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Sample records for automated hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic

  1. Speciation analysis of arsenic in biological matrices by automated hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic absorption spectrometry with multiple microflame quartz tube atomizer (multiatomizer).

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes an automated system for the oxidation state specific speciation of inorganic and methylated arsenicals by selective hydride generation - cryotrapping- gas chromatography - atomic absorption spectrometry with the multiatomizer. The corresponding arsines are ge...

  2. Speciation analysis of arsenic in biological matrices by automated hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic absorption spectrometry with multiple microflame quartz tube atomizer (multiatomizer)

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Zavala, Araceli; Matoušek, Tomáš; Drobná, Zuzana; Paul, David S.; Walton, Felecia; Adair, Blakely M.; Jiří, Dědina; Thomas, David J.

    2008-01-01

    Analyses of arsenic (As) species in tissues and body fluids of individuals chronically exposed to inorganic arsenic (iAs) provide essential information about the exposure level and pattern of iAs metabolism. We have previously described an oxidation state-specific analysis of As species in biological matrices by hydride-generation atomic absorption spectrometry (HG-AAS), using cryotrapping (CT) for preconcentration and separation of arsines. To improve performance and detection limits of the method, HG and CT steps are automated and a conventional flame-in-tube atomizer replaced with a recently developed multiple microflame quartz tube atomizer (multiatomizer). In this system, arsines from AsIII-species are generated in a mixture of Tris-HCl (pH 6) and sodium borohydride. For generation of arsines from both AsIII- and AsV-species, samples are pretreated with L-cysteine. Under these conditions, dimethylthioarsinic acid, a newly described metabolite of iAs, does not interfere significantly with detection and quantification of methylated trivalent arsenicals. Analytical performance of the automated HG-CT-AAS was characterized by analyses of cultured cells and mouse tissues that contained mono- and dimethylated metabolites of iAs. The capacity to detect methylated AsIII- and AsV-species was verified, using an in vitro methylation system containing recombinant rat arsenic (+3 oxidation state) methyltransferase and cultured rat hepatocytes treated with iAs. Compared with the previous HG-CT-AAS design, detection limits for iAs and its metabolites have improved significantly with the current system, ranging from 8 to 20 pg. Recoveries of As were between 78 and 117%. The precision of the method was better than 5% for all biological matrices examined. Thus, the automated HG-CT-AAS system provides an effective and sensitive tool for analysis of all major human metabolites of iAs in complex biological matrices. PMID:18677417

  3. On-line pre-reduction of pentavalent arsenicals by thioglycolic acid for speciation analysis by selective hydride generation cryotrapping atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musil, Stanislav; Matoušek, Tomáš

    2008-06-01

    An improvement of current method of selective hydride generation based on pre-reduction for differentiation of tri- and pentavalent arsenicals is described, applied for the oxidation state specific speciation analysis of inorganic, mono-, di- and trimethylated arsenicals with minimum sample pretreatment using atomic absorption spectrometry with the multiatomizer. The preconcentration and separation of arsine, methylarsine, dimethylarsine and trimethylarsine are then carried out by means of cryotrapping. The presented study shows that 2% (m/v) L-cysteine hydrochloride monohydrate ( L-cys) currently used for off-line pre-reduction of pentavalent arsenicals can be substituted with 1% (m/v) thioglycolic acid (TGA). Much faster pre-reduction of pentavalent arsenicals at 25 °C with equal sensitivities as in the case of L-cys has been achieved with TGA. A setup for on-line pre-reduction by TGA has been optimized, with the application of segmented flow analysis for suppression of axial dispersion in the pre-reduction coil. Standard calibrations measured with or without on-line pre-reduction indicate uniform and equal sensitivities for all As forms. The possibility of standardization by water standards of single species (e.g. iAs(III)) for quantification of all other As forms in urine is demonstrated in the recovery study. Limits of detection were 100 ng l - 1 for iAs(III), 135 ng l - 1 for iAs(V) and 30 to 50 ng l - 1 for methylated arsenicals.

  4. Speciation Analysis of Arsenic by Selective Hydride Generation-Cryotrapping-Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry with Flame-in-Gas-Shield Atomizer: Achieving Extremely Low Detection Limits with Inexpensive Instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This work describes the method of a selective hydride generation-cryotrapping (HG-CT) coupled to an extremely sensitive but simple in-house assembled and designed atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) instrument for determination of toxicologically important As species. Here, an advanced flame-in-gas-shield atomizer (FIGS) was interfaced to HG-CT and its performance was compared to a standard miniature diffusion flame (MDF) atomizer. A significant improvement both in sensitivity and baseline noise was found that was reflected in improved (4 times) limits of detection (LODs). The yielded LODs with the FIGS atomizer were 0.44, 0.74, 0.15, 0.17 and 0.67 ng L–1 for arsenite, total inorganic, mono-, dimethylated As and trimethylarsine oxide, respectively. Moreover, the sensitivities with FIGS and MDF were equal for all As species, allowing for the possibility of single species standardization with arsenate standard for accurate quantification of all other As species. The accuracy of HG-CT-AFS with FIGS was verified by speciation analysis in two samples of bottled drinking water and certified reference materials, NRC CASS-5 (nearshore seawater) and SLRS-5 (river water) that contain traces of methylated As species. As speciation was in agreement with results previously reported and sums of all quantified species corresponded with the certified total As. The feasibility of HG-CT-AFS with FIGS was also demonstrated by the speciation analysis in microsamples of exfoliated bladder epithelial cells isolated from human urine. The results for the sums of trivalent and pentavalent As species corresponded well with the reference results obtained by HG-CT-ICPMS (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry). PMID:25300934

  5. Speciation analysis of arsenic by selective hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic fluorescence spectrometry with flame-in-gas-shield atomizer: achieving extremely low detection limits with inexpensive instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Musil, Stanislav; Matoušek, Tomáš; Currier, Jenna M; Stýblo, Miroslav; Dědina, Jiří

    2014-10-21

    This work describes the method of a selective hydride generation-cryotrapping (HG-CT) coupled to an extremely sensitive but simple in-house assembled and designed atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) instrument for determination of toxicologically important As species. Here, an advanced flame-in-gas-shield atomizer (FIGS) was interfaced to HG-CT and its performance was compared to a standard miniature diffusion flame (MDF) atomizer. A significant improvement both in sensitivity and baseline noise was found that was reflected in improved (4 times) limits of detection (LODs). The yielded LODs with the FIGS atomizer were 0.44, 0.74, 0.15, 0.17 and 0.67 ng L(-1) for arsenite, total inorganic, mono-, dimethylated As and trimethylarsine oxide, respectively. Moreover, the sensitivities with FIGS and MDF were equal for all As species, allowing for the possibility of single species standardization with arsenate standard for accurate quantification of all other As species. The accuracy of HG-CT-AFS with FIGS was verified by speciation analysis in two samples of bottled drinking water and certified reference materials, NRC CASS-5 (nearshore seawater) and SLRS-5 (river water) that contain traces of methylated As species. As speciation was in agreement with results previously reported and sums of all quantified species corresponded with the certified total As. The feasibility of HG-CT-AFS with FIGS was also demonstrated by the speciation analysis in microsamples of exfoliated bladder epithelial cells isolated from human urine. The results for the sums of trivalent and pentavalent As species corresponded well with the reference results obtained by HG-CT-ICPMS (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry). PMID:25300934

  6. SPECIATION ANALYSIS OF ARSENIC IN BIOLOGICAL MATRICES BY AUTOMATED HYDRIDE GENERATION-CRYOTRAPPING-ATOMIC ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY WITH MULTIPLE MICROFLAME QUARTZ TUBE ATOMIZER (MULTIATOMIZER)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Analyses of arsenic (As) species in tissues and body fluids of individuals chronically exposed to inorganic arsenic (iAs) provide essential information about the exposure level and pattern of iAs metabolism. We have previously described an oxidation state-specifi...

  7. Comparative oxidation state specific analysis of arsenic species by high-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled-mass spectrometry and hydride generation-cryotrapping-atomic absorption spectrometry

    EPA Science Inventory

    The formation of methylarsonous acid (MAsIII) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMAsIII) in the course of inorganic arsenic (iAs) metabolism plays an important role in the adverse effects of chronic exposure to iAs. High-performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass ...

  8. Automated determinations of selenium in thermal power plant wastewater by sequential hydride generation and chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Ezoe, Kentaro; Ohyama, Seiichi; Hashem, Md Abul; Ohira, Shin-Ichi; Toda, Kei

    2016-02-01

    After the Fukushima disaster, power generation from nuclear power plants in Japan was completely stopped and old coal-based power plants were re-commissioned to compensate for the decrease in power generation capacity. Although coal is a relatively inexpensive fuel for power generation, it contains high levels (mgkg(-1)) of selenium, which could contaminate the wastewater from thermal power plants. In this work, an automated selenium monitoring system was developed based on sequential hydride generation and chemiluminescence detection. This method could be applied to control of wastewater contamination. In this method, selenium is vaporized as H2Se, which reacts with ozone to produce chemiluminescence. However, interference from arsenic is of concern because the ozone-induced chemiluminescence intensity of H2Se is much lower than that of AsH3. This problem was successfully addressed by vaporizing arsenic and selenium individually in a sequential procedure using a syringe pump equipped with an eight-port selection valve and hot and cold reactors. Oxidative decomposition of organoselenium compounds and pre-reduction of the selenium were performed in the hot reactor, and vapor generation of arsenic and selenium were performed separately in the cold reactor. Sample transfers between the reactors were carried out by a pneumatic air operation by switching with three-way solenoid valves. The detection limit for selenium was 0.008 mg L(-1) and calibration curve was linear up to 1.0 mg L(-1), which provided suitable performance for controlling selenium in wastewater to around the allowable limit (0.1 mg L(-1)). This system consumes few chemicals and is stable for more than a month without any maintenance. Wastewater samples from thermal power plants were collected, and data obtained by the proposed method were compared with those from batchwise water treatment followed by hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry. PMID:26653491

  9. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Laboratory; determination of antimony by automated-hydride atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, G.E.; McLain, B.J.

    1994-01-01

    The analysis of natural-water samples for antimony by automated-hydride atomic absorption spectrophotometry is described. Samples are prepared for analysis by addition of potassium and hydrochloric acid followed by an autoclave digestion. After the digestion, potassium iodide and sodium borohydride are added automatically. Antimony hydride (stibine) gas is generated, then swept into a heated quartz cell for determination of antimony by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Precision and accuracy data are presented. Results obtained on standard reference water samples agree with means established by interlaboratory studies. Spike recoveries for actual samples range from 90 to 114 percent. Replicate analyses of water samples of varying matrices give relative standard deviations from 3 to 10 percent.

  10. Hydriding process

    DOEpatents

    Raymond, J.W.; Taketani, H.

    1973-12-01

    BS>A method is described for hydriding a body of a Group IV-B metal, preferably zirconium, to produce a crack-free metal-hydride bedy of high hydrogen content by cooling the body at the beta to beta + delta boundary, without further addition of hydrogen, to precipitate a fine-grained delta-phase metal hydride in the beta + delta phase region and then resuming the hydriding, preferably preceded by a reheating step. (Official Gazette)

  11. An improved method for the determination of trace levels of arsenic and antimony in geological materials by automated hydride generation-atomic absorption spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crock, J.G.; Lichte, F.E.

    1982-01-01

    An improved, automated method for the determination of arsenic and antimony in geological materials is described. After digestion of the material in sulfuric, nitric, hydrofluoric and perchloric acids, a hydrochloric acid solution of the sample is automatically mixed with reducing agents, acidified with additional hydrochloric acid, and treated with a sodium tetrahydroborate solution to form arsine and stibine. The hydrides are decomposed in a heated quartz tube in the optical path of an atomic absorption spectrometer. The absorbance peak height for arsenic or antimony is measured. Interferences that exist are minimized to the point where most geological materials including coals, soils, coal ashes, rocks and sediments can be analyzed directly without use of standard additions. The relative standard deviation of the digestion and the instrumental procedure is less than 2% at the 50 ??g l-1 As or Sb level. The reagent-blank detection limit is 0.2 ??g l-1 As or Sb. ?? 1982.

  12. Arsenic fractionation in agricultural soil using an automated three-step sequential extraction method coupled to hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Castor, J M; Portugal, L; Ferrer, L; Guzmán-Mar, J L; Hernández-Ramírez, A; Cerdà, V; Hinojosa-Reyes, L

    2015-05-18

    A fully automated modified three-step BCR flow-through sequential extraction method was developed for the fractionation of the arsenic (As) content from agricultural soil based on a multi-syringe flow injection analysis (MSFIA) system coupled to hydride generation-atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS). Critical parameters that affect the performance of the automated system were optimized by exploiting a multivariate approach using a Doehlert design. The validation of the flow-based modified-BCR method was carried out by comparison with the conventional BCR method. Thus, the total As content was determined in the following three fractions: fraction 1 (F1), the acid-soluble or interchangeable fraction; fraction 2 (F2), the reducible fraction; and fraction 3 (F3), the oxidizable fraction. The limits of detection (LOD) were 4.0, 3.4, and 23.6 μg L(-1) for F1, F2, and F3, respectively. A wide working concentration range was obtained for the analysis of each fraction, i.e., 0.013-0.800, 0.011-0.900 and 0.079-1.400 mg L(-1) for F1, F2, and F3, respectively. The precision of the automated MSFIA-HG-AFS system, expressed as the relative standard deviation (RSD), was evaluated for a 200 μg L(-1) As standard solution, and RSD values between 5 and 8% were achieved for the three BCR fractions. The new modified three-step BCR flow-based sequential extraction method was satisfactorily applied for arsenic fractionation in real agricultural soil samples from an arsenic-contaminated mining zone to evaluate its extractability. The frequency of analysis of the proposed method was eight times higher than that of the conventional BCR method (6 vs 48 h), and the kinetics of lixiviation were established for each fraction. PMID:25910440

  13. Hydride compositions

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Myung, W.

    1994-01-01

    Disclosed are a composition for use in storing hydrogen and a method for making the composition. The composition comprises a mixture of two or more hydrides, each hydride having a different series of hydrogen sorption isotherms that contribute to the overall isotherms of the mixture. The hydrides are chosen so that the isotherms of the mixture have regions wherein the H equilibrium pressure increases with increasing hydrogen, preferably linearly. The isotherms of the mixture can be adjusted by selecting hydrides with different isotherms and by varying the amounts of the individual hydrides, or both. Preferably, the mixture is made up of hydrides that have isotherms with substantially flat plateaus and in nearly equimolar amounts. The composition is activated by degassing, exposing to H, and then heating below the softening temperature of any of the constituents. When the composition is used to store hydrogen, its hydrogen content can be found simply by measuring P{sub H}{sub 2} and determining H/M from the isothermic function of the composition.

  14. Hydride compositions

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Myung W.

    1995-01-01

    A composition for use in storing hydrogen, and a method for making the composition. The composition comprises a mixture of two or more hydrides, each hydride having a different series of hydrogen sorption isotherms that contribute to the overall isotherms of the mixture. The hydrides are chosen so that the isotherms of the mixture have regions wherein the hydrogen equilibrium pressure increases with increasing hydrogen, preferably linearly. The isotherms of the mixture can be adjusted by selecting hydrides with different isotherms and by varying the amounts of the individual hydrides, or both. Preferably, the mixture is made up of hydrides that have isotherms with substantially flat plateaus and in nearly equimolar amounts. The composition is activated by degassing, exposing to hydrogen and then heating at a temperature below the softening temperature of any of the. constituents so that their chemical and structural integrity is preserved. When the composition is used to store hydrogen, its hydrogen content can be found simply by measuring P.sub.H.sbsb.2 and determining H/M from the isothermic function of the composition.

  15. Oxidation state specific generation of arsines from methylated arsenicals based on L-cysteine treatment in buffered media for speciation analysis by hydride generation-automated cryotrapping-gas chromatography-atomic absorption spectrometry with the multiatomizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matoušek, Tomáš; Hernández-Zavala, Araceli; Svoboda, Milan; Langrová, Lenka; Adair, Blakely M.; Drobná, Zuzana; Thomas, David J.; Stýblo, Miroslav; Dědina, Jiří

    2008-03-01

    An automated system for hydride generation-cryotrapping-gas chromatography-atomic absorption spectrometry with the multiatomizer is described. Arsines are preconcentrated and separated in a Chromosorb filled U-tube. An automated cryotrapping unit, employing nitrogen gas formed upon heating in the detection phase for the displacement of the cooling liquid nitrogen, has been developed. The conditions for separation of arsines in a Chromosorb filled U-tube have been optimized. A complete separation of signals from arsine, methylarsine, dimethylarsine, and trimethylarsine has been achieved within a 60 s reading window. The limits of detection for methylated arsenicals tested were 4 ng l - 1 . Selective hydride generation is applied for the oxidation state specific speciation analysis of inorganic and methylated arsenicals. The arsines are generated either exclusively from trivalent or from both tri- and pentavalent inorganic and methylated arsenicals depending on the presence of L-cysteine as a prereductant and/or reaction modifier. A TRIS buffer reaction medium is proposed to overcome narrow optimum concentration range observed for the L-cysteine modified reaction in HCl medium. The system provides uniform peak area sensitivity for all As species. Consequently, the calibration with a single form of As is possible. This method permits a high-throughput speciation analysis of metabolites of inorganic arsenic in relatively complex biological matrices such as cell culture systems without sample pretreatment, thus preserving the distribution of tri- and pentavalent species.

  16. Hydride compressor

    DOEpatents

    Powell, James R.; Salzano, Francis J.

    1978-01-01

    Method of producing high energy pressurized gas working fluid power from a low energy, low temperature heat source, wherein the compression energy is gained by using the low energy heat source to desorb hydrogen gas from a metal hydride bed and the desorbed hydrogen for producing power is recycled to the bed, where it is re-adsorbed, with the recycling being powered by the low energy heat source. In one embodiment, the adsorption-desorption cycle provides a chemical compressor that is powered by the low energy heat source, and the compressor is connected to a regenerative gas turbine having a high energy, high temperature heat source with the recycling being powered by the low energy heat source.

  17. Silica Embedded Metal Hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Heung, L.K.; Wicks, G.G.

    1998-08-01

    A method to produce silica embedded metal hydride was developed. The product is a composite in which metal hydride particles are embedded in a matrix of silica. The silica matrix is highly porous. Hydrogen gas can easily reach the embedded metal hydride particles. The pores are small so that the metal hydride particles cannot leave the matrix. The porous matrix also protects the metal hydride particles from larger and reactive molecules such as oxygen, since the larger gas molecules cannot pass through the small pores easily. Tests show that granules of this composite can absorb hydrogen readily and withstand many cycles without making fines.

  18. Modelling of hydride cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, X.J.; Metzger, D.R.; Glinka, G.; Dubey, R.N.

    1996-12-01

    Zirconium alloys may be susceptible to hydride formation under certain service conditions, due to hydrogen diffusion and precipitation in the presence of stress concentrations and temperature gradients. The inhomogeneous brittle hydride platelets that form are modeled as plane defects of zero thickness, with fracture toughness less than that of the matrix. A fracture criterion based on sufficient energy and stress is proposed for either delayed hydride cracking (DHC) under constant loading conditions, or hydride cracking at rising loads, such as in a fracture toughness test. The fracture criterion is validated against available experimental data concerning initiation of hydride fracture in smooth specimens, and DHC in cracked specimens under various loading and temperature conditions.

  19. Hydride precipitation in titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Numakura, H.; Kowia, M.

    1984-10-01

    The crystal structure and morphology of hydride (deuteride) precipitates are investigated on ..cap alpha..-titanium specimens containing 1-3 at.% H or D by transmission electron microscopy. The hydride is found to have a face-centered tetragonal structure (c/a = 1.09) with an ordered arrangement of hydrogen, being isomorphous to ..gamma..-zirconium hydride. Two types of precipitation mode are observed with the habit planes (0110) and near (0225).

  20. Hysteresis in Metal Hydrides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flanagan, Ted B., And Others

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a reproducible process where the irreversibility can be readily evaluated and provides a thermodynamic description of the important phenomenon of hysteresis. A metal hydride is used because hysteresis is observed during the formation and decomposition of the hydride phase. (RH)

  1. Metal hydride heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Nishizaki, T.; Miyamoto, K.; Miyamoto, M.; Nakata, Y.; Yamaji, K.; Yoshida, K.

    1983-12-27

    A metal hydride heat pump is disclosed comprising a first and a second heat medium receptacle having heat media flowing therein and a plurality of closed vessels each containing a hydrogen gas atmosphere and divided into a first chamber having a first metal hydride filled therein and a second chamber having a second metal hydride filled therein. The first and second chambers of each closed vessel are made to communicate with each other so that hydrogen gas passes from one chamber to the other but the metal hydrides do not, and a group of the first chambers of the closed vessels being located within the first heat medium receptacle and a group of the second chambers of the closed vessels being located within the second heat medium receptacle, whereby heat exchange is carried out between the heat media in the first and second heat medium receptacles and the first and second metal hydrides through the external walls of the closed vessels.

  2. Nickel Hydride Complexes.

    PubMed

    Eberhardt, Nathan A; Guan, Hairong

    2016-08-10

    Nickel hydride complexes, defined herein as any molecules bearing a nickel hydrogen bond, are crucial intermediates in numerous nickel-catalyzed reactions. Some of them are also synthetic models of nickel-containing enzymes such as [NiFe]-hydrogenase. The overall objective of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of this specific type of hydride complexes, which has been studied extensively in recent years. This review begins with the significance and a very brief history of nickel hydride complexes, followed by various methods and spectroscopic or crystallographic tools used to synthesize and characterize these complexes. Also discussed are stoichiometric reactions involving nickel hydride complexes and how some of these reactions are developed into catalytic processes. PMID:27437790

  3. Lightweight hydride storage materials

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.J.; Guthrie, S.E.; Bauer, W.

    1995-09-01

    The need for lightweight hydrides in vehicular applications has prompted considerable research into the use of magnesium and its alloys. Although this earlier work has provided some improved performance in operating temperature and pressure, substantial improvements are needed before these materials will significantly enhance the performance of an engineered system on a vehicle. We are extending the work of previous investigators on Mg alloys to reduce the operating temperature and hydride heat of formation in light weight materials. Two important results will be discussed in this paper: (1) a promising new alloy hydride was found which has better pressure-temperature characteristics than any previous Mg alloy and, (2) a new fabrication process for existing Mg alloys was developed and demonstrated. The new alloy hydride is composed of magnesium, aluminum and nickel. It has an equilibrium hydrogen overpressure of 1.3 atm. at 200{degrees}C and a storage capacity between 3 and 4 wt.% hydrogen. A hydrogen release rate of approximately 5 x 10{sup -4} moles-H{sub 2}/gm-min was measured at 200{degrees}C. The hydride heat of formation was found to be 13.5 - 14 kcal/mole-H{sub 2}, somewhat lower than Mg{sub 2}Ni. The new fabrication method takes advantage of the high vapor transport of magnesium. It was found that Mg{sub 2}Ni produced by our low temperature process was better than conventional materials because it was single phase (no Mg phase) and could be fabricated with very small particle sizes. Hydride measurements on this material showed faster kinetic response than conventional material. The technique could potentially be applied to in-situ hydride bed fabrication with improved packing density, release kinetics, thermal properties and mechanical stability.

  4. Metal hydride heat pump system

    SciTech Connect

    Nishizaki, T.; Miyamoto, K.; Miyamoto, M.; Nakata, Y.; Yamaji, K.; Yoshida, K.

    1985-06-18

    A metal hydride heat pump system has a plurality of operating units, the metal hydride heat exchange medium of each operating unit be a combination of a first metal hydride having a lower equilibrium dissociation pressure at the operating temperature and a second metal hydride having a higher equilibrium dissociation pressure at the opening temperature and the metal hydrides being such that hydrogen can flow freely between the two metal hydrides, wherein the equilibrium dissociation pressure characteristics of one or both of the first and second metal hydrides in a given operating unit differ from those of one or both of the first and second metal hydrides in at least one other operating unit.

  5. Hydrated hydride anion clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Han Myoung; Kim, Dongwook; Singh, N. Jiten; Kołaski, Maciej; Kim, Kwang S.

    2007-10-01

    On the basis of density functional theory (DFT) and high level ab initio theory, we report the structures, binding energies, thermodynamic quantities, IR spectra, and electronic properties of the hydride anion hydrated by up to six water molecules. Ground state DFT molecular dynamics simulations (based on the Born-Oppenheimer potential surface) show that as the temperature increases, the surface-bound hydride anion changes to the internally bound structure. Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulations are also carried out for the spectral analysis of the monohydrated hydride. Excited-state ab initio molecular dynamics simulations show that the photoinduced charge-transfer-to-solvent phenomena are accompanied by the formation of the excess electron-water clusters and the detachment of the H radical from the clusters. The dynamics of the detachment process of a hydrogen radical upon the excitation is discussed.

  6. Boron hydride polymer coated substrates

    DOEpatents

    Pearson, Richard K.; Bystroff, Roman I.; Miller, Dale E.

    1987-01-01

    A method is disclosed for coating a substrate with a uniformly smooth layer of a boron hydride polymer. The method comprises providing a reaction chamber which contains the substrate and the boron hydride plasma. A boron hydride feed stock is introduced into the chamber simultaneously with the generation of a plasma discharge within the chamber. A boron hydride plasma of ions, electrons and free radicals which is generated by the plasma discharge interacts to form a uniformly smooth boron hydride polymer which is deposited on the substrate.

  7. Boron hydride polymer coated substrates

    DOEpatents

    Pearson, R.K.; Bystroff, R.I.; Miller, D.E.

    1986-08-27

    A method is disclosed for coating a substrate with a uniformly smooth layer of a boron hydride polymer. The method comprises providing a reaction chamber which contains the substrate and the boron hydride plasma. A boron hydride feed stock is introduced into the chamber simultaneously with the generation of a plasma discharge within the chamber. A boron hydride plasma of ions, electrons and free radicals which is generated by the plasma discharge interacts to form a uniformly smooth boron hydride polymer which is deposited on the substrate.

  8. Superstoichiometric hydride of zirconium

    SciTech Connect

    Kupryazhkin, A.Ya.; Shchepetkin, A.A.; Zabolotskaya, E.V.; Pletnev, R.N.; Alyamovskii, S.I.; Kitaev, G.A.

    1987-12-01

    Superstoichiometric hydrides of zirconium have been obtained all the way up to the composition ZrH/sub 2.4/ by additional hydrogenation of ZrH/sub 2/ as a result of redistribution of hydrogen atoms between t- and o-positions. In the preparation of the hydrides the authors used zirconium iodide with an impurity content no greater than 10/sup -2/ to 10/sup -2/ mole %; the hydrogen and helium used in this work had a minimum purity of 99.95%. The content of hydrogen in the specimens was determined by a volumetric method. The x-ray diffraction analysis was performed in a DRON-2.0 unit (CuK/sub ..cap alpha../ radiation). PMR spectra were recorded in a broad-line spectrometer in the temperature interval 150-450 K.

  9. Hydrogen Outgassing from Lithium Hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Dinh, L N; Schildbach, M A; Smith, R A; Balazs1, B; McLean II, W

    2006-04-20

    Lithium hydride is a nuclear material with a great affinity for moisture. As a result of exposure to water vapor during machining, transportation, storage and assembly, a corrosion layer (oxide and/or hydroxide) always forms on the surface of lithium hydride resulting in the release of hydrogen gas. Thermodynamically, lithium hydride, lithium oxide and lithium hydroxide are all stable. However, lithium hydroxides formed near the lithium hydride substrate (interface hydroxide) and near the sample/vacuum interface (surface hydroxide) are much less thermally stable than their bulk counterpart. In a dry environment, the interface/surface hydroxides slowly degenerate over many years/decades at room temperature into lithium oxide, releasing water vapor and ultimately hydrogen gas through reaction of the water vapor with the lithium hydride substrate. This outgassing can potentially cause metal hydriding and/or compatibility issues elsewhere in the device. In this chapter, the morphology and the chemistry of the corrosion layer grown on lithium hydride (and in some cases, its isotopic cousin, lithium deuteride) as a result of exposure to moisture are investigated. The hydrogen outgassing processes associated with the formation and subsequent degeneration of this corrosion layer are described. Experimental techniques to measure the hydrogen outgassing kinetics from lithium hydride and methods employing the measured kinetics to predict hydrogen outgassing as a function of time and temperature are presented. Finally, practical procedures to mitigate the problem of hydrogen outgassing from lithium hydride are discussed.

  10. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOEpatents

    Ron, M.; Gruen, D.M.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Sheft, I.

    1980-01-21

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  11. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOEpatents

    Ron, Moshe; Gruen, Dieter M.; Mendelsohn, Marshall H.; Sheft, Irving

    1981-01-01

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  12. 17. VIEW OF HYDRIDING SYSTEM IN BUILDING 881. THE HYDRIDING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. VIEW OF HYDRIDING SYSTEM IN BUILDING 881. THE HYDRIDING SYSTEM WAS PART OF THE FAST ENRICHED URANIUM RECOVERY PROCESS. (11/11/59) - Rocky Flats Plant, General Manufacturing, Support, Records-Central Computing, Southern portion of Plant, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  13. Uranium thorium hydride nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Simnad, M.T.

    1985-01-15

    A nuclear fuel includes uranium dispersed within a thorium hydride matrix. The uranium may be in the form of particles including fissile and non-fissile isotopes. Various hydrogen to thorium ratios may be included in the matrix. The matrix with the fissile dispersion may be used as a complete fuel for a metal hydride reactor or may be combined with other fuels.

  14. Dimensionally stable metallic hydride composition

    DOEpatents

    Heung, Leung K.

    1994-01-01

    A stable, metallic hydride composition and a process for making such a composition. The composition comprises a uniformly blended mixture of a metal hydride, kieselguhr, and a ballast metal, all in the form of particles. The composition is made by subjecting a metal hydride to one or more hydrogen absorption/desorption cycles to disintegrate the hydride particles to less than approximately 100 microns in size. The particles are partly oxidized, then blended with the ballast metal and the kieselguhr to form a uniform mixture. The mixture is compressed into pellets and calcined. Preferably, the mixture includes approximately 10 vol. % or more kieselguhr and approximately 50 vol. % or more ballast. Metal hydrides that can be used in the composition include Zr, Ti, V, Nb, Pd, as well as binary, tertiary, and more complex alloys of La, Al, Cu, Ti, Co, Ni, Fe, Zr, Mg, Ca, Mn, and mixtures and other combinations thereof. Ballast metals include Al, Cu and Ni.

  15. Development of metal hydride composites

    SciTech Connect

    Congdon, J.W.

    1992-12-01

    Most of current hydride technology at Savannah River Site is based on beds of metal hydride powders; the expansion upon hydridation and the cycling results in continued breakdown into finer particles. Goal is to develop a composite which will contain the fines in a dimensionally stable matrix, for use in processes which require a stable gas flow through a hydride bed. Metal hydride composites would benefit the advanced Thermal Cycling Absorption process (hydrogen isotope separation), and the Replacement Tritium Facility (storage, pumping, compression, purification of hydrogen isotopes). These composites were fabricated by cold compaction of a mixture of metal hydride granules and coarse copper powder; the porosity in the granules was introduced by means of ammonium carbonate. The composite pellets were cycled 138 times in hydrogen with the loss of LANA0.75 (LaNi{sub 4.25}Al{sub 0.75}) limited to the surface. Vacuum sintering can provide additional strength at the edges. Without a coating, the metal hydride particles exposed at the pellet surface can be removed by cycling several times in hydrogen.

  16. Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

  17. Metallurgy of rechargeable hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Rudman, P.S.; Sandrock, G.D.

    1982-01-01

    Thermodynamic principles of metal-hydrogen (M-H) systems are reviewed, and the theory and practice of M-H alloys are detailed. Pseudobinary systems, phase transformations, and metastability are briefly discussed. The LaNi5-H system is used to examine plateau slope and hysteresis in M-H alloy formation, and the rules of simple averaging and reversed stability are assessed with respect to their usefulness in predicting the behavior of such systems. The crystal structure of metal hydrides is addressed, including AB, AB2, and AB5 structure. Finally, the use of ternary substitutional alloying in controlling the thermodynamic properties of M-H systems is discussed, illustrating the substitution of copper for nickel in LaN5 and the dependence of the equilibrium pressure on the unit cell volume of various CaCu5 type compounds.

  18. Hydride development for hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.J.; Guthrie, S.E.; Bauer, W.; Yang, N.Y.C.; Sandrock, G.

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop and demonstrate improved hydride materials for hydrogen storage. The work currently is organized into four tasks: hydride development, bed fabrication, materials support for engineering systems, and IEA Annex 12 activities. At the present time, hydride development is focused on Mg alloys. These materials generally have higher weight densities for storing hydrogen than rare earth or transition metal alloys, but suffer from high operating temperatures, slow kinetic behavior and material stability. The authors approach is to study bulk alloy additions which increase equilibrium overpressure, in combination with stable surface alloy modification and particle size control to improve kinetic properties. This work attempts to build on the considerable previous research in this area, but examines specific alloy systems in greater detail, with attention to known phase properties and structures. The authors have found that specific phases can be produced which have significantly improved hydride properties compared to previous studies.

  19. Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Slattery, Darlene; Hampton, Michael

    2003-03-10

    This report describes research into the use of complex hydrides for hydrogen storage. The synthesis of a number of alanates, (AIH4) compounds, was investigated. Both wet chemical and mechano-chemical methods were studied.

  20. Low density metal hydride foams

    DOEpatents

    Maienschein, Jon L.; Barry, Patrick E.

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed is a low density foam having a porosity of from 0 to 98% and a density less than about 0.67 gm/cc, prepared by heating a mixture of powered lithium hydride and beryllium hydride in an inert atmosphere at a temperature ranging from about 455 to about 490 K for a period of time sufficient to cause foaming of said mixture, and cooling the foam thus produced. Also disclosed is the process of making the foam.

  1. Bulk Hydrides and Delayed Hydride Cracking in Zirconium Alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tulk, Eric F.

    Zirconium alloys are susceptible to engineering problems associated with the uptake of hydrogen throughout their design lifetime in nuclear reactors. Understanding of hydrogen embrittlement associated with the precipitation of brittle hydride phases and a sub-critical crack growth mechanism known as Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC) is required to provide the engineering justifications for safe reactor operation. The nature of bulk zirconium hydrides at low concentrations (< 100 wt. ppm) is subject to several contradictory descriptions in the literature associated with the stability and metastability of gamma-phase zirconium hydride. Due to the differing volume expansions (12-17%) and crystallography between gamma and delta hydride phases, it is suggested that the matrix yield strength may have an effect on the phase stability. The present work indicated that although yield strength can shift the phase stability, other factors such as microstructure and phase distribution can be as or more important. This suggests that small material differences are the reason for the literature discrepancies. DHC is characterised by the repeated precipitation, growth, fracture of brittle hydride phases and subsequent crack arrest in the ductile metal. DHC growth is associated primarily the ability of hydrogen to diffuse under a stress induced chemical potential towards a stress raiser. Knowledge of the factors controlling DHC are paramount in being able to appropriately describe DHC for engineering purposes. Most studies characterise DHC upon cooling to the test temperature. DHC upon heating has not been extensively studied and the mechanism by which it occurs is somewhat controversial in the literature. This work shows that previous thermo-mechanical processing of hydrided zirconium can have a significant effect on the dissolution behaviour of the bulk hydride upon heating. DHC tests with gamma-quenched, furnace cooled-delta and reoriented bulk hydrides upon heating and DHC upon

  2. Complex and liquid hydrides for energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Callini, Elsa; Atakli, Zuleyha Özlem Kocabas; Hauback, Bjørn C.; Orimo, Shin-ichi; Jensen, Craig; Dornheim, Martin; Grant, David; Cho, Young Whan; Chen, Ping; Hjörvarsson, Bjørgvin; de Jongh, Petra; Weidenthaler, Claudia; Baricco, Marcello; Paskevicius, Mark; Jensen, Torben R.; Bowden, Mark E.; Autrey, Thomas S.; Züttel, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The research on complex hydrides for hydrogen storage was initiated by the discovery of Ti as a hydrogen sorption catalyst in NaAlH4 by Boris Bogdanovic in 1996. A large number of new complex hydride materials in various forms and combinations have been synthesized and characterized, and the knowledge regarding the properties of complex hydrides and the synthesis methods has grown enormously since then. A significant portion of the research groups active in the field of complex hydrides is collaborators in the International Energy Agreement Task 32. This paper reports about the important issues in the field of complex hydride research, i.e. the synthesis of borohydrides, the thermodynamics of complex hydrides, the effects of size and confinement, the hydrogen sorption mechanism and the complex hydride composites as well as the properties of liquid complex hydrides. This paper is the result of the collaboration of several groups and is an excellent summary of the recent achievements.

  3. Hydrogen, lithium, and lithium hydride production

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Sam W; Spencer, Larry S; Phillips, Michael R; Powell, G. Louis; Campbell, Peggy J

    2014-03-25

    A method of producing high purity lithium metal is provided, where gaseous-phase lithium metal is extracted from lithium hydride and condensed to form solid high purity lithium metal. The high purity lithium metal may be hydrided to provide high purity lithium hydride.

  4. Method of producing a chemical hydride

    DOEpatents

    Klingler, Kerry M.; Zollinger, William T.; Wilding, Bruce M.; Bingham, Dennis N.; Wendt, Kraig M.

    2007-11-13

    A method of producing a chemical hydride is described and which includes selecting a composition having chemical bonds and which is capable of forming a chemical hydride; providing a source of a hydrocarbon; and reacting the composition with the source of the hydrocarbon to generate a chemical hydride.

  5. Vanadium hydride deuterium-tritium generator

    DOEpatents

    Christensen, Leslie D.

    1982-01-01

    A pressure controlled vanadium hydride gas generator to provide deuterium-tritium gas in a series of pressure increments. A high pressure chamber filled with vanadium-deuterium-tritium hydride is surrounded by a heater which controls the hydride temperature. The heater is actuated by a power controller which responds to the difference signal between the actual pressure signal and a programmed pressure signal.

  6. Characteristics and Applications of Metal Hydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, G. J.; Lynch, F. E.

    1987-01-01

    Report discusses engineering principles of uses of metal hydrides in spacecraft. Metal hydrides absorb, store, pump, compress, and expand hydrogen gas. Additionally, they release or absorb sizeable amounts of heat as they form and decompose - property adapted for thermal-energy management or for propulsion. Describes efforts to: Identify heat sources and sinks suitable for driving metal hydride thermal cycles in spacecraft; develop concepts for hydride subsystems employing available heating and cooling methods; and produce data base on estimated sizes, masses, and performances of hydride devices for spacecraft.

  7. Bipolar Nickel-Metal Hydride Battery Development Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, John H.

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews the development of the Electro Energy, Inc.'s bipolar nickel metal hydride battery. The advantages of the design are that each cell is individually sealed, and that there are no external cell terminals, no electrode current collectors, it is compatible with plastic bonded electrodes, adaptable to heat transfer fins, scalable to large area, capacity and high voltage. The design will allow for automated flexible manufacturing, improved energy and power density and lower cost. The development and testing of the battery's component are described. Graphic presentation of the results of many of the tests are included.

  8. Properties of nanoscale metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Fichtner, Maximilian

    2009-05-20

    Nanoscale hydride particles may exhibit chemical stabilities which differ from those of a macroscopic system. The stabilities are mainly influenced by a surface energy term which contains size-dependent values of the surface tension, the molar volume and an additional term which takes into account a potential reduction of the excess surface energy. Thus, the equilibrium of a nanoparticular hydride system may be shifted to the hydrogenated or to the dehydrogenated side, depending on the size and on the prefix of the surface energy term of the hydrogenated and dehydrogenated material. Additional complexity appears when solid-state reactions of complex hydrides are considered and phase segregation has to be taken into account. In such a case the reversibility of complex hydrides may be reduced if the nanoparticles are free standing on a surface. However, it may be enhanced if the system is enclosed by a nanoscale void which prevents the reaction partners on the dehydrogenated side from diffusing away from each other. Moreover, the generally enhanced diffusivity in nanocrystalline systems may lower the kinetic barriers for the material's transformation and, thus, facilitate hydrogen absorption and desorption. PMID:19420657

  9. Cheaper Hydride-Forming Cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.; Blue, Gary

    1990-01-01

    Hydride-forming cathodes for electrochemical experiments made of materials or combinations of materials cheaper and more abundant than pure palladium, according to proposal. Concept prompted by needs of experimenters in now-discredited concept of electrochemical nuclear fusion, cathodes useful in other electrochemical applications involving generation or storage of hydrogen, deuterium, or tritium.

  10. Microstructure of surface cerium hydride growth sites

    SciTech Connect

    Brierley, Martin; Knowles, John; Montgomery, Neil; Preuss, Michael

    2014-05-15

    Samples of cerium were exposed to hydrogen under controlled conditions causing cerium hydride sites to nucleate and grow on the surface. The hydriding rate was measured in situ, and the hydrides were characterised using secondary ion mass spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, and optical microscopy. The results show that the hydriding rate proceeded more quickly than earlier studies. Characterisation confirmed that the hydrogen is confined to the sites. The morphology of the hydrides was confirmed to be oblate, and stressed material was observed surrounding the hydride, in a number of cases lathlike features were observed surrounding the hydride sites laterally with cracking in the surface oxide above them. It is proposed that during growth the increased lattice parameter of the CeH{sub 2} induces a lateral compressive stress around the hydride, which relieves by the ca. 16% volume collapse of the γ-Ce to α-Ce pressure induced phase transition. Cracking of the surface oxide above the laths reduces the diffusion barrier to hydrogen reaching the metal/oxide interface surrounding the hydride site and contributes to the anisotropic growth of the hydrides.

  11. Rechargeable metal hydrides for spacecraft application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, J. L.

    1988-01-01

    Storing hydrogen on board the Space Station presents both safety and logistics problems. Conventional storage using pressurized bottles requires large masses, pressures, and volumes to handle the hydrogen to be used in experiments in the U.S. Laboratory Module and residual hydrogen generated by the ECLSS. Rechargeable metal hydrides may be competitive with conventional storage techniques. The basic theory of hydride behavior is presented and the engineering properties of LaNi5 are discussed to gain a clear understanding of the potential of metal hydrides for handling spacecraft hydrogen resources. Applications to Space Station and the safety of metal hydrides are presented and compared to conventional hydride storage. This comparison indicates that metal hydrides may be safer and require lower pressures, less volume, and less mass to store an equivalent mass of hydrogen.

  12. Metal hydride composition and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Congdon, James W.

    1995-01-01

    A dimensionally stable hydride composition and a method for making such a composition. The composition is made by forming particles of a metal hydride into porous granules, mixing the granules with a matrix material, forming the mixture into pellets, and sintering the pellets in the absence of oxygen. The ratio of matrix material to hydride is preferably between approximately 2:1 and 4:1 by volume. The porous structure of the granules accommodates the expansion that occurs when the metal hydride particles absorb hydrogen. The porous matrix allows the flow of hydrogen therethrough to contact the hydride particles, yet supports the granules and contains the hydride fines that result from repeated absorption/desorption cycles.

  13. Ten degree Kelvin hydride refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A compact hydride absorption refrigeration system with few moving parts for 10 Kelvin operation is disclosed and comprises liquid hydrogen producing means in combination with means for solidifying and subliming the liquid hydrogen produced. The liquid hydrogen is sublimed at about 10 Kelvin. By using a symmetrical all hydrogen redundant loop system, a 10 Kelvin refrigeration system can be operated for many years with only a fraction of the power required for prior art systems.

  14. Complex hydrides for hydrogen storage

    DOEpatents

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2006-08-22

    A hydrogen storage material and process of forming the material is provided in which complex hydrides are combined under conditions of elevated temperatures and/or elevated temperature and pressure with a titanium metal such as titanium butoxide. The resulting fused product exhibits hydrogen desorption kinetics having a first hydrogen release point which occurs at normal atmospheres and at a temperature between 50.degree. C. and 90.degree. C.

  15. Hydrogen /Hydride/-air secondary battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarradin, J.; Bronoel, G.; Percheron-Guegan, A.; Achard, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    The use of metal hydrides as negative electrodes in a hydrogen-air secondary battery seems promising. However, in an unpressurized cell, more stable hydrides that LaNi5H6 must be selected. Partial substitutions of nickel by aluminium or manganese increase the stability of hydrides. Combined with an air reversible electrode, a specific energy close to 100 Wh/kg can be expected.

  16. Use of reversible hydrides for hydrogen storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darriet, B.; Pezat, M.; Hagenmuller, P.

    1980-01-01

    The addition of metals or alloys whose hydrides have a high dissociation pressure allows a considerable increase in the hydrogenation rate of magnesium. The influence of temperature and hydrogen pressure on the reaction rate were studied. Results concerning the hydriding of magnesium rich alloys such as Mg2Ca, La2Mg17 and CeMg12 are presented. The hydriding mechanism of La2Mg17 and CeMg12 alloys is given.

  17. Inhibited solid propellant composition containing beryllium hydride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, W. W. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An object of this invention is to provide a composition of beryllium hydride and carboxy-terminated polybutadiene which is stable. Another object of this invention is to provide a method for inhibiting the reactivity of beryllium hydride toward carboxy-terminated polybutadiene. It was found that a small amount of lecithin inhibits the reaction of beryllium hydride with the acid groups in carboxy terminated polybutadiene.

  18. Vanadium hydride deuterium-tritium generator

    DOEpatents

    Christensen, L.D.

    1980-03-13

    A pressure controlled vanadium hydride gas generator was designed to provide deuterium-tritium gas in a series of pressure increments. A high pressure chamber filled with vanadium-deuterium-tritium hydride is surrounded by a heater which controls the hydride temperature. The heater is actuated by a power controller which responds to the difference signal between the actual pressure signal and a programmed pressure signal.

  19. Thermodynamic Hydricity of Transition Metal Hydrides.

    PubMed

    Wiedner, Eric S; Chambers, Matthew B; Pitman, Catherine L; Bullock, R Morris; Miller, Alexander J M; Appel, Aaron M

    2016-08-10

    Transition metal hydrides play a critical role in stoichiometric and catalytic transformations. Knowledge of free energies for cleaving metal hydride bonds enables the prediction of chemical reactivity, such as for the bond-forming and bond-breaking events that occur in a catalytic reaction. Thermodynamic hydricity is the free energy required to cleave an M-H bond to generate a hydride ion (H(-)). Three primary methods have been developed for hydricity determination: the hydride transfer method establishes hydride transfer equilibrium with a hydride donor/acceptor pair of known hydricity, the H2 heterolysis method involves measuring the equilibrium of heterolytic cleavage of H2 in the presence of a base, and the potential-pKa method considers stepwise transfer of a proton and two electrons to give a net hydride transfer. Using these methods, over 100 thermodynamic hydricity values for transition metal hydrides have been determined in acetonitrile or water. In acetonitrile, the hydricity of metal hydrides spans a range of more than 50 kcal/mol. Methods for using hydricity values to predict chemical reactivity are also discussed, including organic transformations, the reduction of CO2, and the production and oxidation of hydrogen. PMID:27483171

  20. Fundamental experiments on hydride reorientation in zircaloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colas, Kimberly B.

    In the current study, an in-situ X-ray diffraction technique using synchrotron radiation was used to follow directly the kinetics of hydride dissolution and precipitation during thermomechanical cycles. This technique was combined with conventional microscopy (optical, SEM and TEM) to gain an overall understanding of the process of hydride reorientation. Thus this part of the study emphasized the time-dependent nature of the process, studying large volume of hydrides in the material. In addition, a micro-diffraction technique was also used to study the spatial distribution of hydrides near stress concentrations. This part of the study emphasized the spatial variation of hydride characteristics such as strain and morphology. Hydrided samples in the shape of tensile dog-bones were used in the time-dependent part of the study. Compact tension specimens were used during the spatial dependence part of the study. The hydride elastic strains from peak shift and size and strain broadening were studied as a function of time for precipitating hydrides. The hydrides precipitate in a very compressed state of stress, as measured by the shift in lattice spacing. As precipitation proceeds the average shift decreases, indicating average stress is reduced, likely due to plastic deformation and morphology changes. When nucleation ends the hydrides follow the zirconium matrix thermal contraction. When stress is applied below the threshold stress for reorientation, hydrides first nucleate in a very compressed state similar to that of unstressed hydrides. After reducing the average strain similarly to unstressed hydrides, the average hydride strain reaches a constant value during cool-down to room temperature. This could be due to a greater ease of deforming the matrix due to the applied far-field strain which would compensate for the strains due to thermal contraction. Finally when hydrides reorient, the average hydride strains become tensile during the first precipitation regime and

  1. Erbium hydride thermal desorption : controlling kinetics.

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2007-08-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report show that hydride film processing parameters directly impact thermal stability. Issues to be addressed include desorption kinetics for dihydrides and trihydrides, and the effect of film growth parameters, loading parameters, and substrate selection on desorption kinetics.

  2. Submillimeter Spectroscopy of Hydride Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, T. G.

    1998-05-01

    Simple hydride molecules are of great importance in astrophysics and astrochemistry. Physically they dominate the cooling of dense, warm phases of the ISM, such as the cores and disks of YSOs. Chemically they are often stable end points of chemical reactions, or may represent important intermediate stages of the reaction chains, which can be used to test the validity of the process. Through the efforts of astronomers, physicists, chemists, and laboratory spectroscopists we have an approximate knowledge of the abundance of some of the important species, but a great deal of new effort will be required to achieve the comprehensive and accurate data set needed to determine the energy balance and firmly establish the chemical pathways. Due to the low moment of inertia, the hydrides rotate rapidly and so have their fundamental spectral lines in the submillimeter. Depending on the cloud geometry and temperature profile they may be observed in emission or absorption. Species such as HCl, HF, OH, CH, CH(+) , NH_2, NH_3, H_2O, H_2S, H_3O(+) and even H_3(+) have been detected, but this is just a fraction of the available set. Also, most deduced abundances are not nearly sufficiently well known to draw definitive conclusions about the chemical processes. For example, the most important coolant for many regions, H_2O, has a possible range of deduced abundance of a factor of 1000. The very low submillimeter opacity at the South Pole site will be a significant factor in providing a new capabilty for interstellar hydride spectroscopy. The new species and lines made available in this way will be discussed.

  3. Direct synthesis of catalyzed hydride compounds

    DOEpatents

    Gross, Karl J.; Majzoub, Eric

    2004-09-21

    A method is disclosed for directly preparing alkali metal aluminum hydrides such as NaAlH.sub.4 and Na.sub.3 AlH.sub.6 from either the alkali metal or its hydride, and aluminum. The hydride thus prepared is doped with a small portion of a transition metal catalyst compound, such as TiCl.sub.3, TiF.sub.3, or a mixture of these materials, in order to render them reversibly hydridable. The process provides for mechanically mixing the dry reagents under an inert atmosphere followed by charging the mixed materials with high pressure hydrogen while heating the mixture to about 125.degree. C. The method is relatively simple and inexpensive and provides reversible hydride compounds which are free of the usual contamination introduced by prior art wet chemical methods.

  4. Zirconium hydride containing explosive composition

    DOEpatents

    Walker, Franklin E.; Wasley, Richard J.

    1981-01-01

    An improved explosive composition is disclosed and comprises a major portion of an explosive having a detonation velocity between about 1500 and 10,000 meters per second and a minor amount of a donor additive comprising a non-explosive compound or mixture of non-explosive compounds which when subjected to an energy fluence of 1000 calories/cm.sup.2 or less is capable of releasing free radicals each having a molecular weight between 1 and 120. Exemplary donor additives are dibasic acids, polyamines and metal hydrides.

  5. Activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Sandrock, Gary; Reilly, James; Graetz, Jason; Wegrzyn, James E.

    2010-11-23

    In one aspect, the invention relates to activated aluminum hydride hydrogen storage compositions containing aluminum hydride in the presence of, or absence of, hydrogen desorption stimulants. The invention particularly relates to such compositions having one or more hydrogen desorption stimulants selected from metal hydrides and metal aluminum hydrides. In another aspect, the invention relates to methods for generating hydrogen from such hydrogen storage compositions.

  6. Cyclopentadiene-mediated hydride transfer from rhodium complexes.

    PubMed

    Pitman, C L; Finster, O N L; Miller, A J M

    2016-07-12

    Attempts to generate a proposed rhodium hydride catalytic intermediate instead resulted in isolation of (Cp*H)Rh(bpy)Cl (1), a pentamethylcyclopentadiene complex, formed by C-H bond-forming reductive elimination from the fleeting rhodium hydride. The hydride transfer ability of diene 1 was explored through thermochemistry and hydride transfer reactions, including the reduction of NAD(+). PMID:26949917

  7. Hydrogen-storing hydride complexes

    DOEpatents

    Srinivasan, Sesha S.; Niemann, Michael U.; Goswami, D. Yogi; Stefanakos, Elias K.

    2012-04-10

    A ternary hydrogen storage system having a constant stoichiometric molar ratio of LiNH.sub.2:MgH.sub.2:LiBH.sub.4 of 2:1:1. It was found that the incorporation of MgH.sub.2 particles of approximately 10 nm to 20 nm exhibit a lower initial hydrogen release temperature of 150.degree. C. Furthermore, it is observed that the particle size of LiBNH quaternary hydride has a significant effect on the hydrogen sorption concentration with an optimum size of 28 nm. The as-synthesized hydrides exhibit two main hydrogen release temperatures, one around 160.degree. C. and the other around 300.degree. C., with the main hydrogen release temperature reduced from 310.degree. C. to 270.degree. C., while hydrogen is first reversibly released at temperatures as low as 150.degree. C. with a total hydrogen capacity of 6 wt. % to 8 wt. %. Detailed thermal, capacity, structural and microstructural properties have been demonstrated and correlated with the activation energies of these materials.

  8. Liquid suspensions of reversible metal hydrides

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, J.J.; Grohse, E.W.; Winsche, W.E.

    1983-12-08

    The reversibility of the process M + x/2 H/sub 2/ ..-->.. MH/sub x/, where M is a metal hydride former that forms a hydride MH/sub x/ in the presence of H/sub 2/, generally used to store and recall H/sub 2/, is found to proceed under a liquid, thereby to reduce contamination, provide better temperature control and provide in situ mobility of the reactants. Thus, a slurry of particles of a metal hydride former with an inert solvent is subjected to temperature and pressure controlled atmosphere containing H/sub 2/, to store hydrogen (at high pressures) and to release (at low pressures) previously stored hydrogen. The direction of the flow of the H/sub 2/ through the liquid is dependent upon the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase at a given temperature. When the former is above the equilibrium absorption pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the right, i.e., the metal hydride is formed and hydrogen is stored in the solid particle. When the H/sub 2/ pressure in the gas phase is below the equilibrium dissociation pressure of the respective hydride the reaction proceeds to the left, the metal hydride is decomposed and hydrogen is released into the gas phase.

  9. Hydride heat pump with heat regenerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A regenerative hydride heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system. A series of at least four canisters containing a lower temperature performing hydride and a series of at least four canisters containing a higher temperature performing hydride is provided. Each canister contains a heat conductive passageway through which a heat transfer fluid is circulated so that sensible heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

  10. Method of forming metal hydride films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinberg, R.; Alger, D. L.; Cooper, D. W. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The substrate to be coated (which may be of metal, glass or the like) is cleaned, both chemically and by off-sputtering in a vacuum chamber. In an ultra-high vacuum system, vapor deposition by a sublimator or vaporizer coats a cooled shroud disposed around the substrate with a thin film of hydride forming metal which getters any contaminant gas molecules. A shutter is then opened to allow hydride forming metal to be deposited as a film or coating on the substrate. After the hydride forming metal coating is formed, deuterium or other hydrogen isotopes are bled into the vacuum system and diffused into the metal film or coating to form a hydride of metal film. Higher substrate temperatures and pressures may be used if various parameters are appropriately adjusted.

  11. Sealed aerospace metal-hydride batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coates, Dwaine

    1992-01-01

    Nickel metal hydride and silver metal hydride batteries are being developed for aerospace applications. There is a growing market for smaller, lower cost satellites which require higher energy density power sources than aerospace nickel-cadmium at a lower cost than space nickel-hydrogen. These include small LEO satellites, tactical military satellites and satellite constellation programs such as Iridium and Brilliant Pebbles. Small satellites typically do not have the spacecraft volume or the budget required for nickel-hydrogen batteries. NiCd's do not have adequate energy density as well as other problems such as overcharge capability and memory effort. Metal hydride batteries provide the ideal solution for these applications. Metal hydride batteries offer a number of advantages over other aerospace battery systems.

  12. Metastable Metal Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Graetz, Jason

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of using hydrogen as a reliable energy carrier for both stationary and mobile applications has gained renewed interest in recent years due to improvements in high temperature fuel cells and a reduction in hydrogen production costs. However, a number of challenges remain and new media are needed that are capable of safely storing hydrogen with high gravimetric and volumetric densities. Metal hydrides and complex metal hydrides offer some hope of overcoming these challenges; however, many of the high capacity “reversible” hydrides exhibit a large endothermic decomposition enthalpy making it difficult to release the hydrogen at low temperatures. Onmore » the other hand, the metastable hydrides are characterized by a low reaction enthalpy and a decomposition reaction that is thermodynamically favorable under ambient conditions. The rapid, low temperature hydrogen evolution rates that can be achieved with these materials offer much promise for mobile PEM fuel cell applications. However, a critical challenge exists to develop new methods to regenerate these hydrides directly from the reactants and hydrogen gas. This spotlight paper presents an overview of some of the metastable metal hydrides for hydrogen storage and a few new approaches being investigated to address the key challenges associated with these materials.« less

  13. Red and blue shifted hydridic bonds.

    PubMed

    Jabłoński, Mirosław

    2014-09-15

    By performing MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ ab initio calculations for a large set of dimer systems possessing a R-H hydridic bond involved in diverse types of intermolecular interactions (dihydrogen bonds, hydride halogen bonds, hydride hydrogen bonds, and charge-assisted hydride hydrogen bonds), we show that this is rather an elongation than a shortening that a hydride bond undergoes on interaction. Contrary to what might have been expected on the basis of studies in uniform electric field, this elongation is accompanied by a blue instead of red shift of the R-H stretching vibration frequency. We propose that the "additional" elongation of the R-H hydridic bond results from the significant charge outflow from the sigma bonding orbital of R-H that weakens this bond. The more standard red shift obtained for stronger complexes is explained by means of the Hermansson's formula and the particularly strong electric field produced by the H-acceptor molecule. PMID:25043253

  14. Thin-film metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Remhof, Arndt; Borgschulte, Andreas

    2008-12-01

    The goal of the medieval alchemist, the chemical transformation of common metals into nobel metals, will forever be a dream. However, key characteristics of metals, such as their electronic band structure and, consequently, their electric, magnetic and optical properties, can be tailored by controlled hydrogen doping. Due to their morphology and well-defined geometry with flat, coplanar surfaces/interfaces, novel phenomena may be observed in thin films. Prominent examples are the eye-catching hydrogen switchable mirror effect, the visualization of solid-state diffusion and the formation of complex surface morphologies. Thin films do not suffer as much from embrittlement and/or decrepitation as bulk materials, allowing the study of cyclic absorption and desorption. Therefore, thin-metal hydride films are used as model systems to study metal-insulator transitions, for high throughput combinatorial research or they may be used as indicator layers to study hydrogen diffusion. They can be found in technological applications as hydrogen sensors, in electrochromic and thermochromic devices. In this review, we discuss the effect of hydrogen loading of thin niobium and yttrium films as archetypical examples of a transition metal and a rare earth metal, respectively. Our focus thereby lies on the hydrogen induced changes of the electronic structure and the morphology of the thin films, their optical properties, the visualization and the control of hydrogen diffusion and on the study of surface phenomena and catalysis. PMID:18980236

  15. High H- ionic conductivity in barium hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verbraeken, Maarten C.; Cheung, Chaksum; Suard, Emmanuelle; Irvine, John T. S.

    2015-01-01

    With hydrogen being seen as a key renewable energy vector, the search for materials exhibiting fast hydrogen transport becomes ever more important. Not only do hydrogen storage materials require high mobility of hydrogen in the solid state, but the efficiency of electrochemical devices is also largely determined by fast ionic transport. Although the heavy alkaline-earth hydrides are of limited interest for their hydrogen storage potential, owing to low gravimetric densities, their ionic nature may prove useful in new electrochemical applications, especially as an ionically conducting electrolyte material. Here we show that barium hydride shows fast pure ionic transport of hydride ions (H-) in the high-temperature, high-symmetry phase. Although some conductivity studies have been reported on related materials previously, the nature of the charge carriers has not been determined. BaH2 gives rise to hydride ion conductivity of 0.2 S cm-1 at 630 °C. This is an order of magnitude larger than that of state-of-the-art proton-conducting perovskites or oxide ion conductors at this temperature. These results suggest that the alkaline-earth hydrides form an important new family of materials, with potential use in a number of applications, such as separation membranes, electrochemical reactors and so on.

  16. Computational Study of Metal Hydride Destabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Karl

    2006-03-01

    The safe and efficient on-board storage of hydrogen in fuel cell vehicles is one of the major road-blocks for utilization of hydrogen in transportation. This talk will illustrate the use quantum molecular modeling techniques for investigating atomic- level details of hydrogen storage in new materials. Metal hydrides of period 2 and 3 materials have high volumetric and gravimetric hydrogen storage capacities. However, these materials typically have very high heats of reaction, meaning that high temperatures are required to dissociate the hydrides. Likewise, hydrogenation reactions evolve very large quantities of energy, making thermal management during refueling a impractical. Recent experimental work has focused on chemical destabilization of metal hydrides as a means of decreasing the heats of reaction. We have carried out quantum mechanical calculations, using the electronic density functional theory (DFT) formalism, for various metal hydride systems. The heats of reaction for over 300 different reactions have been computed. We have compared our calculations with experimental and tabulated data where available and find reasonable agreement. Our calculations demonstrate the utility of DFT for screening reactions and for identifying promising materials for further computational and experimental studies. We have also studied the hydration of Mg2Si, a destabilized hydride of MgH2. Experiments have failed to hydrogenate this material in the laboratory under high pressures of H2. We examine adsorption of H2 and dissociation on the Mg2Si(110) surface to see if kinetic limitations are responsible for the failure to observe hydrogenation of this material.

  17. 49 CFR 173.311 - Metal hydride storage systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Metal hydride storage systems. 173.311 Section 173... REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Gases; Preparation and Packaging § 173.311 Metal hydride storage systems. The following packing instruction is applicable to transportable UN Metal hydride storage...

  18. 1. VIEW OF A PORTION OF THE HYDRIDE PROCESSING LABORATORY. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF A PORTION OF THE HYDRIDE PROCESSING LABORATORY. OPERATIONS IN THE GLOVE BOX IN THE BACKGROUND OF THE PHOTOGRAPH INCLUDED HYDRIDING OF PLUTONIUM AND HYDRIDE SEPARATION. IN THE FOREGROUND, THE VACUUM MONITOR CONTROL PANEL MEASURED TEMPERATURES WITHIN THE GLOVEBOX. THE CENTER CONTROL PANEL REGULATED THE FURNACE INSIDE THE GLOVE BOX USED IN THE HYDRIDING PROCESSES. THIS EQUIPMENT WAS ESSENTIAL TO THE HYDRIDING PROCESS, AS WELL AS OTHER GLOVE BOX OPERATIONS. - Rocky Flats Plant, Plutonium Laboratory, North-central section of industrial area at 79 Drive, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  19. Hydridable material for the negative electrode in a nickel-metal hydride storage battery

    DOEpatents

    Knosp, Bernard; Bouet, Jacques; Jordy, Christian; Mimoun, Michel; Gicquel, Daniel

    1997-01-01

    A monophase hydridable material for the negative electrode of a nickel-metal hydride storage battery with a "Lave's phase" structure of hexagonal C14 type (MgZn.sub.2) has the general formula: Zr.sub.1-x Ti.sub.x Ni.sub.a Mn.sub.b Al.sub.c Co.sub.d V.sub.e where ##EQU1##

  20. Ionic hydrogenations of hindered olefins at low temperature. Hydride transfer reactions of transition metal hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, R.M.; Song, J.S. )

    1994-09-21

    Sterically hindered olefins can be hydrogenated at -50[degree]C in dichloromethane using triflic acid (CF[sub 3]SO[sub 3]H) and a hydride donor. Mechanistic studies indicate that these reactions proceed by hydride transfer to the carbenium ion that is formed by protonation of the olefin. Olefins that form tertiary carbenium ions upon protonation are hydrogenated in high yields (90-100%). Styrenes generally produce lower yields of hydrogenated products (50-60%). Suitable hydride donors include HSiE[sub 3] and several transition metal carbonyl hydrides HW(CO)[sub 3]Cp, HW(CO)[sub 3]Cp[sup +], HMo-(CO)[sub 3]Cp, HMn(CO)[sub 5], HRe(CO)[sub 3], and HO[sub 3](CO)[sub 1]Cp*; Cp = [eta][sup 5]-C[sub 3]H[sub 5+], Cp* = [eta][sup 5]-C[sub 5]Me[sub 5]. A characteristic that is required for transition metal hydrides to be effective is that the cationic dihydrides (or dihydrogen complexes) that result from their protonation must have sufficient acidity to transfer a proton to the olefin, as well as sufficient thermal stability to avoid significant decomposition on the time scale of the hydrogenation reaction. Metal hydrides that fall due to insufficient stability of their protonated forms include HMo(CO)[sub 2](PPH[sub 3])Cp, HMo(CO)[sub 3]Cp*, and HFe(CO)[sub 2]Cp*. 62 refs., 2 tabs.

  1. Understanding the Origins of Nucleophilic Hydride Reactivity of a Sodium Hydride-Iodide Composite.

    PubMed

    Hong, Zonghan; Ong, Derek Yiren; Muduli, Subas Kumar; Too, Pei Chui; Chan, Guo Hao; Tnay, Ya Lin; Chiba, Shunsuke; Nishiyama, Yusuke; Hirao, Hajime; Soo, Han Sen

    2016-05-17

    Sodium hydride (NaH) has been commonly used as a Brønsted base in chemical syntheses, while it has rarely been employed to add hydride (H(-) ) to unsaturated electrophiles. We previously developed a procedure to activate NaH through the addition of a soluble iodide source and found that the new NaH-NaI composite can effect even stereoselective nucleophilic hydride reductions of nitriles, imines, and carbonyl compounds. In this work, we report that mixing NaH with NaI or LiI in tetrahydrofuran (THF) as a solvent provides a new inorganic composite, which consists of NaI interspersed with activated NaH, as revealed by powder X-ray diffraction, and both solid-state NMR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. DFT calculations imply that this remarkably simple inorganic composite, which is comprised of NaH and NaI, gains nucleophilic hydridic character similar to covalent hydrides, resulting in unprecedented and unique hydride donor chemical reactivity. PMID:27038135

  2. Metal hydride fuel storage and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D [Martinez, CA; Jankowski, Alan F [Livermore, CA; Yu, Conrad [Antioch, CA

    2009-05-05

    Disclosed herein is a metal hydride fuel storage cartridge having integrated resistive heaters that can be used in conjunction with fuel cells such as MEMS-based fuel cells. The cartridge is fabricated using micromachining methods and thin/thick film materials synthesis techniques.

  3. Metal hydride fuel storage and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Jankowski, Alan F.; Yu, Conrad

    2006-10-17

    Disclosed herein is a metal hydride fuel storage cartridge having integrated resistive heaters that can be used in conjunction with fuel cells such as MEMS-based fuel cells. The cartridge is fabricated using micromachining methods and thin/thick film materials synthesis techniques.

  4. Ductility Evaluation of As-Hydrided and Hydride Reoriented Zircaloy-4 Cladding under Simulated Dry-Storage Condition

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Yong; Plummer, Lee K; Ray, Holly B; Cook, Tyler S; Bilheux, Hassina Z

    2014-01-01

    Pre-storage drying-transfer operations and early stage storage expose cladding to higher temperatures and much higher pressure-induced tensile hoop stresses relative to normal operation in-reactor and pool storage under these conditions. Radial hydrides could precipitate during slow cooling and provide an additional embrittlement mechanism as the cladding temperature decreases below the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature. As a means of simulating this behavior, unirradiated hydrided Zircaloy-4 samples were fabricated by a gas charging method to levels that encompass the range of hydrogen concentrations observed in current used fuel. Mechanical testing was carried out by the ring compression test (RCT) method at various temperatures to evaluate the sample s ductility for both as-hydrided and post-hydride reorientation treated specimens. As-hydrided samples with higher hydrogen concentration (>800 ppm) resulted in lower strain before fracture and reduced maximum load. Increasing RCT temperatures resulted in increased ductility of the as-hydrided cladding. A systematic radial hydride treatment was conducted at various pressures and temperatures for the hydrided samples with H content around 200 ppm. Following the radial hydride treatment, RCTs on the hydride reoriented samples were conducted and exhibited lower ductility compared to as-hydrided samples.

  5. Thermal cycle limits for tritium hydride beds

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.E.

    1992-12-31

    During revision of the Tritium Facility Technical Standards, a thermal cycle limit was added to the {open_quotes}Hydride Vessels{close_quotes} Technical Standard. A limit of 1,000 cycles was added since the metallurgical effect of repeated thermal cycling of the stainless steel hydride beds was not known. Procedures would require modifications to record the number of thermal cycles a bed has experienced during its life-time. The calculations in this report show that the operations of the hydride beds in the Tritium Facilities can experience at least 10,000 thermal cycles. Maximum temperature differences across the walls of the hydride beds were calculated to determine the cycle limits. The calculated temperature differentials were less than 50% of the temperature differentials which would require a 10,000 cycle limit. 10,000 cycles is equivalent to cycling the bed over nine times per day for the next three years or five times per day for the next five years. If the expected number of bed cycles for the beds are to be less than 10,000 cycles, the number of thermal cycles for the beds do not need to be recorded or logged. Not logging or tracking the number of thermal cycles for the beds will greatly reduce the administrative burden of operating these vessels. These results are based ultimately on the pressure drop of nitrogen through the hydride bed cooling coils which is controlled by the liquid nitrogen dewer`s 22 psig relief valve. This 22 psi differential for flow and the conservative assumptions made in the calculations gave maximum temperature differentials less than 50 percent of the values allowed for the 10,000 cycle limit. Changes which would increase the liquid nitrogen supply pressure for the beds would need to be reviewed to verify that the conclusions of this report were to remain valid.

  6. Thermal cycle limits for tritium hydride beds

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    During revision of the Tritium Facility Technical Standards, a thermal cycle limit was added to the [open quotes]Hydride Vessels[close quotes] Technical Standard. A limit of 1,000 cycles was added since the metallurgical effect of repeated thermal cycling of the stainless steel hydride beds was not known. Procedures would require modifications to record the number of thermal cycles a bed has experienced during its life-time. The calculations in this report show that the operations of the hydride beds in the Tritium Facilities can experience at least 10,000 thermal cycles. Maximum temperature differences across the walls of the hydride beds were calculated to determine the cycle limits. The calculated temperature differentials were less than 50% of the temperature differentials which would require a 10,000 cycle limit. 10,000 cycles is equivalent to cycling the bed over nine times per day for the next three years or five times per day for the next five years. If the expected number of bed cycles for the beds are to be less than 10,000 cycles, the number of thermal cycles for the beds do not need to be recorded or logged. Not logging or tracking the number of thermal cycles for the beds will greatly reduce the administrative burden of operating these vessels. These results are based ultimately on the pressure drop of nitrogen through the hydride bed cooling coils which is controlled by the liquid nitrogen dewer's 22 psig relief valve. This 22 psi differential for flow and the conservative assumptions made in the calculations gave maximum temperature differentials less than 50 percent of the values allowed for the 10,000 cycle limit. Changes which would increase the liquid nitrogen supply pressure for the beds would need to be reviewed to verify that the conclusions of this report were to remain valid.

  7. Microstructural study of hydride formation in Zr-1Nb alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neogy, S.; Srivastava, D.; Tewari, R.; Singh, R. N.; Dey, G. K.; Banerjee, S.

    2003-11-01

    Hydriding of Zr-1Nb alloy having a microstructure comprising equiaxed α grains and a uniform distribution of spherical particles of the β-phase has been carried out in this study. The specimens were hydrided by gaseous charging method to different hydrogen levels. The microstructures of hydrided samples were examined as a function of hydrogen content. The formation of δ-hydride in slow cooled specimens and formation of γ-hydride in rapidly cooled specimens has been studied with their morphology, habit plane and orientation relationship with the α matrix in view. The habit planes of either type of hydride phase has been determined and compared with those observed in other Zr-Nb alloys. The orientation relationship between the α matrix and the δ-hydride was found to be the following: (0 0 0 1) α∥( 1¯ 1 1¯) δ and [1 1 2¯ 0] α∥[1 1 0] δ. The orientation relationship between the α matrix and the γ-hydride was of the following type: (0 0 0 1) α∥(0 0 1) γ and [1 2¯ 1 0] α∥[1 1¯ 0] γ. The internal structure of both types of hydride has been examined. The effect of the presence of the spherical β-phase particles in the α matrix on the growth of the hydride plates has been investigated.

  8. METHOD OF FABRICATING A URANIUM-ZIRCONIUM HYDRIDE REACTOR CORE

    DOEpatents

    Weeks, I.F.; Goeddel, W.V.

    1960-03-22

    A method is described of evenly dispersing uranlum metal in a zirconium hydride moderator to produce a fuel element for nuclear reactors. According to the invention enriched uranium hydride and zirconium hydride powders of 200 mesh particle size are thoroughly admixed to form a mixture containing 0.1 to 3% by weight of U/sup 235/ hydride. The mixed powders are placed in a die and pressed at 100 tons per square inch at room temperature. The resultant compacts are heated in a vacuum to 300 deg C, whereby the uranium hydride deoomposes into uranium metal and hydrogen gas. The escaping hydrogen gas forms a porous matrix of zirconium hydride, with uramum metal evenly dispersed therethrough. The advantage of the invention is that the porosity and uranium distribution of the final fuel element can be more closely determined and controlled than was possible using prior methods of producing such fuel ele- ments.

  9. The influence of prior deformation on hydride precipitation in zircolay

    SciTech Connect

    Perovic, V.; Leger, M. . Metallurgical Research Dept.); Weatherly, G.C. ); MacEwen, S.R. )

    1992-02-01

    This paper reports on precipitation of hydrides that has been studied in samples of Zircaloy subjected to prior tensile or compressive deformation before charging with hydrogen. The mean residual stress pattern in the alloys prior to charging was assessed by neutron diffraction techniques and provided a rough guide as to the preferred site of hydride nucleation. Heterogeneous hydride nucleation at grain boundaries or twin boundaries was commonly found in samples subjected to 4% prior deformation, while transgranular hydrides were most frequently observed after a prior 1/2% compressive deformation or an annealing. The local stress state at grain boundary facets or twins is thought to be the deciding factor in determining where hydrides nucleate and how hydride stacks form.

  10. Numerical study of a magnesium hydride tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delhomme, Baptiste; de Rango, Patricia; Marty, Philippe

    2012-11-01

    Hydrogen storage in metal hydride tanks (MHT) is a very promising solution. Several experimental tanks, studied by different teams, have already proved the feasibility and the interesting performances of this solution. However, in much cases, an optimization of tank geometry is still needed in order to perform fast hydrogen loading. The development of efficient numerical tools is a key issue for MHT design and optimization. We propose a simple model representing a metal hydride tank exchanging its heat of reaction with a thermal fluid flow. In this model, the radial and axial discretisations have been decoupled by using Matlab® one-dimensional tools. Calculations are compared to experimental results obtained in a previous study. A good agreement is found for the loading case. The discharging case shows some discrepancies, which are discussed in this paper.

  11. Flow in a metal hydride chromatographic column

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, G.S.

    1990-01-01

    The flow of hydrogen isotopes in a metal hydride chromatographic column is calculated by a one-dimensional finite difference method. The Ergun equation is used to define the gas flow; and equilibrium pressure isotherms are used to define the column holdup. Solid phase loadings are shown to move as a wave front on absorption, but remain more uniform on desorption. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Dissipative hydride precipitates in superconducting niobium cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Romanenko, A.; Cooley, L.D.; Ciovati, G.; Wu, G.; /Argonne

    2011-10-01

    We report the first direct observation of the microstructural features exhibiting RF losses at high surface magnetic fields of above 100 mT in field emission free superconducting niobium cavities. The lossy areas were identified by advanced thermometry. Surface investigations using different techniques were carried out on cutout samples from lossy areas and showed the presence of dendritic niobium hydrides. This finding has possible implications to the mechanisms of RF losses in superconducting niobium at all field levels.

  13. Nickel metal hydride LEO cycle testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, Eric

    1995-01-01

    The George C. Marshall Space Flight Center is working to characterize aerospace AB5 Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH) cells. The cells are being evaluated in terms of storage, low earth orbit (LEO) cycling, and response to parametric testing (high rate charge and discharge, charge retention, pulse current ability, etc.). Cells manufactured by Eagle Picher are the subjects of the evaluation. There is speculation that NiMH cells may become direct replacements for current Nickel Cadmium cells in the near future.

  14. HYDRIDE-RELATED DEGRADATION OF SNF CLADDING UNDER REPOSITORY CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    K. McCoy

    2000-12-12

    The purpose and scope of this analysis/model report is to analyze the degradation of commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) cladding under repository conditions by the hydride-related metallurgical processes, such as delayed hydride cracking (DHC), hydride reorientation and hydrogen embrittlement, thereby providing a better understanding of the degradation process and clarifying which aspects of the process are known and which need further evaluation and investigation. The intended use is as an input to a more general analysis of cladding degradation.

  15. Plasmonic hydrogen sensing with nanostructured metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Wadell, Carl; Syrenova, Svetlana; Langhammer, Christoph

    2014-12-23

    In this review, we discuss the evolution of localized surface plasmon resonance and surface plasmon resonance hydrogen sensors based on nanostructured metal hydrides, which has accelerated significantly during the past 5 years. We put particular focus on how, conceptually, plasmonic resonances can be used to study metal-hydrogen interactions at the nanoscale, both at the ensemble and at the single-nanoparticle level. Such efforts are motivated by a fundamental interest in understanding the role of nanosizing on metal hydride formation processes in the quest to develop efficient solid-state hydrogen storage materials with fast response times, reasonable thermodynamics, and acceptable long-term stability. Therefore, a brief introduction to the thermodynamics of metal hydride formation is also given. However, plasmonic hydrogen sensors not only are of academic interest as research tool in materials science but also are predicted to find more practical use as all-optical gas detectors in industrial and medical applications, as well as in a future hydrogen economy, where hydrogen is used as a carbon free energy carrier. Therefore, the wide range of different plasmonic hydrogen sensor designs already available is reviewed together with theoretical efforts to understand their fundamentals and optimize their performance in terms of sensitivity. In this context, we also highlight important challenges to be addressed in the future to take plasmonic hydrogen sensors from the laboratory to real applications in devices, including poisoning/deactivation of the active materials, sensor lifetime, and cross-sensitivity toward other gas species. PMID:25427244

  16. METAL HYDRIDE HYDROGEN COMPRESSORS: A REVIEW

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman Jr, Robert C; Yartys, Dr. Volodymyr A.; Lototskyy, Dr. Michael V; Pollet, Dr. B.G.

    2014-01-01

    Metal hydride (MH) thermal sorption compression is an efficient and reliable method allowing a conversion of energy from heat into a compressed hydrogen gas. The most important component of such a thermal engine the metal hydride material itself should possess several material features in order to achieve an efficient performance in the hydrogen compression. Apart from the hydrogen storage characteristics important for every solid H storage material (e.g. gravimetric and volumetric efficiency of H storage, hydrogen sorption kinetics and effective thermal conductivity), the thermodynamics of the metal-hydrogen systems is of primary importance resulting in a temperature dependence of the absorption/desorption pressures). Several specific features should be optimized to govern the performance of the MH-compressors including synchronisation of the pressure plateaus for multi-stage compressors, reduction of slope of the isotherms and hysteresis, increase of cycling stability and life time, together with challenges in system design associated with volume expansion of the metal matrix during the hydrogenation. The present review summarises numerous papers and patent literature dealing with MH hydrogen compression technology. The review considers (a) fundamental aspects of materials development with a focus on structure and phase equilibria in the metal-hydrogen systems suitable for the hydrogen compression; and (b) applied aspects, including their consideration from the applied thermodynamic viewpoint, system design features and performances of the metal hydride compressors and major applications.

  17. Materials compatibility and wall stresses in hydride storage beds

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.; Dunn, K.A.; McKillip, S.T.; Bannister, C.E.

    1991-01-01

    Hydrogen isotope handling and storage will be accomplished using solid-state hydride compounds at the Savannah River Site in the new Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF). The hydride powder is contained in a horizontal cylindrical vessel, and the combination of hydride powder, vessel, and associated heating and cooling facilities are termed in a hydride storage bed. The materials compatibility of the storage powder with the stainless steel vessel has been examined, and the stresses developed in the vessel due to expansion of the powder by absorbing hydrogen have been measured.

  18. Materials compatibility and wall stresses in hydride storage beds

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.; Dunn, K.A.; McKillip, S.T.; Bannister, C.E.

    1991-12-31

    Hydrogen isotope handling and storage will be accomplished using solid-state hydride compounds at the Savannah River Site in the new Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF). The hydride powder is contained in a horizontal cylindrical vessel, and the combination of hydride powder, vessel, and associated heating and cooling facilities are termed in a hydride storage bed. The materials compatibility of the storage powder with the stainless steel vessel has been examined, and the stresses developed in the vessel due to expansion of the powder by absorbing hydrogen have been measured.

  19. Storing hydrogen in the form of light alloy hydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, E.; Gillerm, C.

    1981-01-01

    Different hydrides are investigated to find a system with a sufficiently high storage density (at least 3%). The formation of hydrides with light alloys is examined. Reaction kinetics for hydride formation were defined and applied to the systems Mg-Al-H, Mg-Al-Cu-H, Ti-Al-H, Ti-Al-Cu-H, and Ti-Al-Ni-H. Results indicate that the addition of Al destabilizes MgH2 and TiH2 hydrides while having only a limited effect on the storage density.

  20. Materials compatibility of hydride storage materials with austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.

    1992-09-21

    This task evaluated the materials compatibility of LaNi[sub 5-x]Al[sub x] (x= 0.3, 0.75) hydrides and palladium coated kieselguhr with austenitic stainless steel in hydrogen and tritium process environments. Based on observations of retired prototype hydride storage beds and materials exposure testing samples designed for this study, no materials compatibility problem was indicated. Scanning electron microscopy observations of features on stainless steel surfaces after exposure to hydrides are also commonly found on as-received materials before hydriding. These features are caused by either normal heat treating and acid cleaning of stainless steel or reflect the final machining operation.

  1. Materials compatibility of hydride storage materials with austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.

    1992-09-21

    This task evaluated the materials compatibility of LaNi{sub 5-x}Al{sub x} (x= 0.3, 0.75) hydrides and palladium coated kieselguhr with austenitic stainless steel in hydrogen and tritium process environments. Based on observations of retired prototype hydride storage beds and materials exposure testing samples designed for this study, no materials compatibility problem was indicated. Scanning electron microscopy observations of features on stainless steel surfaces after exposure to hydrides are also commonly found on as-received materials before hydriding. These features are caused by either normal heat treating and acid cleaning of stainless steel or reflect the final machining operation.

  2. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR MAKING URANIUM-HYDRIDE COMPACTS

    DOEpatents

    Wellborn, W.; Armstrong, J.R.

    1959-03-10

    A method and apparatus are presented for making compacts of pyrophoric hydrides in a continuous operation out of contact with air. It is particularly useful for the preparation of a canned compact of uranium hydride possessing high density and purity. The metallic uranium is enclosed in a container, positioned in a die body evacuated and nvert the uranium to the hydride is admitted and the container sealed. Heat is applied to bring about the formation of the hydride, following which compression is used to form the compact sealed in a container ready for use.

  3. Materials compatibility of hydride storage materials with austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, E. A.

    1992-09-01

    This task evaluated the materials compatibility of LaNi(5-x)Al(x) (x= 0.3, 0.75) hydrides and palladium coated kieselguhr with austenitic stainless steel in hydrogen and tritium process environments. Based on observations of retired prototype hydride storage beds and materials exposure testing samples designed for this study, no materials compatibility problem was indicated. Scanning electron microscopy observations of features on stainless steel surfaces after exposure to hydrides are also commonly found on as-received materials before hydriding. These features are caused by either normal heat treating and acid cleaning of stainless steel or reflect the final machining operation.

  4. Automation or De-automation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorlach, Igor; Wessel, Oliver

    2008-09-01

    In the global automotive industry, for decades, vehicle manufacturers have continually increased the level of automation of production systems in order to be competitive. However, there is a new trend to decrease the level of automation, especially in final car assembly, for reasons of economy and flexibility. In this research, the final car assembly lines at three production sites of Volkswagen are analysed in order to determine the best level of automation for each, in terms of manufacturing costs, productivity, quality and flexibility. The case study is based on the methodology proposed by the Fraunhofer Institute. The results of the analysis indicate that fully automated assembly systems are not necessarily the best option in terms of cost, productivity and quality combined, which is attributed to high complexity of final car assembly systems; some de-automation is therefore recommended. On the other hand, the analysis shows that low automation can result in poor product quality due to reasons related to plant location, such as inadequate workers' skills, motivation, etc. Hence, the automation strategy should be formulated on the basis of analysis of all relevant aspects of the manufacturing process, such as costs, quality, productivity and flexibility in relation to the local context. A more balanced combination of automated and manual assembly operations provides better utilisation of equipment, reduces production costs and improves throughput.

  5. Process automation

    SciTech Connect

    Moser, D.R.

    1986-01-01

    Process automation technology has been pursued in the chemical processing industries and to a very limited extent in nuclear fuel reprocessing. Its effective use has been restricted in the past by the lack of diverse and reliable process instrumentation and the unavailability of sophisticated software designed for process control. The Integrated Equipment Test (IET) facility was developed by the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) in part to demonstrate new concepts for control of advanced nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. A demonstration of fuel reprocessing equipment automation using advanced instrumentation and a modern, microprocessor-based control system is nearing completion in the facility. This facility provides for the synergistic testing of all chemical process features of a prototypical fuel reprocessing plant that can be attained with unirradiated uranium-bearing feed materials. The unique equipment and mission of the IET facility make it an ideal test bed for automation studies. This effort will provide for the demonstration of the plant automation concept and for the development of techniques for similar applications in a full-scale plant. A set of preliminary recommendations for implementing process automation has been compiled. Some of these concepts are not generally recognized or accepted. The automation work now under way in the IET facility should be useful to others in helping avoid costly mistakes because of the underutilization or misapplication of process automation. 6 figs.

  6. Hydride phase formation in carbon supported palladium hydride nanoparticles by in situ EXAFS and XRD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bugaev, A. L.; Guda, A. A.; Lomachenko, K. A.; Lazzarini, A.; Srabionyan, V. V.; Vitillo, J. G.; Piovano, A.; Groppo, E.; Bugaev, L. A.; Soldatov, A. V.; Dmitriev, V. P.; Pellegrini, R.; van Bokhoven, J. A.; Lamberti, C.

    2016-05-01

    In the current work we present a detailed analysis of the hydride phase formation in industrial Pd/C nanocatalysts by means of combined in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and volumetric measurements for the temperatures from - 10 to 50 °C in the hydrogen pressure range from 0 to 1000 mbar. α- and β- hydride phases are clearly distinguished in XRD. For the first time, H/Pd atomic ratio were obtained by theoretical fitting of the near-edge region of the absorption spectra (XANES) and compared with volumetric measurements.

  7. Automation pilot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    An important concept of the Action Information Management System (AIMS) approach is to evaluate office automation technology in the context of hands on use by technical program managers in the conduct of human acceptance difficulties which may accompany the transition to a significantly changing work environment. The improved productivity and communications which result from application of office automation technology are already well established for general office environments, but benefits unique to NASA are anticipated and these will be explored in detail.

  8. Automated Urinalysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Information from NASA Tech Briefs assisted DiaSys Corporation in the development of the R/S 2000 which automates urinalysis, eliminating most manual procedures. An automatic aspirator is inserted into a standard specimen tube, the "Sample" button is pressed, and within three seconds a consistent amount of urine sediment is transferred to a microscope. The instrument speeds up, standardizes, automates and makes urine analysis safer. Additional products based on the same technology are anticipated.

  9. Metal Hydride Thermal Storage: Reversible Metal Hydride Thermal Storage for High-Temperature Power Generation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    2011-12-05

    HEATS Project: PNNL is developing a thermal energy storage system based on a Reversible Metal Hydride Thermochemical (RMHT) system, which uses metal hydride as a heat storage material. Heat storage materials are critical to the energy storage process. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials during the day and released at night—when the sun is not out—to drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in these materials at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours. PNNL’s metal hydride material can reversibly store heat as hydrogen cycles in and out of the material. In a RHMT system, metal hydrides remain stable in high temperatures (600- 800°C). A high-temperature tank in PNNL’s storage system releases heat as hydrogen is absorbed, and a low-temperature tank stores the heat until it is needed. The low-cost material and simplicity of PNNL’s thermal energy storage system is expected to keep costs down. The system has the potential to significantly increase energy density.

  10. Hydrogen storage in the form of metal hydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwanziger, M. G.; Santana, C. C.; Santos, S. C.

    1984-01-01

    Reversible reactions between hydrogen and such materials as iron/titanium and magnesium/ nickel alloy may provide a means for storing hydrogen fuel. A demonstration model of an iron/titanium hydride storage bed is described. Hydrogen from the hydride storage bed powers a converted gasoline electric generator.

  11. Metal Hydrides for High-Temperature Power Generation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ronnebro, Ewa; Whyatt, Greg A.; Powell, Michael R.; Westman, Matthew P.; Zheng, Feng; Fang, Zhigang Zak

    2015-08-10

    Metal hydrides can be utilized for hydrogen storage and for thermal energy storage (TES) applications. By using TES with solar technologies, heat can be stored from sun energy to be used later which enables continuous power generation. We are developing a TES technology based on a dual-bed metal hydride system, which has a high-temperature (HT) metal hydride operating reversibly at 600-800°C to generate heat as well as a low-temperature (LT) hydride near room temperature that is used for hydrogen storage during sun hours until there is a need to produce electricity, such as during night time, a cloudy day, ormore » during peak hours. We proceeded from selecting a high-energy density, low-cost HT-hydride based on performance characterization on gram size samples, to scale-up to kilogram quantities and design, fabrication and testing of a 1.5kWh, 200kWh/m3 bench-scale TES prototype based on a HT-bed of titanium hydride and a hydrogen gas storage instead of a LT-hydride. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to make performance predictions for cylindrical hydride beds with varying diameters and thermal conductivities. Based on experimental and modeling results, a bench-scale prototype was designed and fabricated and we successfully showed feasibility to meet or exceed all performance targets.« less

  12. Method of making crack-free zirconium hydride

    DOEpatents

    Sullivan, Richard W.

    1980-01-01

    Crack-free hydrides of zirconium and zirconium-uranium alloys are produced by alloying the zirconium or zirconium-uranium alloy with beryllium, or nickel, or beryllium and scandium, or nickel and scandium, or beryllium and nickel, or beryllium, nickel and scandium and thereafter hydriding.

  13. Metal Hydrides for High-Temperature Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Ronnebro, Ewa; Whyatt, Greg A.; Powell, Michael R.; Westman, Matthew P.; Zheng, Feng; Fang, Zhigang Zak

    2015-08-10

    Metal hydrides can be utilized for hydrogen storage and for thermal energy storage (TES) applications. By using TES with solar technologies, heat can be stored from sun energy to be used later which enables continuous power generation. We are developing a TES technology based on a dual-bed metal hydride system, which has a high-temperature (HT) metal hydride operating reversibly at 600-800°C to generate heat as well as a low-temperature (LT) hydride near room temperature that is used for hydrogen storage during sun hours until there is a need to produce electricity, such as during night time, a cloudy day, or during peak hours. We proceeded from selecting a high-energy density, low-cost HT-hydride based on performance characterization on gram size samples, to scale-up to kilogram quantities and design, fabrication and testing of a 1.5kWh, 200kWh/m3 bench-scale TES prototype based on a HT-bed of titanium hydride and a hydrogen gas storage instead of a LT-hydride. COMSOL Multiphysics was used to make performance predictions for cylindrical hydride beds with varying diameters and thermal conductivities. Based on experimental and modeling results, a bench-scale prototype was designed and fabricated and we successfully showed feasibility to meet or exceed all performance targets.

  14. High energy density battery based on complex hydrides

    DOEpatents

    Zidan, Ragaiy

    2016-04-26

    A battery and process of operating a battery system is provided using high hydrogen capacity complex hydrides in an organic non-aqueous solvent that allows the transport of hydride ions such as AlH.sub.4.sup.- and metal ions during respective discharging and charging steps.

  15. Modular hydride beds for mobile applications

    SciTech Connect

    Malinowski, M.E.; Stewart, K.D.

    1997-08-01

    Design, construction, initial testing and simple thermal modeling of modular, metal hydride beds have been completed. Originally designed for supplying hydrogen to a fuel cell on a mobile vehicle, the complete bed design consists of 8 modules and is intended for use on the Palm Desert Vehicle (PDV) under development at the Schatz Energy Center, Humbolt State University. Each module contains approximately 2 kg of a commercially available, low temperature, hydride-forming metal alloy. Waste heat from the fuel cell in the form of heated water is used to desorb hydrogen from the alloy for supplying feed hydrogen to the fuel cell. In order to help determine the performance of such a modular bed system, six modules were constructed and tested. The design and construction of the modules is described in detail. Initial testing of the modules both individually and as a group showed that each module can store {approximately} 30 g of hydrogen (at 165 PSIA fill pressure, 17 C), could be filled with hydrogen in 6 minutes at a nominal, 75 standard liters/min (slm) fueling rate, and could supply hydrogen during desorption at rates of 25 slm, the maximum anticipated hydrogen fuel cell input requirement. Tests made of 5 modules as a group indicated that the behavior of the group run in parallel both in fueling and gas delivery could be directly predicted from the corresponding, single module characteristics by using an appropriate scaling factor. Simple thermal modeling of a module as an array of cylindrical, hydride-filled tubes was performed. The predictions of the model are in good agreement with experimental data.

  16. A novel plating process for microencapsulating metal hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Law, H.H.; Vyas, B.; Zahurak, S.M.; Kammlott, G.W.

    1996-08-01

    One approach to increasing the lifetime of the metal hydride electrode has been the use of conventional electroless plating to produce a coating of copper or nickel on the surface of the metal hydride powders. In this paper, a novel method for microencapsulating the active electrode powders is presented. This new plating technique takes advantage of the reducing power of hydrogen already stored inside the metal hydride to plate a variety of metals onto metal hydride materials. This method greatly simplifies electroless plating for these powders, eliminating the need for stabilizers and additives typically required for conventional electroless plating solutions. Metals that can be electrolessly plated with stored hydrogen have been identified based on thermodynamic considerations. Experimentally, micrometers thick coatings of copper, silver, and nickel have been plated on several metal hydrides.

  17. Electrochemical characteristics of encapsulated metal-hydride-alloy electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, W.H.; Zhang, D.J.; Ke, J.J.

    1996-06-01

    Metal hydride electrodes with copper-encapsulated alloys and non-coated alloys were fabricated using suitable conductive and binding agents. The charge-discharge characteristics of three kinds of hydride electrodes were comparatively investigated. The encapsulated alloy electrode is remarkably superior to the non-coated LaNi{sub 5}-based one, discharging at a high rate and exhibiting a smaller capacity decay at the stage of cycle tests. The hydride alloy quality of hydride electrodes can be effectively determined by measuring rate capability. The results of vented cell experiments confirm that the capacity decay of non-coated alloy electrodes in sealed cells is not due to the oxidation of oxygen from the nickel hydroxide positive electrodes. The relationship between the equilibrium potential of hydride electrode and the equilibrium hydrogen pressure has been deduced by a succinct thermodynamic method, without consideration of the unknown activity of water and fugacity coefficient of hydrogen.

  18. Porous metal hydride composite and preparation and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Steyert, W.A.; Olsen, C.E.

    1980-03-12

    A composite formed from large pieces of aggregate formed from (1) metal hydride (or hydride-former) powder and (2) either metal powder or plastic powder or both is prepared. The composite has large macroscopic interconnected pores (much larger than the sizes of the powders which are used) and will have a very fast heat transfer rate and low windage loss. It will be useful, for example, in heat engines, hydrogen storage devices, and refrigerator components which depend for their utility upon both a fast rate of hydriding and dehydriding. Additionally, a method of preparing the composite and a method of increasing the rates of hydriding and dehydriding of metal hydrides are also given.

  19. Porous metal hydride composite and preparation and uses thereof

    DOEpatents

    Steyert, William A.; Olsen, Clayton E.

    1982-01-01

    A composite formed from large pieces of aggregate formed from (1) metal hydride (or hydride-former) powder and (2) either metal powder or plastic powder or both is prepared. The composite has large macroscopic interconnected pores (much larger than the sizes of the powders which are used) and will have a very fast heat transfer rate and low windage loss. It will be useful, for example, in heat engines, hydrogen storage devices, and refrigerator components which depend for their utility upon both a fast rate of hydriding and dehydriding. Additionally, a method of preparing the composite and a method of increasing the rates of hydriding and dehydriding of metal hydrides are also given.

  20. Metal hydrides for concentrating solar thermal power energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, D. A.; Paskevicius, M.; Humphries, T. D.; Felderhoff, M.; Capurso, G.; Bellosta von Colbe, J.; Dornheim, M.; Klassen, T.; Ward, P. A.; Teprovich, J. A.; Corgnale, C.; Zidan, R.; Grant, D. M.; Buckley, C. E.

    2016-04-01

    The development of alternative methods for thermal energy storage is important for improving the efficiency and decreasing the cost of concentrating solar thermal power. We focus on the underlying technology that allows metal hydrides to function as thermal energy storage (TES) systems and highlight the current state-of-the-art materials that can operate at temperatures as low as room temperature and as high as 1100 °C. The potential of metal hydrides for thermal storage is explored, while current knowledge gaps about hydride properties, such as hydride thermodynamics, intrinsic kinetics and cyclic stability, are identified. The engineering challenges associated with utilising metal hydrides for high-temperature TES are also addressed.

  1. Recent advances in metal hydrides for clean energy applications

    SciTech Connect

    Ronnebro, Ewa; Majzoub, Eric H.

    2013-06-01

    Metal hydrides are a fascinating class of materials that can be utilized for a surprising variety of clean energy applications, including smart solar collectors, smart windows, sensors, thermal energy storage, and batteries, in addition to their traditional application for hydrogen storage. Over the past decade, research on metal hydrides for hydrogen storage increased due to global governmental incentives and an increased focus on hydrogen storage research for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell operation. Tremendous progress has been made in so-called complex metal hydrides for hydrogen storage applications with the discovery of many new hydrides containing covalently bound complex anions. Many of these materials have applications beyond hydrogen storage and are being investigated for lithium-ion battery separator and anode materials. In this issue of MRS Bulletin , we present the state of the art of key evolving metal-hydride-based clean energy technologies with an outlook toward future needs.

  2. Nanostructured Magnesium Hydride for Reversible Hydrogen Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Rango, P.; Chaise, A.; Fruchart, D.; Miraglia, S.; Marty, Ph.

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this work was to develop suitable materials to store hydrogen in a solid state. A systematic investigation of the co-milling process of magnesium hydride with a transition metal was undertaken in order to produce nanostructured and highly reactive powders. The initiating role of the transition metal was evidenced by in situ neutron diffraction experiments. High performances in terms of thermal and mechanical behavior were achieved introducing expanded graphite and compacting the mixture to form composite materials. Absorption and desorption kinetics have been measured versus temperature and H2 pressure.

  3. Development of nickel-metal hydride cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuwajima, Saburo; Kamimori, Nolimits; Nakatani, Kensuke; Yano, Yoshiaki

    1993-01-01

    National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) has conducted the research and development (R&D) of battery cells for space use. A new R&D program about a Nickel-Metal Hydride (Ni-MH) cell for space use from this year, based on good results in evaluations of commercial Ni-MH cells in Tsukuba Space Center (TKSC), was started. The results of those commercial Ni-MH cell's evaluations and recent status about the development of Ni-MH cells for space use are described.

  4. Highly Concentrated Palladium Hydrides/Deuterides; Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Papaconstantopoulos, Dimitrios

    2013-11-26

    Accomplishments are reported in these areas: tight-binding molecular dynamics study of palladium; First-principles calculations and tight-binding molecular dynamics simulations of the palladium-hydrogen system; tight-binding studies of bulk properties and hydrogen vacancies in KBH{sub 4}; tight-binding study of boron structures; development of angular dependent potentials for Pd-H; and density functional and tight-binding calculations for the light-hydrides NaAlH4 and NaBH4

  5. Metal hydride fuel storage and method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Jankowski, Alan F.; Yu, Conrad

    2010-08-10

    An apparatus having a first substrate having (1) a cavity, (2) one or more resistive heaters, and (3) one or more coatings forming a diffusion barrier to hydrogen; a second substrate having (1) an outlet valve comprising a pressure relief structure and (2) one or more coatings forming a diffusion barrier to hydrogen, wherein said second substrate is coupled to said first substrate forming a sealed volume in said cavity; a metal hydride material contained within said cavity; and a gas distribution system formed by coupling a microfluidic interconnect to said pressure relief structure. Additional apparatuses and methods are also disclosed.

  6. Results of NDE Technique Evaluation of Clad Hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis C. Kunerth

    2014-09-01

    This report fulfills the M4 milestone, M4FT-14IN0805023, Results of NDE Technique Evaluation of Clad Hydrides, under Work Package Number FT-14IN080502. During service, zirconium alloy fuel cladding will degrade via corrosion/oxidation. Hydrogen, a byproduct of the oxidation process, will be absorbed into the cladding and eventually form hydrides due to low hydrogen solubility limits. The hydride phase is detrimental to the mechanical properties of the cladding and therefore it is important to be able to detect and characterize the presence of this constituent within the cladding. Presently, hydrides are evaluated using destructive examination. If nondestructive evaluation techniques can be used to detect and characterize the hydrides, the potential exists to significantly increase test sample coverage while reducing evaluation time and cost. To demonstrate the viability this approach, an initial evaluation of eddy current and ultrasonic techniques were performed to demonstrate the basic ability to these techniques to detect hydrides or their effects on the microstructure. Conventional continuous wave eddy current techniques were applied to zirconium based cladding test samples thermally processed with hydrogen gas to promote the absorption of hydrogen and subsequent formation of hydrides. The results of the evaluation demonstrate that eddy current inspection approaches have the potential to detect both the physical damage induced by hydrides, e.g. blisters and cracking, as well as the combined effects of absorbed hydrogen and hydride precipitates on the electrical properties of the zirconium alloy. Similarly, measurements of ultrasonic wave velocities indicate changes in the elastic properties resulting from the combined effects of absorbed hydrogen and hydride precipitates as well as changes in geometry in regions of severe degradation. However, for both approaches, the signal responses intended to make the desired measurement incorporate a number of contributing

  7. Habitat automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swab, Rodney E.

    1992-01-01

    A habitat, on either the surface of the Moon or Mars, will be designed and built with the proven technologies of that day. These technologies will be mature and readily available to the habitat designer. We believe an acceleration of the normal pace of automation would allow a habitat to be safer and more easily maintained than would be the case otherwise. This document examines the operation of a habitat and describes elements of that operation which may benefit from an increased use of automation. Research topics within the automation realm are then defined and discussed with respect to the role they can have in the design of the habitat. Problems associated with the integration of advanced technologies into real-world projects at NASA are also addressed.

  8. Regeneration of Aluminum Hydride Using Trimethylamine

    SciTech Connect

    D Lacina; J Reilly; Y Celebi; J Wegrzyn; J Johnson; J Graetz

    2011-12-31

    Aluminum hydride is an attractive reducing agent and energy storage compound possessing a low decomposition temperature and a high gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen density. However, it is thermodynamically unstable at room temperature and requires extremely high pressures to form the hydride from aluminum and hydrogen gas. Here, we describe an alternate method of synthesizing AlH{sub 3} using Ti-catalyzed Al powder, H{sub 2}, and trimethylamine (TMA) to form an alane adduct. The formation of trimethylamine alane occurs at modest hydrogen pressures ({approx}100 bar), forming the 2:1 bis complex (2 trimethylamine/AlH{sub 3}). Along with the hydrogenation product, mono (1:1) and bis (2:1) standards of TMA-AlH{sub 3} were prepared and characterized using X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of the reaction products showed that the Ti catalyst remains with the unreacted Al powder after hydrogenation and is not present in the alane adduct. We also demonstrate that TMA can be transaminated with triethylamine to form triethylamine alane, which can easily be separated to recover AlH{sub 3}.

  9. Metal hydrides for lithium-ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Oumellal, Y; Rougier, A; Nazri, G A; Tarascon, J-M; Aymard, L

    2008-11-01

    Classical electrodes for Li-ion technology operate via an insertion/de-insertion process. Recently, conversion electrodes have shown the capability of greater capacity, but have so far suffered from a marked hysteresis in voltage between charge and discharge, leading to poor energy efficiency and voltages. Here, we present the electrochemical reactivity of MgH(2) with Li that constitutes the first use of a metal-hydride electrode for Li-ion batteries. The MgH(2) electrode shows a large, reversible capacity of 1,480 mAh g(-1) at an average voltage of 0.5 V versus Li(+)/Li(o) which is suitable for the negative electrode. In addition, it shows the lowest polarization for conversion electrodes. The electrochemical reaction results in formation of a composite containing Mg embedded in a LiH matrix, which on charging converts back to MgH(2). Furthermore, the reaction is not specific to MgH(2), as other metal or intermetallic hydrides show similar reactivity towards Li. Equally promising, the reaction produces nanosized Mg and MgH(2), which show enhanced hydrogen sorption/desorption kinetics. We hope that such findings can pave the way for designing nanoscale active metal elements with applications in hydrogen storage and lithium-ion batteries. PMID:18849978

  10. Pressure-stabilized superconductive yttrium hydrides

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yinwei; Hao, Jian; Liu, Hanyu; Tse, John S.; Wang, Yanchao; Ma, Yanming

    2015-01-01

    The search for high-temperature superconductors has been focused on compounds containing a large fraction of hydrogen, such as SiH4(H2)2, CaH6 and KH6. Through a systematic investigation of yttrium hydrides at different hydrogen contents using an structure prediction method based on the particle swarm optimization algorithm, we have predicted two new yttrium hydrides (YH4 andYH6), which are stable above 110 GPa. Three types of hydrogen species with increased H contents were found, monatomic H in YH3, monatomic H+molecular “H2” in YH4 and hexagonal “H6” unit in YH6. Interestingly, H atoms in YH6 form sodalite-like cage sublattice with centered Y atom. Electron-phonon calculations revealed the superconductive potential of YH4 and YH6 with estimated transition temperatures (Tc) of 84–95 K and 251–264 K at 120 GPa, respectively. These values are higher than the predicted maximal Tc of 40 K in YH3. PMID:25942452

  11. Surface passivation of metal hydrides for applications

    SciTech Connect

    Suda, S.; Li, Z.P.; Sun, Y.M.; Liu, B.H.; Gao, X.P.

    1998-12-31

    Properties and characteristics of hydriding alloys are strongly dependent on surface compositions and morphologies. For instance, oxides such as La{sub 2}O{sub 3} on AB{sub 5} alloys and ZrO{sub 2} on AB{sub 2}, AB, and body-centered-cubic (BCC) alloys act as the barriers for the conversion of molecular and ionic hydrogen to atomic hydrogen at the surface, thus reducing the kinetics in both the gas-solid and electrochemical reactions. Alloy surfaces chemically treated by an aqueous F-ion containing solution have been developed to solve such problems. F-treated surfaces exhibit significantly improved characteristics in regard to the hydrogen uptakes and the protection against impurities and electrolyte solution. In addition, highly conductive metallic Ni layers can be formed on the surface of the alloy particles by the fluorination. The authors report the properties and characteristics of fluorinated hydriding alloys, mainly of a typical AB{sub 2} Laves phase material which represents the difficult activation characteristics and poor long-term durability during electrochemical charge/discharge cycles.

  12. Millimeter-Wave Spectroscopy of Ethylmercury Hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goubet, M.; Motiyenko, R. A.; Margulès, L.; Guillemin, J.-C.

    2012-06-01

    The first millimeter-wave rotational spectrum of an organomercury compound, ethylmercury hydride (CH_3CH_2HgH), has been recorded using the Lille fast-scan spectrometer in the frequency range 120 -- 180 GHz. The spectroscopic study is complemented by quantum chemical calculations taking into account relativistic effects on the mercury atom. The very good agreement between theoretical and experimental molecular parameters validates the chosen ab initio method, in particular its capability to predict the accurate values of the quartic centrifugal distortion constants related to this type of compound. Estimations of the nuclear quadrupole coupling constants are not as predictive as the structural parameters but good enough to satisfy the spectroscopic needs. In addition, the orientation of the H--Hg--C bonds axis deduced from the experimental nuclear quadrupole coupling constants compares well with the corresponding ab initio value. From the good agreement between experimental and theoretical results, together with the observation of the six most abundant isotopes of mercury, ethylmercury hydride is unambiguously identified and its calculated equilibrium geometry is confirmed. Alekseev, E.A. et al. Radio Physics and Radio Astronomy 3 (2012) 78.

  13. Synthesis and hydride transfer reactions of cobalt and nickel hydride complexes to BX3 compounds.

    PubMed

    Mock, Michael T; Potter, Robert G; O'Hagan, Molly J; Camaioni, Donald M; Dougherty, William G; Kassel, W Scott; DuBois, Daniel L

    2011-12-01

    Hydrides of numerous transition metal complexes can be generated by the heterolytic cleavage of H(2) gas such that they offer alternatives to using main group hydrides in the regeneration of ammonia borane, a compound that has been intensely studied for hydrogen storage applications. Previously, we reported that HRh(dmpe)(2) (dmpe = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphinoethane)) was capable of reducing a variety of BX(3) compounds having a hydride affinity (HA) greater than or equal to the HA of BEt(3). This study examines the reactivity of less expensive cobalt and nickel hydride complexes, HCo(dmpe)(2) and [HNi(dmpe)(2)](+), to form B-H bonds. The hydride donor abilities (ΔG(H(-))°) of HCo(dmpe)(2) and [HNi(dmpe)(2)](+) were positioned on a previously established scale in acetonitrile that is cross-referenced with calculated HAs of BX(3) compounds. The collective data guided our selection of BX(3) compounds to investigate and aided our analysis of factors that determine favorability of hydride transfer. HCo(dmpe)(2) was observed to transfer H(-) to BX(3) compounds with X = H, OC(6)F(5), and SPh. The reaction with B(SPh)(3) is accompanied by the formation of dmpe-(BH(3))(2) and dmpe-(BH(2)(SPh))(2) products that follow from a reduction of multiple B-SPh bonds and a loss of dmpe ligands from cobalt. Reactions between HCo(dmpe)(2) and B(SPh)(3) in the presence of triethylamine result in the formation of Et(3)N-BH(2)SPh and Et(3)N-BH(3) with no loss of a dmpe ligand. Reactions of the cationic complex [HNi(dmpe)(2)](+) with B(SPh)(3) under analogous conditions give Et(3)N-BH(2)SPh as the final product along with the nickel-thiolate complex [Ni(dmpe)(2)(SPh)](+). The synthesis and characterization of HCo(dedpe)(2) (dedpe = Et(2)PCH(2)CH(2)PPh(2)) from H(2) and a base is also discussed, including the formation of an uncommon trans dihydride species, trans-[(H)(2)Co(dedpe)(2)][BF(4)]. PMID:22040085

  14. Synthesis and Hydride Transfer Reactions of Cobalt and Nickel Hydride Complexes to BX3 Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Mock, Michael T.; Potter, Robert G.; O'Hagan, Molly J.; Camaioni, Donald M.; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. S.; DuBois, Daniel L.

    2011-12-05

    Hydrides of numerous transition metal complexes can be generated by the heterolytic cleavage of H{sub 2} gas such that they offer alternatives to using main group hydrides in the regeneration of ammonia borane, a compound that has been intensely studied for hydrogen storage applications. Previously, we reported that HRh(dmpe){sub 2}, dmpe = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphinoethane) was capable of reducing a variety of BX{sub 3} compounds having hydride affinity (HA) greater than or equal to HA of BEt{sub 3}. This study examines the reactivity of less expensive cobalt and nickel hydride complexes, (HCo(dmpe){sub 2} and [HNi(dmpe){sub 2}]{sup +}), to form B-H bonds. The hydride donor abilities ({Delta}G{sub H{sup -}}{sup o}) of HCo(dmpe){sub 2} and [HNi(dmpe){sub 2}]{sup +} were positioned on a previously established scale in acetonitrile that is cross-referenced with calculated HAs of BX{sub 3} compounds. The collective data guided our selection of BX{sub 3} compounds to investigate and aided our analysis of factors that determine favorability of hydride transfer. HCo(dmpe){sub 2} was observed to transfer H{sup -} to BX{sub 3} compounds with X = H, OC{sub 6}F{sub 5} and SPh. The reaction with B(SPh){sub 3} is accompanied by formation of (BH{sub 3}){sub 2}-dmpe and (BH{sub 2}SPh){sub 2}-dmpe products that follow from reduction of multiple BSPh bonds and loss of a dmpe ligand from Co. Reactions between HCo(dmpe){sub 2} and B(SPh){sub 3} in the presence of triethylamine result in formation of Et{sub 3}N-BH{sub 2}SPh and Et{sub 3}N-BH{sub 3} with no loss of dmpe ligand. Reactions of the cationic complex [HNi(dmpe){sub 2}]{sup +} with B(SPh){sub 3} under analogous conditions give Et{sub 3}N-BH{sub 2}SPh as the final product along with the nickel-thiolate complex [Ni(dmpe){sub 2}(SPh)]{sup +}. The synthesis and characterization of HCo(dedpe){sub 2} (dedpe = diethyldiphenyl(phosphino)ethane) from H{sub 2} and a base is also discussed; including the formation of an uncommon trans

  15. Synthesis and Hydride Transfer Reactions of Cobalt and Nickel Hydride Complexes to BX₃ Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Mock, Michael T.; Potter, Robert G.; O'Hagan, Molly; Camaioni, Donald M.; Dougherty, William G.; Kassel, W. Scott; DuBois, Daniel L.

    2011-10-31

    Hydrides of numerous transition metal complexes can be generated by the heterolytic cleavage of H₂ gas such that they offer alternatives to using main group hydrides in the regeneration of ammonia borane, a compound that has been intensely studied for hydrogen storage applications. Previously, we reported that HRh(dmpe)₂ (dmpe = 1,2-bis(dimethylphosphinoethane)) was capable of reducing a variety of BX₃ compounds having a hydride affinity (HA) greater than or equal to the HA of BEt₃. This study examines the reactivity of less expensive cobalt and nickel hydride complexes, HCo(dmpe)₂ and [HNi(dmpe)₂]+, to form B–H bonds. The hydride donor abilities (ΔGH °) of HCo(dmpe)₂ and [HNi(dmpe)₂]+ were positioned on a previously established scale in acetonitrile that is cross-referenced with calculated HAs of BX₃ compounds. The collective data guided our selection of BX₃ compounds to investigate and aided our analysis of factors that determine favorability of hydride transfer. HCo(dmpe)₂ was observed to transfer H to BX₃ compounds with X = H, OC₆F₅, and SPh. The reaction with B(SPh)₃ is accompanied by the formation of dmpe-(BH₃)₂ and dmpe-(BH₂(SPh))₂ products that follow from a reduction of multiple B–SPh bonds and a loss of dmpe ligands from cobalt. Reactions between HCo(dmpe)₂ and B(SPh)₃ in the presence of triethylamine result in the formation of Et₃N–BH₂SPh and Et₃N–BH₃ with no loss of a dmpe ligand. Reactions of the cationic complex [HNi(dmpe)₂]+ with B(SPh)₃ under analogous conditions give Et₃N–BH₂SPh as the final product along with the nickel–thiolate complex [Ni(dmpe)₂(SPh)]+. The synthesis and characterization of HCo(dedpe)₂ (dedpe = Et₂PCH₂CH₂PPh₂) from H₂ and a base is also discussed, including the formation of an uncommon trans dihydride species, trans-[(H)₂Co(dedpe)₂][BF₄].

  16. A study of hydriding kinetics of metal hydrides using a physically based model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voskuilen, Tyler G.

    The reaction of hydrogen with metals to form metal hydrides has numerous potential energy storage and management applications. The metal hydrogen system has a high volumetric energy density and is often reversible with a high cycle life. The stored hydrogen can be used to produce energy through combustion, reaction in a fuel cell, or electrochemically in metal hydride batteries. The high enthalpy of the metal-hydrogen reaction can also be used for rapid heat removal or delivery. However, improving the often poor gravimetric performance of such systems through the use of lightweight metals usually comes at the cost of reduced reaction rates or the requirement of pressure and temperature conditions far from the desired operating conditions. In this work, a 700 bar Sievert system was developed at the Purdue Hydrogen Systems Laboratory to study the kinetic and thermodynamic behavior of high pressure hydrogen absorption under near-ambient temperatures. This system was used to determine the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of TiCrMn, an intermetallic metal hydride of interest due to its ambient temperature performance for vehicular applications. A commonly studied intermetallic hydride, LaNi5, was also characterized as a base case for the phase field model. The analysis of the data obtained from such a system necessitate the use of specialized techniques to decouple the measured reaction rates from experimental conditions. These techniques were also developed as a part of this work. Finally, a phase field model of metal hydride formation in mass-transport limited interstitial solute reactions based on the regular solution model was developed and compared with measured kinetics of LaNi5 and TiCrMn. This model aided in the identification of key reaction features and was used to verify the proposed technique for the analysis of gas-solid reaction rates determined volumetrically. Additionally, the phase field model provided detailed quantitative predictions of the

  17. A self-induced stress model for simulating hydride formation at flaws

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, D.R.; Sauve, R.G.

    1996-12-01

    Formation of hydride at stress concentrations occurs in some materials as part of a stable cracking mechanism called delayed hydride cracking (DHC). As hydrogen combines with matrix material to become hydride, transformation strain is accommodated by local redistribution of stress. Since stress gradients drive hydrogen diffusion, this self-induced stress alters the conditions for subsequent hydride growth, and conditions required to fracture the hydrided material. A numerical model, using the finite element method, has been developed which couples the effect of stress driven hydrogen diffusion, and stress due to applied loads and hydride formation. Strong nonlinearities in this problem are solved effectively by a unique adaptation of the dynamic relaxation method. The simulation provides the volume fraction distribution of hydride, and the corresponding stress distribution. Application of the model to hydride formation at sharp and blunt flaws predicts hydride distribution shapes that are in good agreement with hydrides observed in experiments.

  18. The development of metal hydrides using as concentrating solar thermal storage materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Xuanhui; Li, Yang; Li, Ping; Wan, Qi; Zhai, Fuqiang

    2015-12-01

    Metal hydrides high temperature thermal heat storage technique has great promising future prospects in solar power generation, industrial waste heat utilization and peak load regulating of power system. This article introduces basic principle of metal hydrides for thermal storage, and summarizes developments in advanced metal hydrides high-temperature thermal storage materials, numerical simulation and thermodynamic calculation in thermal storage systems, and metal hydrides thermal storage prototypes. Finally, the future metal hydrides high temperature thermal heat storage technique is been looked ahead.

  19. Molecular rare-earth-metal hydrides in non-cyclopentadienyl environments.

    PubMed

    Fegler, Waldemar; Venugopal, Ajay; Kramer, Mathias; Okuda, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Molecular hydrides of the rare-earth metals play an important role as homogeneous catalysts and as counterparts of solid-state interstitial hydrides. Structurally well-characterized non-metallocene-type hydride complexes allow the study of elementary reactions that occur at rare-earth-metal centers and of catalytic reactions involving bonds between rare-earth metals and hydrides. In addition to neutral hydrides, cationic derivatives have now become available. PMID:25413985

  20. Automating Finance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, John

    2007-01-01

    In past years, higher education's financial management side has been riddled with manual processes and aging mainframe applications. This article discusses schools which had taken advantage of an array of technologies that automate billing, payment processing, and refund processing in the case of overpayment. The investments are well worth it:…

  1. Automated dispenser

    SciTech Connect

    Hollen, R.M.; Stalnaker, N.D.

    1989-04-06

    An automated dispenser having a conventional pipette attached to an actuating cylinder through a flexible cable for delivering precise quantities of a liquid through commands from remotely located computer software. The travel of the flexible cable is controlled by adjustable stops and a locking shaft. The pipette can be positioned manually or by the hands of a robot. 1 fig.

  2. Structural Characterization of Metal Hydrides for Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Lyci

    Hydrogen can be an unlimited source of clean energy for future because of its very high energy density compared to the conventional fuels like gasoline. An efficient and safer way of storing hydrogen is in metals and alloys as hydrides. Light metal hydrides, alanates and borohydrides have very good hydrogen storage capacity, but high operation temperatures hinder their application. Improvement of thermodynamic properties of these hydrides is important for their commercial use as a source of energy. Application of pressure on materials can have influence on their properties favoring hydrogen storage. Hydrogen desorption in many complex hydrides occurs above the transition temperature. Therefore, it is important to study the physical properties of the hydride compounds at ambient and high pressure and/or high temperature conditions, which can assist in the design of suitable storage materials with desired thermodynamic properties. The high pressure-temperature phase diagram, thermal expansion and compressibility have only been evaluated for a limited number of hydrides so far. This situation serves as a main motivation for studying such properties of a number of technologically important hydrides. Focus of this dissertation was on X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy studies of Mg2FeH6, Ca(BH4) 2, Mg(BH4)2, NaBH4, NaAlH4, LiAlH4, LiNH2BH3 and mixture of MgH 2 with AlH3 or Si, at different conditions of pressure and temperature, to obtain their bulk modulus and thermal expansion coefficient. These data are potential source of information regarding inter-atomic forces and also serve as a basis for developing theoretical models. Some high pressure phases were identified for the complex hydrides in this study which may have better hydrogen storage properties than the ambient phase. The results showed that the highly compressible B-H or Al-H bonds and the associated bond disordering under pressure is responsible for phase transitions observed in brorohydrides or

  3. Technical and economic aspects of hydrogen storage in metal hydrides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, R.

    1981-01-01

    The recovery of hydrogen from such metal hydrides as LiH, MgH2, TiH2, CaH2 and FeTiH compounds is studied, with the aim of evaluating the viability of the technique for the storage of hydrogen fuel. The pressure-temperature dependence of the reactions, enthalpies of formation, the kinetics of the hydrogen absorption and desorption, and the mechanical and chemical stability of the metal hydrides are taken into account in the evaluation. Economic aspects are considered. Development of portable metal hydride hydrogen storage reservoirs is also mentioned.

  4. Finite difference program for calculating hydride bed wall temperature profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.E.

    1992-10-29

    A QuickBASIC finite difference program was written for calculating one dimensional temperature profiles in up to two media with flat, cylindrical, or spherical geometries. The development of the program was motivated by the need to calculate maximum temperature differences across the walls of the Tritium metal hydrides beds for thermal fatigue analysis. The purpose of this report is to document the equations and the computer program used to calculate transient wall temperatures in stainless steel hydride vessels. The development of the computer code was motivated by the need to calculate maximum temperature differences across the walls of the hydrides beds in the Tritium Facility for thermal fatigue analysis.

  5. The Hydriding Kinetics of Organic Hydrogen Getters

    SciTech Connect

    Powell, G. L.

    2002-02-11

    The aging of hermetically sealed systems is often accompanied by the gradual production of hydrogen gas that is a result of the decay of environmental gases and the degradation of organic materials. In particular, the oxygen, water, hydrogen ''equilibrium'' is affected by the removal of oxygen due the oxidation of metals and organic materials. This shift of the above ''equilibrium'' towards the formation of hydrogen gas, particularly in crevices, may eventually reach an explosive level of hydrogen gas or degrade metals by hydriding them. The latter process is generally delayed until the oxidizing species are significantly reduced. Organic hydrogen getters introduced by Allied Signal Aerospace Company, Kansas City Division have proven to be a very effective means of preventing hydrogen gas accumulation in sealed containers. These getters are relatively unaffected by air and environmental gases. They can be packaged in a variety of ways to fit particular needs such as porous pellets, fine or coarse [gravel] powder, or loaded into silicone rubber. The hydrogen gettering reactions are extremely irreversible since the hydrogen gas is converted into an organic hydrocarbon. These getters are based on the palladium-catalyzed hydrogenation of triple bonds to double and then single bonds in aromatic aryl compounds. DEB (1,4 bis (phenyl ethynyl) benzene) typically mixed with 25% by weight carbon with palladium (1% by weight of carbon) is one of the newest and best of these organic hydrogen getters. The reaction mechanisms are complex involving solid state reaction with a heterogeneous catalyst leading to the many intermediates, including mixed alkyl and aryl hydrocarbons with the possibilities of many isomers. The reaction kinetics mechanisms are also strongly influenced by the form in which they are packaged. For example, the hydriding rates for pellets and gravel have a strong dependence on reaction extent (i.e., DEB reduction) and a kinetic order in pressure of 0

  6. Synthesis and some reactions of dibutyltin (S)- and (R)-camphorsulfonyl hydrides.

    PubMed

    Kinart, Wojciech J; Kinart, Cezary M; Kozak, Monika; Kinart, Andrzej; Sendecki, Marcin; Matczak, Piotr

    2009-08-01

    The synthesis and physical properties of dibutyltin (S)-camphorsulfonyl hydride (1) and dibutyltin (R)-camphorsulfonyl hydride (2), and diphenyltin (S)-camphorsulfonyl hydride (3) as well as that of their organotin precursors are described. Their reactivity with different amines as triethylamine, morpholine and pyridine has been compared with other mixed hydrides as dibutyltin chloride hydride, dibutyltin acetate hydride and dibutyltin dihydride. It has been studied also the possibility of using of dibutyltin (R)- or (S)-camphorsulfonyl hydrides for the stereoselective reduction of different ketones as acetophenone, menthon, camphor and cyclopropyl-(4-metoxyphenyl)-methanone. The reduction of acetophenone with studied camphorsulfonyl hydrides carried out in benzene at room temperature afforded 1-phenylethanol with relatively low enantioselectivity. Addition of 10 equiv. of MnCl(2)*4H(2)O or ZnCl(2) to the reduction mixture involving dibutyltin (S)-camphorsulfonyl hydride (1) and acetophenone and carried out in methanol and tetrahydrofuran, respectively, resulted in remarkable increase in enantioselectivity. The comparative kinetic studies of reduction of acetophenone by different hydrides proved that dibutyltin camphorsulfonyl hydride is significantly more reactive in comparison with dibutyltin chloro hydride and dibutyltin acetate hydride. Analogous results have been obtained from kinetic studies for different tin hydrides with chosen amines. The outcome of these studies supported by theoretical calculations led to the conclusion that the order of reactivity of the studied hydrides correlates with the rate of their homolytic decomposition at room temperature. PMID:19531015

  7. Zirconium Hydride Space Power Reactor design.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asquith, J. G.; Mason, D. G.; Stamp, S.

    1972-01-01

    The Zirconium Hydride Space Power Reactor being designed and fabricated at Atomics International is intended for a wide range of potential applications. Throughout the program a series of reactor designs have been evaluated to establish the unique requirements imposed by coupling with various power conversion systems and for specific applications. Current design and development emphasis is upon a 100 kilowatt thermal reactor for application in a 5 kwe thermoelectric space power generating system, which is scheduled to be fabricated and ground tested in the mid 70s. The reactor design considerations reviewed in this paper will be discussed in the context of this 100 kwt reactor and a 300 kwt reactor previously designed for larger power demand applications.

  8. Process for production of a metal hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Nathan Tait; Butterick, III, Robert; Chin, Arthur Achhing; Millar, Dean Michael; Molzahn, David Craig

    2014-08-12

    A process for production of a metal hydride compound MH.sub.x, wherein x is one or two and M is an alkali metal, Be or Mg. The process comprises combining a compound of formula (R.sup.1O).sub.xM with aluminum, hydrogen and at least one metal selected from among titanium, zirconium, hafnium, niobium, vanadium, tantalum and iron to produce a compound of formula MH.sub.x. R.sup.1 is phenyl or phenyl substituted by at least one alkyl or alkoxy group. A mole ratio of aluminum to (R.sup.1O).sub.xM is from 0.1:1 to 1:1. The catalyst is present at a level of at least 200 ppm based on weight of aluminum.

  9. Novel Hydride Transfer Catalysis for Carbohydrate Conversions

    SciTech Connect

    Holladay, John E.; Brown, Heather M.; Appel, Aaron M.; Zhang, Z. Conrad

    2008-04-03

    5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), an important versatile sugar derivative has been synthesized from glucose using catalytic amounts of CrCl2 in 1-ethyl-3-methylimidizolium chloride. Glycerol and glyceraldehyde were tested as sugar model compounds. Glycerol is unreactive and does not interfere with glucose conversion. Glyceraldehyde is reactive and does interfere with glucose conversion in competitive experiments. MnCl2 or FeCl2 catalyze dehydration of glyceraldehyde dimer to form compound I, a cyclic hemiacetal with an exocyclic double bond. Upon aqueous work-up I forms pyruvaldehyde. CrCl2 or VCl3 further catalyze a hydride transfer of I to form lactide. Upon aqueous work-up lactide is converted to lactic acid.

  10. Ni/metal hydride secondary element

    DOEpatents

    Bauerlein, Peter

    2005-04-19

    A Ni/metal hydride secondary element having a positive nickel hydroxide electrode, a negative electrode having a hydrogen storage alloy, and an alkaline electrolyte, the positive electrode, provided with a three-dimensional metallic conductive structure, also contains an aluminum compound which is soluble in the electrolyte, in addition to nickel hydroxide and cobalt oxide. The aluminum compound is aluminum hydroxide and/or aluminum oxide, and the mass of the aluminum compound which is present in the positive bulk material mixture is 0.1 to 2% by weight relative to the mass of the nickel hydroxide which is present. In combination with aluminum hydroxide or aluminum oxide, the positive electrode further contains lanthanoid oxidic compounds Y.sub.2 O.sub.3, La.sub.2 O.sub.3 and Ca(OH).sub.2, as well as mixtures of these compounds.

  11. Hydrogen storage in sodium aluminum hydride.

    SciTech Connect

    Ozolins, Vidvuds; Herberg, J.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); McCarty, Kevin F.; Maxwell, Robert S. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA); Stumpf, Roland Rudolph; Majzoub, Eric H.

    2005-11-01

    Sodium aluminum hydride, NaAlH{sub 4}, has been studied for use as a hydrogen storage material. The effect of Ti, as a few mol. % dopant in the system to increase kinetics of hydrogen sorption, is studied with respect to changes in lattice structure of the crystal. No Ti substitution is found in the crystal lattice. Electronic structure calculations indicate that the NaAlH{sub 4} and Na{sub 3}AlH{sub 6} structures are complex-ionic hydrides with Na{sup +} cations and AlH{sub 4}{sup -} and AlH{sub 6}{sup 3-} anions, respectively. Compound formation studies indicate the primary Ti-compound formed when doping the material at 33 at. % is TiAl{sub 3} , and likely Ti-Al compounds at lower doping rates. A general study of sorption kinetics of NaAlH{sub 4}, when doped with a variety of Ti-halide compounds, indicates a uniform response with the kinetics similar for all dopants. NMR multiple quantum studies of solution-doped samples indicate solvent interaction with the doped alanate. Raman spectroscopy was used to study the lattice dynamics of NaAlH{sub 4}, and illustrated the molecular ionic nature of the lattice as a separation of vibrational modes between the AlH{sub 4}{sup -} anion-modes and lattice-modes. In-situ Raman measurements indicate a stable AlH{sub 4}{sup -} anion that is stable at the melting temperature of NaAlH{sub 4}, indicating that Ti-dopants must affect the Al-H bond strength.

  12. Nonaqueous actinide hydride dissolution and production of actinide $beta$- diketonates

    DOEpatents

    Crisler, L.R.

    1975-11-11

    Actinide beta-diketonate complex molecular compounds are produced by reacting a beta-diketone compound with a hydride of the actinide material in a mixture of carbon tetrachloride and methanol. (auth)

  13. Process for massively hydriding zirconium--uranium fuel elements

    DOEpatents

    Katz, N.H.

    1973-12-01

    A method is described of hydriding uranium-zirconium alloy by heating the alloy in a vacuum, introducing hydrogen and maintaining an elevated temperature until occurrence of the beta--delta phase transformation and isobarically cooling the composition. (Official Gazette)

  14. Self-Consistent-Field Calculation on Lithium Hydride for Undergraduates.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rioux, Frank; Harriss, Donald K.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a self-consistent-field-linear combination of atomic orbitals-molecular orbital calculation on the valence electrons of lithium hydride using the method of Roothaan. This description is intended for undergraduate physics students.

  15. Precipitation of hydrides in high purity niobium after different treatments

    SciTech Connect

    Barkov, F.; Romanenko, A.; Trenikhina, Y.; Grassellino, A.

    2013-01-01

    Precipitation of lossy non-superconducting niobium hydrides represents a known problem for high purity niobium in superconducting applications. Using cryogenic optical and laser confocal scanning microscopy we have directly observed surface precipitation and evolution of niobium hydrides in samples after different treatments used for superconducting RF cavities for particle acceleration. Precipitation is shown to occur throughout the sample volume, and the growth of hydrides is well described by the fast diffusion-controlled process in which almost all hydrogen is precipitated at $T=140$~K within $\\sim30$~min. 120$^{\\circ}$C baking and mechanical deformation are found to affect hydride precipitation through their influence on the number of nucleation and trapping centers.

  16. Bipolar Nickel-Metal Hydride Battery Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzo, Michelle A.

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has contracted with Electro Energy, Inc., to develop a bipolar nickel-metal hydride battery design for energy storage on low-Earth-orbit satellites. The objective of the bipolar nickel-metal hydride battery development program is to approach advanced battery development from a systems level while incorporating technology advances from the lightweight nickel electrode field, hydride development, and design developments from nickel-hydrogen systems. This will result in a low-volume, simplified, less-expensive battery system that is ideal for small spacecraft applications. The goals of the program are to develop a 1-kilowatt, 28-volt (V), bipolar nickel-metal hydride battery with a specific energy of 100 watt-hours per kilogram (W-hr/kg), an energy density of 250 W-hr/liter and a 5-year life in low Earth orbit at 40-percent depth-of-discharge.

  17. Metal hydrides as negative electrode materials for Ni- MH batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yartys, V.; Noreus, D.; Latroche, M.

    2016-01-01

    Structural, thermodynamical and electrochemical properties of metallic hydrides belonging to the pseudo-binary family A-Mg-Ni ( A: rare earths) are reviewed and compared. Technology aspects of bipolar cells are also discussed.

  18. Method of selective reduction of polyhalosilanes with alkyltin hydrides

    DOEpatents

    Sharp, Kenneth G.; D'Errico, John J.

    1989-01-01

    The invention relates to the selective and stepwise reduction of polyhalosilanes by reacting at room temperature or below with alkyltin hydrides without the use of free radical intermediates. Alkyltin hydrides selectively and stepwise reduce the Si--Br, Si--Cl, or Si--I bonds while leaving intact any Si--F bonds. When two or more different halogens are present on the polyhalosilane, the halogen with the highest atomic weight is preferentially reduced.

  19. Development of a metal hydride electrode waste treatment process

    SciTech Connect

    Bianco, J.C.; Martin, D.; Ansart, F.; Castillo, S.

    1999-12-01

    Manufacturing residues of metal hydride electrodes for nickel - metal hydride batteries were chemically processed to recover the metal part and heat treated for the organic part. Chemical recovery yielded Ni-Co alloy after electrolysis of the solution and hydroxides of other metal, mainly rare earths. The organic part, pyrolyzed at 700 C, led to separation between carbon and fluorinated matter. Infrared coupling at the output of the pyrolysis furnace was used to identify the pyrolysis gases.

  20. Development of the Low-Pressure Hydride/Dehydride Process

    SciTech Connect

    Rueben L. Gutierrez

    2001-04-01

    The low-pressure hydride/dehydride process was developed from the need to recover thin-film coatings of plutonium metal from the inner walls of an isotope separation chamber located at Los Alamos and to improve the safety operation of a hydride recovery process using hydrogen at a pressure of 0.7 atm at Rocky Flats. This process is now the heart of the Advanced Recovery and Integrated Extraction System (ARIES) project.

  1. Solid-state gadolinium{endash}magnesium hydride optical switch

    SciTech Connect

    Armitage, R.; Rubin, M.; Richardson, T.; OBrien, N.; Chen, Y.

    1999-09-01

    The optical switching properties of gadolinium{endash}magnesium hydride have been demonstrated in a solid-state electrochromic device. With positive polarization of the hydride electrode, the visible reflectance approaches 35{percent} with virtually zero transmission, while with negative polarization, the visible transmission exceeds 25{percent} at 650 nm. The switching is reversible, with intermediate optical properties between the transparent and reflecting states. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  2. Method of selective reduction of halodisilanes with alkyltin hydrides

    DOEpatents

    D'Errico, John J.; Sharp, Kenneth G.

    1989-01-01

    The invention relates to the selective and sequential reduction of halodisilanes by reacting these compounds at room temperature or below with trialkyltin hydrides or dialkyltin dihydrides without the use of free radical intermediates. The alkyltin hydrides selectively and sequentially reduce the Si-Cl, Si-Br or Si-I bonds while leaving intact the Si-Si and Si-F bonds present.

  3. AIR PASSIVATION OF METAL HYDRIDE BEDS FOR WASTE DISPOSAL

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J; R. H. Hsu, R

    2007-07-02

    Metal hydride beds offer compact, safe storage of tritium. After metal hydride beds have reached the end of their useful life, the beds will replaced with new beds and the old beds prepared for disposal. One acceptance criteria for hydride bed waste disposal is that the material inside the bed not be pyrophoric. To determine the pyrophoric nature of spent metal hydride beds, controlled air ingress tests were performed. A simple gas handling manifold fitted with pressure transducers and a calibrated volume were used to introduce controlled quantities of air into a metal hydride bed and the bed temperature rise monitored for reactivity with the air. A desorbed, 4.4 kg titanium prototype hydride storage vessel (HSV) produced a 4.4 C internal temperature rise upon the first air exposure cycle and a 0.1 C temperature rise upon a second air exposure. A total of 346 scc air was consumed by the bed (0.08 scc per gram Ti). A desorbed, 9.66 kg LaNi{sub 4.25}Al{sub 0.75} prototype storage bed experienced larger temperature rises over successive cycles of air ingress and evacuation. The cycles were performed over a period of days with the bed effectively passivated after the 12th cycle. Nine to ten STP-L of air reacted with the bed producing both oxidized metal and water.

  4. Tellurium Hydrides at High Pressures: High-Temperature Superconductors.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xin; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Jurong; Liu, Hanyu; Zhang, Shoutao; Song, Hai-Feng; Yang, Guochun; Zhang, Lijun; Ma, Yanming

    2016-02-01

    Observation of high-temperature superconductivity in compressed sulfur hydrides has generated an irresistible wave of searches for new hydrogen-containing superconductors. We herein report the prediction of high-T_{c} superconductivity in tellurium hydrides stabilized at megabar pressures identified by first-principles calculations in combination with a swarm structure search. Although tellurium is isoelectronic to sulfur or selenium, its heavier atomic mass and weaker electronegativity makes tellurium hydrides fundamentally distinct from sulfur or selenium hydrides in stoichiometries, structures, and chemical bondings. We identify three metallic stoichiometries of H_{4}Te, H_{5}Te_{2}, and HTe_{3}, which are not predicted or known stable structures for sulfur or selenium hydrides. The two hydrogen-rich H_{4}Te and H_{5}Te_{2} phases are primarily ionic and contain exotic quasimolecular H_{2} and linear H_{3} units, respectively. Their high-T_{c} (e.g., 104 K for H_{4}Te at 170 GPa) superconductivity originates from the strong electron-phonon couplings associated with intermediate-frequency H-derived wagging and bending modes, a superconducting mechanism which differs substantially with those in sulfur or selenium hydrides where the high-frequency H-stretching vibrations make considerable contributions. PMID:26894729

  5. Optimization of Hydride Rim Formation in Unirradiated Zr 4 Cladding

    SciTech Connect

    Shimskey, Rick W.; Hanson, Brady D.; MacFarlan, Paul J.

    2013-09-30

    The purpose of this work is to build on the results reported in the M2 milestone M2FT 13PN0805051, document number FCRD-USED-2013-000151 (Hanson, 2013). In that work, it was demonstrated that unirradiated samples of zircaloy-4 cladding could be pre-hydrided at temperatures below 400°C in pure hydrogen gas and that the growth of hydrides on the surface could be controlled by changing the surface condition of the samples and form a desired hydride rim on the outside diameter of the cladding. The work performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory since the issuing of the M2 milestone has focused its efforts to optimize the formation of a hydride rim on available zircaloy-4 cladding samples by controlling temperature variation and gas flow control during pre-hydriding treatments. Surface conditioning of the outside surface was also examined as a variable. The results of test indicate that much of the variability in the hydride thickness is due to temperature variation occurring in the furnaces as well as how hydrogen gas flows across the sample surface. Efforts to examine other alloys, gas concentrations, and different surface conditioning plan to be pursed in the next FY as more cladding samples become available

  6. Tellurium Hydrides at High Pressures: High-Temperature Superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xin; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Jurong; Liu, Hanyu; Zhang, Shoutao; Song, Hai-Feng; Yang, Guochun; Zhang, Lijun; Ma, Yanming

    2016-02-01

    Observation of high-temperature superconductivity in compressed sulfur hydrides has generated an irresistible wave of searches for new hydrogen-containing superconductors. We herein report the prediction of high-Tc superconductivity in tellurium hydrides stabilized at megabar pressures identified by first-principles calculations in combination with a swarm structure search. Although tellurium is isoelectronic to sulfur or selenium, its heavier atomic mass and weaker electronegativity makes tellurium hydrides fundamentally distinct from sulfur or selenium hydrides in stoichiometries, structures, and chemical bondings. We identify three metallic stoichiometries of H4Te , H5Te2 , and HTe3 , which are not predicted or known stable structures for sulfur or selenium hydrides. The two hydrogen-rich H4Te and H5Te2 phases are primarily ionic and contain exotic quasimolecular H2 and linear H3 units, respectively. Their high-Tc (e.g., 104 K for H4Te at 170 GPa) superconductivity originates from the strong electron-phonon couplings associated with intermediate-frequency H-derived wagging and bending modes, a superconducting mechanism which differs substantially with those in sulfur or selenium hydrides where the high-frequency H-stretching vibrations make considerable contributions.

  7. A quantitative phase field model for hydride precipitation in zirconium alloys: Part II. Modeling of temperature dependent hydride precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Zhihua; Hao, Mingjun; Guo, Xianghua; Tang, Guoyi; Shi, San-Qiang

    2015-04-01

    A quantitative free energy functional developed in Part I (Shi and Xiao, 2014 [1]) was applied to model temperature dependent δ-hydride precipitation in zirconium in real time and real length scale. At first, the effect of external tensile load on reorientation of δ-hydrides was calibrated against experimental observations, which provides a modification factor for the strain energy in free energy formulation. Then, two types of temperature-related problems were investigated. In the first type, the effect of temperature transient was studied by cooling the Zr-H system at different cooling rates from high temperature while an external tensile stress was maintained. At the end of temperature transients, the average hydride size as a function of cooling rate was compared to experimental data. In the second type, the effect of temperature gradients was studied in a one or two dimensional temperature field. Different boundary conditions were applied. The results show that the hydride precipitation concentrated in low temperature regions and that it eventually led to the formation of hydride blisters in zirconium. A brief discussion on how to implement the hysteresis of hydrogen solid solubility on hydride precipitation and dissolution in the developed phase field scheme is also presented.

  8. Automated lithocell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englisch, Andreas; Deuter, Armin

    1990-06-01

    Integration and automation have gained more and more ground in modern IC-manufacturing. It is difficult to make a direct calculation of the profit these investments yield. On the other hand, the demands to man, machine and technology have increased enormously of late; it is not difficult to see that only by means of integration and automation can these demands be coped with. Here are some salient points: U the complexity and costs incurred by the equipment and processes have got significantly higher . owing to the reduction of all dimensions, the tolerances within which the various process steps have to be carried out have got smaller and smaller and the adherence to these tolerances more and more difficult U the cycle time has become more and more important both for the development and control of new processes and, to a great extent, for a rapid and reliable supply to the customer. In order that the products be competitive under these conditions, all sort of costs have to be reduced and the yield has to be maximized. Therefore, the computer-aided control of the equipment and the process combined with an automatic data collection and a real-time SPC (statistical process control) has become absolutely necessary for successful IC-manufacturing. Human errors must be eliminated from the execution of the various process steps by automation. The work time set free in this way makes it possible for the human creativity to be employed on a larger scale in stabilizing the processes. Besides, a computer-aided equipment control can ensure the optimal utilization of the equipment round the clock.

  9. Chemical Hydride Slurry for Hydrogen Production and Storage

    SciTech Connect

    McClaine, Andrew W

    2008-09-30

    The purpose of this project was to investigate and evaluate the attractiveness of using a magnesium chemical hydride slurry as a hydrogen storage, delivery, and production medium for automobiles. To fully evaluate the potential for magnesium hydride slurry to act as a carrier of hydrogen, potential slurry compositions, potential hydrogen release techniques, and the processes (and their costs) that will be used to recycle the byproducts back to a high hydrogen content slurry were evaluated. A 75% MgH2 slurry was demonstrated, which was just short of the 76% goal. This slurry is pumpable and storable for months at a time at room temperature and pressure conditions and it has the consistency of paint. Two techniques were demonstrated for reacting the slurry with water to release hydrogen. The first technique was a continuous mixing process that was tested for several hours at a time and demonstrated operation without external heat addition. Further work will be required to reduce this design to a reliable, robust system. The second technique was a semi-continuous process. It was demonstrated on a 2 kWh scale. This system operated continuously and reliably for hours at a time, including starts and stops. This process could be readily reduced to practice for commercial applications. The processes and costs associated with recycling the byproducts of the water/slurry reaction were also evaluated. This included recovering and recycling the oils of the slurry, reforming the magnesium hydroxide and magnesium oxide byproduct to magnesium metal, hydriding the magnesium metal with hydrogen to form magnesium hydride, and preparing the slurry. We found that the SOM process, under development by Boston University, offers the lowest cost alternative for producing and recycling the slurry. Using the H2A framework, a total cost of production, delivery, and distribution of $4.50/kg of hydrogen delivered or $4.50/gge was determined. Experiments performed at Boston

  10. Influence of uranium hydride oxidation on uranium metal behaviour

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, N.; Hambley, D.; Clarke, S.A.; Simpson, K.

    2013-07-01

    This work addresses concerns that the rapid, exothermic oxidation of active uranium hydride in air could stimulate an exothermic reaction (burning) involving any adjacent uranium metal, so as to increase the potential hazard arising from a hydride reaction. The effect of the thermal reaction of active uranium hydride, especially in contact with uranium metal, does not increase in proportion with hydride mass, particularly when considering large quantities of hydride. Whether uranium metal continues to burn in the long term is a function of the uranium metal and its surroundings. The source of the initial heat input to the uranium, if sufficient to cause ignition, is not important. Sustained burning of uranium requires the rate of heat generation to be sufficient to offset the total rate of heat loss so as to maintain an elevated temperature. For dense uranium, this is very difficult to achieve in naturally occurring circumstances. Areas of the uranium surface can lose heat but not generate heat. Heat can be lost by conduction, through contact with other materials, and by convection and radiation, e.g. from areas where the uranium surface is covered with a layer of oxidised material, such as burned-out hydride or from fuel cladding. These rates of heat loss are highly significant in relation to the rate of heat generation by sustained oxidation of uranium in air. Finite volume modelling has been used to examine the behaviour of a magnesium-clad uranium metal fuel element within a bottle surrounded by other un-bottled fuel elements. In the event that the bottle is breached, suddenly, in air, it can be concluded that the bulk uranium metal oxidation reaction will not reach a self-sustaining level and the mass of uranium oxidised will likely to be small in relation to mass of uranium hydride oxidised. (authors)

  11. Reactions of NO with nitrogen hydrides x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mebel, A. M.; Lin, M. C.

    In this review, we consider the reactions of NO ( x 1,2) with the nitrogen x hydrides NH, NH and NH . The reactions are relevant to the post-combustion, non-catalytic reduction of NO with NH in the thermal de-NO process and with x x HNCO in the rapid reduction of NO as well as to the thermal decomposition of x some high-energy materials, including ammonium dinitramide. The practical importance has motivated considerable theoretical interest in these reactions. We review numerous ab - initio molecular orbital studies of potential energy surfaces for NO NH and theoretical calculations of their kinetic parameters, such as x y thermal rate constants and branching ratios of various products. The most advanced theoretical calculations are carried out using the Gaussian-2 family of methods which provides the chemical accuracy (within 2 kcal mol ) for the energetics and molecular parameters of the reactants, products, intermediates and transition states. We present a detailed comparison of the theoretical results with available experimental data. We show that the reactions of NO with NH and NH x are very fast because they occur without a barrier and lead to the formation of multiple products which include radicals and stable molecules. The reactions of NO with NH , taking place by the H abstraction to form NH and HNO , are slow x x but still relevant to the NH de-NO system, because of their fast reverse processes x which have not yet been measured experimentally.

  12. Permeation rates for RTF metal hydride vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.E.

    1992-05-21

    Contamination rates have been estimated for the RTF nitrogen heating and cooling system (NH and CS) due to tritium permeation through the walls of metal hydride vessels. Tritium contamination of the NH and CS will be seen shortly after start-up of the RTF with the majority of it coming from the TCAP units. Contamination rates of the NH and CS are estimated to exceed 400 Ci/year after three years of operation and will elevate tritium concentrations in the NH and CS above 6 {times} 10{sup {minus}3} {mu}Ci/cc. To reduce tritium activity in the NH and CS, a stripper or ``getter`` bed may need to be installed in the NH and CS. Increasing the purge rate of nitrogen from the NH and CS is shown to be an impractical method for reducing tritium activity due to the high purge rates required. Stripping of the NH and CS nitrogen in the glove box stripper system will give a temporary lowering of tritium activity in the NH and CS, but tritium activity will return to its previous level in approximately two weeks.

  13. Fatigue crack growth in lithium hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Healy, T.E.

    1993-09-01

    Subcritical fatigue crack growth, from cyclic tensile loading, was demonstrated in warm pressed Polycrystalline lithium hydride. Experiments were performed with cyclic tension-tension crack opening (mode I) loads applied to a pre-cracked compact type specimen in an argon environment at a temperature of 21C (70F). The fatigue crack growth was found to occur between 7.56 {times} 10{sup {minus}ll} M/cycle (2.98 {times} l0{sup {minus}9} in/cycle) and 2.35 {times} l0{sup {minus}8} m/cycle (9.24{times}10{sup {minus}7} in/cycle) for a range of stress intensity factors between 1.04 MPa{center_dot}{radical}m (0.95 ksi{center_dot}{radical}in) and 1.49 MPa{center_dot}{radical}m (1.36 ksi{center_dot}{radical}in). The rate of fatigue crack growth from cyclic tensile loading was found to be in excess of crack growth from sustained loading at an equivalent stress intensity factor. Furthermore, a fatigue threshold was not evident from the acquired data.

  14. Micro-scale fracture experiments on zirconium hydrides and phase boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, H.; Roberts, S. G.; Gong, J.

    2016-07-01

    Fracture properties of micro-scale zirconium hydrides and phase boundaries were studied using microcantilever testing methods. FIB-machined microcantilevers were milled on cross-sectional surfaces of hydrided samples, with the most highly-stressed regions within the δ-hydride film, within the α-Zr or along the Zr-hydride interface. Cantilevers were notched using the FIB and then tested in bending using a nanoindenter. Load-displacement results show that three types of cantilevers have distinct deformation properties. Zr cantilevers deformed plastically. Hydride cantilevers fractured after a small amount of plastic flow; the fracture toughness of the δ-hydride was found to be 3.3 ± 0.4 MPam1/2 and SEM examination showed transgranular cleavage on the fracture surfaces. Cantilevers notched at the Zr-hydride interface developed interfacial voids during loading, at loads considerably lower than that which initiate brittle fracture of hydrides.

  15. Hydrogen storage as a hydride. Citations from the International Aerospace Abstracts data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zollars, G. F.

    1980-01-01

    These citations from the international literature concern the storage of hydrogen in various metal hydrides. Binary and intermetallic hydrides are considered. Specific alloys discussed are iron titanium, lanthanium nickel, magnesium copper and magnesium nickel among others.

  16. Multidimensional simulations of hydrides during fuel rod lifecycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafford, D. S.

    2015-11-01

    In light water reactor fuel rods, waterside corrosion of zirconium-alloy cladding introduces hydrogen into the cladding, where it is slightly soluble. When the solubility limit is reached, the hydrogen precipitates into crystals of zirconium hydride which decrease the ductility of the cladding and may lead to cladding failure during dry storage or transportation events. The distribution of the hydride phase and the orientation of the crystals depend on the history of the spatial temperature and stress profiles in the cladding. In this work, we have expanded the existing hydride modeling capability in the BISON fuel performance code with the goal of predicting both global and local effects on the radial, azimuthal and axial distribution of the hydride phase. We compare results from 1D simulations to published experimental data. We demonstrate the new capability by simulating in 2D a fuel rod throughout a lifecycle that includes irradiation, short-term storage in the spent fuel pool, drying, and interim storage in a dry cask. Using the 2D simulations, we present qualitative predictions of the effects of the inter-pellet gap and the drying conditions on the growth of a hydride rim.

  17. Sodium-based hydrides for thermal energy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheppard, D. A.; Humphries, T. D.; Buckley, C. E.

    2016-04-01

    Concentrating solar-thermal power (CSP) with thermal energy storage (TES) represents an attractive alternative to conventional fossil fuels for base-load power generation. Sodium alanate (NaAlH4) is a well-known sodium-based complex metal hydride but, more recently, high-temperature sodium-based complex metal hydrides have been considered for TES. This review considers the current state of the art for NaH, NaMgH3- x F x , Na-based transition metal hydrides, NaBH4 and Na3AlH6 for TES and heat pumping applications. These metal hydrides have a number of advantages over other classes of heat storage materials such as high thermal energy storage capacity, low volume, relatively low cost and a wide range of operating temperatures (100 °C to more than 650 °C). Potential safety issues associated with the use of high-temperature sodium-based hydrides are also addressed.

  18. The effect of stress state on zirconium hydride reorientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cinbiz, Mahmut Nedim

    Prior to storage in a dry-cask facility, spent nuclear fuel must undergo a vacuum drying cycle during which the spent fuel rods are heated up to elevated temperatures of ≤ 400°C to remove moisture the canisters within the cask. As temperature increases during heating, some of the hydride particles within the cladding dissolve while the internal gas pressure in fuel rods increases generating multi-axial hoop and axial stresses in the closed-end thin-walled cladding tubes. As cool-down starts, the hydrogen in solid solution precipitates as hydride platelets, and if the multiaxial stresses are sufficiently large, the precipitating hydrides reorient from their initial circumferential orientation to radial orientation. Radial hydrides can severely embrittle the spent nuclear fuel cladding at low temperature in response to hoop stress loading. Because the cladding can experience a range of stress states during the thermo-mechanical treatment induced during vacuum drying, this study has investigated the effect of stress state on the process of hydride reorientation during controlled thermo-mechanical treatments utilizing the combination of in situ X-ray diffraction and novel mechanical testing analyzed by the combination of metallography and finite element analysis. The study used cold worked and stress relieved Zircaloy-4 sheet containing approx. 180 wt. ppm hydrogen as its material basis. The failure behavior of this material containing radial hydrides was also studied over a range of temperatures. Finally, samples from reactor-irradiated cladding tubes were examined by X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. To reveal the stress state effect on hydride reorientation, the critical threshold stress to reorient hydrides was determined by designing novel mechanical test samples which produce a range of stress states from uniaxial to "near-equibiaxial" tension when a load is applied. The threshold stress was determined after thermo-mechanical treatments by

  19. Electrochemical and chemical routes to hydride loss from an iridium dihydride.

    PubMed

    Walden, A G; Kumar, A; Lease, N; Goldman, A S; Miller, A J M

    2016-06-14

    With a view towards replacing sacrificial hydrogen acceptors in alkane dehydrogenation catalysis, electrochemical methods for oxidative activation of a pincer-ligated iridium hydride intermediate were explored. A 1H(+)/2e(-) oxidation process was observed in THF solvent, with net hydride loss leading to a reactive cationic intermediate that can be trapped by chloride. Analogous reactivity was observed with the concerted hydride transfer reagent Ph3C(+), connecting chemical and electrochemical hydride loss pathways. PMID:26979786

  20. A study of advanced magnesium-based hydride and development of a metal hydride thermal battery system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chengshang

    Metal hydrides are a group of important materials known as energy carriers for renewable energy and thermal energy storage. A concept of thermal battery based on advanced metal hydrides is studied for heating and cooling of cabins in electric vehicles. The system utilizes a pair of thermodynamically matched metal hydrides as energy storage media. The hot hydride that is identified and developed is catalyzed MgH2 due to its high energy density and enhanced kinetics. TiV0.62Mn1.5, TiMn2, and LaNi5 alloys are selected as the matching cold hydride. A systematic experimental survey is carried out in this study to compare a wide range of additives including transitions metals, transition metal oxides, hydrides, intermetallic compounds, and carbon materials, with respect to their effects on dehydrogenation properties of MgH2. The results show that additives such as Ti and V-based metals, hydride, and certain intermetallic compounds have strong catalytic effects. Solid solution alloys of magnesium are exploited as a way to destabilize magnesium hydride thermodynamically. Various elements are alloyed with magnesium to form solid solutions, including indium and aluminum. Thermodynamic properties of the reactions between the magnesium solid solution alloys and hydrogen are investigated, showing that all the solid solution alloys that are investigated in this work have higher equilibrium hydrogen pressures than that of pure magnesium. Cyclic stability of catalyzed MgH2 is characterized and analyzed using a PCT Sievert-type apparatus. Three systems, including MgH2-TiH 2, MgH2-TiMn2, and MgH2-VTiCr, are examined. The hydrogenating and dehydrogenating kinetics at 300°C are stable after 100 cycles. However, the low temperature (25°C to 150°C) hydrogenation kinetics suffer a severe degradation during hydrogen cycling. Further experiments confirm that the low temperature kinetic degradation can be mainly related the extended hydrogenation-dehydrogenation reactions. Proof

  1. Investigation of metal hydride materials as hydrogen reservoirs for metal-hydrogen batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    ONISCHAK

    1976-01-01

    The performance and suitability of various metal hydride materials were examined for use as possible hydrogen storage reservoirs for secondary metal-hydrogen batteries. Lanthanum pentanickel hydride appears as a probable candidate in terms of stable hydrogen supply under feasible thermal conditions. A kinetic model describing the decomposition rate data of the hydride has been developed.

  2. The coordination chemistry of organo-hydride donors: new prospects for efficient multi-electron reduction.

    PubMed

    McSkimming, Alex; Colbran, Stephen B

    2013-06-21

    In biological reduction processes the dihydronicotinamides NAD(P)H often transfer hydride to an unsaturated substrate bound within an enzyme active site. In many cases, metal ions in the active site bind, polarize and thereby activate the substrate to direct attack by hydride from NAD(P)H cofactor. This review looks more widely at the metal coordination chemistry of organic donors of hydride ion--organo-hydrides--such as dihydronicotinamides, other dihydropyridines including Hantzsch's ester and dihydroacridine derivatives, those derived from five-membered heterocycles including the benzimidazolines and benzoxazolines, and all-aliphatic hydride donors such as hexadiene and hexadienyl anion derivatives. The hydride donor properties--hydricities--of organo-hydrides and how these are affected by metal ions are discussed. The coordination chemistry of organo-hydrides is critically surveyed and the use of metal-organo-hydride systems in electrochemically-, photochemically- and chemically-driven reductions of unsaturated organic and inorganic (e.g. carbon dioxide) substrates is highlighted. The sustainable electrocatalytic, photochemical or chemical regeneration of organo-hydrides such as NAD(P)H, including for driving enzyme-catalysed reactions, is summarised and opportunities for development are indicated. Finally, new prospects are identified for metal-organo-hydride systems as catalysts for organic transformations involving 'hydride-borrowing' and for sustainable multi-electron reductions of unsaturated organic and inorganic substrates directly driven by electricity or light or by renewable reductants such as formate/formic acid. PMID:23507957

  3. Iron Hydride Detection and Intramolecular Hydride Transfer in a Synthetic Model of Mono-Iron Hydrogenase with a CNS Chelate.

    PubMed

    Durgaprasad, Gummadi; Xie, Zhu-Lin; Rose, Michael J

    2016-01-19

    We report the identification and reactivity of an iron hydride species in a synthetic model complex of monoiron hydrogenase. The hydride complex is derived from a phosphine-free CNS chelate that includes a Fe-C(NH)(═O) bond (carbamoyl) as a mimic of the active site iron acyl. The reaction of [((O═)C(HN)N(py)S(Me))Fe(CO)2(Br)] (1) with NaHBEt3 generates the iron hydride intermediate [((O═)C(HN)N(py)S(Me))Fe(H)(CO)2] (2; δFe-H = -5.08 ppm). Above -40 °C, the hydride species extrudes CH3S(-) via intramolecular hydride transfer, which is stoichiometrically trapped in the structurally characterized dimer μ2-(CH3S)2-[((O═)C(HN)N(Ph))Fe(CO)2]2 (3). Alternately, when activated by base ((t)BuOK), 1 undergoes desulfurization to form a cyclometalated species, [((O═)C(NH)NC(Ph))Fe(CO)2] (5); derivatization of 5 with PPh3 affords the structurally characterized species [((O═)C(NH)NC)Fe(CO)(PPh3)2] (6), indicating complex 6 as the common intermediate along each pathway of desulfurization. PMID:26405810

  4. Hydrogen storage in fullerenes and in an organic hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.C.; Murphy, R.W.; Chen, F.C.; Loutfy, R.O.; Veksler, E.; Li, W.

    1998-05-29

    While the authors have demonstrated the importance and usefulness of thermal management to the hydrogen storage in fullerenes, their recent effort has concentrated on materials improvement and physical model development. In this paper, they report the results of this effort as follows: (1) Liquid phase hydrogenation of fullerenes indicated that more than 6 wt% capacity can be obtained at 180 C, 350--400 psi; (2) Dehydrogenation of fullerenes hydrides below 225 C was demonstrated using an Ir-based P-C-P pincer complex catalyst; (3) Cyclic hydrogenation and dehydrogenation tests of an organic hydride at 7 wt% capacity were conducted at 180--260 C; and (4) Physical models developed for fullerenes were determined to be applicable to this organic hydride (with much smaller activation energies).

  5. Composite Materials for Hazard Mitigation of Reactive Metal Hydrides.

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, Joseph William; Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Sartor, George B.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Reeder, Craig L.

    2012-02-01

    In an attempt to mitigate the hazards associated with storing large quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. The composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride. Composites with vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were also polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The composites were found to be initially effective at reducing the amount of heat released during oxidation. However, upon cycling the composites, the mitigating behavior was lost. While the polymer composites we investigated have mitigating potential and are physically robust, they undergo a chemical change upon cycling that makes them subsequently ineffective at mitigating heat release upon oxidation of the metal hydride. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the following people who participated in this project: Ned Stetson (U.S. Department of Energy) for sponsorship and support of the project. Ken Stewart (Sandia) for building the flow-through calorimeter and cycling test stations. Isidro Ruvalcaba, Jr. (Sandia) for qualitative experiments on the interaction of sodium alanate with water. Terry Johnson (Sandia) for sharing his expertise and knowledge of metal hydrides, and sodium alanate in particular. Marcina Moreno (Sandia) for programmatic assistance. John Khalil (United Technologies Research Corp) for insight into the hazards of reactive metal hydrides and real-world accident scenario experiments. Summary In an attempt to mitigate and/or manage hazards associated with storing bulk quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials (a mixture of a mitigating polymer and a metal hydride) were synthesized and tested

  6. CO2 hydrogenation on a metal hydride surface.

    PubMed

    Kato, Shunsuke; Borgschulte, Andreas; Ferri, Davide; Bielmann, Michael; Crivello, Jean-Claude; Wiedenmann, Daniel; Parlinska-Wojtan, Magdalena; Rossbach, Peggy; Lu, Ye; Remhof, Arndt; Züttel, Andreas

    2012-04-28

    The catalytic hydrogenation of CO(2) at the surface of a metal hydride and the corresponding surface segregation were investigated. The surface processes on Mg(2)NiH(4) were analyzed by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) combined with thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) and mass spectrometry (MS), and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS). CO(2) hydrogenation on the hydride surface during hydrogen desorption was analyzed by catalytic activity measurement with a flow reactor, a gas chromatograph (GC) and MS. We conclude that for the CO(2) methanation reaction, the dissociation of H(2) molecules at the surface is not the rate controlling step but the dissociative adsorption of CO(2) molecules on the hydride surface. PMID:22433948

  7. A nickel metal hydride battery for electric vehicles.

    PubMed

    Ovshinsky, S R; Fetcenko, M A; Ross, J

    1993-04-01

    Widespread use of electric vehicles can have significant impact on urban air quality, national energy independence, and international balance of trade. An efficient battery is the key technological element to the development of practical electric vehicles. The science and technology of a nickel metal hydride battery, which stores hydrogen in the solid hydride phase and has high energy density, high power, long life, tolerance to abuse, a wide range of operating temperature, quick-charge capability, and totally sealed maintenance-free operation, is described. A broad range of multi-element metal hydride materials that use structural and compositional disorder on several scales of length has been engineered for use as the negative electrode in this battery. The battery operates at ambient temperature, is made of nontoxic materials, and is recyclable. Demonstration of the manufacturing technology has been achieved. PMID:17807176

  8. A nickel metal hydride battery for electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Ovshinsky, S.R.; Fetcenko, M.A. ); Ross, J. )

    1993-04-09

    Widespread use of electric vehicles can have significant impact on urban air quality, national energy independence, and international balance of trade. An efficient battery is the key technological element to the development of practical electric vehicles. The science and technology of a nickel metal hydride battery, which stores hydrogen in the solid hydride phase and has high energy density, high power, long life, tolerance to abuse, a wide range of operating temperature, quick-charge capability, and totally sealed maintenance-free operation, is described. A broad range of multi-element metal hydride materials that use structural and compositional disorder on several scales of length has been engineered for use as the negative electrode in this battery. The battery operates at ambient temperature, is made of nontoxic materials, and is recyclable. Demonstration of the manufacturing technology has been achieved. 21 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Investigation of metal hydride nanoparticles templated in metal organic frameworks.

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, Benjamin W.; Herberg, Julie L.; Highley, Aaron M.; Grossman, Jeffrey; Wagner, Lucas; Bhakta, Raghu; Peaslee, D.; Allendorf, Mark D.; Liu, X.; Behrens, Richard, Jr.; Majzoub, Eric H.

    2010-11-01

    Hydrogen is proposed as an ideal carrier for storage, transport, and conversion of energy. However, its storage is a key problem in the development of hydrogen economy. Metal hydrides hold promise in effectively storing hydrogen. For this reason, metal hydrides have been the focus of intensive research. The chemical bonds in light metal hydrides are predominantly covalent, polar covalent or ionic. These bonds are often strong, resulting in high thermodynamic stability and low equilibrium hydrogen pressures. In addition, the directionality of the covalent/ionic bonds in these systems leads to large activation barriers for atomic motion, resulting in slow hydrogen sorption kinetics and limited reversibility. One method for enhancing reaction kinetics is to reduce the size of the metal hydrides to nano scale. This method exploits the short diffusion distances and constrained environment that exist in nanoscale hydride materials. In order to reduce the particle size of metal hydrides, mechanical ball milling is widely used. However, microscopic mechanisms responsible for the changes in kinetics resulting from ball milling are still being investigated. The objective of this work is to use metal organic frameworks (MOFs) as templates for the synthesis of nano-scale NaAlH4 particles, to measure the H2 desorption kinetics and thermodynamics, and to determine quantitative differences from corresponding bulk properties. Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) offer an attractive alternative to traditional scaffolds because their ordered crystalline lattice provides a highly controlled and understandable environment. The present work demonstrates that MOFs are stable hosts for metal hydrides and their reactive precursors and that they can be used as templates to form metal hydride nanoclusters on the scale of their pores (1-2 nm). We find that using the MOF HKUST-1 as template, NaAlH4 nanoclusters as small as 8 formula units can be synthesized inside the pores. A detailed picture of

  10. Metal hydride hydrogen compression: Recent advances and future prospects

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bowman, Jr., Robert C.; Yartys, Volodymyr A.; Lototskyy, Mykhaylo V.; Linkov, Vladimir; Grant, David; Stuart, Alastair; Eriksen, Jon; Denys, Roman

    2016-03-17

    Metal hydride (MH) thermal sorption compression is one of the more important applications of the metal hydrides. The present paper reviews recent advances in the field based on the analysis of the fundamental principles of this technology. The performances when boosting hydrogen pressure, along with two- and three-step compression units are analyzed. The paper includes also a theoretical modeling of a two-stage compressor aimed at both describing the performance of the experimentally studied systems, but, also, on their optimization and design of more advanced MH compressors. Business developments in the field are reviewed for the Norwegian company HYSTORSYS AS andmore » the South African Institute for Advanced Materials Chemistry. Finally, future prospects are outlined presenting the role of the metal hydride compression in the overall development of the hydrogen driven energy systems. Lastly, the work is based on the analysis of the development of the technology in Europe, USA and South Africa.« less

  11. Heat-actuated metal hydride hydrogen compressor testing

    SciTech Connect

    Piraino, M.; Metz, P.D.; Nienke, J.L.; Freitelberg, A.S.; Rahaman, R.S.

    1985-09-01

    Electric utilities use hydrogen for cooling turbine generators. The majority of the utilities purchase the gas from industrial gas markets. On-site electrolytic hydrogen production may prove advantageous both logistically and economically. In order to demonstrate this concept, Public Service Electric and Gas Co. (PSE and G) and EPRI installed an electrolyzer at the Sewaren (NJ) station. To compress the gas, PSE and G purchased a heat-activated metal hydride compressor from Ergenics, Inc. This report describes closed- and open-cycle tests conducted on this metal hydride hydrogen compressor. Test systems, plans, methodologies, and results are presented. A brief discussion evaluates these performance results, addresses some of the practical problems involved with electrolyzer-compressor interface, and compares the costs and benefits of metal hydride versus mechanical hydrogen compression for utility generator cooling.

  12. High-Spin Cobalt Hydrides for Catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, Patrick L.

    2013-08-29

    Organometallic chemists have traditionally used catalysts with strong-field ligands that give low-spin complexes. However, complexes with a weak ligand field have weaker bonds and lower barriers to geometric changes, suggesting that they may lead to more rapid catalytic reactions. Developing our understanding of high-spin complexes requires the use of a broader range of spectroscopic techniques, but has the promise of changing the mechanism and/or selectivity of known catalytic reactions. These changes may enable the more efficient utilization of chemical resources. A special advantage of cobalt and iron catalysts is that the metals are more abundant and cheaper than those currently used for major industrial processes that convert unsaturated organic molecules and biofeedstocks into useful chemicals. This project specifically evaluated the potential of high-spin cobalt complexes for small-molecule reactions for bond rearrangement and cleavage reactions relevant to hydrocarbon transformations. We have learned that many of these reactions proceed through crossing to different spin states: for example, high-spin complexes can flip one electron spin to access a lower-energy reaction pathway for beta-hydride elimination. This reaction enables new, selective olefin isomerization catalysis. The high-spin cobalt complexes also cleave the C-O bond of CO2 and the C-F bonds of fluoroarenes. In each case, the detailed mechanism of the reaction has been determined. Importantly, we have discovered that the cobalt catalysts described here give distinctive selectivities that are better than known catalysts. These selectivities come from a synergy between supporting ligand design and electronic control of the spin-state crossing in the reactions.

  13. Inverse sodium hydride: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Sawicka, Agnieszka; Skurski, Piotr; Simons, Jack

    2003-04-01

    A recent experimental investigation in which a salt containing the unusual charge distribution H(+) and Na(-) was synthesized and characterized prompted us to undertake an ab initio theoretical investigation. In the salt synthesized, the H(+) is bound to the nitrogen center of an amine and the Na(-) alkalide is "blocked" from approaching the protonated amine site by steric constraints of a cage structure. Although one expects that the Na(-) would deprotonate an unprotected R(3)N-H(+) cation, we decided to further explore this issue. Using extended atomic orbital basis sets and Møller-Plesset and coupled-cluster treatments of electron correlation, we examined the relative stabilities of the prototype (Me)(3)N + NaH, (Me)(3)N + Na(+) + H(-), (Me)(3)N-H(+) + Na(-), and (Me)(3)N-Na(+) + H(-) as well as the ion pair complexes (Me)(3)N-H(+).Na(-) and (Me)(3)N-Na(+).H(-). The primary focus of this effort was to determine whether the high-energy (Me)(3)N-H(+).Na(-) ion pair, which is the analogue of what the earlier workers termed "inverse sodium hydride", might be stable with respect to proton abstraction under any reasonable solvation conditions (which we treated within the polarized continuum model). Indeed, we find that such ion pairs are metastable (i.e., locally geometrically stable with a barrier to dissociation) for solvents having dielectric constants below approximately 2 but spontaneously decompose into their constituent ions for solvents with higher dielectric constants. We suggest that amines with large proton affinities and/or metals with weaker MH bond strengths should be explored experimentally. PMID:12656631

  14. Phase I. Lanthanum-based Start Materials for Hydride Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Gschneidner, K. A.; Schmidt, F. A.; Frerichs, A. E.; Ament, K. A.

    2013-08-20

    The purpose of Phase I of this work is to focus on developing a La-based start material for making nickel-metal (lanthanum)-hydride batteries based on our carbothermic-silicon process. The goal is to develop a protocol for the manufacture of (La1-xRx)(Ni1-yMy)(Siz), where R is a rare earth metal and M is a non-rare earth metal, to be utilized as the negative electrode in nickel-metal hydride (NiMH) rechargeable batteries.

  15. Photoelectron spectroscopy of boron aluminum hydride cluster anions

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Haopeng; Zhang, Xinxing; Ko, Yeon Jae; Gantefoer, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H. E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu; Li, Xiang; Kiran, Boggavarapu E-mail: kiran@mcneese.edu; Kandalam, Anil K.

    2014-04-28

    Boron aluminum hydride clusters are studied through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations. Boron aluminum hydride cluster anions, B{sub x}Al{sub y}H{sub z}{sup −}, were generated in a pulsed arc cluster ionization source and identified by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. After mass selection, their photoelectron spectra were measured by a magnetic bottle-type electron energy analyzer. The resultant photoelectron spectra as well as calculations on a selected series of stoichiometries reveal significant geometrical changes upon substitution of aluminum atoms by boron atoms.

  16. Copper(I)-Catalyzed Allylic Substitutions with a Hydride Nucleophile.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T N Thanh; Thiel, Niklas O; Pape, Felix; Teichert, Johannes F

    2016-05-20

    An easily accessible copper(I)/N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complex enables a regioselective hydride transfer to allylic bromides, an allylic reduction. The resulting aryl- and alkyl-substituted branched α-olefins, which are valuable building blocks for synthesis, are obtained in good yields and regioselectivity. A commercially available silane, (TMSO)2Si(Me)H, is employed as hydride source. This protocol offers a unified alternative to the established metal-catalyzed allylic substitutions with carbon nucleophiles, as no adaption of the catalyst to the nature of the nucleophile is required. PMID:27151495

  17. Hydride formation in core-shell alloyed metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2016-07-01

    The model and analysis presented are focused on hydride formation in nanoparticles with a Pd shell and a core formed by another metal. The arrangement of metal atoms is assumed to be coherent (no dislocations). The lattice strain distribution, elastic energy, and chemical potential of hydrogen atoms are scrutinized. The slope of the chemical potential (as a function of hydrogen uptake) is demonstrated to decrease with increasing the core volume, and accordingly the critical temperature for hydride formation and the corresponding hysteresis loops are predicted to decrease as well.

  18. METHOD OF PREPARING SINTERED ZIRCONIUM METAL FROM ITS HYDRIDES

    DOEpatents

    Angier, R.P.

    1958-02-11

    The invention relates to the preparation of metal shapes from zirconium hydride by powder metallurgical techniques. The zirconium hydride powder which is to be used for this purpose can be prepared by rendering massive pieces of crystal bar zirconium friable by heat treatment in purified hydrogen. This any then be ground into powder and powder can be handled in the air without danger of it igniting. It may then be compacted in the normal manner by being piaced in a die. The compact is sintered under vacuum conditions preferably at a temperature ranging from 1200 to 1300 deg C and for periods of one to three hours.

  19. Review of magnesium hydride-based materials: development and optimisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crivello, J.-C.; Dam, B.; Denys, R. V.; Dornheim, M.; Grant, D. M.; Huot, J.; Jensen, T. R.; de Jongh, P.; Latroche, M.; Milanese, C.; Milčius, D.; Walker, G. S.; Webb, C. J.; Zlotea, C.; Yartys, V. A.

    2016-02-01

    Magnesium hydride has been studied extensively for applications as a hydrogen storage material owing to the favourable cost and high gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen densities. However, its high enthalpy of decomposition necessitates high working temperatures for hydrogen desorption while the slow rates for some processes such as hydrogen diffusion through the bulk create challenges for large-scale implementation. The present paper reviews fundamentals of the Mg-H system and looks at the recent advances in the optimisation of magnesium hydride as a hydrogen storage material through the use of catalytic additives, incorporation of defects and an understanding of the rate-limiting processes during absorption and desorption.

  20. Photoelectron spectroscopy of boron aluminum hydride cluster anions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haopeng; Zhang, Xinxing; Ko, Yeon Jae; Gantefoer, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H.; Li, Xiang; Kiran, Boggavarapu; Kandalam, Anil K.

    2014-04-01

    Boron aluminum hydride clusters are studied through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations. Boron aluminum hydride cluster anions, BxAlyHz-, were generated in a pulsed arc cluster ionization source and identified by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. After mass selection, their photoelectron spectra were measured by a magnetic bottle-type electron energy analyzer. The resultant photoelectron spectra as well as calculations on a selected series of stoichiometries reveal significant geometrical changes upon substitution of aluminum atoms by boron atoms.

  1. Photoelectron spectroscopy of boron aluminum hydride cluster anions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haopeng; Zhang, Xinxing; Ko, Yeon Jae; Gantefoer, Gerd; Bowen, Kit H; Li, Xiang; Kiran, Boggavarapu; Kandalam, Anil K

    2014-04-28

    Boron aluminum hydride clusters are studied through a synergetic combination of anion photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory based calculations. Boron aluminum hydride cluster anions, BxAlyHz(-), were generated in a pulsed arc cluster ionization source and identified by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. After mass selection, their photoelectron spectra were measured by a magnetic bottle-type electron energy analyzer. The resultant photoelectron spectra as well as calculations on a selected series of stoichiometries reveal significant geometrical changes upon substitution of aluminum atoms by boron atoms. PMID:24784280

  2. Ab-initio study of transition metal hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Ramesh; Shukla, Seema Dwivedi, Shalini Sharma, Yamini

    2014-04-24

    We have performed ab initio self consistent calculations based on Full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method to investigate the optical and thermal properties of yttrium hydrides. From the band structure and density of states, the optical absorption spectra and specific heats have been calculated. The band structure of Yttrium metal changes dramatically due to hybridization of Y sp orbitals with H s orbitals and there is a net charge transfer from metal to hydrogen site. The electrical resistivity and specific heats of yttrium hydrides are lowered but the thermal conductivity is slightly enhanced due to increase in scattering from hydrogen sites.

  3. Hydride Reduction by a Sodium Hydride–Iodide Composite

    PubMed Central

    Too, Pei Chui; Chan, Guo Hao; Tnay, Ya Lin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Sodium hydride (NaH) is widely used as a Brønsted base in chemical synthesis and reacts with various Brønsted acids, whereas it rarely behaves as a reducing reagent through delivery of the hydride to polar π electrophiles. This study presents a series of reduction reactions of nitriles, amides, and imines as enabled by NaH in the presence of LiI or NaI. This remarkably simple protocol endows NaH with unprecedented and unique hydride‐donor chemical reactivity. PMID:26878823

  4. Method for preparing hydride configurations and reactive metal surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Silver, G.L.

    1984-05-18

    A method for preparing reactive metal surfaces, particularly uranium surfaces is disclosed, whereby the metal is immediately reactive to hydrogen gas at room temperature and low pressure. The metal surfaces are first pretreated by exposure to an acid which forms an adherent hydride-bearing composition on the metal surface. Subsequent heating of the pretreated metal at a temperature sufficient to decompose the hydride coating in vacuum or inert gas renders the metal surface instantaneously reactive to hydrogen gas at room temperature and low pressure.

  5. Exploring "aerogen-hydride" interactions between ZOF2 (Z = Kr, Xe) and metal hydrides: An ab initio study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Mohammadian-Sabet, Fariba

    2016-06-01

    In this work, a new σ-hole interaction formed between ZOF2 (Z = Kr and Xe) as the Lewis acid and a series of metal-hydrides HMX (M = Be, Mg, Zn and X = H, F, CN, CH3) is reported. The nature of this interaction, called "aerogen-hydride" interaction, is unveiled by molecular electrostatic potential, non-covalent interaction, quantum theory of atoms in molecules and natural bond orbital analyses. Our results indicate that the aerogen-hydride interactions are quite strong and can be comparable in strength to other σ-hole bonds. An important charge-transfer interaction is also associated with the formation of OF2Z⋯HMX complexes.

  6. Both Automation and Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Purcell, Royal

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the concept of a paperless society and the current situation in library automation. Various applications of automation and telecommunications are addressed, and future library automation is considered. Automation at the Monroe County Public Library in Bloomington, Indiana, is described as an example. (MES)

  7. High performance Zr-based metal hydride alloys for nickel metal hydride batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Young, R.C.; Ovshinsky, S.R.; Huang, B.; Chao, B.S.; Li, Y.

    2000-07-01

    Based upon Ovonic's multi-element, atomic engineering approach, two families of alloys are being used in commercial Nickel Metal Hydride (NiMH) rechargeable batteries, i.e., the mischmetal (Mm) based AB{sub 5} and Zr based AB{sub 2} alloys. While Mm based alloys are faster to activate, they are limited by a discharge capacity of only 320--340 mAh/g. The Zr based alloy, although slightly slower to activate, provides a much higher discharge capacity. In this paper, the authors first discuss the use of Ovonic's multi-element approach to generate a spectrum of disordered local environments. They then present experimental data to illustrate that through these atomically engineered local environments, they are able to control the hydrogen site occupancy, discharge capacity, kinetics, and surface states. The Zr based alloy with a specific discharge capacity of 465 mAh/g and excellent rate capability has been demonstrated.

  8. OBSERVATION AND MECHANISM OF HYDRIDE IN ZIRCALOY-4 AND LOCAL HYDRIDE RE-ORIENTATION INDUCED BY HIGH PRESSURE AT HIGH TEMPERATURES

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Yong; Blackwell, Andrew S; Plummer, Lee K; Radhakrishnan, Balasubramaniam; Gorti, Sarma B; Clarno, Kevin T

    2013-01-01

    Hydrided Zircaloy-4 samples were produced by a gas charging method to desired amounts of hydrogen. For low hydrogen content samples, the hydrided platelets appear elongated and needle-like, orientated in the circumferential direction. Mechanical testing was carried out by the ring compression method at various temperatures. Samples with higher hydrogen concentration resulted in lower strain before fracture and reduced maximum load. The trend between temperature and ductility was also very clear: increasing temperatures resulted in increased ductility of the hydrided cladding. A single through-wall crack was observed for a hydrided sample having very high hydrogen concentration under ring compression testing. For samples having lower hydrogen concentrations, the fracture surfaces traversed both circumferential and radial directions, and for which voids were observed near the hydrides. Mechanical tests to study hydride reorientation in these samples are under way, and the results will be reported in the near future.

  9. Comparison of the interactions in the rare gas hydride and Group 2 metal hydride anions

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, Joe P.; Manship, Daniel R.; Wright, Timothy G.; Breckenridge, W. H.

    2014-02-28

    We study both the rare gas hydride anions, RG–H{sup −} (RG = He–Rn) and Group 2 (Group IIa) metal hydride anions, M{sub IIa}H{sup −} (M{sub IIa} = Be–Ra), calculating potential energy curves at the CCSD(T) level with augmented quadruple and quintuple basis sets, and extrapolating the results to the basis set limit. We report spectroscopic parameters obtained from these curves; additionally, we study the Be–He complex. While the RG–H{sup −} and Be–He species are weakly bound, we show that, as with the previously studied BeH{sup −} and MgH{sup −} species, the other M{sub IIa}H{sup −} species are strongly bound, despite the interactions nominally also being between two closed shell species: M(ns{sup 2}) and H{sup −}(1s{sup 2}). We gain insight into the interactions using contour plots of the electron density changes and population analyses. For both series, the calculated dissociation energy is significantly less than the ion/induced-dipole attraction term, confirming that electron repulsion is important in these species; this effect is more dramatic for the M{sub IIa}H{sup −} species than for RG–H{sup −}. Our analyses lead us to conclude that the stronger interaction in the case of the M{sub IIa}H{sup −} species arises from sp and spd hybridization, which allows electron density on the M{sub IIa} atom to move away from the incoming H{sup −}.

  10. Hydride transfer and dihydrogen elimination from osmium and ruthenium metalloporphyrin hydrides: Model processes for hydrogenase enzymes and the hydrogen electrode reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Collman, J.P.; Wagenknecht, P.S.; Lewis, N.S.

    1992-07-01

    A series of metalloporphyrin hydride complexes of the type K[M(Por)(L)(H)] (M - Ru, Os; Por - OEP, TMP; L = THF, *Im, PPh{sub 3}, pyridine) has been synthesized by stoichiometric protonation of the corresponding K{sub 2}[M(Por)], followed by addition of L. The addition of excess acids to these hydrides resulted in the elimination of dihydrogen. The kinetics showed no evidence for a bimolecular mechanism for this process and suggest simple protonation of the metal-hydride bond followed by dihydrogen loss. One-electron oxidation of the metal hydrides also resulted in dihydrogen formation. The kinetics of the oxidatively induced hydrogen evolution step from K[Ru(OEP)(THF)(H)] were examined and indicate a biomolecular mechanism in which two metal hydrides reductively eliminate one dihydrogen molecule. The rate constant was determined to be 88 {+-} 14 M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. These reaction mechanisms are discussed in the context of designing bimetallic proton reduction catalysts. The metal hydride K[Ru(OEP)(THF)(H)], was also synthesized by heterolytic activation of H{sub 2}. This hydride is a good one-electron reductant (-1.15 V vs FeCp{sub 2}) and is capable of reducing, by hydride transfer, the NAD{sup +} analogue, 1-benzyl-N,N-diethyl-nicotinamide. This nicotinamide reduction by a hydride formed from heterolytic dihydrogen activation is suggested as the mechanism for hydrogenase enzymes. 38 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Fabrication of lotus-type porous copper through thermal decomposition of titanium hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ide, T.; Nakajima, H.

    2009-05-01

    Lotus-type porous copper was fabricated by unidirectional solidification through thermal decomposition of titanium hydride. Effects of additive method and additive amount of titanium hydride on pore formation were investigated. The porosity of lotus copper depends on additive method and additive amount of titanium hydride. The pore formation effectively occurs in the method that titanium hydride decomposes in molten copper. For all the additive methods of titanium hydride, the porosity increases and pore diameter does not change with increasing additive amount of titanium hydride. While, for adding large amount of titanium hydride, the porosity became constant. This is because hydrogen solubility in liquid phase does not change owing to bubbling of hydrogen gas.

  12. Cascades for hydrogen isotope separation using metal hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Hill, F.B.; Grzetic, V.

    1982-01-01

    Designs are presented for continuous countercurrent hydrogen isotope separation cascades based on the use of metal hydrides. The cascades are made up of pressure swing adsorption (PSA) or temperature swing adsorption (TSA) stages. The designs were evolved from consideration of previously conducted studies of the separation performance of four types of PSA and TSA processes.

  13. Process of forming a sol-gel/metal hydride composite

    DOEpatents

    Congdon, James W.

    2009-03-17

    An external gelation process is described which produces granules of metal hydride particles contained within a sol-gel matrix. The resulting granules are dimensionally stable and are useful for applications such as hydrogen separation and hydrogen purification. An additional coating technique for strengthening the granules is also provided.

  14. Aluminium hydride: a reversible material for hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Zidan, Ragaiy; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda L; Fewox, Christopher S; Stowe, Ashley C; Gray, Joshua R; Harter, Andrew G

    2009-07-01

    Aluminium hydride has been synthesized electrochemically, providing a synthetic route which closes a reversible cycle for regeneration of the material and bypasses expensive thermodynamic costs which have precluded AlH(3) from being considered as a H(2) storage material. PMID:19557259

  15. Electrochromism of Mg-Ni hydride switchable mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isidorsson, Jan; Giebels, I. A. M. E.; Di Vece, M.; Griessen, Ronald

    2001-11-01

    Switchable mirrors have so far been made of rare-earth and rare-earth-magnesium based metal-hydrides. In this investigation we study Mg-Ni-hydrides, which have been shown by Richardson et al. to exhibit switchable properties similar to those of the rare-earth hydrides. Cyclic voltammetry on MgzNiHx samples with 0.8 less than z less than 3.7 shows that addition of one Mg atom per Mg2Ni gives the best ab/desorption kinetics for hydrogen. X- ray diffraction reveals a structural change as hydrogen is absorbed. The metal-insulator transition is confirmed with simultaneous resistivity measurements. A pressure- composition isotherm of Mg2NiHx is also determined electrochemically. Optical spectrometry during gas loading gives an optical band gap of 1.6 eV for Mg2NiH4. This gap increases with increasing Mg content in a way similar to that of the Mg-doped rare-earth hydrides.

  16. Inert blanketing of a hydride bed using typical grade protium

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.E.

    2015-03-15

    This paper describes the impact of 500 ppm (0.05%) impurities in protium on the absorption rate of a 9.66 kg LaNi{sub 4.25}Al{sub 0.75} (LANA0.75) metal hydride bed. The presence of 500 ppm or less inerts (i.e. non-hydrogen isotopes) can significantly impact hydrogen bed absorption rates. The impact on reducing absorption rates is significantly greater than predicted assuming uniform temperature, pressure, and compositions throughout the bed. Possible explanations are discussed. One possibility considered was the feed gas contained impurity levels higher than 500 ppm. It was shown that a level of 5000 ppm of inerts would have been necessary to fit the experimental result so this possibility wa dismissed. Another possibility is that the impurities in the protium supply reacted with the hydride material and partially poisoned the hydride. If the hydride were poisoned with CO or another impurity, the removal of the over-pressure gas in the bed would not be expected to allow the hydride loading of the bed to continue as the experimental results showed, so this possibility was also dismissed. The last possibility questions the validity of the calculations. It is assumed in all the calculations that the gas phase composition, temperature, and pressure are uniform throughout the bed. These assumptions are less valid for large beds where there can be large temperature, pressure, and composition gradients throughout the bed. Eventually the impact of 0.05% inerts in protium on bed absorption rate is shown and explained in terms of an increase in inert partial pressure as the bed was loaded.

  17. Hydride Compressor Sorption Cooler and Surface Contamination Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, R. C.; Reiter, J. W.; Prina, M.; Kulleck, J. G.; Lanford, W. A.

    2003-07-01

    A continuous-duty hydrogen sorption cryocooler is being developed for the Planck spacecraft, a mission to map the cosmic microwave background beginning in 2007. This cryocooler uses six individual compressor elements (CEs) filled with the hydriding alloy LaNi4.78Sn0.22 to provide high-pressure (50 bar) hydrogen to a Joule-Thomson (J-T) expander and to absorb low-pressure (˜0.3 bar) gas from liquid hydrogen reservoirs cooled to ˜18K. Quadrupole Mass Spectrometry (QMS) showed methane in these hydride beds after cycling during initial operation of laboratory tests of the Planck engineering breadboard (EBB) cooler. These contaminants have caused problems involving plugged J-T expanders. The contaminants probably come from reactions with residual hydrocarbon species on surfaces inside the hydride bed. The hydride bed in each CE is contained in an annular volume called a "gas-gap heat switch," which serves as a reversible, intermittent thermal path to the spacecraft radiator. The gas-gap is either "off" (i.e., its pressure <1.3 Pa), or "on" (i.e., hydrogen gas at ˜4 kPa). The hydrogen pressure is varied with an independent hydride actuator containing ZrNiHx. Early EBB cooler tests showed increasing parasitic heat losses from the inner beds, suggesting residual pressures in the gas gap during its "off" state. The pressure was shown to be due to hydrogen from outgassing from metallic surfaces in the gas gap and hydrogen permeation through the inner sorbent bed wall. This gas accumulation has serious end-of-life implications, as the ZrNi actuator has limited storage capacity and any excess hydrogen would necessarily affect its operation. This paper summarizes experiments on the behavior of hydrogen in the gas gap switch and formation of methane in the CE sorbent beds.

  18. 5-year review of Metal Hydride Center of Excellence.

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Jay O.; Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2010-05-01

    The purpose of the DOE Metal Hydride Center of Excellence (MHCoE) is to develop hydrogen storage materials with engineering properties that allow the use of these materials in a way that satisfies the DOE/FreedomCAR Program system requirements for automotive hydrogen storage. The Center is a multidisciplinary and collaborative effort with technical interactions divided into two broad areas: (1) mechanisms and modeling (which provide a theoretically driven basis for pursuing new materials) and (2) materials development (in which new materials are synthesized and characterized). Driving all of this work are the hydrogen storage system specifications outlined by the FreedomCAR Program for 2010 and 2015. The organization of the MHCoE during the past year is show in Figure 1. During the past year, the technical work was divided into four project areas. The purpose of the project areas is to organize the MHCoE technical work along appropriate and flexible technical lines. The four areas summarized are: (1) Project A - Destabilized Hydrides, The objective of this project is to controllably modify the thermodynamics of hydrogen sorption reactions in light metal hydrides using hydride destabilization strategies; (2) Project B - Complex Anionic Materials, The objective is to predict and synthesize highly promising new anionic hydride materials; (3) Project C - Amides/Imides Storage Materials, The objective of Project C is to assess the viability of amides and imides (inorganic materials containing NH{sub 2} and NH moieties, respectively) for onboard hydrogen storage; and (4) Project D - Alane, AlH{sub 3}, The objective of Project D is to understand the sorption and regeneration properties of AlH{sub 3} for hydrogen storage.

  19. Exploring metal hydrides using autoclave and multi-anvil hydrogenations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puhakainen, Kati

    Metal hydride materials have been intensively studied for hydrogen storage applications. In addition to potential hydrogen economy applications, metal hydrides offer a wide variety of other interesting properties. For example, hydrogen-dominant materials, which are hydrides with the highest hydrogen content for a particular metal/semimetal composition, are predicted to display high-temperature superconductivity. On the other side of the spectrum are hydrides with small amounts of hydrogen (0.1 - 1 at.%) that are investigated as viable magnetic, thermoelectric or semiconducting materials. Research of metal hydride materials is generally important to gain fundamental understanding of metal-hydrogen interactions in materials. Hydrogenation of Zintl phases, which are defined as compounds between an active metal (alkali, alkaline earth, rare earth) and a p-block metal/semimetal, were attempted by a hot sintering method utilizing an autoclave loaded with gaseous hydrogen (< 9 MPa). Hydride formation competes with oxidative decomposition of a Zintl phase. The oxidative decomposition, which leads to a mixture of binary active metal hydride and p-block element, was observed for investigated aluminum (Al) and gallium (Ga) containing Zintl phases. However, a new phase Li2Al was discovered when Zintl phase precursors were synthesized. Using the single crystal x-ray diffraction (SCXRD), the Li2Al was found to crystallize in an orthorhombic unit cell (Cmcm) with the lattice parameters a = 4.6404(8) Å, b = 9.719(2) Å, and c = 4.4764(8) Å. Increased demand for materials with improved properties necessitates the exploration of alternative synthesis methods. Conventional metal hydride synthesis methods, like ball-milling and autoclave technique, are not responding to the demands of finding new materials. A viable alternative synthesis method is the application of high pressure for the preparation of hydrogen-dominant materials. Extreme pressures in the gigapascal ranges can open

  20. High pressure hydriding of sponge-Zr in steam-hydrogen mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soo Kim, Yeon; Wang, Wei-E.; Olander, D. R.; Yagnik, S. K.

    1997-07-01

    Hydriding kinetics of thin sponge-Zr layers metallurgically bonded to a Zircaloy disk has been studied by thermogravimetry in the temperature range 350-400°C in 7 MPa hydrogen-steam mixtures. Some specimens were prefilmed with a thin oxide layer prior to exposure to the reactant gas; all were coated with a thin layer of gold to avoid premature reaction at edges. Two types of hydriding were observed in prefilmed specimens, viz., a slow hydrogen absorption process that precedes an accelerated (massive) hydriding. At 7 MPa total pressure, the critical ratio of H 2/H 2O above which massive hydriding occurs at 400°C is ˜ 200. The critical H 2/H 20 ratio is shifted to ˜2.5 × 103 at 350°C. The slow hydriding process occurs only when conditions for hydriding and oxidation are approximately equally favorable. Based on maximum weight gain, the specimen is completely converted to δ-ZrH 2 by massive hydriding in ˜5 h at a hydriding rate of ˜10 -6 mol H/cm 2 s. Incubation times of 10-20 h prior to the onset of massive hydriding increases with prefilm oxide thickness in the range of 0-10 μm. By changing to a steam-enriched gas, massive hydriding that initially started in a steam-starved condition was arrested by re-formation of a protective oxide scale.

  1. Hydriding performances and modeling of a small-scale ZrCo bed

    SciTech Connect

    Koo, D.; Lee, J.; Park, J.; Paek, S.; Chung, H.; Chang, M.H.; Yun, S.H.; Cho, S.; Jung, K.J.

    2015-03-15

    In order to evaluate the performance of the hydriding of a ZrCo bed, a small-scale getter bed of ZrCo was designed and fabricated. The results show that the hydriding time at room temperature was somewhat shorter than that at higher temperatures of ZrCo and that the performance of hydriding at low temperatures of ZrCo was better than that at high temperatures of ZrCo. The experimental results of the hydrogen pressure of hydriding (ZrCoH{sub 2.8}) at different temperatures were in agreement with the computed values using a numerical modeling equation but with a small difference during the first 10 minutes of the hydriding of ZrCo. The model is based on the Kozeny-Carman equation. The effect of a helium blanket on hydriding was measured and analyzed. The hydriding with no helium blanket in the primary vessel of ZrCo is much faster than that with a helium blanket. The hydriding at a helium concentration of 8% is slower than that at 0%. As the helium concentration increases, the hydriding of ZrCo decreases. The experimental results of the hydriding with 0 %, 4%, and 8% of helium concentration are in agreement with the calculated values but with minimal differences during the first 10 minutes.

  2. Automated External Defibrillator

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is an Automated External Defibrillator? An automated external defibrillator (AED) is a portable device that ... Institutes of Health Department of Health and Human Services USA.gov

  3. Workflow automation architecture standard

    SciTech Connect

    Moshofsky, R.P.; Rohen, W.T.

    1994-11-14

    This document presents an architectural standard for application of workflow automation technology. The standard includes a functional architecture, process for developing an automated workflow system for a work group, functional and collateral specifications for workflow automation, and results of a proof of concept prototype.

  4. Heat transfer analysis of metal hydrides in metal-hydrogen secondary batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onischak, M.; Dharia, D.; Gidaspow, D.

    1976-01-01

    The heat transfer between a metal-hydrogen secondary battery and a hydrogen-storing metal hydride was studied. Temperature profiles of the endothermic metal hydrides and the metal-hydrogen battery were obtained during discharging of the batteries assuming an adiabatic system. Two hydride materials were considered in two physical arrangements within the battery system. In one case the hydride is positioned in a thin annular region about the battery stack; in the other the hydride is held in a tube down the center of the stack. The results show that for a typical 20 ampere-hour battery system with lanthanum pentanickel hydride as the hydrogen reservoir the system could perform successfully.

  5. Molecular early main group metal hydrides: synthetic challenge, structures and applications.

    PubMed

    Harder, Sjoerd

    2012-11-25

    Within the general area of early main group metal chemistry, the controlled synthesis of well-defined metal hydride complexes is a rapidly developing research field. As group 1 and 2 metal complexes are generally highly dynamic and lattice energies for their [MH](∞) and [MH(2)](∞) salts are high, the synthesis of well-defined soluble hydride complexes is an obvious challenge. Access to molecular early main group metal hydrides, however, is rewarding: these hydrocarbon-soluble metal hydrides are highly reactive, have found use in early main group metal catalysis and are potentially also valuable molecular model systems for polar metal hydrides as a hydrogen storage material. The article focusses specifically on alkali and alkaline-earth metal hydride complexes and discusses the synthetic challenge, molecular structures, reactivity and applications. PMID:23012695

  6. Effect of hydride orientation on fracture toughness of Zircaloy-4 cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Hsiao-Hung; Tsay, Leu-Wen

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen embrittlement is one of the major degradation mechanisms for high burnup fuel cladding during reactor service and spent fuel dry storage, which is related to the hydrogen concentration, morphology and orientation of zirconium hydrides. In this work, the J-integral values for X-specimens with different hydride orientations are measured to evaluate the fracture toughness of Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) cladding. The toughness values for Zry-4 cladding with various percentages of radial hydrides are much smaller than those with circumferential hydrides only in the same hydrogen content level at 25 °C. The fractograghic features reveal that the crack path is influenced by the orientation of zirconium hydride. Moreover, the fracture toughness measurements for X-specimens at 300 °C are not sensitive to a variation in hydride orientation but to hydrogen concentration.

  7. The free-energy barrier to hydride transfer across a dipalladium complex.

    PubMed

    Vanston, C R; Kearley, G J; Edwards, A J; Darwish, T A; de Souza, N R; Ramirez-Cuesta, A J; Gardiner, M G

    2015-01-01

    We use density-functional theory molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) simulations to determine the hydride transfer coordinate between palladium centres of the crystallographically observed terminal hydride locations, Pd-Pd-H, originally postulated for the solution dynamics of the complex bis-NHC dipalladium hydride [{(MesIm)2CH2}2Pd2H][PF6], and then calculate the free-energy along this coordinate. We estimate the transfer barrier-height to be about 20 kcal mol(-1) with a hydride transfer rate in the order of seconds at room temperature. We validate our DFT-MD modelling using inelastic neutron scattering which reveals anharmonicity of the hydride environment that is so pronounced that there is complete failure of the harmonic model for the hydride ligand. The simulations are extended to high temperature to bring the H-transfer to a rate that is accessible to the simulation technique. PMID:25652724

  8. FEASIBILITY OF RECYCLING PLUTONIUM AND MINOR ACTINIDES IN LIGHT WATER REACTORS USING HYDRIDE FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Greenspan, Ehud; Todreas, Neil; Taiwo, Temitope

    2009-03-10

    The objective of this DOE NERI program sponsored project was to assess the feasibility of improving the plutonium (Pu) and minor actinide (MA) recycling capabilities of pressurized water reactors (PWRs) by using hydride instead of oxide fuels. There are four general parts to this assessment: 1) Identifying promising hydride fuel assembly designs for recycling Pu and MAs in PWRs 2) Performing a comprehensive systems analysis that compares the fuel cycle characteristics of Pu and MA recycling in PWRs using the promising hydride fuel assembly designs identified in Part 1 versus using oxide fuel assembly designs 3) Conducting a safety analysis to assess the likelihood of licensing hydride fuel assembly designs 4) Assessing the compatibility of hydride fuel with cladding materials and water under typical PWR operating conditions Hydride fuel was found to offer promising transmutation characteristics and is recommended for further examination as a possible preferred option for recycling plutonium in PWRs.

  9. Detecting low concentrations of plutonium hydride with magnetization measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae Wook; Mun, E. D.; Baiardo, J. P.; Smith, A. I.; Richmond, S.; Mitchell, J.; Schwartz, D.; Zapf, V. S.; Mielke, C. H.

    2015-02-01

    We report the formation of plutonium hydride in 2 at. % Ga-stabilized δ-Pu, with 1 at. % H charging. We show that magnetization measurements are a sensitive, quantitative measure of ferromagnetic plutonium hydride against the nonmagnetic background of plutonium. It was previously shown that at low hydrogen concentrations, hydrogen forms super-abundant vacancy complexes with plutonium, resulting in a bulk lattice contraction. Here, we use magnetization, X-ray, and neutron diffraction measurements to show that in addition to forming vacancy complexes, at least 30% of the H atoms bond with Pu to precipitate PuHx on the surface of the sample with x ˜ 1.9. We observe magnetic hysteresis loops below 40 K with magnetic remanence, consistent with ferromagnetic PuH1.9.

  10. Preparation and X-ray diffraction studies of curium hydrides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, J. K.; Haire, R. G.

    1985-10-01

    Curium hydrides were prepared by reaction of curium-248 metal with hydrogen and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction. Several of the syntheses resulted in a hexagonal compound with average lattice parameters of a0 = 0.3769(8) nm and c0 = 0.6732(12) nm. These products are considered to be CmH 3-δ by analogy with the behavior of lanthanide-hydrogen and lighter actinide-hydrogen systems. Face-centered cubic products with an average lattice parameter of a0 = 0.5322(4) nm were obtained from other curium hydride preparations. This parameter is slightly smaller than that reported previously for cubic curium dihydride, CmH 2+ x (B. M. Bansal and D. Damien, Inorg. Nucl. Chem. Lett., 6, 603, 1970). The present results established a continuation of typical heavy trivalent lanthanide-like behavior of the transuranium actinide-hydrogen systems through curium.

  11. A low tritium hydride bed inventory estimation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, J.E.; Shanahan, K.L.; Baker, R.A.; Foster, P.J.

    2015-03-15

    Low tritium hydride beds were developed and deployed into tritium service in Savannah River Site. Process beds to be used for low concentration tritium gas were not fitted with instrumentation to perform the steady-state, flowing gas calorimetric inventory measurement method. Low tritium beds contain less than the detection limit of the IBA (In-Bed Accountability) technique used for tritium inventory. This paper describes two techniques for estimating tritium content and uncertainty for low tritium content beds to be used in the facility's physical inventory (PI). PI are performed periodically to assess the quantity of nuclear material used in a facility. The first approach (Mid-point approximation method - MPA) assumes the bed is half-full and uses a gas composition measurement to estimate the tritium inventory and uncertainty. The second approach utilizes the bed's hydride material pressure-composition-temperature (PCT) properties and a gas composition measurement to reduce the uncertainty in the calculated bed inventory.

  12. Composition and structure of sputter deposited erbium hydride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    ADAMS,DAVID P.; ROMERO,JUAN A.; RODRIGUEZ,MARK A.; FLORO,JERROLD A.; BANKS,JAMES C.

    2000-05-10

    Erbium hydride thin films are grown onto polished, a-axis {alpha} Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (sapphire) substrates by reactive ion beam sputtering and analyzed to determine composition, phase and microstructure. Erbium is sputtered while maintaining a H{sub 2} partial pressure of 1.4 x 10{sup {minus}4} Torr. Growth is conducted at several substrate temperatures between 30 and 500 C. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and elastic recoil detection analyses after deposition show that the H/Er areal density ratio is approximately 3:1 for growth temperatures of 30, 150 and 275 C, while for growth above {approximately}430 C, the ratio of hydrogen to metal is closer to 2:1. However, x-ray diffraction shows that all films have a cubic metal sublattice structure corresponding to that of ErH{sub 2}. RBS and Auger electron that sputtered erbium hydride thin films are relatively free of impurities.

  13. On the high-pressure superconducting phase in platinum hydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczȩśniak, D.; Zemła, T. P.

    2015-08-01

    Motivated by the ambiguous experimental data for the superconducting phase in silane (SiH4), which may originate from platinum hydride (PtH), we provide a theoretical study of the superconducting state in the latter alloy. The quantitative estimates of the thermodynamics of PtH at 100 GPa are given for a wide range of Coulomb pseudopotential values ({μ }*) within the Eliashberg formalism. The obtained critical temperature value ({T}{{C}}\\in < 12.94,20.01> for {μ }*\\in < 0.05,0.15> ) agrees well with the experimental TC for SiH4, which may be ascribed to PtH. Moreover, the calculated characteristic thermodynamic ratios exceed the predictions of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory, implying the occurrence of strong-coupling and retardation effects in PtH. We note that our results may be of high relevance for future theoretical and experimental studies on hydrides.

  14. ALUMINUM HYDRIDE: A REVERSIBLE STORAGE MATERIAL FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE

    SciTech Connect

    Zidan, R; Christopher Fewox, C; Brenda Garcia-Diaz, B; Joshua Gray, J

    2009-01-09

    One of the challenges of implementing the hydrogen economy is finding a suitable solid H{sub 2} storage material. Aluminium (alane, AlH{sub 3}) hydride has been examined as a potential hydrogen storage material because of its high weight capacity, low discharge temperature, and volumetric density. Recycling the dehydride material has however precluded AlH{sub 3} from being implemented due to the large pressures required (>10{sup 5} bar H{sub 2} at 25 C) and the thermodynamic expense of chemical synthesis. A reversible cycle to form alane electrochemically using NaAlH{sub 4} in THF been successfully demonstrated. Alane is isolated as the triethylamine (TEA) adduct and converted to unsolvated alane by heating under vacuum. To complete the cycle, the starting alanate can be regenerated by direct hydrogenation of the dehydrided alane and the alkali hydride (NaH) This novel reversible cycle opens the door for alane to fuel the hydrogen economy.

  15. Detecting low concentrations of plutonium hydride with magnetization measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jae Wook; Mun, E. D.; Baiardo, J. P.; Zapf, V. S.; Mielke, C. H.; Smith, A. I.; Richmond, S.; Mitchell, J.; Schwartz, D.

    2015-02-07

    We report the formation of plutonium hydride in 2 at. % Ga-stabilized δ-Pu, with 1 at. % H charging. We show that magnetization measurements are a sensitive, quantitative measure of ferromagnetic plutonium hydride against the nonmagnetic background of plutonium. It was previously shown that at low hydrogen concentrations, hydrogen forms super-abundant vacancy complexes with plutonium, resulting in a bulk lattice contraction. Here, we use magnetization, X-ray, and neutron diffraction measurements to show that in addition to forming vacancy complexes, at least 30% of the H atoms bond with Pu to precipitate PuH{sub x} on the surface of the sample with x ∼ 1.9. We observe magnetic hysteresis loops below 40 K with magnetic remanence, consistent with ferromagnetic PuH{sub 1.9}.

  16. Effect of thermo-mechanical cycling on zirconium hydride reorientation studied in situ with synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colas, Kimberly B.; Motta, Arthur T.; Daymond, Mark R.; Almer, Jonathan D.

    2013-09-01

    The circumferential hydrides normally present in nuclear reactor fuel cladding after reactor exposure may dissolve during drying for dry storage and re-precipitate when cooled under load into a more radial orientation, which could embrittle the fuel cladding. It is necessary to study the rates and conditions under which hydride reorientation may happen in order to assess fuel integrity in dry storage. The objective of this work is to study the effect of applied stress and thermal cycling on the hydride morphology in cold-worked stress-relieved Zircaloy-4 by combining conventional metallography and in situ X-ray diffraction techniques. Metallography is used to study the evolution of hydride morphology after several thermo-mechanical cycles. In situ X-ray diffraction performed at the Advanced Photon Source synchrotron provides real-time information on the process of hydride dissolution and precipitation under stress during several thermal cycles. The detailed study of diffracted intensity, peak position and full-width at half-maximum provides information on precipitation kinetics, elastic strains and other characteristics of the hydride precipitation process. The results show that thermo-mechanical cycling significantly increases the radial hydride fraction as well as the hydride length and connectivity. The radial hydrides are observed to precipitate at a lower temperature than circumferential hydrides. Variations in the magnitude and range of hydride strains due to reorientation and cycling have also been observed. These results are discussed in light of existing models and experiments on hydride reorientation. The study of hydride elastic strains during precipitation shows marked differences between circumferential and radial hydrides, which can be used to investigate the reorientation process. Cycling under stress above the threshold stress for reorientation drastically increases both the reoriented hydride fraction and the hydride size. The reoriented hydride

  17. SPECIATION OF ARSENIC COMPOUNDS IN DRINKING WATER BY CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS WITH HYDRODYNAMICALLY MODIFIED ELECTROOSMOTIC FLOW DETECTED THROUGH HYDRIDE GENERATION INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS..

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) was used to speciate four environmentally significant, toxic forms of arsenic: arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid. Hydride generation (HG) was used to convert the species into their respective hydrides. The hydride ...

  18. SPECIATION OF ARSENIC COMPOUNDS IN DRINKING WATER BY CAPILLARY ELECTROPHORESIS WITH HYDRODYNAMICALLY MODIFIED ELECTROOSMOTIC FLOW DETECTED THROUGH HYDRIDE GENERATION INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS...

    EPA Science Inventory

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) was used to speciate four environmentally significant, toxic forms of arsenic: arsenite, arsenate, monomethylarsonic acid and dimethylarsinic acid. Hydride generation (HG) was used to convert the species into their respective hydrides. The hydride s...

  19. Automation of industrial bioprocesses.

    PubMed

    Beyeler, W; DaPra, E; Schneider, K

    2000-01-01

    The dramatic development of new electronic devices within the last 25 years has had a substantial influence on the control and automation of industrial bioprocesses. Within this short period of time the method of controlling industrial bioprocesses has changed completely. In this paper, the authors will use a practical approach focusing on the industrial applications of automation systems. From the early attempts to use computers for the automation of biotechnological processes up to the modern process automation systems some milestones are highlighted. Special attention is given to the influence of Standards and Guidelines on the development of automation systems. PMID:11092132

  20. Automation in Clinical Microbiology

    PubMed Central

    Ledeboer, Nathan A.

    2013-01-01

    Historically, the trend toward automation in clinical pathology laboratories has largely bypassed the clinical microbiology laboratory. In this article, we review the historical impediments to automation in the microbiology laboratory and offer insight into the reasons why we believe that we are on the cusp of a dramatic change that will sweep a wave of automation into clinical microbiology laboratories. We review the currently available specimen-processing instruments as well as the total laboratory automation solutions. Lastly, we outline the types of studies that will need to be performed to fully assess the benefits of automation in microbiology laboratories. PMID:23515547

  1. Gas chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes using metal hydrides

    SciTech Connect

    Aldridge, F.T.

    1984-05-09

    A study was made of the properties of metal hydrides which may be suitable for use in chromatographic separation of hydrogen isotopes. Sixty-five alloys were measured, with the best having a hydrogen-deuterium separation factor of 1.35 at 60/sup 0/C. Chromatographic columns using these alloys produced deuterium enrichments of up to 3.6 in a single pass, using natural abundance hydrogen as starting material. 25 references, 16 figures, 4 tables.

  2. METHOD OF MAKING DELTA ZIRCONIUM HYDRIDE MONOLITHIC MODERATOR PIECES

    DOEpatents

    Vetrano, J.B.

    1962-01-23

    A method is given for preparing large, sound bodies of delta zirconium hydride. The method includes the steps of heating a zirconium body to a temperature of not less than l000 deg C, providing a hydrogen atmosphere for the zirconium body at a pressure not greater than one atmosphere, reducing the temperature slowly to 800 deg C at such a rate that cracks do not form while maintaining the hydrogen pressure substantially constant, and cooling in an atmosphere of hydrogen. (AEC)

  3. Ground-state energy and relativistic corrections for positronium hydride

    SciTech Connect

    Bubin, Sergiy; Varga, Kalman

    2011-07-15

    Variational calculations of the ground state of positronium hydride (HPs) are reported, including various expectation values, electron-positron annihilation rates, and leading relativistic corrections to the total and dissociation energies. The calculations have been performed using a basis set of 4000 thoroughly optimized explicitly correlated Gaussian basis functions. The relative accuracy of the variational energy upper bound is estimated to be of the order of 2x10{sup -10}, which is a significant improvement over previous nonrelativistic results.

  4. Complications from Dual Roles of Sodium Hydride as a Base and as a Reducing Agent

    PubMed Central

    Hesek, Dusan; Lee, Mijoon; Noll, Bruce C.; Fisher, Jed F.; Mobashery, Shahriar

    2012-01-01

    Sodium hydride is a common reagent for substrate activation in nucleophilic substitution reactions. Sodium hydride can behave both as a base and as a source of hydride. This dual ability in the presence of an electrophile such as benzyl bromide results in the formation of byproducts when dimethylformamide or acetonitrile are used as solvents for these reactions. The structural nature of these byproducts is revealed in this report. PMID:19215116

  5. High temperature metal hydrides as heat storage materials for solar and related applications.

    PubMed

    Felderhoff, Michael; Bogdanović, Borislav

    2009-01-01

    For the continuous production of electricity with solar heat power plants the storage of heat at a temperature level around 400 degrees C is essential. High temperature metal hydrides offer high heat storage capacities around this temperature. Based on Mg-compounds, these hydrides are in principle low-cost materials with excellent cycling stability. Relevant properties of these hydrides and their possible applications as heat storage materials are described. PMID:19333448

  6. High Temperature Metal Hydrides as Heat Storage Materials for Solar and Related Applications

    PubMed Central

    Felderhoff, Michael; Bogdanović, Borislav

    2009-01-01

    For the continuous production of electricity with solar heat power plants the storage of heat at a temperature level around 400 °C is essential. High temperature metal hydrides offer high heat storage capacities around this temperature. Based on Mg-compounds, these hydrides are in principle low-cost materials with excellent cycling stability. Relevant properties of these hydrides and their possible applications as heat storage materials are described. PMID:19333448

  7. Design and Characterization of a Hydride-based Hydrogen Storage Container for Neutron Imaging Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baruj, A.; Ardito, M.; Marín, J.; Sánchez, F.; Borzone, E. M.; Meyer, G.

    We have designed, constructed and tested a prototype hydride-based container to in-situ observe the hydride decomposition process using a neutron imaging facility. This work describes the container design parameters and the experimental setup used for the studies. The results open new possibilities for the application of the neutron imaging technique to visualize the internal state of massive hydride-based hydrogen containers, thus aiding in the design of efficient hydrogen storage tanks.

  8. Superconductive sodalite-like clathrate calcium hydride at high pressures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui; Tse, John S.; Tanaka, Kaori; Iitaka, Toshiaki; Ma, Yanming

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen-rich compounds hold promise as high-temperature superconductors under high pressures. Recent theoretical hydride structures on achieving high-pressure superconductivity are composed mainly of H2 fragments. Through a systematic investigation of Ca hydrides with different hydrogen contents using particle-swam optimization structural search, we show that in the stoichiometry CaH6 a body-centered cubic structure with hydrogen that forms unusual “sodalite” cages containing enclathrated Ca stabilizes above pressure 150 GPa. The stability of this structure is derived from the acceptance by two H2 of electrons donated by Ca forming an “H4” unit as the building block in the construction of the three-dimensional sodalite cage. This unique structure has a partial occupation of the degenerated orbitals at the zone center. The resultant dynamic Jahn–Teller effect helps to enhance electron–phonon coupling and leads to superconductivity of CaH6. A superconducting critical temperature (Tc) of 220–235 K at 150 GPa obtained from the solution of the Eliashberg equations is the highest among all hydrides studied thus far. PMID:22492976

  9. Pressure-driven formation and stabilization of superconductive chromium hydrides

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shuyin; Jia, Xiaojing; Frapper, Gilles; Li, Duan; Oganov, Artem R.; Zeng, Qingfeng; Zhang, Litong

    2015-01-01

    Chromium hydride is a prototype stoichiometric transition metal hydride. The phase diagram of Cr-H system at high pressures remains largely unexplored due to the challenges in dealing with the high activation barriers and complications in handing hydrogen under pressure. We have performed an extensive structural study on Cr-H system at pressure range 0 ∼ 300 GPa using an unbiased structure prediction method based on evolutionary algorithm. Upon compression, a number of hydrides are predicted to become stable in the excess hydrogen environment and these have compositions of Cr2Hn (n = 2–4, 6, 8, 16). Cr2H3, CrH2 and Cr2H5 structures are versions of the perfect anti-NiAs-type CrH with ordered tetrahedral interstitial sites filled by H atoms. CrH3 and CrH4 exhibit host-guest structural characteristics. In CrH8, H2 units are also identified. Our study unravels that CrH is a superconductor at atmospheric pressure with an estimated transition temperature (T c) of 10.6 K, and superconductivity in CrH3 is enhanced by the metallic hydrogen sublattice with T c of 37.1 K at 81 GPa, very similar to the extensively studied MgB2. PMID:26626579

  10. Diffusional exchange of isotopes in a metal hydride sphere.

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfer, Wilhelm G.; Hamilton, John C.; James, Scott Carlton

    2011-04-01

    This report describes the Spherical Particle Exchange Model (SPEM), which simulates exchange of one hydrogen isotope by another hydrogen isotope in a spherical metal hydride particle. This is one of the fundamental physical processes during isotope exchange in a bed of spherical metal particles and is thus one of the key components in any comprehensive physics-based model of exchange. There are two important physical processes in the model. One is the entropy of mixing between the two isotopes; the entropy of mixing is increased by having both isotopes randomly placed at interstitial sites on the lattice and thus impedes the exchange process. The other physical process is the elastic interaction between isotope atoms on the lattice. The elastic interaction is the cause for {beta}-phase formation and is independent of the isotope species. In this report the coupled diffusion equations for two isotopes in the {beta}-phase hydride are solved. A key concept is that the diffusion of one isotope depends not only on its concentration gradient, but also on the concentration gradient of the other isotope. Diffusion rate constants and the chemical potentials for deuterium and hydrogen in the {beta}-phase hydride are reviewed because these quantities are essential for an accurate model of the diffusion process. Finally, a summary of some of the predictions from the SPEM model are provided.