by direct spectrophotometric means is discussed, and development of a prototype Automated Iodine Monitoring/Controller System (AIMS) is elaborated. The present effort is directed primarily toward reducing the power requirement and the weight of the AIMS. Other objectives include determining the maximum concentration of iodine that can be dissolved in an alcohol solution, and in an aqueous potassium iodide solution. Also discussed are the effects of a no flow condition on iodine measurements and the effect of pH on spectrophotometric iodine determinations.

  7. The Automator: Intelligent Control System Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    M. Bickley; D.A. Bryan; K.S. White

    1999-03-01

    A large-scale control system may contain several hundred thousand control points which must be monitored to ensure smooth operation. Knowledge of the current state of such a system is often implicit in the values of these points and operators must be cognizant of the state while making decisions. Repetitive operators requiring human intervention lead to fatigue, which can in turn lead to mistakes. The authors propose a tool called the Automator based on a middleware software server. This tool would provide a user-configurable engine for monitoring control points. Based on the status of these control points, a specified action could be taken. The action could range from setting another control point, to triggering an alarm, to running an executable. Often the data presented by a system is meaningless without context information from other channels. Such a tool could be configured to present interpreted information based on values of other channels. Additionally, this tool could translate numerous values in a non-friendly form (such as numbers, bits, or return codes) into meaningful strings of information. Multiple instances of this server could be run, allowing individuals or groups to configure their own Automators. The configuration of the tool will be file-based. In the future, these files could be generated by graphical design tools, allowing for rapid development of new configurations. In addition, the server will be able to explicitly maintain information about the state of the control system. This state information can be used in decision-making processes and shared with other applications. A conceptual framework and software design for the tool are presented.

  8. Automated Cryocooler Monitor and Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcliffe, Michael J.; Hanscon, Theodore R.; Fowler, Larry E.

    2011-01-01

    A system was designed to automate cryogenically cooled low-noise amplifier systems used in the NASA Deep Space Network. It automates the entire operation of the system including cool-down, warm-up, and performance monitoring. The system is based on a single-board computer with custom software and hardware to monitor and control the cryogenic operation of the system. The system provides local display and control, and can be operated remotely via a Web interface. The system controller is based on a commercial single-board computer with onboard data acquisition capability. The commercial hardware includes a microprocessor, an LCD (liquid crystal display), seven LED (light emitting diode) displays, a seven-key keypad, an Ethernet interface, 40 digital I/O (input/output) ports, 11 A/D (analog to digital) inputs, four D/A (digital to analog) outputs, and an external relay board to control the high-current devices. The temperature sensors used are commercial silicon diode devices that provide a non-linear voltage output proportional to temperature. The devices are excited with a 10-microamp bias current. The system is capable of monitoring and displaying three temperatures. The vacuum sensors are commercial thermistor devices. The output of the sensors is a non-linear voltage proportional to vacuum pressure in the 1-Torr to 1-millitorr range. Two sensors are used. One measures the vacuum pressure in the cryocooler and the other the pressure at the input to the vacuum pump. The helium pressure sensor is a commercial device that provides a linear voltage output from 1 to 5 volts, corresponding to a gas pressure from 0 to 3.5 MPa (approx. = 500 psig). Control of the vacuum process is accomplished with a commercial electrically operated solenoid valve. A commercial motor starter is used to control the input power of the compressor. The warm-up heaters are commercial power resistors sized to provide the appropriate power for the thermal mass of the particular system, and

  9. PEM fuel cell monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Meltser, M.A.; Grot, S.A.

    1998-06-09

    Method and apparatus are disclosed for monitoring the performance of H{sub 2}--O{sub 2} PEM fuel cells. Outputs from a cell/stack voltage monitor and a cathode exhaust gas H{sub 2} sensor are corrected for stack operating conditions, and then compared to predetermined levels of acceptability. If certain unacceptable conditions coexist, an operator is alerted and/or corrective measures are automatically undertaken. 2 figs.

  10. PEM fuel cell monitoring system

    DOEpatents

    Meltser, Mark Alexander; Grot, Stephen Andreas

    1998-01-01

    Method and apparatus for monitoring the performance of H.sub.2 --O.sub.2 PEM fuel cells. Outputs from a cell/stack voltage monitor and a cathode exhaust gas H.sub.2 sensor are corrected for stack operating conditions, and then compared to predetermined levels of acceptability. If certain unacceptable conditions coexist, an operator is alerted and/or corrective measures are automatically undertaken.

  11. Technology Transfer Opportunities: Automated Ground-Water Monitoring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kirk P.; Granato, Gregory E.

    1997-01-01

    Introduction A new automated ground-water monitoring system developed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) measures and records values of selected water-quality properties and constituents using protocols approved for manual sampling. Prototypes using the automated process have demonstrated the ability to increase the quantity and quality of data collected and have shown the potential for reducing labor and material costs for ground-water quality data collection. Automation of water-quality monitoring systems in the field, in laboratories, and in industry have increased data density and utility while reducing operating costs. Uses for an automated ground-water monitoring system include, (but are not limited to) monitoring ground-water quality for research, monitoring known or potential contaminant sites, such as near landfills, underground storage tanks, or other facilities where potential contaminants are stored, and as an early warning system monitoring groundwater quality near public water-supply wells.

  12. Automated monitoring of in-process plutonium concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Rebagay, T.V.; Huff, G.A.; Hofstetter, K.J.

    1982-01-01

    An automated low-level plutonium monitor capable of measuring total and isotopic plutonium abundances in solutions is described. To demonstrate near real-time assay of in-process plutonium, we installed a monitor on a flowing stream of a laboratory experimental facility. The stream was composed of uranium and plutonium in nitric acid at concentrations typical of a plant using a Purex flowsheet modified to permit coprocessing of spent nuclear fuel. The plutonium isotopic abundances were typical of those found in light water reactor grade fuel. The plutonium isotopic concentrations in the stream with the exception of /sup 242/Pu were determined by direct lambda-ray spectrometry. The /sup 242/Pu abundance was calculated by isotope correlation techniques. Additional data were obtained on coprocessed uranium-plutonium solutions denatured with fission products (/sup 103/Ru, /sup 144/Ce//sup 144/Pr, and /sup 95/Zr//sup 95/Nb). /sup 239/Pu and /sup 240/Pu concentrations can be determined to within 2% and 5%, respectively, of the concentrations determined by mass spectrometry.

  13. Automated monitoring of recovered water quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misselhorn, J. E.; Hartung, W. H.; Witz, S. W.

    1974-01-01

    Laboratory prototype water quality monitoring system provides automatic system for online monitoring of chemical, physical, and bacteriological properties of recovered water and for signaling malfunction in water recovery system. Monitor incorporates whenever possible commercially available sensors suitably modified.

  14. Fuel Cell Stations Automate Processes, Catalyst Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Glenn Research Center looks for ways to improve fuel cells, which are an important source of power for space missions, as well as the equipment used to test fuel cells. With Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) awards from Glenn, Lynntech Inc., of College Station, Texas, addressed a major limitation of fuel cell testing equipment. Five years later, the company obtained a patent and provided the equipment to the commercial world. Now offered through TesSol Inc., of Battle Ground, Washington, the technology is used for fuel cell work, catalyst testing, sensor testing, gas blending, and other applications. It can be found at universities, national laboratories, and businesses around the world.

  15. Monitoring arrangement for vented nuclear fuel elements

    DOEpatents

    Campana, Robert J.

    1981-01-01

    In a nuclear fuel reactor core, fuel elements are arranged in a closely packed hexagonal configuration, each fuel element having diametrically opposed vents permitting 180.degree. rotation of the fuel elements to counteract bowing. A grid plate engages the fuel elements and forms passages for communicating sets of three, four or six individual vents with respective monitor lines in order to communicate vented radioactive gases from the fuel elements to suitable monitor means in a manner readily permitting detection of leakage in individual fuel elements.

  16. Automated Monitoring of Pipeline Rights-of-Way

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Chard Ritchie

    2010-01-01

    NASA Ames Research Center and the Pipeline Research Council International, Inc. have partnered in the formation of a research program to identify and develop the key technologies required to enable automated detection of threats to gas and oil transmission and distribution pipelines. This presentation describes the Right-of-way Automated Monitoring (RAM) program and highlights research successes to date, continuing challenges to implementing the RAM objectives, and the program's ongoing work and plans.

  17. A candidate configuration for automated process monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Hollenbaugh, R. ); Franklin, A. )

    1990-03-01

    The concept of total quality management (TQM) embodies a number of significant notions. Among these is the notion of statistical process control (SPC). The US Army Depot System Command (DESCOM) has endorsed the concept of TQM and is actively pursuing the implementation of SPC throughout its organization. One of the difficulties inherent in the applications of SPC to the wide variety of DESCOM processes is the extensive amount of training required to collect process, and interpret the requisite statistical information. To reduce this training demand and to simplify the application of SPC over a broad range of processes, DESCOM is developing a generic automated SPC collection and interpretation system. This system interfaces with individual stages from a large variety of industrial processes to provide automated data storage, presentation, and interpretation. The system is composed of the following six separate modules: process interface module; data storage and presentation module; pattern recognition module; pattern interpretation module; incremental learning module; and user interface module. 1 fig.

  18. Apparatus and method for automated monitoring of airborne bacterial spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An apparatus and method for automated monitoring of airborne bacterial spores. The apparatus is provided with an air sampler, a surface for capturing airborne spores, a thermal lysis unit to release DPA from bacterial spores, a source of lanthanide ions, and a spectrometer for excitation and detection of the characteristic fluorescence of the aromatic molecules in bacterial spores complexed with lanthanide ions. In accordance with the method: computer-programmed steps allow for automation of the apparatus for the monitoring of airborne bacterial spores.

  19. Fuel cell stack monitoring and system control

    DOEpatents

    Keskula, Donald H.; Doan, Tien M.; Clingerman, Bruce J.

    2004-02-17

    A control method for monitoring a fuel cell stack in a fuel cell system in which the actual voltage and actual current from the fuel cell stack are monitored. A preestablished relationship between voltage and current over the operating range of the fuel cell is established. A variance value between the actual measured voltage and the expected voltage magnitude for a given actual measured current is calculated and compared with a predetermined allowable variance. An output is generated if the calculated variance value exceeds the predetermined variance. The predetermined voltage-current for the fuel cell is symbolized as a polarization curve at given operating conditions of the fuel cell.

  20. Automated monitor and control for deep space network subsystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, P.

    1989-01-01

    The problem of automating monitor and control loops for Deep Space Network (DSN) subsystems is considered and an overview of currently available automation techniques is given. The use of standard numerical models, knowledge-based systems, and neural networks is considered. It is argued that none of these techniques alone possess sufficient generality to deal with the demands imposed by the DSN environment. However, it is shown that schemes that integrate the better aspects of each approach and are referenced to a formal system model show considerable promise, although such an integrated technology is not yet available for implementation. Frequent reference is made to the receiver subsystem since this work was largely motivated by experience in developing an automated monitor and control loop for the advanced receiver.

  1. Automation for Accommodating Fuel-Efficient Descents in Constrained Airspace

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coopenbarger, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Continuous descents at low engine power are desired to reduce fuel consumption, emissions and noise during arrival operations. The challenge is to allow airplanes to fly these types of efficient descents without interruption during busy traffic conditions. During busy conditions today, airplanes are commonly forced to fly inefficient, step-down descents as airtraffic controllers work to ensure separation and maximize throughput. NASA in collaboration with government and industry partners is developing new automation to help controllers accommodate continuous descents in the presence of complex traffic and airspace constraints. This automation relies on accurate trajectory predictions to compute strategic maneuver advisories. The talk will describe the concept behind this new automation and provide an overview of the simulations and flight testing used to develop and refine its underlying technology.

  2. Demonstration of expert systems in automated monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Otaduy, P.J.

    1985-11-01

    The Reactor Systems Section of Oak Ridge National Laboratory's Instrumentation and Controls Division has been developing expertise in the application of artificial intelligence (AI) tools and techniques to control complex systems. One of the applications developed demonstrates the capabilities of a rule-based expert system to monitor a nuclear reactor. Based on the experience acquired with the demonstration described in this paper, a 2-yr program was initiated during fiscal year 1985 for the development and implementation of an intelligent monitoring adviser to the operators of the HFIR facility. The intelligent monitoring system will act as an alert and cooperative expert to relieve the operators of routine tasks, request their attention when abnormalities are detected, and provide them with interactive diagnostic aid and project action/effects information as needed or on demand.

  3. Fuel cell stack monitoring and system control

    DOEpatents

    Keskula, Donald H.; Doan, Tien M.; Clingerman, Bruce J.

    2005-01-25

    A control method for monitoring a fuel cell stack in a fuel cell system in which the actual voltage and actual current from the fuel cell stack are monitored. A preestablished relationship between voltage and current over the operating range of the fuel cell is established. A variance value between the actual measured voltage and the expected voltage magnitude for a given actual measured current is calculated and compared with a predetermined allowable variance. An output is generated if the calculated variance value exceeds the predetermined variance. The predetermined voltage-current for the fuel cell is symbolized as a polarization curve at given operating conditions of the fuel cell. Other polarization curves may be generated and used for fuel cell stack monitoring based on different operating pressures, temperatures, hydrogen quantities.

  4. Automated shielding analysis sequences for spent fuel casks

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, J.S.; Parks, C.V.; Hermann, O.W.

    1987-01-01

    Two important Shielding Analysis Sequences (SAS) have recently been developed within the SCALE computational system. These sequences significantly enhance the existing SCALE system capabilities for evaluating radiation doses exterior to spent fuel casks. These new control module sequences (SAS1 and SAS4) and their capabilities are discussed and demonstrated, together with the existing SAS2 sequence that is used to generate radiation sources for spent fuel. Particular attention is given to the new SAS4 sequence which provides an automated scheme for generating and using biasing parameters in a subsequent Monte Carlo analysis of a cask.

  5. Secure automated fabrication: remote fabrication of breeder-reactor fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, E.W.; Rice, L.H.; Horgos, R.M.; Nagamoto, T.T.; Graham, R.A.

    1981-05-01

    The Secure Automated Fabrication (SAF) Program was initiated at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) to develop and demonstrate an advanced manufacturing line (SAF line) for plutonium oxide breeder reactor fuel pins. The SAF line is to be installed in the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) at Hanford and will utilize technology that focuses on improved safety features for plant operating personnel, the public, and the environment. Equipment and process improvements incorporated by the SAF line will yield significant gains in nuclear materials safeguards, product quality and productivity.

  6. Continuous emission monitoring and accounting automated systems at an HPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roslyakov, P. V.; Ionkin, I. L.; Kondrateva, O. E.; Borovkova, A. M.; Seregin, V. A.; Morozov, I. V.

    2015-03-01

    Environmental and industrial emission monitoring at HPP's is a very urgent task today. Industrial monitoring assumes monitoring of emissions of harmful pollutants and optimization of fuel combustion technological processes at HPP's. Environmental monitoring is a system to assess ambient air quality with respect to a number of separate sources of harmful substances in pollution of atmospheric air of the area. Works on creating an industrial monitoring system are carried out at the National Research University Moscow Power Engineering Institute (MPEI) on the basis of the MPEI combined heat and power plant, and environmental monitoring stations are installed in Lefortovo raion, where the CHPP is located.

  7. Science Goal Monitor: Science Goal Driven Automation for NASA Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koratkar, Anuradha; Grosvenor, Sandy; Jung, John; Pell, Melissa; Matusow, David; Bailyn, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Infusion of automation technologies into NASA s future missions will be essential because of the need to: (1) effectively handle an exponentially increasing volume of scientific data, (2) successfully meet dynamic, opportunistic scientific goals and objectives, and (3) substantially reduce mission operations staff and costs. While much effort has gone into automating routine spacecraft operations to reduce human workload and hence costs, applying intelligent automation to the science side, i.e., science data acquisition, data analysis and reactions to that data analysis in a timely and still scientifically valid manner, has been relatively under-emphasized. In order to introduce science driven automation in missions, we must be able to: capture and interpret the science goals of observing programs, represent those goals in machine interpretable language; and allow spacecrafts onboard systems to autonomously react to the scientist's goals. In short, we must teach our platforms to dynamically understand, recognize, and react to the scientists goals. The Science Goal Monitor (SGM) project at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is a prototype software tool being developed to determine the best strategies for implementing science goal driven automation in missions. The tools being developed in SGM improve the ability to monitor and react to the changing status of scientific events. The SGM system enables scientists to specify what to look for and how to react in descriptive rather than technical terms. The system monitors streams of science data to identify occurrences of key events previously specified by the scientist. When an event occurs, the system autonomously coordinates the execution of the scientist s desired reactions. Through SGM, we will improve om understanding about the capabilities needed onboard for success, develop metrics to understand the potential increase in science returns, and develop an operational prototype so that the perceived risks associated

  8. Automated Low-Cost Photogrammetry for Flexible Structure Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C. H.; Mills, J. P.; Miller, P. E.

    2012-07-01

    Structural monitoring requires instruments which can provide high precision and accuracy, reliable measurements at good temporal resolution and rapid processing speeds. Long-term campaigns and flexible structures are regarded as two of the most challenging subjects in monitoring engineering structures. Long-term monitoring in civil engineering is generally considered to be labourintensive and financially expensive and it can take significant effort to arrange the necessary human resources, transportation and equipment maintenance. When dealing with flexible structure monitoring, it is of paramount importance that any monitoring equipment used is able to carry out rapid sampling. Low cost, automated, photogrammetric techniques therefore have the potential to become routinely viable for monitoring non-rigid structures. This research aims to provide a photogrammetric solution for long-term flexible structural monitoring purposes. The automated approach was achieved using low-cost imaging devices (mobile phones) to replace traditional image acquisition stations and substantially reduce the equipment costs. A self-programmed software package was developed to deal with the hardware-software integration and system operation. In order to evaluate the performance of this low-cost monitoring system, a shaking table experiment was undertaken. Different network configurations and target sizes were used to determine the best configuration. A large quantity of image data was captured by four DSLR cameras and four mobile phone cameras respectively. These image data were processed using photogrammetric techniques to calculate the final results for the system evaluation.

  9. Automation of Large-scale Computer Cluster Monitoring Information Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magradze, Erekle; Nadal, Jordi; Quadt, Arnulf; Kawamura, Gen; Musheghyan, Haykuhi

    2015-12-01

    High-throughput computing platforms consist of a complex infrastructure and provide a number of services apt to failures. To mitigate the impact of failures on the quality of the provided services, a constant monitoring and in time reaction is required, which is impossible without automation of the system administration processes. This paper introduces a way of automation of the process of monitoring information analysis to provide the long and short term predictions of the service response time (SRT) for a mass storage and batch systems and to identify the status of a service at a given time. The approach for the SRT predictions is based on Adaptive Neuro Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS). An evaluation of the approaches is performed on real monitoring data from the WLCG Tier 2 center GoeGrid. Ten fold cross validation results demonstrate high efficiency of both approaches in comparison to known methods.

  10. An automated personalised intervention algorithm for remote patient monitoring.

    PubMed

    Fursse, Joanna; Clarke, Malcolm; Jones, Russell; Khemka, Sneh; Findlay, Genevieve

    2008-01-01

    An automated personalised intervention algorithm was developed to determine when and if patients with chronic disease in a remote monitoring programme required intervention for management of their condition. The effectiveness of the algorithm has so far been evaluated on 29 patients. It was found to be particularly effective in monitoring newly diagnosed patients, patients requiring a change in medication as well as highlighting those that were not conforming to their medication. Our approach indicates that RPM used with the intervention algorithm and a clinical protocol can be effective in a primary care setting for targeting those patients that would most benefit from monitoring. PMID:18487728

  11. Automated biowaste sampling system feces monitoring system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, S. R.; Glanfield, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    The Feces Monitoring System (FMS) Program designed, fabricated, assembled and tested an engineering model waste collector system (WCS) to be used in support of life science and medical experiments related to Shuttle missions. The FMS design was patterned closely after the Shuttle WCS, including: interface provisions; mounting; configuration; and operating procedures. These similarities make it possible to eventually substitute an FMS for the Shuttle WCS of Orbiter. In addition, several advanced waste collection features, including the capability of real-time inertial fecal separation and fecal mass measurement and sampling were incorporated into the FMS design.

  12. Passive monitoring for automated MMPP communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, N. G.

    1994-07-01

    A recently completed study of passive sensing techniques for hf communication systems has shown that these sensing techniques can yield data which may be of use in the control of adaptive hf communication systems. The aim of this paper is to review work carried out to date on these techniques and to examine the feasibility of applying similar techniques to radio systems utilizing higher carrier frequencies, up to around 200MHz, where many propagation modes other than ionospheric skywave may exist. Whilst inputs for the control of adaptive radio systems may be derived from a number of sources, many techniques, such as pilot-tone soundings and the transmission of training sequences, involve radiation of signals which may be undesirable in a tactical situation. System control information may also be derived by monitoring other signals which are already present in related parts of the radio spectrum, allowing more covert operation and avoiding unnecessary pollution of the radio spectrum. Derivation of such control information for use in hf systems has been studied in some detail, utilizing the following types of radio signals existing in the hf band: swept frequency sounder signals radiated by other uses of the hf spectrum, broadcast signals, standard time signals, meteorological data signals (RTTY), and overall statistical occupancy measurements of the spectrum. Some of these techniques would also be applicable to the multimechanism case, provided that the more complex propagation inversion, which is due to the greater range of propagation mechanisms available, can be taken into account. Additional, higher frequency, sources of RF energy which may provide data through passive monitoring, include aeronautical navigation beacons, amateur beacons and various types of radar signals. Use may also be made of low-orbiting satellite signals, although these present tracking problems in terms of doppler shift and give data mainly related to ionospheric scintillation and hence

  13. Semi-automated microplate monitoring of protein polymerization and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Veronica M; Rowlett, Veronica W; Margolin, William; Morano, Kevin A

    2016-09-01

    Static light scattering (SLS) is a commonly used technique for monitoring dynamics of high molecular weight protein complexes such as protein oligomers or aggregates. However, traditional methods are limited to testing a single condition and typically require large amounts of protein and specialized equipment. We show that a standard microplate reader can be used to characterize the molecular dynamics of different types of protein complexes, with the multiple advantages of microscale experimental volumes, semi-automated protocols and highly parallel processing. PMID:27251433

  14. Real-time bioacoustics monitoring and automated species identification

    PubMed Central

    Corrada-Bravo, Carlos; Campos-Cerqueira, Marconi; Milan, Carlos; Vega, Giovany; Alvarez, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, animal species diversity and abundance is assessed using a variety of methods that are generally costly, limited in space and time, and most importantly, they rarely include a permanent record. Given the urgency of climate change and the loss of habitat, it is vital that we use new technologies to improve and expand global biodiversity monitoring to thousands of sites around the world. In this article, we describe the acoustical component of the Automated Remote Biodiversity Monitoring Network (ARBIMON), a novel combination of hardware and software for automating data acquisition, data management, and species identification based on audio recordings. The major components of the cyberinfrastructure include: a solar powered remote monitoring station that sends 1-min recordings every 10 min to a base station, which relays the recordings in real-time to the project server, where the recordings are processed and uploaded to the project website (arbimon.net). Along with a module for viewing, listening, and annotating recordings, the website includes a species identification interface to help users create machine learning algorithms to automate species identification. To demonstrate the system we present data on the vocal activity patterns of birds, frogs, insects, and mammals from Puerto Rico and Costa Rica. PMID:23882441

  15. Automated wireless monitoring system for cable tension using smart sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Sung-Han; Li, Jian; Jo, Hongki; Park, Jongwoong; Cho, Soojin; Spencer, Billie F.; Yun, Chung-Bang

    2013-04-01

    Cables are critical load carrying members of cable-stayed bridges; monitoring tension forces of the cables provides valuable information for SHM of the cable-stayed bridges. Monitoring systems for the cable tension can be efficiently realized using wireless smart sensors in conjunction with vibration-based cable tension estimation approaches. This study develops an automated cable tension monitoring system using MEMSIC's Imote2 smart sensors. An embedded data processing strategy is implemented on the Imote2-based wireless sensor network to calculate cable tensions using a vibration-based method, significantly reducing the wireless data transmission and associated power consumption. The autonomous operation of the monitoring system is achieved by AutoMonitor, a high-level coordinator application provided by the Illinois SHM Project Services Toolsuite. The monitoring system also features power harvesting enabled by solar panels attached to each sensor node and AutoMonitor for charging control. The proposed wireless system has been deployed on the Jindo Bridge, a cable-stayed bridge located in South Korea. Tension forces are autonomously monitored for 12 cables in the east, land side of the bridge, proving the validity and potential of the presented tension monitoring system for real-world applications.

  16. Science Goal Monitor: science goal driven automation for NASA missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koratkar, Anuradha; Grosvenor, Sandy; Jung, John; Pell, Melissa; Matusow, David; Bailyn, Charles

    2004-09-01

    Infusion of automation technologies into NASA's future missions will be essential because of the need to: (1) effectively handle an exponentially increasing volume of scientific data, (2) successfully meet dynamic, opportunistic scientific goals and objectives, and (3) substantially reduce mission operations staff and costs. While much effort has gone into automating routine spacecraft operations to reduce human workload and hence costs, applying intelligent automation to the science side, i.e., science data acquisition, data analysis and reactions to that data analysis in a timely and still scientifically valid manner, has been relatively under-emphasized. In order to introduce science driven automation in missions, we must be able to: capture and interpret the science goals of observing programs, represent those goals in machine interpretable language; and allow spacecrafts' onboard systems to autonomously react to the scientist's goals. In short, we must teach our platforms to dynamically understand, recognize, and react to the scientists' goals. The Science Goal Monitor (SGM) project at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center is a prototype software tool being developed to determine the best strategies for implementing science goal driven automation in missions. The tools being developed in SGM improve the ability to monitor and react to the changing status of scientific events. The SGM system enables scientists to specify what to look for and how to react in descriptive rather than technical terms. The system monitors streams of science data to identify occurrences of key events previously specified by the scientist. When an event occurs, the system autonomously coordinates the execution of the scientist's desired reactions. Through SGM, we will improve our understanding about the capabilities needed onboard for success, develop metrics to understand the potential increase in science returns, and develop an "operational" prototype so that the perceived risks

  17. Automated Fuels Treatment Effectiveness Evaluation Using Remote-Sensing Information (AFTEERS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, A.; DeWinter, J. L.; Ekstrand, A. L.; Lorentz, K.; Drury, S.

    2013-12-01

    Recent U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) reports have identified a need for land managers to develop measures for evaluating the efficacy of fuels treatments for mitigating fire hazard on federal lands. Methods exist for evaluating fuels treatment effectiveness after wildfires; however, these techniques are time- and labor-intensive. As a result, fire managers have expressed a need for tools they can use to better evaluate the performance of fuels treatments. To address this need, scientists at Sonoma Technology, Inc., have developed a method for rapidly and efficiently assessing wildland fuels treatment effectiveness using satellite observations and associated map products. The Automated Fuels Treatment Effectiveness Evaluation Using Remote-Sensing Information (AFTEERS) project compares the Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity (MTBS) fire severity map products to fuels treatment, fire progression, terrain, and meteorological data sets to elucidate the underlying factors that influence how a fire burns. We used fuels treatment information from the Forest Service Activity Tracking Support System (FACTS) and National Fire Plan Operations and Reporting System (NFPORS) data sets; fire progression information from the Geospatial Multi-Agency Coordination Group (GeoMAC) database and from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and Hazard Mapping System (HMS) remote-sensing fire detect products; vegetation type information from the Landscape Fire and Resource Management Planning Tools Project (LANDFIRE) and from the MODIS satellite instrument; and terrain slope, aspect, and elevation from LANDFIRE. We will present the results from several case studies to demonstrate how easy access to these data sets will help land managers assess the performance of individual fuels treatments across landscapes to support decision-making regarding the type and location of future fuels treatments. In the future, we hope to develop a tool that will be incorporated

  18. Automated Monitoring System for Waste Disposal Sites and Groundwater

    SciTech Connect

    S. E. Rawlinson

    2003-03-01

    A proposal submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science and Technology, Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) program to deploy an automated monitoring system for waste disposal sites and groundwater, herein referred to as the ''Automated Monitoring System,'' was funded in fiscal year (FY) 2002. This two-year project included three parts: (1) deployment of cellular telephone modems on existing dataloggers, (2) development of a data management system, and (3) development of Internet accessibility. The proposed concept was initially (in FY 2002) to deploy cellular telephone modems on existing dataloggers and partially develop the data management system at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This initial effort included both Bechtel Nevada (BN) and the Desert Research Institute (DRI). The following year (FY 2003), cellular modems were to be similarly deployed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and the early data management system developed at the NTS was to be brought to those locations for site-specific development and use. Also in FY 2003, additional site-specific development of the complete system was to be conducted at the NTS. To complete the project, certain data, depending on site-specific conditions or restrictions involving distribution of data, were to made available through the Internet via the DRI/Western Region Climate Center (WRCC) WEABASE platform. If the complete project had been implemented, the system schematic would have looked like the figure on the following page.

  19. Use of impedance tagging to monitor fuel cell stack performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Gregory

    Fuel cells are electrochemical device that are traditionally assembled in stacks to perform meaningful work. Monitoring the state of the stack is vitally important to ensure that it is operating efficiently and that constituent cells are not failing for one of a several common reasons including membrane dehydration, gas diffusion layer flooding, reactant starvation, and physical damage. Current state-of-the-art monitoring systems are costly and require at least one connection per cell on the stack, which introduces reliability concerns for stacks consisting of hundreds of cells. This thesis presents a novel approach for diagnosing problems in a fuel cell stack that attempts to reduce the cost and complexity of monitoring cells in a stack. The proposed solution modifies the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) response of each cell in the stack by connecting an electrical tag in parallel with each cell. This approach allows the EIS response of the entire stack to identify and locate problems in the stack. Capacitors were chosen as tags because they do not interfere with normal stack operation and because they can generate distinct stack EIS responses. An experiment was performed in the Center for Automation Technologies an Systems (CATS) fuel cell laboratory at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) to perform EIS measurements on a single cell with and without capacitor tags to investigate the proposed solution. The EIS data collected from this experiment was used to create a fuel cell model to investigate the proposed solution under ideal conditions. This thesis found that, although the concept shows some promise in simulations, significant obstacles to implementing the proposed solution. Observed EIS response when the capacitor tags were connected did not match the expected EIS response. Constraints on the capacitor tags found by the model impose significant manufacturing challenges to the proposed solution. Further development of the proposed solution is

  20. Automated key process monitors for patient care documentation.

    PubMed Central

    Heermann, L. K.; East, T. D.; Lugo, A.; Bradshaw, R. L.

    1998-01-01

    Complete, accurate and timely patient care documentation is an essential part of the practice of medicine. As with any other process in medicine or industry, continuous quality improvement (CQI) is essential to assure the highest quality at the lowest cost. CQI requires objective key process measures that can be assessed routinely. A set of key process monitors designed to assess completeness, accuracy and timeliness were created based on local, regional and national standards. Feasibility was assessed in the LDS Hospital Emergency Department using 31,429 patient visits in the 18 months from June 1995 to November 1996. The logic of the score was programmed into SQL scripts and run against an Oracle database containing the patient care documentation. The results indicate that the chosen key process monitors can be used to provide real time assessment of the patient care documentation process. The general concepts of the key process measures of completeness, accuracy and timeliness are generalizable to many areas of medicine. The overall score provides one method of easily tracking departmental performance while the overall process monitoring database allows powerful, in-depth analysis of individual components of the process. It is recommended that such automated process monitoring tools be integrated into future clinical information systems. PMID:9929223

  1. Enrichment Monitor for 235U Fuel Tubes

    SciTech Connect

    Winn, W.G.

    2001-08-22

    This report describes the performance of this prototype y-monitor of 235 Uranium enrichment. In this proposed method y-rates associated with 235U and 232U are correlated with enrichment. Instrumentation for appraising fuel tubes with this method has been assembled and tested.

  2. Tools for automated acoustic monitoring within the R package monitoR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Katz, Jonathan; Hafner, Sasha D.; Donovan, Therese

    2016-01-01

    The R package monitoR contains tools for managing an acoustic-monitoring program including survey metadata, template creation and manipulation, automated detection and results management. These tools are scalable for use with small projects as well as larger long-term projects and those with expansive spatial extents. Here, we describe typical workflow when using the tools in monitoR. Typical workflow utilizes a generic sequence of functions, with the option for either binary point matching or spectrogram cross-correlation detectors.

  3. ClampOn acoustic solid fuel monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Vesterhus, T.

    1999-07-01

    The general idea of the project is to develop a ClampOn Solid Fuel Monitor, enabling optimization of the combustion process in pulverized coal fired boilers. The development will be based on adapting existing technology for measuring the content of sand particles in a flow of natural gas. The Norwegian firm ClampOn AS develops equipment for such measurements, and has already a proven track record as a result of its work with major oil companies throughout the world. The industry wants some sort of fuel indicator, e.g. a piece of equipment that enables the operator to measure and control the amounts of the fuel to each individual burner. The best techniques available today--as far as the author knows--can only offer samples of the fuel stream at discrete points of time. To truly optimize the combustion process, it is vital to continuously monitor the mass of fuel to each burner, and optimize the combustion process through continuous and infinitesimal adjustments of the fuel flow. This will minimize the NO{sub x} created by uneven temperature-distribution in the combustion chamber. In this way maximum power generation can be obtained at minimal emission of pollutants for a given amount of coal burned.

  4. APPLICATIONS OF CURRENT TECHNOLOGY FOR CONTINUOUS MONITORING OF SPENT FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Drayer, R.

    2013-06-09

    Advancements in technology have opened many opportunities to improve upon the current infrastructure surrounding the nuclear fuel cycle. Embedded devices, very small sensors, and wireless technology can be applied to Security, Safety, and Nonproliferation of Spent Nuclear Fuel. Security, separate of current video monitoring systems, can be improved by integrating current wireless technology with a variety of sensors including motion detection, altimeter, accelerometer, and a tagging system. By continually monitoring these sensors, thresholds can be set to sense deviations from nominal values. Then alarms or notifications can be activated as needed. Safety can be improved in several ways. First, human exposure to ionizing radiation can be reduced by using a wireless sensor package on each spent fuel cask to monitor radiation, temperature, humidity, etc. Since the sensor data is monitored remotely operator stay-time is decreased and distance from the spent fuel increased, so the overall radiation exposure is reduced as compared to visual inspections. The second improvement is the ability to monitor continuously rather than periodically. If changes occur to the material, alarm thresholds could be set and notifications made to provide advanced notice of negative data trends. These sensor packages could also record data to be used for scientific evaluation and studies to improve transportation and storage safety. Nonproliferation can be improved for spent fuel transportation and storage by designing an integrated tag that uses current infrastructure for reporting and in an event; tracking can be accomplished using the Iridium satellite system. This technology is similar to GPS but with higher signal strength and penetration power, but lower accuracy. A sensor package can integrate all or some of the above depending on the transportation and storage requirements and regulations. A sensor package can be developed using off the shelf technology and applying it to each

  5. Agents and Daemons, automating Data Quality Monitoring operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopera, Luis I.; DQM Group

    2012-12-01

    Since 2009 when the LHC came back to active service, the Data Quality Monitoring (DQM) team was faced with the need to homogenize and automate operations across all the different environments within which DQM is used. The main goal of automation is to reduce the operator intervention at the minimum possible level, especially in the area of DQM files management, where long-term archival presented the greatest challenges. Manually operated procedures cannot cope with the constant increase in luminosity, datasets and uptime of the CMS detector. Therefore a solid and reliable set of sophisticated scripts, the agents, has been designed since the beginning to manage all DQM-related workflows. This allows to fully exploiting all available resources in every condition, maximizing the performance and reducing the latency in making data available for validation and certification. The agents can be easily fine-tuned to adapt to current and future hardware constraints and proved to be flexible enough to include unforeseen features, like an ad-hoc quota management and a real time sound alarm system.

  6. Automated medical diagnosis with fuzzy stochastic models: monitoring chronic diseases.

    PubMed

    Jeanpierre, Laurent; Charpillet, François

    2004-01-01

    As the world population ages, the patients per physician ratio keeps on increasing. This is even more important in the domain of chronic pathologies where people are usually monitored for years and need regular consultations. To address this problem, we propose an automated system to monitor a patient population, detecting anomalies in instantaneous data and in their temporal evolution, so that it could alert physicians. By handling the population of healthy patients autonomously and by drawing the physicians' attention to the patients-at-risk, the system allows physicians to spend comparatively more time with patients who need their services. In such a system, the interaction between the patients, the diagnosis module, and the physicians is very important. We have based this system on a combination of stochastic models, fuzzy filters, and strong medical semantics. We particularly focused on a particular tele-medicine application: the Diatelic Project. Its objective is to monitor chronic kidney-insufficient patients and to detect hydration troubles. During two years, physicians from the ALTIR have conducted a prospective randomized study of the system. This experiment clearly shows that the proposed system is really beneficial to the patients' health. PMID:15520535

  7. An overview of the Environmental Monitoring Computer Automation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.M.; Lorenz, R.

    1992-12-31

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) was bulk to produce plutonium and tritium for national defense. As a result of site operations, routine and accidental releases of radionuclides have occurred. The effects these releases have on the k>cal population and environment are of concern to the Department of Energy (DOE) and SRS personnel. Each year, approximately 40,000 environmental samples are collected. The quality of the samples, analytical methods and results obtained are important to site personnel. The Environmental Monitoring Computer Automation Project (EMCAP) was developed to better manage scheduling, log-in, tracking, analytical results, and report generation. EMCAP can be viewed as a custom Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) with the ability to schedule samples, generate reports, and query data. The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the SRS environmental monitoring program, describe the development of EMCAP software and hardware, discuss the different software modules, show how EMCAP improved the Environmental Monitoring Section program, and examine the future of EMCAP at SRS.

  8. An overview of the Environmental Monitoring Computer Automation Project

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, S.M.; Lorenz, R.

    1992-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) was bulk to produce plutonium and tritium for national defense. As a result of site operations, routine and accidental releases of radionuclides have occurred. The effects these releases have on the k>cal population and environment are of concern to the Department of Energy (DOE) and SRS personnel. Each year, approximately 40,000 environmental samples are collected. The quality of the samples, analytical methods and results obtained are important to site personnel. The Environmental Monitoring Computer Automation Project (EMCAP) was developed to better manage scheduling, log-in, tracking, analytical results, and report generation. EMCAP can be viewed as a custom Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) with the ability to schedule samples, generate reports, and query data. The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the SRS environmental monitoring program, describe the development of EMCAP software and hardware, discuss the different software modules, show how EMCAP improved the Environmental Monitoring Section program, and examine the future of EMCAP at SRS.

  9. The Automated Instrumentation and Monitoring System (AIMS) reference manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Jerry; Hontalas, Philip; Listgarten, Sherry

    1993-01-01

    Whether a researcher is designing the 'next parallel programming paradigm,' another 'scalable multiprocessor' or investigating resource allocation algorithms for multiprocessors, a facility that enables parallel program execution to be captured and displayed is invaluable. Careful analysis of execution traces can help computer designers and software architects to uncover system behavior and to take advantage of specific application characteristics and hardware features. A software tool kit that facilitates performance evaluation of parallel applications on multiprocessors is described. The Automated Instrumentation and Monitoring System (AIMS) has four major software components: a source code instrumentor which automatically inserts active event recorders into the program's source code before compilation; a run time performance-monitoring library, which collects performance data; a trace file animation and analysis tool kit which reconstructs program execution from the trace file; and a trace post-processor which compensate for data collection overhead. Besides being used as prototype for developing new techniques for instrumenting, monitoring, and visualizing parallel program execution, AIMS is also being incorporated into the run-time environments of various hardware test beds to evaluate their impact on user productivity. Currently, AIMS instrumentors accept FORTRAN and C parallel programs written for Intel's NX operating system on the iPSC family of multi computers. A run-time performance-monitoring library for the iPSC/860 is included in this release. We plan to release monitors for other platforms (such as PVM and TMC's CM-5) in the near future. Performance data collected can be graphically displayed on workstations (e.g. Sun Sparc and SGI) supporting X-Windows (in particular, Xl IR5, Motif 1.1.3).

  10. Automated monitoring and quantitative analysis of feeding behaviour in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Itskov, Pavel M.; Moreira, José-Maria; Vinnik, Ekaterina; Lopes, Gonçalo; Safarik, Steve; Dickinson, Michael H.; Ribeiro, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Food ingestion is one of the defining behaviours of all animals, but its quantification and analysis remain challenging. This is especially the case for feeding behaviour in small, genetically tractable animals such as Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we present a method based on capacitive measurements, which allows the detailed, automated and high-throughput quantification of feeding behaviour. Using this method, we were able to measure the volume ingested in single sips of an individual, and monitor the absorption of food with high temporal resolution. We demonstrate that flies ingest food by rhythmically extending their proboscis with a frequency that is not modulated by the internal state of the animal. Instead, hunger and satiety homeostatically modulate the microstructure of feeding. These results highlight similarities of food intake regulation between insects, rodents, and humans, pointing to a common strategy in how the nervous systems of different animals control food intake. PMID:25087594

  11. Pattern recognition monitoring of PEM fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Meltser, M.A.

    1999-08-31

    The CO-concentration in the H{sub 2} feed stream to a PEM fuel cell stack is monitored by measuring current and voltage behavior patterns from an auxiliary cell attached to the end of the stack. The auxiliary cell is connected to the same oxygen and hydrogen feed manifolds that supply the stack, and discharges through a constant load. Pattern recognition software compares the current and voltage patterns from the auxiliary cell to current and voltage signature determined from a reference cell similar to the auxiliary cell and operated under controlled conditions over a wide range of CO-concentrations in the H{sub 2} fuel stream. 4 figs.

  12. Pattern recognition monitoring of PEM fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Meltser, Mark Alexander

    1999-01-01

    The CO-concentration in the H.sub.2 feed stream to a PEM fuel cell stack is monitored by measuring current and voltage behavior patterns from an auxiliary cell attached to the end of the stack. The auxiliary cell is connected to the same oxygen and hydrogen feed manifolds that supply the stack, and discharges through a constant load. Pattern recognition software compares the current and voltage patterns from the auxiliary cell to current and voltage signature determined from a reference cell similar to the auxiliary cell and operated under controlled conditions over a wide range of CO-concentrations in the H.sub.2 fuel stream.

  13. Microfabricated fuel heating value monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, Alex L.; Manginell, Ronald P.; Moorman, Matthew W.

    2010-05-04

    A microfabricated fuel heating value monitoring device comprises a microfabricated gas chromatography column in combination with a catalytic microcalorimeter. The microcalorimeter can comprise a reference thermal conductivity sensor to provide diagnostics and surety. Using microfabrication techniques, the device can be manufactured in production quantities at a low per-unit cost. The microfabricated fuel heating value monitoring device enables continuous calorimetric determination of the heating value of natural gas with a 1 minute analysis time and 1.5 minute cycle time using air as a carrier gas. This device has applications in remote natural gas mining stations, pipeline switching and metering stations, turbine generators, and other industrial user sites. For gas pipelines, the device can improve gas quality during transfer and blending, and provide accurate financial accounting. For industrial end users, the device can provide continuous feedback of physical gas properties to improve combustion efficiency during use.

  14. Automating slope monitoring in mines with terrestrial lidar scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conforti, Dario

    2014-05-01

    Static terrestrial laser scanners (TLS) have been an important component of slope monitoring for some time, and many solutions for monitoring the progress of a slide have been devised over the years. However, all of these solutions have required users to operate the lidar equipment in the field, creating a high cost in time and resources, especially if the surveys must be performed very frequently. This paper presents a new solution for monitoring slides, developed using a TLS and an automated data acquisition, processing and analysis system. In this solution, a TLS is permanently mounted within sight of the target surface and connected to a control computer. The control software on the computer automatically triggers surveys according to a user-defined schedule, parses data into point clouds, and compares data against a baseline. The software can base the comparison against either the original survey of the site or the most recent survey, depending on whether the operator needs to measure the total or recent movement of the slide. If the displacement exceeds a user-defined safety threshold, the control computer transmits alerts via SMS text messaging and/or email, including graphs and tables describing the nature and size of the displacement. The solution can also be configured to trigger the external visual/audio alarm systems. If the survey areas contain high-traffic areas such as roads, the operator can mark them for exclusion in the comparison to prevent false alarms. To improve usability and safety, the control computer can connect to a local intranet and allow remote access through the software's web portal. This enables operators to perform most tasks with the TLS from their office, including reviewing displacement reports, downloading survey data, and adjusting the scan schedule. This solution has proved invaluable in automatically detecting and alerting users to potential danger within the monitored areas while lowering the cost and work required for

  15. AUTOMATED RADIOLOGICAL MONITORING AT A RUSSIAN MINISTRY OF DEFENSE NAVAL SITE.

    SciTech Connect

    MOSKOWITZ,P.D.; POMERVILLE,J.; GAVRILOV,S.; KISSELEV,V.; DANIYLAN,V.; BELIKOV,A.; EGORKIN,A.; SOKOLOVSKI,Y.; ENDREGARD,M.; KROSSHAVN,M.; SUNDLING,C.V.; YOKSTAD,H.

    2001-02-25

    The Arctic Military Environmental Cooperation (AMEC) Program is a cooperative effort between the military establishments of the Kingdom of Norway, the Russian Federation, and the US. This paper discusses joint activities conducted over the past year among Norwegian, Russian, and US technical experts on a project to develop, demonstrate and implement automated radiological monitoring at Russian Navy facilities engaged in the dismantlement of nuclear-powered strategic ballistic missile launching submarines. Radiological monitoring is needed at these facilities to help protect workers engaged in the dismantlement program and the public living within the footprint of routine and accidental radiation exposure areas. By providing remote stand-alone monitoring, the Russian Navy will achieve added protection due to the defense-in-depth strategy afforded by local (at the site), regional (Kola) and national-level (Moscow) oversight. The system being implemented at the Polyaminsky Russian Naval Shipyard was developed from a working model tested at the Russian Institute for Nuclear Safety, Moscow, Russia. It includes Russian manufactured terrestrial and underwater gamma detectors, smart controllers for graded sampling, radio-modems for offsite transmission of the data, and a data fusion/display system: The data fusion/display system is derived from the Norwegian Picasso AMEC Environmental Monitoring software package. This computer package allows monitoring personnel to review the real-time and historical status of monitoring at specific sites and objects and to establish new monitoring protocols as required, for example, in an off-normal accident situation. Plans are being developed to implement the use of this system at most RF Naval sites handling spent nuclear fuel.

  16. AUTOMATED RADIOLOGICAL MONITORING AT A RUSSIAN MINISTRY OF DEFENCE NAVAL SITE.

    SciTech Connect

    MOSKOWITZ,P.D.; POMERVILLE,J.; GAVRILOV,S.; KISSELEV,V.; DANIYLAN,V.; BELIKOV,A.; EGORKIN,A.; SOKOLOVSKI,Y.; ENDREGARD,M.; KROSSHAVN,M.; SUNDLING,C.V.; YOKSTAD,H.

    2001-02-25

    The Arctic Military Environmental Cooperation (AMEC) Program is a cooperative effort between the military establishments of the Kingdom of Norway, the Russian Federation, and the US. This paper discusses joint activities conducted over the past year among Norwegian, Russian, and US technical experts on a project to develop, demonstrate and implement automated radiological monitoring at Russian Navy facilities engaged in the dismantlement of nuclear-powered strategic ballistic missile launching submarines. Radiological monitoring is needed at these facilities to help protect workers engaged in the dismantlement program and the public living within the footprint of routine and accidental radiation exposure areas. By providing remote stand-alone monitoring, the Russian Navy will achieve added protection due to the defense-in-depth strategy afforded by local (at the site), regional (Kola) and national-level (Moscow) oversight. The system being implemented at the Polyaminsky Russian Naval Shipyard was developed from a working model tested at the Russian Institute for Nuclear Safety, Moscow, Russia. It includes Russian manufactured terrestrial and underwater gamma detectors, smart controllers for graded sampling, radio-modems for offsite transmission of the data, and a data fusion/display system: The data fusion/display system is derived from the Norwegian Picasso AMEC Environmental Monitoring software package. This computer package allows monitoring personnel to review the real-time and historical status of monitoring at specific sites and objects and to establish new monitoring protocols as required, for example, in an off-normal accident situation. Plans are being developed to implement the use of this system at most RF Naval sites handling spent nuclear fuel.

  17. Coupon Surveillance For Corrosion Monitoring In Nuclear Fuel Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J. I.; Murphy, T. R.; Deible, R.

    2012-10-01

    Aluminum and stainless steel coupons were put into a nuclear fuel basin to monitor the effect of water chemistry on the corrosion of fuel cladding. These coupons have been monitored for over ten years. The corrosion and pitting data is being used to model the kinetics and estimate the damage that is occurring to the fuel cladding.

  18. Automated inundation monitoring using TerraSAR-X multitemporal imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gebhardt, S.; Huth, J.; Wehrmann, T.; Schettler, I.; Künzer, C.; Schmidt, M.; Dech, S.

    2009-04-01

    The Mekong Delta in Vietnam offers natural resources for several million inhabitants. However, a strong population increase, changing climatic conditions and regulatory measures at the upper reaches of the Mekong lead to severe changes in the Delta. Extreme flood events occur more frequently, drinking water availability is increasingly limited, soils show signs of salinization or acidification, species and complete habitats diminish. During the Monsoon season the river regularly overflows its banks in the lower Mekong area, usually with beneficial effects. However, extreme flood events occur more frequently causing extensive damage, on the average once every 6 to 10 years river flood levels exceed the critical beneficial level X-band SAR data are well suited for deriving inundated surface areas. The TerraSAR-X sensor with its different scanning modi allows for the derivation of spatial and temporal high resolved inundation masks. The paper presents an automated procedure for deriving inundated areas from TerraSAR-X Scansar and Stripmap image data. Within the framework of the German-Vietnamese WISDOM project, focussing the Mekong Delta region in Vietnam, images have been acquired covering the flood season from June 2008 to November 2008. Based on these images a time series of the so called watermask showing inundated areas have been derived. The product is required as intermediate to (i) calibrate 2d inundation model scenarios, (ii) estimate the extent of affected areas, and (iii) analyze the scope of prior crisis. The image processing approach is based on the assumption that water surfaces are forward scattering the radar signal resulting in low backscatter signals to the sensor. It uses multiple grey level thresholds and image morphological operations. The approach is robust in terms of automation, accuracy, robustness, and processing time. The resulting watermasks show the seasonal flooding pattern with inundations starting in July, having their peak at the end

  19. Automated Instrumentation, Monitoring and Visualization of PVM Programs Using AIMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehra, Pankaj; VanVoorst, Brian; Yan, Jerry; Lum, Henry, Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We present views and analysis of the execution of several PVM (Parallel Virtual Machine) codes for Computational Fluid Dynamics on a networks of Sparcstations, including: (1) NAS Parallel Benchmarks CG and MG; (2) a multi-partitioning algorithm for NAS Parallel Benchmark SP; and (3) an overset grid flowsolver. These views and analysis were obtained using our Automated Instrumentation and Monitoring System (AIMS) version 3.0, a toolkit for debugging the performance of PVM programs. We will describe the architecture, operation and application of AIMS. The AIMS toolkit contains: (1) Xinstrument, which can automatically instrument various computational and communication constructs in message-passing parallel programs; (2) Monitor, a library of runtime trace-collection routines; (3) VK (Visual Kernel), an execution-animation tool with source-code clickback; and (4) Tally, a tool for statistical analysis of execution profiles. Currently, Xinstrument can handle C and Fortran 77 programs using PVM 3.2.x; Monitor has been implemented and tested on Sun 4 systems running SunOS 4.1.2; and VK uses XIIR5 and Motif 1.2. Data and views obtained using AIMS clearly illustrate several characteristic features of executing parallel programs on networked workstations: (1) the impact of long message latencies; (2) the impact of multiprogramming overheads and associated load imbalance; (3) cache and virtual-memory effects; and (4) significant skews between workstation clocks. Interestingly, AIMS can compensate for constant skew (zero drift) by calibrating the skew between a parent and its spawned children. In addition, AIMS' skew-compensation algorithm can adjust timestamps in a way that eliminates physically impossible communications (e.g., messages going backwards in time). Our current efforts are directed toward creating new views to explain the observed performance of PVM programs. Some of the features planned for the near future include: (1) ConfigView, showing the physical topology

  20. Automated Instrumentation, Monitoring and Visualization of PVM Programs Using AIMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehra, Pankaj; VanVoorst, Brian; Yan, Jerry; Tucker, Deanne (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    We present views and analysis of the execution of several PVM codes for Computational Fluid Dynamics on a network of Sparcstations, including (a) NAS Parallel benchmarks CG and MG (White, Alund and Sunderam 1993); (b) a multi-partitioning algorithm for NAS Parallel Benchmark SP (Wijngaart 1993); and (c) an overset grid flowsolver (Smith 1993). These views and analysis were obtained using our Automated Instrumentation and Monitoring System (AIMS) version 3.0, a toolkit for debugging the performance of PVM programs. We will describe the architecture, operation and application of AIMS. The AIMS toolkit contains (a) Xinstrument, which can automatically instrument various computational and communication constructs in message-passing parallel programs; (b) Monitor, a library of run-time trace-collection routines; (c) VK (Visual Kernel), an execution-animation tool with source-code clickback; and (d) Tally, a tool for statistical analysis of execution profiles. Currently, Xinstrument can handle C and Fortran77 programs using PVM 3.2.x; Monitor has been implemented and tested on Sun 4 systems running SunOS 4.1.2; and VK uses X11R5 and Motif 1.2. Data and views obtained using AIMS clearly illustrate several characteristic features of executing parallel programs on networked workstations: (a) the impact of long message latencies; (b) the impact of multiprogramming overheads and associated load imbalance; (c) cache and virtual-memory effects; and (4significant skews between workstation clocks. Interestingly, AIMS can compensate for constant skew (zero drift) by calibrating the skew between a parent and its spawned children. In addition, AIMS' skew-compensation algorithm can adjust timestamps in a way that eliminates physically impossible communications (e.g., messages going backwards in time). Our current efforts are directed toward creating new views to explain the observed performance of PVM programs. Some of the features planned for the near future include: (a) Config

  1. Fuel Cell/Electrochemical Cell Voltage Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasquez, Arturo

    2012-01-01

    A concept has been developed for a new fuel cell individual-cell-voltage monitor that can be directly connected to a multi-cell fuel cell stack for direct substack power provisioning. It can also provide voltage isolation for applications in high-voltage fuel cell stacks. The technology consists of basic modules, each with an 8- to 16-cell input electrical measurement connection port. For each basic module, a power input connection would be provided for direct connection to a sub-stack of fuel cells in series within the larger stack. This power connection would allow for module power to be available in the range of 9-15 volts DC. The relatively low voltage differences that the module would encounter from the input electrical measurement connection port, coupled with the fact that the module's operating power is supplied by the same substack voltage input (and so will be at similar voltage), provides for elimination of high-commonmode voltage issues within each module. Within each module, there would be options for analog-to-digital conversion and data transfer schemes. Each module would also include a data-output/communication port. Each of these ports would be required to be either non-electrical (e.g., optically isolated) or electrically isolated. This is necessary to account for the fact that the plurality of modules attached to the stack will normally be at a range of voltages approaching the full range of the fuel cell stack operating voltages. A communications/ data bus could interface with the several basic modules. Options have been identified for command inputs from the spacecraft vehicle controller, and for output-status/data feeds to the vehicle.

  2. APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant - Monitoring System Report

    SciTech Connect

    James Francfort; Dimitri Hochard

    2005-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA), along with Electric Transportation Applications and Arizona Pubic Service (APS), is monitoring the operations of the APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant to determine the costs to produce hydrogen fuels (including 100% hydrogen as well as hydrogen and compressed natural gas blends) for use by fleets and other operators of advanced-technology vehicles. The hydrogen fuel cost data will be used as benchmark data by technology modelers as well as research and development programs. The Pilot Plant can produce up to 18 kilograms (kg) of hydrogen per day by electrolysis. It can store up to 155 kg of hydrogen at various pressures up to 6,000 psi. The dispenser island can fuel vehicles with 100% hydrogen at 5,000 psi and with blends of hydrogen and compressed natural gas at 3,600 psi. The monitoring system was designed to track hydrogen delivery to each of the three storage areas and to monitor the use of electricity on all major equipment in the Pilot Plant, including the fuel dispenser island. In addition, water used for the electrolysis process is monitored to allow calculation of the total cost of plant operations and plant efficiencies. The monitoring system at the Pilot Plant will include about 100 sensors when complete (50 are installed to date), allowing for analysis of component, subsystems, and plant-level costs. The monitoring software is mostly off-the-shelve, with a custom interface. The majority of the sensors input to the Programmable Automation Controller as 4- to 20-mA analog signals. The plant can be monitored over of the Internet, but the control functions are restricted to the control room equipment. Using the APS general service plan E32 electric rate of 2.105 cents per kWh, during a recent eight-month period when 1,200 kg of hydrogen was produced and the plant capacity factor was 26%, the electricity cost to produce one kg of hydrogen was $3.43. However, the

  3. An automated digital imaging system for environmental monitoring applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bogle, Rian; Velasco, Miguel; Vogel, John

    2013-01-01

    Recent improvements in the affordability and availability of high-resolution digital cameras, data loggers, embedded computers, and radio/cellular modems have advanced the development of sophisticated automated systems for remote imaging. Researchers have successfully placed and operated automated digital cameras in remote locations and in extremes of temperature and humidity, ranging from the islands of the South Pacific to the Mojave Desert and the Grand Canyon. With the integration of environmental sensors, these automated systems are able to respond to local conditions and modify their imaging regimes as needed. In this report we describe in detail the design of one type of automated imaging system developed by our group. It is easily replicated, low-cost, highly robust, and is a stand-alone automated camera designed to be placed in remote locations, without wireless connectivity.

  4. The automated/computerized TLD-personnel monitoring system in Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duftschmid, K. E.

    1980-09-01

    The paper discusses the layout and operation details of the automated TLD system used in Austria for several years to monitor some 13000 radiation workers per month. Dosimetric properties, handling and computer software are described.

  5. AN AUTOMATED MONITORING SYSTEM FOR FISH PHYSIOLOGY AND TOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes a data acquisition and control (DAC) system that was constructed to manage selected physiological measurements and sample control for aquatic physiology and toxicology. Automated DAC was accomplished with a microcomputer running menu-driven software develope...

  6. Radioanalytical Chemistry for Automated Nuclear Waste Process Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Jay W. Grate; Timothy A. DeVol

    2006-07-20

    The objectives of our research were to develop the first automated radiochemical process analyzer including sample pretreatment methodoology, and to initiate work on new detection approaches, especially using modified diode detectors.

  7. Automated Impedance Tomography for Monitoring Permeable Reactive Barrier Health

    SciTech Connect

    LaBrecque, D J; Adkins, P L

    2009-07-02

    The objective of this research was the development of an autonomous, automated electrical geophysical monitoring system which allows for near real-time assessment of Permeable Reactive Barrier (PRB) health and aging and which provides this assessment through a web-based interface to site operators, owners and regulatory agencies. Field studies were performed at four existing PRB sites; (1) a uranium tailing site near Monticello, Utah, (2) the DOE complex at Kansas City, Missouri, (3) the Denver Federal Center in Denver, Colorado and (4) the Asarco Smelter site in East Helena, Montana. Preliminary surface data over the PRB sites were collected (in December, 2005). After the initial round of data collection, the plan was modified to include studies inside the barriers in order to better understand barrier aging processes. In September 2006 an autonomous data collection system was designed and installed at the EPA PRB and the electrode setups in the barrier were revised and three new vertical electrode arrays were placed in dedicated boreholes which were in direct contact with the PRB material. Final data were collected at the Kansas City, Denver and Monticello, Utah PRB sites in the fall of 2007. At the Asarco Smelter site in East Helena, Montana, nearly continuous data was collected by the autonomous monitoring system from June 2006 to November 2007. This data provided us with a picture of the evolution of the barrier, enabling us to examine barrier changes more precisely and determine whether these changes are due to installation issues or are normal barrier aging. Two rounds of laboratory experiments were carried out during the project. We conducted column experiments to investigate the effect of mineralogy on the electrical signatures resulting from iron corrosion and mineral precipitation in zero valent iron (ZVI) columns. In the second round of laboratory experiments we observed the electrical response from simulation of actual field PRBs at two sites: the

  8. Automated chemical monitoring in new projects of nuclear power plant units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanok, O. I.; Fedoseev, M. V.

    2013-07-01

    The development of automated chemical monitoring systems in nuclear power plant units for the past 30 years is briefly described. The modern level of facilities used to support the operation of automated chemical monitoring systems in Russia and abroad is shown. Hardware solutions suggested by the All-Russia Institute for Nuclear Power Plant Operation (which is the General Designer of automated process control systems for power units used in the AES-2006 and VVER-TOI Projects) are presented, including the structure of additional equipment for monitoring water chemistry (taking the Novovoronezh 2 nuclear power plant as an example). It is shown that the solutions proposed with respect to receiving and processing of input measurement signals and subsequent construction of standard control loops are unified in nature. Simultaneous receipt of information from different sources for ensuring that water chemistry is monitored in sufficient scope and with required promptness is one of the problems that have been solved successfully. It is pointed out that improved quality of automated chemical monitoring can be supported by organizing full engineering follow-up of the automated chemical monitoring system's equipment throughout its entire service life.

  9. Unique automation system monitors south Florida production operations

    SciTech Connect

    Weaver, E.G.; Hildebrand, S.M.

    1982-06-01

    A stand-alone local automation system and company-wide design remote terminal units (RTU's) are combined into one system by employing a microprocessor-based control unit. The local system provides operational personnel with alarms, accumulators, analogs, and controls for daily real-time operations. These operational data points, through specialized software, are reformated and interfaced to pseudo-RTU's within the microprocessor memory. From the pseudo-RTU's, the information is transmitted to the company-wide computer production control (CPC) system. A description is given of this unique automation system, its equipment, functions, and operation. 2 refs.

  10. Technology transfer potential of an automated water monitoring system. [market research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jamieson, W. M.; Hillman, M. E. D.; Eischen, M. A.; Stilwell, J. M.

    1976-01-01

    The nature and characteristics of the potential economic need (markets) for a highly integrated water quality monitoring system were investigated. The technological, institutional and marketing factors that would influence the transfer and adoption of an automated system were studied for application to public and private water supply, public and private wastewater treatment and environmental monitoring of rivers and lakes.

  11. Technology Transfer Opportunities: Automated Ground-Water Monitoring, A Proven Technology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Kirk P.; Granato, Gregory E.

    1998-01-01

    Introduction The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has developed and tested an automated ground-water monitoring system that measures and records values of selected water-quality properties and constituents using protocols approved for manual sampling. Prototypes using the automated process have demonstrated the ability to increase the quantity and quality of data collected and have shown the potential for reducing labor and material costs for ground-water quality data collection. Automated ground-water monitoring systems can be used to monitor known or potential contaminant sites, such as near landfills, underground storage tanks, or other facilities where potential contaminants are stored, to serve as early warning systems monitoring ground-water quality near public water-supply wells, and for ground-water quality research.

  12. RADIOANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY FOR AUTOMATED NUCLEAR WASTE PROCESS MONITORING

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research is directed toward rapid, sensitive, and selective determination of beta- and alpha-emitting radionuclides such as 99Tc, 90Sr, and transuranium (TRU) elements in low-activity waste LAW) processing streams. The overall technical approach is based on automated radioch...

  13. AN AUTOMATED MULTISAMPLE-STREAM CHEMICAL MONITORING SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    An automated system has been designed and operated successfully for the past two years for chemical analysis of nitrogen, phosphorus, and carbon compounds in the study of the fate of pollutants. Nine samples from along a simulated river are pumped into the laboratory, and eight d...

  14. Automated brush plating process for solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Jeffrey William

    2003-01-01

    A method of depositing a metal coating (28) on the interconnect (26) of a tubular, hollow fuel cell (10) contains the steps of providing the fuel cell (10) having an exposed interconnect surface (26); contacting the inside of the fuel cell (10) with a cathode (45) without use of any liquid materials; passing electrical current through a contacting applicator (46) which contains a metal electrolyte solution; passing the current from the applicator (46) to the cathode (45) and contacting the interconnect (26) with the applicator (46) and coating all of the exposed interconnect surface.

  15. Analysis of irradiated U-7wt%Mo dispersion fuel microstructures using automated image processing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Collette, R.; King, J.; Buesch, C.; Keiser, Jr., D. D.; Williams, W.; Miller, B. D.; Schulthess, J.

    2016-04-01

    The High Performance Research Reactor Fuel Development (HPPRFD) program is responsible for developing low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel substitutes for high performance reactors fueled with highly enriched uranium (HEU) that have not yet been converted to LEU. The uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) fuel system was selected for this effort. In this study, fission gas pore segmentation was performed on U-7wt%Mo dispersion fuel samples at three separate fission densities using an automated image processing interface developed in MATLAB. Pore size distributions were attained that showed both expected and unexpected fission gas behavior. In general, it proved challenging to identify any dominant trends whenmore » comparing fission bubble data across samples from different fuel plates due to varying compositions and fabrication techniques. Here, the results exhibited fair agreement with the fission density vs. porosity correlation developed by the Russian reactor conversion program.« less

  16. Analysis of irradiated U-7wt%Mo dispersion fuel microstructures using automated image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collette, R.; King, J.; Buesch, C.; Keiser, D. D.; Williams, W.; Miller, B. D.; Schulthess, J.

    2016-07-01

    The High Performance Research Reactor Fuel Development (HPPRFD) program is responsible for developing low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel substitutes for high performance reactors fueled with highly enriched uranium (HEU) that have not yet been converted to LEU. The uranium-molybdenum (U-Mo) fuel system was selected for this effort. In this study, fission gas pore segmentation was performed on U-7wt%Mo dispersion fuel samples at three separate fission densities using an automated image processing interface developed in MATLAB. Pore size distributions were attained that showed both expected and unexpected fission gas behavior. In general, it proved challenging to identify any dominant trends when comparing fission bubble data across samples from different fuel plates due to varying compositions and fabrication techniques. The results exhibited fair agreement with the fission density vs. porosity correlation developed by the Russian reactor conversion program.

  17. A semi-automated method of monitoring dam passage of American Eels Anguilla rostrata

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welsh, Stuart; Aldinger, Joni L.

    2014-01-01

    Fish passage facilities at dams have become an important focus of fishery management in riverine systems. Given the personnel and travel costs associated with physical monitoring programs, automated or semi-automated systems are an attractive alternative for monitoring fish passage facilities. We designed and tested a semi-automated system for eel ladder monitoring at Millville Dam on the lower Shenandoah River, West Virginia. A motion-activated eel ladder camera (ELC) photographed each yellow-phase American Eel Anguilla rostrata that passed through the ladder. Digital images (with date and time stamps) of American Eels allowed for total daily counts and measurements of eel TL using photogrammetric methods with digital imaging software. We compared physical counts of American Eels with camera-based counts; TLs obtained with a measuring board were compared with TLs derived from photogrammetric methods. Data from the ELC were consistent with data obtained by physical methods, thus supporting the semi-automated camera system as a viable option for monitoring American Eel passage. Time stamps on digital images allowed for the documentation of eel passage time—data that were not obtainable from physical monitoring efforts. The ELC has application to eel ladder facilities but can also be used to monitor dam passage of other taxa, such as crayfishes, lampreys, and water snakes.

  18. Radioanalytical Chemistry for Automated Nuclear Waste Process Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Oleg B. Egorov; Jay W. Grate; Timothy A. DeVol

    2004-06-01

    This research program is directed toward rapid, sensitive, and selective determination of beta- and alpha-emitting radionuclides such as 99Tc, 90Sr, and trans-uranium (TRU) elements in low-activity waste (LAW) processing streams. The overall technical approach is based on automated radiochemical measurement principles, which entails integration of sample treatment and separation chemistries and radiometric detection within a single functional analytical instrument. Nuclear waste process streams are particularly challenging for rapid analytical methods due to the complex, high-ionic-strength, caustic brine sample matrix, the presence of interfering radionuclides, and the variable and uncertain speciation of the radionuclides of interest. As a result, matrix modification, speciation control, and separation chemistries are required for use in automated process analyzers. Significant knowledge gaps exist relative to the design of chemistries for such analyzers so that radionuclides can be quantitatively and rapidly separated and analyzed in solutions derived from low-activity waste processing operations. This research is addressing these knowledge gaps in the area of separation science, nuclear detection, and analytical chemistry and instrumentation.

  19. Cooperating Expert Systems For Automated Monitoring And Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwuttke, Ursula M.; Veregge, John R.

    1990-01-01

    Human operators freer to perform nonrepetitive tasks. Expert software system for monitoring multiple streams of sensory data from interacting equipment subsystems undergoing development. Organized hierarchically to monitor multiple equipment subsystems simultaneously. Each expert software subsystem responsible for one of equipment subsystems. Intended to assist human analysts in interpretation of telemetry data indicating operating statuses of subsystems of spacecraft, enables analysts to maintain desired mode(s) of operation, and helps to correct anomalies in subsystems or in overall spacecraft system. Other versions devised for industrial monitoring and analysis tasks similarly complicated.

  20. AUTOMATED MONITORING OF WASTEWATER TREATMENT EFFICIENCY - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wastewater treatments minimize the transmission of pathogens and are required by EPA with established treatment and monitoring requirements. The efficiency of treatment processes is determined by measuring the inactivation of indicator organisms (e.g., fecal coliform...

  1. Utility of an automated thermal-based approach for monitoring evapotranspiration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A very simple remote sensing-based model for water use monitoring is presented. The model acronym DATTUTDUT, (Deriving Atmosphere Turbulent Transport Useful To Dummies Using Temperature) is a Dutch word which loosely translates as “It’s unbelievable that it works”. DATTUTDUT is fully automated and o...

  2. Microsoft Business Solutions-Axapta as a basis for automated monitoring of high technology products competitiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tashchiyan, G. O.; Sushko, A. V.; Grichin, S. V.

    2015-09-01

    One of the conditions of normal performance of the Russian economy is the problem of high technology products competitiveness. Different tools of these products estimation are used nowadays, one of them is automated monitoring of the high technology products in mechanical engineering. This system is developed on the basis of “Innovator" software integrated in Microsoft Business Solutions-Axapta.

  3. Automated catalyst processing for cloud electrode fabrication for fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Goller, Glen J.; Breault, Richard D.

    1980-01-01

    A process for making dry carbon/polytetrafluoroethylene floc material, particularly useful in the manufacture of fuel cell electrodes, comprises of the steps of floccing a co-suspension of carbon particles and polytetrafluoroethylene particles, filtering excess liquids from the co-suspension, molding pellet shapes from the remaining wet floc solids without using significant pressure during the molding, drying the wet floc pellet shapes within the mold at temperatures no greater than about 150.degree. F., and removing the dry pellets from the mold.

  4. Development of an automated potable water bactericide monitoring unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, J. M.; Brawner, C. C.; Sauer, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    A monitor unit has been developed that permits the direct determination of the level of elemental iodine, used for microbiological control, in a spacecraft potable water supply system. Salient features of unit include low weight, volume and maintenance requirements, complete automatic operation, no inflight calibration, no expendables (except electrical current) and high accuracy and precision. This unit is capable of providing a signal to a controller that, in turn, automatically adjusts the addition rate of iodine to the potable water system so that a predetermined level of iodine can be maintained. In addition, the monitor provides a reading whereby the crewman can verify that the proper amount of iodine (within a range) is present in the water. A development history of the monitor is presented along with its design and theory of operation. Also presented are the results generated through testing of the unit in a simulated Shuttle potable water system.

  5. Automated Instructional Monitors for Complex Operational Tasks. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feurzeig, Wallace

    A computer-based instructional system is described which incorporates diagnosis of students difficulties in acquiring complex concepts and skills. A computer automatically generated a simulated display. It then monitored and analyzed a student's work in the performance of assigned training tasks. Two major tasks were studied. The first,…

  6. Automated Monitoring Of Dielectric Properties Of Tree Trunks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdonald, Kyle C.; Chun, William

    1996-01-01

    Semiautomated instrumentation system called "dielectric monitoring system" (DMS) developed for measuring microwave permittivities of selected components of plants, in particular, of active xylems in tree trunks. System set up with coaxial probes inserted in tree trunks to measure dielectric properties. Can be left to operate unattended to gather data on permittivities as function of time.

  7. Automated Web-based Monitoring of a Pump and Treat System at the Hanford Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, W.; Versteeg, R.; Richardson, A.; Ankeny, M.; Gilmore, T.; Morse, J.; Thompson, M.

    2006-05-01

    Automated and autonomous monitoring of environmental conditions can be used to improve operational efficiency, verify remedial action decisions, and promote confidence in the monitoring process by making data and associated derived information readily accessible to regulators and stakeholders. Ultimately autonomous monitoring systems can reduce overall costs associated with regulatory compliance of performance and long- term monitoring. As part of a joint decision between DOE and the WA Department of Ecology to put on "cold standby" a pump and treat system that has been operating on the Department of Energy's Hanford site in Washington State since 1995, a web site was developed to display the automated water level network around the pump and treat system. The automated water level network consists of nineteen wells with water level transducers and temperature and conductivity probes for selected wells. Data from this network will be used to evaluate the impacts of the pump-and-treat system and the response of the aquifer to shutdown of the system. The website will provide access to data from the automated network along with additional information pertaining to the shutdown of the pump and treat system to the various stakeholders in a convenient and timely fashion. This will allow the various stakeholders to observe the impacts of the shutdown as the aquifer responds. There are future plans to expand this web-based data reporting platform to other environmental data that pertains to the various remedial actions planned at the Hanford site. The benefits of the web site application for monitoring and stewardship are: consistency of data processing and analyses with automated and on demand data and information delivery. The system and data access is password controlled and access to various data or fields can be restricted to specified users. An important feature is that the stakeholders have access to the data in near-real time providing a checks-and-balance system

  8. Application of neural network and pattern recognition software to the automated analysis of continuous nuclear monitoring of on-load reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, J.A.; Eccleston, G.W.; Halbig, J.K.; Klosterbuer, S.F.; Larson, T.W.

    1993-08-01

    Automated analysis using pattern recognition and neural network software can help interpret data, call attention to potential anomalies, and improve safeguards effectiveness. Automated software analysis, based on pattern recognition and neural networks, was applied to data collected from a radiation core discharge monitor system located adjacent to an on-load reactor core. Unattended radiation sensors continuously collect data to monitor on-line refueling operations in the reactor. The huge volume of data collected from a number of radiation channels makes it difficult for a safeguards inspector to review it all, check for consistency among the measurement channels, and find anomalies. Pattern recognition and neural network software can analyze large volumes of data from continuous, unattended measurements, thereby improving and automating the detection of anomalies. The authors developed a prototype pattern recognition program that determines the reactor power level and identifies the times when fuel bundles are pushed through the core during on-line refueling. Neural network models were also developed to predict fuel bundle burnup to calculate the region on the on-load reactor face from which fuel bundles were discharged based on the radiation signals. In the preliminary data set, which was limited and consisted of four distinct burnup regions, the neural network model correctly predicted the burnup region with an accuracy of 92%.

  9. Reducing Fuel Consumption through Semi-Automated Platooning with Class 8 Tractor Trailer Combinations (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Lammert, M.; Gonder, J.

    2014-07-01

    This poster describes the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's evaluation of the fuel savings potential of semi-automated truck platooning. Platooning involves reducing aerodynamic drag by grouping vehicles together and decreasing the distance between them through the use of electronic coupling, which allows multiple vehicles to accelerate or brake simultaneously. The NREL study addressed the need for data on American style line-haul sleeper cabs with modern aerodynamics and over a range of trucking speeds common in the United States.

  10. Solid recovered fuels in the cement industry--semi-automated sample preparation unit as a means for facilitated practical application.

    PubMed

    Aldrian, Alexia; Sarc, Renato; Pomberger, Roland; Lorber, Karl E; Sipple, Ernst-Michael

    2016-03-01

    One of the challenges for the cement industry is the quality assurance of alternative fuel (e.g., solid recovered fuel, SRF) in co-incineration plants--especially for inhomogeneous alternative fuels with large particle sizes (d95⩾100 mm), which will gain even more importance in the substitution of conventional fuels due to low production costs. Existing standards for sampling and sample preparation do not cover the challenges resulting from these kinds of materials. A possible approach to ensure quality monitoring is shown in the present contribution. For this, a specially manufactured, automated comminution and sample divider device was installed at a cement plant in Rohožnik. In order to prove its practical suitability with methods according to current standards, the sampling and sample preparation process were validated for alternative fuel with a grain size >30 mm (i.e., d95=approximately 100 mm), so-called 'Hotdisc SRF'. Therefore, series of samples were taken and analysed. A comparison of the analysis results with the yearly average values obtained through a reference investigation route showed good accordance. Further investigations during the validation process also showed that segregation or enrichment of material throughout the comminution plant does not occur. The results also demonstrate that compliance with legal standards regarding the minimum sample amount is not sufficient for inhomogeneous and coarse particle size alternative fuels. Instead, higher sample amounts after the first particle size reduction step are strongly recommended in order to gain a representative laboratory sample. PMID:26759433

  11. Estimate of Fuel Consumption and GHG Emission Impact from an Automated Mobility District

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yuche; Young, Stanley; Qi, Xuewei; Gonder, Jeffrey

    2015-10-19

    This study estimates the range of fuel and emissions impact of an automated-vehicle (AV) based transit system that services campus-based developments, termed an automated mobility district (AMD). The study develops a framework to quantify the fuel consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission impacts of a transit system comprised of AVs, taking into consideration average vehicle fleet composition, fuel consumption/GHG emission of vehicles within specific speed bins, and the average occupancy of passenger vehicles and transit vehicles. The framework is exercised using a previous mobility analysis of a personal rapid transit (PRT) system, a system which shares many attributes with envisioned AV-based transit systems. Total fuel consumption and GHG emissions with and without an AMD are estimated, providing a range of potential system impacts on sustainability. The results of a previous case study based of a proposed implementation of PRT on the Kansas State University (KSU) campus in Manhattan, Kansas, serves as the basis to estimate personal miles traveled supplanted by an AMD at varying levels of service. The results show that an AMD has the potential to reduce total system fuel consumption and GHG emissions, but the amount is largely dependent on operating and ridership assumptions. The study points to the need to better understand ride-sharing scenarios and calls for future research on sustainability benefits of an AMD system at both vehicle and system levels.

  12. Estimate of Fuel Consumption and GHG Emission Impact on an Automated Mobility District: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yuche; Young, Stanley; Gonder, Jeff; Qi, Xuewei

    2015-12-11

    This study estimates the range of fuel and emissions impact of an automated-vehicle (AV) based transit system that services campus-based developments, termed an automated mobility district (AMD). The study develops a framework to quantify the fuel consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emission impacts of a transit system comprised of AVs, taking into consideration average vehicle fleet composition, fuel consumption/GHG emission of vehicles within specific speed bins, and the average occupancy of passenger vehicles and transit vehicles. The framework is exercised using a previous mobility analysis of a personal rapid transit (PRT) system, a system which shares many attributes with envisioned AV-based transit systems. Total fuel consumption and GHG emissions with and without an AMD are estimated, providing a range of potential system impacts on sustainability. The results of a previous case study based of a proposed implementation of PRT on the Kansas State University (KSU) campus in Manhattan, Kansas, serves as the basis to estimate personal miles traveled supplanted by an AMD at varying levels of service. The results show that an AMD has the potential to reduce total system fuel consumption and GHG emissions, but the amount is largely dependent on operating and ridership assumptions. The study points to the need to better understand ride-sharing scenarios and calls for future research on sustainability benefits of an AMD system at both vehicle and system levels.

  13. Automated systems to monitor space radiation effect on photosynthetic organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, D.; di Costa, F.; Faraloni, C.; Fasolo, F.; Pace, E.; Perosino, M.; Torzillo, G.; Touloupakis, E.; Zanini, A.; Giardi, M. T.

    We developed automated biodevices to obtain, automatically, measures about the space radiation effect on living photosynthetic organisms, which can be used as biomass and oxygen-producing system on shuttles or ISS. Vitality measurements were performed by optical devices (fluorimeters) measuring fluorescence emission. Fluorescence methodology is a well known applied technique for studying photosynthetic activity, and in particular the oxygen-evolving process of photosynthetic organisms. Different strains of unicellular green algae are properly immobilized on agar growth medium and kept under survial light. The biodevices are characterised by the sensibility and selectivity of the biological component response, together with easy use, versatility, miniature size and low cost. We performed experiments in some facilities, in order to understand separately the effect of radiation of different LET, on the biochemical activity (gamma rays at Joint Research Centre -Varese, Italy; fast neutrons at CERF -- SPS beam at CERN -Geneva, Switzerland). The exposure to different radiation beams of the automatic devices, allowed us to test them under stress condition. In one year, these instrument are expected to be sent to space, inside a spacecraft, in order to study the effect of ionising cosmic radiation during an ESA flight.

  14. Automated video screening for unattended background monitoring in dynamic environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, Jeffrey J.

    2004-03-01

    This report addresses the development of automated video-screening technology to assist security forces in protecting our homeland against terrorist threats. A threat of specific interest to this project is the covert placement and subsequent remote detonation of bombs (e.g., briefcase bombs) inside crowded public facilities. Different from existing video motion detection systems, the video-screening technology described in this report is capable of detecting changes in the static background of an otherwise, dynamic environment - environments where motion and human activities are persistent. Our goal was to quickly detect changes in the background - even under conditions when the background is visible to the camera less than 5% of the time. Instead of subtracting the background to detect movement or changes in a scene, we subtracted the dynamic scene variations to produce an estimate of the static background. Subsequent comparisons of static background estimates are used to detect changes in the background. Detected changes can be used to alert security forces of the presence and location of potential threats. The results of this research are summarized in two MS Power-point presentations included with this report.

  15. Fuel processor temperature monitoring and control

    DOEpatents

    Keskula, Donald H.; Doan, Tien M.; Clingerman, Bruce J.

    2002-01-01

    In one embodiment, the method of the invention monitors one or more of the following conditions: a relatively low temperature value of the gas stream; a relatively high temperature value of the gas stream; and a rate-of-change of monitored temperature. In a preferred embodiment, the rate of temperature change is monitored to prevent the occurrence of an unacceptably high or low temperature condition. Here, at least two temperatures of the recirculating gas stream are monitored over a period of time. The rate-of-change of temperature versus time is determined. Then the monitored rate-of-change of temperature is compared to a preselected rate-of-change of value. The monitoring of rate-of-change of temperature provides proactive means for preventing occurrence of an unacceptably high temperature in the catalytic reactor.

  16. A method for monitoring nuclear absorption coefficients of aviation fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprinkle, Danny R.; Shen, Chih-Ping

    1989-01-01

    A technique for monitoring variability in the nuclear absorption characteristics of aviation fuels has been developed. It is based on a highly collimated low energy gamma radiation source and a sodium iodide counter. The source and the counter assembly are separated by a geometrically well-defined test fuel cell. A computer program for determining the mass attenuation coefficient of the test fuel sample, based on the data acquired for a preset counting period, has been developed and tested on several types of aviation fuel.

  17. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, JCH FUEL SOLUTIONS, INC., JCH ENVIRO AUTOMATED FUEL CLEANING AND MAINTENANCE SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The verification testing was conducted at the Cl facility in North Las Vegas, NV, on July 17 and 18, 2001. During this period, engine emissions, fuel consumption, and fuel quality were evaluated with contaminated and cleaned fuel.

    To facilitate this verification, JCH repre...

  18. Automated Groundwater Monitoring of Uranium at the Hanford Site, Washington - 13116

    SciTech Connect

    Burge, Scott R.; O'Hara, Matthew J.

    2013-07-01

    An automated groundwater monitoring system for the detection of uranyl ion in groundwater was deployed at the 300 Area Industrial Complex, Hanford Site, Washington. The research was conducted to determine if at-site, automated monitoring of contaminant movement in the subsurface is a viable alternative to the baseline manual sampling and analytical laboratory assay methods currently employed. The monitoring system used Arsenazo III, a colorimetric chelating compound, for the detection of the uranyl ion. The analytical system had a limit of quantification of approximately 10 parts per billion (ppb, μg/L). The EPA's drinking water maximum contaminant level (MCL) is 30 ppb [1]. In addition to the uranyl ion assay, the system was capable of acquiring temperature, conductivity, and river level data. The system was fully automated and could be operated remotely. The system was capable of collecting water samples from four sampling sources, quantifying the uranyl ion, and periodically performing a calibration of the analytical cell. The system communications were accomplished by way of cellular data link with the information transmitted through the internet. Four water sample sources were selected for the investigation: one location provided samples of Columbia River water, and the remaining three sources provided groundwater from aquifer sampling tubes positioned in a vertical array at the Columbia River shoreline. The typical sampling schedule was to sample the four locations twice per day with one calibration check per day. This paper outlines the instrumentation employed, the operation of the instrumentation, and analytical results for a period of time between July and August, 2012. The presentation includes the uranyl ion concentration and conductivity results from the automated sampling/analysis system, along with a comparison between the automated monitor's analytical performance and an independent laboratory analysis. Benefits of using the automated system as an

  19. Comparison of Standard Automated Perimetry, Short-Wavelength Automated Perimetry, and Frequency-Doubling Technology Perimetry to Monitor Glaucoma Progression

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Rongrong; Wang, Chenkun; Gu, Yangshun; Racette, Lyne

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Detection of progression is paramount to the clinical management of glaucoma. Our goal is to compare the performance of standard automated perimetry (SAP), short-wavelength automated perimetry (SWAP), and frequency-doubling technology (FDT) perimetry in monitoring glaucoma progression. Longitudinal data of paired SAP, SWAP, and FDT from 113 eyes with primary open-angle glaucoma enrolled in the Diagnostic Innovations in Glaucoma Study or the African Descent and Glaucoma Evaluation Study were included. Data from all tests were expressed in comparable units by converting the sensitivity from decibels to unitless contrast sensitivity and by expressing sensitivity values in percent of mean normal based on an independent dataset of 207 healthy eyes with aging deterioration taken into consideration. Pointwise linear regression analysis was performed and 3 criteria (conservative, moderate, and liberal) were used to define progression and improvement. Global mean sensitivity (MS) was fitted with linear mixed models. No statistically significant difference in the proportion of progressing and improving eyes was observed across tests using the conservative criterion. Fewer eyes showed improvement on SAP compared to SWAP and FDT using the moderate criterion; and FDT detected less progressing eyes than SAP and SWAP using the liberal criterion. The agreement between these test types was poor. The linear mixed model showed a progressing trend of global MS overtime for SAP and SWAP, but not for FDT. The baseline estimate of SWAP MS was significantly lower than SAP MS by 21.59% of mean normal. FDT showed comparable estimation of baseline MS with SAP. SWAP and FDT do not appear to have significant benefits over SAP in monitoring glaucoma progression. SAP, SWAP, and FDT may, however, detect progression in different glaucoma eyes. PMID:26886602

  20. Automation of film densitometry for application in personal monitoring.

    PubMed

    Taheri, M; Movafeghi, A; Rastkhah, N

    2011-03-01

    In this research work, a semi-automatic densitometry system has been developed for large-scale monitoring services by use of film badge dosemeters. The system consists of a charge-coupled device (CCD)-based scanner that can scan optical densities (ODs) up to 4.2, a computer vision algorithm to improve the quality of digitised films and an analyser program to calculate the necessary information, e.g. the mean OD of region of interest and radiation doses. For calibration of the system, two reference films were used. The Microtek scanner International Color Consortium (ICC) profiler is applied for determining the colour attributes of the scanner accurately and a reference of the density step tablet, Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und-prüfung (BAM) is used for calibrating the automatic conversion of gray-level values to OD values in the range of 0.2-4.0 OD. The system contributes to achieve more objectives and reliable results. So by applying this system, we can digitise a set of 20 films at once and calculate their relative doses less than about 4 min, and meanwhile it causes to avoid disadvantages of manual process and to enhance the accuracy of dosimetry. PMID:21199823

  1. Flexible method for monitoring fuel cell voltage

    DOEpatents

    Mowery, Kenneth D.; Ripley, Eugene V.

    2002-01-01

    A method for equalizing the measured voltage of each cluster in a fuel cell stack wherein at least one of the clusters has a different number of cells than the identical number of cells in the remaining clusters by creating a pseudo voltage for the different cell numbered cluster. The average cell voltage of the all of the cells in the fuel cell stack is calculated and multiplied by a constant equal to the difference in the number of cells in the identical cell clusters and the number of cells in the different numbered cell cluster. The resultant product is added to the actual voltage measured across the different numbered cell cluster to create a pseudo voltage which is equivalent in cell number to the number of cells in the other identical numbered cell clusters.

  2. Electrochemical sensor for monitoring electrochemical potentials of fuel cell components

    DOEpatents

    Kunz, Harold R.; Breault, Richard D.

    1993-01-01

    An electrochemical sensor comprised of wires, a sheath, and a conduit can be utilized to monitor fuel cell component electric potentials during fuel cell shut down or steady state. The electrochemical sensor contacts an electrolyte reservoir plate such that the conduit wicks electrolyte through capillary action to the wires to provide water necessary for the electrolysis reaction which occurs thereon. A voltage is applied across the wires of the electrochemical sensor until hydrogen evolution occurs at the surface of one of the wires, thereby forming a hydrogen reference electrode. The voltage of the fuel cell component is then determined with relation to the hydrogen reference electrode.

  3. Evaluation of new and conventional thermoluminescent phosphors for environmental monitoring using automated thermoluminescent dosimeter readers

    SciTech Connect

    Rathbone, B.A.; Endres, A.W.; Antonio, E.J.

    1994-10-01

    In recent years, there has been considerable interest in a new generation of super-sensitive thermoluminescent (TL) phosphors for potential use in routine personnel and environmental monitoring. Two of these phosphors, {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C and LiF:Mg,Cu,P, are evaluated in this paper for selected characteristics relevant to environmental monitoring, along with two conventional phosphors widely used in environmental monitoring, LiF:Mg,Ti and CaF{sub 2}:Dy. The characteristics evaluated are light-induced fading, light-induced background, linearity and variability at low dose, and the minimum measurable dose. These characteristics were determined using an automated commercial dosimetry system (Harshaw System 8800) and routine processing protocols. Annealing and readout protocols for each phosphor were optimized for use in a large-scale environmental monitoring program.

  4. 40 CFR 60.45 - Emissions and fuel monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Emissions and fuel monitoring. 60.45 Section 60.45 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...-Fired Steam Generators for Which Construction Is Commenced After August 17, 1971 § 60.45 Emissions...

  5. 40 CFR 60.45 - Emissions and fuel monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Emissions and fuel monitoring. 60.45 Section 60.45 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...-Fired Steam Generators for Which Construction Is Commenced After August 17, 1971 § 60.45 Emissions...

  6. 40 CFR 60.45 - Emissions and fuel monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) The CO CEMS must be installed, certified, maintained, and operated according to the provisions in § 60... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Emissions and fuel monitoring. 60.45 Section 60.45 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR...

  7. 40 CFR 60.45 - Emissions and fuel monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) The CO CEMS must be installed, certified, maintained, and operated according to the provisions in § 60... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Emissions and fuel monitoring. 60.45 Section 60.45 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR...

  8. 40 CFR 60.45 - Emissions and fuel monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) The CO CEMS must be installed, certified, maintained, and operated according to the provisions in § 60... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Emissions and fuel monitoring. 60.45 Section 60.45 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR...

  9. Integrated monitoring and reviewing systems for the Rokkasho Spent Fuel Receipt and Storage Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Yokota, Yasuhiro; Ishikawa, Masayuki; Matsuda, Yuji

    1998-12-31

    The Rokkasho Spent Fuel Receipt and Storage (RSFS) Facility at the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant (RRP) in Japan is expected to begin operations in 1998. Effective safeguarding by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Japan Atomic Energy Bureau (JAEB) inspectors requires monitoring the time of transfer, direction of movement, and number of spent fuel assemblies transferred. At peak throughput, up to 1,000 spent fuel assemblies will be accepted by the facility in a 90-day period. In order for the safeguards inspector to efficiently review the resulting large amounts of inspection information, an unattended monitoring system was developed that integrates containment and surveillance (C/S) video with radiation monitors. This allows for an integrated review of the facility`s radiation data, C/S video, and operator declaration data. This paper presents an outline of the integrated unattended monitoring hardware and associated data reviewing software. The hardware consists of a multicamera optical surveillance (MOS) system radiation monitoring gamma-ray and neutron detector (GRAND) electronics, and an intelligent local operating network (ILON). The ILON was used for time synchronization and MOS video triggers. The new software consists of a suite of tools, each one specific to a single data type: radiation data, surveillance video, and operator declarations. Each tool can be used in a stand-alone mode as a separate ion application or configured to communicate and match time-synchronized data with any of the other tools. A data summary and comparison application (Integrated Review System [IRS]) coordinates the use of all of the data-specific review tools under a single-user interface. It therefore automates and simplifies the importation of data and the data-specific analyses.

  10. Automated platform for sensor-based monitoring and controlled assays of living cells and tissues.

    PubMed

    Wolf, P; Brischwein, M; Kleinhans, R; Demmel, F; Schwarzenberger, T; Pfister, C; Wolf, B

    2013-12-15

    Cellular assays have become a fundamental technique in scientific research, pharmaceutical drug screening or toxicity testing. Therefore, the requirements of technical developments for automated assays raised in the same rate. A novel measuring platform was developed, which combines automated assay processing with label-free high-content measuring and real-time monitoring of multiple metabolic and morphologic parameters of living cells or tissues. Core of the system is a test plate with 24 cell culture wells, each equipped with opto-chemical sensor-spots for the determination of cellular oxygen consumption and extracellular acidification, next to electrode-structures for electrical impedance sensing. An automated microscope provides the optical sensor read-out and allows continuous cell imaging. Media and drugs are supplied by a pipetting robot system. Therefore, assay can run over several days without personnel interaction. To demonstrate the performance of the platform in physiologic assays, we continuously recorded the kinetics of metabolic and morphologic parameters of MCF-7 breast cancer cells under the influence of the cytotoxin chloroacetaldehyde. The data point out the time resolved effect kinetics over the complete treatment period. Thereby, the measuring platform overcomes problems of endpoint tests, which cannot monitor the kinetics of different parameters of the same cell population over longer time periods. PMID:23838277

  11. Single-cell bacteria growth monitoring by automated DEP-facilitated image analysis.

    PubMed

    Peitz, Ingmar; van Leeuwen, Rien

    2010-11-01

    Growth monitoring is the method of choice in many assays measuring the presence or properties of pathogens, e.g. in diagnostics and food quality. Established methods, relying on culturing large numbers of bacteria, are rather time-consuming, while in healthcare time often is crucial. Several new approaches have been published, mostly aiming at assaying growth or other properties of a small number of bacteria. However, no method so far readily achieves single-cell resolution with a convenient and easy to handle setup that offers the possibility for automation and high throughput. We demonstrate these benefits in this study by employing dielectrophoretic capturing of bacteria in microfluidic electrode structures, optical detection and automated bacteria identification and counting with image analysis algorithms. For a proof-of-principle experiment we chose an antibiotic susceptibility test with Escherichia coli and polymyxin B. Growth monitoring is demonstrated on single cells and the impact of the antibiotic on the growth rate is shown. The minimum inhibitory concentration as a standard diagnostic parameter is derived from a dose-response plot. This report is the basis for further integration of image analysis code into device control. Ultimately, an automated and parallelized setup may be created, using an optical microscanner and many of the electrode structures simultaneously. Sufficient data for a sound statistical evaluation and a confirmation of the initial findings can then be generated in a single experiment. PMID:20842296

  12. Robowell: An automated process for monitoring ground water quality using established sampling protocols

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granato, G.E.; Smith, K.P.

    1999-01-01

    Robowell is an automated process for monitoring selected ground water quality properties and constituents by pumping a well or multilevel sampler. Robowell was developed and tested to provide a cost-effective monitoring system that meets protocols expected for manual sampling. The process uses commercially available electronics, instrumentation, and hardware, so it can be configured to monitor ground water quality using the equipment, purge protocol, and monitoring well design most appropriate for the monitoring site and the contaminants of interest. A Robowell prototype was installed on a sewage treatment plant infiltration bed that overlies a well-studied unconfined sand and gravel aquifer at the Massachusetts Military Reservation, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, during a time when two distinct plumes of constituents were released. The prototype was operated from May 10 to November 13, 1996, and quality-assurance/quality-control measurements demonstrated that the data obtained by the automated method was equivalent to data obtained by manual sampling methods using the same sampling protocols. Water level, specific conductance, pH, water temperature, dissolved oxygen, and dissolved ammonium were monitored by the prototype as the wells were purged according to U.S Geological Survey (USGS) ground water sampling protocols. Remote access to the data record, via phone modem communications, indicated the arrival of each plume over a few days and the subsequent geochemical reactions over the following weeks. Real-time availability of the monitoring record provided the information needed to initiate manual sampling efforts in response to changes in measured ground water quality, which proved the method and characterized the screened portion of the plume in detail through time. The methods and the case study described are presented to document the process for future use.

  13. Automated integration of continuous glucose monitor data in the electronic health record using consumer technology.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajiv B; Goren, Nira D; Stark, David E; Wall, Dennis P; Longhurst, Christopher A

    2016-05-01

    The diabetes healthcare provider plays a key role in interpreting blood glucose trends, but few institutions have successfully integrated patient home glucose data in the electronic health record (EHR). Published implementations to date have required custom interfaces, which limit wide-scale replication. We piloted automated integration of continuous glucose monitor data in the EHR using widely available consumer technology for 10 pediatric patients with insulin-dependent diabetes. Establishment of a passive data communication bridge via a patient's/parent's smartphone enabled automated integration and analytics of patient device data within the EHR between scheduled clinic visits. It is feasible to utilize available consumer technology to assess and triage home diabetes device data within the EHR, and to engage patients/parents and improve healthcare provider workflow. PMID:27018263

  14. On0Line Fuel Failure Monitor for Fuel Testing and Monitoring of Gas Cooled Very High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Ayman I. Hawari; Mohamed A. Bourham

    2010-04-22

    IVery High Temperature Reactors (VHTR) utilize the TRISO microsphere as the fundamental fuel unit in the core. The TRISO microsphere (~ 1- mm diameter) is composed of a UO2 kernel surrounded by a porous pyrolytic graphite buffer, an inner pyrolytic graphite layer, a silicon carbide (SiC) coating, and an outer pyrolytic graphite layer. The U-235 enrichment of the fuel is expected to range from 4% – 10% (higher enrichments are also being considered). The layer/coating system that surrounds the UO2 kernel acts as the containment and main barrier against the environmental release of radioactivity. To understand better the behavior of this fuel under in-core conditions (e.g., high temperature, intense fast neutron flux, etc.), the US Department of Energy (DOE) is launching a fuel testing program that will take place at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). During this project North Carolina State University (NCSU) researchers will collaborate with INL staff for establishing an optimized system for fuel monitoring for the ATR tests. In addition, it is expected that the developed system and methods will be of general use for fuel failure monitoring in gas cooled VHTRs.

  15. Antineutrino monitoring of burning mixed oxide plutonium fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, A. C.; Trellue, H. R.; Nieto, Michael Martin; Wilson, W. B.

    2012-02-01

    Background: Antineutrino monitoring of reactors is an enhanced nuclear safeguard that is being explored by several international groups. A key question is whether such a scheme could be used to verify the destruction of plutonium loaded in a reactor as mixed oxide (MOX) fuel.Purpose: To explore the effectiveness of antineutrino monitoring for the purposes of nuclear accountability and safeguarding of MOX plutonium, we examine the magnitude and temporal variation in the antineutrino signals expected for different loadings of MOX fuels.Methods: Reactor burn simulations are carried out for four different MOX fuel loadings and the antineutrino signals as a function of fuel burnup are computed and compared.Results: The antineutrino signals from reactor-grade and weapons-grade MOX are shown to be distinct from those from burning low enriched uranium, and this signal difference increases as the MOX plutonium fraction of the reactor core increases.Conclusion: Antineutrino monitoring could be used to verify the destruction of plutonium in reactors, although verifying the grade of the plutonium being burned is found to be more challenging.

  16. Improved automated monitoring and new analysis algorithm for circadian phototaxis rhythms in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Gaskill, Christa; Forbes-Stovall, Jennifer; Kessler, Bruce; Young, Mike; Rinehart, Claire A.; Jacobshagen, Sigrid

    2010-01-01

    Automated monitoring of circadian rhythms is an efficient way of gaining insight into oscillation parameters like period and phase for the underlying pacemaker of the circadian clock. Measurement of the circadian rhythm of phototaxis (swimming towards light) exhibited by the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been automated by directing a narrow and dim light beam through a culture at regular intervals and determining the decrease in light transmittance due to the accumulation of cells in the beam. In this study, the monitoring process was optimized by constructing a new computer-controlled measuring machine that limits the test beam to wavelengths reported to be specific for phototaxis and by choosing an algal strain, which does not need background illumination between test light cycles for proper expression of the rhythm. As a result, period and phase of the rhythm are now unaffected by the time a culture is placed into the machine. Analysis of the rhythm data was also optimized through a new algorithm, whose robustness was demonstrated using virtual rhythms with various noises. The algorithm differs in particular from other reported algorithms by maximizing the fit of the data to a sinusoidal curve that dampens exponentially. The algorithm was also used to confirm the reproducibility of rhythm monitoring by the machine. Machine and algorithm can now be used for a multitude of circadian clock studies that require unambiguous period and phase determinations such as light pulse experiments to identify the photoreceptor(s) that reset the circadian clock in C. reinhardtii. PMID:20116270

  17. Automated ground-water monitoring with Robowell: case studies and potential applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granato, Gregory E.; Smith, Kirk P.

    2002-02-01

    Robowell is an automated system and method for monitoring ground-water quality. Robowell meets accepted manual- sampling protocols without high labor and laboratory costs. Robowell periodically monitors and records water-quality properties and constituents in ground water by pumping a well or multilevel sampler until one or more purge criteria have been met. A record of frequent water-quality measurements from a monitoring site can indicate changes in ground-water quality and can provide a context for the interpretation of laboratory data from discrete samples. Robowell also can communicate data and system performance through a remote communication link. Remote access to ground-water data enables the user to monitor conditions and optimize manual sampling efforts. Six Robowell prototypes have successfully monitored ground-water quality during all four seasons of the year under different hydrogeologic conditions, well designs, and geochemical environments. The U.S. Geological Survey is seeking partners for research with robust and economical water-quality monitoring instruments designed to measure contaminants of concern in conjunction with the application and commercialization of the Robowell technology. Project publications and information about technology transfer opportunities are available on the Internet at URL http://ma.water.usgs.gov/automon/

  18. Automated ground-water monitoring with robowell-Case studies and potential applications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Granato, G.E.; Smith, K.P.

    2001-01-01

    Robowell is an automated system and method for monitoring ground-water quality. Robowell meets accepted manual-sampling protocols without high labor and laboratory costs. Robowell periodically monitors and records water-quality properties and constituents in ground water by pumping a well or multilevel sampler until one or more purge criteria have been met. A record of frequent water-quality measurements from a monitoring site can indicate changes in ground-water quality and can provide a context for the interpretation of laboratory data from discrete samples. Robowell also can communicate data and system performance through a remote communication link. Remote access to ground-water data enables the user to monitor conditions and optimize manual sampling efforts. Six Robowell prototypes have successfully monitored ground-water quality during all four seasons of the year under different hydrogeologic conditions, well designs, and geochemical environments. The U.S. Geological Survey is seeking partners for research with robust and economical water-quality monitoring instruments designed to measure contaminants of concern in conjunction with the application and commercialization of the Robowell technology. Project publications and information about technology transfer opportunities are available on the Internet at URL http://ma.water.usgs.gov/automon/.

  19. Compact approach to monitored retrievable storage of spent fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, D.W.

    1984-09-01

    Recent federal waste-management legislation has raised national interest in monitored retrievable storage (MRS) of unprocessed spent fuel from civilian nuclear power plants. We have reviewed the current MRS design approaches, and we have examined an alternative concept that is extremely compact in terms of total land use. This approach may offer substantial advantages in the areas of monitoring and in safeguards against theft, as well as in reducing the chances of groundwater contamination. Total facility costs are roughly estimated and found to be generally competitive with other MRS concepts. 4 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  20. Automated pupillometer for monitoring the critically ill patient: a critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Sahar F; Suarez, Jose I

    2014-08-01

    Abnormalities in the pupillary light reflex are an important prognostic indicator for patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). Manual pupillary examination is confounded by interobserver discrepancies and errors in detecting a reflex under certain conditions. The automated pupillometer is a computer-based infrared digital video device that can obtain objective measurements of pupillary size and reactivity. We performed an electronic literature search to identify original studies on the use of the automated pupillometer in the ICU. We identified 7 articles that met the inclusion criteria and reviewed them critically and assessed the quality of evidence by using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach. We found that the study grade was low, and study quality was low to moderate for all the reviewed manuscripts. Pupillometric measurements had better precision and reproducibility compared with the manual pupillary examination. Based on these data, we conclude that pupillometry monitoring can serve as an important tool in the ICU. Further large scale studies on patients in the neurocritical care unit and medical ICU are needed to support the routine use of automated pupillometry. PMID:24613394

  1. Miniaturized real-time monitor for fuel cell leak applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beshay, Manal; Chandra Sekhar, Jai Ganesh; Delgado Alonso, Jesús; Boehr, Christopher; Lieberman, Robert A.

    2011-06-01

    The intrinsically safe detection of hydrogen leaks in fuel cell vehicles (FCV) is critical for ensuring system operational safety. An early indication of a leak will not only trigger an alarm in unsafe situations, but will also dramatically reduce the risk and cost associated with fuel cell malfunction. This paper discusses the development of hydrogen leak detection technology that is suitable for onboard, real-time, and intrinsically safe monitoring of fuel cells. This technique offers FCV onboard sensing requirements with a sensitivity of 0.05% (500 ppm) in air, a response time of 3-5 seconds, operation at 5-90%RH and 0-55°C, and power consumption <=0.5 watts.

  2. Automated Identification of Volcanic Plumes using the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flower, V. J. B.; Oommen, T.; Carn, S. A.

    2015-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions are a global phenomenon which are increasingly impacting human populations due to factors such as the extension of population centres into areas of higher risk, expansion of agricultural sectors to accommodate increased production or the increasing impact of volcanic plumes on air travel. In areas where extensive monitoring is present these impacts can be moderated by ground based monitoring and alert systems, however many volcanoes have little or no monitoring capabilities. In many of these regions volcanic alerts are generated by local communities with limited resources or formal communication systems, however additional eruption alerts can result from chance encounters with passing aircraft. In contrast satellite based remote sensing instruments possess the capability to provide near global daily monitoring, facilitating automated volcanic eruption detection. One such system generates eruption alerts through the detection of thermal anomalies, known as MODVOLC, and is currently operational utilising moderate resolution MODIS satellite data. Within this work we outline a method to distinguish SO2 eruptions from background levels recorded by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) through the identification and classification of volcanic activity over a 5 year period. The incorporation of this data into a logistic regression model facilitated the classification of volcanic events with an overall accuracy of 80% whilst consistently identifying plumes with a mass of 400 tons or higher. The implementation of the developed model could facilitate the near real time identification of new and ongoing volcanic activity on a global scale.

  3. Fully Automated Field-Deployable Bioaerosol Monitoring System Using Carbon Nanotube-Based Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junhyup; Jin, Joon-Hyung; Kim, Hyun Soo; Song, Wonbin; Shin, Su-Kyoung; Yi, Hana; Jang, Dae-Ho; Shin, Sehyun; Lee, Byung Yang

    2016-05-17

    Much progress has been made in the field of automated monitoring systems of airborne pathogens. However, they still lack the robustness and stability necessary for field deployment. Here, we demonstrate a bioaerosol automonitoring instrument (BAMI) specifically designed for the in situ capturing and continuous monitoring of airborne fungal particles. This was possible by developing highly sensitive and selective fungi sensors based on two-channel carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT-FETs), followed by integration with a bioaerosol sampler, a Peltier cooler for receptor lifetime enhancement, and a pumping assembly for fluidic control. These four main components collectively cooperated with each other to enable the real-time monitoring of fungi. The two-channel CNT-FETs can detect two different fungal species simultaneously. The Peltier cooler effectively lowers the working temperature of the sensor device, resulting in extended sensor lifetime and receptor stability. The system performance was verified in both laboratory conditions and real residential areas. The system response was in accordance with reported fungal species distribution in the environment. Our system is versatile enough that it can be easily modified for the monitoring of other airborne pathogens. We expect that our system will expedite the development of hand-held and portable systems for airborne bioaerosol monitoring. PMID:27070239

  4. Automated Internet-Based Control of Spacecraft Groundstations: Beacon-Based Health Monitoring Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cantwell, Brian; Twiggs, Robert; Swartwout, Michael

    1997-01-01

    This report serves as an update about the activities of Stanford University's Space Systems Development Laboratory (SSDL) in their beacon-based health monitoring experiment. Section 1 describes the goals of the project and the organization of the team. Section 2 provides an overview of the major components of the system, describing the general approach of automated health monitoring and the beacon signal relay. It also provides background about the SAPPHIRE spacecraft and ASSET operations system, which will be used for the experiment. Specific details about implementation and status of each element of the experiment are found in Section 3. Section 4 describes the experiment and future work, and references are contained in Section 5.

  5. Use of automated medication adherence monitoring in bipolar disorder research: pitfalls, pragmatics, and possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Sams, Johnny; Tatsuoka, Curtis; Cassidy, Kristin A.; Sajatovic, Martha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Medication nonadherence occurs in 20–60% of persons with bipolar disorder (BD) and is associated with serious negative outcomes, including relapse, hospitalization, incarceration, suicide and high healthcare costs. Various strategies have been developed to measure adherence in BD. This descriptive paper summarizes challenges and workable strategies using electronic medication monitoring in a randomized clinical trial (RCT) in patients with BD. Methods: Descriptive data from 57 nonadherent individuals with BD enrolled in a prospective RCT evaluating a novel customized adherence intervention versus control were analyzed. Analyses focused on whole group data and did not assess intervention effects. Adherence was assessed with the self-reported Tablets Routine Questionnaire and the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS). Results: The majority of participants were women (74%), African American (69%), with type I BD (77%). Practical limitations of MEMS included misuse in conjunction with pill minders, polypharmacy, cost, failure to bring to research visits, losing the device, and the device impacting baseline measurement. The advantages were more precise measurement, less biased recall, and collecting data from past time periods for missed interim visits. Conclusions: Automated devices such as MEMS can assist investigators in evaluating adherence in patients with BD. Knowing the anticipated pitfalls allows study teams to implement preemptive procedures for successful implementation in BD adherence studies and can help pave the way for future refinements as automated adherence assessment technologies become more sophisticated and readily available. PMID:26240747

  6. Method for monitoring irradiated fuel using Cerenkov radiation

    DOEpatents

    Dowdy, E.J.; Nicholson, N.; Caldwell, J.T.

    1980-05-21

    A method is provided for monitoring irradiated nuclear fuel inventories located in a water-filled storage pond wherein the intensity of the Cerenkov radiation emitted from the water in the vicinity of the nuclear fuel is measured. This intensity is then compared with the expected intensity for nuclear fuel having a corresponding degree of irradiation exposure and time period after removal from a reactor core. Where the nuclear fuel inventory is located in an assembly having fuel pins or rods with intervening voids, the Cerenkov light intensity measurement is taken at selected bright sports corresponding to the water-filled interstices of the assembly in the water storage, the water-filled interstices acting as Cerenkov light channels so as to reduce cross-talk. On-line digital analysis of an analog video signal is possible, or video tapes may be used for later measurement using a video editor and an electrometer. Direct measurement of the Cerenkov radiation intensity also is possible using spot photometers pointed at the assembly.

  7. Automated small-scale fuel alcohol plant: A means to add value to food processing waste

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfram, J.H.; Keller, J.; Wernimont, L.P.

    1993-12-31

    A small scale fuel grade alcohol plant was designed, constructed and operated a decade ago. This plant design incorporated several innovative processes and features that are still on the cutting edge for small scale alcohol production. The plant design could be scaled down or up to match the needs of food processing waste streams that contain sugars or starches as BOD. The novel features include automation requiring four hours of labor per 24 hour day and a plug flow low temperature cooking system which solubilizes and liquifies the starch in one step. This plant consistently produced high yield of alcohol. Yields of 2.6 gallons of absolute alcohol were produced from a bushel of corn. Potato waste grain dust and cheese whey were also processed in this plant as well as barley. Production energy for a 190 proof gallon was approximately 32,000 BTU. This paper discusses the design, results, and applicability of this plant to food processing industries.

  8. Automated small scale oil seed processing plant for production of fuel for diesel engines

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.C.; Peterson, C.L.

    1982-01-01

    University of Idaho seed processing research is centered about a CeCoCo oil expeller. A seed preheater-auger, seed bin, meal auger, and oil pump have been constructed to complete the system, which is automated and instrumented. The press, preheater, cake removal auger, and oil transfer pump are tied into a central panel where energy use is measured and the process controlled. Extracted oil weight, meal weight, process temperature, and input energy are all recorded during operation. The oil is transferred to tanks where it settles for 48 hours or more. It is then pumped through a filtering system and stored ready to be used as an engine fuel. The plant has processed over 11,000 kg of seed with an average extraction efficiency of 78 percent. 5 tables.

  9. Semi-automated structural characterisation of high velocity oxy fuel thermally sprayed WC-Co based coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fay, M. W.; Han, Y.; McCartney, G.; Korpiola, K.; Brown, P. D.

    2008-08-01

    The application of an automated procedure for the rapid assessment of selected area electron diffraction patterns is described. Comparison with complementary EDX spectra has enabled the thermal decomposition reactions within high velocity oxy-fuel thermally sprayed WC-Co coatings to be investigated.

  10. Automation of Extraction Chromatograhic and Ion Exchange Separations for Radiochemical Analysis and Monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Grate, Jay W.; O'Hara, Matthew J.; Egorov, Oleg

    2009-08-19

    Radiochemical analysis, complete with the separation of radionuclides of interest from the sample matrix and from other interfering radionuclides, is often an essential step in the determination of the radiochemical composition of a nuclear sample or process stream. Although some radionuclides can be determined nondestructively by gamma spectroscopy, where the gamma rays penetrate significant distances in condensed media and the gamma ray energies are diagnostic for specific radionuclides, other radionuclides that may be of interest emit only alpha or beta particles. For these, samples must be taken for destructive analysis and radiochemical separations are required. For process monitoring purposes, the radiochemical separation and detection methods must be rapid so that the results will be timely. These results could be obtained by laboratory analysis or by radiochemical process analyzers operating on-line or at-site. In either case, there is a need for automated radiochemical analysis methods to provide speed, throughput, safety, and consistent analytical protocols. Classical methods of separation used during the development of nuclear technologies, namely manual precipitations, solvent extractions, and ion exchange, are slow and labor intensive. Fortunately, the convergence of digital instrumentation for preprogrammed fluid manipulation and the development of new separation materials for column-based isolation of radionuclides has enabled the development of automated radiochemical analysis methodology. The primary means for separating radionuclides in solution are liquid-liquid extraction and ion exchange. These processes are well known and have been reviewed in the past.1 Ion exchange is readily employed in column formats. Liquid-liquid extraction can also be implemented on column formats using solvent-impregnated resins as extraction chromatographic materials. The organic liquid extractant is immobilized in the pores of a microporous polymer material. Under

  11. Monitoring cognitive function and need with the automated neuropsychological assessment metrics in Decompression Sickness (DCS) research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesthus, Thomas E.; Schiflett, Sammuel G.

    1993-01-01

    Hypobaric decompression sickness (DCS) research presents the medical monitor with the difficult task of assessing the onset and progression of DCS largely on the basis of subjective symptoms. Even with the introduction of precordial Doppler ultrasound techniques for the detection of venous gas emboli (VGE), correct prediction of DCS can be made only about 65 percent of the time according to data from the Armstrong Laboratory's (AL's) hypobaric DCS database. An AL research protocol concerned with exercise and its effects on denitrogenation efficiency includes implementation of a performance assessment test battery to evaluate cognitive functioning during a 4-h simulated 30,000 ft (9144 m) exposure. Information gained from such a test battery may assist the medical monitor in identifying early signs of DCS and subtle neurologic dysfunction related to cases of asymptomatic, but advanced, DCS. This presentation concerns the selection and integration of a test battery and the timely graphic display of subject test results for the principal investigator and medical monitor. A subset of the Automated Neuropsychological Assessment Metrics (ANAM) developed through the Office of Military Performance Assessment Technology (OMPAT) was selected. The ANAM software provides a library of simple tests designed for precise measurement of processing efficiency in a variety of cognitive domains. For our application and time constraints, two tests requiring high levels of cognitive processing and memory were chosen along with one test requiring fine psychomotor performance. Accuracy, speed, and processing throughout variables as well as RMS error were collected. An automated mood survey provided 'state' information on six scales including anger, happiness, fear, depression, activity, and fatigue. An integrated and interactive LOTUS 1-2-3 macro was developed to import and display past and present task performance and mood-change information.

  12. Automated swimming activity monitor for examining temporal patterns of toxicant effects on individual Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Bahrndorff, Simon; Michaelsen, Thomas Yssing; Jensen, Anne; Marcussen, Laurits Faarup; Nielsen, Majken Elley; Roslev, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Aquatic pollutants are often biologically active at low concentrations and impact on biota in combination with other abiotic stressors. Traditional toxicity tests may not detect these effects, and there is a need for sensitive high-throughput methods for detecting sublethal effects. We have evaluated an automated infra-red (IR) light-based monitor for recording the swimming activity of Daphnia magna to establish temporal patterns of toxicant effects on an individual level. Activity was recorded for 48 h and the sensitivity of the monitor was evaluated by exposing D. magna to the reference chemicals K2 Cr2 O7 at 15, 20 and 25 °C and 2,4-dichlorophenol at 20 °C. Significant effects (P < 0.001) of toxicant concentrations, exposure time and incubation temperatures were observed. At 15 °C, the swimming activity remained unchanged for 48 h at sublethal concentrations of K2 Cr2 O7 whereas activity at 20 and 25 °C was more biphasic with decreases in activity occurring after 12-18 h. A similar biphasic pattern was observed after 2,4-dichlorophenol exposure at 20 °C. EC50 values for 2,4-dichlorophenol and K2 Cr2 O7 determined from automated recording of swimming activity showed increasing toxicity with time corresponding to decreases in EC50 of 0.03-0.07 mg l(-1) h(-1) . EC50 values determined after 48 h were comparable or lower than EC50 values based on visual inspection according to ISO 6341. The results demonstrated that the swimming activity monitor is capable of detecting sublethal behavioural effects that are toxicant and temperature dependent. The method allows EC values to be established at different time points and can serve as a high-throughput screening tool in toxicity testing. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26198804

  13. Shrimp monitor/locator for conservation of fuel. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    A demonstration project of a new type Shrimp Detector/Monitor has been completed. The test project proved the efficiency of the Shrimp Monitor/Detector in detecting shrimp, in identifying the number and size, in real time, but indicated that improvement could be effected which would enhance the operation. Data obtained from the test cruises indicate significant savings in diesel fuel will occur for those trawlers using the Shrimp Monitor/Detector in place of the usual trynet operation; 25% savings for the series model number 400, (the prototype tested) and expected 35%+ if the advanced series model number 500 were used. Fabrication and operational costs for the Shrimp Monitor/Detector are reasonable and well within the financial abilities of the usual large offshore trawler. Research and testing during this program resulted in the design of an advanced model incorporating significant improvements, and fabrication was commenced but the extra cost involved beyond the set value of this contract made the further experiments non-viable. Recommendations have been submitted for an extended program to fabricate and test the advanced model series number 500 which may be of more value and interest, market use, to the operating offshore shrimp trawlers. A marketing/sales program will be instituted to place the Shrimp Monitor/Detector in the commercial area serving the shrimp fleet.

  14. A novel automated discontinuous venous blood monitoring system for ex vivo glucose determination in humans.

    PubMed

    Schaller, R; Feichtner, F; Köhler, H; Bodenlenz, M; Plank, J; Wutte, A; Mader, J K; Ellmerer, M; Hellmich, R; Wedig, H; Hainisch, R; Pieber, T R; Schaupp, L

    2009-03-15

    Intensive insulin therapy reduces mortality and morbidity in critically ill patients but imposes great demands on medical staff who must take frequent blood samples for the determination of glucose levels. A solution to this resourcing problem would be provided by an automated blood monitoring system. The aim of the present clinical study was to evaluate such a system comprising an automatic blood sampling unit linked to a glucose biosensor. Our approach was to determine the correlation and system error of the sampling unit alone and of the combined system with respect to reference levels over 12h in humans. Two venous cannulae were inserted to connect the automatic and reference systems to the subjects. Blood samples were taken at 15 and 30 min intervals. The median Pearson coefficient of correlation between manually and automatically withdrawn blood samples was 0.982 for the sampling unit alone and 0.950 for the complete system. The biosensor had a linear range up to 20 mmoll(-1) and a 95% response time of <2 min. Clark Error Grid analysis showed that 96.93% of the data (228 data pairs) was in zone A and 3.07% in zone B. Insulin Titration Error Grid analysis suggested an acceptable treatment in 99.56% of cases. Implementation of a "Keep Vein Open" saline infusion into the automated blood sampling system reduced blood withdrawal failures through occluded catheters fourfold. In summary, automated blood sampling from a peripheral vein coupled with automatic glucose determination is a promising alternative to frequent manual blood sampling. PMID:19135351

  15. Automated size-specific CT dose monitoring program: Assessing variability in CT dose

    SciTech Connect

    Christianson, Olav; Li Xiang; Frush, Donald; Samei, Ehsan

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: The potential health risks associated with low levels of ionizing radiation have created a movement in the radiology community to optimize computed tomography (CT) imaging protocols to use the lowest radiation dose possible without compromising the diagnostic usefulness of the images. Despite efforts to use appropriate and consistent radiation doses, studies suggest that a great deal of variability in radiation dose exists both within and between institutions for CT imaging. In this context, the authors have developed an automated size-specific radiation dose monitoring program for CT and used this program to assess variability in size-adjusted effective dose from CT imaging. Methods: The authors radiation dose monitoring program operates on an independent health insurance portability and accountability act compliant dosimetry server. Digital imaging and communication in medicine routing software is used to isolate dose report screen captures and scout images for all incoming CT studies. Effective dose conversion factors (k-factors) are determined based on the protocol and optical character recognition is used to extract the CT dose index and dose-length product. The patient's thickness is obtained by applying an adaptive thresholding algorithm to the scout images and is used to calculate the size-adjusted effective dose (ED{sub adj}). The radiation dose monitoring program was used to collect data on 6351 CT studies from three scanner models (GE Lightspeed Pro 16, GE Lightspeed VCT, and GE Definition CT750 HD) and two institutions over a one-month period and to analyze the variability in ED{sub adj} between scanner models and across institutions. Results: No significant difference was found between computer measurements of patient thickness and observer measurements (p= 0.17), and the average difference between the two methods was less than 4%. Applying the size correction resulted in ED{sub adj} that differed by up to 44% from effective dose estimates

  16. Tracking forest canopy stress from an automated proximal hyperspectral monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodgate, William; van Gorsel, Eva; Hughes, Dale; Cabello-Leblic, Arantxa

    2016-04-01

    Increasing climate variability and associated extreme weather events such as drought are likely to profoundly affect ecosystems, as many ecological processes are more sensitive to climate extremes than to changes in the mean states. However, the response of vegetation to these changes is one of the largest uncertainties in projecting future climate, carbon sequestration, and water resources. This remains a major limitation for long term climate prediction models integrating vegetation dynamics that are crucial for modelling the interplay of water, carbon and radiation fluxes. Satellite remote sensing data, such as that from the MODIS, Landsat and Sentinel missions, are the only viable means to study national and global vegetation trends. Highly accurate in-situ data is critical to better understand and validate our satellite products. Here, we developed a fully automated hyperspectral monitoring system installed on a flux monitoring tower at a mature Eucalypt forest site. The monitoring system is designed to provide a long-term (May 2014 - ongoing) and high temporal characterisation (3 acquisitions per day) of the proximal forest canopy to an unprecedented level of detail. The system comprises four main instruments: a thermal imaging camera and hyperspectral line camera (spectral ranges 7.5-14 μm and 0.4-1 μm, respectively), an upward pointing spectrometer (350-1000 nm), and hemispherical camera. The time series of hyperspectral and thermal imagery and flux tower data provides a unique dataset to study the impacts of logging, nutrient, and heat stress on trees and forest. Specifically, the monitoring system can be used to derive a range of physiological and structural indices that are also derived by satellites, such as PRI, TCARI/OSAVI, and NDVI. The monitoring system, to our knowledge, is the first fully automated data acquisition system that allows for spatially resolved spectral measurements at the sub-crown scale. Preliminary results indicate that canopy

  17. Active safety monitoring of newly marketed medications in a distributed data network: application of a semi-automated monitoring system.

    PubMed

    Gagne, J J; Glynn, R J; Rassen, J A; Walker, A M; Daniel, G W; Sridhar, G; Schneeweiss, S

    2012-07-01

    We developed a semi-automated active monitoring system that uses sequential matched-cohort analyses to assess drug safety across a distributed network of longitudinal electronic health-care data. In a retrospective analysis, we show that the system would have identified cerivastatin-induced rhabdomyolysis. In this study, we evaluated whether the system would generate alerts for three drug-outcome pairs: rosuvastatin and rhabdomyolysis (known null association), rosuvastatin and diabetes mellitus, and telithromycin and hepatotoxicity (two examples for which alerting would be questionable). Over >5 years of monitoring, rate differences (RDs) in comparisons of rosuvastatin with atorvastatin were -0.1 cases of rhabdomyolysis per 1,000 person-years (95% confidence interval (CI): -0.4, 0.1) and -2.2 diabetes cases per 1,000 person-years (95% CI: -6.0, 1.6). The RD for hepatotoxicity comparing telithromycin with azithromycin was 0.3 cases per 1,000 person-years (95% CI: -0.5, 1.0). In a setting in which false positivity is a major concern, the system did not generate alerts for the three drug-outcome pairs. PMID:22588606

  18. Use of automated monitoring to assess behavioral toxicology in fish: Linking behavior and physiology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brewer, S.K.; DeLonay, A.J.; Beauvais, S.L.; Little, E.E.; Jones, S.B.

    1999-01-01

    We measured locomotory behaviors (distance traveled, speed, tortuosity of path, and rate of change in direction) with computer-assisted analysis in 30 day posthatch rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) exposed to pesticides. We also examined cholinesterase inhibition as a potential endpoint linking physiology and behavior. Sublethal exposure to chemicals often causes changes in swimming behavior, reflecting alterations in sensory and motor systems. Swimming behavior also integrates functions of the nervous system. Rarely are the connections between physiology and behavior made. Although behavior is often suggested as a sensitive, early indicator of toxicity, behavioral toxicology has not been used to its full potential because conventional methods of behavioral assessment have relied on manual techniques, which are often time-consuming and difficult to quantify. This has severely limited the application and utility of behavioral procedures. Swimming behavior is particularly amenable to computerized assessment and automated monitoring. Locomotory responses are sensitive to toxicants and can be easily measured. We briefly discuss the use of behavior in toxicology and automated techniques used in behavioral toxicology. We also describe the system we used to determine locomotory behaviors of fish, and present data demonstrating the system's effectiveness in measuring alterations in response to chemical challenges. Lastly, we correlate behavioral and physiological endpoints.

  19. Automated Selected Reaction Monitoring Software for Accurate Label-Free Protein Quantification

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Selected reaction monitoring (SRM) is a mass spectrometry method with documented ability to quantify proteins accurately and reproducibly using labeled reference peptides. However, the use of labeled reference peptides becomes impractical if large numbers of peptides are targeted and when high flexibility is desired when selecting peptides. We have developed a label-free quantitative SRM workflow that relies on a new automated algorithm, Anubis, for accurate peak detection. Anubis efficiently removes interfering signals from contaminating peptides to estimate the true signal of the targeted peptides. We evaluated the algorithm on a published multisite data set and achieved results in line with manual data analysis. In complex peptide mixtures from whole proteome digests of Streptococcus pyogenes we achieved a technical variability across the entire proteome abundance range of 6.5–19.2%, which was considerably below the total variation across biological samples. Our results show that the label-free SRM workflow with automated data analysis is feasible for large-scale biological studies, opening up new possibilities for quantitative proteomics and systems biology. PMID:22658081

  20. Assessment of the Current Level of Automation in the Manufacture of Fuel Cell Systems for Combined Heat and Power Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ulsh, M.; Wheeler, D.; Protopappas, P.

    2011-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is interested in supporting manufacturing research and development (R&D) for fuel cell systems in the 10-1,000 kilowatt (kW) power range relevant to stationary and distributed combined heat and power applications, with the intent to reduce manufacturing costs and increase production throughput. To assist in future decision-making, DOE requested that the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provide a baseline understanding of the current levels of adoption of automation in manufacturing processes and flow, as well as of continuous processes. NREL identified and visited or interviewed key manufacturers, universities, and laboratories relevant to the study using a standard questionnaire. The questionnaire covered the current level of vertical integration, the importance of quality control developments for automation, the current level of automation and source of automation design, critical balance of plant issues, potential for continuous cell manufacturing, key manufacturing steps or processes that would benefit from DOE support for manufacturing R&D, the potential for cell or stack design changes to support automation, and the relationship between production volume and decisions on automation.

  1. Automated In-Situ Laser Scanner for Monitoring Forest Leaf Area Index

    PubMed Central

    Culvenor, Darius S.; Newnham, Glenn J.; Mellor, Andrew; Sims, Neil C.; Haywood, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    An automated laser rangefinding instrument was developed to characterize overstorey and understorey vegetation dynamics over time. Design criteria were based on information needs within the statewide forest monitoring program in Victoria, Australia. The ground-based monitoring instrument captures the key vegetation structural information needed to overcome ambiguity in the estimation of forest Leaf Area Index (LAI) from satellite sensors. The scanning lidar instrument was developed primarily from low cost, commercially accessible components. While the 635 nm wavelength lidar is not ideally suited to vegetation studies, there was an acceptable trade-off between cost and performance. Tests demonstrated reliable range estimates to live foliage up to a distance of 60 m during night-time operation. Given the instrument's scan angle of 57.5 degrees zenith, the instrument is an effective tool for monitoring LAI in forest canopies up to a height of 30 m. An 18 month field trial of three co-located instruments showed consistent seasonal trends and mean LAI of between 1.32 to 1.56 and a temporal LAI variation of 8 to 17% relative to the mean. PMID:25196006

  2. An automated system for determining drug solubility based on laser monitoring technique.

    PubMed

    Jouyban-Gharamaleki, Vahid; Jouyban-Gharamaleki, Karim; Shayanfar, Ali; Khoubnasabjafari, Mehry; Jouyban, Abolghasem

    2015-02-01

    The aqueous solubility of a drug candidate is a vital physicochemical property that stops a drug candidate from proceeding further in the drug development processes. Classical solubility determination methods, which are commonly used in pharmaceutical laboratories, are expensive and time-consuming. In this work, an automated determination method is proposed that is based on a laser monitoring technique, and the validity of the measured solubilities is checked by comparing the measured solubilities of acetaminophen at various temperatures as proposed in various literatures. An additional set of acetaminophen solubilities in various concentrations of a surface active agent is measured at various temperatures, which has been reported for the first time, and it could be applied in the pharmaceutical industry, where solubilization of acetaminophen in aqueous solutions is required. PMID:25331492

  3. The AAL project: automated monitoring and intelligent analysis for the ATLAS data taking infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazarov, A.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Magnoni, L.

    2012-06-01

    The Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) system of the ATLAS experiment at CERN is the infrastructure responsible for collecting and transferring ATLAS experimental data from detectors to the mass storage system. It relies on a large, distributed computing environment, including thousands of computing nodes with thousands of application running concurrently. In such a complex environment, information analysis is fundamental for controlling applications behavior, error reporting and operational monitoring. During data taking runs, streams of messages sent by applications via the message reporting system together with data published from applications via information services are the main sources of knowledge about correctness of running operations. The flow of data produced (with an average rate of O(1-10KHz)) is constantly monitored by experts to detect problem or misbehavior. This requires strong competence and experience in understanding and discovering problems and root causes, and often the meaningful information is not in the single message or update, but in the aggregated behavior in a certain time-line. The AAL project is meant at reducing the man power needs and at assuring a constant high quality of problem detection by automating most of the monitoring tasks and providing real-time correlation of data-taking and system metrics. This project combines technologies coming from different disciplines, in particular it leverages on an Event Driven Architecture to unify the flow of data from the ATLAS infrastructure, on a Complex Event Processing (CEP) engine for correlation of events and on a message oriented architecture for components integration. The project is composed of 2 main components: a core processing engine, responsible for correlation of events through expert-defined queries and a web based front-end to present real-time information and interact with the system. All components works in a loose-coupled event based architecture, with a message broker

  4. The Earth Observation Monitor - Automated monitoring and alerting for spatial time-series data based on OGC web services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberle, J.; Hüttich, C.; Schmullius, C.

    2014-12-01

    Spatial time series data are freely available around the globe from earth observation satellites and meteorological stations for many years until now. They provide useful and important information to detect ongoing changes of the environment; but for end-users it is often too complex to extract this information out of the original time series datasets. This issue led to the development of the Earth Observation Monitor (EOM), an operational framework and research project to provide simple access, analysis and monitoring tools for global spatial time series data. A multi-source data processing middleware in the backend is linked to MODIS data from Land Processes Distributed Archive Center (LP DAAC) and Google Earth Engine as well as daily climate station data from NOAA National Climatic Data Center. OGC Web Processing Services are used to integrate datasets from linked data providers or external OGC-compliant interfaces to the EOM. Users can either use the web portal (webEOM) or the mobile application (mobileEOM) to execute these processing services and to retrieve the requested data for a given point or polygon in userfriendly file formats (CSV, GeoTiff). Beside providing just data access tools, users can also do further time series analyses like trend calculations, breakpoint detections or the derivation of phenological parameters from vegetation time series data. Furthermore data from climate stations can be aggregated over a given time interval. Calculated results can be visualized in the client and downloaded for offline usage. Automated monitoring and alerting of the time series data integrated by the user is provided by an OGC Sensor Observation Service with a coupled OGC Web Notification Service. Users can decide which datasets and parameters are monitored with a given filter expression (e.g., precipitation value higher than x millimeter per day, occurrence of a MODIS Fire point, detection of a time series anomaly). Datasets integrated in the SOS service are

  5. The Effects of Automated Prompting and Self-Monitoring on Homework Completion for a Student with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blicha, Amy; Belfiore, Phillip J.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the effects of an intervention consisting of automated prompting and self-monitoring on the level of independent homework task completion for an elementary-age student with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Instituting a single subject, within series ABAB design, the results showed a consistent increase and…

  6. Automated Remote Monitoring of Depression: Acceptance Among Low-Income Patients in Diabetes Disease Management

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Magaly; Jin, Haomiao; Ell, Kathleen; Gross-Schulman, Sandra; Myerchin Sklaroff, Laura; Guterman, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    Background Remote patient monitoring is increasingly integrated into health care delivery to expand access and increase effectiveness. Automation can add efficiency to remote monitoring, but patient acceptance of automated tools is critical for success. From 2010 to 2013, the Diabetes-Depression Care-management Adoption Trial (DCAT)–a quasi-experimental comparative effectiveness research trial aimed at accelerating the adoption of collaborative depression care in a safety-net health care system–tested a fully automated telephonic assessment (ATA) depression monitoring system serving low-income patients with diabetes. Objective The aim of this study was to determine patient acceptance of ATA calls over time, and to identify factors predicting long-term patient acceptance of ATA calls. Methods We conducted two analyses using data from the DCAT technology-facilitated care arm, in which for 12 months the ATA system periodically assessed depression symptoms, monitored treatment adherence, prompted self-care behaviors, and inquired about patients’ needs for provider contact. Patients received assessments at 6, 12, and 18 months using Likert-scale measures of willingness to use ATA calls, preferred mode of reach, perceived ease of use, usefulness, nonintrusiveness, privacy/security, and long-term usefulness. For the first analysis (patient acceptance over time), we computed descriptive statistics of these measures. In the second analysis (predictive factors), we collapsed patients into two groups: those reporting “high” versus “low” willingness to use ATA calls. To compare them, we used independent t tests for continuous variables and Pearson chi-square tests for categorical variables. Next, we jointly entered independent factors found to be significantly associated with 18-month willingness to use ATA calls at the univariate level into a logistic regression model with backward selection to identify predictive factors. We performed a final logistic

  7. Thermoelectric powered wireless sensors for spent fuel monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Carstens, T.; Corradini, M.; Blanchard, J.; Ma, Z.

    2011-07-01

    This paper describes using thermoelectric generators to power wireless sensors to monitor spent nuclear fuel during dry-cask storage. OrigenArp was used to determine the decay heat of the spent fuel at different times during the service life of the dry-cask. The Engineering Equation Solver computer program modeled the temperatures inside the spent fuel storage facility during its service life. The temperature distribution in a thermoelectric generator and heat sink was calculated using the computer program Finite Element Heat Transfer. From these temperature distributions the power produced by the thermoelectric generator was determined as a function of the service life of the dry-cask. In addition, an estimation of the path loss experienced by the wireless signal can be made based on materials and thickness of the structure. Once the path loss is known, the transmission power and thermoelectric generator power requirements can be determined. This analysis estimates that a thermoelectric generator can produce enough power for a sensor to function and transmit data from inside the dry-cask throughout its service life. (authors)

  8. The Automated Instrumentation and Monitoring System (AIMS): Design and Architecture. 3.2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yan, Jerry C.; Schmidt, Melisa; Schulbach, Cathy; Bailey, David (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Whether a researcher is designing the 'next parallel programming paradigm', another 'scalable multiprocessor' or investigating resource allocation algorithms for multiprocessors, a facility that enables parallel program execution to be captured and displayed is invaluable. Careful analysis of such information can help computer and software architects to capture, and therefore, exploit behavioral variations among/within various parallel programs to take advantage of specific hardware characteristics. A software tool-set that facilitates performance evaluation of parallel applications on multiprocessors has been put together at NASA Ames Research Center under the sponsorship of NASA's High Performance Computing and Communications Program over the past five years. The Automated Instrumentation and Monitoring Systematic has three major software components: a source code instrumentor which automatically inserts active event recorders into program source code before compilation; a run-time performance monitoring library which collects performance data; and a visualization tool-set which reconstructs program execution based on the data collected. Besides being used as a prototype for developing new techniques for instrumenting, monitoring and presenting parallel program execution, AIMS is also being incorporated into the run-time environments of various hardware testbeds to evaluate their impact on user productivity. Currently, the execution of FORTRAN and C programs on the Intel Paragon and PALM workstations can be automatically instrumented and monitored. Performance data thus collected can be displayed graphically on various workstations. The process of performance tuning with AIMS will be illustrated using various NAB Parallel Benchmarks. This report includes a description of the internal architecture of AIMS and a listing of the source code.

  9. A Low Cost Automated Monitoring System for Landslides Using Dual Frequency GPS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, H.; Edwards, S.

    2006-12-01

    Landslides are an existing and permanent threat to societies across the globe, generating financial and human losses whenever and wherever they occur. Drawing together the strands of science that provide increased understanding of landslide triggers through accurate modelling is therefore vital for the development of mitigation and management strategies. Together with climatic and geomorphological data a key input here is information on the precise location and timing of landslide events. However, the detailed monitoring of landslides and precursor movements is generally limited to episodic campaigns where limiting factors include equipment and mobilisation costs, time constraints and spatial resolution. This research has developed a geodetic tool of benefit to scientists involved in the development of closely coupled models that seek to explain trigger mechanisms such as rainfall duration and intensity and changes in groundwater pressure to actual real land movements. A fully automated low cost dual frequency GPS station for the continuous in-situ monitoring of landslide sites has been developed. System configuration combines a dual frequency GPS receiver, PC board with a GPRS modem and power supply to deliver 24hr/365day operation capability. Individual components have been chosen to provide the highest accuracies while minimising power consumption resulting in a system around half that of equivalent commercial systems. Measurement point-costs can be further reduced through the use of antenna switching and multi antenna arrays. Continuous data is delivered via mobile phone uplink and processed automatically using geodetic software. The developed system has been extensively tested on a purpose built platform capable of simulating ground movements. Co-mounted antennas have allowed direct comparisons with more expensive geodetic GPS receivers. The system is capable of delivering precise 3D coordinates with a 9 mm rms. The system can be up-scaled resulting in the

  10. International remote monitoring project Argentina Nuclear Power Station Spent Fuel Transfer Remote Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, S.; Lucero, R.; Glidewell, D.

    1997-08-01

    The Autoridad Regulataria Nuclear (ARN) and the United States Department of Energy (DOE) are cooperating on the development of a Remote Monitoring System for nuclear nonproliferation efforts. A Remote Monitoring System for spent fuel transfer will be installed at the Argentina Nuclear Power Station in Embalse, Argentina. The system has been designed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) providing gamma and neutron sensors. This project will test and evaluate the fundamental design and implementation of the Remote Monitoring System in its application to regional and international safeguards efficiency. This paper provides a description of the monitoring system and its functions. The Remote Monitoring System consists of gamma and neutron radiation sensors, RF systems, and video systems integrated into a coherent functioning whole. All sensor data communicate over an Echelon LonWorks Network to a single data logger. The Neumann DCM 14 video module is integrated into the Remote Monitoring System. All sensor and image data are stored on a Data Acquisition System (DAS) and archived and reviewed on a Data and Image Review Station (DIRS). Conventional phone lines are used as the telecommunications link to transmit on-site collected data and images to remote locations. The data and images are authenticated before transmission. Data review stations will be installed at ARN in Buenos Aires, Argentina, ABACC in Rio De Janeiro, IAEA Headquarters in Vienna, and Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Automated home telephone self-monitoring reduces hospitalization in patients with advanced heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kurtz, Baptiste; Lemercier, Mathieu; Pouchin, Sophie Cordier; Benmokhtar, Emmanuelle; Vallet, Charlotte; Cribier, Alain; Bauer, Fabrice

    2011-01-01

    We studied 138 patients admitted for heart failure (HF). Patients were allocated one of three treatment strategies. Group 1 (G1, n = 50) were given usual care for HF, Group 2 (G2, n = 56) received a multi-disciplinary team approach, while Group 3 (G3, n = 32) had home telephone self-monitoring. Telemonitoring was based on the answers to three simple queries about bodyweight change, dyspnoea and general health. The system stratified the HF severity of each patient once a week, and recommended a prompt medical appointment or simple follow-up. Over a 12-month follow-up period, there were 43 adverse events (cardiovascular deaths and rehospitalizations for HF: G1 = 22, G2 = 14, G3 = 7). There was no difference between G2 and G3 (P = 0.78) but there was significant disadvantage with usual care (P = 0.02 vs. G2 and P = 0.04 vs. G3). Time to re-admission for HF increased in G2 and G3 compared to G1 (188 and 198 days vs. 95 days, P = 0.03 and P = 0.02 respectively). Automated home telephone self-monitoring reduced rehospitalization in patients with advanced HF. PMID:21844176

  12. Microbiological monitoring and automated event sampling at karst springs using LEO-satellites.

    PubMed

    Stadler, H; Skritek, P; Sommer, R; Mach, R L; Zerobin, W; Farnleitner, A H

    2008-01-01

    Data communication via Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) Satellites between portable hydrometeorological measuring stations is the backbone of our system. This networking allows automated event sampling with short time increments also for E. coli field analysis. All activities of the course of the event-sampling can be observed on an internet platform based on a Linux-Server. Conventionally taken samples compared with the auto-sampling procedure revealed corresponding results and were in agreement with the ISO 9308-1 reference method. E. coli concentrations were individually corrected by event specific inactivation coefficients (0.10-0.14 day(-1)), compensating losses due to sample storage at spring temperature in the auto sampler.Two large summer events in 2005/2006 at an important alpine karst spring (LKAS2) were monitored including detailed analysis of E. coli dynamics (n = 271) together with comprehensive hydrological characterisations. High-resolution time series demonstrated a sudden increase of E. coli concentrations in spring water (approximately 2 log10 units) with a specific time delay after the beginning of the event. Statistical analysis suggested the spectral absorption coefficient measured at 254 nm (SAC254) as an early warning surrogate for real time monitoring of faecal input. Together with the LEO-satellite based system it is a helpful tool for early-warning systems in the field of drinking water protection. PMID:18776628

  13. Application of an automated wireless structural monitoring system for long-span suspension bridges

    SciTech Connect

    Kurata, M.; Lynch, J. P.; Linden, G. W. van der; Hipley, P.; Sheng, L.-H.

    2011-06-23

    This paper describes an automated wireless structural monitoring system installed at the New Carquinez Bridge (NCB). The designed system utilizes a dense network of wireless sensors installed in the bridge but remotely controlled by a hierarchically designed cyber-environment. The early efforts have included performance verification of a dense network of wireless sensors installed on the bridge and the establishment of a cellular gateway to the system for remote access from the internet. Acceleration of the main bridge span was the primary focus of the initial field deployment of the wireless monitoring system. An additional focus of the study is on ensuring wireless sensors can survive for long periods without human intervention. Toward this end, the life-expectancy of the wireless sensors has been enhanced by embedding efficient power management schemes in the sensors while integrating solar panels for power harvesting. The dynamic characteristics of the NCB under daily traffic and wind loads were extracted from the vibration response of the bridge deck and towers. These results have been compared to a high-fidelity finite element model of the bridge.

  14. Atlas-based multichannel monitoring of functional MRI signals in real-time: automated approach.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Hwan; O'Leary, Heather M; Park, Hyunwook; Jolesz, Ferenc A; Yoo, Seung-Schik

    2008-02-01

    We report an automated method to simultaneously monitor blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) MR signals from multiple cortical areas in real-time. Individual brain anatomy was normalized and registered to a pre-segmented atlas in standardized anatomical space. Subsequently, using real-time fMRI (rtfMRI) data acquisition, localized BOLD signals were measured and displayed from user-selected areas labeled with anatomical and Brodmann's Area (BA) nomenclature. The method was tested on healthy volunteers during the performance of hand motor and internal speech generation tasks employing a trial-based design. Our data normalization and registration algorithm, along with image reconstruction, movement correction and a data display routine were executed with enough processing and communication bandwidth necessary for real-time operation. Task-specific BOLD signals were observed from the hand motor and language areas. One of the study participants was allowed to freely engage in hand clenching tasks, and associated brain activities were detected from the motor-related neural substrates without prior knowledge of the task onset time. The proposed method may be applied to various applications such as neurofeedback, brain-computer-interface, and functional mapping for surgical planning where real-time monitoring of region-specific brain activity is needed. PMID:17370340

  15. Application of AN Automated Wireless Structural Monitoring System for Long-Span Suspension Bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurata, M.; Lynch, J. P.; van der Linden, G. W.; Hipley, P.; Sheng, L.-H.

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes an automated wireless structural monitoring system installed at the New Carquinez Bridge (NCB). The designed system utilizes a dense network of wireless sensors installed in the bridge but remotely controlled by a hierarchically designed cyber-environment. The early efforts have included performance verification of a dense network of wireless sensors installed on the bridge and the establishment of a cellular gateway to the system for remote access from the internet. Acceleration of the main bridge span was the primary focus of the initial field deployment of the wireless monitoring system. An additional focus of the study is on ensuring wireless sensors can survive for long periods without human intervention. Toward this end, the life-expectancy of the wireless sensors has been enhanced by embedding efficient power management schemes in the sensors while integrating solar panels for power harvesting. The dynamic characteristics of the NCB under daily traffic and wind loads were extracted from the vibration response of the bridge deck and towers. These results have been compared to a high-fidelity finite element model of the bridge.

  16. MICROBIOLOGICAL MONITORING AND AUTOMATED EVENT SAMPLING AT KARST SPRINGS USING LEO-SATELLITES

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, Hermann; Skritek, Paul; Sommer, Regina; Mach, Robert L.; Zerobin, Wolfgang; Farnleitner, Andreas H.

    2010-01-01

    Data communication via Low-Earth-Orbit Satellites between portable hydro-meteorological measuring stations is the backbone of our system. This networking allows automated event sampling with short time increments also for E.coli field analysis. All activities of the course of the event-sampling can be observed on an internet platform based on a Linux-Server. Conventionally taken samples by hand compared with the auto-sampling procedure revealed corresponding results and were in agreement to the ISO 9308-1 reference method. E.coli concentrations were individually corrected by event specific die-off rates (0.10–0.14 day−1) compensating losses due to sample storage at spring temperature in the auto sampler. Two large summer events 2005/2006 at a large alpine karst spring (LKAS2) were monitored including detailed analysis of E.coli dynamics (n = 271) together with comprehensive hydrological characterisations. High resolution time series demonstrated a sudden increase of E.coli concentrations in spring water (approx. 2 log10 units) with a specific time delay after the beginning of the event. Statistical analysis suggested the spectral absorbent coefficient measured at 254nm (SAC254) as an early warning surrogate for real time monitoring of faecal input. Together with the LEO-Satellite based system it is a helpful tool for Early-Warning-Systems in the field of drinking water protection. PMID:18776628

  17. Greenhouse Gases in the South Atlantic: Testing and Automation of Instrumentation for Long-Term Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, D.; Fisher, R.; Sriskantharajah, S.; Lanoisellé, M.; Etchells, A.; Manning, A.; Nisbet, E.

    2009-04-01

    Understanding ocean uptake of atmospheric CO2 by the Southern Ocean is important for modelling of future global warming scenarios, particularly since it was recently proposed that this sink was reducing (Le Quéré, et al., 2007). To help our understanding of this problem a new project aims to flask sample air from 5 South Atlantic sites and set up continuous monitoring at the 2 most accessible of these: Ascension Island and the Falklands. Flask sample measurements will include CO2 and CH4 mixing ratios and the ^13C measurement of both of these gases using the rapid continuous flow trace gas analysis system at Royal Holloway, University of London (RHUL). Routine precisions are ±0.03 per mil and ±0.05 per mil for CO2 and CH4, respectively (Fisher et al., 2006). A time series of ^13C in CH4 was maintained for Ascension Island from 2000-2005 and a time series for methane isotopes commenced for the Falkland Islands in autumn 2007. To meet the continuous monitoring requirements of the new project, three Picarro G1301 CO2 / CH4 / H2O Cavity Ring Down Spectrometers (CRDS) were installed at RHUL in October 2008 for testing, calibration and the development of an automated air inlet system suitable for analysis of calibration gases at the remote sites. Initial testing included calibration with NOAA calibrated and target gases, validation of the Picarro-defined H2O-correction of CO2, and derivation of an H2O-correction for CH4. Continuing checks on the H2O correction are made by having 2 instruments side-by-side taking air from the same inlet, but one having a combined Nafion / Mg-perchlorate drying system that utilizes the analysis system exhaust gas for the reverse flow through the Nafion and maintains water-levels at 0.05% for more than 2 weeks. These instruments are connected to the same air inlet as a GC measuring CH4 mixing ratio and a LiCor 6252 measuring CO2 mixing ratio at 30-minute and 1-minute intervals respectively. The third CRDS instrument is connected to a

  18. A Spouted Bed Reactor Monitoring System for Particulate Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    D. S. Wendt; R. L. Bewley; W. E. Windes

    2007-06-01

    Conversion and coating of particle nuclear fuel is performed in spouted (fluidized) bed reactors. The reactor must be capable of operating at temperatures up to 2000°C in inert, flammable, and coating gas environments. The spouted bed reactor geometry is defined by a graphite retort with a 2.5 inch inside diameter, conical section with a 60° included angle, and a 4 mm gas inlet orifice diameter through which particles are removed from the reactor at the completion of each run. The particles may range from 200 µm to 2 mm in diameter. Maintaining optimal gas flow rates slightly above the minimum spouting velocity throughout the duration of each run is complicated by the variation of particle size and density as conversion and/or coating reactions proceed in addition to gas composition and temperature variations. In order to achieve uniform particle coating, prevent agglomeration of the particle bed, and monitor the reaction progress, a spouted bed monitoring system was developed. The monitoring system includes a high-sensitivity, low-response time differential pressure transducer paired with a signal processing, data acquisition, and process control unit which allows for real-time monitoring and control of the spouted bed reactor. The pressure transducer is mounted upstream of the spouted bed reactor gas inlet. The gas flow into the reactor induces motion of the particles in the bed and prevents the particles from draining from the reactor due to gravitational forces. Pressure fluctuations in the gas inlet stream are generated as the particles in the bed interact with the entering gas stream. The pressure fluctuations are produced by bulk movement of the bed, generation and movement of gas bubbles through the bed, and the individual motion of particles and particle subsets in the bed. The pressure fluctuations propagate upstream to the pressure transducer where they can be monitored. Pressure fluctuation, mean differential pressure, gas flow rate, reactor

  19. A Continuous Automated Vault Inventory System (CAVIS) for accountability monitoring of stored nuclear materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pickett, C.A.; Barham, M.A.; Gafford, T.A.; Hutchinson, D.P.; Jordan, J.K.; Maxey, L.C.; Moran, B.W.; Muhs, J.; Nodine, R.; Simpson, M.L.

    1994-12-08

    Nearly all facilities that store hazardous (radioactive or non-radioactive) materials must comply with prevailing federal, state, and local laws. These laws usually have components that require periodic physical inspections to insure that all materials remain safely and securely stored. The inspections are generally labor intensive, slow, put personnel at risk, and only find anomalies after they have occurred. The system described in this paper was developed for monitoring stored nuclear materials resulting from weapons dismantlement, but its applications extend to any storage facility that meets the above criteria. The traditional special nuclear material (SNM) accountability programs, that are currently used within most of the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, require the physical entry of highly trained personnel into SNM storage vaults. This imposes the need for additional security measures, which typically mandate that extra security personnel be present while SNM inventories are performed. These requirements increase labor costs and put additional personnel at risk to radiation exposure. In some cases, individuals have received radiation exposure equivalent to the annual maximum during just one inventory verification. With increasing overhead costs, the current system is rapidly becoming too expensive to operate, the need for an automated method of inventory verification is evident. The Continuous Automated Vault Inventory System (CAVIS) described in this paper was designed and prototyped as a low cost, highly reliable, and user friendly system that is capable of providing, real-time weight, gamma. and neutron energy confirmation from each item stored in a SNM vault. This paper describes the sensor technologies, the CAVIS prototype system (built at Y- 12 for highly enriched uranium storage), the technical requirements that must be achieved to assure successful implementation, and descriptions of sensor technologies needed for a plutonium facility.

  20. Distributed cyberinfrastructure tools for automated data processing of structural monitoring data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yilan; Kurata, Masahiro; Lynch, Jerome P.; van der Linden, Gwendolyn; Sederat, Hassan; Prakash, Atul

    2012-04-01

    The emergence of cost-effective sensing technologies has now enabled the use of dense arrays of sensors to monitor the behavior and condition of large-scale bridges. The continuous operation of dense networks of sensors presents a number of new challenges including how to manage such massive amounts of data that can be created by the system. This paper reports on the progress of the creation of cyberinfrastructure tools which hierarchically control networks of wireless sensors deployed in a long-span bridge. The internet-enabled cyberinfrastructure is centrally managed by a powerful database which controls the flow of data in the entire monitoring system architecture. A client-server model built upon the database provides both data-provider and system end-users with secured access to various levels of information of a bridge. In the system, information on bridge behavior (e.g., acceleration, strain, displacement) and environmental condition (e.g., wind speed, wind direction, temperature, humidity) are uploaded to the database from sensor networks installed in the bridge. Then, data interrogation services interface with the database via client APIs to autonomously process data. The current research effort focuses on an assessment of the scalability and long-term robustness of the proposed cyberinfrastructure framework that has been implemented along with a permanent wireless monitoring system on the New Carquinez (Alfred Zampa Memorial) Suspension Bridge in Vallejo, CA. Many data interrogation tools are under development using sensor data and bridge metadata (e.g., geometric details, material properties, etc.) Sample data interrogation clients including those for the detection of faulty sensors, automated modal parameter extraction.

  1. An automated fog monitoring system for the Indo-Gangetic Plains based on satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Dinesh; Chourey, Reema; Rizvi, Sarwar; Singh, Manoj; Gautam, Ritesh

    2016-05-01

    Fog is a meteorological phenomenon that causes reduction in regional visibility and affects air quality, thus leading to various societal and economic implications, especially disrupting air and rail transportation. The persistent and widespread winter fog impacts the entire the Indo-Gangetic Plains (IGP), as frequently observed in satellite imagery. The IGP is a densely populated region in south Asia, inhabiting about 1/6th of the world's population, with a strong upward pollution trend. In this study, we have used multi-spectral radiances and aerosol/cloud retrievals from Terra/Aqua MODIS data for developing an automated web-based fog monitoring system over the IGP. Using our previous and existing methodologies, and ongoing algorithm development for the detection of fog and retrieval of associated microphysical properties (e.g. fog droplet effective radius), we characterize the widespread fog detection during both daytime and nighttime. Specifically, for the night time fog detection, the algorithm employs a satellite-based bi-spectral brightness temperature difference technique between two spectral channels: MODIS band-22 (3.9μm) and band-31 (10.75μm). Further, we are extending our algorithm development to geostationary satellites, for providing continuous monitoring of the spatial-temporal variation of fog. We anticipate that the ongoing and future development of a fog monitoring system would be of assistance to air, rail and vehicular transportation management, as well as for dissemination of fog information to government agencies and general public. The outputs of fog detection algorithm and related aerosol/cloud parameters are operationally disseminated via http://fogsouthasia.com/.

  2. High-Resolution Time-Lapse Monitoring of Unsaturated Flow using Automated GPR Data Collection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangel, A. R.; Moysey, S. M.; Lytle, B. A.; Bradford, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    High-resolution ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data provide the detailed information required to image subsurface structures. Recent advances in GPR monitoring now also make it possible to study transient hydrologic processes, but high-speed data acquisition is critical for this application. We therefore highlight the capabilities of our automated system to acquire time-lapse, high-resolution multifold GPR data during infiltration of water into soils. The system design allows for fast acquisition of constant-offset (COP) and common-midpoint profiles (CMP) to monitor unsaturated flow at multiple locations. Qualitative interpretation of the unprocessed COPs can provide substantial information regarding the hydrologic response of the system, such as the complexities of patterns associated with the wetting of the soil and geophysical evidence of non-uniform propagation of a wetting front. While we find that unprocessed images are informative, we show that the spatial variability of velocity introduced by infiltration events can complicate the images and that migration of the data is an effective tool to improve interpretability of the time-lapse images. The ability of the system to collect high density CMP data also introduces the potential for improving the velocity model along with the image via reflection tomography in the post-migrated domain. We show that for both simulated and empirical time-lapse GPR profiles we can resolve a propagating wetting front in the soil that is in good agreement with the response of in-situ soil moisture measurements. The data from these experiments illustrate the importance of high-speed, high-resolution GPR data acquisition for obtaining insight about the dynamics of hydrologic events. Continuing research is aimed at improving the quantitative analysis of surface-based GPR monitoring data for identifying preferential flow in soils.

  3. Process automation

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Process automation technology has been pursued in the chemical processing industries and to a very limited extent in nuclear fuel reprocessing. Its effective use has been restricted in the past by the lack of diverse and reliable process instrumentation and the unavailability of sophisticated software designed for process control. The Integrated Equipment Test (IET) facility was developed by the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) in part to demonstrate new concepts for control of advanced nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. A demonstration of fuel reprocessing equipment automation using advanced instrumentation and a modern, microprocessor-based control system is nearing completion in the facility. This facility provides for the synergistic testing of all chemical process features of a prototypical fuel reprocessing plant that can be attained with unirradiated uranium-bearing feed materials. The unique equipment and mission of the IET facility make it an ideal test bed for automation studies. This effort will provide for the demonstration of the plant automation concept and for the development of techniques for similar applications in a full-scale plant. A set of preliminary recommendations for implementing process automation has been compiled. Some of these concepts are not generally recognized or accepted. The automation work now under way in the IET facility should be useful to others in helping avoid costly mistakes because of the underutilization or misapplication of process automation. 6 figs.

  4. Automated long-term monitoring of parallel microfluidic operations applying a machine vision-assisted positioning method.

    PubMed

    Yip, Hon Ming; Li, John C S; Xie, Kai; Cui, Xin; Prasad, Agrim; Gao, Qiannan; Leung, Chi Chiu; Lam, Raymond H W

    2014-01-01

    As microfluidics has been applied extensively in many cell and biochemical applications, monitoring the related processes is an important requirement. In this work, we design and fabricate a high-throughput microfluidic device which contains 32 microchambers to perform automated parallel microfluidic operations and monitoring on an automated stage of a microscope. Images are captured at multiple spots on the device during the operations for monitoring samples in microchambers in parallel; yet the device positions may vary at different time points throughout operations as the device moves back and forth on a motorized microscopic stage. Here, we report an image-based positioning strategy to realign the chamber position before every recording of microscopic image. We fabricate alignment marks at defined locations next to the chambers in the microfluidic device as reference positions. We also develop image processing algorithms to recognize the chamber positions in real-time, followed by realigning the chambers to their preset positions in the captured images. We perform experiments to validate and characterize the device functionality and the automated realignment operation. Together, this microfluidic realignment strategy can be a platform technology to achieve precise positioning of multiple chambers for general microfluidic applications requiring long-term parallel monitoring of cell and biochemical activities. PMID:25133248

  5. The feasibility of automated online flow cytometry for in-situ monitoring of microbial dynamics in aquatic ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    Besmer, Michael D.; Weissbrodt, David G.; Kratochvil, Bradley E.; Sigrist, Jürg A.; Weyland, Mathias S.; Hammes, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent staining coupled with flow cytometry (FCM) is often used for the monitoring, quantification and characterization of bacteria in engineered and environmental aquatic ecosystems including seawater, freshwater, drinking water, wastewater, and industrial bioreactors. However, infrequent grab sampling hampers accurate characterization and subsequent understanding of microbial dynamics in all of these ecosystems. A logic technological progression is high throughput and full automation of the sampling, staining, measurement, and data analysis steps. Here we assess the feasibility and applicability of automated FCM by means of actual data sets produced with prototype instrumentation. As proof-of-concept we demonstrate examples of microbial dynamics in (i) flowing tap water from a municipal drinking water supply network and (ii) river water from a small creek subject to two rainfall events. In both cases, automated measurements were done at 15-min intervals during 12–14 consecutive days, yielding more than 1000 individual data points for each ecosystem. The extensive data sets derived from the automated measurements allowed for the establishment of baseline data for each ecosystem, as well as for the recognition of daily variations and specific events that would most likely be missed (or miss-characterized) by infrequent sampling. In addition, the online FCM data from the river water was combined and correlated with online measurements of abiotic parameters, showing considerable potential for a better understanding of cause-and-effect relationships in aquatic ecosystems. Although several challenges remain, the successful operation of an automated online FCM system and the basic interpretation of the resulting data sets represent a breakthrough toward the eventual establishment of fully automated online microbiological monitoring technologies. PMID:24917858

  6. The feasibility of automated online flow cytometry for in-situ monitoring of microbial dynamics in aquatic ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Besmer, Michael D; Weissbrodt, David G; Kratochvil, Bradley E; Sigrist, Jürg A; Weyland, Mathias S; Hammes, Frederik

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescent staining coupled with flow cytometry (FCM) is often used for the monitoring, quantification and characterization of bacteria in engineered and environmental aquatic ecosystems including seawater, freshwater, drinking water, wastewater, and industrial bioreactors. However, infrequent grab sampling hampers accurate characterization and subsequent understanding of microbial dynamics in all of these ecosystems. A logic technological progression is high throughput and full automation of the sampling, staining, measurement, and data analysis steps. Here we assess the feasibility and applicability of automated FCM by means of actual data sets produced with prototype instrumentation. As proof-of-concept we demonstrate examples of microbial dynamics in (i) flowing tap water from a municipal drinking water supply network and (ii) river water from a small creek subject to two rainfall events. In both cases, automated measurements were done at 15-min intervals during 12-14 consecutive days, yielding more than 1000 individual data points for each ecosystem. The extensive data sets derived from the automated measurements allowed for the establishment of baseline data for each ecosystem, as well as for the recognition of daily variations and specific events that would most likely be missed (or miss-characterized) by infrequent sampling. In addition, the online FCM data from the river water was combined and correlated with online measurements of abiotic parameters, showing considerable potential for a better understanding of cause-and-effect relationships in aquatic ecosystems. Although several challenges remain, the successful operation of an automated online FCM system and the basic interpretation of the resulting data sets represent a breakthrough toward the eventual establishment of fully automated online microbiological monitoring technologies. PMID:24917858

  7. Water quality monitoring using an automated portable fiber optic biosensor: RAPTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, George P.; Rowe-Taitt, Chris A.

    2001-03-01

    The RAPTOR is a portable, automated biosensor capable of performing rapid, ten-minute assays on a sample for four target analytes simultaneously. Samples are analyzed using a fluorescent sandwich immunoassay on the surface of short polystyrene optical probes with capture antibody adsorbed to the probe surface. Target analytes bound to the fiber by capture antibodies are detected with fluorescently labeled tracer antibodies, which are held in a separate reservoir. Since target recognition is a two-step process, selectivity is enhanced, and the optical probes can be reused up to forty times, or until a positive result is obtained. This greatly reduces the logistical burden for field operations. Numerous assays for toxins, such as SEB and ricin, and bacteria, such as Bacillus anthracis and Francisella tularensis, have been developed for the RAPTOR. An assay of particular interest for water quality monitoring and the screening of fruits and vegetables is detection of Giardia cysts. Giardia lamblia is a parasitic protozoan common in the developing world that causes severe intestinal infections. Thus, a simple field assay for screening water supplies would be highly useful. Such an assay has been developed using the RAPTOR. The detection limit for Giardia cysts was 5x104/ml for a 10-minute assay.

  8. An automated method to quantify microglia morphology and application to monitor activation state longitudinally in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kozlowski, Cleopatra; Weimer, Robby M

    2012-01-01

    Microglia are specialized immune cells of the brain. Upon insult, microglia initiate a cascade of cellular responses including a characteristic change in cell morphology. To study the dynamics of microglia immune response in situ, we developed an automated image analysis method that enables the quantitative assessment of microglia activation state within tissue based solely on cell morphology. Per cell morphometric analysis of fluorescently labeled microglia is achieved through local iterative threshold segmentation, which reduces errors caused by signal-to-noise variation across large volumes. We demonstrate, utilizing systemic application of lipopolysaccharide as a model of immune challenge, that several morphological parameters, including cell perimeter length, cell roundness and soma size, quantitatively distinguish resting versus activated populations of microglia within tissue comparable to traditional immunohistochemistry methods. Furthermore, we provide proof-of-concept data that monitoring soma size enables the longitudinal assessment of microglia activation in the mouse neocortex imaged via 2-photon in vivo microscopy. The ability to quantify microglia activation automatically by shape alone allows unbiased and rapid analysis of both fixed and in vivo central nervous system tissue. PMID:22457705

  9. The Continuous Monitoring of Flash Flood Velocity Field based on an Automated LSPIV System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, W.; Ran, Q.; Liao, Q.

    2014-12-01

    Large-scale particle image velocimetry (LSPIV) is a non-intrusive tool for flow velocity field measurement and has more advantages against traditional techniques, with its applications on river, lake and ocean, especially under extreme conditions. An automated LSPIV system is presented in this study, which can be easily set up and executed for continuous monitoring of flash flood. The experiment site is Longchi village, Sichuan Province, where 8.0 magnitude earthquake occurred in 2008 and debris flow happens every year since then. The interest of area is about 30m*40m of the channel which has been heavily destroyed by debris flow. Series of videos obtained during the flood season indicates that flood outbreaks after rainstorm just for several hours. Measurement is complete without being influenced by this extreme weather condition and results are more reliable and accurate due to high soil concentration. Compared with direct measurement by impellor flow meter, we validated that LSPIV works well at mountain stream, with index of 6.7% (Average Relative Error) and 95% (Nash-Sutcliffe Coefficient). On Jun 26, the maximum flood surface velocity reached 4.26 m/s, and the discharge based on velocity-area method was also decided. Overall, this system is safe, non-contact and can be adjusted according to our requirement flexibly. We can get valuable data of flood which is scarce before, which will make a great contribution to the analysis of flood and debris flow mechanism.

  10. ConfocalCheck - A Software Tool for the Automated Monitoring of Confocal Microscope Performance

    PubMed Central

    Hng, Keng Imm; Dormann, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Laser scanning confocal microscopy has become an invaluable tool in biomedical research but regular quality testing is vital to maintain the system’s performance for diagnostic and research purposes. Although many methods have been devised over the years to characterise specific aspects of a confocal microscope like measuring the optical point spread function or the field illumination, only very few analysis tools are available. Our aim was to develop a comprehensive quality assurance framework ranging from image acquisition to automated analysis and documentation. We created standardised test data to assess the performance of the lasers, the objective lenses and other key components required for optimum confocal operation. The ConfocalCheck software presented here analyses the data fully automatically. It creates numerous visual outputs indicating potential issues requiring further investigation. By storing results in a web browser compatible file format the software greatly simplifies record keeping allowing the operator to quickly compare old and new data and to spot developing trends. We demonstrate that the systematic monitoring of confocal performance is essential in a core facility environment and how the quantitative measurements obtained can be used for the detailed characterisation of system components as well as for comparisons across multiple instruments. PMID:24224017

  11. Evaluating the Validity of an Automated Device for Asthma Monitoring for Adolescents: Correlational Design

    PubMed Central

    Belyea, Michael J; Sterling, Mark; Bocko, Mark F

    2015-01-01

    Background Symptom monitoring is a cornerstone of asthma self-management. Conventional methods of symptom monitoring have fallen short in producing objective data and eliciting patients’ consistent adherence, particularly in teen patients. We have recently developed an Automated Device for Asthma Monitoring (ADAM) using a consumer mobile device as a platform to facilitate continuous and objective symptom monitoring in adolescents in vivo. Objective The objectives of the study were to evaluate the validity of the device using spirometer data, fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), existing measures of asthma symptoms/control and health care utilization data, and to examine the sensitivity and specificity of the device in discriminating asthma cases from nonasthma cases. Methods A total of 84 teens (42 teens with a current asthma diagnosis; 42 without asthma) aged between 13 and 17 years participated in the study. All participants used ADAM for 7 consecutive days during which participants with asthma completed an asthma diary two times a day. ADAM recorded the frequency of coughing for 24 hours throughout the 7-day trial. Pearson correlation and multiple regression were used to examine the relationships between ADAM data and asthma control, quality of life, and health care utilization at the time of the 7-day trial and 3 months later. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was conducted to examine sensitivity and specificity based on the area under the curve (AUC) as an indicator of the device’s capacity to discriminate between asthma versus nonasthma cases. Results ADAM data (cough counts) were negatively associated with forced expiratory volume in first second of expiration (FEV1) (r=–.26, P=.05), forced vital capacity (FVC) (r=–.31, P=.02), and overall asthma control (r=–.41, P=.009) and positively associated with daily activity limitation (r=.46, P=.01), nighttime (r=.40, P=.02) and daytime symptoms (r=.38, P=.02), and health care

  12. Development and validation of an automated operational modal analysis algorithm for vibration-based monitoring and tensile load estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rainieri, Carlo; Fabbrocino, Giovanni

    2015-08-01

    In the last few decades large research efforts have been devoted to the development of methods for automated detection of damage and degradation phenomena at an early stage. Modal-based damage detection techniques are well-established methods, whose effectiveness for Level 1 (existence) and Level 2 (location) damage detection is demonstrated by several studies. The indirect estimation of tensile loads in cables and tie-rods is another attractive application of vibration measurements. It provides interesting opportunities for cheap and fast quality checks in the construction phase, as well as for safety evaluations and structural maintenance over the structure lifespan. However, the lack of automated modal identification and tracking procedures has been for long a relevant drawback to the extensive application of the above-mentioned techniques in the engineering practice. An increasing number of field applications of modal-based structural health and performance assessment are appearing after the development of several automated output-only modal identification procedures in the last few years. Nevertheless, additional efforts are still needed to enhance the robustness of automated modal identification algorithms, control the computational efforts and improve the reliability of modal parameter estimates (in particular, damping). This paper deals with an original algorithm for automated output-only modal parameter estimation. Particular emphasis is given to the extensive validation of the algorithm based on simulated and real datasets in view of continuous monitoring applications. The results point out that the algorithm is fairly robust and demonstrate its ability to provide accurate and precise estimates of the modal parameters, including damping ratios. As a result, it has been used to develop systems for vibration-based estimation of tensile loads in cables and tie-rods. Promising results have been achieved for non-destructive testing as well as continuous

  13. Multi-Canister overpack pressurization monitoring and control methodology for the spent nuclear fuel project

    SciTech Connect

    Pajunen, A.L., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-19

    A control methodology is developed and monitoring alternatives evaluated for controlling pressurization in a Multi- Canister Overpack for the Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel Project. Monitoring alternative evaluations include concept description, identification of uncertainties, and identification of experimental work required for implementation. A monitoring alternative is recommended and implementation requirements, risks and start up testing associated with the recommendation are discussed.

  14. Monitoring individual cow udder health in automated milking systems using online somatic cell counts.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, L P; Bjerring, M; Løvendahl, P

    2016-01-01

    This study presents and validates a detection and monitoring model for mastitis based on automated frequent sampling of online cell count (OCC). Initially, data were filtered and adjusted for sensor drift and skewed distribution using ln-transformation. Acceptable data were passed on to a time-series model using double exponential smoothing to estimate level and trends at cow level. The OCC levels and trends were converted to a continuous (0-1) scale, termed elevated mastitis risk (EMR), where values close to zero indicate healthy cow status and values close to 1 indicate high risk of mastitis. Finally, a feedback loop was included to dynamically request a time to next sample, based on latest EMR values or errors in the raw data stream. The estimated EMR values were used to issue 2 types of alerts, new and (on-going) intramammary infection (IMI) alerts. The new alerts were issued when the EMR values exceeded a threshold, and the IMI alerts were issued for subsequent alerts. New alerts were only issued after the EMR had been below the threshold for at least 8d. The detection model was evaluated using time-window analysis and commercial herd data (6 herds, 595,927 milkings) at different sampling intensities. Recorded treatments of mastitis were used as gold standard. Significantly higher EMR values were detected in treated than in contemporary untreated cows. The proportion of detected mastitis cases using new alerts was between 28.0 and 43.1% and highest for a fixed sampling scheme aiming at 24h between measurements. This was higher for IMI alerts, between 54.6 and 89.0%, and highest when all available measurements were used. The lowest false alert rate of 6.5 per 1,000 milkings was observed when all measurements were used. The results showed that a dynamic sampling scheme with a default value of 24h between measurements gave only a small reduction in proportion of detected mastitis treatments and remained at 88.5%. It was concluded that filtering of raw data

  15. 40 CFR 60.4365 - How can I be exempted from monitoring the total sulfur content of the fuel?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the total sulfur content of the fuel? 60.4365 Section 60.4365 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... monitoring the total sulfur content of the fuel? You may elect not to monitor the total sulfur content of the fuel combusted in the turbine, if the fuel is demonstrated not to exceed potential sulfur emissions...

  16. Evaluation of a Multi-Parameter Sensor for Automated, Continuous Cell Culture Monitoring in Bioreactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappas, D.; Jeevarajan, A.; Anderson, M. M.

    2004-01-01

    offer automated, continuous monitoring of cell cultures with a temporal resolution of 1 minute, which is not attainable by sampling via handheld blood analyzer (i-STAT). Conclusion: The resulting bias and precision found in these cell culture-based studies is comparable to Paratrend sensor clinical results. Although the large error in p02 measurements (+/-18 mm Hg) may be acceptable for clinical applications, where Paratrend values are periodically adjusted to a BGA measurement, the O2 sensor in this bundle may not be reliable enough for the single-calibration requirement of sensors used in NASA's bioreactors. The pH and pC02 sensors in the bundle are reliable and stable over the measurement period, and can be used without recalibration to measure cell cultures in rn.jcrogravity biotechnology experiments. Future work will test additional Paratrend sensors to provide statistical assessment of sensor performance.

  17. Total Column Greenhouse Gas Monitoring in Central Munich: Automation and Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jia; Heinle, Ludwig; Paetzold, Johannes C.; Le, Long

    2016-04-01

    It is challenging to use in-situ surface measurements of CO2 and CH4 to derive emission fluxes in urban regions. Surface concentrations typically have high variance due to the influence of nearby sources, and they are strongly modulated by mesoscale transport phenomena that are difficult to simulate in atmospheric models. The integrated amount of a tracer through the whole atmosphere is a direct measure of the mass loading of the atmosphere given by emissions. Column measurements are insensitive to vertical redistribution of tracer mass, e.g. due to growth of the planetary boundary layer, and are also less influenced by nearby point sources, whose emissions are concentrated in a thin layer near the surface. Column observations are more compatible with the scale of atmospheric models and hence provide stronger constraints for inverse modeling. In Munich we are aiming at establishing a regional sensor network with differential column measurements, i.e. total column measurements of CO2 and CH4 inside and outside of the city. The inner-city station is equipped with a compact solar-tracking Fourier transform spectrometer (Bruker EM27/SUN) in the campus of Technische Universität München, and our measurements started in Aug. 2015. The measurements over seasons will be shown, as well as preliminary emission studies using these observations. To deploy the compact spectrometers for stationary monitoring of the urban emissions, an automatic protection and control system is mandatory and a challenging task. It will allow solar measurements whenever the sun is out and reliable protection of the instrument when it starts to rain. We have developed a simplified and highly reliable concept for the enclosure, aiming for a fully automated data collection station without the need of local human interactions. Furthermore, we are validating and combining the OCO-2 satellite-based measurements with our ground-based measurements. For this purpose, we have developed a software tool that

  18. Automated Collection of Real-Time Alerts of Citizens as a Useful Tool to Continuously Monitor Malodorous Emissions.

    PubMed

    Brattoli, Magda; Mazzone, Antonio; Giua, Roberto; Assennato, Giorgio; de Gennaro, Gianluigi

    2016-03-01

    The evaluation of odor emissions and dispersion is a very arduous topic to face; the real-time monitoring of odor emissions, the identification of chemical components and, with proper certainty, the source of annoyance represent a challenge for stakeholders such as local authorities. The complaints of people, often not systematic and variously distributed, in general do not allow us to quantify the perceived annoyance. Experimental research has been performed to detect and evaluate olfactory annoyance, based on field testing of an innovative monitoring methodology grounded in automatic recording of citizen alerts. It has been applied in Taranto, in the south of Italy where a relevant industrial area is located, by using Odortel(®) for automated collection of citizen alerts. To evaluate its reliability, the collection system has been integrated with automated samplers, able to sample odorous air in real time, according to the citizen alerts of annoyance and, moreover, with meteorological data (especially the wind direction) and trends in odor marker compounds, recorded by air quality monitoring stations. The results have allowed us, for the first time, to manage annoyance complaints, test their reliability, and obtain information about the distribution and entity of the odor phenomena, such that we were able to identify, with supporting evidence, the source as an oil refinery plant. PMID:26927148

  19. Automated Collection of Real-Time Alerts of Citizens as a Useful Tool to Continuously Monitor Malodorous Emissions

    PubMed Central

    Brattoli, Magda; Mazzone, Antonio; Giua, Roberto; Assennato, Giorgio; de Gennaro, Gianluigi

    2016-01-01

    The evaluation of odor emissions and dispersion is a very arduous topic to face; the real-time monitoring of odor emissions, the identification of chemical components and, with proper certainty, the source of annoyance represent a challenge for stakeholders such as local authorities. The complaints of people, often not systematic and variously distributed, in general do not allow us to quantify the perceived annoyance. Experimental research has been performed to detect and evaluate olfactory annoyance, based on field testing of an innovative monitoring methodology grounded in automatic recording of citizen alerts. It has been applied in Taranto, in the south of Italy where a relevant industrial area is located, by using Odortel® for automated collection of citizen alerts. To evaluate its reliability, the collection system has been integrated with automated samplers, able to sample odorous air in real time, according to the citizen alerts of annoyance and, moreover, with meteorological data (especially the wind direction) and trends in odor marker compounds, recorded by air quality monitoring stations. The results have allowed us, for the first time, to manage annoyance complaints, test their reliability, and obtain information about the distribution and entity of the odor phenomena, such that we were able to identify, with supporting evidence, the source as an oil refinery plant. PMID:26927148

  20. Technical note: Validation of a commercial system for the continuous and automated monitoring of dairy cow activity.

    PubMed

    Tullo, E; Fontana, I; Gottardo, D; Sloth, K H; Guarino, M

    2016-09-01

    Current farm sizes do not allow the precise identification and tracking of individual cows and their health and behavioral records. Currently, the application of information technology within intensive dairy farming takes a key role in proper routine management to improve animal welfare and to enhance the comfort of dairy cows. An existing application based on information technology is represented by the GEA CowView system (GEA Farm Technologies, Bönen, Germany). This system is able to detect and monitor animal behavioral activities based on positioning, through the creation of a virtual map of the barn that outlines all the areas where cows have access. The aim of this study was to validate the accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity of data provided by the CowView system. The validation was performed by comparing data automatically obtained from the CowView system with those obtained by a manual labeling procedure performed on video recordings. Data used for the comparisons were represented by the zone-related activities performed by the selected dairy cows and were classified into 2 categories: activity and localization. The duration in seconds of each of the activities/localizations detected both with the manual labeling and with the automated system were used to evaluate the correlation coefficients among data; and subsequently the accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the automated monitoring system were calculated. The results of this validation study showed that the CowView automated monitoring system is able to identify the cow localization/position (alley, trough, cubicles) with high reliability in relation to the zone-related activities performed by dairy cows (accuracy higher than 95%). The results obtained support the CowView system as an innovative potential solution for the easier management of dairy cows. PMID:27344390

  1. 40 CFR 60.107a - Monitoring of emissions and operations for fuel gas combustion devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... statement that there are no crossover or entry points for sour gas (high H2S content) to be introduced into... for fuel gas combustion devices. 60.107a Section 60.107a Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Commenced After May 14, 2007 § 60.107a Monitoring of emissions and operations for fuel gas...

  2. 40 CFR 60.107a - Monitoring of emissions and operations for fuel gas combustion devices.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... statement that there are no crossover or entry points for sour gas (high H2S content) to be introduced into... for fuel gas combustion devices. 60.107a Section 60.107a Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Commenced After May 14, 2007 § 60.107a Monitoring of emissions and operations for fuel gas...

  3. Method of locating a partially plugged port fuel injector using misfire monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Blanke, J.D.

    1989-06-27

    This patent describes the method of locating a partially plugged port fuel injector in an internal combustion engine comprising using a misfire monitor to determine that the lean-roll frequency has decreased or ceased after the cylinder associated with the partially plugged port fuel injector is disabled.

  4. Science Goal Driven Automation for NASA Missions: The Science Goal Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korathkar, Anuradha; Jones, Jeremy; Jung, John; Grosvenor, Sandy

    2003-01-01

    Infusion of automation technologies into NASA s future missions will be essential not only to achieve substantial reduction in mission operations staff and costs, but also in order to both effectively handle an exponentially increasing volume of scientific data and to successfully meet dynamic, opportunistic scientific goals and objectives. Current spacecraft operations cannot respond to science driven events, such as intrinsically variable or short-lived phenomena in a timely manner. For such investigations, we must teach our platforms to dynamically understand, recognize, and react to the scientists goals. While much effort has gone into automating routine spacecraft operations to reduce human workload and hence costs, applying intelligent automation to the science side, i.e., science data acquisition, data analysis and reactions to that data analysis in a timely and still scientifically valid manner, has been relatively under-emphasized.

  5. A chemical sensor and biosensor based totally automated water quality monitor for extended space flight: Step 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Robert S.

    1993-01-01

    The result of a literature search to consider what technologies should be represented in a totally automated water quality monitor for extended space flight is presented. It is the result of the first summer in a three year JOVE project. The next step will be to build a test platform at the Authors' school, St. John Fisher College. This will involve undergraduates in NASA related research. The test flow injection analysis system will be used to test the detection limit of sensors and the performance of sensors in groups. Sensor companies and research groups will be encouraged to produce sensors which are not currently available and are needed for this project.

  6. A rapid automated procedure for laboratory and shipboard spectrophotometric measurements of seawater alkalinity: continuously monitored single-step acid additions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Byrne, R. H.; Lindemuth, M.; Easley, R. A.; Patsavas, M. C.

    2012-12-01

    An automated system for shipboard and laboratory alkalinity measurements is presented. The simple system, which consists of a Dosimat titrator to deliver acid volumetrically and a USB 4000 spectrophotometer to monitor the titration progress, provides fast, precise and accurate measurements of total alkalinity for oceanographic research. The analytical method is based on single-point HCl titrations of seawater samples of a known volume; bromol cresol purple is used as an indicator to determine the final pH. Field data from an Arctic cruise demonstrates accuracy and precision around 1 micro mol/kg and a sample processing rate of 6 min per sample.

  7. Fully automated digital holographic processing for monitoring the dynamics of a vesicle suspension under shear flow

    PubMed Central

    Minetti, Christophe; Podgorski, Thomas; Coupier, Gwennou; Dubois, Frank

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a vesicle suspension under shear flow between plates using DHM with a spatially reduced coherent source. Holograms are grabbed at a frequency of 24 frames/sec. The distribution of the vesicle suspension is obtained after numerical processing of the digital holograms sequence resulting in a 4D distribution. Obtaining this distribution is not straightforward and requires special processing to automate the analysis. We present an original method that fully automates the analysis and provides distributions that are further analyzed to extract physical properties of the fluid. Details of the numerical implementation, as well as sample experimental results are presented. PMID:24877015

  8. Development of a Fully Automated, GPS Based Monitoring System for Disaster Prevention and Emergency Preparedness: PPMS+RT

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Jason; Kim, Don; Chrzanowski, Adam; Szostak-Chrzanowski, Anna

    2007-01-01

    The increasing number of structural collapses, slope failures and other natural disasters has lead to a demand for new sensors, sensor integration techniques and data processing strategies for deformation monitoring systems. In order to meet extraordinary accuracy requirements for displacement detection in recent deformation monitoring projects, research has been devoted to integrating Global Positioning System (GPS) as a monitoring sensor. Although GPS has been used for monitoring purposes worldwide, certain environments pose challenges where conventional processing techniques cannot provide the required accuracy with sufficient update frequency. Described is the development of a fully automated, continuous, real-time monitoring system that employs GPS sensors and pseudolite technology to meet these requirements in such environments. Ethernet and/or serial port communication techniques are used to transfer data between GPS receivers at target points and a central processing computer. The data can be processed locally or remotely based upon client needs. A test was conducted that illustrated a 10 mm displacement was remotely detected at a target point using the designed system. This information could then be used to signal an alarm if conditions are deemed to be unsafe.

  9. Microprocessor-based integration of microfluidic control for the implementation of automated sensor monitoring and multithreaded optimization algorithms.

    PubMed

    Ezra, Elishai; Maor, Idan; Bavli, Danny; Shalom, Itai; Levy, Gahl; Prill, Sebastian; Jaeger, Magnus S; Nahmias, Yaakov

    2015-08-01

    Microfluidic applications range from combinatorial synthesis to high throughput screening, with platforms integrating analog perfusion components, digitally controlled micro-valves and a range of sensors that demand a variety of communication protocols. Currently, discrete control units are used to regulate and monitor each component, resulting in scattered control interfaces that limit data integration and synchronization. Here, we present a microprocessor-based control unit, utilizing the MS Gadgeteer open framework that integrates all aspects of microfluidics through a high-current electronic circuit that supports and synchronizes digital and analog signals for perfusion components, pressure elements, and arbitrary sensor communication protocols using a plug-and-play interface. The control unit supports an integrated touch screen and TCP/IP interface that provides local and remote control of flow and data acquisition. To establish the ability of our control unit to integrate and synchronize complex microfluidic circuits we developed an equi-pressure combinatorial mixer. We demonstrate the generation of complex perfusion sequences, allowing the automated sampling, washing, and calibrating of an electrochemical lactate sensor continuously monitoring hepatocyte viability following exposure to the pesticide rotenone. Importantly, integration of an optical sensor allowed us to implement automated optimization protocols that require different computational challenges including: prioritized data structures in a genetic algorithm, distributed computational efforts in multiple-hill climbing searches and real-time realization of probabilistic models in simulated annealing. Our system offers a comprehensive solution for establishing optimization protocols and perfusion sequences in complex microfluidic circuits. PMID:26227212

  10. Developing an automated database for monitoring ultrasound- and computed tomography-guided procedure complications and diagnostic yield.

    PubMed

    Itri, Jason N; Jones, Lisa P; Kim, Woojin; Boonn, William W; Kolansky, Ana S; Hilton, Susan; Zafar, Hanna M

    2014-04-01

    Monitoring complications and diagnostic yield for image-guided procedures is an important component of maintaining high quality patient care promoted by professional societies in radiology and accreditation organizations such as the American College of Radiology (ACR) and Joint Commission. These outcome metrics can be used as part of a comprehensive quality assurance/quality improvement program to reduce variation in clinical practice, provide opportunities to engage in practice quality improvement, and contribute to developing national benchmarks and standards. The purpose of this article is to describe the development and successful implementation of an automated web-based software application to monitor procedural outcomes for US- and CT-guided procedures in an academic radiology department. The open source tools PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor (PHP) and MySQL were used to extract relevant procedural information from the Radiology Information System (RIS), auto-populate the procedure log database, and develop a user interface that generates real-time reports of complication rates and diagnostic yield by site and by operator. Utilizing structured radiology report templates resulted in significantly improved accuracy of information auto-populated from radiology reports, as well as greater compliance with manual data entry. An automated web-based procedure log database is an effective tool to reliably track complication rates and diagnostic yield for US- and CT-guided procedures performed in a radiology department. PMID:24146357

  11. A method for monitoring the variability in nuclear absorption characteristics of aviation fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sprinkle, Danny R.; Shen, Chih-Ping

    1988-01-01

    A technique for monitoring variability in the nuclear absorption characteristics of aviation fuels has been developed. It is based on a highly collimated low energy gamma radiation source and a sodium iodide counter. The source and the counter assembly are separated by a geometrically well-defined test fuel cell. A computer program for determining the mass attenuation coefficient of the test fuel sample, based on the data acquired for a preset counting period, has been developed and tested on several types of aviation fuel.

  12. Development of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy monitoring of fuel markers to prevent fraud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Timothy; Clarkson, John; White, Peter C.; Meakin, Nicholas; McDonald, Ken

    2013-05-01

    Governments often tax fuel products to generate revenues to support and stimulate their economies. They also subsidize the cost of essential fuel products. Fuel taxation and subsidization practices are both subject to fraud. Oil marketing companies also suffer from fuel fraud with loss of legitimate sales and additional quality and liability issues. The use of an advanced marking system to identify and control fraud has been shown to be effective in controlling illegal activity. DeCipher has developed surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy as its lead technology for measuring markers in fuel to identify and control malpractice. SERS has many advantages that make it highly suitable for this purpose. The SERS instruments are portable and can be used to monitor fuel at any point in the supply chain. SERS shows high specificity for the marker, with no false positives. Multiple markers can also be detected in a single SERS analysis allowing, for example, specific regional monitoring of fuel. The SERS analysis from fuel is also quick, clear and decisive, with a measurement time of less than 5 minutes. We will present results highlighting our development of the use of a highly stable silver colloid as a SERS substrate to measure the markers at ppb levels. Preliminary results from the use of a solid state SERS substrate to measure fuel markers will also be presented.

  13. Automated Cognitive Health Assessment Using Smart Home Monitoring of Complex Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Dawadi, Prafulla N.; Cook, Diane J.; Schmitter-Edgecombe, Maureen

    2014-01-01

    One of the many services that intelligent systems can provide is the automated assessment of resident well-being. We hypothesize that the functional health of individuals, or ability of individuals to perform activities independently without assistance, can be estimated by tracking their activities using smart home technologies. In this paper, we introduce a machine learning-based method for assessing activity quality in smart homes. To validate our approach we quantify activity quality for 179 volunteer participants who performed a complex, interweaved set of activities in our smart home apartment. We observed a statistically significant correlation (r=0.79) between automated assessment of task quality and direct observation scores. Using machine learning techniques to predict the cognitive health of the participants based on task quality is accomplished with an AUC value of 0.64. We believe that this capability is an important step in understanding everyday functional health of individuals in their home environments. PMID:25530925

  14. Automated Performance Monitoring Data Analysis and Reporting within the Open Source R Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennel, J.; Tonkin, M. J.; Faught, W.; Lee, A.; Biebesheimer, F.

    2013-12-01

    Environmental scientists encounter quantities of data at a rate that in many cases outpaces our ability to appropriately store, visualize and convey the information. The free software environment, R, provides a framework for efficiently processing, analyzing, depicting and reporting on data from a multitude of formats in the form of traceable and quality-assured data summary reports. Automated data summary reporting leverages document markup languages such as markdown, HTML, or LaTeX using R-scripts capable of completing a variety of simple or sophisticated data processing, analysis and visualization tasks. Automated data summary reports seamlessly integrate analysis into report production with calculation outputs - such as plots, maps and statistics - included alongside report text. Once a site-specific template is set up, including data types, geographic base data and reporting requirements, reports can be (re-)generated trivially as the data evolve. The automated data summary report can be a stand-alone report, or it can be incorporated as an attachment to an interpretive report prepared by a subject-matter expert, thereby providing the technical basis to report on and efficiently evaluate large volumes of data resulting in a concise interpretive report. Hence, the data summary report does not replace the scientist, but relieves them of repetitive data processing tasks, facilitating a greater level of analysis. This is demonstrated using an implementation developed for monthly groundwater data reporting for a multi-constituent contaminated site, highlighting selected analysis techniques that can be easily incorporated in a data summary report.

  15. Automated delineation and characterization of watersheds for more than 3,000 surface-water-quality monitoring stations active in 2010 in Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Archuleta, Christy-Ann M.; Gonzales, Sophia L.; Maltby, David R., II

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, developed computer scripts and applications to automate the delineation of watershed boundaries and compute watershed characteristics for more than 3,000 surface-water-quality monitoring stations in Texas that were active during 2010. Microsoft Visual Basic applications were developed using ArcGIS ArcObjects to format the source input data required to delineate watershed boundaries. Several automated scripts and tools were developed or used to calculate watershed characteristics using Python, Microsoft Visual Basic, and the RivEX tool. Automated methods were augmented by the use of manual methods, including those done using ArcMap software. Watershed boundaries delineated for the monitoring stations are limited to the extent of the Subbasin boundaries in the USGS Watershed Boundary Dataset, which may not include the total watershed boundary from the monitoring station to the headwaters.

  16. 40 CFR 60.4365 - How can I be exempted from monitoring the total sulfur content of the fuel?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Standards of Performance for Stationary Combustion Turbines Monitoring § 60.4365 How can I be exempted from... fuel combusted in the turbine, if the fuel is demonstrated not to exceed potential sulfur emissions...

  17. 40 CFR 60.4365 - How can I be exempted from monitoring the total sulfur content of the fuel?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Standards of Performance for Stationary Combustion Turbines Monitoring § 60.4365 How can I be exempted from... fuel combusted in the turbine, if the fuel is demonstrated not to exceed potential sulfur emissions...

  18. 40 CFR 60.4365 - How can I be exempted from monitoring the total sulfur content of the fuel?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Standards of Performance for Stationary Combustion Turbines Monitoring § 60.4365 How can I be exempted from... fuel combusted in the turbine, if the fuel is demonstrated not to exceed potential sulfur emissions...

  19. Implementation and Impact of an Automated Group Monitoring and Feedback System to Promote Hand Hygiene Among Health Care Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Laurie J.; Riley, Linda; Saiman, Lisa; Cohen, Bevin; Alper, Paul; Larson, Elaine L.

    2015-01-01

    Article-at-a-Glance Background Despite substantial evidence to support the effectiveness of hand hygiene for preventing health care–associated infections, hand hygiene practice is often inadequate. Hand hygiene product dispensers that can electronically capture hand hygiene events have the potential to improve hand hygiene performance. A study on an automated group monitoring and feedback system was implemented from January 2012 through March 2013 at a 140-bed community hospital. Methods An electronic system that monitors the use of sanitizer and soap but does not identify individual health care personnel was used to calculate hand hygiene events per patient-hour for each of eight inpatient units and hand hygiene events per patient-visit for the six outpatient units. Hand hygiene was monitored but feedback was not provided during a six-month baseline period and three-month rollout period. During the rollout, focus groups were conducted to determine preferences for feedback frequency and format. During the six-month intervention period, graphical reports were e-mailed monthly to all managers and administrators, and focus groups were repeated. Results After the feedback began, hand hygiene increased on average by 0.17 events/patient-hour in inpatient units (interquartile range = 0.14, p = .008). In outpatient units, hand hygiene performance did not change significantly. A variety of challenges were encountered, including obtaining accurate census and staffing data, engendering confidence in the system, disseminating information in the reports, and using the data to drive improvement. Conclusions Feedback via an automated system was associated with improved hand hygiene performance in the short term. PMID:25252389

  20. Fission Product Monitoring of TRISO Coated Fuel For The Advanced Gas Reactor -1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn M. Scates; John K Hartwell; John B. Walter

    2008-09-01

    The US Department of Energy has embarked on a series of tests of TRISO-coated particle reactor fuel intended for use in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) as part of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program. The AGR-1 TRISO fuel experiment, currently underway, is the first in a series of eight fuel tests planned for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The AGR-1 experiment reached a peak compact averaged burn up of 9% FIMA with no known TRISO fuel particle failures in March 2008. The burnup goal for the majority of the fuel compacts is to have a compact averaged burnup greater than 18% FIMA and a minimum compact averaged burnup of 14% FIMA. At the INL the TRISO fuel in the AGR-1 experiment is closely monitored while it is being irradiated in the ATR. The effluent monitoring system used for the AGR-1 fuel is the Fission Product Monitoring System (FPMS). The FPMS is a valuable tool that provides near real-time data indicative of the AGR-1 test fuel performance and incorporates both high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometers and sodium iodide [NaI(Tl)] scintillation detector-based gross radiation monitors. To quantify the fuel performance, release-to-birth ratios (R/B’s) of radioactive fission gases are computed. The gamma-ray spectra acquired by the AGR-1 FPMS are analyzed and used to determine the released activities of specific fission gases, while a dedicated detector provides near-real time count rate information. Isotopic build up and depletion calculations provide the associated isotopic birth rates. This paper highlights the features of the FPMS, encompassing the equipment, methods and measures that enable the calculation of the release-to-birth ratios. Some preliminary results from the AGR-1 experiment are also presented.

  1. Fission Product Monitoring of TRISO Coated Fuel For The Advanced Gas Reactor -1 Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Dawn M. Scates; John K. Hartwell; John b. Walter

    2010-10-01

    The US Department of Energy has embarked on a series of tests of TRISO-coated particle reactor fuel intended for use in the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) as part of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program. The AGR-1 TRISO fuel experiment, currently underway, is the first in a series of eight fuel tests planned for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The AGR-1 experiment reached a peak compact averaged burn up of 9% FIMA with no known TRISO fuel particle failures in March 2008. The burnup goal for the majority of the fuel compacts is to have a compact averaged burnup greater than 18% FIMA and a minimum compact averaged burnup of 14% FIMA. At the INL the TRISO fuel in the AGR-1 experiment is closely monitored while it is being irradiated in the ATR. The effluent monitoring system used for the AGR-1 fuel is the Fission Product Monitoring System (FPMS). The FPMS is a valuable tool that provides near real-time data indicative of the AGR-1 test fuel performance and incorporates both high-purity germanium (HPGe) gamma-ray spectrometers and sodium iodide [NaI(Tl)] scintillation detector-based gross radiation monitors. To quantify the fuel performance, release-to-birth ratios (R/B’s) of radioactive fission gases are computed. The gamma-ray spectra acquired by the AGR-1 FPMS are analyzed and used to determine the released activities of specific fission gases, while a dedicated detector provides near-real time count rate information. Isotopic build up and depletion calculations provide the associated isotopic birth rates. This paper highlights the features of the FPMS, encompassing the equipment, methods and measures that enable the calculation of the release-to-birth ratios. Some preliminary results from the AGR-1 experiment are also presented.

  2. Apparatus for and method of monitoring for breached fuel elements

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Kenny C.; Strain, Robert V.

    1983-01-01

    This invention teaches improved apparatus for the method of detecting a breach in cladded fuel used in a nuclear reactor. The detector apparatus uses a separate bypass loop for conveying part of the reactor coolant away from the core, and at least three separate delayed-neutron detectors mounted proximate this detector loop. The detectors are spaced apart so that the coolant flow time from the core to each detector is different, and these differences are known. The delayed-neutron activity at the detectors is a function of the dealy time after the reaction in the fuel until the coolant carrying the delayed-neutron emitter passes the respective detector. This time delay is broken down into separate components including an isotopic holdup time required for the emitter to move through the fuel from the reaction to the coolant at the breach, and two transit times required for the emitter now in the coolant to flow from the breach to the detector loop and then via the loop to the detector. At least two of these time components are determined during calibrated operation of the reactor. Thereafter during normal reactor operation, repeated comparisons are made by the method of regression approximation of the third time component for the best-fit line correlating measured delayed-neutron activity against activity that is approximated according to specific equations. The equations use these time-delay components and known parameter values of the fuel and of the part and emitting daughter isotopes.

  3. Automated refueling simulations of a CANDU for the exploitation of thorium fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Bradford

    CANDU nuclear reactors are in a unique circumstance where they are able to utilize and exploit a number of different fuel options to provide power as a utility. Thorium, a fertile isotope found naturally, is one option that should be explored. Thorium is more abundant than uranium, which is the typical fuel in the reactor and the availability of thorium makes nuclear energy desirable to more countries. This document contains the culmination of a project that explores, tests, and analyzes the feasibility of using thorium in a CANDU reactor. The project first develops a set of twodimensional lattice and three dimensional control rod simulations using the DRAGON Version 4 nuclear physics codes. This step is repeated for many concentrations of thorium. The data generated in these steps is then used to determine a functional enrichment of thorium. This is done via a procedural elimination and optimization of certain key parameters including but not limited to average exit burnup and reactivity evolution. For the purposes of this project, an enrichment of 1 % thorium was found viable. Full core calculations were done using the DONJON 4 code. CANFUEL, a program which simulates the refueling operations of a CANDU reactor for this fuel type was developed and ran for a simulation period of one hundred days. The program and the fuel selection met all selected requirements for the entirety of the simulation period. CANFUEL requires optimization for fuel selection before it can be used extensively. The fuel selection was further scrutinized when a reactivity insertion event was simulated. The adjuster rod 11 withdrawal from the core was analyzed and compared to classical CANDU results in order to ensure no significant deviations or unwanted evolutions were encountered. For this case, the simulation results were deemed acceptable with no significant deviations from the classical CANDU case.

  4. A wireless smart sensor network for automated monitoring of cable tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Sung-Han; Li, Jian; Jo, Hongki; Park, Jong-Woong; Cho, Soojin; Spencer, Billie F., Jr.; Jung, Hyung-Jo

    2014-02-01

    As cables are primary load carrying members in cable-stayed bridges, monitoring the tension forces of the cables provides valuable information regarding structural soundness. Incorporating wireless smart sensors with vibration-based tension estimation methods provides an efficient means of autonomous long-term monitoring of cable tensions. This study develops a wireless cable tension monitoring system using MEMSIC’s Imote2 smart sensors. The monitoring system features autonomous operation, sustainable energy harvesting and power consumption, and remote access using the internet. To obtain the tension force, an in-network data processing strategy associated with the vibration-based tension estimation method is implemented on the Imote2-based sensor network, significantly reducing the wireless data transmission and the power consumption. The proposed monitoring system has been deployed and validated on the Jindo Bridge, a cable-stayed bridge located in South Korea.

  5. Heavy Oil Process Monitor: Automated On-Column Asphaltene Precipitation and Re-Dissolution

    SciTech Connect

    John F. Schabron; Joseph F. Rovani; Mark Sanderson

    2007-03-31

    An automated separation technique was developed that provides a new approach to measuring the distribution profiles of the most polar, or asphaltenic components of an oil, using a continuous flow system to precipitate and re-dissolve asphaltenes from the oil. Methods of analysis based on this new technique were explored. One method based on the new technique involves precipitation of a portion of residua sample in heptane on a polytetrafluoroethylene-packed (PTFE) column. The precipitated material is re-dissolved in three steps using solvents of increasing polarity: cyclohexane, toluene, and methylene chloride. The amount of asphaltenes that dissolve in cyclohexane is a useful diagnostic of the thermal history of oil, and its proximity to coke formation. For example, about 40 % (w/w) of the heptane asphaltenes from unpyrolyzed residua dissolves in cyclohexane. As pyrolysis progresses, this number decrease to below 15% as coke and toluene insoluble pre-coke materials appear. Currently, the procedure for the isolation of heptane asphaltenes and the determination of the amount of asphaltenes soluble in cyclohexane spans three days. The automated procedure takes one hour. Another method uses a single solvent, methylene chloride, to re-dissolve the material that precipitates on heptane on the PTFE-packed column. The area of this second peak can be used to calculate a value which correlates with gravimetric asphaltene content. Currently the gravimetric procedure to determine asphaltenes takes about 24 hours. The automated procedure takes 30 minutes. Results for four series of original and pyrolyzed residua were compared with data from the gravimetric methods. Methods based on the new on-column precipitation and re-dissolution technique provide significantly more detail about the polar constituent's oils than the gravimetric determination of asphaltenes.

  6. Automated monitoring of early neurobehavioral changes in mice following traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Qu, Wenrui; Liu, Nai-Kui; Xie, Xin-Min Simon; Li, Rui; Xu, Xiao-Ming

    2016-02-01

    Traumatic brain injury often causes a variety of behavioral and emotional impairments that can develop into chronic disorders. Therefore, there is a need to shift towards identifying early symptoms that can aid in the prediction of traumatic brain injury outcomes and behavioral endpoints in patients with traumatic brain injury after early interventions. In this study, we used the SmartCage system, an automated quantitative approach to assess behavior alterations in mice during an early phase of traumatic brain injury in their home cages. Female C57BL/6 adult mice were subjected to moderate controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury. The mice then received a battery of behavioral assessments including neurological score, locomotor activity, sleep/wake states, and anxiety-like behaviors on days 1, 2, and 7 after CCI. Histological analysis was performed on day 7 after the last assessment. Spontaneous activities on days 1 and 2 after injury were significantly decreased in the CCI group. The average percentage of sleep time spent in both dark and light cycles were significantly higher in the CCI group than in the sham group. For anxiety-like behaviors, the time spent in a light compartment and the number of transitions between the dark/light compartments were all significantly reduced in the CCI group than in the sham group. In addition, the mice suffering from CCI exhibited a preference of staying in the dark compartment of a dark/light cage. The CCI mice showed reduced neurological score and histological abnormalities, which are well correlated to the automated behavioral assessments. Our findings demonstrate that the automated SmartCage system provides sensitive and objective measures for early behavior changes in mice following traumatic brain injury. PMID:27073377

  7. Automated monitoring of early neurobehavioral changes in mice following traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Wenrui; Liu, Nai-kui; Xie, Xin-min (Simon); Li, Rui; Xu, Xiao-ming

    2016-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury often causes a variety of behavioral and emotional impairments that can develop into chronic disorders. Therefore, there is a need to shift towards identifying early symptoms that can aid in the prediction of traumatic brain injury outcomes and behavioral endpoints in patients with traumatic brain injury after early interventions. In this study, we used the SmartCage system, an automated quantitative approach to assess behavior alterations in mice during an early phase of traumatic brain injury in their home cages. Female C57BL/6 adult mice were subjected to moderate controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury. The mice then received a battery of behavioral assessments including neurological score, locomotor activity, sleep/wake states, and anxiety-like behaviors on days 1, 2, and 7 after CCI. Histological analysis was performed on day 7 after the last assessment. Spontaneous activities on days 1 and 2 after injury were significantly decreased in the CCI group. The average percentage of sleep time spent in both dark and light cycles were significantly higher in the CCI group than in the sham group. For anxiety-like behaviors, the time spent in a light compartment and the number of transitions between the dark/light compartments were all significantly reduced in the CCI group than in the sham group. In addition, the mice suffering from CCI exhibited a preference of staying in the dark compartment of a dark/light cage. The CCI mice showed reduced neurological score and histological abnormalities, which are well correlated to the automated behavioral assessments. Our findings demonstrate that the automated SmartCage system provides sensitive and objective measures for early behavior changes in mice following traumatic brain injury. PMID:27073377

  8. Automated data evaluation and modelling of simultaneous (19) F-(1) H medium-resolution NMR spectra for online reaction monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zientek, Nicolai; Laurain, Clément; Meyer, Klas; Paul, Andrea; Engel, Dirk; Guthausen, Gisela; Kraume, Matthias; Maiwald, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Medium-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MR-NMR) currently develops to an important analytical tool for both quality control and process monitoring. In contrast to high-resolution online NMR (HR-NMR), MR-NMR can be operated under rough environmental conditions. A continuous re-circulating stream of reaction mixture from the reaction vessel to the NMR spectrometer enables a non-invasive, volume integrating online analysis of reactants and products. Here, we investigate the esterification of 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol with acetic acid to 2,2,2-trifluoroethyl acetate both by (1) H HR-NMR (500 MHz) and (1) H and (19) F MR-NMR (43 MHz) as a model system. The parallel online measurement is realised by splitting the flow, which allows the adjustment of quantitative and independent flow rates, both in the HR-NMR probe as well as in the MR-NMR probe, in addition to a fast bypass line back to the reactor. One of the fundamental acceptance criteria for online MR-MNR spectroscopy is a robust data treatment and evaluation strategy with the potential for automation. The MR-NMR spectra are treated by an automated baseline and phase correction using the minimum entropy method. The evaluation strategies comprise (i) direct integration, (ii) automated line fitting, (iii) indirect hard modelling (IHM) and (iv) partial least squares regression (PLS-R). To assess the potential of these evaluation strategies for MR-NMR, prediction results are compared with the line fitting data derived from the quantitative HR-NMR spectroscopy. Although, superior results are obtained from both IHM and PLS-R for (1) H MR-NMR, especially the latter demands for elaborate data pretreatment, whereas IHM models needed no previous alignment. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25854892

  9. MASS TRANSFER VARIATIONS IN UX MONOCEROTIS: EIGHT YEARS OF AUTOMATED PHOTOMETRIC MONITORING

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, Edward C.; Henry, Gregory W.; ETZEL, PAUL B. E-mail: henry@schwab.tsuniv.edu

    2009-11-15

    We analyze eight years (1999-2007) of automated photometric observations of the active Algol binary UX Monocerotis to search for mass transfer bursts similar to those seen in U Cephei. The largest photometric anomaly is the mean gainer luminosity difference between the stream-impact hemisphere and the opposite hemisphere. We find an updated Wilson-Devinney solution for earlier six-color observations. The UX Mon donor star fills its Roche lobe and the gainer nearly fills its rotational lobe. Instead of isolated bursts of the U Cep type, we found nearly continuous brightness fluctuations likely produced by variable mass transfer. We discuss implications for mass transfer.

  10. PetriJet Platform Technology: An Automated Platform for Culture Dish Handling and Monitoring of the Contents.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Mathias; Boschke, Elke; Bley, Thomas; Lenk, Felix

    2015-08-01

    Due to the size of the required equipment, automated laboratory systems are often unavailable or impractical for use in small- and mid-sized laboratories. However, recent developments in automation engineering provide endless possibilities for incorporating benchtop devices. Here, the authors describe the development of a platform technology to handle sealed culture dishes. The programming is based on the Petri net method and implemented via Codesys V3.5 pbF. The authors developed a system of three independent electrical driven axes capable of handling sealed culture dishes. The device performs two difference processes. First, it automatically obtains an image of every processed culture dish. Second, a server-based image analysis algorithm provides the user with several parameters of the cultivated sample on the culture dish. For demonstration purposes, the authors developed a continuous, systematic, nondestructive, and quantitative method for monitoring the growth of a hairy root culture. New results can be displayed with respect to the previous images. This system is highly accurate, and the results can be used to simulate the growth of biological cultures. The authors believe that the innovative features of this platform can be implemented, for example, in the food industry, clinical environments, and research laboratories. PMID:25787804

  11. Apparatus for and method of monitoring for breached fuel elements

    DOEpatents

    Gross, K.C.; Strain, R.V.

    1981-04-28

    This invention teaches improved apparatus for the method of detecting a breach in cladded fuel used in a nuclear reactor. The detector apparatus uses a separate bypass loop for conveying part of the reactor coolant away from the core, and at least three separate delayed-neutron detectors mounted proximate this detector loop. The detectors are spaced apart so that the coolant flow time from the core to each detector is different, and these differences are known. The delayed-neutron activity at the detectors is a function of the delay time after the reaction in the fuel until the coolant carrying the delayed-neutron emitter passes the respective detector. This time delay is broken down into separate components including an isotopic holdup time required for the emitter to move through the fuel from the reaction to the coolant at the breach, and two transit times required for the emitter now in the coolant to flow from the breach to the detector loop and then via the loop to the detector.

  12. Automated microfluidic platform of bead-based electrochemical immunosensor integrated with bioreactor for continual monitoring of cell secreted biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Riahi, Reza; Shaegh, Seyed Ali Mousavi; Ghaderi, Masoumeh; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Shin, Su Ryon; Aleman, Julio; Massa, Solange; Kim, Duckjin; Dokmeci, Mehmet Remzi; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in developing microfluidic bioreactors and organs-on-a-chip platforms combined with sensing capabilities for continual monitoring of cell-secreted biomarkers. Conventional approaches such as ELISA and mass spectroscopy cannot satisfy the needs of continual monitoring as they are labor-intensive and not easily integrable with low-volume bioreactors. This paper reports on the development of an automated microfluidic bead-based electrochemical immunosensor for in-line measurement of cell-secreted biomarkers. For the operation of the multi-use immunosensor, disposable magnetic microbeads were used to immobilize biomarker-recognition molecules. Microvalves were further integrated in the microfluidic immunosensor chip to achieve programmable operations of the immunoassay including bead loading and unloading, binding, washing, and electrochemical sensing. The platform allowed convenient integration of the immunosensor with liver-on-chips to carry out continual quantification of biomarkers secreted from hepatocytes. Transferrin and albumin productions were monitored during a 5-day hepatotoxicity assessment in which human primary hepatocytes cultured in the bioreactor were treated with acetaminophen. Taken together, our unique microfluidic immunosensor provides a new platform for in-line detection of biomarkers in low volumes and long-term in vitro assessments of cellular functions in microfluidic bioreactors and organs-on-chips. PMID:27098564

  13. Automated microfluidic platform of bead-based electrochemical immunosensor integrated with bioreactor for continual monitoring of cell secreted biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Riahi, Reza; Shaegh, Seyed Ali Mousavi; Ghaderi, Masoumeh; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Shin, Su Ryon; Aleman, Julio; Massa, Solange; Kim, Duckjin; Dokmeci, Mehmet Remzi; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in developing microfluidic bioreactors and organs-on-a-chip platforms combined with sensing capabilities for continual monitoring of cell-secreted biomarkers. Conventional approaches such as ELISA and mass spectroscopy cannot satisfy the needs of continual monitoring as they are labor-intensive and not easily integrable with low-volume bioreactors. This paper reports on the development of an automated microfluidic bead-based electrochemical immunosensor for in-line measurement of cell-secreted biomarkers. For the operation of the multi-use immunosensor, disposable magnetic microbeads were used to immobilize biomarker-recognition molecules. Microvalves were further integrated in the microfluidic immunosensor chip to achieve programmable operations of the immunoassay including bead loading and unloading, binding, washing, and electrochemical sensing. The platform allowed convenient integration of the immunosensor with liver-on-chips to carry out continual quantification of biomarkers secreted from hepatocytes. Transferrin and albumin productions were monitored during a 5-day hepatotoxicity assessment in which human primary hepatocytes cultured in the bioreactor were treated with acetaminophen. Taken together, our unique microfluidic immunosensor provides a new platform for in-line detection of biomarkers in low volumes and long-term in vitro assessments of cellular functions in microfluidic bioreactors and organs-on-chips. PMID:27098564

  14. A Camera and Multi-Sensor Automated Station Design for Polar Physical and Biological Systems Monitoring: AMIGOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohlander, J. A.; Ross, R.; Scambos, T.; Haran, T. M.; Bauer, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Automated Meteorology - Ice/Indigenous species - Geophysics Observation System (AMIGOS) consists of a set of measurement instruments and camera(s) controlled by a single-board computer with a simplified Linux operating system and an Iridium satellite modem supporting two-way communication. Primary features of the system relevant to polar operations are low power requirements, daily data uploading, reprogramming, tolerance for low temperatures, and various approaches for automatic resets and recovery from low power or cold shut-down. Instruments include a compact weather station, C/A or dual-frequency GPS, solar flux and reflectivity sensors, sonic snow gages, simplified radio-echo-sounder, and resistance thermometer string in the firn column. In the current state of development, there are two basic designs. One is intended for in situ observations of glacier conditions. The other design supports a high-resolution camera for monitoring biological or geophysical systems from short distances (100 m to 20 km). The stations have been successfully used in several locations for operational support, monitoring rapid ice changes in response to climate change or iceberg drift, and monitoring penguin colony activity. As of June, 2012, there are 9 AMIGOS systems installed, all on the Antarctic continent. The stations are a working prototype for a planned series of upgraded stations, currently termed 'Sentinels'. These stations would carry further instrumentation, communications, and processing capability to investigate ice - ocean interaction from ice tongue, ice shelf, or fjord coastline areas.

  15. Automated microfluidic platform of bead-based electrochemical immunosensor integrated with bioreactor for continual monitoring of cell secreted biomarkers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riahi, Reza; Shaegh, Seyed Ali Mousavi; Ghaderi, Masoumeh; Zhang, Yu Shrike; Shin, Su Ryon; Aleman, Julio; Massa, Solange; Kim, Duckjin; Dokmeci, Mehmet Remzi; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-04-01

    There is an increasing interest in developing microfluidic bioreactors and organs-on-a-chip platforms combined with sensing capabilities for continual monitoring of cell-secreted biomarkers. Conventional approaches such as ELISA and mass spectroscopy cannot satisfy the needs of continual monitoring as they are labor-intensive and not easily integrable with low-volume bioreactors. This paper reports on the development of an automated microfluidic bead-based electrochemical immunosensor for in-line measurement of cell-secreted biomarkers. For the operation of the multi-use immunosensor, disposable magnetic microbeads were used to immobilize biomarker-recognition molecules. Microvalves were further integrated in the microfluidic immunosensor chip to achieve programmable operations of the immunoassay including bead loading and unloading, binding, washing, and electrochemical sensing. The platform allowed convenient integration of the immunosensor with liver-on-chips to carry out continual quantification of biomarkers secreted from hepatocytes. Transferrin and albumin productions were monitored during a 5-day hepatotoxicity assessment in which human primary hepatocytes cultured in the bioreactor were treated with acetaminophen. Taken together, our unique microfluidic immunosensor provides a new platform for in-line detection of biomarkers in low volumes and long-term in vitro assessments of cellular functions in microfluidic bioreactors and organs-on-chips.

  16. Quality control of CT systems by automated monitoring of key performance indicators: a two-year study.

    PubMed

    Nowik, Patrik; Bujila, Robert; Poludniowski, Gavin; Fransson, Annette

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a method of performing routine periodical quality controls (QC) of CT systems by automatically analyzing key performance indicators (KPIs), obtainable from images of manufacturers' quality assurance (QA) phantoms. A KPI pertains to a measurable or determinable QC parameter that is influenced by other underlying fundamental QC parameters. The established KPIs are based on relationships between existing QC parameters used in the annual testing program of CT scanners at the Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden. The KPIs include positioning, image noise, uniformity, homogeneity, the CT number of water, and the CT number of air. An application (MonitorCT) was developed to automatically evaluate phantom images in terms of the established KPIs. The developed methodology has been used for two years in clinical routine, where CT technologists perform daily scans of the manufacturer's QA phantom and automatically send the images to MonitorCT for KPI evaluation. In the cases where results were out of tolerance, actions could be initiated in less than 10 min. 900 QC scans from two CT scanners have been collected and analyzed over the two-year period that MonitorCT has been active. Two types of errors have been registered in this period: a ring artifact was discovered with the image noise test, and a calibration error was detected multiple times with the CT number test. In both cases, results were outside the tolerances defined for MonitorCT, as well as by the vendor. Automated monitoring of KPIs is a powerful tool that can be used to supplement established QC methodologies. Medical physicists and other professionals concerned with the performance of a CT system will, using such methods, have access to comprehensive data on the current and historical (trend) status of the system such that swift actions can be taken in order to ensure the quality of the CT examinations, patient safety, and minimal disruption of service

  17. An Automated Electronic Tongue for In-Situ Quick Monitoring of Trace Heavy Metals in Water Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Wei; Li, Yi; Gao, Xiaoming; Guo, Hongsun; Zhao, Huixin; Wang, Ping

    2009-05-01

    An automated electronic tongue instrumentation has been developed for in-situ concentration determination of trace heavy metals in water environment. The electronic tongue contains two main parts. The sensor part consists of a silicon-based Hg-coated Au microelectrodes array (MEA) for the detection of Zn(II), Cd(II), Pb(II) and Cu(II) and a multiple light-addressable potentiometric sensor (MLAPS) for the detection of Fe(III) and Cr(VI). The control part employs pumps, valves and tubes to enable the pick-up and pretreatment of aqueous sample. The electronic tongue realized detection of the six metals mentioned above at part-per-billion (ppb) level without manual operation. This instrumentation will have wide application in quick monitoring and prediction the heavy metal pollution in lakes and oceans.

  18. ONLINE WATER MONITORING UTILIZING AN AUTOMATED MICROARRAY BIOSENSOR INSTRUMENT - PHASE I

    EPA Science Inventory

    Constellation Technology Corporation (Constellation) proposes the use of an integrated recovery and detection system for online water supply monitoring.  The integrated system is designed to efficiently capture and recover pathogens such as bacteria, viruses, parasites, an...

  19. Automated water monitor system field demonstration test report. Volume 2: Technical summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, R. L.; Jeffers, E. L.; Perreira, J.; Poel, J. D.; Nibley, D.; Nuss, R. H.

    1981-01-01

    The NASA Automatic Water Monitor System was installed in a water reclamation facility to evaluate the technical and cost feasibility of producing high quality reclaimed water. Data gathered during this field demonstration test are reported.

  20. Automated time-lapse electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) for improved process analysis and long-term monitoring of frozen ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauck, Christian; Hilbich, Christin; Fuss, Christian

    2010-05-01

    Determining the subsurface ice and unfrozen water content in cold regions are important tasks in all kind of cryospheric studies, but especially on perennial (permafrost) or seasonal frozen ground, where little insights can be gained from direct observations at the surface. In the absence of boreholes, geophysical methods are often the only possibility for visualising and quantifying the subsurface characteristics. Their successful applications in recent years lead to more and more sophisticated approaches including 2- and 3-dimensional monitoring and even quantifying the ice and unfrozen water content evolution within the subsurface. Due to the strong sensitivity of electrical resistivity to the phase change between unfrozen water and ice, the application of electrical and electromagnetic techniques has been especially successful. Within these methods, Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) is often favoured due to its comparatively easy and fast data processing, its robustness against ambient noise and its good performance even in harsh, cold and heterogeneous environments. Numerous recent studies have shown that ERT is principally suitable to spatially delineate ground ice, differentiate between ice-poor and ice-rich occurrences, monitor freezing, thawing and infiltration processes. However, resistivity surveys have still to be made manually, which poses large constraints concerning the comparability of measurements at specific time instances, e.g. the choice of the date for end-of-summer measurements, and/or the possibility for measurements during winter, when many locations are inaccessible. Furthermore, many climate studies require the analysis of statistically meaningful properties, such as maximum/minimum values and monthly or annual mean values, which cannot be determined using temporally sparse and irregularly spaced measurements. As a new system for future automated measurements with regular time interval (e.g. 1 measurement per day), an automated ERT

  1. Automated eligibility screening and monitoring for genotype-driven precision oncology trials.

    PubMed

    Eubank, Michael H; Hyman, David M; Kanakamedala, Amritha D; Gardos, Stuart M; Wills, Jonathan M; Stetson, Peter D

    2016-07-01

    The Information Systems Department at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center developed the DARWIN Cohort Management System (DCMS). The DCMS identifies and tracks cohorts of patients based on genotypic and clinical data. It assists researchers and treating physicians in enrolling patients to genotype-matched IRB-approved clinical trials. The DCMS sends automated, actionable, and secure email notifications to users with information about eligible or enrolled patients before their upcoming appointments. The system also captures investigators input via annotations on patient eligibility and preferences on future status updates. As of August 2015, the DCMS is tracking 159,893 patients on both clinical operations and research cohorts. 134 research cohorts have been established and track 64,473 patients. 51,192 of these have had one or more genomic tests including MSK-IMPACT, comprising the pool eligible for genotype-matched studies. This paper describes the design and evolution of this Informatics solution. PMID:27016727

  2. Automated single cell microbioreactor for monitoring intracellular dynamics and cell growth in free solution†

    PubMed Central

    Johnson-Chavarria, Eric M.; Agrawal, Utsav; Tanyeri, Melikhan; Kuhlman, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    We report an automated microfluidic-based platform for single cell analysis that allows for cell culture in free solution with the ability to control the cell growth environment. Using this approach, cells are confined by the sole action of gentle fluid flow, thereby enabling non-perturbative analysis of cell growth away from solid boundaries. In addition, the single cell microbioreactor allows for precise and time-dependent control over cell culture media, with the combined ability to observe the dynamics of non-adherent cells over long time scales. As a proof-of-principle demonstration, we used the platform to observe dynamic cell growth, gene expression, and intracellular diffusion of repressor proteins while precisely tuning the cell growth environment. Overall, this microfluidic approach enables the direct observation of cellular dynamics with exquisite control over environmental conditions, which will be useful for quantifying the behaviour of single cells in well-defined media. PMID:24836754

  3. Automated analyser for monitoring trace amounts of volatile chloro-organic compounds in recirculated industrial water

    PubMed Central

    Janicki, Wacław; Wasik, Andrzej; Przyk, Elżbieta; Namieśnik, Jacek

    2002-01-01

    An automated analyser of volatile chloro-organic compounds in water was constructed and tested using standard mixtures of dichloromethane and dichloroethane. It was based on continuous, countercurrent gas stripping of the liquid sample followed by periodic trapping of the analytes on two traps alternately connected to the bubbler outlet, and thermal desorption. When one trap performed adsorption, the other underwent desorption and cooling. Analytes were detected by an ECD detector. Integration, calibration, calculations and overall operating cycle control was performed by a microcomputer. The instrument guarantees a 0.02 ppm Cl (w/w) detection limit, a 0—2 ppm detection range and 2 months of autonomous operation. Results are reported every 13 min. PMID:18924724

  4. Automated system for acquisition and image processing for the control and monitoring boned nopal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luevano, E.; de Posada, E.; Arronte, M.; Ponce, L.; Flores, T.

    2013-11-01

    This paper describes the design and fabrication of a system for acquisition and image processing to control the removal of thorns nopal vegetable (Opuntia ficus indica) in an automated machine that uses pulses of a laser of Nd: YAG. The areolas, areas where thorns grow on the bark of the Nopal, are located applying segmentation algorithms to the images obtained by a CCD. Once the position of the areolas is known, coordinates are sent to a motors system that controls the laser to interact with all areolas and remove the thorns of the nopal. The electronic system comprises a video decoder, memory for image and software storage, and digital signal processor for system control. The firmware programmed tasks on acquisition, preprocessing, segmentation, recognition and interpretation of the areolas. This system achievement identifying areolas and generating table of coordinates of them, which will be send the motor galvo system that controls the laser for removal

  5. Monitoring seasonal and diurnal changes in photosynthetic pigments with automated PRI and NDVI sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamon, J. A.; Kovalchuck, O.; Wong, C. Y. S.; Harris, A.; Garrity, S. R.

    2015-07-01

    The vegetation indices normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and photochemical reflectance index (PRI) provide indicators of pigmentation and photosynthetic activity that can be used to model photosynthesis from remote sensing with the light-use-efficiency model. To help develop and validate this approach, reliable proximal NDVI and PRI sensors have been needed. We tested new NDVI and PRI sensors, "spectral reflectance sensors" (SRS sensors; recently developed by Decagon Devices, during spring activation of photosynthetic activity in evergreen and deciduous stands. We also evaluated two methods of sensor cross-calibration - one that considered sky conditions (cloud cover) at midday only, and another that also considered diurnal sun angle effects. Cross-calibration clearly affected sensor agreement with independent measurements, with the best method dependent upon the study aim and time frame (seasonal vs. diurnal). The seasonal patterns of NDVI and PRI differed for evergreen and deciduous species, demonstrating the complementary nature of these two indices. Over the spring season, PRI was most strongly influenced by changing chlorophyll : carotenoid pool sizes, while over the diurnal timescale, PRI was most affected by the xanthophyll cycle epoxidation state. This finding demonstrates that the SRS PRI sensors can resolve different processes affecting PRI over different timescales. The advent of small, inexpensive, automated PRI and NDVI sensors offers new ways to explore environmental and physiological constraints on photosynthesis, and may be particularly well suited for use at flux tower sites. Wider application of automated sensors could lead to improved integration of flux and remote sensing approaches for studying photosynthetic carbon uptake, and could help define the concept of contrasting vegetation optical types.

  6. Monitoring seasonal and diurnal changes in photosynthetic pigments with automated PRI and NDVI sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamon, J. A.; Kovalchuk, O.; Wong, C. Y. S.; Harris, A.; Garrity, S. R.

    2015-02-01

    The vegetation indices normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and photochemical reflectance index (PRI) provide indicators of pigmentation and photosynthetic activity that can be used to model photosynthesis from remote sensing with the light-use efficiency model. To help develop and validate this approach, reliable proximal NDVI and PRI sensors have been needed. We tested new NDVI and PRI sensors, "SRS" sensors recently developed by Decagon Devices, during spring activation of photosynthetic activity in evergreen and deciduous stands. We also evaluated two methods of sensor cross-calibration, one that considered sky conditions (cloud cover) at midday only, and the other that also considered diurnal sun angle effects. Cross-calibration clearly affected sensor agreement with independent measurements, with the best method dependent upon the study aim and time frame (seasonal vs. diurnal). The seasonal patterns of NDVI and PRI differed for evergreen and deciduous species, demonstrating the complementary nature of these two indices. Over the spring season, PRI was most strongly influenced by changing chlorophyll : carotenoid pool sizes, while over the diurnal time scale PRI was most affected by the xanthophyll cycle epoxidation state. This finding demonstrates that the SRS PRI sensors can resolve different processes affecting PRI over different time scales. The advent of small, inexpensive, automated PRI and NDVI sensors offers new ways to explore environmental and physiological constraints on photosynthesis, and may be particularly well-suited for use at flux tower sites. Wider application of automated sensors could lead to improved integration of flux and remote sensing approaches to studying photosynthetic carbon uptake, and could help define the concept of contrasting vegetation optical types.

  7. Demonstrations of safeguards process monitoring sensitivities. Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program

    SciTech Connect

    Ehinger, M.H.; Wachter, J.W.

    1986-09-01

    Can process-monitoring information be incorporated into safeguards tests. What level of sensitivity to removals of materials can be achieved with process monitoring tests. These questions are being answered by a series of tests in US facilities. These tests involve full-scale facilities that simulate operating reprocessing plant conditions with natural or depleted uranium solutions as surrogate feed materials. Safeguards systems are in place to detect loss or unauthorized removals of solutions. As part of the tests, actual removals of material from the operating facilities are made. Removals have ranged from several kilograms down to a few hundred grams of uranium. For purposes of the tests, uranium is considered to be plutonium and is the focus of safeguards concerns.

  8. A Recursive Multiscale Correlation-Averaging Algorithm for an Automated Distributed Road Condition Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect

    Ndoye, Mandoye; Barker, Alan M; Krogmeier, James; Bullock, Darcy

    2011-01-01

    A signal processing approach is proposed to jointly filter and fuse spatially indexed measurements captured from many vehicles. It is assumed that these measurements are influenced by both sensor noise and measurement indexing uncertainties. Measurements from low-cost vehicle-mounted sensors (e.g., accelerometers and Global Positioning System (GPS) receivers) are properly combined to produce higher quality road roughness data for cost-effective road surface condition monitoring. The proposed algorithms are recursively implemented and thus require only moderate computational power and memory space. These algorithms are important for future road management systems, which will use on-road vehicles as a distributed network of sensing probes gathering spatially indexed measurements for condition monitoring, in addition to other applications, such as environmental sensing and/or traffic monitoring. Our method and the related signal processing algorithms have been successfully tested using field data.

  9. Automated on-line plutonium concentration monitor for process control and safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Rebagay, T.V.; Huff, G.A.; Hofstetter, K.J.

    1981-03-12

    A near real-time inventory can be achieved using the monitor. Since the stream being monitored is the aqueous effluent of the electropulse column, the plutonium profile of this column for a given flowsheet condition could be evaluated. Changes in process parameters that influence the kinetics and efficiency of the purification cycle can be performed in real time. This characteristic of the monitor is very valuable in process control and verification of plutonium inventory. The technique of assaying the plutonium content of the stream sequentially enhances rapid optimization of the flowsheet and also improves timeliness of detection in the event of an attempt to divert the plutonium or in case of column upsets.

  10. Intelligent Classification of Heartbeats for Automated Real-Time ECG Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Park, Juyoung

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: The automatic interpretation of electrocardiography (ECG) data can provide continuous analysis of heart activity, allowing the effective use of wireless devices such as the Holter monitor. Materials and Methods: We propose an intelligent heartbeat monitoring system to detect the possibility of arrhythmia in real time. We detected heartbeats and extracted features such as the QRS complex and P wave from ECG signals using the Pan–Tompkins algorithm, and the heartbeats were then classified into 16 types using a decision tree. Results: We tested the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of our system against data from the MIT-BIH Arrhythmia Database. Our system achieved an average accuracy of 97% in heartbeat detection and an average heartbeat classification accuracy of above 96%, which is comparable with the best competing schemes. Conclusions: This work provides a guide to the systematic design of an intelligent classification system for decision support in Holter ECG monitoring. PMID:25010717